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Sample records for bolus methylprednisolone therapy

  1. Prophylactic treatment of episodic cluster headache with intravenous bolus of methylprednisolone.

    PubMed

    Mir, P; Alberca, R; Navarro, A; Montes, E; Martínez, E; Franco, E; Cayuela, A; Lozano, P

    2003-12-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of intravenous boluses of methylprednisolone followed by prednisone as a prophylactic treatment for episodic cluster headache. Fourteen male patients (mean age, 42.54 years) with episodic cluster headache were treated with 250-mg boluses of methylprednisolone on 3 consecutive days, followed by prednisone (90 mg/day orally) with gradual tapering in four weeks. Headache parameters of the active phases treated with methylprednisolone were compared with those of previous active phases in the same patients treated with other prophylactic medications. The primary efficacy criterion was decrease in the frequency of attacks during the first month of treatment. The statistical differences were calculated using Wilcoxon's test. The attacks were significantly less frequent in the active phases treated with methylprednisolone boluses than those treated with other medications ( p<0.05). This treatment seems to be more effective than the usual prophylactic treatments for episodic cluster headache.

  2. Intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy for children with epileptic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Pera, Maria Carmela; Randazzo, Giovanna; Masnada, Silvia; Dontin, Serena Donetti; De Giorgis, Valentina; Balottin, Umberto; Veggiotti, Pierangelo

    2015-01-01

    Summary The aim of this retrospective study of children affected by epileptic encephalopathy was to evaluate seizure frequency, electroencephalographic pattern and neuropsychological status, before and after intravenous methylprednisolone therapy. Eleven children with epileptic encephalopathy were administered one cycle of intravenous methylprednisolone (15–30 mg/kg/day for three consecutive days, once a month for four months) in addition to constant dosages of their regular antiepileptic drugs. The treatment resulted in statistically significant reductions of generalized slow spike-and-wave discharges (p<0.0028) and seizure frequency (p<0.013), which persisted even after methylprednisolone pulse therapy was stopped. A globally positive outcome was noted in 9/11 patients (81.8%). This methylprednisolone treatment regimen did not cause significant or persistent adverse effects. We suggest that children with epileptic encephalopathy without an underlying structural lesion could be the best candidates for intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy. PMID:26910177

  3. Technology for bolus verification in proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipulin, K. N.; Mytsin, G. V.; Agapov, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    To ensure the conformal depth-dose distribution of a proton beam within a target volume, complex shaped range shifters (so-called boluses), which account for the heterogeneous structure of patient tissue and organs in the beam path, were calculated and manufactured. The precise manufacturing of proton compensators used for patient treatment is a vital step in quality assurance in proton therapy. In this work a software-hardware complex that verifies the quality and precision of bolus manufacturing at the Medico-Technical Complex (MTC) was developed. The boluses consisted of a positioning system with two photoelectric biosensors. We evaluated 20 boluses used in proton therapy of five patients. A total number of 2562 experimental points were measured, of which only two points had values that differed from the calculated value by more than 0.5 mm. The other data points displayed a deviation within ±0.5 mm from the calculated value. The technology for bolus verification developed in this work can be used for the high precision testing of geometrical parameters of proton compensators in radiotherapy.

  4. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy in severe dysthyroid optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Guy, J.R.; Fagien, S.; Donovan, J.P.; Rubin, M.L. )

    1989-07-01

    Five patients with severe dysthyroid optic neuropathy were treated with intravenous methylprednisolone (1 g daily for 3 consecutive days). Before administration, visual acuity of the more severely affected eyes of each patient was counting fingers at 5 feet, 8/200, 20/400, 20/200, and 20/80. Immediately after completion of pulse therapy, visual acuity improved to 20/25 in four patients and 20/30 in one. Remissions were maintained with oral prednisone and external beam irradiation of the orbit. Pulse methylprednisolone therapy appears to be beneficial in the initial management of severe dysthyroid optic neuropathy.

  5. Treatment of allergic alveolitis with methylprednisolone pulse therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Christiane; Kleinau, Irene; Niggemann, Bodo; Weinhold, Nathalie; Wahn, Ulrich; Paul, Karl

    2003-02-01

    We report on a 13-year-old-boy who had been admitted to our hospital for dyspnea, hypoxia, and pulmonary infiltrates. The diagnosis of allergic alveolitis was based on history (provocation by exposure), lung function tests, bronchoalveolar lavage, and transbronchial lung biopsy. No specific allergen could be identified. Five courses of methylprednisolone pulse therapy (15 mg/kg on three consecutive days) stabilized the patient with normalization of lung function and blood gas analysis. Between pulses the boy returned to his home on a farm without relapse. It is estimated that the effect of a single pulse lasted for at least 2-4 weeks. We conclude that pulse therapy can be used instead of continuous therapy in this rare disease in childhood.

  6. On bolus for megavoltage photon and electron radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, Vedang; Palmer, Lisa; Mudge, Ray; Jiang, Runqing; Fleck, Andre; Schaly, Bryan; Osei, Ernest; Charland, Paule

    2013-10-01

    Frequently, in radiation therapy one must treat superficial lesions on cancer patients; these are at or adjacent to the skin. Megavoltage photon radiotherapy penetrates through the skin to irradiate deep-seated tumors, with skin-sparing property. Hence, to treat superficial lesions, one must use a layer of scattering material to feign as the skin surface. Although megavoltage electron beams are used for superficial treatments, one occasionally needs to enhance the dose near the surface. Such is the function of a “bolus,” a natural or synthetically developed material that acts as a layer of tissue to provide a more effective treatment to the superficial lesions. Other uses of boluses are to correct for varying surface contours and to add scattering material around the patient's surface. Materials used as bolus vary from simple water to metal and include various mixtures and compounds. Even with the modernization of the technology for external-beam therapy and the emergence of various commercial boluses, the preparation and utilization of a bolus in clinical radiotherapy remains an art. Considering the varying experiences and practices, this paper briefly summarizes available boluses that have been proposed and are employed in clinical radiotherapy. Although this review is not exhaustive, it provides some initial guidance and answers questions that may arise in clinical practice.

  7. Effect of methylprednisolone and "pulse" therapy with methylprednisolone sodium succinate on autologous immune complex nephritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, H; Sagae, Y; Tomabechi, N; Oikawa, S; Tsurufuji, S

    1980-02-01

    Autologous immune complex (AIC) nephritis was induced in rats with a single foot-pad injection of renal tubular epithelial antigen suspended in complete Freund's adjuvant. It was suggested by gel filtration of serum on Sephadex G-200 column that increase in the concentration of macroglobulins was the first alteration reflected on the serum proteins after immunization; the concentration of macroglobulins increased while the concentrations of albumin and gamma-globulin still remained in the normal range. The effect of 6 alpha-methylprednisolone sodium succinate (MP-S), 6 alpha-methylprednisolone (MP) and cyclophosphamide on the AIC nephritis in rats was studied. "Pulse" therapy, that is, an intraperitoneal administration of a large dose (26.5 mg/kg) of MP-S for 3 successive days a week and followed by an intermission for 4 days a week was started from the week of immunization with renal tubular epithelial antigen and continued for 8 weeks, resulting in the retardation of the AIC nephritis induction associated with a partial suppression of the development of proteinuria. Treatment with MP (4 mg/kg) or cyclophosphamide (10 mg/kg) every other day from the week of immunization for 8 weeks partially retarded or completely suppressed the AIC nephritis induction, respectively. On the other hand, the MP-S "pulse" therapy and the MP treatment of rats suffering from the already established AIC nephritis resulted in no apparent improvement of the disease.

  8. SU-C-213-03: Custom 3D Printed Boluses for Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, B; Yang, M; Yan, Y; Rahimi, A; Chopra, R; Jiang, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a clinical workflow and to commission the process of creating custom 3d printed boluses for radiation therapy. Methods: We designed a workflow to create custom boluses using a commercial 3D printer. Contours of several patients were deformably mapped to phantoms where the test bolus contours were designed. Treatment plans were created on the phantoms following our institutional planning guideline. The DICOM file of the bolus contours were then converted to stereoLithography (stl) file for the 3d printer. The boluses were printed on a commercial 3D printer using polylactic acid (PLA) material. Custom printing parameters were optimized in order to meet the requirement of bolus composition. The workflow was tested on multiple anatomical sites such as skull, nose and chest wall. The size of boluses varies from 6×9cm2 to 12×25cm2. To commission the process, basic CT and dose properties of the printing materials were measured in photon and electron beams and compared against water and soft superflab bolus. Phantoms were then scanned to confirm the placement of custom boluses. Finally dose distributions with rescanned CTs were compared with those computer-generated boluses. Results: The relative electron density(1.08±0.006) of the printed boluses resemble those of liquid tap water(1.04±0.004). The dosimetric properties resemble those of liquid tap water(1.04±0.004). The dosimetric properties were measured at dmax with an ion chamber in electron and photon open beams. Compared with solid water and soft bolus, the output difference was within 1% for the 3D printer material. The printed boluses fit well to the phantom surfaces on CT scans. The dose distribution and DVH based on the printed boluses match well with those based on TPS generated boluses. Conclusion: 3d printing provides a cost effective and convenient solution for patient-specific boluses in radiation therapy.

  9. Delivery confirmation of bolus electron conformal therapy combined with intensity modulated x-ray therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kavanaugh, James A.; Hogstrom, Kenneth R.; Fontenot, Jonas P.; Henkelmann, Gregory; Chu, Connel; Carver, Robert A.

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that a bolus electron conformal therapy (ECT) dose plan and a mixed beam plan, composed of an intensity modulated x-ray therapy (IMXT) dose plan optimized on top of the bolus ECT plan, can be accurately delivered. Methods: Calculated dose distributions were compared with measured dose distributions for parotid and chest wall (CW) bolus ECT and mixed beam plans, each simulated in a cylindrical polystyrene phantom that allowed film dose measurements. Bolus ECT plans were created for both parotid and CW PTVs (planning target volumes) using 20 and 16 MeV beams, respectively, whose 90% dose surface conformed to the PTV. Mixed beam plans consisted of an IMXT dose plan optimized on top of the bolus ECT dose plan. The bolus ECT, IMXT, and mixed beam dose distributions were measured using radiographic films in five transverse and one sagittal planes for a total of 36 measurement conditions. Corrections for film dose response, effects of edge-on photon irradiation, and effects of irregular phantom optical properties on the Cerenkov component of the film signal resulted in high precision measurements. Data set consistency was verified by agreement of depth dose at the intersections of the sagittal plane with the five measured transverse planes. For these same depth doses, results for the mixed beam plan agreed with the sum of the individual depth doses for the bolus ECT and IMXT plans. The six mean measured planar dose distributions were compared with those calculated by the treatment planning system for all modalities. Dose agreement was assessed using the 4% dose difference and 0.2 cm distance to agreement. Results: For the combined high-dose region and low-dose region, pass rates for the parotid and CW plans were 98.7% and 96.2%, respectively, for the bolus ECT plans and 97.9% and 97.4%, respectively, for the mixed beam plans. For the high-dose gradient region, pass rates for the parotid and CW plans were 93.1% and 94

  10. Design and production of 3D printed bolus for electron radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Su, Shiqin; Moran, Kathryn; Robar, James L

    2014-07-08

    This is a proof-of-concept study demonstrating the capacity for modulated electron radiation therapy (MERT) dose distributions using 3D printed bolus. Previous reports have involved bolus design using an electron pencil beam model and fabrication using a milling machine. In this study, an in-house algorithm is presented that optimizes the dose distribution with regard to dose coverage, conformity, and homogeneity within the planning target volume (PTV). The algorithm takes advantage of a commercial electron Monte Carlo dose calculation and uses the calculated result as input. Distances along ray lines from the distal side of 90% isodose line to distal surface of the PTV are used to estimate the bolus thickness. Inhomogeneities within the calculation volume are accounted for using the coefficient of equivalent thickness method. Several regional modulation operators are applied to improve the dose coverage and uniformity. The process is iterated (usually twice) until an acceptable MERT plan is realized, and the final bolus is printed using solid polylactic acid. The method is evaluated with regular geometric phantoms, anthropomorphic phantoms, and a clinical rhabdomyosarcoma pediatric case. In all cases the dose conformity are improved compared to that with uniform bolus. For geometric phantoms with air or bone inhomogeneities, the dose homogeneity is markedly improved. The actual printed boluses conform well to the surface of complex anthropomorphic phantoms. The correspondence of the dose distribution between the calculated synthetic bolus and the actual manufactured bolus is shown. For the rhabdomyosarcoma patient, the MERT plan yields a reduction of mean dose by 38.2% in left kidney relative to uniform bolus. MERT using 3D printed bolus appears to be a practical, low-cost approach to generating optimized bolus for electron therapy. The method is effective in improving conformity of the prescription isodose surface and in sparing immediately adjacent normal

  11. Utilization of a 3D printer to fabricate boluses used for electron therapy of skin lesions of the eye canthi.

    PubMed

    Łukowiak, Magdalena; Jezierska, Karolina; Boehlke, Marek; Więcko, Marzena; Łukowiak, Adam; Podraza, Wojciech; Lewocki, Mirosław; Masojć, Bartłomiej; Falco, Michał

    2017-01-01

    This work describes the use of 3D printing technology to create individualized boluses for patients treated with electron beam therapy for skin lesions of the eye canthi. It aimed to demonstrate the effectiveness of 3D-printed over manually fabricated paraffin boluses. The study involved 11 patients for whom the construction of individual boluses were required. CT scans of the fabricated 3D-printed boluses and paraffin boluses were acquired and superimposed onto patient CT scans to compare their fitting, bolus homogeneity, and underlying dose distribution. To quantify the level of matching, multiple metrics were utilized. Matching Level Index (ML) values ranged from 0 to 100%, where 100% indicated a perfect fit between the reference bolus (planned in treatment planning system) and 3D-printed and paraffin bolus. The average ML (± 1 SD) of the 3D-printed boluses was 95.1 ± 2.1%, compared to 46.0 ± 10.1% for the manually fabricated paraffin bolus. Correspondingly, mean doses were closer to the prescribed doses, and dose spreads were less for the dose distributions from the 3D-printed boluses, as compared to those for the manually fabricated paraffin boluses. It was concluded that 3D-printing technology is a viable method for fabricating boluses for small eye lesions and provides boluses superior to our boluses manually fabricated from paraffin sheets.

  12. Methylprednisolone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... allergic reactions. Methylprednisolone injection is used in the management of multiple sclerosis (a disease in which the ... laboratory test, tell your doctor and the laboratory personnel that you are using methylprednisolone injection.If you ...

  13. Evaluation of N-acetylcysteine and methylprednisolone as therapies for oxygen and acrolein-induced lung damage

    SciTech Connect

    Critchley, J.A.J.H. ); Beeley, J.M.; Clark, R.J.; Buchanan, J.D. ); Summerfield, M.; Bell, S. ); Spurlock, M.S.; Edginton, J.A.G. )

    1990-04-01

    Reactive oxidizing species are implicated in the etiology of a range of inhalational pulmonary injuries. Consequently, various free radical scavengers have been tested as potential prophylactic agents. The sulfydryl compound, N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is the only such compound clinically available for use in realistic dosages, and it is well established as an effective antidote for the hepatic and renal toxicity of paracetamol. Another approach in pulmonary injury prophylaxis is methylprednisolone therapy. The authors evaluated NAC and methylprednisolone in two rats models of inhalation injury: 40-hr exposure to >97% oxygen at 1.1 bar and 15-min exposure to acrolein vapor (210 ppm). The increases in lung wet/dry weight ratios, seen with both oxygen and acrolein toxicity were reduced with both treatments. However, with oxygen, NAC therapy was associated with considerably increased mortality and histological changes. Furthermore, IP NAC administration resulted in large volumes of ascitic fluid. With acrolein, IV, NAC had no significant effect on mortality or pulmonary histological damage. Methylprednisolone had no beneficial effects on either the mortality or histological damage observed in either toxicity model. They caution against the ad hoc use of NAC in the management of inhalational pulmonary injury.

  14. Clinical application of 3D-printed-step-bolus in post-total-mastectomy electron conformal therapy.

    PubMed

    Park, Kwangwoo; Park, Sungjin; Jeon, Mi-Jin; Choi, Jinhyun; Kim, Jun Won; Cho, Yoon Jin; Jang, Won-Seok; Keum, Yo Sup; Lee, Ik Jae

    2016-10-23

    The 3D-printed boluses were used during the radiation therapy of the chest wall in six patients with breast cancer after modified radical mastectomy (MRM). We measured the in-vivo skin doses while both conventional and 3D-printed boluses were placed on the chest wall and compared the mean doses delivered to the ipsilateral lung and the heart. The homogeneity and conformity of the dose distribution in the chest wall for both types of boluses were also evaluated. The uniformity index on the chest skin was improved when the 3D-printed boluses were used, with the overall average skin dose being closer to the prescribed one in the former case (-0.47% versus -4.43%). On comparing the dose-volume histogram (DVH), it was found that the 3D-printed boluses resulted in a reduction in the mean dose to the ipsilateral lung by up to 20%. The precision of dose delivery was improved by 3% with the 3D-printed boluses; in contrast, the conventional step bolus resulted in a precision level of 5%. In conclusion, the use of the 3D-printed boluses resulted in better dose homogeneity and conformity to the chest wall as well as the sparing of the normal organs, especially the lung. This suggested that their routine use on the chest wall as a therapeutic approach during post-mastectomy radiation therapy offers numerous advantages over conventional step boluses.

  15. A Patient-Specific Polylactic Acid Bolus Made by a 3D Printer for Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Min; Chun, MinSoo; Han, Ji Hye; Kim, Jung-in

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and advantages of a patient-specific breast bolus made using a 3D printer technique. Methods We used the anthropomorphic female phantom with breast attachments, which volumes are 200, 300, 400, 500 and 650 cc. We simulated the treatment for a right breast patient using parallel opposed tangential fields. Treatment plans were used to investigate the effect of unwanted air gaps under bolus on the dose distribution of the whole breast. The commercial Super-Flex bolus and 3D-printed polylactic acid (PLA) bolus were applied to investigate the skin dose of the breast with the MOSFET measurement. Two boluses of 3 and 5 mm thicknesses were selected. Results There was a good agreement between the dose distribution for a virtual bolus generated by the TPS and PLA bolus. The difference in dose distribution between the virtual bolus and Super-Flex bolus was significant within the bolus and breast due to unwanted air gaps. The average differences between calculated and measured doses in a 200 and 300 cc with PLA bolus were not significant, which were -0.7% and -0.6% for 3mm, and -1.1% and -1.1% for 5 mm, respectively. With the Super-Flex bolus, however, significant dose differences were observed (-5.1% and -3.2% for 3mm, and -6.3% and -4.2% for 5 mm). Conclusion The 3D-printed solid bolus can reduce the uncertainty of the daily setup and help to overcome the dose discrepancy by unwanted air gaps in the breast cancer radiation therapy. PMID:27930717

  16. Bolus electron conformal therapy for the treatment of recurrent inflammatory breast cancer: a case report

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Michelle M.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Kanke, James E.; Zhang, Sean; Perkins, George H.

    2012-07-01

    The treatment of locoregionally recurrent breast cancer in patients who have previously undergone radiation therapy is challenging. Special techniques are often required that both eradicate the disease and minimize the risks of retreatment. We report the case of a patient with an early-stage left breast cancer who developed inflammatory-type recurrence requiring re-irradiation of the chest wall using bolus electron conformal therapy with image-guided treatment delivery. The patient was a 51-year-old woman who had undergone lumpectomy, axillary lymph node dissection, and adjuvant whole-breast radiation therapy for a stage I left breast cancer in June 1998. In March 2009, she presented at our institution with biopsy-proven recurrent inflammatory carcinoma and was aggressively treated with multi-agent chemotherapy followed by mastectomy that left a positive surgical margin. Given the patient's prior irradiation and irregular chest wall anatomy, bolus electron conformal therapy was used to treat her chest wall and draining lymphatics while sparing the underlying soft tissue. The patient still had no evidence of disease 21 months after treatment. Our results indicate that bolus electron conformal therapy is an accessible, effective radiation treatment approach for recurrent breast cancer in patients with irregular chest wall anatomy as a result of surgery. This approach may complement standard techniques used to reduce locoregional recurrence in the postmastectomy setting.

  17. Personalized intensification of insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes - does a basal-bolus regimen suit all patients?

    PubMed

    Giugliano, D; Sieradzki, J; Stefanski, A; Gentilella, R

    2016-08-01

    Many patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) require insulin therapy. If basal insulin fails to achieve glycemic control, insulin intensification is one possible treatment intensification strategy. We summarized clinical data from randomized clinical trials designed to compare the efficacy and safety of basal-bolus and premixed insulin intensification regimens. We defined a between-group difference of ≥0.3% in end-of-study glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) as clinically meaningful. A PubMed database search supplemented by author-identified papers yielded 15 trials which met selection criteria: randomized design, patients with T2DM receiving basal-bolus (bolus injection ≤3 times/day) vs. premixed (≤3 injections/day) insulin regimens, primary/major endpoint(s) HbA1c- and/or hypoglycemia-related, and trial duration ≥12 weeks. Glycemic control improved with both basal-bolus and premixed insulin regimens with - in most cases - acceptable levels of weight gain and hypoglycemia. A clinically meaningful difference between regimens in glycemic control was recorded in only four comparisons, all of which favored basal-bolus therapy. The incidence of hypoglycemia was significantly different between regimens in only three comparisons, one of which favored premixed insulin and two basal-bolus therapy. Of the four trials that reported a significant difference between regimens in bodyweight change, two favored basal-bolus therapy and two favored premixed insulin. Thus, on a population level, neither basal-bolus therapy nor premixed insulin showed a consistent advantage in terms of glycemic control, hypoglycemic risk, or bodyweight gain. It is therefore recommended that clinicians should adopt an individualized approach to insulin intensification - taking into account the benefits and risks of each treatment approach and the attitude and preferences of each patient - in the knowledge that both basal-bolus and premixed regimens may be successful.

  18. Effects of Theophylline with Methylprednisolone Combination Therapy on Biomechanics and Histopathology in Diaphragm Muscles of Rats.

    PubMed

    Yuzkat, Nureddin; Kati, Ismail; Isik, Yasemin; Kavak, Servet; Goktas, Ugur; Cengiz, Nurettin

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of theophylline and methylprednisolone on the mechanical response and histopathology of hemidiaphragm muscle in rats. In the current study, we aimed to investigate the effects of theophylline and methylprednisolone, which are frequently used in clinics and which have different effects on the respiratory system and on the biomechanics and histopathology of the diaphragm muscle. The study included four groups of rats. Group T received 1 mg/kg of intraperitoneal theophylline, group M received 2 mg/kg of intraperitoneal methylprednisolone, group TM received 1 mg/kg of intraperitoneal theophylline plus 2 mg/kg of intraperitoneal methylprednisolone, and group K received of 1 mL intraperitoneal isotonic solution (of 0.9 % NaCl). The medications were continued for 7 days in each group. The rats underwent cervical dislocation under anesthesia on the eighth day, and their diaphragm samples were extracted. The left hemidiaphragm was used for the investigation of biomechanical parameters, and the right hemidiaphragm was used for the histopathological evaluation. It was observed that the medication administered in group T increased the contraction strength and duration compared with that in group M. Additionally, the duration of semi-relaxation was prolonged in group T compared with group M. The highest contraction strength and the longest contraction period among all of the groups were observed in group TM. It was concluded that the combined use of theophylline and methylprednisolone had positive effects on the contraction strength and the durations of contraction and semi-relaxation of the diaphragm muscle. In addition, both drugs had synergistic effects on each other.

  19. Post-mastectomy radiation therapy without usage of a bolus may be a reasonable option

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Naoki; Arahira, Satoko; Zenda, Sadamoto; Yoneyama, Kimiyasu; Mukai, Hirofumi; Onozawa, Masakatsu; Toshima, Masamichi; Motegi, Atsushi; Hirano, Yasuhiro; Hojo, Hidehiro; Kibe, Yuichi; Akimoto, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    To clarify the efficacy and toxicity of post-mastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) without usage of a bolus, we identified 129 consecutive patients who received PMRT at the National Cancer Center Hospital East between 2003 and 2012. Seven of the 129 patients who received breast reconstruction before PMRT were excluded. All patients received PMRT of 6 MV photons, without usage of a bolus. The median follow-up duration for all eligible patients was 47.7 months (range: 4.0–123.2). Local, locoregional and isolated locoregional recurrence was found in 12 (9.8%), 14 (11%) and 5 patients (4.1%), respectively. The 3- and 5-year cumulative incidence of local recurrence, locoregional recurrence and isolated locoregional recurrence was 9.2 and 10.7%, 10.8 and 12.4%, and 4.3 and 4.3%, respectively. Although Grade 2 dermatitis was found in 11 patients (9.0%), no Grade 3–4 dermatitis was found. On univariate analysis, only a non-luminal subtype was a significant predictor for local recurrence (P < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, a non-luminal subtype remained as an independent predictor for local recurrence (P = 0.003, odds ratio: 10.9, 95% confidence interval: 2.23–53.1). In conclusion, PMRT without usage of a bolus resulted in a low rate of severe acute dermatitis without an apparent increase in local recurrence. PMRT without usage of a bolus may be reasonable, especially for patients with a luminal subtype. PMID:27422934

  20. Sci—Thur AM: YIS - 07: Design and production of 3D printed bolus for electron radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Shiqin; Moran, Kathryn; Robar, James L.

    2014-08-15

    This is a proof-of-concept study demonstrating the capacity for modulated electron radiation therapy (MERT) using 3D printed bolus. Previous reports have involved bolus design using an electron pencil beam model and fabrication using a milling machine. In this study, an in-house algorithm is presented that optimizes the dose distribution with regard to dose coverage, conformity and homogeneity within planning target volume (PTV). The algorithm uses calculated result of a commercial electron Monte Carlo dose calculation as input. Distances along ray lines from distal side of 90% isodose to distal surface of PTV are used to estimate the bolus thickness. Inhomogeneities within the calculation volume are accounted for using coefficient of equivalent thickness method. Several regional modulation operators are applied to improve dose coverage and uniformity. The process is iterated (usually twice) until an acceptable MERT plan is realized, and the final bolus is printed using solid polylactic acid. The method is evaluated with regular geometric phantoms, anthropomorphic phantoms and a clinical rhabdomyosarcoma pediatric case. In all cases the dose conformity is improved compared to that with uniform bolus. The printed boluses conform well to the surface of complex anthropomorphic phantoms. For the rhabdomyosarcoma patient, the MERT plan yields a reduction of mean dose by 38.2% in left kidney relative to uniform bolus. MERT using 3D printed bolus appears to be a practical, low cost approach to generating optimized bolus for electron therapy. The method is effective in improving conformity of prescription isodose surface and in sparing immediately adjacent normal tissues.

  1. Methylprednisolone hemisuccinate and metabolites in urine from patients receiving high-dose corticosteroid therapy.

    PubMed

    Lawson, G J; Chakraborty, J; Dumasia, M C; Baylis, E M

    1992-02-01

    A reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic (RP-HPLC) method for the measurement of methylprednisolone hemisuccinate (MPHS) and its metabolites methylprednisolone (MP), 20-alpha- (20a-HMP), and 20-beta-hydroxymethylprednisolone (20b-HMP) in urine is described. The metabolites were extracted from urine samples using Extrelut columns and eluted with ethylacetate. The mobile phase for RP-HPLC comprised methanol:citrate buffer:tetrahydrofuran (30:65:5, vol/vol/vol) with UV detection at 251 nm. Fractions were collected, pooled and the metabolites present were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and normal-phase HPLC (NP-HPLC). By RP-HPLC 30 +/- 7.3% (mean +/- 1 SD) of the dose was detected in the 0-24 h urine sample following a 1 g MPHS infusion to patients with rheumatoid arthritis; MPHS contributed 9.9 +/- 5.0%, MP 12.1 +/- 2.9%, 20a-HMP 7.8 +/- 2.2%, and 20b-HMP 1.0 +/- 0.3%, respectively. A further 1.0 +/- 0.9% of the administered dose was detected in urine collected 24-48 h postinfusion.

  2. Accuracy of pencil-beam redefinition algorithm dose calculations in patient-like cylindrical phantoms for bolus electron conformal therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Carver, Robert L.; Hogstrom, Kenneth R.; Chu, Connel; Fields, Robert S.; Sprunger, Conrad P.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to document the improved accuracy of the pencil beam redefinition algorithm (PBRA) compared to the pencil beam algorithm (PBA) for bolus electron conformal therapy using cylindrical patient phantoms based on patient computed tomography (CT) scans of retromolar trigone and nose cancer.Methods: PBRA and PBA electron dose calculations were compared with measured dose in retromolar trigone and nose phantoms both with and without bolus. For the bolus treatment plans, a radiation oncologist outlined a planning target volume (PTV) on the central axis slice of the CT scan for each phantom. A bolus was designed using the planning.decimal{sup Registered-Sign} (p.d) software (.decimal, Inc., Sanford, FL) to conform the 90% dose line to the distal surface of the PTV. Dose measurements were taken with thermoluminescent dosimeters placed into predrilled holes. The Pinnacle{sup 3} (Philips Healthcare, Andover, MD) treatment planning system was used to calculate PBA dose distributions. The PBRA dose distributions were calculated with an in-house C++ program. In order to accurately account for the phantom materials a table correlating CT number to relative electron stopping and scattering powers was compiled and used for both PBA and PBRA dose calculations. Accuracy was determined by comparing differences in measured and calculated dose, as well as distance to agreement for each measurement point.Results: The measured doses had an average precision of 0.9%. For the retromolar trigone phantom, the PBRA dose calculations had an average {+-}1{sigma} dose difference (calculated - measured) of -0.65%{+-} 1.62% without the bolus and -0.20%{+-} 1.54% with the bolus. The PBA dose calculation had an average dose difference of 0.19%{+-} 3.27% without the bolus and -0.05%{+-} 3.14% with the bolus. For the nose phantom, the PBRA dose calculations had an average dose difference of 0.50%{+-} 3.06% without bolus and -0.18%{+-} 1.22% with the bolus. The PBA

  3. Alpha-methylprednisolone conjugated cyclodextrin polymer-based nanoparticles for rheumatoid arthritis therapy.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jungyeon; Rodgers, Kathleen; Oliver, James C; Schluep, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    A glycinate derivative of alpha-methylprednisolone (MP) was prepared and conjugated to a linear cyclodextrin polymer (CDP) with a loading of 12.4% w/w. The polymer conjugate (CDP-MP) self-assembled into nanoparticles with a size of 27 nm. Release kinetics of MP from the polymer conjugate showed a half-life (t1/2) of 50 h in phosphate buffer solution (PBS) and 19 h in human plasma. In vitro, the proliferation of human lymphocytes was suppressed to a similar extent but with a delayed effect when CDP-MP was compared with free MP. In vivo, CDP-MP was administered intravenously to mice with collagen-induced arthritis and compared with free MP. CDP-MP was administered weekly for six weeks (0.07, 0.7, and 7 mg/kg/week) and MP was administered daily for six weeks (0.01, 0.1, and 1 mg/kg/day). Body weight changes were minimal in all animals. After 28 days, a significant decrease in arthritis score was observed in animals treated weekly with an intermediate or high dose of CDP-MP. Additionally, dorsoplantar swelling was reduced to baseline in animals treated with CDP-MP at the intermediate and high dose level. Histological evaluation showed a reduction in synovitis, pannus formation and disruption of architecture at the highest dose level of CDP-MP. MP administered daily at equivalent cumulative doses showed minimal efficacy in this model. This study demonstrates that conjugation of MP to a cyclodextrin-polymer may improve its efficacy, leading to lower doses and less frequent administration for a safer and more convenient management of rheumatoid arthritis.

  4. Note: Utilization of polymer gel as a bolus compensator and a dosimeter in the near-surface buildup region for breast-conserving therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuse, Hiraku; Shinoda, Kazuya; Inohira, Masaya; Kawamura, Hiraku; Miyamoto, Katsumi; Sakae, Takeji; Fujisaki, Tatsuya

    2015-09-01

    Tangential beam radiotherapy is routinely used for radiation therapy after breast conserving surgery. A tissue-equivalent bolus placed on the irradiated area shifts the depth of the dose distribution; this bolus provides uniform dose distribution to the breast. The gel bolus made by the BANG-Pro® polymer gel and in an oxygen non-transmission pack was applicable as a dosimeter to measure dose distribution in near-surface buildup region. We validated the use of the gel bolus to improve in the whole-breast/chest wall, including the near-surface buildup region.

  5. Note: Utilization of polymer gel as a bolus compensator and a dosimeter in the near-surface buildup region for breast-conserving therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fuse, Hiraku Inohira, Masaya; Kawamura, Hiraku; Fujisaki, Tatsuya; Shinoda, Kazuya; Miyamoto, Katsumi; Sakae, Takeji

    2015-09-15

    Tangential beam radiotherapy is routinely used for radiation therapy after breast conserving surgery. A tissue-equivalent bolus placed on the irradiated area shifts the depth of the dose distribution; this bolus provides uniform dose distribution to the breast. The gel bolus made by the BANG-Pro{sup ®} polymer gel and in an oxygen non-transmission pack was applicable as a dosimeter to measure dose distribution in near-surface buildup region. We validated the use of the gel bolus to improve in the whole-breast/chest wall, including the near-surface buildup region.

  6. Bolus calculators.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Signe; Nørgaard, Kirsten

    2014-09-01

    Matching meal insulin to carbohydrate intake, blood glucose, and activity level is recommended in type 1 diabetes management. Calculating an appropriate insulin bolus size several times per day is, however, challenging and resource demanding. Accordingly, there is a need for bolus calculators to support patients in insulin treatment decisions. Currently, bolus calculators are available integrated in insulin pumps, as stand-alone devices and in the form of software applications that can be downloaded to, for example, smartphones. Functionality and complexity of bolus calculators vary greatly, and the few handfuls of published bolus calculator studies are heterogeneous with regard to study design, intervention, duration, and outcome measures. Furthermore, many factors unrelated to the specific device affect outcomes from bolus calculator use and therefore bolus calculator study comparisons should be conducted cautiously. Despite these reservations, there seems to be increasing evidence that bolus calculators may improve glycemic control and treatment satisfaction in patients who use the devices actively and as intended.

  7. Use of 3D printers to create a patient-specific 3D bolus for external beam therapy.

    PubMed

    Burleson, Sarah; Baker, Jamie; Hsia, An Ting; Xu, Zhigang

    2015-05-08

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that an inexpensive 3D printer can be used to manufacture patient-specific bolus for external beam therapy, and to show we can accurately model this printed bolus in our treatment planning system for accurate treatment delivery. Percent depth-dose measurements and tissue maximum ratios were used to determine the characteristics of the printing materials, acrylonitrile butadiene styrene and polylactic acid, as bolus material with physical density of 1.04 and 1.2 g/cm3, and electron density of 3.38 × 10²³ electrons/cm3 and 3.80 × 10²³ electrons/ cm3, respectively. Dose plane comparisons using Gafchromic EBT2 film and the RANDO phantom were used to verify accurate treatment planning. We accurately modeled a printing material in Eclipse treatment planning system, assigning it a Hounsfield unit of 260. We were also able to verify accurate treatment planning using gamma analysis for dose plane comparisons. With gamma criteria of 5% dose difference and 2 mm DTA, we were able to have 86.5% points passing, and with gamma criteria of 5% dose difference and 3 mm DTA, we were able to have 95% points passing. We were able to create a patient-specific bolus using an inexpensive 3D printer and model it in our treatment planning system for accurate treatment delivery.

  8. Lead as surface bolus for high-energy photon and electron therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, R.F.; King, G.A.; Hauser, J.F.

    1986-03-01

    Dose distributions were evaluated under thin sheet lead used as surface bolus for 4- and 10-MV photons and 6- and 9-MeV electrons using a parallel-plate ion chamber and film. A narrow, significantly low dose region (-17%) was noted for 4-MV photons, whereas a 6% increase in dose was present for 10-MV photons. The dose was elevated 15%-22% near the surface of electron fields with lead bolus, but depth dose relationships were similar to soft-tissue-equivalent (STE) bolus. Investigation of partial-field bolus (2-cm-diam circle) documented reduced doses due to lack of lateral electron equilibrium for 10-MV photons, which was less evident using lead, and large edge effects (up to 30%) for electrons using either lead or STE bolus. Dose distributions on sloped surfaces with electron fields were similar for lead and STE; both require thickness adjustment to achieve a desired effective thickness normal to the surface. Lead bolus has been used successfully in clinical practice for photons.

  9. Effects of copper oxide wire particle bolus therapy on trichostrongyle fecal egg counts in exotic artiodactylids.

    PubMed

    Fontenot, Deidre K; Kinney-Moscona, Allyson; Kaplan, Ray M; Miller, James

    2008-12-01

    Four species of artiodactylids (scimitar-horned oryx [Oryx dama]), roan antelope [Hippotragus equinus], blackbuck [Antilope cervicapra]), and blesbok [Damaliscus pygargus phillipsi]) totaling 13 animals were treated with a one-time 12.5-g dose of copper oxide wire particles (COWPs) in a bolus form. Pretreatment, individual trichostrongyle fecal egg counts (FECs) were performed using the McMaster technique. Individual posttreatment FECs were performed every 7 days for 35 days beginning 7 days after bolus administration, and FEC reduction ratios (FECRRs) expressed as percentage reductions from pretreatment values were calculated every 7 days. Mean FECRRs for the 13 animals were 93% +/- 16%, 98% +/- 7%, 91% +/- 28%, 94% +/- 16%, and 90% +/- 13% at 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35 days posttreatment, respectively. These data demonstrate that COWPs in a bolus form were an effective method for reducing FEC in exotic artiodactylids. Based on this limited data, COWPs show promise as an anthelmintic alternative for exotic artiodactylids in zoologic collections.

  10. Safe and Efficacious Use of Automated Bolus Advisors in Individuals Treated With Multiple Daily Insulin Injection (MDI) Therapy: Lessons Learned From the Automated Bolus Advisor Control and Usability Study (ABACUS).

    PubMed

    Parkin, Christopher G; Barnard, Katharine; Hinnen, Deborah A

    2015-03-20

    Numerous studies have shown that use of integrated automated bolus advisors (BAs) provides significant benefits to individuals using insulin pump devices, including improved glycemic control and greater treatment satisfaction. Within the past few years, BA devices have been developed specifically for individuals treated with multiple daily insulin injection (MDI) therapy; however, many clinicians who treat these individuals may be unfamiliar with insulin pump therapy and, thus, BA use. Findings from the Automated Bolus Advisor Control and Usability Study (ABACUS) revealed that BA use can be efficacious and clinically meaningful in MDI therapy, and that most patients are willing and able to use this technology appropriately when adequate clinical support is provided. The purpose of this article is to review key learnings from ABACUS and provide practical advice for initiating BA use and monitoring therapy.

  11. WE-F-16A-05: Use of 3D-Printers to Create a Tissue Equivalent 3D-Bolus for External Beam Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Burleson, S; Baker, J; Hsia, A; Xu, Z

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this project is to demonstrate that a non-expensive 3D-printer can be used to manufacture a 3D-bolus for external beam therapy. The printed bolus then can be modeled in our treatment planning system to ensure accurate dose delivery to the patient. Methods: We developed a simple method to manufacture a patient-specific custom 3Dbolus. The bolus is designed using Eclipse Treatment Planning System, contoured onto the patients CT images. The bolus file is exported from Eclipse to 3D-printer software, and then printed using a 3D printer. Various tests were completed to determine the properties of the printing material. Percent depth dose curves in this material were measured with electron and photon beams for comparison to other materials. In order to test the validity of the 3D printed bolus for treatment planning, a custom bolus was printed and tested on the Rando phantom using film for a dose plane comparison. We compared the dose plane measured on the film to the same dose plane exported from our treatment planning system using Film QA software. The gamma-dose distribution tool was used in our film analysis. Results: We compared point measurements throughout the dose plane and were able to achieve greater than 95% passing rate at 3% dose difference and 3 mm distance to agreement, which is our departments acceptable gamma pixel parameters. Conclusion: The printed 3D bolus has proven to be accurately modeled in our treatment planning system, it is more conformal to the patient surface and more durable than other bolus currently used (wax, superflab etc.). It is also more convenient and less costly than comparable bolus from milling machine companies.

  12. Evaluation of the Eclipse eMC algorithm for bolus electron conformal therapy using a standard verification dataset.

    PubMed

    Carver, Robert L; Sprunger, Conrad P; Hogstrom, Kenneth R; Popple, Richard A; Antolak, John A

    2016-05-08

     The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and calculation speed of electron dose distributions calculated by the Eclipse electron Monte Carlo (eMC) algorithm for use with bolus electron conformal therapy (ECT). The recent com-mercial availability of bolus ECT technology requires further validation of the eMC dose calculation algorithm. eMC-calculated electron dose distributions for bolus ECT have been compared to previously measured TLD-dose points throughout patient-based cylindrical phantoms (retromolar trigone and nose), whose axial cross sections were based on the mid-PTV (planning treatment volume) CT anatomy. The phantoms consisted of SR4 muscle substitute, SR4 bone substitute, and air. The treatment plans were imported into the Eclipse treatment planning system, and electron dose distributions calculated using 1% and < 0.2% statistical uncertainties. The accuracy of the dose calculations using moderate smoothing and no smooth-ing were evaluated. Dose differences (eMC-calculated less measured dose) were evaluated in terms of absolute dose difference, where 100% equals the given dose, as well as distance to agreement (DTA). Dose calculations were also evaluated for calculation speed. Results from the eMC for the retromolar trigone phantom using 1% statistical uncertainty without smoothing showed calculated dose at 89% (41/46) of the measured TLD-dose points was within 3% dose difference or 3 mm DTA of the measured value. The average dose difference was -0.21%, and the net standard deviation was 2.32%. Differences as large as 3.7% occurred immediately distal to the mandible bone. Results for the nose phantom, using 1% statistical uncertainty without smoothing, showed calculated dose at 93% (53/57) of the measured TLD-dose points within 3% dose difference or 3 mm DTA. The average dose difference was 1.08%, and the net standard deviation was 3.17%. Differences as large as 10% occurred lateral to the nasal air cavities. Including smoothing had

  13. Evaluation of the Eclipse eMC algorithm for bolus electron conformal therapy using a standard verification dataset.

    PubMed

    Carver, Robert L; Sprunger, Conrad P; Hogstrom, Kenneth R; Popple, Richard A; Antolak, John A

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and calculation speed of electron dose distributions calculated by the Eclipse electron Monte Carlo (eMC) algorithm for use with bolus electron conformal therapy (ECT). The recent commercial availability of bolus ECT technology requires further validation of the eMC dose calculation algorithm. eMC-calculated electron dose distributions for bolus ECT have been compared to previously measured TLD-dose points throughout patient-based cylindrical phantoms (retromolar trigone and nose), whose axial cross sections were based on the mid-PTV (planning treatment volume) CT anatomy. The phantoms consisted of SR4 muscle substitute, SR4 bone substitute, and air. The treatment plans were imported into the Eclipse treatment planning system, and electron dose distributions calculated using 1% and <0.2% statistical uncertainties. The accuracy of the dose calculations using moderate smoothing and no smoothing were evaluated. Dose differences (eMC-calculated less measured dose) were evaluated in terms of absolute dose difference, where 100% equals the given dose, as well as distance to agreement (DTA). Dose calculations were also evaluated for calculation speed. Results from the eMC for the retromolar trigone phantom using 1% statistical uncertainty without smoothing showed calculated dose at 89% (41/46) of the measured TLD-dose points was within 3% dose difference or 3 mm DTA of the measured value. The average dose difference was -0.21%, and the net standard deviation was 2.32%. Differences as large as 3.7% occurred immediately distal to the mandible bone. Results for the nose phantom, using 1% statistical uncertainty without smoothing, showed calculated dose at 93% (53/57) of the measured TLD-dose points within 3% dose difference or 3 mm DTA. The average dose difference was 1.08%, and the net standard deviation was 3.17%. Differences as large as 10% occurred lateral to the nasal air cavities. Including smoothing had

  14. Evaluation of bolus electron conformal therapy compared with conventional techniques for the treatment of left chest wall postmastectomy in patients with breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Opp, Dan Forster, Kenneth; Li, Weiqi; Zhang, Geoffrey; Harris, Eleanor E.

    2013-01-01

    Postmastectomy radiation (PMRT) lowers local-regional recurrence risk and improves survival in selected patients with breast cancer. The chest wall and lower axilla are technically challenging areas to treat with homogenous doses and normal tissue sparing. This study compares several techniques for PMRT to provide data to guide selection of optimal treatment techniques. Twenty-five consecutive left-sided patients treated postmastectomy were contoured using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) atlas guidelines then planned using 4 different PMRT techniques: opposed tangents with wedges (3-dimensional [3D] wedges), opposed tangents with field-in-field (FiF) modulation, 8-field intensity modulation radiotherapy (IMRT), and custom bolus electron conformal therapy (BolusECT, .decimal, Inc., Sanford, FL). Required planning target volume (PTV) coverage was held constant, and then dose homogeneity and normal tissue dose parameters were compared among the 4 techniques. BolusECT achieved clincally acceptable PTV coverage for 22 out of 25 cases. Compared with either tangential technique, IMRT and BolusECT provided the lowest heart V{sub 25} doses (3.3% ± 0.9% and 6.6% ± 3.2%, respectively with p < 0.0001). FiF had the lowest mean total lung dose (7.3 ± 1.1 Gy, with p = 0.0013), IMRT had the lowest total lung V{sub 20} (10.3% ± 1.6%, p < 0.0001), and BolusECT had the lowest mean heart dose (7.3 ± 2.0 Gy, p = 0.0002). IMRT provided the optimal dose homogeneity and normal tissue sparing compared with all other techniques for the cases in which BolusECT could not achieve acceptable PTV coverage. IMRT generally exposes contralateral breast and lung to slightly higher doses. Optimal PMRT technique depends upon patient anatomy. Patients whose maximal target volume depth is about 5.7 cm or less can be treated with BolusECT-assisted 12 or 15 MeV electron beams. At these energies, BolusECT has comparable dose-volume statistics as IMRT and lower heart V{sub 25} than opposed

  15. 21 CFR 520.1408 - Methylprednisolone tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Systemic therapy with methylprednisolone is contraindicated in animals with arrested tuberculosis, peptic ulcer, acute psychoses, or cushingoid syndrome. The presence of active tuberculosis, diabetes... corticosteroids may mask signs of infection. (e) Conditions of use—(1) Amount. Dogs and cats: 5 to 15 pounds,...

  16. Gastrostomy feeding tube - bolus

    MedlinePlus

    Feeding - gastrostomy tube - bolus; G-tube - bolus; Gastrostomy button - bolus; Bard Button - bolus; MIC-KEY - bolus ... Your child's gastrostomy tube (G-tube) is a special tube in your child's stomach that will help deliver food and medicines until your ...

  17. SU-E-T-356: Accuracy of Eclipse Electron Macro Monte Carlo Dose Algorithm for Use in Bolus Electron Conformal Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Carver, R; Popple, R; Benhabib, S; Antolak, J; Sprunger, C; Hogstrom, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of electron dose distribution calculated by the Varian Eclipse electron Monte Carlo (eMC) algorithm for use with recent commercially available bolus electron conformal therapy (ECT). Methods: eMC-calculated electron dose distributions for bolus ECT have been compared to those previously measured for cylindrical phantoms (retromolar trigone and nose), whose axial cross sections were based on the mid-PTV CT anatomy for each site. The phantoms consisted of SR4 muscle substitute, SR4 bone substitute, and air. The bolus ECT treatment plans were imported into the Eclipse treatment planning system and calculated using the maximum allowable histories (2×10{sup 9}), resulting in a statistical error of <0.2%. Smoothing was not used for these calculations. Differences between eMC-calculated and measured dose distributions were evaluated in terms of absolute dose difference as well as distance to agreement (DTA). Results: Results from the eMC for the retromolar trigone phantom showed 89% (41/46) of dose points within 3% dose difference or 3 mm DTA. There was an average dose difference of −0.12% with a standard deviation of 2.56%. Results for the nose phantom showed 95% (54/57) of dose points within 3% dose difference or 3 mm DTA. There was an average dose difference of 1.12% with a standard deviation of 3.03%. Dose calculation times for the retromolar trigone and nose treatment plans were 15 min and 22 min, respectively, using 16 processors (Intel Xeon E5-2690, 2.9 GHz) on a Varian Eclipse framework agent server (FAS). Results of this study were consistent with those previously reported for accuracy of the eMC electron dose algorithm and for the .decimal, Inc. pencil beam redefinition algorithm used to plan the bolus. Conclusion: These results show that the accuracy of the Eclipse eMC algorithm is suitable for clinical implementation of bolus ECT.

  18. GLP1-RA Add-on Therapy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Currently on a Bolus Containing Insulin Regimen.

    PubMed

    Davies, Marie L; Pham, David Q; Drab, Scott R

    2016-08-01

    Adding glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) to basal insulin regimens has become a guideline-recommended treatment option for uncontrolled type 2 diabetes. However, limited data exist to support the use of GLP-1 RAs with insulin regimens, including bolus insulin in patients with type 2 diabetes. The primary objectives of this review were to identify if the combination of a GLP-1 RA and an insulin regimen containing bolus insulin resulted in improvements in HbA1c , weight loss, reduction in insulin doses, and to evaluate the side effect profile of this combination in terms of nausea and hypoglycemia risk. Eight studies using exenatide twice/day, liraglutide, and dulaglutide were reviewed ranging in average duration of follow-up from 3 to 15 months. Seven studies showed that addition of a GLP-1 RA was associated with significant HbA1c reductions ranging from 0.4% to 1.64% from baseline to follow-up. Patients in all eight studies had significant weight loss in the GLP-1 RA arm from baseline to follow-up ranging from 0.87 to 10.2 kg. In all the studies, total daily bolus insulin doses decreased 25-67% from baseline to follow-up. In some studies, a portion of patients were able to discontinue bolus insulin all together after initiation of a GLP-1 RA. In addition, in two randomized trials included in the review, the GLP-1 RA arm showed significant improvement in HbA1c and weight compared with the control group who received basal/bolus regimens. Nausea was identified in 7-42% of participants using GLP-1 RAs with insulin. Data support the use of GLP-1 RAs added to insulin regimens already containing bolus insulin for glycemic control, weight loss, and reduction or discontinuation of bolus insulin.

  19. SU-C-213-05: Evaluation of a Composite Copper-Plastic Material for a 3D Printed Radiation Therapy Bolus

    SciTech Connect

    Vitzthum, L; Ehler, E; Sterling, D; Reynolds, T; Higgins, P; Dusenbery, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate a novel 3D printed bolus fabricated from a copper-plastic composite as a thin flexible, custom fitting device that can replicate doses achieved with conventional bolus techniques. Methods: Two models of bolus were created on a 3D printer using a composite copper-PLA/PHA. Firstly, boluses were constructed at thicknesses of 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8 mm. Relative dose measurements were performed under the bolus with an Attix Chamber as well as with radiochromic film. Results were compared to superficial Attix Chamber measurements in a water equivalent material to determine the dosimetric water equivalence of the copper-PLA/PHA plastic. Secondly, CT images of a RANDO phantom were used to create a custom fitting bolus across the anterolateral scalp. Surface dose with the bolus placed on the RANDO phantom was measured with radiochromic film at tangential angles with 6, 10, 10 flattening filter free (FFF) and 18 MV photon beams. Results: Mean surface doses for 6, 10, 10FFF and 18 MV were measured as a percent of Dmax for the flat bolus devices of each thickness. The 0.4 mm thickness bolus was determined to be near equivalent to 2.5 mm depth in water for all four energies. Surface doses ranged from 59–63% without bolus and 85–90% with the custom 0.4 mm copper-plastic bolus relative to the prescribed dose for an oblique tangential beam arrangement on the RANDO phantom. Conclusion: Sub-millimeter thickness, 3D printed composite copper-PLA/PHA bolus can provide a build-up effect equivalent to conventional bolus. At this thickness, the 3D printed bolus allows a level of flexure that may provide more patient comfort than current 3D printing materials used in bolus fabrication while still retaining the CT based custom patient shape. Funding provided by an intra-department grant of the University of Minnesota Department of Radiation Oncology.

  20. [Usefulness of Bolus Administration Using the FLEX Mode(Bolus Infusion Mode)for Baclofen Tolerance].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kazunori

    2017-02-01

    Intrathecal baclofen(ITB)is used to treat intractable spasticity of various etiologies and can provide better control of spasticity through the adjustment of the dose administered through the pump. However, in patients who develop tolerance to baclofen with the standard simple continuous mode, a sharp increase in dose becomes necessary, and spasticity can become harder to control. We investigated whether switching from the simple continuous mode to the bolus infusion mode was effective in controlling spasticity in patients with baclofen tolerance. We reported four patients undergoing ITB therapy at our facility who were considered to have developed baclofen tolerance. We observed the number of bolus infusions and total dose suitable for maintaining spasticity control after switching from the simple continuous mode to the bolus infusion mode. After switching to the bolus infusion mode, the total dose could be reduced in the short term; however, in the long term, the frequency of bolus infusions had to be increased to maintain spasticity control. Two years after changing to bolus infusion six times a day, the total dose was higher than that in the simple continuous mode for two of the four patients, and was the same level in the other two patients. Our four cases suggest that bolus infusion is effective in patients with baclofen tolerance during ITB therapy. Therefore, the conditions of bolus infusion should be further investigated.

  1. In Vivo Two-Photon Imaging of Axonal Dieback, Blood Flow, and Calcium Influx with Methylprednisolone Therapy after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Peifu; Zhang, Yiling; Chen, Chao; Ji, Xinran; Ju, Furong; Liu, Xingyu; Gan, Wen-Biao; He, Zhigang; Zhang, Shengxiang; Li, Wei; Zhang, Lihai

    2015-01-01

    Severe spinal cord injury (SCI) can cause neurological dysfunction and paralysis. However, the early dynamic changes of neurons and their surrounding environment after SCI are poorly understood. Although methylprednisolone (MP) is currently the standard therapeutic agent for treating SCI, its efficacy remains controversial. The purpose of this project was to investigate the early dynamic changes and MP's efficacy on axonal damage, blood flow, and calcium influx into axons in a mouse SCI model. YFP H-line and Thy1-GCaMP transgenic mice were used in this study. Two-photon microscopy was used for imaging of axonal dieback, blood flow, and calcium influx post-injury. We found that MP treatment attenuated progressive damage of axons, increased blood flow, and reduced calcium influx post-injury. Furthermore, microglia/macrophages accumulated in the lesion site after SCI and expressed the proinflammatory mediators iNOS, MCP-1 and IL-1β. MP treatment markedly inhibited the accumulation of microglia/macrophages and reduced the expression of the proinflammatory mediators. MP treatment also improved the recovery of behavioral function post-injury. These findings suggest that MP exerts a neuroprotective effect on SCI treatment by attenuating progressive damage of axons, increasing blood flow, reducing calcium influx, and inhibiting the accumulation of microglia/macrophages after SCI. PMID:25989524

  2. In vivo two-photon imaging of axonal dieback, blood flow, and calcium influx with methylprednisolone therapy after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Tang, Peifu; Zhang, Yiling; Chen, Chao; Ji, Xinran; Ju, Furong; Liu, Xingyu; Gan, Wen-Biao; He, Zhigang; Zhang, Shengxiang; Li, Wei; Zhang, Lihai

    2015-05-19

    Severe spinal cord injury (SCI) can cause neurological dysfunction and paralysis. However, the early dynamic changes of neurons and their surrounding environment after SCI are poorly understood. Although methylprednisolone (MP) is currently the standard therapeutic agent for treating SCI, its efficacy remains controversial. The purpose of this project was to investigate the early dynamic changes and MP's efficacy on axonal damage, blood flow, and calcium influx into axons in a mouse SCI model. YFP H-line and Thy1-GCaMP transgenic mice were used in this study. Two-photon microscopy was used for imaging of axonal dieback, blood flow, and calcium influx post-injury. We found that MP treatment attenuated progressive damage of axons, increased blood flow, and reduced calcium influx post-injury. Furthermore, microglia/macrophages accumulated in the lesion site after SCI and expressed the proinflammatory mediators iNOS, MCP-1 and IL-1β. MP treatment markedly inhibited the accumulation of microglia/macrophages and reduced the expression of the proinflammatory mediators. MP treatment also improved the recovery of behavioral function post-injury. These findings suggest that MP exerts a neuroprotective effect on SCI treatment by attenuating progressive damage of axons, increasing blood flow, reducing calcium influx, and inhibiting the accumulation of microglia/macrophages after SCI.

  3. Primary treatment of incomplete Kawasaki disease with infliximab and methylprednisolone in a patient with a contraindication to intravenous immune globulin.

    PubMed

    Shirley, Debbie-Ann; Stephens, Ina

    2010-10-01

    Incomplete Kawasaki disease was diagnosed in a 3-year-old boy. Because intravenous immune globulin infusion was not tolerated, he was treated with infliximab and methylprednisolone. Coronary aneurysms were not visualized on initial or follow-up echocardiograms. To our knowledge, this is the first report to document the use of infliximab and methylprednisolone as first line therapy for Kawasaki disease.

  4. Predicting erythroid response to recombinant erythropoietin plus granulocyte colony-stimulating factor therapy following a single subcutaneous bolus in patients with myelodysplasia.

    PubMed

    Bowen, David; Hyslop, Ann; Keenan, Norene; Groves, Michael; Culligan, Dominic; Johnson, Peter; Shaw, Ann; Geddes, Fiona; Evans, Patricia; Porter, John; Cavill, Ivor

    2006-05-01

    We randomized 21 patients with low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) to receive a single subcutaneous bolus of recombinant erythropoietin (epoietin) +/- granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), or placebo and monitored erythropoietic response over 7 days. In this small study, the reticulocyte response at day 7 was highly predictive of subsequent response to a therapeutic trial of epoietin + G-CSF.

  5. Intensification of insulin therapy with basal-bolus or premixed insulin regimens in type 2 diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Giugliano, Dario; Chiodini, Paolo; Maiorino, Maria Ida; Bellastella, Giuseppe; Esposito, Katherine

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the effect of intensified insulin regimens (basal-bolus versus premixed) on glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. We conducted an electronic search until March 2015 on many electronic databases including online registries of ongoing trials. All RCTs comparing basal-bolus with premixed insulin regimens, with a duration of >12 weeks and with >30 patients per arm, were included. Investigators extracted data on study characteristics, outcome measures, and methodological quality. We found thirteen RCTs lasting 16-60 weeks and involving 5255 patients assessed for the primary endpoint (reduction of HbA1c from baseline). Meta-analysis of change in HbA1c level between basal-bolus and premixed insulin regimens resulted in a small and non-significant difference of 0.09% (95% CI -0.03 to 0.21), with substantial heterogeneity between studies (I(2) = 74.4%). There was no statistically significant difference in the event rate for overall hypoglycemia (0.16 episode/patient/year, 95%CI -2.07 to 2.3), weight change (-0.21 kg, -0.164 to 0.185), and daily insulin dose (-0.54 U/day, -2.7 to 1.6). The likelihood for reaching the HbA1c <7% was 8% higher (3-13%, I(2) = 68.8%) with the basal-bolus as compared with the premixed regimen. There is no clinically relevant difference in the efficacy of basal-bolus versus premixed insulin regimens for HbA1c decrease in type 2 diabetic patients. These findings may be helpful to adapt treatment to individual patient needs.

  6. Insulin pumps: Beyond basal-bolus.

    PubMed

    Millstein, Richard; Becerra, Nancy Mora; Shubrook, Jay H

    2015-12-01

    Insulin pumps are a major advance in diabetes management, making insulin dosing easier and more accurate and providing great flexibility, safety, and efficacy for people who need basal-bolus insulin therapy. They are the preferred treatment for people with type 1 diabetes and many with type 2 diabetes who require insulin. This article reviews the basics of how insulin pumps work, who benefits from a pump, and how to manage inpatients and outpatients on insulin pumps.

  7. A combination of methylprednisolone and quercetin is effective for the treatment of cardiac contusion following blunt chest trauma in rats

    PubMed Central

    Demir, F.; Güzel, A.; Katı, C.; Karadeniz, C.; Akdemir, U.; Okuyucu, A.; Gacar, A.; Özdemir, S.; Güvenç, T.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac contusion is a potentially fatal complication of blunt chest trauma. The effects of a combination of quercetin and methylprednisolone against trauma-induced cardiac contusion were studied. Thirty-five female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into five groups (n=7) as follows: sham, cardiac contusion with no therapy, treated with methylprednisolone (30 mg/kg on the first day, and 3 mg/kg on the following days), treated with quercetin (50 mg·kg−1·day−1), and treated with a combination of methylprednisolone and quercetin. Serum troponin I (Tn-I) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels and cardiac histopathological findings were evaluated. Tn-I and TNF-α levels were elevated after contusion (P=0.001 and P=0.001). Seven days later, Tn-I and TNF-α levels decreased in the rats treated with methylprednisolone, quercetin, and the combination of methylprednisolone and quercetin compared to the rats without therapy, but a statistical significance was found only with the combination therapy (P=0.001 and P=0.011, respectively). Histopathological degeneration and necrosis scores were statistically lower in the methylprednisolone and quercetin combination group compared to the group treated only with methylprednisolone (P=0.017 and P=0.007, respectively). However, only degeneration scores were lower in the combination therapy group compared to the group treated only with quercetin (P=0.017). Inducible nitric oxide synthase positivity scores were decreased in all treatment groups compared to the untreated groups (P=0.097, P=0.026, and P=0.004, respectively). We conclude that a combination of quercetin and methylprednisolone can be used for the specific treatment of cardiac contusion. PMID:25098616

  8. Development and Clinical Implementation of a Universal Bolus to Maintain Spot Size During Delivery of Base of Skull Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Both, Stefan; Shen, Jiajian; Kirk, Maura; Lin, Liyong; Tang, Shikui; Alonso-Basanta, Michelle; Lustig, Robert; Lin, Haibo; Deville, Curtiland; Hill-Kayser, Christine; Tochner, Zelig; McDonough, James

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To report on a universal bolus (UB) designed to replace the range shifter (RS); the UB allows the treatment of shallow tumors while keeping the pencil beam scanning (PBS) spot size small. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with brain cancers treated from 2010 to 2011 were planned using the PBS technique with bolus and the RS. In-air spot sizes of the pencil beam were measured and compared for 4 conditions (open field, with RS, and with UB at 2- and 8-cm air gap) in isocentric geometry. The UB was applied in our clinic to treat brain tumors, and the plans with UB were compared with the plans with RS. Results: A UB of 5.5 cm water equivalent thickness was found to meet the needs of the majority of patients. By using the UB, the PBS spot sizes are similar with the open beam (P>.1). The heterogeneity index was found to be approximately 10% lower for the UB plans than for the RS plans. The coverage for plans with UB is more conformal than for plans with RS; the largest increase in sparing is usually for peripheral organs at risk. Conclusions: The integrity of the physical properties of the PBS beam can be maintained using a UB that allows for highly conformal PBS treatment design, even in a simple geometry of the fixed beam line when noncoplanar beams are used.

  9. Intratympanic dexamethasone injection vs methylprednisolone for the treatment of refractory sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Berjis, Nezamoddin; Soheilipour, Saeed; Musavi, Alireza; Hashemi, Seyed Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Background: During the past years various drugs have been used for sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) treatment including steroids that are shown to be beneficial. Directed delivery of high doses of steroids into the inner ear is suggested for its potential and known as intratympanic steroids therapy (IST). Despite the use of dexamethasone and methylprednisolone as the traditional treatments, there are still debates about the optimal dosage, preferred drug, and the route of administration. Materials and Methods: We performed a randomized clinical trial study in which 50 patients suffering from SSNHL and resistant to standard therapy were employed. Each patient took 0.5 ml methylprednisolone (40 mg/mg) along with bicarbonate or dexamethasone (4 mg/mL) through direct intratympanic injection. This method was performed and scheduled once every 2 days for three times only for the dexamethasone receiving group. Hearing test was carried out and the results were analyzed according to a four-frequency (0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0 kHz) pure tone average (PTA) and Siegel's criteria. Results: According to Siegel's criteria, three out of 25 (12%) dexamethasone receiving patients were healed in 1 and 4 (16%), 9 (32%) were respectively recovered in Siegel's criteria 2, 3, and 9 (32%) showed no recovery. In the group receiving methylprednisolone, recovery was found in 6 (24%), 8 (32%), 7 (28%) patients in the Siegel's criteria 1, 2, 3, respectively, and in 4 (16%) patients no recovery was recorded. In methylprednisolone group, hearing was significantly improved compared to the dexamethasone group (P < 0.05). The general hearing improvement rate was 84% in methylprednisolone receiving patients showing a significantly higher improvement than 64% in the dexamethasone group. Conclusions: Topical intratympanic treatment with methylprednisolone is safe and an effective treatment approach for those SSNHL cases that are refractory to the common therapies by Dexamethasone. PMID:27403406

  10. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamic response of methylprednisolone in premenopausal renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Tornatore, Kathleen M; Gilliland-Johnson, Kristin K; Farooqui, Mahfooz; Reed, Kris A; Venuto, Rocco C

    2004-09-01

    Chronic glucocorticoid therapy is prescribed in renal transplant recipients according to empiric dose-tapering schedules, which assume a similar pharmacologic response in men and women. The study objectives were (a) to compare the pharmacokinetics of methylprednisolone in premenopausal renal transplant recipients with previously studied male counterparts and (b) to describe the pharmacodynamic response of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis during chronic steroid therapy. Thirteen stable premenopausal subjects (ages 30 to therapy were evaluated for methylprednisolone, cortisol, and adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH) over 24 hours after an intravenous infusion of methylprednisolone sodium succinate. Most patients were evaluated during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Pharmacokinetic parameters of methylprednisolone with cortisol and ACTH responses were determined. Results were compared to counterpart male subjects who participated in a prior study. The total clearance of methylprednisolone for the female subjects was 15.6 +/- 5.99 L/h compared to the males with 21.5 +/- 8.67 L/h (P <.05). When normalized for total or lean body weight, no significant difference was noted (P =.614). A 3-fold interpatient variation in weight-adjusted clearance was noted for female subjects. Dose-normalized methylprednisolone a AUC was greater in women (66.1 +/- 19.8 ng*h/mL) than men (46.4 +/- 19.7 ng*h/mL) (P =.174). Total cortisol AUC was not different between groups (P =.599). Despite chronic steroid therapy, 9 of 13 women had a normal cortisol profile and an ACTH AUC of 299 +/- 102 pg*h/mL. It was concluded that methylprednisolone clearance in women was significantly slower compared to men. When drug clearance was normalized for total and lean body weight, no gender difference was noted. These findings are in contrast to prior data indicating a more rapid methylprednisolone clearance in healthy women. These findings suggest

  11. 21 CFR 520.1158 - Iodochlorhydroxyquin boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Iodochlorhydroxyquin boluses. 520.1158 Section 520... Iodochlorhydroxyquin boluses. (a) Specifications. Each bolus contains 10 grams of iodochlorhydroxyquin. (b) Sponsor. See No. 053501 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c) Conditions of use—(1) Amount. 1 bolus (10...

  12. 21 CFR 520.1158 - Iodochlorhydroxyquin boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Iodochlorhydroxyquin boluses. 520.1158 Section 520... Iodochlorhydroxyquin boluses. (a) Specifications. Each bolus contains 10 grams of iodochlorhydroxyquin. (b) Sponsor. See No. 053501 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c) Conditions of use—(1) Amount. 1 bolus (10...

  13. 21 CFR 520.1158 - Iodochlorhydroxyquin boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Iodochlorhydroxyquin boluses. 520.1158 Section 520... Iodochlorhydroxyquin boluses. (a) Specifications. Each bolus contains 10 grams of iodochlorhydroxyquin. (b) Sponsor. See No. 053501 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c) Conditions of use—(1) Amount. 1 bolus (10...

  14. 21 CFR 520.1158 - Iodochlorhydroxyquin boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Iodochlorhydroxyquin boluses. 520.1158 Section 520... Iodochlorhydroxyquin boluses. (a) Specifications. Each bolus contains 10 grams of iodochlorhydroxyquin. (b) Sponsor. See No. 053501 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c) Conditions of use—(1) Amount. 1 bolus (10...

  15. MO-H-19A-03: Patient Specific Bolus with 3D Printing Technology for Electron Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, W; Swann, B; Siderits, R; McKenna, M; Khan, A; Yue, N; Zhang, M; Fisher, T

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Bolus is widely used in electron radiotherapy to achieve desired dose distribution. 3D printing technologies provide clinicians with easy access to fabricate patient specific bolus accommodating patient body surface irregularities and tissue inhomogeneity. This study presents the design and the clinical workflow of 3D printed bolus for patient electron therapy in our clinic. Methods: Patient simulation CT images free of bolus were exported from treatment planning system (TPS) to an in-house developed software package. Bolus with known material properties was designed in the software package and then exported back to the TPS as a structure. Dose calculation was carried out to examine the coverage of the target. After satisfying dose distribution was achieved, the bolus structure was transferred in Standard Tessellation Language (STL) file format for the 3D printer to generate the machine codes for printing. Upon receiving printed bolus, a quick quality assurance was performed with patient resimulated with bolus in place to verify the bolus dosimetric property before treatment started. Results: A patient specific bolus for electron radiotherapy was designed and fabricated in Form 1 3D printer with methacrylate photopolymer resin. Satisfying dose distribution was achieved in patient with bolus setup. Treatment was successfully finished for one patient with the 3D printed bolus. Conclusion: The electron bolus fabrication with 3D printing technology was successfully implemented in clinic practice.

  16. Effect of inspiration on bolus injection

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, P.M.; Moreno, A.J.; Berger, D.E.; Sorensen, K.A.; Farnum, G.D.

    1986-03-01

    Adequate compact intravenous (i.v.) bolus injections of radiopharmaceuticals are essential for many quantitative radionuclide studies. Techniques have been described to obtain optimum bolus injections. The effect of inspiration on i.v. bolus injections was studied in 36 individuals. A slow, deep inspiration just prior to the arrival of the bolus within the superior vena cava significantly improved the quality of the bolus.

  17. Steroid dose sparing: pharmacodynamic responses to single versus divided doses of methylprednisolone in man.

    PubMed

    Reiss, W G; Slaughter, R L; Ludwig, E A; Middleton, E; Jusko, W J

    1990-06-01

    Inhibitory drug interactions affecting the metabolism of methylprednisolone (MP) may produce either steroid sparing or adverse effects partly by increasing the exposure time to the steroid. This phenomenon can be mimicked by administering MP in divided doses. Two types of responses were compared after a single MP dose (40 mg bolus) and a divided regimen (20 mg bolus and a 5 mg bolus 8 hours later) in six healthy male volunteers. The suppression of basophils measured as whole blood histamine and plasma cortisol concentrations was assessed during 32 hours. The 37.5% reduction in dose produced a 23% overall decreased blood histamine response. A pharmacodynamic model for basophil cell distribution to and from an extravascular compartment describes the effects of MP after both regimens. A slower initial decline in blood histamine after the divided regimen may be related to incomplete suppression of basophil cell return to blood. The 50% inhibitory concentrations of MP of about 5 ng/ml were similar for both regimens. The decline and return of cortisol concentrations were similar between MP treatments with suppression continuing for 24 hours. The 50% inhibitory concentrations of MP values for adrenal suppression were about 1 ng/ml. Pharmacodynamic modeling is useful in quantitating corticosteroid responses and generally predicted the "dose-sparing" effects that were achieved by prolonging MP plasma concentrations. This study supports previous clinical observations that patients may require morning through evening exposure to MP to optimize efficacy while adrenal suppression is being minimized.

  18. Methylprednisolone Protects Cardiac Pumping Mechanics from Deteriorating in Lipopolysaccharide-Treated Rats.

    PubMed

    Ko, Ya-Hui; Tsai, Ming-Shian; Chang, Ru-Wen; Chang, Chun-Yi; Wang, Chih-Hsien; Wu, Ming-Shiou; Liang, Jin-Tung; Chang, Kuo-Chu

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that a prolonged low-dose corticosteroid treatment attenuates the severity of inflammation and the intensity and duration of organ system failure. In the present study, we determined whether low-dose methylprednisolone (a synthetic glucocorticoid) can protect male Wistar rats against cardiac pumping defects caused by lipopolysaccharide-induced chronic inflammation. For the induction of chronic inflammation, a slow-release ALZET osmotic pump was subcutaneously implanted to infuse lipopolysaccharide (1 mg kg(-1) d(-1)) for 2 weeks. The lipopolysaccharide-challenged rats were treated on a daily basis with intraperitoneal injection of methylprednisolone (5 mg kg(-1) d(-1)) for 2 weeks. Under conditions of anesthesia and open chest, we recorded left ventricular (LV) pressure and ascending aortic flow signals to calculate the maximal systolic elastance (E max) and the theoretical maximum flow (Q max), using the elastance-resistance model. Physically, E max reflects the contractility of the myocardium as an intact heart, whereas Q max has an inverse relationship with the LV internal resistance. Compared with the sham rats, the cardiodynamic condition was characterized by a decline in E max associated with the increased Q max in the lipopolysaccharide-treated rats. Methylprednisolone therapy increased E max, which suggests that the drug may have protected the contractile status from deteriorating in the inflamed heart. By contrast, methylprednisolone therapy considerably reduced Q max, indicating that the drug may have normalized the LV internal resistance. In parallel, the benefits of methylprednisolone on the LV systolic pumping mechanics were associated with the reduced cardiac levels of negative inotropic molecules such as peroxynitrite, malondialdehyde, and high-mobility group box 1 protein. Based on these data, we suggested that low-dose methylprednisolone might prevent lipopolysaccharide-induced decline in cardiac intrinsic contractility and LV

  19. Electronic bolus design impacts on administration.

    PubMed

    Hentz, F; Umstätter, C; Gilaverte, S; Prado, O R; Silva, C J A; Monteiro, A L G

    2014-06-01

    Electronic identification of animals has become increasingly important worldwide to improve and ensure traceability. In warm and hot climates, such as Brazil, boluses can have advantages over ear tags as the internal devices reduce the risks of ear tag losses, tissue damage, and lesions on the ear. Electronic boluses, however, are often perceived as having negative characteristics, including reported difficulties of administration in small ruminants. This paper describes the factors associated with bolus design that affect the swallowing of a bolus in sheep. Other factors that might influence bolus swallowing time have also been considered. In addition, the effect of bolus design on its performance was evaluated. A total of 56 Suffolk ewes were used to assess the ease of administration and retention of 3 types of electronic ruminal boluses (mini, 11.5 × 58.0 mm and 21.7 g; small, 14.8 × 48.5 mm and 29.5 g; standard, 19.3 × 69.8 mm and 74.4 g) during a whole productive year, including pregnancy and lamb suckling. Ewe age (5.6 ± 2.3 yr) and weight (85.07 ± 8.2 kg BW) were recorded, as well as time for bolus swallowing. The deglutition of the bolus and any resulting blockages in the esophagus were monitored by visual observations. Retention and readability of the boluses were regularly monitored for d 1, wk 1, mo 1, and every mo until 1 yr. Time for bolus swallowing differed substantially with bolus type and was greater (P < 0.05) for the standard bolus (32.8 ± 6.9 s) when compared to small and mini boluses, which did not differ (8.5 ± 2.0 vs. 9.2 ± 2.7 s; P > 0.05). The bolus o.d. and length were positively correlated with swallowing time (P < 0.01). The ewe weight was negatively correlated with swallowing time (P < 0.05). At 6 mo all electronic boluses showed 100% retention rate, and at 12 mo, bolus retention was 100%, 94.5%, and 100% for mini, small, and standard boluses, respectively (P > 0.05). At 12 mo, all boluses showed 100% readability, except for

  20. Effect of carbohydrate counting using bolus calculators on glycemic control in type 1 diabetes patients during continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Eijiro; Okada, Shuichi; Nakajima, Yasuyo; Bastie, Claire C; Tagaya, Yuko; Osaki, Aya; Shimoda, Yoko; Shibusawa, Ryo; Saito, Tsugumichi; Ozawa, Atsushi; Yamada, Masanobu

    2016-11-29

    The present study examined the long-term efficacy of insulin pump therapy for type 1 diabetes patients when carried out using carbohydrate counting with bolus calculators for 1 year. A total of 22 type 1 diabetes patients who had just started continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion were examined and divided into two groups: one that was educated about carbohydrate counting using bolus calculators (n = 14); and another that did not use bolus calculators (n = 8). After 1 year, the hemoglobin A1c levels of the patient group that used bolus calculators decreased persistently and significantly (P = 0.0297), whereas those of the other group did not. The bodyweight, total daily dose of insulin and bolus percentage of both groups did not change. Carbohydrate counting using bolus calculators is necessary to achieve optimal and persistent glycemic control in patients undergoing continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion.

  1. Methylprednisolone for the treatment of children with refractory epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Sevilla-Castillo, R A; Palacios, G C; Ramirez-Campos, J; Mora-Puga, M; Diaz-Bustos, R

    2009-12-01

    Epilepsy is a disease characterized by unprovoked epileptic seizures resulting from a bioelectrical brain dysfunction. Antiepileptic treatment controls 75% of all epileptic patients; the other 25% continue to have epileptic seizures in spite of a combination of multiple antiepileptic drugs. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the use of methylprednisolone in the treatment of children with refractory epilepsy. Fourteen children with refractory epilepsy at the Hospital de Especialidades No. 25 of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social in Monterrey, Northeast Mexico were included. For five consecutively days, each patient received methylprednisolone by intravenous administration at a dosage of 15 mg/kg/day each 8 h, once a month for 3 months. The frequency of epileptic seizures and possible related side effects were evaluated every month during the three months before, during, and after administration of methylprednisolone. The frequency of epileptic seizures was reduced by more than 50% in 12/14 patients during methylprednisolone treatment. The median number of seizures before treatment with methylprednisolone was 8, 8, and 7; during the treatment: 1, 1, and 1; and after treatment: 2, 2, and 3 (p=0.000). We conclude that methylprednisolone reduces the frequency of epileptic seizures in children with refractory epilepsy.

  2. A Highly Reproducible Bolus Immobilization Technique for the Treatment of Scalp Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Steven H.; Latronico, Diane; Teslow, Terrance; Bajaj, Gopal K.

    2008-04-01

    Radiation treatment of scalp malignancies can be a challenge due to the multiple curved surfaces to which homogenous dose must be delivered. The most readily available techniques utilize linear accelerator-based technique of opposed lateral electron field abutting opposed lateral photon field with central blocking. Bolus material is used to achieve adequate skin dose. Although plans to add bolus material often occur in the virtual setting during treatment planning, the practical aspects of reproducibly maintain the bolus material along curved surfaces during the day-to-day patient setup can be a challenge. We present a case of a patient with squamous cell carcinoma of the scalp with neck node involvement treated with surgery followed by adjuvant radiotherapy. We demonstrate a unique immobilization technique that maintains the bolus material on the aquaplast mesh adherent to the patient's scalp as well as the neck. TomoTherapy with daily megavoltage computed tomography (CT) scan was utilized to verify the daily bolus position. We were able to maintain a 95% reproducibility rate. This technique reliably maintains the bolus material on the desired locations with minimum adjustments and manipulation by the therapist and is a technique that can be universally adapatable for conventional radiotherapy or intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques.

  3. Pharyngeal Pressure and Timing During Bolus Transit.

    PubMed

    Walczak, Chelsea C; Jones, Corinne A; McCulloch, Timothy M

    2017-02-01

    Determining intrabolus pressure (IBP) at the upper esophageal sphincter (UES) and in the esophagus has given compelling evidence that IBP can be a predictor for swallowing dysfunction. Studies have looked most superiorly at the low hypopharynx region but there has been no inquiry into what IBP measures throughout the entire pharynx can tell us. We present a study to describe the pressures within and surrounding the moving bolus throughout the pharynx and into the UES. Simultaneous high-resolution manometry (HRM) and videofluoroscopy were performed in ten healthy subjects swallowing ten 10 mL thin-liquid barium boluses. Three events surrounding bolus movement were tracked via videofluoroscopy, and two additional events were found using manometric measures. As the bolus passes through the pharynx, low pressure is created at and below the head of the bolus. A modest pressure increase is seen as the bolus passes through the pharynx, and finally, high pressure is observed at the bolus tail, followed by an even larger pressure generation of a clearance event. HRM allows for greater resolution in data collection in the pharynx and in this study, aided in identifying semi-unique characteristics around the hypopharynx and the UES which are consistent with the complex anatomy of the regions and the transition of the UES from active closure to relaxed opening. In the future, additional studies designed to look at aged and diseased populations may lead to better understanding of disease etiology, and treatment options.

  4. Bolus injections of measured amounts of radioactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Wesolowski, C.A.; Hogendoorn, P.; Vandierendonck, R.; Driedger, A.A.

    1988-03-01

    Many time-based radionuclide techniques, such as glomerular filtration rate measurement (GFR), require prompt intravenous delivery of and accurately measured tracer bolus with minimal residual tracer retention at the injection site. The quality assurance aspects of two antecubital vein, quantitative injection techniques were investigated. A flush bolus technique using a tuberculin syringe piggybacked onto a 10-ml saline flush was compared to a single blood pressure cuff injection technique. Scintillation camera data for each technique were compared for bolus duration in the abdominal aorta and for residual activity at the injection site at 5 min. Bolus times were measured as the FWHM of the gamma variate fit to the abdominal aortic regional time-activity curves. Relatively little focal activity was seen in the antecubital injection site following the flush bolus: marked residual activity was seen following the blood pressure cuff injections. The injection site/arm background ratios averaged 1.3 for the flush bolus and 30.1 for the cuff technique. Although both methods allowed accurate in vitro determination of administered radioactivity, only the tuberculin syringe flush bolus technique was acceptable for time-based quantitation because of its superior in vivo characteristics.

  5. Unknown Safety and Efficacy of Smartphone Bolus Calculator Apps Puts Patients at Risk for Severe Adverse Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Irl B; Parkin, Christopher G

    2016-07-01

    Manual calculation of bolus insulin dosages can be challenging for individuals treated with multiple daily insulin injections (MDI) therapy. Automated bolus calculator capability has recently been made available via enhanced blood glucose meters and smartphone apps. Use of this technology has been shown to improve glycemic control and reduce glycemic variability without changing hypoglycemia; however, the clinical utility of app-based bolus calculators has not been demonstrated. Moreover, recent evidence challenges the safety and efficacy of these smartphone apps. Although the ability to automatically calculate bolus insulin dosages addresses a critical need of MDI-treated individuals, this technology raises concerns about efficacy of treatment and the protection of patient safety. This article discusses key issues and considerations associated with automated bolus calculator use.

  6. 21 CFR 520.1450a - Morantel tartrate bolus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... bolus. (a) Specifications. Each bolus contains 2.2 grams morantel tartrate equivalent to 1.3 grams of... § 556.425 of this chapter. (d) Conditions of use—(1) Amount. One bolus per 500 pounds of body weight (4.4 milligrams per pound of body weight) as a single oral dose. Boluses may be divided in half...

  7. 21 CFR 522.1410 - Methylprednisolone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... dermatologic disorders; and as supportive therapy to antibacterial treatment of severe infections. (iii... to antibacterial treatment of severe infections. (iii) Limitations. Federal law restricts this...

  8. 21 CFR 522.1410 - Methylprednisolone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... dermatologic disorders; and as supportive therapy to antibacterial treatment of severe infections. (iii... to antibacterial treatment of severe infections. (iii) Limitations. Federal law restricts this...

  9. 21 CFR 522.1410 - Methylprednisolone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... dermatologic disorders; and as supportive therapy to antibacterial treatment of severe infections. (iii... to antibacterial treatment of severe infections. (iii) Limitations. Federal law restricts this...

  10. Methyl-prednisolone in neurologic complications of Mycoplasma pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Gücüyener, K; Simşek, F; Yilmaz, O; Serdaroğlu, A

    2000-06-01

    In patients with Mycoplasma pneumonia extrapulmonary manifestations such as encephalitis, meningitis, cerebellar and brain stem involvement, cranial nerve lesions, peripheral neuropathy, polymyositis have been observed. We report a 16-year-old girl with M. pneumonia infection, acute behavioral changes and coma. Treatment with high dose methyl-prednisolone and clarithromycin led to rapid clinical improvement.

  11. Fungal Contamination of Methylprednisolone Causing Recurrent Lumbosacral Intradural Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Frenkel, Mark B.; Hsu, Wesley

    2017-01-01

    Fungal meningitis transmitted through injections of methylprednisolone contaminated with Exserohilum rostratum affected 753 persons and caused 61 deaths in the United States in 2012. We report a case of infection recurrence after 24-months with the unique manifestation of an intradural fungal abscess. Fungal disease should remain on the differential diagnosis list for previously exposed patients. PMID:28221116

  12. Spinal cord injuries in older children: is there a role for high-dose methylprednisolone?

    PubMed

    Arora, Bhawana; Suresh, Srinivasan

    2011-12-01

    We present a retrospective case series of 15 children (aged 8-16 years) with blunt traumatic spinal cord injury who were treated with methylprednisolone as per the National Acute Spinal Cord Injury Study protocol. Of all patients, 12 (80%) were male. Causes were sports injuries (n = 9), motor vehicle crashes (n = 2), and falls (n = 4). Most injuries were nonskeletal (n = 14), and all patients had incomplete injury of the spinal cord. The most common location of tenderness was cervical (n = 7). Of the 15 patients, methylprednisolone was initiated within 3 hours in 13 patients and between 3 and 8 hours in 2 patients. All patients received the medication for 23 hours as per the National Acute Spinal Cord Injury Study protocol. Of the 15 patients, 13 recovered completely by 24 hours and were discharged with a diagnosis of spinal cord concussion. One patient had compression fracture of T5 and T3-T5 spinal contusion but no long-term neurological deficit. One patient was discharged with diagnosis of C1-C3 spinal cord contusion (by magnetic resonance imaging) and had partial recovery at 2 years after injury. All patients with a diagnosis of cord concussion had normal plain films of the spine and computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging findings. None of the patients had any associated major traumatic injuries to other organ systems. The high-dose steroid therapy did not result in any serious bacterial infections.

  13. 21 CFR 520.1158 - Iodochlorhydroxyquin boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Iodochlorhydroxyquin boluses. 520.1158 Section 520.1158 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS §...

  14. 21 CFR 520.88e - Amoxicillin trihydrate boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Amoxicillin trihydrate boluses. 520.88e Section 520.88e Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... trihydrate boluses. (a) Specifications. Each bolus contains the equivalent of 400 milligrams of...

  15. 21 CFR 520.88e - Amoxicillin trihydrate boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Amoxicillin trihydrate boluses. 520.88e Section 520.88e Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... trihydrate boluses. (a) Specifications. Each bolus contains the equivalent of 400 milligrams of...

  16. 21 CFR 520.88e - Amoxicillin trihydrate boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Amoxicillin trihydrate boluses. 520.88e Section 520.88e Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... trihydrate boluses. (a) Specifications. Each bolus contains the equivalent of 400 milligrams of...

  17. 21 CFR 520.88e - Amoxicillin trihydrate boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Amoxicillin trihydrate boluses. 520.88e Section 520.88e Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... trihydrate boluses. (a) Specifications. Each bolus contains the equivalent of 400 milligrams of...

  18. 21 CFR 520.2170 - Sulfabromomethazine sodium boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sulfabromomethazine sodium boluses. 520.2170 Section 520.2170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Sulfabromomethazine sodium boluses. (a) Specifications. Each bolus contains 15 grams of sulfabromomethazine sodium....

  19. 21 CFR 520.2170 - Sulfabromomethazine sodium boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sulfabromomethazine sodium boluses. 520.2170 Section 520.2170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Sulfabromomethazine sodium boluses. (a) Specifications. Each bolus contains 15 grams of sulfabromomethazine sodium....

  20. Bolus vs. continuous feeding to optimize anabolism in neonates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neonates with feeding difficulties can be fed by orogastric tube, using either continuous or bolus delivery. This review reports on recent findings that bolus is advantageous compared to continuous feeding in supporting optimal protein anabolism. Whether bolus or continuous feeding is more beneficia...

  1. 21 CFR 520.2170 - Sulfabromomethazine sodium boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sulfabromomethazine sodium boluses. 520.2170 Section 520.2170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Sulfabromomethazine sodium boluses. (a) Specifications. Each bolus contains 15 grams of sulfabromomethazine sodium....

  2. Effect of methylprednisolone on mammalian neuronal networks in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wittstock, Matthias; Rommer, Paulus S; Schiffmann, Florian; Jügelt, Konstantin; Stüwe, Simone; Benecke, Reiner; Schiffmann, Dietmar; Zettl, Uwe K

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticosteroids (GCS) are widely used for the treatment of neurological diseases, e.g. multiple sclerosis. High levels of GCS are toxic to the central nervous system and can produce adverse effects. The effect of methylprednisolone (MP) on mammalian neuronal networks was studied in vitro. We demonstrate a dose-dependent excitatory effect of MP on cultured neuronal networks, followed by a shut-down of electrical activity using the microelectrode array technique.

  3. Synthesis of methylprednisolone loaded ibuprofen modified inulin based nanoparticles and their application for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luzhong; Li, Yue; Wang, Caiping; Li, Guicai; Zhao, Yahong; Yang, Yumin

    2014-09-01

    Ibuprofen modified inulin was synthesized through a direct esterification linkage in which the in situ activation of the carboxylic acid with N,N'-carbonyldiimidazole was carried out. The critical aggregation concentration of the ibuprofen modified inulin was determined by using pyrene as the fluorescence probe. Methylprednisolone loaded nanoparticles were prepared by the self-assembly of the ibuprofen modified inulin copolymer and methylprednisolone. In vitro release of the methylprednisolone and the cytotoxicity of the methylprednisolone loaded nanoparticles against RSC-96 cells were evaluated. Since the ibuprofen and methylprednisolone could stimulate a significant neurite growth and diminish the human neurological deficits after the spinal cord injury, the methylprednisolone loaded nanoparticles based on the ibuprofen modified inulin copolymer may have a great potential in the synergetic effect treatment for spinal cord injury.

  4. Fabrication of Artificial Food Bolus for Evaluation of Swallowing.

    PubMed

    Hosotsubo, Miyu; Magota, Tetsuro; Egusa, Masahiko; Miyawaki, Takuya; Matsumoto, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    Simple and easy methods to evaluate swallowing are required because of the recently increased need of rehabilitation for dysphagia. "Artificial food bolus", but not "artificial food", would be a valuable tool for swallowing evaluation without considering the mastication effect which is altered according to the individual's oral condition. Thus, this study was carried out to fabricate artificial bolus resembling natural food bolus. The mechanical property and the volume change of food bolus in normal people were firstly investigated. Thirty healthy adults without dysphagia were selected and asked to chew four sample foods (rice cake, peanut, burdock, and gummy candy). The results indicated that Young's modulus of bolus before swallowing was below 150 kPa. The bolus volume before swallowing was below 400 mm3. In addition, the saliva component ratio of each bolus was approximately 30wt%, and the average saliva viscosity of research participants was approximately 10 mPa•s. Based on the obtained data, artificial food bolus was designed and fabricated by using alginate hydrogel as a visco-elastic material and gelatin solution as a viscotic material with a ratio of 7:3 based on weight. Consequently, the swallowing time of fabricated artificial food bolus was measured among the same participants. The results indicated the participants swallowed fabricated food bolus with similar manner reflecting their mechanical property and volume. Thus, this artificial food bolus would be a promising tool for evaluation of swallowing.

  5. Fabrication of Artificial Food Bolus for Evaluation of Swallowing

    PubMed Central

    Hosotsubo, Miyu; Magota, Tetsuro; Egusa, Masahiko; Miyawaki, Takuya; Matsumoto, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    Simple and easy methods to evaluate swallowing are required because of the recently increased need of rehabilitation for dysphagia. "Artificial food bolus", but not "artificial food", would be a valuable tool for swallowing evaluation without considering the mastication effect which is altered according to the individual's oral condition. Thus, this study was carried out to fabricate artificial bolus resembling natural food bolus. The mechanical property and the volume change of food bolus in normal people were firstly investigated. Thirty healthy adults without dysphagia were selected and asked to chew four sample foods (rice cake, peanut, burdock, and gummy candy). The results indicated that Young’s modulus of bolus before swallowing was below 150 kPa. The bolus volume before swallowing was below 400 mm3. In addition, the saliva component ratio of each bolus was approximately 30wt%, and the average saliva viscosity of research participants was approximately 10 mPa•s. Based on the obtained data, artificial food bolus was designed and fabricated by using alginate hydrogel as a visco-elastic material and gelatin solution as a viscotic material with a ratio of 7:3 based on weight. Consequently, the swallowing time of fabricated artificial food bolus was measured among the same participants. The results indicated the participants swallowed fabricated food bolus with similar manner reflecting their mechanical property and volume. Thus, this artificial food bolus would be a promising tool for evaluation of swallowing. PMID:27977775

  6. Cardiovascular alterations heralded by intrathecal baclofen bolus.

    PubMed

    Rifici, Carmela; D'Aleo, Giangaetano; D'Aleo, Piercataldo; Bramanti, Placido; Saltuari, Leopold; Kofler, Markus

    2011-01-01

    We describe two patients in whom serious bradycardia and arterial hypotension occurred after a small intrathecal baclofen (ITB) test bolus. Both patients suffered from severe spasticity (one due to brain injury, one due to spinal cord injury). Medical history and diagnostic examinations revealed no previous cardiological problems. Ten minutes following a 50 μg ITB bolus, patient 1 developed bradycardia (58 bpm) and incomplete right branch block, lasting for 3 hours. In patient 2, a 20 μg ITB bolus was followed after 5 minutes by severe bradycardia (30 bpm) and hypotension (60/30 mmHg), without loss of consciousness, lasting for 10 minutes. Exaggerated muscle tone was alleviated in both patients after 2 hours by the applied doses. Neither patient underwent implantation of a permanent pump system, both were continued on oral baclofen. Despite numerous unremarkable repeat cardiological exams, both patients suffered fatal cardiac arrest one and two months later, respectively. Our observations suggest that ITB may herald cardiovascular dysfunction in predisposed patients. Careful cardiological examination before ITB treatment, and close monitoring during ITB testing in particular, is advised.

  7. Normal swallowing acoustics across age, gender, bolus viscosity, and bolus volume.

    PubMed

    Youmans, Scott R; Stierwalt, Julie A G

    2011-12-01

    Cervical auscultation has been proposed as an augmentative procedure for the subjective clinical swallowing examination due to the tangible differences between normal and dysphagic swallowing sounds. However, the research is incomplete regarding cervical auscultation and swallowing acoustics in that the differences between the sounds of normal versus dysphagic swallowing have yet to be fully understood or quantified. The swallows of 96 reportedly healthy adults, balanced for gender and divided into younger, middle, and older age groups, were audio-recorded while ingesting several boluses of varying viscosity and volume. The audio signals were then analyzed to determine their temporal and acoustic characteristics. Results indicated increasing pharyngeal swallowing duration with increasing age, bolus viscosity, and bolus volume. In addition, an increased duration to peak intensity with increasing age was found in one of our two analyses, as well as with some of the more viscous versus less viscous boluses. Men and older persons produced higher peak intensities and peak frequencies than women and younger persons. Thin liquids were produced with more intensity than honey or more viscous boluses, and with greater frequency than mechanical soft solids. Larger volumes resulted in greater peak frequency values. Some of the acoustic measurements appear to be more useful than others, including the duration of the acoustic swallowing signal and the within-subjects peak intensity variable. We noted that differences in swallowing acoustics were more related to changes in viscosity rather than volume. Finally, within-participant observations were more useful than between-participant observations.

  8. A source of experimental underestimation of aerosol bolus deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verbanck, S.; Darquenne, C.; Prisk, G. K.; Vincken, W.; Paiva, M.

    1999-01-01

    We examined the measurement error in inhaled and exhaled aerosol concentration resulting from the bolus delivery system when small volumes of monodisperse aerosols are inspired to different lung depths. A laser photometer that illuminated approximately 75% of the breathing path cross section recorded low inhaled bolus half-widths (42 ml) and negative deposition values for shallow bolus inhalation when the inhalation path of a 60-ml aerosol was straight and unobstructed. We attributed these results to incomplete mixing of the inhaled aerosol bolus over the breathing path cross section, on the basis of simultaneous recordings of the photometer with a particle-counter sampling from either the center or the edge of the breathing path. Inserting a 90 degrees bend into the inhaled bolus path increased the photometer measurement of inhaled bolus half-width to 57 ml and yielded positive deposition values. Dispersion, which is predominantly affected by exhaled bolus half-width, was not significantly altered by the 90 degrees bend. We conclude that aerosol bolus-delivery systems should ensure adequate mixing of the inhaled bolus to avoid error in measurement of bolus deposition.

  9. Intra-arterial Methylprednisolone Infusion in Treatment-Resistant Graft-Versus-Host Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Weintraub, Joshua L. Belanger, Adam R.; Sung, Chris C.; Stangl, P. Anondo; Nowakowski, F. Scott; Lookstein, Robert L.

    2010-06-15

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a potentially fatal complication following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Standard primary therapy for acute GVHD includes systemic steroids, often in combination with other agents. Unfortunately, primary treatment failure is common and carries a high mortality. There is no generally accepted secondary therapy for acute GVHD. Although few data on localized therapy for GVHD have been published, intra-arterial injection of high-dose corticosteroids may be a viable option. We treated 11 patients with steroid-resistant GVHD using a single administration of intra-arterial high-dose methylprednisolone. Three patients (27%) died periprocedurally. Four patients (36%) had a partial response to intra-arterial treatment and were discharged on total parenteral nutrition and oral medication. Four patients (36%) had a complete response and were discharged on oral diet and oral medication. No immediate treatment or procedure-related complications were noted. Twenty-seven percent of patients survived long-term. Our preliminary results suggest that regional intra-arterial treatment of steroid-resistant GVHD is a safe and potentially viable secondary therapy in primary treatment-resistant GVHD.

  10. Effect of Heparin on Coagulation Tests: A Comparison of Continuous and Bolus Infusion in Haemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nasiri, Ali Akbar; Ahmadidarrehsima, Sudabeh; Balouchi, Abbas; Moghadam, Mahdiye Poodine

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Haemodialysis is one of the most conventional treatments of chronic renal failure. The risk of clot formation is high during haemodialysis due to regular contact of blood with the surfaces of foreign objects such as catheters, dialyzers’ membrane, and other materials used for dialysis. Therefore, to prevent clot formation during haemodialysis, the dialysis system requires anticoagulation; this is usually done by heparin. Aim The present study aimed to compare two heparinization methods and determine the proper impacts of these methods. Materials and Methods In this quasi-experimental study, 80 haemodialysis patients covered by the dialysis center of Amir-al-momenin Hospital of Zabol were studied in two 40-member groups of heparin therapy methods of bolus injection and continuous infusion. PT and PTT were measured in blood samples collected from all patients before starting haemodialysis. The first group received 3000 units of heparin once the haemodialysis machine started to work and 2000 units of heparin two hours later as bolus injection. In the second group, 1500 units of heparin was injected at the start of dialysis after then, 5000 units of heparin (one mL) were mixed with 11 mL of distilled water and infused using a heparin injection pump up to half an hour before the end of dialysis. At 30 minutes after starting dialysis and at the end of 4 hours of haemodialysis, PT and PTT were measured and compared between the two groups. Results According to the results, the mean partial thromboplastin time in the bolus and continuous heparin-receiving group was 41.75±6.29 and 37.90±4.77, respectively, which was statistically significant (p=0.036). But PT was 14.45±1.82 in the bolus heparin group and 13.95±1.39 in the continuous heparin group, which was not significant according to the results of independent t-test (p=0.336). Conclusion The results indicated a statistically significant difference between the bolus heparin injection and the continuous

  11. 21 CFR 520.1120b - Haloxon boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Haloxon boluses. 520.1120b Section 520.1120b Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1120b Haloxon boluses. (a... bolus contains 10.1 grams of haloxon. (c) Sponsor. See No. 000061 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter....

  12. 21 CFR 520.1120b - Haloxon boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Haloxon boluses. 520.1120b Section 520.1120b Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1120b Haloxon boluses. (a... bolus contains 10.1 grams of haloxon. (c) Sponsor. See No. 000061 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter....

  13. 21 CFR 520.1120b - Haloxon boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Haloxon boluses. 520.1120b Section 520.1120b Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1120b Haloxon boluses. (a... bolus contains 10.1 grams of haloxon. (c) Sponsor. See No. 000061 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter....

  14. 21 CFR 520.1120b - Haloxon boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Haloxon boluses. 520.1120b Section 520.1120b Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1120b Haloxon boluses. (a... bolus contains 10.1 grams of haloxon. (c) Sponsor. See No. 000061 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter....

  15. Optical tracking of contrast medium bolus to optimize bolus shape and timing in dynamic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisa, Fabian; Brauweiler, Robert; Peetz, Alexander; Hupfer, Martin; Nowak, Tristan; Kalender, Willi A.

    2012-05-01

    One of the biggest challenges in dynamic contrast-enhanced CT is the optimal synchronization of scan start and duration with contrast medium administration in order to optimize image contrast and to reduce the amount of contrast medium. We present a new optically based approach, which was developed to investigate and optimize bolus timing and shape. The time-concentration curve of an intravenously injected test bolus of a dye is measured in peripheral vessels with an optical sensor prior to the diagnostic CT scan. The curves can be used to assess bolus shapes as a function of injection protocols and to determine contrast medium arrival times. Preliminary results for phantom and animal experiments showed the expected linear behavior between dye concentration and absorption. The kinetics of the dye was compared to iodinated contrast medium and was found to be in good agreement. The contrast enhancement curves were reliably detected in three mice with individual bolus shapes and delay times of 2.1, 3.5 and 6.1 s, respectively. The optical sensor appears to be a promising approach to optimize injection protocols and contrast enhancement timing and is applicable to all modalities without implying any additional radiation dose. Clinical tests are still necessary.

  16. Protective effect of methylprednisolone on ischaemic myocardium assessed by ventricular function.

    PubMed Central

    Krause, B L; Hassan, M A; McMilan, A B; Brown, A H

    1977-01-01

    Intracardiac surgical procedures are best carried out when the heart is still and bloodless. This condition, however, produces myocardial cellular damage with loss of contractility and compliance unless some protection can be provided. Myocardial contractility and compliance is best studied by isovolumic ventricular function tests, which were used to evaluate the protective effect of methylprednisolone on the isolated cross-perfused canine heart made ischaemic for 2 hours. Control experiments included 2 hours of ischaemia without methylprednisolone, and 2 hours of continuous normothermic cross-perfusion. The methylprednisolone-treated hearts had probably significantly better ventricular function after 2 hours of ischaemia than did hearts without the methylprednisolone, while the cross-perfused hearts were best overall. This work suggests that methylprednisolone may have a protective effect on the ischaemic myocardium of the intact canine heart. PMID:867332

  17. Liposomal glucocorticosteroids in treatment of chronic autoimmune demyelination: long-term protective effects and enhanced efficacy of methylprednisolone formulations.

    PubMed

    Linker, Ralf A; Weller, Charlotte; Lühder, Fred; Mohr, Alexander; Schmidt, Jens; Knauth, Michael; Metselaar, Josbert M; Gold, Ralf

    2008-06-01

    Liposomal encapsulation leads to enhanced efficacy of glucocorticosteroids (GS) in treatment of autoimmune diseases. Here we compare liposomal prednisolone (PL) to liposomal methylprednisolone (MPL) in chronic-relapsing myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model closely reflecting aspects of multiple sclerosis (MS). At the maximum of the first relapse, a single dose of PL or MPL was applied at 10 mg/kg or at 4 mg/kg and compared to classical methylprednisolone (MP) pulse therapy. PL at 10 mg/kg was superior to free MP with long-term efficacy and a sustained protection even during the second and third relapse. At the same time, in vivo magnetic resonance imaging of rat brains revealed a significant reduction of T2-lesions after PL application. Comparison of PL and MPL at 10 mg/kg disclosed superior effects for MPL with an enhanced reduction of inflammatory infiltration as well as preservation of myelin and axons. Dose titration experiments underscored a dose-dependent efficacy of liposomal GS with a sustained efficacy especially of the higher dosage. In histological analyses, PL10 was superior in reducing macrophage and T cell infiltration as well as demyelination and axonal loss while the lower dosages were still at least as effective as free MP. FACS analyses revealed an effect of liposome formulations on T cell numbers, the CD4/CD8 ratio, frequencies of regulatory T cells and adhesion molecule expression. In summary, liposomal GS and especially methylprednisolone formulations display an enhanced efficacy not only in acute inflammatory, but also in chronic demyelinating models of MS and confer long-term protection from relapses. These findings lay the groundwork for applying liposomal GS in clinical MS trials in the near future.

  18. Dosimetric assessment of brass mesh bolus for postmastectomy photon radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Manger, Ryan; Paxton, Adam; Cerviño, Laura

    2016-07-25

    Brass mesh bolus has been shown to be an acceptable substitute for tissue-equivalent bolus to increase superficial dose for chest wall tangent photon radiotherapy. This work investigated the increase in surface dose, the change in the dose at depth, and the safety implications of higher energy photon beams when using brass mesh bolus for postmastectomy chest wall radiotherapy. A photon tangent plan was delivered to a thorax phantom, and the superficial dose ranged from 40%-72% of prescription dose with no bolus. The surface dose increased to 75%-110% of prescription dose with brass mesh bolus and 85%-109% of prescription dose with tissue-equivalent bolus. It was also found that the dose at depth when using brass mesh bolus is comparable to that measured with no bolus for en face and oblique incidence. Monte Carlo calculations were used to assess the photoneutron production from brass mesh bolus used with 15 MV and 24 MV photon beams. The effective dose from photoneutrons was approximated and found to be relatively small, yet not negligible. Activation products generated by these photoneutrons, the surface dose rate due to the activation products, and the half-life of the activation products were also considered in this work. The authors conclude that brass mesh bolus is a reasonable alternative to tissue-equivalent bolus, and it may be used with high-energy beam; but one should be aware of the potential increased effective dose to staff and patients due to the activation products produced by photoneutrons.

  19. Analysis of bolus formation in micropipette ejection systems.

    PubMed

    Mirbod, Parisa; Meng, Diwen

    2015-06-01

    The ejection of drugs from micropipettes is practiced frequently in biomedical research and clinical studies however, little is known about the dynamics of this process. The fundamentals of disperse fluid injection via a capillary into an ambient immiscible fluid have been investigated extensively. Here, we experimentally investigate the bolus formation in micropipette ejection systems, where the injection and ambient fluid are the same. We experimentally measure the temporal evolution of the bolus formation in the same fluid. There are three different bolus formation mechanisms that arise from different Re t regimes: a) a nearly spherical bolus, b) a pear-like bolus, and c) a large distortion or axial jet. We examine the scaled dimensions of the bolus, R b/D t, L b/D t, H/D t, and α, as a function of the dimensionless parameters such as tip Reynolds number, Re t, dimensionless value of g/(D t (.) V t), the dimensionless time, tV t/D t, and the distance between the edge of the micropipette and the free surface, D/D t. The bolus radius for 0.2 < Re t < 30 grows according to t (1/2) in the entire time range, which allows us to estimate the time for complete bolus formation.

  20. 21 CFR 520.1720a - Phenylbutazone tablets and boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Phenylbutazone tablets and boluses. (a) Specifications. Each tablet contains 100, 200, or 400 milligrams (mg), or...-mg or 1-g tablets, or 2- or 4-g boluses, in dogs and horses. (2) Nos. 000010 and 059130 for use of 100- or 200-mg or 1-g tablets in dogs and horses. (3) Nos. 000856 and 061623 for use of 100-mg or...

  1. Development of biodegradable methylprednisolone microparticles for treatment of articular pathology using a spray-drying technique

    PubMed Central

    Tobar-Grande, Blanca; Godoy, Ricardo; Bustos, Paulina; von Plessing, Carlos; Fattal, Elias; Tsapis, Nicolas; Olave, Claudia; Gómez-Gaete, Carolina

    2013-01-01

    In this work, microparticles were prepared by spray-drying using albumin, chondroitin sulfate, and hyaluronic acid as excipients to create a controlled-release methylprednisolone system for use in inflammatory disorders such as arthritis. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that these microparticles were almost spherical, with development of surface wrinkling as the methylprednisolone load in the formulation was increased. The methylprednisolone load also had a direct influence on the mean diameter and zeta potential of the microparticles. Interactions between formulation excipients and the active drug were evaluated by x-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, and thermal gravimetric analysis, showing limited amounts of methylprednisolone in a crystalline state in the loaded microparticles. The encapsulation efficiency of methylprednisolone was approximately 89% in all formulations. The rate of methylprednisolone release from the microparticles depended on the initial drug load in the formulation. In vitro cytotoxic evaluation using THP-1 cells showed that none of the formulations prepared triggered an inflammatory response on release of interleukin-1β, nor did they affect cellular viability, except for the 9.1% methylprednisolone formulation, which was the maximum test concentration used. The microparticles developed in this study have characteristics amenable to a therapeutic role in inflammatory pathology, such as arthritis. PMID:23737670

  2. Development of biodegradable methylprednisolone microparticles for treatment of articular pathology using a spray-drying technique.

    PubMed

    Tobar-Grande, Blanca; Godoy, Ricardo; Bustos, Paulina; von Plessing, Carlos; Fattal, Elias; Tsapis, Nicolas; Olave, Claudia; Gómez-Gaete, Carolina

    2013-01-01

    In this work, microparticles were prepared by spray-drying using albumin, chondroitin sulfate, and hyaluronic acid as excipients to create a controlled-release methylprednisolone system for use in inflammatory disorders such as arthritis. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that these microparticles were almost spherical, with development of surface wrinkling as the methylprednisolone load in the formulation was increased. The methylprednisolone load also had a direct influence on the mean diameter and zeta potential of the microparticles. Interactions between formulation excipients and the active drug were evaluated by x-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, and thermal gravimetric analysis, showing limited amounts of methylprednisolone in a crystalline state in the loaded microparticles. The encapsulation efficiency of methylprednisolone was approximately 89% in all formulations. The rate of methylprednisolone release from the microparticles depended on the initial drug load in the formulation. In vitro cytotoxic evaluation using THP-1 cells showed that none of the formulations prepared triggered an inflammatory response on release of interleukin-1β, nor did they affect cellular viability, except for the 9.1% methylprednisolone formulation, which was the maximum test concentration used. The microparticles developed in this study have characteristics amenable to a therapeutic role in inflammatory pathology, such as arthritis.

  3. Randomized trial comparing protracted infusion of 5-fluorouracil with weekly doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide with a monthly bolus FAC regimen in metastatic breast carcinoma (SPM90).

    PubMed Central

    Pierga, J. Y.; Jouve, M.; Asselain, B.; Livartowski, A.; Beuzeboc, P.; Diéras, V.; Scholl, S.; Dorval, T.; Palangié, T.; Garcia-Giralt, E.; Pouillart, P.

    1998-01-01

    Infusional 5-fluorouracil in advanced breast cancer has been associated with improved clinical response rates when compared with conventional bolus therapy. As a first line of chemotherapy in proven metastatic breast carcinoma, 258 women were randomly assigned to receive FAC consisting of 5-fluorouracil (F) 600 mg m(-2) intravenously (i.v.) over 1 h on days 1, 2 and 3, doxorubicin (A) 50 mg m(-2) i.v. bolus on day 1 and cyclophosphamide (C), 400 mg m(-2) i.v. bolus on days 1, 2 and 3 or 'FULON' consisting of 5-fluorouracil 250 mg m(-2) day(-1) continuously infused from day 1 to day 22, doxorubicin 15 mg m(-2) i.v. bolus on days 1, 8, 15 and 22 and cyclophosphamide 300 mg m(-2) i.v. bolus on days 1, 8, 15 and 22. Chemotherapy courses were administered 4-weekly for the bolus regimen and 6-weekly for FULON. Pretreatment characteristics were identical between the two groups. Response rates were 54% in the FAC arm and 53% in the FULON arm. Time to progression was 14 months in the FAC arm and 12 months in the FULON arm. Differences were not statistically significant. Median overall survival duration for all patients was 22 months. Haematological toxicity was more severe in the bolus-treated group (P = 0.05), as were nausea and vomiting (P < or = 0.01). We conclude that the two regimens appeared equally effective but have different toxicities. PMID:9652764

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid outflow resistance in rabbits with experimental meningitis. Alterations with penicillin and methylprednisolone.

    PubMed Central

    Scheld, W M; Dacey, R G; Winn, H R; Welsh, J E; Jane, J A; Sande, M A

    1980-01-01

    Acute bacterial meningitis may be associated with increased intracranial pressure, neurological sequelae such as communicating hydrocephalus, and a slow response to antibiotic therapy. Alterations in cerebrospinal hydrodynamics are at least partially responsible for these complications. Constant, low-flow short-duration manometric infusion studies through a hollow-bore pressure monitoring device in direct continuity with the supracortical subarachnoid space were performed in rabbits with experimental meningitis. Maximal resistance to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) outflow from the subarachnoid to vascular space was markedly increaed in acute pneumococcal meningitis when compared to control, uninfected animals (6.77 +/- 3.52 vs. 0.26 +/- 0.04 mm Hg/microliter per min, P less than 0.001). Similar elevations (8.93 +/- 4.15 mm Hg/microliter per min were found in experimental Escherichia coli meningitis. Despite eradication of viable bacteria from the CSF by penicillin therapy during the acute stage of pneumococcal meningitis, resistance remained elevated (6.07 +/- 4.68 mm Hg/microliter per min) and had not returned to normal up to 15 d later. Administration of methylprednisolone during the early stages of acute pneumococcal meningitis reduced mean peak outflow resistance towards control values (0.59 mm Hg/microliter per min) and no "rebound" effect was apparent 24 h later. These hydrodynamic alterations in experimental meningitis prevent normal CSF absorption and decrease the ability of the bran to compensate for changes in intracranial volume and pressure. PMID:6995482

  5. Effect of pycnocline thickness on internal wave bolus transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allshouse, Michael; Swinney, Harry

    2016-11-01

    Internal waves shoaling on a continental slope can produce boluses, which are vortices that develop and travel upslope with the shoaling internal wave. In contrast to propagating solitary waves, boluses can trap and transport nutrient rich water upslope. Past laboratory investigations of bolus generation and transport have examined systems that have two layers of uniform density. The present laboratory experiment examines bolus formation and transport as a function of the thickness of a model pyncnocline where there is a continuous variation in density between two regions of constant density. Our dye based measurements for transition layers varying in thickness from 2 to 30 cm demonstrate that fluid transport by boluses exhibits a maximum as the thickness of the transition layer is varied. Complementary Navier-Stokes direct numerical simulations, analyzed using Lagrangian coherent structure techniques, compare well with the laboratory observations. ONR MURI Grant No. N000141110701.

  6. Effects of Age, Gender, Bolus Volume, Bolus Viscosity, and Gustation on Swallowing Apnea Onset Relative to Lingual Bolus Propulsion Onset in Normal Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiss, Susan G.; Strauss, Monica; Treole, Kathleen; Stuart, Andrew; Boutilier, Susan

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain the normal relation of swallowing apnea (SA) onset relative to lingual bolus propulsion along with factors that may alter this relation. Forty adults, composed of 10 men and 10 women in each of 2 age groups (i.e., 20-30 and 63-79 years) participated. SA onset was assessed during 5- and 20-ml bolus volumes…

  7. Clinical outcomes of intracoronary eptifibatide bolus only versus intracoronary bolus and intravenous infusion of eptifibatide in primary percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Soon, Dinna; Ho, Hee Hwa; Loh, Kwok Kong; Ooi, Yau Wei; Foo, David; Jafary, Fahim H; Ong, Paul Jau

    2012-03-01

    Intracoronary bolus of eptifibatide during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has been shown to result in higher local platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor occupancy with improved microvascular perfusion. It is unclear whether intracoronary administration of eptifibatide in a larger patient population results in favourable clinical outcomes. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of two regimens of intracoronary eptifibatide (bolus only versus bolus followed by intravenous infusion) in patients undergoing primary PCI for ST-elevation MI. They were divided into two groups: Group A (n=67) who received fixed-dose intracoronary eptifibatide bolus only and Group B (n=88) who received intracoronary bolus and continuous intravenous infusion of eptifibatide for 18 h. The preliminary findings from our registry showed that both regimens were associated with good angiographic outcomes, few bleeding events and low in-hospital major adverse cardiac events. A large prospective randomized, multi-centre trial is needed to confirm our observation.

  8. The Effect of Adjuvant Postmastectomy Radiotherapy Bolus Technique on Local Recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Tieu, Minh Thi; Graham, Peter; Browne, Lois; Chin, Yaw Sinn

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiotherapy bolus is heterogenous, with little evidence to guide clinical practise. This study explores the effect of chest wall bolus technique on chest wall recurrence. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective cohort study of 254 patients treated with adjuvant postmastectomy radiotherapy between 1993 and 2003. Patient and treatment characteristics including bolus details were extracted. Outcomes considered were treatment toxicities, treatment delivery, and local recurrence. Results: In all, 143 patients received radiotherapy with whole chest wall bolus, 88 patients with parascar bolus, and 23 with no bolus. Twenty patients did not complete radiotherapy because of acute skin toxicity: 17 in the whole chest wall bolus group, 2 in the parascar bolus group, and 1 in the group not treated with bolus. On multivariate analysis, whole chest wall bolus and chemotherapy were found to be significant predictors for early cessation of radiotherapy resulting from acute skin toxicity. There were 19 chest wall failures: 13 in the whole chest wall bolus group, 4 in the parascar bolus group, and 2 in the no-bolus group. On multivariate analysis, lymphovascular invasion and failure to complete radiotherapy because of acute skin toxicity were associated with chest wall recurrence. Conclusions: From our results, parascar bolus and no bolus performed no worse than did whole chest wall bolus with regard to chest wall recurrence. However, bolus may have an impact on early cessation of radiotherapy caused by skin toxicity, which then may influence chest wall recurrence.

  9. Combination of methylprednisolone and rosiglitazone promotes recovery of neurological function after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xi-gong; Lin, Xiang-jin; Du, Jun-hua; Xu, San-zhong; Lou, Xian-feng; Chen, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Methylprednisolone exhibits anti-inflammatory antioxidant properties, and rosiglitazone acts as an anti-inflammatory and antioxidant by activating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ in the spinal cord. Methylprednisolone and rosiglitazone have been clinically used during the early stages of secondary spinal cord injury. Because of the complexity and diversity of the inflammatory process after spinal cord injury, a single drug cannot completely inhibit inflammation. Therefore, we assumed that a combination of methylprednisolone and rosiglitazone might promote recovery of neurological function after secondary spinal cord injury. In this study, rats were intraperitoneally injected with methylprednisolone (30 mg/kg) and rosiglitazone (2 mg/kg) at 1 hour after injury, and methylprednisolone (15 mg/kg) at 24 and 48 hours after injury. Rosiglitazone was then administered once every 12 hours for 7 consecutive days. Our results demonstrated that a combined treatment with methylprednisolone and rosiglitazone had a more pronounced effect on attenuation of inflammation and cell apoptosis, as well as increased functional recovery, compared with either single treatment alone, indicating that a combination better promoted recovery of neurological function after injury. PMID:27904502

  10. The effect of aqueous extract of Kalanchoe Folium on methylprednisolone pharmacokinetic profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indriyanti, Niken; Garmana, Afrillia Nuryanti; Setiawan, Finna; Sukandar, Elin Yulinah; Adnyana, I. Ketut

    2016-03-01

    Aqueous extract of Kalanchoe pinnata leaves had immunosupressant effect on lupus nephritis model. When it combined with methylprednisolone, there is a risk of interaction. In this study rats divided into two groups, a group that received methylprednisolone (MP) (0.72 mg/kgBW) and a group that received MP in combination with extract (0.36 mg/kg BW MP and 140 mg/kg BW extract). These treatment were given everyday for 4 weeks. Methylprednisolone concentration in rats serum was measured using HPLC with extraction method according to Lawson method (1985). The column used was Inertsil C-18 using mobile phase KH2PO4 : metanol (15:85) buffer, flow rate 0.6 mL/minutes, UV detector (λ = 230 nm) and pressure 1319 psi. The result showed that there was an interaction occurred. The combination of MP and aqueous extract of K. pinnata leaves showed interaction which causing methylprednisolone level comparable with methylprednisolone level in MP group. Mean of decreasing MP level in serum was 0.285 ppm. It means that aqueous extract of Kalanchoe Folium could elevate methylprednisolone concentration in plasma. Adjustment of the dose must be considered in this combination.

  11. Open-label randomized clinical trial of atropine bolus injection versus incremental boluses plus infusion for organophosphate poisoning in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Abedin, Mohammed Joynal; Sayeed, Abdullah Abu; Basher, Ariful; Maude, Richard J; Hoque, Gofranul; Faiz, M A

    2012-06-01

    Severe organophosphate compound (OPC) poisoning is an important clinical problem in many countries of the world. Unfortunately, little clinical research has been performed and little evidence exists with which to determine the best therapy. A study was therefore undertaken to determine the optimal dosing regimen for atropine in the treatment of OPC poisoning. An open-label randomized clinical trial was conducted in Chittagong Medical College Hospital, Chittagong, Bangladesh, on 156 hospitalized individuals with OPC poisoning from June to September 2006. The aim was to compare the efficacy and safety of conventional bolus doses with individualized incremental doses of atropine for atropinization followed by continuous atropine infusion for management of OPC poisoning. Inclusion criteria were patients with a clear history of OPC poisoning with clear clinical signs of toxicity, i.e. features of cholinergic crisis. The patients were observed for at least 96 h. Immediate outcome and complications were recorded. Out of 156 patients, 81 patients received conventional bolus dose atropine (group A) and 75 patients received rapidly incremental doses of atropine followed by infusion (group B). The mortality in group 'A' was 22.5% (18/80) and in group 'B' 8% (6/75) (p < 0.05). The mean duration of atropinization in group 'A' was 151.74 min compared to 23.90 min for group 'B' (p < 0.001). More patients in group A experienced atropine toxicity than in group 'B' (28.4% versus 12.0%, p < 0.05); intermediate syndrome was more common in group 'A' than in group 'B' (13.6% versus 4%, p < 0.05), and respiratory support was required more often for patients in group 'A' than in group 'B' (24.7% versus 8%, p < 0.05). Rapid incremental dose atropinization followed by atropine infusion reduces mortality and morbidity from OPC poisoning and shortens the length of hospital stay and recovery. Incremental atropine and infusion should become the treatment of choice for OPC

  12. Methylprednisolone for acute spinal cord injury: an increasingly philosophical debate.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Christian A; Kundu, Bornali; Hawryluk, Gregory W J

    2016-06-01

    Following publication of NASCIS II, methylprednisolone sodium succinate (MPSS) was hailed as a breakthrough for patients with acute spinal cord injury (SCI). MPSS use for SCI has since become very controversial and it is our opinion that additional evidence is unlikely to break the stalemate amongst clinicians. Patient opinion has the potential to break this stalemate and we review our recent findings which reported that spinal cord injured patients informed of the risks and benefits of MPSS reported a preference for MPSS administration. We discuss the implications of the current MPSS debate on translational research and seek to address some misconceptions which have evolved. As science has failed to resolve the MPSS debate we argue that the debate is an increasingly philosophical one. We question whether SCI might be viewed as a serious condition like cancer where serious side effects of therapeutics are tolerated even when benefits may be small. We also draw attention to the similarity between the side effects of MPSS and isotretinoin which is prescribed for the cosmetic disorder acne vulgaris. Ultimately we question how patient autonomy should be weighed in the context of current SCI guidelines and MPSS's status as a historical standard of care.

  13. High-dose methylprednisolone for veno-occlusive disease of the liver in pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients.

    PubMed

    Myers, Kasiani C; Lawrence, Julia; Marsh, Rebecca A; Davies, Stella M; Jodele, Sonata

    2013-03-01

    Veno-occlusive disease (VOD) of the liver is a well-recognized serious complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), with few successful treatment modalities available for severe disease. Some reports have demonstrated success in adults with the use of high-dose steroid therapy, but experience in the pediatric population is lacking. We retrospectively reviewed HSCT patients treated at our institution since 2003 and identified 15 (2.4%) who developed VOD. Of these, nine (60%) were treated with intravenous high-dose methylprednisolone (500 mg/m(2) per dose every 12 hours for six doses). Steroid therapy was initiated at or before first ultrasound evidence of reversal of portal venous flow and before meeting criteria for initiation of defibrotide therapy. Four patients were also treated with defibrotide starting 2 to 5 days after initiation of steroids. Eight of nine patients (88%) with VOD were diagnosed with multiorgan failure. Response to high-dose steroid therapy as defined by decrease in bilirubin by 50% in 10 days from therapy initiation was noted in six of nine patients (67%), occurring within 3 to 6 days of steroid therapy. Two patients died from multiorgan failure due to VOD. Seven survivors of VOD recovered at the median 6 days (range, 5 to 38) from VOD diagnosis. Overall, VOD survival as a group was 78%; however, survival among responders was 100%. No serious toxicities related to high-dose steroid therapy were observed. We conclude that high-dose steroid therapy if initiated early may reverse VOD of the liver in pediatric HSCT patients, abrogating the need for defibrotide therapy with its associated toxicities and regulatory difficulties.

  14. Facilitating Early-In-Day Discharge for Multiple Sclerosis Patients Treated With Intravenous Methylprednisolone

    PubMed Central

    Hawley, Gina; Burnett, Margie; Gibson, Lorrie; Carter, Kathryn; Harlow, Elizabeth; Russell, Holly; Huffman, Linda; Adams, Jane; Ziegler, Terry; Sporney, Hilary; Levy, Michael; Puttgen, Hans A.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Delays in patient hospital discharge affect care value through costs of prolonged length of stay and barriers to patient flow within the hospital. We sought to facilitate early-in-day discharges (EIDDs) without extending length of stay for inpatients with multiple sclerosis admitted for acute exacerbations and treated with intravenous (IV) methylprednisolone. Methods: We developed a standardized admission order set, a provider checklist, and a patient checklist to better coordinate in-hospital care and discharge planning for patients with multiple sclerosis admitted for IV methylprednisolone treatment. The order set allowed providers to enter an accelerated dosing schedule of methylprednisolone, as appropriate, to ensure administration of the final dose of methylprednisolone in the morning on the anticipated day of discharge. We compared a prospective intervention cohort to a retrospective, preintervention baseline cohort. Results: At baseline (N = 25), 12.0% of patients were EIDD compared to 40.7% of intervention patients (N = 27; P = .03). In all, 85.2% of intervention patients compared to 64.0% of baseline patients were discharged on the same day as last methylprednisolone treatment (P = .11). No difference was observed in median length of stay and 30-day readmission rate between groups. Conclusions: Use of a standard admission order set as well as provider and patient checklists can facilitate EIDD and hospital bed availability without compromising care quality for a select group of neurology inpatients. PMID:26425247

  15. Subacromial triamcinolone mexacetonide and methylprednisolone injections in treatment of supra spinam tendinitis. A comparative trial.

    PubMed

    Valtonen, E J

    1976-01-01

    This statistical report describes a clinical trial on 60 patients with supraspinal tendinitis for the comparison of triamcinolone hexacetonide (in a 20 mg/cc suspension in 1 cc ampoules) with methylprednisolone acetate (in a 40 mg/cc suspension in 1 cc ampoules). The objective of the study was to determine the therapeutic activity, including onset and duration of relief, of triamcinolone hexacetonide as a subacromial injection, and to compare these results with those obtained with similar injections of methylprednisolone acetate. The following results were obtained. Triamcinolone hexacetonide reduced pain, local tenderness and functional impairment to a greater degree than did methylprednisolone acetate. A significantly smaller proportion of patients needed a second injection of triamcinolone hexacetonide (33%) than needed a second injection of methylprednisolone acetate (63%). Triamcinolone hexacetonide appears to have longer duration of activity than does methyl-prednisolone acetate, judging by the percentage of patients still getting relief from their first injection at the end of the study period. The drugs were similar as regards side effect incidence rates and time to onset of action.

  16. Effect of methylprednisolone use on the rotator cuff in rats: biomechanical and histological study☆

    PubMed Central

    Ghellioni, Gustavo Vinícius; da Silva, Lucas Souto; Piovezan, Anna Paula; Martins, Rafael Olívio

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the influence of treatment with different doses of methylprednisolone on the mechanical resistance and possible histological alterations of the rotator cuff tendon in rats. Methods Male Wistar rats were divided randomly into four treatment groups: sham, vehicle or 0.6 mg/kg or 6.0 mg/kg of methylprednisolone. Changes to mechanical resistance (in N) and histological parameters (fibrillar appearance, presence of collagen, edema and vascular proliferation) of the rotator cuff tendon were evaluated. The analyses were conducted after administration of one treatment (24 h afterwards), two treatments (7 days afterward) or three treatments (14 days afterwards), into the subacromial space. Results Seven and fourteen days after the treatments were started, it was found that in a dose-dependent manner, methylprednisolone reduced the mechanical resistance of the rotator cuff tendon (p < 0.05 in relation to the vehicle group). Modifications to the histological parameters were observed on the 7th and 14th days after the first infiltration, especially regarding the presence of collagen and vascular proliferation, for the dose of 0.6 mg/kg of methylprednisolone, and also regarding the presence of collagen, edema and vascular proliferation for the dose of 6.0 mg/kg of corticoid. Conclusion The results obtained demonstrated a relationship between methylprednisolone use through infiltration into the subacromial space and reduction of the mechanical resistance of and histological modifications to the rotator cuff tendon in rats. PMID:26229927

  17. Pharmacodynamics of Glucose Regulation by Methylprednisolone. II. Normal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jin Y.; Jusko, William J.

    2013-01-01

    A physiologic pharmacodynamic model was developed to jointly describe the effects of methylprednisolone (MPL) on adrenal suppression and glycemic control in normal rats. Six groups of animals were given MPL intravenously at 0, 10 and 50 mg/kg, or by subcutaneous 7 day infusion at rates of 0, 0.1 and 0.3 mg/kg/h. Plasma concentrations of MPL, corticosterone (CST), glucose and insulin were determined at various times up to 72 h after injection and 336 h after infusion. The pharmacokinetics of MPL was described by a two-compartment model. A circadian rhythm for CST was found in untreated rats with a stress-altered baseline caused by handling, which was captured by a circadian harmonic secretion rate with an increasing mesor. All drug treatments caused CST suppression. Injection of MPL caused temporary increases in glucose over 4 h. Insulin secretion was thereby stimulated yielding a later peak around 6 h. In turn, insulin can normalize glucose. However, long-term dosing caused continuous hyperglycemia during and after infusion. Hyperinsulinemia was achieved during infusion, but diminished immediately after dosing despite the high glucose concentration. The effects of CST and MPL on glucose production were described with a competitive stimulation function. A disease progression model incorporating reduced endogenous glucose uptake/utilization was used to describe glucose metabolism under different treatments. The results exemplify the roles of endogenous and exogenous hormones in mediating glucose dynamics. The pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model is valuable for quantitating diabetogenic effects of corticosteroid treatments and provides mechanistic insights into the hormonal control of the metabolic system. PMID:19156669

  18. Patients with Spinal Cord Injuries Favor Administration of Methylprednisolone

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Christian A.; Kundu, Bornali; Rosenbluth, Jeffrey; Hawryluk, Gregory W. J.

    2016-01-01

    Methylprednisolone sodium succinate (MPSS) for treatment of acute spinal cord injury (SCI) has been associated with both benefits and adverse events. MPSS administration was the standard of care for acute SCI until recently when its use has become controversial. Patients with SCI have had little input in the debate, thus we sought to learn their opinions regarding administration of MPSS. A summary of the published literature to date on MPSS use for acute SCI was created and adjudicated by 28 SCI experts. This summary was then emailed to 384 chronic SCI patients along with a survey that interrogated the patients’ neurological deficits, communication with physicians and their views on MPSS administration. 77 out of 384 patients completed the survey. 28 respondents indicated being able to speak early after injury and of these 24 reported arriving at the hospital within 8 hours of injury. One recalled a physician speaking to them about MPSS and one patient reported choosing whether or not to receive MPSS. 59.4% felt that the small neurological benefits associated with MPSS were ‘very important’ to them (p<0.0001). Patients had ‘little concern’ for potential side-effects of MPSS (p = 0.001). Only 1.4% felt that MPSS should not be given to SCI patients regardless of degree of injury (p<0.0001). This is the first study to report SCI patients’ preferences regarding MPSS treatment for acute SCI. Patients favor the administration of MPSS for acute SCI, however few had input into whether or not it was administered. Conscious patients should be given greater opportunity to decide their treatment. These results also provide some guidance regarding MPSS administration in patients unable to communicate. PMID:26789007

  19. Methylprednisolone protects oligodendrocytes but not neurons following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-Moo; Yan, Ping; Xiao, Qingli; Chen, Shawei; Lee, Kuang-Yung; Hsu, Chung Y.; Xu, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Methylprednisolone (MP) is used to treat a variety of neurological disorders involving white matter injury, including multiple sclerosis, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, and spinal cord injury (SCI). While its mechanism of action has been attributed to anti-inflammatory or anti-oxidant properties, we examined the possibility that MP may have direct neuroprotective activities. Neurons and oligodendrocytes treated with AMPA (alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5- methylisoxazole-4-propionate) or staurosporine died within 24 hrs after treatment. MP attenuated oligodendrocyte death in a dose-dependent manner; however, neurons were not rescued by the same doses of MP. This protective effect was reversed by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist, RU486, and siRNA directed against GR, suggesting a receptor-dependent mechanism. MP reversed AMPA-induced decreases in the expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-xL, caspase-3 activation, and DNA laddering, suggesting anti-apoptotic activity in oligodendrocytes. To examine if MP demonstrated this selective protection in vivo, neuronal and oligodendrocyte survival was assessed in rats subjected to SCI; groups of rats were treated with or without MP in the presence or absence of RU486. Eight days after SCI, MP significantly increased oligodendrocytes (CC-1 immunoreactive cells) following SCI, but neuronal (NeuN immunoreactive cells) number remained unchanged; RU486 reversed this protective effect. MP also inhibited SCI-induced decreases in Bcl-xL and caspase-3 activation. Consistent with these findings, the volume of demyelination, assessed by Luxol Fast Blue staining, was attenuated by MP and reversed by RU486. These results suggest that MP selectively inhibits oligodendrocyte but not neuronal cell death via a receptor-mediated action, and may be a mechanism for its limited protective effect following SCI. PMID:18354017

  20. Bolus tracking for improved metabolic imaging of hyperpolarised compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durst, Markus; Koellisch, Ulrich; Gringeri, Concetta; Janich, Martin A.; Rancan, Giaime; Frank, Annette; Wiesinger, Florian; Menzel, Marion I.; Haase, Axel; Schulte, Rolf F.

    2014-06-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarisation has enabled real-time metabolic imaging of pyruvate and its metabolites. Conventional imaging sequences rely on predefined settings and do not account for intersubject variations in biological parameters such as perfusion. We present a fully automatic real-time bolus tracking sequence for hyperpolarised substrates which starts the imaging acquisition at a defined point on the bolus curve. This reduces artefacts due to signal change and allows for a more efficient use of hyperpolarised magnetisation. For single time point imaging methods, bolus tracking enables a more reliable and consistent quantification of metabolic activity. An RF excitation with a small flip angle is used to obtain slice-selective pyruvate tracking information in rats. Moreover, in combination with a copolarised urea and pyruvate injection, spectrally selective tracking on urea allows obtaining localised bolus tracking information without depleting the pyruvate signal. Particularly with regard to clinical application, the bolus tracking technique could provide an important step towards a routine assessment protocol which removes operator dependencies and ensures comparable results.

  1. Locoregional Outcomes of Inflammatory Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Standard Fractionation Radiation and Daily Skin Bolus in the Taxane Era

    SciTech Connect

    Damast, Shari; Ho, Alice Y.; Montgomery, Leslie; Fornier, Monica N.; Ishill, Nicole; Elkin, Elena; Beal, Kathryn; McCormick, Beryl

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To assess locoregional outcomes of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) patients who received standard fractionation radiation with daily skin bolus and taxanes as part of combined-modality therapy (CMT). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 107 patients diagnosed with IBC between January 1995 and March 2006 who presented to our department for adjuvant radiation therapy (RT). Results: All patients received chemotherapy (95% anthracycline and 95% taxane), modified radical mastectomy, and RT to the chest wall and regional lymphatics using standard fractionation to 50 Gy and daily skin bolus. The RT to the chest wall was delivered via electrons (55%) or photons (45%) in daily fractions of 180 cGy (73%) or 200 cGy (27%). Scar boost was performed in 11%. A majority (84%) of patients completed the prescribed treatment. Median follow-up was 47 months (range, 10-134 months). Locoregional control (LRC) at 3 years and 5 years was 90% and 87%, respectively. Distant metastases-free survival (DMFS) at 3 years and 5 years was 61% and 47%, respectively. Conclusions: Excellent locoregional control was observed in this population of IBC patients who received standard fractionation radiation with daily skin bolus and taxanes as part of combined-modality therapy. Distant metastases-free survival remains a significant therapeutic challenge.

  2. Effects of Verbal Cue on Bolus Flow during Swallowing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Stephanie K.; Schroeder, Mae Fern; DeGeorge, Pamela C.; Corey, David M.; Rosenbek, John C.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the effects of verbal cuing to initiate swallowing on bolus flow measures in healthy adults. Method: Videofluoroscopic examinations were completed in 12 healthy older adults (median age = 69 years) as they swallowed 5 ml of self-administered liquid barium in 2 conditions: verbally cued and noncued swallows. In the cued…

  3. 21 CFR 520.1120b - Haloxon boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... week of slaughter. (6) Do not treat dairy animals of breeding age or older. ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1120b Haloxon boluses....

  4. 21 CFR 520.2380c - Thiabendazole bolus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... slaughter; milk taken from treated animals within 96 hours (8 milkings) after the latest treatment must not... animals within 3 days of slaughter; milk taken from treated animals within 96 hours (8 milkings) after the latest treatment must not be used for food. (2) Sheep and goats. In a bolus. (i) Amount. 2 grams per...

  5. 21 CFR 520.1197 - Ivermectin sustained-release bolus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ivermectin sustained-release bolus. 520.1197 Section 520.1197 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....; sucking lice Linognathus vituli, Solenopotes capillatus; mange mites Psoroptes ovis, Sarcoptes...

  6. 21 CFR 520.1197 - Ivermectin sustained-release bolus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ivermectin sustained-release bolus. 520.1197 Section 520.1197 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....; sucking lice Linognathus vituli, Solenopotes capillatus; mange mites Psoroptes ovis, Sarcoptes...

  7. 21 CFR 520.1197 - Ivermectin sustained-release bolus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ivermectin sustained-release bolus. 520.1197 Section 520.1197 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....; sucking lice Linognathus vituli, Solenopotes capillatus; mange mites Psoroptes ovis, Sarcoptes...

  8. 21 CFR 520.1197 - Ivermectin sustained-release bolus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ivermectin sustained-release bolus. 520.1197 Section 520.1197 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....; sucking lice Linognathus vituli, Solenopotes capillatus; mange mites Psoroptes ovis, Sarcoptes...

  9. 21 CFR 520.1197 - Ivermectin sustained-release bolus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ivermectin sustained-release bolus. 520.1197 Section 520.1197 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....; sucking lice Linognathus vituli, Solenopotes capillatus; mange mites Psoroptes ovis, Sarcoptes...

  10. Analysis of bolus formation from the micropipette ejection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Diwen; Mirbod, Parisa

    2013-11-01

    Ejection of drugs from micropipettes has significant applications in biomedical research and clinical studies, however little is known about the dynamics of the process involved. The experimental results show that micropipette ejection systems operate in a tip Reynolds number (Ret). A series of experiments was performed from a micropipette to visualize the shape of the droplet. The observations led to the following conclusions: a) A nearly spherical bolus, closely corresponding to Sampson flow through a circular orifice, could be achieved provided at Ret <0.05 b) Pear-like bolus distortions are observed at a Ret as small as 0.1. (d) Large distortions are observed at Ret = 0.5 and (e) for Ret > 1 an axial jet develops. Consequently, the transition point between the flow domains represents an important operating point. In this research, laminar is demarcated from turbulent regime by studying the influence of the various material and process parameters on the transition point. Three-dimensional numerical simulations on bolus formation and growth with different tip diameter were investigated and the results were validated with the experimental observations. Effects of fluid physical properties, operation conditions and tip exit size on bolus behavior were also analyzed.

  11. Effect of Pulsed Methylprednisolone on Pain, in Patients with HTLV-1-Associated Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Buell, Kevin G.; Puri, Aiysha; Demontis, Maria Antonietta; Short, Charlotte L.; Adonis, Adine; Haddow, Jana; Martin, Fabiola; Dhasmana, Divya

    2016-01-01

    HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) is an immune mediated myelopathy caused by the human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). The efficacy of treatments used for patients with HAM/TSP is uncertain. The aim of this study is to document the efficacy of pulsed methylprednisolone in patients with HAM/TSP. Data from an open cohort of 26 patients with HAM/TSP was retrospectively analysed. 1g IV methylprednisolone was infused on three consecutive days. The outcomes were pain, gait, urinary frequency and nocturia, a range of inflammatory markers and HTLV-1 proviral load. Treatment was well tolerated in all but one patient. Significant improvements in pain were: observed immediately, unrelated to duration of disease and maintained for three months. Improvement in gait was only seen on Day 3 of treatment. Baseline cytokine concentrations did not correlate to baseline pain or gait impairment but a decrease in tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) concentration after pulsed methylprednisolone was associated with improvements in both. Until compared with placebo, treatment with pulsed methylprednisolone should be offered to patients with HAM/TSP for the treatment of pain present despite regular analgesia. PMID:27077747

  12. Effects of acute and chronic administration of methylprednisolone on oxidative stress in rat lungs* **

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Ronaldo Lopes; Torres, Iraci Lucena da Silva; Laste, Gabriela; Ferreira, Maria Beatriz Cardoso; Cardoso, Paulo Francisco Guerreiro; Belló-Klein, Adriane

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effects of acute and chronic administration of methylprednisolone on oxidative stress, as quantified by measuring lipid peroxidation (LPO) and total reactive antioxidant potential (TRAP), in rat lungs. Methods: Forty Wistar rats were divided into four groups: acute treatment, comprising rats receiving a single injection of methylprednisolone (50 mg/kg i.p.); acute control, comprising rats i.p. injected with saline; chronic treatment, comprising rats receiving methylprednisolone in drinking water (6 mg/kg per day for 30 days); and chronic control, comprising rats receiving normal drinking water. Results: The levels of TRAP were significantly higher in the acute treatment group rats than in the acute control rats, suggesting an improvement in the pulmonary defenses of the former. The levels of lung LPO were significantly higher in the chronic treatment group rats than in the chronic control rats, indicating oxidative damage in the lung tissue of the former. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the acute use of corticosteroids is beneficial to lung tissue, whereas their chronic use is not. The chronic use of methylprednisolone appears to increase lung LPO levels. PMID:25029646

  13. SU-C-213-06: Dosimetric Verification of 3D Printed Electron Bolus

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, K; Corbett, M; Pelletier, C; Huang, Z; Feng, Y; Jung, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the dosimetric effect of 3D printed bolus in an anthropomorphic phantom. Methods: Conformable bolus material was generated for an anthropomorphic phantom from a DICOM volume. The bolus generated was a uniform expansion of 5mm applied to the nose region of the phantom, as this is a difficult area to uniformly apply bolus clinically. A Printrbot metal 3D Printer using PLA plastic generated the bolus. A 9MeV anterior beam with a 5cm cone was used to deliver dose to the nose of the phantom. TLD measurements were compared to predicted values at the phantom surface. Film planes were analyzed for the printed bolus, a standard 5mm bolus sheet placed on the phantom, and the phantom with no bolus applied to determine depth and dose distributions. Results: TLDs measured within 2.5% of predicted value for the 3D bolus. Film demonstrated a more uniform dose distribution in the nostril region for the 3d printed bolus than the standard bolus. This difference is caused by the air gap created around the nostrils by the standard bolus, creating a secondary build-up region. Both demonstrated a 50% central axis dose shift of 5mm relative to the no bolus film. HU for the bolus calculated the PLA electron density to be ∼1.1g/cc. Physical density was measured to be 1.3g/cc overall. Conclusion: 3D printed PLA bolus demonstrates improved dosimetric performance to standard bolus for electron beams with complex phantom geometry.

  14. SU-E-T-437: Dosimetric Assessment of Brass Mesh Bolus for Postmastectomy Chest Wall Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Manger, R; Paxton, A; Cervino, L

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: It has been suggested that the use of a brass mesh bolus for chest wall irradiation sufficiently increases surface dose while having little effect on the dose at depth. This work quantified the increase in surface dose when using a brass mesh bolus in postmastectomy chest wall radiotherapy compared to tissue-equivalent bolus and assessed its effect on dose at depth. Methods: Percent depth doses with brass bolus, 5mm tissue-equivalent bolus, and no bolus were determined for a 6 MV photon beam in a solid water phantom using a parallel plate ionization chamber. Gafchromic film was used to determine the surface dose for the same three experimental setups. For comparison to a realistic treatment setup, gafchromic film and OSLDs were used to determine the surface dose over the irradiated area of a 6 MV chest wall plan with tangential beams delivered to a heterogeneous thorax phantom. The plan was generated using a CT of the phantom and delivered using brass mesh bolus, 5mm tissue-equivalent bolus, and no bolus. Results: For the en face beam, the central surface dose increased to 90% of maximum with the tissue-equivalent bolus, but to only 62% of maximum with the brass mesh. Using tangential beams on the thorax phantom, the surface dose increased from 40–72% to 75–110% of prescribed dose, with the brass mesh, and to 85–109% with the tissue-equivalent bolus. At depths beyond dmax in the plastic water phantom, the dose with and without brass mesh bolus differed by less than 0.5%. Conclusion: A brass mesh may be considered as a substitute for tissue-equivalent bolus to increase the superficial dose of 6 MV chest wall tangent plans. The brass mesh does not significantly change the dose at depth, so a non-bolus plan could be used for bolus and non-bolus treatments.

  15. Bolus-tracking arterial spin labelling: theoretical and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, M. E.; Blau, C. W.; Kerskens, C. M.

    2009-03-01

    Arterial spin labelling (ASL) is a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique that can be used to provide a quantitative assessment of cerebral perfusion. Despite the development of a number of theoretical models to facilitate quantitative ASL, some key challenges still remain. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel quantitative ASL method based on a macroscopic model that reduces the number of variables required to describe the physiological processes involved. To this end, a novel Fokker-Planck equation consisting of stochastically varying macroscopic variables was derived from a general Langevin equation. ASL data from the rat brain was acquired using a bolus-tracking ASL protocol where a bolus of labelled spins flowing from an inversion plane in the neck into an imaging plane in the brain can be observed. Bolus durations of 1.5 s, 2.0 s and 3.0 s were used and the solution to the Fokker-Planck equation for the boundary conditions of bolus-tracking ASL was fitted to the experimental data using a least-squares fit. The mean transit time (MTT) and capillary transit time (CTT) were calculated from the first and second moments of the resultant curve respectively and the arterial transit time (ATT) was calculated by subtracting the CTT from the MTT. The average MTT, CTT and ATT values were 1.75 ± 0.22 s, 1.43 ± 0.12 s and 0.32 ± 0.04 s respectively. In conclusion, a new ASL protocol has been developed by combining the theoretical model with ASL experiments. The technique has the unique ability to provide solutions for varying bolus volumes and the generality of the new model is demonstrated by the derivation of additional solutions for the continuous and pulsed ASL (CASL and PASL) techniques.

  16. A simple formula to determine the bolus thickness on an oblique surface

    SciTech Connect

    Vossler, Matthew

    2014-07-01

    For certain clinical situations such as breast treatments, a bolus is used and must be accounted for in monitor unit calculations. Because of the oblique incidence involved, the thickness of bolus traversed by the radiation beam, as opposed to its nominal thickness, must be used. Using principles of geometry, a simple method is derived to calculate the thickness of bolus for these calculations.

  17. 21 CFR 520.1802b - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex boluses. 520....1802b Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex boluses. (a) Specifications. Each bolus contains 20 grams of piperazine-carbon disulfide complex. (b) Sponsor. See 000009 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c)...

  18. 21 CFR 520.1802b - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex boluses. 520....1802b Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex boluses. (a) Specifications. Each bolus contains 20 grams of piperazine-carbon disulfide complex. (b) Sponsor. See 000009 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c)...

  19. 21 CFR 520.1802b - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex boluses. 520....1802b Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex boluses. (a) Specifications. Each bolus contains 20 grams of piperazine-carbon disulfide complex. (b) Sponsor. See 000009 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c)...

  20. 21 CFR 520.1802b - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex boluses. 520....1802b Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex boluses. (a) Specifications. Each bolus contains 20 grams of piperazine-carbon disulfide complex. (b) Sponsor. See 000009 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c)...

  1. 21 CFR 520.1802b - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex boluses. 520....1802b Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex boluses. (a) Specifications. Each bolus contains 20 grams of piperazine-carbon disulfide complex. (b) Sponsor. See 000009 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c)...

  2. Albumin-based nanoparticles as methylprednisolone carriers for targeted delivery towards the neonatal Fc receptor in glomerular podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lin; Chen, Mingyu; Mao, Huijuan; Wang, Ningning; Zhang, Bo; Zhao, Xiufen; Qian, Jun; Xing, Changying

    2017-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are commonly used in the treatment of nephrotic syndrome. However, high doses and long periods of GC therapy can result in severe side effects. The present study aimed to selectively deliver albumin-methylprednisolone (MP) nanoparticles towards glomerular podocytes, which highly express the specific neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) of albumin. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was labeled with a fluorescent dye and linked with modified MP via an amide bond. The outcome nanoparticle named BSA633-MP showed a uniform size with a diameter of approximately 10 nm and contained 12 drug molecules on average. The nanoconjugates were found to be stable at pH 7.4 and acid-sensitive at pH 4.0, with approximately 72% release of the MP drug after 48 h of incubation. The nanoparticle demonstrated a 36-fold uptake in receptor-specific cellular delivery in the FcRn-expressing human podocytes compared to the uptake in the non-FcRn-expressing control cells. Co-localization further confirmed that uptake of the nanoconjugates involved receptor-mediated endocytosis followed by lysosome associated transportation. In vitro cellular experiments indicated that the BSA633-MP ameliorated puromycin aminonucleoside-induced podocyte apoptosis. Moreover, in vivo fluorescence molecular imaging showed that BSA633-MP was mainly accumulated in the liver and kidney after intravenous dosing for 24 h. Collectively, this study may provide an approach for the effective and safe therapy of nephrotic syndrome. PMID:28259932

  3. 21 CFR 522.1410 - Sterile methylprednisolone acetate suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... contraindicated in animals with arrested tuberculosis, peptic ulcer, and Cushing's syndrome. The presence of active tuberculosis, diabetes mellitus, osteoporosis, renal insufficiency, predisposition to...; and as supportive therapy to antibacterial treatment of severe infections in dogs and cats....

  4. 21 CFR 522.1410 - Sterile methylprednisolone acetate suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... contraindicated in animals with arrested tuberculosis, peptic ulcer, and Cushing's syndrome. The presence of active tuberculosis, diabetes mellitus, osteoporosis, renal insufficiency, predisposition to...; and as supportive therapy to antibacterial treatment of severe infections in dogs and cats....

  5. [Disseminated histoplasmosis treated by boluses of fluconazole].

    PubMed

    Mandengue Ebenye, C; Takuefou Mfangam, B; Nouédoui, C; Atangana, P J A

    2015-01-01

    We report a case in which an HIV-infected man was cured of disseminated histoplasmosis (Histoplasma capsulatum var duboisii) after treatment by high-dose fluconazole (1,600 mg taken four times daily) for 2 months, combined with active antiretroviral therapy. The choice of fluconazole at this dosage was motivated by its availability as a generic and thus inexpensive medication, the patient's precarious status, and his critical clinical condition. At the end of the second month of treatment, the patient chose to stop the fluconazole, which he could no longer afford, while continuing the antiretroviral treatment, which was free. The clinical and laboratory improvement observed from the first week has continued to progress for more than 8 months after fluconazole treatment stopped. This single case needs - and deserves - to be confirmed in a series of patients. Nonetheless it makes it possible to envision fluconazole as a low-cost and efficacious antifungal agent for the treatment of disseminated histoplasmosis in AIDS patients in sub-Saharan Africa.

  6. Bolus calculator with nutrition database software, a new concept of prandial insulin programming for pump users.

    PubMed

    Pańkowska, Ewa; Błazik, Marlena

    2010-05-01

    Bolus calculators are effective tools in controlling blood glucose levels in patients treated with insulin. Diabetics is a new software devised for patients to facilitate and improve self-managing for prandial insulin dosing and for better controlling food intake. This device contains two integral parts: a nutrition database and a bolus calculator. The algorithm is based on a formula in which carbohydrate (CHO) and either fat and/or protein (FP) products are engulfed in insulin. The insulin dose setting is programmed individually for CHO in a normal bolus (N-W) and for FP in a square-wave bolus (S-W). The device calculates the dose of insulin for N-W or S-W, suggests the optimal kind of bolus, and indicates the timing in hours for an S-W bolus. In addition, this calculator, which contains a nutrition database and insulin dosing software, helps determine the correct type of necessary boluses for selected foods.

  7. Dose reduction with adaptive bolus chasing computed tomography angiography.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhijun; Bai, Er-Wei; Wang, Ge; Sharafuddin, Melhem J; Abada, Hicham T

    2010-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) has become an effective diagnosis and evaluating tool in clinical; however, its radiation exposure has drawn great attention as more and more CT scans are performed every year. How to reduce the radiation dose and meanwhile keep the resultant CT images diagnosable becomes an important research topic. In this paper, we propose a dose reduction approach along with the adaptive bolus chasing CT Angiography (CTA) techniques, which are capable of tracking the contrast bolus peak over all the blood vessel segments during the CTA scan. By modulating the tube current (and collimator width) online, we can reduce the total radiation dose and maintain the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) of the blood vessel. Numerical experiments on reference DSA data sets show that by using the proposed dose reduction method, the effective radiation dose can be saved about 39%.

  8. Dose Reduction with Adaptive Bolus Chasing Computed Tomography Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zhijun; Bai, Er-Wei; Wang, Ge; Sharafuddin, Melhem J.; Abada, Hicham T.

    2010-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) has become an effective diagnosis and evaluating tool in clinical; however, its radiation exposure has drawn great attention as more and more CT scans are performed every year. How to reduce the radiation dose and meanwhile keep the resultant CT images diagnosable becomes an important research topic. In this paper, we propose a dose reduction approach along with the adaptive bolus chasing CT Angiography (CTA) techniques, which are capable of tracking the contrast bolus peak over all the blood vessel segments during the CTA scan. By modulating the tube current (and collimator width) online, we can reduce the total radiation dose and maintain the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) of the blood vessel. Numerical experiments on reference DSA data sets show that by using the proposed dose reduction method, the effective radiation dose can be saved about 39%. PMID:20421701

  9. Analysis of pressure generation and bolus transit during pharyngeal swallowing.

    PubMed

    McConnel, F M

    1988-01-01

    Current pharyngeal deglutition theory has stressed the role of the pharyngeal constrictors as producing a peristaltic wave responsible for bolus propulsion through the pharynx. This thesis presents data obtained using manofluorography which supports the significance of tongue and laryngeal motion in swallowing. The usage of the term peristalsis to describe the constrictor contraction is challenged. The results of this quantitative study of swallowing in normal subjects, laryngectomized patients, and patients with restricted tongue motion show that tongue driving pressure and the negative pressure developed in the pharyngeal esophageal segment appear more important than the peristaltic-like pressure of the constrictors. Bolus transit is really dependent upon these two pressures. This model for analysis has clinical significance because it permits quantification of the pharyngeal swallowing mechanism.

  10. 21 CFR 520.1720a - Phenylbutazone tablets and boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...-mg or 1-g tablets, or 2- or 4-g boluses, in dogs and horses. (2) Nos. 000010 and 000859 for use of 100- or 200-mg or 1-g tablets in dogs and horses. (3) Nos. 000856 and 061623 for use of 100-mg or 1-g tablets in dogs and horses. (4) (5) No. 000143 for use of 1-g tablets in horses. (6) No. 058829 for use...

  11. 21 CFR 520.1720a - Phenylbutazone tablets and boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...-mg or 1-g tablets, or 2- or 4-g boluses, in dogs and horses. (2) Nos. 000010 and 059130 for use of 100- or 200-mg or 1-g tablets in dogs and horses. (3) Nos. 000856 and 061623 for use of 100-mg or 1-g tablets in dogs and horses. (4) No. 055246 for use of 100-mg tablets in dogs. (5) No. 000143 for use of...

  12. 21 CFR 520.1720a - Phenylbutazone tablets and boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...-mg or 1-g tablets, or 2- or 4-g boluses, in dogs and horses. (2) Nos. 000010 and 059130 for use of 100- or 200-mg or 1-g tablets in dogs and horses. (3) Nos. 000856 and 061623 for use of 100-mg or 1-g tablets in dogs and horses. (4) (5) No. 000143 for use of 1-g tablets in horses. (6) No. 058829 for use...

  13. Atorvastatin calcium in combination with methylprednisolone for the treatment of multiple sclerosis relapse.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-ling; Zhang, Zhen-chang; Zhang, Bo; Jiang, Hua; Yu, Chun-mei; Zhang, Wen-jing; Yan, Xiang; Wang, Man-xia

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the efficacy of combined atorvastatin calcium and methylprednisolone for the treatment of multiple sclerosis relapse. Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) at the relapse phase were randomized to receive either combined treatment of atorvastatin calcium and methylprednisolone (n = 19) or methylprednisolone alone (n = 19). Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) was administered at baseline, 1 week, 2 weeks, 4 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after treatment initiation. The number and volume of brain lesions were evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging at baseline and 6 months. The levels of IL-13, IL-35, IFN-γ, and IL-10 in the cerebrospinal fluid were examined using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. There was no significant difference in EDSS scores at 1, 2, and 4 weeks. At 3 and 6 months, the combined treatment group showed significantly lower EDSS scores than the monotherapy group (P < 0.05). The number and volume of brain lesions in the combined treatment group were significantly lower than the monotherapy group at 6 months (P < 0.001). The mean time to relapse was significantly extended in the combined treatment group than the monotherapy group (P < 0.001). At 2 and 4 weeks, the combined treatment group had significantly higher levels of IL-13, IL-35, and IL-10 in the cerebrospinal fluid than the monotherapy group (P < 0.05), but significantly lower level of IFN-γ (P < 0.001). The levels of IL-13 and IL-10 in the combined treatment group were positively correlated with EDSS scores (r = 0.632, P = 0.001; r = 0.731, P = 0.002). Combined treatment with atorvastatin calcium and methylprednisolone can improve the outcomes of MS relapse compared with glucocorticosteroid alone.

  14. [Continuous infusion versus bolus injection of loop diuretics in acute heart failure: a literature review].

    PubMed

    Leto, Laura; Aspromonte, Nadia; Feola, Mauro

    2012-04-01

    Intravenous loop diuretics are increasingly used to treat symptoms and signs of fluid overload in acute heart failure, a clinical condition associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Although diuretic therapy is widely used and strongly recommended by most recent clinical guidelines, prospective studies and randomized clinical trials are lacking and hence there is no reliable evidence regarding the best therapy in terms of doses, ways and methods of administration. With heart failure progression, the efficacy of loop diuretics is impaired by diuretic resistance characterized by a decreased diuretic and natriuretic effect of drugs. This review focuses on the current management of acute heart failure with diuretic therapy. Continuous diuretic infusion seems to be a good choice, from a pharmacokinetic point of view, when fluid overload is refractory to conventional therapy. Several available studies comparing bolus injection to continuous infusion of loop diuretics proved the latter to be an effective and safe method of administration. Continuous infusion seems to produce a constant plasma drug concentration with a more uniform daily diuretic and natriuretic effect and a greater safety profile (fewer adverse events such as worsening renal failure, electrolyte imbalance, ototoxicity). In addition, the analysis of available literature data did not provide conclusive evidence about the effects on clinical outcomes (mortality, rehospitalization rates, adverse events).

  15. The Effect of Oblique Electron Beams to the Surface Dose Under the Bolus

    SciTech Connect

    Demir, Bayram Okutan, Murat; Cakir, Aydin; Goeksel, Evren; Bilge, Hatice

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the effect of bolus to the surface dose in oblique electron incidences. Irradiations with 4.5, 6, 7.5, 9, and 12-MeV electron beams were made for the incidence angles of 0 deg., 15 deg., 30 deg., 45 deg., 60 deg., 75 deg. and using 3 different bolus setups: (1) unbolused (no bolus), (2) 5-mm bolus, and (3) 10-mm bolus. A set of EBT gafchromic film pieces placed on the phantom surface was irradiated with a 400-cGy dose at D{sub max} for each setup. Whereas surface dose increased with increasing incidence degrees in the absence of a bolus, it was seen that there was a large surface dose decreasing in the presence of a bolus with increasing incidence angles. For 60 deg. incidence angle, the relative surface doses with unbolused setup were: 88.10%, 90.06%, 89.35%, 90.25%, and 97.10%; with 5-mm bolus: 66.45%, 81.20%, 99.78%, 124.43%, and 116.07%; and with 10-mm bolus: 22.65%, 45.20%, 55.20%, 65.82%, and 90.27% for 4.5, 6, 7.5, 9, and 12 MeV, respectively. The use of bolus in the treatment of highly oblique surfaces with low-energy electron beams significantly decreases the surface dose.

  16. Design of a Water Coupling Bolus with Improved Flow Distribution for Multielement Superficial Hyperthermia Applicators

    PubMed Central

    Arunachalam, Kavitha; Maccarini, Paolo F; Schlorff, Jaime L.; Birkelund, Yngve; Jacobsen, Svein; Stauffer, Paul R.

    2009-01-01

    A water bolus used in superficial hyperthermia couples the electromagnetic (EM) or acoustic energy into the target tissue and cools the tissue surface to minimize thermal hotspots and patient discomfort during treatment. Parametric analyses of the fluid pressure inside the bolus computed using 3D fluid dynamics simulations are used in this study to determine a bolus design with improved flow and surface temperature distributions for large area superficial heat applicators. The simulation results are used in the design and fabrication of a 19×32 cm prototype bolus with dual input-dual output (DIDO) flow channels. Sequential thermal images of the bolus surface temperature recorded for a step change in the circulating water temperature are used to assess steady state flow and surface temperature distributions across the bolus. Modeling and measurement data indicate substantial improvement in bolus flow and surface temperature distributions when changing from the previous single input-single output (SISO) to DIDO configuration. Temperature variation across the bolus at steady state was measured to be less than 0.8°C for the DIDO bolus compared to 1.5°C for the SISO waterbolus. The new DIDO bolus configuration maintains a nearly uniform flow distribution and low variation in surface temperature over a large area typically treated in superficial hyperthermia. PMID:19848618

  17. Pharyngeal swallow adaptations to bolus volume measured with high resolution manometry

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Matthew R.; Ciucci, Michelle R.; Mielens, Jason D.; Jiang, Jack J.; McCulloch, Timothy M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of bolus volume on pharyngeal swallowing using high resolution manometry (HRM). Study design Repeated measures with subjects serving as own controls. Methods Twelve subjects swallowed four bolus volumes in the neutral head position: saliva; 5 ml water; 10 ml water; and 20 ml water. Pressure measurements were taken along the length of the pharynx using a high resolution manometer, with emphasis placed on the velopharynx, tongue base, and upper esophageal sphincter (UES). Variables were analyzed across bolus volumes using three-way repeated measures analysis of co-variance (ANCOVA) investigating the effect of sex, bolus volume, and pharynx length. Pearson’s product moment tests were performed to evaluate how pharyngeal pressure and timing events changed across bolus volume. Results Velopharyngeal duration, maximum tongue base pressure, tongue base pressure rise rate, UES opening duration, and total swallow duration varied significantly across bolus volume. Sex did not have an effect, while pharynx length appeared to affect tongue base pressure duration. Maximum velopharyngeal pressure and minimum UES pressure had a direct relationship with bolus volume, while maximum tongue base pressure had an inverse relationship. Velopharyngeal pressure duration, UES opening duration, and total swallow duration increased as bolus volume increased. Conclusions Differences in pharyngeal pressures and timing of key pressure events were detected across varying bolus volumes. Knowing the relationships between bolus volume and pharyngeal pressure activity can be valuable when diagnosing and treating dysphagic patients. Level of evidence N/A. PMID:21108425

  18. Impacts of wearing complete dentures on bolus transport during feeding in elderly edentulous.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, H; Furuya, J; Tamada, Y; Kondo, H

    2013-12-01

    Prosthetic treatment with dentures is often required for the elderly who have reduced swallowing function. Therefore, it is important to understand the relationship between denture-wearing and feeding function from the perspective of swallowing. To clarify changes in bolus transport during feeding in elderly edentulous patients with or without complete dentures. Subjects were 15 elderly edentulous volunteers who were treated with maxillary and mandibular complete dentures. The test food was 10 g of minced agar jelly containing barium sulphate with a particle diameter of 4·0-5·6 mm. Lateral videofluoroscopy was performed to assess the position of the leading edge of the bolus, the bolus volume in each area at swallow onset, bolus transit time and the mandibular position during pharyngeal swallowing. There were significant changes between the bolus transport with and without dentures. Without dentures, the leading edge of the bolus at swallow onset fell from the valleculae area to the hypopharynx, and the bolus volume in the hypopharynx increased. Bolus transit time increased in the oral cavity, valleculae and hypopharynx. The mandibular position shifted anterosuperior direction. The results arose owing to anatomical changes in the oral and pharyngeal structure and the following functional changes: poor food manipulation, poor bolus formation and delayed swallowing reflex. Removing dentures in elderly edentulous individuals influences bolus transport during feeding, resulting in the exacerbation of the reduced swallowing reserve capacity that accompanies ageing, and may increase the risk of dysphagia.

  19. Effects of Methylprednisolone And Ganglioside GM-1 on a Spinal Lesion: A Functional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Márcio Oliveira Penna; de Barros Filho, Tarcisio Eloy Pessoa; Tebet, Marcos Antonio

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The pharmacological effects of methylprednisolone (MP) and ganglioside GM-1 on spinal injuries have been thoroughly investigated, but only a few studies have evaluated the interaction between these two drugs. METHODS Twenty-four Wistar rats were subjected to contusive injury of the spinal cord produced by the NYU system. These animals were divided into four groups: group I was injected with MP; group II was injected with GM-1; group III was injected with MP together with GM-1; and group control received physiological serum. The animals were evaluated with regard to their recovery of locomotive function by means of the BBB test on the second, seventh and fourteenth days after receiving the contusive injury to the spinal cord. They were sacrificed on the fourteenth day. RESULTS This study demonstrated that the MP and GM-1 groups presented functional results that were better than those of the control group, although the enhanced recovery of group II (GM-1) relative to the control group was not statistically significant (p>0.05). The most notable recovery of locomotive function was observed in the group that received MP alone (p<0.05). The group that received MP together with GM-1 presented results that were better than those of the control group (p<0.05). CONCLUSION Administration of methylprednisolone alone or with GM-1 was shown to be effective for recovery of locomotive function. Combined administration of these drugs resulted in better outcomes than administration of methylprednisolone alone. PMID:18568249

  20. Multicenter Closed-Loop/Hybrid Meal Bolus Insulin Delivery with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Chase, H. Peter; Doyle, Francis J.; Zisser, Howard; Renard, Eric; Nimri, Revital; Cobelli, Claudio; Buckingham, Bruce A.; Maahs, David M.; Anderson, Stacey; Magni, Lalo; Lum, John; Calhoun, Peter; Kollman, Craig

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: This study evaluated meal bolus insulin delivery strategies and associated postprandial glucose control while using an artificial pancreas (AP) system. Subjects and Methods: This study was a multicenter trial in 53 patients, 12–65 years of age, with type 1 diabetes for at least 1 year and use of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion for at least 6 months. Four different insulin bolus strategies were assessed: standard bolus delivered with meal (n=51), standard bolus delivered 15 min prior to meal (n=40), over-bolus of 30% delivered with meal (n=40), and bolus purposely omitted (n=46). Meal carbohydrate (CHO) intake was 1 g of CHO/kg of body weight up to a maximum of 100 g for the first three strategies or up to a maximum of 50 g for strategy 4. Results: Only three of 177 meals (two with over-bolus and one with standard bolus 15 min prior to meal) had postprandial blood glucose values of <60 mg/dL. Postprandial hyperglycemia (blood glucose level >180 mg/dL) was prolonged for all four bolus strategies but was shorter for the over-bolus (41% of the 4-h period) than the two standard bolus strategies (73% for each). Mean postprandial blood glucose level was 15.9 mg/dL higher for the standard bolus with meal compared with the prebolus (baseline-adjusted, P=0.07 for treatment effect over the 4-h period). Conclusions: The AP handled the four bolus situations safely, but at the expense of having elevated postprandial glucose levels in most subjects. This was most likely secondary to suboptimal performance of the algorithm. PMID:25188375

  1. Hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD) with complete occlusion of liver venules after tandem autologous stem cell transplantation-- successful treatment with high-dose methylprednisolone and defibrotide.

    PubMed

    Sayer, H G; Will, U; Schilling, K; Vogt, T; Wollina, K; Höffken, K

    2002-03-01

    Veno-occlusive disease (VOD) is a life-threatening complication following allogeneic or autologous stem cell transplantation. We report on a patient with a high grade B-cell lymphoma who presented 28 days after the second autologous stem cell transplantation with weight gain, ascites, hyperbilirubinemia, and liver venules occlusion as demonstrated by sonography. Starting with high-dose methylprednisolone treatment followed by defibrotide maintenance therapy the patient showed dramatic complete response of VOD, resulting in a normal sonography of the liver and normalization of laboratory values. The response of the occlusion of nearly all liver venules underlines the value of anti-inflammatory treatment combined with new thrombolytic medication such as defibrotide for the treatment of severe VOD.

  2. Internal wave bolus detection and analysis by a Lagrangian coherent structure method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allshouse, Michael R.; Salvador-Vieira, G.; Swinney, Harry L.

    2015-11-01

    The shoaling of vertical mode internal waves on a continental shelf produces boluses, which are trapped regions of fluid that travel up the shelf with the wave. Unlike a propagating solitary wave, these boluses can transport material with the wave. Boluses have been observed to transport oxygen depleted water and induce rapid changes in temperature both of which have potential ramifications for marine biology. We extend a number of two-layer studies by investigating bolus generation and material transport in continuously stratified fluids. Laboratory experiments are conducted in a 4 m long tank and are complemented by 2-dimensional numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations. The boundaries of a bolus are identified using a Lagrangian based coherent structure method relying on trajectory clustering. The time evolution of material transport by the bolus is investigated as a function of the stratification, wave properties, and the angle of the sloping topography. ONR MURI Grant No. N000141110701.

  3. Automatic measurement of contrast bolus distribution in carotid arteries using a C-arm angiography system to support interventional perfusion imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fieselmann, Andreas; Ganguly, Arundhuti; Yu, Deuerling-Zheng; Boese, Jan; Hornegger, Joachim; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2011-03-01

    Brain perfusion CT using a C-arm angiography system capable of CT-like imaging could optimize patient treatment during stroke therapy procedures. For this application, an intra-arterial contrast bolus injection at the aortic arch could be used provided that the location of the injection catheter enables uniform distribution of the bolus into the two common carotid arteries (CCA). In this work, we present a novel method to support optimal injection catheter placement by providing additional quantitative information about the distribution of the contrast bolus into the CCAs. Our fully automatic method uses 2-D digital subtraction angiography (DSA) images following a test bolus injection. It segments both CCAs and computes the relative contrast distribution. We have tested the method in DSA data sets from 5 healthy pigs and our method achieved successful segmentation of both CCAs in all data sets. The results showed that the contrast is uniformly distributed (mean relative difference less or equal than 10%) if the injection location is properly chosen.

  4. Comparison of clinical efficacy of methylprednisolone and serratiopeptidase for reduction of postoperative sequelae after lower third molar surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chappi D., Mouneshkumar; Patil, Manisha R.; Desai, Rajendra; Tauro, David P.; Bharani K.N.S., Shiva; Parkar, Mushtaq I.; Babaji, Harsha V.

    2015-01-01

    Background Surgical removal of mandibular third molars results in some degree of post-operative pain, swelling and trismus. These can be controlled by proper administration of local anesthesia, careful bone removal, minimal trauma to adjacent soft tissues and administration of methylprednisolone and serratiopeptidase drugs. The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of methylprednisolone and serratiopeptidase in controlling post-operative pain, swelling and trismus after surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molars. Material and Methods The subjects were divided into two groups of 50 patients each undergoing surgical removal of mandibular third molars. Group A was given methylprednisolone 4mg orally every 8th hourly and Group B was given serratiopeptidase 10 mg every 12th hourly orally. Post-operatively pain, swelling and trismus were evaluated at the end of 1st, 3rd and 5thday. Results The results of this study showed that methylprednisolone is an effective analgesic, while serratiopeptidase has moderate analgesic activity. Serratiopeptidase is more effective than methylprednisolone in controlling post surgical swelling and trismus. Hence combination of these two drugs would be very effective than individual drug when widespread post-operative sequelae are expected after surgical removal of impacted lower third molars. Conclusions We conclude that methylprednisolone affords better pain relief while serratiopeptidase exerts better anti-inflammatory and anti-swelling effects in the post-operative period. Synergistic combinations of these two drugs would however prove to be more effective when extensive post-operative sequelae are expected. Key words:Methylprednisolone, serratiopeptidase, pain, swelling, trismus, third molar. PMID:26155332

  5. High-Dose Intravenous Methylprednisolone for Hantavirus Cardiopulmonary Syndrome in Chile: A Double-Blind, Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Vial, Pablo A.; Valdivieso, Francisca; Ferres, Marcela; Riquelme, Raul; Rioseco, M. Luisa; Calvo, Mario; Castillo, Constanza; Díaz, Ricardo; Scholz, Luis; Cuiza, Analia; Belmar, Edith; Hernandez, Carla; Martinez, Jessica; Lee, Sang-Joon; Mertz, Gregory J.; Abarca, Juan; Tomicic, Vinko; Aracena, M. Eugenia; Rehbein, Ana Maria; Velásquez, Soledad; Lavin, Victoria; Garrido, Felipe; Godoy, Paula; Martinez, Constanza; Chamorro, Juan Carlos; Contreras, Jorge; Hernandez, Jury; Pino, Marcelo; Villegas, Paola; Zapata, Viviana; León, Marisol; Vega, Ivonne; Otarola, Irisol; Ortega, Carlos; Daube, Elizabeth; Huecha, Doris; Neira, Alda; Ruiz, Ines; Nuñez, M. Antonieta; Monsalve, Luz; Chabouty, Henriette; Riquelme, Lorena; Palma, Samia; Bustos, Raul; Miranda, Ruben; Mardones, Jovita; Hernandez, Nora; Betancur, Yasna; Sanhueza, Ligia; Inostroza, Jaime; Donoso, Solange; Navarrete, Maritza; Acuña, Lily; Manriquez, Paulina; Castillo, Fabiola; Unzueta, Paola; Aguilera, Teresa; Osorio, Carola; Yobanolo, Veronica; Mardones, Jorge; Aranda, Sandra; Carvajal, Soledad; Sandoval, Moisés; Daza, Soraya; Vargas, Felipe; Diaz, Violeta; Riquelme, Mauricio; Muñoz, Miriam; Carriel, Andrea; Lanino, Paola; Hernandez, Susana; Schumacher, Patricia; Yañez, Lia; Marco, Claudia; Ehrenfeld, Mildred; Delgado, Iris; Rios, Susana; Vial, Cecilia; Bedrick, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Background. Andes virus (ANDV)–related hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) has a 35% case fatality rate in Chile and no specific treatment. In an immunomodulatory approach, we evaluated the efficacy of intravenous methylprednisolone for HCPS treatment, through a parallel-group, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Methods. Patients aged >2 years, with confirmed or suspected HCPS in cardiopulmonary stage, admitted to any of 13 study sites in Chile, were randomized by study center in blocks of 4 with a 1:1 allocation and assigned through sequentially numbered envelopes to receive placebo or methylprednisolone 16 mg/kg/day (≤1000 mg) for 3 days. All personnel remained blinded except the local pharmacist. Infection was confirmed by immunoglobulin M antibodies or ANDV RNA in blood. The composite primary endpoint was death, partial pressure of arterial oxygen/fraction of inspired oxygen ratio ≤55, cardiac index ≤2.2, or ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation within 28 days. Safety endpoints included the number of serious adverse events (SAEs) and quantification of viral RNA in blood. Analysis was by intention to treat. Results. Infection was confirmed in 60 of 66 (91%) enrollees. Fifteen of 30 placebo-treated patients and 11 of 30 methylprednisolone-treated patients progressed to the primary endpoint (P = .43). We observed no significant difference in mortality between treatment groups (P = .41). There was a trend toward more severe disease in placebo recipients at entry. More subjects in the placebo group experienced SAEs (P = .02). There were no SAEs clearly related to methylprednisolone administration, and methylprednisolone did not increase viral load. Conclusions. Although methylprednisolone appears to be safe, it did not provide significant clinical benefit to patients. Our results do not support the use of methylprednisolone for HCPS. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT00128180. PMID:23784924

  6. Methylprednisolone promotes recovery of neurological function after spinal cord injury: association with Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway activation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Gong-biao; Niu, Fu-wen; Zhang, Ying-chun; Du, Lin; Liang, Zhi-yuan; Gao, Yuan; Yan, Ting-zhen; Nie, Zhi-kui; Gao, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Some studies have indicated that the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is activated following spinal cord injury, and expression levels of specific proteins, including low-density lipoprotein receptor related protein-6 phosphorylation, β-catenin, and glycogen synthase kinase-3β, are significantly altered. We hypothesized that methylprednisolone treatment contributes to functional recovery after spinal cord injury by inhibiting apoptosis and activating the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. In the current study, 30 mg/kg methylprednisolone was injected into rats with spinal cord injury immediately post-injury and at 1 and 2 days post-injury. Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan scores showed that methylprednisolone treatment significantly promoted locomotor functional recovery between 2 and 6 weeks post-injury. The number of surviving motor neurons increased, whereas the lesion size significantly decreased following methylprednisolone treatment at 7 days post-injury. Additionally, caspase-3, caspase-9, and Bax protein expression levels and the number of apoptotic cells were reduced at 3 and 7 days post-injury, while Bcl-2 levels at 7 days post-injury were higher in methylprednisolone-treated rats compared with saline-treated rats. At 3 and 7 days post-injury, methylprednisolone up-regulated expression and activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, including low-density lipoprotein receptor related protein-6 phosphorylation, β-catenin, and glycogen synthase kinase-3β phosphorylation. These results indicate that methylprednisolone-induced neuroprotection may correlate with activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:28123427

  7. Factors predicting incremental administration of antihypertensive boluses during deep brain stimulator placement for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Shobana; Deogaonkar, Milind; Kaw, Roop; Nada, Eman Ms; Hernandez, Adrian V; Ebrahim, Zeyd; Avitsian, Rafi

    2014-10-01

    Hypertension is common in deep brain stimulator (DBS) placement predisposing to intracranial hemorrhage. This retrospective review evaluates factors predicting incremental antihypertensive use intraoperatively. Medical records of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients undergoing DBS procedure between 2008-2011 were reviewed after Institutional Review Board approval. Anesthesia medication, preoperative levodopa dose, age, preoperative use of antihypertensive medications, diabetes mellitus, anxiety, motor part of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale score and PD duration were collected. Univariate and multivariate analysis was done between each patient characteristic and the number of antihypertensive boluses. From the 136 patients included 60 were hypertensive, of whom 32 were on angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB), told to hold on the morning of surgery. Antihypertensive medications were given to 130 patients intraoperatively. Age (relative risk [RR] 1.01; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00-1.02; p=0.005), high Joint National Committee (JNC) class (p<0.0001), diabetes mellitus (RR 1.4; 95%CI 1.2-17; p<0.0001) and duration of PD >10 years (RR 1.2; 95%CI 1.1-1.3; p=0.001) were independent predictors for antihypertensive use. No difference was noted in the mean dose of levodopa (p=0.1) and levodopa equivalent dose (p=0.4) between the low (I/II) and high severity (III/IV) JNC groups. Addition of dexmedetomidine to propofol did not influence antihypertensive boluses required (p=0.38). Intraoperative hypertension during DBS surgery is associated with higher age group, hypertensive, diabetic patients and longer duration of PD. Withholding ACEI or ARB is an independent predictor of hypertension requiring more aggressive therapy. Levodopa withdrawal and choice of anesthetic agent is not associated with higher intraoperative antihypertensive medications.

  8. Dispersion of a nanoliter bolus in microfluidic co-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, A. J.; Saadi, W. M.; Sinatra, F. L.; Kowalski, G.; Larson, D.; Fiering, J.

    2014-03-01

    Microfluidic systems enable reactions and assays on the scale of nanoliters. However, at this scale non-uniformities in sample delivery become significant. To determine the fundamental minimum sample volume required for a particular device, a detailed understanding of mass transport is required. Co-flowing laminar streams are widely used in many devices, but typically only in the steady-state. Because establishing the co-flow steady-state consumes excess sample volume and time, there is a benefit to operating devices in the transient state, which predominates as the volume of the co-flow reactor decreases. Analysis of the co-flow transient has been neglected thus far. In this work we describe the fabrication of a pneumatically controlled microfluidic injector constructed to inject a discrete 50 nL bolus into one side of a two-stream co-flow reactor. Using dye for image analysis, injections were performed at a range of flow rates from 0.5-10 µL min-1, and for comparison we collected the co-flow steady-state data for this range. The results of the image analysis were also compared against theory and simulations for device validation. For evaluation, we established a metric that indicates how well the mass distribution in the bolus injection approximates steady-state co-flow. Using such analysis, transient-state injections can approximate steady-state conditions within pre-defined errors, allowing straightforward measurements to be performed with reduced reagent consumption.

  9. Dispersion of a Nanoliter Bolus in Microfluidic Co-Flow

    PubMed Central

    Conway, A J; Saadi, W M; Sinatra, F L; Kowalski, G; Larson, D; Fiering, J

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic systems enable reactions and assays on the scale of nanoliters. However, at this scale nonuniformities in sample delivery become significant. To determine the fundamental minimum sample volume required for a particular device, a detailed understanding of mass transport is required. Co-flowing laminar streams are widely used in many devices, but typically only in the steady-state. Because establishing the co-flow steady-state consumes excess sample volume and time, there is a benefit to operating devices in the transient state, which predominates as the volume of the co-flow reactor decreases. Analysis of the co-flow transient has been neglected thus far. In this work we describe the fabrication of a pneumatically controlled microfluidic injector constructed to inject a discrete 50nL bolus into one side of a two-stream co-flow reactor. Using dye for image analysis, injections were performed at a range of flow rates from 0.5-10μL/min, and for comparison we collected the co-flow steady-state data for this range. The results of the image analysis were also compared against theory and simulations for device validation. For evaluation, we established a metric that indicates how well the mass distribution in the bolus injection approximates steady-state co-flow. Using such analysis, transient-state injections can approximate steady-state conditions within predefined errors, allowing straight forward measurements to be performed with reduced reagent consumption. PMID:25045205

  10. Methylcobalamin, but not methylprednisolone or pleiotrophin, accelerates the recovery of rat biceps after ulnar to musculocutaneous nerve transfer.

    PubMed

    Liao, W-C; Chen, J-R; Wang, Y-J; Tseng, G-F

    2010-12-15

    Using ulnar nerve as donor and musculocutaneous nerve as recipient we recently demonstrated that end-to-end neurorrhaphy in young adult male Wistar rats resulted in good recovery following protracted survival. Here we explored whether anti-inflammatory drug- methylprednisolone, regeneration/myelination-enhancing agent- methylcobalamin and neurite growth-enhancing and angiogenic factor- pleiotrophin accelerated its recovery. Methylprednisolone suppressed the perineuronal microglial reaction and periaxonal ED-1 expression while pleiotrophin increased the blood vessel density and nerve fiber densities in the reconnected nerve as expected. Neither methylprednisolone nor methylcobalamin altered the expression of growth associated protein 43 in the neurons examined suggesting that they did not interfere with axonal regeneration attempt. Surprisingly methylcobalamin enhanced the recovery of compound muscle action potentials and motor end plate innervation and the performance on sticker removal grooming test and augmented the diameters and myelin thicknesses of regenerated axons dramatically while enhancing S-100 expression in Schwann cells; remarkable recovery was achieved 1 month following neurorrhaphy. Simultaneous methylcobalamin and pleiotrophin treatment resulted in quick and persistent supernumerary reinnervation but failed to enhance the recovery over that of the former alone. Methylprednisolone transiently suppressed the enumeration of regrowing axons. In conclusion, methylcobalamin may be preferred over methylprednisolone to facilitate the recovery of peripheral nerves following end-to-end neurorrhaphy. The long-term effect of this treatment however remains to be clarified.

  11. Bolus-dependent dosimetric effect of positioning errors for tangential scalp radiotherapy with helical tomotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lobb, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The dosimetric effect of errors in patient position is studied on-phantom as a function of simulated bolus thickness to assess the need for bolus utilization in scalp radiotherapy with tomotherapy. A treatment plan is generated on a cylindrical phantom, mimicking a radiotherapy technique for the scalp utilizing primarily tangential beamlets. A planning target volume with embedded scalplike clinical target volumes (CTVs) is planned to a uniform dose of 200cGy. Translational errors in phantom position are introduced in 1-mm increments and dose is recomputed from the original sinogram. For each error the maximum dose, minimum dose, clinical target dose homogeneity index (HI), and dose-volume histogram (DVH) are presented for simulated bolus thicknesses from 0 to 10mm. Baseline HI values for all bolus thicknesses were in the 5.5 to 7.0 range, increasing to a maximum of 18.0 to 30.5 for the largest positioning errors when 0 to 2mm of bolus is used. Utilizing 5mm of bolus resulted in a maximum HI value of 9.5 for the largest positioning errors. Using 0 to 2mm of bolus resulted in minimum and maximum dose values of 85% to 94% and 118% to 125% of the prescription dose, respectively. When using 5mm of bolus these values were 98.5% and 109.5%. DVHs showed minimal changes in CTV dose coverage when using 5mm of bolus, even for the largest positioning errors. CTV dose homogeneity becomes increasingly sensitive to errors in patient position as bolus thickness decreases when treating the scalp with primarily tangential beamlets. Performing a radial expansion of the scalp CTV into 5mm of bolus material minimizes dosimetric sensitivity to errors in patient position as large as 5mm and is therefore recommended.

  12. Bolus-dependent dosimetric effect of positioning errors for tangential scalp radiotherapy with helical tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lobb, Eric

    2014-04-01

    The dosimetric effect of errors in patient position is studied on-phantom as a function of simulated bolus thickness to assess the need for bolus utilization in scalp radiotherapy with tomotherapy. A treatment plan is generated on a cylindrical phantom, mimicking a radiotherapy technique for the scalp utilizing primarily tangential beamlets. A planning target volume with embedded scalplike clinical target volumes (CTVs) is planned to a uniform dose of 200 cGy. Translational errors in phantom position are introduced in 1-mm increments and dose is recomputed from the original sinogram. For each error the maximum dose, minimum dose, clinical target dose homogeneity index (HI), and dose-volume histogram (DVH) are presented for simulated bolus thicknesses from 0 to 10 mm. Baseline HI values for all bolus thicknesses were in the 5.5 to 7.0 range, increasing to a maximum of 18.0 to 30.5 for the largest positioning errors when 0 to 2 mm of bolus is used. Utilizing 5 mm of bolus resulted in a maximum HI value of 9.5 for the largest positioning errors. Using 0 to 2 mm of bolus resulted in minimum and maximum dose values of 85% to 94% and 118% to 125% of the prescription dose, respectively. When using 5 mm of bolus these values were 98.5% and 109.5%. DVHs showed minimal changes in CTV dose coverage when using 5 mm of bolus, even for the largest positioning errors. CTV dose homogeneity becomes increasingly sensitive to errors in patient position as bolus thickness decreases when treating the scalp with primarily tangential beamlets. Performing a radial expansion of the scalp CTV into 5 mm of bolus material minimizes dosimetric sensitivity to errors in patient position as large as 5 mm and is therefore recommended.

  13. SU-E-T-09: A Dosimetric Analysis of Various Clinically Used Bolus Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Stowe, M; Yeager, C; Zhou, F; Hand, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric effect of various clinically used bolus materials. Methods: Materials investigated include solid water, superflab, wet gauze, wet sheets, Play-Doh{sup ™}, and gauze embedded with petroleum jelly. Each bolusing material was scanned in a Philips CT to determine the Hounsfield unit (HU) and to verify uniformity throughout the material. Using the corresponding HU, boluses of 0.5 cm and 1.0 cm thicknesses were created in the Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) on a solid water phantom. Dose was calculated at various depths for beam energies 6 MV, 6 MeV, 9 MeV, and 12 MeV to determine the effects of each material on deposition of dose. In addition, linac-based measurements at these energies were made using a farmer chamber in solid water. Wet sheets and wet gauze were measured with various water content to quantify the effects on dose. Results: Preliminary CT scans find a range in HU of bolus materials from −120 to almost 300. There is a trend in the dose at depth based on the HU of the material; however inconsistencies are found when the bolus materials have a negative HU value. The measured data indicates that there is a linear relationship between the mass of water in a material and the dose reading, the slope of which is material dependent. Conclusion: Due to the variation in HU of the bolus materials studied, it is recommended that any new bolus be evaluated before clinical use to determine physical and dosimetric properties. If possible, patients should have bolus included in their CT scans; or if the bolus is created in the TPS, the HU should correspond to the material used. For water-soaked materials, once the bolus material is selected (gauze or sheet), the bolusing effect is only dependent on the amount of water applied to the material.

  14. Disseminated nocardiosis in a patient on infliximab and methylprednisolone for treatment-resistant Sweet's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Drone, Elizabeth R; McCrory, Allison L; Lane, Natalie; Fiala, Katherine

    2014-07-01

    A 62-year-old white man with a 10-year history of treatment-refractory Sweet's syndrome was admitted to the hospital with the onset of purpuric lesions. Methylprednisolone and infliximab were administered. Our patient developed disseminated Nocardia infection and eventually succumbed. Opportunistic infections such as Nocardia have been associated with infliximab and other tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitors. The astute clinician should be aware of the risk of rare opportunistic infections, particularly in patients on TNF-α inhibitors and systemic corticosteroids.

  15. The Comparison of Patient-Controlled Remifentanil Administered by Two Different Protocols (Bolus and Bolus+Infusion) and Intramuscular Meperidine for Labor Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Güneş, Süleyman; Türktan, Mediha; Güleç, Ümran Küçükgöz; Hatipoğlu, Zehra; Ünlügenç, Hakkı; Işık, Geylan

    2014-01-01

    Objective Nowadays, there are many pain relief methods for reducing the pain and stress of labor and delivery. In our study, two different remifentanil protocols (bolus and bolus+infusion) administered by patient-controlled analgesia method were compared with intramuscular meperidine for labor analgesia. Methods Ninety parturients who were scheduled for vaginal delivery were included in this study. Patients were randomly divided into 3 groups, with 15 primiparous and 15 multiparous patients in each group. Whenever a patient requested analgesics during the labor, Group M was given 1 mg kg−1 intramuscular meperidine, Group B was given intravenous bolus patient-controlled remifentanil, and Group IB was given intravenous bolus+infusion patient-controlled remifentanil. Patients’ systolic and diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, pain-comfort and sedation scores, remifentanil consumption, side effects, and Apgar scores of the newborns were evaluated during the labor and delivery. Results Patients’ mean pain and comfort scores were significantly lower in Groups B and IB than in Group M at all time intervals except the first minute. Compared with Group IB, mean pain and comfort scores at 15, 30, 60, and 120 minutes were significantly higher in Group B. The mean sedation scores were similar among the groups. Total remifentanil consumption was lower in Group IB than in Group B, but it was not statistically significant. Conclusion Patient-controlled intravenous bolus or bolus+infusion remifentanil provided more effective analgesia and patient comfort than intramuscular meperidine for labor analgesia. Especially during labor, bolus+infusion remifentanil administration provided better pain and patient comfort scores than bolus alone, without increasing remifentanil consumption. PMID:27366433

  16. A comparison of the effects of methylprednisolone and tenoxicam on pain, edema, and trismus after impacted lower third molar extraction

    PubMed Central

    Ilhan, Ozgur; Agacayak, Kamil Serkan; Gulsun, Belgin; Koparal, Mahmut; Gunes, Nedim

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of preemptive intravenous tenoxicam and methylprednisolone administrations on extraction of impacted third molars. Material/Methods This was a placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind, clinical trial. A total of 60 adult patients ages 18–40 years with the complaints of impacted third molar teeth were included in the study. Results The postoperative swelling ratios (p<0.05) and pain scores (p<0.05) were significantly better in both study groups than in the control group and there was no statistically significant difference between methylprednisolone and tenoxicam groups with regards to the edema and pain relief. Conclusions Preoperative administration of 80 mg methylprednisolone achieves better control of trismus than tenoxicam without any significant differences in edema and pain control in impacted third molar teeth extraction. PMID:24473372

  17. Laterality of bolus passage through the pharynx in patients with unilateral medullary infarction.

    PubMed

    Mikushi, Shinya; Kagaya, Hitoshi; Baba, Mikoto; Tohara, Haruka; Saitoh, Eiichi

    2014-02-01

    Laterality of bolus passage in the pharynx is often seen in patients with medullary infarction. We evaluated the dominant side of bolus passage in the pharynx and investigated the factors that cause the passage to dominantly occur on the affected side. Forty-one patients (35 men and 6 women, 64 ± 9 years) with unilateral medullary infarction participated in this study. Bolus passage of 4 mL of thick liquid was evaluated in 3 regions (oropharyngeal, thyropharyngeal, and cricopharyngeal) and classified into 4 patterns (dominantly on the unaffected side [UAS], on both sides without clear laterality [BS], dominantly on the affected side [AS], and nonpassage of the bolus [NP]) by videofluoroscopic examination of swallowing. The bolus passages were as follows: UAS, BS, and AS occurred in 2, 32, and 7 patients in the oropharyngeal region; UAS, BS, and AS occurred in 5, 20, and 16 patients in the thyropharyngeal region; and UAS, BS, AS, and NP occurred in 11, 9, 10, and 11 patients in the cricopharyngeal region, respectively. In the thyropharyngeal region, the proportion of patients in whom the swallowing reflex occurred when the bolus was in the oropharynx and the proportion of patients with unilateral pharyngeal constrictor paralysis were greater in patients whose bolus passage was AS than in patients whose passage was BS. This suggests that the bolus predominantly passed through the affected side of the thyropharyngeal portion because of the asymmetry of pharyngeal contraction during swallowing in the early period after onset.

  18. Modélisation du bolus urétéral humain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gintz, Daniel; Elmabsout, Badaoui; Renaudeaux, Jean-Pierre

    We propose an improvement of the bolus passive viscoelastic wall model [1], by adding an active muscular layer situated on the internal side of the wall. This new model permits, for a suitable choice of the active force, to obtain analytically a closed bolus on its two ends and to get a close approach of the medical observations.

  19. Correlation of esophageal pressure-flow analysis findings with bolus transit patterns on videofluoroscopy.

    PubMed

    Omari, T I; Szczesniak, M M; Maclean, J; Myers, J C; Rommel, N; Cock, C; Cook, I J

    2016-01-01

    Pressure-flow analysis quantifies the interactions between bolus transport and pressure generation. We undertook a pilot study to assess the interrelationships between pressure-flow metrics and fluoroscopically determined bolus clearance and bolus transport across the esophagogastric junction (EGJ). We hypothesized that findings of abnormal pressure-flow metrics would correlate with impaired bolus clearance and reduced flow across the EGJ. Videofluoroscopic images, impedance, and pressure were recorded simultaneously in nine patients with dysphagia (62-82 years, seven male) tested with liquid barium boluses. A 3.6 mm diameter solid-state catheter with 25 × 1 cm pressure/12 × 2 cm impedance was utilized. Swallowed bolus clearance was assessed using a validated 7-point radiological bolus transport scale. The cumulative period of bolus flow across the EGJ was also fluoroscopically measured (EGJ flow time). Pressure only parameters included the length of breaks in the 20 mmHg iso-contour and the 4 second integrated EGJ relaxation pressure (IRP4s). Pressure-flow metrics were calculated for the distal esophagus, these were: time from nadir impedance to peak pressure (TNadImp to PeakP) to quantify bolus flow timing; pressure flow index (PFI) to integrate bolus pressurization and flow timing; and impedance ratio (IR) to assess bolus clearance. When compared with controls, patients had longer peristaltic breaks, higher IRs, and higher residual EGJ relaxation pressures (break length of 8 [2, 13] vs. 2 [0, 2] cm, P = 0.027; IR 0.5 ± 0.1 vs. 0.3 ± 0.0, P = 0.019; IRP4s 11 ± 2 vs. 6 ± 1 mmHg, P = 0.070). There was a significant positive correlation between higher bolus transport scores and longer peristaltic breaks (Spearman correlation r = 0.895, P < 0.001) and with higher IRs (r = 0.661, P < 0.05). Diminished EGJ flow times correlated with a shorter TNadImp to PeakP (r = -0.733, P < 0.05) and a higher IR (r = -0.750, P < 0.05). Longer peristaltic breaks and higher IR

  20. Efficacy of intraruminal albendazole boluses against Dicrocoelium dendriticum in sheep.

    PubMed

    Corba, J; Krupicer, I

    1992-01-01

    The anthelmintic potential of albendazole (ABZ) in intraruminal boluses (Proftril-Captec) was investigated in sheep harbouring naturally acquired Dicrocoelium infection. The anthelmintic efficacy was assessed by coprological testing during the autumn pasture and comparison of worm counts in 22 necropsied animals (11 treated and 11 untreated) at the end of the experiment. The mean faecal egg count (EPG) in treated animals dropped significantly during week 2, and between the 4th and the 12th week the faecal samples were almost negative. The health status of treated animals improved significantly during the first 2 weeks. Helminthological dissection of livers and small intestines revealed 91.8% efficacy, but a small number of live adult flukes were found in all treated animals.

  1. Radiation dosimetry for bolus administration of oxygen-15-water

    SciTech Connect

    Brihaye, C.; Depresseux, J.C.; Comar, D.

    1995-04-01

    The authors describe the development of a biokinetic model which permits an estimation of organ activities and the dosimetry of a bolus of {sup 15}O-water. The aim of this study was to estimate time-activity functions and deduce the cumulated activities in different organs so that the radiation absorbed dose values can be estimated. The model used includes the right heart chambers, lungs, left heart chambers, brain, liver, kidneys, muscles, gasrointestinal tract and the remainder of the body. Activity in an organ will decay by physical decay with the decay constant, {gamma}, and can diffuse in the organ. An exception is the heart, where blood is ejected from the heart chambers. Depending on the location of the organ in relation to the blood sampling point, organ activities can be calculated by convolution or deconvolution. The radiation absorbed dose values were estimated and an effective dose equivalent H{sub E} of 1.16 {mu}Sv/MBq (4.32 mrem/mCi) as well as an effective dose E of 1.15 {mu}Sv/MBq (4.25 mrem/mCi) were calculated. The cumulated activities in select organs measured by PET gave good agreement with the values calculated by this model. The values of effective dose equivalent and effective dose for bolus administration of {sup 15}O-water calculated from the absorbed doses estimated by the proposed kinetic model are almost three times higher than those previously published. A total of 8700 MBq (235 mCi) of {sup 15}O-water can be administered if an effective dose of 10 mSv (1 rem) is accepted. 32 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Utility of Operative Glaucoma Tube Shunt Viscoelastic Bolus Flush

    PubMed Central

    Groth, Sylvia L; Greider, Kelsi L

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To assess the utility of viscoelastic injection to induce bleb expansion and decrease intraocular pressure (IOP) in eyes with encapsulated glaucoma tube shunt blebs. Design: Case series. Subjects and participants: Forty-three glaucomatous eyes, including 13 eyes with congenital, 13 uveitic, 5 neovascular, 5 open angle, 4 narrow angle and 3 traumatic glaucomas. Methods, interventions or testing: All patients underwent viscoelastic flush procedure. A pre-bent 27 or 30-gauge cannula was passed through a 25-gauge paracentesis, advanced over the iris across the anterior chamber, and insinuated into the tube shunt lumen. Once the cannula was firmly lodged in position, 0.45 to 0.85 ml of viscoelastic was injected to hyperinflate the bleb. Main outcome measures: Paired t-tests were performed comparing preoperative IOP and number of medications used preoperatively vs levels measured at 1, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months. Results: Intraocular pressure was reduced from a mean preoperative level of 26.0 ± 1.2 (sem) mm Hg to 15.8 ± 1.0 at 1 month, remaining stable thereafter at each 6-month interval with 15.1 ± 1.1 mm Hg at 24 months (p < 0.0001). Medication use did not vary significantly from baseline. Pressure remained < 21 mm Hg after 2 years in 85% of eyes cannulated within 1 year of primary tube shunt implantation (n = 23), and in 62% of eyes cannulated more than 1 year after tube shunt placement (n = 20). Conclusion: Tube shunt expansion with bolus viscoelastic flush successfully restored encapsulated bleb function, providing a substantial (~10 mm Hg) IOP decrease into the mid-normal pressure range. This persisted in the majority of treated eyes for the entire study period. How to cite this article: Groth SL, Greider KL, Sponsel WE. Utility of Operative Glaucoma Tube Shunt Viscoelastic Bolus Flush. J Curr Glaucoma Pract 2015;9(3):73-76. PMID:26997840

  3. A double-blind clinical trial of mitoxantrone versus methylprednisolone in relapsing, secondary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    van de Wyngaert, F A; Beguin, C; D'Hooghe, M B; Dooms, G; Lissoir, F; Carton, H; Sindic, C J

    2001-12-01

    A double-blind clinical trial of mitoxantrone versus methylprednisolone was performed in 49 patients with relapsing, secondary multiple sclerosis. Patients were randomized to receive 13 infusions of mitoxantrone 12 mg/m2 (n = 28), or 13 infusions of 1 g of methylprednisolone (n = 21), over 32 months. Twenty-four patients completed the trial. There were no statistical differences between the two groups of patients at study entry. A significant improvement in the Expanded Disability Scale Score (EDSS) was observed in the mitoxantrone group after one year of treatment (p < 0.0022). The total number of relapses, the mean number of relapses/patient/year, and the total number of gadolinium-enhanced lesions on bi-annual MRI scans were significantly decreased in the mitoxantrone group throughout the study period. Nausea, vomiting, and alopecia were more frequent in the mitoxantrone-treated patients. Mitoxantrone has a role in the treatment of MS patients with frequent exacerbations and rapid disease progression.

  4. Modeling the retention of rumen boluses for the electronic identification of goats.

    PubMed

    Carné, S; Caja, G; Ghirardi, J J; Salama, A A K

    2011-02-01

    We constructed a regression model to estimate the retention of electronic boluses in goats. With this aim, 2,482 boluses were administered to goats from dairy (Murciano-Granadina, n=1,326; French Alpine, n=381) and meat (Blanca de Rasquera, n=532) breeds. A total of 19 bolus types made of materials (ceramic, plastic tubes filled with concrete or silicone, and ballasts) differing in their specific gravity (SG) were used, thereby obtaining a wide variation in bolus features: diameter (9 to 22 mm), length (37 to 84 mm), weight (5 to 111 g), volume (2.6 to 26 mL), and SG (1.0 to 5.5). Each bolus contained a half-duplex glass encapsulated transponder (32 × 3.8mm) and was administered using adapted balling guns. Murciano-Granadina and Blanca de Rasquera goats also wore 2 visual plastic ear tags: V1 (double flag, 5.1g) and V2 (flag-button, 4.2g). No data on ear tags in French Alpine goats was available. Bolus and ear tag retention [(retained/monitored) × 100] was recorded for at least 1 yr. Dynamic reading efficiency [(dynamic reading/static reading) × 100] was also evaluated from 1,496 bolus readings. No administration incidences or apparent negative behavior or performance effects were observed for any bolus type. Static reading efficiency of retained boluses was 100%, except for the prototypes with metal ballasts, which yielded a 93.3% reading efficiency. Retention of metal-ballasted boluses was confirmed using x-ray equipment. Excluding ballasted boluses, a 99.5% dynamic reading efficiency was obtained. Ear tag losses were 6.5% for V1 and 3.7% for V2, ranging from 3.2 to 7.8% depending on ear tag type and goat breed. Bolus retention varied (0 to 100%) according to their physical features. Obtained data allowed the fitting of a logistic model of bolus retention rate according to bolus volume and weight (R(2) = 0.98); the SG was implicitly considered. Estimated weight and SG to produce medium- (15 mL) and standard-sized (22 mL) boluses for 99.95% retention rate in

  5. Esophageal solid bolus transit: studies using combined multichannel intraluminal impedance and manometry in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Chen, C L; Yi, C H; Chou, A S B; Liu, T T

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to apply combined multichannel intraluminal impedance and esophageal manometry (MII-EM) to test esophageal function during solid swallowing in a normal healthy population. We determined whether combined MII-EM with solid bolus is more sensitive than that with viscous bolus in the detection of motility abnormality. Eighteen healthy volunteers (11 men and 7 women; mean age 22 years, range 20-26 years) underwent combined MII-EM with a catheter containing four impedance-measuring segments and five solid-state pressure transducers. Each subject received 10 viscous and 10 solid materials. Tracings were analyzed manually for bolus presence time, total bolus transit time, contraction amplitude, duration, and onset velocity. Three hundred and sixty swallows including viscous and solid materials were analyzed. Contraction amplitude for the viscous swallows was higher at 20 cm above the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) (P= 0.049) but lower at 15 cm above the LES (P < 0.001). Duration of contractions for the solid swallows was longer at 15 cm (P= 0.002) and 10 cm above the LES (P= 0.011) compared with viscous swallows. The total bolus transit time for solid was significantly shorter than that for viscous boluses (6.8 vs. 7.7 seconds, P < 0.001). Bolus presence time appeared to be similar between viscous and solid boluses (except in the proximal esophagus). The percentage of swallows with ineffective peristalsis by manometry, as well as those with incomplete bolus transit by impedance, did not differ between viscous and solid swallows. The proportion of manometrically ineffective solid swallows with incomplete bolus transit was greater than that of viscous swallows (62.1% vs. 34.8%, P= 0.05). Application of solid boluses may potentially enhance diagnostic capability of esophageal function testing. Solid boluses can be regarded as a valuable complement to viscous boluses in the detection of esophageal motility abnormalities when applied with

  6. In vitro evaluation of the impact of ultrasound scanner settings and contrast bolus volume on time-intensity curves.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Thomas P; Chebil, Mohamed; Peronneau, Pierre; Lassau, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess in vitro the impact of ultrasound scanner settings and contrast bolus volume on time-intensity curves formed from dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound image loops. An indicator-dilution experiment was developed with an in vitro flow phantom setup used with SonoVue contrast agent (Bracco SpA, Milan, Italy). Imaging was performed with a Philips iU22 scanner and two transducers (L9-3 linear and C5-1 curvilinear). The following ultrasound scanner settings were investigated, along with contrast bolus volume: contrast-specific nonlinear pulse sequence, gain, mechanical index, focal zone depth, acoustic pulse center frequency and bandwidth. Four parameters (rise time, mean transit time, peak intensity, and area under the curve) were derived from time-intensity curves which were obtained after pixel by pixel linearization of log-compressed data (also referred to as video data) included in a region of interest. Rise time was found to be the parameter least impacted by changes to ultrasound scanner settings and contrast bolus volume; the associated coefficient of variation varied between 0.7% and 6.9% while it varied between 0.8% and 19%, 12% and 71%, and 9.2% and 66%, for mean transit time, peak intensity, and area under the curve, respectively. The present study assessed the impact of ultrasound scanner settings and contrast bolus volume on time-intensity curve analysis. One should be aware of these issues to standardize their technique in each specific organ of interest and to achieve accurate, sensitive, and reproducible data using dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound. One way to mitigate the impact of ultrasound scanner settings in longitudinal, multi-center quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound studies may be to prohibit any adjustments to those settings throughout a given study. Further clinical studies are warranted to confirm the reproducibility and diagnostic or prognostic value of time-intensity curve

  7. Methylprednisolone Oral

    MedlinePlus

    ... any unusual weight gain.If your sputum (the matter you cough up during an asthma attack) thickens or changes color from clear white to yellow, green, or gray, call your doctor; these changes may be signs ...

  8. Bolus matters: the influence of food oral breakdown on dynamic texture perception.

    PubMed

    Devezeaux de Lavergne, Marine; van de Velde, Fred; Stieger, Markus

    2017-02-22

    This review article focuses on design of food structure, characterisation of oral processing by boli characterisation and dynamic texture perception. Knowledge of the food properties governing bolus formation and bolus properties determining temporal changes in texture perception is of major importance. Such knowledge allows academia to better understand the mechanisms underlying texture perception and food industry to improve product texture. For instance, such knowledge can be used for developing foods with desired texture perception that fit in a healthy diet or that are customized to specific consumer groups. The end point of oral processing is the formation of a safe-to-swallow bolus. The transitions of solid and soft solid foods into bolus are accompanied by tremendous modifications of food properties. The review discusses dynamic changes in bolus properties resulting in dynamic changes of texture perception during oral processing. Studies monitoring chewing behaviour are discussed to complement the relationships between bolus properties and dynamic texture perception. We conclude that texture perception evolves over mastication time and depends on food properties, such as mechanical properties, mainly in the beginning of oral processing. Towards the middle and end of oral processing, bolus properties depend on food properties and explain texture perception better than food properties.

  9. Simulation studies of the role of esophageal mucosa in bolus transport.

    PubMed

    Kou, Wenjun; Pandolfino, John E; Kahrilas, Peter J; Patankar, Neelesh A

    2017-01-03

    Based on a fully coupled computational model for esophageal transport, we analyzed the role of the mucosa (including the submucosa) in esophageal bolus transport and how bolus transport is affected by mucosal stiffness. Two groups of studies were conducted using a computational model. In the first group, a base case that represents normal esophageal transport and two hypothetical cases were simulated: (1) esophageal mucosa replaced by muscle and (2) esophagus without mucosa. For the base case, the geometric configuration of the esophageal wall was examined and the mechanical role of mucosa was analyzed. For the hypothetical cases, the pressure field and transport features were examined. In the second group of studies, cases with mucosa of varying stiffness were simulated. Overall transport characteristics were examined, and both pressure and geometry were analyzed. Results show that a compliant mucosa helped accommodate the incoming bolus and lubricate the moving bolus. Bolus transport was marginally achieved without mucosa or with mucosa replaced by muscle. A stiff mucosa greatly impaired bolus transport due to the lowered esophageal distensibility and increased luminal pressure. We conclude that mucosa is essential for normal esophageal transport function. Mechanically stiffened mucosa reduces the distensibility of the esophagus by obstructing luminal opening and bolus transport. Mucosal stiffening may be relevant in diseases characterized by reduced esophageal distensibility, elevated intrabolus pressure, and/or hypertensive muscle contraction such as eosinophilic esophagitis and jackhammer esophagus.

  10. Numerical simulation of interaction between organs and food bolus during swallowing and aspiration.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Takahiro; Michiwaki, Yukihiro; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Kamiya, Tetsu; Toyama, Yoshio

    2017-01-01

    The mechanism of swallowing is still not fully understood, because the process of swallowing is a rapid and complex interaction among several involved organs and the food bolus. In this work, with the aim of studying swallowing and aspiration processes noninvasively and systematically, a computer simulation method for analyzing the involved organs and water (considered as the food bolus) is proposed. The shape and motion of the organs involved in swallowing are modeled in the same way as in our previous study, by using the Hamiltonian moving particle simulation (MPS) method and forced displacements on the basis of motion in a healthy volunteer. The bolus flow is simulated using the explicit MPS method for fluid analysis. The interaction between the organs and the bolus is analyzed using a fluid-structure coupling scheme. To validate the proposed method, the behavior of the simulated bolus flow is compared qualitatively and quantitatively with corresponding medical images. In addition to the healthy motion model, disorder motion models are constructed for reproducing the aspiration phenomenon by computer simulation. The behaviors of the organs and the bolus considered as the food bolus in the healthy and disorder motion models are compared for evaluating the mechanism of aspiration.

  11. Fungal DNA detected in blood samples of patients who received contaminated methylprednisolone injections reveals increased complexity of causative agents.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanan; Armeanu, Emilian; DiVerniero, Richard; Lewis, Terri A; Dobson, Richard C; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P; Roilides, Emmanuel; Walsh, Thomas J; Perlin, David S

    2014-06-01

    Using Exserohilum rostratum-specific and panfungal real-time PCR, we studied 24 blood samples and 2 synovial fluid specimens from 20 patients with persistent or worsening pain following injections of contaminated methylprednisolone. Seven blood specimens from 6 patients were significantly positive for fungal DNA by panfungal PCR, with multiple fungal species identified.

  12. Prevalence of Eosinophilic Esophagitis and Lymphocytic Esophagitis in Adults with Esophageal Food Bolus Impaction

    PubMed Central

    Truskaite, Kotryna

    2016-01-01

    Background. The relation of esophageal food bolus impaction (FBI) to eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and lymphocytic esophagitis (LyE) is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of EoE and LyE among adults with FBI. Methods. In this retrospective study we analyzed data from all patients referred for gastroscopy during the past 5 years, because of a present or recent episode of FBI. Results. We found 238 patients with FBI (median age 51 (17–96), 71% males). Endoscopic therapy was required in 143 patients. Esophageal biopsies were obtained in 185 (78%) patients. All biopsies were assessed for numbers of eosinophils and lymphocytes. EoE was found in 18% of patients who underwent biopsy. We found 41 patients (22%) who fulfilled the criteria for both EoE and LyE (EoE/LyE). LyE was found in the 9% of patients with FBI. EoE together with EoE/LyE was the leading cause of FBI in patients ≤50 years (64%). GERD was the leading cause of FBI among patients older than 50 years (42%). Conclusions. Our study showed that EoE was the leading cause of FBI in particular among young adults. Our study highlights the need for esophageal biopsies in any patient with FBI. PMID:27547221

  13. Prevalence of Eosinophilic Esophagitis and Lymphocytic Esophagitis in Adults with Esophageal Food Bolus Impaction.

    PubMed

    Truskaite, Kotryna; Dlugosz, Aldona

    2016-01-01

    Background. The relation of esophageal food bolus impaction (FBI) to eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and lymphocytic esophagitis (LyE) is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of EoE and LyE among adults with FBI. Methods. In this retrospective study we analyzed data from all patients referred for gastroscopy during the past 5 years, because of a present or recent episode of FBI. Results. We found 238 patients with FBI (median age 51 (17-96), 71% males). Endoscopic therapy was required in 143 patients. Esophageal biopsies were obtained in 185 (78%) patients. All biopsies were assessed for numbers of eosinophils and lymphocytes. EoE was found in 18% of patients who underwent biopsy. We found 41 patients (22%) who fulfilled the criteria for both EoE and LyE (EoE/LyE). LyE was found in the 9% of patients with FBI. EoE together with EoE/LyE was the leading cause of FBI in patients ≤50 years (64%). GERD was the leading cause of FBI among patients older than 50 years (42%). Conclusions. Our study showed that EoE was the leading cause of FBI in particular among young adults. Our study highlights the need for esophageal biopsies in any patient with FBI.

  14. Comparison of the efficacy of low doses of methylprednisolone, acetaminophen, and dexketoprofen trometamol on the swelling developed after the removal of impacted third molar

    PubMed Central

    Ataoglu, Hanife; Yildirim, Gulsun; Kiresi, Demet

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of low doses of methylprednisolone, acetaminophen and dexketoprofen trometamol, which are among the drug groups used in our clinic, on postoperative swelling developing after removal of impacted third molar. Material and Methods The three group of patients received either 40 mg methylprednisolone or 300 mg acetaminophen or 12.5 mg dexketoprofen trometamol one hour before the procedure, according to the patient groups. The patients in the methylprednisolone group were injected with methylprednisolone at a dose of 20 mg 24 hour after the procedure and prescribed 300 mg acetaminophen as rescue analgesic. During the postoperative period, the doses that were given before the procedure were continued 3 times a day for 2 days in the acetaminophen and dexketoprofen trometamol groups. Maximal swelling was assessed preoperatively and at the postoperative 48 hours by ultrasound images. Results Swelling was 34% lower in the methylprednisolone than in the other groups; however, no statistically significant difference was found between the groups. The acetaminophen and dexketoprofen trometamol groups exhibited clinical results close to each other. Conclusions Combination of low doses of methylprednisolone and acetaminophen provide a safe and adequate clinical success on swelling. Key words: Methylprednisolone, acetaminophen, dexketoprofen trometamol, third molar extraction, swelling. PMID:26241458

  15. Three-dimensional customized bolus for intensity-modulated radiotherapy in a patient with Kimura's disease involving the auricle.

    PubMed

    Park, J W; Yea, J W

    2016-05-01

    In radiotherapy, a commercial bolus often does not provide a suitable fit over irregular surfaces. To address this issue, we fabricated a customized bolus using 3D printing technology. The aim of our study was to evaluate the application of this 3D-printed bolus in a clinical setting. The patient was a 45-year-old man with recurrent Kimura's disease involving the auricle, receiving radiotherapy in our oncology department. A customized bolus, 5mm in thickness, was fabricated based on reconstruction of computed tomography (CT) images. The bolus was printed on a Dimension 1200 series SST 3D printer. Repeat CT-based simulation indicated an acceptable fit of the 3D-printed bolus to the target region, with a maximum air gap of less than 5mm at the tragus. Most of the surface area of the target region was covered by the 95% isodose line. The plan with the 3D-printed bolus improved target coverage compared to that without a bolus. And the plan with the 3D-printed bolus yielded comparable results to those with the paraffin wax bolus. In conclusion, a customized bolus using a 3D printer was successfully applied to an irregular surface.

  16. Bolus location associated with videofluoroscopic and respirodeglutometric events.

    PubMed

    Perlman, Adrienne L; He, Xuming; Barkmeier, Joseph; Van Leer, Eva

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to determine the relation between specific events observed with simultaneous videofluoroscopy and respirodeglutometry. The order of occurrence was determined for each of 31 events (18 videofluoroscopic, 13 respirodeglutometric). Using 1 video frame (33.3 ms) as the maximum distance allowed between the average times of 2 events in the same cluster, 8 potential clusters were identified, 3 of which were statistically confirmed based on 90% confidence intervals on the mean time distances between events. Confirmed clusters included the time of (a) complete velar descent and the onset of the small noninspiratory flow (SNIF), (b) full separation of the base of the tongue from the pharyngeal wall and SNIF nadir, complete upper esophageal sphincter closure, and SNIF nadir, and (c) onset of epiglottic return and apnea offset. The onset of respiratory flow occurred within 13 ms after the onset of epiglottic return. Additionally, the percentage of swallows during which the bolus head or tail was located at each of 6 locations was determined for 20 of these events (10 videofluoroscopic, 10 respirodeglutometric). The 6 locations of interest included the oral cavity, base of tongue, valleculae, pyriform sinuses, upper esophageal sphincter, and the esophagus. Lastly, of the 72 swallows performed by these healthy, young adults, 65 (90.3%) were preceded by expiration, and all (100%) were followed by expiration.

  17. INDUCED SPUTUM DERIVES FROM THE CENTRAL AIRWAYS: CONFIRMATION USING A RADIOLABELED AEROSOL BOLUS DELIVERY TECHNIQUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Indirect evidence suggests that induced sputum derives from the surfaces of the bronchial airways. To confirm this experimentally, we employed a radiolabeled aerosol bolus delivery technique that preferentially deposits aerosol in the central airways in humans. We hypothesized th...

  18. Ultrasound perfusion analysis combining bolus-tracking and burst-replenishment.

    PubMed

    Jirik, Radovan; Nylund, Kim; Gilja, Odd H; Mezl, Martin; Harabis, Vratislav; Kolar, Radim; Standara, Michal; Taxt, Torfinn

    2013-02-01

    A new signal model and processing method for quantitative ultrasound perfusion analysis is presented, called bolus-and-burst. The method has the potential to provide absolute values of blood flow, blood volume, and mean transit time. Furthermore, it provides an estimate of the local arterial input function which characterizes the arterial tree, allowing accurate estimation of the bolus arrival time. The method combines two approaches to ultrasound perfusion analysis: bolus-tracking and burst-replenishment. A pharmacokinetic model based on the concept of arterial input functions and tissue residue functions is used to model both the bolus and replenishment parts of the recording. The pharmacokinetic model is fitted to the data using blind deconvolution. A preliminary assessment of the new perfusion-analysis method is presented on clinical recordings.

  19. Plasma and Electrolyte Changes in Exercising Humans After Ingestion of Multiple Boluses of Pickle Juice

    PubMed Central

    McKenney, Michael A.; Miller, Kevin C.; Deal, James E.; Garden-Robinson, Julie A.; Rhee, Yeong S.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Twenty-five percent of athletic trainers administer pickle juice (PJ) to treat cramping. Anecdotally, some clinicians provide multiple boluses of PJ during exercise but warn that repeated ingestion of PJ may cause hyperkalemia. To our knowledge, no researchers have examined the effect of ingesting multiple boluses of PJ on the same day or the effect of ingestion during exercise. Objective: To determine the short-term effects of ingesting a single bolus or multiple boluses of PJ on plasma variables and to characterize changes in plasma variables when individuals ingest PJ and resume exercise. Design: Crossover study. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Nine euhydrated men (age = 23 ± 4 years, height = 180.9 ± 5.8 cm, mass = 80.7 ± 13.8 kg, urine specific gravity = 1.009 ± 0.005). Intervention(s): On 3 days, participants rested for 30 minutes, and then a blood sample was collected. Participants ingested 0 or 1 bolus (1 mL·kg−1 body weight) of PJ, donned sweat suits, biked vigorously for 30 minutes (approximate temperature = 37°C, relative humidity = 18%), and had a blood sample collected. They either rested for 60 seconds (0- and 1-bolus conditions) or ingested a second 1 mL·kg−1 body weight bolus of PJ (2-bolus condition). They resumed exercise for another 35 minutes. A third blood sample was collected, and they exited the environmental chamber and rested for 60 minutes (approximate temperature = 21°C, relative humidity = 18%). Blood samples were collected at 30 and 60 minutes postexercise. Main Outcome Measure(s): Plasma sodium concentration, plasma potassium concentration, plasma osmolality, and changes in plasma volume. Results: The number of PJ boluses ingested did not affect plasma sodium concentration, plasma potassium concentration, plasma osmolality, or changes in plasma volume over time. The plasma sodium concentration, plasma potassium concentration, and plasma osmolality did not exceed 144.6 mEq·L−1 (144.6 mmol

  20. Cost comparison of insulin glargine with insulin detemir in a basal-bolus regime with mealtime insulin aspart in type 2 diabetes in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Pscherer, Stefan; Dietrich, Eva Susanne; Dippel, Franz-Werner; Neilson, Aileen Rae

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To compare the treatment costs of insulin glargine (IG; Lantus®) to detemir (ID; Levemir®), both combined with bolus insulin aspart (NovoRapid®) in type 2 diabetes (T2D) in Germany. Methods: Cost comparison was based on data of a 1-year randomised controlled trial [1]. IG was administered once daily and ID once (57% of patients) or twice daily (43%) according to treatment response. At the end of the trial, mean daily basal insulin doses were 0.59 U/kg (IG) and 0.82 U/kg (ID). Aspart doses were 0.32 U/kg (IG) and 0.36 U/kg (ID). Costs were calculated from the German statutory health insurance (SHI) perspective using official 2008 prices. Sensitivity analyses were performed to test robustness of the results. Results: Annual basal and bolus insulin costs per patient were € 1,473 (IG) and € 1,940 (ID). The cost of lancets and blood glucose test strips were € 1,125 (IG) and € 1,286 (ID). Annual costs for needles were € 393 (IG) and € 449 (ID). The total annual cost per patient of administering IG was € 2,991 compared with € 3,675 for ID, translating into a 19% annual cost difference of € 684/patient. Base case results were robust to varying assumptions for insulin dose, insulin price, change in weight and proportion of ID once daily administrations. Conclusion: IG and ID basal-bolus regimes have comparative safety and efficacy, based on the Hollander study, IG however may represent a significantly more cost saving option for T2D patients in Germany requiring basal-bolus insulin analogue therapy with potential annual cost savings of € 684/patient compared to ID. PMID:20725588

  1. Potential of 3D printing technologies for fabrication of electron bolus and proton compensators.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wei; Fisher, Ted; Zhang, Miao; Kim, Leonard; Chen, Ting; Narra, Venkat; Swann, Beth; Singh, Rachana; Siderit, Richard; Yin, Lingshu; Teo, Boon-Keng Kevin; McKenna, Michael; McDonough, James; Ning, Yue J

    2015-05-08

    In electron and proton radiotherapy, applications of patient-specific electron bolus or proton compensators during radiation treatments are often necessary to accommodate patient body surface irregularities, tissue inhomogeneity, and variations in PTV depths to achieve desired dose distributions. Emerging 3D printing technologies provide alternative fabrication methods for these bolus and compensators. This study investigated the potential of utilizing 3D printing technologies for the fabrication of the electron bolus and proton compensators. Two printing technologies, fused deposition modeling (FDM) and selective laser sintering (SLS), and two printing materials, PLA and polyamide, were investigated. Samples were printed and characterized with CT scan and under electron and proton beams. In addition, a software package was developed to convert electron bolus and proton compensator designs to printable Standard Tessellation Language file format. A phantom scalp electron bolus was printed with FDM technology with PLA material. The HU of the printed electron bolus was 106.5 ± 15.2. A prostate patient proton compensator was printed with SLS technology and polyamide material with -70.1 ± 8.1 HU. The profiles of the electron bolus and proton compensator were compared with the original designs. The average over all the CT slices of the largest Euclidean distance between the design and the fabricated bolus on each CT slice was found to be 0.84 ± 0.45 mm and for the compensator to be 0.40 ± 0.42 mm. It is recommended that the properties of specific 3D printed objects are understood before being applied to radiotherapy treatments.

  2. The four phases of esophageal bolus transit defined by high-resolution impedance manometry and fluoroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhiyue; Yim, Brandon; Gawron, Andrew; Imam, Hala; Kahrilas, Peter J; Pandolfino, John E

    2014-08-15

    We aimed to model esophageal bolus transit based on esophageal pressure topography (EPT) landmarks, concurrent intrabolus pressure (IBP), and esophageal diameter as defined with fluoroscopy. Ten healthy subjects were studied with high-resolution impedance manometry and videofluoroscopy. Data from four 5-ml barium swallows (2 upright, 2 supine) in each subject were analyzed. EPT landmarks were utilized to divide bolus transit into four phases: phase I, upper esophageal sphincter (UES) opening; phase II, UES closure to the transition zone (TZ); phase III, TZ to contractile deceleration point (CDP); and phase IV, CDP to completion of bolus emptying. IBP and esophageal diameter were analyzed to define functional differences among phases. IBP exhibited distinct changes during the four phases of bolus transit. Phase I was associated with filling via passive dilatation of the esophagus and IBP reflective of intrathoracic pressure. Phase II was associated with auxotonic relaxation and compartmentalization of the bolus distal to the TZ. During phase III, IBP exhibited a slow increase with loss of volume related to peristalsis (auxotonic contraction) and passive dilatation in the distal esophagus. Phase IV was associated with the highest IBP and exhibited isometric contraction during periods of nonemptying and auxotonic contraction during emptying. IBP may be used as a marker of esophageal wall state during the four phases of esophageal bolus transit. Thus abnormalities in IBP may identify subtypes of esophageal disease attributable to abnormal distensibility or neuromuscular dysfunction.

  3. [Effect of Bolus Volume on Pharyngeal Swallowing Dynamics Evaluated with Small High-Resolution Manometry Catheters].

    PubMed

    Jungheim, Michael; Kallusky, Johanna; Ptok, Martin

    2017-02-01

    The bolus volume has a modulating effect on the swallowing dynamics, but previously reported adaptations of the pharyngeal function have been inconsistent. Therefore, the aim of this study was to comprehensively evaluate changes of pressure and time parameters in the pharynx and upper esophageal sphincter (UES) in relation to the swallowed bolus volume with high-resolution manometry (HRM). To examine the normal swallowing physiology, particularly thin HRM probes were used, which were expected to influence the investigated structures only minimally.10 healthy volunteers accomplished 10 swallows with 2 and 10 ml water respectively in an upright position, while an HRM-examination was performed. Pressure and time parameters of the velopharynx, the tongue base region and the UES were determined and analyzed for statistical differences with respect to the bolus volume.Swallowing larger bolus volumes resulted in both, a longer closure of the velopharynx and in a longer opening of the UES. Volume dependent pressure changes in the pharyngeal swallowing sequence were not detectable.Under the chosen test conditions, bolus volume had an impact on the time parameters of the pharyngeal phase, thus, temporal adaptations of the automated swallowing dynamics were detected. Changes in pharyngeal pressure parameters as shown in other studies cannot be confirmed. They may be due to HRM probes with a larger diameter, which take an effect on the pharyngeal structures themselves. With regard to diagnostic aspects, HRM studies should always be conducted with different bolus volumes in order to investigate the swallowing process completely.

  4. Effects of bolus size and hardness on within-subject variability of chewing cycle kinematics.

    PubMed

    Wintergerst, Ana M; Throckmorton, Gaylord S; Buschang, Peter H

    2008-04-01

    This study analysed how bolus hardness and size affect within-subject variability of chewing cycle kinematics. Two independent prospective studies were performed; both tracked chin movements using an optoelectronic recording system. Computer programs identified each subject's ten most representative cycles, and multilevel modelling procedures were used to estimate variances. One study evaluated 38 subjects who chewed 1, 2, 4 or 8 g of gum presented in random order. The second study evaluated 26 subjects who chewed approximately 2.5 g of harder (670 g) or softer (440 g) gum, also presented in random order. In terms of bolus size, the 2g and 1g boluses produced the least and greatest relative within-subject variability, respectively; the largest differences were found for cycle duration and excursions. Within-subject variability when chewing the harder gum was consistently greater than when chewing the softer gum, except for lateral movement towards the balancing side. Because bolus hardness and bolus size influence within-subject variability differently, they must be taken into consideration when designing experiments to study masticatory kinematics. We conclude that a 2g bolus of soft gum should be used in studies of chewing cycle kinematics in order to reduce within-subject variability and increase statistical power.

  5. Bolus versus continuous infusion of microbubble contrast agent for liver US: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Okada, Masahiro; Hoffmann, Christian W; Wolf, Karl J; Albrecht, Thomas

    2005-12-01

    Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained. To prospectively assess if continuous infusion of galactose-palmitic acid can prolong the duration of hepatic enhancement at ultrasonography over bolus injection, 11 patients received two injections--one bolus injection (2 mL/sec) and one continuous infusion (1.5 mL/min)--with the same dose of galactose-palmitic acid (4 g, 300 mg/dL). Two unenhanced baseline sweep scans (mechanical index of 0.7 and 1.3) of the relevant liver lobe were acquired followed by contrast-enhanced sweeps after bolus injection and continuous infusion. Each sweep was saved as cine loops and analyzed with a personal computer. Duration of enhancement more than 3 dB was prolonged by continuous infusion from 4.3 minutes +/- 2.4 (+/-standard deviation) at bolus injection to 10.1 minutes +/- 3.0 (P < .005). Maximal parenchymal enhancement was 11.0 dB +/- 3.2 (bolus injection) and 9.2 dB +/- 3.8 (infusion, P < .05). Peak liver-to-lesion contrast was 14.2 dB +/- 6.3 (bolus injection) and 13.2 dB +/- 7.1 (infusion, not significant). Continuous infusion of galactose-palmitic acid markedly prolongs but slightly diminishes hepatic enhancement; liver-to-lesion contrast remains unchanged.

  6. Oral and pharyngeal bolus transit in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Cassiani, Rachel Aguiar; Santos, Carla Manfredi; Baddini-Martinez, José; Dantas, Roberto Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with respiratory diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), may have swallowing dysfunction. Objective The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the oral and pharyngeal phases of swallowing in patients with COPD. Methods We studied 16 patients with clinical manifestations and pulmonary function tests diagnosis of COPD (mean age: 68 years) and 15 nonsmoking healthy volunteers (mean age: 65 years) with normal pulmonary function tests. All subjects were submitted to clinical and videofluoroscopic evaluation of swallowing. Each subject performed in duplicate swallows of 5 mL and 10 mL of liquid bolus, paste bolus, and a solid bolus. Results In general, the duration of the events of the pharyngeal phase of swallowing was longer in COPD patients than controls. The difference was significant in the laryngeal vestibular closure, hyoid movement, and pharyngeal transit with swallows of both volumes of liquid bolus; in oral–pharyngeal transit with 5 mL paste bolus; and in pharyngeal and oral–pharyngeal transit with solid bolus. The difference between the duration of maximal laryngeal elevation and the duration of pharyngeal transit was higher in control subjects than in patients with COPD. Conclusion The results suggested that patients with COPD have a longer pharyngeal swallowing phase than normal subjects, which is associated with a decrease in the difference between the duration of maximal laryngeal elevation and the duration of pharyngeal transit. PMID:25784795

  7. Bolus Estimation—Rethinking the Effect of Meal Fat Content

    PubMed Central

    Laxminarayan, Srinivas; Reifman, Jaques; Edwards, Stephanie S.; Wolpert, Howard

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Traditionally, insulin bolus calculations for managing postprandial glucose levels in individuals with type 1 diabetes rely solely on the carbohydrate content of a meal. However, recent studies have reported that other macronutrients in a meal can alter the insulin required for good postprandial control. Specifically, studies have shown that high-fat (HF) meals require more insulin than low-fat (LF) meals with identical carbohydrate content. Our objective was to assess the mechanisms underlying the higher insulin requirement observed in one of these studies. Materials and Methods: We used a combination of previously validated metabolic models to fit data from a study comparing HF and LF dinners with identical carbohydrate content in seven subjects with type 1 diabetes. For each subject and dinner type, we estimated the model parameters representing the time of peak meal-glucose appearance (τm), insulin sensitivity (SI), the net hepatic glucose balance, and the glucose effect at zero insulin in four time windows (dinner, early night, late night, and breakfast) and assessed the differences in model parameters via paired Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Results: During the HF meal, the τm was significantly delayed (mean and standard error [SE]: 102 [14] min vs. 71 [4] min; P = 0.02), and SI was significantly lower (7.25 × 10−4 [1.29 × 10−4] mL/μU/min vs. 8.72 × 10−4 [1.08 × 10−4] mL/μU/min; P = 0.02). Conclusions: In addition to considering the putative delay in gastric emptying associated with HF meals, we suggest that clinicians reviewing patient records consider that the fat content of these meals may alter SI. PMID:26270134

  8. Regulation of Inflammatory Biomarkers by Intravenous Methylprednisolone in Pediatric ARDS Patients: Results from a Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Randomized Pilot Trial

    PubMed Central

    Schwingshackl, Andreas; Kimura, Dai; Rovnaghi, Cynthia R.; Saravia, Jordy S.; Cormier, Stephania A; Teng, Bin; West, Alina N.; Meduri, Umberto G.; Anand, Kanwaljeet J. S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective A double-blind, randomized controlled trial showed that low-dose glucocorticoid therapy in pediatric ARDS patients is feasible and may improve both ventilation and oxygenation indices in these patients. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying potential changes in outcomes remain unclear. Based on these clinical findings, this study was designed to examine the effects of intravenous methylprednisolone on circulating inflammatory biomarkers in pediatric ARDS patients. Design Double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized trial with blood collection on study entry and day 7. Setting Tertiary care children’s hospital. Patients Children (0–18 years) with ARDS undergoing mechanical ventilation. Interventions 35 children were randomized within 72 hours of mechanical ventilation. The glucocorticoid group received methylprednisolone 2 mg/kg loading dose followed by 1 mg/kg/day continuous infusion from days 1–7. Both groups were ventilated following the ARDSnet recommendations. WBC and differential cell counts, plasma cytokines and CRP levels, and coagulation parameters were analyzed on days 0 and 7. Results At study entry, the placebo group had higher IL-15 and basophil levels. On day 7, in comparison to study entry, the placebo group had lower IL-1α, IFN-γ and IL-10 levels. The glucocorticoid group had lower INF-α, IL-6, IL-10, MCP-1, G-CSF and GM-CSF levels, and higher IL-17α levels on day 7 in comparison to study entry. Total and differential cell counts remained unchanged within the placebo group between days 0 and 7, whereas in the glucocorticoid group total WBC and platelets counts were increased on day 7. Pearson’s correlation studies within the placebo and glucocorticoid groups revealed positive and negative correlations between cytokine levels, cell counts, coagulation parameters and relevant clinical parameters of disease severity identified in our previous study. Multiple regression models identified several cytokines as predictors for

  9. Phase I trial of cremophor EL with bolus doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Millward, M J; Webster, L K; Rischin, D; Stokes, K H; Toner, G C; Bishop, J F; Olver, I N; Linahan, B M; Linsenmeyer, M E; Woodcock, D M

    1998-10-01

    Cremophor EL (cremophor), a component of the paclitaxel formulation, can potentially reverse P-glycoprotein-associated multidrug resistance. A Phase I trial of cremophor as a 6-h infusion every 3 weeks was performed with bolus doxorubicin (50 mg/m2). The cremophor dose was escalated from 1 to 60 ml/m2. A standard paclitaxel premedication was given before cremophor. Using a bioassay, potentially active cremophor levels (> or = 1 microl/ml) were measured in plasma from patients receiving cremophor doses of 30, 45, and 60 ml/m2. A cross-over design was used to assess the influence of cremophor 30 ml/m2 on the pharmacokinetics of doxorubicin and doxorubicinol. The plasma area under the concentration versus time curve (AUC) of doxorubicin increased from 1448 +/- 350 to 1786 +/- 264 ng/ml x h (P = 0.02) in the presence of cremophor, whereas the AUC of doxorubicinol increased from 252 +/- 104 to 486 +/- 107 ng/ml x h (P = 0.02). This pharmacokinetic interaction was associated with significantly increased neutropenia. With reduction of the doxorubicin dose to 35 mg/m2, the cremophor dose was increased to 60 ml/m2. Dose-limiting toxicities occurred in two of six patients after 45 ml/m2 and two of four patients after 60 ml/m2, which included febrile neutropenia and grade III cremophor-related toxicities of rash, pruritus, headache, and hypotension. All patients who received 45 ml/m2 cremophor reached plasma levels > or = 1.5 microl/ml, but at 60 ml/m2, only two of four reached this level, and the calculated plasma clearance of cremophor was significantly faster at this dose. One patient with hepatoma resistant to epirubicin achieved a near-complete response. Cremophor 45 ml/m2 over 6 h with 35 mg/m2 doxorubicin is recommended for further studies. The pharmacokinetic interaction between cremophor and doxorubicin is quantitatively similar to that described in trials of paclitaxel with doxorubicin and suggests that the cremophor in the paclitaxel formulation is responsible.

  10. Effect of the route of administration of methylprednisolone on oedema and trismus in impacted lower third molar surgery.

    PubMed

    Koçer, G; Yuce, E; Tuzuner Oncul, A; Dereci, O; Koskan, O

    2014-05-01

    Due to their anatomical position, the surgical removal of impacted third molars results in oedema, pain, and trismus. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of supraperiosteal injection of methylprednisolone compared with an oral tablet form and intravenous (i.v.) injection in the prevention of postoperative pain and oedema associated with inflammation. This randomized, prospective, and controlled study included 44 patients. The patients were randomly divided into four groups: group 1 (control; no steroids), group 2 (local injection), group 3 (oral tablets), and group 4 (i.v. injection). On days 2 and 7 following surgery, linear oedema was determined using facial landmarks, and maximal mouth opening was measured. Postoperative mouth opening and swelling were evaluated for each route of methylprednisolone administration and compared. The female (59%) to male (41%) ratio was 1.44; the mean age of the patients was 29.6 years. The level of significance was set at P<0.01 for mouth opening and P<0.05 for oedema. With regard to trismus, all three routes of administration demonstrated better efficacy in comparison to the control. While oral administration and i.v. injection of methylprednisolone achieved similar results, masseter injection provided better results in reducing oedema and trismus when compared to the control following lower third molar surgery.

  11. Intravenous salbutamol bolus compared with an aminophylline infusion in children with severe asthma: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, G; Newsom, D; Gomez, K; Raffles, A; Saglani, S; Begent, J; Lachman, P; Sloper, K; Buchdahl, R; Habel, A

    2003-01-01

    Background: The relative efficacies of aminophylline and salbutamol in severe acute childhood asthma are currently unclear. A single bolus of salbutamol was compared with a continuous aminophylline infusion in children with severe asthma in a randomised double blind study. Methods: Children aged 1–16 years with acute severe asthma were enrolled if they showed little improvement with three nebulisers (combined salbutamol and ipratropium) administered over an hour and systemic steroids. Subjects were randomised to receive either a short intravenous bolus of salbutamol (15 µg/kg over 20 minutes) followed by a saline infusion or an aminophylline infusion (5 mg/kg over 20 minutes) followed by 0.9 mg/kg/h. Results: Forty four subjects were enrolled, with 18 randomly allocated to receive salbutamol and 26 to receive aminophylline. The groups were well matched at baseline. An intention to treat analysis showed that there was no statistically significant difference in the asthma severity score (ASS) at 2 hours between the two groups (median (IQR) 6 (6, 8) and 6.5 (5, 8) for salbutamol and aminophylline respectively, p=0.93). A similar improvement in ASS to 2 hours was seen in the two groups (mean difference –0.08, 95% CI –0.97 to 0.80), there was a trend (p=0.07) towards a longer duration of oxygen therapy in the salbutamol group (17.8 hours (95% CI 8.5 to 37.5) v 7.0 hours (95% CI 3.4 to 14.2)), and a significantly (p=0.02) longer length of hospital stay in the salbutamol group (85.4 (95% CI 66.1 to 110.2) hours v 57.3 hours (95% CI 45.6 to 72.0)). There was no significant difference in adverse events between the two groups. Conclusions: This study suggests that, in severe childhood asthma, there is no significant difference in the effectiveness of a bolus of salbutamol and an aminophylline infusion in the first 2 hours of treatment. Overall, the aminophylline infusion was superior as it significantly reduced the length of stay in hospital. PMID:12668792

  12. Bronchoalveolar lavage versus bolus administration of lucinactant, a synthetic surfactant in meconium aspiration in newborn lambs.

    PubMed

    Rey-Santano, C; Alvarez-Diaz, F J; Mielgo, V; Murgia, X; Lafuente, H; Ruiz-Del-Yerro, E; Valls-I-Soler, A; Gastiasoro, E

    2011-10-01

    This study was designed to study effects of lung lavage versus the classical bolus instillation with a peptide-based synthetic surfactant (lucinactant) in a model of Meconium Aspiration Syndrome (MAS). Eighteen newborn lambs received meconium and were randomized to: the experimental meconium installation (eMAS) group-lambs with eMAS kept on conventional mechanical ventilation (control); the SF-Bolus group-eMAS receiving a lucinactant bolus (30 mg/ml); or the D-SF-Lavage group-eMAS treated with dilute lucinactant bronchoalveolar lavage (10 mg/ml). Systemic and pulmonary arterial pressures, blood gases, and pulmonary mechanics were recorded for 180 min. In addition, the intrapulmonary distribution of the lucinactant was determined using dye-labeled microspheres. Following meconium instillation, severe hypoxia, hypercapnia, acidosis, and pulmonary hypertension developed, and dynamic compliance decreased (50% from baseline). After lung lavage with dilute lucinactant, gas exchange significantly improved versus bolus instillation (P < 0.05). Further, only in the lavage group did pulmonary arterial pressure return to basal values and dynamic compliance significantly increased. Both lung lavage and bolus techniques for the administration of lucinactant resulted in a non-uniform lung distribution. In conclusion, in newborn lambs with respiratory failure and pulmonary hypertension induced by meconium, lung lavage with dilute lucinactant seems to be an effective and safe alternative for treatment for MAS.

  13. Flow patterns and heat convection in a rectangular water bolus for use in superficial hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Birkelund, Yngve; Jacobsen, Svein; Arunachalam, Kavitha; Maccarini, Paolo; Stauffer, Paul R

    2009-07-07

    This paper investigates both numerically and experimentally the spatio-temporal effects of water flow in a custom-made water bolus used for superficial hyperthermia generated by a 915-MHz, 4 x 3 microwave applicator array. Similar hyperthermia models referenced in the literature use a constant water temperature and uniform heat flux to describe conduction and convection energy exchange within the heating apparatus available to cool the tissue surface. The results presented in this paper show that the spatially varying flow pattern and rate are vital factors for the overall heat control applicability of the 5 mm thick bolus under study. Regions with low flow rates and low heat convection clearly put restrictions on the maximum microwave energy possible within the limits of skin temperature rise under the bolus. Our analysis is illustrated by experimental flow front studies using a contrast liquid set-up monitored by high definition video and complemented by numerical analysis of liquid flow and heat exchange within the rectangular water bolus loaded by malignant tissue. Important factors for the improvement of future bolus designs are also discussed in terms of diameter and configuration of the water input and output tubing network.

  14. Flow patterns and heat convection in a rectangular water bolus for use in superficial hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Birkelund, Yngve; Jacobsen, Svein; Arunachalam, Kavitha; Maccarini, Paolo; Stauffer, Paul R

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates both numerically and experimentally the spatio-temporal effects of water flow in a custom made water bolus used for superficial hyperthermia generated by a 915-MHz, 4 × 3 microwave applicator array. Similar hyperthermia models referenced in the literature use a constant water temperature and uniform heat flux to describe conduction and convection energy exchange within the heating apparatus available to cool the tissue surface. The results presented in this paper show that the spatially varying flow pattern and rate are vital factors for the overall heat control applicability of the 5 mm thick bolus under study. Regions with low flow rates and low heat convection clearly put restrictions on the maximum microwave energy possible within the limits of skin temperature rise under the bolus. Our analysis is illustrated by experimental flow front studies using a contrast liquid setup monitored by high definition video and complemented by numerical analysis of liquid flow and heat exchange within the rectangular water bolus loaded by malignant tissue. Important factors for improvement of future bolus designs are also discussed in terms of diameter and configuration of the water input and output tubing network. PMID:19494426

  15. Use of glucagon in relieving esophageal food bolus impaction in the era of eosinophilic esophageal infiltration.

    PubMed

    Thimmapuram, Jayaram; Oosterveen, Scott; Grim, Rodney

    2013-06-01

    Esophageal food bolus impaction may require an urgent endoscopy. Glucagon is often administered to promote spontaneous passage of the food bolus. Eosinophilic esophagitis is increasingly recognized as a cause of dysphagia, and food impaction is often the presenting symptom. Our study was aimed at determining the effectiveness of glucagon in relieving esophageal foreign body obstruction in general and in the setting of esophageal eosinophilic infiltration (EEI). A retrospective chart review was performed using the ICD codes and the emergency department database of adult patients presenting with symptoms of esophageal food bolus impaction from July 2004 to October 2010. Response to glucagon was defined as symptomatic relief of obstruction prior to endoscopic intervention. A total of 213 episodes of esophageal food bolus obstruction in 192 patients were identified during the study period. Glucagon was given in 125 cases of which 41 had a response (32.8 %). A total of 170 episodes had an Esophagogastroduodenoscopy performed either during the impaction event or at a later date. Of the 60 patients' biopsies, 45 had received glucagon (17 with EEI, 28 without EEI). None of the 17 episodes with EEI as compared to 8 of the 28 without EEI responded to glucagon (0 % vs. 28.5 %, p = 0.017). Glucagon is effective in about one third of patients with esophageal food bolus impaction, which is consistent with historical data. Patients with EEI appear less likely to respond to glucagon.

  16. Efficacy of acupuncture versus local methylprednisolone acetate injection in De Quervain's tenosynovitis: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hadianfard, Mohammadjavad; Ashraf, Alireza; Fakheri, Maryamsadat; Nasiri, Aref

    2014-06-01

    There is no consensus on the management of De Quervain's tenosynovitis, but local corticosteroid injection is considered the mainstay of treatment. However, some patients are reluctant to take steroid injections. This study was performed to compare the efficacy of acupuncture versus corticosteroid injection for the treatment of this disease. Thirty patients were consequently treated in two groups. The acupuncture group received five acupuncture sessions of 30 minutes duration on classic points of LI-5, LU-7, and LU-9 and on ahshi points. The injection group received one methylprednisolone acetate injection in the first dorsal compartment of the wrist. The degree of disability and pain was evaluated by using the Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (Q-DASH) scale and the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) at baseline and at 2 weeks and 6 weeks after the start of treatment. The baseline means of the Q-DASH and the VAS scores were 62.8 and 6.9, respectively. At the last follow-up, the mean Q-DASH scores were 9.8 versus 6.2 in the acupuncture and injection groups, respectively, and the mean VAS scores were 2 versus 1.2. We demonstrated short-term improvement of pain and function in both groups. Although the success rate was somewhat higher with corticosteroid injection, acupuncture can be considered as an alternative option for treatment of De Quervain's tenosynovitis.

  17. Spinal and paraspinal infections associated with contaminated methylprednisolone acetate injections - Michigan, 2012-2013.

    PubMed

    2013-05-17

    As of May 6, 2013, Michigan had reported 167 (52%) of the 320 paraspinal or spinal infections without meningitis associated with the 2012-2013 fungal meningitis outbreak nationally. Although the index patient had a laboratory-confirmed Aspergillus fumigatus infection, the fungus most often identified, including in unopened vials of methylprednisolone acetate (MPA), remains Exserohilum rostratum, a common black mold found on plants and in soil. Exposures have occurred through epidural, paraspinal, peripheral nerve, and intra-articular injection with MPA from contaminated lots compounded by the New England Compounding Center in Framingham, Massachusetts. The Michigan Department of Community Health and CDC conducted case ascertainment to describe epidemiologic and clinical characteristics of Michigan patients and to determine factors that might have contributed to the high percentage of spinal and paraspinal infections reported from Michigan. A distinct epidemiologic or clinical difference was not observed between patients with paraspinal or spinal infection with and without meningitis. Lengthy periods (range: 12-121 days) were observed from date of last injection with contaminated MPA to date of first magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) finding indicative of infection. Clinicians should continue to maintain a higher index of suspicion for patients who received injections with contaminated MPA but have not developed infection.

  18. Methylprednisolone versus triamcinolone in painful shoulder using ultrasound-guided injection.

    PubMed

    Chávez-López, Mario Alfredo; Navarro-Soltero, Luis Alberto; Rosas-Cabral, Alejandro; Gallaga, Adán; Huerta-Yáñez, Guillermo

    2009-01-01

    There is little evidence about the comparative efficacy of corticosteroids in the treatment of painful shoulder. The main aim was to compare the efficacy of methylprednisolone (MTP) versus triamcinolone (TMC) in the treatment of painful shoulder using an ultrasound-guided injection. Patients with painful shoulder due to subacromial bursitis and partial or full-thickness rotator cuff tears demonstrated by musculoskeletal ultrasound received a guided-injection of MTP acetate 40 mg (12 patients) or TMC acetonide 40 mg (12 patients). Range of motion and pain visual analogue scale were registered at 10 and 30 min, 1 and 2 weeks postinjection. Two weeks postinjection, both groups reported a mean improvement in range of motion (33%) and relief of pain (61%). Relief of pain of 50% or more was observed in 92% of patients in MTP group and 50% of TMC group (p = 0.02). Two months postinjection, 50% of the patients in MTP group and 25% in TMC group reported total relief of pain (p = 0.3). Patients with painful shoulder receiving an ultrasound-guided injection of MTP or TMC have a rapid and sustained overall response. Relief of pain tends to be more rapid with MTP than TMC.

  19. Determination of surface dose and the effect of bolus to surface dose in electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Guenhan, Basri; Kemikler, Goenuel; Koca, Ayse

    2003-09-30

    When treating tumors from surface to a certain depth (< 5 cm), electron beams are preferred in radiotherapy. To increase the surface doses of lower electron beams, tissue-equivalent bolus materials are often used. We observed that the surface doses increased with increasing field sizes and electron energies. At the same time, we also observed that all electron parameters were shifted toward the skin as much as the thickness of the bolus used. The effect of bolus to the surface doses was more significant at low electron energies than at higher electron energies. Rando phantom measurements at 6-, 7.5-, and 9-MeV were slightly lower than the solid phantom measurements, which could only be explained by the inverse square law effect and the Rando phantom contour irregularity.

  20. New approach for quantitative analysis of myocardial perfusion with magnetic resonance first-pass bolus imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswald, Helmut; Schnackenburg, Bernd; Bornstedt, Axel; Gross, Michael; Al-Saadi, Nidal; Nagel, Eicke; Fleck, Eckart

    1999-05-01

    Myocardial perfusion reserve can be noninvasively assessed with cardiovascular magnetic resonance. With magnetic resonance (MR) multislice dynamic imaging techniques it is possible to acquire the complete heart during the first pass of a contrast agent bolus. For diagnostic reasons an important question is to obtain quantitative parameters of the perfusion of the myocardium. We developed a model for the analysis of the contrast agent bolus pass in the myocardium and established a process for the complete task, which will support a routine clinical use delivering these quantitative parameters in a reproducible way. To evaluate the analysis in a collective of patients with single vessel disease and without significant coronary artery disease the signal intensity curves of the first pass of a gadolinium-DTPA bolus injected via a central vein were estimated before and after dipyridamole infusion.

  1. Bolus generation by a river plume in coastal Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huguenard, K.; Bogucki, D.; Ozgokmen, T. M.; Haus, B. K.; Reniers, A.; MacMahan, J.; Hargrove, J.; Laxague, N.; Ortiz-Suslow, D. G.

    2014-12-01

    On December 13, 2013, satellite imagery revealed a packet of internal waves propagating along the coast and was assumed to be connected to the Choctowachee Bay plume in the northern Gulf of Mexico. In situ profiles of current velocity, density and TKE dissipation were obtained to investigate the plume during the Surfzone Coastal Ocean Pathways Experiment. On December 17th, elevated river discharge, spring tidal velocities and weak winds (< 2.5 m/s) created a freshwater plume that propagated as a buoyant gravity front approximately 6.7 km west of Destin Pass inlet. Results revealed a subcritical gravity front that was dominated in the along-shore direction by Coriolis, pressure gradient, and friction forces. An unsteady trapped core (referred herein as a bolus) was observed ahead (westward) of the gravity front head. The bolus was identified by a bulge of westward near-surface flow that transported less-dense plume water in a turbulent trapped core. As the bolus propagated away from the gravity front head, momentum was reduced through turbulent mixing of the less dense fluid in the core with the ambient water at the trailing edge of the bulge. Eventually, the bolus arrested near the along-shore extent of residual stratification from a previous tidal plume. Bolus formation likely occurred when the gravity front decelerated below the first mode internal wave speed. This research posits that during wave fission, an internal wave radiated away from the gravity front head, transporting less dense plume water with it. The disturbance initially propagated as a surging front until it was arrested. We postulate that the bolus may eventually evolve into internal waves, similar to those observed in the SAR image, but only under the condition that ambient waters are stratified. These results expose an important coastal transport mechanism, particularly in context of an oil spill inside a bay.

  2. Chewing behaviour and bolus formation during mastication of meat with different textures.

    PubMed

    Mioche, Laurence; Bourdiol, Pierre; Monier, Sandra

    2003-03-01

    During chewing, meat is mashed under compression and shear bite forces whilst saliva is incorporated. The resulting mixture is shaped into a cohesive bolus by agglomeration of small particles, and triggers a swallow. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between chewing behaviour and bolus formation of meat with different textures. Twenty-five consenting young adults participated in this study. Electromyographic activity was recorded from surface electrodes on the elevator muscles (masseter and temporalis) during mastication of cold beef. Two different textures (T(1): tough and dry; T(2): tender and juicy) were studied, and subjects were asked to chew the beef and then spit out the bolus either: (1) after a constant chewing period of 7s or (2) when the bolus was ready to be swallowed. Meat samples were weighed before and after chewing to determine weight changes due to saliva incorporation and the release of meat juice. Cutting tests were applied to measure the maximum shear force. The mechanical shear force was maximal for meat before chewing (T(1)=124 N/cm(2); T(2)=83 N/cm(2)) and decreased with increased chewing duration. Texture differences analysed from mechanical measurements remained significant even when the boli were ready for swallowing (T(1)=39 N/cm(2); T(2)=32 N/cm(2)); the toughest meat gave the toughest bolus. Muscular activity adapted to the texture of the meat as soon as chewing began, and remained constant over the observed chewing period. Mean muscular activity was higher during the chewing of tough meat than during the chewing of tender meat. As a consequence, by the time a bolus was ready to be swallowed, more saliva had been incorporated into the tough meat samples (mean weight increase: 36%) than the tender meat samples (mean weight increase: 30%).

  3. Viscera and muscle protein synthesis in neonatal pigs is increased more by intermittent bolus than by continuous feeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Continuous and intermittent bolus orogastric feedings are strategies used in infants unable to tolerate normal feeds. To determine the effects of feeding modality on protein synthesis in different tissues, neonatal pigs received a balanced formula by orogastric tube as an intermittent bolus feed eve...

  4. Effect of bolus hardness on the chewing pattern and activation of masticatory muscles in subjects with normal dental occlusion.

    PubMed

    Piancino, Maria Grazia; Bracco, Pietro; Vallelonga, Teresa; Merlo, Andrea; Farina, Dario

    2008-12-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of bolus hardness on the kinematic of mastication and jaw-elevator muscle activity in subjects with normal dental occlusion and function. The mandibular motion and the surface EMG envelope of the masseter and temporalis anterior muscles were assessed in twelve subjects during mastication of a soft and hard bolus of the same size. When chewing the hard bolus, the chewing pattern in the frontal plane was significantly higher and wider, with smaller closure angle and higher peak velocity than when chewing the soft bolus. EMG peak amplitude of both the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles was higher for the side of the bolus but the contralateral side increased its activity significantly more than the ipsilateral side when the hardness of the bolus increased (for the masseter, mean+/-SD: 130.4+/-108.1% increase for the contralateral side and 29.6+/-26.9% for the ipsilateral side). Moreover, the peak EMG activity for both muscles occurred more distant from the closure point with hard bolus. The increased activity of the contralateral side may help maintaining the mandibular equilibrium, with indirect participation to the power stroke generated by the chewing-side masseter. The results provide kinematic and EMG adaptations to bolus hardness in healthy subjects and can be used as normative data in the development of methods for early diagnosis of impaired chewing function.

  5. Efficacy of methylprednisolone and lignocaine on propofol injection pain: A randomised, double-blind, prospective study in adult cardiac surgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Shivanna, Shivaprakash; Priye, Shio; Singh, Dipali; Jagannath, Sathyanarayan; Mudassar, Syed; Reddy, Durga Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Propofol (2, 6-di-isopropylphenol) used for the induction of anaesthesia often causes mild to severe pain or discomfort on injection. We designed this double-blind study to compare the efficacy of methylprednisolone and lignocaine in reducing the pain of propofol injection in patients scheduled for cardiac surgery. Methods: A total of 165 adult patients, scheduled for elective cardiac surgery, were divided into three groups: saline (group S, n = 55), lignocaine 20 mg (Group L, n = 55) and methylprednisolone 125 mg diluted into 2 ml of distilled water (Group MP, n = 55). Drugs were administered after tourniquet application and occlusion was released after 1 min and 1/4th of the total dose of propofol (2 mg/kg) was administered at the rate of 0.5 ml/s. Pain on propofol injection was evaluated by four-point verbal rating scale. Statistical methods used included Student's t-test and Chi-square test/Fisher's exact test. Results: The overall incidence of pain was 70.9% in the saline group, 30.9% in the lignocaine group and 36.4% in the methylprednisolone group. The intensity of pain was significantly less in patients receiving methylprednisolone and lignocaine than those receiving saline (P < 0.012). Conclusion: Pre-treatment with intravenous methylprednisolone was found to be as effective as lignocaine in reducing propofol injection-induced pain. PMID:27942060

  6. Dynamic modeling of methylprednisolone effects on body weight and glucose regulation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jing; DuBois, Debra C.; He, Yang; Almon, Richard R.

    2012-01-01

    Influences of methylprednisolone (MPL) and food consumption on body weight (BW), and the effects of MPL on glycemic control including food consumption and the dynamic interactions among glucose, insulin, and free fatty acids (FFA) were evaluated in normal male Wistar rats. Six groups of animals received either saline or MPL via subcutaneous infusions at the rate of 0.03, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3 and 0.4 mg/kg/h for different treatment periods. BW and food consumption were measured twice a week. Plasma concentrations of MPL and corticosterone (CST) were determined at animal sacrifice. Plasma glucose, insulin, and FFA were measured at various times after infusion. Plasma MPL concentrations were simulated by a two-compartment model and used as the driving force in the pharmacodynamic (PD) analysis. All data were modeled using ADAPT 5. The MPL treatments caused reduction of food consumption and body weights in all dosing groups. The steroid also caused changes in plasma glucose, insulin, and FFA concentrations. Hyper-insulinemia was achieved rapidly at the first sampling time of 6 h; significant elevations of FFA were observed in all drug treatment groups; whereas only modest increases in plasma glucose were observed in the low dosing groups (0.03 and 0.1 mg/kg/h). Body weight changes were modeled by dual actions of MPL: inhibition of food consumption and stimulation of weight loss, with food consumption accounting for the input of energy for body weight. Dynamic models of glucose and insulin feedback interactions were extended to capture the major metabolic effects of FFA: stimulation of insulin secretion and inhibition of insulin-stimulated glucose utilization. These models of body weight and glucose regulation adequately captured the experimental data and reflect significant physiological interactions among glucose, insulin, and FFA. These mechanism-based PD models provide further insights into the multi-factor control of this essential metabolic system. PMID:21394487

  7. Preliminary laboratory report of fungal infections associated with contaminated methylprednisolone injections.

    PubMed

    Lockhart, Shawn R; Pham, Cau D; Gade, Lalitha; Iqbal, Naureen; Scheel, Christina M; Cleveland, Angela A; Whitney, Anne M; Noble-Wang, Judith; Chiller, Tom M; Park, Benjamin J; Litvintseva, Anastasia P; Brandt, Mary E

    2013-08-01

    In September 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) initiated an outbreak investigation of fungal infections linked to injection of contaminated methylprednisolone acetate (MPA). Between 2 October 2012 and 14 February 2013, the CDC laboratory received 799 fungal isolates or human specimens, including cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), synovial fluid, and abscess tissue, from 469 case patients in 19 states. A novel broad-range PCR assay and DNA sequencing were used to evaluate these specimens. Although Aspergillus fumigatus was recovered from the index case, Exserohilum rostratum was the primary pathogen in this outbreak and was also confirmed from unopened MPA vials. Exserohilum rostratum was detected or confirmed in 191 specimens or isolates from 150 case patients, primarily from Michigan (n=67 patients), Tennessee (n=26), Virginia (n=20), and Indiana (n=16). Positive specimens from Michigan were primarily abscess tissues, while positive specimens from Tennessee, Virginia, and Indiana were primarily CSF. E. rostratum antifungal susceptibility MIC50 and MIC90 values were determined for voriconazole (1 and 2 μg/ml, respectively), itraconazole (0.5 and 1 μg/ml), posaconazole (0.5 and 1 μg/ml), isavuconazole (4 and 4 μg/ml), and amphotericin B (0.25 and 0.5 μg/ml). Thirteen other mold species were identified among case patients, and four other fungal genera were isolated from the implicated MPA vials. The clinical significance of these other fungal species remains under investigation. The laboratory response provided significant support to case confirmation, enabled linkage between clinical isolates and injected vials of MPA, and described significant features of the fungal agents involved in this large multistate outbreak.

  8. Double-Blind Controlled Randomized Trial of Cyclophosphamide versus Methylprednisolone in Secondary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Brochet, Bruno; Deloire, Mathilde S. A.; Perez, Paul; Loock, Timothé; Baschet, Louise; Debouverie, Marc; Pittion, Sophie; Ouallet, Jean-Christophe; Clavelou, Pierre; de Sèze, Jérôme; Collongues, Nicolas; Vermersch, Patrick; Zéphir, Hélène; Castelnovo, Giovanni; Labauge, Pierre; Lebrun, Christine; Cohen, Mikael; Ruet, Aurélie

    2017-01-01

    Background Therapeutic options are limited in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS). Open-label studies suggested efficacy of monthly IV cyclophosphamide (CPM) without induction for delaying progression but no randomized trial was conducted so far. Objective To compare CPM to methylprednisolone (MP) in SPMS. Methods Randomized, double-blind clinical trial on two parallel groups. Patient with SPMS, with a documented worsening of the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score during the last year and an EDSS score between 4·0 and 6·5 were recruited and received one intravenous infusion of treatment (CPM: 750 mg /m2 body surface area—MP: 1g) every four weeks for one year, and every eight weeks for the second year. The primary endpoint was the time to EDSS deterioration, when confirmed sixteen weeks later, analyzed using a Cox model. Results Due to recruitment difficulties, the study was terminated prematurely after 138 patients were included (CPM, n = 72; MP, n = 66). In the CPM group, 33 patients stopped treatment prematurely, mainly due to tolerability, compared with 22 in the MP group. Primary endpoint: the hazard ratio for EDSS deterioration in the CPM in comparison with the MP group was 0.61 [95% CI: 0·31–1·22](p = 0·16). According to the secondary multistate model analysis, patients in the CPM group were 2.2 times more likely ([1·14–4.29]; p = 0.02) to discontinue treatment than those in the MP group and 2.7 times less likely (HR = 0.37, 95% CI: 0.17–0.84; p = 0.02) to experience disability progression when they did not stop treatment prematurely. Safety profile was as expected. Conclusion Although the primary end-point was negative, secondary analysis suggested that CPM decreases the risk of progression in SPMS, but its use may be limited by low tolerability. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00241254 PMID:28045953

  9. Preliminary Laboratory Report of Fungal Infections Associated with Contaminated Methylprednisolone Injections

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Cau D.; Gade, Lalitha; Iqbal, Naureen; Scheel, Christina M.; Cleveland, Angela A.; Whitney, Anne M.; Noble-Wang, Judith; Chiller, Tom M.; Park, Benjamin J.; Litvintseva, Anastasia P.; Brandt, Mary E.

    2013-01-01

    In September 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) initiated an outbreak investigation of fungal infections linked to injection of contaminated methylprednisolone acetate (MPA). Between 2 October 2012 and 14 February 2013, the CDC laboratory received 799 fungal isolates or human specimens, including cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), synovial fluid, and abscess tissue, from 469 case patients in 19 states. A novel broad-range PCR assay and DNA sequencing were used to evaluate these specimens. Although Aspergillus fumigatus was recovered from the index case, Exserohilum rostratum was the primary pathogen in this outbreak and was also confirmed from unopened MPA vials. Exserohilum rostratum was detected or confirmed in 191 specimens or isolates from 150 case patients, primarily from Michigan (n = 67 patients), Tennessee (n = 26), Virginia (n = 20), and Indiana (n = 16). Positive specimens from Michigan were primarily abscess tissues, while positive specimens from Tennessee, Virginia, and Indiana were primarily CSF. E. rostratum antifungal susceptibility MIC50 and MIC90 values were determined for voriconazole (1 and 2 μg/ml, respectively), itraconazole (0.5 and 1 μg/ml), posaconazole (0.5 and 1 μg/ml), isavuconazole (4 and 4 μg/ml), and amphotericin B (0.25 and 0.5 μg/ml). Thirteen other mold species were identified among case patients, and four other fungal genera were isolated from the implicated MPA vials. The clinical significance of these other fungal species remains under investigation. The laboratory response provided significant support to case confirmation, enabled linkage between clinical isolates and injected vials of MPA, and described significant features of the fungal agents involved in this large multistate outbreak. PMID:23761142

  10. Opioid blockade effect on insulin beta-cells secretory patterns in polycystic ovary syndrome. Oral glucose load versus intravenous glucagon bolus.

    PubMed

    Ciampelli, M; Fulghesu, A M; Guido, M; Murgia, F; Muzj, G; Belosi, C; Fortini, A; Cento, R; Lanzone, A

    1998-01-01

    In order to evaluate the involvement of endogenous opiates in the insulin disorders of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOs) a total of 25 PCOs women and 11 normo-ovulatory controls were studied by comparing the effect of a chronic opioid blockade on beta-cells responsiveness to oral glucose load and to intravenous glucagon bolus. Each patient, studied on follicular phase, underwent to oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), and, 2 days later, to a glucagon intravenous bolus (1 mg); these tests were then repeated after 6 weeks of naltrexone treatment (50 mg orally). Naltrexone treatment did not modify the insulin secretory patterns of control subjects, whereas the same therapy significantly reduced, in hyperinsulinemic PCOs women, the beta-cell hyperresponsiveness both to oral glucose load and to intravenous glucagon (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively), even if with different mean percent decrease (32% OGTT vs. 45% glucagon, p < 0.05). Moreover, normoinsulinemic PCOs patients showed a slight, but not significantly increase in the beta-cells response to OGTT after opioid blockade, whereas, in the same situation, the insulin release after glucagon bolus was significantly reduced (p < 0.01). Chronic opioid blockade did not modify gonadotropins, steroids and SHBG levels in either group. Our data show that naltrexone treatment is able to reduce the beta-cell response to a direct intravenous secretagogue stimulus in all PCOs patients, while only in hyperinsulinemic PCOs subjects the same treatment is effective in reducing the exaggerated insulin secretion after oral glucose load. The reason for such a discrepancy could be ascribed to a different effect of opioids on first- and second-phase insulin secretion, or, alternatively, to an involvement of other secretagogue factors, such as glucoincretins.

  11. Ozone absorption into excised porcine and sheep tracheae by a bolus-response method

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Jebria, A.; Hu, S.C.; Kitzmiller, E.L.; Ultman, J.S. )

    1991-12-01

    The absorption of ozone (O3) into excised porcine and sheep tracheae was characterized by a bolus-response experiment in which a bolus with a peak O3 concentration of 1 ppm was rapidly injected into a steadily flowing airstream entering the trachea. Using a fast-responding chemiluminescent analyzer of the authors design, the O3 concentration curves at the proximal end (i.e., the bolus input) and at the distal end (i.e., the response) of the trachea were monitored. Each concentration curve was numerically integrated, and the fraction of O3 absorbed in the trachea was obtained by subtracting from unity the ratio of the response integral to the bolus input integral. Average values of ozone-absorbed fraction decreased from about 0.50 to 0.15 at increasing airflows from 50 to 200 ml/sec. A diffusion theory that includes the effects of bulk convection, axial dispersion, and first-order absorption was developed to relate the fractional absorption to an overall mass transfer coefficient (K). The results indicate that K is independent of airflow, suggesting that the diffusion resistance in mucus is much greater than that in the gas phase. The time-weighted integrals of the concentration curves were also computed, allowing the mean residence time of O3 in the trachea (delta tau) to be determined. As predicted by the diffusion theory, delta tau was inversely related to the rate of O3 absorption.

  12. Aerosol bolus dispersion in acinar airways--influence of gravity and airway asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Ma, Baoshun; Darquenne, Chantal

    2012-08-01

    The aerosol bolus technique can be used to estimate the degree of convective mixing in the lung; however, contributions of different lung compartments to measured dispersion cannot be differentiated unambiguously. To estimate dispersion in the distal lung, we studied the effect of gravity and airway asymmetry on the dispersion of 1 μm-diameter particle boluses in three-dimensional computational models of the lung periphery, ranging from a single alveolar sac to four-generation (g4) structures of bifurcating airways that deformed homogeneously during breathing. Boluses were introduced at the beginning of a 2-s inhalation, immediately followed by a 3-s exhalation. Dispersion was estimated by the half-width of the exhaled bolus. Dispersion was significantly affected by the spatial orientation of the models in normal gravity and was less in zero gravity than in normal gravity. Dispersion was strongly correlated with model volume in both normal and zero gravity. Predicted pulmonary dispersion based on a symmetric g4 acinar model was 391 ml and 238 ml under normal and zero gravity, respectively. These results accounted for a significant amount of dispersion measured experimentally. In zero gravity, predicted dispersion in a highly asymmetric model accounted for ∼20% of that obtained in a symmetric model with comparable volume and number of alveolated branches, whereas normal gravity dispersions were comparable in both models. These results suggest that gravitational sedimentation and not geometrical asymmetry is the dominant factor in aerosol dispersion in the lung periphery.

  13. Intermittent bolus feeding increases visceral tissue protein synthesis more than continuous feeding in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Orogastric tube feeding, using either continuous or intermittent bolus delivery, is commonly used in infants unable to feed orally. To compare the impact of different feeding strategies on visceral tissue protein synthesis, neonatal pigs (5–7 day old) received a balanced formula orally either by int...

  14. Effects of ketamine-xylazine intravenous bolus injection on cardiovascular function in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, Christine; Bollerhey, Melanie; Ebner, Johanna; Laacke-Singer, Lién; Schuster, Tibor; Erhardt, Wolf

    2010-01-01

    The direct effects of ketamine-xylazine (KET-XYL) on vascular function have not been investigated in rabbits. The short-term cardiovascular effects of intravenous (IV) KET-XYL bolus injection, therefore, should be investigated using vascular ultrasonography. In this prospective experimental study, KET-XYL anesthesia was induced IV in 9 female New Zealand White rabbits before 3 defined test bolus injections of KET-XYL were given IV. Before and for 10 min after each KET-XYL injection vascular and hemodynamic variables were recorded at the left common carotid artery (ACC) after the 1st injection, and at the abdominal aorta (AA) after the 2nd injection. Echocardiography was performed after the 3rd injection to investigate changes in cardiac parameters. Ketamine-xylazine IV caused a significant increase in vessel diameter at the ACC and AA. Average volumetric flow significantly decreased at the ACC and pulsatility index significantly decreased at the AA. Fractional shortening (FS) and heart rate significantly decreased, while mean arterial blood pressure initially increased. Bolus injections of KET-XYL IV produced a transient vasodilatation at the ACC and AA. Despite central vasodilatation, bradycardia, and decrease of FS and average volumetric flow (VFave), mean arterial blood pressure did not significantly decrease indicating well-preserved cardiovascular compensatory mechanism after the ratio and doses of KET-XYL IV bolus injections used in this study. PMID:20885844

  15. Soft-robotic esophageal swallowing as a clinically-inspired bolus rheometry technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirven, Steven; Allen, Jacqueline; (Peter Xu, Weiliang; Cheng, Leo K.

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the impact of viscosity and peristaltic transport parameters on manometric pressure signatures, a reproducible swallowing process is required. Due to inter- and intra-subject variability from swallow to swallow, the human body does not represent an optimal mechanism for such an investigation. A smooth and continuous swallowing soft-robot has been developed to produce biomimetic swallowing trajectories, and is proposed to operate as a bench-top bolus rheometric investigation method. The method compares conventional viscometry and pressure signature findings from robotic swallowing experiments. The robotic aspect of experimentation involved 450 biomimetic swallows (10 repetitions of 45 unique experiments). The method examined swallowing transport in three dimensions: bolus formulation, peristaltic wavelength, and peristaltic velocity, each of which are known to contribute to safe and effective swallowing in vivo. It is found that the pressure gradients and magnitudes are commensurate with clinical reports on biological swallowing, on the order of 100 mmHg peak, however, the relationship between viscosity and pressure signatures is less clear. Bolus transport cannot be predicted as a function of bolus viscosity alone. Traditional viscometric data at 50 s-1, as used in clinical practice, may not be a strong indicator of swallow effort, safety, or efficacy in vivo.

  16. Lung Volume during Swallowing: Single Bolus Swallows in Healthy Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hegland, Karen M. Wheeler; Huber, Jessica E.; Pitts, Teresa; Sapienza, Christine M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the relationship between swallowing and lung volume initiation in healthy adults during single swallows of boluses differing in volume and consistency. Differences in lung volume according to respiratory phase surrounding the swallow were also assessed. Method: Nine men and 11 women between the ages of 19 and 28 years…

  17. Skeletal muscle protein synthesis in neonatal pigs is increased more by intermittent bolus than continuous feeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Feeding by orogastric tube, using either continuous or intermittent bolus delivery, is common for infants for whom normal feeding is contraindicated. To determine the impact of different feeding modalities on muscle protein anabolism, neonatal pigs (5-7 day old) received a balanced enteral formula e...

  18. Surface dose measurements from air gaps under a bolus by using a MOSFET dosimeter in clinical oblique photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Jin-Beom; Kim, Jae-Sung; Kim, In-Ah; Lee, Jeong-Woo

    2012-10-01

    This study is intended to investigate the effects of surface dose from air gaps under the bolus in clinically used oblique photon beams by using a Markus parallel-plate chamber and a metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeter. To evaluate the performances of the two detectors, the percentage surface doses of the MOSFET dosimeters in without an air gap under the bolus material were measured and compared with those of the Markus parallel-plate chamber. MOSFET dosimeters at the surface provided results mostly in good agreement with the parallelplate chamber. The MOSFET dosimeters seemed suitable for surface dose measurements having excellent accuracy for clinical used photon beams. The relative surface doses were measured with air gaps (2, 5, 10 mm) and without an air gap under 3 different bolus setups: (1) unbolused (no bolus), (2) 5-mm bolus, and (3) 10-mm bolus. The reductions in the surface dose substantially increased with small field size, thick bolus, and large air gap. The absolute difference in the reductions of the surface dose between the MOSFET dosimeter and the Markus parallel-plate chamber was less than 1.1%. Results at oblique angles of incidence showed larger reductions in surface dose with increasing angle of incidence. The largest reduction in surface dose was recorded for a 6 × 6 cm2 field at a 60° angle of incidence with an 10-mm air gap under a 10-mm bolus. When a 10-mm bolus was used, a reduction in the surface dose with an air gap of up to 10.5% could be achieved by varying the field size and the incident angle. Therefore, air gaps under the bolus should be avoided in radiotherapy treatment, especially for photon beam with highly oblique angles of incidence.

  19. A double-blind randomised controlled study comparing subacromial injection of tenoxicam or methylprednisolone in patients with subacromial impingement.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, S; Kwong, H T; Upadhyay, P K; Parsons, N; Drew, S J; Griffin, D

    2010-01-01

    We have carried out a prospective double-blind randomised controlled trial to compare the efficacy of a single subacromial injection of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, tenoxicam, with a single injection of methylprednisolone in patients with subacromial impingement. A total of 58 patients were randomly allocated into two groups. Group A received 40 mg of methylprednisolone and group B 20 mg of tenoxicam as a subacromial injection along with lignocaine. The Constant-Murley shoulder score was used as the primary outcome measure and the Disability of Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) and the Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS) as secondary measures. Six weeks after injection the improvement in the Constant-Murley score was significantly greater in the methylprednisolone group (p = 0.003) than in the tenoxicam group. The improvement in the DASH score was greater in the steroid group and the difference was statistically significant and consistent two (p < 0.01), four (p < 0.01) and six weeks (p < 0.020) after the injection. The improvement in the OSS was consistently greater in the steroid group than in the tenoxicam group. Although the difference was statistically significant at two (p < 0.001) and four (p = 0.003) weeks after the injection, it was not at six weeks (p = 0.055). Subacromial injection of tenoxicam does not offer an equivalent outcome to subacromial injection of corticosteroid at six weeks. Corticosteroid is significantly better than tenoxicam for improving shoulder function in tendonitis of the rotator cuff after six weeks.

  20. Equitoxicity of bolus and infusional etoposide: results of a multicenter randomised trial of the German High-Grade Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma Study Group (DSHNHL) in elderly patients with refractory or relapsing aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma using the CEMP regimen (cisplatinum, etoposide, mitoxantrone and prednisone).

    PubMed

    Zwick, Carsten; Birkmann, Josef; Peter, Norma; Bodenstein, Heinrich; Fuchs, Roland; Hänel, Mathias; Reiser, Marcel; Hensel, Manfred; Clemens, Michael; Zeynalova, Samira; Ziepert, Marita; Pfreundschuh, Michael

    2008-09-01

    To compare toxicity of etoposide bolus with continuous infusion and to assess the efficacy of the CEMP (cisplatinum, etoposide, mitoxantrone, prednisone) regimen, 47 patients with refractory or relapsed aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma older than 60 years (n=43) or not qualifying for high-dose chemotherapy (n=4) received five four-weekly CEMP cycles. Patients were randomised to start with bolus or continuous-infusion etoposide and then received bolus and infusional etoposide in an alternating fashion. The primary objective was the comparison of differences in the course of leukocytopenia and thrombocytopenia between the two application schedules. CEMP was well tolerated with little organ and moderate haematotoxicity. There was no difference in toxicity between bolus and continuous-infusion etoposide. Complete remission rate was 44% in patients relapsing >or=1 year, 27% in patients relapsing within the first year after achieving complete remission and 5% in primary refractory patients. Median event-free and overall survivals for all patients were 3 and 10 months, respectively. The observed equitoxicity and the more challenging logistics of a 60-h infusion make bolus injection the preferred application of etoposide. As the CEMP regimen is well tolerated and efficacious in elderly patients with relapsed or refractory aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma for whom more aggressive therapies are not feasible, a three-weekly modification of CEMP should be tested in combination with rituximab.

  1. The effect of ozone exposure on the dispersion of inhaled aerosol boluses in healthy human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, M.J.; Bennett, W.D.; DeWitt, P.; Seal, E.; Strong, A.A.; Gerrity, T.R. )

    1991-07-01

    Acute exposure of humans to low levels of ozone are known to cause decreases in FVC and increases in SRaw. These alterations in lung function do not, however, elucidate the potential for acute small airway responses. In this study we employed a test of aerosol dispersion to examine the potential effects of ozone on small airways in humans. Twenty-two healthy nonsmoking male volunteers were exposed to 0.4 ppm ozone for 1 h while exercising at 20 L/min/m2 body surface area. Before and immediately after exposure, tests of spirometry (FVC, FEV1, and FEF25-75) and plethysmography (Raw and SRaw) were performed. Subjects also performed an aerosol dispersion test before and after exposure. Each test involved a subject inhaling five to seven breaths of a 300-ml bolus of a 0.5 micron triphenyl phosphate aerosol injected into a 2-L tidal volume. The bolus was injected into the tidal breath at three different depths: at Depth A the bolus was injected after 1.6 L of clean air were inhaled from FRC, at Depth B after 1.2 L, and at Depth C after 1.2 L but with inhalation beginning from RV. The primary measure of bolus dispersion was the expired half-width (HW). Secondary measures were the ratio (expressed as percent) of peak exhaled aerosol concentration to peak inhaled concentration (PR), shift in the median bolus volume between inspiration and expiration (VS), and percent of total aerosol recovered (RC). Changes in pulmonary function after ozone exposure were consistent with previous findings.

  2. Real-time myocardial contrast echocardiography in rat: infusion versus bolus administration.

    PubMed

    Su, Hai-Li; Qian, Yun-Qiu; Wei, Zhang-Rui; He, Jian-Guo; Li, Guo-Quan; Zhang, Jun; Zhou, Xiao-Dong; Jing, Wang

    2009-05-01

    To compare the feasibility of real-time myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) in rats with infusion and bolus administration of a second-generation ultrasound contrast agent BR1. B-mode real-time MCE was performed in 12 Sprague Dawley rats following the BR1 infusion or bolus injection. The myocardium signal intensity (SI) was plotted against time and was fitted to exponential functions. The plateau SI (A) and rate of SI increase (beta) for the infusion study and peak signal intensity (PSI) for the bolus study were obtained. (99m)Tc-Sestamibi and Evans blue were used to assess myocardial blood perfusion and to calculate the myocardium perfusion defect area ex vivo. High-quality real-time MCE images were successfully obtained using each method. At baseline, all LV segments showed even contrast distribution. Following left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) ligation, significant perfusion defect was observed in LAD beds with a significantly decreased A* beta and PSI values compared with LCx beds (Infusion: A*beta (LAD): 5.42 +/- 1.57 dB, A*beta (LCx): 46.52 +/- 5.32 dB, p < 0.05; Bolus: PSI (LAD): 2.11 +/- 0.67 dB, PSI (LCx): 20.68 +/- 0.72 dB, p < 0.05), which was consistent with (99m)Tc-Sestamibi distribution findings. Myocardial perfusion defect areas, assessed by both methods, showed no differences and showed good correlation with Evans blue staining. ED frames were more favorable for imaging analysis. Both infusion and bolus administration of the contrast agent combined with real-time MCE technique can provide a reliable and noninvasive approach for myocardial perfusion assessment in rats and the infusion method was more suitable for quantitative analysis of myocardial blood flow.

  3. Intra-articular methylprednisolone acetate injection at the knee joint and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis: a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Habib, George; Jabbour, Adel; Artul, Suheil; Hakim, Geries

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of intra-articular corticosteroid injection (IACI) of methylprednisolone acetate (MPA) on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis of the knee who failed to respond to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications and physical therapy were randomized between group 1 and group 2. Group 1 patients had an IACI of 80 mg of MPA at the knee joint and group 2 patients had an intra-articular injection (IAI) of 6 ml (60 mg) of sodium hyaluronate (control group). Immediately prior to the IAI and on weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, and 8 following IAI, patients from both groups underwent a low-dose (1 μg) adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH) stimulation test. Demographic, clinical, laboratory, and radiologic variables were documented in all patients. Both criteria of <7 μg/dl increase in the serum cortisol level and absolute levels of <18 μg/dl 30 min following the ACTH stimulation test were used to define secondary adrenal insufficiency (SAI). Twenty patients were randomized in each group. In group 1, 25 % of patients had SAI vs. none in group 2 (p = 0.0471). The earliest SAI was observed at week 2, and latest SAI was observed at week 4. SAI was observed at one time point, two consecutive time points, or two separate time points in the same patient. There was no correlation between SAI and any of the demographic, clinical, or laboratory variables. An IACI of 80 mg MPA at the knee joint induced a transient SAI in 25 % of the patients, an effect that was observed between week 2 and week 4 following the IACI.

  4. Pre-pharyngeal Swallow Effects of Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Lesion on Bolus Shape and Airway Protection in an Infant Pig Model.

    PubMed

    Gould, Francois D H; Yglesias, B; Ohlemacher, J; German, R Z

    2016-11-21

    Recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) damage in infants leads to increased dysphagia and aspiration pneumonia. Recent work has shown that intraoral transport and swallow kinematics change following RLN lesion, suggesting potential changes in bolus formation prior to the swallow. In this study, we used geometric morphometrics to understand the effect of bolus shape on penetration and aspiration in infants with and without RLN lesion. We hypothesized (1) that geometric bolus properties are related to airway protection outcomes and (2) that in infants with RLN lesion, the relationship between geometric bolus properties and dysphagia is changed. In five infant pigs, dysphagia in 188 swallows was assessed using the Infant Mammalian Penetration-Aspiration Scale (IMPAS). Using images from high-speed VFSS, bolus shape, bolus area, and tongue outline were quantified digitally. Bolus shape was analyzed using elliptical Fourier analysis, and tongue outline using polynomial curve fitting. Despite large inter-individual differences, significant within individual effects of bolus shape and bolus area on airway protection exist. The relationship between penetration-aspiration score and both bolus area and shape changed post lesion. Tongue shape differed between pre- and post-lesion swallows, and between swallows with different IMPAS scores. Bolus shape and area affect airway protection outcomes. RLN lesion changes that relationship, indicating that proper bolus formation and control by the tongue require intact laryngeal sensation. The impact of RLN lesion on dysphagia is pervasive.

  5. Methylprednisolone for the Treatment of Patients with Acute Spinal Cord Injuries: A Propensity Score-Matched Cohort Study from a Canadian Multi-Center Spinal Cord Injury Registry

    PubMed Central

    Evaniew, Nathan; Noonan, Vanessa K.; Fallah, Nader; Kwon, Brian K.; Rivers, Carly S.; Ahn, Henry; Bailey, Christopher S.; Christie, Sean D.; Fourney, Daryl R.; Hurlbert, R. John; Linassi, A.G.; Fehlings, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In prior analyses of the effectiveness of methylprednisolone for the treatment of patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injuries (TSCIs), the prognostic importance of patients' neurological levels of injury and their baseline severity of impairment has not been considered. Our objective was to determine whether methylprednisolone improved motor recovery among participants in the Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry (RHSCIR). We identified RHSCIR participants who received methylprednisolone according to the Second National Spinal Cord Injury Study (NASCIS-II) protocol and used propensity score matching to account for age, sex, time of neurological exam, varying neurological level of injury, and baseline severity of neurological impairment. We compared changes in total, upper extremity, and lower extremity motor scores using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and performed sensitivity analyses using negative binomial regression. Forty-six patients received methylprednisolone and 1555 received no steroid treatment. There were no significant differences between matched participants for each of total (13.7 vs. 14.1, respectively; p=0.43), upper extremity (7.3 vs. 6.4; p=0.38), and lower extremity (6.5 vs. 7.7; p=0.40) motor recovery. This result was confirmed using a multivariate model and, as predicted, only cervical (C1–T1) rather than thoracolumbar (T2–L3) injury levels (p<0.01) and reduced baseline injury severity (American Spinal Injury Association [ASIA] Impairment Scale grades; p<0.01) were associated with greater motor score recovery. There was no in-hospital mortality in either group; however, the NASCIS-II methylprednisolone group had a significantly higher rate of total complications (61% vs. 36%; p=0.02) NASCIS-II methylprednisolone did not improve motor score recovery in RHSCIR patients with acute TSCIs in either the cervical or thoracic spine when the influence of anatomical level and severity of injury were included in the analysis. There

  6. Mesotherapy versus Systemic Therapy in the Treatment of Acute Low Back Pain: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Costantino, Cosimo; Marangio, Emilio; Coruzzi, Gabriella

    2011-01-01

    Pharmacological therapy of back pain with analgesics and anti-inflammatory drugs is frequently associated with adverse effects, particularly in the elderly. Aim of this study was to compare mesotherapic versus conventional systemic administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and corticosteroids in patients with acute low back pain. Eighty-four patients were randomized to receive anti-inflammatory therapy according to the following protocols: (a) mesotherapy group received the 1st and 4th day 2% lidocaine (1 mL) + ketoprofen 160 mg (1 mL) + methylprednisolone 40 mg (1 mL), then on 7th, 10th, and 13th day, 2% lidocaine (1 mL) + ketoprofen 160 mg (1 mL) + methylprednisolone 20 mg (1 mL) (b) conventional therapy group received ketoprofen 80 mg × 2/die and esomeprazole 20 mg/die orally for 12 days, methylprednisolone 40 mg/die intramuscularly for 4 days, followed by methylprednisolone 20 mg/die for 3 days, and thereafter, methylprednisolone 20 mg/die at alternate days. Pain intensity and functional disability were assessed at baseline (T0), at the end of treatment (T1), and 6 months thereafter (T2) by using visual analogic scale (VAS) and Roland-Morris disability questionnaire (RMDQ). In both groups, VAS and RMDQ values were significantly reduced at the end of drug treatment and after 6 months, in comparison with baseline. No significant differences were found between the two groups. This suggests that mesotherapy may be a valid alternative to conventional therapy in the treatment of acute low back pain with corticosteroids and NSAIDs. PMID:20953425

  7. MO-B-BRD-03: Principles, Pitfalls and Techniques of 3D Printing for Bolus and Compensators

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, J.

    2015-06-15

    This session is designed so that the learning objectives are practical. The intent is that the attendee may take home an understanding of not just the technology, but also the logistical steps necessary to execute these 3D printing techniques in the clinic. Four practical 3D printing topics will be discussed: (i) Creating bolus and compensators for photon machines; (ii) tools for proton therapy; (iii) clinical applications in imaging; (iv) custom phantom design for clinic and research use. The use of 3D printers within the radiation oncology setting is proving to be a useful tool for creating patient specific bolus and compensators with the added benefit of cost savings. Creating the proper protocol is essential to ensuring that the desired effect is achieved and modeled in the treatment planning system. The critical choice of printer material (since it determines the interaction with the radiation) will be discussed. Selection of 3D printer type, design methods, verification of dose calculation, and the printing process will be detailed to give the basis for establishing your own protocol for electron and photon fields. A practical discussion of likely obstacles that may be encountered will be included. The diversity of systems and techniques in proton facilities leads to different facilities having very different requirements for beam modifying hardware and quality assurance devices. Many departments find the need to design and fabricate facility-specific equipment, making 3D printing an attractive technology. 3D printer applications in proton therapy will be discussed, including beam filters and compensators, and the design of proton therapy specific quality assurance tools. Quality control specific to 3D printing in proton therapy will be addressed. Advantages and disadvantages of different printing technology for these applications will also be discussed. 3D printing applications using high-resolution radiology-based imaging data will be presented. This data

  8. Meta-Modeling of Methylprednisolone Effects on Glucose Regulation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jing; Sukumaran, Siddharth; DuBois, Debra C.; Almon, Richard R.; Jusko, William J.

    2013-01-01

    A retrospective meta-modeling analysis was performed to integrate previously reported data of glucocorticoid (GC) effects on glucose regulation following a single intramuscular dose (50 mg/kg), single intravenous doses (10, 50 mg/kg), and intravenous infusions (0.1, 0.2, 0.3 and 0.4 mg/kg/h) of methylprednisolone (MPL) in normal and adrenalectomized (ADX) male Wistar rats. A mechanistic pharmacodynamic (PD) model was developed based on the receptor/gene/protein-mediated GC effects on glucose regulation. Three major target organs (liver, white adipose tissue and skeletal muscle) together with some selected intermediate controlling factors were designated as important regulators involved in the pathogenesis of GC-induced glucose dysregulation. Assessed were dynamic changes of food intake and systemic factors (plasma glucose, insulin, free fatty acids (FFA) and leptin) and tissue-specific biomarkers (cAMP, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) mRNA and enzyme activity, leptin mRNA, interleukin 6 receptor type 1 (IL6R1) mRNA and Insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) mRNA) after acute and chronic dosing with MPL along with the GC receptor (GR) dynamics in each target organ. Upon binding to GR in liver, MPL dosing caused increased glucose production by stimulating hepatic cAMP and PEPCK activity. In adipose tissue, the rise in leptin mRNA and plasma leptin caused reduction of food intake, the exogenous source of glucose input. Down-regulation of IRS-1 mRNA expression in skeletal muscle inhibited the stimulatory effect of insulin on glucose utilization further contributing to hyperglycemia. The nuclear drug-receptor complex served as the driving force for stimulation or inhibition of downstream target gene expression within different tissues. Incorporating information such as receptor dynamics, as well as the gene and protein induction, allowed us to describe the receptor-mediated effects of MPL on glucose regulation in each important tissue. This advanced mechanistic

  9. Effect of bolus volume and viscosity on pharyngeal automated impedance manometry variables derived for broad Dysphagia patients.

    PubMed

    Omari, Taher I; Dejaeger, Eddy; Tack, Jan; Van Beckevoort, Dirk; Rommel, Nathalie

    2013-06-01

    Automated impedance manometry (AIM) analysis measures swallow variables defining bolus timing, pressure, contractile vigour, and bolus presence, which are combined to derive a swallow risk index (SRI) correlating with aspiration. In a heterogeneous cohort of dysphagia patients, we assessed the impact of bolus volume and viscosity on AIM variables. We studied 40 patients (average age = 46 years). Swallowing of boluses was recorded with manometry, impedance, and videofluoroscopy. AIMplot software was used to derive functional variables: peak pressure (PeakP), pressure at nadir impedance (PNadImp), time from nadir impedance to peak pressure (TNadImp-PeakP), the interval of impedance drop in the distal pharynx (flow interval, FI), upper oesophageal sphincter (UES) relaxation interval (UES RI), nadir UES pressure (Nad UESP), UES intrabolus pressure (UES IBP), and UES resistance. The SRI was derived using the formula SRI = (FI * PNadImp)/(PeakP * (TNadImp-PeakP + 1)) * 100. A total of 173 liquid, 44 semisolid, and 33 solid boluses were analysed. The SRI was elevated in relation to aspiration. PeakP increased with volume. SRI was not significantly altered by bolus volume. PNadImp, UES IBP, and UES resistance increased with viscosity. SRI was lower with increased viscosity. In patients with dysphagia, the SRI is elevated in relation to aspiration, reduced by bolus viscosity, and not affected by bolus volume. These data provide evidence that pharyngeal AIM analysis may have clinical utility for assessing deglutitive aspiration risk to liquid boluses.

  10. Acid diffusion into rice boluses is influenced by rice type, variety, and presence of α-amylase.

    PubMed

    Mennah-Govela, Yamile A; Bornhorst, Gail M; Singh, R Paul

    2015-02-01

    Breakdown of rice during gastric digestion may be influenced by rice structure, presence of salivary α-amylase, and hydrolysis by gastric acid. During mastication, saliva is mixed with rice, allowing α-amylase to begin starch hydrolysis. This hydrolysis may continue in the gastric environment depending on the rate at which gastric acid penetrates into the rice bolus. The objective of this study was to determine the acid uptake into rice boluses with and without α-amylase in saliva. Two types each of brown and white rice (medium and long grain), were formed into a cylindrical-shaped bolus. Each bolus was sealed on all sides except one to allow one-dimensional mass transfer, and incubated by immersion in simulated gastric juice at 37 °C under static conditions. Acidity of the boluses was measured by titration after 1 to 96 h of incubation. Effective diffusivity of the gastric juice through the bolus was estimated using MATLAB. Average acidity values ranged from 0.04 mg HCl/g dry matter (medium grain white rice, no incubation) to 10.01 mg HCl/g dry matter (long-grain brown rice, 72 h incubation). The rice type, presence of α-amylase, and incubation time all significantly influenced rice bolus acidity (P < 0.001). Effective diffusivity of gastric juice into the bolus was greater in brown rice than in white rice. These results indicate that starch hydrolysis by α-amylase may continue in the stomach before the gastric acid penetrates the rice bolus, and the rate of acid uptake will depend on the type of rice consumed.

  11. The history of pulse therapy in lupus nephritis (1976-2016).

    PubMed

    Scheinberg, Morton

    2016-01-01

    Pulse therapy with methylprednisolone became standard of care for the treatment of worsening lupus nephritis since its introduction in 1976. Even today, 40 years since its introduction, it is still a gold standard for this clinical condition. In this communication, we have reviewed the events that surrounded the use of this therapy by one of the authors of the original paper published in Lancet 40 years ago.

  12. Development and Dosimetric Characterization of a Tissue Substitute (Bolus) For Use in Linear Accelerator Electron Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada Trujillo, Jorge; Villaseñor Navarro, Luis Felipe; Mitsoura, Eleni

    2003-09-01

    We propose the design of a new custom made material, to be used as a tissue substitute in external beam electron radiotherapy, based on cotton fabric and beeswax. Due to its inexpensive, easy preparation, constant thickness, flexibility, uniform density and physical properties similar to those of soft tissue, this bolus will insure personalized optimal dose build up and dose distribution in irregular treatment regions. Materials and Methods: We used commercial Campeche beeswax and 100% cotton fabric to prepare the bolus. Beeswax's physical characteristics were determined by thermal and density analysis. Its chemical properties are to be determined by electronic microcopy. We performed quality control tests and calibration of the Varian 2100C linear accelerator. The tissue equivalence of the material is established for a range of electron energies (6, 9, 12, 16, 20 MeV) using a water equivalent solid phantom (PTW; Freiburg, Germany) and a plane parallel ionization chamber (PTW) associated to a PTW electrometer. Results: Beeswax's absolute density was found to be 0.9181g/ml at 21°C, with a melting point of 45°C. For the bolus elaboration, the cotton fabric was soaked in liquid beeswax and thin sheets of approximately 1 mm were obtained. These presented high flexibility, physical stability (color, texture, thickness) and homogeneity. Determination of this dosimetric characteristics and equivalent thickness are still in process. Discussion and conclusions: Our preliminary results suggest that the tissue substitute is easily made, inexpensive to produce, molds well to the treatment area and its positioning is easy and reproducible over the course of the treatment. So we consider that it's a good alternative to the commercial bolus.

  13. Esophageal Bolus Transit in Newborns with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Symptoms: A Multichannel Intraluminal Impedance Study

    PubMed Central

    Liguori, Stefania Alfonsina; Maggiora, Elena; Locatelli, Emanuela; Indrio, Flavia; Bertino, Enrico; Coscia, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate bolus transit during esophageal swallow (ES) and gastroesophageal reflux (GER) events and to investigate the relationship between the characteristics of ES and GER events in a population of term and preterm newborns with symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Methods The study population consisted of term and preterm newborns referred to combined multichannel intraluminal impedance (MII) and pH monitoring for GERD symptoms. The frequency and characteristics of ES and GER events were assessed by two independent investigators. Statistical significance was set at p<0.05. Results Fifty-four newborns (23 preterm) were included in the analyses. Median bolus head advancing time corrected for esophageal length (BHATc) was shorter during mealtime than during the postprandial period (median, interquartile range): 0.20 (0.15-0.29) s/cm vs. 0.47 (0.39-0.64) s/cm, p<0.001. Median bolus presence time (BPT) was prolonged during mealtime: 4.71(3.49-6.27) s vs. 2.66 (1.82-3.73) s, p<0.001. Higher BHATc (p=0.03) and prolonged BPT (p<0.001) were observed in preterm newborns during the postprandial period. A significant positive correlation between BHATc and bolus clearance time was also observed (ρ=0.33, p=0.016). Conclusion The analysis of ES and GER events at the same time by MII provides useful information to better understand the physiopathology of GERD. In particular, the analysis of BHATc during the postprandial period could help clinicians identify newborns with prolonged esophageal clearance time due to impaired esophageal motility, which could allow for more accurate recommendations regarding further tests and treatment. PMID:26770898

  14. Comparison of Basal-Bolus and Premixed Insulin Regimens in Hospitalized Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, Lorena; Rodriguez, Maria Galiana; Sanchez, Cecilia; Dieguez, Marta; Riestra, Maria; Casal, Florentino; Delgado, Elias; Menendez, Edelmiro; Umpierrez, Guillermo E.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Premixed insulin is a commonly prescribed formulation for the outpatient management of patients with type 2 diabetes. The safety and efficacy of premixed insulin formulations in the hospital setting is not known. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In a prospective, open-label trial, we randomized general medicine and surgery patients to receive a basal-bolus regimen with glargine once daily and glulisine before meals (n = 33) or premixed human insulin (30% regular insulin and 70% NPH insulin) twice daily (n = 39). Major outcomes included differences in daily blood glucose (BG) levels and frequency of hypoglycemic events (<70 mg/dL) between treatment groups. RESULTS At the first prespecified interim analysis, the study was stopped early because of an increased frequency of hypoglycemia >50% in patients treated with premixed human insulin. A total of 64% of patients treated with premixed insulin experienced one or more episodes of hypoglycemia compared with 24% in the basal-bolus group (P < 0.001). There were no differences in mean daily BG level after the first day of insulin treatment (175 ± 32 vs. 179 ± 43 mg/dL, P = 0.64) between groups. A BG target between 80 and 180 mg/dL before meals was achieved in 55.9% of BG readings in the basal-bolus group and 54.3% of BG readings in the premixed insulin group (P = 0.23). There was no difference in the length of hospital stay or mortality between treatment groups. CONCLUSIONS Inpatient treatment with premixed human insulin resulted in similar glycemic control but in significantly higher frequency of hypoglycemia compared with treatment with basal-bolus insulin regimen in hospitalized patients with diabetes. PMID:26459273

  15. An implantable bolus infusion pump for use in freely moving, nontethered rats

    PubMed Central

    HOLSCHNEIDER, D. P.; MAAREK, J.-M. I.; HARIMOTO, J.; YANG, J.; SCREMIN, O. U.

    2014-01-01

    One of the current constraints on functional neuroimaging in animals is that to avoid movement artifacts during data acquisition, subjects need to be immobilized, sedated, or anesthetized. Such measures limit the behaviors that can be examined, and introduce the additional variables of stress or anesthetic agents that may confound meaningful interpretation. This study provides a description of the design and characteristics of a self-contained, implantable microbolus infusion pump (MIP) that allows triggering of a bolus injection at a distance in conscious, behaving rats that are not restrained or tethered. The MIP is externally triggered by a pulse of infrared light and allows in vivo bolus drug delivery. We describe application of this technology to the intravenous bolus delivery of iodo[14C]antipyrine in a freely moving animal, followed immediately by lethal injection, rapid removal of the brain, and analysis of regional cerebral blood flow tissue radioactivity with the use of autoradiography. The ability to investigate changes in brain activation in nonrestrained animals makes the MIP a powerful tool for evaluation of complex behaviors. PMID:12234827

  16. Increased Bolus Volume Effect on Delayed Pharyngeal Swallowing Response in Post-stroke Oropharyngeal Dysphagia: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To confirm a relationship between the pharyngeal response and bolus volume, and examine whether increasing the fluid bolus volume can improve penetration and aspiration for stroke dysphagic patients. Methods Ten stroke patients with a delayed pharyngeal response problem confirmed by a videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) were enrolled. Each subject completed two swallows each of 2 mL, 5 mL, and 10 mL of barium liquid thinned with water. The pharyngeal delay time (PDT) and penetration-aspiration scale (PAS) were measured and the changes among the different volumes were analyzed. Results PDTs were shortened significantly when 5 mL and 10 mL of thin barium were swallowed compared to 2 mL. However, there was no significant difference in PAS as the bolus volume increased. Conclusion The increased fluid bolus volume reduced the pharyngeal delay time, but did not affect the penetration and aspiration status. PMID:28119831

  17. Lack of protective effect of local administration of triamcinolone or systemic treatment with methylprednisolone against damages caused by optic nerve crush in rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tzu Lun; Chang, Chung Hsing; Lin, Kung Hung; Sheu, Min Muh; Tsai, Rong Kung

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of administrations of triamcinolone acetonide and systemic methylprednisolone sodium succinate on optic nerves (ON) and retinal ganglion cells (RGC) in a rat model of optic nerve crush. The treated groups either received triamcinolone immediately in the form of two pieces of soaked-gelform surrounding retrobulbar optic nerves (0.5 mg/per gelform) or methylprednisolone via peritoneal injection, and control group received intra-peritoneal injection with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) after crush experiments. RGC density was counted by retrograde labeling with Fluorogold, and visual function was assessed by flash visual-evoked potentials. Terminal transferase dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assays, Western blot analysis of serine/threonine kinase (p-Akt), extracellular signal-regulated kinases (p-ERK) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (p-STAT3) and immunohistochemistry of ED1, marker of macrophage/microglia in the optic nerve were conducted. Two and four weeks after optic nerve crush experiments, neither triamcinolone nor methylprednisolone treatment rescued the RGC from death in the central and mid-peripheral retinas compared with those of the corresponding optic nerve-crushed and PBS-treated rats. Visual-evoked potentials measurements showed a prolonged latency of the P(1) wave in all treated groups (triamcinolone-treated: 123 ± 23 ms, methylprednisolone-treated: 133 ± 25 ms and PBS-treated: 151 ± 55 ms) after two weeks. TUNEL assays showed that there was no decrease in apoptotic cells in the RGC layers of both triamcinolone treated and methylprednisolone-treated retinas. Western blot analysis showed that p-AKT, p-ERK and p-Stat3 were not up-regulated in either retina of the triamcinolone or methylprednisolone treated rats. In addition, the number of ED1-positive cells was not attenuated at the lesion sites of the ON in either treatment group. Based upon these results

  18. Mn (III) tetrakis (4-benzoic acid) porphyrin scavenges reactive species, reduces oxidative stress, and improves functional recovery after experimental spinal cord injury in rats: comparison with methylprednisolone

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Substantial experimental evidence supports that reactive species mediate secondary damage after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) by inducing oxidative stress. Removal of reactive species may reduce secondary damage following SCI. This study explored the effectiveness of a catalytic antioxidant - Mn (III) tetrakis (4-benzoic acid) porphyrin (MnTBAP) - in removing reactive oxygen species (ROS), reducing oxidative stress, and improving functional recovery in vivo in a rat impact SCI model. The efficiency of MnTBAP was also compared with that of methylprednisolone – the only drug used clinically in treating acute SCI. Results In vivo measurements of time courses of ROS production by microdialysis and microcannula sampling in MnTBAP, methylprednisolone, and saline (as vehicle control)-treated SCI rats showed that both agents significantly reduced the production of hydrogen peroxide, but only MnTBAP significantly reduced superoxide elevation after SCI. In vitro experiments further demonstrated that MnTBAP scavenged both of the preceding ROS, whereas methylprednisolone had no effect on either. By counting the immuno-positive neurons in the spinal cord sections immunohistochemically stained with anti-nitrotyrosine and anti-4-hydroxy-nonenal antibodies as the markers of protein nitration and membrane lipid peroxidation, we demonstrated that MnTBAP significantly reduced the numbers of 4-hydroxy-nonenal-positive and nitrotyrosine-positive neurons in the sections at 1.55 to 2.55 mm and 1.1 to 3.1 mm, respectively, rostral to the injury epicenter compared to the vehicle-treated animals. By behavioral tests (open field and inclined plane tests), we demonstrated that at 4 hours post-SCI treatment with MnTBAP and the standard methylprednisolone regimen both significantly increased test scores compared to those produced by vehicle treatment. However, the outcomes for MnTBAP-treated rats were significantly better than those for methylprednisolone-treated animals

  19. Influence of everyday bolus consistencies in different body positions on high-resolution esophageal pressure topography (HREPT) parameters.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Y; Go, J; Hashmi, S M; Valestin, J; Schey, R

    2015-04-01

    The standard protocol for esophageal manometry involves placing the patient in the supine position with head turned to left (supine head left [SHL]) while evaluating liquid bolus swallows. Routinely, semisolid or solid boluses are not evaluated. Currently, the daily American diet includes up to 40% solid or semisolid texture. Thus far, the data on the effect of different bolus on high-resolution esophageal pressure topography (HREPT) parameters are scarce. This study aims to evaluate the effect of every day bolus consistencies in different body positions on HREPT variables. HREPT was performed on healthy volunteers with a modified protocol including liquid swallows in the SHL position followed by applesauce (semisolid), cracker (solid), and marshmallow (soft solid) in three different positions (SHL, sitting, and standing). A total of 38 healthy adult subjects (22 males and 16 females, median age = 27, and mean body mass index = 25) were evaluated. The resting upper esophageal sphincter pressure was significantly different while subjects swallowed crackers, applesauce, and marshmallows in most positions compared with liquid SHL (P < 0.05). The lower esophageal sphincter, contractile front velocity, and distal contractile integral pressures did not differ in all different consistencies compared with SHL. The integrated relaxation period was significantly higher with solid bolus compared with liquid bolus only in SHL position. The intrabolus pressure was significantly different with solid and soft solid boluses in all postures compared to liquid SHL. The American diet consistency affects upper esophageal sphincter pressure and partially integrated relaxation period and intrabolus pressure in various positions. Semisolid bolus swallows do not cause substantial pressure changes and are safe for evaluation and maintaining adequate caloric intake in patients with dysphagia who cannot tolerate solids.

  20. Effects of different strategies of mineral supplementation (marine algae alone or combined with rumen boluses) in organic dairy systems.

    PubMed

    López-Alonso, M; Rey-Crespo, F; Orjales, I; Rodríguez-Bermúdez, R; Miranda, M

    2016-10-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effect of marine algae supplementation alone or in combination with a regular mineral supplement (rumen boluses) to improve the mineral status in organic dairy cattle and their effect on the milk mineral composition, milk production, composition (% of fat and protein) and quality (SCC). Thirty-two Holstein Friesian lactating cows were randomly selected and assigned to the algae (A), boluses (B), algae+boluses (AB) and control group (C). For the algae groups (A, AB), a supplement composed of Sea Lettuce (80%), Japanese Wireweed (17.5%) and Furbelows (2.5%) was formulated to be given to the cows at the rate of 100 g/animal per day (A1) for the length of 4 weeks. In the second half of the experiment (weeks 5-8), the algae mixture was reformulated and the proportion of Furbelows was increased from 2.5% to 5.0% with a subsequent decrease of Lettuce to 77.5% (A2). In the boluses group (B), each cow received 2 boluses after calving. Blood (serum) and milk samples were collected at 2 and 4 week intervals, respectively, and analysed for trace element concentrations by ICP-MS. Information related to the milk composition and SCC during a 305-day lactation for each animal were obtained from the Dairy Records Management System. The supplementation with algae, boluses or the combination of both treatments showed a statistically significant effect on the iodine (algae), selenium (boluses) and cobalt (algae+boluses) status of the animals. In milk, treatments had a statistical significant increase on iodine, and a tendency to increase selenium concentrations. The assayed algae mixture combined with another source of selenium could be an effective tool to improve the mineral status in serum and milk.

  1. Effect of different phenylephrine bolus doses for treatment of hypotension during spinal anaesthesia in patients undergoing elective caesarean section.

    PubMed

    Mohta, M; Harisinghani, P; Sethi, A K; Agarwal, D

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of phenylephrine might be improved by giving doses higher than that traditionally used (100 µg). This study compared the effects of three initial bolus doses of intravenous phenylephrine; 100 µg (group P100), 125 µg (group P125) and 150 µg (group P150), for the treatment of post-spinal hypotension in patients undergoing elective caesarean delivery. If hypotension was not corrected by this dose, additional boluses of 25 µg were given every minute. Further hypotensive episodes were treated with half the initial bolus dose, followed by 25 µg boluses, as required. Umbilical arterial and venous blood samples were obtained for blood gas analysis and Apgar scores recorded. One hundred and twenty subjects (40 per group) who developed post-spinal hypotension (75%) were included in this randomised, double blind trial. Although systolic blood pressure was higher at certain time-points after 150 µg phenylephrine, there were no statistically significant differences in the effectiveness of the first bolus of phenylephrine to treat hypotension (85%, 95% and 95% in groups P100, P125 and P150, respectively, P=0.215); the additional dose of phenylephrine after the first bolus (P=0.810); the number of additional boluses (P=0.318) or of hypotensive episodes (P=0.118). There were no significant differences in the number of patients developing reactive hypertension or bradycardia, in maternal side-effects or in neonatal outcomes. Although the study may have been underpowered, initial phenylephrine bolus doses of 100 µg, 125 µg and 150 µg did not significantly differ in efficacy to treat post-spinal hypotension in these patients.

  2. Optimal dosage of methylprednisolone for the treatment of sudden hearing loss in geriatric patients: a propensity score-matched analysis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Myoung Su; Lee, Ho Yun; Cho, Chin Saeng

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to compare the treatment outcomes and the occurrence rates of adverse events associated with different steroid regimens in geriatric patients (aged 65 years or older) with unilateral idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL). After thorough medical chart reviews of 109 patients with ISSNHL between May 2006 and December 2013, we performed a propensity score-matched analysis using previously known prognostic factors, steroid regimens, and other cointerventions. Patients were divided based on their steroid regimens into group I (which initially received 48 mg of methylprednisolone daily with a subsequently tapered dose) and group II (which initially received 24 mg of methylprednisolone daily with a subsequently tapered dose). We compared final hearing and the occurrence of adverse events between the two groups. As a result, 20 pairs of propensity score-matched patients (n = 40) were enrolled. Group I patients showed better final hearing levels compared with group II patients (42.00 ± 22.35 dB and 57.38 ± 26.40 dB, respectively), although this difference was marginally significant (p = 0.058). Based on the comparative analysis of each of the frequencies in the final audiograms, lower hearing thresholds at 2 KHz were observed in group I (p = 0.049). There was no significant difference in the occurrence of adverse effects between the two groups (p>0.05). In conclusion, conventional steroid regimens produced adverse event occurrence rates that were similar to those of low-dose treatment but may also have produced superior hearing recovery. The use of steroid dose reduction in geriatric patients with ISSNHL is not preferable to conventional steroid regimens.

  3. Comparison of concentrations of sulbactam-ampicillin administered by bolus injections or bolus plus continuous infusion in tissues of patients undergoing colorectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Martin, C; Cotin, A; Giraud, A; Beccani-Argème, M; Alliot, P; Mallet, M N; Argème, M

    1998-05-01

    The concentrations of sulbactam and ampicillin were determined in sera and different abdominal tissues of 16 patients who underwent elective colorectal surgery. Patients were randomly allocated to two groups. At the time of induction of anesthesia, patients in group 1 (eight patients) were given 1,000 mg of sulbactam with 2,000 mg of ampicillin by intravenous bolus injection (3 min). This dose was administered again after 2 h by bolus injection by the same route. Patients in group 2 (eight patients) were given the same initial dose of sulbactam-ampicillin by bolus injection (3 min). Then, a continuous infusion of 1,000 mg of sulbactam with 2,000 mg of ampicillin in normal saline was immediately started and was administered over a 4-h period. Blood samples were collected to determine peak (10 min) and trough (end of surgery) antibiotic levels. Serial blood samples were also collected at predetermined periods (at the time of opening and closing of the abdominal cavity and at the time of surgical anastomosis). Abdominal wall fat, epiploic fat, and colonic wall tissue samples were collected simultaneously. Antibiotic concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Similar levels of the drugs in serum were observed for the two regimens of administration, with trough sulbactam levels of 33 +/- 16 and 37 +/- 22 microg/ml in groups 1 and 2, respectively, and trough ampicillin levels of 72 +/- 55 and 79 +/- 47 microg/ml in groups 1 and 2, respectively. Similar sulbactam concentrations were observed in abdominal tissues whichever regimen of administration was used; in fatty tissues the sulbactam concentrations ranged from 2.7 to 3.8 microg/g for group 1 and from 1.7 to 4.0 microg/g for group 2, and sulbactam concentrations in the colonic wall were 5.6 +/- 7.7 and 6.8 +/- 3.2 microg/g in groups 1 and 2, respectively (not significant). Again, no influence of the regimen of administration was observed on tissue ampicillin concentrations; in fatty

  4. Metastatic Thymoma-Associated Myasthenia Gravis: Favorable Response to Steroid Pulse Therapy Plus Immunosuppressive Agent

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Guoyan; Liu, Peng; Dong, Huimin; Gu, Shanshan; Yang, Hongxia; Xue, Yinping

    2017-01-01

    Background Our study retrospectively reviewed the therapeutic effect of steroid pulse therapy in combination with an immunosuppressive agent in myasthenia gravis (MG) patients with metastatic thymoma. Material/Methods MG patients with metastatic thymoma that underwent methylprednisolone pulse therapy plus cyclophosphamide were retrospectively analyzed. Patients initially received methylprednisolone pulse therapy followed by oral methylprednisolone. Cyclophosphamide was prescribed simultaneously at the beginning of treatment. Clinical outcomes, including therapeutic efficacy and adverse effects of MG and thymoma, were assessed. Results Twelve patients were recruited. According to histological classification, 4 cases were type B2 thymoma, 3 were type B3, 2 were type B1, and 1 was type AB. After combined treatment for 15 days, both the thymoma and MG responded dramatically to high-dose methylprednisolone plus cyclophosphamide. The symptoms of MG were improved in all patients, with marked improvement in 6 patients and basic remission in 4. Interestingly, complete remission of thymoma was achieved in 5 patients and partial remission in 7 patients. Myasthenic crisis was observed in 1 patient and was relieved after intubation and ventilation. Adverse reactions were observed in 7 patients (58.3%), most commonly infections, and all were resolved without discontinuation of therapy. During the follow-up, all patients were stabilized except for 1 with pleural metastasis who received further treatment and another 1 who died from myasthenic crisis. Conclusions The present study in a series of MG patients with metastatic thymoma indicated that steroid pulse therapy in combination with immunosuppressive agents was an effective and well-tolerated for treatment of both metastatic thymoma and MG. Glucocorticoid pulse therapy plus immunosuppressive agents should therefore be considered in MG patients with metastatic thymoma. PMID:28278141

  5. SU-E-T-298: Dosimetric Assessment of Using Brass Mesh Bolus with High Energy X-Ray Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Manger, R; Yock, A; Soultan, D; Harry, T; Cervino, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Brass mesh bolus has been shown to be an acceptable substitute for tissue equivalent bolus to increase superficial dose for 6 MV chest wall tangent plans. It may be advantageous to deliver a portion of the treatment using higher energy beams to decrease dose heterogeneity. The purpose of this study is to investigate the photoneutron production and activation of brass mesh bolus by high energy x-ray beams. Methods: MCNPX was used to determine brass mesh photoneutron energy spectrum and PDDs for 15 MV and 24 MV beams. PDD and photoneutron spectra were determined with and without photoneutron production to assess the contribution of photoneutrons to CAX dose. Brass mesh was placed on a solid water slab phantom and irradiated with 500 MU of 15 MV photons at 100cm SSD. A Geiger-Mueller counter was used to record counts in 10-second intervals for 30 minutes. A survey meter was used to estimate dose on contact immediately following irradiation. Results: The thickness of brass mesh bolus for MCNPX simulation was 0.4 mm. The PDDs with and without photoneutron production were statistically equivalent (i.e. the increase in neutron dose at the central axis is insignificant). Using ICRP 103 dose conversion coefficients, the increase in effective dose from en-face delivery of 300 MU was 0.047 mSv for 15 MV and 0.525 mSV for 24 MV. The dose rate on contact after the 500 MU irradiation was 0.4 mrem/hr. The effective half-life was estimated to approximately 6 minutes. Conclusion: The use of brass mesh bolus with high energy beams does not significantly affect central axis PDD. The use of a 24 MV beam with brass bolus results in nearly 10 times the increase in effective dose as with 15 MV. The activation products produced by brass bolus have an effective half-life of approximately 6 minutes.

  6. The influence of the bolus-surface distance on the dose distribution in the build-up region

    PubMed Central

    Sroka, Martyna; Reguła, Jakub; Łobodziec, Włodzimierz

    2010-01-01

    Aim The aim of the paper is to examine the relation between the increase of the photon dose in water in the region of electronic disequilibrium – so-called build-up region – and the distance of the bolus from the water surface for the applied parameters of X-ray beams. Materials and methods PDD measurements were carried out using the plane-parallel ionization chamber Markus in the automatic water phantom IBA BluePhantom with OmniPro-Accept V7 (IBA Dosimetry GmbH, Schwarzenbruck, Germany). All measurements were performed for different field sizes and for 6 MV and 15 MV X-ray beams, respectively. A water-equivalent RW3 slab (Goettingen White Water) produced by PTW was used as a bolus. Results Placing a bolus in an irradiated field changes the shape of the PDD curve in the build-up region in comparison with the one obtained for an open field. All results has been inserted in tables and figures. Conclusion The closer the bolus is to the water surface, the smaller the depth of the maximum dose in the phantom for all investigated fields and energies. The changes in the build-up region are important, even if the bolus does not touch the surface of the water phantom. The influence of the bolus can be ignored when the bolus-surface distance equals 25 cm for 6MV X-ray beams and 39 cm for 15 MV X-ray beams. PMID:24376943

  7. SU-E-T-275: Dose Build Up and Bolusing Characteristics for Total Body Irradiation Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Butson, M; Pope, D; Whitaker, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Total Body Irradiation (TBI) treatments are mainly used in a preparative regimen for haematopoietic stem cell (or bone marrow) transplantation. Our standard regimen is a 12 Gy / 6 fraction bi-daily technique. To evaluate the delivered dose homogeneity to the patient, EBT3 Gafchromic film is positioned at the head, neck, chest, pelvis and groin for all fractions. This work investigates and quantifies the build-up dose characteristics at TBI distances and requirements for in-vivo dosimetry bolusing. Methods: Percentage dose build up characteristics of photon beams have been investigated at large extended SSD’s using parallel plate ionisations chambers (Attix) and EBT3 Gafchromic film. Measurements were made to open fields at different field sizes as well as large 40cm × 40cm fields with differing scatter conditions such as the introduction of standard Perspex scattering plates at different distances to the measurement point. Results: Percentage surface dose measured values for open fields at 300 cm SSD were found to range from 20 % up to 65.5 % for fields of 5 cm × 5 cm to 40 cm × 40 cm. With the introduction of 1cm Perspex scattering plates used in TBI treatments the surface dose values increased up to 83% to 90%, depending on the position of the Perspex scattering plate compared to the measurement point. Our work showed that at least 3mm water equivalent bolus / scatter material should be placed over the EBT3 for accurate dose assessment for TBI treatments. Conclusion: Build up dose characteristics exist at long (300cm) SSD’s including treatments using Perspex scattering plates placed at various distances form the patient during TBI treatment. Top accurately assess the applied dose during treatment, in-vivo dosimeters such as Gafchromic EBT3 should have at least 3mm bolus / scatter material placed over them to measure actual applied doses.

  8. Intraoperative imaging of cortical perfusion by time-resolved thermography using cold bolus approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollmach, Julia; Schnabel, Christian; Hoffmann, Nico; Radev, Yordan; Sobottka, Stephan; Kirsch, Matthias; Schackert, Gabriele; Koch, Edmund; Steiner, Gerald

    2014-03-01

    During the past decade, thermographic cameras with high thermal and temporal resolution of up to 30 mK and 50 Hz, respectively, have been developed. These camera systems can be used to reveal thermal variations and heterogeneities of tissue and blood. Thus, they provide a fast, sensitive, noninvasive, and label-free application to investigate blood perfusion and to detect perfusion disorders. Therefore, time-resolved thermography is evaluated and tested for intraoperative imaging of the cerebral cortex during neurosurgeries. The motivation of this study is the intraoperative evaluation of the cortical perfusion by observing the temporal temperature curve of the cortex during and after the intravenous application of a cold bolus. The temperature curve caused by a cold bolus is influenced by thermodilution, depending on the temperature difference to the patient's circulation, and the pattern of mixing with the patient's blood. In this initial study, a flow phantom was used in order to determine the temperature variations of cold boli under stable conditions in a vascular system. The typical temperature profile of cold water passing by can be approximated by a bi- Gaussian function involving a set of four parameters. These parameters can be used to assess the cold bolus, since they provide information about its intensity, duration and arrival time. The findings of the flow phantom can be applied to thermographic measurements of the human cortex. The results demonstrate that time-resolved thermographic imaging is a suitable method to detect cold boli not only at a flow phantom but also at the human cortex.

  9. Tissue distribution of sup 3 H-nicotine in rats after bolus or constant injection

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, P.; Pasley, J.N.; Rayford, P.L. )

    1989-01-01

    Two groups of rats, (N = 7), were fasted for 24 hrs prior to the study. On the day of the experiment, the animals were anesthetized and infused with either 5 ml nicotine solution (200 {mu}g/L) in saline containing 5 {mu}c {sup 3}H-nicotine, (sp. activity 50-80 mCi/mol) for 90 minutes or injected as a bolus with 0.5 ml of the same nicotine (200 {mu}g/L) solution. The animals were sacrificed 60 minutes after the injection or after the infusion was stopped. Blood and tissue samples were counted by liquid scintillation counting. Percent distribution of {sup 3}H-nicotine per gm of tissue was calculated from the total radioactivity recovered in individual tissues over the total activity injected into the rat and the values were compared using student's t test. Results: Distribution of {sup 3}H-nicotine was found highest in kidney (45-49%) among all tissues examined and was not different between routes of administration. Significantly higher retention of {sup 3}H-nicotine was found with continuous infusion in esophagus, fundus, antrum, spleen, cecum, pancreas, testes, heart and muscle when {sup 3}H-nicotine retentions were compared with bolus injection. In contrast, the distribution of {sup 3}H-nicotine in adrenal gland, was significantly lower in continuous infusion group. Distribution in blood was 6 fold higher in continuous infusion (7.26%) compared to bolus (1.11%) injection. The distribution {sup 3}H-nicotine in other tissues were not different by either routes of injection.

  10. Effects of Age and Bolus Volume on Velocity of Hyolaryngeal Excursion in Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Barikroo, Ali; Carnaby, Giselle; Crary, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Reduced movement velocity has been identified as a risk marker for movement impairment in older adults. Hyolaryngeal excursion is a key movement feature of normal swallowing function which is known to change with age and other extrinsic variables such as bolus volume. However, velocity of hyolaryngeal excursion has received limited attention in the literature on normal or abnormal swallowing. This study evaluated the effects of age and bolus volume on the velocity of hyoid and laryngeal excursion during swallowing in healthy adults. Forty-four healthy volunteers were grouped into three age bands (young: 20-35 years, middle age: 36-55 years, older: 56 ≥ years). All subjects swallowed 5 and 20 mL of thin liquid during fluoroscopic recording. Fluoroscopic images were extracted for each swallow representing the onset and maximum excursion positions of the hyoid and larynx. Superior and anterior excursion distance (excursion magnitude) and the time difference between rest and maximum excursion (excursion duration) were calculated. Velocity was calculated as a ratio of distance over time. Superior hyoid excursion magnitude was significantly increased for the 20 mL volume. Anterior laryngeal excursion magnitude was also significantly increased for the 20 mL volume. No kinematic duration measure demonstrated significant change across age or bolus conditions. Superior hyoid excursion velocity was significantly faster for the 20 mL volume. Superior and anterior laryngeal excursion velocity were significantly faster for the 20 mL volume only in the older group. Results of this study indicate that magnitude and velocity of hyoid and laryngeal excursion vary with age and volume. Comprising both excursion magnitude and duration, kinematic velocity may be a more complete metric to evaluate age-related swallowing performance.

  11. Continuous infusion or bolus injection of loop diuretics for congestive heart failure?

    PubMed

    Zepeda, Patricio; Rain, Carmen; Sepúlveda, Paola

    2016-04-22

    Loop diuretics are widely used in acute heart failure. However, there is controversy about the superiority of continuous infusion over bolus administration. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified four systematic reviews including 11 pertinent randomized controlled trials overall. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded continuous administration of loop diuretics probably reduces mortality and length of stay compared to intermittent administration in patients with acute heart failure.

  12. Insulin therapy in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Tamborlane, William V; Sikes, Kristin A

    2012-03-01

    Insulin therapy is the mainstay of treatment in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and is a key component in the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in this population as well. A major aim of current insulin replacement therapy is to simulate the normal pattern of insulin secretion as closely as possible. This aim can best be achieved with basal-bolus therapy using multiple daily injections (MDI) or continuous insulin infusion (CSII) pump therapy. Only a few years ago, options for insulin formulations were limited. There are now more than 10 varieties of biosynthetic human and analogue insulin.

  13. High-resolution manometric evaluation of the effects of cisapride on the esophagus during administration of solid and liquid boluses in awake healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Ullal, Tarini V; Kass, Philip H; Conklin, Jeffrey L; Belafsky, Peter C; Marks, Stanley L

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE To validate the use of high-resolution manometry (HRM) in awake, healthy dogs and compare the effects of bolus type (liquid vs solid) and drug treatment (saline [0.9% NaCl] solution [SS] vs cisapride) on esophageal pressure profiles. ANIMALS 8 healthy dogs. PROCEDURES In a crossover study, each dog received SS (10 mL) IV, and HRM was performed during oral administration of 10 boluses (5 mL each) of water or 10 boluses (5 g each) of canned food. Cisapride (1 mg/kg in 60 mL of SS) was subsequently administered IV to 7 dogs; HRM and bolus administration procedures were repeated. Two to 4 weeks later, HRM was repeated following administration of SS and water and food boluses in 4 dogs. Pressure profile data were obtained for all swallows, and 11 outcome variables were statistically analyzed. RESULTS After SS administration, predicted means for the esophageal contractile integral were 850.4 cm/mm Hg/s for food boluses and 660.3 cm/mm Hg/s for water boluses. Predicted means for esophageal contraction front velocity were 6.2 cm/s for water boluses and 5.6 cm/s for food boluses after SS administration. Predicted means for residual LES pressure were significantly higher following cisapride administration. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that HRM was feasible and repeatable in awake healthy dogs of various breeds and sizes. Stronger esophageal contractions and faster esophageal contraction velocity occurred during solid bolus and liquid bolus swallows, respectively. Lower esophageal sphincter pressure increased significantly following cisapride administration. Esophageal contractions and bolus transit latency should be further evaluated by HRM in clinically dysphagic dogs.

  14. Stable and episodic/bolus patterns of methylmercury exposure on mercury accumulation and histopathologic alterations in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Mineshi; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Domingo, José L; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Oliveira, Ricardo B; Sarrazin, Sandra L F; Eto, Komyo; Murata, Katsuyuki

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose of the present study was to compare the blood and brain mercury (Hg) accumulation and neurological alterations in adult male and pregnant female/fetal rats following stable and episodic/bolus patterns of methylmercury (MeHg) exposure. In addition, MeHg accumulation in the human body was estimated by a one-compartment model using three different patterns of MeHg exposure. In the adult male rat experiment, doses of 0.3 and 1.5mg MeHg/kg/day were orally administered to the stable groups for 5 weeks, while 7-fold higher doses of 2.1 and 10.5mg MeHg/kg/once a week were administered to the bolus groups. The blood Hg levels increased constantly in the stable groups, but increased with repeated waves in the bolus groups. At completion of the experiment, there were no significant differences in the brain Hg concentrations or neurological alterations between the stable and bolus groups, when the total doses of MeHg were the same. In the pregnant female rat experiment, a dose of 1mg MeHg/kg/day was administered orally to the stable group for 20 days (until 1day before expected parturition), while a 5-fold higher dose of 5mg MeHg/kg/once every 5 days was administered to the bolus group. In the brains of the maternal/fetal rats, there were no significant differences in the Hg concentrations and neurological alterations between the stable and bolus groups. The mean Hg concentrations in the fetal brains were approximately 2-fold higher than those in the maternal brains for both stable and bolus groups. Using the one-compartment model, the Hg accumulation curves in humans at doses of 7µg MeHg/day, 48µg MeHg/once a week, and 96µg MeHg/once every 2 weeks were estimated to be similar, while the bolus groups showed dose-dependent amplitudes of repeated waves. These results suggest that stable and episodic/bolus patterns of MeHg exposure do not cause differences in Hg accumulation in the blood and brain, or in neurological alterations, when the total doses are the

  15. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of a bolus and infusion of cangrelor: a direct, parenteral P2Y12 receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Akers, Wendell S; Oh, Jennifer J; Oestreich, Julie H; Ferraris, Suellen; Wethington, Mary; Steinhubl, Steven R

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of cangrelor administered as an intravenous bolus plus a continuous infusion in healthy volunteers. Twenty-two healthy volunteers are randomized to receive 1 of 2 intravenous cangrelor dosing regimens: a 15-microg/kg bolus followed by a 2-microg/kg/min infusion or a 30-microg/kg bolus followed by a 4-microg/kg/min infusion. The infusion is continued for 60 minutes, and serial blood samples are obtained for evaluation of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters. Administration of an intravenous bolus followed by a continuous infusion rapidly achieves maximum concentrations of cangrelor that are associated with extensive platelet inhibition within 2 minutes. Moreover, extensive platelet inhibition is maintained throughout the infusion period with near-full recovery of platelet function within 60 to 90 minutes of terminating the infusion. The effect of high-dose cangrelor is more consistent and demonstrates a greater level of inhibition on adenosine diphosphate-induced P-selectin expression; how ever, no significant differences are observed between the 2 dosing regimens with regard to platelet aggregation or time to recovery of platelet function. Cangrelor administered as an intravenous bolus followed by a continuous infusion in healthy volunteers offers rapid and reversible inhibition of platelet function.

  16. Deposition and dispersion of 1-micrometer aerosol boluses in the human lung: effect of micro- and hypergravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darquenne, C.; West, J. B.; Prisk, G. K.

    1998-01-01

    We performed bolus inhalations of 1-micrometer particles in four subjects on the ground (1 G) and during parabolic flights both in microgravity (microG) and in approximately 1.6 G. Boluses of approximately 70 ml were inhaled at different points in an inspiration from residual volume to 1 liter above functional residual capacity. The volume of air inhaled after the bolus [the penetration volume (Vp)] ranged from 200 to 1,500 ml. Aerosol concentration and flow rate were continuously measured at the mouth. The deposition, dispersion, and position of the bolus in the expired gas were calculated from these data. For Vp >/=400 ml, both deposition and dispersion increased with Vp and were strongly gravity dependent, with the greatest deposition and dispersion occurring for the largest G level. At Vp = 800 ml, deposition and dispersion increased from 33.9% and 319 ml in microG to 56.9% and 573 ml at approximately 1.6 G, respectively (P < 0.05). At each G level, the bolus was expired at a smaller volume than Vp, and this volume became smaller with increasing Vp. Although dispersion was lower in microG than in 1 G and approximately 1.6 G, it still increased steadily with increasing Vp, showing that nongravitational ventilatory inhomogeneity is partly responsible for dispersion in the human lung.

  17. Effect of carnosine, methylprednisolone and their combined application on irisin levels in the plasma and brain of rats with acute spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Albayrak, Serdal; Atci, İbrahim Burak; Kalayci, Mehmet; Yilmaz, Musa; Kuloglu, Tuncay; Aydin, Suna; Kom, Mustafa; Ayden, Omer; Aydin, Suleyman

    2015-08-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) might occur to anybody at any time and any age. In its treatment, methylprednisolone (MP) is a first choice worldwide, but there is still no significant breakthrough in truly beneficial treatment due to SCI's complex pathophysiology. We investigated the effect of carnosine, methylprednisolone (MP) and its combination on irisin levels in the plasma, brain and medulla spinalis tissues in SCI using a rat model. The rats were divided into 6 groups: I (Control, saline); II (sham animals with laminectomy without cross-clamping); III (SCI); IV (SCI treated with 150mg/kg carnosine); V (SCI treated with 30mg/kg methylprednisolone); and VI (SCI treated with a combination of carnosine and MP). The animals were given traumatic SCI after laminectomy, using 70-g closing force aneurysm clips (Yasargil FE 721). Irisin concentration was measured by ELISA. The distribution of irisin in brain and spinal cord tissues was examined by immunochemistry. Irisin was mainly expressed in the astrocytes and microglia of brain tissues, and multipolar neurones of the anterior horn of spinal cord tissue in rats of all groups, indicating that irisin is physiologically indispensable. MP and carnosine and the combination of the two, significantly increased irisin in plasma and were accompanied by a significant rise in irisin immunoreactivity of brain and spinal cord tissues of the injured rats compared with control and sham. This finding raises the possibility that methylprednisolone and carnosine regulate the brain and spinal cord tissues in SCI by inducing irisin expression, and may therefore offer a better neurological prognosis.

  18. CBF and CBV measurements by USPIO bolus tracking: reproducibility and comparison with Gd-based values.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, C Z; Ostergaard, L; Vestergaard-Poulsen, P; Røhl, L; Bjørnerud, A; Gyldensted, C

    1999-02-01

    The authors measured cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV) by bolus tracking of a novel ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) contrast agent (NC100150) and compared absolute and relative perfusion measurements with those obtained by a standard gadolinium-based contrast agent. They found a linear correlation between the two methods. A dose of 0.4 mg Fe/kg body weight was found to produce a signal drop similar to that of a standard 0.2 mmol/kg gadodiamide injection using spin-echo echoplanar imaging (SE-EPI) at 1.0 T. The measurements showed a high degree of reproducibility of repeated absolute as well as relative CBF and CBV values, lending further hope to the possibility of using magnetic resonance bolus tracking for routine CBF and CBV measurements. Finally, the authors present their initial experience with high-resolution, non-EPI CBV maps obtained from steady-state levels of an intravascular superparamagnetic contrast agent.

  19. Missed Insulin Boluses for Snacks in Youth With Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    VanderWel, Brandon W.; Messer, Laurel H.; Horton, Lauren A.; McNair, Bryan; Cobry, Erin C.; McFann, Kim K.; Chase, H. Peter

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effects of missed insulin boluses for snacks in youth with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Three months of simultaneous continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion and continuous glucose monitoring data from nine subjects were retrospectively evaluated. Glucose excursions between 1330 and 1700 h were defined as relating to snacks with insulin or snacks with no insulin administered. Area under the curve >180 mg/dl (AUC >180), average Δ glucose, and rate of change were analyzed and compared within and between groups. RESULTS A total of 94 snacks without insulin and 101 snacks with insulin were analyzed. Snacks without insulin had significantly higher log (AUC >180 + 1) (1.26 vs. 0.44 mg/dl per event; P < 0.001), Δ glucose (114 vs. 52 mg/dl; P < 0.001), and average rate of change (1.3 vs. 1.1 mg/dl per minute; P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS This study shows that afternoon snacks without insulin boluses are common and result in significantly higher glucose excursions than snacks with insulin administration. PMID:20032279

  20. A retrospective comparison of smart prep and test bolus multi-detector CT pulmonary angiography protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Suckling, Tara; Smith, Tony; Reed, Warren

    2013-06-15

    Optimal arterial opacification is crucial in imaging the pulmonary arteries using computed tomography (CT). This poses the challenge of precisely timing data acquisition to coincide with the transit of the contrast bolus through the pulmonary vasculature. The aim of this quality assurance exercise was to investigate if a change in CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) scanning protocol resulted in improved opacification of the pulmonary arteries. Comparison was made between the smart prep protocol (SPP) and the test bolus protocol (TBP) for opacification in the pulmonary trunk. A total of 160 CTPA examinations (80 using each protocol) performed between January 2010 and February 2011 were assessed retrospectively. CT attenuation coefficients were measured in Hounsfield Units (HU) using regions of interest at the level of the pulmonary trunk. The average pixel value, standard deviation (SD), maximum, and minimum were recorded. For each of these variables a mean value was then calculated and compared for these two CTPA protocols. Minimum opacification of 200 HU was achieved in 98% of the TBP sample but only 90% of the SPP sample. The average CT attenuation over the pulmonary trunk for the SPP was 329 (SD = ±21) HU, whereas for the TBP it was 396 (SD = ±22) HU (P = 0.0017). The TBP also recorded higher maximum (P = 0.0024) and minimum (P = 0.0039) levels of opacification. This study has found that a TBP resulted in significantly better opacification of the pulmonary trunk than the SPP.

  1. Cardiovascular effects of an intravenous bolus of morphine in the ventilated preterm infant

    PubMed Central

    Rutter, N; Evans, N

    2000-01-01

    AIM—To examine the cardiovascular effects of an intravenous bolus of morphine, 100 µg/kg, in 17 ventilated preterm infants.
METHODS—Heart rate and blood pressure were monitored. Right ventricular output, superior vena caval flow, and the width of the ductus arteriosus were measured by Doppler echocardiography 10 and 60minutes after the morphine injection, and the values compared with baseline values by the paired t test.
RESULTS—There was a small but significant fall in heart rate (2.1% at 10 minutes, 4.3% at 60 minutes) consistent with a sedative effect. There was no effect on systolic, diastolic, or mean blood pressure. There was no significant effect on systemic blood flow as measured by either right ventricular output or superior vena caval flow. Ductal width was significantly reduced by a mean of 16% at 60minutes, suggesting that normal duct closure was not inhibited.
CONCLUSION—No cardiovascular effects of an intravenous bolus of morphine could be detected.

 PMID:10952701

  2. Mode shift of an inhaled aerosol bolus is correlated with flow sequencing in the human lung

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, Christopher N.; Darquenne, Chantal; Prisk, G. Kim; West, J. B. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    We studied the effects on aerosol bolus inhalations of small changes in convective inhomogeneity induced by posture change from upright to supine in nine normal subjects. Vital capacity single-breath nitrogen washout tests were used to determine ventilatory inhomogeneity change between postures. Relative to upright, supine phase III slope was increased 33 +/- 11% (mean +/- SE, P < 0.05) and phase IV height increased 25 +/- 11% (P < 0.05), consistent with an increase in convective inhomogeneity likely due to increases in flow sequencing. Subjects also performed 0.5-microm-particle bolus inhalations to penetration volumes (V(p)) between 150 and 1,200 ml during a standardized inhalation from residual volume to 1 liter above upright functional residual capacity. Mode shift (MS) in supine posture was more mouthward than upright at all V(p), changing by 11.6 ml at V(p) = 150 ml (P < 0.05) and 38.4 ml at V(p) = 1,200 ml (P < 0.05). MS and phase III slope changes correlated positively at deeper V(p). Deposition did not change at any V(p), suggesting that deposition did not cause the MS change. We propose that the MS change results from increased sequencing in supine vs. upright posture.

  3. ESHAP therapy effective in a patient with Langerhans cell sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Yoshimi, Akihide; Kumano, Keiki; Motokura, Toru; Takazawa, Yutaka; Oota, Satoshi; Chiba, Shigeru; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Fukayama, Masashi; Kurokawa, Mineo

    2008-06-01

    We describe the rare case of a 53-year-old woman with systemic involvement of Langerhans cell sarcoma (LCS) who had undergone living-related liver transplantation. We chose the CHOP regimen as first-line chemotherapy, and clinical improvement of LCS was obtained. Intensive care was necessary due to the systemic involvement of LCS and severe infectious diseases. After the third cycle of CHOP therapy, however, disease progression was observed, and we administrated a modified ESHAP regimen (etoposide, carboplatin, cytarabine, methylprednisolone) as second-line therapy. A marked response was obtained after four cycles of this combination chemotherapy. Modified ESHAP may be a very effective combination chemotherapy regimen for LCS.

  4. Effect of pre-bypass methylprednisolone on post-operative renal function following correction of atrial septal defect under cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Dhar, S; Rahman, Z; Hasan, K; Hoque, M F; Sultana, A

    2012-01-01

    Conventional open heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) are associated with transient post-operative renal dysfunction which is caused by systemic inflammatory response induced by CPB. Corticosteroids are administered to attenuate the systemic inflammatory response. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of pre-bypass and post-bypass methylprednisolone on postoperative renal function after correction of ASD under CPB. Forty (40) patients were selected in the University cardiac centre of BSMMU undergoing ASD correction under CPB. Patients were randomized into two group to receive pre-bypass (Group A) or post-bypass (Group B) methylprednisolone 30mg/kg. Markers of glomerular function (BUN, serum creatinine, creatinine clearance) and damage (micro-albuminuria) and tubular function (glucosuria) were evaluated 24 hours after operation. Transient impairment of glomerular and tubular function of kidney was observed in patients those received post-bypass metylprednisolone (Group B) while Group A patients shown no significant difference between baseline and post-operative renal function. Use of pre-bypass methylprednisolone has a protective effect on post-operative renal function after correction of ASD under CPB.

  5. The influence of carbon monoxide bolus on the measurement of total haemoglobin mass using the optimized CO-rebreathing method.

    PubMed

    Turner, G; Pringle, J S M; Ingham, S A; Fudge, B W; Richardson, A J; Maxwell, N S

    2014-02-01

    The optimized carbon monoxide (CO) rebreathing method (oCOR-method) is routinely used to measure total haemoglobin mass (tHbmass). The tHbmass measure is subject to a test-retest typical error of ~2%, mostly from the precision of carboxyhaemoglobin (HbCO) measurement. We hypothesized that tHbmass would be robust to differences in the bolus of CO administered during the oCOR-method. Twelve participants (ten males and two females; age 27 ± 6 yr, height 177 ± 11 cm and mass 73.9 ± 12.1 kg) completed the oCOR-method on four occasions. Different bolus of CO were administered (LOW: 0.6 ml kg(-1); MED1: 1.0 ml kg(-1) and HIGH: 1.4 ml kg(-1)); to determine the reliability of MED1, a second trial was conducted (MED2). tHbmass was found to be significantly less from the HIGH CO bolus (776 ± 148 g) when compared to the LOW CO (791 ± 149 g) or MED1 CO (788 ± 149 g) trials. MED2 CO was 785 ± 150 g. The measurement of tHbmass is repeatable to within 0.8%, but a small and notable difference was seen when using a HIGH CO bolus (1.4 to 1.9% less), potentially due to differences in CO uptake kinetics. Previously, an improved precision of the oCOR-method was thought to require a higher bolus of CO (i.e. larger Δ%HbCO), as commercial hemoximeters only estimate %HbCO levels to a single decimal place (usually ± 0.1%). With the new hemoximeter used in this study, a bolus of 1.0 ml kg(-1) allows adequate precision with acceptable safety.

  6. Qualitative and quantitative contrast enhanced ultrasonography of the pancreas using bolus injection and continuous infusion methods in normal dogs.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sue Yee; Nakamura, Kensuke; Morishita, Keitaro; Sasaki, Noboru; Murakami, Masahiro; Osuga, Tatsuyuki; Ohta, Hiroshi; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Takiguchi, Mitsuyoshi

    2013-12-30

    Quantitative contrast enhanced ultrasound is a major breakthrough for ultrasound imaging in recent years. However, contrast enhancement of the pancreas is brief with bolus injection. To assess if continuous infusion of Sonazoid(®) can prolong the duration of pancreatic enhancement over bolus injections, eight adult dogs received bolus injection and continuous infusion of Sonazoid(®) on separate days. Contrast enhanced ultrasound of the pancreatic parenchyma and proximal descending duodenum was performed, and time intensity curves reflecting tissue perfusions were generated. Perfusion parameters- time to initial upslope, peak time, time to wash-out and peak intensity were calculated and evaluated. Fast wash-in to intense peak, followed by rapid wash-out was observed for time intensity curves of bolus injection. With continuous infusion, contrast wash-in to peak intensity was gradual, followed by long plateau and slow wash-out. Median contrast enhancement durations of the pancreas and duodenum were significantly prolonged by continuous infusion from 11 sec (range, 10 to 23 sec) and 16 sec (range, 3 to 43 sec) at bolus injection to 205 sec (range, 170 to 264 sec, P<0.01) and 193 sec (range, 169 to 216 sec, P<0.05), respectively. Median peak intensity of the pancreas was 100.9 MPV (range, 80.2 to 124.3 MPV) at bolus injection and 77.6 MPV (range, 58.2 to 99.5 MPV, P<0.05) at continuous infusion. Prolonged continuous imaging is afforded by continuous infusion of contrast agent. Peak intensity of the pancreas was slightly diminished in continuous infusion, but offered adequate imaging subjectively.

  7. Intermittent bolus feeding has a greater stimulatory effect on protein synthesis in skeletal muscle than continuous feeding in neonatal pigs.

    PubMed

    Gazzaneo, María C; Suryawan, Agus; Orellana, Renán A; Torrazza, Roberto Murgas; El-Kadi, Samer W; Wilson, Fiona A; Kimball, Scot R; Srivastava, Neeraj; Nguyen, Hanh V; Fiorotto, Marta L; Davis, Teresa A

    2011-12-01

    Orogastric tube feeding, using either continuous or intermittent bolus delivery, is common in infants for whom normal feeding is contraindicated. To compare the impact of different feeding strategies on muscle protein synthesis, after withholding food overnight, neonatal pigs received a complete formula orally as a bolus feed every 4 h or were continuously fed. Protein synthesis rate and translational mechanisms in skeletal muscle were examined after 0, 24, and 25.5 h. Plasma amino acid and insulin concentrations increased minimally and remained constant in continuously fed compared to feed-deprived pigs; however, the pulsatile meal feeding pattern was mimicked in bolus-fed pigs. Muscle protein synthesis was stimulated by feeding and the greatest response occurred after a bolus meal. Bolus but not continuous feeds increased polysome aggregation, the phosphorylation of protein kinase B, tuberous sclerosis complex 2, proline-rich Akt substrate of 40 kDa, eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4E binding protein (4EBP1), and rp S6 kinase and enhanced dissociation of the 4EBP1 ·eIF4E complex and formation of the eIF4E ·eIF4G complex compared to feed deprivation (P < 0.05). Activation of insulin receptor substrate-1, regulatory associated protein of mammalian target of rapamycin, AMP-activated protein kinase, eukaryotic elongation factor 2, and eIF2α phosphorylation were unaffected by either feeding modality. These results suggest that in neonates, intermittent bolus feeding enhances muscle protein synthesis to a greater extent than continuous feeding by eliciting a pulsatile pattern of amino acid- and insulin-induced translation initiation.

  8. Myocardial extravascular extracellular volume fraction measurement by gadolinium cardiovascular magnetic resonance in humans: slow infusion versus bolus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Myocardial extravascular extracellular volume fraction (Ve) measures quantify diffuse fibrosis not readily detectable by conventional late gadolinium (Gd) enhancement (LGE). Ve measurement requires steady state equilibrium between plasma and interstitial Gd contrast. While a constant infusion produces steady state, it is unclear whether a simple bolus can do the same. Given the relatively slow clearance of Gd, we hypothesized that a bolus technique accurately measures Ve, thus facilitating integration of myocardial fibrosis quantification into cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) workflow routines. Assuming equivalence between techniques, we further hypothesized that Ve measures would be reproducible across scans. Methods In 10 volunteers (ages 20-81, median 33 yr, 3 females), we compared serial Ve measures from a single short axis slice from two scans: first, during a constant infusion, and second, 12-50 min after a bolus (0.2 mmol/kg gadoteridol) on another day. Steady state during infusion was defined when serial blood and myocardial T1 data varied <5%. We measured T1 on a 1.5 T Siemens scanner using a single-shot modified Look Locker inversion recovery sequence (MOLLI) with balanced SSFP. To shorten breath hold times, T1 values were measured with a shorter sampling scheme that was validated with spin echo relaxometry (TR = 15 sec) in CuSO4-Agar phantoms. Serial infusion vs. bolus Ve measures (n = 205) from the 10 subjects were compared with generalized estimating equations (GEE) with exchangeable correlation matrices. LGE images were also acquired 12-30 minutes after the bolus. Results No subject exhibited LGE near the short axis slices where Ve was measured. The Ve range was 19.3-29.2% and 18.4-29.1% by constant infusion and bolus, respectively. In GEE models, serial Ve measures by constant infusion and bolus did not differ significantly (difference = 0.1%, p = 0.38). For both techniques, Ve was strongly related to age (p < 0.01 for both) in GEE

  9. Multistate outbreak of fungal infection associated with injection of methylprednisolone acetate solution from a single compounding pharmacy - United States, 2012.

    PubMed

    2012-10-19

    On September 18, 2012, the Tennessee Department of Health was alerted by a clinician regarding a patient with culture-confirmed Aspergillus fumigatus meningitis diagnosed 46 days after epidural steroid injection at a Tennessee ambulatory surgical center. By September 27, the initial investigation, carried out by the Tennessee Department of Health in collaboration with CDC and the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, had identified an additional eight patients with clinically diagnosed, culture-negative meningitis: seven in Tennessee and one in North Carolina. All nine patients had received epidural steroid injection with preservative-free methylprednisolone acetate solution (MPA), compounded at New England Compounding Center (NECC) in Framingham, Massachusetts. All nine patients had received one or more injections from three lots of MPA (lot numbers 05212012@68; 06292012@26; and 08102012@51). As of October 10, a multistate investigation led by CDC in collaboration with state and local health departments and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) had identified 137 cases and 12 deaths associated with this outbreak in 10 states. Active case-finding efforts and extensive investigation into medications and medication lot numbers received by patients have confirmed that, as of October 10, no cases were associated with other lots of MPA, nor were any associated with other NECC products. This report describes the ongoing investigation by CDC and state and local health departments, and includes important recommendations for physicians and patients.

  10. Noninvasive determination of respiratory ozone absorption: the bolus-response method.

    PubMed

    Ultman, J S; Ben-Jebria, A; Hu, S C

    1994-08-01

    Morphometric studies in animals exposed to ozone (O3), and mathematical simulations of O3 transport in human lungs indicate that O3 toxicity is focal in nature, causing tissue damage that is more pronounced in the proximal alveolar region (the proximal end of the respiratory airspaces in our compartment models) than in other airways. These findings suggest that the internal distribution of O3 uptake must be known in order to assess health risk reliably. In previous work (Ultman and Ben-Jebria 1990), we developed a fast-responding chemiluminescent O3 analyzer and a small-scale O3 generator, both of which are suitable for respiratory measurements. The objective of the current research was to integrate these instruments into a bolus inhalation system capable of noninvasively measuring the longitudinal distribution of O3 absorption in intact human lungs. With this system we aimed to carry out baseline experiments in healthy men during quiet oral breathing at a respiratory flow rate of 250 mL/sec, determine the effect of alternative respiratory flow rates between 150 and 1,000 mL/sec, compare the absorption distribution during quiet oral breathing with that during quiet nasal breathing, and ascertain the influence of a peak inspired concentration between 0.3 and 4.0 parts per million (ppm). Ozone uptake (lambda) was expressed as the amount of O3 absorbed during a single breath relative to the amount in the inhaled bolus. Measurements of lambda were correlated with the penetration volume (VP) of the bolus into the respiratory tract. Values of VP less than 70 mL were considered to be associated with the upper airways, values between 70 and 180 mL were associated with the lower conducting airways, and values greater than 180 mL were associated with the respiratory airspaces. During quiet oral breathing, lambda increased smoothly with VP, with 50% of the inhaled O3 absorbed in the upper airways and the balance absorbed within the lower conducting airways. This compares

  11. Estimation of contrast agent bolus arrival delays for improved reproducibility of liver DCE MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouhan, Manil D.; Bainbridge, Alan; Atkinson, David; Punwani, Shonit; Mookerjee, Rajeshwar P.; Lythgoe, Mark F.; Taylor, Stuart A.

    2016-10-01

    Delays between contrast agent (CA) arrival at the site of vascular input function (VIF) sampling and the tissue of interest affect dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI pharmacokinetic modelling. We investigate effects of altering VIF CA bolus arrival delays on liver DCE MRI perfusion parameters, propose an alternative approach to estimating delays and evaluate reproducibility. Thirteen healthy volunteers (28.7  ±  1.9 years, seven males) underwent liver DCE MRI using dual-input single compartment modelling, with reproducibility (n  =  9) measured at 7 days. Effects of VIF CA bolus arrival delays were assessed for arterial and portal venous input functions. Delays were pre-estimated using linear regression, with restricted free modelling around the pre-estimated delay. Perfusion parameters and 7 days reproducibility were compared using this method, freely modelled delays and no delays using one-way ANOVA. Reproducibility was assessed using Bland-Altman analysis of agreement. Maximum percent change relative to parameters obtained using zero delays, were  -31% for portal venous (PV) perfusion, +43% for total liver blood flow (TLBF), +3247% for hepatic arterial (HA) fraction, +150% for mean transit time and  -10% for distribution volume. Differences were demonstrated between the 3 methods for PV perfusion (p  =  0.0085) and HA fraction (p  <  0.0001), but not other parameters. Improved mean differences and Bland-Altman 95% Limits-of-Agreement for reproducibility of PV perfusion (9.3 ml/min/100 g, ±506.1 ml/min/100 g) and TLBF (43.8 ml/min/100 g, ±586.7 ml/min/100 g) were demonstrated using pre-estimated delays with constrained free modelling. CA bolus arrival delays cause profound differences in liver DCE MRI quantification. Pre-estimation of delays with constrained free modelling improved 7 days reproducibility of perfusion parameters in volunteers.

  12. Suitability of electronic mini-boluses for the early identification of goat kids and effects on growth performance and development of the reticulorumen.

    PubMed

    Castro, N; Martín, D; Castro-Alonso, A; Argüello, A; Capote, J; Caja, G

    2010-10-01

    A total of 60 twin-goat kids (30 male and 30 female) of the Canary Island Majorera dairy breed were used in 2 experiments to evaluate 2 types of electronic identification mini-boluses and their effects on rearing performances and reticulorumen development. Electronic identification mini-boluses were cylindrical and made of ceramic materials (B1, 9.0 g and 38.5 × 9.5 mm; B2, 16.3 g and 42.2 × 12.2 mm), contained a 32-mm half-duplex passive transponder, and were administered to kids at different BW. In Exp. 1, treatments were 1) control, without bolus (n = 15) and 2) identified with B1 at 4.8 kg of BW (n = 15). In Exp. 2, treatments were 1) control, without bolus (n = 15) and 2) identified with B2 at 5.6 kg of BW (n = 15). Kids were penned separately, according to mini-bolus treatments, fed a milk replacer daily, and slaughtered at 10 kg of BW. Milk replacer intake was recorded individually twice weekly and boluses read weekly until slaughter. The full and empty stomach complex was measured immediately after slaughter, and mini-bolus location was recorded. Samples of the reticulum and rumen wall were taken to measure the number and length of the papillae and crest. Despite the light BW of kids at time of mini-bolus treatment, no negative effects (P > 0.05) of B1 and B2 mini-boluses were observed on milk intake, growth rate, or G:F in either experiment. No kid mortality or mini-bolus losses were observed during either experiment. All mini-boluses were retained until slaughter, and all were found in the rumen upon dissection, except one B2, which was found in the reticulum. Mini-bolus treatment did not affect (P > 0.05) the weight of full and empty reticulorumen or the number of papillae and crest size of the reticulum epithelium. Moreover, the B1-treated kids showed a greater number of papillae in the rumen wall than the control kids (22.4 +/- 1.0 vs. 18.9 +/- 0.9 papillae/cm, respectively; P < 0.05) in Exp. 1. In conclusion, the use of mini-boluses was suitable for

  13. Bolus tracking with nanofilter-based multispectral videography for capturing microvasculature hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Najiminaini, Mohamadreza; Kaminska, Bozena; St Lawrence, Keith; Carson, Jeffrey J L

    2014-04-24

    Multispectral imaging is a highly desirable modality for material-based analysis in diverse areas such as food production and processing, satellite-based reconnaissance, and biomedical imaging. Here, we present nanofilter-based multispectral videography (nMSV) in the 700 to 950 nm range made possible by the tunable extraordinary-optical-transmission properties of 3D metallic nanostructures. Measurements made with nMSV during a bolus injection of an intravascular tracer in the ear of a piglet resulted in spectral videos of the microvasculature. Analysis of the multispectral videos generated contrast measurements representative of arterial pulsation, the distribution of microvascular transit times, as well as a separation of the venous and arterial signals arising from within the tissue. Therefore, nMSV is capable of acquiring serial multispectral images relevant to tissue hemodynamics, which may have application to the detection and identification of skin cancer.

  14. Bolus tracking with nanofilter-based multispectral videography for capturing microvasculature hemodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najiminaini, Mohamadreza; Kaminska, Bozena; St. Lawrence, Keith; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.

    2014-04-01

    Multispectral imaging is a highly desirable modality for material-based analysis in diverse areas such as food production and processing, satellite-based reconnaissance, and biomedical imaging. Here, we present nanofilter-based multispectral videography (nMSV) in the 700 to 950 nm range made possible by the tunable extraordinary-optical-transmission properties of 3D metallic nanostructures. Measurements made with nMSV during a bolus injection of an intravascular tracer in the ear of a piglet resulted in spectral videos of the microvasculature. Analysis of the multispectral videos generated contrast measurements representative of arterial pulsation, the distribution of microvascular transit times, as well as a separation of the venous and arterial signals arising from within the tissue. Therefore, nMSV is capable of acquiring serial multispectral images relevant to tissue hemodynamics, which may have application to the detection and identification of skin cancer.

  15. Time Varying Apparent Volume of Distribution and Drug Half-Lives Following Intravenous Bolus Injections

    PubMed Central

    Wesolowski, Carl A.; Wesolowski, Michal J.; Babyn, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    We present a model that generalizes the apparent volume of distribution and half-life as functions of time following intravenous bolus injection. This generalized model defines a time varying apparent volume of drug distribution. The half-lives of drug remaining in the body vary in time and become longer as time elapses, eventually converging to the terminal half-life. Two example fit models were substituted into the general model: biexponential models from the least relative concentration error, and gamma variate models using adaptive regularization for least relative error of clearance. Using adult population parameters from 41 studies of the renal glomerular filtration marker 169Yb-DTPA, simulations of extracellular fluid volumes of 5, 10, 15 and 20 litres and plasma clearances of 40 and 100 ml/min were obtained. Of these models, the adaptively obtained gamma variate models had longer times to 95% of terminal volume and longer half-lives. PMID:27403663

  16. Effect of treatment with an ivermectin sustained-release bolus on productivity of stocker beef calves.

    PubMed

    Williams, J C; Loyacano, A F; Broussard, S D; Coombs, D F

    1995-05-01

    Three groups of 30 crossbred beef steers, 8-10 months of age and ranging in weight from 158 to 320 kg, were used to compare effects of treatment with an ivermectin sustained-release bolus or two ivermectin injectable treatments on parasite control and productivity in relation to untreated controls during a 168 day winter-spring grazing period. Each group of 30 consisted of five cattle on each of six separate 1.6 ha pastures. Treatments on Day 0 (12 December) were: Group 1: untreated controls; Group 2: ivermectin injectable at 200 micrograms kg-1 bodyweight, s.c., on Day 0 and Day 56; Group 3: ivermectin sustained-release bolus to deliver ivermectin at 12 mg day-1 over approximately 135 days. All cattle were weighed at 28 day intervals and fecal samples were collected for egg per gram counts (EPG). Geometric mean EPG for Group 3 remained consistently less than 1.0 after Day 0 and were highest (2.4) on Day 168. All group EPG were significantly different (P < 0.01) by Day 56, and EPG of Group 2 had increased to 10.5 following initial treatment and to 42.8 on Day 112. With the exception of a low mean EPG of 6.8 for Group 1 on Day 112, EPG of the group were consistently highest (range 24.9-36.0) to the end of the experiment. Ostertagia ostertagi was predominant, along with smaller proportions of Haemonchus placei and Cooperia spp. Throughout the experiment Group 3 had highest liveweights and gains that were most often different from those of Group 1 at P < 0.01 or greater.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Bolus oral or continuous intestinal amino acids reduce hypothermia during anesthesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Imoto, Akinobu; Yokoyama, Takeshi; Suwa, Kunio; Yamasaki, Fumiyasu; Yatabe, Tomoaki; Yokoyama, Reiko; Yamashita, Koichi; Selldén, Eva

    2010-01-01

    We hypothesized that, with oral or intestinal administration of amino acids (AA), we may reduce hypothermia during general anesthesia as effectively as with intravenous AA. We, therefore, examined the effect of bolus oral and continuous intestinal AA in preventing hypothermia in rats. Male Wistar rats were anesthetized with sevoflurane for induction and with propofol for maintenance. In the first experiment, 30 min before anesthesia, rats received one bolus 42 mL/kg of AA solution (100 g/L) or saline orally. Then for the next 3 h during anesthesia, they received 14 mL/kg/h of AA and/or saline intravenously. They were in 4 groups: I-A/A, both AA; I-A/S, oral AA and intravenous saline; I-S/A, oral saline and intravenous AA; I-S/S, both saline. In the second experiment, rats received 14 mL/kg/h duodenal AA and/or saline for 2 h. They were in 3 groups: II-A/S, duodenal AA and intravenous saline; II-S/A, duodenal saline and intravenous AA; II-S/S, both saline. Core body temperature was measured rectally. After the second experiment, serum electrolytes were examined. In both experiments, rectal temperature decreased in all groups during anesthesia. However, the decrease in rectal temperature was significantly less in groups receiving AA than in groups receiving only saline. In the second experiment, although there was no significant difference in the decrease in body temperature between II-A/S and II-S/A, Na(+) concentration was significantly lower in II-S/A. In conclusion, AA, administered orally or intestinally, tended to keep the body temperature stable during anesthesia without disturbing electrolyte balance. These results suggest that oral or enteral AA may be useful for prevention of hypothermia in patients.

  18. Noninvasive determination of respiratory ozone absorption: The bolus-response method. Research report, July 1990-September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Ultman, J.S.; Ben-Jebria, A.; Hu, S.C.

    1994-08-01

    The objective of the current research was to integrate into a bolus inhalation system capable of noninvasively measuring the longitudinal distribution of O3 absorption in intact human lungs. Ozone uptake was expressed as the amount of O3 absorbed during a single breath relative to the amount in the inhaled bolus. Measurements of ozone uptake were correlated with the penetration volume (Vp) of the bolus into the respiratory tract. During quiet oral breathing, ozone uptake increased smoothly with Vp, with 50% of the inhaled O3 absorbed in the upper airways and the balance absorbed within the lower conducting airways. The effect of increasing the respiratory flow, which occurs when people exercise, was to shift the ozone uptake-Vp distribution distally so that significantly less O3 was absorbed in the upper airways and more reached the respiratory airspaces. Compared with oral breathing, nasal breathing caused a proximal shift in the ozone uptake-Vp distribution to the extent that absorption in the upper airways increased from 50% to 80% flow. The peak O3 concentration of an inhaled bolus did not have a significant effect on the ozone uptake-Vp distributon. This implies that the diffusion and chemical reaction process dictating O3 absorption are linear.

  19. Intermittent bolus feeding has a greater stimulatory effect on protein synthesis in skeletal muscle than continuous feeding in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Orogastric tube feeding, using either continuous or intermittent bolus delivery, is common in infants for whom normal feeding is contraindicated. To compare the impact of different feeding strategies on muscle protein synthesis, after withholding food overnight, neonatal pigs received a complete for...

  20. Changes in fat concentration of human milk during delivery by intermittent bolus and continuous mechanical pump infusion.

    PubMed

    Greer, F R; McCormick, A; Loker, J

    1984-11-01

    The changes in fat concentration and cumulative fat losses that occur during the delivery of human milk using two different continuous infusion systems were compared with the changes in fat concentration during simulated intermittent gavage or bolus feedings. With both mechanical pumps the largest cumulative fat losses and the greatest decreases in fat concentrations occurred at the slowest infusion rates. State of homogenization of the milk generally made little difference in the changes in fat concentration using the syringe pump, whereas homogenizing the milk increased the fat concentration significantly with the roller pump. With the syringe pump the positioning of the syringe tip (horizontal or vertical) made no difference in fat concentration at an infusion rate of 1 ml/hr, whereas at 4 and 7 ml/hr the fat concentration was increased significantly by keeping the syringe tip vertical. With either mechanical pump a large fat bolus was delivered during the eighth and final hour of infusion if the milk remaining in the tubing was recovered by using air infusion at the same infusion rate. Intermittent bolus delivery of human milk resulted in no significant loss of human milk fat, no changes in fat concentration, and no terminal delivery of a large fat load. Thus intermittent bolus feedings are preferred over continuous mechanical pump infusion systems for the delivery of human milk to low-birth-weight infants.

  1. Intermittent bolus feeding has a greater stimulatory effect on protein synthesis in skeletal muscle than continuous feeding in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Feeding by orogastric tube, using either continuous or intermittent bolus delivery, is common for infants for whom normal feeding is contraindicated. To determine the impact of different feeding modalities on muscle protein anabolism, neonatal pigs (5–7 day old) received a balanced enteral formula e...

  2. Protein deposition in the hindquarters of neonatal pigs is enhanced by intermittent bolus compared to continuous feeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Orogastric tube feeding is indicated in neonates with impaired ability to feed, and can be administered by an intermittent bolus or continuous schedule. The aim of this study was to determine how these feeding modalities affect protein turnover. Neonatal pigs (n=6/group, 9-d-old) were overnight fast...

  3. SU-E-T-176: Clinical Experience of Brass Mesh Bolus: Patient-Specific Parameters as Predictors of Measured Dosimetric Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Yock, A; Manger, R; Einck, J; Yashar, C; Sanghvi, P; Hattangadi-Gluth, J; Cervino, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Increasingly, brass mesh bolus is used to insure dosimetric coverage of the skin for patients treated post-mastectomy for breast cancer. Contribution of photoelectrons from interactions between the bolus and the primary beam increases dose superficially without affecting dose at greater depths. We present our experience using brass mesh bolus – including patients for whom the bolus was dosimetrically inadequate – along with analysis of relevant patient-specific parameters. Methods: Optically-stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs) were used to determine the effect of the bolus for 15 patients. They were positioned beneath the bolus within the tangent fields at three positions: 1.5–3cm inside the medial and lateral field edges, and midway between the two. All OSLDs were midfield in the cranial-caudal direction. The measurements were compared with patient-specific parameters including separation, chest wall/breast tissue thickness, beam angle incidence, and planned surface dose. Results: The average OSLD measurement at the medial field edge, midfield, and lateral field edge position was 86.8%, 101.8%, and 92.8% of the prescription dose, respectively. A measurement for one patient was low enough (77.0%) to warrant a switch to an alternative type of bolus. Anatomic parameters were analyzed to investigate the low dose in this case, not observed in the planning system. The patient was observed to have a thin chest wall and very oblique beam angles. A second patient was also switched to an alternative type of bolus due to her being high risk and treated with an electron patch that extended onto the breast. Conclusion: Brass mesh bolus increases dose superficially while leaving dose at greater depths unaffected. However, our results suggest that this effect may be insufficient in patients with a thin chest wall or very oblique beam angles. More data and analysis is necessary to proactively identify patients for whom brass mesh bolus is effective.

  4. Once-Daily Radiation Therapy for Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Lindsay; Harmsen, William; Blanchard, Miran; Goetz, Matthew; Jakub, James; Mutter, Robert; Petersen, Ivy; Rooney, Jessica; Stauder, Michael; Yan, Elizabeth; Laack, Nadia

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a rare and aggressive breast cancer variant treated with multimodality therapy. A variety of approaches intended to escalate the intensity and efficacy of radiation therapy have been reported, including twice-daily radiation therapy, dose escalation, and aggressive use of bolus. Herein, we examine our outcomes for patients treated with once-daily radiation therapy with aggressive bolus utilization, focusing on treatment technique. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of patients with nonmetastatic IBC treated from January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2010, was performed. Locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS) and predictors thereof were assessed. Results: Fifty-two women with IBC were identified, 49 (94%) of whom were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. All underwent mastectomy followed by adjuvant radiation therapy. Radiation was delivered in once-daily fractions of 1.8 to 2.25 Gy (median, 2 Gy). Patients were typically treated with daily 1-cm bolus throughout treatment, and 33 (63%) received a subsequent boost to the mastectomy scar. Five-year Kaplan Meier survival estimates for LRC, DFS, and OS were 81%, 56%, and 64%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence was associated with poorer OS (P<.001; hazard ratio [HR], 4.1). Extracapsular extension was associated with worse LRC (P=.02), DFS (P=.007), and OS (P=.002). Age greater than 50 years was associated with better DFS (P=.03). Pathologic complete response was associated with a trend toward improved LRC (P=.06). Conclusions: Once-daily radiation therapy with aggressive use of bolus for IBC results in outcomes consistent with previous reports using various intensified radiation therapy regimens. LRC remains a challenge despite modern systemic therapy. Extracapsular extension, age ≤50 years, and lack of complete response to chemotherapy appear to be associated with worse outcomes. Novel strategies are needed in IBC

  5. The optimal exhaled concentration of sevoflurane for intubation without neuromuscular blockade using clinical bolus doses of remifentanil

    PubMed Central

    Goo, Eui-Kyoung; Lee, Jong Seok; Koh, Jae Chul

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the optimal exhaled sevoflurane concentration that produces adequate endotracheal intubation conditions when sevoflurane is combined with the different bolus doses of remifentanil used in clinical practice. Methods: The patients were randomized to 3 groups (groups 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0), receiving remifentanil bolus doses of 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 μg/kg, respectively. For each group, the concentration of sevoflurane used for each consecutive patient was increased or decreased using the “up-and-down” method based on the success or failure to achieve adequate conditions for intubation in the previous patient. The remifentanil bolus dose was administered 90 s before intubation and after the target sevoflurane concentration was achieved. Results: In groups 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0, the effective concentration in 50% (EC50) of the sevoflurane concentration required to perform successful intubation was 3.0, 2.0, and 1.29 vol% and the effective concentration in 95% was 3.45, 2.91, and 1.89 vol%, respectively. When sevoflurane was administered for the induction, the increase in heart rate (HR) of group 1.0 was the highest among the groups. The highest number of adverse events occurred in group 2.0, including vocal cord rigidity, hypotension, and bradycardia. Discussion: The EC50 of the sevoflurane concentration was 3.0, 2.0, and 1.29 vol% when it was combined with a bolus dose of remifentanil of 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 μg/kg, respectively. Of the 3 different bolus doses of remifentanil, the dose of 1.5 μg/kg was least associated with changes in the HR/mean blood pressure during intubation without increasing adverse effects. PMID:28248887

  6. SU-E-T-19: A Comparison of the Dosimetric Effects of Brass Mesh and Superflab Boluses

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, JS; Gong, J; Pavord, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We compared the dosimetric effects of brass mesh (Whiting and Davis, Attleboro Falls, MA) and Superflab (CNMC, Nashville, TN) boluses to verify equivalence between the two. Brass mesh bolus may be a convenient alternative to traditional bolus as it better conforms to the skin surface. Methods: Measurements were taken using a 6MV 10×10cm field produced by an Infinity linear accelerator (Elekta, Stockholm, Sweden) in a solid water phantom using a parallel plate ion chamber (Model 96035, Keithley Instruments, Cleveland, OH). Measurements compared 0.5cm and 1cm of Superflab to one to six layers of brass bolus mesh. Measurements were performed at depths from 0cm (‘skin’) to 10cm. Oblique beams were not studied. Results: Four layers of brass mesh were equivalent to 0.5cm Superflab within 5% at all depths. Six layers of brass compares most favorably with 0.5cm Superflab, with doses at all depths within 3%. Six layers of brass were not fully equivalent to 1cm Superflab, although the agreement was within 5% for depths greater than 3mm. Surface dose was 12% lower than 1cm Superflab. Surface dose can be up to 34% different between Superflab and brass mesh, but is less than 5% different with 4–6 layers of brass when compared to 0.5cm Superflab. To achieve surface dose agreement better than 5% compared to 1cm Superflab, more than 6 layers would be needed. The attenuation at depth was a maximum of 0.17cm per layer. Conclusion: Between four and six layers of brass mesh can be equivalent to 0.5cm Superflab, depending on the level of agreement desired. Equivalence within 5% at all depths to 1cm Superflab was not achieved even with six layers. This data agrees with measurements taken by Utsunomiya et al. (2010). More point measurements at shallower depths should be taken prior to clinical implementation of brass bolus mesh.

  7. Vasopressin Bolus Protocol Compared to Desmopressin (DDAVP) for Managing Acute, Postoperative Central Diabetes Insipidus and Hypovolemic Shock.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Anukrati; Alqadri, Syeda; Ausmus, Ashley; Bell, Robert; Nattanmai, Premkumar; Newey, Christopher R

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Management of postoperative central diabetes insipidus (DI) can be challenging from changes in volume status and serum sodium levels. We report a case successfully using a dilute vasopressin bolus protocol in managing hypovolemic shock in acute, postoperative, central DI. Case Report. Patient presented after bifrontal decompressive craniotomy for severe traumatic brain injury. He developed increased urine output resulting in hypovolemia and hypernatremia. He was resuscitated with intravenous fluids including a dilute vasopressin bolus protocol. This protocol consisted of 1 unit of vasopressin in 1 liter of 0.45% normal saline. This protocol was given in boluses based on the formula: urine output minus one hundred. Initial serum sodium was 148 mmol/L, and one-hour urine output was 1 liter. After 48 hours, he transitioned to 1-desamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin (DDAVP). Pre-DDAVP serum sodium was 149 mmol/L and one-hour urine output 320 cc. Comparing the bolus protocol to the DDAVP protocol, the average sodium was 143.8 ± 3.2 and 149.6 ± 3.2 mmol/L (p = 0.0001), average urine output was 433.2 ± 354.4 and 422.3 ± 276.0 cc/hr (p = 0.90), and average specific gravity was 1.019 ± 0.009 and 1.016 ± 0.01 (p = 0.42), respectively. Conclusion. A protocol using dilute vasopressin bolus can be an alternative for managing acute, central DI postoperatively, particularly in setting of hypovolemic shock resulting in a consistent control of serum sodium.

  8. Vasopressin Bolus Protocol Compared to Desmopressin (DDAVP) for Managing Acute, Postoperative Central Diabetes Insipidus and Hypovolemic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Anukrati; Alqadri, Syeda; Ausmus, Ashley; Bell, Robert; Nattanmai, Premkumar

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Management of postoperative central diabetes insipidus (DI) can be challenging from changes in volume status and serum sodium levels. We report a case successfully using a dilute vasopressin bolus protocol in managing hypovolemic shock in acute, postoperative, central DI. Case Report. Patient presented after bifrontal decompressive craniotomy for severe traumatic brain injury. He developed increased urine output resulting in hypovolemia and hypernatremia. He was resuscitated with intravenous fluids including a dilute vasopressin bolus protocol. This protocol consisted of 1 unit of vasopressin in 1 liter of 0.45% normal saline. This protocol was given in boluses based on the formula: urine output minus one hundred. Initial serum sodium was 148 mmol/L, and one-hour urine output was 1 liter. After 48 hours, he transitioned to 1-desamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin (DDAVP). Pre-DDAVP serum sodium was 149 mmol/L and one-hour urine output 320 cc. Comparing the bolus protocol to the DDAVP protocol, the average sodium was 143.8 ± 3.2 and 149.6 ± 3.2 mmol/L (p = 0.0001), average urine output was 433.2 ± 354.4 and 422.3 ± 276.0 cc/hr (p = 0.90), and average specific gravity was 1.019 ± 0.009 and 1.016 ± 0.01 (p = 0.42), respectively. Conclusion. A protocol using dilute vasopressin bolus can be an alternative for managing acute, central DI postoperatively, particularly in setting of hypovolemic shock resulting in a consistent control of serum sodium. PMID:28127476

  9. Extended field test on the use of visual ear tags and electronic boluses for the identification of different goat breeds in the United States.

    PubMed

    Carné, S; Gipson, T A; Rovai, M; Merkel, R C; Caja, G

    2009-07-01

    A total of 295 goats from 4 breeds (Alpine, n = 74; Angora, n = 75; Boer-cross, n = 73; Spanish, n = 73) were used to assess the retention of 3 types of electronic ruminal boluses (B1, 20 g, n = 95; B2, 75 g, n = 100; and B3, 82 g, n = 100) according to breed and feeding conditions. Time for bolus administration, reading with a handheld reader, and animal data recording (goat identification, breed, and bolus type) were registered. Each goat was also identified with 1 flag-button plastic ear tag (4.6 g, 51 x 41 mm). Retention of boluses and ear tags was regularly monitored for 1 yr. Ruminal fluid in 5 goats from each breed and management group was obtained with an oro-ruminal probe at 2 h after feeding. Ruminal pH was measured at 24 h and at wk 1, 2, 3, and 4 and used as an indicator of feeding conditions on rumen environment. Time for bolus administration differed by bolus type (B1, 14 +/- 2 s; B2, 24 +/- 2 s; B3, 27 +/- 2 s; P < 0.05) and goat breed (Alpine, 34 +/- 3 s; Angora, 17 +/- 2 s; Boer-cross, 16 +/- 1 s; Spanish, 19 +/- 2 s; P < 0.05), although differences were due to greater times for B2 and B3 in Alpine goats. Time for bolus administration averaged 22 +/- 1 s, and overall time for bolusing, reading, and data typing was 49 +/- 1 s on average. Ruminal pH differed according to breed and feeding management (lactating Alpine, 6.50 +/- 0.07; yearling Alpine, 6.73 +/- 0.07; Angora, 6.34 +/- 0.06; Boer-cross, 6.62 +/- 0.04; Spanish, 6.32 +/- 0.08; P < 0.05), but no early bolus losses occurred; rumen pH did not differ according to bolus type (B1, 6.45 +/- 0.05; B2, 6.39 +/- 0.07; B3, 6.49 +/- 0.05; P > 0.05). At 6 mo, electronic boluses showed greater retention than ear tags (99.7 vs. 97.2%; P < 0.05). At 12 mo, bolus retention was 96.3, 100, and 97.8% for B1, B2, and B3, respectively, not differing between B1 and B3 (P = 0.562). No effect of breed and bolus type on bolus retention was detected. No goat losing, at the same time, both bolus and ear tag was

  10. Methylprednisolone prevents the development of autotomy and neuropathic edema in rats, but has no effect on nociceptive thresholds.

    PubMed

    Kingery, W S; Castellote, J M; Maze, M

    1999-04-01

    Corticosteroids are probably an effective treatment for some types of neuropathic pain and complex regional pain syndromes. This study examined the effects of systemic methylprednisolone (MP) on acute nociception and on pain behavior and hyperalgesia in normal and neuropathic rats. There was no dose-response to intraperitoneal MP (up to 12 mg/kg) for nociceptive thresholds to heat (Peltier) or mechanical (analgesy-meter and von Frey fibers) stimuli in normal rats. Chronic high dose MP (3 mg/kg per day for 21 days) also had no effect on acute nociceptive thresholds in normal rats. After sciatic nerve section in rats a saphenous nerve mediated hyperalgesia to heat and mechanical stimuli gradually developed over 21 days. High dose MP (3 mg/kg per day for 21 days) had no effect on this adjacent neuropathic hyperalgesia. When systemic MP was started immediately after bilateral sciatic and saphenous nerve transection there was a dose-dependent reduction in autotomy behavior. Substance P has been proposed as a mediator of neuropathic pain and edema. Single dose MP (12 mg/kg) slightly reduced the substance P mediated extravasation induced with electrical stimulation of the saphenous nerve. Chronic MP (3.4 mg/kg per day for 28 days) severely reduced the neurogenic extravasation induced with saphenous nerve stimulation. Sciatic sectioned rats developed hindpaw edema between 7 and 14 days after surgery, and this neuropathic edema did not develop in rats chronically treated with MP (3.4 mg/kg per day). These results demonstrate that corticosteroids did not affect nociceptive thresholds in normal or neuropathic hyperalgesic rats. Chronic steroid treatment did prevent the development of autotomy and neuropathic edema, and completely blocked neurogenic extravasation, findings consistent with the hypothesis that primary afferent substance P release mediates autotomy pain behavior and neuropathic edema. This may be a relevant model for examining the effects of corticosteroids on

  11. Disposition of methylprednisolone acetate in plasma, urine, and synovial fluid following intra-articular administration to exercised thoroughbred horses.

    PubMed

    Knych, H K; Harrison, L M; Casbeer, H C; McKemie, D S

    2014-04-01

    Methylprednisolone acetate (MPA) is commonly administered to performance horses, and therefore, establishing appropriate withdrawal times prior to performance is critical. The objectives of this study were to describe the plasma pharmacokinetics of MPA and time-related urine and synovial fluid concentrations following intra-articular administration to sixteen racing fit adult Thoroughbred horses. Horses received a single intra-articular administration of MPA (100 mg). Blood, urine, and synovial fluid samples were collected prior to and at various times up to 77 days postdrug administration and analyzed using tandem liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Maximum measured plasma MPA concentrations were 6.06 ± 1.57 at 0.271 days (6.5 h; range: 5.0-7.92 h) and 6.27 ± 1.29 ng/mL at 0.276 days (6.6 h; range: 4.03-12.0 h) for horses that had synovial fluid collected (group 1) and those that did not (group 2), respectively. The plasma terminal half-life was 1.33 ± 0.80 and 0.843 ± 0.414 days for groups 1 and 2, respectively. MPA was undetectable by day 6.25 ± 2.12 (group 1) and 4.81 ± 2.56 (group 2) in plasma and day 17 (group 1) and 14 (group 2) in urine. MPA concentrations in synovial fluid remained above the limit of detection (LOD) for up to 77 days following intra-articular administration, suggesting that plasma and urine concentrations are not a good indicator of synovial fluid concentrations.

  12. Combined treatment with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and methylprednisolone in paraquat-induced acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To evaluate the efficacy of combined treatment with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC) transplantation and methylprednisolone (MP) to treat paraquat (PQ)-induced acute lung injury. Materials and methods A total of 102 female rats were randomly divided into five groups: PQ, BMSC, MP, BMSC + MP and normal control. After 14 days of PQ poisoning, the survival of rats, wet/dry weight ratio of lung tissue, serum levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-10, malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxidase dismutase (SOD), and the expression of nuclear factor (NF)-кB p65 in lung tissue were determined. Results Rats in BMSC and BMSC + MP groups survived. BMSC transplantation significantly decreased the wet/dry weight ratio of lung tissue, down-regulated NF-кB p65 expression in lung tissue, lowered serum levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and MDA, and increased serum levels of IL-10 and SOD. These changes were particularly significant on days 7–14 after PQ poisoning. The above changes were more significant in the MP group on days 1–3 after PQ poisoning, compared with those of the BMSC group. However, the BMSC + MP group showed more significant changes on days 1–14 after PQ poisoning than those of both BMSC and MP groups. Conclusions MP inhibits the inflammatory response, reduces the products of lipid peroxidation and promotes survival of transplanted BMSC, thus improving the intermediate and longer term efficacy of BMSC transplantation for treatment of PQ-induced lung injury. PMID:23902576

  13. Tolerability and efficacy of erythropoietin (EPO) treatment in traumatic spinal cord injury: a preliminary randomized comparative trial vs. methylprednisolone (MP).

    PubMed

    Costa, Davide Dalla; Beghi, Ettore; Carignano, Paola; Pagliacci, Cristina; Faccioli, Franco; Pupillo, Elisabetta; Messina, Paolo; Gorio, Alfredo; Redaelli, Tiziana

    2015-09-01

    The only available treatment of traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) is high-dose methylprednisolone (MP) administered acutely after injury. However, as the efficacy of MP is controversial, we assessed the superiority of erythropoietin (EPO) versus MP in improving clinical outcome of acute TSCI. Patients aged 18 to 65 years after C5-T12 injury, and grade A or B of the ASIA Impairment Scale (AIS), admitted within 8 h, hemodynamically stable, were randomized to MP according to the NASCIS III protocol or EPO iv (500 UI/kg, repeated at 24 and 48 h). Patients were assessed by an investigator blind to treatment assignment at baseline and at day 3, 7, 14, 30, 60 and 90. Primary end point: number of responders (reduction of at least one AIS grade). Secondary end points: treatment safety and the effects of drugs on a number of disability measures. Frequentistic and post hoc Bayesian analyses were performed. Eight patients were randomized to MP and 11 to EPO. Three patients (27.3 %) on EPO and no patients on MP reached the primary end point (p = 0.17). No significant differences were found for the other disability measures. No adverse events or serious adverse events were reported in both groups. The Bayesian analysis detected a 91.8 % chance of achieving higher success rates on the primary end point with EPO in the intention-to-treat population with a 95 % chance the difference between EPO and MP falling in the range (-0.10, 0.51) and a median value of 0.2. The results of Bayesian analysis favored the experimental treatment.

  14. Clinical experience with repository corticotropin injection in patients with multiple sclerosis experiencing mood changes with intravenous methylprednisolone: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Stacey; Woo, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The elevated prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms and disorders among patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) is well recognized, as are potential neuropsychiatric side effects of treatment with corticosteroids. Both methylprednisolone (MP) and repository corticotropin injection (HP Acthar® gel) have demonstrated efficacy in reducing short-term disability after exacerbations of MS. Although historical data are limited, repository corticotropin injection has not generally been associated with detrimental neuropsychiatric effects. We describe six cases of patients with relapsing-remitting MS who had previously experienced detrimental mood changes with MP treatment. Some of these patients had previous histories of mood disorders or other neuropsychiatric symptoms prior to MS diagnosis. All six patients were subsequently treated with repository corticotropin injection for MS exacerbations and each demonstrated improvements in MS symptoms. This clinical experience suggests that repository corticotropin injection should be considered as an alternative for patients who do not tolerate corticosteroids or have difficulties associated with intravenous medication. Furthermore, the rate of neuropsychiatric side effects observed in these patients was low. These observations support repository corticotropin injection as a viable alternative for the treatment of acute exacerbations of MS, particularly in patients who have a history of neuropsychiatric disorders or symptoms either independently or in response to MP treatment. In reviewing both the published data and our own clinical experience regarding potential neuropsychiatric adverse events with treatment for MS exacerbations, we hope to stimulate further research into the potential efficacy and safety of repository corticotropin injection among patients with some form of neuropsychiatric complications that must be considered when establishing a treatment plan for MS. PMID:27134674

  15. Effect of short-term, high-dose methylprednisolone on oxidative stress in children with acute immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Cura, Musa; Koç, Ahmet; Aksoy, Nurten

    2016-01-01

    Background Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is the most common cause of acquired childhood thrombocytopenia and is characterized by increased immune-mediated destruction of circulating thrombocytes. Oxidative damage may be involved in ITP pathogenesis; paraoxonase (PON) and arylesterase (ARE) enzymes are closely associated with the cellular antioxidant system. We investigated the effect of short-term high-dose methylprednisolone (HDMP) treatment on the total oxidant status (TOS), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), oxidative stress index (OSI), and PON and ARE enzymatic activity in children with acute ITP. Methods Thirty children with acute ITP constituted the study group and 30 healthy children constituted the control group. Children with acute ITP were treated with HDMP: 30 mg/kg for 3 days, then 20 mg/kg for 4 days. The TOS, TAC, OSI, PON, and ARE levels were determined before and after 7 days of HDMP treatment. Results The TAC level (P<0.001), and PON (P<0.001) and ARE (P=0.001) activities were lower and the TOS (P=0.003) and OSI (P<0.001) levels were higher in children with acute ITP than those in healthy children in the control group. We also observed statistically significant increases in the TAC (P<0.01), PON (P<0.001) and ARE levels (P=0.001) and decreases in the TOS (P<0.05) and OSI levels (P<0.05) with 7 days of HDMP treatment compared to their values before treatment. Conclusion Our study demonstrated increased oxidative stress (OSI and TOC) and decreased antioxidant capacity (TAC), PON, and ARE in ITP patients and that steroid treatment could be effective in reducing the oxidative stress. PMID:28090489

  16. Classification and discrimination of pediatric patients undergoing open heart surgery with and without methylprednisolone treatment by cytomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocsi, Jozsef; Mittag, Anja; Pierzchalski, Arkadiusz; Osmancik, Pavel; Dähnert, Ingo; Tárnok, Attila

    2011-02-01

    Introduction: Methylprednisolone (MP) is frequently preoperatively administered in children undergoing open heart surgery. The aim of this medication is to inhibit overshooting immune responses. Earlier studies demonstrated cellular and humoral immunological changes in pediatric patients undergoing heart surgeries with and without MP administration. Here in a retrospective study we investigated the modulation of the cellular immune response by MP. The aim was to identify suitable parameters characterizing MP effects by cluster analysis. Methods: Blood samples were analysed from two aged matched groups with surgical correction of septum defects. Group without MP treatment consisted of 10 patients; MP was administered on 21 patients (median dose: 11mg/kg) before cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). EDTA anticoagulated blood was obtained 24 h preoperatively, after anesthesia, at CPB begin and end (CPB2), 4h, 24h, 48h after surgery, at discharge and at out-patient followup (8.2; 3.3-12.2 month after surgery; median and IQR). Flow cytometry showed the biggest MP relevant changes at CPB2 and 4h postoperatively. They were used for clustering analysis. Classification was made by discriminant analysis and cluster analysis by means of Genes@work software. Results & conclusion: 146 parameters were obtained from analysis. Cross-validation revealed several parameters being able to discriminate between MP groups and to identify immune modulation. MP administration resulted in a delayed activation of monocytes, increased ratio of neutrophils, reduced T-lymphocytes counts. Cluster analysis demonstrated that classification of patients is possible based on the identified cytomics parameters. Further investigation of these parameters might help to understand the MP effects in pediatric open heart surgery.

  17. Myocardial hydroxyproline reduced by early administration of methylprednisolone or ibuprofen to rabbits with radiation-induced heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, W.C.; Cunningham, D.; Schwiter, E.J.; Abt, A.; Skarlatos, S.; Wood, M.A.; Whitesell, L.

    1982-05-01

    The ability of methylprednisolone (MP) and ibuprofen (IB) to reduce the severity of the late state of radiation-induced heart disease was assessed in 57 New Zealand white rabbits. Before and shortly after cardiac irradiation, 15 rabbits received i.v. MP, 30 mg/kg twice daily for 3 days, and 15 others received IB, 12.5 mg/kg twice daily for 2 days. No drug administered to 14 irradiated rabbits, and neither irradiation nor drugs were administered to 13 rabbits that served as controls. All 15 rabbits treated with MP and 13 of the 15 treated with IB lived for 100 days. Only seven of the untreated, irradiated rabbits lived that long. Longevity of each treated group of rabbits was better (p < 0.01 and 0.05) than that of the untreated, irradiated rabbits. Surviving rabbits were killed 100 days after irradiation. Pericarditis (p < 0.05) and pericardial effusion (p < 0.01) were less frequent in the treated, irradiated groups than in the untreated, irradiated rabbits. At least some rabbits in each irradiated group had microscopic evidence of myocardial fibrosis. The fibrosis was quantitated by determination of myocardial hydroxyproline concentrations (MHP). MHP concentration in the untreated, irradiated rabbits was greater than in those treated with MP (p < 0.05) or IB (p < 0.01) and in the untreated, unirradiated rabbits (p < 0.01). Early administrative of MP or IB retarded the development of myocardial fibrosis, pericarditis and pericardial effusin, and improved survival in this experimental model of radiation-induced heart disease.

  18. Myocardial hydroxyproline reduced by early administration of methylprednisolone or ibuprofen to rabbits with radiation-induced heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, W.C.; Cunningham, D.; Schwiter, E.J.; Abt, A.; Skarlatos, S.; Wood, M.A.; Whitesell, L.

    1982-05-01

    The ability of methylprednisolone (MP) and ibuprofen (IB) to reduce the severity of the late state of radiation-induced heart disease was assessed in 57 New Zealand white rabbits. Before and shortly after cardiac irradiation, 15 rabbits received i.v. MP, 30 mg/kg twice daily for 3 days, and 15 others received IB, 12.5 mg/kg twice daily for 2 days. No drug was administered to 14 irradiated rabbits, and neither irradiation nor drugs were administered to 13 rabbits that served as controls, All 15 rabbits treated with MP and 13 of the 15 treated with IB lived for 100 days. Only seven of the untreated, irradiated rabbits lived that long. Longevity of each treated group of rabbits was better (p less than 0.01 and 0.05) than that of the untreated, irradiated rabbits. Surviving rabbits were killed 100 days after irradiation. Pericarditis (p less than 0.05) and pericardial effusion (p less than 0.01) were less frequent in the treated, irradiated groups than in the untreated, irradiated rabbits. At least some rabbits in each irradiated group had microscopic evidence of myocardial fibrosis. The fibrosis was quantitated by determination of myocardial hydroxyproline concentrations (MHP). MHP concentration in the untreated, irradiated rabbits was greater than in those treated with MP (p less than 0.05) or IB (p less than 0.01) and in the untreated, unirradiated rabbits (p less than 0.01). Early administration of MP or IB retarded the development of myocardial fibrosis, pericarditis and pericardial effusion, and improved survival in this experimental model of radiation-induced heart disease.

  19. Sulfoalkyl ether-alkyl ether cyclodextrin derivatives, their synthesis, NMR characterization, and binding of 6alpha-methylprednisolone.

    PubMed

    Tongiani, Serena; Velde, David Vander; Ozeki, Tetsuya; Stella, Valentino J

    2005-11-01

    The objective of this study is to see if random alkyl ethers of various sulfoalkyl ether cyclodextrins can be synthesized and characterized. The purpose of the alkylation was to test the hypothesis that an increase in the "height" of a cyclodextrins cavity would help in the binding/complexation of larger more structurally complex molecules. The synthesis of new cyclodextrin derivatives comprising a mixture of sulfoalkyl ether and alkyl ether substituents on the same cyclodextrin ring was performed in aqueous alkaline solutions using various sultones and alkylsulfates. The method presented provided an easy and efficient way to modify cyclodextrins avoiding the use of organic solvents and high quantities of alkylating agents and could be carried out in either a two step or "one pot" single step process. Purification was by neutralization followed by ultrafiltration. The derivatives were characterized by 1D, ((1)H and (13)C), and a 2D NMR technique (HMQC, Heteronuclear Multiple Quantum Coherence). The combination of these techniques allowed an analysis of the degree of substitution and the site of substitution on the cyclodextrin (CD) nucleus. For both beta- and gamma-CD, sulfoakylation was preferred on the 2 > 3 > 6 hydroxyls while alkylation was preferred 6 > 2 > 3. Due to the simultaneous presence of short alkyl ether chains and negatively charged sulfoalkyl ether chains, these mixed water-soluble cyclodextrin derivatives, especially those of gamma-cyclodextrin, should be able to bind more complex drugs. The improved binding capacity of these new modified CDs with the model drug 6alpha-methylprednisolone is reported.

  20. A retrospective study on IVF outcome in patients with anticardiolipin antibody: effects of methylprednisolone plus low-dose aspirin adjuvant treatment.

    PubMed

    Ying, Ying; Zhong, Yi-ping; Zhou, Can-quan; Xu, Yan-wen; Wang, Qiong; Li, Jie; Wu, Hai-tao; Shen, Xiao-ting

    2012-06-01

    Patients undergoing in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer have a high prevalence of anticardiolipin antibody (ACA). However, the relationship between ACA and IVF outcome is still controversial. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the potential effect of anticardiolipin antibody on IVF outcome and determine the role of adjuvant treatment in these ACA positive patients. The study included a total of 116 infertile women (116 IVF-ET cycles) positive for ACA, including 56 women pretreated with methylprednisolone plus low-dose aspirin before IVF (treated ACA+ group) and 60 patients without treatment (untreated ACA+ group). In addition, 518 infertile women (518 IVF-ET cycles) negative for ACA were enroled as controls (ACA- group). The results show that ACA+ patients who did not receive any adjuvant treatment showed a significantly lower fertilization rate, less high-quality embryos, as well as a markedly lower pregnancy rate and implantation rate than controls. Moreover, ACA+ patients who received methylprednisolone plus aspirin achieved significantly higher fertilization, pregnancy and implantation rates than untreated ACA+ patients (FR 69.0%, PR 46.4% and IR 25.4% vs. FR 60.0%, PR 33.3% and IR 17.9%, respectively). The overall IVF results in the treated ACA+ group were comparable to patients negative for ACA (PR 53.9% and IR 32.3%). Thus, while the presence of ACA exerts a detrimental effect on IVF outcome, ACA+ patients have a better outcome if given methylprednisolone for immunosuppression and low-dose aspirin as an anti-thrombotic agent.

  1. Time-Resolved and Bolus-Chase MR Angiography of the Leg: Branching Pattern Analysis and Identification of Septocutaneous Perforators

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Gurpreet S.; Rezaee, Rod P.; Wright, Katherine; Jesberger, John A.; Griswold, Mark A.; Gulani, Vikas

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The goal of this study was to compare time-resolved MR angiography (MRA) and bolus-chase MRA in the identification of peroneal artery septocutaneous perforators and for classification of the branching pattern of the arterial tree in the leg in a cohort of candidates for fibular free flap transfer operations. MATERIALS AND METHODS Retrospective analysis was performed on imaging data from 53 legs of 27 patients (age range, 27–88 years) who underwent time-resolved MRA (FLASH; TR/TE, 2.5/1.0; flip angle, 22°; voxel dimensions, 1.54 × 1.25 × 1.5 mm; acquisition time, 2.27 s/frame) and bolus-chase MRA (FLASH; 3.2/1.2; flip angle, 25°; voxel dimensions, 0.94 × 0.89 × 1 mm) at 3 T with gadobenate dimeglumine administered at 0.05 and 0.10 mmol/kg, respectively. The branching pattern was analyzed; the total number of septocutaneous perforators for each leg was calculated from the time-resolved and bolus-chase MRA data; and the results were combined. The total and average number of septocutaneous perforators per leg and the frequency of various branching patterns were calculated. The techniques were compared in terms of branching pattern and number of visible septocutaneous perforators. RESULTS A total of 84 septocutaneous perforators (1.58 ± 1.05 [SD] per leg) were identified. Pattern 1A was found in 42 legs; 1B, two legs; 2A, one leg; 2B, one; 3A, four; 3B, one; and 3D, two legs. Classification with time-resolved MRA was successful for 53 legs and with bolus-chase MRA for 51 legs (Z = 0.713, p = 0.24, one-tailed, not significant). Twenty-two septocutaneous perforators were identified with time-resolved MRA and 82 with bolus-chase MRA. CONCLUSION MRA of the leg can be used to investigate the branching pattern and identify septocutaneous perforators in a single step. With the imaging parameters and contrast dose used in this study, septocutaneous perforators can be better identified with bolus-chase MRA, although this result may be partially related to the

  2. Growth hormone and prolactin responses to bolus and sustained infusions of GRH-1-40-OH in man.

    PubMed

    Goldman, J A; Molitch, M E; Thorner, M O; Vale, W; Rivier, J; Reichlin, S

    1987-08-01

    To determine whether GRH stimulates PRL secretion we studied the effects of iv bolus injections and prolonged infusions of GRH 1-40-OH on PRL and GH serum levels in normal volunteers. Eight patients with acromegaly, two of whom had elevated basal levels of PRL, were also tested with single bolus injections. Six normal subjects given 3.3 micrograms/kg bolus injections of GRH showed a mean increment of GH of 22.0 +/- 1.7 ng/ml (mean +/- SE). A small rise in PRL was noted in 5 of the 6 subjects (mean peak level of 6.4 +/- 1.9 ng/ml vs basal level of 3.3 +/- 0.4 ng/ml, p less than 0.05). During the continuous intusion of GRH (10 ng/kg/min), GH levels rose gradually from a mean baseline of 1.1 +/- 0.1 ng/ml to a mean peak of 30.0 +/- 7.2 ng/ml at about 2 h and then slowly declined to a nadir of 4.2 +/- 0.4 ng/ml at 330 min. PRL levels did not rise significantly during the infusion. To determine whether the decline in GH levels in the face of continued infusion was due to loss of GH responsiveness, a 3.3 micrograms/kg bolus of GRH was given during the nadir at 330 min; this GH increment was significantly less than that obtained by the GRH bolus injection without the infusion (12.9 +/- 3.5 ng/ml vs 22.0 +/- 1.7 ng/ml, p less than 0.05). The PRL response to the GRH bolus was the same during the infusion of GRH as before. In each of 8 acromegalic patients (including two who had initially elevated basal PRL levels) GRH led to an increase in both GH and PRL levels. PRL and GH levels spontaneously fluctuated in parallel in 4 acromegalic cases studied with repeated samples over 6 h during placebo administration. These experiments show that GRH has significant, though weak, PRF effect in normals and that it is more potent PRF in acromegalic patients. Furthermore, the effects on GH and PRL of a sustained infusion of GRH for 5 1/2 h are both qualitatively and quantitatively different. These results suggest that the GRH effect is exerted either on different pituitary receptors for

  3. The use of a radiotelemetric ruminal bolus to detect body temperature changes in lactating dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Alzahal, O; Alzahal, H; Steele, M A; Van Schaik, M; Kyriazakis, I; Duffield, T F; McBride, B W

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this study was to validate the efficacy of a radiotelemetric bolus (RTB) to detect changes in ruminal temperature resulting from (1) systemic illnesses that are associated with febrile responses and (2) subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA). Eight rumen-fistulated, lactating Holstein cows (586±37 kg of body weight, 106±18 d in milk) were used in a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square design with a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement. Each period consisted of 21 d. The factors were 2 diets, a moderate forage:concentrate [MFC; 52:48; % of dry matter (DM)] or a high forage:concentrate (HFC; 65:35, % of DM) total mixed ration, and a challenge with a single intramammary injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 100 μg derived from Escherichia coli 0111:B4) or no LPS (sterile saline). Thus, the 4 resulting treatments were (1) MFC with LPS challenge, (2) MFC with saline, (3) HFC with LPS challenge, and (4) HFC with saline. Cows were fed at 0800 and 1400 h daily. Cows received the intramammary injections at 0900 h of d 21. Ruminal pH and ruminal temperature were also measured on d 21 every minute via an indwelling logging system that resided in the ventral sac of the rumen and via a radiotelemetric bolus that resided in the reticulum. Vaginal temperature was also recorded every minute via temperature loggers. Prior to LPS injection, the duration of rumen pH below 5.6 (indicative of SARA) was higher in cows receiving MFC than cows receiving HFC (148±24 and 62±24 min/d, respectively). The temperature measured at the same time via RTB was higher for MFC than HFC cows (167±21 vs. 104 vs. 21 min/d above 38.8°C, respectively). The following day, cows challenged with LPS showed signs of mastitis within the injected quarters, depressed DM intake, decreased milk yield, and a peak vaginal temperature of 41.3±0.1°C 5.5h after the LPS injection. The RTB system successfully detected a fever response parallel to that measured by the vaginal loggers but temperature peak detected by

  4. Transcatheter Thrombolysis with High-Dose Bolus Tissue Plasminogen Activator in Iatrogenic Arterial Occlusion after Femoral Arterial Catheterization

    SciTech Connect

    Tsetis, Dimitrios K.; Kochiadakis, George E.; Hatzidakis, Adam A.; Skalidis, Emannuel I.; Chryssou, Evangelia G.; Tritou, Ioanna N.; Vardas, Panos E.; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas C.

    2002-01-15

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of percutaneous local thrombolysis with high-dose bolus recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) in patients with acute limb ischemia due to arterial thrombosis after cardiac catheterization.Methods: We treated eight patients (7 men; mean age 56 years) with thrombotic occlusion of both the common femoral artery (CFA) and external iliac artery (EIA) in six patients and of the CFA only in two patients. Two 5 mg boluses of rt-PA were injected into the proximal clot through a 5 Fr end-hole catheter and subsequently two additional boluses of 5 mg rt-PA were given through a catheter with multiple side-holes. In case of a significant amount of residual thrombus, a continuous infusion of 2.5 mg/hr of rt-PA was started.Results: Successful lysis was achieved in all patients. The mean duration of lysis was 2 hr 41 min. The mean total amount of rt-PA delivered was 23.16 mg. In four patients unmasked flow-limited dissections confined to the CFA were managed by prolonged balloon dilatation, while in the remaining four patients with extension of the dissection to the external iliac artery one or two Easy Wallstents were implanted. There was prompt relief of lower limb ischemic symptoms and signs in all patients. Two groin hematomas were conservatively treated.Clinical and color Doppler flow imaging follow-up with a mean duration of 15 months, showed no reappearance of ischemic symptoms or development of restenosis in any of the patients. One patient died 6 months after thrombolysis.Conclusions: Transcatheter thrombolysis with high-dose bolus rt-PA is a safe and effective treatment inpatients with iatrogenic arterial occlusion after femoral catheterization. Underlying dissections should be treated by prolonged balloon dilatation but stent implantation is often required.

  5. Comparison of continuous infusion with intermittent bolus administration of cefotaxime on blood and cavity fluid drug concentrations in neonatal foals.

    PubMed

    Hewson, J; Johnson, R; Arroyo, L G; Diaz-Mendez, A; Ruiz-López, J A; Gu, Y; del Castillo, J R E

    2013-02-01

    Healthy neonatal foals were treated with cefotaxime by bolus (40 mg/kg i.v. q6h for 12 doses; n=10) or by infusion (loading dose of 40 mg/kg i.v. followed by continuous infusion of a total daily dose of 160 mg/kg per 24 h for 3 days; n=5). Population pharmacokinetics was determined, and concentrations in cavity fluids were measured at steady state (72 h). Highest measured serum drug concentration in the bolus group was 88.09 μg/mL and minimum drug concentration (C(min)) was 0.78 μg/mL at 6-h postadministration (immediately before each next dose), whereas infusion resulted in a steady-state concentration of 16.10 μg/mL in the infusion group. Mean cefotaxime concentration in joint fluid at 72 h was higher (P=0.051) in the infusion group (5.02 μg/mL) compared to the bolus group (0.78 μg/mL). Drug concentration in CSF at 72 h was not different between groups (P=0.243) and was substantially lower than serum concentrations in either group. Insufficient data on pulmonary epithelial lining fluid were available to compare the methods of administration for cefotaxime in this cavity fluid. Results support continuous drug infusion over bolus dosing in the treatment for neonatal foal septicemia to optimize time that cefotaxime concentration exceeds the minimum inhibitory concentration of common equine pathogens.

  6. Electron Conformal Radiotherapy for Post-Mastectomy Irradiation: A Bolus-Free, Multi-Energy, Multi-Segmented Field Algorithm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    that compared to customized electron bolu s radiotherapy for post-mastectomy irradiation, ECT with multi-energy, multi-segmente d treatment fields has...PTV dos e homogeneity was quite good . Use of the treatment plan modification techniques improved dose sparin g for the non-target portion of the...phantom . For the patient treatment plans, the algorithm provided acceptable results for PTV conformality and dose homogeneity, in comparison to the bolus

  7. Split-Bolus Single-Pass Multidetector-Row CT Protocol for Diagnosis of Acute Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Scialpi, Michele; Rebonato, Alberto; Cagini, Lucio; Brunese, Luca; Piscioli, Irene; Pierotti, Luisa; Bellantonio, Lucio; D’Andrea, Alfredo; Rotondo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background: Currently computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) has become a widely accepted clinical tool in the diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Objectives: To report split-bolus single-pass 64-multidetector-row CT (MDCT) protocol for diagnosis of PE. Patients and Methods: MDCT split-bolus results in 40 patients suspicious of PE were analyzed in terms of image quality of target pulmonary vessels (TPVs) and occurrence and severity of flow-related artifact, flow-related artifact, false filling defect of the pulmonary veins and beam hardening streak artifacts. Dose radiation to patients was calculated. Results: MDCT split-bolus protocol allowed diagnostic images of high quality in all cases. Diagnosis of PE was obtained in 22 of 40 patients. Mean attenuation for target vessels was higher than 250 HU all cases: 361 ± 98 HU in pulmonary artery trunk (PAT); 339 ± 93 HU in right pulmonary artery (RPA); 334 ± 100 HU in left pulmonary artery (LPA). Adequate enhancement was obtained in the right atrium (RA):292 ± 83 HU; right pulmonary vein (RPV): 302 ± 91 HU, and left pulmonary vein (LPV): 291 ± 83 HU. The flow related artifacts and the beam hardening streak artifacts have been detected respectively in 4 and 25 patients. No false filling defect of the pulmonary veins was revealed. Conclusion: MDCT split-bolus technique by simultaneous opacification of pulmonary arteries and veins represents an accurate technique for diagnosis of acute PE, removes the false filling defects of the pulmonary veins, and reduces flow related artifacts. PMID:27110334

  8. Effect of bolus fluid intake on energy expenditure values as determined by the doubly labeled water method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drews, D.; Stein, T. P.

    1992-01-01

    The doubly labeled water (DLW, 2H(2)18O) method is a highly accurate method for measuring energy expenditure (EE). A possible source of error is bolus fluid intake before body water sampling. If there is bolus fluid intake immediately before body water sampling, the saliva may reflect the ingested water disproportionately, because the ingested water may not have had time to mix fully with the body water pool. To ascertain the magnitude of this problem, EE was measured over a 5-day period by the DLW method. Six subjects were dosed with 2H2(18)O. After the reference salivas for the two-point determination were obtained, subjects drank water (700-1,000 ml), and serial saliva samples were collected for the next 3 h. Expressing the postbolus saliva enrichments as a percentage of the prebolus value, we found 1) a minimum in the saliva isotopic enrichments were reached at approximately 30 min with the minimum for 2H (95.48 +/- 0.43%) being significantly lower than the minimum for 18O (97.55 +/- 0.44, P less than 0.05) and 2) EE values calculated using the postbolus isotopic enrichments are appreciably higher (19.9 +/- 7.5%) than the prebolus reference values. In conclusion, it is not advisable to collect saliva samples for DLW measurements within approximately 1 h of bolus fluid intake.

  9. Feedback-controlled bolus plus infusion (FC-B/I) method for quantitative drug assessment in living brain with PET

    PubMed Central

    Ohba, Hiroyuki; Harada, Norihiro; Nishiyama, Shingo; Kakiuchi, Takeharu; Kimura, Yuichi; Tsukada, Hideo

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a feedback-controlled bolus plus infusion (FC-B/I) method for monitoring the interaction between positron emission tomography (PET) ligands and their specific target molecules with PET. The usefulness of the FC-B/I method was evaluated by the direct interaction between [11C]raclopride, a dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) ligand, and cold raclopride (10 and 100 μg/kg) in the brains of conscious monkeys. The present results demonstrated that the FC-B/I method could achieve the equilibrium state of [11C]raclopride in the striatum of monkey brain, and also that the cold raclopride-induced reduction of [11C]raclopride binding to D2R was observed in a dose-dependent manner. Good correlations of distribution volume ratio of the striatum to cerebellum between the conventional bolus plus infusion (B/I) method and the FC-B/I method as well as between the conventional bolus injection method and the FC-B/I method were observed. These results indicated that the system could be a useful tool for the evaluation of interaction between drug candidates and their target molecules like enzymes, receptors, and transporters by using of their specific PET ligands. PMID:22968323

  10. Local infiltration analgesia is not improved by postoperative intra-articular bolus injections for pain after total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Karen V; Nikolajsen, Lone; Daugaard, Henrik; Andersen, Niels T; Haraldsted, Viggo; Søballe, Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose — The effect of postoperative intra-articular bolus injections after total hip arthroplasty (THA) remains unclear. We tested the hypothesis that intra-articular bolus injections administered every 6 hours after surgery during the first 24 hours would significantly improve analgesia after THA. Patients and methods — 80 patients undergoing THA received high-volume local infiltration analgesia (LIA; 200 mg ropivacaine and 30 mg ketorolac) followed by 4 intra-articular injections with either ropivacaine (100 mg) and ketorolac (15 mg) (the treatment group) or saline (the control group). The intra-articular injections were combined with 4 intravenous injections of either saline (treatment group) or 15 mg ketorolac (control group). All patients received morphine as patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). The primary outcome was consumption of intravenous morphine PCA and secondary outcomes were consumption of oral morphine, pain intensity, side effects, readiness for hospital discharge, length of hospital stay, and postoperative consumption of analgesics at 3, 6, and 12 weeks after surgery. Results — There were no statistically significant differences between the 2 groups regarding postoperative consumption of intravenous morphine PCA. Postoperative pain scores during walking were higher in the treatment group from 24–72 hours after surgery, but other pain scores were similar between groups. Time to readiness for hospital discharge was longer in the treatment group. Other secondary outcomes were similar between groups. Interpretation — Postoperative intra-articular bolus injections of ropivacaine and ketorolac cannot be recommended as analgesic method after THA. PMID:26312445

  11. A fully coupled bolus-esophageal-gastric model for esophageal emptying based on the immersed boundary method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Wenjun; Pandolfino, John E.; Kahrilas, Peter J.; Patankar, Neelesh A.

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we develop a fully coupled bolus-esophageal-gastric model to study esophageal emptying based on the immersed boundary method. The model includes an esophageal segment, an ellipsoid-shaped stomach, and a bolus. It can easily handle the passive and active function of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). Two groups of case studies are presented. The first group is about the influence from tissue anisotropy. Simulation shows that the weaker (or more compliant) part suffers from a higher wall shear stress and higher pressure load when the bolus is filled in and emptied from the LES segment. This implies a degradation cycle in which a weaker tissue becomes much weaker due to an increased load, a possible pathway to the esophageal lower diverticulum. The second group is about bulge formation resulting from asymmetric anatomy and a compliant LES. In particular, we find a right bulge tends to develop for a compliant LES. The bulge is most pronounced with a highest stiffness of the gastric wall. This implies that the competition between the LES stiffness and gastric wall stiffness might be another factor related to the esophageal lower diverticulum. The support of Grant R01 DK56033 and R01 DK079902 from NIH is gratefully acknowledged.

  12. Contrasting effects of nitrofurans on plasma corticosterone in chickens following administration as a bolus or diet additive.

    PubMed

    Bartlet, A L; Harvey, S; Klandorf, H

    1990-09-01

    Administration of furazolidone as a bolus dose (8-500 mg/kg), produced a decrease in plasma corticosterone in chickens. In contrast, addition of furazolidone or furaltadone to the diet (0.04% or above, 10 days), increased plasma corticosterone. Pre-treatment with a 200-mg/kg bolus of furazolidone or furaltadone did not affect pentobarbitone anaesthesia time in the birds. In chickens pre-treated with a nitrofuran in the diet, however, pentobarbitone anaesthesia time was significantly less than that in controls. Furaltadone in the diet, produced significant increases in the amount of cytochrome P-450 and the activity of aniline hydroxylase in the liver microsomes. It is suggested that nitrofurans given in the diet stimulated corticosterone biosynthesis in the adrenal glands and induced mixed-function oxidase activity in the liver. Nitrofurans given as a bolus did not produce these effects. Furazolidone (200 mg/kg) produced severe anorexia, which lasted 2 days in T-line birds. The anorexia seemed to be associated with tissue damage in the birds rather than the ensuing adrenal cortical insufficiency.

  13. A critical appraisal of the reporting of the National Acute Spinal Cord Injury Studies (II and III) of methylprednisolone in acute spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Coleman, W P; Benzel, D; Cahill, D W; Ducker, T; Geisler, F; Green, B; Gropper, M R; Goffin, J; Madsen, P W; Maiman, D J; Ondra, S L; Rosner, M; Sasso, R C; Trost, G R; Zeidman, S

    2000-06-01

    From the beginning, the reporting of the results of National Acute Spinal Cord Injury Studies (NASCIS) II and III has been incomplete, leaving clinicians in the spinal cord injury (SCI) community to use or avoid using methylprednisolone in acute SCI on the basis of faith rather than a publicly developed scientific consensus. NASCIS II was initially reported by National Institutes of Health announcements, National Institutes of Health facsimiles to emergency room physicians, and the news media. The subsequent report in the New England Journal of Medicine implied that there was a positive result in the primary efficacy analysis for the entire 487 patient sample. However, this analysis was in fact negative, and the positive result was found only in a secondary analysis of the subgroup of patients who received treatment within 8 hours. In addition, that subgroup apparently had only 62 patients taking methylprednisolone and 67 receiving placebo. The NASCIS II and III reports embody specific choices of statistical methods that have strongly shaped the reporting of results but have not been adequately challenged or or even explained. These studies show statistical artifacts that call their results into question. In NASCIS II, the placebo group treated before 8 hours did poorly, not only when compared with the methylprednisolone group treated before 8 hours but even when compared with the placebo group treated after 8 hours. Thus, the positive result may have been caused by a weakness in the control group rather than any strength of methylprednisolone. In NASCIS III, a randomization imbalance occurred that allocated a disproportionate number of patients with no motor deficit (and therefore no chance for recovery) to the lower dose control group. When this imbalance is controlled for, much of the superiority of the higher dose group seems to disappear. The NASCIS group's decision to admit persons with minor SCIs with minimal or no motor deficit not only enables statistical

  14. Efficacy and Safety of Bolus 5-Fluorouracil and L-Leucovorin as Salvage Chemotherapy for Oral Fluoropyrimidine-Resistant Unresectable or Recurrent Gastric Cancer: A Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Muranaka, Tetsuhito; Yuki, Satoshi; Sawada, Kentaro; Harada, Kazuaki; Kawamoto, Yasuyuki; Nakatsumi, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The International Organization for Standardization-5fluorouracil (FU) 10 trial found that bolus 5-FU and l-leucovorin was not inferior to S-1 in the treatment of gastric cancer (GC). Continuous 5-FU and the rapid injection of 5-FU have different anti-cancer effects. Thus, bolus 5-FU and l-leucovorin treatment might be useful for oral FU-resistant GC. Materials and Methods We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of all patients with S-1 or capecitabine-resistant, unresectable, or recurrent GC treated with bolus 5-FU and l-leucovorin between January 2010 and December 2015 at Hokkaido University Hospital. The bolus 5-FU and l-leucovorin regimen consisted of intravenous l-leucovorin (250 mg/m2/2 h) and bolus 5-FU (600 mg/m2) administered once weekly followed by a 2-week rest period; each cycle was repeated every 8 weeks. Results A total of 14 patients were identified. The disease control rate was 35.7%. The median progression-free survival was 1.6 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3~2.0 months), and the median overall survival was 6.3 months (95% CI, 4.7~7.9 months). No patient died from treatment-related causes. The most common severe adverse event associated with bolus 5-FU and l-leucovorin was neutropenia, which occurred in 21.4% of patients. Conclusions Bolus 5-FU and l-leucovorin treatment might be useful for oral FU-resistant GC. We are planning a multi-center prospective phase II trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of bolus 5-FU and l-leucovorin treatment for pre-treated unresectable or recurrent GC to confirm the results of this limited, retrospective study. PMID:27752395

  15. Proliferative and necrotizing otitis externa in a kitten: successful treatment with intralesional and topical corticosteroid therapy

    PubMed Central

    MOMOTA, Yutaka; YASUDA, Junya; IKEZAWA, Mitsutaka; SASAKI, Jun; KATAYAMA, Masaaki; TANI, Kenji; MIYABE, Masahiro; ONOZAWA, Eri; AZAKAMI, Daigo; ISHIOKA, Katsumi; SAKO, Toshinori

    2016-01-01

    Proliferative and necrotising otitis externa (PNOE) is a very rare disease affecting the ear canals and concave pinnae of kittens. This report describes a 5-month-old cat with PNOE. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis. Treatment was initiated with local injection of methylprednisolone acetate into the lesions. The cat was subsequently treated with clobetasol propionate cream, a potent topical glucocorticoid ointment. The cat showed marked improvement. While topical treatment with tacrolimus, an immunosuppressive agent, is reported to be an effective therapy, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to treat PNOE with local corticosteroid therapy. PMID:27570137

  16. Proliferative and necrotizing otitis externa in a kitten: successful treatment with intralesional and topical corticosteroid therapy.

    PubMed

    Momota, Yutaka; Yasuda, Junya; Ikezawa, Mitsutaka; Sasaki, Jun; Katayama, Masaaki; Tani, Kenji; Miyabe, Masahiro; Onozawa, Eri; Azakami, Daigo; Ishioka, Katsumi; Sako, Toshinori

    2017-01-10

    Proliferative and necrotising otitis externa (PNOE) is a very rare disease affecting the ear canals and concave pinnae of kittens. This report describes a 5-month-old cat with PNOE. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis. Treatment was initiated with local injection of methylprednisolone acetate into the lesions. The cat was subsequently treated with clobetasol propionate cream, a potent topical glucocorticoid ointment. The cat showed marked improvement. While topical treatment with tacrolimus, an immunosuppressive agent, is reported to be an effective therapy, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to treat PNOE with local corticosteroid therapy.

  17. Effect of dexmedetomidine bolus dose on isoflurane consumption in surgical patients under general anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Muniyappa, Reshma B.; Rajappa, Geetha C.; Govindswamy, Suresh; Thamanna, Prathima P.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Various adjuvants have been introduced to decrease the dose of volatile agents and their side effects. Dexmedetomidine a potent alpha-2 adrenoreceptor agonist is one such agent. Our objective is to assess the effect of preanesthetic dexmedetomidine on isoflurane consumption and its effect on intraoperative hemodynamic stability and recovery profile. Setting and Design: This prospective, randomized controlled, double-blind study was done in a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: One hundred patients were randomly allocated into two groups. Group 1 received saline infusion and Group 2 received dexmedetomidine infusion in a dose of 1 μg/kg over 10 min given 15 min before induction. Vital parameters and bispectral index (BIS) values were noted throughout the surgery. Patients were induced and intubated as per the standard protocol and maintained with N2O: O2 = 1:1 mixture at 2 L/min and isoflurane concentration adjusted to achieve BIS values of 45–60. Demographic profile, hemodynamic variables, total isoflurane consumption, and recovery profile data were collected. Statistics: Independent t-test and Mann–Whitney U-test were used to compare the average anesthetic consumption, hemodynamics, and recovery profile between two groups. Results: End-tidal concentration and total isoflurane consumption in Group 2 were 0.56 ± 0.11 and 10.69 ± 3.01 mL, respectively, with P < 0.001 which was statistically significant compared to Group 1 which were 0.76 ± 0.14 and 13.76 ± 3.84 mL. Postintubation and intraoperative mean arterial pressure values were significantly lower in dexmedetomidine group with P < 0.001. Conclusion: Preanesthetic bolus dose of dexmedetomidine is a useful adjuvant to reduce isoflurane consumption. PMID:27746567

  18. Physiology of the intrathecal bolus: the leptomeningeal route for macromolecule and particle delivery to CNS.

    PubMed

    Papisov, Mikhail I; Belov, Vasily V; Gannon, Kimberley S

    2013-05-06

    Presently, there are no effective treatments for several diseases involving the CNS, which is protected by the blood-brain, blood-CSF, and blood-arachnoid barriers. Traversing any of these barriers is difficult, especially for macromolecular drugs and particulates. However, there is significant experimental evidence that large molecules can be delivered to the CNS through the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The flux of the interstitial fluid in the CNS parenchyma, as well as the macro flux of CSF in the leptomeningeal space, are believed to be generally opposite to the desirable direction of CNS-targeted drug delivery. On the other hand, the available data suggest that the layer of pia mater lining the CNS surface is not continuous, and the continuity of the leptomeningeal space (LMS) with the perivascular spaces penetrating into the parenchyma provides an unexplored avenue for drug transport deep into the brain via CSF. The published data generally do not support the view that macromolecule transport from the LMS to CNS is hindered by the interstitial and CSF fluxes. The data strongly suggest that leptomeningeal transport depends on the location and volume of the administered bolus and consists of four processes: (i) pulsation-assisted convectional transport of the solutes with CSF, (ii) active "pumping" of CSF into the periarterial spaces, (iii) solute transport from the latter to and within the parenchyma, and (iv) neuronal uptake and axonal transport. The final outcome will depend on the drug molecule behavior in each of these processes, which have not been studied systematically. The data available to date suggest that many macromolecules and nanoparticles can be delivered to CNS in biologically significant amounts (>1% of the administered dose); mechanistic investigation of macromolecule and particle behavior in CSF may result in a significantly more efficient leptomeningeal drug delivery than previously thought.

  19. Noninvasive quantification of human brain antioxidant concentrations after an intravenous bolus of vitamin C

    PubMed Central

    Terpstra, Melissa; Torkelson, Carolyn; Emir, Uzay; Hodges, James S.; Raatz, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Until now, the lack of a means to detect a deficiency or to measure the pharmacologic effect in the human brain in situ has been a hindrance to the development of antioxidant-based prevention and treatment of dementia. In this study, a recently developed 1H MRS approach was applied to quantify key human brain antioxidant concentrations throughout the course of an aggressive antioxidant-based intervention. The concentrations of the two most abundant central nervous system chemical antioxidants, vitamin C and glutathione, were quantified noninvasively in the human occipital cortex prior to and throughout 24 h after bolus intravenous delivery of 3 g of vitamin C. Although the kinetics of the sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter and physiologic blood vitamin C concentrations predict theoretically that brain vitamin C concentration will not increase above its homeostatically maintained level, this theory has never been tested experimentally in the living human brain. Therefore, human brain vitamin C and glutathione concentrations were quantified noninvasively using MEGA-PRESS double-edited 1H MRS and LCModel. Healthy subjects (age, 19–63 years) with typical dietary consumption, who did not take vitamin supplements, fasted overnight and then reported for the measurement of baseline antioxidant concentrations. They then began controlled feeding which they adhered to until after vitamin C and glutathione concentrations had been measured at 2, 6, 10 and 24 h after receiving intravenous vitamin C. Two of the twelve studies were sham controls in which no vitamin C was administered. The main finding was that human brain vitamin C and glutathione concentrations remained constant throughout the protocol, even though blood serum vitamin C concentrations spanned from the low end of the normal range to very high. PMID:21674654

  20. Clinical applications of continuous infusion chemotherapy ahd concomitant radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, C.J.; Rotman, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: theoretical basis and clinical applications of 5-FU as a radiosensitizer; treatment of hepatic metastases from gastro intestingal primaries with split course radiation therapy; combined modality therapy with 5-FU, Mitomycin-C and radiation therapy for sqamous cell cancers; treatment of bladder carcinoma with concomitant infusion chemotherapy and irradiation; a treatment of invasiv bladder cancer by the XRT/5FU protocol; concomitant radiation therapy and doxorubicin by continuous infusion in advanced malignancies; cis platin by continuous infusion with concurrent radiation therapy in malignant tumors; combination of radiation with concomitant continuous adriamycin infusion in a patient with partially excised pleomorphic soft tissue sarcoma of the lower extremeity; treatment of recurrent carcinoma of the paranasal sinuses using concomitant infusion cis-platinum and radiation therapy; hepatic artery infusion for hepatic metastases in combination with hepatic resection and hepatic radiation; study of simultaneous radiation therapy, continuous infusion, 5FU and bolus mitomycin-C; cancer of the esophagus; continuous infusion VP-16, bolus cis-platinum and simultaneous radiation therapy as salvage therapy in small cell bronchogenic carcinoma; and concomitant radiation, mitomycin-C and 5-FU infusion in gastro intestinal cancer.

  1. Treatment of extensive scalp lesions with segmental intensity-modulated photon therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bedford, James L. . E-mail: James.Bedford@icr.ac.uk; Childs, Peter J.; Hansen, Vibeke Nordmark; Warrington, Alan P.; Mendes, Ruheena L.; Glees, John P.

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: To compare static electron therapy, electron arc therapy, and photon intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for treatment of extensive scalp lesions and to examine the dosimetric accuracy of the techniques. Methods and Materials: A retrospective treatment-planning study was performed to evaluate the relative merits of static electron fields, arcing electron fields, and five-field photon IMRT. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) were used to verify the accuracy of the techniques. The required thickness of bolus was investigated, and an anthropomorphic phantom was also used to examine the effects of air gaps between the wax bolus used for the IMRT technique and the patient's scalp. Results: Neither static nor arcing electron techniques were able to provide a reliable coverage of the planning target volume (PTV), owing to obliquity of the fields in relation to the scalp. The IMRT technique considerably improved PTV dose uniformity, though it irradiated a larger volume of brain. Either 0.5 cm or 1.0 cm of wax bolus was found to be suitable. Air gaps of up to 1 cm between the bolus and the patient's scalp were correctly handled by the treatment-planning system and had negligible influence on the dose to the scalp. Conclusions: Photon IMRT provides a feasible alternative to electron techniques for treatment of large scalp lesions, resulting in improved homogeneity of dose to the PTV but with a moderate increase in dose to the brain.

  2. Surfactant therapy for meconium aspiration syndrome: current status.

    PubMed

    Dargaville, Peter A; Mills, John F

    2005-01-01

    Meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) is an important cause of respiratory distress in the term infant. Therapy for the disease remains problematic, and newer treatments such as high-frequency ventilation and inhaled nitric oxide are being applied with increasing frequency. There is a significant disturbance of the pulmonary surfactant system in MAS, with a wealth of experimental data indicating that inhibition of surfactant function in the alveolar space is an important element of the pathophysiology of the disease. This inhibition may be mediated by meconium, plasma proteins, haemoglobin and oedema fluid, and, at least in vitro, can be overcome by increasing surfactant phospholipid concentration. These observations have served as the rationale for administration of exogenous surfactant preparations in MAS, initially as standard bolus therapy and, more recently, in association with therapeutic lung lavage. Bolus surfactant therapy in ventilated infants with MAS has been found to improve oxygenation in most studies, although there are a significant proportion of nonresponders and in many cases the effect is transient. Pooled data from randomised controlled trials of surfactant therapy suggest a benefit in terms of a reduction in the requirement for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (relative risk 0.48 in surfactant-treated infants) but no diminution of air leak or ventilator days. Current evidence would support the use of bolus surfactant therapy on a case by case basis in nurseries with a relatively high mortality associated with MAS, or the lack of availability of other forms of respiratory support such as high-frequency ventilation or nitric oxide. If used, bolus surfactant should be administered as early as practicable to infants who exhibit significant parenchymal disease, at a phospholipid dose of at least 100 mg/kg, rapidly instilled into the trachea. Natural surfactant or a third-generation synthetic surfactant should be used and the dosage repeated every 6

  3. In vitro incubation of bone marrow and peripheral stem cells with vincristine and methylprednisolone: functional T-cell depletion for haploidentical and autologous transplants.

    PubMed

    Fragonas, E; Perticarari, S; Presani, G; Rabusin, M; Andolina, M; Mangiarotti, M A

    2000-11-01

    A mismatched bone marrow transplantation is feasible only if the donor's marrow lymphocytes are eliminated from the graft. This can be achieved by several methods, but all have the disadvantage of inducing a long-lasting immune deficiency while the risk of graft rejection and leukemic relapse increase. We use a sort of functional T-cell depletion by treating the cells with vincristine and methylprednisolone. This method is surely the cheapest and has allowed us to perform 60 transplants with a tolerable risk of GVHD. The treatment of the donor's lymphocytes has already been demonstrated to be able to block the mixed lymphocyte culture reaction in vitro. In this experiment Th1 and Th2 activities were almost completely blocked without reduction of lymphocyte viability and apoptosis induction.

  4. Bolus intravenous injection of obestatin does not change blood pressure level of spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao-Feng; Song, Shu-Wei; Qin, Yong-Wen; Zhang, Jian-Liang; Zhao, Xian-Xian; Zhang, Bi-Li; Ren, An-Jing; Guo, Zhi-Fu; Zheng, Xing

    2009-10-01

    Ghrelin, an endogenous ligand for the GH secretagogue receptor, has been shown to decrease arterial pressure. Obestatin, a sibling of ghrelin derived from preproghrelin, opposes several physiological actions of ghrelin. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of bolus intravenous injection of obestatin on blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Three different dosages of obestatin (10, 50, and 100 microg/kg) and one dosage of ghrelin (10 microg/kg) were applied. The mean arterial pressure and heart period were continuously recorded for 30 min after injection of drugs. Baroreflex sensitivity was also investigated. In this study, we first demonstrated that intravenous injection of obestatin showed no significant effects on mean blood pressure (10 microg/kg: 113.8+/-2.0 mmHg vs. 114.4+/-1.6 mmHg; 50 microg/kg: 110+/-2.4 mmHg vs. 109+/-3.2 mmHg; 100 microg/kg: 115.9+/-1.5 mmHg vs. 115.8+/-2.4 mmHg; all P>0.05), heart period (10 microg/kg: 184.7+/-3.9 ms vs. 185.5+/-4.1ms; 50 microg/kg: 185.9+/-4.1 ms vs. 193.4+/-4.5 ms; 100 microg/kg: 137.7+/-4.5 ms vs. 143.9+/-5.6 ms; all P>0.05), or baroreflex sensitivity (10 microg/kg: 0.414+/-0.03 ms/mmHg vs. 0.442+/-0.02 ms/mmHg; 50 microg/kg: 0.453+/-0.04 ms/mmHg vs. 0.439+/-0.01 ms/mmHg; 100 microg/kg: 0.398+/-0.02 ms/mmHg vs. 0.401+/-0.01 ms/mmHg; all P>0.05), however, intravenous injection of ghrelin could decrease mean arterial pressure (115.9+/-1.5 mmHg vs. 108.6+/-3.6 mmHg, P<0.01) and increase heart period (132.4+/-2.8 ms vs. 152.6+/-7.4 ms, P<0.05), but did not change baroreflex sensitivity (0.36+/-0.009 ms/mmHg, P>0.05) in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

  5. Concurrent use of the oxfendazole pulse release bolus and the monensin rumen delivery device in young grazing cattle.

    PubMed

    Rowlands, D T; Woollon, R M; McEvoy, C M

    1989-07-15

    When they were turned out to grass in May 1987 for their first season, 10 calves were dosed with a 5 x 750 mg oxfendazole pulse release bolus (OPRB) and a monensin sodium rumen delivery device (RDD); eight calves received one OPRB; 10 calves received one RDD and eight calves received neither bolus. Each group was set-stocked on individual paddocks which had been grazed during the previous season by cattle which developed clinical parasitic gastroenteritis and bronchitis (husk). In July, before they were due to be moved to new pastures in mid-summer, and before they were dosed strategically with levamisole HCl, some of the calves not dosed with an OPRB succumbed to clinical parasitic gastroenteritis and husk and received emergency anthelmintic treatment, after which no further clinical episodes occurred. The 'dose and move' strategy was implemented in early August after which both groups not dosed with an OPRB were set-stocked together until the trial ended on October 14, 147 days after turn out. The two groups of calves which had received the OPRB were also moved to new pasture and set-stocked together until the end of the trial. No evidence of clinical helminthiases developed in either of the two groups of calves dosed with OPRBs and their faecal worm egg and larval counts, and plasma pepsinogen activities remained low. They gained significantly more weight than the two groups of calves not dosed with OPRBs (P less than 0.001). The bolus types were compatible and induced no untoward side-effects when used together.

  6. Measuring plasma fatty acid oxidation with intravenous bolus injection of 3H- and 14C-fatty acid

    PubMed Central

    Koutsari, Christina; Ali, Asem H.; Mundi, Manpreet S.; Jensen, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate measures of plasma FA oxidation can improve our understanding of diseases characterized by impaired FA oxidation. We describe and compare the 24 h time-courses of FA oxidation using bolus injections of [1-14C]palmitate versus [9,10-3H]palmitate under postabsorptive, postprandial, and walking conditions. Fifty-one men and 95 premenopausal women participated in one condition (postabsorptive, postprandial, or walking), one tracer (14C- or 3H-labeled), and an acetate or palmitate study. Groups were matched for sex, age, and body mass index (BMI). At 24 h, cumulative [3H]acetate recovery as 3H2O was 80 ± 6%, 78 ± 2%, and 81 ± 6% in the postabsorptive, postprandial, and walking conditions, respectively (not significant). Model-predicted maximum [1-14C]acetate recovery as expired 14CO2 was 59 ± 12%, 52 ± 8%, and 65 ± 10% in the postabsorptive, postprandial, and walking condition, respectively (one way ANOVA, P = 0.12). When corrected with the corresponding acetate recovery factors, 24 h time-courses of FFA oxidation were similar between [1-14C]palmitate and [9,10-3H]palmitate in all three conditions. In contrast to previous meal ingestion studies, an acetate-hydrogen recovery factor was needed to achieve comparable oxidation rates using an intravenous bolus of [3H]palmitate. In conclusion, intravenous boluses of [9,10-3H]palmitate versus [1-14C]palmitate gave similar estimates of 24 h cumulative FFA oxidation in age-, sex- and BMI-matched individuals. PMID:23093549

  7. Rumen temperature change monitored with remote rumen temperature boluses after challenges with bovine viral diarrhea virus and Mannheimia haemolytica.

    PubMed

    Rose-Dye, T K; Burciaga-Robles, L O; Krehbiel, C R; Step, D L; Fulton, R W; Confer, A W; Richards, C J

    2011-04-01

    Remote rumen temperature monitoring is a potential method for early disease detection in beef cattle. This experiment was conducted to determine if remotely monitored rumen temperature boluses could detect a temperature change in steers exposed to bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and challenged with a common bovine respiratory disease pathogen, Mannheimia haemolytica (MH). Twenty-four Angus crossbred steers (BW = 313 ± 31 kg) were allotted to 1 of 4 treatments: 1) no challenge (control); 2) challenge by a 72-h exposure to 2 steers persistently infected with BVDV; 3) bacterial challenge with MH; and 4) viral challenge by a 72-h exposure to 2 steers persistently infected with BVDV followed by bacterial challenge with MH (BVDV + MH). Remotely monitored rumen temperature boluses programmed to transmit temperature every minute were placed in the rumen before the time of exposure to steers persistently infected with BVDV. Rectal temperatures were taken before MH challenge (0) and at 2, 4, 6, 12, 18, 24, 36, 48, 72, and 96 h after MH challenge. Rumen temperatures were recorded 3 d before (-72 h; period of BVDV exposure) through 14 d after (336 h) MH challenge. Rumen temperatures were analyzed as a randomized complete block design with a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments and a first-order autoregressive covariance structure for repeated measures. A treatment × day interaction was observed for average daily rumen temperature (P < 0.01). A treatment difference (P < 0.01) was observed on d 0, when MH-challenged steers had greater rumen temperatures than steers not challenged with MH. There was no BVDV × day interaction (P > 0.01). Rumen temperatures averaged every 2 h resulted in a BVDV × hour interaction (P < 0.01) and an MH × hour interaction (P < 0.01). The BVDV × hour differences occurred at h -18 to -14, 40 to 46, 110, 122, and 144 to 146 (P < 0.01). The MH × hour difference occurred at h 4 to 24 (P < 0.01). Maximum rumen temperature was increased (P

  8. Optimisation of immunosuppressive therapy using pharmacokinetic principles.

    PubMed

    Grevel, J

    1992-11-01

    Clinical experience with immunosuppressive therapy is more extensive in the area of preventing the rejection of transplanted organs than in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Among the many pharmacological agents presently in use, only prednisone (or methylprednisolone) and cyclosporin require dosage individualisation. Sources of interindividual variability in the pharmacokinetics of prednisone have been identified and are guiding the selection of individual dosage rates. As an alternative, a single timed concentration can determine an apparent value for prednisone clearance from which an individual dosage can be calculated. In contrast, numerous sources of inter- and intraindividual variability in cyclosporin pharmacokinetics prevent the easy selection of safe and effective starting dose rates. Indeed, test doses of cyclosporin followed by series of blood samples and the calculation of individual pharmacokinetic parameters are needed to assure successful immunosuppression right from the start. Furthermore, only continued monitoring sustains immunotherapy vis-à-vis intraindividual variability and a narrow therapeutic range of cyclosporin concentrations.

  9. Pharmacokinetics of piperacillin in critically ill patients receiving continuous venovenous haemofiltration: A randomised controlled trial of continuous infusion versus intermittent bolus administration.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Janattul-Ain; Roberts, Darren M; Udy, Andrew A; Mat-Nor, Mohd-Basri; Mohamad-Nor, Fariz-Safhan; Wallis, Steven C; Lipman, Jeffrey; Roberts, Jason A

    2015-07-01

    Here we describe the pharmacokinetics of piperacillin administered by continuous infusion (CI) versus intermittent bolus (IB) dosing in critically ill patients receiving continuous venovenous haemofiltration (CVVH) and compare the frequency of pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic (PK/PD) target attainment with each dosing strategy. This was a prospective pharmacokinetic trial in 16 critically ill patients with severe sepsis or septic shock undergoing CVVH and randomised to receive either CI or IB administration of a standard daily dose of piperacillin/tazobactam (11.25g/day on Day 1 followed by 9g/day). Serial blood samples were measured on two occasions. Piperacillin pharmacokinetics were calculated using a non-compartmental approach. Blood concentrations were compared with established PK/PD targets. On occasion 1 (Days 1-3 of therapy), IB administration resulted in significantly higher piperacillin peak concentrations (169 vs. 89mg/L; P=0.002), whereas significantly higher steady-state concentrations were observed in CI patients (83 vs. 57mg/L; P=0.04). Total clearance and clearance not mediated by CVVH were significantly higher with CI administration [median (interquartile range), 1.0 (0.7-1.1) and 0.8 (0.6-1.0)mL/kg/min; P=0.001 and 0.001, respectively]. The estimated unbound piperacillin concentrations were four times above the target susceptibility breakpoint (16mg/L) for the entire dosing interval (100%fT>4xMIC) in 87.5% of patients receiving CI administration (sampling occasion 1), compared with 62.5% of IB patients achieving the desired target (50%fT>4xMIC). Compared with IB dosing, and despite similar CVVH settings, CI administration of piperacillin results in a pharmacokinetic profile that may optimise outcomes for less susceptible pathogens.

  10. Therapy of NMO spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Atanu; Mukherjee, Arabinda

    2015-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an autoimmune demyelinating condition of the central nervous system often associated with aquaporin-4 (AQP4) autoantibodies manifesting as severe optic neuritis and long segment myelitis with tendency to relapse. Seronegative patients and who do not meet the NMO criteria are classified as having NMO Spectrum Disorder (NMOSD), but are treated identically to clinically definite NMO. Acute relapse is treated with intravenous methylprednisolone for 5 days with or without subsequent treatment with plasma exchange (PE). This must be followed by oral steroid to prevent rebound worsening and further relapse. For relapse prevention, immunosuppressive agents that have been found to be effective are azathioprine, rituximab, mycophenolate mofetil, methotrexate, and mitoxantrone; although none of which have been validated in randomized, controlled trial. Some patients do relapse with monotherapy, and switching to more effective agent or use of combination therapy is beneficial in such situation. There is no consensus about the duration of preventive therapy, but generally 2-3 years of relapse-free period is considered the minimum, taking into account the risks of long-term toxicity of these agents. PMID:26538843

  11. Perceptions and experiences of using automated bolus advisors amongst people with type 1 diabetes: A longitudinal qualitative investigation

    PubMed Central

    Lawton, J.; Kirkham, J.; Rankin, D.; Barnard, K.; Cooper, C.L.; Taylor, C.; Heller, S.; Elliott, J.

    2014-01-01

    Aims We explored people's reasons for, and experiences of, using bolus advisors to determine insulin doses; and, their likes/dislikes of this technology. Subjects and methods 42 people with type 1 diabetes who had received instruction in use of bolus advisors during a structured education course were interviewed post-course and 6 months later. Data were analysed thematically. Results Participants who considered themselves to have poor mathematical skills highlighted a gratitude for, and heavy reliance on, advisors. Others liked and chose to use advisors because they saved time and effort calculating doses and/or had a data storage facility. Follow-up interviews highlighted that, by virtue of no longer calculating their doses, participants could become deskilled and increasingly dependent on advisors. Some forgot what their mealtime ratios were; others reported a misperception that, because they were pre-programmed during courses, these parameters never needed changing. Use of data storage facilities could hinder effective review of blood glucose data and some participants reported an adverse impact on glycaemic control. Discussion While participants liked and perceived benefits to using advisors, there may be unintended consequences to giving people access to this technology. To promote effective use, on-going input and education from trained health professionals may be necessary. PMID:25451897

  12. Total bolus extraction method improves arterial image quality in dynamic CTAs derived from whole-brain CTP data.

    PubMed

    Ghariq, Elyas; Mendrik, Adriënne M; Willems, Peter W A; Joemai, Raoul M S; Ghariq, Eidrees; Vonken, Evert-jan; van Osch, Matthias J P; van Walderveen, Marianne A A

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purposes. The 320-detector row CT scanner enables visualization of whole-brain hemodynamic information (dynamic CT angiography (CTA) derived from CT perfusion scans). However, arterial image quality in dynamic CTA (dCTA) is inferior to arterial image quality in standard CTA. This study evaluates whether the arterial image quality can be improved by using a total bolus extraction (ToBE) method. Materials and Methods. DCTAs of 15 patients, who presented with signs of acute cerebral ischemia, were derived from 320-slice CT perfusion scans using both the standard subtraction method and the proposed ToBE method. Two neurointerventionalists blinded to the scan type scored the arterial image quality on a 5-point scale in the 4D dCTAs in consensus. Arteries were divided into four categories: (I) large extradural, (II) intradural (large, medium, and small), (III) communicating arteries, and (IV) cerebellar and ophthalmic arteries. Results. Quality of extradural and intradural arteries was significantly higher in the ToBE dCTAs than in the standard dCTAs (extradural P = 0.001, large intradural P < 0.001, medium intradural P < 0.001, and small intradural P < 0.001). Conclusion. The 4D dCTAs derived with the total bolus extraction (ToBE) method provide hemodynamic information combined with improved arterial image quality as compared to standard 4D dCTAs.

  13. Field effects of faecal residues from ivermectin slow-release boluses on the attractiveness of cattle dung to dung beetles.

    PubMed

    Errouissi, F; Lumaret, J-P

    2010-12-01

    A 2-year study was performed in two sites in southern France to assess the effect of ivermectin residues on the attractiveness of cattle dung to colonizing insects. Insect captures were compared between pitfall traps baited with dung from untreated cattle and dung from cattle that had been treated with a slow-release (SR) bolus of ivermectin. Cattle dung was collected at different times after treatment (4, 14, 42, 70 and 98 days). Excretion showed a plateau, with levels ranging between 0.688 µg and 1.123 µg ivermectin per gram of wet dung. Faecal residues affected insect captures at both sites. Effects were independent of the time dung was collected after treatment, except for one result subsequent to a severe drought during the baiting period. Ivermectin-contaminated dung showed a significant attractive effect, with increased captures regardless of the guild to which beetles belonged. This study demonstrates the attractiveness of ivermectin residues over a long period after the treatment of animals. It draws attention to the danger of widespread use of this endectocide-based SR bolus, which is attributable to the preferential attraction of insects to treated dung, which potentially puts at risk the survival of their offspring.

  14. Comparison of dose distribution by means of bolus versus water bath phantom techniques in treatment of cutaneous sarcoma of an extremity

    SciTech Connect

    Janjan, N.A.; Zellmer, D.L.; Lois, P.; Gillin, M.T.; Hackbarth, D. )

    1990-12-01

    Cutaneous involvement by Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is frequently diffuse, requiring large field irradiation. Selective tissue compensation techniques, accomplished with either a 1.5 cm bolus cast or water bath phantom, are compared. Dosimetric determinations were performed using 6 MVX with bone heterogeneity corrections. Application of 1.5 cm bolus effectively eliminated dose buildup and provided tissue compensation equivalent to water bath phantom technique. Treatment of other cutaneous malignancies, such as angiosarcoma, requiring higher total doses, should be accompanied by dosimetric evaluation, because cutaneous and midline dose inhomogeneity may result in a significant total dose differential over the target volume. Application of 1.5 cm bolus improved accuracy in treatment positioning, eliminated concerns regarding infection control in AIDS-related KS, and provided dose homogeneity comparable to the more standard water bath phantom technique.

  15. Intracoronary versus intravenous high-dose bolus plus maintenance administration of tirofiban in patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention for acute ST elevation myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Candemir, Basar; Kilickap, Mustafa; Ozcan, Ozgur Ulas; Kaya, Cansin Tulunay; Gerede, Menekse; Ozdemir, Aydan Ongun; Ozdol, Cagdas; Kumbasar, Deniz; Erol, Cetin

    2012-07-01

    We aimed to examine whether intracoronary high-dose bolus of tirofiban plus maintenance would result in improved clinical outcome in STEMI patients undergoing primary PCI in this pilot trial. A total of 56 patients were enrolled to receive either intracoronary high-dose bolus plus maintenance (n = 34) or intravenous high-dose bolus plus maintenance (n = 22) of tirofiban. Pre and post intervention TIMI flow grades, myocardial blush grades, peak CKMB and troponin levels, time to peak CKMB and troponin, time to 50% ST resolution and major composite adverse cardiac event rates at 30 days were recorded. Although incidence of major adverse cardiac events was not different, post intervention TIMI flow and TIMI blush grades, peak CKMB and troponin levels, and time to peak CKMB and time to peak troponin were significantly different, favoring intracoronary strategy. In conclusion, this regimen improved myocardial reperfusion and coronary flow, and reduced myocardial necrosis, but failed to improve clinical outcomes at 30 days.

  16. Effects of Bolus and Continuous Nasogastric Feeding on Gastric Emptying, Small Bowel Water Content, Superior Mesenteric Artery Blood Flow, and Plasma Hormone Concentrations in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Abeed H.; Murray, Kathryn; Hoad, Caroline L.; Costigan, Carolyn; Marciani, Luca; Macdonald, Ian A.; Bowling, Timothy E.; Lobo, Dileep N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to demonstrate the effect of continuous or bolus nasogastric feeding on gastric emptying, small bowel water content, and splanchnic blood flow measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the context of changes in plasma gastrointestinal hormone secretion. Background: Nasogastric/nasoenteral tube feeding is often complicated by diarrhea but the contribution of feeding strategy to the etiology is unclear. Methods: Twelve healthy adult male participants who underwent nasogastric intubation before a baseline MRI scan, received 400 mL of Resource Energy (Nestle) as a bolus over 5 minutes or continuously over 4 hours via pump in this randomized crossover study. Changes in gastric volume, small bowel water content, and superior mesenteric artery blood flow and velocity were measured over 4 hours using MRI and blood glucose and plasma concentrations of insulin, peptide YY, and ghrelin were assayed every 30 minutes. Results: Bolus nasogastric feeding led to significant elevations in gastric volume (P < 0.0001), superior mesenteric artery blood flow (P < 0.0001), and velocity (P = 0.0011) compared with continuous feeding. Both types of feeding reduced small bowel water content, although there was an increase in small bowel water content with bolus feeding after 90 minutes (P < 0.0068). Similarly, both types of feeding led to a fall in plasma ghrelin concentration although this fall was greater with bolus feeding (P < 0.0001). Bolus feeding also led to an increase in concentrations of insulin (P = 0.0024) and peptide YY (P < 0.0001), not seen with continuous feeding. Conclusion: Continuous nasogastric feeding does not increase small bowel water content, thus fluid flux within the small bowel is not a major contributor to the etiology of tube feeding-related diarrhea. PMID:25549202

  17. SU-E-T-71: A Radiochromic Film Based Quantitative Assessment of Thermoplastic Mask Bolus Effect in Head and Neck IMRT/VMAT

    SciTech Connect

    Kalavagunta, C; Lin, M; Snider, J; Xu, H; Schrum, A; Vadnais, P; Marter, K; Suntharalingam, M; Prado, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify the factors leading to thermoplastic mask bolus-associated-increased skin dose in head and neck IMRT/VMAT using EBT2 film. Methods: EBT2 film placed beneath a dual layer 3-point ORFIT head, neck and shoulder mask was used to test the effect of mask thickness, beam modulation, air gap, and beam obliquity on bolus effect. Mask thickness was varied based on the distribution of 1.6mm Orfilight layer on top of 2 mm Efficast layer. Beam modulation was varied by irradiating the film with an open field (no beam modulation) and a step and shoot field (beam modulation). Air gap between mask and film was varied from 0 to 5mm. Beam obliquity was varied by irradiating the film at gantry angles of 0°, 35°, and 70°.Finally, film strips placed on a Rando phantom under an Orfit mask, in regions of expected high dose, were irradiated using 5 IMRT and 5 VMAT plans with various modulation levels (modulation factor 2 to 5) and the results were compared with those obtained placing OSLDs at the same locations. Results: An 18–34% increase in mask bolus effect was observed for three factors where the effect of beam obliquity ≥ beam modulation > mask thickness. No increase in mask bolus effect was observed for change in air gap. A 6–13% increase in dose due to mask bolus effect was observed on film strips. Conclusion: This work underlines the role of beam obliquity and beam modulation combined with thermoplastic mask thickness in increasing mask bolus-associated skin dose in head and neck IMRT/VMAT. One possible method of dose reduction, based on knowledge gained from this work, is inclusion of skin as an avoidance structure in treatment planning. Another approach is to design a mask with the least amount of thermoplastic material necessary for immobilization.

  18. Electroconvulsive therapy for catatonia in juvenile neuropsychiatric lupus.

    PubMed

    Leon, T; Aguirre, A; Pesce, C; Sanhueza, P; Toro, P

    2014-09-01

    Neuropsychiatric manifestations are serious and frequent complications of systemic lupus erythematous (SLE). Catatonia is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by motor disturbance (including waxy flexibility and catalepsy), stupor, excitement, negativism, mutism, echopraxia and echolalia. Catatonia associated with SLE has been only rarely reported, especially in children. Here we present a case of a 14-year-old patient encountered in consultation-liaison psychiatry who presented catatonia associated with SLE. Her catatonia was refractory to treatment with pulse methylprednisolone, intravenous cyclophosphamide and rituximab. The patient responded to a combined therapy of electroconvulsive therapy and benzodiazepines. The present case suggests that although rarely reported, catatonia seen in the background of SLE should be promptly identified and treated to reduce the morbidity.

  19. Variation of the relaxographic "shutter-speed" for transcytolemmal water exchange affects the CR bolus-tracking curve shape.

    PubMed

    Yankeelov, Thomas E; Rooney, William D; Li, Xin; Springer, Charles S

    2003-12-01

    Contrast reagents (CRs) may enter the tissue interstitium for a period after a vascular bolus injection. As the amount of interstitial CR increases, the longitudinal relaxographic NMR "shutter-speed" (T(-1)) for the equilibrium transcytolemmal water exchange process increases. The quantity T(-1) is given by |r(1o)[CR(o)] + R(1o0) - R(1i)| (where r(1o) and [CR(o)] represent the interstitial (extracellular) CR relaxivity and concentration, respectively, and R(1o0) and R(1i) are the extra- and intracellular (1)H(2)O relaxation rate constants, respectively, in the absence of exchange). The increase of T(-1) with [CR(o)] causes the kinetics of the water exchange equilibrium to appear to decrease. Here, analytical theory for two-site-exchange processes is combined with that for pharmacokinetic CR delivery, extraction, and distribution in a method termed BOLus Enhanced Relaxation Overview (BOLERO(Copyright )). The shutter-speed effect alters the shape of the bolus-tracking (B-T) time-course. It is shown that this is mostly accounted for by the inclusion of only one additional parameter, which measures the mean intracellular lifetime of a water molecule. Simulated and real data demonstrate that the effect of shutter-speed variation on pharmacokinetic parameters can be very significant: neglecting this effect can lead to an underestimation of the parameter values by 50%. This phenomenon can be heterogeneous. Within a tiny gliosarcoma implanted in the rat brain, the interstitial CR in the tumor core never rises to a level sufficient to cause apparent slowing of the exchange process. However, within the few microns needed to reach the proliferating rim, this occurs to a significant degree. Thus, even relative pharmacokinetic quantities can be incorrectly represented in a parametric map that neglects this effect. The BOLERO analysis shows promise for in vivo vascular phenotyping in pathophysiology. It also includes a provision for approximating the separation of the perfusion

  20. Neurobehavioral effect of chronic and bolus doses of methylmercury following prenatal exposure in C57BL/6 weanling mice.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jacky; Inskip, Mike; Newhook, Deborah; Messier, Claude

    2009-01-01

    Several studies with animals have shown that even low and medium prenatal and postnatal exposure to methylmercury (MeHg) can result in locomotor, motor coordination and learning deficits. However, some behavioural effects of MeHg remain controversial and the methods to model human MeHg exposure in animal still remain to be optimized. We investigated the neurobehavioral effects of two different patterns of MeHg exposure. MeHg was given mixed in palatable food that mice readily ate. For the first pattern (chronic group), C57BL/6 mice dams were given 1.4 microg/g body weight (BW)/day (n=20) throughout gestation mixed in palatable food. For the second pattern (bolus) dams were given 6.0 microg/g BW/day mixed in palatable food on gestation day 12 and 16 together with a lower chronic dose of 0.85 microg/g BW/day mixed in palatable food on all remaining gestation days (n=20). Day 12 and 16 were chosen because neuron proliferation and the start of migration for many brain regions occur during that period. Behavioural testing on weanling animals started at 8 weeks. Both the chronic and bolus groups showed an impairment of working memory and visual spatial ability in the radial arm maze task. Other tests did not provide clear evidence that methylmercury exposure had significant adverse effects on locomotor activity, motor coordination or emotional reactivity. However, the chronic groups had a tendency for lower performance in most tests including activity in Skinner box and open field trials, as well as a higher number of anxiety-like behaviors. Chronic exposure to lower levels of MeHg combined to acute exposure with high levels of a few days during gestation appears to be less damaging than chronic exposure to slightly higher levels without acute MeHg exposure even though, equal amounts were administered during gestation. Possibly, as indicated by preliminary data, the relatively larger impact of chronic administration of a higher daily dose could be the consequence of a

  1. Effects of an intravenous bolus calcium injection on glomerular filtration rate and electrolyte excretion in the kidney in conscious pigs.

    PubMed

    Maier, H; Járos, G G; van Hoorn-Hickman, R; Hall, A

    1985-03-02

    This paper reports the changes observed in the concentration of various constituents of plasma and in their excretion in the urine after a bolus intravenous injection of 2,2 mM calcium gluconate into conscious pigs weighing 20 kg. In the plasma, both ionic and total calcium concentrations increased but returned to normal within 35 minutes, while sodium, potassium and inorganic phosphate did not change significantly. In the kidney, the urine volume, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and fractional sodium excretion increased slightly during the first 10 minutes but became significantly depressed later. Potassium and phosphate levels decreased, the latter significantly, while the calcium concentration increased significantly and only returned to normal after 70 minutes. These results suggest that since the disturbances in urinary volume, GFR and fractional phosphate excretion persist after both the plasma calcium and urinary calcium levels have returned to normal, factors other than these calcium values may be responsible for changes in the former measurements.

  2. Prolonged infusion versus intermittent boluses of β-lactam antibiotics for treatment of acute infections: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Teo, Jocelyn; Liew, Yixin; Lee, Winnie; Kwa, Andrea Lay-Hoon

    2014-05-01

    The clinical advantages of prolonged (extended/continuous) infusion remain controversial. Previous studies and reviews have failed to show consistent clinical benefits of extending the infusion time. This meta-analysis sought to determine whether prolonged β-lactam infusions were associated with a reduction in mortality and improvement in clinical success. A search of PubMed, EMBASE and The Cochrane Library for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies comparing prolonged infusion with intermittent bolus administration of the same antibiotic in hospitalised adult patients was conducted. Primary outcomes evaluated were mortality and clinical success. A total of 29 studies with 2206 patients (18 RCTs and 11 observational studies) were included in the meta-analysis. Compared with intermittent boluses, use of prolonged infusion appeared to be associated with a significant reduction in mortality [pooled relative risk (RR) = 0.66, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.53-0.83] and improvement in clinical success (RR = 1.12, 95% CI 1.03-1.21). Statistically significant benefit was supported by non-randomised studies (mortality, RR = 0.57, 95% CI 0.43-0.76; clinical success, RR = 1.34, 95% CI 1.02-1.76) but not by RCTs (mortality, RR = 0.83, 95% CI 0.57-1.21; clinical success, RR = 1.05, 95% CI 0.99-1.12). The positive results from observational studies, especially in the face of increasing antibiotic resistance, serve to justify the imperative need to conduct a large-scale, well-designed, multicentre RCT involving critically ill patients infected with high minimum inhibitory concentration pathogens to clearly substantiate this benefit.

  3. Impact of Bolus dosing versus continuous infusion of Piperacillin and Tazobactam on the development of antimicrobial resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Felton, T W; Goodwin, J; O'Connor, L; Sharp, A; Gregson, L; Livermore, J; Howard, S J; Neely, M N; Hope, W W

    2013-12-01

    Management of nosocomial pneumonia is frequently complicated by bacterial resistance. Extended infusions of beta-lactams are increasingly being used to improve clinical outcomes. However, the impact of this strategy on the emergence of antimicrobial resistance is not known. A hollow-fiber infection model with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1) was used. Pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles of piperacillin-tazobactam similar to those in humans were simulated over 5 days. Three dosages of piperacillin-tazobactam were administered over 0.5 h or 4 h, with redosing every 8 h. Two initial bacterial densities were investigated (∼10(4) CFU/ml and ∼10(7) CFU/ml). The time courses of the total bacterial population and the resistant subpopulation were determined. All data were described using a mathematical model, which was then used to define the relationship between drug concentrations, bacterial killing, and emergence of piperacillin resistance. There was logarithmic growth in controls in the initial 24 h, reaching a plateau of ∼9 log10 CFU/ml. Bacterial killing following administration of piperacillin via bolus dosing and that after extended infusions were similar. For the lower initial bacterial density, trough total plasma piperacillin concentration/MIC ratios of 3.4 and 10.4 for bolus and extended-infusion regimens, respectively, were able to suppress the emergence of piperacillin resistance. For the higher initial bacterial density, all regimens were associated with progressive growth of a resistant subpopulation. A stratified approach, according to bacterial density, is required to treat patients with nosocomial pneumonia. Antimicrobial monotherapy may be sufficient for some patients. However, for patients with a high bacterial burden, alternative therapeutic strategies are required to maximize bacterial killing and prevent antimicrobial resistance.

  4. Potential impact of a 500-mL water bolus and body mass on plasma osmolality dilution.

    PubMed

    Sollanek, Kurt J; Kenefick, Robert W; Cheuvront, Samuel N; Axtell, Robert S

    2011-09-01

    A methodological discrepancy exists in the hydration assessment literature regarding the establishment of euhydration, as some investigations utilize a pre-hydration technique, while others do not (overnight fluid/food fast). However, the degree that plasma osmolality (P (osm)) dilutes when using the pre-hydration method and how body mass/composition might influence the results is not known. Thirty subjects (22 M, 8 F; 20 ± 2 years (mean ± SD); 1.8 ± 0.1 m; 75.8 ± 13.5 kg) had P (osm) measured after an 8-h food and fluid fast (overnight fast) and 90 min after a 500-mL (4-9 mL/kg) water bolus (pre-hydration). From pre- to post-bolus, participants' P (osm) declined from 297 ± 3.5 to 295 ± 3.8 mmol/kg (p < 0.05; ∆ -1.7 ± 3.5 mmol/kg). One-third of the sample diluted to more than -3 mmol/kg. The effect of body mass on P (osm) dilution was investigated by comparing dilution in the ten lightest (62.8 ± 3.4 kg) and heaviest (92.0 ± 9.8 kg) participants; however, the change between the light (∆ -1.9 ± 3.8 mmol/kg) versus heavy groups (∆ -1.1 ± 3.0 mmol/kg) was not different (p > 0.05). The correlation between body mass or total body water and change in P (osm) was weak (p > 0.05), as was the correlation between relative fluid intake based on mass and change in P (osm) (p > 0.05). The two methodologies appear to produce similar P (osm) values when measured in most individuals. However, the potential for significant dilution (>3 mmol/kg) should be considered when choosing the pre-hydration methodology.

  5. Quantitative measurement of regional blood flow with gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetate bolus track NMR imaging in cerebral infarcts in rats: validation with the iodo[14C]antipyrine technique.

    PubMed Central

    Wittlich, F; Kohno, K; Mies, G; Norris, D G; Hoehn-Berlage, M

    1995-01-01

    NMR bolus track measurements were correlated with autoradiographically determined regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). The NMR method is based on bolus infusion of the contrast agent gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetate and high-speed T*2-sensitive NMR imaging. The first pass of the contrast agent through the image plane causes a transient decrease of the signal intensity. This time course of the signal intensity is transformed into relative concentrations of the contrast agent in each pixel. The mean transit time and relative blood flow and volume are calculated from such indicator dilution curves. We investigated whether this NMR technique correctly expresses the relative rCBF. The relative blood flow data, calculated from NMR bolus track experiments, and the absolute values of iodo[14C]antipyrine autoradiography were compared. A linear relationship was observed, indicating the proportionality of the transient NMR signal change with CBF. Excellent interindividual reproducibility of calibration constants is observed (r = 0.963). For a given NMR protocol, bolus track measurements calibrated with autoradiography after the experiment allow determination of absolute values for rCBF and regional blood volume. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7892189

  6. New bolus models for in vivo efficacy testing of mycotoxin-detoxifying agents in relation to EFSA guidelines, assessed using deoxynivalenol in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Devreese, M; Osselaere, A; Goossens, J; Vandenbroucke, V; De Baere, S; Eeckhout, M; De Backer, P; Croubels, S

    2012-01-01

    In this study, three new models were developed for efficacy testing of mycotoxin-detoxifying agents in relation to recent European guidelines. In the first model, deoxynivalenol was given to broiler chickens as an intra-crop bolus together with a mycotoxin-detoxifying agent in order to study the plasma concentration-time profile of deoxynivalenol. In the second model, the same oral bolus was given, preceded by an oral bolus of mycotoxin-detoxifying agent, to make sure the detoxifying agent was present in the whole intestinal tract when the mycotoxin was administered. In the third model, the mycotoxin-detoxifying agent was mixed in the feed of broiler chickens, and after 1 week's feeding, deoxynivalenol was given as an oral bolus. In order to evaluate the efficacy of these agents, plasma concentration-time profiles were set up and the main toxicokinetic parameters were compared. Two commercially available mycotoxin-detoxifying agents were tested, but they were not able to lower the oral availability of deoxynivalenol. As a positive control, activated carbon was used. We showed that activated carbon significantly reduces the absorption and oral availability of deoxynivalenol in all three models. Therefore, it can be concluded that these models are able to demonstrate the efficacy of mycotoxin-detoxifying agents in relation to European Food Safety Authority guidelines.

  7. Comparison of fractionated dose versus bolus dose injection in spinal anaesthesia for patients undergoing elective caesarean section: A randomised, double-blind study

    PubMed Central

    Badheka, Jigisha Prahaladray; Oza, Vrinda Pravinbhai; Vyas, Ashutosh; Baria, Deepika; Nehra, Poonam; Babu, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: Spinal anaesthesia (SA) with bolus dose has rapid onset but may precipitate hypotension. When we inject local anaesthetic in fractions with a time gap, it provides a dense block with haemodynamic stability and also prolongs the duration of analgesia. We aimed to compare fractionated dose with bolus dose in SA for haemodynamic stability and duration of analgesia in patients undergoing elective lower segment caesarean section (LSCS). Methods: After clearance from the Institutional Ethics Committee, the study was carried out in sixty patients undergoing elective LSCS. Patients were divided into two groups. Group B patients received single bolus SA with injection bupivacaine heavy (0.5%) and Group F patients fractionated dose with two-third of the total dose of injection bupivacaine heavy (0.5%) given initially followed by one-third dose after 90 s. Time of onset and regression of sensory and motor blockage, intraoperative haemodynamics and duration of analgesia were recorded and analysed with Student's unpaired t-test. Result: All the patients were haemodynamically stable in Group F as compared to Group B. Five patients in Group F and fourteen patients in Group B required vasopressor. Duration of sensory and motor block and duration of analgesia were longer in Group F (273.83 ± 20.62 min) compared to Group B (231.5 ± 31.87 min) P < 0.05. Conclusion: Fractionated dose of SA provides greater haemodynamic stability and longer duration of analgesia compared to bolus dose. PMID:28216705

  8. Simulation of contrast agent transport in arteries with multilayer arterial wall: impact of arterial transmural transport on the bolus delay and dispersion.

    PubMed

    Xu, Min; Liu, Xiao; Li, Ang; Fan, Yubo; Sun, Anqiang; Deng, Xiaoyan; Li, Deyu

    2014-01-01

    One assumption of DSC-MRI is that the injected contrast agent is kept totally intravascular and the arterial wall is impermeable to contrast agent. The assumption is unreal for such small contrast agent as Gd-DTPA can leak into the arterial wall. To investigate whether the unreal assumption is valid for the estimation of the delay and dispersion of the contrast agent bolus, we simulated flow and Gd-DTPA transport in a model with multilayer arterial wall and analyzed the bolus delay and dispersion qualified by mean vascular transit time (MVTT) and the variance of the vascular transport function. Factors that may affect Gd-DTPA transport hence the delay and dispersion were further investigated, such as integrity of endothelium and disturbed flow. The results revealed that arterial transmural transport would slightly affect MVTT and moderately increase the variance. In addition, although the integrity of endothelium can significantly affect the accumulation of contrast agent in the arterial wall, it had small effects on the bolus delay and dispersion. However, the disturbed flow would significantly increase both MVTT and the variance. In conclusion, arterial transmural transport may have a small effect on the bolus delay and dispersion when compared to the flow pattern in the artery.

  9. Nonlinear stochastic regularization to characterize tissue residue function in bolus-tracking MRI: assessment and comparison with SVD, block-circulant SVD, and Tikhonov.

    PubMed

    Zanderigo, Francesca; Bertoldo, Alessandra; Pillonetto, Gianluigi; Cobelli Ast, Claudio

    2009-05-01

    An accurate characterization of tissue residue function R(t) in bolus-tracking magnetic resonance imaging is of crucial importance to quantify cerebral hemodynamics. R(t) estimation requires to solve a deconvolution problem. The most popular deconvolution method is singular value decomposition (SVD). However, SVD is known to bear some limitations, e.g., R(t) profiles exhibit nonphysiological oscillations and take on negative values. In addition, SVD estimates are biased in presence of bolus delay and dispersion. Recently, other deconvolution methods have been proposed, in particular block-circulant SVD (cSVD) and Tikhonov regularization (TIKH). Here we propose a new method based on nonlinear stochastic regularization (NSR). NSR is tested on simulated data and compared with SVD, cSVD, and TIKH in presence and absence of bolus dispersion. A clinical case in one patient has also been considered. NSR is shown to perform better than SVD, cSVD, and TIKH in reconstructing both the peak and the residue function, in particular when bolus dispersion is considered. In addition, differently from SVD, cSVD, and TIKH, NSR always provides positive and smooth R(t).

  10. Simulation of Contrast Agent Transport in Arteries with Multilayer Arterial Wall: Impact of Arterial Transmural Transport on the Bolus Delay and Dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Min; Liu, Xiao; Li, Ang; Sun, Anqiang; Li, Deyu

    2014-01-01

    One assumption of DSC-MRI is that the injected contrast agent is kept totally intravascular and the arterial wall is impermeable to contrast agent. The assumption is unreal for such small contrast agent as Gd-DTPA can leak into the arterial wall. To investigate whether the unreal assumption is valid for the estimation of the delay and dispersion of the contrast agent bolus, we simulated flow and Gd-DTPA transport in a model with multilayer arterial wall and analyzed the bolus delay and dispersion qualified by mean vascular transit time (MVTT) and the variance of the vascular transport function. Factors that may affect Gd-DTPA transport hence the delay and dispersion were further investigated, such as integrity of endothelium and disturbed flow. The results revealed that arterial transmural transport would slightly affect MVTT and moderately increase the variance. In addition, although the integrity of endothelium can significantly affect the accumulation of contrast agent in the arterial wall, it had small effects on the bolus delay and dispersion. However, the disturbed flow would significantly increase both MVTT and the variance. In conclusion, arterial transmural transport may have a small effect on the bolus delay and dispersion when compared to the flow pattern in the artery. PMID:25692178

  11. Icariin has synergistic effects with methylprednisolone to ameliorate EAE via modulating HPA function, promoting anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Zhisheng; Deng, Xuemei; Hong, Mingfan; Su, Quanxi; Liu, Aiqun; Huang, Yeqing; Yu, Qingyun; Peng, Zhongxing

    2015-01-01

    Background: High-dose methylprednisolone (MP) is a clinically recommended therapeutic regimen for Multiple Sclerosis (MS), whereas some dreadful complications induced by it remain inevitable. Studies implied that estrogens might play neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory roles in EAE and MS and promote glucocorticoid efficacy. Icariin (ICA), a primary active component of Epimedium extracts, also possesses neuroprotective and estrogen-like effects with less adverse complication than estrogen. However, rare study focuses ICA’s effects on MS or EAE. Objective: Our purpose is to determine whether ICA has synergistic effects with MP in treating EAE and explore the possible mechanisms. Methods: C57BL/6 EAE mice were received different dose of ICA combined with MP and single MP treatment. Then, the clinical scores and serum Interleukin-17 (IL-17), Corticosterone (CORT), Adrenocorticotropic Hormone (ACTH) concentrations were analyzed. Western blot and Flow Cytometry were used to investigate the expression of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and cell apoptosis. Results: ICA has cooperative effects with MP in decreasing serum IL-17 and CORT concentrations, up-regulating the expression of GR in cerebral white matter and attenuating the cell apoptosis in spinal cord, especially high-dose ICA combined with MP. Conclusion: ICA has synergistic effects with MP to ameliorate EAE via modulating hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) function, promoting anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects. ICA could be considered as a promising therapeutic option for MS. PMID:26884931

  12. SU-E-T-72: Commissioning of a Standardized SRS Cone Set: Determination of the Bolus Gap Factors in a Passively Scattered Proton Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, R; Gordon, I; Ghebremedhin, A; Wroe, A; Schulte, R; Bush, D; Slater, J; Patyal, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the proton output factors for an SRS cone set using standardized apertures and varied range compensators (bolus blanks); specifically, to determine the best method for modeling the bolus gap factor (BGF) and eliminate the need for patient specific calibrations. Methods: A Standard Imaging A-16 chamber was placed in a Plastic Water phantom to measure the change in dose/MU with different treatment combinations for a proton SRS cone, using standardized apertures and range compensators. Measurements were made with all apertures in the SRS cone set, with four different range compensator thicknesses and five different air gaps between the end of the SRS cone and the surface of the phantom. The chamber was located at iso-center and maintained at a constant depth at the center of modulation for all measurements. Each aperture was placed in the cone to measure the change in MU needed to maintain constant dose at the chamber, as the air gap was increased with different thicknesses of bolus. Results: The dose/MU varied significantly with decreasing aperture size, increasing bolus thickness, or increasing air gap. The measured data was fitted with the lowest order polynomials that accurately described the data, to create a model for determining the change in output for any potential combination of devices used to treat a patient. For a given standardized aperture, the BGF could be described by its constituent factors: the bolus thickness factor (BTF) and the nozzle extension factor (NEF). Conclusion: The methods used to model the dose at the calibration point could be used to accurately predict the change in output for SRS proton beams due to the BGF, eliminating the need for patient specific calibrations. This method for modeling SRS treatments could also be applied to model other treatments using passively scattered proton beams.

  13. Continuous Femoral Nerve Blocks: Varying Local Anesthetic Delivery Method (Bolus versus Basal) to Minimize Quadriceps Motor Block while Maintaining Sensory Block

    PubMed Central

    Charous, Matthew T.; Madison, Sarah J.; Suresh, J.; Sandhu, NavParkash S.; Loland, Vanessa J.; Mariano, Edward R.; Donohue, Michael C.; Dutton, Pascual H.; Ferguson, Eliza J.; Ilfeld, Brian M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Whether the method of local anesthetic administration for continuous femoral nerve blocks —basal infusion versus repeated hourly bolus doses —influences block effects remains unknown. Methods Bilateral femoral perineural catheters were inserted in volunteers (n = 11). Ropivacaine 0.1% was administered through both catheters concurrently: a 6-h continuous 5 ml/h basal infusion on one side and 6 hourly bolus doses on the contralateral side. The primary endpoint was the maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) of the quadriceps femoris muscle at Hour 6. Secondary end points included quadriceps MVIC at other time points, hip adductor MVIC, and cutaneous sensation 2 cm medial to the distal quadriceps tendon in the 22 h following local anesthetic administration initiation. Results Quadriceps MVIC for limbs receiving 0.1% ropivacaine as a basal infusion declined by a mean (SD) of 84% (19) compared with 83% (24) for limbs receiving 0.1% ropivacaine as repeated bolus doses between baseline and Hour 6 (paired t test P = 0.91). Intrasubject comparisons (left vs. right) reflected a lack of difference as well: the mean basal-bolus difference in quadriceps MVIC at Hour 6 was −1.1% (95% CI −22.0 to 19.8%). The similarity did not reach our a priori threshold for concluding equivalence, which was the 95% CI falling within ± 20%. There were similar minimal differences in the secondary endpoints during local anesthetic administration. Conclusions This study did not find evidence to support the hypothesis that varying the method of local anesthetic administration —basal infusion versus repeated bolus doses —influences continuous femoral nerve block effects to a clinically significant degree. PMID:21394001

  14. The impact of delivery profile of essential amino acids upon skeletal muscle protein synthesis in older men: clinical efficacy of pulse vs. bolus supply.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, W Kyle; Phillips, Bethan E; Williams, John P; Rankin, Debbie; Lund, Jonathan N; Wilkinson, Daniel J; Smith, Kenneth; Atherton, Philip J

    2015-09-01

    Essential amino acids (EAA) are responsible for skeletal muscle anabolic effects after nutrient intake. The pattern of appearance of EAA in blood, e.g., after intake of "slow" or "fast" protein sources or in response to grazing vs. bolus feeding patterns, may impact anabolism. However, the influence of this on muscle anabolism is poorly understood, particularly in older individuals. We determined the effects of divergent feeding profiles of EAA on blood flow, anabolic signaling, and muscle protein synthesis (MPS) in older men. Sixteen men (∼70 yr) consumed EAA either as a single dose (bolus, 15 g; n = 8) or as small repeated fractions (pulse, 4 × 3.75 g every 45 min; n = 8) during (13)C6 phenylalanine infusion. Repeated blood samples and muscle biopsies permitted measurement of fasting and postprandial plasma EAA, insulin, anabolic signaling, and MPS. Muscle blood flow was assessed by contrast-enhanced ultrasound (Sonovue). Bolus achieved rapid insulinemia (12.7 μiU/ml 25-min postfeed), essential aminoacidemia (∼3,000 μM, 45-65 min postfeed), and mTORC1 activity; pulse achieved attenuated insulin responses, gradual low-amplitude aminoacidemia (∼1,800 μM 80-195 min after feeding), and undetectable mTORC1 signaling. Despite this, equivalent anabolic responses were observed: fasting FSRs of 0.051 and 0.047%/h (bolus and pulse, respectively) increased to 0.084 and 0.073%/h, respectively. Moreover, pulse led to sustainment of MPS beyond 180 min, when bolus MPS had returned to basal rates. We detected no benefit of rapid aminoacidemia in this older population despite enhanced anabolic signaling and greater overall EAA exposure. Rather, apparent delayed onset of the "muscle-full" effect permitted identical MPS following low-amplitude-sustained EAA exposure.

  15. Prospective Evaluation of Severe Skin Toxicity and Pain During Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Vu, Thi Trinh Thuc; Mitera, Gunita; Bosnic, Sandy; Verkooijen, Helena M.; Truong, Pauline

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively capture acute toxicities and pain associated with postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT), to analyze patient and treatment risk factors for severe side effects. Methods and Materials: Women referred for PMRT were prospectively enrolled and assessed weekly during and after radiation therapy. The endpoint included severe National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Effects grade 3 moist desquamation, other skin symptoms, and pain. Results: Of 257 patients, 73 (28.4%) experienced extensive moist desquamation, 84 (32.7%) Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Effects skin toxicity grade 3, and 57 (22.2%) a pain impacting on daily life activities. Among symptoms only grade 3 moist desquamation was significantly associated with severe pain (P<.001). On multivariate analysis, smoking, high-energy photons, and skin bolus were significantly associated with severe moist desquamation. Skin toxicity doubled for smokers, with 40% severe pain, 48% grade 3 moist desquamation, and 64% grade 3 skin toxicity. Without skin bolus 4.2% had severe pain, none moist desquamation, and 2.1% grade 3 skin toxicity. When skin bolus was used on alternate days, the frequency increased to 15% for pain, 22% for moist desquamation, and 26% for grade 3 skin toxicity. When bolus was used daily, 32% had pain, 41% moist desquamation, and 47% grade 3 skin toxicity. Symptoms peaked 1 to 2 weeks after the end of PMRT. Conclusions: The present cohort study suggests excessive radiation toxicity after PMRT. Among factors associated with an increase of toxicity are smoking habits and the use of skin bolus.

  16. [Insulin dose analysis during pregnancy in type 1 diabetic patients treated with insulin pump therapy].

    PubMed

    Qiu, L L; Weng, J P; Zheng, X Y; Luo, S H; Yang, D Z; Xu, W; Cai, M Y; Xu, F; Yan, J H; Yao, B

    2017-02-28

    Objective: To analyze the insulin dose of type 1 diabetic patients who treated with insulin pump therapy during pregnancy in order to explore the features of these patients' insulin requirement during gestation. Methods: A total of 12 well-controlled type 1 diabetic women patients who were treated with insulin pump therapy before and during gestation without any adverse pregnancy outcomes from June 2011 to December 2014 were selected from Guangdong Type 1 Diabetes Translational Medicine Study and included in the study. Demographic data, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) before pregnancy and before delivery, insulin dose, hypoglycemia episodes and pregnancy outcomes were collected to analyze the insulin dose of preconception, the 1(st,) the 2(nd) and the 3(rd) trimester to analyze the requirement of insulin before and throughout pregnancy. Results: Subjects were (26.9±2.6) years old, with a diabetes duration of (6.6±4.4) years. HbA1c were (5.8±0.5)% before conception. The preconception total daily insulin dose, basal rate, bolus and bolus proportion were (0.60±0.18)U/kg, (0.28±0.10)U/kg, (0.32±0.13)U/kg and (54.8±12.9)%, respectively. Both of the insulin dose indexes mentioned above changed significantly in different trimesters compared with that in preconception (P value was <0.001, 0.034, <0.001 and <0.001, respectively). The total daily insulin dose, bolus and bolus proportion kept increasing during pregnancy. In the 1(st,) the 2(nd) and the 3(rd) trimester, the total daily insulin dose rose by 0.2%, 45.4% and 72.7%, respectively, the bolus rose by 8.0%, 72.2% and 106.8%, respectively, and the bolus proportion rose by 8.0%, 16.8% and 19.0%, respectively. While the basal rate decreased by 9.0% in the 1(st) trimester and rose by 14.1% and 32.9% in the 2(nd) and 3(rd) trimester, respectively. Conclusions: In well-controlled pregnant women with type 1 diabetes mellitus, insulin requirement increased throughout pregnancy. Most of the increased insulin requirement was

  17. Insulin therapy in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Malik, Faisal S; Taplin, Craig E

    2014-04-01

    Treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) requires lifelong administration of exogenous insulin. The primary goal of treatment of T1DM in children and adolescents is to maintain near-normoglycemia through intensive insulin therapy, avoid acute complications, and prevent long-term microvascular and macrovascular complications, while facilitating as close to a normal life as possible. Effective insulin therapy must, therefore, be provided on the basis of the needs, preferences, and resources of the individual and the family for optimal management of T1DM. To achieve target glycemic control, the best therapeutic option for patients with T1DM is basal-bolus therapy either with multiple daily injections (MDI) or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII). Many formulations of insulin are available to help simulate endogenous insulin secretion as closely as possible in an effort to eliminate the symptoms and complications of hyperglycemia, while minimizing the risk of hypoglycemia secondary to therapy. When using MDI, basal insulin requirements are given as an injection of long- or intermediate-acting insulin analogs, while meal-related glucose excursions are controlled with bolus injections of rapid-acting insulin analogs. Alternatively, CSII can be used, which provides a 24-h preselected but adjustable basal rate of rapid-acting insulin, along with patient-activated mealtime bolus doses, eliminating the need for periodic injections. Both MDI treatment and CSII therapy must be supported by comprehensive education that is appropriate for the individual needs of the patient and family before and after initiation. Current therapies still do not match the endogenous insulin profile of pancreatic β-cells, and all still pose risks of suboptimal control, hypoglycemia, and ketosis in children and adolescents. The safety and success of a prescribed insulin regimen is, therefore, dependent on self-monitoring of blood glucose and/or a continuous glucose monitoring system

  18. The use of electroconvulsive therapy in a patient with juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus and catatonia.

    PubMed

    Mon, T; L'ecuyer, S; Farber, N B; White, A J; Baszis, K W; Hearn, J K; Spiegel, T E; French, A R; Kitcharoensakkul, M

    2012-12-01

    Catatonia is a rare manifestation in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). As catatonia can be associated with both psychiatric and organic conditions, this could create a diagnostic dilemma once this occurs in SLE patients. The report describes a 15-year-old female with SLE who developed catatonia three days after the diagnosis of SLE was made. Her catatonia was refractory to the treatment with immunosuppressive therapy, which included pulse methylprednisolone, intravenous cyclophosphamide, rituximab, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and plasmapheresis. Given her persistent catatonia, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) was initiated three months after the onset of her symptoms. After the third ECT treatment, her mental status dramatically improved and returned nearly to baseline while she was continued on the immunosuppression. This is the first report of a successful ECT therapy in catatonic lupus in children.

  19. Noninvasive functional liver blood flow measurement: comparison between bolus dose and steady-state clearance of sorbitol in a small-rodent model.

    PubMed

    van der Hoven, Ben; van Pelt, Hans; Swart, Eleonore L; Bonthuis, Fred; Tilanus, Huug W; Bakker, Jan; Gommers, Diederik

    2010-02-01

    Plasma clearance of D-sorbitol, a nontoxic polyol, occurs predominantly in the liver and has been used to measure functional liver blood flow after bolus and steady- state intravenous administration. However, it is not known which of these two administration methods is superior. Therefore, plasma D-sorbitol clearance was studied in an animal model both after a bolus dose and under steady-state (SS) conditions and compared directly with liver blood flow, under normal conditions, and after the induction of endotoxin (LPS) sepsis. Adult male Wistar rats (526 +/- 38 g body wt; n = 27) were anesthetized and mechanically ventilated. Hemodynamics, hepatic arterial flow, and portal venous flow were measured. Two groups were studied, namely healthy animals that served as controls and a sepsis group that received 5 mg/kg LPS intravenously (Escherichia coli O127:B8). Each animal received either a SS infusion (0.1 mg/100 g body wt per min) or a bolus (3 mg/100 g body wt) of a 5% D-sorbitol solution intravenously in a randomized order. After the initial measurements and a 60-min pause time in between (T(1/2,sorbitol) = 9 min), a crossover was done. The hepatic clearance of D-sorbitol in the control group showed a good correlation between bolus and SS (Spearman's r = 0.7681, P = 0.0004), and both techniques correlated well with total liver blood flow (TLBF) (r = 0.7239, P = 0.0023 and r = 0.7226, P = 0.0023, respectively). Also in the sepsis group there was a good correlation between bolus and SS sorbitol clearance (r = 0.6655, P = 0.0182). In the sepsis group, only the SS clearance correlated with TLBF (r = 0.6434, P = 0.024). In conclusion, in normal and under septic conditions, hepatic clearance of D-sorbitol either by bolus or a SS infusion is comparable. In healthy animals, this also correlated well with TLBF but not in septic conditions. However, this is expected because of the changes in the liver microcirculation, shunting, and decreased hepatocyte function in sepsis.

  20. Economic Synergy between Dry Cow Diet Improvement and Monensin Bolus Use to Prevent Subclinical Ketosis: An Experimental Demonstration Based on Available Literature

    PubMed Central

    Raboisson, Didier; Barbier, Maxime

    2017-01-01

    The prevention of subclinical ketosis (SCK) is based on maintaining adequate nutrition in dairy cows during the dry period and close to calving. Recently, an oral-route monensin bolus to prevent SCK was approved in Europe. The present study aims to define the allocation of resources for SCK management at the herd level and evaluate the profitability of administering monensin boluses in cows at risk for SCK. A stochastic model was used to calculate the total cost of SCK for a population with a given prevalence of cows at risk for SCK. This model included the ability of the farmer to correctly target and preventatively treat these cows at risk for SCK. The results clearly demonstrated economic synergy between two management practices. First, reducing the prevalence of cows at risk for SCK dramatically reduces the total cost of SCK and seems profitable in most situations. Second, monensin bolus use to reduce the occurrence of SCK in cows already at risk for SCK is cost-effective. The results also highlighted three economic strategies to manage SCK in the dairy industry in Europe. First, monensin bolus use throughout an entire herd when the prevalence of cows at risk for SCK is high is only profitable in the short-term as a tool to correct acute deterioration at the herd level. Second, decreasing the prevalence of cows at risk for SCK through adequate feeding in the dry period is of financial interest as a baseline strategy when prevalence is high, assuming moderate additional cost linked to the new diet. Third, monensin bolus use when the prevalence of cows at risk for SCK is low is also profitable as a long-term strategy when only cows at high risk for SCK (such as cows that are over-conditioned, old, or have a previous history of SCK-related disorders) are targeted for preventative treatment. Authors suggest to use the present results considering that farmers have a correct, but not perfect, ability to target animals to be preventively targeted with the monensin

  1. SU-E-T-541: Bolus Effect of Thermoplastic Masks in IMRT and VMAT Head and Neck Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Zhen, H; Nedzi, L; Chen, S; Jiang, S; Zhao, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively evaluate the bolus effect of thermoplalstic mask on patient skin dose during multi-field IMRT and VMAT treatment. Methods: The clinically approved target contours for five head and neck patients were deformably registered to an anthropomorphic Rando phantom. Two plans: Multifield IMRT plan with 7-9 beams and VMAT plan with 2-4 arcs were created for each patient following same dose constraints. 3mm skin was excluded from PTVs but not constrained during optimization. The prescription dose was 200-220 cGy/fraction. A thermoplastic head and shoulder mask was customized for the Rando phantom. Each plan was delivered to the phantom twice with and without mask. During each delivery, two rectangular strips of EBT3 films (1cm x 6.8cm) were placed across the anterior upper and lower neck near PTVs to measure the surface dose. For consistency films were positioned at same locations for same patient. A total of 8 film strips were obtained for each patient. Film dose was calibrated in the range of 0-400cGy on the day of plan delivery. For dose comparison 3 regions of interests (ROIs) of 1×1 cm{sup 2} were selected at left, right and middle part of each film, resulting in 6 point doses at each plan delivery. Results: The films without mask show relatively uniform dose distribution while those with mask clearly show mesh pattern of mask, usually indicating an increase in skin dose. On average the increase in skin dose over all ROIs with mask was 31.9%(±14.8%) with a range of 11.4%- 58.4%. There is no statistically significant difference (p=0.44) between skin dose increase in VMAT (30.8%±15.3%) and IMRT delivery (33.0%±14.9%). Conclusion: Thermoplastic immobilization masks increase surface dose for HN patient by around 30%. The magnitude is comparable between multi-field IMRT and VMAT. Radiochromic EBT3 film serves as an effective tool to quantify bolus effect.

  2. Double-blind trial of intravenous methylprednisolone in Guillain-Barré syndrome. Guillain-Barré Syndrome Steroid Trial Group.

    PubMed

    1993-03-06

    Steroids have been beneficial in the treatment of demyelinating diseases with features similar to those of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). However, steroid treatment of GBS has been disappointing; in an earlier trial oral prednisolone was ineffective, although the dose was low and the sample small. We assessed the benefit of a high-dose steroid regimen in a large sample of patients with GBS in a multicentre, randomised, double-blind trial. 242 adult patients were randomised to receive intravenous methylprednisolone (IVMP) 500 mg (124 patients) or a placebo (118) daily for 5 days. Patients were diagnosed by standard clinical criteria and entered the trial within 15 days of onset of neurological symptoms. All patients were too weak to run. Some patients received plasma exchange depending on the practice of their centre. Disability was graded on a scale from 0 (healthy) to 6 (dead) at intervals for 48 weeks. There was no significant difference in any outcome variable between patients treated with IVMP and those given placebo. The most important outcome was the difference between the groups in disability grade 4 weeks after randomisation, which was only a 0.06 grade (95% Cl -0.23 to 0.36) greater improvement in the IVMP than the placebo group. The 39 patients in the IVMP group who required ventilation did so for a median of 18 days, 9 days fewer than the 44 patients who had a placebo and required ventilation (95% Cl -9.6 to 27.6). Median time to walk unaided was 38 days in the IVMP patients and 50 days in the placebo patients (difference 12 days, (95% Cl -21.3 to 45.3). A short course of high-dose IVMP given early in GBS is ineffective.

  3. Multicenter study of combination DEP regimen as a salvage therapy for adult refractory hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yini; Huang, Wenqiu; Hu, Liangding; Cen, Xinan; Li, Lihong; Wang, Jijun; Shen, Jianliang; Wei, Na

    2015-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a refractory immune disorder with a significant risk of death. Although standard therapy has dramatically improved survival in HLH patients, approximately 30%, especially adults, show no response to current treatment strategies. This prospective study aimed to investigate the efficacy of liposomal doxorubicin treatment combined with etoposide and methylprednisolone (doxorubicin-etoposide-methylprednisolone; DEP) as a salvage therapy for adult refractory HLH. Adult patients who did not achieve at least partial response 2 weeks after initial standard HLH therapy were enrolled in this study between June 2013 and June 2014. Response to salvage therapy was assessed at 2 and 4 weeks after initiation of DEP therapy and patients were followed until death or until November 2014. Sixty-three refractory HLH patients were enrolled, including 29 cases of lymphoma-associated HLH, 22 cases of Epstein-Barr virus–associated HLH, and 4 cases of familial HLH. There were 8 cases with unknown underlying diseases. Seventeen cases (27.0%) achieved complete response and 31 cases (49.2%) achieved partial response. The overall response was 76.2% (48/63). Patients who showed no response to DEP died within 4 weeks after salvage therapy. Twenty-nine of the 48 patients who achieved partial or complete response survived to subsequent chemotherapy, allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, or splenectomy. Our study suggests that DEP regimen is an effective salvage regimen for adult refractory HLH, which can prolong patient survival as we continue to understand the responsible mechanisms and bridge the gap between HLH and its underlying diseases. This study was registered in the Chinese Clinical Trials Registry Platform (http://www.chictr.org.cn/) as ChiCTR-IPC-14005514. PMID:26289641

  4. Efficacy of Hylan G-F 20 versus 6-methylprednisolone acetate in painful shoulder osteoarthritis: a retrospective controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Merolla, Giovanni; Sperling, John W; Paladini, Paolo; Porcellini, Giuseppe

    2011-12-01

    Shoulder osteoarthritis affect about 32% of patients over 60 years. Conservative treatment are recommended to restore shoulder function while shoulder arthroplasty remains the standard treatment for severe osteoarthritis. When conservative therapies fail and surgical approach is precluded, viscosupplementation with HA may be the treatment of choice. Currently, there is minimal information available comparing the results of Hylan G-F 20 and corticosteroid injections for the treatment of shoulder osteoarthritis. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the results of these two treatments at specific time points with validated outcome measurements. Retrospective comparative cohort study. The study population included 84 patients, 51 of whom treated with Hylan G-F 20 and 33 with a corticosteroid. Gleno-humeral osteoarthritis was graded according to Samilson-Prieto classification and rotator cuff was assessed with MRI. Both groups received three injections 1 week apart and were evaluated using a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for pain and satisfaction, the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) and the Constant-Murley scale. Outcomes were registered at 1, 3, and 6 months. The Hylan G-F 20 group showed a significant pain reduction (P < 0.05), improvement in the Constant-Murley, SPADI scores (P < 0.05), and satisfaction (P < 0.01) at all three follow-up times. Pain, clinical scores, and subjective satisfaction in the corticosteroid group improved in the first post treatment month only (P < 0.05) compared with the baseline. Overall, lower clinical advantages were found in patients with greater degree of osteoarthritis and rotator cuff tears. Intra-articular injections with Hylan G-F 20 are effective in reducing pain for up to 6 months in gleno-humeral osteoarthritis whereas corticosteroids injections resulte in improvement at 1 month only. In patients with severe osteoarthritis and/or full-thickness, RC tears results tended to be worse.

  5. Evaluation of a Novel Continuous Glucose Monitoring-Based Method for Mealtime Insulin Dosing—the iBolus—in Subjects with Type 1 Diabetes Using Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Therapy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ampudia-Blasco, F. Javier; Laguna, Alejandro; Revert, Ana; Vehì, Josep; Ascaso, Juan F.; Bondia, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective Prandial insulin dosing is an empirical practice associated frequently with poor reproducibility in postprandial glucose response. Based on continuous glucose monitoring (CGM), a method for prandial insulin administration (iBolus) is presented and evaluated for people with type 1 diabetes using CSII therapy. Subjects and Methods An individual patient's model for a 5-h postprandial period was obtained from 6-day ambulatory CGM and used for iBolus calculation in 12 patients with type 1 diabetes. In a double-blind, crossover study each patient underwent four meal tests with 40 g or 100 g of carbohydrates (CHOs), both on two occasions. For each meal, the iBolus or the traditional bolus (tBolus) was given before mealtime (t0) in a randomized order. We measured the postprandial glycemic response as the area under the curve of plasma glucose (AUC-PG0–5h) and variability as the individual coefficient of variation (CV) of AUC-PG0–5h. The contribution of the insulin-to-CHO ratio, CHO, plasma glucose at t0 (PGt0), and insulin dose to AUC-PG0–5h and its CV was also investigated. Results AUC-PG0–5h was similar with either bolus for 40-g (iBolus vs. tBolus, 585.5±127.5 vs. 689.2±180.7 mg/dL·h) or 100-g (752.1±237.7 vs. 760.0±263.2 mg/dL·h) CHO meals. A multiple regression analysis revealed a significant model only for the tBolus, with PGt0 being the best predictor of AUC-PG0–5h explaining approximately 50% of the glycemic response. Observed variability was greater with the iBolus (CV, 16.7±15.3% vs. 10.1±12.5%) but independent of the factors studied. Conclusions A CGM-based algorithm for calculation of prandial insulin is feasible, although it does not reduce unpredictability of individual glycemic responses. Causes of variability need to be identified and analyzed for further optimization of postprandial glycemic control. PMID:23003329

  6. Comparison of first pass bolus AIFs extracted from sequential 18F-FDG PET and DSC-MRI of mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Eleanor; Sawiak, Stephen J.; Ward, Alexander O.; Buonincontri, Guido; Hawkes, Robert C.; Adrian Carpenter, T.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate kinetic modelling of in vivo physiological function using positron emission tomography (PET) requires determination of the tracer time-activity curve in plasma, known as the arterial input function (AIF). The AIF is usually determined by invasive blood sampling methods, which are prohibitive in murine studies due to low total blood volumes. Extracting AIFs from PET images is also challenging due to large partial volume effects (PVE). We hypothesise that in combined PET with magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MR), a co-injected bolus of MR contrast agent and PET ligand can be tracked using fast MR acquisitions. This protocol would allow extraction of a MR AIF from MR contrast agent concentration-time curves, at higher spatial and temporal resolution than an image-derived PET AIF. A conversion factor could then be applied to the MR AIF for use in PET kinetic analysis. This work has compared AIFs obtained from sequential DSC-MRI and PET with separate injections of gadolinium contrast agent and 18F-FDG respectively to ascertain the technique‧s validity. An automated voxel selection algorithm was employed to improve MR AIF reproducibility. We found that MR and PET AIFs displayed similar character in the first pass, confirmed by gamma variate fits (p<0.02). MR AIFs displayed reduced PVE compared to PET AIFs, indicating their potential use in PET/MR studies.

  7. Regional cerebral blood flow measurement with intravenous ( sup 15 O)water bolus and ( sup 18 F)fluoromethane inhalation

    SciTech Connect

    Herholz, K.; Pietrzyk, U.; Wienhard, K.; Hebold, I.; Pawlik, G.; Wagner, R.; Holthoff, V.; Klinkhammer, P.; Heiss, W.D. )

    1989-09-01

    In 20 patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease, classic migraine, or angiomas, we compared paired dynamic positron emission tomographic measurements of regional cerebral blood flow using both ({sup 15}O)water and ({sup 18}F)fluoromethane as tracers. Cerebral blood flow was also determined according to the autoradiographic technique with a bolus injection of ({sup 15}O)water. There were reasonable overall correlations between dynamic ({sup 15}O)water and ({sup 18}F)fluoromethane values for cerebral blood flow (r = 0.82) and between dynamic and autoradiographic ({sup 15}O)water values for cerebral blood flow (r = 0.83). We found a close correspondence between abnormal pathologic findings and visually evaluated cerebral blood flow tomograms obtained with the two tracers. On average, dynamic ({sup 15}O)water cerebral blood flow was 6% lower than that measured with ({sup 18}F)fluoromethane. There also was a general trend toward a greater underestimation with ({sup 15}O)water in high-flow areas, particularly in hyperemic areas, probably due to incomplete first-pass extraction of ({sup 15}O)water. Underestimation was not detected in low-flow areas or in the cerebellum. Absolute cerebral blood flow values were less closely correlated between tracers and techniques than cerebral blood flow patterns. The variability of the relation between absolute flow values was probably caused by confounding effects of the variation in the circulatory delay time. The autoradiographic technique was most sensitive to this type error.

  8. Green Tea Increases the Concentration of Total Mercury in the Blood of Rats following an Oral Fish Tissue Bolus

    PubMed Central

    Janle, Elsa M.; Freiser, Helene; Manganais, Christopher; Chen, Tzu-Ying; Craig, Bruce A.; Santerre, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    Fish has many health benefits but is also the most common source of methylmercury. The bioavailability of methylmercury in fish may be affected by other meal components. In this study, the effect of green tea on the bioavailability of methylmercury from an oral bolus of fish muscle tissue was studied in rats and compared to a water treated control group and a group treated with meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), a compound used medically to chelate mercury. Rats were given a single oral dose of fish tissue via gavage and one of the treatments. Rats were given access to food for 3 h at 12 h intervals. They were dosed with each of the treatments with each meal. Blood samples were collected for 95 hours. Green tea significantly increased the concentration of total mercury in blood relative to the control, whereas DMSA significantly decreased it. In addition, feeding caused a slight increase in blood mercury for several meals following the initial dose. PMID:26301246

  9. Delayed photolysis of liposomes: a strategy for the precision timing of bolus drug release using ex-vivo photochemical sensitization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozikowski, Raymond T.; Sorg, Brian S.

    2012-03-01

    Chemotherapy is a standard treatment for metastatic cancer. However drug toxicity limits the dosage that can safely be used, thus reducing treatment efficacy. Drug carrier particles, like liposomes, can help reduce toxicity by shielding normal tissue from drug and selectively depositing drug in tumors. Over years of development, liposomes have been optimized to avoid uptake by the Reticuloendothelial System (RES) as well as effectively retain their drug content during circulation. As a result, liposomes release drug passively, by slow leakage, but this uncontrolled drug release can limit treatment efficacy as it can be difficult to achieve therapeutic concentrations of drug at tumor sites even with tumor-specific accumulation of the carriers. Lipid membranes can be photochemically lysed by both Type I (photosensitizer-substrate) and Type II (photosensitizer-oxygen) reactions. It has been demonstrated in red blood cells (RBCs) in vitro that these photolysis reactions can occur in two distinct steps: a light-initiated reaction followed by a thermally-initiated reaction. These separable activation steps allow for the delay of photohemolysis in a controlled manner using the irradiation energy, temperature and photosensitizer concentration. In this work we have translated this technique from RBCs to liposomal nanoparticles. To that end, we present in vitro data demonstrating this delayed bolus release from liposomes, as well as the ability to control the timing of this event. Further, we demonstrate for the first time the improved delivery of bioavailable cargo selectively to target sites in vivo.

  10. High-resolution Impedance Manometry Measurement of Bolus Flow Time in Achalasia and its Correlation with Dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhiyue; Carlson, Dusty; Dykstra, Kristina; Sternbach, Joel; Hungness, Eric; Kahrilas, Peter J.; Ciolino, Jody D.; Pandolfino, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Background We assessed whether a high-resolution impedance manometry (HRIM) metric, bolus flow time (BFT) across the esophagogastric junction (EGJ), was abnormal in achalasia patients subtyped by the Chicago Classification and compared BFT to other HRM metrics. Methods HRIM studies were performed in 60 achalasia patients (14 type I, 36 type II and 10 type III) and 15 healthy controls. Studies were analyzed with a MATLAB program to calculate BFT using a virtual HRIM sleeve. Integrated relaxation pressure (IRP) and basal end-expiratory EGJ pressure were also calculated. The relationship between BFT and dysphagia symptom scores was assessed using the impaction dysphagia questionnaire (IDQ). Key Results Median BFT was significantly lower in achalasia patients (0.5 s, range 0.0 to 3.5 s) compared to controls (3.5 s, range 2.0 to 5.0 s) (P<0.05). BFT was significantly lower in types I and II than in type III achalasia in both the supine and upright positions (p<0.0001). BFT was the only HRIM metric significantly associated with IDQ score in both the supine (R2 =0.20, p=0.0046) and upright positions (R2 =0.27, p=0.0002). Conclusions & Inferences BFT was significantly reduced in all subtypes of achalasia and complementary to the IRP as a diagnostic discriminant in equivocal achalasia cases. Additionally, BFT had a more robust correlation with dysphagia severity compared to other metrics of EGJ function. PMID:26088614

  11. Green Tea Increases the Concentration of Total Mercury in the Blood of Rats following an Oral Fish Tissue Bolus.

    PubMed

    Janle, Elsa M; Freiser, Helene; Manganais, Christopher; Chen, Tzu-Ying; Craig, Bruce A; Santerre, Charles R

    2015-01-01

    Fish has many health benefits but is also the most common source of methylmercury. The bioavailability of methylmercury in fish may be affected by other meal components. In this study, the effect of green tea on the bioavailability of methylmercury from an oral bolus of fish muscle tissue was studied in rats and compared to a water treated control group and a group treated with meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), a compound used medically to chelate mercury. Rats were given a single oral dose of fish tissue via gavage and one of the treatments. Rats were given access to food for 3 h at 12 h intervals. They were dosed with each of the treatments with each meal. Blood samples were collected for 95 hours. Green tea significantly increased the concentration of total mercury in blood relative to the control, whereas DMSA significantly decreased it. In addition, feeding caused a slight increase in blood mercury for several meals following the initial dose.

  12. Myocardial rupture associated with bolus injection of contrast medium during computed tomographic study in a patient with acute myocardial infarction: a rare but lethal complication.

    PubMed

    Lai, Vincent; Hau, K C; Lau, H Y; Chan, W C

    2009-08-01

    Well-documented potential cardiovascular complications associated with the use of contrast media include bradycardia, hypotension, arrhythmia, and conduction disturbances. Rupture of the myocardium after acute myocardial infarction is a known cause of death, but has yet to be recognised as a potential complication of the use of a bolus injection of contrast medium. On the contrary, contrast-enhanced computed tomographic studies have been performed widely for the diagnosis and evaluation of myocardial infarction. We report a case of complicated myocardial rupture after a single bolus injection of contrast medium during a computed tomographic study in an elderly woman with acute myocardial infarction, which led to cardiac tamponade and rapid death. Although rare, this should alert us to the need for cautious use of contrast medium in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

  13. Whole-brain radiotherapy and high-dose methylprednisolone for elderly patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma: Results of North Central Cancer Treatment Group (NCCTG) 96-73-51

    SciTech Connect

    Laack, Nadia N.; Ballman, Karla V.; Brown, Paul B.; O'Neill, Brian Patrick . E-mail: boneill@mayo.edu

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy, toxicity, and survival of whole-brain radiotherapy-treated (WBRT) and high-dose methylprednisolone (HDMP)-treated in elderly patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL). Methods and Materials: Patients with PCNSL who were 70 years and older received 1 g of methylprednisolone daily for 5 days, 30 days after WBRT. Patients then received 1 g of methylprednisolone every 28 days until progression. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS) at 6 months. Results were compared with those in patients on the previous North Central Cancer Treatment Group (NCCTG) trial who received pre-WBRT cytoxan, adriamycin, vincristine, prednisone (CHOP) and high-dose cytarabine (CHOP-WBRT). A planned interim analysis was performed. The current regimen would be considered inactive if survival was not improved from patients treated with CHOP-WBRT. Results: Nineteen patients were accrued between 1998 and 2003. Median age was 76 years. Interim analysis revealed a 6-month survival of 33%, resulting in closure of the trial. Toxicity, OS, and event-free survival (EFS) were similar to those in patients more than 70 years of age who received CHOP-WBRT. The subgroup of patients who received HDMP had longer OS (12.1 vs. 7.0 months, p = 0.76) and EFS (11.7 vs. 4.0 months, p = 0.04) compared with the CHOP-WBRT patients alive 60 days after the start of treatment. Conclusions: Patients on-study long enough to receive HDMP had prolongation of OS and EFS compared to patients receiving CHOP-WBRT. Although the numbers of patients are too small for statistical conclusions, the HDMP regimen deserves further study.

  14. A comparative evaluation of the effect of diclofenac sodium with and without per-orally administered methylprednisolone on the sequelae of impacted mandibular third molar removal: A cohort randomized double-blind clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Prashar, Deepti V.; Pahwa, Deepti; Kalia, Vimal; Jindal, Govind; Kaur, Rupinder

    2016-01-01

    Aim and Objectives: This study evaluated the efficacy of oral methylprednisolone and diclofenac sodium on post-operative sequelae after third molar surgery. Settings and Design: A randomized double-blind clinical trial was conducted (with institutional and university approval for dissertation) to evaluate the effect of methylprednisolone with diclofenac sodium (group A) as compared with diclofenac sodium and placebo (group B) on three variables: Pain, swelling and trismus, after third molar surgery. Materials and Methods: Thirty consecutive consenting patients for surgical removal of mandibular impacted third molar were randomly placed into two groups of 15 each (groups A and B). Pain, swelling and trismus were observed by visual analog scale, facial measurements and inter-incisal opening. Scores were recorded after 24 and 72 h and on the seventh post-operative day. Results were subjected to the Chi-square test and independent sample t-test (P = 0.05). Results: Mean difference in pain experienced between the two groups was statistically significant at 24 h (P = 0.015) and 72 h (P = 0.001) and on the seventh day (P = 0.005). Difference in inter-incisal distance was insignificant (P = 0.239) pre-operatively, but significant after 24 h (P = 0.014) and 72 h (P = 0.001) and on the seventh post-operative day (P = 0.001). Mean difference in swelling was highly significant after 24 h (P = 0.001) and 72 h (P = 0.0001) and on the seventh post-operative day (P = 0.047). Conclusions: The combination of oral dose of methylprednisolone (a corticosteroid) diclofenac sodium (a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) was found to be more effective than diclofenac sodium alone on the sequelae of surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molar. PMID:27134449

  15. A comparison of continuous infusion and intermittent bolus administration of 0.1% ropivacaine with 0.0002% fentanyl for epidural labor analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Patkar, Chinmayi Surendra; Vora, Kalpana; Patel, Harshal; Shah, Veena; Modi, Manisha Pranjal; Parikh, Geeta

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Minimal consumption of local anesthetic and opioid for epidural labor analgesia has been advocated for safe obstetric outcome and superior maternal satisfaction. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the analgesic efficacy of mode of administration of epidural 0.1% ropivacaine with 0.0002% fentanyl via continuous infusion or intermittent boluses during labor. Material and Methods: Sixty term primi or second gravida healthy parturients in labor requesting epidural analgesia were recruited in this study. Lumbar epidural catheter was inserted, and analgesia initiated with 0.2% ropivacaine. Patients were randomized to receive ropivacaine 0.1% with fentanyl 0.0002% via either continuous infusion (Group A) or intermittent boluses (Group B) on an hourly basis. If the parturient complained of pain and visual analog scale (VAS) score was >3, an additional bolus of the study drug was given. VAS score, motor blockade, maternal hemodynamics and fetal heart sounds were frequently monitored. Side effects, mode of delivery and neonatal outcome were noted. Results: To achieve similar VAS, the mean total dose of ropivacaine was 18.78 ± 3.88 mg in Group A and 16.86 ± 4.3 mg in Group B, the difference being statistically significant (P = 0.04). Seventeen out of 30 patients in Group A that is, 56.6% and nine patients in Group B that is, 30% required additional top-ups, and this was significantly higher (P = 0.037). Side effects, mode of delivery and neonatal outcome were comparable in both groups. Conclusion: Intermittent bolus administration provides a more efficacious route of drug delivery when compared to continuous infusion by significantly decreasing the total amount of local anesthetic plus opioid without adversely affecting patient safety or maternal satisfaction. PMID:25948908

  16. SU-D-18C-05: Variable Bolus Arterial Spin Labeling MRI for Accurate Cerebral Blood Flow and Arterial Transit Time Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, M; Jung, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is an MRI perfusion imaging method from which quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) maps can be calculated. Acquisition with variable post-labeling delays (PLD) and variable TRs allows for arterial transit time (ATT) mapping and leads to more accurate CBF quantification with a scan time saving of 48%. In addition, T1 and M0 maps can be obtained without a separate scan. In order to accurately estimate ATT and T1 of brain tissue from the ASL data, variable labeling durations were invented, entitled variable-bolus ASL. Methods: All images were collected on a healthy subject with a 3T Siemens Skyra scanner. Variable-bolus Psuedo-continuous ASL (PCASL) images were collected with 7 TI times ranging 100-4300ms in increments of 700ms with TR ranging 1000-5200ms. All boluses were 1600ms when the TI allowed, otherwise the bolus duration was 100ms shorter than the TI. All TI times were interleaved to reduce sensitivity to motion. Voxel-wise T1 and M0 maps were estimated using a linear least squares fitting routine from the average singal from each TI time. Then pairwise subtraction of each label/control pair and averaging for each TI time was performed. CBF and ATT maps were created using the standard model by Buxton et al. with a nonlinear fitting routine using the T1 tissue map. Results: CBF maps insensitive to ATT were produced along with ATT maps. Both maps show patterns and averages consistent with literature. The T1 map also shows typical T1 contrast. Conclusion: It has been demonstrated that variablebolus ASL produces CBF maps free from the errors due to ATT and tissue T1 variations and provides M0, T1, and ATT maps which have potential utility. This is accomplished with a single scan in a feasible scan time (under 6 minutes) with low sensivity to motion.

  17. SU-E-T-246: MU Model Implementation for a Passively Scattered Proton Beam: Inclusion of the Bolus Gap and Nozzle Extension Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, R; Ghebremedhin, A; Gordon, I; Patyal, B; Piskulich, F.; LeMaster, Brett

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop and implement an MU model for a passively scattered proton beam, and eliminate the need for patient specific calibrations for field sizes from 3cm to 15cm. This would enable consistent and timely calibrations for a wide variety of patient portals, streamlining the treatment process. Methods: Measurements were initially made using a Standard Imaging A-16 ion chamber and a modified water tank to determine the bolus gap factors (BGF) for multiple combinations of aperture size, bolus thickness, and air gap. The BGF was then separated into two component factors: the bolus thickness factor (BTF) and the nozzle extension factor (NEF). Polynomial curves were generated using the measured data to produce BTF tables for air gaps from 0cm to 30cm and for bolus thicknesses from 0cm to 10cm, and NEF tables for the full range of clinically used nozzle extensions. Additionally, data tables were created for every factor that affects beam output in the MU model. The MUs were then modeled for 487 patient portals and retrospectively compared to the MUs generated from the physical calibrations previously performed. Results: Of the 487 patient portals tested, 100% of the portals used for the comparison were within 2.5% from the MUs generated using a physical calibration, and 95.9% of the MU model portals tested were within 2%. The patient portals tested had field sizes ranging from 2.1cm to 10.1cm, with air gaps from 2cm to 25cm. Output factors for field sizes below 3cm with irregularly shaped fields demonstrated inconsistent results and will be further studied. Conclusion: The most problematic output factor, the BGF, was modeled accurately and consistently using the lowest order polynomial curve fits and interpolation between measured data. The study results demonstrate the robustness of the MU model and the potential for saving valuable personnel and beam time.

  18. Bed-side assessment of cerebral perfusion in stroke patients based on optical monitoring of a dye bolus by time-resolved diffuse reflectance.

    PubMed

    Liebert, A; Wabnitz, H; Steinbrink, J; Möller, M; Macdonald, R; Rinneberg, H; Villringer, A; Obrig, H

    2005-01-15

    We present a minimally invasive optical method, that is, multi-channel time-domain diffuse near-infrared reflectometry of the head to assess cerebral blood perfusion that is applicable at the bed-side and repetitively at short intervals. Following intravenous injection of an ICG bolus, its transit through intra- and extracerebral tissue is monitored based on changes in moments of distributions of times of flight of photons, recorded with a 4-channel instrument simultaneously on both hemispheres. In healthy volunteers, we found that variance of distributions of times of flight of photons is well suited to assess latency and initial slope of the increase in absorption of intracerebral tissue due to the bolus. We successfully applied our method in two patients demonstrating a reversible cerebral perfusion deficit in an ischemic stroke patient who was treated by thrombolysis and in another patient with a permanent impaired unilateral perfusion due to ipsilateral internal carotid artery occlusion. In either case, we observed a difference in bolus transit time between the hemispheres. In the stroke patient, this difference resolved when re-evaluated 1 day after thrombolysis. The study demonstrates the necessity of a technique with sub-nanosecond time resolution to allow for depth discrimination if clinical perfusion monitoring of cerebrovascular diseases is addressed by optical methods.

  19. Monte Carlo characterization of skin doses in 6 MV transverse field MRI-linac systems: Effect of field size, surface orientation, magnetic field strength, and exit bolus

    SciTech Connect

    Oborn, B. M.; Metcalfe, P. E.; Butson, M. J.; Rosenfeld, A. B.

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: The main focus of this work is to continue investigations into the Monte Carlo predicted skin doses seen in MRI-guided radiotherapy. In particular, the authors aim to characterize the 70 {mu}m skin doses over a larger range of magnetic field strength and x-ray field size than in the current literature. The effect of surface orientation on both the entry and exit sides is also studied. Finally, the use of exit bolus is also investigated for minimizing the negative effects of the electron return effect (ERE) on the exit skin dose. Methods: High resolution GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations of a water phantom exposed to a 6 MV x-ray beam (Varian 2100C) have been performed. Transverse magnetic fields of strengths between 0 and 3 T have been applied to a 30x30x20 cm{sup 3} phantom. This phantom is also altered to have variable entry and exit surfaces with respect to the beam central axis and they range from -75 deg. to +75 deg. The exit bolus simulated is a 1 cm thick (water equivalent) slab located on the beam exit side. Results: On the entry side, significant skin doses at the beam central axis are reported for large positive surface angles and strong magnetic fields. However, over the entry surface angle range of -30 deg. to -60 deg., the entry skin dose is comparable to or less than the zero magnetic field skin dose, regardless of magnetic field strength and field size. On the exit side, moderate to high central axis skin dose increases are expected except at large positive surface angles. For exit bolus of 1 cm thickness, the central axis exit skin dose becomes an almost consistent value regardless of magnetic field strength or exit surface angle. This is due to the almost complete absorption of the ERE electrons by the bolus. Conclusions: There is an ideal entry angle range of -30 deg. to -60 deg. where entry skin dose is comparable to or less than the zero magnetic field skin dose. Other than this, the entry skin dose increases are significant, especially at

  20. Cysteamine-colon and cysteamine-duodenum lesions in rats. Attenuation by gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157, cimetidine, ranitidine, atropine, omeprazole, sulphasalazine and methylprednisolone.

    PubMed

    Sikiric, P; Seiwerth, S; Grabarevic, Z; Balen, I; Aralica, G; Gjurasin, M; Komericki, L; Perovic, D; Ziger, T; Anic, T; Prkacin, I; Separovic, J; Stancic-Rokotov, D; Lovric-Bencic, M; Mikus, D; Staresinic, M; Aralica, J; DiBiaggio, N; Simec, Z; Turkovic, B; Rotkvic, I; Mise, S; Rucman, R; Petek, M; Sebecic, B; Ivasovic, Z; Boban-Blagaic, A; Sjekavica, I

    2001-01-01

    Recently, we showed cysteamine-duodenal lesions without gastric acid, since they were induced also in gastrectomized rats, as in naive rats, and they were inhibited by the novel stomach pentadecapeptide BPC 157 as well as standard antiulcer drugs (i.e. cimetidine, ranitidine, omeprazole, bromocriptine, atropine). Therefore, as an advantage of considering cysteamine as a directly acting cytotoxic agent and mentioned agents as direct cytoprotective agents, the present focus was on the ulcerogenic effect of cysteamine and protective effect of gastroduodenal antiulcer agents outside upper gastrointestinal tract (i.e. in colon). Intrarectal administration of the cysteamine (200 or 400 mg/kg b.w) produced severe colon lesions (i.e. transmural inflammation with serosal involvement) in rats (30 min-72 h-experimental period), apparently distinctive from smaller lesions after non-specific irritant enema [diluted HCl solution, pH 3.8 (adjusted to pH of cysteamine solution (pH 3.8)]. All of the tested antiulcer agents were applied simultaneously with cysteamine enema (8 cm from the anus, in a volume of the 1.0 ml/rat) intraperitoneally (i.p.), intragastrically (i.g.) or intrarectally (i.r.). Pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (10 microg or 10 ng/kg b.w.), given in either regimen, previously shown to have, besides others, a particular beneficial activity just in the intestinal mucosa, inhibited these cysteamine colon lesions (assessed after 30 min, 60 min, 180 min, 24 h, 48 h, 72 h following cysteamine in a dose of either 200 or 400 mg/kg i.r.). Cysteamine-colon lesions were also attenuated by standard antiulcer agents (mg/kg b.w.), given i.p., i.g., or i.r., such as ranitidine (10), cimetidine (50), omeprazole (10), atropine (10), together with methylprednisolone (1), and sulphasalazine (50, i.r.), assessed 30 min following application of 200 mg of cysteamine. Finally, standard cysteamine duodenal lesions (assessed 24 h after a subcutaneous application of 400 mg/kg of cysteamine) were

  1. Efficacy of triamcinolone acetate and methylprednisolone acetonide for intrabursal injection after ultrasound-guided percutaneous treatment in painful shoulder calcific tendonitis: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Milva; Guaraldi, Federica; Gori, Davide; Castiello, Emanuela; Arvat, Emanuela; Sudanese, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Background Ultrasound-guided percutaneous irrigation of calcific tendinopathy (US-PICT) with intrabursal steroid injection is an elective treatment for painful rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy. Purpose To compare the efficacy of post-US-PICT intrabursal 40 mg injection of triamcinolone acetonide (TA) versus methylprednisolone acetate (MA). Material and Methods Forty patients (22 women; mean age 48.7 ± 7.2 years) with painful shoulder calcific tendinopathy, treated with TA or MA injected intrabursally after US-PICT, were included in this randomized controlled trial. At baseline and after 1, 7, 15, 30, 45, and 180 days, patients underwent US and clinical examination, using Constant (CS) and VAS (VS) scores. Complications and analgesic use were also recorded. Results Compared to baseline, at the 45-day follow-up, TA and MA group showed a similar improvement (Δ) in CS (42 ± 10 versus 36 ± 9 points) and VS (-4.4 ± 1.3 versus -3.6 ± 1.3 points). At the 180-day follow-up, the improvement was higher in TA versus MA (ΔCS: 53 ± 7 versus 44 ± 7 points; ΔVS: -4.9 ± 1.1 versus -3.9 ± 1 points). Multivariate analysis showed a mean CS higher ( P = 0.02) in TA versus MA group, while VS was similar. TA had a 5 × higher ( P = 0.007) chance of reaching complete remission (CS = 100 points) than MA group. A progressive decrease in analgesic use, concomitant to a significant and similar reduction of bursitis and calcifications, was observed in both groups. No major complications occurred. Conclusion Two-needle US-PICT with intrabursal steroid injection is safe and effective. The chance of reaching better scores and, even more important for a clinical perspective, of functional recovery, is higher in patients treated with TA than MA.

  2. MPI as high temporal resolution imaging technique for in vivo bolus tracking of Ferucarbotran in mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, C.; Salamon, J.; Hofmann, M.; Kaul, M. G.; Adam, G.; Ittrich, H.; Knopp, T.

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to achieve a real time 3D visualisation of the murine cardiovascular system by intravenously injected superparamagnetic nanoparticles using Magnetic particle imaging (MPI). Material and Methods: MPI scans of FVB mice were performed using a 3D imaging sequence (1T/m gradient strength, 10mT drive-field strength). A dynamic scan with a temporal resolution of 21.5ms per 3D volume acquisition was performed. 50μl ferucarbotran (Resovist®, Bayer Healthcare AG) were injected into the tail vein after baseline MPI measurements. As MPI delivers no anatomic information, MRI scans at a 7T ClinScan (Bruker) were performed using a T2-weighted 2D TSE sequence. The reconstruction of the MPI data was performed on the MPI console (ParaVision 6.0/MPI, Bruker). Image fusion was done using additional image processing software (Imalytics, Philips). The dynamic information was extracted using custom software developed in the Julia programming environment. Results: The combined MRI-MPI measurements were carried out successfully. MPI data clearly demonstrated the passage of the SPIO tracer through the inferior vena cava, the heart and finally the liver. By co-registration with MRI the anatomical regions were identified. Due to the volume frame rate of about 46 volumes per second a signal modulation with the frequency of the heart beat was detectable and a heart beat of 520 beats per minute (bpm) has been assumed. Moreover, the blood flow velocity of approximately 5cm/s in the vena cava has been estimated. Conclusions: The high temporal resolution of MPI allows real-time imaging and bolus tracking of intravenous injected nanoparticles and offers a real time tool to assess blood flow velocity.

  3. In vivo assessment of coronary flow and cardiac function after bolus adenosine injection in adenosine receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Teng, Bunyen; Tilley, Stephen L; Ledent, Catherine; Mustafa, S Jamal

    2016-06-01

    Bolus injections of adenosine and the A2A adenosine receptor (AR) selective agonist (regadenoson) are used clinically as a substitute for a stress test in people who cannot exercise. Using isolated tissue preparations, our lab has shown that coronary flow and cardiac effects of adenosine are mostly regulated by the AR subtypes A1, A2A, and A2B In this study, we used ultrasound imaging to measure the in vivo effects of adenosine on coronary blood flow (left coronary artery) and cardiac function in anesthetized wild-type, A1 knockout (KO), A2AKO, A2BKO, A3KO, A1, and A3 double KO (A1/3 DKO) and A2A and A2B double KO (A2A/2B DKO) mice in real time. Echocardiographic and Doppler studies were performed using a Visualsonic Vevo 2100 ultrasound system. Coronary blood flow (CBF) baseline data were obtained when animals were anesthetized with 1% isoflourane. Diameter (D) and velocity time integral (VTI) were measured on the left coronary arteries (CBF = ((π/4) × D(2) × VTI × HR)/1000). CBF changes were the highest within 2 min of injection (about 10 mg/kg). Heart rate, cardiac output, and stroke volume were measured by tracing the left ventricle long axis. Our data support a role for the A2 AR in CBF and further support our conclusions of previous studies from isolated tissues. Adenosine-mediated decreases in cardiac output and stroke volume may be A2B and/or A3 AR-mediated; however, the A1 and A2 ARs also play roles in overall cardiac function. These data further provide a powerful translational tool in studying the cardiovascular effects of adenosine in disease states.

  4. Bolus intravenous 0.9% saline, but not 4% albumin or 5% glucose, causes interstitial pulmonary edema in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Bihari, Shailesh; Wiersema, Ubbo F; Schembri, David; De Pasquale, Carmine G; Dixon, Dani-Louise; Prakash, Shivesh; Lawrence, Mark D; Bowden, Jeffrey J; Bersten, Andrew D

    2015-10-01

    Rapid intravenous (iv) infusion of 0.9% saline alters respiratory mechanics in healthy subjects. However, the relative cardiovascular and respiratory effects of bolus iv crystalloid vs. colloid are unknown. Six healthy male volunteers were given 30 ml/kg iv 0.9% saline, 4% albumin, and 5% glucose at a rate of 100 ml/min on 3 separate days in a double-blinded, randomized crossover study. Impulse oscillometry, spirometry, lung volumes, diffusing capacity (DLCO), and blood samples were measured before and after fluid administration. Lung ultrasound B-line score (indicating interstitial pulmonary edema) and Doppler echocardiography indices of cardiac preload were measured before, midway, immediately after, and 1 h after fluid administration. Infusion of 0.9% saline increased small airway resistance at 5 Hz (P = 0.04) and lung ultrasound B-line score (P = 0.01) without changes in Doppler echocardiography measures of preload. In contrast, 4% albumin increased DLCO, decreased lung volumes, and increased the Doppler echocardiography mitral E velocity (P = 0.001) and E-to-lateral/septal e' ratio, estimated blood volume, and N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (P = 0.01) but not lung ultrasound B-line score, consistent with increased pulmonary blood volume without interstitial pulmonary edema. There were no significant changes with 5% glucose. Plasma angiopoietin-2 concentration increased only after 0.9% saline (P = 0.001), suggesting an inflammatory mechanism associated with edema formation. In healthy subjects, 0.9% saline and 4% albumin have differential pulmonary effects not attributable to passive fluid filtration. This may reflect either different effects of these fluids on active signaling in the pulmonary circulation or a protective effect of albumin.

  5. Simultaneous technetium-99 MAG(3), iodine-131-orthoiodohippurate and iodine-125 iothalamate clearance and biodistribution after bolus injection in rats.

    PubMed

    Casadevall, G; Turull, A; Piera, C; Queralt, J

    2000-07-01

    A bolus injection multiple blood sampling method was developed for the simultaneous measurement of blood and plasma clearance of three radiopharmaceuticals in rats. Technetium-99m mercaptoacetyltriglycine ([(99m)Tc]MAG(3)) and iodine-131-orthoiodohippurate ([(131)I]OIH) were used as makers of effective renal blood flow (ERBF), and iodine-125 iothalamate ([(125)I]IOT) was used as a marker of glomerular filtration rate (GFR). These methods can be easily performed in rats without arterial catheterization. Tissue biodistribution was studied in four groups of rats subjected to the following: group A, renal pedicle isolation (sham-operated); group B, ligature of one kidney pedicle; group C, ligature of both renal pedicles; and group D, ligature of both kidney pedicles and the bile duct. Renal clearance of [(99m)Tc]MAG(3) was greater than [(131)I]OIH and both agents were cleared faster than ([(125)I]-IOT). Either of the two markers of ERBF may be used in experimental studies, but it should be borne in mind that these are relative measurements of kidney performance. [(99m)Tc]MAG(3) and [(125)I]-IOT showed bile excretion in healthy rats, so they cannot completely fulfill the requirements for use as markers of ERBF. When renal function was impaired experimentally, [(99m)Tc]MAG(3) and [(125)I]-IOT were excreted in bile and [(131)I]OIH was secreted in the intestine. Thus, while the markers of ERBF and GFR may be reliable under normal physiological conditions, they may give progressively more erroneous values as renal function deteriorates.

  6. Bilateral Osteonecrosis of the Femoral and Humeral Heads after Short Term Corticosteroid Therapy. A Case Study.

    PubMed

    El Gamal, Tarek Ahmed; El-Bakoury, Ahmed; Hawkins, Amanda; Ed AlTayeb Mussa, Moham; Er Ahmed Sweed, Tam; Eh Samir Ansara, Sam

    2016-03-23

    Steroid induced osteonecrosis is a devastating injury that usually requires rebuild of the joint, with the femoral and the humeral head being most commonly affected. Steroid therapy is the most common reported cause of atraumatic osteonecrosis. The Collaborative Osteonecrosis Group Study confirmed that steroids are the primary cause of multi-focal osteonecrosis in 91% of the cases. Osteonecrosis is considered multifocal when three or more joints are involved. We report a rare case of bilateral steroid-induced osteonecrosis of the proximal femora and humeri nine months after a short course of intravenous methylprednisolone for treatment of multiple myeloma. The relationship between development of osteonecrosis and corticosteroid treatment has been extensively investigated. Steroid therapy is the most common reported cause of atraumatic osteonecrosis. Multi-focal osteonecrosis should be highly suspected and thoroughly investigated in patients with persistent pain at typical sites after commencement of steroids.

  7. Vitamin D insufficiency underlies unexpected hypocalcemia following high dose glucocorticoid therapy.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Yuka; Masuoka, Kazuhiro; Miyakoshi, Shigesaburo; Taniguchi, Shuichi; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro

    2008-01-01

    Vitamin D insufficiency is a reemerging and common health problem for skeletal system. Pharmacological application of glucocorticoid inhibits intestinal calcium absorption and stimulates tubular calcium excretion, thus induces severely negative calcium balance. We report a patient presenting symptomatic hypocalcemia following high dose glucocorticoid administration. After a pulse-therapy with methylprednisolone, hypocalcemia with muscle cramp developed in association with hypercalciuria and secondary hyperparathyroidism in the absence of hypomagnesemia. Circulating level of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D was in a reference range, while that of 25-hydroxyvitamin D was insufficient. Treatment with alfacalcidol of 1 mug/day promptly improved serum calcium level within a couple of weeks. Vitamin D insufficiency could be a serious problem in patients with high dose glucocorticoid therapy.

  8. Corticosteroid Therapy for Hearing and Balance Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Trune, Dennis R.; Canlon, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    This review addresses the current status of steroid therapies for hearing and vestibular disorders and how certain misconceptions may be undermining the efficacy in restoring normal ear function, both experimentally and clinically. Specific misconceptions addressed are that steroid therapy is not effective, steroid-responsive hearing loss proves an underlying inflammatory problem in the ear, and steroids only have application to the hearing disorders listed below. Glucocorticoid therapy for hearing and balance disorders has been employed for over 60 years. It is recommended in cases of sudden hearing loss, Meniére’s disease, immune-mediated hearing loss, and any vestibular dysfunction suspected of having an inflammatory etiology. The predominant steroids employed today are dexamethasone, prednisone, prednisolone, and methyl-prednisolone. In spite of years of use, little is known of the steroid responsive mechanisms in the ear that are influenced by glucocorticoid therapy. Furthermore, meta-analyses and clinical study reviews occasionally question whether steroids offer any benefit at all. Foremost in the minds of clinicians is the immune suppression and antiinflammatory functions of steroids because of their efficacy for autoimmune hearing loss. However, glucocorticoids have a strong binding affinity for the mineralocorticoid (aldosterone) and glucocorticoid receptors, both of which are prominent in the ear. Because the auditory and vestibular end organs require tightly regulated endolymph and perilymph fluids, this ion homeostasis role of the mineralocorticoid receptor cannot be overlooked in both normal and pathologic functions of the ear. The function of the glucocorticoid receptor is to provide anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic signals by mediating survival factors. PMID:23044978

  9. Therapy effect of antiulcer agents on new chronic cysteamine colon lesion in rat.

    PubMed

    Sikiric, P; Seiwerth, S; Aralica, G; Perovic, D; Staresinic, M; Anic, T; Gjurasin, M; Prkacin, I; Separovic, J; Stancic-Rokotov, D; Lovric-Bencic, M; Mikus, D; Turkovic, B; Rotkvic, I; Mise, S; Rucman, R; Petek, M; Ziger, T; Sebecic, B; Ivasovic, Z; Jagic, V; Komericki, L; Balen, I; Boban-Blagaic, A; Sjekavica, I

    2001-01-01

    After demonstration that cysteamine induced duodenal lesions in gastrectomized rats, while a number of antiulcer drugs mitigated these lesions, it was shown that one single intrarectal (i.r.) cysteamine application produced severe colon lesions in acute studies in rats. Thus, the further focus was on the protracted effect of cysteamine challenge (400 mg/kg b.w. i.r.) and therapy influence in chronic experiments in female rats. Regularly, cysteamine colon lesions were markedly mitigated by ranitidine (10), omeprazole (10), atropine (10), methylprednisolone (1), sulphasalazine (50; mg/kg), pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (PL-10, PLD-116; 10 microg or 10 ng/kg). Specifically, after 1 or 3 months following initial challenge (cysteamine 400 mg/kg i.r.) in female rat, the therapy [BPC 157 (PL-10, PLD-116 (10.0 microg or 10.0 ng/kg; i.g., i.p., i.r.), ranitidine, omeprazole, atropine, methylprednisolone, sulphasalazine (i.p.)] reversed the protracted cysteamine colon injury: the 1 week-regimen (once daily application) started after 1 month post-cysteamine, as well as the 2 weeks-regimen (once daily application), which started after 3 months. The effect on recidive lesion was also tested. These cysteamine lesions may reappear after stopping therapy (after stopping therapy for 3 weeks at the end of 2-weeks regimen started in 3 months-cysteamine female rats) in sulphasalazine group, while this reappearance is markedly antagonized in pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (PL-10, PLD-116)-rats (cysteamine-colon lesion still substantially low).

  10. WE-F-16A-03: 3D Printer Application in Proton Therapy: A Novel Method to Deliver Passive-Scattering Proton Beams with a Fixed Range and Modulation for SRS and SRT

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, X; Witztum, A; Liang, X; Reiche, M; Lin, H; Teo, B; Yin, L; Fiene, J; McDonough, J; Kassaee, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To present a novel technique to deliver passive-scattering proton beam with fixed range and modulation using a 3D printed patient-specific bolus for proton stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy. Methods: A CIRS head phantom was used to simulate a patient with a small brain lesion. A custom bolus was created in the Eclipse Treatment Planning System (TPS) to compensate for the different water equivalent depths from the patient surface to the target from multiple beam directions. To simulate arc therapy, a plan was created on the initial CT using three passive-scattering proton beams with a fixed range and modulations irradiating from different angles. The DICOM-RT structure file of the bolus was exported from the TPS and converted to STL format for 3D printing. The phantom was rescanned with the printed custom bolus and head cup to verify the dose distribution comparing to the initial plan. EBT3 films were placed in the sagital plane of the target to verify the delivered dose distribution. The relative stopping power of the printing material(ABSplus-P430) was measured using the Zebra multi-plate ion chamber. Results: The relative stopping power of the 3D printing material, ABSplus-P430 was 1.05 which is almost water equivalent. The dose difference between verification CT and Initial CT is almost negligible. Film measurement also confirmed the accuracy for this new proton delivery technique. Conclusion: Our method using 3D printed range modifiers simplify the treatment delivery of multiple passive-scattering beams in treatment of small lesion in brain. This technique makes delivery of multiple beam more efficient and can be extended to allow arc therapy with proton beams. The ability to create and construct complex patient specific bolus structures provides a new dimension in creating optimized quality treatment plans not only for proton therapy but also for electron and photon therapy.

  11. Prophylaxis of bovine trichostrongylidosis in the alpine region: effect of pasture contamination on infections in calves receiving a morantel sustained-release trilaminate bolus in mid-July.

    PubMed

    Hertzberg, H; Durgiai, B; Kohler, L; Eckert, J

    1994-05-01

    In the alpine region, mixed grazing systems with cattle of different age, origin and prophylaxis against trichostrongylid infections are most common. Under these conditions the administration of anthelmintic devices to susceptible calves is frequently postponed to June or July to achieve a better protection during the period of increased pasture infectivity in summer and autumn. In a field experiment with 27 first-year grazing calves a morantel sustained-release trilaminate bolus (MSRT, Pfizer) was given to two groups (Groups A and B) of nine naturally infected calves each, on 22 July. Calves of Group B were moved to a clean pasture (B) 1 day later, whereas the calves of Group A remained on the previous pasture (A) together with nine untreated calves (Group C). The contamination with infective larvae (L3) on Pasture A remained below 1000 L3 kg-1 dry matter, which was sufficient to produce clinical parasitic gastroenteritis in five of nine control calves. The MSRT bolus reduced the mean egg output by more than 90% within 14 days after administration and prevented clinical parasitic gastroenteritis in the calves of Groups A and B. Owing to the persisting infection risk on Pasture A, the mean serum pepsinogen levels reached about 3000 mU tyrosine in the calves of Group A in September compared with approximately 2000 mU in Group B grazing the clean pasture. However, the differences in pasture contamination were not reflected in the mean bodyweight of the calves, which were 20 kg heavier at the end of the trial in both MSRT-treated groups compared with the control calves (P < 0.01). As there is a high probability that a moderate larval contamination is present on prealpine and alpine community pastures in summer, the metaphylactic use of an MSRT bolus in mid-July is likely to limit trichostrongylid infections within a subclinical range and thus provides sufficient protection of susceptible calves against parasitic gastroenteritis.

  12. Family Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Tests and Procedures Family therapy By Mayo Clinic Staff Family therapy is a type of psychological counseling (psychotherapy) that helps family members improve communication and resolve conflicts. Family therapy is usually provided ...

  13. Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Radiation Therapy KidsHealth > For Teens > Radiation Therapy A A ... how to cope with side effects. What Is Radiation Therapy? Cancer is a disease that causes cells ...

  14. [Diuretic therapy in acute heart failure].

    PubMed

    Trullàs, Joan Carles; Morales-Rull, José Luis; Formiga, Francesc

    2014-03-01

    Diuretics are widely recommended in patients with acute heart failure (AHF). Unfortunately, despite their widespread use, limited data are available from randomized clinical trials to guide clinicians on the appropriate management of diuretic therapy. Loop diuretics are considered the first-line diuretic therapy, especially intravenous furosemide, but the best mode of administration (high-dose versus low-dose and continuous infusion versus bolus) is unclear. When diuretic resistance develops, different therapeutic strategies can be adopted, including combined diuretic therapy with thiazide diuretics and/or aldosterone antagonists. Low or "non-diuretic" doses (25-50mg QD) of aldosterone antagonists have been demonstrated to confer a survival benefit in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction and consequently should be prescribed in all such patients, unless contraindicated by potassium and/or renal function values. There is less evidence on the use of aldosterone antagonists at higher or "diuretic" doses (≥ 100mg QD) but these drugs could be useful in relieving congestive symptoms in combination with furosemide. Thiazide diuretics can also be helpful as they have synergic effects with loop diuretics by inhibiting sodium reabsorption in distal parts of the nephron. The effect of diuretic therapy in AHF should be monitored with careful observation of clinical signs and symptoms of congestion. Serum electrolytes and kidney function should also be monitored during the use of intravenous diuretics.

  15. Prevention of trismus with different pharmacological therapies after surgical extraction of impacted mandibular third molar.

    PubMed

    Selimović, Edin; Ibrahimagić-Šeper, Lejla; Šišić, Ibrahim; Sivić, Suad; Huseinagić, Senad

    2017-02-01

    Aim To assess prevention and reduction of trismus after surgically extracted impacted mandibular third molars with individual and combined therapy with corticosteroids and anti-inflammatory analgesics. Methods The research included 60 randomly selected patients (3 groups) attended to the Dental Oral Surgery of the Public Institution Healthcare Center Zenica during the period January-December 2008. Patients of both genders, 18-45 years of age, were presented without pain and other inflammatory symptoms at the time of surgery. According to a scheme established in the research protocol, two medications were administered orally: methylprednisolone(corticosteroid) 32 mg and meloxicam (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory analgesic, NSAID) 15 mg as a single drug, or a combination of both drugs. The level of trismus is assessed on the basis of differences of preoperative and postoperative values of interincisal spaces when fully opening the mouth on the second and the seventh post-operative day. The differences between groups of patients were evaluated by means of Tukey's HSD test. Results On the second and on the seventh post-operative day significantly better results were registered in the group that received only corticosteroids and in the group that received both, corticosteroids and NSAIDs compared to the group that received only NSAIDs. A tendency of trismus reduction was present in all patient groups for the second and seventh day after surgery. Conclusion Prevention and control of postoperative trismus after surgical extraction of impacted mandibular third molars with combined therapy is effective and superior comparing to individual therapy with meloxicam-or methylprednisolone alone.

  16. Bisphenol A (BPA) pharmacokinetics with daily oral bolus or continuous exposure via silastic capsules in pregnant rhesus monkeys: Relevance for human exposures.

    PubMed

    Vom Saal, Frederick S; VandeVoort, Catherine A; Taylor, Julia A; Welshons, Wade V; Toutain, Pierre-Louis; Hunt, Patricia A

    2014-06-01

    We measured serum dBPA in non-pregnant and pregnant female rhesus monkeys, fetuses and amniotic fluid. dBPA was administered by a daily oral bolus or sc implantation of Silastic capsules; both resulted in daily average serum unconjugated dBPA concentrations of <1ng/ml. We observed lower serum concentrations of unconjugated dBPA in pregnant females relative to pre-pregnancy values, and generally lower concentrations in fetal serum than in maternal serum. Differences in pharmacokinetics of dBPA were evident between pre-pregnancy, early and late pregnancy, likely reflecting changes in maternal, fetal and placental physiology. The serum ratio of conjugated to unconjugated dBPA after continuous sc release of dBPA was similar to values reported in human biomonitoring studies and markedly lower than with oral administration, suggesting oral bolus exposure is not an appropriate human exposure model. We report elsewhere that there were numerous adverse effects on fetuses exposed to very low serum dBPA in these studies.

  17. Complications mimicking lupus flare-up in a uremic patient undergoing pegylated liposomal doxorubicin therapy for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jeng-Yi; Wu, Ching-Herng; Shih, I-Hsin; Lai, Ping-Chin

    2004-03-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have an increased risk for malignancy and end-stage renal disease itself might further augment the risk. Treating uremic patients with cervical cancer by cisplatin-based chemotherapy combined with radiation is hampered by the reduced renal excretion of cisplatin. Doxorubicin, a potential radiosensitizer with an established effect on carcinomas that arise in the ovary, uterine cervix and endometrium, might be applied in these cases. We describe a 36-year-old woman, who had a 9-year history of SLE and was maintained on dialysis, and who developed severe drug reaction manifesting as fever, skin rash and exfoliative dermatitis with positive lupus band test after infusion of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin therapy for advanced cervical cancer. These skin manifestations improved after i.v. methylprednisolone pulse therapy.

  18. Severe, Protracted Spasm of Urinary Bladder and Autonomic Dysreflexia Caused by Changing the Suprapubic Catheter in a Cervical Spinal Cord Injury Patient: Treatment by a Bolus Dose and Increased Total Daily Dose of Intrathecal Baclofen

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, Subramanian; Oo, Tun; Soni, Bakul M.; Hughes, Peter L.; Singh, Gurpreet

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Intrathecal administration of baclofen by implanted pump reduces rigidity and muscle spasms. Its use specifically to control bladder spasms has not been reported. CASE REPORT A tetraplegic patient developed severe, protracted, bladder spasms, abdominal muscles spasms, and high blood pressure after change of suprapubic catheter; nifedipine, diazepam, and paracetamol did not control spasms; bolus dose of baclofen intrathecally produced prompt relief via baclofen pump. CONCLUSION Severe, protracted bladder spasms, abdominal muscles spasms, and autonomic dysreflexia, induced by change of suprapubic catheter in a spinal cord injury patient, were treated successfully by a bolus dose and increased total daily dose of intrathecal baclofen. PMID:28008298

  19. Similar insulin secretory response to a gastric inhibitory polypeptide bolus injection at euglycemia in first-degree relatives of patients with type 2 diabetes and control subjects.

    PubMed

    Meier, Juris J; Nauck, Michael A; Siepmann, Nina; Greulich, Michael; Holst, Jens J; Deacon, Carolyn F; Schmidt, Wolfgang E; Gallwitz, Baptist

    2003-12-01

    Insulin secretion following the intravenous infusion of gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) is diminished in patients with type 2 diabetes and at least a subgroup of their first-degree relatives at hyperglycemic clamp conditions. Therefore, we studied the effects of an intravenous bolus administration of GIP at normoglycemic conditions in the fasting state. Ten healthy control subjects were studied with an intravenous bolus administration of placebo, and of 7, 20, and 60 pmol GIP/kg body weight (BW), respectively. Forty-five first-degree relatives of patients with type 2 diabetes and 33 matched control subjects were studied with (1) a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and (2) an intravenous bolus injection of 20 pmol GIP/kg BW with blood samples drawn over 30 minutes for determination of plasma glucose, insulin, C-peptide, and GIP. Statistical analysis applied repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncan's post hoc tests. Insulin secretion was stimulated after the administration of 20 and of 60 pmol GIP/kg BW in the dose-response experiments (P <.0001). GIP administration (20 pmol/kg BW) led to a significant rise of insulin and C-peptide concentrations in the first-degree relatives and control subjects (P <.0001), but there was difference between groups (P =.64 and P =.87, respectively). Also expressed as increments over baseline, no differences were apparent (Delta(insulin), 7.6 +/- 1.2 and 7.6 +/- 1.6 mU/L, P =.99; Delta(C-peptide), 0.35 +/- 0.06 and 0.38 +/- 0.08 ng/mL, P =.75). Integrated insulin and C-peptide responses after GIP administration significantly correlated with the respective insulin and C-peptide responses after glucose ingestion (insulin, r = 0.78, P <.0001; C-peptide, r = 0.35, P =.0015). We conclude that a reduced insulinotropic effect of GIP in first-degree relatives of patients with type 2 diabetes cannot be observed at euglycemia. Therefore, a reduced GIP-induced insulin secretion in patients with type 2 diabetes and

  20. When enough is enough: how the decision was made to stop the FEAST trial: data and safety monitoring in an African trial of Fluid Expansion As Supportive Therapy (FEAST) for critically ill children.

    PubMed

    Todd, Jim; Heyderman, Robert S; Musoke, Philippa; Peto, Tim

    2013-03-26

    In resource-rich countries, bolus fluid expansion is routinely used for the treatment of poor perfusion and shock, but is less commonly used in many African settings. Controversial results from the recently completed FEAST (Fluid Expansion As Supportive Therapy) trial in African children have raised questions about the use of intravenous bolus fluid for the treatment of shock. Prior to the start of the trial, the Independent data monitoring committee (IDMC) developed stopping rules for the proof of benefit that bolus fluid resuscitation would bring. Although careful safety monitoring was put in place, there was less expectation that bolus fluid expansion would be harmful and differential stopping rules for harm were not formulated.In July 2010, two protocol amendments were agreed to increase the sample size from 2,880 to 3,600 children, and to increase bolus fluid administration. There was a non-significant trend against bolus treatment, but although the implications were discussed, the IDMC did not comment on the results, or on the amendments, in order to avoid inadvertent partial unblinding of the study.In January 2011, the trial was stopped for futility, as the combined intervention arms had significantly higher mortality (relative risk 1.46, 95% CI 1.13 to 1.90, P = 0.004) than the control arm. The stopping rule for proof of benefit was not achieved, and the IDMC stopped the trial with a lower level of significance (P = 0.01) due to futility and an increased risk of mortality from bolus fluid expansion in children enrolled in the trial. The basis for this decision was that the local standard of care was not to use bolus fluid for the care of children with shock in these African countries, and this was a different standard of care to that used in the UK. These decisions emphasize two important principles: firstly, the IDMC should avoid inadvertent unblinding of the trial by commenting on amendments, and secondly, when considering stopping a trial, the IDMC

  1. Radiation therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) Proton therapy is another kind of radiation used to ... than using x-rays to destroy cancer cells, proton therapy uses a beam of special particles called ...

  2. Alternative Therapies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Late Effects of Poliomyelitis for Physicians and Survivors © Alternative Therapies Alternative therapies, also called complementary, can support ... of motion, pain, and fatigue are often reported. Energy work includes acupuncture and acupressure, traditional Chinese medicine ...

  3. Pharmacokinetics of perfluorobutane following intravenous bolus injection and continuous infusion of sonazoid in healthy volunteers and in patients with reduced pulmonary diffusing capacity.

    PubMed

    Landmark, Kristin Eitrem; Johansen, Per Wiik; Johnson, Judith A; Johansen, Bjørn; Uran, Steinar; Skotland, Tore

    2008-03-01

    The ultrasound contrast agent Sonazoidtrade mark was administered as an i.v. bolus injection of 0.6 microL microbubbles/kg body weight or as a continuous infusion over 30 min at a rate of 1.2 microL microbubbles/kg body weight to healthy volunteers and patients with reduced pulmonary diffusing capacity. Expired air and blood samples were collected from 32 subjects and perfluorobutane (PFB) gas was analyzed using validated gas chromatography mass spectrometry methods. Blood concentrations of PFB declined biphasicly with a distribution half-life (t(0.5 to 15)) of 2 to 3 min and an elimination half-life (t(15 to 120)) of 30 to 45 min. Area under the curve (AUC) values in patients with impaired gas diffusion were significantly larger than those in healthy volunteers. The exhalation kinetics were somewhat variable with a PFB elimination half-life (t(15 to 120)) of 28 to 111 min. Clearance of PFB was independent of study population and mode of administration. There were no deaths and no serious adverse events that resulted in the withdrawal of a subject from the study. With the exception that arthralgia predominated in healthy volunteers, healthy volunteers and diseased subjects did not show a different adverse event profile whether Sonazoid was administered as a bolus injection or as an infusion. Assessment of laboratory parameters (serum biochemistry, haematology and urinalysis), vital signs, oxygen saturation and electrocardiograms (ECGs) showed no changes which caused safety concern. (E-mail: Kristin.Landmark@ge.com).

  4. Play Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kool, Ritesh

    2010-01-01

    Play therapy represents a unique form of treatment that is not only geared toward young children, but is translated into a language children can comprehend and utilize—the language of play. For the referring provider or practitioner, questions may remain regarding the nature, course, and efficacy of play therapy. This article reviews the theoretical underpinnings of play therapy, some practical considerations, and finally a summary of the current state of research in regard to play therapy. The authors present the practicing psychiatrist with a road map for referring a patient to play therapy or initiating it in appropriate cases. PMID:21103141

  5. What Is Music Therapy?

    MedlinePlus

    American Music Therapy Association Home Contact News Help/FAQ Members Only Login About Music Therapy & AMTA What is Music Therapy? Definition and ... is Music Therapy? Print Email Share What is Music Therapy What is Music Therapy? Music Therapy is ...

  6. Novel insulin delivery profiles for mixed meals for sensor-augmented pump and closed-loop artificial pancreas therapy for type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Asavari; Lee, Joon Bok; Dassau, Eyal; Doyle, Francis J

    2014-09-01

    Maintaining euglycemia for people with type 1 diabetes is highly challenging, and variations in glucose absorption rates with meal composition require meal type specific insulin delivery profiles for optimal blood glucose control. Traditional basal/bolus therapy is not fully optimized for meals of varied fat contents. Thus, regimens for low- and high-fat meals were developed to improve current insulin pump therapy. Simulations of meals with varied fat content demonstrably replicated published data. Subsequently, an insulin profile library with optimized delivery regimens under open and closed loop for various meal compositions was constructed using particle swarm optimization. Calculations showed that the optimal basal bolus insulin profiles for low-fat meals comprise a normal bolus or a short wave. The preferred delivery for high-fat meals is typically biphasic, but can extend to multiple phases depending on meal characteristics. Results also revealed that patients that are highly sensitive to insulin could benefit from biphasic deliveries. Preliminary investigations of the optimal closed-loop regimens also display bi- or multiphasic patterns for high-fat meals. The novel insulin delivery profiles present new waveforms that provide better control of postprandial glucose excursions than existing schemes. Furthermore, the proposed novel regimens are also more or similarly robust to uncertainties in meal parameter estimates, with the closed-loop schemes demonstrating superior performance and robustness.

  7. Successful Treatment of Corticosteroid with Antiviral Therapy for a Neonatal Liver Failure with Disseminated Herpes Simplex Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Maeba, Shinji; Hasegawa, Shunji; Shimomura, Maiko; Ichimura, Takuya; Takahashi, Kazumasa; Motoyama, Masashi; Fukunaga, Shinnosuke; Ito, Yoshinori; Ichiyama, Takashi; Ohga, Shouichi

    2015-10-01

    Background Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection carries one of the poorest outcomes of neonatal liver failure (NLF). Neonates with disseminated HSV infection can develop hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH), and occasionally need orthotopic liver transplantation. Early interventions may be critical for the cure of NLF. Case Report We describe herewith a 6-day-old neonate with fulminant hepatic failure due to disseminated HSV-1 infection, who successfully responded to high-dose corticosteroid therapy 72 hours after the onset of disease. Preceding acyclovir, gamma globulin, and exchange blood transfusion therapies failed to control the disease. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy led to a drastic improvement of liver function and cytokine storms, and prevented the disease progression to HLH. Sustained levels of plasma and cerebrospinal fluid HSV DNA declined after prolonged acyclovir therapy. Bilateral lesions of the periventricular white matter areas, assessed by magnetic resonance imaging, disappeared at 3 months of age. The infant showed normal growth and development at 4 years of age. Conclusion Early anti-hypercytokinemia therapy using corticosteroid, and prolonged antiviral therapy might only provide the transplantation-free cure of NLF with HSV dissemination.

  8. Recurrent Proliferative Glomerulonephritis With Monoclonal IgG Deposits After a Renal Transplant Which Was Insensitive to Pulse Therapy Remitted by Double Filtration Plasmapheresis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Chen, Jin-Song; Cheng, Dong-Rui; Chen, Hao; Li, Xue; Ji, Shu-Ming; Xie, Ke-Nan; Ni, Xue-Feng; Liu, Zhi-Hong; Wen, Ji-Qiu

    2015-10-01

    Proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal IgG deposits manifesting as a nephrotic syndrome recently has been described as a renal disease with the pathological features of mesangial and subendothelial deposits of monoclonal IgG. Eight cases of recurrent proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal IgG deposits after a renal transplant have been reported. Almost all of these patients had a certain remission of proteinuria by steroids alone or with cyclophosphamide, and had further remission through other special treatments (ie, rituximab and plasmapheresis). We present a case of recurrent proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal IgG deposits of the IgG3? subtype after a renal transplant, which was insensitive to pulse intravenous methyl-prednisolone and cyclophosphamide remitted by double filtration plasmapheresis. This case report reveals that recurrent proliferative glomerulo-nephritis with monoclonal IgG deposits may be insensitive to intravenous pulse therapy of methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide. We advocate double filtration plasmapheresis as an effective treatment of proliferative glomerulo-nephritis with monoclonal IgG deposits on remission of proteinuria.

  9. Psychosexual therapy.

    PubMed

    Gregory, P

    Sexual problems are more likely to originate from psychological or relationship difficulties rather than 'mechanical failure'. Here Peter Gregory reveals the often closed world of psychosexual therapy.

  10. Electroconvulsive therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Shock treatment; Shock therapy; ECT; Depression - ECT; Bipolar - ECT ... ECT is a highly effective treatment for depression, most commonly ... who: Are having delusions or other psychotic symptoms with ...

  11. Efficacy and safety of addition of bevacizumab to FOLFIRI or irinotecan/bolus 5-FU/LV (IFL) in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ke; Gong, Yinya; Zhang, Qi; Shen, Yanping; Zhou, Taoqi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recent studies have paid much attention on the safety of bevacizumab as adjuvant chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer. The aim of this meta-analysis was to study the efficacy and safety of bevacizumab in combination with irinotecan, bolus followed by infusional 5-fluorouracil, and leucovorin (FOLFIRI) and, irinotecan, bolus fluorouracil, leucovorin (IFL) for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). An electronic search of related trials was conducted from PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library databases. Risk ratio (RRs) and its 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated by using either DerSimonian–Laird method or Mantel–Haenszel method according to the heterogeneity of included articles. The risk of mortality, therapeutic efficacy, and adverse effect were meta-analyzed. In total, 6 RCTs including 2165 participants (1109 in the treatment group, 1056 in the control group) were included in this meta-analysis. Compared with FOLFIRI-panitumumab/cetuximab, the bevacizumab addition significantly reduced the complete response (CR) rate (RR [95%CI] = 0.31[0.11, 0.89], P = 0.03) and the risk of grade 3/4 adverse event (RR [95%CI] = 0.89[0.80, 0.98], P = 0.01). Compared with FOLFIRI and IFL alone, the addition of bevacizumb significantly increased the partial response (PR) and objective response (OR) rates. Compared with IFL alone, the addition of bevacizumb significantly reduced the mortality risk of PFS (RR [95%CI] = 0.53[0.42, 0.66], P < 0.00001) and OS (RR[95%CI] = 0.70[0.60, 0.82], P < 0.00001), but increased the risk of adverse events (RR[95%CI] = 1.14[1.06, 1.21], P = 0.0002). Combination chemotherapy of bevacizumab plus FOLFIRI or IFL had a relative high efficacy and acceptable safety for treatment of mCRC. PMID:27861344

  12. Sweat Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colmant, Stephen A.; Merta, Rod J.

    2000-01-01

    A study combined group sweating and group counseling. Four adolescent boys with disruptive behavior disorders participated in 12 sweat therapy sessions. They reported the sessions useful for sharing personal concerns and receiving assistance with problem solving. Three boys showed improvement in self-esteem. Advantages of sweat therapy over other…

  13. Intravenous Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galliart, Barbara

    Intended for teaching licensed practical nurses, this curriculum guide provides information related to the equipment and skills required for nursing care of patients needing intravenous (IV) therapy. It also explains the roles and responsibilities of the licensed practical nurse with regard to intravenous therapy. Each of the 15 instructional…

  14. Proton Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver Breast Esophagus Rectum Skull base sarcomas Pediatric brain tumors Head and neck - see the Head and Neck Cancer page Eye ... Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) Brain Tumor Treatment Brain Tumors Prostate Cancer Lung Cancer ... related to Proton Therapy Videos related ...

  15. Poetry Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Ronald V.

    Poetry therapy is the method of therapy based on the principle that a poem is a special medium for expressing emotions and that this expression can have psychotherapeutic value. A survey taken in 1973 showed there were over 400 therapists treating 3,500 drug addicts, alcoholics, and mental retardates around the country. Poetry therapists…

  16. Continuous renal replacement therapy circuit failure after antidote administration.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jinwoo

    2014-12-01

    A 73-year-old man was transferred to the emergency department (ED). He was found unconscious in his house along with an empty 200-mL bottle of Basta(™), a herbicide containing 18% glufosinate. He was comatose with a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 3. As his blood pressure dropped to 60/30 mmHg despite fluids and norepinephrine, 20% intravenous fat emulsion product was injected. He experienced repeated cardiopulmonary arrests during his first 4 h in the ED. When the arrests occurred, standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed, and boluses of fat emulsion were given. He was given a total of 1500 mL of 20% fat emulsion. In an attempt to correct the acidosis, continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) was started. Within 5 min of starting CRRT, the transmembrane pressure increased sharply and the machine stopped.

  17. [Effect of (2"R)-4'-O-tetrahydropyranyladriamycin, a new antitumor antibiotic, on the bone marrow function of rabbits. (1) Intravenous administration by a single bolus injection].

    PubMed

    Tone, H; Kiyosaki, T; Shirai, M

    1986-02-01

    New Zealand White rabbits were treated with (2"R)-4'-O-tetrahydropyranyladriamycin-HCl (THP), a new antitumor antibiotic, by an intravenous bolus injection at a dose of 1, 2 or 4 mg/kg. The peripheral leucocyte counts decreased markedly at doses of 2 and 4 mg/kg 1 to 7 days after injection, and the lymphocytes and neutrophils were affected. The nucleated cell count decreased in the bone marrow. Especially 3 days after injection, remarkable reductions of erythroids and immatured myelocytes were observed, with a subsequent rise of the matured myelocytes ratio in bone marrow cell constituents. These changes resulted in a marked increase of M/E ratio. Doxorubicin also showed an inhibitory effect on the bone marrow function of rabbits but the effect was slightly lower than THP. These changes of bone marrow cells reverted 7 days after injection and the recovery of the reduced peripheral leucocyte was also observed 14 days after injection. Therefore, it can be concluded that THP showed suppressive but reversible effects on the bone marrow function of rabbits.

  18. Synergistic Effect of Bolus Exposure to Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles on Bleomycin-Induced Secretion of Pro-Fibrotic Cytokines without Lasting Fibrotic Changes in Murine Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wenting; Ichihara, Gaku; Hashimoto, Naozumi; Hasegawa, Yoshinori; Hayashi, Yasuhiko; Tada-Oikawa, Saeko; Suzuki, Yuka; Chang, Jie; Kato, Masashi; D’Alessandro-Gabazza, Corina N.; Gabazza, Esteban C.; Ichihara, Sahoko

    2014-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles are widely used in various products, and the safety evaluation of this manufactured material is important. The present study investigated the inflammatory and fibrotic effects of pulmonary exposure to ZnO nanoparticles in a mouse model of pulmonary fibrosis. Pulmonary fibrosis was induced by constant subcutaneous infusion of bleomycin (BLM). Female C57BL/6Jcl mice were divided into BLM-treated and non-treated groups. In each treatment group, 0, 10, 20 or 30 µg of ZnO nanoparticles were delivered into the lungs through pharyngeal aspiration. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and the lungs were sampled at Day 10 or 14 after administration. Pulmonary exposure by a single bolus of ZnO nanoparticles resulted in severe, but transient inflammatory infiltration and thickening of the alveolar septa in the lungs, along with the increase of total and differential cell counts in BLAF. The BALF level of interleukin (IL)-1β and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β was increased at Day 10 and 14, respectively. At Day 10, the synergistic effect of BLM and ZnO exposure was detected on IL-1β and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 in BALF. The present study demonstrated the synergistic effect of pulmonary exposure to ZnO nanoparticles and subcutaneous infusion of BLM on the secretion of pro-fibrotic cytokines in the lungs. PMID:25561223

  19. Intracoronary Bivalirudin Bolus in ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction Patients Treated with Primary Angioplasty: Theoretical Bases, Clinical Experience, and Future Applications.

    PubMed

    Lupi, Alessandro; Schaffer, Alon; Rognoni, Andrea; Cavallino, Chiara; Bongo, Angelo S; Cortese, Bernardo; Jaffe, Allan S; Angiolillo, Dominick J; Porto, Italo

    2016-12-01

    Intracoronary thrombus is a common finding in acute coronary syndromes and often correlates with adverse prognosis and complications during percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs). Bivalirudin, a direct thrombin inhibitor, is one of the recommended antithrombotic treatments for PCI in ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). The intracoronary administration of a bivalirudin loading dose, even if off-label, offers theoretical advantages over the standard intravenous route, providing a very high drug concentration in the infarct-related artery without increasing the total dose of the drug administered. After the description in case reports of such an approach, a larger scale experience was recently reported in a large cohort of patients with STEMI treated during primary PCI with a bivalirudin intracoronary loading dose followed by the standard intravenous maintenance infusion. As a control group, a propensity score-matched cohort of patients undergoing primary PCI treated with intravenous bivalirudin in the same institution was selected. Compared with the intravenous bolus, the intracoronary administration of bivalirudin was associated with improved ST-segment resolution, lower post-procedural peak CK-MB levels, and better Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) frame count values, without difference in bleeding rates. Thus, this new promising antithrombotic strategy, based on the intracoronary administration of a bivalirudin loading dose during primary PCI, appeared safe, improved myocardial reperfusion, and mitigated enzymatic myocardial infarct size compared with the standard intravenous protocol. Randomized trials are warranted to confirm these results and evaluate the possible long-term clinical benefits.

  20. Lipid emulsion therapy given intraosseously in massive verapamil overdose.

    PubMed

    Sampson, Christopher S; Bedy, Starr-Mar'ee

    2015-12-01

    Intravenous fat emulsion (IFE) therapy has been widely used in the emergency department (ED) for treating various medication overdoses. The standard recommended route to administer IFE therapy is intravenously through a peripheral or central vein. No reports of intraosseous (IO) administration in humans could be found in the literature after a brief search. We report of a patient emergently receiving IFE through the IO route. A 24-year-old woman presented to ED after a massive deliberate verapamil overdose. A decision was then made to start both vasopressors and 20% IFE therapy. Central access was established, and a norepinephrine drip was started. Intravenous fat emulsion was to be started, but peripheral access was lost at that time and not able to be reestablished. An IO line was then placed without difficulty in the left proximal tibia using an EZ-IO system. Approximately half way during the bolus administration, the intravenous pump began to alarm that the infusion was not flowing adequately. At this point, peripheral access was obtained, and IFE infusion was moved to that site. We believe that this is the first report of IFE administered via the IO route in a human. This case report illustrates a novel way of administering IFE therapy in an emergency situation where intravenous access may be difficult to obtain.

  1. Antiparasitic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kappagoda, Shanthi; Singh, Upinder; Blackburn, Brian G.

    2011-01-01

    Parasitic diseases affect more than 2 billion people globally and cause substantial morbidity and mortality, particularly among the world's poorest people. This overview focuses on the treatment of the major protozoan and helminth infections in humans. Recent developments in antiparasitic therapy include the expansion of artemisinin-based therapies for malaria, new drugs for soil-transmitted helminths and intestinal protozoa, expansion of the indications for antiparasitic drug treatment in patients with Chagas disease, and the use of combination therapy for leishmaniasis and human African trypanosomiasis. PMID:21628620

  2. Comparison of Gavage, Water Bottle, and a High-Moisture Diet Bolus as Dosing Methods for Quantitative D-xylose Administration to B6D2F1 (Mus musculus) Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmer, J. Paul; Lewis, Sherry M.; Moyer, Jerry L.

    1993-01-01

    Gavage, water bottle, and diet incorporation are 3 dosing methods used orally to administer test compounds to rodents. These 3 methods were compared in mice to determine which represented the most quantitative delivery system. For dietary incorporation, a high-moisture bolus form of NIH-31 rodent meal was developed using hydroxypropyl methylcellulose as an autoclave-stable binding agent. A high-moisture bolus were selected to increase the acceptability of the dosed diet and to promote quantitative consumption through reduced wastage. The test compound used was D-xylose, a pentose sugar that may be quantitatively detected, colorimetrically, in urine following oral dosing. Six male and 6 female B6D2FI mice were placed in metabolism cages and dosed with a known quantity of D-xylose by each of the 3 methods. Urine was collected before and after each method of administration and analysed for total D-xylose; the per cent recovery was based upon the amount of D-xylose consumed. Quantitative consumption was apparently greatest for water bottle dosing with an average recovery of 56.0% of the original D-xylose dose. High-moisture bolus incorporation ranked second with 50.0% D-xylose recovery, and gavage was third with 41.0% D-xylose recovery.

  3. Proton Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... for e-updates Please leave this field empty Proton Therapy SHARE Home > Treatment and Care > Treatments Listen ... a nucleus, which holds two types of particles—protons and neutrons. The nucleus is surrounded by electrons. ...

  4. Play Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lawver, Timothy; Blankenship, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    Play therapy is a treatment modality in which the therapist engages in play with the child. Its use has been documented in a variety of settings and with a variety of diagnoses. Treating within the context of play brings the therapist and the therapy to the level of the child. By way of an introduction to this approach, a case is presented of a six-year-old boy with oppositional defiant disorder. The presentation focuses on the events and interactions of a typical session with an established patient. The primary issues of the session are aggression, self worth, and self efficacy. These themes manifest themselves through the content of the child’s play and narration of his actions. The therapist then reflects these back to the child while gently encouraging the child toward more positive play. Though the example is one of nondirective play therapy, a wide range of variation exists under the heading of play therapy. PMID:19724720

  5. Proton Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... effects of the treatment. top of page What equipment is used? Proton beam therapy uses special machines, ... tumor cells. top of page Who operates the equipment? With backgrounds in mechanical, electrical, software, hardware and ...

  6. Hand Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Guide Journal of Hand Surgery (JHS) Home Anatomy Hand Therapy Email to a friend * required fields From * ... ensure a healthy style of work. Find a Hand Therapist Search for a hand therapist in your ...

  7. Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Oxygen therapy is a treatment that provides you with extra oxygen. Oxygen is a gas that your body needs to function. Normally, your lungs absorb oxygen from the air you breathe. But some conditions ...

  8. Intratympanic Steroid Treatment for Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss after Failure of Intravenous Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, Emanuele; Frisina, Antonio; Fasson, Anna Chiara; Armato, Enrico; Spinato, Giacomo; Amadori, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study is the investigation of the effectiveness of intratympanic steroids therapy (IST) in patients with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL) who had not responded to intravenous treatment, evaluating the overall hearing recovery and comparing the results with different variables. Materials and Methods. Our study consisted of 55 patients with refractory ISSHL who, at the end of 10 days of therapy with intravenous steroids, had puretone 4-frequency average (PTA) of worse than 30 dB. The patients received 0.5 mL of methylprednisolone by direct intratympanic injection. The procedure was carried out up to 7 times within a 20-days period. Statistical analysis was carried out. Results. Overall 29 patients (52.7%) showed improvement in PTA, 24 (43.8%) had no change in hearing, and 2 (3.5%) worsened. There was a significant statistical correlation between hearing recovery and time to onset of symptoms, severity of hearing loss and frequency of hearing loss. Conclusions. IST is an effective and safe therapy in sudden sensorineural hearing loss cases that are refractory to standard treatment. The earlier IST, the hearing losses less than 90 dB and the involvement of the low frequencies seem to influence positively the hearing recovery. PMID:23724270

  9. Radionuclide Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalutsky, M. R.

    Radionuclide therapy utilizes unsealed sources of radionuclides as a treatment for cancer or other pathological conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. Radionuclides that decay by the emission of β and α particles, as well as those that emit Auger electrons, have been used for this purpose. In this chapter, radiochemical aspects of radionuclide therapy, including criteria for radionuclide selection, radionuclide production, radiolabeling chemistry, and radiation dosimetry are discussed.

  10. Antiviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stalder, Hans

    1977-01-01

    The current status of antiviral therapy is reviewed, including discussion of older approaches together with more recently developed chemotherapy. Following the introduction dealing with pathophysiological aspects of virus disease, the different approaches to antiviral therapy are presented. The reasons for the slow progress in antiviral therapy are discussed. These include: 1. the necessity of intracellular penetration of drugs acting on viral replication; 2. the severe toxicity of most antiviral drugs; 3. the narrow antiviral spectrum of most of these agents; 4. the difficulty of making a rapid etiological diagnosis in view of the necessity of starting (specific?) treatment early in the course of the disease; 5. the difficult evaluation of beneficial as compared with deleterious effects of antiviral therapy. After a detailed review of clinically tested substances, including immunoglobulins, synthetic antiviral drugs (amantadine, nucleoside analogs, thiosemicarbazones and photodynamic dyes) and interferon, a guide concerning indications and application of specific antiviral therapy is presented. Although at present there are few indications, clinicians should be aware of the (present and future) possibilities of antiviral therapy. PMID:341538

  11. Evaluation of two-dimensional bolus effect of immobilization/support devices on skin doses: A radiochromic EBT film dosimetry study in phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu-Tsao, Sou-Tung; Chan, Maria F.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: In this study, the authors have quantified the two-dimensional (2D) perspective of skin dose increase using EBT film dosimetry in phantom in the presence of patient immobilization devices during conventional and IMRT treatments. Methods: For 6 MV conventional photon field, the authors evaluated and quantified the 2D bolus effect on skin doses for six different common patient immobilization/support devices, including carbon fiber grid with Mylar sheet, Orfit carbon fiber base plate, balsa wood board, Styrofoam, perforated AquaPlast sheet, and alpha-cradle. For 6 and 15 MV IMRT fields, a stack of two film layers positioned above a solid phantom was exposed at the air interface or in the presence of a patient alpha-cradle. All the films were scanned and the pixel values were converted to doses based on an established calibration curve. The authors determined the 2D skin dose distributions, isodose curves, and cross-sectional profiles at the surface layers with or without the immobilization/support device. The authors also generated and compared the dose area histograms (DAHs) and dose area products from the 2D skin dose distributions. Results: In contrast with 20% relative dose [(RD) dose relative to d{sub max} on central axis] at 0.0153 cm in the film layer for 6 MV 10x10 cm{sup 2} open field, the average RDs at the same depth in the film layer were 71%, 69%, 55%, and 57% for Orfit, balsa wood, Styrofoam, and alpha-cradle, respectively. At the same depth, the RDs were 54% under a strut and 26% between neighboring struts of a carbon fiber grid with Mylar sheet, and between 34% and 56% for stretched perforated AquaPlast sheet. In the presence of the alpha-cradle for the 6 MV (15 MV) IMRT fields, the hot spot doses at the effective measurement depths of 0.0153 and 0.0459 cm were 140% and 150% (83% and 89%), respectively, of the isocenter dose. The enhancement factor was defined as the ratio of a given DAH parameter (minimum dose received in a given area) with

  12. Relationships between antimicrobial effect and area under the concentration-time curve as a basis for comparison of modes of antibiotic administration: meropenem bolus injections versus continuous infusions.

    PubMed Central

    Firsov, A A; Mattie, H

    1997-01-01

    In comparative studies of different modes of administration (MAs) simulated in in vitro dynamic models, only one dose of antibiotic is usually mimicked. Such an experimental design can provide a prediction of the antimicrobial effect (AME) of a given combination of drug, clinical isolate, and infection site, but may be inappropriate for accurate comparison of MAs. An alternative design providing comparison of different MAs with various antibiotic doses in a wide range and with evaluation of the respective relationships between AME and the AUC was proposed and examined. Two series of meropenem pharmacokinetic profiles, i.e., monoexponentially decreasing concentrations (bolus doses) and constant concentrations (6-h continuous infusion), were in vitro simulated. The simulated initial concentrations (Co[from 0.62 to 48 micrograms/ml]) and steady-state concentrations (Css[from 0.016 to 8 micrograms/ml]) were chosen to provide similar AUC for 0 to 6 h (AUC0-6) ranges for both MAs (from 0.070 to 50.0 micrograms.h/ml and from 0.09 to 48.0 micrograms.h/ml, respectively). The AME of meropenem on Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 (MIC, 0.06 micrograms/ml) was determined at each time (t) point as a difference (E) between the logarithms of viable counts (N) in the control cultures without antibiotic (NC) and in cultures exposed to antibiotics (NA). Time courses of E observed at different Co of Css levels were compared in terms of the areas under the E-t curves (ABBCt). The finite values of the ABBCt observed by the end of the 6 -h observation period, which are equivalent to the area between bacterial count-time curves observed in the absence and presence of antibiotic (ABBC), were plotted versus the respective AUCs produced by each of the MAs. The ABBC versus AUC curves had a similar pattern: a plateau achieved at high AUCs followed by a steep rise in ABBC at relatively low AUCs was inherent in both of the MAs. The superiority of bolus dosing over the infusions could be

  13. Dose Regimens, Variability, and Complications Associated with Using Repeat-Bolus Dosing to Extend a Surgical Plane of Anesthesia in Laboratory Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jaber, Samer M; Hankenson, F Claire; Heng, Kathleen; McKinstry-Wu, Andrew; Kelz, Max B; Marx, James O

    2014-01-01

    Extending a surgical plane of anesthesia in mice by using injectable anesthetics typically is accomplished by repeat-bolus dosing. We compared the safety and efficacy of redosing protocols administered either during an anesthetic surgical plane (maintaining a continuous surgical plane, CSP), or immediately after leaving this plane (interrupted surgical plane, ISP) in C57BL/6J mice. Anesthesia was induced with ketamine, xylazine, and acepromazine (80, 8, and 1 mg/kg IP, respectively), and redosing protocols included 25% (0.25K), 50% (0.5K), or 100% (1.0K) of the initial ketamine dose or 25% (0.25KX) or 50% (0.5KX) of the initial ketamine–xylazine dose. In the ISP group, the surgical plane was extended by 13.8 ± 2.1 min (mean ± SEM) after redosing for the 0.25K redose with 50% returning to a surgical plane, 42.7 ± 4.5 min for the 0.5K redose with 88% returning to a surgical plane, and 44.3 ± 15.4 min for the 1.0K redose, 52.8 ± 7.2 min for the 0.25KX redose, and 45.9 ± 2.9 min for the 0.5KX redose, with 100% of mice returning to a surgical plane of anesthesia in these 3 groups. Mortality rates for ISP groups were 0%, 12%, 33%, 12%, and 18%, respectively. Mice in CSP groups had 50% mortality, independent of the repeat-dosing protocol. We recommend redosing mice with either 50% of the initial ketamine dose or 25% of the initial ketamine–xylazine dose immediately upon return of the pedal withdrawal reflex to extend the surgical plane of anesthesia in mice, optimize the extension of the surgical plane, and minimize mortality. PMID:25650976

  14. Effect on the incidence of pneumonia of vitamin D supplementation by quarterly bolus dose to infants in Kabul: a randomised controlled superiority trial

    PubMed Central

    Manaseki-Holland, Semira; Maroof, Zabihullah; Bruce, Jane; Mughal, M Zulf; Masher, Mohammad Isaq; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Walraven, Gijs; Chandramohan, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Vitamin D has a role in regulating immune function, and its deficiency is a suggested risk factor for childhood pneumonia. Our aim was to assess whether oral supplementation of vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) will reduce the incidence and severity of pneumonia in a high-risk infant population. Methods We did a randomised placebo-controlled trial to compare oral 100 000 IU (2·5 mg) vitamin D3 with placebo given to children aged 1–11 months in Kabul, Afghanistan. Randomisation was by use of a computer-generated list. Vitamin D or placebo was given by fieldworkers once every 3 months for 18 months. Children presenting at the study hospital with signs of pneumonia had their diagnosis confirmed radiographically. Our primary outcome was the first or only episode of radiologically confirmed pneumonia. Our analysis was by intention to treat. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00548379. Findings 1524 children were assigned to receive vitamin D3 and 1522 placebo. There was no significant difference between the incidence of first or only pneumonia between the vitamin D (0·145 per child per year, 95% CI 0·129–0·164) and the placebo group (0.137, 0·121–0·155); the incidence rate ratio was 1·06 (95% CI 0·89–1·27). From 652 children during five separate periods of testing serum calcifediol, only one child in each of two testing periods had results greater than 375 nmol/L in the intervention group—a toxic level. Interpretations Quarterly bolus doses of oral vitamin D3 supplementation to infants are not an effective intervention to reduce the incidence of pneumonia in infants in this setting. Funding Wellcome Trust and British Council. PMID:22494826

  15. Liquid Therapy Delivery Models Using Microfluidic Airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, Molly K.; Grotberg, James B.; Waisman, Dan; Filoche, Marcel; Sznitman, Josué

    2013-11-01

    The propagation and break-up of viscous and surfactant-laden liquid plugs in the lungs is an active area of research in view of liquid plug installation in the lungs to treat a host of different pulmonary conditions. This includes Infant Respiratory Distress Syndrome (IRDS) the primary cause of neonatal death and disability. Until present, experimental studies of liquid plugs have generally been restricted to low-viscosity Newtonian fluids along a single bifurcation. However, these fluids reflect poorly the actual liquid medication therapies used to treat pulmonary conditions. The present work attempts to uncover the propagation, rupture and break-up of liquid plugs in the airway tree using microfluidic models spanning three or more generations of the bronchiole tree. Our approach allows the dynamics of plug propagation and break-up to be studied in real-time, in a one-to-one scale in vitro model, as a function of fluid rheology, trailing film dynamics and bronchial tree geometry. Understanding these dynamics are a first and necessary step to deliver more effectively boluses of liquid medication to the lungs while minimizing the injury caused to epithelial cells lining the lungs from the rupture of such liquid plugs.

  16. Successful Treatment of Plasma Cell-Rich Acute Rejection Using Pulse Steroid Therapy Alone: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Nakada, Yasuyuki; Yamamoto, Izumi; Kawabe, Mayuko; Yamakawa, Takafumi; Katsuma, Ai; Katsumata, Haruki; Mafune, Aki; Kobayashi, Akimitsu; Koike, Yusuke; Yamada, Hiroki; Miki, Jun; Tanno, Yudo; Ohkido, Ichiro; Tsuboi, Nobuo; Yokoyama, Keitaro; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Yokoo, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Despite the recent development of immunosuppressive agents, plasma cell-rich acute rejection (PCAR) has remained refractory to treatment. Herein, we report an unusual case of PCAR that responded well to pulse steroid therapy alone. A 47-year-old man was admitted for a protocol biopsy three months after kidney transplantation, with a stable serum creatinine level of 1.6 mg/dL. Histological examination showed focal aggressive tubulointerstitial inflammatory cell infiltration of predominantly polyclonal mature plasma cells, leading to our diagnosis of PCAR. Three months following three consecutive days of high-dose methylprednisolone (mPSL) therapy, an allograft biopsy performed for therapy evaluation showed persistent PCAR. We readministered mPSL therapy and successfully resolved the PCAR. Although PCAR generally develops more than six months after transplantation, we diagnosed this case early, at three months after transplantation, with focally infiltrated PCAR. This case demonstrates the importance of early diagnosis and prompt treatment of PCAR to manage the development and severity of allograft rejection. PMID:28168079

  17. Dosimetric comparison of three different treatment modalities for total scalp irradiation: the conventional lateral photon-electron technique, helical tomotherapy, and volumetric-modulated arc therapy.

    PubMed

    Song, Jin Ho; Jung, Ji-Young; Park, Hyung-Wook; Lee, Gi Woong; Chae, Soo-Min; Kay, Chul Seung; Son, Seok Hyun

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare lateral photon-electron (LPE), helical tomotherapy (HT), and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans for total scalp irradiation. We selected a single adult model case and compared the dosimetric results for the three plans. All plans mainly used 6-MV photon beams, and the prescription dose was 60 Gy in 30 fractions. First, we compared the LPE, HT and VMAT plans, with all plans including a 1-cm bolus. We also compared HT plans with and without the bolus. The conformity indices for LPE, HT and VMAT were 1.73, 1.35 and 1.49, respectively. The HT plan showed the best conformity and the LPE plan showed the worst. However, the plans had similar homogeneity indexes. The dose to the hippocampus was the highest in the VMAT plan, with a mean of 6.7 Gy, compared with 3.5 Gy in the LPE plan and 4.8 Gy in the HT plan. The doses to the optical structures were all within the clinically acceptable range. The beam-on time and monitor units were highest in the HT plan. The HT plans with and without a bolus showed similar target coverage and organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing. The HT plan showed the best target coverage and conformity, with low doses to the brain and hippocampus. This plan also had the advantage of not necessarily requiring a bolus. Although the VMAT plan showed better conformity than the LPE plan and acceptable OAR sparing, the dose to the hippocampus should be considered when high doses are prescribed.

  18. Preliminary Evaluation of a New Semi-Closed-Loop Insulin Therapy System Over the Prandial Period in Adult Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Quemerais, Marie Aude; Doron, Maeva; Dutrech, Florent; Melki, Vincent; Franc, Sylvia; Antonakios, Michel; Charpentier, Guillaume; Hanaire, Helene; Charpentier, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    There is room for improvement in the algorithms used in closed-loop insulin therapy during the prandial period. This pilot study evaluated the efficacy and safety of the Diabeloop algorithm (model predictive control type) during the postprandial period. This 2-center clinical trial compared interstitial glucose levels over two 5-hour periods (with/without the algorithm) following a calibrated lunch. On the control day, the amount of insulin delivered by the pump was determined according to the patient’s usual parameters. On the test day, 50% or 75% of the theoretical bolus required was delivered, while the algorithm, informed of carbohydrate intake, proposed changes to insulin delivery every 15 minutes using modeling to forecast glucose levels. The primary endpoint was percentage of time spent at near normoglycemia (70-180 mg/dl). Twelve patients with type 1 diabetes (9 men, age 35.6 ± 12.7 years, HbA1c 7.3 ± 0.8%) were included. The percentage of time spent in the target range was 84.5 ± 20.8 (test day) versus 69.2 ± 33.9% (control day, P = .11). The percentage of time spent in hypoglycemia < 70 mg/dl was 0.2 ± 0.8 (test) versus 4.4 ± 8.2% (control, P = .18). Interstitial glucose at the end of the test (5 hours) was 127.5 ± 40.1 (test) versus 146 ± 53.5 mg/dl (control, P = .25). The insulin doses did not differ, and no differences were observed between the 50% and 75% boluses. In a semi-closed-loop configuration with manual priming boluses (25% or 50% reduction), the Diabeloop v1 algorithm was as successful as the manual method in determining the prandial bolus, without any exposure to excessive hypoglycemic risk. PMID:25097057

  19. [Testosterone therapy].

    PubMed

    Diemer, T; Hauptmann, A; Wagenlehner, F M E

    2016-04-01

    Hormone replacement therapy with testosterone has become well-established over the course of time. The initial substantial concerns with respect to complications and potential adverse events, particularly in older patients, were proven to be unfounded over time. Testosterone therapy has therefore gradually become a regular treatment modality in urological practice. It has also been shown to represent a valuable tool as supportive treatment for patients with erectile dysfunction and hypogonadism. A variety of testosterone preparations are available for treatment. Recent pharmaceutical developments have greatly improved the practicability and ease of administration for patients. Several guidelines have been developed that provide clearly formulated standards and instructions for indications, contraindications, application, risk factors and monitoring of testosterone therapy. Adverse events affecting the cardiovascular system and especially diseases of the prostate gland are of great importance, thus making the urologist the primary partner in the treatment of patients with testosterone deficiency.

  20. Anticoagulant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Teitel, Jerome M.

    1984-01-01

    Venous thromboembolic diseases are among the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in Canada. Agents which interfere with the coagulation mechanism are highly effective in treating these disorders, but at the potentially high cost of serious hemorrhagic complications. The optimal prevention of both serious outcomes and complications of therapy can be achieved by prophylactic treatment of high risk patients. Heparin and vitamin K antagonists remain the mainstays of antithrombotic therapy. The pharmacology of these agents is reviewed, and a rational approach to their clinical use is presented. PMID:21279098

  1. Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... can watch you during the procedure. As you go through radiation treatment, you may feel like you're all ... treatment. Avoid exposing the treated area to the sun during the weeks you're getting radiation therapy. And when the treatment's over, wear sunscreen ...

  2. Dance Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leventhal, Marcia B.

    1980-01-01

    Dance therapy deals with personal growth via body-mind interaction. A change in movement expression is believed to result in a personality or behavior change. The therapist is trained to become sensitive to movement expression as it relates to the psychological, motor, and cognitive development of the child. (JN)

  3. Gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Williamson, B

    1982-07-29

    Gene therapy is not yet possible, but may become feasible soon, particularly for well understood gene defects. Although treatment of a patient raises no ethical problems once it can be done well, changing the genes of an early embryo is more difficult, controversial and unlikely to be required clinically.

  4. Sex Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... effective for individuals of any age, sex or sexual orientation. Sex therapy is usually provided by psychologists, social workers, physicians or licensed therapists who have special training in issues related to sex ... do not have sexual contact with clients, in the office or anywhere ...

  5. Pet Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kavanagh, Kim

    1994-01-01

    This resource guide presents information on a variety of ways that animals can be used as a therapeutic modality with people having disabilities. Aspects addressed include: pet ownership and selection criteria; dogs (including service dogs, hearing/signal dogs, seeing leader dogs, and social/specialty dogs); horseriding for both therapy and fun;…

  6. Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... them from spreading. About half of all cancer patients receive it. The radiation may be external, from special machines, or internal, from radioactive substances that a doctor places inside your body. The type of radiation therapy you receive depends on many factors, including The ...

  7. Gene Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells in an effort to treat or stop disease. Genes contain your DNA — the code that controls much of your body's form and function, from making you grow taller to regulating your body systems. Genes that don't work properly can cause disease. Gene therapy replaces a faulty gene or adds ...

  8. Methylprednisolone inhibits the proliferation and affects the differentiation of rat spinal cord-derived neural progenitor cells cultured in low oxygen conditions by inhibiting HIF-1α and Hes1 in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenhao; Wang, Peng; Li, Shiyuan; Yang, Jiewen; Liang, Xinjun; Tang, Yong; Li, Yuxi; Yang, Rui; Wu, Yanfeng; Shen, Huiyong

    2014-09-01

    Although there is much controversy over the use of methylprednisolone (MP), it is one of the main drugs used in the treatment of acute spinal cord injury (SCI). The induction of the proliferation and differentiation of endogenous neural progenitor cells (NPCs) is considered a promising mode of treatment for SCI. However, the effects of MP on spinal cord-derived endogenous NPCs in a low oxygen enviroment remain to be delineated. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the potential effects of MP on NPCs cultured under low oxygen conditions in vitro and to elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved. Fetal rat spinal cord-derived NPCs were harvested and divided into 4 groups: 2 groups of cells cultured under normal oxygen conditions and treated with or without MP, and 2 groups incubated in 3% O2 (low oxygen) treated in a similar manner. We found that MP induced suppressive effects on NPC proliferation even under low oxygen conditions (3% O2). The proportion of nestin-positive NPCs decreased from 51.8±2.46% to 36.17±3.55% following the addition of MP and decreased more significantly to 27.20±2.68% in the cells cultured in 3% O2. In addition, a smaller number of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive cells and a greater number of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2)-positive cells was observed following the addition of MP under both normal (normoxic) and low oxygen (hypoxic) conditions. In response to MP treatment, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and the Notch signaling pathway downstream protein, Hes1, but not the upstream Notch-1 intracelluar domain (NICD), were inhibited. After blocking NICD with a γ-secretase inhibitor (DAPT) MP still inhibited the expression of Hes1. Our results provide insight into the molecular mechanisms responsible for the MP-induced inhibition of proliferation and its effects on differentiation and suggest that HIF-1α and Hes1 play an important role in this effect.

  9. Effect of different doses of D-penicillamine and combined administration of D-penicillamine and methylprednisolone on collagen, glycosaminoglycans, DNA and RNA of granulation tissue, skin, bone and aorta in rats.

    PubMed

    Junker, P; Helin, G; Lorenzen, I

    1981-11-01

    D-penicillamine (D-pen) in doses of 20, 100 and 500 mg/kg/day or D-pen 100 mg/kg/day plus methylprednisolone (MP) 2.0 mg/kg/day was administered daily for 42 days to rats implanted with viscose-cellulose sponges. Operated, pairfed rats served as controls. D-pen increased the DNA content of granulation tissue, but had no effect on the amount of tissue produced. In contrast, high dose D-pen reduced the content of DNA and collagen in skin. A dose related inhibition of collagen crosslink formation occurred in all tissues, particularly in skin, as indicated by increased proportions of extractable collagen with increased alpha/beta chain ratio and aldehyde content. Moreover, low doses of D-pen increased the hydroxyproline/proline ratio of acid soluble skin collagen, presumably due to solubilization of type III collagen as demonstrated by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of 3.6 M urea. These changes were associated with increased skin fragility and edema plus excess elastin deposition in the aorta after high dose D-pen treatment. Low dose D-pen stimulated the 35S-sulphate uptake into the sulphated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) of granulation tissue without altering their relative amounts, whereas high dose D-pen reduced the concentration of chondroitin-4/6-sulphate in skin. MP antagonized the solubilizing effect of D-pen on collagen, probably by inhibition of the collagen synthesis. In addition, MP inhibited the cell proliferation and GAG metabolism. Food restriction reduced the DNA content of granulation tissue. The inhibitory effect of D-pen on the formation of granuloma collagen crosslinks in the presence of unaltered rate of collagen biosynthesis may diminish the amount of fibrotic tissue due to increased degradability of crosslink deficient collagen. Simultaneous administration of MP may facilitate this effect by inhibiting the biosynthesis of collagen. However, long-term D-pen treatment seems to increase the susceptibility of normal tissues to

  10. Deciding about hormone therapy

    MedlinePlus

    HRT - deciding; Estrogen replacement therapy - deciding; ERT- deciding; Hormone replacement therapy - deciding; Menopause - deciding; HT - deciding; Menopausal hormone therapy - deciding; MHT - deciding

  11. Anecdotal therapies.

    PubMed

    Millikan, L E

    1999-01-01

    Traditionally, many advances in medicine have been serendipitous. Are serendipitous and anecdotal synonymous? Many of our materia medica today relate to initial probes and anecdotal reports that matured to full investigation and therapeutic indications. The recent situation regarding Skin Cap is one that highlights the downside of this scenario. Several drugs in the US continue usage largely related to anecdotal indications, and anecdotal extension of legend indications is a standard for American Dermatology. The situation with systemic drugs, such as Trental, zinc preparations, imidazoles for extended indications, lysine and melatonin, all will be discussed. Topical preparations such as skin cap, cantharone, Vioform, all also are included in this category. It is important to place this topic in perspective in regards to geographic variation and therapeutic need. Many diseases lacking specific therapy are important targets for anecdotal therapy, and this will foster continued approaches in this area. The growing standardization of medicine and pharmaceutical regulation, threatens the anecdotal approach, but it provides still an important link to the future for some forms of therapy in diseases that are difficult to treat. Traditionally, the anecdote has been the first step in the therapeutic chain. Withering discovery of the benefits of the common fox glove in dropsy, was followed by many other anecdotes arriving via folk-medicine in the New World. This approach of utilizing folk medicine has now reached new heights, with very active searches by major pharmaceutical companies throughout the third world for remedies that may have potential. Couched with this is the history of anecdotal "snake-oil" remedies, that clearly had no benefit to anyone except the huckster marketing same. The excesses in this area of unproven and false therapies, led to the gradual organization of therapeutic trials and the Food and Drug Administration in the US as we know it today. The

  12. Reduction in stray radiation dose using a body-shielding device during external radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuxu; Jiang, Shaohui; Zhang, Quanbin; Lin, Shengqu; Wang, Ruihao; Zhou, Xiang; Zhang, Guoqian; Lei, Huaiyu; Yu, Hui

    2017-03-01

    With the purpose of reducing stray radiation dose (SRD) in out-of-field region (OFR) during radiotherapy with 6 MV intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), a body-shielding device (BSD) was prepared according to the measurements obtained in experimental testing. In experimental testing, optimal shielding conditions, such as 1 mm lead, 2 mm lead, and 1 mm lead plus 10 mm bolus, were investigated along the medial axis of a phantom using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). The SRDs at distances from field edge were then measured and analyzed for a clinical IMRT treatment plan for nasopharyngeal carcinoma before and after shielding using the BSD. In addition, SRDs in anterior, posterior, left and right directions of phantom were investigated with and without shielding, respectively. Also, the SRD at the bottom of treatment couch was measured. SRD decreased exponentially to a constant value with increasing distance from field edge. The shielding rate was 50%-80%; however, there were no significant differences in SRDs when shielded by 1 mm lead, 2 mm lead, or 1 mm lead plus 10 mm bolus (P>0.05). Importantly, the 10 mm bolus absorbed back-scattering radiation due to the interaction between photons and lead. As a result, 1 mm lead plus 10 mm bolus was selected to prepare the BSD. After shielding with BSD, total SRDs in the OFR decreased to almost 50% of those without shielding when irradiated with IMRT beams. Due to the effects of treatment couch and gantry angle, SRDs at distances were not identical in anterior, posterior, left and right direction of phantom without BSD. As higher dose in anterior and lower dose in posterior, SRDs were substantial similarities after shielding. There was no significant difference in SRDs for left and right directions with or without shielding. Interestingly, SRDs in the four directions were similar after shielding. From these results, the BSD developed in this study may significantly reduce SRD in the OFR during

  13. Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis after Oral Therapy with Herbal Extracts: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kaymakamzade, Bahar; Karabudak, Rana; Kurne, Aslı Tuncer; Nurlu, Gülay

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is a rare demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, commonly attributed to infections or vaccinations. Toxic or allergenic compounds can also trigger a response in the immune system and may cause demyelination. We present a case with ADEM after using oral herbal medications. Case Report: A 25 year-old male developed bilateral central facial palsy and severe quadriparesis after taking herbal drugs (containing echinacea and many other herbal ingredients) for two weeks. He had used the extract to increase his potency and reproductivity. He had no past history of recent immunization or viral infection. The clinical findings, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were compatible with ADEM. The neurological findings were improved after seven doses of pulse methylprednisolone treatment. To our knowledge, this is the third report in the literature that links herbal therapy and demyelinating disease. Conclusion: Most of the ADEM cases related to herbal therapy in the literature similarly used echinacea. It is our opinion that other ingredients of the herbal extract used by our case, besides echinacea, could have the potential to cause a trigger in the immune system. Further studies are needed to clarify the immunological effects of different kinds of herbal compounds, as well as the effects of different parts of the plants and the results of various dosages. Moreover, ingredients should also be tested for toxicity, adverse effects and drug interactions. PMID:27308086

  14. Ozone Therapy in Ethidium Bromide-Induced Demyelination in Rats: Possible Protective Effect.

    PubMed

    Salem, Nevee