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Sample records for boks jhannes sigurjnsson

  1. BOK-Printed Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffarian, Reza

    2013-01-01

    The use of printed electronics technologies (PETs), 2D or 3D printing approaches either by conventional electronic fabrication or by rapid graphic printing of organic or nonorganic electronic devices on various small or large rigid or flexible substrates, is projected to grow exponentially in commercial industry. This has provided an opportunity to determine whether or not PETs could be applicable for low volume and high-reliability applications. This report presents a summary of literature surveyed and provides a body of knowledge (BOK) gathered on the current status of organic and printed electronics technologies. It reviews three key industry roadmaps- on this subject-OE-A, ITRS, and iNEMI-each with a different name identification for this emerging technology. This followed by a brief review of the status of the industry on standard development for this technology, including IEEE and IPC specifications. The report concludes with key technologies and applications and provides a technology hierarchy similar to those of conventional microelectronics for electronics packaging. Understanding key technology roadmaps, parameters, and applications is important when judicially selecting and narrowing the follow-up of new and emerging applicable technologies for evaluation, as well as the low risk insertion of organic, large area, and printed electronics.

  2. Burrell-Optical-Kepler Survey (BOKS) II: Early Variability Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Steve B.; Feldmeier, J.; von Braun, K.; Everett, M.; Mihos, C.; Harding, P.; Knox, C.; Sherry, W.; Lee, T.; Ciardi, D.; Rudick, C.; Proctor, M.; van Belle, G.

    2006-12-01

    We present preliminary results for the photometric time-series data obtained with the BOKS survey (see BOKS I poster Feldmeier et al.). The BOKS survey covers about 1 square degree in the constellation of Cygnus. We obtained nearly 2000 SDSS r-band images spanning a total time period of 39 days. Each point source in our BOKS survey is also present in the single epoch, 7-color photometric survey catalogue being produced by the NASA Discovery program Kepler mission. Light curves of approximately 60,000 point sources, spanning r=14 to 20, are examined and discussed. We will present variability demographics for the BOKS survey including characterization of the light curves into variable classes based on type, color, amplitude, and any extra-solar planet transit candidates.

  3. Placental autophagy regulation by the BOK-MCL1 rheostat.

    PubMed

    Kalkat, Manpreet; Garcia, Julia; Ebrahimi, Jessica; Melland-Smith, Megan; Todros, Tullia; Post, Martin; Caniggia, Isabella

    2013-12-01

    Autophagy is the catabolic degradation of cellular cytoplasmic constituents via the lysosomal pathway that physiologically elicits a primarily cytoprotective function, but can rapidly be upregulated in response to stressors thereby inducing cell death. We have reported that the balance between the BCL2 family proteins BOK and MCL1 regulates human trophoblast cell fate and its alteration toward cell death typifies preeclampsia. Here we demonstrate that BOK is a potent inducer of autophagy as shown by increased LC3B-II production, autophagosomal formation and lysosomal activation in HEK 293. In contrast, using JEG3 cells we showed that prosurvival MCL1 acts as a repressor of autophagy via an interaction with BECN1, which is abrogated by BOK. We found that MCL1-cleaved products, specifically MCL1c157, trigger autophagy while the splicing variant MCL1S has no effect. Treatment of JEG3 cells with nitric oxide donor SNP resulted in BOK-MCL1 rheostat dysregulation, favoring BOK accumulation, thereby inducing autophagy. Overexpression of MCL1 rescued oxidative stress-induced autophagy. Of clinical relevance, we report aberrant autophagy levels in the preeclamptic placenta due to impaired recruitment of BECN1 to MCL1. Our data provided the first evidence for a key role of the BOK-MCL1 system in regulating autophagy in the human placenta, whereby an adverse environment as seen in preeclampsia tilts the BOK-MCL1 balance toward the build-up of isoforms that triggers placental autophagy.

  4. On the origins of polarization holes in Bok globules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauer, R.; Wolf, S.; Reissl, S.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Polarimetric observations of Bok globules frequently show a decrease in the degree of polarization towards their central dense regions (polarization holes). This behaviour is usually explained with increased disalignment owing to high density and temperature, or insufficient angular resolution of a possibly complex magnetic field structure. Aims: We investigate whether a significant decrease in polarized emission of dense regions in Bok globules is possible under certain physical conditions. For instance, we evaluate the impact of optical depth effects and various properties of the dust phase. Methods: We use radiative transfer modelling to calculate the temperature structure of an analytical Bok globule model and simulate the polarized thermal emission of elongated dust grains. For the alignment of the dust grains, we consider a magnetic field and include radiative torque and internal alignment. Results: Besides the usual explanations, selected conditions of the temperature and density distribution, the dust phase and the magnetic field are also able to significantly decrease the polarized emission of dense regions in Bok globules. Taking submm/mm grains and typical column densities of existing Bok globules into consideration, the optical depth is high enough to decrease the degree of polarization by up to ΔP ~ 10%. If limited to the densest regions, dust grain growth to submm/mm size and accumulated graphite grains decrease the degree of polarization by up to ΔP ~ 10% and ΔP ~ 5%, respectively. However, the effect of the graphite grains occurs only if they do not align with the magnetic field.

  5. Burrell-Optical-Kepler Survey (BOKS) I: Survey Description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmeier, John J.; Howell, S.; Harding, P.; Mihos, C.; Rudick, C.; Sherry, W.; Lee, T.; Knox, C.; Ciardi, D.; von Braun, K.; Everett, M.; Proctor, M.; van Belle, G.

    2006-12-01

    The Burrell Optical Kepler Survey (BOKS) is a ground-based, high cadence, stellar variability survey over a portion of the planned science field for the Kepler mission. The survey was carried out at the 0.6m Burrell Schmidt telescope, with an observed field size of 1.36 square degrees. Over 60,000 stars were observed within the BOKS field in the SDSS r-band spanning a time period of 39 days, with a 4.5 minute cadence. We give a basic description of the survey, and calculate the observability function for stellar variablity of different types.

  6. Team Software Process (TSP) Body of Knowledge (BOK)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    Software Engineering Body of Knowledge (SWEBOK), 2004 Version • Project Management Institute’s A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge ( PMBOK ...Version and PMBOK Guide were influential in determining the document flow and delineation of components used in the description of the TSP BOK. The

  7. ISO Observations of Starless Bok Globules: Usually No Embedded Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemens, D.; Byrne, A.; Yun, J.; Kane, B.

    1996-01-01

    We have used ISOCAM to search the cores of a sample of small Bok globules previously classified to be mostly starless based on analysis of IRAS data. The ISO observations at 6.75microns (LW2 filter) and 14.5microns (LW3 filter) were sufficiently deep to enable detection of any low-mass hydrogen burning star or young stellar object (YSO) embedded in these globules. Of the 20 Bok globules observed by ISOCAM to date, we have reduced the data for 14. Of these, 13 show no evidence for faint red (S(sub v)(LW3) greater than S(sub v)(LW2)) stars missed by IRAS. One (CB68) does show the first mid-infrared detection of the very cool IRAS source toward this cloud, and may be a Class I or 0 YSO. We conclude, based on these new ISO observations, that Bok globules which have no IRAS sources are in general bona fide starless molecular clouds.

  8. Assessing Historically Black College and University (HBCU) Students' Familiarity with the FCS-BOK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sung-Jin; Williams-Wheeler, Meeshay; Walker, Jane

    2015-01-01

    University faculty who are teaching courses in family and consumer sciences (FCS) have sought to integrate the body of knowledge (BOK) in their curricula. This article reports on a study assessing the familiarity of Historically Black College and University (HBCU) students with the FCS-BOK by their major (specialized area) and classification…

  9. Improving Students' Familiarity with the Family and Consumer Sciences Body of Knowledge (FCS-BOK)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Jane; Williams-Wheeler, Meeshay; Lee, Sung-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Because the family and consumer sciences body of knowledge (FCS-BOK) is the framework for the profession, students' familiarity with the FCS-BOK has implications for the profession. Using pre- (N = 78) and posttest (N = 43) data from students enrolled in an "Introduction to Family and Consumer Sciences" (FCS 160) undergraduate student…

  10. The effectiveness of the nationwide BokSmart rugby injury prevention program on catastrophic injury rates.

    PubMed

    Brown, J C; Verhagen, E; Knol, D; Van Mechelen, W; Lambert, M I

    2016-02-01

    Rugby Union ("rugby") participants have a higher than average risk of injury compared with participants of other popular team sports. BokSmart, a nationwide injury prevention program was launched in South Africa in mid-2009, with the goal of reducing catastrophic head/neck (serious) injuries in players. The program provides injury prevention information to coaches and referees. This study investigated if BokSmart has been associated with a reduction in these injuries. The BokSmart program collected data on all South African rugby-related serious injuries since 2008. Using a Poisson regression, injury numbers were compared pre-BokSmart (2008-2009) to the years post-implementation (2010-2013). Player numbers were assumed to be constant throughout this evaluation: junior = 529,483; senior = 121,663. In junior players, the "post-BokSmart" period had 2.5 less annual serious injuries than "pre-BokSmart" (incidence rate ratio: 0.6, 95% confidence interval: 0.5-0.7, P < 0.000). In contrast, there was no significant difference in these periods in seniors. The absence of effect in seniors may be a result of fewer players or of differences in effectiveness of BokSmart in this group--future studies should investigate these questions.

  11. There is something about BOK we just don't get yet.

    PubMed

    Haschka, Manuel D; Villunger, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    Fernández-Marrero and colleagues show in their work that the proapoptotic BCL-2 family member BOK can form large, stable pores in artificial liposomes. This can be enhanced by the proapoptotic protein cBID and is unaffected by the antiapoptotic BCL-XL . Although BOK can bind to isolated mitochondria, it is unable to cause cytochrome c release even with the help of cBID.

  12. Molecular profiles and pathogen-induced transcriptional responses of prawn B cell lymphoma-2 related ovarian killer protein (BOK).

    PubMed

    Chaurasia, Mukesh Kumar; Palanisamy, Rajesh; Harikrishnan, Ramasamy; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Arockiaraj, Jesu

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we have reported a molecular characterization of the first B cell lymphoma-2 (BCL-2) related ovarian killer protein (BOK) from freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii (Mr). BOK is a novel pro-apoptotic protein of the BCL-2 family that entails in mediating apoptosis to remove cancer cells. A cDNA sequence of MrBOK was identified from the prawn cDNA library and its full length was obtained by internal sequencing. The coding region of MrBOK yields a polypeptide of 291 amino acids. The analysis revealed that MrBOK contains a transmembrane helix at V(261)-L(283) and a putative BCL-2 family domain at V(144)-W(245). MrBOK also possessed four putative BCL-2 homology domains including BH1, BH2, BH3 and weak BH4. The BH3 contains 21 binding sites and among them five residues are highly conserved with the aligned BOK proteins. The homology analysis showed that MrBOK shared maximum similarity with the Caligus rogercresseyi BOK A. The topology of the phylogenetic tree was classified into nine sister groups which includes BOK, BAK, BAX, BAD, BCL-2, BCL-XL, NR13 and MCL members. The BOK protein group further sub-grouped into vertebrate and invertebrate BOK, wherein MrBOK located within insect monophyletic clad of invertebrate BOK. The secondary structural analysis showed that MrBOK contains 11 α-helices (52.2%) which are connected over random coils (47.7%). The 3D structure of MrBOK showed three central helices (α6, α7 and α8) which formed the core of the protein and are flanked on one side by α1, α2 and α3, and on the other side by α4, α5 and α11. MrBOK mRNA is expressed most abundantly (P < 0.05) in ovary compared to other tissues taken for analysis. Hence ovary was selected to study the possible roles of MrBOK mRNA regulation upon bacterial (Aeromonas hydrophila and Vibrio harveyi) and viral [white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) and M. rosenbergii nodovirus] infection. During bacterial and viral infection, the highest MrBOK mRNA transcription was varied

  13. Bok globules in the far infrared: Constraining the origin of polarization holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauer, Robert

    Polarimetric observations of Bok globules at submm/mm wavelengths frequently show a decrease in the degree of polarization towards their central dense regions ("polarization holes", Henning et al. 2001; Vallee et al. 2003; Wolf et al. 2003). This behavior can be explained by multiple physical conditions and effects (Brauer et al. 2016). For instance, a high optical depth in the core of Bok globules is expected to significantly reduce the degree of polarization. However, the relative importance of the various effects has not been confirmed quantitatively. We investigate the influence of the optical depth on the occurrence of polarization holes in observations of Bok globules at 850 microns by comparing these with polarimetric observations at 154 microns and 214 microns. We will make use of HAWC+ polarimetric observations at 154 microns (D) and 214 microns (E) to obtain the orientation and degree of linear polarization in the central regions of the Bok globules CB199 (B335), CB68, and CB54. We will obtain the Stokes parameter I, Q and U of the central regions of the Bok globules B335, CB68, and CB54 to calculate the orientation and degree of the linear polarization. Taking these polarization observations and those already obtained at 850 microns into account, the relative importance of the optical depth effect can be estimated. In addition, we will compare the direction of the polarization vectors with observations of dichroic extinction of background stars to enhance our constraints on the optical depth (Bertrang et al. 2014).

  14. BCL-2 family member BOK promotes apoptosis in response to endoplasmic reticulum stress

    PubMed Central

    Carpio, Marcos A.; Michaud, Michael; Zhou, Wenping; Fisher, Jill K.; Walensky, Loren D.; Katz, Samuel G.

    2015-01-01

    B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL-2) ovarian killer (BOK) is a BCL-2 family protein with high homology to the multidomain proapoptotic proteins BAX and BAK, yet Bok−/− and even Bax−/−Bok−/− and Bak−/−Bok−/− mice were reported to have no overt phenotype or apoptotic defects in response to a host of classical stress stimuli. These surprising findings were interpreted to reflect functional compensation among the BAX, BAK, and BOK proteins. However, BOK cannot compensate for the severe apoptotic defects of Bax−/−Bak−/− mice despite its widespread expression. Here, we independently developed Bok−/− mice and found that Bok−/− cells are selectively defective in their response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress stimuli, consistent with the predominant subcellular localization of BOK at the ER. Whereas Bok−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts exposed to thapsigargin, A23187, brefeldin A, DTT, geldanamycin, or bortezomib manifested reduced activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, the death response to other stimuli such as etoposide, staurosporine, or UV remained fully intact. Multiple organs in Bok−/− mice exhibited resistance to thapsigargin-induced apoptosis in vivo. Although the ER stress agents activated the unfolded protein response, both ATF4 and CHOP activation were diminished in Bok−/− cells and mice. Importantly, BAX and BAK were unable to compensate for the defective apoptotic response to ER stress observed in SV40-transformed and primary Bok−/− cells, and in vivo. These findings support a selective and distinguishing role for BOK in regulating the apoptotic response to ER stress, revealing—to our knowledge—the first bona fide apoptotic defect linked to Bok deletion. PMID:26015568

  15. The Bok Award Presented for High School Astronomy Research at the Intel Science Fair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmany, Catharine D.

    2013-01-01

    The Priscilla and Bart Bok award, presented jointly by the Astronomical Society of the Pacific (ASP) and the American Astronomical Society (AAS) at the annual Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF), recognizes excellent research in astronomy conducted by high school students. The award is named in honor of two well-known astronomers. Bart Bok was an outstanding research astronomer: much of his research was done with his wife, Priscilla Fairfield Bok. Since 1992, the ASP and the AAS have shared the responsibility of sending three judges to the annual Intel ISEF to select two Bok awardees. Funds for the prizes themselves are derived from an endowment in Bart Bok’s honor held at the ASP. The Intel ISEF is a massive event. In order to become a finalist and attend ISEF, a student must first compete, and win one of the top awards, in both their local and regional science fairs. In recent years, about 1,500 high-school students have attended. About 100 of these students present projects in the category physics: of these, less than 20 are astronomy projects. Winners of the award are invited to attend the winter AAS meeting, and this year both of the 2012 winners are expected to be in attendance. There are also previous winners who are actively in our midst. But there is an unanswered question: why are there so few student projects in astronomy?

  16. C[superscript 2] = BOK: Two Apparel Studies' Capstone Courses Incorporating the Body of Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Kathleen R.; Apple, Laurie; Souhtward, Leigh

    2014-01-01

    Guided by the five cross-cutting themes of the American Association of Family & Consumer Sciences (AAFCS) Body of Knowledge (BOK) two capstone courses (C[superscript 2]) in Apparel Studies were designed to help prepare students for careers, further study, or both.

  17. THE KEPLER LIGHT CURVE OF THE UNIQUE DA WHITE DWARF BOKS 53856

    SciTech Connect

    Holberg, J. B.; Howell, Steve B. E-mail: howell@noao.edu

    2011-08-15

    The faint (g = 16.9) hot white dwarf BOKS 53856 was observed by the Kepler Mission in short cadence mode during mid-2009. Analysis of these observations reveals a highly stable modulation with a period of 6.1375 hr and a 2.46% half-amplitude. The folded light curve has an unusual shape that is difficult to explain in terms of a binary system containing an unseen companion more luminous than an L0 brown dwarf. Optical spectra of BOKS 53856 show a T{sub eff} = 34,000 K, log g = 8.0 DA white dwarf. There are few, if any, known white dwarfs in this temperature range exhibiting photometric variations similar to those we describe. A magnetic spin-modulated white dwarf model can in principle explain the light curve, an interpretation supported by spectral observations of the H{alpha} line showing evidence of Zeeman splitting.

  18. WNT signaling controls expression of pro-apoptotic BOK and BAX in intestinal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zeilstra, Jurrit; Joosten, Sander P.J.; Wensveen, Felix M.; Dessing, Mark C.; Schuetze, Denise M.; Eldering, Eric; Spaargaren, Marcel; Pals, Steven T.

    2011-03-04

    Research highlights: {yields} Intestinal adenomas initiated by aberrant activation of the WNT pathway displayed an increased sensitivity to apoptosis. {yields} Expression profiling of apoptosis-related genes in Apc{sup Min/+} mice revealed the differential expression of pro-apoptotic Bok and Bax. {yields} APC-mutant adenomatous crypts in FAP patients showed strongly increased BAX immunoreactivity. {yields} Blocking of {beta}-catenin/TCF-4-mediated signaling in colon cancer cells reduced the expression of BOK and BAX. -- Abstract: In a majority of cases, colorectal cancer is initiated by aberrant activation of the WNT signaling pathway. Mutation of the genes encoding the WNT signaling components adenomatous polyposis coli or {beta}-catenin causes constitutively active {beta}-catenin/TCF-mediated transcription, driving the transformation of intestinal crypts to cancer precursor lesions, called dysplastic aberrant crypt foci. Deregulated apoptosis is a hallmark of adenomatous colon tissue. However, the contribution of WNT signaling to this process is not fully understood. We addressed this role by analyzing the rate of epithelial apoptosis in aberrant crypts and adenomas of the Apc{sup Min/+} mouse model. In comparison with normal crypts and adenomas, aberrant crypts displayed a dramatically increased rate of apoptotic cell death. Expression profiling of apoptosis-related genes along the crypt-villus axis and in Apc mutant adenomas revealed increased expression of two pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members in intestinal adenomas, Bok and Bax. Analysis of the colon of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) patients along the crypt-to-surface axis, and of dysplastic crypts, corroborated this expression pattern. Disruption of {beta}-catenin/TCF-4-mediated signaling in the colorectal cancer cell line Ls174T significantly decreased BOK and BAX expression, confirming WNT-dependent regulation in intestinal epithelial cells. Our results suggest a feedback mechanism by which

  19. Anthocyanin accumulation and transcriptional regulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis in purple bok choy (Brassica rapa var. chinensis).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanjie; Chen, Guoping; Dong, Tingting; Pan, Yu; Zhao, Zhiping; Tian, Shibing; Hu, Zongli

    2014-12-24

    Bok choy (Brassica rapa var. chinensis) is an important dietary vegetable cultivated and consumed worldwide for its edible leaves. The purple cultivars rich in health-promoting anthocyanins are usually more eye-catching and valuable. Fifteen kinds of anthocyanins were separated and identified from a purple bok choy cultivar (Zi He) by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. To investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying anthocyanin accumulation in bok choy, the expression profiles of anthocyanin biosynthetic and regulatory genes were analyzed in seedlings and leaves of the purple cultivar and the green cultivar (Su Zhouqing). Compared with the other tissues, BrTT8 and most of the anthocyanin biosynthetic genes were significantly up-regulated in the leaves and light-grown seedlings of Zi He. The results that heterologous expression of BrTT8 promotes the transcription of partial anthocyanin biosynthetic genes in regeneration shoots of tomato indicate that BrTT8 plays an important role in the regulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis.

  20. BOKS 45906: a CV with an Orbital Period of 56.6 Min in the Kepler Field?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsay, Gavin; Howell, Steve B.; Wood, Matt A.; Smale, Alan; Barclay, Thomas; Seebode, Sally A.; Gelino, Dawn; Still, Martin; Cannizzo, John K.

    2013-01-01

    BOKS 45906 was found to be a blue source in the Burrell-Optical-Kepler Survey which showed a 3 magnitude outburst lasting approximately 5 days. We present the Kepler light curve of this source which covers nearly 3 years. We find that it is in a faint optical state for approximately half the time and shows a series of outbursts separated by distinct dips in flux. Using data with 1 minute sampling, we find clear evidence that in its low state BOKS 45906 shows a flux variability on a period of 56.5574 plus or minus 0.0014 minutes and a semi-amplitude of approximately 3 percent. Since we can phase all the 1 minute cadence data on a common ephemeris using this period, it is probable that 56.56 minutes is the binary orbital period. Optical spectra of BOKS 45906 show the presence of Balmer lines in emission indicating it is not an AM CVn (pure Helium) binary. Swift data show that it is a weak X-ray source and is weakly detected in the bluest of the UVOT filters. We conclude that BOKS 45906 is a cataclysmic variable with a period shorter than the 'period-bounce' systems and therefore BOKS 45906 could be the first helium-rich cataclysmic variable detected in the Kepler field.

  1. Effects of endocrine disruptor di-n-butyl phthalate on the growth of Bok choy (Brassica rapa subsp. chinensis).

    PubMed

    Liao, Chien-Sen; Yen, Jui-Hung; Wang, Yei-Shung

    2006-12-01

    The effects of the endocrine disrupter, di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP), on the growth of leaf vegetable Bok choy (Brassica rapa subsp. chinensis, white stem Bok choy) were investigated. The results showed that leaves of Bok choy became white in color with the occurrence of chlorosis and necrosis upon treating with 30 mg l(-1) DBP for 42 days. Transmission electron microscopic images revealed that changes in the chloroplast structures accompanied the chlorosis. In addition, a decrease in biomass and chlorophyll, and accumulation of DBP, were found in DBP-treated Bok choy. The growth and morphology of Bok choy showed a significant dose-response relationship upon treatment with DBP in a hydroponic culture medium. The proteome of the leaf tissue was analyzed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry (MS). Six protein spots were identified in 2-DE that showed reproducible differences in expression between the normal control and the DBP-treated sample. Based on proteome level studies two protein spots increased and were identified as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase 21 precursor. These proteins are believed to increase in expression in response to free radical exposure as a detoxification mechanism. The other four protein spots that disappeared on treatment with DBP were identified as heat shock cognate protein 80, protein disulfide isomerase precursor, apocytochrome f precursor, and RNA polymerase beta subunit. The first two play an important role in polypeptide folding, the third is associated with electron transport, and the last has a critical function in DNA transcription. This study indicated that DBP affects the proteome formation as well as the physiology and the morphology of Bok choy during growth. The decrease in those four proteins might be related to the growth and development of a plant.

  2. Hazard map of agricultural products due to typhoons-an example of Bok-choy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yong-Jun; Ma, Kuo-Chen; Lai, Jihn-Sung; Chang, Tsang-Jung; Tan, Yih-Chi

    2015-04-01

    The torrential rain and strong wind brought by typhoons usually cause huge damages to agricultural products. This study aims at hazard map of agricultural products due to typhoons. The factors affecting the hazard of agricultural products due to typhoons include the duration of flooding, flooding depth, wind speed, and rainfall intensity. High rainfall intensity and high wind speed may knock down the leaves or fruits of the plants. The long-duration of flooding or high flooding depth may chock the plant or rotten the roots. In order to get the information needed for making hazard map due to assumed scenarios, an overland flow simulations is performed for getting the duration of flooding and maximum flooding in the study area. The data of wind speed is obtained from metrological stations. Four levels of hazard are defined due to the characteristic of the chosen agricultural products- Bok-choy (such average height of mature Bok-choy). The final goal of this study is to establish a real-time hazard evaluation system for the specific agricultural products.

  3. A Spectral and Lightcurve Study of 50+ Blue Stars from the Burrell-Optical-Kepler-Survey (BOKS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalmansingh, Jared; Howell, S.; Walter, D.; Cash, J.; Mighell, K.

    2011-01-01

    BOKS used the 0.6 m Burrell-Schmidt telescope over a period of 40 nights and identified 54,687 stars between 14 < r < 19 in the Kepler Mission's field of view. Its primary goal was to detect Jupiter-sized and Hot Jupiter (Period = 3 - 9 days) short-period exoplanets within the survey field as well as to compile high precision stellar variability data that the Kepler Mission can use for comparison purposes and to characterize the hundreds of other variable stars within the survey region. We present the spectral classifications and light curve analysis of a sub-sample of 50+ blue stars within the BOKS field of view using BOKS lightcurve data and spectra from the Kitt Peak 2.1 meter telescope. The purpose of this study is to identify the variability of and provide characterization for the blue star population within the BOKS field. Support for this work was provided by NOAO and the NSF PAARE program to South Carolina State University under award AST-0750814.

  4. Jeans analysis of Bok globules in {\\varvec{f(R)}} gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainio, Jaakko; Vilja, Iiro

    2016-10-01

    We examine the effects of f( R) gravity on Jeans analysis of collapsing dust clouds. We provide a method for testing modified gravity models by their effects on star formation as the presence of f(R) gravity is found to modify the limit for collapse. In this analysis we add perturbations to a de Sitter background. As the standard Einstein-Hilbert Lagrangian is modified, new types of dynamics emerge. Depending on the characteristics of a chosen f( R) model, the appearance of new limits is possible. The physicality of these limits is further examined. We find the asymptotic Jeans masses for f( R) theories compared to standard Jeans mass. Through this ratio, the effects of the f( R) modified Jeans mass for viable theories are examined in molecular clouds. Bok globules have a mass range comparable to Jeans masses in question and are therefore used for comparing different f( R) models. Viable theories are found to assist in star formation.

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Bok globule BHR 160 radio lines spectra (Haikala+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haikala, L. K.; Reipurth, B.

    2016-11-01

    Radio spectral lines in maps covering approximately 2' by 2' with 20" spacing and a tilt of 60 degrees of the Bok globule BHR160 are presented. The spectra were obtained at Swedish ESO Submillimetre Telescope (SEST) in 1999. The observed molecular lines were 12CO(1-0), 12CO(2-1), 13CO(1-0), 13CO (2-1), C18O(1-0), C18O(2-1), CS(2-1) and CS(3-2). The SEST 2 and 3mm SESIS and 1 and 3mm IRAM dual SIS SSB receivers and the high resolution 2000 channel AOS spectrometer (channel spacing 41.711kHz) were used. The spectrometer was split into two to observe both channels simultaneously. The observations were made in the frequency switch mode. The switch was 5MHz (the 3mm channels) and 15MHz (the 1 and 2mm channels). The calibration was obtained using the chopper wheel method. The temperature scale of the spectra is in Ta* units, i.e. corrected to outside of the atmosphere but not for beam coupling. The 12CO spectra have been processed to correct for the artefact produced by the frequency switching method by the atmospheric CO and the -5km/s component (12CO (1-0)) and the -5km/s velocity component (12CO(2-1). The spectra are presented in 9 binary table FITS files. (10 data files).

  6. Fitting a Turbulent Cloud Model to CO Observations of Starless Bok Globules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegmann, M.; Hengel, C.; Röllig, M.; Kegel, W. H.

    We present observations of five starless Bok globules in transitions of 12CO (J=2-1 and {J=3-2}), 13CO (J=2-1), and C18O (J=2-1) which have been obtained at the Heinrich-Hertz-Telescope. For an analysis of the data we use the model of Kegel et al. (see e.g. Piehler & Kegel 1995, A&A 297, 841; Hegmann & Kegel 2000, A&A 359, 405) which describes an isothermal sphere stabilized by turbulent and thermal pressure. This approach deals with the full NLTE radiative transfer problem and accounts for a turbulent velocity field with finite correlation length. By a comparison of observed and calculated line profiles we are able not only to determine the kinetic temperature, hydrogen density and CO coloumn density of the globules, but also to study the properties of the turbulent velocity field, i.e. the variance of its one-point-distribution and its correlation length. We consider our model to be an alternative tool for the evaluation of molecular lines emitted by molecular clouds. The model assumptions are certainly closer to reality than the assumptions behind the standard evaluation models, as for example the LVG model. Our current study shows that that the results obtained from our model can differ significantly from those obtained from a LVG analysis.

  7. Discovery of a Hot Corino in the Bok Globule B335

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Muneaki; Sakai, Nami; Oya, Yoko; López-Sepulcre, Ana; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Lefloch, Bertrand; Caux, Emmanuel; Vastel, Charlotte; Kahane, Claudine; Sakai, Takeshi; Hirota, Tomoya; Aikawa, Yuri; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2016-10-01

    We report the first evidence of a hot corino in a Bok globule. This is based on ALMA observations in the 1.2 mm band toward the low-mass Class 0 protostar IRAS 19347+0727 in B335. Saturated complex organic molecules (COMs), CH3CHO, HCOOCH3, and NH2CHO, are detected in a compact region within a few 10 au around the protostar. Additionally, CH3OCH3, C2H5OH, C2H5CN, and CH3COCH3 are tentatively detected. Carbon-chain related molecules, CCH and c-C3H2, are also found in this source, whose distributions are extended over a scale of a few 100 au. On the other hand, sulfur-bearing molecules CS, SO, and SO2 have both compact and extended components. Fractional abundances of the COMs relative to H2 are found to be comparable to those in known hot corino sources. Though the COMs lines are as broad as 5-8 km s-1, they do not show obvious rotation motion in the present observation. Thus, the COMs mainly exist in a structure whose distribution is much smaller than the synthesized beam (0.″58 × 0.″52).

  8. Analysis of genetic diversity of Brassica rapa var. chinensis using ISSR markers and development of SCAR marker specific for Fragrant Bok Choy, a product of geographic indication.

    PubMed

    Shen, X L; Zhang, Y M; Xue, J Y; Li, M M; Lin, Y B; Sun, X Q; Hang, Y Y

    2016-04-25

    Non-heading Chinese cabbage [Brassica rapa var. chinensis (Linnaeus) Kitamura] is a popular vegetable and is also used as a medicinal plant in traditional Chinese medicine. Fragrant Bok Choy is a unique accession of non-heading Chinese cabbage and a product of geographic indication certified by the Ministry of Agriculture of China, which is noted for its rich aromatic flavor. However, transitional and overlapping morphological traits can make it difficult to distinguish this accession from other non-heading Chinese cabbages. This study aimed to develop a molecular method for efficient identification of Fragrant Bok Choy. Genetic diversity analysis, based on inter-simple sequence repeat molecular markers, was conducted for 11 non-heading Chinese cabbage accessions grown in the Yangtze River Delta region. Genetic similarity coefficients between the 11 accessions ranged from 0.5455 to 0.8961, and the genetic distance ranged from 0.0755 to 0.4475. Cluster analysis divided the 11 accessions into two major groups. The primer ISSR-840 amplified a fragment specific for Fragrant Bok Choy. A pair of specific sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) primers based on this fragment amplified a target band in Fragrant Bok Choy individuals, but no band was detected in individuals of other accessions. In conclusion, this study has developed an efficient strategy for authentication of Fragrant Bok Choy. The SCAR marker described here will facilitate the conservation and utilization of this unique non-heading Chinese cabbage germplasm resource.

  9. SUBMILLIMETER ARRAY AND SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF BOK GLOBULE CB 17: A CANDIDATE FIRST HYDROSTATIC CORE?

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xuepeng; Arce, Hector G.; Dunham, Michael M.; Zhang Qizhou; Bourke, Tyler L.; Launhardt, Ralf; Schmalzl, Markus; Henning, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    We present high angular resolution Submillimeter Array (SMA) and Spitzer observations toward the Bok globule CB 17. SMA 1.3 mm dust continuum images reveal within CB 17 two sources with an angular separation of {approx}21'' ({approx}5250 AU at a distance of {approx}250 pc). The northwestern continuum source, referred to as CB 17 IRS, dominates the infrared emission in the Spitzer images, drives a bipolar outflow extending in the northwest-southeast direction, and is classified as a low-luminosity Class 0/I transition object (L{sub bol} {approx} 0.5 L{sub Sun }). The southeastern continuum source, referred to as CB 17 MMS, has faint dust continuum emission in the SMA 1.3 mm observations ({approx}6{sigma} detection; {approx}3.8 mJy), but is not detected in the deep Spitzer infrared images at wavelengths from 3.6 to 70 {mu}m. Its bolometric luminosity and temperature, estimated from its spectral energy distribution, are {<=}0.04 L{sub Sun} and {<=}16 K, respectively. The SMA CO (2-1) observations suggest that CB 17 MMS may drive a low-velocity molecular outflow ({approx}2.5 km s{sup -1}), extending in the east-west direction. Comparisons with prestellar cores and Class 0 protostars suggest that CB 17 MMS is more evolved than prestellar cores but less evolved than Class 0 protostars. The observed characteristics of CB 17 MMS are consistent with the theoretical predictions from radiative/magnetohydrodynamical simulations of a first hydrostatic core, but there is also the possibility that CB 17 MMS is an extremely low luminosity protostar deeply embedded in an edge-on circumstellar disk. Further observations are needed to study the properties of CB 17 MMS and to address more precisely its evolutionary stage.

  10. Study of magnetic field geometry and extinction in Bok globule CB130

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, A.; Das, H. S.

    2016-09-01

    We trace the peripheral magnetic field structure of Bok globule CB130 by estimating the linear polarization of its field stars in the R band. The magnetic field orientation sampled by these stars, aligned on average among themselves, and the polarization produced within the cloud has a different direction from that of Galactic plane with an offset of 53°. The offset between minor axis and the mean magnetic field of CB130 is found to be 80°. The estimated strength of the magnetic field in the plane-of-the-sky is ˜116±19 μG. We constructed the visual extinction map using the Near Infrared Color Excess (NICE) method to see the dust distribution around CB130. Contours of Herschel (Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA) SPIRE 500 μm dust continuum emission map of this cloud is over-plotted on the visual extinction map, which shows that the regions having higher optical extinction correspond to higher densities of dust. Three distinct high dust density cores (named as C1, C2, and C3) are identified in the extinction map. It is observed that the cores C1 and C3 are located close to two previously known cores CB130-1 and CB130-2, respectively. Estimates of visual extinction of some moderately obscured stars of CB130 are made utilizing near-infrared photometry. It is observed that there is a feeble dependence of polarization on extinction, and the polarization efficiency (defined as p/AV) of the dust grains decreases with the increase in extinction.

  11. Relationships between soil properties and toxicity of copper and nickel to bok choy and tomato in Chinese soils.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Zhang, Hongtao; Ma, Yibing; McLaughlin, Mike J

    2013-10-01

    The toxicity of copper (Cu) and nickel (Ni) to bok choy and tomato shoot growth was investigated in a wide range of Chinese soils with and without leaching with artificial rainwater. The results showed that the variations of Ni toxicity induced by soil properties were wider than those of Cu toxicity to both tomato and bok choy plant growth. Leaching generally decreased the toxicity of Cu and Ni added to soils, which also depended on soils, metals, and test plant species. Soil factors controlling metal phytotoxicity were found to be soil pH and soil organic carbon content for Cu, and soil pH for Ni. It was also found that soil pH had stronger effects on Ni toxicity than on Cu toxicity. Predictive toxicity models based on these soil factors were developed. These toxicity models for Cu and Ni toxicity to tomato plant growth were validated using an independent data set for European soils. These models could be applied to predict the Cu and Ni phytotoxicity in not only Chinese soils but also European soils.

  12. A characterization of young stellar objects in BOK globules: Infrared imaging, spectral energy distributions, and molecular outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Joao Lin

    1993-09-01

    A large-scale observational study of star formation in Bok globules is presented. A sample of 248 optically selected, small molecular clouds (mostly Bok globules) was probed using IRAS co-added images to search for associated young stellar objects (YSO's). Fifty-seven of the globules show evidence for a total of 72 point sources near locations of local dust heating. A sub-sample of 41 globules was observed, in the CO J = 1-0 line, to search for molecular outflows associated with the YSO's. Outflows were found in about one-third of the sample (14 of 41). The presence of an outflow was found to be correlated with the value of the IRAS-based spectral index (between 12 and 25 microns) of the YSO's. A near-infrared imaging survey of 34 globules containing YSO-candidates was conducted in the J, H, and K bands using infrared arrays. Eleven YSO-candidates displayed near-infrared nebulosities. This group of objects, when ordered by their values of the 12/25 microns spectral index, seems to form an evolutionary sequence, from younger objects with negative (red) indices and whose nebulosities are brighter in the K-band, to objects in later stages of pre-main-sequence evolution with positive (bluer) indices and whose nebular emission is brighter in the J-band. Comparison of the morphology of the infrared nebulae with the corresponding CO outflow morphology supports the idea that infrared reflection nebulae, seen at 2.2 microns, are good morphological tracers of CO mass outflow, and that CO outflows occur during the earliest YSO phases. Photometry of the near-infrared counterparts of the YSO-candidates was combined with their IRAS fluxes to yield broad-band spectral energy distributions (SED's). The broadness and steepness of the SED's indicated clear evidence of the evolutionary stage of the objects confirming their youth. Given all of the new information obtained, a firm conclusion emerged, namely that Bok globules are active sites of low-mass star formation.

  13. Polarimetría multicolor en dirección a un glóbulo de Bok

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, J. R.; Morras, R.; Arnal, E. M.

    Presentamos resultados de observaciones polarimétricas UBVRI en 65 estrellas muy débiles localizadas en el campo de un Glóbulo de Bok carente de anterior análisis observacional. Los resultados muestran un alto y uniforme grado de polarización --sobre todo en las bandas V, R e I-- en casi todas las estrellas de la muestra, así como una alineación del campo magnético proyectado en torno a la nube similar al del campo magnético general. Adicionalmente, estudiamos la posible conexión con la emisión en el infrarrojo a través de las observaciones del satélite IRAS.

  14. LOOKING INTO THE HEARTS OF BOK GLOBULES: MILLIMETER AND SUBMILLIMETER CONTINUUM IMAGES OF ISOLATED STAR-FORMING CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Launhardt, R.; Henning, Th.; Khanzadyan, T.; Schmalzl, M.; Wolf, S.; Nutter, D.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Bourke, T. L.; Zylka, R.

    2010-05-15

    We present the results of a comprehensive infrared, submillimeter, and millimeter continuum emission study of isolated low-mass star-forming cores in 32 Bok globules, with the aim to investigate the process of star formation in these regions. The submillimeter and millimeter dust continuum emission maps together with the spectral energy distributions are used to model and derive the physical properties of the star-forming cores, such as luminosities, sizes, masses, densities, etc. Comparisons with ground-based near-infrared and space-based mid- and far-infrared images from Spitzer are used to reveal the stellar content of the Bok globules, association of embedded young stellar objects (YSOs) with the submillimeter dust cores, and the evolutionary stages of the individual sources. Submillimeter dust continuum emission was detected in 26 out of the 32 globule cores observed. For 18 globules with detected (sub)millimeter cores, we derive evolutionary stages and physical parameters of the embedded sources. We identify nine starless cores, most of which are presumably prestellar, nine Class 0 protostars, and twelve Class I YSOs. Specific source properties like bolometric temperature, core size, and central densities are discussed as a function of evolutionary stage. We find that at least two thirds (16 out of 24) of the star-forming globules studied here show evidence of forming multiple stars on scales between 1000 and 50,000 AU. However, we also find that most of these small prototstar and star groups are comprised of sources with different evolutionary stages, suggesting a picture of slow and sequential star formation in isolated globules.

  15. Spacewatch Astrometry of Asteroids and Comets with the Bok 2.3-m and Mayall 4-m Telescopes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scotti, James V.; McMillan, Robert S.; Larsen, Jeffrey A.

    2014-11-01

    We use the Bok 2.3-m and Mayall 4-m telescopes on Kitt Peak to improve knowledge of the orbits and magnitudes of high priority classes of Near Earth Objects (NEOs) and other small bodies in need of recovery that cannot be reached with the Spacewatch 0.9-m and 1.8-m telescopes. Targets include NEOs with potential close encounters with Earth (Virtual Impactors; VIs), future targets of radar, NEOs previously detected by NEOWISE with orbits or albedos suggesting potential for cometary activity, potential destinations for spacecraft, returning NEOs with hard-won albedos and diameters determined by NEOWISE, and faint Potentially Hazardous Asteroids (PHAs). Notable targets successfully recovered include the Earth Trojan 2010 TK7 and the faint almost-lost VI 2011 BY24 discovered by NEOWISE. Between 2010 June 6 and 2014 July 23 the MPC accepted 1316 lines of astrometry by us with these telescopes on 207 different NEOs including 84 PHAs. We made 343 observations of PHAs with V>=22. Our average arc extension on large PHAs (with H<=17.75) is 184 days, which is 2x longer than the next most effective observing station. Recently with all four telescopes Spacewatch has made 39% of all the observations of PHAs that were fainter than V=22 at the time of measurement. This count is twice that of the next most productive station in that measure. The faintest V magnitude we have observed so far is 24.4 and the smallest solar elongation angle at which we have observed is 46 degrees. Our work with the Mayall and Bok telescopes has been determined by the Minor Planet Center (MPC) to provide "dramatic improvement" to NEO orbits (T. Spahr, 2014 private communication). Support of Spacewatch was/is from JPL subcontract 100319 (2010-2011), NASA/NEOO grants NNG06GJ42G, NNX11AB52G, NNX12AG11G, NNX13AP99G, NNX14AL13G, and NNX14AL14G, the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, the Brinson Foundation of Chicago, IL, the estates of R. S. Vail and R. L. Waland, and other private donors. We are also indebted

  16. Determination of the physical parameters of Bok-globules by means of a stochastical radiative transfer method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hengel, C.; Hegmann, M.; Röllig, M.; Kegel, W. H.

    During the last years, one of the key projects of the Astrophysics group at the University of Frankfurt was the theoretical examination of the influence of turbulence and density fluctuations on the formation of interstellar molecular lines, especially CO lines (Albrecht & Kegel 1987, Kegel et al. 1993, Piehler & Kegel 1995, Hegmann 1999). Based on an approach by G. Traving and collaborators (cf. Gail et al. 1974), a numerical code has been developed to deal with the NLTE problem in an isothermal spherical cloud being stabelized by turbulent and thermal pressure, considering the turbulent velocity field to be stochastic. Our model has been primarily constructed to achieve theoretical insight in the fundamental mechanisms of line formation under more realistic conditions. In view of the stage of development, the model has actually reached, we seriously think of it as an alternative tool for the evaluation of molecular lines emitted by molecular clouds, especially as the model assumptions are certainly closer to reality than the assumptions behind the standard evaluation methods such as e. g. LVG analysis. The objects the physics of which we believe to be closest to our model assumptions are starless Bok globules. We thus have performed observations at the HHT, where we have collected data of five Bok globules in the CO(2-1), CO(3-2), 13CO(2-1) and C18O(2-1) lines. In my contribution I will adress the question, if and how the physical parameters derived by our analysis of the observational data (central H2 density, temperature, correlation length of the turbulent velocity field, and mean square turbulent velocity) differ from the results of an LVG analysis (they do!) and what these findings imply from a physical point of view as well as from a critical viewpoint on the practice of data evaluation. I will talk about problems of our model at its current stage and possible consequences for an improvement of the model, and I will finally give an outlook, how, with

  17. Voices in American Education: Conversations with Patricia Biehl, Derek Bok, Daniel Callahan, Robert Coles, Edwin Dorn, Georgie Anne Geyer, Henry Giroux, Ralph Ketcham, Christopher Lasch, Elizabeth Minnich, Frank Newman, Robert Payton, Douglas Sloan, and Manfred Stanley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murchland, Bernard

    Interviews expressing a variety of viewpoints on the present and future status of education on a national and global scale are offered by 14 major educators and public figures. The theme of educational reform frames each interview. Patricia Biehl reflects on the diminishing effectiveness of secondary education. Derek Bok favors the teaching of…

  18. The circumstellar disc in the Bok globule CB 26. Multi-wavelength observations and modelling of the dust disc and envelope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauter, J.; Wolf, S.; Launhardt, R.; Padgett, D. L.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.; Pinte, C.; Duchêne, G.; Ménard, F.; McCabe, C.-E.; Pontoppidan, K.; Dunham, M.; Bourke, T. L.; Chen, J.-H.

    2009-10-01

    Context: Circumstellar discs are expected to be the nursery of planets. Grain growth within such discs is the first step in the planet formation process. The Bok globule CB 26 harbours such a young disc. Aims: We present a detailed model of the edge-on circumstellar disc and its envelope in the Bok globule CB 26. Methods: The model is based on HST near-infrared maps in the I, J, H, and K bands, OVRO and SMA radio maps at 1.1 mm, 1.3 mm and 2.7 mm, and the spectral energy distribution (SED) from 0.9 {μ m} to 3 mm. New photometric and spectroscopic data from the Spitzer Space Telescope and the Caltech Submilimeter Observatory are also part of our analysis. Using the self-consistent radiative transfer code MC3D, the model we construct is able to discriminate between parameter sets and dust properties of both envelope and disc. Results: We find that the data are fit by a disc that has an inner hole with a radius of 45±5 AU. Based on a dust model including silicate and graphite, the maximum grain size needed to reproduce the spectral millimetre index is 2.5 {μ m}. Features seen in the near-infrared images, dominated by scattered light, can be described as a result of a rotating envelope. Conclusions: Successful employment of ISM dust in both the disc and envelope hint that grain growth may not yet play a significant role for the appearance of this system. A large inner hole implies that CB 26 is a circumbinary disc.

  19. Body of Knowledge (BOK) for Leadless Quad Flat No-Lead/bottom Termination Components (QFN/BTC) Package Trends and Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffarian, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Bottom terminated components and quad flat no-lead (BTC/QFN) packages have been extensively used by commercial industry for more than a decade. Cost and performance advantages and the closeness of the packages to the boards make them especially unique for radio frequency (RF) applications. A number of high-reliability parts are now available in this style of package configuration. This report presents a summary of literature surveyed and provides a body of knowledge (BOK) gathered on the status of BTC/QFN and their advanced versions of multi-row QFN (MRQFN) packaging technologies. The report provides a comprehensive review of packaging trends and specifications on design, assembly, and reliability. Emphasis is placed on assembly reliability and associated key design and process parameters because they show lower life than standard leaded package assembly under thermal cycling exposures. Inspection of hidden solder joints for assuring quality is challenging and is similar to ball grid arrays (BGAs). Understanding the key BTC/QFN technology trends, applications, processing parameters, workmanship defects, and reliability behavior is important when judicially selecting and narrowing the follow-on packages for evaluation and testing, as well as for the low risk insertion in high-reliability applications.

  20. Body of Knowledge (BOK) for Leadless Quad Flat No-Lead/Bottom Termination Components (QFN/BTC) Package Trends and Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffarian, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Bottom terminated components and quad flat no-lead (BTC/QFN) packages have been extensively used by commercial industry for more than a decade. Cost and performance advantages and the closeness of the packages to the boards make them especially unique for radio frequency (RF) applications. A number of high-reliability parts are now available in this style of package configuration. This report presents a summary of literature surveyed and provides a body of knowledge (BOK) gathered on the status of BTC/QFN and their advanced versions of multi-row QFN (MRQFN) packaging technologies. The report provides a comprehensive review of packaging trends and specifications on design, assembly, and reliability. Emphasis is placed on assembly reliability and associated key design and process parameters because they show lower life than standard leaded package assembly under thermal cycling exposures. Inspection of hidden solder joints for assuring quality is challenging and is similar to ball grid arrays (BGAs). Understanding the key BTC/QFN technology trends, applications, processing parameters, workmanship defects, and reliability behavior is important when judicially selecting and narrowing the follow-on packages for evaluation and testing, as well as for the low risk insertion in high-reliability applications.

  1. BOK-Underfill Optimization for FPGA Package/Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffarian, Reza

    2011-01-01

    Commercial-off-the-shelf area array package technologies in high-reliability versions are being considered for NASA electronic systems. These packages are prone to early failure due to the severe mechanical shock and vibration of launch, as well as other less severe conditions, such as mechanical loading during descent, rough terrain mobility, handling, and ground tests. As the density of these packages increases and the size of ball interconnections decrease, susceptibility to mechanical loading and cycling fatigue grows. This report presents a summary of the body of knowledge developed for the evaluation of area array packages and is based on surveys of literature from industry and academia. For high-reliability applications, the limited data that exists will be presented. Most data from industry deals with mechanical fatigue caused by four-point bend tests, as well as from drop tests for hand-held electronics; the most recent data will be presented, along with a brief background of prior literature. Understanding the key design guidelines and failure mechanisms from past tests is critical to developing an approach that will minimize future failures. Additional specific testing enables low-risk insertion of these advanced electronic packages.

  2. The Bok globule BHR 160: structure and star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haikala, L. K.; Reipurth, B.

    2017-01-01

    Context. BHR 160 is a virtually unstudied cometary globule within the Sco OB4 association in Scorpius at a distance of 1600 pc. It is part of a system of cometary clouds which face the luminous O star HD 155806. BHR 160 is special because it has an intense bright rim. Aims: We attempt to derive physical parameters for BHR 160 and to understand its structure and the origin of its peculiar bright rim. Methods: BHR 160 was mapped in the , and C18O(2-1) and (1-0) and CS (3-2) and (2-1) lines. These data, augmented with stellar photometry derived from the ESO VVV survey, were used to derive the mass and distribution of molecular material in BHR 160 and its surroundings. Archival mid-infrared data from the WISE satellite was used to find IR excess stars in the globule and its neighbourhood. Results: An elongated 1' by 0.´6 core lies adjacent to the globule bright rim. emission covers the whole globule, but the , C18Oand CS emission is more concentrated to the core. The line profiles indicate the presence of outflowing material near the core, but the spatial resolution of the mm data is not sufficient for a detailed spatial analysis. The BHR 160 mass estimated from the C18Omapping is100 ± 50 M⊙ (d/1.6 kpc)2 where d is the distance to the globule. Approximately 70% of the mass lies in the dense core. The total mass of molecular gas in the direction of BHR 160 is 210 ± 80 (d/1.6 kpc)2 M⊙ when estimated from the more extended VVV near-infrared photometry. We argue that the bright rim of BHR 160 is produced by a close-by early B-type star, HD 319648, that was likely recently born in the globule. This star is likely to have triggered the formation of a source, IRS 1, that is embedded within the core of the globule and detected only in Ks and by WISE and IRAS. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla or Paranal Observatories.Reduced molecular line spectra (The SEST spectra as FITS files) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/597/A118

  3. Body of Knowledge (BOK) for Copper Wire Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutkowski, E.; Sampson, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Copper wire bonds have replaced gold wire bonds in the majority of commercial semiconductor devices for the latest technology nodes. Although economics has been the driving mechanism to lower semiconductor packaging costs for a savings of about 20% by replacing gold wire bonds with copper, copper also has materials property advantages over gold. When compared to gold, copper has approximately: 25% lower electrical resistivity, 30% higher thermal conductivity, 75% higher tensile strength and 45% higher modulus of elasticity. Copper wire bonds on aluminum bond pads are also more mechanically robust over time and elevated temperature due to the slower intermetallic formation rate - approximately 1/100th that of the gold to aluminum intermetallic formation rate. However, there are significant tradeoffs with copper wire bonding - copper has twice the hardness of gold which results in a narrower bonding manufacturing process window and requires that the semiconductor companies design more mechanically rigid bonding pads to prevent cratering to both the bond pad and underlying chip structure. Furthermore, copper is significantly more prone to corrosion issues. The semiconductor packaging industry has responded to this corrosion concern by creating a palladium coated copper bonding wire, which is more corrosion resistant than pure copper bonding wire. Also, the selection of the device molding compound is critical because use of environmentally friendly green compounds can result in internal CTE (Coefficient of Thermal Expansion) mismatches with the copper wire bonds that can eventually lead to device failures during thermal cycling. Despite the difficult problems associated with the changeover to copper bonding wire, there are billions of copper wire bonded devices delivered annually to customers. It is noteworthy that Texas Instruments announced in October of 2014 that they are shipping microcircuits containing copper wire bonds for safety critical automotive applications. An evaluation of copper wire bond technology for applicability to spaceflight hardware may be warranted along with concurrently compiling a comprehensive understanding of the failure mechanisms involved with copper wire bonded semiconductor devices.

  4. SCAMPI Lead Appraiser (Service Mark) Body of Knowledge (SLA BOK)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    Competencies • CMP 3.2.2, Defining the appraisal team roles and responsibilities Examples • The initial set of appraisal team norms are agreed on...Competencies • CMP 3.1.1, Managing stakeholder involvement • CMP 3.2.2, Defining the appraisal team roles and responsibilities Examples • A site...appraisal team roles and responsibilities Associated Skills • Balancing appraisal team members’ workloads based on team member capabilities and

  5. Book of Knowledge (BOK) for NASA Electronic Packaging Roadmap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffarian, Reza

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this document is to update the NASA roadmap on packaging technologies (initially released in 2007) and to present the current trends toward further reducing size and increasing functionality. Due to the breadth of work being performed in the area of microelectronics packaging, this report presents only a number of key packaging technologies detailed in three industry roadmaps for conventional microelectronics and a more recently introduced roadmap for organic and printed electronics applications. The topics for each category were down-selected by reviewing the 2012 reports of the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductor (ITRS), the 2013 roadmap reports of the International Electronics Manufacturing Initiative (iNEMI), the 2013 roadmap of association connecting electronics industry (IPC), the Organic Printed Electronics Association (OE-A). The report also summarizes the results of numerous articles and websites specifically discussing the trends in microelectronics packaging technologies.

  6. Spitzer Observations of a 24 μm Shadow: Bok Globule CB 190

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutz, Amelia M.; Bieging, John H.; Rieke, George H.; Shirley, Yancy L.; Balog, Zoltan; Gordon, Karl D.; Green, Elizabeth M.; Keene, Jocelyn; Kelly, Brandon C.; Rubin, Mark; Werner, Michael W.

    2007-08-01

    We present Spitzer observations of the dark globule CB 190 (LDN 771). We observe a roughly circular 24 μm shadow with a 70" radius. The extinction profile of this shadow matches the profile derived from 2MASS photometry at the outer edges of the globule and reaches a maximum of ~32 visual magnitudes at the center. The corresponding mass of CB 190 is ~10 Msolar. Our 12CO and 13CO J=2-1 data over a 10'×10' region centered on the shadow show a temperature ~10 K. The thermal continuum indicates a similar temperature for the dust. The molecular data also show evidence of freezeout onto dust grains. We estimate a distance to CB 190 of 400 pc using the spectroscopic parallax of a star associated with the globule. Bonnor-Ebert fits to the density profile, in conjunction with this distance, yield ξmax=7.2, indicating that CB 190 may be unstable. The high temperature (56 K) of the best-fit Bonnor-Ebert model is in contradiction with the CO and thermal continuum data, leading to the conclusion that the thermal pressure is not enough to prevent free-fall collapse. We also find that the turbulence in the cloud is inadequate to support it. However, the cloud may be supported by the magnetic field, if this field is at the average level for dark globules. Since the magnetic field will eventually leak out through ambipolar diffusion, it is likely that CB 190 is collapsing or in a late precollapse stage. This work is based in part on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under NASA contract 1407.

  7. Burrell-Optical-Kepler Survey (BOKS): Exo-planet Search In Cygnus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, Amanda; Howell, S.; Sherry, W.; Everett, M.; von Braun, K.; Feldmeier, J.; BOKS Consortium

    2007-12-01

    We present the results of >20; continuous days of time series photometric observations of a 1.0 sq. deg field in Cygnus centered on the NASA Kepler Mission field of view. Using the Case Western Burrell Schmidt telescope located at Kitt Peak National Observatory we gathered a dataset containing light curves of roughly 30000 stars between 14

  8. Disciplinary Categories, Majors, and Undergraduate Academic Experiences: Rethinking Bok's "Underachieving Colleges" Thesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brint, Steven; Cantwell, Allison M.; Saxena, Preeta

    2012-01-01

    Using data from the 2008 University of California Undergraduate Experience Survey, we show that study time and academic conscientiousness were lower among students in humanities and social science majors than among students in science and engineering majors. Analytical and critical thinking experiences were no more evident among humanities and…

  9. THE BURRELL-OPTICAL-KEPLER-SURVEY (BOKS). I. SURVEY DESCRIPTION AND INITIAL RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Feldmeier, John J.; Kutsko, Rebecca M.; Howell, Steve B.; Sherry, William; Von Braun, Kaspar; Ciardi, David R.; Everett, Mark E.; Paul Harding; Mihos, J. Christopher; Rudick, Craig S.; Lee, Ting-Hui; Van Belle, Gerard T.

    2011-07-15

    We present the initial results of a 40 night contiguous ground-based campaign of time series photometric observations of a 1.39 deg{sup 2} field located within the NASA Kepler Mission field of view. The goal of this pre-launch survey was to search for transiting extrasolar planets and to provide independent variability information of stellar sources. We have gathered a data set containing light curves of 54,687 stars from which we have created a statistical sub-sample of 13,786 stars between 14 < r < 18.5 and have statistically examined each light curve to test for variability. We present a summary of our preliminary photometric findings including the overall level and content of stellar variability in this portion of the Kepler field and give some examples of unusual variable stars found within. We present a preliminary catalog of 2,457 candidate variable stars, of which 776 show signs of periodicity. We also present three potential exoplanet candidates, all of which should be observable by the Kepler mission.

  10. The Thumbprint nebula: The distribution of molecular gas and dust in a regular BOK globule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtinen, K.; Mattila, K.; Schnur, G. F. O.; Prusti, T.

    1995-03-01

    We have studied a regular bright-rimmed globule called Thumbprint Nebula, TPN, (size approximately 0.18 pc, distance approximately 200 pc) in millimeter molecular lines (CO isotopic lines), at optical wavelengths (scanned Schmidt plates) and at infrared wavelengths (IRAS maps and scans). The molecular line observations have been made with the Swedish-ESO Submillimeter Telescope (SEST) in (12)CO (J = 1-0) and (J = 2-1), (13)CO (J = 1-0) and (J = 2-1), C(18)O (J = 1-0), C(17)O (J = 1-0), CS (J = 2-1) and HNC (J = 1-0) transitions. These observations reveal a centrally condensed cloud with an excitation temperature of Tex approximately equal to 6.6 K, and a mass of 6 solar mass. There is indication of a cloud rotation with a rotation rate of approximately 0.6 km/s/pc, as measured using (13)CO lines. Optical surface brightness distribution as measured from blue and red European Southern Observatory (ESO/SRC) Schmidt plates has been used to determine the distribution of the dust particles in comparison with the distribution of the gas component. The position of the surface brightness minimum, which corresponds to the dust density maximum, is found to be about 40 sec to 50 sec north of the (13)CO and C(18)O column density maximum. We have made infrared surface brightness maps using the IRAS Sky Survey Atlas (ISSA) survey plates at 12, 25, 60 and 100 micrometers and extracted individual IRAS scans crossing the TPN. The globule is seen at 100 and 60 micrometers but the dust is apparently too cold to be visible at shorter wavelengths.

  11. Deriving the Age of an Individual WD: SDSS, Bok, USNO, and Bayes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    square degrees of sky and identified numerous WDs with Teff ≤ 6000. A subset of these WDs are high velocity objects that most likely belong to the...and identified numerous WDs with Teff ≤ 6000. A subset of these WDs are high velocity objects that most likely belong to the Galactic halo

  12. Academic Disciplines and the Undergraduate Experience: Rethinking Bok's "Underachieving Colleges" Thesis. SERU Project and Consortium Research Paper. Research & Occasional Paper Series: CSHE.6.11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brint, Steven; Cantwell, Allison M.

    2011-01-01

    Using data from the 2008 University of California Undergraduate Experience Survey, we show that study time and academic conscientiousness were lower among students in humanities and social science majors than among students in science and engineering majors. Analytical and critical thinking experiences were no more evident among humanities and…

  13. The Implications of the People’s Liberation Army’s Modernization for the Republic of Korea’s Security Policy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    for full-scale PSI (Proliferation Security Initiative). In addition, Myung Bok Bae, Hyung Kyu Choi , and Sae Jeong Jang note that China’s Ministry...10&Total_ID=3622502 (accessed May 27, 2009). 10 Myung Bok Bae, Hyung Kyu Choi , and Sae Jeong Jang, “Bulkoehan Jungguk ‘Bihaekhwa Yaksok Jikigo...2004. http://www.uscc.gov/annual_report/2004/04annual_report.pdf (accessed May 10, 2009). 82 E. NEWS ARTICLES Bae, Myung Bok , Choi

  14. Creating an Academy of Learning: Authentic Assessment, Peer Review, and the College and Work Readiness Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, John

    2010-01-01

    Most agree that schools have a special obligation to study the effectiveness of their educational programs and seek ways to improve student learning. Derek Bok, the former president of Harvard University, has persuasively argued that schools must envision themselves as "learning organizations." Like hospitals and businesses, Bok writes,…

  15. Promoting Strong Community Alliances with Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swafford, Melinda; Ramsey, Elizabeth; Self-Mullens, Lizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Family and consumer sciences (FCS) professionals utilize the body of knowledge (BOK) as they support individuals, families, and communities. The BOK uses an ecological perspective, with emphasis on individual and family well-being. This holistic approach identifies interdependence of the environmental layers that must be considered when analyzing…

  16. Phenolic component profiles of mustard greens, yu choy, and 15 other brassica vegetables.

    PubMed

    Lin, Long-Ze; Harnly, James M

    2010-06-09

    A liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) profiling method was used to characterize the phenolic components of 17 leafy vegetables from Brassica species other than Brassica oleracea. The vegetables studied were mustard green, baby mustard green, gai choy, baby gai choy, yu choy, yu choy tip, bok choy, bok choy tip, baby bok choy, bok choy sum, Taiwan bok choy, Shanghai bok choy, baby Shanghai bok choy, rapini broccoli, turnip green, napa, and baby napa. This work led to the tentative identification of 71 phenolic compounds consisting of kaempferol 3-O-diglucoside-7-O-glucoside derivatives, isorhamnetin 3-O-glucoside-7-O-glucoside hydroxycinnamoyl gentiobioses, hydroxycinnamoylmalic acids, and hydroxycinnamoylquinic acids. Ten of the compounds, 3-O-diacyltriglucoside-7-O-glucosides of kaempferol and quercetin, had not been previously reported. The phenolic component profiles of these vegetables were significantly different than those of the leafy vegetables from B. oleracea. This is the first comparative study of these leafy vegetables. Ten of the vegetables had never been previously studied by LC-MS.

  17. Phenolic Component Profiles of Mustard Greens, Yu Choy, and 15 Other Brassica Vegetables

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Long-Ze; Harnly, James M

    2013-01-01

    A liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC-MS) profiling method was used to characterize the phenolic components of 17 leafy vegetables from Brassica species other than Brassica oleracea. The vegetables studied were mustard green, baby mustard green, gai choy, baby gai choy, yu choy, yu choy tip, bok choy, bok choy tip, baby bok choy, bok choy sum, Taiwan bok choy, Shanghai bok choy, baby Shanghai bok choy, rapini broccoli, turnip green, napa, and baby napa. This work led to the tentative identification of 71 phenolic compounds consisting of kaempferol 3-O-diglucoside-7-O-glucoside derivatives, isorhamnetin 3-O-glucoside-7-O-glucoside hydroxycinnamoyl gentiobioses, hydroxycinnamoylmalic acids, and hydroxycinnamoylquinic acids. Ten of the compounds, 3-O-diacyltriglucoside-7-O-glucosides of kaempferol and quercetin, had not been previously reported. The phenolic component profiles of these vegetables were significantly different than those of the leafy vegetables from B. oleracea. This is the first comparative study of these leafy vegetables. Ten of the vegetables had never been previously studied by LC-MS. PMID:20465307

  18. The North Korean Ballistic Missile Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    Chŏn Tu- hwan) used the uprising as a pretext to oust President Choi Kyu Ha (Ch’oe Kyu-ha), who had succeeded Park in October 1979 but was a life...components and other sophisticated hardware for guidance systems. According to a North Korea defector (alias “Lee Bok Koo” or “Yi Bok -ku”) who claims to...the Nodong’s inertial guidance system, which is estimated to give the missile a circular error probable (CEP) of 2-4km.77 “Lee Bok Koo,” who defected

  19. Nutrition Guide for Toddlers

    MedlinePlus

    ... cooked dry beans, or 1 egg. continue Milk Matters Milks is an important part of a toddler's ... fortified breads and cereals, cooked dried beans, and dark green vegetables like broccoli, bok choy, and kale. ...

  20. For Strong Bones...For Lifelong Health...Milk Matters!

    MedlinePlus

    ... also get some of their needed calcium from dark green vegetables, such as spinach, broccoli, and bok ... fat-free string cheese. • Make a salad with dark green, leafy vegetables. • Serve broccoli or cooked, dry ...

  1. Cruciferous Vegetables and Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... cruciferous vegetables? Cruciferous vegetables are part of the Brassica genus of plants. They include the following vegetables, ... others: Arugula Bok choy Broccoli Brussels sprouts Cabbage Cauliflower Collard greens Horseradish Kale Radishes Rutabaga Turnips Watercress ...

  2. Automated Design Tools for Integrated Mixed-Signal Microsystems (NeoCAD)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    in equations (36) and (37) M N fn =k=5’bkjg(j Y- ajixi + a°J) + bok ;n = 1,2 (36) g(u) = (ex + e-X)/(ex - e-x (37) where, b and a are weights...shown in equation (41) M N f,’ (x) =- Y bkjg((J E ajixi +aOj)+ bok (41) k=1 j=1 g(x) = (ex - e-x)/(ex + ex) (42) where, a and b are weights associated...data for simulation of distributed interconnect networks," accepted for publication on IEEE Trans. Electromagnetic Compatibility, 2003. [4] K. L. Choi

  3. Time-Reversal Based Range Extension Technique for Ultra-wideband (UWB) Sensors and Applications in Tactical Communications and Networking

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-16

    Reference System for Communication in Random or Unknown Channels," IEEE Trans. Comm. Tech., vol. 13, pp. 293-301, September 1965. [28] J. Choi and W...Orthogonal Keyed ( BOK ) system, utilizing the quasi-orthogonal property of up and down chirps. In NSI|- 5.4. THE HISTORY OF CSS 79I I 800 600 ............ I 4 0...2500 3000 3500 4000 Time (ns) Figure 5.8: Normal match filter output with NBI, SIR = -20dB 1966, Hata [18] and Gott [19] independently proposed a BOK

  4. United States - Republic of Korea Security Relations: Policy/Strategy for the Future

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    bok , "Seoul-Moscow Normalization Only at Floating Stage," The Korea Times, 24 April 1990, p. 2. 7Edward A. Olsen, Prospects For An Increased Naval Role...2, No. 4, 1989. Kim, Sung- Bok . "Seoul-Moscow Normalization Only at Floating Stage." The Korea Herald, 24 April 1990, p. 2. Kinnard, Douglas. "The...Public and National Security Policy." Naval War College Review, Autumn 1989, pp. 66-82. Kwang, Soo Choi . "Korea’s Foreign Policy in the 1990’s." Korea

  5. Task Group on Increasing Diversity in DOD’s Flag and Senior Executive Ranks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-03-01

    Chairman, Community Outreach: Linda Griego Secretary: Joan Bok Treasurer: Dominic Tarantino Its General Counsel is Bettina B. Plevan, senior partner...Simmons College offers a liberal arts education for undergraduate women integrated with professional work experience, as well as, coeducational...graduate programs in health studies, education, liberal arts , communications management, social work, and library and information science. Simmons also

  6. The Impact of US Forces in Korea

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    and p. 10. 11; Dallin , Soviet Foreign Policy after Stalin, p. 87. 12. Park Tu-bok, Study of Reason for Red China’s Intervention in Korean War, pp...Co., 1983), p. 209. 5. Stanley R. Larsen and James L. Collines, Jr., Allied PartiCipation ill Vietnam (Washington, DC: Department of the Army, 1975

  7. Asian-South Pacific Bureau of Adult Education Courier No. 32.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ASPBAE Courier, 1984

    1984-01-01

    This issue is comprised of a series of articles dealing with adult education in Asia and the South Pacific. Included in the issue are the following articles: "Thoughts for the Advancement of Women's Project" by Sally Bruce Seddon; "Adult Education Program for Working Women in Kumi Industrial Area" by Yoon Bok-Nam; "Needs…

  8. PSN J11473508+5558147 is a Type Ib Supernova Near Maximum Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, D. C.; Sheehan, P.; McCarthy, D.; Follette, K.; Moustakas, J.; Cantillo, D.; Cazares-Kelly, A.; Cazares-Kelly, S.; Cendes, Y.; Damm, N.; Donati, A.; Douglas, E.; Ferrell, L.; Fosbiner-Elkins, H.; Fox, C.; Greenberg, M.; Hart, K.; Hensley, H.; Holt, A.; Hooper, E.; Juran, C.; Keane, J.; Key, K.; Korus, L.; Lee, T.; Leidig, K.; Merchak, E.; Nessmann, K.; Pendyala, S.; Pirkl, S.; Reeder, J.; Roos, A.; Rounseville, S.; Ruddy, E.; Schlingman, A.; Schlingman, W.; Schlingman, W.; Schwartzman, E.; Shanmugam, V.; Silver, E.; Stein, A.; Stock, N.; Svoboda, B.; Thomas, B.; Thomas, N.; Thompson-Taylor, K.; Walton, H.

    2015-06-01

    We report spectroscopic classification of PSN J11473508+5558147 through inspection of a low-dispersion optical spectrum (range 370-680 nm), obtained with the 2.3-m Bok telescope (+ Boller & Chivens spectrograph) at Kitt Peak on 2015 June 21 UT.

  9. 78 FR 78956 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... Corporation dba B.O Logistic Corp (NVO), 2461 W. 205th Street, B-105, Torrance, CA 90501, Officer: Bok Kun... Seahorse Container Lines, Inc. (NVO), 10731 Walker Street, Suite B, Cypress, CA 90630, Officers: Carlo De... I, Palo Alto, CA 94306, Officer: Xin You, President (QI), Application Type: New NVO License...

  10. The Feasibility of Event Sequence Discrimination for the Improvement of Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Sensitivity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-29

    Inst. and Meth. in Phys, Res. 223: 420-425; 1984. Mi86 Michel , C.; Emling, H.; Grosse, E.; Azgui, F.; Grein, H.; Wollersheim, H.J.; Gaardhoje, J.J...Behavior in an Elecrton Hole Plasma in Ge." Phys. Rev. Lett. 52: 1037-1040; 1984. Hu85 Hulin , D.; Coinbescot, M.; Bok, J.; Migus, A.; Antonetti, A.; Vinet

  11. Integrating the Family and Consumer Sciences Body of Knowledge into Higher Education: Eight AAFCS-Accredited Universities Explain Their Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reiboldt, Wendy; Stanley, M. Sue; Coffey, Kitty R.; Whaley, Heather M.; Yazedjian, Ani; Yates, Amy M.; Kihm, Holly; Wanga, Pamela E.; Martin, Lynda; Olle, Mary; Anderson, Melinda

    2016-01-01

    This article features eight AAFCS-accredited academic units in higher education that illustrate how the Family and Consumer Sciences Body of Knowledge (FCS-BOK) can be integrated into program curricula and educational procedures or structures. Contributors represent the following educational institutions (in alphabetical order): (1) California…

  12. Heart of the FCS Body of Knowledge: Relational Ethic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roubanis, Jody L.

    2016-01-01

    The Family and Consumer Sciences Body of Knowledge (FCS-BOK) provides an ideological stance that is universal to all practitioners of the profession, and it has major implications for the normative ethics that guide professional practice. The purpose of this article is to outline a conceptual framework to reveal the relational ethic inherent in…

  13. Side Effects of HIV Medicines: HIV and Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... include dark green leafy vegetables (such as collard greens, bok choy, spinach, and kale), broccoli, sardines, tofu, and almonds. Milk is fortified with vitamin D. Certain fish and mushrooms are also high in vitamin D. If needed, heath care providers can offer guidance on taking calcium and ...

  14. The Source of the River: The Social Origins of Freshmen at America's Selective Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massey, Douglas S.; Charles, Camille Z.; Lundy, Garvey F.; Fischer, Mary J.

    2006-01-01

    African Americans and Latinos earn lower grades and drop out of college more often than whites or Asians. Yet thirty years after deliberate minority recruitment efforts began, we still don't know why. In "The Shape of the River," William Bowen and Derek Bok documented the benefits of affirmative action for minority students, their communities, and…

  15. Ethnic and Gender Differences in Science Graduation at Selective Colleges with Implications for Admission Policy and College Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smyth, Frederick L.; McArdle, John J.

    Emphasizing graduation rate, W. Bowen and D. Bok (1998) argue that race-sensitive admission at selective colleges enhances the educational attainment of underrepresented minority students, and that the effect increases with college selectivity. Focusing on graduation in science, however, R. Elliott and colleagues (1995) conclude that: (1)…

  16. Assessing Intercultural Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deardorff, Darla K.

    2011-01-01

    In his book "Our Underachieving Colleges," Derek Bok laments the poor job postsecondary institutions are doing in preparing students for the twenty-first century. Other scholars have likewise noted the central responsibility of today's institutions of higher education being to train students to function more effectively in the integrated…

  17. Ethnic and Gender Differences in Science Graduation at Selective Colleges with Implications for Admission Policy and College Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smyth, Frederick L.; McArdle, John J.

    2004-01-01

    Using Bowen and Bok's data from 23 selective colleges, we fit multilevel logit models to test two hypotheses with implications for affirmative action and group differences in attainment of science, math, or engineering (SME) degrees. Hypothesis 1, that differences in precollege academic preparation will explain later SME graduation disparities,…

  18. Project Produce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfinger, Donna M.

    2005-01-01

    The grocery store produce section used to be a familiar but rather dull place. There were bananas next to the oranges next to the limes. Broccoli was next to corn and lettuce. Apples and pears, radishes and onions, eggplants and zucchinis all lay in their appropriate bins. Those days are over. Now, broccoli may be next to bok choy, potatoes beside…

  19. School Communication to Outside Publics: Truthfulness Must Be the Bottom Line.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinson, David L.

    1998-01-01

    Traditional ethics holds that one isn't obligated to tell everything one knows at all times. Ethicist Sissela Bok distinguishes the ethical requirement to communicate truthfully from a demand to communicate the truth. When communicating to a particular public, school administrators have an ethical obligation to provide substantially complete and…

  20. A Model for Developing Improvements to Critical Thinking Skills across the Community College Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGarrity, DeShawn N.

    2013-01-01

    Society is faced with more complex problems than in the past because of rapid advancements in technology. These complex problems require multi-dimensional problem-solving abilities that are consistent with higher-order thinking skills. Bok (2006) posits that over 90% of U.S. faculty members consider critical thinking skills as essential for…

  1. On the Stability and Evolution of Isolated Molecular Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, W.; Nelson, R.

    1998-01-01

    We present the results of three dimensional hydrodynamic models of evolving, isolated, low mass, quiescent clouds and Bok gobules, where the interstellar radiation field plays an important role in the thermal and chemical evolution, and thermal pressure provides dominant support against gravitational collapse.

  2. Universities in the Marketplace: The Commercialization of Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bok, Derek

    2004-01-01

    Is everything in a university for sale if the price is right? In this book, one of America's leading educators cautions that the answer is all too often "yes." Taking the first comprehensive look at the growing commercialization of our academic institutions, Derek Bok probes the efforts on campus to profit financially not only from athletics but…

  3. The "Ladies' Home Journal" between 1890 and 1906: The Influence of Its Crusade To Regulate Food and Drug Products.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris-Wheeker, Sally A.

    This paper discusses how "The Ladies' Home Journal" was used by its editor, Edward Bok, in his crusade for food and drug regulation in the United States between the years 1890 and 1906, and whether these efforts were influential in bringing about the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906. The first section describes "The Ladies' Home…

  4. 40 CFR 180.349 - Fenamiphos; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....10 None Brussels sprouts 0.05 12/31/09 Cabbage 0.10 12/31/09 Cherry, sweet 0.25 12/31/09 Cherry, tart... Cabbage, Chinese, bok choy 0.50 12/31/09 Kiwifruit 0.10 12/31/09 Pepper, nonbell 0.60 12/31/09...

  5. Lightcurve Analysis for Seven Main-belt Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalnuovo, Giovanni Battitsa

    2015-04-01

    Photometric observations of seven main-belt asteroids were made at the Eurac Observatory (C62 in Bolzano- Italy) in 2014: 1983 Bok, 2634 James Bradley, 4252 Godwin, 5116 Korsor, 10597 (1996 TR10), 52505 (1996 FD4), and 53247 (1999 DE2).

  6. From Study Abroad to Global Studies: Reconstructing International Education for a Globalized World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Theodore E.

    2013-01-01

    Study abroad has become a substantial enterprise as educators embraced the idea that learning about other cultures is a critical component of becoming an educated person, succeeding at work, and serving as an effective citizen (Bok, 2006). Studies now show that study abroad is positively related to student persistence and success, and liberal…

  7. Political Education in/as the Practice of Freedom: A Paradoxical Defence from the Perspective of Michael Oakeshott

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel, Stephen M.

    2007-01-01

    Creating education systems that promote democratic sustainability has been the concern of political thinkers as diverse as J. S. Mill, Dewey, Benjamin Barber and Derek Bok. The classic dichotomisation of democratic theory between deliberative democrats and Schumpeterian democrats suggests that education in the service of democracy can be…

  8. National Program for Inspection of Non-Federal Dams. Plymouth Reservoir Dam (CT 00286), Naugatuck River Basin, Plymouth, Connecticut. Phase I Inspection Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    NOTE LACK OF RIPRAP ABOVE WATER LEVEL. US ARMY ENGINEER DIV NEW ENGLAND PLY MOLITH I L’ I V1 )% CORPS OF ENGINEERS NATIONAL PROGRAM OF TRI .--- T H AULA ...HAESTAD, INC. SHEET tiC ;............ CONSULTING L.NI.\\LE RS CKD) BY ... DATE . ’ 3~bok~cRa atru~ un(uo ............... D ND........ SUBJECT ........... S

  9. Surface and Bulk Phase Separations in Block Copolymers and Their Blends.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

    Sulfone Siloxane NIL,, HOMOPOL YMER: POLY (B BISPH ENOL- A -SU LFON E) 0 CH 3 CHm3 CHARACTERIZATION DATA: Polymer Polysiloxane 1Polysulfone ’Weight CHOI ...ag lrdpn et bhvo f P F S bok coplmes -., -., 1~.~ 72 but a smaller siloxane block length(4400 9/mole vs. 12800 9/mole) or overall siloxane content(47

  10. CTLA-4 Blockade-Based Immunotherapy in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    V, Bok R, Small EJ. Prostate-specific antigen kinetics as a measure of the biologic effect of granulocyte- macrophage colony-stimulating factor in...Kwon ED, Truong T, Choi EM, Greenberg NM, et al. Combination immunotherapy of primary prostate cancer in a transgenic mouse model using CTLA-4 blockade

  11. Evaluation of U.S. Navy Tropical Cyclone Storm Surge Requirements in the Western North Pacific and Indian Oceans.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    NAVENVPREDRSCHFAC Technical Report TR 77-03, 284 pp. c. Choi , B.H., 1980: Tidal Analysis of Inchon for the Years 1962-1972/1975-1977, KORDI Report 80-01. d. Hwang, C...Seoul, Korea, Hydro- graphic records and storm surge data. g. Chu, K.S., Personal storm surge data and calculations. h. Ahn, Myong- Bok , Personal storm

  12. CTLA-4 Blockade-Based Immunotherapy in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Sci U S A 1997;94(15):8099-103. 8 4. Rini BI, Weinberg V, Bok R, Small EJ. Prostate-specific antigen kinetics as a measure of the biologic effect of...Cancer Res 1999;5(7):1738-44. 6. Hurwitz AA, Foster BA, Kwon ED, Truong T, Choi EM, Greenberg NM, et al. Combination immunotherapy of primary

  13. Using TSP Data to Evaluate Your Project Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    Accounting Data,” Journal of Forensic Accounting 1524-5586/vol. V (2004), pp 17-34, R.T. Edwards, Inc., 2004. [Fahmi 2008] Fahmi, Syed Ahsan and Choi ...Marsha, Team Software Process (TSP) Body of Knowledge ( BOK ) (CMU/SEI-2010-TR-020). Carnegie Mellon University, 2010. www.sei.cmu.edu/library/abstracts

  14. ROK (Republic of Korea)-US (United States) Military Relations: Transition of Defense Responsibility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-23

    Korea," The Journal of International Affairs, Vol. 41, No. 1, Summer/Fall 1987, p. 82. 22. Kwang Soo Choi , "The Situation on the Korean Peninsula and in...Daily Report, East Asia, (herein refered to as FBIS-EAS), 3 January 1989, p. 31. Original source KYONGHYANG SINMUN, 1 January 1989, p. 10. 39. Suk Bok Lee

  15. Unification Costs for Korea and the Korean Peninsula

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    86 xiii LIST OF ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS BOK Bank of Korea CCP Chinese Communist Party DM Deutsche Mark DMZ...financially supported the privatization process. In the process, Germany spent about 200 billion deutsche mark (DM).56 Considering the exchange rate

  16. Examining a knowledge domain: Interactive visualization of the Geographic Information Science and Technology Body of Knowledge 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stowell, Marilyn Ruth

    This research compared the effectiveness and performance of interactive visualizations of the GIS&T Body of Knowledge 1. The visualizations were created using Processing, and display the structure and content of the Body of Knowledge using various spatial layout methods: the Indented List, Tree Graph, treemap and Similarity Graph. The first three methods utilize the existing hierarchical structure of the BoK text, while the fourth method (Similarity Graph) serves as a jumping off point for exploring content-based visualizations of the BoK. The following questions have guided the framework of this research: (1) Which of the spatial layouts is most effective for completing tasks related to the GIS&T; BoK overall? How do they compare to each other in terms of performance? (2) Is one spatial layout significantly more or less effective than others for completing a particular cognitive task? (3) Is the user able to utilize the BoK as a basemap or reference system and make inferences based on BoK scorecard overlays? (4) Which design aspects of the interface assist in carrying out the survey objectives? Which design aspects of the application detract from fulfilling the objectives? To answer these questions, human subjects were recruited to participate in a survey, during which they were assigned a random spatial layout and were asked questions about the BoK based on their interaction with the visualization tool. 75 users were tested, 25 for each spatial layout. Statistical analysis revealed that there were no statistically significant differences between means for overall accuracy when comparing the three visualizations. In looking at individual questions, Tree Graph and Indented List yielded statistically significant higher scores for questions regarding the structure of the Body of Knowledge, as compared to the treemap. There was a significant strong positive correlation between the time taken to complete the survey and the final survey score. This correlation was

  17. Computer Automated Page Layout (PLA) for Text-Graphic Materials: User’s Guide.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    WRR4 Widt &,dk ?11*1 SPsoer (SeleCtOrd.0 0tions A Ad Sk file) btakww E(Siqtor V 0 [Oreu Bok 110) SFl$ (t *I i oject] 27 page 9 SEGMENT II: CREATING...015 0 a o o 0 16 0 0 0 0 0 17 0 0 0 0 0Page Input/Edt Choi : is 0 0 o 0 0 ’##’ Line ,1T’exti rint,1S’av,’.’ Done] Enter Desired Option: 01 Note...SI RE D) PROJECT: 4 . F :, t - PI35 Specify the BOOK< Reqired &ENWR OESIWD BOK C~#f r5. ’<y Po Ple,3SP SDeCifv the PAGEC Reuire NOs~ o<Nm,.r X Number

  18. Observations of Periodic Comet 2P/Encke: Physical Properties of the Nucleus and First Visual-Wavelength Detection of Its Dust Trail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, Stephen C.; Weissman, Paul R.; Sykes, Mark V.; Reach, William T.

    2003-01-01

    We are conducting an observational program designed to determine the overall distributions of size, shape, rotation period, and surface characteristics of cometary nuclei. Here, we present results from a study of the Jupiter- family comet 2P/Encke based on observations from Steward Observatory's 2.3m Bok Telescope at Kitt Peak. This comet has been observed extensively in the past and was one of the primary flyby targets of the recently failed CONTOUR mission.

  19. Hyperpolarized 13C MR Markers of Renal Tumor Aggressiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Criekinge, Ailin Hansen, Bertram Koelsch, Jeremy Gordon, Celine Baligand, Robert Bok, Dan B. Vigneron, David M. Wilson, Peder Larson, Kayvan R. Keshari...Sep. 2013. Published OnlineFirst November 30, 2012.Cancer Res Kayvan R. Keshari, Renuka Sriram, Bertram L. Koelsch, et al. Rapid Lactate...Resonance Reveals Rapid Lactate Export in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinomas Kayvan R. Keshari1, Renuka Sriram1, Bertram L. Koelsch2, Mark Van Criekinge1

  20. Eye Movements and Visual Search: A Bibliography,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    594-598. VIS, AID 117 Carpenter, R.II.S. Oculomotor Procrastination . In: D.F. Fisher, R.A., Monty, J.W., Senders (Eds). Eye Movements Cognition and... Affect and Conition: The 17th Annual Carnegie Symposium on Cognition . Lawrence Erlbaum, 1982, New Jersey. PSY, BOK 134 Clement, W.F.; Graham, D...8217. IMQ: ’Image quality’. Objuctive measures. IND: ’Individual differences ’. Inter-subject variance in vision and visual task performance. INS

  1. MATRIS Indexing and Retrieval Thesaurus (MIRT): Keyword Out of Context (KWOC)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-01

    BREATHING Mrc 18 -B- I I I -- BRIDGE BRIDGE control systems Xeic BRIDGE control simulator Epqc i BRIGS Military BRIGS Feua I BROADCAST BROADCAST media Ys I I...CHANGE Gei Social CHANGE effects Fiqia CHANGES Social trends / CHANGES Bok CHANNELS Career promotion CHANNELS Fceg CHAPLAINRY Religious programs...m Attitudes of COMMUNITIES Mfem COMMUNITY I COMMUNITY / social -related factors Fiqi COMMUNITY relations skills Sim COMPANIES COMPANIES Gcka COMPANY

  2. MATRIS Indexing and Retrieval Thesaurus (MIRT): Hierarchical List of Indexing Terms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-01

    UF Verbal skills Sgec Reading skills Sgee Writing skills Sgeg Second language skills Sgega *UF ESL skills Si Personal improvement / social skills...Systems/Equipment ........................... page 63 Media /Documents ............................. page 69 I I I I I I MANPOWERI I B MANPOWER Bc Manpower...Political trends Boi Cultural trends Bok Social trends / changes Bom Technological trends Bq Manpower data Bqc Biographical data Bqe Geographic data Bqea *UF

  3. Ethics: A Selected Bibliography.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-01

    Light of American Law. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1955. (JF423 C3) 53. Callahan, Daniel , and Bok, Sissela, eds. Ethics Teaching in Higher...Educa- tion. New York: Plenum Press, 1980. (BJ66 E84) 54. Callahan, Daniel , and Engelhardt, H. Tristram, eds. The Roots of Ethics: . Science, Religion...Missouri Press, 1966. (JX1416 C18) -" 56. Caplan, Arthur L., and Callahan, Daniel , eds. Ethics in Hard Times. New York: Plenum Press, 1981. (JA79 E825

  4. Spectroscopy of PSN J19583553+0236163

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, D. C.; Moustakas, J.; Swift, B. J.; McCarthy, D.; Bailey, V.; Carrico, E.; Carter, A.; Chui, E.; Douglas, E.; Eggeman, E.; Goldberg, R.; Grant, R.; Hartman, K.; Hellerstein, J.; Hooper, E.; Horlick-Cruz, C.; Hunter, L.; Jiles, T.; Johnson, E. D.; Kumar, K.; Lappe, L.; Lee, J.; Lee, W.; Marsh, F.; Mehta, G.; Miller, P.; Rampalli, R.; Reed, J.; Rice, K.; Saldivar, H.; Salgado-Flores, M.; Schlingman, A.; Schlingman, W. F.; Schlingman, W. M.; Scibelli, S.; Sinclair, K.; Steincamp, I.; Stock, N.; Todd, N.; Vargas, L. L. Aizpuru; Yamanaka, S.; Zachary, E.

    2011-06-01

    As part of the 2011 Advanced Teen Astronomy Camp (http://www.astronomycamp.org), we obtained a low dispersion optical spectrum (range 370-690 nm) of PSN J19583553+0236163 in UGC 11501 with the 2.3m Bok telescope (+ Boller & Chivens spectrograph) at Steward Observatory, on 2011 June 23 UT. Cross-correlation with a library of supernova spectra using the Supernova Identification code (SNID; Blondin and Tonry 2007, Ap.J.

  5. Submillimeter astronomy at the NASA/University of Hawaii 3-meter infrared telescope facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Problems encountered in the design of a submillimeter photometer for the infrared telescope facility and some of the solutions already provided are described. Observations of Saturn's rings and the determination of the brightness temperature of Titan, Jupiter, Saturn, Neptune, and Uranus are summarized. Significant findings during solar, galactic, and extragalactic observations include the discovery of low luminosity star formation in the Bok Globule B335 and determination of the far infrared properties of dust in the reflection nebula NGC 7023.

  6. Southeast Asia Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-25

    would decide on the par- ty’s name and constitu- tion. Former« Perak CCC treasurer Hew Choy Kon told reporters that the de- cision to form the...Cheah Swee Choy (treasurer). The others are former Penang and Butterworth CCC chairman Khoo Hock San, Negri Sembilan CCC chairman Liew Wah, Ma...into Thai territory at the Bok pass in Nam Yun District. Landmines were placed around the Thai border at Ban Sangae in Ta Phraya District, which had

  7. Watchdog Sensor Network with Multi-Stage RF Signal Identification and Cooperative Intrusion Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    Group 5: 9504-10.560 GHz 3.1-4.85 GHz 6.2-9.7 GHz Modulation Scheme QPSK BPSK 4- BOK (optional) Data Rates 53.3*, 80, 110*, 160, 200*, 320, 400, and...Jeon, J. Choi and H. Lee, ``Fast spectrum sensing algorithm for 802.22 WRAN systems,’’ in Proc. International Symposium on Communications and

  8. Annual Review of Progress in Applied Computational Electromagnetics (4th), Held in Monterey, California on March 22-24, 1988

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-24

    0249 for Naval Weapons Center. [4] R. J. Marhcfka and J. H. Choi , "Bistatic Scattering Analysis of an Ellipsoid," Applied Computational Electromagnetics...Society, 3rd Annual Review Conference Proceedings, Monterey, California, March 24-26, 1987. [51 J. HI. Choi and R.. J. Marhefka, "Bistatic Scattering...given by the formulas on the next page. In these formulas, the elements 1’ essentially relarýý the magnetic current basis functions to the BOK basis

  9. Fault Tolerant Optimal Control.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    i k+l since the cost to be minimized in (D.2.3) increases withXk (for fixed xsk). When we have b k _ x~ ji ] Aj M 2a(j) R(j) x bOk +l x]rkt] -b (j...22, pp. 236-239. 69. D.D.Sworder and L.L. Choi (1976): Stationary Cost Densities for Optimally Controlled Stochastic Systems, IEEE Trans. Automatic

  10. Measuring Refractive Index Using the Focal Displacement Method (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    measurements of wafer- shaped InAs and InSb,” Appl. Opt. 47, 164–168 (2008). 6. H. J. Choi , H. H. Lim, H. S. Moon, T. B. Eom, J. J. Ju, and M. Cha...coefficients of germanium and silicon,” Appl. Opt. 15, 2348–2351 (1976). 13. P. Hlidek, J. Bok , J. Franc, and R. Grill, “Refractive index of CdTe: spectral and

  11. Gordon Research Conference on Electrodeposition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-04

    Registered KYOUNG-SHIN CHOI PURDUE UNIVERSITY Speaker Registered PAULA COJOCARU POLITECNICO DI MILANO Attendee Registered THOMAS W. CORNELIUS... BOK LEE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND Poster Presenter Registered JAE H LEE HONGIK UNIVERSITY Poster Presenter Registered CHI-WOO LEE KOREA UNIVERSITY Poster...Break 10:30 am - 11:20 am Kyoung-Shin Choi (Purdue University, USA) "Directing habit and branching growth during electrocrystallization" 11:20 am - 11

  12. Disruption of sphingolipid metabolism augments ceramide-induced autophagy in preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Melland-Smith, Megan; Ermini, Leonardo; Chauvin, Sarah; Craig-Barnes, Hayley; Tagliaferro, Andrea; Todros, Tullia; Post, Martin; Caniggia, Isabella

    2015-04-03

    Bioactive sphingolipids including ceramides are involved in a variety of pathophysiological processes by regulating cell death and survival. The objective of the current study was to examine ceramide metabolism in preeclampsia, a serious disorder of pregnancy characterized by oxidative stress, and increased trophoblast cell death and autophagy. Maternal circulating and placental ceramide levels quantified by tandem mass spectrometry were elevated in pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia. Placental ceramides were elevated due to greater de novo synthesis via high serine palmitoyltransferase activity and reduced lysosomal breakdown via diminished ASAH1 expression caused by TGFB3-induced E2F4 transcriptional repression. SMPD1 activity was reduced; hence, sphingomyelin degradation by SMPD1 did not contribute to elevated ceramide levels in preeclampsia. Oxidative stress triggered similar changes in ceramide levels and acid hydrolase expression in villous explants and trophoblast cells. MALDI-imaging mass spectrometry localized the ceramide increases to the trophophoblast layers and syncytial knots of placentae from pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia. ASAH1 inhibition or ceramide treatment induced autophagy in human trophoblast cells via a shift of the BOK-MCL1 rheostat toward prodeath BOK. Pharmacological inhibition of ASAH1 activity in pregnant mice resulted in increased placental ceramide content, abnormal placentation, reduced fetal growth, and increased autophagy via a similar shift in the BOK-MCL1 system. Our results reveal that oxidative stress-induced reduction of lysosomal hydrolase activities in combination with elevated de novo synthesis leads to ceramide overload, resulting in increased trophoblast cell autophagy, and typifies preeclampsia as a sphingolipid storage disorder.

  13. Diffusion and accumulation in cultivated vegetable plants of di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) from a plastic production factory.

    PubMed

    Du, Q Z; Wang, J W; Fu, X W; Xia, H L

    2010-08-01

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) concentrations in the atmosphere and in four vegetable crops including Brassica chinensis L. (bok choy), Brassica campestris L. (field mustard), Vigna unguiculata Walp. (cowpea), and Solanum melongena L. (eggplant) cultivated on land surrounding a plastic production factory were determined. The air DEHP concentrations (means) at the sites 0.2, 0.4, 0.8, and 1.6 km away from the plastic production building were about 9.4-12.8, 5.8-9.6, 1.6-5.0, and 0.04-0.27 microg m(-3) dry weight (DW), respectively. Wind direction is a key factor influencing the measurable DEHP concentration of the air, which was highest in the downwind direction and lowest in the upwind direction, and thus the vegetables accumulated the highest DEHP contents in the downwind direction and the lowest quantities in the upwind direction. The highest DEHP accumulations content of bok choy, field mustard, eggplant, and cowpea were 52.0 +/- 3.1, 43.1 +/- 2.2, 36.2 +/- 2.8, and 19.4 +/- 0.47 mg kg(-1) DW, respectively. Safety estimation on the basis of the daily intake limit referenced by the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) led to the conclusion that eating vegetables cultivated 0.2 km away from the plastic production building is not a food safety problem under normal conditions. A strong positive linear correlation between atmospheric DEHP concentration and DEHP content of the vegetable crops was found. The limits for air DEHP concentration for safe vegetable cultivation are 24.0, 34.8, 40.8, and 82.8 microg m(-3) for bok choy, field mustard, cowpea, and eggplant, respectively, by calculating from the equation of linear regression between air DEHP concentration and vegetable DEHP content.

  14. Measurements of nitrous oxide emissions from vegetable production in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Zhengqin; Xie, Yingxin; Xing, Guangxi; Zhu, Zhaoliang; Butenhoff, Chris

    Nitrous oxide (N 2O) emissions resulting from Chinese vegetable production were measured. A site in suburban Nanjing (East coast; Jiangsu Province) was monitored from November 2001 to January 2003, in which five consecutive vegetable crops were sown. The crops consisted of radish, baby bok choy, lettuce, second planting of baby bok choy, and finally celery. Results suggested that N 2O emission events occur in pulses. The average N 2O-N flux for all five crops was 148±9 μg N m -2 h -1 and the average emission rate was 12±0.7 kg N ha -1. The average seasonal emission fluxes ranged from 37 μg N m -2 h -1 in the radish plot to 300 μg N m -2 h -1 in the celery plot. The celery field produced the greatest cumulative emission of 5.8 kg N ha -1 while the baby bok choy field had the lowest rate of 0.96-1.0 kg N ha -1. In total, 0.73% of applied fertilizer N was emitted as N 2O-N as a whole. The lettuce field had the largest emission factor of 2.2%. Results indicate that emissions from vegetable field are a potential source of national N 2O inventory. Temporal variation is much greater than spatial variation and the corresponding CV averaged 115% and 22%, respectively. Under the same total sampling quantity, increasing sampling frequency is more important than increasing spatial replicates.

  15. Visitors from the Halo: 11 Gyr Old White Dwarfs in the Solar Neighborhood

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-20

    College, 515 Loudon Road, Loudonville, NY 12211, USA 7 Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA Received...proper motion survey on the Bok and U.S. Naval Observatory Flagstaff Station 1.3 m telescopes , and they display proper motions of 0.′′4–0.′′5 yr−1... Telescope should find many old thick disk and halo WDs that can be used to constrain the age of the Galactic thick disk and halo. Key words: stars

  16. Spectral Estimation: An Overdetermined Rational Model Equation Approach.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-15

    procedure. This method was developed by Levinson and is commonly referred to as the Levinson- Durbin algorithm [24,[431. In this approach, one solves the...k-) /bo(k-l)1 2 (2.17a) ai (k) -i k)ai 1 j i k-1 (2.17b) Wb k 2 (k) 2((k-1)1 No r - (1 - lak I 11bok(12.17c Table 2.1. Levinson- Durbin Algorithm...a moderate mount of algebraic manipulation will reveal the validity of the solution as liven in Step 2 of Table 2.1 with k - 2 (with superscript (2

  17. A Conceptual Framework for Grammar-Driven Synthesis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    AD°AlO0 159 NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA FIO 9/2 A CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK FOR GRAMMAR-DRIVEN SYNTHESIS.(U) DEC 80 W R SHOCKLEY, D P HADDOW...UNCLASSIFIED NL iflfl/lf/l...l../l IEIIIIEIIIEEI hhhhmmhmmmhu LEVEK NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, California THESIS A CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK FOR...1, . VT ACCg"bOk NNyls CATALOG TUMBIOR 4. T....... I Ji D COVEEO ’ I. A Conceptual Framework for Grammar-Driven Synthesi Me- - ~er’s j sisjec, 1980 P

  18. The interaction of hydrodynamic shocks with self-gravitating clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falle, S. A. E. G.; Vaidya, B.; Hartquist, T. W.

    2017-02-01

    We describe the results of 3D simulations of the interaction of hydrodynamic shocks with Bonnor-Ebert spheres performed with an adaptive mesh refinement code. The calculations are isothermal and the clouds are embedded in a medium in which the sound speed is either 4 or 10 times that in the cloud. The strengths of the shocks are such that they induce gravitational collapse in some cases and not in others, and we derive a simple estimate for the shock strength required for this to occur. These results are relevant to dense cores and Bok globules in star-forming regions subjected to shocks produced by stellar feedback.

  19. Honesty in Professional Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahearne, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Honesty is an important subject in science and philosophy. Nobel Laureate Michael Bishop: "Each of us builds our discoveries on the work of others; if that work is false, our constructions fall like a house of cards and we must start all over again.” Sissela Bok has written on the pervasiveness and destructive power of lying. Not only is dishonesty corrosive to other's efforts, it corrodes the dishonest person. In most professions, respect and trust by colleagues are critical in maintaining effective working relationships. Robert Fulghum described traits that should be learned in kindergarten. These include many that seem to be lacking in today's political, economic, and communications realms.

  20. Uptake of di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate of vegetables from plastic film greenhouses.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaowei; Du, Qizhen

    2011-11-09

    Uptake of di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) of nine vegetables including potherb mustard, bok choy, celery, spinach, cabbage, leaf of tube, lettuce, garlic, and edible amaranth in plastic film greenhouses with different plastic films, film thickness, greenhouse age, and greenhouse height was studied. The results showed that the higher the DEHP content of film, the thicker the film, the lower the height of the greenhouse, and the younger the age of the greenhouse were, the higher the DEHP concentration of vegetables was. The results afford significant information for production of safe vegetables with low level DEHP contamination.

  1. Military Exercises in Korea: A Provocation or a Deterrent to War?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-13

    Review 30, No. 4 (Winter 2004): 280-282. 7 General Ri Chan Bok , a DPRK military leader, said during an interview with 60 Minutes correspondent Dan...infantry brigade. 66 James J. Przystup and Kang Choi , “The U.S.-ROK Alliance: Building a Mature Partnership,” INSS Special Report, (Washington, DC...Alliance. Cambridge, MA: The Institute of Foreign Policy Analysis, Aug 2003. Przystup, James J. and Kang Choi . “The U.S.-ROK Alliance: Building a

  2. Apoptosis of DU145 human prostate cancer cells induced by dehydrocostus lactone isolated from the root of Saussurea lappa.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Ji; Lim, Soon Sung; Park, So Young; Shin, Hyun-Kyung; Kim, Jong-Sang; Park, Jung Han Yoon

    2008-12-01

    Saussurea lappa (SL) is a plant regularly utilized in traditional herbal medicine, and in vitro cell culture studies have demonstrated that SL has anti-ulcer, anti-inflammatory, and anti-tumor properties. In order to explore the possibility that SL exerts chemopreventive effects in androgen-independent prostate cancer, we attempted to determine whether the hexane extract of SL (HESL) induces apoptosis of DU145 cells, as well as the mechanisms underlying this effect. HESL substantially reduced the number of viable cells and induced apoptosis in DU145 cells in a dose-dependent manner. HESL-induced the cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and caspases 8, 9, 7, and 3. HESL increased the protein levels of Bax, Bak, Bok, Bik, truncated Bid (t-Bid), and Bmf with a concomitant increase in the permeability of the mitochondrial membrane and in the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria. The active fraction of HESL was isolated by column chromatography and the structure of the active compound dehydrocostus lactone (DHCL) was identified via (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR. DHCL promoted apoptosis with increased activation of caspases 8, 9, 7, 3, enhanced PARP cleavage, decreased Bcl-xL expression and increased levels of Bax, Bak, Bok, Bik, Bmf, and t-Bid. We have demonstrated that HESL and its active principle, DHCL, inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis in DU145 cells.

  3. Co-treatment of mouse antral follicles with 17β-estradiol interferes with mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP)-induced atresia and altered apoptosis gene expression.

    PubMed

    Craig, Zelieann R; Singh, Jeffrey; Gupta, Rupesh K; Flaws, Jodi A

    2014-06-01

    Mono-2-ethyhexyl phthalate (MEHP) is a metabolite of a plasticizer found in many consumer products. MEHP inhibits mouse ovarian follicle growth by reducing 17β-estradiol (E2) production. Yet, whether MEHP causes follicle death (atresia) is unclear. We hypothesized that MEHP causes atresia by altering apoptosis gene expression, and that E2 co-treatment blocks these effects. Follicles were exposed to MEHP (0.36-36μM)±E2 for 48-96h to determine the effect of MEHP±E2 on atresia and gene expression. MEHP increased atresia, but this effect was blocked by co-treatment with E2. MEHP increased the expression of the pro-apoptotic gene Aifm1, but decreased that of the pro-apoptotic gene Bok and the anti-apoptotic gene Bcl2l10. E2 interfered with MEHP-induced changes in Aifm1 and Bcl2l10. Our findings suggest that decreased E2 levels are required for MEHP-induced follicle atresia and that Aifm1, Bok, and Bcl2l10 are involved in this process.

  4. Co-treatment of mouse antral follicles with 17β-estradiol interferes with mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP)-induced atresia and altered apoptosis gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Zelieann R.; Singh, Jeffrey; Gupta, Rupesh K.; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2014-01-01

    Mono-2-ethyhexyl phthalate (MEHP) is a metabolite of a plasticizer found in many consumer products. MEHP inhibits mouse ovarian follicle growth by reducing 17β-estradiol (E2) production. Yet, whether MEHP causes follicle death (atresia) is unclear. We hypothesized that MEHP causes atresia by altering apoptosis gene expression, and that E2 co-treatment blocks these effects. Follicles were exposed to MEHP (0.36–36 µM) ± E2 for 48–96h to determine the effect of MEHP ± E2 on atresia and gene expression. MEHP increased atresia, but this effect was blocked by co-treatment with E2. MEHP increased the expression of the pro-apoptotic gene Aifm1, but decreased that of the pro-apoptotic gene Bok and the anti-apoptotic gene Bcl2l10. E2 interfered with MEHP-induced changes in Aifm1 and Bcl2l10. Our findings suggest that decreased E2 levels are required for MEHP-induced follicle atresia and that Aifm1, Bok, and Bcl2l10 are involved in this process. PMID:24412242

  5. Advanced Life Support Food Subsystem Salad Crop Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perchonok, Michele H.; Stevens, Irene; Swango, Beverly E.; Toerne, Mary E.; Lane, Helen W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    As the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) begins to look towards longer duration space flights, the importance of fresh foods and varied menu choices increases. Long duration space missions require development of both a Transit Food System and a Lunar or Planetary Food System. These two systems are intrinsically different since the first one will be utilized in the transit vehicle in microgravity conditions while the second will be used in conditions of partial gravity (hypogravity). The Transit Food System will consist of prepackaged food of extended shelf life. Microgravity imposes significant limitations on the ability of the crew to handle food and allows only for minimal processing. Salad crops will be available for the planetary mission. Supplementing the transit food system with salad crops is also being considered. These crops will include carrots, tomatoes, lettuce, radish, spinach, chard, cabbage, and onion. The crops will be incorporated in the menu along with the prepackaged food. The fresh tasting salad crops will provide variety, texture, and color in the menu. This variety should provide increased psychological benefit. Preliminary studies on spinach, tomatoes, and bok choy have been completed. Sensory and analytical tests, including color and moisture were conducted on the chamber grown crops and compared to store bought spinach, tomatoes, and bok choy. Preliminary studies of the appropriate serving sizes and number of servings per week have also been conducted.

  6. [N2O emission from an intensively managed greenhouse vegetable field in Nanjing suburb, Jiangsu Province of East China].

    PubMed

    Jia, Jun-Xiang; Zhang, Man; Xiong, Zheng-Qin; Li, Ye

    2012-03-01

    By using static opaque chamber and gas chromatography, this paper studied the dynamic changes of N2O fluxes and their relationships with soil temperature, soil moisture content, and soil nitrate and ammonium contents in an intensively managed greenhouse celery-Tung choy-Bok choy-amaranth rotation field and in a bare fallow land in Nanjing suburb. The cumulative N2O emission from the rotation vegetable field was as high as 137.2 kg N x hm(-2), being significantly higher than that from the bare fallow land (29.2 kg N x hm(-2)), and the N2O-N emission factor of the rotation vegetable field ecosystem was up to 4.6%. In the rotation field, the planting of Tung choy had the greatest contribution to the annual cumulative N2O emission, occupying 53.5% of the total, followed by the planting of Bok choy (31.9%), celery field (4.5%), and amaranth (4.8%). The N2O flux of the rotation field had significant positive correlation with soil temperature, the Q10 being 2.80, but no significant correlations with soil moisture content and soil nitrate and ammonium contents.

  7. Obituary: Raymond Edwin White Jr., 1933-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebert, James William

    2004-12-01

    traditions. Earlier in 1971-72, Ray served as Program Officer for Stars and Stellar Evolution in the Astronomy Section of the National Science Foundation. Ray was one of the three "originators" of "The Inspiration of Astronomical Phenomena" (INSAP) Conferences. These conferences provide scholarly discussions on the many and variegated cultural impacts of the perceptions about the day- and night-time sky, thus providing a forum for a broad sampling of artists, historians, philosophers, and scientists to get together, compare notes, and ask questions of one another. The INSAP Conferences have taken place near Castel Gandolfo Italy, on the island of Malta, near Palermo Italy, and at Oxford University in England. Ray's scholarship also was manifest in his activities as editor. For some years in the 1990s, he edited two astronomy journals, The Astronomy Quarterly and Vistas in Astronomy. Raymond E. White, Jr., is survived by his wife Ruby E. (nee Fisk), his high school sweetheart at Heidelberg High in Germany. Their children include Raymond E. White III (Professor of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa), Kathleen M. (White) Wade, and Kevin D. White. Ray was proud of two beautiful granddaughters, Charlotte R. Wade and Sarah E. Wade. Ray was proud of his early role with Steward Observatory Director Bart Bok in the commissioning of the "90-inch" reflector at the University of Arizona site on Kitt Peak in 1969. He built the direct camera, and was invited by his close friend Bok to share the "first light" of this telescope, now renamed the Bok 2.3-m telescope. When Professor Bok passed away, the astronomy magazine Sky & Telescope invited Ray to write an article which was entitled "Bart J. Bok (1906-83): Personal Memoir from a Grandson." (Bok mentored Ivan R. King, who was Ray's thesis advisor.) In his concluding remarks, Ray wrote, "The aspect of Bart J. Bok I will miss the most is his exuberance for the art of astronomy." We will also miss greatly this

  8. Optical Photometry of V404 Cyg (=GS2023+338)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R. M.; Shrader, C. R.; Starrfield, S. G.

    2000-03-01

    In response to the request by Hjellming et al. in ATEL #54, Rose Finn (Steward Observatory/U. Arizona) obtained for us two R-band CCD images of V404 Cyg (=GS2023+338) on 2000 Mar 3.52 UT with the Steward Observatory Bok 2.3-m telescope and direct CCD (scale = 0.3 arcsec/pixel, airmass = 1.8, seeing = 1.7 arcsec FWHM). Photometry of V404 Cyg was obtained with respect to the comparison stars C1, C4, and C5 of Udalski and Kaluzny (1991, PASP, 103, 198), Casares et al. (1993, MNRAS, 265, 834), and our own photometry of C1 (R = 12.39).

  9. Historical Notes on the Dutch and American-Dutch "schools" in Astronomy and Their Relations with Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Heuvel, Ed

    2006-04-01

    Dutch astronomy and physics experienced two "golden ages". The firstone covered the 17th century, culminating with Christiaan Huygens,inventor of the pendulum clock and the wave theory of light, anddiscoverer of Saturn's rings and largest satellite Titan. The secondone, which lasts till the present, started around 1880 withphysicists Lorentz, van der Waals, Zeeman and Kamerlingh Onnes andastronomer Kapteijn and his pupils De Sitter, van Rhijn, Oort andSchilt. Kapteijn, through his friendship with George Ellery Hale,initiated the strong connection between American and Dutch astronomy,which led to the rise of many Dutch-born astronomers to prominentpositions in the US, from Luyten, Bok, Brouwer, Schilt and Kuiperto Woltjer, Gehrels, and Beckers. The rise of the second "goldenage" appears to be closely related to drastic reforms in the Dutchhigh school and university systems in the last decades of the 19thcentury.

  10. Radial systems of dark globules

    SciTech Connect

    Gyul'budagyn, A.L.

    1986-03-01

    The author gives examples of radial systems consisting of dark globules and ''elephant trunks''. Besides already known systems, which contain hot stars at their center, data are given on three radial systems of a new kind, at the center of which there are stars of spectral types later than B. Data are given on 32 globules of radial systems of the association Cep OB2. On the basis of the observational data, it is concluded that at least some of the isolated Bok globules derive from elephant trunks and dark globules forming radial systems around hot stars. It is also suggested that the two molecular clouds situated near the Rosette nebula and possessing velocities differing by ca 20 km/sec from the velocity of the nebula could have been ejected in opposite directions from the center of the nebula. One of these clouds consists of dark globules forming the radial system of the Rosette nebula.

  11. The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI): The NOAO DECam Legacy Imaging Survey and DESI Target Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlegel, David J.; Blum, Robert D.; Castander, Francisco Javier; Dey, Arjun; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Foucaud, Sebastien; Honscheid, Klaus; James, David; Lang, Dustin; Levi, Michael; Moustakas, John; Myers, Adam D.; Newman, Jeffrey; Nord, Brian; Nugent, Peter E.; Patej, Anna; Reil, Kevin; Rudnick, Gregory; Rykoff, Eli S.; Ford Schlafly, Eddie; Stark, Casey; Valdes, Francisco; Walker, Alistair R.; Weaver, Benjamin; DECam Legacy Survey Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The DECam Legacy Survey will conduct a 3-band imaging survey of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) extragalactic footprint. The Dark Energy Camera (DECam) will be used to image the 6700 square degree footprint overlapping SDSS in the region -20 < Dec < +30 deg, to depths of g=24.7, r=23.9, z=23.0. The survey will be conducted from Fall 2014 through Spring 2017, with periodic data releases beginning in March 2015. These releases will include catalogs constructed with the Tractor-based multi-wavelength forced photometry applied to the DECam and WISE satellite data.The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) will observe 24 million galaxies and quasars in a 14,000 square degree extragalactic footprint. The targeting in that footprint will be provided by a combination of these DECam data, the MOSAIC camera on the Mayall 4-meter, and the 90Prime camera on the Bok Telescope.

  12. The development and validation of the core competencies scale (CCS) for the college and university students.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Bin; Mok, Magdalena Mo Ching; Edginton, Christopher R; Chin, Ming Kai

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the development and validation of the Core Competencies Scale (CCS) using Bok's (2006) competency framework for undergraduate education. The framework included: communication, critical thinking, character development, citizenship, diversity, global understanding, widening of interest, and career and vocational development. The sample comprised 70 college and university students. Results of analysis using Rasch rating scale modelling showed that there was strong empirical evidence on the validity of the measures in contents, structure, interpretation, generalizability, and response options of the CCS scale. The implication of having developed Rasch-based valid and dependable measures in this study for gauging the value added of college and university education to their students is that the feedback generated from CCS will enable evidence-based decision and policy making to be implemented and strategized. Further, program effectiveness can be measured and thus accountability on the achievement of the program objectives.

  13. Optical measurements during increased gamma-ray activity in 3C 454.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Paul S.; Wehrle, Ann E.

    2010-04-01

    Observations obtained with the Steward Observatory 2.3m Bok Telescope show 3C 454.3 to be optically bright and highly linear polarized during a period of increased gamma-ray activity (ATel #2534). Differential spectrophotometry yield a V-band magnitude of 15.02 ± 0.02 and an R-band (Kron-Cousins bandpass) magnitude of 14.53 ± 0.01 on 2010 April 5, 12:10 UT. Spectropolarimetry of 3C 454.3 with the SPOL instrument find an average linear polarization of 9.85 ± 0.17% at a position angle of 23.0 ± 0.5 degrees over a 5000-7000 Angstrom spectral bin.

  14. Asymmetries in the bright and moderately extincted SN Ia ASASSN-14lp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Amber L.; Milne, Peter; Williams, Grant; Mauerhan, Jon; Leising, Mark D.; Smith, Paul S.

    2017-01-01

    Spectropolarimetry of supernovae, or measuring the polarization of their light as a function of wavelength, records the intricate details about the geometry of the explosion for each epoch obtained. The Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) ASASSN-14lp was the second brightest supernova in 2014 and suffers from a moderate amount of extinction (Shappee et al. 2016). We obtained spectropolarimetric observations spanning -9 to +150 days, relative to B-maximum, using the CCD Imaging/Spectropolarimeter (SPOL) on the 1.5-m Kuiper, 2.3-m Bok, and 6.5-m MMT telescopes and the Kast spectrograph on the 3-m Shane telescope at Lick Observatory. We investigate the evolution of the polarization intrinsic to the supernova which describes asymmetries in the ejecta of the explosion and comment on the extragalactic dust of the host galaxy, NGC 4666.

  15. Spectroscopy of PSN J00513484+2943149 in UGC 525

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachubo, A. A.; Leonard, D. C.; Follette, K.; Sheehan, P.; Bailey, V.; McCarthy, D.; Moustakas, J.; Barrows, J.; Bosset, E.; Buckley, E.; Burd, D.; Calahan, J.; Ceesay, I.; Douglas, E.; Feeney, C.; Fornari, T.; Fox, A.; Fishwick, H.; Gano, H.; Green, C.; Griggs, J.; Hart, K.; Hart, S.; Hartman, K.; Holt, A.; Hooper, E.; Hume, S.; Jaeggli, S.; Lesser, D.; Kerr, M.; Kopans-Johnson, C.; Kumar, K.; Lackey, A.; Laube, S.; Marshall, E.; Martinez, M.; Mehta, G.; Melbourne, K.; Meshel, M.; Myers, C.; Puranen, E.; Schlingman, A.; Schlingman, W.; Schlingman, W. M.; Shen, K.; Stock, N.; Stillman, C.; Tinker, J.; Whitesell, B.

    2013-06-01

    We report that inspection of a low-dispersion optical spectrum (range 370-680 nm) of PSN J00513484+2943149 (CBAT TOCP), obtained in heavy twilight with the 2.3-m Bok telescope (+ Boller & Chivens spectrograph) at Steward Observatory on June 28 UT, shows it to be an aging type-Ia supernova. After correcting for a redshift of 4931 km/s for the assumed host galaxy, UGC 525 (Falco et al. 1999, PASP, 111, 438; via NED), reasonable matches are found with normal SNe Ia at epochs ranging between 40 and 65 days after maximum light, although there is a notable absence of emission in PSN J00513484+2943149 near 5000 Angstrom (attributed to Fe II; Branch et al.

  16. Spectroscopic Classification of AT2016cvw as a normal Type Ia Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, D. C.; Sheehan, P.; McCarthy, D.; Follette, K.; Moustakas, J.; Alaniz, M.; Beaumont, C.; Batterman, T.; Black, E.; Bowers, T.; Cryder, M.; Davis, C.; Dawsey, R.; Douglas, E.; Gordon, S.; Gramze, S.; Greiner, M.; Hart, K.; Holt, A.; Hu, J.; Ingebretsen, C.; Iyer, D.; Josephson, R.; Kapko, A.; Keane, J.; Kimberlin, T.; Kinman, S.; Klusmeyer, J.; Kolderup, E.; Kresina, K.; Madden, M.; Meiman, E.; Miniconi, S.; Morton, A.; Neumann, K.; Noguerra, T.; Regester, B.; Regester, J.; Rosenthal, M.; Schlingman, A.; Schlingman, W.; Schlingman, W.; Smith, A.; Svoboda, B.; Watson, L.; Whitesell, R.

    2016-06-01

    We report spectroscopic classification of AT2016cvw (also known as PTSS-16ipw), discovered 2016 June 18.813 UT by the PMO-Tsinghua Supernova Survey (PTSS) in MCG +02-58-008 (z=0.038877; Huchra et al. 2012, ApJS, 199, 26, via NED), through inspection of an optical spectrum (range 370-690 nm, resolution 0.8 nm) obtained with the 2.3-m Bok telescope (+ Boller & Chivens spectrograph) at Kitt Peak on 2016 June 20.423 UT. Cross-correlation with a library of supernova spectra using the "Supernova Identification" code (SNID; Blondin and Tonry 2007, ApJ, 666, 1024) and GELATO (Harutyunyan et al. 2008, A & A, 488, 383) finds convincing spectral matches with a number of normal Type-Ia supernovae roughly 3 days before maximum light.

  17. Spectroscopic Classification of AT2016cvv as a normal Type Ia Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, D. C.; Sheehan, P.; McCarthy, D.; Follette, K.; Moustakas, J.; Alaniz, M.; Beaumont, C.; Batterman, T.; Black, E.; Bowers, T.; Cryder, M.; Davis, C.; Dawsey, R.; Douglas, E.; Gordon, S.; Gramze, S.; Greiner, M.; Hart, K.; Holt, A.; Hu, J.; Ingebretsen, C.; Iyer, D.; Josephson, R.; Kapko, A.; Keane, J.; Kimberlin, T.; Kinman, S.; Klusmeyer, J.; Kolderup, E.; Kresina, K.; Madden, M.; Meiman, E.; Miniconi, S.; Morton, A.; Neumann, K.; Noguerra, T.; Regester, B.; Regester, J.; Rosenthal, M.; Schlingman, A.; Schlingman, W.; Schlingman, W.; Smith, A.; Svoboda, B.; Watson, L.; Whitesell, R.

    2016-06-01

    We report spectroscopic classification of AT2016cvv (also known as PTSS-16ijc), discovered 2016 June 16.709 UT by the PMO-Tsinghua Supernova Survey (PTSS) in CGCG 280-024 (z=0.044571; Falco et al. 1999, PASP 111, 438, via NED), through inspection of an optical spectrum (range 370-690 nm, resolution 0.8 nm) obtained with the 2.3-m Bok telescope (+ Boller & Chivens spectrograph) at Kitt Peak on 2016 June 19.347 UT. Cross-correlation with a library of supernova spectra using the "Supernova Identification" code (SNID; Blondin and Tonry 2007, ApJ, 666, 1024) and GELATO (Harutyunyan et al. 2008, A & A, 488, 383) finds convincing spectral matches with a number of normal Type-Ia supernovae a few days before maximum light.

  18. The Wide Integral Field Infrared Spectrograph (WIFIS): optomechanical design and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, R. Elliot; Moon, Dae-Sik; Sivanandam, Suresh; Ma, Ke; Henderson, Chuck; Blank, Basil; Chou, Chueh-Yi; Jarvis, Miranda; Eikenberry, Stephen S.

    2016-08-01

    We present the optomechanical design and development of the Wide Integral Field Infrared Spectrograph (WIFIS). WIFIS will provide an unrivalled integral field size of 20"×50" for a near-infrared (0.9-1.7 μm) integral-field spectrograph at the 2.3-meter Steward Bok telescope. Its main optomechanical system consists of two assemblies: a room-temperature bench housing the majority of the optical components and a cryostat for a field-flattening lens, thermal blocking filter, and detector. Two additional optical subsystems will provide calibration functionality, telescope guiding, and off-axis optical imaging. WIFIS will be a highly competitive instrument for seeing-limited astronomical investigations of the dynamics and chemistry of extended objects in the near-infrared wavebands. WIFIS is expected to be commissioned during the end of 2016 with scientific operations beginning in 2017.

  19. Hybrid Fluorosilicones for Aircraft Fuel Tank Sealants. Part 4. Synthesis of Fluorocarbon and Fluorocarbon Ether Hybrid Fluorosilicone Polymers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-05-01

    w 0) N t- x - -HP x )0; o 0 0 - r : H z z0) 4-) * 4 x (2) to ’d c 0 10 0)4 0 0 ;4 ~ o4o c 0 * 4 30 0 0 4-H4 -T m 0 .0 d4.3 NH 0 Hd Hr H NNi H E-4 4...SO G Cefne nvers ie fnoe el end Ientfyb bok ies n ly A9TRC aCrlmse r ers seIfnsem is Idef by atc nbe er oc fl ohr sii0 n It NS etomi poymr wee...3 A. Fluorosilicone-Fluoroether Hybrid Polymers (FES) .................... 3 1. Preparation of X (CFa)*O(CF2)nO(CF2

  20. Attenuation of Carcinogenesis and the Mechanism Underlying by the Influence of Indole-3-carbinol and Its Metabolite 3,3'-Diindolylmethane: A Therapeutic Marvel.

    PubMed

    Maruthanila, V L; Poornima, J; Mirunalini, S

    2014-01-01

    Rising evidence provides credible support towards the potential role of bioactive products derived from cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, cauliflower, kale, cabbage, brussels sprouts, turnips, kohlrabi, bok choy, and radishes. Many epidemiological studies point out that Brassica vegetable protects humans against cancer since they are rich sources of glucosinolates in addition to possessing a high content of flavonoids, vitamins, and mineral nutrients. Indole-3-carbinol (I3C) belongs to the class of compounds called indole glucosinolate, obtained from cruciferous vegetables, and is well-known for tits anticancer properties. In particular, I3C and its dimeric product, 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM), have been generally investigated for their value against a number of human cancers in vitro as well as in vivo. This paper reviews an in-depth study of the anticancer activity and the miscellaneous mechanisms underlying the anticarcinogenicity thereby broadening its therapeutic marvel.

  1. Attenuation of Carcinogenesis and the Mechanism Underlying by the Influence of Indole-3-carbinol and Its Metabolite 3,3′-Diindolylmethane: A Therapeutic Marvel

    PubMed Central

    Maruthanila, V. L.; Poornima, J.; Mirunalini, S.

    2014-01-01

    Rising evidence provides credible support towards the potential role of bioactive products derived from cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, cauliflower, kale, cabbage, brussels sprouts, turnips, kohlrabi, bok choy, and radishes. Many epidemiological studies point out that Brassica vegetable protects humans against cancer since they are rich sources of glucosinolates in addition to possessing a high content of flavonoids, vitamins, and mineral nutrients. Indole-3-carbinol (I3C) belongs to the class of compounds called indole glucosinolate, obtained from cruciferous vegetables, and is well-known for tits anticancer properties. In particular, I3C and its dimeric product, 3,3′-diindolylmethane (DIM), have been generally investigated for their value against a number of human cancers in vitro as well as in vivo. This paper reviews an in-depth study of the anticancer activity and the miscellaneous mechanisms underlying the anticarcinogenicity thereby broadening its therapeutic marvel. PMID:24982671

  2. Brassica vegetables and prostate cancer risk: a review of the epidemiological evidence.

    PubMed

    Kristal, Alan R; Lampe, Johanna W

    2002-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have yielded conflicting results on the associations of diet with prostate cancer. We review evidence that Brassica vegetables are associated with reduced prostate cancer risk. Brassica vegetables, which include broccoli, cabbage, mustard and collard greens, and bok choy, contain glucosinolates, the metabolic breakdown products of which are potent modulators of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes that protect DNA from damage. Twelve published studies give some information about Brassica vegetables and prostate cancer risk; six of these studies can be clearly interpreted. Of these, three reported statistically significant reduced risks (P < 0.05) and one reported a borderline significant reduced risk (P = 0.06) with high Brassica vegetable consumption. The epidemiological literature provides modest support for the hypothesis that high intakes of Brassica vegetables reduce prostate cancer risk.

  3. XMM-Newton Proposal 02066102

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitschwerdt, Dieter

    2003-03-01

    The densest and closest absorbers of the soft X-ray background (SXRB) in the Milky Way are Bok globules, located just outside the Local Bubble in the Pipe Nebula at a distance of 125pc. With column densities of up to log(NH)~23, they are ideal targets for shadowing the SXRB in the energy range 0.3 - 2 keV, thus giving important information on the spatial and spectral variation of the foreground X-ray intensity on small scales. We propose Barnard 59 due to an extinction gradient of A_V~50 mag and the Fest 1-457 region due to strong small scale NH-variations for a detailed spectral study with XMM-Newton. Together with already existing XMM data of Barnard 68, this will allow to determine the ionization structure of the Local and Loop I superbubbles.

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: JKs photometry of local universe galaxies (Grauer+, 2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grauer, A. D.; Rieke, M. J.; Quillen, A. C.

    2003-11-01

    This paper presents empirical results from a deep imaging survey of galaxies in the local universe at the J and Ks wavelengths. Three hundred ninety-one images have been obtained and calibrated using the same camera and filter set with the Steward Observatory 1.6m Kuiper Telescope on Mount Bigelow and the 2.3m Bok Telescope on Kitt Peak. The limiting magnitude is typically 22mag/arcsec at J and 21mag/arcsec at Ks. The central surface brightness, apparent magnitudes, sizes, scale lengths, and inclinations are tabulated from measurements made using these data. The purpose of this paper is to provide basic near-infrared data on a variety of galaxy types. (2 data files).

  5. Sound-triggered collapse of stably oscillating low-mass cores in a two-phase interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ui-Han; Schive, Hsi-Yu; Chiueh, Tzihong

    2015-05-01

    Inspired by Barnard 68, a Bok globule, that undergoes stable oscillations, we perform multiphase hydrodynamic simulations to analyse the stability of Bok globules. We show that a high-density soft molecular core, with an adiabatic index γ = 0.7 embedded in a warm isothermal diffuse gas, must have a small density gradient to retain the stability. Despite being stable, the molecular core can still collapse spontaneously as it will relax to develop a sufficiently large density gradient after tens of oscillations, or a few 107 yr. However, during its relaxation, the core may abruptly collapse triggered by the impingement of small-amplitude, long-wavelength (˜6-36 pc) sound waves in the warm gas. This triggered collapse mechanism is similar to a sonoluminescence phenomenon, where underwater ultrasounds can drive air bubble coalescence. The collapse configuration is found to be different from both inside-out and outside-in models of low-mass star formation; none the less the mass flux is close to the prediction of the inside-out model. The condition and the efficiency for this core collapse mechanism are identified. Generally speaking, a broad-band resonance condition must be met, where the core oscillation frequency and the wave frequency should match each other within a factor of several. A consequence of our findings predicts the possibility of propagating low-mass star formation, for which collapse of cores, within a mass range short of one order of magnitude, takes place sequentially tracing the wavefront across a region of few tens of pc over 107 yr.

  6. The DECam Legacy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Robert D.; Burleigh, Kaylan; Dey, Arjun; Schlegel, David J.; Meisner, Aaron M.; Levi, Michael; Myers, Adam D.; Lang, Dustin; Moustakas, John; Patej, Anna; Valdes, Francisco; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Huanyuan, Shan; Nord, Brian; Olsen, Knut A.; Delubac, Timothée; Saha, Abi; James, David; Walker, Alistair R.; DECaLS Team

    2016-06-01

    The DECam Legacy Survey (DECaLS) is conducting a 3-band imaging survey of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) extragalactic footprint as part of the Legacy Survey, which is associated with the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) redshift survey. The Legacy Survey covers 14000 square degrees in the g, r, and z bands and is being executed on the Blanco 4-m, Mayall 4-m, and Bok 2.3-m telescopes. For DECaLS, the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) will image the footprint overlapping SDSS in the region -20 < Dec < +30 deg, to depths of g=24.7, r=23.9, z=23.0 and will eventually cover a total of 7500 square degrees. The survey began in 2014 and will run through Spring 2017. Images and catalogs were introduced in Public Data Release 2 (DR2), which occurred in January 2016. The algorithm "Tractor" applies multi-wavelength forced photometry to DECam and WISE data to produce galaxy (and star) magnitudes (as well as shape and other information) for the catalogs. In total, the optical data in DR2 cover a disjoint footprint in 2078, 2141 and 5322 square degrees in g, r, and z bands, respectively; 1807 square degrees has been observed in all three optical filters. There are approximately 260 million unique sources in DR2 spread over 97,554 0.25 x 0.25 square degree bricks.The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) will observe 30+ million galaxies and quasars in a 14,000 square degree extragalactic footprint. The targeting in that footprint will be provided by a combination of these DECam data, the MOSAIC camera on the Mayall 4-meter, and the 90Prime camera on the Bok telescope.

  7. Population Structure and Phylogenetic Relationships in a Diverse Panel of Brassica rapa L.

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Kevin A.; An, Hong; Gazave, Elodie; Gore, Michael A.; Pires, J. Chris; Robertson, Larry D.; Labate, Joanne A.

    2017-01-01

    The crop species Brassica rapa L. has significant economic importance around the world. However, the global distribution and complex evolutionary history of the species has made investigating its genetic population structure difficult. Crop domestication and improvement has resulted in extreme phenotypic diversity and subspecies that are used for oilseed, food for human consumption, and fodder for livestock. These subspecies include the oilseed morphotypes. oleifera (turnip rape), ssp. dichotoma (brown sarson/toria), ssp. trilocularis (yellow sarson); ssp. rapa (turnip); and Asian leafy vegetables ssp. pekinensis (Chinese cabbage), ssp. chinensis (bok choy), ssp. nipposinica (mizuna/mibuna), ssp. rapifera (rapini/broccoli rabe), ssp. narinosa (tatsoi), ssp parachinensis (choy sum), and ssp. perviridis (komatsuna). To date, studies have had insufficient sampling to determine the relationship of all morphotypes, especially oilseed morphotypes, and questions remain over the contribution of morphotype and geographic origin to population structure. We used genotyping-by-sequencing to score 18,272 single nucleotide polymorphism markers in a globally diverse panel of 333 B. rapa National Plant Germplasm System accessions that included 10 recognized subspecies. Our population genetic and phylogenetic analyses were broadly congruent and revealed five subpopulations that were largely reflective of morphotype and geography. These subpopulations were 1. European turnips/oilseed, 2. Asian turnips/oilseed, 3. yellow/brown sarson (ssp. trilocularis and ssp. dichotoma), 4. Chinese cabbage (ssp. pekinensis), and 5. bok choy, choy sum, and tatsoi (ssp. chinensis, ssp. parachinensis, ssp. narinosa). Additionally, we found evidence of polyphyly and/or paraphyly, particularly for oilseed morphotypes (ssp. oleifera and ssp. dichotoma) and turnips. The results of this study have provided improved resolution to the genetic and phylogenetic relationships of subspecies within the species B

  8. The development of WIFIS: a wide integral field infrared spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivanandam, Suresh; Chou, Richard C. Y.; Moon, Dae-Sik; Ma, Ke; Millar-Blanchaer, Maxwell; Eikenberry, Stephen S.; Chun, Moo-Young; Kim, Sang Chul; Raines, Steven N.; Eisner, Joshua

    2012-09-01

    We present the current results from the development of a wide integral field infrared spectrograph (WIFIS). WIFIS offers an unprecedented combination of etendue and spectral resolving power for seeing-limited, integral field observations in the 0.9 - 1.8 μm range and is most sensitive in the 0.9 - 1.35 μ,m range. Its optical design consists of front-end re-imaging optics, an all-reflective image slicer-type, integral field unit (IFU) called FISICA, and a long-slit grating spectrograph back-end that is coupled with a HAWAII 2RG focal plane array. The full wavelength range is achieved by selecting between two different gratings. By virtue of its re-imaging optics, the spectrograph is quite versatile and can be used at multiple telescopes. The size of its field-of-view is unrivalled by other similar spectrographs, offering a 4.511x 1211 integral field at a 10-meter class telescope (or 2011 x 5011 at a 2.3-meter telescope). The use of WIFIS will be crucial in astronomical problems which require wide-field, two-dimensional spectroscopy such as the study of merging galaxies at moderate redshift and nearby star/planet-forming regions and supernova remnants. We discuss the final optical design of WIFIS, and its predicted on-sky performance on two reference telescope platforms: the 2.3-m Steward Bok telescope and the 10.4-m Gran Telescopio Canarias. We also present the results from our laboratory characterization of FISICA. IFU properties such as magnification, field-mapping, and slit width along the entire slit length were measured by our tests. The construction and testing of WIFIS is expected to be completed by early 2013. We plan to commission the instrument at the 2.3-m Steward Bok telescope at Kitt Peak, USA in Spring 2013.

  9. The Mayall z-band Legacy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, David R.; Blum, Robert D.; Allen, Lori; Dey, Arjun; Schlegel, David J.; Lang, Dustin; Moustakas, John; Meisner, Aaron M.; Valdes, Francisco; Patej, Anna; Myers, Adam D.; Sprayberry, David; Saha, Abi; Olsen, Knut A.; Safonova, Sasha; Yang, Qian; Burleigh, Kaylan J.; MzLS Team

    2016-06-01

    The Mayall z-band Legacy Survey (MzLS) is conducting a deep z-band imaging survey covering 5000 square degrees in the north Galactic cap as part of the Legacy Survey, which is associated with the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) redshift survey. The Legacy Survey covers 14000 square degrees in the g, r, and z bands and is being executed on the Blanco 4-m, Mayall 4-m, and Bok 2.3-m telescopes. The MzLS footprint will be observed in the g and r bands using the Bok 2.3-m telescope also on Kitt Peak. The Beijing Arizona Sky Survey (BASS) is being conducted by a parallel team from Beijing and the University of Arizona. MzLS will cover the sky north of declination 30 degrees and reach a depth of z=23.0. The survey began in January 2016 and will run through June 2017 comprising approximately 230 nights on the Mayall telescope. The data are being obtained with an upgraded Mosaic camera that deploys with newred-sensitive CCDs from Lawrence Berkeley Lab (LBL) whose throughput is in excess of 80% at 8000 to approximately 9800 Angstrom. The upgrade project was a collaboration of Yale, LBL, and NOAO. MzLS images are public as soon as they are taken and delivered to the NOAO archive. Catalogs based on Tractor photometry for all available Legacy Survey images are released soon after they are constructed and MzLS sources will be included in next release planned for summer 2016. The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) will observe 30+ million galaxies and quasars in a 14,000 square degree extragalactic footprint. The targeting in that footprint will be provided by a combination of these MzLS data, DECam data from the DECam Legacy Survey, and data from the BASS survey.

  10. Population Structure and Phylogenetic Relationships in a Diverse Panel of Brassica rapa L.

    PubMed

    Bird, Kevin A; An, Hong; Gazave, Elodie; Gore, Michael A; Pires, J Chris; Robertson, Larry D; Labate, Joanne A

    2017-01-01

    The crop species Brassica rapa L. has significant economic importance around the world. However, the global distribution and complex evolutionary history of the species has made investigating its genetic population structure difficult. Crop domestication and improvement has resulted in extreme phenotypic diversity and subspecies that are used for oilseed, food for human consumption, and fodder for livestock. These subspecies include the oilseed morphotypes. oleifera (turnip rape), ssp. dichotoma (brown sarson/toria), ssp. trilocularis (yellow sarson); ssp. rapa (turnip); and Asian leafy vegetables ssp. pekinensis (Chinese cabbage), ssp. chinensis (bok choy), ssp. nipposinica (mizuna/mibuna), ssp. rapifera (rapini/broccoli rabe), ssp. narinosa (tatsoi), ssp parachinensis (choy sum), and ssp. perviridis (komatsuna). To date, studies have had insufficient sampling to determine the relationship of all morphotypes, especially oilseed morphotypes, and questions remain over the contribution of morphotype and geographic origin to population structure. We used genotyping-by-sequencing to score 18,272 single nucleotide polymorphism markers in a globally diverse panel of 333 B. rapa National Plant Germplasm System accessions that included 10 recognized subspecies. Our population genetic and phylogenetic analyses were broadly congruent and revealed five subpopulations that were largely reflective of morphotype and geography. These subpopulations were 1. European turnips/oilseed, 2. Asian turnips/oilseed, 3. yellow/brown sarson (ssp. trilocularis and ssp. dichotoma), 4. Chinese cabbage (ssp. pekinensis), and 5. bok choy, choy sum, and tatsoi (ssp. chinensis, ssp. parachinensis, ssp. narinosa). Additionally, we found evidence of polyphyly and/or paraphyly, particularly for oilseed morphotypes (ssp. oleifera and ssp. dichotoma) and turnips. The results of this study have provided improved resolution to the genetic and phylogenetic relationships of subspecies within the species B

  11. Synoptic Observations for Physical Characterization of Fast Rotator NEOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikwaya Eluo, Jean-Baptiste; Hergenrother, Carl W.

    2014-11-01

    NEOs can be studied not only dynamically, to learn about their impact hazard, but also physically, to establish various properties important both to better address their potential hazard and also to understand what they can tell us about the origin of the solar system and its ongoing processes.Taking advantage of the two-meter-class telescopes around Tucson, we plan to observe NEOs synoptically using telescopes at three different locations: VATT (Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope) at Mount Graham (longitude: -109.8719, latitude: 32.7016, elevation: 10469 feet), Bok 2.3 m at Kitt Peak (longitude: -111.6004, latitude: 31.9629, elevation: 6795 feet) and Kuiper 1.5-m at Mount Bigelow (longitude: -110.7345, latitude: 32.4165, elevation: 8235 feet). All three telescopes will aim simultaneously at the same object, each with a different instrument. The three telescopes will be part of the Arizona Robotic Telescope (ART) network, a University of Arizona initiative to provide near real-time observations of Target of Opportunity objects across the visible and near-infrared wavelengths. The VATT-4K optical imager mounted on the VATT has already been used for photometry. In the future we plan to utilize the BCSpec (Boller & Chivens Spectrograph) for visible spectroscopy on Bok 2.3 meter and a near-infrared instrument on Kuiper 1.5 meter. We report here the preliminary results of several NEOs whose rotation rate and color have been estimated using photometry with images recorded with VATT-4K. 2009 SQ104 has a rotation rate of 6.85+/- 0.03 h, 2014 AY28 has a rotation rate of 0.91 +/- 0.02 h, 2014 EC of 0.54 +/-0.04 h, 2014 FA44 of 3.45 +/- 0.05 h, and 2014 KS40 of 1.11 +/- 0.06 h.

  12. Multicolor Photometry of the Merging Galaxy Cluster A2319: Dynamics and Star Formation Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Peng-Fei; Yuan, Qi-Rong; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Xu

    2014-05-01

    Asymmetric X-ray emission and a powerful cluster-scale radio halo indicate that A2319 is a merging cluster of galaxies. This paper presents our multicolor photometry for A2319 with 15 optical intermediate filters in the Beijing-Arizona-Taiwan-Connecticut (BATC) system. There are 142 galaxies with known spectroscopic redshifts within the viewing field of 58' × 58' centered on this rich cluster, including 128 member galaxies (called sample I). A large velocity dispersion in the rest frame, 1622^{+91}_{-70} km s-1, suggests merger dynamics in A2319. The contour map of projected density and localized velocity structure confirm the so-called A2319B substructure, at ~10' northwest to the main concentration A2319A. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of more than 30,000 sources are obtained in our BATC photometry down to V ~ 20 mag. A u-band (~3551 Å) image with better seeing and spatial resolution, obtained with the Bok 2.3 m telescope at Kitt Peak, is taken to make star-galaxy separation and distinguish the overlapping contamination in the BATC aperture photometry. With color-color diagrams and photometric redshift technique, 233 galaxies brighter than h BATC = 19.0 are newly selected as member candidates after an exclusion of false candidates with contaminated BATC SEDs by eyeball-checking the u-band Bok image. The early-type galaxies are found to follow a tight color-magnitude correlation. Based on sample I and the enlarged sample of member galaxies (called sample II), subcluster A2319B is confirmed. The star formation properties of cluster galaxies are derived with the evolutionary synthesis model, PEGASE, assuming a Salpeter initial mass function and an exponentially decreasing star formation rate (SFR). A strong environmental effect on star formation histories is found in the manner that galaxies in the sparse regions have various star formation histories, while galaxies in the dense regions are found to have shorter SFR time scales, older stellar ages, and

  13. Scientists Look at 2010: Carrying on Margaret Mayall's Legacy of Debunking Pseudoscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Krinstine

    2010-06-01

    In 1941 Margaret Mayall, the future director of the AAVSO, and Harvard colleague Bart Bok authored a critical study of astrology and its impact on society entitled "Scientists Look at Astrology." They chastised the scientific community for thinking the debunking of astrology to be "below the dignity of scientists." In contrast, they opined that it is one of the duties of scientists to "inform the public about the nature and background of a current fad, such as astrology, even though to do so may be unpleasant." Fast-forward 68 years in the future, and the astronomical community now faces a pseudoscientific enemy just as insidious as astrology, yet just as ignored by the general professional and amateur community as astrology had been when Mayall and Bok took up the charge in 1941. The pseudoscience in question is the well-publicized "prediction" that the Mayan calendar will end on December 21, 2012, causing the end of civilization in concert with one of a number of possible astronomical calamities, including (but not limited to) the gravitational pull of the center of the Milky Way (somehow enhanced by an "alignment" with our solar system), the near-approach by a mythical 10th planet (often named Nibiru), large-scale damage to the planet by solar flares larger than those ever recorded, or the shifting of the earth's axis of rotation (often confused with a proposed sudden and catastrophic reversal of the earth's magnetic polarity). As a scientific and educational organization, the AAVSO and its members have a responsibility to follow in Mayall's footsteps, shining the light of reason and knowledge on the dark corners of ignorance which far too often permeate the Internet, radio and television programming, and recent films, most notably 2012. This talk will highlight some of the basic premises of the 2012 hysteria and suggest ways that the AAVSO and its members can use variable stars and the history of the AAVSO to counteract some of the astronomical misinformation

  14. Multicolor photometry of the merging galaxy cluster A2319: Dynamics and star formation properties

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Peng-Fei; Yuan, Qi-Rong; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Xu E-mail: yuanqirong@njnu.edu.cn

    2014-05-01

    Asymmetric X-ray emission and a powerful cluster-scale radio halo indicate that A2319 is a merging cluster of galaxies. This paper presents our multicolor photometry for A2319 with 15 optical intermediate filters in the Beijing-Arizona-Taiwan-Connecticut (BATC) system. There are 142 galaxies with known spectroscopic redshifts within the viewing field of 58' × 58' centered on this rich cluster, including 128 member galaxies (called sample I). A large velocity dispersion in the rest frame, 1622{sub −70}{sup +91} km s{sup –1}, suggests merger dynamics in A2319. The contour map of projected density and localized velocity structure confirm the so-called A2319B substructure, at ∼10' northwest to the main concentration A2319A. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of more than 30,000 sources are obtained in our BATC photometry down to V ∼ 20 mag. A u-band (∼3551 Å) image with better seeing and spatial resolution, obtained with the Bok 2.3 m telescope at Kitt Peak, is taken to make star-galaxy separation and distinguish the overlapping contamination in the BATC aperture photometry. With color-color diagrams and photometric redshift technique, 233 galaxies brighter than h {sub BATC} = 19.0 are newly selected as member candidates after an exclusion of false candidates with contaminated BATC SEDs by eyeball-checking the u-band Bok image. The early-type galaxies are found to follow a tight color-magnitude correlation. Based on sample I and the enlarged sample of member galaxies (called sample II), subcluster A2319B is confirmed. The star formation properties of cluster galaxies are derived with the evolutionary synthesis model, PEGASE, assuming a Salpeter initial mass function and an exponentially decreasing star formation rate (SFR). A strong environmental effect on star formation histories is found in the manner that galaxies in the sparse regions have various star formation histories, while galaxies in the dense regions are found to have shorter SFR time

  15. Population health risk via dietary exposure to trace elements (Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, Hg, and As) in Qiqihar, Northeastern China.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jinming; Meng, Jia; Ye, Yajie; Wang, Yongjie; Bai, Lin

    2016-11-15

    The estimated daily intakes (EDIs) of six trace elements (Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, Hg, and As) in vegetables (leafy vegetable, i.e., bok choy, fruit vegetables, i.e., cucumber and tomato, and other categories, i.e., mushroom, kidney bean, and potato), cereals (rice and wheat flour), and meats (pork, mutton, and beef) most commonly consumed by adult inhabitants of Qiqihar, Northeastern China, were determined to assess the health status of local people. The average EDIs of Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, Hg, and As were with 20.77 μg (kg bw)(-1) day(-1) of Cu, 288 μg (kg bw)(-1) day(-1) of Zn, 2.01 μg (kg bw)(-1) day(-1) of Pb, 0.41 μg (kg bw)(-1) day(-1) of Cd, 0.01 μg (kg bw)(-1) day(-1) of Hg, and 0.52 μg (kg bw)(-1) day(-1) of As, respectively, which are below the daily allowance recommended by FAO/WHO. However, the maximum EDIs of Pb and Cd were 4.56 μg (kg bw)(-1) day(-1) and 1.68 μg (kg bw)(-1) day(-1), respectively, which are above the recommended levels [i.e., 3.58 μg (kg bw)(-1) day(-1) for Pb and 1.0 μg (kg bw)(-1) day(-1) for Cd] by FAO/WHO. This finding indicates that the potential health risk induced by daily ingestion of Pb and Cd for the local residents should receive a significant concern. Similarly, we detected elevated Pb and Cd concentrations, i.e., with average of 13.58 and 0.60 mg kg(-1) dw, respectively, in the adult scalp hairs. Consumption of rice, potato, bok choy, and wheat flour contributed to 75 and 82% of Pb and Cd daily intake from foodstuffs. Nevertheless, human scalp hair is inappropriate biological material for determination of the nutritional status of trace elements in this region.

  16. Spacewatch Observations of Near-Earth Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Robert S.; Larsen, Jeffrey A.; Bressi, Terrence H.; Scotti, James V.; Mastaler, Ronald A.; Tubbiolo, Andrew F.

    2015-08-01

    Spacewatch specializes in followup of NEOs of high priority while they are faint, producing an annual average of ~8500 lines of astrometry of ~1,000 different NEOs. We contribute to the removal of half of the objects that were retired from impact risk lists. Our observations at elongations as small as 46 deg support followup of hazardous NEOs and NEOs discovered by the NEOWISE spacecraft. Per year we observe about 35 radar targets, 50 NEOs that were measured by NEOWISE, and 100 potential rendezvous destinations. In the last 3 years we have observed 50% of all NEOs observed in that time and 54% of all PHAs observed in that time. We lead in followup of provisionally designated PHAs while faint (V>= 22); contributing 41% of all such observations. With the Steward Obs. 0.9-m telescope, site code 691, we survey with a mosaic of CCDs near opposition and at low elongation in the east. Coverage is 1400 sq. deg per lunation; V mag limit ~20.5-21.7. The 12 yrs of uniform surveying will go live on the web in 2015 to support incidental astrometry & precoveries of NEOs. On the Spacewatch 1.8-m telescope, site code 291, the FOV = 20x20 arcmin and the pixel scale = 0.6 arcsec/pixel. V mag limit=23 and the astrometric residuals are +/-0.3 arcsec. Our output with the Bok 2.3-m & Mayall 4-m telescopes from 2010-2014 was 1316 lines of astrometry on 207 different NEOs, including 84 different PHAs. 343 observations were made of PHAs with V>=22. Our average calendar span extension on large PHAs is 6 mo, 2x longer than the next most effective observing station. We extend the span of calendar time coverage on PHAs an average of 3.8x. For 38 of 72 PHAs we added another observed opposition. With the Bok & Mayall we reduce uncertainties of orbital elements an average of a factor of 6 and the uncertainty of the time of perihelion passage an average of a factor of 19 (G. Williams 2014 private communication). We gratefully acknowledge NASA's NEO Observation Program, The IAU's Minor Planet

  17. HUBBLE SNAPSHOT CAPTURES LIFE CYCLE OF STARS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In this stunning picture of the giant galactic nebula NGC 3603, the crisp resolution of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope captures various stages of the life cycle of stars in one single view. To the upper right of center is the evolved blue supergiant called Sher 25. The star has a unique circumstellar ring of glowing gas that is a galactic twin to the famous ring around the supernova 1987A. The grayish-bluish color of the ring and the bipolar outflows (blobs to the upper right and lower left of the star) indicates the presence of processed (chemically enriched) material. Near the center of the view is a so-called starburst cluster dominated by young, hot Wolf-Rayet stars and early O-type stars. A torrent of ionizing radiation and fast stellar winds from these massive stars has blown a large cavity around the cluster. The most spectacular evidence for the interaction of ionizing radiation with cold molecular-hydrogen cloud material are the giant gaseous pillars to the right and lower left of the cluster. These pillars are sculptured by the same physical processes as the famous pillars Hubble photographed in the M16 Eagle Nebula. Dark clouds at the upper right are so-called Bok globules, which are probably in an earlier stage of star formation. To the lower left of the cluster are two compact, tadpole-shaped emission nebulae. Similar structures were found by Hubble in Orion, and have been interpreted as gas and dust evaporation from possibly protoplanetary disks (proplyds). The 'proplyds' in NGC 3603 are 5 to 10 times larger in size and correspondingly also more massive. This single view nicely illustrates the entire stellar life cycle of stars, starting with the Bok globules and giant gaseous pillars, followed by circumstellar disks, and progressing to evolved massive stars in the young starburst cluster. The blue supergiant with its ring and bipolar outflow marks the end of the life cycle. The color difference between the supergiant's bipolar outflow and the diffuse

  18. A New Look at Stellar Outflows: Spitzer Observations of the HH 46/47 System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noriega-Crespo, Alberto; Morris, Patrick; Marleau, Francine R.; Carey, Sean; Boogert, Adwin; van Dishoeck, Ewine; Evans, Neal J., II; Keene, Jocelyn; Muzerolle, James; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Pontoppidan, Klaus; Lowrance, Patrick; Allen, Lori; Bourke, Tyler L.

    2004-01-01

    We present the Early Release Observations of the HH 46/47 system and HH 46 IRS 1 source, taken with the three instruments aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. The optically invisible southwest lobe, driven by the HH 47C bow shock, is revealed in full detail by the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) images and displays a 'loop'-like morphology. Both of the mid-infrared outflow lobes are narrower than those of CO flow. We believe that the combination of emission by H2 rotational lines [S(11)-S(4)] and some atomic lines, which fall within the IRAC passbands, are responsible for the bulk of the observed emission, although contributions from the 3.3, 6.2, and 7.7 micron polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission bands cannot be ruled out. Weak spectral features corresponding to these emitters are present in the Infrared Spectrograph spectrum of the HH 47A bow shock. The spectrum of HH 46 IRS 1 shows remarkable similarities to those of high-mass protostars, which include the presence of H2O, CO2, CH4, and possibly NH3, CH3OH, and ices. The high ice abundances and the lack of signs of thermal processing indicate that these ices in the envelope are well shielded from the powerful outflow and its cavity. Emission from the Bok globule at 24 micron is detected and displays a similar structure to that observed at 8 micron.

  19. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping Project: Quasar Reverberation Mapping Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grier, Catherine; SDSS-RM Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping Project (SDSS-RM) has completed its first three years of spectroscopic observations of a sample of ~850 quasars with the SDSS-III BOSS spectrograph. From January-July in 2014, 2015, and 2016, more than 55 epochs of spectroscopy were obtained for this quasar sample, and continued monitoring has been approved for 2017. Supporting photometric observations were also carried out at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope and the Steward Observatory Bok telescope. In addition, the SDSS-RM field overlaps with the Pan-STARRS 1 Medium Deep Field MD07, so we have photometric data for three years prior to the SDSS-RM observations, which considerably extends the time delay sensitivity of the campaign. Preliminary reverberation mapping results were presented by Shen et al. (2015) and the program has also yielded ancillary science results in regimes such as broad absorption line variability, quasar ensemble variability characteristics, quasar emission line studies, SDSS quasar redshift measurements, and host galaxy properties. I will discuss the current status of the SDSS-RM program, including recent reverberation mapping results from the wider 850-quasar sample using the full set of first-year photometric and spectroscopic data.

  20. Repression of TCF3/E2A contributes to Hodgkin lymphomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Hanfeng; Xie, Linka; Wirth, Thomas; Ushmorov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    Although Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells of classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) derived from germinal or post germinal B cells, they have lost the B cell phenotype in the process of lymphomagenesis. The phenomenon can be at least partially explained by repression of B-cell-specific transcription factors including TCF3, early B-cell factor 1 (EBF1), SPI1/PU.1, and FOXO1, which are down-regulated by genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. The unique phenotype has been suspected to be advantageous for survival of HRS cells. Ectopic expression of some of these transcription factors (EBF1, PU.1, FOXO1) indeed impaired survival of cHL cells. Here we show that forced expression of TCF3 causes cell death and cell cycle arrest in cHL cell lines. Mechanistically, TCF3 overexpression modulated expression of multiple pro-apoptotic genes including BIK, APAF1, FASLG, BOK, and TNFRSF10A/DR4. We conclude that TCF3 inactivation contributes not only to extinguishing of B cell phenotype but also to cHL oncogenesis. PMID:27166193

  1. Pluto and Charon's Visible Spectrum (3500-9000 Å)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, J. C.; Wyckoff, S.

    2003-05-01

    Uncertainty in the chemical composition of Pluto's atmosphere severely limits our understanding of its physical properties. The only atmospheric gas identified spectroscopically to date has been CH4 (Young et al., 1997), while an upper limit has been set for CO gas (Young et al., 2001). Infrared detection of surface N2 ice (Owen et al., 1993) together with models based on occultation data (Elliot and Young, 1992) indicate that Pluto's atmosphere is probably dominated by CO and/or N2 (Yelle and Lunine, 1989; Hubbard et al., 1990; Stansberry et al., 1994). If the atmosphere is in vapor pressure equilibrium with the surface ice, then N2 gas would dominate the atmosphere with abundances ≳ 90% (Owen et al., 1993). Here we report on a search to identify atmospheric spectral features using data collected with the Steward Observatory 90'' Bok Telescope and the B & C Spectrograph. Pluto-Charon spectra were obtained on five nights in May and June 2003 using 300 l/mm grating blazed in the blue and red spectral regions. We present spectra covering the visible range from 3500 to 9000 Å : (λ /Δ λ ˜ 750 at 6000 Å), and discuss limits set on gases in the atmosphere and extended exosphere of the Pluto-Charon system. J. C. Cook would like to acknowledge support from NASA Space Grant Fellowship.

  2. The Supernova Spectropolarimetry Project: Evolution of Asymmetries in the Very Luminous Type Ib SN 2012au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Jennifer L.; Smith, N.; Bilinski, C.; Dessart, L.; Huk, L. N.; Leonard, D. C.; Milne, P.; Smith, P. S.; Williams, G.

    2014-01-01

    The Supernova Spectropolarimetry Project is a recently formed collaboration between observers and theorists that focuses on decoding the complex, time-dependent spectropolarimetric behavior of supernovae (SNe) of all types. Using the CCD Imaging/Spectropolarimeter (SPOL) at the 61" Kuiper, the 90" Bok, and the 6.5-m MMT telescopes, we obtain multi-epoch observations of each target, aiming to construct the most comprehensive survey to date of supernovae in polarized light. In this poster we present the results of 6 epochs of spectropolarimetric observations of the Type Ib SN 2012au spanning the first 315 days of its evolution. This supernova was a very energetic, luminous, and slow-evolving event that may represent an intermediate case between normal core-collapse SNe and the enigmatic superluminous SNe (SLSNe). Strong, time-variable line polarization signatures, particularly in the He I λ5876 line, support previous hypotheses of an asymmetric explosion and allow us to trace detailed structures within the supernova ejecta as they change over time. We compare the spectropolarimetric evolution of SN 2012au with that of other objects in our data set and discuss its connections with other SNe Ib/c and SLSNe.

  3. Preliminary Results from a Search for a Nebula in the Vicinity of Sirius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutz, Steven B.; Wyckoff, Susan

    1992-12-01

    Ptolemy, Seneca, and several Babylonian and mediaeval texts have described Sirius (now A1V for the visible component) as a red star (Gry and Bonnet-Bidaud 1990, Schlosser and Bergman 1985). If true, then the present color of Sirius would be very difficult to explain in terms of current theories of stellar evolution. A possible explanation is that Sirius was eclipsed by a small, dark nebula such as a Bok globule (see Gry and Bonnet-Bidaud 1990). To search for such an object J, H, K, and CO (near 2.4 mu ) imaging of the stellar field near Sirius' apparent postion of 2000 years ago was performed using the University of Arizona's 256x256 IR array on their 61-inch Mt Bigelow telescope. Preliminary (J-H) vs. (H-K) diagrams indicate the presence of color excesses in the area of study (following the methods of Jones et al. 1980, 1984). Examination of the Palomar Sky Survey plates for the region of interest shows several areas where the stellar number density is more than 3 sigma smaller than the average stellar density for that area of the sky. Also, the stellar density for these depleted regions is higher on the red Palomar plate than the number density of the regions on the blue plate, suggesting a redder stellar population in these regions, which may be due to the presence of intervening material.

  4. A Systems Engineering Approach to Quality Assurance for Aerospace Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, Christena C.

    2015-01-01

    On the surface, it appears that AS91001 has little to say about how to apply a Quality Management System (QMS) to major aerospace test programs (or even smaller ones). It also appears that there is little in the quality engineering Body of Knowledge (BOK)2 that applies to testing, unless it is nondestructive examination (NDE), or some type of lab or bench testing associated with the manufacturing process. However, if one examines: a) how the systems engineering (SE) processes are implemented throughout a test program; and b) how these SE processes can be mapped to the requirements of AS9100, a number of areas for involvement of the quality professional are revealed. What often happens is that quality assurance during a test program is limited to inspections of the test article; what could be considered a manufacturing al fresco approach. This limits the quality professional and is a disservice to the programs and projects, since there are a number of ways that quality can enhance critical processes, and support efforts to improve risk reduction, efficiency and effectiveness.

  5. The molecular gas associated with HH46 and HH47

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuiper, T. B. H.; Peters, W. L., III; Forster, J. R.; Gardner, F. F.; Whiteoak, J. B.

    1987-01-01

    The NASA 64-m and CSIRO 64-m antennas at Tidbinbilla and Parkes, respectively, have been used to observe the star-forming region associated with HH46 and HH47 in the Bok globule known as ESO 210-6A or Sa III. The (1,1), (2,2), and (3,3) transitions of ammonia were observed at the position of the infrared point source, which is the star energizing this complex. Ammonia was not detected at other nearby locations in the globule. The ammonia emission is attributed to a circumstellar toroid or disk with a gas temperature of 17 + or - 2 K, a density of 7 + or - 20,000/cu cm, a size of 6000-7500 Au, and a mass of 0.09-0.14 solar masses, assuming an ammonia abundance of 10 to the -7th. Such a low disk mass may imply more than mere confinement as the mechanism for achieving high collimation observed in the outflow from this region.

  6. Should non-disclosures be considered as morally equivalent to lies within the doctor-patient relationship?

    PubMed

    Cox, Caitriona L; Fritz, Zoe

    2016-10-01

    In modern practice, doctors who outright lie to their patients are often condemned, yet those who employ non-lying deceptions tend to be judged less critically. Some areas of non-disclosure have recently been challenged: not telling patients about resuscitation decisions; inadequately informing patients about risks of alternative procedures and withholding information about medical errors. Despite this, there remain many areas of clinical practice where non-disclosures of information are accepted, where lies about such information would not be. Using illustrative hypothetical situations, all based on common clinical practice, we explore the extent to which we should consider other deceptive practices in medicine to be morally equivalent to lying. We suggest that there is no significant moral difference between lying to a patient and intentionally withholding relevant information: non-disclosures could be subjected to Bok's 'Test of Publicity' to assess permissibility in the same way that lies are. The moral equivalence of lying and relevant non-disclosure is particularly compelling when the agent's motivations, and the consequences of the actions (from the patient's perspectives), are the same. We conclude that it is arbitrary to claim that there is anything inherently worse about lying to a patient to mislead them than intentionally deceiving them using other methods, such as euphemism or non-disclosure. We should question our intuition that non-lying deceptive practices in clinical practice are more permissible and should thus subject non-disclosures to the same scrutiny we afford to lies.

  7. CCD observations of distant comets from Palomar and Steward Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, Stephen C.; Weissman, Paul R.

    2003-08-01

    We are conducting a ground-based observational study of distant cometary nuclei with the aim of increasing the current database of physical parameters of individual objects, and to estimate the overall distributions of size, rotation period, axial ratio, and color indices. Additionally, we are obtaining CCD spectroscopy and photometry of established and potential targets of current and future spacecraft missions. The results presented here are derived from CCD imaging obtained using the 2.3-m Bok telescope of Steward Observatory (Arizona), obtained in May 2001, and the 5-m Hale telescope at Palomar Observatory (California), obtained in May 2000 and March 2001. Comets observed include 4P/Faye, 6P/d'Arrest, 22P/Kopff, 36P/Whipple, 50P/Arend, 78P/Gehrels 2, 92P/Sanguin, 107P/Wilson-Harrington, and 128P/Shoemaker-Holt 1-A. Of the nine comets observed, only Comets 4P/Faye and 50P/Arend displayed visible coma activity. We have performed either single R filter or multi-filter ( BVRI) measurements on these comets, from which we obtain radius and broadband color estimates as well as Afρ values for the active comets. For selected objects we have performed time-series R filter imaging from which we have derived the rotation period and lower limits on the nuclear axial ratio and density. The radius results obtained are included in the cometary nucleus size distribution estimate by Weissman and Lowry (2003).

  8. DA white dwarfs in the Kepler field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, T. F.; Howell, S. B.; Petit, V.; Lépine, S.

    2017-01-01

    We present 16 new, and confirm 7 previously identified, DA white dwarfs in the Kepler field through ground-based spectroscopy with the Hale 200″, Kitt Peak 4-m, and Bok 2.3-m telescopes. Using atmospheric models, we determine their effective temperatures and surface gravities to constrain their position with respect to the ZZ Ceti (DA pulsator) instability strip, and look for the presence or absence of pulsation with Kepler's unprecedented photometry. Our results are as follows. (i) From our measurements of temperature and surface gravity, 12 of the 23 DA white dwarfs from this work fall well outside of the instability strip. The Kepler photometry available for 11 of these WDs allows us to confirm that none are pulsating. One of these 11 happens to be a presumed binary, KIC 11604781, with a period of ˜5 d. (ii) The remaining 11 DA white dwarfs are instability strip candidates, potentially falling within the current, empirical instability strip, after accounting for uncertainties. These WDs will help constrain the strip's location further, as eight are near the blue edge and three are near the red edge of the instability strip. Four of these WDs do not have Kepler photometry, so ground-based photometry is needed to determine the pulsation nature of these white dwarfs. The remaining seven have Kepler photometry available, but do not show any periodicity on typical WD pulsation time-scales.

  9. Mosaic3: a red-sensitive upgrade for the prime focus camera at the Mayall 4m telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Arjun; Rabinowitz, David; Karcher, Armin; Bebek, Chris; Baltay, Charles; Sprayberry, David; Valdes, Frank; Stupak, Bob; Donaldson, John; Emmet, Will; Hurteau, Tom; Abareshi, Behzad; Marshall, Bob; Lang, Dustin; Fitzpatrick, Mike; Daly, Phil; Joyce, Dick; Schlegel, David; Schweiker, Heidi; Allen, Lori; Blum, Bob; Levi, Michael

    2016-08-01

    The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) is under construction and will be used to measure the expansion history of the Universe using the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) technique and the growth of structure using redshift-space distortions (RSD). The spectra of 30 million galaxies over 14000 sq deg will be measured over the course of the experiment. In order to provide spectroscopic targets for the DESI survey, we are carrying out a three-band (g,r,z ) imaging survey of the sky using the NOAO 4-m telescopes at Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) and the Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory (CTIO). At KPNO, we will use an upgraded version of the Mayall 4m telescope prime focus camera, Mosaic3, to carry out a z-band survey of the Northern Galactic Cap at declinations δ>=+30 degrees. By equipping an existing Dewar with four 4kx4k fully depleted CCDs manufactured by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), we increased the z-band throughput of the system by a factor of 1.6. These devices have the thickest active area fielded at a telescope. The Mosaic3 z-band survey will be complemented by g-band and r-band observations using the Bok telescope and 90 Prime imager on Kitt Peak. We describe the upgrade and performance of the Mosaic3 instrument and the scope of the northern survey.

  10. South Galactic Cap u-band Sky Survey (SCUSS): Project Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xu; Fan, Xiao-Hui; Fan, Zhou; He, Bo-Liang; Jiang, Lin-Hua; Jiang, Zhao-Ji; Jing, Yi-Peng; Lesser, Michael; Ma, Jun; Nie, Jun-Dan; Shen, Shi-Yin; Wang, Jia-Li; Wu, Zhen-Yu; Zhang, Tian-Meng; Zhou, Zhi-Min; Zou, Hu

    2016-04-01

    The South Galactic Cap u-band Sky Survey (SCUSS) was established in 2009 in order to provide a photometric input catalog for target selection of the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) project. SCUSS is an international cooperative project between National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and Steward Observatory at the University of Arizona, using the 90 inch (2.3m) Bok telescope on Kitt Peak. The telescope is equipped with a prime focus camera that is composed of a mosaic of four 4096 × 4096 CCDs and has a field of view of about 1 deg2. From 2009 to 2013, SCUSS performed a sky survey of an approximately 5000 deg2 field of the South Galactic Cap in u band, including the Galactic anticenter area and the SDSS-IV extended imaging area. The limiting magnitude of SCUSS is deeper than 23 mag (at a signal-to-noise ratio of 5). In this paper, we briefly describe the goals of this project, method of observations and data reduction, and we also introduce current and potential scientific activities related to the SCUSS project.

  11. A deep proper motion catalog within the Sloan digital sky survey footprint

    SciTech Connect

    Munn, Jeffrey A.; Harris, Hugh C.; Tilleman, Trudy M.; Hippel, Ted von; Kilic, Mukremin; Liebert, James W.; Williams, Kurtis A.; DeGenarro, Steven; Jeffery, Elizabeth E-mail: hch@nofs.navy.mil E-mail: ted.vonhippel@erau.edu E-mail: jamesliebert@gmail.com E-mail: studiofortytwo@yahoo.com

    2014-12-01

    A new proper motion catalog is presented, combining the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) with second epoch observations in the r band within a portion of the SDSS imaging footprint. The new observations were obtained with the 90prime camera on the Steward Observatory Bok 90 inch telescope, and the Array Camera on the U.S. Naval Observatory, Flagstaff Station, 1.3 m telescope. The catalog covers 1098 square degrees to r = 22.0, an additional 1521 square degrees to r = 20.9, plus a further 488 square degrees of lesser quality data. Statistical errors in the proper motions range from 5 mas year{sup −1} at the bright end to 15 mas year{sup −1} at the faint end, for a typical epoch difference of six years. Systematic errors are estimated to be roughly 1 mas year{sup −1} for the Array Camera data, and as much as 2–4 mas year{sup −1} for the 90prime data (though typically less). The catalog also includes a second epoch of r band photometry.

  12. Crimson Tide: The Harvard Books on Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, R. P.

    2001-12-01

    The Harvard Books on Astronomy, a series of crimson clad, fully illustrated volumes, cornered, for more than a generation, the market of readers interested in astronomy. A large number of astronomers owe their first serious initiation to the literature of astronomy to these books. Their style, presentation, design, and tone marked a clear departure from the inherited traditions in the field. Each summed up a field, awarded points for merit, and staked out paths for future study. No doubt each of the more mature readers of this abstract has his or her favorite volume, and even his or her own favorite edition of a particular volume. How the volumes evolved and what happened to the series with Harlow Shapley's retirement are not only questions in the history of the book but also form a commentary on the standards of scientific writing for the educated public. For this the major evidence comes from the volumes by Shapley himself, Leo Goldberg and Lawrence Aller, and the Boks. This paper discusses the origins of the series, the purpose of the works, the varying successes of the volumes, and the impact they had on the future astronomical community. In part, this is a contribution to the impact of Harlow Shapley upon the wider field and the role of Harvard in the American astronomical community. It is also a meditation upon the ways of recruitment into the field and forming ways of looking at research problems.

  13. Should non-disclosures be considered as morally equivalent to lies within the doctor–patient relationship?

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Caitriona L; Fritz, Zoe

    2016-01-01

    In modern practice, doctors who outright lie to their patients are often condemned, yet those who employ non-lying deceptions tend to be judged less critically. Some areas of non-disclosure have recently been challenged: not telling patients about resuscitation decisions; inadequately informing patients about risks of alternative procedures and withholding information about medical errors. Despite this, there remain many areas of clinical practice where non-disclosures of information are accepted, where lies about such information would not be. Using illustrative hypothetical situations, all based on common clinical practice, we explore the extent to which we should consider other deceptive practices in medicine to be morally equivalent to lying. We suggest that there is no significant moral difference between lying to a patient and intentionally withholding relevant information: non-disclosures could be subjected to Bok's ‘Test of Publicity’ to assess permissibility in the same way that lies are. The moral equivalence of lying and relevant non-disclosure is particularly compelling when the agent's motivations, and the consequences of the actions (from the patient's perspectives), are the same. We conclude that it is arbitrary to claim that there is anything inherently worse about lying to a patient to mislead them than intentionally deceiving them using other methods, such as euphemism or non-disclosure. We should question our intuition that non-lying deceptive practices in clinical practice are more permissible and should thus subject non-disclosures to the same scrutiny we afford to lies. PMID:27451425

  14. Magnetic field geometry of the large globule CB 34

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, A.; Das, H. S.; Medhi, Biman J.; Wolf, S.

    2016-12-01

    We report the results of optical polarimetric observations of a Bok globule CB34 to study magnetic field structure on large scales (105-106 AU), which is combined with archival sub-mm observations to characterize the magnetic field structure of CB34 on small scales (104-105 AU). The optical polarization measurements indicate that the magnetic field in the globule is constrained to a maximum radius of 105 AU around the core, out to densities not smaller than 104 cm^{-3}. Our study is mainly concentrated on two submillimeter cores C1 and C2 of CB34. The direction of magnetic field of core C2 is found to be nearly perpendicular to the CO outflow direction of the globule. The magnetic field of core C1 is almost aligned with the minor axis of the core which is typical for magnetically dominated star formation models. The mean value of offset between the minor axis of core C2 and the outflow direction is found to be 14° which suggests that the direct ion of the outflow is almost aligned with the minor axis of core C2. The magnetic field strength in the plane-of-sky for cores C1 and C2 is estimated to be ≈ 34 μG and ≈ 70 μG.

  15. Insecticide susceptibility of three species of cutworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) pests of grapes.

    PubMed

    Smirle, Michael J; Zurowski, Cheryl L; Lowery, D Thomas; Mostafa, Ayman M

    2013-10-01

    Climbing cutworms in the genus Abagrotis are economically important pests of grapes in the Okanagan Valley of British Columbia (BC). Grapes are recently introduced into many areas of the region, and the association between crop and pest is new and still evolving. This has led to limited information being available on pest management strategies, including the evaluation of chemical controls compatible with local production practices. Few insecticides are currently registered in Canada for cutworm control on grapes, and our study was initiated to provide information on the efficacy of potential control materials. We were also interested in the relative susceptibilities of the three most common cutworm species attacking grape buds in BC--Abagrotis orbis (Grote), Abagrotis reedi Buckett, and Abagrotis nefascia (Smith). Dose-response bioassays with nine insecticides were conducted on neonate larvae using Bok Choy leaf disks, and on fourth-instar larvae using diet incorporation. There were considerable differences in the toxicity of insecticides within species for neonates and fourth instars. For some materials, the relative toxicity to neonates and fourth instars were not correlated. Response to insecticides among the three species showed variation as well, and correct identification of the species complex present in individual locations is important in choosing the best available control material.

  16. The Effects of Various Amendments on Trace Element Stabilization in Acidic, Neutral, and Alkali Soil with Similar Pollution Index.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Suk; Min, Hyun-Gi; Lee, Sang-Hwan; Kim, Jeong-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have examined the application of soil amendments, including pH change-induced immobilizers, adsorbents, and organic materials, for soil remediation. This study evaluated the effects of various amendments on trace element stabilization and phytotoxicity, depending on the initial soil pH in acid, neutral, and alkali conditions. As in all types of soils, Fe and Ca were well stabilized on adsorption sites. There was an effect from pH control or adsorption mechanisms on the stabilization of cationic trace elements from inorganic amendments in acidic and neutral soil. Furthermore, acid mine drainage sludge has shown great potential for stabilizing most trace elements. In a phytotoxicity test, the ratio of the bioavailable fraction to the pseudo-total fraction significantly affected the uptake of trace elements by bok choy. While inorganic amendments efficiently decreased the bioavailability of trace elements, significant effects from organic amendments were not noticeable due to the short-term cultivation period. Therefore, the application of organic amendments for stabilizing trace elements in agricultural soil requires further study.

  17. The effectiveness of spent coffee grounds and its biochar on the amelioration of heavy metals-contaminated water and soil using chemical and biological assessments.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Suk; Min, Hyun-Gi; Koo, Namin; Park, Jeongsik; Lee, Sang-Hwan; Bak, Gwan-In; Kim, Jeong-Gyu

    2014-12-15

    Spent coffee grounds (SCG) and charred spent coffee grounds (SCG-char) have been widely used to adsorb or to amend heavy metals that contaminate water or soil and their success is usually assessed by chemical analysis. In this work, the effects of SCG and SCG-char on metal-contaminated water and soil were evaluated using chemical and biological assessments; a phytotoxicity test using bok choy (Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis Jusl.) was conducted for the biological assessment. When SCG and SCG-char were applied to acid mine drainage, the heavy metal concentrations were decreased and the pH was increased. However, for SCG, the phytotoxicity increased because a massive amount of dissolved organic carbon was released from SCG. In contrast, SCG-char did not exhibit this phenomenon because any easily released organic matter was removed during pyrolysis. While the bioavailable heavy metal content decreased in soils treated with SCG or SCG-char, the phytotoxicity only rose after SCG treatment. According to our statistical methodology, bioavailable Pb, Cu and As, as well as the electrical conductivity representing an increase in organic content, affected the phytotoxicity of soil. Therefore, applying SCG during environment remediation requires careful biological assessments and evaluations of the efficiency of this remediation technology.

  18. The Effects of Various Amendments on Trace Element Stabilization in Acidic, Neutral, and Alkali Soil with Similar Pollution Index

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Suk; Min, Hyun-Gi; Lee, Sang-Hwan; Kim, Jeong-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have examined the application of soil amendments, including pH change-induced immobilizers, adsorbents, and organic materials, for soil remediation. This study evaluated the effects of various amendments on trace element stabilization and phytotoxicity, depending on the initial soil pH in acid, neutral, and alkali conditions. As in all types of soils, Fe and Ca were well stabilized on adsorption sites. There was an effect from pH control or adsorption mechanisms on the stabilization of cationic trace elements from inorganic amendments in acidic and neutral soil. Furthermore, acid mine drainage sludge has shown great potential for stabilizing most trace elements. In a phytotoxicity test, the ratio of the bioavailable fraction to the pseudo-total fraction significantly affected the uptake of trace elements by bok choy. While inorganic amendments efficiently decreased the bioavailability of trace elements, significant effects from organic amendments were not noticeable due to the short-term cultivation period. Therefore, the application of organic amendments for stabilizing trace elements in agricultural soil requires further study. PMID:27835687

  19. Growth inhibition in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa var. chinensis) growth exposed to di-n-butyl phthalate.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chien-Sen; Yen, Jui-Hung; Wang, Yei-Shung

    2009-04-30

    The toxicity and effects of di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP), an endocrine disruptor, on the growth of Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa var. chinensis) were studied. Etiolation occurred on leaves of Chinese cabbage plant treated with 50mg/L of DBP for 42 d. DBP even below 1mg/L had a significant effect on the concentration of chlorophyll in Chinese cabbage and the biomass showed a severe decrease under treatment with more than 30 mg/L of DBP. At a concentration below 1mg/L of DBP, no significant difference in accumulation was found, but treatments with concentration exceeding 10, 30, 50 and 100mg/L all resulted in significant accumulation of DBP. Six protein spots extracted from leaf tissue of DBP-treated Chinese cabbage displaying a differential expression are shown in 2-DE maps. According to proteome level studies, three protein spots were found to increase and were identified, respectively, as acyl-[acyl-carrier-protein] desaturase (acyl-ACP desaturase), root phototropism protein 3 (RPT3) and ferredoxin-nitrite reductase (Fd-NiR). The other three protein spots were found to decrease and were identified respectively as dihydroflavonol-4-reductase (DFR), aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (aaRS) and ATP synthase subunit beta. The key finding is that the other closely related plant, Bok choy (Brassica rapa subsp. chinensis), the subspecies of Chinese cabbage, respond differently to the same chemicals.

  20. Territorial and land-use rights perspectives on human-chimpanzee-elephant coexistence in West Africa (Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Senegal, nineteenth to twenty-first centuries).

    PubMed

    Leblan, Vincent

    2016-07-01

    The first part of this article compares the distribution of chimpanzee and elephant populations in reaction to human territorial dynamics of West African trade in parts of nineteenth century Guinea, Guinea-Bissau and Senegal. It answers for this specific region the question of whether present-day situations of close chimpanzee-human spatial proximity are stable or only temporary phenomena in long-term processes of environmental change, and shows that conservation policies centred on either of these two "flagship" species carry radically different ecological, political and territorial implications. The second part shifts to local-level perspectives on human-chimpanzee relationships, emphasizing the land rights contentions and misunderstandings created by the implementation of protected areas at Bossou and in the Boké region of Guinea. These case studies help to look at acts of resistance and local interpretations of primate conservation policies as opportunities to reconsider what is being protected, for what purpose, as whose heritage, and to move towards new and more legitimate opportunities for the implementation of conservation policies.

  1. Spectroscopy of Intermediate Mass Members of the Orion OB1a and b associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Frederick M.; Sherry, William; Kim, Serena; Brittain, Sean

    2010-08-01

    OB associations are ideal sites for probing the formation of low mass stars. There has been little systematic study of the low mass stars in the largest nearby OB association, Orion OB1, aside from the Orion Nebula and σ Ori clusters. In an attempt to map the mass function and its spatial variation from 40 to below 0.01 M_⊙, we have completed a near-IR (JHK) survey of about 18 square degrees in the Orion OB1a and OB1b associations using the CPAPIR camera on the SMARTS/CTIO 1.5m telescope, supplemented by a VRI survey using the Steward Observatory Bok/90Prime and the KPNO 4m/MOSAIC cameras, as well as deep 4m/NEWFIRM images. The photometry reveals thousands of candidate association members. We request time with HYDRA to obtain spectra of the brighter candidate members (V<19), in order to confirm youth and membership from Li abundances, chromospheric activity, and radial velocities.

  2. Geomorphological context of the basins of Northwestern Peninsular Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sautter, Benjamin; Pubellier, Manuel; Menier, David

    2014-05-01

    Geomorphological context of the basins of Northwestern Peninsular Malaysia Benjamin Sautter, Manuel Pubellier, David Menier Department of Petroleum Geosciences, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS CNRS-UMR 8538, Ecole Normale Supérieure, 24, Rue Lhomond, 75231, Paris Cedex 05, France Petroleum basins of Western Malaysia are poorly known and their formation is controlled by the Tertiary stress variations applied on Mesozoic basement structures. Among these are the Paleozoic-Mesozoic Bentong Raub, Inthanon, and Nan suture zones. By the end of Mesozoic times, the arrival of Indian plate was accompanied by strike slip deformation, accommodated by several Major Faults (Sagaing, Three Pagodas, Mae Ping, Red River, Ranong and Klong Marui Faults). Due to changes in the boundary forces, these areas of weakness (faults) were reactivated during the Tertiary, leading to the opening of basins in most of Sundaland. Within this framework, while most of the Sundaland records stretching of the crust and opening of basins (SCS, Malay, Penyu, Natuna, Mergui) during the Cenozoics, Peninsular Malaysia and the Strait of Malacca are considered to be in tectonic quiescence by most of the authors. We present the geomorphology of the Northwestern Malaysia Peninsula with emphasis on the deformations onshore from the Bentong Raub Suture Zone to the Bok Bak Fault, via the Kinta Valley, and offshore from the Port Klang Graben to the North Penang Graben. By analyzing Digital Elevation Model from ASTER and SRTM data, two main directions of fractures in the granitic plutons are highlighted: NW-SE to W-E sigmoidal faults and N-S to NE-SW linear fractures which seem to cross-cut the others. In the field in the area of the Kinta Valley (Western Belt, NW Peninsular Malaysia), granitic bodies show intense fracturation reflecting several stages of deformation. The granites are generally syntectonic and do not cut fully across the Late Paleozoic platform limestone. Two sets of fractures (NW-SE and NE

  3. Astronomy Camp = IYA x 22: 22 Years of International Astronomy Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, Eric Jon; McCarthy, D. W.; Camp Staff, Astronomy

    2010-01-01

    Do you remember childhood dreams of being an astronomer, or the ravenous desire for ever larger glass and better equipment as an amateur astronomer? What if your child or the person down the street could live that dream for a weekend or a week? The University of Arizona Astronomy Camp continues to substantiate those dreams after more than two decades in existence. Astronomy Camp is an immersion hands-on field experience in astronomy, ranging from two to eight nights, occurring a few times per year. Participants span an age range from elementary students to octogenarians. The three basic offerings include adult camps, a beginning Camp for teenagers, and an advanced teen Camp. Several variants of the basic Camp model have evolved, including an ongoing decade long series of specialized Camps for Girl Scout leaders from across the country, funded by the NIRCam instrument development program for the James Webb Space Telescope. The advanced teen Camp is a microcosm of the entire research arc: the participants propose projects, spend the week collecting and analyzing data using research grade CCDs, infrared arrays, and radio/sub-millimeter telescopes, and finish with a presentation of the results. This past summer the Camps moved to Kitt Peak National Observatory for the first time, providing access to a vast and diverse collection of research instruments, including the 0.9-meter WIYN and 2.3-meter Bok telescopes, the McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope, and the 12-meter ARO radio telescope. Education research into the Camp's impact indicates that reasons for its appeal to youth include a learner-centered and personal approach with a fun attitude toward learning, authentic scientific inquiry led by mentors who are real scientists, a peer group with common interests in science and engineering, and the emotional appeal of spending time on a dark "sky island" devoted to the exploration of nature.

  4. Protective effects of an ethanol extract of Angelica keiskei against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in HepG2 and HepaRG cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon-Hee; Lee, Hyun Sook; Chung, Cha-Kwon

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE Although Angelica keiskei (AK) has widely been utilized for the purpose of general health improvement among Asian, its functionality and mechanism of action. The aim of this study was to determine the protective effect of ethanol extract of AK (AK-Ex) on acute hepatotoxicity induced by acetaminophen (AAP) in HepG2 human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cells and HepaRG human hepatic progenitor cells. MATERIALS/METHODS AK-Ex was prepared HepG2 and HepaRG cells were cultured with various concentrations and 30 mM AAP. The protective effects of AK-Ex against AAP-induced hepatotoxicity in HepG2 and HepaRG cells were evaluated using 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay, flow cytometry, and Western blotting. RESULTS AK-Ex, when administered prior to AAP, increased cell growth and decreased leakage of LDH in a dose-dependent manner in HepG2 and HepaRG cells against AAP-induced hepatotoxicity. AK-Ex increased the level of Bcl-2 and decreased the levels of Bax, Bok and Bik decreased the permeability of the mitochondrial membrane in HepG2 cells intoxicated with AAP. AK-Ex decreased the cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and the activation of caspase-9, -7, and -3. CONCLUSIONS These results demonstrate that AK-Ex downregulates apoptosis via intrinsic and extrinsic pathways against AAP-induced hepatotoxicity. We suggest that AK could be a useful preventive agent against AAP-induced apoptosis in hepatocytes. PMID:28386382

  5. Political Activity at Harvard College Observatory in the Shapley ERA (1921-1952): Controversy and Consequences.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welther, Barbara L.

    1993-12-01

    Soon after Harlow Shapley became director of HCO in 1921, he established himself as a scientist who would speak out and take action on national and international issues. Recognizing the importance of international cooperation in astronomy, he frequently traveled abroad and in turn invited foreign scientists to visit and work at HCO. By the mid-1930s, Shapley was actively rescuing refugee scientists in war-torn Europe and placing them in American universities. Both Harvard and the FBI took note of his activities. Shapley feared intervention of any kind from either academia or the government. Desperate for funding, however, he finally went to Washington and lobbied Congress to set up the NSF. Through 1945, when Truman succeeded Roosevelt, Shapley pursued his political activities freely. That year he travelled to Moscow to represent Harvard at the 220th anniversary celebration of the Academy of Sciences. In Moscow he advocated international cooperation between Soviet and American scientists. Consequently, Shapley was subpoenaed for interrogation in 1946 by John Rankin, who served during the Truman administration as a one-man committee to investigate un-American activities. The ordeal infuriated Shapley. Headlines about it infuriated some Harvard alumni who urged the university to fire him. Although Shapley was nearing retirement, President Conant stood by his right to keep his job. By 1950, when Senator Joseph McCarthy was compiling a list of Communist sympathizers in the State Department, the FBI had a dossier on Shapley. McCarthy subpoenaed Shapley, but could not intimidate him. The Senator continued the witch hunt with Shapley's associates. First he harassed Martha Betz Shapley, then Donald Menzel. Both cleared themselves. Other associates, such as Bart Bok, were spared. Ultimately, the interrogation worked in Menzel's favor. It disassociated him from Shapley's ideology and political activities. When the Harvard Corporation sought the next director of HCO, Menzel

  6. Di-n-Butyl Phthalate Disrupts the Expression of Genes Involved in Cell Cycle and Apoptotic Pathways in Mouse Ovarian Antral Follicles1

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Zelieann R.; Hannon, Patrick R.; Wang, Wei; Ziv-Gal, Ayelet; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) is present in many consumer products, such as infant, beauty, and medical products. Several studies have shown that DBP causes reproductive toxicity in rodents, but no studies have evaluated its effects on ovarian follicles. Therefore, we used a follicle culture system to evaluate the effects of DBP on antral follicle growth, cell cycle and apoptosis gene expression, cell cycle staging, atresia, and 17β-estradiol (E2) production. Antral follicles were isolated from adult CD-1 mice and exposed to DBP at 1, 10, 100, and 1000 μg/ml for 24 or 168 h. Follicles treated with vehicle or DBP at 1–100 μg/ml grew over time, but DBP at 1000 μg/ml significantly suppressed follicle growth. Regardless of effect on follicle growth, DBP-treated follicles had decreased mRNA for cyclins D2, E1, A2, and B1 and increased p21. Levels of the proapoptotic genes Bax, Bad, and Bok were not altered by DBP treatment, but DBP 1000 μg/ml increased levels of Bid and decreased levels of the antiapoptotic gene Bcl2. DBP-treated follicles contained significantly more cells in G1 phase, significantly less cells in S, and exhibited a trend for fewer cells in G2. Although DBP did not affect E2 production and atresia at 24 h, follicles treated with DBP had reduced levels of E2 at 96 h and underwent atresia at 168 h. These data suggest that DBP targets antral follicles and alters the expression of cell cycle and apoptosis factors, causes cell cycle arrest, decreases E2, and triggers atresia, depending on dose. PMID:23242528

  7. Interstellar Bubbles in Two Young H II Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazé, Yaël; Chu, You-Hua; Points, Sean D.; Danforth, Charles W.; Rosado, Margarita; Chen, C.-H. Rosie

    2001-08-01

    Massive stars are expected to produce wind-blown bubbles in the interstellar medium; however, ring nebulae, suggesting the existence of bubbles, are rarely seen around main-sequence O stars. To search for wind-blown bubbles around main-sequence O stars, we have obtained high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 images and high-dispersion echelle spectra of two pristine H II regions, N11B and N180B, in the Large Magellanic Cloud. These H II regions are ionized by OB associations that still contain O3 stars, suggesting that the H II regions are young and have not hosted any supernova explosions. Our observations show that wind-blown bubbles in these H II regions can be detected kinematically, but not morphologically, because their expansion velocities are comparable to or only slightly higher than the isothermal sound velocity in the H II regions. Bubbles are detected around concentrations of massive stars, individual O stars, and even an evolved red supergiant (a fossil bubble). Comparisons between the observed bubble dynamics and model predictions show a large discrepancy (1-2 orders of magnitude) between the stellar wind luminosity derived from bubble observations and models and that derived from observations of stellar winds. The number and distribution of bubbles in N11B differ from those in N180B, which can be explained by the difference in the richness of stellar content between these two H II regions. Most of the bubbles observed in N11B and N180B show a blister structure, indicating that the stars were formed on the surfaces of dense clouds. Numerous small dust clouds, similar to Bok globules or elephant trunks, are detected in these H II regions, and at least one of them hosts on-going star formation.

  8. Bcl-2-related protein family gene expression during oligodendroglial differentiation.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Takayuki; Itoh, Aki; Pleasure, David

    2003-06-01

    Oligodendroglial lineage cells (OLC) vary in susceptibility to both necrosis and apoptosis depending on their developmental stages, which might be regulated by differential expression of Bcl-2-related genes. As an initial step to test this hypothesis, we examined the expression of 19 Bcl-2-related genes in purified cultures of rat oligodendroglial progenitors, immature and mature oligodendrocytes. All 'multidomain' anti-apoptotic members (Bcl-x, Bcl-2, Mcl-1, Bcl-w and Bcl2l10/Diva/Boo) except Bcl2a1/A1 are expressed in OLC. Semiquantitative and real-time RT-PCR revealed that Bcl-xL and Mcl-1 mRNAs are the dominant anti-apoptotic members and increase four- and twofold, respectively, with maturation. Bcl-2 mRNA is less abundant than Bcl-xL mRNA in progenitors and falls an additional 10-fold during differentiation. Bcl-w mRNA also increases, with significant changes in its splicing pattern, as OLC mature. Transfection studies demonstrated that Bcl-xL overexpression protects against kainate-induced excitotoxicity, whereas Bcl-2 overexpression does not. As for 'multidomain' pro-apoptotic members (Bax, Bad and Bok/Mtd), Bax and Bak are highly expressed throughout differentiation. Among 'BH3 domain-only' members examined (Bim, Biklk, DP5/Hrk, Bad, Bid, Noxa, Puma/Bbc3, Bmf, BNip3 and BNip3L), BNip3 and Bmf mRNAs increase markedly during differentiation. These results provide basic information to guide further studies on the roles for Bcl-2-related family proteins in OLC death.

  9. REVERBERATION MAPPING WITH INTERMEDIATE-BAND PHOTOMETRY: DETECTION OF BROAD-LINE Hα TIME LAGS FOR QUASARS AT 0.2 < z < 0.4

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Linhua; Shen, Yue; McGreer, Ian D.; Fan, Xiaohui; Morganson, Eric; Windhorst, Rogier A.

    2016-02-20

    We present a reverberation mapping (RM) experiment that combines broad- and intermediate-band photometry; it is the first such attempt targeting 13 quasars at 0.2 < z < 0.9. The quasars were selected to have strong Hα or Hβ emission lines that are located in one of three intermediate bands (with FWHM around 200 Å) centered at 8045, 8505, and 9171 Å. The imaging observations were carried out in the intermediate bands and the broad i and z bands using the prime-focus imager 90Prime on the 2.3 m Bok telescope. Because of the large (∼1 deg{sup 2}) field of view (FOV) of 90Prime, we included the 13 quasars within only five telescope pointings or fields. The five fields were repeatedly observed over 20–30 epochs that were unevenly distributed over a duration of 5–6 months. The combination of the broad- and intermediate-band photometry allows us to derive accurate light curves for both optical continuum emission (from the accretion disk) and line emission (from the broad-line region, or BLR). We detect Hα time lags between the continuum and line emission in six quasars. These quasars are at relatively low redshifts 0.2 < z < 0.4. The measured lags are consistent with the current BLR size–luminosity relation for Hβ at z < 0.3. While this experiment appears successful in detecting lags of the bright Hα line, further investigation is required to see if it can also be applied to the fainter Hβ line for quasars at higher redshifts. Finally we demonstrate that, by using a small telescope with a large FOV, intermediate-band photometric RM can be efficiently executed for a large sample of quasars at z > 0.2.

  10. Geological and structural interpretation of Peninsular Malaysia by marine and aeromagnetic data: Some preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrudin, Nurul Fairuz Diyana Binti; Hamzah, Umar

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic data were processed to interpret the geology of Peninsular Malaysia especially in delineating the igneous bodies and structural lineament trends by potential field geophysical method. A total of about 32000 magnetic intensity data were obtained from Earth Magnetic Anomaly Grid (EMAG2) covering an area of East Sumatra to part of South China Sea within 99° E to 105° E Longitude and 1° N to 7°N Latitude. These data were used in several processing stages in generating the total magnetic intensity (TMI), reduce to equator (RTE), total horizontal derivative (THD) and total vertical derivative (TVD). Values of the possible surface and subsurface magnetic sources associated to the geological features of the study area. The magnetic properties are normally corresponding to features like igneous bodies and faults structures. The anomalies obtained were then compared to the geological features of the area. In general, the high magnetic anomalies of the TMI-RTE are closely matched with major igneous intrusion of Peninsular Malaysia such as the Main Range, Eastern Belt and the Mersing-Johor Bahru stretch. More dense lineaments of magnetic structures were observed in the THD and TVD results indicating the presence of more deep and shallow magnetic rich geological features. The positions of Bukit Tinggi, Mersing and Lepar faults are perfectly matched with the magnetic highs while the presence of Lebir and Bok Bak faults are not clearly observed in the magnetic results. The high magnetic values of igneous bodies may have concealed and obscured the magnetic values representing these faults.

  11. High-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of plant metabolites in brassicaceae.

    PubMed

    De Vos, Ric C H; Schipper, Bert; Hall, Robert D

    2012-01-01

    The Brassicaceae family comprises a variety of plant species that are of high economic importance as -vegetables or industrial crops. This includes crops such as Brassica rapa (turnip, Bok Choi), B. oleracea (cabbages, broccoli, cauliflower, etc.), and B. napus (oil seed rape), and also includes the famous genetic model of plant research, Arabidopsis thaliana (thale cress). Brassicaceae plants contain a large variety of interesting secondary metabolites, including glucosinolates, hydroxycinnamic acids, and flavonoids. These metabolites are also of particular importance due to their proposed positive effects on human health. Next to these well-known groups of phytochemicals, many more metabolites are of course also present in crude extracts prepared from Brassica and Arabidopsis plant material.High-pressure liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS), especially if combined with a high mass resolution instrument such as a QTOF MS, is a powerful approach to separate, detect, and annotate metabolites present in crude aqueous-alcohol plant extracts. Using an essentially unbiased procedure that takes into account all metabolite mass signals from the raw data files, detailed information on the relative abundance of hundreds of both known and, as yet, unknown semipolar metabolites can be obtained. These comprehensive metabolomics data can then be used to, for instance, identify genetic markers regulating metabolic composition, determine effects of (a)biotic stress or specific growth conditions, or establish metabolite changes occurring upon food processing or storage.This chapter describes in detail a procedure for preparing crude extracts and performing comprehensive HPLC-QTOF MS-based profiling of semi-polar metabolites in Brassicaceae plant material. Compounds present in the extract can be (partially or completely) annotated based on their accurate mass, their MS/MS fragments and on other specific chemical characteristics such as retention time and UV

  12. The Colors of Hilda Group Asteroids: Complications For Use in Testing Dynamical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Erin L.; Noll, Keith; Woodward, Charles E.

    2014-11-01

    Hilda group asteroids are in a stable 3:2 resonance with Jupiter which may have been reshaped by giant planet migration in the early epochs of solar system formation. Although the population is currently dynamically stable, the dynamics of this population suggest at minimum an inward migration of Jupiter by ~0.4 AU (Franklin et al. 2004, AJ, 128, 1391). As this population of objects is relatively isolated, compositional types can be used to test dynamical models such as the Grand Tack and Nice Model which suggest that objects of outer solar system (beyond Saturn) origin would be found in the Hilda population. We have undertaken a multi-year observational program at the 2.3-m Bok Telescope to obtain compositional types for a large sample of Hilda group asteroids. With a preliminary sample of ~400 objects from our observations and the literature, we find complications for direct compositional tests of the giant planet migration models. Specifically, we find that the two dynamical families within the Hilda group, Schubart and Hilda, have disparate dynamical ages ( 1.7 +/- 0.7 Gyr vs > 4 Gyr ; Broz & Vokrouhlicky 2008, MNRAS, 390, 715) but similar colors not seen elsewhere in the Hilda group population. This suggests dynamical family members should be removed from samples when using Hilda group asteroid compositions as a test of giant planet migration models. This research was supported by an appointment to the NASA Postdoctoral Program at Goddard Space Flight Center, administered by Oak Ridge Associated Universities through a contract with NASA. This work also funded by NASA Planetary Astronomy Grant NNX13AJ11G.

  13. ABCG1 rs57137919G>A Polymorphism Is Functionally Associated with Varying Gene Expression and Apoptosis of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Wang, Wei; Xu, Yan; Wang, Yu; Chen, Lian-Feng; Fang, Quan; Yan, Xiao-Wei

    2014-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1) is a transmembrane cholesterol transporter involved in macrophage sterol homeostasis, reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), and atherosclerosis. The role of ABCG1 in atherosclerosis remains controversial, especially in animal models. Our previous study showed that single nucleotide polymorphism rs57137919 (-367G>A) in the ABCG1 promoter region was associated with reduced risk for atherosclerotic coronary artery disease (CAD). This study was designed to provide functional evidence for the role of rs57137919G>A in atherosclerosis in humans. We combined in vitro and ex vivo studies using cell lines and human monocyte-derived macrophages to investigate the functional consequences of the promoter polymorphism by observing the effects of the rs57137919A allele on promoter activity, transcription factor binding, gene expression, cholesterol efflux, and apoptosis levels. The results showed that the rs57137919A allele was significantly associated with decreased ABCG1 gene expression possibly due to the impaired ability of protein-DNA binding. ABCG1-mediated cholesterol efflux decreased by 23% with rs57137919 A/A versus the G/G genotype. Cholesterol-loaded macrophage apoptosis was induced 2-fold with the A/A genotype compared with the G/G genotype. Proapoptotic genes Bok and Bid mRNA levels were significantly increased in macrophages from the A/A genotype compared with those from the G/G genotype. These findings demonstrated that the ABCG1 promoter rs57137919G>A variant had an allele-specific effect on ABCG1 expression and was associated with an increased apoptosis in cholesterol-loaded macrophages, providing functional evidence to explain the reduced risk for atherosclerosis in subjects with the ABCG1 promoter rs57137919A allele as reported in our previous study. PMID:24972087

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SDSS-RM project: technical overview (Shen+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Y.; Brandt, W. N.; Dawson, K. S.; Hall, P. B.; McGreer, I. D.; Anderson, S. F.; Chen, Y.; Denney, K. D.; Eftekharzadeh, S.; Fan, X.; Gao, Y.; Green, P. J.; Greene, J. E.; Ho, L. C.; Horne, K.; Jiang, L.; Kelly, B. C.; Kinemuchi, K.; Kochanek, C. S.; Paris, I.; Peters, C. M.; Peterson, B. M.; Petitjean, P.; Ponder, K.; Richards, G. T.; Schneider, D. P.; Seth, A.; Smith, R. N.; Strauss, M. A.; Tao, C.; Trump, J. R.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Zu, Y.; Eisenstein, D. J.; Pan, K.; Bizyaev, D.; Malanushenko, V.; Malanushenko, E.; Oravetz, D.

    2015-02-01

    Our reverberation mapping (RM) field is the Pan-STARRS 1 (PS1) Medium Deep Field (MDF) MD07 (RAJ2000=213.704, DEJ2000=+53.083), which is a 7deg2 field within the CFHT-LS W3 field. This field is fully covered in the SDSS-I/II and SDSS-III BOSS footprints. The final RM sample contains 849 quasars, each of which was assigned a fiber on the RM plates. The remaining fibers were allocated to calibration sources, including 70 spectrophotometric standard stars, 80 sky fibers, and 1 LRG target (enforced by the BOSS tiling algorithm, but actually not tiled on any existing object in SDSS imaging). The BOSS spectroscopic observations were acquired during 7 dark/gray runs from 2014 January 1 to 2014 July 3. The separation between epochs in a given run is roughly 3-4 days, but varies from run to run under different weather conditions. Typically five epochs were taken for each run when weather permitted, totaling 32 epochs. The main portion of the RM imaging of our program is obtained with the CFHT/MegaCam and the Steward Observatory Bok 2.3m/90Prime. Given that our RM sample covers a wide redshift range, the photometric monitoring is performed in the SDSS g band and i band to sample the quasar continuum at low and high redshifts, respectively. We also had six nights of KPNO-4m (Mayall)/MOSAIC-1.1 observation to perform multi-band (Ugriz) imaging of the RM field. (4 data files).

  15. Formation of CO in turbulent PDR`s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röllig, M.; Hegmann, M.; Hengel, C.; Kegel, W. H.

    Based on an approach by G. Traving and collaborators (cf. Gail et al. 1974), we developed a comprehensive numerical code to deal with density and velocity fluctuations in radiative transfer problems (Albrecht & Kegel 1987, Kegel et al. 1993, Piehler & Kegel 1995, Hegmann 1999). In the last two years we have performed observations at the HHT and collected data of several Bok globules in the CO(2-1), CO(3-2), 13CO(2-1) and C18O(2-1)lines. For an analysis of the data we use the model of Kegel et al. which describes an isothermal spherical cloud being stabelized by turbulent and thermal pressure, considering the turbulent velocity field to be stochastic. In order to fit the observations to this model it turned out to be neccessary to implement an cut off radius for the CO density distribution. We hereby first relied on calculations of van Dishoeck & Black (1988) who accounted for the complicated CO photodissociation process dominated by line rather than continuous absorption using a simplified radiative transfer model. To model the radiation transfer more realistically we calculate the CO density distribution self consistently with the radiation field in a turbulent molecular cloud with regard to a chemical network incorporating 26 different molecules and over 200 chemical reactions. Since the photodissociation of CO is dominated by line absorption turbulence has a substantial influence an the CO density distribution in the outher region of molecular clouds which is an important factor in every model that tries to explain observations of molecular clouds.

  16. DUST SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS IN THE ERA OF HERSCHEL AND PLANCK: A HIERARCHICAL BAYESIAN-FITTING TECHNIQUE

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Brandon C.; Goodman, Alyssa A.; Shetty, Rahul; Stutz, Amelia M.; Launhardt, Ralf; Kauffmann, Jens

    2012-06-10

    We present a hierarchical Bayesian method for fitting infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of dust emission to observed fluxes. Under the standard assumption of optically thin single temperature (T) sources, the dust SED as represented by a power-law-modified blackbody is subject to a strong degeneracy between T and the spectral index {beta}. The traditional non-hierarchical approaches, typically based on {chi}{sup 2} minimization, are severely limited by this degeneracy, as it produces an artificial anti-correlation between T and {beta} even with modest levels of observational noise. The hierarchical Bayesian method rigorously and self-consistently treats measurement uncertainties, including calibration and noise, resulting in more precise SED fits. As a result, the Bayesian fits do not produce any spurious anti-correlations between the SED parameters due to measurement uncertainty. We demonstrate that the Bayesian method is substantially more accurate than the {chi}{sup 2} fit in recovering the SED parameters, as well as the correlations between them. As an illustration, we apply our method to Herschel and submillimeter ground-based observations of the star-forming Bok globule CB244. This source is a small, nearby molecular cloud containing a single low-mass protostar and a starless core. We find that T and {beta} are weakly positively correlated-in contradiction with the {chi}{sup 2} fits, which indicate a T-{beta} anti-correlation from the same data set. Additionally, in comparison to the {chi}{sup 2} fits the Bayesian SED parameter estimates exhibit a reduced range in values.

  17. Morphological variation, advertisement call, and tadpoles of Bokermannohyla nanuzae (Bokermann, 1973), and taxonomic status of B. feioi (Napoli & Caramaschi, 2004) (Anura, Hylidae, Cophomantini).

    PubMed

    Walker, Marina; Lourenço, Ana Carolina Calijorne; Pimenta, Bruno V S; Nascimento, Luciana Barreto

    2015-03-24

    Bokermannohyla nanuzae (Bokermann & Sazima 1973) and B. feioi (Napoli & Caramaschi 2004) belong to the B. cir-cumdata species group. The type locality of the former is Serra do Cipó, Espinhaço mountain range, and of the latter is Parque Estadual do Ibitipoca, Mantiqueira mountain range, both in Minas Gerais State, Brazil. Differences on dorsal draw-ing pattern of adults, oral disc morphology of tadpoles, and temporal properties of calls were proposed to distinguish these two species. However, several specimens found between the two type localities remain unidentified because diagnostic characters and states occur in all of these populations. Thus, in order to assess these characters variations, we performed an analysis of the morphology and morphometry of adults, vocalization, and morphology of tadpoles. Specimens were divided into three operational taxonomic units (OTUs): B. nanuzae (Serra do Cipó and northwards, Espinhaço mountain range), B. cf. nanuzae (Quadrilátero Ferrífero, Espinhaço mountain range, south of Serra do Cipó), and B. feioi (Serra do Ibitipoca, Mantiqueira mountain range). Drawing patterns of the dorsum and limbs show clinal variation and the three units are morphometrically very similar. Temporal and spectral properties of calls overlap in these three units. The diagnostic differences originally proposed for tadpoles are intrapopulational variations and occur in specimens from all of the locations analyzed. We found that these three units are morphologically indistinguishable. Therefore, we designate Bok-ermannohyla feioi (Napoli & Caramaschi 2004) as a junior synonym of Bokermannohyla nanuzae (Bokermann & Sazima 1973), extending its geographical distribution to the Mantiqueira mountain range.

  18. Optical Spectroscopy of the Classical Novae V339 Del (2013) and V5668 Sgr (2015 No. 2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R. Mark; Woodward, Charles E.; Starrfield, Sumner; Ilyin, Ilya; Strassmeier, Klaus G.; Page, Kim; Osborne, Julian P.; Beardmore, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of optical spectroscopy of the gamma-ray classical novae V339 Del (2013) and V5668 Sgr (PNV J18365700-2855420/Nova Sgr 2015 No. 2) supplemented by UV and X-ray observations obtained with Swift. Our spectra were obtained with the Steward Observatory Bok 2.3 m telescope (+B&C), the MDM 2.4 m Hiltner telescope (+OSMOS), the 6.5 m MMT (+BlueChannel), and the 2 x 8.4 m Large Binocular Telescope (+MODS1 and PEPSI) between 2013 August and 2015 September. The PEPSI spectra cover all or part of the 384-907 nm spectral region at a resolution of up to 270,000 (1 km/s). This is the highest resolution available on any 8-10 m class telescope. V339 Del was discovered on 2015 August 14.58 by Itagaki at V about 6.8. This nova reached a peak magnitude of about 4.3 making it one of the brightest novae of this century. Because of its exceptional brightness it has been observed at a variety of wavelengths and by a host of observatories both on the ground and in space. V5668 Sgr was discovered on 2015 March 15.634 by Seach at a magnitude of 6.0. It subsequently reached a maximum brightness of about 4.0 in late March. High resolution PEPSI spectra obtained in early April show dramatic variations in the multi-component P Cygni-type line profiles. V5668 Sgr was observed to form dust in June thereafter fading to about 13th magnitude. Our recent observations show that it has now evolved into the nebular phase. SS acknowledges partial support from NSF and NASA grants to ASU. CEW acknowledges support from NASA.

  19. Di-n-butyl phthalate disrupts the expression of genes involved in cell cycle and apoptotic pathways in mouse ovarian antral follicles.

    PubMed

    Craig, Zelieann R; Hannon, Patrick R; Wang, Wei; Ziv-Gal, Ayelet; Flaws, Jodi A

    2013-01-01

    Di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) is present in many consumer products, such as infant, beauty, and medical products. Several studies have shown that DBP causes reproductive toxicity in rodents, but no studies have evaluated its effects on ovarian follicles. Therefore, we used a follicle culture system to evaluate the effects of DBP on antral follicle growth, cell cycle and apoptosis gene expression, cell cycle staging, atresia, and 17β-estradiol (E(2)) production. Antral follicles were isolated from adult CD-1 mice and exposed to DBP at 1, 10, 100, and 1000 μg/ml for 24 or 168 h. Follicles treated with vehicle or DBP at 1-100 μg/ml grew over time, but DBP at 1000 μg/ml significantly suppressed follicle growth. Regardless of effect on follicle growth, DBP-treated follicles had decreased mRNA for cyclins D2, E1, A2, and B1 and increased p21. Levels of the proapoptotic genes Bax, Bad, and Bok were not altered by DBP treatment, but DBP 1000 μg/ml increased levels of Bid and decreased levels of the antiapoptotic gene Bcl2. DBP-treated follicles contained significantly more cells in G(1) phase, significantly less cells in S, and exhibited a trend for fewer cells in G(2). Although DBP did not affect E(2) production and atresia at 24 h, follicles treated with DBP had reduced levels of E(2) at 96 h and underwent atresia at 168 h. These data suggest that DBP targets antral follicles and alters the expression of cell cycle and apoptosis factors, causes cell cycle arrest, decreases E(2), and triggers atresia, depending on dose.

  20. Suppressed Expression of T-Box Transcription Factors is Involved in Senescence in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Acquaah-Mensah, George; Malhotra, Deepti; Vulimiri, Madhulika; McDermott, Jason E.; Biswal, Shyam

    2012-06-19

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major global health problem. The etiology of COPD has been associated with apoptosis, oxidative stress, and inflammation. However, understanding of the molecular interactions that modulate COPD pathogenesis remains only partly resolved. We conducted an exploratory study on COPD etiology to identify the key molecular participants. We used information-theoretic algorithms including Context Likelihood of Relatedness (CLR), Algorithm for the Reconstruction of Accurate Cellular Networks (ARACNE), and Inferelator. We captured direct functional associations among genes, given a compendium of gene expression profiles of human lung epithelial cells. A set of genes differentially expressed in COPD, as reported in a previous study were superposed with the resulting transcriptional regulatory networks. After factoring in the properties of the networks, an established COPD susceptibility locus and domain-domain interactions involving protein products of genes in the generated networks, several molecular candidates were predicted to be involved in the etiology of COPD. These include COL4A3, CFLAR, GULP1, PDCD1, CASP10, PAX3, BOK, HSPD1, PITX2, and PML. Furthermore, T-box (TBX) genes and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A), which are in a direct transcriptional regulatory relationship, emerged as preeminent participants in the etiology of COPD by means of senescence. Contrary to observations in neoplasms, our study reveals that the expression of genes and proteins in the lung samples from patients with COPD indicate an increased tendency towards cellular senescence. The expression of the anti-senescence mediators TBX transcription factors, chromatin modifiers histone deacetylases, and sirtuins was suppressed; while the expression of TBX-regulated cellular senescence markers such as CDKN2A, CDKN1A, and CAV1 was elevated in the peripheral lung tissue samples from patients with COPD. The critical balance between senescence

  1. Perspectives on the Happiness of Community-Dwelling Elderly in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Sang Won; Lee, Jongha; Lim, JaeHyoung; Jeong, Hyun-Ghang; Park, Moon Ho; Ko, Young-Hoon; Pae, Chi-Un; Kim, Seung Hyun; Joe, Sook-Haeng; Steffens, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective A community survey was performed to investigate the factors and perspectives associated with happiness among the elderly in Korea (≥60 years). Methods Eight hundred volunteers selected from participants in the Ansan Geriatric study (AGE study) were enrolled, and 706 completed the survey. The Happiness Questionnaire (HQ), which asks four questions about happiness, was administered. To explore the relationship between happiness and depression, the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) also were administered. Results The participants' average level of happiness, determined using a 100-mm visual analogue scale (VAS) of the HQ, was 64.7±26.0. The happiest situations for most people were "getting together with family" (23.8%) and "living in peace with family members (well-being)" (13.2%). Frequent reasons for not being happy were "worsened health condition" (28.7% of the not-happy group), "economic problems of their own" (16.5%), and "economic problems of their children" (14.8%). The participants' choices regarding the essential conditions for happiness were "good health" (65.3%) and "being with family" (20.5%). The BDI and GDS scores were negatively related to the happiness score. A preliminary scale [Happy (Haeng-Bok, 幸福) aging scale] based on the HQ for measuring the happiness level of the Korean elderly was suggested for follow-up studies. Conclusion The most important factors determining the happiness of the community-dwelling elderly in Korea were good family relationships, economic stability, and good health. A higher depression score negatively impacted happiness among Korean elders. Further studies on the factors in their happiness are required. PMID:26766946

  2. Plant growth inhibition by cis-cinnamoyl glucosides and cis-cinnamic acid.

    PubMed

    Hiradate, Syuntaro; Morita, Sayaka; Furubayashi, Akihiro; Fujii, Yoshiharu; Harada, Jiro

    2005-03-01

    Spiraea thunbergii Sieb. contains 1-O-cis-cinnamoyl-beta-D-glucopyranose (CG) and 6-O-(4'-hydroxy-2'-methylene-butyroyl)-1-O-cis-cinnamoyl-beta-D-glucopyranose (BCG) as major plant growth inhibiting constituents. In the present study, we determined the inhibitory activity of CG and BCG on root elongation of germinated seedlings of lettuce (Lactuca sativa), pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus), red clover (Trifolium pratense), timothy (Phleum pratense), and bok choy (Brassica rapa var chinensis) in comparison with that of two well-known growth inhibitors, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and (+)-2-cis-4-trans-abscisic acid (cis-ABA), as well as two related chemicals of CG and BCG, cis-cinnamic acid (cis-CA) and trans-cinnamic acid (trans-CA). The EC50 values for CG and BCG on lettuce were roughly one-half to one-quarter of the value for cis-ABA. cis-Cinnamic acid, which is a component of CG and BCG, possessed almost the same inhibitory activity of CG and BCG, suggesting that the essential chemical structure responsible for the inhibitory activity of CG and BCG is cis-CA. The cis-stereochemistry of the methylene moiety is apparently needed for high inhibitory activity, as trans-CA had an EC50 value roughly 100 times that of CG, BCG, and cis-CA. Growth inhibition by CG, BCG, and cis-CA was influenced by the nature of the soil in the growing medium: alluvial soil preserved the bioactivity, whereas volcanic ash and calcareous soils inhibited bioactivity. These findings indicate a potential role of cis-CA and its glucosides as allelochemicals for use as plant growth regulators in agricultural fields.

  3. [Effects of aging time on the form transformation and eco-toxicity threshold (ECx) of added Zn in typical China soils].

    PubMed

    Lin, Lei; Chen, Shi-Bao; Liu, Ji-Fang; Ma, Yi-Bing

    2013-07-01

    Six typical China soils with different properties were selected and added with seven concentrations of ZnCl2 to study the effects of different aging time (14, 90, 180, 360, and 540 days) on the form transformation and eco-toxicity threshold (ECx) of added Zn in the soils, with the main affecting factors analyzed. The results indicated that with the increase of aging time, the fraction of 0.01 mol x L(-1) CaCl2-extracted Zn in the soils decreased sharply initially, then slowed down, and reached the dynamic balance after 540 d incubation. The eco-toxicity thresholds (ECx, x = 10, 50) of Zn to bok choy increased significantly with aging time (P < 0.05), which implied the marked decrease of the phyto-toxicity of Zn. The measured aging factors AF10 and AF50 of Zn ranged from 1.077-1.743 and 1.174-1.441, respectively, and increased with aging time. The balanced concentration of Zn in the soils was significantly negatively correlated with soil pH, CEC, and organic carbon (Org-C) content, and soil pH was the most important controlling factor, followed by CEC and Org-C. It took shorter time to reach Zn balance in the soils with higher pH. The prediction model of the ECx of Zn was developed based on the aging factors and the main soil properties, and could be well validated by the measured ECx under field condition. This study would provide theoretical basis for the normalization of the eco-toxicity thresholds of added Zn in different soils and the formulation of the environmental criterion of Zn in China soils.

  4. Urinary isothiocyanate excretion, brassica consumption, and gene polymorphisms among women living in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Fowke, Jay H; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Dai, Qi; Shintani, Ayumi; Conaway, C Clifford; Chung, Fung-Lung; Cai, Qiuyin; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zheng, Wei

    2003-12-01

    Alternative measures of Brassica vegetable consumption (e.g., cabbage) may clarify the association between Brassica and cancer risk. Brassica isothiocyanates (ITCs) are excreted in urine and may provide a sensitive and food-specific dietary biomarker. However, the persistence of ITCs in the body may be brief and dependent on the activity of several Phase II enzymes, raising questions about the relationship between a single ITC measure and habitual dietary patterns. This study investigates the association between urinary ITC excretion and habitual Brassica consumption, estimated by a food frequency questionnaire, among healthy Chinese women enrolled in the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study. Participants (n = 347) completed a validated food frequency questionnaire querying habitual dietary intake during the prior 5 years and provided a fasting first-morning urine specimen. Genetic deletion of glutathione S-transferases (GSTM1/GSTT1), and single nucleotide substitutions in GSTP1 (A313G) and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1: C609T), were identified from blood DNA. Urinary ITC excretion levels were marginally higher with the GSTT1-null or GSTP1-G/G genotypes (P = 0.07, P = 0.05, respectively). Mean habitual Brassica intake was 98.3 g/day, primarily as bok choy, and Brassica intake significantly increased across quartile categories of ITC levels. The association between habitual Brassica intake and urinary ITC levels was stronger among women with GSTT1-null or GSTP1-A/A genotypes, or NQO1 T-allele, and the interaction was statistically significant across GSTP1 genotype. In conclusion, a single urinary ITC measure, in conjunction with markers of Phase II enzyme activity, provides a complementary measure of habitual Brassica intake among Shanghai women.

  5. Life Cycle of Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In this stunning picture of the giant galactic nebula NGC 3603, the crisp resolution of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope captures various stages of the life cycle of stars in one single view. To the upper left of center is the evolved blue supergiant called Sher 25. The star has a unique circumstellar ring of glowing gas that is a galactic twin to the famous ring around the supernova 1987A. The grayish-bluish color of the ring and the bipolar outflows (blobs to the upper right and lower left of the star) indicates the presence of processed (chemically enriched) material. Near the center of the view is a so-called starburst cluster dominated by young, hot Wolf-Rayet stars and early O-type stars. A torrent of ionizing radiation and fast stellar winds from these massive stars has blown a large cavity around the cluster. The most spectacular evidence for the interaction of ionizing radiation with cold molecular-hydrogen cloud material are the giant gaseous pillars to the right of the cluster. These pillars are sculptured by the same physical processes as the famous pillars Hubble photographed in the M16 Eagle Nebula. Dark clouds at the upper right are so-called Bok globules, which are probably in an earlier stage of star formation. To the lower left of the cluster are two compact, tadpole-shaped emission nebulae. Similar structures were found by Hubble in Orion, and have been interpreted as gas and dust evaporation from possibly protoplanetary disks (proplyds). This true-color picture was taken on March 5, 1999 with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2.

  6. Coagulation of grains in static and collapsing protostellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidenschilling, S. J.; Ruzmaikina, T. V.

    1994-01-01

    We simulate collisional evolution of grains in dense turbulent molecular cloud cores (or Bok globules) in static equilibrium and free-fall collapse, assuming spherical symmetry. Relative velocities are due to thermal motions, differential settling, and turbulence, with the latter dominant for sonic turbulence with an assumed Kolmogorov spectrum. Realistic criteria are used to determine outcomes of collisions (coagulation vs. destruction) as functions of particle size and velocity. Results are presented for a variety of cloud parameters (radial density profile, turbulent velocity) and particle properties (density, impact strength). Results are sensitive to the assumed mechanical properties (density and impact strength) of grain aggregates. Particle growth is enhanced if aggregates have low density or fractal structures. On a timescale of a few Myr, an initial population of 0.1 micrometers grains may produce dense compact particles approximately 1 micrometer in size, or fluffy aggregates approximately 100 micrometers. For impact strengths less than or equal to 10(exp 6) ergs/g, a steady state is reached between coagulation of small grains and collisional disruption of larger aggregates. Formation of macroscopic aggregates requires high mechanical strengths and low aggregate densities. We assume sonic turbulence during collapse, with varied eddy size scales determining the dissipation rate or turbulence strength. The degree of collisional evolution during collapse is sensitive to the assumed small-scale structure (inner sc ale) of the turbulence. Weak turbulence results in few collisions and preserves the precollapse particle size distribution with little change. Strong turbulence tends to produce net destruction, rather than particle growth, during infall, unless inpact strengths are greater than 10(exp 6)ergs/g.

  7. Increasing the Output of Spacewatch Astrometry of Near-Earth Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Robert S.; Bressi, Terrence H.; Larsen, Jeffrey A.; Mastaler, Ronald A.; Read, Michael T.; Tubbiolo, Andrew F.; Scotti, James V.

    2016-10-01

    The Spacewatch Project at the University of Arizona specializes in followup astrometry of Near-Earth Asteroids (NEAs) when they are fainter than most other followup stations can reach. Priority is given to objects on the Confirmation Page of the Minor Planet Center (MPC), potential impactors on the Earth, objects requested by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), future targets of radar, objects whose infrared flux or taxonomic properties have been measured, potential destinations of spacecraft, and objects being monitored for Yarkovsky drift. Upgrades in hardware, software, and observing procedures since 2015 Sept have boosted the numbers of observations of NEAs we make with the 0.9-m, 1.8-m, and 2.3-m telescopes on Kitt Peak in Arizona. Targeting specific NEAs with our 0.9-m telescope (site code 691) down to V magnitude 22 has increased the rate of observations of NEAs by a factor of 3.9 compared to the previous survey pattern. Comparing the first three months of 2016 with the same period in 2015 our 1.8-m telescope (site code 291) shows a 25% increase in total images acquired, a 35% increase in shutter-open exposure time, a 68% increase in the number of PHAs observed down to R magnitude 22.5, and a 105% increase in the number of PHAs observed with magnitudes >= 21.5. Installation of our new CCD camera at the Cassegrain focus of the Bok 2.3-meter telescope of Steward Observatory (site code ^695) and better software have allowed 50% more targeted objects per night down to R magnitude 23 and a 303% increase in the number of images taken per night. In the time interval reported, Spacewatch observed 41% of all the NEAs that were observed by anyone and 44% of all the PHAs that were observed by anyone. We also contributed 19% of all the astrometry of PHAs that were fainter than magnitude 22. Support of Spacewatch is from NASA/NEOO grants, the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, Steward Observatory, Kitt Peak National Observatory, the Brinson Foundation of Chicago, IL, the

  8. Visual Colors of the Nucleus of Periodic Comet 2P/Encke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, S. C.; Weissman, P. R.

    2003-05-01

    Comet 2P/Encke has been observed extensively in the past and was one of the planned flyby targets of the recently failed CONTOUR mission [1]. We present results for comet Encke based on observations with Steward Observatory's 2.3-m Bok telescope at Kitt Peak and Palomar Observatory's 1.5-m telescope. Our observations consist of time-series BVR photometry obtained under photometric conditions in October 2002, when the comet was at an inbound heliocentric distance of 3.93 AU. From these data we obtain the nucleus color indices and search for signs of color variation with rotation, which may provide evidence of nucleus surface inhomogeniety. We also provide an update of our analysis of observations obtained in September 2002, which include time-series R filter photometry of Encke when it was at a heliocentric distance of 3.97 AU. From these data we have derived an estimate of the rotation period and limits on the nuclear size and shape. The September rotational lightcurve is highly asymmetric - a feature also observed by Meech et al. and Fernandez et al. [2,3] - with a periodicity of 11.03 hours. We also discuss our previously reported visual wavelength detection of comet Encke's dust trail [4]. The Encke dust trail had only been detected at IR wavelengths [5,6]. This visual detection was achieved by co-adding four nights of continuous R filter observations from the September 2002 run. Combining photometric measurements at visual and IR wavelengths will allow us to constrain the physical properties of the dust particles within the trail. This work was supported in part by the NASA Planetary Astronomy program, and was performed jointly at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Queen's University Belfast. [1] Bell, J.F., and 18 colleagues. 2000. M&PS 35, A23. [2] Meech, K.J., Y. Fernandez, and J. Pittichova. 2001. BAAS 33, 1075 (abstract). [3] Fernandez, Y.R., S.C. Lowry, P.R. Weissman, and K.J. Meech. 2002. BAAS 34, 887 (abstract). [4] Lowry, S.C., P.R. Weissman, M.V. Sykes

  9. Observational analysis of the physical conditions in galactic and extragalactic active star forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, L. E.

    2007-10-01

    In my thesis observations of near-infrared rovibrational H_2 emission in active star-forming regions are presented and analysed. The main subject of this work concerns new observations of the Orion Molecular Cloud (OMC1) and in particular the BN-KL region. Data consist of images of individual H_2 lines with high spatial resolution obtained both at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope and at the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT). With the high spatial resolution of the VLT it is possible to analyse in detail (down to 60 AU ~ 0.13") individual objects in the region. I have also analysed H_2 and [FeII] emission from outflows in two dark clouds (Bok globules BHR71 and BHR137) and a high excitation blob in the Magellanic Clouds (N159-5). In the latter, data consist of long-slit spectra obtained at the ESO-VLT. In order to facilitate this work I ran a large grid of ~25000 shock models, producing almost 400 Gb of results. These models are state-of-the-art and there is a large number of free parameters which can be adjusted. A big part of my project has been to analyse the results from this grid and make it publically available. Furthermore, as it turned out, not all results are equally reliable and I have had to develop methods for checking the consistency of the wealth of results obtained. But with the model results and a sound knowledge of shock physics it is now relatively straightforward to interpret the H_2 and [FeII] data. The models allow me to predict the large-scale physical conditions in OMC1 such as density, shock velocities, magnetic field strengths, etc. Overall the preshock density is of the order of ~10^5-10^7 cm(-3) and shock velocities are in the interval 10-40 km/s. Another very interesting result is a new method developed for analysing bow shocks observed at high spatial resolution. For one isolated bow shock in OMC1 I predict a shock velocity of 50 km/s and a preshock density of the order of 5x10^5 cm(-3). The 3D velocity has recently been measured to 55 km

  10. A Systems Engineering Approach to Quality Assurance for Aerospace Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, Christena C.

    2014-01-01

    On the surface, it appears that AS9100 has little to say about how to apply a Quality Management System (QMS) to major aerospace test programs (or even smaller ones). It also appears that there is little in the quality engineering Body of Knowledge (BOK) that applies to testing, unless it is nondestructive examination (NDE), or some type of lab or bench testing associated with the manufacturing process. However, if one examines: a) how the systems engineering (SE) processes are implemented throughout a test program; and b) how these SE processes can be mapped to the requirements of AS9100, a number of areas for involvement of the quality professional are revealed. What often happens is that quality assurance during a test program is limited to inspections of the test article; what could be considered a manufacturing al fresco approach. This limits the quality professional and is a disservice to the programs and projects, since there are a number of ways that quality can enhance critical processes, and support efforts to improve risk reduction, efficiency and effectiveness. The Systems Engineering (SE) discipline is widely used in aerospace to ensure the progress from Stakeholder Expectations (the President, Congress, the taxpayers) to a successful, delivered product or service. Although this is well known, what is not well known is that these same SE processes are implemented in varying complexity, to prepare for and implement test projects that support research, development, verification and validation, qualification, and acceptance test projects. Although the test organization's terminology may vary from the SE terminology, and from one test service provider to another, the basic process is followed by successful, reliable testing organizations. For this analysis, NASA Procedural Requirements (NPR) 7123.1, NASA Systems Engineering Processes and Requirements is used to illustrate the SE processes that are used for major aerospace testing. Many of these processes

  11. Spectropolarimetry of B-type and C-type asteroids: Phase Curves and Wavelength Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleszewski, C.; McMillan, R. S.; Smith, P. S.

    2014-12-01

    We present recent spectropolarimetric observations of eleven B- and C-type asteroids using SPOL (http://james.as.arizona.edu/~psmith/SPOL/) at the 2.3-m Bok and 1.6-m Kuiper telescopes. Our primary goal is to further constrain our understanding of the wavelength dependence of linear polarization. For each object, we produced polarimetric phase curves (linear polarization vs. phase angle) and measure the wavelength dependence in each observation by calculating the slope of each polarization spectrum. Previous analysis by Belskaya et al. (2009) shows that the slope of the polarization spectrum increases as the wavelength increases. No analysis of the wavelength dependence in B-types has occurred previously to our knowledge. For the five C-type (3 Ch- and 2 C-) objects observed, those of the Ch-type have larger minimum polarizations than of the C- subtype. This is consistent with polarimetric phase curves of similar asteroids by Gil-Hutton and Cañada-Assandri (2012). With respect to the wavelength dependence, our observed targets show an increase in polarization slope with wavelength, confirming the Belskaya (2009) result. After dividing the data by group, C- subtype objects have relatively flat polarization spectra, as opposed to the Ch- subtypes that have more rapidly changing slopes as phase angle increases. A mineralogical basis for the variety of wavelength dependences observed is most likely. Additional observations of the other C- subtypes will aid to distinguish how mineralogical variation affects polarization. It may also explain the wide range of polarization slopes measured near a phase angle of ten degrees in the Belskaya (2009) analysis. Six B-type asteroids were observed in a similar manner. As with the C-types, the polarimetric phase curves vary in shape, suggesting differences in albedo. Also, the wavelength dependence increases with wavelength, as shown for the C-types. On the other hand, all of the B-type objects have a similar wavelength dependence

  12. Molecular and Histopathological Changes in Mouse Intestinal Tissue after Proton Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purgason, Ashley; Zhang, Ye; Hamilton, Stanley; Wu, Honglu

    Radiation in space, especially energetic protons emitted from solar particle events (SPEs), poses serious health risks to astronauts and is especially dangerous for long duration missions. Protons are the most abundant particles in space and to date there is little known about the details of the negative consequences crew members will face upon exposure to them. To elucidate some of the possible health effects induced by protons, BALB/C mice were subjected to 250 MeV of proton radiation at doses of 0 Gy, 0.1 Gy, 1 Gy, and 2 Gy. Three specimens per dose were studied. The gastrointestinal tract of each animal was dissected four hours post-irradiation and the isolated small intestinal tissue was fixed in formalin for histopathological examination or snap-frozen in liquid nitrogen for RNA isolation. Histopathologic observation of the tissue using standard HE staining methods to screen for morphologic changes showed a marked increase in apoptotic lesions for even the lowest dose of 0.1 Gy, and the dose response showed possible hyper sensitivities at low dose. Tissue of the gastrointestinal tract was also homogenized and RNA was isolated for cDNA synthesis and real-time PCR analysis for genes involved in apoptosis. Results of gene expression changes revealed consistent up or down regulation of a number of genes for all of the exposure doses that may play a role in proton-induced apoptosis (e.g. Hsp90ab1). In addition, several genes were found to have significant changes in the RNA level after only the low dose (0.1 Gy), but not the high dose (1 and 2 Gy), proton exposures (e.g. Bok and Casp1), whereas some genes had expression changes only after high dose proton exposures (e.g. Tsc22d3). These findings demonstrated that apoptosis may occur in gastrointestinal tracts after even low dose proton exposures, and the different gene expression patterns between low and high dose proton irradiated mice may offer insight into the molecular mechanisms of the possible hyper

  13. The Earliest Phases of Star formation (EPoS). Temperature, density, and kinematic structure of the star-forming core CB 17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalzl, M.; Launhardt, R.; Stutz, A. M.; Linz, H.; Bourke, T. L.; Beuther, H.; Henning, Th.; Krause, O.; Nielbock, M.; Schmiedeke, A.

    2014-09-01

    Context. The initial conditions for the gravitational collapse of molecular cloud cores and the subsequent birth of stars are still not well constrained. The characteristic cold temperatures (~10 K) in such regions require observations at sub-millimetre and longer wavelengths. The Herschel Space Observatory and complementary ground-based observations presented in this paper have the unprecedented potential to reveal the structure and kinematics of a prototypical core region at the onset of stellar birth. Aims: This paper aims to determine the density, temperature, and velocity structure of the star-forming Bok globule CB 17. This isolated region is known to host (at least) two sources at different evolutionary stages: a dense core, SMM1, and a Class I protostar, IRS. Methods: We modeled the cold dust emission maps from 100 μm to 1.2 mm with both a modified blackbody technique to determine the optical depth-weighted line-of-sight temperature and column density and a ray-tracing technique to determine the core temperature and volume density structure. Furthermore, we analysed the kinematics of CB17 using the high-density gas tracer N2H+. Results: From the ray-tracing analysis, we find a temperature in the centre of SMM1 of T0 = 10.6 K, a flat density profile with radius 9.5 × 103 au, and a central volume density of nH,0 = 2.3 × 105 cm-3. The velocity structure of the N2H+ observations reveal global rotation with a velocity gradient of 4.3 km s-1 pc-1. Superposed on this rotation signature we find a more complex velocity field, which may be indicative of differential motions within the dense core. Conclusions: SMM is a core in an early evolutionary stage at the verge of being bound, but the question of whether it is a starless or a protostellar core remains unanswered. The Herschel data (Fig. 2) including N- and T-maps in Fig. 3 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  14. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) scanning of discrete samples: Examples from the loess-paleosol sequence on the Island of Susak, Croatia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Profe, Jörn; Wacha, Lara; Frechen, Manfred; Rolf, Christian; Brlek, Mihovil; Ohlendorf, Christian; Zolitschka, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    Loess-paleosol sequences (LPS) are recognized as valuable terrestrial environmental archives. Although LPS provide discontinuous archives, high-resolution sampling and analyzing strategies are required for a sound reconstruction of past environmental conditions. Up to now, proxies such as grain size, rock magnetic properties and calcium-carbonate content are commonly investigated at the centimeter scale, whereas the elemental as well as the mineralogical compositions are analyzed at a much coarser resolution, e.g. with 10 cm intervals or once for every lithological unit. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) scanning of discrete powdered and homogenized samples is a new application of the XRF core-scanner technology providing a tool for fast and non-destructive qualitative measurement of the elemental composition along LPS. Tracking relative changes of the elemental distribution at the centimeter scale is considered as an important supplement to existing methods applied to LPS in order to gain a more detailed knowledge about weathering, dust provenance and sedimentation dynamics. The island of Susak, situated in the north-eastern Adriatic Sea, represents an exceptional site with Pleistocene aeolian sediments of up to 90 m thickness covering at least the last glacial-interglacial cycle. The studied sub-profiles are part of loess cliffs located directly on the coast of Susak (Bok-Bay). Therefore, this record qualifies as a test candidate for benchmarking XRF scanning of discrete samples against magnetic susceptibility, organic carbon and lithological data. The following elements are studied as proxies for weathering (K, Ca, Sr, Rb), for dust provenance (Al, Si, Ti, Zr) and for organic matter (S, Br). In addition, Fe is directly linked to magnetic susceptibility. First results indicate a general agreement between lithologically identified paleosols and element weathering indices. Fe is predominantly positively correlated with magnetic susceptibility. The Ti/Zr-ratio points to a

  15. Increased sagittal vertical axis is associated with less effective control of acute pain following vertebroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Y-C.; Bok, D. H.; Chang, H-G.; Kim, S. W.; Park, M. S.; Oh, J. K.; Kim, J.

    2016-01-01

    . Bok, H-G. Chang, S. W. Kim, M. S. Park, J. K. Oh, J. Kim, T-H. Kim. Increased sagittal vertical axis is associated with less effective control of acute pain following vertebroplasty. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:544–551. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.511.BJR-2016-0135.R1. PMID:27831489

  16. Tentative critical levels of tropospheric ozone for agricultural crops in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonekura, T.

    2010-12-01

    Ground level ozone concentrations have increased year by year in Japan. High ozone concentrations have been known to affect growth and yield of agricultural crops. In the US and Europe, much effort has been directed to establish regulatory policies such as secondary air quality standard and critical levels to protect vegetation against ozone. On the contrary, in Japan, there is a few data of agricultural crops sensitivity to ozone. Furthermore, there is no information about the ozone risk of agricultural crop loss by based on ozone index (e.g. AOT40, SUM06, W126)-crop response relationship, yet. The objects of our research are: (1) to screen sensitivity of ozone on 10 crops cultivated in urban area in Japan. (2) to establish critical levels of ozone for protecting agricultural crops based on ozone index-crop response relationship. The 10 Japanese agricultural crops such as Japanese rice, Hanegi (Welsh onion), Shungiku (Crown daisy), Saradana (Lettus), Hatsukadaikon (Radish), Kokabu (Small Turnip), Santosai (Chinese cabbage), Tasai (Spinach mustard), Komatsuna (Japanese mustard spinach) and Chingensai (Bok Choy), were fumigated to three levels of ozone (clean air (< 5 ppbv), ambient level of ozone, 1.5 times ambient ozone) in open-top chambers during 30 to 120 days. Those experiments were repeated five times during two growing season. Throughout the experimental period, the growth or yield were measured, and the relationship between growth (or yield) and ozone index was examined. As a result, the influences of ozone on growth or yield were different among 10 crops. Relatively good correlations of coefficients of determination (r2) for linear regressions to growth or yield were obtained with “8h means” and “AOT40” rather than “SUM00”, “SUM06” and “W126”. Critical level for 10 crops in terms of an AOT40 were 1.1 to 2.1 ppm h per month. The ozone sensitive crop in our study was sound to be 1.0 ppm h per month in AOT40.

  17. HST Parallel WFPC2 Imagery of a Region in the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufour, R. J.; Vanorsow, D.; Walter, D. K.; Hester, J. J.; Currie, D. G.

    1995-12-01

    As part of the HST General Observer Program GO-6042, parallel WFPC2 images of locations in the large Carina H ii region were taken during a series of FOS spectra of several ejecta of Eta Carinae (cf., the poster by Glover et al. at this meeting). The observations were scheduled during two CVZ (continuous viewing zone) visits in 1995 October, enabling deep WFPC2 exposures to be taken in ten filters. The ``serendipitous'' target was an area which included the Cr 232 star cluster and surrounding H ii region, about 8 arcmin to the NW of Eta Carinae itself. Images of the nebula were obtained in the filters F656N (Hα ), F673N ([S ii] 6717+31 Angstroms), F658N ([N ii] 6583 Angstroms), F502N ([O iii] 5007 Angstroms), and F547M (continuum) for purposes of studying the ionization structure. In addition, relatively long ( ~ 1000 sec) exposures were obtained though the wide-band filters F336W, F439W, and F555W for purposes of obtaining UBV magnitudes and colors of stars down to a limiting magnitude of V ~ 25. We present the results of this imagery in the form of (a) color-coded emission line ratio maps of the nebulosity in the various lines noted above, and (b) color-magnitude (CMD) and color-color diagrams of faint stars in the field. At a distance of 2500 pc for the nebula and cluster, the spatial resolution of 0.1 arcsec on the WFPC2 imagery corresponds to 250 AU per pixel, a scale that resolves numerous Bok globules not previously seen from ground-based imagery. These globules are seen in absorption in the [O iii] images and with bright rims in [S ii] and [N ii], indicating their proximity to the cluster OB stars and location in the ionized volume of the nebula. Our CMDs, (very preliminary at the time of writing) reach M_V ~ +11 for stars at the distance of the Cr 232 cluster. A prominent reflection nebula is also seen around one of the stars in the cluster. This study is made possible by grants from AURA/STScI related to GO-6042 and the HST Cycle 5 TAC, which supported

  18. The Flagstaff Meeting in June 1964

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baars, J. W. M.

    1999-05-01

    My most memorable AAS meeting is the first one, the 116th meeting in Flagstaff , AZ, June 1964. I had been at the NRAO in Green Bank for less than a year and this was going to be my first presentation at a scientific conference. I traveled with my Director, Dave Heeschen, from the newly opened Dulles Airport near Washington non stop to Tucson (try that these days of hub-hopping!). In Tucson, I was met by a friend who exposed me to a phenomenon, unknown in West Virginia: the drive-in liquor store. In those days, the AAS could comfortably meet in a small city like Flagstaff. Today this would be impossible; Flagstaff has grown slower than the AAS. I was fascinated to see and hear many astronomers, but I don't remember how my own presentation went. The most memorable event was the talk presented hors concours by Bart Bok, who had just returned from Australia to become Director of Steward Observatory. He would give an unscheduled ten minute talk on the new Anglo-Australian Telescope, but instead treated us to a most exciting story of the beauty of the Southern Sky and its astronomical wonders. He went on for 25 minutes without the Chairman daring to stop him! All following speakers were curtailed by a minute and the session finished on time. Flagstaff was, as it is now, a quiet town. There was a bar next to my motel, where I drank two Heineken every day. On the last day, there was no more Heineken. As the bar man said: `I had a six pack and you drank me out of it'. Such was the business acumen in Flagstaff in the mid sixties. Impressive was the trip to Oak Creek Canyon and Sedona, where we visited the Chapel, beautifully placed in the hills nearby. I felt the harmony between nature and building was perfect. Encroaching development, right up to the church, have taken away much of the serenity of the place. The evening flight out of Flagstaff was delayed by a summer storm. At the airport, Martin Schwarzschild chatted with me for half an hour and I was barely aware how

  19. THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY REVERBERATION MAPPING PROJECT: TECHNICAL OVERVIEW

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yue; Brandt, W. N.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Hall, Patrick B.; McGreer, Ian D.; Fan, Xiaohui; Anderson, Scott F.; Chen, Yuguang; Denney, Kelly D.; Eftekharzadeh, Sarah; Gao, Yang; Green, Paul J.; Greene, Jenny E.; Ho, Luis C.; Horne, Keith; Kelly, Brandon C.; and others

    2015-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping (SDSS-RM) project is a dedicated multi-object RM experiment that has spectroscopically monitored a sample of 849 broad-line quasars in a single 7 deg{sup 2} field with the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey spectrograph. The RM quasar sample is flux-limited to i {sub psf} = 21.7 mag, and covers a redshift range of 0.1 < z < 4.5 without any other cuts on quasar properties. Optical spectroscopy was performed during 2014 January-July dark/gray time, with an average cadence of ∼4 days, totaling more than 30 epochs. Supporting photometric monitoring in the g and i bands was conducted at multiple facilities including the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) and the Steward Observatory Bok telescope in 2014, with a cadence of ∼2 days and covering all lunar phases. The RM field (R.A., decl. = 14:14:49.00, +53:05:00.0) lies within the CFHT-LS W3 field, and coincides with the Pan-STARRS 1 (PS1) Medium Deep Field MD07, with three prior years of multi-band PS1 light curves. The SDSS-RM six month baseline program aims to detect time lags between the quasar continuum and broad line region (BLR) variability on timescales of up to several months (in the observed frame) for ∼10% of the sample, and to anchor the time baseline for continued monitoring in the future to detect lags on longer timescales and at higher redshift. SDSS-RM is the first major program to systematically explore the potential of RM for broad-line quasars at z > 0.3, and will investigate the prospects of RM with all major broad lines covered in optical spectroscopy. SDSS-RM will provide guidance on future multi-object RM campaigns on larger scales, and is aiming to deliver more than tens of BLR lag detections for a homogeneous sample of quasars. We describe the motivation, design, and implementation of this program, and outline the science impact expected from the resulting data for RM and general quasar science.

  20. Constraining the wavelength dependence of polarization for various asteroid taxonomies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleszewski, Chester; Smith, Paul S.; McMillan, Robert S.

    2016-10-01

    The polarization of sunlight reflected from asteroids is known to be inversely proportional to geometric albedo (Umov 1905). However, that was mainly derived from observations in the V-filter. Preliminary observations of the wavelength dependence were conducted by Belskaya et al. (2009) in the major asteroid taxonomic classes. The limited UBVRI data revealed trends of spectral slope vs. phase angle. To study the wavelength dependence of asteroid polarization more robustly, we have used the SPOL spectropolarimeter at the 2.3-m Bok and 1.6-m Kuiper telescopes. The finer spectral resolution of spectropolarimetry is needed to confirm the linearity of the wavelength dependence of polarization.We present polarization spectra from four asteroid taxonomic groups: B-, C-, S-, and X-types. Across the observed wavelength range (0.45 to 0.7 microns), the linear trend described by Belskaya et al. is confirmed and we determined the best-fit linear slope of each spectrum. For the S-type asteroids, the slope of the polarization spectra becomes more negative as the phase angle increases. The rate at which the polarization slope changes increases at phase angles greater than the inversion angle. C-type asteroids behave differently from the S-types in two ways. First, the polarization spectra for the C-types are positively sloped as opposed to negative (also noted in Belskaya et al.). Also, as you observe the C-types closer to the inversion angle (~20 degrees phase angle), the polarization slopes tend to flatten as opposed to steepen. The polarization spectra of B-type asteroids are positively sloped, but the tendency to flatten near the inversion angle like the C-type spectra is not evident. Our observations of low albedo X-types exhibit positive polarization slopes, while the high albedo observations exhibit negative slopes. Differences in the wavelength dependencies of polarization between various asteroid types appear to be driven by differences in their geometric albedos. Better

  1. Physical characterization of fast rotator NEOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikwaya Eluo, Jean-Baptiste; Hergenrother, Carl W.

    2015-08-01

    Understanding the physical characteristics of fast rotator NEOs (sub-km sizes with H > 22) is important for two reasons: to establish properties that can constraint models of their potential hazard, and to learn about the origin and the evolution of the solar system. Technically it is difficult to cover different ranges of wavelengths using one telescope with one instrument. Setting up a network of telescopes with different instruments observing simultaneously the same object will efficiently contribute to the characterization of NEOs.ART (Arizona Robotic Telescope) is a University of Arizona initiative whose goal is to use local 2-m size telescopes to provide near real-time observations of Target of Opportunity objects covering the visible and the near- infrared wavelengths. We plan to use three telescopes of the ART project to observe fast rotator NEOs: 1) VATT (Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope) at Mount Graham (longitude: -109.8719, latitude: 32.7016, elevation: 10469 feet) with VATT-4K optical imager for photometry to estimate colors, lightcurves to get the rotation rate, and estimate the phase angle function of NEOs, 2) Bok 2.3 m at Kitt Peak (longitude: -111.6004, latitude: 31.9629, elevation: 6795 feet) with BCSpec (Boller & Chivens Spectrograph) for visible spectroscopy, and 3) Kuiper 1.5-m at Mount Bigelow (longitude: -110.7345, latitude: 32.4165, elevation: 8235 feet) with a near-infrared instrument.We report here the preliminary results of several NEOs whose rotation rate, color, and type have been estimated using photometry with images recorded with VATT-4K. 2009 SQ104 has a rotation rate of 6.85+/- 0.03 h, 2014 AY28 has a rotation rate of 0.91 +/- 0.02 h, 2014 EC of 0.54 +/-0.04 h, 2014 FA44 of 3.45 +/- 0.05 h, 2014 KS40 of 1.11 +/- 0.06 h, 2011 PT of 0.17 +/- 0.05 h, 2014 SC324 of 0.36 +/- 0.43 h, 2014 WF201 of 1.00 +/- 0.03 h. Of these objects, 2014 HM2, 2014 FA, 2014 SB145, 2011 PT fall among X-type asteroids; 2014 KS, 2014 WF are likely to be

  2. VISTA Stares Deeply into the Blue Lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-01-01

    This new infrared image of the Lagoon Nebula was captured as part of a five-year study of the Milky Way using ESO's VISTA telescope at the Paranal Observatory in Chile. This is a small piece of a much larger image of the region surrounding the nebula, which is, in turn, only one part of a huge survey. Astronomers are currently using ESO's Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA) to scour the Milky Way's central regions for variable objects and map its structure in greater detail than ever before. This huge survey is called VISTA Variables in the Via Lactea (VVV) [1]. The new infrared image presented here was taken as part of this survey. It shows the stellar nursery called the Lagoon Nebula (also known as Messier 8, see eso0936), which lies about 4000-5000 light-years away in the constellation of Sagittarius (the Archer). Infrared observations allow astronomers to peer behind the veil of dust that prevents them from seeing celestial objects in visible light. This is because visible light, which has a wavelength that is about the same size as the dust particles, is strongly scattered, but the longer wavelength infrared light can pass through the dust largely unscathed. VISTA, with its 4.1-metre diameter mirror - the largest survey telescope in the world - is dedicated to surveying large areas of the sky at near-infrared wavelengths deeply and quickly. It is therefore ideally suited to studying star birth. Stars typically form in large molecular clouds of gas and dust, which collapse under their own weight. The Lagoon Nebula, however, is also home to a number of much more compact regions of collapsing gas and dust, called Bok globules [2]. These dark clouds are so dense that, even in the infrared, they can block the starlight from background stars. But the most famous dark feature in the nebula, for which it is named, is the lagoon-shaped dust lane that winds its way through the glowing cloud of gas. Hot, young stars, which give off intense

  3. How to Become a Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-01-01

    ESO Telescopes Provide Most Detailed View Ever Into a Dark Cloud Summary How do stars like our Sun come into being? Which fundamental processes are responsible for transforming a dark and diffuse interstellar cloud of gas and dust into a much denser, shining object? Astronomers have just taken an important step towards answering this fundamental question. Based on the most detailed study ever made of the internal structure of a small interstellar cloud, three scientists from ESO and the USA [1] have found that it is apparently on the verge of becoming unstable - and thus in the stage immediately preceding a dramatic collapse into a dense and hot, low-mass star. Interestingly, the current structure of this cloud, a "Bok globule" known as Barnard 68 (B68) [2], is governed by the same basic physics as is that of a star. The cloud is obviously in a temporary state of near-equilibrium, where the inward force of gravity caused by its mass more or less balances that of the outward pressure due to its temperature. But this situation may not last long. The astronomers believe that this particular cloud, together with some others in the same galactic neighbourhood, constitute the few resistent remains of a much larger cloud that has disappeared due to the influence of strong stellar winds and ultraviolet radiation from young and heavy stars as well as supernova explosions. The new and unique insight into the pre-collapse phase of the complicated process of stellar birth is based on observations made with ESO telescopes at the La Silla and Paranal observatories in Chile. PR Photo 02a/01 : The Bok Globule B68 , as seen in visual light. PR Photo 02b/01 : Looking through the Bok Globule B68 . PR Photo 02c/01 : A comparison of the visual and infrared views of the Bok Globule B68 . From Dark Clouds to Stars Astronomers have known for some time that stars like our Sun are formed from interstellar clouds of gas and dust. When they contract, the interior temperature rises. If the

  4. Thackeray's Globules in IC 2944

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Strangely glowing dark clouds float serenely in this remarkable and beautiful image taken with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. These dense, opaque dust clouds - known as 'globules' - are silhouetted against nearby bright stars in the busy star-forming region, IC 2944. These globules were first found in IC 2944 by astronomer A.D. Thackeray in 1950. Although globules like these have been known since Dutch-American astronomer Bart Bok first drew attention to such objects in 1947, little is still known about their origin and nature, except that they are generally associated with areas of star formation, called 'HII regions' due to the presence of hydrogen gas. The largest of the globules in this image is actually two separate clouds that gently overlap along our line of sight. Each cloud is nearly 1.4 light-years (50 arcseconds) along its longest dimension, and collectively, they contain enough material to equal over 15 solar masses. IC 2944, the surrounding HII region, is filled with gas and dust that is illuminated and heated by a loose cluster of O-type stars. These stars are much hotter and much more massive than our Sun. IC 2944 is relatively close by, located only 5900 light-years (1800 parsecs) away in the constellation Centaurus. Thanks to the remarkable resolution offered by the Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers can for the first time study the intricate structure of these globules. The globules appear to be heavily fractured, as if major forces were tearing them apart. When radio astronomers observed the faint hiss of molecules within the globules, they realized that the globules are actually in constant, churning motion, moving supersonically among each other. This may be caused by the powerful ultraviolet radiation from the luminous, massive stars, which also heat up the gas in the HII region, causing it to expand and stream against the globules, leading to their destruction. Despite their serene appearance, the globules may actually be likened to clumps

  5. Embedded Outflows from Herbig-Haro 46/47

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for larger view of insert

    This image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope transforms a dark cloud into a silky translucent veil, revealing the molecular outflow from an otherwise hidden newborn star. Using near-infrared light, Spitzer pierces through the dark cloud to detect the embedded outflow in an object called HH 46/47. Herbig-Haro (HH) objects are bright, nebulous regions of gas and dust that are usually buried within dark clouds. They are formed when supersonic gas ejected from a forming protostar, or embryonic stars, interacts with the surrounding interstellar medium. These young stars are often detected only in the infrared.

    The Spitzer image was obtained with the infrared array camera and is a three-color mosaic. Emission at 3.6 microns is shown as blue, emission from 4.5 and 5.8 microns has been combined as green, and 8.0 micron emission is depicted as red.

    HH 46/47 is a striking example of a low mass protostar ejecting a jet and creating a bipolar, or two-sided, outflow. The central protostar lies inside a dark cloud (known as a 'Bok globule') which is illuminated by the nearby Gum Nebula. Located at a distance of 1,140 light-years and found in the constellation Vela, the protostar is hidden from view in the visible-light image (inset). With Spitzer, the star and its dazzling jets of molecular gas appear with clarity.

    The 8-micron channel of the infrared array camera is sensitive to emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. These organic molecules, comprised of carbon and hydrogen, are excited by the surrounding radiation field and become luminescent, accounting for the reddish cloud. Note that the boundary layer of the 8-micron emission corresponds to the lower right edge of the dark cloud in the visible-light picture.

    Outflows are fascinating objects, since they characterize one of the most energetic phases of the formation of low-mass stars (like our Sun). The

  6. Water vapor toward starless cores: The Herschel view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caselli, P.; Keto, E.; Pagani, L.; Aikawa, Y.; Yıldız, U. A.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Tafalla, M.; Bergin, E. A.; Nisini, B.; Codella, C.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Bachiller, R.; Baudry, A.; Benedettini, M.; Benz, A. O.; Bjerkeli, P.; Blake, G. A.; Bontemps, S.; Braine, J.; Bruderer, S.; Cernicharo, J.; Daniel, F.; di Giorgio, A. M.; Dominik, C.; Doty, S. D.; Encrenaz, P.; Fich, M.; Fuente, A.; Gaier, T.; Giannini, T.; Goicoechea, J. R.; de Graauw, Th.; Helmich, F.; Herczeg, G. J.; Herpin, F.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Jackson, B.; Jacq, T.; Javadi, H.; Johnstone, D.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Kester, D.; Kristensen, L. E.; Laauwen, W.; Larsson, B.; Lis, D.; Liseau, R.; Luinge, W.; Marseille, M.; McCoey, C.; Megej, A.; Melnick, G.; Neufeld, D.; Olberg, M.; Parise, B.; Pearson, J. C.; Plume, R.; Risacher, C.; Santiago-García, J.; Saraceno, P.; Shipman, R.; Siegel, P.; van Kempen, T. A.; Visser, R.; Wampfler, S. F.; Wyrowski, F.

    2010-10-01

    Aims: Previous studies by the satellites SWAS and Odin provided stringent upper limits on the gas phase water abundance of dark clouds (x(H2O) < 7 × 10-9). We investigate the chemistry of water vapor in starless cores beyond the previous upper limits using the highly improved angular resolution and sensitivity of Herschel and measure the abundance of water vapor during evolutionary stages just preceding star formation. Methods: High spectral resolution observations of the fundamental ortho water (o-H2O) transition (557 GHz) were carried out with the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared onboard Herschel toward two starless cores: Barnard 68 (hereafter B68), a Bok globule, and LDN 1544 (L1544), a prestellar core embedded in the Taurus molecular cloud complex. Detailed radiative transfer and chemical codes were used to analyze the data. Results: The RMS in the brightness temperature measured for the B68 and L1544 spectra is 2.0 and 2.2 mK, respectively, in a velocity bin of 0.59 km s-1. The continuum level is 3.5 ± 0.2 mK in B68 and 11.4 ± 0.4 mK in L1544. No significant feature is detected in B68 and the 3σ upper limit is consistent with a column density of o-H2O N(o-H2O) < 2.5 × 1013 cm-2, or a fractional abundance x(o-H2O) < 1.3 × 10-9, more than an order of magnitude lower than the SWAS upper limit on this source. The L1544 spectrum shows an absorption feature at a 5σ level from which we obtain the first value of the o-H2O column density ever measured in dark clouds: N(o-H2O) = (8 ± 4) × 1012 cm-2. The corresponding fractional abundance is x(o-H2O) ≃ 5 × 10-9 at radii >7000 AU and ≃2 × 10-10 toward the center. The radiative transfer analysis shows that this is consistent with a x(o-H2O) profile peaking at ≃10-8, 0.1 pc away from the core center, where both freeze-out and photodissociation are negligible. Conclusions: Herschel has provided the first measurement of water vapor in dark regions. Column densities of o-H2O are low, but prestellar

  7. Leslie Peltier, Amateur Astronomer and Observer Extraordinaire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin, B. G.

    2003-12-01

    surroundings. Peltier was a shy person who rarely left Delphos, and worked as a designer of children's furniture and toys until his death. However, he was widely recognized during his lifetime with articles about him appearing in popular magazines such as Reader's Digest and Newsweek. Many famous astronomers visited him at Delphos including W.W. Morgan, W.A. Hiltner, Donald Menzel, the Boks, and others. He received many honors including an honorary Doctor of Science degree from Bowling Green State University (Ohio) and the AAVSO's first Merit Award in 1934. Starlight Nights returned to print in 1999 with a foreword by David Levy, and is now introducing a new generation to the beauty and thrill of observing.

  8. Rotation and color properties of the nucleus of Comet 2P/Encke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, Stephen C.; Weissman, Paul R.

    2007-05-01

    We present results from CCD observations of Comet 2P/Encke acquired at Steward Observatory's 2.3 m Bok Telescope on Kitt Peak. The observations were carried out in October 2002 when the comet was near aphelion. Rotational lightcurves in B-, V-, and R-filters were acquired over two nights of observations, and analysed to study the physical and color properties of the nucleus. The average apparent R-filter magnitude across both nights corresponds to a mean effective radius of 3.95±0.06 km, and this value is similar to that found for the V- and B-filters. Taking the observed brightness range, we obtain a/b⩾1.44±0.06 for the semi-axial ratio of Encke's nucleus. Applying the axial ratio to the R-filter photometry gives nucleus semi-axes of [3.60±0.09]×[5.20±0.13] km, using the empirically-derived albedo and phase coefficient. No coma or tail was seen despite deep imaging of the comet, and flux limits from potential unresolved coma do not exceed a few percent of the total measured flux, for standard coma models. This is consistent with many other published data sets taken when the comet was near aphelion. Our data includes the first detailed time series multi-color measurements of a cometary nucleus, and significant color variations were seen on October 3, though not repeated on October 4. The average color indices across both nights are: (V-R)=0.39±0.06 and (B-V)=0.73±0.06 ( R¯=19.76±0.03). We analysed the R-filter time-series photometry using the method of Harris et al. [Harris, A.W., Young, J.W., Bowell, E., Martin, L.J., Millis, R.L., Poutanen, M., Scaltriti, F., Zappala, V., Schober, H.J., Debehogne, H., Zeigler, K.W., 1989. Icarus 77, 171-186] to constrain the rotation period of the comet's nucleus, and find that a period of ˜11.45 h will satisfy the data, however the errors bars are large. We have successfully linked our data with the September 2002 data from Fernández et al. [Fernández, Y.R., Lowry, S.C., Weissman, P.R., Mueller, B.E.A., Samarasinha

  9. SHRIMP U-Pb in zircon geochronology of granitoids from Myanmar: temporal constraints on the tectonic evolution of Southeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barley, M. E.; Zaw, Khin

    2009-04-01

    southern Myanmar (Shan-Thai terrane) have magmatic ages of 82  1.4 Ma (Kawthoung), 62  1.2 Ma (Hermyngi) and 50  0.5 Ma (Auk Bok). Xenocryst zircons in these granitoids are either Proterozoic or derived from older members of the suite. This suite which extends into adjacent peninsular Thailand and was emplaced into thickened continental crust well inboard of the subduction zone during rapid convergence and subduction of the India-Australia plate. The primitive I-type Shangalon granodiorite in the Wuntho Batholith of west Myanmar has a magmatic age of 38.5  0.6 Ma indicating subduction continued until ~40 Ma. Metamorphic overgrowths to zircons in the MMB orthogneiss near Mandalay date a period of Eocene (~43 Ma) high-grade metamorphism possibly during crustal thickening related to the initial collision between India and Eurasia (65 to 55 Ma). This was followed by emplacement of syn-tectonic hornblende syenites and leucogranites between 35 and 23 Ma. Comparison of the geochronology of Myanmar granitoids with the Hymalayas, Tibet and other parts of Southeast Asia indicates that Myanmar played a key role linking the Hymalayan Orogen to the tectonic evolution of Southeast Asia.

  10. Spectrum from Embedded Star in Herbig-Haro 46/47

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has lifted the cosmic veil to see an otherwise hidden newborn star, while detecting the presence of water and carbon dioxide ices, as well as organic molecules. Using near-infrared light, Spitzer pierces through an optically dark cloud to detect the embedded outflow in an object called HH 46/47. Herbig-Haro (HH) objects are bright, nebulous regions of gas and dust that are usually buried within dark dust clouds. They are formed when supersonic gas ejected from a forming protostar, or embryonic star, interacts with the surrounding interstellar medium. These young stars are often detected only in the infrared.

    HH 46/47 is a striking example of a low mass protostar ejecting a jet and creating a bipolar, or two-sided, outflow. The central protostar lies inside a dark cloud (known as a 'Bok globule') which is illuminated by the nearby Gum Nebula. Located at a distance of 1140 light-years and found in the constellation Vela, the protostar is hidden from view in the visible-light image (inset). With Spitzer, the star and its dazzling jets of molecular gas appear with clarity.

    The Spitzer image (inset) was obtained with the infrared array camera and is a three-color mosaic. Emission at 3.6 microns is shown as blue, emission from 4.5 and 5.8 microns has been combined as green, and 8.0 micron emission is depicted as red. The 8-micron channel of the camera is sensitive to emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. These organic molecules, comprised of carbon and hydrogen, are excited by the surrounding radiation field and become luminescent, accounting for the reddish cloud. Note that the boundary layer of the 8-micron mission corresponds to the lower right edge of the dark cloud in the visible-light picture.

    The primary image shows a spectrum obtained with Spitzer's infrared spectrograph instrument, stretching from wavelengths of 5.5 microns (left) to 20 microns (right). Spectra are graphical representations of a celestial

  11. Dynamic Cores in Hydrostatic Disguise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier; Klessen, Ralf S.; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique

    2003-07-01

    project are small (<~0.18 pc). As a consequence, different projections of the same core may give very different values of the BE fits. Finally, we briefly discuss recent results claiming that Bok globule B68 is in hydrostatic equilibrium, stressing that they imply that this core is unstable by a wide margin. We conclude that fitting BE profiles to observed cores is not an unambiguous test of hydrostatic equilibrium and that fit-estimated parameters such as mass, central density, density contrast, temperature, or radial profile of the BE sphere may differ significantly from the actual values in the cores.

  12. Obituary: Frank K. Edmondson (1912-2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilachowski, Catherine A.; Olson, Margaret K. Edmondson; Edmondson, Frank K., Jr.

    2009-12-01

    Pluto's status to a dwarf planet. While in Flagstaff, Frank met Margaret Russell, the youngest daughter of famed American astronomer Henry Norris Russell of Princeton University. The young couple instantly bonded and became engaged after only two weeks. He and Margaret were married on November 24, 1934. Frank and Margaret remained inseparable until her death in 1999, always together at meetings of the American Astronomical Society, the International Astronomical Union, and elsewhere. Studying under astronomer Bart Bok, Frank received his Ph.D. in astronomy in 1937 from Harvard University, where he completed his dissertation on "The Absorption of Light in the Galaxy," and joined the faculty as an Instructor in Astronomy at Indiana University. Frank became the second member of the Astronomy Department, with Professor W. A. Cogshall, housed in Kirkwood Observatory. Frank served as chair of the department from 1944 until 1978. Under his leadership, the University acquired the Goethe Link Observatory in Brooklyn, IN, (a gift from Dr. Goethe Link, a noted Indianapolis physician and avid amateur astronomer), established a graduate program in astronomy, and enlarged the Department of Astronomy from two faculty members to eight. In one of his favorite stories, Edmondson bet Professor Cogshall a chocolate ice cream cone that President Herman B Wells would fund a new position for the Department, knowing full well that Wells had already agreed. Frank retired from IU in 1983. Studying under astronomer Bart Bok, Frank received his Ph.D. in astronomy in 1937 from Harvard University, where he completed his dissertation on "The Absorption of Light in the Galaxy," and joined the faculty as an Instructor in Astronomy at Indiana University. Frank became the second member of the Astronomy Department, with Professor W. A. Cogshall, housed in Kirkwood Observatory. Frank served as chair of the department from 1944 until 1978. Under his leadership, the University acquired the Goethe Link

  13. Obituary: Allan R. Sandage (1926-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devorkin, David

    2011-12-01

    Weart on 22 May 1978, Niels Bohr Library & Archives, American Institute of Physics, College Park, MD, USA, www.aip.org/history/ohilist/ and http://www.aip.org/history/ohilist/4380_1.html] Allan enrolled in Miami University in 1943 because his father was on the faculty there at the time. He majored in physics until he entered the Navy for 18 months to train as an electronics technician's mate. His training began in Chicago, where he became acquainted with others interested in astronomy, like Arthur Code and Albert Wilson, and then his tour took him to Gulfport, Mississippi, and finally to Treasure Island in the San Francisco Bay. When Sandage was discharged from the Navy his father was moving to the University of Illinois, so Allan transferred there, entering a much larger and more competitive physics department. He majored in physics and mathematics but he also minored in philosophy, and took a celestial mechanics course from Robert H. Baker. He volunteered to work at the observatory, learning the art and craft of calibrating photographic plates so that magnitudes could be transferred and intercompared from plate to plate, an experience that he later realized prepared him well for his life career and also introduced him into Bart Bok's "star counting" circuit based at Harvard. In consequence, when Bok visited Illinois sometime in 1947, he invited Sandage to work at Harvard in their summer school at the Agassiz Station mapping Milky Way fields. Sandage applied both to Harvard and Caltech for graduate school. Harvard was very well established in its graduate program whereas Caltech was just beginning to offer the Ph.D. in astronomy. He chose Caltech because that was where the big telescopes were. His family had visited Mount Wilson in 1941 during a summer when his father was teaching at Berkeley, and since that time Sandage had dreamed of observing with those giant telescopes. Thus in September 1948, Sandage joined the first class of students to engage in formal graduate

  14. Obituary: Donald Alexander Macrae, 1916-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaquist, E. R.

    2007-12-01

    With the passing of Donald Alexander MacRae on 6 December 2006 at age 90, the astronomy community lost a visionary scientist and a great educator in the field. Don MacRae was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia, on 19 February 1916, to Donald Alexander and Laura Geddes (Barnstead) MacRae. His father was originally a classics scholar and preceptor of Greek and Latin at Princeton, but at the time of Don's birth in 1916 he was Dean of the Dalhousie Law School in Halifax. The family moved to Toronto, Ontario, in 1924 when his father joined the faculty of Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto as a Professor of Law. After the family moved to Toronto, where he received most of his early education, he obtained his undergraduate degree in Mathematics and Physics in 1937 from the University of Toronto (U of T). He obtained the degree of A.M. in 1940 and of Ph.D. in 1943 from Harvard University under the mentorship of Bart Bok in the field of galactic structure. During his early career he worked briefly at the University of Pennsylvania, Cornell University, and Carbide and Chemical Corporation at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. For Don the latter work was a brief and somewhat uneasy association with the Manhattan Project. In 1946, he obtained a position at Case Institute of Technology (now Case Western Reserve University), where he worked until 1953. In 1953, he accepted a position at the U of T, replacing Ralph Williamson, who had earlier introduced Don to the emerging field of radio astronomy while they both were at Cornell. Don's primary research field was stellar spectroscopy, but his interests were much broader than this, and he possessed an abiding ability to interest students and faculty in new and emerging ideas. In the early 1960s he developed a strong interest in the nature and origin of the lunar surface, and discussed these extensively with colleagues. Many of his ideas on this subject were later confirmed by the lunar exploration program. Don's continuing interest in radio astronomy

  15. Obituary: E. Dorrit Hoffleit, 1907-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimble, Virginia

    2007-12-01

    next year as a research assistant (later research associate) at Harvard College Observatory, then directed by Harlow Shapley, about whom her opinion was much warmer than that expressed by Cecilia Payne Gaposchkin. Dorrit's immediate supervisor at Harvard was Henrietta Swope, daughter of the President of General Electric, and eventually best known for work at Mount Wilson Observatory with Walter Baade on variable stars in the Magellanic Clouds, published in papers that continued to appear long after Baade's death. Hoffleit's first ten papers were also on variable stars and appeared in Harvard Observatory publications. But the MA she completed in 1932 was on the light curves of meteors and was published in the Proceedings of the United States National Academy of Sciences. By this time, Dorrit had established a work pattern that was to persist right up to retirement - at least 40 hours per week on whatever the current boss thought she should be doing, and another 20 or so on other astronomical research that interested her. Hffleit had supposed that an MA would be her highest degree, but Shapley urged her to go on for a PhD, with, it would seem, a bit of urging on both sides from Bart Bok, who informed her that "if God recommends that you do something, it is your duty to do it." The thesis (PhD 1938) was on yet a third topic, spectroscopic parallaxes. This means determining the luminosities of stars, hence their distances, from line width and ratio diagnostics in their spectra. The pioneer was Antonia Maury, whose insights were not appreciated by Shapley's predecessor, E. C. Pickering. Another valuable Hoffleit mentor was Ernst Öpik, on a three-month visit to Harvard in 1934, from whom Dorrit learned stellar statistics and half a dozen other things. The thesis also provided her "break out" paper into the Astrophysical Journal (on CN as a giant/dwarf discriminator). Hoffleit began to branch out into astrometry, comets, and other parts of astronomy and, starting in 1941