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Sample records for bond overlap plasmon

  1. Overlap populations, bond orders and valences for 'fuzzy' atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, I.; Salvador, P.

    2004-01-01

    Proper definitions are proposed to calculate interatomic overlap populations, bond order (multiplicity) indices and actual atomic valences from the results of ab initio quantum chemical calculations, in terms of 'fuzzy' atoms, i.e., such divisions of the three-dimensional physical space into atomic regions in which the regions assigned to the individual atoms have no sharp boundaries but exhibit a continuous transition from one to another. The results of test calculations are in agreement with the classical chemical notions, exhibit unexpectedly small basis sensitivity and do not depend too much on the selection of the weight function defining the actual division of the space into 'fuzzy' atomic regions. The scheme is applicable on both SCF and correlated levels of theory. A free program is available.

  2. Tunable plasmon resonances and two-dimensional anisotropy of angular optical response of overlapped nanoshells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tengfei; Yang, Shaobo; Li, Xingfei

    2013-03-25

    Symmetry breaking of metallic nanoparticles results in many unique optical properties. We use the discrete dipole approximation method to study the optical properties of overlapped nanoshells which further break the rotational symmetry compared with the semishells. The optical properties of the nanoparticles can be tuned from the visible to near infrared regime by varying the geometry parameters and the hybrid components of nanoparticles. The calculated extinction spectra show the two-dimensional anisotropy of the angular optical response of the nanoparticles. The plasmon hybridization model provides a way to interpret the resonance modes of the nanoparticles. The tunable plasmon resonances, the enhanced local fields and the anisotropic optical properties suggest that the overlapped nanoshells have potential applications in surface-enhanced spectroscopy and "smart" coating in windows or display devices. PMID:23546162

  3. An experimental correlation study between field-target overlap and sensitivity of surface plasmon resonance biosensors based on sandwiched immunoassays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Yeonsoo; Moon, Seyoung; Oh, Youngjin; Kim, Yonghwi; Kim, Donghyun

    2012-10-01

    In this report, we have studied the effectiveness of field-target overlap to evaluate detection sensitivity of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors. The investigation used theoretical analysis based on the transfer matrix method, which was experimentally confirmed by thin film-based detection in sandwich and reverse sandwich immunoglobulin G (IgG) assays. Both theoretical and experimental results show that strong correlation exists between the overlap and the sensitivity with the coefficient of correlation higher than 95% in all the cases that we have considered. We have also confirmed the correlation in diffraction grating-based SPR measurement of IgG/anti-IgG interactions. The correlation elucidates the mechanism behind the far-field detection sensitivity of SPR biosensors and can lead to the enhancement of SPR biosensing with molecular scale sensitivity.

  4. Bonding and Anti-bonding Modes of Plasmon Coupling Effects in TiO2-Ag Core-shell Dimers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Quanshui; Zhang, Zhili

    2016-01-01

    Bonding and anti-bonding modes of plasmon coupling effects are numerically investigated in TiO2-Ag core-shell nano dimers. First, splitting phenomena of the coupled anti-bonding modes are observed under the longitudinal polarization when the distance between the monomers decreases to a certain level. Second, one of the split resonance modes is identified to be formed by the dipole anti-bonding mode of the monomers from charge density distribution patterns. Those split modes have similar redshift behaviors as the coupled dipole bonding modes in the same situations. Furthermore, the intensities of those anti-bonding modes weaken with decreasing distance between the monomers, because of the interaction of the induced dipole moment in the monomers and the charge distribution variation on the facing surfaces of the gap by the coulomb attraction. Other split bands are the higher-order mode (octupole-like or triakontadipole-like), which do not have obvious peak-shift behavior, and the intensities have very little attenuation with decreasing distance. Finally, the coupling of the bonding and anti-bonding modes under the longitudinal polarization is symmetric (bonding). PMID:26763719

  5. Bonding and Anti-bonding Modes of Plasmon Coupling Effects in TiO2-Ag Core-shell Dimers.

    PubMed

    Li, Quanshui; Zhang, Zhili

    2016-01-01

    Bonding and anti-bonding modes of plasmon coupling effects are numerically investigated in TiO2-Ag core-shell nano dimers. First, splitting phenomena of the coupled anti-bonding modes are observed under the longitudinal polarization when the distance between the monomers decreases to a certain level. Second, one of the split resonance modes is identified to be formed by the dipole anti-bonding mode of the monomers from charge density distribution patterns. Those split modes have similar redshift behaviors as the coupled dipole bonding modes in the same situations. Furthermore, the intensities of those anti-bonding modes weaken with decreasing distance between the monomers, because of the interaction of the induced dipole moment in the monomers and the charge distribution variation on the facing surfaces of the gap by the coulomb attraction. Other split bands are the higher-order mode (octupole-like or triakontadipole-like), which do not have obvious peak-shift behavior, and the intensities have very little attenuation with decreasing distance. Finally, the coupling of the bonding and anti-bonding modes under the longitudinal polarization is symmetric (bonding). PMID:26763719

  6. Plasmon-driven dimerization via S-S chemical bond in an aqueous environment

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Lin; Wang, Peijie; Chen, Xiaowei; Fang, Yurui; Zhang, Zhenglong; Sun, Mengtao

    2014-01-01

    The surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of thioanisole are experimentally investigated in an electrochemical environment in this study. Two Raman peaks, which depend strongly not only on electric potential but also on the local surface plasmon resonances (LSPR), have been observed. Theoretical calculations reveal that thioanisole is first dissociated from thiophenol via the S-CH3 bond; plasmons then drive the dimerisation of thiophenol via the S-S bond, which is strongly potential dependent. One Raman peak corresponds to the S-S vibrational mode of the thiophenol dimer, and the other corresponds to the asymmetric C-C stretching modes of the benzenyl of the thiophenol dimer. The potential-dependent two Raman modes is the potential-dependent dimerisation dynamics of thiophenol via the S-S bond. Our experimental findings provide insight into the structural elucidation of adsorbed molecules and molecular surface reaction dynamics. PMID:25427897

  7. Features of chemical bonds based on the overlap polarizabilities: diatomic and solid-state systems with the frozen-density embedding approach.

    PubMed

    Moura, Renaldo T; Duarte, Gian C S; da Silva, Thiago E; Malta, Oscar L; Longo, Ricardo L

    2015-03-28

    The chemical bond overlap properties were obtained for alkali halides NaY (Y = F, Cl, Br), alkaline-earth chalcogenides MX (M = Ca, Mg and X = O, S, Se) and alkali and alkali-earth metals (Li, Na, and Mg) in diatomic and solid-state systems using an embedding approach based on the frozen density functional theory to simulate the crystalline effects. The computational protocol established provides errors for bond distances smaller than 1%. The results indicate that larger chemical bond covalency leads to larger absorption or scattering by the overlap region. The ionic specific valence and overlap polarizability are closely related to the valence orbital compactness measured by the sum of Mulliken electronegativities. The embedding approach used in this work makes it possible to quantify the effects of the crystalline environment on the chemical bond overlap properties. In the solid-state, the bond overlap charges are less polarizable, in cases of well-known ionic systems (provided by electronegativity differences), leading to smaller chemical bond covalency in solids than in diatomics. The spectroscopic properties of the polarizability of the electron density in the overlap region of a chemical bond could be measured in the 1-20 eV spectral region and could be used to characterize some bands in several spectra whose assignments are ambiguous or not available.

  8. Visual Identification of Light-Driven Breakage of the Silver-Dithiocarbamate Bond by Single Plasmonic Nanoprobes

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Peng Fei; Yuan, Bin Fang; Gao, Ming Xuan; Li, Rong Sheng; Ma, Jun; Zou, Hong Yan; Li, Yuan Fang; Li, Ming; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Insight into the nature of metal-sulfur bond, a meaningful one in life science, interface chemistry and organometallic chemistry, is interesting but challenging. By utilizing the localized surface plasmon resonance properties of silver nanoparticles, herein we visually identified the photosensitivity of silver-dithiocarbamate (Ag-DTC) bond by using dark field microscopic imaging (iDFM) technique at single nanoparticle level. It was found that the breakage of Ag-DTC bond could be accelerated effectively by light irradiation, followed by a pH-dependent horizontal or vertical degradation of the DTC molecules, in which an indispensable preoxidation process of the silver was at first disclosed. These findings suggest a visualization strategy at single plasmonic nanoparticle level which can be excellently applied to explore new stimulus-triggered reactions, and might also open a new way to understand traditional organic reaction mechanisms. PMID:26493773

  9. Visual Identification of Light-Driven Breakage of the Silver-Dithiocarbamate Bond by Single Plasmonic Nanoprobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peng Fei; Yuan, Bin Fang; Gao, Ming Xuan; Li, Rong Sheng; Ma, Jun; Zou, Hong Yan; Li, Yuan Fang; Li, Ming; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2015-10-01

    Insight into the nature of metal-sulfur bond, a meaningful one in life science, interface chemistry and organometallic chemistry, is interesting but challenging. By utilizing the localized surface plasmon resonance properties of silver nanoparticles, herein we visually identified the photosensitivity of silver-dithiocarbamate (Ag-DTC) bond by using dark field microscopic imaging (iDFM) technique at single nanoparticle level. It was found that the breakage of Ag-DTC bond could be accelerated effectively by light irradiation, followed by a pH-dependent horizontal or vertical degradation of the DTC molecules, in which an indispensable preoxidation process of the silver was at first disclosed. These findings suggest a visualization strategy at single plasmonic nanoparticle level which can be excellently applied to explore new stimulus-triggered reactions, and might also open a new way to understand traditional organic reaction mechanisms.

  10. A Wafer-Level Sn-Rich Au—Sn Bonding Technique and Its Application in Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Xu; Lv, Xing-Dong; Wei, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Zhe; Yang, Jin-Ling; Qi, Zhi-Mei; Yang, Fu-Hua

    2014-05-01

    Sn-rich Au—Sn solder bonding is systematically investigated. High shear strength (64MPa) and good hermeticity (a leak rate lower than 1 × 10-7 torr·l/s) are obtained for Au—Sn solder with 54 wt% Sn bonded at 310°C. The AuSn2 phase with the highest Vickers-hardness among the four stable intermetallic compounds of the Au—Sn system makes a major contribution to the high bonding strength. This bonding technique has been successfully used to package the Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) sensors. The Sn-rich Au—Sn solder bonding provides a reliable, low-cost, low-temperature and wafer-level hermetic packaging solution for the micro-electromechanical system devices and has potential applications in high-end biomedical sensors.

  11. Is There a Need to Discuss Atomic Orbital Overlap When Teaching Hydrogen-Halide Bond Strength and Acidity Trends in Organic Chemistry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devarajan, Deepa; Gustafson, Samantha J.; Bickelhaupt, F. Matthias; Ess, Daniel H.

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate organic chemistry textbooks and Internet websites use a variety of approaches for presenting and explaining the impact of halogen atom size on trends in bond strengths and/or acidity of hydrogen halides. In particular, several textbooks and Internet websites explain these trends by invoking decreasing orbital overlap between the…

  12. Singular characteristics and unique chemical bond activation mechanisms of photocatalytic reactions on plasmonic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopher, Phillip; Xin, Hongliang; Marimuthu, Andiappan; Linic, Suljo

    2012-12-01

    The field of heterogeneous photocatalysis has almost exclusively focused on semiconductor photocatalysts. Herein, we show that plasmonic metallic nanostructures represent a new family of photocatalysts. We demonstrate that these photocatalysts exhibit fundamentally different behaviour compared with semiconductors. First, we show that photocatalytic reaction rates on excited plasmonic metallic nanostructures exhibit a super-linear power law dependence on light intensity (rate ∝intensityn, with n > 1), at significantly lower intensity than required for super-linear behaviour on extended metal surfaces. We also demonstrate that, in sharp contrast to semiconductor photocatalysts, photocatalytic quantum efficiencies on plasmonic metallic nanostructures increase with light intensity and operating temperature. These unique characteristics of plasmonic metallic nanostructures suggest that this new family of photocatalysts could prove useful for many heterogeneous catalytic processes that cannot be activated using conventional thermal processes on metals or photocatalytic processes on semiconductors.

  13. The aspect ratio effect on plasmonic properties and biosensing of bonding mode in gold elliptical nanoring arrays.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chia-Yang; Chang, Kai-Hao; Wu, Che-Yao; Lee, Po-Tsung

    2013-06-17

    We investigate both numerically and experimentally the optical properties and biosensing of gold elliptical nanoring (ENR) arrays with various aspect ratios. The gold ENR exhibits a strong localized surface plasmon bonding mode in near-infrared region, whose peak wavelength is red-shifted as increasing the aspect ratio under longitudinal and transverse polarizations. Furthermore, the disk- and hole-like optical properties for longitudinal and transverse modes are observed, which cause different behaviors in field intensity enhancement. For biomolecule sensing, we find that both modes show increased surface sensitivities when enlarging the aspect ratio of gold ENR.

  14. Matching plasmon resonances to the C=C and C-H bonds in estradiol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbomson, Ifeoma G.; McMeekin, Scott; De La Rue, Richard; Johnson, Nigel P.

    2015-03-01

    We tune nanoantennas to resonate within mid-infrared wavelengths to match the vibrational resonances of C=C and C-H of the hormone estradiol. Modelling and fabrication of the nanoantennas produce plasmon resonances between 2 μm to 7 μm. The hormone estradiol was dissolved in ethanol and evaporated, leaving thickness of a few hundreds of nanometres on top of gold asymmetric split H-like shaped on a fused silica substrate. The reflectance was measured and a red-shift is recorded from the resonators plasmonic peaks. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is use to observe enhanced spectra of the stretching modes for the analyte which belongs to alkenyl biochemical group.

  15. Plasmonic band gap engineering of plasmon-exciton coupling.

    PubMed

    Karademir, Ertugrul; Balci, Sinan; Kocabas, Coskun; Aydinli, Atilla

    2014-10-01

    Controlling plasmon-exciton coupling through band gap engineering of plasmonic crystals is demonstrated in the Kretschmann configuration. When the flat metal surface is textured with a sinusoidal grating only in one direction, using laser interference lithography, it exhibits a plasmonic band gap because of the Bragg scattering of surface plasmon polaritons on the plasmonic crystals. The contrast of the grating profile determines the observed width of the plasmonic band gap and hence allows engineering of the plasmonic band gap. In this work, resonant coupling between the molecular resonance of a J-aggregate dye and the plasmonic resonance of a textured metal film is extensively studied through plasmonic band gap engineering. Polarization dependent spectroscopic reflection measurements probe the spectral overlap occurring between the molecular resonance and the plasmonic resonance. The results indicate that plasmon-exciton interaction is attenuated in the band gap region along the grating direction.

  16. Bonding and charge transfer plasmons of conductively bridged nanoparticles: The effects of junction conductance and nanoparticle morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koya, Alemayehu Nana; Lin, Jingquan

    2016-09-01

    A detailed study of charge transfer plasmon properties of conductively bridged nanoparticles is essential for designing artificial molecules and developing plasmonic sensors. In this report, we demonstrate spectral tuning and control of local field responses of conductively bridged and compositionally homogeneous plasmonic nanoparticles of various shapes and sizes. The scattering spectral peaks of connected nanoparticles are tuned by controlling inter-particle feed-gap, junction conductance, and nanoparticle morphology. The far-field spectral responses are further tuned by increasing the number of nanoparticles from dimer to trimer, and a generalized expression for charge transfer plasmon peak shift with junction geometry is developed for various shapes of nanotrimers. The corresponding near-field distributions of the linked nanoparticles also exhibit remarkable features. Specifically, the local field profiles of dimer nanoparticles calculated at the charge transfer wavelengths show strong interaction between the nanoparticles. On the other hand, in the bridged symmetrical nanotrimers, the central nanoparticles act as a bridge and only the rest two of the nanoparticles show bright modes. These findings suggest that using conductively bridged nanoaggregates could play a significant role in tuning far-field spectral responses of plasmonic nanostructures for practical applications in molecular sensing.

  17. Aluminum plasmonic photocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Qi; Wang, Chenxi; Huang, Hao; Li, Wan; Du, Deyang; Han, Di; Qiu, Teng; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of photocatalytic processes is dictated largely by plasmonic materials with the capability to enhance light absorption as well as the energy conversion efficiency. Herein, we demonstrate how to improve the plasmonic photocatalytic properties of TiO2/Al nano-void arrays by overlapping the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) modes with the TiO2 band gap. The plasmonic TiO2/Al arrays exhibit superior photocatalytic activity boasting an enhancement of 7.2 folds. The underlying mechanisms concerning the radiative energy transfer and interface energy transfer processes are discussed. Both processes occur at the TiO2/Al interface and their contributions to photocatalysis are evaluated. The results are important to the optimization of aluminum plasmonic materials in photocatalytic applications. PMID:26497411

  18. Plasmon hybridization in nanoparticle dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordlander, Peter; Prodan, Emil; Oubre, Chris

    2004-03-01

    We apply the recently developed plasmon hybridization method (Science 302(2003)419-422) to solid sphere and nanoshell dimers. The results provide a simple and intuitive description of how the energy and excitation cross sections of the dimer plasmons depend on nanoparticle separation, D. We show that the dimer plasmons can be viewed as bonding and antibonding combinations, i.e. hybridization of the individual nanoparticle plasmons. For large D, the shifts of the dipolar dimer plasmons essentially follow the interaction energy between two classical dipoles (1/D^3). As D becomes smaller, the shifts of the dipolar dimer plasmons becomes much stronger and varies much faster with D due to the interaction of the dipolar plasmon of an individual particle with higher energy multipolar plasmons of the other particle. For the heterodimer, the hybridization between the individual nanoparticle plasmons on the different particles result in dimer plasmons whose energies as a function of D exhibit avoided crossings and other interesting effects. The results are compared with FDTD calculations. Work supported by ARO, TATP and the Robert A. Welch Foundation

  19. Molecular Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Andrew J; Willets, Katherine A

    2016-06-12

    In this review, we survey recent advances in the field of molecular plasmonics beyond the traditional sensing modality. Molecular plasmonics is explored in the context of the complex interaction between plasmon resonances and molecules and the ability of molecules to support plasmons self-consistently. First, spectroscopic changes induced by the interaction between molecular and plasmonic resonances are discussed, followed by examples of how tuning molecular properties leads to active molecular plasmonic systems. Next, the role of the position and polarizability of a molecular adsorbate on surface-enhanced Raman scattering signals is examined experimentally and theoretically. Finally, we introduce recent research focused on using molecules as plasmonic materials. Each of these examples is intended to highlight the role of molecules as integral components in coupled molecule-plasmon systems, as well as to show the diversity of applications in molecular plasmonics.

  20. Molecular Plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Andrew J.; Willets, Katherine A.

    2016-06-01

    In this review, we survey recent advances in the field of molecular plasmonics beyond the traditional sensing modality. Molecular plasmonics is explored in the context of the complex interaction between plasmon resonances and molecules and the ability of molecules to support plasmons self-consistently. First, spectroscopic changes induced by the interaction between molecular and plasmonic resonances are discussed, followed by examples of how tuning molecular properties leads to active molecular plasmonic systems. Next, the role of the position and polarizability of a molecular adsorbate on surface-enhanced Raman scattering signals is examined experimentally and theoretically. Finally, we introduce recent research focused on using molecules as plasmonic materials. Each of these examples is intended to highlight the role of molecules as integral components in coupled molecule-plasmon systems, as well as to show the diversity of applications in molecular plasmonics.

  1. Graphene Plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, Shin; Abeysinghe, Don; Nader, Nima; Hendrickson, Joshua; Cleary, Justin; Elhamri, Said

    Plasmon, the collective free charge carrier oscillation, has been a popular research theme recently mostly associated with surface plasmon in metal nanoparticles. After the discovery of graphene, researchers soon began to study plasmonic effects with or within graphene, for instance, decorating graphene with metal nanoparticles to enhance optical processes via plasmonic field enhancement. Following that, people also gained interests in studying the intrinsic plasmon of graphene. Graphene, a tunable semimetal under field effect, demonstrates tunable plasmon resonances at room temperature, which enables new capabilities beyond those of metal-nanoparticle surface plasmons. In this project, we would like to show intrinsic graphene plasmon resonances in that we experimentally demonstrated polarization dependent and gate-bias tunable plasmon-resonance absorption in the mid-infrared regime of 5-14 um by utilizing an array of graphene nanoribbon resonators. By scaling nanoribbon width and charge densities, we probed graphene plasmons with plasmon resonance energy as high as 0.26 meV (2100 cm-1) for 40 nm wide nanoresonators. The result reveals the intriguing nature of graphene plasmon in graphene nanoribbons where the nanoribbon edge plays critical roles by introducing extra doping and damping the graphene plasmon resonance.

  2. A Kirchhoff solution to plasmon hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willingham, Britain; Link, Stephan

    2013-12-01

    Using Ohm's law, a solution to plasmon hybridization via Kirchoff's equations results in a simple and intuitive picture of a metal nanoparticle dimer as a capacitively coupled circuit. Calculated absorption spectra and surface charge densities show that dimers of different metallic composition support different super- and sub-radiant plasmons compared to homodimers. Strong screening of Coulomb interactions between nanoparticles of different metallic background prohibits the excitation of anti-bonding plasmons, while changes to the free electron conductivity upon a collective response result in coupled plasmon lifetimes which shift as a function of interparticle distance. Smaller separations then result in the longest lived plasmons.

  3. Shake for Sigma, Pray for Pi: Classroom Orbital Overlap Analogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dicks, Andrew P.

    2011-01-01

    An introductory organic classroom demonstration is discussed where analogies are made between common societal hand contact and covalent bond formation. A handshake signifies creation of a [sigma] bond ("head-on" orbital overlap), whereas the action of praying illustrates "sideways" overlap and generation of a [pi] bond. The nature of orbital and…

  4. Correlated optical measurements and plasmon mapping of silver nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Guiton, Beth S; Iberi, Vighter; Li, Shuzhou; Leonard, Donovan N; Parish, Chad M; Kotula, Paul G; Varela del Arco, Maria; Schatz, George C.; Pennycook, Stephen J; Camden, Jon P

    2011-01-01

    Plasmonics is a rapidly growing field, yet imaging of the plasmonic modes in complex nanoscale architectures is extremely challenging. Here we obtain spatial maps of the localized surface plasmon modes of high-aspect-ratio silver nanorods using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and correlate to optical data and classical electrodynamics calculations from the exact same particles. EELS mapping is thus demonstrated to be an invaluable technique for elucidating complex and overlapping plasmon modes.

  5. Correlated optical measurements and plasmon mapping of silver nanorods.

    PubMed

    Guiton, Beth S; Iberi, Vighter; Li, Shuzhou; Leonard, Donovan N; Parish, Chad M; Kotula, Paul G; Varela, Maria; Schatz, George C; Pennycook, Stephen J; Camden, Jon P

    2011-08-10

    Plasmonics is a rapidly growing field, yet imaging of the plasmonic modes in complex nanoscale architectures is extremely challenging. Here we obtain spatial maps of the localized surface plasmon modes of high-aspect-ratio silver nanorods using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and correlate to optical data and classical electrodynamics calculations from the exact same particles. EELS mapping is thus demonstrated to be an invaluable technique for elucidating complex and overlapping plasmon modes.

  6. Substrate phonon-mediated plasmon hybridization in coplanar graphene nanostructures for broadband plasmonic circuits.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoxia; Kong, Xiang-Tian; Bai, Bing; Li, Zhenjun; Hu, Hai; Qiu, Xiaohui; Dai, Qing

    2015-02-01

    The mode hybridization between adjacent graphene nanoribbons determines the integration density of graphene-based plasmonic devices. Here, plasmon hybridization in graphene nanostructures is demonstrated through the characterization of the coupling strength of plasmons in graphene nanoribbons as a function of charge density and inter-ribbon spacing using Fourier transform infrared microscopy. In combination with numerical simulations, it is shown that the plasmon coupling is strongly mediated by the substrate phonons. For polar substrates, the plasmon coupling strength is limited by the plasmon-phonon interactions. In contrast, a nonpolar substrate affects neither the energy distribution of the original plasmon modes in graphene nanostructures nor their plasmon interactions, which increases exponentially as the inter-ribbon spacing decreases. To further explore the potential of graphene broadband plasmonics on nonpolar substrates, a scheme is proposed that uses a metal-dielectric heterostructure to prevent the overlap of plasmons between neighboring graphene nanoribbons. The device structures retain the plasmon resonance frequency of the graphene ribbons and maximally isolate the plasmonic components from the surrounding electromagnetic environment, allowing modular design in integrated plasmonic circuits.

  7. Plasmonic Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Ryan T.

    2015-01-01

    The unique optical properties of plasmon resonant nanostructures enable exploration of nanoscale environments using relatively simple optical characterization techniques. For this reason, the field of plasmonics continues to garner the attention of the biosensing community. Biosensors based on propagating surface plasmon resonances (SPRs) in films are the most well-recognized plasmonic biosensors, but there is great potential for the new, developing technologies to surpass the robustness and popularity of film-based SPR sensing. This review surveys the current plasmonic biosensor landscape with emphasis on the basic operating principles of each plasmonic sensing technique and the practical considerations when developing a sensing platform with the various techniques. The “gold standard” film SPR technique is reviewed briefly, but special emphasis is devoted to the up-and-coming LSPR-based and plasmonically coupled sensor technology. PMID:25377594

  8. Coexistence of Scattering Enhancement and Suppression by Plasmonic Cavity Modes in Loaded Dimer Gap-Antennas

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Xiao, Jun-Jun; Li, Meili; Han, Dezhuan; Gao, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic nanoantenna is of promising applications in optical sensing and detection, enhancement of optical nonlinear effect, surface optical spectroscopy, photoemission, etc. Here we show that in a carefully-designed dimer gap-antenna made by two metallic nanorods, the longitudinal plasmon antenna mode (AM) of bonding dipoles can compete with the transverse plasmonic cavity modes (CMs), yielding dramatically enhanced or suppressed scattering efficiency, depending on the CMs symmetry characteristics. More specifically, it is demonstrated that an appropriately loaded gap layer enables substantial excitation of toroidal moment and its strong interaction with the AM dipole moment, resulting in Fano- or electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT)-like profile in the scattering spectrum. However, for CMs with nonzero azimuthal number, the spectrum features a cumulative signature of the respective AM and CM resonances. We supply both detailed near-field and far-field analysis, showing that the modal overlap and phase relationship between the fundamental moments of different order play a crucial role. Finally, we show that the resonance bands of the AM and CMs can be tuned by adjusting the geometry parameters and the permittivity of the load. Our results may be useful in plasmonic cloaking, spin-polarized directional light emission, ultra-sensitive optical sensing, and plasmon-mediated photoluminescence. PMID:26611726

  9. Coexistence of Scattering Enhancement and Suppression by Plasmonic Cavity Modes in Loaded Dimer Gap-Antennas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Xiao, Jun-Jun; Li, Meili; Han, Dezhuan; Gao, Lei

    2015-11-27

    Plasmonic nanoantenna is of promising applications in optical sensing and detection, enhancement of optical nonlinear effect, surface optical spectroscopy, photoemission, etc. Here we show that in a carefully-designed dimer gap-antenna made by two metallic nanorods, the longitudinal plasmon antenna mode (AM) of bonding dipoles can compete with the transverse plasmonic cavity modes (CMs), yielding dramatically enhanced or suppressed scattering efficiency, depending on the CMs symmetry characteristics. More specifically, it is demonstrated that an appropriately loaded gap layer enables substantial excitation of toroidal moment and its strong interaction with the AM dipole moment, resulting in Fano- or electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT)-like profile in the scattering spectrum. However, for CMs with nonzero azimuthal number, the spectrum features a cumulative signature of the respective AM and CM resonances. We supply both detailed near-field and far-field analysis, showing that the modal overlap and phase relationship between the fundamental moments of different order play a crucial role. Finally, we show that the resonance bands of the AM and CMs can be tuned by adjusting the geometry parameters and the permittivity of the load. Our results may be useful in plasmonic cloaking, spin-polarized directional light emission, ultra-sensitive optical sensing, and plasmon-mediated photoluminescence.

  10. Coexistence of Scattering Enhancement and Suppression by Plasmonic Cavity Modes in Loaded Dimer Gap-Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiang; Xiao, Jun-Jun; Li, Meili; Han, Dezhuan; Gao, Lei

    2015-11-01

    Plasmonic nanoantenna is of promising applications in optical sensing and detection, enhancement of optical nonlinear effect, surface optical spectroscopy, photoemission, etc. Here we show that in a carefully-designed dimer gap-antenna made by two metallic nanorods, the longitudinal plasmon antenna mode (AM) of bonding dipoles can compete with the transverse plasmonic cavity modes (CMs), yielding dramatically enhanced or suppressed scattering efficiency, depending on the CMs symmetry characteristics. More specifically, it is demonstrated that an appropriately loaded gap layer enables substantial excitation of toroidal moment and its strong interaction with the AM dipole moment, resulting in Fano- or electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT)-like profile in the scattering spectrum. However, for CMs with nonzero azimuthal number, the spectrum features a cumulative signature of the respective AM and CM resonances. We supply both detailed near-field and far-field analysis, showing that the modal overlap and phase relationship between the fundamental moments of different order play a crucial role. Finally, we show that the resonance bands of the AM and CMs can be tuned by adjusting the geometry parameters and the permittivity of the load. Our results may be useful in plasmonic cloaking, spin-polarized directional light emission, ultra-sensitive optical sensing, and plasmon-mediated photoluminescence.

  11. Overlap in Bibliographic Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hood, William W.; Wilson, Concepcion S.

    2003-01-01

    Examines the topic of Fuzzy Set Theory to determine the overlap of coverage in bibliographic databases. Highlights include examples of comparisons of database coverage; frequency distribution of the degree of overlap; records with maximum overlap; records unique to one database; intra-database duplicates; and overlap in the top ten databases.…

  12. Aluminium plasmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Gerard, Davy; Gray, Stephen K.

    2014-12-15

    In this study, we present an overview of 'aluminium plasmonics', i.e. the study of both fundamental and practical aspects of surface plasmon excitations in aluminium structures, in particular thin films and metal nanoparticles. After a brief introduction noting both some recent and historical contributions to aluminium plasmonics, we discuss the optical properties of aluminium and aluminium nanostructures and highlight a few selected studies in a host of areas ranging from fluorescence to data storage.

  13. Strong coupling between mid-infrared localized plasmons and phonons.

    PubMed

    Wan, Weiwei; Yang, Xiaodong; Gao, Jie

    2016-05-30

    We numerically and experimentally demonstrate strong coupling between the mid-infrared localized surface plasmon resonances supported by plasmonic metamaterials and the phonon vibrational resonances of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) molecules. The plasmonic resonances are tuned across the phonon resonance of PMMA molecules at 52 THz to observe the strong coupling, which manifests itself as an anti-crossing feature with two newly formed plasmon-phonon modes. It is also shown that the forbidden energy gap due to mode splitting is proportional to the overlapped optical power between the plasmonic resonance mode and the PMMA molecules, providing an effective approach for manipulating the coupling strength of light-matter interaction. PMID:27410151

  14. Gold nanodisk array surface plasmon resonance sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xueli

    Surface plasmon resonances in periodic metal nanostructures have been investigated for sensing applications over the last decade. The resonance wavelengths of the nanostructures are usually measured in the transmission or reflection spectrum for chemical and biological sensing. In this thesis, I introduce a nanoscale gap mediated surface plasmon resonance nanodisk array for displacement sensing and a super-period gold nanodisk grating enabled surface plasmon resonance spectrometer sensor. The super-period gold nanodisk grating has a small subwavelength period and a large diffraction grating period. Surface plasmon resonance spectra are measured in the first order diffraction spatial profiles captured by a charge-coupled device (CCD). A surface plasmon resonance sensor for the bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein nanolayer bonding is demonstrated by measuring the surface plasmon resonance shift in the first order diffraction spatial intensity profiles captured by the CCD.

  15. Absorption-induced scattering and surface plasmon out-coupling from absorber-coated plasmonic metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Petoukhoff, Christopher E; O'Carroll, Deirdre M

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between absorbers and plasmonic metasurfaces can give rise to unique optical properties not present for either of the individual materials and can influence the performance of a host of optical sensing and thin-film optoelectronic applications. Here we identify three distinct mode types of absorber-coated plasmonic metasurfaces: localized and propagating surface plasmons and a previously unidentified optical mode type called absorption-induced scattering. The extinction of the latter mode type can be tuned by controlling the morphology of the absorber coating and the spectral overlap of the absorber with the plasmonic modes. Furthermore, we show that surface plasmons are backscattered when the crystallinity of the absorber is low but are absorbed for more crystalline absorber coatings. This work furthers our understanding of light-matter interactions between absorbers and surface plasmons to enable practical optoelectronic applications of metasurfaces.

  16. Absorption-induced scattering and surface plasmon out-coupling from absorber-coated plasmonic metasurfaces

    PubMed Central

    Petoukhoff, Christopher E.; O'Carroll, Deirdre M.

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between absorbers and plasmonic metasurfaces can give rise to unique optical properties not present for either of the individual materials and can influence the performance of a host of optical sensing and thin-film optoelectronic applications. Here we identify three distinct mode types of absorber-coated plasmonic metasurfaces: localized and propagating surface plasmons and a previously unidentified optical mode type called absorption-induced scattering. The extinction of the latter mode type can be tuned by controlling the morphology of the absorber coating and the spectral overlap of the absorber with the plasmonic modes. Furthermore, we show that surface plasmons are backscattered when the crystallinity of the absorber is low but are absorbed for more crystalline absorber coatings. This work furthers our understanding of light–matter interactions between absorbers and surface plasmons to enable practical optoelectronic applications of metasurfaces. PMID:26271900

  17. Plasmonic photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuming; Chen, Yu Lim; Liu, Ru-Shi; Tsai, Din Ping

    2013-04-01

    Plasmonic photocatalysis has recently facilitated the rapid progress in enhancing photocatalytic efficiency under visible light irradiation, increasing the prospect of using sunlight for environmental and energy applications such as wastewater treatment, water splitting and carbon dioxide reduction. Plasmonic photocatalysis makes use of noble metal nanoparticles dispersed into semiconductor photocatalysts and possesses two prominent features-a Schottky junction and localized surface plasmonic resonance (LSPR). The former is of benefit to charge separation and transfer whereas the latter contributes to the strong absorption of visible light and the excitation of active charge carriers. This article aims to provide a systematic study of the fundamental physical mechanisms of plasmonic photocatalysis and to rationalize many experimental observations. In particular, we show that LSPR could boost the generation of electrons and holes in semiconductor photocatalysts through two different effects-the LSPR sensitization effect and the LSPR-powered bandgap breaking effect. By classifying the plasmonic photocatalytic systems in terms of their contact form and irradiation state, we show that the enhancement effects on different properties of photocatalysis can be well-explained and systematized. Moreover, we identify popular material systems of plasmonic photocatalysis that have shown excellent performance and elucidate their key features in the context of our proposed mechanisms and classifications.

  18. Molecular Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Lauchner, Adam; Schlather, Andrea E; Manjavacas, Alejandro; Cui, Yao; McClain, Michael J; Stec, Grant J; García de Abajo, F Javier; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2015-09-01

    Graphene supports surface plasmons that have been observed to be both electrically and geometrically tunable in the mid- to far-infrared spectral regions. In particular, it has been demonstrated that graphene plasmons can be tuned across a wide spectral range spanning from the mid-infrared to the terahertz. The identification of a general class of plasmonic excitations in systems containing only a few dozen atoms permits us to extend this versatility into the visible and ultraviolet. As appealing as this extension might be for active nanoscale manipulation of visible light, its realization constitutes a formidable technical challenge. We experimentally demonstrate the existence of molecular plasmon resonances in the visible for ionized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which we reversibly switch by adding, then removing, a single electron from the molecule. The charged PAHs display intense absorption in the visible regime with electrical and geometrical tunability analogous to the plasmonic resonances of much larger nanographene systems. Finally, we also use the switchable molecular plasmon in anthracene to demonstrate a proof-of-concept low-voltage electrochromic device.

  19. Plasmonically amplified fluorescence bioassay with microarray format

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogalic, S.; Hageneder, S.; Ctortecka, C.; Bauch, M.; Khan, I.; Preininger, Claudia; Sauer, U.; Dostalek, J.

    2015-05-01

    Plasmonic amplification of fluorescence signal in bioassays with microarray detection format is reported. A crossed relief diffraction grating was designed to couple an excitation laser beam to surface plasmons at the wavelength overlapping with the absorption and emission bands of fluorophore Dy647 that was used as a label. The surface of periodically corrugated sensor chip was coated with surface plasmon-supporting gold layer and a thin SU8 polymer film carrying epoxy groups. These groups were employed for the covalent immobilization of capture antibodies at arrays of spots. The plasmonic amplification of fluorescence signal on the developed microarray chip was tested by using interleukin 8 sandwich immunoassay. The readout was performed ex situ after drying the chip by using a commercial scanner with high numerical aperture collecting lens. Obtained results reveal the enhancement of fluorescence signal by a factor of 5 when compared to a regular glass chip.

  20. Plasmonics in nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zheyu; Zhu, Xing

    2013-07-26

    Plasmonics has developed into one of the rapidly growing research topics for nanophotonics. With advanced nanofabrication techniques, a broad variety of nanostructures can be designed and fabricated for plasmonic devices at nanoscale. Fundamental properties for both surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) and localized surface plasmons (LSP) arise a new insight and understanding for the electro-optical device investigations, such as plasmonic nanofocusing, low-loss plasmon waveguide and active plasmonic detectors for energy harvesting. Here, we review some typical functional plasmonic nanostructures and nanosmart devices emerging from our individual and collaborative research works.

  1. Cascaded plasmon-plasmon coupling mediated energy transfer across stratified metal-dielectric nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golmakaniyoon, Sepideh; Hernandez-Martinez, Pedro Ludwig; Demir, Hilmi Volkan; Sun, Xiao Wei

    2016-10-01

    Surface plasmon (SP) coupling has been successfully applied to nonradiative energy transfer via exciton-plasmon-exciton coupling in conventionally sandwiched donor-metal film-acceptor configurations. However, these structures lack the desired efficiency and suffer poor photoemission due to the high energy loss. Here, we show that the cascaded exciton-plasmon-plasmon-exciton coupling in stratified architecture enables an efficient energy transfer mechanism. The overlaps of the surface plasmon modes at the metal-dielectric and dielectric-metal interfaces allow for strong cross-coupling in comparison with the single metal film configuration. The proposed architecture has been demonstrated through the analytical modeling and numerical simulation of an oscillating dipole near the stratified nanostructure of metal-dielectric-metal-acceptor. Consistent with theoretical and numerical results, experimental measurements confirm at least 50% plasmon resonance energy transfer enhancement in the donor-metal-dielectric-metal-acceptor compared to the donor-metal-acceptor structure. Cascaded plasmon-plasmon coupling enables record high efficiency for exciton transfer through metallic structures.

  2. Cascaded plasmon-plasmon coupling mediated energy transfer across stratified metal-dielectric nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Golmakaniyoon, Sepideh; Hernandez-Martinez, Pedro Ludwig; Demir, Hilmi Volkan; Sun, Xiao Wei

    2016-01-01

    Surface plasmon (SP) coupling has been successfully applied to nonradiative energy transfer via exciton-plasmon-exciton coupling in conventionally sandwiched donor-metal film-acceptor configurations. However, these structures lack the desired efficiency and suffer poor photoemission due to the high energy loss. Here, we show that the cascaded exciton-plasmon-plasmon-exciton coupling in stratified architecture enables an efficient energy transfer mechanism. The overlaps of the surface plasmon modes at the metal-dielectric and dielectric-metal interfaces allow for strong cross-coupling in comparison with the single metal film configuration. The proposed architecture has been demonstrated through the analytical modeling and numerical simulation of an oscillating dipole near the stratified nanostructure of metal-dielectric-metal-acceptor. Consistent with theoretical and numerical results, experimental measurements confirm at least 50% plasmon resonance energy transfer enhancement in the donor-metal-dielectric-metal-acceptor compared to the donor-metal-acceptor structure. Cascaded plasmon-plasmon coupling enables record high efficiency for exciton transfer through metallic structures. PMID:27698422

  3. Illusion induced overlapped optics.

    PubMed

    Zang, XiaoFei; Shi, Cheng; Li, Zhou; Chen, Lin; Cai, Bin; Zhu, YiMing; Zhu, HaiBin

    2014-01-13

    The traditional transformation-based cloak seems like it can only hide objects by bending the incident electromagnetic waves around the hidden region. In this paper, we prove that invisible cloaks can be applied to realize the overlapped optics. No matter how many in-phase point sources are located in the hidden region, all of them can overlap each other (this can be considered as illusion effect), leading to the perfect optical interference effect. In addition, a singular parameter-independent cloak is also designed to obtain quasi-overlapped optics. Even more amazing of overlapped optics is that if N identical separated in-phase point sources covered with the illusion media, the total power outside the transformation region is N2I0 (not NI0) (I0 is the power of just one point source, and N is the number point sources), which seems violating the law of conservation of energy. A theoretical model based on interference effect is proposed to interpret the total power of these two kinds of overlapped optics effects. Our investigation may have wide applications in high power coherent laser beams, and multiple laser diodes, and so on.

  4. Illusion induced overlapped optics.

    PubMed

    Zang, XiaoFei; Shi, Cheng; Li, Zhou; Chen, Lin; Cai, Bin; Zhu, YiMing; Zhu, HaiBin

    2014-01-13

    The traditional transformation-based cloak seems like it can only hide objects by bending the incident electromagnetic waves around the hidden region. In this paper, we prove that invisible cloaks can be applied to realize the overlapped optics. No matter how many in-phase point sources are located in the hidden region, all of them can overlap each other (this can be considered as illusion effect), leading to the perfect optical interference effect. In addition, a singular parameter-independent cloak is also designed to obtain quasi-overlapped optics. Even more amazing of overlapped optics is that if N identical separated in-phase point sources covered with the illusion media, the total power outside the transformation region is N2I0 (not NI0) (I0 is the power of just one point source, and N is the number point sources), which seems violating the law of conservation of energy. A theoretical model based on interference effect is proposed to interpret the total power of these two kinds of overlapped optics effects. Our investigation may have wide applications in high power coherent laser beams, and multiple laser diodes, and so on. PMID:24515019

  5. Overlap among Environmental Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Betty

    1981-01-01

    Describes the methodology and results of a study comparing the overlap of Enviroline, Pollution, and the Environmental Periodicals Bibliography files through searches on acid rain, asbestos and water, diesel, glass recycling, Lake Erie, Concorde, reverse osmosis wastewater treatment cost, and Calspan. Nine tables are provided. (RBF)

  6. Spectrometer sensor using patterned nano-structure plasmon resonance grating (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hong; Tian, Xueli; Guo, Junpeng

    2016-03-01

    Localized surface plasmon resonance has been extensively investigated for biochemical sensor applications. In traditional localized surface plasmon resonance biosensors, resonance spectra were measured in the reflection or transmission from the nanostructure devices. In this work, we demonstrate a new surface plasmon resonance sensor platform with which the localized surface plasmon resonance and shift were measured by using a CCD imager instead of using an optical spectrometer. In additional to the metal nanostructures which support localized plasmon resonance, we pattern the nanostructures into diffraction gratings with super-wavelength grating periods. The nanostructure diffraction gratings support localized plasmon resonance and also diffract localized plasmon resonance radiations into non-zeroth order diffractions. Plasmon resonance spectrum and shift are measured with a CCD imager in one of the diffraction orders. The new plasmon resonance spectrometer sensor combines the functions of sensing and spectral analysis into one apparatus and is capable of real-time visualization of the biochemical bonding process with an imager.

  7. Controlling surface plasmon interference in branched silver nanowire structures.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hong; Xu, Hongxing

    2012-11-21

    Using quantum dot fluorescence imaging, we investigated the interference of surface plasmon beams in branched silver nanowire structures. Depending on the phases and polarizations of the incident light, interferences of plasmon beams modulate the plasmon propagation in the branched structures and the output light intensity in the distal ends. The interference visibility is strongly dependent on the incident polarization at the main wire terminal, and the mechanism is revealed by quantum dot fluorescence imaging of the near field distribution of propagating plasmons. The near field distribution pattern resulting from the beating of different plasmon modes plays a critical role in the plasmon interference. The overlap of the antinode in the near field pattern with the connection junction in the nanowire structure is required for a large interference visibility, since the overlap makes the electric field intensity difference of the two plasmon beams smaller. It is found that the plasmon interference is strongly dependent on the polarization of the excitation light at the main wire terminal, but weakly dependent on the polarization at the branch wire terminal.

  8. Towards Plasmonic Solar to Fuel Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, Dayton Thomas

    The need to renewably store and utilize energy from chemical bonds has grown with recent economic and environmental concerns. Plasmonically-enabled devices have shown promise in various photosynthetic processes due to their scalable, cost-effective, and robust performance. Utilizing charge carriers derived from localized surface plasmons, these devices can drive various photoelectrochemical (PEC) reactions, however at limited efficiencies due to incomplete solar absorption. To improve broadband solar absorption in wide bandgap semiconductors, the plasmon resonance of different metal nanostructures in the visible are synthesized using anodic and sol-gel templating methods. Preliminary results suggest that gold nanoparticles and helical metal nanowires are well suited for photosensitization of titania for visible light absorption. Characterization by UV-Visible spectrophotometry, scanning electron microscopy, and photoelectrochemical measurements indicate that these templated methods can be utilized as the basis for synthesizing a variety of photoelectrochemical devices as well as unique plasmonic materials for applications including energy storage, sensing, and catalysis.

  9. HUNTing the Overlap

    SciTech Connect

    Iancu, Costin; Parry, Husbands; Hargrove, Paul

    2005-07-08

    Hiding communication latency is an important optimization for parallel programs. Programmers or compilers achieve this by using non-blocking communication primitives and overlapping communication with computation or other communication operations. Using non-blocking communication raises two issues: performance and programmability. In terms of performance, optimizers need to find a good communication schedule and are sometimes constrained by lack of full application knowledge. In terms of programmability, efficiently managing non-blocking communication can prove cumbersome for complex applications. In this paper we present the design principles of HUNT, a runtime system designed to search and exploit some of the available overlap present at execution time in UPC programs. Using virtual memory support, our runtime implements demand-driven synchronization for data involved in communication operations. It also employs message decomposition and scheduling heuristics to transparently improve the non-blocking behavior of applications. We provide a user level implementation of HUNT on a variety of modern high performance computing systems. Results indicate that our approach is successful in finding some of the overlap available at execution time. While system and application characteristics influence performance, perhaps the determining factor is the time taken by the CPU to execute a signal handler. Demand driven synchronization at execution time eliminates the need for the explicit management of non-blocking communication. Besides increasing programmer productivity, this feature also simplifies compiler analysis for communication optimizations.

  10. Plasmon transmission through excitonic subwavelength gaps.

    PubMed

    Sukharev, Maxim; Nitzan, Abraham

    2016-04-14

    We study the transfer of electromagnetic energy across a subwavelength gap separating two co-axial metal nanorods. In the absence of spacer in the gap separating the rods, the system exhibits strong coupling behavior between longitudinal plasmons in the two rods. The nature and magnitude of this coupling are studied by varying various geometrical parameters. As a function of frequency, the transmission is dominated by a split longitudinal plasmon peak. The two hybrid modes are the dipole-like "bonding" mode characterized by a peak intensity in the gap and a quadrupole-like "antibonding" mode whose amplitude vanishes at the gap center. When the length of one rod is varied, this mode spectrum exhibits the familiar anti-crossing behavior that depends on the coupling strength determined by the gap width. When off-resonant 2-level emitters are placed in the gap, almost no effect on the frequency dependent transmission is observed. In contrast, when the molecular system is resonant with the plasmonic line shape, the transmission is strongly modified, showing characteristics of strong exciton-plasmon coupling. Most strongly modified is the transmission near the lower frequency "bonding" plasmon mode. The presence of resonant molecules in the gap affects not only the molecule-field interaction but also the spatial distribution of the field intensity and the electromagnetic energy flux across the junction. PMID:27083741

  11. Basics of quantum plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hieu Nguyen, Van; Nguyen, Bich Ha

    2015-01-01

    The present work is a topical review of the theoretical research on the quantum theory of plasmons and plasmon-photon interaction. The plasmons are defined as the quanta of the quantized plasmonic field. The corresponding classical plasmonic field was constructed on the basis of the study of collective oscillations of the electron gas in the solid. The electron-electron Coulomb interaction is taken into account. The explicit forms of the plasmon-photon interaction Lagrangian in canonical quantum mechanics and the plasmon-photon interaction action functional in the functional integral approach are derived. They all show that the interaction processes are nonlocal ones. The physical origin of the nonlocality is the complex structure of plasmons as composite quasiparticles: they cannot be considered as point particles, as was assumed in all phenomenological theories.

  12. Overlap extension PCR cloning.

    PubMed

    Bryksin, Anton; Matsumura, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Rising demand for recombinant proteins has motivated the development of efficient and reliable cloning methods. Here we show how a beginner can clone virtually any DNA insert into a plasmid of choice without the use of restriction endonucleases or T4 DNA ligase. Chimeric primers encoding plasmid sequence at the 5' ends and insert sequence at the 3' ends are designed and synthesized. Phusion(®) DNA polymerase is utilized to amplify the desired insert by PCR. The double-stranded product is subsequently employed as a pair of mega-primers in a PCR-like reaction with circular plasmids. The original plasmids are then destroyed in restriction digests with Dpn I. The product of the overlap extension PCR is used to transform competent Escherichia coli cells. Phusion(®) DNA polymerase is used for both the amplification and fusion reactions, so both steps can be monitored and optimized in the same way. PMID:23996437

  13. Edge Mode Coupling within a Plasmonic Nanoparticle

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The coupling of plasmonic nanoparticles can strongly modify their optical properties. Here, we show that the coupling of the edges within a single rectangular particle leads to mode splitting and the formation of bonding and antibonding edge modes. We are able to unambiguously designate the modes due to the high spatial resolution of electron microscopy-based electron energy loss spectroscopy and the comparison with numerical simulations. Our results provide simple guidelines for the interpretation and the design of plasmonic mode spectra. PMID:27427962

  14. Plasmonic solar water splitting.

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, S. C.; Thimsen, E.

    2012-01-01

    The study of the optoelectronic effects of plasmonic metal nanoparticles on semiconductors has led to compelling evidence for plasmon-enhanced water splitting. We review the relevant physics, device geometries, and research progress in this area. We focus on localized surface plasmons and their effects on semiconductors, particularly in terms of energy transfer, scattering, and hot electron transfer.

  15. Plasmonics and Electron Optics in Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Min Seok

    The field of plasmonics has been attracting wide interest because it has provided routes to guide and localize light at nanoscales by utilizing metals as its major building block. Meanwhile, graphene, a two-dimensional lattice of carbon atoms, has been regarded as an ideal material for electronic applications owing to its remarkably high carrier mobility and superior thermal properties. Both research fields have been growing rapidly, but quite independently. However, a closer look reveals that there are actually numerous similarities between them, and it is possible to extract useful applications from these analogies. Even more interestingly, these research fields are recently overlapping to create a new field of research, namely graphene plasmonics. In this thesis, we present a few examples of these intertwined topics. First, we investigate "rainbow trapping" structures, broadband plasmonic slow light systems composed of single or double negative materials. We clarify the mode-conversion mechanism and the light-trapping performance by analyzing the dispersion relation. We then show that electrons in graphene exhibit photonlike dynamics including Goos- Hanchen effect and the rainbow trapping effect, but quantitatively differently. To study the dynamics of graphene electrons numerically, we develop a finite-difference time domain simulator. We also present a way to enhance electron backscattering in graphene by engineering the dispersion of electron eigenmodes in a Kronig-Penney potential. Finally, we discuss physics of graphene plasmon cavities. We report the resonant mid-infrared transmission across a plasmonic waveguide gap that is governed by the Fano interference between transmission through plasmon modes in graphene and nonresonant background transmission. An ultracompact graphene plasmon cavity, which resonates at near-infrared telecommunication frequencies, is also proposed.

  16. Tunable plasmonic crystal

    DOEpatents

    Dyer, Gregory Conrad; Shaner, Eric A.; Reno, John L.; Aizin, Gregory

    2015-08-11

    A tunable plasmonic crystal comprises several periods in a two-dimensional electron or hole gas plasmonic medium that is both extremely subwavelength (.about..lamda./100) and tunable through the application of voltages to metal electrodes. Tuning of the plasmonic crystal band edges can be realized in materials such as semiconductors and graphene to actively control the plasmonic crystal dispersion in the terahertz and infrared spectral regions. The tunable plasmonic crystal provides a useful degree of freedom for applications in slow light devices, voltage-tunable waveguides, filters, ultra-sensitive direct and heterodyne THz detectors, and THz oscillators.

  17. Ultrafast hybrid plasmonics.

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederrecht, G. P.; Wurtz, G. A.; Bouhelier, A.; Univ. of North Florida; Univ. de Bourgogne

    2008-08-20

    We review our recent studies of electromagnetic coupling and associated temporal dynamics of molecular excitations with plasmonic resonances supported by either localized or extended planar geometries. We focus on coherent interactions between plasmon resonances and molecular excitations, which are experimentally challenging due to the very short ({approx}10-100 fs) coherence times of plasmons. Recent experimental results and theoretical analysis for observing and controlling coherences between molecular excitations and plasmonic polarizations are shown. Advances will explore new directions in ultrafast coherent control of molecular excited states and energy dissipation processes, as well as ultrafast addressing and switching in plasmonics-based circuit architectures.

  18. Overlapping left ventricular restoration.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshiro

    2009-06-01

    Cardiac transplantation, a final option of treatment for refractory heart failure, has not been a standard procedure in Japan especially, mainly because of the shortage of donors. However, surgical methods to restore native heart function, such as surgical ventricular restoration (SVR), are often effective for these cases. The Dor procedure has been used for ischemic cardiomyopathy cases presenting with broad akinetic segments. This is a fine method to exclude the scarred septum and to reduce the intraventricular cavity by encircling purse-string suture, but it may produce a postoperative spherical ventricular shape as a result of endoventricular patch repair. Also, partial left ventriculectomy is not recommended for non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy cases for now. A modification of these SVR and surgical approaches to functional mitral regurgitation has been named "overlapping ventriculoplasty" without endoventricular patch and resection of viable cardiac muscle, and "mitral complex reconstruction", which consists of mitral annuloplasty, papillary muscle approximation, and suspension. Although the long-term prognosis of these procedures is undetermined, they could be an important option, at least as an alternative bridge to transplantation. This review will describe the concepts and some technical aspects of these procedures for the end-stage heart. PMID:19474505

  19. Single-plasmon interferences.

    PubMed

    Dheur, Marie-Christine; Devaux, Eloïse; Ebbesen, Thomas W; Baron, Alexandre; Rodier, Jean-Claude; Hugonin, Jean-Paul; Lalanne, Philippe; Greffet, Jean-Jacques; Messin, Gaétan; Marquier, François

    2016-03-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons are electromagnetic waves coupled to collective electron oscillations propagating along metal-dielectric interfaces, exhibiting a bosonic character. Recent experiments involving surface plasmons guided by wires or stripes allowed the reproduction of quantum optics effects, such as antibunching with a single surface plasmon state, coalescence with a two-plasmon state, conservation of squeezing, or entanglement through plasmonic channels. We report the first direct demonstration of the wave-particle duality for a single surface plasmon freely propagating along a planar metal-air interface. We develop a platform that enables two complementary experiments, one revealing the particle behavior of the single-plasmon state through antibunching, and the other one where the interferences prove its wave nature. This result opens up new ways to exploit quantum conversion effects between different bosonic species as shown here with photons and polaritons. PMID:26998521

  20. Single-plasmon interferences.

    PubMed

    Dheur, Marie-Christine; Devaux, Eloïse; Ebbesen, Thomas W; Baron, Alexandre; Rodier, Jean-Claude; Hugonin, Jean-Paul; Lalanne, Philippe; Greffet, Jean-Jacques; Messin, Gaétan; Marquier, François

    2016-03-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons are electromagnetic waves coupled to collective electron oscillations propagating along metal-dielectric interfaces, exhibiting a bosonic character. Recent experiments involving surface plasmons guided by wires or stripes allowed the reproduction of quantum optics effects, such as antibunching with a single surface plasmon state, coalescence with a two-plasmon state, conservation of squeezing, or entanglement through plasmonic channels. We report the first direct demonstration of the wave-particle duality for a single surface plasmon freely propagating along a planar metal-air interface. We develop a platform that enables two complementary experiments, one revealing the particle behavior of the single-plasmon state through antibunching, and the other one where the interferences prove its wave nature. This result opens up new ways to exploit quantum conversion effects between different bosonic species as shown here with photons and polaritons.

  1. Single-plasmon interferences

    PubMed Central

    Dheur, Marie-Christine; Devaux, Eloïse; Ebbesen, Thomas W.; Baron, Alexandre; Rodier, Jean-Claude; Hugonin, Jean-Paul; Lalanne, Philippe; Greffet, Jean-Jacques; Messin, Gaétan; Marquier, François

    2016-01-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons are electromagnetic waves coupled to collective electron oscillations propagating along metal-dielectric interfaces, exhibiting a bosonic character. Recent experiments involving surface plasmons guided by wires or stripes allowed the reproduction of quantum optics effects, such as antibunching with a single surface plasmon state, coalescence with a two-plasmon state, conservation of squeezing, or entanglement through plasmonic channels. We report the first direct demonstration of the wave-particle duality for a single surface plasmon freely propagating along a planar metal-air interface. We develop a platform that enables two complementary experiments, one revealing the particle behavior of the single-plasmon state through antibunching, and the other one where the interferences prove its wave nature. This result opens up new ways to exploit quantum conversion effects between different bosonic species as shown here with photons and polaritons. PMID:26998521

  2. Cu nanoshells: effects of interband transitions on the nanoparticle plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Tam, Felicia; Grady, Nathaniel K; Halas, Naomi J

    2005-10-01

    The optical properties of metals arise both from optical excitation of interband transitions and their collective electronic, or plasmon, response. Here, we examine the optical properties of Cu, whose strong interband transitions dominate its optical response in the visible region of the spectrum, in a nanoshell geometry. This nanostructure permits the geometrical tuning of the nanoparticle plasmon energy relative to the onset of interband transitions in the metal. Spectral overlap of the interband transitions of Cu with the nanoshell plasmon resonance results in a striking double-peaked plasmon resonance, a unique phenomenon previously unobserved in other noble or coinage metal nanostructures. PMID:16853342

  3. Continuing relationships with the deceased: disentangling bonds and grief.

    PubMed

    Schut, Henk A W; Stroebe, Margaret S; Boelen, Paul A; Zijerveld, Annemieke M

    2006-10-01

    Some studies of the relationship between continuing bonds and grief intensity have claimed that continuing bonds lead to poor adaptation to bereavement. However, operationalizations of continuing bonds and grief intensity appear to overlap conceptually. Thus, it is still unclear what character the connection between continuing bonds and grief bears and how strong the relationship is. Three studies are reported, 2 of which examine the perception of conceptual overlap between continuing bonds and grief intensity, and 1 that examines whether reducing this perceived conceptual overlap affects the association between continuing bonds and grief intensity. In the first 2 studies, extent of perception of conceptual overlap was established, and subscales for the bonds and grief measures were derived that could be considered less overlapping. In the third study, relationships between bonds, grief, and well-being were calculated for the original scales and those reduced on the basis of deleted perceived overlap. When conceptual overlap was reduced, the relationship between grief and continuing bonds was slightly lower but not significantly so, as happened to the relationship between bonds and well-being. By contrast, the link between grief intensity and well-being did not diminish after deleting the overlapping items. These patterns suggest that future research should continue to explore whether the association between continuing bonds and grief intensity is due to conceptual overlap.

  4. Raman Scattering at Plasmonic Junctions Shorted by Conductive Molecular Bridges

    SciTech Connect

    El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hu, Dehong; Apkarian, V. Ara; Hess, Wayne P.

    2013-04-10

    Intensity spikes in Raman scattering, accompanied by switching between line spectra and band spectra, can be assigned to shorting the junction plasmon through molecular conductive bridges. This is demonstrated through Raman trajectories recorded at a plasmonic junction formed by a gold AFM tip in contact with a silver surface coated either with biphenyl-4,4’-dithiol or biphenyl-4-thiol. The fluctuations are absent in the monothiol. In effect, the making and breaking of chemical bonds is tracked.

  5. Optical coherence tomography with plasmon resonant nanorods of gold.

    PubMed

    Troutman, Timothy S; Barton, Jennifer K; Romanowski, Marek

    2007-06-01

    We explored plasmon resonant nanorods of gold as a contrast agent for optical coherence tomography (OCT). Nanorod suspensions were generated through wet chemical synthesis and characterized with spectrophotometry, transmission electron microscopy, and OCT. Polyacrylamide-based phantoms were generated with appropriate scattering and anisotropy coefficients (30 cm(-1) and 0.89, respectively) to image distribution of the contrast agent in an environment similar to that of tissue. The observed signal was dependent on whether the plasmon resonance peak overlapped the source bandwidth of the OCT, confirming the resonant character of enhancement. Gold nanorods with plasmon resonance wavelengths overlapping the OCT source yielded a signal-to-background ratio of 4.5 dB, relative to the tissue phantom. Strategies for OCT imaging with nanorods are discussed.

  6. Optical coherence tomography with plasmon resonant nanorods of gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troutman, Timothy S.; Barton, Jennifer K.; Romanowski, Marek

    2007-06-01

    We explored plasmon resonant nanorods of gold as a contrast agent for optical coherence tomography (OCT). Nanorod suspensions were generated through wet chemical synthesis and characterized with spectrophotometry, transmission electron microscopy, and OCT. Polyacrylamide-based phantoms were generated with appropriate scattering and anisotropy coefficients (30 cm-1 and 0.89, respectively) to image distribution of the contrast agent in an environment similar to that of tissue. The observed signal was dependent on whether the plasmon resonance peak overlapped the source bandwidth of the OCT, confirming the resonant character of enhancement. Gold nanorods with plasmon resonance wavelengths overlapping the OCT source yielded a signal-to-background ratio of 4.5 dB, relative to the tissue phantom. Strategies for OCT imaging with nanorods are discussed.

  7. Optical coherence tomography with plasmon resonant nanorods of gold.

    PubMed

    Troutman, Timothy S; Barton, Jennifer K; Romanowski, Marek

    2007-06-01

    We explored plasmon resonant nanorods of gold as a contrast agent for optical coherence tomography (OCT). Nanorod suspensions were generated through wet chemical synthesis and characterized with spectrophotometry, transmission electron microscopy, and OCT. Polyacrylamide-based phantoms were generated with appropriate scattering and anisotropy coefficients (30 cm(-1) and 0.89, respectively) to image distribution of the contrast agent in an environment similar to that of tissue. The observed signal was dependent on whether the plasmon resonance peak overlapped the source bandwidth of the OCT, confirming the resonant character of enhancement. Gold nanorods with plasmon resonance wavelengths overlapping the OCT source yielded a signal-to-background ratio of 4.5 dB, relative to the tissue phantom. Strategies for OCT imaging with nanorods are discussed. PMID:17546147

  8. Surface plasmon enhanced photoluminescence from copper nanoparticles: Influence of temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Yeshchenko, Oleg A. Bondarchuk, Illya S.; Losytskyy, Mykhaylo Yu.

    2014-08-07

    Anomalous temperature dependence of surface plasmon enhanced photoluminescence from copper nanoparticles embedded in a silica host matrix has been observed. The quantum yield of photoluminescence increases as the temperature increases. The key role of such an effect is the interplay between the surface plasmon resonance and the interband transitions in the copper nanoparticles occurring at change of the temperature. Namely, the increase of temperature leads to the red shift of the resonance. The shift leads to increase of the spectral overlap of the resonance with photoluminescence band of copper as well as to the decrease of plasmon damping caused by interband transitions. Such mechanisms lead to the increase of surface plasmon enhancement factor and, consequently, to increase of the quantum yield of the photoluminescence.

  9. Evaluating plasmonic transport in current-carrying silver nanowires.

    PubMed

    Song, Mingxia; Stolz, Arnaud; Zhang, Douguo; Arocas, Juan; Markey, Laurent; Colas des Francs, Gérard; Dujardin, Erik; Bouhelier, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Plasmonics is an emerging technology capable of simultaneously transporting a plasmonic signal and an electronic signal on the same information support. In this context, metal nanowires are especially desirable for realizing dense routing networks. A prerequisite to operate such shared nanowire-based platform relies on our ability to electrically contact individual metal nanowires and efficiently excite surface plasmon polaritons in this information support. In this article, we describe a protocol to bring electrical terminals to chemically-synthesized silver nanowires randomly distributed on a glass substrate. The positions of the nanowire ends with respect to predefined landmarks are precisely located using standard optical transmission microscopy before encapsulation in an electron-sensitive resist. Trenches representing the electrode layout are subsequently designed by electron-beam lithography. Metal electrodes are then fabricated by thermally evaporating a Cr/Au layer followed by a chemical lift-off. The contacted silver nanowires are finally transferred to a leakage radiation microscope for surface plasmon excitation and characterization. Surface plasmons are launched in the nanowires by focusing a near infrared laser beam on a diffraction-limited spot overlapping one nanowire extremity. For sufficiently large nanowires, the surface plasmon mode leaks into the glass substrate. This leakage radiation is readily detected, imaged, and analyzed in the different conjugate planes in leakage radiation microscopy. The electrical terminals do not affect the plasmon propagation. However, a current-induced morphological deterioration of the nanowire drastically degrades the flow of surface plasmons. The combination of surface plasmon leakage radiation microscopy with a simultaneous analysis of the nanowire electrical transport characteristics reveals the intrinsic limitations of such plasmonic circuitry. PMID:24378340

  10. Evaluating plasmonic transport in current-carrying silver nanowires.

    PubMed

    Song, Mingxia; Stolz, Arnaud; Zhang, Douguo; Arocas, Juan; Markey, Laurent; Colas des Francs, Gérard; Dujardin, Erik; Bouhelier, Alexandre

    2013-12-11

    Plasmonics is an emerging technology capable of simultaneously transporting a plasmonic signal and an electronic signal on the same information support. In this context, metal nanowires are especially desirable for realizing dense routing networks. A prerequisite to operate such shared nanowire-based platform relies on our ability to electrically contact individual metal nanowires and efficiently excite surface plasmon polaritons in this information support. In this article, we describe a protocol to bring electrical terminals to chemically-synthesized silver nanowires randomly distributed on a glass substrate. The positions of the nanowire ends with respect to predefined landmarks are precisely located using standard optical transmission microscopy before encapsulation in an electron-sensitive resist. Trenches representing the electrode layout are subsequently designed by electron-beam lithography. Metal electrodes are then fabricated by thermally evaporating a Cr/Au layer followed by a chemical lift-off. The contacted silver nanowires are finally transferred to a leakage radiation microscope for surface plasmon excitation and characterization. Surface plasmons are launched in the nanowires by focusing a near infrared laser beam on a diffraction-limited spot overlapping one nanowire extremity. For sufficiently large nanowires, the surface plasmon mode leaks into the glass substrate. This leakage radiation is readily detected, imaged, and analyzed in the different conjugate planes in leakage radiation microscopy. The electrical terminals do not affect the plasmon propagation. However, a current-induced morphological deterioration of the nanowire drastically degrades the flow of surface plasmons. The combination of surface plasmon leakage radiation microscopy with a simultaneous analysis of the nanowire electrical transport characteristics reveals the intrinsic limitations of such plasmonic circuitry.

  11. Overlapping clusters for distributed computation.

    SciTech Connect

    Mirrokni, Vahab; Andersen, Reid; Gleich, David F.

    2010-11-01

    Scalable, distributed algorithms must address communication problems. We investigate overlapping clusters, or vertex partitions that intersect, for graph computations. This setup stores more of the graph than required but then affords the ease of implementation of vertex partitioned algorithms. Our hope is that this technique allows us to reduce communication in a computation on a distributed graph. The motivation above draws on recent work in communication avoiding algorithms. Mohiyuddin et al. (SC09) design a matrix-powers kernel that gives rise to an overlapping partition. Fritzsche et al. (CSC2009) develop an overlapping clustering for a Schwarz method. Both techniques extend an initial partitioning with overlap. Our procedure generates overlap directly. Indeed, Schwarz methods are commonly used to capitalize on overlap. Elsewhere, overlapping communities (Ahn et al, Nature 2009; Mishra et al. WAW2007) are now a popular model of structure in social networks. These have long been studied in statistics (Cole and Wishart, CompJ 1970). We present two types of results: (i) an estimated swapping probability {rho}{infinity}; and (ii) the communication volume of a parallel PageRank solution (link-following {alpha} = 0.85) using an additive Schwarz method. The volume ratio is the amount of extra storage for the overlap (2 means we store the graph twice). Below, as the ratio increases, the swapping probability and PageRank communication volume decreases.

  12. EDITORIAL: Focus on Plasmonics FOCUS ON PLASMONICS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey; García-Vidal, Francisco

    2008-10-01

    Plasmonics is an emerging field in optics dealing with the so-called surface plasmons whose extraordinary properties are being both analyzed from a fundamental point of view and exploited for numerous technological applications. Surface plasmons associated with surface electron density oscillations decorating metal-dielectric interfaces were discovered by Rufus Ritchie in the 1950s. Since the seventies, the subwavelength confinement of electromagnetic fields as well as their enhancement inherent to the surface plasmon excitation has been widely used for spectroscopic purposes. Recent advances in nano-fabrication, characterization and modelling techniques have allowed unique properties of these surface electromagnetic modes to be explored with respect to subwavelength field localization and waveguiding, opening the path to truly nanoscale plasmonic optical devices. This area of investigation also has interesting links with research on photonic band gap materials and the field of optical metamaterials. Nowadays, plasmonics can be seen as a mature interdisciplinary area of research in which scientists coming from different backgrounds (chemistry, physics, optics and engineering) strive to discover and exploit new and exciting phenomena associated with surface plasmons. The already made and forthcoming discoveries will have impacts in many fields of science and technology, including not only photonics and materials science but also computation, biology and medicine, among others. This focus issue of New Journal of Physics is intended to cover all the aforementioned capabilities of surface plasmons by presenting a current overview of state-of-the-art advances achieved by the leading groups in this field of research. The below list of articles represents the first contributions to the collection and further additions will appear soon. Focus on Plasmonics Contents Nanoantenna array-induced fluorescence enhancement and reduced lifetimes Reuben M Bakker, Vladimir P Drachev

  13. A Model for the Chemical Bond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnasco, Valerio

    2004-01-01

    Bond stereochemistry in polyatomic hydrides is explained in terms of the principle of bond energies maximization, which yields X-H straight bonds and suggests the formation of appropriate sp hybrids on the central atom. An introduction to the electron charge distribution in molecules is given, and atomic, overlap, gross and formal charges are…

  14. Plasmonic nanoantenna hydrophones.

    PubMed

    Maksymov, Ivan S; Greentree, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound is a valuable biomedical imaging modality and diagnostic tool. Here we theoretically demonstrate that a single dipole plasmonic nanoantenna can be used as an optical hydrophone for MHz-range ultrasound. The nanoantenna is tuned to operate on a high-order plasmon mode, which provides an increased sensitivity to ultrasound in contrast to the usual approach of using the fundamental dipolar plasmon resonance. Plasmonic nanoantenna hydrophones may be useful for ultrasonic imaging of biological cells, cancer tissues or small blood vessels, as well as for Brillouin spectroscopy at the nanoscale. PMID:27612092

  15. Plasmonics: Loss and gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oulton, Rupert F.

    2012-04-01

    Providing sufficient gain to overcome loss remains a fundamental challenge for light amplification in miniaturized plasmonic devices. Ongoing research gives hope for a cautious but optimistic outlook.

  16. Plasmonic nanoantenna hydrophones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksymov, Ivan S.; Greentree, Andrew D.

    2016-09-01

    Ultrasound is a valuable biomedical imaging modality and diagnostic tool. Here we theoretically demonstrate that a single dipole plasmonic nanoantenna can be used as an optical hydrophone for MHz-range ultrasound. The nanoantenna is tuned to operate on a high-order plasmon mode, which provides an increased sensitivity to ultrasound in contrast to the usual approach of using the fundamental dipolar plasmon resonance. Plasmonic nanoantenna hydrophones may be useful for ultrasonic imaging of biological cells, cancer tissues or small blood vessels, as well as for Brillouin spectroscopy at the nanoscale.

  17. Plasmonic nanoantenna hydrophones

    PubMed Central

    Maksymov, Ivan S.; Greentree, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound is a valuable biomedical imaging modality and diagnostic tool. Here we theoretically demonstrate that a single dipole plasmonic nanoantenna can be used as an optical hydrophone for MHz-range ultrasound. The nanoantenna is tuned to operate on a high-order plasmon mode, which provides an increased sensitivity to ultrasound in contrast to the usual approach of using the fundamental dipolar plasmon resonance. Plasmonic nanoantenna hydrophones may be useful for ultrasonic imaging of biological cells, cancer tissues or small blood vessels, as well as for Brillouin spectroscopy at the nanoscale. PMID:27612092

  18. Nanomembrane-based plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakšić, Zoran; Vuković, Slobodan M.; Buha, Jelena; Matovic, Jovan

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the main properties and applications of nanomembrane-based plasmonic structures, including some results presented here for the first time. Artificial nanomembranes are a novel building block in micro- and nanosystems technologies. They represent quasi-two-dimensional (2D) freestanding structures thinner than 100 nm and with giant aspect ratios that often exceed 1,000,000. They may be fabricated as various quasi-2D metal-dielectric nanocomposites with tailorable properties; they are fully symmetric in an electromagnetic sense and support long-range surface plasmon polaritons. This makes nanomembranes a convenient platform for different plasmonic structures such as subwavelength plasmonic crystals and metamaterials and applications such as plasmon waveguides and ultrasensitive bio/chemical sensors. Among other advantages of nanomembrane plasmonics is the feasibility to fabricate flexible, transferable plasmonic guides applicable to different substrates and dynamically tunable through stretching. There are various approaches to multifunctionalization of nanomembranes for plasmonics, including the use of transparent conductive oxide nanoparticles, but also the incorporation of switchable ion channels. Since the natural counterpart of the artificial nanomembranes are cell membranes, the multifunctionalization of synthetic nanomembranes ensures the introduction of bionic principles into plasmonics, at the same time extending the toolbox of the available nanostructures, materials and functions.

  19. Bent Bonds and Multiple Bonds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Edward A.; Gillespie, Ronald J.

    1980-01-01

    Considers carbon-carbon multiple bonds in terms of Pauling's bent bond model, which allows direct calculation of double and triple bonds from the length of a CC single bond. Lengths of these multiple bonds are estimated from direct measurements on "bent-bond" models constructed of plastic tubing and standard kits. (CS)

  20. Directing fluorescence with plasmonic and photonic structures.

    PubMed

    Dutta Choudhury, Sharmistha; Badugu, Ramachandram; Lakowicz, Joseph R

    2015-08-18

    Fluorescence technology pervades all areas of chemical and biological sciences. In recent years, it is being realized that traditional fluorescence can be enriched in many ways by harnessing the power of plasmonic or photonic structures that have remarkable abilities to mold the flow of optical energy. Conventional fluorescence is omnidirectional in nature, which makes it difficult to capture the entire emission. Suitably designed emission directivity can improve collection efficiency and is desirable for many fluorescence-based applications like sensing, imaging, single molecule spectroscopy, and optical communication. By incorporating fluorophores in plasmonic or photonic substrates, it is possible to tailor the optical environment surrounding the fluorophores and to modify the spatial distribution of emission. This promising approach works on the principle of near-field interaction of fluorescence with spectrally overlapping optical modes present in the substrates. In this Account, we present our studies on directional emission with different kinds of planar metallic, dielectric, and hybrid structures. In metal-dielectric substrates, the coupling of fluorescence with surface plasmons leads to directional surface-plasmon-coupled emission with characteristic dispersion and polarization properties. In one-dimensional photonic crystals (1DPC), fluorophores can interact with Bloch surface waves, giving rise to sharply directional Bloch surface wave-coupled emission. The interaction of fluorescence with Fabry-Pérot-like modes in metal-dielectric-metal substrates and with Tamm states in plasmonic-photonic hybrid substrates provides beaming emission normal to the substrate surface. These interesting features are explained in the context of reflectivity dispersion diagrams, which provide a complete picture of the mode profiles and the corresponding coupled emission patterns. Other than planar substrates, specially fabricated plasmonic nanoantennas also have tremendous

  1. Disposable Plasmonics: Plastic Templated Plasmonic Metamaterials with Tunable Chirality.

    PubMed

    Karimullah, Affar S; Jack, Calum; Tullius, Ryan; Rotello, Vincent M; Cooke, Graeme; Gadegaard, Nikolaj; Barron, Laurence D; Kadodwala, Malcolm

    2015-10-01

    Development of low-cost disposable plasmonic substrates is vital for the applicability of plasmonic sensing. Such devices can be made using injection-molded templates to create plasmonic films. The elements of these plasmonic films are hybrid nanostructures composed of inverse and solid structures. Tuning the modal coupling between the two allows optimization of the optical properties for nanophotonic applications.

  2. On the Neuberger overlap operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boriçi, Artan

    1999-04-01

    We compute Neuberger's overlap operator by the Lanczos algorithm applied to the Wilson-Dirac operator. Locality of the operator for quenched QCD data and its eigenvalue spectrum in an instanton background are studied.

  3. Complex Plasmonic Nanostructures: Symmetry Breaking and Coupled Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassiter, J. Britt

    Metallic nanostructures support resonant oscillations of their conduction band electrons called localized surface plasmon resonances. Plasmons couple efficiently to light and have enabled a new class of technology for the manipulation of light at the nanoscale. Nanostructures that support plasmon resonances have the potential for a wide range of applications such as enhanced optical spectroscopy techniques for chemical- and bio-sensing, cancer diagnosis and therapy, metamaterials, and energy harvesting. As the field of plasmonics has progressed, these applications have become more sophisticated, requiring increasingly complex nanostructures. For example, coupled nanostructures of two or more nanoparticles are used extensively in plasmon-enhanced spectroscopy techniques because they exhibit extremely large optical field enhancements. Asymmetric nanostructures, such as nanocups (metallic semishells), have been shown to support magnetic modes that could be used in metamaterials applications. This class of complex plasmonic nanostructures holds great potential for both the observation of new physical phenomena and practical applications. This thesis will focus on the fabrication and characterization of several examples of these complex nanostructures using darkfield spectroscopy. The plasmon modes of a dimer consisting of two nanoshells are investigated in both the separated and conductively overlapping regimes and are interpreted using the plasmon hybridization model. Next, coupled nanoclusters of seven particles arranged in a hexagonal pattern are studied. It is found that these nanoclusters support Fano resonances due to the coupling and interference of degenerate subradiant and superradiant plasmon modes. These structures are found to have an extremely high sensitivity to the local dielectric environment, making them attractive for biosensing applications. Variations on the nanocluster geometry are then explored, and it is observed that by adding more particles and

  4. Ultra hybrid plasmonics: strong coupling of plexcitons with plasmon polaritons.

    PubMed

    Balci, Sinan; Kocabas, Coskun

    2015-07-15

    We report a ternary-coupled plasmonic system consisting of excitons of J-aggregated dye, localized surface plasmon polaritons of Ag nanoparticles, and propagating surface plasmon polaritons of continuous Ag film. J-aggregate dyes are uniformly self-assembled on colloidally synthesized Ag nanoprisms forming plexcitonic nanoparticles, which are placed at a distance nanometers away from the Ag thin film. The reflection measurements, corroborated by theoretical predictions, reveal that the strong coupling of plasmon polaritons and plexcitons results in a newly formed plasmon-exciton-plasmon hybridized state that we call here, reportedly for the first time, a plexcimon state. The hybrid plasmonic system shows dispersion characteristics similar to a coupled resonator optical waveguide. The group velocity of the plexcimon state approaches zero at the band edges. The ultrahybrid plasmonic system presented here is promising for a variety of light-matter interaction studies, including polariton lasers, plasmonic devices, plasmonic waveguiding, and spectroscopy.

  5. Ultraviolet surface plasmon-mediated low temperature hydrazine decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Siying; Sheldon, Matthew T.; Atwater, Harry A.; Liu, Wei-Guang; Jaramillo-Botero, Andres; Goddard, William Andrew

    2015-01-12

    Conventional methods require elevated temperatures in order to dissociate high-energy nitrogen bonds in precursor molecules such as ammonia or hydrazine used for nitride film growth. We report enhanced photodissociation of surface-absorbed hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}) molecules at low temperature by using ultraviolet surface plasmons to concentrate the exciting radiation. Plasmonic nanostructured aluminum substrates were designed to provide resonant near field concentration at λ = 248 nm (5 eV), corresponding to the maximum optical cross section for hydrogen abstraction from N{sub 2}H{sub 4}. We employed nanoimprint lithography to fabricate 1 mm × 1 mm arrays of the resonant plasmonic structures, and ultraviolet reflectance spectroscopy confirmed resonant extinction at 248 nm. Hydrazine was cryogenically adsorbed to the plasmonic substrate in a low-pressure ambient, and 5 eV surface plasmons were resonantly excited using a pulsed KrF laser. Mass spectrometry was used to characterize the photodissociation products and indicated a 6.2× overall enhancement in photodissociation yield for hydrazine adsorbed on plasmonic substrates compared with control substrates. The ultraviolet surface plasmon enhanced photodissociation demonstrated here may provide a valuable method to generate reactive precursors for deposition of nitride thin film materials at low temperatures.

  6. Super-Period Gold Nanodisc Grating-Enabled Surface Plasmon Resonance Spectrometer Sensor.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xueli; Guo, Hong; Bhatt, Ketan H; Zhao, Song Q; Wang, Yi; Guo, Junpeng

    2015-10-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a surface plasmon resonance spectrometer sensor by using an e-beam-patterned super-period gold nanodisc grating on a glass substrate. The super-period gold nanodisc grating has a small subwavelength period and a large diffraction grating period. The small subwavelength period enhances localized surface plasmon resonance, and the large diffraction grating period diffracts surface plasmon resonance radiation into different directions corresponding to different wavelengths. Surface plasmon resonance spectra are measured in the first order diffraction spatial profiles captured by a charge-coupled device (CCD) in addition to the traditional way of measurement using an external optical spectrometer in the zeroth order transmission. A surface plasmon resonance sensor for the bovine serum albumin protein nanolayer bonding is demonstrated by measuring the surface plasmon resonance shift in the first order diffraction spatial intensity profiles captured by the CCD.

  7. Active quantum plasmonics

    PubMed Central

    Marinica, Dana Codruta; Zapata, Mario; Nordlander, Peter; Kazansky, Andrey K.; M. Echenique, Pedro; Aizpurua, Javier; Borisov, Andrei G.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of localized surface plasmons to squeeze light and engineer nanoscale electromagnetic fields through electron-photon coupling at dimensions below the wavelength has turned plasmonics into a driving tool in a variety of technological applications, targeting novel and more efficient optoelectronic processes. In this context, the development of active control of plasmon excitations is a major fundamental and practical challenge. We propose a mechanism for fast and active control of the optical response of metallic nanostructures based on exploiting quantum effects in subnanometric plasmonic gaps. By applying an external dc bias across a narrow gap, a substantial change in the tunneling conductance across the junction can be induced at optical frequencies, which modifies the plasmonic resonances of the system in a reversible manner. We demonstrate the feasibility of the concept using time-dependent density functional theory calculations. Thus, along with two-dimensional structures, metal nanoparticle plasmonics can benefit from the reversibility, fast response time, and versatility of an active control strategy based on applied bias. The proposed electrical manipulation of light using quantum plasmonics establishes a new platform for many practical applications in optoelectronics. PMID:26824066

  8. Plasmonics without negative dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Giovampaola, Cristian; Engheta, Nader

    2016-05-01

    Plasmonic phenomena are exhibited in light-matter interaction involving materials whose real parts of permittivity functions attain negative values at operating wavelengths. However, such materials usually suffer from dissipative losses, thus limiting the performance of plasmon-based optical devices. Here, we utilize an alternative methodology that mimics a variety of plasmonic phenomena by exploiting the well-known structural dispersion of electromagnetic modes in bounded guided-wave structures filled with only materials with positive permittivity. A key issue in the design of such structures is prevention of mode coupling, which can be achieved by implementing thin metallic wires at proper interfaces. This method, which is more suitable for lower frequencies, allows designers to employ conventional dielectrics and highly conductive metals for which the loss is low at these frequencies, while achieving plasmonic features. We demonstrate, numerically and analytically, that this platform can provide surface plasmon polaritons, local plasmonic resonance, plasmonic cloaking, and epsilon-near-zero-based tunneling using conventional positive-dielectric materials.

  9. Active quantum plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Marinica, Dana Codruta; Zapata, Mario; Nordlander, Peter; Kazansky, Andrey K; M Echenique, Pedro; Aizpurua, Javier; Borisov, Andrei G

    2015-12-01

    The ability of localized surface plasmons to squeeze light and engineer nanoscale electromagnetic fields through electron-photon coupling at dimensions below the wavelength has turned plasmonics into a driving tool in a variety of technological applications, targeting novel and more efficient optoelectronic processes. In this context, the development of active control of plasmon excitations is a major fundamental and practical challenge. We propose a mechanism for fast and active control of the optical response of metallic nanostructures based on exploiting quantum effects in subnanometric plasmonic gaps. By applying an external dc bias across a narrow gap, a substantial change in the tunneling conductance across the junction can be induced at optical frequencies, which modifies the plasmonic resonances of the system in a reversible manner. We demonstrate the feasibility of the concept using time-dependent density functional theory calculations. Thus, along with two-dimensional structures, metal nanoparticle plasmonics can benefit from the reversibility, fast response time, and versatility of an active control strategy based on applied bias. The proposed electrical manipulation of light using quantum plasmonics establishes a new platform for many practical applications in optoelectronics.

  10. Active quantum plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Marinica, Dana Codruta; Zapata, Mario; Nordlander, Peter; Kazansky, Andrey K; M Echenique, Pedro; Aizpurua, Javier; Borisov, Andrei G

    2015-12-01

    The ability of localized surface plasmons to squeeze light and engineer nanoscale electromagnetic fields through electron-photon coupling at dimensions below the wavelength has turned plasmonics into a driving tool in a variety of technological applications, targeting novel and more efficient optoelectronic processes. In this context, the development of active control of plasmon excitations is a major fundamental and practical challenge. We propose a mechanism for fast and active control of the optical response of metallic nanostructures based on exploiting quantum effects in subnanometric plasmonic gaps. By applying an external dc bias across a narrow gap, a substantial change in the tunneling conductance across the junction can be induced at optical frequencies, which modifies the plasmonic resonances of the system in a reversible manner. We demonstrate the feasibility of the concept using time-dependent density functional theory calculations. Thus, along with two-dimensional structures, metal nanoparticle plasmonics can benefit from the reversibility, fast response time, and versatility of an active control strategy based on applied bias. The proposed electrical manipulation of light using quantum plasmonics establishes a new platform for many practical applications in optoelectronics. PMID:26824066

  11. Seeding for pervasively overlapping communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Conrad; Reid, Fergal; McDaid, Aaron; Hurley, Neil

    2011-06-01

    In some social and biological networks, the majority of nodes belong to multiple communities. It has recently been shown that a number of the algorithms specifically designed to detect overlapping communities do not perform well in such highly overlapping settings. Here, we consider one class of these algorithms, those which optimize a local fitness measure, typically by using a greedy heuristic to expand a seed into a community. We perform synthetic benchmarks which indicate that an appropriate seeding strategy becomes more important as the extent of community overlap increases. We find that distinct cliques provide the best seeds. We find further support for this seeding strategy with benchmarks on a Facebook network and the yeast interactome.

  12. Continuing Relationships with the Deceased: Disentangling Bonds and Grief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schut, Henk A. W.; Stroebe, Margaret S.; Boelen, Paul A.; Zijerveld, Annemieke M.

    2006-01-01

    Some studies of the relationship between continuing bonds and grief intensity have claimed that continuing bonds lead to poor adaptation to bereavement. However, operationalizations of continuing bonds and grief intensity appear to overlap conceptually. Thus, it is still unclear what character the connection between continuing bonds and grief…

  13. Plasmonic nanostructures: artificial molecules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Brandl, Daniel W; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2007-01-01

    This Account describes a new paradigm for the relationship between the geometry of metallic nanostructures and their optical properties. While the interaction of light with metallic nanoparticles is determined by their collective electronic or plasmon response, a compelling analogy exists between plasmon resonances of metallic nanoparticles and wave functions of simple atoms and molecules. Based on this insight, an entire family of plasmonic nanostructures, artificial molecules, has been developed whose optical properties can be understood within this picture: nanoparticles (nanoshells, nanoeggs, nanomatryushkas, nanorice), multi-nanoparticle assemblies (dimers, trimers, quadrumers), and a nanoparticle-over-metallic film, an electromagnetic analog of the spinless Anderson model. PMID:17226945

  14. EDITORIAL: Focus on terahertz plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahm, Marco; Nahata, Ajay; Akalin, Tahsin; Beruete, Miguel; Sorolla, Mario

    2015-10-01

    Plasmonics is one of the growing fields in modern photonics that has garnered increasing interest over the last few years. In this focus issue, the specific challenges concerning terahertz plasmonics have been addressed and most recent advances in this specific field have been highlighted. The articles demonstrate the diversity and the opportunities of this rich field by covering a variety of topics ranging from the propagation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) on artificially structures surfaces, 2D manipulation of surface plasmons and SPPs, plasmonic focusing, plasmonic high-Q resonators for sensing applications, plasmonically enhanced terahertz antennas to terahertz field manipulation by use of plasmonic structures. The articles substantiate the impact of plasmonics and its great innovative potential for terahertz technology. In memory of Professor Mario Sorolla Ayza.

  15. Hydrogen bonding in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Patricia A; Ashworth, Claire R; Matthews, Richard P

    2015-03-01

    Ionic liquids (IL) and hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) are two diverse fields for which there is a developing recognition of significant overlap. Doubly ionic H-bonds occur when a H-bond forms between a cation and anion, and are a key feature of ILs. Doubly ionic H-bonds represent a wide area of H-bonding which has yet to be fully recognised, characterised or explored. H-bonds in ILs (both protic and aprotic) are bifurcated and chelating, and unlike many molecular liquids a significant variety of distinct H-bonds are formed between different types and numbers of donor and acceptor sites within a given IL. Traditional more neutral H-bonds can also be formed in functionalised ILs, adding a further level of complexity. Ab initio computed parameters; association energies, partial charges, density descriptors as encompassed by the QTAIM methodology (ρBCP), qualitative molecular orbital theory and NBO analysis provide established and robust mechanisms for understanding and interpreting traditional neutral and ionic H-bonds. In this review the applicability and extension of these parameters to describe and quantify the doubly ionic H-bond has been explored. Estimating the H-bonding energy is difficult because at a fundamental level the H-bond and ionic interaction are coupled. The NBO and QTAIM methodologies, unlike the total energy, are local descriptors and therefore can be used to directly compare neutral, ionic and doubly ionic H-bonds. The charged nature of the ions influences the ionic characteristics of the H-bond and vice versa, in addition the close association of the ions leads to enhanced orbital overlap and covalent contributions. The charge on the ions raises the energy of the Ylp and lowers the energy of the X-H σ* NBOs resulting in greater charge transfer, strengthening the H-bond. Using this range of parameters and comparing doubly ionic H-bonds to more traditional neutral and ionic H-bonds it is clear that doubly ionic H-bonds cover the full range of weak

  16. Towards Quantum Plasmonic Networks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Holtfrerich, M.W.; Dowran, M.; Lawrie, Benjamin J; Pooser, Raphael C; Marino, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the transduction of macroscopic quantum entanglement by independent, distant plasmonic structures embedded in separate thin silver films. In particular, we show that the plasmon-mediated transmission through each film conserves spatially dependent, entangled quantum images, opening the door for the implementation of parallel quantum protocols, super-resolution imaging, and quantum plasmonic sensing geometries at the nanoscale level. The conservation of quantum information by the transduction process shows that continuous variable multi-mode entanglement is momentarily transferred from entangled beams of light to the space-like separated, completely independent plasmonic structures, thus providing a first important step toward establishing a multichannel quantum networkmore » across separate solid-state substrates.« less

  17. Towards Quantum Plasmonic Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Holtfrerich, M.W.; Dowran, M.; Lawrie, Benjamin J; Pooser, Raphael C; Marino, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the transduction of macroscopic quantum entanglement by independent, distant plasmonic structures embedded in separate thin silver films. In particular, we show that the plasmon-mediated transmission through each film conserves spatially dependent, entangled quantum images, opening the door for the implementation of parallel quantum protocols, super-resolution imaging, and quantum plasmonic sensing geometries at the nanoscale level. The conservation of quantum information by the transduction process shows that continuous variable multi-mode entanglement is momentarily transferred from entangled beams of light to the space-like separated, completely independent plasmonic structures, thus providing a first important step toward establishing a multichannel quantum network across separate solid-state substrates.

  18. Transformational plasmon optics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongmin; Zentgraf, Thomas; Bartal, Guy; Zhang, Xiang

    2010-06-01

    We propose and demonstrate efficiently molding surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) based on transformation optics. SPPs are surface modes of electromagnetic waves tightly bound at metal-dielectric interfaces, which allow us to scale optics beyond the diffraction limit. Taking advantage of transformation optics, here we show that the propagation of SPPs can be manipulated in a prescribed manner by careful control of the dielectric material properties adjacent to a metal. Since the metal properties are completely unaltered, this methodology provides a practical way for routing light at very small scales. For instance, our approach enables SPPs to travel at uneven and curved surfaces over a broad wavelength range, where SPPs would normally suffer significant scattering losses. In addition, a plasmonic 180 degrees waveguide bend and a plasmonic Luneburg lens with simple designs are presented. The unique design flexibility of the transformational plasmon optics introduced here may open a new door to nano optics and downscaling of photonic circuits.

  19. Toward quantum plasmonic networks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Holtfrerich, M. W.; Dowran, M.; Davidson, R.; Lawrie, B. J.; Pooser, R. C.; Marino, A. M.

    2016-08-30

    Here, we demonstrate the transduction of macroscopic quantum entanglement by independent, distant plasmonic structures embedded in separate thin silver films. In particular, we show that the plasmon-mediated transmission through each film conserves spatially dependent, entangled quantum images, opening the door for the implementation of parallel quantum protocols, super-resolution imaging, and quantum plasmonic sensing geometries at the nanoscale level. The conservation of quantum information by the transduction process shows that continuous variable multi-mode entanglement is momentarily transferred from entangled beams of light to the space-like separated, completely independent plasmonic structures, thus providing a first important step toward establishing a multichannel quantummore » network across separate solid-state substrates.« less

  20. Surface Plasmon Based Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wig, Andrew; Passian, Ali; Boudreaux, Philip; Ferrell, Tom

    2008-03-01

    A spectrometer that uses surface plasmon excitation in thin metal films to separate light into its component wavelengths is described. The use of surface plasmons as a dispersive medium sets this spectrometer apart from prism, grating, and interference based variants and allows for the miniaturization of this device. Theoretical and experimental results are presented for two different operation models. In the first case surface plasmon tunneling in the near field is used to provide transmission spectra of different broad band-pass, glass filters across the visible wavelength range with high stray-light rejection at low resolution as well as absorption spectra of chlorophyll extracted from a spinach leaf. The second model looks at the far field components of surface plasmon scattering.

  1. Nanobiosensing Using Plasmonic Nanoprobes

    PubMed Central

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the development and applications of plasmonics-active nanoprobes in biomedical diagnostics. Specific examples of detection techniques using surface-enhanced Raman scattering are presented to illustrate the usefulness and potential of the plasmonics nanoprobes for gene detection and nanobiosensing. The detection of specific target deoxyribonucleic acids sequences using a novel “molecular sentinel” nanoprobe method is presented and discussed in detail. PMID:24839386

  2. Nanobiosensing Using Plasmonic Nanoprobes.

    PubMed

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the development and applications of plasmonics-active nanoprobes in biomedical diagnostics. Specific examples of detection techniques using surface-enhanced Raman scattering are presented to illustrate the usefulness and potential of the plasmonics nanoprobes for gene detection and nanobiosensing. The detection of specific target deoxyribonucleic acids sequences using a novel "molecular sentinel" nanoprobe method is presented and discussed in detail.

  3. Multiscale plasmonic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henzie, Joel

    Metallic nanostructures are able to confine and manipulate electromagnetic fields because light can couple to free electron oscillations called surface plasmons (SPs). These plasmons exist on metal surfaces as localized (short-range) or as propagating (long-range) modes depending upon the size and geometry of the nanostructure. This dichotomy is primarily an issue of scale that has largely been studied with sample geometries dominated by one type of plasmon mode. We believe this difference in length scale provides a unique opportunity to design new plasmonic nanostructures with effective, tunable optical properties by organizing metallic building blocks over multiple length scales. This approach takes advantage of both propagating and confined plasmon modes in the same nanoscale system, with tunable coupling between different SPs. This dissertation describes a new set of techniques for high-throughput nanofabrication based on soft lithography. We have generated metallic structures that expand on the fundamental science of surface plasmons, and our major observations include: (i) metallic pyramids with nanoscale tips that exhibit multipolar optical resonances depending on the direction and polarization of the incident light. (ii) SP standing waves between microscale arrays of nanoscale holes that enhance light transmission through the holes by a factor of 8X. (iii) Plasmonic metamaterials that exhibit optical properties by changing the lattice spacings of subwavelength nanohole arrays. (iv) Ultra-narrow, hybridized plasmon resonances and far-field beaming with finite-arrays of nanoholes. Such unique metallic structures have established a better understanding of the relationship between localized and propagating SPs and now enable an accessible platform for applied studies in nanophotonics and single molecule imaging.

  4. Plasmonics for nanoimaging and nanospectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kawata, Satoshi

    2013-02-01

    The science of surface plasmon polaritons, known as "plasmonics," is reviewed from the viewpoint of applied spectroscopy. In this discussion, noble metals are regarded as reservoirs of photons exhibiting the functions of photon confinement and field enhancement at metallic nanostructures. The functions of surface plasmons are described in detail with an historical overview, and the applications of plasmonics to a variety of industry and sciences are shown. The slow light effect of surface plasmons is also discussed for nanoimaging capability of the near-field optical microscopy and tip-enhanced Raman microscopy. The future issues of plasmonics are also shown, including metamaterials and the extension to the ultraviolet and terahertz regions.

  5. Dirac-like plasmons in Ag nanopillar honeycomb lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Siying; Brenny, Benjamin; Hellstrom, Sondra; Coenen, Toon; Polman, Albert; Atwater, Harry

    2015-03-01

    Surface plasmons in honeycomb lattices of Ag nanoparticles exhibit Dirac-like band structures, similar to the electronic band structure of graphene. Full wave simulations for an infinite honeycomb lattice of silver nano-pillars reveal hybridization of localized plasmonic modes between two neighboring pillars and the consequent formation of bonding and anti-bonding modes that are energetically degenerate at Dirac points. Electromagnetic simulations reveal the existence of plasmonic edge states in finite width nanoribbons of the honeycomb nanoparticle lattice. Nanoscale architecture of the honeycomb lattice may provide a new way to control plasmon propagation by selective excitation of directional surface plasmon edge states without backscattering. Experimentally, we have utilized cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy to study angular emission patterns and construct band structures of the silver pillars in honeycomb lattices. In our initial CL measurement, silver pillars in honeycomb lattices, we have observed strong radiation patterns near the Brillouin zone edge, integrated over an interval of wavelength centered on the wavelength of the Dirac points.

  6. Plasmon-enhanced sub-wavelength laser ablation: plasmonic nanojets.

    PubMed

    Valev, Ventsislav K; Denkova, Denitza; Zheng, Xuezhi; Kuznetsov, Arseniy I; Reinhardt, Carsten; Chichkov, Boris N; Tsutsumanova, Gichka; Osley, Edward J; Petkov, Veselin; De Clercq, Ben; Silhanek, Alejandro V; Jeyaram, Yogesh; Volskiy, Vladimir; Warburton, Paul A; Vandenbosch, Guy A E; Russev, Stoyan; Aktsipetrov, Oleg A; Ameloot, Marcel; Moshchalkov, Victor V; Verbiest, Thierry

    2012-03-01

    In response to the incident light's electric field, the electron density oscillates in the plasmonic hotspots producing an electric current. Associated Ohmic losses raise the temperature of the material within the plasmonic hotspot above the melting point. A nanojet and nanosphere ejection can then be observed precisely from the plasmonic hotspots. PMID:22228434

  7. Clique graphs and overlapping communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, T. S.

    2010-12-01

    It is shown how to construct a clique graph in which properties of cliques of a fixed order in a given graph are represented by vertices in a weighted graph. Various definitions and motivations for these weights are given. The detection of communities or clusters is used to illustrate how a clique graph may be exploited. In particular a benchmark network is shown where clique graphs find the overlapping communities accurately while vertex partition methods fail.

  8. Semiconductor active plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendach, Stefan; Nötzel, Richard

    2013-12-01

    Plasmonics is a research area in nanophotonics attracting increasing interest due to the potential applications in sensing and detecting, sub-wavelength confinement of light, integrated circuits, and many others. In particular, when plasmonic structures such as metal nanostructures or highly doped semiconductor particles are combined with active semiconductor materials and nanostructures, novel exciting physics and applications arise. This special section on semiconductor active plasmonics covers several of the most important and complementary directions in the field. First is the modification of the optical properties of a semiconductor nanostructure due to the close proximity of a metallic film or nanostructure. These arise from the formation hybrid plasmon/exciton states and may lead to enhanced spontaneous emission rates, directional far field emission patterns, strong coupling phenomena, and many more. Second is the realization of sub-wavelength scale nanolasers by coupling a semiconductor gain medium with a plasmonic metallic cavity. Particular emphasis is given on the major technical challenges in the fabrication of these nanolasers, such as device patterning, surface passivation, and metal deposition. While the above topics address mainly active structures and devices operating in the visible or near-infrared wavelength region, in the third, the enhanced THz extinction by periodic arrays of semiconductor particles is discussed. This is based on the build-up of surface plasmon resonances in the doped semiconductor particles which can be resonantly coupled and widely tuned by the carrier density in the semiconductor. We believe these highly diverse aspects give insight into the wide variety of new physics and applications that semiconductor active plasmonics is offering. Finally, we would like to thank the IOP editorial staff, in particular Alice Malhador, for their support, and we would also like to thank the contributors for their efforts and participation

  9. Plasmon device design: Conversion from surface to junction plasmons with grating-couplers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, L. M.

    1984-01-01

    Scaling calculations and numerical studies are used to show that grating couplers provide effective energy transfer between surface plasmons and slower modes localized in the tunnel diodes. Within first order perturbation theory in grating amplitude, 90% efficiency energy transfer occurs within micrometers for realistic structures and materials parameters. Scaling laws are derived. Seventy to 90% of the electromagnetic field energy is concentrated in the oxide layer of an MOM diode after the energy is distributed by longer range modes that have less than 0.1% overlap with the tunneling region. The mode conversion allows the requirements separation for energy transport and power production by inelastic tunneling.

  10. Backside configured surface plasmonic enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Guiru; Lu, Xuejun; Vaillancourt, Jarrod

    2014-03-31

    In this work, we fabricated, measured and compared the quantum dots infrared photodetector enhancement by the top- and backside- configured plasmonic structures. The backside configured plasmonic structure can provide much higher device performance enhancement. Furthermore, the excitation of the surface plasmonic waves by the top- and backside- configured plasmonic structures was analyzed. Detailed simulation results of the electric field at different wavelength from top illumination and backside illumination were provided. The stronger electric field from the backside illumination attributed to the higher enhancement.

  11. Plasmons: Why Should We Care?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Dean J.; Xia, Younan

    2007-01-01

    The physical phenomenon of plasmons and the techniques that build upon them are discussed. Plasmon-enhanced applications are well-suited for introduction in physical chemistry and instrumental analysis classes and some methods of fabrication and analysis of plasmon-producing structures are simple for use in labs in general, physical and inorganic…

  12. Refractory plasmonics (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guler, Urcan; Boltasseva, Alexandra; Shalaev, Vladimir M.

    2016-04-01

    The use of plasmonic effects over a broad range of electromagnetic spectrum has been a challenge over the first few decades of research due to limited number of available materials. Recently, the efforts in the area has been concentrated on identifying and examining new material classes as the building blocks for optical technologies over a broader electromagnetic spectrum. Transition metal nitrides attract attention as plasmonic materials in the visible and infrared spectral regions with optical properties resembling gold. As refractory materials, nitrides can withstand heat induced physical phenomena as well as aggressive chemical environment. Adjustable dielectric permittivity of plasmonic nitrides allow fine tuning of optical properties for selected applications. In addition to favorable optical, physical and chemical properties; transition metal nitrides provide CMOS- and bio-compatibility. In this talk, novel designs and concepts based on refractory plasmonic materials for infrared applications will be presented. Additionally, light confinement at the nanoscale with refractory plasmonic antennas, spectral engineering of absorption and emission with metamaterials, and the use of colloidal solutions for a variety of applications will be discussed.

  13. Far-infrared graphene plasmonic crystals for plasmonic band engineering.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Kitty Y M; Chee, Jingyee; Yoon, Hosang; Song, Yi; Kong, Jing; Ham, Donhee

    2014-05-14

    We introduce far-infrared graphene plasmonic crystals. Periodic structural perturbation-in a proof-of-concept form of hexagonal lattice of apertures-of a continuous graphene medium alters delocalized plasmonic dynamics, creating plasmonic bands in a manner akin to photonic crystals. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy demonstrates band formation, where far-infrared irradiation excites a unique set of plasmonic bands selected by phase matching and symmetry-based selection rules. This band engineering may lead to a new class of graphene plasmonic devices.

  14. Bond Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollack, Rachel H.

    2000-01-01

    Notes trends toward increased borrowing by colleges and universities and offers guidelines for institutions that are considering issuing bonds to raise money for capital projects. Discussion covers advantages of using bond financing, how use of bonds impacts on traditional fund raising, other cautions and concerns, and some troubling aspects of…

  15. Sticker Bonding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Laura Corbin

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a science activity on the bonding of chemical compounds. Assigns students the role of either a cation or anion and asks them to write the ions they may bond with. Assesses students' understanding of charge, bonding, and other concepts. (YDS)

  16. Gap plasmon excitation in plasmonic waveguide using Si waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuda, Koji; Kamada, Shun; Okamoto, Toshihiro; Haraguchi, Masanobu

    2016-08-01

    Plasmonic waveguides have attracted considerable attention for application in highly integrated optical circuits since they can confine light to areas smaller than the diffraction limit. In this context, in order to realize a highly integrated optical circuit, we fabricate and evaluate the optical characteristics of a poly(methyl methacrylate) junction positioned between Si and plasmonic waveguides. For the plasmonic waveguide, we employ a gap plasmonic waveguide in which the energy of the plasmonic wave can be confined in order to reduce the scattering loss at the junction. By experimental measurement, we determine the coupling efficiency between the Si and gap plasmonic waveguides and the propagation length at the gap plasmonic waveguide to be 52.4% and 11.1 µm, respectively. These values agree with those obtained by the three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain simulation. We believe that our findings can significantly contribute to the development of highly integrated optical circuits.

  17. Active Nanorheology with Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyeon-Ho; Mark, Andrew G; Lee, Tung-Chun; Alarcón-Correa, Mariana; Eslami, Sahand; Qiu, Tian; Gibbs, John G; Fischer, Peer

    2016-08-10

    Nanoplasmonic systems are valued for their strong optical response and their small size. Most plasmonic sensors and systems to date have been rigid and passive. However, rendering these structures dynamic opens new possibilities for applications. Here we demonstrate that dynamic plasmonic nanoparticles can be used as mechanical sensors to selectively probe the rheological properties of a fluid in situ at the nanoscale and in microscopic volumes. We fabricate chiral magneto-plasmonic nanocolloids that can be actuated by an external magnetic field, which in turn allows for the direct and fast modulation of their distinct optical response. The method is robust and allows nanorheological measurements with a mechanical sensitivity of ∼0.1 cP, even in strongly absorbing fluids with an optical density of up to OD ∼ 3 (∼0.1% light transmittance) and in the presence of scatterers (e.g., 50% v/v red blood cells). PMID:27367304

  18. Single Nanoparticle Plasmonic Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Sriram, Manish; Zong, Kelly; Vivekchand, S. R. C.; Gooding, J. Justin

    2015-01-01

    The adoption of plasmonic nanomaterials in optical sensors, coupled with the advances in detection techniques, has opened the way for biosensing with single plasmonic particles. Single nanoparticle sensors offer the potential to analyse biochemical interactions at a single-molecule level, thereby allowing us to capture even more information than ensemble measurements. We introduce the concepts behind single nanoparticle sensing and how the localised surface plasmon resonances of these nanoparticles are dependent upon their materials, shape and size. Then we outline the different synthetic approaches, like citrate reduction, seed-mediated and seedless growth, that enable the synthesis of gold and silver nanospheres, nanorods, nanostars, nanoprisms and other nanostructures with tunable sizes. Further, we go into the aspects related to purification and functionalisation of nanoparticles, prior to the fabrication of sensing surfaces. Finally, the recent developments in single nanoparticle detection, spectroscopy and sensing applications are discussed. PMID:26473866

  19. Active Nanorheology with Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyeon-Ho; Mark, Andrew G; Lee, Tung-Chun; Alarcón-Correa, Mariana; Eslami, Sahand; Qiu, Tian; Gibbs, John G; Fischer, Peer

    2016-08-10

    Nanoplasmonic systems are valued for their strong optical response and their small size. Most plasmonic sensors and systems to date have been rigid and passive. However, rendering these structures dynamic opens new possibilities for applications. Here we demonstrate that dynamic plasmonic nanoparticles can be used as mechanical sensors to selectively probe the rheological properties of a fluid in situ at the nanoscale and in microscopic volumes. We fabricate chiral magneto-plasmonic nanocolloids that can be actuated by an external magnetic field, which in turn allows for the direct and fast modulation of their distinct optical response. The method is robust and allows nanorheological measurements with a mechanical sensitivity of ∼0.1 cP, even in strongly absorbing fluids with an optical density of up to OD ∼ 3 (∼0.1% light transmittance) and in the presence of scatterers (e.g., 50% v/v red blood cells).

  20. Single nanoparticle plasmonic sensors.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Manish; Zong, Kelly; Vivekchand, S R C; Gooding, J Justin

    2015-01-01

    The adoption of plasmonic nanomaterials in optical sensors, coupled with the advances in detection techniques, has opened the way for biosensing with single plasmonic particles. Single nanoparticle sensors offer the potential to analyse biochemical interactions at a single-molecule level, thereby allowing us to capture even more information than ensemble measurements. We introduce the concepts behind single nanoparticle sensing and how the localised surface plasmon resonances of these nanoparticles are dependent upon their materials, shape and size. Then we outline the different synthetic approaches, like citrate reduction, seed-mediated and seedless growth, that enable the synthesis of gold and silver nanospheres, nanorods, nanostars, nanoprisms and other nanostructures with tunable sizes. Further, we go into the aspects related to purification and functionalisation of nanoparticles, prior to the fabrication of sensing surfaces. Finally, the recent developments in single nanoparticle detection, spectroscopy and sensing applications are discussed. PMID:26473866

  1. Hospital mergers and market overlap.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, G R; Jones, V G

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To address two questions: What are the characteristics of hospitals that affect the likelihood of their being involved in a merger? What characteristics of particular pairs of hospitals affect the likelihood of the pair engaging in a merger? DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING: Hospitals in the 12 county region surrounding the San Francisco Bay during the period 1983 to 1992 were the focus of the study. Data were drawn from secondary sources, including the Lexis/Nexis database, the American Hospital Association, and the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development of the State of California. STUDY DESIGN: Seventeen hospital mergers during the study period were identified. A random sample of pairs of hospitals that did not merge was drawn to establish a statistically efficient control set. Models constructed from hypotheses regarding hospital and market characteristics believed to be related to merger likelihood were tested using logistic regression analysis. DATA COLLECTION: See Data Sources/Study Setting. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The analysis shows that the likelihood of a merger between a particular pair of hospitals is positively related to the degree of market overlap that exists between them. Furthermore, market overlap and performance difference interact in their effect on merger likelihood. In an analysis of individual hospitals, conditions of rivalry, hospital market share, and hospital size were not found to influence the likelihood that a hospital will engage in a merger. CONCLUSIONS: Mergers between hospitals are not driven directly by considerations of market power or efficiency as much as by the existence of specific merger opportunities in the hospitals' local markets. Market overlap is a condition that enables a merger to occur, but other factors, such as the relative performance levels of the hospitals in question and their ownership and teaching status, also play a role in influencing the likelihood that a merger will in fact take place. PMID

  2. Plasmons in QED vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, E. Yu.; Kudrin, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    The problem of longitudinal oscillations of an electric field and a charge polarization density in a quantum electrodynamics (QED) vacuum is considered. Within the framework of semiclassical analysis, we calculate time-periodic solutions of bosonized (1 +1 )-dimensional QED (massive Schwinger model). Applying the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization condition, we determine the mass spectrum of charge-zero bound states (plasmons) which correspond in quantum theory to the found classical solutions. We show that the existence of such plasmons does not contradict any fundamental physical laws and study qualitatively their excitation in a (3 +1 )-dimensional real world.

  3. Nanoporous plasmonic metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, J; Nyce, G W; Hodge, A M; Biener, M M; Hamza, A V; Maier, S A

    2007-05-24

    We review different routes for the generation of nanoporous metallic foams and films exhibiting well-defined pore size and short-range order. Dealloying and templating allows the generation of both two- and three-dimensional structures which promise a well defined plasmonic response determined by material constituents and porosity. Viewed in the context of metamaterials, the ease of fabrication of samples covering macroscopic dimensions is highly promising, and suggests more in-depth investigations of the plasmonic and photonic properties of this material system for photonic applications.

  4. Terahertz plasmonic Bessel beamformer

    SciTech Connect

    Monnai, Yasuaki; Shinoda, Hiroyuki; Jahn, David; Koch, Martin; Withayachumnankul, Withawat

    2015-01-12

    We experimentally demonstrate terahertz Bessel beamforming based on the concept of plasmonics. The proposed planar structure is made of concentric metallic grooves with a subwavelength spacing that couple to a point source to create tightly confined surface waves or spoof surface plasmon polaritons. Concentric scatterers periodically incorporated at a wavelength scale allow for launching the surface waves into free space to define a Bessel beam. The Bessel beam defined at 0.29 THz has been characterized through terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. This approach is capable of generating Bessel beams with planar structures as opposed to bulky axicon lenses and can be readily integrated with solid-state terahertz sources.

  5. Arbitrary bending plasmonic light waves.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Itai; Arie, Ady

    2014-01-17

    We demonstrate the generation of self-accelerating surface plasmon beams along arbitrary caustic curvatures. These plasmonic beams are excited by free-space beams through a two-dimensional binary plasmonic phase mask, which provides the missing momentum between the two beams in the direction of propagation and sets the required phase for the plasmonic beam in the transverse direction. We examine the cases of paraxial and nonparaxial curvatures and show that this highly versatile scheme can be designed to produce arbitrary plasmonic self-accelerating beams. Several different plasmonic beams, which accelerate along polynomial and exponential trajectories, are demonstrated both numerically and experimentally, with a direct measurement of the plasmonic light intensity using a near-field scanning optical microscope.

  6. “Deterministic” quantum plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Cuche, Aurélien; Mollet, Oriane; Drezet, Aurélien; Huant, Serge

    2010-11-10

    We demonstrate “deterministic” launching of propagative quantum surface-plasmon polaritons at freely chosen positions on gold plasmonic receptacles. This is achieved by using as a plasmon launcher a near-field scanning optical source made of a diamond nanocrystal with two nitrogen-vacancy color-center occupancy. Our demonstration relies on leakage-radiation microscopy of a thin homogeneous gold film and on near-field optical microscopy of a nanostructured thick gold film. Our work paves the way to future fundamental studies and applications in quantum plasmonics that require an accurate positioning of single-plasmon sources and may open a new branch in plasmonics and nanophotonics, namely scanning quantum plasmonics.

  7. [Asthma-COPD overlap syndrome].

    PubMed

    Odler, Balázs; Müller, Veronika

    2016-08-01

    Obstructive lung diseases represent a major health problem worldwide due to their high prevalence associated with elevated socioeconomic costs. Bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are chronic obstructive ventilatory disorders with airway inflammation, however they are separate nosological entities based on thedifferent development, diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, and prognostic features. However, these diseases may coexist and can be defined as the coexistence of increased variability of airflow in a patient with incompletely reversible airway obstruction. This phenotype is called asthma - chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome. The syndrome is a clinical and scientific challenge as the majority of these patients have been excluded from the clinical and pharmacological trials, thus well-defined clinical characteristics and therapeutic approaches are lacking. The aim of this review is to summarize the currently available literature focusing on pathophysiological and clinical features, and discuss possible therapeutic approaches of patients with asthma - chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(33), 1304-1313. PMID:27523313

  8. Item Overlap Correlations: Definitions, Interpretations, and Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Louis M.

    1994-01-01

    Item overlap coefficient (IOC) formulas are discussed, providing six warnings about their calculation and interpretation and some explanations of why item overlap influences the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory and the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory factor structures. (SLD)

  9. Overlap in Facebook Profiles Reflects Relationship Closeness.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, Araceli M; Wendel, Markie L; Crockett, Erin E

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the association between self-reported Inclusion of Other in the Self (IOS) and Facebook overlap. Ninety-two participants completed online measures of IOS and investment model constructs. Researchers then recorded Facebook data from participants' profile pages. Results from multilevel models revealed that IOS predicted Facebook overlap. Furthermore, Facebook overlap was associated with commitment and investment in ways comparable to self-reported IOS. These findings suggest that overlap in Facebook profiles can be used to measure relationship closeness.

  10. Asymmetric split nanorings for Fano induced plasmonic sensor in visible region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yao; Liao, Zhongwei

    2015-05-01

    Fano resonance exhibits high sensitivity and promising applications in the field of ultra-sensitive plasmonic sensor. In this work, the Fano lineshape in spectra of gold rectangular split nanorings (RSNRs) is investigated using the finite element method. The simulation results figure out the Fano lineshape could be modulated by the positions of split gap in RSNRs for symmetry breaking, which is explained by the plasmonic hybridization theory. Furthermore, the high order bonding plasmon mode H in absorption spectra exhibits high sensitivity in visible region. Our investigations here are beneficial for the design and application of ultra-sensitive LSPR sensor in visible region.

  11. Plasmonics for the industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lütolf, Fabian; Basset, Guillaume; Casari, Daniele; Luu-Dinh, Angélique; Gallinet, Benjamin

    2015-08-01

    Metallic nanostructures interact strongly with light through surface plasmon modes and many application fields have been proposed during the past decade, including light harvesting, sensing and structural colors. However, their implementation for the industry requires the development of up scalable and cost effective manufacturing processes. The fabrication at wafer scale of plasmonic nanostructures and metamaterials using nano imprint lithography is reported. After structuring, the evaporation of various plasmonic materials are performed with a tilt angle with respect to the substrate, which increases the light interactions with the different metallic layers as well as enlarges the design possibilities. A step and repeat process is used to increase further the area of nanostructured surface. The measured optical properties of the fabricated structures show a very good agreement compared to numerical calculations using the rigorous coupled wave analysis. These numerical calculations together which structural characterization, increase the process control and enable the design of the nanostructures for specific applications. In particular, nanostructures with a shape similar to split ring resonators and which support high order plasmonic modes showing Fano resonances are shown to be promising for sensing applications. The structures were designed in such a way to have a strong spectral response in the blue/green region of the visible spectrum. Examples of refractive index sensors and stretch sensors were finally discussed.

  12. Electrochemically Programmable Plasmonic Antennas.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shi; Zhang, Kai; Yu, Zhiping; Fan, Jonathan A

    2016-07-26

    Plasmonic antennas are building blocks in advanced nano-optical systems due to their ability to tailor optical response based on their geometry. We propose an electrochemical approach to program the optical properties of dipole antennas in a scalable, fast, and energy-efficient manner. These antennas comprise two arms, one serving as an anode and the other a cathode, separated by a solid electrolyte. As a voltage is applied between the antenna arms, a conductive filament either grows or dissolves within the electrolyte, modifying the antenna load. We probe the dynamics of stochastic filament formation and their effects on plasmonic mode programming using a combination of three-dimensional optical and electronic simulations. In particular, we identify device operation regimes in which the charge-transfer plasmon mode can be programmed to be "on" or "off." We also identify, unexpectedly, a strong correlation between DC filament resistance and charge-transfer plasmon mode frequency that is insensitive to the detailed filament morphology. We envision that the scalability of our electrochemical platform can generalize to large-area reconfigurable metamaterials and metasurfaces for on-chip and free-space applications. PMID:27328022

  13. Plasmonic colour laser printing.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Vannahme, Christoph; Højlund-Nielsen, Emil; Mortensen, N Asger; Kristensen, Anders

    2016-04-01

    Colour generation by plasmonic nanostructures and metasurfaces has several advantages over dye technology: reduced pixel area, sub-wavelength resolution and the production of bright and non-fading colours. However, plasmonic colour patterns need to be pre-designed and printed either by e-beam lithography (EBL) or focused ion beam (FIB), both expensive and not scalable processes that are not suitable for post-processing customization. Here we show a method of colour printing on nanoimprinted plasmonic metasurfaces using laser post-writing. Laser pulses induce transient local heat generation that leads to melting and reshaping of the imprinted nanostructures. Depending on the laser pulse energy density, different surface morphologies that support different plasmonic resonances leading to different colour appearances can be created. Using this technique we can print all primary colours with a speed of 1 ns per pixel, resolution up to 127,000 dots per inch (DPI) and power consumption down to 0.3 nJ per pixel. PMID:26657786

  14. Electrochemically Programmable Plasmonic Antennas.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shi; Zhang, Kai; Yu, Zhiping; Fan, Jonathan A

    2016-07-26

    Plasmonic antennas are building blocks in advanced nano-optical systems due to their ability to tailor optical response based on their geometry. We propose an electrochemical approach to program the optical properties of dipole antennas in a scalable, fast, and energy-efficient manner. These antennas comprise two arms, one serving as an anode and the other a cathode, separated by a solid electrolyte. As a voltage is applied between the antenna arms, a conductive filament either grows or dissolves within the electrolyte, modifying the antenna load. We probe the dynamics of stochastic filament formation and their effects on plasmonic mode programming using a combination of three-dimensional optical and electronic simulations. In particular, we identify device operation regimes in which the charge-transfer plasmon mode can be programmed to be "on" or "off." We also identify, unexpectedly, a strong correlation between DC filament resistance and charge-transfer plasmon mode frequency that is insensitive to the detailed filament morphology. We envision that the scalability of our electrochemical platform can generalize to large-area reconfigurable metamaterials and metasurfaces for on-chip and free-space applications.

  15. Plasmonic colour laser printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Vannahme, Christoph; Højlund-Nielsen, Emil; Mortensen, N. Asger; Kristensen, Anders

    2016-04-01

    Colour generation by plasmonic nanostructures and metasurfaces has several advantages over dye technology: reduced pixel area, sub-wavelength resolution and the production of bright and non-fading colours. However, plasmonic colour patterns need to be pre-designed and printed either by e-beam lithography (EBL) or focused ion beam (FIB), both expensive and not scalable processes that are not suitable for post-processing customization. Here we show a method of colour printing on nanoimprinted plasmonic metasurfaces using laser post-writing. Laser pulses induce transient local heat generation that leads to melting and reshaping of the imprinted nanostructures. Depending on the laser pulse energy density, different surface morphologies that support different plasmonic resonances leading to different colour appearances can be created. Using this technique we can print all primary colours with a speed of 1 ns per pixel, resolution up to 127,000 dots per inch (DPI) and power consumption down to 0.3 nJ per pixel.

  16. Designing plasmonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flammer, P. David

    This thesis describes methods and results used in the design of various photonic structures. The emphasis of this thesis is in the theoretical and computational methods employed in the design. Many structures were fabricated and experimentally characterized confirming simulation results. Theoretically, surface plasmons (SPs) or more generally the study of light near micro- or nano-fabricated metallic surfaces, play a major role in all structures in this thesis. An effective work-flow in designing "plasmonic" structures is detailed. Various applications are then discussed: (1) Enhanced transmission through subwavelength apertures in metal films; (2) long range SP hybrid waveguides for use in the area of micro-electronics; (3) circular micro-polarizers, which also filter for a specific color band, combined with linear polarizers for full stokes polarization imaging; and (4) using plasmonic couplers to increase efficiency of metal-insulator-metal (MIM) tunnel junction detectors for use in the low THz. General conclusions about the efficacy of plasmonic structures, or the lack thereof, in these applications are discussed.

  17. On Multigrid for Overlapping Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Henshaw, W

    2004-01-13

    The solution of elliptic partial differential equations on composite overlapping grids using multigrid is discussed. An approach is described that provides a fast and memory efficient scheme for the solution of boundary value problems in complex geometries. The key aspects of the new scheme are an automatic coarse grid generation algorithm, an adaptive smoothing technique for adjusting residuals on different component grids, and the use of local smoothing near interpolation boundaries. Other important features include optimizations for Cartesian component grids, the use of over-relaxed Red-Black smoothers and the generation of coarse grid operators through Galerkin averaging. Numerical results in two and three dimensions show that very good multigrid convergence rates can be obtained for both Dirichlet and Neumann/mixed boundary conditions. A comparison to Krylov based solvers shows that the multigrid solver can be much faster and require significantly less memory.

  18. Solar-Powered Plasmon-Enhanced Heterogeneous Catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naldoni, Alberto; Riboni, Francesca; Guler, Urcan; Boltasseva, Alexandra; Shalaev, Vladimir M.; Kildishev, Alexander V.

    2016-06-01

    Photocatalysis uses semiconductors to convert sunlight into chemical energy. Recent reports have shown that plasmonic nanostructures can be used to extend semiconductor light absorption or to drive direct photocatalysis with visible light at their surface. In this review, we discuss the fundamental decay pathway of localized surface plasmons in the context of driving solar-powered chemical reactions. We also review different nanophotonic approaches demonstrated for increasing solar-to-hydrogen conversion in photoelectrochemical water splitting, including experimental observations of enhanced reaction selectivity for reactions occurring at the metalsemiconductor interface. The enhanced reaction selectivity is highly dependent on the morphology, electronic properties, and spatial arrangement of composite nanostructures and their elements. In addition, we report on the particular features of photocatalytic reactions evolving at plasmonic metal surfaces and discuss the possibility of manipulating the reaction selectivity through the activation of targeted molecular bonds. Finally, using solar-to-hydrogen conversion techniques as an example, we quantify the efficacy metrics achievable in plasmon-driven photoelectrochemical systems and highlight some of the new directions that could lead to the practical implementation of solar-powered plasmon-based catalytic devices.

  19. Plasmon blockade in nanostructured graphene.

    PubMed

    Manjavacas, Alejandro; Nordlander, Peter; García de Abajo, F Javier

    2012-02-28

    Among the many extraordinary properties of graphene, its optical response allows one to easily tune its interaction with nearby molecules via electrostatic doping. The large confinement displayed by plasmons in graphene nanodisks makes it possible to reach the strong-coupling regime with a nearby quantum emitter, such as a quantum dot or a molecule. In this limit, the quantum emitter can introduce a significant plasmon-plasmon interaction, which gives rise to a plasmon blockade effect. This produces, in turn, strongly nonlinear absorption cross sections and modified statistics of the bosonic plasmon mode. We characterize these phenomena by studying the equal-time second-order correlation function g((2))(0), which plunges below a value of 1, thus revealing the existence of nonclassical plasmon states. The plasmon-emitter coupling, and therefore the plasmon blockade, can be efficiently controlled by tuning the doping level of the graphene nanodisks. The proposed system emerges as a new promising platform to realize quantum plasmonic devices capable of commuting optical signals at the single-photon/plasmon level.

  20. Resonance coupling in plasmonic nanomatryoshka homo- and heterodimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadivand, Arash; Sinha, Raju; Pala, Nezih

    2016-06-01

    Here, we examine the electromagnetic (EM) energy coupling and hybridization of plasmon resonances between closely spaced concentric nanoshells known as "nanomatryoshka" (NM) units in symmetric and antisymmetric compositions using the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) analysis. Utilizing plasmon hybridization model, we calculated the energy level diagrams and verified that, in the symmetric dimer (in-phase mode in a homodimer), plasmonic bonding modes are dominant and tunable within the considered bandwidth. In contrast, in the antisymmetric dimer (out-of-phase mode in a heterodimer), due to the lack of the geometrical symmetry, new antibonding modes appear in the extinction profile, and this condition gives rise to repeal of dipolar field coupling. We also studied the extinction spectra and positions of the antibonding and bonding modes excited due to the energy coupling between silver and gold NM units in a heterodimer structure. Our analysis suggest abnormal shifts in the higher energy modes. We propose a method to analyze the behavior of multilayer concentric nanoshell particles in an antisymmetric orientation employing full dielectric function calculations and the Drude model based on interband transitions in metallic components. This study provides a method to predict the behavior of the higher energy plasmon resonant modes in entirely antisymmetric structures such as compositional heterodimers.

  1. Quantum Mode Selectivity of Plasmon-Induced Water Splitting on Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lei; Wang, Fangwei; Meng, Sheng

    2016-05-24

    Plasmon induced water splitting is a promising research area with the potential for efficient conversion of solar to chemical energy, yet its atomic mechanism is not well understood. Here, ultrafast electron-nuclear dynamics of water splitting on gold nanoparticles upon exposure to femtosecond laser pulses was directly simulated using real time time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). Strong correlation between laser intensity, hot electron transfer, and reaction rates has been identified. The rate of water splitting is dependent not only on respective optical absorption strength, but also on the quantum oscillation mode of plasmonic excitation. Odd modes are more efficient than even modes, owing to faster decaying into hot electrons whose energy matches well the antibonding orbital of water. This finding suggests photocatalytic activity can be manipulated by adjusting the energy level of plasmon-induced hot carriers, through altering the cluster size and laser parameter, to better overlap adsorbate unoccupied level in plasmon-assisted photochemistry.

  2. High resolution grating-assisted surface plasmon resonance fiber optic aptasensor.

    PubMed

    Albert, Jacques; Lepinay, Sandrine; Caucheteur, Christophe; Derosa, Maria C

    2013-10-01

    A surface plasmon resonance biochemical sensor based on a tilted fiber Bragg grating imprinted in a single mode fiber core is demonstrated. A 30-50 nm thick gold coating on the cladding of the fiber provides the support for surface plasmon waves whose interaction with attached biomolecules is monitored at near infrared wavelengths near 1,550 nm. The transmission spectrum of the sensor provides a fine comb of narrowband resonances that overlap with the broader absorption of the surface plasmon and thus provide a unique tool to measure small shifts of the plasmon with high accuracy. The attachment on the gold surfaces of aptamers with specific affinities for proteins provides the required target-analyte system and is shown to be functional in the framework of our sensing device. The implementation of the sensor either as a stand-alone device or as part of a multi-sensor platform is also described.

  3. Distance and plasmon wavelength dependent fluorescence of molecules bound to silica-coated gold nanorods.

    PubMed

    Abadeer, Nardine S; Brennan, Marshall R; Wilson, William L; Murphy, Catherine J

    2014-08-26

    Plasmonic nanoparticles can strongly interact with adjacent fluorophores, resulting in plasmon-enhanced fluorescence or fluorescence quenching. This dipolar coupling is dependent upon nanoparticle composition, distance between the fluorophore and the plasmonic surface, the transition dipole orientation, and the degree of spectral overlap between the fluorophore's absorbance/emission and the surface plasmon band of the nanoparticles. In this work, we examine the distance and plasmon wavelength dependent fluorescence of an infrared dye ("IRDye") bound to silica-coated gold nanorods. Nanorods with plasmon band maxima ranging from 530 to 850 nm are synthesized and then coated with mesoporous silica shells 11-26 nm thick. IRDye is covalently attached to the nanoparticle surface via a click reaction. Steady-state fluorescence measurements demonstrate plasmon wavelength and silica shell thickness dependent fluorescence emission. Maximum fluorescence intensity, with approximately 10-fold enhancement, is observed with 17 nm shells when the nanorod plasmon maximum is resonant with IRDye absorption. Time-resolved photoluminescence reveals multiexponential decay and a sharp reduction in fluorescence lifetime with decreasing silica shell thickness and when the plasmon maximum is closer to IRDye absorption/emission. Control experiments are carried out to confirm that the observed changes in fluorescence are due to plasmonic interactions, is simply surface attachment. There is no change in fluorescence intensity or lifetime when IRDye is bound to mesoporous silica nanoparticles. In addition, IRDye loading is limited to maintain a distance between dye molecules on the surface to more than 9 nm, well above the Förster radius. This assures minimal dye-dye interactions on the surface of the nanoparticles.

  4. Hemodynamics in coronary arteries with overlapping stents.

    PubMed

    Rikhtegar, Farhad; Wyss, Christophe; Stok, Kathryn S; Poulikakos, Dimos; Müller, Ralph; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan

    2014-01-22

    Coronary artery stenosis is commonly treated by stent placement via percutaneous intervention, at times requiring multiple stents that may overlap. Stent overlap is associated with increased risk of adverse clinical outcome. While changes in local blood flow are suspected to play a role therein, hemodynamics in arteries with overlapping stents remain poorly understood. In this study we analyzed six cases of partially overlapping stents, placed ex vivo in porcine left coronary arteries and compared them to five cases with two non-overlapping stents. The stented vessel geometries were obtained by micro-computed tomography of corrosion casts. Flow and shear stress distribution were calculated using computational fluid dynamics. We observed a significant increase in the relative area exposed to low wall shear stress (WSS<0.5 Pa) in the overlapping stent segments compared both to areas without overlap in the same samples, as well as to non-overlapping stents. We further observed that the configuration of the overlapping stent struts relative to each other influenced the size of the low WSS area: positioning of the struts in the same axial location led to larger areas of low WSS compared to alternating struts. Our results indicate that the overlap geometry is by itself sufficient to cause unfavorable flow conditions that may worsen clinical outcome. While stent overlap cannot always be avoided, improved deployment strategies or stent designs could reduce the low WSS burden.

  5. Plasmonic interactions: from molecular plasmonics and Fano resonances to ferroplasmons.

    PubMed

    Passarelli, Nicolás; Pérez, Luis A; Coronado, Eduardo A

    2014-10-28

    Plasmon interactions are a subject of great interest from both the technological as well as the fundamental points of view. In this Perspective, we outline the great variety of physical phenomena that are produced by the interactions of localized surface plasmon resonance with molecular excitons; with other plasmonic nanostructures, particularly the Fano effect; and with nonplasmonic nanoparticles, such as the just-reported interaction with ferromagnetic nanoparticles. The theoretical as well as experimental challenges remaining to be elucidated are discussed.

  6. Overlapping Structures in Sensory-Motor Mappings

    PubMed Central

    Earland, Kevin; Lee, Mark; Shaw, Patricia; Law, James

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines a biologically-inspired representation technique designed for the support of sensory-motor learning in developmental robotics. An interesting feature of the many topographic neural sheets in the brain is that closely packed receptive fields must overlap in order to fully cover a spatial region. This raises interesting scientific questions with engineering implications: e.g. is overlap detrimental? does it have any benefits? This paper examines the effects and properties of overlap between elements arranged in arrays or maps. In particular we investigate how overlap affects the representation and transmission of spatial location information on and between topographic maps. Through a series of experiments we determine the conditions under which overlap offers advantages and identify useful ranges of overlap for building mappings in cognitive robotic systems. Our motivation is to understand the phenomena of overlap in order to provide guidance for application in sensory-motor learning robots. PMID:24392118

  7. Toward broadband plasmonics: tuning dispersion in rhombic plasmonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Gao, Hanwei; Odom, Teri W

    2010-02-23

    The angle-dependent optical properties of rhombic plasmonic crystals are described. We show that by extending the capabilities of soft interference lithography, subwavelength periodic patterns with arbitrary 2D Bravais lattices can be generated. In addition, we demonstrate that by lowering the plasmonic crystal lattice symmetry, degenerate conditions can be lifted and more plasmon bands can be excited within a fixed wavelength range. Degeneracies were also removed by changing the polar and azimuthal angles of excitation and visualized in dispersion diagrams. Anticrossings between different plasmon bands were observed to depend significantly on the local refractive index and the excitation direction.

  8. Simultaneous Visualization of Covalent and Noncovalent Interactions Using Regions of Density Overlap

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a density-dependent bonding descriptor that enables simultaneous visualization of both covalent and noncovalent interactions. The proposed quantity is tailored to reveal the regions of space, where the total electron density results from a strong overlap of shell, atomic, or molecular densities. We show that this approach is successful in describing a variety of bonding patterns as well as nonbonding contacts. The Density Overlap Regions Indicator (DORI) analysis is also exploited to visualize and quantify the concept of electronic compactness in supramolecular chemistry. In particular, the scalar field is used to compare the compactness in molecular crystals, with a special emphasis on quaterthiophene derivatives with enhanced charge mobilities. PMID:25221443

  9. Symmetry Engineering of Graphene Plasmonic Crystals.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Kitty Y M; Chee, Jingyee; Song, Yi; Kong, Jing; Ham, Donhee

    2015-08-12

    The dispersion relation of plasmons in graphene with a periodic lattice of apertures takes a band structure. Light incident on this plasmonic crystal excites only particular plasmonic modes in select bands. The selection rule is not only frequency/wavevector matching but also symmetry matching, where the symmetry of plasmonic modes originates from the point group symmetry of the lattice. We demonstrate versatile manipulation of light-plasmon coupling behaviors by engineering the symmetry of the graphene plasmonic crystal.

  10. High-Q plasmonic bottle microresonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Nasir, M. Narizee; Ding, Ming; Murugan, G. Senthil; Zervas, Michalis N.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a hybrid plasmonic bottle microresonator (PBMR) which supports whispering gallery modes (WGMs) along with surface plasmon waves (SPWs) for high performance optical sensor applications. The BMR was fabricated through "soften-and-compress" technique with a thin gold layer deposited on top of the resonator. A polarization-resolved measurement was set-up in order to fully characterize the fabricated PBMR. Initially, the uncoated BMR with waist diameter of 181 μm, stem diameter of 125 μm and length of 400 μm was fabricated and then gold film was deposited on the surface. Due to surface curvature, the gold film covering half of the BMR had a characteristic meniscus shape and maximum thickness of 30 nm. The meniscus provides appropriately tapered edges which facilitate the adiabatic transformation of BMR WGMs to SPWs and vice versa. This results in low transition losses, which combined with partially-metal-coated resonator, can result in high hybrid-PBMR Q's. The transmission spectra of the hybrid PBMR are dramatically different to the original uncoated BMR. Under TE(TM) excitation, the PBMR showed composite resonances with Q of ~2100(850) and almost identical ~ 3 nm FSR. We have accurately fitted the observed transmission resonances with Lorentzian-shaped curves and showed that the TE and TM excitations are actually composite resonances comprise of two and three partially overlapping resonances with Q's in excess of 2900 and 2500, respectively. To the best of our knowledge these are the highest Qs observed in plasmonic microcavities.

  11. The dark side of plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Gómez, D E; Teo, Z Q; Altissimo, M; Davis, T J; Earl, S; Roberts, A

    2013-08-14

    Plasmonic dark modes are pure near-field modes that can arise from the plasmon hybridization in a set of interacting nanoparticles. When compared to bright modes, dark modes have longer lifetimes due to their lack of a net dipole moment, making them attractive for a number of applications. We demonstrate the excitation and optical detection of a collective dark plasmonic mode from individual plasmonic trimers. The trimers consist of triangular arrangements of gold nanorods, and due to this symmetry, the lowest-energy dark plasmonic mode can interact with radially polarized light. The experimental data presented confirm the excitation of this mode, and its assignment is supported with an electrostatic approximation wherein these dark modes are described in terms of plasmon hybridization. The strong confinement of energy in these modes and their associated near fields hold great promise for achieving strong coupling to single photon emitters.

  12. Tunneling Plasmonics in Bilayer Graphene.

    PubMed

    Fei, Z; Iwinski, E G; Ni, G X; Zhang, L M; Bao, W; Rodin, A S; Lee, Y; Wagner, M; Liu, M K; Dai, S; Goldflam, M D; Thiemens, M; Keilmann, F; Lau, C N; Castro-Neto, A H; Fogler, M M; Basov, D N

    2015-08-12

    We report experimental signatures of plasmonic effects due to electron tunneling between adjacent graphene layers. At subnanometer separation, such layers can form either a strongly coupled bilayer graphene with a Bernal stacking or a weakly coupled double-layer graphene with a random stacking order. Effects due to interlayer tunneling dominate in the former case but are negligible in the latter. We found through infrared nanoimaging that bilayer graphene supports plasmons with a higher degree of confinement compared to single- and double-layer graphene, a direct consequence of interlayer tunneling. Moreover, we were able to shut off plasmons in bilayer graphene through gating within a wide voltage range. Theoretical modeling indicates that such a plasmon-off region is directly linked to a gapped insulating state of bilayer graphene, yet another implication of interlayer tunneling. Our work uncovers essential plasmonic properties in bilayer graphene and suggests a possibility to achieve novel plasmonic functionalities in graphene few-layers.

  13. Localized electric field of plasmonic nanoplatform enhanced photodynamic tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiye; Wen, Tao; Zhao, Ruifang; Liu, Xixi; Ji, Tianjiao; Wang, Hai; Shi, Xiaowei; Shi, Jian; Wei, Jingyan; Zhao, Yuliang; Wu, Xiaochun; Nie, Guangjun

    2014-11-25

    Near-infrared plasmonic nanoparticles demonstrate great potential in disease theranostic applications. Herein a nanoplatform, composed of mesoporous silica-coated gold nanorods (AuNRs), is tailor-designed to optimize the photodynamic therapy (PDT) for tumor based on the plasmonic effect. The surface plasmon resonance of AuNRs was fine-tuned to overlap with the exciton absorption of indocyanine green (ICG), a near-infrared photodynamic dye with poor photostability and low quantum yield. Such overlap greatly increases the singlet oxygen yield of incorporated ICG by maximizing the local field enhancement, and protecting the ICG molecules against photodegradation by virtue of the high absorption cross section of the AuNRs. The silica shell strongly increased ICG payload with the additional benefit of enhancing ICG photostability by facilitating the formation of ICG aggregates. As-fabricated AuNR@SiO2-ICG nanoplatform enables trimodal imaging, near-infrared fluorescence from ICG, and two-photon luminescence/photoacoustic tomography from the AuNRs. The integrated strategy significantly improved photodynamic destruction of breast tumor cells and inhibited the growth of orthotopic breast tumors in mice, with mild laser irradiation, through a synergistic effect of PDT and photothermal therapy. Our study highlights the effect of local field enhancement in PDT and demonstrates the importance of systematic design of nanoplatform to greatly enhancing the antitumor efficacy. PMID:25375193

  14. Spectral dependence of fluorescence near plasmon resonant metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yeechi

    The optical properties of fluorophores are significantly modified when placed within the near field (0--100 nm) of plasmon resonant metal nanostructures, due to the competition between increased decay rates and "hotspots" of concentrated electric fields. The decay rates and effective electric field intensities are highly dependent on the relative position of dye and metal and the overlap between plasmon resonance and dye absorption and emission. Understanding these dependencies can greatly improve the performance of biosensing and nanophotonic devices. In this dissertation, the fluorescence intensity of organic dyes and CdSe quantum dots near single metal nanoparticles is studied as a function of the local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of the nanoparticle. Single metal nanoparticles have narrow, well-defined, intense local surface plasmon resonances that are tunable across the visible spectrum by changes in size and shape. First, we show that organic dyes can be self-assembled on single silver nanoprisms into known configurations by the hybridization of thiolated DNA oligomers. We correlate the fluorescence intensity of the dyes to the LSPR of the individual nanoprism to which they are attached. For each of three different organic dyes, we observe a strong correlation between the fluorescence intensity of the dye and the degree of spectral overlap with the plasmon resonance of the nanoparticle. On average, we observe the brightest fluorescence from dyes attached to metal nanoparticles that have a LSPR scattering peak 40--120 meV higher in energy than the emission peak of the fluorophore. Second, the plasmon-enhanced fluorescence from CdSe/CdS/CdZnS/ZnS core/shell quantum dots is studied near a variety of silver and gold nanoparticles. With single-particle scattering spectroscopy, the localized surface plasmon resonance spectra of single metal nanoparticles is correlated with the photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectra of the nearby quantum dots. The PLE

  15. Plasmonic fiber-optic vector magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaochuan; Guo, Tuan; Zhang, Xuejun; Xu, Jian; Xie, Wenping; Nie, Ming; Wu, Qiang; Guan, Bai-Ou; Albert, Jacques

    2016-03-01

    A compact fiber-optic vector magnetometer based on directional scattering between polarized plasmon waves and ferro-magnetic nanoparticles is demonstrated. The sensor configuration reported in this work uses a short section of tilted fiber Bragg grating (TFBG) coated with a nanometer scale gold film and packaged with a magnetic fluid (Fe3O4) inside a capillary. The transmission spectrum of the sensor provides a fine comb of narrowband resonances that overlap with a broader absorption of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The wavelength of the SPR attenuation in transmission shows high sensitivity to slight perturbations by magnetic fields, due to the strong directional scattering between the SPR attenuated cladding modes and the magnetic fluid near the fiber surface. Both the orientation (2 nm/deg) and the intensity (1.8 nm/mT) of magnetic fields can be determined unambiguously from the TFBG spectrum. Temperature cross sensitivity can be referenced out by monitoring the wavelength of the core mode resonance simultaneously.

  16. EDITORIAL: Plasmas and plasmons: links in nanosilver Plasmas and plasmons: links in nanosilver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2013-03-01

    appearing in the 620-800 nm regions of the absorption spectra. A number of research groups have investigated the possibility of exploiting the plasmonic properties of silver and gold nanostructures for optoelectronic devices [7-9]. The advantages can be quite substantial. Researchers in Korea successfully used silver nanoparticles to obtain a 38% increase in performance of blue LEDs by using silver nanoparticles embedded in p-GaN [10]. The researchers attribute the improvement to an increase in the spontaneous emission rate through resonance coupling between the excitons in multiple quantum wells and localized surface plasmons in the silver nanoparticles. In their work reported in this issue Kostya Ostrikov and his co-authors bridge the link between microplasma-assisted electrochemical process parameters and the plasmonic response. As they point out, 'This is an important experimental step towards bringing together plasma chemistry and plasmonics' [1]. All-gas-phase plasma approaches have already been demonstrated for the synthesis of nanoparticles of other metals. X D Pi and colleagues from the University of Minnesota demonstrated how one simple gas-phase process could produce stable silicon nanocrystal emitters with tailored size and surface functionalization [11]. Previously silicon nanocrystals had been prone to emission instabilities in air. Now Ostrikov and colleagues at the University of Sydney, CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering in Australia and the Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas in China have studied microplasma-assisted electrochemical synthesis of Ag nanoparticles for plasmonic applications [1]. The synthesis uses moderate temperatures and atmospheric pressures and does not involve any toxic reducing agents. In addition they demonstrate how it allows control over nanoparticle size and interparticle spacing to optimize performance in device applications. Despite the overlap in plasma physics and the origins of plasmonic phenomena, studies of the

  17. Nanoantioxidant-driven plasmon enhanced proton-coupled electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiriou, Georgios A.; Blattmann, Christoph O.; Deligiannakis, Yiannis

    2015-12-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions involve the transfer of a proton and an electron and play an important role in a number of chemical and biological processes. Here, we describe a novel phenomenon, plasmon-enhanced PCET, which is manifested using SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles functionalized with gallic acid (GA), a natural antioxidant molecule that can perform PCET. These GA-functionalized nanoparticles show enhanced plasmonic response at near-IR wavelengths, due to particle agglomeration caused by the GA molecules. Near-IR laser irradiation induces strong local hot-spots on the SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles, as evidenced by surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This leads to plasmon energy transfer to the grafted GA molecules that lowers the GA-OH bond dissociation enthalpy by at least 2 kcal mol-1 and therefore facilitates PCET. The nanoparticle-driven plasmon-enhancement of PCET brings together the so far unrelated research domains of nanoplasmonics and electron/proton translocation with significant impact on applications based on interfacial electron/proton transfer.Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions involve the transfer of a proton and an electron and play an important role in a number of chemical and biological processes. Here, we describe a novel phenomenon, plasmon-enhanced PCET, which is manifested using SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles functionalized with gallic acid (GA), a natural antioxidant molecule that can perform PCET. These GA-functionalized nanoparticles show enhanced plasmonic response at near-IR wavelengths, due to particle agglomeration caused by the GA molecules. Near-IR laser irradiation induces strong local hot-spots on the SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles, as evidenced by surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This leads to plasmon energy transfer to the grafted GA molecules that lowers the GA-OH bond dissociation enthalpy by at least 2 kcal mol-1 and therefore facilitates PCET. The nanoparticle-driven plasmon

  18. Active modulation of nanorod plasmons.

    PubMed

    Khatua, Saumyakanti; Chang, Wei-Shun; Swanglap, Pattanawit; Olson, Jana; Link, Stephan

    2011-09-14

    Confining visible light to nanoscale dimensions has become possible with surface plasmons. Many plasmonic elements have already been realized. Nanorods, for example, function as efficient optical antennas. However, active control of the plasmonic response remains a roadblock for building optical analogues of electronic circuits. We present a new approach to modulate the polarized scattering intensities of individual gold nanorods by 100% using liquid crystals with applied voltages as low as 4 V. This novel effect is based on the transition from a homogeneous to a twisted nematic phase of the liquid crystal covering the nanorods. With our method it will be possible to actively control optical antennas as well as other plasmonic elements.

  19. Plasmonics for improved photovoltaic devices.

    PubMed

    Atwater, Harry A; Polman, Albert

    2010-03-01

    The emerging field of plasmonics has yielded methods for guiding and localizing light at the nanoscale, well below the scale of the wavelength of light in free space. Now plasmonics researchers are turning their attention to photovoltaics, where design approaches based on plasmonics can be used to improve absorption in photovoltaic devices, permitting a considerable reduction in the physical thickness of solar photovoltaic absorber layers, and yielding new options for solar-cell design. In this review, we survey recent advances at the intersection of plasmonics and photovoltaics and offer an outlook on the future of solar cells based on these principles.

  20. Optically Thin Metallic Films for High-Radiative-Efficiency Plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yi; Zhen, Bo; Hsu, Chia Wei; Miller, Owen D.; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin

    2016-07-01

    Plasmonics enables deep-subwavelength concentration of light and has become important for fundamental studies as well as real-life applications. Two major existing platforms of plasmonics are metallic nanoparticles and metallic films. Metallic nanoparticles allow efficient coupling to far field radiation, yet their synthesis typically leads to poor material quality. Metallic films offer substantially higher quality materials, but their coupling to radiation is typically jeopardized due to the large momentum mismatch with free space. Here, we propose and theoretically investigate optically thin metallic films as an ideal platform for high-radiative-efficiency plasmonics. For far-field scattering, adding a thin high-quality metallic substrate enables a higher quality factor while maintaining the localization and tunability that the nanoparticle provides. For near-field spontaneous emission, a thin metallic substrate, of high quality or not, greatly improves the field overlap between the emitter environment and propagating surface plasmons, enabling high-Purcell (total enhancement > $10^4$), high-quantum-yield (> 50 %) spontaneous emission, even as the gap size vanishes (3$\\sim$5 nm). The enhancement has almost spatially independent efficiency and does not suffer from quenching effects that commonly exist in previous structures.

  1. Optically Thin Metallic Films for High-Radiative-Efficiency Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Zhen, Bo; Hsu, Chia Wei; Miller, Owen D; Joannopoulos, John D; Soljačić, Marin

    2016-07-13

    Plasmonics enables deep-subwavelength concentration of light and has become important for fundamental studies as well as real-life applications. Two major existing platforms of plasmonics are metallic nanoparticles and metallic films. Metallic nanoparticles allow efficient coupling to far field radiation, yet their synthesis typically leads to poor material quality. Metallic films offer substantially higher quality materials, but their coupling to radiation is typically jeopardized due to the large momentum mismatch with free space. Here, we propose and theoretically investigate optically thin metallic films as an ideal platform for high-radiative-efficiency plasmonics. For far-field scattering, adding a thin high-quality metallic substrate enables a higher quality factor while maintaining the localization and tunability that the nanoparticle provides. For near-field spontaneous emission, a thin metallic substrate, of high quality or not, greatly improves the field overlap between the emitter environment and propagating surface plasmons, enabling high-Purcell (total enhancement >10(4)), high-quantum-yield (>50%) spontaneous emission, even as the gap size vanishes (3-5 nm). The enhancement has almost spatially independent efficiency and does not suffer from quenching effects that commonly exist in previous structures.

  2. Quantum plasmonic sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Wenjiang; Lawrie, Benjamin J.; Pooser, Raphael C.

    2015-11-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors can reach the quantum noise limit of the optical readout field in various configurations. We demonstrate that two-mode intensity squeezed states produce a further enhancement in sensitivity compared with a classical optical readout when the quantum noise is used to transduce an SPR sensor signal in the Kretschmann configuration. The quantum noise reduction between the twin beams when incident at an angle away from the plasmonic resonance, combined with quantum noise resulting from quantum anticorrelations when on resonance, results in an effective SPR-mediated modulation that yields a measured sensitivity 5 dB better than that with a classical optical readout in this configuration. The theoretical potential of this technique points to resolving particle concentrations with more accuracy than is possible via classical approaches to optical transduction.

  3. Plasmonic enhanced ultrafast switch.

    SciTech Connect

    Subramania,Ganapathi Subramanian; Reno, John Louis; Passmore, Brandon Scott; Harris, Tom.; Shaner, Eric Arthur; Barrick, Todd A.

    2009-09-01

    Ultrafast electronic switches fabricated from defective material have been used for several decades in order to produce picosecond electrical transients and TeraHertz radiation. Due to the ultrashort recombination time in the photoconductor materials used, these switches are inefficient and are ultimately limited by the amount of optical power that can be applied to the switch before self-destruction. The goal of this work is to create ultrafast (sub-picosecond response) photoconductive switches on GaAs that are enhanced through plasmonic coupling structures. Here, the plasmonic coupler primarily plays the role of being a radiation condenser which will cause carriers to be generated adjacent to metallic electrodes where they can more efficiently be collected.

  4. Understanding complex chiral plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiaoyang; Yue, Song; Liu, Na

    2015-11-01

    Chiral nanoplasmonics exhibits great potential for novel nanooptical devices due to the generation of a strong chiroptical response within nanoscale metallic structures. Recently, a number of different approaches have been utilized to create chiral nanoplasmonic structures. However, particularly for tailoring nanooptical chiral sensing devices, the understanding of the resulting chiroptical response when coupling chiral and achiral structures together is crucial and has not been completely understood to date. Here, we present a thorough and step-by-step experimental study to understand the intriguing chiral-achiral coupling scheme. We set up a hybrid plasmonic system, which bears resemblance to the 'host-guest' system in supramolecular chemistry to analyze and explain the complex chiral response both at the chiral and achiral plasmonic resonances. We also provide an elegant and simple analytical model, which can describe, predict, and comprehend the chiroptical spectra in detail. Our study will shed light on designing well-controlled chiral-achiral coupling platforms for reliable chiral sensing.

  5. Quantum plasmonic sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Wenjiang; Lawrie, Benjamin J.; Pooser, Raphael C.

    2015-11-04

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors can reach the quantum noise limit of the optical readout field in various configurations. We demonstrate that two-mode intensity squeezed states produce a further enhancement in sensitivity compared with a classical optical readout when the quantum noise is used to transduce an SPR sensor signal in the Kretschmann configuration. The quantum noise reduction between the twin beams when incident at an angle away from the plasmonic resonance, combined with quantum noise resulting from quantum anticorrelations when on resonance, results in an effective SPR-mediated modulation that yields a measured sensitivity 5 dB better than that with a classical optical readout in this configuration. Furthermore, the theoretical potential of this technique points to resolving particle concentrations with more accuracy than is possible via classical approaches to optical transduction.

  6. Quantum plasmonic sensing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fan, Wenjiang; Lawrie, Benjamin J.; Pooser, Raphael C.

    2015-11-04

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors can reach the quantum noise limit of the optical readout field in various configurations. We demonstrate that two-mode intensity squeezed states produce a further enhancement in sensitivity compared with a classical optical readout when the quantum noise is used to transduce an SPR sensor signal in the Kretschmann configuration. The quantum noise reduction between the twin beams when incident at an angle away from the plasmonic resonance, combined with quantum noise resulting from quantum anticorrelations when on resonance, results in an effective SPR-mediated modulation that yields a measured sensitivity 5 dB better than that withmore » a classical optical readout in this configuration. Furthermore, the theoretical potential of this technique points to resolving particle concentrations with more accuracy than is possible via classical approaches to optical transduction.« less

  7. Localized surface plasmon resonance modes on an asymmetric cylindrical nanorod dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui-Bing; Zhang, Zhi-Dong; Jiao, Guo-Tai; Xue, Chen-Yang; Yan, Shu-Bin; Wang, Hongyang

    2016-08-01

    The extinction spectra and electric field distribution of an asymmetric cylindrical nanorod dimer (ACND) are calculated by discrete dipole approximation. The ACND is composed of two linear orders of cylindrical silver nanorods with different radii and lengths. The effects of the structural parameters of ACND on the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) mode are also studied. Results show two resonance peaks in the extinction spectra of ACND: the higher-energy anti-bonding mode and the lower-energy bonding mode. The interaction of two hybridization plasmonic resonance modes produces an asymmetric line shape in the extinction spectra, which is considered to be a Fano resonance profile.

  8. Terahertz plasmonic composites.

    PubMed

    Nemat-Nasser, Syrus C; Amirkhizi, Alireza V; Padilla, Willie J; Basov, Dimitri N; Nemat-Nasser, Sia; Bruzewicz, Derek; Whitesides, George

    2007-03-01

    The dielectric response of a polymer matrix composite can be substantially modified and tuned within a broad frequency band by integrating within the material an artificial plasmon medium composed of periodically distributed, very thin, electrically conducting wires. In the microwave regime, such plasmon/polymer composites have been studied analytically, computationally, and experimentally. This work reports the design, fabrication, and characterization of similar composites for operation at terahertz frequencies. Such composites require significant reduction in the thickness and spacing of the wires. We used numerical modeling to design artificial effective plasmonic media with turn-on frequencies in the terahertz range. Prototype samples were produced by lithographically embedding very thin gold strips into a PDMS [poly(dimethylsiloxane)] matrix. These samples were characterized with a Fourier-transform infrared interferometer using the frequency-dependent transmission and Kramers-Kronig relations to determine the electromagnetic properties. We report the characterization results for a sample, demonstrating excellent agreement between theory, computer design, and experiment. To our knowledge this is the first demonstration of the possibility of creating composites with tuned dielectric response at terahertz frequencies. PMID:17500816

  9. Atomic Scale Plasmonic Switch.

    PubMed

    Emboras, Alexandros; Niegemann, Jens; Ma, Ping; Haffner, Christian; Pedersen, Andreas; Luisier, Mathieu; Hafner, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas; Leuthold, Juerg

    2016-01-13

    The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moore's law in the electronics industry. While electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling, similar to electronics, is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled plasmonic switch operating at the atomic scale. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocation of an individual or, at most, a few atoms in a plasmonic cavity. Depending on the location of the atom either of two distinct plasmonic cavity resonance states are supported. Experimental results show reversible digital optical switching with an extinction ratio of 9.2 dB and operation at room temperature up to MHz with femtojoule (fJ) power consumption for a single switch operation. This demonstration of an integrated quantum device allowing to control photons at the atomic level opens intriguing perspectives for a fully integrated and highly scalable chip platform, a platform where optics, electronics, and memory may be controlled at the single-atom level.

  10. Solving Partial Differential Equations on Overlapping Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Henshaw, W D

    2008-09-22

    We discuss the solution of partial differential equations (PDEs) on overlapping grids. This is a powerful technique for efficiently solving problems in complex, possibly moving, geometry. An overlapping grid consists of a set of structured grids that overlap and cover the computational domain. By allowing the grids to overlap, grids for complex geometries can be more easily constructed. The overlapping grid approach can also be used to remove coordinate singularities by, for example, covering a sphere with two or more patches. We describe the application of the overlapping grid approach to a variety of different problems. These include the solution of incompressible fluid flows with moving and deforming geometry, the solution of high-speed compressible reactive flow with rigid bodies using adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), and the solution of the time-domain Maxwell's equations of electromagnetism.

  11. Determination of overlap in lidar systems.

    PubMed

    Vande Hey, Joshua; Coupland, Jeremy; Foo, Ming Hui; Richards, James; Sandford, Andrew

    2011-10-20

    The overlap profile, also known as crossover function or geometric form factor, is often a source of uncertainty for lidar measurements. This paper describes a method for measuring the overlap by presenting the lidar with a virtual cloud through the use of an imaging system. Results show good agreement with horizontal hard target lidar measurements and with geometric overlap calculated for the ideal aberration-free case. PMID:22015406

  12. Terahertz plasmon and surface-plasmon modes in hollow nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yiming; Xu, Wen; Zhang, Yaya; Hu, Jiaguang

    2012-10-23

    : We present a theoretical study of the electronic subband structure and collective electronic excitation associated with plasmon and surface plasmon modes in metal-based hollow nanosphere. The dependence of the electronic subband energy on the sample parameters of the hollow nanosphere is examined. We find that the subband states with different quantum numbers l degenerate roughly when the outer radius of the sphere is r2 ≥ 100 nm. In this case, the energy spectrum of a sphere is mainly determined by quantum number n. Moreover, the plasmon and surface plasmon excitations can be achieved mainly via inter-subband transitions from occupied subbands to unoccupied subbands. We examine the dependence of the plasmon and surface-plasmon frequencies on the shell thickness d and the outer radius r2 of the sphere using the standard random-phase approximation. We find that when a four-state model is employed for calculations, four branches of the plasmon and surface plasmon oscillations with terahertz frequencies can be observed, respectively.

  13. Overlap in Facebook Profiles Reflects Relationship Closeness.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, Araceli M; Wendel, Markie L; Crockett, Erin E

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the association between self-reported Inclusion of Other in the Self (IOS) and Facebook overlap. Ninety-two participants completed online measures of IOS and investment model constructs. Researchers then recorded Facebook data from participants' profile pages. Results from multilevel models revealed that IOS predicted Facebook overlap. Furthermore, Facebook overlap was associated with commitment and investment in ways comparable to self-reported IOS. These findings suggest that overlap in Facebook profiles can be used to measure relationship closeness. PMID:25635533

  14. APPLIED PHYSICS. Mid-infrared plasmonic biosensing with graphene.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Daniel; Limaj, Odeta; Janner, Davide; Etezadi, Dordaneh; García de Abajo, F Javier; Pruneri, Valerio; Altug, Hatice

    2015-07-10

    Infrared spectroscopy is the technique of choice for chemical identification of biomolecules through their vibrational fingerprints. However, infrared light interacts poorly with nanometric-size molecules. We exploit the unique electro-optical properties of graphene to demonstrate a high-sensitivity tunable plasmonic biosensor for chemically specific label-free detection of protein monolayers. The plasmon resonance of nanostructured graphene is dynamically tuned to selectively probe the protein at different frequencies and extract its complex refractive index. Additionally, the extreme spatial light confinement in graphene—up to two orders of magnitude higher than in metals—produces an unprecedentedly high overlap with nanometric biomolecules, enabling superior sensitivity in the detection of their refractive index and vibrational fingerprints. The combination of tunable spectral selectivity and enhanced sensitivity of graphene opens exciting prospects for biosensing.

  15. Coupled nanowire-based hybrid plasmonic nanocavities on thin substrates

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We theoretically analyze nanowire-based hybrid plasmonic nanocavities on thin substrates at visible wavelengths. In the presence of thin suspended substrates, the hybrid plasmonic modes, formed by the coupling between a metal nanowire and a dielectric nanowire with optical gain, exhibit negligible substrate-mediated characteristics and overlap better with the gain region. Consequently, the confinement factor of the guided hybrid modes is enhanced by more than 42%. However, the presence of significant mirror loss remains the main challenge to lasing. By adding silver coatings with a sufficient thickness range on the two end facets, we show that the reflectivity is substantially enhanced to above 50%. For a coating thickness of 50 nm and cavity length of about 4 μm, the quality factor is above 100. PMID:25520591

  16. The variational subspace valence bond method

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, Graham D.

    2015-04-07

    The variational subspace valence bond (VSVB) method based on overlapping orbitals is introduced. VSVB provides variational support against collapse for the optimization of overlapping linear combinations of atomic orbitals (OLCAOs) using modified orbital expansions, without recourse to orthogonalization. OLCAO have the advantage of being naturally localized, chemically intuitive (to individually model bonds and lone pairs, for example), and transferrable between different molecular systems. Such features are exploited to avoid key computational bottlenecks. Since the OLCAO can be doubly occupied, VSVB can access very large problems, and calculations on systems with several hundred atoms are presented.

  17. Switching plasmon coupling through the formation of dimers from polyaniline-coated gold nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Nina; Ruan, Qifeng; Qin, Feng; Wang, Jianfang; Lin, Hai-Qing

    2015-08-01

    Active modulation of the plasmon coupling in homodimers of polyaniline (PANI)-coated Au nanospheres is achieved by changing the proton-doping state of the PANI shell. Such a PANI-enabled modulation of the plasmon coupling in the dimers gives rise to remarkable spectral shifts, which show an exponential dependence on the interparticle gap distance. For the dimer with a 10 nm PANI shell thickness and a 0.5 nm gap distance, the shift of the stronger scattering peak in response to the active modulation reaches 231 nm. Electrodynamic simulations reveal that the shift of the dipolar bonding plasmon mode dominates the position variation of the stronger scattering peak for the dimers with different gap distances. Moreover, the quadrupolar bonding plasmon mode can be turned on and off by controlling the proton-doping state of the dimers with gap distances of less than ∼3 nm. These results are of high importance for fundamentally understanding the sensitivity of coupled plasmon resonance modes to the dielectric environment, as well as for designing active plasmonic devices with high modulation performances.

  18. Volume plasmon of bismuth nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Nan; Su, Dong; Spence, John C. H.; Zhou, Shifeng; Qiu, Jianrong

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the measurements of the bulk plasmon of Bi nanoparticles supported by a SiO 2 matrix using electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The blue shifts of plasmon peak in small particles were observed. However, the degree of shift was much smaller than the previous study in the literature and cannot be interpreted by the quantum confinement.

  19. Quantum interference in plasmonic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeres, Reinier W.; Kouwenhoven, Leo P.; Zwiller, Valery

    2013-10-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons (plasmons) are a combination of light and a collective oscillation of the free electron plasma at metal/dielectric interfaces. This interaction allows subwavelength confinement of light beyond the diffraction limit inherent to dielectric structures. As a result, the intensity of the electromagnetic field is enhanced, with the possibility to increase the strength of the optical interactions between waveguides, light sources and detectors. Plasmons maintain non-classical photon statistics and preserve entanglement upon transmission through thin, patterned metallic films or weakly confining waveguides. For quantum applications, it is essential that plasmons behave as indistinguishable quantum particles. Here we report on a quantum interference experiment in a nanoscale plasmonic circuit consisting of an on-chip plasmon beamsplitter with integrated superconducting single-photon detectors to allow efficient single plasmon detection. We demonstrate a quantum-mechanical interaction between pairs of indistinguishable surface plasmons by observing Hong-Ou-Mandel (HOM) interference, a hallmark non-classical interference effect that is the basis of linear optics-based quantum computation. Our work shows that it is feasible to shrink quantum optical experiments to the nanoscale and offers a promising route towards subwavelength quantum optical networks.

  20. Sensitivity enhancement through overlapping simultaneously excited Fano resonance modes of metallic-photonic-crystal sensors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Xinping; Su, Xueqiong; Lu, Yi; Feng, Shengfei; Wang, Li

    2014-02-10

    We investigated enhancement of sensitivity of sensors based on metallic photonic crystals through tuning the thickness of the waveguide layer by pulsed laser deposition. Thicker waveguides made of InGaZnO allow double resonance of Fano coupling modes due to plasmonic-photonic interactions. Tuning the angle of incidence enables overlap between these doubly resonant modes, which induces much enlarged and spectrally narrowed sensor signals, leading to significantly enhanced sensitivity of the sensor device. The thickness of the waveguide layer is found to be a crucial structural parameter to improve sensitivity of the MPC sensors. PMID:24663620

  1. Electron diffraction by plasmon waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García de Abajo, F. J.; Barwick, B.; Carbone, F.

    2016-07-01

    An electron beam traversing a structured plasmonic field is shown to undergo diffraction with characteristic angular patterns of both elastic and inelastic outgoing electron components. In particular, a plasmonic grating (e.g., a standing wave formed by two counterpropagating plasmons in a thin film) produces diffraction orders of the same parity as the net number of exchanged plasmons. Large diffracted beam fractions are predicted to occur for realistic plasmon intensities in attainable geometries due to a combination of phase and amplitude changes locally imprinted on the passing electron wave. Our study opens vistas in the study of multiphoton exchanges between electron beams and evanescent optical fields with unexplored effects related to the transversal component of the electron wave function.

  2. Plasmonic polymer tandem solar cell.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; You, Jingbi; Chen, Chun-Chao; Hsu, Wan-Ching; Tan, Hai-ren; Zhang, Xing Wang; Hong, Ziruo; Yang, Yang

    2011-08-23

    We demonstrated plasmonic effects in an inverted tandem polymer solar cell configuration by blending Au nanoparticles (NPs) into the interconnecting layer (ICL) that connects two subcells. Experimental results showed this plasmonic enhanced ICL improves both the top and bottom subcells' efficiency simultaneously by enhancing optical absorption. The presence of Au NPs did not cause electrical characteristics to degrade within the tandem cell. As a result, a 20% improvement of power conversion efficiency has been attained by the light concentration of Au NPs via plasmonic near-field enhancement. The simulated near-field distribution and experimental Raman scattering investigation support our results of plasmonic induced enhancement in solar cell performance. Our finding shows a great potential of incorporating the plasmonic effect with conventional device structure in achieving highly efficient polymer solar cells. PMID:21749062

  3. 47 CFR 73.509 - Prohibited overlap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... operation would involve overlap of signal strength contours with any other station licensed by the... separation Contour of proposed station Contour of other station Co-channel 0.1mV/m (40 dBu)1 mV/m (60 dBu) 1... if the proposed operation would involve overlap of signal strength contours with any other station...

  4. 47 CFR 73.509 - Prohibited overlap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... operation would involve overlap of signal strength contours with any other station licensed by the... separation Contour of proposed station Contour of other station Co-channel 0.1mV/m (40 dBu)1 mV/m (60 dBu) 1... if the proposed operation would involve overlap of signal strength contours with any other station...

  5. 47 CFR 73.509 - Prohibited overlap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... operation would involve overlap of signal strength contours with any other station licensed by the... separation Contour of proposed station Contour of other station Co-channel 0.1mV/m (40 dBu)1 mV/m (60 dBu) 1... if the proposed operation would involve overlap of signal strength contours with any other station...

  6. 47 CFR 73.509 - Prohibited overlap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... operation would involve overlap of signal strength contours with any other station licensed by the... separation Contour of proposed station Contour of other station Co-channel 0.1mV/m (40 dBu)1 mV/m (60 dBu) 1... if the proposed operation would involve overlap of signal strength contours with any other station...

  7. 47 CFR 73.509 - Prohibited overlap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... operation would involve overlap of signal strength contours with any other station licensed by the... separation Contour of proposed station Contour of other station Co-channel 0.1mV/m (40 dBu)1 mV/m (60 dBu) 1... if the proposed operation would involve overlap of signal strength contours with any other station...

  8. Crystal Field Theory and the Angular Overlap Model Applied to Hydrides of Main Group Elements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, E. A.

    1990-01-01

    Described is how crystal field theory and the angular overlap model can be applied to very simple molecules which can then be used to introduce such concepts as bonding orbitals, MO diagrams, and Walsh diagrams. The main-group compounds are used as examples and a switch to the transition metal complexes. (KR)

  9. Neural overlap in processing music and speech.

    PubMed

    Peretz, Isabelle; Vuvan, Dominique; Lagrois, Marie-Élaine; Armony, Jorge L

    2015-03-19

    Neural overlap in processing music and speech, as measured by the co-activation of brain regions in neuroimaging studies, may suggest that parts of the neural circuitries established for language may have been recycled during evolution for musicality, or vice versa that musicality served as a springboard for language emergence. Such a perspective has important implications for several topics of general interest besides evolutionary origins. For instance, neural overlap is an important premise for the possibility of music training to influence language acquisition and literacy. However, neural overlap in processing music and speech does not entail sharing neural circuitries. Neural separability between music and speech may occur in overlapping brain regions. In this paper, we review the evidence and outline the issues faced in interpreting such neural data, and argue that converging evidence from several methodologies is needed before neural overlap is taken as evidence of sharing. PMID:25646513

  10. Neural overlap in processing music and speech.

    PubMed

    Peretz, Isabelle; Vuvan, Dominique; Lagrois, Marie-Élaine; Armony, Jorge L

    2015-03-19

    Neural overlap in processing music and speech, as measured by the co-activation of brain regions in neuroimaging studies, may suggest that parts of the neural circuitries established for language may have been recycled during evolution for musicality, or vice versa that musicality served as a springboard for language emergence. Such a perspective has important implications for several topics of general interest besides evolutionary origins. For instance, neural overlap is an important premise for the possibility of music training to influence language acquisition and literacy. However, neural overlap in processing music and speech does not entail sharing neural circuitries. Neural separability between music and speech may occur in overlapping brain regions. In this paper, we review the evidence and outline the issues faced in interpreting such neural data, and argue that converging evidence from several methodologies is needed before neural overlap is taken as evidence of sharing.

  11. Surface plasmon observed for carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bursill, L. A.; Stadelmann, P. A.; Peng, J. L.; Prawer, S.

    Parallel electron energy loss spectra (PEELS) results obtained for individual carbon nanotubes, using nanoprobe techniques (1-2 nm diameter electron beam), energy resolution 0.5 eV and collection times of 4-25 sec are presented. The aim was to use a nanoprobe to compare PEELS spectra from different parts of a tube, in order to search for variations in sp(exp 2)/sp(exp 3) bonding ratios as well as to look for orientation dependent plasmon and core-loss phenomena. It also seemed interesting to compare results for nanotubes with those for other varieties of graphitized carbons. The most interesting result so far was the appearance of a 15 eV plasmon peak, which appeared only for tubes containing less than or equal to about 12 graphite-like layers. This peak did not shift significantly with tube size. A low-loss peak at 6 eV of variable relative intensity was also observed. This peak was relatively very weak for amorphous tubes; it appears to be characteristic of graphite-like layers, as found for nanotubes and, of course, graphite itself. This paper is restricted to discussion of the low-loss results. The experimental techniques are first described, including some details of the methods which may be used to disperse and support sooty carbons for high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The results are then presented, followed by an interpretation of all the low-loss PEELS results.

  12. Motor Protein Accumulation on Antiparallel Microtubule Overlaps.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Hui-Shun; Betterton, Meredith D

    2016-05-10

    Biopolymers serve as one-dimensional tracks on which motor proteins move to perform their biological roles. Motor protein phenomena have inspired theoretical models of one-dimensional transport, crowding, and jamming. Experiments studying the motion of Xklp1 motors on reconstituted antiparallel microtubule overlaps demonstrated that motors recruited to the overlap walk toward the plus end of individual microtubules and frequently switch between filaments. We study a model of this system that couples the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process for motor motion with switches between antiparallel filaments and binding kinetics. We determine steady-state motor density profiles for fixed-length overlaps using exact and approximate solutions of the continuum differential equations and compare to kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. Overlap motor density profiles and motor trajectories resemble experimental measurements. The phase diagram of the model is similar to the single-filament case for low switching rate, while for high switching rate we find a new (to our knowledge) low density-high density-low density-high density phase. The overlap center region, far from the overlap ends, has a constant motor density as one would naïvely expect. However, rather than following a simple binding equilibrium, the center motor density depends on total overlap length, motor speed, and motor switching rate. The size of the crowded boundary layer near the overlap ends is also dependent on the overlap length and switching rate in addition to the motor speed and bulk concentration. The antiparallel microtubule overlap geometry may offer a previously unrecognized mechanism for biological regulation of protein concentration and consequent activity. PMID:27166811

  13. Impedance generalization for plasmonic waveguides beyond the lumped circuit model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Thomas; Hasan, Shakeeb Bin; Paul, Thomas; Pertsch, Thomas; Rockstuhl, Carsten

    2013-07-01

    We analytically derive a rigorous expression for the relative impedance ratio between two photonic structures based on their electromagnetic interaction. Our approach generalizes the physical meaning of the impedance to a measure for the reciprocity-based overlap of eigenmodes. The consistency with known cases in the radio-frequency and optical domain is shown. The analysis reveals where the applicability of simple circuit parameters ends and how the impedance can be interpreted beyond this point. We illustrate our approach by successfully describing a Bragg reflector that terminates an insulator-metal-insulator plasmonic waveguide in the near infrared by our impedance concept.

  14. Distinguishing Bonds.

    PubMed

    Rahm, Martin; Hoffmann, Roald

    2016-03-23

    The energy change per electron in a chemical or physical transformation, ΔE/n, may be expressed as Δχ̅ + Δ(VNN + ω)/n, where Δχ̅ is the average electron binding energy, a generalized electronegativity, ΔVNN is the change in nuclear repulsions, and Δω is the change in multielectron interactions in the process considered. The last term can be obtained by the difference from experimental or theoretical estimates of the first terms. Previously obtained consequences of this energy partitioning are extended here to a different analysis of bonding in a great variety of diatomics, including more or less polar ones. Arguments are presented for associating the average change in electron binding energy with covalence, and the change in multielectron interactions with electron transfer, either to, out, or within a molecule. A new descriptor Q, essentially the scaled difference between the Δχ̅ and Δ(VNN + ω)/n terms, when plotted versus the bond energy, separates nicely a wide variety of bonding types, covalent, covalent but more correlated, polar and increasingly ionic, metallogenic, electrostatic, charge-shift bonds, and dispersion interactions. Also, Q itself shows a set of interesting relations with the correlation energy of a bond.

  15. Giant optical response from graphene--plasmonic system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pu; Zhang, Wei; Liang, Owen; Pantoja, Marcos; Katzer, Jens; Schroeder, Thomas; Xie, Ya-Hong

    2012-07-24

    The unique properties of graphene when coupled to plasmonic surfaces render a very interesting physical system with intriguing responses to stimuli such as photons. It promises exciting application potentials such as photodetectors as well as biosensing. With its semimetallic band structure, graphene in the vicinity of metallic nanostructures is expected to lead to non-negligible perturbation of the local distribution of electromagnetic field intensity, an interesting plasmonic resonance process that has not been studied to a sufficient extent. Efforts to enhance optoelectronic responses of graphene using plasmonic structures have been demonstrated with rather modest Raman enhancement factors of less than 100. Here, we examine a novel cooperative graphene-Au nanopyramid system with a remarkable graphene Raman enhancement factor of up to 10(7). Experimental evidence including polarization-dependent Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy points to a new origin of a drastically enhanced D-band from sharp folds of graphene near the extremities of the nanostructure that is free of broken carbon bonds. These observations indicate a new approach for obtaining detailed structural and vibrational information on graphene from an extremely localized region. The new physical origin of the D-band offers a realistic possibility of defining active devices in the form of, for example, graphene nanoribbons by engineered graphene folds (also known as wrinkles) to realize edge-disorder-free transport. Furthermore, the addition of graphene made it possible to tailor the biochemical properties of plasmonic surfaces from conventional metallic ones to biocompatible carbon surfaces. PMID:22712497

  16. Polarization State of Light Scattered from Quantum Plasmonic Dimer Antennas.

    PubMed

    Yang, Longkun; Wang, Hancong; Fang, Yan; Li, Zhipeng

    2016-01-26

    Plasmonic antennas are able to concentrate and re-emit light in a controllable manner through strong coupling between metallic nanostructures. Only recently has it found that quantum mechanical effects can drastically change the coupling strength as the feature size approaches atomic scales. Here, we present a comprehensive experimental and theoretical study of the evolution of the resonance peak and its polarization state as the dimer-antenna gap narrows to subnanometer scale. We clearly can identify the classical plasmonic regime, a crossover regime where nonlocal screening plays an important role, and the quantum regime where a charge transfer plasmon appears due to interparticle electron tunneling. Moreover, as the gap decreases from tens of to a few nanometers, the bonding dipole mode tends to emit photons with increasing polarizability. When the gap narrows to quantum regime, a significant depolarization of the mode emission is observed due to the reduction of the charge density of coupled quantum plasmons. These results would be beneficial for the understanding of quantum effects on emitting-polarization of nanoantennas and the development of quantum-based photonic nanodevices. PMID:26700823

  17. Polarization State of Light Scattered from Quantum Plasmonic Dimer Antennas.

    PubMed

    Yang, Longkun; Wang, Hancong; Fang, Yan; Li, Zhipeng

    2016-01-26

    Plasmonic antennas are able to concentrate and re-emit light in a controllable manner through strong coupling between metallic nanostructures. Only recently has it found that quantum mechanical effects can drastically change the coupling strength as the feature size approaches atomic scales. Here, we present a comprehensive experimental and theoretical study of the evolution of the resonance peak and its polarization state as the dimer-antenna gap narrows to subnanometer scale. We clearly can identify the classical plasmonic regime, a crossover regime where nonlocal screening plays an important role, and the quantum regime where a charge transfer plasmon appears due to interparticle electron tunneling. Moreover, as the gap decreases from tens of to a few nanometers, the bonding dipole mode tends to emit photons with increasing polarizability. When the gap narrows to quantum regime, a significant depolarization of the mode emission is observed due to the reduction of the charge density of coupled quantum plasmons. These results would be beneficial for the understanding of quantum effects on emitting-polarization of nanoantennas and the development of quantum-based photonic nanodevices.

  18. Plasmon waveguide resonance for sensing glycan-lectin interactions.

    PubMed

    Alves, Isabel; Kurylo, Ievgen; Coffinier, Yannick; Siriwardena, Aloysius; Zaitsev, Vladimir; Harté, Etienne; Boukherroub, Rabah; Szunerits, Sabine

    2015-05-11

    Carbohydrate-modified interfaces have been shown to be valuable tools for the study of protein-glycan recognition events. Label-free approache such as plasmonic based techniques are particularly attractive. This paper describes a new analytical platform for the sensitive and selective screening of carbohydrate-lectin interactions using plasmon waveguide resonance. Planar optical waveguides (POW), consisting of glass prisms coated with silver (50 nm) and silica (460 nm) layers were derivatized with mannose or lactose moieties. The specific association of the resulting interface with selected lectins was assessed by following the changes in its plasmonic response. The immobilization strategy investigated in this work is based on the formation of a covalent bond between propargyl-functionalized glycans and surface-linked azide groups via a Cu(I) "click" chemistry. Optimization of the surface architecture through the introduction of an oligo(ethylene glycol) spacer between the plasmonic surface and the glycan ligands provided an interface which allowed screening of glycan-lectin interactions in a highly selective manner. The limit of detection (LOD) of this method for this particular application was found to be in the subnanomolar range (0.5 nM), showing it to constitute a promising analytical platform for future development and use in a pharmaceutical or biomedical setting.

  19. Size Dependent Plasmonic Effect on BiVO4 Photoanodes for Solar Water Splitting

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liwu; Herrmann, Lars O.; Baumberg, Jeremy J.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures show great promise in enhancing the solar water splitting efficiency due to their ability to confine light to extremely small volumes inside semiconductors. While size plays a critical role in the plasmonic performance of Au nanoparticles (AuNPs), its influence on plasmon-assisted water splitting is still not fully understood. This holds especially true for low band gap semiconductors, for which interband excitations occur in wavelength regions that overlap with plasmonic resonances. Here, BiVO4 films are modified with AuNPs of diameters varying from 10 to 80 nm to study the size dependence of the plasmonic effect. Plasmon resonance energy transfer (PRET) is found to be the dominant effect in enhancing the water splitting efficiency of BiVO4. “Hot electron” injection effect is weak in the case of BiVO4/AuNP. This is attributed to the interband excitation of BiVO4, which is unfavourable for the hot electrons accumulation in BiVO4 conduction band. The resonant scattering effect also contributes to the enhanced water splitting efficiency for the larger diameter AuNPs. It is also for the first time found that higher PRET effect can be achieved at larger off-normal irradiation angle. PMID:26581942

  20. Self-aligned deterministic coupling of single quantum emitter to nanofocused plasmonic modes

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Su-Hyun; Kim, Je-Hyung; Ko, Young-Ho; Rodriguez, Christophe; Shin, Jonghwa; Lee, Yong-Hee; Dang, Le Si; Zhang, Xiang; Cho, Yong-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    The quantum plasmonics field has emerged and been growing increasingly, including study of single emitter–light coupling using plasmonic system and scalable quantum plasmonic circuit. This offers opportunity for the quantum control of light with compact device footprint. However, coupling of a single emitter to highly localized plasmonic mode with nanoscale precision remains an important challenge. Today, the spatial overlap between metallic structure and single emitter mostly relies either on chance or on advanced nanopositioning control. Here, we demonstrate deterministic coupling between three-dimensionally nanofocused plasmonic modes and single quantum dots (QDs) without any positioning for single QDs. By depositing a thin silver layer on a site-controlled pyramid QD wafer, three-dimensional plasmonic nanofocusing on each QD at the pyramid apex is geometrically achieved through the silver-coated pyramid facets. Enhancement of the QD spontaneous emission rate as high as 22 ± 16 is measured for all processed QDs emitting over ∼150-meV spectral range. This approach could apply to high fabrication yield on-chip devices for wide application fields, e.g., high-efficiency light-emitting devices and quantum information processing. PMID:25870303

  1. Self-aligned deterministic coupling of single quantum emitter to nanofocused plasmonic modes.

    PubMed

    Gong, Su-Hyun; Kim, Je-Hyung; Ko, Young-Ho; Rodriguez, Christophe; Shin, Jonghwa; Lee, Yong-Hee; Dang, Le Si; Zhang, Xiang; Cho, Yong-Hoon

    2015-04-28

    The quantum plasmonics field has emerged and been growing increasingly, including study of single emitter-light coupling using plasmonic system and scalable quantum plasmonic circuit. This offers opportunity for the quantum control of light with compact device footprint. However, coupling of a single emitter to highly localized plasmonic mode with nanoscale precision remains an important challenge. Today, the spatial overlap between metallic structure and single emitter mostly relies either on chance or on advanced nanopositioning control. Here, we demonstrate deterministic coupling between three-dimensionally nanofocused plasmonic modes and single quantum dots (QDs) without any positioning for single QDs. By depositing a thin silver layer on a site-controlled pyramid QD wafer, three-dimensional plasmonic nanofocusing on each QD at the pyramid apex is geometrically achieved through the silver-coated pyramid facets. Enhancement of the QD spontaneous emission rate as high as 22 ± 16 is measured for all processed QDs emitting over ∼150-meV spectral range. This approach could apply to high fabrication yield on-chip devices for wide application fields, e.g., high-efficiency light-emitting devices and quantum information processing.

  2. Size Dependent Plasmonic Effect on BiVO4 Photoanodes for Solar Water Splitting.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liwu; Herrmann, Lars O; Baumberg, Jeremy J

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures show great promise in enhancing the solar water splitting efficiency due to their ability to confine light to extremely small volumes inside semiconductors. While size plays a critical role in the plasmonic performance of Au nanoparticles (AuNPs), its influence on plasmon-assisted water splitting is still not fully understood. This holds especially true for low band gap semiconductors, for which interband excitations occur in wavelength regions that overlap with plasmonic resonances. Here, BiVO4 films are modified with AuNPs of diameters varying from 10 to 80 nm to study the size dependence of the plasmonic effect. Plasmon resonance energy transfer (PRET) is found to be the dominant effect in enhancing the water splitting efficiency of BiVO4. "Hot electron" injection effect is weak in the case of BiVO4/AuNP. This is attributed to the interband excitation of BiVO4, which is unfavourable for the hot electrons accumulation in BiVO4 conduction band. The resonant scattering effect also contributes to the enhanced water splitting efficiency for the larger diameter AuNPs. It is also for the first time found that higher PRET effect can be achieved at larger off-normal irradiation angle.

  3. Plasmon-enhanced second-harmonic generation from hybrid ZnO-covered silver-bowl array.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingming; Shen, Shaoxin; Wang, Xiangjie; Yu, Binbin; Huang, Shengli; Xu, Die; Hu, Jiawen; Yang, Zhilin

    2016-06-01

    High-efficient, plasmon-enhanced nonlinear phenomena based on hybrid nanostructures, which combine nonlinear dielectrics with plasmonic metals, are of fundamental importance for various applications ranging from all-optical switching to imaging or bio-sensing. However, the high loss of the excitation energy in nanostructures and the poor spatial overlap between the plasmon enhancement and the bulk of nonlinear materials largely limit the operation of plasmon-enhanced nonlinear effects, resulting in low nonlinear conversion efficiency. Here, we design and fabricate a ZnO-covered, 2D silver-bowl array, which can serve as an efficient platform for plasmon-enhanced second-harmonic generation (PESHG). Validated by experiments and simulations, we demonstrate that the high spatial overlap between the near-field enhancement and the ZnO film plays the key role for this nanostructure-based PESHG process. The enhancement mainly originates from the fundamental wavelength-derived plasmon resonance, providing an enhancement factor of approximately 33 times. These results achieved pave the way for future applications, which require localized light sources at nanoscale.

  4. Plasmon-enhanced second-harmonic generation from hybrid ZnO-covered silver-bowl array.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingming; Shen, Shaoxin; Wang, Xiangjie; Yu, Binbin; Huang, Shengli; Xu, Die; Hu, Jiawen; Yang, Zhilin

    2016-06-01

    High-efficient, plasmon-enhanced nonlinear phenomena based on hybrid nanostructures, which combine nonlinear dielectrics with plasmonic metals, are of fundamental importance for various applications ranging from all-optical switching to imaging or bio-sensing. However, the high loss of the excitation energy in nanostructures and the poor spatial overlap between the plasmon enhancement and the bulk of nonlinear materials largely limit the operation of plasmon-enhanced nonlinear effects, resulting in low nonlinear conversion efficiency. Here, we design and fabricate a ZnO-covered, 2D silver-bowl array, which can serve as an efficient platform for plasmon-enhanced second-harmonic generation (PESHG). Validated by experiments and simulations, we demonstrate that the high spatial overlap between the near-field enhancement and the ZnO film plays the key role for this nanostructure-based PESHG process. The enhancement mainly originates from the fundamental wavelength-derived plasmon resonance, providing an enhancement factor of approximately 33 times. These results achieved pave the way for future applications, which require localized light sources at nanoscale. PMID:27145724

  5. Plasmon-enhanced second-harmonic generation from hybrid ZnO-covered silver-bowl array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mingming; Shen, Shaoxin; Wang, Xiangjie; Yu, Binbin; Huang, Shengli; Xu, Die; Hu, Jiawen; Yang, Zhilin

    2016-06-01

    High-efficient, plasmon-enhanced nonlinear phenomena based on hybrid nanostructures, which combine nonlinear dielectrics with plasmonic metals, are of fundamental importance for various applications ranging from all-optical switching to imaging or bio-sensing. However, the high loss of the excitation energy in nanostructures and the poor spatial overlap between the plasmon enhancement and the bulk of nonlinear materials largely limit the operation of plasmon-enhanced nonlinear effects, resulting in low nonlinear conversion efficiency. Here, we design and fabricate a ZnO-covered, 2D silver-bowl array, which can serve as an efficient platform for plasmon-enhanced second-harmonic generation (PESHG). Validated by experiments and simulations, we demonstrate that the high spatial overlap between the near-field enhancement and the ZnO film plays the key role for this nanostructure-based PESHG process. The enhancement mainly originates from the fundamental wavelength-derived plasmon resonance, providing an enhancement factor of approximately 33 times. These results achieved pave the way for future applications, which require localized light sources at nanoscale.

  6. Direct Plasmon-Driven Photoelectrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Robatjazi, Hossein; Bahauddin, Shah Mohammad; Doiron, Chloe; Thomann, Isabell

    2015-09-01

    Harnessing the energy from hot charge carriers is an emerging research area with the potential to improve energy conversion technologies.1-3 Here we present a novel plasmonic photoelectrode architecture carefully designed to drive photocatalytic reactions by efficient, nonradiative plasmon decay into hot carriers. In contrast to past work, our architecture does not utilize a Schottky junction, the commonly used building block to collect hot carriers. Instead, we observed large photocurrents from a Schottky-free junction due to direct hot electron injection from plasmonic gold nanoparticles into the reactant species upon plasmon decay. The key ingredients of our approach are (i) an architecture for increased light absorption inspired by optical impedance matching concepts,4 (ii) carrier separation by a selective transport layer, and (iii) efficient hot-carrier generation and injection from small plasmonic Au nanoparticles to adsorbed water molecules. We also investigated the quantum efficiency of hot electron injection for different particle diameters to elucidate potential quantum effects while keeping the plasmon resonance frequency unchanged. Interestingly, our studies did not reveal differences in the hot-electron generation and injection efficiencies for the investigated particle dimensions and plasmon resonances. PMID:26243130

  7. Reconfigurable 3D plasmonic metamolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzyk, Anton; Schreiber, Robert; Zhang, Hui; Govorov, Alexander O.; Liedl, Tim; Liu, Na

    2014-09-01

    A reconfigurable plasmonic nanosystem combines an active plasmonic structure with a regulated physical or chemical control input. There have been considerable efforts on integration of plasmonic nanostructures with active platforms using top-down techniques. The active media include phase-transition materials, graphene, liquid crystals and carrier-modulated semiconductors, which can respond to thermal, electrical and optical stimuli. However, these plasmonic nanostructures are often restricted to two-dimensional substrates, showing desired optical response only along specific excitation directions. Alternatively, bottom-up techniques offer a new pathway to impart reconfigurability and functionality to passive systems. In particular, DNA has proven to be one of the most versatile and robust building blocks for construction of complex three-dimensional architectures with high fidelity. Here we show the creation of reconfigurable three-dimensional plasmonic metamolecules, which execute DNA-regulated conformational changes at the nanoscale. DNA serves as both a construction material to organize plasmonic nanoparticles in three dimensions, as well as fuel for driving the metamolecules to distinct conformational states. Simultaneously, the three-dimensional plasmonic metamolecules can work as optical reporters, which transduce their conformational changes in situ into circular dichroism changes in the visible wavelength range.

  8. Plasmonic gas and chemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tittl, Andreas; Giessen, Harald; Liu, Na

    2014-06-01

    Sensitive and robust detection of gases and chemical reactions constitutes a cornerstone of scientific research and key industrial applications. In an effort to reach progressively smaller reagent concentrations and sensing volumes, optical sensor technology has experienced a paradigm shift from extended thin-film systems towards engineered nanoscale devices. In this size regime, plasmonic particles and nanostructures provide an ideal toolkit for the realization of novel sensing concepts. This is due to their unique ability to simultaneously focus light into subwavelength hotspots of the electromagnetic field and to transmit minute changes of the local environment back into the farfield as a modulation of their optical response. Since the basic building blocks of a plasmonic system are commonly noble metal nanoparticles or nanostructures, plasmonics can easily be integrated with a plethora of chemically or catalytically active materials and compounds to investigate processes ranging from hydrogen absorption in palladium to the detection of trinitrotoluene (TNT). In this review, we will discuss a multitude of plasmonic sensing strategies, spanning the technological scale from simple plasmonic particles embedded in extended thin films to highly engineered complex plasmonic nanostructures. Due to their flexibility and excellent sensing performance, plasmonic structures may open an exciting pathway towards the detection of chemical and catalytic events down to the single molecule level.

  9. Reconfigurable 3D plasmonic metamolecules.

    PubMed

    Kuzyk, Anton; Schreiber, Robert; Zhang, Hui; Govorov, Alexander O; Liedl, Tim; Liu, Na

    2014-09-01

    A reconfigurable plasmonic nanosystem combines an active plasmonic structure with a regulated physical or chemical control input. There have been considerable efforts on integration of plasmonic nanostructures with active platforms using top-down techniques. The active media include phase-transition materials, graphene, liquid crystals and carrier-modulated semiconductors, which can respond to thermal, electrical and optical stimuli. However, these plasmonic nanostructures are often restricted to two-dimensional substrates, showing desired optical response only along specific excitation directions. Alternatively, bottom-up techniques offer a new pathway to impart reconfigurability and functionality to passive systems. In particular, DNA has proven to be one of the most versatile and robust building blocks for construction of complex three-dimensional architectures with high fidelity. Here we show the creation of reconfigurable three-dimensional plasmonic metamolecules, which execute DNA-regulated conformational changes at the nanoscale. DNA serves as both a construction material to organize plasmonic nanoparticles in three dimensions, as well as fuel for driving the metamolecules to distinct conformational states. Simultaneously, the three-dimensional plasmonic metamolecules can work as optical reporters, which transduce their conformational changes in situ into circular dichroism changes in the visible wavelength range.

  10. Genetically engineered plasmonic nanoarrays.

    PubMed

    Forestiere, Carlo; Pasquale, Alyssa J; Capretti, Antonio; Miano, Giovanni; Tamburrino, Antonello; Lee, Sylvanus Y; Reinhard, Björn M; Dal Negro, Luca

    2012-04-11

    In the present Letter, we demonstrate how the design of metallic nanoparticle arrays with large electric field enhancement can be performed using the basic paradigm of engineering, namely the optimization of a well-defined objective function. Such optimization is carried out by coupling a genetic algorithm with the analytical multiparticle Mie theory. General design criteria for best enhancement of electric fields are obtained, unveiling the fundamental interplay between the near-field plasmonic and radiative photonic coupling. Our optimization approach is experimentally validated by surface-enhanced Raman scattering measurements, which demonstrate how genetically optimized arrays, fabricated using electron beam lithography, lead to order of ten improvement of Raman enhancement over nanoparticle dimer antennas, and order of one hundred improvement over optimal nanoparticle gratings. A rigorous design of nanoparticle arrays with optimal field enhancement is essential to the engineering of numerous nanoscale optical devices such as plasmon-enhanced biosensors, photodetectors, light sources and more efficient nonlinear optical elements for on chip integration. PMID:22381056

  11. Imaging through plasmonic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tanzid, Mehbuba; Sobhani, Ali; DeSantis, Christopher J; Cui, Yao; Hogan, Nathaniel J; Samaniego, Adam; Veeraraghavan, Ashok; Halas, Naomi J

    2016-05-17

    The optical properties of metallic nanoparticles with plasmon resonances have been studied extensively, typically by measuring the transmission of light, as a function of wavelength, through a nanoparticle suspension. One question that has not yet been addressed, however, is how an image is transmitted through such a suspension of absorber-scatterers, in other words, how the various spatial frequencies are attenuated as they pass through the nanoparticle host medium. Here, we examine how the optical properties of a suspension of plasmonic nanoparticles affect the transmitted image. We use two distinct ways to assess transmitted image quality: the structural similarity index (SSIM), a perceptual distortion metric based on the human visual system, and the modulation transfer function (MTF), which assesses the resolvable spatial frequencies. We show that perceived image quality, as well as spatial resolution, are both dependent on the scattering and absorption cross-sections of the constituent nanoparticles. Surprisingly, we observe a nonlinear dependence of image quality on optical density by varying optical path length and nanoparticle concentration. This work is a first step toward understanding the requirements for visualizing and resolving objects through media consisting of subwavelength absorber-scatterer structures, an approach that should also prove useful in the assessment of metamaterial or metasurface-based optical imaging systems. PMID:27140618

  12. Imaging through plasmonic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanzid, Mehbuba; Sobhani, Ali; DeSantis, Christopher J.; Cui, Yao; Hogan, Nathaniel J.; Samaniego, Adam; Veeraraghavan, Ashok; Halas, Naomi J.

    2016-05-01

    The optical properties of metallic nanoparticles with plasmon resonances have been studied extensively, typically by measuring the transmission of light, as a function of wavelength, through a nanoparticle suspension. One question that has not yet been addressed, however, is how an image is transmitted through such a suspension of absorber-scatterers, in other words, how the various spatial frequencies are attenuated as they pass through the nanoparticle host medium. Here, we examine how the optical properties of a suspension of plasmonic nanoparticles affect the transmitted image. We use two distinct ways to assess transmitted image quality: the structural similarity index (SSIM), a perceptual distortion metric based on the human visual system, and the modulation transfer function (MTF), which assesses the resolvable spatial frequencies. We show that perceived image quality, as well as spatial resolution, are both dependent on the scattering and absorption cross-sections of the constituent nanoparticles. Surprisingly, we observe a nonlinear dependence of image quality on optical density by varying optical path length and nanoparticle concentration. This work is a first step toward understanding the requirements for visualizing and resolving objects through media consisting of subwavelength absorber-scatterer structures, an approach that should also prove useful in the assessment of metamaterial or metasurface-based optical imaging systems.

  13. Imaging through plasmonic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Tanzid, Mehbuba; Sobhani, Ali; DeSantis, Christopher J.; Cui, Yao; Hogan, Nathaniel J.; Samaniego, Adam; Veeraraghavan, Ashok; Halas, Naomi J.

    2016-01-01

    The optical properties of metallic nanoparticles with plasmon resonances have been studied extensively, typically by measuring the transmission of light, as a function of wavelength, through a nanoparticle suspension. One question that has not yet been addressed, however, is how an image is transmitted through such a suspension of absorber-scatterers, in other words, how the various spatial frequencies are attenuated as they pass through the nanoparticle host medium. Here, we examine how the optical properties of a suspension of plasmonic nanoparticles affect the transmitted image. We use two distinct ways to assess transmitted image quality: the structural similarity index (SSIM), a perceptual distortion metric based on the human visual system, and the modulation transfer function (MTF), which assesses the resolvable spatial frequencies. We show that perceived image quality, as well as spatial resolution, are both dependent on the scattering and absorption cross-sections of the constituent nanoparticles. Surprisingly, we observe a nonlinear dependence of image quality on optical density by varying optical path length and nanoparticle concentration. This work is a first step toward understanding the requirements for visualizing and resolving objects through media consisting of subwavelength absorber-scatterer structures, an approach that should also prove useful in the assessment of metamaterial or metasurface-based optical imaging systems. PMID:27140618

  14. Asymptotics of surface-plasmon redshift saturation at subnanometric separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnitzer, Ory; Giannini, Vincenzo; Craster, Richard V.; Maier, Stefan A.

    2016-01-01

    Many promising nanophotonics endeavors hinge upon the unique plasmonic properties of nanometallic structures with narrow nonmetallic gaps, which support superconcentrated bonding modes that singularly redshift with decreasing separations. In this Rapid Communication, we present a descriptive physical picture, complemented by elementary asymptotic formulas, of a nonlocal mechanism for plasmon redshift saturation at subnanometric gap widths. Thus, by considering the electron-charge and field distributions in the close vicinity of the metal-vacuum interface, we show that nonlocality is asymptotically manifested as an effective potential discontinuity. For bonding modes in the near-contact limit, the latter discontinuity is shown to be effectively equivalent to a widening of the gap. As a consequence, the resonance-frequency near-contact asymptotics are a renormalization of the corresponding local ones. Specifically, the renormalization furnishes an asymptotic plasmon-frequency lower bound that scales with the 1 /4 power of the Fermi wavelength. We demonstrate these remarkable features in the prototypical cases of nanowire and nanosphere dimers, showing agreement between our elementary expressions and previously reported numerical computations.

  15. Optical activity and circular dichroism of plasmonic nanorod assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosravi Khorashad, Larousse; Liu, Na; Govorov, Alexander O.

    Plasmonic circular dichroism (CD) has offered an efficient spectroscopy method for the electronic, chemical, and structural properties of different types of light active molecules in the subwavelength regime. Among the different chiral geometries of metal nanoparticles utilized by the plasmonic CD spectroscopy, gold nanorods (AuNRs) have shown strong CD signals in the visible frequency range. In this work, we theoretically study the CD signals of AuNR arrangements in order to mimic structures and chemical bonds of chiral biomolecules. In particular, our twisted three-AuNR geometries resemble a molecular structure of tartaric acid. This molecule played an important role in the discovery of chemical chirality. In our study, we show that the strength of CD signals changes dramatically by tuning the interparticle distances and angles. Since the CD signals are typically weak, we develop reliable computational approaches to calculate the plasmonic CD. Manipulating interparticle distances, size, and molecular bond angles result in full control over peak positions, handedness, and positive and negative bands which are observed in the CD spectra. This work has been supported under the grant from Volkswagen Foundation. We also acknowledge the financial support of Condensed Matter and Surface Science program of Ohio University.

  16. Probing plasmonic breathing modes optically

    SciTech Connect

    Krug, Markus K. Reisecker, Michael; Hohenau, Andreas; Ditlbacher, Harald; Trügler, Andreas; Hohenester, Ulrich; Krenn, Joachim R.

    2014-10-27

    The confinement of surface plasmon modes in flat nanoparticles gives rise to plasmonic breathing modes. With a vanishing net dipole moment, breathing modes do not radiate, i.e., they are optically dark. Having thus escaped optical detection, breathing modes were only recently revealed in silver nanodisks with electron energy loss spectroscopy in an electron microscope. We show that for disk diameters >200 nm, retardation induced by oblique optical illumination relaxes the optically dark character. This makes breathing modes and thus the full plasmonic mode spectrum accessible to optical spectroscopy. The experimental spectroscopy data are in excellent agreement with numerical simulations.

  17. Rhodium Nanoparticles for Ultraviolet Plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Anne M.; Zhang, Xiao; Alcaraz de la Osa, Rodrigo; Sanz, Juan Marcos; González, Francisco; Moreno, Fernando; Finkelstein, Gleb; Liu, Jie; Everitt, Henry O.

    2015-02-01

    The non-oxidizing catalytic noble metal rhodium is introduced for ultraviolet plasmonics. Planar tripods of 8 nm Rh nanoparticles, synthesized by a modified polyol reduction method, have a calculated local surface plasmon resonance near 330 nm. By attaching p-aminothiophenol, local field-enhanced Raman spectra and accelerated photo-damage were observed under near-resonant ultraviolet illumination, while charge transfer simultaneously increased fluorescence for up to 13 minutes. The combined local field enhancement and charge transfer demonstrate essential steps toward plasmonically-enhanced ultraviolet photocatalysis.

  18. Dynamic coupling of plasmonic resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Suyeon; Park, Q.-Han

    2016-02-01

    We clarify the nature of dynamic coupling in plasmonic resonators and determine the dynamic coupling coefficient using a simple analytic model. We show that plasmonic resonators, such as subwavelength holes in a metal film which can be treated as bound charge oscillators, couple to each other through the retarded interaction of oscillating screened charges. Our dynamic coupling model offers, for the first time, a quantitative analytic description of the fundamental symmetric and anti-symmetric modes of coupled resonators which agrees with experimental results. Our model also reveals that plasmonic electromagnetically induced transparency arises in any coupled resonators of slightly unequal lengths, as confirmed by a rigorous numerical calculation and experiments.

  19. Electrically driven surface plasmon nanosources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boer-Duchemin, Elizabeth; Wang, Tao; Le Moal, Eric; Dujardin, Gérald

    2015-03-01

    Electrical nanosources of surface plasmons will be an integral part of any future plasmonic circuits. Three different types of such nanosources (based on inelastic electron tunneling, high energy electron bombardment, and the electrical injection of a semiconductor device) are briefly described here. An example of a fundamental experiment using an electrical nanosource consisting of the tunnel junction formed between a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and a metallic sample is given. In this experiment, the temporal coherence of the broadband STM-plasmon source is probed using a variant of Young's double slit experiment, and the coherence time of the broadband source is estimated to be about 5-10 fs.

  20. Rhodium nanoparticles for ultraviolet plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Watson, Anne M; Zhang, Xiao; Alcaraz de la Osa, Rodrigo; Marcos Sanz, Juan; González, Francisco; Moreno, Fernando; Finkelstein, Gleb; Liu, Jie; Everitt, Henry O

    2015-02-11

    The nonoxidizing catalytic noble metal rhodium is introduced for ultraviolet plasmonics. Planar tripods of 8 nm Rh nanoparticles, synthesized by a modified polyol reduction method, have a calculated local surface plasmon resonance near 330 nm. By attaching p-aminothiophenol, local field-enhanced Raman spectra and accelerated photodamage were observed under near-resonant ultraviolet illumination, while charge transfer simultaneously increased fluorescence for up to 13 min. The combined local field enhancement and charge transfer demonstrate essential steps toward plasmonically enhanced ultraviolet photocatalysis.

  1. Dynamic coupling of plasmonic resonators

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Suyeon; Park, Q-Han

    2016-01-01

    We clarify the nature of dynamic coupling in plasmonic resonators and determine the dynamic coupling coefficient using a simple analytic model. We show that plasmonic resonators, such as subwavelength holes in a metal film which can be treated as bound charge oscillators, couple to each other through the retarded interaction of oscillating screened charges. Our dynamic coupling model offers, for the first time, a quantitative analytic description of the fundamental symmetric and anti-symmetric modes of coupled resonators which agrees with experimental results. Our model also reveals that plasmonic electromagnetically induced transparency arises in any coupled resonators of slightly unequal lengths, as confirmed by a rigorous numerical calculation and experiments. PMID:26911786

  2. Surface plasmon polaritons mode conversion via a coupled plasmonic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Tian, Hao

    2016-05-01

    A coupled plasmonic system for effective mode conversion between single interface surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) in a metal-dielectric waveguide and gap SPP in a metal-dielectric-metal waveguide is proposed. With the modal analysis, it is shown that the interference of the two plasmonic modes in a metal-dielectric-metal-dielectric coupled structure plays the key role in the mode conversion. With typical parameters, the conversion efficiency is as high as 61% (equivalent to 87% of the output total energy flow) at 1μm wavelength, and 1 dB bandwidth is as broad as 300 nm. The proposed structure can be used to implement an SPP mode convertor, router and beam splitter, which enables the interconnection between two important waveguides in plasmonics. The method presented here is fully-analytical, and is tested against fully-vectorial numerical results.

  3. Bonds Boom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Cathryn

    1989-01-01

    The combined effect of the "Serrano" decision and Proposition 13 left California school districts with aging, overcrowded facilities. Chico schools won a $18.5 million general obligation bond election for facilities construction. With $11 billion needed for new school construction, California will need to tap local sources. A sidebar outlines…

  4. Yankee bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Delaney, P. )

    1993-10-01

    Yankee and Euromarket bonds may soon find their way into the financing of power projects in Latin America. For developers seeking long-term commitments under build, own, operate, and transfer (BOOT) power projects in Latin America, the benefits are substantial.

  5. Plasmonic Library Based on Substrate-Supported Gradiential Plasmonic Arrays

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We present a versatile approach to produce macroscopic, substrate-supported arrays of plasmonic nanoparticles with well-defined interparticle spacing and a continuous particle size gradient. The arrays thus present a “plasmonic library” of locally noncoupling plasmonic particles of different sizes, which can serve as a platform for future combinatorial screening of size effects. The structures were prepared by substrate assembly of gold-core/poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-shell particles and subsequent post-modification. Coupling of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) could be avoided since the polymer shell separates the encapsulated gold cores. To produce a particle array with a broad range of well-defined but laterally distinguishable particle sizes, the substrate was dip-coated in a growth solution, which resulted in an overgrowth of the gold cores controlled by the local exposure time. The kinetics was quantitatively analyzed and found to be diffusion rate controlled, allowing for precise tuning of particle size by adjusting the withdrawal speed. We determined the kinetics of the overgrowth process, investigated the LSPRs along the gradient by UV–vis extinction spectroscopy, and compared the spectroscopic results to the predictions from Mie theory, indicating the absence of local interparticle coupling. We finally discuss potential applications of these substrate-supported plasmonic particle libraries and perspectives toward extending the concept from size to composition variation and screening of plasmonic coupling effects. PMID:25137554

  6. Graphene-protected copper and silver plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Kravets, V G; Jalil, R; Kim, Y-J; Ansell, D; Aznakayeva, D E; Thackray, B; Britnell, L; Belle, B D; Withers, F; Radko, I P; Han, Z; Bozhevolnyi, S I; Novoselov, K S; Geim, A K; Grigorenko, A N

    2014-07-01

    Plasmonics has established itself as a branch of physics which promises to revolutionize data processing, improve photovoltaics, and increase sensitivity of bio-detection. A widespread use of plasmonic devices is notably hindered by high losses and the absence of stable and inexpensive metal films suitable for plasmonic applications. To this end, there has been a continuous search for alternative plasmonic materials that are also compatible with complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. Here we show that copper and silver protected by graphene are viable candidates. Copper films covered with one to a few graphene layers show excellent plasmonic characteristics. They can be used to fabricate plasmonic devices and survive for at least a year, even in wet and corroding conditions. As a proof of concept, we use the graphene-protected copper to demonstrate dielectric loaded plasmonic waveguides and test sensitivity of surface plasmon resonances. Our results are likely to initiate wide use of graphene-protected plasmonics.

  7. Correlated edge overlaps in multiplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, Gareth J.; Bianconi, Ginestra; da Costa, Rui A.; Dorogovtsev, Sergey N.; Mendes, José F. F.

    2016-07-01

    We develop the theory of sparse multiplex networks with partially overlapping links based on their local treelikeness. This theory enables us to find the giant mutually connected component in a two-layer multiplex network with arbitrary correlations between connections of different types. We find that correlations between the overlapping and nonoverlapping links markedly change the phase diagram of the system, leading to multiple hybrid phase transitions. For assortative correlations we observe recurrent hybrid phase transitions.

  8. Photoluminescence of a Plasmonic Molecule.

    PubMed

    Huang, Da; Byers, Chad P; Wang, Lin-Yung; Hoggard, Anneli; Hoener, Ben; Dominguez-Medina, Sergio; Chen, Sishan; Chang, Wei-Shun; Landes, Christy F; Link, Stephan

    2015-07-28

    Photoluminescent Au nanoparticles are appealing for biosensing and bioimaging applications because of their non-photobleaching and non-photoblinking emission. The mechanism of one-photon photoluminescence from plasmonic nanostructures is still heavily debated though. Here, we report on the one-photon photoluminescence of strongly coupled 50 nm Au nanosphere dimers, the simplest plasmonic molecule. We observe emission from coupled plasmonic modes as revealed by single-particle photoluminescence spectra in comparison to correlated dark-field scattering spectroscopy. The photoluminescence quantum yield of the dimers is found to be surprisingly similar to the constituent monomers, suggesting that the increased local electric field of the dimer plays a minor role, in contradiction to several proposed mechanisms. Aided by electromagnetic simulations of scattering and absorption spectra, we conclude that our data are instead consistent with a multistep mechanism that involves the emission due to radiative decay of surface plasmons generated from excited electron-hole pairs following interband absorption. PMID:26165983

  9. Polarization of inverse plasmon scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Windsor, R. A.; Kellogg, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    The scattering of electrostatic plasma waves by a flux of ultrarelativistic electrons passing through a plasma gives rise to a radiation spectrum which is similar to a synchrotron radiation spectrum. This mechanism, first considered by Gailitis and Tsytovich, is analagous to inverse Compton scattering, and we have named it inverse plasmon scattering. For a power-law electron flux, both inverse plasmon scattering and synchrotron radiation have the same spectral index. In an attempt to distinguish between these mechanisms, we have calculated the polarization level expected from inverse plasmon scattering. The polarization level found is similar to that obtained from a synchrotron radiation source. This means that the radiation produced by two mechanisms, synchrotron radiation and inverse plasmon scattering, is indistinguishable; and this attempt to differentiate between them by polarization effects has been unsuccessful.

  10. Flexible transformation plasmonics using graphene.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wei Bing; Zhu, Wei; Xu, Hong Ju; Ni, Zhen Hua; Dong, Zheng Gao; Cui, Tie Jun

    2013-05-01

    The flexible control of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) is important and intriguing due to its wide application in novel plasmonic devices. Transformation optics (TO) offers the capability either to confine the SPP propagation on rigid curved/uneven surfaces, or to control the flow of SPPs on planar surfaces. However, TO has not permitted us to confine, manipulate, and control SPP waves on flexible curved surfaces. Here, we propose to confine and freely control flexible SPPs using TO and graphene. We show that SPP waves can be naturally confined and propagate on curved or uneven graphene surfaces with little bending and radiation losses, and the confined SPPs are further manipulated and controlled using TO. Flexible plasmonic devices are presented, including the bending waveguides, wave splitter, and Luneburg lens on curved surfaces. Together with the intrinsic flexibility, graphene can be served as a good platform for flexible transformation plasmonics. PMID:23669904

  11. Flexible transformation plasmonics using graphene.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wei Bing; Zhu, Wei; Xu, Hong Ju; Ni, Zhen Hua; Dong, Zheng Gao; Cui, Tie Jun

    2013-05-01

    The flexible control of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) is important and intriguing due to its wide application in novel plasmonic devices. Transformation optics (TO) offers the capability either to confine the SPP propagation on rigid curved/uneven surfaces, or to control the flow of SPPs on planar surfaces. However, TO has not permitted us to confine, manipulate, and control SPP waves on flexible curved surfaces. Here, we propose to confine and freely control flexible SPPs using TO and graphene. We show that SPP waves can be naturally confined and propagate on curved or uneven graphene surfaces with little bending and radiation losses, and the confined SPPs are further manipulated and controlled using TO. Flexible plasmonic devices are presented, including the bending waveguides, wave splitter, and Luneburg lens on curved surfaces. Together with the intrinsic flexibility, graphene can be served as a good platform for flexible transformation plasmonics.

  12. Infrared lidar overlap function: an experimental determination.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Rascado, Juan Luis; Costa, Maria João; Bortoli, Daniele; Silva, Ana Maria; Lyamani, Hassan; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas

    2010-09-13

    The most recent works demonstrate that the lidar overlap function, which describes the overlap between the laser beam and the receiver field of view, can be determined experimentally for the 355 and 532 nm channels using Raman signals. Nevertheless, the Raman channels cannot be used to determine the lidar overlap for the infrared channel (1064 nm) because of their low intensity. In addition, many Raman lidar systems only provide inelastic signals with reasonable signal-to-noise ratio at nighttime. In view of this fact, this work presents a modification of that method, based on the comparison of attenuated backscatter profiles derived from lidar and ceilometer, to retrieve the overlap function for the lidar infrared channel. Similarly to the Raman overlap method, the approach presented here allows to derive the overlap correction without an explicit knowledge of all system parameters. The application of the proposed methodology will improve the potential of Raman lidars to investigate the aerosol microphysical properties in the planetary boundary layer, extending the information of 1064 nm backscatter profiles to the ground and allowing the retrieval of microphysical properties practically close to the surface.

  13. Plasmon enhancement of luminescence upconversion.

    PubMed

    Park, Wounjhang; Lu, Dawei; Ahn, Sungmo

    2015-05-21

    Frequency conversion has always been an important topic in optics. Nonlinear optics has traditionally focused on frequency conversion based on nonlinear susceptibility but with the recent development of upconversion nanomaterials, luminescence upconversion has begun to receive renewed attention. While upconversion nanomaterials open doors to a wide range of new opportunities, they remain too inefficient for most applications. Incorporating plasmonic nanostructures provides a promising pathway to highly efficient upconversion. Naturally, a plethora of theoretical and experimental studies have been published in recent years, reporting enhancements up to several hundred. It is however difficult to make meaningful comparisons since the plasmonic fields are highly sensitive to the local geometry and excitation condition. Also, many luminescence upconversion processes involve multiple steps via different physical mechanisms and the overall output is often determined by a delicate interplay among them. This review is aimed at offering a comprehensive framework for plasmon enhanced luminescence upconversion. We first present quantum electrodynamics descriptions for all the processes involved in luminescence upconversion, which include absorption, emission, energy transfer and nonradiative transitions. We then present a bird's eye view of published works on plasmon enhanced upconversion, followed by more detailed discussion on comparable classes of nanostructures, the effects of spacer layers and local heating, and the dynamics of the plasmon enhanced upconversion process. Plasmon enhanced upconversion is a challenging and exciting field from the fundamental scientific perspective and also from technological standpoints. It offers an excellent system to study how optical processes are affected by the local photonic environment. This type of research is particularly timely as the plasmonics is placing heavier emphasis on nonlinearity. At the same time, efficient upconversion

  14. Particle plasmons: Why shape matters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, William L.

    2016-08-01

    Simple analytic expressions for the polarizability of metallic nanoparticles are in wide use in the field of plasmonics, but their origins are not obvious. In this article, expressions for the polarizability of a particle are derived in the quasistatic limit in a manner that allows the physical origin of the terms to be clearly seen. The discussion is tutorial in nature, with particular attention given to the role of particle shape since this is a controlling factor in particle plasmon resonances.

  15. Simultaneous observation of the quantization and the interference pattern of a plasmonic near-field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazza, L.; Lummen, T. T. A.; Quiñonez, E.; Murooka, Y.; Reed, B. W.; Barwick, B.; Carbone, F.

    2015-03-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons can confine electromagnetic fields in subwavelength spaces and are of interest for photonics, optical data storage devices and biosensing applications. In analogy to photons, they exhibit wave-particle duality, whose different aspects have recently been observed in separate tailored experiments. Here we demonstrate the ability of ultrafast transmission electron microscopy to simultaneously image both the spatial interference and the quantization of such confined plasmonic fields. Our experiments are accomplished by spatiotemporally overlapping electron and light pulses on a single nanowire suspended on a graphene film. The resulting energy exchange between single electrons and the quanta of the photoinduced near-field is imaged synchronously with its spatial interference pattern. This methodology enables the control and visualization of plasmonic fields at the nanoscale, providing a promising tool for understanding the fundamental properties of confined electromagnetic fields and the development of advanced photonic circuits.

  16. Simultaneous observation of the quantization and the interference pattern of a plasmonic near-field

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, L; Lummen, T.T.A.; Quiñonez, E; Murooka, Y; Reed, B.W.; Barwick, B; Carbone, F

    2015-01-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons can confine electromagnetic fields in subwavelength spaces and are of interest for photonics, optical data storage devices and biosensing applications. In analogy to photons, they exhibit wave–particle duality, whose different aspects have recently been observed in separate tailored experiments. Here we demonstrate the ability of ultrafast transmission electron microscopy to simultaneously image both the spatial interference and the quantization of such confined plasmonic fields. Our experiments are accomplished by spatiotemporally overlapping electron and light pulses on a single nanowire suspended on a graphene film. The resulting energy exchange between single electrons and the quanta of the photoinduced near-field is imaged synchronously with its spatial interference pattern. This methodology enables the control and visualization of plasmonic fields at the nanoscale, providing a promising tool for understanding the fundamental properties of confined electromagnetic fields and the development of advanced photonic circuits. PMID:25728197

  17. Simultaneous observation of the quantization and the interference pattern of a plasmonic near-field

    SciTech Connect

    Piazza, L.; Lummen, T. T. A.; Quiñonez, E.; Murooka, Y.; Reed, B. W.; Barwick, B.; Carbone, F.

    2015-03-02

    Surface plasmon polaritons can confine electromagnetic fields in subwavelength spaces and are of interest for photonics, optical data storage devices and biosensing applications. In analogy to photons, they exhibit wave–particle duality, whose different aspects have recently been observed in separate tailored experiments. Here we demonstrate the ability of ultrafast transmission electron microscopy to simultaneously image both the spatial interference and the quantization of such confined plasmonic fields. Our experiments are accomplished by spatiotemporally overlapping electron and light pulses on a single nanowire suspended on a graphene film. The resulting energy exchange between single electrons and the quanta of the photoinduced near-field is imaged synchronously with its spatial interference pattern. In conclusion, this methodology enables the control and visualization of plasmonic fields at the nanoscale, providing a promising tool for understanding the fundamental properties of confined electromagnetic fields and the development of advanced photonic circuits.

  18. Simultaneous observation of the quantization and the interference pattern of a plasmonic near-field

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Piazza, L.; Lummen, T. T. A.; Quiñonez, E.; Murooka, Y.; Reed, B. W.; Barwick, B.; Carbone, F.

    2015-03-02

    Surface plasmon polaritons can confine electromagnetic fields in subwavelength spaces and are of interest for photonics, optical data storage devices and biosensing applications. In analogy to photons, they exhibit wave–particle duality, whose different aspects have recently been observed in separate tailored experiments. Here we demonstrate the ability of ultrafast transmission electron microscopy to simultaneously image both the spatial interference and the quantization of such confined plasmonic fields. Our experiments are accomplished by spatiotemporally overlapping electron and light pulses on a single nanowire suspended on a graphene film. The resulting energy exchange between single electrons and the quanta of the photoinducedmore » near-field is imaged synchronously with its spatial interference pattern. In conclusion, this methodology enables the control and visualization of plasmonic fields at the nanoscale, providing a promising tool for understanding the fundamental properties of confined electromagnetic fields and the development of advanced photonic circuits.« less

  19. Tunable surface plasmon devices

    DOEpatents

    Shaner, Eric A.; Wasserman, Daniel

    2011-08-30

    A tunable extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) device wherein the tunability derives from controlled variation of the dielectric constant of a semiconducting material (semiconductor) in evanescent-field contact with a metallic array of sub-wavelength apertures. The surface plasmon resonance wavelength can be changed by changing the dielectric constant of the dielectric material. In embodiments of this invention, the dielectric material is a semiconducting material. The dielectric constant of the semiconducting material in the metal/semiconductor interfacial region is controllably adjusted by adjusting one or more of the semiconductor plasma frequency, the concentration and effective mass of free carriers, and the background high-frequency dielectric constant in the interfacial region. Thermal heating and/or voltage-gated carrier-concentration changes may be used to variably adjust the value of the semiconductor dielectric constant.

  20. A plasmonic Fano switch.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wei-Shun; Lassiter, J Britt; Swanglap, Pattanawit; Sobhani, Heidar; Khatua, Saumyakanti; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J; Link, Stephan

    2012-09-12

    Plasmonic clusters can support Fano resonances, where the line shape characteristics are controlled by cluster geometry. Here we show that clusters with a hemicircular central disk surrounded by a circular ring of closely spaced, coupled nanodisks yield Fano-like and non-Fano-like spectra for orthogonal incident polarization orientations. When this structure is incorporated into an uniquely broadband, liquid crystal device geometry, the entire Fano resonance spectrum can be switched on and off in a voltage-dependent manner. A reversible transition between the Fano-like and non-Fano-like spectra is induced by relatively low (∼6 V) applied voltages, resulting in a complete on/off switching of the transparency window. PMID:22924610

  1. Nonlinear terahertz superconducting plasmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jingbo; Liang, Lanju; Jin, Biaobing E-mail: tonouchi@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp Kang, Lin; Xu, Weiwei; Chen, Jian; Wu, Peiheng E-mail: tonouchi@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp; Zhang, Caihong; Kawayama, Iwao; Murakami, Hironaru; Tonouchi, Masayoshi E-mail: tonouchi@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp; Wang, Huabing

    2014-10-20

    Nonlinear terahertz (THz) transmission through subwavelength hole array in superconducting niobium nitride (NbN) film is experimentally investigated using intense THz pulses. The good agreement between the measurement and numerical simulations indicates that the field strength dependent transmission mainly arises from the nonlinear properties of the superconducting film. Under weak THz pulses, the transmission peak can be tuned over a frequency range of 145 GHz which is attributed to the high kinetic inductance of 50 nm-thick NbN film. Utilizing the THz pump-THz probe spectroscopy, we study the dynamic process of transmission spectra and demonstrate that the transition time of such superconducting plasmonic device is within 5 ps.

  2. A plasmonic Fano switch.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wei-Shun; Lassiter, J Britt; Swanglap, Pattanawit; Sobhani, Heidar; Khatua, Saumyakanti; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J; Link, Stephan

    2012-09-12

    Plasmonic clusters can support Fano resonances, where the line shape characteristics are controlled by cluster geometry. Here we show that clusters with a hemicircular central disk surrounded by a circular ring of closely spaced, coupled nanodisks yield Fano-like and non-Fano-like spectra for orthogonal incident polarization orientations. When this structure is incorporated into an uniquely broadband, liquid crystal device geometry, the entire Fano resonance spectrum can be switched on and off in a voltage-dependent manner. A reversible transition between the Fano-like and non-Fano-like spectra is induced by relatively low (∼6 V) applied voltages, resulting in a complete on/off switching of the transparency window.

  3. Plasmonics in Biology and Plasmon-Controlled Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence technology is fully entrenched in all aspects of biological research. To a significant extent, future advances in biology and medicine depend on the advances in the capabilities of fluorescence measurements. As examples, the sensitivity of many clinical assays is limited by sample autofluorescence, single-molecule detection is limited by the brightness and photostability of the fluorophores, and the spatial resolution of cellular imaging is limited to about one-half of the wavelength of the incident light. We believe a combination of fluorescence, plasmonics, and nanofabrication can fundamentally change and increase the capabilities of fluorescence technology. Surface plasmons are collective oscillations of free electrons in metallic surfaces and particles. Surface plasmons, without fluorescence, are already in use to a limited extent in biological research. These applications include the use of surface plasmon resonance to measure bioaffinity reactions and the use of metal colloids as light-scattering probes. However, the uses of surface plasmons in biology are not limited to their optical absorption or extinction. We now know that fluorophores in the excited state can create plasmons that radiate into the far field and that fluorophores in the ground state can interact with and be excited by surface plasmons. These reciprocal interactions suggest that the novel optical absorption and scattering properties of metallic nanostructures can be used to control the decay rates, location, and direction of fluorophore emission. We refer to these phenomena as plasmon-controlled fluorescence (PCF). We predict that PCF will result in a new generation of probes and devices. These likely possibilities include ultrabright single-particle probes that do not photobleach, probes for selective multiphoton excitation with decreased light intensities, and distance measurements in biomolecular assemblies in the range from 10 to 200 nm. Additionally, PCF is likely to allow

  4. Plasmonics in Biology and Plasmon-Controlled Fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Lakowicz, Joseph R

    2006-03-01

    Fluorescence technology is fully entrenched in all aspects of biological research. To a significant extent, future advances in biology and medicine depend on the advances in the capabilities of fluorescence measurements. As examples, the sensitivity of many clinical assays is limited by sample autofluorescence, single-molecule detection is limited by the brightness and photostability of the fluorophores, and the spatial resolution of cellular imaging is limited to about one-half of the wavelength of the incident light. We believe a combination of fluorescence, plasmonics, and nanofabrication can fundamentally change and increase the capabilities of fluorescence technology. Surface plasmons are collective oscillations of free electrons in metallic surfaces and particles. Surface plasmons, without fluorescence, are already in use to a limited extent in biological research. These applications include the use of surface plasmon resonance to measure bioaffinity reactions and the use of metal colloids as light-scattering probes. However, the uses of surface plasmons in biology are not limited to their optical absorption or extinction. We now know that fluorophores in the excited state can create plasmons that radiate into the far field and that fluorophores in the ground state can interact with and be excited by surface plasmons. These reciprocal interactions suggest that the novel optical absorption and scattering properties of metallic nanostructures can be used to control the decay rates, location, and direction of fluorophore emission. We refer to these phenomena as plasmon-controlled fluorescence (PCF). We predict that PCF will result in a new generation of probes and devices. These likely possibilities include ultrabright single-particle probes that do not photobleach, probes for selective multiphoton excitation with decreased light intensities, and distance measurements in biomolecular assemblies in the range from 10 to 200 nm. Additionally, PCF is likely to allow

  5. Diffusion bonding

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert C.

    1976-06-22

    1. A method for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding, comprising the steps of coating at least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces with nickel, positioning a coated surface portion in a contiguous relationship with an other surface portion, subjecting the contiguously disposed surface portions to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure, applying a force upon the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other, heating the contiguous surface portions to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, substantially uniformly decreasing the applied force while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature, and maintaining a portion of the applied force at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions.

  6. Overlapping genetic codes for overlapping frameshifted genes in Testudines, and Lepidochelys olivacea as special case.

    PubMed

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2012-12-01

    Mitochondrial genes code for additional proteins after +2 frameshifts by reassigning stops to code for amino acids, which defines overlapping genetic codes for overlapping genes. Turtles recode stops UAR → Trp and AGR → Lys (AGR → Gly in the marine Olive Ridley turtle, Lepidochelys olivacea). In Lepidochelys the +2 frameshifted mitochondrial Cytb gene lacks stops, open reading frames from other genes code for unknown proteins, and for regular mitochondrial proteins after frameshifts according to the overlapping genetic code. Lepidochelys' inversion between proteins coded by regular and overlapping genetic codes substantiates the existence of overlap coding. ND4 differs among Lepidochelys mitochondrial genomes: it is regular in DQ486893; in NC_011516, the open reading frame codes for another protein, the regular ND4 protein is coded by the frameshifted sequence reassigning stops as in other turtles. These systematic patterns are incompatible with Genbank/sequencing errors and DNA decay. Random mixing of synonymous codons, conserving main frame coding properties, shows optimization of natural sequences for overlap coding; Ka/Ks analyses show high positive (directional) selection on overlapping genes. Tests based on circular genetic codes confirm programmed frameshifts in ND3 and ND4l genes, and predicted frameshift sites for overlap coding in Lepidochelys. Chelonian mitochondria adapt for overlapping gene expression: cloverleaf formation by antisense tRNAs with predicted anticodons matching stops coevolves with overlap coding; antisense tRNAs with predicted expanded anticodons (frameshift suppressor tRNAs) associate with frameshift-coding in ND3 and ND4l, a potential regulation of frameshifted overlap coding. Anaeroby perhaps switched between regular and overlap coding genes in Lepidochelys.

  7. EDITORIAL: Plasmas and plasmons: links in nanosilver Plasmas and plasmons: links in nanosilver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2013-03-01

    appearing in the 620-800 nm regions of the absorption spectra. A number of research groups have investigated the possibility of exploiting the plasmonic properties of silver and gold nanostructures for optoelectronic devices [7-9]. The advantages can be quite substantial. Researchers in Korea successfully used silver nanoparticles to obtain a 38% increase in performance of blue LEDs by using silver nanoparticles embedded in p-GaN [10]. The researchers attribute the improvement to an increase in the spontaneous emission rate through resonance coupling between the excitons in multiple quantum wells and localized surface plasmons in the silver nanoparticles. In their work reported in this issue Kostya Ostrikov and his co-authors bridge the link between microplasma-assisted electrochemical process parameters and the plasmonic response. As they point out, 'This is an important experimental step towards bringing together plasma chemistry and plasmonics' [1]. All-gas-phase plasma approaches have already been demonstrated for the synthesis of nanoparticles of other metals. X D Pi and colleagues from the University of Minnesota demonstrated how one simple gas-phase process could produce stable silicon nanocrystal emitters with tailored size and surface functionalization [11]. Previously silicon nanocrystals had been prone to emission instabilities in air. Now Ostrikov and colleagues at the University of Sydney, CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering in Australia and the Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas in China have studied microplasma-assisted electrochemical synthesis of Ag nanoparticles for plasmonic applications [1]. The synthesis uses moderate temperatures and atmospheric pressures and does not involve any toxic reducing agents. In addition they demonstrate how it allows control over nanoparticle size and interparticle spacing to optimize performance in device applications. Despite the overlap in plasma physics and the origins of plasmonic phenomena, studies of the

  8. Automatic segmentation of overlapping and touching chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhiqiang; Chen, Xiaohua; Zhang, Renli; Yu, Chang

    2001-09-01

    This paper describes a technique to segment overlapping and touching chromosomes of human metaphase cells. Automated chromosome classification has been an important pattern recognition problem for decades, numerous attempts were made in the past to characterize chromosome band patterns. But successful separation between touching and overlapping chromosomes is vital for correct classification. Since chromosomes are non-rigid objects, common methods for separation between touching chromosomes are not usable. We proposed a method using shape concave and convex information, topology analysis information, and band pale paths for segmentation of touching and overlapping chromosomes. To detect shape concave and convex information, we should first pre-segment the chromosomes and get the edge of overlapping and touching chromosomes. After filtering the original image using edge-preserving filter, we adopt the Otsu's segmentation method and extract the boundary of chromosomes. Hence the boundary can be used for segment the overlapping and touching chromosomes by detecting the concave and convex information based on boundary information. Most of the traditional boundary-based algorithms detect corners based on two steps: the first step is to acquire the smoothed version of curvature at every point along the contour, and the second step is to detect the positions where curvature maximal occur and threshold the curvature as corner points. Recently wavelet transform has been adopted into corner detection algorithms. Since the metaphase overlapping chromosomes has multi-scale corners, we adopt a multi-scale corner detection method based on Hua's method for corner detection. For touching chromosomes, it is convenient to split them using pale paths. Starting from concave corner points, a search algorithm is represented. The searching algorithm traces three pixels into the object in the direction of the normal vector in order to avoid stopping at the initial boundary until it

  9. Chalcogen bond: a sister noncovalent bond to halogen bond.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weizhou; Ji, Baoming; Zhang, Yu

    2009-07-16

    A sister noncovalent bond to halogen bond, termed chalcogen bond, is defined in this article. By selecting the complexes H(2)CS...Cl(-), F(2)CS...Cl(-), OCS...Cl(-), and SCS...Cl(-) as models, the bond-length change, interaction energy, topological property of the electron charge density and its Laplacian, and the charge transfer of the chalcogen bond have been investigated in detail theoretically. It was found that the similar misshaped electron clouds of the chalcogen atom and the halogen atom result in the similar properties of the chalcogen bond and the halogen bond. Experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  10. Analysis of noise barrier overlap gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Lloyd A.; Clum, Craig M.

    2002-04-01

    Sound propagation through the gap produced by two parallel vertical barriers with overlapped ends is formulated for traffic noise sources. The analysis identifies both source and receiver regions according to the mechanisms that influence noise propagation in the vicinity of an overlap gap. A method to account for the contributions from the various source regions for a given receiver location is described. The derived method can be implemented using various equations for sound propagation. The results of using equations approved by the United States Federal Highway Administration for traffic noise propagation are given. Uncalibrated predictions are compared with field measurements for up to 30 receiver positions from each of four overlap gaps. The relative importance of contributions from reflected rays to the noise levels at receiver positions is given. The analysis confirms the initial hypothesis that a commonly used strategy of overlapping barriers by an amount equal to two or three times the overlap width is useful for controlling line-of-sight propagation but ignores the substantial effect of reflections.

  11. Adaptive Estimation with Partially Overlapping Models

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sunyoung; Fine, Jason; Liu, Yufeng

    2015-01-01

    In many problems, one has several models of interest that capture key parameters describing the distribution of the data. Partially overlapping models are taken as models in which at least one covariate effect is common to the models. A priori knowledge of such structure enables efficient estimation of all model parameters. However, in practice, this structure may be unknown. We propose adaptive composite M-estimation (ACME) for partially overlapping models using a composite loss function, which is a linear combination of loss functions defining the individual models. Penalization is applied to pairwise differences of parameters across models, resulting in data driven identification of the overlap structure. Further penalization is imposed on the individual parameters, enabling sparse estimation in the regression setting. The recovery of the overlap structure enables more efficient parameter estimation. An oracle result is established. Simulation studies illustrate the advantages of ACME over existing methods that fit individual models separately or make strong a priori assumption about the overlap structure. PMID:26917931

  12. Pi Bond Orders and Bond Lengths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herndon, William C.; Parkanyi, Cyril

    1976-01-01

    Discusses three methods of correlating bond orders and bond lengths in unsaturated hydrocarbons: the Pauling theory, the Huckel molecular orbital technique, and self-consistent-field techniques. (MLH)

  13. Plasmon dromions in a metamaterial via plasmon-induced transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Zhengyang; Huang, Guoxiang

    2016-01-01

    We propose a scheme to realize a giant Kerr nonlinearity and create stable high-dimensional nonlinear plasmon polaritons via plasmon-induced transparency (PIT) in a metamaterial, which is constructed by an array of unit cell consisting of a cut-wire and a pair of varactor-loaded split-ring resonators. We show that, due to the PIT effect and the nonlinearity contributed by the varactor, the system may possess very large second-order and third-order nonlinear susceptibilities. We further show that the system supports a resonant interaction between longwave and shortwave and hence effective third-order nonlinear susceptibility can be further enhanced one order of magnitude. Based on these peculiar properties, we derive Davey-Stewartson equations governing the evolution of longwave and shortwave envelope, and demonstrate that it possible to generate plasmon dromions [i.e., (2+1)-dimensional plasmon solitons with coupled longwave and shortwave components] with very low generation power. Our study raises the possibility for obtaining new, giant Kerr effect and stable high-dimensional nonlinear plasmon polaritons at very low radiation intensity by using nonlinear PIT metamaterials.

  14. Surface Plasmon-Assisted Solar Energy Conversion.

    PubMed

    Dodekatos, Georgios; Schünemann, Stefan; Tüysüz, Harun

    2016-01-01

    The utilization of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) from plasmonic noble metals in combination with semiconductors promises great improvements for visible light-driven photocatalysis, in particular for energy conversion. This review summarizes the basic principles of plasmonic photocatalysis, giving a comprehensive overview about the proposed mechanisms for enhancing the performance of photocatalytically active semiconductors with plasmonic devices and their applications for surface plasmon-assisted solar energy conversion. The main focus is on gold and, to a lesser extent, silver nanoparticles in combination with titania as semiconductor and their usage as active plasmonic photocatalysts. Recent advances in water splitting, hydrogen generation with sacrificial organic compounds, and CO2 reduction to hydrocarbons for solar fuel production are highlighted. Finally, further improvements for plasmonic photocatalysts, regarding performance, stability, and economic feasibility, are discussed for surface plasmon-assisted solar energy conversion.

  15. Plasmon-enhanced optical sensors: a review.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Cushing, Scott K; Wu, Nianqiang

    2015-01-21

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has found extensive applications in chemi-sensors and biosensors. Plasmons play different roles in different types of optical sensors. SPR transduces a signal in a colorimetric sensor through shifts in the spectral position and intensity in response to external stimuli. SPR can also concentrate the incident electromagnetic field in a nanostructure, modulating fluorescence emission and enabling plasmon-enhanced fluorescence to be used for ultrasensitive detection. Furthermore, plasmons have been extensively used for amplifying a Raman signal in a surface-enhanced Raman scattering sensor. This paper presents a review of recent research progress in plasmon-enhanced optical sensing, giving emphasis on the physical basis of plasmon-enhanced sensors and how these principles guide the design of sensors. In particular, this paper discusses the design strategies for nanomaterials and nanostructures to plasmonically enhance optical sensing signals, also highlighting the applications of plasmon-enhanced optical sensors in healthcare, homeland security, food safety and environmental monitoring.

  16. Visible quantum plasmonics from metallic nanodimers

    PubMed Central

    Alpeggiani, F.; D’Agostino, S.; Sanvitto, D.; Gerace, D.

    2016-01-01

    We report theoretical evidence that bulk nonlinear materials weakly interacting with highly localized plasmonic modes in ultra-sub-wavelength metallic nanostructures can lead to nonlinear effects at the single plasmon level in the visible range. In particular, the two-plasmon interaction energy in such systems is numerically estimated to be comparable with the typical plasmon linewidths. Localized surface plasmons are thus predicted to exhibit a purely nonclassical behavior, which can be clearly identified by a sub-Poissonian second-order correlation in the signal scattered from the quantized plasmonic field under coherent electromagnetic excitation. We explicitly show that systems sensitive to single-plasmon scattering can be experimentally realized by combining electromagnetic confinement in the interstitial region of gold nanodimers with local infiltration or deposition of ordinary nonlinear materials. We also propose configurations that could allow to realistically detect such an effect with state-of-the-art technology, overcoming the limitations imposed by the short plasmonic lifetime. PMID:27752037

  17. Molecular resonant dissociation of surface-adsorbed molecules by plasmonic nanoscissors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenglong; Sheng, Shaoxiang; Zheng, Hairong; Xu, Hongxing; Sun, Mengtao

    2014-04-01

    The ability to break individual bonds or specific modes in chemical reactions is an ardently sought goal by chemists and physicists. While photochemistry based methodologies are very successful in controlling e.g. photocatalysis, photosynthesis and the degradation of plastic, it is hard to break individual molecular bonds for those molecules adsorbed on the surface because of the weak light-absorption in molecules and the redistribution of the resulting vibrational energy both inside the molecule and to its surrounding environment. Here we show how to overcome these obstacles with a plasmonic hot-electron mediated process and demonstrate a new method that allows the sensitive control of resonant dissociation of surface-adsorbed molecules by `plasmonic' scissors. To that end, we used a high-vacuum tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (HV-TERS) setup to dissociate resonantly excited NC2H6 fragments from Malachite green. The surface plasmons (SPs) excited at the sharp metal tip not only enhance the local electric field to harvest the light incident from the laser, but crucially supply `hot electrons' whose energy can be transferred to individual bonds. These processes are resonant Raman, which result in some active chemical bonds and then weaken these bonds, followed by dumping in lots of indiscriminant energy and breaking the weakest bond. The method allows for sensitive control of both the rate and probability of dissociation through their dependence on the density of hot electrons, which can be manipulated by tuning the laser intensity or tunneling current/bias voltage in the HV-TERS setup, respectively. The concepts of plasmonic scissors open up new versatile avenues for the deep understanding of in situ surface-catalyzed chemistry.The ability to break individual bonds or specific modes in chemical reactions is an ardently sought goal by chemists and physicists. While photochemistry based methodologies are very successful in controlling e.g. photocatalysis

  18. Integrating plasmonic diagnostics and microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Lifang; Zhang, Nan; Liu, Hong; Zhou, Xiaodong; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonics is generally divided into two categories: surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of electromagnetic modes propagating along a (noble) metal/dielectric interface and localized SPRs (LSPRs) on nanoscopic metallic structures (particles, rods, shells, holes, etc.). Both optical transducer concepts can be combined with and integrated in microfluidic devices for biomolecular analyte detections, with the benefits of small foot-print for point-of-care detection, low-cost for one-time disposal, and ease of being integrated into an array format. The key technologies in such integration include the plasmonic chip, microfluidic channel fabrication, surface bio-functionalization, and selection of the detection scheme, which are selected according to the specifics of the targeting analytes. This paper demonstrates a few examples of the many versions of how to combine plasmonics and integrated microfluidics, using different plasmonic generation mechanisms for different analyte detections. One example is a DNA sensor array using a gold film as substrate and surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy as the transduction method. This is then compared to grating-coupled SPR for poly(ethylene glycol) thiol interaction detected by angle interrogation, gold nanohole based LSPR chip for biotin-strepavidin detection by wavelength shift, and gold nanoholes/nanopillars for the detection of prostate specific antigen by quantum dot labels excited by the LSPR. Our experimental results exemplified that the plasmonic integrated microfluidics is a promising tool for understanding the biomolecular interactions and molecular recognition process as well as biosensing, especially for on-site or point-of-care diagnostics. PMID:26392832

  19. Phonon Overlaps in Molecular Quantum Dot Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Connie; Sethna, James

    2004-03-01

    We model the amplitudes and frequencies of the vibrational sidebands for the new molecular quantum dot systems. We calculate the Franck-Condon phonon overlaps in the 3N-dimensional configuration sapce. We solve the general case where the vibrational frequencies and eigenmodes change during the transition. We perform PM3 and DFT calculations for the case of the dumb bell-shaped C140 molecule. We find that the strongest amplitudes are associated with the 11 meV stretch mode, in agreement with experiment. The experimental amplitudes vary from molecule to molecule; indicating that the molecular overlaps are environment dependent. We explore overlaps in the presence of external electric fields from image charges and counter ions.

  20. Generating Composite Overlapping Grids on CAD Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Henshaw, W.D.

    2002-02-07

    We describe some algorithms and tools that have been developed to generate composite overlapping grids on geometries that have been defined with computer aided design (CAD) programs. This process consists of five main steps. Starting from a description of the surfaces defining the computational domain we (1) correct errors in the CAD representation, (2) determine topology of the patched-surface, (3) build a global triangulation of the surface, (4) construct structured surface and volume grids using hyperbolic grid generation, and (5) generate the overlapping grid by determining the holes and the interpolation points. The overlapping grid generator which is used for the final step also supports the rapid generation of grids for block-structured adaptive mesh refinement and for moving grids. These algorithms have been implemented as part of the Overture object-oriented framework.

  1. Nanoscale photonics using coupled hybrid plasmonic architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Charles; Su, Yiwen; Helmy, Amr S.

    2016-04-01

    Plasmonic waveguides, which support surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) propagating along metal-dielectric interfaces, offer strong field confinement and are ideal for the design of integrated nano-scale photonic devices. However, due to free-carrier absorption in the metal, the enhanced mode confinement inevitably entails an increase in the waveguide loss. This lowers the device figure-of-merit achievable with passive plasmonic components and in turn hinders the performance of active plasmonic components such as optical modulators.

  2. Brightening gold nanoparticles: new sensing approach based on plasmon resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Jing, Chao; Gu, Zhen; Long, Yi-Tao

    2015-05-11

    Scattering recovered plasmonic resonance energy transfer (SR-PRET) was reported by blocking the plasmon resonance energy transfer (PRET) from gold nanoparticle (GNP) to the adsorbed molecules (RdBS). Due to the selective cleavage of the Si-O bond by F- ions, the quenching is switched off causing an increase in the brightness of the GNPs,detected using dark-field microscopy (DFM) were brightened. This method was successfully applied to the determination of fluoride ions in water. The SR-PRET provides a potential approach for a vitro/vivo sensing with high sensitivity and selectivity.

  3. Brightening Gold Nanoparticles: New Sensing Approach Based on Plasmon Resonance Energy Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lei; Jing, Chao; Gu, Zhen; Long, Yi-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Scattering recovered plasmonic resonance energy transfer (SR-PRET) was reported by blocking the plasmon resonance energy transfer (PRET) from gold nanoparticle (GNP) to the adsorbed molecules (RdBS). Due to the selective cleavage of the Si-O bond by F− ions, the quenching is switched off causing an increase in the brightness of the GNPs,detected using dark-field microscopy (DFM) were brightened. This method was successfully applied to the determination of fluoride ions in water. The SR-PRET provides a potential approach for a vitro/vivo sensing with high sensitivity and selectivity. PMID:25959016

  4. Sub-Plate Overlap Code Documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taff, L. G.; Bucciarelli, B.; Zarate, N.

    1997-01-01

    An expansion of the plate overlap method of astrometric data reduction to a single plate has been proposed and successfully tested. Each plate is (artificially) divided into sub-plates which can then be overlapped. This reduces the area of a 'plate' over which a plate model needs to accurately represent the relationship between measured coordinates and standard coordinates. Application is made to non-astrographic plates such as Schmidt plates and to wide-field astrographic plates. Indeed, the method is completely general and can be applied to any type of recording media.

  5. A spiral plasmonic lens with directional excitation of surface plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Qingrui; Zhang, Chi; Hu, Xinhua

    2016-08-01

    Conventional plasmonic lenses are composed of curved slits carved through metallic films. Here, we propose a new plasmonic lens based on a metallic slit with an auxiliary groove. When the lens is illumined normally, only inward surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) can be generated and then focused into a hot spot at the center of the lens. The focusing effect is theoretically investigated by varying the groove parameters and incident polarizations. It is found that this phenomenon exists for both the circular and linear polarizations of incidence. Under optimal groove parameters, the intensity of the focal spot in our lens can be 2.5 times of that in one without grooves for both linearly and circularly polarized illuminations.

  6. Plasmonic Nanobubbles as Transient Vapor Nanobubbles Generated Around Plasmonic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina; Hu, Ying; Latterini, Loredana; Tarpani, Luigi; Lee, Seunghyun; Drezek, Rebekah A.; Hafner, Jason H.; Lapotko, Dmitri O.

    2010-01-01

    We have used short laser pulses to generate transient vapor nanobubbles around plasmonic nanoparticles. The photothermal, mechanical and optical properties of such bubbles were found to be different from those of plasmonic nanoparticle and vapor bubbles as well. This phenomena was considered as a new complex nanosystem – plasmonic nanobubble (PNB). Mechanical and optical scattering properties of PNB depended upon the nanoparticle surface and heat capacity, clusterization state, and the optical pulse length. The generation of the PNB required much higher laser pulse fluence thresholds than the explosive boiling level, and was characterized by the relatively high lower threshold of the minimal size (lifetime) of PNB. Optical scattering by PNB and its diameter (measured as the lifetime) has been varied with the fluence of laser pulse and this has demonstrated the tunable nature of PNB. PMID:20307085

  7. A spiral plasmonic lens with directional excitation of surface plasmons

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qingrui; Zhang, Chi; Hu, Xinhua

    2016-01-01

    Conventional plasmonic lenses are composed of curved slits carved through metallic films. Here, we propose a new plasmonic lens based on a metallic slit with an auxiliary groove. When the lens is illumined normally, only inward surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) can be generated and then focused into a hot spot at the center of the lens. The focusing effect is theoretically investigated by varying the groove parameters and incident polarizations. It is found that this phenomenon exists for both the circular and linear polarizations of incidence. Under optimal groove parameters, the intensity of the focal spot in our lens can be 2.5 times of that in one without grooves for both linearly and circularly polarized illuminations. PMID:27562227

  8. A spiral plasmonic lens with directional excitation of surface plasmons.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qingrui; Zhang, Chi; Hu, Xinhua

    2016-01-01

    Conventional plasmonic lenses are composed of curved slits carved through metallic films. Here, we propose a new plasmonic lens based on a metallic slit with an auxiliary groove. When the lens is illumined normally, only inward surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) can be generated and then focused into a hot spot at the center of the lens. The focusing effect is theoretically investigated by varying the groove parameters and incident polarizations. It is found that this phenomenon exists for both the circular and linear polarizations of incidence. Under optimal groove parameters, the intensity of the focal spot in our lens can be 2.5 times of that in one without grooves for both linearly and circularly polarized illuminations. PMID:27562227

  9. Bonded Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Another spinoff to the food processing industry involves a dry lubricant developed by General Magnaplate Corp. of Linden, N.J. Used in such spacecraft as Apollo, Skylab and Viking, the lubricant is a coating bonded to metal surfaces providing permanent lubrication and corrosion resistance. The coating lengthens equipment life and permits machinery to be operated at greater speed, thus increasing productivity and reducing costs. Bonded lubricants are used in scores of commercia1 applications. They have proved particularly valuable to food processing firms because, while increasing production efficiency, they also help meet the stringent USDA sanitation codes for food-handling equipment. For example, a cookie manufacturer plagued production interruptions because sticky batter was clogging the cookie molds had the brass molds coated to solve the problem. Similarly, a pasta producer faced USDA action on a sanitation violation because dough was clinging to an automatic ravioli-forming machine; use of the anti-stick coating on the steel forming plates solved the dual problem of sanitation deficiency and production line downtime.

  10. Plasmonic Switches and Sensors Based on PANI-Coated Gold Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Nina

    a macroscale array of PANI-coated gold nanorods immobilized on glass slides, whose performance is as good as that of the individual PANI-coated gold nanorods. With much smaller amounts of materials, my core/shell nanorod arrays show peak extinction values and maximal modulation depths that are comparable to those of PANI films with micrometer-scale thicknesses. Switching coupled surface plasmon relative to uncoupled one affords the possibility to achieve the modulation over a wide spectral band and with wealthy plasmonic responses. Thus, I have studied the active control of plasmon coupling in homodimers and homotrimers of PANI-coated gold nanospheres (PGNSs). The dimers and trimers are obtained by reducing the surfactant concentration in the polymerization process of PANI. The reversible proton-doping of PANI enables the control of plasmon coupling to succeed. When the plasmon coupling of the dimers is switched, the wavelength shift of the strongest scattering peak shows an exponential increase with the decrease of the interparticle gap distance. A giant wavelength shift of 231 nm is observed for the dimer with a shell thickness of 10 nm and a gap distance of 0.5 nm. Electrodynamic calculations ascertain that the wavelength shift of the strongest scattering peak originates from the tuning of the dipolar bonding plasmon resonance mode in the dimers. The quadrupolar bonding plasmon resonance mode is turned on and off by switching the doped and undoped state of the dimers with gap distances of less than 3 nm. The active tuning of plasmon coupling is further demonstrated with the trimers of PGNSs, which is sensitive to their configurations. In the triangular configuration, larger vertex angles lead to larger wavelength shifts for the plasmonic tuning. Another strategy for controlling the dielectric properties of PANI shell around gold nanostructures is to change its oxidation level. The variation of the oxidation state of PANI leads to the plasmonic peak wavelength

  11. Plasmonic Gold Nanorods Coverage Influence on Enhancement of the Photoluminescence of Two-Dimensional MoS2 Monolayer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kevin C. J.; Chen, Yi-Huan; Lin, Hsiang-Yu; Cheng, Chia-Chin; Chen, Pei-Ying; Wu, Ting-Yi; Shih, Min-Hsiung; Wei, Kung-Hwa; Li, Lain-Jong; Chang, Chien-Wen

    2015-01-01

    The 2-D transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) semiconductors, has received great attention due to its excellent optical and electronic properties and potential applications in field-effect transistors, light emitting and sensing devices. Recently surface plasmon enhanced photoluminescence (PL) of the weak 2-D TMD atomic layers was developed to realize the potential optoelectronic devices. However, we noticed that the enhancement would not increase monotonically with increasing of metal plasmonic objects and the emission drop after the certain coverage. This study presents the optimized PL enhancement of a monolayer MoS2 in the presence of gold (Au) nanorods. A localized surface plasmon wave of Au nanorods that generated around the monolayer MoS2 can provide resonance wavelength overlapping with that of the MoS2 gain spectrum. These spatial and spectral overlapping between the localized surface plasmon polariton waves and that from MoS2 emission drastically enhanced the light emission from the MoS2 monolayer. We gave a simple model and physical interpretations to explain the phenomena. The plasmonic Au nanostructures approach provides a valuable avenue to enhancing the emitting efficiency of the 2-D nano-materials and their devices for the future optoelectronic devices and systems. PMID:26576041

  12. Chiral plasmons without magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Song, Justin C W; Rudner, Mark S

    2016-04-26

    Plasmons, the collective oscillations of interacting electrons, possess emergent properties that dramatically alter the optical response of metals. We predict the existence of a new class of plasmons-chiral Berry plasmons (CBPs)-for a wide range of 2D metallic systems including gapped Dirac materials. As we show, in these materials the interplay between Berry curvature and electron-electron interactions yields chiral plasmonic modes at zero magnetic field. The CBP modes are confined to system boundaries, even in the absence of topological edge states, with chirality manifested in split energy dispersions for oppositely directed plasmon waves. We unveil a rich CBP phenomenology and propose setups for realizing them, including in anomalous Hall metals and optically pumped 2D Dirac materials. Realization of CBPs will offer a powerful paradigm for magnetic field-free, subwavelength optical nonreciprocity, in the mid-IR to terahertz range, with tunable splittings as large as tens of THz, as well as sensitive all-optical diagnostics of topological bands. PMID:27071090

  13. Microgrooved plasmonic bottle microresonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Nasir, M. N.; Ding, M.; Murugan, G. S.; Zervas, M. N.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate an enhancement to SPW cavity through the incorporation of high-Q WGM bottle microresonator (BMR) with surface microgrooves. A standard BMR fabricated through the “soften-and-compress” technique with initial length of 280 μm, bottle diameter of 187 μm and stem diameter of 125 μm was utilized in the experiment for supporting WGMs. Thin gold film was deposited on top of the BMR for generating SPWs. 21 microgrooves was then inscribed on the metal surface of the BMR along the azimuthal direction with 10 μm length, 485 nm width, 6 μm depth and pitch of 1.5 μm. Due to surface curvature, the gold film only covered half of the BMR with a characteristic meniscus shape and maximum thickness of 30 nm. The meniscus provides appropriately tapered metal edges that facilitate the adiabatic transformation of BMR WGMs to SPWs and vice-versa. Lorentzian shape-line fit performed on the TM excited resonances show that plasmonic Q values in excess of 4000 could be achieved from such structure with ∼ 25% coupling efficiency.

  14. Active Chiral Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xinghui; Schäferling, Martin; Michel, Ann-Katrin U; Tittl, Andreas; Wuttig, Matthias; Taubner, Thomas; Giessen, Harald

    2015-07-01

    Active control over the handedness of a chiral metamaterial has the potential to serve as key element for highly integrated polarization engineering approaches, polarization sensitive imaging devices, and stereo display technologies. However, this is hard to achieve as it seemingly involves the reconfiguration of the metamolecule from a left-handed into a right-handed enantiomer and vice versa. This type of mechanical actuation is intricate and usually neither monolithically realizable nor viable for high-speed applications. Here, enabled by the phase change material Ge3Sb2Te6 (GST-326), we demonstrate a tunable and switchable mid-infrared plasmonic chiral metamaterial in a proof-of-concept experiment. A large tunability range of the circular dichroism response from λ = 4.15 to 4.90 μm is achieved, and we experimentally demonstrate that the combination of a passive bias-type chiral layer with the active chiral metamaterial allows for switchable chirality, that is, the reversal of the circular dichroism sign, in a fully planar, layered design without the need for geometrical reconfiguration. Because phase change materials can be electrically and optically switched, our designs may open up a path for highly integrated mid-IR polarization engineering devices that can be modulated on ultrafast time scales.

  15. Confinement of Surface Plasmon Polaritons by Heterostructures of Plasmonic Crystals.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hikaru; Mizuma, Shohei; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2015-10-14

    Square lattice plasmonic crystals (SQ-PlCs) composed of silver pillars generate large bandgaps for surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). SPP confinement is demonstrated using one- and two-dimensional heterostructures of SQ-PlCs comprised of cylindrical pillars with different diameters in a common square lattice. Two kinds of localized modes are observed to appear in the heterostructures by photon map imaging using cathodoluminescence (CL) technique combined with a scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Angle-resolved CL spectroscopy reveals contrasting characteristics of the two localized modes in their emission distributions, indicating that they originate from the band-edge A and E modes of the matrix SQ-PlC.

  16. Reflection positivity of free overlap fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Kikukawa, Yoshio; Usui, Kouta

    2010-12-01

    It is shown that free lattice fermions defined by overlap Dirac operator fulfill the Osterwalder-Schrader reflection positivity condition with respect to the link-reflection. The proof holds true in nongauge models with interactions such as chiral Yukawa models.

  17. Autism and ADHD: Overlapping and Discriminating Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayes, Susan Dickerson; Calhoun, Susan L.; Mayes, Rebecca D.; Molitoris, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Children with ADHD and autism have some similar features, complicating a differential diagnosis. The purpose of our study was to determine the degree to which core ADHD and autistic symptoms overlap in and discriminate between children 2-16 years of age with autism and ADHD. Our study demonstrated that 847 children with autism were easily…

  18. Overlapping Community Detection based on Network Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhuanlian; Zhang, Xingyi; Sun, Dengdi; Luo, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Community detection in complex network has become a vital step to understand the structure and dynamics of networks in various fields. However, traditional node clustering and relatively new proposed link clustering methods have inherent drawbacks to discover overlapping communities. Node clustering is inadequate to capture the pervasive overlaps, while link clustering is often criticized due to the high computational cost and ambiguous definition of communities. So, overlapping community detection is still a formidable challenge. In this work, we propose a new overlapping community detection algorithm based on network decomposition, called NDOCD. Specifically, NDOCD iteratively splits the network by removing all links in derived link communities, which are identified by utilizing node clustering technique. The network decomposition contributes to reducing the computation time and noise link elimination conduces to improving the quality of obtained communities. Besides, we employ node clustering technique rather than link similarity measure to discover link communities, thus NDOCD avoids an ambiguous definition of community and becomes less time-consuming. We test our approach on both synthetic and real-world networks. Results demonstrate the superior performance of our approach both in computation time and accuracy compared to state-of-the-art algorithms. PMID:27066904

  19. Overlapping Community Detection based on Network Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Zhuanlian; Zhang, Xingyi; Sun, Dengdi; Luo, Bin

    2016-04-01

    Community detection in complex network has become a vital step to understand the structure and dynamics of networks in various fields. However, traditional node clustering and relatively new proposed link clustering methods have inherent drawbacks to discover overlapping communities. Node clustering is inadequate to capture the pervasive overlaps, while link clustering is often criticized due to the high computational cost and ambiguous definition of communities. So, overlapping community detection is still a formidable challenge. In this work, we propose a new overlapping community detection algorithm based on network decomposition, called NDOCD. Specifically, NDOCD iteratively splits the network by removing all links in derived link communities, which are identified by utilizing node clustering technique. The network decomposition contributes to reducing the computation time and noise link elimination conduces to improving the quality of obtained communities. Besides, we employ node clustering technique rather than link similarity measure to discover link communities, thus NDOCD avoids an ambiguous definition of community and becomes less time-consuming. We test our approach on both synthetic and real-world networks. Results demonstrate the superior performance of our approach both in computation time and accuracy compared to state-of-the-art algorithms.

  20. Liberal Education: An Overlapping Pragmatic Consensus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paris, David C.; Kimball, Bruce A.

    2000-01-01

    Suggests in Bruce Kimball's thesis that a pragmatic consensus was emerging about the understanding of liberal education offers that it might be best understood by comparing it to J. Rawl's idea of an "overlapping consensus." States that by comparing and contrasting these ideas that the emerging consensus is pragmatic in nature. (CMK)

  1. Overlapping Community Detection based on Network Decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zhuanlian; Zhang, Xingyi; Sun, Dengdi; Luo, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Community detection in complex network has become a vital step to understand the structure and dynamics of networks in various fields. However, traditional node clustering and relatively new proposed link clustering methods have inherent drawbacks to discover overlapping communities. Node clustering is inadequate to capture the pervasive overlaps, while link clustering is often criticized due to the high computational cost and ambiguous definition of communities. So, overlapping community detection is still a formidable challenge. In this work, we propose a new overlapping community detection algorithm based on network decomposition, called NDOCD. Specifically, NDOCD iteratively splits the network by removing all links in derived link communities, which are identified by utilizing node clustering technique. The network decomposition contributes to reducing the computation time and noise link elimination conduces to improving the quality of obtained communities. Besides, we employ node clustering technique rather than link similarity measure to discover link communities, thus NDOCD avoids an ambiguous definition of community and becomes less time-consuming. We test our approach on both synthetic and real-world networks. Results demonstrate the superior performance of our approach both in computation time and accuracy compared to state-of-the-art algorithms. PMID:27066904

  2. Terahertz spectroscopy of plasmonic fractals.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, A; Matsui, T; Zhu, W; Nahata, A; Vardeny, Z V

    2009-03-20

    We use terahertz time-domain spectroscopy to study the transmission properties of metallic films perforated with aperture arrays having deterministic or stochastic fractal morphologies ("plasmonic fractals"), and compare them with random aperture arrays. All of the measured plasmonic fractals show transmission resonances and antiresonances at frequencies that correspond to prominent features in their structure factors in k space. However, in sharp contrast to periodic aperture arrays, the resonant transmission enhancement decreases with increasing array size. This property is explained using a density-density correlation function, and is utilized for determining the underlying fractal dimensionality, D(<2). Furthermore, a sum rule for the transmission resonances and antiresonances in plasmonic fractals relative to the transmission of the corresponding random aperture arrays is obtained, and is shown to be universal.

  3. Path entanglement of surface plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakonas, James S.; Mitskovets, Anna; Atwater, Harry A.

    2015-02-01

    Metals can sustain traveling electromagnetic waves at their surfaces supported by the collective oscillations of their free electrons in unison. Remarkably, classical electromagnetism captures the essential physics of these ‘surface plasma’ waves using simple models with only macroscopic features, accounting for microscopic electron-electron and electron-phonon interactions with a single, semi-empirical damping parameter. Nevertheless, in quantum theory these microscopic interactions could be important, as any substantial environmental interactions could decohere quantum superpositions of surface plasmons, the quanta of these waves. Here we report a measurement of path entanglement between surface plasmons with 95% contrast, confirming that a path-entangled state can indeed survive without measurable decoherence. Our measurement suggests that elastic scattering mechanisms of the type that might cause pure dephasing in plasmonic systems must be weak enough not to significantly perturb the state of the metal under the experimental conditions we investigated.

  4. On-chip plasmonic spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Tsur, Yuval; Arie, Ady

    2016-08-01

    We report a numerical and experimental study of an on-chip optical spectrometer, utilizing propagating surface plasmon polaritons in the telecom spectral range. The device is based on two holographic gratings, one for coupling, and the other for decoupling free-space radiation with the surface plasmons. This 800 μm×100 μm on-chip spectrometer resolves 17 channels spectrally separated by 3.1 nm, spanning a freely tunable spectral window, and is based on standard lithography fabrication technology. We propose two potential applications for this new device; the first employs the holographic control over the amplitude and phase of the input spectrum, for intrinsically filtering unwanted frequencies, like pump radiation in Raman spectroscopy. The second prospect utilizes the unique plasmonic field enhancement at the metal-dielectric boundary for the spectral analysis of very small samples (e.g., Mie scatterers) placed between the two gratings.

  5. On-chip plasmonic spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Tsur, Yuval; Arie, Ady

    2016-08-01

    We report a numerical and experimental study of an on-chip optical spectrometer, utilizing propagating surface plasmon polaritons in the telecom spectral range. The device is based on two holographic gratings, one for coupling, and the other for decoupling free-space radiation with the surface plasmons. This 800 μm×100 μm on-chip spectrometer resolves 17 channels spectrally separated by 3.1 nm, spanning a freely tunable spectral window, and is based on standard lithography fabrication technology. We propose two potential applications for this new device; the first employs the holographic control over the amplitude and phase of the input spectrum, for intrinsically filtering unwanted frequencies, like pump radiation in Raman spectroscopy. The second prospect utilizes the unique plasmonic field enhancement at the metal-dielectric boundary for the spectral analysis of very small samples (e.g., Mie scatterers) placed between the two gratings. PMID:27472609

  6. Nanorice Particles: Hybrid Plasmonic Nanostructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Hui (Inventor); Brandl, Daniel (Inventor); Le, Fei (Inventor); Nordlander, Peter (Inventor); Halas, Nancy J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A new hybrid nanoparticle, i.e., a nanorice particle, which combines the intense local fields of nanorods with the highly tunable plasmon resonances of nanoshells, is described herein. This geometry possesses far greater structural tunability than previous nanoparticle geometries, along with much larger local field enhancements and far greater sensitivity as a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) nanosensor than presently known dielectric-conductive material nanostructures. In an embodiment, a nanoparticle comprises a prolate spheroid-shaped core having a first aspect ratio. The nanoparticle also comprises at least one conductive shell surrounding said prolate spheroid-shaped core. The nanoparticle has a surface plasmon resonance sensitivity of at least 600 nm RIU(sup.-1). Methods of making the disclosed nanorice particles are also described herein.

  7. New materials for tunable plasmonic colloidal nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Comin, Alberto; Manna, Liberato

    2014-06-01

    We present a review on the emerging materials for novel plasmonic colloidal nanocrystals. We start by explaining the basic processes involved in surface plasmon resonances in nanoparticles and then discuss the classes of nanocrystals that to date are particularly promising for tunable plasmonics: non-stoichiometric copper chalcogenides, extrinsically doped metal oxides, oxygen-deficient metal oxides and conductive metal oxides. We additionally introduce other emerging types of plasmonic nanocrystals and finally we give an outlook on nanocrystals of materials that could potentially display interesting plasmonic properties.

  8. Controlling plasmonic wave packets in silver nanowires.

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, L.; Nome, R.; Montgomery, J. M.; Gray, S. K.; Scherer, N. F.

    2010-09-01

    Three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain simulations were performed to explore the excitation of surface plasmon resonances in long silver (Ag) nanowires. In particular, we show that it is possible to generate plasmonic wave packets that can propagate along the nanowire by exciting superpositions of surface plasmon resonances. By using an appropriately chirped pulse, it is possible to transiently achieve localization of the excitation at the distal end of the nanowire. Such designed coherent superpositions will allow realizing spatiotemporal control of plasmonic excitations for enhancing nonlinear responses in plasmonic 'circuits'.

  9. Plasmonic crystal demultiplexer and multiports.

    PubMed

    Drezet, A; Koller, Daniel; Hohenau, Andreas; Leitner, Alfred; Aussenegg, Franz R; Krenn, Joachim R

    2007-06-01

    We report the realization of two-dimensional optical wavelength demultiplexers and multiports for surface plasmons polaritons (SPPs) based on plasmonic crystals, i.e., photonic crystals for SPPs. These SPP elements are built up of lithographically fabricated gold nanostructures on gold thin films. We show by direct imaging of laterally confined SPP beams in the visible spectral range by leakage radiation microscopy that SPPs of different wavelengths are efficiently rerouted into different directions. In addition we demonstrate the generation of three output SPP beams from one input beam.

  10. Ultrathin plasmonic chiral phase plate.

    PubMed

    Gorodetski, Yuri; Genet, Cyriaque; Ebbesen, Thomas W

    2016-09-15

    A thin free-standing gold membrane with complex plasmonic structures engraved on both sides is shown to perform as an ultrathin phase plate. Specifically, we demonstrate the generation of a far-field vortex beam propagating at a desired angle. The angular momentum of the beam is generated by the groove helicity, together with the geometric phase arising from a plasmonic spin-orbit interaction. The radial chirp of the back-side structure is used to modify the emission angle via a specific momentum matching condition. PMID:27628405

  11. Plasmonic lens for ultraviolet wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Minoru; Tanimoto, Takuya; Inoue, Tsutomu; Aizawa, Kento

    2016-09-01

    A plasmonic lens (PL) is one of the promising photonic devices utilizing the surface plasmon wave. In this study, we have newly developed a PL with a 3.5 µm diameter for a wavelength of 375 nm (ultraviolet region). It is composed of multiple circular slit apertures milled in aluminum (Al) thin film. We have simulated the electric field distribution of the PL, and confirmed that a tightly focused beam spot of subwavelength size in the far-field region was attained. We have also measured the focusing characteristics of the PL using a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and compared them with the calculated results.

  12. Plasmon-enhanced UV photocatalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Honda, Mitsuhiro; Saito, Yuika Kawata, Satoshi; Kumamoto, Yasuaki; Taguchi, Atsushi

    2014-02-10

    We report plasmonic nanoparticle enhanced photocatalysis on titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) in the deep-UV range. Aluminum (Al) nanoparticles fabricated on TiO{sub 2} film increases the reaction rate of photocatalysis by factors as high as 14 under UV irradiation in the range of 260–340 nm. The reaction efficiency has been determined by measuring the decolorization rate of methylene blue applied on the TiO{sub 2} substrate. The enhancement of photocatalysis shows particle size and excitation wavelength dependence, which can be explained by the surface plasmon resonance of Al nanoparticles.

  13. Plasmonic crystal demultiplexer and multiports.

    PubMed

    Drezet, A; Koller, Daniel; Hohenau, Andreas; Leitner, Alfred; Aussenegg, Franz R; Krenn, Joachim R

    2007-06-01

    We report the realization of two-dimensional optical wavelength demultiplexers and multiports for surface plasmons polaritons (SPPs) based on plasmonic crystals, i.e., photonic crystals for SPPs. These SPP elements are built up of lithographically fabricated gold nanostructures on gold thin films. We show by direct imaging of laterally confined SPP beams in the visible spectral range by leakage radiation microscopy that SPPs of different wavelengths are efficiently rerouted into different directions. In addition we demonstrate the generation of three output SPP beams from one input beam. PMID:17500579

  14. Sub-wavelength plasmon laser

    DOEpatents

    Bora, Mihail; Bond, Tiziana C.

    2016-04-19

    A plasmonic laser device has resonant nanocavities filled with a gain medium containing an organic dye. The resonant plasmon frequencies of the nanocavities are tuned to align with both the absorption and emission spectra of the dye. Variables in the system include the nature of the dye and the wavelength of its absorption and emission, the wavelength of the pumping radiation, and the resonance frequencies of the nanocavities. In addition the pumping frequency of the dye is selected to be close to the absorption maximum.

  15. Noncentrosymmetric plasmon modes and giant terahertz photocurrent in a two-dimensional plasmonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, V. V.; Fateev, D. V.; Ivchenko, E. L.; Ganichev, S. D.

    2015-06-01

    We introduce and theoretically study the plasmon-photogalvanic effect in a planar noncentrosymmetric plasmonic crystal containing a homogeneous two-dimensional electron system gated by a periodic metal grating with an asymmetric unit cell. The plasmon-photogalvanic dc current arises due to the two-dimensional electron drag by the noncentrosymmetric plasmon modes excited under normal incidence of terahertz radiation. We show that the collective plasmon modes of the planar plasmonic crystal become strongly noncentrosymmetric in the weak-coupling regime of their anticrossing. A large plasmon wave vector (which is typically by two-three orders of magnitude greater than the terahertz photon wave vector) along with strong near-field enhancement at the plasmon resonance make the plasmonic drag a much stronger effect compared to the photon drag observed in conventional two-dimensional electron systems.

  16. Plasmon modes in graphene: status and prospect.

    PubMed

    Politano, Antonio; Chiarello, Gennaro

    2014-10-01

    Plasmons in graphene have unusual properties and offer promising prospects for plasmonic applications covering a wide frequency range, ranging from terahertz up to the visible. Plasmon modes have been recently studied in both free-standing and supported graphene. Here, we review plasmons in graphene with particular emphasis on plasmonic excitations in epitaxial graphene and on the influence of the underlying substrate on the screening processes. Although the theoretical comprehension of plasmons in supported graphene is still incomplete, several experimental results provide clues regarding the nature of plasmonic excitations in graphene on metals and semiconductors. Plasmon in graphene can be tuned by chemical doping and gating potentials. We show through selected examples that the adsorbates can be used to tune the plasmon frequency, while the intercalation of chemical species allows the decoupling of the graphene sheet from the substrate to recover the plasmon dispersion of pristine graphene. Finally, we also report intriguing effects due to many-body interaction, such as the excitations generated by electron-electron coupling (magnetoplasmons) and the composite modes arising from the coupling of plasmons with phonons and with charge carriers. PMID:25130215

  17. Plasmon modes in graphene: status and prospect.

    PubMed

    Politano, Antonio; Chiarello, Gennaro

    2014-10-01

    Plasmons in graphene have unusual properties and offer promising prospects for plasmonic applications covering a wide frequency range, ranging from terahertz up to the visible. Plasmon modes have been recently studied in both free-standing and supported graphene. Here, we review plasmons in graphene with particular emphasis on plasmonic excitations in epitaxial graphene and on the influence of the underlying substrate on the screening processes. Although the theoretical comprehension of plasmons in supported graphene is still incomplete, several experimental results provide clues regarding the nature of plasmonic excitations in graphene on metals and semiconductors. Plasmon in graphene can be tuned by chemical doping and gating potentials. We show through selected examples that the adsorbates can be used to tune the plasmon frequency, while the intercalation of chemical species allows the decoupling of the graphene sheet from the substrate to recover the plasmon dispersion of pristine graphene. Finally, we also report intriguing effects due to many-body interaction, such as the excitations generated by electron-electron coupling (magnetoplasmons) and the composite modes arising from the coupling of plasmons with phonons and with charge carriers.

  18. Molecular plasmonics for biology and nanomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yue Bing; Kiraly, Brian; Weiss, Paul S; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    The optical excitation of surface plasmons in metal nanoparticles leads to nanoscale spatial confinement of electromagnetic fields. The confined electromagnetic fields can generate intense, localized thermal energy and large near-field optical forces. The interaction between these effects and nearby molecules has led to the emerging field known as molecular plasmonics. Recent advances in molecular plasmonics have enabled novel optical materials and devices with applications in biology and nanomedicine. In this article, we categorize three main types of interactions between molecules and surface plasmons: optical, thermal and mechanical. Within the scope of each type of interaction, we will review applications of molecular plasmonics in biology and nanomedicine. We include a wide range of applications that involve sensing, spectral analysis, imaging, delivery, manipulation and heating of molecules, biomolecules or cells using plasmonic effects. We also briefly describe the physical principles of molecular plasmonics and progress in the nanofabrication, surface functionalization and bioconjugation of metal nanoparticles. PMID:22630155

  19. Molecular plasmonics for biology and nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yue Bing; Kiraly, Brian; Weiss, Paul S; Huang, Tony Jun

    2012-05-01

    The optical excitation of surface plasmons in metal nanoparticles leads to nanoscale spatial confinement of electromagnetic fields. The confined electromagnetic fields can generate intense, localized thermal energy and large near-field optical forces. The interaction between these effects and nearby molecules has led to the emerging field known as molecular plasmonics. Recent advances in molecular plasmonics have enabled novel optical materials and devices with applications in biology and nanomedicine. In this article, we categorize three main types of interactions between molecules and surface plasmons: optical, thermal and mechanical. Within the scope of each type of interaction, we will review applications of molecular plasmonics in biology and nanomedicine. We include a wide range of applications that involve sensing, spectral analysis, imaging, delivery, manipulation and heating of molecules, biomolecules or cells using plasmonic effects. We also briefly describe the physical principles of molecular plasmonics and progress in the nanofabrication, surface functionalization and bioconjugation of metal nanoparticles.

  20. Atomically localized plasmon enhancement in monolayer graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Wu; Lee, Jaekwang; Nanda, Jagjit; Pantelides, Sokrates T.; Pennycook, Stephen J; Idrobo Tapia, Juan C

    2012-01-01

    Plasmons in graphene can be tuned by using electrostatic gating or chemical doping, and the ability to confine plasmons in very small regions could have applications in optoelectronics, plasmonics and transformation optics. However, little is known about how atomic-scale defects influence the plasmonic properties of graphene. Moreover, the smallest localized plasmon resonance observed in any material to date has been limited to around 10 nm. Here, we show that surface plasmon resonances in graphene can be enhanced locally at the atomic scale. Using electron energy-loss spectrum imaging in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope, we find that a single point defect can act as an atomic antenna in the petahertz (10{sup 15} Hz) frequency range, leading to surface plasmon resonances at the subnanometer scale.

  1. Principles of nanoparticle imaging using surface plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demetriadou, Angela; Kornyshev, Alexei A.

    2015-01-01

    Unlike surface plasmon resonance sensors that detect integral changes to the optical properties of a sample, surface plasmon polariton-microscopy techniques can detect isolated nanoparticles in real-time through their plasmonic image, even of sub-wavelength dimensions. The feature characteristics and intensity of this plasmonic image are dependent on the nanoparticle's chemical composition and size. However, the lack of a theoretical model describing the principles forming a plasmonic image have hindered their understanding. In this article, we present a full-wave analytical model that describes electromagnetically the formation of the plasmonic image. Through our analytical model and numerical calculations, we show the properties of a plasmonic image from sub-wavelength to macroscopic particles of various chemical compositions.

  2. Plasmon Enhanced Photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Polyakov, Aleksandr

    2012-05-08

    Next generation ultrabright light sources will operate at megahertz repetition rates with temporal resolution in the attosecond regime. For an X-Ray Free Electron Laser (FEL) to operate at such repetition rate requires a high quantum efficiency (QE) cathode to produce electron bunches of 300 pC per 1.5 μJ incident laser pulse. Semiconductor photocathodes have sufficient QE in the ultraviolet (UV) and the visible spectrum, however, they produce picosecond electron pulses due to the electron-phonon scattering. On the other hand, metals have two orders of magnitude less QE, but can produce femtosecond pulses, that are required to form the optimum electron distribution for high efficiency FEL operation. In this work, a novel metallic photocathode design is presented, where a set of nano-cavities is introduced on the metal surface to increase its QE to meet the FEL requirements, while maintaining the fast time response. Photoemission can be broken up into three steps: (1) photon absorption, (2) electron transport to the surface, and (3) crossing the metal-vacuum barrier. The first two steps can be improved by making the metal completely absorbing and by localizing the fields closer to the metal surface, thereby reducing the electron travel distance. Both of these effects can be achieved by coupling the incident light to an electron density wave on the metal surface, represented by a quasi-particle, the Surface Plasmon Polariton (SPP). The photoemission then becomes a process where the photon energy is transferred to an SPP and then to an electron. The dispersion relation for the SPP defines the region of energies where such process can occur. For example, for gold, the maximum SPP energy is 2.4 eV, however, the work function is 5.6 eV, therefore, only a fourth order photoemission process is possible. In such process, four photons excite four plasmons that together excite only one electron. The yield of such non-linear process depends strongly on the light intensity. In

  3. Imaging of Surfaces by Concurrent Surface Plasmon Resonance and Surface Plasmon Resonance-Enhanced Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Thariani, Rahber; Yager, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance imaging and surface plasmon induced fluorescent are sensitive tools for surface analysis. However, existing instruments in this area have provided limited capability for concurrent detection, and may be large and expensive. We demonstrate a highly cost-effective system capable of concurrent surface plasmon resonance microscopy (SPRM) and surface plasmon resonance-enhanced fluorescence (SPRF) imaging, allowing for simultaneous monitoring of reflectivity and fluorescence from discrete spatial regions. The instrument allows for high performance imaging and quantitative measurements with surface plasmon resonance, and surface plasmon induced fluorescence, with inexpensive off-the-shelf components. PMID:20360841

  4. Automated Deconvolution of Overlapped Ion Mobility Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantley, Matthew; Zekavat, Behrooz; Harper, Brett; Mason, Rachel; Solouki, Touradj

    2014-10-01

    Presence of unresolved ion mobility (IM) profiles limits the efficient utilization of IM mass spectrometry (IM-MS) systems for isomer differentiation. Here, we introduce an automated ion mobility deconvolution (AIMD) computer software for streamlined deconvolution of overlapped IM-MS profiles. AIMD is based on a previously reported post-IM/collision-induced dissociation (CID) deconvolution approach [ J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 23, 1873 (2012)] and, unlike the previously reported manual approach, it does not require resampling of post-IM/CID data. A novel data preprocessing approach is utilized to improve the accuracy and efficiency of the deconvolution process. Results from AIMD analysis of overlapped IM profiles of data from (1) Waters Synapt G1 for a binary mixture of isomeric peptides (amino acid sequences: GRGDS and SDGRG) and (2) Waters Synapt G2-S for a binary mixture of isomeric trisaccharides (raffinose and isomaltotriose) are presented.

  5. Chiral plasmons without magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Song, Justin C. W.; Rudner, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmons, the collective oscillations of interacting electrons, possess emergent properties that dramatically alter the optical response of metals. We predict the existence of a new class of plasmons—chiral Berry plasmons (CBPs)—for a wide range of 2D metallic systems including gapped Dirac materials. As we show, in these materials the interplay between Berry curvature and electron–electron interactions yields chiral plasmonic modes at zero magnetic field. The CBP modes are confined to system boundaries, even in the absence of topological edge states, with chirality manifested in split energy dispersions for oppositely directed plasmon waves. We unveil a rich CBP phenomenology and propose setups for realizing them, including in anomalous Hall metals and optically pumped 2D Dirac materials. Realization of CBPs will offer a powerful paradigm for magnetic field-free, subwavelength optical nonreciprocity, in the mid-IR to terahertz range, with tunable splittings as large as tens of THz, as well as sensitive all-optical diagnostics of topological bands. PMID:27071090

  6. Compact nanomechanical plasmonic phase modulators

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, B. S.; Haftel, M. I.; Czaplewski, D. A.; Lopez, D.; Blumberg, G.; Aksyuk, V. A.

    2015-03-30

    Highly confined optical energy in plasmonic devices is advancing miniaturization in photonics. However, for mode sizes approaching ≈10 nm, the energy increasingly shifts into the metal, raising losses and hindering active phase modulation. Here, we propose a nanoelectromechanical phase-modulation principle exploiting the extraordinarily strong dependence of the phase velocity of metal–insulator–metal gap plasmons on dynamically variable gap size. We experimentally demonstrate a 23-μm-long non-resonant modulator having a 1.5π rad range, with 1.7 dB excess loss at 780 nm. Analysis shows that by simultaneously decreasing the gap, length and width, an ultracompact-footprint π rad phase modulator can be realized. This is achieved without incurring the extra loss expected for plasmons confined in a decreasing gap, because the increasing phase-modulation strength from a narrowing gap offsets rising propagation losses. Such small, high-density electrically controllable components may find applications in optical switch fabrics and reconfigurable plasmonic optics.

  7. Photoresistance Switching of Plasmonic Nanopores

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Fast and reversible modulation of ion flow through nanosized apertures is important for many nanofluidic applications, including sensing and separation systems. Here, we present the first demonstration of a reversible plasmon-controlled nanofluidic valve. We show that plasmonic nanopores (solid-state nanopores integrated with metal nanocavities) can be used as a fluidic switch upon optical excitation. We systematically investigate the effects of laser illumination of single plasmonic nanopores and experimentally demonstrate photoresistance switching where fluidic transport and ion flow are switched on or off. This is manifested as a large (∼1–2 orders of magnitude) increase in the ionic nanopore resistance and an accompanying current rectification upon illumination at high laser powers (tens of milliwatts). At lower laser powers, the resistance decreases monotonically with increasing power, followed by an abrupt transition to high resistances at a certain threshold power. A similar rapid transition, although at a lower threshold power, is observed when the power is instead swept from high to low power. This hysteretic behavior is found to be dependent on the rate of the power sweep. The photoresistance switching effect is attributed to plasmon-induced formation and growth of nanobubbles that reversibly block the ionic current through the nanopore from one side of the membrane. This explanation is corroborated by finite-element simulations of a nanobubble in the nanopore that show the switching and the rectification. PMID:25514824

  8. Burnout-depression overlap: a review.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Renzo; Schonfeld, Irvin Sam; Laurent, Eric

    2015-03-01

    Whether burnout is a form of depression or a distinct phenomenon is an object of controversy. The aim of the present article was to provide an up-to-date review of the literature dedicated to the question of burnout-depression overlap. A systematic literature search was carried out in PubMed, PsycINFO, and IngentaConnect. A total of 92 studies were identified as informing the issue of burnout-depression overlap. The current state of the art suggests that the distinction between burnout and depression is conceptually fragile. It is notably unclear how the state of burnout (i.e., the end stage of the burnout process) is conceived to differ from clinical depression. Empirically, evidence for the distinctiveness of the burnout phenomenon has been inconsistent, with the most recent studies casting doubt on that distinctiveness. The absence of consensual diagnostic criteria for burnout and burnout research's insufficient consideration of the heterogeneity of depressive disorders constitute major obstacles to the resolution of the raised issue. In conclusion, the epistemic status of the seminal, field-dominating definition of burnout is questioned. It is suggested that systematic clinical observation should be given a central place in future research on burnout-depression overlap.

  9. Overlaps between Frailty and Sarcopenia Definitions.

    PubMed

    Cederholm, Tommy

    2015-01-01

    Aging is characterized by the catabolism of muscles leading to sarcopenia and frailty. These are two geriatric syndromes with partly overlapping phenotypes. Primary sarcopenia, i.e. loss of muscle mass and function related to aging alone, usually precedes frailty. Thus, robustness passes from sarcopenia over frailty to disability leading eventually to a mortal outcome. Frailty (defined according to the phenotype model) encompasses states as exhaustion, weakness, and slowness, whereas sarcopenia, combining mass and function, is more strictly focused on muscles. Frailty is age related, whereas sarcopenia is also related to disease, starvation, and disuse. In general, the criteria for the two conditions overlap, but frailty requires weight loss, whereas sarcopenia requires muscle loss. Both gait speed and hand grip strength are suggested to be used as diagnostic measures for the two conditions since muscle function is crucial for any of the two syndromes. It is suggested that frailty screening should be part of the geriatric comprehensive assessment starting with measuring walking capacity and complemented by taking a history of fatigue and low activity. For younger adults (i.e. <70 years), sarcopenia screening could first register gait speed or hand grip strength and then body composition measurements. Simple questionnaires are feasible clinical alternatives. Treatment of frailty and sarcopenia overlaps, i.e. provide adequate protein and vitamin D supplementation, and encourage resistance exercise. PMID:26484770

  10. Protein gelation kinetics near the overlap concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabatabai, Pasha; Partlow, Benjamin; Kaplan, David; Blair, Daniel

    Proteins can be crosslinked to form gel networks either as a tool to study biological problems or as a method for creating novel materials. The bulk mechanical properties of protein gels in steady state are a manifestation of the gel structure, but the polymerization kinetics are often disregarded. Using the gelation of an aqueous denatured silk protein solution as a model polymer system, we probe the gelation kinetics (modulus vs. time) and find two regimes that depend on whether the initial protein concentration (c) is near or below the overlap concentration (c *) . We find that systems with c / c * ~ 1 exhibit immediate and single-mode modulus growth until the completion of polymerization that can be scaled onto a characteristic polymerization curve. However, systems with c / c * < 1 display delayed modulus development followed by two-stage modulus growth that can be normalized onto a separate distinctive polymerization curve. These two regimes are probed by changing both the initial concentration and the overlap concentration separately, emphasizing the importance of the overlap concentration on the assembly of polymeric/complex fluids.

  11. Function approximation using adaptive and overlapping intervals

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, R.B.

    1995-05-01

    A problem common to many disciplines is to approximate a function given only the values of the function at various points in input variable space. A method is proposed for approximating a function of several to one variable. The model takes the form of weighted averaging of overlapping basis functions defined over intervals. The number of such basis functions and their parameters (widths and centers) are automatically determined using given training data and a learning algorithm. The proposed algorithm can be seen as placing a nonuniform multidimensional grid in the input domain with overlapping cells. The non-uniformity and overlap of the cells is achieved by a learning algorithm to optimize a given objective function. This approach is motivated by the fuzzy modeling approach and a learning algorithms used for clustering and classification in pattern recognition. The basics of why and how the approach works are given. Few examples of nonlinear regression and classification are modeled. The relationship between the proposed technique, radial basis neural networks, kernel regression, probabilistic neural networks, and fuzzy modeling is explained. Finally advantages and disadvantages are discussed.

  12. Evidence and implications of direct charge excitation as the dominant mechanism in plasmon-mediated photocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    Boerigter, Calvin; Campana, Robert; Morabito, Matthew; Linic, Suljo

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonic metal nanoparticles enhance chemical reactions on their surface when illuminated with light of particular frequencies. It has been shown that these processes are driven by excitation of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). The interaction of LSPR with adsorbate orbitals can lead to the injection of energized charge carriers into the adsorbate, which can result in chemical transformations. The mechanism of the charge injection process (and role of LSPR) is not well understood. Here we shed light on the specifics of this mechanism by coupling optical characterization methods, mainly wavelength-dependent Stokes and anti-Stokes SERS, with kinetic analysis of photocatalytic reactions in an Ag nanocube–methylene blue plasmonic system. We propose that localized LSPR-induced electric fields result in a direct charge transfer within the molecule–adsorbate system. These observations provide a foundation for the development of plasmonic catalysts that can selectively activate targeted chemical bonds, since the mechanism allows for tuning plasmonic nanomaterials in such a way that illumination can selectively enhance desired chemical pathways. PMID:26817619

  13. Evidence and implications of direct charge excitation as the dominant mechanism in plasmon-mediated photocatalysis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Boerigter, Calvin; Campana, Robert; Morabito, Matthew; Linic, Suljo

    2016-01-28

    Plasmonic metal nanoparticles enhance chemical reactions on their surface when illuminated with light of particular frequencies. It has been shown that these processes are driven by excitation of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). The interaction of LSPR with adsorbate orbitals can lead to the injection of energized charge carriers into the adsorbate, which can result in chemical transformations. The mechanism of the charge injection process (and role of LSPR) is not well understood. Here we shed light on the specifics of this mechanism by coupling optical characterization methods, mainly wavelength-dependent Stokes and anti-Stokes SERS, with kinetic analysis of photocatalytic reactionsmore » in an Ag nanocube–methylene blue plasmonic system. We propose that localized LSPR-induced electric fields result in a direct charge transfer within the molecule–adsorbate system. Lastly, these observations provide a foundation for the development of plasmonic catalysts that can selectively activate targeted chemical bonds, since the mechanism allows for tuning plasmonic nanomaterials in such a way that illumination can selectively enhance desired chemical pathways.« less

  14. A generalized non-local optical response theory for plasmonic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, N A; Raza, S; Wubs, M; Søndergaard, T; Bozhevolnyi, S I

    2014-05-02

    Metallic nanostructures exhibit a multitude of optical resonances associated with localized surface plasmon excitations. Recent observations of plasmonic phenomena at the sub-nanometre to atomic scale have stimulated the development of various sophisticated theoretical approaches for their description. Here instead we present a comparatively simple semiclassical generalized non-local optical response theory that unifies quantum pressure convection effects and induced charge diffusion kinetics, with a concomitant complex-valued generalized non-local optical response parameter. Our theory explains surprisingly well both the frequency shifts and size-dependent damping in individual metallic nanoparticles as well as the observed broadening of the crossover regime from bonding-dipole plasmons to charge-transfer plasmons in metal nanoparticle dimers, thus unravelling a classical broadening mechanism that even dominates the widely anticipated short circuiting by quantum tunnelling. We anticipate that our theory can be successfully applied in plasmonics to a wide class of conducting media, including doped semiconductors and low-dimensional materials such as graphene.

  15. Strong Exciton-Plasmon Coupling in MoS2 Coupled with Plasmonic Lattice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjing; Lee, Bumsu; Naylor, Carl H; Ee, Ho-Seok; Park, Joohee; Johnson, A T Charlie; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2016-02-10

    We demonstrate strong exciton-plasmon coupling in silver nanodisk arrays integrated with monolayer MoS2 via angle-resolved reflectance microscopy spectra of the coupled system. Strong exciton-plasmon coupling is observed with the exciton-plasmon coupling strength up to 58 meV at 77 K, which also survives at room temperature. The strong coupling involves three types of resonances: MoS2 excitons, localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) of individual silver nanodisks and plasmonic lattice resonances of the nanodisk array. We show that the exciton-plasmon coupling strength, polariton composition, and dispersion can be effectively engineered by tuning the geometry of the plasmonic lattice, which makes the system promising for realizing novel two-dimensional plasmonic polaritonic devices.

  16. Chemical Bonds II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, R. T.

    1972-01-01

    The continuation of a paper discussing chemical bonding from a bond energy viewpoint, with a number of examples of single and multiple bonds. (Part I appeared in volume 1 number 3, pages 16-23, February 1972.) (AL)

  17. What Determines Bond Costs. Municipal Bonds Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Douglas; And Others

    Public officials in small towns who participate infrequently in the bond market need information about bond financing. This publication, one in a series of booklets published by the Western Rural Development Center using research gathered between 1967-77, discusses factors influencing the marketability and cost of bond financing for towns and…

  18. Gap Plasmon Resonance in a Suspended Plasmonic Nanowire Coupled to a Metallic Substrate.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Masashi; Holsteen, Aaron; Nagasaki, Yusuke; Brongersma, Mark L; Takahara, Junichi

    2015-08-12

    We present an experimental demonstration of nanoscale gap plasmon resonators that consist of an individual suspended plasmonic nanowire (NW) over a metallic substrate. Our study demonstrates that the NW supports strong gap plasmon resonances of various gap sizes including single-nanometer-scale gaps. The obtained resonance features agree well with intuitive resonance models for near- and far-field regimes. We also illustrate that our suspended NW geometry is capable of constructing plasmonic coupled systems dominated by quasi-electrostatics.

  19. Influence of slice overlap on positron emission tomography image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeown, Clare; Gillen, Gerry; Dempsey, Mary Frances; Findlay, Caroline

    2016-02-01

    PET scans use overlapping acquisition beds to correct for reduced sensitivity at bed edges. The optimum overlap size for the General Electric (GE) Discovery 690 has not been established. This study assesses how image quality is affected by slice overlap. Efficacy of 23% overlaps (recommended by GE) and 49% overlaps (maximum possible overlap) were specifically assessed. European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) guidelines for calculating minimum injected activities based on overlap size were also reviewed. A uniform flood phantom was used to assess noise (coefficient of variation, (COV)) and voxel accuracy (activity concentrations, Bq ml-1). A NEMA (National Electrical Manufacturers Association) body phantom with hot/cold spheres in a background activity was used to assess contrast recovery coefficients (CRCs) and signal to noise ratios (SNR). Different overlap sizes and sphere-to-background ratios were assessed. COVs for 49% and 23% overlaps were 9% and 13% respectively. This increased noise was difficult to visualise on the 23% overlap images. Mean voxel activity concentrations were not affected by overlap size. No clinically significant differences in CRCs were observed. However, visibility and SNR of small, low contrast spheres (⩽13 mm diameter, 2:1 sphere to background ratio) may be affected by overlap size in low count studies if they are located in the overlap area. There was minimal detectable influence on image quality in terms of noise, mean activity concentrations or mean CRCs when comparing 23% overlap with 49% overlap. Detectability of small, low contrast lesions may be affected in low count studies—however, this is a worst-case scenario. The marginal benefits of increasing overlap from 23% to 49% are likely to be offset by increased patient scan times. A 23% overlap is therefore appropriate for clinical use. An amendment to EANM guidelines for calculating injected activities is also proposed which better reflects the effect overlap size has

  20. Nonlinearly coupled localized plasmon resonances: Resonant second-harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzburg, Pavel; Krasavin, Alexey; Sonnefraud, Yannick; Murphy, Antony; Pollard, Robert J.; Maier, Stefan A.; Zayats, Anatoly V.

    2012-08-01

    The efficient resonant nonlinear coupling between localized surface plasmon modes is demonstrated in a simple and intuitive way using boundary integral formulation and utilizing second-order optical nonlinearity. The nonlinearity is derived from the hydrodynamic description of electron plasma and originates from the presence of material interfaces in the case of small metal particles. The coupling between fundamental and second-harmonic modes is shown to be symmetry selective and proportional to the spatial overlap between polarization dipole density of the second-harmonic mode and the square of the polarization charge density of the fundamental mode. Particles with high geometrical symmetry will convert a far-field illumination into dark nonradiating second-harmonic modes, such as quadrupoles. Effective second-harmonic susceptibilities are proportional to the surface-to-volume ratio of a particle, emphasizing the nanoscale enhancement of the effect.

  1. Plasmonic solitons and dromions via plasmon-induced transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Zhengyang; Huang, Guoxiang

    2016-09-01

    We propose a method to enhance Kerr nonlinearities and realize low-power gigahertz solitons via plasmon induced transparency (PIT) in a new type of metamaterial, which is constructed by an array of unit cell consisting of a cut-wire and a pair of varactor- loaded split-ring resonators. We show that the PIT in such metamaterial can not only mimic the electromagnetically induced transparency in coherent three-level atomic systems, but also exhibit a crossover from PIT to Autler-Townes splitting. We further show that the system suggested here also possess giant second- and third-order nonlinear optical susceptibilities, which may be used to create plasmon solitons and dromions with extremely low power. Our studies raise the possibility for obtaining strong nonlinear effects of gigahertz radiation at very low intensity based on room temperature metamaterials.

  2. A phased antenna array for surface plasmons.

    PubMed

    Dikken, Dirk Jan W; Korterik, Jeroen P; Segerink, Frans B; Herek, Jennifer L; Prangsma, Jord C

    2016-01-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons are electromagnetic waves that propagate tightly bound to metal surfaces. The concentration of the electromagnetic field at the surface as well as the short wavelength of surface plasmons enable sensitive detection methods and miniaturization of optics. We present an optical frequency plasmonic analog to the phased antenna array as it is well known in radar technology and radio astronomy. Individual holes in a thick gold film act as dipolar emitters of surface plasmon polaritons whose phase is controlled individually using a digital spatial light modulator. We show experimentally, using a phase sensitive near-field microscope, that this optical system allows accurate directional emission of surface waves. This compact and flexible method allows for dynamically shaping the propagation of plasmons and holds promise for nanophotonic applications employing propagating surface plasmons. PMID:27121099

  3. Localized surface plasmons in vibrating graphene nanodisks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weihua; Li, Bo-Hong; Stassen, Erik; Mortensen, N Asger; Christensen, Johan

    2016-02-14

    Localized surface plasmons are confined collective oscillations of electrons in metallic nanoparticles. When driven by light, the optical response is dictated by geometrical parameters and the dielectric environment and plasmons are therefore extremely important for sensing applications. Plasmons in graphene disks have the additional benefit of being highly tunable via electrical stimulation. Mechanical vibrations create structural deformations in ways where the excitation of localized surface plasmons can be strongly modulated. We show that the spectral shift in such a scenario is determined by a complex interplay between the symmetry and shape of the modal vibrations and the plasmonic mode pattern. Tuning confined modes of light in graphene via acoustic excitations, paves new avenues in shaping the sensitivity of plasmonic detectors, and in the enhancement of the interaction with optical emitters, such as molecules, for future nanophotonic devices. PMID:26815600

  4. A phased antenna array for surface plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikken, Dirk Jan W.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Segerink, Frans B.; Herek, Jennifer L.; Prangsma, Jord C.

    2016-04-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons are electromagnetic waves that propagate tightly bound to metal surfaces. The concentration of the electromagnetic field at the surface as well as the short wavelength of surface plasmons enable sensitive detection methods and miniaturization of optics. We present an optical frequency plasmonic analog to the phased antenna array as it is well known in radar technology and radio astronomy. Individual holes in a thick gold film act as dipolar emitters of surface plasmon polaritons whose phase is controlled individually using a digital spatial light modulator. We show experimentally, using a phase sensitive near-field microscope, that this optical system allows accurate directional emission of surface waves. This compact and flexible method allows for dynamically shaping the propagation of plasmons and holds promise for nanophotonic applications employing propagating surface plasmons.

  5. Dynamics of plasmon in graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javvaji, Brahmanandam; Mahapatra, D. R.; Raha, S.

    2015-04-01

    Dynamic effects of plasmon such as scattering with defect boundaries and oxygen impurities in the graphene oxide are investigated. Study of plasmon dynamics helps in understanding electronic, opto-electronic and biological applications of graphene based nanostructures. Tuning or control over such applications is made possible by graphene nanostructure engineering. We have modeled defects with increased smoothing of defect edge in graphene keeping area of the defect constant. Scattering of plasmons in graphene with defects is modeled using an electromagnetic field coupled inter-atomic potential approach with finite element discretization of the atomic vibrational and electromagnetic field degrees of freedom. Our calculations show π+σ plasmon red shifting under sharp defect edges whereas π plasmon show high extinction efficiency. Strong localization of electric fields near the sharp defect edges is observed. Observations on plasmons and its dynamics draws attention in designing novel optoelectronic devices and binders for bio-molecules.

  6. Quantum Beats from Entangled Localized Surface Plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiello, David

    Recent experiments report observations of quantum interference between plasmon resonances, inviting descriptions of plasmon-photon interaction using methods from quantum optics. Here we demonstrate, using a Heisenberg-Langevin approach, that the radiation emitted from the localized surface plasmon resonances of a mixed-metal heterodimer may exhibit observable, beat frequency interferences at a far-field detector, known as quantum beats. This prediction represents a correspondence between V-type atoms of quantum optics and the familiar heterodimer system of plasmonics. We explore this analogy in depth and find that although both systems support quantum beats, the heterodimer emits photons in bunches due to the bosonic nature of the plasmon. This highlights a significant difference between the properties of atomic and plasmonic systems. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation's CAREER program under Award Number CHE-1253775 and NSF XSEDE resources under Award Number PHY-130045.

  7. Tunable mid IR plasmon in GZO nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Hamza, M K; Bluet, J-M; Masenelli-Varlot, K; Canut, B; Boisron, O; Melinon, P; Masenelli, B

    2015-07-28

    Degenerate metal oxide nanoparticles are promising systems to expand the significant achievements of plasmonics into the infrared (IR) range. Among the possible candidates, Ga-doped ZnO nanocrystals are particularly suited for mid IR, considering their wide range of possible doping levels and thus of plasmon tuning. In the present work, we report on the tunable mid IR plasmon induced in degenerate Ga-doped ZnO nanocrystals. The nanocrystals are produced by a plasma expansion and exhibit unprotected surfaces. Tuning the Ga concentration allows tuning the localized surface plasmon resonance. Moreover, the plasmon resonance is characterized by a large damping. By comparing the plasmon of nanocrystal assemblies to that of nanoparticles dispersed in an alumina matrix, we investigate the possible origins of such damping. We demonstrate that it partially results from the self-organization of the naked particles and also from intrinsic inhomogeneity of dopants.

  8. A phased antenna array for surface plasmons

    PubMed Central

    Dikken, Dirk Jan W.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Segerink, Frans B.; Herek, Jennifer L.; Prangsma, Jord C.

    2016-01-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons are electromagnetic waves that propagate tightly bound to metal surfaces. The concentration of the electromagnetic field at the surface as well as the short wavelength of surface plasmons enable sensitive detection methods and miniaturization of optics. We present an optical frequency plasmonic analog to the phased antenna array as it is well known in radar technology and radio astronomy. Individual holes in a thick gold film act as dipolar emitters of surface plasmon polaritons whose phase is controlled individually using a digital spatial light modulator. We show experimentally, using a phase sensitive near-field microscope, that this optical system allows accurate directional emission of surface waves. This compact and flexible method allows for dynamically shaping the propagation of plasmons and holds promise for nanophotonic applications employing propagating surface plasmons. PMID:27121099

  9. A phased antenna array for surface plasmons.

    PubMed

    Dikken, Dirk Jan W; Korterik, Jeroen P; Segerink, Frans B; Herek, Jennifer L; Prangsma, Jord C

    2016-01-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons are electromagnetic waves that propagate tightly bound to metal surfaces. The concentration of the electromagnetic field at the surface as well as the short wavelength of surface plasmons enable sensitive detection methods and miniaturization of optics. We present an optical frequency plasmonic analog to the phased antenna array as it is well known in radar technology and radio astronomy. Individual holes in a thick gold film act as dipolar emitters of surface plasmon polaritons whose phase is controlled individually using a digital spatial light modulator. We show experimentally, using a phase sensitive near-field microscope, that this optical system allows accurate directional emission of surface waves. This compact and flexible method allows for dynamically shaping the propagation of plasmons and holds promise for nanophotonic applications employing propagating surface plasmons.

  10. Cenozoic Motion of Greenland - Overlaps and Seaways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawver, L. A.; Norton, I. O.; Gahagan, L.

    2014-12-01

    Using the seafloor magnetic anomalies found in the Labrador Sea, North Atlantic and Eurasian basin to constrain the Cenozoic motion of Greenland, we have produced a new model for the tectonic evolution of the region. The aeromagnetic data collected by the Naval Research Lab [Brozena et al., 2003] in the Eurasian Basin and Canadian data from the Labrador Sea have been re-evaluated using new gridding algorithms and profile modeling using ModMag (Mendel et al., 2005). As a consequence, we have changed the published correlations, mostly prior to Chron C6 [19.05 Ma]. Presently published seafloor magnetic anomalies from the Labrador Sea assume that seafloor spreading ceased at C13 [33.06 Ma] but such an assumption produces an unacceptable overlap of Kronprins Christian Land of northeast Greenland with Svalbard, up to 140 km of overlap in some models. Our new model does not need any "unacceptable" overlap but does produce a slight amount of Eocene compression on Svalbard as is found on land there. Our model allows for an Early Eocene seaway between Ellesmere Island and northwest Greenland that may have connected the Labrador Sea through Baffin Bay and ultimately to the nascent Eurasian Basin, although its depth or even its essential existence is unknowable. During the Miocene, there is no room for a deepwater seaway in Fram Strait until at least the very end of the Early Miocene and perhaps not until Middle Miocene. Brozena, J. and six others, 2003. New aerogeophysical study of the Eurasia Basin and Lomonosov Ridge: Implications for basin development. Geology 31, 825-828. Mendel, V., M. Munschy and D.Sauter, 2005, MODMAG, a MATLAB program to model marine magnetic anomalies, Comp. Geosci., 31, .589-597

  11. Highly efficient plasmonic tip design for plasmon nanofocusing in near-field optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umakoshi, Takayuki; Saito, Yuika; Verma, Prabhat

    2016-03-01

    Near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) combined with plasmon nanofocusing is a powerful nano-analytical tool due to its attractive feature of efficient background suppression as well as light energy compression to the nanoscale. In plasmon nanofocusing-based NSOM, the metallic tip plays an important role in inducing plasmon nanofocusing. It is, however, very challenging to control plasmonic properties of tips for plasmon nanofocusing with existing tip fabrication methods, even though the plasmonic properties need to be adjusted to experimental environments such as the sample or excitation wavelength. In this study, we propose an efficient tip design and fabrication which enable one to actively control plasmonic properties for efficient plasmon nanofocusing. Because our method offers flexibility in the material and structure of tips, one can easily modify the plasmonic properties depending on the requirements. Importantly, through optimization of the plasmonic properties, we achieve almost 100% reproducibility in plasmon nanofocusing in our experiments. This new approach of tip fabrication makes plasmon nanofocusing-based NSOM practical and reliable, and opens doors for many scientists working in related fields.

  12. Highly efficient plasmonic tip design for plasmon nanofocusing in near-field optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Umakoshi, Takayuki; Saito, Yuika; Verma, Prabhat

    2016-03-14

    Near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) combined with plasmon nanofocusing is a powerful nano-analytical tool due to its attractive feature of efficient background suppression as well as light energy compression to the nanoscale. In plasmon nanofocusing-based NSOM, the metallic tip plays an important role in inducing plasmon nanofocusing. It is, however, very challenging to control plasmonic properties of tips for plasmon nanofocusing with existing tip fabrication methods, even though the plasmonic properties need to be adjusted to experimental environments such as the sample or excitation wavelength. In this study, we propose an efficient tip design and fabrication which enable one to actively control plasmonic properties for efficient plasmon nanofocusing. Because our method offers flexibility in the material and structure of tips, one can easily modify the plasmonic properties depending on the requirements. Importantly, through optimization of the plasmonic properties, we achieve almost 100% reproducibility in plasmon nanofocusing in our experiments. This new approach of tip fabrication makes plasmon nanofocusing-based NSOM practical and reliable, and opens doors for many scientists working in related fields.

  13. Imaging of electric and magnetic fields near plasmonic nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabakova, I. V.; de Hoogh, A.; van der Wel, R. E. C.; Wulf, M.; Le Feber, B.; Kuipers, L.

    2016-03-01

    Near-field imaging is a powerful tool to investigate the complex structure of light at the nanoscale. Recent advances in near-field imaging have indicated the possibility for the complete reconstruction of both electric and magnetic components of the evanescent field. Here we study the electro-magnetic field structure of surface plasmon polariton waves propagating along subwavelength gold nanowires by performing phase- and polarization-resolved near-field microscopy in collection mode. By applying the optical reciprocity theorem, we describe the signal collected by the probe as an overlap integral of the nanowire’s evanescent field and the probe’s response function. As a result, we find that the probe’s sensitivity to the magnetic field is approximately equal to its sensitivity to the electric field. Through rigorous modeling of the nanowire mode as well as the aperture probe response function, we obtain a good agreement between experimentally measured signals and a numerical model. Our findings provide a better understanding of aperture-based near-field imaging of the nanoscopic plasmonic and photonic structures and are helpful for the interpretation of future near-field experiments.

  14. Imaging of electric and magnetic fields near plasmonic nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Kabakova, I. V.; de Hoogh, A.; van der Wel, R. E. C.; Wulf , M.; le Feber, B.; Kuipers, L.

    2016-01-01

    Near-field imaging is a powerful tool to investigate the complex structure of light at the nanoscale. Recent advances in near-field imaging have indicated the possibility for the complete reconstruction of both electric and magnetic components of the evanescent field. Here we study the electro-magnetic field structure of surface plasmon polariton waves propagating along subwavelength gold nanowires by performing phase- and polarization-resolved near-field microscopy in collection mode. By applying the optical reciprocity theorem, we describe the signal collected by the probe as an overlap integral of the nanowire’s evanescent field and the probe’s response function. As a result, we find that the probe’s sensitivity to the magnetic field is approximately equal to its sensitivity to the electric field. Through rigorous modeling of the nanowire mode as well as the aperture probe response function, we obtain a good agreement between experimentally measured signals and a numerical model. Our findings provide a better understanding of aperture-based near-field imaging of the nanoscopic plasmonic and photonic structures and are helpful for the interpretation of future near-field experiments. PMID:26947124

  15. Compact program resolves overlapping voltammetric peaks.

    PubMed

    Dimitrov, Jordan D

    2004-05-01

    A simple self-contained program designed to separate overlapping peaks from electrochemical analyses is presented. Combining an original interactive way to define initial parameter estimates with nonlinear curve fitting based on the simplex method of optimization, it allows the user to resolve voltammograms consisting of 2 to 5 analytical peaks raised on a straight base line. The program provides highly intuitive interface, easy operation, and straightforward result documentation. A free package including the program, three data files and user instructions is available on request.

  16. Technology initiatives with government/business overlap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Robert H., Jr.

    2015-03-01

    Three important present-day technology development settings involve significant overlap between government and private sectors. The Advanced Research Project Agency for Energy (ARPA-E) supports a wide range of "high risk, high return" projects carried out in academic, non-profit or private business settings. The Materials Genome Initiative (MGI), based in the White House, aims at radical acceleration of the development process for advanced materials. California public utilities such as Pacific Gas & Electric operate under a structure of financial returns and political program mandates that make them arms of public policy as much as independent businesses.

  17. Angle-resolved surface-enhanced Raman scattering on metallic nanostructured plasmonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Baumberg, Jeremy J; Kelf, Timothy A; Sugawara, Yoshihiro; Cintra, Suzanne; Abdelsalam, Mamdouh E; Bartlett, Phillip N; Russell, Andrea E

    2005-11-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering is an ideal tool for identifying molecules from the "fingerprint" of their molecular bonds; unfortunately, this process lacks a full microscopic understanding and, practically, is plagued with irreproducibility. Using nanostructured metal surfaces, we demonstrate strong correlations between plasmon resonances and Raman enhancements. Evidence for simultaneous ingoing and outgoing resonances in wavelength and angle sheds new light on the Raman enhancement process, allowing optimization of a new generation of reproducible Raman substrates.

  18. Observations of Plasmons in Warm Dense Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Glenzer, S H; Landen, O L; Neumayer, P; Lee, R W; Widmann, K; Pollaine, S W; Wallace, R J; Gregori, G; Holl, A; Bornath, T; Thiele, R; Schwarz, V; Kraeft, W; Redmer, R

    2006-09-05

    We present the first collective x-ray scattering measurements of plasmons in solid-density plasmas. The forward scattering spectra of a laser-produced narrow-band x-ray line from isochorically heated beryllium show that the plasmon frequency is a sensitive measure of the electron density. Dynamic structure calculations that include collisions and detailed balance match the measured plasmon spectrum indicating that this technique will enable new applications to determine the equation of state and compressibility of dense matter.

  19. Plasmoelectronics: coupling plasmonic excitation with electron flow.

    PubMed

    Warren, Scott C; Walker, David A; Grzybowski, Bartosz A

    2012-06-19

    Explorations of the coupling of light and charge via localized surface plasmons have led to the discovery that plasmonic excitation can influence macroscopic flows of charge and, conversely, that charging events can change the plasmonic excitation. We discuss recent theory and experiments in the emerging field of plasmoelectronics, with particular emphasis on the application of these materials to challenges in nanotechnology, energy use, and sensing. PMID:22385329

  20. Plasmon resonant cavities in vertical nanowire arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Bora, M; Bond, T; Behymer, E; Chang, A

    2010-02-23

    We investigate tunable plasmon resonant cavity arrays in paired parallel nanowire waveguides. Resonances are observed when the waveguide length is an odd multiple of quarter plasmon wavelengths, consistent with boundary conditions of node and antinode at the ends. Two nanowire waveguides satisfy the dispersion relation of a planar metal-dielectric-metal waveguide of equivalent width equal to the square field average weighted gap. Confinement factors over 103 are possible due to plasmon focusing in the inter-wire space.

  1. Devices based on surface plasmon interference filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yu (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Devices based on surface plasmon filters having at least one metal-dielectric interface to support surface plasmon waves. A multi-layer-coupled surface plasmon notch filter is provided to have more than two symmetric metal-dielectric interfaces coupled with one another to produce a transmission spectral window with desired spectral profile and bandwidth. Such notch filters can form various color filtering devices for color flat panel displays.

  2. VERTICAL PILLAR ARRAYS FOR PLASMON NANOCAVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bora, M; Fasenfest, B; Behymer, E; Chang, A; Nguyen, H; Britten, J; Larson, C; Bond, T

    2010-04-02

    We investigate tunable plasmon resonant cavity arrays in paired parallel nanowire waveguides. Resonances are observed when the waveguide length is an odd multiple of quarter plasmon wavelengths, consistent with boundary conditions of node and antinode at the ends. Two nanowire waveguides satisfy the dispersion relation of a planar metal-dielectric-metal waveguide of equivalent width equal to the square field average weighted gap. Confinement factors over 10{sup 3} are possible due to plasmon focusing in the inter-wire space.

  3. Overlapping genes in the human and mouse genomes

    PubMed Central

    Sanna, Chaitanya R; Li, Wen-Hsiung; Zhang, Liqing

    2008-01-01

    Background Increasing evidence suggests that overlapping genes are much more common in eukaryotic genomes than previously thought. In this study we identified and characterized the overlapping genes in a set of 13,484 pairs of human-mouse orthologous genes. Results About 10% of the genes under study are overlapping genes, the majority of which are different-strand overlaps. The majority of the same-strand overlaps are embedded forms, whereas most different-strand overlaps are not embedded and in the convergent transcription orientation. Most of the same-strand overlapping gene pairs show at least a tenfold difference in length, much larger than the length difference between non-overlapping neighboring gene pairs. The length difference between the two different-strand overlapping genes is less dramatic. Over 27% of the different-strand-overlap relationships are shared between human and mouse, compared to only ~8% conservation for same-strand-overlap relationships. More than 96% of the same-strand and different-strand overlaps that are not shared between human and mouse have both genes located on the same chromosomes in the species that does not show the overlap. We examined the causes of transition between the overlapping and non-overlapping states in the two species and found that 3' UTR change plays an important role in the transition. Conclusion Our study contributes to the understanding of the evolutionary transition between overlapping genes and non-overlapping genes and demonstrates the high rates of evolutionary changes in the un-translated regions. PMID:18410680

  4. Plasmonic Fano resonances in metallic nanorod complexes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhong-Jian; Hao, Zhong-Hua; Lin, Hai-Qing; Wang, Qu-Quan

    2014-05-21

    Plasmonic Fano resonances (FRs) in nanostructures have been extensively studied in recent years. Nanorod-based complexes for FRs have also attracted much attention. The basic optical properties and fabrication technology of different kinds of plasmonic nanorods have been greatly developed over the last several years. The mutipole plasmon resonances and their flexible adjustment ranges on nanorods make them promising for FR modifications and structure diversity. In this paper, we review some recently studied plasmonic nanorod based nanostructures for FRs, including single nanorods, dimers, mutipole rods and nanorod-nanoparticle hybrids. The corresponding applications of the FRs are also briefly discussed.

  5. Magnetic-Plasmonic Core-Shell Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Carly S.; Hofmann, Cristina; Ali, Tamer A.; Kelly, Anna T.; Morosan, Emilia; Nordlander, Peter; Whitmire, Kenton H.; Halas, Naomi J.

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles composed of magnetic cores with continuous Au shell layers simultaneously possess both magnetic and plasmonic properties. Faceted and tetracubic nanocrystals consisting of wüstite with magnetite-rich corners and edges retain magnetic properties when coated with an Au shell layer, with the composite nanostructures showing ferrimagnetic behavior. The plasmonic properties are profoundly influenced by the high dielectric constant of the mixed-iron-oxide nanocrystalline core. A comprehensive theoretical analysis that examines the geometric plasmon tunability over a range of core permittivities enables us to identify the dielectric properties of the mixed-oxide magnetic core directly from the plasmonic behavior of the core-shell nanoparticle. PMID:19441794

  6. Culturing photosynthetic bacteria through surface plasmon resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Ooms, Matthew D.; Bajin, Lauren; Sinton, David

    2012-12-17

    In this work, cultivation of photosynthetic microbes in surface plasmon enhanced evanescent fields is demonstrated. Proliferation of Synechococcus elongatus was obtained on gold surfaces excited with surface plasmons. Excitation over three days resulted in 10 {mu}m thick biofilms with maximum cell volume density of 20% vol/vol (2% more total accumulation than control experiments with direct light). Collectively, these results indicate the ability to (1) excite surface-bound cells using plasmonic light fields, and (2) subsequently grow thick biofilms by coupling light from the surface. Plasmonic light delivery presents opportunities for high-density optofluidic photobioreactors for microalgal analysis and solar fuel production.

  7. Nonlinear Terahertz Absorption of Graphene Plasmons.

    PubMed

    Jadidi, Mohammad M; König-Otto, Jacob C; Winnerl, Stephan; Sushkov, Andrei B; Drew, H Dennis; Murphy, Thomas E; Mittendorff, Martin

    2016-04-13

    Subwavelength graphene structures support localized plasmonic resonances in the terahertz and mid-infrared spectral regimes. The strong field confinement at the resonant frequency is predicted to significantly enhance the light-graphene interaction, which could enable nonlinear optics at low intensity in atomically thin, subwavelength devices. To date, the nonlinear response of graphene plasmons and their energy loss dynamics have not been experimentally studied. We measure and theoretically model the terahertz nonlinear response and energy relaxation dynamics of plasmons in graphene nanoribbons. We employ a terahertz pump-terahertz probe technique at the plasmon frequency and observe a strong saturation of plasmon absorption followed by a 10 ps relaxation time. The observed nonlinearity is enhanced by 2 orders of magnitude compared to unpatterned graphene with no plasmon resonance. We further present a thermal model for the nonlinear plasmonic absorption that supports the experimental results. The model shows that the observed strong linearity is caused by an unexpected red shift of plasmon resonance together with a broadening and weakening of the resonance caused by the transient increase in electron temperature. The model further predicts that even greater resonant enhancement of the nonlinear response can be expected in high-mobility graphene, suggesting that nonlinear graphene plasmonic devices could be promising candidates for nonlinear optical processing. PMID:26978242

  8. Culturing photosynthetic bacteria through surface plasmon resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooms, Matthew D.; Bajin, Lauren; Sinton, David

    2012-12-01

    In this work, cultivation of photosynthetic microbes in surface plasmon enhanced evanescent fields is demonstrated. Proliferation of Synechococcus elongatus was obtained on gold surfaces excited with surface plasmons. Excitation over three days resulted in 10 μm thick biofilms with maximum cell volume density of 20% vol/vol (2% more total accumulation than control experiments with direct light). Collectively, these results indicate the ability to (1) excite surface-bound cells using plasmonic light fields, and (2) subsequently grow thick biofilms by coupling light from the surface. Plasmonic light delivery presents opportunities for high-density optofluidic photobioreactors for microalgal analysis and solar fuel production.

  9. Hybrid photon-plasmon nanowire lasers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoqin; Xiao, Yao; Meng, Chao; Zhang, Xining; Yu, Shaoliang; Wang, Yipei; Yang, Chuanxi; Guo, Xin; Ning, C Z; Tong, Limin

    2013-01-01

    Metallic and plasmonic nanolasers have attracted growing interest recently. Plasmonic lasers demonstrated so far operate in hybrid photon-plasmon modes in transverse dimensions, rendering it impossible to separate photonic from plasmonic components. Thus only the far-field photonic component can be measured and utilized directly. But spatially separated plasmon modes are highly desired for applications including high-efficiency coupling of single-photon emitters and ultrasensitivity optical sensing. Here, we report a nanowire (NW) laser that offers subdiffraction-limited beam size and spatially separated plasmon cavity modes. By near-field coupling a high-gain CdSe NW and a 100 nm diameter Ag NW, we demonstrate a hybrid photon-plasmon laser operating at 723 nm wavelength at room temperature, with a plasmon mode area of 0.008λ(2). This device simultaneously provides spatially separated photonic far-field output and highly localized coherent plasmon modes, which may open up new avenues in the fields of integrated nanophotonic circuits, biosensing, and quantum information processing.

  10. Optimized plasmonic nanostructures for improved sensing activities.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong; Guillot, Nicolas; Rouxel, Jérémy; Lamy de la Chapelle, Marc; Toury, Timothée

    2012-09-10

    The paper outlines the optimization of plasmonic nanostructures in order to improve their sensing properties such as their sensitivity and their ease of manipulation. The key point in this study is the optimization of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) properties essential to the sensor characteristics, and more especially for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Two aspects were considered in order to optimize the sensing performance: apolar plasmonic nanostructures for non polarization dependent detection and improvements of SERS sensitivity by using a molecular adhesion layer between gold nanostructures and glass. Both issues could be generalized to all plasmon-resonance-based sensing applications.

  11. Wedge Waveguides and Resonators for Quantum Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Kress, Stephan J P; Antolinez, Felipe V; Richner, Patrizia; Jayanti, Sriharsha V; Kim, David K; Prins, Ferry; Riedinger, Andreas; Fischer, Maximilian P C; Meyer, Stefan; McPeak, Kevin M; Poulikakos, Dimos; Norris, David J

    2015-09-01

    Plasmonic structures can provide deep-subwavelength electromagnetic fields that are useful for enhancing light-matter interactions. However, because these localized modes are also dissipative, structures that offer the best compromise between field confinement and loss have been sought. Metallic wedge waveguides were initially identified as an ideal candidate but have been largely abandoned because to date their experimental performance has been limited. We combine state-of-the-art metallic wedges with integrated reflectors and precisely placed colloidal quantum dots (down to the single-emitter level) and demonstrate quantum-plasmonic waveguides and resonators with performance approaching theoretical limits. By exploiting a nearly 10-fold improvement in wedge-plasmon propagation (19 μm at a vacuum wavelength, λvac, of 630 nm), efficient reflectors (93%), and effective coupling (estimated to be >70%) to highly emissive (~90%) quantum dots, we obtain Ag plasmonic resonators at visible wavelengths with quality factors approaching 200 (3.3 nm line widths). As our structures offer modal volumes down to ~0.004λvac(3) in an exposed single-mode waveguide-resonator geometry, they provide advantages over both traditional photonic microcavities and localized-plasmonic resonators for enhancing light-matter interactions. Our results confirm the promise of wedges for creating plasmonic devices and for studying coherent quantum-plasmonic effects such as long-distance plasmon-mediated entanglement and strong plasmon-matter coupling.

  12. Tunable Terahertz Hybrid Metal-Graphene Plasmons.

    PubMed

    Jadidi, Mohammad M; Sushkov, Andrei B; Myers-Ward, Rachael L; Boyd, Anthony K; Daniels, Kevin M; Gaskill, D Kurt; Fuhrer, Michael S; Drew, H Dennis; Murphy, Thomas E

    2015-10-14

    We report here a new type of plasmon resonance that occurs when graphene is connected to a metal. These new plasmon modes offer the potential to incorporate a tunable plasmonic channel into a device with electrical contacts, a critical step toward practical graphene terahertz optoelectronics. Through theory and experiments, we demonstrate, for example, anomalously high resonant absorption or transmission when subwavelength graphene-filled apertures are introduced into an otherwise conductive layer. These tunable plasmon resonances are essential yet missing ingredients needed for terahertz filters, oscillators, detectors, and modulators. PMID:26397718

  13. Plasmonic Biofoam: A Versatile Optically Active Material.

    PubMed

    Tian, Limei; Luan, Jingyi; Liu, Keng-Ku; Jiang, Qisheng; Tadepalli, Sirimuvva; Gupta, Maneesh K; Naik, Rajesh R; Singamaneni, Srikanth

    2016-01-13

    Owing to their ability to confine and manipulate light at the nanoscale, plasmonic nanostructures are highly attractive for a broad range of applications. While tremendous progress has been made in the synthesis of size- and shape-controlled plasmonic nanostructures, their integration with other materials and application in solid-state is primarily through their assembly on rigid two-dimensional (2D) substrates, which limits the plasmonically active space to a few nanometers above the substrate. In this work, we demonstrate a simple method to create plasmonically active three-dimensional biofoams by integrating plasmonic nanostructures with highly porous biomaterial aerogels. We demonstrate that plasmonic biofoam is a versatile optically active platform that can be harnessed for numerous applications including (i) ultrasensitive chemical detection using surface-enhanced Raman scattering; (ii) highly efficient energy harvesting and steam generation through plasmonic photothermal heating; and (iii) optical control of enzymatic activity by triggered release of biomolecules encapsulated within the aerogel. Our results demonstrate that 3D plasmonic biofoam exhibits significantly higher sensing, photothermal, and loading efficiency compared to conventional 2D counterparts. The design principles and processing methodology of plasmonic aerogels demonstrated here can be broadly applied in the fabrication of other functional foams. PMID:26630376

  14. Optical interaction between small plasmonic nanowires: a perspective from induced forces and torques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekeroth, Ricardo M. Abraham

    2016-08-01

    This paper addresses a new numerical study of the near electromagnetic coupling between two small, metallic nanowires under plane-wave illumination. The forces and torques induced give a different point of view of the interaction. The analysis of these near-field, mechanical observables is based entirely on the plasmon hybridization model, with the help of an adequate correlation with far fields. Although several studies of the opto-mechanical inductions have been done, unexpected features of the movement are obtained. ‘Coordinated’ spin for the wires are found, in addition to binding or repulsion forces between the wires and scattering forces. For heterodimers, also orbital torques are obtained. The binding and rotation of the nanowires as well as orbital torques are strongly dependent on the plasmonic excitations of the system. They identify uniquely the surface plasmons. In particular, dark modes can be optically detected without using evanescent fields. The optical forces and torques are calculated exactly by Maxwell stress tensor. ‘Realistic’ infinite nanowires of silver and gold are simulated by a size correction in bulk dielectric function. Thus, the importance of this correction on the mechanical results is also studied. The results can contribute to the design of devices for real observation/detection of surface plasmons. The spectra of forces, and specially of torques, show more resolved resonances because overlapping effects are not as present as in far-field calculations. The spinning of wires found and the analysis made could open new directions of studies and applications of dimers.

  15. Optomechanical coupling in phoxonic–plasmonic slab cavities with periodic metal strips

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Tzy-Rong; Huang, Yin-Chen; Hsu, Jin-Chen

    2015-05-07

    We theoretically investigate the optomechanical (OM) coupling of submicron cavities formed in one-dimensional phoxonic–plasmonic slabs. The phoxonic–plasmonic slabs are structured by depositing periodic Ag strips onto the top surfaces of dielectric GaAs slabs to produce dual band gaps for both electromagnetic and acoustic waves, thereby inducing the coupling of surface plasmons with photons for tailoring the OM coupling. We quantify the OM coupling by calculating the temporal modulation of the optical resonance wavelength with the acoustic phonon-induced photoelastic (PE) and moving-boundary (MB) effects. We also consider the appearance of a uniform Ag layer on the bottom surface of the slabs to modulate the photonic–plasmonic coupling. The results show that the PE and MB effects can be constructive or destructive in the overall OM coupling, and their magnitudes depend not only on the quality factors of the resonant modes but also on the mode area, mode overlap, and individual symmetries of the photonic–phononic mode pairs. Lowering the mode area could be effective for enhancing the OM coupling of subwavelength photons and phonons. This study introduces possible engineering applications to achieve enhanced interaction between photons and phonons in nanoscale OM devices.

  16. Plasmonic effect on photon antibunching and blinking behavior of single quantum dots near gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Swayandipta; Zhou, Yadong; Tian, Xiangdong; Jenkins, Julie A.; Chen, Ou; Zou, Shengli; Zhao, Jing

    2015-02-01

    In this work, we investigated how the blinking statistics and the photon antibunching behavior of single CdSe/CdS core/shell quantum dots(QDs) get modified in the presence of gold nanoparticles(Au NPs) overcoated with a silica shell of varying thickness.(Au@SiO2). The Au@SiO2 NPs have distinct plasmon resonance peaks which overlap with the absorption and emission of QDs, thereby effectively increasing the mutual plasmon-exciton interactions between them. From the second-order photoluminescence intensity cross-correlation measurements, we observed that in the regime of low excitation power, the relative ratio of the biexciton/exciton (BX/X) quantum yield (QY) and lifetimes of the single QDs in presence of the plasmonic substrates get significantly modified as compared to the QDs on glass. An electrodynamics model was developed to further quantify the effect of plasmons on the emission intensity, QY and lifetimes of X and BX of single QDs. The theoretical studies also indicated that the relative position of the QDs and orientation of the electric field are the critical factors regulating the emission properties of Xs and BXs.

  17. Integrated plasmonic metasurfaces for spectropolarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei Ting; Török, Peter; Foreman, Matthew R.; Yen Liao, Chun; Tsai, Wei-Yi; Wu, Pei Ru; Tsai, Din Ping

    2016-06-01

    Plasmonic metasurfaces enable simultaneous control of the phase, momentum, amplitude and polarization of light and hence promise great utility in realization of compact photonic devices. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel chip-scale device suitable for simultaneous polarization and spectral measurements through use of six integrated plasmonic metasurfaces (IPMs), which diffract light with a given polarization state and spectral component into well-defined spatial domains. Full calibration and characterization of our device is presented, whereby good spectral resolution and polarization accuracy over a wavelength range of 500-700 nm is shown. Functionality of our device in a Müller matrix modality is demonstrated through determination of the polarization properties of a commercially available variable waveplate. Our proposed IPM is robust, compact and can be fabricated with a single photolithography step, promising many applications in polarization imaging, quantum communication and quantitative sensing.

  18. Remote sensing by plasmonic transport.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Joon; Moskovits, Martin

    2012-07-18

    Arrays of periodically disposed silver nanowires embedded in alumina were shown to be capable of conducting plasmons excited by laser illuminating one end of the array to its opposite end where surface-enhanced Raman of molecules resident among the tips of the nanowires was excited. The SERS signals, in turn, excited plasmons which propagated back to the originally illuminated ends of the nanowires where they emitted light signals that were collected and spectroscopically dispersed, in essence creating a sensor capable of exciting and collecting SERS remotely. For nanowire arrays with interwire gaps of ~11 nm and lengths of ~3.3 μm (i.e., after a ~6.6 μm round trip) the SERS signals obtained by remote sensing were rather strong, ~5% the intensity of those obtained by exciting the molecules resident among the nanowire tips directly. PMID:22747443

  19. Development of Ultrasensitive Plasmonic Nanosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Gayatribahen K.

    Nanostructures (NSs) based localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensors have brought a transformation in development of sensing devices due to their ability to detect extremely small changes in surrounding refractive index (R.I.). NS-based LSPR sensing approaches have been employed to enhance the sensitivity for a variety of applications, such as diagnosis of disease, food and environmental analysis, and chemical and biological threat detection. Generally in LSPR spectroscopy, absorption and scattering of light is greatly enhanced at a frequency that excites the NS's LSPR and results in well-defined LSPR extinction peak (lambdaLSPR). This lambdaLSPR is highly dependent on the size, shape, and surrounding R.I. of NSs. Compositional and confirmational change within the surrounding R.I. near the NS could be detected by monitoring the shifts in lambdaLSPR. This thesis specifically focuses on the rational development of the plasmonic nanosensors for various sensing applications by utilizing the LSPR properties of Au NS with prismatic shape. First the chemical synthetic approach that can produce Au nanoprisms, which displayed lambdaLSPR in 650-850 nm range corresponding to 20-50 nm edge lengths has been developed. The chemically synthesized Au nanoprisms were attached to silanized glass substrate and employed as a solid-state sensing platform for the development of label-free plasmonic nanosensors. The size, shape, and surface of nanoprisms were characterized through transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and UV-visible spectroscopy. Further, the influence of the structure, size and surface ligand chemistry onto the lambda LSPR of nanoprisms were investigated in detail. Both bulk and local R.I. sensitivity, and the electromagnetic-field (EM-field) decay length were derived for various edge lengths of nanoprisms through measuring the lambda LSPR shifts by UV-visible spectroscopy. Finally, nanoprisms

  20. Plasmonic enhancement of ultraviolet fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Xiaojin

    Plasmonics relates to the interaction between electromagnetic radiation and conduction electrons at metallic interfaces or in metallic nanostructures. Surface plasmons are collective electron oscillations at a metal surface, which can be manipulated by shape, texture and material composition. Plasmonic applications cover a broad spectrum from visible to near infrared, including biosensing, nanolithography, spectroscopy, optoelectronics, photovoltaics and so on. However, there remains a gap in this activity in the ultraviolet (UV, < 400 nm), where significant opportunity exists for both fundamental and application research. Motivating factors in the study of UV Plasmonics are the direct access to biomolecular resonances and native fluorescence, resonant Raman scattering interactions, and the potential for exerting control over photochemical reactions. This dissertation aims to fill in the gap of Plasmonics in the UV with efforts of design, fabrication and characterization of aluminium (Al) and magnesium (Mg) nanostructures for the application of label-free bimolecular detection via native UV fluorescence. The first contribution of this dissertation addresses the design of Al nanostructures in the context of UV fluorescence enhancement. A design method that combines analytical analysis with numerical simulation has been developed. Performance of three canonical plasmonic structures---the dipole antenna, bullseye nanoaperture and nanoaperture array---has been compared. The optimal geometrical parameters have been determined. A novel design of a compound bullseye structure has been proposed and numerically analyzed for the purpose of compensating for the large Stokes shift typical of UV fluorescence. Second, UV lifetime modification of diffusing molecules by Al nanoapertures has been experimentally demonstrated for the first time. Lifetime reductions of ~3.5x have been observed for the high quantum yield (QY) laser dye p-terphenyl in a 60 nm diameter aperture with 50

  1. Data Assimilation Results from PLASMON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, A. M.; Lichtenberger, J.; Duffy, J.; Friedel, R. H.; Clilverd, M.; Heilig, B.; Vellante, M.; Manninen, J. K.; Raita, T.; Rodger, C. J.; Collier, A.; Reda, J.; Holzworth, R. H.; Ober, D. M.; Boudouridis, A.; Zesta, E.; Chi, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    VLF and magnetometer observations can be used to remotely sense the plasmasphere. VLF whistler waves can be used to measure the electron density and magnetic Field Line Resonance (FLR) measurements can be used to measure the mass density. In principle it is then possible to remotely map the plasmasphere with a network of ground-based stations which are also less expensive and more permanent than satellites. The PLASMON project, funded by the EU FP-7 program, is in the process of doing just this. A large number of ground-based observations will be input into a data assimilative framework which models the plasmasphere structure and dynamics. The data assimilation framework combines the Ensemble Kalman Filter with the Dynamic Global Core Plasma Model. In this presentation we will describe the plasmasphere model, the data assimilation approach that we have taken, PLASMON data and data assimilation results for specific events.

  2. Controlling light with plasmonic multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, Alexey A.; Zhukovsky, Sergei V.; Iorsh, Ivan V.; Belov, Pavel A.

    2014-06-01

    Recent years have seen a new wave of interest in layered media - namely, plasmonic multilayers - in several emerging applications ranging from transparent metals to hyperbolic metamaterials. In this paper, we review the optical properties of such subwavelength metal-dielectric multilayered metamaterials and describe their use for light manipulation at the nanoscale. While demonstrating the recently emphasized hallmark effect of hyperbolic dispersion, we put special emphasis to the comparison between multilayered hyperbolic metamaterials and more broadly defined plasmonic-multilayer metamaterials A number of fundamental electromagnetic effects unique to the latter are identified and demonstrated. Examples include the evolution of isofrequency contour shape from elliptical to hyperbolic, all-angle negative refraction, and nonlocality-induced optical birefringence. Analysis of the underlying physical causes, which are spatial dispersion and optical nonlocality, is also reviewed. These recent results are extremely promising for a number of applications ranging from nanolithography to optical cloaking.

  3. Nano-plasmonic exosome diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Im, Hyungsoon; Shao, Huilin; Weissleder, Ralph; Castro, Cesar M.; Lee, Hakho

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes have emerged as a promising biomarker. These vesicles abound in biofluids and harbor molecular constituents from their parent cells, thereby offering a minimally-invasive avenue for molecular analyses. Despite such clinical potential, routine exosomal analysis, particularly the protein assay, remains challenging, due to requirements for large sample volumes and extensive processing. We have been developing miniaturized systems to facilitate clinical exosome studies. These systems can be categorized into two components: microfluidics for sample preparation and analytical tools for protein analyses. In this report, we review a new assay platform, nano-plasmonic exosome (nPLEX), in which sensing is based on surface plasmon resonance to achieve label-free exosome detection. Looking forward, we also discuss some potential challenges and improvements in exosome studies. PMID:25936957

  4. Serial FBG sensor network allowing overlapping spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbenseth, S.; Lochmann, S.; Ahrens, A.; Rehm, B.

    2016-05-01

    For structure or material monitoring low impact serial fiber Bragg grating (FBG) networks have attracted increasing research interest. Common sensor networks using wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) for FBG interrogation are limited in their efficiency by the spectral width of their light source, the FBG tuning range and the spectral guard bands. Overlapping spectra are strictly forbidden in this case. Applying time division multiplexing (TDM) or active resonator schemes may overcome these restrictions. However, they introduce other substantial disadvantages like signal roundtrip dependency or sophisticated control of active resonating structures. Code division multiplexing (CDM) as a means of FBG interrogation by simple autocorrelation of appropriate codes has been shown to be superior in this respect. However, it came at the cost of a second spectrometer introducing additional equalization efforts. We demonstrate a new serial FBG sensor network utilizing CDM signal processing for efficient sensor interrogation without the need of a second spectrometer and additional state of polarization (SOP) controlling components. It allows overlapping spectra even when all sensing FBGs are positioned at the same centre wavelength and it shows a high degree of insensitivity to SOP. Sequence inversed keyed (SIK) serial signal processing utilizing quasi-orthogonal balanced codes ensures simple and quick sensor interrogation with high signal-to-interference/noise ratio.

  5. Fluorescence axial nanotomography with plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Cade, Nicholas I; Fruhwirth, Gilbert O; Krasavin, Alexey V; Ng, Tony; Richards, David

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel imaging technique with super-resolution axial sensitivity, exploiting the changes in fluorescence lifetime above a plasmonic substrate. Using conventional confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging, we show that it is possible to deliver down to 6 nm axial position sensitivity of fluorophores in whole biological cell imaging. We employ this technique to map the topography of the cellular membrane, and demonstrate its application in an investigation of receptor-mediated endocytosis in carcinoma cells.

  6. Plasmonic Metallurgy Enabled by DNA.

    PubMed

    Ross, Michael B; Ku, Jessie C; Lee, Byeongdu; Mirkin, Chad A; Schatz, George C

    2016-04-13

    Mixed silver and gold plasmonic nanoparticle architectures are synthesized using DNA-programmable assembly, unveiling exquisitely tunable optical properties that are predicted and explained both by effective thin-film models and explicit electrodynamic simulations. These data demonstrate that the manner and ratio with which multiple metallic components are arranged can greatly alter optical properties, including tunable color and asymmetric reflectivity behavior of relevance for thin-film applications.

  7. When plasmonics meets membrane technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Politano, A.; Cupolillo, A.; Di Profio, G.; Arafat, H. A.; Chiarello, G.; Curcio, E.

    2016-09-01

    In this review, we present the applications of thermoplasmonics in membrane processes. We discuss the influence of the heat capacity of the solvent, the amount of plasmonic nanoparticles in the membrane, the intensity of the light source and the transmembrane flow rate on the increase of permeability. Remarkably, thermoplasmonic effects do not involve any noticeable loss of membrane rejection. Herein, we consider application feasibilities, including application fields, requirements of feed, alternatives of light sources, promising thermoplasmonic nanoparticles and scaling up issues.

  8. When plasmonics meets membrane technology.

    PubMed

    Politano, A; Cupolillo, A; Di Profio, G; Arafat, H A; Chiarello, G; Curcio, E

    2016-09-14

    In this review, we present the applications of thermoplasmonics in membrane processes. We discuss the influence of the heat capacity of the solvent, the amount of plasmonic nanoparticles in the membrane, the intensity of the light source and the transmembrane flow rate on the increase of permeability. Remarkably, thermoplasmonic effects do not involve any noticeable loss of membrane rejection. Herein, we consider application feasibilities, including application fields, requirements of feed, alternatives of light sources, promising thermoplasmonic nanoparticles and scaling up issues.

  9. Nanostructured surfaces for surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petefish, Joseph W.

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has achieved widespread recognition as a sensitive, label-free, and versatile optical method for monitoring changes in refractive index at a metal-dielectric interface. Refractive index deviations of 10-6 RIU are resolvable using SPR, and the method can be used in real-time or ex-situ. Instruments based on carboxymethyl dextran coated SPR chips have achieved commercial success in biological detection, while SPR sensors can also be found in other fields as varied as food safety and gas sensing. Chapter 1 provides a physical background of SPR sensing. A brief history of the technology is presented, and publication data are included that demonstrate the large and growing interest in surface plasmons. Numerous applications of SPR sensors are listed to illustrate the broad appeal of the method. Surface plasmons (SPs) and surface plasmon polaritions (SPPs) are formally defined, and important parameters governing their spatial behavior are derived from Maxwell's equations and appropriate boundary conditions. Physical requirements for exciting SPs with incident light are discussed, and SPR imaging is used to illustrate the operating principle of SPR-based detection. Angle-tunable surface enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA) of polymer vibrational modes via grating-coupled SPR is demonstrated in Chapter 2. Over 10-fold enhancement of C-H stretching modes was found relative to the absorbance of the same film in the absence of plasmon excitation. Modeling results are used to support and explain experimental observations. Improvements to the grating coupler SEIRA platform in Chapter 2 are explored in Chapters 3 and 4. Chapter 3 displays data for two sets of multipitch gratings: one set with broadly distributed resonances with the potential for multiband IR enhancement and the other with finely spaced, overlapping resonances to form a broadband IR enhancement device. Diffraction gratings having multiple periods were fabricated using a Lloyd

  10. Structural and plasmonic properties of gold nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivapalan, Sean T.

    the nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were then tilted such that were oriented so that the electron beam was parallel to a major zone axis and the diffraction pattern recorded. We observed streaks at each Bragg reflection that changed depending on the shape of the nanoparticle. This is in contrast to the spots for the Bragg reflections observed for normal small area diffraction patterns of gold nanoparticles. The angles between the streaks were compared using vector analysis to theoretical simulated three dimensional models and showed good correlation. These studies indicate such a platform can be used to elucidate the structure of high-index gold nanoparticle shapes such as trisoctahedra. The as-synthesized gold nanoparticles had surface plasmon resonances that incrementally spanned the spectral region of 500-900 nm. The reporter molecules used all have an absorption maximum far from the excitation wavelength. This ensures that chemical resonant based effects are minimized and plasmonic electromagnetic effects dominate the observed signal enhancement. For gold nanorods, the highest SERS signal from six different aspect ratios was observed with absorption maxima blue-shifted from the laser excitation wavelength. This finding is in contrast to substrate measurements where the maximum observed signal is red-shifted from the laser excitation wavelength. A similar platform was used to compare the effects of changing the nanoparticle shape on the observed SERS enhancement. We synthesized trisoctahedral, cubic and spherical geometries with electronic absorption maxima that overlapped within 3 nm. The relative SERS enhancement with 785 nm excitation was compared to theoretical simulations using finite element analysis. The observed signal intensities correlated well to the theory, suggesting the electromagnetic fields focused towards sharp edges and corners dominated the spectral response. The final chapters of this thesis are tailored towards understanding the distance

  11. Plasmonics in atomically thin materials.

    PubMed

    García de Abajo, F Javier; Manjavacas, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    The observation and electrical manipulation of infrared surface plasmons in graphene have triggered a search for similar photonic capabilities in other atomically thin materials that enable electrical modulation of light at visible and near-infrared frequencies, as well as strong interaction with optical quantum emitters. Here, we present a simple analytical description of the optical response of such kinds of structures, which we exploit to investigate their application to light modulation and quantum optics. Specifically, we show that plasmons in one-atom-thick noble-metal layers can be used both to produce complete tunable optical absorption and to reach the strong-coupling regime in the interaction with neighboring quantum emitters. Our methods are applicable to any plasmon-supporting thin materials, and in particular, we provide parameters that allow us to readily calculate the response of silver, gold, and graphene islands. Besides their interest for nanoscale electro-optics, the present study emphasizes the great potential of these structures for the design of quantum nanophotonics devices.

  12. Self-assembled plasmonic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühlig, Stefan; Cunningham, Alastair; Dintinger, José; Scharf, Toralf; Bürgi, Thomas; Lederer, Falk; Rockstuhl, Carsten

    2013-07-01

    Nowadays for the sake of convenience most plasmonic nanostructures are fabricated by top-down nanofabrication technologies. This offers great degrees of freedom to tailor the geometry with unprecedented precision. However, it often causes disadvantages as well. The structures available are usually planar and periodically arranged. Therefore, bulk plasmonic structures are difficult to fabricate and the periodic arrangement causes undesired effects, e.g., strong spatial dispersion is observed in metamaterials. These limitations can be mitigated by relying on bottom-up nanofabrication technologies. There, self-assembly methods and techniques from the field of colloidal nanochemistry are used to build complex functional unit cells in solution from an ensemble of simple building blocks, i.e., in most cases plasmonic nanoparticles. Achievable structures are characterized by a high degree of nominal order only on a short-range scale. The precise spatial arrangement across larger dimensions is not possible in most cases; leading essentially to amorphous structures. Such self-assembled nanostructures require novel analytical means to describe their properties, innovative designs of functional elements that possess a desired near- and far-field response, and entail genuine nanofabrication and characterization techniques. Eventually, novel applications have to be perceived that are adapted to the specifics of the self-assembled nanostructures. This review shall document recent progress in this field of research. Emphasis is put on bottom-up amorphous metamaterials. We document the state-of-the-art but also critically assess the problems that have to be overcome.

  13. Plasmon-induced artificial photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Kosei; Oshikiri, Tomoya; Shi, Xu; Zhong, Yuqing; Misawa, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    We have successfully developed a plasmon-induced artificial photosynthesis system that uses a gold nanoparticle-loaded oxide semiconductor electrode to produce useful chemical energy as hydrogen and ammonia. The most important feature of this system is that both sides of a strontium titanate single-crystal substrate are used without an electrochemical apparatus. Plasmon-induced water splitting occurred even with a minimum chemical bias of 0.23 V owing to the plasmonic effects based on the efficient oxidation of water and the use of platinum as a co-catalyst for reduction. Photocurrent measurements were performed to determine the electron transfer between the gold nanoparticles and the oxide semiconductor. The efficiency of water oxidation was determined through spectroelectrochemical experiments aimed at elucidating the electron density in the gold nanoparticles. A set-up similar to the water-splitting system was used to synthesize ammonia via nitrogen fixation using ruthenium instead of platinum as a co-catalyst. PMID:26052419

  14. How molecular is the chemisorptive bond?

    PubMed

    van Santen, R A; Tranca, I

    2016-08-01

    Trends in adsorption energies as a function of transition metal differ for adsorbates that are attached atop a surface atom or are adsorbed onto a high coordination site. When adsorption onto early and late transition metals is compared variation in relative bond energies of adsorbates attached to different sites is large. A theoretical understanding is provided based on the analysis of the electronic structure of the respective chemical bonds. The electronic structure analysis is based on partial density of states (PDOS) and bond order overlap population densities from crystal orbital Hamiltonian population (COHP) calculations available from DFT electronic structure computations. This is complemented by calculations of Bader charge densities and electron density topology properties. Variation of the respective bond energies depends on the symmetry of the molecular orbitals that form the chemical bond. The key electronic structure parameters are the position of the Fermi level in the bonding or antibonding molecular orbital partial density of states region of the chemical bond and chemical bond polarity. These are very different for adsorbates adsorbed onto the same transition metal surface, but which have different coordination with surface metal atoms. The adsorption energies and the respective electronic structures of adatoms H, C and O and molecular fragments CHx (x = 1-3) are compared with those of the analogous molecules that contain a single transition metal atom. When adsorbed atop, trends in bond energies are remarkably similar to those of the corresponding molecules. The difference in bond energies of adsorbates and transition metal molecules, i.e. the embedding energy, is shown to consist of three contributions: quenching of the sometimes high molecular spin states, weakening of the adsorbate-surface interaction energy and weakening of the metal-metal atom bond energies next to the adsorbate. Conventional scaling rules of the interaction energies of

  15. Using Multiple Bonding Strategies.

    PubMed

    Larson, Thomas D

    2015-01-01

    There are many ways to bond to tooth structure, some micro-mechanical some chemical, some a combination. Different dentin bonding materials have different bonding strengths to differently prepared surfaces, and because of differences in their nature, different areas of tooth structure present peculiar bonding challenges. This paper will review a variety of material types, elucidating their particular bonding strengths and commenting on improved bonding strategies to increase durability, strength, and favorable pulpal response. In this discussion, resin dentin bonding systems, glass ionomers, Gluma, resin cements, and newer combined products will br reviewed. PMID:26485903

  16. Using Multiple Bonding Strategies.

    PubMed

    Larson, Thomas D

    2015-01-01

    There are many ways to bond to tooth structure, some micro-mechanical some chemical, some a combination. Different dentin bonding materials have different bonding strengths to differently prepared surfaces, and because of differences in their nature, different areas of tooth structure present peculiar bonding challenges. This paper will review a variety of material types, elucidating their particular bonding strengths and commenting on improved bonding strategies to increase durability, strength, and favorable pulpal response. In this discussion, resin dentin bonding systems, glass ionomers, Gluma, resin cements, and newer combined products will br reviewed.

  17. Thermoplastic Ribbon-Ply Bonding Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Marchello, Joseph M.; Messier, Bernadette C.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to identify key variables in rapid weldbonding of thermoplastic tow (ribbon) and their relationship to matrix polymer properties and to ribbon microstructure. Theoretical models for viscosity, establishment of ply-ply contact, instantaneous (Velcro) bonding, molecular interdiffusion (healing), void growth suppression, and gap filling were reviewed and synthesized. Consideration of the theoretical bonding mechanisms and length scales and of the experimental weld/peel data allow the prediction of such quantities as the time and pressure required to achieve good contact between a ribbon and a flat substrate, the time dependence of bond strength, pressures needed to prevent void growth from dissolved moisture and conditions for filling gaps and smoothing overlaps.

  18. Semiconductor plasmonic nanolasers: current status and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwo, Shangjr; Shih, Chih-Kang

    2016-08-01

    Scaling down semiconductor lasers in all three dimensions holds the key to the development of compact, low-threshold, and ultrafast coherent light sources, as well as integrated optoelectronic and plasmonic circuits. However, the minimum size of conventional semiconductor lasers utilizing dielectric cavity resonators (photonic cavities) is limited by the diffraction limit. To date, surface plasmon amplification by stimulated emission of radiation (spaser)-based plasmonic nanolaser is the only photon and plasmon-emitting device capable of this remarkable feat. Specifically, it has been experimentally demonstrated that the use of plasmonic cavities based on metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) nanostructures can indeed break the diffraction limit in all three dimensions. In this review, we present an updated overview of the current status for plasmonic nanolasers using the MIS configuration and other related metal-cladded semiconductor microlasers. In particular, by using composition-varied indium gallium nitride/gallium nitride core–shell nanorods, it is possible to realize all-color, single-mode nanolasers in the full visible wavelength range with ultralow continuous-wave (CW) lasing thresholds. The lasing action in these subdiffraction plasmonic cavities is achieved via a unique auto-tuning mechanism based on the property of weak size dependence inherent in plasmonic nanolasers. As for the choice of metals in the plasmonic structures, epitaxial silver films and giant colloidal silver crystals have been shown to be the superior constituent materials for plasmonic cavities due to their low plasmonic losses in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) spectral regions. In this review, we also provide some perspectives on the challenges and opportunities in this exciting new research frontier.

  19. Plasmonic metamaterials with tuneable optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zayats, Anatoly

    2008-03-01

    Negative refraction in metamaterials has recently attracted significant attention due to its possible numerous applications in high-resolution imaging and photolithography with the so-called ``perfect lenses,'' for electromagnetic shielding (invisibility cloak), optical signal manipulation, etc. Among various realizations of negative index materials, plasmonic nanostructures play a prominent role as they allow negative refraction properties to be engineered in the visible and near infrared spectral ranges. The coupling of light to plasmonic modes, that are collective electronic excitations in metallic nanostructures, provides the possibility to confine the electromagnetic field on the sub-wavelength scale and manipulate it with high precision to achieve the desired mode dispersion and, thus, reflection, absorption and transmission properties of the nanostructures. In this talk we will discuss various pathways to control dispersion of the electromagnetic waves in plasmonic metamaterials, including plasmon polaritonic crystals and plasmonic nanorod arrays, and the approaches to active tuneability of their optical properties using optical and electric control signals. Both approaches take advantage of the very high sensitivity of surface plasmon mode dispersion on the refractive index of the dielectric adjacent to metallic nanostructure. Hybridization of plasmonic nanostructures with molecular species exhibiting nonlinear optical response allows the development of metamaterials with high effective nonlinear susceptibility due to the electromagnetic field enhancement related to plasmonic excitations. Signal and control light are then coupled to plasmonic modes that strongly interact via nonlinearity introduced by the hybridization. Concurrently, the use of electro-optically active dielectrics incorporated into plasmonic nanostructures provides the route to control optical signals electronically. Plasmonic metamaterials with tuneable optical properties can be used to

  20. Semiconductor plasmonic nanolasers: current status and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Gwo, Shangjr; Shih, Chih-Kang

    2016-08-01

    Scaling down semiconductor lasers in all three dimensions holds the key to the development of compact, low-threshold, and ultrafast coherent light sources, as well as integrated optoelectronic and plasmonic circuits. However, the minimum size of conventional semiconductor lasers utilizing dielectric cavity resonators (photonic cavities) is limited by the diffraction limit. To date, surface plasmon amplification by stimulated emission of radiation (spaser)-based plasmonic nanolaser is the only photon and plasmon-emitting device capable of this remarkable feat. Specifically, it has been experimentally demonstrated that the use of plasmonic cavities based on metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) nanostructures can indeed break the diffraction limit in all three dimensions. In this review, we present an updated overview of the current status for plasmonic nanolasers using the MIS configuration and other related metal-cladded semiconductor microlasers. In particular, by using composition-varied indium gallium nitride/gallium nitride core-shell nanorods, it is possible to realize all-color, single-mode nanolasers in the full visible wavelength range with ultralow continuous-wave (CW) lasing thresholds. The lasing action in these subdiffraction plasmonic cavities is achieved via a unique auto-tuning mechanism based on the property of weak size dependence inherent in plasmonic nanolasers. As for the choice of metals in the plasmonic structures, epitaxial silver films and giant colloidal silver crystals have been shown to be the superior constituent materials for plasmonic cavities due to their low plasmonic losses in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) spectral regions. In this review, we also provide some perspectives on the challenges and opportunities in this exciting new research frontier. PMID:27459210

  1. Semiconductor plasmonic nanolasers: current status and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwo, Shangjr; Shih, Chih-Kang

    2016-08-01

    Scaling down semiconductor lasers in all three dimensions holds the key to the development of compact, low-threshold, and ultrafast coherent light sources, as well as integrated optoelectronic and plasmonic circuits. However, the minimum size of conventional semiconductor lasers utilizing dielectric cavity resonators (photonic cavities) is limited by the diffraction limit. To date, surface plasmon amplification by stimulated emission of radiation (spaser)-based plasmonic nanolaser is the only photon and plasmon-emitting device capable of this remarkable feat. Specifically, it has been experimentally demonstrated that the use of plasmonic cavities based on metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) nanostructures can indeed break the diffraction limit in all three dimensions. In this review, we present an updated overview of the current status for plasmonic nanolasers using the MIS configuration and other related metal-cladded semiconductor microlasers. In particular, by using composition-varied indium gallium nitride/gallium nitride core-shell nanorods, it is possible to realize all-color, single-mode nanolasers in the full visible wavelength range with ultralow continuous-wave (CW) lasing thresholds. The lasing action in these subdiffraction plasmonic cavities is achieved via a unique auto-tuning mechanism based on the property of weak size dependence inherent in plasmonic nanolasers. As for the choice of metals in the plasmonic structures, epitaxial silver films and giant colloidal silver crystals have been shown to be the superior constituent materials for plasmonic cavities due to their low plasmonic losses in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) spectral regions. In this review, we also provide some perspectives on the challenges and opportunities in this exciting new research frontier.

  2. The overlap-Dirac operator: Topology and chiral symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, R.G.; Heller, U.M.; Narayanan, R.

    2000-01-01

    The authors review the spectral flow techniques for computing the index of the overlap Dirac operator including results relevant for SUSY Yang-Mills theories. They describe properties of the overlap Dirac operator, and methods to implement it numerically. They use the results from the spectral flow to illuminate the difficulties in numerical calculations involving domain wall and overlap fermions.

  3. Phonological and Orthographic Overlap Effects in Fast and Masked Priming

    PubMed Central

    Frisson, Steven; Bélanger, Nathalie N.; Rayner, Keith

    2014-01-01

    We investigated how orthographic and phonological information is activated during reading, using a fast priming task, and during single word recognition, using masked priming. Specifically, different types of overlap between prime and target were contrasted: high orthographic and high phonological overlap (track-crack), high orthographic and low phonological overlap (bear-gear), or low orthographic and high phonological overlap (fruit-chute). In addition, we examined whether (orthographic) beginning overlap (swoop-swoon) yielded the same priming pattern as end (rhyme) overlap (track-crack). Prime durations were 32 and 50ms in the fast priming version, and 50ms in the masked priming version, and mode of presentation (prime and target in lower case) was identical. The fast priming experiment showed facilitatory priming effects when both orthography and phonology overlapped, with no apparent differences between beginning and end overlap pairs. Facilitation was also found when prime and target only overlapped orthographically. In contrast, the masked priming experiment showed inhibition for both types of end overlap pairs (with and without phonological overlap), and no difference for begin overlap items. When prime and target only shared principally phonological information, facilitation was only found with a long prime duration in the fast priming experiment, while no differences were found in the masked priming version. These contrasting results suggest that fast priming and masked priming do not necessarily tap into the same type of processing. PMID:24365065

  4. Polarization-independent actively tunable colour generation on imprinted plasmonic surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Daniel; Chen, Yuan; Vazquez-Guardado, Abraham; Modak, Sushrut; Boroumand, Javaneh; Xu, Daming; Wu, Shin-Tson; Chanda, Debashis

    2015-01-01

    Structural colour arising from nanostructured metallic surfaces offers many benefits compared to conventional pigmentation based display technologies, such as increased resolution and scalability of their optical response with structure dimensions. However, once these structures are fabricated their optical characteristics remain static, limiting their potential application. Here, by using a specially designed nanostructured plasmonic surface in conjunction with high birefringence liquid crystals, we demonstrate a tunable polarization-independent reflective surface where the colour of the surface is changed as a function of applied voltage. A large range of colour tunability is achieved over previous reports by utilizing an engineered surface which allows full liquid crystal reorientation while maximizing the overlap between plasmonic fields and liquid crystal. In combination with imprinted structures of varying periods, a full range of colours spanning the entire visible spectrum is achieved, paving the way towards dynamic pixels for reflective displays. PMID:26066375

  5. Polarization-independent actively tunable colour generation on imprinted plasmonic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Daniel; Chen, Yuan; Vazquez-Guardado, Abraham; Modak, Sushrut; Boroumand, Javaneh; Xu, Daming; Wu, Shin-Tson; Chanda, Debashis

    2015-01-01

    Structural colour arising from nanostructured metallic surfaces offers many benefits compared to conventional pigmentation based display technologies, such as increased resolution and scalability of their optical response with structure dimensions. However, once these structures are fabricated their optical characteristics remain static, limiting their potential application. Here, by using a specially designed nanostructured plasmonic surface in conjunction with high birefringence liquid crystals, we demonstrate a tunable polarization-independent reflective surface where the colour of the surface is changed as a function of applied voltage. A large range of colour tunability is achieved over previous reports by utilizing an engineered surface which allows full liquid crystal reorientation while maximizing the overlap between plasmonic fields and liquid crystal. In combination with imprinted structures of varying periods, a full range of colours spanning the entire visible spectrum is achieved, paving the way towards dynamic pixels for reflective displays. PMID:26066375

  6. Polarization-independent actively tunable colour generation on imprinted plasmonic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Daniel; Chen, Yuan; Vazquez-Guardado, Abraham; Modak, Sushrut; Boroumand, Javaneh; Xu, Daming; Wu, Shin-Tson; Chanda, Debashis

    2015-06-11

    Structural colour arising from nanostructured metallic surfaces offers many benefits compared to conventional pigmentation based display technologies, such as increased resolution and scalability of their optical response with structure dimensions. However, once these structures are fabricated their optical characteristics remain static, limiting their potential application. Here, by using a specially designed nanostructured plasmonic surface in conjunction with high birefringence liquid crystals, we demonstrate a tunable polarization-independent reflective surface where the colour of the surface is changed as a function of applied voltage. A large range of colour tunability is achieved over previous reports by utilizing an engineered surface which allows full liquid crystal reorientation while maximizing the overlap between plasmonic fields and liquid crystal. In combination with imprinted structures of varying periods, a full range of colours spanning the entire visible spectrum is achieved, paving the way towards dynamic pixels for reflective displays.

  7. Boundary effects in finite size plasmonic crystals: focusing and routing of plasmonic beams for optical communications.

    PubMed

    Benetou, M I; Bouillard, J-S; Segovia, P; Dickson, W; Thomsen, B C; Bayvel, P; Zayats, A V

    2015-11-01

    Plasmonic crystals, which consist of periodic arrangements of surface features at a metal-dielectric interface, allow the manipulation of optical information in the form of surface plasmon polaritons. Here we investigate the excitation and propagation of plasmonic beams in and around finite size plasmonic crystals at telecom wavelengths, highlighting the effects of the crystal boundary shape and illumination conditions. Significant differences in broad plasmonic beam generation by crystals of different shapes are demonstrated, while for narrow beams, the propagation from a crystal onto the smooth metal film is less sensitive to the crystal boundary shape. We show that by controlling the boundary shape, the size and the excitation beam parameters, directional control of propagating plasmonic modes and their behaviour such as angular beam splitting, focusing power and beam width can be efficiently achieved. This provides a promising route for robust and alignment-independent integration of plasmonic crystals with optical communication components.

  8. Plasmonic Enhancement Mechanisms in Solar Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cushing, Scott K.

    Semiconductor photovoltaics (solar-to-electrical) and photocatalysis (solar-to-chemical) requires sunlight to be converted into excited charge carriers with sufficient lifetimes and mobility to drive a current or photoreaction. Thin semiconductor films are necessary to reduce the charge recombination and mobility losses, but thin films also limit light absorption, reducing the solar energy conversion efficiency. Further, in photocatalysis, the band edges of semiconductor must straddle the redox potentials of a photochemical reaction, reducing light absorption to half the solar spectrum in water splitting. Plasmonics transforms metal nanoparticles into antennas with resonances tuneable across the solar spectrum. If energy can be transferred from the plasmon to the semiconductor, light absorption in the semiconductor can be increased in thin films and occur at energies smaller than the band gap. This thesis investigates why, despite this potential, plasmonic solar energy harvesting techniques rarely appear in top performing solar architectures. To accomplish this goal, the possible plasmonic enhancement mechanisms for solar energy conversion were identified, isolated, and optimized by combining systematic sample design with transient absorption spectroscopy, photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic testing, and theoretical development. Specifically, metal semiconductor nanostructures were designed to modulate the plasmon's scattering, hot carrier, and near field interactions as well as remove heating and self-catalysis effects. Transient absorption spectroscopy then revealed how the structure design affected energy and charge carrier transfer between metal and semiconductor. Correlating this data with wavelength-dependent photoconversion efficiencies and theoretical developments regarding metal-semiconductor interactions identified the origin of the plasmonic enhancement. Using this methodology, it has first been proven that three plasmonic enhancement routes are

  9. Plasmonic Enhancement Mechanisms in Solar Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cushing, Scott K.

    Semiconductor photovoltaics (solar-to-electrical) and photocatalysis (solar-to-chemical) requires sunlight to be converted into excited charge carriers with sufficient lifetimes and mobility to drive a current or photoreaction. Thin semiconductor films are necessary to reduce the charge recombination and mobility losses, but thin films also limit light absorption, reducing the solar energy conversion efficiency. Further, in photocatalysis, the band edges of semiconductor must straddle the redox potentials of a photochemical reaction, reducing light absorption to half the solar spectrum in water splitting. Plasmonics transforms metal nanoparticles into antennas with resonances tuneable across the solar spectrum. If energy can be transferred from the plasmon to the semiconductor, light absorption in the semiconductor can be increased in thin films and occur at energies smaller than the band gap. This thesis investigates why, despite this potential, plasmonic solar energy harvesting techniques rarely appear in top performing solar architectures. To accomplish this goal, the possible plasmonic enhancement mechanisms for solar energy conversion were identified, isolated, and optimized by combining systematic sample design with transient absorption spectroscopy, photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic testing, and theoretical development. Specifically, metal semiconductor nanostructures were designed to modulate the plasmon's scattering, hot carrier, and near field interactions as well as remove heating and self-catalysis effects. Transient absorption spectroscopy then revealed how the structure design affected energy and charge carrier transfer between metal and semiconductor. Correlating this data with wavelength-dependent photoconversion efficiencies and theoretical developments regarding metal-semiconductor interactions identified the origin of the plasmonic enhancement. Using this methodology, it has first been proven that three plasmonic enhancement routes are

  10. Social externalities, overlap and the poverty trap.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Chul; Loury, Glenn C

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies find that some social groups are stuck in poverty traps because of network effects. However, these studies do not carefully analyze how these groups overcome low human capital investment activities. Unlike previous studies, the model in this paper includes network externalities in both the human capital investment stage and the subsequent career stages. This implies that not only the current network quality, but also the expectations about future network quality affect the current investment decision. Consequently, the coordinated expectation among the group members can play a crucial role in the determination of the final state. We define "overlap" for some initial skill ranges, whereby the economic performance of a group can be improved simply by increasing expectations of a brighter future. We also define "poverty trap" for some ranges, wherein a disadvantaged group is constrained by its history, and we explore the egalitarian policies to mobilize the group out of the trap.

  11. Dimensional overlap between time and space.

    PubMed

    Eikmeier, Verena; Schröter, Hannes; Maienborn, Claudia; Alex-Ruf, Simone; Ulrich, Rolf

    2013-12-01

    Several pieces of evidence suggest that our mental representations of time and space are linked. However, the extent of this linkage between the two domains has not yet been assessed. We present the results of two experiments that draw on the predictions of the dimensional overlap model (Kornblum, Hasbroucq, & Osman, Psychological Review 97:253-270, 1990). The stimulus and response sets in these reaction time experiments were related to either time or space. The obtained stimulus-response congruency effects were of about the same size for identical stimulus-response sets (time-time or space-space) and for different stimulus-response sets (time-space or space-time). These results support the view that our representations of time and space are strongly linked.

  12. Grid adaptation using chimera composite overlapping meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, Kai-Hsiung; Liou, Meng-Sing; Chow, Chuen-Yen

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to perform grid adaptation using composite overlapping meshes in regions of large gradient to accurately capture the salient features during computation. The chimera grid scheme, a multiple overset mesh technique, is used in combination with a Navier-Stokes solver. The numerical solution is first converged to a steady state based on an initial coarse mesh. Solution-adaptive enhancement is then performed by using a secondary fine grid system which oversets on top of the base grid in the high-gradient region, but without requiring the mesh boundaries to join in any special way. Communications through boundary interfaces between those separated grids are carried out using trilinear interpolation. Application to the Euler equations for shock reflections and to shock wave/boundary layer interaction problem are tested. With the present method, the salient features are well-resolved.

  13. Grid adaptation using Chimera composite overlapping meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, Kai-Hsiung; Liou, Meng-Sing; Chow, Chuen-Yen

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to perform grid adaptation using composite over-lapping meshes in regions of large gradient to capture the salient features accurately during computation. The Chimera grid scheme, a multiple overset mesh technique, is used in combination with a Navier-Stokes solver. The numerical solution is first converged to a steady state based on an initial coarse mesh. Solution-adaptive enhancement is then performed by using a secondary fine grid system which oversets on top of the base grid in the high-gradient region, but without requiring the mesh boundaries to join in any special way. Communications through boundary interfaces between those separated grids are carried out using tri-linear interpolation. Applications to the Euler equations for shock reflections and to a shock wave/boundary layer interaction problem are tested. With the present method, the salient features are well resolved.

  14. Grid adaption using Chimera composite overlapping meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, Kai-Hsiung; Liou, Meng-Sing; Chow, Chuen-Yen

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to perform grid adaptation using composite over-lapping meshes in regions of large gradient to capture the salient features accurately during computation. The Chimera grid scheme, a multiple overset mesh technique, is used in combination with a Navier-Stokes solver. The numerical solution is first converged to a steady state based on an initial coarse mesh. Solution-adaptive enhancement is then performed by using a secondary fine grid system which oversets on top of the base grid in the high-gradient region, but without requiring the mesh boundaries to join in any special way. Communications through boundary interfaces between those separated grids are carried out using tri-linear interpolation. Applications to the Euler equations for shock reflections and to a shock wave/boundary layer interaction problem are tested. With the present method, the salient features are well resolved.

  15. Overlapped Fourier coding for optical aberration removal

    PubMed Central

    Horstmeyer, Roarke; Ou, Xiaoze; Chung, Jaebum; Zheng, Guoan; Yang, Changhuei

    2014-01-01

    We present an imaging procedure that simultaneously optimizes a camera’s resolution and retrieves a sample’s phase over a sequence of snapshots. The technique, termed overlapped Fourier coding (OFC), first digitally pans a small aperture across a camera’s pupil plane with a spatial light modulator. At each aperture location, a unique image is acquired. The OFC algorithm then fuses these low-resolution images into a full-resolution estimate of the complex optical field incident upon the detector. Simultaneously, the algorithm utilizes redundancies within the acquired dataset to computationally estimate and remove unknown optical aberrations and system misalignments via simulated annealing. The result is an imaging system that can computationally overcome its optical imperfections to offer enhanced resolution, at the expense of taking multiple snapshots over time. PMID:25321982

  16. Optical biosensors using surface plasmon resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homola, Jiri; Brynda, Eduard; Tobiska, Petr; Tichy, Ivo; Skvor, Jiri

    1999-12-01

    We present a surface plasmon resonance sensor base on prism excitation of surface plasmons and spectral interrogation. For specific detection of biomolecular analytes, multilayers of monoclonal antibodies are immobilized on the surface of the sensor. Detection of biomolecular analytes such as human (beta) -2)-microglobulin, choriogonadotropin, hepatitis B surface antigen, salmonella enteritidis is demonstrated.

  17. Self-similar parabolic plasmonic beams.

    PubMed

    Davoyan, Arthur R; Turitsyn, Sergei K; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2013-02-15

    We demonstrate that an interplay between diffraction and defocusing nonlinearity can support stable self-similar plasmonic waves with a parabolic profile. Simplicity of a parabolic shape combined with the corresponding parabolic spatial phase distribution creates opportunities for controllable manipulation of plasmons through a combined action of diffraction and nonlinearity.

  18. Three-dimensional Chiral Plasmonic Oligomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hentschel, Mario

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate chiral optical response in stacked arrangements of plasmonic nanostructures. We show that three-dimensional arrangements of plasmonic ``meta-atoms'' only exhibit a chiral optical response if similar plasmonic ``atoms'' are arranged in a handed fashion as we require resonant plasmonic coupling. Moreover, we demonstrate that such particle groupings, similarly to molecular systems, possess the capability to encode their three-dimensional arrangement in unique and well-modulated spectra, making them ideal candidates for a three-dimensional chiral plasmon ruler. Furthermore, we discuss the onset of a broadband chiral optical response in the wavelength regime between 700 nm and 3500 nm upon charge transfer between the nanoparticles. We show in experiment and simulation that this response is due to the ohmic contact between adjacent particles which causes a strong red-shift of the fundamental mode. The geometrical shape of the resulting fused particles allows for efficient excitation of higher order modes. Calculated spectra and field distributions confirm our interpretation and show a number of interacting plasmonic modes. Finally, we will discuss plasmonic diastereomers which consist of multiple chiral centers. We find that the chiral optical response of the composite molecules can be traced back to the properties of the constituting building blocks. We demonstrate that the optical response of complex chiral plasmonic systems can be decomposed and understood in terms of fundamental building blocks, offering simple and straightforward design rules for future applications such as chiral optical elements and enantiomer sensors.

  19. A spectroscopic refractometer based on plasmonic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jing; Pacifici, Domenico

    2016-02-01

    We describe the design, fabrication, and testing of a spectroscopic refractometer that employs plasmonic interferometry to measure the optical dielectric functions of materials in the visible range. The proposed device, dubbed a plasmonic refractometer, consists of an array of slit-groove plasmonic interferometers etched in a ˜300 nm-thick metal film (silver or gold) with arm lengths varying in steps of 25 nm up to ˜8 μm. The nano-groove in each interferometer is able to generate propagating surface plasmon polaritons efficiently in a broad wavelength range, without requiring prism- or grating-coupling configurations. An integrated microfluidic channel ensures uniform delivery of dielectric materials in liquid phase. Spectrally resolved plasmonic interferograms are generated by measuring light transmission spectra through the slit of each slit-groove plasmonic interferometer and plotting the normalized intensity as a function of arm length (0.26-8.16 μm) and incident wavelength (400-800 nm) for various combinations of metal/dielectric materials. Fits of the plasmonic interferograms with a surface plasmon interference model allow determination of the refractive index dispersion of a broad class of dielectric materials, over a wide range of wavelengths and dielectric constants. As proof of concept, we extract and report the dielectric functions of representative materials, such as silver, gold, water, methanol, and ethanol.

  20. Wedge Waveguides and Resonators for Quantum Plasmonics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic structures can provide deep-subwavelength electromagnetic fields that are useful for enhancing light–matter interactions. However, because these localized modes are also dissipative, structures that offer the best compromise between field confinement and loss have been sought. Metallic wedge waveguides were initially identified as an ideal candidate but have been largely abandoned because to date their experimental performance has been limited. We combine state-of-the-art metallic wedges with integrated reflectors and precisely placed colloidal quantum dots (down to the single-emitter level) and demonstrate quantum-plasmonic waveguides and resonators with performance approaching theoretical limits. By exploiting a nearly 10-fold improvement in wedge-plasmon propagation (19 μm at a vacuum wavelength, λvac, of 630 nm), efficient reflectors (93%), and effective coupling (estimated to be >70%) to highly emissive (∼90%) quantum dots, we obtain Ag plasmonic resonators at visible wavelengths with quality factors approaching 200 (3.3 nm line widths). As our structures offer modal volumes down to ∼0.004λvac3 in an exposed single-mode waveguide–resonator geometry, they provide advantages over both traditional photonic microcavities and localized-plasmonic resonators for enhancing light–matter interactions. Our results confirm the promise of wedges for creating plasmonic devices and for studying coherent quantum-plasmonic effects such as long-distance plasmon-mediated entanglement and strong plasmon–matter coupling. PMID:26284499

  1. Plasmon-Enhanced Optical Sensors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Cushing, Scott K

    2014-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has found extensive applications in chemi-sensors and biosensors. Plasmons play different roles in different types of optical sensors. SPR transduces a signal in a colorimetric sensor through shifts in the spectral position and intensity in response to external stimuli. SPR can also concentrate the incident electromagnetic field in a nanostructure, modulating fluorescence emission and enabling plasmon-enhanced fluorescence to be used for ultrasensitive detection. Furthermore, plasmons have been extensively used for amplifying a Raman signal in a surface-enhanced Raman scattering sensor. This paper presents a review of recent research progress in plasmon-enhanced optical sensing, giving an emphasis on the physical basis of plasmon-enhanced sensors and how these principles guide the design of sensors. In particular, this paper discusses the design strategies for nanomaterials and nanostructures to plasmonically enhance optical sensing signals, also highlighting the applications of plasmon-enhanced optical sensors in health care, homeland security, food safety and environmental monitoring. PMID:25365823

  2. Nano- and Micro-Auxetic Plasmonic Materials.

    PubMed

    Valente, João; Plum, Eric; Youngs, Ian J; Zheludev, Nikolay I

    2016-07-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures with a negative Poisson ratio are demonstrated, having the unusual mechanical property of auxetics to expand laterally when being stretched. Using nanomembrane technology, auxetics are shrunk by orders of magnitude, giving simultaneous access to optical properties of plasmonic metamaterials, as well as auxetic mechanical properties on the nanoscale. PMID:27143502

  3. Optical emission from coupled surface plasmons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruhlke, R. W.; Holland, W. R.; Hall, D. G.

    1987-01-01

    Surface plasmons on opposite sides of a thin metal film surrounded by identical dielectrics interact to form coupled surface plasmons (CSP's). Corrugation of the metal film permits interaction of the CSP's with the radiation field. This paper reports the observation of optical emission from CSP's excited by the near-field coupling of molecules adjacent to a corrugated thin metal film embedded in photoresist.

  4. Geometrical constraint experimental determination of Raman lidar overlap profile.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Li, Chengcai; Zhao, Yiming; Li, Jing; Chu, Yiqi

    2016-06-20

    A simple experimental method to determine the overlap profile of Raman lidar is presented in this paper. Based on Mie and Raman backscattering signals and a geometrically constrained condition, the overlap profile of a Raman lidar system can be determined. Our approach simultaneously retrieves the lidar ratio of aerosols, which is one of the most important sources of uncertainty in the overlap profile determination. The results indicate that the overlap factor is significantly influenced by the lidar ratio in experimental methods. A representative case study indicates that the correction of the overlap profile obtained by this method is practical and feasible.

  5. Geometrical constraint experimental determination of Raman lidar overlap profile.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Li, Chengcai; Zhao, Yiming; Li, Jing; Chu, Yiqi

    2016-06-20

    A simple experimental method to determine the overlap profile of Raman lidar is presented in this paper. Based on Mie and Raman backscattering signals and a geometrically constrained condition, the overlap profile of a Raman lidar system can be determined. Our approach simultaneously retrieves the lidar ratio of aerosols, which is one of the most important sources of uncertainty in the overlap profile determination. The results indicate that the overlap factor is significantly influenced by the lidar ratio in experimental methods. A representative case study indicates that the correction of the overlap profile obtained by this method is practical and feasible. PMID:27409119

  6. Quasiperiodic moiré plasmonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Lubin, Steven M; Hryn, Alexander J; Huntington, Mark D; Engel, Clifford J; Odom, Teri W

    2013-12-23

    This paper describes the properties of silver plasmonic crystals with quasiperiodic rotational symmetries. Compared to periodic plasmonic crystals, quasiperiodic moiré structures exhibited an increased number of surface plasmon polariton modes, especially at high angles of excitation. In addition, plasmonic band gaps were often formed at the intersections of these new modes. To identify the origin and predict the location of the band gaps, we developed a Bragg-based indexing system using the reciprocal lattice vectors of the moiré plasmonic crystals. We showed that even more complicated quasiperiodic geometries could also be described by this indexing model. We anticipate that these quasiperiodic lattices will be useful for applications that require the concentration and manipulation of light over a broadband spectrum.

  7. Tailoring terahertz plasmons with silver nanorod arrays

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Wei; Song, Chunyuan; Lanier, Thomas E.; Singh, Ranjan; O'Hara, John F.; Dennis, William M.; Zhao, Yiping; Zhang, Weili

    2013-01-01

    Plasmonic materials that strongly interact with light are ideal candidates for designing subwavelength photonic devices. We report on direct coupling of terahertz waves in metallic nanorods by observing the resonant transmission of surface plasmon polariton waves through lithographically patterned films of silver nanorod (100 nm in diameter) micro-hole arrays. The best enhancement in surface plasmon resonant transmission is obtained when the nanorods are perfectly aligned with the electric field direction of the linearly polarized terahertz wave. This unique polarization-dependent propagation of surface plasmons in structures fabricated from nanorod films offers promising device applications. We conclude that the anisotropy of nanoscale metallic rod arrays imparts a material anisotropy relevant at the microscale that may be utilized for the fabrication of plasmonic and metamaterial based devices for operation at terahertz frequencies.

  8. Hot electron plasmon-protected solar cell.

    PubMed

    Kong, J; Rose, A H; Yang, C; Wu, X; Merlo, J M; Burns, M J; Naughton, M J; Kempa, K

    2015-09-21

    A solar cell based on a hot electron plasmon protection effect is proposed and made plausible by simulations, non-local modeling of the response, and quantum mechanical calculations. In this cell, a thin-film, plasmonic metamaterial structure acts as both an efficient photon absorber in the visible frequency range and a plasmonic resonator in the IR range, the latter of which absorbs and protects against phonon emission the free energy of the hot electrons in an adjacent semiconductor junction. We show that in this structure, electron-plasmon scattering is much more efficient than electron-phonon scattering in cooling-off hot electrons, and the plasmon-stored energy is recoverable as an additional cell voltage. The proposed structure could become a prototype of a new generation of high efficiency solar cells. PMID:26406739

  9. Silicon Hybrid Plasmonic Waveguides and Passive Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Marcelo

    The field of plasmonics has offered the promise to combine electronics and photonics at the nanometer scale for ultrafast information processing speeds and compact integration of devices. Various plasmonic waveguide schemes were proposed with the potential to achieve switching functionalities and densely integrated circuits using optical signals instead of electrons. Among these, the hybrid plasmonic waveguide stands out thanks to two sought-out properties: long propagation lengths and strong modal confinement. In this work, hybrid plasmonic waveguides and passive devices were theoretically investigated and experimentally demonstrated on an integrated silicon platform. A thin SiO2 gap between a gold conductive layer and a silicon core provides subwavelength confinement of light inside the gap. A long propagation length of 40mum was experimentally measured. A system of taper coupler connects the plasmonic waveguide to conventional photonic waveguides at a high efficiency of 80%. Passive devices were also fabricated and characterized, including S-bends and Y-splitters.

  10. Plasmonics with two-dimensional conductors

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Hosang; Yeung, Kitty Y. M.; Kim, Philip; Ham, Donhee

    2014-01-01

    A wealth of effort in photonics has been dedicated to the study and engineering of surface plasmonic waves in the skin of three-dimensional bulk metals, owing largely to their trait of subwavelength confinement. Plasmonic waves in two-dimensional conductors, such as semiconductor heterojunction and graphene, contrast the surface plasmonic waves on bulk metals, as the former emerge at gigahertz to terahertz and infrared frequencies well below the photonics regime and can exhibit far stronger subwavelength confinement. This review elucidates the machinery behind the unique behaviours of the two-dimensional plasmonic waves and discusses how they can be engineered to create ultra-subwavelength plasmonic circuits and metamaterials for infrared and gigahertz to terahertz integrated electronics. PMID:24567472

  11. Caustic graphene plasmons with Kelvin angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Fei; Xu, Hongyi; Yang, Zhaoju; Zhang, Baile

    2015-08-01

    A century-long argument made by Lord Kelvin that all swimming objects have an effective Mach number of 3, corresponding to a Kelvin angle of 19.5° for ship waves, has been challenged recently with the conclusion that the Kelvin angle should gradually transit to the Mach angle as the ship's velocity increases. Here we show that a similar phenomenon can happen for graphene plasmons. By analyzing the caustic wave pattern of graphene plasmons stimulated by a swift charged particle moving uniformly above graphene, we show that at low velocities of the charged particle, the caustics of graphene plasmons form the Kelvin angle. At large velocities of the particle, the caustics disappear and the effective semiangle of the wave pattern approaches the Mach angle. Our study introduces caustic wave theory to the field of graphene plasmonics, and reveals a physical picture of graphene plasmon excitation during electron energy-loss spectroscopy measurements.

  12. Plasmonics with two-dimensional conductors.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hosang; Yeung, Kitty Y M; Kim, Philip; Ham, Donhee

    2014-03-28

    A wealth of effort in photonics has been dedicated to the study and engineering of surface plasmonic waves in the skin of three-dimensional bulk metals, owing largely to their trait of subwavelength confinement. Plasmonic waves in two-dimensional conductors, such as semiconductor heterojunction and graphene, contrast the surface plasmonic waves on bulk metals, as the former emerge at gigahertz to terahertz and infrared frequencies well below the photonics regime and can exhibit far stronger subwavelength confinement. This review elucidates the machinery behind the unique behaviours of the two-dimensional plasmonic waves and discusses how they can be engineered to create ultra-subwavelength plasmonic circuits and metamaterials for infrared and gigahertz to terahertz integrated electronics.

  13. Plasmon absorption modulator systems and methods

    DOEpatents

    Kekatpure, Rohan Deodatta; Davids, Paul

    2014-07-15

    Plasmon absorption modulator systems and methods are disclosed. A plasmon absorption modulator system includes a semiconductor substrate, a plurality of quantum well layers stacked on a top surface of the semiconductor substrate, and a metal layer formed on a top surface of the stack of quantum well layers. A method for modulating plasmonic current includes enabling propagation of the plasmonic current along a metal layer, and applying a voltage across the stack of quantum well layers to cause absorption of a portion of energy of the plasmonic current by the stack of quantum well layers. A metamaterial switching system includes a semiconductor substrate, a plurality of quantum well layers stacked on a top surface of the semiconductor substrate, and at least one metamaterial structure formed on a top surface of the stack of quantum well layers.

  14. Studies on metal-dielectric plasmonic structures.

    SciTech Connect

    Chettiar, Uday K.; Liu, Zhengtong; Thoreson, Mark D.; Shalaev, Vladimir M.; Drachev, Vladimir P.; Pack, Michael Vern; Kildishev, Alexander V.; Nyga, Piotr

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of light with nanostructured metal leads to a number of fascinating phenomena, including plasmon oscillations that can be harnessed for a variety of cutting-edge applications. Plasmon oscillation modes are the collective oscillation of free electrons in metals under incident light. Previously, surface plasmon modes have been used for communication, sensing, nonlinear optics and novel physics studies. In this report, we describe the scientific research completed on metal-dielectric plasmonic films accomplished during a multi-year Purdue Excellence in Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship sponsored by Sandia National Laboratories. A variety of plasmonic structures, from random 2D metal-dielectric films to 3D composite metal-dielectric films, have been studied in this research for applications such as surface-enhanced Raman sensing, tunable superlenses with resolutions beyond the diffraction limit, enhanced molecular absorption, infrared obscurants, and other real-world applications.

  15. Overlap in Patients With Dyspepsia/Functional Dyspepsia

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Patients with dyspepsia/functional dyspepsia (FD) show frequent overlapping of other gastrointestinal (GI) diseases, such as irritable bowel syndrome, and non-GI diseases, in addition to internal subgroup overlapping. These overlap patients have more frequent or more severe symptoms, poorer health-related quality of life and higher somatization scores, and they are more likely to experience anxiety, depression or insomnia compared to non-overlap patients. The higher prevalence of overlap in patients with dyspepsia/FD is not by chance, indicating common pathogeneses, including visceral hypersensitivity, altered GI motility, infection, and stressful early life events. There are few clinical trials targeting overlap in patients with dyspepsia/FD, and no therapeutic strategy has been established. Further studies in this research area are needed. In this review, we describe the epidemiology, pathogenesis and treatment of overlap in patients with dyspepsia/FD. PMID:25257470

  16. Hydroxide-catalyzed bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwo, Dz-Hung (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method of bonding substrates by hydroxide-catalyzed hydration/dehydration involves applying a bonding material to at least one surface to be bonded, and placing the at least one surface sufficiently close to another surface such that a bonding interface is formed between them. A bonding material of the invention comprises a source of hydroxide ions, and may optionally include a silicate component, a particulate filling material, and a property-modifying component. Bonding methods of the invention reliably and reproducibly provide bonds which are strong and precise, and which may be tailored according to a wide range of possible applications. Possible applications for bonding materials of the invention include: forming composite materials, coating substrates, forming laminate structures, assembly of precision optical components, and preparing objects of defined geometry and composition. Bonding materials and methods of preparing the same are also disclosed.

  17. Love and attachment: the psychobiology of social bonding.

    PubMed

    Stein, Dan J; Vythilingum, Bavanisha

    2009-05-01

    Basic animal studies and human imaging studies have contributed to our understanding of the psychobiology of love and attachment. There are overlaps and distinctions in the neuronal circuitry of maternal love, romantic love, and long-term attachment. In these circuits, important molecules, which have been demonstrated to play a role in the psychobiology of social bonding include dopamine, serotonin, opioids, oxytocin, and vasopressin. Particular genetic and environmental variations contribute to social-bonding phenotypes, consistent with an evolutionary perspective on the value of these behaviors. Advances in the psychobiology of social bonds have led to hypotheses about the pharmacotherapy of disorders of attachment.

  18. Optical sensing and determination of complex reflection coefficients of plasmonic structures using transmission interferometric plasmonic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sannomiya, Takumi; Balmer, Tobias E.; Hafner, Christian; Heuberger, Manfred; Vörös, Janos

    2010-05-01

    The combination of interferometry and plasmonic structure, which consists of gold nanoparticle layer, sputter coated silicon oxide spacer layer, and aluminum mirror layer, was studied in transmission mode for biosensing and refractive index sensing applications. Because of the interferometric nature of the system, the information of the reflection amplitude and phase of the plasmonic layer can be deduced from one spectrum. The modulation amplitude in the transmission spectrum, caused by the interference between the plasmonic particle layer and the mirror layer, increases upon the refractive index increase around the plasmonic particles due to their coherent backscattering property. Our proposed evaluation method requires only two light sources with different wavelengths for a stable self-referenced signal, which can be easily and precisely tuned by a transparent spacer layer thickness. Unlike the standard localized surface plasmon sensors, where a sharp resonance peak is essential, a broad band plasmon resonance is accepted in this method. This leads to large fabrication tolerance of the plasmonic structures. We investigated bulk and adsorption layer sensitivities both experimentally and by simulation. The highest sensitivity wavelength corresponded to the resonance of the plasmonic particles, but useful signals are produced in a much broader spectral range. Analysis of a single transmission spectrum allowed us to access the wavelength-dependent complex reflection coefficient of the plasmonic particle layer, which confirmed the reflection amplitude increase in the plasmonic particle layer upon molecular adsorption.

  19. Plasmonic nanopatch array for optical integrated circuit applications

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Shi-Wei; Nie, Zai-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Future plasmonic integrated circuits with the capability of extremely high-speed data processing at optical frequencies will be dominated by the efficient optical emission (excitation) from (of) plasmonic waveguides. Towards this goal, plasmonic nanoantennas, currently a hot topic in the field of plasmonics, have potential to bridge the mismatch between the wave vector of free-space photonics and that of the guided plasmonics. To manipulate light at will, plasmonic nanoantenna arrays will definitely be more efficient than isolated nanoantennas. In this article, the concepts of microwave antenna arrays are applied to efficiently convert plasmonic waves in the plasmonic waveguides into free-space optical waves or vice versa. The proposed plasmonic nanoantenna array, with nanopatch antennas and a coupled wedge plasmon waveguide, can also act as an efficient spectrometer to project different wavelengths into different directions, or as a spatial filter to absorb a specific wavelength at a specified incident angle. PMID:24201454

  20. Plasmonic nanopatch array for optical integrated circuit applications.

    PubMed

    Qu, Shi-Wei; Nie, Zai-Ping

    2013-11-08

    Future plasmonic integrated circuits with the capability of extremely high-speed data processing at optical frequencies will be dominated by the efficient optical emission (excitation) from (of) plasmonic waveguides. Towards this goal, plasmonic nanoantennas, currently a hot topic in the field of plasmonics, have potential to bridge the mismatch between the wave vector of free-space photonics and that of the guided plasmonics. To manipulate light at will, plasmonic nanoantenna arrays will definitely be more efficient than isolated nanoantennas. In this article, the concepts of microwave antenna arrays are applied to efficiently convert plasmonic waves in the plasmonic waveguides into free-space optical waves or vice versa. The proposed plasmonic nanoantenna array, with nanopatch antennas and a coupled wedge plasmon waveguide, can also act as an efficient spectrometer to project different wavelengths into different directions, or as a spatial filter to absorb a specific wavelength at a specified incident angle.

  1. Subwavelength plasmonics for graded-index optics on a chip.

    PubMed

    Grajower, Meir; Lerman, Gilad M; Goykhman, Ilya; Desiatov, Boris; Yanai, Avner; Smith, David R; Levy, Uriel

    2013-09-15

    Planar plasmonic devices are becoming attractive for myriad applications, owing to their potential compatibility with standard microelectronics technology and the capability for densely integrating a large variety of plasmonic devices on a chip. Mitigating the challenges of using plasmonics in on-chip configurations requires precise control over the properties of plasmonic modes, in particular their shape and size. Here we achieve this goal by demonstrating a planar plasmonic graded-index lens focusing surface plasmons propagating along the device. The plasmonic mode is manipulated by carving subwavelength features into a dielectric layer positioned on top of a uniform metal film, allowing the local effective index of the plasmonic mode to be controlled using a single binary lithographic step. Focusing and divergence of surface plasmons is demonstrated experimentally. The demonstrated approach can be used for manipulating the propagation of surface plasmons, e.g., for beam steering, splitting, cloaking, mode matching, and beam shaping applications.

  2. Evolution of Plasmonic Metamolecule Modes in the Quantum Tunneling Regime.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Jonathan A; Garcia-Etxarri, Aitzol; Aguirregabiria, Garikoitz; Esteban, Ruben; Narayan, Tarun C; Koh, Ai Leen; Aizpurua, Javier; Dionne, Jennifer A

    2016-01-26

    Plasmonic multinanoparticle systems exhibit collective electric and magnetic resonances that are fundamental for the development of state-of-the-art optical nanoantennas, metamaterials, and surface-enhanced spectroscopy substrates. While electric dipolar modes have been investigated in both the classical and quantum realm, little attention has been given to magnetic and other "dark" modes at the smallest dimensions. Here, we study the collective electric, magnetic, and dark modes of colloidally synthesized silver nanosphere trimers with varying interparticle separation using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). This technique enables direct visualization and spatially selective excitation of individual trimers, as well as manipulation of the interparticle distance into the subnanometer regime with the electron beam. Our experiments reveal that bonding electric and magnetic modes are significantly impacted by quantum effects, exhibiting a relative blueshift and reduced EELS amplitude compared to classical predictions. In contrast, the trimer's electric dark mode is not affected by quantum tunneling for even Ångström-scale interparticle separations. We employ a quantum-corrected model to simulate the effect of electron tunneling in the trimer which shows excellent agreement with experimental results. This understanding of classical and quantum-influenced hybridized modes may impact the development of future quantum plasmonic materials and devices, including Fano-like molecular sensors and quantum metamaterials. PMID:26639023

  3. Evolution of Plasmonic Metamolecule Modes in the Quantum Tunneling Regime.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Jonathan A; Garcia-Etxarri, Aitzol; Aguirregabiria, Garikoitz; Esteban, Ruben; Narayan, Tarun C; Koh, Ai Leen; Aizpurua, Javier; Dionne, Jennifer A

    2016-01-26

    Plasmonic multinanoparticle systems exhibit collective electric and magnetic resonances that are fundamental for the development of state-of-the-art optical nanoantennas, metamaterials, and surface-enhanced spectroscopy substrates. While electric dipolar modes have been investigated in both the classical and quantum realm, little attention has been given to magnetic and other "dark" modes at the smallest dimensions. Here, we study the collective electric, magnetic, and dark modes of colloidally synthesized silver nanosphere trimers with varying interparticle separation using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). This technique enables direct visualization and spatially selective excitation of individual trimers, as well as manipulation of the interparticle distance into the subnanometer regime with the electron beam. Our experiments reveal that bonding electric and magnetic modes are significantly impacted by quantum effects, exhibiting a relative blueshift and reduced EELS amplitude compared to classical predictions. In contrast, the trimer's electric dark mode is not affected by quantum tunneling for even Ångström-scale interparticle separations. We employ a quantum-corrected model to simulate the effect of electron tunneling in the trimer which shows excellent agreement with experimental results. This understanding of classical and quantum-influenced hybridized modes may impact the development of future quantum plasmonic materials and devices, including Fano-like molecular sensors and quantum metamaterials.

  4. Spatiotemporal control of femtosecond plasmon using plasmon response functions measured by near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM).

    PubMed

    Onishi, Shutaro; Matsuishi, Keiichiro; Oi, Jun; Harada, Takuya; Kusaba, Miyuki; Hirosawa, Kenichi; Kannari, Fumihiko

    2013-11-01

    Spectral interferometry combined with near-field scanning optical microscopy is applied in the spatiotemporal characterization of femtosecond plasmon localized at gold nanostructures and surface plasmon polariton in an air-gap waveguide. Based on the plasmon response function in both the amplitude and the phase obtained from the measurements, we deterministically tailored the femtosecond plasmon pulse by shaping the femtosecond excitation laser pulses.

  5. Depression-Burnout Overlap in Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Wurm, Walter; Vogel, Katrin; Holl, Anna; Ebner, Christoph; Bayer, Dietmar; Mörkl, Sabrina; Szilagyi, Istvan-Szilard; Hotter, Erich; Kapfhammer, Hans-Peter; Hofmann, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background Whether burnout is a distinct phenomenon rather than a type of depression and whether it is a syndrome, limited to three “core” components (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and low personal accomplishment) are subjects of current debate. We investigated the depression-burnout overlap, and the pertinence of these three components in a large, representative sample of physicians. Methods In a cross-sectional study, all Austrian physicians were invited to answer a questionnaire that included the Major Depression Inventory (MDI), the Hamburg Burnout Inventory (HBI), as well as demographic and job-related parameters. Of the 40093 physicians who received an invitation, a total of 6351 (15.8%) participated. The data of 5897 participants were suitable for analysis. Results Of the participants, 10.3% were affected by major depression. Our study results suggest that potentially 50.7% of the participants were affected by symptoms of burnout. Compared to physicians unaffected by burnout, the odds ratio of suffering from major depression was 2.99 (95% CI 2.21–4.06) for physicians with mild, 10.14 (95% CI 7.58–13.59) for physicians with moderate, 46.84 (95% CI 35.25–62.24) for physicians with severe burnout and 92.78 (95% CI 62.96–136.74) for the 3% of participants with the highest HBI_sum (sum score of all ten HBI components). The HBI components Emotional Exhaustion, Personal Accomplishment and Detachment (representing depersonalization) tend to correlate more highly with the main symptoms of major depression (sadness, lack of interest and lack of energy) than with each other. A combination of the HBI components Emotional Exhaustion, Helplessness, Inner Void and Tedium (adj.R2 = 0.92) explained more HBI_sum variance than the three “core” components (adj.R2 = 0.85) of burnout combined. Cronbach’s alpha for Emotional Exhaustion, Helplessness, Inner Void and Tedium combined was 0.90 compared to α = 0.54 for the combination of the three

  6. Large-area nanogap plasmon resonator arrays for plasmonics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Mingliang; van Wolferen, Henk; Wormeester, Herbert; van den Berg, Albert; Carlen, Edwin T.

    2012-07-01

    Large-area (~8000 mm2) Au nanogap plasmon resonator array substrates manufactured using maskless laser interference lithography (LIL) with high uniformity are presented. The periodically spaced subwavelength nanogap arrays are formed between adjacent nanopyramid (NPy) structures with precisely defined pitch and high length density (~1 km cm-2), and are ideally suited as scattering sites for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), as well as refractive index sensing. The two-dimensional grid arrangement of NPy structures renders the excitation of the plasmon resonators minimally dependent on the incident polarization. The SERS average enhancement factor (AEF) has been characterized using over 30 000 individual measurements of benzenethiol (BT) chemisorbed on the Au NPy surfaces. From the 1(a1), βCCC + νCS ring mode (1074 cm-1) of BT on surfaces with pitch λg = 200 nm, AEF = 0.8 × 106 and for surfaces with λg = 500 nm, AEF = 0.3 × 107 from over 99% of the imaged spots. Maximum AEFs > 108 have been measured in both cases.

  7. Plasmonic Gold Decorated MWCNT Nanocomposite for Localized Plasmon Resonance Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozhikandathil, J.; Badilescu, S.; Packirisamy, M.

    2015-08-01

    The synergism of excellent properties of carbon nanotubes and gold nanoparticles is used in this work for bio-sensing of recombinant bovine growth hormones (rbST) by making Multi Wall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNT) locally optically responsive by augmenting it optical properties through Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR). To this purpose, locally gold nano particles decorated gold-MWCNT composite was synthesized from a suspension of MWCNT bundles and hydrogen chloroauric acid in an aqueous solution, activated ultrasonically and, then, drop-casted on a glass substrate. The slow drying of the drop produces a “coffee ring” pattern that is found to contain gold-MWCNT nanocomposites, accumulated mostly along the perimeter of the ring. The reaction is studied also at low-temperature, in the vacuum chamber of the Scanning Electron Microscope and is accounted for by the local melting processes that facilitate the contact between the bundle of tubes and the gold ions. Biosensing applications of the gold-MWCNT nanocomposite using their LSPR properties are demonstrated for the plasmonic detection of traces of bovine growth hormone. The sensitivity of the hybrid platform which is found to be 1 ng/ml is much better than that measuring with gold nanoparticles alone which is only 25 ng/ml.

  8. Plasmonic Gold Decorated MWCNT Nanocomposite for Localized Plasmon Resonance Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Ozhikandathil, J.; Badilescu, S.; Packirisamy, M.

    2015-01-01

    The synergism of excellent properties of carbon nanotubes and gold nanoparticles is used in this work for bio-sensing of recombinant bovine growth hormones (rbST) by making Multi Wall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNT) locally optically responsive by augmenting it optical properties through Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR). To this purpose, locally gold nano particles decorated gold–MWCNT composite was synthesized from a suspension of MWCNT bundles and hydrogen chloroauric acid in an aqueous solution, activated ultrasonically and, then, drop-casted on a glass substrate. The slow drying of the drop produces a “coffee ring” pattern that is found to contain gold–MWCNT nanocomposites, accumulated mostly along the perimeter of the ring. The reaction is studied also at low-temperature, in the vacuum chamber of the Scanning Electron Microscope and is accounted for by the local melting processes that facilitate the contact between the bundle of tubes and the gold ions. Biosensing applications of the gold–MWCNT nanocomposite using their LSPR properties are demonstrated for the plasmonic detection of traces of bovine growth hormone. The sensitivity of the hybrid platform which is found to be 1 ng/ml is much better than that measuring with gold nanoparticles alone which is only 25 ng/ml. PMID:26282187

  9. Plasmonic Gold Decorated MWCNT Nanocomposite for Localized Plasmon Resonance Sensing.

    PubMed

    Ozhikandathil, J; Badilescu, S; Packirisamy, M

    2015-01-01

    The synergism of excellent properties of carbon nanotubes and gold nanoparticles is used in this work for bio-sensing of recombinant bovine growth hormones (rbST) by making Multi Wall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNT) locally optically responsive by augmenting it optical properties through Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR). To this purpose, locally gold nano particles decorated gold-MWCNT composite was synthesized from a suspension of MWCNT bundles and hydrogen chloroauric acid in an aqueous solution, activated ultrasonically and, then, drop-casted on a glass substrate. The slow drying of the drop produces a "coffee ring" pattern that is found to contain gold-MWCNT nanocomposites, accumulated mostly along the perimeter of the ring. The reaction is studied also at low-temperature, in the vacuum chamber of the Scanning Electron Microscope and is accounted for by the local melting processes that facilitate the contact between the bundle of tubes and the gold ions. Biosensing applications of the gold-MWCNT nanocomposite using their LSPR properties are demonstrated for the plasmonic detection of traces of bovine growth hormone. The sensitivity of the hybrid platform which is found to be 1 ng/ml is much better than that measuring with gold nanoparticles alone which is only 25 ng/ml.

  10. Plasmonic Gold Decorated MWCNT Nanocomposite for Localized Plasmon Resonance Sensing.

    PubMed

    Ozhikandathil, J; Badilescu, S; Packirisamy, M

    2015-01-01

    The synergism of excellent properties of carbon nanotubes and gold nanoparticles is used in this work for bio-sensing of recombinant bovine growth hormones (rbST) by making Multi Wall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNT) locally optically responsive by augmenting it optical properties through Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR). To this purpose, locally gold nano particles decorated gold-MWCNT composite was synthesized from a suspension of MWCNT bundles and hydrogen chloroauric acid in an aqueous solution, activated ultrasonically and, then, drop-casted on a glass substrate. The slow drying of the drop produces a "coffee ring" pattern that is found to contain gold-MWCNT nanocomposites, accumulated mostly along the perimeter of the ring. The reaction is studied also at low-temperature, in the vacuum chamber of the Scanning Electron Microscope and is accounted for by the local melting processes that facilitate the contact between the bundle of tubes and the gold ions. Biosensing applications of the gold-MWCNT nanocomposite using their LSPR properties are demonstrated for the plasmonic detection of traces of bovine growth hormone. The sensitivity of the hybrid platform which is found to be 1 ng/ml is much better than that measuring with gold nanoparticles alone which is only 25 ng/ml. PMID:26282187

  11. A terahertz plasmon cavity detector

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, G. C.; Vinh, N. Q.; Allen, S. J.; Aizin, G. R.; Mikalopas, J.; Reno, J. L.; Shaner, E. A.

    2010-11-08

    Sensitivity of a plasmonic detector is enhanced by integrating a broadband log-periodic antenna with a two-dimensional plasma cavity that is defined by source, drain, and multiple gates of a GaAs/AlGaAs high electron mobility transistor. Both narrow-band terahertz detection and a rich harmonic spectrum are evident. With a bolometric sensor in the channel, we report responsivity, on resonance at 235-240 GHz and at 20 K, of up to 7 kV/W and a noise equivalent power of 5x10{sup -10} W/Hz{sup 1/2}.

  12. Development of Ultrasensitive Plasmonic Nanosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Gayatribahen K.

    Nanostructures (NSs) based localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensors have brought a transformation in development of sensing devices due to their ability to detect extremely small changes in surrounding refractive index (R.I.). NS-based LSPR sensing approaches have been employed to enhance the sensitivity for a variety of applications, such as diagnosis of disease, food and environmental analysis, and chemical and biological threat detection. Generally in LSPR spectroscopy, absorption and scattering of light is greatly enhanced at a frequency that excites the NS's LSPR and results in well-defined LSPR extinction peak (lambdaLSPR). This lambdaLSPR is highly dependent on the size, shape, and surrounding R.I. of NSs. Compositional and confirmational change within the surrounding R.I. near the NS could be detected by monitoring the shifts in lambdaLSPR. This thesis specifically focuses on the rational development of the plasmonic nanosensors for various sensing applications by utilizing the LSPR properties of Au NS with prismatic shape. First the chemical synthetic approach that can produce Au nanoprisms, which displayed lambdaLSPR in 650-850 nm range corresponding to 20-50 nm edge lengths has been developed. The chemically synthesized Au nanoprisms were attached to silanized glass substrate and employed as a solid-state sensing platform for the development of label-free plasmonic nanosensors. The size, shape, and surface of nanoprisms were characterized through transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and UV-visible spectroscopy. Further, the influence of the structure, size and surface ligand chemistry onto the lambda LSPR of nanoprisms were investigated in detail. Both bulk and local R.I. sensitivity, and the electromagnetic-field (EM-field) decay length were derived for various edge lengths of nanoprisms through measuring the lambda LSPR shifts by UV-visible spectroscopy. Finally, nanoprisms

  13. Voigt Airy surface magneto plasmons.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bin; Wang, Qi Jie; Zhang, Ying

    2012-09-10

    We present a basic theory on Airy surface magneto plasmons (SMPs) at the interface between a dielectric layer and a metal layer (or a doped semiconductor layer) under an external static magnetic field in the Voigt configuration. It is shown that, in the paraxial approximation, the Airy SMPs can propagate along the surface without violating the nondiffracting characteristics, while the ballistic trajectory of the Airy SMPs can be tuned by the applied magnetic field. In addition, the self-deflection-tuning property of the Airy SMPs depends on the direction of the external magnetic field applied, owing to the nonreciprocal effect. PMID:23037243

  14. Sol-Gel Thin Films for Plasmonic Gas Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Della Gaspera, Enrico; Martucci, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic gas sensors are optical sensors that use localized surface plasmons or extended surface plasmons as transducing platform. Surface plasmons are very sensitive to dielectric variations of the environment or to electron exchange, and these effects have been exploited for the realization of sensitive gas sensors. In this paper, we review our research work of the last few years on the synthesis and the gas sensing properties of sol-gel based nanomaterials for plasmonic sensors. PMID:26184216

  15. The use of plasmon spectroscopy and imaging in a transmission electron microscope to probe physical properties at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Oleshko, Vladimir P

    2012-11-01

    Valence EELS and energy-filtering TEM appear to be powerful tools to explore diverse nanoscale phenomena. The techniques enable real-time information on the band structure, bonding, dielectric and optical response and phase compositions of nanostructured materials. Furthermore, electron beam-induced excitations in the 0 to 50 eV energy loss range dominated by plasmons are sensitive to valence electron states primarily responsible for intrinsic materials properties. We used universality and scaling in relationships between the volume plasmon energy and cohesive energy, elastic moduli and hardness to derive analytical expressions for quantitative determination of the properties. Based on this approach, cohesive and elastic properties of metastable nanoprecipitates in structural alloys and hardness of diesel engine soot nanoparticles have been evaluated. Spatially-resolved plasmon spectroscopic imaging techniques offer possibilities to determine and image in situ multiple physical properties of nanoscale materials and to monitor their changes during dynamic transformations, thus establishing new capabilities for material research.

  16. Plasmonic nanostructures to enhance catalytic performance of zeolites under visible light

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xingguang; Ke, Xuebin; Du, Aijun; Zhu, Huaiyong

    2014-01-01

    Light absorption efficiency of heterogeneous catalysts has restricted their photocatalytic capability for commercially important organic synthesis. Here, we report a way of harvesting visible light efficiently to boost zeolite catalysis by means of plasmonic gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) supported on zeolites. Zeolites possess strong Brønsted acids and polarized electric fields created by extra-framework cations. The polarized electric fields can be further intensified by the electric near-field enhancement of Au-NPs, which results from the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) upon visible light irradiation. The acetalization reaction was selected as a showcase performed on MZSM-5 and Au/MZSM-5 (M = H+, Na+, Ca2+, or La3+). The density functional theory (DFT) calculations confirmed that the intensified polarized electric fields played a critical role in stretching the C = O bond of the reactants of benzaldehyde to enlarge their molecular polarities, thus allowing reactants to be activated more efficiently by catalytic centers so as to boost the reaction rates. This discovery should evoke intensive research interest on plasmonic metals and diverse zeolites with an aim to take advantage of sunlight for plasmonic devices, molecular electronics, energy storage, and catalysis. PMID:24448225

  17. Plasmonic nanostructures to enhance catalytic performance of zeolites under visible light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xingguang; Ke, Xuebin; Du, Aijun; Zhu, Huaiyong

    2014-01-01

    Light absorption efficiency of heterogeneous catalysts has restricted their photocatalytic capability for commercially important organic synthesis. Here, we report a way of harvesting visible light efficiently to boost zeolite catalysis by means of plasmonic gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) supported on zeolites. Zeolites possess strong Brønsted acids and polarized electric fields created by extra-framework cations. The polarized electric fields can be further intensified by the electric near-field enhancement of Au-NPs, which results from the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) upon visible light irradiation. The acetalization reaction was selected as a showcase performed on MZSM-5 and Au/MZSM-5 (M = H+, Na+, Ca2+, or La3+). The density functional theory (DFT) calculations confirmed that the intensified polarized electric fields played a critical role in stretching the C = O bond of the reactants of benzaldehyde to enlarge their molecular polarities, thus allowing reactants to be activated more efficiently by catalytic centers so as to boost the reaction rates. This discovery should evoke intensive research interest on plasmonic metals and diverse zeolites with an aim to take advantage of sunlight for plasmonic devices, molecular electronics, energy storage, and catalysis.

  18. EVOG: a database for evolutionary analysis of overlapping genes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Soo; Cho, Chi-Young; Huh, Jae-Won; Kim, Heui-Soo; Cho, Hwan-Gue

    2009-01-01

    Overlapping genes are defined as a pair of genes whose transcripts are overlapped. Recently, many cases of overlapped genes have been investigated in various eukaryotic organisms; however, their origin and transcriptional control mechanism has not yet been clearly determined. In this study, we implemented evolutionary visualizer for overlapping genes (EVOG), a Web-based DB with a novel visualization interface, to investigate the evolutionary relationship between overlapping genes. Using this technique, we collected and analyzed all overlapping genes in human, chimpanzee, orangutan, marmoset, rhesus, cow, dog, mouse, rat, chicken, Xenopus, zebrafish and Drosophila. This integrated database provides a manually curated database that displays the evolutionary features of overlapping genes. The EVOG DB components included a number of overlapping genes (10074 in human, 10,009 in chimpanzee, 67,039 in orangutan, 51,001 in marmoset, 219 in rhesus, 3627 in cow, 209 in dog, 10,700 in mouse, 7987 in rat, 1439 in chicken, 597 in Xenopus, 2457 in zebrafish and 4115 in Drosophila). The EVOG database is very effective and easy to use for the analysis of the evolutionary process of overlapping genes when comparing different species. Therefore, EVOG could potentially be used as the main tool to investigate the evolution of the human genome in relation to disease by comparing the expression profiles of overlapping genes. EVOG is available at http://neobio.cs.pusan.ac.kr/evog/.

  19. Localized overlap algorithm for unexpanded dispersion energies

    SciTech Connect

    Rob, Fazle; Szalewicz, Krzysztof; Misquitta, Alston J.; Podeszwa, Rafał

    2014-03-21

    First-principles-based, linearly scaling algorithm has been developed for calculations of dispersion energies from frequency-dependent density susceptibility (FDDS) functions with account of charge-overlap effects. The transition densities in FDDSs are fitted by a set of auxiliary atom-centered functions. The terms in the dispersion energy expression involving products of such functions are computed using either the unexpanded (exact) formula or from inexpensive asymptotic expansions, depending on the location of these functions relative to the dimer configuration. This approach leads to significant savings of computational resources. In particular, for a dimer consisting of two elongated monomers with 81 atoms each in a head-to-head configuration, the most favorable case for our algorithm, a 43-fold speedup has been achieved while the approximate dispersion energy differs by less than 1% from that computed using the standard unexpanded approach. In contrast, the dispersion energy computed from the distributed asymptotic expansion differs by dozens of percent in the van der Waals minimum region. A further increase of the size of each monomer would result in only small increased costs since all the additional terms would be computed from the asymptotic expansion.

  20. Effects of overlapping strings in pp collisions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bierlich, Christian; Gustafson, Gösta; Lönnblad, Leif; Tarasov, Andrey

    2015-03-26

    In models for hadron collisions based on string hadronization, the strings are usually treated as independent, allowing no interaction between the confined colour fields. In studies of nucleus collisions it has been suggested that strings close in space can fuse to form "colour ropes." Such ropes are expected to give more strange particles and baryons, which also has been suggested as a signal for plasma formation. Overlapping strings can also be expected in pp collisions, where usually no phase transition is expected. In particular at the high LHC energies the expected density of strings is quite high. To investigate possiblemore » effects of rope formation, we present a model in which strings are allowed to combine into higher multiplets, giving rise to increased production of baryons and strangeness, or recombine into singlet structures and vanish. Also a crude model for strings recombining into junction structures is considered, again giving rise to increased baryon production. The models are implemented in the DIPSY MC event generator, using PYTHIA8 for hadronization, and comparison to pp minimum bias data, reveals improvement in the description of identified particle spectra.« less

  1. Enzymatic assembly of overlapping DNA fragments.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Daniel G

    2011-01-01

    Three methods for assembling multiple, overlapping DNA molecules are described. Each method shares the same basic approach: (i) an exonuclease removes nucleotides from the ends of double-stranded (ds) DNA molecules, exposing complementary single-stranded (ss) DNA overhangs that are specifically annealed; (ii) the ssDNA gaps of the joined molecules are filled in by DNA polymerase, and the nicks are covalently sealed by DNA ligase. The first method employs the 3'-exonuclease activity of T4 DNA polymerase (T4 pol), Taq DNA polymerase (Taq pol), and Taq DNA ligase (Taq lig) in a two-step thermocycled reaction. The second method uses 3'-exonuclease III (ExoIII), antibody-bound Taq pol, and Taq lig in a one-step thermocycled reaction. The third method employs 5'-T5 exonuclease, Phusion® DNA polymerase, and Taq lig in a one-step isothermal reaction and can be used to assemble both ssDNA and dsDNA. These assembly methods can be used to seamlessly construct synthetic and natural genes, genetic pathways, and entire genomes and could be very useful for molecular engineering tools. PMID:21601685

  2. Continuum percolation of congruent overlapping spherocylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenxiang; Su, Xianglong; Jiao, Yang

    2016-09-01

    Continuum percolation of randomly orientated congruent overlapping spherocylinders (composed of cylinder of height H with semispheres of diameter D at the ends) with aspect ratio α =H /D in [0 ,∞ ) is studied. The percolation threshold ϕc, percolation transition width Δ, and correlation-length critical exponent ν for spherocylinders with α in [0, 200] are determined with a high degree of accuracy via extensive finite-size scaling analysis. A generalized excluded-volume approximation for percolation threshold with an exponent explicitly depending on both aspect ratio and excluded volume for arbitrary α values in [0 ,∞ ) is proposed and shown to yield accurate predictions of ϕc for an extremely wide range of α in [0, 2000] based on available numerical and experimental data. We find ϕc is a universal monotonic decreasing function of α and is independent of the effective particle size. Our study has implications in percolation theory for nonspherical particles and composite material design.

  3. Base drive and overlap protection circuit

    DOEpatents

    Gritter, David J.

    1983-01-01

    An inverter (34) which provides power to an A. C. machine (28) is controlled by a circuit (36) employing PWM control strategy whereby A. C. power is supplied to the machine at a preselectable frequency and preselectable voltage. This is accomplished by the technique of waveform notching in which the shapes of the notches are varied to determine the average energy content of the overall waveform. Through this arrangement, the operational efficiency of the A. C. machine is optimized. The control circuit includes a microcomputer and memory element which receive various parametric inputs and calculate optimized machine control data signals therefrom. The control data is asynchronously loaded into the inverter through an intermediate buffer (38). A base drive and overlap protection circuit is included to insure that both transistors of a complimentary pair are not conducting at the same time. In its preferred embodiment, the present invention is incorporated within an electric vehicle (10) employing a 144 VDC battery pack (32) and a three-phase induction motor (18).

  4. Effects of overlapping strings in pp collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bierlich, Christian; Gustafson, Gösta; Lönnblad, Leif; Tarasov, Andrey

    2015-03-26

    In models for hadron collisions based on string hadronization, the strings are usually treated as independent, allowing no interaction between the confined colour fields. In studies of nucleus collisions it has been suggested that strings close in space can fuse to form "colour ropes." Such ropes are expected to give more strange particles and baryons, which also has been suggested as a signal for plasma formation. Overlapping strings can also be expected in pp collisions, where usually no phase transition is expected. In particular at the high LHC energies the expected density of strings is quite high. To investigate possible effects of rope formation, we present a model in which strings are allowed to combine into higher multiplets, giving rise to increased production of baryons and strangeness, or recombine into singlet structures and vanish. Also a crude model for strings recombining into junction structures is considered, again giving rise to increased baryon production. The models are implemented in the DIPSY MC event generator, using PYTHIA8 for hadronization, and comparison to pp minimum bias data, reveals improvement in the description of identified particle spectra.

  5. Low-temperature plasmonics of metallic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Bouillard, Jean-Sebastien G; Dickson, Wayne; O'Connor, Daniel P; Wurtz, Gregory A; Zayats, Anatoly V

    2012-03-14

    The requirements for spatial and temporal manipulation of electromagnetic fields on the nanoscale have recently resulted in an ever-increasing use of plasmonics for achieving various functionalities with superior performance to those available from conventional photonics. For these applications, ohmic losses resulting from free-electron scattering in the metal is one major limitation for the performance of plasmonic structures. In the low-frequency regime, ohmic losses can be reduced at low temperatures. In this work, we study the effect of temperature on the optical response of different plasmonic nanostructures and show that the extinction of a plasmonic nanorod metamaterial can be efficiently controlled with temperature with transmission changes by nearly a factor of 10 between room and liquid nitrogen temperatures, while temperature effects in plasmonic crystals are relatively weak (transmission changes only up to 20%). Because of the different nature of the plasmonic interactions in these types of plasmonic nanostructures, drastically differing responses (increased or decreased extinction) to temperature change were observed despite identical variations of the metal's permittivity.

  6. Plasmonic polymers unraveled through single particle spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Slaughter, Liane S; Wang, Lin-Yung; Willingham, Britain A; Olson, Jana M; Swanglap, Pattanawit; Dominguez-Medina, Sergio; Link, Stephan

    2014-10-01

    Plasmonic polymers are quasi one-dimensional assemblies of nanoparticles whose optical responses are governed by near-field coupling of localized surface plasmons. Through single particle extinction spectroscopy correlated with electron microscopy, we reveal the effect of the composition of the repeat unit, the chain length, and extent of disorder on the energies, intensities, and line shapes of the collective resonances of individual plasmonic polymers constructed from three different sizes of gold nanoparticles. Our combined experimental and theoretical analysis focuses on the superradiant plasmon mode, which results from the most attractive interactions along the nanoparticle chain and yields the lowest energy resonance in the spectrum. This superradiant mode redshifts with increasing chain length until an infinite chain limit, where additional increases in chain length cause negligible change in the energy of the superradiant mode. We find that, among plasmonic polymers of equal width comprising nanoparticles with different sizes, the onset of the infinite chain limit and its associated energy are dictated by the number of repeat units and not the overall length of the polymer. The intensities and linewidths of the superradiant mode relative to higher energy resonances, however, differ as the size and number of nanoparticles are varied in the plasmonic polymers studied here. These findings provide general guidelines for engineering the energies, intensities, and line shapes of the collective optical response of plasmonic polymers constructed from nanoparticles with sizes ranging from a few tens to one hundred nanometers. PMID:25155111

  7. Electrically Excited Plasmonic Nanoruler for Biomolecule Detection.

    PubMed

    Dathe, André; Ziegler, Mario; Hübner, Uwe; Fritzsche, Wolfgang; Stranik, Ondrej

    2016-09-14

    Plasmon-based sensors are excellent tools for a label-free detection of small biomolecules. An interesting group of such sensors are plasmonic nanorulers that rely on the plasmon hybridization upon modification of their morphology to sense nanoscale distances. Sensor geometries based on the interaction of plasmons in a flat metallic layer together with metal nanoparticles inherit unique advantages but need a special optical excitation configuration that is not easy to miniaturize. Herein, we introduce the concept of nanoruler excitation by direct, electrically induced generation of surface plasmons based on the quantum shot noise of tunneling currents. An electron tunneling junction consisting of a metal-dielectric-semiconductor heterostructure is directly incorporated into the nanoruler basic geometry. With the application of voltage on this modified nanoruler, the plasmon modes are directly excited without any additional optical component as a light source. We demonstrate via several experiments that this electrically driven nanoruler possesses similar properties as an optically exited one and confirm its sensing capabilities by the detection of the binding of small biomolecules such as antibodies. This new sensing principle could open the way to a new platform of highly miniaturized, integrated plasmonic sensors compatible with monolithic integrated circuits.

  8. Surface plasmon polaritons in artificial metallic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briscoe, Jayson Lawrence

    Surface plasmon polaritons have been the focus of intense research due to their many unique properties such as high electromagnetic field localization, extreme sensitivity to surface conditions, and subwavelength confinement of electromagnetic waves. The area of potential impact is vast and includes promising advancements in photonic circuits, high speed photodetection, hyperspectral imaging, spectroscopy, enhanced solar cells, ultra-small scale lithography, and microscopy. My research has focused on utilizing these properties to design and demonstrate new phenomena and implement real-world applications using artificial metallic nanostructures. Artificial metallic nanostructures employed during my research begin as thin planar gold films which are then lithographically patterned according to previously determined dimensions. The result is a nanopatterned device which can excite surface plasmon polaritons on its surface under specific conditions. Through my research I characterized the optical properties of these devices for further insight into the interesting properties of surface plasmon polaritons. Exploration of these properties led to advancements in biosensing, development of artificial media to enhance and control light-matter interactions at the nanoscale, and hybrid plasmonic cavities. Demonstrations from these advancements include: label-free immunosensing of Plasmodium in a whole blood lysate, low part-per-trillion detection of microcystin-LR, enhanced refractive index sensitivity of novel resonant plasmonic devices, a defect-based plasmonic crystal, spontaneous emission modification of colloidal quantum dots, and coupling of plasmonic and optical Fabry-Perot resonant modes in a hybrid cavity.

  9. Active plasmonics in WDM traffic switching applications.

    PubMed

    Papaioannou, Sotirios; Kalavrouziotis, Dimitrios; Vyrsokinos, Konstantinos; Weeber, Jean-Claude; Hassan, Karim; Markey, Laurent; Dereux, Alain; Kumar, Ashwani; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I; Baus, Matthias; Tekin, Tolga; Apostolopoulos, Dimitrios; Avramopoulos, Hercules; Pleros, Nikos

    2012-01-01

    With metal stripes being intrinsic components of plasmonic waveguides, plasmonics provides a "naturally" energy-efficient platform for merging broadband optical links with intelligent electronic processing, instigating a great promise for low-power and small-footprint active functional circuitry. The first active Dielectric-Loaded Surface Plasmon Polariton (DLSPP) thermo-optic (TO) switches with successful performance in single-channel 10 Gb/s data traffic environments have led the inroad towards bringing low-power active plasmonics in practical traffic applications. In this article, we introduce active plasmonics into Wavelength Division Multiplexed (WDM) switching applications, using the smallest TO DLSPP-based Mach-Zehnder interferometric switch reported so far and showing its successful performance in 4×10 Gb/s low-power and fast switching operation. The demonstration of the WDM-enabling characteristics of active plasmonic circuits with an ultra-low power × response time product represents a crucial milestone in the development of active plasmonics towards real telecom and datacom applications, where low-energy and fast TO operation with small-size circuitry is targeted.

  10. Direct temperature mapping of nanoscale plasmonic devices.

    PubMed

    Desiatov, Boris; Goykhman, Ilya; Levy, Uriel

    2014-02-12

    Side by side with the great advantages of plasmonics in nanoscale light confinement, the inevitable ohmic loss results in significant joule heating in plasmonic devices. Therefore, understanding optical-induced heat generation and heat transport in integrated on-chip plasmonic devices is of major importance. Specifically, there is a need for in situ visualization of electromagnetic induced thermal energy distribution with high spatial resolution. This paper studies the heat distribution in silicon plasmonic nanotips. Light is coupled to the plasmonic nanotips from a silicon nanowaveguide that is integrated with the tip on chip. Heat is generated by light absorption in the metal surrounding the silicon nanotip. The steady-state thermal distribution is studied numerically and measured experimentally using the approach of scanning thermal microscopy. It is shown that following the nanoscale heat generation by a 10 mW light source within a silicon photonic waveguide the temperature in the region of the nanotip is increased by ∼ 15 °C compared with the ambient temperature. Furthermore, we also perform a numerical study of the dynamics of the heat transport. Given the nanoscale dimensions of the structure, significant heating is expected to occur within the time frame of picoseconds. The capability of measuring temperature distribution of plasmonic structures at the nanoscale is shown to be a powerful tool and may be used in future applications related to thermal plasmonic applications such as control heating of liquids, thermal photovoltaic, nanochemistry, medicine, heat-assisted magnetic memories, and nanolithography.

  11. Active plasmonics in WDM traffic switching applications

    PubMed Central

    Papaioannou, Sotirios; Kalavrouziotis, Dimitrios; Vyrsokinos, Konstantinos; Weeber, Jean-Claude; Hassan, Karim; Markey, Laurent; Dereux, Alain; Kumar, Ashwani; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Baus, Matthias; Tekin, Tolga; Apostolopoulos, Dimitrios; Avramopoulos, Hercules; Pleros, Nikos

    2012-01-01

    With metal stripes being intrinsic components of plasmonic waveguides, plasmonics provides a “naturally” energy-efficient platform for merging broadband optical links with intelligent electronic processing, instigating a great promise for low-power and small-footprint active functional circuitry. The first active Dielectric-Loaded Surface Plasmon Polariton (DLSPP) thermo-optic (TO) switches with successful performance in single-channel 10 Gb/s data traffic environments have led the inroad towards bringing low-power active plasmonics in practical traffic applications. In this article, we introduce active plasmonics into Wavelength Division Multiplexed (WDM) switching applications, using the smallest TO DLSPP-based Mach-Zehnder interferometric switch reported so far and showing its successful performance in 4×10 Gb/s low-power and fast switching operation. The demonstration of the WDM-enabling characteristics of active plasmonic circuits with an ultra-low power × response time product represents a crucial milestone in the development of active plasmonics towards real telecom and datacom applications, where low-energy and fast TO operation with small-size circuitry is targeted. PMID:22973502

  12. Diffusion bonding aeroengine components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, G. A.; Broughton, T.

    1988-10-01

    The use of diffusion bonding processes at Rolls-Royce for the manufacture of titanium-alloy aircraft engine components and structures is described. A liquid-phase diffusion bonding process called activated diffusion bonding has been developed for the manufacture of the hollow titanium wide chord fan blade. In addition, solid-state diffusion bonding is being used in the manufacture of hollow vane/blade airfoil constructions mainly in conjunction with superplastic forming and hot forming techniques.

  13. Electronic structure and bonding in crystalline peroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Königstein, Markus; Sokol, Alexei A.; Catlow, C. Richard A.

    1999-08-01

    Hartree-Fock and density-functional PW91 theories as realized in the CRYSTAL95 code have been applied to investigate the structural and electronic properties of Ba, Sr, and Ca peroxide materials with the calcium carbide crystal structure, results for which are compared with those for the corresponding oxides. Special attention is paid to the stabilization of the peroxide molecular ion O2-2 in the ionic environment provided by the lattice, and to chemical bonding effects. In order to describe the covalent bonding within the O2-2 ion and the polarization of the O- ion in the crystal electrostatic field, it is essential to include an account of the effects of electron correlation. The PW91 density functional has allowed us to reproduce the crystallographic parameters within a 3% error. The chemical bonding within the peroxide molecular ion has a complex nature with a balance between the weak covalent bond of σz type and the strong electrostatic repulsion of the closed-shell electron groups occupying O 2s and O 2px and 2py states. Compression of the peroxide ion in the ionic crystals gives rise to an excessive overlap of the O 2s closed shells of the two O- ions of a peroxide molecular ion O2-2, which in turn determines the antibonding character of the interaction and chemical bonding in the O2-2 molecular ion.

  14. Recent Progress on Plasmon-Enhanced Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jun; Zhang, Zhenglong; Zheng, Hairong; Sun, Mentao

    2015-12-01

    The optically generated collective electron density waves on metal-dielectric boundaries known as surface plasmons have been of great scientific interest since their discovery. Being electromagnetic waves on gold or silver nanoparticle's surface, localised surface plasmons (LSP) can strongly enhance the electromagnetic field. These strong electromagnetic fields near the metal surfaces have been used in various applications like surface enhanced spectroscopy (SES), plasmonic lithography, plasmonic trapping of particles, and plasmonic catalysis. Resonant coupling of LSPs to fluorophore can strongly enhance the emission intensity, the angular distribution, and the polarisation of the emitted radiation and even the speed of radiative decay, which is so-called plasmon enhanced fluorescence (PEF). As a result, more and more reports on surface-enhanced fluorescence have appeared, such as SPASER-s, plasmon assisted lasing, single molecule fluorescence measurements, surface plasmoncoupled emission (SPCE) in biological sensing, optical orbit designs etc. In this review, we focus on recent advanced reports on plasmon-enhanced fluorescence (PEF). First, the mechanism of PEF and early results of enhanced fluorescence observed by metal nanostructure will be introduced. Then, the enhanced substrates, including periodical and nonperiodical nanostructure, will be discussed and the most important factor of the spacer between molecule and surface and wavelength dependence on PEF is demonstrated. Finally, the recent progress of tipenhanced fluorescence and PEF from the rare-earth doped up-conversion (UC) and down-conversion (DC) nanoparticles (NPs) are also commented upon. This review provides an introduction to fundamentals of PEF, illustrates the current progress in the design of metallic nanostructures for efficient fluorescence signal amplification that utilises propagating and localised surface plasmons.

  15. Bond percolation in films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korneta, W.; Pytel, Z.

    1988-04-01

    Bond percolation in films with simple cubic structure is considered. It is assumed that the probability of a bond being present between nearest-neighbor sites depends on the distances to surfaces. Based on the relation between the Potts model and the bond percolation model, and using the mean-field approximation, the phase diagram and profiles of the percolation probability have been obtained.

  16. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, B. A.; Tyeryar, J. R.; Hodges, W. T.

    1984-01-01

    Adhesive bonding in the aerospace industry typically utilizes autoclaves or presses which have considerable thermal mass. As a consequence, the rates of heatup and cooldown of the bonded parts are limited and the total time and cost of the bonding process is often relatively high. Many of the adhesives themselves do not inherently require long processing times. Bonding could be performed rapidly if the heat was concentrated in the bond lines or at least in the adherends. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts were developed to utilize induction heating techniques to provide heat directly to the bond line and/or adherends without heating the entire structure, supports, and fixtures of a bonding assembly. Bonding times for specimens are cut by a factor of 10 to 100 compared to standard press bonding. The development of rapid adhesive bonding for lap shear specimens (per ASTM D1003 and D3163), for aerospace panel bonding, and for field repair needs of metallic and advanced fiber reinforced polymeric matrix composite structures are reviewed.

  17. Acrylic mechanical bond tests

    SciTech Connect

    Wouters, J.M.; Doe, P.J.

    1991-02-01

    The tensile strength of bonded acrylic is tested as a function of bond joint thickness. 0.125 in. thick bond joints were found to posses the maximum strength while the acceptable range of joints varied from 0.063 in. to almost 0.25 in. Such joints are used in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory.

  18. Hybridized plasmon modes and near-field enhancement of metallic nanoparticle-dimer on a mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu; Ma, Lingwei; Hou, Mengjing; Li, Jianghao; Xie, Zheng; Zhang, Zhengjun

    2016-07-01

    For the attractive plasmonic structure consisting of metal nanoparticles (NPs) on a mirror, the coexistence of near-field NP-NP and NP-mirror couplings is numerically studied at normal incidence. By mapping their 3D surface charge distributions directly, we have demonstrated two different kinds of mirror-induced bonding dipole plasmon modes and confirmed the bonding hybridizations of the mirror and the NP-dimer which may offer a much stronger near-field enhancement than that of the isolated NP dimers over a broad wavelength range. Further, it is revealed that the huge near-field enhancement of these two modes exhibit different dependence on the NP-NP and NP-mirror hot spots, while both of their near-field resonance wavelengths can be tuned to the blue exponentially by increasing the NP-NP gaps or the NP-mirror separation. Our results here benifit significantly the fundamental understanding and practical applications of metallic NPs on a mirror in plasmonics.

  19. Hybridized plasmon modes and near-field enhancement of metallic nanoparticle-dimer on a mirror.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu; Ma, Lingwei; Hou, Mengjing; Li, Jianghao; Xie, Zheng; Zhang, Zhengjun

    2016-01-01

    For the attractive plasmonic structure consisting of metal nanoparticles (NPs) on a mirror, the coexistence of near-field NP-NP and NP-mirror couplings is numerically studied at normal incidence. By mapping their 3D surface charge distributions directly, we have demonstrated two different kinds of mirror-induced bonding dipole plasmon modes and confirmed the bonding hybridizations of the mirror and the NP-dimer which may offer a much stronger near-field enhancement than that of the isolated NP dimers over a broad wavelength range. Further, it is revealed that the huge near-field enhancement of these two modes exhibit different dependence on the NP-NP and NP-mirror hot spots, while both of their near-field resonance wavelengths can be tuned to the blue exponentially by increasing the NP-NP gaps or the NP-mirror separation. Our results here benifit significantly the fundamental understanding and practical applications of metallic NPs on a mirror in plasmonics. PMID:27418039

  20. Hybridized plasmon modes and near-field enhancement of metallic nanoparticle-dimer on a mirror

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu; Ma, Lingwei; Hou, Mengjing; Li, Jianghao; Xie, Zheng; Zhang, Zhengjun

    2016-01-01

    For the attractive plasmonic structure consisting of metal nanoparticles (NPs) on a mirror, the coexistence of near-field NP-NP and NP-mirror couplings is numerically studied at normal incidence. By mapping their 3D surface charge distributions directly, we have demonstrated two different kinds of mirror-induced bonding dipole plasmon modes and confirmed the bonding hybridizations of the mirror and the NP-dimer which may offer a much stronger near-field enhancement than that of the isolated NP dimers over a broad wavelength range. Further, it is revealed that the huge near-field enhancement of these two modes exhibit different dependence on the NP-NP and NP-mirror hot spots, while both of their near-field resonance wavelengths can be tuned to the blue exponentially by increasing the NP-NP gaps or the NP-mirror separation. Our results here benifit significantly the fundamental understanding and practical applications of metallic NPs on a mirror in plasmonics. PMID:27418039

  1. A Lower Bound for Quantifying Overlap Effects: An Empirical Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Bassetti, Federico

    1997-12-31

    Among the many features that are implemented in today`s microprocessors there are some that have the capability of reducing the execution time via overlapping of different operations. Overlapping of instructions with other instructions, and overlapping of computation with memory activities are the main way in which execution time is reduced. In this paper we will introduce a notion of overlap and its definition, and a few different ways to capture its effects. We will characterize some of the DOE Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) benchmarks using the overlap and some other quantities related to it. Also, we will present a characterization of the overlap effects using a lower bound derived empirically from measured data. We will conclude by using the lower bound to estimate other components of the overall execution time.

  2. Dark plasmonic breathing modes in silver nanodisks.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Franz-Philipp; Ditlbacher, Harald; Hohenester, Ulrich; Hohenau, Andreas; Hofer, Ferdinand; Krenn, Joachim R

    2012-11-14

    We map the complete plasmonic spectrum of silver nanodisks by electron energy loss spectroscopy and show that the mode which couples strongest to the electron beam has radial symmetry with no net dipole moment. Therefore, this mode does not couple to light and has escaped from observation in optical experiments. This radial breathing mode has the character of an extended two-dimensional surface plasmon with a wavenumber determined by the circular disk confinement. Its strong near fields can impact the hybridization in coupled plasmonic nanoparticles as well as couplings with nearby quantum emitters.

  3. Nanooptics of Molecular-Shunted Plasmonic Nanojunctions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are separated above a planar gold film by 1.1 nm thick self-assembled molecular monolayers of different conductivities. Incremental replacement of the nonconductive molecules with a chemically equivalent conductive version differing by only one atom produces a strong 50 nm blue-shift of the coupled plasmon. With modeling this gives a conductance of 0.17G0 per biphenyl-4,4′-dithiol molecule and a total conductance across the plasmonic junction of 30G0. Our approach provides a reliable tool quantifying the number of molecules in each plasmonic hotspot, here <200. PMID:25494169

  4. Magnetic plasmonic Fano resonance at optical frequency.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yanjun; Hu, Zhijian; Li, Ziwei; Zhu, Xing; Fang, Zheyu

    2015-05-13

    Plasmonic Fano resonances are typically understood and investigated assuming electrical mode hybridization. Here we demonstrate that a purely magnetic plasmon Fano resonance can be realized at optical frequency with Au split ring hexamer nanostructure excited by an azimuthally polarized incident light. Collective magnetic plasmon modes induced by the circular electric field within the hexamer and each of the split ring can be controlled and effectively hybridized by designing the size and orientation of each ring unit. With simulated results reproducing the experiment, our suggested configuration with narrow line-shape magnetic Fano resonance has significant potential applications in low-loss sensing and may serves as suitable elementary building blocks for optical metamaterials.

  5. Plasmon resonant cavities in vertical nanowire arrays

    DOEpatents

    Bora, Mihail; Bond, Tiziana C.; Fasenfest, Benjamin J.; Behymer, Elaine M.

    2014-07-15

    Tunable plasmon resonant cavity arrays in paired parallel nanowire waveguides are presented. Resonances can be observed when the waveguide length is an odd multiple of quarter plasmon wavelengths, consistent with boundary conditions of node and antinode at the ends. Two nanowire waveguides can satisfy the dispersion relation of a planar metal-dielectric-metal waveguide of equivalent width equal to the square field average weighted gap. Confinement factors of over 10.sup.3 are possible due to plasmon focusing in the inter-wire space.

  6. Symmetry breaking in individual plasmonic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Wu, Yanpeng; Lassiter, Britt; Nehl, Colleen L.; Hafner, Jason H.; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J.

    2006-01-01

    The plasmon resonances of a concentric metallic nanoshell arise from the hybridization of primitive plasmon modes of the same angular momentum on its inner and outer surfaces. For a nanoshell with an offset core, the reduction in symmetry relaxes these selection rules, allowing for an admixture of dipolar components in all plasmon modes of the particle. This metallodielectric nanostructure with reduced symmetry exhibits a core offset-dependent multipeaked spectrum, seen in single-particle spectroscopic measurements, and exhibits significantly larger local-field enhancements on its external surface than the equivalent concentric spherical nanostructure. PMID:16829573

  7. Dark Plasmonic Breathing Modes in Silver Nanodisks

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We map the complete plasmonic spectrum of silver nanodisks by electron energy loss spectroscopy and show that the mode which couples strongest to the electron beam has radial symmetry with no net dipole moment. Therefore, this mode does not couple to light and has escaped from observation in optical experiments. This radial breathing mode has the character of an extended two-dimensional surface plasmon with a wavenumber determined by the circular disk confinement. Its strong near fields can impact the hybridization in coupled plasmonic nanoparticles as well as couplings with nearby quantum emitters. PMID:23025804

  8. Temperature effect on plasmons in bilayer graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Digish K. Sharma, A. C.; Ashraf, S. S. Z.; Ambavale, S. K.

    2015-06-24

    We have theoretically investigated the plasmon dispersion and damping rate of doped bilayer graphene (BLG) at finite temperatures within the random phase approximation. Our computed results on plasmon dispersion show that plasmon frequency enhances with increasing temperatures in contrast to single layer graphene where it is suppressed. This can be attributed to the fact that the dynamic response of the electron gas or screening in bilayer graphene is different from that of single layer graphene. Further the temperature effect on damping rate is also discussed.

  9. Designing broadband plasmonic nanoantennas for ultrasensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Zhenhuan; Wang, Kai; Voronine, Dmitri V.; Traverso, Andrew; Sokolov, Alexei

    2011-03-01

    Various designs of broadband plasmonic nanoantennas made of gold and silver nanospheres are considered and optimized for ultrasensitive spectroscopic applications. The simulated nanostructures show a broadband optical response which may be tuned by varying the size, position and composition of nanospheres. Near-field enhancement in nanoantenna hot spots is analyzed and compared with previous literature results in the case of a fractal plasmonic nanolens. Broadband plasmonic nanoantennas may allow detecting ultrasmall concentrations of toxic materials and may be used for decoding DNA and for ultrafast nanophotonics applications.

  10. Plasmonic photodetectors based on asymmetric nanogap electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Junyu; Luo, Manlin; Zou, Wanghui; Peng, Wei; Duan, Huigao

    2016-08-01

    Hot electrons excited by plasmon resonance in nanostructure can be employed to enhance the properties of photodetectors, even when the photon energy is lower than the bandgap of the semiconductor. However, current research has seldom considered how to realize the efficient collection of hot electrons, which restricts the responsivity of the device. In this paper, a type of plasmonic photodetector based on asymmetric nanogap electrodes is proposed. Owing to this structure, the device achieves responsivities as high as 0.45 and 0.25 mA/W for wavelengths of 1310 and 1550 nm, respectively. These insights can aid the realization of efficient plasmon-enhanced photodetectors for infrared detection.

  11. Melting points and chemical bonding properties of 3d transition metal elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahara, Wataru

    2014-08-01

    The melting points of 3d transition metal elements show an unusual local minimal peak at manganese across Period 4 in the periodic table. The chemical bonding properties of scandium, titanium, vanadium, chromium, manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel and copper are investigated by the DV-Xα cluster method. The melting points are found to correlate with the bond overlap populations. The chemical bonding nature therefore appears to be the primary factor governing the melting points.

  12. Focusing surface plasmon polaritons and detecting Stokes parameters utilizing nanoslits distributed plasmonic lenses.

    PubMed

    Huang, Feng; Jiang, Xiangqian; Yuan, Haiming; Yang, Hanning; Li, Siren; Sun, Xiudong

    2016-04-01

    A method to detect the full Stokes parameters utilizing a double-ring and Archimedes-curves distributed nanoslits plasmonic lenses is proposed. We demonstrate theoretically and numerically that both of these two plasmonic lenses can focus surface plasmon polaritons to centrally symmetric fields with subwavelength-sized focal spots under linear, elliptical, and circular polarization incidence. The intensity at the focal spots is modulated by the polarization state of incident light. Utilizing this intensity polarization sensitivity, the full Stokes parameters of incident light are detected by recoding only four intensities at the focal spots of these two plasmonic lenses. PMID:27192318

  13. Absorption effects on the Mie plasmon-polariton modes in two-dimensional plasmonic photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Valencia, B. F.; Mejía-Salazar, J. R.; Porras-Montenegro, N.

    2015-09-01

    We have theoretically investigated the absorption effects on the Mie plasmonic resonances in single metallic shell rods and two-dimensional plasmonic photonic crystals. Present results show that Mie resonances stemming from the dipolar and quadrupolar contributions are robust to absorption effects not only in single scatterers but also in the case of two-dimensional plasmonic photonic crystals. On the other hand, we have found that the extinction (Qext) and scattering (Qsca) efficiencies corresponding to an isolated metallic rod may be employed to predict the frequency range for flat or slow dispersive photonic bands in plasmonic photonic crystals, indicating a robust behavior of such resonant modes.

  14. All-fiber hybrid photon-plasmon circuits: integrating nanowire plasmonics with fiber optics.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiyuan; Li, Wei; Guo, Xin; Lou, Jingyi; Tong, Limin

    2013-07-01

    We demonstrate all-fiber hybrid photon-plasmon circuits by integrating Ag nanowires with optical fibers. Relying on near-field coupling, we realize a photon-to-plasmon conversion efficiency up to 92% in a fiber-based nanowire plasmonic probe. Around optical communication band, we assemble an all-fiber resonator and a Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) with Q-factor of 6 × 10(6) and extinction ratio up to 30 dB, respectively. Using the MZI, we demonstrate fiber-compatible plasmonic sensing with high sensitivity and low optical power.

  15. Construction of simple gold nanoparticle aggregates with controlled plasmon plasmon interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westcott, Sarah L.; Oldenburg, Steven J.; Lee, T. Randall; Halas, Naomi J.

    1999-02-01

    We have developed a colloidal assembly for the study of plasmon-plasmon interactions between gold nanoparticles. Colloidal aggregates of controlled size and interparticle spacing were synthesized on silica nanoparticle substrates. Following the immobilization of isolated gold nanoparticles onto silica nanoparticles, the surfaces of the adsorbed gold nanoparticles were functionalized with 4-aminobenzenethiol. This molecular linker attached additional gold nanoparticles to the `parent' gold nanoparticle, forming small nanoparticle aggregates. The optical absorption spectrum of these clusters differed from that of gold colloid in a manner consistent with plasmon-plasmon interactions between the gold nanoparticles.

  16. Surface plasmon amplification by stimulated emission of radiation: quantum generation of coherent surface plasmons in nanosystems.

    PubMed

    Bergman, David J; Stockman, Mark I

    2003-01-17

    We make a step towards quantum nanoplasmonics: surface plasmon fields of a nanosystem are quantized and their stimulated emission is considered. We introduce a quantum generator for surface plasmon quanta and consider the phenomenon of surface plasmon amplification by stimulated emission of radiation (spaser). Spaser generates temporally coherent high-intensity fields of selected surface plasmon modes that can be strongly localized on the nanoscale, including dark modes that do not couple to far-zone electromagnetic fields. Applications and related phenomena are discussed. PMID:12570577

  17. A Poincaré's approach for plasmonics: the plasmon localization.

    PubMed

    Barchiesi, D; Kremer, E; Mai, V P; Grosges, T

    2008-03-01

    A Poincaré's approach is employed to characterize the excitation of a plasmon, which in essence corresponds to a zero of a complex S-matrix. Throughout this work we study the plasmonic behaviour of gold, as this metal not only is frequently used in experimental arrays, but also requires an accurate dispersion model to properly excite plasmons. We investigate the plasmonic behaviour of gold nanogratings by means of Born's approximation and the Finite-Elements Method. Also, a method based on the Poincaré's approach is proposed to optimize this kind of structures.

  18. Focusing surface plasmon polaritons and detecting Stokes parameters utilizing nanoslits distributed plasmonic lenses.

    PubMed

    Huang, Feng; Jiang, Xiangqian; Yuan, Haiming; Yang, Hanning; Li, Siren; Sun, Xiudong

    2016-04-01

    A method to detect the full Stokes parameters utilizing a double-ring and Archimedes-curves distributed nanoslits plasmonic lenses is proposed. We demonstrate theoretically and numerically that both of these two plasmonic lenses can focus surface plasmon polaritons to centrally symmetric fields with subwavelength-sized focal spots under linear, elliptical, and circular polarization incidence. The intensity at the focal spots is modulated by the polarization state of incident light. Utilizing this intensity polarization sensitivity, the full Stokes parameters of incident light are detected by recoding only four intensities at the focal spots of these two plasmonic lenses.

  19. Coexistence of classical and quantum plasmonics in large plasmonic structures with subnanometer gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Kadkhodazadeh, Shima; Wagner, Jakob B.; Kneipp, Harald; Kneipp, Katrin

    2013-08-19

    Large metal nanostructures with subnanometer interparticle separations (gaps) can provide extremely high local fields and are of particular interest in surface enhanced spectroscopy, as well as for basic understanding of plasmonics. In this experimental electron energy loss study, we monitor the transition of plasmonic dimers from a classical to a quantum system by decreasing gaps to dimensions when tunneling occurs and a conductive nanobridge evolves. Our studies show that silver dimers with atomic scale gaps can exhibit a regime, in which charge transfer plasmon modes, as a hallmark of a quantum nature, and “classical” bright and dark dipolar plasmon modes can be seen simultaneously.

  20. Copper plasmonics and catalysis: role of electron-phonon interactions in dephasing localized surface plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qi-C.; Ding, Yuchen; Goodman, Samuel M.; H. Funke, Hans; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-10-01

    Copper metal can provide an important alternative for the development of efficient, low-cost and low-loss plasmonic nanoparticles, and selective nanocatalysts. However, poor chemical stability and lack of insight into photophysics and plasmon decay mechanisms has impeded study. Here, we use smooth conformal ALD coating on copper nanoparticles to prevent surface oxidation, and study dephasing time for localized surface plasmons on different sized copper nanoparticles. Using dephasing time as a figure of merit, we elucidate the role of electron-electron, electron-phonon, impurity, surface and grain boundary scattering on the decay of localized surface plasmon waves. Using our quantitative analysis and different temperature dependent measurements, we show that electron-phonon interactions dominate over other scattering mechanisms in dephasing plasmon waves. While interband transitions in copper metal contributes substantially to plasmon losses, tuning surface plasmon modes to infrared frequencies leads to a five-fold enhancement in the quality factor. These findings demonstrate that conformal ALD coatings can improve the chemical stability for copper nanoparticles, even at high temperatures (>300 °C) in ambient atmosphere, and nanoscaled copper is a good alternative material for many potential applications in nanophotonics, plasmonics, catalysis and nanoscale electronics.Copper metal can provide an important alternative for the development of efficient, low-cost and low-loss plasmonic nanoparticles, and selective nanocatalysts. However, poor chemical stability and lack of insight into photophysics and plasmon decay mechanisms has impeded study. Here, we use smooth conformal ALD coating on copper nanoparticles to prevent surface oxidation, and study dephasing time for localized surface plasmons on different sized copper nanoparticles. Using dephasing time as a figure of merit, we elucidate the role of electron-electron, electron-phonon, impurity, surface and grain

  1. Solving Fluid Flow Problems on Moving and Adaptive Overlapping Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Henshaw, W

    2005-07-28

    Solution of fluid dynamics problems on overlapping grids will be discussed. An overlapping grid consists of a set of structured component grids that cover a domain and overlap where they meet. Overlapping grids provide an effective approach for developing efficient and accurate approximations for complex, possibly moving geometry. Topics to be addressed include the reactive Euler equations, the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and elliptic equations solved with a multigrid algorithm. Recent developments coupling moving grids and adaptive mesh refinement and preliminary parallel results will also be presented.

  2. DNA statistics, overlapping word paradox and Conway equation

    SciTech Connect

    Pevzner, P.A.

    1993-12-31

    Overlapping word paradox known in combinatorics for 20 years is to this day disregarded in many papers on DNA statistics. The author considers Conway equation for the best bet for simpletons as an example of the overlapping word paradox. He gives a new short proof of Conway equation and discusses the implications of the overlapping word paradox for DNA statistics. In particular, he demonstrates that ignoring overlapping word paradox in DNA statistics can easily lead to 500% mistakes in estimations of statistical significance. He also presents formulas allowing one to find `anomalous` words in DNA texts.

  3. Dynamic analysis of piping using the structural overlap method

    SciTech Connect

    Curreri, J.; Bezler, P.; Hartzman, M.

    1981-03-01

    The structural overlap method is a procedure for analyzing the dynamic response of a piping system by performing a separate analysis on subsystems of the complete structure. Specific cases were investigated to obtain an estimate of the validity and application of the method. The case studies were increased in complexity in order to examine some of the problems involved in implementing the method. It is concluded that the overlap method should not be substituted for a complete analysis of a full system. However, if a sufficiently high natural frequency is associated with the overlap section or the overlap section is a substantial portion of the system, acceptable results could be obtained.

  4. Bonding thermoplastic polymers

    DOEpatents

    Wallow, Thomas I.; Hunter, Marion C.; Krafcik, Karen Lee; Morales, Alfredo M.; Simmons, Blake A.; Domeier, Linda A.

    2008-06-24

    We demonstrate a new method for joining patterned thermoplastic parts into layered structures. The method takes advantage of case-II permeant diffusion to generate dimensionally controlled, activated bonding layers at the surfaces being joined. It is capable of producing bonds characterized by cohesive failure while preserving the fidelity of patterned features in the bonding surfaces. This approach is uniquely suited to production of microfluidic multilayer structures, as it allows the bond-forming interface between plastic parts to be precisely manipulated at micrometer length scales. The bond enhancing procedure is easily integrated in standard process flows and requires no specialized equipment.

  5. Intracellular pH-Induced Tip-to-Tip Assembly of Gold Nanorods for Enhanced Plasmonic Photothermal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The search for efficient plasmonic photothermal therapies using nonharmful pulse laser irradiation at the near-infrared (NIR) is fundamental for biomedical cancer research. Therefore, the development of novel assembled plasmonic gold nanostructures with the aim of reducing the applied laser power density to a minimum through hot-spot-mediated cell photothermolysis is an ongoing challenge. We demonstrate that gold nanorods (Au NRs) functionalized at their tips with a pH-sensitive ligand assemble into oligomers within cell lysosomes through hydrogen-bonding attractive interactions. The unique intracellular features of the plasmonic oligomers allow us to significantly reduce the femtosecond laser power density and Au NR dose while still achieving excellent cell killing rates. The formation of gold tip-to-tip oligomers with longitudinal localized surface plasmon resonance bands at the NIR, obtained from low-aspect-ratio Au NRs close in resonance with 800 nm Ti:sapphire 90 fs laser pulses, was found to be the key parameter for realizing the enhanced plasmonic photothermal therapy. PMID:27713930

  6. Simple Bond Cleavage

    SciTech Connect

    Gary S. Groenewold

    2005-08-01

    Simple bond cleavage is a class of fragmentation reactions in which a single bond is broken, without formation of new bonds between previously unconnected atoms. Because no bond making is involved, simple bond cleavages are endothermic, and activation energies are generally higher than for rearrangement eliminations. The rate of simple bond cleavage reactions is a strong function of the internal energy of the molecular ion, which reflects a loose transition state that resembles reaction products, and has a high density of accessible states. For this reason, simple bond cleavages tend to dominate fragmentation reactions for highly energized molecular ions. Simple bond cleavages have negligible reverse activation energy, and hence they are used as valuable probes of ion thermochemistry, since the energy dependence of the reactions can be related to the bond energy. In organic mass spectrometry, simple bond cleavages of odd electron ions can be either homolytic or heterolytic, depending on whether the fragmentation is driven by the radical site or the charge site. Simple bond cleavages of even electron ions tend to be heterolytic, producing even electron product ions and neutrals.

  7. Optofluidic SERS chip with plasmonic nanoprobes self-aligned along microfluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Oh, Young-Jae; Jeong, Ki-Hun

    2014-03-01

    This work reports an optofluidic SERS chip with plasmonic nanoprobes self-aligned along microfluidic channels. Plasmonic nanoprobes with rich electromagnetic hot spots are selectively patterned along PDMS microfluidic channels by using a Scotch tape removal and oxygen plasma treatment, which also provide the permanent bonding between PDMS and a glass substrate. A silver film with an initial thickness of 30 nm after oxygen plasma treatment creates nanotips and nanodots with a maximum SERS performance, which were successfully implanted with microfluidic concentration gradient generators. The novel device enables the label-free and solution-phase SERS detection of small molecules with low Raman activity such as dopamine at micromolar level in flow. This optofluidic SERS chip can be readily expanded for microfluidic networks with diverse functions for advanced optical biochemical assays.

  8. Parasitic antenna effect in terahertz plasmon detector array for real-time imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jong-Ryul; Lee, Woo-Jae; Ryu, Min Woo; Rok Kim, Kyung; Han, Seong-Tae

    2015-10-01

    The performance uniformity of each pixel integrated with a patch antenna in a terahertz plasmon detector array is very important in building the large array necessary for a real-time imaging system. We found a parasitic antenna effect in the terahertz plasmon detector whose response is dependent on the position of the detector pixel in the illumination area of the terahertz beam. It was also demonstrated that the parasitic antenna effect is attributed to the physical structure consisting of signal pads, bonding wires, and interconnection lines on a chip and a printed circuit board. Experimental results show that the performance of the detector pixel is determined by the sum of the effects of each parasitic antenna and the on-chip integrated antenna designed to detect signals at the operating frequency. The parasitic antenna effect can be minimized by blocking the interconnections with a metallic shield.

  9. On a plasmon resonance in ellipsoidal nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Oraevsky, A A; Oraevsky, Anatolii N

    2002-01-31

    The dependence of the plasmon resonance frequency of metal ellipsoids of revolution on their eccentricity is calculated. The plasmon resonance shifts to the red with increasing eccentricity and its intensity increases. The resonance intensity increases with decreasing the imaginary part of the dielectric constant of a metal. The plasmon resonance frequency in a suspension of randomly oriented prolate nanoparticles (with a large eccentricity) almost exactly coincides with that in a suspension of oriented particles. These features permit the efficient improvement of the sensitivity and resolving power of optoacoustic tomography by introducing prolate metal nanoparticles into the region of an object under study. The possibility of plasmon resonance narrowing by introducing metal nanoparticles into an amplifying medium is pointed out. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  10. Wireless communication system via nanoscale plasmonic antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlo, Juan M.; Nesbitt, Nathan T.; Calm, Yitzi M.; Rose, Aaron H.; D’Imperio, Luke; Yang, Chaobin; Naughton, Jeffrey R.; Burns, Michael J.; Kempa, Krzysztof; Naughton, Michael J.

    2016-08-01

    Present on-chip optical communication technology uses near-infrared light, but visible wavelengths would allow system miniaturization and higher energy confinement. Towards this end, we report a nanoscale wireless communication system that operates at visible wavelengths via in-plane information transmission. Here, plasmonic antenna radiation mediates a three-step conversion process (surface plasmon → photon → surface plasmon) with in-plane efficiency (plasmon → plasmon) of 38% for antenna separation 4λ0 (with λ0 the free-space excitation wavelength). Information transmission is demonstrated at bandwidths in the Hz and MHz ranges. This work opens the possibility of optical conveyance of information using plasmonic antennas for on-chip communication technology.

  11. Wireless communication system via nanoscale plasmonic antennas.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Juan M; Nesbitt, Nathan T; Calm, Yitzi M; Rose, Aaron H; D'Imperio, Luke; Yang, Chaobin; Naughton, Jeffrey R; Burns, Michael J; Kempa, Krzysztof; Naughton, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Present on-chip optical communication technology uses near-infrared light, but visible wavelengths would allow system miniaturization and higher energy confinement. Towards this end, we report a nanoscale wireless communication system that operates at visible wavelengths via in-plane information transmission. Here, plasmonic antenna radiation mediates a three-step conversion process (surface plasmon → photon → surface plasmon) with in-plane efficiency (plasmon → plasmon) of 38% for antenna separation 4λ0 (with λ0 the free-space excitation wavelength). Information transmission is demonstrated at bandwidths in the Hz and MHz ranges. This work opens the possibility of optical conveyance of information using plasmonic antennas for on-chip communication technology. PMID:27555451

  12. Ultrasmooth patterned metals for plasmonics and metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Nagpal, Prashant; Lindquist, Nathan C; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Norris, David J

    2009-07-31

    Surface plasmons are electromagnetic waves that can exist at metal interfaces because of coupling between light and free electrons. Restricted to travel along the interface, these waves can be channeled, concentrated, or otherwise manipulated by surface patterning. However, because surface roughness and other inhomogeneities have so far limited surface-plasmon propagation in real plasmonic devices, simple high-throughput methods are needed to fabricate high-quality patterned metals. We combined template stripping with precisely patterned silicon substrates to obtain ultrasmooth pure metal films with grooves, bumps, pyramids, ridges, and holes. Measured surface-plasmon-propagation lengths on the resulting surfaces approach theoretical values for perfectly flat films. With the use of our method, we demonstrated structures that exhibit Raman scattering enhancements above 10(7) for sensing applications and multilayer films for optical metamaterials.

  13. Thermal energy harvesting plasmonic based chemical sensors.

    PubMed

    Karker, Nicholas; Dharmalingam, Gnanaprakash; Carpenter, Michael A

    2014-10-28

    Detection of gases such as H2, CO, and NO2 at 500 °C or greater requires materials with thermal stability and reliability. One of the major barriers toward integration of plasmonic-based chemical sensors is the requirement of multiple components such as light sources and spectrometers. In this work, plasmonic sensing results are presented where thermal energy is harvested using lithographically patterned Au nanorods, replacing the need for an external incident light source. Gas sensing results using the harvested thermal energy are in good agreement with sensing experiments, which used an external incident light source. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to reduce the wavelength parameter space from 665 variables down to 4 variables with similar levels of demonstrated selectivity. The combination of a plasmonic-based energy harvesting sensing paradigm with PCA analysis offers a novel path toward simplification and integration of plasmonic-based sensing methods. PMID:25280004

  14. Understanding and controlling plasmon-induced convection.

    PubMed

    Roxworthy, Brian J; Bhuiya, Abdul M; Vanka, Surya P; Toussaint, Kimani C

    2014-01-01

    The heat generation and fluid convection induced by plasmonic nanostructures is attractive for optofluidic applications. However, previously published theoretical studies predict only nanometre per second fluid velocities that are inadequate for microscale mass transport. Here we show both theoretically and experimentally that an array of plasmonic nanoantennas coupled to an optically absorptive indium-tin-oxide (ITO) substrate can generate >micrometre per second fluid convection. Crucially, the ITO distributes thermal energy created by the nanoantennas generating an order of magnitude increase in convection velocities compared with nanoantennas on a SiO2 base layer. In addition, the plasmonic array alters absorption in the ITO, causing a deviation from Beer-Lambert absorption that results in an optimum ITO thickness for a given system. This work elucidates the role of convection in plasmonic optical trapping and particle assembly, and opens up new avenues for controlling fluid and mass transport on the micro- and nanoscale. PMID:24445431

  15. Understanding and controlling plasmon-induced convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roxworthy, Brian J.; Bhuiya, Abdul M.; Vanka, Surya P.; Toussaint, Kimani C.

    2014-01-01

    The heat generation and fluid convection induced by plasmonic nanostructures is attractive for optofluidic applications. However, previously published theoretical studies predict only nanometre per second fluid velocities that are inadequate for microscale mass transport. Here we show both theoretically and experimentally that an array of plasmonic nanoantennas coupled to an optically absorptive indium-tin-oxide (ITO) substrate can generate >micrometre per second fluid convection. Crucially, the ITO distributes thermal energy created by the nanoantennas generating an order of magnitude increase in convection velocities compared with nanoantennas on a SiO2 base layer. In addition, the plasmonic array alters absorption in the ITO, causing a deviation from Beer-Lambert absorption that results in an optimum ITO thickness for a given system. This work elucidates the role of convection in plasmonic optical trapping and particle assembly, and opens up new avenues for controlling fluid and mass transport on the micro- and nanoscale.

  16. Biomolecular Plasmonics for Quantitative Biology and Nanomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Somin Eunice; Lee, Luke P.

    2012-01-01

    Free electrons in a noble metal nanoparticle can be resonantly excited, leading to their collective oscillation termed as a surface plasmon. These surface plasmons enable nanoparticles to absorb light, generate heat, transfer energy, and re-radiate incident photons. Creative designs of nanoplasmonic optical antennae (i.e. plasmon resonant nanoparticles) have become a new foundation of quantitative biology and nanomedicine. This review focuses on the recent developments in dual-functional nanoplasmonic optical antennae for label-free biosensors and nanoplasmonic gene switches. Nanoplasmonic optical antennae, functioning as biosensors to significantly enhance biochemical-specific spectral information via plasmon resonance energy transfer (PRET) and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), are discussed. Nanoplasmonic optical antennae, functioning as nanoplasmonic gene switches to enable spatiotemporal regulation of genetic activity, are also reviewed. Nanoplasmonic molecular rulers and integrated photoacoustic-photothermal contrast agents are also described. PMID:20801636

  17. Photoluminescence of a single complex plasmonic nanoparticle

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tianyue; Lu, Guowei; Shen, Hongming; Shi, Kebin; Jiang, Yuanyuan; Xu, Dongsheng; Gong, Qihuang

    2014-01-01

    We report detailed investigations of the photoluminescence (PL) generated from an individual gold nanoflower, a highly branched plasmonic nanoparticle. Compared to nanostructures with simple shapes, such as spheres, nanorods, and bipyramids, nanoflowers exhibit more distinct features, i.e., the PL spectra and far-field emission patterns are strongly dependent on the wavelength and polarization of the excitation light. The experimental results are qualitatively explained using theoretical calculations. In addition, the intrinsic PL signal is highly dominated by localized surface plasmon resonances. The crucial role of plasmonic coupling in complex nanostructures during the plasmon-enhanced PL process is highlighted. The findings contribute to a deeper understanding of the PL properties of metallic nanoparticles. This study will be beneficial for several potential applications, including optical imaging and sensing in the fields of materials science and biology. PMID:24463794

  18. Plasmonic nanoparticle scattering for color holograms

    PubMed Central

    Montelongo, Yunuen; Tenorio-Pearl, Jaime Oscar; Williams, Calum; Zhang, Shuang; Milne, William Ireland; Wilkinson, Timothy David

    2014-01-01

    This work presents an original approach to create holograms based on the optical scattering of plasmonic nanoparticles. By analogy to the diffraction produced by the scattering of atoms in X-ray crystallography, we show that plasmonic nanoparticles can produce a wave-front reconstruction when they are sampled on a diffractive plane. By applying this method, all of the scattering characteristics of the nanoparticles are transferred to the reconstructed field. Hence, we demonstrate that a narrow-band reconstruction can be achieved for direct white light illumination on an array of plasmonic nanoparticles. Furthermore, multicolor capabilities are shown with minimal cross-talk by multiplexing different plasmonic nanoparticles at subwavelength distances. The holograms were fabricated from a single subwavelength thin film of silver and demonstrate that the total amount of binary information stored in the plane can exceed the limits of diffraction and that this wavelength modulation can be detected optically in the far field. PMID:25122675

  19. Morphing a Plasmonic Nanodisk into a Nanotriangle

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We morph a silver nanodisk into a nanotriangle by producing a series of nanoparticles with electron beam lithography. Using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), we map out the plasmonic eigenmodes and trace the evolution of edge and film modes during morphing. Our results suggest that disk modes, characterized by angular order, can serve as a suitable basis for other nanoparticle geometries and are subject to resonance energy shifts and splittings, as well as to hybridization upon morphing. Similar to the linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) in quantum chemistry, we introduce a linear combination of plasmonic eigenmodes to describe plasmon modes in different geometries, hereby extending the successful hybridization model of plasmonics. PMID:25000389

  20. Ultrasmooth patterned metals for plasmonics and metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Nagpal, Prashant; Lindquist, Nathan C; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Norris, David J

    2009-07-31

    Surface plasmons are electromagnetic waves that can exist at metal interfaces because of coupling between light and free electrons. Restricted to travel along the interface, these waves can be channeled, concentrated, or otherwise manipulated by surface patterning. However, because surface roughness and other inhomogeneities have so far limited surface-plasmon propagation in real plasmonic devices, simple high-throughput methods are needed to fabricate high-quality patterned metals. We combined template stripping with precisely patterned silicon substrates to obtain ultrasmooth pure metal films with grooves, bumps, pyramids, ridges, and holes. Measured surface-plasmon-propagation lengths on the resulting surfaces approach theoretical values for perfectly flat films. With the use of our method, we demonstrated structures that exhibit Raman scattering enhancements above 10(7) for sensing applications and multilayer films for optical metamaterials. PMID:19644116