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Sample records for bohemian uranium miners

  1. The Rožná uranium deposit (Bohemian Massif, Czech Republic): shear zone-hosted, late Variscan and post-Variscan hydrothermal mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kříbek, Bohdan; Žák, Karel; Dobeš, Petr; Leichmann, Jaromír; Pudilová, Marta; René, Miloš; Scharm, Bohdan; Scharmová, Marta; Hájek, Antonín; Holeczy, Daniel; Hein, Ulrich F.; Lehmann, Bernd

    2009-01-01

    Three major mineralization events are recorded at the Rožná uranium deposit (total mine production of 23,000 t U, average grade of 0.24% U): (1) pre-uranium quartz-sulfide and carbonate-sulfide mineralization, (2) uranium, and (3) post-uranium quartz-carbonate-sulfide mineralization. (1) K-Ar ages for white mica from wall rock alteration of the pre-uranium mineralization style range from 304.5 ± 5.8 to 307.6 ± 6.0 Ma coinciding with the post-orogenic exhumation of the Moldanubian orogenic root and retrograde-metamorphic equilibration of the high-grade metamorphic host rocks. The fluid inclusion record consists of low-salinity aqueous inclusions, together with H2O-CO2-CH4, CO2-CH4, and pure CH4 inclusions. The fluid inclusion, paragenetic, and isotope data suggest that the pre-uranium mineralization formed from a reduced low-salinity aqueous fluid at temperatures close to 300°C. (2) The uraniferous hydrothermal event is subdivided into the pre-ore, ore, and post-ore substages. K-Ar ages of pre-ore authigenic K-feldspar range from 296.3 ± 7.5 to 281.0 ± 5.4 Ma and coincide with the transcurrent reorganization of crustal blocks of the Bohemian Massif and with Late Stephanian to Early Permian rifting. Massive hematitization, albitization, and desilicification of the pre-ore altered rocks indicate an influx of oxidized basinal fluids to the crystalline rocks of the Moldanubian domain. The wide range of salinities of fluid inclusions is interpreted as a result of the large-scale mixing of basinal brines with meteoric water. The cationic composition of these fluids indicates extensive interaction with crystalline rocks. Chlorite thermometry yielded temperatures of 260°C to 310°C. During this substage, uranium was probably leached from the Moldanubian crystalline rocks. The hydrothermal alteration of the ore substage followed, or partly overlapped in time, the pre-ore substage alteration. K-Ar ages of illite from ore substage alteration range from 277.2 ± 5.5 to

  2. Age and mineralogy of supergene uranium minerals — Tools to unravel geomorphological and palaeohydrological processes in granitic terrains (Bohemian Massif, SE Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dill, H. G.; Gerdes, A.; Weber, B.

    2010-04-01

    Uranyl phosphates (torbernite, autunite, uranocircite, saleeite) and hydrated uranyl silicates (normal and beta-uranophane) found in various erosion levels and structures in the Late Variscan granites at the western edge of the Bohemian Massif, Germany, were the target of mineralogical investigations and age dating, using conventional and more advanced techniques such as Laser-Ablation-Inductive-Coupled-Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Supergene U minerals have an edge over other rock-forming minerals for such studies, because of their inherent ‘clock’ and their swift response to chemical and physical environmental changes on different scales. Uraniferous phoscretes and silcretes, can be used to characterize the alkalinity/acidity of meteoric/per descensum fluids and to constrain the redox conditions during geomorphic processes. This study aims to decipher the geomorphological and palaeohydrological regime that granitic rocks of the Central European Variscides (Moldanubian and Saxothuringian zones) went through during the Neogene and Quaternary in the foreland of the rising Alpine mobile fold belt. The study provides an amendment to the current sub-division of the regolith by introducing the term “hydraulith”, made up of percolation and infiltration zones, for the supergene alteration zone in granitic terrains. It undercuts the regolith at the brink of the phreatic to vadose hydrological zones. Based upon the present geomorphological and mineralogical studies a four-stage model is proposed for the evolution of the landscape in a granitic terrain which might also be applicable to other regions of the European Variscides, considering the hydrological facies changes along with paleocurrent and paleoslope in the basement and the development of the fluvial drainage system in the foreland. Stage I (U mineralization in the infiltration zone) is a mirror image of the relic granitic landscape with high-altitude divides and alluvial-fluvial terraces. Its

  3. Possible uranium mineralization, Mineral Mountains, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, W. Roger; McHugh, John B.; Ficklin, Walter H.

    1979-01-01

    The Mineral Mountains block in west-central Utah is a horst whose core stands structurally high relative to all nearby basin-and-range fault blocks. Rocks of the Mineral Mountains range from Precambrian to Quaternary in age, but mostly consist of Tertiary granitic rocks. The range lies with the Wah Wah-Tusher mineral belt. Lead, silver, gold, and tungsten have been mined commercially. During a geochemical survey conducted in the summer of 1978, 30 water samples and 29 stream-sediment samples were collected from the Mineral Mountains area. The interpretation of simple plots of uranium concentrations and the results of a Q-mode factor analysis indicate that potential exists for uranium mineral deposits within the Mineral Mountains. The most favorable areas are in the granitic pluton near its contacts with sedimentary and metamorphic rocks. The most likely source of the uranium anomalies is uraninite-bearing epigenic veins along faults and fractures within the pluton. Three hypothetical models are proposed to account for the uranium mineralization.

  4. Structural changes in amber due to uranium mineralization.

    PubMed

    Havelcová, Martina; Machovič, Vladimír; Mizera, Jiří; Sýkorová, Ivana; René, Miloš; Borecká, Lenka; Lapčák, Ladislav; Bičáková, Olga; Janeček, Oldřich; Dvořák, Zdeněk

    2016-07-01

    The presence of uranium, with a bulk mass fraction of about 1.5 wt% and radiolytic alterations are a feature of Cenomanian amber from Křižany, at the northeastern edge of the North Bohemian Cretaceous uranium ore district. Pores and microcracks in the amber were filled with a mineral admixture, mainly in the form of Zr-Y-REE enriched uraninite. As a result of radiolytic alterations due to the presence of uranium, structural changes were observed in the Křižany amber in comparison with a reference amber from Nové Strašecí in central Bohemia; this was of similar age and botanical origin but did not contain elevated levels of uranium. Structural changes involved an increase in aromaticity due to dehydroaromatization of aliphatic cyclic hydrocarbons, loss of oxygen functional groups, an increase in the degree of polymerization, crosslinking of CC bonds, formation of a three-dimensional hydrocarbon network in the bulk organic matrix, and carbonization of the organic matrix around the uraninite infill.

  5. Temporal evolution of mineralization events in the Bohemian Massif inferred from the Re-Os geochronology of molybdenite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerman, Lukáš; Haluzová, Eva; Creaser, Robert A.; Pašava, Jan; Veselovský, František; Breiter, Karel; Erban, Vojtěch; Drábek, Milan

    2017-06-01

    Molybdenite is a common mineral accompanying Sn-W, Au, and base metal mineralizations located in different geotectonic units of the Bohemian Massif, but it is also widespread in granitoids and/or related quartz veins/pegmatites forming disseminated Mo mineralization. Thirty Re-Os ages were obtained for molybdenite samples from the Bohemian Massif to provide constraints on the timing and duration of mineralization event(s) within the framework of previously published geochronological data for the host and/or associated rocks. The obtained data for Sn-W-(Li) deposits in the Erzgebirge metallogenetic province indicate the predominance of one and/or multiple short-time mineralization events taking place between ˜319 and 323 Ma, with the exception of the Krupka deposit associated with the Altenberg-Teplice caldera where the data may suggest prolonged activity until ˜315 Ma. The ages of the Pb-Zn-(Au-Mo) Hůrky u Rakovníka and Fe-Cu-As Obří důl mineralizations from the exocontacts of the Čistá pluton and Krkonoše-Jizera Plutonic Complex, respectively, provide evidence for synchronous emplacement of the ore and the associated granitic rocks. In contrast, the Padrť Fe-As-Mo mineralization postdates the age of the associated Padrť granite. Disseminated Mo mineralization in Cadomian and Variscan granitoids and/or related to quartz veins/pegmatites provides Re-Os ages that overlap with the previously published geochronological data for the host rocks, suggesting coeval evolution. Molybdenite samples from the Sázava suite granites of the Central Bohemian Plutonic Complex (CBPC) have resolvable younger ages than their host granites, but similar to the age of spatially related Au mineralization which is associated with the latest evolution of the CBPC.

  6. Temporal evolution of mineralization events in the Bohemian Massif inferred from the Re-Os geochronology of molybdenite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerman, Lukáš; Haluzová, Eva; Creaser, Robert A.; Pašava, Jan; Veselovský, František; Breiter, Karel; Erban, Vojtěch; Drábek, Milan

    2016-10-01

    Molybdenite is a common mineral accompanying Sn-W, Au, and base metal mineralizations located in different geotectonic units of the Bohemian Massif, but it is also widespread in granitoids and/or related quartz veins/pegmatites forming disseminated Mo mineralization. Thirty Re-Os ages were obtained for molybdenite samples from the Bohemian Massif to provide constraints on the timing and duration of mineralization event(s) within the framework of previously published geochronological data for the host and/or associated rocks. The obtained data for Sn-W-(Li) deposits in the Erzgebirge metallogenetic province indicate the predominance of one and/or multiple short-time mineralization events taking place between ˜319 and 323 Ma, with the exception of the Krupka deposit associated with the Altenberg-Teplice caldera where the data may suggest prolonged activity until ˜315 Ma. The ages of the Pb-Zn-(Au-Mo) Hůrky u Rakovníka and Fe-Cu-As Obří důl mineralizations from the exocontacts of the Čistá pluton and Krkonoše-Jizera Plutonic Complex, respectively, provide evidence for synchronous emplacement of the ore and the associated granitic rocks. In contrast, the Padrť Fe-As-Mo mineralization postdates the age of the associated Padrť granite. Disseminated Mo mineralization in Cadomian and Variscan granitoids and/or related to quartz veins/pegmatites provides Re-Os ages that overlap with the previously published geochronological data for the host rocks, suggesting coeval evolution. Molybdenite samples from the Sázava suite granites of the Central Bohemian Plutonic Complex (CBPC) have resolvable younger ages than their host granites, but similar to the age of spatially related Au mineralization which is associated with the latest evolution of the CBPC.

  7. Uranium mineralization in southern Victoria Land, Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Dreschhoff, G.A.M.; Zeller, E.J.

    1986-01-01

    For the past 10 antarctic field seasons, an airborne gamma-ray spectrometric survey has been conducted over widely separated parts of the continent. Localized accumulations of both primary and secondary uranium minerals have been discovered at several localities scattered along the Transantarctic Mountains from the Scott Glacier to northern Victoria Land. A number of highly significant radiation anomalies have been discovered in the area between the Koettlitz Glacier and the Pyramid Trough. The occurrences consist of pegmatite vein complexes which contain an association of primary uranium and thorium minerals. Of still greater significance is the fact that abundant secondary uranium minerals were found in association with the primary deposits, and they indicate clearly that uranium is geochemically mobile under the conditions imposed by the arid polar climate that now exists in southern Victoria Land. Preliminary results of a uranium analysis performed by neutron activation indicate a concentration of 0.12% uranium in a composite sample from the two veins. Even higher levels of thorium are present. The nature of the primary uranium mineralization is currently under investigation. Preliminary results are discussed.

  8. Monitoring genotoxic exposure in uranium miners

    SciTech Connect

    Sram, R.J.; Binkova, B.; Dobias, L.; Roessner, P.T.; Topinka, J.; Vesela, D.; Vesely, D.; Stejskalova, J.; Bavorova, H.; Rericha, V. )

    1993-03-01

    Recent data from deep uranium mines in Czechoslovakia indicated that in addition to radon daughter products, miners are also exposed to chemical mutagens. Mycotoxins were identified as a possible source of mutagenicity present in the mines. Various methods of biomonitoring were used to examine three groups of miners from different uranium mines. Cytogenetic analysis of peripheral lymphocytes, unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in lymphocytes, and lipid peroxidation (LPO) in both plasma and lymphocytes were studied on 66 exposed miners and 56 controls. Throat swabs were taken from 116 miners and 78 controls. Significantly increased numbers of aberrant cells were found in all groups of miners, as well as decreased UDS values in lymphocytes and increased LPO plasma levels in comparison to controls. Molds were detected in throat swabs from 27% of miners, and 58% of these molds were embryotoxic. Only 5% of the control samples contained molds and none of them was embryotoxic. The following mycotoxins were isolated from miners' throat swab samples: rugulosin, sterigmatocystin, mycophenolic acid, brevianamid A, citreoviridin, citrinin, penicilic acid, and secalonic acid. These data suggest that mycotoxins are a genotoxic factor affecting uranium miners.

  9. Exploration for uranium deposits, Grants mineral belt

    SciTech Connect

    Fitch, D.C.

    1980-01-01

    Uranium ore deposits in the Grants mineral belt, New Mexico, occur in fluvial sandstones in the Morrison Formation (Jurassic). Uranium mineralization is concentrated by a dark-gray to black substance that has been identified as humate, which is derived from decaying vegetation. Black ore is truncated by overlying sandstone in at least three ore deposits, documenting an early age for mineralization. Ore deposits in the Grants mineral belt vary greatly in size and shape, tend to occur in clusters, and often present difficult drill targets. Current exploration is largely a matter of drilling in stages to distinguish favorable from unfavorable ground on a wide spacing, to seek mineralization in favorable ground, and to conduct close-spaced drilling in mineralized areas. Criteria for favorability differ among exploration groups but generally include 1) presence of a host sandstone, 2) anomalous mineralization, 3) color of the host rock, 4) presence of carbonaceous matter, and 5) position of the area relative to mineralized trends. A description of the drilling sequence, from ore discovery to the development of a mine at the Johnny M deposit (in the east part of the Ambrosia Lake district), exemplifies the problem of predicting where orebodies may occur. A study of the drill data at the Johnny M indicates the uranium ore is not related to specific geologic features other than humate, which is commonly associated with coalified plant fragments in mudstone-rich parts of the host sandstone.

  10. Evolution of uranium and thorium minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazen, R. M.; Ewing, R. C.; Sverjensky, D. A.

    2009-12-01

    The origins and near-surface distributions of the approximately 250 known uranium and/or thorium minerals elucidate principles of mineral evolution. This history can be divided into four phases. The first, from ~4.5 to 3.5 Ga, involved successive concentrations of uranium and thorium from their initial uniform trace distribution into magmatic-related fluids from which the first U4+ and Th4+ minerals, uraninite (UO2), thorianite (ThO2) and coffinite (USiO4), precipitated in the crust. The second period, from ~3.5 to 2.2 Ga, saw the formation of large low-grade concentrations of detrital uraninite (containing several weight percent Th) in the Witwatersrand-type quartz-pebble conglomerates deposited in a highly anoxic fluvial environment. Abiotic alteration of uraninite and coffinite, including radiolysis and auto-oxidation caused by radioactive decay and the formation of helium from alpha particles, may have resulted in the formation of a limited suite of uranyl oxide-hydroxides. Earth’s third phase of uranium mineral evolution, during which most known U minerals first precipitated from reactions of soluble uranyl (U6+O2)2+ complexes, followed the Great Oxidation Event (GOE) at ~2.2 Ga and thus was mediated indirectly by biologic activity. Most uraninite deposited during this phase was low in Th and precipitated from saline and oxidizing hydrothermal solutions (100 to 300°C) transporting (UO2)2+-chloride complexes. Examples include the unconformity- and vein-type U deposits (Australia and Canada) and the unique Oklo natural nuclear reactors in Gabon. The onset of hydrothermal transport of (UO2)2+ complexes in the upper crust may reflect the availability of CaSO4-bearing evaporites after the GOE. During this phase, most uranyl minerals would have been able to form in the O2-bearing near-surface environment for the first time through weathering processes. The fourth phase of uranium mineralization began approximately 400 million years ago, as the rise of land plants

  11. Petrography, geochemistry and geochronology of granite hosted rhyodacites associated with a disseminated pyrite mineralization (Arnolz, Southern Bohemian Massif, Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göd, Richard; Kurzweil, Johannes; Klötzli, Urs

    2017-04-01

    The study focuses on a subvolcanic rhyodacite dyke intruding a fine grained biotite granite and paragneisses of the South Bohemian Massif, part of the Variscan Orogenic Belt in Central Europe. The subvertical dyke strikes NNE, displays a thickness of about 30 m and has been traced by boulder mapping for approximately 7 km. The rhyodacites have been affected by two hydrothermal fluids. An older one of oxidizing condition giving rise to a reddish to brownish type of rock (Type I) and a younger fluid of reducing condition causing a greenish variety (Type II). The hydrothermal alteration is associated with the formation of the clay minerals chlorite, sericite, kaolinite and smectite and a disseminated pyrite mineralization. Bulk chemistries of the rhyodacites emphasize the hydrothermal alterations to be isochemical with the exception of sulphur enriched up to a maximum of 0.6 wt%. Trace element composition of the rhyodacites points to a barren geochemical environment in terms of base and precious elements. Sulphur isotope investigations of pyrites from the rhyodacites and the hosting granites respectively yield d34S data ranging from +0.07 to -2.22 ‰, emphasizing a magmatic origin of the sulphur. Geochronological investigations yield in situ U/Pb zircon ages of 312 ± 4 Ma for the biotite granite and of 292 ± 4 Ma for the rhyodacitic dykes indicating a time gap of ≈ 20 Ma between these two intrusive events. A contemporaneous but geochemically specialized granitic intrusion associated with NW striking "felsitic" dykes occurs about 10 to 20 km to the NW of Arnolz. However, the rhyodacites around Arnolz differ significantly from these felsitic dykes in their geochemistry and alteration phenomena which points to a different magmatic source. This coincides with a change in the orientation of the dykes from a NW direction controlling the geochemically specialized intrusions in the NW to a dominating NNE direction mirrored by the studied rhyodacites at Arnolz.

  12. Petrography, geochemistry and geochronology of granite hosted rhyodacites associated with a disseminated pyrite mineralization (Arnolz, Southern Bohemian Massif, Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göd, Richard; Kurzweil, Johannes; Klötzli, Urs

    2016-09-01

    The study focuses on a subvolcanic rhyodacite dyke intruding a fine grained biotite granite and paragneisses of the South Bohemian Massif, part of the Variscan Orogenic Belt in Central Europe. The subvertical dyke strikes NNE, displays a thickness of about 30 m and has been traced by boulder mapping for approximately 7 km. The rhyodacites have been affected by two hydrothermal fluids. An older one of oxidizing condition giving rise to a reddish to brownish type of rock (Type I) and a younger fluid of reducing condition causing a greenish variety (Type II). The hydrothermal alteration is associated with the formation of the clay minerals chlorite, sericite, kaolinite and smectite and a disseminated pyrite mineralization. Bulk chemistries of the rhyodacites emphasize the hydrothermal alterations to be isochemical with the exception of sulphur enriched up to a maximum of 0.6 wt%. Trace element composition of the rhyodacites points to a barren geochemical environment in terms of base and precious elements. Sulphur isotope investigations of pyrites from the rhyodacites and the hosting granites respectively yield d34S data ranging from +0.07 to -2.22 ‰, emphasizing a magmatic origin of the sulphur. Geochronological investigations yield in situ U/Pb zircon ages of 312 ± 4 Ma for the biotite granite and of 292 ± 4 Ma for the rhyodacitic dykes indicating a time gap of ≈ 20 Ma between these two intrusive events. A contemporaneous but geochemically specialized granitic intrusion associated with NW striking "felsitic" dykes occurs about 10 to 20 km to the NW of Arnolz. However, the rhyodacites around Arnolz differ significantly from these felsitic dykes in their geochemistry and alteration phenomena which points to a different magmatic source. This coincides with a change in the orientation of the dykes from a NW direction controlling the geochemically specialized intrusions in the NW to a dominating NNE direction mirrored by the studied rhyodacites at Arnolz.

  13. Radon contribution to the total effective dose of uranium miners.

    PubMed

    Otahal, P; Burian, I; Nasir, M M; Gregor, Z

    2014-07-01

    Exposure to radon and its decay products is one of the three parts that create the total effective dose of uranium miners. Photons from gamma radiation and exposition to long-lived alpha emitters which are members of uranium family are the other two parts. The monthly total effective dose of uranium miners in mine Rozna I (Czech republic) is determined by the personal dosemeter ALGADE, which ensures the continual individual monitoring of all three parts. The exposed dosemeters are evaluated in the National Institute for Nuclear, Chemical and Biological Protection in Kamenna near Pribram. This paper describes the individual parts of miners' total effective dose considering the different types of work activities and workplaces. The main input data are the evaluation results of the uranium miners' personal dosemeters ALGADE in mine Rozna I in the time period from 2000 till 2012.

  14. Mineral dusts and radon in uranium mines

    SciTech Connect

    Abelson, P.H.

    1991-11-08

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) continues to assert that radon is a major cause of lung cancer in this country. EPA is fostering a radon program that could entail huge financial and emotional costs while yielding negligible benefits to public health. Justification for the program was the occurrence of lung cancer in men exposed to huge amounts of radon, mineral dusts, and other lung irritants in uranium mines on the Colorado Plateau. Lung cancer has been reported in about 356 cigarette smokers and in about 25 nonsmokers. During the era of high radon levels, monitoring was sporadic. Conditions in only a small fraction of the mines were measured, and that on a few separate occasions. Later, cumulative exposure to radon was calculated on the basis of measurements involving only a tiny fraction of the miners. Some were exposed to more than 15,000 pCi/liter of radon and its products. The level in the average home is about 1.5 pCi/liter. In making extrapolations from mine to home, the assumption is made that residents are in their dwellings most of the time and that miners spend only 170 hours a month in the mine. Two major questionable assumptions are involved in extrapolations from high doses of radon in the mines to low doses in homes. One is that no threshold is involved; that is, that humans have no remediation mechanism for {alpha} particle damages. There is evidence to the contrary. The most unrealistic assumption is that heavy exposure to silica has no effect on inducing lung cancer. Many studies have shown that silica dust causes lung cancer in animals. Exposure of human culture cells to silica has resulted in formation of neoplastic tissue. EPA has no solid evidence that exposures to 4 pCi/liter of radon causes lung cancer in either smokers or nonsmokers. Indeed, there is abundant evidence to the contrary in the fact that in states with high levels of radon, inhabitants have less lung cancer than those in states with low levels.

  15. Effects of ammonium on uranium partitioning and kaolinite mineral dissolution.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Hilary P; Di Pietro, Silvina; Katsenovich, Yelena; Szecsody, Jim

    2017-02-01

    Ammonia gas injection is a promising technique for the remediation of uranium within the vadose zone. It can be used to manipulate the pH of a system and cause co-precipitation processes that are expected to remove uranium from the aqueous phase and decrease leaching from the solid phase. The work presented in this paper explores the effects of ammonium and sodium hydroxide on the partitioning of uranium and dissolution of the kaolinite mineral in simplified synthetic groundwaters using equilibrium batch sorption and sequential extraction experiments. It shows that there is a significant increase in uranium removal in systems with divalent cations present in the aqueous phase but not in sodium chloride synthetic groundwaters. Further, the initial conditions of the aqueous phase do not affect the dissolution of kaolinite. However, the type of base treatment does have an effect on mineral dissolution. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Mortality from lung cancer in Ontario uranium miners.

    PubMed Central

    Kusiak, R A; Ritchie, A C; Muller, J; Springer, J

    1993-01-01

    Mortality from lung cancer was greater in Ontario uranium miners than in the general male population of Ontario (observed = 152, expected = 67.6, standardised mortality ratio 225, 95% confidence interval 191-264). Part of the excess of lung cancer may be because the proportion of men who are smokers or have smoked is greater in uranium miners than in Ontario men. Smoking does not explain the whole excess. Mortality from lung cancer in Ontario uranium miners is clearly related to exposure to short lived radon progeny. The excess relative risk of lung cancer from the same degree of exposure to short lived radon progeny is greatest five to 14 years after exposure and less subsequently. It is greater in men under the age of 55 years and less in older men. Part of the excess of lung cancer mortality in Ontario uranium miners is probably also due to exposure to arsenic that occurred earlier in gold mines. In Ontario uranium miners, the lung cancer mortality from exposure to arsenic increases as the intensity of exposure to short lived radon progeny increases. This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that the risk of lung cancer from exposure to arsenic is enhanced by exposure to other carcinogens. In Ontario uranium miners, the proportion of lung cancers that are small cell carcinomas is greater than in the general population. The proportion of small cell carcinomas is especially great five to 14 years after exposure to short lived radon progeny and in men who die from lung cancer at younger ages. PMID:8217852

  17. EXAFS studies of uranium sorption on layer-silicate minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, E.A.; Terminello, L.J.; Viani, B.E.

    1995-12-31

    The local structure of uranium sorbed on mineral surfaces was investigated by uranium L{sub 3}-edge EXAFS. Solutions of uranyl chloride, UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}, were exposed to vermiculite, an expansible layer silicate mineral, under conditions which favor sorption by either cation exchange or surface complexation. EXAFS of the resulting mineral samples indicates a larger distortion of the uranyl equatorial shell for cation exchange, possibly due to steric effects of interlayer sorption. The uranyl U-O axial bond distance is greater for surface complexation than for ion exchange. Uranyl sorption on talc and pyrophyllite, layer silicate minerals with essentially no cation-exchange capacity, gives results which generally support the trends for surface complexation on vermiculite.

  18. Lung cancer in a nonsmoking underground uranium miner.

    PubMed Central

    Mulloy, K B; James, D S; Mohs, K; Kornfeld, M

    2001-01-01

    Working in mines is associated with acute and chronic occupational disorders. Most of the uranium mining in the United States took place in the Four Corners region of the Southwest (Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah) and on Native American lands. Although the uranium industry collapsed in the late 1980s, the industry employed several thousand individuals who continue to be at increased risk for developing lung cancers. We present the case of a 72-year-old Navajo male who worked for 17 years as an underground uranium miner and who developed lung cancer 22 years after leaving the industry. His total occupational exposure to radon progeny was estimated at 506 working level months. The miner was a life-long nonsmoker and had no other significant occupational or environmental exposures. On the chest X-ray taken at admission into the hospital, a right lower lung zone infiltrate was detected. The patient was treated for community-acquired pneumonia and developed respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. Respiratory failure worsened and the patient died 19 days after presenting. On autopsy, a 2.5 cm squamous cell carcinoma of the right lung arising from the lower lobe bronchus, a right broncho-esophageal fistula, and a right lower lung abscess were found. Malignant respiratory disease in uranium miners may be from several occupational exposures; for example, radon decay products, silica, and possibly diesel exhaust are respiratory carcinogens that were commonly encountered. In response to a growing number of affected uranium miners, the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act (RECA) was passed by the U.S. Congress in 1990 to make partial restitution to individuals harmed by radiation exposure resulting from underground uranium mining and above-ground nuclear tests in Nevada. PMID:11333194

  19. Newly discovered uranium mineralization at 2.0 Ma in the Menggongjie granite-hosted uranium deposit, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jin-Cheng; Hu, Rui-Zhong; Fayek, Mostafa; Bi, Xian-Wu; Shi, Shao-Hua; Chen, You-Wei

    2017-04-01

    The southeastern part of the Nanling metallogenic province, South China contains numerous economically important granite-hosted, hydrothermal vein-type uranium deposits. The Miao'ershan (MES) uranium ore field is one of the most important uranium sources in China, hosts the largest Chanziping carbonaceous-siliceous-pelitic rock-type uranium deposit and several representative granite-hosted uranium deposits. The geology and geochemistry of these deposits have been extensively studied. However, accurate and precise ages for the uranium mineralization are scarce because uranium minerals in these deposits are usually fine-grained, and may have formed in several stages, thus hindering the understanding of the uranium metallogenesis of this province. The Menggongjie (MGJ) uranium deposit is one of the largest granite-hosted uranium deposits in the MES ore field. Uranium mineralization in this deposit occurs at the central part of the MES granitic complex, accompanied with silicification, fluorination, K-metasomatism and hematitization. The ore minerals are dominated by uraninite, occurring in quartz or fluorite veinlets along fractures in altered granite. In-situ SIMS U-Pb dating on the uraninite yields the U-Pb isotopic age of 1.9 ± 0.7 Ma, which is comparable to the chemical U-Th-Pbtol uraninite age of 2.3 ± 0.1 Ma. Such ages agree well with the eruption ages of the extension-related Quaternary volcanics (2.1-1.2 Ma) in South China, suggesting that the uranium mineralization have formed at an extensional setting, possibly related to the Quaternary volcanic activities. Therefore, our robust, new dating results of the MGJ uranium deposit make it the youngest granite-hosted uranium deposit reported so far in South China and the mineralization event represents a newly identified mineralization epoch.

  20. Dosimetric calculations for uranium miners for epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Marsh, J W; Blanchardon, E; Gregoratto, D; Hofmann, W; Karcher, K; Nosske, D; Tomásek, L

    2012-05-01

    Epidemiological studies on uranium miners are being carried out to quantify the risk of cancer based on organ dose calculations. Mathematical models have been applied to calculate the annual absorbed doses to regions of the lung, red bone marrow, liver, kidney and stomach for each individual miner arising from exposure to radon gas, radon progeny and long-lived radionuclides (LLR) present in the uranium ore dust and to external gamma radiation. The methodology and dosimetric models used to calculate these organ doses are described and the resulting doses for unit exposure to each source (radon gas, radon progeny and LLR) are presented. The results of dosimetric calculations for a typical German miner are also given. For this miner, the absorbed dose to the central regions of the lung is dominated by the dose arising from exposure to radon progeny, whereas the absorbed dose to the red bone marrow is dominated by the external gamma dose. The uncertainties in the absorbed dose to regions of the lung arising from unit exposure to radon progeny are also discussed. These dose estimates are being used in epidemiological studies of cancer in uranium miners.

  1. Lung cancer epidemiology in New Mexico uranium miners

    SciTech Connect

    Samet, J.M.

    1991-11-01

    This investigation assesses the health effects of radon progeny exposure in New Mexico uranium miners. Cumulative exposures sustained by most New Mexico miners are well below those received earlier in the Colorado Plateau. This project utilizes the research opportunity offered by New Mexico miners to address unresolved issues related to radon progeny exposure: (1) the lung cancer risk of lower levels of exposure, (2) interaction between radon progeny exposure and cigarette smoking in the causation of lung cancer, (3) the relationship between lung cancer histologic type and radon progeny exposure, and (4) possible effects of radon progeny exposure other than lung cancer. A cohort study of 3800 men with at least one year of underground uranium mining experience in New Mexico is in progress. Results are discussed.

  2. Detection of trisomy 7 in bronchial cells from uranium miners

    SciTech Connect

    Lechner, J.F.; Neft, R.E.; Belinsky, S.A.

    1995-12-01

    New Mexico was the largest producer of uranium in the western world during 1960s and 1970s. Investigators at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine`s Epidemiology and Cancer Control Program have been conducting epidemiological studies on uranium miners over the past 2 decades. Currently, this cohort includes more than 3600 men who had completed at least 1 y of underground work experience in New Mexico by December 31, 1976. These miners, who are now in their 5th through 7th decades, the age when lung cancer incidence is highest, are at high risk for developing this disease because they were exposed to high levels of radon progeny in the mines, and they also smoked tobacco. However, not all people comparably exposed develop lung cancer; in fact, the lifetime risk of lung cancer for the smoking uranium miners has been projected by epidemiological analyses to be no higher than 50%. Therefore, the identification of gene alterations in bronchial epithelium would be a valuable tool to ascertain which miners are at greatest risk for lung cancer. The underlying significance of the current effort confirms the hypothesis that chronic exposure to high concentrations of {alpha}-particles and tobacco smoke produces genetically altered lung epithelial cells throughout the respiratory tract of some susceptible individuals before they develop clinical disease.

  3. Alteration and vein mineralization, Schwartzwalder uranium deposit, Front Range, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallace, Alan R.

    1983-01-01

    The Schwartzwalder uranium deposit, in the Front Range west of Denver, Colorado, is the largest vein-type uranium deposit in the United States. The deposit is situated in a steeply dipping fault system that cuts Proterozoic metamorphic rocks. The host rocks represent a submarine volcanic system with associated chert and iron- and sulfide-rich pelitic rocks. Where faulted, the more competent garnetiferous and quartzitic units behaved brittlely and created a deep, narrow conduit. The ores formed 70-72 m.y. ago beneath 3 km of Phanerozoic sedimentary rocks. Mineralization included two episodes of alteration and three stages of vein-mineralization. Early carbonate-sericite alteration pseudomorphically replaced mafic minerals, whereas the ensuing hematite-adularia episode replaced only the earlier alteration assemblage. Early vein mineralization produced a minor sulfide-adularia-carbonate assemblage. Later vein mineralization generated the uranium ores in two successive stages. Carbonates, sulfides, and adularia filled the remaining voids. Clastic dikes composed of fault gouge and, locally, ore were injected into new and existing fractures. Geologic and chemical evidence suggest that virtually all components of the deposit were derived from major hornblende gneiss units and related rocks. The initial fluids were evolved connate/metamorphic water that infiltrated and resided along the extensive fault zones. Complex fault movements in the frontal zone of the eastern Front Range caused the fluids to migrate to the most permeable segments of the fault zones. Heat was supplied by increased crustal heat flow related to igneous activity in the nearby Colorado mineral belt. Temperatures decreased from 225?C to 125?C during later mineralization, and the pressure episodically dropped from 1000 bars. The CO2 fugacity was initially near 100 bars, and uranium was carried as a dicarbonate complex. Sudden decreases in confining pressure during fault movement caused evolution of CO2

  4. Mining death: Cancer among America`s uranium miners

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, H.

    1995-10-01

    The approach the author takes in this book is that American uranium miners suffered unnecessary severe, often fatal, health problems because of their exposure to radiation. More than half the book reprints a 1986 report from the Committee on Energy and Commerce titled `America`s Nuclear Guinea Pigs: three Decades of Radiation Experiments on U.S. Citizens.` The book continues well documented history of the nuclear era.

  5. X-ray powder data for uranium and thorium minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frondel, Clifford; Riska, Daphne; Frondel, Judith Weiss

    1956-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has in preparation a comprehensive volume on the mineralogy of uranium and thorium. This work has been done as part of a continuing systematic survey of data on uranium and thorium minerals on behalf of the Division of Raw Materials, U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. Pending publication of this volume and in response to a widespread demand among workers in uranium and thorium mineralogy, the X-ray powder diffraction data for the known minerals that contain uranium or thorium as an essential constituent are presented here. The coverage is complete except for a few minerals for which there are no reliable data owing to lack of authentic specimens. With the exception of that for ianthinite, the new data either originated in the Geological Survey or in the Mineralogical Laboratory of Harvard University. Data from the literature or other sources were cross-checked against the files of standard patterns of these laboratories; the sources are indicated in the references. Data not accompanied by a reference were obtained from films in the Harvard Standard File and cross-checked as to the identity of the film with the Geological Survey's file. Minor differences can be expected in the d-spacings reported for the same specimens by different investigators because of the manner of preparation of the mount, the conditions of X-ray irradiation, and the method of photography and measurement of the film or chart. The Harvard and Geological Survey data all were obtained from films taken in 114-mm diameter cameras, using either ethyl cellulose and toluene or collodion spindle mounts and Straumanis-type film mounting. Unless otherwise indicated all patterns were taken with copper radiation (Kα 1.5418 A.) and nickel filter and data are given in Angstrom units. The d-spacings are not corrected for film shrinkage. The correction ordinarily is small and in general is less than either the variation in spacing arising from differences in experimental technique of

  6. Alteration and vein mineralization, Ladwig uranium mine, Jefferson County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallace, Alan R.

    1979-01-01

    Uranium ore at the Ladwig mine, Jefferson County, Colo., occurs in steeply dipping, northwest-striking faults and related fractures with a carbonate-adularia assemblage that forms in altered wallrocks and fills veins. The faults occur between large intrusive pegmatites and garnetiferous gneisses of Precambrian age, and were reactivated as the result of the early Paleocene uplift of the Front Range foothills. Mineralization in the deposit includes both wallrock alteration and vein filling. Alteration was intense but local, and chiefly involved the carbonatization of mafic minerals in the wallrocks. Felsic minerals in the wallrocks are relatively unaltered. The veins are filled with an adularia-pitchblende-carbonate assemblage with minor related sulfides and coffinite. Many of the iron-bearing carbonates in both the alteration and vein assemblages have been altered to hematite. The mineralization and alteration are believed to have formed in response to initially high amounts of CO2 and the subsequent release of dissolved CO2 by boiling or effervescence. Uranium, carried in a dicarbonate complex, was precipitated directly as pitchblende when the CO2 was released. The expulsion of H+ during boiling created a net oxidizing environment which oxidized the iron-bearing carbonates. Late stage calcite and sulfides were deposited in existing voids in the veins.

  7. Behavior of Colorado Plateau uranium minerals during oxidation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garrels, Robert Minard; Christ, C.L.

    1956-01-01

    Uranium occurs as U(VI) and U(IV) in minerals of the Colorado Plateau ores. The number of species containing U(VI) is large, but only two U(IV) minerals are known from the Plateau: uraninite, and oxide, and coffinite, a hydroxy-silicate. These oxidize to yield U(VI) before reacting significantly with other mineral constituents. Crystal-structure analysis has shown that U(VI) invariable occurs as uranyl ion, UO2+2. Uranyl ion may form complex carbonate or sulfate ions with resulting soluble compounds, but only in the absence of quinquevalent vanadium, arsenic, or phosphorous. In the presence of these elements in the +5 valence state, the uranyl ion is fixed in insoluble layer compounds formed by union of uranyl ion with orthovanadate, orthophosphate, or orthoarsenate. Under favorable conditions UO2+2 may react to form the relatively insoluble rutherfordine, UO2CO3, or hydrated uranyl hydroxides. These are rarely found on the Colorado Plateau as opposed to their excellent development in other uraniferous areas, a condition which is apparently related to the semiarid climate and low water table of the Plateau. Uranium may also be fixed as uranyl silicate, but little is known about minerals of this kind. In the present study emphasis has been placed on a detailing of the chemical and crystal structural changes which occur in the oxidation paragenetic sequence.

  8. Uranium minerals in Oligocene gypsum near Chadron, Dawes County, Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunham, R.J.

    1955-01-01

    Carnotite, sabugalite [HAI(UO2)4(PO4)4 • 16H2O] and autunite occur in the basal 25 feet of a 270-foot sequence of nonmarine bedded gypsum and gypsiferous clay in the Brule formation of Oligocene age about 12 miles northeast of Chadron in northeastern Dawes County, Nebraska. Uranium minerals are visible at only two localities and are associated with carbonaceous matter. Elsewhere the basal 25 feet of the gypsum sequence is interbedded with carbonate rocks and is weakly but persistently uraniferous. Uranium probably was emplaced from above by uranyl solutions rich in sulfate.

  9. Variable mineral composition of metamorphic rocks from a single quarry compared to their ASR potential (Bohemian Massif, Czech Republic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stastna, Aneta; Sachlova, Sarka; Pertold, Zdenek; Nekvasilova, Zuzana; Prikryl, Richard

    2013-04-01

    The alkali-silica reaction (ASR) is one of the most damaging factors for concrete structures. ASR originates due to the presence of reactive silica (SiO2) that reacts with alkaline ions under wet conditions. The reaction mechanism consists of four different steps: initial attack of OH- compounds on SiO2 at aggregate-cement paste boundary; formation of silanol groups at SiO2 surface; formation of siloxane groups and their polymerization; adsorption of alkaline and Ca2+ ions and formation of alkali-silica gels. Alkali-silica gels tend to absorb water molecules and swell causing increasing internal pressures in concrete and microcracking. The most reactive aggregates are mainly composed of amorphous and/or fine-grained SiO2-rich phases. In the Czech Republic, ASR was observed in deteriorating concrete structures containing very fine-grained quartz (quartz in tuffaceous sandstones and greywackes), as well as quartz indicating variable degree of deformation (quartz in quartzite, granodiorite and various metamorphic rock types). In this study, mineralogical-petrographic methods (polarizing, electron and cathodoluminescence microscopy) were combined with the accelerated mortar bar test (following the standard ASTM C1260), with the aim to quantify the ASR potential, as well as to distinguish reactive mineral phases. Different aggregate varieties from the Těchobuz quarry (Moldanubian Zone, Czech Republic) have been compared. Mineralogical-petrographic characteristics permit a distinction between 1) medium-grained plagioclase quartzite and 2) fine-grained biotite-plagioclase-quartz paragneiss and 3) fine-grained calc-silicate rock. Mineralogical composition of the first type is quartz + Ca-plagioclase + K-feldspar + biotite + chlorite + diopside + pyrite + apatite + titanite ± calcite. The second type has mineral assemblage including quartz + Ca-plagioclase + K-feldspar + biotite + chlorite + pyrite + tourmaline + apatite + titanite ± calcite. The third type contains

  10. Lung cancer mortality among U. S. uranium miners: a reappraisal

    SciTech Connect

    Whittemore, A.S.; McMillan, A.

    1983-09-01

    This report examines lung cancer mortality among a cohort of white underground uranium miners in the Colorado plateau and is based on mortality follow-up through December 31, 1977. The analytic methods represent a miner's annual age-specific lung cancer mortality rate as the (unspecified) rate among nonsmoking men born at the same time and with no mining history, multiplied by the relative risk factor R. This factor depends on the miner's total exposures to radon daughters (in working level months (WLM) and to cigarettes (in packs), accumulated from start of exposure until 10 years before his current age. Among those examined, the relative risk function giving the highest likelihood of the data was R . (1 + 0.31 X 10(-/sup 2/) WLM)(1 + 0.51 X 10(-/sup 3/) packs). This multiplicative function specifies that ratios of mortality rates for miners versus nonminers with similar age and smoking characteristics do not depend on smoking status. By contrast, differences between miners' and nonminers' mortality rates are substantially higher for smokers than for nonsmokers. The data rejected (P . .01) several additive functions for R that specify relative risk as a sum of components due to radiation and to cigarette smoking. Cumulative exposures to both radiation and cigarettes gave better fits to the data than did average annual exposure rates. Age at start of underground mining had no effect on risk, after controlling for age at lung cancer death, year of birth, and cumulative radiation and smoking exposures.

  11. Mineral transformations during the dissolution of uranium ore minerals by dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasauer, S.; Weidler, P.; Fakra, S.; Tyliszczak, T.; Shuh, D.

    2011-12-01

    Carnotite minerals [X2(UO2)2(VO4)2]; X = K, Ca, Ba, Mn, Na, Cu or Pb] form the major ore of uranium in the Colorado Plateau. These deposits are highly oxidized and contain U(VI) and V(IV). The biotransformation of U(VI) bound in carnotite by bacteria during dissimilatory metal reduction presents a complex puzzle in mineral chemistry. Both U(VI) and V(V) can be respired by metal reducing bacteria, and the mineral structure can change depending on the associated counterion. We incubated anaerobic cultures of S. putrefaciens CN32 with natural carnotite minerals from southeastern Utah in a nutrient-limited defined medium. Strain CN32 is a gram negative bacterium and a terrestrial isolate from New Mexico. The mineral and metal transformations were compared to a system that contained similar concentrations of soluble U(VI) and V(V). Electron (SEM, TEM) microscopies and x-ray spectromicroscopy (STXM) were used in conjunction with XRD to track mineral changes, and bacterial survival was monitored throughout the incubations. Slow rates of metal reduction over 10 months for the treatment with carnotite minerals revealed distinct biotic and abiotic processes, providing insight on mineral transformation and bacteria-metal interactions. The bacteria existed as small flocs or individual cells attached to the mineral phase, but did not adsorb soluble U or V, and accumulated very little of the biominerals. Reduction of mineral V(V) necessarily led to a dismantling of the carnotite structure. Bioreduction of V(V) by CN32 contributed small but profound changes to the mineral system, resulting in new minerals. Abiotic cation exchange within the carnotite group minerals induced the rearrangement of the mineral structures, leading to further mineral transformation. In contrast, bacteria survival was poor for treatments with soluble U(VI) and V(V), although both metals were reduced completely and formed solid UO2 and VO2; we also detected V(III). For these treatments, the bacteria

  12. Combined SEM/EDX and micro-Raman spectroscopy analysis of uranium minerals from a former uranium mine.

    PubMed

    Stefaniak, Elzbieta A; Alsecz, Anita; Frost, Ray; Máthé, Zoltán; Sajó, István E; Török, Szabina; Worobiec, Anna; Van Grieken, René

    2009-08-30

    Samples of the secondary uranium minerals collected in the abandoned uranium mine at Pecs (Hungary) were investigated by two micro-techniques: scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDX) and micro-Raman spectroscopy (MRS). They were applied to locate U-rich particles and identify the chemical form and oxidation state of the uranium compounds. The most abundant mineral was a K and/or Na uranyl sulphate (zippeite group). U(VI) was also present in the form showing intensive Raman scattering at 860 cm(-1) which can be attributed to uranium trioxide. This research has shown the successful application of micro-Raman spectroscopy for the identification of uranyl mineral species on the level of individual particles.

  13. Uranium minerals from the San Marcos District, Chihuahua, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Cortés, Manuel; Fuentes-Cobas, Luis; Torres-Moye, Enrique; Esparza-Ponce, Hilda; Montero-Cabrera, María Elena

    2010-05-01

    The mineralogy of the two uranium deposits (Victorino and San Marcos I) of Sierra San Marcos, located 30 km northwest of Chihuahua City, Mexico, was studied by optical microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction with Rietveld analysis, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis, inductively coupled plasma spectrometry, and gamma spectrometry. At the San Marcos I deposit, uranophane Ca(UO2)2Si2O7·6(H2O) (the dominant mineral at both deposits) and metatyuyamunite Ca(UO2)(V2O8)·3(H2O) were observed. Uranophane, uraninite (UO2+x), masuyite Pb(UO2)3O3(OH)·3(H2O), and becquerelite Ca(UO2)6O4(OH)6 ·(8H2O) are present at the Victorino deposit. Field observations, coupled with analytical data, suggest the following sequence of mineralization: (1) deposition of uraninite, (2) alteration of uraninite to masuyite, (3) deposition of uranophane, (4) micro-fracturing, (5) calcite deposition in the micro-fractures, and (6) formation of becquerelite. The investigated deposits were formed by high-to low-temperature hydrothermal activity during post-orogenic evolution of Sierra San Marcos. The secondary mineralization occurred through a combination of hydrothermal and supergene alteration events. Becquerelite was formed in situ by reaction of uraninite with geothermal carbonated solutions, which led to almost complete dissolution of the precursor uraninite. The Victorino deposit represents the second known occurrence of becquerelite in Mexico, the other being the uranium deposits at Peña Blanca in Chihuahua State.

  14. Uranium mineralization in response to regional metamorphism at Lilljuthatten, Sweden.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuckless, J.S.; Troeng, B.

    1984-01-01

    Uranium deposits occur in the Olden granite of approx 1650 m.y. in age. This granite outcrops in the northern and eastern segments of the Precambrian Olden window of the central Swedish Caledonides. The Olden granite is a 'highly evolved' biotite granite, with SiO2 >70%. The granite was rich in U (and other incompatible trace elements) and much of the U was located in labile sites. During the Caledonian orogeny 420 m.y. ago, the granite was metamorphosed to greenschist facies, clastically deformed, hydrothermally altered in turn, and mineralized along fractures with quartz, fluorite, calcite and galena. Pitchblende and coffinite were locally deposited as fracture fillings, in particular association with biotitic alteration, whose relation to hydrothermal alteration is obscure; biotite is concentrated along fractures. The U deposits are partly and 'recently' oxidized. The Pb-U, Pb-Pb, and Sr-Rb isotopic systems of most samples were strongly to completely reset by the Caledonian orogeny. The source and host of the Lilljuthatten uranium ore was a special type of granite. The granite fractured, U was mobilized by metamorphism, and deposited in the fractures, and the deposit was preserved from weathering. Similar U deposits in high U granites, common in the Swedish Caledonides, should occur elsewhere.-G.J.N.

  15. Identification and occurrence of uranium and vanadium minerals from the Colorado Plateaus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weeks, A.D.; Thompson, M.E.

    1954-01-01

    This report, designed to make available to field geologists and others informa- tion obtained in recent investigations by the Geological Survey on identification and occurrence of uranium minerals of the Colorado Plateaus, contains descriptions of the physical properties, X-ray data, and in some instances results of chemical and spectrographic analysis of 48 uranium and vanadium minerals. Also included is a list of locations of mines from which the minerals have been identified.

  16. Uranium mineralization in fluorine-enriched volcanic rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, D.M.; Sheridan, M.F.; Bikun, J.; Christiansen, E.; Correa, B.; Murphy, B.; Self, S.

    1980-09-01

    Several uranium and other lithophile element deposits are located within or adjacent to small middle to late Cenozoic, fluorine-rich rhyolitic dome complexes. Examples studied include Spor Mountain, Utah (Be-U-F), the Honeycomb Hills, Utah (Be-U), the Wah Wah Mountains, Utah (U-F), and the Black Range-Sierra Cuchillo, New Mexico (Sn-Be-W-F). The formation of these and similar deposits begins with the emplacement of a rhyolitic magma, enriched in lithophile metals and complexing fluorine, that rises to a shallow crustal level, where its roof zone may become further enriched in volatiles and the ore elements. During initial explosive volcanic activity, aprons of lithicrich tuffs are erupted around the vents. These early pyroclastic deposits commonly host the mineralization, due to their initial enrichment in the lithophile elements, their permeability, and the reactivity of their foreign lithic inclusions (particularly carbonate rocks). The pyroclastics are capped and preserved by thick topaz rhyolite domes and flows that can serve as a source of heat and of additional quantities of ore elements. Devitrification, vapor-phase crystallization, or fumarolic alteration may free the ore elements from the glassy matrix and place them in a form readily leached by percolating meteoric waters. Heat from the rhyolitic sheets drives such waters through the system, generally into and up the vents and out through the early tuffs. Secondary alteration zones (K-feldspar, sericite, silica, clays, fluorite, carbonate, and zeolites) and economic mineral concentrations may form in response to this low temperature (less than 200 C) circulation. After cooling, meteoric water continues to migrate through the system, modifying the distribution and concentration of the ore elements (especially uranium).

  17. Uranium*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenthe, Ingmar; Drożdżyński, Janusz; Fujino, Takeo; Buck, Edgar C.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.; Wolf, Stephen F.

    Uranium compounds have been used as colorants since Roman times (Caley, 1948). Uranium was discovered as a chemical element in a pitchblende specimen by Martin Heinrich Klaproth, who published the results of his work in 1789. Pitchblende is an impure uranium oxide, consisting partly of the most reduced oxide uraninite (UO2) and partly of U3O8. Earlier mineralogists had considered this mineral to be a complex oxide of iron and tungsten or of iron and zinc, but Klaproth showed by dissolving it partially in strong acid that the solutions yielded precipitates that were different from those of known elements. Therefore he concluded that it contained a new element (Mellor, 1932); he named it after the planet Uranus, which had been discovered in 1781 by William Herschel, who named it after the ancient Greek deity of the Heavens.

  18. Early lung cancer detection in uranium miners with abnormal sputum cytology

    SciTech Connect

    Saccomanno, G.

    1992-08-01

    This work supported by the United States of Energy, continues to add data on the health affects of cigarette smoking and radon exposure on uranium miners. Since the last Technical Progress Report in July or 1991, 537 sputum cytology samples have been collected on the 300 uranium workers in the surveillance study. To date there are 436 lung cancer cases in the Uranium Miner Tumor Registry with diagnostic slides from surgery and/or autopsy; an additional 40 cases have been diagnosed with sputum cytology only. In March of 1991 the Geno Saccomanno Uranium Workers Archive was established at St. Mary's Hospital and Medical Center as a depository for biological specimens and epidemiological data from the 17,700 uranium miners who have been a part or the study.

  19. Occurrences of uranium-bearing minerals in the St. Kevin District, Lake County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierson, C.T.; Singewald, Q.D.

    1953-01-01

    None of the uranium occurrences are of commercial importance. They are for the most part in non-glaciated terrane, which has been subjected to a very long period of weathering.  Thus, chemical leaching within the zone of weathering may have greatly reduced the uranium content of material near the surface, and occurrences of even small quantities of secondary uranium minerals might be related to stronger, primary concentrations at depth.

  20. Hydrologic and Temporal Influences of Evaporite Minerals on the Vertical Distribution, Storage, and Mobility of Uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roycroft, S. J.; Noel, V.; Boye, K.; Besancon, C.; Weaver, K. L.; Johnson, R. H.; Dam, W. L.; Fendorf, S. E.; Bargar, J.

    2016-12-01

    Uranium contaminated groundwater in Riverton, Wyoming persists despite anticipated natural attenuation outside of a former uranium ore processing facility. The inability of natural flushing to dilute the uranium below the regulatory threshold indicates that sediments act as secondary sources likely (re)supplying uranium to groundwater. Throughout the contaminated floodplain, uranium rich-evaporites are readily abundant in the upper 2 m of sediments and are spatially coincident with the location of the plume, which suggests a likely link between evaporites and increased uranium levels. Knowledge of where and how uranium is stored within evaporite-associated sediments is required to understand processes controlling the mobility of uranium. We expect that flooding and seasonal changes in hydrologic conditions will affect U phase partitioning, and thus largely control U mobility. The primary questions we are addressing in this project are: What is the relative abundance of uranium incorporated in various mineral complexes throughout the evaporite sediments? How do the factors of depth, location, and seasonality influence the relative incorporation, mobility and speciation of uranium?We have systematically sampled from two soil columns over three dates in Riverton. The sampling dates span before and after a significant flooding event, providing insight into the flood's impact on local uranium mobility. Sequential chemical extractions are used to decipher the reactivity of uranium and approximate U operationally defined within reactants targeting carbonate, silicate, organic, and metal oxide bound or water and exchangeable phases. Extractions throughout the entirety of the sediment cores provide a high-resolution vertical profile of the distribution of uranium in various extracted phases. Throughout the profile, the majority (50-60%) of uranium is bound within carbonate-targeted extracts, a direct effect of the carbonate-rich evaporite sediments. The sum of our analyses

  1. Polygenetic and polychronic uranium mineralization at deposits of the Khiagda ore field, Buryatia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochkin, B. T.; Tarasov, N. N.; Andreeva, O. V.; Asadulin, En. E.; Golubev, V. N.

    2017-03-01

    The unique combination of several exogenic processes augmenting uranium mineralization followed one another in time at deposits of the Khiagda ore field and gave rise to the formation of uranium resources exceptional for the paleovalley geologic and economic type. The specific geological evolution, volcanic activity, and regional climatic conditions taken together became the main cause of local occurrence of these deposits.

  2. High resolution remote sensing information identification for characterizing uranium mineralization setting in Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie-Lin; Wang, Jun-hu; Zhou, Mi; Huang, Yan-ju; Xuan, Yan-xiu; Wu, Ding

    2011-11-01

    The modern Earth Observation System (EOS) technology takes important role in the uranium geological exploration, and high resolution remote sensing as one of key parts of EOS is vital to characterize spectral and spatial information of uranium mineralization factors. Utilizing satellite high spatial resolution and hyperspectral remote sensing data (QuickBird, Radarsat2, ASTER), field spectral measurement (ASD data) and geological survey, this paper established the spectral identification characteristics of uranium mineralization factors including six different types of alaskite, lower and upper marble of Rössing formation, dolerite, alkali metasomatism, hematization and chloritization in the central zone of Damara Orogen, Namibia. Moreover, adopted the texture information identification technology, the geographical distribution zones of ore-controlling faults and boundaries between the different strata were delineated. Based on above approaches, the remote sensing geological anomaly information and image interpretation signs of uranium mineralization factors were extracted, the metallogenic conditions were evaluated, and the prospective areas have been predicted.

  3. U-Pb geochronology of the Lagoa Real uranium district, Brazil: Implications for the age of the uranium mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobato, Lydia Maria; Pimentel, Márcio Martins; Cruz, Simone C. P.; Machado, Nuno; Noce, Carlos Maurício; Alkmim, Fernando Flecha

    2015-03-01

    The Lagoa Real uranium district in Bahia, northeastern Brazil, is the most important uranium province in the country and presently produces this metal in an open-pit mine operated by Indústrias Nucleares do Brasil. Uranium-rich zones are associated with plagioclase (dominantly albite ± oligoclase) -rich rocks, albitites and metasomatized granitic-gneisses, distributed along NNW/SSE striking shear zones. We have used the ID-TIMS U-Pb method to date zircon and titanite grains from the São Timóteo granitoid, and albite-rich rocks from the Lagoa Real district in order to assess the age of granite emplacement, deformation/metamorphism and uranium mineralization. The isotopic data support the following sequence of events (i) 1746 ± 5 Ma - emplacement of the São Timóteo granitoid (U-Pb zircon age) in an extensional setting, coeval with the beginning of the sedimentation of the Espinhaço Supergroup; (ii) 956 ± 59 Ma hydrothermal alteration of the São Timóteo granitoid and emplacement of the uranium mineralization (U-Pb titanite age on an albite-rich sample); (iii) 480 Ma metamorphism, remobilization and Pb loss (U-Pb titanite age for the gneiss sample), during the nucleation of shear zones related to the collision between the São Francisco-Congo and Amazonia paleoplates. The 956 ± 59-Ma mineralization age is apparently associated with the evolution of the Macaúbas-Santo Onofre rift. This age bracket may bear an important exploration implication, and should be included in the diverse age scenario of uranium deposits worldwide.

  4. Reassessment of individual dosimetry of long-lived alpha radionuclides of uranium miners through experimental determination of urinary excretion of uranium.

    PubMed

    Malátová, I; Becková, V; Tomásek, L; Slezáková-Marusiaková, M; Hůlka, J

    2013-04-01

    Urinary excretion of uranium of 40 uranium miners was determined by the high-resolution inductively coupled mass spectrometry method. The concentration of uranium in the urine of the miners was converted to daily excretion of (238)U either under the assumption that the daily urinary excretion is 1.6 l or daily urinary excretion of creatinine is 1.7 g and compared with the excretion of (238)U calculated with a biokinetic model. Input data to the excretion model were derived from personal three- component ALGADE dosemeters, using the component for the estimation of inhalation of long-lived alpha radionuclides. Experimentally found contents of uranium in the urine of uranium miners are generally lower than the modelled ones, which means that the dosimetric approach is conservative. The uncertainty of inhalation intakes, derived from the measurements of filters from personal dosemeters, and the uncertainty of the concentration of uranium in the urine are discussed.

  5. Geochemistry of clay minerals for uranium exploration in the Grants mineral belt, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookins, D. G.

    1982-03-01

    Clay mineralogy studies of ore rocks versus barren rocks in the Grants mineral belt, New Mexico, show that some combination of chlorite (rosette form), illite, mixed-layer illite-montmorillonite, (±Mg-montmorillonite) are penecontemporaneous with uranium minerals in trend ore; these same clay minerals plus kaolinite are related to the roll-type ore near the main redox front of the Grants mineral belt. Clay minerals from barren rocks are characterized by a greater abundance of Na-montmorillonite, kaolinite, and face-to-edge form chlorite. Chlorites from ore zones contain much more vanadium than do chlorites from barren rocks. Trend orr probably formed from southeasterly flowing waters following paleochannels in the Late Jurassic. These deposits are found almost entirely in reduced rocks, and organic carbon may have been an important reductant to remove U-V-U-V-Se-Mo from solution as carbonate from ore zones contains some organic carbon based on stable isotope studies. Uplift, remobilization, and reprecipitation of some of the trend ore resulted in the formation of redistributed ore, some of which possesses a roll-type geometry. Mineralization for the roll-type ore was apparently controlled by sulfide-sulfate equilibria at or near the main redox front in the Grants mineral belt. Trend and roll-type ore possess different assemblages of clay minerals and different trace element abundances. Laramide-age faults cut both trend ore and some roll-type ores. Stack ore is found in Laramide-age fault zones. Limited oxygen isotopic data from clay minerals collected from two mines at Ambrosia Lake in reduced rocks indicate probable preservation of ancient, formational waters and show no evidence of infiltration by young meteoric waters. This information, plus the pre-Laramide-age faults, suggest, but do not unequivocally prove, that the main redox front has been relatively stable since its formation, probably some time in the Cretaceous. Younger encroachment of the redox front

  6. Early Lung Cancer Detection in Uranium Miners with Abnormal Sputum Cytology

    SciTech Connect

    Saccomanno, G.

    2000-06-30

    ''Early Lung Cancer Detection in Uranium Miners with Abnormal Sputum Cytology'' was funded by the Department of Energy to monitor the health effects of radon exposure and/or cigarette smoke on uranium workers from the Colorado Plateau. The resulting Saccomanno Uranium Workers Archive and data base has been used as a source of information to prove eligibility for compensation under the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act and as the source of primary data tissue for a subcontract and other collaborations with outside investigators. The latter includes a study of radon exposure and lung cancer risk in a non-smoking cohort of uranium miners (subcontract); a study of genetic markers for lung cancer susceptibility; and a study of {sup 210}Pb accumulation in the skull as a biomarker of radon exposure.

  7. Mechanisms of uranium mineralization by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Ozaki, Takuo; Yoshida, Takahiro; Sakamoto, Fuminori; Kozai, Naofumi; Wakai, Eiichi; Francis, Arokiasamy J.; Iefuji, Haruyuki

    2005-11-01

    We determined the association of uranium in yeast cells S. cerevisiae grown in medium containing high (1 g · L -1) or low (0.2 g · L -1) concentrations of phosphate after exposure for 96 h to a 4 × 10 -4 mol · L -1 U(VI) solution at pH 3.2 or 4.7. The analysis was made using a field emission scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (FESEM-EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and visible diffuse reflectance spectrometry. Cells grown in the high-phosphate medium rapidly accumulated U(VI) from solution at pH 3.2 over the first 24 h, followed by a slow uptake until 96 h, whereas in cells grown in low-phosphate medium, U(VI) accumulation reached a steady state within 24 h. FESEM-EDS analyses revealed the formation of a U(VI)-bearing precipitate on the yeast cells grown in high-phosphate medium after only 48 h exposure; no precipitate was detected on cells grown in low-phosphate medium up to 96 h. These results suggest that sorption onto the cell surfaces was the dominant process initially. Analysis of the U(VI)-bearing precipitates by all three methods demonstrated the presence of H-autunite, HUO 2PO 4 · 4H 2O. Thermodynamic calculations suggest that the chemical compositions of the solutions containing yeast grown in high-phosphate medium were undersaturated with respect to H-autunite, but were supersaturated with ten times more U(VI) and P than were actually observed. Apparently, the sorbed U(VI) on the cell surfaces reacts with P released from the yeast to form H-autunite by local saturation. The U(VI) uptake by yeast cells grown in high phosphate medium at pH 4.7, along with the thermodynamic calculation, indicated that more H-autunite is precipitated in neutral pH solution than in acid solution. Thus, U(VI)-phosphate mineralization on the cells of microorganisms should be taken into account for predicting U(VI) mobility in the environment.

  8. X-ray absorption studies of uranium sorption on mineral substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, E.A.; Terminello, L.J.; Viani, B.E.

    1994-11-01

    Uranium L{sub 3}-edge x-ray absorption spectra have been measured for uranium-mineral sorption systems. An expansible layer silicate, vermiculite, was treated to obtain a collapsed and non-expanding phase, thereby limiting access to the interior cation exchange sites. Samples were prepared by exposing the finely powdered mineral, in the natural and modified form, to aqueous solutions of uranyl chloride. EXAFS spectra of the encapsulated samples were measured at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Results indicate that the uranyl ion possesses a more symmetric local structure within the interlayer regions of vermiculite than on the external surfaces.

  9. Genesis of secondary uranium minerals associated with jasperoid veins, El Erediya area, Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd El-Naby, Hamdy H.

    2008-11-01

    Uranium mineralization in the El Erediya area, Egyptian Eastern Desert, has been affected by both high temperature and low temperature fluids. Mineralization is structurally controlled and is associated with jasperoid veins that are hosted by a granitic pluton. This granite exhibits extensive alteration, including silicification, argillization, sericitization, chloritization, carbonatization, and hematization. The primary uranium mineral is pitchblende, whereas uranpyrochlore, uranophane, kasolite, and an unidentified hydrated uranium niobate mineral are the most abundant secondary uranium minerals. Uranpyrochlore and the unidentified hydrated uranium niobate mineral are interpreted as alteration products of petscheckite. The chemical formula of the uranpyrochlore based upon the Electron Probe Micro Analyzer (EPMA) is A {left( {{text{U}}_{{1.07}} {text{Ca}}_{{0.28}} {text{Pb}}_{{0.03}} {text{Na}}_{{0.21}} {text{Mg}}_{{0.02}} } right)}_{{Σ 1.6}} B {left( {{text{Nb}}_{{0.57}} {text{Si}}_{{0.62}} {text{Zr}}_{{0.35}} {text{P}}_{{0.20}} {text{Fe}}_{{0.17}} {text{Al}}_{{0.06}} {text{Ti}}_{{0.03}} } right)}_{{Σ 2}} . It is characterized by a relatively high Zr content (average ZrO2 = 6.6 wt%). The average composition of the unidentified hydrated uranium niobate mineral is ^{{text{U}}} {left( {{text{U}}_{{1.89}} {text{Ca}}_{{0.49}} {text{Pb}}_{{0.13}} {text{Na}}_{{0.06}} {text{Mg}}_{{0.02}} } right)}_{{Σ 2.59}} ^{{{text{Nb}}}} {left( {{text{Nb}}_{{1.31}} {text{Fe}}_{{0.34}} {text{Si}}_{{0.14}} {text{P}}_{{0.10}} {text{Ti}}_{{0.05}} {text{Zr}}_{{0.03}} {text{Al}}_{{0.03}} } right)}_{{Σ 2.0}} , where U and Nb represent the dominant cations in the U and Nb site, respectively. Uranophane is the dominant U6+ silicate phase in oxidized zones of the jasperoid veins. Kasolite is less abundant than uranophane and contains major U, Pb, and Si but only minor Ca, Fe, P, and Zr. A two-stage metallogenetic model is proposed for the alteration processes and uranium mineralization at

  10. Polarographic behaviour of uranium beta-diketonates in chloroform Application of ac polarography to the analysis of uranium minerals.

    PubMed

    Pournaghi-Azar, M H; Ordoukhanian, J

    1991-12-01

    The polarographic behaviour of U(VI) beta-diketonates has been studied in chloroform. The conditions for reversible electrochemical reduction of U(VI) acetylacetonate and benzoylacetonate at a dropping mercury electrode was optimized by using a suitable ratio of piperidinium perchlorate and piperidine mixture as supporting electrolyte in chloroform. The one-electron nature of the reduction wave of U(VI) complexes was confirmed by controlled potential coulometry. The ac method preceded by a solvent extraction of U(VI) benzoylacetonate in chloroform was used for the determination of uranium. The calibration curve was linear over the range 0.5-20 mu/ml. The correlation coefficient was 0.9998 and the detection limit was about 0.2 mu/ml. The interference of some concomitant ions were examined and EDTA was used as an effective masking agent to separate uranium from other metals. The proposed method has been applied to the determination of uranium in uranium minerals.

  11. Lung cancer in uranium miners: A tissue resource and pilot study. Final performance report

    SciTech Connect

    Samet, J.; Gilliland, F.D.

    1998-08-13

    This project incorporates two related research projects directed toward understanding respiratory carcinogenesis in radon-exposed former uranium miners. The first project involved a continuation of the tissue resource of lung cancer cases from former underground uranium miners and comparison cases from non-miners. The second project was a pilot study for a proposed longitudinal study of respiratory carcinogenesis in former uranium miners. The objectives including facilitating the investigation of molecular changes in radon exposed lung cancer cases, developing methods for prospectively studying clinical, cytologic, cytogenetic, and molecular changes in the multi-event process of respiratory carcinogenesis, and assessing the feasibility of recruiting former uranium miners into a longitudinal study that collected multiple biological specimens. A pilot study was conducted to determine whether blood collection, induced sputum, bronchial brushing, washings, and mucosal biopsies from participants at two of the hospitals could be included efficiently. A questionnaire was developed for the extended study and all protocols for specimen collection and tissue handling were completed. Resource utilization is in progress at ITRI and the methods have been developed to study molecular and cellular changes in exfoliated cells contained in sputum as well as susceptibility factors.

  12. Geologic controls of uranium mineralization in the Tallahassee Creek uranium district, Fremont County, Colorado.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dickinson, K.A.

    1981-01-01

    Two important orebodies have been defined by drilling in the Tallahassee Creek uranium district, Fremont County, Colorado, namely the Hansen and the Picnic Tree. Host rocks are respectively the upper Eocene Echo park Alluvium, and the lower Oligocene Tallahassee Creek Conglomerate. Average ore grade is about 0.08% U3O8. The principal source rock is the lower Oligocene Wall Mountain Tuff. Leaching and transportation of the uranium occurred in alkaline oxidizing ground water that developed during alteration of the ash in a semi-arid environment. The uranium was transported in the groundwater and deposited in a reducing environment controlled by carbonaceous material and associated pyrite. Localization of the ore was controlled by groundwater flow conditions and by the distribution of organic matter in the host rock. -from Author

  13. Multisource data set integration and characterization of uranium mineralization for the Montrose Quadrangle, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Bolivar, S.L.; Balog, S.H.; Campbell, K.; Fugelso, L.E.; Weaver, T.A.; Wecksung, G.W.

    1981-04-01

    Several data-classification schemes were developed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory to detect potential uranium mineralization in the Montrose 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ quadrangle, Colorado. A first step was to develop and refine the techniques necessary to digitize, integrate, and register various large geological, geochemical, and geophysical data sets, including Landsat 2 imagery, for the Montrose quadrangle, Colorado, using a grid resolution of 1 km. All data sets for the Montrose quadrangle were registered to the Universal Transverse Mercator projection. The data sets include hydrogeochemical and stream sediment analyses for 23 elements, uranium-to-thorium ratios, airborne geophysical survey data, the locations of 90 uranium occurrences, a geologic map and Landsat 2 (bands 4 through 7) imagery. Geochemical samples were collected from 3965 locations in the 19 200 km/sup 2/ quadrangle; aerial data were collected on flight lines flown with 3 to 5 km spacings. These data sets were smoothed by universal kriging and interpolated to a 179 x 119 rectangular grid. A mylar transparency of the geologic map was prepared and digitized. Locations for the known uranium occurrences were also digitized. The Landsat 2 imagery was digitally manipulated and rubber-sheet transformed to quadrangle boundaries and bands 4 through 7 were resampled to both a 1-km and 100-m resolution. All possible combinations of three, for all data sets, were examined for general geologic correlations by utilizing a color microfilm output. Subsets of data were further examined for selected test areas. Two classification schemes for uranium mineralization, based on selected test areas in both the Cochetopa and Marshall Pass uranium districts, are presented. Areas favorable for uranium mineralization, based on these schemes, were identified and are discussed.

  14. Unfinished business: Radiation Exposure Compensation Act (RECA) for post-1971 U.S. uranium underground miners.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Gary E; Dawson, Susan E

    2004-01-01

    Congress enacted the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act (RECA) in 1990 and amended it in 2000. Included for compensation were underground uranium miners who developed health problems related to radiation exposures. Neither the 1990 Act nor the 2000 Amendments covered post-1971 workers. In this article, we will examine regulatory history and scientific evidence used for the passage of RECA for the pre-1972 miners and will present evidence supporting the inclusion of the post-1971 workers.

  15. Large uraniferous springs and associated uranium minerals, Shirley Mountains, Carbon County, Wyoming -- A preliminary report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, J.D.

    1963-01-01

    Ten springs along the southeast flank of the Shirley Mountains, Carbon County, Wyoming, have water containing from 12 to 27 parts per billion uranium, have a total estimated flow of 3 million gallons of clear fresh water per day, and have a combined annual output that may be as much as 166 pounds of uranium. These springs emerge from Pennsylvanian, Permian, and Triassic rocks on the east flank of a faulted anticlinal fold. In the vicinity of several springs, metatyuyamunite occurs locally in crystalline calcite veins averaging 3 feet in width but reaching a maximum of 24 feet. The veins are as much as several hundred feet long-and cut vertically through sandstones of Pennsylvanian age overlying the Madison Limestone (Mississippian). This limestone is believed to be the source of the calcite. A 3-foot channel sample cross one calcite vein contains 0.089 percent uranium. Lesser amounts of uranium were obtained from other channel samples. Selected samples contain from 0.39 to 2.2 percent uranium and from 0.25 to 0.86 percent vanadium. Three possible sources of the uranium are: (1) Precambrian rocks, (2) Paleozoic rocks, (3) Pliocene(?) tuffaceous strata that were deposited unconformably across older .rocks in both the graphically high and low parts of the area, but were subsequently removed by erosion except for a few small remnants, one of which contains carnotite. There is apparently a close genetic relation between the uraniferous springs and uranium mineralization in the calcite veins. Data from this locality illustrate how uraniferous ground water can be used as a guide in the exploration for areas where uranium deposits may occur. Also demonstrated is the fact that significant quantities of uranium are present in water of some large flowing springs.

  16. Appraisal of selected epidemiologic issues from studies of lung cancer among uranium and hard rock miners

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, G R; Sever, L E

    1982-04-01

    An extensive body of published information about lung cancer among uranium miners was reviewed and diverse information, useful in identifying important issues but not in resolving them was found. Measuring exposure and response; thresholds of exposure; latency or the period from first mining experience to death; effort to predict excess risk of death, using a model; effects of smoking and radon daughter exposure on the histology of lung tumors; and the interplay of factors on the overall risk of death were all examined. The general concept of thresholds; that is, an exposure level below which risk does not increase was considered. The conclusion is that it should be possible to detect and estimate an epidemiologic threshold when the cohorts have been followed to the death of all members. Issues concerning latency in the studies of uranium miners published to date were examined. It is believed that the induction-latent period for lung cancer among uranium miners may be: as little as 10 to more than 40 years; dependent on age at which exposure begins; exposure rate; and ethnicity or smoking habits. Although suggested as factual, their existence is uncertain. An effect due to the exposure rate may exist although it has not been factual, their existence is uncertain. An effect due to the exposure rate may exist although it has not been confirmed. The median induction-latent period appears to be in excess of the 15 years frequently cited for US uranium miner. A distinct pattern of shorter induction-latent periods with increasing age at first mining exposure is reported. The evidence for and against an unusual histologic pattern of lung cancers among uranium miners was examined. The ratio of epidermoid to small cell types was close to 1:2; the ratio in the general population is nearer 2:1. The histologic pattern warrants closer attention of pathologists and epidemiologists. (ERB) (ERB)

  17. Magnetic Titanohematite Minerals in Uranium-Bearing Sandstones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, Richard L.

    1977-01-01

    Detrital grains of the rhombohedral ilmenite (FeT1O3)--hematite (Fe2O3) solid solution series (titanohematites) have been identified by thermomagnetic, reflection microscopic, and X-ray diffraction analysis in six uranium-bearing sandstones in the western United States. Many of the titanohematites are ferrimagnetic and have Curie temperatures ranging from about 70 Deg C to 220 Deg C. Magnetic titanohematite is commonly more abundant than magnetite in many samples and, therefore, should be considered as a major source of the permanent magnetization in these units.

  18. Uranium, geoinformatics, and the economic image of mineral exploration.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Tom

    2013-09-01

    When uranium prospectors working in northern Canada want to visualize a new deposit, they can't simply walk outside and take a picture of the ground beneath their feet. 'Mapping' an ore body in the twenty-first century means building a statistical model from a grid of chemical data, a collaborative process demanding the efforts of drilling crews, geologists, chemists, and statisticians. As rock samples are translated into numerical concentration values and then back into images of geological features, scientific theories become economic data, reshaping geological theory, environmental regulation and development in the process.

  19. Lung cancer epidemiology in New Mexico uranium miners. Progress report, March 1, 1991--November 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Samet, J.M.

    1991-11-01

    This investigation assesses the health effects of radon progeny exposure in New Mexico uranium miners. Cumulative exposures sustained by most New Mexico miners are well below those received earlier in the Colorado Plateau. This project utilizes the research opportunity offered by New Mexico miners to address unresolved issues related to radon progeny exposure: (1) the lung cancer risk of lower levels of exposure, (2) interaction between radon progeny exposure and cigarette smoking in the causation of lung cancer, (3) the relationship between lung cancer histologic type and radon progeny exposure, and (4) possible effects of radon progeny exposure other than lung cancer. A cohort study of 3800 men with at least one year of underground uranium mining experience in New Mexico is in progress. Results are discussed.

  20. Lung cancer in uranium miners: A tissue resource and pilot study. Progress report, September 25, 1992--May 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Samet, J.M.

    1993-05-01

    This project involves two related activities directed toward understanding respiratory carcinogenesis in radon-exposed former uranium miners. The first activity involves a continuation of the tissue resource of lung cancer cases from former underground uranium miners and comparison cases from non-miners. The second activity is a pilot study for a proposed longitudinal study of respiratory carcinogenesis in former uranium miners. The objectives are to facilitate the investigation of molecular changes in radon exposed lung cancer cases and to develop methods for prospectively studying clinical, cytologic, cytogenetic, and molecular changes in the multi-event process of respiratory carcinogenesis, and to assess the feasibility of recruiting former uranium miners into a longitudinal study that collects multiple biologic specimens.

  1. Unexpected rates of chromosomal instabilities and alterations of hormone levels in Namibian uranium miners

    SciTech Connect

    Zaire, R.; Notter, M.; Thiel, E.

    1997-05-01

    A common problem in determining the health consequences of radiation exposure is factoring out other carcinogenic influences. The conditions in Namibia provide a test case for distinguishing the effects of long-term low-dose exposure to uranium from the other environmental factors because of good air quality and the lack of other industries with negative health effects. Present records indicate a much higher prevalence of cancer among male workers in the open-pit uranium mine in Namibia compared with the general population. The objective of the present study was to determine whether long-term exposure to low doses of uranium increases the risk of a biological radiation damage which would lead to malignant diseases and to derive a dose-response model for these miners. To investigate this risk, we measured uranium excretion in urine, neutrophil counts and the serum level of FSH, LH and testosterone and analyzed chromosome aberrations in whole blood cells using fluorescence in situ hybridization. A representative cohort of 75 non-smoking, HIV-negative miners was compared to a control group of 31 individuals with no occupational history in mining. A sixfold increase in uranium excretion among the miners compared to the controls was recorded (P < 0.001). Furthermore, we determined a significant reduction in testosterone levels (P < 0.008) and neutrophil count (P < 0.0001). Most remarkably, cells with multiple aberrations such as {open_quotes}rogue{close_quotes} cells were observed for the first time in miners; these cells had previously been found only after short-term high-dose radiation exposure, e.g. from the Hiroshima atomic bomb or the Chernobyl accident. 19 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  2. In vivo measurements of lead-210 for assessing cumulative radon exposure in uranium miners

    SciTech Connect

    Guilmette, R.A.; Laurer, G.R.; Lambert, W.E.; Gilliland, F.D.

    1995-12-01

    It has long been recognized that a major contributor to the uncertainty in risk analysis of lung cancer in uranium and other hard rock miners is the estimation of total radon progeny exposure of individual miners under study. These uncertainties arise from the fact that only a limited number of measurements of airborne {sup 222}Rn progeny concentrations were made in the mines during the times that the miners were being exposed, and that dosimeters capable of integrating the Rn progeny exposures of the miners did not exist. Historically, the cumulative exposures for individual uranium and other hard rock miners have been calculated by combining the employee`s work history, which may or may not have included time spent at different jobs within the mines and at different locations within the mines, with whatever periodic measurements of Rn and Rn progeny were available. The amount and quality of the measurement data varied enormously from mine to mine and from population to population. Because the quality of the exposure data collected during the period of active mining in the United STates cannot now be altered substantially, significant improvement in individual miner exposure estimates is only likely to be achieved if a new cumulative exposure metric is developed and implemented. The decay chain of Rn includes the production of {sup 210}Pb, which can accumulate in the skeleton in amounts proportional to the intake of Rn progeny. We hypothesize that the in vivo measurement of {sup 210}Pb in the skulls of miners will provide such a metric. In summary, the primary purpose of this pilot study to demonstrate the feasibility of measuring {sup 210}Pb in the heads of former uranium miners has been accomplished.

  3. Biogeochemical aspects of uranium mineralization, mining, milling, and remediation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, Kate M.; Gallegos, Tanya J.; Landa, Edward R.

    2015-01-01

    Natural uranium (U) occurs as a mixture of three radioactive isotopes: 238U, 235U, and 234U. Only 235U is fissionable and makes up about 0.7% of natural U, while 238U is overwhelmingly the most abundant at greater than 99% of the total mass of U. Prior to the 1940s, U was predominantly used as a coloring agent, and U-bearing ores were mined mainly for their radium (Ra) and/or vanadium (V) content; the bulk of the U was discarded with the tailings (Finch et al., 1972). Once nuclear fission was discovered, the economic importance of U increased greatly. The mining and milling of U-bearing ores is the first step in the nuclear fuel cycle, and the contact of residual waste with natural water is a potential source of contamination of U and associated elements to the environment. Uranium is mined by three basic methods: surface (open pit), underground, and solution mining (in situ leaching or in situ recovery), depending on the deposit grade, size, location, geology and economic considerations (Abdelouas, 2006). Solid wastes at U mill tailings (UMT) sites can include both standard tailings (i.e., leached ore rock residues) and solids generated on site by waste treatment processes. The latter can include sludge or “mud” from neutralization of acidic mine/mill effluents, containing Fe and a range of coprecipitated constituents, or barium sulfate precipitates that selectively remove Ra (e.g., Carvalho et al., 2007). In this chapter, we review the hydrometallurgical processes by which U is extracted from ore, the biogeochemical processes that can affect the fate and transport of U and associated elements in the environment, and possible remediation strategies for site closure and aquifer restoration.This paper represents the fourth in a series of review papers from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) on geochemical aspects of UMT management that span more than three decades. The first paper (Landa, 1980) in this series is a primer on the nature of tailings and radionuclide

  4. Early lung cancer detection in uranium miners with abnormal sputum cytology. Technical progress report, July 31, 1991--July 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Saccomanno, G.

    1992-08-01

    This work supported by the United States of Energy, continues to add data on the health affects of cigarette smoking and radon exposure on uranium miners. Since the last Technical Progress Report in July or 1991, 537 sputum cytology samples have been collected on the 300 uranium workers in the surveillance study. To date there are 436 lung cancer cases in the Uranium Miner Tumor Registry with diagnostic slides from surgery and/or autopsy; an additional 40 cases have been diagnosed with sputum cytology only. In March of 1991 the Geno Saccomanno Uranium Workers Archive was established at St. Mary`s Hospital and Medical Center as a depository for biological specimens and epidemiological data from the 17,700 uranium miners who have been a part or the study.

  5. Uranium-bearing minerals in placer deposits of the Red River Valley, Elk City district, Idaho County, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Armstrong, F.C.; Weis, P.L.

    1955-01-01

    The nonmagnetic, non-radioactive fractions of the samples assayed 0.2 percent niobium, but no columbite was recognized in the samples. The uranium-bearing placer mineals are brannerite. euxenitte, davidite. betafite, and also contain niobium; ilmenite in the gravels may also contain some niobium. Pegmatites are believed to be the somce of the uranium- and niobium-bearing minerals, but the possibility of finding a pegmatite in the area ,that can be mined economically for uranium or niobium is remote.

  6. Detailed mineral and chemical relations in two uranium-vanadium ores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garrels, Robert M.; Larsen, E. S.; Pommer, A.M.; Coleman, R.G.

    1956-01-01

    Channel samples from two mines on the Colorado Plateau have been studied in detail both mineralogically and chemically. A channel sample from the Mineral Joe No. 1 mine, Montrose County, Colo., extends from unmineralized rock on one side, through a zone of variable mineralization, into only weakly mineralized rock. The unmineralized rock is a fairly clean quartz sand cemented with gypsum and contains only minor amounts of clay minerals. One boundary between unmineralized and mineralized rock is quite sharo and is nearly at right angles to the bedding. Vanadium clay minerals, chiefly mixed layered mica-montmorillonite and chlorite-monmorillonite, are abundant throughout the mineralized zone. Except in the dark "eye" of the channel sample, the vanadium clay minerals are accompanied by hewettite, carnotite, tyuyamunite, and probably unidentified vanadates. In the dark "eye," paramontroseite, pyrite, and marcasite are abundant, and bordered on each side by a zone containing abundant corvusite. No recognizable uranium minerals were seen in the paramontroseite zone although uranium is abundant there. Coaly material is recognizable throughout all of the channel but is most abundant in and near the dark "eye." Detailed chemical studies show a general increase in Fe, Al, U, and V, and a decrease in SO4 toward the "eye" of the channel. Reducing capacity studies indicate that V(IV) and Fe(II) are present in the clay mineral throughout the channel, but only in and near the "eye" are other V(IV) minerals present (paramontroseite and corvusite). The uranium is sexivalent, although its state of combination is conjectural where it is associated with paramontroseite. Where the ore boundary is sharp, the boundary of introduced trace elements is equally sharp. Textural and chemical relations leave no doubt that the "eye: is a partially oxidized remnant of a former lower-valence ore, and the remainder of the channel is a much more fully oxidized remnant. A channel sample from the

  7. Ethnic differences in the prevalence of nonmalignant respiratory disease among uranium miners.

    PubMed Central

    Mapel, D W; Coultas, D B; James, D S; Hunt, W C; Stidley, C A; Gilliland, F D

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study (1) investigates the relationship of nonmalignant respiratory disease to underground uranium mining and to cigarette smoking in Native American, Hispanic, and non-Hispanic White miners in the Southwest and (2) evaluates the criteria for compensation of ethnic minorities. METHODS: Risk for mining-related lung disease was analyzed by stratified analysis, multiple linear regression, and logistic regression with data on 1359 miners. RESULTS: Uranium mining is more strongly associated with obstructive lung disease and radiographic pnuemoconiosis in Native Americans than in Hispanics and non-Hispanic Whites. Obstructive lung disease in Hispanic and non-Hispanic White miners is mostly related to cigarette smoking. Current compensation criteria excluded 24% of Native Americans who, by ethnic-specific standards, had restrictive lung disease and 4.8% who had obstructive lung disease. Native Americans have the highest prevalence of radiographic pneumoconiosis, but are less likely to meet spirometry criteria for compensation. CONCLUSIONS: Native American miners have more nonmalignant respiratory disease from underground uranium mining, and less disease from smoking, than the other groups, but are less likely to receive compensation for mining-related disease. PMID:9184515

  8. Radon Exposure, IL-6 Promoter Variants, and Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Former Uranium Miners

    DOE PAGES

    Leng, Shuguang; Thomas, Cynthia L.; Snider, Amanda M.; ...

    2015-09-15

    Background: High radon exposure is a risk factor for squamous cell carcinoma, a major lung cancer histology observed in former uranium miners. Radon exposure can cause oxidative stress, leading to pulmonary inflammation. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a pro-carcinogenic inflammatory cytokine that plays a pivotal role in lung cancer development. Objectives: We assessed whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the IL6 promoter are associated with lung cancer in former uranium miners with high occupational exposure to radon gas. Methods: Genetic associations were assessed in a case–control study of former uranium miners (242 cases and 336 controls). A replication study was performed usingmore » data from the Gene Environment Association Studies (GENEVA) Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) of Lung Cancer and Smoking. Functional relevance of the SNPs was characterized using in vitro approaches. Results: We found that rs1800797 was associated with squamous cell carcinoma in miners and with a shorter time between the midpoint of the period of substantial exposure and diagnosis among the cases. Furthermore, rs1800797 was also associated with lung cancer among never smokers in the GENEVA dataset. Functional studies identified that the risk allele was associated with increased basal IL-6 mRNA level and greater promoter activity. Furthermore, fibroblasts with the risk allele showed greater induction of IL-6 secretion by hydrogen peroxide or benzo[a]pyrene diolepoxide treatments. Conclusions: An IL6 promoter variant was associated with lung cancer in uranium miners and never smokers in two external study populations. Lastly, the associations are strongly supported by the functional relevance that the IL6 promoter SNP affects basal expression and carcinogen-induced IL-6 secretion« less

  9. Radon Exposure, IL-6 Promoter Variants, and Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Former Uranium Miners

    SciTech Connect

    Leng, Shuguang; Thomas, Cynthia L.; Snider, Amanda M.; Picchi, Maria A.; Chen, Wenshu; Willis, Derall G.; Carr, Teara G.; Krzeminski, Jacek; Desai, Dhimant; Shantu, Amin; Lin, Yong; Jacobson, Marty R.; Belinsky, Steven A.

    2015-09-15

    Background: High radon exposure is a risk factor for squamous cell carcinoma, a major lung cancer histology observed in former uranium miners. Radon exposure can cause oxidative stress, leading to pulmonary inflammation. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a pro-carcinogenic inflammatory cytokine that plays a pivotal role in lung cancer development. Objectives: We assessed whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the IL6 promoter are associated with lung cancer in former uranium miners with high occupational exposure to radon gas. Methods: Genetic associations were assessed in a case–control study of former uranium miners (242 cases and 336 controls). A replication study was performed using data from the Gene Environment Association Studies (GENEVA) Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) of Lung Cancer and Smoking. Functional relevance of the SNPs was characterized using in vitro approaches. Results: We found that rs1800797 was associated with squamous cell carcinoma in miners and with a shorter time between the midpoint of the period of substantial exposure and diagnosis among the cases. Furthermore, rs1800797 was also associated with lung cancer among never smokers in the GENEVA dataset. Functional studies identified that the risk allele was associated with increased basal IL-6 mRNA level and greater promoter activity. Furthermore, fibroblasts with the risk allele showed greater induction of IL-6 secretion by hydrogen peroxide or benzo[a]pyrene diolepoxide treatments. Conclusions: An IL6 promoter variant was associated with lung cancer in uranium miners and never smokers in two external study populations. Lastly, the associations are strongly supported by the functional relevance that the IL6 promoter SNP affects basal expression and carcinogen-induced IL-6 secretion

  10. Uranium and thorium sorption on minerals studied by x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, E.A.; Terminello, L.J.; Viani, B.E.

    1995-12-01

    Several actinide-mineral sorption systems were studied by uranium and thorium L{sub 3}-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy. A series of layer silicate minerals, including micas, were selected for their systematic variations in surface structure, e.g. degree of permanent negative charge on the basal planes. An expansible layer silicate, vermiculite, was treated to provide several different interlayer spacings, allowing variations in the accessibility of interior cation exchange sites. The finely powdered minerals were exposed to aqueous solutions of uranyl chloride or thorium chloride. Analysis of the EXAFS and XANES spectra indicates the influence of the mineral substrate upon the local structure of the bound actinide species. Trends in the data are interpreted based upon the known variations in mineral structure.

  11. Spectral discrimination of uranium-mineralized breccia pipes in northwestern Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Kwarteng, A.Y.; Goodell, P.C.; Pingitore, N.E. Jr.; Wenich, K.J.

    1989-03-01

    The price of uranium is currently the lowest in more than a decade. The only type of uranium deposit that is economically viable in the depressed uranium market is such high-grade ore as the unconformity type found in Canada and Australia. Exploration for uranium-bearing breccia pipes in northwestern Arizona by both domestic and foreign companies is currently active because of the relatively high-grade ore they contain and their tendency to be polymetallic. In the US, uranium-mineralized breccia pipes are one of the few deposits that can compete in the current market. A stepwise discriminant analysis was performed on spectral data acquired from the field, laboratory, and Landsat thematic mapper (TM). The principal objectives were (1) to investigate the fundamental differences in the spectral properties of outcrops on the surface of breccia pipes and the background, (2) to choose TM bandpasses that were statistically optimum for distinguishing between breccia pipes and the background, and (3) to compare the results of the field, laboratory, and TM digital data which were acquired by different instruments having different spatial and spectral resolutions.

  12. Uranium in stream and mineral water of the Federal Republic of Germany.

    PubMed

    Birke, Manfred; Rauch, Uwe; Lorenz, Hans

    2009-12-01

    The concentration of uranium was determined in 944 samples from stream water by the inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometry (ICP-QMS) method and represented on a color-shaded contour map. Uranium concentrations in surface water were determined to be between 0.007 μg/l and 43.7 μg/l with median of 0.33 μg/l. The regional distribution of uranium is influenced primarily by lithological and anthropogenic factors. In Mecklenburg, northern Brandenburg, and eastern Schleswig-Holstein, elevated uranium concentrations coincide with the extent of the last Weichselian ice sheet. The maximum concentrations are observed in the surface waters of the old mining districts in the western part of the Ore Mountains and in eastern Thuringia. Elevated concentrations are found in areas of agriculturally used loess soils. These concentrations correlate with the use of phosphate fertilizers. There is a zone of elevated concentrations up to 10.0 μg U/l in the Keuper Sandstone area south of the Thuringian Forest and from northwest of Stuttgart as far as Coburg. The distribution of elevated values in mineral water shows a clear correlation with the elevated values in surface water and the geology of those locations. Bunter and Keuper strata are the most important uranium source.

  13. Radon exposure, cigarette smoking, and other mining experience in the beaverlodge uranium miners cohort

    SciTech Connect

    L'Abbe, K.A.; Howe, G.R.; Burch, J.D.; Miller, A.B.; Abbatt, J.; Band, P.; Choi, W.; Du, J.; Feather, J.; Gallagher, R. )

    1991-04-01

    A nested case-control study within the Beaverlodge Uranium Miners Cohort was undertaken to assess any possible contribution of confounding by smoking and other mining experience to the risk estimate derived from the original cohort study. Next of kin have been interviewed for 46 lung cancer cases and 95 controls enrolled in the Beaverlodge Uranium Miners Cohort Study who died between 1950 and 1980. Confounding by cigarette smoking and other mining experience appears unlikely to have contributed to the relative risk coefficient for exposure to Rn decay products derived in the parent study. Data for smoking and exposure to Rn decay products are consistent with a multiplicative model, although considerable caution must be applied to this interpretation.

  14. Radon Exposure, IL-6 Promoter Variants, and Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Former Uranium Miners

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Shuguang; Thomas, Cynthia L.; Snider, Amanda M.; Picchi, Maria A.; Chen, Wenshu; Willis, Derall G.; Carr, Teara G.; Krzeminski, Jacek; Desai, Dhimant; Shantu, Amin; Lin, Yong; Jacobson, Marty R.; Belinsky, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: High radon exposure is a risk factor for squamous cell carcinoma, a major lung cancer histology observed in former uranium miners. Radon exposure can cause oxidative stress, leading to pulmonary inflammation. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a pro-carcinogenic inflammatory cytokine that plays a pivotal role in lung cancer development. Objectives: We assessed whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the IL6 promoter are associated with lung cancer in former uranium miners with high occupational exposure to radon gas. Methods: Genetic associations were assessed in a case–control study of former uranium miners (242 cases and 336 controls). A replication study was performed using data from the Gene Environment Association Studies (GENEVA) Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) of Lung Cancer and Smoking. Functional relevance of the SNPs was characterized using in vitro approaches. Results: We found that rs1800797 was associated with squamous cell carcinoma in miners and with a shorter time between the midpoint of the period of substantial exposure and diagnosis among the cases. Furthermore, rs1800797 was also associated with lung cancer among never smokers in the GENEVA dataset. Functional studies identified that the risk allele was associated with increased basal IL-6 mRNA level and greater promoter activity. Furthermore, fibroblasts with the risk allele showed greater induction of IL-6 secretion by hydrogen peroxide or benzo[a]pyrene diolepoxide treatments. Conclusions: An IL6 promoter variant was associated with lung cancer in uranium miners and never smokers in two external study populations. The associations are strongly supported by the functional relevance that the IL6 promoter SNP affects basal expression and carcinogen-induced IL-6 secretion. Citation: Leng S, Thomas CL, Snider AM, Picchi MA, Chen W, Willis DG, Carr TG, Krzeminski J, Desai D, Shantu A, Lin Y, Jacobson MR, Belinsky SA. 2016. Radon exposure, IL-6 promoter variants, and lung squamous

  15. Interpretation of aircraft multispectral scanner images for mapping of alteration with uranium mineralization, Copper Mountain, Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conel, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    NS-001 multispectral scanner data (0.45-2.35 micron) combined as principal components were utilized to map distributions of surface oxidation/weathering in Precambrian granitic rocks at Copper Mountain, Wyoming. Intense oxidation is found over granitic outcrops in partly exhumed pediments along the southern margin of the Owl Creek uplift, and along paleodrainages higher in the range. Supergene(?) uranium mineralization in the granites is localized beneath remnant Tertiary sediments covering portions of the pediments. The patterns of mineralization and oxidation are in agreement, but the genetic connections between the two remain in doubt.

  16. Interpretation of aircraft multispectral scanner images for mapping of alteration with uranium mineralization, Copper Mountain, Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conel, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    NS-001 multispectral scanner data (0.45-2.35 micron) combined as principal components were utilized to map distributions of surface oxidation/weathering in Precambrian granitic rocks at Copper Mountain, Wyoming. Intense oxidation is found over granitic outcrops in partly exhumed pediments along the southern margin of the Owl Creek uplift, and along paleodrainages higher in the range. Supergene(?) uranium mineralization in the granites is localized beneath remnant Tertiary sediments covering portions of the pediments. The patterns of mineralization and oxidation are in agreement, but the genetic connections between the two remain in doubt.

  17. Dissolution of uranium-bearing minerals and mobilization of uranium by organic ligands in a biologically reduced sediment.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wensui; Gu, Baohua

    2011-04-01

    The stability and mobility of uranium (U) is a concern following its reductive precipitation or immobilization by techniques such as bioremediation at contaminated sites. In this study, the influences of complexing organic ligands such as citrate and ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) on the mobilization of U were investigated in both batch and column flow systems using a contaminated and bioreduced sediment. Results indicate that both reduced U(IV) and oxidized U(VI) in the sediment can be effectively mobilized with the addition of EDTA or citrate under anaerobic conditions. The dissolution and mobilization of U appear to be correlated to the dissolution of iron (Fe)- or aluminum (Al)-bearing minerals, with EDTA being more effective (with R2≥0.89) than citrate (R2<0.60) in dissolving these minerals. The column flow experiments confirm that U, Fe, and Al can be mobilized by these ligands under anoxic conditions, although the cumulative amounts of U removal constituted ∼0.1% of total U present in this sediment following a limited period of leaching. This study concludes that the presence of complexing organic ligands may pose a long-term concern by slowly dissolving U-bearing minerals and mobilizing U even under a strict anaerobic environment.

  18. Dissolution of Uranium-Bearing Minerals and Mobilization of Uranium by Organic Ligands in a Biologically Reduced Sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Wensui; Gu, Baohua

    2011-01-01

    The stability and mobility of uranium (U) is a concern following its reductive precipitation or immobilization by techniques such as bioremediation at contaminated sites. In this study, the influences of complexing organic ligands such as citrate and ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) on the mobilization of U were investigated in both batch and column flow systems using a contaminated and bioreduced sediment. Results indicate that both reduced U(IV) and oxidized U(VI) in the sediment can be effectively mobilized with the addition of EDTA or citrate under anaerobic conditions. The dissolution and mobilization of U appear to be correlated to the dissolution of iron (Fe)- or aluminum (Al)-bearing minerals, with EDTA being more effective (with R2 0.89) than citrate (R2 <0.60) in dissolving these minerals. The column flow experiments confirm that U, Fe, and Al can be mobilized by these ligands under anoxic conditions, although the cumulative amounts of U removal constituted ~0.1% of total U present in this sediment following a limited period of leaching. This study concludes that the presence of complexing organic ligands may pose a long-term concern by slowly dissolving U-bearing minerals and mobilizing U even under a strict anaerobic environment.

  19. Mineral transformation and biomass accumulation associated with uranium bioremediation at Rifle, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Li, L.; Steefel, C.I.; Williams, K.H.; Wilkins, M.J.; Hubbard, S.S.

    2009-04-20

    Injection of organic carbon into the subsurface as an electron donor for bioremediation of redox-sensitive contaminants like uranium often leads to mineral transformation and biomass accumulation, both of which can alter the flow field and potentially bioremediation efficacy. This work combines reactive transport modeling with a column experiment and field measurements to understand the biogeochemical processes and to quantify the biomass and mineral transformation/accumulation during a bioremediation experiment at a uranium contaminated site near Rifle, Colorado. We use the reactive transport model CrunchFlow to explicitly simulate microbial community dynamics of iron and sulfate reducers, and their impacts on reaction rates. The column experiment shows clear evidence of mineral precipitation, primarily in the form of calcite and iron monosulfide. At the field scale, reactive transport simulations suggest that the biogeochemical reactions occur mostly close to the injection wells where acetate concentrations are highest, with mineral precipitate and biomass accumulation reaching as high as 1.5% of the pore space. This work shows that reactive transport modeling coupled with field data can be an effective tool for quantitative estimation of mineral transformation and biomass accumulation, thus improving the design of bioremediation strategies.

  20. Heavy-mineral criteria for subsurface uranium exploration, San Juan Basin, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Rhett, D.W.

    1980-01-01

    In Phillips Petroleum Company's Nose Rock deposit, uranium occurs in a series of roll-front deposits in now largely reduced rock. Mineralogical data support geological evidence that the oxidizing ground-water regime that prevailed during active migration of the roll fronts was replaced by a reducing ground-water regime. This reducing event halted roll-front migration and generally obliterated macroscopic evidence of oxidation. Diagenetic heavy-mineral assemblages have survived the reducing event and reflect the geochemical environment in which they formed. Consequently, diagnostic heavy-mineral assemblages can be used to identify geochemical zones associated with roll-front mineralization in reduced ground. A field trial based on the heavy-mineral composition of drill cuttings demonstrated that mineralogical criteria can provide a reliable means of recognizing stratigraphic horizons that were traversed by roll-front systems.

  1. Approaches to modelling uranium (VI) adsorption on natural mineral assemblages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waite, T.D.; Davis, J.A.; Fenton, B.R.; Payne, T.E.

    2000-01-01

    Component additivity (CA) and generalised composite (GC) approaches to deriving a suitable surface complexation model for description of U(VI) adsorption to natural mineral assemblages are pursued in this paper with good success. A single, ferrihydrite-like component is found to reasonably describe uranyl uptake to a number of kaolinitic iron-rich natural substrates at pH > 4 in the CA approach with previously published information on nature of surface complexes, acid-base properties of surface sites and electrostatic effects used in the model. The GC approach, in which little pre-knowledge about generic surface sites is assumed, gives even better fits and would appear to be a method of particular strength for application in areas such as performance assessment provided the model is developed in a careful, stepwise manner with simplicity and goodness of fit as the major criteria for acceptance.

  2. Uranium-bearing minerals of lunar rock 12013.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, E. L.; Albee, A. L.; Chodos, A. A.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1971-01-01

    The U distribution in rock 12013 was studied by fission track and elemental mapping techniques. Major U-bearing phases are whitlockite, apatite, zircon, and phase beta, which is a Zr-Ti mineral rich in Fe, Nb, Y, REE, and containing up to 3.6% UO2, 4.7% ThO2 and 4.2% PbO. Calculated microprobe ages for phase beta average 4.0 b.y. and are in reasonable agreement with Rb-Sr and K-Ar ages. Phase beta plays a significant role in the U-Th-Pb systematics of rock 12012 and may play a similar role in the model ages of lunar soil.

  3. Uranium in the mineralized lakes of Altai Krai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isupov, V. P.; Kolpakova, M. N.; Borzenko, S. V.; Shatskaja, S. S.; Shvartsev, S. L.; Dolgushin, A. P.; Arzamasova, G. M.; Lyakhov, N. Z.

    2016-10-01

    Data on the physicochemical properties (pH, Eh, salinity) and content of U and other trace elements (As, Li, B, Br, I, Sr) are provided for the mineralized lakes of the Kulundinskaya steppe of Altai Krai. The sodic lakes of the region are characterized by higher U238 contents (up to 4 mg/l). The U contents in the lake waters are positively correlated with the sum of carbonate and hydrocarbonate ions and the pH of waters and are negatively correlated with salinity. These data confirm the presence of an economic U-bearing zone of the ground reservoir oxidation located along the eastern slope of the Platovskoe uplift in the northwestern direction along the boundary with Kazakhstan.

  4. Spectroscopic verification of the mineralogy of an ultrathin mineral film on depleted uranium.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Nils; Arnold, Thuro; Foerstendorf, Harald; Read, David

    2008-11-15

    The alteration of a depleted uranium (DU) disk in contact with a synthetic pore water, as a simulantforfertilized agricultural soil, was studied by exposing the DU to a calcium phosphate solution (2.5 x 10(-3) M Ca, 1 x 10(-3) M P). Within 12 months this contact resulted in the formation of a thin film of a secondary uranium mineral on the metallic DU. The reaction product was analyzed with both time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) and infrared spectroscopy. Both techniques identified the reaction product on DU as a uranium(VI) phosphate phase, but only TRLFS provided its unequivocal identification as meta-autunite based on the positions of the fluorescence emission maxima at 487.8, 502.0, 523.6, 547.0, 572.1, and 600.6 nm and fluorescence lifetimes of 410 +/- 15 and 3300 +/- 310 ns. These results highlight the enhanced performance and sensitivity of the TRLFS technique for mineralogical characterization of thin surface films. Furthermore, they demonstrate that the dissolution of uranium from DU projectiles under the conditions described here is limited by the development and solubility of a meta-autunite secondary phase. The findings have helped clarify the interactions of DU ammunition with phosphate-rich soil-water.

  5. Mineral-Water Interface Processes Affecting Uranium Fate in Contaminated Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, J. G.

    2011-12-01

    Widespread uranium contamination of soil, sediments, and groundwater systems has resulted from mining activities, nuclear weapon production, and energy generation. The fate and transport of uranium in such systems is strongly affected by geochemical processes occurring at mineral-water interfaces. I will present a summary of the mineral-water interface processes found to affect uranium fate in example contaminated sediments at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford sites and in related model systems. Processes occurring under oxic conditions will be the primary focus of this talk as under these conditions uranium is most mobile and thus presents the greatest hazard. Three dominant solid-phase uranium species are observed in contaminated soil and sediments at the Hanford site: uranyl silicates, uranyl phosphates, and uranyl adsorbed to clays and iron oxides. In deep sediments, uranyl silicates are found in microfractures in feldspar grains, likely because slow diffusion in such fractures maintains a high silicate activity. Such silicates are also found in waste-impacted shallow sediments and soil; waste fluids or evaporative processes may have generated the silicate activity needed to produce such phases. Uranyl phosphates are less abundant, occurring primarily in shallow sediments exposed to P-bearing waste fluids. However, remediation approaches under consideration may produce substantial quantities of uranyl phosphates in the future. Adsorbed uranyl is dispersed throughout contaminated soils and shallow sediments and likely has the greatest potential for remobilization. Analogue studies show that precipitation of uranyl phosphates is rapid when such phases are supersaturated and that both homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation may occur. Specific adsorption of uranyl to minerals is strongly affected by the presence of complexation anions. Carbonate suppresses uranyl adsorption but also forms uranyl-carbonate ternary surface complexes. At conditions below

  6. X-ray absorption studies of uranium sorption on mineral substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, E.A.; Terminello, L.J.; Viani, B.E.; Reich, T.; Bucher, J.J.; Shuh, D.K.; Edelstein, N.M.

    1995-09-01

    Aqueous transport of actinides in the geosphere can be significantly retarded by sorption and/or precipitation upon mineral surfaces. Despite the importance of this effect to environmental remediation efforts and nuclear waste repository design, there is only limited direct knowledge about the microscopic nature of the actinide-mineral interaction. Here, uranium L{sub 3}-edge x-ray absorption spectra have been measured for uranium-mineral sorption systems. An expansible layer silicate, vermiculite, was treated to obtain a collapsed phase, thereby limiting access to the interior cation exchange sites. Samples were prepared by exposing the finely powdered mineral, in the natural and modified form, to aqueous solutions of uranyl chloride. EXAFS spectra of the encapsulated samples were measured at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Results indicate that the uranyl ion possesses a more symmetric local structure for the natural vermiculite than for the collapsed form, suggesting structural differences between uranyl species within the interlayer regions of vermiculite and on the external surfaces.

  7. Incidence of non-lung solid cancers in Czech uranium miners: A case-cohort study

    SciTech Connect

    Kulich, M.; Rericha, V.; Rericha, R.; Shore, D.L.; Sandler, D.P.

    2011-04-15

    Objectives: Uranium miners are chronically exposed to radon and its progeny, which are known to cause lung cancer and may be associated with leukemia. This study was undertaken to evaluate risk of non-lung solid cancers among uranium miners in Pribram region, Czech Republic. Methods: A retrospective stratified case-cohort study in a cohort of 22,816 underground miners who were employed between 1949 and 1975. All incident non-lung solid cancers were ascertained among miners who worked underground for at least 12 months (n=1020). A subcohort of 1707 subjects was randomly drawn from the same population by random sampling stratified on age. The follow-up period lasted from 1977 to 1996. Results: Relative risks comparing 180 WLM (90th percentile) of cumulative lifetime radon exposure to 3 WLM (10th percentile) were 0.88 for all non-lung solid cancers combined (95% CI 0.73-1.04, n=1020), 0.87 for all digestive cancers (95% CI 0.69-1.09, n=561), 2.39 for gallbladder cancer (95% CI 0.52-10.98, n=13), 0.79 for larynx cancer (95% CI 0.38-1.64, n=62), 2.92 for malignant melanoma (95% CI 0.91-9.42, n=23), 0.84 for bladder cancer (95% CI 0.43-1.65, n=73), and 1.13 for kidney cancer (95% CI 0.62-2.04, n=66). No cancer type was significantly associated with radon exposure; only malignant melanoma and gallbladder cancer showed elevated but non-significant association with radon. Conclusions: Radon was not significantly associated with incidence of any cancer of interest, although a positive association of radon with malignant melanoma and gallbladder cancer cannot be entirely ruled out. - Research highlights: {yields} Uranium miners are chronically exposed to radon. {yields} We evaluate risk of non-lung solid cancers among uranium miners. {yields} No cancer type was significantly associated with radon exposure. {yields} Malignant melanoma and gallbladder cancer showed non-significant elevated risk.

  8. Uranium immobilization and nanofilm formation on magnesium-rich minerals

    DOE PAGES

    van Veelen, Arjen; Bargar, John R.; Law, Gareth T. W.; ...

    2016-03-18

    Polarization-dependent grazing incidence X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements were completed on oriented single crystals of magnesite [MgCO3] and brucite [Mg(OH)2] reacted with aqueous uranyl chloride above and below the solubility boundaries of schoepite (500, 50, and 5 ppm) at pH 8.3 and at ambient (PCO2 = 10–3.5) or reduced partial pressures of carbon dioxide (PCO2 = 10–4.5). X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra show a striking polarization dependence (χ = 0° and 90° relative to the polarization plane of the incident beam) and consistently demonstrated that the uranyl molecule was preferentially oriented with its Oaxial = U(VI) = Oaxialmore » linkage at high angles (60–80°) to both magnesite (101¯4) and brucite (0001). Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis shows that the “effective” number of U(VI) axial oxygens is the most strongly affected fitting parameter as a function of polarization. Furthermore, axial tilt in the surface thin films (thickness ~ 21 Å) is correlated with surface roughness [σ]. Our results show that hydrated uranyl(-carbonate) complexes polymerize on all of our experimental surfaces and that this process is controlled by surface hydroxylation. Lastly, these results provide new insights into the bonding configuration expected for uranyl complexes on the environmentally significant carbonate and hydroxide mineral surfaces.« less

  9. Uranium mineralization and unconformities: how do they correlate? - A look beyond the classic unconformity-type deposit model?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markwitz, Vanessa; Porwal, Alok; Campbell McCuaig, T.; Kreuzer, Oliver P.

    2010-05-01

    Uranium deposits are usually classified based on the characteristics of their host rocks and geological environments (Dahlkamp, 1993; OECD/NEA Red Book and IAEA, 2000; Cuney, 2009). The traditional unconformity-related deposit types are the most economical deposits in the world, with the highest grades amongst all uranium deposit types. In order to predict undiscovered uranium deposits, there is a need to understand the spatial association of uranium mineralization with structures and unconformities. Hydrothermal uranium deposits develop by uranium enriched fluids from source rocks, transported along permeable pathways to their depositional environment. Unconformities are not only separating competent from incompetent sequences, but provide the physico-chemical gradient in the depositional environment. They acted as important fluid flow pathways for uranium to migrate not only for surface-derived oxygenated fluids, but also for high oxidized metamorphic and magmatic fluids, dominated by their geological environment in which the unconformities occur. We have carried out comprehensive empirical spatial analyses of various types of uranium deposits in Australia, and first results indicate that there is a strong spatial correlation between unconformities and uranium deposits, not only for traditional unconformity-related deposits but also for other styles. As a start we analysed uranium deposits in Queensland and in particular Proterozoic metasomatic-related deposits in the Mount Isa Inlier and Late Carboniferous to Early Permian volcanic-hosted uranium occurrences in Georgetown and Charters Towers Regions show strong spatial associations with contemporary and older unconformities. The Georgetown Inlier in northern Queensland consists of a diverse range of rocks, including Proterozoic and early Palaeozoic metamorphic rocks and granites and late Palaeozoic volcanic rocks and related granites. Uranium-molybdenum (+/- fluorine) mineralization in the Georgetown inlier

  10. PHASE ANALYSES OF URANIUM-BEARING MINERALS FROM THE HIGH GRADE ORE, NOPAL I, PENA BLANCA, MEXICO

    SciTech Connect

    M. Ren; P. Goodell; A. Kelts; E.Y. Anthony; M. Fayek; C. Fan; C. Beshears

    2005-07-11

    The Nopal I uranium deposit is located in the Pena Blanca district, approximately 40 miles north of Chihuahua City, Mexico. The deposit was formed by hydrothermal processes within the fracture zone of welded silicic volcanic tuff. The ages of volcanic formations are between 35 to 44 m.y. and there was secondary silicification of most of the formations. After the formation of at least part of the uranium deposit, the ore body was uplifted above the water table and is presently exposed at the surface. Detailed petrographic characterization, electron microprobe backscatter electron (BSE) imagery, and selected x-ray maps for the samples from Nopal I high-grade ore document different uranium phases in the ore. There are at least two stages of uranium precipitation. A small amount of uraninite is encapsulated in silica. Hexavalent uranium may also have been a primary precipitant. The uranium phases were precipitated along cleavages of feldspars, and along fractures in the tuff. Energy dispersive spectrometer data and x-ray maps suggest that the major uranium phases are uranophane and weeksite. Substitutions of Ca and K occur in both phases, implying that conditions were variable during the mineralization/alteration process, and that compositions of the original minerals have a major influence on later stage alteration. Continued study is needed to fully characterize uranium behavior in these semi-arid to arid conditions.

  11. Lung cancer risk at low radon exposure rates in German uranium miners

    PubMed Central

    Kreuzer, M; Fenske, N; Schnelzer, M; Walsh, L

    2015-01-01

    Background: A determination of the risk of lung cancer at low levels of radon exposure is important for occupational radiation protection. Methods: The risk of death from lung cancer at low radon exposure rates was investigated in the subcohort of 26 766 German uranium miners hired in 1960 or later. Results: A clear association between lung cancer mortality (n=334 deaths) and cumulative exposure to radon in working level months (WLM) was found. The excess relative risk per WLM was 0.013 (95% confidence intervals: 0.007; 0.021). Conclusions: The present findings provide strong evidence for an increased lung cancer risk after long-term exposure to low radon exposure rates among Wismut miners. The results are compatible to those from residential radon studies and miner studies restricted to low levels. PMID:26393888

  12. Potentiation of cigarette smoking and radiation: evidence from a sputum cytology survey among uranium miners and controls

    SciTech Connect

    Band, P.; Feldstein, M.; Saccomanno, G.; Watson, L.; King, G.

    1980-03-15

    To assess the effect of cigarette smoking and of exposure to radon daughters, a prospective survey consisting of periodic sputum cytology evaluation was initiated among 249 underground uranium miners and 123 male controls. Sputum cytology specimens showing moderate atypia, marked atypia, or cancer cells were classified as abnormal. As compared to control smokers, miners who smoke had a significantly higher incidence of abnormal cytology (P = 0.025). For miner smokers, the observed frequencies of abnormal cytology were linearly related to cumulative exposure to radon daughters and to the number of years of uranium mining. A statistical model relating the probability of abnormal cytology to the risk factors was investigated using a binary logistic regression. The estimated frequency of abnormal cytology was significantly dependent, for controls, on the duration of cigarette smoking, and for miners, on the duration of cigarette smoking and of uranium mining.

  13. Occupational and diagnostic exposure to ionizing radiation and leukemia risk among German uranium miners.

    PubMed

    Möhner, Matthias; Gellissen, Johannes; Marsh, James W; Gregoratto, Demetrio

    2010-09-01

    Lung cancer is a well-known effect of radon exposure in uranium mines. However, little is known about the induction of leukemia by radiation exposure in mines. Moreover, miners usually have occupational medical checkup programs that include chest x-ray examinations. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to re-examine leukemia risk among miners, taking into account exposure to x rays for diagnostic purposes. The data used were from a previously analyzed individually matched case-control study of former uranium miners in East Germany with 377 cases and 980 controls. Additionally, data on x-ray examinations were taken from medical records for most of the subjects. Finally, the absorbed dose to red bone marrow was calculated considering both occupational and diagnostic exposures. Using conditional logistic regression models, a moderately but not statistically significant elevated risk was seen in the dose category above 200 mGy for the combined dose from both sources [odds ratio (OR) = 1.33, 90% confidence interval (CI): (0.82-2.14)]. Ignoring the dose accumulated in the recent 20 y, the risk in the highest dose category (>105 mGy) was higher [OR = 1.77, 90% CI: (1.06-2.95)]. Ignoring diagnostic exposure yielded similar results. For the highest dose category (absorbed dose lagged by 20 y) the risk was more than doubled [OR = 2.64, 90% CI: (1.60-4.35)].

  14. Kidney cancer mortality and ionizing radiation among French and German uranium miners.

    PubMed

    Drubay, Damien; Ancelet, Sophie; Acker, Alain; Kreuzer, Michaela; Laurier, Dominique; Rage, Estelle

    2014-08-01

    The investigation of potential adverse health effects of occupational exposures to ionizing radiation, on uranium miners, is an important area of research. Radon is a well-known carcinogen for lung, but the link between radiation exposure and other diseases remains controversial, particularly for kidney cancer. The aims of this study were therefore to perform external kidney cancer mortality analyses and to assess the relationship between occupational radiation exposure and kidney cancer mortality, using competing risks methodology, from two uranium miners cohorts. The French (n = 3,377) and German (n = 58,986) cohorts of uranium miners included 11 and 174 deaths from kidney cancer. For each cohort, the excess of kidney cancer mortality has been assessed by standardized mortality ratio (SMR) corrected for the probability of known causes of death. The associations between cumulative occupational radiation exposures (radon, external gamma radiation and long-lived radionuclides) or kidney equivalent doses and both the cause-specific hazard and the probability of occurrence of kidney cancer death have been estimated with Cox and Fine and Gray models adjusted to date of birth and considering the attained age as the timescale. No significant excess of kidney cancer mortality has been observed neither in the French cohort (SMR = 1.49, 95 % confidence interval [0.73; 2.67]) nor in the German cohort (SMR = 0.91 [0.77; 1.06]). Moreover, no significant association between kidney cancer mortality and any type of occupational radiation exposure or kidney equivalent dose has been observed. Future analyses based on further follow-up updates and/or large pooled cohorts should allow us to confirm or not the absence of association.

  15. Uranium Isotopic Fractionation Induced by U(VI) Adsorption Onto Common Aquifer Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jemison, N.; Johnson, T. M.; Shiel, A. E.; Lundstrom, C.

    2014-12-01

    Mining and processing of uranium (U) ore for nuclear energy and weapons has led to U contamination of groundwater. Reduction of soluble, mobile U(VI) to UO2 decreases uranium groundwater concentrations and is an important driver of natural and stimulated attenuation. 238U/235U measurements can be used to monitor and perhaps quantify U(VI) reduction; biological reduction of U(VI) has been shown to produce a ~1.0‰ isotopic fractionation in both laboratory and field settings, with the reduced product enriched in 238U. However, adsorption of U(VI) onto minerals may complicate the use of 238U/235U in this application; adsorption of U(VI) onto Mn oxides induces an isotopic fractionation of 0.2‰ with the sorbed U(VI) depleted in 238U. At present, the isotopic shift produced by adsorption of U(VI) onto other minerals has not yet been explored. This study measures U isotopic fractionation during adsorption onto goethite, birnessite, quartz, illite, and complex aquifer materials. In addition, the effect of U speciation on fractionation is also examined by adsorption of uranyl (UO22+), uranyl carbonato (such as UO2(CO3)22- and UO2(CO3)34-), and calcium uranyl carbonato (Ca2UO2(CO3)3(aq) and CaUO2(CO3)32-) ions to goethite and birnessite. Experiments are carried out with a multi-stage, batch approach, in which a U(VI)-bearing solution is exposed to three stages of adsorption, and the final solution is analyzed by a double-spike MC-ICP-MS method. This increases our ability to resolve among sorbents the extent of fractionation. Early results suggest that uranium adsorption to different minerals produces different isotopic fractionations, with quartz producing little to no fractionation (<0 .05‰), while goethite produces a 0.16‰ isotopic shift (adsorbed U(VI) depleted in 238U).

  16. What are the health costs of uranium mining? A case study of miners in Grants, New Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Benjamin A

    2014-01-01

    Background: Uranium mining is associated with lung cancer and other health problems among miners. Health impacts are related with miner exposure to radon gas progeny. Objectives: This study estimates the health costs of excess lung cancer mortality among uranium miners in the largest uranium-producing district in the USA, centered in Grants, New Mexico. Methods: Lung cancer mortality rates on miners were used to estimate excess mortality and years of life lost (YLL) among the miner population in Grants from 1955 to 2005. A cost analysis was performed to estimate direct (medical) and indirect (premature mortality) health costs. Results: Total health costs ranged from $2.2 million to $7.7 million per excess death. This amounts to between $22.4 million and $165.8 million in annual health costs over the 1955–1990 mining period. Annual exposure-related lung cancer mortality was estimated at 2185.4 miners per 100 000, with a range of 1419.8–2974.3 per 100 000. Conclusions: Given renewed interest in uranium worldwide, results suggest a re-evaluation of radon exposure standards and inclusion of miner long-term health into mining planning decisions. PMID:25224806

  17. Structure of uranium sorption complexes on alumino-silicate minerals studied by x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, E.A.; Terminello, L.J.; Viani, B.E.

    1996-10-01

    The local geometry of uranium bound to mineral surfaces was investigated by uranium L{sub 3}-edge EXAFS. Uranium(6+) in solution was exposed to vermiculite and clinoptilolite, under conditions which favor sorption by either cation exchange or surface complexation. The aqueous speciation of uranium in each solution was predicted using the thermodynamic modeling code EQ3/6, and is dominated by complexes of the uranyl ion (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}). EXAFS of the resulting mineral samples indicates that in all cases the sorbed species is a monomeric uranyl complex. A larger distortion of the uranyl equatorial shell is observed for cation exchange, possibly due to steric effects at internal cation exchange sites. The uranyl U-O axial bond distance is greater for surface complexation than for ion exchange.

  18. Uranium in big sagebrush from western U.S. and evidence of possible mineralization in the Owyhee mountains of Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erdman, J.A.; Harrach, G.H.

    1981-01-01

    Two regional studies of big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata), a widely distributed and dominant shrub in the western United States, have shown its responsiveness to known uranium mineralization in the Monument Hill and Pumpkin Buttes districts of the southern Powder River Basin, Wyoming, and the Uravan mineral belt area in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado. Uranium concentrations in the ash of 154 stem-and-leaf samples of sagebrush are plotted on two maps, one representing the sampling design for the Powder River Basin study, and the other representing the sampling design for the Colorado Plateaus, the Basin and Range, and the Columbia Plateaus physiographic provinces of the West. Sites having high concentrations in sagebrush correspond not only to the above uranium districts, but also reveal an area along the northeast flanks of the Owyhee Mountains in Idaho that should be further explored for its possible uranium potential.

  19. Investigation on Microbial Dissolution of Uranium (VI) from Autunite Mineral - 13421

    SciTech Connect

    Sepulveda, Paola; Katsenovich, Yelena; Lagos, Leonel

    2013-07-01

    Precipitating autunite minerals by polyphosphate injection was identified as a feasible remediation strategy for sequestering uranium in contaminated groundwater and soil in situ at the Hanford Site. Autunite stability under vadose and saturated zone environmental conditions can help to determine the long-term effectiveness of this remediation strategy. The Arthrobacter bacteria are one of the most common groups in soils and are found in large numbers in Hanford soil as well as other subsurface environments contaminated with radionuclides. Ubiquitous in subsurface microbial communities, these bacteria can play a significant role in the dissolution of minerals and the formation of secondary minerals. The main objective of this investigation was to study the bacterial interactions under oxidizing conditions with uranium (VI); study the potential role of bicarbonate, which is an integral complexing ligand for U(VI) and a major ion in groundwater compositions; and present data from autunite dissolution experiments using Arthrobacter strain G968, a less U(VI)-tolerant strain. Sterile 100 mL glass mixed reactors served as the major bioreactor for initial experimentation. These autunite-containing bioreactors were injected with bacterial cells after the autunite equilibrated with the media solution amended with 0 mM, 3 mM 5 mM and 10 mM concentrations of bicarbonate. G968 Arthrobacter cells in the amount of 10{sup 6} cells/mL were injected into the reactors after 27 days, giving time for the autunite to reach steady state. Abiotic non-carbonate controls were kept without bacterial inoculation to provide a control for the biotic samples. Samples of the solution were analyzed for dissolved U(VI) by means of kinetic phosphorescence analyzer KPA-11 (Chemcheck Instruments, Richland, WA). Analysis showed that as [HCO{sub 3}{sup -}] increases, a diminishing trend on the effect of bacteria on autunite leaching is observed. Viability of cells was conducted after 24 hours of cell

  20. Exploration techniques for locating uranium-mineralized breccia pipes in northern Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Wenrich, K.J.

    1986-05-01

    Thousands of solution-collapse breccia pipes may crop out in the canyons and on the plateaus of northern Arizona, and more than 80 contain uranium or copper mineralized rock; however, their small size and limited rock outcrop make them difficult to locate. Recognition of the pipes on the plateaus is particularly important because mining access to the plateaus is far easier than to the canyons. Several reconnaissance geochemical methods have been tested to help locate suspected and mineralized breccia pipes. (1) A hydrogeochemical survey conducted on the 1500 mi/sup 2/ (4000 km/sup 2/) Hualapai Indian Reservation appears to yield anomalous values downstream from regions, such as Mohawk Canyon, where clusters of mineralized pipes occur. Pigeon Spring, east of the Pigeon mine, also had anomalous uranium (44 ppb). (2) A stream-sediment survey was not made on the Hualapai Reservation because the dilution factor that results from the large volume of country rock, compared to that of mineralized rock, swamps out any low-level geochemical signature contributed to streams by rock or soil overlying breccia pipes. Several types of detailed geochemical and geophysical surveys, made over individual collapse features located through examination of aerial photographs and later field mapping, have generally been successful at delineating collapse features from the surrounding host rock: (1) rock geochemistry commonly shows Ag, As, Ba, Cu, Pb, Se, and/or Zn enrichments of from 3 to 100 times background levels over mineralized breccia pipes; (2) soil surveys appear to have the greatest exploration potential of the geochemical methods (e.g., samples collected from the centers of several collapse features show consistently twice the background value for a number of elements);

  1. Mortality from cardiovascular diseases in the German uranium miners cohort study, 1946-1998.

    PubMed

    Kreuzer, M; Kreisheimer, M; Kandel, M; Schnelzer, M; Tschense, A; Grosche, B

    2006-09-01

    An increased risk of cardiovascular diseases after exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation has been suggested among the atomic bomb survivors. Few and inconclusive results on this issue are available from miner studies. A positive correlation between coronary heart disease mortality and radon exposure has been reported in the Newfoundland fluorspar miners study, yet low statistical power due to small sample size was of concern. To get further insight into this controversial issue, data from the German uranium miners cohort study were used, which is by far the largest miner study up to date. The cohort includes 59,001 male subjects who were employed for at least six months between 1946 and 1989 at the former Wismut uranium company in Eastern Germany. Exposure to radon, long-lived radionuclides and external gamma radiation was estimated by using a detailed job-exposure matrix. About 16,598 cohort members were deceased until 31 December 1998, including 5,417 deaths from cardiovascular diseases. Linear Poisson regression models were used to estimate the excess relative risk (ERR) per unit of cumulative radiation exposure after adjusting for attained age and calendar period. No trend in risk of circulatory diseases with increasing cumulative exposure to either radon [ERR per 100 working level month: 0.0006; 95% confidence limit (CI): -0.004 to 0.006], external gamma radiation (ERR per Sv: -0.26, 95% CI: -0.6 to 0.05) or long-lived radionuclides (ERR per 100 kBqh/m3: -0.2, 95% CI: -0.5 to 0.06), respectively, was observed. This was also true for the sub-group heart disease and stroke. Our findings do not support an association between cardiovascular disease mortality and exposure to radiation among miners, yet low doses and uncontrolled confounding hamper interpretation.

  2. Resource characterization for uranium mineralization in the Montrose 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ quadrangle, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Bolivar, S.L.; Balog, S.H.; Weaver, T.A.

    1981-01-01

    A data-classification scheme was developed to detect potential uranium mineralization in the Montrose 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ quadrangle, Colorado. The methodology developed is a rapid and efficient method of resource evaluation on a reconnaissance scale. The necessary techniques were developed and refined to digitize, integrate, and register various large geological, geochemical, and geophysical data sets for the Montrose quadrangle, Colorado, using a grid resolution of 1 km. All data sets for the Montrose quadrangle were registered to the Universal Transverse Mercator projection. The data sets include hydrogeochemical and stream sediment analyses for 23 elements, uranium-to-thorium ratios, airborne geophysical survey data, the locations of 90 uranium occurrences, and a geologic map (scale 1:250 000). Geochemical samples were collected from 3965 locations in the 19 200 km/sup 2/ quadrangle; aerial data were collected on flight lines flown with 3 to 5 km spacings. These data sets were smoothed by universal kriging and interpolated to a 179 x 119 rectangular grid (each grid block is 1 km/sup 2/). A mylar transparency of the geologic map was prepared and digitized. All possible combinations of three, for all data sets, were examined for general geologic correlations by utilizing a color microfilm output. Subsets of data were further examined for selected test areas. A classification scheme for uranium mineralization, based on selected test areas in the Cochetopa uranium district, is presented. Areas favorable for uranium mineralization, based on this scheme, were identified and are discussed.

  3. Predicted number of lung cancer cases in Germany among former uranium miners of the Wismut

    SciTech Connect

    Brueske-Hohlfeld, I.; Moehner, M.; Wichmann, H.E.

    1997-01-01

    Between 1946-1990, the Wismut-Company in the former German Democratic Republic was the leading producer of uranium for the Soviet union. After the German reunification, a central welfare system for uranium miners of the Wismut Zentrale Betreuung Wismut (ZeBWiS) was initiated by the Hauptverband der Berufsgenossenschaften in 1992, and a data base of exposed employees was established. In spring 1993, data regarding 95,000 exposed persons were available from Saxony, but none from Thuringia. A sample of 3,654 persons was drawn. For 3,128 of them the working history at the Wismut could be reconstructed. Having established the age distribution and taking into account mortality of other causes, the expected age-specific mortality rates of lung cancer were calculated. Statistical risk models were applied. Assuming that for Saxony about 156,000 workers were exposed in underground mining and/or uranium processing, a total (past and future) of about 7,000-25,000 excess lung cancer cases are estimated to be due to exposure to radon and its progeny. From 1995 onwards about 1,300-4,800 additional cases are predicted in the population of exposed former Wismut workers in Saxony. The peak incidence was reached between 1985-1991. No prognosis for Thuringia can be given so far.

  4. Lung cancer mortality among nonsmoking uranium miners exposed to radon daughters

    SciTech Connect

    Roscoe, R.J.; Steenland, K.; Halperin, W.E.; Beaumont, J.J.; Waxweiler, R.J.

    1989-08-04

    Radon daughters, both in the workplace and in the household, are a continuing cause for concern because of the well-documented association between exposure to radon daughters and lung cancer. To estimate the risk of lung cancer mortality among nonsmokers exposed to varying levels of radon daughters, 516 white men who never smoked cigarettes, pipes, or cigars were selected from the US Public Health Service cohort of Colorado Plateau uranium miners and followed up from 1950 through 1984. Age-specific mortality rates for nonsmokers from a study of US veterans were used for comparison. Fourteen deaths from lung cancer were observed among the nonsmoking miners, while 1.1 deaths were expected, yielding a standardized mortality ratio of 12.7 with 95% confidence limits of 8.0 and 20.1. These results confirm that exposure to radon daughters in the absence of cigarette smoking is a potent carcinogen that should be strictly controlled.

  5. U-Pb isotope systematics and age of uranium mineralization, Midnite mine, Washington.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ludwig, K. R.; Nash, J.T.; Naeser, C.W.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium ores at the Midnite mine, near Spokane, Washington, occur in phyllites and calcsilicates of the Proterozoic Togo Formation, near the margins of an anomalously uraniferous, porphyritic quartz monzonite of Late Cretaceous age. The present geometry of the ore zones is tabular, with the thickest zones above depressions in the pluton-country rock contact. Analyses of high-grade ores from the mine define a 207 Pb/ 204 Pb- 235 U/ 204 Pb isochron indicating an age of mineralization of 51.0 + or - 0.5 m.y. This age coincides with a time of regional volcanic activity (Sanpoil Volcanics), shallow intrusive activity, erosion, and faulting. U-Th-Pb isotopic ages of zircons from the porphyritic quartz monzonite in the mine indicate an age of about 75 m.y., hence the present orebodies were formed about 24 m.y. after its intrusion. The 51-m.y. time of mineralization probably represents a period of mobilization and redeposition of uranium by supergene ground waters, perhaps aided by mild heating and ground preparation and preserved by a capping of newly accumulated, impermeable volcanic rocks. It seems most likely that the initial concentration of uranium occurred about 75 m.y. ago, probably from relatively mild hydrothermal fluids in the contact-metamorphic aureole of the U-rich porphyritic quartz monzonite.Pitchblende, coffinitc, pyrite, marcasite, and hisingerite are the most common minerals in the uranium-bearing veinlets, with minor sphalerite and chalcopyrite. Coffinitc with associated marcasite is paragenetically later than pitchblende, though textural and isotopic evidence suggests no large difference in the times of pitchblende and colfinite formation.The U-Pb isotope systematics of total ores and of pitchblende-coffinite and pyrite-marcasite separates show that whereas open system behavior for U and Pb is essentially negligible for large (200-500 g) ore samples, Pb migration has occurred on a scale of 1 to 10 mm (out of pitchblende and coffinite and into pyrite

  6. Cancer incidence and mortality from exposure to radon progeny among Ontario uranium miners.

    PubMed

    Navaranjan, Garthika; Berriault, Colin; Do, Minh; Villeneuve, Paul J; Demers, Paul A

    2016-12-01

    The study objectives were to extend the follow-up of the Ontario uranium miners cohort, one of the largest cohorts of uranium miners with low cumulative exposures, to examine the relationship between radon exposure and lung cancer mortality and, for the first time incidence, and address gaps in the literature, including dose-response relationship between radon exposure and other cancer sites, and non-cancer mortality. The cohort of mine and mill workers was created using data from Canada's National Dose Registry and the Ontario Mining Master File. The follow-up for the cohort was recently extended for mortality (1954-2007) and for the first time includes cancer incidence (1969-2005). The Poisson regression was used to estimate relative risks (RR) and excess relative risks (ERR) and their 95% CIs with levels of cumulative radon exposure. The cohort consisted of 28 546 male miners with a mean cumulative radon exposure of 21.0 working level months (WLM). An increased risk of lung cancer and a dose-response relationship was observed with cumulative radon exposure. Miners exposed to >100 WLM demonstrated a twofold increase in the risk of lung cancer incidence (RR=1.89, CI 1.43 to 2.50) compared with the non-exposed group, and a linear ERR of 0.64/100 WLM (CI 0.43 to 0.85), with similar results observed for mortality. No association was observed for other cancer sites (stomach, leukaemia, kidney and extrathoracic airways) or non-cancer sites (cardiovascular diseases) with increasing cumulative exposure to radon. These findings suggest no increased risk of cancer sites other than lung or non-cancer mortality from relatively low cumulative exposure to radon. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  7. Meta-Autunite Solubility as Related to Uranium Minerals in Concrete Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Mattigod, Shas; Wellman, Dawn; Arey, Bruce; Glovack, Julie; Wood, Marcus

    2008-07-01

    Previous in situ examination of U(VI) spiked concrete indicated that uranyl-oxyhydroxide phases that were initially formed, later led to the formation of mixed uranyl-oxyhydroxide/ silicates, which subsequently transformed into uranyl-silicates, and finally altered into mixed uranyl-silicate/phosphate and uranyl-phosphate phases. We conducted solubility studies of the identified final uranyl-phosphate phase (calcium meta-autunite) in phosphate solutions ranging in concentration from 0.001 - 0.1 M as a function of pH. These studies indicated a secondary phosphate phase that formed during the solubility of meta-autunite regulated the uranium concentrations at relatively low levels under high pH conditions (>12) typically encountered in cement pore waters. The importance of uranyl-phosphate minerals in concrete waste forms has, to date, been neglected because of the minimal amount of phosphorus present in most concrete compositions. However, because concrete is a continuously reacting solid, the thermodynamic stability of uranyl minerals that form at the later stages of reaction may have a substantial impact on the long-term fate of uranium in the waste forms. This study suggests that any future investigations should consider the potential benefit of including phosphorus in concrete waste forms. (authors)

  8. Margaritasite: a new mineral of hydrothermal origin from the Pena Blanca uranium district, Mexico.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wenrich, K.J.; Modreski, P.J.; Zielinski, R.A.; Seeley, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    Margaritasite, (Cs,K,H3O)2(UO2)2V2O8.nH2O (where Cs > K, H3O and n approx 1), a 10.514, b 8.425, c 7.25 A, beta 106.01o, P21/a, Z = 2, is a newly recognized uranium ore mineral named for the Margaritas deposit, Pena Blanca uranium district, Chihuahua, Mexico, at which it was discovered. A Cs-rich analogue of carnotite, margaritasite is the natural equivalent of synthetic Cs-uranyl vanadate (A.M. 43- 799, 50-825). A fine-grained yellow mineral, it is most easily distinguished from carnotite by XRD; X-ray powder patterns (CuKalpha radiation) show that the (001) reflection of margaritasite lies at 12.7o (2theta ), while that of carnotite is found at 13.8o (2theta ). The shift of the (001) reflection in margaritasite reflects the structural changes caused when Cs occupies the sites filled by K in carnotite. Synthesis experiments indicate that margaritasite also differs from carnotite in a higher-T hydrothermal origin. Chemical analyses and XRD data for margaritasite and synthetic Cs- carnotite, and chemical analyses for rocks from Sierra Pena Blanca and vicinity, are tabulated.-J.A.Z.

  9. Meta-Autunite Solubility as Related to Uranium Minerals in Concrete Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Glovack, Julia N.; Arey, Bruce W.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2008-07-01

    Previous in situ examination of U(VI) spiked concrete indicated that uranyl-oxyhydroxide phases that were initially formed, later led to the formation of mixed uranyl-oxyhydroxide/silicates, which subsequently transformed into uranyl-silicates, and finally altered into mixed uranyl-silicate/phosphate and uranyl-phosphate phases. We conducted solubility studies of the identified final uranyl-phosphate phase (calcium meta-autunite) in phosphate solutions ranging in concentration from 0.001 – 0.1M as a function of pH. These studies indicated a secondary phosphate phase that formed during the solubility of meta-autunite regulated the uranium concentrations at relatively low levels under high pH conditions (>12) typically encountered in cement pore waters. The importance of uranyl-phosphate minerals in concrete waste forms has, to date, been neglected because of the minimal amount of phosphorus present in most concrete compositions. However, because concrete is a continuously reacting solid, the thermodynamic stability of uranyl minerals that form at the later stages of reaction may have a substantial impact on the long-term fate of uranium in the waste forms. This study suggests that any future investigations should consider the potential benefit of including phosphorus in concrete waste forms.

  10. Ianthinite: A rare hydrous uranium oxide mineral from Akkavaram, Andhra Pradesh, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Yamuna; Viswanathan, R.; Parashar, K. K.; Srivastava, S. K.; Ramesh Babu, P. V.; Parihar, P. S.

    2014-02-01

    Ianthinite is the only known uranyl oxide hydrate mineral that contains both U6 + and U4 + . For the first time, we report ianthinite from India (at Akkavaram, Andhra Pradesh), which is hosted in basement granitoids. The mineral occurs in the form of tiny grains, encrustations and coatings in intimate association with uraninite and uranophane. X-ray diffraction (XRD) data reveals that d-spacings of the investigated ianthinite are in close agreement with the corresponding values given for ianthinite standard in International Centre for Diffraction Data (ICDD) card no. 12-272. The crystallographic parameters of the studied ianthinite are: ao = 11.3 (1) Å, bo = 7.19 (3) Å and co = 30.46 (8) Å, with a unit cell volume of 2474 (27) Å3. The association of investigated ianthinite with uraninite suggests that the former has formed due to oxidation of the latter. Since a major part of the uraninite was exposed to oxidizing meteoric water, much of it has been transformed into hydrous uranium oxide (ianthinite) and very little part remained unaltered as uranium oxide (uraninite). Absence of schoepite in the investigated ianthinite suggests that after its formation it (ianthinite) was not exposed to oxygen/oxidizing meteoric water. As the oxidation was partial and short lived, some amount of primary uraninite is also preserved.

  11. Radioactive mineral spring precipitates, their analytical and statistical data and the uranium connection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cadigan, R.A.; Felmlee, J.K.

    1982-01-01

    Major radioactive mineral springs are probably related to deep zones of active metamorphism in areas of orogenic tectonism. The most common precipitate is travertine, a chemically precipitated rock composed chiefly of calcium carbonate, but also containing other minerals. The mineral springs are surface manifestations of hydrothermal conduit systems which extend downward many kilometers to hot source rocks. Conduits are kept open by fluid pressure exerted by carbon dioxide-charged waters rising to the surface propelled by heat and gas (CO2 and steam) pressure. On reaching the surface, the dissolved carbon dioxide is released from solution, and calcium carbonate is precipitated. Springs also contain sulfur species (for example, H2S and HS-), and radon, helium and methane as entrained or dissolved gases. The HS- ion can react to form hydrogen sulfide gas, sulfate salts, and native sulfur. Chemical salts and native sulfur precipitate at the surface. The sulfur may partly oxidize to produce detectable sulfur dioxide gas. Radioactivity is due to the presence of radium-226, radon-222, radium-228, and radon-220, and other daughter products of uranium-238 and thorium-232. Uranium and thorium are not present in economically significant amounts in most radioactive spring precipitates. Most radium is coprecipitated at the surface with barite. Barite (barium sulfate) forms in the barium-containing spring water as a product of the oxidation of sulfur species to sulfate ions. The relatively insoluble barium sulfate precipitates and removes much of the radium from solution. Radium coprecipitates to a lesser extent with manganese-barium- and iron-oxy hydroxides. R-mode factor analysis of abundances of elements suggests that 65 percent of the variance of the different elements is affected by seven factors interpreted as follows: (1) Silica and silicate contamination and precipitation; (2) Carbonate travertine precipitation; (3) Radium coprecipitation; (4) Evaporite precipitation

  12. Healthy Worker Survivor Bias in the Colorado Plateau Uranium Miners Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Keil, Alexander P.; Richardson, David B.; Troester, Melissa A.

    2015-01-01

    Cohort mortality studies of underground miners have been used to estimate the number of lung cancer deaths attributable to radon exposure. However, previous studies of the radon–lung cancer association among underground miners may have been subject to healthy worker survivor bias, a type of time-varying confounding by employment status. We examined radon-mortality associations in a study of 4,124 male uranium miners from the Colorado Plateau who were followed from 1950 through 2005. We estimated the time ratio (relative change in median survival time) per 100 working level months (radon exposure averaging 130,000 mega-electron volts of potential α energy per liter of air, per working month) using G-estimation of structural nested models. After controlling for healthy worker survivor bias, the time ratio for lung cancer per 100 working level months was 1.168 (95% confidence interval: 1.152, 1.174). In an unadjusted model, the estimate was 1.102 (95% confidence interval: 1.099, 1.112)—39% lower. Controlling for this bias, we estimated that among 617 lung cancer deaths, 6,071 person-years of life were lost due to occupational radon exposure during follow-up. Our analysis suggests that healthy worker survivor bias in miner cohort studies can be substantial, warranting reexamination of current estimates of radon's estimated impact on lung cancer mortality. PMID:25837305

  13. Alteration of uranium minerals in the Koongarra deposit, Australia: Unweathered zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, Hiroshi; Murakami, Takashi; Ewing, Rodney C.

    1992-08-01

    The alteration behavior of natural uranium minerals may be used as a natural analogue for the long-term behavior of actinide-bearing ceramic waste forms. Specifically, uraninite (UO 2+ x) has been used as a natural analogue in the study of the processes and alteration products that are important in the corrosion of the UO 2 in spent nuclear fuel. Uranium minerals from the Koongarra deposit, Northern Territory of Australia, were examined in order to understand the alteration processes of the primary ore body in the unweathered zone, which extends at depths greater than 20 m from the surface. The primary mineral is uraninite with less than 2 wt% of CaO and 10 wt% of PbO. Uraninite has been altered to uranyl-lead oxides and uranyl silicates by the ground water which contains Si (10 mg/1), Mg (25 mg/l) and PO 4 (100 μg/l) at the present time. Uraninite reacted to form sklodowskite, a uranyl-Mg silicate (MgSi 2U 2O 11 · 7H 2O). Lead in uraninite is not released to form kasolite, a uranyl-Pb silicate (PbSiUO 6 · 2H 2O), but was enriched in residual phases such as curite (Pb 3U 8O 27 · 5H 2O) and wo¨lsendorfite (PbU 2O 7 · 2H 2O). Primary uraninite contains Ca, but Ca has an apparently high mobility and was not retained in the U-Pb oxides or uranyl silicates. Kasolite is observed with Pb-free sklodowskite in the uranyl silicates region formed by the alteration of uraninite and U-Pb oxides. Kasolite crystals are euhedral and acicular. This suggests that radiogenic Pb, produced in sklodowskite, was released to form kasolite. Redistribution of Pb in uranyl silicates may take place continuously in the uranyl silicates region of the deposit.

  14. Characterization of uranium surfaces machined with aqueous propylene glycol-borax or perchloroethylene-mineral oil coolants

    SciTech Connect

    Cristy, S.S.; Bennett, R.K. Jr.; Dillon, J.J.; Richards, H.L.; Seals, R.D.; Byrd, V.R.

    1986-12-31

    The use of perchloroethylene (perc) as an ingredient in coolants for machining enriched uranium at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has been discontinued because of environmental concerns. A new coolant was substituted in December 1985, which consists of an aqueous solution of propylene glycol with borax (sodium tetraborate) added as a nuclear poison and with a nitrite added as a corrosion inhibitor. Uranium surfaces machined using the two coolants were compared with respects to residual contamination, corrosion or corrosion potential, and with the aqueous propylene glycol-borax coolant was found to be better than that of enriched uranium machined with the perc-mineral oil coolant. The boron residues on the final-finished parts machined with the borax-containing coolant were not sufficient to cause problems in further processing. All evidence indicated that the enriched uranium surfaces machined with the borax-containing coolant will be as satisfactory as those machined with the perc coolant.

  15. Detection of Bronchial Neoplasia in Uranium Miners by Autofluorescence Endoscopy (SAFE-1000)

    PubMed Central

    Horvathova, M.; Salajka, F.; Habanec, B.; Foretova, L.; Kana, J.; Koukalova, H.; Pafko, P.; Wurst, F.; Novotna, E.; Pecina, J.; Vagunda, V.; Vrbacky, R.; Talac, R.; Coupková, H.; Pacovsky, Z.

    1999-01-01

    The increase in the detection rate for premalignant changes of bronchial epithelium was studied in 56 symptom-free volunteers from the risk group of Czech uranium miners (mean age 50.69 years, mean WLM 21.06 (1 Working Level Month is equal to the absorption of latent energy of 2.08 × 10–5 J/m3 in one month, i.e. 170 working hours)) by the additional employment of the System of Autofluorescence Endoscopy (SAFE-1000 Pentax) to conventional white-light bronchoscopy, comparing results with those of bronchial biopsy histopathology examination. Histopathology using hematoxylin and eosin staining confirmed intraepithelial neoplasias in 15 areas in 10 persons. White-light bronchoscopy sensitivity was 21.05%, and specificity 93.7% which an autofluorescence bronchoscopy sensitivity was 78.95% and specificity 81.89%. PMID:18493487

  16. Uranium-Bearing Evaporite Mineralization Influencing Plume Persistence. Literature Review and DOE-LM Site Surveys

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2016-05-01

    This report on evaporite mineralization was completed as an Ancillary Work Plan for the Applied Studies and Technology program under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM). This study reviews all LM sites under Title I and Title II of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) and one Decontamination and Decommissioning site to provide (1) a summary of which sites have evaporite deposits, (2) any available quantitative geochemical and mineralogical analyses, and (3) references to relevant reports. In this study, “evaporite” refers to any secondary mineral precipitate that occurs due to a loss of water through evaporative processes. This includes efflorescent salt crusts, where this term refers to a migration of dissolved constituents to the surface with a resulting salt crust, where “salt” can refer to any secondary precipitate, regardless of constituents. The potential for the formation of evaporites at LM sites has been identified, and may have relevance to plume persistence issues. Evaporite deposits have the potential to concentrate and store contaminants at LM sites that could later be re-released. These deposits can also provide a temporary storage mechanism for carbonate, chloride, and sulfate salts along with uranium and other contaminants of concern (COCs). Identification of sites with evaporites will be used in a new technical task plan (TTP), Persistent Secondary Contaminant Sources (PeSCS), for any proposed additional sampling and analyses. This additional study is currently under development and will focus on determining if the dissolution of evaporites has the potential to hinder natural flushing strategies and impact plume persistence. This report provides an initial literature review on evaporites followed by details for each site with identified evaporites. The final summary includes a table listing of all relevant LM sites regardless of evaporite identification.

  17. Mortality from Circulatory System Diseases among French Uranium Miners: A Nested Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Drubay, Damien; Caër-Lorho, Sylvaine; Laroche, Pierre; Laurier, Dominique; Rage, Estelle

    2015-05-01

    A significant association has been observed between radon exposure and cerebrovascular disease (CeVD) mortality among French uranium miners, but risk factors for circulatory system diseases (CSD) have not been previously considered. We conducted new analyses in the recently updated (through 2007) French cohort of uranium miners (n = 5,086), which included 442 deaths from CSD, 167 of them from ischemic heart disease (IHD) and 105 from CeVD. A nested case-control study was then set up to collect and investigate the influence of these risk factors on the relationships between mortality from CSD and occupational external gamma ray and internal ionizing radiation exposure (radon and long-lived radionuclides) in this updated cohort. The nested case-control study included miners first employed after 1955, still employed in 1976 and followed up through 2007. Individual information about CSD risk factors was collected from medical files for the 76 deaths from CSD (including 26 from IHD and 16 from CeVD) and 237 miners who had not died of CSD by the end of follow-up. The exposure-risk relationships were assessed with a Cox proportional hazard model weighted by the inverse sampling probability. A significant increase in all CSD and CeVD mortality risks associated with radon exposure was observed in the total cohort [hazard ratios: HRCSD/100 working level months (WLM) = 1.11, 95% confidence interval (1.01; 1.22) and HRCeVD/100 WLM = 1.25 (1.09; 1.43), respectively]. A nonsignificant exposure-risk relationship was observed for every type of cumulative ionizing radiation exposure and every end point [e.g., HRCSD/100WLM = 1.43 (0.71; 2.87)]. The adjustment for each CSD risk factor did not substantially change the exposure-risk relationships. When the model was adjusted for overweight, hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia and smoking status, the HR/100WLM for CSD, for example, was equal to 1.21 (0.54; 2.75); and when it was adjusted for risk factors selected with the

  18. Remote sensing applied to the exploration for uranium-mineralized breccia pipes in northwestern Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Kwarteng, A.M.Y.

    1988-01-01

    Exploration for uranium-mineralized breccia pipes in northwestern Arizona has been active because of the high-grade ore they contain, which may also include such by-products as Ag, Au, Cu, Pb, Zn, and V. These breccia pipes were formed from the collapse of the overlying sedimentary strata into karst caverns developed in the Mississippian Redwall Limestone; mineralization occurred between 200 and 220 m.y. ago as determined previously by U-Pb isotopic analyses. Spectroscopic and statistical analyses of field, laboratory, and digital Landsat Thermatic Mapper (TM) data were carried out to determine the fundamental spectral and mineralogical differences between samples on the surface of breccia pipes and their background areas. Spectroscopic and XRD mineralogical studies clearly demonstrate that hydrothermally altered rocks associated with mineralized breccia pipes are distinguished from the surrounding rocks by the Fe{sup 3+}, hydroxyl, and carbonate minerals content. Discriminant analyses of field, laboratory, and TM data indicates that 64-80% of the samples collected on the surfaces of breccia pipes and their immediately surrounding areas were correctly classified. Digitally enhanced TM images printed at the scale of 1:100,000 resulted in the recognition of more than 80% of previously known orebodies as well as additional anomalies identified in the study areas. Digital image processing techniques were applied to airborne geophysical data consisting of apparent resistivity, total-field magnetics, derived overburden thickness, and very low-frequency electromagnetics (VLF-EM) to evaluate the utility of the data sets for breccia pipe exploration. The processing and critical analysis of the geophysical data is apparently the most promising approach to breccia pipe exploration in this study.

  19. Healthy worker survivor bias in the Colorado Plateau uranium miners cohort.

    PubMed

    Keil, Alexander P; Richardson, David B; Troester, Melissa A

    2015-05-15

    Cohort mortality studies of underground miners have been used to estimate the number of lung cancer deaths attributable to radon exposure. However, previous studies of the radon-lung cancer association among underground miners may have been subject to healthy worker survivor bias, a type of time-varying confounding by employment status. We examined radon-mortality associations in a study of 4,124 male uranium miners from the Colorado Plateau who were followed from 1950 through 2005. We estimated the time ratio (relative change in median survival time) per 100 working level months (radon exposure averaging 130,000 mega-electron volts of potential α energy per liter of air, per working month) using G-estimation of structural nested models. After controlling for healthy worker survivor bias, the time ratio for lung cancer per 100 working level months was 1.168 (95% confidence interval: 1.152, 1.174). In an unadjusted model, the estimate was 1.102 (95% confidence interval: 1.099, 1.112)-39% lower. Controlling for this bias, we estimated that among 617 lung cancer deaths, 6,071 person-years of life were lost due to occupational radon exposure during follow-up. Our analysis suggests that healthy worker survivor bias in miner cohort studies can be substantial, warranting reexamination of current estimates of radon's estimated impact on lung cancer mortality. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Mortality in uranium miners in west Bohemia: a long-term cohort study.

    PubMed

    Tomásek, L; Swerdlow, A J; Darby, S C; Placek, V; Kunz, E

    1994-05-01

    A cohort of 4320 uranium miners in West Bohemia who started work at the mines during 1948 to 1959 and worked there for at least four years were followed up to the end of 1990 to determine cause specific mortality risks in relation to exposures in the mines. The miners had experienced high radon exposures, on average 219 working level months during their uranium mining careers, for which detailed measurements were available. They had also been exposed to high arsenic levels in one of the two major mines, and to dust. New follow up methods, not previously used for occupational cohorts in Czechoslovakia, were utilised. By the end of follow up 2415 (56%) of the cohort were known to have died. Overall mortality was significantly raised compared with that in the general population (relative risk (RR) = 1.56, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.50-1.63), with significantly raised risks of lung cancer (RR = 5.08, 95% CI 4.71-5.47), accidents (RR = 1.59, 95% CI 1.34-1.87), homicide (RR = 5.57, 95% CI 2.66-10.21), mental disorders (RR = 5.18, 95% CI 2.83-8.70), cirrhosis (RR = 1.51, 95% CI 1.16-1.94), and non-rheumatic circulatory diseases (RR = 1.16, 95% CI 1.08-1.25). The relative risk of lung cancer was greatest four to 14 years after entry to the mines. Relative risks for homicide and accidents were raised up to 25 years from entry but not after this. Substantial significantly raised risks at 15 to 24 years after entry occurred for cirrhosis, non-rheumatic circulatory diseases,a nd pneumonia and other respiratory infections. Sizeable significantly raised risks at 25 and more years after entry, but not earlier, were present for mental disorders, tuberculosis, and non-malignant non-infectious respiratory conditions. No specific causes showed risks significantly related to age at entry to mining. Risk of lung cancer was significantly positively related to radon exposure, estimated arsenic exposure, and duration of work in the mines, but no other cause was significantly

  1. Risk of lung cancer from radon exposure: contribution of recently published studies of uranium miners.

    PubMed

    Tirmarche, M; Harrison, J; Laurier, D; Blanchardon, E; Paquet, F; Marsh, J

    2012-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recently estimated the risk of lung cancer associated with radon exposure, and a statement was issued in ICRP Publication 115. This was based on recent epidemiological studies and the results from a joint analysis of cohorts of Czech, French, and German uranium miners, and indicated that the excess relative risk of lung cancer per unit of exposure should be expressed with consideration of chronic exposure over more than 10 years, by modelling time since median exposure, age attained or age at exposure, and taking in account, if possible, interaction between radon and tobacco. The lifetime excess absolute risk (LEAR) calculated from occupational exposure studies is close to 5 × 10(-4) per working level month (WLM) (14 × 10(-5) per hmJ/m(3)). LEAR values estimated using risk models derived from both miners and domestic exposure studies are in good agreement after accounting for factors such as sex, attained age, and exposure scenario. A sensitivity analysis highlighted the high dependence of background mortality rates on LEAR estimates. Using lung cancer rates among Euro-American males instead of the ICRP reference rates (males and females, and Euro-American and Asian populations), the estimated LEAR is close to 7 × 10(-4) per WLM (20 × 10(-5) per hm J/m(3)). Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Age of uranium mineralization at the Jabiluka and Ranger deposits, Northern Territory, Australia: New U- Pb isotope evidence.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ludwig, K. R.; Grauch, R.I.; Nutt, C.J.; Nash, J.T.; Frishman, D.; Simmons, K.R.

    1987-01-01

    The Ranger and Jabiluka uranium deposits are the largest in the Alligator Rivers uranium field, which contains at least 20% of the world's low-cost uranium reserves. Ore occurs in early Proterozoic metasediments, below an unconformity with sandstones of the 1.65 b.y.-old Kombolgie Formation. This study has used U-Pb isotope data from a large number of whole-rock drill core samples with a variety of mineral assemblages and textures. Both Ranger and Jabiluka reflect a common, profound isotopic disturbance at about 400 to 600 m.y. This disturbance, which was especially pronounced at Jabiluka, may correspond to the development of basins and associated basalt flows to the W and SW.-from Authors

  3. Clinical measures, smoking, radon exposure, and risk of lung cancer in uranium miners.

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, M M

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Exposure to the radioactive daughters of radon is associated with increased risk of lung cancer in mining populations. An investigation of incidence of lung cancer following a clinical survey of Ontario uranium miners was undertaken to explore whether risk associated with radon is modified by factors including smoking, radiographic silicosis, clinical symptoms, the results of lung function testing, and the temporal pattern of radon exposure. METHODS: Miners were examined in 1974 by a respiratory questionnaire, tests of lung function, and chest radiography. A random selection of 733 (75%) of the original 973 participants was followed up by linkage to the Ontario Mortality and Cancer Registries. RESULTS: Incidence of lung cancer was increased threefold. Risk of lung cancer among miners who had stopped smoking was half that of men who continued to smoke. There was no interaction between smoking and radon exposure. Men with lung function test results consistent with airways obstruction had an increased risk of lung cancer, even after adjustment for cigarette smoking. There was no association between radiographic silicosis and risk of lung cancer. Lung cancer was associated with exposures to radon daughters accumulated in a time window four to 14 years before diagnosis, but there was little association with exposures incurred earlier than 14 years before diagnosis. Among the men diagnosed with lung cancer, the mean and median dose rates were 2.6 working level months (WLM) a year and 1.8 WLM/year in the four to 14 year exposure window. CONCLUSIONS: Risk of lung cancer associated with radon is modified by dose and time from exposure. Risk can be substantially decreased by stopping smoking. PMID:8943835

  4. Mortality of a cohort of French uranium miners exposed to relatively low radon concentrations.

    PubMed Central

    Tirmarche, M.; Raphalen, A.; Allin, F.; Chameaud, J.; Bredon, P.

    1993-01-01

    A cohort mortality study has been performed on French uranium miners having experienced more than 2 years of underground mining, with first radon exposure between 1946 and 1972. Vital status has been ascertained from the date of entry to the 31 December 1985 for 99% of the members of this cohort; causes of death are identified for 95.5% of the decedents. The different causes of death are compared to the age specific national death rates by indirect standardisation and expressed by standardised mortality ratios (SMR). A statistically significant excess has been observed for lung and laryngeal cancer deaths. The Poisson trend test shows a statistically significant trend for the risk of lung cancer death as a function of cumulative radon exposure, assuming a lag time of 5 years; for laryngeal cancer no significant trend has been observed. Poisson regression modelling has been applied to the following exposure groups: < 10 WLM (Working Level Month); 10-49 WLM; 50-149 WLM; 150-299 WLM; > or = 300 WLM; it indicates an increase in the SMR for lung cancer of 0.6% per WLM (standard error: 0.4%) with an estimated intercept at 0 WLM of 1.68 (standard error: 0.4). The distinction of two working periods, differing by their annual radon concentration (before/since 1956) does not modify this exposure-response relationship. This coefficient of risk per unit of exposure is lower than in most of the other uranium miners' studies but it lies in the range of the evaluation of the ICRP 50 committee and the 'BEIR IV' report of the U.S. National Academy of Science. It is observed in a cohort having experienced low cumulative exposure to radon (mean: 70 WLM) spread over a mean duration of 14.5 years. Even though occupational exposure in mines differs in several particulars from domestic exposure, this study presents characteristics of low annual exposure comparable to radon gas concentrations in houses of 500-1000 Bq.m-3, and will contribute to the evaluation of cancer risk for the public

  5. The chemical evolution and paragenesis of uranium minerals from the ruggles and palermo granitic pegmatites, New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Korzeb, S.L.; Foord, E.E.; Lichte, F.E.

    1997-01-01

    A study of the chemical evolution and paragenesis of the uranium minerals at the Palermo No. 1 and Ruggles granitic pegmatites, Grafton County, New Hampshire, revealed four stages of secondary mineralization. A total of eight uranium minerals were identified in the four stages. The first stage is a mixture of uranyl oxide hydroxide-hydrates represented by mineral "A", which surrounds and replaces a uraninite core. The second stage is a carbonate stage found only at the Palermo No. 1 pegmatite, and is represented by rutherfordine. The third stage is represented by uranyl silicates. At the Palermo No. 1 pegmatite, this stage consists of ??-uranophane, and at the Ruggles pegmatite, it consists of soddyite and ??-uranophane. A final fourth stage is a phosphate stage represented by phosphuranylite and meta-autunite I. The first three stages of mineralization developed from hydrothermal and meteoric processes. With dropping temperatures, hydrothermal fluids reached meteoric temperatures and acquired the characteristics of meteoric water. The pH shifted from acidic (pH less than about 6 at 100??C) to alkaline (pH > 7 at 25??C). Since mineral "A" contains hydroxyl and a low amount of molecular water, it probably formed at a temperature greater than 100??C in the acidic environment. After the first stage, the hydrothermal fluids likely reached the temperatures of meteoric water. The initial pH of the meteoric water was acidic (pH less than about 6 at 25??C) and then slowly shifted to alkaline. The mineralizing fluids became oversaturated in CO3, Ca, K, and Si. Uraninite and mineral "A" became unstable and were replaced by rutherfordine and uranyl silicates. The fourth or phosphate stage developed from the introduction of groundwater. The uranyl phosphate minerals precipitated from an acidic fluid (pH < 7 at 25??C) that was oversaturated with Ca, K, U, and P.

  6. Radiation dose dependent risk of liver cancer mortality in the German uranium miners cohort 1946-2003.

    PubMed

    Dufey, F; Walsh, L; Sogl, M; Tschense, A; Schnelzer, M; Kreuzer, M

    2013-03-01

    An increased risk of mortality from primary liver cancers among uranium miners has been observed in various studies. An analysis of the data from a German uranium miner cohort (the 'Wismut cohort') was used to assess the relationship with ionising radiation. To that end the absorbed organ dose due to high and low linear energy transfer radiation was calculated for 58 987 miners with complete information on radiation exposure from a detailed job-exposure matrix. 159 deaths from liver cancer were observed in the follow-up period from 1946 to 2003. Relative risk models with either linear or categorical dependence on high and low linear energy transfer radiation liver doses were fitted by Poisson regression, stratified on age and calendar year. The linear trend of excess relative risk in a model with both low and high linear transfer radiation is -0.8 (95% confidence interval (CI): -3.7, 2.1) Gy(-1) and 48.3 (95% CI: -32.0, 128.6) Gy(-1) for low and high linear energy transfer radiation, respectively, and thus not statistically significant for either dose. The increase of excess relative risk with equivalent liver dose is 0.57 (95% CI: -0.69, 1.82) Sv(-1). Adjustment for arsenic only had a negligible effect on the radiation risk. In conclusion, there is only weak evidence for an increase of liver cancer mortality with increasing radiation dose in the German uranium miners cohort considered. However, both a lack of statistical power and potential misclassification of primary liver cancer are issues.

  7. Annotated bibliography of environmentally relevant investigations of uranium mining and milling in the Grants Mineral Belt, northwestern New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Otton, James K.

    2011-01-01

    Studies of the natural environment in the Grants Mineral Belt in northwestern New Mexico have been conducted since the 1930s; however, few such investigations predate uranium mining and milling operations, which began in the early 1950s. This report provides an annotated bibliography of reports that describe the hydrology and geochemistry of groundwaters and surface waters and the geochemistry of soils and sediments in the Grants Mineral Belt and contiguous areas. The reports referenced and discussed provide a large volume of information about the environmental conditions in the area after mining started. Data presented in many of these studies, if evaluated carefully, may provide much basic information about the baseline conditions that existed over large parts of the Grants Mineral Belt prior to mining. Other data may provide information that can direct new work in efforts to discriminate between baseline conditions and the effects of the mining and milling on the natural environment.

  8. Assessment of the total effective dose of miners in the underground Rožná Uranium Mine in the Czech Republic during the period 2004-2009.

    PubMed

    Sabol, J; Jurda, M; Gregor, Z; Navrátil, L

    2011-03-01

    The paper discusses the situation in the Czech Republic regarding past and present uranium mining activities with emphasis on the evaluation of the exposure of underground miners in the Rožná Uranium Mine, which is currently the only active mine in the country and practically in the entire European Union. The total effective dose has been summarised taking into account all three major components, namely radon short-lived decay products, long-lived alpha emitters in ore dust and penetrating external gamma radiation. The average and maximum values of the effective dose as well as the collective effective dose of underground miners are also presented. The purpose of the paper is to document the miners' exposures during a period of 6 years in a uranium mine where conditions including the ore grade and methods of mining showed recently some changes that may affect the individual components of the total effective dose.

  9. Uranium and thorium behavior in groundwater of the natural spa area “Choygan mineral water” (East Tuva)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopylova, Y.; Guseva, N.; Shestakova, A.; Khvaschevskaya, A.; Arakchaa, K.

    2015-11-01

    The natural spa area “Choygan mineral waters”, a unique deposit of natural carbon dioxide mineral waters in Siberia, is located in the Eastern Sayan Mountains. There are 33 spring discharges in this area. Spring waters are mainly of HCO3-Na-Ca type. TDS varies from 300 mg/L to 2600 mg/L, the temperature ranges from 7 °C (in spring 33) to 39 °C (in spring 12), pH varies from 5.9 to 8.3, and the value of the oxidation-reduction potential is from -170 mV to 236 mV. All studied waters were divided into two groups according to their temperature and geochemical conditions: cold fresh water in oxidizing environment and warm slightly brackish water in reducing environment. The uranium concentration varies from 0.7 to 14 μg/l and the thorium concentration varies from 0.001 to 0.33 μg/l in the studied waters. The predominant uranium complexes are (UO2(CO3)3)4-, (UO2(CO3)2)2-, UO2CO3, (UO2(PO4)2)4- in the waters in oxidizing and reducing environments. It was found that acid-alkaline and oxidizing-reducing conditions were the determining factors for uranium behavior and speciation in the studied waters. The pH conditions are determining factors for thorium behavior and speciation in the studied waters. In slightly acidic water the predominant thorium species is negatively charge complex (ThCO3(OH)3)- (more than 95%).

  10. Potential precious and strategic metals as by-products of uranium mineralized breccia pipes in northern Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Wenrich, K.J.; Silberman, M.L.

    1984-07-01

    The development of caves within the Mississippian Redwall Limestone, accompanied by later upward stoping of overlying Paleozoic and Triassic rock, resulted in the formation of breccia pipes. Despite the depressed uranium market, some of these pipes are presently being mined for uranium. No brecciated rock within pipes has been observed above its normal stratigraphic position, nor is any volcanic rock associated in space or time with these pipes. Mineralized rock transects any strata from the Redwall Limestone to the Triassic Chinle Formation. Over 400 collapse structures, believed to represent breccia pipes (many with exposed breccia), have been mapped. Those with gamma radiation exceeding 2.5 times background (57 pipes) have been sampled (155 samples). Of these oxidized surface samples collected solely on the basis of radioactivity, 30% have Ag exceeding 10 ppm, some with up to 1150 ppm. Two samples of brecciated, oxidized sandstone with radioactivity exceeding 20 and 40 times background from this adit, and another sample of hematite-, malachite-, and chalcocite-impregnated sandstone from a higher level adit contained high concentrations of Au, Hg, Cd, and W, along with many elements commonly anomalous in mineralized breccia pipes from northern Arizona: Ag, As, Co, Cu, Mo, Ni, and Pb. The potential for economic recovery from breccia pipes of elements other than U, such as Ag, Au, Co, and Ni, should not be ignored as their concentrations are even more enhanced in unoxidized samples.

  11. Influence of mineral colloids and humic substances on uranium(VI) transport in water-saturated geologic porous media.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Cheng, Tao; Wu, Yang

    2014-12-01

    Mineral colloids and humic substances often co-exist in subsurface environment and substantially influence uranium (U) transport. However, the combined effects of mineral colloids and humic substances on U transport are not clear. This study is aimed at quantifying U transport and elucidating geochemical processes that control U transport when both mineral colloids and humic acid (HA) are present. U-spiked solutions/suspensions were injected into water-saturated sand columns, and U and colloid concentrations in column effluent were monitored. We found that HA promoted U transport via (i) formation of aqueous U-HA complexes, and (ii) competition against aqueous U for surface sites on transport media. Illite colloids had no influence on U transport at pH5 in the absence of HA due to low mobility of the colloids. At pH9, U desorbed from mobile illite and the presence of illite decreased U transport. At pH5, high U transport occurred when both illite colloids and HA were present, which was attributed to enhanced U adsorption to illite colloids via formation of ternary illite-HA-U surface complexes, and enhanced illite transport due to HA attachment to illite and transport media. This study demonstrates that the combined effects of mineral colloids and HA on contaminant transport is different from simple addition of the individual effect. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Risk of lung cancer mortality in relation to lung doses among French uranium miners: follow-up 1956-1999.

    PubMed

    Rage, Estelle; Vacquier, Blandine; Blanchardon, Eric; Allodji, Rodrigue S; Marsh, James W; Caër-Lorho, Sylvaine; Acker, Alain; Laurier, Dominique

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the risk of lung cancer death associated with cumulative lung doses from exposure to α-particle emitters, including radon gas, radon short-lived progeny, and long-lived radionuclides, and to external γ rays among French uranium miners. The French "post-55" sub-cohort included 3,377 uranium miners hired from 1956, followed up through the end of 1999, and contributing to 89,405 person-years. Lung doses were calculated with the ICRP Human Respiratory Tract Model (Publication 66) for 3,271 exposed miners. The mean "absorbed lung dose" due to α-particle radiation was 78 mGy, and that due to the contribution from other types of radiation (γ and β-particle radiation) was 56 mGy. Radon short-lived progeny accounted for 97% of the α-particle absorbed dose. Out of the 627 deaths, the cause of death was identified for 97.4%, and 66 cases were due to lung cancer. A significant excess relative risk (ERR) of lung cancer death was associated with the total absorbed lung dose (ERR/Gy = 2.94, 95% CI 0.80, 7.53) and the α-particle absorbed dose (4.48, 95% CI 1.27, 10.89). Assuming a value of 20 for the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of α particles for lung cancer induction, the ERR/Gy-Eq for the total weighted lung dose was 0.22 (95% CI: 0.06, 0.53).

  13. Comparison of abundances of chemical elements in mineralized and unmineralized sandstone of the Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation, Smith Lake District, Grants uranium region, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierson, C.T.; Spirakis, C.S.; Robertson, J.F.

    1983-01-01

    Statistical treatment of analytical data from the Mariano Lake and Ruby uranium deposits in the Smith Lake district, New Mexico, indicates that organic carbon, arsenic, barium, calcium, cobalt, copper, gallium, iron, lead, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, strontium, sulfur, vanadium, yttrium, and zirconium are concentrated along with uranium in primary ore. Comparison of the Smith Lake data with information from other primary deposits in the Grants uranium region and elsewhere in the Morrison Formation of the Colorado Plateau suggests that these elements, with the possible exceptions of zirconium and gallium and with the probable addition of aluminum and magnesium, are typically associated with primary, tabular uranium deposits. Chemical differences between the Ruby and Mariano Lake deposits are consistent with the interpretation that the Ruby deposit has been more affected by post-mineralization oxidizing solutions than has the Mariano Lake deposit.

  14. Localization of uranium minerals in channel sediments at the base of the Shinarump conglomerate, Monument Valley, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Witkind, I.J.

    1954-01-01

    formation (Permian) to the Salt Wash member of the Morrison formation (Jurassic), The dominant structural element of the area is the Monument upwarp, a arge asymmetrical anticline whose northern end is near the junction of the Green and Colorado Rivers in Utah, and whose southern end disappears near Kayenta, Ariz. Asymmetrical anticlines with steeply dipping east flanks and gently dipping west flanks are superimposed on the upwarp. These subsidiary structures trend north. The uranium ore bodies are localized in conglomeratic sandstone of the Upper Triassic Shinarump conglomerate that fills channels scoured in the underlying Lower and Middle (?) Triassic Moenkopi formation. These channels range from relatively narrow and shallow ones 15 feet wide and 10 feet deep to much broader and deeper ones 2,300 feet wide and 70 feet deep. Two types of channels can be distinguished-r-a short-type less than 2 miles Iong 5 and a long-type traceable for distances greater than 2 miles Plant matter in the form of trees, branches,'and twigs was deposited with Shinarump sediments in the channels. It is suggested that when the Shinarump conglomerate was invaded by mineralizing solutions the uranium ore was deposited primarily in localities formerly occupied by the plant material. Further, it is suggested that the short channels are more likely to have ore accumulations than long channels.

  15. Thermodynamic modeling of the behavior of Uranium and Arsenic in mineralized Shaazgai-Nuur Lake (Northwest Mongolia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskova, O. L.; Isupov, V. P.; Vladimirov, A. G.; Shvartsev, S. L.; Kolpakova, M. N.

    2015-11-01

    Highly mineralized closed lakes on the territory of ore regions of Mongolia are of special interest in relation to the search for nonconventional sources of metals. Water of soda Shaazgai-Nuur Lake contains ~1 mg/L U, and the content of the undesirable admixture of As is up to 300 μg/L. Uranium and Arsenic speciation in solution and in the bottom sediments of the lake was estimated using thermodynamic modeling, and a method of their separation was suggested. Calculation of the models of sorption of these elements by goethite and calcite showed that at pH 9.4 typical of natural water it could be effective only at a high concentration of FeOOH sorbent. In this case, at pH <5 and >8 (the area of U sorption), As may be removed by simple filtering of solutions from the suspension upon additional coagulation.

  16. [Clinical and morphologic characteristics of lung cancer in miners of Krivoy Rog iron-ore region and of uranium mines of Zhovti Vody].

    PubMed

    Bednaryk, O M; Filipchenko, L L; Pan'kova, A O; Kryvosheĭ, L O; Slinchenko, M Z

    2004-01-01

    Clinical and morphological features of cancer were observed in two groups of miners (of Krivoy Rog iron-ore and Zholty Vody uranium mines), working in hazardous labour conditions. In both of groups the disease course had typical features for lung cancer. Roentgenologic changes were observed, central cancer of left and right lung was revealed by bronchoscopy method. In all the cases lung cancer was morphologically proved and classified as squamous. Rapid progression of the disease and late medical aid appealability cause the patients consulted with their doctors only at the stage of II-III, sometimes III of the disease and it makes a distinction of lung cancer in miners of iron-ore and uranium mines. In order to prevent such a late diagnostics all the miners should be referred to the group of risk on lung cancer.

  17. Enhancement of lung cancer by cigarette smoking in uranium and other miners

    SciTech Connect

    Archer, V.E.

    1985-01-01

    There are substantial animal and epidemiological data related to cigarette smoking and lung cancer among miners exposed to elevated levels of radon daughters that appears to be in disagreement. An hypothesis is advanced that explains most of this disagreement as being derived from temporal differences of cancer expression. The hypothesis is that a given radiation exposure induced a finite number of lung cancers, which have shorter latent periods due to the cancer promotion activity of smoke among cigarette smokers. According to this hypothesis, the life-shortening effect is greater among smoking miners than nonsmoking miners, and the ultimate number of lung cancers among smoking miners will be only a little larger than among nonsmokers. The greater number will derive from the additive effect of radiation and smoking, plus the greater force of competing causes of death among elderly nonsmokers.

  18. Immobilization of uranium and plutonium into borobasalt, pyroxene and andradite mineral-like compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Matyunin, Y I; Jardine, L J; Yudintsev, S V

    2001-02-05

    The immobilization of plutonium-containing wastes into stable solid compositions is one of the problems to be solved in the disposal of radioactive wastes. Research efforts on the selection, preparation with the use of the cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) technology, and investigation of materials that are most suitable for immobilizing plutonium-containing wastes of different origin have been carried out at the All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM) and the Institute of the Geology of Ore Deposits, Petrography, Mineralogy, and Geochemistry (IGEM), Russian Academy of Sciences within the framework of agreements with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL, USA) regarding material and technical support. This paper presents the data on the synthesis of cerium-, uranium-, and plutonium-containing materials based on borobasalt, pyroxene, and andradite compositions in the muffle furnace and by the CCIM method. Compositions containing up to 15-18 wt% cerium oxide, 8-11 wt% uranium oxide, and 4.6-5.7 wt% plutonium oxide were obtained in laboratory facilities installed in glove boxes. Comparison studies of the materials synthesized in the muffle furnace and CCIM demonstrate the advantages of using the CCIM method. The distribution of components in the materials.

  19. Southern complex: geology, geochemistry, mineralogy, and mineral chemistry of selected uranium- and thorium-rich granites

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    Four major rock groups are defined in the Southern Complex: the Bell Creek Granite (BCG), the Clotted Granitoids (CGR), the Albite Granite (AGR), and the Migmatite Complex. Metatexites of the Migmatite Complex are the oldest rocks and include paleosome of a metasedimentary and metavolcanic protolith represented by Banded Iron Formation, Banded Amphibolite, and Banded Gneisses, and interlayered or crosscutting leucogranites. The CGR span the range from metatexite to diatexite and represent in-situ partial melting of metapelitic layers in the protolith during intrusion of the BCG. The BCG cuts the migmatites, is locally cut by the CGR, and was derived by partial melting of a dominantly metasedimentary protolith at some depth below the presently exposed migmatites during a regional tectonothermal event. The Albite Granite is a 2km diameter, muscovite-fluorite-columbite-bearing intrusive stock that cuts all other major units. The thorium history of the BCG is a function of the history of monazite. The thorium history of the CGR is also dominated by monazite but the thorium content of this unit cannot be entirely accounted for by original restite monazite. The uranium history of the BCG and CGR was dominated by magmatic differentiation and post magmatic, metamorphic and supergene redistributions and is largely independent of the thorium history. The thorium and uranium history of the AGR was dominated by magmatic/deuteric processes unlike the BCG and CGR.

  20. Uranium Isotopic Fractionation Induced by U(VI) Adsorption onto Common Aquifer Minerals.

    PubMed

    Jemison, N E; Johnson, T M; Shiel, A E; Lundstrom, C C

    2016-11-15

    Uranium groundwater contamination due to U mining and processing affects numerous sites globally. Bioreduction of soluble, mobile U(VI) to U(IV)-bearing solids is potentially a very effective remediation strategy. Uranium isotopes ((238)U/(235)U) have been utilized to track the progress of microbial reduction, with laboratory and field studies finding a ∼1‰ isotopic fractionation, with the U(IV) product enriched in (238)U. However, the isotopic fractionation produced by adsorption may complicate the use of (238)U/(235)U to trace microbial reduction. A previous study found that adsorption of U(VI) onto Mn oxides produced a -0.2‰ fractionation with the adsorbed U(VI) depleted in (238)U. In this study, adsorption to quartz, goethite, birnessite, illite, and aquifer sediments induced an average isotopic fractionation of -0.15‰ with the adsorbed U(VI) isotopically lighter than coexisting aqueous U(VI). In bicarbonate-bearing matrices, the fractionation depended little on the nature of the sorbent, with only birnessite producing an atypically large fractionation. In the case of solutions with ionic strengths much lower than those of typical groundwater, less isotopic fractionation was produced than U(VI) solutions with greater ionic strength. Studies using U isotope data to assess U(VI) reduction must consider adsorption as a lesser, but significant isotope fractionation process.

  1. Low radon exposure and mortality among Jouac uranium miners: an update of the French cohort (1946-2007).

    PubMed

    Rage, Estelle; Caër-Lorho, Sylvaine; Laurier, Dominique

    2017-09-19

    After the extension of the French cohort of uranium miners with the inclusion of workers employed in the Jouac mines, this article seeks to describe the new Jouac cohort and to estimate mortality risks, as well as to quantify their relation to radon exposure in this extended cohort. The Jouac cohort includes 458 miners hired by the Société des Mines de Jouac between 1957 and 2001. As there is no measurement of radon exposure before 1978 were unavailable, only the post-1977 Jouac cohort (n=314) has been included in the French cohort, creating an extended cohort of 5400 French uranium miners followed up from 1946 to 2007. Mortality analyses computed the standardised mortality ratios (SMR). Excess relative risks (ERR) were assessed using Poisson regression models. No evidence of a significant excess risk of overall mortality (n=66, SMR=0.93; 95% CI = 0.72-1.19) or any specific mortality was observed in the Jouac cohort. In the extended cohort, overall mortality did not increase, but a significant excess of deaths was observed for all cancers (SMR=1.11, 95% CI = 1.03-1.19), lung cancer (SMR=1.32, 95% CI = 1.14-1.51), and kidney cancer (SMR=1.58, 95% CI = 1.01-2.35). Cumulative exposure to radon was 3.9 Working Level Month (WLM) and 35.1 WLM in the post-1977 Jouac and extended cohorts respectively. Cumulative radon exposure was significantly associated with an excess risk of death from lung cancer (ERR/100 WLM = 0.73, 95% CI = 0.32-1.33) and from cerebrovascular diseases (ERR/100 WLM = 0.42 95% CI = 0.04-1.04). In conclusion, the Jouac cohort is still a young cohort and its inclusion leads to slightly modifications compared to previous analyses of for the French cohort. The already known relation between radon exposure and lung cancer death as well as the excess risk for death for cerebrovascular diseases persisted in the extended cohort. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  2. A review of the results from the German Wismut uranium miners cohort.

    PubMed

    Walsh, L; Grosche, B; Schnelzer, M; Tschense, A; Sogl, M; Kreuzer, M

    2015-04-01

    The Wismut cohort is currently the largest single study on the health risks associated with occupational exposures to ionising radiation and dust accrued during activities related to uranium mining. The cohort has ∼59 000 male workers, first employed between 1946 and 1989, at the Wismut Company in Germany. The main effect is a statistically significant increase in mortality from lung cancer with both increasing cumulative radon exposure and silica dust exposure. Risks for cancers of the extrathoracic airways, all extra-pulmonary cancers and cardiovascular diseases associated with radiation exposures have been evaluated. Cohort mortality rates for some other cancer sites, stomach and liver, are statistically significantly increased in relation to the general population, but not statistically significantly related to occupational exposures. No associations between leukaemia mortality and occupational doses of ionising radiation were found.

  3. Lung cancer in relation to exposure to silica dust, silicosis and uranium production in South African gold miners

    PubMed Central

    Hnizdo, E.; Murray, J.; Klempman, S.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A nested case-control study for lung cancer was performed on a cohort of 2260 South African gold miners in whom an association between exposure to silica dust and risk of lung cancer was previously reported. The objective was to investigate an expanded set of risk factors and also cancer cell type. METHODS: The 78 cases of lung cancer found during the follow up period from 1970 to 1986 were matched with 386 controls. Risk of lung cancer was related to smoking, exposure to silica dust, incidence of silicosis, and uranium production and the uranium content of the mine ore. RESULTS: The risk of lung cancer was associated with tobacco smoking, cumulative dust exposure, duration of underground mining, and with silicosis. The best predictive model included pack years of cigarette consumption (adjusted relative risk (RR) = 1.0 for < 6.5 pack years, 3.5 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.7 to 16.8) for 6.5-20 pack years, 5.7 (95% CI 1.3 to 25.8) for 21-30 pack years, and 13.2 (95% CI 3.1 to 56.2) for more than 30 pack years) and silicosis (RR = 2.45 (95% CI 1.2 to 5.2)). No association was found with uranium production. The lung tumour cell type distribution was 40.3% small cell carcinoma, 38.8% squamous cell, 16.4% adenocarcinoma, and 4.5% large cell carcinoma. Small and large cell cancer combined were associated with exposure to dust. CONCLUSIONS: The results cannot be interpreted definitively in terms of causal association. Possible interpretations are: (1) subjects with high dust exposure who develop silicosis are at increased risk of lung cancer; (2) high levels of exposure to silica dust on its own is important in the pathogenesis of lung cancer and silicosis is coincidental; and (3) high levels of silica dust exposure may be a surrogate for the exposure to radon daughters. 


 PMID:9093345

  4. Mineral resource assessment of rare-earth elements, thorium, titanium, and uranium in the Greenville 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, South Carolina, Georgia, and North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lesure, Frank G.; Curtin, Gary C.; Daniels, David L.; Jackson, John C.

    1993-01-01

    Mineral resources of the Greenville 1° x 2° quadrangle, South Carolina, Georgia, and North Carolina, were assessed between 1984 and 1990 under the Conterminuous United States Mineral Assessment Program (CUSMAP) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The mineral resource assessments were made on the basis of geologic, geochemical, and geophysical investigations and the presence of mines, prospects, and mineral occurrences from the literature. This report is an assessment of the rare-earth elements (REE), thorium, titanium, and uranium resources in the Greenville quadrangle and is based on heavy mineral concentrates collected in 1951-54 by the USGS (Overstreet and others, 1968; Caldwell and White, 1973; Cuppels and White, 1973); on the results of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) sampling program (Ferguson, 1978, 1979); on analyses of stream-sediment and heavy-mineral-concentrate samples (Jackson and Moore, 1992, G.C Cullin, USGS, unpub. data, 1992) on maps showing aerial gamma radiation in the Greenville quadrangle (D.L. Daniels, USGS, unpub. data, 1992); and on the geology as mapped by Nelson and others (1987, 1989).

  5. Uranium Mines and Mills Location Database

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Uranium Mines and Mills location database identifies and shows the location of active and inactive uranium mines and mills, as well as mines which principally produced other minerals, but were known to have uranium in the ore.

  6. Iron disulfide minerals and the genesis of roll-type uranium deposits.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, R.L.; Goldhaber, M.B.

    1983-01-01

    Studies of the distribution of and textural relationships among pyrite and marcasite in host rocks for a number of roll-type sedimentary U deposits have enabled identification of several generations of FeS2 minerals. A critical factor influencing mineral formation is the complex relationship of pH and the S species that are precursors of FeS2 minerals. The presence or absence of intrinsic organic matter for bacterial sulphate reduction also plays a key role. In deposits lacking such organic matter, the pre-ore is often euhedral pyrite and the ore-stage is marcasite. In contrast, in deposits containing organic matter the pre-ore is pyrite occurring as framboids or as replacements of plant material, and the ore-stage is also pyrite. These contrasting FeS2 assemblages and their respective modes of origin are consistent with previously proposed biogenic and nonbiogenic theories of the genesis of roll-type U deposits. -J.E.S.

  7. Geology and mineral resources of the Florence, Beaufort, Rocky Mount, and Norfolk 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles. National Uranium Resource Evaluation program

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, W.B.

    1982-08-01

    This document provides geologic and mineral resources data for previously-issued Savannah River Laboratory hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reports of the Beaufort, Florence, Norfolk, and Rocky Mount 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ National Topographic Map Series quadrangles in the southeastern United States. This report is issued in draft form, without detailed technical and copy editing. This was done to make the report available to the public before the end of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program.

  8. Petrogenetic evolution of Late Paleozoic rhyolites of the Harvey Group, southwestern New Brunswick (Canada) hosting uranium mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostal, J.; van Hengstum, T. R.; Shellnutt, J. G.; Hanley, J. J.

    2016-06-01

    The 360 Ma subaerial felsic volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks of the Harvey Group form a belt about 15 km long and 3 km wide in southwestern New Brunswick (Canada) that has been correlated with parts of the Mount Pleasant caldera complex, the site of a significant polymetallic (tin, tungsten, molybdenum, indium and bismuth) deposit. The Harvey volcanic rocks are highly fractionated peraluminous within-plate F-rich rhyolites, which host uranium mineralization. The rocks were modified by late-magmatic and post-magmatic processes. A comparison of the composition of whole rocks and melt inclusions in the quartz phenocrysts shows that some trace elements, including U, were affected by the post-magmatic processes. Their flat REE patterns accompanied by distinct negative Eu anomalies are typical of highly evolved F-rich leucogranites and rhyolites. Nd isotopic ratios (ɛNd(360) = +0.6 to -1.0) are similar to those of the felsic rocks of the Mount Pleasant complex. The Harvey rhyolites were generated by extensive fractional crystallization of andesites of the Mount Pleasant caldera. The melt evolved at the apex of the magma chamber where volatile elements become concentrated. The Harvey rhyolite (with melt inclusions containing ~20 ppm U) had the potential to develop a significant U mineralization. The erupted glassy rhyolite is a favorable U source rock amendable to leaching by post-magmatic hydrothermal and meteoric water. The high Th/U ratios in the Harvey volcanic rocks compared to the low ratios in the U-rich melt inclusions is indicative of such a process.

  9. Feasibility of using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to detect early gene changes in sputum cells from uranium miners

    SciTech Connect

    Neft, R.E.; Rogers, J.L.; Belinsky, S.A.

    1995-12-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that combined exposure to radon progeny and tobacco smoke produce a greater than additive or synergistic increase in lung cancer risk. Lung cancer results from multiple genetic changes over a long period of time. An early change that occurs in lung cancer is trisomy 7 which is found in 50% of non-small cell lung cancer and in the far margins of resected lung tumors. The 80% mortality associated with lung cancer is in part related to the high proportion of patients who present with an advanced, unresectable tumor. Therefore, early detection of patients at risk for tumor development is critical to improve treatment of this disease. Currently, it is difficult to detect lung cancer early while it is still amendable by surgery. Saccomanno, G. has shown that premalignant cytologic changes in sputum cells collected from uranium miners can be detected by a skilled, highly trained cytopathologist. A more objective alternative for identifying premalignant cells in sputum may be to determine whether an early genetic change such as trisomy 7 is present in these cells. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) can be used to identify cells with trisomy 7. The results of this investigation indicate that FISH may prove to be an accurate, efficient method to test at-risk individuals for genetic alterations in bronchial epithelial cells from sputum.

  10. Isotopic evidence for reductive immobilization of uranium across a roll-front mineral deposit

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Shaun T.; Basu, Anirban; Christensen, John N.; Reimus, Paul; Heikoop, Jeffrey; Simmons, Ardyth; Woldegabriel, Giday; Maher, Kate; Weaver, Karrie; Clay, James; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2016-05-20

    We use uranium (U) isotope ratios to detect and quantify the extent of natural U reduction in groundwater across a roll front redox gradient. Our study was conducted at the Smith Ranch-Highland in situ recovery (ISR) U mine in eastern Wyoming, USA, where economic U deposits occur in the Paleocene Fort Union formation. To evaluate the fate of aqueous U in and adjacent to the ore body, we investigated the chemical composition and isotope ratios of groundwater samples from the roll-front type ore body and surrounding monitoring wells of a previously mined area. The 238U/235U of groundwater varies by approximately 3‰ and is correlated with U concentrations. Fluid samples down-gradient of the ore zone are the most depleted in 238U and have the lowest U concentrations. Activity ratios of 234U/238U are ~5.5 up-gradient of the ore zone, ~1.0 in the ore zone, and between 2.3 and 3.7 in the down-gradient monitoring wells. High-precision measurements of 234U/238U and 238U/235U allow for development of a conceptual model that evaluates both the migration of U from the ore body and the extent of natural attenuation due to reduction. We find that the premining migration of U down-gradient of the delineated ore body is minimal along eight transects due to reduction in or adjacent to the ore body, whereas two other transects show little or no sign of reduction in the down-gradient region. Lastly, these results suggest that characterization of U isotopic ratios at the mine planning stage, in conjunction with routine geochemical analyses, can be used to identify where more or less postmining remediation will be necessary.

  11. Isotopic evidence for reductive immobilization of uranium across a roll-front mineral deposit

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Shaun T.; Basu, Anirban; Christensen, John N.; Reimus, Paul; Heikoop, Jeffrey; Simmons, Ardyth; Woldegabriel, Giday; Maher, Kate; Weaver, Karrie; Clay, James; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2016-05-20

    We use uranium (U) isotope ratios to detect and quantify the extent of natural U reduction in groundwater across a roll front redox gradient. Our study was conducted at the Smith Ranch-Highland in situ recovery (ISR) U mine in eastern Wyoming, USA, where economic U deposits occur in the Paleocene Fort Union formation. To evaluate the fate of aqueous U in and adjacent to the ore body, we investigated the chemical composition and isotope ratios of groundwater samples from the roll-front type ore body and surrounding monitoring wells of a previously mined area. The 238U/235U of groundwater varies by approximately 3‰ and is correlated with U concentrations. Fluid samples down-gradient of the ore zone are the most depleted in 238U and have the lowest U concentrations. Activity ratios of 234U/238U are ~5.5 up-gradient of the ore zone, ~1.0 in the ore zone, and between 2.3 and 3.7 in the down-gradient monitoring wells. High-precision measurements of 234U/238U and 238U/235U allow for development of a conceptual model that evaluates both the migration of U from the ore body and the extent of natural attenuation due to reduction. We find that the premining migration of U down-gradient of the delineated ore body is minimal along eight transects due to reduction in or adjacent to the ore body, whereas two other transects show little or no sign of reduction in the down-gradient region. Lastly, these results suggest that characterization of U isotopic ratios at the mine planning stage, in conjunction with routine geochemical analyses, can be used to identify where more or less postmining remediation will be necessary.

  12. Isotopic evidence for reductive immobilization of uranium across a roll-front mineral deposit

    DOE PAGES

    Brown, Shaun T.; Basu, Anirban; Christensen, John N.; ...

    2016-05-20

    We use uranium (U) isotope ratios to detect and quantify the extent of natural U reduction in groundwater across a roll front redox gradient. Our study was conducted at the Smith Ranch-Highland in situ recovery (ISR) U mine in eastern Wyoming, USA, where economic U deposits occur in the Paleocene Fort Union formation. To evaluate the fate of aqueous U in and adjacent to the ore body, we investigated the chemical composition and isotope ratios of groundwater samples from the roll-front type ore body and surrounding monitoring wells of a previously mined area. The 238U/235U of groundwater varies by approximatelymore » 3‰ and is correlated with U concentrations. Fluid samples down-gradient of the ore zone are the most depleted in 238U and have the lowest U concentrations. Activity ratios of 234U/238U are ~5.5 up-gradient of the ore zone, ~1.0 in the ore zone, and between 2.3 and 3.7 in the down-gradient monitoring wells. High-precision measurements of 234U/238U and 238U/235U allow for development of a conceptual model that evaluates both the migration of U from the ore body and the extent of natural attenuation due to reduction. We find that the premining migration of U down-gradient of the delineated ore body is minimal along eight transects due to reduction in or adjacent to the ore body, whereas two other transects show little or no sign of reduction in the down-gradient region. Lastly, these results suggest that characterization of U isotopic ratios at the mine planning stage, in conjunction with routine geochemical analyses, can be used to identify where more or less postmining remediation will be necessary.« less

  13. Fixation of radionuclides in the 238U decay series in the vicinity of mineralized zones: 1. The Austatom Uranium Prospect, Northern Territory, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirvington, P. J.

    1983-03-01

    The minimum age of a zone of secondary uranium mineralization, located at the Austatom Prospect in the Alligator Rivers region of Australia, is estimated to be 3.6 × 10 5y. This is derived from a geochronological model based on retarded leaching of 234U with respect to 238U and on ratios within the ore of these members of the 238U decay series. Although kaolinite is a dominant mineral in the weathered schist-host-rocks, retarded dissolution of 234U occurs only in the presence of the clay minerals illite and montmorillonite. In their absence the reverse occurs. A model is proposed to explain the results. Ratios of 230Th to 238U indicate that the mineralization has probably remained stationary within the weathered schist for at least 1 to 2 × 10 5y. Future use of clay minerals as buffers in radioactive waste repositories is supported by the excellent long-term retention obtained for oxidized uranium, probably due in part to isomorphic substitution into the clay crystal lattice.

  14. Agricolaite, a new mineral of uranium from Jáchymov, Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skála, Roman; Ondruš, Petr; Veselovský, František; Císařová, Ivana; Hloušek, Jan

    2011-11-01

    The new mineral agricolaite, a potassium uranyl carbonate with ideal formula K4(UO2)(CO3)3, occurs in vugs of ankerite gangue in gneisses in the abandoned Giftkiesstollen adit at Jáchymov, Czech Republic. The name is after Georgius Agricola (1494-1555), German scholar and scientist. Agricolaite occurs as isolated equant irregular translucent grains to 0.3 mm with yellow color, pale yellow streak, and vitreous luster. It is brittle with uneven fracture and displays neither cleavage nor parting. Agricolaite is non-fluorescent. Mohs hardness is ~4. It is associated with aragonite, brochantite, posnjakite, malachite, rutherfordine, and "pseudo-voglite". Experimental density is higher than 3.3 g.cm-3, Dcalc is 3.531 g. cm-3. The mineral is monoclinic, space group C2/ c, with a 10.2380(2), b 9.1930(2), c 12.2110(3) Å, β 95.108(2)°, V 1144.71(4) Å3, Z = 4. The strongest lines in the powder X-ray diffraction pattern are d( I)( hkl): 6.061(55)(002), 5.087(57)(200), 3.740(100)(202), 3.393(43)(113), 2.281(52)(402). Average composition based on ten electron microprobe analyses corresponds to (in wt.%) UO3 48.53, K2O 31.49, CO2(calc) 22.04 which gives the empirical formula K3.98(UO2)1.01(CO3)3.00. The crystal structure was solved from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data and refined to R 1 = 0.0184 on the basis of the 1,308 unique reflections with F o > 4 σF o. The structure of agricolaite is identical to that of synthetic K4(UO2)(CO3)3 and consists of separate UO2(CO3)3 groups organized into layers parallel to (100) and two crystallographically non-equivalent sites occupied by K+ cations. Both the mineral and its name were approved by the IMA-CNMNC.

  15. Spatial distribution and compositional variation of APS minerals related to uranium deposits in the Kiggavik-Andrew Lake structural trend, Nunavut, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riegler, Thomas; Quirt, Dave; Beaufort, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    The Kiggavik-Andrew Lake structural trend consists of four mineralized zones, partially outcropping, lying 2 km south of the erosional contact with the unmetamorphosed sandstone and basal conglomerates of the Paleoproterozoic Thelon Formation. The mineralization is controlled by a major E-W fault system associated with illite and sudoite alteration halos developed in the Archean metagraywackes of the Woodburn Lake Group. Aluminum phosphate sulfate (APS) minerals from the alunite group crystallized in association with the clay minerals in the basement alteration halo as well as in the overlying sandstones, which underwent mostly diagenesis. APS minerals are Sr- and S-rich (svanbergite end-member) in the sedimentary cover overlying the unconformity, whereas they are light rare earth elements (LREE)-rich (florencite end-member) in the altered basement rocks below the unconformity. The geochemical signature of each group of APS minerals together with the petrography indicates three distinct generations of APS minerals related to the following: (1) paleoweathering of continental surfaces prior to the basin occurrence, (2) diagenetic processes during the burial history of the lower unit of the Thelon sandstones, and (3) hydrothermal alteration processes which accompanied the uranium deposition in the basement rocks and partially overlap the sedimentary-diagenetic mineral parageneses. In addition, the association of a first generation of APS minerals with both detrital cerium oxide and aluminum oxy-hydroxide highlights the fact that a part of the detrital material of the basal Thelon Formation originated from eroded paleolaterite (allochthonous regolith). The primary rare earth element (REE)-bearing minerals (e.g., monazite, REE carbonates, and allanite) of the host rocks were characterized to identify the potential sources of REE. The REE chemical composition highlights a local re-incorporation of the REE released from the alteration processes in the APS minerals of

  16. 3D Reconstruction of Biological Organization and Mineralization in Sediment Attached Biofilms During Uranium Bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Banfield, Jillian; Comolli, Luis R.; Singer, Steve

    2014-11-17

    development of a platform for routine correlative cryogenic microscopy and spectroscopy with samples prepared on-site. 2) The determination of which organisms dominate planktonic and biofilm communities in the subsurface. 3) Identification of microorganism-mineral associations and discovery of a novel mechanism that sustains activity of iron-reducing bacteria. 4) The detection of bacteria from the OP11-OD1-WWE3 (etc.) radiation and elucidation of their remarkable structural organization by cryog-TEM cryo-electron tomograhpy (cryo-ET). 5) Extensive analysis of biofilms and documentation of the association of cells and Se minerals. 6) The comparison of expressed c-type cytochromes between pure cultures of G. bemidjiensis and related field populations, provided insight into possible molecular mechanisms for U(VI) reduction in the aquifer. At least sixteen publications will result from this project (partial support), which provide both graduate student and post doctoral training.

  17. Possibilities of Using Transport Terminals in South Bohemian Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čejka, Jiří; Bartuška, Ladislav; Turinská, Libuše

    2017-03-01

    Currently, when there is a need for transport services adapted to the customer requirements and create a workable operational system, there is increasing talk about transport terminals. Since the South Bohemian region is one of those where this issue will be increasingly dealt with, this paper suggests ways to use transport terminals as important support systems for freight and passenger transport.

  18. Uranium and thorium in soils, mineral sands, water and food samples in a tin mining area in Nigeria with elevated activity.

    PubMed

    Arogunjo, A M; Höllriegl, V; Giussani, A; Leopold, K; Gerstmann, U; Veronese, I; Oeh, U

    2009-03-01

    The activity concentrations of uranium and thorium have been determined in soils and mineral sands from the Nigerian tin mining area of Bisichi, located in the Jos Plateau, and from two control areas in Nigeria (Jos City and Akure) using high-purity germanium detectors (HPGe). High resolution sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (HR-SF-ICP-MS) was used to determine uranium and thorium in liquids and foodstuffs consumed locally in the mining area. The activities of uranium and thorium measured in the soils and mineral sands from Bisichi ranged from 8.7 kBq kg(-1) to 51 kBq kg(-1) for (238)U and from 16.8 kBq kg(-1) to 98 kBq kg(-1) for (232)Th, respectively. These values were significantly higher than those in the control areas of Jos City and Akure and than the reference values reported in the literature. They even exceeded the concentrations reported for areas of high natural radioactive background. Radionuclide concentrations in samples of the local foodstuffs and in water samples collected in Bisichi were found to be higher than UNSCEAR reference values. The results reveal the pollution potential of the mining activities on the surrounding areas.

  19. External gamma radiation and mortality from cardiovascular diseases in the German WISMUT uranium miners cohort study, 1946-2008.

    PubMed

    Kreuzer, M; Dufey, F; Sogl, M; Schnelzer, M; Walsh, L

    2013-03-01

    It is currently unclear whether exposure of the heart and vascular system, at lifetime accumulated dose levels relevant to the general public (<500 mGy), is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Therefore, data from the German WISMUT cohort of uranium miners were investigated for evidence of a relationship between external gamma radiation and death from cardiovascular diseases. The cohort comprises 58,982 former employees of the Wismut company. There were 9,039 recorded deaths from cardiovascular diseases during the follow-up period from 1946 to 2008. Exposures to external gamma radiation were estimated using a detailed job-exposure matrix. The exposures were based on expert ratings for the period 1946-1954 and measurements thereafter. The excess relative risk (ERR) per unit of cumulative gamma dose was obtained with internal Poisson regression using a linear ERR model with baseline stratification by age and calendar year. The mean cumulative gamma dose was 47 mSv for exposed miners (86 %), with a maximum of 909 mSv. No evidence for an increase in risk with increasing cumulative dose was found for mortality from all cardiovascular diseases (ERR/Sv = -0.13; 95 % confidence interval (CI): -0.38; 0.12) and ischemic heart diseases (n = 4,613; ERR/Sv = -0.03; 95 % CI: -0.38, 0.32). However, a statistically insignificant increase (n = 2,073; ERR/Sv = 0.44; 95 % CI: -0.16, 1.04) for mortality from cerebrovascular diseases was observed. Data on smoking, diabetes, and overweight are available for subgroups of the cohort, indicating no major correlation with cumulative gamma radiation. Confounding by these factors or other risk factors, however, cannot be excluded. In conclusion, the results provide weak evidence for an increased risk of death due to gamma radiation only for cerebrovascular diseases.

  20. Large-basin ground water circulation and paleo-reconstruction of circulation leading to uranium mineralization in Grand Canyon breccia pipes, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Huntoon, P.W.

    1996-07-01

    Breccia pipes - vertical collapse structures - are common in the Phanerozoic sedimentary section in the Grand Canyon region. Breccias in economically significant pipes are as great as 900 m high and 90 m in diameter. The pipes originated through collapse into paleocaverns in Mississippian carbonates. The large heights of the mineralized pipes is attributed to upward stoping resulting from progressive creation of space within the pipes through dissolution of wall rocks and soluble constituents in the breccia clasts. The paleocaves that served as nucleation sites for the pipes date from Mississippian time. Stoping appears to have been reactivated or accelerated during Triassic time as terrains to the south became uplifted. Uplift cause hydraulic gradients within aquifers in the Paleozoic section to increase significantly which enhanced ground water circulation and attendant dissolution. The most likely source for uranium in the Grand Canyon breccia pipes was eroding volcanic and Precambrian crystalline rocks in the Triassic Mogollon highlands south of the Grand Canyon region. The circulation model proposed herein assumes that uranium-rich waters originating in the highlands recharged through the exposed Redwall Limestone and circulated northward in the artesian Redwall aquifer. On reaching the Grand Canyon region, the water circulated upward into the Phanerozoic section in the breccia pipes which served as permeability pathways through thick confining strata. The pipes concentrated fluid circulation and directed it through reducing environments which caused precipitation of the uranium and associated metals yielding a number of economic uranium ore bodies. The architecture of the circulation systems in the Colorado plateau prior to incision of the Colorado river was such that hydraulic heads decreased within successively shallower aquifers. Consequently, head gradients at any location were upward in the pipes during the mineralizing stages.

  1. U-Pb ages of uraniferous opals and implications for the history of beryllium, fluorine, and uranium mineralization at Spor Mountain, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ludwig, K. R.; Lindsey, D.A.; Zielinski, R.A.; Simmons, K.R.

    1980-01-01

    The U-Pb isotope systematics of uraniferous opals from Spor Mountain, Utah, were investigated to determine the suitability of such material for geochronologic purposes, and to estimate the timing of uranium and associated beryllium and fluorine mineralization. The results indicate that uraniferous opals can approximate a closed system for uranium and uranium daughters, so that dating samples as young as ???1 m.y. should be possible. In addition, the expected lack of initial 230Th and 231Pa in opals permits valuable information on the initial 234U/238U to be obtained on suitable samples of ???10 m.y. age. The oldest 207Pb/235U apparent age observed, 20.8 ?? 1 m.y., was that of the opal-fluorite core of a nodule from a beryllium deposit in the Spor Mountain Formation. This age is indistinguishable from that of fission-track and K-Ar ages from the host rhyolite, and links the mineralization to the first episode of alkali rhyolite magmatism and related hydrothermal activity at Spor Mountain. Successively younger ages of 13 m.y. and 8-9 m.y. on concentric outer zones of the same nodule indicate that opal formed either episodically or continuously for over 10 m.y. Several samples of both fracture-filling and massive-nodule opal associated with beryllium deposits gave 207Pb/235U apparent ages of 13-16 m.y., which may reflect a restricted period of mineralization or perhaps an averaging of 21- and <13-m.y. periods of opal growth. Several samples of fracture-filling opal in volcanic rocks as young as 6 m.y. gave 207Pb/235U ages of 3.4-4.8 m.y. These ages may reflect hot-spring activity after the last major eruption of alkali rhyolite. ?? 1980.

  2. Minerals

    MedlinePlus

    Minerals are important for your body to stay healthy. Your body uses minerals for many different jobs, including keeping your bones, muscles, heart, and brain working properly. Minerals are also important for making enzymes and hormones. ...

  3. Leukaemia mortality and low-dose ionising radiation in the WISMUT uranium miner cohort (1946-2013).

    PubMed

    Kreuzer, Michaela; Sobotzki, Christina; Fenske, Nora; Marsh, James W; Schnelzer, Maria

    2017-03-01

    To examine the risk of death from leukaemia in relation to occupational chronic low-level external and internal radiation exposure in a cohort of 58 972 former German uranium miners with mortality follow-up from 1946 to 2013. The red bone marrow (RBM) dose from low-linear energy transfer (LET) (mainly external γ-radiation) and high-LET (mainly radon gas) radiation was estimated based on a job-exposure matrix and biokinetic/dosimetric models. Linear excess relative risks (ERR) and 95% CIs were estimated via Poisson regression for chronic lymphatic leukaemia (CLL) and non-CLL. The mean cumulative low-LET and high-LET RBM doses among the 86% radiation-exposed workers were 48 and 9 mGy, respectively. There was a positive non-significant dose-response for mortality from non-CLL (n=120) in relation to low-LET (ERR/Gy=2.18; 95% CI -0.41 to 6.37) and high-LET radiation (ERR/Gy=16.65; 95% -1.13 to 46.75). A statistically significant excess was found for the subgroup chronic myeloid leukaemia (n=31) in relation to low-LET radiation (ERR/Gy=7.20; 95% CI 0.48 to 24.54) and the subgroup myeloid leukaemia (n=99) (ERR/Gy=26.02; 95% CI 2.55 to 68.99) for high-LET radiation. The ERR/Gy tended to be about five to ten times higher for high-LET versus low-LET radiation; however, the CIs largely overlapped. Results indicate no association of death from CLL (n=70) with either type of radiation. Our findings indicate an increased risk of death for specific subtypes from non-CLL in relation to chronic low-LET and high-LET radiation, but no such relation for CLL. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  4. Distribution of long-lived radionuclides of the 238U series in the sediments of a small river in a uranium mineralized region of Spain.

    PubMed

    Lozano, J C; Blanco Rodríguez, P; Tomé, F Vera

    2002-01-01

    A study is presented on the distribution and mobilization of the natural U isotopes (238U and 234U), 230Th, and 226Ra in the sediments of a small river crossing an uranium mineralized zone where a disused uranium mine is located. Due to the preferential directions for surface run-off waters and to the mine's situation, one sampling point along the river bed was identified as a point of accumulation of radionuclides. The average values of the activity concentrations (Bq/kg) in this sediment sample were 5,025, 5,055, 5,915 and 1,694 for 238U, 234U, 230Th and 226Ra, respectively, while the respective average values of the activity concentrations (Bq/kg) for the sediment sample considered to give the background level were 125, 124, 131 and 370. Isotopic ratios between the descendants of 238U served to clarify some paths of distribution, involving the soils nearest to the sampling points and the location of these points with respect to the disused mine. The differences in behaviour found between the uranium, thorium and radium isotopes were associated to the mobility of these radionuclides in the fluvial system studied. Correlations between the radionuclide activity concentration ratios and stable element concentrations in the sediment samples were also investigated.

  5. Uranium mineralization in the Wilson Creek and Cranberry Gneisses and the Grandfather Mountain Formation, North Carolina and Tennessee. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Wagener, H.D.; McHone, J.G.

    1982-10-01

    Detailed petrologic investigations were conducted at 74 anomalies that have surface radioactivities of 5 to 300 times background in the Grandfather Mountain region of North Carolina and Tennessee. One or more specimens of radioactive rock and one specimen of nonanomalous (barren) rock were taken for chemical analysis from each of the 74 sites. The specimens were analyzed fluorometrically for uranium (U/sub 3/O/sub 8/) and for 29 other elements by emission spectroscopy. Of the radioactive specimens, 23 contained less than 100 ppM U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ and were either depleted in uranium because of leaching or were rich in thorium; 25 contained more than 500 ppM U/sub 3/O/sub 8/, with a maximum of 33,000 ppM. Specimens collected as barren contained up to 65 ppM U/sub 3/O/sub 8/. The more uraniferous rocks of the region tend to contain the larger concentrations of trace amounts of base metals.

  6. Radiation-associated lung cancer: A comparison of the histology of lung cancers in uranium miners and survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    SciTech Connect

    Land, C.E.; Shimosato, Y.; Saccomanno, G.; Tokuoka, S.; Auerbach, O.; Tateishi, R.; Greenberg, S.D.; Nambu, S.; Carter, D.; Akiba, S. )

    1993-05-01

    A binational panel of Japanese and American pulmonary pathologists reviewed tissue slides of lung cancer cases diagnosed among Japanese A-bomb survivors and American uranium miners and classified the cases according to histological subtype. Blind reviews were completed on slides from 92 uranium miners and 108 A-bomb survivors, without knowledge of population, sex, age, smoking history, or level of radiation exposure. Consensus diagnoses were obtained with respect to principal subtype, including squamous-cell cancer, small-cell cancer, adenocarcinoma, and less frequent subtypes. The results were analyzed in terms of population, radiation dose, and smoking history. As expected, the proportion of squamous-cell cancer was positively related to smoking history in both populations. The relative frequencies of small-cell cancer and adenocarcinoma were very different in the two populations, but this difference was accounted for adequately by differences in radiation dose or, more specifically, dose-based relative risk estimates based on published data. Radiation-induced cancers appeared more likely to be of the small-cell subtype, and less likely to be adenocarcinomas, in both populations. The data appeared to require no additional explanation in terms of radiation quality (alpha particles vs gamma rays), uniform or local irradiation, inhaled vs external radiation source, or other population difference.

  7. Radiation-associated lung cancer: a comparison of the histology of lung cancers in uranium miners and survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

    PubMed

    Land, C E; Shimosato, Y; Saccomanno, G; Tokuoka, S; Auerbach, O; Tateishi, R; Greenberg, S D; Nambu, S; Carter, D; Akiba, S

    1993-05-01

    A binational panel of Japanese and American pulmonary pathologists reviewed tissue slides of lung cancer cases diagnosed among Japanese A-bomb survivors and American uranium miners and classified the cases according to histological subtype. Blind reviews were completed on slides from 92 uranium miners and 108 A-bomb survivors, without knowledge of population, sex, age, smoking history, or level of radiation exposure. Consensus diagnoses were obtained with respect to principal subtype, including squamous-cell cancer, small-cell cancer, adenocarcinoma, and less frequent subtypes. The results were analyzed in terms of population, radiation dose, and smoking history. As expected, the proportion of squamous-cell cancer was positively related to smoking history in both populations. The relative frequencies of small-cell cancer and adenocarcinoma were very different in the two populations, but this difference was accounted for adequately by differences in radiation dose or, more specifically, dose-based relative risk estimates based on published data. Radiation-induced cancers appeared more likely to be of the small-cell subtype, and less likely to be adenocarcinomas, in both populations. The data appeared to require no additional explanation in terms of radiation quality (alpha particles vs gamma rays), uniform or local irradiation, inhaled vs external radiation source, or other population difference.

  8. Application of mineral-solution equilibria to geochemical exploration for sandstone-hosted uranium deposits in two basins in west central Utah.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, W.R.; Wanty, R.B.; McHugh, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    This study applies mineral-solution equilibrium methods to the interpretation of ground-water chemistry in evaluating the uranium potential of the Beaver and Milford basins in west central Utah. Waters were collected mainly from wells and springs at 100 sites in limited areas in the basins, and in part from mixed sources. The waters were analysed for T, pH, alkalinity, specific conductance, SO4, Cl, F, NO3, Ca, Mg, Na, K, SiO2, Zn, Cu, Mo, As, U, V, Se, Li, Fe, Mn, and Al on different fractions. A computer model (WATEQ3) was used to calculate the redox potential and the state of saturation of the waters with respect to uraninite, coffinite, realgar and arsenopyrite. Mineral saturation studies have reliably predicted the location of known (none given here) U deposits and are more diagnostic of these deposits than are concentrations of indicator elements (U, Mo, As, Se). Several areas in the basins have ground-water environments of reducing redox potential, favourable for precipitation of reduced U minerals, and some of these areas are saturated or near-saturated with respect to uraninite and coffinite. The approach shows only that the environment is favourable locally for precipitation of reduced U minerals, but thereby locates exploration targets for (modern?) sandstone-hosted U deposits.-G.J.N.

  9. Phase equilibria of HP mica schists from the Kamieniec Metamorphic Belt (Sudetes, NE Bohemian Massif)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczepanski, Jacek; Golen, Marcin; Anczkiewicz, Robert

    2017-04-01

    The Kamieniec Metamorphic Belt (KMB), situated in the north-eastern part of the Bohemian Massif, represents the easternmost part of the Variscan Belt of Europe and is interpreted as a fragment of Central Sudetic accretionary wedge containg vestiges of the Saxothuringian crust (Mazur et al., 2015). The KMB comprises a volcano-sedimentary succession dominated by mica schists with intercalations of quartzo-feldspatic schists and subordinate marbles, amphibolites and eclogites. These rocks bear an imprint of Variscan tectonometamorphic reworking. PT conditions of these events were previously estimated at ca. 550 - 590 oC and 7.5 up to 12 kbars (Nowak, 1998; Józefiak, 2000) for mica schists and at 15 kbar and 575 oC for eclogites (Achramowicz et al., 1997). The metamorphic evolution of micaschists comprise the early HP/LT assemblage M1 with Cld+Phe and also earlier reported pseudomorphs after lawsonite (Nowak, 1998) followed by MP/MT mineral assemblage M2 comprising Grt+Pl+Bt+Ms+Qtz±St. Minerals of the M1 and M2 metamorphic events were overprinted by the LP/MT assemblage M3 containing Pl+Chl+Bt+Ms+Qtz±And. Thermodynamic modelling suggests that mineral assemblages record peak-pressure conditions of 20-25 kbar at 520 oC (M1) followed by nearly isothermal decompression to 6-7 kbar, and subsequent metamorphism with record of temperature progression from 500 to 600 oC at 10 kbar (M2) and final retrogression to 3 kbar and 550 oC (M3). The calculated PT conditions indicate a surprisingly low geothermal gradient during the M1 event of 5.5-7.1 oC/km. However, similar eclogitic mica schists with recognised geothermal gradient of ca. 8 oC/km were documented elsewhere from the Saxothuringian domain (Konopásek, 2001). Presented data provides the first report on mica schists from the KMB metamorphosed under eclogite-facies conditions at such low geothermal gradient. Acknowledgements: The study was supported from NCN research grant UMO-2015/17/B/ST10/02212. References Achramowicz

  10. Effect of mineral constituents in the bioleaching of uranium from uraniferous sedimentary rock samples, Southwestern Sinai, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Amin, Maisa M; Elaassy, Ibrahim E; El-Feky, Mohamed G; Sallam, Abdel Sattar M; Talaat, Mona S; Kawady, Nilly A

    2014-08-01

    Bioleaching, like Biotechnology uses microorganisms to extract metals from their ore materials, whereas microbial activity has an appreciable effect on the dissolution of toxic metals and radionuclides. Bioleaching of uranium was carried out with isolated fungi from uraniferous sedimentary rocks from Southwestern Sinai, Egypt. Eight fungal species were isolated from different grades of uraniferous samples. The bio-dissolution experiments showed that Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus terreus exhibited the highest leaching efficiencies of uranium from the studied samples. Through monitoring the bio-dissolution process, the uranium grade and mineralogic constituents of the ore material proved to play an important role in the bioleaching process. The tested samples asserted that the optimum conditions of uranium leaching are: 7 days incubation time, 3% pulp density, 30 °C incubation temperature and pH 3. Both fungi produced the organic acids, namely; oxalic, acetic, citric, formic, malonic, galic and ascorbic in the culture filtrate, indicating an important role in the bioleaching processes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Combined high-resolution aeromagnetic and radiometric mapping of uranium mineralization and tectonic settings in Northeastern Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adepelumi, A. A.; Falade, A. H.

    2017-09-01

    Geological lineaments, depths to the basement, uranium concentrations, and remobilization in parts of the Upper Benue Trough, covering about 55 × 55 km2 (longitudes 11°30'-12°00'E and 10°30'-10°30'N), Northeastern Nigeria were investigated using integrated High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Data (HRAD) and radiometric data. This was with a view to identifying the potential zones of uranium occurrence in the area. The HRAD was processed to accentuate anomalies of interest and depths estimate of 150-1941 m were obtained from source parameter imaging technique. The results from the superposition of the horizontal gradient magnitude, analytical signal amplitude, first vertical derivative, and 3D Euler solutions of the HRAD revealed that the study area was dissected by linear structures that trend ENE-WSW, NE-SW, E-W, NNE-SSW, WNW-ESE, and NW-SE; among which the ENE-WSW and NE-SW trends dominated. Analyses of radiometric data showed that uranium ores in the study area were possibly remobilized epigenetically from the granitic rocks, and were later deposited into sedimentary rocks (Bima formation). Burashika group (Bongna hills) and Wawa area of the study area showed vein-type deposits, while the anatectic migmatite in the northeastern region and the uranium rich Bima formation showed both fault/fracture and contact types of deposition. It was also observed the northwesterly and southeasterly, dominant dip direction, dipping faults dip in the same direction as the paleocurrent direction (direction of depositions of sediments), and trend in a direction perpendicular to the hypothetical direction of uranium deposition. The study concluded that the studied area is dissected by several linear structures and the studied area possibly contains deposits of uranium ore, which are likely to be found in: the Bima Sandstones of Wade, Shinga, Bima hill, Wuyo, Teli, Bryel, Dali, Barkan, Gasi, Kunkun, Boragara, Deba, and Gberundi localities; the anatectic migmatite at Kubuku, Whada

  12. Tectono-metamorphic evolution of the internal zone of the Pan-African Lufilian orogenic belt (Zambia): Implications for crustal reworking and syn-orogenic uranium mineralizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eglinger, Aurélien; Vanderhaeghe, Olivier; André-Mayer, Anne-Sylvie; Goncalves, Philippe; Zeh, Armin; Durand, Cyril; Deloule, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    The internal zone of the Pan-African Lufilian orogenic belt (Zambia) hosts a dozen uranium occurrences mostly located within kyanite micaschists in a shear zone marking the contact between metasedimentary rocks attributed to the Katanga Neoproterozoic sedimentary sequence and migmatites coring domes developed dominantly at the expense of the pre-Neoproterozoic basement. The P-T-t-d paths reconstructed for these rocks combining field observations, microstructural analysis, metamorphic petrology and thermobarometry and geochronology indicate that they have recorded burial and exhumation during the Pan-African orogeny. Both units of the Katanga metasedimentary sequence and pre-Katanga migmatitic basement have underwent minimum peak P-T conditions of 9-11 kbar and 640-660 °C, dated at ca. 530 Ma by garnet-whole rock Lu-Hf isochrons. This suggests that this entire continental segment has been buried up to a depth of 40-50 km with geothermal gradients of 15-20 °C.km- 1 during the Pan-African orogeny and the formation of the West Gondwana supercontinent. Syn-orogenic exhumation of the partially molten root of the Lufilian belt is attested by isothermal decompression under P-T conditions of 6-8 kbar at ca. 530-500 Ma, witnessing an increase of the geothermal gradients to 25-30 °C·km- 1. Uranium mineralizations that consist of uraninite and brannerite took place at temperatures ranging from 600 to 700 °C, and have been dated at ca. 540-530 Ma by U-Pb ages on uraninite. The main uranium deposition thus occurred at the transition from the syn-orogenic burial to the syn-orogenic exhumation stages and has been then partially transposed and locally remobilized during the post-orogenic exhumation accommodated by activation of low-angle extensional detachment.

  13. Hydrochemical monitoring results in relation to the vogtland-nw bohemian earthquake swarm period 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kämpf, H.; Bräuer, K.; Dulski, P.; Faber, E.; Koch, U.; Mrlina, J.; Strauch, G.; Weise, S. M.

    2003-04-01

    The Vogtland-NW Bohemian earthquake swarm area/Central Europe is characterised by carbon dioxide- rich mineral springs and mofetts. The August-December 2000 earthquake period was the strongest compared with the December 1985/86 swarms occurred in the area of Novy Kostel, Czech Republic. Here, we present first results of long-term hydrochemical monitoring studies before, during and after the 2000 swarm period. The swarm 2000 lasted from August 28 until December 26 and consisted of altogether nine sub-swarm episodes, each of them lasting for several days. At the mineral spring Wettinquelle, Bad Brambach/Germany the water chemistry and isotope (D, 18O) composition was monitored weekly and two-weekly, respectively, since May 2000. The mineral spring Wettinquelle is located in a distance of about 10 km from the epicentral area of Novy Kostel. The aim of our investigation was to look for seismic induced or seismic coupled changes of the chemical and isotope composition of the mineral water. We had to separate seismohydrological effects from seasonal and hydrological caused changes. The seasonal caused shifts were found for water temperature and alkaline elements (Li, Na, K, Rb and Cs) as well as for discharge, conductivity, hydrogenecarbonate- concentration, and the concentration of the alkaline earth's (Ca, Mg, Sr). Strain related anomalies which could influence the hydrogeochemistry of the mineral water seems to be visible in the iron- concentration of the spring water, in the methane- concentration of the free gas component and caused probably changes of the groundwater level of the well H3 located about 5 km SE of the Wettinquelle at Skalna.

  14. Prostate cancer mortality risk in relation to working underground in the Wismut cohort study of German uranium miners, 1970–2003

    PubMed Central

    Dufey, Florian; Tschense, Annemarie; Schnelzer, Maria; Sogl, Marion; Kreuzer, Michaela

    2012-01-01

    Objective A recent study and comprehensive literature review has indicated that mining could be protective against prostate cancer. This indication has been explored further here by analysing prostate cancer mortality in the German ‘Wismut’ uranium miner cohort, which has detailed information on the number of days worked underground. Design An historical cohort study of 58 987 male mine workers with retrospective follow-up before 1999 and prospective follow-up since 1999. Setting and participants Uranium mine workers employed during the period 1970–1990 in the regions of Saxony and Thuringia, Germany, contributing 1.42 million person-years of follow-up ending in 2003. Outcome measure Simple standardised mortality ratio (SMR) analyses were applied to assess differences between the national and cohort prostate cancer mortality rates and complemented by refined analyses done entirely within the cohort. The internal comparisons applied Poisson regression excess relative prostate cancer mortality risk model with background stratification by age and calendar year and a whole range of possible explanatory covariables that included days worked underground and years worked at high physical activity with γ radiation treated as a confounder. Results The analysis is based on miner data for 263 prostate cancer deaths. The overall SMR was 0.85 (95% CI 0.75 to 0.95). A linear excess relative risk model with the number of years worked at high physical activity and the number of days worked underground as explanatory covariables provided a statistically significant fit when compared with the background model (p=0.039). Results (with 95% CIs) for the excess relative risk per day worked underground indicated a statistically significant (p=0.0096) small protective effect of −5.59 (−9.81 to −1.36) ×10−5. Conclusion Evidence is provided from the German Wismut cohort in support of a protective effect from working underground on prostate cancer mortality risk. PMID

  15. Prostate cancer mortality risk in relation to working underground in the Wismut cohort study of German uranium miners, 1970-2003.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Linda; Dufey, Florian; Tschense, Annemarie; Schnelzer, Maria; Sogl, Marion; Kreuzer, Michaela

    2012-01-01

    A recent study and comprehensive literature review has indicated that mining could be protective against prostate cancer. This indication has been explored further here by analysing prostate cancer mortality in the German 'Wismut' uranium miner cohort, which has detailed information on the number of days worked underground. An historical cohort study of 58 987 male mine workers with retrospective follow-up before 1999 and prospective follow-up since 1999. Uranium mine workers employed during the period 1970-1990 in the regions of Saxony and Thuringia, Germany, contributing 1.42 million person-years of follow-up ending in 2003. Simple standardised mortality ratio (SMR) analyses were applied to assess differences between the national and cohort prostate cancer mortality rates and complemented by refined analyses done entirely within the cohort. The internal comparisons applied Poisson regression excess relative prostate cancer mortality risk model with background stratification by age and calendar year and a whole range of possible explanatory covariables that included days worked underground and years worked at high physical activity with γ radiation treated as a confounder. The analysis is based on miner data for 263 prostate cancer deaths. The overall SMR was 0.85 (95% CI 0.75 to 0.95). A linear excess relative risk model with the number of years worked at high physical activity and the number of days worked underground as explanatory covariables provided a statistically significant fit when compared with the background model (p=0.039). Results (with 95% CIs) for the excess relative risk per day worked underground indicated a statistically significant (p=0.0096) small protective effect of -5.59 (-9.81 to -1.36) ×10(-5). Evidence is provided from the German Wismut cohort in support of a protective effect from working underground on prostate cancer mortality risk.

  16. Numerical simulation of the 2008 West-Bohemian earthquake swarm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinze, Thomas; Hamidi, Sahar; Galvan, Boris; Miller, Stephen A.

    2017-01-01

    CO2 has long been suspected of driving the Bohemian earthquake swarms because of the migrating nature of the swarms and expressions of CO2 degassing at the surface. Modeling to date primarily employed linear diffusion models, but more sophisticated modeling that includes a coupled fluid - and rock mechanical model has been lacking. In this work, we apply a model that couples mechanics to heat and flow of a super-critical CO2 through a fracture network. We present a continuum mechanical approach to derive the seismic moment magnitude using the deviatoric strain as an indicator of rupturing processes during individual events. We use a peak-detection algorithm to identify rapid changes in deviatoric strain, indicative of slip events. This method has been shown to work very well in dry and fluid-induced fracturing experiments at the laboratory scale, and in this work we extend the method to the scale of the West Bohemia/Vogtland earthquake swarms. We show very good agreement between model results and observations of the 2008 swarm, further supporting the hypothesis that the Bohemian earthquake swarms are predominately fluid-driven.

  17. Release behavior of uranium in uranium mill tailings under environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Peng, Tongjiang; Sun, Hongjuan; Yue, Huanjuan

    2017-05-01

    Uranium contamination is observed in sedimentary geochemical environments, but the geochemical and mineralogical processes that control uranium release from sediment are not fully appreciated. Identification of how sediments and water influence the release and migration of uranium is critical to improve the prevention of uranium contamination in soil and groundwater. To understand the process of uranium release and migration from uranium mill tailings under water chemistry conditions, uranium mill tailing samples from northwest China were investigated with batch leaching experiments. Results showed that water played an important role in uranium release from the tailing minerals. The uranium release was clearly influenced by contact time, liquid-solid ratio, particle size, and pH under water chemistry conditions. Longer contact time, higher liquid content, and extreme pH were all not conducive to the stabilization of uranium and accelerated the uranium release from the tailing mineral to the solution. The values of pH were found to significantly influence the extent and mechanisms of uranium release from minerals to water. Uranium release was monitored by a number of interactive processes, including dissolution of uranium-bearing minerals, uranium desorption from mineral surfaces, and formation of aqueous uranium complexes. Considering the impact of contact time, liquid-solid ratio, particle size, and pH on uranium release from uranium mill tailings, reducing the water content, decreasing the porosity of tailing dumps and controlling the pH of tailings were the key factors for prevention and management of environmental pollution in areas near uranium mines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. From evaporated seawater to uranium-mineralizing brines: Isotopic and trace element study of quartz-dolomite veins in the Athabasca system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Antonin; Boulvais, Philippe; Mercadier, Julien; Boiron, Marie-Christine; Cathelineau, Michel; Cuney, Michel; France-Lanord, Christian

    2013-07-01

    Stable isotope (O, H, C), radiogenic isotope (Sr, Nd) and trace element analyses have been applied to quartz-dolomite veins and their uranium(U)-bearing fluid inclusions associated with Proterozoic unconformity-related UO2 (uraninite) ores in the Athabasca Basin (Canada) in order to trace the evolution of pristine evaporated seawater towards U-mineralizing brines during their migration through sediments and basement rocks. Fluid inclusion data show that quartz and dolomite have precipitated from brines of comparable chemistry (excepted for relatively small amounts of CO2 found in dolomite-hosted fluid inclusions). However, δ18O values of quartz veins (δ18O = 11‰ to 18‰) and dolomite veins (δ18O = 13‰ to 24‰) clearly indicate isotopic disequilibrium between quartz and dolomite. Hence, it is inferred that this isotopic disequilibrium primarily reflects a decrease in temperature between the quartz stage (˜180 °C) and the dolomite stage (˜120 °C). The δ13C values of CO2 dissolved in dolomite-hosted fluid inclusions (δ13C = -30‰ to -4‰) and the δ13C values of dolomite (δ13C = -23.5‰ to -3.5‰) indicate that the CO2 dissolved in the mineralizing brines originated from brine-graphite interactions in the basement. The resulting slight increase in the fluid partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) may have triggered dolomite precipitation instead of quartz. δ18O values of quartz veins and previously published δ18O values of the main alteration minerals around the U-ores (illite, chlorite and tourmaline) show that quartz and alteration minerals were isotopically equilibrated with the same fluid at ˜180 °C. The REE concentrations in dolomite produce PAAS-normalized patterns that show some similarities with that of UO2 and are clearly distinct from that of the other main REE-bearing minerals in these environments (monazite, zircon and aluminum phosphate-sulfate (APS) minerals). The radiogenic isotope compositions of dolomite (87Sr/86Sri = 0.7053 to 0

  19. Uranium: A Dentist's perspective

    PubMed Central

    Toor, R. S. S.; Brar, G. S.

    2012-01-01

    Uranium is a naturally occurring radionuclide found in granite and other mineral deposits. In its natural state, it consists of three isotopes (U-234, U-235 and U-238). On an average, 1% – 2% of ingested uranium is absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract in adults. The absorbed uranium rapidly enters the bloodstream and forms a diffusible ionic uranyl hydrogen carbonate complex (UO2HCO3+) which is in equilibrium with a nondiffusible uranyl albumin complex. In the skeleton, the uranyl ion replaces calcium in the hydroxyapatite complex of the bone crystal. Although in North India, there is a risk of radiological toxicity from orally ingested natural uranium, the principal health effects are chemical toxicity. The skeleton and kidney are the primary sites of uranium accumulation. Acute high dose of uranyl nitrate delays tooth eruption, and mandibular growth and development, probably due to its effect on target cells. Based on all previous research and recommendations, the role of a dentist is to educate the masses about the adverse effects of uranium on the overall as well as the dental health. The authors recommended that apart from the discontinuation of the addition of uranium to porcelain, the Public community water supplies must also comply with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards of uranium levels being not more than 30 ppb (parts per billion). PMID:24478959

  20. Sorption and coprecipitation of trace concentrations of thorium with various minerals under conditions simulating an acid uranium mill effluent environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landa, Edward R.; Le, Anh H.; Luck, Rudy L.; Yeich, Philip J.

    1995-01-01

    Sorption of thorium by pre-existing crystals of anglesite (PbSO4), apatite (Ca5(PO4)3(HO)), barite (BaSO4), bentonite (Na0.7Al3.3Mg0.7Si8O20(OH)4), celestite (SrSO4), fluorite (CaF2), galena (PbS), gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O), hematite (Fe2O3), jarosite (KFe3(SO4)2(OH)6), kaolinite (Al2O3·2SiO2·2H2O), quartz (SiO2) and sodium feldspar (NaAlSi3O8) was studied under conditions that simulate an acidic uranium mill effluent environment. Up to 100% removal of trace quantitiees of thorim (approx. 1.00 ppm in 0.01 N H2SO4) from solution occurred within 3 h with fluorite and within 48 h in the case of bentonite. Quartz, jarosite, hematite, sodium feldspar, gypsum and galena removed less than 15% of the thorium from solution. In the coprecipitation studies, barite, anglesite, gypsum and celestite were formed in the presence of thorium (approx. 1.00 ppm). Approximately all of the thorium present in solution coprecipitated with barite and celestite; 95% coprecipitated with anglesite and less than 5% with gypsum under similar conditions. When jarosite was precipitated in the presence of thorium, a significant amount of thorium (78%) was incorporated in the precipitate.

  1. Assessment of the vertical distribution of natural radionuclides in a mineralized uranium area in south-west Spain.

    PubMed

    Blanco Rodríguez, P; Vera Tomé, F; Lozano, J C

    2014-01-01

    Low-level alpha spectrometry techniques using semiconductor detectors (PIPS) and liquid scintillation (LKB Quantulus 1220™) were used to determine the activity concentration of (238)U, (234)U, (230)Th, (226)Ra, (232)Th, and (210)Pb in soil samples. The soils were collected from an old disused uranium mine located in southwest Spain. The soils were sampled from areas with different levels of influence from the installation and hence had different levels of contamination. The vertical profiles of the soils (down to 40 cm depth) were studied in order to evaluate the vertical distribution of the natural radionuclides. To determine the origin of these natural radionuclides the Enrichment Factor was used. Also, study of the activity ratios between radionuclides belonging to the same radioactive series allowed us to assess the different types of behaviors of the radionuclides involved. The vertical profiles for the radionuclide members of the (238)U series were different at each sampling point, depending on the level of influence of the installation. However, the profiles of each point were similar for the long-lived radionuclides of the (238)U series ((238)U, (234)U, (230)Th, and (226)Ra). Moreover, a major imbalance was observed between (210)Pb and (226)Ra in the surface layer, due to (222)Rn exhalation and the subsequent surface deposition of (210)Pb. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Bulakh, Andrei

    2004-06-01

    This introduction to mineralogy for undergraduate and graduate students in geology and materials science has been designed for a semester course. Covering all aspects of mineralogy in an integrated way, it links mineral properties with broader geological processes, and conveys their economic importance throughout the text. Handy reference tables and a glossary of terms make this study an indispensable guide for the next generation of mineralogy students.

  3. The performance of functional methods for correcting non-Gaussian measurement error within Poisson regression: corrected excess risk of lung cancer mortality in relation to radon exposure among French uranium miners.

    PubMed

    Allodji, Rodrigue S; Thiébaut, Anne C M; Leuraud, Klervi; Rage, Estelle; Henry, Stéphane; Laurier, Dominique; Bénichou, Jacques

    2012-12-30

    A broad variety of methods for measurement error (ME) correction have been developed, but these methods have rarely been applied possibly because their ability to correct ME is poorly understood. We carried out a simulation study to assess the performance of three error-correction methods: two variants of regression calibration (the substitution method and the estimation calibration method) and the simulation extrapolation (SIMEX) method. Features of the simulated cohorts were borrowed from the French Uranium Miners' Cohort in which exposure to radon had been documented from 1946 to 1999. In the absence of ME correction, we observed a severe attenuation of the true effect of radon exposure, with a negative relative bias of the order of 60% on the excess relative risk of lung cancer death. In the main scenario considered, that is, when ME characteristics previously determined as most plausible from the French Uranium Miners' Cohort were used both to generate exposure data and to correct for ME at the analysis stage, all three error-correction methods showed a noticeable but partial reduction of the attenuation bias, with a slight advantage for the SIMEX method. However, the performance of the three correction methods highly depended on the accurate determination of the characteristics of ME. In particular, we encountered severe overestimation in some scenarios with the SIMEX method, and we observed lack of correction with the three methods in some other scenarios. For illustration, we also applied and compared the proposed methods on the real data set from the French Uranium Miners' Cohort study.

  4. Computer-assisted decision aid for the estimation of mineral endowment: uranium in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico, a case study

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, F.J.

    1983-01-01

    This methodology comprises two main sections, each executed on a different computer system. The first section, the Geologic Decision Model, has been computerized as an interactive PLATO program. Using the PLATO system, the geologist describes probabilistically the perceived states of geologic processes and conditions. The decision model analyzes this information and computes a probability distribution for mineral occurrence. The second section, the Endowment Simulation Model (program MASTER), is run on the DEC 10 and Cyber 175 computers. Program MASTER takes the product of the Geologic Decision Model, combines it with other data, and produces a probabilistic estimate of mineral endowment for the region being evaluated. Development and testing of the Arizona Appraisal System were carried out simultaneously over a period of about three years. During this period, four geologists from government and industry were called upon four or five times over a period of about a year for a study of the uranium (U/sub 3/O/sub 8/) endowment in the San Juan Basin of northwestern New Mexico. The results produced by the system consist, for each geologist, of a probability distribution for tons of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ endowment for (1) each partition of each stratigraphic unit, (2) each stratigraphic unit as a whole, (3) ''formations'' or ''merged units'' (groups of stratigraphic units), and (4) the San Juan Basin as a whole (all stratigraphic units). The system also calculates the average distribution across all geologists for the various merged units and for the basin as a whole. The result for the basin as a whole (in thousands of tons) is: mean 3,855, variance 4,108 x 10/sup 9/, and 95th percentile 6,541.

  5. Uranium interaction with soil minerals in the presence of co-contaminants: Case Study- subsurface sediments at or below the water table

    SciTech Connect

    Gartman, Brandy N.; Qafoku, Nikolla

    2016-03-09

    Uranium (U) contaminated subsurface systems are common on a global scale mainly because of its essential role in the production of plutonium for nuclear weapons and other nuclear energy and research activities. Studying the behavior and fate of U in these systems is challenging because of heterogeneities of different types (i.e., physical, chemical and mineralogical) and a complex network of often time-dependent hydrological, biological and chemical reactions and processes that occur sequentially or simultaneously, affecting and/or controlling U mobility. A U contaminated site, i.e., the Integrated Field Research Challenge site in Rifle, CO, USA (a former U mill site) is the focus of this discussion. The overall objectives of this chapter are to 1) provide an overview of the contamination levels (U and other co-contaminants) at this field site; 2) review and discuss different aspects of mineral-U contaminant interactions in reduced and oxidized environments, and in the presence of co-contaminants; 3) present results from a systematic macroscopic, microscopic, and spectroscopic study as an example of the current research efforts and the state-of-knowledge in this important research area; and 4) offer insightful conclusive remarks and future research needs about reactions and processes that control U and other contaminants’ fate and behavior under hydraulically saturated conditions. The implications and applications presented in this chapter are valid for U contaminated sites across the world.

  6. Impact of measurement error in radon exposure on the estimated excess relative risk of lung cancer death in a simulated study based on the French Uranium Miners' Cohort.

    PubMed

    Allodji, Rodrigue S; Leuraud, Klervi; Thiébaut, Anne C M; Henry, Stéphane; Laurier, Dominique; Bénichou, Jacques

    2012-05-01

    Measurement error (ME) can lead to bias in the analysis of epidemiologic studies. Here a simulation study is described that is based on data from the French Uranium Miners' Cohort and that was conducted to assess the effect of ME on the estimated excess relative risk (ERR) of lung cancer death associated with radon exposure. Starting from a scenario without any ME, data were generated containing successively Berkson or classical ME depending on time periods, to reflect changes in the measurement of exposure to radon ((222)Rn) and its decay products over time in this cohort. Results indicate that ME attenuated the level of association with radon exposure, with a negative bias percentage on the order of 60% on the ERR estimate. Sensitivity analyses showed the consequences of specific ME characteristics (type, size, structure, and distribution) on the ERR estimates. In the future, it appears important to correct for ME upon analyzing cohorts such as this one to decrease bias in estimates of the ERR of adverse events associated with exposure to ionizing radiation.

  7. Composition and diversity of microbial communities recovered from surrogate minerals incubated in an acidic uranium-contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Reardon, Catherine L.; Cummings, David E.; Petzke, Lynn M.; Kinsall, Barry Lee; Watson, David B; Peyton, Brent M.; Geesey, Gill G.

    2004-10-01

    Our understanding of subsurface microbiology is hindered by the inaccessibility of this environment, particularly when the hydrogeologic medium is contaminated with toxic substances. In this study, surrogate geological media contained in a porous receptacle were incubated in a well within the saturated zone of a pristine region of an aquifer to capture populations from the extant communities. After an 8-week incubation, the media were recovered, and the microbial community that developed on each medium was compared to the community recovered from groundwater and native sediments from the same region of the aquifer, using 16S DNA coding for rRNA (rDNA)-based terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). The groundwater and sediment communities were highly distinct from one another, and the communities that developed on the various media were more similar to groundwater communities than to sediment communities. 16S rDNA clone libraries of communities that developed on particles of a specular hematite medium incubated in the same well as the media used for T-RFLP analysis were compared with those obtained from an acidic, uranium-contaminated region of the same aquifer. The hematite-associated community formed in the pristine area was highly diverse at the species level, with 25 distinct phylotypes identified, the majority of which (73%) were affiliated with the {beta}-Proteobacteria. Similarly, the hematite-associated community formed in the contaminated area was populated in large part by {beta}-Proteobacteria (62%); however, only 13 distinct phylotypes were apparent. The three numerically dominant clones from the hematite-associated community from the contaminated site were affiliated with metal- and radionuclide-tolerant or acidophilic taxa, consistent with the environmental conditions. Only two populations were common to both sites.

  8. The solubilities of some major and minor element minerals in ground waters associated with a sandstone-hosted uranium deposit.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wanty, R.B.; Chatcham, J.R.; Langmuir, D.

    1987-01-01

    Ground-water samples from 41 wells penetrating basal Oakville sandstone (Miocene) in S Texas were chemically analysed to identify chemical changes related to nearby U orebodies. The coverage included a 240 km2 area which contains several fault-related U deposits. Factors affecting the hydrochemistry include: 1) relatively high permeabilities of buried fluvial-channel sediments; 2) upwards leakage of brines along growth faults into the aquifer; 3) development of a redox interface (Eh = 0 volts) within the aquifer; and 4) the semi-arid climate. Variations in the saturation index (SI) for chemically reduced minerals of U, As, Mo, Se and for associated minerals such as pyrite outlined the position of known deposits. The SI increases towards zero as the deposits are approached from updip distances of 3-4.5 km, then decreases again downdip. The radiogenic pathfinders Ra and Rn showed very strong anomalies with ore, but diminished to background levels at short distances from ore. A strong He anomaly is deflected in the direction of ground-water flow away from the ore.-R.A.H.

  9. Multistage evolution of UHT granulites from the southernmost part of the Gföhl Nappe, Bohemian Massif, Lower Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schantl, Philip; Hauzenberger, Christoph; Linner, Manfred

    2016-04-01

    A detailed petrological investigation has been undertaken in leucocratic kyanite-garnet bearing and mesocratic orthopyroxene bearing granulites from the Dunkelsteiner Wald, Pöchlarn-Wieselburg and Zöbing granulite bodies from the Moldanubian Zone in the Bohemian Massif (Austria). A combination of textural observations, conventional geothermobarometry, phase equilibrium modelling as well as major and trace element analyses in garnet enables us to confirm a multistage Variscan metamorphic history. Chemically homogenous garnet cores with near constant grossular-rich plateaus are considered to reflect garnet growth during an early HP/UHP metamorphic evolution. Crystallographically oriented rutile exsolutions restricted to those grossular-rich garnet cores point to a subsequent isothermal decompression of the HP/UHP rocks. Overgrowing garnet rims show a pronounced zonation and are interpreted as the result of dehydration melting reactions during an isobaric heating phase which could have taken place near the base of an overthickened continental crust, where the previously deeply subducted rocks were exhumed to. For this HP granulite facies event maximum PT conditions of ~1050 °C and 1.6 GPa have been estimated from leucocratic granulites comprising the peak mineral assemblage quartz, ternary feldspar, garnet, kyanite and rutile. The pronounced zoning of garnet rims indicates that the HP granulite facies event must have been short lived since diffusion in this temperature region is usually sufficient fast to homogenize a zoning pattern in garnet. A retrogressive metamorphic stage is documented in these rocks by the replacement of kyanite to sillimanite and the growth of biotite. This retrograde event took place within the granulite facies but at significantly lower pressures and temperatures with ~0.8 GPa and ~760 °C. This final stage of re-equilibration is thought to be linked with a second exhumation phase into middle crustal levels accompanied by intensive

  10. Fluorite as an Sm-Nd geochronometer of hydrothermal processes: Dating of mineralization hosted in the Strel'tsovka uranium ore field, eastern Baikal region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyshev, I. V.; Golubev, V. N.; Aleshin, A. P.; Larionova, Yu. O.; Gol'tsman, Yu. V.

    2016-11-01

    The possibility of using hydrothermal fluorite as an Sm-Nd geochronometer is based on the results of an REE pattern study of this mineral (Chernyshev et al., 1986). As a result of REE fractionation, in many cases, the Sm/Nd ratio achieves a multifold increase compared with its level in terrestrial rocks, and the radiogenic shift of the 143Nd/144Nd isotope ratio reaches 10-20 ɛNd units over a short time interval (as soon as tens of Ma). This is a necessary prerequisite for Sm-Nd isochron dating of fluorite. Zonal polychrome fluorite from a vein referred to the final stage of large-scale uranium mineralization at the Sterl'tsovka deposit in the ore field of the same name located in the eastern Transbaikal region has been dated using the 143Nd/144Nd method. To optimize isochron construction, local probes with high and contrasting Sm/Nd ratios have been sampled from the polished surfaces of two samples, taking into account the REE pattern of zonal fluorite. Sm-Nd isochron dating has been carried out separately for each sample. The 147Sm/144Nd i 143Nd/144Nd ratios vary within the intervals 0.5359-2.037 and 0.512799-0.514105, respectively. Two isochrons, each based on six fluorite probes, have been obtained with the following parameters, which coincide within 2σ uncertainty limits: (1) t = 134.8 ± 1.3 Ma, (143Nd/144Nd)0 = 0.512310 ± 13, MWSD = 0.43 and (2) t = 135.8 ± 1.6 Ma, (143Nd/144Nd)0 = 0.512318 ± 10, MWSD = 1.5. The mean age of fluorite based on two isochron datings is 135.3 ± 1 Ma. Comparison of this value with the most precise dating of pitchblende related to the ore stage in the Strel'tsovka ore field (135.5 ± 1 Ma) shows that four mineralization stages, distinguished by geological and mineralogical data, that were completed with the formation of polychrome fluorite veins 135.3 ± 1 Ma ago, represent a single and indivisible hydrothermal process whose duration does not exceed 1 Ma.

  11. Uranium-lead isotope systematics and apparent ages of zircons and other minerals in precambrian granitic rocks, Granite Mountains, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ludwig, K. R.; Stuckless, J.S.

    1978-01-01

    Zircon suites from the two main types of granite in the Granite Mountains, Wyoming, yielded concordia-intercept ages of 2,640??20 m.y. for a red, foliated granite (granite of Long Creek Mountain) and 2,595??40 m.y. for the much larger mass of the granite of Lankin Dome. These ages are statistically distinct (40??20 m.y. difference) and are consistent with observed chemical and textural differences. The lower intercepts of the zircon chords of 50??40 and 100+ 75 m.y. for the granite of Long Creek Mountain and granite of Lankin Dome, respectively, are not consistent with reasonable continuous diffusion lead-loss curves but do correspond well with the known (Laramide) time of uplift of the rocks. Epidote, zircon, and apatite from silicified and epidotized zones in the granites all record at least one postcrystallization disturbance in addition to the Laramide event and do not define a unique age of silicification and epidotization. The lower limit of ???2,500 m.y. provided by the least disturbed epidote, however, suggests that these rocks were probably formed by deuteric processes shortly after emplacement of the granite of the Lankin Dome. The earlier of the two disturbances that affected the minerals of the silicified-epidotized rock can be bracketed between 1,350 and 2,240 m.y. ago and is probably the same event that lowered mineral K-Ar and ages in the region. Zircon suites from both types of granite show well-defined linear correlations among U content, common-Pb content, and degree of discordance. One of the zircon suites has an extremely high common-Pb content (up to 180 ppm) and exhibits a component of radiogenic-Pb loss that is apparently unrelated to radiation damage. ?? 1978 Springer-Verlag.

  12. P-wave Receiver Functions reveal the Bohemian Massif crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampfova Exnerova, Hana; Plomerova, Jaroslava; Vecsey, Ludek

    2015-04-01

    In this study we present initial results of P-wave Receiver Functions (RF) calculated from broad-band waveforms of teleseismic events recorded by temporary and permanent stations in the Bohemian Massif (BM, Central Europe). Temporary arrays BOHEMA I (2001-2003), BOHEMA II (2004-2005) and BOHEMA III (2005-2006) operated during passive seismic experiments oriented towards studying velocity structure of the lithosphere and the upper mantle. Receiver Functions show relative response of the Earth structure under a seismic station and nowadays represent frequently-used method to retrieve structure of the crust, whose knowledge is needed in various studies of the upper mantle. The recorded waveforms are composites of direct P and P-to-S converted waves that reverberate in the structure beneath the receiver (Ammon, 1997). The RFs are sensitive to seismic velocity contrast and are thus suited to identifying velocity discontinuities in the crust, including the Mohorovičić discontinuity (Moho). Relative travel-time delays of the converted phases detected in the RFs are transformed into estimates of discontinuity depths assuming external information on the vp/vs and P velocity. To evaluate RFs we use the Multiple-taper spectral correlation (MTC) method (Park and Levin, 2000) and process signals from teleseismic events at epicentral distances of 30 - 100° with magnitude Mw > 5.5. Recordings are filtered with Butterworth band-pass filter of 2 - 8 s. To select automatically signals which are strong enough, we calculate signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) in two steps. In the first step we calculate SNR for signals from intervals (-1s, 3s)/(-10s, -2s), where P-arrival time represent time zero. In the second step we broaden the intervals and calculate SNR for (-1s, 9s)/(-60s, -2s). We also employ forward modelling of the RFs using Interactive Receiver Functions Forward Modeller (IRFFM) (Tkalčić et al., 2010) to produce, in the first step, one-dimensional velocity models under

  13. The Leyden uranium prospect, Jefferson County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gott, Garland B.

    1950-01-01

    The Leyden uranium prospect is in sec. 28, T, 2 S., R. 70 W, Jefferson County, Cplo, Examination of the property was made in February 1950. Uranium was first reported in this locality in 1875 by Captain E. L. Berthoud, who noted uranium minerals associated with the main coal bed. The Old Leyden coal mine workings have long been abandoned and caved, but specimens of the uranium-bearing rock can be seen on the old dump 700 feet to the south. The mineralized coal bed is 10 to 12 feet thick and occurs near the base of the Laramie formation of Upper Cretaceous age. Uranium minerals are present in the form of yellow incrustations and inclusions in fractured and partly silicified coal. Petrographic studies indicate that the silica and uranium minerals were deposited after deposition and carbonization of the coal. Secondary uranium minerals also were found by C. R. Butler along the outcrop of the sandstones in the Laramie formation. No uranium minerals were found in place by the writer, but four samples from the dump contained 0.001, 0,005, 0.17 and 0.69 percent uranium.

  14. Felsic granulite with layers of eclogite facies rocks in the Bohemian Massif; did they share a common metamorphic history?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedlicka, Radim; Faryad, Shah Wali

    2017-08-01

    High pressure granulite and granulite gneiss from the Rychleby Mountains in the East Sudetes form an approximately 7 km long and 0.8 km wide body, which is enclosed by amphibolite facies orthogneiss with a steep foliation. Well preserved felsic granulite is located in the central part of the body, where several small bodies of mafic granulite are also present. In comparison to other high pressure granulites in the Bohemian Massif, which show strong mineral and textural re-equilibration under granulite facies conditions, the mafic granulite samples preserve eclogite facies minerals (garnet, omphacite, kyanite, rutile and phengite) and their field and textural relations indicate that both mafic and felsic granulites shared common metamorphic history during prograde eclogite facies and subsequent granulite facies events. Garnet from both granulite varieties shows prograde compositional zoning and contains inclusions of phengite. Yttrium and REEs in garnet show typical bell-shaped distributions with no annular peaks near the grain rims. Investigation of major and trace elements zoning, including REEs distribution in garnet, was combined with thermodynamic modelling to constrain the early eclogite facies metamorphism and to estimate pressure-temperature conditions of the subsequent granulite facies overprint. The first (U)HP metamorphism occurred along a low geothermal gradient in a subduction-related environment from its initial stage at 0.8 GPa/460 °C and reached pressures up to 2.5 GPa at 550 °C. The subsequent granulite facies overprint (1.6-1.8 GPa/800-880 °C) affected the rocks only partially; by replacement of omphacite into diopside + plagioclase symplectite and by compositional modification of garnet rims. The mineral textures and the preservation of the eclogite facies prograde compositional zoning in garnet cores confirm that the granulite facies overprint was either too short or too faint to cause recrystallisation and homogenisation of the eclogite

  15. The calculated solubility of platinum and gold in oxygen-saturated fluids and the genesis of platinum-palladium and gold mineralization in the unconformity-related uranium deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaireth, S.

    1992-01-01

    Thermodynamic calculations on the solubility of platinum and gold indicate that saline (1 m NaCl), fluids saturated with atmospheric oxygen can transport geologically realistic concentrations of platinum-group-elements (PGE), gold, and uranium as chloro-complexes. A number of calculations involving fluid-rock interaction suggest that the oxygen-saturated fluids flowing through rocks containing quartz, muscovite, kaolinite, magnetite and hematite, initially oxidize any magnetite to hematite, allowing subsequent batches of ore fluids to retain their high oxidation state. During their migration through the aquifer, the oxidizing fluids would move the oxidation-reduction interface deeper into the aquifer, leaching and redepositing platinum and gold. The redissolution of earlier precipitated platinum and gold depends on the fluid/ rock ratio and the associated increase in the oxidation state. Therefore, lowering of fluid/rock ratios and/or mixing of the oxidized fluids with a large amount of reduced fluid will precipitate uranium, PGE, and gold. It is suggested that this model can explain the genesis of gold and PGE mineralization in the unconformity-related uranium deposits of the Alligator Rivers Uranium Field in the Northern Territory, Australia.

  16. Uranium-lead and lead-lead investigations of minerals from the Broken Hill lodes and mine sequence rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Gulson, B.L.

    1984-05-01

    Mineral separates from the main lodes and mine sequence rocks at Broken Hill have been analyzed using the U-Pb and Pb-Pb methods. Apatite separates were analyzed from the mine sequence rocks, from banded iron-formations, and from the lodes. A regression analysis of the combined rock and lode apatite data for the /sup 207/Pb//sup 206/Pb vs. /sup 204/Pb//sup 206/Pb plot gives an age of 1,565 + or - 20 m.y. (2sigma) which is similar, within the experimental error limits, to the minimum U-Pb ages for monazite and Pb-pb age for sphene from the mine sequence rocks of about 1,595 m.y. Apparent differences in initial /sup 208/Pb//sup 206/Pb (or /sup 208/Pb//sup 204/Pb) ratios in the lode, and in the banded iron-formations and mine sequence rock apatites preclude a simple genetic relationship between them.

  17. Bohemian circular structure, Czechoslovakia: Search for the impact evidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajlich, Petr

    1992-01-01

    Test of the impact hypothesis for the origin of the circular, 260-km-diameter structure of the Bohemian Massif led to the discovery of glasses and breccias in the Upper Proterozoic sequence that can be compared to autogeneous breccias of larger craters. The black recrystallized glass contains small exsolution crystals of albite-oligoclase and biotite, regularly dispersed in the matrix recrystallized to quartz. The occurrence of these rocks is limited to a 1-sq-km area. It is directly underlain by the breccia of the pelitic and silty rocks cemented by the melted matrix, found on several tens of square kilometers. The melt has the same chemistry as rock fragments in major and in trace elements. It is slightly impoverished in water. The proportion of melted rocks to fragments varies from 1:5 to 10:1. The mineralogy of melt viens is the function of later, mostly contact metamorphism. On the contact of granitic plutons it abounds on sillimanite, cordierite, and small bullets of ilmenite. Immediately on the contact with syenodiorites it contains garnets. The metamorphism of the impact rock melt seems the most probable explanation of the mineralogy and the dry total fusion of rocks accompanied by the strong fragmentation. Other aspects of this investigation are discussed.

  18. Passive seismic experiment BOHEMA - BOhemian Massif Anisotropy and HEterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babuska, V.; Bohema Working, Group

    2003-04-01

    A dense network of stations, consisting of 61 permanent and 84 temporary stations, has been deployed to operate during most of 2002 and the beginning of 2003. The array is centered in the geodynamically active part of the western Bohemian Massif (BM) around the crossing of the Eger Graben (EG) with the Marianske Lazne Fault (MLF). A joint inversion of the shear-wave splitting parameters and P-residual spheres aims at finding a general 3D orientation of anisotropic structures. A three-dimensional anisotropic tomographic model will be one of major results of the experiment. Special attention will be paid to spatial variations of the vP/vS ratio with the aim to map concentrations of fluids which probably play an important role in triggering the earthquake swarms. The BOHEMA research team, formed by scientists from 10 institutions of the Czech republic, Germany and France, will concentrate on distinguishing between thermal anomalies and anisotropic structures and try to answer the question about a possible existence of a thermal plume beneath the western EG. The resulting geodynamic model of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system, based on all available geophysical, geological and petrological data, will shed light on possible causes of earthquake swarms, which periodically occur in the region, as well as on a deep-seated source of the numerous CO2 and He gas emanations. Among preliminary results we present lateral variations of the shear-wave splitting across and along the EG in comparison with the near- surface tectonics.

  19. Uranium-rich accessory minerals in the peraluminous and perphosphorous Belvís de Monroy pluton (Iberian Variscan belt)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Soba, Cecilia; Villaseca, Carlos; Orejana, David; Jeffries, Teresa

    2014-05-01

    The strongly peraluminous, perphosphorous (<0.85 wt% P2O5) and low-Ca granites from the Belvís de Monroy pluton contain the most U-rich monazite-(Ce) and xenotime known in igneous rocks. Along with these accessory minerals, P-rich zircon occurs, reaching uncommon compositions particularly in the more fractionated units of this zoned pluton. Monazite displays a wide compositional variation of UO2 (<23.13 wt%) and ThO2 (<19.58 wt%), positively correlated with Ca, Si, P, Y and REE. Xenotime shows a high UO2 content (2.37-13.34 wt%) with parallel increases of LREE, Ca and Si. Zircon contains comparatively much lower UO2 (<1.53 wt%) but high P2O5 (<14.91 wt%), Al2O3 (<6.96 wt%), FeO (<2.93 wt%) and CaO (<2.24 wt%) contents. The main mechanism of incorporating large U and Th amounts in studied monazite and U in xenotime is the cheralite-type [(Th,U)4+ + Ca2+ = 2(Y,REE)3+] substitution. Zircon requires several coupled mechanisms to charge balance the P substitution, resulting in non-stoichiometric compositions with low analytical totals. Compositional variations in the studied accessory phases indicate that the substitution mechanisms during crystal growth depend on the availability of non-formula elements. The strong P-rich character of the studied granites increases monazite crystallization, triggering a progressive impoverishment in Th and LREE in the residual melts, and consequently increasing extraordinarily the U content in monazite and xenotime. This is in marked contrast to other peraluminous (I-type or P-poor S-type) granite series. The P-rich and low-Ca peraluminous melt inhibits uraninite crystallization, so contributing to the U availability for monazite and xenotime.

  20. The Nolans Bore rare-earth element-phosphorus-uranium mineral system: geology, origin and post-depositional modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huston, David L.; Maas, Roland; Cross, Andrew; Hussey, Kelvin J.; Mernagh, Terrence P.; Fraser, Geoff; Champion, David C.

    2016-08-01

    Nolans Bore is a rare-earth element (REE)-U-P fluorapatite vein deposit hosted mostly by the ~1805 Ma Boothby Orthogneiss in the Aileron Province, Northern Territory, Australia. The fluorapatite veins are complex, with two stages: (1) massive to granular fluorapatite with inclusions of REE silicates, phosphates and (fluoro)carbonates, and (2) calcite-allanite with accessory REE-bearing phosphate and (fluoro)carbonate minerals that vein and brecciate the earlier stage. The veins are locally accompanied by narrow skarn-like (garnet-diopside-amphibole) wall rock alteration zones. SHRIMP Th-Pb analyses of allanite yielded an age of 1525 ± 18 Ma, interpreted as the minimum age of mineralisation. The maximum age is provided by a ~1550 Ma SHRIMP U-Pb age for a pegmatite that predates the fluorapatite veins. Other isotopic systems yielded ages from ~1443 to ~345 Ma, implying significant post-depositional isotopic disturbance. Calculation of initial ɛNd and 87Sr/86Sr at 1525 Ma and stable isotope data are consistent with an enriched mantle or lower crust source, although post-depositional disturbance is likely. Processes leading to formation of Nolans Bore began with north-dipping subduction along the south margin of the Aileron Province at 1820-1750 Ma, producing a metasomatised, volatile-rich, lithospheric mantle wedge. About 200 million years later, near the end of the Chewings Orogeny, this reservoir and/or the lower crust sourced alkaline low-degree partial melts which passed into the mid- and upper-crust. Fluids derived from these melts, which may have included phosphatic melts, eventually deposited the Nolans Bore fluorapatite veins due to fluid-rock interaction, cooling, depressurisation and/or fluid mixing. Owing to its size and high concentration of Th (2500 ppm), in situ radiogenic heating caused significant recrystallisation and isotopic resetting. The system finally cooled below 300 °C at ~370 Ma, possibly in response to unroofing during the Alice Springs

  1. URANIUM RECOVERY

    DOEpatents

    Fitch, F.T.; Cruikshank, A.J.

    1958-10-28

    A process for recovering uranium from a solution of a diethyl dithiocarbaruate of uranium in an orgakic solvent substantially immiscible with water is presented. The process comprises brlnging the organic solutlon into intimate contact wlth an aqueous solution of ammonium carbonate, whereby the uranium passes to the aqueous carbonate solution as a soluble uranyl carbonate.

  2. A Treasure Chest of Nanogranites: the Bohemian Massif (Central Europe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrero, S.; O'Brien, P. J.; Walczak, K.; Wunder, B.; Ziemann, M. A.; Hecht, L.

    2014-12-01

    Despite 150 years of investigation of the Bohemian Massif (Central Europe), it is only recently that the investigation of old and new samples displayed the occurrence of tiny portions of crystallized anatectic melt in regional migmatites. These vestiges of magma, called "nanogranites", are natural probes of the partial melting processes in the crust. Original melt composition and water content can be directly analyzed after piston cylinder re-homogenization. When compared to classic re-melting experiments, nanogranites are ideal "natural" experimental charges of anatectic melt. They are encapsulated in peritectic garnet immediately after production - both phases are products of the same partial melting reaction. Sheltered inside garnet, they remain unaffected by the physico-chemical changes which affected the host migmatites during their slow cooling, unlike leucosomes and anatexis-related plutons. Five different case studies of nanogranite-bearing high-grade rocks have been identified so far: three in metapelites from the Moldanubian Zone, and two in metagranitoids from the Granulitgebirge and Orlica-Śnieżnik Dome. Their characterization provides insights into how the continental crust melts at different depths, from shallow levels to mantle depths, during different moments of its metamorphic history (prograde vs. decompressional melting). For example, the investigation and experimental re-melting of nanogranites from Grt+Ky leucogranulites (Orlica-Śnieżnik Dome) recently provided evidence of prograde melting of metagranitoids under eclogite-facies conditions (T≥875°C and P~2.7 GPa), close to the stability field of coesite. The melt generated is granitic, hydrous (6 wt% H2O) and metaluminous (ASI=1.03), and is at the moment the "deepest" glass obtained through re-homogenization of primary polycrystalline inclusions in natural rocks. This work confirms that nanogranites in migmatites 1) are a powerful tool to constrain anatexis in natural rocks, and 2) can

  3. The Freyenstein Shear Zone - Implications for exhumation of the South Bohemian Batholith (Moldanubian Superunit, Strudengau, Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griesmeier, Gerit; Iglseder, Christoph; Konstantin, Petrakakis

    2016-04-01

    The Moldanubian superunit is part of the internal zone of the Variscan Orogen in Europe and borders on the Saxothuringian and Sudetes zones in the north. In the south, it is blanketed by the Alpine foreland molasse. Tectonically it is subdivided into the Moldanubian Nappes (MN), the South Bohemian Batholith (SBB) and the Bavarian Nappes. This work describes the ~ 500 m thick Freyenstein shear zone, which is located at the southern border of the Bohemian Massif north and south of the Danube near Freyenstein (Strudengau, Lower Austria). The area is built up by granites of Weinsberg-type, which are interlayered by numerous dikes and paragneisses of the Ostrong nappe system. These dikes include medium grained granites and finegrained granites (Mauthausen-type granites), which form huge intrusions. In addition, smaller intrusions of dark, finegrained diorites und aplitic dikes are observed. These rocks are affected by the Freyenstein shear zone und ductily deformed. Highly deformed pegmatoides containing white mica crystals up to one cm cut through the deformed rocks and form the last dike generation. The Freyenstein shear zone is a NE-SW striking shear zone at the eastern edge of the SBB. The mylonitic foliation is dipping to the SE with angles around 60°. Shear-sense criteria like clast geometries, SĆ structures as well as microstructures show normal faulting top to S/SW with steep (ca. 50°) angles. The Freyenstein shear zone records a polyphase history of deformation and crystallization: In a first phase, mylonitized mineral assemblages in deformed granitoides can be observed, which consist of pre- to syntectonic muscovite-porphyroclasts and biotite as well as dynamically recrystallized potassium feldspar, plagioclase and quartz. The muscovite porphyroclasts often form mica fishes and show top to S/SW directed shear-sense. The lack of syntectonic chlorite crystals points to metamorphic conditions of lower amphibolite-facies > than 450° C. In a later stage fluid

  4. Solubility measurement of uranium in uranium-contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.; Elless, M.; Hoffman, F.

    1993-08-01

    A short-term equilibration study involving two uranium-contaminated soils at the Fernald site was conducted as part of the In Situ Remediation Integrated Program. The goal of this study is to predict the behavior of uranium during on-site remediation of these soils. Geochemical modeling was performed on the aqueous species dissolved from these soils following the equilibration study to predict the on-site uranium leaching and transport processes. The soluble levels of total uranium, calcium, magnesium, and carbonate increased continually for the first four weeks. After the first four weeks, these components either reached a steady-state equilibrium or continued linearity throughout the study. Aluminum, potassium, and iron, reached a steady-state concentration within three days. Silica levels approximated the predicted solubility of quartz throughout the study. A much higher level of dissolved uranium was observed in the soil contaminated from spillage of uranium-laden solvents and process effluents than in the soil contaminated from settling of airborne uranium particles ejected from the nearby incinerator. The high levels observed for soluble calcium, magnesium, and bicarbonate are probably the result of magnesium and/or calcium carbonate minerals dissolving in these soils. Geochemical modeling confirms that the uranyl-carbonate complexes are the most stable and dominant in these solutions. The use of carbonate minerals on these soils for erosion control and road construction activities contributes to the leaching of uranium from contaminated soil particles. Dissolved carbonates promote uranium solubility, forming highly mobile anionic species. Mobile uranium species are contaminating the groundwater underlying these soils. The development of a site-specific remediation technology is urgently needed for the FEMP site.

  5. Nanogranitoids in garnet clinopyroxenites of the Granulitgebirge (Bohemian Massif): evidence for metasomatism and partial melting?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghini, Alessia; Ferrero, Silvio; Wunder, Bernd; O'Brien, Patrick J.; Ziemann, Martin A.

    2017-04-01

    Primary nanogranitoids occur in garnet from the garnet clinopyroxenites of the Granulitgebirge, Bohemian Massif. They form clusters in the inner part of the garnet, and may occur both as polycrystalline and glassy inclusions with size from 5 to 20 µm. Because of their random distribution in garnet these inclusions are interpreted as primary inclusions, thus formed during the growth of the garnet. Garnet does not show any major element zoning. Nanogranitoids were identified in garnet clinopyroxenites from two different locations and show slightly different mineral assemblages. Kumdykolite or albite, phlogopite, osumilite, kokchetavite and a variable amount of quartz occur in both locations. However, osumilite is more abundant in one locality and kokchetavite in the other. All these phases are identified using Raman Spectroscopy. Both assemblages are consistent with the origin of these inclusions as former droplets of melt. Nanogranitoids from one locality have been re-homogenized at 1000°C and 22 kbar to a hydrous glass of granodioritic/quartz-monzonitic composition in a piston cylinder apparatus. The chosen experimental conditions correspond to the formation of the host garnet (O'Brien & Rötzler, 2003) and thus of melt entrapment. Nanogranitoid-bearing garnet clinopyroxenites occur in bodies of serpentinized peridotites, hosted in turn in felsic granulites. The garnet clinopyroxenites show granoblastic texture dominated by garnet and clinopyroxene porphyroblasts with a variable amount of interstitial plagioclase, biotite, two generations of amphiboles (brown and green) and rutile and opaque minerals as accessories. The bulk rock composition is basic to intermediate, and the garnet chemistry varies from 24% Alm, 65% Prp and 11% Grs to 38% Alm, 36% Prp and 26 % Grs between one outcrop and the other. The origin of the investigated inclusions could be due to different processes: localized melting of metasomatized mafic rocks with simultaneous production of garnet or

  6. Separation of Depleted Uranium From Soil

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    order to remove the metallic DU present in these soils. This procedure would re- duce the amount of time that metallic uranium could undergo corrosion ...slow corrosion is not sufficient to ignite the uranium . Unfired rod Weathered, unfired rod with yellow uranyl salt deposits Figure 1. Comparison...resulting in less downward movement. Interactions between uranium corrosion products and soil mineral and organic components can also affect

  7. Preliminary report on the use of LANDSAT-1 (ERTS-1) reflectance data in locating alteration zones associated with uranium mineralization near Cameron, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spirakis, Charles S.; Condit, Christopher D.

    1975-01-01

    LANDSAT-I (ERTS-I) multispectral reflectance data were used to enhance the detection of alteration around uranium deposits near Cameron, Ariz. The technique involved stretching and ratioing computer-enhanced data from which electronic noise and atmospheric haze had been removed. Using present techniques, the work proves that LANDSAT-I data are useful in detecting alteration around uranium deposits, but the method may still be improved. Bluish-gray mudstone in the target area could not be differentiated from the altered zones on the ratioed images. Further experiments involving combinations of ratioed and nonratioed data will be required to uniquely define the altered zones.

  8. URANIUM COMPOSITIONS

    DOEpatents

    Allen, N.P.; Grogan, J.D.

    1959-05-12

    This patent relates to high purity uranium alloys characterized by improved stability to thermal cycling and low thermal neutron absorption. The high purity uranium alloy contains less than 0.1 per cent by weight in total amount of any ore or more of the elements such as aluminum, silicon, phosphorous, tin, lead, bismuth, niobium, and zinc.

  9. Crustal structure of the Bohemian Massif in the light of seismic refraction data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrubcova, Pavla

    2010-05-01

    The Bohemian Massif is one of the largest stable outcrops of pre-Permian rocks in Central and Western Europe. It forms the easternmost part of the Variscan Belt, which developed approximately between 500 and 250 Ma during a stage of large-scale crustal convergence, collision of continental plates and microplates, and possibly also subduction. It consists mainly of low- to high-grade metamorphic and plutonic Palaeozoic rocks. The area of the Bohemian Massif can be subdivided into various tectonostratigraphic units separated by faults, shear zones or thrusts trending roughly in a SW-NE direction, and reflecting varying influence of the Cadomian and Variscan orogenies: the Saxothuringian, Teplá-Barrandian, Moldanubian and Moravo-Silesian. Geographically, it comprises the area of the Czech Republic, partly Austria, Germany and Poland. While the post-collisional history of the Variscan Bohemian Massif is relatively clear, the kinematics of plate movements before and during collision is still subject of debates. To investigate such a complex structure, the Bohemian Massif has been covered by a network of seismic experiments as a result of a massive international cooperative effort in central Europe. Detailed analyses of the data from the main profiles of the CELEBRATION 2000, ALP 2002, and SUDETES 2003 refraction and wide-angle reflection seismic experiments show crustal and uppermost mantle structure of the massif and delimit the continuation of various tectonic units in depth. The differences in seismic velocities reflect, to some extent, the structural variances and give some indications for tracing of crust-forming processes during individual tectonic events. Lower crust in the Saxothuringian exhibits complicated structure, ranging from a highly reflective lower crustal layer above Moho with a strong velocity contrast at the top of this layer. Another possible explanation can be a double Moho or the Moho with some lateral topography. This complicated lower crust

  10. Variations in the uranium isotopic compositions of uranium ores from different types of uranium deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uvarova, Yulia A.; Kyser, T. Kurt; Geagea, Majdi Lahd; Chipley, Don

    2014-12-01

    Variations in 238U/235U and 234U/238U ratios were measured in uranium minerals from a spectrum of uranium deposit types, as well as diagenetic phosphates in uranium-rich basins and peraluminous rhyolites and associated autunite mineralisation from Macusani Meseta, Peru. Mean δ238U values of uranium minerals relative to NBL CRM 112-A are 0.02‰ for metasomatic deposits, 0.16‰ for intrusive, 0.18‰ for calcrete, 0.18‰ for volcanic, 0.29‰ for quartz-pebble conglomerate, 0.29‰ for sandstone-hosted, 0.44‰ for unconformity-type, and 0.56‰ for vein, with a total range in δ238U values from -0.30‰ to 1.52‰. Uranium mineralisation associated with igneous systems, including low-temperature calcretes that are sourced from U-rich minerals in igneous systems, have low δ238U values of ca. 0.1‰, near those of their igneous sources, whereas uranium minerals in basin-hosted deposits have higher and more variable values. High-grade unconformity-related deposits have δ238U values around 0.2‰, whereas lower grade unconformity-type deposits in the Athabasca, Kombolgie and Otish basins have higher δ238U values. The δ234U values for most samples are around 0‰, in secular equilibrium, but some samples have δ234U values much lower or higher than 0‰ associated with addition or removal of 234U during the past 2.5 Ma. These δ238U and δ234U values suggest that there are at least two different mechanisms responsible for 238U/235U and 234U/238U variations. The 234U/238U disequilibria ratios indicate recent fluid interaction with the uranium minerals and preferential migration of 234U. Fractionation between 235U and 238U is a result of nuclear-field effects with enrichment of 238U in the reduced insoluble species (mostly UO2) and 235U in oxidised mobile species as uranyl ion, UO22+, and its complexes. Therefore, isotopic fractionation effects should be reflected in 238U/235U ratios in uranium ore minerals formed either by reduction of uranium to UO2 or chemical

  11. The Uranium Resource: A Comparative Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Erich A.; Sailor, William C.

    2007-07-01

    An analogy was drawn between uranium and thirty five minerals for which the USGS maintains extensive records. The USGS mineral price data, which extends from 1900 to the present, was used to create a simple model describing long term price evolution. Making the assumption that the price of uranium, a geologically unexceptional mineral, will evolve in a manner similar to that of the USGS minerals, the model was used to project its price trend for this century. Based upon the precedent set by the USGS data, there is an 80% likelihood that the price of uranium will decline. Moreover, the most likely scenario would see the equilibrium price of uranium decline by about 40% by mid-century. (authors)

  12. The influence of multiple types of occupational exposure to radon, gamma rays and long-lived radionuclides on mortality risk in the French "post-55" sub-cohort of uranium miners: 1956-1999.

    PubMed

    Vacquier, Blandine; Rage, Estelle; Leuraud, Klervi; Caër-Lorho, Sylvaine; Houot, Jennifer; Acker, Alain; Laurier, Dominique

    2011-12-01

    The adverse health effects of radon on uranium miners, especially on their lungs, are well documented, but few studies have considered the effects of other radiation exposures. This study examined the mortality risks associated with exposure to radon, external γ rays and long-lived radionuclides (LLR) in the French "post-55" sub-cohort, which includes uranium miners first employed between 1956 and 1990 for whom all three types of exposure were assessed individually. Exposure-risk relationships were estimated with linear excess relative risk models and a 5-year lag time. The post-55 sub-cohort includes 3377 miners, contributing 89,405 person-years, followed up through the end of 1999 with a mean follow-up of 26.5 years. Mean cumulative exposure was 17.8 WLM for radon, 54.7 mSv for γ rays, and 1,632 Bq.m(-3).h for LLR. Among the 611 deaths observed, 66 were due to lung cancer. Annual individual exposures were significantly correlated. Increased mortality was observed for lung cancer (SMR = 1.30; 95% CI: 1.01, 1.65) and for brain and central nervous system (CNS) cancer (SMR = 2.00; 95% CI: 1.09, 3.35). Cumulative exposure to radon, γ rays and LLR was associated only with a significant risk of lung cancer. These new results could suggest an association between lung cancer and exposure to γ rays and LLR. They must nonetheless be interpreted with caution because of the correlation between the types of exposure. The calculation of organ doses received by each of these exposures would reduce the collinearity.

  13. Transformation of uranium in a geological environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, Derrell

    Incorporation of uranium into iron oxide minerals is a promising mechanism for the environmental immobilization of U(VI). In this study, synthesized hematite was doped with uranium and analyzed with SEM-EDS, TEM, XRD, and ICP-MS. The results of this analysis strongly indicate uranium incorporation into the mineral, as well as the possible presence of a co-precipitated uranium mineral clarkeite. Preliminary results also shows an increase in the amount of uranium associated with the hematite particles as a function of mineral aging. Cyclic Voltammetry (CV) was used to induce and characterize electrochemical changes of uranium in the doped hematite system; these changes may possibly affect the stability of the bulk hematite, as well as the solubility of incorporated uranium should the hematite dissolve. The latter scenario is of particular interest, given the possibility of corrosive pH and temperature conditions in a geological waste repository. For this reason, uranium redox reactions were investigated at varying physical conditions. CV experiments demonstrated that a rapid and reversible U(V)-U(VI) redox couple will form in the presence of an applied cyclical voltage. The redox reactions between U(IV) and U(VI) are also possible, but are kinetically slower. All uranium redox reactions were most strongly observed in a narrow pH range centered around pH 3.5. The rate of each redox reaction increased with increasing temperature, while the electrochemical potential decreased with increasing temperature. These results are the groundwork upon which to conduct additional testing to further assess the viability of uranium incorporation as a strategy for uranium waste sequestration.

  14. Alteration of magnetite and ilmenite in Upper Jurassic Morrison formation, San Juan basin, New Mexico: relationship to facies and primary uranium mineralization

    SciTech Connect

    Fishman, N.S.; Peterson, C.E.T.; Reynolds; Reynolds, R.L.

    1984-07-01

    Petrographic studies of outcrop and drill core samples in the Westwater Canyon Member of the Morrison Formation along the southern and western margins of the San Juan basin reveal a close spatial relationship among altered (iron-leached) detrital magnetite and ilmenite (FeTi oxides), depositional facies in the overlying Brushy Basin Member, and distribution of primary uranium deposits. Iron leaching of FeTi oxides resulted from passage of solutions containing soluble organic material; concentrations of this organic material are the sites of the primary uranium ore bodies. Along the southern and western parts of the basin, FeTi oxides typically have been leached in the upper Westwater Member, but are unaltered in the lower Westwater; however, locally, leaching occurred throughout the Westwater. This zone of leaching systematically thins northward to zero, where unleached FeTi oxides occur throughout the Westwater. Regional patterns of alteration of FeTi oxides correspond to regional facies distribution in the overlying Brushy Basin Member. Extensive FeTi oxide leaching characterizes the Westwater beneath the smectite-rich mud-flat facies of the Brushy Basin, whereas negligible leaching characterizes the Westwater beneath the zeolite-rich playa facies of the Brushy Basin. This correspondence between facies and alteration patterns suggests that solutions responsible for solubilization of organic material, which in turn leached FeTi oxides in the Westwater, originated from the mud-flat facies of the Brushy Basin. Organic material that precipitated form these solutions concentrated uranium to form primary uranium ore bodies; therefore, distribution of the Brushy Basin mud-flat facies may define, and restrict, distribution of primary ore bodies in the Westwater.

  15. Accounting for Berkson and Classical Measurement Error in Radon Exposure Using a Bayesian Structural Approach in the Analysis of Lung Cancer Mortality in the French Cohort of Uranium Miners.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Sabine; Rage, Estelle; Laurier, Dominique; Laroche, Pierre; Guihenneuc, Chantal; Ancelet, Sophie

    2017-02-01

    Many occupational cohort studies on underground miners have demonstrated that radon exposure is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer mortality. However, despite the deleterious consequences of exposure measurement error on statistical inference, these analyses traditionally do not account for exposure uncertainty. This might be due to the challenging nature of measurement error resulting from imperfect surrogate measures of radon exposure. Indeed, we are typically faced with exposure uncertainty in a time-varying exposure variable where both the type and the magnitude of error may depend on period of exposure. To address the challenge of accounting for multiplicative and heteroscedastic measurement error that may be of Berkson or classical nature, depending on the year of exposure, we opted for a Bayesian structural approach, which is arguably the most flexible method to account for uncertainty in exposure assessment. We assessed the association between occupational radon exposure and lung cancer mortality in the French cohort of uranium miners and found the impact of uncorrelated multiplicative measurement error to be of marginal importance. However, our findings indicate that the retrospective nature of exposure assessment that occurred in the earliest years of mining of this cohort as well as many other cohorts of underground miners might lead to an attenuation of the exposure-risk relationship. More research is needed to address further uncertainties in the calculation of lung dose, since this step will likely introduce important sources of shared uncertainty.

  16. Campylobacteriosis in the South Bohemian Region - a Recurrent Problem.

    PubMed

    Hamplová, L; Kotrbová, K; Príkazská, M

    Campylobacteriosis is among the most frequently reported foodborne diseases in both the Czech Republic (CR) and South Bohemian Region (SBR). Campylobacteriosis has been a notifiable disease in the CR since 1984. The objective of this study is the analysis of the data reported to the surveillance system between 2005 and 2014 to describe the seasonal variation, age specific incidence, and route of transmission of campylobacteriosis in the South Bohemian Region. The data reported to the surveillance system EPIDAT from 2005 to 2014 were analysed in order to determine the incidence trends and seasonality, age distribution, and route of transmission of campylobacteriosis in the South Bohemian Region. Campylobacteriosis incidence in the South Bohemian Region follows the same annual pattern as in the Czech Republic. There is a very slight declining trend in the incidence over the study period. A strong seasonal variation was observed, with a late summer peak and a winter low. An exception to the regularity of the incidence pattern was an outbreak notified in 2010. The most affected age groups are children 1 to 5 years and newborns (0 age group). In the other age groups, the incidence has a declining tendency. The most common vehicles for the transmission of campylobacteriosis are chicken and meat products while other vehicles and routes of transmission have been reported exceptionally. Only one third of cases have been notified along with the suspected route of transmission. The most common route of transmission is through the consumption of contaminated chicken and meat, including smoked meat products. Therefore, the measures targeting consumers and also producers of poultry, meat, and unpasteurized milk products may contribute to the reduction of campylobacteriosis incidence.

  17. JACKETING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Saller, H.A.; Keeler, J.R.

    1959-07-14

    The bonding to uranium of sheathing of iron or cobalt, or nickel, or alloys thereof is described. The bonding is accomplished by electro-depositing both surfaces to be joined with a coating of silver and amalgamating or alloying the silver layer with mercury or indium. Then the silver alloy is homogenized by exerting pressure on an assembly of the uranium core and the metal jacket, reducing the area of assembly and heating the assembly to homogenize by diffusion.

  18. Significance of Geological Units of the Bohemian Massif, Czech Republic, as Seen by Ambient Noise Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Růžek, Bohuslav; Valentová, Lubica; Gallovič, František

    2016-05-01

    Broadband recordings of 88 seismic stations distributed in the Bohemian Massif, Czech Republic, and covering the time period of up to 12 years were processed by a cross-correlation technique. All correlograms were analyzed by a novel approach to get both group and phase dispersion of Rayleigh and Love waves. Individual dispersion curves were averaged in five distinct geological units which constitute the Bohemian Massif (Saxothuringian, Teplá-Barrandean, Sudetes, Moravo-Silesian, and Moldanubian). Estimated error of the averaged dispersion curves are by an order smaller than the inherent variability due to the 3D distribution of seismic velocities within the units. The averaged dispersion data were inverted for 1D layered velocity models including their uncertainty, which are characteristic for each of the geological unit. We found that, overall, the differences between the inverted velocity models are of similar order as the variability inside the geological units, suggesting that the geological specification of the units is not fully reflected into the S-wave propagation velocities on a regional scale. Nevertheless, careful treatment of the dispersion data allowed us to identify some robust characteristics of the area. The vp to vs ratio is anomalously low (~1.6) for all the units. The Moldanubian is the most rigid and most homogeneous part of the Bohemian Massif. Middle crust in the depth range of ~3-15 km is relatively homogeneous across the investigated region, while both uppermost horizon (0-3 km) and lower crust (>15 km) exhibit lower degree of homogeneity.

  19. Uranium ores and depleted uranium in the environment, with a reference to uranium in the biosphere from the Erzgebirge/Sachsen, Germany.

    PubMed

    Meinrath, A; Schneider, P; Meinrath, G

    2003-01-01

    The Erzgebirge ('Ore Mountains') area in the eastern part of Germany was a major source of uranium for Soviet nuclear programs between 1945 and 1989. During this time, the former German Democratic Republic became the third largest uranium producer in the world. The high abundance of uranium in the geological formations of the Erzgebirge are mirrored in the discovery of uranium by M. Klaproth close to Freiberg City in 1789 and the description of the so-called 'Schneeberg' disease, lung cancer caused in miners by the accumulation of the uranium decay product, radon, in the subsurfaces of shafts. Since 1991, remediation and mitigation of uranium at production facilities, rock piles and mill tailings has taken place. In parallel, efforts were initiated to assess the likely adverse effects of uranium mining to humans. The costs of these activities amount to about 6.5 10(9) Euro. A comparison with concentrations of depleted uranium at certain sites is given.

  20. P T and fluid evolution of barren and lithium pegmatites from Vlastějovice, Bohemian Massif, Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerman, Lukáš; Zachariáš, Jiří; Pudilová, Marta

    2007-08-01

    Fluid inclusions, mineral thermometry and stable isotope data from two types of mineralogically and texturally contrasting pegmatites, barren ones and lithium ones, from the Moldanubian Zone of the Bohemian Massif were studied in order to constrain P T conditions of their emplacement, subsolidus hydrothermal evolution and to estimate composition of the early exsolved fluid and that of the parental melt. Despite the fact that the lithium pegmatites are abundant throughout the crystalline units of the Bohemian Massif, data similar to this paper have not been published yet. The studied pegmatites are hosted by iron-rich calcic skarn bodies. This specific setting allowed scavenging of calcium, fluorine and some other elements from the host rocks into the pegmatitic melts and post-magmatic fluids. Such contamination process was important namely in the case of barren pegmatites, as can be deduced from the variation in anorthite contents in plagioclase and from the presence of fluorite, hornblende (with F content) or garnet in the contact zones of pegmatite dykes. Fluid inclusions were studied mostly in quartz, but also in fluorite, titanite and apatite. Early aqueous carbonic and late aqueous fluids were identified in both pegmatite types. The P T conditions of crystallization as well as the detailed composition of exsolved magmatic fluid, however, particularly differ. The magmatic fluids associated with barren pegmatites correspond to H2O CO2 low salinity fluids, composition of which evolved from 20 to 23 to <5 mol% CO2, and from 2 to 4 6 mol% NaCl eq. Sudden decrease in the CO2 content of the post-magmatic fluids (<5 mol% CO2) seems to coincide with the enrichment of the fluid in calcium (from the contamination process) and resulted in precipitation of calcites (frequently found as trapped solid phases in fluid inclusions). The fluids associated with lithium pegmatites are more complex (H2O CO2/N2 H3BO3 NaCl). The CO2 content of early exsolved fluid is 26 20 mol% CO2

  1. RECOVERY OF URANIUM VALUES FROM RESIDUES

    DOEpatents

    Schaap, W.B.

    1959-08-18

    A process is described for the recovery of uranium from insoluble oxide residues resistant to repeated leaching with mineral acids. The residue is treated with gaseous hydrogen fluoride, then with hydrogen and again with hydrogen fluoride, preferably at 500 to 700 deg C, prior to the mineral acid leaching.

  2. Uranium bombs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGroot, Gerard

    2009-11-01

    Enrico Fermi was a brilliant physicist, but he did occasionally get things wrong. In 1934 he famously bombarded a sample of uranium with neutrons. The result was astounding: the experiment had, Fermi concluded, produced element 93, later called neptunium. The German physicist Ida Noddack, however, came to an even more spectacular conclusion, namely that Fermi had split the uranium nucleus to produce lighter elements. Noddack's friend Otto Hahn judged that idea preposterous and advised her to keep quiet, since ridicule could ruin a female physicist. She ignored that advice, and was, indeed, scorned.

  3. Monazite and zircon as major carriers of Th, U, and Y in peraluminous granites: examples from the Bohemian Massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breiter, Karel

    2016-12-01

    The chemical compositions of zircon and monazite and the relationships between the contents of Th, U, Y, and REE in both minerals and in the bulk samples of their parental rocks were studied in three Variscan composite peraluminous granite plutons in the Bohemian Massif. It was established that granites of similar bulk composition contain zircon and monazite of significantly different chemistry. Monazite typically contains 5-13 wt% (rarely up to 28 wt%) ThO2, 0.4-2 wt% (up to 8.2 wt%) UO2, and 0.5-2 wt% (up to 5 wt%) Y2O3, whereas zircon typically contains less than 0.1 wt% (rarely up to 1.7 wt%) ThO2, less than 1 wt% UO2 (in the Plechý/Plockenstein granite, commonly, 1-2 wt% and scarcely up to 4.8 wt% UO2), and less than 1 wt% Y2O3 (in the Nejdek pluton often 2-5, maximally 7 wt% Y2O3). Monazite is an essential carrier of thorium, hosting more than 80 % of Th in all studied granites. Monazite also appears to be an important carrier of Y (typically 14-16 %, and in the Melechov pluton, up to 81 % of the total rock content) and U (typically 18-35 % and occasionally 6-60 % of the total rock budget). The importance of zircon for the rock budget of all the investigated elements in granites is lower: 4-26 % U, 5-17 % Y, and less than 5 % Th.

  4. Isotopic composition of salt efflorescence from the sandstone castellated rocks of the Bohemian Cretaceous Basin (Czech Republic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweigstillová, Jana; Přikryl, Richard; Novotná, Miroslava

    2009-07-01

    The origin of sulphates in sulphate-rich efflorescences on quartz sandstones with a clay matrix, exposed in rural areas of the Czech Republic is interpreted, based upon an isotopic study of S and O. Sulphates such as gypsum and/or alums exhibit δ34S ranging from +1.3 to +6.1‰ and δ18O from +5.3 to +8.8‰. The low variability of S and O isotopes indicates a common source of the sulphur and a similar mode of sulphate formation. Atmospheric sulphates with a similar isotopic signature occur in the area, due to the combustion of sulphurous coal in power plants, located a few tens of kilometres from the sampling points. The sulphates crystallize from supersaturated pore waters that represent atmospheric precipitation, rich in sulphates, having percolated through the porous sandstone system. The previously proposed model of efflorescence growth (that it is due to the oxidation of pyrite) can be excluded, due to both the rare occurrence of pyrite and also to its different isotopic signature (δ34S about -22‰). Although gypsum prevails in the central and eastern part of the studied area, the north and north-west of the Bohemian Cretaceous Basin (the most polluted region) exhibits a significant presence of alums (NH4 + or K+-NH4 +-rich). Formation of alums can be explained by the partial dissolution of clay minerals or feldspars present in the sandstone matrix. Release of alumina from these phases is facilitated by the low pH of the precipitation (pH 4-4.5) and also locally by organic acids, traces of which were found in the studied efflorescences by the use of infrared spectroscopy.

  5. Machining of uranium and uranium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, T.O.

    1981-12-14

    Uranium and uranium alloys can be readily machined by conventional methods in the standard machine shop when proper safety and operating techniques are used. Material properties that affect machining processes and recommended machining parameters are discussed. Safety procedures and precautions necessary in machining uranium and uranium alloys are also covered. 30 figures.

  6. Deformation mechanisms and grain size evolution in the Bohemian granulites - a computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maierova, Petra; Lexa, Ondrej; Jeřábek, Petr; Franěk, Jan; Schulmann, Karel

    2015-04-01

    A dominant deformation mechanism in crustal rocks (e.g., dislocation and diffusion creep, grain boundary sliding, solution-precipitation) depends on many parameters such as temperature, major minerals, differential stress, strain rate and grain size. An exemplary sequence of deformation mechanisms was identified in the largest felsic granulite massifs in the southern Moldanubian domain (Bohemian Massif, central European Variscides). These massifs were interpreted to result from collision-related forced diapiric ascent of lower crust and its subsequent lateral spreading at mid-crustal levels. Three types of microstructures were distinguished. The oldest relict microstructure (S1) with large grains (>1000 μm) of feldspar deformed probably by dislocation creep at peak HT eclogite facies conditions. Subsequently at HP granulite-facies conditions, chemically- and deformation- induced recrystallization of feldspar porphyroclasts led to development of a fine-grained microstructure (S2, ~50 μm grain size) indicating deformation via diffusion creep, probably assisted by melt-enhanced grain-boundary sliding. This microstructure was associated with flow in the lower crust and/or its diapiric ascent. The latest microstructure (S3, ~100 μm grain size) is related to the final lateral spreading of retrograde granulites, and shows deformation by dislocation creep at amphibolite-facies conditions. The S2-S3 switch and coarsening was interpreted to be related with a significant decrease in strain rate. From this microstructural sequence it appears that it is the grain size that is critically linked with specific mechanical behavior of these rocks. Thus in this study, we focused on the interplay between grain size and deformation with the aim to numerically simulate and reinterpret the observed microstructural sequence. We tested several different mathematical descriptions of the grain size evolution, each of which gave qualitatively different results. We selected the two most

  7. Significance of the effect of mineral alteration of nuclide migration

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Takashi; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Isobe, Hiroshi; Sato, Tsutomu; Yanase, Nobuyuki; Kimura, Hideo

    1994-12-31

    In order to clarify the effect of mineral alteration on nuclide migration, we examined the processes, mechanisms, and kinetics of chlorite weathering, and the uranium concentrations in minerals and rocks at Koongarra, Australia. The observed concentrations of uranium in rocks were compared to those calculated. The sequence of chlorite weathering may be simply expressed as a chlorite {yields} vermiculite {yields} kaolinite conversion. These minerals occur as a function of depth, which corresponds well to uranium concentrations on the meter scale. Iron minerals, closely related to the uranium redistribution, are released during the weathering. The first-order kinetic model of the weathering process suggests that the weathering rate is not constant but time-dependent. The uranium concentrations are qualitatively proportional to the extent of the weathering, the weathered part having higher uranium concentration. Uranium mainly occurs with iron minerals, and sub micron sized saleeite, a uranyl phosphate, is one of the most probable uranyl phases associated with the iron minerals. The uranium fixation mechanisms are probably saleeite microcrystal coprecipitation and sorption to the iron minerals. Our model, which describes uranium concentrations in rocks as a function of time, shows that the transition zone (a vermiculite dominant area) plays an important role in the uranium migration. We have established that weathering of chlorite has affected the redistribution of uranium for more than one million years. The present study demonstrates the significance of mineral alteration when we estimate nuclide migration for geologic time.

  8. Two Lithologies in Lithospheric Mantle Beneath Nothern Margin of the Bohemian Massif (e Germany and SW Poland).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matusiak-Małek, Magdalena; Puziewicz, Jacek; Ntaflos, Theodoros; Kukuła, Anna; Ćwiek, Mateusz

    2014-05-01

    The subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) occurring beneath Bohemian Massif in Central Europe has been sampled in Cenozoic times by numerous lavas. Recent studies (Puziewicz et al. 2011 and references therein) show that mantle in this region is mostly anhydrous, harzburgitic, and was subjected to various kinds of metasomatic events. Two major mantle lithologies characterized by different major element composition of peridotite- forming minerals occur in the SCLM Lower Silesia and Lusatia (op. cit. and unpublished results, 9 sites). Lithology "A" (minimal temperatures from 900 to 1000ºC or no equilibrium between cpx and opx) contains olivine Fo90.5 -92.0. Part of the population "A" peridotites contain clinopyroxene of mg# 94 - 95, typical for low temperatures of equilibration. The lithology "B" (equilibration temperatures close to 900 ºC) contains olivine Fo87.5-90.0. Elevated contents of LREE in clinopyroxene from both the lithologies "A" and "B" suggest their equilibration with one of the two metasomatic agents stated in this area: anhydrous silicate alkaline melt or carbonatite-silicate melt. Action of hydrous alkaline melts in the mantle in the region is recorded only locally (e.g. Wilcza Góra). In some sites (e.g. Krzeniów) the trace element patterns show that decreasing mg# of clinopyroxene in the "A" peridotites is due to gradual replacement of primary lower-temperature mineral assemblage by the later higher-temperature one. This suggests that the variation of mineral chemistry is rather due to chromatographic fractionation of metasomatic agents than due to vertical variation in lithospheric mantle temperatures (Christensen et al.,2001). The "B" peridotites originated due to "Fe-metasomatism" of more magnesian peridotites by silicate melts percolating through lithospheric mantle. The peridotites belonging to lithology "A" might have been partly the protolith of the lithology "B". The data on Central European lithospheric mantle are equivocal and thus

  9. Uranium, natural

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Uranium , natural ; CASRN 7440 - 61 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  10. URANIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Seybolt, A.U.

    1958-04-15

    Uranium alloys containing from 0.1 to 10% by weight, but preferably at least 5%, of either zirconium, niobium, or molybdenum exhibit highly desirable nuclear and structural properties which may be improved by heating the alloy to about 900 d C for an extended period of time and then rapidly quenching it.

  11. Uranium industry annual 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  12. Reactivity of North Bohemian coals in coprocessing of coal/oil mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Sebor, G.; Cerny, J.; Maxa, D.; Blazek, J.; Sykorova, I.

    1995-12-01

    Autoclave experiments with North Bohemian coal were done in order to evaluate their reactivity in coprocessing with petroleum vacuum residue, Selected coals were comprehensively characterized by using a number of analytical methods. While the coals were of similar geological origin, some of their characteristics differed largely from one coal to another. Despite the differences in physical and chemical structure, the coals provided very similar yields of desired reaction products. The yields of a heavy non- distillable fraction and/or an insoluble solid residue were, under experimental conditions, largely affected by retrogressive reactions (coking). The insoluble solid fractions were examined microscopically under polarized light.

  13. Neutron activation and X-ray fluorescence analyses of Early Roman Age Bohemian artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fikrle, M.; Frána, J.; Droberjar, E.

    2006-05-01

    Composition of more than 500 metallic artifacts was studied by means of INAA and XRF, including 404 objects of copper alloys. Analyses proved not only use of specialized bronze alloys in the imported Roman vessels, but also use of very pure brass with average content of 20% zinc in the production of decorative brooches, especially in the 1st century A.D. These artifacts were evidently made on the Bohemian territory, but raw brass was probably imported from the Roman provinces. Common products are mostly made of mixed materials possibly recycling old objects and using local raw materials.

  14. Anomalous induction zone near the eastern margin of the Bohemian Massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petr, V.; Pěčová, J.; Praus, O.; Pěč, K.

    1987-03-01

    Wiese vectors, induction vectors, field separation and a physical-statistical approach were used to identify a zone of geoelectrical inhomogeneity near the eastern margin of the Bohemian Massif. This zone seems to mark an important geological and tectonic boundary separating two different tectogenes. The spatial distribution of the induction characteristics along five profiles traversing the boundary suggests a general 3-D model of internal geoelectrical-geological structure for the region. Common reference transfer functions and corresponding in- and out-of-phase vectors calculated by relating the data at a particular station and a common reference station were also derived as a tool for mapping internal geoelectrical structure.

  15. 31 CFR 540.317 - Uranium feed; natural uranium feed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Uranium feed; natural uranium feed...) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.317 Uranium feed; natural uranium feed. The term uranium feed or natural uranium feed means natural uranium in the form of UF6 suitable for uranium...

  16. 31 CFR 540.317 - Uranium feed; natural uranium feed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Uranium feed; natural uranium feed...) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.317 Uranium feed; natural uranium feed. The term uranium feed or natural uranium feed means natural uranium in the form of UF6 suitable for uranium...

  17. Yellow Canary uranium deposits, Daggett County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilmarth, Verl Richard

    1953-01-01

    The Yellow Canary uranium deposit is on the west side of Red Creek Canyon in the northern part of the Uinta Mountains, Daggett County, Utah. Two claims have been developed by means of an adit, three opencuts, and several hundred feet of bulldozer trenches. No uranium ore has been produced from this deposit. The deposit is in the pre-Cambrian Red Creek quartzite. This formation is composed of intercalated beds of quartzite, hornblendite, garnet schist, staurolite schist, and quartz-mica schist and is intruded by dioritic dikes. A thick unit of highly fractured white quartzite near the top of the formation contains tyuyamunite as coatings on fracture surfaces. The tyuyamunite is associated with carnotite, volborthite, iron oxides, azurite, malachite, brochantite, and hyalite. The uranium and vanadium minerals are probably alteration products of primary minerals. The uranium content of 15 samples from this property ranged from 0.000 to 0.57 percent.

  18. Uranium provinces of North America; their definition, distribution, and models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finch, Warren Irvin

    1996-01-01

    Uranium resources in North America are principally in unconformity-related, quartz-pebble conglomerate, sandstone, volcanic, and phosphorite types of uranium deposits. Most are concentrated in separate, well-defined metallogenic provinces. Proterozoic quartz-pebble conglomerate and unconformity-related deposits are, respectively, in the Blind River?Elliot Lake (BRELUP) and the Athabasca Basin (ABUP) Uranium Provinces in Canada. Sandstone uranium deposits are of two principal subtypes, tabular and roll-front. Tabular sandstone uranium deposits are mainly in upper Paleozoic and Mesozoic rocks in the Colorado Plateau Uranium Province (CPUP). Roll-front sandstone uranium deposits are in Tertiary rocks of the Rocky Mountain and Intermontane Basins Uranium Province (RMIBUP), and in a narrow belt of Tertiary rocks that form the Gulf Coastal Uranium Province (GCUP) in south Texas and adjacent Mexico. Volcanic uranium deposits are concentrated in the Basin and Range Uranium Province (BRUP) stretching from the McDermitt caldera at the Oregon-Nevada border through the Marysvale district of Utah and Date Creek Basin in Arizona and south into the Sierra de Pe?a Blanca District, Chihuahua, Mexico. Uraniferous phosphorite occurs in Tertiary sediments in Florida, Georgia, and North and South Carolina and in the Lower Permian Phosphoria Formation in Idaho and adjacent States, but only in Florida has economic recovery been successful. The Florida Phosphorite Uranium Province (FPUP) has yielded large quantities of uranium as a byproduct of the production of phosphoric acid fertilizer. Economically recoverable quantities of copper, gold, molybdenum, nickel, silver, thorium, and vanadium occur with the uranium deposits in some provinces. Many major epochs of uranium mineralization occurred in North America. In the BRELUP, uranium minerals were concentrated in placers during the Early Proterozoic (2,500?2,250 Ma). In the ABUP, the unconformity-related deposits were most likely formed

  19. Uranium provinces of North America; their definition, distribution, and models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finch, Warren Irvin

    1996-01-01

    Uranium resources in North America are principally in unconformity-related, quartz-pebble conglomerate, sandstone, volcanic, and phosphorite types of uranium deposits. Most are concentrated in separate, well-defined metallogenic provinces. Proterozoic quartz-pebble conglomerate and unconformity-related deposits are, respectively, in the Blind River–Elliot Lake (BRELUP) and the Athabasca Basin (ABUP) Uranium Provinces in Canada. Sandstone uranium deposits are of two principal subtypes, tabular and roll-front. Tabular sandstone uranium deposits are mainly in upper Paleozoic and Mesozoic rocks in the Colorado Plateau Uranium Province (CPUP). Roll-front sandstone uranium deposits are in Tertiary rocks of the Rocky Mountain and Intermontane Basins Uranium Province (RMIBUP), and in a narrow belt of Tertiary rocks that form the Gulf Coastal Uranium Province (GCUP) in south Texas and adjacent Mexico. Volcanic uranium deposits are concentrated in the Basin and Range Uranium Province (BRUP) stretching from the McDermitt caldera at the Oregon-Nevada border through the Marysvale district of Utah and Date Creek Basin in Arizona and south into the Sierra de Peña Blanca District, Chihuahua, Mexico. Uraniferous phosphorite occurs in Tertiary sediments in Florida, Georgia, and North and South Carolina and in the Lower Permian Phosphoria Formation in Idaho and adjacent States, but only in Florida has economic recovery been successful. The Florida Phosphorite Uranium Province (FPUP) has yielded large quantities of uranium as a byproduct of the production of phosphoric acid fertilizer. Economically recoverable quantities of copper, gold, molybdenum, nickel, silver, thorium, and vanadium occur with the uranium deposits in some provinces.Many major epochs of uranium mineralization occurred in North America. In the BRELUP, uranium minerals were concentrated in placers during the Early Proterozoic (2,500–2,250 Ma). In the ABUP, the unconformity-related deposits were most likely

  20. The East Slope No. 2 uranium prospect, Piute County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wyant, Donald Gray

    1954-01-01

    The secondary uranium minerals autunite, metatorbernite, uranophane(?), and schroeckingerite occur in altered hornfels at the East Slope No. 9. uranium prospect. The deposit, in sec. 6, T. 9.7 S., R. 3 W., Piute County, Utah, is about 1 mile west of the Bullion Monarch mine which is in the central producing area of the Marysvale uranium district. Hornfels, formed by contact metamorphism of rocks of the Bullion Canyon volcanics borderhug the margin of a quartz monzonite stock, is in fault contact with the later Mount Belknap rhyolite. The hornfels was intensely altered by hydrothermal solutions in pre-Mount Belknap time. Hematite-alunite-quartz-kaolinite rock, the most completely altered hornfels, is surrounded by orange to white argillized hornfels containing beidellite-montmorillonite clay, and secondary uranium minerals. The secondary uranium minerals probably have been derived from pitchblende, the primary ore mineral in other deposits of the Marysvale area. The two uranium-rich zones, 4 feet ad 5 feet thick, have been traced on the surface for 60 feet and 110 feet, respectively. Channel samples from these zones contained as much as 0.047 percent uranium. The deposit is significant because of its position outside the central producing area and because of the association of uranium minerals with alunitic rock in hydrothermally altered hornfels of volcanic rocks of early Tertiary age.

  1. Uranium content and leachable fraction of fluorspars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landa, E.R.; Councell, T.B.

    2000-01-01

    Much attention in the radiological health community has recently focused on the management and regulation of naturally occurring radioactive materials. Although uranium-bearing minerals are present in a variety of fluorspar deposits, their potential consideration as naturally occurring radioactive materials has received only limited recognition. The uranium content of 28 samples of acid- and cryolite-grade (>97% CaF2) fluorspar from the National Defense Stockpile was found to range from 120 to 24,200 ??g kg-1, with a mean of 2,145 ??g kg-1. As a point of comparison, the average concentration of uranium in the upper crust of the earth is about 2,500 ??g kg-1. Leachability of this uranium was assessed by means of the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). The TCLP extractable fraction ranged from 1 to 98%, with a mean of 24% of the total uranium. The typically low concentrations of uranium seen in these materials probably reflects the removal of uranium-bearing mineral phases during the beneficiation of the crude fluorspar ore to achieve industrial specifications. Future NORM studies should examine crude fluorspar ores and flotation tailings.

  2. U-Pb isotope systematics and apparent ages of uranium ores, Ambrosia Lake and Smith Lake districts, Grants mineral belt, New Mexico.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ludwig, K. R.; Simmons, K.R.; Webster, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    Two types of uranium orebodies occur in continental sandstones of the Upper Jurassic Morrison formation: 1) 'primary' tabular peneconcordant bodies rich in interstitial organic material (containing most of the U) and older than the overlying Cretaceous Dakota sandstone and 2) younger discordant ore-bodies associated with Tertiary faults, containing little organic material (coffinite is the U-carrier) and considered to be redistributed primary ore. U/Pb isotope ages of four of the younger ore-bodies from the Ambrosia Lake district are concordant at 3.3-12.5 m.y. U/Pb isotope ages of primary ores from the same district show pronounced normal discordance, explained by continuous loss of Pb and 238U daughters and, locally, by U-gain during Tertiary redistribution. The primary ores, without Tertiary U-gain, plot on the concordia diagram close to a calculated continuous diffusion curve for coupled loss of Pb and 238U daughters. The concordia intercept of this curve corresponds with an age of approx 130 m.y. Ore-bodies in the Smith Lake district have characteristics both of primary (co-extensive with organic material) and redistributed (discordant) types. They show less coherent U/Pb isotope systematics but give only pre-Tertiary apparent ages.-G.J.N.

  3. Derived enriched uranium market

    SciTech Connect

    Rutkowski, E.

    1996-12-01

    The potential impact on the uranium market of highly enriched uranium from nuclear weapons dismantling in the Russian Federation and the USA is analyzed. Uranium supply, conversion, and enrichment factors are outlined for each country; inventories are also listed. The enrichment component and conversion components are expected to cause little disruption to uranium markets. The uranium component of Russian derived enriched uranium hexafluoride is unresolved; US legislation places constraints on its introduction into the US market.

  4. 1996 annual report on Alaska's mineral resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schneider, Jill L.

    1997-01-01

    This is the fifteenth annual report that has been prepared in response to the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act. Current Alaskan mineral projects and events that occurred during 1995 are summarized. For the purpose of this document, the term 'minerals' encompasses both energy resources (oil and gas, coal and peat, uranium, and geothermal) and nonfuel-mineral resources (metallic and industrial minerals).

  5. Monitoring genotoxic exposure in uranium mines

    SciTech Connect

    Sram, R.J.; Vesela, D.; Vesely, D.

    1993-10-01

    Recent data from deep uranium mines in Czechoslovakia indicated that miners are exposed to other mutagenic factors in addition to radon daughter products. Mycotoxins were identified as a possible source of mutagens in these mines. Mycotoxins were examined in 38 samples from mines and in throat swabs taken from 116 miners and 78 controls. The following mycotoxins were identified from mines samples: aflatoxins B{sub 1} and G1, citrinin, citreoviridin, mycophenolic acid, and sterigmatocystin. Some mold strains isolated from mines and throat swabs were investigated for mutagenic activity by the SOS chromotest and Salmonella assay with strains TA100 and TA98. Mutagenicity was observed, especially with metabolic activation in citro. These data suggest that mycotoxins produced by molds in uranium mines are a new genotoxic factor im uranium miners. 17 refs., 4 tabs.

  6. Bioremediation of uranium contaminated soils and wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, A.J.

    1998-12-31

    Contamination of soils, water, and sediments by radionuclides and toxic metals from uranium mill tailings, nuclear fuel manufacturing and nuclear weapons production is a major concern. Studies of the mechanisms of biotransformation of uranium and toxic metals under various microbial process conditions has resulted in the development of two treatment processes: (1) stabilization of uranium and toxic metals with reduction in waste volume and (2) removal and recovery of uranium and toxic metals from wastes and contaminated soils. Stabilization of uranium and toxic metals in wastes is accomplished by exploiting the unique metabolic capabilities of the anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium sp. The radionuclides and toxic metals are solubilized by the bacteria directly by enzymatic reductive dissolution, or indirectly due to the production of organic acid metabolites. The radionuclides and toxic metals released into solution are immobilized by enzymatic reductive precipitation, biosorption and redistribution with stable mineral phases in the waste. Non-hazardous bulk components of the waste volume. In the second process uranium and toxic metals are removed from wastes or contaminated soils by extracting with the complexing agent citric acid. The citric-acid extract is subjected to biodegradation to recover the toxic metals, followed by photochemical degradation of the uranium citrate complex which is recalcitrant to biodegradation. The toxic metals and uranium are recovered in separate fractions for recycling or for disposal. The use of combined chemical and microbiological treatment process is more efficient than present methods and should result in considerable savings in clean-up and disposal costs.

  7. National Uranium Resource Evaluation, Klamath Falls Quadrangle, Oregon and California

    SciTech Connect

    Castor, S.B.; Berry, M.R.; Robins, J.W.

    1982-07-01

    The Klamath Falls Quadrangle, Oregon, was evaluated to identify and delineate areas favorable for uranium deposits according to criteria developed for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation. Surface radiometric reconnaissance and geochemical sampling were used for overall evaluation of the quadrangle. Detailed rock sampling, geologic mapping, and examinations of uranium mines and occurrences were performed in suspected favorable areas. Results of the work indicate good potential for shallow hydrothermal volcanogenic uranium deposits in the Lakeview favorable area, which comprises a northwest-trending belt of rhyolite intrusions in the eastern half of the quadrangle. The young age, peraluminous chemistry, and low thorium-to-uranium ratios of the rhyolite intrusions, as well as low uranium content of groundwater samples, indicate that uranium has not been leached from the intrusions by ground water. Therefore, supergene uranium deposits are not likely in the area. Scattered occurrences of ash-flow tuff in the east half of the quadrangle that contain high uranium and (or) thorium contents, and four occurrences of secondary uranium minerals in ash-flow tuff, indicate possible uranium deposits in ash flows in a poorly defined area that is partially coextensive with the Lakeview favorable area. Small granitic plutons with associated quartz-tourmaline breccia veins and base-metal occurrences may also be favorable for uranium deposits but were not examined during this study.

  8. Effects of clay minerals and organic matter in formulated sediments on the bioavailability of sediment-associated uranium to the freshwater midge, Chironomus dilutus.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Sarah E; Liber, Karsten

    2015-11-01

    It is well established that bioavailability influences metal toxicity in aquatic ecosystems. However, the factors and mechanisms that influence uranium (U) bioavailability and toxicity in sediment have not been thoroughly evaluated, despite evidence that suggests different sediment components can influence the sorption and interaction of some metals. Given that dissolved U is generally accepted as being the primary bioavailable fraction of U, it is hypothesized that adsorption and interaction of U with different sediment components will influence the bioavailability of U in sediment. We investigated the effects of key sediment physicochemical properties on the bioavailability of U to a model freshwater benthic invertebrate, Chironomus dilutus. Several 10-day spiked sediment bioaccumulation experiments were performed, exposing C. dilutus larvae to a variety of formulated sediments spiked with different concentrations of U (5, 50 and/or 200 mg U/kg d.w.). Mean accumulation of U in C. dilutus larvae decreased significantly from 1195 to 10 mg U/kg d.w. as kaolin clay content increased from 0% to 60% in sediment spiked with 50 mg U/kg d.w. Similarly, higher organic matter content also resulted in a significant reduction of U bioaccumulation in C. dilutus larvae, indicating a reduction in U bioavailability. Concentrations of U in both the overlying water and sediment pore water displayed a strong positive relationship to U bioaccumulation in C. dilutus larvae (r(2) = 0.77, p<0.001 and r(2) = 0.57, p < 0.001, respectively) for all experiments, while total U concentrations in the sediment had a poor relationship to U bioaccumulation (r(2) = 0.10, p = 0.028). Results from this research confirm that sediment clay and organic matter content play a significant role in altering U bioavailability, which is important in informing risk assessments of U contaminated sites and in the development of site-specific sediment quality guidelines for U.

  9. Sulphur and nitrogen fluxes and budgets in the Bohemian Forest and Tatra Mountains during the Industrial Revolution (1850-2000)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopcek, J.; Vesel, J.; Stuchlk, E.

    Major fluxes of sulphur and dissolved inorganic nitrogen were estimated in Central European mountain ecosystems of the Bohemian Forest (forest lakes) and Tatra Mountains (alpine lakes) over the industrial period. Sulphur outputs from these ecosystems were comparable to inputs during a period of relatively stable atmospheric deposition (10-35 mmol m-2 yr-1) around the 1930s. Atmospheric inputs of sulphur increased by three- to four-fold between the 1950s and 1980s to ~140 and ~60 mmol mm-2 yr-1 in the Bohemian Forest and Tatra Mountains, respectively. Sulphur outputs were lower than inputs due to accumulation in soils, which was higher in forest soils than in the sparser alpine soils and represented 0.8-1.6 and 0.2-0.3 mol m-2, respectively, for the whole 1930-2000 period. In the 1990s, atmospheric inputs of sulphur decreased 80% and 50% in the Bohemian Forest and Tatra Mountains, respectively, and sulphur outputs exceeded inputs. Catchment soils became pronounced sources of sulphur with output fluxes averaging between 15 and 31 mmol m-2 yr-1. Higher sulphur accumulation in the forest soils has delayed (by several decades) recovery of forest lakes from acidification compared to alpine lakes. Estimated deposition of dissolved inorganic nitrogen was 53-75 mmol m-2 yr-1 in the Bohemian Forest and 35-45 mmol m-2 yr-1 in the Tatra Mountains in the 1880- 1950 period, i.e. below the empirically derived threshold of ~70 mmol m-2 yr-1, above which nitrogen leaching often occurs. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen was efficiently retained in the ecosystems and nitrate export was negligible (0-7 mmol m-2 yr-1). By the 1980s, nitrogen deposition increased to ~160 and ~80 mmol m-2 yr-1 in the Bohemian Forest and Tatra Mountains, respectively, and nitrogen output increased to 120 and 60 mmol m-2 yr-1. Moreover, assimilation of nitrogen in soils declined from ~40 to 10-20 mmol m-2 yr-1 in the alpine soils and even more in the Bohemian Forest, where one of the catchments has even become

  10. Mineral bioprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Torma, A.E.

    1993-05-01

    In the last 25 years, the introduction of biotechnological methods in hydrometallurgy has created new opportunities and challenges for the mineral processing industry. This was especially true for the production of metal values from mining wastes and low-and-complex-grade mineral resources, which were considered economically not amenable for processing by conventional extraction methods. Using bio-assisted heap, dump and in-situ leaching technologies, copper and uranium extractions gained their first industrial applications. The precious metal industries were the next to adopt the bio-preoxidation technique in the extraction of gold from refractory sulfide-bearing ores and concentrates. A variety of other bioleaching opportunities exist for nickel, cobalt, cadmium and zinc sulfide leaching. Recently developed bioremediation methods and biosorption technologies have shown a good potential for industrial applications to remove trace heavy metal and radionuclide concentrations from contaminated soils, and mining and processing effluents.

  11. Uranium Industry Annual, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-28

    The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ``Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,`` is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2.

  12. Petrological Characterization of the Triassic Paleosurface in the Northern Bohemian Massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Kouakou; Thiry, Medard; Szuszkiewicz, Adam; Turniak, Krzysztof

    2010-05-01

    ‘Albitization' is a widespread alteration process affecting sedimentary, igneous and metamorphic rocks. Albitized facies usually show a pinkish to red colour, depending on the degree of alteration. The main mineralogical process of this phenomenon is the pseudomorphic replacement of the primary Ca-Na plagioclases by secondary albite (Na). During this replacement biotite is often transformed to chlorite and inclusions of hematite, apatite, titanite, and calcite develop. So far, albitization has been systematically regarded as caused by magmatic derived hydrothermal brines, alkaline metasomatism reactions (Cathelineau, 1986; Petersson and Eliasson, 1997), or as a low grade metamorphic facies (Boles and Coombs, 1977). Recent studies in the Morvan Massif granites (Ricordel et al., 2007; Parcerisa et al., 2009) showed that the albitization there is related to the Triassic paleosurface. The decrease of this alteration with depth and its paleomagnetic age support the link of the albitization to the Triassic paleosurface. Furthermore, the petrographic data suggest the import of sodium by weathering solutions. The enrichement in Na+ of the fluids that triggered this alteration is probably linked to the Triassic salt deposits. Albitised pinkish facies have been recognized in the northern part of the Bohemian Massif (Polish Sudetes). Typical igneous and metamorphic rocks of the Klodzko area (southern Poland) are granites, granodiorites, schists, amphibolite, and gneisses, mostly of Paleozoic age. Three sites in the Klodzko area were sampled in detail from N to S: (1) Laski quarry, (2) Laski village, and (3) Chwalislaw. Here, the occurrence of the albitization is well developed and specific in its mineralogical paragenesis. Throughout the sample sites different albitization stages can be observed. The most albitized and therefore reddish facies can be found at the Laski village granite that consists of primary quartz and K-feldspar, biotite, and development of secondary

  13. 75 FR 48305 - Kaibab National Forest; Arizona; Uranium Exploratory Drilling Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-10

    ... Forest Service Kaibab National Forest; Arizona; Uranium Exploratory Drilling Project AGENCY: Forest... an Environmental Impact Statement for the Uranium Exploratory Drilling Project, posted in the Federal...-delivered to Kaibab National Forest, Attn: VANE Minerals Uranium Exploratory Drilling Project, 800 S. 6th St...

  14. A geophysical model of the Variscan orogenic root (Bohemian Massif): Implications for modern collisional orogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guy, Alexandra; Edel, Jean-Bernard; Schulmann, Karel; Tomek, Čestmir; Lexa, Ondrej

    2011-05-01

    A new model of the structure and composition of the Variscan crust in the Bohemian Massif is proposed based on 3D gravity modelling, geological data, seismic refraction (CEL09) and reflection (9HR) sections. The Bohemian Massif crust is characterized by a succession of positive and negative anomalies of about 60-80 km wavelength for nearly constant Moho depths. The south-western part of the Bohemian Massif displays a large negative Bouguer anomaly corresponding to high grade rocks (granulites and migmatites) of the Palaeozoic crustal root represented by the Moldanubian domain. The adjacent Neo-Proterozoic Bruno-Vistulian microcontinent displays an important gravity high reflecting mafic and intermediate medium grade metamorphic and magmatic rocks. The deep crustal boundary between the root domain and the Bruno-Vistulian microcontinent is represented by a strong gradient located 50 to 70 km westwards from the surface boundary between these units indicating that the high density basement rocks are covered by a thin sheet of low density granulites and migmatites. North-west from the Moldanubian domain occurs an important gravity high corresponding to the Neo-Proterozoic basement of the Teplá-Barrandian Unit limited in the north by southeast dipping reflectors of the Teplá suture which is characterized by high density eclogites and ultramafics. The footwall of the suture corresponds to low density felsic crust of the Saxothuringian basement. The reflection and refraction seismics and gravity modelling suggest a complex lithological structure of the Moldanubian domain marked by a low density 5-10 km thick lower crustal layer located above the Moho, a 5-10 km thick heavy mafic layer, a 10 km thick mid-crustal layer of intermediate density and a locally developed 2-5 km thick low density layer at the surface. The low density lower crust correlates well with low P-wave velocities in the range 6.0-6.4 km s- 1 in the CEL09 section. This complex geophysical structure and

  15. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM MONOCARBIDE

    DOEpatents

    Powers, R.M.

    1962-07-24

    A method of making essentially stoichiometric uranium monocarbide by pelletizing a mixture of uranium tetrafluoride, silicon, and carbon and reacting the mixture at a temperature of approximately 1500 to 1700 deg C until the reaction goes to completion, forming uranium monocarbide powder and volatile silicon tetrafluoride, is described. The powder is then melted to produce uranium monocarbide in massive form. (AEC)

  16. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM TETRACHLORIDE

    DOEpatents

    Calkins, V.P.

    1958-12-16

    A process is descrlbed for the production of uranium tetrachloride by contacting uranlum values such as uranium hexafluoride, uranlum tetrafluoride, or uranium oxides with either aluminum chloride, boron chloride, or sodium alumlnum chloride under substantially anhydrous condltlons at such a temperature and pressure that the chlorldes are maintained in the molten form and until the uranium values are completely converted to uranlum tetrachloride.

  17. URANIUM EXTRACTION

    DOEpatents

    Harrington, C.D.; Opie, J.V.

    1958-07-01

    The recovery of uranium values from uranium ore such as pitchblende is described. The ore is first dissolved in nitric acid, and a water soluble nitrate is added as a salting out agent. The resulting feed solution is then contacted with diethyl ether, whereby the bulk of the uranyl nitrate and a portion of the impurities are taken up by the ether. This acid ether extract is then separated from the aqueous raffinate, and contacted with water causing back extractioa of the uranyl nitrate and impurities into the water to form a crude liquor. After separation from the ether extract, this crude liquor is heated to about 118 deg C to obtain molten uranyl nitrate hexahydratc. After being slightly cooled the uranyl nitrate hexahydrate is contacted with acid free diethyl ether whereby the bulk of the uranyl nitrate is dissolved into the ethcr to form a neutral ether solution while most of the impurities remain in the aqueous waste. After separation from the aqueous waste, the resultant ether solution is washed with about l0% of its volume of water to free it of any dissolved impurities and is then contacted with at least one half its volume of water whereby the uranyl nitrate is extracted into the water to form an aqueous product solution.

  18. Enhanced uranium immobilization and reduction by Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms.

    PubMed

    Cologgi, Dena L; Speers, Allison M; Bullard, Blair A; Kelly, Shelly D; Reguera, Gemma

    2014-11-01

    Biofilms formed by dissimilatory metal reducers are of interest to develop permeable biobarriers for the immobilization of soluble contaminants such as uranium. Here we show that biofilms of the model uranium-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens immobilized substantially more U(VI) than planktonic cells and did so for longer periods of time, reductively precipitating it to a mononuclear U(IV) phase involving carbon ligands. The biofilms also tolerated high and otherwise toxic concentrations (up to 5 mM) of uranium, consistent with a respiratory strategy that also protected the cells from uranium toxicity. The enhanced ability of the biofilms to immobilize uranium correlated only partially with the biofilm biomass and thickness and depended greatly on the area of the biofilm exposed to the soluble contaminant. In contrast, uranium reduction depended on the expression of Geobacter conductive pili and, to a lesser extent, on the presence of the c cytochrome OmcZ in the biofilm matrix. The results support a model in which the electroactive biofilm matrix immobilizes and reduces the uranium in the top stratum. This mechanism prevents the permeation and mineralization of uranium in the cell envelope, thereby preserving essential cellular functions and enhancing the catalytic capacity of Geobacter cells to reduce uranium. Hence, the biofilms provide cells with a physically and chemically protected environment for the sustained immobilization and reduction of uranium that is of interest for the development of improved strategies for the in situ bioremediation of environments impacted by uranium contamination.

  19. Enhanced Uranium Immobilization and Reduction by Geobacter sulfurreducens Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Cologgi, Dena L.; Speers, Allison M.; Bullard, Blair A.; Kelly, Shelly D.

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms formed by dissimilatory metal reducers are of interest to develop permeable biobarriers for the immobilization of soluble contaminants such as uranium. Here we show that biofilms of the model uranium-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens immobilized substantially more U(VI) than planktonic cells and did so for longer periods of time, reductively precipitating it to a mononuclear U(IV) phase involving carbon ligands. The biofilms also tolerated high and otherwise toxic concentrations (up to 5 mM) of uranium, consistent with a respiratory strategy that also protected the cells from uranium toxicity. The enhanced ability of the biofilms to immobilize uranium correlated only partially with the biofilm biomass and thickness and depended greatly on the area of the biofilm exposed to the soluble contaminant. In contrast, uranium reduction depended on the expression of Geobacter conductive pili and, to a lesser extent, on the presence of the c cytochrome OmcZ in the biofilm matrix. The results support a model in which the electroactive biofilm matrix immobilizes and reduces the uranium in the top stratum. This mechanism prevents the permeation and mineralization of uranium in the cell envelope, thereby preserving essential cellular functions and enhancing the catalytic capacity of Geobacter cells to reduce uranium. Hence, the biofilms provide cells with a physically and chemically protected environment for the sustained immobilization and reduction of uranium that is of interest for the development of improved strategies for the in situ bioremediation of environments impacted by uranium contamination. PMID:25128347

  20. Late Quaternary tectonic switching of siliciclastic provenance in the strike-slip-dominated foreland of the Western Carpathians; Upper Morava Basin, Bohemian Massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novák, Aleš; Bábek, Ondřej; Kapusta, Jaroslav

    2017-06-01

    This study is focused on the lithology and provenance of late Quaternary fluvial deposits of the Upper Morava Basin a pull-apart basin situated at the contact of the Bohemian Massif and Western Carpathians. Late Cenozoic tectonic convergence between these two units caused differential subsidence along strike-slip faults of the Elbe-Odra zone, leading to a distinct horst-and-graben morphology of the Upper Morava Basin. The Pleistocene fluvial deposits are preserved in several terrace levels and partly buried under the present-day floodplain of the Morava River. This study is based on four cores (11-25 m deep) drilled in the floodplain of two major depocentres of the basin, the Lutín Graben, and the Upper Morava Basin sensu stricto. The drill cores were analysed for grain size, pebble- and heavy-mineral composition, chemical composition of detrital garnets, bulk magnetic susceptibility, sediment colour (visible-light spectral reflectance) and bulk element geochemistry. Age interpretations are based on eight optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) analyses. The Upper Pleistocene sediments were deposited in a gravelly braided to transitional braided-meandering river in both the Upper Morava Basin s.s. and the Lutín Graben (the oldest OSL age is 161.5 ka, corresponding to the late Saalian). Between the end of the Saalian and late Weichselian glaciations, the Morava River abandoned the Lutín Graben for the Upper Morava Basin s.s. where it flows up to the present day. The Pleistocene fluvial style contrasts with the present-day meandering to anastomosing fluvial style of the Morava River. The Pleistocene deposits were sourced from areas corresponding to the present-day Morava River catchment including crystalline units of the eastern Bohemian Massif and the Moravo-Silesian Carboniferous Basin. They also contain a considerable input from the Bohemian Cretaceous Basin. The composition of late Weichselian deposits from the Dub nad Moravou core (34.53 ± 3.42 ka and

  1. Lung cancer mortality in the European uranium miners cohorts analyzed with a biologically based model taking into account radon measurement error.

    PubMed

    Heidenreich, W F; Tomasek, L; Grosche, B; Leuraud, K; Laurier, D

    2012-08-01

    The biologically based two-stage clonal expansion (TSCE) model is used to analyze lung cancer mortality of European miners from the Czech Republic, France, and Germany. All three cohorts indicate a highly significant action of exposure to radon and its progeny on promotion. The action on initiation is not significant in the French cohort. An action on transformation was tested but not found significant. In a pooled analysis, the results based on the French and German datasets do not differ significantly in any of the used parameters. For the Czech dataset, only lag time and two parameters that determine the clonal expansion without exposure and with low exposure rates (promotion) are consistent with the other studies. For low exposure rates, the resulting relative risks are quite similar. Exposure estimates for each calendar year are used. A model for random errors in each of these yearly exposures is presented. Depending on the used technique of exposure estimate, Berkson and classical errors are used. The consequences for the model parameters are calculated and found to be mostly of minor importance, except that the large difference in the exposure-induced initiation between the studies is decreased substantially.

  2. DECONTAMINATION OF URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Feder, H.M.; Chellew, N.R.

    1958-02-01

    This patent deals with the separation of rare earth and other fission products from neutron bombarded uranium. This is accomplished by melting the uranium in contact with either thorium oxide, maguesium oxide, alumnum oxide, beryllium oxide, or uranium dioxide. The melting is preferably carried out at from 1150 deg to 1400 deg C in an inert atmosphere, such as argon or helium. During this treatment a scale of uranium dioxide forms on the uranium whtch contains most of the fission products.

  3. Search for uranium in western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKelvey, Vincent Ellis

    1953-01-01

    The search for uranium in the United States is one of the most intensive ever made for any metal during our history. The number of prospectors and miners involved is difficult to estimate but some measure of the size of the effort is indicated by the fact that about 500 geologists are employed by government and industry in the work--more than the total number of geologists engaged in the study of all other minerals together except oil. The largest part of the effort has been concentrated in the western states. No single deposit of major importance by world standards has been discovered but the search has led to the discovery of important minable deposits of carnotite and related minerals on the Colorado Plateau; of large, low grade deposits of uranium in phosphates in the northwestern states and in lignites in the Dakotas, Wyoming, Idaho and New Mexico; and of many new and some promising occurrences of uranium in carnotite-like deposits and in vein deposits. Despite the fact that a large number of the districts considered favorable for the occurrence of uranium have already been examined, the outlook for future discoveries is bright, particularly for uranium in vein and in carnotite-like deposits in the Rocky Mountain States.

  4. Relationship between sandstone-type uranium deposits and hydrocarbon in the northern ordos basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feifei; Wang, Jianqiang; Guo, Pei; Cheng, Xianghu; Li, Bei; Song, Zisheng; Wei, Anjun

    2017-05-01

    The Ordos Basin is one of the largest proliferous basins and also one of the most important uranium-bearing basins in China. It is characterized by the coexistence of petroleum and uranium in the northern part of the basin. To understand the coexistence mechanism, more studies are called for on the genesis of sandstone-type uranium deposits in the northern part of the basin, especially on the role of hydrocarbon in uranium mineralization. In this study, we investigated the relationship between uranium and hydrocarbon in the northern Ordos Basin using the methods of petrology, mineralogy and geochemistry. Our results show that the hydrocarbon seepage plays an important role in the mineralization of sandstone-type uranium deposits. It greatly affects the reduction in mineralization and the environmental rehabilitation to protect the ore body from being destroyed by the groundwater after mineralization.

  5. Mineral Deposit Data for Epigenetic Base- and Precious-metal and Uranium-thorium Deposits in South-central and Southwestern Montana and Southern and Central Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klein, T.L.

    2004-01-01

    Metal deposits spatially associated with the Cretaceous Boulder and Idaho batholiths of southwestern Montana and southern and central Idaho have been exploited since the early 1860s. Au was first discovered in placer deposits; exploitation of vein deposits in bedrock soon followed. In 1865, high-grade Ag vein deposits were discovered and remained economically important until the 1890s. Early high-grade deposits of Au, Ag and Pb were found in the weathered portions of the veins systems. As mining progressed to deeper levels, Ag and Pb grades diminished. Exploration for and development of these vein deposits in this area have continued until the present. A majority of these base- and precious-metal vein deposits are classified as polymetallic veins (PMV) and polymetallic carbonate-replacement (PMR) deposits in this compilation. Porphyry Cu and Mo, epithermal (Au, Ag, Hg and Sb), base- and precious-metal and W skarn, W vein, and U and Th vein deposits are also common in this area. The world-class Butte Cu porphyry and the Butte high-sulfidation Cu vein deposits are in this study area. PMV and PMR deposits are the most numerous in the region and constitute about 85% of the deposit records compiled. Several types of syngenetic/diagenetic sulfide mineral deposits in rocks of the Belt Supergroup or their equivalents are common in the region and they have been the source of a substantial metal production over the last century. These syngenetic deposits and their metamorphosed/structurally remobilized equivalents were not included in this database; therefore, deposits in the Idaho portion of the Coeur d'Alene district and the Idaho Cobalt belt, for example, have not been included because many of them are believed to be of this type.

  6. Influence of Acidic and Alkaline Waste Solution Properties on Uranium Migration in Subsurface Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Szecsody, James E.; Truex, Michael J.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Wellman, Dawn M.; Resch, Charles T.; Zhong, Lirong

    2013-08-01

    This study shows that acidic and alkaline wastes co-disposed with uranium into subsurface sediments has significant impact on changes in uranium retardation, concentration, and mass during downward migration. For uranium co-disposal with acidic wastes, significant rapid (i.e., hours) carbonate and slow (i.e., 100s of hours) clay dissolution resulted, releasing significant sediment-associated uranium, but the extent of uranium release and mobility change was controlled by the acid mass added relative to the sediment proton adsorption capacity. Mineral dissolution in acidic solutions (pH 2) resulted in a rapid (< 10 h) increase in aqueous carbonate (with Ca2+, Mg2+) and phosphate and a slow (100s of hours) increase in silica, Al3+, and K+, likely from 2:1 clay dissolution. Infiltration of uranium with a strong acid resulted in significant shallow uranium mineral dissolution and deeper uranium precipitation (likely as phosphates and carbonates) with downward uranium migration of three times greater mass at a faster velocity relative to uranium infiltration in pH neutral groundwater. In contrast, mineral dissolution in an alkaline environment (pH 13) resulted in a rapid (< 10 h) increase in carbonate, followed by a slow (10s to 100s of hours) increase in silica concentration, likely from montmorillonite, muscovite, and kaolinite dissolution. Infiltration of uranium with a strong base resulted in uranium-silicate precipitation (presumed Na-boltwoodite) but also desorption of natural uranium on the sediment due to the high ionic strength solution, or 60% greater mass with greater retardation compared with groundwater. Overall, these results show that acidic or alkaline co-contaminant disposal with uranium can result in complex depth- and time-dependent changes in uranium dissolution/precipitation reactions and uranium sorption, which alter the uranium migration mass, concentration, and velocity.

  7. Influence of acidic and alkaline waste solution properties on uranium migration in subsurface sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szecsody, Jim E.; Truex, Mike J.; Qafoku, Nikolla P.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Resch, Tom; Zhong, Lirong

    2013-08-01

    This study shows that acidic and alkaline wastes co-disposed with uranium into subsurface sediments have significant impact on changes in uranium retardation, concentration, and mass during downward migration. For uranium co-disposal with acidic wastes, significant rapid (i.e., hours) carbonate and slow (i.e., 100 s of hours) clay dissolution resulted, releasing significant sediment-associated uranium, but the extent of uranium release and mobility change was controlled by the acid mass added relative to the sediment proton adsorption capacity. Mineral dissolution in acidic solutions (pH 2) resulted in a rapid (< 10 h) increase in aqueous carbonate (with Ca2 +, Mg2 +) and phosphate and a slow (100 s of hours) increase in silica, Al3 +, and K+, likely from 2:1 clay dissolution. Infiltration of uranium with a strong acid resulted in significant shallow uranium mineral dissolution and deeper uranium precipitation (likely as phosphates and carbonates) with downward uranium migration of three times greater mass at a faster velocity relative to uranium infiltration in pH neutral groundwater. In contrast, mineral dissolution in an alkaline environment (pH 13) resulted in a rapid (< 10 h) increase in carbonate, followed by a slow (10 s to 100 s of hours) increase in silica concentration, likely from montmorillonite, muscovite, and kaolinite dissolution. Infiltration of uranium with a strong base resulted in not only uranium-silicate precipitation (presumed Na-boltwoodite) but also desorption of natural uranium on the sediment due to the high ionic strength solution, or 60% greater mass with greater retardation compared with groundwater. Overall, these results show that acidic or alkaline co-contaminant disposal with uranium can result in complex depth- and time-dependent changes in uranium dissolution/precipitation reactions and uranium sorption, which alter the uranium migration mass, concentration, and velocity.

  8. URANIUM DECONTAMINATION

    DOEpatents

    Buckingham, J.S.; Carroll, J.L.

    1959-12-22

    A process is described for reducing the extractability of ruthenium, zirconium, and niobium values into hexone contained in an aqueous nitric acid uranium-containing solution. The solution is made acid-deficient, heated to between 55 and 70 deg C, and at that temperature a water-soluble inorganic thiosulfate is added. By this, a precipitate is formed which carries the bulk of the ruthenium, and the remainder of the ruthenium as well as the zirconium and niobium are converted to a hexone-nonextractable form. The rutheniumcontaining precipitate can either be removed from the solu tion or it can be dissolved as a hexone-non-extractable compound by the addition of sodium dichromate prior to hexone extraction.

  9. Uranium redistribution under oxidizing conditions in Oklo natural reactor zone 2, Gabon

    SciTech Connect

    Isobe, H.; Ohnuki, T.; Murakami, T.; Gauthier-Lafaye, F.

    1995-12-31

    This mineralogical study was completed to elucidate the relationships between uranium distribution and alteration products of the host rock of natural reactor zone clays just below the reactor core. Uraninite is preserved without any alteration in the reactor core. Uranium minerals are found to be present in the fractures in the reactor zone clays associated with iron-mineral veins, galena and Ti-bearing minerals. Uranium, for which the phases could not be identified, occurs in iron-mineral veins and the iron-mineral rim of pyrite grains in the reactor zone clays. Uranium is not associated with granular iron minerals occurring in the illite matrix of the reactor zone clays. The degree of crystallinity and uranium content of the three iron-bearing alteration products suggest that they formed under different conditions; the granular iron minerals, under alteration conditions where uranium was not mobilized while the iron-mineral veins and the iron-mineral rim of pyrite, under conditions in which uranium is mobilized after the formation of the granular iron minerals.

  10. Cleaning of uranium vs machine coolant formulations

    SciTech Connect

    Cristy, S.S.; Byrd, V.R.; Simandl, R.F.

    1984-10-01

    This study compares methods for cleaning uranium chips and the residues left on chips from alternate machine coolants based on propylene glycol-water mixtures with either borax, ammonium tetraborate, or triethanolamine tetraborate added as a nuclear poison. Residues left on uranium surfaces machined with perchloroethylene-mineral oil coolant and on surfaces machined with the borax-containing alternate coolant were also compared. In comparing machined surfaces, greater chlorine contamination was found on the surface of the perchloroethylene-mineral oil machined surfaces, but slightly greater oxidation was found on the surfaces machined with the alternate borax-containing coolant. Overall, the differences were small and a change to the alternate coolant does not appear to constitute a significant threat to the integrity of machined uranium parts.

  11. Monitoring genotoxic exposure in uranium mines.

    PubMed Central

    Srám, R J; Dobiás, L; Rössner, P; Veselá, D; Veselý, D; Rakusová, R; Rericha, V

    1993-01-01

    Recent data from deep uranium mines in Czechoslovakia indicated that mines are exposed to other mutagenic factors in addition to radon daughter products. Mycotoxins were identified as a possible source of mutagens in these mines. Mycotoxins were examined in 38 samples from mines and in throat swabs taken from 116 miners and 78 controls. The following mycotoxins were identified from mines samples: aflatoxins B1 and G1, citrinin, citreoviridin, mycophenolic acid, and sterigmatocystin. Some mold strains isolated from mines and throat swabs were investigated for mutagenic activity by the SOS chromotest and Salmonella assay with strains TA100 and TA98. Mutagenicity was observed, especially with metabolic activation in vitro. These data suggest that mycotoxins produced by molds in uranium mines are a new genotoxic factor for uranium miners. PMID:8143610

  12. The history of uranium mining and the Navajo people.

    PubMed

    Brugge, Doug; Goble, Rob

    2002-09-01

    From World War II until 1971, the government was the sole purchaser of uranium ore in the United States. Uranium mining occurred mostly in the southwestern United States and drew many Native Americans and others into work in the mines and mills. Despite a long and well-developed understanding, based on the European experience earlier in the century, that uranium mining led to high rates of lung cancer, few protections were provided for US miners before 1962 and their adoption after that time was slow and incomplete. The resulting high rates of illness among miners led in 1990 to passage of the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act.

  13. The History of Uranium Mining and the Navajo People

    PubMed Central

    Brugge, Doug; Goble, Rob

    2002-01-01

    From World War II until 1971, the government was the sole purchaser of uranium ore in the United States. Uranium mining occurred mostly in the southwestern United States and drew many Native Americans and others into work in the mines and mills. Despite a long and well-developed understanding, based on the European experience earlier in the century, that uranium mining led to high rates of lung cancer, few protections were provided for US miners before 1962 and their adoption after that time was slow and incomplete. The resulting high rates of illness among miners led in 1990 to passage of the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act. PMID:12197966

  14. Uranium industry annual 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-05

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1994 (UIA 1994) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing during that survey year. The UIA 1994 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the 10-year period 1985 through 1994 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` (UIAS) provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1994, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. A feature article, ``Comparison of Uranium Mill Tailings Reclamation in the United States and Canada,`` is included in the UIA 1994. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, and uranium inventories, enrichment feed deliveries (actual and projected), and unfilled market requirements are shown in Chapter 2.

  15. Uranium industry annual 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-22

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1998 (UIA 1998) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. It contains data for the period 1989 through 2008 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data provides a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1989 through 1998, including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment, are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2008, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, and uranium inventories, are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1998 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. The Form EIA-858 ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is shown in Appendix D. For the readers convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix E along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  16. The Nopal 1 Uranium Deposit: an Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calas, G.; Allard, T.; Galoisy, L.

    2007-05-01

    The Nopal 1 natural analogue is located in the Pena Blanca uranium district, about 50 kms north of Chihuahua City, Mexico. The deposit is hosted in tertiary ignimbritic ash-flow tuffs, dated at 44 Ma (Nopal and Colorados formations), and overlying the Pozos conglomerate formation and a sequence of Cretaceous carbonate rocks. The deposit is exposed at the ground surface and consists of a near vertical zone extending over about 100 m with a diameter of 40 m. An interesting characteristic is that the primary mineralization has been exposed above the water table, as a result of the uplift of the Sierra Pena Blanca, and subsequently oxidized with a remobilization of hexavalent uranium. The primary mineralization has been explained by various genetic models. It is associated to an extensive hydrothermal alteration of the volcanic tuffs, locally associated to pyrite and preserved by an intense silicification. Several kaolinite parageneses occur in fissure fillings and feldspar pseudomorphs, within the mineralized breccia pipe and the barren surrounding rhyolitic tuffs. Smectites are mainly developed in the underlying weakly welded tuffs. Several radiation-induced defect centers have been found in these kaolinites providing a unique picture of the dynamics of uranium mobilization (see Allard et al., this session). Another evidence of this mobilization is given by the spectroscopy of uranium-bearing opals, which show characteristic fluorescence spectra of uranyl groups sorbed at the surface of silica. By comparison with the other uranium deposits of the Sierra Pena Blanca and the nearby Sierra de Gomez, the Nopal 1 deposit is original, as it is one of the few deposits hving retained a reduced uranium mineralization.

  17. Uranium on the Checkerboard: Crisis at Crownpoint

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Tom; Wood, Beth

    1978-01-01

    Some 22 companies are currently exploring for uranium in the Crownpoint, New Mexico area. Due to complicated patterns of land and mineral ownership on the Navajo Reservation, the mining companies do not feel obligated to communicate, and the Navajo are, consequently, worried about their social and physical environment. (JC)

  18. Speciation of uranium in compartments of living cells.

    PubMed

    Geipel, Gerhard; Viehweger, Katrin

    2015-06-01

    Depleted uranium used as ammunition corrodes in the environment forming mineral phases and then dissolved uranium species like uranium carbonates (Schimmack et al., in Radiat Environ Biophys 46:221-227, 2007) and hydroxides. These hydroxide species were contacted with plant cells (canola). After 24 h contact time the cells were fractionated and the uranium speciation in the fraction was determined by time resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy at room temperature as well at 150 K. It could be shown that the uranium speciation in the fractions is different to that in the nutrient solution. Comparison of the emission bands with literature data allows assignment of the uranium binding forms.

  19. Process for electroslag refining of uranium and uranium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, P.S. Jr.; Agee, W.A.; Bullock, J.S. IV; Condon, J.B.

    1975-07-22

    A process is described for electroslag refining of uranium and uranium alloys wherein molten uranium and uranium alloys are melted in a molten layer of a fluoride slag containing up to about 8 weight percent calcium metal. The calcium metal reduces oxides in the uranium and uranium alloys to provide them with an oxygen content of less than 100 parts per million. (auth)

  20. Technical Basis for Assessing Uranium Bioremediation Performance

    SciTech Connect

    PE Long; SB Yabusaki; PD Meyer; CJ Murray; AL N’Guessan

    2008-04-01

    In situ bioremediation of uranium holds significant promise for effective stabilization of U(VI) from groundwater at reduced cost compared to conventional pump and treat. This promise is unlikely to be realized unless researchers and practitioners successfully predict and demonstrate the long-term effectiveness of uranium bioremediation protocols. Field research to date has focused on both proof of principle and a mechanistic level of understanding. Current practice typically involves an engineering approach using proprietary amendments that focuses mainly on monitoring U(VI) concentration for a limited time period. Given the complexity of uranium biogeochemistry and uranium secondary minerals, and the lack of documented case studies, a systematic monitoring approach using multiple performance indicators is needed. This document provides an overview of uranium bioremediation, summarizes design considerations, and identifies and prioritizes field performance indicators for the application of uranium bioremediation. The performance indicators provided as part of this document are based on current biogeochemical understanding of uranium and will enable practitioners to monitor the performance of their system and make a strong case to clients, regulators, and the public that the future performance of the system can be assured and changes in performance addressed as needed. The performance indicators established by this document and the information gained by using these indicators do add to the cost of uranium bioremediation. However, they are vital to the long-term success of the application of uranium bioremediation and provide a significant assurance that regulatory goals will be met. The document also emphasizes the need for systematic development of key information from bench scale tests and pilot scales tests prior to full-scale implementation.

  1. PRODUCTION OF PURIFIED URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Burris, L. Jr.; Knighton, J.B.; Feder, H.M.

    1960-01-26

    A pyrometallurgical method for processing nuclear reactor fuel elements containing uranium and fission products and for reducing uranium compound; to metallic uranium is reported. If the material proccssed is essentially metallic uranium, it is dissolved in zinc, the sulution is cooled to crystallize UZn/sub 9/ , and the UZn/sub 9/ is distilled to obtain uranium free of fission products. If the material processed is a uranium compound, the sollvent is an alloy of zinc and magnesium and the remaining steps are the same.

  2. URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Bailes, R.H.; Long, R.S.; Olson, R.S.; Kerlinger, H.O.

    1959-02-10

    A method is described for recovering uranium values from uranium bearing phosphate solutions such as are encountered in the manufacture of phosphate fertilizers. The solution is first treated with a reducing agent to obtain all the uranium in the tetravalent state. Following this reduction, the solution is treated to co-precipitate the rcduced uranium as a fluoride, together with other insoluble fluorides, thereby accomplishing a substantially complete recovery of even trace amounts of uranium from the phosphate solution. This precipitate usually takes the form of a complex fluoride precipitate, and after appropriate pre-treatment, the uranium fluorides are leached from this precipitate and rccovered from the leach solution.

  3. Chemical Equilibrium of the Dissolved Uranium in Groundwaters From a Spanish Uranium-Ore Deposit

    SciTech Connect

    Garralon, Antonio; Gomez, Paloma; Turrero, Maria Jesus; Buil, Belen; Sanchez, Lorenzo

    2007-07-01

    The main objectives of this work are to determine the hydrogeochemical evolution of an uranium ore and identify the main water/rock interaction processes that control the dissolved uranium content. The Mina Fe uranium-ore deposit is the most important and biggest mine worked in Spain. Sageras area is located at the north part of the Mina Fe, over the same ore deposit. The uranium deposit was not mined in Sageras and was only perturbed by the exploration activities performed 20 years ago. The studied area is located 10 Km northeast of Ciudad Rodrigo (Salamanca) at an altitude over 650 m.a.s.l. The uranium mineralization is related to faults affecting the metasediments of the Upper Proterozoic to Lower Cambrian schist-graywacke complex (CEG), located in the Centro-Iberian Zone of the Hesperian Massif . The primary uranium minerals are uraninite and coffinite but numerous secondary uranium minerals have been formed as a result of the weathering processes: yellow gummite, autunite, meta-autunite, torbernite, saleeite, uranotile, ianthinite and uranopilite. The water flow at regional scale is controlled by the topography. Recharge takes place mainly in the surrounding mountains (Sierra Pena de Francia) and discharge at fluvial courses, mainly Agueda and Yeltes rivers, boundaries S-NW and NE of the area, respectively. Deep flows (lower than 100 m depth) should be upwards due to the river vicinity, with flow directions towards the W, NW or N. In Sageras-Mina Fe there are more than 100 boreholes drilled to investigate the mineral resources of the deposit. 35 boreholes were selected in order to analyze the chemical composition of groundwaters based on their depth and situation around the uranium ore. Groundwater samples come from 50 to 150 m depth. The waters are classified as calcium-bicarbonate type waters, with a redox potential that indicates they are slightly reduced (values vary between 50 to -350 mV). The TOC varies between <0.1 and 4.0 mgC/L and the dissolved

  4. 28 CFR 79.42 - Criteria for eligibility for claims by miners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... RADIATION EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Uranium Miners § 79.42 Criteria for... in a uranium mine or mines during the period identified in paragraph (b) of this section; and (d)...

  5. 28 CFR 79.42 - Criteria for eligibility for claims by miners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... RADIATION EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Uranium Miners § 79.42 Criteria for... in a uranium mine or mines during the period identified in paragraph (b) of this section; and (d)...

  6. Organic geochemical analysis of sedimentary organic matter associated with uranium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leventhal, J.S.; Daws, T.A.; Frye, J.S.

    1986-01-01

    Samples of sedimentary organic matter from several geologic environments and ages which are enriched in uranium (56 ppm to 12%) have been characterized. The three analytical techniqyes used to study the samples were Rock-Eval pyrolysis, pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and solid-state C-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In samples with low uranium content, the pyrolysis-gas chromatography products contain oxygenated functional groups (as hydroxyl) and molecules with both aliphatic and aromatic carbon atoms. These samples with low uranium content give measurable Rock-Eval hydrocarbon and organic-CO2 yields, and C-13 NMR values of > 30% aliphatic carbon. In contrast, uranium-rich samples have few hydrocarbon pyrolysis products, increased Rock-Eval organic-CO2 contents and > 70% aromatic carbon contents from C-13 NMR. The increase in aromaticity and decrease in hydrocarbon pyrolysis yield are related to the amount of uranium and the age of the uranium minerals, which correspond to the degree of radiation damage. The three analytical techniques give complementary results. Increase in Rock-Eval organic-CO2 yield correlates with uranium content for samples from the Grants uranium region. Calculations show that the amount of organic-CO2 corresponds to the quantity of uranium chemically reduced by the organic matter for the Grants uranium region samples. ?? 1986.

  7. Assessing the environmental availability of uranium in soils and sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Amonette, J.E.; Holdren, G.R. Jr.; Krupa, K.M.; Lindenmeier, C.W.

    1994-06-01

    Soils and sediments contaminated with uranium pose certain environmental and ecological risks. At low to moderate levels of contamination, the magnitude of these risks depends not only on the absolute concentrations of uranium in the material but also on the availability of the uranium to drinking water supplies, plants, or higher organisms. Rational approaches for regulating the clean-up of sites contaminated with uranium, therefore, should consider the value of assessing the environmental availability of uranium at the site before making decisions regarding remediation. The purpose of this work is to review existing approaches and procedures to determine their potential applicability for assessing the environmental availability of uranium in bulk soils or sediments. In addition to making the recommendations regarding methodology, the authors have tabulated data from the literature on the aqueous complexes of uranium and major uranium minerals, examined the possibility of predicting environmental availability of uranium based on thermodynamic solubility data, and compiled a representative list of analytical laboratories capable of performing environmental analyses of uranium in soils and sediments.

  8. Three-dimensional S-wave velocity model of the Bohemian Massif from Bayesian ambient noise tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentová, Lubica; Gallovič, František; Maierová, Petra

    2017-10-01

    We perform two-step surface wave tomography of phase-velocity dispersion curves obtained by ambient noise cross-correlations in the Bohemian Massif. In the first step, the inter-station dispersion curves were inverted for each period (ranging between 4 and 20 s) separately into phase-velocity maps using 2D adjoint method. In the second step, we perform Bayesian inversion of the set of the phase-velocity maps into an S-wave velocity model. To sample the posterior probability density function, the parallel tempering algorithm is employed providing over 1 million models. From the model samples, not only mean model but also its uncertainty is determined to appraise the reliable features. The model is correlated with known main geologic structures of the Bohemian Massif. The uppermost low-velocity anomalies are in agreement with thick sedimentary basins. In deeper parts (4-20 km), the S-wave velocity anomalies correspond, in general, to main tectonic domains of the Bohemian Massif. The exception is a stable low-velocity body in the middle of the high-velocity Moldanubian domain and high-velocity body resembling a promontory of the Moldanubian into the Teplá-Barrandian domain. The most pronounced (high-velocity) anomaly is located beneath the Eger Rift that is a part of a Tertiary rift system across Europe.

  9. METHOD FOR PURIFYING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Knighton, J.B.; Feder, H.M.

    1960-04-26

    A process is given for purifying a uranium-base nuclear material. The nuclear material is dissolved in zinc or a zinc-magnesium alloy and the concentration of magnesium is increased until uranium precipitates.

  10. NICKEL COATED URANIUM ARTICLE

    DOEpatents

    Gray, A.G.

    1958-10-01

    Nickel coatings on uranium and various methods of obtaining such coatings are described. Specifically disclosed are such nickel or nickel alloy layers as barriers between uranium and aluminum- silicon, chromium, or copper coatings.

  11. Incorporation of uranium into a biomimetic apatite: physicochemical and biological aspects.

    PubMed

    Chatelain, Grégory; Bourgeois, Damien; Ravaux, Johann; Averseng, Olivier; Vidaud, Claude; Meyer, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Bone is the main target organ for the storage of several toxic metals, including uranium. But the mode of action of uranium on bones remains poorly understood. To better assess the impact of uranium on bone cells, synthetic biomimetic apatites encompassing a controlled amount of uranium were prepared and analyzed. This study revealed the physicochemical impact of uranium on apatite mineralization: the presence of the metal induces a loss of crystallinity and a lower mineralization rate. The prepared samples were then used as substrates for bone cell culture. Osteoblasts were not sensitive to the presence of uranium in the support, whereas previous results showed a deleterious effect of uranium introduced into a cell culture solution. This work should therefore have some original prospects within the context of toxicological studies concerning the effect of metallic cations on bone cell systems.

  12. Potential aquifer vulnerability in regions down-gradient from uranium in situ recovery (ISR) sites.

    PubMed

    Saunders, James A; Pivetz, Bruce E; Voorhies, Nathan; Wilkin, Richard T

    2016-12-01

    Sandstone-hosted roll-front uranium ore deposits originate when U(VI) dissolved in groundwater is reduced and precipitated as insoluble U(IV) minerals. Groundwater redox geochemistry, aqueous complexation, and solute migration are important in leaching uranium from source rocks and transporting it in low concentrations to a chemical redox interface where it is deposited in an ore zone typically containing the uranium minerals uraninite, pitchblende, and/or coffinite; various iron sulfides; native selenium; clays; and calcite. In situ recovery (ISR) of uranium ores is a process of contacting the uranium mineral deposit with leaching and oxidizing (lixiviant) fluids via injection of the lixiviant into wells drilled into the subsurface aquifer that hosts uranium ore, while other extraction wells pump the dissolved uranium after dissolution of the uranium minerals. Environmental concerns during and after ISR include water quality degradation from: 1) potential excursions of leaching solutions away from the injection zone into down-gradient, underlying, or overlying aquifers; 2) potential migration of uranium and its decay products (e.g., Ra, Rn, Pb); and, 3) potential mobilization and migration of redox-sensitive trace metals (e.g., Fe, Mn, Mo, Se, V), metalloids (e.g., As), and anions (e.g., sulfate). This review describes the geochemical processes that control roll-front uranium transport and fate in groundwater systems, identifies potential aquifer vulnerabilities to ISR operations, identifies data gaps in mitigating these vulnerabilities, and discusses the hydrogeological characterization involved in developing a monitoring program. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. PROCESS OF PURIFYING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.; Orlemann, E.F.; Jensen, L.H.

    1958-12-23

    A method of obtaining substantially pure uranium from a uranium composition contaminated with light element impurities such as sodium, magnesium, beryllium, and the like is described. An acidic aqueous solution containing tetravalent uranium is treated with a soluble molybdate to form insoluble uranous molybdate which is removed. This material after washing is dissolved in concentrated nitric acid to obtaln a uranyl nitrate solution from which highly purified uranium is obtained by extraction with ether.

  14. Uranium industry annual 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1995 (UIA 1995) provides current statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1995 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the period 1986 through 2005 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey``. Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1995, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1986 through 1995 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2005, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1995 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. For the reader`s convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix D along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 14 figs., 56 tabs.

  15. PREPARATION OF URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE

    DOEpatents

    Lawroski, S.; Jonke, A.A.; Steunenberg, R.K.

    1959-10-01

    A process is described for preparing uranium hexafluoride from carbonate- leach uranium ore concentrate. The briquetted, crushed, and screened concentrate is reacted with hydrogen fluoride in a fluidized bed, and the uranium tetrafluoride formed is mixed with a solid diluent, such as calcium fluoride. This mixture is fluorinated with fluorine and an inert diluent gas, also in a fluidized bed, and the uranium hexafluoride obtained is finally purified by fractional distillation.

  16. Treatability Test Plan for 300 Area Uranium Stabilization through Polyphosphate Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeul, Vincent R.; Williams, Mark D.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mackley, Rob D.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Williams, Bruce A.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2007-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has initiated a study into possible options for stabilizing uranium at the 300 Area using polyphosphate injection. As part of this effort, PNNL will perform bench- and field-scale treatability testing designed to evaluate the efficacy of using polyphosphate injections to reduced uranium concentrations in the groundwater to meet drinking water standards (30 ug/L) in situ. This technology works by forming phosphate minerals (autunite and apatite) in the aquifer that directly sequester the existing aqueous uranium in autunite minerals and precipitates apatite minerals for sorption and long term treatment of uranium migrating into the treatment zone, thus reducing current and future aqueous uranium concentrations. Polyphosphate injection was selected for testing based on technology screening as part of the 300-FF-5 Phase III Feasibility Study for treatment of uranium in the 300-Area.

  17. High resolution remote sensing image processing technology and its application to uranium geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie-lin

    2008-12-01

    Hyperspectral and high spatial resolution remote sensing technology take important role in uranium geological application, data mining and knowledge discovery methods are key to character spectral and spatial information of uranium mineralization factors. Based on curvelet transform algorithm, this paper developed the image fusion technology of hyperspectral (Hyperion) and high spatial data (SPOT5), and results demonstrated that fusion image had advantage in denoising, enhancing and information identification. Used discrete wavelet transform, the spectral parameters of uranium mineralization factors were acquired, the spectral identification pedigrees of typical quadrivalence and hexavalence uranium minerals were established. Furthermore, utilizing hyperspectral remote sensing observation technology, this paper developed hyperspectral logging of drill cores and trench, it can quickly processed lots of geological and spectral information, and the relationship between radioactive intensity and abnormal spectral characteristics of Fe3+ was established. All those provided remote sensing technical bases to uranium geology, and the better results have been achieved in Taoshan uranium deposits in south China.

  18. Accumulation of uranium by immobilized persimmon tannin

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaguchi, Takashi; Nakajima, Akira )

    1994-01-01

    We have discovered that the extracted juice of unripe astringent persimmon fruit, designated as kakishibu or shibuol, has an extremely high affinity for uranium. To develop efficient adsorbents for uranium, we tried to immobilize kakishibu (persimmon tannin) with various aldehydes and mineral acids. Persimmon tannin immobilized with glutaraldehyde can accumulate 1.71 g (14 mEq U) of uranium per gram of the adsorbent. The uranium accumulating capacity of this adsorbent is several times greater than that of commercially available chelating resins (2-3 mEq/g). Immobilized persimmon tannin has the most favorable features for uranium recovery; high selective adsorption ability, rapid adsorption rate, and applicability in both column and batch systems. The uranium retained on immobilized persimmon tannin can be quantitatively and easily eluted with a very dilute acid, and the adsorbent can thus be easily recycled in the adsorption-desorption process. Immobilized persimmon tannin also has a high affinity for thorium. 23 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

  19. Microbial transformation of uranium in wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.; Gillow, J.B.; Cline, J.E.; Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN )

    1989-01-01

    Contamination of soils, water, and sediments by radionuclides and toxic metals from the disposal of uranium processing wastes is a major national concern. Although much is known about the physico- chemical aspects of U, we have little information on the effects of aerobic and anaerobic microbial activities on the mobilization or immobilization of U and other toxic metals in mixed wastes. In order to understand the mechanisms of microbial transformations of uranium, we examined a contaminated pond sediment and a sludge sample from the uranium processing facility at Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, TN. The uranium concentration in the sediment and sludge samples was 923 and 3080 ug/g dry wt, respectively. In addition to U, the sediment and sludge samples contained high levels of toxic metals such as Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Pb, Ni, and Zn. The association of uranium with the various mineral fractions of the sediment and sludge was determined by selective chemical extraction techniques. Uranium was associated to varying degrees with the exchangeable carbonate, iron oxide, organic, and inert fractions in both samples. Initial results in samples amended with carbon and nitrogen indicate immobilization of U due to enhanced indigenous microbial activity under anaerobic conditions. 23 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM TETRAFLUORIDE

    DOEpatents

    Shaw, W.E.; Spenceley, R.M.; Teetzel, F.M.

    1959-08-01

    A method is presented for producing uranium tetrafluoride from the gaseous hexafluoride by feeding the hexafluoride into a high temperature zone obtained by the recombination of molecularly dissociated hydrogen. The molal ratio of hydrogen to uranium hexnfluoride is preferably about 3 to 1. Uranium tetrafluoride is obtained in a finely divided, anhydrous state.

  1. Large plates and small blocks: The Variscan orogeny in the Bohemian Massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroner, Uwe; Romer, Rolf L.

    2017-04-01

    The Bohemian Massif of the Central European Variscides consists of several late Proterozoic / early Paleozoic low-strain crustal units, namely the Bruno-Vistulian continental block of the Laurussian plate that is juxtaposed with the Tepla-Barrandian Unit and the Lausitz block of the Gondwana plate. These pre-Variscan low-strain units are separated by high-strain zones that contain the mid- and lower crustal record of the Variscan orogeny (400-300 Ma), with nappes reflecting successive subduction exhumation events, voluminous migmatites and a wide range of geochemically contrasting granites. Although the principal constraints are undisputed, there is no consensus regarding the general tectonics of this area. Here we present a plate tectonic model explaining the Bohemian Massif as an orogenic wedge with a Gondwana pro-wedge and a Laurussia retro-wedge area. The principal formation steps are as follows. Subduction of the oceanic crust of the Gondwana plate, i.e. the southern part of the Rheic Ocean eventually followed by continental subduction of the distal Peri-Gondwana shelf produced the early Devonian (U)HP complexes now exposed in the uppermost allochthonous units. The arrival of the Tepla-Barrandian Cadomian block initiates a flip of subduction polarity, leading to the complete closure of the Rheic Ocean in the late Devonian coeval with the exhumation of the early Variscan (U)HP units. Caused by the Lausitz block entering the plate boundary zone in the early Carboniferous, this early subduction accretion stage was followed by continent continent collision. The resulting orogenic wedge is characterized by an intra-continental subduction zone in the pro-wedge area superimposed by the crustal stack of early and mid-Variscan accreted units. Due to heating of the subducted slab in the mantle, the isothermal exhumation of this deeply buried continental crust caused HT-LP metamorphism during the final transpressional stage. Lateral extrusion tectonics coeval with the

  2. Mantle anisotropy of the Bohemian Massif as seen by SKS-wave splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecsey, Ludek; Plomerova, Jaroslava; Babuska, Vladislav

    2014-05-01

    The Bohemian Massif (BM) assembled during the collision of Laurasia (Laurentia-Baltica) and Gondwana as a part of the Armorican Terrane Assemblage. It represents the estern-most outcrop of the European Variscan belt. The detailed tomographic and seismic anisotropy research of the deep structure of the BM has proceeded in several passive seismic experiments: BOHEMA I (2001-2003), BOHEMA II (2004-2005), BOHEMA III (2005-2006), PASSEQ (2006-2008) and Eger Rift (2007-2011). During these periods, the whole massif was stepwise covered by networks of temporal short-period and broad-band stations that recorded large amount of data from teleseismic events. The inferences from seismic anisotropy image the Bohemian Massif as a mosaic of microplates with a rigid mantle lithosphere preserving a fossil olivine fabric. The mantle domains can be associated with the tectonic units recognized by geological studies: Saxothuringian (ST), Teplá-Barrandian (TB), Moldanubian (MB) and finally Moravian (M) and Silesian (S) parts of the MS Zone, overlying the Brunovistulian mantle lithosphere. In this contribution, we concetrate on the large-scale mantle anisotropy modelled from splitting of SKS waves and their particle motion (PM). An advantage of using PM analysis is its ability to employ even events with lower signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) that are otherwise not usable for splitting analysis. To improve results of splitting analysis of signals distorted by noise, we use stacking of individual splitting measurements from waves closely propagating through the mantle. Another way of improving our analysis is a stacking of individual splittings of a single event measured at nearby stations. On average, the fast shear waves are polarized in the E-W direction in the ST, MD, TB units, but exhibit different regional variations of the splitting parameters in dependence on back-azimuths. Thus, different lithosphere mantle fabrics in the ST, MD and TB units were modelled. Moreover, the ST unit can

  3. Summary of investigations of uranium deposits in the Pumpkin Buttes area, Johnson and Campbell Counties, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Troyer, Max L.; McKay, Edward J.; Soister, Paul E.; Wallace, Stewart R.

    1954-01-01

    Uranium minerals were discovered in the Pumpkin Buttes area, Campbell and Johnson Counties, Wyo., by the U. S. Geological Survey in October 1951. From June to November 1952, an area of about 750 square miles was examined for uranium deposits, and 211 localities having abnormally high radioactivity were found; uranium minerals are visible at 121 of these localities. All known uranium mineralization in the area is restricted to sandstones of the Wasatch formation, except sparsely disseminated uranium in the sandstone of the White River formation, which caps the Pumpkin Buttes, mid several localities on the Great Pine Ridge southwest of the Pumpkin Buttes where iron-saturated sandstone and clinker in the Fort Union formation have above-normal radioactivity. The uranium occurrences in the Wasatch formation are in a red sandstone zone 450 to 900 feet above the base of the formation and are of two types: small concretionary masses of uranium, iron, manganese and vanadium minerals in sandstone, and irregular zones in which uranium minerals are disseminated in sandstone. The second type is usually larger but of lower grade than the first. Most of the localities at which uranium occurs are in a north-trending belt about 60 miles long and 18 miles in maximum width.

  4. Summary of investigations of uranium deposits in the Pumpkin Buttes area, Johnson and Campbell Counties, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Troyer, Max L.; McKay, Edward J.; Soister, Paul E.; Wallace, Stewart R.

    1953-01-01

    Uranium minerals were discovered in the Pumpkin Buttes area Campbell and Johnson Counties by the U.S. Geological Survey in October 1951 From June to November 1952 an area of about 750 square miles was examined for uranium deposits, and 211 localities with abnormally high radioactivity were found uranium minerals are visible at 121 of these localities. All known uranium mineralization is restricted to sandstones of the Wasatch formation exclusive of sparsely disseminated uranium in the White River sandstone which caps the Pumpkin Buttes and several localities on the Great Pine Ridge southwest of the Pumpkin Buttes where ironstone and clinker in the Fort Union formation have above normal radioactivity. The uranium occurrences in the Wasatch formation are in a red sandstone zone 450 to 900 feet above the base of formation and are of two types. (1) small concretionary masses of uranium, iron, and manganese minerals in sandstone and (2) irregular zones in which uranium minerals are disseminated in sandstone The second type is usually larger but lower grade than the first type. Most of the localities at which uranium occurs are in a north -trending belt approximately 60 miles long with a maximum width of 18 miles,

  5. Influence of Uranium on Bacterial Communities: A Comparison of Natural Uranium-Rich Soils with Controls

    PubMed Central

    Mondani, Laure; Benzerara, Karim; Carrière, Marie; Christen, Richard; Mamindy-Pajany, Yannick; Février, Laureline; Marmier, Nicolas; Achouak, Wafa; Nardoux, Pascal; Berthomieu, Catherine; Chapon, Virginie

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of uranium on the indigenous bacterial community structure in natural soils with high uranium content. Radioactive soil samples exhibiting 0.26% - 25.5% U in mass were analyzed and compared with nearby control soils containing trace uranium. EXAFS and XRD analyses of soils revealed the presence of U(VI) and uranium-phosphate mineral phases, identified as sabugalite and meta-autunite. A comparative analysis of bacterial community fingerprints using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) revealed the presence of a complex population in both control and uranium-rich samples. However, bacterial communities inhabiting uraniferous soils exhibited specific fingerprints that were remarkably stable over time, in contrast to populations from nearby control samples. Representatives of Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria, and seven others phyla were detected in DGGE bands specific to uraniferous samples. In particular, sequences related to iron-reducing bacteria such as Geobacter and Geothrix were identified concomitantly with iron-oxidizing species such as Gallionella and Sideroxydans. All together, our results demonstrate that uranium exerts a permanent high pressure on soil bacterial communities and suggest the existence of a uranium redox cycle mediated by bacteria in the soil. PMID:21998695

  6. Mica surfaces stabilize pentavalent uranium.

    PubMed

    Ilton, Eugene S; Haiduc, Anca; Cahill, Christopher L; Felmy, Andrew R

    2005-05-02

    High-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to demonstrate that reduction of aqueous U6+ at ferrous mica surfaces at 25 degrees C preserves U5+ as the dominant sorbed species over a broad range of solution compositions. Polymerization of sorbed U5+ with sorbed U6+ and U4+ is identified as a possible mechanism for how mineral surfaces circumvent the rapid disproportionation of aqueous U5+. The general nature of this mechanism suggests that U5+ could play an important, but previously unidentified, role in the low-temperature chemistry of uranium in reducing, heterogeneous aqueous systems.

  7. Mica Surfaces Stabilize Pentavalent Uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Ilton, Eugene S.; Haiduc, Anca; Cahill, Christopher L.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2005-05-02

    We used high-resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to demonstrate that reduction of aqueous U6+ at ferrous mica surfaces at 25oC preserves U5+ as the dominant sorbed species over a broad range of solution compositions. Polymerization of sorbed U5+ with sorbed U6+ and U4+ is identified as a possible mechanism for how mineral surfaces circumvent the rapid disproportionation of aqueous U5+. The general nature of this mechanism suggests that U5+ could play an important, but previously unidentified, role in the low–temperature chemistry of uranium in reducing, heterogeneous aqueous systems.

  8. Laboratory-scale experimental burning of selected Palaeozoic limestones from the Barrandian area (Prague Basin, Bohemian Massif, Czech Republic): re-evaluation of properties of historical raw material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovcev, Petr; Prikryl, Richard; Stastna, Aneta

    2013-04-01

    Palaeozoic limestones from the Barrandian area (Prague Basin, Bohemian Massif, Czech Republic) have been quarried and utilized, among others, for manufacturing of inorganic binders. Certain beds, e.g. Devonian dvorecko-prokopské limestones were historically burnt for high quality hydraulic lime which is not produced recently. Aiming to evaluate potential of this specific raw material for small-scale production of restoration hydraulic lime, we have conducted some laboratory experimental burning tests in an electrical furnace up to 1200°C. Prior to the burning, all studied lithotypes (4 in total) have been examined for their mineralogy (optical microscopy, cathodoluminescence study, X-ray diffraction of insoluble residue) and geochemistry (wet chemical analyses). Studied biomicritic limestones can be classified as wackstones to packstones. Carbonate content varies from 80 to 90 %, the rest is due to dominant illite and silica, and subordinate kaolinite, feldspars, and/or chlorite. Specific composition of non-carbonate component (specifically high content of illite and silica) positively influences formation of CS, Ca, and/or CAS phases when burnt at calcination temperatures from 850 to 1200°C (in steps of 50°C). In the products formed during firing, mineral phases typical for hydraulic lime, such as larnite, brownmillerite, and gehlenite, along with free lime, quartz and silica phases, and portlandite were identified by X-ray diffraction. The amount of the dominant hydraulic phase, larnite, increased with higher firing temperature. On the other hand, content of free lime, quartz and silica decreased. The amount of portlandite was almost independent of the firing temperature. Higher amounts of larnite and other hydraulic phase were detected during the peak firing temperature of 1200°C in specimens containing higher amount of insoluble residue. From the study performed, it is evident that studied dvorecko-prokopské limestone, which included favourable amount of

  9. BIOREMEDIATION OF URANIUM CONTAMINATED SOILS AND WASTES.

    SciTech Connect

    FRANCIS,A.J.

    1998-09-17

    Contamination of soils, water, and sediments by radionuclides and toxic metals from uranium mill tailings, nuclear fuel manufacturing and nuclear weapons production is a major concern. Studies of the mechanisms of biotransformation of uranium and toxic metals under various microbial process conditions has resulted in the development of two treatment processes: (i) stabilization of uranium and toxic metals with reduction in waste volume and (ii) removal and recovery of uranium and toxic metals from wastes and contaminated soils. Stabilization of uranium and toxic metals in wastes is accomplished by exploiting the unique metabolic capabilities of the anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium sp. The radionuclides and toxic metals are solubilized by the bacteria directly by enzymatic reductive dissolution, or indirectly due to the production of organic acid metabolites. The radionuclides and toxic metals released into solution are immobilized by enzymatic reductive precipitation, biosorption and redistribution with stable mineral phases in the waste. Non-hazardous bulk components of the waste such as Ca, Fe, K, Mg and Na released into solution are removed, thus reducing the waste volume. In the second process uranium and toxic metals are removed from wastes or contaminated soils by extracting with the complexing agent citric acid. The citric-acid extract is subjected to biodegradation to recover the toxic metals, followed by photochemical degradation of the uranium citrate complex which is recalcitrant to biodegradation. The toxic metals and uranium are recovered in separate fractions for recycling or for disposal. The use of combined chemical and microbiological treatment process is more efficient than present methods and should result in considerable savings in clean-up and disposal costs.

  10. PROCESS OF RECOVERING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Carter, J.M.; Larson, C.E.

    1958-10-01

    A process is presented for recovering uranium values from calutron deposits. The process consists in treating such deposits to produce an oxidlzed acidic solution containing uranium together with the following imparities: Cu, Fe, Cr, Ni, Mn, Zn. The uranium is recovered from such an impurity-bearing solution by adjusting the pH of the solution to the range 1.5 to 3.0 and then treating the solution with hydrogen peroxide. This results in the precipitation of uranium peroxide which is substantially free of the metal impurities in the solution. The peroxide precipitate is then separated from the solution, washed, and calcined to produce uranium trioxide.

  11. URANIUM SEPARATION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Hyde, E.K.; Katzin, L.I.; Wolf, M.J.

    1959-07-14

    The separation of uranium from a mixture of uranium and thorium by organic solvent extraction from an aqueous solution is described. The uranium is separrted from an aqueous mixture of uranium and thorium nitrates 3 N in nitric acid and containing salting out agents such as ammonium nitrate, so as to bring ihe total nitrate ion concentration to a maximum of about 8 N by contacting the mixture with an immiscible aliphatic oxygen containing organic solvent such as diethyl carbinol, hexone, n-amyl acetate and the like. The uranium values may be recovered from the organic phase by back extraction with water.

  12. URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Yeager, J.H.

    1958-08-12

    In the prior art processing of uranium ores, the ore is flrst digested with nitric acid and filtered, and the uranium values are then extracted tom the filtrate by contacting with an organic solvent. The insoluble residue has been processed separately in order to recover any uranium which it might contain. The improvement consists in contacting a slurry, composed of both solution and residue, with the organic solvent prior to filtration. Tbe result is that uranium values contained in the residue are extracted along with the uranium values contained th the solution in one step.

  13. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Spedding, F.H.; Wilhelm, H.A.; Keller, W.H.

    1958-04-15

    The production of uranium metal by the reduction of uranium tetrafluoride is described. Massive uranium metal of high purily is produced by reacting uranium tetrafluoride with 2 to 20% stoichiometric excess of magnesium at a temperature sufficient to promote the reaction and then mantaining the reaction mass in a sealed vessel at temperature in the range of 1150 to 2000 d C, under a superatomospheric pressure of magnesium for a period of time sufficient 10 allow separation of liquid uranium and liquid magnesium fluoride into separate layers.

  14. Timing of Variscan HP-HT metamorphism in the Moldanubian Zone of the Bohemian Massif: U-Pb SHRIMP dating on multiply zoned zircons from a granulite from the Dunkelsteiner Wald Massif, Lower Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl, Gertrude; Cooke, Rob A.; Finger, Friedrich; McNaughton, Neal J.; Fletcher, Ian R.

    2011-10-01

    In an attempt to better constrain the timing of Variscan HP-HT metamorphism in the SE Bohemian Massif we have dated zoned zircons from a garnet-kyanite granulite of granitic composition from the Dunkelsteiner Wald Massif, Lower Austria, by means of sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) technique. In order to combine isotopic information with crystal growth textures, CL and BSE images were systematically taken from the dated zircons. A characteristic threefold concentric zoning was found in many zircons. This involves pre-Variscan protolithic cores followed by two distinct metamorphic/anatectic overgrowth shells of Variscan age. The inner overgrowth shell is characterized by a weak CL but bright BSE signal, and yields high contents of uranium (0.1 to 0.2 wt.%). A pooled U-Pb Concordia age for this zone is 342.0 ± 3.0 Ma ( n = 11, MSWD = 0.12). The second, outer, overgrowth shell is always bright in the CL image, dark in the BSE image, and has generally low uranium contents (mostly <500 ppm). A pooled U-Pb Concordia age for this zone is 337.1 ± 2.7 Ma ( n = 11, MSWD = 0.22). These results imply that the Variscan HT crystallisation history of the Moldanubian granulites took place over a period of a few million years and was not an extremely rapid subduction-exhumation process. SHRIMP measurements in the protolithic cores yield a cluster of (sub)concordant ages between ˜390 and 460 Ma and a few outliers at higher ages mostly represented by cores in cores. Core domains, which are large, homogeneous and with undisturbed igneous oscillatory zoning, yielded preferentially ages between 430 and 460 Ma. We therefore consider that granitic protolith formation took place at that time. The still older inner cores are interpreted as inherited into the granitic melt.

  15. Method for converting uranium oxides to uranium metal

    DOEpatents

    Duerksen, Walter K.

    1988-01-01

    A process is described for converting scrap and waste uranium oxide to uranium metal. The uranium oxide is sequentially reduced with a suitable reducing agent to a mixture of uranium metal and oxide products. The uranium metal is then converted to uranium hydride and the uranium hydride-containing mixture is then cooled to a temperature less than -100.degree. C. in an inert liquid which renders the uranium hydride ferromagnetic. The uranium hydride is then magnetically separated from the cooled mixture. The separated uranium hydride is readily converted to uranium metal by heating in an inert atmosphere. This process is environmentally acceptable and eliminates the use of hydrogen fluoride as well as the explosive conditions encountered in the previously employed bomb-reduction processes utilized for converting uranium oxides to uranium metal.

  16. Adjusting stream-sediment geochemical maps in the Austrian Bohemian Massif by analysis of variance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, J.C.; Hausberger, G.; Schermann, O.; Bohling, G.

    1995-01-01

    The Austrian portion of the Bohemian Massif is a Precambrian terrane composed mostly of highly metamorphosed rocks intruded by a series of granitoids that are petrographically similar. Rocks are exposed poorly and the subtle variations in rock type are difficult to map in the field. A detailed geochemical survey of stream sediments in this region has been conducted and included as part of the Geochemischer Atlas der Republik O??sterreich, and the variations in stream sediment composition may help refine the geological interpretation. In an earlier study, multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) was applied to the stream-sediment data in order to minimize unwanted sampling variation and emphasize relationships between stream sediments and rock types in sample catchment areas. The estimated coefficients were used successfully to correct for the sampling effects throughout most of the region, but also introduced an overcorrection in some areas that seems to result from consistent but subtle differences in composition of specific rock types. By expanding the model to include an additional factor reflecting the presence of a major tectonic unit, the Rohrbach block, the overcorrection is removed. This iterative process simultaneously refines both the geochemical map by removing extraneous variation and the geological map by suggesting a more detailed classification of rock types. ?? 1995 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  17. On the occurrence of Ctenocheles (Decapoda, Axiidea, Ctenochelidae) in the Bohemian Cretaceous Basin

    PubMed Central

    HYŽNÝ, MATÚŠ; VESELSKÁ, MARTINA KOČOVÁ; DVOŘÁK, PAVEL

    2015-01-01

    Because of close morphological affinities, fossil cheliped fragments of the ghost shrimp Ctenocheles (Decapoda, Axiidea, Ctenochelidae) can be easily misidentified as remains of different decapod crustacean taxa. Re-examination of the Cretaceous decapods deposited in the National Museum in Prague revealed that all supposed specimens of the lobster genus Oncopareia found in the Middle Coniacian calcareous claystones of the Březno Formation, including one of the Fritsch’s original specimens of Stenocheles parvulus, actually belong to Ctenocheles. This material together with newly collected specimens from the same locality, allowed for erection of a new species, Ctenocheles fritschi. Its major chela possesses a serrated ischium and ovoid, unarmed merus; therefore, it is considered a close relative of the extant C. collini and C. maorianus. Ctenocheles fritschi sp. nov. represents the first report on the occurrence of the genus from the Bohemian Cretaceous Basin. It is one of the oldest records of Ctenocheles and simultaneously one of the best preserved fossils of the genus reported to date. Confusing taxonomy of S. parvulus is reviewed and shortly discussed. PMID:25983568

  18. The Auchenorrhyncha fauna of peat bogs in the Austrian part of the Bohemian Forest (Insecta, Hemiptera)

    PubMed Central

    Holzinger, Werner E.; Schlosser, Lydia

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The first overview on the Auchenorrhyncha fauna of peat bogs of the Austrian Bohemian Forest is presented. Seven oligotrophic peat bog sites were studied in 2011 by suction sampler (“G-Vac”) and 93 Auchenorrhyncha species (with 7465 adult specimens) were recorded. Eleven species (about 18 % of the individuals) are tyrphobiontic or tyrphophilous. The relative species abundance plot is not very steep; the six most abundant species represent 50 % of the individuals. The most common species is Conomelus anceps (17 % of the individuals). Compared to the whole Austrian Auchenorrhyncha fauna, the fauna of peat bogs comprises distinctly more univoltine species and more species hibernating in nymphal stage. Densities of adult Auchenorrhyncha in peat bogs are low in spring (about 10–60 individuals per m²) and high in July, with up to 180 (±50) individuals per m². Disturbed peat bogs have higher species numbers and higher Auchenorrhyncha densities in total, but lower numbers and densities in peat bog specialists. PMID:24039517

  19. Radioactivity in mushrooms from selected locations in the Bohemian Forest, Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Čadová, Michaela; Havránková, Renata; Havránek, Jiří; Zölzer, Friedo

    2017-03-03

    (137)Cs is one of the most important radionuclides released in the course of atmospheric nuclear weapon tests and during accidents in nuclear power plants such as that in Chernobyl, Ukraine, or Fukushima, Japan. The aim of this study was to compare (137)Cs and (40)K concentrations in particular species of mushrooms from selected locations in the Bohemian Forest (Czech: Šumava), Czech Republic, where a considerable contamination from the Chernobyl accident had been measured in 1986. Samples were collected between June and October 2014. Activities of (137)Cs and (40)K per dry mass were measured by means of a semiconductor gamma spectrometer. The (137)Cs values measured range from below detection limit to 4300 ± 20 Bq kg(-1), in the case of (40)K from 910 ± 80 to 4300 ± 230 Bq kg(-1). Differences were found between individual locations, due to uneven precipitation in the course of the movement of the radioactive cloud after the Chernobyl accident. There are, however, also differences between individual species of mushrooms from identical locations, which inter alia result from different characteristics of the soil and depths of mycelia. The values measured are compared with established limits and exposures from other radiation sources present in the environment. In general, it can be stated that the values measured are relatively low and the effects on the health of the population are negligible compared to other sources of ionizing radiation.

  20. Uranium deposition in bones of Wistar rats associated with skeleton development.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, G; Arruda-Neto, J D T; Pereira, R M R; Kleeb, S R; Geraldo, L P; Primi, M C; Takayama, L; Rodrigues, T E; Cavalcante, G T; Genofre, G C; Semmler, R; Nogueira, G P; Fontes, E M

    2013-12-01

    Sixty female Wistar rats were submitted to a daily intake of ration doped with uranium from weaning to adulthood. Uranium in bone was quantified by the SSNTD (solid state nuclear track detection) technique, and bone mineral density (BMD) analysis performed. Uranium concentration as a function of age exhibited a sharp rise during the first week of the experiment and a drastic drop of 70% in the following weeks. Data interpretation indicates that uranium mimics calcium. Results from BMD suggest that radiation emitted by the incorporated Uranium could induce death of bone cells. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Behavior of Uranium in the Environment: Bacterial Reduction of an Aqueous Uranium Species.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-06-01

    characteristics of both UO2 (s) and U3O8 (s). Electron microprobe showed a very small crystal formed by the bacteria, but was inconclusive with respect to the...elemental composition of the mineral. The XRD spectra determined that precipitate was uranium dioxide UO2 (s). The investigation included a time

  2. 31 CFR 540.317 - Uranium feed; natural uranium feed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Uranium feed; natural uranium feed... (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.317 Uranium feed; natural uranium feed. The...

  3. 31 CFR 540.317 - Uranium feed; natural uranium feed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Uranium feed; natural uranium feed... (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.317 Uranium feed; natural uranium feed. The...

  4. 31 CFR 540.317 - Uranium feed; natural uranium feed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Uranium feed; natural uranium feed... (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.317 Uranium feed; natural uranium feed. The...

  5. Welding of uranium and uranium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Mara, G.L.; Murphy, J.L.

    1982-03-26

    The major reported work on joining uranium comes from the USA, Great Britain, France and the USSR. The driving force for producing this technology base stems from the uses of uranium as a nuclear fuel for energy production, compact structures requiring high density, projectiles, radiation shielding, and nuclear weapons. This review examines the state-of-the-art of this technology and presents current welding process and parameter information. The welding metallurgy of uranium and the influence of microstructure on mechanical properties is developed for a number of the more commonly used welding processes.

  6. The determination of uranium (IV) in apatite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clarke, Roy S.; Altschuler, Zalman S.

    1956-01-01

    Geologic and mineralogic evidence indicate that the uranium present in apatite may proxy for calcium in the mineral structure as U(IV). An experimental investigation was conducted and chemical evidence was obtained that establishes the presence of U(IV) in apatite. The following analytical procedure was developed for the determination of U(IV). Carbonate-fluorapatite is dissolved in cold 1.5M orthophosphoric acid and fluorapatite is dissolved in cold 1.2M hydrochloric acid containing 1.5 g of hydroxylamine hydrochloride per 100 ml. Uranium (IV) is precipitated by cupferron using titanium as a carrier. The uranium in the precipitate is separated by use of the ethyl acetate extraction procedure and determined fluorimetrically. The validity and the limitations of the method have been established by spike experiments.

  7. Uranium mining and lung cancer in Navajo men

    SciTech Connect

    Samet, J.M.; Kutvirt, D.M.; Waxweiler, R.J.; Key, C.R.

    1984-06-07

    We performed a population-based case-control study to examine the association between uranium mining and lung cancer in Navajo men, a predominantly nonsmoking population. The 32 cases included all those occurring among Navajo men between 1969 and 1982, as ascertained by the New Mexico Tumor Registry. For each case in a Navajo man, two controls with nonrespiratory cancer were selected. Of the 32 Navajo patients, 72 per cent had been employed as uranium miners, whereas no controls had documented experience in this industry. The lower 95 per cent confidence limit for the relative risk of lung cancer associated with uranium mining was 14.4. Information on cigarette smoking was available for 21 of the 23 affected uranium miners; eight were nonsmokers and median consumption by the remainder was one to three cigarettes daily. These results demonstrate that in a rural nonsmoking population most of the lung cancer may be attributable to one hazardous occupation.

  8. RECOVERY OF URANIUM AND THORIUM FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Calkins, G.D.

    1958-06-10

    >A process is described for the recovery of uranium and thorium from monazite sand, which is frequently processed by treating it with a hot sodium hydroxide solution whereby a precipitate forms consisting mainly of oxides or hydroxides of the rare earths, thorium and uranium. The precipitate is dissolved in mineral acid, and the acid solution is then neutralized to a pH value of between 5.2 and 6.2 whereby both the uranium and thorium precipitate as the hydroxides, while substantially all the rare earth metal values present remain in the solution. The uranium and thoriunn can then be separated by dissolving the precipitate in a solution containing a mixture of alkali carbonate and alkali bicarbonate: and contacting the carbonate solution with a strong-base anion exchange resin whereby the uranium values are adsorbed on the resin while the thorium remains in solution.

  9. 300 Area Uranium Stabilization Through Polyphosphate Injection: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeul, Vincent R.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Fritz, Brad G.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Mackley, Rob D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Williams, Mark D.

    2009-06-30

    The objective of the treatability test was to evaluate the efficacy of using polyphosphate injections to treat uranium-contaminated groundwater in situ. A test site consisting of an injection well and 15 monitoring wells was installed in the 300 Area near the process trenches that had previously received uranium-bearing effluents. This report summarizes the work on the polyphosphate injection project, including bench-scale laboratory studies, a field injection test, and the subsequent analysis and interpretation of the results. Previous laboratory tests have demonstrated that when a soluble form of polyphosphate is injected into uranium-bearing saturated porous media, immobilization of uranium occurs due to formation of an insoluble uranyl phosphate, autunite [Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2•nH2O]. These tests were conducted at conditions expected for the aquifer and used Hanford soils and groundwater containing very low concentrations of uranium (10-6 M). Because autunite sequesters uranium in the oxidized form U(VI) rather than forcing reduction to U(IV), the possibility of re-oxidation and subsequent re-mobilization is negated. Extensive testing demonstrated the very low solubility and slow dissolution kinetics of autunite. In addition to autunite, excess phosphorous may result in apatite mineral formation, which provides a long-term source of treatment capacity. Phosphate arrival response data indicate that, under site conditions, the polyphosphate amendment could be effectively distributed over a relatively large lateral extent, with wells located at a radial distance of 23 m (75 ft) reaching from between 40% and 60% of the injection concentration. Given these phosphate transport characteristics, direct treatment of uranium through the formation of uranyl-phosphate mineral phases (i.e., autunite) could likely be effectively implemented at full field scale. However, formation of calcium-phosphate mineral phases using the selected three-phase approach was problematic. Although

  10. Ultrapotassic dykes in the Moldanubian Zone and their significance for understanding of the post-collisional mantle dynamics during Variscan orogeny in the Bohemian Massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubínová, Šárka; Faryad, Shah Wali; Verner, Kryštof; Schmitz, Mark; Holub, František

    2017-02-01

    We report mineral textures, geochemistry and age relations of two ultrapotassic dykes from a dyke swarm in the Western part of the Moldanubian Zone at contact to the Teplá-Barrandian Block. The dykes have orientation almost perpendicular to the NNE-SSW trending Central Bohemian plutonic complex and cross cut metamorphic foliation in basement gneisses and migmatites. Based on mineral compositions and geochemistry, the dykes show close relations to Mg-K syenite plutons in the Moldanubian Zone. The two dykes are vaugnerite and syenite in compositions and contain talc pseudomorphs after olivine within a fine-grained matrix that consists of K-feldspar, phlogopite with small amounts of clinopyroxene and accessory quartz, apatite, titanite and sulphides of Fe, Cu, Ni. The syenite porphyry dyke cross cuts the vaugnerite. It contains quartz phenocrysts and comparing to vaugnerite has lower modal content of talc pseudomorphs. The vaugnerite and syenite porphyry have high K2O (6 to 7 wt.%) and mg-number (0.66-0.74), but low CaO and Na2O contents. The vaugnerite is markedly rich in P2O5 (> 2 wt.%) and comparing to syenite porphyry has higher amount of mantle-incompatible elements (e.g. Rb, Cs, Ba, Pb, Th, U), V and Cr. ID-TIMS analyses on titanite in vaugnerite and on zircon in syenite porphyry yielded 338.59 ± 0.68 and 337.87 ± 0.21 Ma, respectively. Mineral and bulk rock chemistry of the dykes indicates that the source magma was formed by a low degree of partial melting of a highly anomalous domain in the upper mantle which subsequently fractionated and was contaminated with crustal material during its ascent. Formation of ultrapotassic magma is explained by transcurrent shear zones in the mantle lithosphere that occurred due to block rotation and post-collisional mantle dynamics initiated by slab break-off and asthenosphere upwelling into the Moldanubian accretionary complex during the Variscan Orogeny.

  11. Uranium hexafluoride public risk

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.R.; Hui, T.E.; Yurconic, M.; Johnson, J.R.

    1994-08-01

    The limiting value for uranium toxicity in a human being should be based on the concentration of uranium (U) in the kidneys. The threshold for nephrotoxicity appears to lie very near 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney tissue. There does not appear to be strong scientific support for any other improved estimate, either higher or lower than this, of the threshold for uranium nephrotoxicity in a human being. The value 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney is the concentration that results from a single intake of about 30 mg soluble uranium by inhalation (assuming the metabolism of a standard person). The concentration of uranium continues to increase in the kidneys after long-term, continuous (or chronic) exposure. After chronic intakes of soluble uranium by workers at the rate of 10 mg U per week, the concentration of uranium in the kidneys approaches and may even exceed the nephrotoxic limit of 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney tissue. Precise values of the kidney concentration depend on the biokinetic model and model parameters assumed for such a calculation. Since it is possible for the concentration of uranium in the kidneys to exceed 3 {mu}g per gram tissue at an intake rate of 10 mg U per week over long periods of time, we believe that the kidneys are protected from injury when intakes of soluble uranium at the rate of 10 mg U per week do not continue for more than two consecutive weeks. For long-term, continuous occupational exposure to low-level, soluble uranium, we recommend a reduced weekly intake limit of 5 mg uranium to prevent nephrotoxicity in workers. Our analysis shows that the nephrotoxic limit of 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney tissues is not exceeded after long-term, continuous uranium intake at the intake rate of 5 mg soluble uranium per week.

  12. Bioremediation of uranium contamination with enzymatic uranium reduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Phillips, E.J.P.

    1992-01-01

    Enzymatic uranium reduction by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans readily removed uranium from solution in a batch system or when D. desulfuricans was separated from the bulk of the uranium-containing water by a semipermeable membrane. Uranium reduction continued at concentrations as high as 24 mM. Of a variety of potentially inhibiting anions and metals evaluated, only high concentrations of copper inhibited uranium reduction. Freeze-dried cells, stored aerobically, reduced uranium as fast as fresh cells. D. desulfuricans reduced uranium in pH 4 and pH 7.4 mine drainage waters and in uraniumcontaining groundwaters from a contaminated Department of Energy site. Enzymatic uranium reduction has several potential advantages over other bioprocessing techniques for uranium removal, the most important of which are as follows: the ability to precipitate uranium that is in the form of a uranyl carbonate complex; high capacity for uranium removal per cell; the formation of a compact, relatively pure, uranium precipitate.

  13. Intense alpha-particle emitting crystallites in uranium mill wastes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landa, E.R.; Stieff, L.R.; Germani, M.S.; Tanner, A.B.; Evans, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear emulsion microscopy has demonstrated the presence of small, intense ??-particle emitting crystallites in laboratory-produced tailings derived from the sulfuric acid milling of uranium ores. The ??-particle activity is associated with the isotope pair 210Pb 210Po, and the host mineral appears to be PbSO4 occurring as inclusions in gypsum laths. These particles represent potential inhalation hazards at uranium mill tailings disposal areas. ?? 1994.

  14. Selective removal of dissolved uranium in drinking water by nanofiltration.

    PubMed

    Favre-Réguillon, A; Lebuzit, G; Murat, D; Foos, J; Mansour, C; Draye, M

    2008-02-01

    A procedure for the selective removal of uranium traces dissolved in drinking water has been studied. Plate module membrane filtration equipment was operated to evaluate the performance and selectivity of three different nanofiltration flat-sheet membranes. Experiments were carried out using various commercial mineral waters with distinct physicochemical compositions. The membranes were first discriminating by their ability to reject uranium in the presence of the main cations found in mineral waters, using a 2 mg L(-1) (2000 ppb) concentration of uranium. The rejection of U(VI) was dependent on the uranyl speciation and the ionic strength. Second, removal of uranium traces (0.02 mg L(-1), 20 ppb) was performed using the nanofiltration membrane showing the highest selectivity for uranium toward alkaline and alkaline-earth ions. The results showed a high performance of the nanofiltration membrane, Osmonics DL, for selective uranium rejection at low pressure (1 bar), illustrating the advantage of nanofiltration for the selective removal of uranium from drinking water.

  15. Polyphosphate Remediation Technology for In-Situ Stabilization of Uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Pierce, Eric M.; Bacon, Diana H.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Webb, Samuel M.

    2009-03-01

    A labortory testing program has been conducted to optimize polyphosphate remediation technology for implementation through a field-scale technology infiltration demonstration to stabilize soluble, uranium-bearing source phases in the vadose zone and capillary fringe. Source treatment in the deep vadose zone will accelerate the natural attenuation of uranium to more thermodynamically stable uranium-phosphate minerals, enhancing the performance of the proposed polyphosphate remediation within the 300 Area aquifer. The objective of this investigation was to develop polyphosphate remediation technology to treat uranium contamination contained within the deep vadose zone and capillary fringe. This paper presents the results of an investigation that evaluated the rate and extent of reaction between polyphosphate and the uranium mineral phases present within the 300 Area vadose zone and capillary fringe and autunite formation as a function of polyphosphate formulation and concentration. This information is critical for identifying the optimum implementation approach and controlling the flux of uranium from the vadose zone and capillary fringe to the underlying aquifer during remediation. Results from this investigation will be used to design a full-scale remediation of uranium at the 300 Area of the Hanford Site.

  16. Uranium in Wheeler Basin, Grand County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Young, E.J.

    1982-01-01

    Two kinds of radioactive anomalies are found in Wheeler Basin, both of which consist of biotite concentrations in Precambrian rocks, but the ones in migmatized biotite gneiss contain uraninite and the ones in Silver Plume Granite probably do not. At least 18 new uranium occurrences were found, most of which are less than a square meter. These discoveries enlarge the uraniferous area reported by Young and Hauff in 1975. Uranium in these biotite concentrations occurs in several modes: as uraninite grains; in accessory minerals, such as zircon; in fractures in plagioclase; and along grain boundaries and in cleavage openings in mica. Uranium mineralogy in the fractures, grain boundaries, and micas is not known. Yellow, secondary uranium minerals are seen locally on outcrop. Relative to crustal abundance, the radioactive biotite concentrations in migmatized biotite gneiss show depletion in Ca, Sr, Na, and, locally, Cu, but pronounced enrichment in U and Mo, and moderate enrichment in Pb, Ag, Th, and REE. The radioactive biotite concentrations in the Silver Plume Granite show pronounced enrichment in Th, and moderate enrichment in U, Sn, Zr, and Ag. Enrichment in light REE predominates over heavy REE. As U is more abundant in biotite concentrations in migmatized biotite gneiss than in biotite concentrations in Silver Plume Granite, I have concluded that U in the migmatized biotite gneiss was present before intrusion of the Silver Plume Granite, and that metamorphic effects of the Silver Plume intrusion remobilized U to form pockets of enrichment (biotite concentrations).

  17. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Marfa Quadrangle, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, C D; Duex, T W; Wilbert, W P

    1982-09-01

    The uranium favorability of the Marfa 1/sup 0/ by 2/sup 0/ Quadrangle, Texas, was evaluated in accordance with criteria established for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation. Surface and subsurface studies, to a 1500 m (5000 ft) depth, and chemical, petrologic, hydrogeochemical, and airborne radiometric data were employed. The entire quadrangle is in the Basin and Range Province and is characterized by Tertiary silicic volcanic rocks overlying mainly Cretaceous carbonate rocks and sandstones. Strand-plain sandstones of the Upper Cretaceous San Carlos Formation and El Picacho Formation possess many favorable characteristics and are tentatively judged as favorable for sandstone-type deposits. The Tertiary Buckshot Ignimbrite contains uranium mineralization at the Mammoth Mine. This deposit may be an example of the hydroauthigenic class; alternatively, it may have formed by reduction of uranium-bearing ground water produced during diagenesis of tuffaceous sediments of the Vieja Group. Although the presence of the deposit indicates favorability, the uncertainty in the process that formed the mineralization makes delineation of a favorable environment or area difficult. The Allen intrusions are favorable for authigenic deposits. Basin fill in several bolsons possesses characteristics that suggest favorability but which are classified as unevaluated because of insufficient data. All Precambrian, Paleozoic, other Mesozoic, and other Cenozoic environments are unfavorable.

  18. Calixarene cleansing formulation for uranium skin contamination.

    PubMed

    Phan, Guillaume; Semili, Naïma; Bouvier-Capely, Céline; Landon, Géraldine; Mekhloufi, Ghozlene; Huang, Nicolas; Rebière, François; Agarande, Michelle; Fattal, Elias

    2013-10-01

    An oil-in-water cleansing emulsion containing calixarene molecule, an actinide specific chelating agent, was formulated in order to improve the decontamination of uranium from the skin. Commonly commercialized cosmetic ingredients such as surfactants, mineral oil, or viscosifying agents were used in preparing the calixarene emulsion. The formulation was characterized in terms of size and apparent viscosity measurements and then was tested for its ability to limit uranyl ion permeation through excoriated pig-ear skin explants in 24-h penetration studies. Calixarene emulsion effectiveness was compared with two other reference treatments consisting of DTPA and EHBP solutions. Application of calixarene emulsion induced the highest decontamination effect with an 87% decrease in uranium diffusion flux. By contrast, EHBP and DTPA solutions only allowed a 50% and 55% reduction of uranium permeation, respectively, and had the same effect as a simple dilution of the contamination by pure water. Uranium diffusion decrease was attributed to uranyl ion-specific chelation by calixarene within the formulation, since no significant effect was obtained after application of the same emulsion without calixarene. Thus, calixarene cleansing emulsion could be considered as a promising treatment in case of accidental contamination of the skin by highly diffusible uranium compounds.

  19. Uranium purchases report 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-19

    Data reported by domestic nuclear utility companies in their responses to the 1991 and 1992 ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey,`` Form EIA-858, Schedule B ``Uranium Marketing Activities,are provided in response to the requirements in the Energy Policy Act 1992. Data on utility uranium purchases and imports are shown on Table 1. Utility enrichment feed deliveries and secondary market acquisitions of uranium equivalent of US DOE separative work units are shown on Table 2. Appendix A contains a listing of firms that sold uranium to US utilities during 1992 under new domestic purchase contracts. Appendix B contains a similar listing of firms that sold uranium to US utilities during 1992 under new import purchase contracts. Appendix C contains an explanation of Form EIA-858 survey methodologies with emphasis on the processing of Schedule B data.

  20. Process for continuous production of metallic uranium and uranium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Hayden, H.W. Jr.; Horton, J.A.; Elliott, G.R.B.

    1995-06-06

    A method is described for forming metallic uranium, or a uranium alloy, from uranium oxide in a manner which substantially eliminates the formation of uranium-containing wastes. A source of uranium dioxide is first provided, for example, by reducing uranium trioxide (UO{sub 3}), or any other substantially stable uranium oxide, to form the uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}). This uranium dioxide is then chlorinated to form uranium tetrachloride (UCl{sub 4}), and the uranium tetrachloride is then reduced to metallic uranium by reacting the uranium chloride with a metal which will form the chloride of the metal. This last step may be carried out in the presence of another metal capable of forming one or more alloys with metallic uranium to thereby lower the melting point of the reduced uranium product. The metal chloride formed during the uranium tetrachloride reduction step may then be reduced in an electrolysis cell to recover and recycle the metal back to the uranium tetrachloride reduction operation and the chlorine gas back to the uranium dioxide chlorination operation. 4 figs.

  1. Process for continuous production of metallic uranium and uranium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Hayden, Jr., Howard W.; Horton, James A.; Elliott, Guy R. B.

    1995-01-01

    A method is described for forming metallic uranium, or a uranium alloy, from uranium oxide in a manner which substantially eliminates the formation of uranium-containing wastes. A source of uranium dioxide is first provided, for example, by reducing uranium trioxide (UO.sub.3), or any other substantially stable uranium oxide, to form the uranium dioxide (UO.sub.2). This uranium dioxide is then chlorinated to form uranium tetrachloride (UCl.sub.4), and the uranium tetrachloride is then reduced to metallic uranium by reacting the uranium chloride with a metal which will form the chloride of the metal. This last step may be carried out in the presence of another metal capable of forming one or more alloys with metallic uranium to thereby lower the melting point of the reduced uranium product. The metal chloride formed during the uranium tetrachloride reduction step may then be reduced in an electrolysis cell to recover and recycle the metal back to the uranium tetrachloride reduction operation and the chlorine gas back to the uranium dioxide chlorination operation.

  2. Nanostructured Metal Oxide Sorbents for the Collection and Recovery of Uranium from Seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Warner, Cynthia L.; Mackie, Katherine E.; Warner, Marvin G.; Gill, Gary A.; Addleman, Raymond S.

    2016-02-07

    The ability to collect uranium from seawater offers the potential for a long-term green fuel supply for nuclear energy. However, extraction of uranium, and other trace minerals, is challenging due to the high ionic strength and low mineral concentrations in seawater. Herein we evaluate the use of nanostructured metal oxide sorbents for the collection and recovery of uranium from seawater. Chemical affinity, chemical adsorption capacity and kinetics of preferred sorbent materials were evaluated. High surface area manganese and iron oxide nanomaterials showed excellent performance for uranium collection from seawater. Inexpensive nontoxic carbonate solutions were demonstrated to be an effective and environmental benign method of stripping the uranium from the metal oxide sorbents. Various formats for the utilization of the nanostructured metals oxide sorbent materials are discussed including traditional and nontraditional methods such as magnetic separation. Keywords: Uranium, nano, manganese, iron, sorbent, seawater, magnetic, separations, nuclear energy

  3. Preparation of uranium compounds

    DOEpatents

    Kiplinger, Jaqueline L; Montreal, Marisa J; Thomson, Robert K; Cantat, Thibault; Travia, Nicholas E

    2013-02-19

    UI.sub.3(1,4-dioxane).sub.1.5 and UI.sub.4(1,4-dioxane).sub.2, were synthesized in high yield by reacting turnings of elemental uranium with iodine dissolved in 1,4-dioxane under mild conditions. These molecular compounds of uranium are thermally stable and excellent precursor materials for synthesizing other molecular compounds of uranium including alkoxide, amide, organometallic, and halide compounds.

  4. Metals fact sheet - uranium

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    About 147 million pounds of this radioactive element are consumed annually by the worldwide nuclear power and weapons industries, as well as in the manufacture of ceramics and metal products. The heaviest naturally occurring element, uranium is typically found in intrusive granites, igneous and metamorphic veins, tabular sedimentary deposits, and unconformity-related structures. This article discusses the geology, exploitation, market, and applications of uranium and uranium ores.

  5. Nonmilitary applications of uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Polson, C.E.; Blasch, E.B.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium and its alloys should be considered for any application where weight and/or strength is required, or where weight to volume is important. There is considerable literature on uranium and its alloys. The fear of handling metallic uranium should not be a factor. It is the least hazardous of all long-lived isotopes. Sound industrial hygiene practices will provide adequate protection. In general, safety controls are similar to those required for other heavy metals.

  6. The rare earth element potential of kaolin deposits in the Bohemian Massif (Czech Republic, Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höhn, S.; Frimmel, H. E.; Pašava, J.

    2014-12-01

    Four kaolin deposits in the Bohemian Massif were studied in order to assess the potential for the recovery of rare earth elements (REE) as by-products from the residue after extraction and refining of the raw kaolin. The behaviour of REE + Y during kaolinitization was found to be largely a function of pre-alteration mineralogy. In the examples studied, i.e. granite-derived deposits of Kriechbaum (Austria) and Božičany, and arkose-derived deposits of Kaznějov and Podbořany (all Czech Republic), the REE + Y are predominantly hosted by monazite which has remained unaffected by kaolinitization. The overall REE + Y content of the variably kaolinitized rocks is strongly dependent on their genesis. While ion adsorption plays only a minor role in the concentration of REE + Y in the studied kaolinitized rocks, the processing and refining of the raw kaolin leads to residues that are enriched in REE + Y by a factor of up to 40. The use of a magnetic separator and a hydrocyclone in the processing of the raw material can yield REE + Y contents of as much as 0.77 wt%. Although this value compares well with the REE + Y concentration in some potentially economic REE + Y projects elsewhere, the overall tonnage of the (REE + Y)-enriched residue is by far not sufficient to consider economic extraction of REE + Y as by-product. Our results are most probably applicable also to other kaolin deposits derived from the weathering of Hercynian basement granites elsewhere (e.g. in Saxonia and Bavaria, Germany). Overall, the potential for REE + Y production as by-product from kaolin mining has to be regarded as minimal.

  7. Flash flood in 1714 in the Bohemian-Moravian Highlands - Reconstructing a Catastrophe.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elleder, Libor; Krejčí, Jakub; Šírová, Jolana

    2015-04-01

    Read against the backdrop of the past twenty years with their exceptional frequency of summer floods, records of historical flood events have become highly topical. Aside from the May flood of 1872, the flash flood that occurred at the turn of July and August 1714 in the Bohemian-Moravian Highlands is probably the most important case of its kind in the Czech lands, and may likely be ranked among the most notable occurrences of extreme weather even within the larger Central European context. Within the catchment basin of the Sázava River, the headwater level rose about three meters above the highest floods on the hydrological record and 1.5m above the highest historical flood-mark. Taking into account the time period - i.e., the beginning of the 18th century - some of the concurrent accounts of the flood are uncommonly detailed, containing not only a specification of the damage caused, but also high water mark figures and, at least in broad strokes, a record of the changing water levels over time. The flood caused tremendous material damage at the time, breaching e.g. about 70 fish ponds and destroying essentially all bridges; over 230 people were killed. It was revealed that the area of Žďárské vrchy (Žďár Hills) at the divide of the rivers Loučná, Chrudimka, Sázava, and Svratka which was impacted by the causative extreme precipitation may have measured 800 to 1000 square kilometers. Rough estimates of the headwater flow rate equal about four times current Q100 values. We therefore used the hydrological model Aqualog in order to determine whether an event of this scope was at all realistic. The goal was to assess whether it was realistically possible that precipitation may have been of such scope as to trigger a hydrological response of this intensity.

  8. Forensic analysis of uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Stoyer, N.J.; Moody, K.J.

    1996-10-01

    As more and more offers for illicit {open_quotes}Black Market{close_quotes} radioactive materials are found, the forensic information contained within the radioactive material itself becomes more important. Many {open_quotes}Black Market{close_quotes} offers are for uranium in various forms and enrichments. Although most are scams, some countries have actually interdicted enriched uranium. We will discuss the forensic information that can be obtained from materials containing uranium along with examples of data that has been determined from analysis of uranium samples obtained from legitimate sources.

  9. URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Kaufman, D.

    1958-04-15

    A process of recovering uranium from very low-grade ore residues is described. These low-grade uraniumcontaining hydroxide precipitates, which also contain hydrated silica and iron and aluminum hydroxides, are subjected to multiple leachings with aqueous solutions of sodium carbonate at a pH of at least 9. This leaching serves to selectively extract the uranium from the precipitate, but to leave the greater part of the silica, iron, and aluminum with the residue. The uranium is then separated from the leach liquor by the addition of an acid in sufficient amount to destroy the carbonate followed by the addition of ammonia to precipitate uranium as ammonium diuranate.

  10. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Ruehle, A.E.; Stevenson, J.W.

    1957-11-12

    An improved process is described for the magnesium reduction of UF/sub 4/ to produce uranium metal. In the past, there have been undesirable premature reactions between the Mg and the bomb liner or the UF/sub 4/ before the actual ignition of the bomb reaction. Since these premature reactions impair the yield of uranium metal, they have been inhibited by forming a protective film upon the particles of Mg by reacting it with hydrated uranium tetrafluoride, sodium bifluoride, uranyl fluoride, or uranium trioxide. This may be accomplished by adding about 0.5 to 2% of the additive to the bomb charge.

  11. Uranium Dispersion & Dosimetry Model.

    SciTech Connect

    MICHAEL,; MOMENI, H.

    2002-03-22

    The Uranium Dispersion and Dosimetry (UDAD) program provides estimates of potential radiation exposure to individuals and to the general population in the vicinity of a uranium processing facility such as a uranium mine or mill. Only transport through the air is considered. Exposure results from inhalation, external irradiation from airborne and ground-deposited activity, and ingestion of foodstuffs. Individual dose commitments, population dose commitments, and environmental dose commitments are computed. The program was developed for application to uranium mining and milling; however, it may be applied to dispersion of any other pollutant.

  12. COATING URANIUM FROM CARBONYLS

    DOEpatents

    Gurinsky, D.H.; Storrs, S.S.

    1959-07-14

    Methods are described for making adherent corrosion resistant coatings on uranium metal. According to the invention, the uranium metal is heated in the presence of an organometallic compound such as the carbonyls of nickel, molybdenum, chromium, niobium, and tungsten at a temperature sufficient to decompose the metal carbonyl and dry plate the resultant free metal on the surface of the uranium metal body. The metal coated body is then further heated at a higher temperature to thermally diffuse the coating metal within the uranium bcdy.

  13. METHOD OF ROLLING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Smith, C.S.

    1959-08-01

    A method is described for rolling uranium metal at relatively low temperatures and under non-oxidizing conditions. The method involves the steps of heating the uranium to 200 deg C in an oil bath, withdrawing the uranium and permitting the oil to drain so that only a thin protective coating remains and rolling the oil coated uranium at a temperature of 200 deg C to give about a 15% reduction in thickness at each pass. The operation may be repeated to accomplish about a 90% reduction without edge cracking, checking or any appreciable increase in brittleness.

  14. Laser fluorometric analysis of plants for uranium exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harms, T.F.; Ward, F.N.; Erdman, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    A preliminary test of biogeochemical exploration for locating uranium occurrences in the Marfa Basin, Texas, was conducted in 1978. Only 6 of 74 plant samples (mostly catclaw mimosa, Mimosa biuncifera) contained uranium in amounts above the detection limit (0.4 ppm in the ash) of the conventional fluorometric method. The samples were then analyzed using a Scintrex UA-3 uranium analyzer* * Use of trade names in this paper is for descriptive purposes only and does not constitute endorsement by the U.S. Geological Survey. - an instrument designed for direct analysis of uranium in water, and which can be conveniently used in a mobile field laboratory. The detection limit for uranium in plant ash (0.05 ppm) by this method is almost an order of magnitude lower than with the fluorometric conventional method. Only 1 of the 74 samples contained uranium below the detection limit of the new method. Accuracy and precision were determined to be satisfactory. Samples of plants growing on mineralized soils and nonmineralized soils show a 15-fold difference in uranium content; whereas the soils themselves (analyzed by delayed neutron activation analysis) show only a 4-fold difference. The method involves acid digestion of ashed tissue, extraction of uranium into ethyl acetate, destruction of the ethyl acetate, dissolution of the residue in 0.005% nitric acid, and measurement. ?? 1981.

  15. URANIUM LEACHING AND RECOVERY PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    McClaine, L.A.

    1959-08-18

    A process is described for recovering uranium from carbonate leach solutions by precipitating uranium as a mixed oxidation state compound. Uranium is recovered by adding a quadrivalent uranium carbon;te solution to the carbonate solution, adjusting the pH to 13 or greater, and precipitating the uranium as a filterable mixed oxidation state compound. In the event vanadium occurs with the uranium, the vanadium is unaffected by the uranium precipitation step and remains in the carbonate solution. The uranium-free solution is electrolyzed in the cathode compartment of a mercury cathode diaphragm cell to reduce and precipitate the vanadium.

  16. Electron microprobe mineral analysis guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    Electron microprobe mineral analysis guide is a compilation of X-ray tables and spectra recorded from various mineral matrices. Spectra were obtained using electron microprobe, equipped with LiF geared, curved crystal X-ray spectrometers, utilizing typical analytical operating conditions: 15 Kv acceleration potential, 0.02 microampere sample current as measured on a clinopyroxene standard (CP19). Tables and spectra are presented for the majority of elements, fluorine through uranium, occurring in mineral samples from lunar, meteoritic and terrestrial sources. Tables for each element contain relevant analytical information, i.e., analyzing crystal, X-ray peak, background and relative intensity information, X-ray interferences and a section containing notes on the measurement. Originally intended to cover silicates and oxide minerals the tables and spectra have been expanded to cover other mineral phases. Electron microprobe mineral analysis guide is intended as a spectral base to which additional spectra can be added as the analyst encounters new mineral matrices.

  17. The roles of organic matter in the formation of uranium deposits in sedimentary rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spirakis, C.S.

    1996-01-01

    Because reduced uranium species have a much smaller solubility than oxidized uranium species and because of the strong association of organic matter (a powerful reductant) with many uranium ores, reduction has long been considered to be the precipitation mechanism for many types of uranium deposits. Organic matter may also be involved in the alterations in and around tabular uranium deposits, including dolomite precipitation, formation of silicified layers, iron-titanium oxide destruction, dissolution of quartz grains, and precipitation of clay minerals. The diagenetic processes that produced these alterations also consumed organic matter. Consequently, those tabular deposits that underwent the more advanced stages of diagenesis, including methanogenesis and organic acid generation, display the greatest range of alterations and contain the smallest amount of organic matter. Because of certain similarities between tabular uranium deposits and Precambrian unconformity-related deposits, some of the same processes might have been involved in the genesis of Precambrian unconformity-related deposits. Hydrologic studies place important constraints on genetic models of various types of uranium deposits. In roll-front deposits, oxidized waters carried uranium to reductants (organic matter and pyrite derived from sulfate reduction by organic matter). After these reductants were oxidized at any point in the host sandstone, uranium minerals were reoxidized and transported further down the flow path to react with additional reductants. In this manner, the uranium ore migrated through the sandstone at a rate slower than the mineralizing ground water. In the case of tabular uranium deposits, the recharge of surface water into the ground water during flooding of lakes carried soluble humic material to the water table or to an interface where humate precipitated in tabular layers. These humate layers then established the chemical conditions for mineralization and related

  18. Reconnaissance for uranium-bearing lignite in the Ekalaka Lignite Field, Carter County, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gill, James R.

    1954-01-01

    Uranium-bearing lignite beds 1.5 to 8 feet thick occur in the Fort Union formation of the southern part of the Ekalaka Hills, Carter County, Mont. Data from surface outcrops indicate that an area of about 1,400 acres is underlain by 16,500,000 tons of uranium-bearing lignite containing 700 tons of uranium. The uranium content of the lignite beds ranges from 0.001 to 0.034 percent. Ironstone concretions in the massive coarse-grained sandstones in the upper part of the Fort Union formation contain 0.005 percent uranium in the northern and eastern parts of the area. These sandstones are good potential host rocks for uranium mineralization and are lithologically similar to the massive coarse-grained uranium-bearing sandstones of the Wasatch formation in the Pumpkin Buttes area of the Powder River Basin.

  19. Uranium industry annual 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    Uranium production in the United States has declined dramatically from a peak of 43.7 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (16.8 thousand metric tons uranium (U)) in 1980 to 3.1 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (1.2 thousand metric tons U) in 1993. This decline is attributed to the world uranium market experiencing oversupply and intense competition. Large inventories of uranium accumulated when optimistic forecasts for growth in nuclear power generation were not realized. The other factor which is affecting U.S. uranium production is that some other countries, notably Australia and Canada, possess higher quality uranium reserves that can be mined at lower costs than those of the United States. Realizing its competitive advantage, Canada was the world`s largest producer in 1993 with an output of 23.9 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (9.2 thousand metric tons U). The U.S. uranium industry, responding to over a decade of declining market prices, has downsized and adopted less costly and more efficient production methods. The main result has been a suspension of production from conventional mines and mills. Since mid-1992, only nonconventional production facilities, chiefly in situ leach (ISL) mining and byproduct recovery, have operated in the United States. In contrast, nonconventional sources provided only 13 percent of the uranium produced in 1980. ISL mining has developed into the most cost efficient and environmentally acceptable method for producing uranium in the United States. The process, also known as solution mining, differs from conventional mining in that solutions are used to recover uranium from the ground without excavating the ore and generating associated solid waste. This article describes the current ISL Yang technology and its regulatory approval process, and provides an analysis of the factors favoring ISL mining over conventional methods in a declining uranium market.

  20. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Newcastle NTMS Quadrangle, Wyoming, including concentrations of forty-two additional elements

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, S.J.; Sandoval, W.F.; Gallimore, D.L.; Talcott, C.L.; Martinez, R.G.; Minor, M.E.; Mills, C.F.

    1980-06-01

    Water and sediment samples were collected and each water sample was analyzed for U, and each sediment sample was analyzed for 43 elements, including U and Th. Uranium concentrations in water samples range from below the detection limit of 0.02 ppB to 702.26 ppB and have a median of 1.73 ppB and a mean of 11.76 ppB. Water samples containing high uranium concentrations generally are associated with known uranium mining activity or units known to be uranium bearing. About one-third of the water samples containing high uranium concentrations were collected from locations within the Pumpkin Buttes and Turnercrest-Ross Districts. Nearly half of the water samples containing high uranium concentrations were collected from locations just west of the Monument Hill and Highland Flats-Box Creek Districts. Similar anomalous uranium concentrations in this region have been reported updip from Exxon's Highland uranium deposits. High uranium concentrations were also found associated with the Lance Creek-Old Woman Anticline District. Uranium concentrations in sediment samples range from 1.14 to 220.70 ppM and have a median of 3.37 ppM and a mean of 4.03 ppM. Throughout the major uranium mining districts of the Powder River Basin, sediment samples with high uranium concentrations were collected from dry streams located near wells producing water samples with high uranium concentrations. High uranium concentrations were also found associated with the Lance Creek oil field where uranium mineralization is known in the White River formation. High uranium concentrations were also found in sediment samples in areas where uranium mineralization is not known. These samples are from dry streams in areas underlain by the White River formation, the Niobrara formation, and the Pierre, Carlisle, Belle Fourche, and Mowry shales.

  1. Uranium-Series Constraints on Subrepository Water Flow at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    L.A. Neymark; J.B. Paces; S.J. Chipera; D.T. Vaniman

    2006-03-10

    Mineral abundances and whole-rock chemical and uranium-series isotopic compositions were measured in unfractured and rubble core samples from borehole USWSD-9 in the same layers of variably zeolitized tuffs that underlie the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Uranium concentrations and isotopic compositions also were measured in pore water from core samples from the same rock units and rock leachates representing loosely bound U adsorbed on mineral surfaces or contained in readily soluble secondary minerals. The chemical and isotopic data were used to evaluate differences in water-rock interaction between fractured and unfractured rock and between fracture surfaces and rock matrix. Samples of unfractured and rubble fragments (about 1 centimeter) core and material from fracture surfaces show similar amounts of uranium-series disequilibrium, recording a complex history of sorption and loss of uranium over the past 1 million years. The data indicate that fractures in zeolitized tuffs may not have had greater amounts of water-rock interaction than the rock matrix. The data also show that rock matrix from subrepository units is capable of scavenging uranium with elevated uranium-234/uranium-238 from percolating water and that retardation of radionuclides and dose reduction may be greater than currently credited to this aspect of the natural barrier. Uranium concentrations of pore water and the rock leachates are used to estimate long-term in situ uranium partition coefficient values greater than 7 milliliters per gram.

  2. Uranium-series constraints on subrepository water flow at yucca mountain, nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neymark, L.A.; Chipera, S.J.; Paces, J.B.; Vaniman, D.T.

    2006-01-01

    Mineral abundances and whole-rock chemical and uranium-series isotopic compositions were measured in unfractured and rubble core samples from borehole USW SD-9 in the same layers of variably zeolitized tuffs that underlie the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Uranium concentrations and isotopic compositions also were measured in pore water from core samples from the same rock units and rock leachates representing loosely bound U adsorbed on mineral surfaces or contained in readily soluble secondary minerals. The chemical and isotopic data were used to evaluate differences in water-rock interaction between fractured and unfractured rock and between fracture surfaces and rock matrix. Samples of unfractured and rubble (fragments about 1 centimeter) core and material from fracture surfaces show similar amounts of uranium-series disequilibrium, recording a complex history of sorption and loss of uranium over the past 1 million years. The data indicate that fractures in zeolitized tuffs may not have had greater amounts of water-rock interaction than the rock matrix. The data also show that rock matrix from subrepository units is capable of scavenging uranium with elevated uranium-234/uranium-238 from percolating water and that retardation of radionuclides and dose reduction may be greater than currently credited to this aspect of the natural barrier. Uranium concentrations of pore water and the rock leachates are used to estimate long-term in situ uranium partition coefficient values greater than 7 milliliters per gram.

  3. Minerals yearbook: Mineral industries of Africa. Volume 3. 1992 international review

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The 53 countries that constituted Africa in 1992 accounted for a significant portion of total world output of a number of mineral commodities. Among the most significant mineral commodities produced in Africa were andalusite, antimony, asbestos, bauxite, chromite, coal, cobalt, copper, diamond, fluorspar, gold, lithium minerals, manganese, phosphate, platinum-group metals, the titanium minerals-ilmenite and rutile, vanadium, vermiculite, uranium, and zircon. Chromite, cobalt, and manganese, were not mined in the Untied States.

  4. Upper Pleistocene Gulo gulo (Linne, 1758) remains from the Srbsko Chlum-Komin Hyena den cave in the Bohemian Karst, Czech Republic, with comparisons to contemporary wolverines

    Treesearch

    Cajus G. Diedrich; Jeffrey P. Copeland

    2010-01-01

    Wolverine bone material is described from the famous Upper Pleistocene cave Srbsko Chlum-Komin in the Bohemian Karst, Czech Republic, along with an overview of recently known Czech sites. The Gulo gulo Linne material was found in one of the largest Ice Age spotted-hyena dens in Europe. As a result of non-systematic excavations, the taphonomy is partly unclear. Lower-...

  5. Potential Aquifer Vulnerability in Regions Down-Gradient from Uranium In Situ Recovery (ISR) Sites

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sandstone-hosted roll-front uranium ore deposits originate when U(VI) dissolved in groundwater is reduced and precipitated as insoluble U(IV) minerals. Groundwater redox geochemistry, aqueous complexation, and solute migration are instrumental in leaching uranium from source rock...

  6. Potential Aquifer Vulnerability in Regions Down-Gradient from Uranium In Situ Recovery (ISR) Sites

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sandstone-hosted roll-front uranium ore deposits originate when U(VI) dissolved in groundwater is reduced and precipitated as insoluble U(IV) minerals. Groundwater redox geochemistry, aqueous complexation, and solute migration are instrumental in leaching uranium from source rock...

  7. Uranium and Thorium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finch, Warren I.

    1978-01-01

    The results of President Carter's policy on non-proliferation of nuclear weapons are expected to slow the growth rate in energy consumption, put the development of the breeder reactor in question, halt plans to reprocess and recycle uranium and plutonium, and expand facilities to supply enriched uranium. (Author/MA)

  8. URANIUM SEPARATION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    McVey, W.H.; Reas, W.H.

    1959-03-10

    The separation of uranium from an aqueous solution containing a water soluble uranyl salt is described. The process involves adding an alkali thiocyanate to the aqueous solution, contacting the resulting solution with methyl isobutyl ketons and separating the resulting aqueous and organic phase. The uranium is extracted in the organic phase as UO/sub 2/(SCN)/sub/.

  9. International uranium market

    SciTech Connect

    Neff, T.L.; Jacoby, H.D.

    1980-12-01

    The international uranium market is affected by many of the same concerns that now attend all trade in energy: the adequacy of the resource base, price uncertainty, and worries about security of access. Uranium, like energy generally, is now a strategic commodity for reasons of economic security. Uranium is also the subject of international security concerns because of its association with the proliferation of nuclear weapons. Proliferation is a subject of disagreement among nations - with some arguing that access to uranium or enriched fuel should be coupled to restraint in technological decisions and acceptance of wide-ranging safeguards; the net result is yet another dimension of uncertainty about an energy commodity that many nations feel is vital to their future. These security concerns are related to the nature and behavior of the international market for nuclear fuels. Without adequate information, the worst is usually assumed. Thus, a clearer view of the nature of supply and demand, of government policy formulation, and of market functioning can help relieve at least some of the security worries felt by those in charge of national energy policies. It is the purpose of this paper to improve this understanding. The following topics are discussed: Uranium Demand; Uranium Supply; Major Uranium Producers - Australia, Canada, South Africa, Namibia, Niger; Major Consumers - Japan, France, West Germany; The Uranium Market; and Issues and Implications.

  10. Uranium and Thorium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finch, Warren I.

    1978-01-01

    The results of President Carter's policy on non-proliferation of nuclear weapons are expected to slow the growth rate in energy consumption, put the development of the breeder reactor in question, halt plans to reprocess and recycle uranium and plutonium, and expand facilities to supply enriched uranium. (Author/MA)

  11. DECONTAMINATION OF URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Spedding, F.H.; Butler, T.A.

    1962-05-15

    A process is given for separating fission products from uranium by extracting the former into molten aluminum. Phase isolation can be accomplished by selectively hydriding the uranium at between 200 and 300 deg C and separating the hydride powder from coarse particles of fissionproduct-containing aluminum. (AEC)

  12. 16. VIEW OF THE ENRICHED URANIUM RECOVERY SYSTEM. ENRICHED URANIUM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. VIEW OF THE ENRICHED URANIUM RECOVERY SYSTEM. ENRICHED URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESSED RELATIVELY PURE MATERIALS AND SOLUTIONS AND SOLID RESIDUES WITH RELATIVELY LOW URANIUM CONTENT. URANIUM RECOVERY INVOLVED BOTH SLOW AND FAST PROCESSES. (4/4/66) - Rocky Flats Plant, General Manufacturing, Support, Records-Central Computing, Southern portion of Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  13. Sandstone type uranium deposits in the Ordos Basin, Northwest China: A case study and an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtar, Shamim; Yang, Xiaoyong; Pirajno, Franco

    2017-09-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive review on studies of sandstone type uranium deposits in the Ordos Basin, Northwest China. As the second largest sedimentary basin, the Ordos Basin has great potential for targeting sandstone type U mineralization. The newly found and explored Dongsheng and Diantou sandstone type uranium deposits are hosted in the Middle Jurassic Zhilou Formation. A large number of investigations have been conducted to trace the source rock compositions and relationship between lithic subarkose sandstone host rock and uranium mineralization. An optical microscopy study reveals two types of alteration associated with the U mineralization: chloritization and sericitization. Some unusual mineral structures, with compositional similarity to coffinite, have been identified in a secondary pyrite by SEM These mineral phases are proposed to be of bacterial origin, following high resolution mapping of uranium minerals and trace element determinations in situ. Moreover, geochemical studies of REE and trace elements constrained the mechanism of uranium enrichment, displaying LREE enrichment relative to HREE. Trace elements such as Pb, Mo and Ba have a direct relationship with uranium enrichment and can be used as index for mineralization. The source of uranium ore forming fluids and related geological processes have been studied using H, O and C isotope systematics of fluid inclusions in quartz veins and the calcite cement of sandstone rocks hosting U mineralization. Both H and O isotopic compositions of fluid inclusions reveal that ore forming fluids are a mixture of meteoric water and magmatic water. The C and S isotopes of the cementing material of sandstone suggest organic origin and bacterial sulfate reduction (BSR), providing an important clue for U mineralization. Discussion of the ore genesis shows that the greenish gray sandstone plays a crucial role during processes leading to uranium mineralization. Consequently, an oxidation-reduction model for

  14. Uranium- and thorium-bearing pegmatites of the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J.W.; Arengi, J.T.; Parrish, I.S.

    1980-04-01

    This report is part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program designed to identify criteria favorable for the occurrence of the world's significant uranium deposits. This project deals specifically with uranium- and thorium-bearing pegmatites in the United States and, in particular, their distribution and origin. From an extensive literature survey and field examination of 44 pegmatite localities in the United States and Canada, the authors have compiled an index to about 300 uranium- and thorium-bearing pegmatites in the United States, maps giving location of these deposits, and an annotated bibliography to some of the most pertinent literature on the geology of pegmatites. Pegmatites form from late-state magma differentiates rich in volatile constituents with an attendant aqueous vapor phase. It is the presence of an aqueous phase which results in the development of the variable grain size which characterizes pegmatites. All pegmatites occur in areas of tectonic mobility involving crustal material usually along plate margins. Those pegmatites containing radioactive mineral species show, essentially, a similar distribution to those without radioactive minerals. Criteria such as tectonic setting, magma composition, host rock, and elemental indicators among others, all serve to help delineate areas more favorable for uranium- and thorium-bearing pegmatites. The most useful guide remains the radioactivity exhibited by uranium- and thorium-bearing pegmatites. Although pegmatites are frequently noted as favorable hosts for radioactive minerals, the general paucity and sporadic distribution of these minerals and inherent mining and milling difficulties negate the resource potential of pegmatites for uranium and thorium.

  15. METHOD FOR PURIFYING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Kennedy, J.W.; Segre, E.G.

    1958-08-26

    A method is presented for obtaining a compound of uranium in an extremely pure state and in such a condition that it can be used in determinations of the isotopic composition of uranium. Uranium deposited in calutron receivers is removed therefrom by washing with cold nitric acid and the resulting solution, coataining uranium and trace amounts of various impurities, such as Fe, Ag, Zn, Pb, and Ni, is then subjected to various analytical manipulations to obtain an impurity-free uranium containing solution. This solution is then evaporated on a platinum disk and the residue is ignited converting it to U2/sub 3//sub 8/. The platinum disk having such a thin film of pure U/sub 2/O/sub 8/ is suitable for use with isotopic determination techaiques.

  16. Uranium dioxide electrolysis

    DOEpatents

    Willit, James L [Batavia, IL; Ackerman, John P [Prescott, AZ; Williamson, Mark A [Naperville, IL

    2009-12-29

    This is a single stage process for treating spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors. The spent nuclear fuel, uranium oxide, UO.sub.2, is added to a solution of UCl.sub.4 dissolved in molten LiCl. A carbon anode and a metallic cathode is positioned in the molten salt bath. A power source is connected to the electrodes and a voltage greater than or equal to 1.3 volts is applied to the bath. At the anode, the carbon is oxidized to form carbon dioxide and uranium chloride. At the cathode, uranium is electroplated. The uranium chloride at the cathode reacts with more uranium oxide to continue the reaction. The process may also be used with other transuranic oxides and rare earth metal oxides.

  17. Uranium triamidoamine chemistry.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Benedict M; Liddle, Stephen T

    2015-07-07

    Triamidoamine (Tren) complexes of the p- and d-block elements have been well-studied, and they display a diverse array of chemistry of academic, industrial and biological significance. Such in-depth investigations are not as widespread for Tren complexes of uranium, despite the general drive to better understand the chemical behaviour of uranium by virtue of its fundamental position within the nuclear sector. However, the chemistry of Tren-uranium complexes is characterised by the ability to stabilise otherwise reactive, multiply bonded main group donor atom ligands, construct uranium-metal bonds, promote small molecule activation, and support single molecule magnetism, all of which exploit the steric, electronic, thermodynamic and kinetic features of the Tren ligand system. This Feature Article presents a current account of the chemistry of Tren-uranium complexes.

  18. URANIUM PRECIPITATION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Thunaes, A.; Brown, E.A.; Smith, H.W.; Simard, R.

    1957-12-01

    A method for the recovery of uranium from sulfuric acid solutions is described. In the present process, sulfuric acid is added to the uranium bearing solution to bring the pH to between 1 and 1.8, preferably to about 1.4, and aluminum metal is then used as a reducing agent to convert hexavalent uranium to the tetravalent state. As the reaction proceeds, the pH rises amd a selective precipitation of uranium occurs resulting in a high grade precipitate. This process is an improvement over the process using metallic iron, in that metallic aluminum reacts less readily than metallic iron with sulfuric acid, thus avoiding consumption of the reducing agent and a raising of the pH without accomplishing the desired reduction of the hexavalent uranium in the solution. Another disadvantage to the use of iron is that positive ferric ions will precipitate with negative phosphate and arsenate ions at the pH range employed.

  19. Elevated Uranium in Aquifers of the Jacobsville Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, H.; Gierke, J.

    2003-12-01

    The EPA has announced a new standard for uranium in drinking water of 30 parts per billion (ppb). This maximum contaminant level (MCL) takes effect for community water supplies December 2003. The EPA's ruling has heightened awareness among residential well owners that uranium in drinking water may increase the risk of kidney disease and cancer and has created a need for a quantified, scientific understanding of the occurrence and distribution of uranium isotopes in aquifers. The authors are investigating the occurrence of elevated uranium in northern Michigan aquifers of the Middle Proterozoic Jacobsville sandstone, a red to mottled sequence of sandstones, conglomerates, siltstones and shales deposited as basin fill in the 1.1 Ga Midcontinent rift. Approximately 25% of 300 well water samples tested for isotopic uranium have concentrations above the MCL. Elevated uranium occurrences are distributed throughout the Jacobsville sandstone aquifers stretching across Michigan's Upper Peninsula. However, there is significant variation in well water uranium concentrations (from 0.01 to 190 ppb) and neighboring wells do not necessarily have similar concentrations. The authors are investigating hydrogeologic controls on ground water uranium concentrations in the Jacobsville sandstone, e.g. variations in lithology, mineralogy, groundwater residence time and geochemistry. Approximately 2000' of Jacobsville core from the Amoco St. Amour well was examined in conjunction with the spectral gamma ray log run in the borehole. Spikes in equivalent uranium (eU) concentration from the log are frequently associated with clay and heavy mineral layers in the sandstone core. The lithology and mineralogy of these layers will be determined by analysis of thin sections and x-ray diffraction. A portable spectrometer, model GRS-2000/BL, will be used on the sandstone cliffs along Lake Superior to characterize depositional and lithologic facies of the Jacobsville sandstone in terms of

  20. National Uranium Resource Evaluation. Volume 1. Summary of the geology and uranium potential of Precambrian conglomerates in southeastern Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Karlstrom, K.E.; Houston, R.S.; Flurkey, A.J.; Coolidge, C.M.; Kratochvil, A.L.; Sever, C.K.

    1981-02-01

    A series of uranium-, thorium-, and gold-bearing conglomerates in Late Archean and Early Proterozoic metasedimentary rocks have been discovered in southern Wyoming. The mineral deposits were found by applying the time and strata bound model for the origin of uranium-bearing quartz-pebble conglomerates to favorable rock types within a geologic terrane known from prior regional mapping. No mineral deposits have been discovered that are of current (1981) economic interest, but preliminary resource estimates indicate that over 3418 tons of uranium and over 1996 tons of thorium are present in the Medicine Bow Mountains and that over 440 tons of uranium and 6350 tons of thorium are present in Sierra Madre. Sampling has been inadequate to determine gold resources. High grade uranium deposits have not been detected by work to date but local beds of uranium-bearing conglomerate contain as much as 1380 ppM uranium over a thickness of 0.65 meters. This project has involved geologic mapping at scales from 1/6000 to 1/50,000 detailed sampling, and the evaluation of 48 diamond drill holes, but the area is too large to fully establish the economic potential with the present information. This first volume summarizes the geologic setting and geologic and geochemical characteristics of the uranium-bearing conglomerates. Volume 2 contains supporting geochemical data, lithologic logs from 48 drill holes in Precambrian rocks, and drill site geologic maps and cross-sections from most of the holes. Volume 3 is a geostatistical resource estimate of uranium and thorium in quartz-pebble conglomerates.

  1. Mineralogical classification of uranium-vanadium deposits of the Colorado Plateau

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Botinelly, Theodore; Weeks, Alice D.

    1957-01-01

    The uranium deposi ts of the Colorado Plateau contain suites of minerals that are the result of different stages of oxidation of deposits with different elemental composition. A classification based on composition and stage of oxidation is presented.

  2. Terrasar-X Insar Processing in Northern Bohemian Coal Basin Using Corner Reflectors (preliminary Results)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlaváčová, I.; Halounová, L.; Svobodová, K.

    2012-07-01

    The area of Northern Bohemian coal basin is rich in brown coal. Part of it is undermined, but large areas were mined using open-pit mines. There are numerous reclaimed waste dumps here, with a horse racetrack, roads and in some cases also houses. However, on most of the waste dumps, there are forests, meadows and fields. Above the coal basin, there are the Ore mountains which are suspected to be sliding down to the open mines below them. We installed 11 corner reflectors in the area and monitor them using the TerraSAR-X satellite. One of the reflectors is situated in the area of radar layover, therefore it cannot be processed. We present preliminary results of monitoring the remaining corner reflectors, with the use of 7 TerraSAR-X scenes acquired between June and December 2011. We process whole scene crops, as well as the artificial reflector information alone. Our scene set contains interferometric pairs with perpendicular baselines reaching from 0 to 150 m. Such a configuration allows us to distinguish deformations from DEM errors, which are usual when the SRTM (Shuttle Radar Topography Mission) DEM (X-band) is used for Stripmap data. Unfortunately, most of the area of interest is decorrelated due to vegetation that covers both the Ore mountains and the reclaimed waste dumps. We had to enlarge the scene crop in order to be able to distinguish deformations from the atmospheric delay. We are still not certain about the stability of some regions. For the installed artificial reflectors, the expected deformations are in the order of mm/year. Generally, deformations in the area of interest may reach up to about 5 cm/year for the Ervěnice corridor (a road and railway built on a waste dump). When processing artificial corner reflector information alone, we check triangular sums and perform the processing for all possible point combinations - and that allows us to correct for some unwrapping errors. However, the problem is highly ambiguous.

  3. Geology and uranium favorability of the Sonora Pass region, Alpine and Tuolumne Counties, California

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, J.S.; Short, W.O.

    1981-06-01

    Uranium mineralization at the Juniper Mine is restricted to host rocks of the Relief Peak Formation and is most common in coarse-grained lithic sandstone, conglomerate, and lithic wacke. The richest beds contain as much as 0.5% U/sub 3/O/sub 8/. Uranium is present as coffinite, uraninite, and unidentified minerals. Thorium/uranium ratios are generally low and erratic. Equivalent uranium determinations are low in comparison with chemical uranium values, indicating that uranium mineralization of the Juniper Mine is geologically young. Core drilling at 16 localities shows that widely separated exposures of the Relief Peak Formation have very similar lithology, geochemistry, and stratigraphy. Some sections are similar to the Juniper Mine section. Core from the bottom of drill hole SP-1 contains 83 ppM uranium, the greatest known concentration outside the mine area. Significant uranium deposits may be concealed beneath the thick Tertiary volcanic cover of the region. The quartz latitic Eureka Valley Tuff is fairly widespread in east-central California and western Nevada. It contains 12 to 14 ppM uranium and stratigraphically overlies the Relief Peak Formation. It is permeable and contains abundant alkali metals and volcanic glass. Because of its petrology, geochemistry, and position, this formation is the most likely source for uranium mineralization of the Sonora Pass region. It should be examined as a potential source rock in other areas with special regard to its relationship to carbonaceous sedimentary formations. The uraniferous granite pegmatitite dike that crops out in the Niagara Creek area appears too small to be a significant source rock. The most favorable rocks in the Sonora Pass region occur near the Juniper Mine and west of it, in the Dardanelles, the Whittakers Dardanelles, and the area of the Big Meadow Quadrangle. Potential uranium host rocks crop out in areas along the crest of the Sierra Nevada from Lake Tahoe to Yosemite.

  4. Uranium Biomineralization by Natural Microbial Phosphatase Activities in the Subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Sobecky, Patricia A.

    2015-04-06

    In this project, inter-disciplinary research activities were conducted in collaboration among investigators at The University of Alabama (UA), Georgia Institute of Technology (GT), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), and the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light source (SSRL) to: (i) confirm that phosphatase activities of subsurface bacteria in Area 2 and 3 from the Oak Ridge Field Research Center result in solid U-phosphate precipitation in aerobic and anaerobic conditions; (ii) investigate the eventual competition between uranium biomineralization via U-phosphate precipitation and uranium bioreduction; (iii) determine subsurface microbial community structure changes of Area 2 soils following organophosphate amendments; (iv) obtain the complete genome sequences of the Rahnella sp. Y9-602 and the type-strain Rahnella aquatilis ATCC 33071 isolated from these soils; (v) determine if polyphosphate accumulation and phytate hydrolysis can be used to promote U(VI) biomineralization in subsurface sediments; (vi) characterize the effect of uranium on phytate hydrolysis by a new microorganism isolated from uranium-contaminated sediments; (vii) utilize positron-emission tomography to label and track metabolically-active bacteria in soil columns, and (viii) study the stability of the uranium phosphate mineral product. Microarray analyses and mineral precipitation characterizations were conducted in collaboration with DOE SBR-funded investigators at LBNL. Thus, microbial phosphorus metabolism has been shown to have a contributing role to uranium immobilization in the subsurface.

  5. Uranium and diagenesis in evaporitic lacustrine mudstone of the Oligocene White River Group, Dawes County, Nebraska

    SciTech Connect

    Dickinson, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the uranium mineralization and diagenesis of an evaporitic lacustrine mudstone and related fluvial and colluvial facies in the White River Group in Dawes county, Nebraska, are described. Diagenetic minerals and textures are identified using a variety of petrologic methods, including x-ray diffraction, thin-section study, and scanning electron micrography. R-mode factor analysis was performed on a data base containing chemical and mineralogical data. Uranium distribution in the depositional and diagenetic environments is also analyzed.

  6. PROCESS OF RECOVERING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Kilner, S.B.

    1959-12-29

    A method is presented for separating and recovering uranium from a complex mixure of impurities. The uranium is dissolved to produce an aqueous acidic solution including various impurities. In accordance with one method, with the uranium in the uranyl state, hydrogen cyanide is introduced into the solution to complex the impurities. Subsequently, ammonia is added to the solution to precipitate the uraniunn as ammonium diuranate away from the impurities in the solution. Alternatively, the uranium is precipitated by adding an alkaline metal hydroxide. In accordance with the second method, the uranium is reduced to the uranous state in the solution. The reduced solution is then treated with solid alkali metal cyanide sufficient to render the solution about 0.1 to 1.0 N in cyanide ions whereat cyanide complex ions of the metal impurities are produced and the uranium is simultaneously precipituted as uranous hydroxide. Alternatively, hydrogen cyanide may be added to the reduced solution and the uranium precipitated subsequently by adding ammonium hydroxide or an alkali metal hydroxide. Other refinements of the method are also disclosed.

  7. India's Worsening Uranium Shortage

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, Michael M.

    2007-01-15

    As a result of NSG restrictions, India cannot import the natural uranium required to fuel its Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs); consequently, it is forced to rely on the expediency of domestic uranium production. However, domestic production from mines and byproduct sources has not kept pace with demand from commercial reactors. This shortage has been officially confirmed by the Indian Planning Commission’s Mid-Term Appraisal of the country’s current Five Year Plan. The report stresses that as a result of the uranium shortage, Indian PHWR load factors have been continually decreasing. The Uranium Corporation of India Ltd (UCIL) operates a number of underground mines in the Singhbhum Shear Zone of Jharkhand, and it is all processed at a single mill in Jaduguda. UCIL is attempting to aggrandize operations by establishing new mines and mills in other states, but the requisite permit-gathering and development time will defer production until at least 2009. A significant portion of India’s uranium comes from byproduct sources, but a number of these are derived from accumulated stores that are nearing exhaustion. A current maximum estimate of indigenous uranium production is 430t/yr (230t from mines and 200t from byproduct sources); whereas, the current uranium requirement for Indian PHWRs is 455t/yr (depending on plant capacity factor). This deficit is exacerbated by the additional requirements of the Indian weapons program. Present power generation capacity of Indian nuclear plants is 4350 MWe. The power generation target set by the Indian Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) is 20,000 MWe by the year 2020. It is expected that around half of this total will be provided by PHWRs using indigenously supplied uranium with the bulk of the remainder provided by breeder reactors or pressurized water reactors using imported low-enriched uranium.

  8. Uranium partitioning under acidic conditions in a sandy soil aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.H. |; Serkiz, S.M.; Johnson, L.M.

    1995-07-01

    The partitioning of uranium in an aquifer down gradient of two large mixed waste sites was examined with respect to the solution and soil chemistry (e.g., pH redox potential and contaminant concentration) and aqueous-phase chemical speciation. This involved generation of field-derived, batch sorption, and reactive mineral surface sorption data. Field-derived distribution coefficients for uranium at these waste sites were found to vary between 0.40 and 15,000. Based on thermodynamic speciation modeling and a comparison of field and laboratory data, gibbsite is a potential reactive mineral surface present in modified soils at the sites. Uranium partitioning data are presented from field samples and laboratory studies of background soil and the mineral surface gibbsite. Mechanistic and empirical sorption models fit to the field-derived uranium partitioning data show an improvement of over two orders of magnitude, as measured by the normalized sum of errors squared, when compared with the single K{sub d} model used in previous risk work. Models fit to batch sorption data provided a better fit of sorbed uranium than do models fit to the field-derived data.

  9. Documentation and evaluation of slope instabilities and other geological phenomena in the Geopark Bohemian Paradise (Czech Republic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krejčí, Oldřich; Krejčí, Vladimíra; Švábenická, Lilian; Hartvich, Filip

    2016-04-01

    Geographically, the area is part of the Bohemian Cretaceous Basin, the unit Jičín Hilly land. Since October 2005, the area belongs to the European Geopark UNESCO Bohemian Paradise. The reason of the protection is a major complex of rocks, natural forest communities and geomorphological valuable territory. The territory has been newly geologically mapped in a scale of 1 : 25,000. Sediments of the Czech Cretaceous Basin covers an area of 181 km2 and were deposited transgressively on the Permian - Carboniferous and crystalline basement of the Bohemian Massif. Except for locally developed basal sediments of fluvial origin they are mostly shallow marine sediments. Middle Turonian to Lower Coniacian rocks of the Jizera lithofacies are dominant by calcareous sandstones deposited under extremely dynamic conditions. Scattered alkaline volcanics penetrate the older formations as small intrusions and form locally preserved bodies at the surface. Area is strongly predisposed to the development of various types of landforms by structural segmentation of the Cretaceous sandstones and claystones and by Plio-Pleistocene inverse erosion. Numerous archival manuscripts are available from this area together with published geological, engineering-geological, geomorphological and historical papers. This is due to the fact that in 1926 a large landslide destroyed a substantial part of the village Dneboh, situated on the slope below a rock castle Drabske Svetnicky. Drabske Svetnicky is a ruin of a 13th century castle. It is located on the ragged edge of a sandstone cliff high above surrounding landscape. The castle covers a group of seven sandstone rocks, connected with wooden bridges. In the 50ies of the 20th century, an increased attention was paid to Drabske Svetnicky by experts on medieval architecture and a restoration of the original state of the castle rock was accomplished. Remnants of pottery and other findings suggest that the plateau region of the castle was first inhabited

  10. Determination of uranium isotopes in environmental samples by anion exchange in sulfuric and hydrochloric acid media.

    PubMed

    Popov, L

    2016-09-01

    Method for determination of uranium isotopes in various environmental samples is presented. The major advantages of the method are the low cost of the analysis, high radiochemical yields and good decontamination factors from the matrix elements, natural and man-made radionuclides. The separation and purification of uranium is attained by adsorption with strong base anion exchange resin in sulfuric and hydrochloric acid media. Uranium is electrodeposited on a stainless steel disk and measured by alpha spectrometry. The analytical method has been applied for the determination of concentrations of uranium isotopes in mineral, spring and tap waters from Bulgaria. The analytical quality was checked by analyzing reference materials.

  11. Apache Trail uranium prospect, White Signal district, Grant County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bauer, Herman L.

    1951-01-01

    The Apache Trail uranium prospect in the White Signal district, Grant County. N. Mex., was mapped by the Geological Survey in May 1950. Pre-Cambrian granite is cut by a diabase dike and a parallel quartz-hematite vein, both of which strike easterly and dip 60 to 65 degrees north. Small quantities of copper carbonates and bismuth-gold ore have been mined. The quartz-hematite vein is moderately radioactive and, although no uranium minerals were seen, two samples contained about 0.01 percent uranium. The diabase dike locally contains torbernite. Two samples of diabase contained about 0.04 percent uranium.

  12. Depleted uranium management alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.

    1994-08-01

    This report evaluates two management alternatives for Department of Energy depleted uranium: continued storage as uranium hexafluoride, and conversion to uranium metal and fabrication to shielding for spent nuclear fuel containers. The results will be used to compare the costs with other alternatives, such as disposal. Cost estimates for the continued storage alternative are based on a life-cycle of 27 years through the year 2020. Cost estimates for the recycle alternative are based on existing conversion process costs and Capital costs for fabricating the containers. Additionally, the recycle alternative accounts for costs associated with intermediate product resale and secondary waste disposal for materials generated during the conversion process.

  13. Recovery of uranium values

    DOEpatents

    Brown, K. B.; Crouse, Jr., D. J.; Moore, J. G.

    1959-03-10

    A liquid-liquid extraction method is presented for recovering uranium values from an aqueous acidic solution by means of certain high molecular weight amine fn the amine classes of primary, secondary, heterocyclic secondary, tertiary, or heterocyclic tertiary. The uranium bearing aqueous acidic solution is contacted with the selected anine dissolved in a nonpolar waterimmiscible organfc solvent such as kerosene. The uranium which is substantially completely extracted by the organic phase may be stripped therefrom by water, and recovered from the aqueous phase by treatment into ammonia to precipitate ammonium diuranate.

  14. RECOVERY OF URANIUM VALUES

    DOEpatents

    Brown, K.B.; Crouse, D.J. Jr.; Moore, J.G.

    1959-03-10

    A liquid-liquid extraction method is presented for recovering uranium values from an aqueous acidic solution by means of certain high molecular weight amine in the amine classes of primary, secondary, heterocyclic secondary, tertiary, or heterocyclic tertiary. The uranium bearing aqueous acidic solution is contacted with the selected amine dissolved in a nonpolar water-immiscible organic solvent such as kerosene. The uranium which is substantially completely exiracted by the organic phase may be stripped therefrom by waters and recovered from the aqueous phase by treatment into ammonia to precipitate ammonium diuranate.

  15. Uranium in clays of crystalline rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, G.; Caruso, L.

    1985-03-10

    Uraniferous clay aggregates in several granites have been examined in detail with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with a high resolution backscattered electron detector (BSE) and an energy dispersive x-ray system (EDS). The same polished sections used for the microscope observations were irradiated with thermal neutrons and the etched lexan detectors were then used to determine the location of uranium with a spatial resolution of a few microns. A set of 100 samples of the following granites were used for this study: Carnmenellis granite of southwestern England, Conway and Mount Osceola granites of central New Hampshire, Sherman granite of Wyoming and Colorado, Granite Mountains granite of Wyoming, several granites from central Maine, and the Graniteville granite of Missouri. These samples contain clay rich regions as large as a few millimeters that appear to consist entirely of clay when examined with the petrographic microscope. The clays are smectite, nontronite, or vermiculite. The fission track detectors show uranium to be present within the regions. Close examination with the BSE and EDS, however, shows in every instance that the host for the uranium is not clay but clay-sized grains of the following minerals: bastnesite group, hematite, siderite, secondary monazite, secondary thorite, and several different Y-bearing niobates. This finding may have severe implications for the long-term retention of uranium and transuranic elements adsorbed on clay. Perhaps the presence of clay is not significant for the long-term retention of radioisotopes. 22 refs., 7 figs.

  16. The utilization of uranium industry technology and relevant chemistry to leach uranium from mixed-waste solids

    SciTech Connect

    Mattus, A.J.; Farr, L.L.

    1991-01-01

    Methods for the chemical extraction of uranium from a number of refractory uranium-containing minerals found in nature have been in place and employed by the uranium mining and milling industry for nearly half a century. These same methods, in conjunction with the principles of relevant uranium chemistry, have been employed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to chemically leach depleted uranium from mixed-waste sludge and soil. The removal of uranium from what is now classified as mixed waste may result in the reclassification of the waste as hazardous, which may then be delisted. The delisted waste might eventually be disposed of in commercial landfill sites. This paper generally discusses the application of chemical extractive methods to remove depleted uranium from a biodenitrification sludge and a storm sewer soil sediment from the Y-12 weapons plant in Oak Ridge. Some select data obtained from scoping leach tests on these materials are presented along with associated limitations and observations which might be useful to others performing such test work. 6 refs., 2 tabs.

  17. Re-Os and Lu-Hf isotopic constraints on the formation and age of mantle pyroxenites from the Bohemian Massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerman, Lukáš; Bizimis, Michael; Haluzová, Eva; Sláma, Jiří; Svojtka, Martin; Hirajima, Takao; Erban, Vojtěch

    2016-07-01

    We report on the Lu-Hf and Re-Os isotope systematics of a well-characterized suite of spinel and garnet pyroxenites from the Gföhl Unit of the Bohemian Massif (Czech Republic, Austria). Lu-Hf mineral isochrons of three pyroxenites yield undistinguishable values in the range of 336-338 Ma. Similarly, the slope of Re-Os regression for most samples yields an age of 327 ± 31 Ma. These values overlap previously reported Sm-Nd ages on pyroxenites, eclogites and associated peridotites from the Gföhl Unit, suggesting contemporaneous evolution of all these HT-HP rocks. The whole-rock Hf isotopic compositions are highly variable with initial εHf values ranging from - 6.4 to + 66. Most samples show a negative correlation between bulk rock Sm/Hf and εHf and, when taking into account other characteristics (e.g., high 87Sr/86Sr), this may be explained by the presence of recycled oceanic sediments in the source of the pyroxenite parental melts. A pyroxenite from Horní Kounice has decoupled Hf-Nd systematics with highly radiogenic initial εHf of + 66 for a given εNd of + 7.8. This decoupling is consistent with the presence of a melt derived from a depleted mantle component with high Lu/Hf. Finally, one sample from Bečváry plots close to the MORB field in Hf-Nd isotope space consistent with its previously proposed origin as metamorphosed oceanic gabbro. Some of the websterites and thin-layered pyroxenites have variable, but high Os concentrations paralleled by low initial γOs. This reflects the interaction of the parental pyroxenitic melts with a depleted peridotite wall rock. In turn, the radiogenic Os isotope compositions observed in most pyroxenite samples is best explained by mixing between unradiogenic Os derived from peridotites and a low-Os sedimentary precursor with highly radiogenic 187Os/188Os. Steep increase of 187Os/188Os at nearly uniform 187Re/188Os found in a few pyroxenites may be connected with the absence of primary sulfides, but the presence of minor

  18. Behavior of trace elements in quartz from plutons of different geochemical signature: A case study from the Bohemian Massif, Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breiter, Karel; Ackerman, Lukáš; Svojtka, Martin; Müller, Axel

    2013-08-01

    In this study, the trace-element content in igneous quartz from granitoids of different geochemical types was investigated using the laser ablation ICP-MS technique. The Variscan granitoids in the Bohemian Massif provide an excellent opportunity to study the chemical composition of magmatic quartz from the following granite types: (1) geochemically primitive I-type tonalites and granodiorites, (2) peraluminous S-type two-mica granites, (3) moderately fractionated A-type volcano-plutonic complexes of the Teplice caldera, and (4) highly fractionated S- and A-type rare-metal granites. This diversity of granitoids permitted the study of the chemical composition of magmatic quartz as the result of (i) different magma protoliths and (ii) variable degrees of differentiation. There were only small differences in the quartz trace-element contents, ranging from weakly to moderately differentiated plutons of all geochemical types: Al (mostly in the range between 20 and 250 ppm), Ti (mostly 20-110 ppm), B (< 13 ppm), Be (< 0.7 ppm), Ge (< 1 ppm), Li (< 30 ppm), and Rb (< 2 ppm). Only the S-type granites from western Erzgebirge contain Al-enriched quartz (mostly 200-400 ppm Al) since the beginning of its evolution. However, quartz from the highly fractionated granites (group 4) differs significantly: this quartz is generally poor in Ti (< 20 ppm Ti) and enriched in Al (up to 600 ppm in A-type, and up to 1000 ppm in S-type granites), Be (up to 3.2 ppm), Ge (up to 5.7 ppm), Li (up to 132 ppm, particularly in the S-type granites), and Rb (up to 15 ppm). The contents of the analyzed lithophile elements in the quartz from the highly fractionated granites are similar to the contents reported to be present in evolved complex pegmatites. Although the input of Ti into quartz is controlled mainly by the temperature and pressure of quartz crystallization, the entry of Al into quartz increases as a function of the water and fluorine content of the residual melt. The contents of Ge and Li

  19. Early Triassic change in the erosional level in the eastern part of the Bohemian Massif revealed by detrital garnet assemblages from the Buntsandstein siliciclastics of southern Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowal-Linka, Monika; Walczak, Klaudia

    2017-04-01

    Garnets, as constituents of various magmatic and metamorphic rocks, show different chemical compositions depending on the type of magma or primary rock, the temperature, and the pressure. This diversity of chemical compositions makes detrital garnets a very useful tool for provenance analysis and deciphering changes in erosional levels of source areas. Preliminary works reveal that the Lower and Middle Buntsandstein terrigenous and marine sandstones cropping out in southern Poland (50˚ 28'20"N, 18˚ 04'33"E and 50˚ 27'35"N, 18˚ 07'23"E) are characterized by very different heavy mineral assemblages (HMA) and types of detrital garnets. The aim of the research is to recognize the source areas and causes of these distinct variations using petrographic analysis, heavy mineral analysis, and electron probe microanalysis. During the Early Triassic, the area under study was located between two landmasses: the eastern margin of the Bohemian Massif (BM) to the west and Pre-Carpathian Land (PCL) to the east. Presently, the sampled area is situated ˜50 km from the NE margin of the BM, which consists of many garnet-bearing rocks and is a presumable source area for the examined grains. The PCL was hidden under the Carpathians during the Alpine orogeny and knowledge of its composition is very limited. Petrographic analysis shows that the older sandstones are red to rusty quartz arenites with a hematite-rich matrix and well-rounded grains (aeolian deposits). The younger sandstones are bicolored quartz wackes (dirty pink with grey patches) with a calcite matrix and angular to rounded grains (shallow marine deposits). The arenites contain zircon, tourmaline, and rutile grains accompanied by garnet, staurolite, apatite, and topaz. The opaque heavy minerals include ilmenite, ilmenite-rutile aggregates, magnetite and rarely chromian spinel. In contrast, the HMA from the wackes consist mostly of garnets, while the minerals listed above occur in subordinate amounts. The garnets from

  20. Psychosocial and health impacts of uranium mining and milling on Navajo lands.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Susan E; Madsen, Gary E

    2011-11-01

    The uranium industry in the American Southwest has had profoundly negative impacts on American Indian communities. Navajo workers experienced significant health problems, including lung cancer and nonmalignant respiratory diseases, and psychosocial problems, such as depression and anxiety. There were four uranium processing mills and approximately 1,200 uranium mines on the Navajo Nation's over 27,000 square miles. In this paper, a chronology is presented of how uranium mining and milling impacted the lives of Navajo workers and their families. Local community leaders organized meetings across the reservation to inform workers and their families about the relationship between worker exposures and possible health problems. A reservation-wide effort resulted in activists working with political leaders and attorneys to write radiation compensation legislation, which was passed in 1990 as the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act (RECA) and included underground uranium miners, atomic downwinders, and nuclear test-site workers. Later efforts resulted in the inclusion of surface miners, ore truck haulers, and millworkers in the RECA Amendments of 2000. On the Navajo Nation, the Office of Navajo Uranium Workers was created to assist workers and their families to apply for RECA funds. Present issues concerning the Navajo and other uranium-impacted groups include those who worked in mining and milling after 1971 and are excluded from RECA. Perceptions about uranium health impacts have contributed recently to the Navajo people rejecting a resumption of uranium mining and milling on Navajo lands.

  1. Spatial distribution of gamma radiation levels in surface soils from Jaduguda uranium mineralization zone, Jharkhand, India, using γ-ray spectrometry, and determination of outdoor dose to the population

    PubMed Central

    Maharana, Mandakini; Krishnan, Narayani; Sengupta, D.

    2010-01-01

    The concentrations of natural radionuclides in surface soil samples around selected villages of Jaduguda were investigated and compared with the radioactivity level in the region. Concentrations of 238U, 232Th, and 40K were determined by a gamma ray spectrometer using the HPGe detector with 50% relative efficiency, and the radiation dose to the local population was estimated. The average estimated activity concentrations of 238U, 232Th, and 40K in the surface soil were 53.8, 44.2 and 464.2 Bq kg−1 respectively. The average absorbed dose rate in the study area was estimated to be 72.5 nGy h-1, where as the annual effective dose to the population was 0.09 mSv y-1. A correlation analysis was made between measured dose rate and individual radionuclides, in order to delineate the contribution of the respective nuclides towards dose rate. The radio-elemental concentrations of uranium, thorium and potassium estimated for the soils, in the study area, indicated the enrichment of uranium series nuclide. The results of the present study were subsequently compared with international and national recommended values. PMID:21170189

  2. Occurrence of uranium in rocks of the intrusive complex at Ekiek Creek, western Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallace, Alan R.

    1979-01-01

    Uranium in the Ekiek Creek Complex of western Alaska is related to a niobium-rich pyrochlore in the nepheline syenite of the complex. The complex consists of an aegirine-phlogopite pyroxenite that has been intruded and partly replaced by nepheline syenite. The contact zone between the two igneous units varies from a sharp contact to a diffuse zone where the pyroxenite has been metasomatically replaced by the syenite. The entire complex was intruded into an older Cretaceous monzonite. The pyrochlore occurs as an accessory mineral in the syenite, and is visible in rocks containing over 50 ppm uranium. Chemical analyses indicate that, in all samples of syenite, there is a positive correlation between uranium and niobium; this suggests that the uranium-pyrochlore association persists even when pyrochlore is not readily visible in thin section. The small amount of pyrochlore, and its refractory nature, make the complex an unfavorable source for secondary uranium leaching or heavy-mineral concentration.

  3. Soil Collembola communities within Plešné Lake and Čertovo Lake catchments, the Bohemian Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čuchta, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The soil Collembola communities were studied for three years in disturbed spruce forest stands in the catchments areas of Čertovo and Plešné Lakes in the Bohemian Forest, Czech Republic. The study was focused on the impact of the windthrow, bark beetle outbreak damage and consecutive changes in the forest stands including soil environment. Four different treatments were selected for the study on both study areas: undamaged (control) forest stands, "dead" forest stands damaged by bark beetle, slightly managed windthrown forest stands left for the natural succession, and freshly harvested windthrown stands. After two years of research a total of 7,294 Collembola specimens were recorded belonging to 93 species. We recorded the highest collembolan abundance and species richness in the reference stands within catchments of both lakes, while both given parameters were considerably lower in harmed forest stands. To summarize, the disturbance led to a general decrease of Collembola communities.

  4. Cross-border radon index map 1:100 000 Lausitz - Jizera - Karkonosze - Region (northern part of the Bohemian Massif).

    PubMed

    Barnet, Ivan; Pacherová, Petra; Preusse, Werner; Stec, Bartosz

    2010-10-01

    The first cross-border map describing the radon (Rn) risk from bedrock was assembled in the northern part of the Bohemian Massif at a scale 1:100 000. The map covers the area of Lausitz (Germany), Karkonosze (Czech Republic and Poland) and Jizera (Czech Republic). The map is based on 818 measurements of soil gas Rn in rock types of Precambrian to Mesozoic age with variable geology. Geographic information system (GIS) processing enabled a good coincidence of soil gas Rn concentrations between data from all three countries in lithologically adjacent rock types as well as the direct correlation to georeferenced indoor Rn values, which was tested using the Czech indoor Rn data. The method of data processing can contribute to assembling the European Geogenic Radon Map.

  5. Two species of Selaginella cones and their spores from the Bohemian Carboniferous continental basins of the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Bek, J; Oplustil, S; Drábková, J

    2001-03-01

    Two species of Selaginella cones from the Bohemian Upper Carboniferous continental basins of the Bolsovian and Westphalian D age are described, together with their in situ spores. Two specimens of Selaginella gutbierii yielded microspores closely comparable with the dispersed species Cirratriradites saturnii and megaspores closely comparable with the dispersed species Triangulatisporites vermiculatus. Microspores closely comparable with the dispersed species Cirratriradites annulatus and megaspores resemble the dispersed species Triangulatisporites tertius were isolated from cones of Selaginella cf. leptostachys. All the spores isolated from one cone are of the same type and would be referred to one dispersed micro- and megaspore species if found as Sporae dispersae. The paper contains a review of all palynologically studied Carboniferous Selaginella and Selaginella-like cones and reviews of all in situ and dispersed Cirratriradites and Triangulatisporites spores.

  6. [The occurrence of O-antigens of Escheria coli strains in calves suffering from diarrhea in the Eastern Bohemian Region].

    PubMed

    Svastová, A

    1980-06-01

    Coli infections in calves belong to the most serious diseases occurring in the early post-natal period and causing considerable losses to large cattle stocks. The calves affected by diarrhoea were studied as to the serological typification of E. coli. The total number of the calves examined was 1182. The examination yielded 2112 isolated strains. Twelve antisera made it possible to identify 569 strains, i. e. 26.94 %. O-antigens were found to occur with the following descending frequency: 015, 0139, 0117, 0141, 08, 0149, 09, 0101, 02, 0147, 078, and 0115. Although it is obvious that enteropathogenic strains of E. coli were not responsible for all cases of diarrhoea in the examined calves, the total set of animals was large enough to show which O-antigens could be involved in the diarrhoea in the calves kept on large cattle farms in the East Bohemian region.

  7. Depleted Uranium: Technical Brief

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This technical brief provides accepted data and references to additional sources for radiological and chemical characteristics, health risks and references for both the monitoring and measurement, and applicable treatment techniques for depleted uranium.

  8. Uranium Location Database Compilation

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has compiled mine location information from federal, state, and Tribal agencies into a single database as part of its investigation into the potential environmental hazards of wastes from abandoned uranium mines in the western United States.

  9. PURIFICATION OF URANIUM FUELS

    DOEpatents

    Niedrach, L.W.; Glamm, A.C.

    1959-09-01

    An electrolytic process of refining or decontaminating uranium is presented. The impure uranium is made the anode of an electrolytic cell. The molten salt electrolyte of this cell comprises a uranium halide such as UF/sub 4/ or UCl/sub 3/ and an alkaline earth metal halide such as CaCl/sub 2/, BaF/sub 2/, or BaCl/sub 2/. The cathode of the cell is a metal such as Mn, Cr, Co, Fe, or Ni which forms a low melting eutectic with U. The cell is operated at a temperature below the melting point of U. In operation the electrodeposited uranium becomes alloyed with the metal of the cathode, and the low melting alloy thus formed drips from the cathode.

  10. URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Stevenson, J.W.; Werkema, R.G.

    1959-07-28

    The recovery of uranium from magnesium fluoride slag obtained as a by- product in the production of uranium metal by the bomb reduction prccess is presented. Generally the recovery is accomplished by finely grinding the slag, roasting ihe ground slag air, and leaching the roasted slag with a hot, aqueous solution containing an excess of the sodium bicarbonate stoichiometrically required to form soluble uranium carbonate complex. The roasting is preferably carried out at between 425 and 485 deg C for about three hours. The leaching is preferably done at 70 to 90 deg C and under pressure. After leaching and filtration the uranium may be recovered from the clear leach liquor by any desired method.

  11. 300 AREA URANIUM CONTAMINATION

    SciTech Connect

    BORGHESE JV

    2009-07-02

    {sm_bullet} Uranium fuel production {sm_bullet} Test reactor and separations experiments {sm_bullet} Animal and radiobiology experiments conducted at the. 331 Laboratory Complex {sm_bullet} .Deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning,. and demolition of 300 Area facilities

  12. Uranium purchases report 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-10

    Data reported by domestic nuclear utility companies in their responses to the 1991 through 1993 ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey,`` Form EIA-858, Schedule B,`` Uranium Marketing Activities,`` are provided in response to the requirements in the Energy Policy Act 1992. Appendix A contains an explanation of Form EIA-858 survey methodologies with emphasis on the processing of Schedule B data. Additional information published in this report not included in Uranium Purchases Report 1992, includes a new data table. Presented in Table 1 are US utility purchases of uranium and enrichment services by origin country. Also, this report contains additional purchase information covering average price and contract duration. Table 2 is an update of Table 1 and Table 3 is an update of Table 2 from the previous year`s report. The report contains a glossary of terms.

  13. Uranium concentrations in asparagus

    SciTech Connect

    Tiller, B.L.; Poston, T.M.

    1992-05-01

    Concentrations of uranium were determined in asparagus collected from eight locations near and ten locations on the Hanford Site southcentral Washington State. Only one location (Sagemoor) had samples with elevated concentrations. The presence of elevated uranium in asparagus at Sagemoor may be explained by the elevated levels in irrigation water. These levels of uranium are comparable to levels previously reported upstream and downstream of the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit on the Hanford Site (0.0008 {mu}g/g), but were below the 0.020-{mu}g/g level reported for brush collected at Sagemoor in a 1982 study. Concentrations at all other onsite and offsite sample locations were considerably lower than concentrations reported immediately upstream and downstream of the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit. Using an earlier analysis of the uranium concentrations in asparagus collected from the Hanford Site constitutes a very small fraction of the US Department of Energy effective dose equivalent limit of 100 mrem.

  14. Method for the recovery of uranium values from uranium tetrafluoride

    DOEpatents

    Kreuzmann, Alvin B.

    1983-01-01

    The invention is a novel method for the recovery of uranium from dry, particulate uranium tetrafluoride. In one aspect, the invention comprises reacting particulate uranium tetrafluoride and calcium oxide in the presence of gaseous oxygen to effect formation of the corresponding alkaline earth metal uranate and alkaline earth metal fluoride. The product uranate is highly soluble in various acidic solutions wherein the product fluoride is virtually insoluble therein. The product mixture of uranate and alkaline earth metal fluoride is contacted with a suitable acid to provide a uranium-containing solution, from which the uranium is recovered. The invention can achieve quantitative recovery of uranium in highly pure form.

  15. Method for the recovery of uranium values from uranium tetrafluoride

    DOEpatents

    Kreuzmann, A.B.

    1982-10-27

    The invention is a novel method for the recovery of uranium from dry, particulate uranium tetrafluoride. In one aspect, the invention comprises reacting particulate uranium tetrafluoride and calcium oxide in the presence of gaseous oxygen to effect formation of the corresponding alkaline earth metal uranate and alkaline earth metal fluoride. The product uranate is highly soluble in various acidic solutions whereas the product fluoride is virtually insoluble therein. The product mixture of uranate and alkaline earth metal fluoride is contacted with a suitable acid to provide a uranium-containing solution, from which the uranium is recovered. The invention can achieve quantitative recovery of uranium in highly pure form.

  16. ANODIC TREATMENT OF URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Kolodney, M.

    1959-02-01

    A method is presented for effecting eloctrolytic dissolution of a metallic uranium article at a uniform rate. The uranium is made the anode in an aqueous phosphoric acid solution containing nitrate ions furnished by either ammonium nitrate, lithium nitrate, sodium nitrate, or potassium nitrate. A stainless steel cathode is employed and electrolysls carried out at a current density of about 0.1 to 1 ampere per square inch.

  17. URANIUM SEPARATION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Lyon, W.L.

    1962-04-17

    A method of separating uranium oxides from PuO/sub 2/, ThO/sub 2/, and other actinide oxides is described. The oxide mixture is suspended in a fused salt melt and a chlorinating agent such as chlorine gas or phosgene is sparged through the suspension. Uranium oxides are selectively chlorinated and dissolve in the melt, which may then be filtered to remove the unchlorinated oxides of the other actinides. (AEC)

  18. Uranium purchases report 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    US utilities are required to report to the Secretary of Energy annually the country of origin and the seller of any uranium or enriched uranium purchased or imported into the US, as well as the country of origin and seller of any enrichment services purchased by the utility. This report compiles these data and also contains a glossary of terms and additional purchase information covering average price and contract duration. 3 tabs.

  19. Worldwide developments in uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Hoellen, E.E.

    1987-05-01

    World uranium production will continue to change in most major producing nations. Canadian production will increase and will be increasingly dominated by western producers as eastern Canadian high-cost production declines. Australian production will increase as major projects come into operation before 2000. US production will stabilize through the end of the century. South African production will be dependent upon the worldwide support for economic sanctions. China's entry into the world market injects yet another variable into the already cloudy supply picture. Many risks and uncertainties will face uranium producers through the 1980s. Recognizing that the uranium industry is not a fast-growing market, many existing and potential producers are seeking alternate investment courses, causing a restructuring of the world uranium production industry in ways not anticipated even a few years ago. During the restructuring process, world uranium production will most likely continue to exceed uranium consumption, resulting in a further buildup of world uranium inventories. Inventory sales will continue to redistribute this material. As inventory selling runs its course, users will turn to normal sources of supply, stimulating additional production to meet needs. Stimulation in the form of higher prices will be determined by how fast producers are willing and able to return to the market. Production costs are expected to have an increasing impact as it has become apparent that uranium resources are large in comparison to projected consumption. Conversely, security-of-supply issues have seemed to be of decreasing magnitude as Canada, Australia, and other non-US producers continue to meet delivery commitments.

  20. URANIUM EXTRACTION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Baldwin, W.H.; Higgins, C.E.

    1958-12-16

    A process is described for recovering uranium values from acidic aqueous solutions containing hexavalent uranium by contacting the solution with an organic solution comprised of a substantially water-immiscible organlc diluent and an organic phosphate to extract the uranlum values into the organic phase. Carbon tetrachloride and a petroleum hydrocarbon fraction, such as kerosene, are sultable diluents to be used in combination with organlc phosphates such as dibutyl butylphosphonate, trlbutyl phosphine oxide, and tributyl phosphate.

  1. Toxicity of Depleted Uranium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-02-01

    Exposure to Uranium Hexafluoride NUREG /CR- 5566, PNL-7328, Prepared for US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC, 1990. 27. Thun MJ, Baker DB... NUREG /CR-495 1, Prepared for US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC, 1987. 31. Morrow PE, Leach LJ, Smith FA, Goloin RM, Scott JB, Belter HD...of Uranium Hexafluoride, NUREG /CR- 2268, RH, Prepared for Division of Health Siting and Waste Management, Washington, DC, 1982. 32. Eidson AF, Damon

  2. Predictive modeling of uranium roll front deposits: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ortoleva, P.; Chadam, J.; Moore, C.

    1987-05-22

    Mathematical and computational tools were developed for assessing criteria for the formation of uranium roll front mineralization. As a by-product, the methods developed were applicable to a much wider class of problems including other water-rock interaction related ore bodies and the trapping and migration of petroleum.

  3. Soviet uranium supply capability

    SciTech Connect

    1990-02-01

    For many years, only limited information concerning uranium deposits in the USSR has been available from Soviet sources. The Soviet Union has, however, cooperated in some past efforts to promote interaction with the international scientific community. For example, in 1984 the Soviet Union hosted the 27th International Geological Congress (IGC). The uranium portion included 50 papers, primarily on uranium deposits in sandstone and metamorphic rocks, presented to about 300 members. The IGC sponsored almost 400 geology field trips, the most noteworthy of which was a five-day trip to the Krivoi Rog iron and uranium district in the south-central Ukraine, including visits to two open-pit iron mines and the underground Novaya uranium mine in Zholtye Vody. That conference was reported in detail on the October 1984 NUEXCO Monthly Report. Some other information that has been made available over the years is contained in the April 1985 Report discussion of uranium deposit classifications. Advanced processing technology, low-cost labor, by-product and co-product recovery, and the large existing production capacity enable MAEI to produce nuclear fuel at low cost. The Soviet Union`s reserve base, technological development, and production experience make it one of the world`s leading producers of nuclear fuel. As additional information is made available for publication, NUEXCO will present updated reports on the nuclear fuel cycle facilities in the Soviet Union.

  4. Analytical Electron Microscopy examination of uranium contamination at the DOE Fernald operation site

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Bates, J.K.; Cunnane, J.C.

    1993-02-01

    Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM) has been used to identify uranium-bearing phases present in contaminated soils from the DOE Fernald operation site. A combination of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with backscattered electron detection (SEM/BSE), and AEM was used in isolating and characterizing uranium-rich regions of the contaminated soils. Soil samples were prepared for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) by ultramicrotomy using an embedding resin previously employed for aquatic colloids and biological samples. This preparation method allowed direct comparison between SEM and TEM images. At the macroscopic level much of the uranium appears to be associated with clays in the soils; however, electron beam analysis revealed that the uranium is present as discrete phases, including iron oxides, silicates (soddyite), phosphates (autunites), and fluorite. Only low levels of uranium were actually within the clay minerals. The distribution of uranium phases was inhomogeneous at the submicron level.

  5. Evaluation of Water Use Efficiency of Short Rotation Poplar Coppice at Bohemian-Moravian Highlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlaváčová, Marcela; Fischer, Milan; Mani Tripathi, Abhishek; Orság, Matěj; Trnka, Miroslav

    2015-04-01

    The water availability of the locality constitutes one of the main constraint for short rotation coppices grown on arable land. As a convenient characteristic assessing how the water use is coupled with the biomass yields, so called water use efficiency (WUE) is proposed. One method of water use efficiency determination is presented within this study. The study was carried out at short rotation poplar coppice (poplar clone J-105) at the Test Station Domanínek, Ltd. at Bohemian-Moravian Highlands during the growing season 2013. Diameters at breast height (DBH) were measured for 16 sample trees where sap flow measuring systems (Granier's Thermal Dissipation Probe, TDP) were installed. TDP outputs are expressed as temperature differences (ΔT) between the heated and non-heated probes. Estimation of sap flux density (Fd) by the Granier method relies on the measurement of temperature difference (ΔT). Determination of maximum temperature difference (ΔTmax) is fundamental for sap flux density (Fd) calculation. Although ΔTmax can be theoretically defined as ΔT at Fd = 0, many factors may prevent the occurrence of the zero flow state, such as night-time water movement for new growth (vegetative or reproductive) or water loss from the canopy due to high vapour pressure deficit (VPD). Therefore, the VPD condition was established for determination of ΔTmax. VPD condition was established as follows: VPD reaching values 0.2 at least 6 hours during night (from 21 p. m. to 3 a. m. and when the condition was fullfilled, the value at 3 a. m. was taken) because it is a supposed time after that the tree has no transpiration. The programmable part of Mini 32 software (www.emsbrno.cz) was used for application of the script establishing ΔTmax values under this VPD condition. Nevertheless, another script was applied on ΔT data set to determination of ΔTmax values for every night at 3 a. m. (as this is when ΔT should be at its daily maximum) without VPD condition restriction for

  6. Petrographic-geochemical characteristics of granitoids and their epigenetic alteration products in paleovalley fields (Vitim uranium-ore site)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, E. S.; Domarenko, V. A.; Matveenko, I. A.

    2016-09-01

    The study describes the results of the mineral and element composition of granitoids in basement and weathering crust of Khiagdinsk ore field in Vitim uranium ore site. It has been stated that granitoids in basement consist of leucocratic biotite granite of subalkaline group. The major rock-forming, accessory (apatite, zircon, sphene (titanite), magnetite, monazite, xenotime), and uranium-bearing minerals have been determined. Weathering crust is composed of unlithified or weakly lithified sediments, among which sandy and sandy medium gravel deposits have been distinguished in terms of mineralogical and granulometric texture. High radioactivity of granitoids was revealed in thorium-uranium basement and natural uranium. The combination of the specified factors presupposes that granitoids of Vitim uranium ore site may be a source of uranium in the fields of the paleovalley type.

  7. Reconnaissance of uranium and copper deposits in parts of New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, Idaho, and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gott, Garland B.; Erickson, Ralph L.

    1952-01-01

    Because of the common association of uranium and copper in several of the commercial uranium deposits in the Colorado Plateau Province, a reconnaissance was made of several known deposits of copper disseminated through sandstone to determine whether they might be a source of uranium. In order to obtain more information regarding the relationship between copper, uranium and carbonaceous materials, some of the uraniferious asphaltrite deposits in the Shinarump conglomerate along the west flank of the San Rafael Swell were also investigated briefly. During this reconnaissance 18 deposits were examined in New Mexico, eight in Utah, two in Idaho, and one each in Wyoming and Colorado. No uranium deposits of commercial grade are associated with the copper deposits that were examined. The uraniferous asphaltites in the Shinarump conglomerate of Triassic age on the west flank of the San Rafael Swell, however, are promising from the standpoint of commercial uranium production. Spectrographic analyses of crude oil, asphalt, and bituminous shales show a rather consistent suite of trace metals including vanadium, nickel, copper, cobalt, chromium, lead zinc, and molybdenum. The similarity of the metal assemblage, including uranium of the San Rafael Swell asphaltites, to the metal assemblage in crude oil and other bituminous materials suggests that these metals were concentrated in the asphaltites from petroleum. However, the hypothesis that uranium minerals were already present before the hydrocarbons were introduced and that some sort of replacement or uranium minerals by carbon compounds was effected after the petroleum migrated into the uranium deposit should not be disregarded. The widespread association of uranium with asphaltic material suggests that it also may have been concentrated by some agency connected with the formation of petroleum. The problem of the association of uranium and other trace metals with hydrocarbons should be studied further both in the field and in

  8. Uranium occurrences on the Blue Jay Claim, White Signal District, Grant County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Granger, Harry C.; Bauer, Herman L.

    1951-01-01

    A discovery of secondary uranium minerals on the Blue Jay claim was reported in 1949 and the occurrence was examined by the authors in March 1950, The Blue Jay claim is about three-fourths of a mile south of White Signal, Grant County, N. Mex. in sees, 23 and 26, T. 20 3., R. 15 W. , New Mexico principal meridian. The Blue Jay claim is underlain by a pre-Cambrian granite mass that was intruded by numerous dikes ranging from rhyolite to basalt in composition. Abnormal radioactivity and secondary uranium minerals occur in altered rocks near oxidized quart z-pyrite veins. Forty-four samples ranged in grade from 0.001 to 0.11 percent uranium. The intermediate and basic rocks seem to have been the more favorable host rocks for the deposition of secondary uranium minerals, possibly because of their higher phosphate content.

  9. Uranium deposits in Grant County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Granger, Harry C.; Bauer, Herman L.; Lovering, Tom G.; Gillerman, Elliot

    1952-01-01

    The known uranium deposits of Grant county, N. Mex., are principally in the White Signal and Black Hawk districts. Both districts are within a northwesterly-trending belt of pre-Cambrian rocks, composed chiefly of granite with included gneisses, schists, and quartzites. Younger dikes and stocks intrude the pre-Cambrian complex. The White Signal district is on the southeast flanks of the Burro Mountains; the Black Hawk district is about 18 miles northwest of the town of White Signal. In the White Signal district the seconday uranium phosphates--autunite and torbernite--occur as fracture coatings and disseminations in oxidized parts of quartz-pyrite veins, and in the adjacent mafic dikes and granites; uraniferous limonite is common locally. Most of the known uraniferous deposits are less that 50 feet in their greatest dimension. The most promising deposits in the district are on the Merry Widow and Blue Jay claims. The richest sample taken from the Merry Widow mine contained more than 2 percent uranium and a sample from the Blue Jay property contained as much as 0.11 percent; samples from the other properties were of lower grade. In the Black Hawk district pitchblende is associated with nickel, silver, and cobalt minerals in fissure veins. The most promising properties in the Black Hawk district are the Black Hawk, Alhambra, and Rose mines. No uranium analyses from this district were available in 1951. There are no known minable reserves of uranium ore in either district, although there is some vein material at the Merry Widow mine of ore grade, if a market were available in the region.

  10. Process for electrolytically preparing uranium metal

    DOEpatents

    Haas, Paul A.

    1989-08-01

    A process for making uranium metal from uranium oxide by first fluorinating uranium oxide to form uranium tetrafluoride and next electrolytically reducing the uranium tetrafluoride with a carbon anode to form uranium metal and CF.sub.4. The CF.sub.4 is reused in the fluorination reaction rather than being disposed of as a hazardous waste.

  11. Process for electrolytically preparing uranium metal

    DOEpatents

    Haas, Paul A.

    1989-01-01

    A process for making uranium metal from uranium oxide by first fluorinating uranium oxide to form uranium tetrafluoride and next electrolytically reducing the uranium tetrafluoride with a carbon anode to form uranium metal and CF.sub.4. The CF.sub.4 is reused in the fluorination reaction rather than being disposed of as a hazardous waste.

  12. UHP-UHT peak conditions and near-adiabatic exhumation path of diamond-bearing garnet-clinopyroxene rocks from the Eger Crystalline Complex, North Bohemian Massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haifler, Jakub; Kotková, Jana

    2016-04-01

    Intermediate garnet-clinopyroxene rocks from the Eger Crystalline Complex, North Bohemian Massif, contain microdiamonds enclosed in garnet and zircon. The variable mineral assemblage of these rocks allows for an evaluation of the P-T evolution using numerous univariant equilibria and thermodynamic modelling, in addition to the ternary feldspar solvus, Ti-in-garnet, Zr-in-rutile and Ti-in-zircon thermometry. Zircon mantle domains with diamond inclusions contain 111-189 ppm Ti, reflecting temperatures of 1037-1117 °C. The peak pressure consistent with diamond stability corresponds to c. 4.5-5.0 GPa. Ti-in-garnet thermometry using the Ti content of diamond-bearing garnet core yielded temperatures of 993-1039 °C at c. 5.0 GPa. An omphacite inclusion in garnet (reflecting c. 2.3-2.4 GPa at c. 1050 °C) and metastably preserved kyanite represent relics of eclogite-facies conditions. The dominant high-pressure granulite-facies mineral assemblage of low-Ca garnet, diopsidic clinopyroxene, antiperthitic feldspar and quartz equilibrated at 1.8-2.1 GPa and c. 1050 °C, based on the XGrs isopleth of the garnet mantle, garnet-feldspar-kyanite-quartz univariant equilibria and ternary feldspar solvus. Our thermodynamic modelling shows that a steep decrease of XGrs from a maximum core value of 0.32 to 0.17 at the rim as well as a rimward XMg increase (from 0.42 to 0.50) are consistent with significant decompression without heating. The latter is related to omphacite and kyanite breakdown reactions producing garnet and plagioclase. The Ti content in the rim zone of zircon (13-42 ppm), exsolved plagioclase and K-feldspar associated with matrix diopside and garnet rim, and late biotite reflect temperatures of c. 830-900 °C at c. 1.4 GPa. A similar temperature is recorded by matrix rutile grains, containing 2028-4390 ppm Zr and representing a relatively homogeneous population in contrast to rutile enclosed in garnet with variable Zr content. Our results show that the garnet

  13. Minerals yearbook: Mineral industries of Africa. Volume 3. 1990 international review

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The 53 countries that constituted Africa in 1990 accounted for a significant portion of total world output of a number of mineral commodities. Among the most significant to be produced in Africa were andalusite, antimony, asbestos, bauxite, chromite, coal, cobalt, copper, diamond, fluorspar, gold, lithium minerals, manganese, phosphate, platinum-group metals, the titanium minerals--ilmenite and rutile, vanadium, vermiculite, uranium, and zircon. Several of these, chromite, cobalt, diamond, and manganese, were not produced in the United States.

  14. Influence of uranium hydride oxidation on uranium metal behaviour

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, N.; Hambley, D.; Clarke, S.A.; Simpson, K.

    2013-07-01

    This work addresses concerns that the rapid, exothermic oxidation of active uranium hydride in air could stimulate an exothermic reaction (burning) involving any adjacent uranium metal, so as to increase the potential hazard arising from a hydride reaction. The effect of the thermal reaction of active uranium hydride, especially in contact with uranium metal, does not increase in proportion with hydride mass, particularly when considering large quantities of hydride. Whether uranium metal continues to burn in the long term is a function of the uranium metal and its surroundings. The source of the initial heat input to the uranium, if sufficient to cause ignition, is not important. Sustained burning of uranium requires the rate of heat generation to be sufficient to offset the total rate of heat loss so as to maintain an elevated temperature. For dense uranium, this is very difficult to achieve in naturally occurring circumstances. Areas of the uranium surface can lose heat but not generate heat. Heat can be lost by conduction, through contact with other materials, and by convection and radiation, e.g. from areas where the uranium surface is covered with a layer of oxidised material, such as burned-out hydride or from fuel cladding. These rates of heat loss are highly significant in relation to the rate of heat generation by sustained oxidation of uranium in air. Finite volume modelling has been used to examine the behaviour of a magnesium-clad uranium metal fuel element within a bottle surrounded by other un-bottled fuel elements. In the event that the bottle is breached, suddenly, in air, it can be concluded that the bulk uranium metal oxidation reaction will not reach a self-sustaining level and the mass of uranium oxidised will likely to be small in relation to mass of uranium hydride oxidised. (authors)

  15. Hydrothermal Phase Relations Among Uranyl Minerals at the Nopal I Analog Site

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, William M.

    2007-07-01

    Uranyl mineral paragenesis at Nopal I is an analog of spent fuel alteration at Yucca Mountain. Petrographic studies suggest a variety of possible hydrothermal conditions for uranium mineralization at Nopal I. Calculated equilibrium phase relations among uranyl minerals show uranophane stability over a broad range of realistic conditions and indicate that uranyl mineral variety reflects persistent chemical potential heterogeneity. (author)

  16. Selective leaching of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils: Progress report 1

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, C.W.; Mattus, A.J.; Farr, L.L.; Elless, M.P.; Lee, S.Y.

    1993-02-01

    Three soils and a sediment contaminated with uranium were used to determine the effectiveness of sodium carbonate and citric acid leaching to decontaminated or remove uranium to acceptable regulatory levels. Two of the soils were surface soils from the DOE facility formerly called the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) at Fernald, Ohio. This facility is presently called the Femald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). Carbonate extractions generally removed from 70 to 90% of the uranium from the Fernald storage pad soil. Uranium was slightly more difficult to extract from the Fernald incinerator and the Y-12 landfarm soils. Very small amounts of uranium could be extracted from the storm sewer sediment. Extraction with carbonate at high solution-to-soil ratios were as effective as extractions at low solution-to-soil ratios, indicating attrition by the paddle mixer was not significantly different than that provided in a rotary extractor. Also, pretreatments such as milling or pulverizing the soil sample did not appear to increase extraction efficiency when carbonate extractions were carried out at elevated temperatures (60[degree]C) or long extraction times (23 h). Adding KMnO[sub 4] in the carbonate extraction appeared to increase extraction efficiency from the Fernald incinerator soil but not the Fernald storage pad soil. The most effective leaching rates (> 90 % from both Fernald soils) were obtained using a citrate/dithionite extraction procedure designed to remove amorphous (noncrystalline) iron/aluminum sesquioxides from surfaces of clay minerals. Citric acid also proved to be a very good extractant for uranium.

  17. Mineral resources of the Arrastra Mountain People Canyon wilderness study area, LaPaz, Mohave, and Yavapai Counties, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, F.; Miller, R.J.; Pitkin, J.A.; Bagby, W.C.; Hassemer, J.R.; McCarthy, J.H.; Hanna, W.F.; Conant Callas, M.L.; Lane, M.E.

    1989-01-01

    This area of western Arizona has identified mineral resources of manganese, uranium, and gold. This book discusses the potential for undiscovered mineral resources which is high for sediment-hosted manganese and uranium and is high and moderate for gold with minor silver in fault and shear zones. The mineral resource potential is moderate for silver, gold, lead, and zinc in vein, for tungsten, rare-earth elements, quartz, and feldspar in pegmatites, and for geothermal energy. Low mineral resource potential exists for copper, lead, and zinc in massive sulfide deposits, for additional uranium and for thorium, zeolite minerals, clay, gypsum, coal, and oil and gas.

  18. METHOD OF RECOVERING URANIUM COMPOUNDS

    DOEpatents

    Poirier, R.H.

    1957-10-29

    S>The recovery of uranium compounds which have been adsorbed on anion exchange resins is discussed. The uranium and thorium-containing residues from monazite processed by alkali hydroxide are separated from solution, and leached with an alkali metal carbonate solution, whereby the uranium and thorium hydrorides are dissolved. The carbonate solution is then passed over an anion exchange resin causing the uranium to be adsorbed while the thorium remains in solution. The uranium may be recovered by contacting the uranium-holding resin with an aqueous ammonium carbonate solution whereby the uranium values are eluted from the resin and then heating the eluate whereby carbon dioxide and ammonia are given off, the pH value of the solution is lowered, and the uranium is precipitated.

  19. State policies and requirements for management of uranium mining and milling in New Mexico. Volume IV. The supply of electric power and natural gas fuel as possible constraints on uranium production

    SciTech Connect

    Page, G.B.

    1980-04-01

    The report contained in this volume considers the availability of electric power to supply uranium mines and mills. The report, submited to Sandia Laboratories by the New Mexico Department of Energy and Minerals (EMD), is reproduced without modification. The state concludes that the supply of power, including natural gas-fueled production, will not constrain uranium production.

  20. Microbial reduction of uranium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Phillips, E.J.P.; Gorby, Y.A.; Landa, E.R.

    1991-01-01

    REDUCTION of the soluble, oxidized form of uranium, U(VI), to insoluble U(IV) is an important mechanism for the immobilization of uranium in aquatic sediments and for the formation of some uranium ores1-10. U(VI) reduction has generally been regarded as an abiological reaction in which sulphide, molecular hydrogen or organic compounds function as the reductant1,2,5,11. Microbial involvement in U(VI) reduction has been considered to be limited to indirect effects, such as microbial metabolism providing the reduced compounds for abiological U(VI) reduction and microbial cell walls providing a surface to stimulate abiological U(VI) reduction1,12,13. We report here, however, that dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can obtain energy for growth by electron transport to U(VI). This novel form of microbial metabolism can be much faster than commonly cited abiological mechanisms for U(VI) reduction. Not only do these findings expand the known potential terminal electron acceptors for microbial energy transduction, they offer a likely explanation for the deposition of uranium in aquatic sediments and aquifers, and suggest a method for biological remediation of environments contaminated with uranium.

  1. Uranium hexafluoride handling. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    The United States Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Field Office, and Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., are co-sponsoring this Second International Conference on Uranium Hexafluoride Handling. The conference is offered as a forum for the exchange of information and concepts regarding the technical and regulatory issues and the safety aspects which relate to the handling of uranium hexafluoride. Through the papers presented here, we attempt not only to share technological advances and lessons learned, but also to demonstrate that we are concerned about the health and safety of our workers and the public, and are good stewards of the environment in which we all work and live. These proceedings are a compilation of the work of many experts in that phase of world-wide industry which comprises the nuclear fuel cycle. Their experience spans the entire range over which uranium hexafluoride is involved in the fuel cycle, from the production of UF{sub 6} from the naturally-occurring oxide to its re-conversion to oxide for reactor fuels. The papers furnish insights into the chemical, physical, and nuclear properties of uranium hexafluoride as they influence its transport, storage, and the design and operation of plant-scale facilities for production, processing, and conversion to oxide. The papers demonstrate, in an industry often cited for its excellent safety record, continuing efforts to further improve safety in all areas of handling uranium hexafluoride. Selected papers were processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  2. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, R.D.

    1957-08-27

    A process for the production of uranium hexafluoride from the oxides of uranium is reported. In accordance with the method, the higher oxides of uranium may be reduced to uranium dioxide (UO/sub 2/), the latter converted into uranium tetrafluoride by reaction with hydrogen fluoride, and the UF/sub 4/ converted to UF/sub 6/ by reaction with a fluorinating agent, such as CoF/sub 3/. The UO/sub 3/ or U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ is placed in a reac tion chamber in a copper boat or tray enclosed in a copper oven, and heated to 500 to 650 deg C while hydrogen gas is passed through the oven. After nitrogen gas is used to sweep out the hydrogen and the water vapor formed, and while continuing to inaintain the temperature between 400 deg C and 600 deg C, anhydrous hydrogen fluoride is passed through. After completion of the conversion of UO/sub 2/ to UF/sub 4/ the temperature of the reaction chamber is lowered to about 400 deg C or less, the UF/sub 4/ is mixed with the requisite quantity of CoF/sub 3/, and after evacuating the chamber, the mixture is heated to 300 to 400 deg C, and the resulting UF/sub 6/ is led off and delivered to a condenser.

  3. Uranium deposits of Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    1991-09-01

    Brazil is a country of vast natural resources, including numerous uranium deposits. In support of the country`s nuclear power program, Brazil has developed the most active uranium industry in South America. Brazil has one operating reactor (Angra 1, a 626-MWe PWR), and two under construction. The country`s economic challenges have slowed the progress of its nuclear program. At present, the Pocos de Caldas district is the only active uranium production. In 1990, the Cercado open-pit mine produced approximately 45 metric tons (MT) U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (100 thousand pounds). Brazil`s state-owned uranium production and processing company, Uranio do Brasil, announced it has decided to begin shifting its production from the high-cost and nearly depleted deposits at Pocos de Caldas, to lower-cost reserves at Lagoa Real. Production at Lagoa Real is schedules to begin by 1993. In addition to these two districts, Brazil has many other known uranium deposits, and as a whole, it is estimated that Brazil has over 275,000 MT U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (600 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8}) in reserves.

  4. Cenozoic volcanism in the Bohemian Massif in the context of P- and S-velocity high-resolution teleseismic tomography of the upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plomerová, Jaroslava; Munzarová, Helena; Vecsey, Luděk.; Kissling, Eduard; Achauer, Ulrich; Babuška, Vladislav

    2016-08-01

    New high-resolution tomographic models of P- and S-wave isotropic-velocity perturbations for the Bohemian upper mantle are estimated from carefully preprocessed travel-time residuals of teleseismic P, PKP and S waves recorded during the BOHEMA passive seismic experiment. The new data resolve anomalies with scale lengths 30-50 km. The models address whether a small mantle plume in the western Bohemian Massif is responsible for this geodynamically active region in central Europe, as expressed in recurrent earthquake swarms. Velocity-perturbations of the P- and S-wave models show similar features, though their resolutions are different. No model resolves a narrow subvertical low-velocity anomaly, which would validate the "baby-plume" concept. The new tomographic inferences complement previous studies of the upper mantle beneath the Bohemian Massif, in a broader context of the European Cenozoic Rift System (ECRIS) and of other Variscan Massifs in Europe. The low-velocity perturbations beneath the Eger Rift, observed in about 200km-broad zone, agree with shear-velocity models from full-waveform inversion, which also did not identify a mantle plume beneath the ECRIS. Boundaries between mantle domains of three tectonic units that comprise the region, determined from studies of seismic anisotropy, represent weak zones in the otherwise rigid continental mantle lithosphere. In the past, such zones could have channeled upwelling of hot mantle material, which on its way could have modified the mantle domain boundaries and locally thinned the lithosphere.

  5. Efficiency of sepiolite in broilers diet as uranium adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Mitrović, Branislava M; Jovanović, Milijan; Lazarević-Macanović, Mirjana; Janaćković, Djordje; Krstić, Nikola; Stojanović, Mirjana; Mirilović, Milorad

    2015-05-01

    The use of phosphate mineral products in animal nutrition, as a major source of phosphor and calcium, can lead to uranium entering the food chain. The aim of the present study was to determine the protective effect of natural sepiolite and sepiolite treated with acid for broilers after oral intake of uranium. The broilers were contaminated for 7 days with 25 mg/uranyl nitrate per day. Two different adsorbents (natural sepiolite and sepiolite treated with acid) were given via gastric tube immediately after the oral administration of uranium. Natural sepiolite reduced uranium distribution by 57% in kidney, 80% in liver, 42% in brain, and 56% in muscle. A lower protective effect was observed after the administration of sepiolite treated with acid, resulting in significant damage of intestinal villi in the form of shortening, fragmentation, and necrosis, and histopathological lesions on kidney in the form of edema and abruption of epithelial cells in tubules. When broilers received only sepiolite treated with acid (no uranyl nitrate), shortening of intestinal villi occurred. Kidney injuries were evident when uranium concentrations in kidney were 0.88 and 1.25 µg/g dry weight. It is concluded that adding of natural sepiolite to the diets of broilers can reduce uranium distribution in organs by significant amount without adverse side effects.

  6. A Uranium Bioremediation Reactive Transport Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Yabusaki, Steven B.; Sengor, Sevinc; Fang, Yilin

    2015-06-01

    A reactive transport benchmark problem set has been developed based on in situ uranium bio-immobilization experiments that have been performed at a former uranium mill tailings site in Rifle, Colorado, USA. Acetate-amended groundwater stimulates indigenous microorganisms to catalyze the reduction of U(VI) to a sparingly soluble U(IV) mineral. The interplay between the flow, acetate loading periods and rates, microbially-mediated and geochemical reactions leads to dynamic behavior in metal- and sulfate-reducing bacteria, pH, alkalinity, and reactive mineral surfaces. The benchmark is based on an 8.5 m long one-dimensional model domain with constant saturated flow and uniform porosity. The 159-day simulation introduces acetate and bromide through the upgradient boundary in 14-day and 85-day pulses separated by a 10 day interruption. Acetate loading is tripled during the second pulse, which is followed by a 50 day recovery period. Terminal electron accepting processes for goethite, phyllosilicate Fe(III), U(VI), and sulfate are modeled using Monod-type rate laws. Major ion geochemistry modeled includes mineral reactions, as well as aqueous and surface complexation reactions for UO2++, Fe++, and H+. In addition to the dynamics imparted by the transport of the acetate pulses, U(VI) behavior involves the interplay between bioreduction, which is dependent on acetate availability, and speciation-controlled surface complexation, which is dependent on pH, alkalinity and available surface complexation sites. The general difficulty of this benchmark is the large number of reactions (74), multiple rate law formulations, a multisite uranium surface complexation model, and the strong interdependency and sensitivity of the reaction processes. Results are presented for three simulators: HYDROGEOCHEM, PHT3D, and PHREEQC.

  7. Magnesium reduction of uranium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, G.R.B.

    1985-08-13

    A method and apparatus are provided for reducing uranium oxide with magnesium to form uranium metal. The reduction is carried out in a molten-salt solution of density greater than 3.4 grams per cubic centimeter, thereby allowing the uranium product to sink and the magnesium oxide byproduct to float, consequently allowing separation of product and byproduct.

  8. Uranium immobilization and nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, C.J.; Ogard, A.E.

    1982-02-01

    Considerable information useful in nuclear waste storage can be gained by studying the conditions of uranium ore deposit formation. Further information can be gained by comparing the chemistry of uranium to nuclear fission products and other radionuclides of concern to nuclear waste disposal. Redox state appears to be the most important variable in controlling uranium solubility, especially at near neutral pH, which is characteristic of most ground water. This is probably also true of neptunium, plutonium, and technetium. Further, redox conditions that immobilize uranium should immobilize these elements. The mechanisms that have produced uranium ore bodies in the Earth's crust are somewhat less clear. At the temperatures of hydrothermal uranium deposits, equilibrium models are probably adequate, aqueous uranium (VI) being reduced and precipitated by interaction with ferrous-iron-bearing oxides and silicates. In lower temperature roll-type uranium deposits, overall equilibrium may not have been achieved. The involvement of sulfate-reducing bacteria in ore-body formation has been postulated, but is uncertain. Reduced sulfur species do, however, appear to be involved in much of the low temperature uranium precipitation. Assessment of the possibility of uranium transport in natural ground water is complicated because the system is generally not in overall equilibrium. For this reason, Eh measurements are of limited value. If a ground water is to be capable of reducing uranium, it must contain ions capable of reducing uranium both thermodynamically and kinetically. At present, the best candidates are reduced sulfur species.

  9. PROCESS OF PREPARING URANIUM CARBIDE

    DOEpatents

    Miller, W.E.; Stethers, H.L.; Johnson, T.R.

    1964-03-24

    A process of preparing uranium monocarbide is de scribed. Uranium metal is dissolved in cadmium, zinc, cadmium-- zinc, or magnesium-- zinc alloy and a small quantity of alkali metal is added. Addition of stoichiometric amounts of carbon at 500 to 820 deg C then precipitates uranium monocarbide. (AEC)

  10. Silver Plume Granite; possible source of uranium in sandstone uranium deposits, Tallahassee Creek and High Park areas, Fremont and Teller counties, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hills, F.A.; Dickinson, K.A.

    1982-01-01

    Anomalously high concentrations of thorium and of the light rare earth elements lanthanum and cerium suggest that the actinides and light lanthanides were enriched to an abnormal degree by the magmatic processes that formed the Proterozoic Y Silver Plume Granite in areas adjoining Tallahassee Creek and High Park. However, no such enrichment is found in the Proterozoic X Boulder Creek Granodiorite. Although uranium presently does not appear to be significantly enriched in sampled outcrops of Silver Plume Granite, a large part of the original uranium content of Silver Plume may have been removed by oxidizing ground waters, leaving behind mainly the uranium bound in resistate minerals such as zircon and monazite. Lead isotopic compositions of acid leachate from barren shale and sandstone associated with the Hansen uranium deposit (Tallahassee Creek area) indicate that (1) the predominant source of acid-soluble lead is 1410 m.y: old (Silver Plume age); (2) the source of the lead is characterized by Th/U around 1 (this ratio in the source may apply to soluble minerals only and may exclude thorium and uranium in resistate minerals), and the mean uranium content of this source may be as high as 30 ppm; and (3) at the time of sediment deposition, a paleohydrologic system existed that was capable of transporting Silver Plume lead and, therefore, Silver Plume uranium to the Hansen deposit. Although a significant contribution of uranium from Tertiary volcanic rocks cannot be ruled out and is even probable (Dickinson and Hills, 1982), it appears probable that some of the uranium in deposits of the Tallahassee Creek area was derived from Silver Plume Granite.

  11. In Situ Biostimulation at a Former Uranium Mill Tailings Site: Multicomponent Biogeochemical Reactive Transport Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabusaki, S.; Fang, Y.; Long, P.

    2005-12-01

    In situ biostimulation at a Former Uranium Mill Tailings Site: Multicomponent Biogeochemical Reactive Transport Modeling Field experiments conducted at a former uranium mill tailings site in western Colorado are being used to investigate microbially mediated immobilization of uranium as a potential future remediation option for such sites. While the general principle of biostimulating microbial communities to reduce aqueous hexavalent uranium to immobile uraninite has been demonstrated in the laboratory and field, the ability to predictably engineer long lasting immobilization will require a more complete understanding of field-scale processes and properties. For this study, numerical simulation of the flow field, geochemical conditions, and micriobial communities is used to interpret field-scale biogeochemical reactive transport observed during experiments performed in 2002 to 2004. One key issue is identifying bioavailable Fe(III) oxide, which is the principal electron acceptor utilized by the acetate- oxidizing Geobacter sp. These organisms are responsible for uranium bioreduction that results in the removal of sufficient U(VI) to lower uranium groundwater concentrations to at or near applicable standards. The depletion of bioavailable Fe(III) leads to succession by sulfate reducers that are considerably less effective at uranium bioreduction. An important modeling consideration are the abiotic reactions (e.g., mineral precipitation and dissolution, aqueous and surface complexation) involving the Fe(II) and sulfide produced during biostimulation. These components, strongly associated with the solid phases, may play an important role in the evolving reactivity of the mineral surfaces that are likely to impact long-term uranium immobilization.

  12. Uranium series disequilibrium studies in Chenchu colony area, Guntur district, Andhra Pradesh, India.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, H B; Koteswara Rao, V; Singh, R V; Rahman, M; Rout, G B; Banerjee, Rahul; Pandey, B K; Verma, M B

    2015-11-01

    An attempt is made to understand uranium series disequilibrium in unconformity proximal related uranium mineralisation in Chenchu colony area, Guntur district, Andhra Pradesh, India. The uranium mineralization in Chenchu colony is the western continuity of the Koppunuru uranium deposit and predominantly hosted by gritty quartzite/conglomerate, which occasionally transgresses to underlying basement granite/basic rock. Disequilibrium studies are based on borehole core samples (35 boreholes, No. of samples=634) broadly divided in two groups of cover rocks of Banganapalle formation (above unconformity) and basement granites (below unconformity). Linear regression coefficient between uranium and radium is 0.95, which reflects excellent correlation and significant enrichment of parent uranium. Disequilibrium studies have indicated predominant disequilibrium in favour of parent uranium (35%), which is probably due to the weathering process causing migration of some of the radionuclides while dissolution of minerals due to groundwater action might have also played a significant role. Further, escape of radon might have accentuated the disequilibrium factor resulting in an increase in the grade of the mineralization. This is well corroborated by the presence of fractures and faults in the study area providing channels for radon migration/escape. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. PROCESS FOR RECOVERING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    MacWood, G.E.; Wilder, C.D.; Altman, D.

    1959-03-24

    A process is described for recovering uranium from deposits on stainless steel liner surfaces of calutrons. The deposit is removed from the stainless steel surface by washing with aqueous nitric acid. The solution obtained containing uranium, chromium, nickels copper, and iron is treated with excess of ammonium hydroxide to precipitatc the uranium, irons and chromium and convert thc nickel and copper to soluble ammonia complexions. The precipitated material is removed, dried, and treated with carbon tetrachloride at an elevated temperature of about 500 to 600 deg C to form a vapor mixture of UCl/sub 4/, UCl/sub 5/, FeCl/ sub 3/, and CrCl/sub 4/. The UCl/sub 4/ is separated from this vapor mixture by selective fractional condensation at a temprrature of about 300 to400 deg C.

  14. Process for recovering uranium

    DOEpatents

    MacWood, G. E.; Wilder, C. D.; Altman, D.

    1959-03-24

    A process useful in recovering uranium from deposits on stainless steel liner surfaces of calutrons is presented. The deposit is removed from the stainless steel surface by washing with aqueous nitric acid. The solution obtained containing uranium, chromium, nickel, copper, and iron is treated with an excess of ammonium hydroxide to precipitnte the uranium, iron, and chromium and convert the nickel and copper to soluble ammonio complexions. The precipitated material is removed, dried and treated with carbon tetrachloride at an elevated temperature of about 500 to 600 deg C to form a vapor mixture of UCl/ sub 4/, UCl/sub 5/, FeCl/sub 3/, and CrCl/sub 4/. The UCl/sub 4/ is separated from this vapor mixture by selective fractional condensation at a temperature of about 500 to 400 deg C.

  15. EXTRACTION OF URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Kesler, R.D.; Rabb, D.D.

    1959-07-28

    An improved process is presented for recovering uranium from a carnotite ore. In the improved process U/sub 2/O/sub 5/ is added to the comminuted ore along with the usual amount of NaCl prior to roasting. The amount of U/sub 2/O/ sub 5/ is dependent on the amount of free calcium oxide and the uranium in the ore. Specifically, the desirable amount of U/sub 2/O/sub 5/ is 3.2% for each 1% of CaO, and 5 to 6% for each 1% of uranium. The mixture is roasted at about 1560 deg C for about 30 min and then leached with a 3 to 9% aqueous solution of sodium carbonate.

  16. Systematic evaluation of satellite remote sensing for identifying uranium mines and mills.

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, Dianna Sue; Stork, Christopher Lyle; Smartt, Heidi Anne; Smith, Jody Lynn

    2006-01-01

    In this report, we systematically evaluate the ability of current-generation, satellite-based spectroscopic sensors to distinguish uranium mines and mills from other mineral mining and milling operations. We perform this systematic evaluation by (1) outlining the remote, spectroscopic signal generation process, (2) documenting the capabilities of current commercial satellite systems, (3) systematically comparing the uranium mining and milling process to other mineral mining and milling operations, and (4) identifying the most promising observables associated with uranium mining and milling that can be identified using satellite remote sensing. The Ranger uranium mine and mill in Australia serves as a case study where we apply and test the techniques developed in this systematic analysis. Based on literature research of mineral mining and milling practices, we develop a decision tree which utilizes the information contained in one or more observables to determine whether uranium is possibly being mined and/or milled at a given site. Promising observables associated with uranium mining and milling at the Ranger site included in the decision tree are uranium ore, sulfur, the uranium pregnant leach liquor, ammonia, and uranyl compounds and sulfate ion disposed of in the tailings pond. Based on the size, concentration, and spectral characteristics of these promising observables, we then determine whether these observables can be identified using current commercial satellite systems, namely Hyperion, ASTER, and Quickbird. We conclude that the only promising observables at Ranger that can be uniquely identified using a current commercial satellite system (notably Hyperion) are magnesium chlorite in the open pit mine and the sulfur stockpile. Based on the identified magnesium chlorite and sulfur observables, the decision tree narrows the possible mineral candidates at Ranger to uranium, copper, zinc, manganese, vanadium, the rare earths, and phosphorus, all of which are

  17. Solubility characterization of airborne uranium from a uranium recycling plant.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Robert; Cole, Leslie

    2004-07-01

    Solubility profiles of uranium dusts in a uranium recycling plant were determined by performing in vitro solubility tests on breathing zone air samples conducted in all process areas of the processing plant. The recycling plant produces high density shields, closed end tubes that are punched and formed from uranium sheet metal, and high-fired uranium oxide, which is used as a catalyst. The recycled uranium is cut and melted in a vacuum furnace, and part of the molten uranium is poured into molds for further processing. Air samples were taken in process areas under normal working conditions. The dissolution rate of the uranium in a simulant solution of extracellular airway lining fluid (Gamble's solution) was then determined over the next 28 d. Airborne uranium in the oxide section of the plant was found to be highly insoluble with 99% of the uranium having a dissolution half time in excess of 100 d. The solubility of the airborne uranium in other areas of the facility was only slightly more soluble with over 90% of the airborne uranium having dissolution half times in excess of 90 d.

  18. Paragenesis and Geochronology of the Nopal I Uranium Deposit, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    M. Fayek; M. Ren

    2007-02-14

    Uranium deposits can, by analogy, provide important information on the long-term performance of radioactive waste forms and radioactive waste repositories. Their complex mineralogy and variable elemental and isotopic compositions can provide important information, provided that analyses are obtained on the scale of several micrometers. Here, we present a structural model of the Nopal I deposit as well as petrography at the nanoscale coupled with preliminary U-Th-Pb ages and O isotopic compositions of uranium-rich minerals obtained by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). This multi-technique approach promises to provide ''natural system'' data on the corrosion rate of uraninite, the natural analogue of spent nuclear fuel.

  19. Summary of reconnaissance for uranium in Alaska, 1955

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matzko, John J.; Freeman, Val L.

    1957-01-01

    Reconnaissance for uranium in Alaska during 1955 included airborne radiometric traverses, examination of radioactivity anomalies found during the airborne traverses, examination of prospector leads, and examination of areas that seems geologically favorable for the occurrence of uranium. The airborne radiometric traverses in central Alaska revealed 33 anomalies considered worth examining. The ground examinations of a few of these anomalies indicated that they were due to radiation of from accessory minerals in intrusive granitic rocks. The examination of prospector leads revealed several radioactivity anomalies of interest and one, near Bokan Mountain on prince of Wales Island, of possible commercial importance.

  20. PROCESS OF RECOVERING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Price, T.D.; Jeung, N.M.

    1958-06-17

    An improved precipitation method is described for the recovery of uranium from aqueous solutions. After removal of all but small amounts of Ni or Cu, and after complexing any iron present, the uranium is separated as the peroxide by adding H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. The improvement lies in the fact that the addition of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and consequent precipitation are carried out at a temperature below the freezing; point of the solution, so that minute crystals of solvent are present as seed crystals for the precipitation.

  1. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM TUBING

    DOEpatents

    Creutz, E.C.

    1958-04-15

    The manufacture of thin-walled uranium tubing by the hot-piercing techique is described. Uranium billets are preheated to a temperature above 780 d C. The heated billet is fed to a station where it is engaged on its external surface by three convex-surfaced rotating rollers which are set at an angle to the axis of the billet to produce a surface friction force in one direction to force the billet over a piercing mandrel. While being formed around the mandrel and before losing the desired shape, the tube thus formed is cooled by a water spray.

  2. Corrosion-resistant uranium

    DOEpatents

    Hovis, Jr., Victor M.; Pullen, William C.; Kollie, Thomas G.; Bell, Richard T.

    1983-01-01

    The present invention is directed to the protecting of uranium and uranium alloy articles from corrosion by providing the surfaces of the articles with a layer of an ion-plated metal selected from aluminum and zinc to a thickness of at least 60 microinches and then converting at least the outer surface of the ion-plated layer of aluminum or zinc to aluminum chromate or zinc chromate. This conversion of the aluminum or zinc to the chromate form considerably enhances the corrosion resistance of the ion plating so as to effectively protect the coated article from corrosion.

  3. TREATMENT OF URANIUM SURFACES

    DOEpatents

    Slunder, C.J.

    1959-02-01

    An improved process is presented for prcparation of uranium surfaces prior to electroplating. The surfacc of the uranium to be electroplated is anodized in a bath comprising a solution of approximately 20 to 602 by weight of phosphoric acid which contains about 20 cc per liter of concentrated hydrochloric acid. Anodization is carried out for approximately 20 minutes at a current density of about 0.5 amperes per square inch at a temperature of about 35 to 45 C. The oxidic film produced by anodization is removed by dipping in strong nitric acid, followed by rinsing with water just prior to electroplating.

  4. Recovery of Uranium Fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, H. R.; McElrue, D. H.; Winter, R. E.

    2002-07-01

    We describe a theory for calculating the penetration of fragments into foam. Comparisons with regular projectiles show that the drag term is similar in value to the analogous term in aerodynamics. This, plus the simple model used to describe porosity, enables the theory to be used in predicting the levels of stress present when uranium fragments are arrested in foam catchers. Consequently the theory can be used to assist in the design of catchers which will not distort uranium fragments travelling at 1-3 km/s. The theory is tested against experiments using some current designs.

  5. Corrosion-resistant uranium

    DOEpatents

    Hovis, V.M. Jr.; Pullen, W.C.; Kollie, T.G.; Bell, R.T.

    1981-10-21

    The present invention is directed to the protecting of uranium and uranium alloy articles from corrosion by providing the surfaces of the articles with a layer of an ion-plated metal selected from aluminum and zinc to a thickness of at least 60 microinches and then converting at least the outer surface of the ion-plated layer of aluminum or zinc to aluminum chromate or zinc chromate. This conversion of the aluminum or zinc to the chromate form considerably enhances the corrosion resistance of the ion plating so as to effectively protect the coated article from corrosion.

  6. PREPARATION OF URANIUM TRIOXIDE

    DOEpatents

    Buckingham, J.S.

    1959-09-01

    The production of uranium trioxide from aqueous solutions of uranyl nitrate is discussed. The uranium trioxide is produced by adding sulfur or a sulfur-containing compound, such as thiourea, sulfamic acid, sulfuric acid, and ammonium sulfate, to the uranyl solution in an amount of about 0.5% by weight of the uranyl nitrate hexahydrate, evaporating the solution to dryness, and calcining the dry residue. The trioxide obtained by this method furnished a dioxide with a considerably higher reactivity with hydrogen fluoride than a trioxide prepared without the sulfur additive.

  7. Germylmercury complex of uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Bochkarev, M.N.; Bochkarev, L.N.; Kalinina, G.S.; Razuvaev, G.A.; Sevast'yanov, V.G.

    1983-09-01

    The authors have established that metallic uranium reacts with ((C/sub 6/F/sub 5/)/sub 3/Ge)/sub 3/Hg at about 20/sup 0/C in a medium of 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME). The reaction was complete after 3 h by the separation of metallic mercury (100 %) and by the formation of the heptakis (tris(pentafluoro-phenyl)germyl) dimercurate of uranium (((C/sub 6/F/sub 5/)/sub 3/Ge)/sub 7/Hg/sub 2/)U3DME (i), 81%. 1 reference.

  8. METHOD OF ELECTROPOLISHING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Walker, D.E.; Noland, R.A.

    1959-07-14

    A method of electropolishing the surface of uranium articles is presented. The process of this invention is carried out by immersing the uranium anticle into an electrolyte which contains from 35 to 65% by volume sulfuric acid, 1 to 20% by volume glycerine and 25 to 50% by volume of water. The article is made the anode in the cell and polished by electrolyzing at a voltage of from 10 to 15 volts. Discontinuing the electrolysis by intermittently withdrawing the anode from the electrolyte and removing any polarized film formed therein results in an especially bright surface.

  9. A literature review of interaction of oxidized uranium species and uranium complexes with soluble organic matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jennings, Joan K.; Leventhal, J.S.

    1978-01-01

    Organic material is commonly found associated with uranium ores in sandstone-type deposits. This review of the literature summarizes the classes and separations of naturally occurring organic material but the emphasis is on soluble organic species. The main class of materials of interest is humic substances which are high-molecular-weight complex molecules that are soluble in alkaline solution. These humic substances are able to solubilize (make soluble) minerals and also to complex [by ion exchange and (or) chelation] many cations. The natural process of soil formation results in both mineral decomposition and element complexing by organic species. Uranium in solution, such as ground water, can form many species with other elements or complexes present depending on Eh and pH. In natural systems (oxidizing Eh, pH 5-9) the uranium is usually present as a complex with hydroxide or carbonate. Thermodynamic data for these species are presented. Interacting metals and organic materials have been observed in nature and studied in the laboratory by many workers in diverse scientific disciplines. The results are not easily compared. Measurements of the degree of complexation are reported as equilibrium stability constant determinations. This type of research has been done for Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb, Ni, Co, Mg, Ca, Al, and to a limited degree for U. The use of Conditional Stability Constants has given quantitative results in some cases. The methods utilized in experiments and calculations are reviewed.

  10. Uranium immobilization by sulfate-reducing biofilms grown on hematite, dolomite, and calcite.

    SciTech Connect

    Marsili, E.; Beyenal, Haluk; Di Palma, L.; Merli, C.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Amonette, James E.; Lewandowski, Zbigniew

    2007-12-15

    Biofilms of sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20 wereused to reduce dissolved U(VI)and subsequently immobilize U(IV) in the presence of uranium-complexing carbonates. The biofilms were grown in three identically operated fixed bed reactors, filled with three types of minerals: one noncarbonate-bearing mineral(hematite) and two carbonate-bearing minerals (calcite and dolomite). The source of carbonates in the reactors filled with calcite and dolomite were the minerals, while in the reactor filled with hematite it was a 10 mM carbonate buffer, pH 7.2, which we added to the growth medium. Our five-month study demonstrated that the sulfate-reducing biofilms grown in all reactors were able to immobilize/reduce uranium efficiently, despite the presence of uranium-complexing carbonates.

  11. Uranium immobilization by sulfate-reducing biofilms grown on hematite, dolomite, and calcite.

    PubMed

    Marsili, Enrico; Beyenal, Haluk; Di Palma, Luca; Merli, Carlo; Dohnalkova, Alice; Amonette, James E; Lewandowski, Zbigniew

    2007-12-15

    Biofilms of sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20 were used to reduce dissolved U(VI) and subsequently immobilize U(IV) in the presence of uranium-complexing carbonates. The biofilms were grown in three identically operated fixed bed reactors, filled with three types of minerals: one noncarbonate-bearing mineral (hematite) and two carbonate-bearing minerals (calcite and dolomite). The source of carbonates in the reactors filled with calcite and dolomite were the minerals, while in the reactor filled with hematite it was a 10 mM carbonate buffer, pH 7.2, which we added to the growth medium. Our five-month study demonstrated that the sulfate-reducing biofilms grown in all reactors were able to immobilize/reduce uranium efficiently, despite the presence of uranium-complexing carbonates.

  12. Physicochemical and mineralogical characterization of uranium-contaminated soils from the Fernald Integrated Demonstration Site

    SciTech Connect

    Elless, M.P.; Lee, S.Y.; Timpson, M.E.

    1994-09-01

    An integrated approach that utilizes various characterization technologies has been developed for the Uranium Soil Integrated Demonstration program. The Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation site near Cincinnati, Ohio, was selected as the host facility for this demonstration. Characterization of background, untreated contaminated, and treated contaminated soils was performed to assess the contamination and the effect of treatment efforts to remove uranium from these soils. Carbonate minerals were present in the contaminated soils (added for erosion control) but were absent in the nearby background soils. Because of the importance of the carbonate anion to uranium solubility, the occurrence of carbonate minerals in these soils will be an important factor in the development of a successful remediation technology. Uranium partitioning data among several particle-size fractions indicate that conventional soil washing will be ineffective for remediation of these soils and that chemical extraction will be necessary to lower the uranium concentration to the target level (52 mg/kg). Carbonate-based (sodium carbonate/bicarbonate) and acid-based (sulfuric and citric acids) lixiviants were employed for the selective removal of uranium from these soils. Characterization results have identified uranium phosphate minerals as the predominant uranium mineral form in both the untreated and treated soils. The low solubility associated with phosphate minerals is primarily responsible for their occurrence in the posttreated soils. Artificial weathering of the treated soils caused by the treatments, particularly acid-based lixiviants, was documented by their detrimental effects on several physicochemical characteristics of these soils (e.g., soil pH, particle-size distribution, and mineralogy).

  13. RECOVERY OF URANIUM FROM PITCHBLENDE

    DOEpatents

    Ruehle, A.E.

    1958-06-24

    The decontamination of uranium from molybdenum is described. When acid solutions containing uranyl nitrate are contacted with ether for the purpose of extracting the uranium values, complex molybdenum compounds are coextracted with the uranium and also again back-extracted from the ether with the uranium. This invention provides a process for extracting uranium in which coextraction of molybdenum is avoided. It has been found that polyhydric alcohols form complexes with molybdenum which are preferentially water-soluble are taken up by the ether extractant to only a very minor degree. The preferred embodiment of the process uses mannitol, sorbitol or a mixture of the two as the complexing agent.

  14. High loading uranium fuel plate

    DOEpatents

    Wiencek, Thomas C.; Domagala, Robert F.; Thresh, Henry R.

    1990-01-01

    Two embodiments of a high uranium fuel plate are disclosed which contain a meat comprising structured uranium compound confined between a pair of diffusion bonded ductile metal cladding plates uniformly covering the meat, the meat having a uniform high fuel loading comprising a content of uranium compound greater than about 45 Vol. % at a porosity not greater than about 10 Vol. %. In a first embodiment, the meat is a plurality of parallel wires of uranium compound. In a second embodiment, the meat is a dispersion compact containing uranium compound. The fuel plates are fabricated by a hot isostatic pressing process.

  15. STRIPPING OF URANIUM FROM ORGANIC EXTRACTANTS

    DOEpatents

    Crouse, D.J. Jr.

    1962-09-01

    A liquid-liquid extraction method is given for recovering uranium values from uranium-containing solutions. Uranium is removed from a uranium-containing organic solution by contacting said organic solution with an aqueous ammonium carbonate solution substantially saturated in uranium values. A uranium- containing precipitate is thereby formed which is separated from the organic and aqueous phases. Uranium values are recovered from this separated precipitate. (AE C)

  16. Palaeomagnetism and geochemistry of Early Palaeozoic rocks of the Barrandian (Teplé-Barrandian Unit, Bohemian Massif): palaeotectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patočka, F.; Pruner, P.; Štorch, P.

    The Barrandian area (the Teplá-Barrandian unit, Bohemian Massif) provided palaeomagnetic results on Early Palaeozoic rocks and chemical data on siliciclastic sediments of both Middle Cambrian and Early Ordovician to Middle Devonian sedimentary sequences; an outcoming interpretation defined source areas of clastic material and palaeotectonic settings of the siliciclastic rock deposition. The siliciclastic rocks of the earliest Palaeozoic sedimentation cycle, deposited in the Cambrian Přı´bram-Jince Basin of the Barrandian, were derived from an early Cadomian volcanic island arc developed on Neoproterozoic oceanic lithosphere and accreted to a Cadomian active margin of northwestern Gondwana. Inversion of relief terminated the Cambrian sedimentation, and a successory Prague Basin subsided nearby since Tremadocian. Source area of the Ordovician and Early Silurian shallow-marine siliciclastic sediments corresponded to progressively dissected crust of continental arc/active continental margin type of Cadomian age. Since Late Ordovician onwards both synsedimentary within-plate basic volcanics and older sediments had been contributing in recognizable proportions to the siliciclastic rocks. The siliciclastic sedimentation was replaced by deposition of carbonate rocks throughout late Early Silurian to Early Devonian period of withdrawal of the Cadomian clastic material source. Above the carbonates an early Givetian flysch-like siliciclastic suite completed sedimentation in the Barrandian. In times between Middle Cambrian and Early/Middle Devonian boundary interval an extensional tectonic setting prevailed in the Teplá-Barrandian unit. The extensional regime was related to Early Palaeozoic large-scale fragmentation of the Cadomian belt of northwestern Gondwana and origin of Armorican microcontinent assemblage. The Teplá-Barrandian unit was also engaged in a peri-equatorially oriented drift of Armorican microcontinent assemblage throughout the Early Palaeozoic

  17. Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic dynamics of the Bohemian Massif inferred from the paleostress history of the Lusatian Fault Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coubal, Miroslav; Málek, Jiří; Adamovič, Jiří; Štěpančíková, Petra

    2015-07-01

    An analysis of fault-slip data from the Lusatian Fault Belt, limiting the Lusatian Block of the Bohemian Massif in the SW, yielded parameters of eight successive paleostress patterns, Late Cretaceous to Plio-Pleistocene in age. These patterns were linked with specific stages in fault kinematics and fault-belt deformation. They include (1) α1, NE- to NNE-directed compression in a reverse fault regime (σ3 vertical) associated with major thrusting and drag zone formation in the latest Cretaceous, preceded by pre-drag origin of deformation bands α0; (2) αβ1-2, WNW-directed extension associated with emplacement of polzenite-group volcanics (≈80-61 Ma) and influx of hydrothermal fluids, overlapping in time with α1; (3) α2, N-directed compression in a reverse fault regime, probably Paleocene in age, associated with thrusting and intensive shear faulting in adjacent parts of blocks; (4) αβ3, Early Oligocene W- to WNW-directed extension in a regime of strike-slip faulting (σ2 vertical), probably connected with an emplacement of phonolitic magmas and influx of hydrothermal fluids; (5) α3, NNW-directed compression associated with activation of transverse/oblique faults of the fault belt, close in age to αβ3 with unclear mutual superposition; (6) β, Late Oligocene-Early Miocene multi-stage N- to NE-directed extension in a normal fault regime, specific to the Bohemian Massif, responsible for downfaulting of the hangingwall block; (7) γ, Mid to Late Miocene NE-directed compression in a reverse fault regime associated with thrusting; (8) δ, Pliocene (to Pleistocene?) NW- to NNW-directed compression in a strike-slip regime, associated with transverse faulting in the fault belt. The identified paleostress patterns show a good correlation with the hitherto identified paleostress fields transmitted to the Alpine foreland and refine the temporal sequence of paleostress states, especially in the post-Lower Miocene period.

  18. August, 2002 - floods events, affected areas revitalisation and prevention for the future in the central Bohemian region, Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bina, L.; Vacha, F.; Vodova, J.

    2003-04-01

    Central Bohemian Region is located in a shape of a ring surrounding the capitol of Prague. Its total territorial area is 11.014 sq.km and population of 1 130.000 inhabitants. According to EU nomenclature of regional statistical units, the Central Bohemian Region is classified as an independent NUTS II. Bohemia's biggest rivers, Vltava and Labe form the region's backbone dividing it along a north-south line, besides that there are Sazava and Berounka, the two big headwaters of Vltava, which flow through the region and there also are some cascade man made lakes and 2 important big dams - Orlik and Slapy on the Vltava River in the area of the region. Overflowing of these rivers and their feeders including cracking of high-water dams during the floods in August 2002 caused total or partial destruction or damage of more than 200 towns and villages and total losses to the extend of 450 mil. EUR. The worst impact was on damaged or destroyed human dwellings, social infrastructure (schools, kindergartens, humanitarian facilities) and technical infrastructure (roads, waterworks, power distribution). Also businesses were considerably damaged including transport terminals in the area of river ports. Flowage of Spolana Neratovice chemical works caused critical environmental havoc. Regional crisis staff with regional Governor in the lead worked continuously during the floods and a regional integrated rescue system was subordinated to it. Due to the huge extent of the floods the crisis staff coordinated its work with central bodies of state including the Government and single "power" resorts (army, interior, transport). Immediately after floods a regional - controlled management was set up including an executive body for regional revitalisation which is connected to state coordinating resort - Ministry for Local Development, EU sources and humanitarian aid. In addition to a program of regional revitalisation additional preventive flood control programs are being developed

  19. A geophysical model of lower crustal structure of the Palaezoic crustal root (Bohemian Massif): implications for modern collisional orogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guy, Alexandra; Edel, Jean Bernard; Schulmann, Karel; Tomek, Cestmir; Lexa, Ondrej

    2010-05-01

    A new model of the structure and composition of Variscan crust is proposed based on 3D gravity modelling, geological data, seismic refraction (CEL09) and reflection (9HR) sections. The Bohemian Massif crust is characterized by succession of positive and negative anomalies of about 60 - 80 km wavelength for nearly constant Moho depths. The southwestern part of the Bohemian Massif displays a large negative Bouguer anomaly corresponding to high grade rocks (granulites, migmatites) of the Palaeozoic crustal root represented by the Moldanubian domain. Adjacent Neo-Proterozoic Brunia microcontinent displays important gravity high corresponding to mafic and intermediate medium grade metamorphic and magmatic rocks. However, the strong gradient marking deep crustal boundary between the root domain and the Brunia microcontinent is located 50 to 70 km westwards from the surface boundary between these units suggesting that in this area the high density basement rocks are covered by thin sheet of low density granulites and migmatites. NW from the Moldanubain domain occurs an important gravity high corresponding to the Neo-Proterozoic basement of the Teplá-Barrandian Unit limited in the north by southeast dipping reflectors of the Teplá suture which is characterized by high density eclogites and ultramafics. The footwall of the suture corresponds to low density felsic crust of the Saxothuringian basement. The reflection and refraction seismics and gravity modelling suggest a complex lithological structure of the Moldanubian domain marked by low density 5 - 10 km thick lower crustal layer located above MOHO, 5 - 10 km thick heavy mafic layer, 10 km thick mid-crustal layer of intermediate density and locally developed 2 - 5 km thick low density layer at the surface. The low density lower crust correlates well with low P velocities in the range 6.0-6.4 km-sec in the CEL09 section. This complex geophysical structure and surface geology are interpreted as a result of partial

  20. Colloids generation from metallic uranium fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, C.; Fortner, J.; Goldberg, M.; Shelton-Davis, C.

    2000-07-20

    The possibility of colloid generation from spent fuel in an unsaturated environment has significant implications for storage of these fuels in the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. Because colloids can act as a transport medium for sparingly soluble radionuclides, it might be possible for colloid-associated radionuclides to migrate large distances underground and present a human health concern. This study examines the nature of colloidal materials produced during corrosion of metallic uranium fuel in simulated groundwater at elevated temperature in an unsaturated environment. Colloidal analyses of the leachates from these corrosion tests were performed using dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Results from both techniques indicate a bimodal distribution of small discrete particles and aggregates of the small particles. The average diameters of the small, discrete colloids are {approximately}3--12 nm, and the large aggregates have average diameters of {approximately}100--200 nm. X-ray diffraction of the solids from these tests indicates a mineral composition of uranium oxide or uranium oxy-hydroxide.

  1. Fluid-bed fluoride volatility process recovers uranium from spent uranium alloy fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barghusen, J. J.; Chilenskas, A. A.; Gunderson, G. E.; Holmes, J. T.; Jonke, A. A.; Kincinas, J. E.; Levitz, N. M.; Potts, G. L.; Ramaswami, D.; Stethers, H.; hide

    1967-01-01

    Fluid-bed fluoride volatility process recovers uranium from uranium fuels containing either zirconium or aluminum. The uranium is recovered as uranium hexafluoride. The process requires few operations in simple, compact equipment, and eliminates aqueous radioactive wastes.

  2. Laboratory column experiments and transport modeling to evaluate retardation of uranium in an aquifer downgradient of a uranium in-situ recovery site

    DOE PAGES

    Dangelmayr, Martin A.; Reimus, Paul W.; Wasserman, Naomi L.; ...

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the attenuation potential and retardation of uranium in sediments taken from boreholes at the Smith-Ranch Highland in-situ recovery (ISR) site. Five column experiments with four different sediments were conducted to study the effects of variable mineralogy and alkalinity on uranium breakthrough. Uranium transport was modeled with PHREEQC using a generalized composite surface complexation model (GC SCM) with one, two, and, three generic surfaces, respectively. Reactive surface areas were approximated with PEST using BET derived surface areas to constrain fitting parameters. Uranium breakthrough was delayed by a factor of 1.68, 1.69 and 1.47more » relative to the non-reactive tracer for three of the 5 experiments at an alkalinity of 540 mg/l. A sediment containing smectite and kaolinite retained uranium by a factor of 2.80 despite a lower measured BET surface area. Decreasing alkalinity to 360 mg/l from 540 mg/l increased retardation by a factor of 4.26. Model fits correlated well to overall BET surface area in the three columns where clay content was less than 1%. For the sediment with clay, models consistently understated uranium retardation when reactive surface sites were restricted by BET results. Calcite saturation was shown to be a controlling factor for uranium desorption as the pH of the system changes. A pH of 6 during a secondary background water flush remobilized previously sorbed uranium resulting in a secondary uranium peak at twice the influent concentrations. Furthermore, this study demonstrates the potential of GC SCM models to predict uranium transport in sediments with homogenous mineral composition, but highlights the need for further research to understand the role of sediment clay composition and calcite saturation in uranium transport.« less

  3. Geochemical orientation survey of stream sediment, stream water, and ground water near uranium prospects, Monticello area, New York. National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, A. W.; Smith, A. T.; Wesolowski, D.

    1982-08-01

    A detailed geochemical test survey has been conducted in a 570 sq km area around six small copper-uranium prospects in sandstones of the Devonian Catskill Formation near Monticello in southern New York state. This report summarizes and interprets the data for about 500 stream sediment samples, 500 stream water samples, and 500 ground water samples, each analyzed for 40 to 50 elements. The groundwater samples furnish distinctive anomalies for uranium, helium, radon, and copper near the mineralized localities, but the samples must be segregated into aquifers in order to obtain continuous well-defined anomalies. Two zones of uranium-rich water (1 to 16 parts per billion) can be recognized on cross sections; the upper zone extends through the known occurrences. The anomalies in uranium and helium are strongest in the deeper parts of the aquifers and are diluted in samples from shallow wells. In stream water, copper and uranium are slightly anomalous, as in an ore factor derived from factor analysis. Ratios of copper, uranium, and zinc to conductivity improve the resolution of anomalies. In stream sediment, extractable uranium, copper, niobium, vanadium, and an ore factor furnish weak anomalies, and ratios of uranium and copper to zinc improve the definition of anomalies. The uranium/thorium ratio is not helpful. Published analyses of rock samples from the nearby stratigraphic section show distinct anomalies in the zone containing the copper-uranium occurrences. This report is being issued without the normal detailed technical and copy editing, to make the data available to the public before the end of the National Uranium Reconnaissance Evaluation program.

  4. Uranium, soluble salts

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Uranium , soluble salts ; no CASRN Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  5. Uranium Reduction by Clostridia

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, A.J.; Dodge, Cleveland J.; Gillow, Jeffrey B.

    2006-04-05

    The FRC groundwater and sediment contain significant concentrations of U and Tc and are dominated by low pH, and high nitrate and Al concentrations where dissimilatory metal reducing bacterial activity may be limited. The presence of Clostridia in Area 3 at the FRC site has been confirmed and their ability to reduce uranium under site conditions will be determined. Although the phenomenon of uranium reduction by Clostridia has been firmly established, the molecular mechanisms underlying such a reaction are not very clear. The authors are exploring the hypothesis that U(VI) reduction occurs through hydrogenases and other enzymes (Matin and Francis). Fundamental knowledge of metal reduction using Clostridia will allow us to exploit naturally occurring processes to attenuate radionuclide and metal contaminants in situ in the subsurface. The outline for this report are as follows: (1) Growth of Clostridium sp. under normal culture conditions; (2) Fate of metals and radionuclides in the presence of Clostridia; (3) Bioreduction of uranium associated with nitrate, citrate, and lepidocrocite; and (4) Utilization of Clostridium sp. for immobilization of uranium at the FRC Area 3 site.

  6. URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Hyman, H.H.; Dreher, J.L.

    1959-07-01

    The recovery of uranium from the acidic aqueous metal waste solutions resulting from the bismuth phosphate carrier precipitation of plutonium from solutions of neutron irradiated uranium is described. The waste solutions consist of phosphoric acid, sulfuric acid, and uranium as a uranyl salt, together with salts of the fission products normally associated with neutron irradiated uranium. Generally, the process of the invention involves the partial neutralization of the waste solution with sodium hydroxide, followed by conversion of the solution to a pH 11 by mixing therewith sufficient sodium carbonate. The resultant carbonate-complexed waste is contacted with a titanated silica gel and the adsorbent separated from the aqueous medium. The aqueous solution is then mixed with sufficient acetic acid to bring the pH of the aqueous medium to between 4 and 5, whereby sodium uranyl acetate is precipitated. The precipitate is dissolved in nitric acid and the resulting solution preferably provided with salting out agents. Uranyl nitrate is recovered from the solution by extraction with an ether such as diethyl ether.

  7. URANIUM SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Harrington, C.D.

    1959-09-01

    A method is given for extracting uranium values from ores of high phosphate content consisting of dissolving them in aqueous nitric acid, adjusting the concentration of the aqueous solution to about 2 M with respect to nitric acid, and then contacting it with diethyl ether which has previously been made 1 M with respect to nitric acid.

  8. Uranium Location Database

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A GIS compiled locational database in Microsoft Access of ~15,000 mines with uranium occurrence or production, primarily in the western United States. The metadata was cooperatively compiled from Federal and State agency data sets and enables the user to conduct geographic and analytical studies on mine impacts on the public and environment.

  9. Roessing Uranium Limited

    SciTech Connect

    1991-04-01

    The government of Namibia, celebrating the first anniversary (Marsh 21) of the country`s independence from South African rule, is looking to Roessing Uranium Limited (RUL) to improve the economic health of the country. RUL is Namibia`s largest employer, producer of one third of the country`s exports and 13 percent of its domestic product. The Roessing mine is the second largest uranium mine in the world, producing over 108 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} from 1976 through 1989, and still holding an estimated 322 million pounds in reserves. Yet Roessing is one of the lowest grade uranium deposits ever commercially exploited, with an average grade of only 0.035 w/o U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. To efficiently develop such a low-grade deposit, RUL uses extensive real-time cost analysis systems and has the highest rock production rate (ore plus waste) of any uranium mine in the world, over 300 thousand tons per day.

  10. The neurotoxicology of uranium.

    PubMed

    Dinocourt, Céline; Legrand, Marie; Dublineau, Isabelle; Lestaevel, Philippe

    2015-11-04

    The brain is a target of environmental toxic pollutants that impair cerebral functions. Uranium is present in the environment as a result of natural deposits and release by human applications. The first part of this review describes the passage of uranium into the brain, and its effects on neurological functions and cognitive abilities. Very few human studies have looked at its cognitive effects. Experimental studies show that after exposure, uranium can reach the brain and lead to neurobehavioral impairments, including increased locomotor activity, perturbation of the sleep-wake cycle, decreased memory, and increased anxiety. The mechanisms underlying these neurobehavioral disturbances are not clearly understood. It is evident that there must be more than one toxic mechanism and that it might include different targets in the brain. In the second part, we therefore review the principal mechanisms that have been investigated in experimental models: imbalance of the anti/pro-oxidant system and neurochemical and neurophysiological pathways. Uranium effects are clearly specific according to brain area, dose, and time. Nonetheless, this review demonstrates the paucity of data about its effects on developmental processes and the need for more attention to the consequences of exposure during development.

  11. Diffusion of uranium hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, J.

    This document is part of Subvolume A `Gases in Gases, Liquids and their Mixtures' of Volume 15 `Diffusion in Gases, Liquids and Electrolytes' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV `Physical Chemistry'. It is part of the chapter of the chapter `Diffusion in Pure Gases' and contains data on diffusion of uranium hexafluoride

  12. Principal uranium deposits of the world

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byers, Virginia P.

    1978-01-01

    The geology of the principal world uranium deposits that have identified uranium reserves and production, as described in published literature, is summarized briefly, including such features as type of deposit, host rock and age of host roc, age of mineralization, depositional environment, and mineralogy. The deposits are located on four maps with the deposit grouped according to age of host rocks?Precambrian, Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Cenozoic?and further subdivided into types of deposits and size categories. Types of deposits are penecordant sandstone, quartz-pebble conglomerate, vein and vein-type, marine black shale, phosphate deposits, coaly carbonaceous rocks, and pegmatic and alaskitic rocks. The economically most significant deposits of uranium known in 1975 are in quartz-pebble conglomerates and sandstones, which together represented about 75 percent of the world?s total production. The largest deposits occur in quartz-pebble conglomerate at the Elliot Lake-Blind River area, Canada (average grade 0.12 percent U3O8), and at the Witwatersrand basin area in the Republic of South Africa (average grade 0.025 percent U3O8), where uranium is produced principally as a byproduct or coproduct of gold mining; and in medium-grained sandstones in the Colorado Plateau, USA (average grade 0.2 percent U3O8). Other economically significant concentrations are vein, pegmatite or contact metamorphic types, containing smaller but relatively high-grade tonnages and representing about 20 percent of the world?s total production. At Vastergotland (Billingen) and Narke in Sweden, uranium has been recovered on a pilot-plant basis from black shale deposits having an uncommonly high grade for black shale of 0.03 percent U3O8. ?Recoverable reserves? in the near future (40 year period, lifetime of nuclear plants) is on the order of 50,000 metric tons U. Over 50 percent of the world?s total uranium reserves is located on or near the trend of the iron deposits in the Precambrian iron

  13. Distribution of trace elements in drilling chip samples around a roll-type uranium deposit, San Juan Basin, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Day, H.C.; Spirakis, C.S.; Zech, R.S.; Kirk, A.R.

    1983-01-01

    Chip samples from rotary drilling in the vicinity of a roll-type uranium deposit in the southwestern San Juan Basin were split into a whole-washed fraction, a clay fraction, and a heavy mineral concentrate fraction. Analyses of these fractions determined that cutting samples could be used to identify geochemical halos associated with this ore deposit. In addition to showing a distribution of selenium, uranium, vanadium, and molybdenum similar to that described by Harshman (1974) in uranium roll-type deposits in Wyoming, South Dakota, and Texas, the chemical data indicate a previously unrecognized zinc anomaly in the clay fraction downdip of the uranium ore.

  14. Landscape control of uranium and thorium in boreal streams - spatiotemporal variability and the role of wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidman, F.; Mörth, C. M.; Laudon, H.

    2012-11-01

    The concentrations of uranium and thorium in ten partly nested streams in the boreal forest region were monitored over a two-year period. The investigated catchments ranged from small headwaters (0.1 km2) up to a fourth-order stream (67 km2). Considerable spatiotemporal variations were observed, with little or no correlation between streams. The fluxes of both uranium and thorium varied substantially between the subcatchments, ranging from 1.7 to 30 g km-2 a-1 for uranium and from 3.2 to 24 g km-2 a-1 for thorium. Airborne gamma spectrometry was used to measure the concentrations of uranium and thorium in surface soils throughout the catchment, suggesting that the concentrations of uranium and thorium in mineral soils are similar throughout the catchment. The fluxes of uranium and thorium were compared to a wide range of parameters characterising the investigated catchments and the chemistry of the stream water, e.g. soil concentrations of these elements, pH, TOC (total organic carbon), Al, Si and hydrogen carbonate, but it was concluded that the spatial variabilities in the fluxes of both uranium and thorium mainly were controlled by wetlands. The results indicate that there is a predictable and systematic accumulation of both uranium and thorium in boreal wetlands that is large enough to control the transport of these elements. On the landscape scale approximately 65-80% of uranium and 55-65% of thorium entering a wetland were estimated to be retained in the peat. Overall, accumulation in mires and other types of wetlands was estimated to decrease the fluxes of uranium and thorium from the boreal forest landscape by 30-40%, indicating that wetlands play an important role for the biogeochemical cycling of uranium and thorium in the boreal forest landscape. The atmospheric deposition of uranium and thorium was also quantified, and its contribution to boreal streams was found to be low compared to weathering.

  15. The impact of a disused mine on uranium transport in the River Fal, South West England.

    PubMed

    Moliner-Martinez, Yolanda; Campíns-Falcó, Pilar; Worsfold, Paul J; Keith-Roach, Miranda J

    2004-11-01

    Unfiltered and filtered (0.45 and 0.2 microm) water samples and sediment samples (sieved to <180 microm and 180-1000 microm) were collected along an approximately 15 km transect of the River Fal, Cornwall, UK, to examine the impact of the disused South Terras uranium mine on the uranium concentrations of the river water and underlying sediments. The uranium concentration of the water samples fluctuated along the river, with the 0.45 microm filtered water showing the largest, seven-fold, difference between minimum (0.19 microg L(-1)) and maximum (1.34 microg L(-1)) concentrations. The historical uranium mine and spoil heaps were not a significant source of uranium to the river water, as water concentrations were low next to the site, but a highly elevated uranium concentration (1000 mg kg(-1)) was found in sediment below an outflow pipe from this mine. Operationally defined "colloidal" (0.2-0.45 microm) and "dissolved" (<0.2 microm) uranium were the predominant forms of the element in the river water (35 and 45% respectively). The uranium concentration in the dissolved phase showed a correlation coefficient of 0.83 (n= 9) with the total cation concentration, suggesting that the uranium concentration in this fraction is directly linked to weathering of rocks and minerals. The observation that weathering is the dominant mechanism delivering uranium to the river water explains the low uranium concentrations in the river water close to South Terras mine, despite the proximity of the spoil heaps, and the maximum uranium concentrations close to a china clay mining area.

  16. Urinary excretion of uranium in adult inhabitants of the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Malátová, Irena; Bečková, Věra; Kotík, Lukáš

    2016-02-01

    The main aim of this study was to determine and evaluate urinary excretion of uranium in the general public of the Czech Republic. This value should serve as a baseline for distinguishing possible increase in uranium content in population living near legacy sites of mining and processing uranium ores and also to help to distinguish the proportion of the uranium content in urine among uranium miners resulting from inhaled dust. The geometric mean of the uranium concentration in urine of 74 inhabitants of the Czech Republic was 0.091 mBq/L (7.4 ng/L) with the 95% confidence interval 0.071-0.12 mBq/L (5.7-9.6 ng/L) respectively. The geometric mean of the daily excretion was 0.15 mBq/d (12.4 ng/d) with the 95% confidence interval 0.12-0.20 mBq/d (9.5-16.1 ng/d) respectively. Despite the legacy of uranium mines and plants processing uranium ore in the Czech Republic, the levels of uranium in urine and therefore, also human body content of uranium, is similar to other countries, esp. Germany, Slovenia and USA. Significant difference in the daily urinary excretion of uranium was found between individuals using public supply and private water wells as a source of drinking water. Age dependence of daily urinary excretion of uranium was not found. Mean values and their range are comparable to other countries, esp. Germany, Slovenia and USA.

  17. A preliminary report on the geology of the Dennison-Bunn uranium claim, Sandoval County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ridgley, Jennie L.

    1978-01-01

    Uranium at the Dennison-Bunn claim, south of Cuba, N. Mex., along the east margin of the San Juan Basin, occurs in unoxidized gray, fluvial channel sandstone of the Westwater Canyon Member of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation. The uranium-bearing sandstone is bounded on the north and south by a variable zone of buff and orange sandstone. Within the mineralized zone, the uranium has been remobilized and reconcentrated along the margins of numerous smaller tongues of oxidized rock in a configuration similar to that found in roll-type uranium deposits. In cross section, these small-scale features are zoned; they have an inner, pale orange, oxidized core, a mineralized redox rim cemented with hematite(?), and an outer-shell of -gray, slightly to moderately mineralized rock. The uranium content in the mineralized rock ranges from 0.001 to 0.07 percent U3O8. The uranium, at this locality, is believed to have originated within the Westwater Canyon Member or to have been derived from the overlying Brushy Basin Member. Based on observed outcrop relations, two hypotheses are proposed for explaining the origin of the occurrence. Briefly these hypotheses are: (1) the mineralized zone represents the remnant of an original roll-type uranium deposit, formed during early Eocene time, which has undergone subsequent oxidation with remobilization and redeposition of uranium around the margins of smaller tongues of oxidized rock; and (2) the mineralized zone represents the remnant of an original tabular deposit which has undergone subsequent oxidation with remobilization and redeposition of uranium around the margins of smaller tongues of oxidized rock.

  18. Uranium from seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Gregg, D.; Folkendt, M.

    1982-09-21

    A novel process for recovering uranium from seawater is proposed and some of the critical technical parameters are evaluated. The process, in summary, consists of two different options for contacting adsorbant pellets with seawater without pumping the seawater. It is expected that this will reduce the mass handling requirements, compared to pumped seawater systems, by a factor of approximately 10/sup 5/, which should also result in a large reduction in initial capital investment. Activated carbon, possibly in combination with a small amount of dissolved titanium hydroxide, is expected to be the preferred adsorbant material instead of the commonly assumed titanium hydroxide alone. The activated carbon, after exposure to seawater, can be stripped of uranium with an appropriate eluant (probably an acid) or can be burned for its heating value (possible in a power plant) leaving the uranium further enriched in its ash. The uranium, representing about 1% of the ash, is then a rich ore and would be recovered in a conventional manner. Experimental results have indicated that activated carbon, acting alone, is not adequately effective in adsorbing the uranium from seawater. We measured partition coefficients (concentration ratios) of approximately 10/sup 3/ in seawater instead of the reported values of 10/sup 5/. However, preliminary tests carried out in fresh water show considerable promise for an extraction system that uses a combination of dissolved titanium hydroxide (in minute amounts) which forms an insoluble compound with the uranyl ion, and the insoluble compound then being sorbed out on activated carbon. Such a system showed partition coefficients in excess of 10/sup 5/ in fresh water. However, the system was not tested in seawater.

  19. Clay Mineral: Radiological Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotomácio, J. G.; Silva, P. S. C.; Mazzilli, B. P.

    2008-08-01

    Since the early days, clays have been used for therapeutic purposes. Nowadays, most minerals applied as anti-inflammatory, pharmaceutics and cosmetic are the clay minerals that are used as the active ingredient or, as the excipient, in formulations. Although their large use, few information is available in literature on the content of the radionuclide concentrations of uranium and thorium natural series and 40K in these clay minerals. The objective of this work is to determine the concentrations of 238U, 232Th, 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb and 40K in commercial samples of clay minerals used for pharmaceutical or cosmetic purposes. Two kinds of clays samples were obtained in pharmacies, named green clay and white clay. Measurement for the determination of 238U and 232Th activity concentration was made by alpha spectrometry and gamma spectrometry was used for 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb and 40K determination. Some physical-chemical parameters were also determined as organic carbon and pH. The average activity concentration obtained was 906±340 Bq kg-1 for 40K, 40±9 Bq kg-1 for 226Ra, 75±9 Bq kg-1 for 228Ra, 197±38 Bq kg-1 for 210Pb, 51±26 Bq kg-1 for 238U and 55±24 Bq kg-1 for 232Th, considering both kinds of clay.

  20. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM METAL BY CARBON REDUCTION

    DOEpatents

    Holden, R.B.; Powers, R.M.; Blaber, O.J.

    1959-09-22

    The preparation of uranium metal by the carbon reduction of an oxide of uranium is described. In a preferred embodiment of the invention a charge composed of carbon and uranium oxide is heated to a solid mass after which it is further heated under vacuum to a temperature of about 2000 deg C to produce a fused uranium metal. Slowly ccoling the fused mass produces a dendritic structure of uranium carbide in uranium metal. Reacting the solidified charge with deionized water hydrolyzes the uranium carbide to finely divide uranium dioxide which can be separated from the coarser uranium metal by ordinary filtration methods.