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  1. Boise Geothermal Aquifer Study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This report is the final product of a detailed review and quantitative evaluation of existing data for the Boise Front Geothermal Aquifer. Upon review of the many publications, and raw data for the Boise geothermal aquifer, it became clear that adequate data only exists for analysis of current and proposed development within a limited area. This region extends approximately 1.5 miles southeast of the State Capitol to 0.5 mile northwest. Though there are geothermal wells located along the Boise Front outside of this area, the lack of production and water level data preclude any detailed discussions and analysis of their relationship to the central resource. As a result, discussion will concentrate on major users such as the Capitol Mall (CM) Boise Geothermal LTD. (BGL), Veterans Administration (VA) and Boise Warm Springs Water District (BWSWD). The objectives of this study are: Define the inter-relationship of the existing wells and/or portions of the geothermal aquifer; evaluate the effects of current and proposed development on the geothermal aquifer; estimate longevity of the geothermal resource; and make recommendations for an on-going monitoring program. 44 refs., 40 figs., 9 tabs.

  2. Boise geothermal district heating system

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, P.J.

    1985-10-01

    This document describes the Boise geothermal district heating project from preliminary feasibility studies completed in 1979 to a fully operational system by 1983. The report includes information about the two local governments that participated in the project - the City of Boise, Idaho and the Boise Warm Springs Water District. It also discusses the federal funding sources; the financial studies; the feasibility studies conducted; the general system planning and design; design of detailed system components; the legal issues involved in production; geological analysis of the resource area; distribution and disposal; the program to market system services; and the methods of retrofitting buildings to use geothermal hot water for space heating. Technically this report describes the Boise City district heating system based on 170/sup 0/F water, a 4000 gpm production system, a 41,000 foot pipeline system, and system economies. Comparable data are also provided for the Boise Warm Springs Water District. 62 figs., 31 tabs.

  3. Water-quality data for the Boise River, Boise to Star, Idaho, January to March 1988

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frenzel, S.A.; Hansen, T.F.

    1988-01-01

    Physical and chemical data were collected at six sites and biological data were collected at five sites on the Boise River between Veterans Memorial Parkway in Boise and Star, Idaho, from January to March 1988. Data were collected to determine the effect of sewage effluent from two Boise wastewater treatment facilities on the water and biological quality of the Boise River. Similar data were collected from October to December 1987. Results of all data analyses will be discussed in an interpretive report.

  4. Boise Cascade: INEL solar home

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebelt, K. H.; Novick, A. H.; Mills, J. I.

    1981-07-01

    The operating data on the Bosie Cascade-INEL solar homes located in Boise and Idaho Falls, Idaho, are summarized for the period from July 1, 1980 through March 31, 1981. All three major system functions are discussed: space heating, domestic hot water heating, and space cooling. In addition, the update data acquisition system, which allows for simultaneous acquisition and analysis of data, and also the new data reduction and analysis capabilities are discussed. The general performance of the houses during the reporting period is summarized, but it is beyond the scope of this report to present a detailed analysis of the data or to completely address existing data anomalies.

  5. Water-quality data for the Boise River, Boise to Star, Idaho, October to December 1987

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frenzel, S.A.; Hansen, T.F.

    1988-01-01

    Chemical and physical data were collected at six and biological data at five sites on the Boise River between Veterans Memorial Parkway in Boise and Star, Idaho, from October to December 1987. Data were collected to determine the impact of sewage effluent from two Boise wastewater treatment plants on the water and biological quality of the Boise River. Similar data will be collected from January to March 1988 and will be published in a second noninterpretive report. Results of all data analyses will be discussed in a final interpretive report. (USGS)

  6. Retrofitting the Streetlights in Boise, Idaho

    ScienceCinema

    Young, Clay; Oliver, LeAnn; Bieter, David; Johnson, Michael; Oldemeyer, Neal

    2016-07-12

    Boise, Idaho is using an energy efficiency grant to retrofit hundreds of streetlights throughout the downtown area with energy-efficient LED bulbs, which will save money and improve safety and local quality of life.

  7. Retrofitting the Streetlights in Boise, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Clay; Oliver, LeAnn; Bieter, David; Johnson, Michael; Oldemeyer, Neal

    2011-01-01

    Boise, Idaho is using an energy efficiency grant to retrofit hundreds of streetlights throughout the downtown area with energy-efficient LED bulbs, which will save money and improve safety and local quality of life.

  8. Defluoridation study for Boise geothermal water

    SciTech Connect

    Rigdon, L.

    1980-06-03

    Methods of removing fluorides from water are reviewed and recommendations are made for treating geothermal water used by the Boise Geothermal Project, Boise, Idaho. The Boise geothermal water except for its high fluoride content would be high quality, suitable for primary drinking water. Fluoride ranges from about 15 to 25 mg/l in water from various wells in the Boise region where the Project plans to obtain hot water. Four techniques for removing fluorides from water have been studied extensively during the past 15 years or so. Electrodialysis and reverse osmosis are useful in reducing total dissolved solids from brackish water, but are nonspecific and are too expensive for treatment of the Boise geothermal water. Selective precipitation is a widely used technique for treating water, but would also prove expensive for the Boise geothermal water because of the relatively high solubility of fluoride salts and consequently high concentration (and cost) of precipitants required to reduce the fluorides to an acceptable level. Ion-exchange separation using activated alumina as the exchange medium appears to be the most promising technique and we recommend that some laboratory and pilot studies be conducted to establish suitability and operating boundaries.

  9. 78 FR 21151 - Boise White Paper, LLC, A Subsidiary of Boise Paper Holdings, LLC, Including On-Site Leased...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-09

    ... determination was published in the Federal Register on February 6, 2013 (78 FR 8590). Workers are engaged in... Employment and Training Administration Boise White Paper, LLC, A Subsidiary of Boise Paper Holdings, LLC... Electric, Mitech, and Anne Elisabeth Elsey, St. Helens, OR; Boise White Paper, LLC, A Subsidiary of...

  10. Geothermal conversion at Veterans Hospital, Boise, Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engen, I. A.; Metzger, S. W.

    1982-02-01

    A geothermal resource near the Veterans Administration Hospital facilities in Boise, Idaho, has been used since the turn of the century for space heating of homes. A plan for using this resource in some of the Veterans Hospital facilities is discussed. Preliminary cost estimates are presented, economic evaluation criteria are given, and heating system alternatives for the facilities are compared.

  11. Boise geothermal injection well: Final environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    The City of Boise, Idaho, an Idaho Municipal Corporation, is proposing to construct a well with which to inject spent geothermal water from its hot water heating system back into the geothermal aquifer. Because of a cooperative agreement between the City and the US Department of Energy to design and construct the proposed well, compliance to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) is required. Therefore, this Environmental Assessment (EA) represents the analysis of the proposed project required under NEPA. The intent of this EA is to: (1) briefly describe historical uses of the Boise Geothermal Aquifer; (2) discuss the underlying reason for the proposed action; (3) describe alternatives considered, including the No Action Alternative and the Preferred Alternative; and (4) present potential environmental impacts of the proposed action and the analysis of those impacts as they apply to the respective alternatives.

  12. 77 FR 55688 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Boise, ID

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-11

    ... E airspace designated as an extension at Boise Air Terminal, Boise, ID (77 FR 38552). Interested... FR 6026). Interested parties were invited to participate in this rulemaking effort by submitting... Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation...

  13. UTM Well Coordinates for the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site (BHRS)

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, David

    2014-12-19

    A series of oscillatory pumping tests were performed at the BHRS. The data collected from these wells will be used to tomographically image the shallow subsurface. This excel file only contains well coordinates for all wells at the Boise site.

  14. Dendrochronological reconstruction of fire at the Boise Wildland-Urban Interface, Boise National Forest, Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutter, A.; Kinkead, K.; Wilkins, D. E.

    2013-12-01

    Changing climate conditions (warmer temperatures, changes in modes and timing of precipitation) are thought to be driving factors in increasing burned acreage and fire intensity in both forested and non-forested lands in Idaho and elsewhere in the interior western US. Cities in the west may be vulnerable to fire impacts to urban development , watersheds, and recreation. The wildland-urban interface (WUI) between the Boise, Idaho and the range front to its north is an example of this vulnerability. Because of long-standing practices and policies of wildfire suppression, the natural fire frequency (i.e., pre-suppression) of the forested component of the WUI is not well known or understood. In this study, we sampled fire-scarred ponderosa pine at two dry sites in separate drainages above Boise to identify both the timing and synchroneity of fire events. Partial cross-sections were collected from standing live trees using a chainsaw, and then cross-dated with an established local tree-ring chronology. The two sites have ten fire events, ranging from 1709 to 1889, with shared events only in 1771 and 1829. The fire events at the two sites all are consistent with regional fire-years in a published fire history for Idaho and Montana (Heyerdahl, et al., 2008), with one exception in 1883. This suggests that the local forest is largely responding to broader regional climate drivers. During the period of fire-scar record, fire frequency at these two sites near the Boise WUI ranged from 15-50 years; this is a much higher fire frequency than that observed since fire suppression policies were enacted, with no fire scar recorded events since 1889.

  15. 77 FR 51561 - Notice of Temporary Restriction Order for Skinny Dipper Hot Springs, Boise County, ID

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-24

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Temporary Restriction Order for Skinny Dipper Hot Springs, Boise...: This serves as notice of a sunset-to-sunrise recreational use restriction of Skinny Dipper Hot Springs... Hot Springs, and the public lands in Lot 3, Section 25, T. 9 N., R.3 E., Boise Meridian, Boise...

  16. Boise Inc. St. Helens Paper Mill Achieves Significant Fuel Savings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2008-05-01

    This case study describes how the Boise Inc. paper mill in St. Helens, Oregon, achieved annual savings of approximately 154,000 MMBtu and more than $1 million after receiving a DOE Save Energy Now energy assessment and implementing recommendations to improve the efficiency of its steam system.

  17. Boise Inc. St. Helens Paper Mill Achieves Significant Fuel Savings

    SciTech Connect

    2008-05-01

    This case study describes how the Boise Inc. paper mill in St. Helens, Oregon, achieved annual savings of approximately 154,000 MMBtu and more than $1 million. This was accomplished after receiving a DOE Save Energy Now energy assessment and implementing recommendations to improve the efficiency of its steam system.

  18. Hydrogeologic framework of the Boise Aquifer system, southwestern Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Squires, E.; Wood, S.H. ); Osiensky, J.L. )

    1993-04-01

    The City of Boise relies upon the underlying groundwater resource (38,000 acre-feet/year) for 90% of its public water-supply. Basin-fill sediments which comprise this system of aquifers are divisible into five distinct hydrogeologic settings which differ on the basis of sediment type, geophysical log character, and hydraulic properties. A large buried alluvial-fan/fan-delta complex (the Boise Fan) occupies the eastern head of the basin. Down-valley gradations in sediment type show a general increase in unit thickness and sediment color more typically gray; reflecting transition to the lake environment of deposition. Basinward (northwestward), the ancient fan materials grade into lake/fan transitional sediments which grade to predominantly lake sediment which grade to gray mudstones and fine sand layers of the deep lake environment. The depth to which drinking-water aquifers extend is limited by an underlying sequence of relatively impermeable volcanic rocks. Specific capacities of efficient wells, 400--1,200 feet deep and open to 80--100 feet of sand are highest in the lake/fan transition and the lacustrine aquifers of central Boise, lowest for the Boise Fan and intermediate for the deep artesian sand aquifers of west Boise. As a result of screen and filter-pack design based upon attention to sampling drill cuttings, sieve analysis of sands, and geophysical log location of aquifers, efficiency and productivity of new wells has been greatly increased. Groundwater recharge to the deeper aquifers is via permeable surface gravels. Increased groundwater withdrawals have possibly accelerated recharge by increasing vertical hydraulic gradients. Overbored wells with continuous surface-to-depth gravel packs, wells open to multiple aquifers, and improperly abandoned wells with deteriorating casing are also conduits for polluted shallow groundwater to enter the deeper aquifers.

  19. Biotic integrity of the Boise River upstream and downstream from two municipal wastewater treatment facilities, Boise, Idaho, 1995-96

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mullins, William H.

    1999-01-01

    Aquatic biological communities were used to assess the biotic integrity of the Boise River upstream and downstream from the Lander Street and West Boise municipal wastewater treatment facilities (WTFs) in Boise, Idaho. Samples of epilithic periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrates, and fish were collected in late February and early March 1995, in late October 1996, and in early December 1996. Epilithic periphyton biomass, expressed as chlorophyll-a and ash-free dry weight, declined substantially between 1995 and 1996. Chlorophyll-a concentrations were higher at sites downstream from WTFs in both years, but differences in concentrations between sites upstream and downstream from WTFs were not statistically significant. High withinsite variance suggests that greater sampling intensity would improve statistical comparison. Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) scores calculated for benthic macroinvertebrates were higher for the sites upstream from WTFs in 1995 and were the same for all sites in 1996. Similarly, IBI scores calculated for fish were higher for the sites upstream from WTFs in 1995, were higher for the site upstream from the Lander Street WTF in 1996, and were the same for sites upstream and downstream from the West Boise WTF in 1996. Two species of sculpin (Cottus) were abundant at the site upstream from both WTFs but were absent at all other sites downstream from WTFs in 1995 and composed only 2 percent of the total number of fish collected downstream from the Lander Street WTF in 1996.

  20. Boise geothermal system, western Snake River plain, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, S.H.; Burnham, W.L.

    1984-07-01

    The Boise geothermal system lies in an area of high heat flow along the northern margin of the western Snake River plain. Exploratory drilling for petroleum and geothermal water, seismic reflection profiling, and regional gravity data permit construction of a detailed structure section across the western plain. A faulted acoustic basement of volcanic rocks lies at depths of 2400 to 6000 ft (730-1830 m) beneath late Cenozoic lacustrine and fluvial deposits in the center of the plain. Volcanic rocks of the acoustic basement are typically basalt out in the plain, but the acoustic basement along the north margin in the vicinity of Boise is largely silicic volcanic rock. Geologic mapping and geothermal well data have provided information on the late Cenozoic geologic units and structures important to the understanding of the Boise geothermal system. The main geothermal aquifer is a sequence of rhyolite layers and minor arkosic and tuffaceous sediment of the Miocene Idavada Volcanics. The aquifer is confined by a sequence of impermeable basaltic tuffs. The aquifer has sufficient fracture permeability to yield 150/sup 0/-170/sup 0/F (65/sup 0/-76.6/sup 0/C) hot water for space heating at a rate of 600 to 1200 gpm from wells drilled in the metropolitan area, north of the Boise River. In this area the rhyolite lies at a depth of 900-2000 ft (274-610 m). Artesian pressure typically lifts water to an elevation of about 2760 ft (840 m). A conceptual model of recharge assumes percolation driven by the topographic head to a depth of more than 7000 ft (2135 m) beneath the granitic highlands northeast of the city. Heated water convects upward through northwest-trending range-front faults.

  1. Physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of the Boise River from Veterans Memorial Parkway, Boise to Star, Idaho, October 1987 to March 1988

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frenzel, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    Physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of the Boise River were examined from October 1987 to March 1988 to determine whether trace elements in effluents from two Boise wastewater treatment facilities were detrimental to aquatic communities. Cadmium, chromium, hexavalent chromium, cyanide, lead, nickel, and silver concentrations in the Boise River were less than or near analytical detection levels and were less than chronic toxicity criteria when detectable. Arsenic, copper, and zinc were detected in concentrations less than chronic toxicity criteria. Concentrations of trace elements in bottom material generally were small and could not be attributed to effluents from wastewater treatment facilities. From October to December 1987, mean density of benthic invertebrates colonizing artificial substrates was from 6,100 individuals/substrate downstream from the West Boise wastewater treatment facility to 14,000 individuals per substrate downstream from the Lander Street wastewater treatment facility. From January to March 1988 , mean density of benthic invertebrates colonizing artificial substrates was from 7,100 individuals per substrate downstream from the West Boise facility to 10,000 individuals per substrate near Star. Insect communities upstream and downstream from the wastewater treatment facilities were strongly associated, and coeffients of community loss indicated that effluents had benign enriching effects. Distribution of mayflies indicates that trace-element concentrations in effluents did not adversely affect intolerant organisms in the Boise River. Condition factor of whitefish was significantly increased downstream from the Lander Street wastewater treatment facility and was significantly decreased downstream from the West Boise wastewater treatment facility.

  2. 40 CFR 81.87 - Metropolitan Boise Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.87 Section 81.87 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.87 Metropolitan Boise Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Boise Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Idaho) consists of the territorial area...

  3. 75 FR 11936 - Hewlett Packard; Technical Support Call Center; Boise, ID; Notice of Termination of Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Hewlett Packard; Technical Support Call Center; Boise, ID; Notice of... Packard, Technical Support Call Center, Boise, Idaho. The petitioner has requested that the petition...

  4. Amity Elementary School, Boise, Idaho. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The design, predicted system performance, operation and maintenance instructions, and wiring and piping schematic diagrams for the recently installed active/passive solar space and hot water system for the Amity Elementary School in Boise, Idaho, are presented. 370 sq. ft. of single-glazed Solecor collectors supply the domestic hot water system and 1830 sq. ft. of collectors are utilized in the space heating system. Tanks provide hot water storage. The earth-covered school building contains 51,400 gross sq. ft. Component specifications are included. (WHK)

  5. Evaluation of total phosphorus mass balance in the lower Boise River and selected tributaries, southwestern Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Etheridge, Alexandra B.

    2013-01-01

    he U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Idaho Department of Environmental Quality, developed spreadsheet mass-balance models for total phosphorus using results from three synoptic sampling periods conducted in the lower Boise River watershed during August and October 2012, and March 2013. The modeling reach spanned 46.4 river miles (RM) along the Boise River from Veteran’s Memorial Parkway in Boise, Idaho (RM 50.2), to Parma, Idaho (RM 3.8). The USGS collected water-quality samples and measured streamflow at 14 main-stem Boise River sites, two Boise River north channel sites, two sites on the Snake River upstream and downstream of its confluence with the Boise River, and 17 tributary and return-flow sites. Additional samples were collected from treated effluent at six wastewater treatment plants and two fish hatcheries. The Idaho Department of Water Resources quantified diversion flows in the modeling reach. Total phosphorus mass-balance models were useful tools for evaluating sources of phosphorus in the Boise River during each sampling period. The timing of synoptic sampling allowed the USGS to evaluate phosphorus inputs to and outputs from the Boise River during irrigation season, shortly after irrigation ended, and soon before irrigation resumed. Results from the synoptic sampling periods showed important differences in surface-water and groundwater distribution and phosphorus loading. In late August 2012, substantial streamflow gains to the Boise River occurred from Middleton (RM 31.4) downstream to Parma (RM 3.8). Mass-balance model results indicated that point and nonpoint sources (including groundwater) contributed phosphorus loads to the Boise River during irrigation season. Groundwater exchange within the Boise River in October 2012 and March 2013 was not as considerable as that measured in August 2012. However, groundwater discharge to agricultural tributaries and drains during non-irrigation season was a large source of discharge and

  6. 77 FR 77090 - Resource Advisory Council to the Boise District; Notice of Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-31

    ... management in southwestern Idaho. Items on the agenda include an update on the State of Idaho Governor's Sage Grouse Committee. A report on the wildland fires within Boise District and the region will be...

  7. Wildlife Impact Assessment: Anderson Ranch, Black Canyon, and Boise Diversion Projects, Idaho. Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Meuleman, G. Allyn

    1986-05-01

    This report presents an analysis of impacts on wildlife and their habitats as a result of construction and operation of the US Bureau of Reclamation's Anderson Ranch, Black Canyon, and Boise Diversion Projects in Idaho. The objectives were to: (1) determine the probable impacts of development and operation of the Anderson Ranch, Black Canyon, and Boise Diversion Projects to wildlife and their habitats; (2) determine the wildlife and habitat impacts directly attributable to hydroelectric development and operation; (3) briefly identify the current major concerns for wildlife in the vicinities of the hydroelectric projects; and (4) provide for consultation and coordination with interested agencies, tribes, and other entities expressing interest in the project.

  8. Ground-water quality in northern Ada County, lower Boise River basin, Idaho, 1985-96

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parliman, D.J.; Spinazola, Joseph M.

    1998-01-01

    In October 1992, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Idaho Division of Environmental Quality, Boise Regional Office (IDEQ-BRO), began a comprehensive study of ground-water quality in the lower Boise River Basin. The study in northern Ada County has been completed, and this report presents selected results of investigations in that area. Results and discussion presented herein are based on information in publications listed under “References Cited” on the last page of this Fact Sheet.

  9. Fish communities and related environmental conditions of the lower Boise River, southwestern Idaho, 1974-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacCoy, Dorene E.

    2006-01-01

    Within the last century, the lower Boise River has been transformed from a meandering, braided, gravel-bed river that supported large runs of salmon to a channelized, regulated, urban river that provides flood control and irrigation water to more than 1,200 square miles of land. An understanding of the current status of the river's fish communities and related environmental conditions is important to support the ongoing management of the Boise River. Therefore, fish community data from the U.S. Geological Survey and the Idaho Department of Fish and Game collected since 1974 were analyzed to describe the status of fish communities in the lower Boise River. Each set of data was collected to address different study objectives, but is combined here to provide an overall distribution of fish in the lower Boise River over the last 30 years. Twenty-two species of fish in 7 families have been identified in the lower Boise River-3 salmonidae, trout and whitefish; 2 cottidae, sculpins; 3 catostomidae, suckers; 7 cyprinidae, minnows; 4 centrarchidae, sunfish; 2 ictaluridae, catfish; and 1 cobitidae, loach. Analysis of fish community data using an Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) for Northwest rivers shows a decrease in the biotic integrity in a downstream direction, with the lowest IBI near the mouth of the Boise River. The number of tolerant and introduced fish were greater in the lower reaches of the river. Changes in land use, habitat, and water quality, as well as regulated streamflow have affected the lower Boise River fish community. IBI scores were negatively correlated with maximum instantaneous water temperature, specific conductance, and suspended sediment; as well as the basin land-use metrics, area of developed land, impervious surface area, and the number of major diversions upstream of a site. Fish communities in the upstream reaches were dominated by piscivorous fish, whereas the downstream reaches were dominated by tolerant, omnivorous fish. The percentage of

  10. 40 CFR 81.87 - Metropolitan Boise Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Metropolitan Boise Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.87 Section 81.87 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions §...

  11. 75 FR 15741 - Applied Materials; Boise, ID; Notice of Termination of Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Applied Materials; Boise, ID; Notice of Termination of Investigation Pursuant to Section 221 of the Trade Act of 1974, as amended, an investigation was initiated in response...

  12. Bricks & Mortar, Heart & Soul: Saving a Landmark School in Downtown Boise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linik, Joyce Riha

    2001-01-01

    Recognizing its integral role in the community, Boise (Idaho) renovated its 100-year old high school instead of building a new one. The architect, contractor, principal, students, and teachers cooperated throughout the planning and construction. The city enacted a "smart code" to encourage the rehabilitation of historic buildings and a statute…

  13. 78 FR 79707 - Notice of Public Meeting, Gateway West Project Subcommittee of the Boise District Resource...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-31

    ...In accordance with the Federal Land Policy and Management Act (FLPMA) and the Federal Advisory Committee Act of 1972 (FACA), the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Gateway West Project Subcommittee of the Boise District Resource Advisory Council (RAC), will hold a work session as indicated...

  14. 78 FR 79708 - Notice of Public Meeting, Boise District Resource Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-31

    ...In accordance with the Federal Land Policy and Management Act (FLPMA) and the Federal Advisory Committee Act of 1972 (FACA), the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Boise District Resource Advisory Council (RAC), will hold a meeting as indicated...

  15. Streamflow gains and losses in the lower Boise River basin, Idaho, 1996-97

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berenbrock, Charles

    1999-01-01

    Study results indicate that additional seepage runs are needed on irrigation canals and creeks, the Boise River, and the New York Canal. Piezometers installed at different depths are needed to better define vertical ground-water movement and gradients. Additional work is needed to determine how seepage in canals and streams relates to environmental characteristics.

  16. Water-quality conditions of the lower Boise River, Ada and Canyon Counties, Idaho, May 1994 through February 1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mullins, William H.

    1998-01-01

    Agricultural land and water use, wastewater treatment facility discharges, land development, road construction, urban runoff, confined-animal feeding operations, reservoir operations, and river channelization affect the water quality and biotic integrity of the lower Boise River between Lucky Peak Dam and the river's mouth at Parma, Idaho. During May 1994 through February 1997, 4 sites on the Boise River, 12 tributary/drain sites, and 3 wastewater treatment facilities were sampled at various intervals during the irrigation (high-flow) and post-irrigation (low-flow) seasons to determine sources, concentrations, and relative loads of nutrients and suspended sediment. Discharge entering the Boise River from the 12 tributary/drain sites and 3 wastewater treatment facilities was measured to determine the nutrient loads being contributed from each source. Total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and suspended sediment concentrations and loads tended to increase in a downstream direction along the Boise River. Among the 15 sources of discharge to the Boise River, 3 southside tributary/drains and the West Boise wastewater treatment facility contributed the largest loads of total nitrogen; the median daily load was more than 2,000 pounds per day. The West Boise wastewater treatment facility contributed the largest median daily load of total phosphorus (810 pounds per day); Dixie Drain contributed the largest median daily load of suspended sediment (26.4 tons per day). Nitrogen-to-phosphorus ratios at the four Boise River sites indicated that phosphorus could be limiting algal growth at the Diversion Dam site, whereas nitrogen could be limiting algal growth at the Glenwood and Middleton sites during some parts of the year. Algal growth in the Boise River near Parma did not appear to be nutrient limited. Because of the complexity of the plumbing system in the lower Boise River (numerous diversions and inflow points), accurate comparisons between discharge and nutrient loads entering

  17. Water-quality conditions near the confluence of the Snake and Boise Rivers, Canyon County, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Molly S.; Etheridge, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) have been established under authority of the Federal Clean Water Act for the Snake River-Hells Canyon reach, on the border of Idaho and Oregon, to improve water quality and preserve beneficial uses such as public consumption, recreation, and aquatic habitat. The TMDL sets targets for seasonal average and annual maximum concentrations of chlorophyll-a at 14 and 30 micrograms per liter, respectively. To attain these conditions, the maximum total phosphorus concentration at the mouth of the Boise River in Idaho, a tributary to the Snake River, has been set at 0.07 milligrams per liter. However, interactions among chlorophyll-a, nutrients, and other key water-quality parameters that may affect beneficial uses in the Snake and Boise Rivers are unknown. In addition, contributions of nutrients and chlorophyll-a loads from the Boise River to the Snake River have not been fully characterized. To evaluate seasonal trends and relations among nutrients and other water-quality parameters in the Boise and Snake Rivers, a comprehensive monitoring program was conducted near their confluence in water years (WY) 2009 and 2010. The study also provided information on the relative contribution of nutrient and sediment loads from the Boise River to the Snake River, which has an effect on water-quality conditions in downstream reservoirs. State and site-specific water-quality standards, in addition to those that relate to the Snake River-Hells Canyon TMDL, have been established to protect beneficial uses in both rivers. Measured water-quality conditions in WY2009 and WY2010 exceeded these targets at one or more sites for the following constituents: water temperature, total phosphorus concentrations, total phosphorus loads, dissolved oxygen concentration, pH, and chlorophyll-a concentrations (WY2009 only). All measured total phosphorus concentrations in the Boise River near Parma exceeded the seasonal target of 0.07 milligram per liter. Data collected

  18. Combined Active and Passive Solar Space Heating and Solar Hot Water Systems for an Elementary School in Boise, Idaho.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smull, Neil A.; Armstrong, Gerald L.

    1979-01-01

    Amity Elementary School in Boise, Idaho, features a solar space heating and domestic hot water system along with an earth covering to accommodate the passive aspects of energy conservation. (Author/MLF)

  19. Water-quality conditions near the confluence of the Snake and Boise Rivers, Canyon County, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Molly S.; Etheridge, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) have been established under authority of the Federal Clean Water Act for the Snake River-Hells Canyon reach, on the border of Idaho and Oregon, to improve water quality and preserve beneficial uses such as public consumption, recreation, and aquatic habitat. The TMDL sets targets for seasonal average and annual maximum concentrations of chlorophyll-a at 14 and 30 micrograms per liter, respectively. To attain these conditions, the maximum total phosphorus concentration at the mouth of the Boise River in Idaho, a tributary to the Snake River, has been set at 0.07 milligrams per liter. However, interactions among chlorophyll-a, nutrients, and other key water-quality parameters that may affect beneficial uses in the Snake and Boise Rivers are unknown. In addition, contributions of nutrients and chlorophyll-a loads from the Boise River to the Snake River have not been fully characterized. To evaluate seasonal trends and relations among nutrients and other water-quality parameters in the Boise and Snake Rivers, a comprehensive monitoring program was conducted near their confluence in water years (WY) 2009 and 2010. The study also provided information on the relative contribution of nutrient and sediment loads from the Boise River to the Snake River, which has an effect on water-quality conditions in downstream reservoirs. State and site-specific water-quality standards, in addition to those that relate to the Snake River-Hells Canyon TMDL, have been established to protect beneficial uses in both rivers. Measured water-quality conditions in WY2009 and WY2010 exceeded these targets at one or more sites for the following constituents: water temperature, total phosphorus concentrations, total phosphorus loads, dissolved oxygen concentration, pH, and chlorophyll-a concentrations (WY2009 only). All measured total phosphorus concentrations in the Boise River near Parma exceeded the seasonal target of 0.07 milligram per liter. Data collected

  20. Discharge and sediment loads in the Boise River drainage basin, Idaho 1939-40

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, S.K.; Benedict, Paul Charles

    1948-01-01

    The Boise River project is a highly developed agricultural area comprising some 520 square miles of valley and bench lands in southwestern Idaho. Water for irrigation is obtained from the Boise River and its tributaries which are regulated by storage in Arrow Rock and Deer Flat reservoirs. Distribution of water to the farms is effected by 27 principal canals and several small farm laterals which divert directly from the river. The- New York Canal, which is the largest, not only supplies water to smaller canals and farm laterals, but also is used to fill Deer Flat Reservoir near Nampa from which water is furnished to farms in the lower valley. During the past 15 years maintenance costs in a number of those canals have increased due to deposition of sediment in them and in the river channel itself below the mouth of Moore Creek. Interest in determining the runoff and sediment loads from certain areas in the Boise River drainage basin led to an investigation by the Flood Control Coordinating Committee of the Department of Agriculture. Measurements of daily discharge and sediments loads were made by the Geological Survey at 13 stations in the drainage basin during the 18-month period ended June 30, 1940. The stations were on streams in areas having different kinds of vegetative cover and subjected to different kinds of land-use practice. Data obtained during the investigation furnish a basis for certain comparisons of runoff and sediment loads from several areas arid for several periods of time. Runoff measured at stations on the. Boise River near Twin Springs and on Moore Creek near Arrow Rock was smaller during 1939 than during 1940 and was below the average annual runoff for the period of available record. Runoff measured at the other stations on the project also was smaller during 1939 than during 1940 and probably did not exceed the average for the previous 25 years. The sediment loads measured during the spring runoff in 1939 were smaller at most stations than

  1. PoroTomo Subtask 3.8D - Raw Pressure Data from Boise Hydrogephysical Research Site (BHRS)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Lim, David

    2013-07-17

    Pressure data from a phreatic aquifer was collected in the summer of 2013 during Multi-frequency Oscillatory Hydraulic Tomography pumping tests. All tests were performed at the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site. The data will be inverted using a fast steady-periodic adjoint-based inverse code.

  2. 77 FR 68146 - Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment To Amend Bureau of Land Management, Boise...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-15

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment To Amend Bureau of Land Management, Boise District, Land Use Plans To Clarify Lands Eligible for Disposal; Correction AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Correction. SUMMARY: This action corrects the ZIP...

  3. An Historiographical Analysis of the Impact of the 1960s on Institutions of Higher Education in Metropolitan Boise, Idaho

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, R. Scott

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation traces the history of three of the colleges in Idaho's Treasure Valley during the 1960s: Boise State University (BSU), the College of Idaho (C of I), and Northwest Nazarene University (NNU). The time period examined in the study begins with the Soviet launch of Sputnik in late 1957 and ends with the deaths of students during…

  4. Phosphorus and suspended sediment load estimates for the Lower Boise River, Idaho, 1994-2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donato, Mary M.; MacCoy, Dorene E.

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey used LOADEST, newly developed load estimation software, to develop regression equations and estimate loads of total phosphorus (TP), dissolved orthophosphorus (OP), and suspended sediment (SS) from January 1994 through September 2002 at four sites on the lower Boise River: Boise River below Diversion Dam near Boise, Boise River at Glenwood Bridge at Boise, Boise River near Middleton, and Boise River near Parma. The objective was to help the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality develop and implement total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) by providing spatial and temporal resolution for phosphorus and sediment loads and enabling load estimates made by mass balance calculations to be refined and validated. Regression models for TP and OP generally were well fit on the basis of regression coefficients of determination (R2), but results varied in quality from site to site. The TP and OP results for Glenwood probably were affected by the upstream wastewater-treatment plant outlet, which provides a variable phosphorus input that is unrelated to river discharge. Regression models for SS generally were statistically well fit. Regression models for Middleton for all constituents, although statistically acceptable, were of limited usefulness because sparse and intermittent discharge data at that site caused many gaps in the resulting estimates. Although the models successfully simulated measured loads under predominant flow conditions, errors in TP and SS estimates at Middleton and in TP estimates at Parma were larger during high- and low-flow conditions. This shortcoming might be improved if additional concentration data for a wider range of flow conditions were available for calibrating the model. The average estimated daily TP load ranged from less than 250 pounds per day (lb/d) at Diversion to nearly 2,200 lb/d at Parma. Estimated TP loads at all four sites displayed cyclical variations coinciding with seasonal fluctuations in discharge

  5. Digital Database of Selected Aggregate and Related Resources in Ada, Boise, Canyon, Elmore, Gem, and Owyhee Counties, Southwestern Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moyle, Phillip R.; Wallis, John C.; Bliss, James D.; Bolm, Karen D.

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) compiled a database of aggregate sites and geotechnical sample data for six counties - Ada, Boise, Canyon, Elmore, Gem, and Owyhee - in southwest Idaho as part of a series of studies in support of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) planning process. Emphasis is placed on sand and gravel sites in deposits of the Boise River, Snake River, and other fluvial systems and in Neogene lacustrine deposits. Data were collected primarily from unpublished Idaho Transportation Department (ITD) records and BLM site descriptions, published Army Corps of Engineers (ACE) records, and USGS sampling data. The results of this study provides important information needed by land-use planners and resource managers, particularly in the BLM, to anticipate and plan for demand and development of sand and gravel and other mineral material resources on public lands in response to the urban growth in southwestern Idaho.

  6. Water-quality and biological conditions in the Lower Boise River, Ada and Canyon Counties, Idaho, 1994-2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacCoy, Dorene E.

    2004-01-01

    The water quality and biotic integrity of the lower Boise River between Lucky Peak Dam and the river's mouth near Parma, Idaho, have been affected by agricultural land and water use, wastewater treatment facility discharge, urbanization, reservoir operations, and river channel alteration. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and cooperators have studied water-quality and biological aspects of the lower Boise River in the past to address water-quality concerns and issues brought forth by the Clean Water Act of 1977. Past and present issues include preservation of beneficial uses of the river for fisheries, recreation, and irrigation; and maintenance of high-quality water for domestic and agricultural uses. Evaluation of the data collected from 1994 to 2002 by the USGS revealed increases in constituent concentrations in the lower Boise in a downstream direction. Median suspended sediment concentrations from Diversion Dam (downstream from Lucky Peak Dam) to Parma increased more than 11 times, nitrogen concentrations increased more than 8 times, phosphorus concentrations increased more than 7 times, and fecal coliform concentrations increased more than 400 times. Chlorophyll-a concentrations, used as an indicator of nutrient input and the potential for nuisance algal growth, also increased in a downstream direction; median concentrations were highest at the Middleton and Parma sites. There were no discernible temporal trends in nutrients, sediment, or bacteria concentrations over the 8-year study. The State of Idaho?s temperature standards to protect coldwater biota and salmonid spawning were exceeded most frequently at Middleton and Parma. Suspended sediment concentrations exceeded criteria proposed by Idaho Department of Environmental Quality most frequently at Parma and at all but three tributaries. Total nitrogen concentrations at Glenwood, Middleton, and Parma exceeded national background levels; median flow-adjusted total nitrogen concentrations at Middleton and

  7. Discharge and sediment loads in the Boise River drainage basin, Idaho 1939-40

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, S.K.; Benedict, Paul Charles

    1948-01-01

    The Boise River project is a highly developed agricultural area comprising some 520 square miles of valley and bench lands in southwestern Idaho. Water for irrigation is obtained from the Boise River and its tributaries which are regulated by storage in Arrow Rock and Deer Flat reservoirs. Distribution of water to the farms is effected by 27 principal canals and several small farm laterals which divert directly from the river. The- New York Canal, which is the largest, not only supplies water to smaller canals and farm laterals, but also is used to fill Deer Flat Reservoir near Nampa from which water is furnished to farms in the lower valley. During the past 15 years maintenance costs in a number of those canals have increased due to deposition of sediment in them and in the river channel itself below the mouth of Moore Creek. Interest in determining the runoff and sediment loads from certain areas in the Boise River drainage basin led to an investigation by the Flood Control Coordinating Committee of the Department of Agriculture. Measurements of daily discharge and sediments loads were made by the Geological Survey at 13 stations in the drainage basin during the 18-month period ended June 30, 1940. The stations were on streams in areas having different kinds of vegetative cover and subjected to different kinds of land-use practice. Data obtained during the investigation furnish a basis for certain comparisons of runoff and sediment loads from several areas arid for several periods of time. Runoff measured at stations on the. Boise River near Twin Springs and on Moore Creek near Arrow Rock was smaller during 1939 than during 1940 and was below the average annual runoff for the period of available record. Runoff measured at the other stations on the project also was smaller during 1939 than during 1940 and probably did not exceed the average for the previous 25 years. The sediment loads measured during the spring runoff in 1939 were smaller at most stations than

  8. Capture and Sequestration of CO2 at the Boise White Paper Mill

    SciTech Connect

    B.P. McGrail; C.J. Freeman; G.H. Beeman; E.C. Sullivan; S.K. Wurstner; C.F. Brown; R.D. Garber; D. Tobin E.J. Steffensen; S. Reddy; J.P. Gilmartin

    2010-06-16

    This report documents the efforts taken to develop a preliminary design for the first commercial-scale CO2 capture and sequestration (CCS) project associated with biomass power integrated into a pulp and paper operation. The Boise Wallula paper mill is located near the township of Wallula in Southeastern Washington State. Infrastructure at the paper mill will be upgraded such that current steam needs and a significant portion of the current mill electric power are supplied from a 100% biomass power source. A new biomass power system will be constructed with an integrated amine-based CO2 capture plant to capture approximately 550,000 tons of CO2 per year for geologic sequestration. A customized version of Fluor Corporation’s Econamine Plus™ carbon capture technology will be designed to accommodate the specific chemical composition of exhaust gases from the biomass boiler. Due to the use of biomass for fuel, employing CCS technology represents a unique opportunity to generate a net negative carbon emissions footprint, which on an equivalent emissions reduction basis is 1.8X greater than from equivalent fossil fuel sources (SPATH and MANN, 2004). Furthermore, the proposed project will offset a significant amount of current natural gas use at the mill, equating to an additional 200,000 tons of avoided CO2 emissions. Hence, the total net emissions avoided through this project equates to 1,100,000 tons of CO2 per year. Successful execution of this project will provide a clear path forward for similar kinds of emissions reduction that can be replicated at other energy-intensive industrial facilities where the geology is suitable for sequestration. This project also represents a first opportunity for commercial development of geologic storage of CO2 in deep flood basalt formations. The Boise paper mill site is host to a Phase II pilot study being carried out under DOE’s Regional Carbon Partnership Program. Lessons learned from this pilot study and other separately

  9. Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site: Field-Scale Test Facility for Addressing Fundamental Questions of Environmental Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrash, W.; Routh, P. S.

    2006-12-01

    The Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site (BHRS) is a research wellfield or field-scale test facility developed in a shallow, coarse, fluvial aquifer with the objectives of supporting (a) development of cost-effective, non- invasive methods for quantitative characterization and imaging methods in heterogeneous aquifers using hydrologic and geophysical techniques; (b) examination of fundamental relationships and processes at multiple scales; (c) testing theories and models for groundwater flow and solute transport; and (d) educating and training the next generation of professionals in multidisciplinary subsurface science and engineering. The design of the wells and the wellfield provide for a wide range of single-well, cross-hole, multiwell and multilevel hydrologic, geophysical, and combined hydrologic-geophysical experiments. Efforts have been focused largely on (a) establishing the 3D distributions of geologic, hydrologic, and geophysical parameters which can then be used as the basis for testing methods to jointly invert hard and soft data to return the "known" 3D K distribution and (b) developing subsurface measurement and imaging methods including static and time-lapse tomographic imaging methods. From this work we have developed a good understanding of the hydrostratigraphic framework of the BHRS as a hierarchical system which includes layers and lenses; this framework is recognized with geologic, hydrologic, radar, seismic, and EM methods and tracer tests. Work to date has been conducted by Boise State University with some collaboration and exchange with researchers and students from other institutions. At this point the BHRS is functioning well as a field-scale control volume and test cell in a multiscale heterogeneous aquifer so there is an opportunity to increase the range of both collaborative participation and research activities at the BHRS. In this regard, opportunities exist to investigate and monitor process and property variation in time and space

  10. Oscillatory Hydraulic Tomography at the Field Scale: Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, D.; Barrash, W.; Cardiff, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    The use of sinusoidal or periodic testing for field-scale tomography of aquifer parameters (conductivity / storativity) is a novel, minimally-invasive method for aquifer characterization between boreholes. Previous results have demonstrated the effectiveness of this method, which we name Oscillatory Hydraulic Tomography (OHT), through both numerical and laboratory experiments. However, implementation and analysis of field-scale OHT testing has not been achieved to-date, and thus the technique remains unproven for application in real-world aquifers. We present an evaluation of OHT at the field scale here through application at the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site (BHRS), a field-scale (~20m diameter x 20m thickness) research site. Through Bayesian inversion, we assess issues such as data quality impacts and resolution of obtained tomographic images. We discuss issues associated with both data collection and data processing, and based on our experiences suggest a workflow for OHT performance at other field sites. The advantages of OHT, relative to "traditional" hydraulic tomography with constant rate pumping tests, include the ability to test across a range of stimulation frequencies (obtaining increased heterogeneity information), very high signal-to-noise ratios. Additionally, we examine the impact of nonlinear effects - such as water table boundary conditions - and their impact on OHT analysis algorithms.

  11. Thermal springs in the Boise River basin, south-central Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis, R.E.; Young, H.W.

    1982-01-01

    The Boise River Basin, characterized by steep, rugged mountains and narrow river valleys, drains an area of about 2,680 square miles in south-central Idaho. Granitic rocks of the Idaho batholith predominate in the basin. Temperature of waters from thermal springs in the basin range from 33 degrees to 87 degrees Celsius, are sodium carbonate type and are slightly alkaline. Dissolved-solids concentrations are less than 280 milligrams per liter. Estimated reservoir temperatures determined by the silica and sodium-potassium-calcium geothermometers range from 50 degrees to 98 degrees Celsius. Tritium concentrations in sampled thermal springs are near zero and indicate these waters were recharged prior to 1954. Stable-isotope data are not conclusive insofar as indicating a source area of recharge for the thermal springs in the basin. Thermal springs discharged at least 4,900 acre-feet of water in 1981, and the associated convective heat flux is 11,000,000 calories per second. (USGS)

  12. Stream channel cross sections for a reach of the Boise River in Ada County, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hortness, Jon E.; Werner, Douglas C.

    1999-01-01

    The Federal Emergency Management Agency produces maps of areas that are likely to be inundated during major floods, usually the 100-year, or 1-percent probability, flood. The maps, called Flood Insurance Rate Maps, are used to determine flood insurance rates for homes, businesses, or other structures located in flood-prone areas. State and local governments also use these maps for help with, among other things, development planning and disaster mitigation. During the period October 1997 through December 1998, the initial phase of a hydraulic analysis project of the Boise River from Barber Dam to the Ada/Canyon County boundary, the U.S. Geological Survey collected stream channel cross-section data at 238 locations along the river and documented 108 elevation reference marks established for horizontal and vertical control. In the final phase of the project, the Survey will use these data to determine water-surface elevations for the 10-, 50-, 100-, and 500-year floods and to define floodway limits. The Federal Emergency Management Agency will use the results of this hydraulic analysis to update the 100- and 500-year flood boundaries and the floodway limits on their Flood Insurance Rate Maps.

  13. A population balance model for transient and steady-state foam flow in Boise sandstone

    SciTech Connect

    Kovscek, A.; Patzek, T.; Radke, C.

    1995-07-01

    An experimental and mechanistic-modeling study is reported for the transient flow of aqueous foam through 1.3-{mu}m{sup 2} (1.3-D) Boise sandstone at backpressures in excess of 5 MPa (700 psi) over a quality range from 0.80 to 0.99. Total superficial velocities range from as little as 0.42 to 2.20 m/day (1.4 ft/day to 7 ft/day). Sequential pressure taps and gamma-ray densitometry measure flow resistance and in-situ liquid saturations, respectively. We garner experimental pressure and saturation profiles in both the transient and steady states. Adoption of a mean-size foam-bubble conservation equation along with the traditional reservoir simulation equations allows mechanistic foam simulation. Since foam mobility depends heavily upon its texture, the bubble population balance is both useful and necessary as the role of foam texture must be incorporated into any model which seeks accurate prediction of flow properties. Our model employs capillary-pressure-dependent kinetic expressions for lamellae generation and coalescence and also a term for trapping of lamellae. Additionally, the effects of surfactant chemical transport are included. We find quantitative agreement between experimental and theoretical saturation and pressure profiles in both the transient and steady states.

  14. Aquifer Characterization of the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site using 3-D Oscillatory Hydraulic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhos, T.; Cardiff, M. A.; Hochstetler, D. L.; Zhou, Y.; Barrash, W.; Kitanidis, P. K.

    2014-12-01

    Hydraulic Tomography is a method of aquifer characterization that estimates hydraulic parameters related to the subsurface, such as hydraulic conductivity and storage, from measurements of hydraulic heads at numerous observation locations during a series of hydrologic tests, commonly pumping tests. Characterizing the subsurface is important for many hydrogeologic projects such as site remediation and groundwater resource exploration. Oscillatory Hydraulic Tomography (OHT) is a method of imaging that uses a tomographic analysis of periodic signals. These signals are generated at distinct locations by oscillatory pumping tests in which fluid is extracted for half a period then re-injected. The transmitted effects of these signals are recorded at observation wells. The resulting measurements can be used to reconstruct the spatial variation of hydraulic parameters by solving a nonlinear inverse problem, which we solve using the geostatistical approach. Oscillatory pumping test data were collected in the summer of 2013 in an extensive field campaign at the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site (BHRS), a moderately heterogeneous unconfined aquifer. We present results of OHT applied to the BHRS.

  15. Monitoring plan for mercury in fish tissue and water from the Boise River, Snake River, and Brownlee Reservoir, Idaho and Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mebane, Christopher A.; MacCoy, Dorene E.

    2013-01-01

    The methylmercury criterion adopted as a water-quality standard in the State of Idaho is a concentration in fish tissue rather than a concentration in water. A plan for monitoring mercury in fish tissue and water was developed to evaluate whether fish in the Boise River, Idaho, upstream and downstream of wastewater-treatment plant discharges, meet the methylmercury water-quality criterion. Monitoring also will be conducted at sites on the Snake River, upstream and downstream of the confluence with the Boise River, and in Brownlee Reservoir, which lies along the border between Idaho and Oregon. Descriptions of standard procedures for collecting and processing samples and quality assurance steps are included. This monitoring plan is intended to provide a framework for cooperative methylmercury sampling in the lower Boise River basin.

  16. Investigating the impact of limited irrigation practices on soil moisture variability and vineyard performance, Boise, Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffin, J.; Wilkins, D. E.; Guenther, J.

    2012-12-01

    In semiarid regions, the changing climate may affect the timing and form of precipitation. This could result in increased water stress for agricultural production as available surface water for irrigation diminishes. To prepare for these changing conditions the possibility of limited-irrigation agriculture as an alternative to heavily-irrigated production is being investigated. This study specifically investigates the ability to grow productive wine grapes with different levels of limited irrigation in the Boise Front foothills at the West Foothills TIC Vineyard, located in a climate zone receiving less than 300 mm of annual precipitation over two growing seasons (2011-2012). The vineyard is divided into three test plots on a northwest facing-slope. Soil texture analyses show that soils are homogenous across all three plots. Traditional vineyard performance factors, such as planting densities, soil type, rootstock, and climate, are standardized and serve as constants in this study. Thus, the limiting factor for vine performance is the difference in irrigation on each plot. Water delivery through drip emitters varies in each of the three vineyard test plots from 2 gallons per week to 0.75 gallons per week. Soil moisture is monitored at depths of 0.25 meters and 0.50 meters in two pits in each of the test plots, collecting data in 2011 and 2012, and in a third pit added to each plot in 2012 at upper elevations. The paired upper elevation sensors record the natural soil moisture and the irrigated soil moisture in each irrigation scheme. Soil moisture for each plot, compared to the annual mortality and growth rates of the vines, will suggest a minimum irrigation level needed for limited irrigation farming and highlight other factors that may affect vine performance in this location.

  17. Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) survey of the Idaho State Emergency Operating Center, Boise, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Crutcher, R.I.; Buchanan, M.E.; Jones, R.W.

    1992-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to develop an engineering design package to protect the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) National Radio System (FNARS) facilities from the effects of high- altitude electromagnetic pulses (HEMPs). This report was developed specifically for the Idaho State Emergency Operating Center (EOC) in Boise, Idaho. It is highly probable that there will be a heavy dependence upon high-frequency (hf) radio communications for long- haul communications following a nuclear attack on the continental United States, should one occur. To maintain the viability of the FEMA hf radio network during such a situation, steps must be taken to protect the FNARS facilities against the effects of HEMP that are likely to be created in a nuclear confrontation. The solution must than be to reduce HEMP-induced stresses on the system by means of tailored retrofit hardening measures using commercial protection devices when available. It is the intent of this report to define the particular hardening measures that will minimize the susceptibility of system components to HEMP effects. To the extent economically viable, protective actions have been recommended for implementation, along with necessary changes or additions, during the period of the FNARS upgrade program. This report addresses electromagnetic pulse (EMP) effects only and disregards any condition in which radiation effects may be a factor. It has been established that, except for the source region of a surface burst, EMP effects of high-altitude bursts are more severe than comparable detonations in either air or surface regions. Any system hardened to withstand the more extreme EMP environment will survive the less severe EMP conditions. The threatening environment will therefore be limited to HEMP situations.

  18. Analysis of historical and current drawdown and production data from the Boise geothermal system. Research technical completion report

    SciTech Connect

    Waag, C.J.; Wood, S.H.

    1987-08-01

    Since 1982 withdrawals from the Boise Geothermal aquifer system have increased from less than 300 million to over 600 million gals/yr. Prior to 1983 the system appears to have been in or near equilibrium. Current production levels exceed the ability of the system to recover on an annual basis. Potentiometric levels within the aquifer are declining at increasing rates and a new equilibrium level is not evident. Thus, exploitation of the geothermal aquifer is currently outstripping knowledge and understanding of the aquifer. It is time to give serious consideration to placing a temporary moratorium on further development and production from the system until a better understanding of its capacity is achieved.

  19. Chemical and hydrologic data for selected thermal-water wells and nonthermal springs in the Boise Area, southwesten Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Young, H.W.; Parliman, D.J.; Mariner, R.H.

    1988-01-01

    Data were collected during January to July 1988 from 37 thermal-water wells and 3 nonthermal springs in the Boise area, southwestern Idaho. Included are well and spring locations; well-construction, water-level, and water-use information; hydrographs of water levels in 3 wells; chemical and isotopic analyses of water from 18 thermal-water wells and 3 nonthermal springs; and drillers ' logs from 23 wells. The purpose of the report is to make these data conveniently available to the public. (USGS)

  20. An Integrated Hydrologic-Economic Modeling Tool for Evaluating Water Management Responses to Climate Change in the Boise River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, R. D.; Taylor, R. G.; Stodick, L. D.; Contor, B. A.

    2009-12-01

    A recent federal interagency report on climate change and water management (Brekke et. al., 2009) describes several possible management responses to the impacts of climate change on water supply and demand. Management alternatives include changes to water supply infrastructure, reservoir system operations, and water demand policies. Water users in the Bureau of Reclamation’s Boise Project (located in the Lower Boise River basin in southwestern Idaho) would be among those impacted both hydrologically and economically by climate change. Climate change and management responses to climate change are expected to cause shifts in water supply and demand. Supply shifts would result from changes in basin precipitation patterns, and demand shifts would result from higher evapotranspiration rates and a longer growing season. The impacts would also extend to non-Project water users in the basin, since most non-Project groundwater pumpers and drain water diverters rely on hydrologic externalities created by seepage losses from Boise Project water deliveries. An integrated hydrologic-economic model was developed for the Boise basin to aid Reclamation in evaluating the hydrologic and economic impacts of various management responses to climate change. A spatial, partial-equilibrium, economic optimization model calculates spatially-distinct equilibrium water prices and quantities, and maximizes a social welfare function (the sum of consumer and producers surpluses) for all agricultural and municipal water suppliers and demanders (both Project and non-Project) in the basin. Supply-price functions and demand-price functions are exogenous inputs to the economic optimization model. On the supply side, groundwater and river/reservoir models are used to generate hydrologic responses to various management alternatives. The response data is then used to develop water supply-price functions for Project and non-Project water users. On the demand side, crop production functions

  1. Analytical determinations from samples taken in the Ten Mile West Roadless Area, Boise and Elmore counties, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kiilsgaard, Thor H.

    1982-01-01

    A total of 584 stream-sediment and rock samples were collected from within or near the Ten Mile West Roadless Area, Boise and Elmore Counties, Idaho, as part of a geologic study aimed at appraising the mineral resource potential of the area. Emphasis was placed on stream-sediment samples because stream sediments represent the erosional products of a drainage system and offer a rapid means of locating anomalous concentrations of ore-forming elements. An unusually high proportion of the stream-sediment samples contained concentrations of silver and molybdenum. Unaltered rocks of the area contain normal quantities of the common rock-forming elements. Some exposures of altered or mineralized rocks and some quartz veins contain significant quantities of gold and silver.

  2. Use of satellite data in runoff forecasting in the heavily forested, cloud-covered Pacific Northwest. [Upper Snake, Boise, Dworshak, Libby and Hungry Horse River Basins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillard, J. P.; Orwig, C. F. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Satellite-derived snow cover data improves forecasts of stream flow but not at a statistically significant amount and should not be used exclusively because of persistent cloud cover. Based upon reconstruction runs, satellite data can be used to augment snow-flight data in the Upper Snake, Boise, Dworshak, and Hungry Horse basins. Satellite data does not compare well with aerial snow-flight data in the Libby basin.

  3. Policy change and governance at the wildland-urban interface: the case of post-wildfire impacts in Boise, Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindquist, Eric

    2013-04-01

    In the summer of 2012 over 1.7 million acres (approximately 6900 sq kilometers) were burned from wildfires in the state of Idaho in the Western United States. While most of the these fires were in rural and wilderness areas, several significant fires occurred at the wildland-urban interface (WUI), threatening houses, communities and the built environment as never before. As the population of the Mountain West in the United States grows, the WUI (the area where homes are being built adjacent to traditionally wild or rural areas and the built environment encroaches on wildlands) is rapidly becoming an at risk area for human habitation. Efforts to make these areas more resilient and sustainable in the face of increasing fire risk, due to increasing drought and climate change, are resulting in efforts to change or adapt disaster response and planning policy. An increase in stakeholders, however, with diverse objectives and resources presents an opportunity to assess the current governance situation for policy change in response to wildland fires in the dynamic and complex context of the WUI. The research presented here will focus on the case of Treasure Valley region of southwest Idaho and Boise, the capitol city of Idaho. This region is illustrative of the growing urban western United States and the pressures from a growing population pushing into the WUI. This research frames fire policy and decision making at the wildland-urban interface within public policy process theory using the example of the summer of 2012 forest fires in Idaho (USA) and focuses on subsequents impact these fires are having on fire planning and policy in the Boise metropolitan region. The focus is on the diverse stakeholders (federal, state and regional agencies, tourism, agriculture and private sector interests, homeowner organizations, and fire response and recovery agencies) and their roles and responsibilities, their interactions, decision and policy processes, the use of science in

  4. Influences of body size and environmental factors on autumn downstream migration of bull trout in the Boise River, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Monnot, L.; Dunham, J.B.; Hoem, T.; Koetsier, P.

    2008-01-01

    Many fishes migrate extensively through stream networks, yet patterns are commonly described only in terms of the origin and destination of migration (e.g., between natal and feeding habitats). To better understand patterns of migration in bull trout,Salvelinus confluentus we studied the influences of body size (total length [TL]) and environmental factors (stream temperature and discharge) on migrations in the Boise River basin, Idaho. During the autumns of 2001-2003, we tracked the downstream migrations of 174 radio-tagged bull trout ranging in size from 21 to 73 cm TL. The results indicated that large bull trout (>30 cm) were more likely than small fish to migrate rapidly downstream after spawning in headwater streams in early autumn. Large bull trout also had a higher probability of arriving at the current terminus of migration in the system, Arrowrock Reservoir. The rate of migration by small bull trout was more variable and individuals were less likely to move into Arrowrock Reservoir. The rate of downstream migration by all fish was slower when stream discharge was greater. Temperature was not associated with the rate of migration. These findings indicate that fish size and environmentally related changes in behavior have important influences on patterns of migration. In a broader context, these results and other recent work suggest, at least in some cases, that commonly used classifications of migratory behavior may not accurately reflect the full range of behaviors and variability among individuals (or life stages) and environmental conditions. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2008.

  5. Mercury concentrations in water, and mercury and selenium concentrations in fish from Brownlee Reservoir and selected sites in Boise and Snake Rivers, Idaho and Oregon, 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacCoy, Dorene E.

    2014-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) analyses were conducted on samples of sport fish and water collected from six sampling sites in the Boise and Snake Rivers, and Brownlee Reservoir to meet National Pollution Discharge and Elimination System (NPDES) permit requirements for the City of Boise, Idaho. A water sample was collected from each site during October and November 2013 by the City of Boise personnel and was analyzed by the Boise City Public Works Water Quality Laboratory. Total Hg concentrations in unfiltered water samples ranged from 0.73 to 1.21 nanograms per liter (ng/L) at five river sites; total Hg concentration was highest (8.78 ng/L) in a water sample from Brownlee Reservoir. All Hg concentrations in water samples were less than the EPA Hg chronic aquatic life criterion in Idaho (12 ng/L). The EPA recommended a water-quality criterion of 0.30 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) methylmercury (MeHg) expressed as a fish-tissue residue value (wet-weight MeHg in fish tissue). MeHg residue in fish tissue is considered to be equivalent to total Hg in fish muscle tissue and is referred to as Hg in this report. The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality adopted the EPA’s fish-tissue criterion and a reasonable potential to exceed (RPTE) threshold 20 percent lower than the criterion or greater than 0.24 mg/kg based on an average concentration of 10 fish from a receiving waterbody. NPDES permitted discharge to waters with fish having Hg concentrations exceeding 0.24 mg/kg are said to have a reasonable potential to exceed the water-quality criterion and thus are subject to additional permit obligations, such as requirements for increased monitoring and the development of a Hg minimization plan. The Idaho Fish Consumption Advisory Program (IFCAP) issues fish advisories to protect general and sensitive populations of fish consumers and has developed an action level of 0.22 mg/kg wet weight Hg in fish tissue. Fish consumption advisories are water body- and species-specific and are used to

  6. Patterns of hybridization of nonnative cutthroat trout and hatchery rainbow trout with native redband trout in the Boise River, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neville, Helen M.; Dunham, Jason B.

    2011-01-01

    Hybridization is one of the greatest threats to native fishes. Threats from hybridization are particularly important for native trout species as stocking of nonnative trout has been widespread within the ranges of native species, thus increasing the potential for hybridization. While many studies have documented hybridization between native cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii and nonnative rainbow trout O. mykiss, fewer have focused on this issue in native rainbow trout despite widespread threats from introductions of both nonnative cutthroat trout and hatchery rainbow trout. Here, we describe the current genetic (i.e., hybridization) status of native redband trout O. mykiss gairdneri populations in the upper Boise River, Idaho. Interspecific hybridization was widespread (detected at 14 of the 41 sampled locations), but high levels of hybridization between nonnative cutthroat trout and redband trout were detected in only a few streams. Intraspecific hybridization was considerably more widespread (almost 40% of sampled locations), and several local populations of native redband trout have been almost completely replaced with hatchery coastal rainbow trout O. mykiss irideus; other populations exist as hybrid swarms, some are in the process of being actively invaded, and some are maintaining genetic characteristics of native populations. The persistence of some redband trout populations with high genetic integrity provides some opportunity to conserve native genomes, but our findings also highlight the complex decisions facing managers today. Effective management strategies in this system may include analysis of the specific attributes of each site and population to evaluate the relative risks posed by isolation versus maintaining connectivity, identifying potential sites for control or eradication of nonnative trout, and long-term monitoring of the genetic integrity of remaining redband trout populations to track changes in their status.

  7. Hydrological parameter estimations from a conservative tracer test with variable-density effects at the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dafflon, B.; Barrash, W.; Cardiff, M.; Johnson, T. C.

    2011-12-01

    Reliable predictions of groundwater flow and solute transport require an estimation of the detailed distribution of the parameters (e.g., hydraulic conductivity, effective porosity) controlling these processes. However, such parameters are difficult to estimate because of the inaccessibility and complexity of the subsurface. In this regard, developments in parameter estimation techniques and investigations of field experiments are still challenging and necessary to improve our understanding and the prediction of hydrological processes. Here we analyze a conservative tracer test conducted at the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site in 2001 in a heterogeneous unconfined fluvial aquifer. Some relevant characteristics of this test include: variable-density (sinking) effects because of the injection concentration of the bromide tracer, the relatively small size of the experiment, and the availability of various sources of geophysical and hydrological information. The information contained in this experiment is evaluated through several parameter estimation approaches, including a grid-search-based strategy, stochastic simulation of hydrological property distributions, and deterministic inversion using regularization and pilot-point techniques. Doing this allows us to investigate hydraulic conductivity and effective porosity distributions and to compare the effects of assumptions from several methods and parameterizations. Our results provide new insights into the understanding of variable-density transport processes and the hydrological relevance of incorporating various sources of information in parameter estimation approaches. Among others, the variable-density effect and the effective porosity distribution, as well as their coupling with the hydraulic conductivity structure, are seen to be significant in the transport process. The results also show that assumed prior information can strongly influence the estimated distributions of hydrological properties.

  8. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) - FEMP Technical Assistance - Federal Aviation Administration - Project 209 - Control Tower and Support Building, Boise, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Arends, J.; Sandusky, William F.

    2010-06-28

    This report documents an energy audit performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Redhorse Corporation (Redhorse) conducted on the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) control tower and base building in Boise, Idaho. This report presents findings of the energy audit team that evaluated construction documents and operating specifications (at the 100% level) followed by a site visit of the facility under construction. The focus of the review was to identify measures that could be incorporated into the final design and operating specifications that would result in additional energy savings for FAA that would not have otherwise occurred.

  9. Assessment of the sand and gravel resources of the Lower Boise River Valley area, Idaho: part one: geological framework of the sand and gravel deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bliss, James D.; Moyle, Phillip R.

    2001-01-01

    The USGS has undertaken a first order evaluation of sand & gravel resources in the Lower Boise River Valley in response to rapid urban expansion in the Boise-Nampa-Caldwell corridor in southwest Idaho. The study is intended to provide land-use planners and managers, particularly in the Bureau of Land Management, with a foundation of knowledge that will allow them to anticipate and plan for demand for and development of sand and gravel resources on public lands in response to the urban growth. Attributes under study include: regional geology of both alluvial source areas as well as deposits; fluvial processes that led to deposition of the sand and gravel deposits; spatial distribution of the deposits; quantity and quality of materials in the deposits; and the suitability of the deposits for a range of applications. The study will also examine and attempt to model the association between fluvial processes, deposit characteristics, and physical specifications for various applications of sand and gravel. The results will be presented in a series of sand and gravel assessment reports of which this is the first.

  10. Water-quality and biological conditions in selected tributaries of the Lower Boise River, southwestern Idaho, water years 2009-12

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Etheridge, Alexandra B.; MacCoy, Dorene E.; Weakland, Rhonda J.

    2014-01-01

    Water-quality conditions were studied in selected tributaries of the lower Boise River during water years 2009–12, including Fivemile and Tenmile Creeks in 2009, Indian Creek in 2010, and Mason Creek in 2011 and 2012. Biological samples, including periphyton biomass and chlorophyll-a, benthic macroinvertebrates, and fish were collected in Mason Creek in October 2011. Synoptic water-quality sampling events were timed to coincide with the beginning and middle of the irrigation season as well as the non-irrigation season, and showed that land uses and irrigation practices affect water quality in the selected tributaries. Large increases in nutrient and sediment concentrations and loads occurred over relatively short stream reaches and affected nutrient and sediment concentrations downstream of those reaches. Escherichia coli (E. coli) values increased in study reaches adjacent to pastured lands or wastewater treatment plants, but increased E. coli values at upstream locations did not necessarily affect E. coli values at downstream locations. A spatial loading analysis identified source areas for nutrients, sediment, and E. coli, and might be useful in selecting locations for water-quality improvement projects. Effluent from wastewater treatment plants increased nutrient loads in specific reaches in Fivemile and Indian Creeks. Increased suspended-sediment loads were associated with increased discharge from irrigation returns in each of the studied tributaries. Samples collected during or shortly after storms showed that surface runoff, particularly during the winter, may be an important source of nutrients in tributary watersheds with substantial agricultural land use. Concentrations of total phosphorus, suspended sediment, and E. coli exceeded regulatory water-quality targets or trigger levels at one or more monitoring sites in each tributary studied, and exceedences occurred during irrigation season more often than during non-irrigation season. As with water

  11. Water-quality and biological conditions in selected tributaries of the Lower Boise River, southwestern Idaho, water years 2009-12

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Etheridge, Alexandra B.; MacCoy, Dorene E.; Weakland, Rhonda J.

    2014-01-01

    Water-quality conditions were studied in selected tributaries of the lower Boise River during water years 2009–12, including Fivemile and Tenmile Creeks in 2009, Indian Creek in 2010, and Mason Creek in 2011 and 2012. Biological samples, including periphyton biomass and chlorophyll-a, benthic macroinvertebrates, and fish were collected in Mason Creek in October 2011. Synoptic water-quality sampling events were timed to coincide with the beginning and middle of the irrigation season as well as the non-irrigation season, and showed that land uses and irrigation practices affect water quality in the selected tributaries. Large increases in nutrient and sediment concentrations and loads occurred over relatively short stream reaches and affected nutrient and sediment concentrations downstream of those reaches. Escherichia coli (E. coli) values increased in study reaches adjacent to pastured lands or wastewater treatment plants, but increased E. coli values at upstream locations did not necessarily affect E. coli values at downstream locations. A spatial loading analysis identified source areas for nutrients, sediment, and E. coli, and might be useful in selecting locations for water-quality improvement projects. Effluent from wastewater treatment plants increased nutrient loads in specific reaches in Fivemile and Indian Creeks. Increased suspended-sediment loads were associated with increased discharge from irrigation returns in each of the studied tributaries. Samples collected during or shortly after storms showed that surface runoff, particularly during the winter, may be an important source of nutrients in tributary watersheds with substantial agricultural land use. Concentrations of total phosphorus, suspended sediment, and E. coli exceeded regulatory water-quality targets or trigger levels at one or more monitoring sites in each tributary studied, and exceedences occurred during irrigation season more often than during non-irrigation season. As with water

  12. Biological assessment of the lower Boise River, October 1995 through January 1998, Ada and Canyon Counties, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mullins, William H.

    1999-01-01

    The lower Boise River, between Lucky Peak Dam and the mouth of the river near Parma, Idaho, is adversely affected by various land- and water-use activities. To assess the biotic integrity of the river and the effects of environmental perturbations on aquatic community structure, and to provide a baseline from which to identify future changes in habitat conditions, biological data were collected from October 1995 through January 1998 and evaluated using protocols developed for the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program. Aquatic biological communities were sampled according to the following schedule: epilithic periphyton were collected in October 1995, October 1996, and August 1997; benthic macroinvertebrates were collected in October 1995, 1996, and 1997; and fish were collected in December 1996 and August 1997. Qualitative measurements of instream and riparian habitat indicated an overall decrease in instream habitat quality in a downstream direction. Embeddedness was high at all sites but was lower at the Eckert Road site than at the downstream sites near Middleton and Parma. Silt/sand substrate increased from 17 percent at the Eckert Road site to 49 percent near the mouth of the river. The Eckert Road site had a mix of geomorphic channel units (pool/riffle/run), whereas the Middleton and Parma sites were dominated by runs with very little pool or riffle habitat. Epilithic periphyton chlorophyll-a and ashfree dry weight values tended to increase downstream to the Middleton site and decrease from Middleton to the downstream sites near Caldwell and near Parma. Benthic index of biotic integrity (B-IBI) scores for macroinvertebrates collected in 1995, 1996, and 1997 were highest at the Eckert Road site and decreased at sites downstream. IBI scores for fish collected in 1996 were similar at the Glenwood Bridge and Middleton sites (17 and 16, respectively) and were indicative of a low to moderate level of disturbance. In contrast, the IBI score

  13. Evaluation of LiDAR-Acquired Bathymetric and Topographic Data Accuracy in Various Hydrogeomorphic Settings in the Lower Boise River, Southwestern Idaho, 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skinner, Kenneth D.

    2009-01-01

    Elevation data in riverine environments can be used in various applications for which different levels of accuracy are required. The Experimental Advanced Airborne Research LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) - or EAARL - system was used to obtain topographic and bathymetric data along the lower Boise River, southwestern Idaho, for use in hydraulic and habitat modeling. The EAARL data were post-processed into bare earth and bathymetric raster and point datasets. Concurrently with the EAARL data collection, real-time kinetic global positioning system and total station ground-survey data were collected in three areas within the lower Boise River basin to assess the accuracy of the EAARL elevation data in different hydrogeomorphic settings. The accuracies of the EAARL-derived elevation data, determined in open, flat terrain, to provide an optimal vertical comparison surface, had root mean square errors ranging from 0.082 to 0.138 m. Accuracies for bank, floodplain, and in-stream bathymetric data had root mean square errors ranging from 0.090 to 0.583 m. The greater root mean square errors for the latter data are the result of high levels of turbidity in the downstream ground-survey area, dense tree canopy, and horizontal location discrepancies between the EAARL and ground-survey data in steeply sloping areas such as riverbanks. The EAARL point to ground-survey comparisons produced results similar to those for the EAARL raster to ground-survey comparisons, indicating that the interpolation of the EAARL points to rasters did not introduce significant additional error. The mean percent error for the wetted cross-sectional areas of the two upstream ground-survey areas was 1 percent. The mean percent error increases to -18 percent if the downstream ground-survey area is included, reflecting the influence of turbidity in that area.

  14. Data for and adjusted regional regression models of volume and quality of urban storm-water runoff in Boise and Garden City, Idaho, 1993-94

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kjelstrom, L.C.

    1995-01-01

    Previously developed U.S. Geological Survey regional regression models of runoff and 11 chemical constituents were evaluated to assess their suitability for use in urban areas in Boise and Garden City. Data collected in the study area were used to develop adjusted regional models of storm-runoff volumes and mean concentrations and loads of chemical oxygen demand, dissolved and suspended solids, total nitrogen and total ammonia plus organic nitrogen as nitrogen, total and dissolved phosphorus, and total recoverable cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc. Explanatory variables used in these models were drainage area, impervious area, land-use information, and precipitation data. Mean annual runoff volume and loads at the five outfalls were estimated from 904 individual storms during 1976 through 1993. Two methods were used to compute individual storm loads. The first method used adjusted regional models of storm loads and the second used adjusted regional models for mean concentration and runoff volume. For large storms, the first method seemed to produce excessively high loads for some constituents and the second method provided more reliable results for all constituents except suspended solids. The first method provided more reliable results for large storms for suspended solids.

  15. Investigating the impact of restricted irrigation practices on soil moisture variability and distribution in a dry farmed vineyard site, Boise, Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffin, J.; Wilkins, D. E.; Guenther, J.

    2011-12-01

    Changing climate in semiarid regions may result in increased water stresses for agricultural production as timing and form of precipitation may result in diminished surface water for irrigation. To prepare for these changing conditions, studies are being conducted on the possibility of dry farmed agriculture as an alternative to irrigated production. This study specifically investigates the ability to grow productive wine grapes with limited or zero irrigation in the Boise Front Foothills, West Foothills TIC Vineyard, located in a climate zone receiving less than 300 mm of annual precipitation. Traditional vineyard performance factors such as planting densities, soil type, rootstock, and climate are standardized and serve as constants in this study. Thus, the limiting factor for vine performance is irrigation. Water delivery through drip emitters varies in each of the three test plots in the vineyard. Soil moisture is monitored at depths of 0.25 meters and 0.50 meters in two pits in each of the test plots. Prior to start of irrigation in June 2011, the sensors recorded the natural variability of moisture resulting solely from precipitation and evapotranspiration. From June on, drying trends are visible in all the data as they start to stabilize at lower moisture levels in July. After weekly irrigation started in June, soil moisture data showed no marked increase through irrigation input. This suggests that irrigation may have a limited role in moisture variability at this site. Vine performance is monitored through vine mortality within each test plot throughout a two year period. The results of this study will demonstrate if dry farming is a possibility in a dry microclimate.

  16. Mercury concentrations in water and mercury and selenium concentrations in fish from Brownlee Reservoir and selected sites in the Boise and Snake Rivers, Idaho and Oregon, 2013–15

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Marshall L.; MacCoy, Dorene E.

    2016-06-30

    Mercury (Hg) analyses were conducted on samples of sport fish and water collected from selected sampling sites in Brownlee Reservoir and the Boise and Snake Rivers to meet National Pollution Discharge and Elimination System (NPDES) permit requirements for the City of Boise, Idaho, between 2013 and 2015. City of Boise personnel collected water samples from six sites between October and November 2013 and 2015, with one site sampled in 2014. Total Hg concentrations in unfiltered water samples ranged from 0.48 to 8.8 nanograms per liter (ng/L), with the highest value in Brownlee Reservoir in 2013. All Hg concentrations in water samples were less than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Hg chronic aquatic life criterion of 12 ng/L.The USEPA recommended a water-quality criterion of 0.30 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) methylmercury (MeHg) expressed as a fish-tissue residue value (wet-weight MeHg in fish tissue). The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality adopted the USEPA’s fish-tissue criterion and established a reasonable potential to exceed (RPTE) threshold 20 percent lower than the criterion or greater than 0.24 mg/kg Hg based on an average concentration of 10 fish from a receiving waterbody. NPDES permitted discharge to waters with fish having Hg concentrations exceeding 0.24 mg/kg are said to have a reasonable potential to exceed the water-quality criterion and thus are subject to additional permit obligations, such as requirements for increased monitoring and the development of a Hg minimization plan. The Idaho Fish Consumption Advisory Program (IFCAP) issues fish advisories to protect general and sensitive populations of fish consumers and has developed an action level of 0.22 mg/kg Hg in fish tissue. Fish consumption advisories are water body- and species-specific and are used to advise allowable fish consumption from specific water bodies. The geometric mean Hg concentration of 10 fish of a single species collected from a single water body

  17. Modeling a Combined Tracer and Time-Lapse Radar Imaging Test in the Heterogeneous Fluvial Aquifer at the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leven, C.; Barrash, W.; Hyndman, D. W.; Johnson, T. C.

    2002-12-01

    Detailed characterization of aquifer heterogeneity is critical for the design and reliable monitoring of contaminant remediation systems. Traditional characterization efforts have been limited by the local nature of core measurements, and the inability to sample volumes between wells. A promising new approach for the detection and determination of fluid and solute movement involves time-lapse geophysical imaging of subsurface volumes in conjunction with borehole-based hydrogeological investigation techniques. This approach shows promise for quantifying the spatial distribution of flow and transport parameters of aquifer material between wells. A combined tracer and time-lapse radar imaging experiment was conducted in the unconfined coarse fluvial aquifer at the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site in August, 2001. Potassium bromide tracer was injected to form an electrically conductive plume over a 4-m interval that spanned the contact between two hydrostratigraphic units. Data from hydrogeologic and geophysical investigation methods indicate that these units: are continuous between the wells, have contrasting average permeability and porosity between units, and have variable porosity and permeability within units (i.e., heterogeneity at multiple scales from <2m to >20m). During the two-week field experiment the tracer plume traveled 6.9 m from the injection well to the extraction well, passing through a central monitoring well with 20 sampling zones over a 5-m interval spanning the injection interval. Cross borehole radar data were collected periodically on cross-sectional and longitudinal planes through the tracer plume. Two of these tomographic planes passed through the central monitoring well for quantitative calibration of radar attenuation tomograms to measured solute concentrations. Bromide breakthrough at the central well occurred first and with greatest concentration in the higher conductivity unit as expected, with significant variability in peak time and

  18. Evaluation of LiDAR-acquired bathymetric and topographic data accuracy in various hydrogeomorphic settings in the Deadwood and South Fork Boise Rivers, West-Central Idaho, 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skinner, Kenneth D.

    2011-01-01

    High-quality elevation data in riverine environments are important for fisheries management applications and the accuracy of such data needs to be determined for its proper application. The Experimental Advanced Airborne Research LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging)-or EAARL-system was used to obtain topographic and bathymetric data along the Deadwood and South Fork Boise Rivers in west-central Idaho. The EAARL data were post-processed into bare earth and bathymetric raster and point datasets. Concurrently with the EAARL surveys, real-time kinematic global positioning system surveys were made in three areas along each of the rivers to assess the accuracy of the EAARL elevation data in different hydrogeomorphic settings. The accuracies of the EAARL-derived raster elevation values, determined in open, flat terrain, to provide an optimal vertical comparison surface, had root mean square errors ranging from 0.134 to 0.347 m. Accuracies in the elevation values for the stream hydrogeomorphic settings had root mean square errors ranging from 0.251 to 0.782 m. The greater root mean square errors for the latter data are the result of complex hydrogeomorphic environments within the streams, such as submerged aquatic macrophytes and air bubble entrainment; and those along the banks, such as boulders, woody debris, and steep slopes. These complex environments reduce the accuracy of EAARL bathymetric and topographic measurements. Steep banks emphasize the horizontal location discrepancies between the EAARL and ground-survey data and may not be good representations of vertical accuracy. The EAARL point to ground-survey comparisons produced results with slightly higher but similar root mean square errors than those for the EAARL raster to ground-survey comparisons, emphasizing the minimized horizontal offset by using interpolated values from the raster dataset at the exact location of the ground-survey point as opposed to an actual EAARL point within a 1-meter distance. The

  19. Photographic copy of photograph, photographer unknown, 1908 (original print located ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of photograph, photographer unknown, 1908 (original print located at National Archives and Records Administration, Denver, Colorado). "CONSTRUCTION - BOISE RIVER DIVERSION DAM." - Boise Project, Boise River Diversion Dam, Across Boise River, Boise, Ada County, ID

  20. Proceedings of a Symposium: Education and Contemporary America (Boise, Idaho, October 9-11, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahlberg, E. John, Jr., Ed.; And Others

    Papers presented at this symposium were on the following topics: (1) the role of education in clarifying the relation of the individual to the state and the basic meaning of citizenship; (2) the mythologies of college teaching; (3) the movement of education from elitism to educational populism; (4) how empathy, morality, and altruism affect…

  1. PoroTomo Subtask 3.8 - Analyzed Boise Data for Oscillatory Hydraulic Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    David Lim

    2014-03-25

    Data here has been "pre-processed" and "analyzed" from the raw data submitted to the GDR previously (raw datafiles found at http://gdr.openei.org/submissions/479. doi:10.15121/1176944 after 30 September 2017). First, we submit .mat files which are the "pre-processed" data (must have MATLAB software to use). Secondly, the csv files contain submitted data in its final analyzed form before being used for inversion. Specifically, we have fourier coefficients obtained from Fast Fourier Transform Algorithms.

  2. 75 FR 38767 - Intermountain Region, Boise, Payette, and Sawtooth National Forests; ID; Amendment to the 2003...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-06

    ... 2003 Land and Resource Management Plans: Wildlife Conservation Strategy (Forested Biological Community... comprehensive, Forest Plan-level, wildlife conservation strategy (WCS). A correction to the September 14, 2007... Sawtooth Forest Plan, p. 11-9). To address this need, each Forest Plan included a wildlife...

  3. Ground-water and drainage problems in the Whitney terrace area, Boise, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    West, S.W.

    1955-01-01

    Ground-water and drainage problems can be relieved by reducing excessive recharge to the ground-water reservoir.  Reduction can be accomplished by economical use of water by individuals, establishment of a water-tight public sewage system to transport all sewage to a central plant outside of the area, and by drainage works.  These measures would cause a net decline of ground-water levels in the area.  They can be undertaken separately or collectively.

  4. 75 FR 25198 - Intermountain Region, Boise National Forest, Emmett Ranger District; Idaho Scriver Creek...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ... Integrated Restoration Project AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of intent to prepare an... environmental impact statement (EIS) for the integrated restoration project in the Scriver Creek subwatershed... Integrated Restoration Project proposes to undertake vegetation condition restoration, improve...

  5. 77 FR 36251 - Intermountain Region, Boise National Forest; Emmett Ranger District, Idaho; Scriver Creek...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-18

    ... (FR Vol. 76, No. 251; NOA for EIS No. 20110438). Specifically, an SDEIS is needed to identify that a... Integrated Restoration Project AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of Intent to prepare a... considered for the Scriver Creek Integrated Restoration Project. Following the public review period for...

  6. 78 FR 20135 - Notice of Temporary Closure on Public Lands in Boise County, ID

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-03

    ... surrounding Skinny Dipper Hot Springs, near Banks, Idaho, that burned August 5, 2012. The affected public... recreating public around the hot springs due to fire damage, as a result of the loss of stabilizing vegetation upstream from the hot springs as identified in the Springs Fire Emergency Stabilization and...

  7. 77 FR 38552 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Boise, ID

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-28

    ... (77 FR 6026). The comment period closed March 23, 2012. No comments were received. Subsequent to... ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does..., 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 2. The incorporation...

  8. 77 FR 6026 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Boise, ID

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-07

    ... Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of.... 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 2. The incorporation by reference in 14 CFR...: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM). SUMMARY:...

  9. 7. DETAIL OF GATE LIFTING GEARS AND ELECTRIC DRIVE MOTOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL OF GATE LIFTING GEARS AND ELECTRIC DRIVE MOTOR (LEFT BACKGROUND) FOR NEW YORK CANAL HEADWORKS. VIEW TO EAST. - Boise Project, Boise River Diversion Dam, Across Boise River, Boise, Ada County, ID

  10. 11. DETAIL OF UPSTREAM FACE OF SLUICE GATE CONTROLS FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. DETAIL OF UPSTREAM FACE OF SLUICE GATE CONTROLS FROM CATWALK, SHOWING GATE LIFTING GEARS (TOP) AND GEAR SHAFTS (BOTTOM). VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Boise Project, Boise River Diversion Dam, Across Boise River, Boise, Ada County, ID

  11. 10. DETAIL OF UPSTREAM FACE OF NEW YORK CANAL HEADWORKS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DETAIL OF UPSTREAM FACE OF NEW YORK CANAL HEADWORKS, SHOWING GATE LIFTING GEARS (TOP), WORM GEAR SHAFTS (CENTER) AND SLIDE GATES (BOTTOM). VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Boise Project, Boise River Diversion Dam, Across Boise River, Boise, Ada County, ID

  12. Photographic copy of photograph, photographer unknown, 20 March 1912 (original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of photograph, photographer unknown, 20 March 1912 (original print located at National Archives and Records Administration, Denver, Colorado). "DIVERSION WORKS AND POWER HOUSE CONSTRUCTION" - Boise Project, Boise River Diversion Dam, Across Boise River, Boise, Ada County, ID

  13. Photographic copy of photograph, photographer unknown, 17 April 1912 (original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of photograph, photographer unknown, 17 April 1912 (original print located at National Archives and Records Administration, Denver, Colorado). "POWER PLANT CONSTRUCTION AT DIVERSION DAM" - Boise Project, Boise River Diversion Dam, Across Boise River, Boise, Ada County, ID

  14. 36 CFR 294.29 - List of designated Idaho Roadless Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 019 X X Boise Bear Wallow 125 X X Boise Bernard 029 X X Boise Black Lake 036 X X Boise Blue Bunch 923... Meadows 027 X X Boise Ten Mile/Black Warrior 013 X X X X Boise Tennessee 033 X X Boise Whiskey 031 X Boise...-Spring Creek 111 X X X X Caribou Gibson 181 X X Caribou Hell Hole 168 X X Caribou Huckleberry Basin 165...

  15. 36 CFR 294.29 - List of designated Idaho Roadless Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 019 X X Boise Bear Wallow 125 X X Boise Bernard 029 X X Boise Black Lake 036 X X Boise Blue Bunch 923... Meadows 027 X X Boise Ten Mile/Black Warrior 013 X X X X Boise Tennessee 033 X X Boise Whiskey 031 X Boise...-Spring Creek 111 X X X X Caribou Gibson 181 X X Caribou Hell Hole 168 X X Caribou Huckleberry Basin 165...

  16. 36 CFR 294.29 - List of designated Idaho Roadless Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 019 X X Boise Bear Wallow 125 X X Boise Bernard 029 X X Boise Black Lake 036 X X Boise Blue Bunch 923... Meadows 027 X X Boise Ten Mile/Black Warrior 013 X X X X Boise Tennessee 033 X X Boise Whiskey 031 X Boise...-Spring Creek 111 X X X X Caribou Gibson 181 X X Caribou Hell Hole 168 X X Caribou Huckleberry Basin 165...

  17. 36 CFR 294.29 - List of designated Idaho Roadless Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 019 X X Boise Bear Wallow 125 X X Boise Bernard 029 X X Boise Black Lake 036 X X Boise Blue Bunch 923... Meadows 027 X X Boise Ten Mile/Black Warrior 013 X X X X Boise Tennessee 033 X X Boise Whiskey 031 X Boise...-Spring Creek 111 X X X X Caribou Gibson 181 X X Caribou Hell Hole 168 X X Caribou Huckleberry Basin 165...

  18. Photographic copy of construction drawings, U.S. Reclamation Service, 22 March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of construction drawings, U.S. Reclamation Service, 22 March 1912 (original drawing located at U.S. Bureau of Reclamation Snake River Area Office, Boise, Idaho). "PLAN VIEW - BOISE POWER PLANT" - Boise Project, Boise River Diversion Dam, Across Boise River, Boise, Ada County, ID

  19. Photographic copy of construction drawings, U.S. Reclamation Service, 2 July ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of construction drawings, U.S. Reclamation Service, 2 July 1912 (original drawing located at U.S. Bureau of Reclamation Snake River Area Office, Boise, Idaho). "BOISE POWER PLANT AND DIVERSION DAM" - Boise Project, Boise River Diversion Dam, Across Boise River, Boise, Ada County, ID

  20. Photographic copy of construction drawings, U.S. Reclamation Service, 9 October ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of construction drawings, U.S. Reclamation Service, 9 October 1936 (original drawing located at U.S. Bureau of Reclamation Snake River Area Office, Boise, Idaho). "BOISE RIVER DIVERSION DAM - FLASHBOARD CREST" - Boise Project, Boise River Diversion Dam, Across Boise River, Boise, Ada County, ID

  1. Photographic copy of construction drawings, U.S. Reclamation Service, 16 July ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of construction drawings, U.S. Reclamation Service, 16 July 1941 (original drawing located at U.S. Bureau of Reclamation Snake River Area Office, Boise, Idaho). "BOISE RIVER DIVERSION DAM AND POWER PLANT - GENERAL MAP OF GROUNDS - Boise Project, Boise River Diversion Dam, Across Boise River, Boise, Ada County, ID

  2. Photographic copy of photograph, Walter Lubken, photographer, 1910 (original print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of photograph, Walter Lubken, photographer, 1910 (original print located at U.S. Bureau of Reclamation Pacific Northwest Regional Office, Boise, Idaho). "GOVERNMENT FORCE ACCOUNT CAMP BELOW BOISE RIVER DIVERSION DAM ON WESTERNLY sic BANK." - Boise Project, Boise River Diversion Dam, Across Boise River, Boise, Ada County, ID

  3. Photographic copy of photograph, Walter Lubken, photographer, 1910 (original print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of photograph, Walter Lubken, photographer, 1910 (original print located at U.S. Bureau of Reclamation Pacific Northwest Regional Office, Boise, Idaho). VIEW OF BOISE DIVERSION DAM UNDER CONSTRUCTION - Boise Project, Boise River Diversion Dam, Across Boise River, Boise, Ada County, ID

  4. Photographic copy of photograph, Walter Lubken, photographer, 31 August 1911 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of photograph, Walter Lubken, photographer, 31 August 1911 (original print located at U.S. Bureau of Reclamation Pacific Northwest Regional Office, Boise, Idaho). BOISE RIVER DIVERSION DAM AND POWERPLANT CONSTRUCTION - Boise Project, Boise River Diversion Dam, Across Boise River, Boise, Ada County, ID

  5. Photographic copy of photograph, Walter Lubken, photographer, 1908 (original print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of photograph, Walter Lubken, photographer, 1908 (original print located at U.S. Bureau of Reclamation Pacific Northwest Regional Office, Boise, Idaho). GOVERNMENT FORCES CONSTRUCTION CAMP AT THE BOISE RIVER DIVERSION DAMSITE BEFORE BEGINNING OF CONSTRUCTION ON DIVERSION STRUCTURE - Boise Project, Boise River Diversion Dam, Across Boise River, Boise, Ada County, ID

  6. 36 CFR 294.29 - List of designated Idaho Roadless Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Mountain 902 X Salmon West Big Hole 943 X X X X Salmon West Panther Creek 504 X Sawtooth Black Pine 003 X X... 019 X X Boise Bear Wallow 125 X X Boise Bernard 029 X X Boise Black Lake 036 X X Boise Blue Bunch 923... Meadows 027 X X Boise Ten Mile/Black Warrior 013 X X X X Boise Tennessee 033 X X Boise Whiskey 031 X...

  7. 35. Photographic copy of historic photo, c1915 (original print in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. Photographic copy of historic photo, c1915 (original print in Still Photo Branch of the National Archives, RG-155-JC, Washington, DC; photographer unknown). FRONT VIEW OF BOISE PROJECT OFFICE SHOWING UNITED STATES RECLAMATION SERVICE BOISE PROJECT CLERICAL AND ENGINEERING STAFF. - Boise Project, Boise Project Office, 214 Broadway, Boise, Ada County, ID

  8. 37. Photographic copy of historic photo, March 20, 1912 (original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. Photographic copy of historic photo, March 20, 1912 (original print filed in Record Group 115, National Archives, Washington, D.C.). BOISE DIVERSION DAM. POWER HOUSE CONSTRUCTION. - Boise Project, Boise River Diversion Dam, Across Boise River, Boise, Ada County, ID

  9. Disability and Deprivation. Selected Papers of a Conference on Disability and Deprivation (Boise, Idaho, June 9-10, 1969).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, Boulder, CO.

    Rodger L. Hurley discusses the causal relationship between poverty and mental retardation; John W. Kidd describes limitations in special education systems. Also, David L. Cowen considers health problems and health care of the poor. (JD)

  10. 77 FR 45962 - Approval and Promulgation of State Implementation Plans: Idaho; Boise-Northern Ada County Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-02

    ... October 28, 2002 (67 FR 65713). The State submitted a second 10-year maintenance plan to EPA on February...-classified'' (56 FR 56746). On January 17, 2002, the State requested EPA redesignate the Northern Ada County... 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993); Does not impose an information collection burden under...

  11. 77 FR 46008 - Approval and Promulgation of State Implementation Plans: Idaho; Boise-Northern Ada County Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-02

    ... County Air Quality Maintenance Area; Second 10-Year Carbon Monoxide Maintenance Plan AGENCY... Environmental Quality (IDEQ) submitted the Northern Ada County Air Quality Maintenance Area Second 10-year Carbon Monoxide Maintenance Plan on February 10, 2011. In accordance with the requirements of the...

  12. 75 FR 49521 - Notice of Public Meeting: Resource Advisory Council to the Boise District, Bureau of Land...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-13

    ..., Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Department of the Interior AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Department of the Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Land... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  13. 75 FR 4583 - Notice of Public Meeting: Resource Advisory Council to the Boise District, Bureau of Land...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-28

    ..., Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Department of the Interior AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Department of the Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Land... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  14. 78 FR 19522 - Notice of Public Meeting: Resource Advisory Council to the Boise District, Bureau of Land...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-01

    ..., Bureau of Land Management, U. S. Department of the Interior AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Department of the Interior. ACTION: Notice of Public Meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Land... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  15. 75 FR 28057 - Notice of Public Meeting: Resource Advisory Council to the Boise District, Bureau of Land...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-19

    ..., Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Department of the Interior AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Department of the Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Land... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  16. 77 FR 27795 - Notice of Public Meeting: Resource Advisory Council to the Boise District, Bureau of Land...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ... summary of the report with recommendations by the Idaho Governor's Sage-Grouse Conservation Task Force, and BLM's sage-grouse conservation efforts. An update on the Paradigm Project and the Comprehensive Plan of Conservation Measures Addressing the Threats of Fire and Exotic Annual Plants to Greater...

  17. A COMPARATIVE ASSESSMENT OF BOISE, IDAHO, AMBIENT AIR FINE PARTICLE SAMPLES USING THE PLATE AND MICROSUSPENSION SALMONELLA MUTAGENICITY ASSAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary objective of this study is to characterize the genotoxic potential of the ambient air aerosols collected within an air shed impacted primarily by wood smoke and automotive emissions. The study also examines the relative merits of a microsuspension assay and the standa...

  18. 9. DETAIL OF INTERIOR OF FRONT PORCH SHOWING FRONT ENTRY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. DETAIL OF INTERIOR OF FRONT PORCH SHOWING FRONT ENTRY (LEFT) AND BLANK WALL (CENTER) CORRESPONDING TO LOCATION OF INTERIOR VAULTS. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Boise Project, Boise Project Office, 214 Broadway, Boise, Ada County, ID

  19. 20. DETAIL OF OFFICE FURNITURE IN NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECRETARIES' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. DETAIL OF OFFICE FURNITURE IN NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECRETARIES' OFFICE ALONG NORTH SIDE OF FIRST FLOOR. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Boise Project, Boise Project Office, 214 Broadway, Boise, Ada County, ID

  20. 36. Photographic copy of historic photo, c1915 (original print in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. Photographic copy of historic photo, c1915 (original print in Still Photo Branch of the National Archives, RG-155-JC, Washington, DC; photographer unknown). VIEW OF NORTH SIDE OF BOISE PROJECT OFFICE. - Boise Project, Boise Project Office, 214 Broadway, Boise, Ada County, ID

  1. 42. Photographic copy of original construction drawing, dated June 1911 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. Photographic copy of original construction drawing, dated June 1911 (from paper-copy of aperture-card negative at Bureau of Reclamation, Pacific Northwest Regional Office, Boise, ID). EAST ELEVATION (EAST SIDE) AND SOUTH ELEVATION (SOUTH SIDE). - Boise Project, Boise Project Office, 214 Broadway, Boise, Ada County, ID

  2. 37. Photographic copy of original construction drawing, dated June 1911 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. Photographic copy of original construction drawing, dated June 1911 (from paper-copy of aperture-card negative at Bureau of Reclamation, Pacific Northwest Regional Office, Boise, ID). BASEMENT PLAN. - Boise Project, Boise Project Office, 214 Broadway, Boise, Ada County, ID

  3. 40. Photographic copy of original construction drawing, dated June 1911 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. Photographic copy of original construction drawing, dated June 1911 (from paper-copy of aperture-card negative at Bureau of Reclamation, Pacific Northwest Regional Office, Boise, ID). ROOF PLAN. - Boise Project, Boise Project Office, 214 Broadway, Boise, Ada County, ID

  4. 45. Photographic copy of original construction drawing, dated 16 February ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. Photographic copy of original construction drawing, dated 16 February 1916 (from paper-copy of aperture-card negative at Bureau of Reclamation, Pacific Northwest Regional Office, Boise, ID). LOT SURVEY. - Boise Project, Boise Project Office, 214 Broadway, Boise, Ada County, ID

  5. 41. Photographic copy of original construction drawing, dated June 1911 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. Photographic copy of original construction drawing, dated June 1911 (from paper-copy of aperture-card negative at Bureau of Reclamation, Pacific Northwest Regional Office, Boise, ID). CROSS SECTIONS. - Boise Project, Boise Project Office, 214 Broadway, Boise, Ada County, ID

  6. 39. Photographic copy of original construction drawing, dated June 1911 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. Photographic copy of original construction drawing, dated June 1911 (from paper-copy of aperture-card negative at Bureau of Reclamation, Pacific Northwest Regional Office, Boise, ID). SECOND FLOOR PLAN. - Boise Project, Boise Project Office, 214 Broadway, Boise, Ada County, ID

  7. 43. Photographic copy of original construction drawing, dated June 1911 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. Photographic copy of original construction drawing, dated June 1911 (from paper-copy of aperture-card negative at Bureau of Reclamation, Pacific Northwest Regional Office, Boise, ID). NORTH ELEVATION (NORTH SIDE) AND WEST ELEVATION (WEST SIDE). - Boise Project, Boise Project Office, 214 Broadway, Boise, Ada County, ID

  8. 44. Photographic copy of original construction drawing, dated August 1911 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. Photographic copy of original construction drawing, dated August 1911 (from paper-copy of aperture-card negative at Bureau of Reclamation, Pacific Northwest Regional Office, Boise, ID). PLANS AND SECTIONS OF VAULTS. - Boise Project, Boise Project Office, 214 Broadway, Boise, Ada County, ID

  9. 38. Photographic copy of original construction drawing, dated June 1911 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. Photographic copy of original construction drawing, dated June 1911 (from paper-copy of aperture-card negative at Bureau of Reclamation, Pacific Northwest Regional Office, Boise, ID). FIRST FLOOR PLAN. - Boise Project, Boise Project Office, 214 Broadway, Boise, Ada County, ID

  10. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (19th, Boise, Idaho, October 8-10, 1992).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riordan, Daniel G., Ed.

    Based on the theme of broadening the base of academic, industrial and professional connections, this proceedings presents papers delivered at the annual meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (CPTSC). Papers in the proceedings are divided into four sections: Models for Connecting Academia, Industries, and the…

  11. Increasing Understanding of Public Problems and Policies, 1994. [National Public Policy Education Conference (44th, Boise, Idaho, September 18-21, 1994).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halbrook, Steve A., Ed.; Grace, Teddee E., Ed.

    The National Public Policy Education Conference is held annually to improve the policy education efforts of extension workers responsible for public affairs programs. The 1994 conference addressed the following topics: (1) ethical perspectives in public policy education; (2) transition of food and agricultural policy; (3) building human…

  12. Measuring snow cover using satellite imagery during 1973 and 1974 melt season: North Santiam, Boise, and Upper Snake Basins, phase 1. [LANDSAT satellites, imaging techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegman, E. J.; Evans, W. E.; Hadfield, R.

    1975-01-01

    Measurements are examined of snow coverage during the snow-melt season in 1973 and 1974 from LANDSAT imagery for the three Columbia River Subbasins. Satellite derived snow cover inventories for the three test basins were obtained as an alternative to inventories performed with the current operational practice of using small aircraft flights over selected snow fields. The accuracy and precision versus cost for several different interactive image analysis procedures was investigated using a display device, the Electronic Satellite Image Analysis Console. Single-band radiance thresholding was the principal technique employed in the snow detection, although this technique was supplemented by an editing procedure involving reference to hand-generated elevation contours. For each data and view measured, a binary thematic map or "mask" depicting the snow cover was generated by a combination of objective and subjective procedures. Photographs of data analysis equipment (displays) are shown.

  13. 11. Photocopy of old photo shows people in front of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photocopy of old photo shows people in front of Miners' Exchange, late 19th or early 20th century. Original photograph at Boise Basin Museum, Idaho City, Idaho. - Miners' Exchange Block, Main & Wall Streets, Idaho City, Boise County, ID

  14. 10. Photocopy of old photo shows men sitting in front ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Photocopy of old photo shows men sitting in front of the saloon, late 19th or early 20th century. Original photograph at Idaho Historical Society, Boise, Idaho. - Miners' Exchange Block, Main & Wall Streets, Idaho City, Boise County, ID

  15. Libraries in Idaho: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Research Center 1055 North Curtis Road Boise, ID 83706 208-367-2271 http://www.saintalphonsus.org/ ... System Health Sciences Library 190 East Bannock Boise, ID 83712 208-381-2276 http://www.stlukesonline.org/ ...

  16. 10. Photocopy of old photo shows another general view of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Photocopy of old photo shows another general view of the church, taken June 1961. Original photograph at Idaho Historical Society, Boise, Idaho - St. Joseph's Roman Catholic Church, High & Wallula Streets, Idaho City, Boise County, ID

  17. 5. VIEW OF FRONT (WEST AND SOUTH SIDES) TO NORTHEAST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW OF FRONT (WEST AND SOUTH SIDES) TO NORTHEAST. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. NOTE THAT LARGE TREES PREVENT MORE COMPLETE VIEW FROM BETTER ANGLE. FOR MORE COMPLETE VIEW, SEE PHOTOGRAPHIC COPY OF 1916 PHOTO, NO. ID-17-C-35. - Boise Project, Boise Project Office, 214 Broadway, Boise, Ada County, ID

  18. 21. DETAIL OF AREA WHERE FIRST FLOOR PASSAGEWAY USED TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. DETAIL OF AREA WHERE FIRST FLOOR PASSAGEWAY USED TO BE SHOWING VERTICAL WOOD MOLDING COVERING JOINT WHERE PARTITION USED TO BE (LEFT), TELLER'S WINDOW LINKING PASSAGEWAY WITH INFORMATION BOOTH (CENTER), AND TYPICAL FURNITURE. VIEW TO EAST. - Boise Project, Boise Project Office, 214 Broadway, Boise, Ada County, ID

  19. Chapter Four: Discursive Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Richard F.

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter, the focus of attention moves from the contexts described in chapter 3 to the verbal, nonverbal, and interactional resources that participants employ in discursive practices. These resources are discussed within the frame of participation status and participation framework proposed by Goffman. Verbal resources employed by…

  20. Chapter 9: Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Grupen, Claus; Shwartz, Boris A.

    2006-12-19

    Sophisticated front-end electronics are a key part of practically all modern radiation detector systems. This chapter introduces the basic principles and their implementation. Topics include signal acquisition, electronic noise, pulse shaping (analog and digital), and data readout techniques.

  1. Chapter 3: Energy Security

    SciTech Connect

    Foust, Thomas D.; Arent, Doug; de Carvalho Macedo, Isaias; Goldemberg, Jose; Hoysala, Chanakya; Filho, Rubens Maciel; Nigro, Francisco E. B.; Richard, Tom L.; Saddler, Jack; Samseth, Jon; Somerville, Chris R.

    2015-04-01

    This chapter considers the energy security implications and impacts of bioenergy. We provide an assessment to answer the following questions: What are the implications for bioenergy and energy security within the broader policy environment that includes food and water security, development, economic productivity, and multiple foreign policy aspects? What are the conditions under which bioenergy contributes positively to energy security?

  2. Diagnostic and vaccine chapter.

    PubMed

    Wolfram, J H; Kokanov, S K; Verkhovsky, O A

    2010-10-01

    The first report in this chapter describes the development of a killed composite vaccine. This killed vaccine is non-infectious to humans, other animals, and the environment. The vaccine has low reactivity, is non-abortive, and does not induce pathomorphological alterations to the organs of vaccinated animals. The second report of this chapter describes the diagnostic value of a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detecting Brucella-specific antibodies and its ability to discriminate vaccinated cattle from infected cattle. The results indicated that the competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay is more sensitive than traditional tests for detecting antibodies to Brucella abortus in naturally and experimentally infected cattle. PMID:20850688

  3. Nutrient dynamics: Chapter 3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Likens, Gene E.; LaBaugh, James W.; Buso, Donald C.; Bade, Darren; Winter, Thomas C.; Likens, Gene E.

    2009-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the variability and trends in chemical concentrations and fluxes at Mirror Lake during the period 1981–2000. It examines the water and chemical budgets of Mirror Lake to identify and understand better long-term trends in the chemical characteristics of the lake. It also identifies the causes of changes in nutrient concentrations and examines the contribution of hydrologic pathways to the contamination of Mirror Lake by road salt. The role of groundwater and precipitation on water and chemical budgets of the lake are also examined.

  4. Melt inclusions: Chapter 6

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,; Lowenstern, J. B.

    2014-01-01

    Melt inclusions are small droplets of silicate melt that are trapped in minerals during their growth in a magma. Once formed, they commonly retain much of their initial composition (with some exceptions) unless they are re-opened at some later stage. Melt inclusions thus offer several key advantages over whole rock samples: (i) they record pristine concentrations of volatiles and metals that are usually lost during magma solidification and degassing, (ii) they are snapshots in time whereas whole rocks are the time-integrated end products, thus allowing a more detailed, time-resolved view into magmatic processes (iii) they are largely unaffected by subsolidus alteration. Due to these characteristics, melt inclusions are an ideal tool to study the evolution of mineralized magma systems. This chapter first discusses general aspects of melt inclusions formation and methods for their investigation, before reviewing studies performed on mineralized magma systems.

  5. Chapter 4: Solar Magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatakrishnan, P.; Gosain, Sanjay

    2008-10-01

    This chapter is basically divided into 2 parts. In the first part, the important properties of the solar magnetic field are summarized. The discussion begins with a simple introduction to solar magneto hydrodynamics. This introduction will be sufficient to understand the current status of the solar dynamo theory that follows. Some very curious and interesting results on force free fields are then presented in very basic terms. Finally, the application of this theoretical framework to the problems of coronal heating, solar flares and coronal mass ejections are developed in a simple unified scheme, based on a hierarchy of physical conditions. The second part consists of a tutorial on magnetographs. It begins with a description of polarization of light from very fundamental notions of coherence of light. This is followed by simple but comprehensive explanations of the Zeeman and Hanle effects along with the necessary basic ideas of quantum physics of scattering of light. Then the working of a few important magnetographs is outlined, with special emphasis on a solar vector magnetograph developed for USO, to provide a ''hands on" perspective. The article concludes with a few brief remarks on the possible future directions for research in the domain of solar magnetism...

  6. Chapter 20: Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, Timothy D

    2012-01-01

    Graphite is truly a unique material. Its structure, from the nano- to the millimeter scale give it remarkable properties that lead to numerous and diverse applications. Graphite bond anisotropy, with strong in-plane covalent bonds and weak van der Waals type bonding between the planes, gives graphite its unique combination of properties. Easy shear of the crystal, facilitated by weak interplaner bonds allows graphite to be used as a dry lubricant, and is responsible for the substances name! The word graphite is derived from the Greek to write because of graphites ability to mark writing surfaces. Moreover, synthetic graphite contains within its structure, porosity spanning many orders of magnitude in size. The thermal closure of these pores profoundly affects the properties for example, graphite strength increases with temperature to temperatures in excess of 2200 C. Consequently, graphite is utilized in many high temperature applications. The basic physical properties of graphite are reviewed here. Graphite applications include metallurgical; (aluminum and steel production), single crystal silicon production, and metal casting; electrical (motor brushes and commutators); mechanical (seals, bearings and bushings); and nuclear applications, (see Chapter 91, Nuclear Graphite). Here we discuss the structure, manufacture, properties, and applications of Graphite.

  7. Synthesis: Chapter 19

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pardo, L.H.; Geiser, L.H.; Fenn, M.E.; Driscoll, C.T.; Goodale, C.L.; Allen, E.B.; Baron, J. S.; Bobbink, R.; Bowman, W.D.; Clark, C.M.; Emmett, B.; Gilliam, F.S.; Greaver, T.; Hall, S.J.; Lilleskov, E.A.; Liu, L.; Lynch, J.A.; Nadelhoffer, K.; Perakis, S.S.; Robin-Abbott, M. J.; Stoddard, J.L.; Weathers, K. C.

    2011-01-01

    Human activity in the last century has led to a substantial increase in nitrogen (N) emissions and deposition (Galloway et al. 2003). Because of past, and, in some regions, continuing increases in emissions (Lehmann et al. 2005, Nilles and Conley 2001), this N deposition has reached a level that has caused or is likely to cause alterations and damage in many ecosystems across the United States. In some ecoregions, the impact of N deposition has been severe and has changed the biotic community structure and composition of ecosystems. In the Mediterranean California ecoregion, for example (see Chapter 13), replacement of native by exotic invasive vegetation is accelerated because exotic species are often more productive under elevated N deposition than native species in some California grasslands, coastal sage scrub, and desert scrub (Fenn et al. 2010, Rao and Allen 2010, Rao et al. 2010, Weiss 1999, Yoshida and Allen 2004). Such shifts in plant community composition and species richness can have consequences beyond changes in ecosystem structure: shifts may lead to overall losses in biodiversity and further impair particular threatened or endangered species (Stevens et al. 2004). Th e extirpation of the endangered checkerspot butterfl y (Euphydryas editha bayensis), because the host plant for the larval stage disappears in N-enriched ecosystems (Fenn et al. 2010, Weiss 1999), is just one example of the detrimental impacts of elevated N deposition.

  8. Career development through local chapter involvement: perspectives from chapter members.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Melissa; Inniss-Richter, Zipporah; Mata, Holly; Cottrell, Randall R

    2013-07-01

    The importance of career development in professional organizations has been noted in the literature. Personal and professional benefits of membership regardless of discipline can be found across the career spectrum from student to executive. The benefits of professional membership with respect to career development in local chapter organizations have seldom been studied. Local chapter participation may offer significant career development opportunities for the practitioner, faculty member, and student. The purpose of this study was to explore the importance of local chapter involvement to the career development of health education practitioners. An 18-item questionnaire was disseminated to the membership of three local SOPHE (Society for Public Health Education) chapters that explored the level of local chapter involvement and the impact of how specific professional development activities impacted career development. The results of the survey highlighted the importance of continuing education programs, networking, and leadership experience in developing one's career that are offered by local SOPHE chapter involvement. Making a positive impact in the community and earning the respect of one's peers were most often reported as indicators of career success. These factors can directly impact local chapter participation. Career development can certainly be enhanced by active participation in the local chapter of a professional association.

  9. Career development through local chapter involvement: perspectives from chapter members.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Melissa; Inniss-Richter, Zipporah; Mata, Holly; Cottrell, Randall R

    2013-07-01

    The importance of career development in professional organizations has been noted in the literature. Personal and professional benefits of membership regardless of discipline can be found across the career spectrum from student to executive. The benefits of professional membership with respect to career development in local chapter organizations have seldom been studied. Local chapter participation may offer significant career development opportunities for the practitioner, faculty member, and student. The purpose of this study was to explore the importance of local chapter involvement to the career development of health education practitioners. An 18-item questionnaire was disseminated to the membership of three local SOPHE (Society for Public Health Education) chapters that explored the level of local chapter involvement and the impact of how specific professional development activities impacted career development. The results of the survey highlighted the importance of continuing education programs, networking, and leadership experience in developing one's career that are offered by local SOPHE chapter involvement. Making a positive impact in the community and earning the respect of one's peers were most often reported as indicators of career success. These factors can directly impact local chapter participation. Career development can certainly be enhanced by active participation in the local chapter of a professional association. PMID:23539263

  10. Collective Intelligence. Chapter 17

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolpert, David H.

    2003-01-01

    Many systems of self-interested agents have an associated performance criterion that rates the dynamic behavior of the overall system. This chapter presents an introduction to the science of such systems. Formally, collectives are defined as any system having the following two characteristics: First, the system must contain one or more agents each of which we view as trying to maximize an associated private utility; second, the system must have an associated world utility function that rates the possible behaviors of that overall system. In practice, collectives are often very large, distributed, and support little, if any, centralized communication and control, although those characteristics are not part of their formal definition. A naturally occurring example of a collective is a human economy. One can identify the agents and their private utilities as the human individuals in the economy and the associated personal rewards they are each trying to maximize. One could then identify the world utility as the time average of the gross domestic product. ("World utility" per se is not a construction internal to a human economy, but rather something defined from the outside.) To achieve high world utility it is necessary to avoid having the agents work at cross-purposes lest phenomena like liquidity traps or the Tragedy of the Commons (TOC) occur, in which agents' individually pursuing their private utilities lowers world utility. The obvious way to avoid such phenomena is by modifying the agents utility functions to be "aligned" with the world utility. This can be done via punitive legislation. A real-world example of an attempt to do this was the creation of antitrust regulations designed to prevent monopolistic practices.

  11. Explanatory chapter: PCR primer design.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Fernández, Rubén

    2013-01-01

    This chapter is intended as a guide on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primer design (for information on PCR, see General PCR and Explanatory Chapter: Troubleshooting PCR). In the next section, general guidelines will be provided, followed by a discussion on primer design for specific applications. A list of recommended software tools is shown at the end.

  12. Chapter 59: Web Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, M. J.

    Web services are a cornerstone of the distributed computing infrastructure that the VO is built upon yet to the newcomer, they can appear to be a black art. This perception is not helped by the miasma of technobabble that pervades the subject and the seemingly impenetrable high priesthood of actual users. In truth, however, there is nothing conceptually difficult about web services (unsurprisingly any complexities will lie in the implementation details) nor indeed anything particularly new. A web service is a piece of software available over a network with a formal description of how it is called and what it returns that a computer can understand. Note that entities such as web servers, ftp servers and database servers do not generally qualify as they lack the standardized description of their inputs and outputs. There are prior technologies, such as RMI, CORBA, and DCOM, that have employed a similar approach but the success of web services lies predominantly in its use of standardized XML to provide a language-neutral way for representing data. In fact, the standardization goes further as web services are traditionally (or as traditionally as five years will allow) tied to a specific set of technologies (WSDL and SOAP conveyed using HTTP with an XML serialization). Alternative implementations are becoming increasingly common and we will cover some of these here. One important thing to remember in all of this, though, is that web services are meant for use by computers and not humans (unlike web pages) and this is why so much of it seems incomprehensible gobbledegook. In this chapter, we will start with an overview of the web services current in the VO and present a short guide on how to use and deploy a web service. We will then review the different approaches to web services, particularly REST and SOAP, and alternatives to XML as a data format. We will consider how web services can be formally described and discuss how advanced features such as security, state

  13. Advanced Concepts. Chapter 21

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Mulqueen, Jack

    2013-01-01

    Before there is a funded space mission, there must be a present need for the mission. Space science and exploration are expensive, and without a well-defined and justifiable need, no one is going to commit significant funding for any space endeavor. However, as discussed in Chapter 1, applications of space technology and many and broad, hence there are many ways to determine and establish a mission need. Robotic science missions are justified by their science return. To be selected for flight, questions like these must be addressed: What is the science question that needs answering, and will the proposed mission be the most cost-effective way to answer it? Why does answering the question require an expensive space flight, instead of some ground-based alternative? If the question can only be answered by flying in space, then why is this approach better than other potential approaches? How much will it cost? And is the technology required to answer the question in hand and ready to use? If not, then how much will it cost and how long will it take to mature the technology to a usable level? There are also many ways to justify human exploration missions, including science return, technology advancement, as well as intangible reasons, such as national pride. Nonetheless, many of the questions that need answering, are similar to those for robotic science missions: Where are the people going, why, and will the proposed mission be the most cost-effective way to get there? What is the safest method to achieve the goal? How much will it cost? And is the technology required to get there and keep the crew alive in hand and ready to use? If not, then how much will it cost and how long will it take to mature the technology to a usable level? Another reason for some groups sending spacecraft into space is for profit. Telecommunications, geospatial imaging, and tourism are examples of proven, market-driven space missions and applications. For this specific set of users, the

  14. Promoting certification: the chapter's role.

    PubMed

    Staul, Luann

    2011-01-01

    The mission of the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses focuses on providing nurses with expert knowledge to promote delivery of excellent, safe, quality care to acutely and critically ill patients and their families. Chapters consist of professional leaders in a community who carry on the mission work of the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses at the local level. Chapters can emphasize the value of certification and continuing education, because they offer a wide spectrum of opportunities to meet the learning and developmental needs of nurses as they advance in their professional careers. This article will highlight strategies that can be implemented by local chapters to facilitate and promote certification.

  15. 12. Photocopy of old photo shows the saloon, then owned ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Photocopy of old photo shows the saloon, then owned by Melvin Wiegel, in business from 1907-1945. Stuffed wild animals and birds decorate the saloon, date unknown. Original photograph at Idaho Historical Society, Boise, Idaho. - Miners' Exchange Block, Main & Wall Streets, Idaho City, Boise County, ID

  16. 77 FR 65403 - Public Land Order No. 7804; Partial Revocation of a Secretarial Order Dated December 4, 1909; ID

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-26

    ... National Forest System land withdrawn on behalf of the Bureau of Reclamation for the Payette Boise Reclamation Project within the Boise National Forest. This order also opens the land to disposition under the... withdrew National Forest System lands from all forms of appropriation under the public land laws,...

  17. 7. Photocopy, of old photo shows another general view of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photocopy, of old photo shows another general view of the building, with people posing for the picture, taken late 19th or early 20th century. Original photograph at Boise Basin Museum, Idaho City, Idaho. - Idaho World Building, Main & Commercial Streets, Idaho City, Boise County, ID

  18. 77 FR 42327 - Proposed Supplementary Rules for the Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-18

    ... proposed supplementary rules until September 17, 2012. ADDRESSES: You may submit comments by mail, electronic mail, or hand- delivery. Mail or Hand Delivery: Jared Fluckiger, Outdoor Recreation Planner, Bureau of Land Management, Boise District Office, 3948 Development Ave. Boise, Idaho 83705....

  19. 77 FR 6816 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-09

    ... Departments and Agencies of January 21, 2009--Transparency and Open Government (74 FR 4685; January 26, 2009... Applicant: Phoenix Zoo, Phoenix, AZ; PRT-678366 The applicant requests renewal of their captive-bred... maximus) Applicant: Zoo Boise, Boise, ID; PRT-781629 The applicant requests amendment of their...

  20. 6. Photocopy of old photo shows a general view of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Photocopy of old photo shows a general view of the building before 1918, when Idaho World occupied it. Note north extension and bricked openings on the south elevation. Original photograph at Boise Basin Museum, Idaho City, Idaho - Idaho World Building, Main & Commercial Streets, Idaho City, Boise County, ID

  1. Chapter A7. Biological Indicators

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Myers, Donna N.; Wilde, Franceska D.

    2003-01-01

    The National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (National Field Manual) provides guidelines and standard procedures for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel who collect data used to assess the quality of the Nation's surface-water and ground-water resources. This chapter of the manual includes procedures for the (1) determination of biochemical oxygen demand using a 5-day bioassay test; (2) collection, identification, and enumeration of fecal indicator bacteria; (3) collection of samples and information on two laboratory methods for fecal indicator viruses (coliphages); and (4) collection of samples for protozoan pathogens. Each chapter of the National Field Manual is published separately and revised periodically. Newly published and revised chapters are posted on the World Wide Web on the USGS page 'National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data.' The URL for this page is http://pubs.water.usgs.gov/twri9A/ (accessed November 25, 2003).

  2. "Unusually Successful": Pittsfield Chapter 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiminski, James A.

    The United States Education Department recognizes projects that effectively meet the special needs of educationally deprived students. In 1992, the Pittsfield, Massachusetts, Chapter 1 preschool program earned national validation as an "unusually successful" compensatory education program. The program has served as a statewide model, and has…

  3. Venus 3 Book: Chapter 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, F.; Svedhem, H.; Head, J.

    2014-04-01

    This will be the first chapter in the planned 'Venus 3' book, which will present the latest knowledge about all aspects of the planet Venus. Chapter 1 will include: 1. Brief history of Venus observations, from telescopic studies up to and including early space missions (Venera, Mariner) 2. Overview of key results from more recent groundbased observations and space missions, including Pioneer Venus, the later Veneras, Vega, Magellan, Akatsuki and Venus Express 3. Summary of current knowledge, in three main sections: a. Surface and interior b. Atmosphere and climate c. Thermosphere, exosphere and magnetosphere 4. Outstanding scientific questions remaining, and future mission concepts providing background, introduction and an overview to the rest of the book.

  4. Objectives and Overview. Chapter 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, John E.; Hummel, Dietrich

    2009-01-01

    The RTO Task Group AVT-113 "Understanding and Modeling Vortical Flows to Improve the Technology Readiness Level for Military Aircraft" was established in April 2003. Two facets of the group, "Cranked Arrow Wing Aerodynamic Project International (CAWAPI)" and "Vortex Flow Experiment-2 (VFE-2)", worked closely together. However, because of the different requirements of each part, the CAWAPI facet concluded its work earlier (December 2006) than the VFE-2 facet (December 2007). In this first chapter of the Final Report of the Task Group an overview on its work is given, and the objectives for the Task Group are described.

  5. Chapter 3. Public health resources

    PubMed Central

    1973-01-01

    The resource requirements of the public health services are discussed in terms of their three main components: manpower, physical resources, and finances in relation to population. The observational data from the Republic of Korea provide an illustration of the problems of resource availability and utilization, with special reference to tuberculosis control. A calculation of resource and population constraints and estimates of the basic inputs required by tuberculosis control technology are presented. Data on the 1965 level of Korean health resources are given in the Annex to this chapter. PMID:20604424

  6. Earthquake ground motion: Chapter 3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luco, Nicolas; Valley, Michael; Crouse, C.B.

    2012-01-01

    Most of the effort in seismic design of buildings and other structures is focused on structural design. This chapter addresses another key aspect of the design process—characterization of earthquake ground motion. Section 3.1 describes the basis of the earthquake ground motion maps in the Provisions and in ASCE 7. Section 3.2 has examples for the determination of ground motion parameters and spectra for use in design. Section 3.3 discusses and provides an example for the selection and scaling of ground motion records for use in response history analysis.

  7. 31 CFR Appendixes to Chapter V - Note

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Note Appendixes to Chapter V Money... CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Ch. V, Nt. Appendixes to Chapter V—Note Notes: The alphabetical lists... blocked vessel in the underlying transaction. See § 501.604(b)(1) of this chapter. Financial...

  8. Chapter 1 and Chapter 1 Migrant. Evaluation Findings, 1990-91. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christner, Catherine; And Others

    This report describes an evaluation of the Austin (Texas) Independent School District's (AISD) Chapter 1 and Chapter 1 Migrant programs. Chapter 1 is a federally funded compensatory educational program that provided funding in 1990-91 to 25 AISD elementary schools with high concentrations of low-income students. Chapter 1 Migrant is also a…

  9. Secondary School Mathematics, Chapter 21, Rigid Motions and Vectors, Chapter 22, Computer and Programs. Teacher's Commentary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Univ., CA. School Mathematics Study Group.

    The teacher's guide for the eleventh unit in this SMSG series covers the chapter on rigid motions and vectors and the chapter on computers and programs. The overall purpose for each of the chapters is described, the prerequisite knowledge needed by students is specified, the mathematical development of each chapter is detailed, behavioral…

  10. Beyond Chapter 4.7.

    PubMed

    Bandler, Lilon Gretl

    2015-12-01

    Chapter 4.7 of the National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research refers specifically to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples. It lays out the points at which researchers working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders must consider their approach, and the engagement with individuals, communities or groups who are involved in or affected by their research. History, of Australia and of research involving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, has informed this approach. The response to that history has been a rational, institutionalised, systematic demand for a different perception of what should direct research and research processes to ensure engagement with and service to the community with whom the researchers wish to do the work. This paper considers whether these principles could inform the approach to other research work. PMID:27135116

  11. Chapter 14: Cancer Genome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez, Miguel; de la Torre, Victor; Valencia, Alfonso

    2012-01-01

    Although there is great promise in the benefits to be obtained by analyzing cancer genomes, numerous challenges hinder different stages of the process, from the problem of sample preparation and the validation of the experimental techniques, to the interpretation of the results. This chapter specifically focuses on the technical issues associated with the bioinformatics analysis of cancer genome data. The main issues addressed are the use of database and software resources, the use of analysis workflows and the presentation of clinically relevant action items. We attempt to aid new developers in the field by describing the different stages of analysis and discussing current approaches, as well as by providing practical advice on how to access and use resources, and how to implement recommendations. Real cases from cancer genome projects are used as examples. PMID:23300415

  12. Defining groundwater age: Chapter 3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Torgersen, T.; Purtschert, R.; Phillips, F.M.; Plummer, L.N.; Sanford, W.E.; Suckow, A.

    2013-01-01

    This book investigates applications of selected chemical and isotopic substances that can be used to recognize and interpret age information pertaining to ‘old’ groundwater (defined as water that was recharged on a timescale from approximately 1000 to more than 1 000 000 a). However, as discussed below, only estimates of the ‘age’ of water extracted from wells can be inferred. These groundwater age estimates are interpreted from measured concentrations of chemical and isotopic substances in the groundwater. Even then, there are many complicating factors, as discussed in this book. In spite of these limitations, much can be learned about the physics of groundwater flow and about the temporal aspects of groundwater systems from age interpretations of measured concentrations of environmental tracers in groundwater systems. This chapter puts the concept of ‘age’ into context, including its meaning and interpretation, and attempts to provide a unifying usage for the rest of the book.

  13. Beyond Chapter 4.7.

    PubMed

    Bandler, Lilon Gretl

    2015-12-01

    Chapter 4.7 of the National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research refers specifically to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples. It lays out the points at which researchers working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders must consider their approach, and the engagement with individuals, communities or groups who are involved in or affected by their research. History, of Australia and of research involving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, has informed this approach. The response to that history has been a rational, institutionalised, systematic demand for a different perception of what should direct research and research processes to ensure engagement with and service to the community with whom the researchers wish to do the work. This paper considers whether these principles could inform the approach to other research work.

  14. Conclusions and Recommendations. Chapter 37

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, John E.; Hummel, Dietrich

    2009-01-01

    This chapter provides a brief wrap-up of the task group report and focuses on the overall conclusions and recommendations for future work for the CAWAPI and VFE-2 facets beyond the task group. The overall conclusion is that the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of CFD solvers has been improved in predicting the flow-physics of vortex-dominated flows during the work of the task group, by having flight and wind-tunnel data available for comparison. Moreover, like all good scientific studies, this task group has identified flight conditions on the F-16XL airplane or wind-tunnel test conditions for a specific leading-edge radius on the 65 delta-wing model where the TRL still needs to be increased.

  15. Chapter 4: Geological Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, J; Herzog, H

    2006-06-14

    Carbon sequestration is the long term isolation of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through physical, chemical, biological, or engineered processes. The largest potential reservoirs for storing carbon are the deep oceans and geological reservoirs in the earth's upper crust. This chapter focuses on geological sequestration because it appears to be the most promising large-scale approach for the 2050 timeframe. It does not discuss ocean or terrestrial sequestration. In order to achieve substantial GHG reductions, geological storage needs to be deployed at a large scale. For example, 1 Gt C/yr (3.6 Gt CO{sub 2}/yr) abatement, requires carbon capture and storage (CCS) from 600 large pulverized coal plants ({approx}1000 MW each) or 3600 injection projects at the scale of Statoil's Sleipner project. At present, global carbon emissions from coal approximate 2.5 Gt C. However, given reasonable economic and demand growth projections in a business-as-usual context, global coal emissions could account for 9 Gt C. These volumes highlight the need to develop rapidly an understanding of typical crustal response to such large projects, and the magnitude of the effort prompts certain concerns regarding implementation, efficiency, and risk of the enterprise. The key questions of subsurface engineering and surface safety associated with carbon sequestration are: (1) Subsurface issues: (a) Is there enough capacity to store CO{sub 2} where needed? (b) Do we understand storage mechanisms well enough? (c) Could we establish a process to certify injection sites with our current level of understanding? (d) Once injected, can we monitor and verify the movement of subsurface CO{sub 2}? (2) Near surface issues: (a) How might the siting of new coal plants be influenced by the distribution of storage sites? (b) What is the probability of CO{sub 2} escaping from injection sites? What are the attendant risks? Can we detect leakage if it occurs? (3) Will surface leakage negate or reduce the

  16. Sediment transport measurements: Chapter 5

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diplas, P.; Kuhnle, R.; Gray, J.; Glysson, D.; Edwards, T.; García, Marcelo H.

    2008-01-01

    Sediment erosion, transport, and deposition in fluvial systems are complex processes that are treated in detail in other sections of this book. Development of methods suitable for the collection of data that contribute to understanding these processes is a still-evolving science. Sediment and ancillary data are fundamental requirements for the proper management of river systems, including the design of structures, the determination of aspects of stream behavior, ascertaining the probable effect of removing an existing structure, estimation of bulk erosion, transport, and sediment delivery to the oceans, ascertaining the long-term usefulness of reservoirs and other public works, tracking movement of solid-phase contaminants, restoration of degraded or otherwise modified streams, and assistance in the calibration and validation of numerical models. This chapter presents techniques for measuring bed-material properties and suspended and bed-load discharges. Well-established and relatively recent, yet adequately tested, sampling equipment and methodologies, with designs that are guided by sound physical and statistical principles, are described. Where appropriate, the theory behind the development of the equipment and guidelines for its use are presented.

  17. Actively Controlled Components. Chapter 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horn, W.; Hiller, S.-J.; Pfoertner, H.; Schadow, K.; Rosenfeld, T.; Garg, S.

    2009-01-01

    Active Control can help to meet future engine requirements by an active improvement of the component characteristics. The concept is based on an intelligent control logic, which senses actual operating conditions and reacts with adequate actuator action. This approach can directly improve engine characteristics as performance, operability, durability and emissions on the one hand. On the other hand active control addresses the design constrains imposed by unsteady phenomena like inlet distortion, compressor surge, combustion instability, flow separations, vibration and noise, which only occur during exceptional operating conditions. The feasibility and effectiveness of active control technologies have been demonstrated in lab-scale tests. This chapter describes a broad range of promising applications for each engine component. Significant efforts in research and development remain to implement these technologies in engine rig and finally production engines and to demonstrate today s engine generation airworthiness, safety, reliability, and durability requirements. Active control applications are in particular limited by the gap between available and advanced sensors and actuators, which allow an operation in the harsh environment in an aero engine. The operating and performance requirements for actuators and sensors are outlined for each of the gas turbine sections from inlet to nozzle.

  18. Chapter 12: Human microbiome analysis.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Xochitl C; Huttenhower, Curtis

    2012-01-01

    Humans are essentially sterile during gestation, but during and after birth, every body surface, including the skin, mouth, and gut, becomes host to an enormous variety of microbes, bacterial, archaeal, fungal, and viral. Under normal circumstances, these microbes help us to digest our food and to maintain our immune systems, but dysfunction of the human microbiota has been linked to conditions ranging from inflammatory bowel disease to antibiotic-resistant infections. Modern high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatic tools provide a powerful means of understanding the contribution of the human microbiome to health and its potential as a target for therapeutic interventions. This chapter will first discuss the historical origins of microbiome studies and methods for determining the ecological diversity of a microbial community. Next, it will introduce shotgun sequencing technologies such as metagenomics and metatranscriptomics, the computational challenges and methods associated with these data, and how they enable microbiome analysis. Finally, it will conclude with examples of the functional genomics of the human microbiome and its influences upon health and disease.

  19. VUV thin films, chapter 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zukic, Muamer; Torr, Douglas G.

    1993-01-01

    The application of thin film technology to the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) wavelength region from 120 nm to 230 nm has not been fully exploited in the past because of absorption effects which complicate the accurate determination of the optical functions of dielectric materials. The problem therefore reduces to that of determining the real and imaginary parts of a complex optical function, namely the frequency dependent refractive index n and extinction coefficient k. We discuss techniques for the inverse retrieval of n and k for dielectric materials at VUV wavelengths from measurements of their reflectance and transmittance. Suitable substrate and film materials are identified for application in the VUV. Such applications include coatings for the fabrication of narrow and broadband filters and beamsplitters. The availability of such devices open the VUV regime to high resolution photometry, interferometry and polarimetry both for space based and laboratory applications. This chapter deals with the optics of absorbing multilayers, the determination of the optical functions for several useful materials, and the design of VUV multilayer stacks as applied to the design of narrow and broadband reflection and transmission filters and beamsplitters. Experimental techniques are discussed briefly, and several examples of the optical functions derived for selected materials are presented.

  20. Chapter 12: Human Microbiome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Xochitl C.; Huttenhower, Curtis

    2012-01-01

    Humans are essentially sterile during gestation, but during and after birth, every body surface, including the skin, mouth, and gut, becomes host to an enormous variety of microbes, bacterial, archaeal, fungal, and viral. Under normal circumstances, these microbes help us to digest our food and to maintain our immune systems, but dysfunction of the human microbiota has been linked to conditions ranging from inflammatory bowel disease to antibiotic-resistant infections. Modern high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatic tools provide a powerful means of understanding the contribution of the human microbiome to health and its potential as a target for therapeutic interventions. This chapter will first discuss the historical origins of microbiome studies and methods for determining the ecological diversity of a microbial community. Next, it will introduce shotgun sequencing technologies such as metagenomics and metatranscriptomics, the computational challenges and methods associated with these data, and how they enable microbiome analysis. Finally, it will conclude with examples of the functional genomics of the human microbiome and its influences upon health and disease. PMID:23300406

  1. Chapter 1: Biomedical knowledge integration.

    PubMed

    Payne, Philip R O

    2012-01-01

    The modern biomedical research and healthcare delivery domains have seen an unparalleled increase in the rate of innovation and novel technologies over the past several decades. Catalyzed by paradigm-shifting public and private programs focusing upon the formation and delivery of genomic and personalized medicine, the need for high-throughput and integrative approaches to the collection, management, and analysis of heterogeneous data sets has become imperative. This need is particularly pressing in the translational bioinformatics domain, where many fundamental research questions require the integration of large scale, multi-dimensional clinical phenotype and bio-molecular data sets. Modern biomedical informatics theory and practice has demonstrated the distinct benefits associated with the use of knowledge-based systems in such contexts. A knowledge-based system can be defined as an intelligent agent that employs a computationally tractable knowledge base or repository in order to reason upon data in a targeted domain and reproduce expert performance relative to such reasoning operations. The ultimate goal of the design and use of such agents is to increase the reproducibility, scalability, and accessibility of complex reasoning tasks. Examples of the application of knowledge-based systems in biomedicine span a broad spectrum, from the execution of clinical decision support, to epidemiologic surveillance of public data sets for the purposes of detecting emerging infectious diseases, to the discovery of novel hypotheses in large-scale research data sets. In this chapter, we will review the basic theoretical frameworks that define core knowledge types and reasoning operations with particular emphasis on the applicability of such conceptual models within the biomedical domain, and then go on to introduce a number of prototypical data integration requirements and patterns relevant to the conduct of translational bioinformatics that can be addressed via the design and

  2. Volcanism on Mars. Chapter 41

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimbelman, J. R.; Garry, W. B.; Bleacher, J. E.; Crown, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    Spacecraft exploration has revealed abundant evidence that Mars possesses some of the most dramatic volcanic landforms found anywhere within the solar system. How did a planet half the size of Earth produce volcanoes like Olympus Mons, which is several times the size of the largest volcanoes on Earth? This question is an example of the kinds of issues currently being investigated as part of the space-age scientific endeavor called "comparative planetology." This chapter summarizes the basic information currently known about volcanism on Mars. The volcanoes on Mars appear to be broadly similar in overall morphology (although, often quite different in scale) to volcanic features on Earth, which suggests that Martian eruptive processes are not significantly different from the volcanic styles and processes on Earth. Martian volcanoes are found on terrains of different age, and Martian volcanic rocks are estimated to comprise more than 50% of the Martian surface. This is in contrast to volcanism on smaller bodies such as Earth's Moon, where volcanic activity was mainly confined to the first half of lunar history (see "Volcanism on the Moon"). Comparative planetology supports the concept that volcanism is the primary mechanism for a planetary body to get rid of its internal heat; smaller bodies tend to lose their internal heat more rapidly than larger bodies (although, Jupiter's moon Io appears to contradict this trend; Io's intense volcanic activity is powered by unique gravitational tidal forces within the Jovian system; see "Volcanism on Io"), so that volcanic activity on Mars would be expected to differ considerably from that found on Earth and the Moon.

  3. Chapter 1: Biomedical knowledge integration.

    PubMed

    Payne, Philip R O

    2012-01-01

    The modern biomedical research and healthcare delivery domains have seen an unparalleled increase in the rate of innovation and novel technologies over the past several decades. Catalyzed by paradigm-shifting public and private programs focusing upon the formation and delivery of genomic and personalized medicine, the need for high-throughput and integrative approaches to the collection, management, and analysis of heterogeneous data sets has become imperative. This need is particularly pressing in the translational bioinformatics domain, where many fundamental research questions require the integration of large scale, multi-dimensional clinical phenotype and bio-molecular data sets. Modern biomedical informatics theory and practice has demonstrated the distinct benefits associated with the use of knowledge-based systems in such contexts. A knowledge-based system can be defined as an intelligent agent that employs a computationally tractable knowledge base or repository in order to reason upon data in a targeted domain and reproduce expert performance relative to such reasoning operations. The ultimate goal of the design and use of such agents is to increase the reproducibility, scalability, and accessibility of complex reasoning tasks. Examples of the application of knowledge-based systems in biomedicine span a broad spectrum, from the execution of clinical decision support, to epidemiologic surveillance of public data sets for the purposes of detecting emerging infectious diseases, to the discovery of novel hypotheses in large-scale research data sets. In this chapter, we will review the basic theoretical frameworks that define core knowledge types and reasoning operations with particular emphasis on the applicability of such conceptual models within the biomedical domain, and then go on to introduce a number of prototypical data integration requirements and patterns relevant to the conduct of translational bioinformatics that can be addressed via the design and

  4. Chapter 1: Biomedical Knowledge Integration

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Philip R. O.

    2012-01-01

    The modern biomedical research and healthcare delivery domains have seen an unparalleled increase in the rate of innovation and novel technologies over the past several decades. Catalyzed by paradigm-shifting public and private programs focusing upon the formation and delivery of genomic and personalized medicine, the need for high-throughput and integrative approaches to the collection, management, and analysis of heterogeneous data sets has become imperative. This need is particularly pressing in the translational bioinformatics domain, where many fundamental research questions require the integration of large scale, multi-dimensional clinical phenotype and bio-molecular data sets. Modern biomedical informatics theory and practice has demonstrated the distinct benefits associated with the use of knowledge-based systems in such contexts. A knowledge-based system can be defined as an intelligent agent that employs a computationally tractable knowledge base or repository in order to reason upon data in a targeted domain and reproduce expert performance relative to such reasoning operations. The ultimate goal of the design and use of such agents is to increase the reproducibility, scalability, and accessibility of complex reasoning tasks. Examples of the application of knowledge-based systems in biomedicine span a broad spectrum, from the execution of clinical decision support, to epidemiologic surveillance of public data sets for the purposes of detecting emerging infectious diseases, to the discovery of novel hypotheses in large-scale research data sets. In this chapter, we will review the basic theoretical frameworks that define core knowledge types and reasoning operations with particular emphasis on the applicability of such conceptual models within the biomedical domain, and then go on to introduce a number of prototypical data integration requirements and patterns relevant to the conduct of translational bioinformatics that can be addressed via the design and

  5. National ESEA Chapter 1 Schoolwide Projects Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleveland Public Schools, OH.

    This document is a collection of schoolwide compensatory education project plans for 22 elementary schools in the Cleveland (Ohio) Public Schools system, with funding provided by Chapter 1 of the Education Consolidation and Improvement Act. Chapter 1 project plans are included for the following schools: (1) Alfred A. Benesch; (2) Andrew J.…

  6. Chapter 6: Selenium Toxicity to Aquatic Organisms

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter addresses the characteristics and nature of organic selenium (Se) toxicity to aquatic organisms, based on the most current state of scientific knowledge. As such, the information contained in this chapter relates to the 'toxicity assessment' phase of aquatic ecologi...

  7. Chapter 17: Estimating Net Savings: Common Practices

    SciTech Connect

    Violette, D. M.; Rathbun, P.

    2014-09-01

    This chapter focuses on the methods used to estimate net energy savings in evaluation, measurement, and verification (EM&V) studies for energy efficiency (EE) programs. The chapter provides a definition of net savings, which remains an unsettled topic both within the EE evaluation community and across the broader public policy evaluation community, particularly in the context of attribution of savings to particular program. The chapter differs from the measure-specific Uniform Methods Project (UMP) chapters in both its approach and work product. Unlike other UMP resources that provide recommended protocols for determining gross energy savings, this chapter describes and compares the current industry practices for determining net energy savings, but does not prescribe particular methods.

  8. 26 CFR 31.3503-1 - Tax under chapter 21 or 22 paid under wrong chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tax under chapter 21 or 22 paid under wrong chapter. 31.3503-1 Section 31.3503-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... TAX AT SOURCE General Provisions Relating to Employment Taxes (Chapter 25, Internal Revenue Code...

  9. Misinterpretations of United States pharmacopeia chapter <797>.

    PubMed

    McElhiney, Linda F

    2012-01-01

    By now, all compounding pharmacists should be aware that United States Pharmacopeia Chapter <797> has been revised. However, the revisions are tedious to read and may be misinterpreted. This article discusses some of the misinterpreted revisions of United States Pharmacopeia Chapter <797> and clarifies the revisions on the topics of Terminology, The Compounder, Facilities and Environment, Personnel Cleansing and Garbing, Assigning Beyond-use Dates, and Testing. Compounders need to take a firm stand with these misinterpretations of United States Pharmacopeia Chapter <797> and educate those who are not thoroughly familiar with the document. Compounders need to be diligent in following these standards to prevent harm to the patients.

  10. Blueprint for financing geothermal district heating in California

    SciTech Connect

    Grattan, J.P.; Hansen, D.P.

    1981-03-01

    The current legal and investment climate surrounding geothermal development is depicted. Changes that would make the climate more favorable to direct heat geothermal development are recommended. The Boise, Susanville, and Brady Hot Springs projects are analyzed. (MHR)

  11. 7 CFR Appendix A to Part 3600 - List of State Statistical Offices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 32803 Georgia, Stephens Federal Building, Suite 320, Athens, GA 30613 Hawaii, State Department of Agriculture Building, 1428 South King Street, Honolulu, HI 96814 Idaho, 2224 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise,...

  12. 64. Photographic copy of historic photo, July 1908 (original print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    64. Photographic copy of historic photo, July 1908 (original print filed in Record Group 115, National Archives, Washington, D.C.). TEAM MOVING TRACK ON UPPER DEER FLAT EMBANKMENT. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  13. 20. OUTLET (FOREGROUND) AND WEIR (BACKGROUND) OF DEER FLAT CALDWELL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. OUTLET (FOREGROUND) AND WEIR (BACKGROUND) OF DEER FLAT CALDWELL CANAL ON DOWNSTREAM FACE OF UPPER EMBANKMENT. VIEW TO NORTH. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  14. 32. DETAIL OF CONCRETE TOWER AND SLIDE GATE LIFTING GEARS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. DETAIL OF CONCRETE TOWER AND SLIDE GATE LIFTING GEARS ON HEADWORKS OF DEER FLAT LOW LINE CANAL ON LOWER EMBANKMENT. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  15. 29. HEADWORKS OF DEER FLAT LOW LINE CANAL ON LOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. HEADWORKS OF DEER FLAT LOW LINE CANAL ON LOWER EMBANKMENT, SHOWING IDAHO-SHAPED ROCKS FLANKING ENTRANCE TO BRIDGE. VIEW TO EAST. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  16. 57. Photographic copy of historic photo, May 1908 (original print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    57. Photographic copy of historic photo, May 1908 (original print filed in Record Group 115, National Archives, Washington, D.C.). UPPER DEER FLAT EMBANKMENT; CAMP AND BUILDINGS. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  17. 68. Photographic copy of historic photo, June, 1912 (original print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    68. Photographic copy of historic photo, June, 1912 (original print filed in Record Group 115, National Archives, Washington, D.C.). INLET GATES, DEER FLAT RESERVOIR. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  18. 16. DETAIL OF OUTLET OF DEER FLAT NAMPA CANAL ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. DETAIL OF OUTLET OF DEER FLAT NAMPA CANAL ON DOWNSTREAM FACE OF UPPER EMBANKMENT (NOTE TWO FILLED-IN PORTALS). VIEW TO EAST. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  19. 13. DETAIL OF CONCRETE TOWER AND SLIDE GATE LIFTING GEARS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. DETAIL OF CONCRETE TOWER AND SLIDE GATE LIFTING GEARS ON HEADWORKS OF DEER FLAT NAMPA CANAL ON UPPER EMBANKMENT. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  20. 54. Photographic copy of historic photo, January 16, 1909 (original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. Photographic copy of historic photo, January 16, 1909 (original print filed in Record Group 115, National Archives, Washington, D.C.). LOWER DEER FLAT EMBANKMENT. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  1. 6. CREST ROAD ON UPPER EMBANKMENT, SHOWING MASONRY UPSTREAM PARAPET ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. CREST ROAD ON UPPER EMBANKMENT, SHOWING MASONRY UPSTREAM PARAPET WALL (LEFT) AND ENTRANCE TO DEER FLAT NAMPA CANAL HEADWORKS (ALSO LEFT). VIEW TO WEST. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  2. 43 CFR 1821.10 - Where are BLM offices located?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... several subsidiary offices called Field Offices. The addresses of the State Offices and their respective... Office, 1387 South Vinnell Way, Boise, Idaho 83709-1657—Idaho. Montana State Office, 5001 Southgate...

  3. 77 FR 12082 - Notice of Determinations Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-28

    ... Division, Aerotek, Remedy Staffing and TMI Managemet. 81,225 Adecco Engineering and Boise, ID February 13... Tower Automotive, Bellevue, OH February 13, 2010. L.L.C., Weststaff. 81,035 Dell USA LP, Global...

  4. 75 FR 54115 - Procurement List: Proposed Additions and Deletions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-03

    .... Service Type/Location: Property Management, Horace M. Albright Training Center and Residence Hall, Grand Canyon National Park, AZ. NPA: Trace, Inc., Boise, ID. Contracting Activity: National Park Service,...

  5. 77 FR 3789 - Call for Nominations for Resource Advisory Councils

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-25

    ... Office, BLM, 3948 Development Avenue, Boise, Idaho 83705, (208) 384-3393. Coeur d'Alene District RAC Suzanne Endsley, Coeur d'Alene District Office, BLM, 3815 Schreiber ] Way, Coeur d'Alene, Idaho...

  6. Native Health Research Database

    MedlinePlus

    ... Big Lagoon Rancheria Big Pine Band Blackfeet Blue Lake Rancheria Boise Forte Caddo Cahuilla Band of Indians ... Creek Crow Crow Creek Sioux Delaware Dene Devil's Lake Sioux Dogrib Eastern Band of Cherokee Elk Valley ...

  7. 7 CFR 2003.10 - Rural Development State Offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE, RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, AND FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE..., DE Florida Gainesville, FL Georgia Athens, GA Hawaii Hilo, HI Idaho Boise, ID Illinois Champaign,...

  8. 7 CFR 2003.10 - Rural Development State Offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE, RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, AND FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE..., DE Florida Gainesville, FL Georgia Athens, GA Hawaii Hilo, HI Idaho Boise, ID Illinois Champaign,...

  9. 7 CFR 2003.10 - Rural Development State Offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE, RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, AND FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE..., DE Florida Gainesville, FL Georgia Athens, GA Hawaii Hilo, HI Idaho Boise, ID Illinois Champaign,...

  10. 7 CFR 2003.10 - Rural Development State Offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE, RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, AND FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE..., DE Florida Gainesville, FL Georgia Athens, GA Hawaii Hilo, HI Idaho Boise, ID Illinois Champaign,...

  11. Chapter 42. Waterborne and Foodborne Parasites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter identifies the most prominent parasites in North America that are acquired through contaminated food and water including protozoa (Acanthamoeba, Naegleria, Entamoeba, Giardia, Cryptosporidium, Cystoisospora, Cyclospora, Toxoplasma, and Balantidium), nematodes (Trichinella, Angiostrongyl...

  12. How to write a medical book chapter?

    PubMed

    Kendirci, Muammer

    2013-09-01

    Invited medical book chapters are usually requested by editors from experienced authors who have made significant contributions to the literature in certain fields requested by an editor from an experienced. Before the start of the writing process a consensus should be established between the editor and the author with regard to the title, deadline, specific instructions and content of the manuscript. Certain issues concerning a chapter can be negotiated by the parties beforehand, but some issues cannot. As writing a medical book chapter is seen as an honor in its own right, the assignment needs to be treated with sincerity by elucidating the topic in detail, and maximal effort should be made to keep in mind that the chapter will reach a large target audience. The purpose of this review article is to provide guidance to residents and junior specialists in the field of urology to improve their writing skills.

  13. AIR POLLUTION CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES (CHAPTER 65)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chapter discusses the use of technologies for reducing air pollution emissions from stationary sources, with emphasis on the control of combustion gen-erated air pollution. Major stationary sources include utility power boilers, industrial boilers and heaters, metal smelting ...

  14. AMPLIFICATION OF RIBOSOMAL RNA SEQUENCES - Book Chapter

    EPA Science Inventory

    This book chapter contains the following headings and subheadings: Introduction; Experimental Approach - Precautions, Template, Primers, Reaction Conditions, Enhancers, Post Amplification; Procedures - Template DNA, Basic PCR, Thermal Cycle Parameters, Enzyme Addition, Agarose Ge...

  15. Where Social and Professional Networking Meet: The Virtual Association Chapter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noxon, Rose

    2011-01-01

    Online Capella University wanted to sponsor an International Society for Performance Improvement (ISPI) chapter. Using social networking platforms, a new type of chapter was designed. The virtual chapter breaks new ground on more than the chapter's platform; it is also the first university-sponsored chapter and has a unique approach to…

  16. 48 CFR 9900.000 - Scope of chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scope of chapter. 9900.000... PROCUREMENT POLICY, OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET SCOPE OF CHAPTER 9900.000 Scope of chapter. This chapter... and subcontracts. This chapter does not apply to sealed bid contracts or to any contract with a...

  17. 1 CFR 21.8 - Chapters and subchapters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Chapters and subchapters. 21.8 Section 21.8... Chapters and subchapters. (a) The normal divisions of a title are chapters, assigned to the various...) Subchapters may be used to group related parts within a chapter. (c) Chapter and subchapter assignments...

  18. Chapter IV - Safety During Payload Ground Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, Paul; Dollberg, John; Trinchero, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    This chapter describes the typical hazards that can be expected to be encountered when processing payloads on the ground. Also described are some of the more common controls for these hazards. Many of these controls are based on hard requirements but they are also based on specific lessons learned. This chapter uses the term Flight Hardware (F/H) for all payloads regardless of size.

  19. Geological Survey Research 1966, Chapter A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1966-01-01

    'Geological Survey Research 1966' is the seventh annual review of the econamic and scientific work of the U.S. Geological Survey. As in previous years the purpose of the volume is to make available promptly to the public the highlights of Survey investigations. This year the volume consists of 4 chapters (A through D) of Professional Paper 550. Chapter A contains a summary of significant results, and the remaining chapters are made up of collections of short technical papers. Many of the results summarized in chapter A are discussed in greater detail in the short papers or in reports listed in 'Publications in Fiscal Year 1966,' beginning on page A265. The tables of contents for chapters B through D are listed on pages A259-A264. Numerous Federal, State, county, and municipal agencies listed on pages A211-A215 cooperated financially with the Geological Survey during fiscal 1966 and have contributed significantly to the results reported here. They are identified where appropriate in the short technical papers that have appeared in Geological Survey Research and in papers published cooperatively, but generally are not identified in the brief statements in chapter A. Many individuals on the staff of the Geological Survey have contributed to 'Geological Survey Research 1966.' Reference is made to only a few. Frank W. Trainer, Water Resources Division, was responsible for organizing and assembling chapter A and for critical review of papers in chapters B-D, assisted by Louis Pavlides, Geologic Division. Marston S. Chase, Publications Division, was in charge of production aspects of the series, assisted by Jesse R. Upperco in technical editing, and William H. Elliott and James R. Hamilton in planning and preparing illustrations. The volume for next year, 'Geological Survey Research 1967,' will be published as chapters af Professional Paper 5715. Previous volumes are listed below, with their series designations. Gealagical Survey Research 1960-Prof. Paper 400 Gealagical

  20. Chapter A5. Processing of Water Samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilde, Franceska D.; Radtke, Dean B.; Gibs, Jacob; Iwatsubo, Rick T.

    1999-01-01

    The National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (National Field Manual) describes protocols and provides guidelines for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel who collect data used to assess the quality of the Nation's surface-water and ground-water resources. This chapter addresses methods to be used in processing water samples to be analyzed for inorganic and organic chemical substances, including the bottling of composite, pumped, and bailed samples and subsamples; sample filtration; solid-phase extraction for pesticide analyses; sample preservation; and sample handling and shipping. Each chapter of the National Field Manual is published separately and revised periodically. Newly published and revised chapters will be announced on the USGS Home Page on the World Wide Web under 'New Publications of the U.S. Geological Survey.' The URL for this page is http:/ /water.usgs.gov/lookup/get?newpubs.

  1. Marine West Coast Forests, Chapter 9

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perakis, Steven S.; Geiser, Linda H.; Lilleskov, Erik A.; Pardo, Linda H.; Robin-Abbott, Molly J.; Driscoll, Charles T.

    2011-01-01

    Human activities have greatly increased nitrogen emissions and deposition across large areas of Earth. Although nitrogen is an essential nutrient for plant growth, too much nitrogen in excess of critical loads leads to losses of biodiversity, soil and stream acidification, nutrient imbalances, and other deleterious effects. In a new report quantifying critical loads of nitrogen deposition across the United States, USGS scientist Steve Perakis and co-authors provided a chapter about responses of marine west coast forests. Much of this region is understudied with respect to nitrogen deposition, and in this chapter the authors identify known adverse effects and estimate critical loads of nitrogen deposition for western Oregon and Washington and southeast Alaska forests. Perakis also contributed to the synthesis chapter, which includes background, objectives, advantages and uncertainties of critical loads, an overview of critical loads across U.S. ecoregions, and other topics.

  2. Secondary School Mathematics, Chapter 21, Rigid Motions and Vectors, Chapter 22, Computers and Programs. Student's Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Univ., CA. School Mathematics Study Group.

    Transformation geometry topics are covered in one chapter of Unit 11 of this SMSG series. Work with translations, reflections, rotations, and composition of motions is included; vectors are briefly discussed. The chapter on computers and programming deals with recent history and uses of of the computer, organization of a digital computer, an…

  3. [Biennial Survey of Education, 1926-1928. Bulletin, 1930, No. 16. Chapter I - Chapter XX

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Education, United States Department of the Interior, 1930

    1930-01-01

    This document contains the first twenty chapters of the Biennial Survey of Education document, covering the years 1926-1928. The following chapters are included in this document: (1) Higher education (Arthur J. Klein); (2) Medical education (N. P. Colwell); (3) Legal education (Alfred Z. Reed); (4) Significant movements in city school systems (W.…

  4. Report of the Chapter 1 Sustained Effects Study. Elementary and Secondary Education Act--Chapter 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, William S.

    School districts receiving Chapter 1 funds are to conduct a study of sustained effects once every 3 years and to use the results for planning future Chapter 1 programs. As part of this effort, the Columbus (Ohio) public schools conducted pretest-to-posttest, posttest-to-sustained effect, and pretest-to-sustained effect studies of 4,031 students in…

  5. Secondary School Mathematics, Chapter 13, Perpendiculars and Parallels (I), Chapter 14, Similarity. Student's Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Univ., CA. School Mathematics Study Group.

    The first chapter of the seventh unit in this SMSG series discusses perpendiculars and parallels; topics covered include the relationship between parallelism and perpendicularity, rectangles, transversals, parallelograms, general triangles, and measurement of the circumference of the earth. The second chapter, on similarity, discusses scale…

  6. Secondary School Mathematics, Chapter 27, Logic, Chapter 28, Applications of Probability and Statistics. Student's Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Univ., CA. School Mathematics Study Group.

    One chapter in the fourteenth unit of this SMSG series deals with logic; simple and compound statements, truth tables, logical equivalence, rules of a logical argument, proof, quantifiers, and negations are the topics covered. The second chapter of the unit discusses applications of probability and statistics, including random sampling,…

  7. Secondary School Mathematics, Chapter 17, Perpendiculars and Parallels (II), Chapter 18, Coordinate Geometry. Student's Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Univ., CA. School Mathematics Study Group.

    The first chapter, Perpendiculars and Parallels (II), of the ninth unit in this SMSG series includes a discussion of the properties of triangles, circles and perpendiculars, parallels in space, perpendicular lines and planes, and parallel planes. The next chapter, on coordinate geometry, covers distance; midpoints; algebraic descriptions of…

  8. INDOOR AIR QUALITY MODELING (CHAPTER 58)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chapter discussses indoor air quality (IAQ) modeling. Such modeling provides a way to investigate many IAQ problems without the expense of large field experiments. Where experiments are planned, IAQ models can be used to help design experiments by providing information on exp...

  9. Chapter 4. Students' Attitudes toward Computer Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russian Education and Society, 2004

    2004-01-01

    In this chapter, the authors attempt not only to discern aspects that relate to age, place, and the amount of time devoted to playing computer games in adolescence, but also to study content characteristics of their attitudes such as: the developmental dynamic in the change of their genre preferences in computer games, changes in factors that…

  10. Chapter 8: Youth, Technology, and Media Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sefton-Green, Julian

    2006-01-01

    This chapter begins with a scenario contrasting two seemingly different images of child and media from before and after the "digital revolution." The author argues that there is much greater continuity in how this relationship has been conceptualized over the period than is commonly imagined. While not offering a comprehensive study of recent…

  11. Chapter 12: spatial or area repellents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spatial repellents a three-dimensional zone of protection around a host from attacks by biting arthropods. This chapter reviews current knowledge and outlines future directions for utilization of spatial repellents. Current knowledge includes the kinds of products, both active and passive devices,...

  12. The Chapter I Challenge: Colorado's Contribution 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petro, Janice Rose

    Chapter I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) is the largest federally-funded program designed to provide services to elementary and secondary students to meet the special needs of educationally deprived students who reside in areas with high concentrations of low-income families. The 1994-95 school year is the last year of…

  13. Recommended Research on Artificial Gravity. Chapter 13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos, Joan; Paloski, William; Fuller, Charles; Clement, Gilles

    2006-01-01

    Based on the summaries presented in the above sections of what is still to be learned on the effects of artificial gravity on human functions, this chapter will discuss the short- and long-term steps of research required to understand fundamentals and to validate operational aspects of using artificial gravity as an effective countermeasure for long-duration space travel.

  14. Chapter Five: Language Learning and Discursive Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Richard F.

    2008-01-01

    This chapter is framed by the three questions related to learning in Practice Theory posed by Johannes Wagner (2008): (1) What is learned?; (2) Who is learning?; and (3) Who is participating in the learning? These questions are addressed in two learning theories: Language Socialization and Situated Learning theory. In Language Socialization, the…

  15. Chapter 7: Principles of Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Sullivan, Mary; Deglau, Dena

    2006-01-01

    This chapter summarizes the 4-year-long PEP professional development (PD) initiative in terms of current perspectives on teacher learning and PD, shares lessons learned about the design and delivery of high-quality PD, and presents some principles to guide the development of future PD efforts. The first section reviews the definition and…

  16. Metrology of Large Parts. Chapter 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2012-01-01

    As discussed in the first chapter of this book, there are many different methods to measure a part using optical technology. Chapter 2 discussed the use of machine vision to measure macroscopic features such as length and position, which was extended to the use of interferometry as a linear measurement tool in chapter 3, and laser or other trackers to find the relation of key points on large parts in chapter 4. This chapter looks at measuring large parts to optical tolerances in the sub-micron range using interferometry, ranging, and optical tools discussed in the previous chapters. The purpose of this chapter is not to discuss specific metrology tools (such as interferometers or gauges), but to describe a systems engineering approach to testing large parts. Issues such as material warpage and temperature drifts that may be insignificant when measuring a part to micron levels under a microscope, as will be discussed in later chapters, can prove to be very important when making the same measurement over a larger part. In this chapter, we will define a set of guiding principles for successfully overcoming these challenges and illustrate the application of these principles with real world examples. While these examples are drawn from specific large optical testing applications, they inform the problems associated with testing any large part to optical tolerances. Manufacturing today relies on micrometer level part performance. Fields such as energy and transportation are demanding higher tolerances to provide increased efficiencies and fuel savings. By looking at how the optics industry approaches sub-micrometer metrology, one can gain a better understanding of the metrology challenges for any larger part specified to micrometer tolerances. Testing large parts, whether optical components or precision structures, to optical tolerances is just like testing small parts, only harder. Identical with what one does for small parts, a metrologist tests large parts and optics

  17. Vaccination against bacterial kidney disease: Chapter 22

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, Diane G.; Wiens, Gregory D.; Hammell, K. Larry; Rhodes, Linda D.; Edited by Gudding, Roar; Lillehaug, Atle; Evensen, Øystein

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial kidney disease (BKD) of salmonid fishes, caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum, has been recognized as a serious disease in salmonid fishes since the 1930s. This chapter discusses the occurrence and significance, etiology, and pathogenesis of BKD. It then describes the different vaccination procedures and the effects and side-effects of vaccination. Despite years of research, however, only a single vaccine has been licensed for prevention of BKD, and has demonstrated variable efficacy. Therefore, in addition to a presentation of the current status of BKD vaccination, a discussion of potential future directions for BKD vaccine development is included in the chapter. This discussion is focused on the unique characteristics of R. salmoninarum and its biology, as well as aspects of the salmonid immune system that might be explored specifically to develop more effective vaccines for BKD prevention.

  18. Dust and human health: Chapter 15

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morman, Suzette A.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Knippertz, Peter; Stuut, Jan-Berend W.

    2013-01-01

    It is generally accepted that exposure to fine particulate matter may increase risk for human morbidity and mortality. Until recently, population health related studies examining the effects of particulate matter on human health generally examined anthropogenic (industry and combustion by-products) sources with few studies considering contributions from natural sources. This chapter provides an overview of naturally occurring inorganic mineral dust research and associated human health ailments and some of the challenges in elucidating the etiological mechanisms responsible.

  19. Managing atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome: chapter 2.

    PubMed

    Nester, Carla M

    2015-05-01

    Licht et al. present the 2-year follow-up data of the landmark trials studying the efficacy of eculizumab in the treatment of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS). They report sustained improvements in hematologic parameters, continued safety, and additional improvements in kidney function with extended treatment. This report adds a layer of comfort to our care of patients with this rare disease; however, it is unlikely to be the final chapter in the treatment of aHUS.

  20. Chapter A9. Safety in Field Activities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lane, Susan L.; Ray, Ronald G.

    1998-01-01

    The National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (National Field Manual) describes protocols (requirements and recommendations) and provides guidelines for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel who collect data used to assess the quality of the Nation's surface-water and ground-water resources. This chapter of the manual addresses topics related to personal safety to be used in the collection of water-quality data, including: policies and general regulations on field safety; transportation of people and equipment; implementation of surface-water and ground-water activities; procedures for handling chemicals; and information on potentially hazardous environmental conditions, animals, and plants. Each chapter of the National Field Manual is published separately and revised periodically. Newly published and revised chapters will be announced on the USGS Home Page on the World Wide Web under 'New Publications of the U.S. Geological Survey.' The URL for this page is http://pubs.usgs.gov/publications/ index.html.

  1. Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications. Chapter 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2000-01-01

    This chapter focuses attention on the friction and wear properties of selected solid lubricating films to aid users in choosing the best lubricant, deposition conditions, and operational variables. For simplicity, discussion of the tribological properties of concern is separated into two parts. The first part of the chapter discusses the different solid lubricating films selected for study including commercially developed solid film lubricants: (1) bonded molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), (2) magnetron-sputtered MoS2, (3) ion-plated silver, (4) ion-plated lead, (5) magnetron-sputtered diamondlike carbon (MS DLC), and (6) plasma-assisted, chemical-vapor-deposited diamondlike carbon (PACVD DEC) films. Marked differences in the friction and wear properties of the different films resulted from the different environmental conditions (ultrahigh vacuum, humid air, and dry nitrogen) and the solid film lubricant materials. The second part of the chapter discusses the physical and chemical characteristics, friction behavior, and endurance life of the magnetron-sputtered MoS2 films. The role of interface species and the effects of applied load, film thickness, oxygen pressure, environment, and temperature on the friction and wear properties are considered.

  2. A Survey of Geologic Resources. Chapter 11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonson, Jennifer; Rickman, Doug

    2012-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the resources available from the Moon itself: regolith, geologically concentrated materials, and lunar physical features that will enable habitation and generation of power on the surface. This chapter briefly covers the formation of the Moon and thus the formation of the crust of the Moon, as well as the evolution of the regolith. The characteristics of the regolith are provided in some detail, including its mineralogy and lithology. The location of high concentrations of specific minerals or rocks is noted. Other ideal locations for in situ resource utilization technology and lunar habitation are presented. This chapter is intended to be a brief review of current knowledge, and to serve as a foundational source for further study. Each concept presented here has a wealth of literature associated with it; the reader is therefore directed to that literature with each discussion. With great interest in possible manned lunar landings and continued study of the Moon by multiple satellites, the available information changes regularly.

  3. 48 CFR Appendix E to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false E Appendix E to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendix E to Chapter 7...

  4. 48 CFR Appendix E to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false E Appendix E to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendix E to Chapter 7...

  5. 48 CFR Appendix E to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false E Appendix E to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendix E to Chapter 7...

  6. 48 CFR Appendixes A-C to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false A Appendixes A-C to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendixes A-C to Chapter 7...

  7. 48 CFR Appendix E to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false E Appendix E to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendix E to Chapter 7...

  8. 48 CFR Appendix G to Chapter 2 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false G Appendix G to Chapter 2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Appendix G to Chapter 2...

  9. 48 CFR Appendixes G-H to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false G Appendixes G-H to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendixes G-H to Chapter 7...

  10. 48 CFR Appendixes A-C to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false A Appendixes A-C to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendixes A-C to Chapter 7...

  11. 48 CFR Appendix E to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false E Appendix E to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendix E to Chapter 7...

  12. 48 CFR Appendixes G-H to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false G Appendixes G-H to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendixes G-H to Chapter 7...

  13. Space Applications of Mass Spectrometry. Chapter 31

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, John H.; Griffin, Timothy P.; Limero, Thomas; Arkin, C. Richard

    2010-01-01

    Mass spectrometers have been involved in essentially all aspects of space exploration. This chapter outlines some of these many uses. Mass spectrometers have not only helped to expand our knowledge and understanding of the world and solar system around us, they have helped to put man safely in space and expand our frontier. Mass spectrometry continues to prove to be a very reliable, robust, and flexible analytical instrument, ensuring that its use will continue to help aid our investigation of the universe and this small planet that we call home.

  14. Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications. Chapter 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1998-01-01

    This chapter describes powerful analytical techniques capable of sampling tribological surfaces and solid-film lubricants. Some of these techniques may also be used to determine the locus of failure in a bonded structure or coated substrate; such information is important when seeking improved adhesion between a solid-film lubricant and a substrate and when seeking improved performance and long life expectancy of solid lubricants. Many examples are given here and through-out the book on the nature and character of solid surfaces and their significance in lubrication, friction, and wear. The analytical techniques used include the late spectroscopic methods.

  15. Columbia: The Economic Foundation of Peace. Chapters 21-28.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giugale, Marcelo M., Ed.; Lafourcade, Olivier, Ed.; Luff, Connie, Ed.

    This document contains 8 chapters of a 35-chapter book that presents a comprehensive diagnosis of current economic, social, and educational conditions in Colombia and their importance to development prospects and the quest for peace. The eight chapters covered here are part of a section titled "Sharing the Fruits of Growth with All Colombians."…

  16. 38 CFR 21.6380 - Additional applicable Chapter 31 regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Chapter 31 regulations. 21.6380 Section 21.6380 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF... applicable Chapter 31 regulations. The following regulations are applicable to veterans pursuing the vocational training under this program in the same manner as they apply to 38 U.S.C. chapter 31: §...

  17. 24 CFR 300.1 - Scope of chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Scope of chapter. 300.1 Section 300.1 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued... of chapter. This chapter consists of general information and does not purport to set forth all of...

  18. Using Kolb's Experiential Learning Cycle in Chapter Presentations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokes-Eley, Stephanie

    2007-01-01

    Student-led chapter presentations provide an excellent opportunity for instructors to evaluate a student's comprehension of the assigned chapter, as well as the student's ability to present and convey information in a public forum. Although several instructors realize the benefits of requiring students to complete chapter presentations either as…

  19. Methods of assessing responses of trees, stands, and ecosystems to air pollution (Chapter 7). Book chapter

    SciTech Connect

    Stolte, K.W.; Duriscoe, D.M.; Cook, E.R.; Cline, S.P.

    1992-01-01

    The chapter focuses on three main types of assessments of pollution effects used in the case studies chronicled in Chapter 8 through 12 (Regional Studies of conifer forests in the west). These are measures of crown condition of individual trees; impacts on populations and communities; and temporal patterns in radial growth. The concepts behind the development of each approach are introduced with references to previous work, leading to a discussion of the state of science. The importance of quality assurance techniques to the success of any assessment of air pollution effects is also discussed.

  20. Universal Sensor and Actuator Requirements. Chapter 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, Taylor; Webster, John; Garg, Sanjay

    2009-01-01

    The previous chapters have focused on the requirements for sensors and actuators for "More Intelligent Gas Turbine Engines" from the perspective of performance and operating environment. Even if a technology is available, which meets these performance requirements, there are still various hurdles to be overcome for the technology to transition into a real engine. Such requirements relate to TRL (Technology Readiness Level), durability, reliability, volume, weight, cost, etc. This chapter provides an overview of such universal requirements which any sensor or actuator technology will have to meet before it can be implemented on a product. The objective here is to help educate the researchers or technology developers on the extensive process that the technology has to go through beyond just meeting performance requirements. The hope is that such knowledge will help the technology developers as well as decision makers to prevent wasteful investment in developing solutions to performance requirements, which have no potential to meet the "universal" requirements. These "universal" requirements can be divided into 2 broad areas: 1) Technology value proposition; and 2) Technology maturation. These requirements are briefly discussed in the following.

  1. Volatile hydrocarbons and fuel oxygenates: Chapter 12

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.

    2014-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons and fuel oxygenates are among the most commonly occurring and widely distributed contaminants in the environment. This chapter presents a summary of the sources, transport, fate, and remediation of volatile fuel hydrocarbons and fuel additives in the environment. Much research has focused on the transport and transformation processes of petroleum hydrocarbons and fuel oxygenates, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes and methyl tert‐butyl ether, in groundwater following release from underground storage tanks. Natural attenuation from biodegradation limits the movement of these contaminants and has received considerable attention as an environmental restoration option. This chapter summarizes approaches to environmental restoration, including those that rely on natural attenuation, and also engineered or enhanced remediation. Researchers are increasingly combining several microbial and molecular-based methods to give a complete picture of biodegradation potential and occurrence at contaminated field sites. New insights into the fate of petroleum hydrocarbons and fuel additives have been gained by recent advances in analytical tools and approaches, including stable isotope fractionation, analysis of metabolic intermediates, and direct microbial evidence. However, development of long-term detailed monitoring programs is required to further develop conceptual models of natural attenuation and increase our understanding of the behavior of contaminant mixtures in the subsurface.

  2. Chapter 2: Stand-alone Applications - TOPCAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C. J.

    Tool for OPerations on Catalogues And Tables or TOPCAT is a graphical viewer for table data. It offers a variety of ways to work with data tables, including a browser for the cell data, viewers for information about table and column metadata, dataset visualization, and even analysis. We discuss a small subset of TOPCAT's functionalities in this chapter. TOPCAT was originally developed as part of the Starlink program in the United Kingdom. It is now maintained by AstroGrid. The program is written in pure Java and available under the GNU General Public License. It is available for download and a version is included in the software distribution accompanying this book. TOPCAT is a GUI interface on top of the STIL library. A command line interface to this library, STILTS, described in Chapter 21 provides scriptable access to many of the capabilities described here. The purpose of this tutorial is to provide an overview of TOPCAT to the novice user. The best place to look for and learn about TOPCAT is the web page maintained by Mark B. Taylor. There, TOPCAT documentation is provided in HTML, PDF, via screen shots, etc. In this chapter we take the user through a few examples that give the general idea of how TOPCAT works. The majority of the functionality of TOPCAT is not included in this short tutorial. Our goal in this tutorial is to lead the reader through an exercise that would result in a publication quality figure (e.g. for a journal article). Specifically, we will use TOPCAT to show how the color-magnitude relation of a galaxy cluster compares to that of all galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (York et al. 2000). This diagnostic is used not only in cluster finding, but its linear fit can provide insight into the age and/or metallicity of the oldest galaxies in galaxy clusters (which are some of the oldest galaxies in the Universe). The data we need for this exercise are: 1) the entire spectroscopic galaxy catalog from the SDSS, with galaxy positions, galaxy

  3. History of Artificial Gravity. Chapter 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, Gilles; Bukley, Angie; Paloski, William

    2006-01-01

    This chapter reviews the past and current projects on artificial gravity during space missions. The idea of a rotating wheel-like space station providing artificial gravity goes back in the writings of Tsiolkovsky, Noordung, and Wernher von Braun. Its most famous fictional representation is in the film 2001: A Space Odyssey, which also depicts spin-generated artificial gravity aboard a space station and a spaceship bound for Jupiter. The O Neill-type space colony provides another classic illustration of this technique. A more realistic approach to rotating the space station is to provide astronauts with a smaller centrifuge contained within a spacecraft. The astronauts would go into it for a workout, and get their gravity therapeutic dose for a certain period of time, daily or a few times a week. This simpler concept is current being tested during ground-based studies in several laboratories around the world.

  4. New training building heralds new chapter.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2014-09-01

    Established in 1969 by the Department of Health as the National Centre for Hospital Engineering, Eastwood Park is today acknowledged as one of the UK's leading providers of specialist technical, engineering, estates, and facilities management training to the healthcare sector. Having celebrated 40 years in business in 2009, and with the breadth of its portfolio growing year-on-year, the training provider has recently entered a particularly exciting new chapter, as plans for a new 3,000 m2 training centre, due to open late next year, and equipped with facilities which Eastwood Park's management say will be 'unrivalled anywhere else in the world', come to fruition. HEJ editor, Jonathan Baillie reports.

  5. Coldwater fish in wadeable streams: chapter 8

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunham, Jason B.; Rosenberger, Amanda E.; Thurow, Russell F.; Dolloff, C. Andrew; Howell, Philip J.

    2009-01-01

    Standardizing sampling methods for fish populations across large regions is important for consistent measurement of large-scale effects of climate or geography. In addition, pooling samples creates larger sample sizes and can facilitate data sharing among scientists and land managers. Sampling freshwater fish has largely not been standardized due to the diversity of fish and habitats. USGS aquatic ecologist Jason Dunham and co-authors contributed a chapter about sampling coldwater fish in wadeable streams to a new book that details common methods, protocols, and guidelines for sampling fish across North America. Topics include three common sampling methods: electrofishing, snorkeling, and nest counts. Each method provides complementary information about different species and life stages. The information will be useful for initiating new or fine-tuning ongoing sampling programs.

  6. Mercury and halogens in coal: Chapter 2

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolker, Allan; Quick, Jeffrey C.; Granite, Evan J.; Pennline, Henry W.; Senior, Constance L.

    2014-01-01

    Apart from mercury itself, coal rank and halogen content are among the most important factors inherent in coal that determine the proportion of mercury captured by conventional controls during coal combustion. This chapter reviews how mercury in coal occurs, gives available concentration data for mercury in U.S. and international commercial coals, and provides an overview of the natural variation in halogens that influence mercury capture. Three databases, the U.S. Geological Survey coal quality (USGS COALQUAL) database for in-ground coals, and the 1999 and 2010 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Information Collection Request (ICR) databases for coals delivered to power stations, provide extensive results for mercury and other parameters that are compared in this chapter. In addition to the United States, detailed characterization of mercury is available on a nationwide basis for China, whose mean values in recent compilations are very similar to the United States in-ground mean of 0.17 ppm mercury. Available data for the next five largest producers (India, Australia, South Africa, the Russian Federation, and Indonesia) are more limited and with the possible exceptions of Australia and the Russian Federation, do not allow nationwide means for mercury in coal to be calculated. Chlorine in coal varies as a function of rank and correspondingly, depth of burial. As discussed elsewhere in this volume, on a proportional basis, bromine is more effective than chlorine in promoting mercury oxidation in flue gas and capture by conventional controls. The ratio of bromine to chlorine in coal is indicative of the proportion of halogens present in formation waters within a coal basin. This ratio is relatively constant except in coals that have interacted with deep-basin brines that have reached halite saturation, enriching residual fluids in bromine. Results presented here help optimize mercury capture by conventional controls and provide a starting point for

  7. Chapter 24: Programmatic Interfaces - IDL VOlib

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C. J.

    In this chapter, we describe a library for working with the VO using IDL (the Interactive Data Language). IDL is a software environment for data analysis, visualization, and cross-platform application development. It has wide-usage in astronomy, including NASA (e.g. http://seadas.gsfc.nasa.gov/), the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (http://www.sdss.org), and the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph Instrument (http://ssc.spitzer.caltech.edu/archanaly/contributed/smart/). David Stern, the founder of Research Systems, Inc. (RSI), began the development of IDL while working with NASA's Mars Mariner 7 and 9 data at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics at the University of Colorado. In 1981, IDL was rewritten in assembly language and FORTRAN for VAX/VMS. IDL's usage has expanded over the last decade into the fields of medical imaging and engineering, among many others. IDL's programming style carries over much of this FORTRAN-legacy, and has a familiar feel to many astronomers who learned their trade using FORTRAN. The spread of IDL-usage amongst astronomers can in part be attributed to the wealth of publicly astronomical libraries. The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) maintains a list of astronomy-related IDL libraries, including the well known Astronomy User's Library (hereafter ASTROLIB2). We will use some of these GSFC IDL libraries. We note that while IDL is a licensed-software product, the source code of user-written procedures are typically freely available to the community. To make the most out of this section as a reader, it is important that many of the data discovery, access, and analysis protocols are understood before reading this chapter. In the next section, we provide an overview of some of the NVO terminology with which the reader should be familiar. The IDL library discussed here is specifically for use with the Virtual Observatory and is named VOlib. IDL's VOlib is available at http://nvo.noao.edu and is included with the software distrubution for this

  8. Numerical Prediction of Dust. Chapter 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benedetti, Angela; Baldasano, J. M.; Basart, S.; Benincasa, F.; Boucher, O.; Brooks, M.; Chen, J. P.; Colarco, P. R.; Gong, S.; Huneeus, N.; Jones, L; Lu, S.; Menut, L.; Mulcahy, J.; Nickovic, S.; Morcrette, J.-J.; Perez, C.; Reid, J. S.; Sekiyama, T. T.; Tanaka, T.; Terradellas, E.; Westphal, D. L.; Zhang, X.-Y.; Zhou, C.-H.

    2013-01-01

    Covers the whole breadth of mineral dust research, from a scientific perspective Presents interdisciplinary work including results from field campaigns, satellite observations, laboratory studies, computer modelling and theoretical studies Explores the role of dust as a player and recorder of environmental change This volume presents state-of-the-art research about mineral dust, including results from field campaigns, satellite observations, laboratory studies, computer modelling and theoretical studies. Dust research is a new, dynamic and fast-growing area of science and due to its multiple roles in the Earth system, dust has become a fascinating topic for many scientific disciplines. Aspects of dust research covered in this book reach from timescales of minutes (as with dust devils, cloud processes, and radiation) to millennia (as with loess formation and oceanic sediments), making dust both a player and recorder of environmental change. The book is structured in four main parts that explore characteristics of dust, the global dust cycle, impacts of dust on the Earth system, and dust as a climate indicator. The chapters in these parts provide a comprehensive, detailed overview of this highly interdisciplinary subject. The contributions presented here cover dust from source to sink and describe all the processes dust particles undergo while travelling through the atmosphere. Chapters explore how dust is lifted and transported, how it affects radiation, clouds, regional circulations, precipitation and chemical processes in the atmosphere, and how it deteriorates air quality. The book explores how dust is removed from the atmosphere by gravitational settling, turbulence or precipitation, how iron contained in dust fertilizes terrestrial and marine ecosystems, and about the role that dust plays in human health. We learn how dust is observed, simulated using computer models and forecast. The book also details the role of dust deposits for climate reconstructions

  9. Dealing with Processing Chapter 10 Files from Multiple Vendors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knudtson, Kevin Mark

    2011-01-01

    This presentation discusses the experiences of the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center's (DFRC) Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) in dealing with the problems encountered while performing post flight data processing using the WATR's data collection/processing system on Chapter 10 files from different Chapter 10 recorders. The transition to Chapter 10 recorders has brought Vvith it an assortment of issues that must be addressed: the ambiguities of language in the Chapter 10 standard, the unrealistic near-term expectations of the Chapter 10 standard, the incompatibility of data products generated from Chapter 10 recorders, and the unavailability of mature Chapter 10 applications. Some of these issues properly belong to the users of Chapter 10 recorders, some to the manufacturers, and some to the flight test community at large. The goal of this presentation is to share the WATR's lesson learned in processing data products from various Chapter 10 recorder vendors. The WATR could benefit greatly in the open forum Vvith lessons learned discussions with other members of the flight test community.

  10. Carbon cycling in terrestrial environments: Chapter 17

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Yang; Huntington, Thomas G.; Osher, Laurie J.; Wassenaar, Leonard I; Trumbore, Susan E.; Amundson, Ronald; Harden, Jennifer W.; McKnight, Diane M.; Schiff, Sherry L.; Aiken, George R.; Lyons, W. Berry; Aravena, Ramon O.; Baron, Jill S.

    1998-01-01

    This chapter reviews a number of applications of isotopic techniques for the investigation of carbon cycling processes. Carbon dioxide (C02) is an important greenhouse gas. Its concentration in the atmosphere has increased from an estimated 270 ppm at the beginning of the industrial revolution to ∼ 360 ppm at present. Climatic conditions and atmospheric C02 concentration also influence isotopic discrimination during photosynthesis. Natural and anthropogenically induced variations in the carbon isotopic abundance can be exploited to investigate carbon transformations between pools on various time scales. It also discusses one of the isotopes of carbon, the 14C, that is produced in the atmosphere by interactions of cosmic-ray produced neutrons with stable isotopes of nitrogen (N), oxygen (O), and carbon (C), and has a natural abundance in the atmosphere of ∼1 atom 14 C per 1012 atoms 12C. The most important factor affecting the measured 14C ages of soil organic matter is the rate of organic carbon cycling in soils. Differences in the dynamics of soil carbon among different soils or soil horizons will result in different soil organic 14C signatures. As a result, the deviation of the measured 14C age from the true age could differ significantly among different soils or soil horizons.

  11. Chapter 19: visual images and neurological illustration.

    PubMed

    Ione, Amy

    2010-01-01

    This chapter examines the importance of visual materials for studying the brain in health and in disease. Surveying historical representations, this research confirms that images of the brain's form and function have long served as teaching tools and as historical reference points for neurological events. The research is divided into five sections: the first section, Early History to Printing Technology considers prehistoric and ancient imagery, pre-Renaissance thinking about the brain, and the impact of printing and printmaking on neurological research. The second section, Renaissance Illustration, focuses on Leonardo da Vinci, Andreas Vesalius, and other contributors who produced images of the brain as dissection restrictions eased. The third section, which turns to Early Modern and Modern Illustration, highlights the work of Thomas Willis, Charles Bell, and other scientists (throughout the 19th century) who demonstrated the value of a visual component within brain studies. The fourth section presents examples of Neurologically-Descriptive Illustrations, with the final section considering Historical Illustration and Contemporary Research. PMID:19892122

  12. Fire as an ecosystem process: Chapter 3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keeley, Jon E.; Safford, Hugh D.

    2016-01-01

    This long-anticipated reference and sourcebook for California’s remarkable ecological abundance provides an integrated assessment of each major ecosystem type—its distribution, structure, function, and management. A comprehensive synthesis of our knowledge about this biologically diverse state, Ecosystems of California covers the state from oceans to mountaintops using multiple lenses: past and present, flora and fauna, aquatic and terrestrial, natural and managed. Each chapter evaluates natural processes for a specific ecosystem, describes drivers of change, and discusses how that ecosystem may be altered in the future. This book also explores the drivers of California’s ecological patterns and the history of the state’s various ecosystems, outlining how the challenges of climate change and invasive species and opportunities for regulation and stewardship could potentially affect the state’s ecosystems. The text explicitly incorporates both human impacts and conservation and restoration efforts and shows how ecosystems support human well-being. Edited by two esteemed ecosystem ecologists and with overviews by leading experts on each ecosystem, this definitive work will be indispensable for natural resource management and conservation professionals as well as for undergraduate or graduate students of California’s environment and curious naturalists.

  13. Chapter 1: Epidemiology of Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Maahs, David M; West, Nancy A; Lawrence, Jean M.; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis This chapter describes the epidemiology of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) around the world and across the lifespan. Epidemiologic patterns of T1D by demographic, geographic, biologic, cultural and other factors in populations are presented to gain insight about the etiology, natural history, risks, and complications of T1D. Data from large epidemiologic studies worldwide indicate that the incidence of T1D has been increasing by 2–5% worldwide and that the prevalence of T1D is approximately 1 in 300 in the US by 18 years of age. Research on risk factors for T1D is an active area of research to identify genetic and environmental triggers that could potentially be targeted for intervention. While significant advances have been made in the clinical care of T1D with resultant improvements in quality of life and clinical outcomes, much more needs to be done to improve care of, and ultimately find a cure for T1D. Epidemiologic studies have an important on-going role to investigate the complex causes, clinical care, prevention, and cure of T1D. PMID:20723815

  14. Feasibility of ground-water features of the alternate plan for the Mountain Home project, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nace, Raymond L.; West, S.W.; Mowder, R.W.

    1957-01-01

    An early plan of the U. S. Bureau of Reclamation proposed to irrigate 183,000 acres on the arid Snake River Plain south of Boise, Idaho (Mountain Home project) with Boise River water. That water would have been replaced to the Boise Valley with water imported from the Payette River. An alternate plan, proposed in 1953, would divert water from the Boise River to the plain; part of the water would be replaced by pumping ground water in the Boise valley and by importing water from the Snake River. Pumping of ground water in the Boise Valley also would help to drain waterlogged land. The present report evaluates the feasibility of the alternate plan in relation to geology and the occurrence and quality of ground water. The mean annual temperature at Boise is 50.8 ? F and there is an average of 172 days between killing frosts. The annual evaporation rate from open-water surfaces in the area is about 33 inches. Runoff in the Boise River is chiefly from precipitation on mountain slopes at altitudes above 3,000 feet, east of Boise Diversion Dam. The surface-water supply of the Boise Valley is more Than ample for the valley, owing to large upstream storage and regulatory dams and reservoirs. The valley also contains a large volume of ground water in storage, and the perennial rate of recharge is large. The computed consumptive depletion of surface water in the valley is nearly 600,000 acre-feet a year. Apparent depletion, computed from adjusted runoff at Notus, is 1,070,000 acre-feet. The difference of 470,000 acre-feet represents ground-water underflow and ungaged surface outflow from the area east of Notus. After the beginning of irrigation, around the turn of the century, the water table in the Boise Valley rose steadily; the amount of rise at some places was as much as 140 feet. Shallow perched zones of saturation were created locally. More than 100,000 acres of Boise Valley land now is waterlogged or threatened with waterlogging, despite the presence of more than 325

  15. Effects of burn rate, wood species, altitude, and stove type on wood-stove emissions

    SciTech Connect

    McCrillis, R.C.; Burnet, P.G.

    1990-01-01

    The paper discusses an emission measurement program in Boise, ID, designed to identify the potential mutagenic impact of residential wood burning on ambient and indoor air. One facet of this field sampling involved obtaining emission samples from chimneys serving wood burning appliances in Boise. A parallel project was undertaken in an instrumented woodstove test laboratory to quantify woodstove emissions during operations typical of Boise usage. Test results showed wide variability probably due primarily to the difficulty in duplicating conditions during stove start-up. Total woodstove dilution sampling system (WSDSS) emissions showed the expected inverse correlation with burnrate for the conventional stove and nearly flat for the catalytic stove. While there appeared to be little or no correlation of total WSDSS emissions with altitude, the sum of the 16 polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) quantified showed a direct correlation with altitude: higher PAH emissions at the higher altitude. Two woodstoves were operated in the test laboratory over a range of burnrates, burning either eastern oak or white pine from the Boise area. A conventional stove, manufactured in the Boise area, was tested at altitudes of 90 and 825 m. A catalytic stove was tested only at the high altitude. Pine produced a higher PAH emission rate than oak.

  16. Ecological consequences of manipulative parasites: chapter 9

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lafferty, Kevin D.; Kuris, A. M.

    2012-01-01

    phrases such as “may ultimately infl uence community structure” (Kiesecker and Blaustein 1999), yet few demonstrate ecological effects. Here, we consider the conditions under which manipulative parasites might have a substantial ecological effect in nature and highlight those for which evidence exists (see also Chapter 10).

  17. Introduction to MODIS Cloud Products. Chapter 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, Bryan A.; Platnick, Steven

    2006-01-01

    derived from heritage instruments. This chapter provides an overview of the MODIS Level-2 and -3 operational cloud products.

  18. 48 CFR Appendixes B-E to Chapter 2 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false B Appendixes B-E to Chapter 2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Appendixes B-E to Chapter 2...

  19. 48 CFR Appendixes B-E to Chapter 2 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false B Appendixes B-E to Chapter 2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Appendixes B-E to Chapter 2...

  20. 48 CFR Appendixes B-E to Chapter 2 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false B Appendixes B-E to Chapter 2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Appendixes B-E to Chapter 2...

  1. Report of Evaluation, Chapter I Mathematics Program, 1982-83.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tompkins, John F.

    The Des Moines Chapter I math program served 1110 students in grades 1-8 during school year 1982-83. The total population of Chapter I students attained the established criteria for achievement gains but the gains for grades 7 and 8, taken alone, were lower than the goals. The same was true for mastery of math objectives. All parent contact…

  2. Chapter I Mathematics Program, 1982-83. Report of Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tompkins, John F.

    The Des Moines (Iowa) Independent Community School District Chapter I Mathematics Program served 1,110 students in grades 2-8. Chapter I Math students in grades two through six achieved gains on the Iowa Tests of Basic Skills from pre to posttesting. Scores on these tests are reported using a metric known as the Normal Curve Equivalent (NCE). The…

  3. Chapter 2: Optical Properties of the Water Column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, D. A.; Collins, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    In this chapter, and in chapter 29, the basic inter-relationship between the flux of radiant energy through the water column and the fixation of carbon by the phytoplankton in the ocean through processes of photosynthesis or primary production will be discussed.

  4. 48 CFR Appendixes B-E to Chapter 2 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false B Appendixes B-E to Chapter 2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Appendixes B-E to Chapter 2...

  5. Technology and Chapter 1: Solutions for Catholic School Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Catholic Educational Association, Washington, DC.

    This booklet is designed to provide pertinent information about Chapter 1 (Elementary and Secondary Education Act), explaining what it is, who can participate, how funds are spent, and how technology can be used in a non-public school to meet the needs of students. Chapter 1 channels federal funds to school districts with high concentrations of…

  6. Chapter 2 Formula: Evaluation Report 1990-91.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bliss, Kristen M.

    Chapter 2 Formula provides federal funds to the states through the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA) as amended by P.L. 100-297 in 1988. Chapter 2 funds can support one or more programs that do the following: meet the educational needs of students with special needs (at-risk and high-cost students); acquire curricular…

  7. Chapter 1 Support for Instructional Development, 1986-87.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaemper, Jack; Morse, Kathy

    Six of the 39 Albuquerque (New Mexico) Public Schools' Chapter 1 participating schools, as part of the school-based budgeting process, allocated a portion of their Chapter 1 resource allocation for on-site intensive staff development activities. Three schools--Alamosa, Chaparral, and Duranes--agreed to utilize the time of a Support for…

  8. Biological effects: Marine mammals and sea turtles (chapter 14). Book chapter

    SciTech Connect

    Haebler, R.

    1994-01-01

    All spills are different, varying in type and amount of oil spilled, species exposed, and geographic and atmospheric conditions. It is important to understand as much as possible about both the natural history and characteristics of various species and the specific effects oil has on wildlife. Doing so improves the ability to extrapolate from one spill to another and improves prediction of types and severity of effects to wildlife. This chapter presents an overview of the biological effects of oil on marine mammals and sea turtles.

  9. Chapter A3. Cleaning of Equipment for Water Sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilde, Franceska D.; Radtke, Dean B.; Gibs, Jacob; Iwatsubo, Rick T.

    1998-01-01

    The National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (National Field Manual) describes protocols and provides guidelines for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel who collect data used to assess the quality of the Nation's surface-water and ground-water resources. Chapter A3 describes procedures for cleaning the equipment used to collect and process samples of surface water and ground water and procedures for assessing the efficacy of the equipment-cleaning process. This chapter is designed for use with the other chapters of this field manual. Each chapter of the National Field Manual is published separately and revised periodically. Newly published and revised chapters will be posted on the USGS page 'National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data.' The URL for this page is http://pubs.water.usgs.gov/twri9A/ (accessed September 20, 2004).

  10. Nanoporous Materials in Atmosphere Revitalization. Chapter 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez-Maldonado, J.; Ishikawa, Yasuyuki; Luna, Bernadette; Junaedi, Christian; Mulloth, Lila; Perry, Jay L.; Raptis, Raphael G.; Roychoudhury, Subir

    2012-01-01

    lowering cabin levels of CO2 and NH3 as well as reducing power requirements and increasing reliability. This chapter summarizes the challenges faced by ECLS system engineers in pursuing these goals, and the promising materials developments that may be part of the technical solution for challenges of crewed space exploration beyond LEO.

  11. Chapter 9: Analyses Using Disease Ontologies

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nigam H.; Cole, Tyler; Musen, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Advanced statistical methods used to analyze high-throughput data such as gene-expression assays result in long lists of “significant genes.” One way to gain insight into the significance of altered expression levels is to determine whether Gene Ontology (GO) terms associated with a particular biological process, molecular function, or cellular component are over- or under-represented in the set of genes deemed significant. This process, referred to as enrichment analysis, profiles a gene-set, and is widely used to makes sense of the results of high-throughput experiments. The canonical example of enrichment analysis is when the output dataset is a list of genes differentially expressed in some condition. To determine the biological relevance of a lengthy gene list, the usual solution is to perform enrichment analysis with the GO. We can aggregate the annotating GO concepts for each gene in this list, and arrive at a profile of the biological processes or mechanisms affected by the condition under study. While GO has been the principal target for enrichment analysis, the methods of enrichment analysis are generalizable. We can conduct the same sort of profiling along other ontologies of interest. Just as scientists can ask “Which biological process is over-represented in my set of interesting genes or proteins?” we can also ask “Which disease (or class of diseases) is over-represented in my set of interesting genes or proteins?“. For example, by annotating known protein mutations with disease terms from the ontologies in BioPortal, Mort et al. recently identified a class of diseases—blood coagulation disorders—that were associated with a 14-fold depletion in substitutions at O-linked glycosylation sites. With the availability of tools for automatic annotation of datasets with terms from disease ontologies, there is no reason to restrict enrichment analyses to the GO. In this chapter, we will discuss methods to perform enrichment analysis using any

  12. Getting the Most from Pi Sigma Alpha Chapters: Exploring the Chapter Activity Grant Program and Its Multiplier Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    The political science honor society, Pi Sigma Alpha, has chapters in nearly 700 institutions across the United States. The organization sponsors many programs that can contribute a great deal to students of political science; however, many students are unaware of these opportunities. This article encourages chapter advisors to make use of these…

  13. Chapter 8: Plasma operation and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ITER Physics Expert Group on Disruptions, Control, Plasma, and MHD; ITER Physics Expert Group on Energetic Particles, Heating, Current and Drive; ITER Physics Expert Group on Diagnostics; ITER Physics Basis Editors

    1999-12-01

    well as in plasma periphery and divertor. The planned diagnostics (Chapter 7) serve as sensors for kinetic control, while gas and pellet fuelling, auxiliary power and angular momentum input, impurity injection, and non-inductive current drive constitute the control actuators. For example, in an ignited plasma, core density controls fusion power output. Kinetic control algorithms vary according to the plasma state, e.g. H- or L-mode. Generally, present facilities have demonstrated the kinetic control methods required for a reactor scale device. Plasma initiation - breakdown, burnthrough and initial current ramp - in reactor scale tokamaks will not involve physics differing from that found in present day devices. For ITER, the induced electric field in the chamber will be ~0.3V· m-1 - comparable to that required by breakdown theory but somewhat smaller than in present devices. Thus, a start-up 3MW electron cyclotron heating system will be employed to assure burnthrough. Simulations show that plasma current ramp up and termination in a reactor scale device can follow procedures developed to avoid disruption in present devices. In particular, simulations remain in the stable area of the li-q plane. For design purposes, the resistive V·s consumed during initiation is found, by experiments, to follow the Ejima expression, 0.45μ0 RIp. Advanced tokamak control has two distinct goals. First, control of density, auxiliary power, and inductive current ramping to attain reverse shear q profiles and internal transport barriers, which persist until dissipated by magnetic flux diffusion. Such internal transport barriers can lead to transient ignition. Second, combined use poloidal field shape control with non-inductive current drive and NBI angular momentum injection to create and control steady state, high bootstrap fraction, reverse shear discharges. Active n = 1 magnetic feedback and/or driven rotation will be required to suppress resistive wall modes for steady state plasmas

  14. Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications. Chapter 1; Introduction and Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1996-01-01

    This chapter presents an introduction and historical background to the field of tribology, especially solid lubrication and lubricants and sets them in the perspective of techniques and materials in lubrication. Also, solid and liquid lubrication films are defined and described.

  15. Transverse section through the Grand Lodge and Grand Chapter rooms ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Transverse section through the Grand Lodge and Grand Chapter rooms of James H. Windrim and George Summers’s neoclassical competition design for the New Masonic Temple, Philadelphia, 1867 - Masonic Temple, 1 North Broad Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  16. Row erupts over axed chapter from Newt Gingrich book

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwynne, Peter

    2012-02-01

    A chapter written by a respected climate scientist for a book co-edited by Republican presidential candidate Newt Gingrich has been canned because its author asserts that humans are responsible for climate change.

  17. Standardizing electrofishing power for boat electrofishing: chapter 14

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miranda, L.E. (Steve); Bonar, Scott A.; Hubert, Wayne A.; Willis, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Standardizing boat electrofishing entails achieving an accepted level of collection consistency by managing various brand factors, including (1) the temporal and spatial distribution of sampling effort, (2) boat operation, (3) equipment configuration, (4) characteristics of the waveform and energized field, and (5) power transferred to fish. This chapter focuses exclusively on factor 5:L factors 1-4 have been addressed in earlier chapters. Additionally, while the concepts covered in this chapter address boat electrofishing in general, the power settings discussed were developed from tests with primarily warmwater fish communities. Others (see Chapter 9) recommend lower power settings for communities consisting of primarily coldwater fishes. For reviews of basic concepts of electricity, electrofishing theory and systems, fish behavior relative to diverse waveforms, and injury matter, the reader is referred to Novotny (1990), Reynold (1996), and Snyder (2003).

  18. United States Parmacopeia Chapter <797> timeline: 1989 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Newton, David W

    2013-01-01

    This article features a tabular chronology of events deemed relevant to the creation and revision of United States Pharmacopeia General Chapter <797> Pharmaceutical Compounding--Sterile Preparations, which premiered in 2004.

  19. Modeling and Advanced Control for Sustainable Process Systems (chapter 5)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This book chapter introduces a novel process systems engineering framework that integrates process control with sustainability assessment tools for the simultaneous evaluation and optimization of process operations. The implemented control strategy consists of a biologically-insp...

  20. Implications of climate and land use change: Chapter 4

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, Jefferson S.; Murgueitio, Enrique; Calle, Zoraida; Raudsepp-Hearne, Ciara; Stallard, Robert F.; Balvanera, Patricia; Hall, Jefferson S.; Kirn, Vanessa; Yanguas-Fernandez, Estrella

    2015-01-01

    This chapter relates ecosystem services to climate change and land use. The bulk of the chapter focuses on ecosystem services and steepland land use in the humid Neotropics – what is lost with land-cover changed, and what is gained with various types of restoration that are sustainable given private ownership. Many case studies are presented later in the white paper. The USGS contribution relates to climate change and the role of extreme weather events in land-use planning.

  1. Feasibility of ground-water features of the alternate plan for the Mountain Home Project, Idaho: abstract and summary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nace, Raymond L.; West, S.W.; Mower, R.W.

    1955-01-01

    On the arid Mountain Home Plateau of Idaho more than 400,000 acres of arable land is largely unused except for grazing. The Boise Valley, adjoining on the north, was reclaimed from similar land and irrigated with Boise River water. The productivity of about 100,000 acres of the valley land is lowered or threatened, however, by an ever-rising water table, caused to rise by infiltration of excess irrigation water. Surface drains alleviate the drainage problem but areas of water-logging, alkaline land, and inferior vegetation continue to spread.

  2. Natural resource workshop: Public/private partnership for sustainable use of natural resources

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    As part of an effort to shape Federal policy for environmentally sound, sustainable economic development, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy sponsored a workshop in Boise, Idaho on February 1--2, 1995. The Boise Idaho workshop focused on the sustainable use of natural resources, a topic of considerable interest in Idaho. The workshop gave representatives from industry, academia, research, the public, and local and state government an opportunity to provide input to lawmakers and policymakers for establishing a National Environmental Technology Strategy to be issued by Earth Day, 1995.

  3. Air cleaners for indoor-air-pollution control (Chapter 10). Book chapter, Feb 89-Jul 90

    SciTech Connect

    Viner, A.S.; Ramanathan, K.; Hanley, J.T.; Smith, D.D.; Ensor, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    The chapter describes an experimental study to evaluate performance characteristics of currently available controls for indoor air pollutants, including both particles and gases. The study evaluated the particle-size-dependent collection efficiency of seven commercially available devices for particulate control: a common furnace filter, four industrial filters, and two electronic air cleaners (EACs). The furnance filter had negligible effect on particles with diameters between 0.1 and 1 micrometer. The industrial filters, with ASHRAE ratings of 95, 85, 65, and 40% showed minimum efficiency at about 0.1 micrometer, which was substantially less than the ASHRAE efficiency. One EAC, essentially a furnance filter with a high-voltage electrode, reached a maximum efficiency of 30% at low flowrates (7 cu m/min); however, it had a negligible effect at higher flowrates. The other EAC, similar to an industrial ESP, showed efficiencies of 80-90% over the entire size range at low to moderate flowrates. At the highest flowrate, a minimum efficiency was detected at 0.35 micrometer. The study also evaluated the suitability of commerically available carbon-based sorbents (wood, coal, and coconut) for removing low concentrations of volatile organic compounds (benzene, acetaldehyde, and 1,1,1-trichloroethane).

  4. Mirror Lake: Past, present and future: Chapter 6

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Likens, Gene E.; LaBaugh, James W.; Winter, Thomas C.; Likens, Gene E.

    2009-01-01

    This chapter discusses the hydrological and biogeochemical characteristics of Mirror Lake and the changes that resulted from air-land-water interactions and human activities. Since the formation of Mirror Lake, both the watershed and the lake have undergone many changes, such as vegetation development and basin filling. These changes are ongoing, and Mirror Lake is continuing along an aging pathway and ultimately, it will fill with sediment and no longer be a lake. The chapter also identifies major factors that affected the hydrology and biogeochemistry of Mirror Lake: acid rain, atmospheric deposition of lead and other heavy metals, increased human settlement around the lake, the construction of an interstate highway through the watershed of the Northeast Tributary, the construction of an access road through the West and Northeast watersheds to the lake, and climate change. The chapter also offers future recommendations for management and protection of Mirror Lake.

  5. The Western Aeronautical Test Range. Chapter 10 Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knudtson, Kevin; Park, Alice; Downing, Robert; Sheldon, Jack; Harvey, Robert; Norcross, April

    2011-01-01

    The Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) staff at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center is developing a translation software called Chapter 10 Tools in response to challenges posed by post-flight processing data files originating from various on-board digital recorders that follow the Range Commanders Council Inter-Range Instrumentation Group (IRIG) 106 Chapter 10 Digital Recording Standard but use differing interpretations of the Standard. The software will read the date files regardless of the vendor implementation of the source recorder, displaying data, identifying and correcting errors, and producing a data file that can be successfully processed post-flight

  6. Measurement and modeling of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity: Chapter 21

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perkins, Kim S.; Elango, Lakshmanan

    2011-01-01

    This chapter will discuss, by way of examples, various techniques used to measure and model hydraulic conductivity as a function of water content, K(). The parameters that describe the K() curve obtained by different methods are used directly in Richards’ equation-based numerical models, which have some degree of sensitivity to those parameters. This chapter will explore the complications of using laboratory measured or estimated properties for field scale investigations to shed light on how adequately the processes are represented. Additionally, some more recent concepts for representing unsaturated-zone flow processes will be discussed.

  7. CHAPTER 7. BERYLLIUM ANALYSIS BY NON-PLASMA BASED METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    Ekechukwu, A

    2009-04-20

    The most common method of analysis for beryllium is inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). This method, along with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), is discussed in Chapter 6. However, other methods exist and have been used for different applications. These methods include spectroscopic, chromatographic, colorimetric, and electrochemical. This chapter provides an overview of beryllium analysis methods other than plasma spectrometry (inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry or mass spectrometry). The basic methods, detection limits and interferences are described. Specific applications from the literature are also presented.

  8. 38 CFR 21.7044 - Persons with eligibility under 38 U.S.C. chapter 34.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... under 38 U.S.C. chapter 34. 21.7044 Section 21.7044 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... under 38 U.S.C. chapter 34. Certain individuals with 38 U.S.C. chapter 34 eligibility may establish eligibility for educational assistance under 38 U.S.C. chapter 30. This section requires an individual...

  9. 38 CFR 21.82 - Completing the plan under Chapter 31.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Chapter 31. 21.82 Section 21.82 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS.... Chapter 31 Individualized Written Rehabilitation Plan § 21.82 Completing the plan under Chapter 31. (a... completion of the program provided by the plan under Chapter 31. The provisions of § 21.70 and § 21.78(c)...

  10. 2 CFR 1.200 - Purpose of chapters I and II.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Purpose of chapters I and II. 1.200 Section... Introduction toSubtitle A § 1.200 Purpose of chapters I and II. (a) Chapters I and II of subtitle A provide OMB... procedures for management of the agencies' grants and agreements. (b) There are two chapters for...

  11. 24 CFR 1720.205 - Suspension notice under § 1710.45(a) of this chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...(a) of this chapter. 1720.205 Section 1720.205 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to....45(a) of this chapter. A suspension pursuant to § 1710.45(a) of this chapter shall be effected by... fee tender which constitute the grounds under § 1710.45(a) of this chapter, of the suspension, and...

  12. 41 CFR 304-2.1 - What definitions apply to this chapter?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... to this chapter? 304-2.1 Section 304-2.1 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel... chapter? The following definitions apply to this chapter: Employee means an appointed officer or employee... defined in this chapter does not include a meeting or other event required to carry out an...

  13. 47 CFR 2.811 - Transmitters operated under part 73 of this chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... chapter. 2.811 Section 2.811 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY....811 Transmitters operated under part 73 of this chapter. Section 2.803(a) through (d) shall not be... chapter, provided the conditions set out in part 73 of this chapter for the acceptability of...

  14. 38 CFR 21.79 - Determining entitlement usage under Chapter 31.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... usage under Chapter 31. 21.79 Section 21.79 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF... Employment Under 38 U.S.C. Chapter 31 Duration of Rehabilitation Programs § 21.79 Determining entitlement usage under Chapter 31. (a) General. The determination of entitlement usage for chapter 31...

  15. Ethical & Legal Issues in School Counseling. Chapter 1: Ethical Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huey, Wayne C.; And Others

    This document contains chapter 1 (8 articles) from a collection of 35 articles primarily from American Association for Counseling and Development (AACD) publications on the most important legal and ethical topics about which all school counselors need to be informed. "Ethical Standards for School Counselors: Test Your Knowledge" (Wayne C. Huey)…

  16. Chapter 1 Early Literacy Summer School. Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollock, John S.

    A study examined the effectiveness of the Chapter 1 Early Literacy Summer School program. The program provided additional reading instruction to underachieving first-grade pupils at five schools located throughout the Columbus, Ohio public school district. The program featured group instruction (with many of the activities modelled after the…

  17. Chapter 1 Early Literacy Summer School, 1993. Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollock, John S.

    A study examined the effectiveness of the Chapter 1 Early Literacy Summer School program. The program provided additional reading instruction to underachieving first-grade pupils at six schools located throughout the Columbus, Ohio public school district. The program featured group instruction (with many of the activities modeled after the Reading…

  18. 48 CFR 9900.000 - Scope of chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Scope of chapter. 9900.000 Section 9900.000 Federal Acquisition Regulations System COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD, OFFICE OF FEDERAL... describes policies and procedures for applying the Cost Accounting Standards (CAS) to negotiated...

  19. Elements of Mathematics, Book O: Intuitive Background. Chapter 5, Mappings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exner, Robert; And Others

    The sixteen chapters of this book provide the core material for the Elements of Mathematics Program, a secondary sequence developed for highly motivated students with strong verbal abilities. The sequence is based on a functional-relational approach to mathematics teaching, and emphasizes teaching by analysis of real-life situations. This text is…

  20. Chapter 1: Redefining Disciplinary Learning in Classroom Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Michael J.; Forman, Ellice A.

    2006-01-01

    In this chapter, the authors aim to review recent, sociocultural studies of classroom-based research in science education in light of a sample of practice-based research within the field of science studies. They provide a framework for examining the discipline of science that can also be useful for assessing its impact on students. The framework…

  1. Ethical & Legal Issues in School Counseling. Chapter 6: Special Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampson, James P., Jr.; And Others

    This document contains chapter 6 (5 articles) of a collection of 35 articles primarily from American Association for Counseling and Development (AACD) publications on the most important legal and ethical topics about which all school counselors need to be informed. "Ethical Issues Involved With the Use of Computer-Assisted Counseling, Testing, and…

  2. Chapter 2 Forumula. 1988-89 Final Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin Independent School District, TX. Office of Research and Evaluation.

    Presented is the final technical report on the evaluation of the 1988-89 supplementary education programs of the Austin (Texas) Independent School District funded under Chapter 2 of the Education Consolidation and Improvement Act. The following major findings are reported: (1) extracurricular transportation costs, which had been reduced by…

  3. Chapter 636, Voluntary Integration in Massachusetts. Successful Programs of Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spier, Adele W.; And Others

    A statewide study was conducted to identify and describe successful voluntary school desegregation programs funded under Chapter 636, a 1974 amendment to Massachussets' Racial Imbalance Law. Programs selected were of four types: (1) school-based (elementary, middle, and high); (2) school system- or district-wide; (3) part-time and full-time…

  4. 24 CFR 300.1 - Scope of chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Scope of chapter. 300.1 Section 300.1 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) GOVERNMENT NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT GENERAL § 300.1...

  5. Chapter 11. Quality evaluation of apple by computer vision

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apple is one of the most consumed fruits in the world, and there is a critical need for enhanced computer vision technology for quality assessment of apples. This chapter gives a comprehensive review on recent advances in various computer vision techniques for detecting surface and internal defects ...

  6. Missing Chapters II: West Virginia Women in History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hensley, Frances S., Ed.

    This collection of essays chronicles the contributions of 14 West Virginia women active in individual and group endeavors from 1824 to the present. Because the achievements of these women are absent from previous histories of West Virginia, their stories constitute missing chapters in the state's history. Some of these women made contributions in…

  7. Chapter Two: Foundations for the Study of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Richard F.

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter, the historical roots of contemporary Practice Theory are unearthed in the work of semioticians, philosophers, and anthropologists. Saussure's semiotic theory is contrasted with that of Peirce, and the importance of Peirce's work for understanding the context of signs is stressed. The philosophy of language in the writings of…

  8. Economic and Societal Benefits of Soil Carbon Management (Chapter 1).

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many papers and books on soil carbon management have addressed specific ecosystems such as agricultural lands, rangelands, forestlands, etc. This paper introduces a book within which each chapter begins by addressing a particular concern and potential options to manage it, along with their real and...

  9. From Literacy Activities to Entrepreneurship in Siete Pilas. Chapter 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chacon, Antonio; Polo, Angel

    This chapter describes a community development project in Siete Pilas (Spain), a village whose economy is based primarily on small family farms and unskilled labor. The project grew out of the Sierra Education Program, which in 1980 sent adult-education teachers to five villages in the Sierra de Ronda region. The goal was to stimulate a socially…

  10. Evaluation of the 1985 Chapter 1 Citywide Summer School Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Detroit Public Schools, MI. Dept. of Evaluation and Testing.

    Described are aspects of the evaluation of the Detroit (Michigan) Public Schools' 1985 Chapter 1 Citywide Summer School program, a program implemented to improve the reading and mathematics skills of students from pre-kindergarten classes through grade 8. A random sample of 18 schools, including elementary and middle schools, was selected for…

  11. Chapter 13. Exploring Use of the Reserved Core

    SciTech Connect

    Holmen, John; Humphrey, Alan; Berzins, Martin

    2015-07-29

    In this chapter, we illustrate benefits of thinking in terms of thread management techniques when using a centralized scheduler model along with interoperability of MPI and PThread. This is facilitated through an exploration of thread placement strategies for an algorithm modeling radiative heat transfer with special attention to the 61st core. This algorithm plays a key role within the Uintah Computational Framework (UCF) and current efforts taking place at the University of Utah to model next-generation, large-scale clean coal boilers. In such simulations, this algorithm models the dominant form of heat transfer and consumes a large portion of compute time. Exemplified by a real-world example, this chapter presents our early efforts in porting a key portion of a scalability-centric codebase to the Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor. Specifically, this chapter presents results from our experiments profiling the native execution of a reverse Monte-Carlo ray tracing-based radiation model on a single coprocessor. These results demonstrate that our fastest run configurations utilized the 61st core and that performance was not profoundly impacted when explicitly oversubscribing the coprocessor operating system thread. Additionally, this chapter presents a portion of radiation model source code, a MIC-centric UCF cross-compilation example, and less conventional thread management technique for developers utilizing the PThreads threading model.

  12. "Preescolar Na Casa": Teaching Parents To Teach Children. Chapter 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Ermitas

    This chapter describes a school readiness program that has been implemented in rural Galicia (Spain) since 1977. Data reveal that 70 percent of Galicia's population lives in rural areas, the economy remains primarily agricultural, Galicians earn less than the national average and have the largest number of public assistance recipients, and there…

  13. Television & Literacy Development in the Czech Republic. Chapter 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubik, Stanislav

    This chapter begins by explaining that cultural literacy is the ability of a community to create relationships, processes, and institutions aimed at multifaceted community development using indigenous resources (natural, human, social, and cultural). Literacy development in a rural community involves three equally important dimensions--social,…

  14. Chapter 688 Implementation Guidelines and Instructions for Local School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts State Executive Office of Human Services, Boston.

    The booklet presents guidelines for implementing Massachusetts Chapter 688, which provides for a 2-year transitional process to plan for habilitative services for severely disabled young adults who will lose their entitlement to special education upon graduation or reaching the age of 22. The law is intended to serve individuals who traditionally…

  15. Reading Recovery and ESEA Chapter 1: Issues and Possibilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zajano, Nancy C.

    The simultaneous implementation of Reading Recovery (an early intervention program designed to help children "at risk" of failure in their first year of reading instruction) and Chapter 1 programs in schools raises a number of issues as educators attempt to provide effective reading instruction within the policies and guidelines of both programs.…

  16. Chapter 5: Long-term benefits analysis of EERE's Programs

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    This chapter provides an overview of the modeling approach used in MARKAL-GPRA05 to evaluate the benefits of EERE R&D programs and technologies. The program benefits reported in this section result from comparisons of each Program Case to the Baseline Case, as modeled in MARKAL-GPRA05.

  17. Chapter 5: Long-term benefits analysis of EERE's programs

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    This chapter provides an overview of the modeling approach used in MARKAL-GPRA06 to evaluate the benefits of EERE R&D programs and technologies. The program benefits reported in this section result from comparisons of each Program Case to the Baseline Case, as modeled in MARKAL-GPRA06.

  18. Chapter 2 Formula. 1992-93 Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marable, Paula; And Others

    The Chapter 2 Formula provides federal funds to states through the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA). These funds are used to help students at risk of academic failure or dropping out, support purchases and programs, and develop teachers' professional skills. In 1992-93, the Austin Independent School District (AISD) received…

  19. Chapter 2 Formula Final Report, 1993-94.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, Julia E.

    Chapter 2 Formula funds provide federal aid to states through the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) of 1965 as amended in 1988 by PL 100-297. Funds can support programs for students at risk of failure or dropping out, or students for whom providing an education entails higher than average costs. Funds can also support programs for…

  20. Chapter 2 Formula: 1991-92. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moede, Lauren Hall

    Education Consolidation and Improvement Act (ECIA) Chapter 2 Formula has provided funding to the Austin (Texas) Independent School District (AISD) in order to expand existing programs and implement new programs, including the addition of staff and the acquisition of materials and equipment that would not otherwise be available from state or local…

  1. Ethical & Legal Issues in School Counseling. Chapter 3: Legal Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remley, Theodore P., Jr.; And Others

    This document contains chapter 3 (7 articles) of a collection of 35 articles primarily from American Association for Counseling and Development (AACD) publications on the most important legal and ethical topics about which all school counselors need to be informed. "The Law and Ethical Practices in Elementary and Middle Schools" (Theodore P.…

  2. Endocrine and exocrine function of the bovine testis. Chapter 2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter is devoted to the endocrine and exocrine function of the normal bovine male testes. The discussion begins with a historical review of the literature dating back to Aristotle’s (300 BC) initial description of the anatomy of the mammalian testes. The first microscopic examination of the t...

  3. Vision for Micro Technology Space Missions. Chapter 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennehy, Neil

    2005-01-01

    It is exciting to contemplate the various space mission applications that Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) technology could enable in the next 10-20 years. The primary objective of this chapter is to both stimulate ideas for MEMS technology infusion on future NASA space missions and to spur adoption of the MEMS technology in the minds of mission designers. This chapter is also intended to inform non-space oriented MEMS technologists, researchers and decision makers about the rich potential application set that future NASA Science and Exploration missions will provide. The motivation for this chapter is therefore to lead the reader down a path to identify and it is exciting to contemplate the various space mission applications that Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) technology could enable in the next 10-20 years. The primary objective of this chapter is to both stimulate ideas for MEMS technology infusion on future NASA space missions and to spur adoption of the MEMS technology in the minds of mission designers. This chapter is also intended to inform non-space oriented MEMS technologists, researchers and decision makers about the rich potential application set that future NASA Science and Exploration missions will provide. The motivation for this chapter is therefore to lead the reader down a path to identify and consider potential long-term, perhaps disruptive or revolutionary, impacts that MEMS technology may have for future civilian space applications. A general discussion of the potential for MEMS in space applications is followed by a brief showcasing of a few selected examples of recent MEMS technology developments for future space missions. Using these recent developments as a point of departure, a vision is then presented of several areas where MEMS technology might eventually be exploited in future Science and Exploration mission applications. Lastly, as a stimulus for future research and development, this chapter summarizes a set of barriers

  4. Implementing United States Pharmacopeia chapter <1163> quality assurance in pharmaceutical compounding, Part 1.

    PubMed

    Allen, Loyd V

    2012-01-01

    Compounding pharmacists must be familiar with and participate in the appropriate standards set forth in each chapter of the United States Pharmacopeia. Pharmacists should also be aware of any revisions to these standards. This article discusses the revisions to United States Pharmacopeia Chapter <1163> Quality Assurance in Pharmaceutical Compounding, a chapter which has been compared with other chapters, discusses some of those other chapters, and discusses the components of a reasonable quality-assurance program.

  5. Chapter 1 Reading Program. Final Evaluation Report 1994-95. Elementary and Secondary Education Act--Chapter 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lore, Rosemary

    A study evaluated the Chapter 1 Reading Program that served 5,914 underachieving pupils in grades 1 through 8 in the Columbus, Ohio, public schools. The program provided service to 84 public elementary schools, 26 public middle schools, and 11 nonpublic schools. These students appeared unlikely to learn to read successfully without additional…

  6. Chapter I: Impacting Excellence in Basic Skills since 1965. Initiative to Improve the Quality of Chapter I Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Billie; And Others

    The overall goal of the sections of Mercer County's Chapter 1 project described in this profile was to provide a low-risk environment for the development of writing, reading, and related language arts skills in first, second, and third grade children. This goal was implemented within the broader sphere of the total school community. Communication,…

  7. Development of a Launch Vehicle Manufacturing Process. Chapter 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vickers, John; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    One of the goals of this chapter is to provide sufficient information so that you can develop a manufacturing process for a potential launch vehicle. With the variety of manufacturing options available, you might ask how this can possibly be done in the span of a single chapter. Actually, it will be quite simple because a basic manufacturing process is nothing more than a set of logical steps that are iterated until they produce a desired product. Although these statements seem simple and logical, don't let this simplicity fool you. Manufacturing problems with launch vehicles and their subassemblies have been the primary cause of project failures because the vehicle concept delivered to the manufacturing floor could not be built as designed.

  8. Advanced light water reactor requirements document: Chapter 4, Reactor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    The purpose of this chapter of the Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) Plant Requirements Document is to establish utility requirements for the design of the Reactor Systems of Advanced LWR plants consistent with the objectives and principles of the ALWR program. The scope of this chapter covers the following for Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactor (BWR): reactor pressure vessel, nozzles and safe-ends, reactor internals, in-vessel portions of fluid systems (including reactor internal pumps (Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) piping and spargers), nuclear fuel, and the control rods and control rod drive system (including hydraulic supply and accumulators). Special tools required for reactor system maintenance, inspection and testing are also covered.

  9. Characterization of eastern US spruce-fir soils. Book chapter

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, I.J.

    1992-01-01

    The spruce-fir forest of the eastern United States encompasses a diverse range of edaphic conditions due to differences in surficial geology, mineralogy, elevation, and climate. This chapter describes the characteristics of soils supporting eastern spruce-fir ecosystems, including soil properties that are important in understanding forest function and the consequences of atmospheric deposition to forested ecosystems. Chapter 1 describes the silvical characteristics of the spruce-fir forest. The Spruce-Fir Research Cooperative included six intensive study sites; five were high-elevation research sites located from western North Carolina to New Hampshire, with one low-elevation site in Maine. Information gained from research at these sites, and other relevant research from these regions, provides the basis for this description of eastern U. S. spruce-fir soils.

  10. Planning and setting objectives in field studies: Chapter 2

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, Robert N.; Dodd, C. Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    This chapter enumerates the steps required in designing and planning field studies on the ecology and conservation of reptiles, as these involve a high level of uncertainty and risk. To this end, the chapter differentiates between goals (descriptions of what one intends to accomplish) and objectives (the measurable steps required to achieve the established goals). Thus, meeting a specific goal may require many objectives. It may not be possible to define some of them until certain experiments have been conducted; often evaluations of sampling protocols are needed to increase certainty in the biological results. And if sampling locations are fixed and sampling events are repeated over time, then both study-specific covariates and sampling-specific covariates should exist. Additionally, other critical design considerations for field study include obtaining permits, as well as researching ethics and biosecurity issues.

  11. Habitat characteristics of North American tortoises: chapter 9

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nussear, Kenneth E.; Tuberville, Tracey D.

    2014-01-01

    North American tortoises are distributed in semi-arid and temperate deserts and coastal regions of the southern United States and Mexico. The five species currently recognized each have specific habitat requirements, which they fulfill through their selection of, and interaction with unique habitat constituents. In this chapter we discuss the physiographic and geological associations, perennial and annual vegetation components, shelter sites, and climatic conditions associated with the species’ habitats, as well as the potential threats to their habitat.

  12. Hydrologic processes and the water budget: Chapter 2

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenberry, Donald O.; Winter, Thomas C.; Winter, Thomas C.; Likens, Gene E.

    2009-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the hydrological setting of Mirror Lake and its water budget. It first describes the glacial deposits and bedrock topography in the Mirror Lake area. It then provides an overview of the hydrologic processes associated with Mirror Lake and examines the field and analytical methods used to determine its water budget. It presents results from the hydrologic studies, which are based on monthly and annual water budgets for the calendar years 1981 through 2000.

  13. Introduction: Aims and Requirements of Future Aerospace Vehicles. Chapter 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Pedro I.; Smeltzer, Stanley S., III; McConnaughey, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The goals and system-level requirements for the next generation aerospace vehicles emphasize safety, reliability, low-cost, and robustness rather than performance. Technologies, including new materials, design and analysis approaches, manufacturing and testing methods, operations and maintenance, and multidisciplinary systems-level vehicle development are key to increasing the safety and reducing the cost of aerospace launch systems. This chapter identifies the goals and needs of the next generation or advanced aerospace vehicle systems.

  14. Chapter Five - Ubiquitination of Ion Channels and Transporters.

    PubMed

    Lamothe, S M; Zhang, S

    2016-01-01

    Ion channels and transporters play essential roles in excitable cells including cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscle cells, neurons, and endocrine cells. Their dysfunction underlies the pathology of various diseases. Thus, the tight regulation of these transmembrane proteins is essential for cell physiology. While the ubiquitin system is involved in many aspects of cellular processes, this chapter focuses on the ubiquitin-mediated degradation of ion channels and transporters. Ubiquitination of ion channels and transporters is multifaceted and occurs at various cellular compartments such as the plasma membrane and the endoplasmic reticulum. While various molecules are involved in the ubiquitination of ion channels and transporters, E3 ubiquitin ligases play a central role in selectively targeting substrates for ubiquitination and will be a major focus in this chapter. To date, the Nedd4 family of E3 ubiquitin ligases and their regulations of ion channels and transporters have been extensively studied. In this chapter, we will first review Nedd4/Nedd4-2 and their regulations. We will then discuss how E3 ubiquitin ligases, especially Nedd4-2, regulate various ion channels and transporters including epithelial Na(+) channels, voltage-gated Na(+) channels, KCNQ and hERG K(+) channels, Cl(-) channels such as CFTR, transporters such as Na(+)/K(+) ATPase, and gap junctions. Furthermore, diseases caused by improper ubiquitination of ion channels and transporters will be discussed to highlight the process of ubiquitination and its biological as well as clinical significance. PMID:27378758

  15. Chapter Five - Ubiquitination of Ion Channels and Transporters.

    PubMed

    Lamothe, S M; Zhang, S

    2016-01-01

    Ion channels and transporters play essential roles in excitable cells including cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscle cells, neurons, and endocrine cells. Their dysfunction underlies the pathology of various diseases. Thus, the tight regulation of these transmembrane proteins is essential for cell physiology. While the ubiquitin system is involved in many aspects of cellular processes, this chapter focuses on the ubiquitin-mediated degradation of ion channels and transporters. Ubiquitination of ion channels and transporters is multifaceted and occurs at various cellular compartments such as the plasma membrane and the endoplasmic reticulum. While various molecules are involved in the ubiquitination of ion channels and transporters, E3 ubiquitin ligases play a central role in selectively targeting substrates for ubiquitination and will be a major focus in this chapter. To date, the Nedd4 family of E3 ubiquitin ligases and their regulations of ion channels and transporters have been extensively studied. In this chapter, we will first review Nedd4/Nedd4-2 and their regulations. We will then discuss how E3 ubiquitin ligases, especially Nedd4-2, regulate various ion channels and transporters including epithelial Na(+) channels, voltage-gated Na(+) channels, KCNQ and hERG K(+) channels, Cl(-) channels such as CFTR, transporters such as Na(+)/K(+) ATPase, and gap junctions. Furthermore, diseases caused by improper ubiquitination of ion channels and transporters will be discussed to highlight the process of ubiquitination and its biological as well as clinical significance.

  16. Inducible defenses in food webs: Chapter 3.4

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vos, Matthijs; Kooi, Bob W.; DeAngelis, Donald L.; Mooij, Wolf M.; de Ruiter, Peter; Wolters, Volkmar; Moore, John C.; Melville-Smith, Kimberly

    2005-01-01

    This chapter reviews the predicted effects of induced defenses on trophic structure and two aspects of stability, “local” stability and persistence, as well as presenting novel results on a third, resilience. Food webs are structures of populations in a given location organized according to their predator–prey interactions. Interaction strengths and, therefore, prey defenses are generally recognized as important ecological factors affecting food webs. Despite this, surprisingly, little light has been shed on the food web-level consequences of inducible defenses. Inducible defenses occur in many taxa in both terrestrial and aquatic food webs. They include refuge use, reduced activity, adaptive life history changes, the production of toxins, synomones and extrafloral nectar, and the formation of colonies, helmets, thorns, or spines. In the chapter, theoretical results for the effects of inducible defenses on trophic structure and the three aspects of stability are reviewed. This is done, in part, using bifurcation analysis—a type of analysis that is applied to nonlinear dynamic systems described by a set of ordinary differential or difference equations. The work presented in the chapter suggests that heterogeneity, as caused by induced defenses in prey species, has major effects on the functioning of food webs. Inducible defenses occur in many species in both aquatic and terrestrial systems, and theoretical work indicates they have major effects on important food web properties such as trophic structure, local stability, persistence, and resilience.

  17. Fundamentals of Physics, Volume 1, (Chapters 1 - 21)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Jearl

    2004-01-01

    Chapter 1. Measurement 1. How does the appearance of a new type of cloud signal changes in Earth's atmosphere? 1-1 What Is Physics? 1-2 Measuring Things. 1-3 The International System of Units. 1-4 Changing Units. 1-5 Length. 1-6 Time. 1-7 Mass. Review & Summary. Problems. Chapter 2. Motion Along a Straight Line. What causes whiplash injury in rear-end collisions of cars? 2-1 What Is Physics? 2-2 Motion. 2-3 Position and Displacement. 2-4 Average Velocity and Average Speed. 2-5 Instantaneous Velocity and Speed. 2-6 Acceleration. 2-7 Constant Acceleration: A Special Case. 2-8 Another Look at Constant Acceleration. 2-9 Free-Fall Acceleration. 2-10 Graphical Integration in Motion Analysis. 2 Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 3. Vectors. How does an ant know the way home with no guiding clues on the desert plains? 3-1 What Is Physics? 3-2 Vectors and Scalars. 3-3 Adding Vectors Geometrically. 3-4 Components of Vectors. 3-5 Unit Vectors. 3-6 Adding Vectors by Components. 3-7 Vectors and the Laws of Physics. 3-8 Multiplying Vectors. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 4. Motion in Two and Three Dimensions. In a motorcycle jump for record distance, where does the jumper put the second ramp? 4-1 What Is Physics? 4-2 Position and Displacement. 4-3 Average Velocity and Instantaneous Velocity. 4-4 Average Acceleration and Instantaneous Acceleration. 4-5 Projectile Motion. 4-6 Projectile Motion Analyzed. 4-7 Uniform Circular Motion. 4-8 Relative Motion in One Dimension. 4-9 Relative Motion in Two Dimensions. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 5. Force and Motion--I. When a pilot takes off from an aircraft carrier, what causes the compulsion to .y the plane into the ocean? 5-1 What Is Physics? 5-2 Newtonian Mechanics. 5-3 Newton's First Law. 5-4 Force. 5-5 Mass. 5-6 Newton's Second Law. 5-7 Some Particular Forces. 5-8 Newton's Third Law. 5-9 Applying Newton's Laws. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 6. Force and Motion--II. Can a

  18. Fundamentals of Physics, Part 1 (Chapters 1-11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2003-12-01

    Chapter 1.Measurement. How does the appearance of a new type of cloud signal changes in Earth's atmosphere? 1-1 What Is Physics? 1-2 Measuring Things. 1-3 The International System of Units. 1-4 Changing Units. 1-5 Length. 1-6 Time. 1-7 Mass. Review & Summary. Problems. Chapter 2.Motion Along a Straight Line. What causes whiplash injury in rear-end collisions of cars? 2-1 What Is Physics? 2-2 Motion. 2-3 Position and Displacement. 2-4 Average Velocity and Average Speed. 2-5 Instantaneous Velocity and Speed. 2-6 Acceleration. 2-7 Constant Acceleration: A Special Case. 2-8 Another Look at Constant Acceleration. 2-9 Free-Fall Acceleration. 2-10 Graphical Integration in Motion Analysis. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 3.Vectors. How does an ant know the way home with no guiding clues on the deser t plains? 3-2 Vectors and Scalars. 3-3 Adding Vectors Geometrically. 3-4 Components of Vectors. 3-5 Unit Vectors. 3-6 Adding Vectors by Components. 3-7 Vectors and the Laws of Physics. 3-8 Multiplying Vectors. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 4.Motion in Two and Three Dimensions. In a motorcycle jump for record distance, where does the jumper put the second ramp? 4-1 What Is Physics? 4-2 Position and Displacement. 4-3 Average Velocity and Instantaneous Velocity. 4-4 Average Acceleration and Instantaneous Acceleration. 4-5 Projectile Motion. 4-6 Projectile Motion Analyzed. 4-7 Uniform Circular Motion. 4-8 Relative Motion in One Dimension. 4-9 Relative Motion in Two Dimensions. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 5.Force and Motion-I. When a pilot takes off from an aircraft carrier, what causes the compulsion to fly the plane into the ocean? 5-1 What Is Physics? 5-2 Newtonian Mechanics. 5-3 Newton's First Law. 5-4 Force. 5-5 Mass. 5-6 Newton's Second Law. 5-7 Some Particular Forces. 5-8 Newton's Third Law. 5-9 Applying Newton's Laws. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 6.Force and Motion-II. Can a Grand Prix race car be driven

  19. A Strategic Alliance with Business in Idaho and Beyond. State of the College of Business & Economics, Issue No. 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boise State Univ., ID.

    This brochure, published by the College of Business & Economics at Boise State University, gives a brief description of the various programs and initiatives undertaken during 1998. The brochure begins with a statement of the College's vision, mission, and values and beliefs about learning, education, and people. Following are brief descriptions of…

  20. 2. SNAKE RIVER VALLEY IRRIGATION DISTRICT DAM, PHOTOGRAPHIC COPY OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. SNAKE RIVER VALLEY IRRIGATION DISTRICT DAM, PHOTOGRAPHIC COPY OF DRAWING, PLAN, SHEET 5 OF 5, 1924 (on file at the Idaho State Office of Water Resources, Boise, Idaho) - Snake River Valley Irrigation District, East Side of Snake River (River Mile 796), Shelley, Bingham County, ID

  1. 3. SNAKE RIVER VALLEY IRRIGATION DISTRICT, PHOTOGRAPHIC COPY OF DRAWING, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. SNAKE RIVER VALLEY IRRIGATION DISTRICT, PHOTOGRAPHIC COPY OF DRAWING, PROFILE AND ALIGNMENT OF DAM ACROSS WEST CHANNEL OF SNAKE RIVER, SHEET 3 OF 5, 1924 (on file at the Idaho State Office of Water Resources, Boise, Idaho) - Snake River Valley Irrigation District, East Side of Snake River (River Mile 796), Shelley, Bingham County, ID

  2. 4. SNAKE RIVER VALLEY IRRIGATION DISTRICT, PHOTOGRAPHIC COPY OF DRAWING, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. SNAKE RIVER VALLEY IRRIGATION DISTRICT, PHOTOGRAPHIC COPY OF DRAWING, PROPOSED SECTION OF DIVERSION DAM ACROSS SNAKE RIVER, SHEET 1 OF 5, 1924 (on file at the Idaho State Office of Water Resources, Boise, Idaho) - Snake River Valley Irrigation District, East Side of Snake River (River Mile 796), Shelley, Bingham County, ID

  3. 75 FR 1406 - Idaho: Filing of Plats of Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

    ... Bureau of Land Management Idaho: Filing of Plats of Survey AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of filing of plats of surveys. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has officially filed the plats of survey of the lands described below in the BLM Idaho State Office, Boise,...

  4. Discovery of a Balkan fresh-water fauna in the Idaho formation of Snake River Valley, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dall, W.H.

    1925-01-01

    In 1866 Gabb described Melania taylori and Lithasia antiqua "from a fresh-water deposit on Snake River, Idaho Territory, on the road from Fort Boise to the Owyhee mining country. Collected by A. Taylor." He states that a small bivalve, perhaps a Sphaerium, was associated with them.

  5. Career Guidance within JTPA for High Risk Populations: Programs, Methods and Products.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izzo, Margaretha Vreeburg; Drier, Harry N.

    This monograph contains summaries of the following 19 programs for providing career guidance to high-risk persons participating in a Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA) program: Youth Employment Curriculum and Competencies (Boise, Idaho); Career Mentoring Program for the Disadvantaged (Grayslake, Illinois); Partners in Skills for Career/Vocational…

  6. 76 FR 65520 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-21

    ...: Asbestos present Reasons: Floodway, Contamination, Extensive deterioration Mississippi 12 Bldgs. Naval Air.... ft; current use: storage; non-friable asbestos and lead base paint present; currently under license... asbestos present Reasons: Contamination Bldgs. 0004-0203 Dam Camp Storage Boise ID 83716 Landholding...

  7. 2. View of west side of HiattStricklin House showing front ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View of west side of Hiatt-Stricklin House showing front porch, aluminum siding to cover foundation damage and shutters. - Hiatt Property, House, West bank of Woof Creek, 400 feet northwest of intersection of U.S.F.S. Roads 651 & 349, Placerville, Boise County, ID

  8. Woodyard Skills Handbook. [Today's Workplace: An Employee Handbook].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Southern Community Coll., Monroeville.

    This document consists of the woodyard skills handbook and an employee handbook for woodyard employees of Boise Cascade. The handbooks are products of a National Workplace Literacy project conducted by Alabama Southern Community College. The woodyard skills handbook contains information needed by employees to improve math, measurement, vocabulary,…

  9. Center For Advanced Energy Studies Overview

    ScienceCinema

    Blackman, Harold

    2016-07-12

    A collaboration between Idaho National Laboratory, Boise State University, Idaho State University and the University of Idaho. Conducts research in nuclear energy, advanced materials, carbon management, bioenergy, energy policy, modeling and simulation, and energy efficiency. Educates next generation of energy workforce. Visit us at www.caesenergy.org.

  10. 75 FR 3782 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Interstate 84 Highway in Idaho

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-22

    ...This notice announces actions taken by the FHWA that are final within the meaning of 23 U.S.C. 139(l)(1). The actions relate to a proposed highway project, I-84 Karcher Interchange to Five Mile Environmental Study, in Boise, Ada and Canyon Counties in the State of Idaho [Idaho Transportation Department (ITD) Key Number...

  11. 2. View of McKenzieRichey root cellar showing north side and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View of McKenzie-Richey root cellar showing north side and west front. Note porch overhang, walkway, handrail, and house corner in the lower right corner, facing southeast. - McKenzie Property, Root Cellar, North Bank of Sailor Gulch, 750 feet northwest of intersection of U.S.F.S. Roads 651 & 349, Placerville, Boise County, ID

  12. 4. View of McKenzieRichey root cellar showing east and south ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. View of McKenzie-Richey root cellar showing east and south sides from the access road. Note the vent and fence, facing northwest. - McKenzie Property, Root Cellar, North Bank of Sailor Gulch, 750 feet northwest of intersection of U.S.F.S. Roads 651 & 349, Placerville, Boise County, ID

  13. 2. View of McKenzieRichey property from north fence line. Barn ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View of McKenzie-Richey property from north fence line. Barn with wood shed on left edge, root cellar behind trees, house in center, and garage in foreground, facing south - McKenzie Property, North Bank of Sailor Gulch 750 feet northwest of intersection of U.S.F.S. Roads 651 & 349, Placerville, Boise County, ID

  14. 1. View of McKenzieRichey property from access road, facing northwest. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View of McKenzie-Richey property from access road, facing northwest. Note covered well, house, root cellar, barn and access road - McKenzie Property, North Bank of Sailor Gulch 750 feet northwest of intersection of U.S.F.S. Roads 651 & 349, Placerville, Boise County, ID

  15. 3. View of McKenzieRichey root cellar showing west front. Note ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View of McKenzie-Richey root cellar showing west front. Note the door and porch roof, facing east. - McKenzie Property, Root Cellar, North Bank of Sailor Gulch, 750 feet northwest of intersection of U.S.F.S. Roads 651 & 349, Placerville, Boise County, ID

  16. 5. View of McKenzieRichey House showing south and east sides. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. View of McKenzie-Richey House showing south and east sides. Note the covered well roof on the left edge and the root cellar on the right edge. - McKenzie Property, House, North Bank of Sailor Gulch, 750 feet northwest of intersection of U.S.F.S. Roads 651 & 349, Placerville, Boise County, ID

  17. 1. View of McKenzieRicjey root cellar showing east back of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View of McKenzie-Ricjey root cellar showing east back of root cellar and roof in the foreground with the house in the background, facing west. - McKenzie Property, Root Cellar, North Bank of Sailor Gulch, 750 feet northwest of intersection of U.S.F.S. Roads 651 & 349, Placerville, Boise County, ID

  18. 4. Views of McKenzieRichey House showing west and north sides. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Views of McKenzie-Richey House showing west and north sides. Note walkway, root cellar and covered well in the background, facing southeast. - McKenzie Property, House, North Bank of Sailor Gulch, 750 feet northwest of intersection of U.S.F.S. Roads 651 & 349, Placerville, Boise County, ID

  19. 46. Photographic copy of historic photo, June 3, 1907 (original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. Photographic copy of historic photo, June 3, 1907 (original print filed in Record Group 115, National Archives, Washington, D.C.). 'GREASY MARY' WORN OUT AND DESERTED, LOWER DEER FLAT EMBANKMENT. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  20. 65. Photographic copy of historic photo, May 1908 (original print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    65. Photographic copy of historic photo, May 1908 (original print filed in Record Group 115, National Archives, Washington, D.C.). UPPER DEER FLAT EMBANKMENT; UPSTREAM FACE, SHOWING GRAVEL FACING AND METHOD OF PLACING. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  1. 69. Photographic copy of historic photo, March 1913 (original print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. Photographic copy of historic photo, March 1913 (original print filed in Record Group 115, National Archives, Washington, D.C.). OUTLET WORKS FOR DEER FLAT CALDWELL CANAL UPPER EMBANKMENT. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  2. 55. Photographic copy of historic photo, 1911 (original print filed ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    55. Photographic copy of historic photo, 1911 (original print filed in Record Group 115, National Archives, Washington, D.C.). U.S.R.S. CAMP FOR FORCE ACCOUNT CONSTRUCTION OUTFIT, INSTALLING FOREST PIPE LINE AND FACING LOWER DEER FLAT EMBANKMENT WITH GRAVEL. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  3. 70. Photographic copy of historic photo, August 1914 (original print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    70. Photographic copy of historic photo, August 1914 (original print filed in Record Group 115, National Archives, Washington, D.C.). WATER SIDE UPPER EMBANKMENT. DEER FLAT RESERVOIR, SHOWING GATES AND DAM. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  4. 52. Photographic copy of historic photo, April 14, 1906 (original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. Photographic copy of historic photo, April 14, 1906 (original print filed in Record Group 115, National Archives, Washington, D.C.). WATER TANK NO. 1, RESERVOIR, SPRINKLING CART, AND CONCRETE GROOVED ROLLER AT LOWER DEER FLAT EMBANKMENT. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  5. 58. Photographic copy of historic photo, April 14, 1907 (original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    58. Photographic copy of historic photo, April 14, 1907 (original print filed in Record Group 115, National Archives, Washington, D.C.). VIEW OF ONE OF THE CUT-OFF TRENCHES SHOWING MODE OF EXCAVATING. UPPER DEER FLAT EMBANKMENT. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  6. 56. Photographic copy of historic photo, 1911 (original print filed ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. Photographic copy of historic photo, 1911 (original print filed in Record Group 115, National Archives, Washington, D.C.). STEAM SHOVEL EXCAVATING GRAVEL FOR FACING LOWER DEER FLAT EMBANKMENT. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  7. 63. Photographic copy of historic photo, April 25, 1907 (original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. Photographic copy of historic photo, April 25, 1907 (original print filed in Record Group 115, National Archives, Washington, D.C.). UPPER DEER FLAT EMBANKMENT. LOCOMOTIVE WITH TRAIN OF 12 CARS OF 4 CUBIC-YARDS CAPACITY EACH, DUMPING MATERIAL ON EMBANKMENT EXCAVATED FROM WESTERLY BORROW PIT. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  8. 49. Photographic copy of historic photo, June 3, 1907 (original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. Photographic copy of historic photo, June 3, 1907 (original print filed in Record Group 115, National Archives, Washington, D.C.). LOADING GRAVEL TO BE USED ON LOWER DEER FLAT EMBANKMENT, HUBBARD & CARLSON, CONTRACTORS. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  9. 72. Photographic copy of historic photo, August 1914 (original print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    72. Photographic copy of historic photo, August 1914 (original print filed in Record Group 115, National Archives, Washington, D.C.). SEBREE'S PARK. LAKE LOWELL, DEER FLAT RESERVOIR UPPER EMBANKMENT. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  10. 53. Photographic copy of historic photo, April 14, 1906 (original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. Photographic copy of historic photo, April 14, 1906 (original print filed in Record Group 115, National Archives, Washington, D.C.). CONCRETE GROOVED ROLLER WITH THE NECESSARY 6 HORSES, LOWER DEER FLAT EMBANKMENT. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  11. 51. Photographic copy of historic photo, March 20, 1907 (original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. Photographic copy of historic photo, March 20, 1907 (original print filed in Record Group 115, National Archives, Washington, D.C.). LOWER DEER FLAT EMBANKMENT SHOWING GRAVEL ON LOWER FACE AND METHOD OF HAULING, PLACING AND SPREADING. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  12. 71. Photographic copy of historic photo, September 1912 (original print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    71. Photographic copy of historic photo, September 1912 (original print filed in Record Group 115, National Archives, Washington, D.C.). DEER FLAT RESERVOIR. OUTLET GATES IN THE NORTH SIDE OF UPPER EMBANKMENT. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  13. 45. Photographic copy of historic photo, April 14, 1906 (original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. Photographic copy of historic photo, April 14, 1906 (original print filed in Record Group 115, National Archives, Washington, D.C.). GENERAL VIEW OF LOWER DEER FLAT EMBANKMENT FROM NORTHERLY END SHOWING THREE OF THE CUT-OFF TRENCHES. CONTRACTOR'S CAMP (HUBBARD AND CARLSON) TO THE LEFT. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  14. 66. Photographic copy of historic photo, June 3, 1907 (original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    66. Photographic copy of historic photo, June 3, 1907 (original print filed in Record Group 115, National Archives, Washington, D.C.). UPPER DEER FLAT EMBANKMENT. SPRINKLING MATERIAL PREPARATORY TO COMPACTING. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  15. 61. Photographic copy of historic photo, April 25, 1907 (original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    61. Photographic copy of historic photo, April 25, 1907 (original print filed in Record Group 115, National Archives, Washington, D.C.). UPPER DEER FLAT EMBANKMENT. VIEW FROM WESTERLY END LOOKING OVER EMBANKMENT UNDER CONSTRUCTION. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  16. 50. Photographic copy of historic photo, April 14, 1906 (original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. Photographic copy of historic photo, April 14, 1906 (original print filed in Record Group 115, National Archives, Washington, D.C.). GRADER BEING HAULED BY TRACTION ENGINE AT LOWER DEER FLAT EMBANKMENT. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  17. 76. Photographic copy of historic photo, ca. 1935, (original print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    76. Photographic copy of historic photo, ca. 1935, (original print filed in Record Group 115, National Archives, Washington, D.C.). CCC ENROLLEES PLACING ROCK RIPRAP ON UPSTREAM FACE OF DEER FLAT DAM TO PREVENT EROSION OF EARTH FILL BY WIND AND WAVE ACTION-BIOSE FEDERAL RECLAMATION PROJECT-IDAHO. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  18. Center For Advanced Energy Studies Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Blackman, Harold

    2011-01-01

    A collaboration between Idaho National Laboratory, Boise State University, Idaho State University and the University of Idaho. Conducts research in nuclear energy, advanced materials, carbon management, bioenergy, energy policy, modeling and simulation, and energy efficiency. Educates next generation of energy workforce. Visit us at www.caesenergy.org.

  19. The Development and Evolution of a Two-Year Program in IT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavaiani, Thomas P.; Hancock, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The Computer Network Support Technician program offered by Selland College of Applied Technology at Boise State University provides hands-on training on Microsoft and Cisco products. A key element is the opportunity to obtain real-world experience through internships. (JOW)

  20. 75 FR 43204 - Notice of Realty Action: Recreation and Public Purposes Act Classification for Conveyance of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    ... expansion of the existing Ohio Gulch transfer station and also for recreational use. DATES: Interested... transfer station (60 acres), and (2) recreational use (182.72 acres): Area 1--Transfer Station Boise... (i.e. transfer stations) is $10 an acre, with a minimum price per conveyance of $50. The 60 acres...

  1. 76 FR 53705 - Notice To Rescind a Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), Ada...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-29

    ... 13, 2004, at 69 FR 2040, to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for a proposed highway..., ``Communities in Motion,'' prepared by the Boise-Nampa Metropolitan Planning Organization, Community Planning... the Federal Register on January 18, 2008, at 73 FR 3464. A public hearing was held on February...

  2. 76 FR 29784 - Notice of Realty Action; Direct Sale of Public Lands in Jerome County, ID

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-23

    ... owners of the adjacent private land, Todd and Bridget Buschhorn, for the appraised fair market value of... than the appraised fair market value: Boise Meridian T. 10 S., R. 19 E., sec. 25, lot 10. The area described contains 7.45 acres in Jerome County. The appraised fair market value is $5,600. The public...

  3. A Case Study: Increase Enrollment by Reducing Dropout Rates in Adult Distance Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chyung, Yonnie; Winiecki, Donald J.; Fenner, Jo Ann

    The Instructional and Performance Technology Department at Boise State University (Idaho) offers a master's degree program via distance education to prepare adult students for careers in the areas of instructional design, job performance improvement, human resources, organizational redesign, training, and training management. Most students attend…

  4. 75 FR 16070 - Notice of Southwest Idaho Resource Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-31

    ..., April 15, 2010, beginning at 10:30 a.m. ADDRESSES: Idaho Counties Risk Management Program Building, 3100... Forest Service Notice of Southwest Idaho Resource Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA... amended, (Pub. L. 110-343), the Boise, Payette, and Sawtooth National Forests' Southwest Idaho...

  5. 75 FR 24879 - Notice of Southwest Idaho Resource Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-06

    ... 20, 2010, beginning at 10:30 a.m. ADDRESSES: Idaho Counties Risk Management Program Building, 3100... Forest Service Notice of Southwest Idaho Resource Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA... amended, (Pub. L. 110-343), the Boise, Payette, and Sawtooth National Forests' Southwest Idaho...

  6. 40 CFR 52.677 - Original identification of plan section.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... variance from the indirect source regulation for an urban renewal project located in downtown Boise, as... requirements of Air Quality Monitoring 40 CFR part 58, subpart C, § 58.20. (19) Revisions to the... Manual” were previously approved by EPA at 40 CFR 52.670(c)(19).) An April 3, 1986, commitment...

  7. 40 CFR 52.677 - Original identification of plan section.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... variance from the indirect source regulation for an urban renewal project located in downtown Boise, as... requirements of Air Quality Monitoring 40 CFR part 58, subpart C, § 58.20. (19) Revisions to the... Manual” were previously approved by EPA at 40 CFR 52.670(c)(19).) An April 3, 1986, commitment...

  8. 40 CFR 52.677 - Original identification of plan section.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... variance from the indirect source regulation for an urban renewal project located in downtown Boise, as... requirements of Air Quality Monitoring 40 CFR part 58, subpart C, § 58.20. (19) Revisions to the... Manual” were previously approved by EPA at 40 CFR 52.670(c)(19).) An April 3, 1986, commitment...

  9. 40 CFR 52.677 - Original identification of plan section.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... variance from the indirect source regulation for an urban renewal project located in downtown Boise, as... requirements of Air Quality Monitoring 40 CFR part 58, subpart C, § 58.20. (19) Revisions to the... Manual” were previously approved by EPA at 40 CFR 52.670(c)(19).) An April 3, 1986, commitment...

  10. EFFECTS OF BURNRATE, WOOD SPECIES, ALTITUDE, AND STOVE TYPE ON WOODSTOVE EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the winter of 1986-87, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducted an emission measurement program in Boise, ID, as part of the Integrated Air Cancer Project (IACP). This program was designed to identify the potential mutagenic impact of residential wood burni...

  11. Vallivue Middle School: Our Schools Are Our Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Principal Leadership, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Vallivue School District, located about 20 minutes from Boise, Idaho, can trace its origins to 13 rural schools scattered throughout Canyon County. The schools served students from kindergarten through eighth grade, and each building was independently administered by local school boards. Those boards were consolidated into a single district in…

  12. Effectiveness and Student Perceptions of High-Enrolment Health Studies Online Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Ken-Zen; Lowenthal, Patrick R.; Bauer, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In countries such as the USA, colleges and universities are focusing on how best to serve their students in tough fiscal times and a highly competitive marketplace. Boise State University has specifically focused on providing online courses as one option to meet student needs. However, more recently, the university has begun developing…

  13. 76 FR 4934 - Idaho: Filing of Plats of Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-27

    ... Bureau of Land Management Idaho: Filing of Plats of Survey AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of filing of plats of surveys. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has officially filed the plats of survey of the lands described below in the BLM Idaho State Office, Boise,...

  14. 77 FR 42759 - IDAHO: Filing of Plats of Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ... Bureau of Land Management IDAHO: Filing of Plats of Survey AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of filing of plats of surveys. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has officially filed the plats of survey of the lands described below in the BLM Idaho State Office, Boise,...

  15. 76 FR 23333 - Idaho: Filing of Plats of Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-26

    ... Bureau of Land Management Idaho: Filing of Plats of Survey AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Filing of Plats of Surveys. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has officially filed the plats of survey of the lands described below in the BLM Idaho State Office, Boise,...

  16. 78 FR 45955 - IDAHO: Filing of Plats of Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-30

    ... Bureau of Land Management IDAHO: Filing of Plats of Survey AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of filing of plats of surveys. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has officially filed the plats of survey of the lands described below in the BLM Idaho State Office, Boise,...

  17. 78 FR 21968 - Idaho: Filing of Plats of Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-12

    ... Bureau of Land Management Idaho: Filing of Plats of Survey AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Filing of Plats of Surveys. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has officially filed the plats of survey of the lands described below in the BLM Idaho State Office, Boise,...

  18. 77 FR 21805 - Idaho: Filing of Plats of Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ... Bureau of Land Management Idaho: Filing of Plats of Survey AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Filing of Plats of Surveys. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has officially filed the plats of survey of the lands described below in the BLM Idaho State Office, Boise,...

  19. 76 FR 66322 - Idaho: Filing of Plats of Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ... Bureau of Land Management Idaho: Filing of Plats of Survey AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Filing of Plats of Surveys. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has officially filed the plats of survey of the lands described below in the BLM Idaho State Office, Boise,...

  20. 78 FR 64530 - Idaho: Filing of Plats of Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ... Bureau of Land Management Idaho: Filing of Plats of Survey AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of filing of plats of surveys. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has officially filed the plats of survey of the lands described below in the BLM Idaho State Office, Boise,...

  1. 77 FR 77089 - Idaho: Filing of Plats of Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-31

    ... Bureau of Land Management Idaho: Filing of Plats of Survey AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Filing of Plats of Surveys. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has officially filed the plats of survey of the lands described below in the BLM Idaho State Office, Boise,...

  2. 75 FR 66788 - Idaho: Filing of Plats of Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-29

    ... Bureau of Land Management Idaho: Filing of Plats of Survey AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Filing of Plats of Surveys. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has officially filed the plat of survey of the lands described below in the BLM Idaho State Office, Boise,...

  3. View of McKenzieRichey garage showing front opening, the false front, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of McKenzie-Richey garage showing front opening, the false front, metal roofing and horizontal plank siding, facing northeast - McKenzie Property, Garage, North Bank of Sailor Gulch, 750 feet northwest of intersection of U.S.F.S. Roads 651 & 349, Placerville, Boise County, ID

  4. 6. View of HiattStricklin House showing north gable back and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. View of Hiatt-Stricklin House showing north gable back and east side. Note the porches, shsutters and chimney. The shiny squares on the siding are metal pieces to repair woodpecker holes, facing southwest. - Hiatt Property, House, West bank of Woof Creek, 400 feet northwest of intersection of U.S.F.S. Roads 651 & 349, Placerville, Boise County, ID

  5. 75 FR 1609 - Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for Beddown of Training F-35A Aircraft

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-12

    ... following cities: Truth or Consequences, NM, Socorro, NM, and Sun City, AZ; however, Scoping Meetings will... Cloudcroft, NM, Boise, ID, City of Surprise/ Sun Cities, AZ, and Tucson, AZ. In addition, exact meeting... @ Surprise, 15850 West Civic Center Plaza, City of Surprise/Sun Cities, Arizona; Thursday, February 25,...

  6. 32 CFR 185.4 - Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of the dead. (v) Monitoring and decontaminating radiological, chemical, and biological effects... cooperation with civil agencies. (1) Under E.O. 12148 (44 FR 43239, 3 CFR 1979 Comp., p. 412) and E.O. 12656....S. Department of Agriculture or Interior. The Boise Interagency Fire Center (BIFC) may request...

  7. Workplace Literacy. Project SIDE. Procedural Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Southern Community Coll., Monroeville.

    This report describes procedures for effective development and implementation of workplace literacy programs based on the experience of a partnership among Alabama Southern Community College (Monroeville, Alabama), Boise Cascade (Jackson, Alabama), and Vanity Fair (Monroeville, Alabama). The introductory summary describes the voluntary,…

  8. Click Here To Buy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridgman, Anne

    2000-01-01

    E-commerce is coming slowly to education, but some curious school purchasing officials are clicking on vendors' web sites. Pioneering districts include the Chicago, Detroit, and El Dorado (California) public schools. Vendors include Boise Cascade and Office Depot. Some vendors are joining institutional exchanges like Commerce One or marketing…

  9. Geothermal district heating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Budney, G.S.; Childs, F.

    1982-01-01

    Ten district heating demonstration projects and their present status are described. The projects are Klamath County YMCA, Susanville District Heating, Klamath Falls District Heating, Reno Salem Plaza Condominium, El Centro Community Center Heating/Cooling, Haakon School and Business District Heating, St. Mary's Hospital, Diamond Ring Ranch, Pagosa Springs District Heating, and Boise District Heating.

  10. Geothermal heat, BAS controls: a capitol investment for Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-11-01

    At the Capitol Mall in Boise, the old old problem of space heating has been solved by a marriage of old and new technologies: a geothermal heating system and a high-tech building automation system (BAS). The result is savings of more than $200,000 a year in natural gas costs.

  11. 75 FR 60142 - Notice of Determinations Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-29

    .... formerly Medware, Inc.; Reporting From Home Offices. 74,363 ACS Commercial Solutions, London, KY July 1...,591 ProTeam, Inc., Emerson Boise, ID August 25, 2009. Electric, Leased Workers of SOS Staffing and Labormax. 74,591A The United Electric Company, Burlington, NC...... August 25, 2009. Proteam, Inc.,...

  12. Publicizing Your Program: Website Evaluation, Design, and Marketing Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shroeder, Barbara A.

    2007-01-01

    This research was undertaken to study and improve the marketing efforts of the Department of Educational Technology (EDTECH) at Boise State University, recognizing the need to generate revenues based upon the new self-support structure instituted at the university and EDTECH Department. In investigating the marketing opportunities for the…

  13. It Isn't about the Building

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raymond, Allen; Broderick, Patricia

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the ANSER Public Charter School in Boise, Idaho, where character education is considered a critical educational element, and both teachers and students are expected to adopt the core values of respect, integrity, courage, compassion, discipline, and responsibility. The ANSER school was founded by a group of parents, public…

  14. Tools and Techniques for Simplifying the Analysis of Captured Packet Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavaiani, Thomas P.

    2008-01-01

    Students acquire an understanding of the differences between TCP and UDP (connection-oriented vs. connection-less) data transfers as they analyze network packet data collected during one of a series of labs designed for an introductory network essentials course taught at Boise State University. The learning emphasis of the lab is not on the…

  15. Direct-use geothermal district heating projects in the US. A summary

    SciTech Connect

    Fornes, A.O.

    1981-10-01

    Brief summaries of geothermal district heating projects are presented for the following: Boise, Idaho; Elko, Nevada; Ephrata, Washington; Hawthorne, Nevada; Klamath Falls, Oregon; Lakeview, Oregon; Madison County, Idaho; North Bonneville, Washington; Pagosa Springs, Colorado; Preston, Idaho; Reno, Nevada; Susanville, California; Thermopolis, Wyoming; and Utah State Prison, Utah. (MHR)

  16. View of McKenzieRichey covered well showing log and lumber construction ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of McKenzie-Richey covered well showing log and lumber construction and shingles, facing southeast - McKenzie Property, Covered Well, North Bank of Sailor Gulch, 750 feet northwest of intersection of U.S.F.S. Roads 651 & 349, Placerville, Boise County, ID

  17. Proceedings of the 22nd symposium on engineering geology and soils engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a symposium on soil mechanics and engineering geology. Topics considered at the symposium included geotechnical testing and site exploration, design, soil dynamics, geotextiles, earthquake and volcanic hazard studies, slope stability and landslides, seismic considerations in geotechnical engineering, hazardous substances disposal, ground water, environmental and urban geology, and the response of the Boise geothermal aquifer to earth tides.

  18. 75 FR 33269 - Procurement List; Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ... Street, Boise, ID. NPA: Western Idaho Training Company, Caldwell, ID Contracting Activity: Dept of Trans... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Additions On 4/9/2010 (75 FR 18164-18165), the Committee for Purchase From People Who... contractor for the commodity or service. Comments were received from a commercial company that claims to...

  19. 77 FR 64402 - Order of Succession for HUD Region X

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-19

    ... supersedes all previous Orders of Succession for HUD Region X. DATES: Effective Date: October 9, 2012. FOR... Succession a. Deputy Regional Administrator; b. Regional Counsel; c. Regional Director, Community Planning.... Field Director, Community Planning and Development. 4. Boise Field Office Order of Succession a....

  20. Fundamentals of Physics, Volume 1, (Chapters 1 - 21)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Jearl

    2004-01-01

    Chapter 1. Measurement 1. How does the appearance of a new type of cloud signal changes in Earth's atmosphere? 1-1 What Is Physics? 1-2 Measuring Things. 1-3 The International System of Units. 1-4 Changing Units. 1-5 Length. 1-6 Time. 1-7 Mass. Review & Summary. Problems. Chapter 2. Motion Along a Straight Line. What causes whiplash injury in rear-end collisions of cars? 2-1 What Is Physics? 2-2 Motion. 2-3 Position and Displacement. 2-4 Average Velocity and Average Speed. 2-5 Instantaneous Velocity and Speed. 2-6 Acceleration. 2-7 Constant Acceleration: A Special Case. 2-8 Another Look at Constant Acceleration. 2-9 Free-Fall Acceleration. 2-10 Graphical Integration in Motion Analysis. 2 Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 3. Vectors. How does an ant know the way home with no guiding clues on the desert plains? 3-1 What Is Physics? 3-2 Vectors and Scalars. 3-3 Adding Vectors Geometrically. 3-4 Components of Vectors. 3-5 Unit Vectors. 3-6 Adding Vectors by Components. 3-7 Vectors and the Laws of Physics. 3-8 Multiplying Vectors. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 4. Motion in Two and Three Dimensions. In a motorcycle jump for record distance, where does the jumper put the second ramp? 4-1 What Is Physics? 4-2 Position and Displacement. 4-3 Average Velocity and Instantaneous Velocity. 4-4 Average Acceleration and Instantaneous Acceleration. 4-5 Projectile Motion. 4-6 Projectile Motion Analyzed. 4-7 Uniform Circular Motion. 4-8 Relative Motion in One Dimension. 4-9 Relative Motion in Two Dimensions. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 5. Force and Motion--I. When a pilot takes off from an aircraft carrier, what causes the compulsion to .y the plane into the ocean? 5-1 What Is Physics? 5-2 Newtonian Mechanics. 5-3 Newton's First Law. 5-4 Force. 5-5 Mass. 5-6 Newton's Second Law. 5-7 Some Particular Forces. 5-8 Newton's Third Law. 5-9 Applying Newton's Laws. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 6. Force and Motion--II. Can a

  1. Fundamentals of Physics, Part 1 (Chapters 1-11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2003-12-01

    Chapter 1.Measurement. How does the appearance of a new type of cloud signal changes in Earth's atmosphere? 1-1 What Is Physics? 1-2 Measuring Things. 1-3 The International System of Units. 1-4 Changing Units. 1-5 Length. 1-6 Time. 1-7 Mass. Review & Summary. Problems. Chapter 2.Motion Along a Straight Line. What causes whiplash injury in rear-end collisions of cars? 2-1 What Is Physics? 2-2 Motion. 2-3 Position and Displacement. 2-4 Average Velocity and Average Speed. 2-5 Instantaneous Velocity and Speed. 2-6 Acceleration. 2-7 Constant Acceleration: A Special Case. 2-8 Another Look at Constant Acceleration. 2-9 Free-Fall Acceleration. 2-10 Graphical Integration in Motion Analysis. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 3.Vectors. How does an ant know the way home with no guiding clues on the deser t plains? 3-2 Vectors and Scalars. 3-3 Adding Vectors Geometrically. 3-4 Components of Vectors. 3-5 Unit Vectors. 3-6 Adding Vectors by Components. 3-7 Vectors and the Laws of Physics. 3-8 Multiplying Vectors. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 4.Motion in Two and Three Dimensions. In a motorcycle jump for record distance, where does the jumper put the second ramp? 4-1 What Is Physics? 4-2 Position and Displacement. 4-3 Average Velocity and Instantaneous Velocity. 4-4 Average Acceleration and Instantaneous Acceleration. 4-5 Projectile Motion. 4-6 Projectile Motion Analyzed. 4-7 Uniform Circular Motion. 4-8 Relative Motion in One Dimension. 4-9 Relative Motion in Two Dimensions. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 5.Force and Motion-I. When a pilot takes off from an aircraft carrier, what causes the compulsion to fly the plane into the ocean? 5-1 What Is Physics? 5-2 Newtonian Mechanics. 5-3 Newton's First Law. 5-4 Force. 5-5 Mass. 5-6 Newton's Second Law. 5-7 Some Particular Forces. 5-8 Newton's Third Law. 5-9 Applying Newton's Laws. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 6.Force and Motion-II. Can a Grand Prix race car be driven

  2. 76 FR 60133 - Proposed Information Collection (Request for Supplies (Chapter 31-Vocational Rehabilitation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Request for Supplies (Chapter 31--Vocational Rehabilitation... information technology. Title: Request for Supplies (Chapter 31--Vocational Rehabilitation), VA Form...

  3. 76 FR 77893 - Agency Information Collection (Request for Supplies (Chapter 31-Vocational Rehabilitation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Request for Supplies (Chapter 31- Vocational Rehabilitation.... 2900-0061.'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Request for Supplies (Chapter...

  4. Fundamentals of Physics, Part 3 (Chapters 22-33)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2004-03-01

    Chapter 21. Electric Charge. Why do video monitors in surgical rooms increase the risk of bacterial contamination? 21-1 What Is Physics? 21-2 Electric Charge. 21-3 Conductors and Insulators. 21-4 Coulomb's Law. 21-5 Charge Is Quantized. 21-6 Charge Is Conserved. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 22. Electric Fields. What causes sprites, those brief .ashes of light high above lightning storms? 22-1 What Is Physics? 22-2 The Electric Field. 22-3 Electric Field Lines. 22-4 The Electric Field Due to a Point Charge. 22-5 The Electric Field Due to an Electric Dipole. 22-6 The Electric Field Due to a Line of Charge. 22-7 The Electric Field Due to a Charged Disk. 22-8 A Point Charge in an Electric Field. 22-9 A Dipole in an Electric Field. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 23. Gauss' Law. How can lightning harm you even if it do es not strike you? 23-1 What Is Physics? 23-2 Flux. 23-3 Flux of an Electric Field. 23-4 Gauss' Law. 23-5 Gauss' Law and Coulomb's Law. 23-6 A Charged Isolated Conductor. 23-7 Applying Gauss' Law: Cylindrical Symmetry. 23-8 Applying Gauss' Law: Planar Symmetry. 23-9 Applying Gauss' Law: Spherical Symmetry. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 24. Electric Potential. What danger does a sweater pose to a computer? 24-1 What Is Physics? 24-2 Electric Potential Energy. 24-3 Electric Potential. 24-4 Equipotential Surfaces. 24-5 Calculating the Potential from the Field. 24-6 Potential Due to a Point Charge. 24-7 Potential Due to a Group of Point Charges. 24-8 Potential Due to an Electric Dipole. 24-9 Potential Due to a Continuous Charge Distribution. 24-10 Calculating the Field from the Potential. 24-11 Electric Potential Energy of a System of Point Charges. 24-12 Potential of a Charged Isolated Conductor. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 25. Capacitance. How did a fire start in a stretcher being withdrawn from an oxygen chamber? 25-1 What Is Physics? 25-2 Capacitance. 25-3 Calculating the Capacitance. 25

  5. Fundamentals of Physics, Part 2 (Chapters 12-20)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2003-12-01

    Chapter 12 Equilibrium and Elasticity. What injury can occur to a rock climber hanging by a crimp hold? 12-1 What Is Physics? 12-2 Equilibrium. 12-3 The Requirements of Equilibrium. 12-4 The Center of Gravity. 12-5 Some Examples of Static Equilibrium. 12-6 Indeterminate Structures. 12-7 Elasticity. Review & Summary Questions Problems. Chapter 13 Gravitation. What lies at the center of our Milky Way galaxy? 13-1 What Is Physics? 13-2 Newton's Law of Gravitation. 13-3 Gravitation and the Principle of Superposition. 13-4 Gravitation Near Earth's Surface. 13-5 Gravitation Inside Earth. 13-6 Gravitational Potential Energy. 13-7 Planets and Satellites: Kepler's Laws. 13-8 Satellites: Orbits and Energy. 13-9 Einstein and Gravitation. Review & Summary Questions Problems. Chapter 14 Fluids. What causes ground effect in race car driving? 14-1 What Is Physics? 14-2 What Is a Fluid? 14-3 Density and Pressure. 14-4 Fluids at Rest. 14-5 Measuring Pressure. 14-6 Pascal's Principle. 14-7 Archimedes' Principle. 14-8 Ideal Fluids in Motion. 14-9 The Equation of Continuity. 14-10 Bernoulli's Equation. Review & SummaryQuestionsProblems. Chapter 15 Oscillations. What is the "secret" of a skilled diver's high catapult in springboard diving? 15-1 What Is Physics? 15-2 Simple Harmonic Motion. 15-3 The Force Law for Simple Harmonic Motion. 15-4 Energy in Simple Harmonic Motion. 15-5 An Angular Simple Harmonic Oscillator. 15-6 Pendulums. 15-7 Simple Harmonic Motion and Uniform Circular Motion. 15-8 Damped Simple Harmonic Motion. 15-9 Forced Oscillations and Resonance. Review & Summary Questions Problems. Chapter 16 Waves--I. How can a submarine wreck be located by distant seismic stations? 16-1 What Is Physics? 16-2 Types of Waves. 16-3 Transverse and Longitudinal Waves. 16-4 Wavelength and Frequency. 16-5 The Speed of a Traveling Wave. 16-6 Wave Speed on a Stretched String. 16-7 Energy and Power of a Wave Traveling Along a String. 16-8 The Wave Equation. 16-9 The Principle of Superposition

  6. Chapter 2: Simulations of the Structure of Cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, J. F.; Himmel, M. E.; Brady, J. W.

    2010-01-01

    Cellulose is the homopolymer of (1 {yields} 4)-{beta}-D-glucose. The chemical composition of this polymer is simple, but understanding the conformation and packing of cellulose molecules is challenging. This chapter describes the structure of cellulose from the perspective of molecular mechanics simulations, including conformational analysis of cellobiose and simulations of hydrated cellulose I{beta} with CSFF and GLYCAM06, two sets of force field parameters developed specifically for carbohydrates. Many important features observed in these simulations are sensitive to differences in force field parameters, giving rise to dramatically different structures. The structures and properties of non-naturally occurring cellulose allomorphs (II, III, and IV) are also discussed.

  7. Aerothermodynamics of Blunt Body Entry Vehicles. Chapter 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.; Borrelli, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter, the aerothermodynamic phenomena of blunt body entry vehicles are discussed. Four topics will be considered that present challenges to current computational modeling techniques for blunt body environments: turbulent flow, non-equilibrium flow, rarefied flow, and radiation transport. Examples of comparisons between computational tools to ground and flight-test data will be presented in order to illustrate the challenges existing in the numerical modeling of each of these phenomena and to provide test cases for evaluation of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code predictions.

  8. Collection and chemical analysis of lichens for biomonitoring. Book chapter

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, L.L.; Ford, J.; Schwartzman, D.

    1991-01-01

    The chapter discusses the interrelated aspects of biomonitoring using chemical analysis of lichens. Many unique aspects of study objectives, study design (including design tasks, considerations, and sampling schemes), sample collection, sample preparation, and sample analysis that are required for a successful biomonitoring program using chemical analysis are emphasized. The advantages and disadvantages of common analytical methods suitable for chemical analysis of lichens are briefly discussed. Aspects of a quality assurance program and final contract reports are highlighted. In addition, some examples of studies using chemical analysis of lichens are discussed.

  9. 48 CFR Appendix H to Chapter 2 - Debarment and Suspension Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .... 421 and 48 CFR chapter 1. H-100Scope. This appendix provides uniform debarment and suspension... Procedures H Appendix H to Chapter 2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Ch. 2, App. H Appendix H to Chapter 2—Debarment and Suspension...

  10. 38 CFR 21.9645 - Refund of basic contribution to chapter 30.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... contribution to chapter 30. 21.9645 Section 21.9645 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF... Assistance § 21.9645 Refund of basic contribution to chapter 30. (a)(1) An individual who makes an irrevocable election to receive educational assistance under this chapter by relinquishing eligibility...

  11. 5 CFR 841.506 - Effect of part 772 of this chapter on FERS payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Effect of part 772 of this chapter on... Employee Deductions and Government Contributions § 841.506 Effect of part 772 of this chapter on FERS... the interim appointment under § 772.102 of this chapter. The notice must specify that the...

  12. 27 CFR 9.3 - Relation to parts 4 and 70 of this chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of this chapter. 9.3 Section 9.3 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... Relation to parts 4 and 70 of this chapter. (a) Procedure. In accordance with §§ 4.25a(e)(2) and 70.701(c) of this chapter, the Administrator shall receive petitions to establish American viticultural...

  13. 26 CFR 301.6501(n)-1 - Special rules for chapter 42 and similar taxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Special rules for chapter 42 and similar taxes... Assessment and Collection § 301.6501(n)-1 Special rules for chapter 42 and similar taxes. (a) Return filed by... by chapter 42 (other than a tax imposed by section 4940), or by section 4975 shall be considered,...

  14. 21 CFR 312.54 - Emergency research under § 50.24 of this chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Emergency research under § 50.24 of this chapter... and Investigators § 312.54 Emergency research under § 50.24 of this chapter. (a) The sponsor shall... this chapter. When the sponsor receives from the IRB information concerning the public...

  15. 27 CFR 53.172 - Credit or refund of manufacturers tax under chapter 32.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... manufacturers tax under chapter 32. 53.172 Section 53.172 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND... Taxes § 53.172 Credit or refund of manufacturers tax under chapter 32. (a) Overpayment not described in... refund of an overpayment of manufacturers tax imposed by Chapter 32. It does not apply, however, to...

  16. 31 CFR 500.203 - Effect of transfers violating the provisions of this chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... provisions of this chapter. 500.203 Section 500.203 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money... CONTROL REGULATIONS Prohibitions § 500.203 Effect of transfers violating the provisions of this chapter. (a) Any transfer after the “effective date” which is in violation of any provision of this chapter...

  17. 5 CFR 891.101 - Relationship to part 890 of this chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Relationship to part 890 of this chapter... Provisions § 891.101 Relationship to part 890 of this chapter. This part does not apply to the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program which is governed by part 890 of this chapter. Part 890 of this...

  18. 38 CFR 21.380 - Establishment of qualifications for personnel providing assistance under Chapter 31.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... qualifications for personnel providing assistance under Chapter 31. 21.380 Section 21.380 Pensions, Bonuses, and... Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Under 38 U.S.C. Chapter 31 Personnel Training and Development § 21.380 Establishment of qualifications for personnel providing assistance under Chapter 31. (a)...

  19. 10 CFR 52.0 - Scope; applicability of 10 CFR Chapter I provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Scope; applicability of 10 CFR Chapter I provisions. 52.0... NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS General Provisions § 52.0 Scope; applicability of 10 CFR Chapter I provisions. (a... CFR Chapter I apply to a holder of or applicant for an approval, certification, permit, or license....

  20. 26 CFR 301.6511(f)-1 - Special rules for chapter 42 taxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Special rules for chapter 42 taxes. 301.6511(f... and Collection § 301.6511(f)-1 Special rules for chapter 42 taxes. (a) In general. Claims for credit or refund of an overpayment of any tax imposed by chapter 42 shall be filed by the taxpayer within...

  1. 20 CFR 1.3 - What rules are contained in this chapter?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What rules are contained in this chapter? 1.3... AND PROCEDURES PERFORMANCE OF FUNCTIONS § 1.3 What rules are contained in this chapter? The rules in this chapter are those governing the OWCP functions under the Federal Employees' Compensation Act,...

  2. 26 CFR 48.6416(a)-3 - Credit or refund of manufacturers tax under chapter 32.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... chapter 32. 48.6416(a)-3 Section 48.6416(a)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... refund of manufacturers tax under chapter 32. (a) Overpayment not described in section 6416(b)(3)(C) or... to claims for credit or refund of an overpayment of manufacturers tax imposed by chapter 32. It...

  3. 49 CFR 1500.3 - Terms and abbreviations used in this chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Terms and abbreviations used in this chapter. 1500... APPLICABILITY, TERMS, AND ABBREVIATIONS § 1500.3 Terms and abbreviations used in this chapter. As used in this chapter: Administrator means the Under Secretary of Transportation for Security identified in 49...

  4. 26 CFR 1.6662-5 - Substantial and gross valuation misstatements under chapter 1.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... under chapter 1. 1.6662-5 Section 1.6662-5 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Assessable Penalties § 1.6662-5 Substantial and gross valuation misstatements under chapter 1. (a) In general... imposed under chapter 1 of subtitle A of the Code that is required to be shown on a return is...

  5. 9 CFR 51.10 - Part 53 of this chapter not applicable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Part 53 of this chapter not applicable... DESTROYED BECAUSE OF BRUCELLOSIS Indemnity for Cattle, Bison, and Swine § 51.10 Part 53 of this chapter not... the regulations contained in part 53 of this chapter, but all such claims shall be presented and...

  6. 26 CFR 156.6091-1 - Place for filing chapter 54 (Greenmail) tax returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Place for filing chapter 54 (Greenmail) tax... Administration § 156.6091-1 Place for filing chapter 54 (Greenmail) tax returns. Except as provided in § 156.6091... under chapter 54 of the Code of individuals, estates, and trusts shall be filed with any person...

  7. 38 CFR 21.334 - Election of payment at the Chapter 30 rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the Chapter 30 rate. 21.334 Section 21.334 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF... Employment Under 38 U.S.C. Chapter 31 Authorization of Subsistence Allowance and Training and Rehabilitation Services § 21.334 Election of payment at the Chapter 30 rate. (a) Election. When the veteran elects...

  8. 20 CFR 802.102 - Applicability of part 801 of this chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Applicability of part 801 of this chapter... PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE General Provisions Introductory § 802.102 Applicability of part 801 of this chapter. Part 801 of this chapter VII sets forth rules of general applicability covering the...

  9. 14 CFR 91.1007 - Flights conducted under part 121 or part 135 of this chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 135 of this chapter. 91.1007 Section 91.1007 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... chapter. (a) Except as provided in § 91.501(b), when a nonprogram aircraft is used to substitute for a program flight, the flight must be operated in compliance with part 121 or part 135 of this chapter,...

  10. 31 CFR 501.101 - Relation of this part to other parts in this chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... in this chapter. 501.101 Section 501.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money..., PROCEDURES AND PENALTIES REGULATIONS Relation of This Part to Other Parts in This Chapter § 501.101 Relation of this part to other parts in this chapter. This part sets forth standard reporting...

  11. 47 CFR 80.3 - Other applicable rule parts of this chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Other applicable rule parts of this chapter. 80... rule parts of this chapter. Other FCC rule parts applicable to licensees in the maritime services... requirements for construction, marking and lighting of antenna towers. (f) Part 20 of this chapter...

  12. 78 FR 48696 - Draft Revisions to the Marine Safety Manual, Volume III, Chapters 20-26

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-09

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Draft Revisions to the Marine Safety Manual, Volume III, Chapters 20-26 AGENCY: Coast... discusses the substantive changes to chapters 20 through 26 of MSM Volume III. The Coast Guard seeks and... Notice and Draft of MSM Volume III, Chapters 20-26: To view this Commandant Change notice and Draft...

  13. 14 CFR 36.105 - Flight Manual Statement of Chapter 4 equivalency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight Manual Statement of Chapter 4... Airplanes and Jet Airplanes § 36.105 Flight Manual Statement of Chapter 4 equivalency. For each airplane... by the FAA to be equivalent to the Chapter 4 noise level required by the International Civil...

  14. 26 CFR 53.6091-1 - Place for filing chapter 42 tax returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Place for filing chapter 42 tax returns. 53... Administration § 53.6091-1 Place for filing chapter 42 tax returns. Except as provided in § 53.6091-2 (relating to exceptional cases): (a) Persons other than corporations. Chapter 42 tax returns of persons...

  15. 26 CFR 55.6091-1 - Place for filing Chapter 44 tax returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Place for filing Chapter 44 tax returns. 55... INVESTMENT COMPANIES Procedure and Administration § 55.6091-1 Place for filing Chapter 44 tax returns. Except as provided in § 55.6091-2 (relating to exceptional cases): (a) In general. Chapter 44 tax...

  16. 46 CFR 154.1800 - Special operating requirements under Part 35 of this chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... chapter. 154.1800 Section 154.1800 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... Operations § 154.1800 Special operating requirements under Part 35 of this chapter. Each vessel must meet the requirements of Part 35 of this chapter except § 35.30-20....

  17. 21 CFR 812.47 - Emergency research under § 50.24 of this chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Emergency research under § 50.24 of this chapter....47 Emergency research under § 50.24 of this chapter. (a) The sponsor shall monitor the progress of all investigations involving an exception from informed consent under § 50.24 of this chapter....

  18. 38 CFR 21.5001 - Administration of benefits: 38 U.S.C. Chapter 32.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... benefits: 38 U.S.C. Chapter 32. 21.5001 Section 21.5001 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT...' Educational Assistance Under 38 U.S.C. Chapter 32 Administrative § 21.5001 Administration of benefits: 38 U.S.C. Chapter 32. (a) Delegation of authority. Except as otherwise provided, authority is delegated...

  19. 48 CFR Appendix A to Chapter 2 - Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Contract Appeals A Appendix A to Chapter 2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Ch. 2, App. A Appendix A to Chapter 2—Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals Pt. Part 1—Charter Part 2—Rules Authority: 41 U.S.C. 421 and 48 CFR chapter 1....

  20. Educating Today's Children for Tomorrow's World. 1991-92 Chapter 1 Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock. General Education Div.

    This document first provides an overall explanation of the Education Consolidation Improvement Act Chapter 1 and then describes Arkansas' involvement in Chapter 1 services. The report reveals that there were 76,588 Arkansas students who received Chapter 1 services in fiscal year (FY) 92, which amounted to a 7 percent increase over the previous…

  1. 77 FR 39731 - Swinomish Indian Tribal Community-Title 15, Chapter 4: Liquor Legalization, Regulation and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-05

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Swinomish Indian Tribal Community--Title 15, Chapter 4: Liquor Legalization... publishes Title 15, Chapter 4: Liquor Legalization, Regulation and License Code for the Swinomish Indian... adopted Ordinance No. 296, Enacting Swinomish Tribal Code Title 15, Chapter 4: Liquor...

  2. 77 FR 21581 - Kootenai Tribe of Idaho: Chapter 11-Alcohol Control Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-10

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Kootenai Tribe of Idaho: Chapter 11--Alcohol Control Act AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice publishes Chapter 11--Alcohol Control Act... enact a new Chapter 11--Alcohol Control Act on August 9, 2011. This notice is published in...

  3. 48 CFR Appendix H to Chapter 2 - Debarment and Suspension Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    .... 421 and 48 CFR chapter 1. H-100Scope. This appendix provides uniform debarment and suspension... Procedures H Appendix H to Chapter 2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Ch. 2, App. H Appendix H to Chapter 2—Debarment and Suspension...

  4. Chapter 2 Formula, 1989-90: Major Points. Publication No. 89.32.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baenen, Nancy R.

    Programs implemented in 1989-90 by the Austin (Texas) Independent School District (AISD) using Chapter 2 Formula federal funds are described. Chapter 2 Formula provides federal funds to the states through the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 as amended in 1988. Chapter 2 funds can support programs that meet the educational needs of…

  5. Chapter 12: the anatomical foundations of clinical neurology.

    PubMed

    Bentivoglio, Marina; Mazzarello, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    The chapter provides an itinerary of knowledge on nervous system anatomy as one of the pillars of clinical neurology. The journey starts from the Renaissance explosion on the approach to the human body, its functions and its diseases, dealing with the seminal contributions of Leonardo da Vinci and Vesalius. The itinerary proceeds through the contributions of the 17th century, especially by Thomas Willis and the pioneering investigations of Marcello Malpighi and Antony van Leeuwenhoek, and onto the 18th century. The itinerary thus leads to the progress from gross anatomy to the microscopic investigation of the nervous system in the 19th century: the reticular theories, the revolution of the neural doctrine and their protagonists (Camillo Golgi and Santiago Ramón y Cajal), which initiated the modern era of the neurosciences. The chapter also includes sections on the contributions of developmental neuroanatomy to neurology, on the history of tract tracing, and on the cytoarchitecture of the cerebral cortex. The never-ending story of the anatomical foundations of clinical neurology continues to evolve at the dawn of the 21st century, including knowledge that guides deep brain stimulation, and novel approaches to the anatomy of the living brain based on rapidly developing neuroimaging technology.

  6. Overview of NATO Background on Scramjet Technology. Chapter 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, J. Philip; Bouchez, Marc; McClinton, Charles R.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the present overview is to summarize the current knowledge of the NATO contributors. All the topics will be addressed in this chapter, with references and some examples. This background enhances the level of knowledge of the NATO scramjet community, which will be used for writing the specific chapters of the Report. Some previous overviews have been published on scramjet technology worldwide. NASA, DOD, the U.S. industry and global community have studied scramjet-powered hypersonic vehicles for over 40 years. Within the U.S. alone, NASA, DOD (DARPA, U.S. Navy and USAF), and industry have participated in hypersonic technology development. Over this time NASA Langley Research Center continuously studied hypersonic system design, aerothermodynamics, scramjet propulsion, propulsion-airframe integration, high temperature materials and structural architectures, and associated facilities, instrumentation and test methods. These modestly funded programs were substantially augmented during the National Aero-Space Plane (X-30) Program, which spent more than $3B between 1984 and 1995, and brought the DOD and other NASA Centers, universities and industry back into hypersonics. In addition, significant progress was achieved in all technologies required for hypersonic flight, and much of that technology was transferred into other programs, such as X-33, DC-X, X-37, X-43, etc. In addition, technology transfer impacted numerous other industries, including automotive, medical, sports and aerospace.

  7. Chapter 9 prehospital tourniquets: review, recommendations, and future research.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Paul C

    2014-01-01

    The tourniquet is a simple device that has been used since the Middle Ages. Although different variations have been designed throughout its history, the simplicity of design has remained. The history of tourniquets follows two distinct paths--the operating room and the prehospital setting. From the earliest recorded history, tourniquets have been used for surgical procedures which were originally to amputate war-ravaged limbs and then to create a bloodless field for routine limb surgery. This history has continued uninterrupted since the early 1900s with continued research to foster advances in knowledge. The history of tourniquets in the prehospital setting, however, has not progressed as smoothly. The debate regarding the use of a tourniquet to save a life from excessive limb hemorrhage began in the 1600s, and continues to this day. This chapter will explore the prehospital use of tourniquets, which may shed some light on where this debate originated. The current state of the knowledge regarding tourniquets will then be discussed with a focus on prehospital use, using the operating room literature when needed to fill knowledge gaps. The chapter will conclude with recommendations for prehospital tourniquet use and some areas for future research. Tourniquets are used for operative procedures within accepted clinical guidelines throughout the world as the standard of care. Current science supports a similar stance for the use of prehospital tourniquets within clinical guidelines.

  8. Chapter 9 prehospital tourniquets: review, recommendations, and future research.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Paul C

    2014-01-01

    The tourniquet is a simple device that has been used since the Middle Ages. Although different variations have been designed throughout its history, the simplicity of design has remained. The history of tourniquets follows two distinct paths--the operating room and the prehospital setting. From the earliest recorded history, tourniquets have been used for surgical procedures which were originally to amputate war-ravaged limbs and then to create a bloodless field for routine limb surgery. This history has continued uninterrupted since the early 1900s with continued research to foster advances in knowledge. The history of tourniquets in the prehospital setting, however, has not progressed as smoothly. The debate regarding the use of a tourniquet to save a life from excessive limb hemorrhage began in the 1600s, and continues to this day. This chapter will explore the prehospital use of tourniquets, which may shed some light on where this debate originated. The current state of the knowledge regarding tourniquets will then be discussed with a focus on prehospital use, using the operating room literature when needed to fill knowledge gaps. The chapter will conclude with recommendations for prehospital tourniquet use and some areas for future research. Tourniquets are used for operative procedures within accepted clinical guidelines throughout the world as the standard of care. Current science supports a similar stance for the use of prehospital tourniquets within clinical guidelines. PMID:25222543

  9. Chapter 24: Computational modeling of self-organized spindle formation.

    PubMed

    Schaffner, Stuart C; José, Jorge V

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter, we provide a derivation and computational details of a biophysical model we introduced to describe the self-organized mitotic spindle formation properties in the chromosome dominated pathway studied in Xenopus meiotic extracts. The mitotic spindle is a biological structure composed of microtubules. This structure forms the scaffold on which mitosis and cytokinesis occurs. Despite the seeming mechanical simplicity of the spindle itself, its formation and the way in which it is used in mitosis and cytokinesis is complex and not fully understood. Biophysical modeling of a system as complex as mitosis requires contributions from biologists, biochemists, mathematicians, physicists, and software engineers. This chapter is written for biologists and biochemists who wish to understand how biophysical modeling can complement a program of biological experimentation. It is also written for a physicist, computer scientist, or mathematician unfamiliar with this class of biological physics model. We will describe how we built such a mathematical model and its numerical simulator to obtain results that agree with many of the results found experimentally. The components of this system are large enough to be described in terms of coarse-grained approximations. We will discuss how to properly model such systems and will suggest effective tradeoffs between reliability, simulation speed, and accuracy. At all times we have in mind the realistic biophysical properties of the system we are trying to model. PMID:19118693

  10. Experiences gained by establishing the IAMG Student Chapter Freiberg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, Sebastian M.; Liesenberg, Veraldo; Shahzad, Faisal

    2013-04-01

    The International Association for Mathematical Geosciences (IAMG) Student Chapter Freiberg was founded in 2007 at the Technische Universität Bergakademie Freiberg (TUBAF) in Germany by national and international graduate and undergraduate students of various geoscientific as well as natural science disciplines. The major aim of the IAMG is to promote international cooperation in the application and use of Mathematics in Geosciences research and technology. The IAMG encourages all types of students and young scientists to found and maintain student chapters, which can even receive limited financial support by the IAMG. Following this encouragement, generations of students at TUBAF have build up and established a prosperous range of activities. These might be an example and an invitation for other young scientists and institutions worldwide to run similar activities. We, some of the current and former students behind the student chapter, have organised talks, membership drives, student seminars, guest lectures, several short courses and even international workshops. Some notable short courses were held by invited IAMG distinguished lecturers. The topics included "Statistical analysis in the Earth Sciences using R - a language and environment for statistical computing and graphics", "Geomathematical Natural Resource Modeling" and "Introduction to Geostatistics for Environmental Applications and Natural Resources Evaluation: Basic Concepts and Examples". Furthermore, we conducted short courses by ourselves. Here, the topics included basic introductions into MATLAB, object oriented programming concepts for geoscientists using MATLAB and an introduction to the Keyhole Markup Language (KML). Most of those short courses lasted several days and provided an excellent and unprecedented teaching experience for us. We were given credit by attending students for filling gaps in our university's curriculum by providing in-depth and hands-on tutorials on topics, which were merely

  11. Fundamentals of Physics, Part 4 (Chapters 34-38)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2004-04-01

    Chapter 33. Electromagnetic Waves. Why can one rainbow or two rainbows be seen in the sky but never three rainbows? 33-1 What Is Physics? 33-2 Maxwell's Rainbow. 33-3 The Traveling Electromagnetic Wave, Qualitatively. 33-4 The Traveling Electromagnetic Wave, Quantitatively. 33-5 Energy Transport and the Poynting Vector. 33-6 Radiation Pressure. 33-7 Polarization. 33-8 Reflection and Refraction. 33-9 Total Internal Reflection. 33-10 Polarization by Reflection. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 34. Images. What creates the illusion of hallways in a mirror maze? 34-1 What Is Physics? 34-2 Two Types of Images. 34-3 Plane Mirrors. 34-4 Spherical Mirrors. 34-5 Images from Spherical Mirrors. 34-6 Spherical Refracting Surfaces. 34-7 Thin Lenses. 34-8 Optical Instruments. 34-9 Three Proofs. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 35. Interference. How do color-shifting inks on paper currency shift colors? 35-1 What Is Physics? 35-2 Light as a Wave. 35-3 Diffraction. 35-4 Young's Interference Experiment. 35-5 Coherence. 35-6 Intensity in Double-Slit Interference. 35-7 Interference from Thin Films. 35-8 Michelson's Interferometer. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 36. Diffraction. How were variable displays on credit cards made bright and counterfeit-proof? 36-1 What Is Physics? 36-2 Diffraction and the Wave Theory of Light. 36-3 Diffraction by a Single Slit: Locating the Minima. 36-4 Intensity in Single-Slit Diffraction, Qualitatively. 36-5 Intensity in Single-Slit Diffraction, Quantitatively. 36-6 Diffraction by a Circular Aperture. 36-7 Diffraction by a Double Slit. 36-8 Diffraction Gratings. 36-9 Gratings: Dispersion and Resolving Power. 36-10 X-Ray Diffraction. Review & Summary Questions. Problems. Chapter 37. Relativity. How can we determine what lurks at the center of the galaxy M87, 50 million light-years away? 37-1 What Is Physics? 37-2 The Postulates. 37-3 Measuring an Event. 37-4 The Relativity of Simultaneity. 37-5 The Relativity

  12. Basics of compounding: implementing United States pharmacopeia chapter <795> pharmaceutical compounding--nonsterile preparations, part 4.

    PubMed

    Allen, Loyd V

    2012-01-01

    Compounding pharmacists must participate in the standards set forth in the United States Pharmacopeia. Chapters <795> and <1075> within the United States Pharmacopeia have been combined and revised and new categories included. It is incumbent upon the compounder to maintain knowledge and skill in all categories of compounding that occurs in the facility. Therefore, pharmacists should acquire and study the newly revised chapter. This article concludes the four-part discussion on the newly revised United States Pharmacopeia Chapter <795>. Our purpose for these discussions was to bring to your attention that Chapter <795> and Chapter <1075> were combined and to highlight the most important changes and their effect on compounding pharmacy.

  13. Effects of burnrate, wood species, altitude, and stove type on woodstove emissions

    SciTech Connect

    McCrillis, R.C.; Burnet, P.G. )

    1990-10-01

    During the winter of 1986-87, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducted an emission measurement program in Boise, ID, as part of the Integrated Air Cancer Project (IACP). This program was designed to identify the potential mutagenic impact of residential wood burning on ambient and indoor air. One facet of this field sampling effort involved obtaining emission samples from chimneys serving wood burning appliances in Boise. As a companion to the field source sampling, a parallel project was undertaken in an instrumented woodstove test laboratory to quantify woodstove emissions during operations typical of Boise usage. Two woodstoves were operated in a test laboratory over a range of burnrates, burning either eastern oak or white pine from the Boise, ID, area. A conventional stove, manufactured in the Boise area, was tested at altitudes of 90 and 825 m. A catalytic stove was tested only at the high altitude facility. All emission tests were started with kindling a fire in a cold stove using black and white newsprint. Emissions were collected using the wood stove dilution sampling system (WSDSS) for a continuous period of about 8 hours, encompassing start-up and several wood additions. The results showed wide variability probably due primarily to the difficulty in duplicating conditions during start-up. Total WSDSS emissions showed the expected inverse correlations with burnrate for the conventional stove and nearly flat for the catalytic stove. While there appeared to be little or no correlation of total WSDSS emissions with altitude, the sum of the 16 polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) quantified showed an inverse correlation with altitude: higher PAH emissions at the lower altitude.

  14. Exposure and risk from ambient particle-bound pollution in an airshed dominated by residential wood combustion and mobile sources.

    PubMed Central

    Cupitt, L T; Glen, W G; Lewtas, J

    1994-01-01

    A major field study was conducted in Boise, Idaho, during the heating season of 1986 to 1987 as part of the Integrated Air Cancer Project. Filter samples were systematically collected in residences and in the ambient air across the community to characterize the particle-bound pollutants. The extractable organic matter (EOM) from the filter samples was apportioned to its source of origin, either residential wood combustion (RWC) or mobile sources (MS). Two composite samples, with apportioned contributions from RWC and MS, were prepared from the Boise ambient samples and tested for tumor-initiation potency. A comparative potency lung cancer risk estimate has been made based on the two ambient composite samples from this airshed. In addition, a microenvironmental exposure model was developed from the Boise data and from national survey data to estimate the exposure to EOM from RWC and MS. In this paper, the microenvironmental model is extrapolated to provide an estimate of the average annual exposure and dose in Boise to EOM from RWC and MS. The annual model considers actual pollutant levels in Boise, historical changes in RWC usage and meteorological dilution factors and the likely activities in the various microenvironmental zones and their resultant inhalation rates. Combined with the lifetime risk estimates, the average annual dose suggests a risk of about 4 x 10(-4) based upon the composite ambient samples. Despite the fact that RWC accounts for 73% of the EOM on an annual average basis, it accounts for only about 20% of the estimated lifetime risk. PMID:7529707

  15. Basics of compounding: considerations for implementing United States pharmacopeia chapter 797 pharmaceutical compounding sterile preparations, part 6: 2008 revisions to chapter 797.

    PubMed

    Allen, Loyd V; Okeke, Claudia C

    2008-01-01

    United States Pharmacopeia Chapter 797 Pharmaceutical Compounding-Sterile Preparations pertains to all preadministration manipulations and procedures involved in the preparation of sterile compounds for application, implantation, infusion, inhalation, injection, insertion, instillation, or irrigation, including preparation, storage and transportation. The chapter does not pertain to actual clinical administration of compounded sterile preparations to patients. The intent of Chapter 797 is simply to prevent patient harm and fatalities that may result from nonsterility , excessive endotoxin load, large content errors in strength of correct ingredients, or the presence of incorrect ingredients. Because the achievement of sterility requires that facilities meet minimum cleanliness standards, that personnel be trained adequately and undergo periodic testing and training in sterilization techniques, and that appropriate principles and practices be appied to sustain solution stability, compliance with Chapter 797, and those that have already met the new standards seem to support them strongly. A number of significant changes have been made to Chapter 797, and this article discusses these changes.

  16. Structural equation modeling: building and evaluating causal models: Chapter 8

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grace, James B.; Scheiner, Samuel M.; Schoolmaster, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    Scientists frequently wish to study hypotheses about causal relationships, rather than just statistical associations. This chapter addresses the question of how scientists might approach this ambitious task. Here we describe structural equation modeling (SEM), a general modeling framework for the study of causal hypotheses. Our goals are to (a) concisely describe the methodology, (b) illustrate its utility for investigating ecological systems, and (c) provide guidance for its application. Throughout our presentation, we rely on a study of the effects of human activities on wetland ecosystems to make our description of methodology more tangible. We begin by presenting the fundamental principles of SEM, including both its distinguishing characteristics and the requirements for modeling hypotheses about causal networks. We then illustrate SEM procedures and offer guidelines for conducting SEM analyses. Our focus in this presentation is on basic modeling objectives and core techniques. Pointers to additional modeling options are also given.

  17. Chapter 88-97 of 1988 Laws, 15 June 1988.

    PubMed

    1988-01-01

    This document contains amended sections of Sections 001 and 012 of Chapter 390 of Florida's statute relating to abortions. The amended sections state that the physician must obtain the written informed consent of the woman or her legal guardian if she is incompetent. If the woman is under age 18 and unmarried, the written informed consent of a parent, custodian, or legal guardian must be obtained, unless a court order allows the physician to bypass this additional consent requirement. Further amendments give the department the power to develop and enforce rules governing the operation of abortion clinics. These rules insure, among other things, that abortions may be performed only by licensed physicians. The rules also cover the proper treatment of patient records and the proper disposal of fetal remains. PMID:12289580

  18. NASA's MERBoard: An Interactive Collaborative Workspace Platform. Chapter 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimble, Jay; Wales, Roxana; Gossweiler, Rich

    2003-01-01

    This chapter describes the ongoing process by which a multidisciplinary group at NASA's Ames Research Center is designing and implementing a large interactive work surface called the MERBoard Collaborative Workspace. A MERBoard system involves several distributed, large, touch-enabled, plasma display systems with custom MERBoard software. A centralized server and database back the system. We are continually tuning MERBoard to support over two hundred scientists and engineers during the surface operations of the Mars Exploration Rover Missions. These scientists and engineers come from various disciplines and are working both in small and large groups over a span of space and time. We describe the multidisciplinary, human-centered process by which this h4ERBoard system is being designed, the usage patterns and social interactions that we have observed, and issues we are currently facing.

  19. The role of infectious disease in marine communities: chapter 5

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lafferty, Kevin D.; Harvell, C. Drew

    2014-01-01

    Marine ecologists recognize that infectious diseases play and important role in ocean ecosystems. This role may have increased in some host taxa over time (Ward and Lafferty 2004). We begin this chapter by introducing infectious agents and their relationships with their hosts in marine systems. We then put infectious disease agents with their hosts in marine systems. We then put infectious disease agents in the perspective of marine biodiversity and discuss the various factors that affect parasites. Specifically, we introduce some basin epidemiological concepts, including the effects of stress and free-living diversity on parasites. Following this, we give brief consideration to communities of parasites within their hosts, particularly as these can lead to general insights into community ecology. We also give examples of how infectious diseases affect host populations, scaling up to marine communities. Finally, we present examples of marine infectious disease that impair conservation and fisheries.

  20. Anatomy and physiology of plant conductive systems. Book chapter

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, C.

    1993-01-01

    Mathematical models considered in the book are representations of the physical features and chemical reactions that define interactions between plants and their environment. By centering attention on equations, it is easy to lose sight of the intricate and complex nature of the problem. The particular chapter describes the anatomy of important plant features and briefly discuss some physiological principles that will help to visualize and perceive the conditions which are represented in the models. Because of the many competing interactions, the fate of chemicals in the soil/plant/air environment is not obvious. Models were thus developed to intelligently integrate available knowledge, to increase understanding of the complex interactions, to aid in presentation of plant functions, and to help make predictions about chemical fate.