Science.gov

Sample records for bond overlap plasmon

  1. Analysis of Bonding between Conjugated Organic Molecules and Noble Metal Surfaces Using Orbital Overlap Populations.

    PubMed

    Rangger, Gerold M; Romaner, Lorenz; Hofmann, Oliver T; Heimel, Georg; Ramsey, Michael G; Zojer, Egbert

    2010-11-09

    The electronic structure of metal-organic interfaces is of paramount importance for the properties of organic electronic and single-molecule devices. Here, we use so-called orbital overlap populations derived from slab-type band-structure calculations to analyze the covalent contribution to the bonding between an adsorbate layer and a metal. Using two prototypical molecules, the strong acceptor 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (F4TCNQ) on Ag(111) and the strong donor 1H,1'H-[4,4']bipyridinylidene (HV0) on Au(111), we present overlap populations as particularly versatile tools for describing the metal-organic interaction. Going beyond traditional approaches, in which overlap populations are represented in an atomic orbital basis, we also explore the use of a molecular orbital basis to gain significant additional insight. On the basis of the derived quantities, it is possible to identify the parts of the molecules responsible for the bonding and to analyze which of the molecular orbitals and metal bands most strongly contribute to the interaction and where on the energy scale they interact in bonding or antibonding fashion.

  2. Adsorbate-metal bond effect on empirical determination of surface plasmon penetration depth.

    PubMed

    Kegel, Laurel L; Menegazzo, Nicola; Booksh, Karl S

    2013-05-21

    The penetration depth of surface plasmons is commonly determined empirically from the observed response for adsorbate loading on gold surface plasmon resonance (SPR) substrates. However, changes in the SPR spectrum may originate from both changes in the effective refractive index near the metal surface and changes in the metal permittivity following covalent binding of the adsorbate layer. Herein, the significance of incorporating an additional adsorbate-metal bonding effect in the calculation is demonstrated in theory and in practice. The bonding effect is determined from the nonzero intercept of a SPR shift versus adsorbate thickness calibration and incorporated into the calculation of penetration depth at various excitation wavelengths. Determinations of plasmon penetration depth with and without the bonding response for alkanethiolate-gold are compared and are shown to be significantly different for a thiol monolayer adsorbate system. Additionally, plasmon penetration depth evaluated with bonding effect compensation shows greater consistency over different adsorbate thicknesses and better agreement with theory derived from Maxwell's equation, particularly for adsorbate thicknesses that are much smaller (<5%) than the plasmon penetration depth. The method is also extended to a more practically applicable polyelectrolyte multilayer adsorbate system.

  3. An experimental correlation study between field-target overlap and sensitivity of surface plasmon resonance biosensors based on sandwiched immunoassays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Yeonsoo; Moon, Seyoung; Oh, Youngjin; Kim, Yonghwi; Kim, Donghyun

    2012-10-01

    In this report, we have studied the effectiveness of field-target overlap to evaluate detection sensitivity of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors. The investigation used theoretical analysis based on the transfer matrix method, which was experimentally confirmed by thin film-based detection in sandwich and reverse sandwich immunoglobulin G (IgG) assays. Both theoretical and experimental results show that strong correlation exists between the overlap and the sensitivity with the coefficient of correlation higher than 95% in all the cases that we have considered. We have also confirmed the correlation in diffraction grating-based SPR measurement of IgG/anti-IgG interactions. The correlation elucidates the mechanism behind the far-field detection sensitivity of SPR biosensors and can lead to the enhancement of SPR biosensing with molecular scale sensitivity.

  4. Singular diffraction-free surface plasmon beams generated by overlapping phase-shifted sources.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shibiao; Lin, Jiao; Wang, Qian; Yuan, Guanghui; Du, Luping; Wang, Rong; Xu, Le; Hong, Minghui; Min, Changjun; Yuan, Xiaocong

    2013-04-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate the singular surface plasmon beam that presents a dark channel generated by a point dislocation and a long diffraction-free propagation distance up to 70λ(sp). The singular surface beam is the result of the interference of two surface plasmon polariton (SPP) plane waves, which are launched by two coupling gratings with lateral displacement. An aperture-type near-field scanning optical microscope is used to map the intensity distribution of the singular SPP waves. The propagating point dislocation embedded in the beam is shown by full-wave calculations and is later verified by near-field interference in the experiment.

  5. Bonding and Anti-bonding Modes of Plasmon Coupling Effects in TiO2-Ag Core-shell Dimers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Quanshui; Zhang, Zhili

    2016-01-01

    Bonding and anti-bonding modes of plasmon coupling effects are numerically investigated in TiO2-Ag core-shell nano dimers. First, splitting phenomena of the coupled anti-bonding modes are observed under the longitudinal polarization when the distance between the monomers decreases to a certain level. Second, one of the split resonance modes is identified to be formed by the dipole anti-bonding mode of the monomers from charge density distribution patterns. Those split modes have similar redshift behaviors as the coupled dipole bonding modes in the same situations. Furthermore, the intensities of those anti-bonding modes weaken with decreasing distance between the monomers, because of the interaction of the induced dipole moment in the monomers and the charge distribution variation on the facing surfaces of the gap by the coulomb attraction. Other split bands are the higher-order mode (octupole-like or triakontadipole-like), which do not have obvious peak-shift behavior, and the intensities have very little attenuation with decreasing distance. Finally, the coupling of the bonding and anti-bonding modes under the longitudinal polarization is symmetric (bonding). PMID:26763719

  6. Bonding and Anti-bonding Modes of Plasmon Coupling Effects in TiO2-Ag Core-shell Dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Quanshui; Zhang, Zhili

    2016-01-01

    Bonding and anti-bonding modes of plasmon coupling effects are numerically investigated in TiO2-Ag core-shell nano dimers. First, splitting phenomena of the coupled anti-bonding modes are observed under the longitudinal polarization when the distance between the monomers decreases to a certain level. Second, one of the split resonance modes is identified to be formed by the dipole anti-bonding mode of the monomers from charge density distribution patterns. Those split modes have similar redshift behaviors as the coupled dipole bonding modes in the same situations. Furthermore, the intensities of those anti-bonding modes weaken with decreasing distance between the monomers, because of the interaction of the induced dipole moment in the monomers and the charge distribution variation on the facing surfaces of the gap by the coulomb attraction. Other split bands are the higher-order mode (octupole-like or triakontadipole-like), which do not have obvious peak-shift behavior, and the intensities have very little attenuation with decreasing distance. Finally, the coupling of the bonding and anti-bonding modes under the longitudinal polarization is symmetric (bonding).

  7. Bonding and Anti-bonding Modes of Plasmon Coupling Effects in TiO2-Ag Core-shell Dimers.

    PubMed

    Li, Quanshui; Zhang, Zhili

    2016-01-14

    Bonding and anti-bonding modes of plasmon coupling effects are numerically investigated in TiO2-Ag core-shell nano dimers. First, splitting phenomena of the coupled anti-bonding modes are observed under the longitudinal polarization when the distance between the monomers decreases to a certain level. Second, one of the split resonance modes is identified to be formed by the dipole anti-bonding mode of the monomers from charge density distribution patterns. Those split modes have similar redshift behaviors as the coupled dipole bonding modes in the same situations. Furthermore, the intensities of those anti-bonding modes weaken with decreasing distance between the monomers, because of the interaction of the induced dipole moment in the monomers and the charge distribution variation on the facing surfaces of the gap by the coulomb attraction. Other split bands are the higher-order mode (octupole-like or triakontadipole-like), which do not have obvious peak-shift behavior, and the intensities have very little attenuation with decreasing distance. Finally, the coupling of the bonding and anti-bonding modes under the longitudinal polarization is symmetric (bonding).

  8. Plasmon-driven dimerization via S-S chemical bond in an aqueous environment.

    PubMed

    Cui, Lin; Wang, Peijie; Chen, Xiaowei; Fang, Yurui; Zhang, Zhenglong; Sun, Mengtao

    2014-11-27

    The surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of thioanisole are experimentally investigated in an electrochemical environment in this study. Two Raman peaks, which depend strongly not only on electric potential but also on the local surface plasmon resonances (LSPR), have been observed. Theoretical calculations reveal that thioanisole is first dissociated from thiophenol via the S-CH3 bond; plasmons then drive the dimerisation of thiophenol via the S-S bond, which is strongly potential dependent. One Raman peak corresponds to the S-S vibrational mode of the thiophenol dimer, and the other corresponds to the asymmetric C-C stretching modes of the benzenyl of the thiophenol dimer. The potential-dependent two Raman modes is the potential-dependent dimerisation dynamics of thiophenol via the S-S bond. Our experimental findings provide insight into the structural elucidation of adsorbed molecules and molecular surface reaction dynamics.

  9. Plasmon-driven dimerization via S-S chemical bond in an aqueous environment

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Lin; Wang, Peijie; Chen, Xiaowei; Fang, Yurui; Zhang, Zhenglong; Sun, Mengtao

    2014-01-01

    The surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of thioanisole are experimentally investigated in an electrochemical environment in this study. Two Raman peaks, which depend strongly not only on electric potential but also on the local surface plasmon resonances (LSPR), have been observed. Theoretical calculations reveal that thioanisole is first dissociated from thiophenol via the S-CH3 bond; plasmons then drive the dimerisation of thiophenol via the S-S bond, which is strongly potential dependent. One Raman peak corresponds to the S-S vibrational mode of the thiophenol dimer, and the other corresponds to the asymmetric C-C stretching modes of the benzenyl of the thiophenol dimer. The potential-dependent two Raman modes is the potential-dependent dimerisation dynamics of thiophenol via the S-S bond. Our experimental findings provide insight into the structural elucidation of adsorbed molecules and molecular surface reaction dynamics. PMID:25427897

  10. Onset of bonding plasmon hybridization preceded by gap modes in dielectric splitting of metal disks.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, Maj; Bochenkov, Vladimir E; Ogaki, Ryosuke; Sutherland, Duncan S

    2013-01-01

    Dielectric splitting of nanoscale disks was studied experimentally and via finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations through systematic introduction of multiple ultrathin dielectric layers. Tunable, hybridized dark bonding modes were seen with first-order gap modes preceding the appearance of bonding dipole-dipole disk modes. The observed bright dipolar mode did not show the energy shift expected from plasmon hybridization but activated dark higher order gap modes. Introducing lateral asymmetry was shown to remodel the field distribution resulting in 3D asymmetry that reoriented the dipole orientation away from the dipole of the elementary disk modes.

  11. Features of chemical bonds based on the overlap polarizabilities: diatomic and solid-state systems with the frozen-density embedding approach.

    PubMed

    Moura, Renaldo T; Duarte, Gian C S; da Silva, Thiago E; Malta, Oscar L; Longo, Ricardo L

    2015-03-28

    The chemical bond overlap properties were obtained for alkali halides NaY (Y = F, Cl, Br), alkaline-earth chalcogenides MX (M = Ca, Mg and X = O, S, Se) and alkali and alkali-earth metals (Li, Na, and Mg) in diatomic and solid-state systems using an embedding approach based on the frozen density functional theory to simulate the crystalline effects. The computational protocol established provides errors for bond distances smaller than 1%. The results indicate that larger chemical bond covalency leads to larger absorption or scattering by the overlap region. The ionic specific valence and overlap polarizability are closely related to the valence orbital compactness measured by the sum of Mulliken electronegativities. The embedding approach used in this work makes it possible to quantify the effects of the crystalline environment on the chemical bond overlap properties. In the solid-state, the bond overlap charges are less polarizable, in cases of well-known ionic systems (provided by electronegativity differences), leading to smaller chemical bond covalency in solids than in diatomics. The spectroscopic properties of the polarizability of the electron density in the overlap region of a chemical bond could be measured in the 1-20 eV spectral region and could be used to characterize some bands in several spectra whose assignments are ambiguous or not available.

  12. Visual Identification of Light-Driven Breakage of the Silver-Dithiocarbamate Bond by Single Plasmonic Nanoprobes

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Peng Fei; Yuan, Bin Fang; Gao, Ming Xuan; Li, Rong Sheng; Ma, Jun; Zou, Hong Yan; Li, Yuan Fang; Li, Ming; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Insight into the nature of metal-sulfur bond, a meaningful one in life science, interface chemistry and organometallic chemistry, is interesting but challenging. By utilizing the localized surface plasmon resonance properties of silver nanoparticles, herein we visually identified the photosensitivity of silver-dithiocarbamate (Ag-DTC) bond by using dark field microscopic imaging (iDFM) technique at single nanoparticle level. It was found that the breakage of Ag-DTC bond could be accelerated effectively by light irradiation, followed by a pH-dependent horizontal or vertical degradation of the DTC molecules, in which an indispensable preoxidation process of the silver was at first disclosed. These findings suggest a visualization strategy at single plasmonic nanoparticle level which can be excellently applied to explore new stimulus-triggered reactions, and might also open a new way to understand traditional organic reaction mechanisms. PMID:26493773

  13. Mechanical control of the plasmon coupling with Au nanoparticle arrays fixed on the elastomeric film via chemical bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedogni, Elena; Kaneko, Satoshi; Fujii, Shintaro; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2017-03-01

    We have fabricated Au nanoparticle arrays on the flexible poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) film. The nanoparticles were bound to the film via a covalent bond by a ligand exchange reaction. Thanks to the strong chemical bonding, highly stable and uniformly dispersed Au nanoparticle arrays were fixed on the PDMS film. The Au nanoparticle arrays were characterized by the UV–vis, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The UV–vis and SEM measurements showed the uniformity of the surface-dispersed Au nanoparticles, and SERS measurement confirmed the chemistry of the PDMS film. Reflecting the high stability and the uniformity of the Au nanoparticle arrays, the plasmon wavelength of the Au nanoparticles reversely changed with modulation of the interparticle distance, which was induced by the stretching of the PDMS film. The plasmon wavelength linearly decreased from 664 to 591 nm by stretching of 60%. The plasmon wavelength shift can be explained by the change in the strength of the plasmon coupling which is mechanically controlled by the mechanical strain.

  14. Label free checkerboard assay to determine overlapping epitopes of Ebola virus VP-40 antibodies using surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Anderson, George P; Liu, Jinny L; Zabetakis, Dan; Legler, Patricia M; Goldman, Ellen R

    2017-03-01

    Immunoassay formats, in which antibodies provide sensitivity and specificity, are often utilized to provide rapid and simple diagnostic tests. Surface plasmon resonance is frequently used to evaluate the suitability of antibodies by determining binding kinetics to agents or surrogate antigens. We used SPR to evaluate a number of commercial monoclonal antibodies as well as single domain antibodies produced in-house. All the antibodies targeted the Ebola virus viral protein 40 (VP40). We determined the ability of each antibody to bind to immobilized VP40, and ensured they did not bind Ebola glycoprotein or the nucleoprotein. A subset of the monoclonal antibodies was immobilized to characterize antigen capture in solution. It can be advantageous to utilize antibodies that recognize distinct epitopes when choosing reagents for detection and diagnostic assays. We determined the uniqueness of the epitope recognized by the anti-VP40 antibodies using a checkerboard format that exploits the 6×6 array of interactions monitored by the Bio-Rad ProteOn XPR36 SPR instrument. The results demonstrate the utility of surface plasmon resonance to characterize monoclonal and recombinant antibodies. Additionally, the analysis presented here enabled the identification of pairs of anti-VP40 antibodies which could potentially be utilized in sandwich type immunoassays for the detection of Ebola virus.

  15. Is There a Need to Discuss Atomic Orbital Overlap When Teaching Hydrogen-Halide Bond Strength and Acidity Trends in Organic Chemistry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devarajan, Deepa; Gustafson, Samantha J.; Bickelhaupt, F. Matthias; Ess, Daniel H.

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate organic chemistry textbooks and Internet websites use a variety of approaches for presenting and explaining the impact of halogen atom size on trends in bond strengths and/or acidity of hydrogen halides. In particular, several textbooks and Internet websites explain these trends by invoking decreasing orbital overlap between the…

  16. Singular characteristics and unique chemical bond activation mechanisms of photocatalytic reactions on plasmonic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Christopher, Phillip; Xin, Hongliang; Marimuthu, Andiappan; Linic, Suljo

    2012-12-01

    The field of heterogeneous photocatalysis has almost exclusively focused on semiconductor photocatalysts. Herein, we show that plasmonic metallic nanostructures represent a new family of photocatalysts. We demonstrate that these photocatalysts exhibit fundamentally different behaviour compared with semiconductors. First, we show that photocatalytic reaction rates on excited plasmonic metallic nanostructures exhibit a super-linear power law dependence on light intensity (rate ∝ intensity(n), with n > 1), at significantly lower intensity than required for super-linear behaviour on extended metal surfaces. We also demonstrate that, in sharp contrast to semiconductor photocatalysts, photocatalytic quantum efficiencies on plasmonic metallic nanostructures increase with light intensity and operating temperature. These unique characteristics of plasmonic metallic nanostructures suggest that this new family of photocatalysts could prove useful for many heterogeneous catalytic processes that cannot be activated using conventional thermal processes on metals or photocatalytic processes on semiconductors.

  17. Matching plasmon resonances to the C=C and C-H bonds in estradiol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbomson, Ifeoma G.; McMeekin, Scott; De La Rue, Richard; Johnson, Nigel P.

    2015-03-01

    We tune nanoantennas to resonate within mid-infrared wavelengths to match the vibrational resonances of C=C and C-H of the hormone estradiol. Modelling and fabrication of the nanoantennas produce plasmon resonances between 2 μm to 7 μm. The hormone estradiol was dissolved in ethanol and evaporated, leaving thickness of a few hundreds of nanometres on top of gold asymmetric split H-like shaped on a fused silica substrate. The reflectance was measured and a red-shift is recorded from the resonators plasmonic peaks. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is use to observe enhanced spectra of the stretching modes for the analyte which belongs to alkenyl biochemical group.

  18. Nonlocal study of ultimate plasmon hybridization.

    PubMed

    Raza, Søren; Wubs, Martijn; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I; Mortensen, N Asger

    2015-03-01

    Within our recently proposed generalized nonlocal optical response (GNOR) model, where nonlocal response is included by taking into account both convective and diffusive currents of the conduction electrons, we revisit the fundamental problem of an optically excited plasmonic dimer. We consider the transition from separated dimers via touching dimers to finally overlapping dimers. In particular, we focus on the touching case, showing a fundamental limit on the hybridization of the bonding plasmon modes due to nonlocality. Using transformation optics, we determine a simple analytical equation for the resonance energies.

  19. Citrate-hydrazine hydrogen-bonding driven single-step synthesis of tunable near-IR plasmonic, anisotropic silver nanocrystals: implications for SERS spectroscopy of inorganic oxoanions.

    PubMed

    Pattanayak, Satarupa; Swarnkar, Abhishek; Priyam, Amiya; Bhalerao, Gopal M

    2014-08-21

    A simplified, single-step aqueous synthesis route to tunable anisotropic silver nanocrystals (NCs) has been developed by tailoring the hydrogen-bonding interactions between a mild stabilizer, sodium citrate, and a mild reductant, hydrazine hydrate. The structure directing ability of the H-bonding interaction was harnessed by keeping a stoichiometric excess of hydrazine under ambient conditions (pH 7, 25 °C). Decreasing the synthesis temperature to 5 °C imparts rigidity to the citrate-hydrazine H-bonding network, and the plasmon peak moves from 500 to 550 nm (using 40 mM hydrazine). On lowering the pH from 7 to 5, the H-bonding is further strengthened due to partial protonation of citrate and the plasmon peak is tuned to 790 nm. Further, we found that, at 5 °C and pH 5, there also exists a sub-stoichiometric regime in which maximum tunability of the plasmon peak (790→1010 nm) is achieved with 1 mM hydrazine. HR-TEM reveals that the near-IR plasmonic NCs are nanopyramids having a pentagonal base with edge length varying from 15 nm to 30 nm. Through second derivative FTIR analysis, a correlation between hydrogen-bonded molecular vibrations and the plasmon tunability has been established. The anisotropic NCs exhibit significant Raman enhancement on the citrate molecules. Further, a solution-phase, non-resonant SERS spectroscopic detection method for an inorganic contaminant of ground water, arsenite, has also been developed.

  20. Plasmonic band gap engineering of plasmon-exciton coupling.

    PubMed

    Karademir, Ertugrul; Balci, Sinan; Kocabas, Coskun; Aydinli, Atilla

    2014-10-01

    Controlling plasmon-exciton coupling through band gap engineering of plasmonic crystals is demonstrated in the Kretschmann configuration. When the flat metal surface is textured with a sinusoidal grating only in one direction, using laser interference lithography, it exhibits a plasmonic band gap because of the Bragg scattering of surface plasmon polaritons on the plasmonic crystals. The contrast of the grating profile determines the observed width of the plasmonic band gap and hence allows engineering of the plasmonic band gap. In this work, resonant coupling between the molecular resonance of a J-aggregate dye and the plasmonic resonance of a textured metal film is extensively studied through plasmonic band gap engineering. Polarization dependent spectroscopic reflection measurements probe the spectral overlap occurring between the molecular resonance and the plasmonic resonance. The results indicate that plasmon-exciton interaction is attenuated in the band gap region along the grating direction.

  1. Plasmonics in buried structures.

    PubMed

    Romero, I; García de Abajo, F J

    2009-10-12

    We describe plasmon propagation in silica-filled coupled nanovoids fully buried in gold. Propagation bands and band gaps are shown to be tunable through the degree of overlap and plasmon hybridization between contiguous voids. The effect of disorder and fabrication imperfections is thoroughly investigated. Our work explores a novel paradigm for plasmon photonics relying on plasmon modes in metal-buried structures, which can benefit from long propagation distances, cancelation of radiative losses, minimum crosstalk between neighboring waveguides, and maximum optical integration in three-dimensional arrangements.

  2. Observation of quantum tunneling between two plasmonic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Jonathan A; García-Etxarri, Aitzol; Koh, Ai Leen; Dionne, Jennifer A

    2013-02-13

    The plasmon resonances of two closely spaced metallic particles have enabled applications including single-molecule sensing and spectroscopy, novel nanoantennas, molecular rulers, and nonlinear optical devices. In a classical electrodynamic context, the strength of such dimer plasmon resonances increases monotonically as the particle gap size decreases. In contrast, a quantum mechanical framework predicts that electron tunneling will strongly diminish the dimer plasmon strength for subnanometer-scale separations. Here, we directly observe the plasmon resonances of coupled metallic nanoparticles as their gap size is reduced to atomic dimensions. Using the electron beam of a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), we manipulate pairs of ~10-nm-diameter spherical silver nanoparticles on a substrate, controlling their convergence and eventual coalescence into a single nanosphere. We simultaneously employ electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) to observe the dynamic plasmonic properties of these dimers before and after particle contact. As separations are reduced from 7 nm, the dominant dipolar peak exhibits a redshift consistent with classical calculations. However, gaps smaller than ~0.5 nm cause this mode to exhibit a reduced intensity consistent with quantum theories that incorporate electron tunneling. As the particles overlap, the bonding dipolar mode disappears and is replaced by a dipolar charge transfer mode. Our dynamic imaging, manipulation, and spectroscopy of nanostructures enables the first full spectral mapping of dimer plasmon evolution and may provide new avenues for in situ nanoassembly and analysis in the quantum regime.

  3. The resonant, near-resonant, and off-resonant plasmon coupling effects for the bonding modes in two types of asymmetric dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Quanshui; Hu, Jianling; Wang, Ziya; Wang, Fengping; Bao, Yongjun

    2014-07-01

    The resonant, near-resonant, and off-resonant plasmon coupling effects for the bonding modes in asymmetric dimers are illustrated by two types of configuration, one formed by a gold nanoparticle and a TiO2-Ag core-shell nanoparticle and the other formed by two TiO2-Ag core-shell nanoparticles with suitable sizes. The redshift and blueshift behaviours of the coupled bonding modes with decreasing gap are found under longitudinal and transverse polarization of light for these dimers in the resonant situation, respectively. Under the near-resonant situation, the redshift behaviours of the coupled bonding modes still remain under longitudinal polarization, whereas the two separated modes of monomers after coupling under transverse polarization exhibit no obvious peak-shift behaviours, and the one on the lower frequency side shows an apparent attenuation in the strength. Under the off-resonant situation, the redshift behaviours not only occur in the coupled modes under longitudinal polarization, but also occur in two separated modes under transverse polarization.

  4. Aluminum plasmonic photocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Qi; Wang, Chenxi; Huang, Hao; Li, Wan; Du, Deyang; Han, Di; Qiu, Teng; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of photocatalytic processes is dictated largely by plasmonic materials with the capability to enhance light absorption as well as the energy conversion efficiency. Herein, we demonstrate how to improve the plasmonic photocatalytic properties of TiO2/Al nano-void arrays by overlapping the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) modes with the TiO2 band gap. The plasmonic TiO2/Al arrays exhibit superior photocatalytic activity boasting an enhancement of 7.2 folds. The underlying mechanisms concerning the radiative energy transfer and interface energy transfer processes are discussed. Both processes occur at the TiO2/Al interface and their contributions to photocatalysis are evaluated. The results are important to the optimization of aluminum plasmonic materials in photocatalytic applications. PMID:26497411

  5. Molecular Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Andrew J; Willets, Katherine A

    2016-06-12

    In this review, we survey recent advances in the field of molecular plasmonics beyond the traditional sensing modality. Molecular plasmonics is explored in the context of the complex interaction between plasmon resonances and molecules and the ability of molecules to support plasmons self-consistently. First, spectroscopic changes induced by the interaction between molecular and plasmonic resonances are discussed, followed by examples of how tuning molecular properties leads to active molecular plasmonic systems. Next, the role of the position and polarizability of a molecular adsorbate on surface-enhanced Raman scattering signals is examined experimentally and theoretically. Finally, we introduce recent research focused on using molecules as plasmonic materials. Each of these examples is intended to highlight the role of molecules as integral components in coupled molecule-plasmon systems, as well as to show the diversity of applications in molecular plasmonics.

  6. Shake for Sigma, Pray for Pi: Classroom Orbital Overlap Analogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dicks, Andrew P.

    2011-01-01

    An introductory organic classroom demonstration is discussed where analogies are made between common societal hand contact and covalent bond formation. A handshake signifies creation of a [sigma] bond ("head-on" orbital overlap), whereas the action of praying illustrates "sideways" overlap and generation of a [pi] bond. The nature of orbital and…

  7. Plasmonic Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Ryan T.

    2015-01-01

    The unique optical properties of plasmon resonant nanostructures enable exploration of nanoscale environments using relatively simple optical characterization techniques. For this reason, the field of plasmonics continues to garner the attention of the biosensing community. Biosensors based on propagating surface plasmon resonances (SPRs) in films are the most well-recognized plasmonic biosensors, but there is great potential for the new, developing technologies to surpass the robustness and popularity of film-based SPR sensing. This review surveys the current plasmonic biosensor landscape with emphasis on the basic operating principles of each plasmonic sensing technique and the practical considerations when developing a sensing platform with the various techniques. The “gold standard” film SPR technique is reviewed briefly, but special emphasis is devoted to the up-and-coming LSPR-based and plasmonically coupled sensor technology. PMID:25377594

  8. Coexistence of Scattering Enhancement and Suppression by Plasmonic Cavity Modes in Loaded Dimer Gap-Antennas

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Xiao, Jun-Jun; Li, Meili; Han, Dezhuan; Gao, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic nanoantenna is of promising applications in optical sensing and detection, enhancement of optical nonlinear effect, surface optical spectroscopy, photoemission, etc. Here we show that in a carefully-designed dimer gap-antenna made by two metallic nanorods, the longitudinal plasmon antenna mode (AM) of bonding dipoles can compete with the transverse plasmonic cavity modes (CMs), yielding dramatically enhanced or suppressed scattering efficiency, depending on the CMs symmetry characteristics. More specifically, it is demonstrated that an appropriately loaded gap layer enables substantial excitation of toroidal moment and its strong interaction with the AM dipole moment, resulting in Fano- or electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT)-like profile in the scattering spectrum. However, for CMs with nonzero azimuthal number, the spectrum features a cumulative signature of the respective AM and CM resonances. We supply both detailed near-field and far-field analysis, showing that the modal overlap and phase relationship between the fundamental moments of different order play a crucial role. Finally, we show that the resonance bands of the AM and CMs can be tuned by adjusting the geometry parameters and the permittivity of the load. Our results may be useful in plasmonic cloaking, spin-polarized directional light emission, ultra-sensitive optical sensing, and plasmon-mediated photoluminescence. PMID:26611726

  9. Plasmonic nanorod metamaterials for biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabashin, A. V.; Evans, P.; Pastkovsky, S.; Hendren, W.; Wurtz, G. A.; Atkinson, R.; Pollard, R.; Podolskiy, V. A.; Zayats, A. V.

    2009-11-01

    Label-free plasmonic biosensors rely either on surface plasmon polaritons or on localized surface plasmons on continuous or nanostructured noble-metal surfaces to detect molecular-binding events. Despite undisputed advantages, including spectral tunability, strong enhancement of the local electric field and much better adaptability to modern nanobiotechnology architectures, localized plasmons demonstrate orders of magnitude lower sensitivity compared with their guided counterparts. Here, we demonstrate an improvement in biosensing technology using a plasmonic metamaterial that is capable of supporting a guided mode in a porous nanorod layer. Benefiting from a substantial overlap between the probing field and the active biological substance incorporated between the nanorods and a strong plasmon-mediated energy confinement inside the layer, this metamaterial provides an enhanced sensitivity to refractive-index variations of the medium between the rods (more than 30,000nm per refractive-index unit). We demonstrate the feasibility of our approach using a standard streptavidin-biotin affinity model and record considerable improvement in the detection limit of small analytes compared with conventional label-free plasmonic devices.

  10. Aluminium plasmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Gerard, Davy; Gray, Stephen K.

    2014-12-15

    In this study, we present an overview of 'aluminium plasmonics', i.e. the study of both fundamental and practical aspects of surface plasmon excitations in aluminium structures, in particular thin films and metal nanoparticles. After a brief introduction noting both some recent and historical contributions to aluminium plasmonics, we discuss the optical properties of aluminium and aluminium nanostructures and highlight a few selected studies in a host of areas ranging from fluorescence to data storage.

  11. Gold nanodisk array surface plasmon resonance sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xueli

    Surface plasmon resonances in periodic metal nanostructures have been investigated for sensing applications over the last decade. The resonance wavelengths of the nanostructures are usually measured in the transmission or reflection spectrum for chemical and biological sensing. In this thesis, I introduce a nanoscale gap mediated surface plasmon resonance nanodisk array for displacement sensing and a super-period gold nanodisk grating enabled surface plasmon resonance spectrometer sensor. The super-period gold nanodisk grating has a small subwavelength period and a large diffraction grating period. Surface plasmon resonance spectra are measured in the first order diffraction spatial profiles captured by a charge-coupled device (CCD). A surface plasmon resonance sensor for the bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein nanolayer bonding is demonstrated by measuring the surface plasmon resonance shift in the first order diffraction spatial intensity profiles captured by the CCD.

  12. Absorption-induced scattering and surface plasmon out-coupling from absorber-coated plasmonic metasurfaces

    PubMed Central

    Petoukhoff, Christopher E.; O'Carroll, Deirdre M.

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between absorbers and plasmonic metasurfaces can give rise to unique optical properties not present for either of the individual materials and can influence the performance of a host of optical sensing and thin-film optoelectronic applications. Here we identify three distinct mode types of absorber-coated plasmonic metasurfaces: localized and propagating surface plasmons and a previously unidentified optical mode type called absorption-induced scattering. The extinction of the latter mode type can be tuned by controlling the morphology of the absorber coating and the spectral overlap of the absorber with the plasmonic modes. Furthermore, we show that surface plasmons are backscattered when the crystallinity of the absorber is low but are absorbed for more crystalline absorber coatings. This work furthers our understanding of light–matter interactions between absorbers and surface plasmons to enable practical optoelectronic applications of metasurfaces. PMID:26271900

  13. Plasmonic Encoding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-06

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0291 PLASMONIC ENCODING Chad Mirkin NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY Final Report 10/06/2014 DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved for...2014 4.  TITLE AND SUBTITLE PLASMONIC ENCODING 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA9550-09-1-0294 5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6.  AUTHOR(S) Chad...called Nanoflares. 15.  SUBJECT TERMS plasmonic , encoding 16.  SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17.  LIMITATION OF       ABSTRACT UU 18.  NUMBER        OF

  14. Aluminium plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gérard, Davy; Gray, Stephen K.

    2015-05-01

    We present an overview of ‘aluminium plasmonics’, i.e. the study of both fundamental and practical aspects of surface plasmon excitations in aluminium structures, in particular thin films and metal nanoparticles. After a brief introduction noting both some recent and historical contributions to aluminium plasmonics, we discuss the optical properties of aluminium and aluminium nanostructures and highlight a few selected studies in a host of areas ranging from fluorescence to data storage.

  15. Molecular Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Lauchner, Adam; Schlather, Andrea E; Manjavacas, Alejandro; Cui, Yao; McClain, Michael J; Stec, Grant J; García de Abajo, F Javier; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2015-09-09

    Graphene supports surface plasmons that have been observed to be both electrically and geometrically tunable in the mid- to far-infrared spectral regions. In particular, it has been demonstrated that graphene plasmons can be tuned across a wide spectral range spanning from the mid-infrared to the terahertz. The identification of a general class of plasmonic excitations in systems containing only a few dozen atoms permits us to extend this versatility into the visible and ultraviolet. As appealing as this extension might be for active nanoscale manipulation of visible light, its realization constitutes a formidable technical challenge. We experimentally demonstrate the existence of molecular plasmon resonances in the visible for ionized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which we reversibly switch by adding, then removing, a single electron from the molecule. The charged PAHs display intense absorption in the visible regime with electrical and geometrical tunability analogous to the plasmonic resonances of much larger nanographene systems. Finally, we also use the switchable molecular plasmon in anthracene to demonstrate a proof-of-concept low-voltage electrochromic device.

  16. Plasmonic photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuming; Chen, Yu Lim; Liu, Ru-Shi; Tsai, Din Ping

    2013-04-01

    Plasmonic photocatalysis has recently facilitated the rapid progress in enhancing photocatalytic efficiency under visible light irradiation, increasing the prospect of using sunlight for environmental and energy applications such as wastewater treatment, water splitting and carbon dioxide reduction. Plasmonic photocatalysis makes use of noble metal nanoparticles dispersed into semiconductor photocatalysts and possesses two prominent features-a Schottky junction and localized surface plasmonic resonance (LSPR). The former is of benefit to charge separation and transfer whereas the latter contributes to the strong absorption of visible light and the excitation of active charge carriers. This article aims to provide a systematic study of the fundamental physical mechanisms of plasmonic photocatalysis and to rationalize many experimental observations. In particular, we show that LSPR could boost the generation of electrons and holes in semiconductor photocatalysts through two different effects-the LSPR sensitization effect and the LSPR-powered bandgap breaking effect. By classifying the plasmonic photocatalytic systems in terms of their contact form and irradiation state, we show that the enhancement effects on different properties of photocatalysis can be well-explained and systematized. Moreover, we identify popular material systems of plasmonic photocatalysis that have shown excellent performance and elucidate their key features in the context of our proposed mechanisms and classifications.

  17. Observation of plasmon propagation, redirection, and fan-out in silver nanowires.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Aric W; Routenberg, David A; Wiley, Benjamin J; Xia, Younan; Dufresne, Eric R; Reed, Mark A

    2006-08-01

    We report the coupling of free-space photons (vacuum wavelength of 830 nm) to surface plasmon modes of a silver nanowire. The launch of propagating plasmons, and the subsequent emission of photons, is selective and occurs only at ends and other discontinuities of the nanowire. In addition, we observe that the nanowires redirect the plasmons through turns of radii as small as 4 microm. We exploit the radiating nature of discontinuities to find a plasmon propagation length >3 +/- 1 microm. Finally, we observe that interwire plasmon coupling occurs for overlapping wires, demonstrating plasmon fan-out at subwavelength scales.

  18. Steganalysis of overlapping images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, James M.; Ker, Andrew D.

    2015-03-01

    We examine whether steganographic images can be detected more reliably when there exist other images, taken with the same camera under the same conditions, of the same scene. We argue that such a circumstance is realistic and likely in practice. In `laboratory conditions' mimicking circumstances favourable to the analyst, and with a custom set of digital images which capture the same scenes with controlled amounts of overlap, we use an overlapping reference image to calibrate steganographic features of the image under analysis. Experimental results show that the analysed image can be classified as cover or stego with much greater reliability than traditional steganalysis not exploiting overlapping content, and the improvement in reliability depends on the amount of overlap. These results are curious because two different photographs of exactly the same scene, taken only a few seconds apart with a fixed camera and settings, typically have steganographic features that differ by considerably more than a cover and stego image.

  19. Plasmonically amplified fluorescence bioassay with microarray format

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogalic, S.; Hageneder, S.; Ctortecka, C.; Bauch, M.; Khan, I.; Preininger, Claudia; Sauer, U.; Dostalek, J.

    2015-05-01

    Plasmonic amplification of fluorescence signal in bioassays with microarray detection format is reported. A crossed relief diffraction grating was designed to couple an excitation laser beam to surface plasmons at the wavelength overlapping with the absorption and emission bands of fluorophore Dy647 that was used as a label. The surface of periodically corrugated sensor chip was coated with surface plasmon-supporting gold layer and a thin SU8 polymer film carrying epoxy groups. These groups were employed for the covalent immobilization of capture antibodies at arrays of spots. The plasmonic amplification of fluorescence signal on the developed microarray chip was tested by using interleukin 8 sandwich immunoassay. The readout was performed ex situ after drying the chip by using a commercial scanner with high numerical aperture collecting lens. Obtained results reveal the enhancement of fluorescence signal by a factor of 5 when compared to a regular glass chip.

  20. Plasmonics in nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zheyu; Zhu, Xing

    2013-07-26

    Plasmonics has developed into one of the rapidly growing research topics for nanophotonics. With advanced nanofabrication techniques, a broad variety of nanostructures can be designed and fabricated for plasmonic devices at nanoscale. Fundamental properties for both surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) and localized surface plasmons (LSP) arise a new insight and understanding for the electro-optical device investigations, such as plasmonic nanofocusing, low-loss plasmon waveguide and active plasmonic detectors for energy harvesting. Here, we review some typical functional plasmonic nanostructures and nanosmart devices emerging from our individual and collaborative research works.

  1. Cascaded plasmon-plasmon coupling mediated energy transfer across stratified metal-dielectric nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Golmakaniyoon, Sepideh; Hernandez-Martinez, Pedro Ludwig; Demir, Hilmi Volkan; Sun, Xiao Wei

    2016-01-01

    Surface plasmon (SP) coupling has been successfully applied to nonradiative energy transfer via exciton-plasmon-exciton coupling in conventionally sandwiched donor-metal film-acceptor configurations. However, these structures lack the desired efficiency and suffer poor photoemission due to the high energy loss. Here, we show that the cascaded exciton-plasmon-plasmon-exciton coupling in stratified architecture enables an efficient energy transfer mechanism. The overlaps of the surface plasmon modes at the metal-dielectric and dielectric-metal interfaces allow for strong cross-coupling in comparison with the single metal film configuration. The proposed architecture has been demonstrated through the analytical modeling and numerical simulation of an oscillating dipole near the stratified nanostructure of metal-dielectric-metal-acceptor. Consistent with theoretical and numerical results, experimental measurements confirm at least 50% plasmon resonance energy transfer enhancement in the donor-metal-dielectric-metal-acceptor compared to the donor-metal-acceptor structure. Cascaded plasmon-plasmon coupling enables record high efficiency for exciton transfer through metallic structures. PMID:27698422

  2. Illusion induced overlapped optics.

    PubMed

    Zang, XiaoFei; Shi, Cheng; Li, Zhou; Chen, Lin; Cai, Bin; Zhu, YiMing; Zhu, HaiBin

    2014-01-13

    The traditional transformation-based cloak seems like it can only hide objects by bending the incident electromagnetic waves around the hidden region. In this paper, we prove that invisible cloaks can be applied to realize the overlapped optics. No matter how many in-phase point sources are located in the hidden region, all of them can overlap each other (this can be considered as illusion effect), leading to the perfect optical interference effect. In addition, a singular parameter-independent cloak is also designed to obtain quasi-overlapped optics. Even more amazing of overlapped optics is that if N identical separated in-phase point sources covered with the illusion media, the total power outside the transformation region is N2I0 (not NI0) (I0 is the power of just one point source, and N is the number point sources), which seems violating the law of conservation of energy. A theoretical model based on interference effect is proposed to interpret the total power of these two kinds of overlapped optics effects. Our investigation may have wide applications in high power coherent laser beams, and multiple laser diodes, and so on.

  3. Transformation plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadic, Muamer; Guenneau, Sébastien; Enoch, Stefan; Huidobro, Paloma A.; Martín-Moreno, Luis; García-Vidal, Francisco J.; Renger, Jan; Quidant, Romain

    2012-07-01

    Surface plasmons polaritons (SPPs) at metal/dielectric interfaces have raised lots of expectations in the on-going quest towards scaling down optical devices. SPP optics offers a powerful and flexible platform for real two-dimensional integrated optics, capable of supporting both light and electrons. Yet, a full exploitation of the features of SPPs is conditioned by an accurate control of their flow. Most efforts have so far focused on the extrapolation of concepts borrowed from guided optics. This strategy has already led to many important breakthroughs but a fully deterministic control of SPP modes remains a challenge. Recently, the field of optics was stimulated by a novel paradigm, transformation optics, which offers the capability to control light flow in any desired fashion. While it has already significantly contributed to the design of metamaterials with unprecedented optical properties, its versatility offers new opportunities towards a fully deterministic control of SPPs and the design of a new class of plasmonic functionalities. Here, we review recent progress in the application of transformation optics to SPPs. We first briefly describe the theoretical formalism of transformation plasmonics, focusing on its specificities over its three-dimensional optical counterpart. Numerical simulations are then used to illustrate its capability to tame SPP flows at a metal interface patterned with a dielectric load. Finally, we review recent experimental implementations leading to unique SPP functionalities at optical frequencies.

  4. Distal tibiofibular radiological overlap

    PubMed Central

    Sowman, B.; Radic, R.; Kuster, M.; Yates, P.; Breidiel, B.; Karamfilef, S.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Overlap between the distal tibia and fibula has always been quoted to be positive. If the value is not positive then an injury to the syndesmosis is thought to exist. Our null hypothesis is that it is a normal variant in the adult population. Methods We looked at axial CT scans of the ankle in 325 patients for the presence of overlap between the distal tibia and fibula. Where we thought this was possible we reconstructed the images to represent a plain film radiograph which we were able to rotate and view in multiple planes to confirm the assessment. Results The scans were taken for reasons other than pathology of the ankle. We found there was no overlap in four patients. These patients were then questioned about previous injury, trauma, surgery or pain, in order to exclude underlying pathology. Conclusion We concluded that no overlap between the tibia and fibula may exist in the population, albeit in a very small proportion. PMID:23610666

  5. Overlap among Environmental Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Betty

    1981-01-01

    Describes the methodology and results of a study comparing the overlap of Enviroline, Pollution, and the Environmental Periodicals Bibliography files through searches on acid rain, asbestos and water, diesel, glass recycling, Lake Erie, Concorde, reverse osmosis wastewater treatment cost, and Calspan. Nine tables are provided. (RBF)

  6. The Plate Overlap Technique.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-07-31

    INTRODUCTION 1 II. NOTATION 2 III. THE GNOMONIC PROJECTION 4 IV . THE PLATE OVERLAP TECHNIQUE 6 A. MOTIVATION 6 B. FORNULATION 9 C. ON STATISTICAL RIGOR 14 D...and new hardware. Since this aim was clearly recognized long ago, wherever possible in earlier documents or software development flexibility was...reader should see 1, 2, and 3. The procedures one should use to update stellar positions are discussed in 4 with applica- tions to the SAOC in 5. Non

  7. Long Range Surface Plasmon Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasry, Amal; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2007-03-01

    Surface plasmon modes, excited at the two sides of a thin metal layer surrounded by two (nearly) identical dielectric media interact via the overlap of their electromagnetic fields. This overlap results in two new-coupled modes, a short and a long-range surface plasmon (LRSP). We demonstrate that combining the LRSP optics with fluorescence spectroscopy can result in a huge enhancement of the fluorescence signal due to the enhanced optical field of the LRSP at the metal dielectric interface, and to its increased evanescent depth into the analyte. This was demonstrated for the detection of the fluorescence intensity of chromophore labeled protein bound to the surface sensor. Beside that, some fundamentals were studied leading to some interesting difference between SPFS and LRSPFS.

  8. Plasmon transmission through excitonic subwavelength gaps.

    PubMed

    Sukharev, Maxim; Nitzan, Abraham

    2016-04-14

    We study the transfer of electromagnetic energy across a subwavelength gap separating two co-axial metal nanorods. In the absence of spacer in the gap separating the rods, the system exhibits strong coupling behavior between longitudinal plasmons in the two rods. The nature and magnitude of this coupling are studied by varying various geometrical parameters. As a function of frequency, the transmission is dominated by a split longitudinal plasmon peak. The two hybrid modes are the dipole-like "bonding" mode characterized by a peak intensity in the gap and a quadrupole-like "antibonding" mode whose amplitude vanishes at the gap center. When the length of one rod is varied, this mode spectrum exhibits the familiar anti-crossing behavior that depends on the coupling strength determined by the gap width. When off-resonant 2-level emitters are placed in the gap, almost no effect on the frequency dependent transmission is observed. In contrast, when the molecular system is resonant with the plasmonic line shape, the transmission is strongly modified, showing characteristics of strong exciton-plasmon coupling. Most strongly modified is the transmission near the lower frequency "bonding" plasmon mode. The presence of resonant molecules in the gap affects not only the molecule-field interaction but also the spatial distribution of the field intensity and the electromagnetic energy flux across the junction.

  9. Plasmon transmission through excitonic subwavelength gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukharev, Maxim; Nitzan, Abraham

    2016-04-01

    We study the transfer of electromagnetic energy across a subwavelength gap separating two co-axial metal nanorods. In the absence of spacer in the gap separating the rods, the system exhibits strong coupling behavior between longitudinal plasmons in the two rods. The nature and magnitude of this coupling are studied by varying various geometrical parameters. As a function of frequency, the transmission is dominated by a split longitudinal plasmon peak. The two hybrid modes are the dipole-like "bonding" mode characterized by a peak intensity in the gap and a quadrupole-like "antibonding" mode whose amplitude vanishes at the gap center. When the length of one rod is varied, this mode spectrum exhibits the familiar anti-crossing behavior that depends on the coupling strength determined by the gap width. When off-resonant 2-level emitters are placed in the gap, almost no effect on the frequency dependent transmission is observed. In contrast, when the molecular system is resonant with the plasmonic line shape, the transmission is strongly modified, showing characteristics of strong exciton-plasmon coupling. Most strongly modified is the transmission near the lower frequency "bonding" plasmon mode. The presence of resonant molecules in the gap affects not only the molecule-field interaction but also the spatial distribution of the field intensity and the electromagnetic energy flux across the junction.

  10. Plasmon and compositional mapping of plasmonic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringe, Emilie; Collins, Sean M.; DeSantis, Christopher J.; Skrabalak, Sara E.; Midgley, Paul A.

    2014-11-01

    Recently, co-reduction of Au and Pd has allowed the synthesis of complex Au core/AuPd shell nanoparticles with elongated tips and cubic-like symmetry. Optical studies have shown strong plasmonic behavior and high refractive index sensitivities. In this paper, we describe the composition and the near-field plasmonic behavior of those complex structures. Monochromated STEM-EELS, Cathodoluminescence, and EDS mapping reveals the different resonant modes in these particles, and shows that Pd, a poor plasmonic metal, does not prevent strong resonances and could actually be extremely helpful for plasmon-enhanced catalysis.

  11. Plasmonic optical interference.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dukhyun; Shin, Chang Kyun; Yoon, Daesung; Chung, Deuk Seok; Jin, Yong Wan; Lee, Luke P

    2014-06-11

    Understanding optical interference is of great importance in fundamental and analytical optical design for next-generation personal, industrial, and military applications. So far, various researches have been performed for optical interference phenomena, but there have been no reports on plasmonic optical interference. Here, we report that optical interference could be effectively coupled with surface plasmons, resulting in enhanced optical absorption. We prepared a three-dimensional (3D) plasmonic nanostructure that consists of a plasmonic layer at the top, a nanoporous dielectric layer at the center, and a mirror layer at the bottom. The plasmonic layer mediates strong plasmonic absorption when the constructive interference pattern is matched with the plasmonic component. By tailoring the thickness of the dielectric layer, the strong plasmonic absorption can facilely be controlled and covers the full visible range. The plasmonic interference in the 3D nanostructure thus creates brilliant structural colors. We develop a design equation to determine the thickness of the dielectric layer in a 3D plasmonic nanostructure that could create the maximum absorption at a given wavelength. It is further demonstrated that the 3D plasmonic nanostructure can be realized on a flexible substrate. Our 3D plasmonic nanostructures will have a huge impact on the fields of optoelectronic systems, biochemical optical sensors, and spectral imaging.

  12. Tunable plasmonic crystal

    DOEpatents

    Dyer, Gregory Conrad; Shaner, Eric A.; Reno, John L.; Aizin, Gregory

    2015-08-11

    A tunable plasmonic crystal comprises several periods in a two-dimensional electron or hole gas plasmonic medium that is both extremely subwavelength (.about..lamda./100) and tunable through the application of voltages to metal electrodes. Tuning of the plasmonic crystal band edges can be realized in materials such as semiconductors and graphene to actively control the plasmonic crystal dispersion in the terahertz and infrared spectral regions. The tunable plasmonic crystal provides a useful degree of freedom for applications in slow light devices, voltage-tunable waveguides, filters, ultra-sensitive direct and heterodyne THz detectors, and THz oscillators.

  13. Single-plasmon interferences.

    PubMed

    Dheur, Marie-Christine; Devaux, Eloïse; Ebbesen, Thomas W; Baron, Alexandre; Rodier, Jean-Claude; Hugonin, Jean-Paul; Lalanne, Philippe; Greffet, Jean-Jacques; Messin, Gaétan; Marquier, François

    2016-03-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons are electromagnetic waves coupled to collective electron oscillations propagating along metal-dielectric interfaces, exhibiting a bosonic character. Recent experiments involving surface plasmons guided by wires or stripes allowed the reproduction of quantum optics effects, such as antibunching with a single surface plasmon state, coalescence with a two-plasmon state, conservation of squeezing, or entanglement through plasmonic channels. We report the first direct demonstration of the wave-particle duality for a single surface plasmon freely propagating along a planar metal-air interface. We develop a platform that enables two complementary experiments, one revealing the particle behavior of the single-plasmon state through antibunching, and the other one where the interferences prove its wave nature. This result opens up new ways to exploit quantum conversion effects between different bosonic species as shown here with photons and polaritons.

  14. Single-plasmon interferences

    PubMed Central

    Dheur, Marie-Christine; Devaux, Eloïse; Ebbesen, Thomas W.; Baron, Alexandre; Rodier, Jean-Claude; Hugonin, Jean-Paul; Lalanne, Philippe; Greffet, Jean-Jacques; Messin, Gaétan; Marquier, François

    2016-01-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons are electromagnetic waves coupled to collective electron oscillations propagating along metal-dielectric interfaces, exhibiting a bosonic character. Recent experiments involving surface plasmons guided by wires or stripes allowed the reproduction of quantum optics effects, such as antibunching with a single surface plasmon state, coalescence with a two-plasmon state, conservation of squeezing, or entanglement through plasmonic channels. We report the first direct demonstration of the wave-particle duality for a single surface plasmon freely propagating along a planar metal-air interface. We develop a platform that enables two complementary experiments, one revealing the particle behavior of the single-plasmon state through antibunching, and the other one where the interferences prove its wave nature. This result opens up new ways to exploit quantum conversion effects between different bosonic species as shown here with photons and polaritons. PMID:26998521

  15. Measurements of the femtosecond relaxation dynamics of Tamm plasmon-polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afinogenov, B. I.; Popkova, A. A.; Bessonov, V. O.; Fedyanin, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    This paper reports on measurements of the lifetime of Tamm plasmon-polaritons (TPPs) excited in a 1D photonic-crystal/thin-metal-film structure. A femtosecond pulse reflected from a structure of this kind is found to be significantly distorted if its spectrum overlaps with the Tamm plasmon resonance. It is shown that the TPP lifetime possesses strong polarization and angular dependence. It varies from 20 fs for p-polarized light to 40 fs for s-polarized light at a 45° angle of incidence. The reported lifetime of Tamm plasmons is several times smaller than the previously reported lifetime of surface plasmons.

  16. Raman Scattering at Plasmonic Junctions Shorted by Conductive Molecular Bridges

    SciTech Connect

    El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hu, Dehong; Apkarian, V. Ara; Hess, Wayne P.

    2013-04-10

    Intensity spikes in Raman scattering, accompanied by switching between line spectra and band spectra, can be assigned to shorting the junction plasmon through molecular conductive bridges. This is demonstrated through Raman trajectories recorded at a plasmonic junction formed by a gold AFM tip in contact with a silver surface coated either with biphenyl-4,4’-dithiol or biphenyl-4-thiol. The fluctuations are absent in the monothiol. In effect, the making and breaking of chemical bonds is tracked.

  17. Plasmon field effect transistor: A novel sensing platform for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokri Kojori, Hossein

    The interest in plasmons, associated with nanostructured metals, has remarkably increased in the past decade. A Recent improvement in fabrication techniques to create well-controlled nanostructures also contributed to the rapid development of plasmonic applications, such as meta-materials, nonlinear optics, photovoltaic devices, biomedical sensors, medical therapies and spectroscopy. The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor is one of the successful applications, which is widely used in biomedical research. On the other hand, localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) is also widely studied in a broad range of applications. The distinct property of LSPR is a tailored and sharp absorption/scattering peaks depending on the shape and sizes of the metal nanostructures. In addition, plasmonics can enable integration of high speed optical circuit by taking the advantages from the current electronics and optics technologies. Thus, plasmonics is considered as a solution for the next generation systems that offers ultra-high speed data processing. In this dissertation, we will introduce a novel plasmon field effect transistor (FET) that enables direct detection and efficient amplification of plasmon energy. This FET has several advantages such as electrical isolation of plasmon absorber nanostructures from a sensing and drug screening. Currently, we have proof of concept for the antigen-antibody bonding using the plasmon field effect transistor. We will develop a multiplexing capable plasmon FET sensing platform by integrating an array of plasmon FETs with microfluidic channels to detect cancer biomarkers.

  18. Low-dimensional gap plasmons for enhanced light-graphene interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yunjung; Yu, Sunkyu; Park, Namkyoo

    2017-01-01

    Graphene plasmonics has become a highlighted research area due to the outstanding properties of deep-subwavelength plasmon excitation, long relaxation time, and electro-optical tunability. Although the giant conductivity of a graphene layer enables the low-dimensional confinement of light, the atomic scale of the layer thickness is severely mismatched with optical mode sizes, which impedes the efficient tuning of graphene plasmon modes from the degraded light-graphene overlap. Inspired by gap plasmon modes in noble metals, here we propose low-dimensional hybrid graphene gap plasmon waves for large light-graphene overlap factor. We show that gap plasmon waves exhibit improved in-plane and out-of-plane field concentrations on graphene compared to those of edge or wire-like graphene plasmons. By adjusting the chemical property of the graphene layer, efficient and linear modulation of hybrid graphene gap plasmon modes is also achieved. Our results provide potential opportunities to low-dimensional graphene plasmonic devices with strong tunability. PMID:28240230

  19. Low-dimensional gap plasmons for enhanced light-graphene interactions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yunjung; Yu, Sunkyu; Park, Namkyoo

    2017-02-27

    Graphene plasmonics has become a highlighted research area due to the outstanding properties of deep-subwavelength plasmon excitation, long relaxation time, and electro-optical tunability. Although the giant conductivity of a graphene layer enables the low-dimensional confinement of light, the atomic scale of the layer thickness is severely mismatched with optical mode sizes, which impedes the efficient tuning of graphene plasmon modes from the degraded light-graphene overlap. Inspired by gap plasmon modes in noble metals, here we propose low-dimensional hybrid graphene gap plasmon waves for large light-graphene overlap factor. We show that gap plasmon waves exhibit improved in-plane and out-of-plane field concentrations on graphene compared to those of edge or wire-like graphene plasmons. By adjusting the chemical property of the graphene layer, efficient and linear modulation of hybrid graphene gap plasmon modes is also achieved. Our results provide potential opportunities to low-dimensional graphene plasmonic devices with strong tunability.

  20. Low-dimensional gap plasmons for enhanced light-graphene interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yunjung; Yu, Sunkyu; Park, Namkyoo

    2017-02-01

    Graphene plasmonics has become a highlighted research area due to the outstanding properties of deep-subwavelength plasmon excitation, long relaxation time, and electro-optical tunability. Although the giant conductivity of a graphene layer enables the low-dimensional confinement of light, the atomic scale of the layer thickness is severely mismatched with optical mode sizes, which impedes the efficient tuning of graphene plasmon modes from the degraded light-graphene overlap. Inspired by gap plasmon modes in noble metals, here we propose low-dimensional hybrid graphene gap plasmon waves for large light-graphene overlap factor. We show that gap plasmon waves exhibit improved in-plane and out-of-plane field concentrations on graphene compared to those of edge or wire-like graphene plasmons. By adjusting the chemical property of the graphene layer, efficient and linear modulation of hybrid graphene gap plasmon modes is also achieved. Our results provide potential opportunities to low-dimensional graphene plasmonic devices with strong tunability.

  1. Surface plasmon enhanced photoluminescence from copper nanoparticles: Influence of temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Yeshchenko, Oleg A. Bondarchuk, Illya S.; Losytskyy, Mykhaylo Yu.

    2014-08-07

    Anomalous temperature dependence of surface plasmon enhanced photoluminescence from copper nanoparticles embedded in a silica host matrix has been observed. The quantum yield of photoluminescence increases as the temperature increases. The key role of such an effect is the interplay between the surface plasmon resonance and the interband transitions in the copper nanoparticles occurring at change of the temperature. Namely, the increase of temperature leads to the red shift of the resonance. The shift leads to increase of the spectral overlap of the resonance with photoluminescence band of copper as well as to the decrease of plasmon damping caused by interband transitions. Such mechanisms lead to the increase of surface plasmon enhancement factor and, consequently, to increase of the quantum yield of the photoluminescence.

  2. Color changing plasmonic surfaces utilizing liquid crystal (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, Daniel; Wu, Shin-Tson; Chanda, Debashis

    2016-09-01

    Plasmonic structural color has recently garnered significant interest as an alternative to the organic dyes standard in print media and liquid crystal displays. These nanostructured metallic systems can produce diffraction limited images, be made polarization dependent, and exhibit resistance to color bleaching. Perhaps even more advantageous, their optical characteristics can also be tuned, post-fabrication, by altering the surrounding media's refractive index parallel to the local plasmonic fields. A common material with which to achieve this is liquid crystal. By reorienting the liquid crystal molecules through external electric fields, the optical resonances of the plasmonic filters can be dynamically controlled. Demonstrations of this phenomenon, however, have been limited to modest shifts in plasmon resonance. Here, we report a liquid crystal-plasmonic system with an enhanced tuning range through the use of a shallow array of nano-wells and high birefringent liquid crystal. The continuous metallic nanostructure maximizes the overlap between plasmonic fields and liquid crystal while also allowing full reorientation of the liquid crystal upon an applied electric field. Sweeping over structural dimensions and voltages results in a color palette for these dynamic reflective pixels that can further be exploited to create color tunable images. These advances make plasmonic-liquid crystal systems more attractive candidates for filter, display, and other tunable optical technologies.

  3. Overlapping clusters for distributed computation.

    SciTech Connect

    Mirrokni, Vahab; Andersen, Reid; Gleich, David F.

    2010-11-01

    Scalable, distributed algorithms must address communication problems. We investigate overlapping clusters, or vertex partitions that intersect, for graph computations. This setup stores more of the graph than required but then affords the ease of implementation of vertex partitioned algorithms. Our hope is that this technique allows us to reduce communication in a computation on a distributed graph. The motivation above draws on recent work in communication avoiding algorithms. Mohiyuddin et al. (SC09) design a matrix-powers kernel that gives rise to an overlapping partition. Fritzsche et al. (CSC2009) develop an overlapping clustering for a Schwarz method. Both techniques extend an initial partitioning with overlap. Our procedure generates overlap directly. Indeed, Schwarz methods are commonly used to capitalize on overlap. Elsewhere, overlapping communities (Ahn et al, Nature 2009; Mishra et al. WAW2007) are now a popular model of structure in social networks. These have long been studied in statistics (Cole and Wishart, CompJ 1970). We present two types of results: (i) an estimated swapping probability {rho}{infinity}; and (ii) the communication volume of a parallel PageRank solution (link-following {alpha} = 0.85) using an additive Schwarz method. The volume ratio is the amount of extra storage for the overlap (2 means we store the graph twice). Below, as the ratio increases, the swapping probability and PageRank communication volume decreases.

  4. Plasmonic graphene transparent conductors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guowei; Liu, Jianwei; Wang, Qian; Hui, Rongqing; Chen, Zhijun; Maroni, Victor A; Wu, Judy

    2012-03-08

    Plasmonic graphene is fabricated using thermally assisted self-assembly of silver nanoparticles on graphene. The localized surface-plasmonic effect is demonstrated with the resonance frequency shifting from 446 to 495 nm when the lateral dimension of the Ag nanoparticles increases from about 50 to 150 nm. Finite-difference time-domain simulations are employed to confirm the experimentally observed light-scattering enhancement in the solar spectrum in plasmonic graphene and the decrease of both the plasmonic resonance frequency and amplitude with increasing graphene thickness. In addition, plasmonic graphene shows much-improved electrical conductance by a factor of 2-4 as compared to the original graphene, making the plasmonic graphene a promising advanced transparent conductor with enhanced light scattering for thin-film optoelectronic devices.

  5. EDITORIAL: Focus on Plasmonics FOCUS ON PLASMONICS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey; García-Vidal, Francisco

    2008-10-01

    Plasmonics is an emerging field in optics dealing with the so-called surface plasmons whose extraordinary properties are being both analyzed from a fundamental point of view and exploited for numerous technological applications. Surface plasmons associated with surface electron density oscillations decorating metal-dielectric interfaces were discovered by Rufus Ritchie in the 1950s. Since the seventies, the subwavelength confinement of electromagnetic fields as well as their enhancement inherent to the surface plasmon excitation has been widely used for spectroscopic purposes. Recent advances in nano-fabrication, characterization and modelling techniques have allowed unique properties of these surface electromagnetic modes to be explored with respect to subwavelength field localization and waveguiding, opening the path to truly nanoscale plasmonic optical devices. This area of investigation also has interesting links with research on photonic band gap materials and the field of optical metamaterials. Nowadays, plasmonics can be seen as a mature interdisciplinary area of research in which scientists coming from different backgrounds (chemistry, physics, optics and engineering) strive to discover and exploit new and exciting phenomena associated with surface plasmons. The already made and forthcoming discoveries will have impacts in many fields of science and technology, including not only photonics and materials science but also computation, biology and medicine, among others. This focus issue of New Journal of Physics is intended to cover all the aforementioned capabilities of surface plasmons by presenting a current overview of state-of-the-art advances achieved by the leading groups in this field of research. The below list of articles represents the first contributions to the collection and further additions will appear soon. Focus on Plasmonics Contents Nanoantenna array-induced fluorescence enhancement and reduced lifetimes Reuben M Bakker, Vladimir P Drachev

  6. Integrated Plasmonic Nanocircuits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-23

    unsurpassable obstacle: The diffraction limit. Surface plasmon- polaritons (SPP) are easily accessible excitations, whose unique physical properties...naturally forms between two closely-spaced metallic electrodes can support strong standing wave resonances of surface plasmon- polaritons (SPPs). When...the planar ellipse sharing a common focus. In such a geometry, a beam of light can be generated by exciting surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) at an

  7. Plasmonic nanoantenna hydrophones

    PubMed Central

    Maksymov, Ivan S.; Greentree, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound is a valuable biomedical imaging modality and diagnostic tool. Here we theoretically demonstrate that a single dipole plasmonic nanoantenna can be used as an optical hydrophone for MHz-range ultrasound. The nanoantenna is tuned to operate on a high-order plasmon mode, which provides an increased sensitivity to ultrasound in contrast to the usual approach of using the fundamental dipolar plasmon resonance. Plasmonic nanoantenna hydrophones may be useful for ultrasonic imaging of biological cells, cancer tissues or small blood vessels, as well as for Brillouin spectroscopy at the nanoscale. PMID:27612092

  8. Plasmonic colour generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Anders; Yang, Joel K. W.; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Link, Stephan; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J.; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2016-11-01

    Plasmonic colours are structural colours that emerge from resonant interactions between light and metallic nanostructures. The engineering of plasmonic colours is a promising, rapidly emerging research field that could have a large technological impact. We highlight basic properties of plasmonic colours and recent nanofabrication developments, comparing technology-performance indicators for traditional and nanophotonic colour technologies. The structures of interest include diffraction gratings, nanoaperture arrays, thin films, and multilayers and structures that support Mie resonances and whispering-gallery modes. We discuss plasmonic colour nanotechnology based on localized surface plasmon resonances, such as gap plasmons and hybridized disk-hole plasmons, which allow for colour printing with sub-diffraction resolution. We also address a range of fabrication approaches that enable large-area printing and nanoscale lithography compatible with complementary metal-oxide semiconductor technologies, including nanoimprint lithography and self-assembly. Finally, we review recent developments in dynamically reconfigurable plasmonic colours and in the laser-induced post-processing of plasmonic colour surfaces.

  9. A Model for the Chemical Bond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnasco, Valerio

    2004-01-01

    Bond stereochemistry in polyatomic hydrides is explained in terms of the principle of bond energies maximization, which yields X-H straight bonds and suggests the formation of appropriate sp hybrids on the central atom. An introduction to the electron charge distribution in molecules is given, and atomic, overlap, gross and formal charges are…

  10. Tunable random lasing behavior in plasmonic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Ashish; Zhong, Liubiao; Sun, Jun; Jiang, Lin; Cheng, Gary J.; Chi, Lifeng

    2017-01-01

    Random lasing is desired in plasmonics nanostructures through surface plasmon amplification. In this study, tunable random lasing behavior was observed in dye molecules attached with Au nanorods (NRs), Au nanoparticles (NPs) and Au@Ag nanorods (NRs) respectively. Our experimental investigations showed that all nanostructures i.e., Au@AgNRs, AuNRs & AuNPs have intensive tunable spectral effects. The random lasing has been observed at excitation wavelength 532 nm and varying pump powers. The best random lasing properties were noticed in Au@AgNRs structure, which exhibits broad absorption spectrum, sufficiently overlapping with that of dye Rhodamine B (RhB). Au@AgNRs significantly enhance the tunable spectral behavior through localized electromagnetic field and scattering. The random lasing in Au@AgNRs provides an efficient coherent feedback for random lasers.

  11. Disposable Plasmonics: Plastic Templated Plasmonic Metamaterials with Tunable Chirality.

    PubMed

    Karimullah, Affar S; Jack, Calum; Tullius, Ryan; Rotello, Vincent M; Cooke, Graeme; Gadegaard, Nikolaj; Barron, Laurence D; Kadodwala, Malcolm

    2015-10-07

    Development of low-cost disposable plasmonic substrates is vital for the applicability of plasmonic sensing. Such devices can be made using injection-molded templates to create plasmonic films. The elements of these plasmonic films are hybrid nanostructures composed of inverse and solid structures. Tuning the modal coupling between the two allows optimization of the optical properties for nanophotonic applications.

  12. Bent Bonds and Multiple Bonds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Edward A.; Gillespie, Ronald J.

    1980-01-01

    Considers carbon-carbon multiple bonds in terms of Pauling's bent bond model, which allows direct calculation of double and triple bonds from the length of a CC single bond. Lengths of these multiple bonds are estimated from direct measurements on "bent-bond" models constructed of plastic tubing and standard kits. (CS)

  13. Dynamic plasmonic colour display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Xiaoyang; Kamin, Simon; Liu, Na

    2017-02-01

    Plasmonic colour printing based on engineered metasurfaces has revolutionized colour display science due to its unprecedented subwavelength resolution and high-density optical data storage. However, advanced plasmonic displays with novel functionalities including dynamic multicolour printing, animations, and highly secure encryption have remained in their infancy. Here we demonstrate a dynamic plasmonic colour display technique that enables all the aforementioned functionalities using catalytic magnesium metasurfaces. Controlled hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of the constituent magnesium nanoparticles, which serve as dynamic pixels, allow for plasmonic colour printing, tuning, erasing and restoration of colour. Different dynamic pixels feature distinct colour transformation kinetics, enabling plasmonic animations. Through smart material processing, information encoded on selected pixels, which are indiscernible to both optical and scanning electron microscopies, can only be read out using hydrogen as a decoding key, suggesting a new generation of information encryption and anti-counterfeiting applications.

  14. Dynamic plasmonic colour display

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xiaoyang; Kamin, Simon; Liu, Na

    2017-01-01

    Plasmonic colour printing based on engineered metasurfaces has revolutionized colour display science due to its unprecedented subwavelength resolution and high-density optical data storage. However, advanced plasmonic displays with novel functionalities including dynamic multicolour printing, animations, and highly secure encryption have remained in their infancy. Here we demonstrate a dynamic plasmonic colour display technique that enables all the aforementioned functionalities using catalytic magnesium metasurfaces. Controlled hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of the constituent magnesium nanoparticles, which serve as dynamic pixels, allow for plasmonic colour printing, tuning, erasing and restoration of colour. Different dynamic pixels feature distinct colour transformation kinetics, enabling plasmonic animations. Through smart material processing, information encoded on selected pixels, which are indiscernible to both optical and scanning electron microscopies, can only be read out using hydrogen as a decoding key, suggesting a new generation of information encryption and anti-counterfeiting applications. PMID:28232722

  15. Ultraviolet surface plasmon-mediated low temperature hydrazine decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Siying; Sheldon, Matthew T.; Atwater, Harry A.; Liu, Wei-Guang; Jaramillo-Botero, Andres; Goddard, William Andrew

    2015-01-12

    Conventional methods require elevated temperatures in order to dissociate high-energy nitrogen bonds in precursor molecules such as ammonia or hydrazine used for nitride film growth. We report enhanced photodissociation of surface-absorbed hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}) molecules at low temperature by using ultraviolet surface plasmons to concentrate the exciting radiation. Plasmonic nanostructured aluminum substrates were designed to provide resonant near field concentration at λ = 248 nm (5 eV), corresponding to the maximum optical cross section for hydrogen abstraction from N{sub 2}H{sub 4}. We employed nanoimprint lithography to fabricate 1 mm × 1 mm arrays of the resonant plasmonic structures, and ultraviolet reflectance spectroscopy confirmed resonant extinction at 248 nm. Hydrazine was cryogenically adsorbed to the plasmonic substrate in a low-pressure ambient, and 5 eV surface plasmons were resonantly excited using a pulsed KrF laser. Mass spectrometry was used to characterize the photodissociation products and indicated a 6.2× overall enhancement in photodissociation yield for hydrazine adsorbed on plasmonic substrates compared with control substrates. The ultraviolet surface plasmon enhanced photodissociation demonstrated here may provide a valuable method to generate reactive precursors for deposition of nitride thin film materials at low temperatures.

  16. Active quantum plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Marinica, Dana Codruta; Zapata, Mario; Nordlander, Peter; Kazansky, Andrey K; M Echenique, Pedro; Aizpurua, Javier; Borisov, Andrei G

    2015-12-01

    The ability of localized surface plasmons to squeeze light and engineer nanoscale electromagnetic fields through electron-photon coupling at dimensions below the wavelength has turned plasmonics into a driving tool in a variety of technological applications, targeting novel and more efficient optoelectronic processes. In this context, the development of active control of plasmon excitations is a major fundamental and practical challenge. We propose a mechanism for fast and active control of the optical response of metallic nanostructures based on exploiting quantum effects in subnanometric plasmonic gaps. By applying an external dc bias across a narrow gap, a substantial change in the tunneling conductance across the junction can be induced at optical frequencies, which modifies the plasmonic resonances of the system in a reversible manner. We demonstrate the feasibility of the concept using time-dependent density functional theory calculations. Thus, along with two-dimensional structures, metal nanoparticle plasmonics can benefit from the reversibility, fast response time, and versatility of an active control strategy based on applied bias. The proposed electrical manipulation of light using quantum plasmonics establishes a new platform for many practical applications in optoelectronics.

  17. Active quantum plasmonics

    PubMed Central

    Marinica, Dana Codruta; Zapata, Mario; Nordlander, Peter; Kazansky, Andrey K.; M. Echenique, Pedro; Aizpurua, Javier; Borisov, Andrei G.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of localized surface plasmons to squeeze light and engineer nanoscale electromagnetic fields through electron-photon coupling at dimensions below the wavelength has turned plasmonics into a driving tool in a variety of technological applications, targeting novel and more efficient optoelectronic processes. In this context, the development of active control of plasmon excitations is a major fundamental and practical challenge. We propose a mechanism for fast and active control of the optical response of metallic nanostructures based on exploiting quantum effects in subnanometric plasmonic gaps. By applying an external dc bias across a narrow gap, a substantial change in the tunneling conductance across the junction can be induced at optical frequencies, which modifies the plasmonic resonances of the system in a reversible manner. We demonstrate the feasibility of the concept using time-dependent density functional theory calculations. Thus, along with two-dimensional structures, metal nanoparticle plasmonics can benefit from the reversibility, fast response time, and versatility of an active control strategy based on applied bias. The proposed electrical manipulation of light using quantum plasmonics establishes a new platform for many practical applications in optoelectronics. PMID:26824066

  18. Plasmonic-Electronic Transduction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-31

    Resonant terahertz absorption by plasmons in grating-gate GaN HEMT structures,” A. V. Muravjov, D. B. Veksler, X. Hu, R. Gaska, N. Pala, H. Saxena...Nov. 2009, Singapore. 4. “ Terahertz Plasmons in Grating-Gate AlGaN/ GaN HEMTs,” A.V. Muravjov, D.B. Veksler, V.V. Popov, M.S. Shur, N. Pala, X. Hu, R...CA (2009). 9. “Plasmon grating-gate GaN HEMT structures for terahertz applications,” A.V. Muravjov, D.B. Veksler, V.V. Popov, M.S. Shur, N. Pala

  19. Seeding for pervasively overlapping communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Conrad; Reid, Fergal; McDaid, Aaron; Hurley, Neil

    2011-06-01

    In some social and biological networks, the majority of nodes belong to multiple communities. It has recently been shown that a number of the algorithms specifically designed to detect overlapping communities do not perform well in such highly overlapping settings. Here, we consider one class of these algorithms, those which optimize a local fitness measure, typically by using a greedy heuristic to expand a seed into a community. We perform synthetic benchmarks which indicate that an appropriate seeding strategy becomes more important as the extent of community overlap increases. We find that distinct cliques provide the best seeds. We find further support for this seeding strategy with benchmarks on a Facebook network and the yeast interactome.

  20. EDITORIAL: Focus on terahertz plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahm, Marco; Nahata, Ajay; Akalin, Tahsin; Beruete, Miguel; Sorolla, Mario

    2015-10-01

    Plasmonics is one of the growing fields in modern photonics that has garnered increasing interest over the last few years. In this focus issue, the specific challenges concerning terahertz plasmonics have been addressed and most recent advances in this specific field have been highlighted. The articles demonstrate the diversity and the opportunities of this rich field by covering a variety of topics ranging from the propagation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) on artificially structures surfaces, 2D manipulation of surface plasmons and SPPs, plasmonic focusing, plasmonic high-Q resonators for sensing applications, plasmonically enhanced terahertz antennas to terahertz field manipulation by use of plasmonic structures. The articles substantiate the impact of plasmonics and its great innovative potential for terahertz technology. In memory of Professor Mario Sorolla Ayza.

  1. Hydrogen bonding in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Patricia A; Ashworth, Claire R; Matthews, Richard P

    2015-03-07

    Ionic liquids (IL) and hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) are two diverse fields for which there is a developing recognition of significant overlap. Doubly ionic H-bonds occur when a H-bond forms between a cation and anion, and are a key feature of ILs. Doubly ionic H-bonds represent a wide area of H-bonding which has yet to be fully recognised, characterised or explored. H-bonds in ILs (both protic and aprotic) are bifurcated and chelating, and unlike many molecular liquids a significant variety of distinct H-bonds are formed between different types and numbers of donor and acceptor sites within a given IL. Traditional more neutral H-bonds can also be formed in functionalised ILs, adding a further level of complexity. Ab initio computed parameters; association energies, partial charges, density descriptors as encompassed by the QTAIM methodology (ρBCP), qualitative molecular orbital theory and NBO analysis provide established and robust mechanisms for understanding and interpreting traditional neutral and ionic H-bonds. In this review the applicability and extension of these parameters to describe and quantify the doubly ionic H-bond has been explored. Estimating the H-bonding energy is difficult because at a fundamental level the H-bond and ionic interaction are coupled. The NBO and QTAIM methodologies, unlike the total energy, are local descriptors and therefore can be used to directly compare neutral, ionic and doubly ionic H-bonds. The charged nature of the ions influences the ionic characteristics of the H-bond and vice versa, in addition the close association of the ions leads to enhanced orbital overlap and covalent contributions. The charge on the ions raises the energy of the Ylp and lowers the energy of the X-H σ* NBOs resulting in greater charge transfer, strengthening the H-bond. Using this range of parameters and comparing doubly ionic H-bonds to more traditional neutral and ionic H-bonds it is clear that doubly ionic H-bonds cover the full range of weak

  2. Toward quantum plasmonic networks

    DOE PAGES

    Holtfrerich, M. W.; Dowran, M.; Davidson, R.; ...

    2016-08-30

    Here, we demonstrate the transduction of macroscopic quantum entanglement by independent, distant plasmonic structures embedded in separate thin silver films. In particular, we show that the plasmon-mediated transmission through each film conserves spatially dependent, entangled quantum images, opening the door for the implementation of parallel quantum protocols, super-resolution imaging, and quantum plasmonic sensing geometries at the nanoscale level. The conservation of quantum information by the transduction process shows that continuous variable multi-mode entanglement is momentarily transferred from entangled beams of light to the space-like separated, completely independent plasmonic structures, thus providing a first important step toward establishing a multichannel quantummore » network across separate solid-state substrates.« less

  3. Toward quantum plasmonic networks

    SciTech Connect

    Holtfrerich, M. W.; Dowran, M.; Davidson, R.; Lawrie, B. J.; Pooser, R. C.; Marino, A. M.

    2016-08-30

    Here, we demonstrate the transduction of macroscopic quantum entanglement by independent, distant plasmonic structures embedded in separate thin silver films. In particular, we show that the plasmon-mediated transmission through each film conserves spatially dependent, entangled quantum images, opening the door for the implementation of parallel quantum protocols, super-resolution imaging, and quantum plasmonic sensing geometries at the nanoscale level. The conservation of quantum information by the transduction process shows that continuous variable multi-mode entanglement is momentarily transferred from entangled beams of light to the space-like separated, completely independent plasmonic structures, thus providing a first important step toward establishing a multichannel quantum network across separate solid-state substrates.

  4. Surface Plasmon Based Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wig, Andrew; Passian, Ali; Boudreaux, Philip; Ferrell, Tom

    2008-03-01

    A spectrometer that uses surface plasmon excitation in thin metal films to separate light into its component wavelengths is described. The use of surface plasmons as a dispersive medium sets this spectrometer apart from prism, grating, and interference based variants and allows for the miniaturization of this device. Theoretical and experimental results are presented for two different operation models. In the first case surface plasmon tunneling in the near field is used to provide transmission spectra of different broad band-pass, glass filters across the visible wavelength range with high stray-light rejection at low resolution as well as absorption spectra of chlorophyll extracted from a spinach leaf. The second model looks at the far field components of surface plasmon scattering.

  5. Modern Introduction to Surface Plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarid, Dror; Challener, William

    2010-05-01

    1. Introduction; 2. Electromagnetics of planar surface waves; 3. Single-interface modes in the microwave regime; 4. Single-interface lossless modes in ɛr'-μr' parameter space; 5. Double-interface lossless modes in ɛr'-μr' parameter space; 6. Single-interface surface plasmons; 7. Double-interface surface plasmons in symmetric guides; 8. Quasi one-dimensional surface plasmons; 9. Localized surface plasmons; 10. Techniques for exciting surface plasmons; 11. Plasmonic materials; 12. Applications; Appendixes; Index.

  6. Plasmonics for nanoimaging and nanospectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kawata, Satoshi

    2013-02-01

    The science of surface plasmon polaritons, known as "plasmonics," is reviewed from the viewpoint of applied spectroscopy. In this discussion, noble metals are regarded as reservoirs of photons exhibiting the functions of photon confinement and field enhancement at metallic nanostructures. The functions of surface plasmons are described in detail with an historical overview, and the applications of plasmonics to a variety of industry and sciences are shown. The slow light effect of surface plasmons is also discussed for nanoimaging capability of the near-field optical microscopy and tip-enhanced Raman microscopy. The future issues of plasmonics are also shown, including metamaterials and the extension to the ultraviolet and terahertz regions.

  7. Shadow overlap ion-beam lithography for nanoarchitectures.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yeonho; Hong, Soongweon; Lee, Luke P

    2009-11-01

    Precisely constructed nanoscale devices and nanoarchitectures with high spatial resolution are critically needed for applications in high-speed electronics, high-density memory, efficient solar cells, optoelectronics, plasmonics, optical antennas, chemical sensors, biological sensors, and nanospectroscopic imaging. Current methods of classical optical lithography are limited by the diffraction effect of light for nanolithography, and the state of art of e-beam or focused ion beam lithography limit the throughput and further reduction less than few nanometers for large-area batch fabrication. However, these limits can be surpassed surprisingly by utilizing the overlap of two shadow images. Here we present shadow overlap of ion-beam lithography (SOIL), which can combine the advantages of parallel processing, tunable capability of geometries, cost-effective method, and high spatial resolution nanofabrication technique. The SOIL method relies on the overlap of shadows created by the directional metal deposition and etching angles on prepatterned structures. Consequently, highly tunable patterns can be obtained. As examples, unprecedented nanoarchitectures for optical antennas are demonstrated by SOIL. We expect that SOIL can have a significant impact not only on nanoscale devices, but also large-scale (i.e., micro and macro) three-dimensional innovative lithography.

  8. Exploring Coupled Plasmonic Nanostructures in the Near Field by Photoemission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Han; Sun, Quan; Ueno, Kosei; Oshikiri, Tomoya; Kubo, Atsushi; Matsuo, Yasutaka; Misawa, Hiroaki

    2016-11-22

    The extraordinary optical properties of coupled plasmonic nanostructures make these materials potentially useful in many applications; thus, they have received enormous attention in basic and applied research. Coupled plasmon modes have been characterized predominantly using far-field spectroscopy. In near-field spectroscopy, the spectral response of local field enhancement in coupled plasmonic nanostructures remains largely unexplored, especially experimentally. Here, we investigate the coupled gold dolmen nanostructures in the near field using photoemission electron microscopy, with wavelength-tunable femtosecond laser pulses as an excitation source. The spatial evolution of near-field mapping of an individual dolmen structure with the excitation wavelength was successfully obtained. In the near field, we spatially resolved an anti-bonding mode and a bonding mode as the result of plasmon hybridization. Additionally, the quadrupole plasmon mode that could be involved in the formation of a Fano resonance was also revealed by spatially resolved near-field spectra, but it only contributed little to the total near-field enhancement. On the basis of these findings, we obtained a better understanding of the near-field properties of coupled plasmonic nanostructures, where the plasmon hybridization and the plasmonic Fano resonance were mixed.

  9. Surface plasmon modes management by Thompson plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Nai Jing; Chau, Cheung Wai; Kit Yung, Sai; Yu, Kin Wah

    2012-02-01

    We have studied the dispersion and propagation of the surface plasmons in a structure consisting of a metal slab and a dielectric slab, the latter of which contains randomly distributed small metal particles. In our model, the metal material is characterized by the Drude model and the pudding structure is studied with Maxwell-Garnett effective medium theory. This construction of material can bring a new hybridized band in the dispersion relation where light has a relatively small group velocity. The geometric profile of volume fraction of metal balls in pudding structure can effectively change the behaviour of the plasmon propagation. For example, by adding a parabolic confinement, it is shown by the Hamiltonian optics that the light propagation is trapped, i.e., the light experiences an oscillation in a small space. Experimentally, the confinement condition can be achieved with various means, thus it may be useful in development of new mechanism of solar cell.

  10. Harnessing plasmonics for solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Martin A.; Pillai, Supriya

    2012-03-01

    Plasmons are free-electron oscillations in a conductor that allow light to be manipulated at the nanoscale. The ability of plasmons to guide and confine light on subwavelength scales is opening up new design possibilities for solar cells.

  11. Revealing the effect of plasmon transmutation on charge transfer plasmons in substrate-mediated metallodielectric aluminum clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nooshnab, Vida; Golmohammadi, Saeed

    2017-01-01

    Aluminum nanoparticle nanocomplexes have extensively been utilized for sustaining ultrastrong plasmonic bonding and antibonding resonant modes across the ultraviolet to visible spectrum. In this study, we analyze the plasmon response for two conventional symmetric heptamer and antisymmetric octamer antennas mediated by conductive film as a substrate to induce very sharp Fano-resonant mode at the high energy states. Besides, presence of an underlying conductive film in touching regime with the plasmonic nanoantennas leads to formation of charge transfer plasmons (CTPs) across the deep-UV band. It is also shown that presence of dielectric carbon nanospheres in the gap spots between proximal nanodisks gives rise to breaking the symmetry of the assemblies, while the new magnetic multipolar modes are induced and divided the Fano dip in two parts as well as formation of a couple of charge transfer plasmon resonant shoulders. The compactness and geometries of the clusters allow for inducing substantially strong resonant modes across the deep-UV domain. Our investigations provide new pathways and features for designing multifunctional molecular probes, biochemical sensors, and cathodoluminescence antennas across the UV spectrum. The proposed analysis were done using a blend of Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) calculations and transfer of plasmonic charges in nanoscale systems.

  12. Plasmon device design: Conversion from surface to junction plasmons with grating-couplers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, L. M.

    1984-01-01

    Scaling calculations and numerical studies are used to show that grating couplers provide effective energy transfer between surface plasmons and slower modes localized in the tunnel diodes. Within first order perturbation theory in grating amplitude, 90% efficiency energy transfer occurs within micrometers for realistic structures and materials parameters. Scaling laws are derived. Seventy to 90% of the electromagnetic field energy is concentrated in the oxide layer of an MOM diode after the energy is distributed by longer range modes that have less than 0.1% overlap with the tunneling region. The mode conversion allows the requirements separation for energy transport and power production by inelastic tunneling.

  13. Clique graphs and overlapping communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, T. S.

    2010-12-01

    It is shown how to construct a clique graph in which properties of cliques of a fixed order in a given graph are represented by vertices in a weighted graph. Various definitions and motivations for these weights are given. The detection of communities or clusters is used to illustrate how a clique graph may be exploited. In particular a benchmark network is shown where clique graphs find the overlapping communities accurately while vertex partition methods fail.

  14. Plasmonic polymers with strong chiroptical response for sensing molecular chirality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Dawei; Wang, Peng; Wang, Rong-Yao; Tian, Xiaorui; Ji, Yinglu; Zhao, Wenjing; Wang, Luming; Wei, Hong; Wu, Xiaochun; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2015-06-01

    We report on the chiroptical transfer and amplification effect observed in plasmonic polymers consisting of achiral gold nanorod monomers linked by cysteine chiral molecules in an end-to-end fashion. A new strategy for controlling the hot spots based circular dichroism (CD)-active sites in plasmonic polymers was developed to realize tailored and reproducible chiroptical activity in a controlled way. We showed that by regulating the bond angles between adjacent nanorods and the degree of polymerization in the linear plasmonic polymer, weak molecular chirality in the ultraviolet spectral region can be amplified by more than two orders of magnitude via the induced CD response in the visible/near infrared region. We demonstrate that this plasmonic polymer can be used to provide not only the Raman ``fingerprint'' information for identifying the molecular identity but also the CD signatures for (i) resolving the enantiomeric pairs of cysteine molecules at a small quantity level, and (ii) quantifying the enantiomeric purity of the chiral analytes. Chiral analyses by chiroptically responsive plasmonic polymers may find important applications in bioscience and biomedicine.We report on the chiroptical transfer and amplification effect observed in plasmonic polymers consisting of achiral gold nanorod monomers linked by cysteine chiral molecules in an end-to-end fashion. A new strategy for controlling the hot spots based circular dichroism (CD)-active sites in plasmonic polymers was developed to realize tailored and reproducible chiroptical activity in a controlled way. We showed that by regulating the bond angles between adjacent nanorods and the degree of polymerization in the linear plasmonic polymer, weak molecular chirality in the ultraviolet spectral region can be amplified by more than two orders of magnitude via the induced CD response in the visible/near infrared region. We demonstrate that this plasmonic polymer can be used to provide not only the Raman ``fingerprint

  15. Reconfigurable Nano-Plasmonics Holography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    nanostructures brought into the vicinity of propagating surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) will retard the SPP phase. SPP wavefronts could be manipulated in...a prototype Surface Plasmon Modulator (SPM) micro- electromechanical system (MEMS) designed to manipulate and shape a surface plasmon polariton (SPP...optical diffraction limit [2–9]. Surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) are electromagnetic waves that propagate at the interfaces between a metal and a

  16. Plasmons: Why Should We Care?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Dean J.; Xia, Younan

    2007-01-01

    The physical phenomenon of plasmons and the techniques that build upon them are discussed. Plasmon-enhanced applications are well-suited for introduction in physical chemistry and instrumental analysis classes and some methods of fabrication and analysis of plasmon-producing structures are simple for use in labs in general, physical and inorganic…

  17. Surface plasmon-coupled emission on plasmonic Bragg gratings.

    PubMed

    Toma, Mana; Toma, Koji; Adam, Pavel; Homola, Jiří; Knoll, Wolfgang; Dostálek, Jakub

    2012-06-18

    Surface plasmon-coupled emission (SPCE) from emitters in a close proximity to a plasmonic Bragg grating is investigated. In this study, the directional fluorescence emission mediated by Bragg-scattered surface plasmons and surface plasmons diffraction cross-coupled through a thin metallic film is observed by using the reverse Kretschmann configuration. We show that controlling of dispersion relation of these surface plasmon modes by tuning the refractive index at upper and lower interfaces of a dense sub-wavelength metallic grating enables selective reducing or increasing the intensity of the light emitted to certain directions. These observations may provide important leads for design of advanced plasmonic structures in applications areas of plasmon-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy and nanoscale optical sources.

  18. Gap plasmon excitation in plasmonic waveguide using Si waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuda, Koji; Kamada, Shun; Okamoto, Toshihiro; Haraguchi, Masanobu

    2016-08-01

    Plasmonic waveguides have attracted considerable attention for application in highly integrated optical circuits since they can confine light to areas smaller than the diffraction limit. In this context, in order to realize a highly integrated optical circuit, we fabricate and evaluate the optical characteristics of a poly(methyl methacrylate) junction positioned between Si and plasmonic waveguides. For the plasmonic waveguide, we employ a gap plasmonic waveguide in which the energy of the plasmonic wave can be confined in order to reduce the scattering loss at the junction. By experimental measurement, we determine the coupling efficiency between the Si and gap plasmonic waveguides and the propagation length at the gap plasmonic waveguide to be 52.4% and 11.1 µm, respectively. These values agree with those obtained by the three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain simulation. We believe that our findings can significantly contribute to the development of highly integrated optical circuits.

  19. Single Nanoparticle Plasmonic Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Sriram, Manish; Zong, Kelly; Vivekchand, S. R. C.; Gooding, J. Justin

    2015-01-01

    The adoption of plasmonic nanomaterials in optical sensors, coupled with the advances in detection techniques, has opened the way for biosensing with single plasmonic particles. Single nanoparticle sensors offer the potential to analyse biochemical interactions at a single-molecule level, thereby allowing us to capture even more information than ensemble measurements. We introduce the concepts behind single nanoparticle sensing and how the localised surface plasmon resonances of these nanoparticles are dependent upon their materials, shape and size. Then we outline the different synthetic approaches, like citrate reduction, seed-mediated and seedless growth, that enable the synthesis of gold and silver nanospheres, nanorods, nanostars, nanoprisms and other nanostructures with tunable sizes. Further, we go into the aspects related to purification and functionalisation of nanoparticles, prior to the fabrication of sensing surfaces. Finally, the recent developments in single nanoparticle detection, spectroscopy and sensing applications are discussed. PMID:26473866

  20. Nanowire Plasmon Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Leon, Nathalie; Shields, Brendan; Yu, Chun; Englund, Dirk; Akimov, Alexey; Lukin, Mikhail; Park, Hongkun

    2011-05-01

    Strong interactions between light and matter can be engineered by confining light to a small volume for an extended period of time. Nanoscale plasmonic structures can concentrate lighte well below the diffraction limit, but realization of small mode-volume plasmon cavities remains an outstanding challenge. We propose and demonstrate a new approach for realization of nanoscale plasmon resonators enabling strong light-matter interaction. In our approach, chemically synthesized silver nanowires are surrounded by patterned dielectric to create resonators with mode volumes that are two orders of magnitude below the diffraction limit and quality factors approaching 100. We show that they can be used to enhance spontaneous emission rates of CdSe quantum dots and single diamond nitrogen-vacancy centers by a factor larger than 20 at the cavity resonance.

  1. Active Nanorheology with Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyeon-Ho; Mark, Andrew G; Lee, Tung-Chun; Alarcón-Correa, Mariana; Eslami, Sahand; Qiu, Tian; Gibbs, John G; Fischer, Peer

    2016-08-10

    Nanoplasmonic systems are valued for their strong optical response and their small size. Most plasmonic sensors and systems to date have been rigid and passive. However, rendering these structures dynamic opens new possibilities for applications. Here we demonstrate that dynamic plasmonic nanoparticles can be used as mechanical sensors to selectively probe the rheological properties of a fluid in situ at the nanoscale and in microscopic volumes. We fabricate chiral magneto-plasmonic nanocolloids that can be actuated by an external magnetic field, which in turn allows for the direct and fast modulation of their distinct optical response. The method is robust and allows nanorheological measurements with a mechanical sensitivity of ∼0.1 cP, even in strongly absorbing fluids with an optical density of up to OD ∼ 3 (∼0.1% light transmittance) and in the presence of scatterers (e.g., 50% v/v red blood cells).

  2. Rapid adhesive bonding of advanced composites and titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, B. A.; Tyeryart, J. R.; Hodgest, W. T.

    1985-01-01

    Rapid adhesive bonding (RAB) concepts utilize a toroid induction technique to heat the adhesive bond line directly. This technique was used to bond titanium overlap shear specimens with 3 advanced thermoplastic adhesives and APC-2 (graphite/PEEK) composites with PEEK film. Bond strengths equivalent to standard heated-platen press bonds were produced with large reductions in process time. RAB produced very strong bonds in APC-2 adherend specimens; the APC-2 adherends were highly resistant to delamination. Thermal cycling did not significantly affect the shear strengths of RAB titanium bonds with polyimide adhesives. A simple ultrasonic non-destructive evaluation process was found promising for evaluating bond quality.

  3. Sticker Bonding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Laura Corbin

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a science activity on the bonding of chemical compounds. Assigns students the role of either a cation or anion and asks them to write the ions they may bond with. Assesses students' understanding of charge, bonding, and other concepts. (YDS)

  4. Hospital mergers and market overlap.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, G R; Jones, V G

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To address two questions: What are the characteristics of hospitals that affect the likelihood of their being involved in a merger? What characteristics of particular pairs of hospitals affect the likelihood of the pair engaging in a merger? DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING: Hospitals in the 12 county region surrounding the San Francisco Bay during the period 1983 to 1992 were the focus of the study. Data were drawn from secondary sources, including the Lexis/Nexis database, the American Hospital Association, and the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development of the State of California. STUDY DESIGN: Seventeen hospital mergers during the study period were identified. A random sample of pairs of hospitals that did not merge was drawn to establish a statistically efficient control set. Models constructed from hypotheses regarding hospital and market characteristics believed to be related to merger likelihood were tested using logistic regression analysis. DATA COLLECTION: See Data Sources/Study Setting. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The analysis shows that the likelihood of a merger between a particular pair of hospitals is positively related to the degree of market overlap that exists between them. Furthermore, market overlap and performance difference interact in their effect on merger likelihood. In an analysis of individual hospitals, conditions of rivalry, hospital market share, and hospital size were not found to influence the likelihood that a hospital will engage in a merger. CONCLUSIONS: Mergers between hospitals are not driven directly by considerations of market power or efficiency as much as by the existence of specific merger opportunities in the hospitals' local markets. Market overlap is a condition that enables a merger to occur, but other factors, such as the relative performance levels of the hospitals in question and their ownership and teaching status, also play a role in influencing the likelihood that a merger will in fact take place. PMID

  5. Terahertz plasmonic Bessel beamformer

    SciTech Connect

    Monnai, Yasuaki; Shinoda, Hiroyuki; Jahn, David; Koch, Martin; Withayachumnankul, Withawat

    2015-01-12

    We experimentally demonstrate terahertz Bessel beamforming based on the concept of plasmonics. The proposed planar structure is made of concentric metallic grooves with a subwavelength spacing that couple to a point source to create tightly confined surface waves or spoof surface plasmon polaritons. Concentric scatterers periodically incorporated at a wavelength scale allow for launching the surface waves into free space to define a Bessel beam. The Bessel beam defined at 0.29 THz has been characterized through terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. This approach is capable of generating Bessel beams with planar structures as opposed to bulky axicon lenses and can be readily integrated with solid-state terahertz sources.

  6. Plasmonics: Future Outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    Plasma resonance in metals exhibits some unique optical phenomena that occur on the surface of metal with nanostructures. The use of surface plasmons has been proposed in various fields, such as nanometer-resolution near-field optical microscopy, nanoscale optical circuits, single-molecule detection, molecular sensors, cancer treatment, solar cells, lasers, and holography. The study of plasma resonance is called “plasmonics” and is expected as a new field of nanophotonics. In this report, I review the principles and limits of plasmonics and give a future outlook.

  7. Nanoporous plasmonic metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, J; Nyce, G W; Hodge, A M; Biener, M M; Hamza, A V; Maier, S A

    2007-05-24

    We review different routes for the generation of nanoporous metallic foams and films exhibiting well-defined pore size and short-range order. Dealloying and templating allows the generation of both two- and three-dimensional structures which promise a well defined plasmonic response determined by material constituents and porosity. Viewed in the context of metamaterials, the ease of fabrication of samples covering macroscopic dimensions is highly promising, and suggests more in-depth investigations of the plasmonic and photonic properties of this material system for photonic applications.

  8. Plasmonic transparent conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liapis, Andreas C.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Black, Charles T.

    2016-09-01

    Many of today's technological applications, such as solar cells, light-emitting diodes, displays, and touch screens, require materials that are simultaneously optically transparent and electrically conducting. Here we explore transparent conductors based on the excitation of surface plasmons in nanostructured metal films. We measure both the optical and electrical properties of films perforated with nanometer-scale features and optimize the design parameters in order to maximize optical transmission without sacrificing electrical conductivity. We demonstrate that plasmonic transparent conductors can out-perform indium tin oxide in terms of both their transparency and their conductivity.

  9. Arbitrary bending plasmonic light waves.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Itai; Arie, Ady

    2014-01-17

    We demonstrate the generation of self-accelerating surface plasmon beams along arbitrary caustic curvatures. These plasmonic beams are excited by free-space beams through a two-dimensional binary plasmonic phase mask, which provides the missing momentum between the two beams in the direction of propagation and sets the required phase for the plasmonic beam in the transverse direction. We examine the cases of paraxial and nonparaxial curvatures and show that this highly versatile scheme can be designed to produce arbitrary plasmonic self-accelerating beams. Several different plasmonic beams, which accelerate along polynomial and exponential trajectories, are demonstrated both numerically and experimentally, with a direct measurement of the plasmonic light intensity using a near-field scanning optical microscope.

  10. “Deterministic” quantum plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Cuche, Aurélien; Mollet, Oriane; Drezet, Aurélien; Huant, Serge

    2010-11-10

    We demonstrate “deterministic” launching of propagative quantum surface-plasmon polaritons at freely chosen positions on gold plasmonic receptacles. This is achieved by using as a plasmon launcher a near-field scanning optical source made of a diamond nanocrystal with two nitrogen-vacancy color-center occupancy. Our demonstration relies on leakage-radiation microscopy of a thin homogeneous gold film and on near-field optical microscopy of a nanostructured thick gold film. Our work paves the way to future fundamental studies and applications in quantum plasmonics that require an accurate positioning of single-plasmon sources and may open a new branch in plasmonics and nanophotonics, namely scanning quantum plasmonics.

  11. Overlap in Facebook Profiles Reflects Relationship Closeness.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, Araceli M; Wendel, Markie L; Crockett, Erin E

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the association between self-reported Inclusion of Other in the Self (IOS) and Facebook overlap. Ninety-two participants completed online measures of IOS and investment model constructs. Researchers then recorded Facebook data from participants' profile pages. Results from multilevel models revealed that IOS predicted Facebook overlap. Furthermore, Facebook overlap was associated with commitment and investment in ways comparable to self-reported IOS. These findings suggest that overlap in Facebook profiles can be used to measure relationship closeness.

  12. Electrochemically Programmable Plasmonic Antennas.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shi; Zhang, Kai; Yu, Zhiping; Fan, Jonathan A

    2016-07-26

    Plasmonic antennas are building blocks in advanced nano-optical systems due to their ability to tailor optical response based on their geometry. We propose an electrochemical approach to program the optical properties of dipole antennas in a scalable, fast, and energy-efficient manner. These antennas comprise two arms, one serving as an anode and the other a cathode, separated by a solid electrolyte. As a voltage is applied between the antenna arms, a conductive filament either grows or dissolves within the electrolyte, modifying the antenna load. We probe the dynamics of stochastic filament formation and their effects on plasmonic mode programming using a combination of three-dimensional optical and electronic simulations. In particular, we identify device operation regimes in which the charge-transfer plasmon mode can be programmed to be "on" or "off." We also identify, unexpectedly, a strong correlation between DC filament resistance and charge-transfer plasmon mode frequency that is insensitive to the detailed filament morphology. We envision that the scalability of our electrochemical platform can generalize to large-area reconfigurable metamaterials and metasurfaces for on-chip and free-space applications.

  13. Femtosecond plasmon interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melentiev, Pavel N.; Kuzin, Artur A.; Gritchenko, Anton S.; Kalmykov, Alexey S.; Balykin, Victor I.

    2017-01-01

    We have realized a plasmonic interferometer formed by a nanoslit and a nanogroove in a single-crystal gold film. The possibility of measuring laser pulses of ultimately short durations, corresponding to two periods of a light wave (6 fs pulse duration), has been demonstrated using this interferometer.

  14. Photocatalysis: Plasmonic solar desalination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tianyu; Li, Yat

    2016-06-01

    The sustainability of many existing desalination technologies is questionable. Plasmon-mediated solar desalination has now been demonstrated for the first time, using an aluminium structure that absorbs photons spanning the 200 nm to 2,500 nm wavelength range, and is both cheap and 'clean'.

  15. Plasmonics for the industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lütolf, Fabian; Basset, Guillaume; Casari, Daniele; Luu-Dinh, Angélique; Gallinet, Benjamin

    2015-08-01

    Metallic nanostructures interact strongly with light through surface plasmon modes and many application fields have been proposed during the past decade, including light harvesting, sensing and structural colors. However, their implementation for the industry requires the development of up scalable and cost effective manufacturing processes. The fabrication at wafer scale of plasmonic nanostructures and metamaterials using nano imprint lithography is reported. After structuring, the evaporation of various plasmonic materials are performed with a tilt angle with respect to the substrate, which increases the light interactions with the different metallic layers as well as enlarges the design possibilities. A step and repeat process is used to increase further the area of nanostructured surface. The measured optical properties of the fabricated structures show a very good agreement compared to numerical calculations using the rigorous coupled wave analysis. These numerical calculations together which structural characterization, increase the process control and enable the design of the nanostructures for specific applications. In particular, nanostructures with a shape similar to split ring resonators and which support high order plasmonic modes showing Fano resonances are shown to be promising for sensing applications. The structures were designed in such a way to have a strong spectral response in the blue/green region of the visible spectrum. Examples of refractive index sensors and stretch sensors were finally discussed.

  16. Plasmonic colour laser printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Vannahme, Christoph; Højlund-Nielsen, Emil; Mortensen, N. Asger; Kristensen, Anders

    2016-04-01

    Colour generation by plasmonic nanostructures and metasurfaces has several advantages over dye technology: reduced pixel area, sub-wavelength resolution and the production of bright and non-fading colours. However, plasmonic colour patterns need to be pre-designed and printed either by e-beam lithography (EBL) or focused ion beam (FIB), both expensive and not scalable processes that are not suitable for post-processing customization. Here we show a method of colour printing on nanoimprinted plasmonic metasurfaces using laser post-writing. Laser pulses induce transient local heat generation that leads to melting and reshaping of the imprinted nanostructures. Depending on the laser pulse energy density, different surface morphologies that support different plasmonic resonances leading to different colour appearances can be created. Using this technique we can print all primary colours with a speed of 1 ns per pixel, resolution up to 127,000 dots per inch (DPI) and power consumption down to 0.3 nJ per pixel.

  17. Plasmonic polymers with strong chiroptical response for sensing molecular chirality.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Dawei; Wang, Peng; Wang, Rong-Yao; Tian, Xiaorui; Ji, Yinglu; Zhao, Wenjing; Wang, Luming; Wei, Hong; Wu, Xiaochun; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2015-06-28

    We report on the chiroptical transfer and amplification effect observed in plasmonic polymers consisting of achiral gold nanorod monomers linked by cysteine chiral molecules in an end-to-end fashion. A new strategy for controlling the hot spots based circular dichroism (CD)-active sites in plasmonic polymers was developed to realize tailored and reproducible chiroptical activity in a controlled way. We showed that by regulating the bond angles between adjacent nanorods and the degree of polymerization in the linear plasmonic polymer, weak molecular chirality in the ultraviolet spectral region can be amplified by more than two orders of magnitude via the induced CD response in the visible/near infrared region. We demonstrate that this plasmonic polymer can be used to provide not only the Raman "fingerprint" information for identifying the molecular identity but also the CD signatures for (i) resolving the enantiomeric pairs of cysteine molecules at a small quantity level, and (ii) quantifying the enantiomeric purity of the chiral analytes. Chiral analyses by chiroptically responsive plasmonic polymers may find important applications in bioscience and biomedicine.

  18. Solar-Powered Plasmon-Enhanced Heterogeneous Catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naldoni, Alberto; Riboni, Francesca; Guler, Urcan; Boltasseva, Alexandra; Shalaev, Vladimir M.; Kildishev, Alexander V.

    2016-06-01

    Photocatalysis uses semiconductors to convert sunlight into chemical energy. Recent reports have shown that plasmonic nanostructures can be used to extend semiconductor light absorption or to drive direct photocatalysis with visible light at their surface. In this review, we discuss the fundamental decay pathway of localized surface plasmons in the context of driving solar-powered chemical reactions. We also review different nanophotonic approaches demonstrated for increasing solar-to-hydrogen conversion in photoelectrochemical water splitting, including experimental observations of enhanced reaction selectivity for reactions occurring at the metalsemiconductor interface. The enhanced reaction selectivity is highly dependent on the morphology, electronic properties, and spatial arrangement of composite nanostructures and their elements. In addition, we report on the particular features of photocatalytic reactions evolving at plasmonic metal surfaces and discuss the possibility of manipulating the reaction selectivity through the activation of targeted molecular bonds. Finally, using solar-to-hydrogen conversion techniques as an example, we quantify the efficacy metrics achievable in plasmon-driven photoelectrochemical systems and highlight some of the new directions that could lead to the practical implementation of solar-powered plasmon-based catalytic devices.

  19. Resonance coupling in plasmonic nanomatryoshka homo- and heterodimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadivand, Arash; Sinha, Raju; Pala, Nezih

    2016-06-01

    Here, we examine the electromagnetic (EM) energy coupling and hybridization of plasmon resonances between closely spaced concentric nanoshells known as "nanomatryoshka" (NM) units in symmetric and antisymmetric compositions using the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) analysis. Utilizing plasmon hybridization model, we calculated the energy level diagrams and verified that, in the symmetric dimer (in-phase mode in a homodimer), plasmonic bonding modes are dominant and tunable within the considered bandwidth. In contrast, in the antisymmetric dimer (out-of-phase mode in a heterodimer), due to the lack of the geometrical symmetry, new antibonding modes appear in the extinction profile, and this condition gives rise to repeal of dipolar field coupling. We also studied the extinction spectra and positions of the antibonding and bonding modes excited due to the energy coupling between silver and gold NM units in a heterodimer structure. Our analysis suggest abnormal shifts in the higher energy modes. We propose a method to analyze the behavior of multilayer concentric nanoshell particles in an antisymmetric orientation employing full dielectric function calculations and the Drude model based on interband transitions in metallic components. This study provides a method to predict the behavior of the higher energy plasmon resonant modes in entirely antisymmetric structures such as compositional heterodimers.

  20. Quantum Mode Selectivity of Plasmon-Induced Water Splitting on Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lei; Wang, Fangwei; Meng, Sheng

    2016-05-24

    Plasmon induced water splitting is a promising research area with the potential for efficient conversion of solar to chemical energy, yet its atomic mechanism is not well understood. Here, ultrafast electron-nuclear dynamics of water splitting on gold nanoparticles upon exposure to femtosecond laser pulses was directly simulated using real time time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). Strong correlation between laser intensity, hot electron transfer, and reaction rates has been identified. The rate of water splitting is dependent not only on respective optical absorption strength, but also on the quantum oscillation mode of plasmonic excitation. Odd modes are more efficient than even modes, owing to faster decaying into hot electrons whose energy matches well the antibonding orbital of water. This finding suggests photocatalytic activity can be manipulated by adjusting the energy level of plasmon-induced hot carriers, through altering the cluster size and laser parameter, to better overlap adsorbate unoccupied level in plasmon-assisted photochemistry.

  1. Plasmonic Periodic Nanodot Arrays via Laser Interference Lithography for Organic Photovoltaic Cells with >10% Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Oh, Yulin; Lim, Ju Won; Kim, Jae Geun; Wang, Huan; Kang, Byung-Hyun; Park, Young Wook; Kim, Heejun; Jang, Yu Jin; Kim, Jihyeon; Kim, Dong Ha; Ju, Byeong-Kwon

    2016-11-22

    In this study, we demonstrate a viable and promising optical engineering technique enabling the development of high-performance plasmonic organic photovoltaic devices. Laser interference lithography was explored to fabricate metal nanodot (MND) arrays with elaborately controlled dot size as well as periodicity, allowing spectral overlap between the absorption range of the active layers and the surface plasmon band of MND arrays. MND arrays with ∼91 nm dot size and ∼202 nm periodicity embedded in a poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) hole transport layer remarkably enhanced the average power conversion efficiency (PCE) from 7.52% up to 10.11%, representing one of the highest PCE and degree of enhancement (∼34.4%) levels compared to the pristine device among plasmonic organic photovoltaics reported to date. The plasmonic enhancement mechanism was investigated by both optical and electrical analyses using finite difference time domain simulation and conductive atomic force microscopy studies.

  2. Metallic adhesion layer induced plasmon damping and molecular linker as a nondamping alternative.

    PubMed

    Habteyes, Terefe G; Dhuey, Scott; Wood, Erin; Gargas, Daniel; Cabrini, Stefano; Schuck, P James; Alivisatos, A Paul; Leone, Stephen R

    2012-06-26

    Drastic chemical interface plasmon damping is induced by the ultrathin (∼2 nm) titanium (Ti) adhesion layer; alternatively, molecular adhesion is implemented for lithographic fabrication of plasmonic nanostructures without significant distortion of the plasmonic characteristics. As determined from the homogeneous linewidth of the resonance scattering spectrum of individual gold nanorods, an ultrathin Ti layer reduces the plasmon dephasing time significantly, and it reduces the plasmon scattering amplitude drastically. The increased damping rate and decreased plasmon amplitude are due to the dissipative dielectric function of Ti and the chemical interface plasmon damping where the conduction electrons are transferred across the metal-metal interface. In addition, a pronounced red shift due to the Ti adhesion layer, more than predicted using electromagnetic simulation, suggests the prevalence of interfacial reactions. By extending the experiment to conductively coupled ring-rod nanostructures, it is shown that a sharp Fano-like resonance feature is smeared out due to the Ti layer. Alternatively, vapor deposition of (3-mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane on gently cleaned and activated lithographic patterns functionalizes the glass surface sufficiently to link the gold nanostructures to the surface by sulfur-gold chemical bonds without observable plasmon damping effects.

  3. Cathodoluminescence plasmon microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttge, M.

    2009-03-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) are electromagnetic waves that are strongly coupled to the collective oscillation of free electrons at an interface between a dielectric and a metal. Strong confinement of the electromagnetic field and tunability of SPP dispersion allow two-dimensional optics. This thesis focuses on acquiring fundamental understanding of the generation and confinement of SPPs using electron beam irradiation. SPPs are generated using the focused electron beam of a scanning electron microscope. The electron beam acts as point source for circular SPP waves. The resulting emission is detected using a cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy setup The CL emission in front of a grating patterned in an otherwise planar gold surface shows oscillations with distance from the grating. These oscillations are caused by the coherent interaction of transition radiation and SPPs scattered by the grating, which leads to interference in the far field. We present a detailed theoretical analysis that successfully explains the measured CL signal. A connection between the CL signal and the photonic local density of states associated to SPPs is established. The SPP damping was determined by measuring the decay of the CL intensity on a line scan perpendicular to gratings fabricated into the surface. We find that the propagation length for single-crystalline gold is in agreement with calculations based on dielectric constants while for poly-crystalline films the propagation length is reduced. Scattering of SPPs at grain boundaries is identified as additional loss mechanism. We have numerically studied the reflectivity for SPPs of single grooves structured into the surface. Using FDTD calculations we find that the reflectivity shows resonances that are related to localized groove modes. The groove reflectivity is the result of coupling of the incident plasmon wave to the localized modes that then reradiate to cause a reflected plasmon wave. Two parallel grooves structured

  4. Overlapping structures in sensory-motor mappings.

    PubMed

    Earland, Kevin; Lee, Mark; Shaw, Patricia; Law, James

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines a biologically-inspired representation technique designed for the support of sensory-motor learning in developmental robotics. An interesting feature of the many topographic neural sheets in the brain is that closely packed receptive fields must overlap in order to fully cover a spatial region. This raises interesting scientific questions with engineering implications: e.g. is overlap detrimental? does it have any benefits? This paper examines the effects and properties of overlap between elements arranged in arrays or maps. In particular we investigate how overlap affects the representation and transmission of spatial location information on and between topographic maps. Through a series of experiments we determine the conditions under which overlap offers advantages and identify useful ranges of overlap for building mappings in cognitive robotic systems. Our motivation is to understand the phenomena of overlap in order to provide guidance for application in sensory-motor learning robots.

  5. Overlapping Structures in Sensory-Motor Mappings

    PubMed Central

    Earland, Kevin; Lee, Mark; Shaw, Patricia; Law, James

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines a biologically-inspired representation technique designed for the support of sensory-motor learning in developmental robotics. An interesting feature of the many topographic neural sheets in the brain is that closely packed receptive fields must overlap in order to fully cover a spatial region. This raises interesting scientific questions with engineering implications: e.g. is overlap detrimental? does it have any benefits? This paper examines the effects and properties of overlap between elements arranged in arrays or maps. In particular we investigate how overlap affects the representation and transmission of spatial location information on and between topographic maps. Through a series of experiments we determine the conditions under which overlap offers advantages and identify useful ranges of overlap for building mappings in cognitive robotic systems. Our motivation is to understand the phenomena of overlap in order to provide guidance for application in sensory-motor learning robots. PMID:24392118

  6. High-Q plasmonic bottle microresonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Nasir, M. Narizee; Ding, Ming; Murugan, G. Senthil; Zervas, Michalis N.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a hybrid plasmonic bottle microresonator (PBMR) which supports whispering gallery modes (WGMs) along with surface plasmon waves (SPWs) for high performance optical sensor applications. The BMR was fabricated through "soften-and-compress" technique with a thin gold layer deposited on top of the resonator. A polarization-resolved measurement was set-up in order to fully characterize the fabricated PBMR. Initially, the uncoated BMR with waist diameter of 181 μm, stem diameter of 125 μm and length of 400 μm was fabricated and then gold film was deposited on the surface. Due to surface curvature, the gold film covering half of the BMR had a characteristic meniscus shape and maximum thickness of 30 nm. The meniscus provides appropriately tapered edges which facilitate the adiabatic transformation of BMR WGMs to SPWs and vice versa. This results in low transition losses, which combined with partially-metal-coated resonator, can result in high hybrid-PBMR Q's. The transmission spectra of the hybrid PBMR are dramatically different to the original uncoated BMR. Under TE(TM) excitation, the PBMR showed composite resonances with Q of ~2100(850) and almost identical ~ 3 nm FSR. We have accurately fitted the observed transmission resonances with Lorentzian-shaped curves and showed that the TE and TM excitations are actually composite resonances comprise of two and three partially overlapping resonances with Q's in excess of 2900 and 2500, respectively. To the best of our knowledge these are the highest Qs observed in plasmonic microcavities.

  7. Hybrid photonic-plasmonic molecule based on metal/Si disks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Zhao, Hang; Du, Xu; Zhang, Weichun; Qiu, Min; Li, Qiang

    2013-05-06

    Optical properties of two identical coupled disks forming a "hybrid photonic-plasmonic molecule" are investigated. Each disk is a metal-dielectric structure supporting hybrid plasmonic-photonic whispering-gallery (WG) modes. The WG modes of a molecule split into two groups of nearly-degenerate modes, i.e., bonding and anti-bonding modes. The oscillation of quality factor (Q) with the inter-disk gap d and significant enhancement at certain inter-disk gaps can be observed. An enhanced Q factor of 1821 for a hybrid photonic-plasmonic molecule composed of two 1.2 μm-diameter disks, compared with that for a single disk, is achieved. The corresponding Purcell factor is 191, making the hybrid photonic-plasmonic molecule an optimal choice for subwavelength-scale device miniaturization and light-matter interactions. Moreover, the far-field emission pattern of the hybrid photonic-plasmonic molecule exhibits an enhanced directional light output by tuning the azimuthal mode number for both bonding and anti-bonding modes.

  8. The dark side of plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Gómez, D E; Teo, Z Q; Altissimo, M; Davis, T J; Earl, S; Roberts, A

    2013-08-14

    Plasmonic dark modes are pure near-field modes that can arise from the plasmon hybridization in a set of interacting nanoparticles. When compared to bright modes, dark modes have longer lifetimes due to their lack of a net dipole moment, making them attractive for a number of applications. We demonstrate the excitation and optical detection of a collective dark plasmonic mode from individual plasmonic trimers. The trimers consist of triangular arrangements of gold nanorods, and due to this symmetry, the lowest-energy dark plasmonic mode can interact with radially polarized light. The experimental data presented confirm the excitation of this mode, and its assignment is supported with an electrostatic approximation wherein these dark modes are described in terms of plasmon hybridization. The strong confinement of energy in these modes and their associated near fields hold great promise for achieving strong coupling to single photon emitters.

  9. Band Structures of Plasmonic Polarons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruso, Fabio; Lambert, Henry; Giustino, Feliciano

    2015-03-01

    In angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), the acceleration of a photo-electron upon photon absorption may trigger shake-up excitations in the sample, leading to the emission of phonons, electron-hole pairs, and plasmons, the latter being collective charge-density fluctuations. Using state-of-the-art many-body calculations based on the `GW plus cumulant' approach, we show that electron-plasmon interactions induce plasmonic polaron bands in group IV transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers (MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, WSe2). We find that the energy vs. momentum dispersion relations of these plasmonic structures closely follow the standard valence bands, although they appear broadened and blueshifted by the plasmon energy. Based on our results we identify general criteria for observing plasmonic polaron bands in the angle-resolved photoelectron spectra of solids.

  10. Tunneling Plasmonics in Bilayer Graphene.

    PubMed

    Fei, Z; Iwinski, E G; Ni, G X; Zhang, L M; Bao, W; Rodin, A S; Lee, Y; Wagner, M; Liu, M K; Dai, S; Goldflam, M D; Thiemens, M; Keilmann, F; Lau, C N; Castro-Neto, A H; Fogler, M M; Basov, D N

    2015-08-12

    We report experimental signatures of plasmonic effects due to electron tunneling between adjacent graphene layers. At subnanometer separation, such layers can form either a strongly coupled bilayer graphene with a Bernal stacking or a weakly coupled double-layer graphene with a random stacking order. Effects due to interlayer tunneling dominate in the former case but are negligible in the latter. We found through infrared nanoimaging that bilayer graphene supports plasmons with a higher degree of confinement compared to single- and double-layer graphene, a direct consequence of interlayer tunneling. Moreover, we were able to shut off plasmons in bilayer graphene through gating within a wide voltage range. Theoretical modeling indicates that such a plasmon-off region is directly linked to a gapped insulating state of bilayer graphene, yet another implication of interlayer tunneling. Our work uncovers essential plasmonic properties in bilayer graphene and suggests a possibility to achieve novel plasmonic functionalities in graphene few-layers.

  11. Tunneling Plasmonics in Bilayer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Z.; Iwinski, E. G.; Ni, G. X.; Zhang, L. M.; Bao, W.; Rodin, A. S.; Lee, Y.; Wagner, M.; Liu, M. K.; Dai, S.; Goldflam, M. D.; Thiemens, M.; Keilmann, F.; Lau, C. N.; Castro-Neto, A. H.; Fogler, M. M.; Basov, D. N.

    2015-08-01

    We report experimental signatures of plasmonic effects due to electron tunneling between adjacent graphene layers. At sub-nanometer separation, such layers can form either a strongly coupled bilayer graphene with a Bernal stacking or a weakly coupled double-layer graphene with a random stacking order. Effects due to interlayer tunneling dominate in the former case but are negligible in the latter. We found through infrared nano-imaging that bilayer graphene supports plasmons with a higher degree of confinement compared to single- and double-layer graphene, a direct consequence of interlayer tunneling. Moreover, we were able to shut off plasmons in bilayer graphene through gating within a wide voltage range. Theoretical modeling indicates that such a plasmon-off region is directly linked to a gapped insulating state of bilayer graphene: yet another implication of interlayer tunneling. Our work uncovers essential plasmonic properties in bilayer graphene and suggests a possibility to achieve novel plasmonic functionalities in graphene few-layers.

  12. Spectral dependence of fluorescence near plasmon resonant metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yeechi

    The optical properties of fluorophores are significantly modified when placed within the near field (0--100 nm) of plasmon resonant metal nanostructures, due to the competition between increased decay rates and "hotspots" of concentrated electric fields. The decay rates and effective electric field intensities are highly dependent on the relative position of dye and metal and the overlap between plasmon resonance and dye absorption and emission. Understanding these dependencies can greatly improve the performance of biosensing and nanophotonic devices. In this dissertation, the fluorescence intensity of organic dyes and CdSe quantum dots near single metal nanoparticles is studied as a function of the local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of the nanoparticle. Single metal nanoparticles have narrow, well-defined, intense local surface plasmon resonances that are tunable across the visible spectrum by changes in size and shape. First, we show that organic dyes can be self-assembled on single silver nanoprisms into known configurations by the hybridization of thiolated DNA oligomers. We correlate the fluorescence intensity of the dyes to the LSPR of the individual nanoprism to which they are attached. For each of three different organic dyes, we observe a strong correlation between the fluorescence intensity of the dye and the degree of spectral overlap with the plasmon resonance of the nanoparticle. On average, we observe the brightest fluorescence from dyes attached to metal nanoparticles that have a LSPR scattering peak 40--120 meV higher in energy than the emission peak of the fluorophore. Second, the plasmon-enhanced fluorescence from CdSe/CdS/CdZnS/ZnS core/shell quantum dots is studied near a variety of silver and gold nanoparticles. With single-particle scattering spectroscopy, the localized surface plasmon resonance spectra of single metal nanoparticles is correlated with the photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectra of the nearby quantum dots. The PLE

  13. Plasmonic fiber-optic vector magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaochuan; Guo, Tuan; Zhang, Xuejun; Xu, Jian; Xie, Wenping; Nie, Ming; Wu, Qiang; Guan, Bai-Ou; Albert, Jacques

    2016-03-01

    A compact fiber-optic vector magnetometer based on directional scattering between polarized plasmon waves and ferro-magnetic nanoparticles is demonstrated. The sensor configuration reported in this work uses a short section of tilted fiber Bragg grating (TFBG) coated with a nanometer scale gold film and packaged with a magnetic fluid (Fe3O4) inside a capillary. The transmission spectrum of the sensor provides a fine comb of narrowband resonances that overlap with a broader absorption of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The wavelength of the SPR attenuation in transmission shows high sensitivity to slight perturbations by magnetic fields, due to the strong directional scattering between the SPR attenuated cladding modes and the magnetic fluid near the fiber surface. Both the orientation (2 nm/deg) and the intensity (1.8 nm/mT) of magnetic fields can be determined unambiguously from the TFBG spectrum. Temperature cross sensitivity can be referenced out by monitoring the wavelength of the core mode resonance simultaneously.

  14. Gold nanorod plasmonic upconversion microlaser.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ce; Soltani, Soheil; Armani, Andrea M

    2013-01-01

    Plasmonic-photonic interactions have stimulated significant interdisciplinary interest, leading to rapid innovations in solar design and biosensors. However, the development of an optically pumped plasmonic laser has failed to keep pace due to the difficulty of integrating a plasmonic gain material with a suitable pump source. In the present work, we develop a method for coating high quality factor toroidal optical cavities with gold nanorods, forming a photonic-plasmonic laser. By leveraging the two-photon upconversion capability of the nanorods, lasing at 581 nm with a 20 μW threshold is demonstrated.

  15. Plasmonics for improved photovoltaic devices.

    PubMed

    Atwater, Harry A; Polman, Albert

    2010-03-01

    The emerging field of plasmonics has yielded methods for guiding and localizing light at the nanoscale, well below the scale of the wavelength of light in free space. Now plasmonics researchers are turning their attention to photovoltaics, where design approaches based on plasmonics can be used to improve absorption in photovoltaic devices, permitting a considerable reduction in the physical thickness of solar photovoltaic absorber layers, and yielding new options for solar-cell design. In this review, we survey recent advances at the intersection of plasmonics and photovoltaics and offer an outlook on the future of solar cells based on these principles.

  16. Recent Advances in Plasmonic Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Lianming; Wei, Hong; Zhang, Shunping; Xu, Hongxing

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonic sensing has been an important multidisciplinary research field and has been extensively used in detection of trace molecules in chemistry and biology. The sensing techniques are typically based on surface-enhanced spectroscopies and surface plasmon resonances (SPRs). This review article deals with some recent advances in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensors and SPR sensors using either localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) or propagating surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). The advances discussed herein present some improvements in SERS and SPR sensing, as well as a new type of nanowire-based SPP sensor. PMID:24803189

  17. Nanoantioxidant-driven plasmon enhanced proton-coupled electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiriou, Georgios A.; Blattmann, Christoph O.; Deligiannakis, Yiannis

    2015-12-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions involve the transfer of a proton and an electron and play an important role in a number of chemical and biological processes. Here, we describe a novel phenomenon, plasmon-enhanced PCET, which is manifested using SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles functionalized with gallic acid (GA), a natural antioxidant molecule that can perform PCET. These GA-functionalized nanoparticles show enhanced plasmonic response at near-IR wavelengths, due to particle agglomeration caused by the GA molecules. Near-IR laser irradiation induces strong local hot-spots on the SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles, as evidenced by surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This leads to plasmon energy transfer to the grafted GA molecules that lowers the GA-OH bond dissociation enthalpy by at least 2 kcal mol-1 and therefore facilitates PCET. The nanoparticle-driven plasmon-enhancement of PCET brings together the so far unrelated research domains of nanoplasmonics and electron/proton translocation with significant impact on applications based on interfacial electron/proton transfer.Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions involve the transfer of a proton and an electron and play an important role in a number of chemical and biological processes. Here, we describe a novel phenomenon, plasmon-enhanced PCET, which is manifested using SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles functionalized with gallic acid (GA), a natural antioxidant molecule that can perform PCET. These GA-functionalized nanoparticles show enhanced plasmonic response at near-IR wavelengths, due to particle agglomeration caused by the GA molecules. Near-IR laser irradiation induces strong local hot-spots on the SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles, as evidenced by surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This leads to plasmon energy transfer to the grafted GA molecules that lowers the GA-OH bond dissociation enthalpy by at least 2 kcal mol-1 and therefore facilitates PCET. The nanoparticle-driven plasmon

  18. Reconfigurable exciton-plasmon interconversion for nanophotonic circuits.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Seok; Luong, Dinh Hoa; Kim, Min Su; Jin, Youngjo; Kim, Hyun; Yun, Seokjoon; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-11-28

    The recent challenges for improving the operation speed of nanoelectronics have motivated research on manipulating light in on-chip integrated circuits. Hybrid plasmonic waveguides with low-dimensional semiconductors, including quantum dots and quantum wells, are a promising platform for realizing sub-diffraction limited optical components. Meanwhile, two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have received broad interest in optoelectronics owing to tightly bound excitons at room temperature, strong light-matter and exciton-plasmon interactions, available top-down wafer-scale integration, and band-gap tunability. Here, we demonstrate principal functionalities for on-chip optical communications via reconfigurable exciton-plasmon interconversions in ∼200-nm-diameter Ag-nanowires overlapping onto TMD transistors. By varying device configurations for each operation purpose, three active components for optical communications are realized: field-effect exciton transistors with a channel length of ∼32 μm, field-effect exciton multiplexers transmitting multiple signals through a single NW and electrical detectors of propagating plasmons with a high On/Off ratio of∼190. Our results illustrate the unique merits of two-dimensional semiconductors for constructing reconfigurable device architectures in integrated nanophotonic circuits.

  19. Reconfigurable exciton-plasmon interconversion for nanophotonic circuits

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Seok; Luong, Dinh Hoa; Kim, Min Su; Jin, Youngjo; Kim, Hyun; Yun, Seokjoon; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-01-01

    The recent challenges for improving the operation speed of nanoelectronics have motivated research on manipulating light in on-chip integrated circuits. Hybrid plasmonic waveguides with low-dimensional semiconductors, including quantum dots and quantum wells, are a promising platform for realizing sub-diffraction limited optical components. Meanwhile, two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have received broad interest in optoelectronics owing to tightly bound excitons at room temperature, strong light-matter and exciton-plasmon interactions, available top-down wafer-scale integration, and band-gap tunability. Here, we demonstrate principal functionalities for on-chip optical communications via reconfigurable exciton-plasmon interconversions in ∼200-nm-diameter Ag-nanowires overlapping onto TMD transistors. By varying device configurations for each operation purpose, three active components for optical communications are realized: field-effect exciton transistors with a channel length of ∼32 μm, field-effect exciton multiplexers transmitting multiple signals through a single NW and electrical detectors of propagating plasmons with a high On/Off ratio of∼190. Our results illustrate the unique merits of two-dimensional semiconductors for constructing reconfigurable device architectures in integrated nanophotonic circuits. PMID:27892463

  20. Reconfigurable exciton-plasmon interconversion for nanophotonic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun Seok; Luong, Dinh Hoa; Kim, Min Su; Jin, Youngjo; Kim, Hyun; Yun, Seokjoon; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-11-01

    The recent challenges for improving the operation speed of nanoelectronics have motivated research on manipulating light in on-chip integrated circuits. Hybrid plasmonic waveguides with low-dimensional semiconductors, including quantum dots and quantum wells, are a promising platform for realizing sub-diffraction limited optical components. Meanwhile, two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have received broad interest in optoelectronics owing to tightly bound excitons at room temperature, strong light-matter and exciton-plasmon interactions, available top-down wafer-scale integration, and band-gap tunability. Here, we demonstrate principal functionalities for on-chip optical communications via reconfigurable exciton-plasmon interconversions in ~200-nm-diameter Ag-nanowires overlapping onto TMD transistors. By varying device configurations for each operation purpose, three active components for optical communications are realized: field-effect exciton transistors with a channel length of ~32 μm, field-effect exciton multiplexers transmitting multiple signals through a single NW and electrical detectors of propagating plasmons with a high On/Off ratio of~190. Our results illustrate the unique merits of two-dimensional semiconductors for constructing reconfigurable device architectures in integrated nanophotonic circuits.

  1. Optically Thin Metallic Films for High-Radiative-Efficiency Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Zhen, Bo; Hsu, Chia Wei; Miller, Owen D; Joannopoulos, John D; Soljačić, Marin

    2016-07-13

    Plasmonics enables deep-subwavelength concentration of light and has become important for fundamental studies as well as real-life applications. Two major existing platforms of plasmonics are metallic nanoparticles and metallic films. Metallic nanoparticles allow efficient coupling to far field radiation, yet their synthesis typically leads to poor material quality. Metallic films offer substantially higher quality materials, but their coupling to radiation is typically jeopardized due to the large momentum mismatch with free space. Here, we propose and theoretically investigate optically thin metallic films as an ideal platform for high-radiative-efficiency plasmonics. For far-field scattering, adding a thin high-quality metallic substrate enables a higher quality factor while maintaining the localization and tunability that the nanoparticle provides. For near-field spontaneous emission, a thin metallic substrate, of high quality or not, greatly improves the field overlap between the emitter environment and propagating surface plasmons, enabling high-Purcell (total enhancement >10(4)), high-quantum-yield (>50%) spontaneous emission, even as the gap size vanishes (3-5 nm). The enhancement has almost spatially independent efficiency and does not suffer from quenching effects that commonly exist in previous structures.

  2. Quantum plasmonic sensing

    DOE PAGES

    Fan, Wenjiang; Lawrie, Benjamin J.; Pooser, Raphael C.

    2015-11-04

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors can reach the quantum noise limit of the optical readout field in various configurations. We demonstrate that two-mode intensity squeezed states produce a further enhancement in sensitivity compared with a classical optical readout when the quantum noise is used to transduce an SPR sensor signal in the Kretschmann configuration. The quantum noise reduction between the twin beams when incident at an angle away from the plasmonic resonance, combined with quantum noise resulting from quantum anticorrelations when on resonance, results in an effective SPR-mediated modulation that yields a measured sensitivity 5 dB better than that withmore » a classical optical readout in this configuration. Furthermore, the theoretical potential of this technique points to resolving particle concentrations with more accuracy than is possible via classical approaches to optical transduction.« less

  3. Quantum plasmonic sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Wenjiang; Lawrie, Benjamin J.; Pooser, Raphael C.

    2015-11-04

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors can reach the quantum noise limit of the optical readout field in various configurations. We demonstrate that two-mode intensity squeezed states produce a further enhancement in sensitivity compared with a classical optical readout when the quantum noise is used to transduce an SPR sensor signal in the Kretschmann configuration. The quantum noise reduction between the twin beams when incident at an angle away from the plasmonic resonance, combined with quantum noise resulting from quantum anticorrelations when on resonance, results in an effective SPR-mediated modulation that yields a measured sensitivity 5 dB better than that with a classical optical readout in this configuration. Furthermore, the theoretical potential of this technique points to resolving particle concentrations with more accuracy than is possible via classical approaches to optical transduction.

  4. Understanding complex chiral plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiaoyang; Yue, Song; Liu, Na

    2015-11-07

    Chiral nanoplasmonics exhibits great potential for novel nanooptical devices due to the generation of a strong chiroptical response within nanoscale metallic structures. Recently, a number of different approaches have been utilized to create chiral nanoplasmonic structures. However, particularly for tailoring nanooptical chiral sensing devices, the understanding of the resulting chiroptical response when coupling chiral and achiral structures together is crucial and has not been completely understood to date. Here, we present a thorough and step-by-step experimental study to understand the intriguing chiral-achiral coupling scheme. We set up a hybrid plasmonic system, which bears resemblance to the 'host-guest' system in supramolecular chemistry to analyze and explain the complex chiral response both at the chiral and achiral plasmonic resonances. We also provide an elegant and simple analytical model, which can describe, predict, and comprehend the chiroptical spectra in detail. Our study will shed light on designing well-controlled chiral-achiral coupling platforms for reliable chiral sensing.

  5. Localized surface plasmon resonance modes on an asymmetric cylindrical nanorod dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui-Bing; Zhang, Zhi-Dong; Jiao, Guo-Tai; Xue, Chen-Yang; Yan, Shu-Bin; Wang, Hongyang

    2016-08-01

    The extinction spectra and electric field distribution of an asymmetric cylindrical nanorod dimer (ACND) are calculated by discrete dipole approximation. The ACND is composed of two linear orders of cylindrical silver nanorods with different radii and lengths. The effects of the structural parameters of ACND on the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) mode are also studied. Results show two resonance peaks in the extinction spectra of ACND: the higher-energy anti-bonding mode and the lower-energy bonding mode. The interaction of two hybridization plasmonic resonance modes produces an asymmetric line shape in the extinction spectra, which is considered to be a Fano resonance profile.

  6. Aluminum for Plasmonics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    M. R .; Thompson, G. E.; Zhou, X.; Beamson, G.; Fairley , N. Quantification of Oxide Film Thickness at the Surface of AluminiumUsing XPS. Surf...10923. 13. Thomas, R .; Swathi, R . S. Organization of Metal Nanopar- ticles for Surface-Enhanced Spectroscopy: A Difference in Size Matters. J. Phys. Chem...Kikawada, M.; Akimoto, R .; Inami, W.; Kawata, Y. Fluorescence Enhancement with Deep-Ultraviolet Surface Plasmon Excitation. Opt. Express 2013, 21, 17447

  7. Plasmonic Graphene Transparent Conductors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    www.MaterialsViews.com www.advopticalmat.de FU LL P A P ER Guowei Xu,* Jianwei Liu, Qian Wang, Rongqing Hui, Zhijun Chen, Victor A. Maroni , and Judy Wu Plasmonic...Wang, Rongqing Hui, Zhijun Chen, Victor A. Maroni , Judy Wu University of Kansas Center for Research, Inc. 2385 Irving Hill Road Lawrence, KS 66045...A. Maroni Materials Science Division, Bldg 212 Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL 60439, USA DOI: 10.1002/adma.201104846 1. Introduction

  8. Aluminum Plasmonic Nanoantennas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-16

    possibility of low-cost, sustainable, mass-producible plasmonic materials. Here we examine the properties of individual Al nanorod antennas with...cathodoluminescence (CL). This approach allows us to image the local density of optical states (LDOS) of Al nanorod antennas with a spatial resolution less than...properties of individual Al nanorod antennas with cathodoluminescence (CL). This approach allows us to image the local density of optical states (LDOS

  9. A theory of adhesion at a bimetallic interface - Overlap effects.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Smith, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    A preliminary calculation of the chemical bonding adhesive interaction between metal surfaces is provided. In this first theory the Hohenberg and Kohn formalism is used to give the bimetallic adhesive binding energy versus separation. The close-packed planes of Al, Mg, and Zn are considered. The effect of simple overlap of the metal-vacuum distributions is determined. The importance of registry between contact surfaces is ascertained. A minimum in the binding energy curve is exhibited for all combinations. The theoretical predictions agree with trends in bond strengths taken from available experimental data. An insight into the mechanisms involved in metallic transfer is given. The relationship between adhesive energies, cohesive energies, and surface energies is discussed.

  10. Nonlinear plasmonic nanorulers.

    PubMed

    Butet, Jérémy; Martin, Olivier J F

    2014-05-27

    The evaluation of distances as small as few nanometers using optical waves is a very challenging task that can pave the way for the development of new applications in biotechnology and nanotechnology. In this article, we propose a new measurement method based on the control of the nonlinear optical response of plasmonic nanostructures by means of Fano resonances. It is shown that Fano resonances resulting from the coupling between a bright mode and a dark mode at the fundamental wavelength enable unprecedented and direct manipulation of the nonlinear electromagnetic sources at the nanoscale. In the case of second harmonic generation from gold nanodolmens, the different nonlinear sources distributions induced by the different coupling regimes are clearly revealed in the far-field distribution. Hence, the configuration of the nanostructure can be accurately determined in 3-dimensions by recording the wave scattered at the second harmonic wavelength. Indeed, the conformation of the different elements building the system is encoded in the nonlinear far-field distribution, making second harmonic generation a promising tool for reading 3-dimension plasmonic nanorulers. Furthemore, it is shown that 3-dimension plasmonic nanorulers can be implemented with simpler geometries than in the linear regime while providing complete information on the structure conformation, including the top nanobar position and orientation.

  11. Atomic Scale Plasmonic Switch.

    PubMed

    Emboras, Alexandros; Niegemann, Jens; Ma, Ping; Haffner, Christian; Pedersen, Andreas; Luisier, Mathieu; Hafner, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas; Leuthold, Juerg

    2016-01-13

    The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moore's law in the electronics industry. While electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling, similar to electronics, is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled plasmonic switch operating at the atomic scale. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocation of an individual or, at most, a few atoms in a plasmonic cavity. Depending on the location of the atom either of two distinct plasmonic cavity resonance states are supported. Experimental results show reversible digital optical switching with an extinction ratio of 9.2 dB and operation at room temperature up to MHz with femtojoule (fJ) power consumption for a single switch operation. This demonstration of an integrated quantum device allowing to control photons at the atomic level opens intriguing perspectives for a fully integrated and highly scalable chip platform, a platform where optics, electronics, and memory may be controlled at the single-atom level.

  12. Plasmonic Nanostructured Cellular Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkhazraji, Emad; Ghalib, A.; Manzoor, K.; Alsunaidi, M. A.

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we have investigated the scattering plasmonic resonance characteristics of silver nanospheres with a geometrical distribution that is modelled by Cellular Automata using time-domain numerical analysis. Cellular Automata are discrete mathematical structures that model different natural phenomena. Two binary one-dimensional Cellular Automata rules are considered to model the nanostructure, namely rule 30 and rule 33. The analysis produces three-dimensional scattering profiles of the entire plasmonic nanostructure. For the Cellular Automaton rule 33, the introduction of more Cellular Automata generations resulted only in slight red and blue shifts in the plasmonic modes with respect to the first generation. On the other hand, while rule 30 introduced significant red shifts in the resonance peaks at early generations, at later generations however, a peculiar effect is witnessed in the scattering profile as new peaks emerge as a feature of the overall Cellular Automata structure rather than the sum of the smaller parts that compose it. We strongly believe that these features that emerge as a result adopting the different 256 Cellular Automata rules as configuration models of nanostructures in different applications and systems might possess a great potential in enhancing their capability, sensitivity, efficiency, and power utilization.

  13. Terahertz plasmonic composites.

    PubMed

    Nemat-Nasser, Syrus C; Amirkhizi, Alireza V; Padilla, Willie J; Basov, Dimitri N; Nemat-Nasser, Sia; Bruzewicz, Derek; Whitesides, George

    2007-03-01

    The dielectric response of a polymer matrix composite can be substantially modified and tuned within a broad frequency band by integrating within the material an artificial plasmon medium composed of periodically distributed, very thin, electrically conducting wires. In the microwave regime, such plasmon/polymer composites have been studied analytically, computationally, and experimentally. This work reports the design, fabrication, and characterization of similar composites for operation at terahertz frequencies. Such composites require significant reduction in the thickness and spacing of the wires. We used numerical modeling to design artificial effective plasmonic media with turn-on frequencies in the terahertz range. Prototype samples were produced by lithographically embedding very thin gold strips into a PDMS [poly(dimethylsiloxane)] matrix. These samples were characterized with a Fourier-transform infrared interferometer using the frequency-dependent transmission and Kramers-Kronig relations to determine the electromagnetic properties. We report the characterization results for a sample, demonstrating excellent agreement between theory, computer design, and experiment. To our knowledge this is the first demonstration of the possibility of creating composites with tuned dielectric response at terahertz frequencies.

  14. Solving Partial Differential Equations on Overlapping Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Henshaw, W D

    2008-09-22

    We discuss the solution of partial differential equations (PDEs) on overlapping grids. This is a powerful technique for efficiently solving problems in complex, possibly moving, geometry. An overlapping grid consists of a set of structured grids that overlap and cover the computational domain. By allowing the grids to overlap, grids for complex geometries can be more easily constructed. The overlapping grid approach can also be used to remove coordinate singularities by, for example, covering a sphere with two or more patches. We describe the application of the overlapping grid approach to a variety of different problems. These include the solution of incompressible fluid flows with moving and deforming geometry, the solution of high-speed compressible reactive flow with rigid bodies using adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), and the solution of the time-domain Maxwell's equations of electromagnetism.

  15. Surface-Plasmon Holography with White-Light Illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, Miyu; Kato, Jun-ichi; Kawata, Satoshi

    2011-04-01

    The recently emerging three-dimensional (3D) displays in the electronic shops imitate depth illusion by overlapping two parallax 2D images through either polarized glasses that viewers are required to wear or lenticular lenses fixed directly on the display. Holography, on the other hand, provides real 3D imaging, although usually limiting colors to monochrome. The so-called rainbow holograms—mounted, for example, on credit cards—are also produced from parallax images that change color with viewing angle. We report on a holographic technique based on surface plasmons that can reconstruct true 3D color images, where the colors are reconstructed by satisfying resonance conditions of surface plasmon polaritons for individual wavelengths. Such real 3D color images can be viewed from any angle, just like the original object.

  16. Surface-plasmon holography with white-light illumination.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Miyu; Kato, Jun-ichi; Kawata, Satoshi

    2011-04-08

    The recently emerging three-dimensional (3D) displays in the electronic shops imitate depth illusion by overlapping two parallax 2D images through either polarized glasses that viewers are required to wear or lenticular lenses fixed directly on the display. Holography, on the other hand, provides real 3D imaging, although usually limiting colors to monochrome. The so-called rainbow holograms--mounted, for example, on credit cards--are also produced from parallax images that change color with viewing angle. We report on a holographic technique based on surface plasmons that can reconstruct true 3D color images, where the colors are reconstructed by satisfying resonance conditions of surface plasmon polaritons for individual wavelengths. Such real 3D color images can be viewed from any angle, just like the original object.

  17. Nonlinear plasmonic amplification via dissipative soliton-plasmon resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrando, Albert

    2017-01-01

    In this contribution we introduce a strategy for the compensation of plasmonic losses based on a recently proposed nonlinear mechanism: the resonant interaction between surface plasmon polaritons and spatial solitons propagating in parallel along a metal/dielectric/Kerr structure. This mechanism naturally leads to the generation of a quasiparticle excitation, the so-called soliplasmon resonance. We analyze the role played by the effective nonlinear coupling inherent to this system and how this can be used to provide a mechanism of quasiresonant nonlinear excitation of surface plasmon polaritons. We will pay particular attention to the introduction of asymmetric linear gain in the Kerr medium. The unique combination of nonlinear propagation, nonlinear coupling, and gain give rise to a scenario for the excitation of long-range surface plasmon polaritons with distinguishing characteristics. The connection between plasmonic losses and soliplasmon resonances in the presence of gain will be discussed.

  18. Surface plasmon dispersion in hexagonal, honeycomb and kagome plasmonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Tenner, V T; de Dood, M J A; van Exter, M P

    2016-12-26

    We present a systematic experimental study on the optical properties of plasmonic crystals (PlC) with hexagonal symmetry. We compare the dispersion and avoided crossings of surface plasmon modes around the Γ-point of Au-metal hole arrays with a hexagonal, honeycomb and kagome lattice. Symmetry arguments and group theory are used to label the six modes and understand their radiative and dispersive properties. Plasmon-plasmon interaction are accurately described by a coupled mode model, that contains effective scattering amplitudes of surface plasmons on a lattice of air holes under 60°, 120°, and 180°. We determine these rates in the experiment and find that they are dominated by the hole-density and not on the complexity of the unit-cell. Our analysis shows that the observed angle-dependent scattering can be explained by a single-hole model based on electric and magnetic dipoles.

  19. The variational subspace valence bond method.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Graham D

    2015-04-07

    The variational subspace valence bond (VSVB) method based on overlapping orbitals is introduced. VSVB provides variational support against collapse for the optimization of overlapping linear combinations of atomic orbitals (OLCAOs) using modified orbital expansions, without recourse to orthogonalization. OLCAO have the advantage of being naturally localized, chemically intuitive (to individually model bonds and lone pairs, for example), and transferrable between different molecular systems. Such features are exploited to avoid key computational bottlenecks. Since the OLCAO can be doubly occupied, VSVB can access very large problems, and calculations on systems with several hundred atoms are presented.

  20. The variational subspace valence bond method

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, Graham D.

    2015-04-07

    The variational subspace valence bond (VSVB) method based on overlapping orbitals is introduced. VSVB provides variational support against collapse for the optimization of overlapping linear combinations of atomic orbitals (OLCAOs) using modified orbital expansions, without recourse to orthogonalization. OLCAO have the advantage of being naturally localized, chemically intuitive (to individually model bonds and lone pairs, for example), and transferrable between different molecular systems. Such features are exploited to avoid key computational bottlenecks. Since the OLCAO can be doubly occupied, VSVB can access very large problems, and calculations on systems with several hundred atoms are presented.

  1. Finding overlapping communities using seed set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jin-Xuan; Zhang, Xiao-Dong

    2017-02-01

    The local optimization algorithm using seed set to find overlapping communities has become more and more a significant method, but it is a great challenge how to choose a good seed set. In this paper, a new method is proposed to achieve the choice of candidate seed sets, and yields a new algorithm to find overlapping communities in complex networks. By testing in real world networks and synthetic networks, this method can successfully detect overlapping communities and outperform other state-of-the-art overlapping community detection methods.

  2. Overlap syndromes among autoimmune liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Rust, Christian; Beuers, Ulrich

    2008-06-07

    The three major immune disorders of the liver are autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). Variant forms of these diseases are generally called overlap syndromes, although there has been no standardised definition. Patients with overlap syndromes present with both hepatitic and cholestatic serum liver tests and have histological features of AIH and PBC or PSC. The AIH-PBC overlap syndrome is the most common form, affecting almost 10% of adults with AIH or PBC. Single cases of AIH and autoimmune cholangitis (AMA-negative PBC) overlap syndrome have also been reported. The AIH-PSC overlap syndrome is predominantly found in children, adolescents and young adults with AIH or PSC. Interestingly, transitions from one autoimmune to another have also been reported in a minority of patients, especially transitions from PBC to AIH-PBC overlap syndrome. Overlap syndromes show a progressive course towards liver cirrhosis and liver failure without treatment. Therapy for overlap syndromes is empiric, since controlled trials are not available in these rare disorders. Anticholestatic therapy with ursodeoxycholic acid is usually combined with immunosuppressive therapy with corticosteroids and/or azathioprine in both AIH-PBC and AIH-PSC overlap syndromes. In end-stage disease, liver transplantation is the treatment of choice.

  3. Quantum interference in plasmonic circuits.

    PubMed

    Heeres, Reinier W; Kouwenhoven, Leo P; Zwiller, Valery

    2013-10-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons (plasmons) are a combination of light and a collective oscillation of the free electron plasma at metal/dielectric interfaces. This interaction allows subwavelength confinement of light beyond the diffraction limit inherent to dielectric structures. As a result, the intensity of the electromagnetic field is enhanced, with the possibility to increase the strength of the optical interactions between waveguides, light sources and detectors. Plasmons maintain non-classical photon statistics and preserve entanglement upon transmission through thin, patterned metallic films or weakly confining waveguides. For quantum applications, it is essential that plasmons behave as indistinguishable quantum particles. Here we report on a quantum interference experiment in a nanoscale plasmonic circuit consisting of an on-chip plasmon beamsplitter with integrated superconducting single-photon detectors to allow efficient single plasmon detection. We demonstrate a quantum-mechanical interaction between pairs of indistinguishable surface plasmons by observing Hong-Ou-Mandel (HOM) interference, a hallmark non-classical interference effect that is the basis of linear optics-based quantum computation. Our work shows that it is feasible to shrink quantum optical experiments to the nanoscale and offers a promising route towards subwavelength quantum optical networks.

  4. Electron diffraction by plasmon waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García de Abajo, F. J.; Barwick, B.; Carbone, F.

    2016-07-01

    An electron beam traversing a structured plasmonic field is shown to undergo diffraction with characteristic angular patterns of both elastic and inelastic outgoing electron components. In particular, a plasmonic grating (e.g., a standing wave formed by two counterpropagating plasmons in a thin film) produces diffraction orders of the same parity as the net number of exchanged plasmons. Large diffracted beam fractions are predicted to occur for realistic plasmon intensities in attainable geometries due to a combination of phase and amplitude changes locally imprinted on the passing electron wave. Our study opens vistas in the study of multiphoton exchanges between electron beams and evanescent optical fields with unexplored effects related to the transversal component of the electron wave function.

  5. Crystal Field Theory and the Angular Overlap Model Applied to Hydrides of Main Group Elements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, E. A.

    1990-01-01

    Described is how crystal field theory and the angular overlap model can be applied to very simple molecules which can then be used to introduce such concepts as bonding orbitals, MO diagrams, and Walsh diagrams. The main-group compounds are used as examples and a switch to the transition metal complexes. (KR)

  6. 47 CFR 73.509 - Prohibited overlap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... operation would involve overlap of signal strength contours with any other station licensed by the... separation Contour of proposed station Contour of other station Co-channel 0.1mV/m (40 dBu)1 mV/m (60 dBu) 1... if the proposed operation would involve overlap of signal strength contours with any other station...

  7. 47 CFR 73.509 - Prohibited overlap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... operation would involve overlap of signal strength contours with any other station licensed by the... separation Contour of proposed station Contour of other station Co-channel 0.1mV/m (40 dBu)1 mV/m (60 dBu) 1... if the proposed operation would involve overlap of signal strength contours with any other station...

  8. 47 CFR 73.509 - Prohibited overlap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... operation would involve overlap of signal strength contours with any other station licensed by the... separation Contour of proposed station Contour of other station Co-channel 0.1mV/m (40 dBu)1 mV/m (60 dBu) 1... if the proposed operation would involve overlap of signal strength contours with any other station...

  9. Neural overlap in processing music and speech.

    PubMed

    Peretz, Isabelle; Vuvan, Dominique; Lagrois, Marie-Élaine; Armony, Jorge L

    2015-03-19

    Neural overlap in processing music and speech, as measured by the co-activation of brain regions in neuroimaging studies, may suggest that parts of the neural circuitries established for language may have been recycled during evolution for musicality, or vice versa that musicality served as a springboard for language emergence. Such a perspective has important implications for several topics of general interest besides evolutionary origins. For instance, neural overlap is an important premise for the possibility of music training to influence language acquisition and literacy. However, neural overlap in processing music and speech does not entail sharing neural circuitries. Neural separability between music and speech may occur in overlapping brain regions. In this paper, we review the evidence and outline the issues faced in interpreting such neural data, and argue that converging evidence from several methodologies is needed before neural overlap is taken as evidence of sharing.

  10. Understanding complex chiral plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Xiaoyang; Yue, Song; Liu, Na

    2015-10-01

    Chiral nanoplasmonics exhibits great potential for novel nanooptical devices due to the generation of a strong chiroptical response within nanoscale metallic structures. Recently, a number of different approaches have been utilized to create chiral nanoplasmonic structures. However, particularly for tailoring nanooptical chiral sensing devices, the understanding of the resulting chiroptical response when coupling chiral and achiral structures together is crucial and has not been completely understood to date. Here, we present a thorough and step-by-step experimental study to understand the intriguing chiral-achiral coupling scheme. We set up a hybrid plasmonic system, which bears resemblance to the `host-guest' system in supramolecular chemistry to analyze and explain the complex chiral response both at the chiral and achiral plasmonic resonances. We also provide an elegant and simple analytical model, which can describe, predict, and comprehend the chiroptical spectra in detail. Our study will shed light on designing well-controlled chiral-achiral coupling platforms for reliable chiral sensing.Chiral nanoplasmonics exhibits great potential for novel nanooptical devices due to the generation of a strong chiroptical response within nanoscale metallic structures. Recently, a number of different approaches have been utilized to create chiral nanoplasmonic structures. However, particularly for tailoring nanooptical chiral sensing devices, the understanding of the resulting chiroptical response when coupling chiral and achiral structures together is crucial and has not been completely understood to date. Here, we present a thorough and step-by-step experimental study to understand the intriguing chiral-achiral coupling scheme. We set up a hybrid plasmonic system, which bears resemblance to the `host-guest' system in supramolecular chemistry to analyze and explain the complex chiral response both at the chiral and achiral plasmonic resonances. We also provide an elegant

  11. Ellipsometric surface plasmon resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Wei-Liang; Lee, Shu-Sheng; Lee, Chih-Kung

    2009-03-01

    We develop a new multifunctional optical biochip system that integrates an ellipsometer with a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) feature. This newly developed biochip biosensor, which we call ESPR for an ellipsometric SPR, provides us with a system to retrieve detailed information such as the optical properties of immobilized biomolecular monolayers, surface concentration variations of biomedical reactions, and kinetic affinity between biomolecules required for further biotech analysis. Our ESPR can also serve as both a research and development tool and a manufacturing tool for various biomedical applications.

  12. Impedance generalization for plasmonic waveguides beyond the lumped circuit model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Thomas; Hasan, Shakeeb Bin; Paul, Thomas; Pertsch, Thomas; Rockstuhl, Carsten

    2013-07-01

    We analytically derive a rigorous expression for the relative impedance ratio between two photonic structures based on their electromagnetic interaction. Our approach generalizes the physical meaning of the impedance to a measure for the reciprocity-based overlap of eigenmodes. The consistency with known cases in the radio-frequency and optical domain is shown. The analysis reveals where the applicability of simple circuit parameters ends and how the impedance can be interpreted beyond this point. We illustrate our approach by successfully describing a Bragg reflector that terminates an insulator-metal-insulator plasmonic waveguide in the near infrared by our impedance concept.

  13. Size Dependent Plasmonic Effect on BiVO4 Photoanodes for Solar Water Splitting

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liwu; Herrmann, Lars O.; Baumberg, Jeremy J.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures show great promise in enhancing the solar water splitting efficiency due to their ability to confine light to extremely small volumes inside semiconductors. While size plays a critical role in the plasmonic performance of Au nanoparticles (AuNPs), its influence on plasmon-assisted water splitting is still not fully understood. This holds especially true for low band gap semiconductors, for which interband excitations occur in wavelength regions that overlap with plasmonic resonances. Here, BiVO4 films are modified with AuNPs of diameters varying from 10 to 80 nm to study the size dependence of the plasmonic effect. Plasmon resonance energy transfer (PRET) is found to be the dominant effect in enhancing the water splitting efficiency of BiVO4. “Hot electron” injection effect is weak in the case of BiVO4/AuNP. This is attributed to the interband excitation of BiVO4, which is unfavourable for the hot electrons accumulation in BiVO4 conduction band. The resonant scattering effect also contributes to the enhanced water splitting efficiency for the larger diameter AuNPs. It is also for the first time found that higher PRET effect can be achieved at larger off-normal irradiation angle. PMID:26581942

  14. Self-aligned deterministic coupling of single quantum emitter to nanofocused plasmonic modes

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Su-Hyun; Kim, Je-Hyung; Ko, Young-Ho; Rodriguez, Christophe; Shin, Jonghwa; Lee, Yong-Hee; Dang, Le Si; Zhang, Xiang; Cho, Yong-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    The quantum plasmonics field has emerged and been growing increasingly, including study of single emitter–light coupling using plasmonic system and scalable quantum plasmonic circuit. This offers opportunity for the quantum control of light with compact device footprint. However, coupling of a single emitter to highly localized plasmonic mode with nanoscale precision remains an important challenge. Today, the spatial overlap between metallic structure and single emitter mostly relies either on chance or on advanced nanopositioning control. Here, we demonstrate deterministic coupling between three-dimensionally nanofocused plasmonic modes and single quantum dots (QDs) without any positioning for single QDs. By depositing a thin silver layer on a site-controlled pyramid QD wafer, three-dimensional plasmonic nanofocusing on each QD at the pyramid apex is geometrically achieved through the silver-coated pyramid facets. Enhancement of the QD spontaneous emission rate as high as 22 ± 16 is measured for all processed QDs emitting over ∼150-meV spectral range. This approach could apply to high fabrication yield on-chip devices for wide application fields, e.g., high-efficiency light-emitting devices and quantum information processing. PMID:25870303

  15. Angle-tunable enhanced infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy via grating-coupled surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Petefish, Joseph W; Hillier, Andrew C

    2014-03-04

    Surface enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA) spectroscopy is an attractive method for increasing the prominence of vibrational modes in infrared spectroscopy. To date, the majority of reports associated with SEIRA utilize localized surface plasmon resonance from metal nanoparticles to enhance electromagnetic fields in the region of analytes. Limited work has been performed using propagating surface plasmons as a method for SEIRA excitation. In this report, we demonstrate angle-tunable enhancement of vibrational stretching modes associated with a thin poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) film that is coupled to a silver-coated diffraction grating. Gratings are fabricated using laser interference lithography to achieve precise surface periodicities, which can be used to generate surface plasmons that overlap with specific vibrational modes in the polymer film. Infrared reflection absorption spectra are presented for both bare silver and PMMA-coated silver gratings at a range of angles and polarization states. In addition, spectra were obtained with the grating direction oriented perpendicular and parallel to the infrared source in order to isolate plasmon enhancement effects. Optical simulations using the rigorous coupled-wave analysis method were used to identify the origin of the plasmon-induced enhancement. Angle-dependent absorption measurements achieved signal enhancements of more than 10-times the signal in the absence of the plasmon.

  16. Plasmonic plano-semi-cylindrical nanocavities with high-efficiency local-field confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feifei; Zhang, Xinping; Fang, Xiaohui

    2017-01-01

    Plasmonic nanocavity arrays were achieved by producing isolated silver semi-cylindrical nanoshells periodically on a continuous planar gold film. Hybridization between localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) in the Ag semi-cylindrical nanoshells (SCNS) and surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) in the gold film was observed as split bonding and anti-bonding resonance modes located at different spectral positions. This led to strong local field enhancement and confinement in the plano-concave nanocavites. Narrow-band optical extinction with an amplitude as high as 1.5 OD, corresponding to 97% reduction in the transmission, was achieved in the visible spectrum. The resonance spectra of this hybrid device can be extended from the visible to the near infrared by adjusting the structural parameters.

  17. Plasmonic plano-semi-cylindrical nanocavities with high-efficiency local-field confinement

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feifei; Zhang, Xinping; Fang, Xiaohui

    2017-01-01

    Plasmonic nanocavity arrays were achieved by producing isolated silver semi-cylindrical nanoshells periodically on a continuous planar gold film. Hybridization between localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) in the Ag semi-cylindrical nanoshells (SCNS) and surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) in the gold film was observed as split bonding and anti-bonding resonance modes located at different spectral positions. This led to strong local field enhancement and confinement in the plano-concave nanocavites. Narrow-band optical extinction with an amplitude as high as 1.5 OD, corresponding to 97% reduction in the transmission, was achieved in the visible spectrum. The resonance spectra of this hybrid device can be extended from the visible to the near infrared by adjusting the structural parameters. PMID:28074853

  18. Plasmon-enhanced second-harmonic generation from hybrid ZnO-covered silver-bowl array.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingming; Shen, Shaoxin; Wang, Xiangjie; Yu, Binbin; Huang, Shengli; Xu, Die; Hu, Jiawen; Yang, Zhilin

    2016-06-02

    High-efficient, plasmon-enhanced nonlinear phenomena based on hybrid nanostructures, which combine nonlinear dielectrics with plasmonic metals, are of fundamental importance for various applications ranging from all-optical switching to imaging or bio-sensing. However, the high loss of the excitation energy in nanostructures and the poor spatial overlap between the plasmon enhancement and the bulk of nonlinear materials largely limit the operation of plasmon-enhanced nonlinear effects, resulting in low nonlinear conversion efficiency. Here, we design and fabricate a ZnO-covered, 2D silver-bowl array, which can serve as an efficient platform for plasmon-enhanced second-harmonic generation (PESHG). Validated by experiments and simulations, we demonstrate that the high spatial overlap between the near-field enhancement and the ZnO film plays the key role for this nanostructure-based PESHG process. The enhancement mainly originates from the fundamental wavelength-derived plasmon resonance, providing an enhancement factor of approximately 33 times. These results achieved pave the way for future applications, which require localized light sources at nanoscale.

  19. Plasmon-enhanced second-harmonic generation from hybrid ZnO-covered silver-bowl array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mingming; Shen, Shaoxin; Wang, Xiangjie; Yu, Binbin; Huang, Shengli; Xu, Die; Hu, Jiawen; Yang, Zhilin

    2016-06-01

    High-efficient, plasmon-enhanced nonlinear phenomena based on hybrid nanostructures, which combine nonlinear dielectrics with plasmonic metals, are of fundamental importance for various applications ranging from all-optical switching to imaging or bio-sensing. However, the high loss of the excitation energy in nanostructures and the poor spatial overlap between the plasmon enhancement and the bulk of nonlinear materials largely limit the operation of plasmon-enhanced nonlinear effects, resulting in low nonlinear conversion efficiency. Here, we design and fabricate a ZnO-covered, 2D silver-bowl array, which can serve as an efficient platform for plasmon-enhanced second-harmonic generation (PESHG). Validated by experiments and simulations, we demonstrate that the high spatial overlap between the near-field enhancement and the ZnO film plays the key role for this nanostructure-based PESHG process. The enhancement mainly originates from the fundamental wavelength-derived plasmon resonance, providing an enhancement factor of approximately 33 times. These results achieved pave the way for future applications, which require localized light sources at nanoscale.

  20. Direct Plasmon-Driven Photoelectrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Robatjazi, Hossein; Bahauddin, Shah Mohammad; Doiron, Chloe; Thomann, Isabell

    2015-09-09

    Harnessing the energy from hot charge carriers is an emerging research area with the potential to improve energy conversion technologies.1-3 Here we present a novel plasmonic photoelectrode architecture carefully designed to drive photocatalytic reactions by efficient, nonradiative plasmon decay into hot carriers. In contrast to past work, our architecture does not utilize a Schottky junction, the commonly used building block to collect hot carriers. Instead, we observed large photocurrents from a Schottky-free junction due to direct hot electron injection from plasmonic gold nanoparticles into the reactant species upon plasmon decay. The key ingredients of our approach are (i) an architecture for increased light absorption inspired by optical impedance matching concepts,4 (ii) carrier separation by a selective transport layer, and (iii) efficient hot-carrier generation and injection from small plasmonic Au nanoparticles to adsorbed water molecules. We also investigated the quantum efficiency of hot electron injection for different particle diameters to elucidate potential quantum effects while keeping the plasmon resonance frequency unchanged. Interestingly, our studies did not reveal differences in the hot-electron generation and injection efficiencies for the investigated particle dimensions and plasmon resonances.

  1. Imaging through plasmonic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Tanzid, Mehbuba; Sobhani, Ali; DeSantis, Christopher J.; Cui, Yao; Hogan, Nathaniel J.; Samaniego, Adam; Veeraraghavan, Ashok; Halas, Naomi J.

    2016-01-01

    The optical properties of metallic nanoparticles with plasmon resonances have been studied extensively, typically by measuring the transmission of light, as a function of wavelength, through a nanoparticle suspension. One question that has not yet been addressed, however, is how an image is transmitted through such a suspension of absorber-scatterers, in other words, how the various spatial frequencies are attenuated as they pass through the nanoparticle host medium. Here, we examine how the optical properties of a suspension of plasmonic nanoparticles affect the transmitted image. We use two distinct ways to assess transmitted image quality: the structural similarity index (SSIM), a perceptual distortion metric based on the human visual system, and the modulation transfer function (MTF), which assesses the resolvable spatial frequencies. We show that perceived image quality, as well as spatial resolution, are both dependent on the scattering and absorption cross-sections of the constituent nanoparticles. Surprisingly, we observe a nonlinear dependence of image quality on optical density by varying optical path length and nanoparticle concentration. This work is a first step toward understanding the requirements for visualizing and resolving objects through media consisting of subwavelength absorber-scatterer structures, an approach that should also prove useful in the assessment of metamaterial or metasurface-based optical imaging systems. PMID:27140618

  2. Imaging through plasmonic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanzid, Mehbuba; Sobhani, Ali; DeSantis, Christopher J.; Cui, Yao; Hogan, Nathaniel J.; Samaniego, Adam; Veeraraghavan, Ashok; Halas, Naomi J.

    2016-05-01

    The optical properties of metallic nanoparticles with plasmon resonances have been studied extensively, typically by measuring the transmission of light, as a function of wavelength, through a nanoparticle suspension. One question that has not yet been addressed, however, is how an image is transmitted through such a suspension of absorber-scatterers, in other words, how the various spatial frequencies are attenuated as they pass through the nanoparticle host medium. Here, we examine how the optical properties of a suspension of plasmonic nanoparticles affect the transmitted image. We use two distinct ways to assess transmitted image quality: the structural similarity index (SSIM), a perceptual distortion metric based on the human visual system, and the modulation transfer function (MTF), which assesses the resolvable spatial frequencies. We show that perceived image quality, as well as spatial resolution, are both dependent on the scattering and absorption cross-sections of the constituent nanoparticles. Surprisingly, we observe a nonlinear dependence of image quality on optical density by varying optical path length and nanoparticle concentration. This work is a first step toward understanding the requirements for visualizing and resolving objects through media consisting of subwavelength absorber-scatterer structures, an approach that should also prove useful in the assessment of metamaterial or metasurface-based optical imaging systems.

  3. Genetically engineered plasmonic nanoarrays.

    PubMed

    Forestiere, Carlo; Pasquale, Alyssa J; Capretti, Antonio; Miano, Giovanni; Tamburrino, Antonello; Lee, Sylvanus Y; Reinhard, Björn M; Dal Negro, Luca

    2012-04-11

    In the present Letter, we demonstrate how the design of metallic nanoparticle arrays with large electric field enhancement can be performed using the basic paradigm of engineering, namely the optimization of a well-defined objective function. Such optimization is carried out by coupling a genetic algorithm with the analytical multiparticle Mie theory. General design criteria for best enhancement of electric fields are obtained, unveiling the fundamental interplay between the near-field plasmonic and radiative photonic coupling. Our optimization approach is experimentally validated by surface-enhanced Raman scattering measurements, which demonstrate how genetically optimized arrays, fabricated using electron beam lithography, lead to order of ten improvement of Raman enhancement over nanoparticle dimer antennas, and order of one hundred improvement over optimal nanoparticle gratings. A rigorous design of nanoparticle arrays with optimal field enhancement is essential to the engineering of numerous nanoscale optical devices such as plasmon-enhanced biosensors, photodetectors, light sources and more efficient nonlinear optical elements for on chip integration.

  4. Plasmonic color tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byoungho; Yun, Hansik; Lee, Seung-Yeol; Kim, Hwi

    2016-03-01

    In general, color filter is an optical component to permit the transmission of a specific color in cameras, displays, and microscopes. Each filter has its own unchangeable color because it is made by chemical materials such as dyes and pigments. Therefore, in order to express various colorful images in a display, one pixel should have three sub-pixels of red, green, and blue colors. Here, we suggest new plasmonic structure and method to change the color in a single pixel. It is comprised of a cavity and a metal nanoaperture. The optical cavity generally supports standing waves inside it, and various standing waves having different wavelength can be confined together in one cavity. On the other hand, although light cannot transmit sub-wavelength sized aperture, surface plasmons can propagate through the metal nanoaperture with high intensity due to the extraordinary transmission. If we combine the two structures, we can organize the spatial distribution of amplitudes according to wavelength of various standing waves using the cavity, and we can extract a light with specific wavelength and amplitude using the nanoaperture. Therefore, this cavity-aperture structure can simultaneously tune the color and intensity of the transmitted light through the single nanoaperture. We expect that the cavity-apertures have a potential for dynamic color pixels, micro-imaging system, and multiplexed sensors.

  5. Periodically structured plasmonic waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saj, W. M.; Foteinopoulou, S.; Kafesaki, M.; Soukoulis, C. M.; Economou, E. N.

    2008-04-01

    We study surface plasmon polariton (SPP) guiding structures, which are a modification of the Metal-Insulator-Metal (MIM) waveguide. The designs are constructed by introducing a periodic modulation in a MIM waveguide, with a glass core and silver claddings. This periodic modulation is created either by causing periodic indentations in the silver slabs encompassing the glass core, or by increasing the glass spacer material in certain periodic locations. Our objective is to achieve long range sub-wavelength waveguiding with vast dispersion engineering capabilities. We employ the Finite Difference Time Domain Method (FDTD) with the Auxiliary Differential Equation method (ADE) for the calculation of the dispersion relation of the guided modes, as well as the real time propagation suggests that the guiding mechnism in the examined structures is based on the electromagnetic (EM) couping between the slit plasmon modes. These - depending on the design - exist in the grooves between the silver plates or in the larger areas of the glass core spacer. Put it different, the guiding mechanism in the examined SPP waveguide designs is analogous to the EM energy transfer along metallic nanoparticle chains.

  6. Asymptotics of surface-plasmon redshift saturation at subnanometric separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnitzer, Ory; Giannini, Vincenzo; Craster, Richard V.; Maier, Stefan A.

    2016-01-01

    Many promising nanophotonics endeavors hinge upon the unique plasmonic properties of nanometallic structures with narrow nonmetallic gaps, which support superconcentrated bonding modes that singularly redshift with decreasing separations. In this Rapid Communication, we present a descriptive physical picture, complemented by elementary asymptotic formulas, of a nonlocal mechanism for plasmon redshift saturation at subnanometric gap widths. Thus, by considering the electron-charge and field distributions in the close vicinity of the metal-vacuum interface, we show that nonlocality is asymptotically manifested as an effective potential discontinuity. For bonding modes in the near-contact limit, the latter discontinuity is shown to be effectively equivalent to a widening of the gap. As a consequence, the resonance-frequency near-contact asymptotics are a renormalization of the corresponding local ones. Specifically, the renormalization furnishes an asymptotic plasmon-frequency lower bound that scales with the 1 /4 power of the Fermi wavelength. We demonstrate these remarkable features in the prototypical cases of nanowire and nanosphere dimers, showing agreement between our elementary expressions and previously reported numerical computations.

  7. Optical activity and circular dichroism of plasmonic nanorod assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosravi Khorashad, Larousse; Liu, Na; Govorov, Alexander O.

    Plasmonic circular dichroism (CD) has offered an efficient spectroscopy method for the electronic, chemical, and structural properties of different types of light active molecules in the subwavelength regime. Among the different chiral geometries of metal nanoparticles utilized by the plasmonic CD spectroscopy, gold nanorods (AuNRs) have shown strong CD signals in the visible frequency range. In this work, we theoretically study the CD signals of AuNR arrangements in order to mimic structures and chemical bonds of chiral biomolecules. In particular, our twisted three-AuNR geometries resemble a molecular structure of tartaric acid. This molecule played an important role in the discovery of chemical chirality. In our study, we show that the strength of CD signals changes dramatically by tuning the interparticle distances and angles. Since the CD signals are typically weak, we develop reliable computational approaches to calculate the plasmonic CD. Manipulating interparticle distances, size, and molecular bond angles result in full control over peak positions, handedness, and positive and negative bands which are observed in the CD spectra. This work has been supported under the grant from Volkswagen Foundation. We also acknowledge the financial support of Condensed Matter and Surface Science program of Ohio University.

  8. Probing plasmonic breathing modes optically

    SciTech Connect

    Krug, Markus K. Reisecker, Michael; Hohenau, Andreas; Ditlbacher, Harald; Trügler, Andreas; Hohenester, Ulrich; Krenn, Joachim R.

    2014-10-27

    The confinement of surface plasmon modes in flat nanoparticles gives rise to plasmonic breathing modes. With a vanishing net dipole moment, breathing modes do not radiate, i.e., they are optically dark. Having thus escaped optical detection, breathing modes were only recently revealed in silver nanodisks with electron energy loss spectroscopy in an electron microscope. We show that for disk diameters >200 nm, retardation induced by oblique optical illumination relaxes the optically dark character. This makes breathing modes and thus the full plasmonic mode spectrum accessible to optical spectroscopy. The experimental spectroscopy data are in excellent agreement with numerical simulations.

  9. Dynamic coupling of plasmonic resonators

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Suyeon; Park, Q-Han

    2016-01-01

    We clarify the nature of dynamic coupling in plasmonic resonators and determine the dynamic coupling coefficient using a simple analytic model. We show that plasmonic resonators, such as subwavelength holes in a metal film which can be treated as bound charge oscillators, couple to each other through the retarded interaction of oscillating screened charges. Our dynamic coupling model offers, for the first time, a quantitative analytic description of the fundamental symmetric and anti-symmetric modes of coupled resonators which agrees with experimental results. Our model also reveals that plasmonic electromagnetically induced transparency arises in any coupled resonators of slightly unequal lengths, as confirmed by a rigorous numerical calculation and experiments. PMID:26911786

  10. Rhodium nanoparticles for ultraviolet plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Watson, Anne M; Zhang, Xiao; Alcaraz de la Osa, Rodrigo; Marcos Sanz, Juan; González, Francisco; Moreno, Fernando; Finkelstein, Gleb; Liu, Jie; Everitt, Henry O

    2015-02-11

    The nonoxidizing catalytic noble metal rhodium is introduced for ultraviolet plasmonics. Planar tripods of 8 nm Rh nanoparticles, synthesized by a modified polyol reduction method, have a calculated local surface plasmon resonance near 330 nm. By attaching p-aminothiophenol, local field-enhanced Raman spectra and accelerated photodamage were observed under near-resonant ultraviolet illumination, while charge transfer simultaneously increased fluorescence for up to 13 min. The combined local field enhancement and charge transfer demonstrate essential steps toward plasmonically enhanced ultraviolet photocatalysis.

  11. Partially coherent surface plasmon polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norrman, Andreas; Ponomarenko, Sergey A.; Friberg, Ari T.

    2016-12-01

    We formulate a framework to tailor the electromagnetic coherence of polychromatic surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) at a metal-air interface by controlling the correlations of the excitation light. The formalism covers stationary and nonstationary SPP fields of arbitrary spectra. We show that narrowband SPPs are virtually propagation invariant and strictly polarized, whereas the coherence properties of broadband SPPs can be widely tuned to specific applications. The connection between the coherence state of the light source and the ensuing SPP field establishes a novel paradigm in statistical plasmonics with far-reaching implications for plasmon coherence engineering.

  12. Hybrid grapheme plasmonic waveguide modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansell, D.; Thackray, B. D.; Aznakayeva, D. E.; Thomas, P.; Auton, G. H.; Marshall, O. P.; Rodriguez, F. J.; Radko, I. P.; Han, Z.; Bozhevolnyi, S. I.; Grigorenko, A. N.

    2016-03-01

    The unique optical and electronic properties of graphene allow one to realize active optical devices. While several types of graphene-based photonic modulators have already been demonstrated, the potential of combining the versatility of graphene with sub-wavelength field confinement of plasmonic/metallic structures is not fully realized. Here we report fabrication and study of hybrid graphene-plasmonic modulators. We consider several types of modulators and identify the most promising one for light modulation at telecom and near-infrared. Our proof-of-concept results pave the way towards on-chip realization of efficient graphene-based active plasmonic waveguide devices for optical communications.

  13. [Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap].

    PubMed

    Müller, Veronika; Gálffy, Gabriella; Tamási, Lilla

    2011-01-16

    Asthma bronchiale and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are the most prevalent lung diseases characterized by inflammation of the airways. International and Hungarian guidelines provide proper definitions for clinical symptoms, diagnostics and therapy of both diseases. However, in everyday clinical practice, overlap of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has become more frequent. As guidelines are mainly based on large, multicenter, randomized, controlled trials that exclude overlap patients, there is a lack of diagnostic and especially therapeutic strategies for these patients. This review summarizes clinical characteristics of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap, and provides daily practical examples for its management.

  14. Yankee bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Delaney, P. )

    1993-10-01

    Yankee and Euromarket bonds may soon find their way into the financing of power projects in Latin America. For developers seeking long-term commitments under build, own, operate, and transfer (BOOT) power projects in Latin America, the benefits are substantial.

  15. Plasmonic nanostructures for electronic designs of photovoltaic devices: plasmonic hot-carrier photovoltaic architectures and plasmonic electrode structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tong; Su, Dan; Li, Ruo-Zhou; Wang, Shan-Jiang; Shan, Feng; Xu, Jia-Jia; Zhang, Xiao-Yang

    2016-10-01

    The tunable and amazing properties of plasmonic nanostructures have received significant attentions in the fields of solar energy conversion. Plasmonic nanostructures provide pathways to directly convert solar energy into electric energy by hot-carrier generation. They can also serve as economical electrodes for high-efficient carrier collection. Both have promising potential for manufacturing new generation solar cells. Here, we review recent advances in plasmonic nanostructures for electronic designs of photovoltaic devices and specially focus on plasmonic hot-carrier photovoltaic architectures and plasmonic electrode structures. Technical challenges toward low-cost and high-performance plasmonics-based solar cells are also discussed.

  16. Graphene-protected copper and silver plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Kravets, V G; Jalil, R; Kim, Y-J; Ansell, D; Aznakayeva, D E; Thackray, B; Britnell, L; Belle, B D; Withers, F; Radko, I P; Han, Z; Bozhevolnyi, S I; Novoselov, K S; Geim, A K; Grigorenko, A N

    2014-07-01

    Plasmonics has established itself as a branch of physics which promises to revolutionize data processing, improve photovoltaics, and increase sensitivity of bio-detection. A widespread use of plasmonic devices is notably hindered by high losses and the absence of stable and inexpensive metal films suitable for plasmonic applications. To this end, there has been a continuous search for alternative plasmonic materials that are also compatible with complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. Here we show that copper and silver protected by graphene are viable candidates. Copper films covered with one to a few graphene layers show excellent plasmonic characteristics. They can be used to fabricate plasmonic devices and survive for at least a year, even in wet and corroding conditions. As a proof of concept, we use the graphene-protected copper to demonstrate dielectric loaded plasmonic waveguides and test sensitivity of surface plasmon resonances. Our results are likely to initiate wide use of graphene-protected plasmonics.

  17. Graphene-protected copper and silver plasmonics

    PubMed Central

    Kravets, V. G.; Jalil, R.; Kim, Y.-J.; Ansell, D.; Aznakayeva, D. E.; Thackray, B.; Britnell, L.; Belle, B. D.; Withers, F.; Radko, I. P.; Han, Z.; Bozhevolnyi, S. I.; Novoselov, K. S.; Geim, A. K.; Grigorenko, A. N.

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonics has established itself as a branch of physics which promises to revolutionize data processing, improve photovoltaics, and increase sensitivity of bio-detection. A widespread use of plasmonic devices is notably hindered by high losses and the absence of stable and inexpensive metal films suitable for plasmonic applications. To this end, there has been a continuous search for alternative plasmonic materials that are also compatible with complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. Here we show that copper and silver protected by graphene are viable candidates. Copper films covered with one to a few graphene layers show excellent plasmonic characteristics. They can be used to fabricate plasmonic devices and survive for at least a year, even in wet and corroding conditions. As a proof of concept, we use the graphene-protected copper to demonstrate dielectric loaded plasmonic waveguides and test sensitivity of surface plasmon resonances. Our results are likely to initiate wide use of graphene-protected plasmonics. PMID:24980150

  18. Characteristics of hydrogen bond revealed from water clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yan; Chen, Hongshan; Zhang, Cairong; Zhang, Yan; Yin, Yuehong

    2014-09-01

    The hydrogen bond network is responsible for the exceptional physical and chemical properties of water, however, the description of hydrogen bond remains a challenge for the studies of condensed water. The investigation of structural and binding properties of water clusters provides a key for understanding the H-bonds in bulk water. In this paper, a new set of geometric parameters are defined to describe the extent of the overlap between the bonding orbital of the donor OH and the nonbonding orbital of the lone-pair of the acceptor molecule. This orbital overlap plays a dominant role for the strength of H-bonds. The dependences of the binding energy of the water dimer on these parameters are studied. The results show that these parameters properly describe the H-bond strength. The ring, book, cage and prism isomers of water hexamer form 6, 7, 8 and 9 H-bonds, and the strength of the bonding in these isomers changes markedly. The internally-solvated and the all-surface structures of (H2O) n for n = 17, 19 and 21 are nearly isoenergetic. The internally-solvated isomers form fewer but stronger H-bonds. The hydrogen bonding in the above clusters are investigated in detail. The geometric parameters can well describe the characters of the H-bonds, and they correlate well with the H-bond strength. For the structures forming stronger H-bonds, the H-bond lengths are shorter, the angle parameters are closer to the optimum values, and their rms deviations are smaller. The H-bonds emanating from DDAA and DDA molecules as H-donor are relatively weak. The vibrational spectra of (H2O) n ( n = 17, 19 and 21) are studied as well. The stretching vibration of the intramolecular OH bond is sensitive to its bonding environment. The H-bond strength judged from the geometric parameters is in good agreement with the bonding strength judged from the stretching frequencies.

  19. Beam bending via plasmonic lenses.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanhui; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Nawaz, Ahmad Ahsan; Kiraly, Brian; Hao, Qingzhen; Liu, Yanjun; Huang, Tony Jun

    2010-10-25

    We have designed and characterized three different types of plasmonic lenses that cannot only focus, but can also bend electromagnetic (EM) waves. The bending effect is achieved by constructing an asymmetric phase front caused by varying phase retardations in EM waves as they pass through a plasmonic lens. With an incident wave normal to the lens surface, light bends up to 8° off the axial direction. The optical wave propagation was numerically investigated using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. Simulation results show that the proposed plasmonic lenses allow effective beam bending under both normal and tilted incidence. With their relatively large bending range and capability to perform in the far field, the plamsonic lenses described in this article could be valuable in applications such as photonic communication and plasmonic circuits.

  20. Dispersion engineering of surface plasmons.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Isroel M; Bendoym, Igor; Jung, Young U; Golovin, Andrii B; Crouse, David T

    2013-12-30

    In this work, it is shown how the shapes of surface plasmon dispersion curves can be engineered by manipulating the distribution of the electromagnetic fields in multilayer structures, which themselves are controlled by the free electron density in metal-like materials, such as doped semiconductors in the THz spectral range. By having a nonuniform free electron density profile, reduced relative to that in typical bulk metals, the electromagnetic fields of surface plasmons are distributed in different metallic materials that have different complex dielectric permittivities. As the in-plane component of surface plasmon's wave-vector increases, they become more confined to a particular layer of the multilayer structure and have energies that are predictable by considering the permittivity of the layer in which the fields are most concentrated. Unusual and arbitrary shapes of surface plasmon dispersion curves can be designed, including stair steps and dovetails shapes.

  1. Group-IV midinfrared plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagioni, Paolo; Frigerio, Jacopo; Samarelli, Antonio; Gallacher, Kevin; Baldassarre, Leonetta; Sakat, Emilie; Calandrini, Eugenio; Millar, Ross W.; Giliberti, Valeria; Isella, Giovanni; Paul, Douglas J.; Ortolani, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The use of heavily doped semiconductors to achieve plasma frequencies in the mid-IR has been recently proposed as a promising way to obtain high-quality and tunable plasmonic materials. We introduce a plasmonic platform based on epitaxial n-type Ge grown on standard Si wafers by means of low-energy plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Due to the large carrier concentration achieved with P dopants and to the compatibility with the existing CMOS technology, SiGe plasmonics hold promises for mid-IR applications in optoelectronics, IR detection, sensing, and light harvesting. As a representative example, we show simulations of mid-IR plasmonic waveguides based on the experimentally retrieved dielectric constants of the grown materials.

  2. Flexible transformation plasmonics using graphene.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wei Bing; Zhu, Wei; Xu, Hong Ju; Ni, Zhen Hua; Dong, Zheng Gao; Cui, Tie Jun

    2013-05-06

    The flexible control of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) is important and intriguing due to its wide application in novel plasmonic devices. Transformation optics (TO) offers the capability either to confine the SPP propagation on rigid curved/uneven surfaces, or to control the flow of SPPs on planar surfaces. However, TO has not permitted us to confine, manipulate, and control SPP waves on flexible curved surfaces. Here, we propose to confine and freely control flexible SPPs using TO and graphene. We show that SPP waves can be naturally confined and propagate on curved or uneven graphene surfaces with little bending and radiation losses, and the confined SPPs are further manipulated and controlled using TO. Flexible plasmonic devices are presented, including the bending waveguides, wave splitter, and Luneburg lens on curved surfaces. Together with the intrinsic flexibility, graphene can be served as a good platform for flexible transformation plasmonics.

  3. Correlated edge overlaps in multiplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, Gareth J.; Bianconi, Ginestra; da Costa, Rui A.; Dorogovtsev, Sergey N.; Mendes, José F. F.

    2016-07-01

    We develop the theory of sparse multiplex networks with partially overlapping links based on their local treelikeness. This theory enables us to find the giant mutually connected component in a two-layer multiplex network with arbitrary correlations between connections of different types. We find that correlations between the overlapping and nonoverlapping links markedly change the phase diagram of the system, leading to multiple hybrid phase transitions. For assortative correlations we observe recurrent hybrid phase transitions.

  4. Particle plasmons: Why shape matters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, William L.

    2016-08-01

    Simple analytic expressions for the polarizability of metallic nanoparticles are in wide use in the field of plasmonics, but their origins are not obvious. In this article, expressions for the polarizability of a particle are derived in the quasistatic limit in a manner that allows the physical origin of the terms to be clearly seen. The discussion is tutorial in nature, with particular attention given to the role of particle shape since this is a controlling factor in particle plasmon resonances.

  5. Infrared lidar overlap function: an experimental determination.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Rascado, Juan Luis; Costa, Maria João; Bortoli, Daniele; Silva, Ana Maria; Lyamani, Hassan; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas

    2010-09-13

    The most recent works demonstrate that the lidar overlap function, which describes the overlap between the laser beam and the receiver field of view, can be determined experimentally for the 355 and 532 nm channels using Raman signals. Nevertheless, the Raman channels cannot be used to determine the lidar overlap for the infrared channel (1064 nm) because of their low intensity. In addition, many Raman lidar systems only provide inelastic signals with reasonable signal-to-noise ratio at nighttime. In view of this fact, this work presents a modification of that method, based on the comparison of attenuated backscatter profiles derived from lidar and ceilometer, to retrieve the overlap function for the lidar infrared channel. Similarly to the Raman overlap method, the approach presented here allows to derive the overlap correction without an explicit knowledge of all system parameters. The application of the proposed methodology will improve the potential of Raman lidars to investigate the aerosol microphysical properties in the planetary boundary layer, extending the information of 1064 nm backscatter profiles to the ground and allowing the retrieval of microphysical properties practically close to the surface.

  6. Overlapping Antisense Transcription in the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Fahey, M. E.; Moore, T. F.

    2002-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates an important role for non-coding RNA molecules in eukaryotic cell regulation. A small number of coding and non-coding overlapping antisense transcripts (OATs) in eukaryotes have been reported, some of which regulate expression of the corresponding sense transcript. The prevalence of this phenomenon is unknown, but there may be an enrichment of such transcripts at imprinted gene loci. Taking a bioinformatics approach, we systematically searched a human mRNA database (RefSeq) for complementary regions that might facilitate pairing with other transcripts. We report 56 pairs of overlapping transcripts, in which each member of the pair is transcribed from the same locus. This allows us to make an estimate of 1000 for the minimum number of such transcript pairs in the entire human genome. This is a surprisingly large number of overlapping gene pairs and, clearly, some of the overlaps may not be functionally significant. Nonetheless, this may indicate an important general role for overlapping antisense control in gene regulation. EST databases were also investigated in order to address the prevalence of cases of imprinted genes with associated non-coding overlapping, antisense transcripts. However, EST databases were found to be completely inappropriate for this purpose. PMID:18628857

  7. Simultaneous observation of the quantization and the interference pattern of a plasmonic near-field

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, L; Lummen, T.T.A.; Quiñonez, E; Murooka, Y; Reed, B.W.; Barwick, B; Carbone, F

    2015-01-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons can confine electromagnetic fields in subwavelength spaces and are of interest for photonics, optical data storage devices and biosensing applications. In analogy to photons, they exhibit wave–particle duality, whose different aspects have recently been observed in separate tailored experiments. Here we demonstrate the ability of ultrafast transmission electron microscopy to simultaneously image both the spatial interference and the quantization of such confined plasmonic fields. Our experiments are accomplished by spatiotemporally overlapping electron and light pulses on a single nanowire suspended on a graphene film. The resulting energy exchange between single electrons and the quanta of the photoinduced near-field is imaged synchronously with its spatial interference pattern. This methodology enables the control and visualization of plasmonic fields at the nanoscale, providing a promising tool for understanding the fundamental properties of confined electromagnetic fields and the development of advanced photonic circuits. PMID:25728197

  8. Simultaneous observation of the quantization and the interference pattern of a plasmonic near-field

    SciTech Connect

    Piazza, L.; Lummen, T. T. A.; Quiñonez, E.; Murooka, Y.; Reed, B. W.; Barwick, B.; Carbone, F.

    2015-03-02

    Surface plasmon polaritons can confine electromagnetic fields in subwavelength spaces and are of interest for photonics, optical data storage devices and biosensing applications. In analogy to photons, they exhibit wave–particle duality, whose different aspects have recently been observed in separate tailored experiments. Here we demonstrate the ability of ultrafast transmission electron microscopy to simultaneously image both the spatial interference and the quantization of such confined plasmonic fields. Our experiments are accomplished by spatiotemporally overlapping electron and light pulses on a single nanowire suspended on a graphene film. The resulting energy exchange between single electrons and the quanta of the photoinduced near-field is imaged synchronously with its spatial interference pattern. In conclusion, this methodology enables the control and visualization of plasmonic fields at the nanoscale, providing a promising tool for understanding the fundamental properties of confined electromagnetic fields and the development of advanced photonic circuits.

  9. Simultaneous observation of the quantization and the interference pattern of a plasmonic near-field

    DOE PAGES

    Piazza, L.; Lummen, T. T. A.; Quiñonez, E.; ...

    2015-03-02

    Surface plasmon polaritons can confine electromagnetic fields in subwavelength spaces and are of interest for photonics, optical data storage devices and biosensing applications. In analogy to photons, they exhibit wave–particle duality, whose different aspects have recently been observed in separate tailored experiments. Here we demonstrate the ability of ultrafast transmission electron microscopy to simultaneously image both the spatial interference and the quantization of such confined plasmonic fields. Our experiments are accomplished by spatiotemporally overlapping electron and light pulses on a single nanowire suspended on a graphene film. The resulting energy exchange between single electrons and the quanta of the photoinducedmore » near-field is imaged synchronously with its spatial interference pattern. In conclusion, this methodology enables the control and visualization of plasmonic fields at the nanoscale, providing a promising tool for understanding the fundamental properties of confined electromagnetic fields and the development of advanced photonic circuits.« less

  10. Simultaneous observation of the quantization and the interference pattern of a plasmonic near-field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazza, L.; Lummen, T. T. A.; Quiñonez, E.; Murooka, Y.; Reed, B. W.; Barwick, B.; Carbone, F.

    2015-03-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons can confine electromagnetic fields in subwavelength spaces and are of interest for photonics, optical data storage devices and biosensing applications. In analogy to photons, they exhibit wave-particle duality, whose different aspects have recently been observed in separate tailored experiments. Here we demonstrate the ability of ultrafast transmission electron microscopy to simultaneously image both the spatial interference and the quantization of such confined plasmonic fields. Our experiments are accomplished by spatiotemporally overlapping electron and light pulses on a single nanowire suspended on a graphene film. The resulting energy exchange between single electrons and the quanta of the photoinduced near-field is imaged synchronously with its spatial interference pattern. This methodology enables the control and visualization of plasmonic fields at the nanoscale, providing a promising tool for understanding the fundamental properties of confined electromagnetic fields and the development of advanced photonic circuits.

  11. Plasmon-Induced Resonant Energy Transfer: a coherent dipole-dipole coupling mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristow, Alan D.; Cushing, Scott K.; Li, Jiangtian; Wu, Nianqiang

    Metal-insulator-semiconductor core-shell nanoparticles have been used to demonstrate a dipole-dipole coupling mechanism that is entirely dependent on the dephasing time of the localized plasmonic resonance. Consequently, the short-time scale of the plasmons leads to broad energy uncertainty that allows for excitation of charge carriers in the semiconductor via stimulation of photons with energies below the energy band gap. In addition, this coherent energy transfer process overcomes interfacial losses often associated with direct charge transfer. This work explores the efficiency of the energy transfer process, the dipole-dipole coupling strength with dipole separation, shell thickness and plasmonic resonance overlap. We demonstrate limits where the coherent nature of the coupling is switched off and charge transfer processes can dominate. Experiments are performed using transient absorption spectroscopy. Results are compared to calculations using a quantum master equation. These nanostructures show strong potential for improving solar light-harvesting for power and fuel generation.

  12. Tunable surface plasmon devices

    DOEpatents

    Shaner, Eric A.; Wasserman, Daniel

    2011-08-30

    A tunable extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) device wherein the tunability derives from controlled variation of the dielectric constant of a semiconducting material (semiconductor) in evanescent-field contact with a metallic array of sub-wavelength apertures. The surface plasmon resonance wavelength can be changed by changing the dielectric constant of the dielectric material. In embodiments of this invention, the dielectric material is a semiconducting material. The dielectric constant of the semiconducting material in the metal/semiconductor interfacial region is controllably adjusted by adjusting one or more of the semiconductor plasma frequency, the concentration and effective mass of free carriers, and the background high-frequency dielectric constant in the interfacial region. Thermal heating and/or voltage-gated carrier-concentration changes may be used to variably adjust the value of the semiconductor dielectric constant.

  13. Nonlinear terahertz superconducting plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jingbo; Zhang, Caihong; Liang, Lanju; Jin, Biaobing; Kawayama, Iwao; Murakami, Hironaru; Kang, Lin; Xu, Weiwei; Wang, Huabing; Chen, Jian; Tonouchi, Masayoshi; Wu, Peiheng

    2014-10-01

    Nonlinear terahertz (THz) transmission through subwavelength hole array in superconducting niobium nitride (NbN) film is experimentally investigated using intense THz pulses. The good agreement between the measurement and numerical simulations indicates that the field strength dependent transmission mainly arises from the nonlinear properties of the superconducting film. Under weak THz pulses, the transmission peak can be tuned over a frequency range of 145 GHz which is attributed to the high kinetic inductance of 50 nm-thick NbN film. Utilizing the THz pump-THz probe spectroscopy, we study the dynamic process of transmission spectra and demonstrate that the transition time of such superconducting plasmonic device is within 5 ps.

  14. Plasmonics in Biology and Plasmon-Controlled Fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Lakowicz, Joseph R

    2006-03-01

    Fluorescence technology is fully entrenched in all aspects of biological research. To a significant extent, future advances in biology and medicine depend on the advances in the capabilities of fluorescence measurements. As examples, the sensitivity of many clinical assays is limited by sample autofluorescence, single-molecule detection is limited by the brightness and photostability of the fluorophores, and the spatial resolution of cellular imaging is limited to about one-half of the wavelength of the incident light. We believe a combination of fluorescence, plasmonics, and nanofabrication can fundamentally change and increase the capabilities of fluorescence technology. Surface plasmons are collective oscillations of free electrons in metallic surfaces and particles. Surface plasmons, without fluorescence, are already in use to a limited extent in biological research. These applications include the use of surface plasmon resonance to measure bioaffinity reactions and the use of metal colloids as light-scattering probes. However, the uses of surface plasmons in biology are not limited to their optical absorption or extinction. We now know that fluorophores in the excited state can create plasmons that radiate into the far field and that fluorophores in the ground state can interact with and be excited by surface plasmons. These reciprocal interactions suggest that the novel optical absorption and scattering properties of metallic nanostructures can be used to control the decay rates, location, and direction of fluorophore emission. We refer to these phenomena as plasmon-controlled fluorescence (PCF). We predict that PCF will result in a new generation of probes and devices. These likely possibilities include ultrabright single-particle probes that do not photobleach, probes for selective multiphoton excitation with decreased light intensities, and distance measurements in biomolecular assemblies in the range from 10 to 200 nm. Additionally, PCF is likely to allow

  15. Plasmonics in Biology and Plasmon-Controlled Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence technology is fully entrenched in all aspects of biological research. To a significant extent, future advances in biology and medicine depend on the advances in the capabilities of fluorescence measurements. As examples, the sensitivity of many clinical assays is limited by sample autofluorescence, single-molecule detection is limited by the brightness and photostability of the fluorophores, and the spatial resolution of cellular imaging is limited to about one-half of the wavelength of the incident light. We believe a combination of fluorescence, plasmonics, and nanofabrication can fundamentally change and increase the capabilities of fluorescence technology. Surface plasmons are collective oscillations of free electrons in metallic surfaces and particles. Surface plasmons, without fluorescence, are already in use to a limited extent in biological research. These applications include the use of surface plasmon resonance to measure bioaffinity reactions and the use of metal colloids as light-scattering probes. However, the uses of surface plasmons in biology are not limited to their optical absorption or extinction. We now know that fluorophores in the excited state can create plasmons that radiate into the far field and that fluorophores in the ground state can interact with and be excited by surface plasmons. These reciprocal interactions suggest that the novel optical absorption and scattering properties of metallic nanostructures can be used to control the decay rates, location, and direction of fluorophore emission. We refer to these phenomena as plasmon-controlled fluorescence (PCF). We predict that PCF will result in a new generation of probes and devices. These likely possibilities include ultrabright single-particle probes that do not photobleach, probes for selective multiphoton excitation with decreased light intensities, and distance measurements in biomolecular assemblies in the range from 10 to 200 nm. Additionally, PCF is likely to allow

  16. Planar plasmonic chiral nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zu, Shuai; Bao, Yanjun; Fang, Zheyu

    2016-02-01

    A strong chiral optical response induced at a plasmonic Fano resonance in a planar Au heptamer nanostructure was experimentally and theoretically demonstrated. The scattering spectra show the characteristic narrow-band feature of Fano resonances for both left and right circular polarized lights, with a chiral response reaching 30% at the Fano resonance. Specifically, we systematically investigate the chiral response of planar heptamers with gradually changing the inter-particle rotation angles and separation distance. The chiral spectral characteristics clearly depend on the strength of Fano resonances and the associated near-field optical distributions. Finite element method simulations together with a multipole expansion method demonstrate that the enhanced chirality is caused by the excitation of magnetic quadrupolar and electric toroidal dipolar modes. Our work provides an effective method for the design of 2D nanostructures with a strong chiral response.A strong chiral optical response induced at a plasmonic Fano resonance in a planar Au heptamer nanostructure was experimentally and theoretically demonstrated. The scattering spectra show the characteristic narrow-band feature of Fano resonances for both left and right circular polarized lights, with a chiral response reaching 30% at the Fano resonance. Specifically, we systematically investigate the chiral response of planar heptamers with gradually changing the inter-particle rotation angles and separation distance. The chiral spectral characteristics clearly depend on the strength of Fano resonances and the associated near-field optical distributions. Finite element method simulations together with a multipole expansion method demonstrate that the enhanced chirality is caused by the excitation of magnetic quadrupolar and electric toroidal dipolar modes. Our work provides an effective method for the design of 2D nanostructures with a strong chiral response. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available

  17. Free-standing chiral plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leong, Eunice Sok Ping; Deng, Jie; Wu, Siji; Khoo, Eng Huat; Liu, Yan Jun

    2014-11-01

    Chiral plasmonic nanostructures offer the ability to achieve strong optical circular dichroism (CD) activity over a broad spectral range, which has been challenging for chiral molecules. Chiral plasmonic nanostructures have been extensively studied based on top-down and bottom-up fabrication techniques. Particularly, in the top-down electron-beam lithography, 3D plasmonic nanostructure fabrication involves layer-by-layer patterning and complex alignment, which is time-consuming and causes many defects in the structures. Here, we present a free-standing 3D chiral plamonic nanostructures using the electron-beam lithography technique with much simplified fabrication processes. The 3D chiral plasmonic nanostructures consist of a free-standing ultrathin silicon nitride membrane with well-aligned L-shape metal nanostructures on one side and disk-shape ones on the other side. The free-standing membrane provides an ultra-smooth metal/dielectric interface and uniformly defines the gap between the upper and lower layers in an array of chiral nanostructures. Such free-standing chiral plasmonic nanostructures exhibit strong CD at optical frequencies, which can be engineered by simply changing the disk size on one side of the membrane. Experimental results are in good agreement with the finite-difference time-domain simulations. Such free-standing chiral plasmonics holds great potential for chirality analysis of biomolecules, drugs, and chemicals.

  18. Diffusion bonding

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert C.

    1976-06-22

    1. A method for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding, comprising the steps of coating at least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces with nickel, positioning a coated surface portion in a contiguous relationship with an other surface portion, subjecting the contiguously disposed surface portions to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure, applying a force upon the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other, heating the contiguous surface portions to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, substantially uniformly decreasing the applied force while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature, and maintaining a portion of the applied force at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions.

  19. Probabilistic approach for sensing performances of localized surface plasmon resonance biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Heejin; Lee, Wonju; Hwang, Taewon; Kim, Donghyun

    2015-07-01

    We analyze sensing performances of localized surface plasmon resonance biosensors based on the overlap between target distribution and local field intensity produced by silver nanoislands in three detection models of non-specific, non-colocalized, and colocalized detection. The behavior of biomolecules was modeled to follow a probabilistic model using Poisson distribution. The results have found that the colocalized detection achieves the highest overlap signature with the smallest uncertainty and can enhance the limit of detection by more than 10000 times compared to conventional non-specific detection.

  20. Thermal phenomena in quantum plasmonics (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarychev, Andrey K.; Tartakovsky, Gennady; Vergeles, Sergey; Parfenyev, Vladimir

    2015-09-01

    Plasmon nanolasers, also known as SPASERs, were suggested by Bergman and Stockman in 2003. Quantum plasmonics attract much attention in recent years due to the numerous potential applications in the plasmonics. We consider thermal effects in the metal nanoresonator immersed in the active, laser medium. The size of the resonator is much less than the wavelength. The plasmon field inside the nanoresonator operates as a quantum object. Due to the nanosize of the resonator, the internal plasmon electric field is about the atomic field even for few plasmon quants. The coupling between the plasmon field and plasmon resonator is anomalous strong. We develop the quantum dynamics of the plasmon field and show that the SPASER may be the subject of thermal instability. The loss in SPASER increases with increasing the temperature when the average number of the plasmons is maintained at the stationary level. Therefore, the heat generation increases with increasing the temperature. This positive feedback results in the thermal instability. When the energy, accumulated in the plasmon nanoresonator, exceeds the instability threshold the temperature increases exponentially. We find the increment of the temperature growth and lifetime as function of the loss in metal and the structure of the plasmon resonator. We consider how the thermal instability influences the luminescence and find how the lasing threshold is changed. The coherence of the light emitted by the plasmon laser is also considered. The thermal stability of the nanolaser is crucial for any practical application.

  1. EDITORIAL: Plasmas and plasmons: links in nanosilver Plasmas and plasmons: links in nanosilver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2013-03-01

    appearing in the 620-800 nm regions of the absorption spectra. A number of research groups have investigated the possibility of exploiting the plasmonic properties of silver and gold nanostructures for optoelectronic devices [7-9]. The advantages can be quite substantial. Researchers in Korea successfully used silver nanoparticles to obtain a 38% increase in performance of blue LEDs by using silver nanoparticles embedded in p-GaN [10]. The researchers attribute the improvement to an increase in the spontaneous emission rate through resonance coupling between the excitons in multiple quantum wells and localized surface plasmons in the silver nanoparticles. In their work reported in this issue Kostya Ostrikov and his co-authors bridge the link between microplasma-assisted electrochemical process parameters and the plasmonic response. As they point out, 'This is an important experimental step towards bringing together plasma chemistry and plasmonics' [1]. All-gas-phase plasma approaches have already been demonstrated for the synthesis of nanoparticles of other metals. X D Pi and colleagues from the University of Minnesota demonstrated how one simple gas-phase process could produce stable silicon nanocrystal emitters with tailored size and surface functionalization [11]. Previously silicon nanocrystals had been prone to emission instabilities in air. Now Ostrikov and colleagues at the University of Sydney, CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering in Australia and the Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas in China have studied microplasma-assisted electrochemical synthesis of Ag nanoparticles for plasmonic applications [1]. The synthesis uses moderate temperatures and atmospheric pressures and does not involve any toxic reducing agents. In addition they demonstrate how it allows control over nanoparticle size and interparticle spacing to optimize performance in device applications. Despite the overlap in plasma physics and the origins of plasmonic phenomena, studies of the

  2. Nonequilibrium evolution of window overlaps in spin glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manssen, Markus; Hartmann, Alexander K.; Young, A. P.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate numerically the time dependence of "window" overlaps in a three-dimensional Ising spin glass below its transition temperature after a rapid quench. Using an efficient GPU implementation, we are able to study large systems up to lateral length L =128 and up to long times of t =108 sweeps. We find that the data scales according to the ratio of the window size W to the nonequilibrium coherence length ξ (t ) . We also show a substantial change in behavior if the system is run for long enough that it globally equilibrates, i.e., ξ (t )≈L /2 , where L is the lattice size. This indicates that the local behavior of a spin glass depends on the spin configurations (and presumably also the bonds) far away. We compare with similar simulations for the Ising ferromagnet. Based on these results, we speculate on a connection between the nonequilibrium dynamics discussed here and averages computed theoretically using the "metastate."

  3. Overlapping genetic codes for overlapping frameshifted genes in Testudines, and Lepidochelys olivacea as special case.

    PubMed

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2012-12-01

    Mitochondrial genes code for additional proteins after +2 frameshifts by reassigning stops to code for amino acids, which defines overlapping genetic codes for overlapping genes. Turtles recode stops UAR → Trp and AGR → Lys (AGR → Gly in the marine Olive Ridley turtle, Lepidochelys olivacea). In Lepidochelys the +2 frameshifted mitochondrial Cytb gene lacks stops, open reading frames from other genes code for unknown proteins, and for regular mitochondrial proteins after frameshifts according to the overlapping genetic code. Lepidochelys' inversion between proteins coded by regular and overlapping genetic codes substantiates the existence of overlap coding. ND4 differs among Lepidochelys mitochondrial genomes: it is regular in DQ486893; in NC_011516, the open reading frame codes for another protein, the regular ND4 protein is coded by the frameshifted sequence reassigning stops as in other turtles. These systematic patterns are incompatible with Genbank/sequencing errors and DNA decay. Random mixing of synonymous codons, conserving main frame coding properties, shows optimization of natural sequences for overlap coding; Ka/Ks analyses show high positive (directional) selection on overlapping genes. Tests based on circular genetic codes confirm programmed frameshifts in ND3 and ND4l genes, and predicted frameshift sites for overlap coding in Lepidochelys. Chelonian mitochondria adapt for overlapping gene expression: cloverleaf formation by antisense tRNAs with predicted anticodons matching stops coevolves with overlap coding; antisense tRNAs with predicted expanded anticodons (frameshift suppressor tRNAs) associate with frameshift-coding in ND3 and ND4l, a potential regulation of frameshifted overlap coding. Anaeroby perhaps switched between regular and overlap coding genes in Lepidochelys.

  4. Exciton-plasmon and spin-plasmon interactions in hybrid semiconductor-metal nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govorov, Alexander

    2011-03-01

    Coulomb and electromagnetic interactions between excitons and plasmons in nanocrystals cause several effects: energy transfer between nanoparticles, plasmon enhancement, Lamb shifts of exciton lines, Fano interference. In a complex composed of semiconductor quantum dot and metal nanoparticle, plasmons interact with spin-polarized excitons. This interaction leads to the formation of coupled spin-plasmon excitations and to spin-dependent Fano resonances. If an exciton-plasmon system includes chiral elements (chiral molecules or nanocrystals), the exciton-plasmon interaction is able to create new plasmonic lines in circular dichroism spectra.

  5. Automatic segmentation of overlapping and touching chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhiqiang; Chen, Xiaohua; Zhang, Renli; Yu, Chang

    2001-09-01

    This paper describes a technique to segment overlapping and touching chromosomes of human metaphase cells. Automated chromosome classification has been an important pattern recognition problem for decades, numerous attempts were made in the past to characterize chromosome band patterns. But successful separation between touching and overlapping chromosomes is vital for correct classification. Since chromosomes are non-rigid objects, common methods for separation between touching chromosomes are not usable. We proposed a method using shape concave and convex information, topology analysis information, and band pale paths for segmentation of touching and overlapping chromosomes. To detect shape concave and convex information, we should first pre-segment the chromosomes and get the edge of overlapping and touching chromosomes. After filtering the original image using edge-preserving filter, we adopt the Otsu's segmentation method and extract the boundary of chromosomes. Hence the boundary can be used for segment the overlapping and touching chromosomes by detecting the concave and convex information based on boundary information. Most of the traditional boundary-based algorithms detect corners based on two steps: the first step is to acquire the smoothed version of curvature at every point along the contour, and the second step is to detect the positions where curvature maximal occur and threshold the curvature as corner points. Recently wavelet transform has been adopted into corner detection algorithms. Since the metaphase overlapping chromosomes has multi-scale corners, we adopt a multi-scale corner detection method based on Hua's method for corner detection. For touching chromosomes, it is convenient to split them using pale paths. Starting from concave corner points, a search algorithm is represented. The searching algorithm traces three pixels into the object in the direction of the normal vector in order to avoid stopping at the initial boundary until it

  6. Plasmonic response of partially gated field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudin, S.; Rupper, G.; Reed, M. L.; Shur, M.

    2016-09-01

    Electron density oscillations in the transistor channels - plasma waves in the two-dimensional electron gas - determine the high frequency device response. Plasmonic field effect transistors have emerged as very sensitive, tunable, and extremely fast detectors of THz radiation. They have been implemented using silicon (CMOS), AlGaAs/InGaAs HEMTs, and AlGaAs/InGaAs HEMTs, with the HEMTs shown to operate more efficiently at higher THz frequencies. These HEMTs have both gated and ungated sections of the device channel between the source and drain, and the photovoltaic regime of operation requires an asymmetric gate placement in the device channel. The interactions of the plasma waves in the gated and ungated channel regions strongly affect the overall response and have been investigated in numerous publications. This work addresses a new aspect of such interaction - the effect of the relative position of the gated and ungated section. We show this previously unexplored effect plays a dominant role in determining the response. The results of the numerical simulation based on the solution of the complete system of the hydrodynamic equations describing the electron fluid in the device channel show that the inverse response frequency could be approximated by the sum of the gated plasmon transit time in the gated section of the device, the ungated plasmon transit time in the ungated section of the device between the gate and the drain, and the RC gate-to-source constant. Here R and C are the resistance and capacitance of the gate to source section. Hence, the highest speed is achieved when the gate is as close to the source as possible. This suggests a novel plasmonic detector design, where the gate and source electrode overlap, which is shown to have a superior frequency response for the same distance between the source and the drain.

  7. Molecular resonant dissociation of surface-adsorbed molecules by plasmonic nanoscissors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenglong; Sheng, Shaoxiang; Zheng, Hairong; Xu, Hongxing; Sun, Mengtao

    2014-04-01

    The ability to break individual bonds or specific modes in chemical reactions is an ardently sought goal by chemists and physicists. While photochemistry based methodologies are very successful in controlling e.g. photocatalysis, photosynthesis and the degradation of plastic, it is hard to break individual molecular bonds for those molecules adsorbed on the surface because of the weak light-absorption in molecules and the redistribution of the resulting vibrational energy both inside the molecule and to its surrounding environment. Here we show how to overcome these obstacles with a plasmonic hot-electron mediated process and demonstrate a new method that allows the sensitive control of resonant dissociation of surface-adsorbed molecules by `plasmonic' scissors. To that end, we used a high-vacuum tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (HV-TERS) setup to dissociate resonantly excited NC2H6 fragments from Malachite green. The surface plasmons (SPs) excited at the sharp metal tip not only enhance the local electric field to harvest the light incident from the laser, but crucially supply `hot electrons' whose energy can be transferred to individual bonds. These processes are resonant Raman, which result in some active chemical bonds and then weaken these bonds, followed by dumping in lots of indiscriminant energy and breaking the weakest bond. The method allows for sensitive control of both the rate and probability of dissociation through their dependence on the density of hot electrons, which can be manipulated by tuning the laser intensity or tunneling current/bias voltage in the HV-TERS setup, respectively. The concepts of plasmonic scissors open up new versatile avenues for the deep understanding of in situ surface-catalyzed chemistry.The ability to break individual bonds or specific modes in chemical reactions is an ardently sought goal by chemists and physicists. While photochemistry based methodologies are very successful in controlling e.g. photocatalysis

  8. Surface Plasmon-Assisted Solar Energy Conversion.

    PubMed

    Dodekatos, Georgios; Schünemann, Stefan; Tüysüz, Harun

    2016-01-01

    The utilization of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) from plasmonic noble metals in combination with semiconductors promises great improvements for visible light-driven photocatalysis, in particular for energy conversion. This review summarizes the basic principles of plasmonic photocatalysis, giving a comprehensive overview about the proposed mechanisms for enhancing the performance of photocatalytically active semiconductors with plasmonic devices and their applications for surface plasmon-assisted solar energy conversion. The main focus is on gold and, to a lesser extent, silver nanoparticles in combination with titania as semiconductor and their usage as active plasmonic photocatalysts. Recent advances in water splitting, hydrogen generation with sacrificial organic compounds, and CO2 reduction to hydrocarbons for solar fuel production are highlighted. Finally, further improvements for plasmonic photocatalysts, regarding performance, stability, and economic feasibility, are discussed for surface plasmon-assisted solar energy conversion.

  9. Visible quantum plasmonics from metallic nanodimers.

    PubMed

    Alpeggiani, F; D'Agostino, S; Sanvitto, D; Gerace, D

    2016-10-18

    We report theoretical evidence that bulk nonlinear materials weakly interacting with highly localized plasmonic modes in ultra-sub-wavelength metallic nanostructures can lead to nonlinear effects at the single plasmon level in the visible range. In particular, the two-plasmon interaction energy in such systems is numerically estimated to be comparable with the typical plasmon linewidths. Localized surface plasmons are thus predicted to exhibit a purely nonclassical behavior, which can be clearly identified by a sub-Poissonian second-order correlation in the signal scattered from the quantized plasmonic field under coherent electromagnetic excitation. We explicitly show that systems sensitive to single-plasmon scattering can be experimentally realized by combining electromagnetic confinement in the interstitial region of gold nanodimers with local infiltration or deposition of ordinary nonlinear materials. We also propose configurations that could allow to realistically detect such an effect with state-of-the-art technology, overcoming the limitations imposed by the short plasmonic lifetime.

  10. Visible quantum plasmonics from metallic nanodimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpeggiani, F.; D’Agostino, S.; Sanvitto, D.; Gerace, D.

    2016-10-01

    We report theoretical evidence that bulk nonlinear materials weakly interacting with highly localized plasmonic modes in ultra-sub-wavelength metallic nanostructures can lead to nonlinear effects at the single plasmon level in the visible range. In particular, the two-plasmon interaction energy in such systems is numerically estimated to be comparable with the typical plasmon linewidths. Localized surface plasmons are thus predicted to exhibit a purely nonclassical behavior, which can be clearly identified by a sub-Poissonian second-order correlation in the signal scattered from the quantized plasmonic field under coherent electromagnetic excitation. We explicitly show that systems sensitive to single-plasmon scattering can be experimentally realized by combining electromagnetic confinement in the interstitial region of gold nanodimers with local infiltration or deposition of ordinary nonlinear materials. We also propose configurations that could allow to realistically detect such an effect with state-of-the-art technology, overcoming the limitations imposed by the short plasmonic lifetime.

  11. Plasmon-enhanced optical sensors: a review.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Cushing, Scott K; Wu, Nianqiang

    2015-01-21

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has found extensive applications in chemi-sensors and biosensors. Plasmons play different roles in different types of optical sensors. SPR transduces a signal in a colorimetric sensor through shifts in the spectral position and intensity in response to external stimuli. SPR can also concentrate the incident electromagnetic field in a nanostructure, modulating fluorescence emission and enabling plasmon-enhanced fluorescence to be used for ultrasensitive detection. Furthermore, plasmons have been extensively used for amplifying a Raman signal in a surface-enhanced Raman scattering sensor. This paper presents a review of recent research progress in plasmon-enhanced optical sensing, giving emphasis on the physical basis of plasmon-enhanced sensors and how these principles guide the design of sensors. In particular, this paper discusses the design strategies for nanomaterials and nanostructures to plasmonically enhance optical sensing signals, also highlighting the applications of plasmon-enhanced optical sensors in healthcare, homeland security, food safety and environmental monitoring.

  12. Visible quantum plasmonics from metallic nanodimers

    PubMed Central

    Alpeggiani, F.; D’Agostino, S.; Sanvitto, D.; Gerace, D.

    2016-01-01

    We report theoretical evidence that bulk nonlinear materials weakly interacting with highly localized plasmonic modes in ultra-sub-wavelength metallic nanostructures can lead to nonlinear effects at the single plasmon level in the visible range. In particular, the two-plasmon interaction energy in such systems is numerically estimated to be comparable with the typical plasmon linewidths. Localized surface plasmons are thus predicted to exhibit a purely nonclassical behavior, which can be clearly identified by a sub-Poissonian second-order correlation in the signal scattered from the quantized plasmonic field under coherent electromagnetic excitation. We explicitly show that systems sensitive to single-plasmon scattering can be experimentally realized by combining electromagnetic confinement in the interstitial region of gold nanodimers with local infiltration or deposition of ordinary nonlinear materials. We also propose configurations that could allow to realistically detect such an effect with state-of-the-art technology, overcoming the limitations imposed by the short plasmonic lifetime. PMID:27752037

  13. Hybrid Airy plasmons with dynamically steerable trajectories.

    PubMed

    Li, Rujiang; Imran, Muhammad; Lin, Xiao; Wang, Huaping; Xu, Zhiwei; Chen, Hongsheng

    2017-01-26

    With their intriguing diffraction-free, self-accelerating, and self-healing properties, Airy plasmons show promise for use in the trapping, transporting, and sorting of micro-objects, imaging, and chip scale signal processing. However, high dissipative loss and lack of dynamical steerability restrict the implementation of Airy plasmons in these applications. Here we reveal hybrid Airy plasmons for the first time by taking a hybrid graphene-based plasmonic waveguide in the terahertz (THz) domain as an example. Due to coupling between optical modes and plasmonic modes, the hybrid Airy plasmons can have large propagation lengths and effective transverse deflections, where the transverse waveguide confinements are governed by the hybrid modes with moderate quality factors. Meanwhile, the propagation trajectories of the hybrid Airy plasmons are dynamically steerable by changing the chemical potential of graphene. These hybrid Airy plasmons may promote the further discovery of non-diffracting beams along with the emerging developments of optical tweezers and tractor beams.

  14. Integrating plasmonic diagnostics and microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Niu, Lifang; Zhang, Nan; Liu, Hong; Zhou, Xiaodong; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2015-09-01

    Plasmonics is generally divided into two categories: surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of electromagnetic modes propagating along a (noble) metal/dielectric interface and localized SPRs (LSPRs) on nanoscopic metallic structures (particles, rods, shells, holes, etc.). Both optical transducer concepts can be combined with and integrated in microfluidic devices for biomolecular analyte detections, with the benefits of small foot-print for point-of-care detection, low-cost for one-time disposal, and ease of being integrated into an array format. The key technologies in such integration include the plasmonic chip, microfluidic channel fabrication, surface bio-functionalization, and selection of the detection scheme, which are selected according to the specifics of the targeting analytes. This paper demonstrates a few examples of the many versions of how to combine plasmonics and integrated microfluidics, using different plasmonic generation mechanisms for different analyte detections. One example is a DNA sensor array using a gold film as substrate and surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy as the transduction method. This is then compared to grating-coupled SPR for poly(ethylene glycol) thiol interaction detected by angle interrogation, gold nanohole based LSPR chip for biotin-strepavidin detection by wavelength shift, and gold nanoholes/nanopillars for the detection of prostate specific antigen by quantum dot labels excited by the LSPR. Our experimental results exemplified that the plasmonic integrated microfluidics is a promising tool for understanding the biomolecular interactions and molecular recognition process as well as biosensing, especially for on-site or point-of-care diagnostics.

  15. Integrating plasmonic diagnostics and microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Lifang; Zhang, Nan; Liu, Hong; Zhou, Xiaodong; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonics is generally divided into two categories: surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of electromagnetic modes propagating along a (noble) metal/dielectric interface and localized SPRs (LSPRs) on nanoscopic metallic structures (particles, rods, shells, holes, etc.). Both optical transducer concepts can be combined with and integrated in microfluidic devices for biomolecular analyte detections, with the benefits of small foot-print for point-of-care detection, low-cost for one-time disposal, and ease of being integrated into an array format. The key technologies in such integration include the plasmonic chip, microfluidic channel fabrication, surface bio-functionalization, and selection of the detection scheme, which are selected according to the specifics of the targeting analytes. This paper demonstrates a few examples of the many versions of how to combine plasmonics and integrated microfluidics, using different plasmonic generation mechanisms for different analyte detections. One example is a DNA sensor array using a gold film as substrate and surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy as the transduction method. This is then compared to grating-coupled SPR for poly(ethylene glycol) thiol interaction detected by angle interrogation, gold nanohole based LSPR chip for biotin-strepavidin detection by wavelength shift, and gold nanoholes/nanopillars for the detection of prostate specific antigen by quantum dot labels excited by the LSPR. Our experimental results exemplified that the plasmonic integrated microfluidics is a promising tool for understanding the biomolecular interactions and molecular recognition process as well as biosensing, especially for on-site or point-of-care diagnostics. PMID:26392832

  16. Pi Bond Orders and Bond Lengths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herndon, William C.; Parkanyi, Cyril

    1976-01-01

    Discusses three methods of correlating bond orders and bond lengths in unsaturated hydrocarbons: the Pauling theory, the Huckel molecular orbital technique, and self-consistent-field techniques. (MLH)

  17. Brightening Gold Nanoparticles: New Sensing Approach Based on Plasmon Resonance Energy Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lei; Jing, Chao; Gu, Zhen; Long, Yi-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Scattering recovered plasmonic resonance energy transfer (SR-PRET) was reported by blocking the plasmon resonance energy transfer (PRET) from gold nanoparticle (GNP) to the adsorbed molecules (RdBS). Due to the selective cleavage of the Si-O bond by F− ions, the quenching is switched off causing an increase in the brightness of the GNPs,detected using dark-field microscopy (DFM) were brightened. This method was successfully applied to the determination of fluoride ions in water. The SR-PRET provides a potential approach for a vitro/vivo sensing with high sensitivity and selectivity. PMID:25959016

  18. Phonon Overlaps in Molecular Quantum Dot Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Connie; Sethna, James

    2004-03-01

    We model the amplitudes and frequencies of the vibrational sidebands for the new molecular quantum dot systems. We calculate the Franck-Condon phonon overlaps in the 3N-dimensional configuration sapce. We solve the general case where the vibrational frequencies and eigenmodes change during the transition. We perform PM3 and DFT calculations for the case of the dumb bell-shaped C140 molecule. We find that the strongest amplitudes are associated with the 11 meV stretch mode, in agreement with experiment. The experimental amplitudes vary from molecule to molecule; indicating that the molecular overlaps are environment dependent. We explore overlaps in the presence of external electric fields from image charges and counter ions.

  19. Generating Composite Overlapping Grids on CAD Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Henshaw, W.D.

    2002-02-07

    We describe some algorithms and tools that have been developed to generate composite overlapping grids on geometries that have been defined with computer aided design (CAD) programs. This process consists of five main steps. Starting from a description of the surfaces defining the computational domain we (1) correct errors in the CAD representation, (2) determine topology of the patched-surface, (3) build a global triangulation of the surface, (4) construct structured surface and volume grids using hyperbolic grid generation, and (5) generate the overlapping grid by determining the holes and the interpolation points. The overlapping grid generator which is used for the final step also supports the rapid generation of grids for block-structured adaptive mesh refinement and for moving grids. These algorithms have been implemented as part of the Overture object-oriented framework.

  20. Probing genetic overlap among complex human phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Rzhetsky, Andrey; Wajngurt, David; Park, Naeun; Zheng, Tian

    2007-07-10

    Geneticists and epidemiologists often observe that certain hereditary disorders cooccur in individual patients significantly more (or significantly less) frequently than expected, suggesting there is a genetic variation that predisposes its bearer to multiple disorders, or that protects against some disorders while predisposing to others. We suggest that, by using a large number of phenotypic observations about multiple disorders and an appropriate statistical model, we can infer genetic overlaps between phenotypes. Our proof-of-concept analysis of 1.5 million patient records and 161 disorders indicates that disease phenotypes form a highly connected network of strong pairwise correlations. Our modeling approach, under appropriate assumptions, allows us to estimate from these correlations the size of putative genetic overlaps. For example, we suggest that autism, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia share significant genetic overlaps. Our disease network hypothesis can be immediately exploited in the design of genetic mapping approaches that involve joint linkage or association analyses of multiple seemingly disparate phenotypes.

  1. Resonance Coupling in Plasmonic Nanomatryoshka Homo- and Heterodimers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-16

    creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4953351] I. INTRODUCTION The optical characteristics of noble metallic structures in nanoscale...compositions.13–18 In this report, we extend our study to the NM structure with different metal compositions and sizes. This method allows us...ing the structural dimensions and choosing the same metal for both units, we observed bonding (σ and π) and antibonding (σ∗ and π∗) plasmon modes for

  2. A spiral plasmonic lens with directional excitation of surface plasmons

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qingrui; Zhang, Chi; Hu, Xinhua

    2016-01-01

    Conventional plasmonic lenses are composed of curved slits carved through metallic films. Here, we propose a new plasmonic lens based on a metallic slit with an auxiliary groove. When the lens is illumined normally, only inward surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) can be generated and then focused into a hot spot at the center of the lens. The focusing effect is theoretically investigated by varying the groove parameters and incident polarizations. It is found that this phenomenon exists for both the circular and linear polarizations of incidence. Under optimal groove parameters, the intensity of the focal spot in our lens can be 2.5 times of that in one without grooves for both linearly and circularly polarized illuminations. PMID:27562227

  3. Plasmonic Switches and Sensors Based on PANI-Coated Gold Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Nina

    a macroscale array of PANI-coated gold nanorods immobilized on glass slides, whose performance is as good as that of the individual PANI-coated gold nanorods. With much smaller amounts of materials, my core/shell nanorod arrays show peak extinction values and maximal modulation depths that are comparable to those of PANI films with micrometer-scale thicknesses. Switching coupled surface plasmon relative to uncoupled one affords the possibility to achieve the modulation over a wide spectral band and with wealthy plasmonic responses. Thus, I have studied the active control of plasmon coupling in homodimers and homotrimers of PANI-coated gold nanospheres (PGNSs). The dimers and trimers are obtained by reducing the surfactant concentration in the polymerization process of PANI. The reversible proton-doping of PANI enables the control of plasmon coupling to succeed. When the plasmon coupling of the dimers is switched, the wavelength shift of the strongest scattering peak shows an exponential increase with the decrease of the interparticle gap distance. A giant wavelength shift of 231 nm is observed for the dimer with a shell thickness of 10 nm and a gap distance of 0.5 nm. Electrodynamic calculations ascertain that the wavelength shift of the strongest scattering peak originates from the tuning of the dipolar bonding plasmon resonance mode in the dimers. The quadrupolar bonding plasmon resonance mode is turned on and off by switching the doped and undoped state of the dimers with gap distances of less than 3 nm. The active tuning of plasmon coupling is further demonstrated with the trimers of PGNSs, which is sensitive to their configurations. In the triangular configuration, larger vertex angles lead to larger wavelength shifts for the plasmonic tuning. Another strategy for controlling the dielectric properties of PANI shell around gold nanostructures is to change its oxidation level. The variation of the oxidation state of PANI leads to the plasmonic peak wavelength

  4. Sub-Plate Overlap Code Documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taff, L. G.; Bucciarelli, B.; Zarate, N.

    1997-01-01

    An expansion of the plate overlap method of astrometric data reduction to a single plate has been proposed and successfully tested. Each plate is (artificially) divided into sub-plates which can then be overlapped. This reduces the area of a 'plate' over which a plate model needs to accurately represent the relationship between measured coordinates and standard coordinates. Application is made to non-astrographic plates such as Schmidt plates and to wide-field astrographic plates. Indeed, the method is completely general and can be applied to any type of recording media.

  5. Dynamics of overlapping structures in modular networks.

    PubMed

    Almendral, J A; Leyva, I; Li, D; Sendiña-Nadal, I; Havlin, S; Boccaletti, S

    2010-07-01

    Modularity is a fundamental feature of real networks, being intimately bounded to their functionality, i.e., to their capability of performing parallel tasks in a coordinated way. Although the modular structure of real graphs has been intensively studied, very little is known on the interactions between functional modules of a graph. Here, we present a general method based on synchronization of networking oscillators, that is able to detect overlapping structures in multimodular environments. We furthermore report the full analytical and theoretical description on the relationship between the overlapping dynamics and the underlying network topology. The method is illustrated by means of a series of applications.

  6. Plasmonic Gold Nanorods Coverage Influence on Enhancement of the Photoluminescence of Two-Dimensional MoS2 Monolayer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kevin C. J.; Chen, Yi-Huan; Lin, Hsiang-Yu; Cheng, Chia-Chin; Chen, Pei-Ying; Wu, Ting-Yi; Shih, Min-Hsiung; Wei, Kung-Hwa; Li, Lain-Jong; Chang, Chien-Wen

    2015-01-01

    The 2-D transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) semiconductors, has received great attention due to its excellent optical and electronic properties and potential applications in field-effect transistors, light emitting and sensing devices. Recently surface plasmon enhanced photoluminescence (PL) of the weak 2-D TMD atomic layers was developed to realize the potential optoelectronic devices. However, we noticed that the enhancement would not increase monotonically with increasing of metal plasmonic objects and the emission drop after the certain coverage. This study presents the optimized PL enhancement of a monolayer MoS2 in the presence of gold (Au) nanorods. A localized surface plasmon wave of Au nanorods that generated around the monolayer MoS2 can provide resonance wavelength overlapping with that of the MoS2 gain spectrum. These spatial and spectral overlapping between the localized surface plasmon polariton waves and that from MoS2 emission drastically enhanced the light emission from the MoS2 monolayer. We gave a simple model and physical interpretations to explain the phenomena. The plasmonic Au nanostructures approach provides a valuable avenue to enhancing the emitting efficiency of the 2-D nano-materials and their devices for the future optoelectronic devices and systems. PMID:26576041

  7. Bonded Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Another spinoff to the food processing industry involves a dry lubricant developed by General Magnaplate Corp. of Linden, N.J. Used in such spacecraft as Apollo, Skylab and Viking, the lubricant is a coating bonded to metal surfaces providing permanent lubrication and corrosion resistance. The coating lengthens equipment life and permits machinery to be operated at greater speed, thus increasing productivity and reducing costs. Bonded lubricants are used in scores of commercia1 applications. They have proved particularly valuable to food processing firms because, while increasing production efficiency, they also help meet the stringent USDA sanitation codes for food-handling equipment. For example, a cookie manufacturer plagued production interruptions because sticky batter was clogging the cookie molds had the brass molds coated to solve the problem. Similarly, a pasta producer faced USDA action on a sanitation violation because dough was clinging to an automatic ravioli-forming machine; use of the anti-stick coating on the steel forming plates solved the dual problem of sanitation deficiency and production line downtime.

  8. 2D quasiperiodic plasmonic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Christina; Kobiela, Georg; Giessen, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Nanophotonic structures with irregular symmetry, such as quasiperiodic plasmonic crystals, have gained an increasing amount of attention, in particular as potential candidates to enhance the absorption of solar cells in an angular insensitive fashion. To examine the photonic bandstructure of such systems that determines their optical properties, it is necessary to measure and model normal and oblique light interaction with plasmonic crystals. We determine the different propagation vectors and consider the interaction of all possible waveguide modes and particle plasmons in a 2D metallic photonic quasicrystal, in conjunction with the dispersion relations of a slab waveguide. Using a Fano model, we calculate the optical properties for normal and inclined light incidence. Comparing measurements of a quasiperiodic lattice to the modelled spectra for angle of incidence variation in both azimuthal and polar direction of the sample gives excellent agreement and confirms the predictive power of our model. PMID:23209871

  9. Terahertz spectroscopy of plasmonic fractals.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, A; Matsui, T; Zhu, W; Nahata, A; Vardeny, Z V

    2009-03-20

    We use terahertz time-domain spectroscopy to study the transmission properties of metallic films perforated with aperture arrays having deterministic or stochastic fractal morphologies ("plasmonic fractals"), and compare them with random aperture arrays. All of the measured plasmonic fractals show transmission resonances and antiresonances at frequencies that correspond to prominent features in their structure factors in k space. However, in sharp contrast to periodic aperture arrays, the resonant transmission enhancement decreases with increasing array size. This property is explained using a density-density correlation function, and is utilized for determining the underlying fractal dimensionality, D(<2). Furthermore, a sum rule for the transmission resonances and antiresonances in plasmonic fractals relative to the transmission of the corresponding random aperture arrays is obtained, and is shown to be universal.

  10. Nanorice Particles: Hybrid Plasmonic Nanostructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Hui (Inventor); Brandl, Daniel (Inventor); Le, Fei (Inventor); Nordlander, Peter (Inventor); Halas, Nancy J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A new hybrid nanoparticle, i.e., a nanorice particle, which combines the intense local fields of nanorods with the highly tunable plasmon resonances of nanoshells, is described herein. This geometry possesses far greater structural tunability than previous nanoparticle geometries, along with much larger local field enhancements and far greater sensitivity as a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) nanosensor than presently known dielectric-conductive material nanostructures. In an embodiment, a nanoparticle comprises a prolate spheroid-shaped core having a first aspect ratio. The nanoparticle also comprises at least one conductive shell surrounding said prolate spheroid-shaped core. The nanoparticle has a surface plasmon resonance sensitivity of at least 600 nm RIU(sup.-1). Methods of making the disclosed nanorice particles are also described herein.

  11. Hidden progress: broadband plasmonic invisibility.

    PubMed

    Renger, Jan; Kadic, Muamer; Dupont, Guillaume; Aćimović, Srdjan S; Guenneau, Sébastien; Quidant, Romain; Enoch, Stefan

    2010-07-19

    One of the key challenges in current research into electromagnetic cloaking is to achieve invisibility at optical frequencies and over an extended bandwidth. There has been significant progress towards this using the idea of cloaking by sweeping under the carpet of Li and Pendry. Here, we show that we can harness surface plasmon polaritons at a metal surface structured with a dielectric material to obtain a unique control of their propagation. We exploit this control to demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally cloaking over an unprecedented bandwidth (650-900 nm). Our non-resonant plasmonic metamaterial is designed using transformational optics extended to plasmonics and allows a curved reflector to mimic a flat mirror. Our theoretical predictions are validated by experiments mapping the surface light intensity at a wavelength of 800 nm.

  12. Highly sensitive plasmonic silver nanorods.

    PubMed

    Jakab, Arpad; Rosman, Christina; Khalavka, Yuriy; Becker, Jan; Trügler, Andreas; Hohenester, Ulrich; Sönnichsen, Carsten

    2011-09-27

    We compare the single-particle plasmonic sensitivity of silver and gold nanorods with similar resonance wavelengths by monitoring the plasmon resonance shift upon changing the environment from water to 12.5% sucrose solution. We find that silver nanoparticles have 1.2 to 2 times higher sensitivity than gold, in good agreement with simulations based on the boundary-elements-method (BEM). To exclude the effect of particle volume on sensitivity, we test gold rods with increasing particle width at a given resonance wavelength. Using the Drude-model of optical properties of metals together with the quasi-static approximation (QSA) for localized surface plasmons, we show that the dominant contribution to higher sensitivity of silver is the lower background polarizability of the d-band electrons and provide a simple formula for the sensitivity. We improve the reversibility of the silver nanorod sensors upon repeated cycles of environmental changes by blocking the high energy parts of the illumination light.

  13. Australian University Libraries: Collections Overlap Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missingham, Roxanne; Walls, Robert

    2003-01-01

    In 2002, the Department of Education, Science and Training (DEST), Higher Education Information Infrastructure Advisory Committee commissioned the National Library of Australia to analyse the uniqueness and overlap of Australian university library collections, comparing library collections in each state, using the National Bibliographic Database…

  14. Stochastic Cooling with Schottky Band Overlap

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, Valeri

    2006-03-20

    Optimal use of stochastic cooling is essential to maximize the antiproton stacking rate for Tevatron Run II. Good understanding and characterization of the cooling is important for the optimization. The paper is devoted to derivation of the Fokker-Plank equations justified in the case of near or full Schottky base overlap for both longitudinal and transverse coolings.

  15. Stochastic Cooling with Schottky Band Overlap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, Valeri

    2006-03-01

    Optimal use of stochastic cooling is essential to maximize the antiproton stacking rate for Tevatron Run II. Good understanding and characterization of the cooling is important for the optimization. The paper is devoted to derivation of the Fokker-Plank equations justified in the case of near or full Schottky base overlap for both longitudinal and transverse coolings.

  16. 47 CFR 73.509 - Prohibited overlap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Noncommercial Educational FM Broadcast Stations § 73.509 Prohibited overlap. (a) An application for a new or modified NCE-FM station other than a Class D (secondary) station will not be accepted if the...

  17. 47 CFR 73.509 - Prohibited overlap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Noncommercial Educational FM Broadcast Stations § 73.509 Prohibited overlap. (a) An application for a new or modified NCE-FM station other than a Class D (secondary) station will not be accepted if the...

  18. Autism and ADHD: Overlapping and Discriminating Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayes, Susan Dickerson; Calhoun, Susan L.; Mayes, Rebecca D.; Molitoris, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Children with ADHD and autism have some similar features, complicating a differential diagnosis. The purpose of our study was to determine the degree to which core ADHD and autistic symptoms overlap in and discriminate between children 2-16 years of age with autism and ADHD. Our study demonstrated that 847 children with autism were easily…

  19. Controlling plasmonic wave packets in silver nanowires.

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, L.; Nome, R.; Montgomery, J. M.; Gray, S. K.; Scherer, N. F.

    2010-09-01

    Three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain simulations were performed to explore the excitation of surface plasmon resonances in long silver (Ag) nanowires. In particular, we show that it is possible to generate plasmonic wave packets that can propagate along the nanowire by exciting superpositions of surface plasmon resonances. By using an appropriately chirped pulse, it is possible to transiently achieve localization of the excitation at the distal end of the nanowire. Such designed coherent superpositions will allow realizing spatiotemporal control of plasmonic excitations for enhancing nonlinear responses in plasmonic 'circuits'.

  20. Direct imaging of localized surface plasmon polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Sinan; Karademir, Ertugrul; Kocabas, Coskun; Aydinli, Atilla

    2011-09-01

    In this Letter, we report on dark field imaging of localized surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) in plasmonic waveguiding bands formed by plasmonic coupled cavities. We image the light scattered from SPPs in the plasmonic cavities excited by a tunable light source. Tuning the excitation wavelength, we measure the localization and dispersion of the plasmonic cavity mode. Dark field imaging has been achieved in the Kretschmann configuration using a supercontinuum white-light laser equipped with an acoustooptic tunable filter. Polarization dependent spectroscopic reflection and dark field imaging measurements are correlated and found to be in agreement with finite-difference time-domain calculations.

  1. Exciton-plasmon interactions between CdS quantum dots and Ag nanoparticles in photoelectrochemical system and its biosensing application.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei-Wei; Yu, Pei-Pei; Shan, Yun; Wang, Jing; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2012-07-17

    With DNA as a rigid spacer, Ag nanoparticles (NPs) were bridged to CdS quantum dots (QDs) for the stimulation of exciton-plasmon interactions (EPI) in a photoelectrochemical (PEC) system. Due to their natural absorption overlap, the exciton of the QDs and the plasmon of Ag NPs could be induced simultaneously. The EPI resonant nature enabled manipulating photoresponse of the QDs via tuning interparticle distances. Specifically, the photocurrent of the QDs could be greatly attenuated and even be completely damped by the generated EPI. The work opens a different horizon for EPI investigation through an engineered PEC nanosystem, and provides a viable mechanism for new DNA sensing protocol.

  2. Sub-wavelength plasmon laser

    DOEpatents

    Bora, Mihail; Bond, Tiziana C.

    2016-04-19

    A plasmonic laser device has resonant nanocavities filled with a gain medium containing an organic dye. The resonant plasmon frequencies of the nanocavities are tuned to align with both the absorption and emission spectra of the dye. Variables in the system include the nature of the dye and the wavelength of its absorption and emission, the wavelength of the pumping radiation, and the resonance frequencies of the nanocavities. In addition the pumping frequency of the dye is selected to be close to the absorption maximum.

  3. Plasmon-enhanced UV photocatalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Honda, Mitsuhiro; Saito, Yuika Kawata, Satoshi; Kumamoto, Yasuaki; Taguchi, Atsushi

    2014-02-10

    We report plasmonic nanoparticle enhanced photocatalysis on titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) in the deep-UV range. Aluminum (Al) nanoparticles fabricated on TiO{sub 2} film increases the reaction rate of photocatalysis by factors as high as 14 under UV irradiation in the range of 260–340 nm. The reaction efficiency has been determined by measuring the decolorization rate of methylene blue applied on the TiO{sub 2} substrate. The enhancement of photocatalysis shows particle size and excitation wavelength dependence, which can be explained by the surface plasmon resonance of Al nanoparticles.

  4. Plasmon-enhanced UV photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Mitsuhiro; Kumamoto, Yasuaki; Taguchi, Atsushi; Saito, Yuika; Kawata, Satoshi

    2014-02-01

    We report plasmonic nanoparticle enhanced photocatalysis on titanium dioxide (TiO2) in the deep-UV range. Aluminum (Al) nanoparticles fabricated on TiO2 film increases the reaction rate of photocatalysis by factors as high as 14 under UV irradiation in the range of 260-340 nm. The reaction efficiency has been determined by measuring the decolorization rate of methylene blue applied on the TiO2 substrate. The enhancement of photocatalysis shows particle size and excitation wavelength dependence, which can be explained by the surface plasmon resonance of Al nanoparticles.

  5. The overlap syndromes of autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Czaja, Albert J

    2013-02-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis has two major variant phenotypes in which the features of classical disease are co-mingled with those of primary biliary cirrhosis or primary sclerosing cholangitis. These overlap syndromes lack codified diagnostic criteria, established pathogenic mechanisms, and confident management strategies. Their clinical importance relates mainly to the identification of patients who respond poorly to conventional corticosteroid treatment. Scoring systems that lack discriminative power have been used in their definition, and a clinical phenotype based on pre-defined laboratory and histological findings has not been promulgated. The frequency of overlap with primary biliary cirrhosis is 7-13 %, and the frequency of overlap with primary sclerosing cholangitis is 8-17 %. Patients with autoimmune hepatitis and features of cholestatic disease must be distinguished from patients with cholestatic disease and features of autoimmune hepatitis. Variants of the overlap syndromes include patients with small duct primary sclerosing cholangitis, antimitochondrial antibody-negative primary biliary cirrhosis, autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis, and immunoglobulin G4-associated disease. Conventional corticosteroid therapy alone or in conjunction with ursodeoxycholic acid (13-15 mg/kg daily) has been variably effective, and cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil, and budesonide have been beneficial in selected patients. The key cholestatic features that influence the prognosis of autoimmune hepatitis must be defined and incorporated into the definition of the syndrome rather than rely on designations that imply the co-mingling of different diseases with manifestations of variable clinical relevance. The overlap syndromes in autoimmune hepatitis are imprecise, heterogeneous, and unfounded, but they constitute a clinical reality that must be accepted, diagnosed, refined, treated, and studied.

  6. Noncentrosymmetric plasmon modes and giant terahertz photocurrent in a two-dimensional plasmonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, V. V.; Fateev, D. V.; Ivchenko, E. L.; Ganichev, S. D.

    2015-06-01

    We introduce and theoretically study the plasmon-photogalvanic effect in a planar noncentrosymmetric plasmonic crystal containing a homogeneous two-dimensional electron system gated by a periodic metal grating with an asymmetric unit cell. The plasmon-photogalvanic dc current arises due to the two-dimensional electron drag by the noncentrosymmetric plasmon modes excited under normal incidence of terahertz radiation. We show that the collective plasmon modes of the planar plasmonic crystal become strongly noncentrosymmetric in the weak-coupling regime of their anticrossing. A large plasmon wave vector (which is typically by two-three orders of magnitude greater than the terahertz photon wave vector) along with strong near-field enhancement at the plasmon resonance make the plasmonic drag a much stronger effect compared to the photon drag observed in conventional two-dimensional electron systems.

  7. Molecular plasmonics for biology and nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yue Bing; Kiraly, Brian; Weiss, Paul S; Huang, Tony Jun

    2012-05-01

    The optical excitation of surface plasmons in metal nanoparticles leads to nanoscale spatial confinement of electromagnetic fields. The confined electromagnetic fields can generate intense, localized thermal energy and large near-field optical forces. The interaction between these effects and nearby molecules has led to the emerging field known as molecular plasmonics. Recent advances in molecular plasmonics have enabled novel optical materials and devices with applications in biology and nanomedicine. In this article, we categorize three main types of interactions between molecules and surface plasmons: optical, thermal and mechanical. Within the scope of each type of interaction, we will review applications of molecular plasmonics in biology and nanomedicine. We include a wide range of applications that involve sensing, spectral analysis, imaging, delivery, manipulation and heating of molecules, biomolecules or cells using plasmonic effects. We also briefly describe the physical principles of molecular plasmonics and progress in the nanofabrication, surface functionalization and bioconjugation of metal nanoparticles.

  8. Ultraconfined Plasmonic Hotspots Inside Graphene Nanobubbles.

    PubMed

    Fei, Z; Foley, J J; Gannett, W; Liu, M K; Dai, S; Ni, G X; Zettl, A; Fogler, M M; Wiederrecht, G P; Gray, S K; Basov, D N

    2016-12-14

    We report on a nanoinfrared (IR) imaging study of ultraconfined plasmonic hotspots inside graphene nanobubbles formed in graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) heterostructures. The volume of these plasmonic hotspots is more than one-million-times smaller than what could be achieved by free-space IR photons, and their real-space distributions are controlled by the sizes and shapes of the nanobubbles. Theoretical analysis indicates that the observed plasmonic hotspots are formed due to a significant increase of the local plasmon wavelength in the nanobubble regions. Such an increase is attributed to the high sensitivity of graphene plasmons to its dielectric environment. Our work presents a novel scheme for plasmonic hotspot formation and sheds light on future applications of graphene nanobubbles for plasmon-enhanced IR spectroscopy.

  9. Plasmon Enhanced Photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyakov, Aleksandr N.

    Next generation ultrabright light sources will operate at megahertz repetition rates with temporal resolution in the attosecond regime. For an X-Ray Free Electron Laser (FEL) to operate at such repetition rate requires a high quantum efficiency (QE) cathode to produce electron bunches of 300 pC per 1.5mu J incident laser pulse. Semiconductor photocathodes have sufficient QE in the ultraviolet (UV) and the visible spectrum, however, they produce picosecond electron pulses due to the electron-phonon scattering. On the other hand, metals have two orders of magnitude less QE, but can produce femtosecond pulses, that are required to form the optimum electron distribution for high efficiency FEL operation. In this work, a novel metallic photocathode design is presented, where a set of nano-cavities is introduced on the metal surface to increase its QE to meet the FEL requirements, while maintaining the fast time response. Photoemission can be broken up into three steps: (1) photon absorption, (2) electron transport to the surface, and (3) crossing the metal-vacuum barrier. The first two steps can be improved by making the metal completely absorbing and by localizing the fields closer to the metal surface, thereby reducing the electron travel distance. Both of these effects can be achieved by coupling the incident light to an electron density wave on the metal surface, represented by a quasi-particle, the Surface Plasmon Polariton (SPP). The photoemission then becomes a process where the photon energy is transferred to an SPP and then to an electron. The dispersion relation for the SPP defines the region of energies where such process can occur. For example, for gold, the maximum SPP energy is 2.4 eV, however, the work function is 5.6 eV, therefore, only a fourth order photoemission process is possible. In such process, four photons excite four plasmons that together excite only one electron. The yield of such non-linear process depends strongly on the light intensity. In

  10. Plasmon Enhanced Photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Polyakov, Aleksandr

    2012-05-08

    Next generation ultrabright light sources will operate at megahertz repetition rates with temporal resolution in the attosecond regime. For an X-Ray Free Electron Laser (FEL) to operate at such repetition rate requires a high quantum efficiency (QE) cathode to produce electron bunches of 300 pC per 1.5 μJ incident laser pulse. Semiconductor photocathodes have sufficient QE in the ultraviolet (UV) and the visible spectrum, however, they produce picosecond electron pulses due to the electron-phonon scattering. On the other hand, metals have two orders of magnitude less QE, but can produce femtosecond pulses, that are required to form the optimum electron distribution for high efficiency FEL operation. In this work, a novel metallic photocathode design is presented, where a set of nano-cavities is introduced on the metal surface to increase its QE to meet the FEL requirements, while maintaining the fast time response. Photoemission can be broken up into three steps: (1) photon absorption, (2) electron transport to the surface, and (3) crossing the metal-vacuum barrier. The first two steps can be improved by making the metal completely absorbing and by localizing the fields closer to the metal surface, thereby reducing the electron travel distance. Both of these effects can be achieved by coupling the incident light to an electron density wave on the metal surface, represented by a quasi-particle, the Surface Plasmon Polariton (SPP). The photoemission then becomes a process where the photon energy is transferred to an SPP and then to an electron. The dispersion relation for the SPP defines the region of energies where such process can occur. For example, for gold, the maximum SPP energy is 2.4 eV, however, the work function is 5.6 eV, therefore, only a fourth order photoemission process is possible. In such process, four photons excite four plasmons that together excite only one electron. The yield of such non-linear process depends strongly on the light intensity. In

  11. Electrical Control of Optical Plasmon Resonance with Graphene

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    at optical frequencies.10 Here we achieve efficient control of near- infrared plasmon resonance in a hybrid graphene-gold nanorod system. Exploiting...quality factor of gold nanorod plasmon. Our analysis shows that the plasmon− graphene coupling is remarkably strong: even a single electron in...events. KEYWORDS: Graphene, plasmon resonance, metamaterials, active plasmonics, gold nanorod , charge transfer sensor Surface plasmon resonance in

  12. Plasmonics Meets Biology through Optics.

    PubMed

    De Sio, Luciano; Caracciolo, Giulio; Annesi, Ferdinanda; Placido, Tiziana; Pozzi, Daniela; Comparelli, Roberto; Pane, Alfredo; Curri, Maria Lucia; Agostiano, Angela; Bartolino, Roberto

    2015-06-09

    Plasmonic metallic nanoparticles (NPs) represent a relevant class of nanomaterials, which is able to achieve light localization down to nanoscale by exploiting a phenomenon called Localized Plasmon Resonance. In the last few years, NPs have been proposed to trigger DNA release or enhance ablation of diseased tissues, while minimizing damage to healthy tissues. In view of the therapeutic relevance of such plasmonic NPs; a detailed characterization of the electrostatic interaction between positively charged gold nanorods (GNRs) and a negatively charged whole-genome DNA solution is reported. The preparation of the hybrid biosystem has been investigated as a function of DNA concentration by means of ζ-potential; hydrodynamic diameter and gel electrophoresis analysis. The results have pointed out the specific conditions to achieve the most promising GNRs/DNA complex and its photo-thermal properties have been investigated. The overall study allows to envisage the possibility to ingeniously combine plasmonic and biological materials and, thus, enable design and development of an original non invasive all-optical methodology for monitoring photo-induced temperature variation with high sensitivity.

  13. Compact nanomechanical plasmonic phase modulators

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, B. S.; Haftel, M. I.; Czaplewski, D. A.; Lopez, D.; Blumberg, G.; Aksyuk, V. A.

    2015-03-30

    Highly confined optical energy in plasmonic devices is advancing miniaturization in photonics. However, for mode sizes approaching ≈10 nm, the energy increasingly shifts into the metal, raising losses and hindering active phase modulation. Here, we propose a nanoelectromechanical phase-modulation principle exploiting the extraordinarily strong dependence of the phase velocity of metal–insulator–metal gap plasmons on dynamically variable gap size. We experimentally demonstrate a 23-μm-long non-resonant modulator having a 1.5π rad range, with 1.7 dB excess loss at 780 nm. Analysis shows that by simultaneously decreasing the gap, length and width, an ultracompact-footprint π rad phase modulator can be realized. This is achieved without incurring the extra loss expected for plasmons confined in a decreasing gap, because the increasing phase-modulation strength from a narrowing gap offsets rising propagation losses. Such small, high-density electrically controllable components may find applications in optical switch fabrics and reconfigurable plasmonic optics.

  14. Chiral plasmons without magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Justin C. W.

    2016-04-01

    Plasmons, the collective oscillations of interacting electrons, possess emergent properties that dramatically alter the optical response of metals. We predict the existence of a new class of plasmons—chiral Berry plasmons (CBPs)—for a wide range of 2D metallic systems including gapped Dirac materials. As we show, in these materials the interplay between Berry curvature and electron-electron interactions yields chiral plasmonic modes at zero magnetic field. The CBP modes are confined to system boundaries, even in the absence of topological edge states, with chirality manifested in split energy dispersions for oppositely directed plasmon waves. We unveil a rich CBP phenomenology and propose setups for realizing them, including in anomalous Hall metals and optically pumped 2D Dirac materials. Realization of CBPs will offer a powerful paradigm for magnetic field-free, subwavelength optical nonreciprocity, in the mid-IR to terahertz range, with tunable splittings as large as tens of THz, as well as sensitive all-optical diagnostics of topological bands.

  15. Chiral plasmons without magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Song, Justin C. W.; Rudner, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmons, the collective oscillations of interacting electrons, possess emergent properties that dramatically alter the optical response of metals. We predict the existence of a new class of plasmons—chiral Berry plasmons (CBPs)—for a wide range of 2D metallic systems including gapped Dirac materials. As we show, in these materials the interplay between Berry curvature and electron–electron interactions yields chiral plasmonic modes at zero magnetic field. The CBP modes are confined to system boundaries, even in the absence of topological edge states, with chirality manifested in split energy dispersions for oppositely directed plasmon waves. We unveil a rich CBP phenomenology and propose setups for realizing them, including in anomalous Hall metals and optically pumped 2D Dirac materials. Realization of CBPs will offer a powerful paradigm for magnetic field-free, subwavelength optical nonreciprocity, in the mid-IR to terahertz range, with tunable splittings as large as tens of THz, as well as sensitive all-optical diagnostics of topological bands. PMID:27071090

  16. Nonlinear graphene plasmonics (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Joel D.; Marini, Andrea; Garcia de Abajo, Javier F.

    2016-09-01

    The combination of graphene's intrinsically-high nonlinear optical response with its ability to support long-lived, electrically tunable plasmons that couple strongly with light has generated great expectations for application of the atomically-thin material to nanophotonic devices. These expectations are mainly reinforced by classical analyses performed using the response derived from extended graphene, neglecting finite-size and nonlocal effects that become important when the carbon layer is structured on the nanometer scale in actual device designs. Based on a quantum-mechanical description of graphene using tight-binding electronic states combined with the random-phase approximation, we show that finite-size effects produce large contributions that increase the nonlinear response associated with plasmons in nanostructured graphene to significantly higher levels than previously thought, particularly in the case of Kerr-type optical nonlinearities. Motivated by this finding, we discuss and compare saturable absorption in extended and nanostructured graphene, with or without plasmonic enhancement, within the context of passive mode-locking for ultrafast lasers. We also explore the possibility of high-harmonic generation in doped graphene nanoribbons and nanoislands, where illumination by an infrared pulse of moderate intensity, tuned to a plasmon resonance, is predicted to generate light at harmonics of order 13 or higher, extending over the visible and UV regimes. Our atomistic description of graphene's nonlinear optical response reveals its complex nature in both extended and nanostructured systems, while further supporting the exceptional potential of this material for nonlinear nanophotonic devices.

  17. Plasmonics Meets Biology through Optics

    PubMed Central

    De Sio, Luciano; Caracciolo, Giulio; Annesi, Ferdinanda; Placido, Tiziana; Pozzi, Daniela; Comparelli, Roberto; Pane, Alfredo; Curri, Maria Lucia; Agostiano, Angela; Bartolino, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic metallic nanoparticles (NPs) represent a relevant class of nanomaterials, which is able to achieve light localization down to nanoscale by exploiting a phenomenon called Localized Plasmon Resonance. In the last few years, NPs have been proposed to trigger DNA release or enhance ablation of diseased tissues, while minimizing damage to healthy tissues. In view of the therapeutic relevance of such plasmonic NPs; a detailed characterization of the electrostatic interaction between positively charged gold nanorods (GNRs) and a negatively charged whole-genome DNA solution is reported. The preparation of the hybrid biosystem has been investigated as a function of DNA concentration by means of ζ-potential; hydrodynamic diameter and gel electrophoresis analysis. The results have pointed out the specific conditions to achieve the most promising GNRs/DNA complex and its photo-thermal properties have been investigated. The overall study allows to envisage the possibility to ingeniously combine plasmonic and biological materials and, thus, enable design and development of an original non invasive all-optical methodology for monitoring photo-induced temperature variation with high sensitivity.

  18. Imaging of autoimmune hepatitis and overlap syndromes.

    PubMed

    Malik, Neera; Venkatesh, Sudhakar K

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is an uncommon, chronic inflammatory, and relapsing liver disease of unknown origin that may lead to liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, liver transplantation, or death. AIH occurs in all age groups and races but can frequently manifest as acute fulminant hepatitis. Clinical presentation of AIH can have features similar to primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), and these diseases may coexist leading to overlap syndromes. Although histological diagnosis is necessary, imaging features often can demonstrate characteristics that may be helpful to distinguish these diseases. Imaging features of AIH are those of chronic liver disease, and imaging plays important role in detection of complications and ruling out other possible causes of chronic liver disease. Emerging techniques such as elastography provide non-invasive options for diagnosis of significant fibrosis and cirrhosis during clinical follow-up as well as assessment of response to treatment. In this study, we will describe imaging findings in AIH and overlap syndromes.

  19. Are non-linear C-H⋯O contacts hydrogen bonds or Van der Waals interactions?. Establishing the limits between hydrogen bonds and Van der Waals interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoa, Juan J.; Lafuente, Pilar; Mota, Fernando

    1998-07-01

    The hydrogen bond nature of angular C-H⋯O contacts is examined to determine when these contacts are better classified as hydrogen bonds or as Van der Waals bonds. To classify the bond we propose to look at the nature of the intermolecular bond critical point present in the electron density of the complex containing the bond. The physics behind this approach is explained using a qualitative orbital overlap model aimed at describing the main changes in the electronic density of the complex produced by the C-H⋯O bending.

  20. Seam bonding of graphite reinforced composite panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, John D.; Fox, Robert L.; Tyeryar, James R.

    1986-01-01

    An account is given of the design features and operating characteristics of a method for the joining of composite parts, at a rate of 2 to 6 inches/min, in which the heating process responsible for adhesive flow at 800 F is focused upon the overlapped seam. The heating element is a self-tuning solid state power oscillator whose ferrite's toroid geometry generates a uniform, concentrated magnetic flux in the component to be bonded. Specimens cut from graphite/epoxy panels bonded with epoxy-phenolic adhesive by this process have exhibited average lap-shear strengths of the order of 3400 lbs/sq in.

  1. "Overlapped" rhinitis: a real trap for rhinoallergologists.

    PubMed

    Gelardi, M

    2014-11-01

    Under the broad heading of "vasomotor" rhinitis two big groups can be distinguished: allergic rhinitis (IgE-mediated), and nonallergic rhinitis. Since they are two separate nosological entities, they can co-exist in the same patient, classifying themselves in the group of "overlapped" rhinitis (OR). Although not absolutely rare (indeed it is estimated a 15-20% incidence among all vasomotor rhinopathies), this condition is not investigated and diagnosed, with significant implications in the clinical-diagnostic and therapeutic field.

  2. Overlap of fibromyalgia with other medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Lavín, M

    2001-08-01

    Fibromyalgia is a multisystem illness. One of its defining features, generalized pain, may also be present in other rheumatic entities. The diagnosis of fibromyalgia is not easy by any means, it requires a profound knowledge of internal medicine. This article discusses the different rheumatic and nonrheumatic diseases that overlap or are prone to be confused with fibromyalgia. It emphasizes the key points in the differential diagnosis.

  3. Metal-Substrate-Mediated Plasmon Hybridization in a Nanoparticle Dimer for Photoluminescence Line-Width Shrinking and Intensity Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Li, Guang-Can; Zhang, Yong-Liang; Jiang, Jing; Luo, Yu; Lei, Dang Yuan

    2017-03-28

    Metal-film-coupled nanoparticles with subnanometer particle-film gaps possess an ultrasmall mode volume, responsible for a variety of intriguing phenomena in plasmonic nanophotonics. Due to the large radiative loss associated with dipolar coupling, however, the plasmonic-film-coupled nanocavities usually feature a low-quality factor, setting an ultimate limit of the increased light-matter interaction strength. Here, we demonstrate a plasmonic nanocavity composed of a metal-film-coupled nanoparticle dimer, exhibiting a significantly improved quality factor. Compared to a silica-supported dimer, the spectral line width of the nanocavity plasmon resonance is reduced by a factor of ∼4.6 and is even smaller than its monomer counterpart (∼30% reduction). Comprehensive theoretical analyses reveal that this pronounced resonance narrowing effect can be attributed to intense film-mediated plasmon hybridization between the bonding dipolar and quadrupolar gap modes in the dimer. More importantly, the invoking of the dark quadrupole resonance leads to a giant photoluminescence intensity enhancement (∼200 times) and dramatic emission line-width narrowing (∼4.6 times), compared to the silica-supported dimer. The similar spectral characteristics of the measured plasmonic scattering and photoluminescence emission indicate that the radiative decay of the coupled plasmons in the nanocavity is the origin of the observed photoluminescence, consistent with a proposed phenomenological model. Numerical calculations show that the intensity enhancement is mainly contributed by the dimer-film gap rather than the interparticle gap. These findings not only shed more light on the hybridized interaction between plasmon modes but also deepen the understanding of photoluminescence emission in coupled plasmonic nanostructures.

  4. Overlaps between Frailty and Sarcopenia Definitions.

    PubMed

    Cederholm, Tommy

    2015-01-01

    Aging is characterized by the catabolism of muscles leading to sarcopenia and frailty. These are two geriatric syndromes with partly overlapping phenotypes. Primary sarcopenia, i.e. loss of muscle mass and function related to aging alone, usually precedes frailty. Thus, robustness passes from sarcopenia over frailty to disability leading eventually to a mortal outcome. Frailty (defined according to the phenotype model) encompasses states as exhaustion, weakness, and slowness, whereas sarcopenia, combining mass and function, is more strictly focused on muscles. Frailty is age related, whereas sarcopenia is also related to disease, starvation, and disuse. In general, the criteria for the two conditions overlap, but frailty requires weight loss, whereas sarcopenia requires muscle loss. Both gait speed and hand grip strength are suggested to be used as diagnostic measures for the two conditions since muscle function is crucial for any of the two syndromes. It is suggested that frailty screening should be part of the geriatric comprehensive assessment starting with measuring walking capacity and complemented by taking a history of fatigue and low activity. For younger adults (i.e. <70 years), sarcopenia screening could first register gait speed or hand grip strength and then body composition measurements. Simple questionnaires are feasible clinical alternatives. Treatment of frailty and sarcopenia overlaps, i.e. provide adequate protein and vitamin D supplementation, and encourage resistance exercise.

  5. Burnout-depression overlap: a review.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Renzo; Schonfeld, Irvin Sam; Laurent, Eric

    2015-03-01

    Whether burnout is a form of depression or a distinct phenomenon is an object of controversy. The aim of the present article was to provide an up-to-date review of the literature dedicated to the question of burnout-depression overlap. A systematic literature search was carried out in PubMed, PsycINFO, and IngentaConnect. A total of 92 studies were identified as informing the issue of burnout-depression overlap. The current state of the art suggests that the distinction between burnout and depression is conceptually fragile. It is notably unclear how the state of burnout (i.e., the end stage of the burnout process) is conceived to differ from clinical depression. Empirically, evidence for the distinctiveness of the burnout phenomenon has been inconsistent, with the most recent studies casting doubt on that distinctiveness. The absence of consensual diagnostic criteria for burnout and burnout research's insufficient consideration of the heterogeneity of depressive disorders constitute major obstacles to the resolution of the raised issue. In conclusion, the epistemic status of the seminal, field-dominating definition of burnout is questioned. It is suggested that systematic clinical observation should be given a central place in future research on burnout-depression overlap.

  6. Vertical overlap of probability density functions of cloud and precipitation hydrometeors: CLOUD AND PRECIPITATION PDF OVERLAP

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Lim, Kyo-Sun Sunny; Larson, Vincent E.; Wong, May; Thayer-Calder, Katherine; Ghan, Steven J.

    2016-11-05

    Coarse-resolution climate models increasingly rely on probability density functions (PDFs) to represent subgrid-scale variability of prognostic variables. While PDFs characterize the horizontal variability, a separate treatment is needed to account for the vertical structure of clouds and precipitation. When sub-columns are drawn from these PDFs for microphysics or radiation parameterizations, appropriate vertical correlations must be enforced via PDF overlap specifications. This study evaluates the representation of PDF overlap in the Subgrid Importance Latin Hypercube Sampler (SILHS) employed in the assumed PDF turbulence and cloud scheme called the Cloud Layers Unified By Binormals (CLUBB). PDF overlap in CLUBB-SILHS simulations of continental and tropical oceanic deep convection is compared with overlap of PDF of various microphysics variables in cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations of the same cases that explicitly predict the 3D structure of cloud and precipitation fields. CRM results show that PDF overlap varies significantly between different hydrometeor types, as well as between PDFs of mass and number mixing ratios for each species, - a distinction that the current SILHS implementation does not make. In CRM simulations that explicitly resolve cloud and precipitation structures, faster falling species, such as rain and graupel, exhibit significantly higher coherence in their vertical distributions than slow falling cloud liquid and ice. These results suggest that to improve the overlap treatment in the sub-column generator, the PDF correlations need to depend on hydrometeor properties, such as fall speeds, in addition to the currently implemented dependency on the turbulent convective length scale.

  7. Evidence and implications of direct charge excitation as the dominant mechanism in plasmon-mediated photocatalysis

    DOE PAGES

    Boerigter, Calvin; Campana, Robert; Morabito, Matthew; ...

    2016-01-28

    Plasmonic metal nanoparticles enhance chemical reactions on their surface when illuminated with light of particular frequencies. It has been shown that these processes are driven by excitation of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). The interaction of LSPR with adsorbate orbitals can lead to the injection of energized charge carriers into the adsorbate, which can result in chemical transformations. The mechanism of the charge injection process (and role of LSPR) is not well understood. Here we shed light on the specifics of this mechanism by coupling optical characterization methods, mainly wavelength-dependent Stokes and anti-Stokes SERS, with kinetic analysis of photocatalytic reactionsmore » in an Ag nanocube–methylene blue plasmonic system. We propose that localized LSPR-induced electric fields result in a direct charge transfer within the molecule–adsorbate system. Lastly, these observations provide a foundation for the development of plasmonic catalysts that can selectively activate targeted chemical bonds, since the mechanism allows for tuning plasmonic nanomaterials in such a way that illumination can selectively enhance desired chemical pathways.« less

  8. Evidence and implications of direct charge excitation as the dominant mechanism in plasmon-mediated photocatalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Boerigter, Calvin; Campana, Robert; Morabito, Matthew; Linic, Suljo

    2016-01-28

    Plasmonic metal nanoparticles enhance chemical reactions on their surface when illuminated with light of particular frequencies. It has been shown that these processes are driven by excitation of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). The interaction of LSPR with adsorbate orbitals can lead to the injection of energized charge carriers into the adsorbate, which can result in chemical transformations. The mechanism of the charge injection process (and role of LSPR) is not well understood. Here we shed light on the specifics of this mechanism by coupling optical characterization methods, mainly wavelength-dependent Stokes and anti-Stokes SERS, with kinetic analysis of photocatalytic reactions in an Ag nanocube–methylene blue plasmonic system. We propose that localized LSPR-induced electric fields result in a direct charge transfer within the molecule–adsorbate system. Lastly, these observations provide a foundation for the development of plasmonic catalysts that can selectively activate targeted chemical bonds, since the mechanism allows for tuning plasmonic nanomaterials in such a way that illumination can selectively enhance desired chemical pathways.

  9. Evidence and implications of direct charge excitation as the dominant mechanism in plasmon-mediated photocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    Boerigter, Calvin; Campana, Robert; Morabito, Matthew; Linic, Suljo

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonic metal nanoparticles enhance chemical reactions on their surface when illuminated with light of particular frequencies. It has been shown that these processes are driven by excitation of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). The interaction of LSPR with adsorbate orbitals can lead to the injection of energized charge carriers into the adsorbate, which can result in chemical transformations. The mechanism of the charge injection process (and role of LSPR) is not well understood. Here we shed light on the specifics of this mechanism by coupling optical characterization methods, mainly wavelength-dependent Stokes and anti-Stokes SERS, with kinetic analysis of photocatalytic reactions in an Ag nanocube–methylene blue plasmonic system. We propose that localized LSPR-induced electric fields result in a direct charge transfer within the molecule–adsorbate system. These observations provide a foundation for the development of plasmonic catalysts that can selectively activate targeted chemical bonds, since the mechanism allows for tuning plasmonic nanomaterials in such a way that illumination can selectively enhance desired chemical pathways. PMID:26817619

  10. Plasmonics: visit the past to know the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Shinji; Okamoto, Takayuki

    2012-10-01

    Surface plasmons are collective oscillations of free electrons localized at surfaces of structures made of metals. Since the surface plasmons induce fluctuations of electric charge at surfaces, they are accompanied by electromagnetic oscillations. Electromagnetic fields associated with surface plasmons are localized at surfaces of metallic structures and significantly enhanced compared with the excitation field. These two characteristics are ingredients for making good use of surface plasmons in plasmonics. Plasmonics is a rapidly growing and well-established research field, which covers various aspects of surface plasmons towards realization of a variety of surface-plasmon-based devices. In this paper, after summarizing the fundamental aspects of surface plasmons propagating on planar metallic surfaces and localized at metallic nanoparticles, recent progress in plasmonic waveguides, plasmonic light-emitting devices and plasmonic solar cells is reviewed.

  11. Chemical Bonds II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, R. T.

    1972-01-01

    The continuation of a paper discussing chemical bonding from a bond energy viewpoint, with a number of examples of single and multiple bonds. (Part I appeared in volume 1 number 3, pages 16-23, February 1972.) (AL)

  12. Gap Plasmon Resonance in a Suspended Plasmonic Nanowire Coupled to a Metallic Substrate.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Masashi; Holsteen, Aaron; Nagasaki, Yusuke; Brongersma, Mark L; Takahara, Junichi

    2015-08-12

    We present an experimental demonstration of nanoscale gap plasmon resonators that consist of an individual suspended plasmonic nanowire (NW) over a metallic substrate. Our study demonstrates that the NW supports strong gap plasmon resonances of various gap sizes including single-nanometer-scale gaps. The obtained resonance features agree well with intuitive resonance models for near- and far-field regimes. We also illustrate that our suspended NW geometry is capable of constructing plasmonic coupled systems dominated by quasi-electrostatics.

  13. What Determines Bond Costs. Municipal Bonds Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Douglas; And Others

    Public officials in small towns who participate infrequently in the bond market need information about bond financing. This publication, one in a series of booklets published by the Western Rural Development Center using research gathered between 1967-77, discusses factors influencing the marketability and cost of bond financing for towns and…

  14. A phased antenna array for surface plasmons.

    PubMed

    Dikken, Dirk Jan W; Korterik, Jeroen P; Segerink, Frans B; Herek, Jennifer L; Prangsma, Jord C

    2016-04-28

    Surface plasmon polaritons are electromagnetic waves that propagate tightly bound to metal surfaces. The concentration of the electromagnetic field at the surface as well as the short wavelength of surface plasmons enable sensitive detection methods and miniaturization of optics. We present an optical frequency plasmonic analog to the phased antenna array as it is well known in radar technology and radio astronomy. Individual holes in a thick gold film act as dipolar emitters of surface plasmon polaritons whose phase is controlled individually using a digital spatial light modulator. We show experimentally, using a phase sensitive near-field microscope, that this optical system allows accurate directional emission of surface waves. This compact and flexible method allows for dynamically shaping the propagation of plasmons and holds promise for nanophotonic applications employing propagating surface plasmons.

  15. A phased antenna array for surface plasmons

    PubMed Central

    Dikken, Dirk Jan W.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Segerink, Frans B.; Herek, Jennifer L.; Prangsma, Jord C.

    2016-01-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons are electromagnetic waves that propagate tightly bound to metal surfaces. The concentration of the electromagnetic field at the surface as well as the short wavelength of surface plasmons enable sensitive detection methods and miniaturization of optics. We present an optical frequency plasmonic analog to the phased antenna array as it is well known in radar technology and radio astronomy. Individual holes in a thick gold film act as dipolar emitters of surface plasmon polaritons whose phase is controlled individually using a digital spatial light modulator. We show experimentally, using a phase sensitive near-field microscope, that this optical system allows accurate directional emission of surface waves. This compact and flexible method allows for dynamically shaping the propagation of plasmons and holds promise for nanophotonic applications employing propagating surface plasmons. PMID:27121099

  16. Stacking of colors in exfoliable plasmonic superlattices.

    PubMed

    Jalali, Mahsa; Yu, Ye; Xu, Kaichen; Ng, Ray J H; Dong, Zhaogang; Wang, Liancheng; Safari Dinachali, Saman; Hong, Minghui; Yang, Joel K W

    2016-10-27

    Color printing with plasmonic resonators can overcome limitations in pigment-based printing approaches. While layering in pigment-based prints results in familiar color mixing effects, the color effects of stacking plasmonic resonator structures have not been investigated. Here, we demonstrate an experimental strategy to fabricate a 3-tiered complex superlattice of nanostructures with multiple sets of building blocks. Laser interference lithography was used to fabricate the nanostructures and a thin-layer of aluminum was deposited to introduce plasmonic colors. Interestingly, the structures exhibited drastic color changes when the layers of structures were sequentially exfoliated. Our theoretical analysis shows that the colors of the superlattice nanostructure were predominantly determined by the plasmonic properties of the two topmost layers. These results suggest the feasibility of the sub-wavelength vertical stacking of multiple plasmonic colors for applications in sensitive tamper-evident seals, dense 3D barcoding, and substrates for plasmonic color laser printing.

  17. Quantum plasmonics with a metal nanoparticle array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Changhyoup; Tame, Mark; Lim, James; Lee, Jinhyoung

    2012-06-01

    We investigate an array of metal nanoparticles as a channel for nanophotonic quantum communication and the generation of quantum plasmonic interference. We consider the transfer of quantum states, including single qubits as plasmonic wave packets, and highlight the necessity of a quantum-mechanical description by comparing the predictions of quantum theory with those of classical electromagnetic theory. The effects of loss in the metal are included, thus putting our investigation into a practical setting and enabling the quantification of the performance of realistic nanoparticle arrays as plasmonic quantum channels. We explore the interference of single plasmons, finding nonlinear absorption effects associated with the quantum properties of the plasmon excitations. This work highlights the benefits and drawbacks of using nanophotonic periodic systems for quantum plasmonic applications, such as quantum communication and the generation of quantum interference.

  18. Ultralow-Loss CMOS Copper Plasmonic Waveguides.

    PubMed

    Fedyanin, Dmitry Yu; Yakubovsky, Dmitry I; Kirtaev, Roman V; Volkov, Valentyn S

    2016-01-13

    Surface plasmon polaritons can give a unique opportunity to manipulate light at a scale well below the diffraction limit reducing the size of optical components down to that of nanoelectronic circuits. At the same time, plasmonics is mostly based on noble metals, which are not compatible with microelectronics manufacturing technologies. This prevents plasmonic components from integration with both silicon photonics and silicon microelectronics. Here, we demonstrate ultralow-loss copper plasmonic waveguides fabricated in a simple complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) compatible process, which can outperform gold plasmonic waveguides simultaneously providing long (>40 μm) propagation length and deep subwavelength (∼λ(2)/50, where λ is the free-space wavelength) mode confinement in the telecommunication spectral range. These results create the backbone for the development of a CMOS plasmonic platform and its integration in future electronic chips.

  19. Tunable mid IR plasmon in GZO nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Hamza, M K; Bluet, J-M; Masenelli-Varlot, K; Canut, B; Boisron, O; Melinon, P; Masenelli, B

    2015-07-28

    Degenerate metal oxide nanoparticles are promising systems to expand the significant achievements of plasmonics into the infrared (IR) range. Among the possible candidates, Ga-doped ZnO nanocrystals are particularly suited for mid IR, considering their wide range of possible doping levels and thus of plasmon tuning. In the present work, we report on the tunable mid IR plasmon induced in degenerate Ga-doped ZnO nanocrystals. The nanocrystals are produced by a plasma expansion and exhibit unprotected surfaces. Tuning the Ga concentration allows tuning the localized surface plasmon resonance. Moreover, the plasmon resonance is characterized by a large damping. By comparing the plasmon of nanocrystal assemblies to that of nanoparticles dispersed in an alumina matrix, we investigate the possible origins of such damping. We demonstrate that it partially results from the self-organization of the naked particles and also from intrinsic inhomogeneity of dopants.

  20. Influence of slice overlap on positron emission tomography image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeown, Clare; Gillen, Gerry; Dempsey, Mary Frances; Findlay, Caroline

    2016-02-01

    PET scans use overlapping acquisition beds to correct for reduced sensitivity at bed edges. The optimum overlap size for the General Electric (GE) Discovery 690 has not been established. This study assesses how image quality is affected by slice overlap. Efficacy of 23% overlaps (recommended by GE) and 49% overlaps (maximum possible overlap) were specifically assessed. European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) guidelines for calculating minimum injected activities based on overlap size were also reviewed. A uniform flood phantom was used to assess noise (coefficient of variation, (COV)) and voxel accuracy (activity concentrations, Bq ml-1). A NEMA (National Electrical Manufacturers Association) body phantom with hot/cold spheres in a background activity was used to assess contrast recovery coefficients (CRCs) and signal to noise ratios (SNR). Different overlap sizes and sphere-to-background ratios were assessed. COVs for 49% and 23% overlaps were 9% and 13% respectively. This increased noise was difficult to visualise on the 23% overlap images. Mean voxel activity concentrations were not affected by overlap size. No clinically significant differences in CRCs were observed. However, visibility and SNR of small, low contrast spheres (⩽13 mm diameter, 2:1 sphere to background ratio) may be affected by overlap size in low count studies if they are located in the overlap area. There was minimal detectable influence on image quality in terms of noise, mean activity concentrations or mean CRCs when comparing 23% overlap with 49% overlap. Detectability of small, low contrast lesions may be affected in low count studies—however, this is a worst-case scenario. The marginal benefits of increasing overlap from 23% to 49% are likely to be offset by increased patient scan times. A 23% overlap is therefore appropriate for clinical use. An amendment to EANM guidelines for calculating injected activities is also proposed which better reflects the effect overlap size has

  1. Control of Plasmon Dynamics in Coupled Plasmonic Hybrid Mode Microcavities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-10

    by concatenating two identical resonators.4,5 Another fascinating example of two-level systems is the exciton- polaritons : pseudoparticles that result...of exciton- polariton enhanced Raman scat- tering, the polariton laser, and the polariton Bose–Einstein condensates are just a few of the recent...diffraction limit in classical photonics and to develop a myriad of applications. While surface plasmon polaritons allow the transmission of optical

  2. Primary Adhesively Bonded Structure Technology (PABST). Design Handbook for Adhesive Bonding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-01

    47 EFFECT OF MOISTURE IN ADHESIVE ON BOND STRESS DISTRIBUTIONS 95 The use of adhesive to fill up the gaps where parts don’t fit is incompatible with...cap and web and chamfer tht base as shown in Figure 72? If the longeron ends adjacent to another member, which is often the case, the gap between the... to2 ) EVALUATE X4 AT TEMPERATURE GIVING LEAST VALUE - AGAIN, THE HOTTEST OPTIMUM OVERLAP = Rp + I’uY(NO GREATER OVERLAP CAN INCREASE JOINT STRENGTH

  3. Imaging of electric and magnetic fields near plasmonic nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Kabakova, I. V.; de Hoogh, A.; van der Wel, R. E. C.; Wulf , M.; le Feber, B.; Kuipers, L.

    2016-01-01

    Near-field imaging is a powerful tool to investigate the complex structure of light at the nanoscale. Recent advances in near-field imaging have indicated the possibility for the complete reconstruction of both electric and magnetic components of the evanescent field. Here we study the electro-magnetic field structure of surface plasmon polariton waves propagating along subwavelength gold nanowires by performing phase- and polarization-resolved near-field microscopy in collection mode. By applying the optical reciprocity theorem, we describe the signal collected by the probe as an overlap integral of the nanowire’s evanescent field and the probe’s response function. As a result, we find that the probe’s sensitivity to the magnetic field is approximately equal to its sensitivity to the electric field. Through rigorous modeling of the nanowire mode as well as the aperture probe response function, we obtain a good agreement between experimentally measured signals and a numerical model. Our findings provide a better understanding of aperture-based near-field imaging of the nanoscopic plasmonic and photonic structures and are helpful for the interpretation of future near-field experiments. PMID:26947124

  4. Angle-resolved surface-enhanced Raman scattering on metallic nanostructured plasmonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Baumberg, Jeremy J; Kelf, Timothy A; Sugawara, Yoshihiro; Cintra, Suzanne; Abdelsalam, Mamdouh E; Bartlett, Phillip N; Russell, Andrea E

    2005-11-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering is an ideal tool for identifying molecules from the "fingerprint" of their molecular bonds; unfortunately, this process lacks a full microscopic understanding and, practically, is plagued with irreproducibility. Using nanostructured metal surfaces, we demonstrate strong correlations between plasmon resonances and Raman enhancements. Evidence for simultaneous ingoing and outgoing resonances in wavelength and angle sheds new light on the Raman enhancement process, allowing optimization of a new generation of reproducible Raman substrates.

  5. Quantum Dot Detectors with Plasmonic Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-15

    AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2015-0102 TR-2015-0102 QUANTUM DOT DETECTORS WITH PLASMONIC STRUCTURES Sanjay Krishna University of...SUBTITLE Quantum Dot Detectors with Plasmonic Structures 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9453-12-1-0131 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 63401F 6...characterization, of multi-spectral quantum dots-in-a-double well (DDWELL) infrared detectors, by the integration of a surface Plasmon (SP) assisted resonant

  6. Devices based on surface plasmon interference filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yu (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Devices based on surface plasmon filters having at least one metal-dielectric interface to support surface plasmon waves. A multi-layer-coupled surface plasmon notch filter is provided to have more than two symmetric metal-dielectric interfaces coupled with one another to produce a transmission spectral window with desired spectral profile and bandwidth. Such notch filters can form various color filtering devices for color flat panel displays.

  7. Plasmon resonant cavities in vertical nanowire arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Bora, M; Bond, T; Behymer, E; Chang, A

    2010-02-23

    We investigate tunable plasmon resonant cavity arrays in paired parallel nanowire waveguides. Resonances are observed when the waveguide length is an odd multiple of quarter plasmon wavelengths, consistent with boundary conditions of node and antinode at the ends. Two nanowire waveguides satisfy the dispersion relation of a planar metal-dielectric-metal waveguide of equivalent width equal to the square field average weighted gap. Confinement factors over 103 are possible due to plasmon focusing in the inter-wire space.

  8. VERTICAL PILLAR ARRAYS FOR PLASMON NANOCAVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bora, M; Fasenfest, B; Behymer, E; Chang, A; Nguyen, H; Britten, J; Larson, C; Bond, T

    2010-04-02

    We investigate tunable plasmon resonant cavity arrays in paired parallel nanowire waveguides. Resonances are observed when the waveguide length is an odd multiple of quarter plasmon wavelengths, consistent with boundary conditions of node and antinode at the ends. Two nanowire waveguides satisfy the dispersion relation of a planar metal-dielectric-metal waveguide of equivalent width equal to the square field average weighted gap. Confinement factors over 10{sup 3} are possible due to plasmon focusing in the inter-wire space.

  9. Overextended sarcomeres regain filament overlap following stretch.

    PubMed

    Panchangam, Appaji; Herzog, Walter

    2012-09-21

    Sarcomere overextension has been widely implicated in stretch-induced muscle injury. Yet, sarcomere overextensions are typically inferred based on indirect evidence obtained in muscle and fibre preparations, where individual sarcomeres cannot be observed during dynamic contractions. Therefore, it remains unclear whether sarcomere overextensions are permanent following injury-inducing stretch-shortening cycles, and thus, if they can explain stretch-induced force loss. We tested the hypothesis that overextended sarcomeres can regain filament overlap in isolated myofibrils from rabbit psoas muscles. Maximally activated myofibrils (n=13) were stretched from an average sarcomere length of 2.6±0.04μm by 0.9μm sarcomere(-1) at a speed of 0.1μm sarcomere(-1)s(-1) and immediately returned to the starting lengths at the same speed (sarcomere strain=34.1±2.3%). Myofibrils were then allowed to contract isometrically at the starting lengths (2.6μm) for ∼30s before relaxing. Force and individual sarcomere lengths were measured continuously. Out of the 182 sarcomeres, 35 sarcomeres were overextended at the peak of stretch, out of which 26 regained filament overlap in the shortening phase while 9 (∼5%) remained overextended. About 35% of the sarcomeres with initial lengths on the descending limb of the force-length relationship and ∼2% of the sarcomeres with shorter initial lengths were overextended. These findings provide first ever direct evidence that overextended sarcomeres can regain filament overlap in the shortening phase following stretch, and that the likelihood of overextension is higher for sarcomeres residing initially on the descending limb.

  10. Technology initiatives with government/business overlap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Robert H., Jr.

    2015-03-01

    Three important present-day technology development settings involve significant overlap between government and private sectors. The Advanced Research Project Agency for Energy (ARPA-E) supports a wide range of "high risk, high return" projects carried out in academic, non-profit or private business settings. The Materials Genome Initiative (MGI), based in the White House, aims at radical acceleration of the development process for advanced materials. California public utilities such as Pacific Gas & Electric operate under a structure of financial returns and political program mandates that make them arms of public policy as much as independent businesses.

  11. Explosives Detection in a Lasing Plasmon Nanocavity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    Explosives detection in a lasing plasmon nanocavity Ren-Min Ma1†, Sadao Ota1†, Yimin Li1, Sui Yang1 and Xiang Zhang1,2* Perhaps the most successful...application of plasmonics to date has been in sensing, where the interaction of a nanoscale loca- lized field with analytes leads to high-sensitivity... plasmon sensors with active excitation (gain-enhanced) can achieve much higher sensitivities due to the amplification of the surface plasmons10–12. Here

  12. Culturing photosynthetic bacteria through surface plasmon resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Ooms, Matthew D.; Bajin, Lauren; Sinton, David

    2012-12-17

    In this work, cultivation of photosynthetic microbes in surface plasmon enhanced evanescent fields is demonstrated. Proliferation of Synechococcus elongatus was obtained on gold surfaces excited with surface plasmons. Excitation over three days resulted in 10 {mu}m thick biofilms with maximum cell volume density of 20% vol/vol (2% more total accumulation than control experiments with direct light). Collectively, these results indicate the ability to (1) excite surface-bound cells using plasmonic light fields, and (2) subsequently grow thick biofilms by coupling light from the surface. Plasmonic light delivery presents opportunities for high-density optofluidic photobioreactors for microalgal analysis and solar fuel production.

  13. Plasmonic substrates for surface-enhanced spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, F.; Hao, F.; Nordlander, P.

    2006-08-01

    Using the Plasmon Hybridization (PH) method and the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method, we investigate the plasmonic properties of finite metallic nanopartices interacting with extended metallic substrates such as thin films and wires. The results from the two computational methods are found to agree very well. We show that the plasmons of a metallic nanoparticle couple to the delocalized plasmons of extended substrates in the same manner as an electronic impurity level couples to an continuum of electronic states. The interaction can result in both localized plasmons and virtual states in the plasmonic continuum. The virtual states are composed of delocalized plasmons from the extended substrate and depend sensitively on the geometry of the system, the polarization of incident electromagnetic excitations as well as the background dielectric properties of the structures. We demonstrate that the virtual state can provide large electric field enhancements over a broad and tunable spectral regime. Our investigations show that plasmonic structures supporting virtual states are highly suitable as substrates for surface enhanced spectroscopic applications and may be useful in plasmonic waveguiding applications.

  14. Hybrid photon-plasmon nanowire lasers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoqin; Xiao, Yao; Meng, Chao; Zhang, Xining; Yu, Shaoliang; Wang, Yipei; Yang, Chuanxi; Guo, Xin; Ning, C Z; Tong, Limin

    2013-01-01

    Metallic and plasmonic nanolasers have attracted growing interest recently. Plasmonic lasers demonstrated so far operate in hybrid photon-plasmon modes in transverse dimensions, rendering it impossible to separate photonic from plasmonic components. Thus only the far-field photonic component can be measured and utilized directly. But spatially separated plasmon modes are highly desired for applications including high-efficiency coupling of single-photon emitters and ultrasensitivity optical sensing. Here, we report a nanowire (NW) laser that offers subdiffraction-limited beam size and spatially separated plasmon cavity modes. By near-field coupling a high-gain CdSe NW and a 100 nm diameter Ag NW, we demonstrate a hybrid photon-plasmon laser operating at 723 nm wavelength at room temperature, with a plasmon mode area of 0.008λ(2). This device simultaneously provides spatially separated photonic far-field output and highly localized coherent plasmon modes, which may open up new avenues in the fields of integrated nanophotonic circuits, biosensing, and quantum information processing.

  15. Wedge Waveguides and Resonators for Quantum Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Kress, Stephan J P; Antolinez, Felipe V; Richner, Patrizia; Jayanti, Sriharsha V; Kim, David K; Prins, Ferry; Riedinger, Andreas; Fischer, Maximilian P C; Meyer, Stefan; McPeak, Kevin M; Poulikakos, Dimos; Norris, David J

    2015-09-09

    Plasmonic structures can provide deep-subwavelength electromagnetic fields that are useful for enhancing light-matter interactions. However, because these localized modes are also dissipative, structures that offer the best compromise between field confinement and loss have been sought. Metallic wedge waveguides were initially identified as an ideal candidate but have been largely abandoned because to date their experimental performance has been limited. We combine state-of-the-art metallic wedges with integrated reflectors and precisely placed colloidal quantum dots (down to the single-emitter level) and demonstrate quantum-plasmonic waveguides and resonators with performance approaching theoretical limits. By exploiting a nearly 10-fold improvement in wedge-plasmon propagation (19 μm at a vacuum wavelength, λvac, of 630 nm), efficient reflectors (93%), and effective coupling (estimated to be >70%) to highly emissive (~90%) quantum dots, we obtain Ag plasmonic resonators at visible wavelengths with quality factors approaching 200 (3.3 nm line widths). As our structures offer modal volumes down to ~0.004λvac(3) in an exposed single-mode waveguide-resonator geometry, they provide advantages over both traditional photonic microcavities and localized-plasmonic resonators for enhancing light-matter interactions. Our results confirm the promise of wedges for creating plasmonic devices and for studying coherent quantum-plasmonic effects such as long-distance plasmon-mediated entanglement and strong plasmon-matter coupling.

  16. Graphene plasmonics for tunable terahertz metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Ju, Long; Geng, Baisong; Horng, Jason; Girit, Caglar; Martin, Michael; Hao, Zhao; Bechtel, Hans A; Liang, Xiaogan; Zettl, Alex; Shen, Y Ron; Wang, Feng

    2011-09-04

    Plasmons describe collective oscillations of electrons. They have a fundamental role in the dynamic responses of electron systems and form the basis of research into optical metamaterials. Plasmons of two-dimensional massless electrons, as present in graphene, show unusual behaviour that enables new tunable plasmonic metamaterials and, potentially, optoelectronic applications in the terahertz frequency range. Here we explore plasmon excitations in engineered graphene micro-ribbon arrays. We demonstrate that graphene plasmon resonances can be tuned over a broad terahertz frequency range by changing micro-ribbon width and in situ electrostatic doping. The ribbon width and carrier doping dependences of graphene plasmon frequency demonstrate power-law behaviour characteristic of two-dimensional massless Dirac electrons. The plasmon resonances have remarkably large oscillator strengths, resulting in prominent room-temperature optical absorption peaks. In comparison, plasmon absorption in a conventional two-dimensional electron gas was observed only at 4.2 K (refs 13, 14). The results represent a first look at light-plasmon coupling in graphene and point to potential graphene-based terahertz metamaterials.

  17. Tunable Terahertz Hybrid Metal-Graphene Plasmons.

    PubMed

    Jadidi, Mohammad M; Sushkov, Andrei B; Myers-Ward, Rachael L; Boyd, Anthony K; Daniels, Kevin M; Gaskill, D Kurt; Fuhrer, Michael S; Drew, H Dennis; Murphy, Thomas E

    2015-10-14

    We report here a new type of plasmon resonance that occurs when graphene is connected to a metal. These new plasmon modes offer the potential to incorporate a tunable plasmonic channel into a device with electrical contacts, a critical step toward practical graphene terahertz optoelectronics. Through theory and experiments, we demonstrate, for example, anomalously high resonant absorption or transmission when subwavelength graphene-filled apertures are introduced into an otherwise conductive layer. These tunable plasmon resonances are essential yet missing ingredients needed for terahertz filters, oscillators, detectors, and modulators.

  18. Culturing photosynthetic bacteria through surface plasmon resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooms, Matthew D.; Bajin, Lauren; Sinton, David

    2012-12-01

    In this work, cultivation of photosynthetic microbes in surface plasmon enhanced evanescent fields is demonstrated. Proliferation of Synechococcus elongatus was obtained on gold surfaces excited with surface plasmons. Excitation over three days resulted in 10 μm thick biofilms with maximum cell volume density of 20% vol/vol (2% more total accumulation than control experiments with direct light). Collectively, these results indicate the ability to (1) excite surface-bound cells using plasmonic light fields, and (2) subsequently grow thick biofilms by coupling light from the surface. Plasmonic light delivery presents opportunities for high-density optofluidic photobioreactors for microalgal analysis and solar fuel production.

  19. Plasmonic Biofoam: A Versatile Optically Active Material.

    PubMed

    Tian, Limei; Luan, Jingyi; Liu, Keng-Ku; Jiang, Qisheng; Tadepalli, Sirimuvva; Gupta, Maneesh K; Naik, Rajesh R; Singamaneni, Srikanth

    2016-01-13

    Owing to their ability to confine and manipulate light at the nanoscale, plasmonic nanostructures are highly attractive for a broad range of applications. While tremendous progress has been made in the synthesis of size- and shape-controlled plasmonic nanostructures, their integration with other materials and application in solid-state is primarily through their assembly on rigid two-dimensional (2D) substrates, which limits the plasmonically active space to a few nanometers above the substrate. In this work, we demonstrate a simple method to create plasmonically active three-dimensional biofoams by integrating plasmonic nanostructures with highly porous biomaterial aerogels. We demonstrate that plasmonic biofoam is a versatile optically active platform that can be harnessed for numerous applications including (i) ultrasensitive chemical detection using surface-enhanced Raman scattering; (ii) highly efficient energy harvesting and steam generation through plasmonic photothermal heating; and (iii) optical control of enzymatic activity by triggered release of biomolecules encapsulated within the aerogel. Our results demonstrate that 3D plasmonic biofoam exhibits significantly higher sensing, photothermal, and loading efficiency compared to conventional 2D counterparts. The design principles and processing methodology of plasmonic aerogels demonstrated here can be broadly applied in the fabrication of other functional foams.

  20. Nonlinear Terahertz Absorption of Graphene Plasmons.

    PubMed

    Jadidi, Mohammad M; König-Otto, Jacob C; Winnerl, Stephan; Sushkov, Andrei B; Drew, H Dennis; Murphy, Thomas E; Mittendorff, Martin

    2016-04-13

    Subwavelength graphene structures support localized plasmonic resonances in the terahertz and mid-infrared spectral regimes. The strong field confinement at the resonant frequency is predicted to significantly enhance the light-graphene interaction, which could enable nonlinear optics at low intensity in atomically thin, subwavelength devices. To date, the nonlinear response of graphene plasmons and their energy loss dynamics have not been experimentally studied. We measure and theoretically model the terahertz nonlinear response and energy relaxation dynamics of plasmons in graphene nanoribbons. We employ a terahertz pump-terahertz probe technique at the plasmon frequency and observe a strong saturation of plasmon absorption followed by a 10 ps relaxation time. The observed nonlinearity is enhanced by 2 orders of magnitude compared to unpatterned graphene with no plasmon resonance. We further present a thermal model for the nonlinear plasmonic absorption that supports the experimental results. The model shows that the observed strong linearity is caused by an unexpected red shift of plasmon resonance together with a broadening and weakening of the resonance caused by the transient increase in electron temperature. The model further predicts that even greater resonant enhancement of the nonlinear response can be expected in high-mobility graphene, suggesting that nonlinear graphene plasmonic devices could be promising candidates for nonlinear optical processing.

  1. Optical interaction between small plasmonic nanowires: a perspective from induced forces and torques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekeroth, Ricardo M. Abraham

    2016-08-01

    This paper addresses a new numerical study of the near electromagnetic coupling between two small, metallic nanowires under plane-wave illumination. The forces and torques induced give a different point of view of the interaction. The analysis of these near-field, mechanical observables is based entirely on the plasmon hybridization model, with the help of an adequate correlation with far fields. Although several studies of the opto-mechanical inductions have been done, unexpected features of the movement are obtained. ‘Coordinated’ spin for the wires are found, in addition to binding or repulsion forces between the wires and scattering forces. For heterodimers, also orbital torques are obtained. The binding and rotation of the nanowires as well as orbital torques are strongly dependent on the plasmonic excitations of the system. They identify uniquely the surface plasmons. In particular, dark modes can be optically detected without using evanescent fields. The optical forces and torques are calculated exactly by Maxwell stress tensor. ‘Realistic’ infinite nanowires of silver and gold are simulated by a size correction in bulk dielectric function. Thus, the importance of this correction on the mechanical results is also studied. The results can contribute to the design of devices for real observation/detection of surface plasmons. The spectra of forces, and specially of torques, show more resolved resonances because overlapping effects are not as present as in far-field calculations. The spinning of wires found and the analysis made could open new directions of studies and applications of dimers.

  2. Optomechanical coupling in phoxonic–plasmonic slab cavities with periodic metal strips

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Tzy-Rong; Huang, Yin-Chen; Hsu, Jin-Chen

    2015-05-07

    We theoretically investigate the optomechanical (OM) coupling of submicron cavities formed in one-dimensional phoxonic–plasmonic slabs. The phoxonic–plasmonic slabs are structured by depositing periodic Ag strips onto the top surfaces of dielectric GaAs slabs to produce dual band gaps for both electromagnetic and acoustic waves, thereby inducing the coupling of surface plasmons with photons for tailoring the OM coupling. We quantify the OM coupling by calculating the temporal modulation of the optical resonance wavelength with the acoustic phonon-induced photoelastic (PE) and moving-boundary (MB) effects. We also consider the appearance of a uniform Ag layer on the bottom surface of the slabs to modulate the photonic–plasmonic coupling. The results show that the PE and MB effects can be constructive or destructive in the overall OM coupling, and their magnitudes depend not only on the quality factors of the resonant modes but also on the mode area, mode overlap, and individual symmetries of the photonic–phononic mode pairs. Lowering the mode area could be effective for enhancing the OM coupling of subwavelength photons and phonons. This study introduces possible engineering applications to achieve enhanced interaction between photons and phonons in nanoscale OM devices.

  3. Electron photoemission in plasmonic nanoparticle arrays: analysis of collective resonances and embedding effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukovsky, Sergei V.; Babicheva, Viktoriia E.; Uskov, Alexander V.; Protsenko, Igor E.; Lavrinenko, Andrei V.

    2014-09-01

    We theoretically study the characteristics of photoelectron emission in plasmonic nanoparticle arrays. Nanoparticles are partially embedded in a semiconductor, forming Schottky barriers at metal/semiconductor interfaces through which photoelectrons can tunnel from the nanoparticle into the semiconductor; photodetection in the infrared range, where photon energies are below the semiconductor band gap (insufficient for band-to-band absorption in semiconductor), is therefore possible. The nanoparticles are arranged in a sparse rectangular lattice so that the wavelength of the lattice-induced Rayleigh anomalies can overlap the wavelength of the localized surface plasmon resonance of the individual particles, bringing about collective effects from the nanoparticle array. Using full-wave numerical simulations, we analyze the effects of lattice constant, embedding depth, and refractive index step between the semiconductor layer and an adjacent transparent conductive oxide layer. We show that the presence of refractive index mismatch between media surrounding the nanoparticles disrupts the formation of a narrow absorption peak associated with the Rayleigh anomaly, so the role of collective lattice effects in the formation of plasmonic resonance is diminished. We also show that 5-20 times increase of photoemission can be achieved on embedding of nanoparticles without taking into account dynamics of ballistic electrons. The results obtained can be used to increase efficiency of plasmon-based photodetectors and photovoltaic devices. The results may provide clues to designing an experiment where the contributions of surface and volume photoelectric effects to the overall photocurrent would be defined.

  4. Nano-plasmonic exosome diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Im, Hyungsoon; Shao, Huilin; Weissleder, Ralph; Castro, Cesar M; Lee, Hakho

    2015-06-01

    Exosomes have emerged as a promising biomarker. These vesicles abound in biofluids and harbor molecular constituents from their parent cells, thereby offering a minimally-invasive avenue for molecular analyses. Despite such clinical potential, routine exosomal analysis, particularly the protein assay, remains challenging, due to requirements for large sample volumes and extensive processing. We have been developing miniaturized systems to facilitate clinical exosome studies. These systems can be categorized into two components: microfluidics for sample preparation and analytical tools for protein analyses. In this report, we review a new assay platform, nano-plasmonic exosome, in which sensing is based on surface plasmon resonance to achieve label-free exosome detection. Looking forward, we also discuss some potential challenges and improvements in exosome studies.

  5. Data Assimilation Results from PLASMON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, A. M.; Lichtenberger, J.; Duffy, J.; Friedel, R. H.; Clilverd, M.; Heilig, B.; Vellante, M.; Manninen, J. K.; Raita, T.; Rodger, C. J.; Collier, A.; Reda, J.; Holzworth, R. H.; Ober, D. M.; Boudouridis, A.; Zesta, E.; Chi, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    VLF and magnetometer observations can be used to remotely sense the plasmasphere. VLF whistler waves can be used to measure the electron density and magnetic Field Line Resonance (FLR) measurements can be used to measure the mass density. In principle it is then possible to remotely map the plasmasphere with a network of ground-based stations which are also less expensive and more permanent than satellites. The PLASMON project, funded by the EU FP-7 program, is in the process of doing just this. A large number of ground-based observations will be input into a data assimilative framework which models the plasmasphere structure and dynamics. The data assimilation framework combines the Ensemble Kalman Filter with the Dynamic Global Core Plasma Model. In this presentation we will describe the plasmasphere model, the data assimilation approach that we have taken, PLASMON data and data assimilation results for specific events.

  6. Technological studies for plasmonic metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomescu, Roxana; Kusko, Cristian; Dinescu, Adrian; Bita, Bogdan; Popescu, Marian

    2016-12-01

    This work will present the technological processes necessary to experimentally obtain plasmonic metasurfaces for developing flat optical components or diffractive optical elements (DOE) which have reflexion functionalities. This class of metasurfaces offers the possibility to manipulate the beam shape using an array of metallic nanoscale elements patterned on a substrate. The main feature of these structures is that one can manipulate the phase behavior by modifying some of the geometrical parameters of the nano-antennas in order to achieve the required phase shift values for the desired applications. The first important step in experimentally obtaining a plasmonic metasurface structures is the electron beam lithography (EBL) followed by the lift-off method. Due to the small sizes of the gold nano-antennas and tight periodicity of the array a number of impediments can emerge in experimentally obtaining such geometries which can be overcome by the parameter optimization of the employed technologies.

  7. Propagating plasmons on silver nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Weidong; Wei, Hong; Li, Zhipeng; Huang, Yingzhou; Fang, Yurui; Li, Ping; Xu, Hongxing

    2010-08-01

    Chemically synthesized Ag nanowires (NWs) can serve as waveguides to support propagating surface plasmons (SPs). By using the propagating SPs on Ag NWs, the surface-enhanced Raman scattering of molecules, located in the nanowire-nanoparticle junction a few microns away from the laser spot on one end of the NW, was excited. The propagating SPs can excite the excitons in quantum dots, and in reverse, the decay of excitons can generate SPs. The direction and polarization of the light emitted through the Ag NW waveguide. The emission polarization depends strongly on the shape of the NW terminals. In branched NW structures, the SPs can be switched between the main NW and the branch NW, by tuning the incident polarization. The light of different wavelength can also be controlled to propagate along different ways. Thus, the branched NW structure can serve as controllable plasmonic router and multiplexer.

  8. Plasmon nano-optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juan, Mathieu L.; Righini, Maurizio; Quidant, Romain

    2011-06-01

    Conventional optical tweezers, formed at the diffraction-limited focus of a laser beam, have become a powerful and flexible tool for manipulating micrometre-sized objects. Extending optical trapping down to the nanometre scale would open unprecedented opportunities in many fields of science, where such nano-optical tweezers would allow the ultra-accurate positioning of single nano-objects. Among the possible strategies, the ability of metallic nanostructures to control light at the subwavelength scale can be exploited to engineer such nano-optical traps. This Review summarizes the recent advances in the emerging field of plasmon-based optical trapping and discusses the details of plasmon tweezers along with their potential applications to bioscience and quantum optics.

  9. Slow plasmons in grating cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydinli, Atilla; Karademir, Ertugrul; Balci, Sinan; Kocabas, Coskun

    2016-03-01

    Recent research on surface plasmon polaritons and their applications have brought forward a wealth of information and continues to be of interest to many. In this report, we concentrate on propagating surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) and their interaction with matter. Using grating based metallic structures, it is possible to control the electrodynamics of propagating SPPs. Biharmonic gratings loaded with periodic Si stripes allow excitation of SPPs that are localized inside the band gap with grating coupling. The cavity state is formed due to periodic effective index modulation obtained by one harmonic of the grating and loaded Si stripes. More complicated grating structures such as metallic Moiré surfaces have also been shown to form a localized state inside the band gap when excited with Kretschmann configuration.

  10. Plasmonic Metallurgy Enabled by DNA

    DOE PAGES

    Ross, Michael B.; Ku, Jessie C.; Lee, Byeongdu; ...

    2016-02-05

    In this study, mixed silver and gold plasmonic nanoparticle architectures are synthesized using DNA-programmable assembly, unveiling exquisitely tunable optical properties that are predicted and explained both by effective thin-film models and explicit electrodynamic simulations. These data demonstrate that the manner and ratio with which multiple metallic components are arranged can greatly alter optical properties, including tunable color and asymmetric reflectivity behavior of relevance for thin-film applications.

  11. When plasmonics meets membrane technology.

    PubMed

    Politano, A; Cupolillo, A; Di Profio, G; Arafat, H A; Chiarello, G; Curcio, E

    2016-09-14

    In this review, we present the applications of thermoplasmonics in membrane processes. We discuss the influence of the heat capacity of the solvent, the amount of plasmonic nanoparticles in the membrane, the intensity of the light source and the transmembrane flow rate on the increase of permeability. Remarkably, thermoplasmonic effects do not involve any noticeable loss of membrane rejection. Herein, we consider application feasibilities, including application fields, requirements of feed, alternatives of light sources, promising thermoplasmonic nanoparticles and scaling up issues.

  12. Plasmonic Metallurgy Enabled by DNA.

    PubMed

    Ross, Michael B; Ku, Jessie C; Lee, Byeongdu; Mirkin, Chad A; Schatz, George C

    2016-04-13

    Mixed silver and gold plasmonic nanoparticle architectures are synthesized using DNA-programmable assembly, unveiling exquisitely tunable optical properties that are predicted and explained both by effective thin-film models and explicit electrodynamic simulations. These data demonstrate that the manner and ratio with which multiple metallic components are arranged can greatly alter optical properties, including tunable color and asymmetric reflectivity behavior of relevance for thin-film applications.

  13. Nanostructured surfaces for surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petefish, Joseph W.

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has achieved widespread recognition as a sensitive, label-free, and versatile optical method for monitoring changes in refractive index at a metal-dielectric interface. Refractive index deviations of 10-6 RIU are resolvable using SPR, and the method can be used in real-time or ex-situ. Instruments based on carboxymethyl dextran coated SPR chips have achieved commercial success in biological detection, while SPR sensors can also be found in other fields as varied as food safety and gas sensing. Chapter 1 provides a physical background of SPR sensing. A brief history of the technology is presented, and publication data are included that demonstrate the large and growing interest in surface plasmons. Numerous applications of SPR sensors are listed to illustrate the broad appeal of the method. Surface plasmons (SPs) and surface plasmon polaritions (SPPs) are formally defined, and important parameters governing their spatial behavior are derived from Maxwell's equations and appropriate boundary conditions. Physical requirements for exciting SPs with incident light are discussed, and SPR imaging is used to illustrate the operating principle of SPR-based detection. Angle-tunable surface enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA) of polymer vibrational modes via grating-coupled SPR is demonstrated in Chapter 2. Over 10-fold enhancement of C-H stretching modes was found relative to the absorbance of the same film in the absence of plasmon excitation. Modeling results are used to support and explain experimental observations. Improvements to the grating coupler SEIRA platform in Chapter 2 are explored in Chapters 3 and 4. Chapter 3 displays data for two sets of multipitch gratings: one set with broadly distributed resonances with the potential for multiband IR enhancement and the other with finely spaced, overlapping resonances to form a broadband IR enhancement device. Diffraction gratings having multiple periods were fabricated using a Lloyd

  14. Structural and plasmonic properties of gold nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivapalan, Sean T.

    the nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were then tilted such that were oriented so that the electron beam was parallel to a major zone axis and the diffraction pattern recorded. We observed streaks at each Bragg reflection that changed depending on the shape of the nanoparticle. This is in contrast to the spots for the Bragg reflections observed for normal small area diffraction patterns of gold nanoparticles. The angles between the streaks were compared using vector analysis to theoretical simulated three dimensional models and showed good correlation. These studies indicate such a platform can be used to elucidate the structure of high-index gold nanoparticle shapes such as trisoctahedra. The as-synthesized gold nanoparticles had surface plasmon resonances that incrementally spanned the spectral region of 500-900 nm. The reporter molecules used all have an absorption maximum far from the excitation wavelength. This ensures that chemical resonant based effects are minimized and plasmonic electromagnetic effects dominate the observed signal enhancement. For gold nanorods, the highest SERS signal from six different aspect ratios was observed with absorption maxima blue-shifted from the laser excitation wavelength. This finding is in contrast to substrate measurements where the maximum observed signal is red-shifted from the laser excitation wavelength. A similar platform was used to compare the effects of changing the nanoparticle shape on the observed SERS enhancement. We synthesized trisoctahedral, cubic and spherical geometries with electronic absorption maxima that overlapped within 3 nm. The relative SERS enhancement with 785 nm excitation was compared to theoretical simulations using finite element analysis. The observed signal intensities correlated well to the theory, suggesting the electromagnetic fields focused towards sharp edges and corners dominated the spectral response. The final chapters of this thesis are tailored towards understanding the distance

  15. Plasmonics in atomically thin materials.

    PubMed

    García de Abajo, F Javier; Manjavacas, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    The observation and electrical manipulation of infrared surface plasmons in graphene have triggered a search for similar photonic capabilities in other atomically thin materials that enable electrical modulation of light at visible and near-infrared frequencies, as well as strong interaction with optical quantum emitters. Here, we present a simple analytical description of the optical response of such kinds of structures, which we exploit to investigate their application to light modulation and quantum optics. Specifically, we show that plasmons in one-atom-thick noble-metal layers can be used both to produce complete tunable optical absorption and to reach the strong-coupling regime in the interaction with neighboring quantum emitters. Our methods are applicable to any plasmon-supporting thin materials, and in particular, we provide parameters that allow us to readily calculate the response of silver, gold, and graphene islands. Besides their interest for nanoscale electro-optics, the present study emphasizes the great potential of these structures for the design of quantum nanophotonics devices.

  16. Self-assembled plasmonic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühlig, Stefan; Cunningham, Alastair; Dintinger, José; Scharf, Toralf; Bürgi, Thomas; Lederer, Falk; Rockstuhl, Carsten

    2013-07-01

    Nowadays for the sake of convenience most plasmonic nanostructures are fabricated by top-down nanofabrication technologies. This offers great degrees of freedom to tailor the geometry with unprecedented precision. However, it often causes disadvantages as well. The structures available are usually planar and periodically arranged. Therefore, bulk plasmonic structures are difficult to fabricate and the periodic arrangement causes undesired effects, e.g., strong spatial dispersion is observed in metamaterials. These limitations can be mitigated by relying on bottom-up nanofabrication technologies. There, self-assembly methods and techniques from the field of colloidal nanochemistry are used to build complex functional unit cells in solution from an ensemble of simple building blocks, i.e., in most cases plasmonic nanoparticles. Achievable structures are characterized by a high degree of nominal order only on a short-range scale. The precise spatial arrangement across larger dimensions is not possible in most cases; leading essentially to amorphous structures. Such self-assembled nanostructures require novel analytical means to describe their properties, innovative designs of functional elements that possess a desired near- and far-field response, and entail genuine nanofabrication and characterization techniques. Eventually, novel applications have to be perceived that are adapted to the specifics of the self-assembled nanostructures. This review shall document recent progress in this field of research. Emphasis is put on bottom-up amorphous metamaterials. We document the state-of-the-art but also critically assess the problems that have to be overcome.

  17. Nonlinear scattering in plasmonic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Shi-Wei

    2016-09-01

    Nonlinear phenomena provide novel light manipulation capabilities and innovative applications. Recently, we discovered nonlinear saturation on single-particle scattering of gold nanospheres by continuous-wave laser excitation and innovatively applied to improve microscopic resolution down to λ/8. However, the nonlinearity was limited to the green-orange plasmonic band of gold nanosphere, and the underlying mechanism has not yet been fully understood. In this work, we demonstrated that nonlinear scattering exists for various material/geometry combinations, thus expanding the applicable wavelength range. For near-infrared, gold nanorod is used, while for blue-violet, silver nanospheres are adopted. In terms of mechanism, the nonlinearity may originate from interband/intraband absorption, hot electron, or hot lattice, which are spectrally mixed in the case of gold nanosphere. For gold nanorod and silver nanosphere, nonlinear scattering occurs at plasmonic resonances, which are spectrally far from interband/intraband absorptions, so they are excluded. We found that the nonlinear index is much larger than possible contributions from hot electrons in literature. Therefore, we conclude that hot lattice is the major mechanism. In addition, we propose that similar to z-scan, which is the standard method to characterize nonlinearity of a thin sample, laser scanning microscopy should be adopted as the standard method to characterize nonlinearity from a nanostructure. Our work not only provides the physical mechanism of the nonlinear scattering, but also paves the way toward multi-color superresolution imaging based on non-bleaching plasmonic scattering.

  18. Plasmon-induced artificial photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Kosei; Oshikiri, Tomoya; Shi, Xu; Zhong, Yuqing; Misawa, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    We have successfully developed a plasmon-induced artificial photosynthesis system that uses a gold nanoparticle-loaded oxide semiconductor electrode to produce useful chemical energy as hydrogen and ammonia. The most important feature of this system is that both sides of a strontium titanate single-crystal substrate are used without an electrochemical apparatus. Plasmon-induced water splitting occurred even with a minimum chemical bias of 0.23 V owing to the plasmonic effects based on the efficient oxidation of water and the use of platinum as a co-catalyst for reduction. Photocurrent measurements were performed to determine the electron transfer between the gold nanoparticles and the oxide semiconductor. The efficiency of water oxidation was determined through spectroelectrochemical experiments aimed at elucidating the electron density in the gold nanoparticles. A set-up similar to the water-splitting system was used to synthesize ammonia via nitrogen fixation using ruthenium instead of platinum as a co-catalyst. PMID:26052419

  19. Activation of words with phonological overlap

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Claudia K.; Felder, Verena; Lahiri, Aditi; Eulitz, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Multiple lexical representations overlapping with the input (cohort neighbors) are temporarily activated in the listener's mental lexicon when speech unfolds in time. Activation for cohort neighbors appears to rapidly decline as soon as there is mismatch with the input. However, it is a matter of debate whether or not they are completely excluded from further processing. We recorded behavioral data and event-related brain potentials (ERPs) in auditory-visual word onset priming during a lexical decision task. As primes we used the first two syllables of spoken German words. In a carrier word condition, the primes were extracted from spoken versions of the target words (ano-ANORAK “anorak”). In a cohort neighbor condition, the primes were taken from words that overlap with the target word up to the second nucleus (ana—taken from ANANAS “pineapple”). Relative to a control condition, where primes and targets were unrelated, lexical decision responses for cohort neighbors were delayed. This reveals that cohort neighbors are disfavored by the decision processes at the behavioral front end. In contrast, left-anterior ERPs reflected long-lasting facilitated processing of cohort neighbors. We interpret these results as evidence for extended parallel processing of cohort neighbors. That is, in parallel to the preparation and elicitation of delayed lexical decision responses to cohort neighbors, aspects of the processing system appear to keep track of those less efficient word candidates. PMID:24009593

  20. The Hippocampus and Disambiguation of Overlapping Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Agster, Kara L.; Fortin, Norbert J.; Eichenbaum, Howard

    2010-01-01

    Recent models of hippocampal function emphasize its potential role in disambiguating sequences of events that compose distinct episodic memories. In this study, rats were trained to distinguish two overlapping sequences of odor choices. The capacity to disambiguate the sequences was measured by the critical odor choice after the overlapping elements of the sequences. When the sequences were presented in rapid alternation, damage to the hippocampus, produced either by infusions of the neurotoxin ibotenic acid or by radiofrequency current, produced a severe deficit, although animals with radiofrequency lesions relearned the task. When the sequences were presented spaced apart and in random order, animals with radiofrequency hippocampal lesions could perform the task. However, they failed when a memory delay was imposed before the critical choice. These findings support the hypothesis that the hippocampus is involved in representing sequences of nonspatial events, particularly when interference between the sequences is high or when animals must remember across a substantial delay preceding items in a current sequence. PMID:12097529

  1. Visualizing fuzzy overlapping communities in networks.

    PubMed

    Vehlow, Corinna; Reinhardt, Thomas; Weiskopf, Daniel

    2013-12-01

    An important feature of networks for many application domains is their community structure. This is because objects within the same community usually have at least one property in common. The investigation of community structure can therefore support the understanding of object attributes from the network topology alone. In real-world systems, objects may belong to several communities at the same time, i.e., communities can overlap. Analyzing fuzzy community memberships is essential to understand to what extent objects contribute to different communities and whether some communities are highly interconnected. We developed a visualization approach that is based on node-link diagrams and supports the investigation of fuzzy communities in weighted undirected graphs at different levels of detail. Starting with the network of communities, the user can continuously drill down to the network of individual nodes and finally analyze the membership distribution of nodes of interest. Our approach uses layout strategies and further visual mappings to graphically encode the fuzzy community memberships. The usefulness of our approach is illustrated by two case studies analyzing networks of different domains: social networking and biological interactions. The case studies showed that our layout and visualization approach helps investigate fuzzy overlapping communities. Fuzzy vertices as well as the different communities to which they belong can be easily identified based on node color and position.

  2. Serial FBG sensor network allowing overlapping spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbenseth, S.; Lochmann, S.; Ahrens, A.; Rehm, B.

    2016-05-01

    For structure or material monitoring low impact serial fiber Bragg grating (FBG) networks have attracted increasing research interest. Common sensor networks using wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) for FBG interrogation are limited in their efficiency by the spectral width of their light source, the FBG tuning range and the spectral guard bands. Overlapping spectra are strictly forbidden in this case. Applying time division multiplexing (TDM) or active resonator schemes may overcome these restrictions. However, they introduce other substantial disadvantages like signal roundtrip dependency or sophisticated control of active resonating structures. Code division multiplexing (CDM) as a means of FBG interrogation by simple autocorrelation of appropriate codes has been shown to be superior in this respect. However, it came at the cost of a second spectrometer introducing additional equalization efforts. We demonstrate a new serial FBG sensor network utilizing CDM signal processing for efficient sensor interrogation without the need of a second spectrometer and additional state of polarization (SOP) controlling components. It allows overlapping spectra even when all sensing FBGs are positioned at the same centre wavelength and it shows a high degree of insensitivity to SOP. Sequence inversed keyed (SIK) serial signal processing utilizing quasi-orthogonal balanced codes ensures simple and quick sensor interrogation with high signal-to-interference/noise ratio.

  3. Octave illusion elicited by overlapping narrowband noises.

    PubMed

    Jonas Brännström, K; Nilsson, Patrik

    2011-05-01

    The octave or Deutsch illusion occurs when two tones, separated by about one octave, are presented simultaneously but alternating between ears, such that when the low tone is presented to the left ear the high tone is presented to the right ear and vice versa. Most subjects hear a single tone that alternates both between ears and in pitch; i.e., they hear a low pitched tone in one ear alternating with a high pitched tone in the other ear. The present study examined whether the illusion can be elicited by aperiodic signals consisting of low-frequency band-pass filtered noises with overlapping spectra. The amount of spectral overlap was held constant, but the high- and low-frequency content of the signals was systematically varied. The majority of subjects perceived an auditory illusion in terms of a dominant ear for pitch and lateralization by frequency, as proposed by Deutsch [(1975a) Sci. Am. 233, 92-104]. Furthermore, the salience of the illusion increased as the high frequency of the content in the signal increased. Since no harmonics were present in the stimuli, it is highly unlikely that this illusion is perceived on the basis of binaural diplacusis or harmonic binaural fusion.

  4. Heterogeneity of asthma–COPD overlap syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Hyonsoo; Han, Deokjae; Lee, Jae Ha; Rhee, Chin Kook

    2017-01-01

    Many patients suffering from asthma or COPD have overlapping features of both diseases. However, a phenotypical approach for evaluating asthma–COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS) has not been established. In this report, we examined the phenotypes in patients with ACOS. Patients diagnosed with ACOS between 2011 and 2015 were identified and classified into four phenotype groups. Group A was composed of patients who smoked <10 pack years and had blood eosinophil counts ≥300. Group B was composed of patients who smoked <10 pack years and had blood eosinophil counts <300. Group C was composed of patients who smoked ≥10 pack years and had blood eosinophil counts ≥300. Group D was composed of patients who smoked <10 pack years and had blood eosinophil counts <300. Clinical characteristics were analyzed and compared among groups. Comparisons were made among 103 ACOS patients. Patients in group D were oldest, while patients in group A were youngest. There were relatively more female patients in groups A and B; the majority of patients in groups C and D were male. The degree of airflow obstruction was most severe in group C. The rate of being free of severe exacerbation was significantly lower in group C than in the other groups. In this study, each ACOS phenotype showed different characteristics. The proportion of patients free of severe exacerbation differed significantly among groups. At this time, further studies on the phenotypes of ACOS are required. PMID:28260876

  5. Adaptive overlapped sub-blocks contrast enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Anqiu; Yuan, Fei; Liu, Jing; Liu, Siqi; Li, An; Zheng, Zhenrong

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, an overlapped sub-block gray-level average method for contrast enhancement is presented. The digital image correction of uneven illumination under microscope transmittance is a problem in image processing, also sometimes the image in the dark place need to correct the uneven problem. A new correction method was proposed based on the mask method and sub-blocks gray-level average method because Traditional mask method and background fitting method are restricted due to application scenarios, and the corrected image brightness is low by using background fitting method, so it has some limitations of the application. In this paper, we introduce a new method called AOSCE for image contrast enhancement. The image is divided into many sub-blocks which are overlapped, calculate the average gray-level of the whole image as M and the calculate the average gray-level of each one as mi, next for each block it can get d = mi - m, each block minus d to get a new image, and then get the minimum gray-level of each block into a matrix DD to get the background, and use bilinearity to get the same scale of the image. over fitting the image in matlab in order to get smoother image, then minus the background to get the contrast enhancement image.

  6. Dissimilar permittivity and permeability sensitivities in nonlinear plasmons and spoof plasmons.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yen-Kai; Chang, Chih-Wei

    2014-06-15

    We show that employing localized surface plasmon resonators to probe environmental media will always lead to dissimilar optical sensitivities to permittivity and permeability. We find that while the permittivity sensitivities of diverse plasmonic structures display a geometry-independent universal scaling relation, the permeability sensitivities are highly dependent on the metals' geometries and resonant modes. Similar results are also found in mixed real/spoof localized surface plasmon resonators, and the phenomena can be universally scaled to the normalized effective plasmon frequencies. Importantly, the results put a fundamental constraint for all plasmonic-assisted nonlinear magneto-optical phenomena, including the Faraday effect, magneto-optical Kerr effect, and Cotton-Mouton effect.

  7. Diffusion bonding of a superplastic Inconel 718SPF superalloy by electroless nickel plating

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, M.S.; Chang, C.B.; Chuang, T.H.

    2000-02-01

    Although intimate contact can be obtained for diffusion bonding of a superplastic Inconel 718SPF superalloy under a low pressure of 7 MPa, the precipitates formed at the interface retarded achievement of a sound joint. The shear strength was only 41.5 MPa for an overlap length of 12 T (T = 1.3 mm, sheet thickness). The diffusion bondability of t his Inconel 718SPF superalloy was enhanced by electroless nickel plating. In this situation, the bonding shear strength increased to 70.4 MPa for the same overlap length of 12 T under the same bonding condition, regardless of the roughness of the surface to be bonded. Upon decreasing the overlap length from 12 to 6T, the bonding strength remained constant.

  8. Semiconductor plasmonic nanolasers: current status and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwo, Shangjr; Shih, Chih-Kang

    2016-08-01

    Scaling down semiconductor lasers in all three dimensions holds the key to the development of compact, low-threshold, and ultrafast coherent light sources, as well as integrated optoelectronic and plasmonic circuits. However, the minimum size of conventional semiconductor lasers utilizing dielectric cavity resonators (photonic cavities) is limited by the diffraction limit. To date, surface plasmon amplification by stimulated emission of radiation (spaser)-based plasmonic nanolaser is the only photon and plasmon-emitting device capable of this remarkable feat. Specifically, it has been experimentally demonstrated that the use of plasmonic cavities based on metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) nanostructures can indeed break the diffraction limit in all three dimensions. In this review, we present an updated overview of the current status for plasmonic nanolasers using the MIS configuration and other related metal-cladded semiconductor microlasers. In particular, by using composition-varied indium gallium nitride/gallium nitride core-shell nanorods, it is possible to realize all-color, single-mode nanolasers in the full visible wavelength range with ultralow continuous-wave (CW) lasing thresholds. The lasing action in these subdiffraction plasmonic cavities is achieved via a unique auto-tuning mechanism based on the property of weak size dependence inherent in plasmonic nanolasers. As for the choice of metals in the plasmonic structures, epitaxial silver films and giant colloidal silver crystals have been shown to be the superior constituent materials for plasmonic cavities due to their low plasmonic losses in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) spectral regions. In this review, we also provide some perspectives on the challenges and opportunities in this exciting new research frontier.

  9. Au Gratings Fabricated by Interference Lithography for Experimental Study of Localized and Propagating Surface Plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan'ko, Viktor; Dmitruk, Mykola; Indutnyi, Ivan; Mamykin, Sergiy; Myn'ko, Victor; Shepeliavyi, Petro; Lukaniuk, Mariia; Lytvyn, Petro

    2017-03-01

    Optical properties of high-frequency Au gratings with a fixed period (296.6 ± 0.5 nm) and a variable modulation depth are studied using measurements of spectral and angular dependence of transmission and reflection of polarized light in order to build the dispersion curves of excited optical modes and to identify their types. It was shown that in gratings with small modulation depth only propagating surface plasmon-polaritons (SPP) modes were observed. With increasing of modulation depth, the intensity of SPP decreases and localized plasmon (LP) resonance appears, which is more intense at small incident angles, and overlaps with the SPP modes. For grating with isolated grooves (nanowires), mostly LP resonance is observed. After additional deposition of gold onto grating with isolated grooves, the intensity of the SPP mode increases again, and the LP band maximum shifts to longer wavelengths.

  10. Polarization-independent actively tunable colour generation on imprinted plasmonic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, Daniel; Chen, Yuan; Vazquez-Guardado, Abraham; Modak, Sushrut; Boroumand, Javaneh; Xu, Daming; Wu, Shin-Tson; Chanda, Debashis

    2015-06-01

    Structural colour arising from nanostructured metallic surfaces offers many benefits compared to conventional pigmentation based display technologies, such as increased resolution and scalability of their optical response with structure dimensions. However, once these structures are fabricated their optical characteristics remain static, limiting their potential application. Here, by using a specially designed nanostructured plasmonic surface in conjunction with high birefringence liquid crystals, we demonstrate a tunable polarization-independent reflective surface where the colour of the surface is changed as a function of applied voltage. A large range of colour tunability is achieved over previous reports by utilizing an engineered surface which allows full liquid crystal reorientation while maximizing the overlap between plasmonic fields and liquid crystal. In combination with imprinted structures of varying periods, a full range of colours spanning the entire visible spectrum is achieved, paving the way towards dynamic pixels for reflective displays.

  11. Polarization-independent actively tunable colour generation on imprinted plasmonic surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Daniel; Chen, Yuan; Vazquez-Guardado, Abraham; Modak, Sushrut; Boroumand, Javaneh; Xu, Daming; Wu, Shin-Tson; Chanda, Debashis

    2015-01-01

    Structural colour arising from nanostructured metallic surfaces offers many benefits compared to conventional pigmentation based display technologies, such as increased resolution and scalability of their optical response with structure dimensions. However, once these structures are fabricated their optical characteristics remain static, limiting their potential application. Here, by using a specially designed nanostructured plasmonic surface in conjunction with high birefringence liquid crystals, we demonstrate a tunable polarization-independent reflective surface where the colour of the surface is changed as a function of applied voltage. A large range of colour tunability is achieved over previous reports by utilizing an engineered surface which allows full liquid crystal reorientation while maximizing the overlap between plasmonic fields and liquid crystal. In combination with imprinted structures of varying periods, a full range of colours spanning the entire visible spectrum is achieved, paving the way towards dynamic pixels for reflective displays. PMID:26066375

  12. Au Gratings Fabricated by Interference Lithography for Experimental Study of Localized and Propagating Surface Plasmons.

    PubMed

    Dan'ko, Viktor; Dmitruk, Mykola; Indutnyi, Ivan; Mamykin, Sergiy; Myn'ko, Victor; Shepeliavyi, Petro; Lukaniuk, Mariia; Lytvyn, Petro

    2017-12-01

    Optical properties of high-frequency Au gratings with a fixed period (296.6 ± 0.5 nm) and a variable modulation depth are studied using measurements of spectral and angular dependence of transmission and reflection of polarized light in order to build the dispersion curves of excited optical modes and to identify their types. It was shown that in gratings with small modulation depth only propagating surface plasmon-polaritons (SPP) modes were observed. With increasing of modulation depth, the intensity of SPP decreases and localized plasmon (LP) resonance appears, which is more intense at small incident angles, and overlaps with the SPP modes. For grating with isolated grooves (nanowires), mostly LP resonance is observed. After additional deposition of gold onto grating with isolated grooves, the intensity of the SPP mode increases again, and the LP band maximum shifts to longer wavelengths.

  13. Thermoplastic Ribbon-Ply Bonding Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Marchello, Joseph M.; Messier, Bernadette C.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to identify key variables in rapid weldbonding of thermoplastic tow (ribbon) and their relationship to matrix polymer properties and to ribbon microstructure. Theoretical models for viscosity, establishment of ply-ply contact, instantaneous (Velcro) bonding, molecular interdiffusion (healing), void growth suppression, and gap filling were reviewed and synthesized. Consideration of the theoretical bonding mechanisms and length scales and of the experimental weld/peel data allow the prediction of such quantities as the time and pressure required to achieve good contact between a ribbon and a flat substrate, the time dependence of bond strength, pressures needed to prevent void growth from dissolved moisture and conditions for filling gaps and smoothing overlaps.

  14. Using Multiple Bonding Strategies.

    PubMed

    Larson, Thomas D

    2015-01-01

    There are many ways to bond to tooth structure, some micro-mechanical some chemical, some a combination. Different dentin bonding materials have different bonding strengths to differently prepared surfaces, and because of differences in their nature, different areas of tooth structure present peculiar bonding challenges. This paper will review a variety of material types, elucidating their particular bonding strengths and commenting on improved bonding strategies to increase durability, strength, and favorable pulpal response. In this discussion, resin dentin bonding systems, glass ionomers, Gluma, resin cements, and newer combined products will br reviewed.

  15. 9 CFR 121.4 - Overlap select agents and toxins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... select agent or toxin to APHIS or CDC. (i) The seizure of any of the following overlap select agents and.... This report must be followed by submission of APHIS/CDC Form 4 within 7 calendar days after seizure of the overlap select agent or toxin. (ii) For all other overlap select agents or toxins, APHIS/CDC...

  16. Phonological and Orthographic Overlap Effects in Fast and Masked Priming

    PubMed Central

    Frisson, Steven; Bélanger, Nathalie N.; Rayner, Keith

    2014-01-01

    We investigated how orthographic and phonological information is activated during reading, using a fast priming task, and during single word recognition, using masked priming. Specifically, different types of overlap between prime and target were contrasted: high orthographic and high phonological overlap (track-crack), high orthographic and low phonological overlap (bear-gear), or low orthographic and high phonological overlap (fruit-chute). In addition, we examined whether (orthographic) beginning overlap (swoop-swoon) yielded the same priming pattern as end (rhyme) overlap (track-crack). Prime durations were 32 and 50ms in the fast priming version, and 50ms in the masked priming version, and mode of presentation (prime and target in lower case) was identical. The fast priming experiment showed facilitatory priming effects when both orthography and phonology overlapped, with no apparent differences between beginning and end overlap pairs. Facilitation was also found when prime and target only overlapped orthographically. In contrast, the masked priming experiment showed inhibition for both types of end overlap pairs (with and without phonological overlap), and no difference for begin overlap items. When prime and target only shared principally phonological information, facilitation was only found with a long prime duration in the fast priming experiment, while no differences were found in the masked priming version. These contrasting results suggest that fast priming and masked priming do not necessarily tap into the same type of processing. PMID:24365065

  17. Plasmonic Enhancement Mechanisms in Solar Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cushing, Scott K.

    Semiconductor photovoltaics (solar-to-electrical) and photocatalysis (solar-to-chemical) requires sunlight to be converted into excited charge carriers with sufficient lifetimes and mobility to drive a current or photoreaction. Thin semiconductor films are necessary to reduce the charge recombination and mobility losses, but thin films also limit light absorption, reducing the solar energy conversion efficiency. Further, in photocatalysis, the band edges of semiconductor must straddle the redox potentials of a photochemical reaction, reducing light absorption to half the solar spectrum in water splitting. Plasmonics transforms metal nanoparticles into antennas with resonances tuneable across the solar spectrum. If energy can be transferred from the plasmon to the semiconductor, light absorption in the semiconductor can be increased in thin films and occur at energies smaller than the band gap. This thesis investigates why, despite this potential, plasmonic solar energy harvesting techniques rarely appear in top performing solar architectures. To accomplish this goal, the possible plasmonic enhancement mechanisms for solar energy conversion were identified, isolated, and optimized by combining systematic sample design with transient absorption spectroscopy, photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic testing, and theoretical development. Specifically, metal semiconductor nanostructures were designed to modulate the plasmon's scattering, hot carrier, and near field interactions as well as remove heating and self-catalysis effects. Transient absorption spectroscopy then revealed how the structure design affected energy and charge carrier transfer between metal and semiconductor. Correlating this data with wavelength-dependent photoconversion efficiencies and theoretical developments regarding metal-semiconductor interactions identified the origin of the plasmonic enhancement. Using this methodology, it has first been proven that three plasmonic enhancement routes are

  18. Dimensional overlap between time and space.

    PubMed

    Eikmeier, Verena; Schröter, Hannes; Maienborn, Claudia; Alex-Ruf, Simone; Ulrich, Rolf

    2013-12-01

    Several pieces of evidence suggest that our mental representations of time and space are linked. However, the extent of this linkage between the two domains has not yet been assessed. We present the results of two experiments that draw on the predictions of the dimensional overlap model (Kornblum, Hasbroucq, & Osman, Psychological Review 97:253-270, 1990). The stimulus and response sets in these reaction time experiments were related to either time or space. The obtained stimulus-response congruency effects were of about the same size for identical stimulus-response sets (time-time or space-space) and for different stimulus-response sets (time-space or space-time). These results support the view that our representations of time and space are strongly linked.

  19. Plasticity of Sensorimotor Networks: Multiple Overlapping Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Buch, Ethan R; Liew, Sook-Lei; Cohen, Leonardo G

    2016-03-16

    Redundancy is an important feature of the motor system, as abundant degrees of freedom are prominent at every level of organization across the central and peripheral nervous systems, and musculoskeletal system. This basic feature results in a system that is both flexible and robust, and which can be sustainably adapted through plasticity mechanisms in response to intrinsic organismal changes and dynamic environments. While much early work of motor system organization has focused on synaptic-based plasticity processes that are driven via experience, recent investigations of neuron-glia interactions, epigenetic mechanisms and large-scale network dynamics have revealed a plethora of plasticity mechanisms that support motor system organization across multiple, overlapping spatial and temporal scales. Furthermore, an important role of these mechanisms is the regulation of intrinsic variability. Here, we review several of these mechanisms and discuss their potential role in neurorehabilitation.

  20. Overlapped Fourier coding for optical aberration removal

    PubMed Central

    Horstmeyer, Roarke; Ou, Xiaoze; Chung, Jaebum; Zheng, Guoan; Yang, Changhuei

    2014-01-01

    We present an imaging procedure that simultaneously optimizes a camera’s resolution and retrieves a sample’s phase over a sequence of snapshots. The technique, termed overlapped Fourier coding (OFC), first digitally pans a small aperture across a camera’s pupil plane with a spatial light modulator. At each aperture location, a unique image is acquired. The OFC algorithm then fuses these low-resolution images into a full-resolution estimate of the complex optical field incident upon the detector. Simultaneously, the algorithm utilizes redundancies within the acquired dataset to computationally estimate and remove unknown optical aberrations and system misalignments via simulated annealing. The result is an imaging system that can computationally overcome its optical imperfections to offer enhanced resolution, at the expense of taking multiple snapshots over time. PMID:25321982

  1. [Syndrome overlap: autoimmune hepatitis and autoimmune cholangitis].

    PubMed

    Guerra Montero, Luis; Ortega Alvarez, Félix; Marquez Teves, Maguin; Asato Higa, Carmen; Sumire Umeres, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and autoimmune cholangitis are chronic autoimmune liver disease, usually present separate, the cases where characteristics of two of the above is observed liver disease is commonly referred to as Overlap Syndromes (OS). Although there is no consensus on specific criteria for the diagnosis of OS identification of this association is important for initiating appropriate treatment and prevent its progression to cirrhosis or at least the complications of cirrhosis and death. We report the case of awoman aged 22 cirrhotic which debuted are edematous ascites, severe asthenia and jaundice compliant diagnostics SS criteria and initially present any response to treatment with ursodeoxycholic acid and oral corticosteroids, but ultimately finished performing a transplant orthotopic liver.

  2. Void percolation and conduction of overlapping ellipsoids.

    PubMed

    Yi, Y B

    2006-09-01

    The void percolation and conduction problems for equisized overlapping ellipsoids of revolution are investigated using the discretization method. The method is validated by comparing the estimated percolation threshold of spheres with the precise result found in literature. The technique is then extended to determine the threshold of void percolation as a function of the geometric aspect ratio of ellipsoidal particles. The finite element method is also applied to evaluate the equivalent conductivity of the void phase in the system. The results confirm that there are no universalities for void percolation threshold and conductivity in particulate systems, and these properties are clearly dependent on the geometrical shape of particles. As a consequence, void percolation and conduction associated with ellipsoidal particles of large aspect ratio should be treated differently from spheres.

  3. Grid adaption using Chimera composite overlapping meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, Kai-Hsiung; Liou, Meng-Sing; Chow, Chuen-Yen

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to perform grid adaptation using composite over-lapping meshes in regions of large gradient to capture the salient features accurately during computation. The Chimera grid scheme, a multiple overset mesh technique, is used in combination with a Navier-Stokes solver. The numerical solution is first converged to a steady state based on an initial coarse mesh. Solution-adaptive enhancement is then performed by using a secondary fine grid system which oversets on top of the base grid in the high-gradient region, but without requiring the mesh boundaries to join in any special way. Communications through boundary interfaces between those separated grids are carried out using tri-linear interpolation. Applications to the Euler equations for shock reflections and to a shock wave/boundary layer interaction problem are tested. With the present method, the salient features are well resolved.

  4. Grid adaptation using chimera composite overlapping meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, Kai-Hsiung; Liou, Meng-Sing; Chow, Chuen-Yen

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to perform grid adaptation using composite overlapping meshes in regions of large gradient to accurately capture the salient features during computation. The chimera grid scheme, a multiple overset mesh technique, is used in combination with a Navier-Stokes solver. The numerical solution is first converged to a steady state based on an initial coarse mesh. Solution-adaptive enhancement is then performed by using a secondary fine grid system which oversets on top of the base grid in the high-gradient region, but without requiring the mesh boundaries to join in any special way. Communications through boundary interfaces between those separated grids are carried out using trilinear interpolation. Application to the Euler equations for shock reflections and to shock wave/boundary layer interaction problem are tested. With the present method, the salient features are well-resolved.

  5. Grid adaptation using Chimera composite overlapping meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, Kai-Hsiung; Liou, Meng-Sing; Chow, Chuen-Yen

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to perform grid adaptation using composite over-lapping meshes in regions of large gradient to capture the salient features accurately during computation. The Chimera grid scheme, a multiple overset mesh technique, is used in combination with a Navier-Stokes solver. The numerical solution is first converged to a steady state based on an initial coarse mesh. Solution-adaptive enhancement is then performed by using a secondary fine grid system which oversets on top of the base grid in the high-gradient region, but without requiring the mesh boundaries to join in any special way. Communications through boundary interfaces between those separated grids are carried out using tri-linear interpolation. Applications to the Euler equations for shock reflections and to a shock wave/boundary layer interaction problem are tested. With the present method, the salient features are well resolved.

  6. Recombining overlapping BACs into single large BACs.

    PubMed

    Kotzamanis, George; Kotsinas, Athanassios

    2015-01-01

    BAC clones containing the entire genomic region of a gene including the long-range regulatory elements are very useful for gene functional analysis. However, large genes often span more than the insert of a BAC clone, and single BACs covering the entire region of interest are not available. Here, we describe a general system for linking two or more overlapping BACs into a single clone. Two rounds of homologous recombination are used. In the first, the BAC inserts are subcloned into the pBACLink vectors. In the second, the two BACs are combined together. Multiple BACs in a contig can be combined by alternating use of the pBACLInk vectors, resulting in several BAC clones containing as much of the genomic region of a gene as required. Such BACs can then be used in gene expression studies and/or gene therapy applications.

  7. Optical biosensors using surface plasmon resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homola, Jiri; Brynda, Eduard; Tobiska, Petr; Tichy, Ivo; Skvor, Jiri

    1999-12-01

    We present a surface plasmon resonance sensor base on prism excitation of surface plasmons and spectral interrogation. For specific detection of biomolecular analytes, multilayers of monoclonal antibodies are immobilized on the surface of the sensor. Detection of biomolecular analytes such as human (beta) -2)-microglobulin, choriogonadotropin, hepatitis B surface antigen, salmonella enteritidis is demonstrated.

  8. Effective charge of photons and plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonça, J. T.; Serbeto, A.; Ali, S.

    2010-08-01

    We review the concept of photon effective charge in a plasma, and extend it to the case of longitudinal photons or plasmons. A simple electrostatic fluid model is considered in a non-magnetized and non-relativistic plasma. The contribution of the ions to the plasmon charge is also considered.

  9. Optical emission from coupled surface plasmons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruhlke, R. W.; Holland, W. R.; Hall, D. G.

    1987-01-01

    Surface plasmons on opposite sides of a thin metal film surrounded by identical dielectrics interact to form coupled surface plasmons (CSP's). Corrugation of the metal film permits interaction of the CSP's with the radiation field. This paper reports the observation of optical emission from CSP's excited by the near-field coupling of molecules adjacent to a corrugated thin metal film embedded in photoresist.

  10. Self-Assembly of Chiral Plasmonic Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Lan, Xiang; Wang, Qiangbin

    2016-12-01

    Plasmonic chiroptical effects have attracted significant attention for their widespread potential applications in negative-refractive-index materials, advanced light-polarization filters, and ultrasensitive sensing devices, etc. As compared to top-down fabrication methods, the bottom-up self-assembly strategy provides nanoscale resolution, parallel production, and isotropic optical response, and therefore plays an indispensable role in the fabrication of chiral plasmonic nanostructures. The optical properties of these chiral structures can be predicted based on the near-field coupling of localized surface plasmons in structural components, which offers a route to tune or enhance optical activity by selecting building blocks and designing structural configurations. To date, three main types of chiral plasmonic nanostructures, i.e., chiral "plasmonic molecules", chiral superstructures, and chiral-molecule-metal hybrid complexes, are usually assembled, in which metal nanoparticles with various sizes, shapes, and compositions, and/or chiral molecules are employed as building blocks. Here, recent achievements in the self-assembly of chiral plasmonic nanostructures are highlighted and perspectives on the future directions of chiral plasmonics integrated with bottom-up self-assembly are presented, showing three typical examples, including chiral plasmonic switches, chiral nanoparticles, and chiral metamaterials.

  11. Plasmon-Enhanced Optical Sensors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Cushing, Scott K

    2014-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has found extensive applications in chemi-sensors and biosensors. Plasmons play different roles in different types of optical sensors. SPR transduces a signal in a colorimetric sensor through shifts in the spectral position and intensity in response to external stimuli. SPR can also concentrate the incident electromagnetic field in a nanostructure, modulating fluorescence emission and enabling plasmon-enhanced fluorescence to be used for ultrasensitive detection. Furthermore, plasmons have been extensively used for amplifying a Raman signal in a surface-enhanced Raman scattering sensor. This paper presents a review of recent research progress in plasmon-enhanced optical sensing, giving an emphasis on the physical basis of plasmon-enhanced sensors and how these principles guide the design of sensors. In particular, this paper discusses the design strategies for nanomaterials and nanostructures to plasmonically enhance optical sensing signals, also highlighting the applications of plasmon-enhanced optical sensors in health care, homeland security, food safety and environmental monitoring. PMID:25365823

  12. Nano- and Micro-Auxetic Plasmonic Materials.

    PubMed

    Valente, João; Plum, Eric; Youngs, Ian J; Zheludev, Nikolay I

    2016-07-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures with a negative Poisson ratio are demonstrated, having the unusual mechanical property of auxetics to expand laterally when being stretched. Using nanomembrane technology, auxetics are shrunk by orders of magnitude, giving simultaneous access to optical properties of plasmonic metamaterials, as well as auxetic mechanical properties on the nanoscale.

  13. Geometrical constraint experimental determination of Raman lidar overlap profile.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Li, Chengcai; Zhao, Yiming; Li, Jing; Chu, Yiqi

    2016-06-20

    A simple experimental method to determine the overlap profile of Raman lidar is presented in this paper. Based on Mie and Raman backscattering signals and a geometrically constrained condition, the overlap profile of a Raman lidar system can be determined. Our approach simultaneously retrieves the lidar ratio of aerosols, which is one of the most important sources of uncertainty in the overlap profile determination. The results indicate that the overlap factor is significantly influenced by the lidar ratio in experimental methods. A representative case study indicates that the correction of the overlap profile obtained by this method is practical and feasible.

  14. Temporal coherence of propagating surface plasmons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Comtet, Geneviève; Le Moal, Eric; Dujardin, Gérald; Drezet, Aurélien; Huant, Serge; Boer-Duchemin, Elizabeth

    2014-12-01

    The temporal coherence of propagating surface plasmons is investigated using a local, broadband plasmon source consisting of a scanning tunneling microscope. A variant of Young's experiment is performed using a sample consisting of a 200-nm-thick gold film perforated by two 1-μm-diameter holes (separated by 4 or 6 μm). The resulting interference fringes are studied as a function of hole separation and source bandwidth. From these experiments, we conclude that apart from plasmon decay in the metal, there is no further loss of plasmon coherence from propagation, scattering at holes, or other dephasing processes. As a result, the plasmon coherence time may be estimated from its spectral bandwidth.

  15. Lasing Enhanced Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xing-Yuan; Wang, Yi-Lun; Wang, Suo; Li, Bo; Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Dai, Lun; Ma, Ren-Min

    2017-03-01

    The resonance phenomena of surface plasmons has enabled development of a novel class of noncontact, real-time and label-free optical sensors, which have emerged as a prominent tool in biochemical sensing and detection. However, various forms of surface plasmon resonances occur with natively strong non-radiative Drude damping that weakens the resonance and limits the sensing performance fundamentally. Here we experimentally demonstrate the first lasing-enhanced surface plasmon resonance (LESPR) refractive index sensor. The figure of merit (FOM) of intensity sensing is 84,000, which is about 400 times higher than state-of-the-art surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor. We found that the high FOM originates from three unique features of LESPR sensors: high-quality factor, nearly zero background emission and the Gaussian-shaped lasing spectra. The LESPR sensors may form the basis for a novel class of plasmonic sensors with unprecedented performance for a broad range of applications.

  16. Plasmonic coaxial waveguide-cavity devices.

    PubMed

    Mahigir, Amirreza; Dastmalchi, Pouya; Shin, Wonseok; Fan, Shanhui; Veronis, Georgios

    2015-08-10

    We theoretically investigate three-dimensional plasmonic waveguide-cavity structures, built by side-coupling stub resonators that consist of plasmonic coaxial waveguides of finite length, to a plasmonic coaxial waveguide. The resonators are terminated either in a short or an open circuit. We show that the properties of these waveguide-cavity systems can be accurately described using a single-mode scattering matrix theory. We also show that, with proper choice of their design parameters, three-dimensional plasmonic coaxial waveguide-cavity devices and two-dimensional metal-dielectric-metal devices can have nearly identical transmission spectra. Thus, three-dimensional plasmonic coaxial waveguides offer a platform for practical implementation of two-dimensional metal-dielectric-metal device designs.

  17. Surface plasmon lifetime in metal nanoshells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirakosyan, Arman S.; Stockman, Mark I.; Shahbazyan, Tigran V.

    2016-10-01

    The lifetime of localized surface plasmon plays an important role in many aspects of plasmonics and its applications. In small metal nanostructures, the dominant mechanism of plasmon decay is size-dependent Landau damping. We performed quantum-mechanical calculations of Landau damping for the bright surface plasmon mode in a metal nanoshell with dielectric core. In contrast to the conventional model based on the electron surface scattering, we found that the damping rate decreases as the nanoshell thickness is reduced. The origin of this behavior is traced to the spatial distribution of plasmon local field in the metal shell. We also found that, due to the interference of electron scattering amplitudes from the two nanoshell metal surfaces, the damping rate exhibits pronounced quantum beats with changing shell thickness.

  18. Plasmonics with two-dimensional conductors.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hosang; Yeung, Kitty Y M; Kim, Philip; Ham, Donhee

    2014-03-28

    A wealth of effort in photonics has been dedicated to the study and engineering of surface plasmonic waves in the skin of three-dimensional bulk metals, owing largely to their trait of subwavelength confinement. Plasmonic waves in two-dimensional conductors, such as semiconductor heterojunction and graphene, contrast the surface plasmonic waves on bulk metals, as the former emerge at gigahertz to terahertz and infrared frequencies well below the photonics regime and can exhibit far stronger subwavelength confinement. This review elucidates the machinery behind the unique behaviours of the two-dimensional plasmonic waves and discusses how they can be engineered to create ultra-subwavelength plasmonic circuits and metamaterials for infrared and gigahertz to terahertz integrated electronics.

  19. The road towards nonlinear magneto-plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wei; Liu, Xiao; Lüpke, Günter; Hanbicki, Aubrey T.; Jonker, Berend T.

    2016-10-01

    Nonlinear magneto-plasmonics (NMP) describes systems where nonlinear optics, magnetics and plasmonics are all involved. NMP can be referred to as interdisciplinary studies at the intersection of Nonlinear Plasmonics (NP), Magneto- Plasmonics (MP), and nanoscience. In NMP systems, nanostructures are the bases, Surface Plasmons (SPs) work as catalyst due to strong field enhancement effects, and the nonlinear magneto-optical Kerr effect (nonlinear MOKE) plays an important role as a characterization method. Many new effects were discovered recently, which include enhanced magnetization-induced harmonic generation, controlled and enhanced magnetic contrast, magneto-chiral effect, correlation between giant magnetroresistance (GMR) and nonlinear MOKE, etc. We review the structures, experiments, findings, and the applications of NMP.

  20. Plasmon absorption modulator systems and methods

    DOEpatents

    Kekatpure, Rohan Deodatta; Davids, Paul

    2014-07-15

    Plasmon absorption modulator systems and methods are disclosed. A plasmon absorption modulator system includes a semiconductor substrate, a plurality of quantum well layers stacked on a top surface of the semiconductor substrate, and a metal layer formed on a top surface of the stack of quantum well layers. A method for modulating plasmonic current includes enabling propagation of the plasmonic current along a metal layer, and applying a voltage across the stack of quantum well layers to cause absorption of a portion of energy of the plasmonic current by the stack of quantum well layers. A metamaterial switching system includes a semiconductor substrate, a plurality of quantum well layers stacked on a top surface of the semiconductor substrate, and at least one metamaterial structure formed on a top surface of the stack of quantum well layers.

  1. Plasmonics with two-dimensional conductors

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Hosang; Yeung, Kitty Y. M.; Kim, Philip; Ham, Donhee

    2014-01-01

    A wealth of effort in photonics has been dedicated to the study and engineering of surface plasmonic waves in the skin of three-dimensional bulk metals, owing largely to their trait of subwavelength confinement. Plasmonic waves in two-dimensional conductors, such as semiconductor heterojunction and graphene, contrast the surface plasmonic waves on bulk metals, as the former emerge at gigahertz to terahertz and infrared frequencies well below the photonics regime and can exhibit far stronger subwavelength confinement. This review elucidates the machinery behind the unique behaviours of the two-dimensional plasmonic waves and discusses how they can be engineered to create ultra-subwavelength plasmonic circuits and metamaterials for infrared and gigahertz to terahertz integrated electronics. PMID:24567472

  2. Studies on metal-dielectric plasmonic structures.

    SciTech Connect

    Chettiar, Uday K.; Liu, Zhengtong; Thoreson, Mark D.; Shalaev, Vladimir M.; Drachev, Vladimir P.; Pack, Michael Vern; Kildishev, Alexander V.; Nyga, Piotr

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of light with nanostructured metal leads to a number of fascinating phenomena, including plasmon oscillations that can be harnessed for a variety of cutting-edge applications. Plasmon oscillation modes are the collective oscillation of free electrons in metals under incident light. Previously, surface plasmon modes have been used for communication, sensing, nonlinear optics and novel physics studies. In this report, we describe the scientific research completed on metal-dielectric plasmonic films accomplished during a multi-year Purdue Excellence in Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship sponsored by Sandia National Laboratories. A variety of plasmonic structures, from random 2D metal-dielectric films to 3D composite metal-dielectric films, have been studied in this research for applications such as surface-enhanced Raman sensing, tunable superlenses with resolutions beyond the diffraction limit, enhanced molecular absorption, infrared obscurants, and other real-world applications.

  3. Tailoring terahertz plasmons with silver nanorod arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wei; Song, Chunyuan; Lanier, Thomas E.; Singh, Ranjan; O'Hara, John F.; Dennis, William M.; Zhao, Yiping; Zhang, Weili

    2013-05-01

    Plasmonic materials that strongly interact with light are ideal candidates for designing subwavelength photonic devices. We report on direct coupling of terahertz waves in metallic nanorods by observing the resonant transmission of surface plasmon polariton waves through lithographically patterned films of silver nanorod (100 nm in diameter) micro-hole arrays. The best enhancement in surface plasmon resonant transmission is obtained when the nanorods are perfectly aligned with the electric field direction of the linearly polarized terahertz wave. This unique polarization-dependent propagation of surface plasmons in structures fabricated from nanorod films offers promising device applications. We conclude that the anisotropy of nanoscale metallic rod arrays imparts a material anisotropy relevant at the microscale that may be utilized for the fabrication of plasmonic and metamaterial based devices for operation at terahertz frequencies.

  4. Nano-plasmonic phenomena in graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Zhe; Goldflam, Michael; Wu, Jhih-Sheng; Dai, Siyuan; Wagner, Martin; McLeod, Alex; Liu, Mengkun; Post, Kirk; Zhu, Shou-En; Janssen, Guido; Fogler, Michael; Basov, Dimitri

    We report on infrared nano-imaging studies of confined plasmon modes inside patterned graphene nanoribbons. The confined geometry of these ribbons leads to distinct mode patterns and strong field enhancement, both of which evolve systematically with the ribbon width and excitation laser frequency. In addition, broadband nano-imaging in a wide mid-infrared region allowed us to evaluate in real space the effect of the plasmon-phonon coupling. Our data and modeling show that the plasmon damping rate increases significantly when approaching the substrate phonon. Furthermore, we observed one-dimensional edge plasmons that propagate strictly along the edges of our patterned graphene nanostructures. These edge modes appear to have a relatively shorter wavelength compared to two-dimensional plasmons.

  5. Effects due to overlapping large impact basins on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Herbert; Reidy, Anne Marie; Roark, James H.; Stockman, Stephanie

    1994-01-01

    Many ancient, highly degraded large impact basins exist on Mars. In many cases these basins overlap or are overlapped by more easily observed, presumably younger, impact basins. While impact basin overlap is becoming more recognized, the effects of such overlap have only occassionally been described. Such effects will depend on a variety of factors including the absolute and relative size of the basins, the degree of overlap, the state of the lithosphere and its thermal gradient at the time of impact, and the time between impacts. There now exists enough evidence for overlapping basins of different sizes that some of these can be discussed. This paper highlights some examples of the obvious effects of basin overlap.

  6. Hydroxide-catalyzed bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwo, Dz-Hung (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method of bonding substrates by hydroxide-catalyzed hydration/dehydration involves applying a bonding material to at least one surface to be bonded, and placing the at least one surface sufficiently close to another surface such that a bonding interface is formed between them. A bonding material of the invention comprises a source of hydroxide ions, and may optionally include a silicate component, a particulate filling material, and a property-modifying component. Bonding methods of the invention reliably and reproducibly provide bonds which are strong and precise, and which may be tailored according to a wide range of possible applications. Possible applications for bonding materials of the invention include: forming composite materials, coating substrates, forming laminate structures, assembly of precision optical components, and preparing objects of defined geometry and composition. Bonding materials and methods of preparing the same are also disclosed.

  7. Leveraging disjoint communities for detecting overlapping community structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Tanmoy

    2015-05-01

    Network communities represent mesoscopic structure for understanding the organization of real-world networks, where nodes often belong to multiple communities and form overlapping community structure in the network. Due to non-triviality in finding the exact boundary of such overlapping communities, this problem has become challenging, and therefore huge effort has been devoted to detect overlapping communities from the network. In this paper, we present PVOC (Permanence based Vertex-replication algorithm for Overlapping Community detection), a two-stage framework to detect overlapping community structure. We build on a novel observation that non-overlapping community structure detected by a standard disjoint community detection algorithm from a network has high resemblance with its actual overlapping community structure, except the overlapping part. Based on this observation, we posit that there is perhaps no need of building yet another overlapping community finding algorithm; but one can efficiently manipulate the output of any existing disjoint community finding algorithm to obtain the required overlapping structure. We propose a new post-processing technique that by combining with any existing disjoint community detection algorithm, can suitably process each vertex using a new vertex-based metric, called permanence, and thereby finds out overlapping candidates with their community memberships. Experimental results on both synthetic and large real-world networks show that PVOC significantly outperforms six state-of-the-art overlapping community detection algorithms in terms of high similarity of the output with the ground-truth structure. Thus our framework not only finds meaningful overlapping communities from the network, but also allows us to put an end to the constant effort of building yet another overlapping community detection algorithm.

  8. Evolution of Plasmonic Metamolecule Modes in the Quantum Tunneling Regime.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Jonathan A; Garcia-Etxarri, Aitzol; Aguirregabiria, Garikoitz; Esteban, Ruben; Narayan, Tarun C; Koh, Ai Leen; Aizpurua, Javier; Dionne, Jennifer A

    2016-01-26

    Plasmonic multinanoparticle systems exhibit collective electric and magnetic resonances that are fundamental for the development of state-of-the-art optical nanoantennas, metamaterials, and surface-enhanced spectroscopy substrates. While electric dipolar modes have been investigated in both the classical and quantum realm, little attention has been given to magnetic and other "dark" modes at the smallest dimensions. Here, we study the collective electric, magnetic, and dark modes of colloidally synthesized silver nanosphere trimers with varying interparticle separation using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). This technique enables direct visualization and spatially selective excitation of individual trimers, as well as manipulation of the interparticle distance into the subnanometer regime with the electron beam. Our experiments reveal that bonding electric and magnetic modes are significantly impacted by quantum effects, exhibiting a relative blueshift and reduced EELS amplitude compared to classical predictions. In contrast, the trimer's electric dark mode is not affected by quantum tunneling for even Ångström-scale interparticle separations. We employ a quantum-corrected model to simulate the effect of electron tunneling in the trimer which shows excellent agreement with experimental results. This understanding of classical and quantum-influenced hybridized modes may impact the development of future quantum plasmonic materials and devices, including Fano-like molecular sensors and quantum metamaterials.

  9. Metamaterial, plasmonic and nanophotonic devices.

    PubMed

    Monticone, Francesco; Alù, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    The field of metamaterials has opened landscapes of possibilities in basic science, and a paradigm shift in the way we think about and design emergent material properties. In many scenarios, metamaterial concepts have helped overcome long-held scientific challenges, such as the absence of optical magnetism and the limits imposed by diffraction in optical imaging. As the potential of metamaterials, as well as their limitations, become clearer, these advances in basic science have started to make an impact on several applications in different areas, with far-reaching implications for many scientific and engineering fields. At optical frequencies, the alliance of metamaterials with the fields of plasmonics and nanophotonics can further advance the possibility of controlling light propagation, radiation, localization and scattering in unprecedented ways. In this review article, we discuss the recent progress in the field of metamaterials, with particular focus on how fundamental advances in this field are enabling a new generation of metamaterial, plasmonic and nanophotonic devices. Relevant examples include optical nanocircuits and nanoantennas, invisibility cloaks, superscatterers and superabsorbers, metasurfaces for wavefront shaping and wave-based analog computing, as well as active, nonreciprocal and topological devices. Throughout the paper, we highlight the fundamental limitations and practical challenges associated with the realization of advanced functionalities, and we suggest potential directions to go beyond these limits. Over the next few years, as new scientific breakthroughs are translated into technological advances, the fields of metamaterials, plasmonics and nanophotonics are expected to have a broad impact on a variety of applications in areas of scientific, industrial and societal significance.

  10. Metamaterial, plasmonic and nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monticone, Francesco; Alù, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    The field of metamaterials has opened landscapes of possibilities in basic science, and a paradigm shift in the way we think about and design emergent material properties. In many scenarios, metamaterial concepts have helped overcome long-held scientific challenges, such as the absence of optical magnetism and the limits imposed by diffraction in optical imaging. As the potential of metamaterials, as well as their limitations, become clearer, these advances in basic science have started to make an impact on several applications in different areas, with far-reaching implications for many scientific and engineering fields. At optical frequencies, the alliance of metamaterials with the fields of plasmonics and nanophotonics can further advance the possibility of controlling light propagation, radiation, localization and scattering in unprecedented ways. In this review article, we discuss the recent progress in the field of metamaterials, with particular focus on how fundamental advances in this field are enabling a new generation of metamaterial, plasmonic and nanophotonic devices. Relevant examples include optical nanocircuits and nanoantennas, invisibility cloaks, superscatterers and superabsorbers, metasurfaces for wavefront shaping and wave-based analog computing, as well as active, nonreciprocal and topological devices. Throughout the paper, we highlight the fundamental limitations and practical challenges associated with the realization of advanced functionalities, and we suggest potential directions to go beyond these limits. Over the next few years, as new scientific breakthroughs are translated into technological advances, the fields of metamaterials, plasmonics and nanophotonics are expected to have a broad impact on a variety of applications in areas of scientific, industrial and societal significance.

  11. Subwavelength plasmonics for graded-index optics on a chip.

    PubMed

    Grajower, Meir; Lerman, Gilad M; Goykhman, Ilya; Desiatov, Boris; Yanai, Avner; Smith, David R; Levy, Uriel

    2013-09-15

    Planar plasmonic devices are becoming attractive for myriad applications, owing to their potential compatibility with standard microelectronics technology and the capability for densely integrating a large variety of plasmonic devices on a chip. Mitigating the challenges of using plasmonics in on-chip configurations requires precise control over the properties of plasmonic modes, in particular their shape and size. Here we achieve this goal by demonstrating a planar plasmonic graded-index lens focusing surface plasmons propagating along the device. The plasmonic mode is manipulated by carving subwavelength features into a dielectric layer positioned on top of a uniform metal film, allowing the local effective index of the plasmonic mode to be controlled using a single binary lithographic step. Focusing and divergence of surface plasmons is demonstrated experimentally. The demonstrated approach can be used for manipulating the propagation of surface plasmons, e.g., for beam steering, splitting, cloaking, mode matching, and beam shaping applications.

  12. Plasmonic nanopatch array for optical integrated circuit applications

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Shi-Wei; Nie, Zai-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Future plasmonic integrated circuits with the capability of extremely high-speed data processing at optical frequencies will be dominated by the efficient optical emission (excitation) from (of) plasmonic waveguides. Towards this goal, plasmonic nanoantennas, currently a hot topic in the field of plasmonics, have potential to bridge the mismatch between the wave vector of free-space photonics and that of the guided plasmonics. To manipulate light at will, plasmonic nanoantenna arrays will definitely be more efficient than isolated nanoantennas. In this article, the concepts of microwave antenna arrays are applied to efficiently convert plasmonic waves in the plasmonic waveguides into free-space optical waves or vice versa. The proposed plasmonic nanoantenna array, with nanopatch antennas and a coupled wedge plasmon waveguide, can also act as an efficient spectrometer to project different wavelengths into different directions, or as a spatial filter to absorb a specific wavelength at a specified incident angle. PMID:24201454

  13. Plasmonic nanopatch array for optical integrated circuit applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Shi-Wei; Nie, Zai-Ping

    2013-11-01

    Future plasmonic integrated circuits with the capability of extremely high-speed data processing at optical frequencies will be dominated by the efficient optical emission (excitation) from (of) plasmonic waveguides. Towards this goal, plasmonic nanoantennas, currently a hot topic in the field of plasmonics, have potential to bridge the mismatch between the wave vector of free-space photonics and that of the guided plasmonics. To manipulate light at will, plasmonic nanoantenna arrays will definitely be more efficient than isolated nanoantennas. In this article, the concepts of microwave antenna arrays are applied to efficiently convert plasmonic waves in the plasmonic waveguides into free-space optical waves or vice versa. The proposed plasmonic nanoantenna array, with nanopatch antennas and a coupled wedge plasmon waveguide, can also act as an efficient spectrometer to project different wavelengths into different directions, or as a spatial filter to absorb a specific wavelength at a specified incident angle.

  14. Plasmonic nanopatch array for optical integrated circuit applications.

    PubMed

    Qu, Shi-Wei; Nie, Zai-Ping

    2013-11-08

    Future plasmonic integrated circuits with the capability of extremely high-speed data processing at optical frequencies will be dominated by the efficient optical emission (excitation) from (of) plasmonic waveguides. Towards this goal, plasmonic nanoantennas, currently a hot topic in the field of plasmonics, have potential to bridge the mismatch between the wave vector of free-space photonics and that of the guided plasmonics. To manipulate light at will, plasmonic nanoantenna arrays will definitely be more efficient than isolated nanoantennas. In this article, the concepts of microwave antenna arrays are applied to efficiently convert plasmonic waves in the plasmonic waveguides into free-space optical waves or vice versa. The proposed plasmonic nanoantenna array, with nanopatch antennas and a coupled wedge plasmon waveguide, can also act as an efficient spectrometer to project different wavelengths into different directions, or as a spatial filter to absorb a specific wavelength at a specified incident angle.

  15. Gallium-doped zinc oxide plasmonic nanostructures for mid-IR applications (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dev, Sukrith U.; Look, David C.; Leedy, Kevin D.; Yu, Lan; Walker, Dennis E.; Wenner, Brett R.; Allen, Jeffery W.; Allen, Monica S.; Wasserman, Daniel M.

    2016-09-01

    The mid-infrared (mid-IR) region of the electromagnetic spectrum has a range of applications in defense, sensing, and free space optical communications. However, most mid-IR sources, particularly incoherent emitters, are practically limited as a result of significant non-radiative losses such as Auger and Shockley-Read-Hall recombination as well as phonon-assisted scattering. Recently, plasmonic materials have been a topic of interest due to their ability to overcome traditional limitations of light confinement as well as enhance light-matter interactions. For inherently inefficient sources, such as many mid-IR emitters, coupling of the emitting element to a plasmonic structure could enhance emission efficiency. In this work, we propose and experimentally evaluate the use of plasmon-mediated photoluminescence as a potential method for improving efficiency in mid-IR emitters. We assess the effectiveness of 3% gallium-doped zinc oxide (G3ZO) as a mid-IR plasmonic material. We design, simulate, fabricate, and characterize a two-dimensional periodic array of bow-tie nanoantennas (nantennas). Our structures are designed to enhance the overlap of the nantenna optical field with underlying In(Ga)Sb/InAs quantum well structures emitting at λ ≈ 4.0μm. Thin films of G3ZO are grown by pulsed laser deposition and are characterized electrically and optically, with the extracted material parameters used as inputs in our simulations. G3ZO plasmonic nantennas are then fabricated by electron-beam lithography and dry-etching. The spectral response of the patterned nantennas is characterized using Fourier transform infrared reflection spectroscopy. Samples are then characterized by temperature and polarization dependent photoluminescence spectroscopy in order to determine the extent to which the emission efficiency improves as a result of coupling to the nanostructures.

  16. Large-area nanogap plasmon resonator arrays for plasmonics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Mingliang; van Wolferen, Henk; Wormeester, Herbert; van den Berg, Albert; Carlen, Edwin T.

    2012-07-01

    Large-area (~8000 mm2) Au nanogap plasmon resonator array substrates manufactured using maskless laser interference lithography (LIL) with high uniformity are presented. The periodically spaced subwavelength nanogap arrays are formed between adjacent nanopyramid (NPy) structures with precisely defined pitch and high length density (~1 km cm-2), and are ideally suited as scattering sites for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), as well as refractive index sensing. The two-dimensional grid arrangement of NPy structures renders the excitation of the plasmon resonators minimally dependent on the incident polarization. The SERS average enhancement factor (AEF) has been characterized using over 30 000 individual measurements of benzenethiol (BT) chemisorbed on the Au NPy surfaces. From the 1(a1), βCCC + νCS ring mode (1074 cm-1) of BT on surfaces with pitch λg = 200 nm, AEF = 0.8 × 106 and for surfaces with λg = 500 nm, AEF = 0.3 × 107 from over 99% of the imaged spots. Maximum AEFs > 108 have been measured in both cases.

  17. Plasmonic Gold Decorated MWCNT Nanocomposite for Localized Plasmon Resonance Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Ozhikandathil, J.; Badilescu, S.; Packirisamy, M.

    2015-01-01

    The synergism of excellent properties of carbon nanotubes and gold nanoparticles is used in this work for bio-sensing of recombinant bovine growth hormones (rbST) by making Multi Wall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNT) locally optically responsive by augmenting it optical properties through Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR). To this purpose, locally gold nano particles decorated gold–MWCNT composite was synthesized from a suspension of MWCNT bundles and hydrogen chloroauric acid in an aqueous solution, activated ultrasonically and, then, drop-casted on a glass substrate. The slow drying of the drop produces a “coffee ring” pattern that is found to contain gold–MWCNT nanocomposites, accumulated mostly along the perimeter of the ring. The reaction is studied also at low-temperature, in the vacuum chamber of the Scanning Electron Microscope and is accounted for by the local melting processes that facilitate the contact between the bundle of tubes and the gold ions. Biosensing applications of the gold–MWCNT nanocomposite using their LSPR properties are demonstrated for the plasmonic detection of traces of bovine growth hormone. The sensitivity of the hybrid platform which is found to be 1 ng/ml is much better than that measuring with gold nanoparticles alone which is only 25 ng/ml. PMID:26282187

  18. Plasmonic Gold Decorated MWCNT Nanocomposite for Localized Plasmon Resonance Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozhikandathil, J.; Badilescu, S.; Packirisamy, M.

    2015-08-01

    The synergism of excellent properties of carbon nanotubes and gold nanoparticles is used in this work for bio-sensing of recombinant bovine growth hormones (rbST) by making Multi Wall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNT) locally optically responsive by augmenting it optical properties through Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR). To this purpose, locally gold nano particles decorated gold-MWCNT composite was synthesized from a suspension of MWCNT bundles and hydrogen chloroauric acid in an aqueous solution, activated ultrasonically and, then, drop-casted on a glass substrate. The slow drying of the drop produces a “coffee ring” pattern that is found to contain gold-MWCNT nanocomposites, accumulated mostly along the perimeter of the ring. The reaction is studied also at low-temperature, in the vacuum chamber of the Scanning Electron Microscope and is accounted for by the local melting processes that facilitate the contact between the bundle of tubes and the gold ions. Biosensing applications of the gold-MWCNT nanocomposite using their LSPR properties are demonstrated for the plasmonic detection of traces of bovine growth hormone. The sensitivity of the hybrid platform which is found to be 1 ng/ml is much better than that measuring with gold nanoparticles alone which is only 25 ng/ml.

  19. Development of Ultrasensitive Plasmonic Nanosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Gayatribahen K.

    Nanostructures (NSs) based localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensors have brought a transformation in development of sensing devices due to their ability to detect extremely small changes in surrounding refractive index (R.I.). NS-based LSPR sensing approaches have been employed to enhance the sensitivity for a variety of applications, such as diagnosis of disease, food and environmental analysis, and chemical and biological threat detection. Generally in LSPR spectroscopy, absorption and scattering of light is greatly enhanced at a frequency that excites the NS's LSPR and results in well-defined LSPR extinction peak (lambdaLSPR). This lambdaLSPR is highly dependent on the size, shape, and surrounding R.I. of NSs. Compositional and confirmational change within the surrounding R.I. near the NS could be detected by monitoring the shifts in lambdaLSPR. This thesis specifically focuses on the rational development of the plasmonic nanosensors for various sensing applications by utilizing the LSPR properties of Au NS with prismatic shape. First the chemical synthetic approach that can produce Au nanoprisms, which displayed lambdaLSPR in 650-850 nm range corresponding to 20-50 nm edge lengths has been developed. The chemically synthesized Au nanoprisms were attached to silanized glass substrate and employed as a solid-state sensing platform for the development of label-free plasmonic nanosensors. The size, shape, and surface of nanoprisms were characterized through transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and UV-visible spectroscopy. Further, the influence of the structure, size and surface ligand chemistry onto the lambda LSPR of nanoprisms were investigated in detail. Both bulk and local R.I. sensitivity, and the electromagnetic-field (EM-field) decay length were derived for various edge lengths of nanoprisms through measuring the lambda LSPR shifts by UV-visible spectroscopy. Finally, nanoprisms

  20. Modular multichannel surface plasmon spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuert, G.; Kufer, S.; Benoit, M.; Gaub, H. E.

    2005-05-01

    We have developed a modular multichannel surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectrometer on the basis of a commercially available hybrid sensor chip. Due to its modularity this inexpensive and easy to use setup can readily be adapted to different experimental environments. High temperature stability is achieved through efficient thermal coupling of individual SPR units. With standard systems the performance of the multichannel instrument was evaluated. The absorption kinetics of a cysteamine monolayer, as well as the concentration dependence of the specific receptor-ligand interaction between biotin and streptavidin was measured.

  1. Depression-Burnout Overlap in Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Wurm, Walter; Vogel, Katrin; Holl, Anna; Ebner, Christoph; Bayer, Dietmar; Mörkl, Sabrina; Szilagyi, Istvan-Szilard; Hotter, Erich; Kapfhammer, Hans-Peter; Hofmann, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background Whether burnout is a distinct phenomenon rather than a type of depression and whether it is a syndrome, limited to three “core” components (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and low personal accomplishment) are subjects of current debate. We investigated the depression-burnout overlap, and the pertinence of these three components in a large, representative sample of physicians. Methods In a cross-sectional study, all Austrian physicians were invited to answer a questionnaire that included the Major Depression Inventory (MDI), the Hamburg Burnout Inventory (HBI), as well as demographic and job-related parameters. Of the 40093 physicians who received an invitation, a total of 6351 (15.8%) participated. The data of 5897 participants were suitable for analysis. Results Of the participants, 10.3% were affected by major depression. Our study results suggest that potentially 50.7% of the participants were affected by symptoms of burnout. Compared to physicians unaffected by burnout, the odds ratio of suffering from major depression was 2.99 (95% CI 2.21–4.06) for physicians with mild, 10.14 (95% CI 7.58–13.59) for physicians with moderate, 46.84 (95% CI 35.25–62.24) for physicians with severe burnout and 92.78 (95% CI 62.96–136.74) for the 3% of participants with the highest HBI_sum (sum score of all ten HBI components). The HBI components Emotional Exhaustion, Personal Accomplishment and Detachment (representing depersonalization) tend to correlate more highly with the main symptoms of major depression (sadness, lack of interest and lack of energy) than with each other. A combination of the HBI components Emotional Exhaustion, Helplessness, Inner Void and Tedium (adj.R2 = 0.92) explained more HBI_sum variance than the three “core” components (adj.R2 = 0.85) of burnout combined. Cronbach’s alpha for Emotional Exhaustion, Helplessness, Inner Void and Tedium combined was 0.90 compared to α = 0.54 for the combination of the three

  2. Sol-Gel Thin Films for Plasmonic Gas Sensors.

    PubMed

    Della Gaspera, Enrico; Martucci, Alessandro

    2015-07-13

    Plasmonic gas sensors are optical sensors that use localized surface plasmons or extended surface plasmons as transducing platform. Surface plasmons are very sensitive to dielectric variations of the environment or to electron exchange, and these effects have been exploited for the realization of sensitive gas sensors. In this paper, we review our research work of the last few years on the synthesis and the gas sensing properties of sol-gel based nanomaterials for plasmonic sensors.

  3. Metal-optic and Plasmonic Semiconductor-based Nanolasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-07

    polaritons (SPPs), however, is less commonly seen. Thus, I will go over basic properties of these SPPs to understand how they might help with nanolaser...Noginov et al. [40]. 2.1.2 Single-Sided Surface Plasmons Besides bulk plasmons, metals can also support surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). Single-sided...surface plasmon polariton crystal (SPPC or plasmonic crystal). A SPPC is simply a periodic structure on a metal film capable of manipulating surface

  4. Sol-Gel Thin Films for Plasmonic Gas Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Della Gaspera, Enrico; Martucci, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic gas sensors are optical sensors that use localized surface plasmons or extended surface plasmons as transducing platform. Surface plasmons are very sensitive to dielectric variations of the environment or to electron exchange, and these effects have been exploited for the realization of sensitive gas sensors. In this paper, we review our research work of the last few years on the synthesis and the gas sensing properties of sol-gel based nanomaterials for plasmonic sensors. PMID:26184216

  5. Product selectivity in plasmonic photocatalysis for carbon dioxide hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao; Li, Xueqian; Zhang, Du; Su, Neil Qiang; Yang, Weitao; Everitt, Henry O; Liu, Jie

    2017-02-23

    Photocatalysis has not found widespread industrial adoption, in spite of decades of active research, because the challenges associated with catalyst illumination and turnover outweigh the touted advantages of replacing heat with light. A demonstration that light can control product selectivity in complex chemical reactions could prove to be transformative. Here, we show how the recently demonstrated plasmonic behaviour of rhodium nanoparticles profoundly improves their already excellent catalytic properties by simultaneously reducing the activation energy and selectively producing a desired but kinetically unfavourable product for the important carbon dioxide hydrogenation reaction. Methane is almost exclusively produced when rhodium nanoparticles are mildly illuminated as hot electrons are injected into the anti-bonding orbital of a critical intermediate, while carbon monoxide and methane are equally produced without illumination. The reduced activation energy and super-linear dependence on light intensity cause the unheated photocatalytic methane production rate to exceed the thermocatalytic rate at 350 °C.

  6. Product selectivity in plasmonic photocatalysis for carbon dioxide hydrogenation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao; Li, Xueqian; Zhang, Du; Su, Neil Qiang; Yang, Weitao; Everitt, Henry O.; Liu, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Photocatalysis has not found widespread industrial adoption, in spite of decades of active research, because the challenges associated with catalyst illumination and turnover outweigh the touted advantages of replacing heat with light. A demonstration that light can control product selectivity in complex chemical reactions could prove to be transformative. Here, we show how the recently demonstrated plasmonic behaviour of rhodium nanoparticles profoundly improves their already excellent catalytic properties by simultaneously reducing the activation energy and selectively producing a desired but kinetically unfavourable product for the important carbon dioxide hydrogenation reaction. Methane is almost exclusively produced when rhodium nanoparticles are mildly illuminated as hot electrons are injected into the anti-bonding orbital of a critical intermediate, while carbon monoxide and methane are equally produced without illumination. The reduced activation energy and super-linear dependence on light intensity cause the unheated photocatalytic methane production rate to exceed the thermocatalytic rate at 350 °C. PMID:28230100

  7. Product selectivity in plasmonic photocatalysis for carbon dioxide hydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao; Li, Xueqian; Zhang, Du; Su, Neil Qiang; Yang, Weitao; Everitt, Henry O.; Liu, Jie

    2017-02-01

    Photocatalysis has not found widespread industrial adoption, in spite of decades of active research, because the challenges associated with catalyst illumination and turnover outweigh the touted advantages of replacing heat with light. A demonstration that light can control product selectivity in complex chemical reactions could prove to be transformative. Here, we show how the recently demonstrated plasmonic behaviour of rhodium nanoparticles profoundly improves their already excellent catalytic properties by simultaneously reducing the activation energy and selectively producing a desired but kinetically unfavourable product for the important carbon dioxide hydrogenation reaction. Methane is almost exclusively produced when rhodium nanoparticles are mildly illuminated as hot electrons are injected into the anti-bonding orbital of a critical intermediate, while carbon monoxide and methane are equally produced without illumination. The reduced activation energy and super-linear dependence on light intensity cause the unheated photocatalytic methane production rate to exceed the thermocatalytic rate at 350 °C.

  8. Plasmonic nanostructures to enhance catalytic performance of zeolites under visible light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xingguang; Ke, Xuebin; Du, Aijun; Zhu, Huaiyong

    2014-01-01

    Light absorption efficiency of heterogeneous catalysts has restricted their photocatalytic capability for commercially important organic synthesis. Here, we report a way of harvesting visible light efficiently to boost zeolite catalysis by means of plasmonic gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) supported on zeolites. Zeolites possess strong Brønsted acids and polarized electric fields created by extra-framework cations. The polarized electric fields can be further intensified by the electric near-field enhancement of Au-NPs, which results from the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) upon visible light irradiation. The acetalization reaction was selected as a showcase performed on MZSM-5 and Au/MZSM-5 (M = H+, Na+, Ca2+, or La3+). The density functional theory (DFT) calculations confirmed that the intensified polarized electric fields played a critical role in stretching the C = O bond of the reactants of benzaldehyde to enlarge their molecular polarities, thus allowing reactants to be activated more efficiently by catalytic centers so as to boost the reaction rates. This discovery should evoke intensive research interest on plasmonic metals and diverse zeolites with an aim to take advantage of sunlight for plasmonic devices, molecular electronics, energy storage, and catalysis.

  9. Base drive and overlap protection circuit

    DOEpatents

    Gritter, David J.

    1983-01-01

    An inverter (34) which provides power to an A. C. machine (28) is controlled by a circuit (36) employing PWM control strategy whereby A. C. power is supplied to the machine at a preselectable frequency and preselectable voltage. This is accomplished by the technique of waveform notching in which the shapes of the notches are varied to determine the average energy content of the overall waveform. Through this arrangement, the operational efficiency of the A. C. machine is optimized. The control circuit includes a microcomputer and memory element which receive various parametric inputs and calculate optimized machine control data signals therefrom. The control data is asynchronously loaded into the inverter through an intermediate buffer (38). A base drive and overlap protection circuit is included to insure that both transistors of a complimentary pair are not conducting at the same time. In its preferred embodiment, the present invention is incorporated within an electric vehicle (10) employing a 144 VDC battery pack (32) and a three-phase induction motor (18).

  10. Continuum percolation of congruent overlapping spherocylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenxiang; Su, Xianglong; Jiao, Yang

    2016-09-01

    Continuum percolation of randomly orientated congruent overlapping spherocylinders (composed of cylinder of height H with semispheres of diameter D at the ends) with aspect ratio α =H /D in [0 ,∞ ) is studied. The percolation threshold ϕc, percolation transition width Δ, and correlation-length critical exponent ν for spherocylinders with α in [0, 200] are determined with a high degree of accuracy via extensive finite-size scaling analysis. A generalized excluded-volume approximation for percolation threshold with an exponent explicitly depending on both aspect ratio and excluded volume for arbitrary α values in [0 ,∞ ) is proposed and shown to yield accurate predictions of ϕc for an extremely wide range of α in [0, 2000] based on available numerical and experimental data. We find ϕc is a universal monotonic decreasing function of α and is independent of the effective particle size. Our study has implications in percolation theory for nonspherical particles and composite material design.

  11. Effects of overlapping strings in pp collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Bierlich, Christian; Gustafson, Gösta; Lönnblad, Leif; ...

    2015-03-26

    In models for hadron collisions based on string hadronization, the strings are usually treated as independent, allowing no interaction between the confined colour fields. In studies of nucleus collisions it has been suggested that strings close in space can fuse to form "colour ropes." Such ropes are expected to give more strange particles and baryons, which also has been suggested as a signal for plasma formation. Overlapping strings can also be expected in pp collisions, where usually no phase transition is expected. In particular at the high LHC energies the expected density of strings is quite high. To investigate possiblemore » effects of rope formation, we present a model in which strings are allowed to combine into higher multiplets, giving rise to increased production of baryons and strangeness, or recombine into singlet structures and vanish. Also a crude model for strings recombining into junction structures is considered, again giving rise to increased baryon production. The models are implemented in the DIPSY MC event generator, using PYTHIA8 for hadronization, and comparison to pp minimum bias data, reveals improvement in the description of identified particle spectra.« less

  12. Effects of overlapping strings in pp collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bierlich, Christian; Gustafson, Gösta; Lönnblad, Leif; Tarasov, Andrey

    2015-03-26

    In models for hadron collisions based on string hadronization, the strings are usually treated as independent, allowing no interaction between the confined colour fields. In studies of nucleus collisions it has been suggested that strings close in space can fuse to form "colour ropes." Such ropes are expected to give more strange particles and baryons, which also has been suggested as a signal for plasma formation. Overlapping strings can also be expected in pp collisions, where usually no phase transition is expected. In particular at the high LHC energies the expected density of strings is quite high. To investigate possible effects of rope formation, we present a model in which strings are allowed to combine into higher multiplets, giving rise to increased production of baryons and strangeness, or recombine into singlet structures and vanish. Also a crude model for strings recombining into junction structures is considered, again giving rise to increased baryon production. The models are implemented in the DIPSY MC event generator, using PYTHIA8 for hadronization, and comparison to pp minimum bias data, reveals improvement in the description of identified particle spectra.

  13. Hybrid lattice Boltzmann method on overlapping grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Ilio, G.; Chiappini, D.; Ubertini, S.; Bella, G.; Succi, S.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, a hybrid lattice Boltzmann method (HLBM) is proposed, where the standard lattice Boltzmann implementation based on the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (LBGK) approximation is combined together with an unstructured finite-volume lattice Boltzmann model. The method is constructed on an overlapping grid system, which allows the coexistence of a uniform lattice nodes spacing and a coordinate-free lattice structure. The natural adaptivity of the hybrid grid system makes the method particularly suitable to handle problems involving complex geometries. Moreover, the provided scheme ensures a high-accuracy solution near walls, given the capability of the unstructured submodel of achieving the desired level of refinement in a very flexible way. For these reasons, the HLBM represents a prospective tool for solving multiscale problems. The proposed method is here applied to the benchmark problem of a two-dimensional flow past a circular cylinder for a wide range of Reynolds numbers and its numerical performances are measured and compared with the standard LBGK ones.

  14. Analysis of stacking overlap in nucleic acid structures: algorithm and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pingali, Pavan Kumar; Halder, Sukanya; Mukherjee, Debasish; Basu, Sankar; Banerjee, Rahul; Choudhury, Devapriya; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay

    2014-08-01

    RNA contains different secondary structural motifs like pseudo-helices, hairpin loops, internal loops, etc. in addition to anti-parallel double helices and random coils. The secondary structures are mainly stabilized by base-pairing and stacking interactions between the planar aromatic bases. The hydrogen bonding strength and geometries of base pairs are characterized by six intra-base pair parameters. Similarly, stacking can be represented by six local doublet parameters. These dinucleotide step parameters can describe the quality of stacking between Watson-Crick base pairs very effectively. However, it is quite difficult to understand the stacking pattern for dinucleotides consisting of non canonical base pairs from these parameters. Stacking interaction is a manifestation of the interaction between two aromatic bases or base pairs and thus can be estimated best by the overlap area between the planar aromatic moieties. We have calculated base pair overlap between two consecutive base pairs as the buried van der Waals surface between them. In general, overlap values show normal distribution for the Watson-Crick base pairs in most double helices within a range from 45 to 50 Å2 irrespective of base sequence. The dinucleotide steps with non-canonical base pairs also are seen to have high overlap value, although their twist and few other parameters are rather unusual. We have analyzed hairpin loops of different length, bulges within double helical structures and pseudo-continuous helices using our algorithm. The overlap area analyses indicate good stacking between few looped out bases especially in GNRA tetraloop, which was difficult to quantitatively characterise from analysis of the base pair or dinucleotide step parameters. This parameter is also seen to be capable to distinguish pseudo-continuous helices from kinked helix junctions.

  15. Surface plasmon polaritons in artificial metallic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briscoe, Jayson Lawrence

    Surface plasmon polaritons have been the focus of intense research due to their many unique properties such as high electromagnetic field localization, extreme sensitivity to surface conditions, and subwavelength confinement of electromagnetic waves. The area of potential impact is vast and includes promising advancements in photonic circuits, high speed photodetection, hyperspectral imaging, spectroscopy, enhanced solar cells, ultra-small scale lithography, and microscopy. My research has focused on utilizing these properties to design and demonstrate new phenomena and implement real-world applications using artificial metallic nanostructures. Artificial metallic nanostructures employed during my research begin as thin planar gold films which are then lithographically patterned according to previously determined dimensions. The result is a nanopatterned device which can excite surface plasmon polaritons on its surface under specific conditions. Through my research I characterized the optical properties of these devices for further insight into the interesting properties of surface plasmon polaritons. Exploration of these properties led to advancements in biosensing, development of artificial media to enhance and control light-matter interactions at the nanoscale, and hybrid plasmonic cavities. Demonstrations from these advancements include: label-free immunosensing of Plasmodium in a whole blood lysate, low part-per-trillion detection of microcystin-LR, enhanced refractive index sensitivity of novel resonant plasmonic devices, a defect-based plasmonic crystal, spontaneous emission modification of colloidal quantum dots, and coupling of plasmonic and optical Fabry-Perot resonant modes in a hybrid cavity.

  16. Infrared Plasmonics with Conductive Ternary Nitrides.

    PubMed

    Metaxa, C; Kassavetis, S; Pierson, J F; Gall, D; Patsalas, P

    2017-03-29

    Conductive transition metal nitrides are emerging as promising alternative plasmonic materials that are refractory and CMOS-compatible. In this work, we show that ternary transition metal nitrides of the B1 structure and consisting of a combination of group-IVb transition metal, such as Ti or Zr, and group III (Sc, Y, Al) or group II (Mg, Ca) elements can have tunable plasmonic activity in the infrared range in contrast to Ta-based ternary nitrides, which exhibit plasmonic performance in the visible and UV ranges. We consider the intrinsic quality factors of surface plasmon polariton for the ternary nitrides, and we calculate the dispersion of surface plasmon polariton and the field enhancement at the vicinity of nitride/silica interfaces. Based on these calculations, it is shown that among these nitrides the most promising are TixSc1-xN and TixMg1-xN. In particular, TixSc1-xN can have plasmonic activity in the usual telecom bands at 850, 1300, and 1550 nm. Still, these nitrides exhibit substantial electronic losses mostly due to fine crystalline grains that deteriorate the plasmonic field enhancement. This unequivocally calls for improved growth processes that would enable the fabrication of such ternary nitrides of high crystallinity.

  17. Active plasmonics in WDM traffic switching applications.

    PubMed

    Papaioannou, Sotirios; Kalavrouziotis, Dimitrios; Vyrsokinos, Konstantinos; Weeber, Jean-Claude; Hassan, Karim; Markey, Laurent; Dereux, Alain; Kumar, Ashwani; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I; Baus, Matthias; Tekin, Tolga; Apostolopoulos, Dimitrios; Avramopoulos, Hercules; Pleros, Nikos

    2012-01-01

    With metal stripes being intrinsic components of plasmonic waveguides, plasmonics provides a "naturally" energy-efficient platform for merging broadband optical links with intelligent electronic processing, instigating a great promise for low-power and small-footprint active functional circuitry. The first active Dielectric-Loaded Surface Plasmon Polariton (DLSPP) thermo-optic (TO) switches with successful performance in single-channel 10 Gb/s data traffic environments have led the inroad towards bringing low-power active plasmonics in practical traffic applications. In this article, we introduce active plasmonics into Wavelength Division Multiplexed (WDM) switching applications, using the smallest TO DLSPP-based Mach-Zehnder interferometric switch reported so far and showing its successful performance in 4×10 Gb/s low-power and fast switching operation. The demonstration of the WDM-enabling characteristics of active plasmonic circuits with an ultra-low power × response time product represents a crucial milestone in the development of active plasmonics towards real telecom and datacom applications, where low-energy and fast TO operation with small-size circuitry is targeted.

  18. Nano-plasmonic phenomena in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basov, Dimitri

    2014-03-01

    Infrared nano-spectroscopy and nano-imaging experiments have uncovered a rich variety of optical effects associated with the Dirac plasmons of graphene [Fei et al. Nano Lett. 11, 4701 (2011)]. We were able to directly image Dirac plasmons propagating over sub-micron distances [Fei et al. Nature 487, 82 (2012)]. We have succeeded in altering both the amplitude and wavelength of these plasmons by gate voltage in common graphene/SiO2/Si back-gated structures. Scanning plasmon interferometry has allowed us to visualize grain boundaries in CVD graphene. These latter experiments revealed that the grain boundaries tend to form electronic barriers that impede both electrical transport and plasmon propagation. Our results attest to the feasibility of using these electronic barriers to realize tunable plasmon reflectors: a precondition for implementation of various metamaterials concepts [Fei et al. Nature Nano 8, 821 (2013)]. Finally, we have carried out pump-probe experiments interrogating ultra-fast dynamics of plasmons in exfoliated graphene with the nano-scale spatial resolution [Wagner et al. (under review)].

  19. Application of Plasmonics in Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Dawei

    This thesis studies the application of plasmonics in solar energy conversion and near field thermal energy harvesting. The efficiency of semiconductor solar cell is limited by the inability of absorbing photons with energy below the bandgap. By designing plasmonic nanograting with resonance at the absorption edge, ~10% overall absorption improvement is achieved. Both localized and propagating surface plasmon modes are observed in the device. Their interaction, and the influence on overall solar cell absorption performance are studied in details. In addition, this thesis studies the upconversion materials which can convert unabsorbed near infrared photons by semiconductor solar cells into well absorbed visible photons. By tuning the surface plasmon resonance at the upconversion frequency with silver nanograting structure, the photoluminescence of upconversion material can be improved by 39-fold maximum. The rate equation analysis reveals that the improvement is attributed to roughly 3-fold absorption enhancement and 2-fold energy transfer enhancement with plasmonics. This thesis also explores the application of plasmonics to enhanced near field thermal radiation harvesting. I designed metamaterial to excite the spoof surface plasmon in the terahertz frequency for strongly enhanced thermal radiation. The FDTD simulation developed from the fluctuation electrodynamics demonstrates several hundredfold enhancement of thermally excited electromagnetic energy in the near field.

  20. Direct temperature mapping of nanoscale plasmonic devices.

    PubMed

    Desiatov, Boris; Goykhman, Ilya; Levy, Uriel

    2014-02-12

    Side by side with the great advantages of plasmonics in nanoscale light confinement, the inevitable ohmic loss results in significant joule heating in plasmonic devices. Therefore, understanding optical-induced heat generation and heat transport in integrated on-chip plasmonic devices is of major importance. Specifically, there is a need for in situ visualization of electromagnetic induced thermal energy distribution with high spatial resolution. This paper studies the heat distribution in silicon plasmonic nanotips. Light is coupled to the plasmonic nanotips from a silicon nanowaveguide that is integrated with the tip on chip. Heat is generated by light absorption in the metal surrounding the silicon nanotip. The steady-state thermal distribution is studied numerically and measured experimentally using the approach of scanning thermal microscopy. It is shown that following the nanoscale heat generation by a 10 mW light source within a silicon photonic waveguide the temperature in the region of the nanotip is increased by ∼ 15 °C compared with the ambient temperature. Furthermore, we also perform a numerical study of the dynamics of the heat transport. Given the nanoscale dimensions of the structure, significant heating is expected to occur within the time frame of picoseconds. The capability of measuring temperature distribution of plasmonic structures at the nanoscale is shown to be a powerful tool and may be used in future applications related to thermal plasmonic applications such as control heating of liquids, thermal photovoltaic, nanochemistry, medicine, heat-assisted magnetic memories, and nanolithography.

  1. Active plasmonics in WDM traffic switching applications

    PubMed Central

    Papaioannou, Sotirios; Kalavrouziotis, Dimitrios; Vyrsokinos, Konstantinos; Weeber, Jean-Claude; Hassan, Karim; Markey, Laurent; Dereux, Alain; Kumar, Ashwani; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Baus, Matthias; Tekin, Tolga; Apostolopoulos, Dimitrios; Avramopoulos, Hercules; Pleros, Nikos

    2012-01-01

    With metal stripes being intrinsic components of plasmonic waveguides, plasmonics provides a “naturally” energy-efficient platform for merging broadband optical links with intelligent electronic processing, instigating a great promise for low-power and small-footprint active functional circuitry. The first active Dielectric-Loaded Surface Plasmon Polariton (DLSPP) thermo-optic (TO) switches with successful performance in single-channel 10 Gb/s data traffic environments have led the inroad towards bringing low-power active plasmonics in practical traffic applications. In this article, we introduce active plasmonics into Wavelength Division Multiplexed (WDM) switching applications, using the smallest TO DLSPP-based Mach-Zehnder interferometric switch reported so far and showing its successful performance in 4×10 Gb/s low-power and fast switching operation. The demonstration of the WDM-enabling characteristics of active plasmonic circuits with an ultra-low power × response time product represents a crucial milestone in the development of active plasmonics towards real telecom and datacom applications, where low-energy and fast TO operation with small-size circuitry is targeted. PMID:22973502

  2. Electrically Excited Plasmonic Nanoruler for Biomolecule Detection.

    PubMed

    Dathe, André; Ziegler, Mario; Hübner, Uwe; Fritzsche, Wolfgang; Stranik, Ondrej

    2016-09-14

    Plasmon-based sensors are excellent tools for a label-free detection of small biomolecules. An interesting group of such sensors are plasmonic nanorulers that rely on the plasmon hybridization upon modification of their morphology to sense nanoscale distances. Sensor geometries based on the interaction of plasmons in a flat metallic layer together with metal nanoparticles inherit unique advantages but need a special optical excitation configuration that is not easy to miniaturize. Herein, we introduce the concept of nanoruler excitation by direct, electrically induced generation of surface plasmons based on the quantum shot noise of tunneling currents. An electron tunneling junction consisting of a metal-dielectric-semiconductor heterostructure is directly incorporated into the nanoruler basic geometry. With the application of voltage on this modified nanoruler, the plasmon modes are directly excited without any additional optical component as a light source. We demonstrate via several experiments that this electrically driven nanoruler possesses similar properties as an optically exited one and confirm its sensing capabilities by the detection of the binding of small biomolecules such as antibodies. This new sensing principle could open the way to a new platform of highly miniaturized, integrated plasmonic sensors compatible with monolithic integrated circuits.

  3. Quantifying entanglement of overlapping indistinguishable particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gittings, Joseph R.

    This thesis develops the quantitative study of quantum entanglement in systems of identical particles. Understanding this topic is essential for the construction of quantum information processing devices involving identical particles. A brief overview of necessary concepts and methods, such as the density matrix, the entanglement in pure and mixed states of distinguishable particles, and some common applications of entanglement is given in the introduction. Some competing methods of calculating the entanglement in bipartite pure states of indistinguishable particles are examined. It is shown that only the 'site entropy' measure introduced by Zanardi satisfies all the criteria for a correct entanglement measure. A teleportation protocol which utilizes all the entanglement carried (in both the spin and space degrees of freedom) in a doubly- occupied molecular bonding orbital is presented. The output from an interferometer in a thought experiment described by Omar et al. is studied as an example to see whether entanglement can be separated into space-only, spin-only, and space-spin components. A similar exercise is performed for a doubly-occupied molecular bonding orbital. The relationship between these results and the application of superselection rules (SSRs) to the quantification of useful entanglement is discussed. A numerical method for estimating the entanglement of formation of a mixed state of arbitrary dimension by a conjugate gradient algorithm is described. The results of applying an implementation of the algorithm to both random and isotropic states of 2 qutrits (i.e. two three-dimensional systems) is described. Existing work on calculating entanglement between two sites in various spin systems is outlined. New methods for calculating the entanglement between two sites in various types of degenerate quantum gas - a Fermi gas, a Bose condensate, and a BCS superconductor - are described. The results of numerical studies of the entanglement in a normal metal

  4. Recent Progress on Plasmon-Enhanced Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jun; Zhang, Zhenglong; Zheng, Hairong; Sun, Mentao

    2015-12-01

    The optically generated collective electron density waves on metal-dielectric boundaries known as surface plasmons have been of great scientific interest since their discovery. Being electromagnetic waves on gold or silver nanoparticle's surface, localised surface plasmons (LSP) can strongly enhance the electromagnetic field. These strong electromagnetic fields near the metal surfaces have been used in various applications like surface enhanced spectroscopy (SES), plasmonic lithography, plasmonic trapping of particles, and plasmonic catalysis. Resonant coupling of LSPs to fluorophore can strongly enhance the emission intensity, the angular distribution, and the polarisation of the emitted radiation and even the speed of radiative decay, which is so-called plasmon enhanced fluorescence (PEF). As a result, more and more reports on surface-enhanced fluorescence have appeared, such as SPASER-s, plasmon assisted lasing, single molecule fluorescence measurements, surface plasmoncoupled emission (SPCE) in biological sensing, optical orbit designs etc. In this review, we focus on recent advanced reports on plasmon-enhanced fluorescence (PEF). First, the mechanism of PEF and early results of enhanced fluorescence observed by metal nanostructure will be introduced. Then, the enhanced substrates, including periodical and nonperiodical nanostructure, will be discussed and the most important factor of the spacer between molecule and surface and wavelength dependence on PEF is demonstrated. Finally, the recent progress of tipenhanced fluorescence and PEF from the rare-earth doped up-conversion (UC) and down-conversion (DC) nanoparticles (NPs) are also commented upon. This review provides an introduction to fundamentals of PEF, illustrates the current progress in the design of metallic nanostructures for efficient fluorescence signal amplification that utilises propagating and localised surface plasmons.

  5. Hybridized plasmon modes and near-field enhancement of metallic nanoparticle-dimer on a mirror

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu; Ma, Lingwei; Hou, Mengjing; Li, Jianghao; Xie, Zheng; Zhang, Zhengjun

    2016-01-01

    For the attractive plasmonic structure consisting of metal nanoparticles (NPs) on a mirror, the coexistence of near-field NP-NP and NP-mirror couplings is numerically studied at normal incidence. By mapping their 3D surface charge distributions directly, we have demonstrated two different kinds of mirror-induced bonding dipole plasmon modes and confirmed the bonding hybridizations of the mirror and the NP-dimer which may offer a much stronger near-field enhancement than that of the isolated NP dimers over a broad wavelength range. Further, it is revealed that the huge near-field enhancement of these two modes exhibit different dependence on the NP-NP and NP-mirror hot spots, while both of their near-field resonance wavelengths can be tuned to the blue exponentially by increasing the NP-NP gaps or the NP-mirror separation. Our results here benifit significantly the fundamental understanding and practical applications of metallic NPs on a mirror in plasmonics. PMID:27418039

  6. Hybridized plasmon modes and near-field enhancement of metallic nanoparticle-dimer on a mirror.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu; Ma, Lingwei; Hou, Mengjing; Li, Jianghao; Xie, Zheng; Zhang, Zhengjun

    2016-07-15

    For the attractive plasmonic structure consisting of metal nanoparticles (NPs) on a mirror, the coexistence of near-field NP-NP and NP-mirror couplings is numerically studied at normal incidence. By mapping their 3D surface charge distributions directly, we have demonstrated two different kinds of mirror-induced bonding dipole plasmon modes and confirmed the bonding hybridizations of the mirror and the NP-dimer which may offer a much stronger near-field enhancement than that of the isolated NP dimers over a broad wavelength range. Further, it is revealed that the huge near-field enhancement of these two modes exhibit different dependence on the NP-NP and NP-mirror hot spots, while both of their near-field resonance wavelengths can be tuned to the blue exponentially by increasing the NP-NP gaps or the NP-mirror separation. Our results here benifit significantly the fundamental understanding and practical applications of metallic NPs on a mirror in plasmonics.

  7. AFOSR Wafer Bonding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-31

    cleanliness (foreign particles) and surface morphology (roughness). Two silicon wafers, when properly cleaned, can easily bond at room temperature because of...4 Figure IV data for nSi-nGaN bond. Structure is similar to that shown in Figure Difficulties and Knowledge Added Surface Morphology and...Particles One of the most important features of materials in determining whether they will bond is the quality of the bonding surfaces , in both

  8. Diffusion bonding aeroengine components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, G. A.; Broughton, T.

    1988-10-01

    The use of diffusion bonding processes at Rolls-Royce for the manufacture of titanium-alloy aircraft engine components and structures is described. A liquid-phase diffusion bonding process called activated diffusion bonding has been developed for the manufacture of the hollow titanium wide chord fan blade. In addition, solid-state diffusion bonding is being used in the manufacture of hollow vane/blade airfoil constructions mainly in conjunction with superplastic forming and hot forming techniques.

  9. Acoustic phonons, surface plasmons and surface acoustic plasmons in a superlattice and their nonreciprocal device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derov, John S.

    1987-05-01

    The literature was surveyed to determine potential applications of acoustic and plasma phenomena in superlattices. The use of folded zone acoustic phonons and acoustic surface plasmons in 3 to 5 compounds like AlGaAs/GaAs superlattices is addressed. A dielectric phonon filter is presented and an acoustic resonator is considered. Surface plasmons and surface acoustic plasmons are discussed and a transducer, delay line and mixer are proposed as applications. A 500 GHz isolator utilizing surface magnetoplasmons is also presented.

  10. Acrylic mechanical bond tests

    SciTech Connect

    Wouters, J.M.; Doe, P.J.

    1991-02-01

    The tensile strength of bonded acrylic is tested as a function of bond joint thickness. 0.125 in. thick bond joints were found to posses the maximum strength while the acceptable range of joints varied from 0.063 in. to almost 0.25 in. Such joints are used in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory.

  11. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, B. A.; Tyeryar, J. R.; Hodges, W. T.

    1984-01-01

    Adhesive bonding in the aerospace industry typically utilizes autoclaves or presses which have considerable thermal mass. As a consequence, the rates of heatup and cooldown of the bonded parts are limited and the total time and cost of the bonding process is often relatively high. Many of the adhesives themselves do not inherently require long processing times. Bonding could be performed rapidly if the heat was concentrated in the bond lines or at least in the adherends. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts were developed to utilize induction heating techniques to provide heat directly to the bond line and/or adherends without heating the entire structure, supports, and fixtures of a bonding assembly. Bonding times for specimens are cut by a factor of 10 to 100 compared to standard press bonding. The development of rapid adhesive bonding for lap shear specimens (per ASTM D1003 and D3163), for aerospace panel bonding, and for field repair needs of metallic and advanced fiber reinforced polymeric matrix composite structures are reviewed.

  12. Bonding aluminum beam leads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkett, F. S.

    1978-01-01

    Report makes it relatively easy for hybrid-circuit manufacturers to convert integrated circuit chips with aluminum bead leads. Report covers: techniques for handling tiny chips; proper geometries for ultrasonic bonding tips; best combinations of pressure, pulse time, and ultrasonic energy for bonding; and best thickness for metal films to which beam leads are bonded.

  13. Plasmon resonant cavities in vertical nanowire arrays

    DOEpatents

    Bora, Mihail; Bond, Tiziana C.; Fasenfest, Benjamin J.; Behymer, Elaine M.

    2014-07-15

    Tunable plasmon resonant cavity arrays in paired parallel nanowire waveguides are presented. Resonances can be observed when the waveguide length is an odd multiple of quarter plasmon wavelengths, consistent with boundary conditions of node and antinode at the ends. Two nanowire waveguides can satisfy the dispersion relation of a planar metal-dielectric-metal waveguide of equivalent width equal to the square field average weighted gap. Confinement factors of over 10.sup.3 are possible due to plasmon focusing in the inter-wire space.

  14. Dark plasmonic breathing modes in silver nanodisks.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Franz-Philipp; Ditlbacher, Harald; Hohenester, Ulrich; Hohenau, Andreas; Hofer, Ferdinand; Krenn, Joachim R

    2012-11-14

    We map the complete plasmonic spectrum of silver nanodisks by electron energy loss spectroscopy and show that the mode which couples strongest to the electron beam has radial symmetry with no net dipole moment. Therefore, this mode does not couple to light and has escaped from observation in optical experiments. This radial breathing mode has the character of an extended two-dimensional surface plasmon with a wavenumber determined by the circular disk confinement. Its strong near fields can impact the hybridization in coupled plasmonic nanoparticles as well as couplings with nearby quantum emitters.

  15. Branched silver nanowires as controllable plasmon routers.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yurui; Li, Zhipeng; Huang, Yingzhou; Zhang, Shunping; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J; Xu, Hongxing

    2010-05-12

    Using polarization dependent scattering spectroscopy, we investigate plasmon propagation on branched silver nanowires. By controlling the polarization of the incident laser light, the wire plasmons can be routed into different wire branches and result in light emission from the corresponding wire ends. This routing behavior is found to be strongly dependent on the wavelength of light. Thus for certain incident polarizations, light of different wavelength will be routed into different branches. The branched nanowire can thus serve as a controllable router and multiplexer in integrated plasmonic circuits.

  16. Fluorescence Spectroscopy with Surface Plasmon Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, T.; Kreiter, M.; Knoll, W.

    In recent years, much effort has been directed towards the development of optical biosensors. While direct sensors are capable of monitoring the presence of an analyte without the use of labelling groups, the class of indirect sensors exploits the signal enhancement caused by bound marker molecules. Surface plasmon spectroscopy (SPS) as a direct detection method [1] is known to lack sensitivity for monitoring of low molecular mass analytes. In order to enhance the sensitivity and to improve the detection limit the technique was combined with fluorescence detection schemes in surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS), as described recently [2]. Here, we briefly review the theory of plasmon excitation and the experimental realization of SPFS.

  17. Plasmonic black metals in resonant nanocavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bora, Mihail; Behymer, Elaine M.; Dehlinger, Dietrich A.; Britten, Jerald A.; Larson, Cindy C.; Chang, Allan S. P.; Munechika, Keiko; Nguyen, Hoang T.; Bond, Tiziana C.

    2013-06-01

    We investigate a plasmonic resonant structure tunable from ultra-violet to near infrared wavelengths with maximum absorbance strength over 95% due to a highly efficient coupling with incident light. Additional harmonics are excited at higher frequencies extending the absorbance range to multiple wavelengths. We propose the concept of a plasmonic black metal nanoresonator that exhibits broadband absorbance characteristics by spacing the modes closer through increasing the resonator length and by employing adiabatic plasmonic nano-focusing on the tapered end of the cavity.

  18. Graphene as a substrate for plasmonic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyushkin, Dmitry K.; Milton, James; Santandrea, Salvatore; Russo, Saverio; Craciun, Monica F.; Green, Stephen J.; Mahe, Laureline; Winolve, C. Peter; Barnes, William L.

    2013-11-01

    We report results from an investigation into the plasmonic properties of metallic nanoparticles supported by graphene fabricated using two different methods. In the first method we used electron-beam lithography to produce ordered arrays of metallic nanoparticles. In the second method we used a technique based on electrochemistry to produce random arrangements of metallic nanoparticles. Our results show that both pristine graphene and a more conducting intercalated variant are excellent substrates for plasmonic nanoparticles owing to their transparency and atomically thin nature, opening an interesting route for building plasmon-based bio- and chemical-sensors, and for developing transparent and flexible optoelectronics.

  19. Temperature effect on plasmons in bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Digish K.; Sharma, A. C.; Ashraf, S. S. Z.; Ambavale, S. K.

    2015-06-01

    We have theoretically investigated the plasmon dispersion and damping rate of doped bilayer graphene (BLG) at finite temperatures within the random phase approximation. Our computed results on plasmon dispersion show that plasmon frequency enhances with increasing temperatures in contrast to single layer graphene where it is suppressed. This can be attributed to the fact that the dynamic response of the electron gas or screening in bilayer graphene is different from that of single layer graphene. Further the temperature effect on damping rate is also discussed.

  20. Edge and Surface Plasmons in Graphene Nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Fei, Z; Goldflam, M D; Wu, J-S; Dai, S; Wagner, M; McLeod, A S; Liu, M K; Post, K W; Zhu, S; Janssen, G C A M; Fogler, M M; Basov, D N

    2015-12-09

    We report on nano-infrared (IR) imaging studies of confined plasmon modes inside patterned graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) fabricated with high-quality chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) graphene on Al2O3 substrates. The confined geometry of these ribbons leads to distinct mode patterns and strong field enhancement, both of which evolve systematically with the ribbon width. In addition, spectroscopic nanoimaging in the mid-infrared range 850-1450 cm(-1) allowed us to evaluate the effect of the substrate phonons on the plasmon damping. Furthermore, we observed edge plasmons: peculiar one-dimensional modes propagating strictly along the edges of our patterned graphene nanostructures.

  1. Edge and Surface Plasmons in Graphene Nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Z.; Goldflam, M. D.; Wu, J.-S.; Dai, S.; Wagner, M.; McLeod, A. S.; Liu, M. K.; Post, K. W.; Zhu, S.; Janssen, G. C. A. M.; Fogler, M. M.; Basov, D. N.

    2015-12-01

    We report on nano-infrared (IR) imaging studies of confined plasmon modes inside patterned graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) fabricated with high-quality chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) graphene on Al2O3 substrates. The confined geometry of these ribbons leads to distinct mode patterns and strong field enhancement, both of which evolve systematically with the ribbon width. In addition, spectroscopic nano-imaging in mid-infrared 850-1450 cm-1 allowed us to evaluate the effect of the substrate phonons on the plasmon damping. Furthermore, we observed edge plasmons: peculiar one-dimensional modes propagating strictly along the edges of our patterned graphene nanostructures.

  2. A Lower Bound for Quantifying Overlap Effects: An Empirical Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Bassetti, Federico

    1997-12-31

    Among the many features that are implemented in today`s microprocessors there are some that have the capability of reducing the execution time via overlapping of different operations. Overlapping of instructions with other instructions, and overlapping of computation with memory activities are the main way in which execution time is reduced. In this paper we will introduce a notion of overlap and its definition, and a few different ways to capture its effects. We will characterize some of the DOE Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) benchmarks using the overlap and some other quantities related to it. Also, we will present a characterization of the overlap effects using a lower bound derived empirically from measured data. We will conclude by using the lower bound to estimate other components of the overall execution time.

  3. Hollow metal nanostructures for enhanced plasmonics: synthesis, local plasmonic properties and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genç, Aziz; Patarroyo, Javier; Sancho-Parramon, Jordi; Bastús, Neus G.; Puntes, Victor; Arbiol, Jordi

    2016-09-01

    Metallic nanostructures have received great attention due to their ability to generate surface plasmon resonances, which are collective oscillations of conduction electrons of a material excited by an electromagnetic wave. Plasmonic metal nanostructures are able to localize and manipulate the light at the nanoscale and, therefore, are attractive building blocks for various emerging applications. In particular, hollow nanostructures are promising plasmonic materials as cavities are known to have better plasmonic properties than their solid counterparts thanks to the plasmon hybridization mechanism. The hybridization of the plasmons results in the enhancement of the plasmon fields along with more homogeneous distribution as well as the reduction of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) quenching due to absorption. In this review, we summarize the efforts on the synthesis of hollow metal nanostructures with an emphasis on the galvanic replacement reaction. In the second part of this review, we discuss the advancements on the characterization of plasmonic properties of hollow nanostructures, covering the single nanoparticle experiments, nanoscale characterization via electron energy-loss spectroscopy and modeling and simulation studies. Examples of the applications, i.e. sensing, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy, photothermal ablation therapy of cancer, drug delivery or catalysis among others, where hollow nanostructures perform better than their solid counterparts, are also evaluated.

  4. Hollow metal nanostructures for enhanced plasmonics: synthesis, local plasmonic properties and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genç, Aziz; Patarroyo, Javier; Sancho-Parramon, Jordi; Bastús, Neus G.; Puntes, Victor; Arbiol, Jordi

    2017-01-01

    Metallic nanostructures have received great attention due to their ability to generate surface plasmon resonances, which are collective oscillations of conduction electrons of a material excited by an electromagnetic wave. Plasmonic metal nanostructures are able to localize and manipulate the light at the nanoscale and, therefore, are attractive building blocks for various emerging applications. In particular, hollow nanostructures are promising plasmonic materials as cavities are known to have better plasmonic properties than their solid counterparts thanks to the plasmon hybridization mechanism. The hybridization of the plasmons results in the enhancement of the plasmon fields along with more homogeneous distribution as well as the reduction of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) quenching due to absorption. In this review, we summarize the efforts on the synthesis of hollow metal nanostructures with an emphasis on the galvanic replacement reaction. In the second part of this review, we discuss the advancements on the characterization of plasmonic properties of hollow nanostructures, covering the single nanoparticle experiments, nanoscale characterization via electron energy-loss spectroscopy and modeling and simulation studies. Examples of the applications, i.e. sensing, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy, photothermal ablation therapy of cancer, drug delivery or catalysis among others, where hollow nanostructures perform better than their solid counterparts, are also evaluated.

  5. All-fiber hybrid photon-plasmon circuits: integrating nanowire plasmonics with fiber optics.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiyuan; Li, Wei; Guo, Xin; Lou, Jingyi; Tong, Limin

    2013-07-01

    We demonstrate all-fiber hybrid photon-plasmon circuits by integrating Ag nanowires with optical fibers. Relying on near-field coupling, we realize a photon-to-plasmon conversion efficiency up to 92% in a fiber-based nanowire plasmonic probe. Around optical communication band, we assemble an all-fiber resonator and a Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) with Q-factor of 6 × 10(6) and extinction ratio up to 30 dB, respectively. Using the MZI, we demonstrate fiber-compatible plasmonic sensing with high sensitivity and low optical power.

  6. Slowing surface plasmon polaritons on plasmonic coupled cavities by tuning grating grooves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Sinan; Kocabas, Askin; Kocabas, Coskun; Aydinli, Atilla

    2010-09-01

    We investigate slow surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) in plasmonic waveguiding bands formed by coupled plasmonic cavities on Moiré surfaces. We demonstrate controlling the group velocity and dispersion of the SPPs by varying the depth of the plasmonic Bragg grating groove. Changing the grating depth results in modification of coupling coefficients between the cavities and hence the SPPs group velocity is altered. Variation in the group velocity and dispersion of SPPs can be measured with polarization dependent spectroscopic reflection measurements. Dispersion of SPPs has been calculated by finite-difference time-domain method in agreement with the experimental data.

  7. Tuning surface plasmon-exciton coupling via thickness dependent plasmon damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Sinan; Kocabas, Coskun; Ates, Simge; Karademir, Ertugrul; Salihoglu, Omer; Aydinli, Atilla

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we report experimental and theoretical investigations on tuning of the surface plasmon-exciton coupling by controlling the plasmonic mode damping, which is defined by the plasmonic layer thickness. The results reveal the formation of plasmon-exciton hybrid state characterized by a tunable Rabi splitting with energies ranging from 0 to 150 meV. Polarization-dependent spectroscopic reflection measurements were employed to probe the dispersion of the coupled system. The transfer matrix method and analytical calculations were used to model the self-assembled J-aggregate/metal multilayer structures in excellent agreement with experimental observations.

  8. Overlapping neural correlates of reading emotionally positive and negative adjectives.

    PubMed

    Demirakca, Traute; Herbert, Cornelia; Kissler, Johanna; Ruf, Matthias; Wokrina, Tim; Ende, Gabriele

    2009-07-03

    Comparison of positive and negative naturally read adjectives to neutral adjectives yielded an overlapping higher BOLD response in the occipital and the orbitofrontal cortex (gyrus rectus). Superior medial frontal gyrus and posterior cingulate gyrus showed higher BOLD response to negative adjectives and inferior frontal gyrus to positive adjectives. The overlap of activated regions and lack of pronounced distinct regions supports the assumption that the processing of negative and positive words mainly takes place in overlapping brain regions.

  9. Covalent versus ionic bonding in alkalimetal fluoride oligomers.

    PubMed

    Bickelhaupt, F M; Solà, M; Guerra, C Fonseca

    2007-01-15

    The most polar bond in chemistry is that between a fluorine and an alkalimetal atom. Inspired by our recent finding that other polar bonds (C--M and H--M) have important covalent contributions (i.e., stabilization due to bond overlap), we herein address the question if covalency is also essential in the F--M bond. Thus, we have theoretically studied the alkalimetal fluoride monomers, FM, and (distorted) cubic tetramers, (FM)4, with M=Li, Na, K, and Rb, using density functional theory at the BP86/TZ2P level. Our objective is to determine how the structure and thermochemistry (e.g., F--M bond lengths and strengths, oligomerization energies, etc.) of alkalimetal fluorides depend on the metal atom, and to understand the emerging trends in terms of quantitative Kohn-Sham molecular orbital theory. The analyses confirm the extreme polarity of the F--M bond (dipole moment, Voronoi deformation density and Hirshfeld atomic charges), and they reveal that bond overlap-derived stabilization (ca. -6, -6, and -2 kcal/mol) contributes only little to the bond strength (-136, -112, and -114 kcal/mol) and the trend therein along Li, Na, and K. According to this and other criteria, the F--M bond is not only strongly polar, but also has a truly ionic bonding mechanism. Interestingly, the polarity is reduced on tetramerization. For the lithium and sodium fluoride tetramers, the F4 tetrahedron is larger than and surrounds the M4 cluster (i.e., F--F>M--M). But in the potassium and rubidium fluoride tetramers, the F4 tetrahedron is smaller than and inside the M4 cluster (i.e., F--F

  10. A new perspective on plasmonics: Confinement and propagation length of surface plasmons for different materials and geometries [A new perspective on materials for plasmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Dastmalchi, Babak; Tassin, Philippe; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, Costas M.

    2015-09-21

    Surface-plasmon polaritons are electromagnetic waves propagating on the surface of a metal. Thanks to subwavelength confinement, they can concentrate optical energy on the micrometer or even nanometer scale, enabling new applications in bio-sensing, optical interconnects, and nonlinear optics, where small footprint and strong field concentration are essential. The major obstacle in developing plasmonic applications is dissipative loss, which limits the propagation length of surface plasmons and broadens the bandwidth of surface-plasmon resonances. Here, a new analysis of plasmonic materials and geometries is presented which fully considers the tradeoff between propagation length and degree of confinement. It is based on a two-dimensional analysis of two independent figures of merit and the analysis is applied to relevant plasmonic materials, e.g., noble metals, aluminum, silicon carbide, doped semiconductors, graphene, etc. Furthermore, the analysis provides guidance on how to improve the performance of any particular plasmonic application and substantially eases the selection of the plasmonic material.

  11. Plasmonic interferometry: Probing launching dipoles in scanning-probe plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollet, Oriane; Bachelier, Guillaume; Genet, Cyriaque; Huant, Serge; Drezet, Aurélien

    2014-03-01

    We develop a semi-analytical method for analyzing surface plasmon interferometry using scanning-probe tips as SP launchers. We apply our approach to Young double-hole interferometry experiments in a scanning tunneling microscope discussed recently in the literature as well as to new experiments—reported here—with an aperture near-field scanning optical microscope source positioned near a ring-like aperture slit in a thick gold film. In both experimental configurations, the agreement between experiments and model is very good. Our work reveals the role of the launching dipole orientations and magnetic versus electric dipole contributions to the interference imaging process. It also stresses the different orientations of the effective dipoles associated with the two different scanning-probe techniques.

  12. Intracellular pH-Induced Tip-to-Tip Assembly of Gold Nanorods for Enhanced Plasmonic Photothermal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The search for efficient plasmonic photothermal therapies using nonharmful pulse laser irradiation at the near-infrared (NIR) is fundamental for biomedical cancer research. Therefore, the development of novel assembled plasmonic gold nanostructures with the aim of reducing the applied laser power density to a minimum through hot-spot-mediated cell photothermolysis is an ongoing challenge. We demonstrate that gold nanorods (Au NRs) functionalized at their tips with a pH-sensitive ligand assemble into oligomers within cell lysosomes through hydrogen-bonding attractive interactions. The unique intracellular features of the plasmonic oligomers allow us to significantly reduce the femtosecond laser power density and Au NR dose while still achieving excellent cell killing rates. The formation of gold tip-to-tip oligomers with longitudinal localized surface plasmon resonance bands at the NIR, obtained from low-aspect-ratio Au NRs close in resonance with 800 nm Ti:sapphire 90 fs laser pulses, was found to be the key parameter for realizing the enhanced plasmonic photothermal therapy. PMID:27713930

  13. Bonding thermoplastic polymers

    DOEpatents

    Wallow, Thomas I.; Hunter, Marion C.; Krafcik, Karen Lee; Morales, Alfredo M.; Simmons, Blake A.; Domeier, Linda A.

    2008-06-24

    We demonstrate a new method for joining patterned thermoplastic parts into layered structures. The method takes advantage of case-II permeant diffusion to generate dimensionally controlled, activated bonding layers at the surfaces being joined. It is capable of producing bonds characterized by cohesive failure while preserving the fidelity of patterned features in the bonding surfaces. This approach is uniquely suited to production of microfluidic multilayer structures, as it allows the bond-forming interface between plastic parts to be precisely manipulated at micrometer length scales. The bond enhancing procedure is easily integrated in standard process flows and requires no specialized equipment.

  14. Thermoelectric detection and imaging of propagating graphene plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundeberg, Mark B.; Gao, Yuanda; Woessner, Achim; Tan, Cheng; Alonso-González, Pablo; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Hone, James; Hillenbrand, Rainer; Koppens, Frank H. L.

    2016-09-01

    Controlling, detecting and generating propagating plasmons by all-electrical means is at the heart of on-chip nano-optical processing. Graphene carries long-lived plasmons that are extremely confined and controllable by electrostatic fields; however, electrical detection of propagating plasmons in graphene has not yet been realized. Here, we present an all-graphene mid-infrared plasmon detector operating at room temperature, where a single graphene sheet serves simultaneously as the plasmonic medium and detector. Rather than achieving detection via added optoelectronic materials, as is typically done in other plasmonic systems, our device converts the natural decay product of the plasmon--electronic heat--directly into a voltage through the thermoelectric effect. We employ two local gates to fully tune the thermoelectric and plasmonic behaviour of the graphene. High-resolution real-space photocurrent maps are used to investigate the plasmon propagation and interference, decay, thermal diffusion, and thermoelectric generation.

  15. Thermoelectric detection and imaging of propagating graphene plasmons.

    PubMed

    Lundeberg, Mark B; Gao, Yuanda; Woessner, Achim; Tan, Cheng; Alonso-González, Pablo; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Hone, James; Hillenbrand, Rainer; Koppens, Frank H L

    2017-02-01

    Controlling, detecting and generating propagating plasmons by all-electrical means is at the heart of on-chip nano-optical processing. Graphene carries long-lived plasmons that are extremely confined and controllable by electrostatic fields; however, electrical detection of propagating plasmons in graphene has not yet been realized. Here, we present an all-graphene mid-infrared plasmon detector operating at room temperature, where a single graphene sheet serves simultaneously as the plasmonic medium and detector. Rather than achieving detection via added optoelectronic materials, as is typically done in other plasmonic systems, our device converts the natural decay product of the plasmon-electronic heat-directly into a voltage through the thermoelectric effect. We employ two local gates to fully tune the thermoelectric and plasmonic behaviour of the graphene. High-resolution real-space photocurrent maps are used to investigate the plasmon propagation and interference, decay, thermal diffusion, and thermoelectric generation.

  16. Simple Bond Cleavage

    SciTech Connect

    Gary S. Groenewold

    2005-08-01

    Simple bond cleavage is a class of fragmentation reactions in which a single bond is broken, without formation of new bonds between previously unconnected atoms. Because no bond making is involved, simple bond cleavages are endothermic, and activation energies are generally higher than for rearrangement eliminations. The rate of simple bond cleavage reactions is a strong function of the internal energy of the molecular ion, which reflects a loose transition state that resembles reaction products, and has a high density of accessible states. For this reason, simple bond cleavages tend to dominate fragmentation reactions for highly energized molecular ions. Simple bond cleavages have negligible reverse activation energy, and hence they are used as valuable probes of ion thermochemistry, since the energy dependence of the reactions can be related to the bond energy. In organic mass spectrometry, simple bond cleavages of odd electron ions can be either homolytic or heterolytic, depending on whether the fragmentation is driven by the radical site or the charge site. Simple bond cleavages of even electron ions tend to be heterolytic, producing even electron product ions and neutrals.

  17. Hydrogen multicentre bonds.

    PubMed

    Janotti, Anderson; Van de Walle, Chris G

    2007-01-01

    The concept of a chemical bond stands out as a major development in the process of understanding how atoms are held together in molecules and solids. Lewis' classical picture of chemical bonds as shared-electron pairs evolved to the quantum-mechanical valence-bond and molecular-orbital theories, and the classification of molecules and solids in terms of their bonding type: covalent, ionic, van der Waals and metallic. Along with the more complex hydrogen bonds and three-centre bonds, they form a paradigm within which the structure of almost all molecules and solids can be understood. Here, we present evidence for hydrogen multicentre bonds-a generalization of three-centre bonds-in which a hydrogen atom equally bonds to four or more other atoms. When substituting for oxygen in metal oxides, hydrogen bonds equally to all the surrounding metal atoms, becoming fourfold coordinated in ZnO, and sixfold coordinated in MgO. These multicentre bonds are remarkably strong despite their large hydrogen-metal distances. The calculated local vibration mode frequency in MgO agrees with infrared spectroscopy measurements. Multicoordinated hydrogen also explains the dependence of electrical conductivity on oxygen partial pressure, resolving a long-standing controversy on the role of point defects in unintentional n-type conductivity of ZnO (refs 8-10).

  18. Parasitic antenna effect in terahertz plasmon detector array for real-time imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jong-Ryul; Lee, Woo-Jae; Ryu, Min Woo; Rok Kim, Kyung; Han, Seong-Tae

    2015-10-01

    The performance uniformity of each pixel integrated with a patch antenna in a terahertz plasmon detector array is very important in building the large array necessary for a real-time imaging system. We found a parasitic antenna effect in the terahertz plasmon detector whose response is dependent on the position of the detector pixel in the illumination area of the terahertz beam. It was also demonstrated that the parasitic antenna effect is attributed to the physical structure consisting of signal pads, bonding wires, and interconnection lines on a chip and a printed circuit board. Experimental results show that the performance of the detector pixel is determined by the sum of the effects of each parasitic antenna and the on-chip integrated antenna designed to detect signals at the operating frequency. The parasitic antenna effect can be minimized by blocking the interconnections with a metallic shield.

  19. A plasmonic perfect absorber enhanced longwave infrared quantum dot infrared photodetector with high quantum efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xuejun; Vaillancourt, Jarrod; Gu, Guiru

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we report a quantum dot infrared photodetector (QDIP) embedded in a plasmonic perfect absorber (PPA) cavity designed at the plasmonic resonant wavelength of 8.2 µm. The reflection spectra and the electric-field are simulated and found to have strong confinement at the resonant wavelength. The QDIP embedded in the PPA cavity was fabricated using our flip-chip bonding and fan-out reading based fabrication process. Strong photocurrent enhancement is observed at the resonant wavelength. Due to the PPA enhancement, a high quantum efficiency (QE) of 50% is achieved. The high QE QDIP demonstration indicates that the PPA enhancement is a promising approach to achieve high QE in QDIPs.

  20. Plasmonics for extreme light concentration and manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuller, Jon A.; Barnard, Edward S.; Cai, Wenshan; Jun, Young Chul; White, Justin S.; Brongersma, Mark L.

    2010-03-01

    The unprecedented ability of nanometallic (that is, plasmonic) structures to concentrate light into deep-subwavelength volumes has propelled their use in a vast array of nanophotonics technologies and research endeavours. Plasmonic light concentrators can elegantly interface diffraction-limited dielectric optical components with nanophotonic structures. Passive and active plasmonic devices provide new pathways to generate, guide, modulate and detect light with structures that are similar in size to state-of-the-art electronic devices. With the ability to produce highly confined optical fields, the conventional rules for light-matter interactions need to be re-examined, and researchers are venturing into new regimes of optical physics. In this review we will discuss the basic concepts behind plasmonics-enabled light concentration and manipulation, make an attempt to capture the wide range of activities and excitement in this area, and speculate on possible future directions.

  1. Fractional tunnelling resonance in plasmonic media

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ji-Hun; -Han Park, Q.

    2013-01-01

    Metals can transmit light by tunnelling when they possess skin-depth thickness. Tunnelling can be resonantly enhanced if resonators are added to each side of a metal film, such as additional dielectric layers or periodic structures on a metal surface. Here we show that, even with no additional resonators, tunnelling resonance can arise if the metal film is confined and fractionally thin. In a slit waveguide filled with a negative permittivity metallic slab of thickness L, resonance is shown to arise at fractional thicknesses (L = Const./m; m = 1,2,3,…) by the excitation of ‘vortex plasmons'. We experimentally demonstrate fractional tunnelling resonance and vortex plasmons using microwave and negative permittivity metamaterials. The measured spectral peaks of the fractional tunnelling resonance and modes of the vortex plasmons agree with theoretical predictions. Fractional tunnelling resonance and vortex plasmons open new perspectives in resonance physics and promise potential applications in nanotechnology. PMID:23939460

  2. Plasmonic nanoparticle scattering for color holograms

    PubMed Central

    Montelongo, Yunuen; Tenorio-Pearl, Jaime Oscar; Williams, Calum; Zhang, Shuang; Milne, William Ireland; Wilkinson, Timothy David

    2014-01-01

    This work presents an original approach to create holograms based on the optical scattering of plasmonic nanoparticles. By analogy to the diffraction produced by the scattering of atoms in X-ray crystallography, we show that plasmonic nanoparticles can produce a wave-front reconstruction when they are sampled on a diffractive plane. By applying this method, all of the scattering characteristics of the nanoparticles are transferred to the reconstructed field. Hence, we demonstrate that a narrow-band reconstruction can be achieved for direct white light illumination on an array of plasmonic nanoparticles. Furthermore, multicolor capabilities are shown with minimal cross-talk by multiplexing different plasmonic nanoparticles at subwavelength distances. The holograms were fabricated from a single subwavelength thin film of silver and demonstrate that the total amount of binary information stored in the plane can exceed the limits of diffraction and that this wavelength modulation can be detected optically in the far field. PMID:25122675

  3. Subwavelength Nanopatch Cavities for Semiconductor Plasmon Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manolatou, Christina; Rana, Farhan

    2008-05-01

    We propose and analyze a family of nanoscale cavities for electrically-pumped surface-emitting semiconductor lasers that use surface plasmons to provide optical mode confinement in cavities which have dimensions in the 100-300 nm range. The proposed laser cavities are in many ways nanoscale optical versions of micropatch antennas that are commonly used at microwave/RF frequencies. Surface plasmons are not only used for mode confinement but also for output beam shaping to realize single-lobe far-field radiation patterns with narrow beam waists from subwavelength size cavities. We identify the cavity modes with the largest quality factors and modal gain, and show that in the near-IR wavelength range (1.0-1.6 microns) cavity losses (including surface plasmon losses) can be compensated by the strong mode confinement in the gain region provided by the surface plasmons themselves and the required material threshold gain values can be smaller than 700 1/cm.

  4. Theory of spoof plasmons in real metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusina, Anastasia; Durach, Maxim; Stockman, Mark I.

    2010-08-01

    In this Letter we develop a theory of spoof plasmons propagating on real metals perforated with planar periodic grooves. Deviation from the spoof plasmons on perfect conductor due to finite skin depth has been analytically described. This allowed us to investigate important propagation characteristics of spoof plasmons such as quality factor and propagation length as the function of the geometrical parameters of the structure. We have also considered THz field confinement by adiabatic increase of the depth of the grooves. It is shown that the finite skin depth limits the propagation length of spoof plasmons as well as a possibility to localize THz field. Geometrical parameters of the structure are found which provide optimal guiding and localization of THz energy.

  5. Multimodal plasmonics in fused colloidal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teulle, Alexandre; Bosman, Michel; Girard, Christian; Gurunatha, Kargal L.; Li, Mei; Mann, Stephen; Dujardin, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Harnessing the optical properties of noble metals down to the nanometre scale is a key step towards fast and low-dissipative information processing. At the 10-nm length scale, metal crystallinity and patterning as well as probing of surface plasmon properties must be controlled with a challenging high level of precision. Here, we demonstrate that ultimate lateral confinement and delocalization of surface plasmon modes are simultaneously achieved in extended self-assembled networks comprising linear chains of partially fused gold nanoparticles. The spectral and spatial distributions of the surface plasmon modes associated with the colloidal superstructures are evidenced by performing monochromated electron energy-loss spectroscopy with a nanometre-sized electron probe. We prepare the metallic bead strings by electron-beam-induced interparticle fusion of nanoparticle networks. The fused superstructures retain the native morphology and crystallinity but develop very low-energy surface plasmon modes that are capable of supporting long-range and spectrally tunable propagation in nanoscale waveguides.

  6. Terahertz optoelectronics with surface plasmon polariton diode.

    PubMed

    Vinnakota, Raj K; Genov, Dentcho A

    2014-05-09

    The field of plasmonics has experience a renaissance in recent years by providing a large variety of new physical effects and applications. Surface plasmon polaritons, i.e. the collective electron oscillations at the interface of a metal/semiconductor and a dielectric, may bridge the gap between electronic and photonic devices, provided a fast switching mechanism is identified. Here, we demonstrate a surface plasmon-polariton diode (SPPD) an optoelectronic switch that can operate at exceedingly large signal modulation rates. The SPPD uses heavily doped p-n junction where surface plasmon polaritons propagate at the interface between n and p-type GaAs and can be switched by an external voltage. The devices can operate at transmission modulation higher than 98% and depending on the doping and applied voltage can achieve switching rates of up to 1 THz. The proposed switch is compatible with the current semiconductor fabrication techniques and could lead to nanoscale semiconductor-based optoelectronics.

  7. Wireless communication system via nanoscale plasmonic antennas.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Juan M; Nesbitt, Nathan T; Calm, Yitzi M; Rose, Aaron H; D'Imperio, Luke; Yang, Chaobin; Naughton, Jeffrey R; Burns, Michael J; Kempa, Krzysztof; Naughton, Michael J

    2016-08-24

    Present on-chip optical communication technology uses near-infrared light, but visible wavelengths would allow system miniaturization and higher energy confinement. Towards this end, we report a nanoscale wireless communication system that operates at visible wavelengths via in-plane information transmission. Here, plasmonic antenna radiation mediates a three-step conversion process (surface plasmon → photon → surface plasmon) with in-plane efficiency (plasmon → plasmon) of 38% for antenna separation 4λ0 (with λ0 the free-space excitation wavelength). Information transmission is demonstrated at bandwidths in the Hz and MHz ranges. This work opens the possibility of optical conveyance of information using plasmonic antennas for on-chip communication technology.

  8. Wireless communication system via nanoscale plasmonic antennas

    PubMed Central

    Merlo, Juan M.; Nesbitt, Nathan T.; Calm, Yitzi M.; Rose, Aaron H.; D’Imperio, Luke; Yang, Chaobin; Naughton, Jeffrey R.; Burns, Michael J.; Kempa, Krzysztof; Naughton, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Present on-chip optical communication technology uses near-infrared light, but visible wavelengths would allow system miniaturization and higher energy confinement. Towards this end, we report a nanoscale wireless communication system that operates at visible wavelengths via in-plane information transmission. Here, plasmonic antenna radiation mediates a three-step conversion process (surface plasmon → photon → surface plasmon) with in-plane efficiency (plasmon → plasmon) of 38% for antenna separation 4λ0 (with λ0 the free-space excitation wavelength). Information transmission is demonstrated at bandwidths in the Hz and MHz ranges. This work opens the possibility of optical conveyance of information using plasmonic antennas for on-chip communication technology. PMID:27555451

  9. Chiral magnetic plasmons in anomalous relativistic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbar, E. V.; Miransky, V. A.; Shovkovy, I. A.; Sukhachov, P. O.

    2017-03-01

    The chiral plasmon modes of relativistic matter in background magnetic and strain-induced pseudomagnetic fields are studied in detail using the consistent chiral kinetic theory. The results reveal a number of anomalous features of these chiral magnetic and pseudomagnetic plasmons that could be used to identify them in experiment. In a system with nonzero electric (chiral) chemical potential, the background magnetic (pseudomagnetic) fields not only modify the values of the plasmon frequencies in the long-wavelength limit, but also affect the qualitative dependence on the wave vector. Similar modifications can be also induced by the chiral shift parameter in Weyl materials. Interestingly, even in the absence of the chiral shift and external fields, the chiral chemical potential alone leads to a splitting of plasmon energies at linear order in the wave vector.

  10. Thermal energy harvesting plasmonic based chemical sensors.

    PubMed

    Karker, Nicholas; Dharmalingam, Gnanaprakash; Carpenter, Michael A

    2014-10-28

    Detection of gases such as H2, CO, and NO2 at 500 °C or greater requires materials with thermal stability and reliability. One of the major barriers toward integration of plasmonic-based chemical sensors is the requirement of multiple components such as light sources and spectrometers. In this work, plasmonic sensing results are presented where thermal energy is harvested using lithographically patterned Au nanorods, replacing the need for an external incident light source. Gas sensing results using the harvested thermal energy are in good agreement with sensing experiments, which used an external incident light source. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to reduce the wavelength parameter space from 665 variables down to 4 variables with similar levels of demonstrated selectivity. The combination of a plasmonic-based energy harvesting sensing paradigm with PCA analysis offers a novel path toward simplification and integration of plasmonic-based sensing methods.

  11. Spatial filtering by using cascading plasmonic gratings.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chih-Ming; Chang, Yia-Chung; Tsai, Din Ping

    2009-04-13

    In this study, the optical properties of a plasmonic multilayer structure, consisting of two longitudinally cascaded gratings with a half pitch off-set, are investigated. The proposed structure, which is a system mixing extended and localized surface plasmon, forms transversely cascaded metal/insulator/metal cavities. The angle dependent reflection spectrum of the proposed structure displays a resonance peak at a specific angle. The full-width at half maximum (FWHM) of the resonant peak is smaller than 3 degrees. The angular dispersion of the cascading plasmonic gratings is about d theta/d lambda =0.15 degrees/nm. The cascading plasmonic gratings can be used as a spatial filter to improve the spatial coherence of a light source.

  12. Plasmonic films based on colloidal lithography.

    PubMed

    Ai, Bin; Yu, Ye; Möhwald, Helmuth; Zhang, Gang; Yang, Bai

    2014-04-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in the field of plasmonic films fabricated by colloidal lithography. Compared with conventional lithography techniques such as electron beam lithography and focused ion beam lithography, the unconventional colloidal lithography technique with advantages of low-cost and high-throughput has made the fabrication process more efficient, and moreover brought out novel films that show remarkable surface plasmon features. These plasmonic films include those with nanohole arrays, nanovoid arrays and nanoshell arrays with precisely controlled shapes, sizes, and spacing. Based on these novel nanostructures, optical and sensing performances can be greatly enhanced. The introduction of colloidal lithography provides not only efficient fabrication processes but also plasmonic films with unique nanostructures, which are difficult to be fabricated by conventional lithography techniques.

  13. Self-excitation of surface plasmon polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordo, V. G.

    2016-04-01

    The novel effect of self-excitation of surface plasmons (SESP) in a plasmonic nanocavity is predicted, and its theory is developed from first principles. It is assumed that the cavity is formed by a nanogap between two metals and contains polarizable inclusions. Basing on the dyadic Green's function of the structure, the equations for the field in the cavity are investigated. It is shown that under certain conditions the field becomes unstable that leads to its self-excitation. The threshold criterion for self-excitation as well as the frequency of self-oscillation are derived in an analytical form. The SESP effect is explained in terms of a positive feedback for the polarization of inclusions provided by the field reflected from the cavity walls. These findings suggest a principally new avenue to surface plasmon generation which does not employ stimulated emission and is different from SPASER or plasmon laser.

  14. Plasmonic nanoprobes for SERS biosensing and bioimaging

    PubMed Central

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Wang, Hsin-Neng; Scaffidi, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the development and application of plasmonic nanoprobes developed in our laboratory for biosensing and bioimaging. We describe the use of plasmonics surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) gene probes for the detection of diseases using DNA hybridization to target biospecies (HIV gene, breast cancer genes etc.). For molecular imaging, we describe a hyperspectral surface-enhanced Raman imaging (HSERI) system that combines imaging capabilities with SERS detection to identify cellular components using Raman dye-labeled silver nanoparticles in cellular systems The detection of specific target DNA sequences associated with breast cancer using “molecular sentinel” nanoprobes and the use of a plasmonic nanosensor to monitor pH in single cells are presented and discussed. Plasmonic nanosensors and nanoprobes have been developed as sensitive and selective tolls for environmental monitoring, cellular biosensing, medical diagnostics and high throughput screnning. PMID:19517422

  15. Plasmon damping in graphene out of equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhiyuan; Basov, Dimitri; Fogler, Michael

    Motivated by recent experiments with graphene under high photoexcitation, we study theoretically plasmons of graphene in the two-temperature regime, i.e., the regime where electrons are much hotter than the lattice. We calculate the plasmon damping due to scattering of electrons by acoustic phonons, which is the dominant intrinsic contribution in clean graphene. As the system relaxes to equilibrium, the plasmon frequency adiabatically changes with time. We show that this causes a partial compensation of the plasmon damping. A similar mechanism may apply to another collective mode (the energy wave) predicted to exist in graphene in the low-frequency hydrodynamic regime. Implications for infrared and THz pump-probe experiments are discussed.

  16. Focused plasmonic trapping of metallic particles

    PubMed Central

    Min, Changjun; Shen, Zhe; Shen, Junfeng; Zhang, Yuquan; Fang, Hui; Yuan, Guanghui; Du, Luping; Zhu, Siwei; Lei, Ting; Yuan, Xiaocong

    2013-01-01

    Scattering forces in focused light beams push away metallic particles. Thus, trapping metallic particles with conventional optical tweezers, especially those of Mie particle size, is difficult. Here we investigate a mechanism by which metallic particles are attracted and trapped by plasmonic tweezers when surface plasmons are excited and focused by a radially polarized beam in a high-numerical-aperture microscopic configuration. This contrasts the repulsion exerted in optical tweezers with the same configuration. We believe that different types of forces exerted on particles are responsible for this contrary trapping behaviour. Further, trapping with plasmonic tweezers is found not to be due to a gradient force balancing an opposing scattering force but results from the sum of both gradient and scattering forces acting in the same direction established by the strong coupling between the metallic particle and the highly focused plasmonic field. Theoretical analysis and simulations yield good agreement with experimental results. PMID:24305554

  17. Wireless communication system via nanoscale plasmonic antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlo, Juan M.; Nesbitt, Nathan T.; Calm, Yitzi M.; Rose, Aaron H.; D'Imperio, Luke; Yang, Chaobin; Naughton, Jeffrey R.; Burns, Michael J.; Kempa, Krzysztof; Naughton, Michael J.

    2016-08-01

    Present on-chip optical communication technology uses near-infrared light, but visible wavelengths would allow system miniaturization and higher energy confinement. Towards this end, we report a nanoscale wireless communication system that operates at visible wavelengths via in-plane information transmission. Here, plasmonic antenna radiation mediates a three-step conversion process (surface plasmon → photon → surface plasmon) with in-plane efficiency (plasmon → plasmon) of 38% for antenna separation 4λ0 (with λ0 the free-space excitation wavelength). Information transmission is demonstrated at bandwidths in the Hz and MHz ranges. This work opens the possibility of optical conveyance of information using plasmonic antennas for on-chip communication technology.

  18. Microcavity surface plasmon resonance bio-sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosavian, Nazanin

    This work discusses a miniature surface plasmon biosensor which uses a dielectric sub- micron diameter core with gold spherical shell. The shell has a subwavelength nanoaperture believed to excite stationary plasmon resonances at the biosensor's surface. The sub-micron cavity enhances the measurement sensitivity of molecules binding to the sensor surface. We used visible-range optical spectroscopy to study the wavelength shift as bio-molecules absorbed-desorbed at the shell surface. We also used Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Focused Ion Beam (FIB) ablation to study the characteristics of microcavity surface plasmon resonance sensor (MSPRS) and the inner structure formed with metal deposition and its spectrum. We found that resonances at 580 nm and 670 nm responded to bound test agents and that Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) sensor intensity could be used to differentiate between D-glucose and L-glucose. The responsiveness of the system depended upon the mechanical integrity of the metallic surface coating.

  19. Triple plasmon resonance of bimetal nanoshell

    SciTech Connect

    Shirzaditabar, Farzad; Saliminasab, Maryam; Arghavani Nia, Borhan

    2014-07-15

    In this paper, light absorption spectra properties of a bimetal multilayer nanoshell based on quasi-static approach are investigated. Comparing with silver-dielectric-silver and silver-dielectric-gold nanoshells, gold-dielectric-silver nanoshells have three intense and separated plasmon peaks which are more suitable for multiplex biosensing. Calculations show that relatively small thickness of outer silver shell and large dielectric constant of middle dielectric layer of gold-dielectric-silver nanoshell are suitable to obtain the triple plasmon resonance.

  20. Enhanced light trapping using plasmonic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manai, L.; Dridi Rezgui, B.; Bou, A.; Barakel, D.; Torchio, P.; Benabderrahmane Zaghouani, R.; Palais, O.; Bessais, B.

    2015-04-01

    Plasmonics is a new light trapping method used in photovoltaic (PV) solar cells. A significant enhancement of the scattered and absorbed incident light due to the use of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) was observed, which yield to the exaltation of the electromagnetic field in the vicinity of these NPs. In this context, we investigate optically and morphologically the effect of the NPs size dependence on the localized surface plasmon resonance. Extinction, absorption and scattering cross sections are calculated using Mie theory.

  1. Chiral Plasmonic Nanostructures on Achiral Nanopillars

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-10

    0704-0188 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) - UU UU UU UU Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Chiral Plasmonic Nanostructures on Achiral...Nanopillars Chirality of plasmonic films can be strongly enhanced by threedimensional (3D) out-of-plane geometries. The complexity of lithographic...methods currently used to produce such structures and other methods utilizing chiral templates impose limitations on spectral windows of chiroptical

  2. Plasmon-mediated energy relaxation in graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Ferry, D. K.; Somphonsane, R.; Ramamoorthy, H.; Bird, J. P.

    2015-12-28

    Energy relaxation of hot carriers in graphene is studied at low temperatures, where the loss rate may differ significantly from that predicted for electron-phonon interactions. We show here that plasmons, important in the relaxation of energetic carriers in bulk semiconductors, can also provide a pathway for energy relaxation in transport experiments in graphene. We obtain a total loss rate to plasmons that results in energy relaxation times whose dependence on temperature and density closely matches that found experimentally.

  3. Triple plasmon resonance of bimetal nanoshell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirzaditabar, Farzad; Saliminasab, Maryam; Arghavani Nia, Borhan

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, light absorption spectra properties of a bimetal multilayer nanoshell based on quasi-static approach are investigated. Comparing with silver-dielectric-silver and silver-dielectric-gold nanoshells, gold-dielectric-silver nanoshells have three intense and separated plasmon peaks which are more suitable for multiplex biosensing. Calculations show that relatively small thickness of outer silver shell and large dielectric constant of middle dielectric layer of gold-dielectric-silver nanoshell are suitable to obtain the triple plasmon resonance.

  4. Nonlinear plasmonics at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivan, Yonatan; Chu, Shi-Wei

    2017-01-01

    We solve the Maxwell and heat equations self-consistently for metal nanoparticles under intense continuous wave (CW) illumination. Unlike previous studies, we rely on experimentally-measured data for metal permittivity for increasing temperature and for the visible spectral range. We show that the thermal nonlinearity of the metal can lead to substantial deviations from the predictions of the linear model for the temperature and field distribution and, thus, can explain qualitatively the strong nonlinear scattering from such configurations observed experimentally. We also show that the incompleteness of existing data of the temperature dependence of the thermal properties of the system prevents reaching a quantitative agreement between the measured and calculated scattering data. This modeling approach is essential for the identification of the underlying physical mechanism responsible for the thermo-optical nonlinearity of the metal and should be adopted in all applications of high-temperature nonlinear plasmonics, especially for refractory metals, for both CW and pulsed illumination.

  5. Nonlinear plasmonics at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivan, Yonatan; Chu, Shi-Wei

    2016-10-01

    We solve the Maxwell and heat equations self-consistently for metal nanoparticles under intense continuous wave (CW) illumination. Unlike previous studies, we rely on experimentally-measured data for metal permittivity for increasing temperature and for the visible spectral range. We show that the thermal nonlinearity of the metal can lead to substantial deviations from the predictions of the linear model for the temperature and field distribution and, thus, can explain qualitatively the strong nonlinear scattering from such configurations observed experimentally. We also show that the incompleteness of existing data of the temperature dependence of the thermal properties of the system prevents reaching a quantitative agreement between the measured and calculated scattering data. This modeling approach is essential for the identification of the underlying physical mechanism responsible for the thermo-optical nonlinearity of the metal and should be adopted in all applications of high-temperature nonlinear plasmonics, especially for refractory metals, for both CW and pulsed illumination.

  6. Temperature effect on acoustic plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silkin, V. M.; Nazarov, V. U.; Balassis, A.; Chernov, I. P.; Chulkov, E. V.

    2016-10-01

    The presence of several kinds of carriers at the Fermi surface results in interesting complex dielectric properties of the bulk Pd in the low-energy excitation range. A most spectacular manifestation of this is the presence of a collective electronic excitation characterized by a soundlike dispersion, termed acoustic plasmon (AP). Due to the characteristic dispersion reaching zero energy in the long-wavelength limit, the question of the thermal stability of the excitation spectrum arises. In this work we explore this problem investigating the thermal effect on the electronic excitation spectrum in this material, tracing how the AP properties vary with the temperature increase. The main effect consists in the gradual destruction of AP in the energy range corresponding to the temperature.

  7. Revealing Nanostructures through Plasmon Polarimetry.

    PubMed

    Kleemann, Marie-Elena; Mertens, Jan; Zheng, Xuezhi; Cormier, Sean; Turek, Vladimir; Benz, Felix; Chikkaraddy, Rohit; Deacon, William; Lombardi, Anna; Moshchalkov, Victor V; Vandenbosch, Guy A E; Baumberg, Jeremy J

    2017-01-24

    Polarized optical dark-field spectroscopy is shown to be a versatile noninvasive probe of plasmonic structures that trap light to the nanoscale. Clear spectral polarization splittings are found to be directly related to the asymmetric morphology of nanocavities formed between faceted gold nanoparticles and an underlying gold substrate. Both experiment and simulation show the influence of geometry on the coupled system, with spectral shifts Δλ = 3 nm from single atoms. Analytical models allow us to identify the split resonances as transverse cavity modes, tightly confined to the nanogap. The direct correlation of resonance splitting with atomistic morphology allows mapping of subnanometre structures, which is crucial for progress in extreme nano-optics involving chemistry, nanophotonics, and quantum devices.

  8. Domain overlap matrices from plane-wave-based methods of electronic structure calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golub, Pavlo; Baranov, Alexey I.

    2016-10-01

    Plane waves are one of the most popular and efficient basis sets for electronic structure calculations of solids; however, their delocalized nature makes it difficult to employ for them classical orbital-based methods of chemical bonding analysis. The quantum chemical topology approach, introducing chemical concepts via partitioning of real space into chemically meaningful domains, has no difficulties with plane-wave-based basis sets. Many popular tools employed within this approach, for instance delocalization indices, need overlap integrals over these domains—the elements of the so called domain overlap matrices. This article reports an efficient algorithm for evaluation of domain overlap matrix elements for plane-wave-based calculations as well as evaluation of its implementation for one of the most popular projector augmented wave (PAW) methods on the small set of simple and complex solids. The stability of the obtained results with respect to PAW calculation parameters has been investigated, and the comparison of the results with the results from other calculation methods has also been made.

  9. Second harmonic excitation spectroscopy in studies of Fano-type coupling in plasmonic arrays (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Gary F.; Trevino, Jacob T.; Pecora, Emanuele Francesco; Dal Negro, Luca

    2015-09-01

    Scattering by plasmon resonances of metallic nanoparticles can be tailored by particle material, size, shape, and local as well as long-range order. In this presentation we discuss a series of experiments in which long-range Fano-type coupling between grating resonances and localized surface palsmon (LSP) resonances were studied using second harmonic excitation (SH-E) spectroscopy. By tuning the excitation wavelength of a femtosecond laser and measuring the relative second harmonic (SH) signal we demonstrated that when long-range grating resonances spectrally overlap with those of the LSPs, electromagnetic field enhancement occurs on the surface of the nanoparticles leading to an increase in nonlinear scattering. This effect has been demonstrated for periodic arrays of monomers and dimers, bi-periodic antenna arrays for multi-spectral focusing to a single point, and chirped nanoparticle structures for broadband field enhancement. Results are supported by finite difference time domain simulations showing that electromagnetic fields are enhanced close on the surface of the nanoparticles when long-range structural resonances are excited. These studies have revealed design principles for engineering the interplay of photonic and plasmonic coupling for future linear and nonlinear plasmonic devices.

  10. Large tuning of narrow-beam terahertz plasmonic lasers operating at 78 K

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Chongzhao; Jin, Yuan; Reno, John L.; ...

    2016-12-19

    A new tuning mechanism is demonstrated for single-mode metal-clad plasmonic lasers, in which the refractive-index of the laser’s surrounding medium affects the resonant-cavity mode in the same vein as the refractive-index of gain medium inside the cavity. Reversible, continuous, and mode-hop-free tuning of ~57 GHz is realized for single-mode narrow-beam terahertz plasmonic quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs), which is demonstrated at a much more practical temperature of 78 K. The tuning is based on post-process deposition/etching of a dielectric (silicon-dioxide) on a QCL chip that has already been soldered and wire-bonded onto a copper mount. This is a considerably larger tuning rangemore » compared to previously reported results for terahertz QCLs with directional far-field radiation patterns. The key enabling mechanism for tuning is a recently developed antenna-feedback scheme for plasmonic lasers, which leads to the generation of hybrid surface-plasmon-polaritons propagating outside the cavity of the laser with a large spatial extent. The effect of dielectric deposition on QCL’s characteristics is investigated in detail including that on maximum operating temperature, peak output power, and far-field radiation patterns. Single-lobed beam with low divergence (<7°) is maintained through the tuning range. The antenna-feedback scheme is ideally suited for modulation of plasmonic lasers and their sensing applications due to the sensitive dependence of spectral and radiative properties of the laser on its surrounding medium.« less

  11. Large tuning of narrow-beam terahertz plasmonic lasers operating at 78 K

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chongzhao; Jin, Yuan; Reno, John L.; Kumar, Sushil

    2016-12-19

    A new tuning mechanism is demonstrated for single-mode metal-clad plasmonic lasers, in which the refractive-index of the laser’s surrounding medium affects the resonant-cavity mode in the same vein as the refractive-index of gain medium inside the cavity. Reversible, continuous, and mode-hop-free tuning of ~57 GHz is realized for single-mode narrow-beam terahertz plasmonic quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs), which is demonstrated at a much more practical temperature of 78 K. The tuning is based on post-process deposition/etching of a dielectric (silicon-dioxide) on a QCL chip that has already been soldered and wire-bonded onto a copper mount. This is a considerably larger tuning range compared to previously reported results for terahertz QCLs with directional far-field radiation patterns. The key enabling mechanism for tuning is a recently developed antenna-feedback scheme for plasmonic lasers, which leads to the generation of hybrid surface-plasmon-polaritons propagating outside the cavity of the laser with a large spatial extent. The effect of dielectric deposition on QCL’s characteristics is investigated in detail including that on maximum operating temperature, peak output power, and far-field radiation patterns. Single-lobed beam with low divergence (<7°) is maintained through the tuning range. The antenna-feedback scheme is ideally suited for modulation of plasmonic lasers and their sensing applications due to the sensitive dependence of spectral and radiative properties of the laser on its surrounding medium.

  12. Large static tuning of narrow-beam terahertz plasmonic lasers operating at 78K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chongzhao; Jin, Yuan; Reno, John L.; Kumar, Sushil

    2017-02-01

    A new tuning mechanism is demonstrated for single-mode metal-clad plasmonic lasers, in which the refractive-index of the laser's surrounding medium affects the resonant-cavity mode in the same vein as the refractive-index of gain medium inside the cavity. Reversible, continuous, and mode-hop-free tuning of ˜57 GHz is realized for single-mode narrow-beam terahertz plasmonic quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs), which is demonstrated at a much more practical temperature of 78 K . The tuning is based on post-process deposition/etching of a dielectric (silicon-dioxide) on a QCL chip that has already been soldered and wire-bonded onto a copper mount. This is a considerably larger tuning range compared to previously reported results for terahertz QCLs with directional far-field radiation patterns. The key enabling mechanism for tuning is a recently developed antenna-feedback scheme for plasmonic lasers, which leads to the generation of hybrid surface-plasmon-polaritons propagating outside the cavity of the laser with a large spatial extent. The effect of dielectric deposition on QCL's characteristics is investigated in detail including that on maximum operating temperature, peak output power, and far-field radiation patterns. Single-lobed beam with low divergence (<7° ) is maintained through the tuning range. The antenna-feedback scheme is ideally suited for modulation of plasmonic lasers and their sensing applications due to the sensitive dependence of spectral and radiative properties of the laser on its surrounding medium.

  13. Graphene active plasmonic metamaterials for new types of terahertz lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuji, Taiichi; Watanabe, Takayuki; Satou, Akira; Popov, Vyacheslav; Ryzhii, Victor

    2013-05-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in graphene active plasmonic metamaterials for new types of terahertz lasers. We theoretically discovered that when the population of Dirac Fermionic carriers in graphene are inverted by optical or electrical pumping the excitation of graphene plasmons by the THz photons results in propagating surface plasmon polaritons with giant gain in a wide THz range. Furthermore, when graphene is patterned in a micro- or nano-ribbon array by grating gate metallization, the structure acts as an active plasmonic metamaterial, providing a super-radiant plasmonic lasing with giant gain at the plasmon modes in a wide THz frequency range.

  14. Controllable and enhanced nanojet effects excited by surface plasmon polariton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Dongquan; Pei, Hanzhang; Jiang, Yongyuan; Sun, Xiudong

    2013-04-01

    Nanojet effects excited by surface plasmon polariton at the shadow-side surfaces of dielectric microdisks positioned on gold films are reported. The surface plasmon nanojet can propagate over several optical wavelengths while still maintaining a subwavelength full-width at half-maximum transverse. Due to the nature of surface plasmon wave, the electric field of the highly confined nanojet at metal-dielectric interface is enhanced by about 30 times. By varying thickness of the dielectric microdisk, the formation of surface plasmon polariton nanojet can be flexibly controlled. The surface plasmon polariton nanojet shows great promise for enhanced Raman scattering and integrated plasmonic circuits.

  15. Imaging nanowire plasmon modes with two-photon polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Gruber, Christian; Trügler, Andreas; Hohenester, Ulrich; Ditlbacher, Harald; Hohenau, Andreas; Krenn, Joachim R.; Hirzer, Andreas; Schmidt, Volker

    2015-02-23

    Metal nanowires sustain propagating surface plasmons that are strongly confined to the wire surface. Plasmon reflection at the wire end faces and interference lead to standing plasmon modes. We demonstrate that these modes can be imaged via two-photon (plasmon) polymerization of a thin film resist covering the wires and subsequent electron microscopy. Thereby, the plasmon wavelength and the phase shift of the nanowire mode picked up upon reflection can be directly retrieved. In general terms, polymerization imaging is a promising tool for the imaging of propagating plasmon modes from the nano- to micro-scale.

  16. Super-Resolution Imaging and Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Willets, Katherine A; Wilson, Andrew J; Sundaresan, Vignesh; Joshi, Padmanabh B

    2017-01-13

    This review describes the growing partnership between super-resolution imaging and plasmonics, by describing the various ways in which the two topics mutually benefit one another to enhance our understanding of the nanoscale world. First, localization-based super-resolution imaging strategies, where molecules are modulated between emissive and nonemissive states and their emission localized, are applied to plasmonic nanoparticle substrates, revealing the hidden shape of the nanoparticles while also mapping local electromagnetic field enhancements and reactivity patterns on their surface. However, these results must be interpreted carefully due to localization errors induced by the interaction between metallic substrates and single fluorophores. Second, plasmonic nanoparticles are explored as image contrast agents for both superlocalization and super-resolution imaging, offering benefits such as high photostability, large signal-to-noise, and distance-dependent spectral features but presenting challenges for localizing individual nanoparticles within a diffraction-limited spot. Finally, the use of plasmon-tailored excitation fields to achieve subdiffraction-limited spatial resolution is discussed, using localized surface plasmons and surface plasmon polaritons to create confined excitation volumes or image magnification to enhance spatial resolution.

  17. Absorption of harmonic light in plasmonic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincenti, Maria A.; de Ceglia, Domenico; Scalora, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Surface plasmons are known for their ability to provide large field enhancement at the interface between a metal and another medium. They can be observed in a variety of structures ranging from plain metallic films to nanoparticles and gratings. Thanks to their large electric field enhancement, surface plasmons have also been exploited for the enhancement of second and third harmonic generation. In fact, metals possess a relatively high third order susceptibility and, although dipole-allowed quadratic nonlinearities are not present in the bulk, they also display an effective second order response that arises from symmetry breaking at the surface, magnetic dipoles (Lorentz force), inner-core electrons, convective nonlinear sources, and electron gas pressure. While much attention has been devoted to achieve efficient excitation of surface plasmons to improve far-field harmonic generation, little or no attention has been paid to the dissipation of the generated harmonic light. Therefore, we undertake a discussion of both harmonic generation and absorption in simple metallic/dielectric interfaces with or without excitation of surface plasmons. We demonstrate that, despite the best efforts embarked upon to study plasmon excitation, the absorbed harmonic energy can far surpass the energy emitted in the far-field. These findings suggest that quantification of the absorbed harmonic light should be an important parameter in evaluating designs of plasmonic nanostructures for frequency mixing.

  18. Plasmonic nanorod absorbers as orientation sensors

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wei-Shun; Ha, Ji Won; Slaughter, Liane S.; Link, Stephan

    2010-01-01

    Nanoparticles are actively exploited as biological imaging probes. Of particular interest are gold nanoparticles because of their nonblinking and nonbleaching absorption and scattering properties that arise from the excitation of surface plasmons. Nanoparticles with anisotropic shapes furthermore provide information about the probe orientation and its environment. Here we show how the orientation of single gold nanorods (25 × 73 nm) can be determined from both the transverse and longitudinal surface plasmon resonance by using polarization-sensitive photothermal imaging. By measuring the orientation of the same nanorods separately using scanning electron microscopy, we verified the high accuracy of this plasmon-absorption-based technique. However, care had to be taken when exciting the transverse plasmon absorption using a large numerical aperture objective as out-of-plane plasmon oscillations were also excited then. For the size regime studied here, being able to establish the nanorod orientation from the transverse mode is unique to photothermal imaging and almost impossible with conventional dark-field scattering spectroscopy. This is important because the transverse surface plasmon resonance is mostly insensitive to the medium refractive index and nanorod aspect ratio allowing nanorods of any length to be used as orientation sensors without changing the laser frequency. PMID:20133646

  19. Plasmonic hydrogen sensing with nanostructured metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    Wadell, Carl; Syrenova, Svetlana; Langhammer, Christoph

    2014-12-23

    In this review, we discuss the evolution of localized surface plasmon resonance and surface plasmon resonance hydrogen sensors based on nanostructured metal hydrides, which has accelerated significantly during the past 5 years. We put particular focus on how, conceptually, plasmonic resonances can be used to study metal-hydrogen interactions at the nanoscale, both at the ensemble and at the single-nanoparticle level. Such efforts are motivated by a fundamental interest in understanding the role of nanosizing on metal hydride formation processes in the quest to develop efficient solid-state hydrogen storage materials with fast response times, reasonable thermodynamics, and acceptable long-term stability. Therefore, a brief introduction to the thermodynamics of metal hydride formation is also given. However, plasmonic hydrogen sensors not only are of academic interest as research tool in materials science but also are predicted to find more practical use as all-optical gas detectors in industrial and medical applications, as well as in a future hydrogen economy, where hydrogen is used as a carbon free energy carrier. Therefore, the wide range of different plasmonic hydrogen sensor designs already available is reviewed together with theoretical efforts to understand their fundamentals and optimize their performance in terms of sensitivity. In this context, we also highlight important challenges to be addressed in the future to take plasmonic hydrogen sensors from the laboratory to real applications in devices, including poisoning/deactivation of the active materials, sensor lifetime, and cross-sensitivity toward other gas species.

  20. Yttrium hydride nanoantennas for active plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohfeldt, Nikolai; Tittl, Andreas; Schäferling, Martin; Neubrech, Frank; Kreibig, Uwe; Griessen, Ronald; Giessen, Harald

    2014-09-01

    A key challenge for the development of active plasmonic nanodevices is the lack of materials with fully controllable plasmonic properties. In this work, we demonstrate that a plasmonic resonance in top-down nanofabricated yttrium antennas can be completely and reversibly turned on and off using hydrogen exposure. We fabricate arrays of yttrium nanorods and optically observe in extinction spectra the hydrogen-induced phase transition between the metallic yttrium dihydride and the insulating trihydride. Whereas the yttrium dihydride nanostructures exhibit a pronounced particle plasmon resonance, the transition to yttrium trihydride leads to a complete vanishing of the resonant behavior. The plasmonic resonance in the dihydride state can be tuned over a wide wavelength range by simply varying the size of the nanostructures. Furthermore, we develop an analytical diffusion model to explain the temporal behaviour of the hydrogen loading and unloading process observed in our experiments and gain information about the thermodynamics of our device. Thus, our nanorod system serves as a versatile basic building block for active plasmonic devices ranging from switchable perfect absorbers to active local heating control elements.