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Sample records for bond strength testing

  1. Validity of bond strength tests: A critical review: Part I

    PubMed Central

    Sirisha, Kantheti; Rambabu, Tankonda; Shankar, Yalavarthi Ravi; Ravikumar, Pabbati

    2014-01-01

    Adhesive systems are selected based on their bond strengths achieved while testing in laboratories. These bond strengths can predict the longevity of a restoration to some extent. There were several discrepancies in the reported bond strengths. To critically review the reliability of macro-bond strength tests used to evaluate resin-tooth interface. Relevant literature published between January 1983 and May 2013 was collected from PubMed database, Google scholar, and hand-searched journals of Conservative Dentistry, Endodontics and Dental materials. Variables that influence the test outcome are categorized into substrate-related factors, factors related to specimen properties, preparation of specimens, and test methodology. Impact of these variables on the test outcome is critically analyzed. There is lack of a standard format for reporting the bond strength tests, which could lead to misinterpretation of the data and bonding abilities of adhesives. PMID:25125840

  2. Bond strength testing--what does it mean?

    PubMed

    Oilo, G

    1993-10-01

    In this paper, bond strength and various important factors in bond strength testing are discussed as well as the limitations in the interpretation and clinical relevance of such tests. Standardisation of bond strength testing is needed, and the solutions found in the new ISO document, ISO CD TR 11405 Dental Materials--Guidance on testing of adhesion to tooth structure, are referred to. Tensile and shear test methods are discussed and the bond strength values obtained with these methods compared. The influence of dentine substrate variations, such as remaining dentine thickness and surface treatment or removal of smear layer, are discussed as well as the storage conditions of specimens for in vitro tests, that is, short term, long term and thermocycling, and their relevance to the clinical situation. The information obtained from microscopical studies of fractured surfaces indicates that some adhesives may, under optimal conditions, obtain a bond strength sufficient to fracture the dentine.

  3. Test procedure for measurement of masonry flexural bond strength (Bond Wrench Test)

    SciTech Connect

    Hardin, E.J.; Wynn, C.C.

    1992-03-30

    This document describes a procedure for determining the flexural bond strength of in situ hollow clay tile bed joints by physical testing of selected joints. This procedure is based on the requirements of ASTM C1072-86. The principal objective of this test is to provide a simple and economical means for the determination of comparative values of flexural bond strength by physical testing of each joint of non-reinforced existing hollow clay tile masonry.

  4. Limitations of push-out test in bond strength measurement.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weng-Pin; Chen, Yen-Yin; Huang, Shih-Hao; Lin, Chun-Pin

    2013-02-01

    The push-out test has been widely performed to measure the bond strength of intracanal materials in dentistry. However, it is difficult to compare equitably the bond strengths from different testing specimens. The aim of this study was to investigate how a specimen's geometric parameters and the elastic moduli of dentin and intracanal filling materials may affect the bond strength measurement. Finite element analysis was used to simulate a push-out test. A base model was established, and 3 parameters were modified: the diameter of the pin, the specimen's thickness, and the elastic modulus of the intracanal filler. The analytic stress results and the calculated bond strengths derived from the original formula for the push-out test were compared at the interfaces. Specifically, the following observations were made: the interfacial stress distributions are mostly unaffected when the ratio of the pin diameter to the specimen's diameter is less than 0.85, and the ratio of the specimen's thickness to the specimen's diameter is greater than 0.6. Two correction factors were suggested for fillers with diverse elastic moduli with respect to the dentin modulus. Two modified formulas for the push-out bond strength test for the test specimens using different bonded composite materials were proposed. The results showed that geometric parameters and materials have certain effects on the push-out bond strength. A more rigorous standard for the push-out test can be established for future applications. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Spotlight on bond strength testing--unraveling the complexities.

    PubMed

    Roeder, Leslie; Pereira, Patricia N R; Yamamoto, Takatsugu; Ilie, Nicoleta; Armstrong, Steven; Ferracane, Jack

    2011-12-01

    The variability in methods and outcomes of bond strength testing reports is well documented in the dental literature. Many studies lack important information, which impairs the ability to reproduce them as well as to compare them to other studies in the literature. In order to critically discuss the important issues around bond strength testing methods, and to move closer to at least standardizing the reporting of such studies, the Academy of Dental Materials held a conference in 2009 entitled Adhesion in Dentistry-Analyzing Bond Strength Testing Methods, Variables, and Outcomes. Short synopses of the presentations are presented in this article. This article also provides a list of the variables that should be reported in bond strength studies, regardless of testing methods, to be used by authors conducting future studies, as well as journal reviewers and editors. The goal is to provide guidance and a rationale for what should be included in a study so that reporting might be more standardized and to enhance the possibility that more meaningful comparisons and conclusions may be drawn across studies. The table lists detailed descriptions covering all aspects of testing procedures, including variables related to tooth substrate, restorative material, specimen preparation, pre-testing conditions, testing methods, data reporting and analysis. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Dynamic versus static bond-strength testing of adhesive interfaces.

    PubMed

    Poitevin, André; De Munck, Jan; Cardoso, Marcio Vivan; Mine, Atsushi; Peumans, Marleen; Lambrechts, Paul; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2010-11-01

    A static bond-strength test is often regarded as clinically less relevant, since such abrupt loading of the adhesive-tooth bond clinically never occurs. Therefore, dynamic fatigue testing is often claimed to better predict the clinical effectiveness of adhesives. To measure the micro-tensile fatigue resistance (μTFR) of adhesives bonded to dentin, and to compare their μTFR to their micro-tensile bond strength (μTBS). The bonding effectiveness (including fracture analysis) of three adhesives (OptiBond FL, Kerr: 3-step etch-and-rinse adhesive or 3-E&Ra; Clearfil SE, Kuraray: 2-step self-etch adhesive or 2-SEa; G-Bond, GC: 1-step self-etch adhesive or 1-SEa) was measured by means of both a dynamic μTFR and a static μTBS approach. Preparation and test set-up of the micro-specimens were identical for both tests. In fatigue, specimens were tested with a wide range of selected loads at 2Hz and at 10Hz until failure, or until 10(4) cycles were reached. At 2Hz, the μTFR was also measured after 3-month water storage. The μTFR was determined using a logistic regression model. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD multiple comparisons test were used to determine statistical differences in μTBS. The 1-SEa recorded significantly lower values in μTFR at 10Hz and in μTBS than the 2-SEa and 3-E&Ra. The 1-SEa and the 2-SEa performed significantly lower in μTFR than the 3-E&Ra, when tested at 2Hz after 3-month water storage. Fatigue testing at 2Hz after 1-week water storage did not reveal any differences in μTFR between the three adhesives. The 3-E&Ra performed best in terms of bonding effectiveness, irrespective of the experimental condition or test used. The μTBS test proved once more to be a reliable laboratory test in ranking contemporary adhesives on their bonding effectiveness. Copyright © 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Test procedure for measurement of masonry flexural bond strength (Bond Wrench Test). Hollow Clay Tile Wall Test Program

    SciTech Connect

    Hardin, E.J.; Wynn, C.C.

    1992-03-30

    This document describes a procedure for determining the flexural bond strength of in situ hollow clay tile bed joints by physical testing of selected joints. This procedure is based on the requirements of ASTM C1072-86. The principal objective of this test is to provide a simple and economical means for the determination of comparative values of flexural bond strength by physical testing of each joint of non-reinforced existing hollow clay tile masonry.

  8. Fatigue strength testing of LTCC and alumina ceramics bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dąbrowski, A.; Matkowski, P.; Golonka, L.

    2012-12-01

    In this paper the results of fatigue strength tests of ceramic joints are presented. These tests have been performed on the samples subjected to thermal and vibration fatigue as well as on the reference samples without any additional loads. The main goal of the investigation was to determine the strength of hybrid ceramics joints using tensile testing machine. The experiment enabled evaluation of fatigue effects in the mentioned joints. Geometry of test samples has been designed according to FEM simulations, performed in ANSYS FEM environment. Thermal stress as well as the stress induced by vibrations have been analyzed in the designed model. In the experiments two types of ceramics have been used — LTCC green tape DP951 (DuPont) and alumina ceramic tape. The samples have been prepared by joining two sintered ceramic beams made of different types of material. The bonds have been realized utilizing low temperature glass or a layer of LTCC green tape.

  9. Relationship between thin-film bond strength as measured by a scratch test, and indentation hardness for bonding agents.

    PubMed

    Kusakabe, Shusuke; Rawls, H Ralph; Hotta, Masato

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate thin-film bond strength between a bonding agent and human dentin, using a scratch test, and the characteristics and accuracy of measurement. One-step bonding agents (BeautiBond; Bond Force; Adper Easy Bond; Clearfil tri-S Bond) and two-step bonding agents (Cleafil SE Bond; FL-Bond II) were investigated in this study. Flat dentin surfaces were prepared for extracted human molars. The dentin surfaces were ground and bonding agents were applied and light cured. The thin-film bond strength test of the specimens was evaluated by the critical load at which the coated bonding agent failed and dentin appeared. The scratch mark sections were then observed under a scanning electron microscope. Indentation hardness was evaluated by the variation in depth under an applied load of 10gf. Data were compared by one-way ANOVA with the Scheffé's post hoc multiple comparison test (p<0.05). In addition, thin-film bond strength and indentation hardness were analyzed using analysis of correlation and covariance. The thin-film bond strength of two-step bonding agents were found to be significantly higher than that of one-step bonding agents with small standard deviations. Scratch marks consistently showed adhesive failure in the vicinity of the bonding agent/dentin interface. The indentation hardness showed a trend that two-step bonding agents have greater hardness than one-step bonding agents. A moderately significant correlation (r(2)=0.31) was found between thin-film bond strength and indentation hardness. Thin-film bond strength test is a valid and reliable means of evaluating bond strength in the vicinity of the adhesive interface and is more accurate than other methods currently in use. Further, the thin-film bond strength is influenced by the hardness of the cued bonding agent. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Do the microshear test variables affect the bond strength values?

    PubMed

    Andrade, Andrea M; Garcia, Eugenio; Moura, Sandra Kiss; Reis, Alessandra; Loguercio, Alessandro; Silva, Luciana Mendonça; Pimentel, Gustavo H D; Grande, Rosa Helena Miranda

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the effect of specimen preparation and testing protocols on the micro-shear bond strength (μSBS) results. To evaluate whether variations in polyethylene rod use affect (μSBS)). Human dentin disks were randomly distributed into six groups (n = 5): polyethylene tube (3 levels) and adhesive system (2 levels). In Group 1, polyethylene tubes filled with polymerized composite) were placed on adhesive covered surfaces. Tubes were removed 24 h after water storage, leaving the rods only. In Group 2, the same procedure was performed; however, tubes were kept in place during testing. In Group 3, composite rods without tubes were placed on adhesive covered dentin. In all groups, adhesives were photoactivated after positioning filled tubes/rods on adhesive covered surfaces. Specimens were tested under shear mode and the data subjected to a two-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests. Groups 1 and 2 resulted in statistically similar mean μSBS (P > 0.05); however, a greater number of pretest failures were observed for Group 1. Higher μSBS values were detected for Group 3, irrespective of adhesive system used (P < 0.05). Removing the polyethylene tube before composite rod is placed on dentin affects μSBS values.

  11. Evaluating resin-enamel bonds by microshear and microtensile bond strength tests: effects of composite resin

    PubMed Central

    de ANDRADE, Andrea Mello; MOURA, Sandra Kiss; REIS, Alessandra; LOGUERCIO, Alessandro Dourado; GARCIA, Eugenio Jose; GRANDE, Rosa Helena Miranda

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The aims of this study were to evaluate the effect of resin composite (Filtek Z250 and Filtek Flow Z350) and adhesive system [(Solobond Plus, Futurabond NR (VOCO) and Adper Single Bond (3M ESPE)] on the microtensile (µTBS) and microshear bond strength (µSBS) tests on enamel, and to correlate the bond strength means between them. Material and methods Thirty-six extracted human molars were sectioned to obtain two tooth halves: one for µTBS and the other one for µSBS. Adhesive systems and resin composites were applied to the enamel ground surfaces and light-cured. After storage (37ºC/24 h) specimens were stressed (0.5 mm/ min). Fracture modes were analyzed under scanning electron microscopy. The data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Results The correlation between tests was estimated with Pearson's product-moment correlation statistics (α =0.05). For both tests only the main factor resin composite was statistically significant (p<0.05). The correlation test detected a positive (r=0.91) and significant (p=0.01) correlation between the tests. Conclusions The results were more influenced by the resin type than by the adhesives. Both microbond tests seem to be positive and linearly correlated and can therefore lead to similar conclusions. PMID:21308290

  12. Validity of bond strength tests: A critical review-Part II

    PubMed Central

    Sirisha, Kantheti; Rambabu, Tankonda; Ravishankar, Yalavarthi; Ravikumar, Pabbati

    2014-01-01

    Background: Macro-bond strength tests resulted in cohesive failures and overestimation of bond strengths. To reduce the flaws, micro-bond strength tests were introduced. They are the most commonly used bond-strength tests. Objective: Thus the objective of this review is to critically review the reliability of micro-bond strength tests used to evaluate resin-tooth interface. Data Collection: Relevant articles published between January 1994 and July 2013 were collected from Pubmed database, Google scholar and hand searched journals of Conservative Dentistry, Endodontics and Dental materials. Data Synthesis: Variables that influence the test outcome are categorized into substrate related factors, factors related to specimen properties, specimen preparation and test methodology. Impact of these variables on the test outcome is critically analyzed. Conclusion: Micro-bond tests are more reliable than macro-bond tests. However, no standard format exists for reporting the bond strength tests which could lead to misinterpretation of the data and bonding abilities of adhesives. PMID:25298640

  13. A new concept and finite-element study on dental bond strength tests.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiao-Zhuang; Homaei, Ehsan; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka; Tsoi, James Kit Hon

    2016-10-01

    Numerous bond strength tests have been performed on dental adhesion experiments. Yet, the validity of these bond strength tests is controversial due to the name (e.g., "shear" or "tensile") may not reflect to the true and complete stress situation, i.e., assumed uniform shear or uniaxial tensile conditions. Thus, the aim of this study was to simulate and compare the stress distribution of and between shear bond strength (SBS), tensile bond strength (TBS), mold-enclosed shear bond strength (ME-SBS) and de novo lever-induced mold-enclosed shear bond strength (LIME-SBS) tests. 3-Dimensional finite element method (FEM) was used on the dental resin-bonded surfaces (i.e., titanium alloy, dentine and porcelain) interphased with adhesive layer (thickness 5μm) to simulate the mechanical tests. For ME-SBS, both polycarbonate and stainless steel molds were used. For LIME-SBS, stainless steel levers and molds with lengths of 3mm, 6mm, 12mm, 15mm and 18mm were used. The applied loads on these models were 50N, 100N and 200N. De novo LIME-SBS test was the most optimal configuration to evaluate "shear" bond strength of adhesive in regards to providing significantly high and uniform shear stress as well as eliminating tensile stress at the interface. The conventional SBS test created very high tensile stress at the load area, whereas the TBS created optimal tensile stress but shear stress indeed co-exist. The ME-SBS test could also eliminate some of the tensile stress. Similar stress distributions pattern appeared on the Ti-adhesive models, the dentine-adhesive models and porcelain-adhesive models. None of the bond strength tests could give purely "shear" or "tensile" bond strength, but LIME-SBS seems to be the best model to evaluate the bond strength under true "shear" mode. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Efficacy of microtensile versus microshear bond testing for evaluation of bond strength of dental adhesive systems to enamel.

    PubMed

    El Zohairy, Ahmed A; Saber, Mohamed H; Abdalla, Ali I; Feilzer, Albert J

    2010-09-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of the microtensile bond test (microTBS) and the microshear bond test (microSBS) in ranking four dental adhesives according to bond strength to enamel and identify the modes of failure involved. Forty-four caries-free human molars were randomly assigned to one of two bond strength testing methods: 20 teeth were used for microTBS test and 24 teeth for microSBS test. Flat enamel surfaces were created by wet grinding. Four adhesive systems were applied to the ground enamel surfaces; a two-step self-etch (Clearfil SE Bond, SEB), two all-in-one self-etch (Adper Prompt L-Pop, APL; Hybrid Bond, HB) and a two-step etch-and-rinse (Adper Single Bond, ASB). Resin composite (Z100) was applied over the adhesive. The microTBS and microSBS were determined after 24h of storage in water at 37 degrees C. The mode of failure was determined by light microscope and SEM. Data was analyzed with ANOVA, Tukey's and Chi-square tests. microTBS test ranked the adhesives as follows: SEB=ASB=APL>HB, while microSBS test ranked the adhesives as follows: ASB>SEB=APL>HB. The highest percentage failure mode with microTBS testing was cohesive in enamel or at the DEJ: SEB (95%), APL (65%) and ASB (65%). As for HB, adhesive failure (95%) was the common finding. The predominant failure mode in case of the microSBS was adhesive (APL 50%, SEB 58.3%, ASB 75% and HB 91.7%). Ranking appears to be test-dependant and microSBS test appears to be more accurate in differentiating among the stronger adhesives. Copyright 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Adhesion to tooth structure: a critical review of "micro" bond strength test methods.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Steve; Geraldeli, Saulo; Maia, Rodrigo; Raposo, Luís Henrique Araújo; Soares, Carlos José; Yamagawa, Junichiro

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to critically review the literature regarding the mechanics, geometry, load application and other testing parameters of "micro" shear and tensile adhesion tests, and to outline their advantages and limitations. The testing of multiple specimens from a single tooth conserves teeth and allows research designs not possible using conventional 'macro' methods. Specimen fabrication, gripping and load application methods, in addition to material properties of the various components comprising the resin-tooth adhesive bond, will influence the stress distribution and consequently, the nominal bond strength and failure mode. These issues must be understood; as should the limitations inherent to strength-based testing of a complicated adhesive bond joining dissimilar substrates, for proper test selection, conduct and interpretation. Finite element analysis and comprehensive reporting of test conduct and results will further our efforts towards a standardization of test procedures. For the foreseeable future, both "micro" and "macro" bond strength tests will, as well as various morphological and spectroscopic investigative techniques, continue to be important tools for improving resin-tooth adhesion to increase the service life of dental resin-based composite restorations. Copyright 2009 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Dentin-Composite Bond Strength Measurement Using the Brazilian Disk Test

    PubMed Central

    Carrera, Carola A.; Chen, Yung-Chung; Li, Yuping; Rudney, Joel; Aparicio, Conrado; Fok, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study presents a variant of the Brazilian disk test (BDT) for assessing the bond strength between composite resins and dentin. Methods Dentin-composite disks (φ 5 mm × 2 mm) were prepared using either Z100 or Z250 (3M ESPE) in combination with one of three adhesives, Adper Easy Bond (EB), Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (MP) and Adper Single Bond (SB), and tested under diametral compression. Acoustic emission (AE) and digital image correlation (DIC) were used to monitor debonding of the composite from the dentin ring. A finite element (FE) model was created to calculate the bond strengths using the failure loads. Fracture modes were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results Most specimens fractured along the dentin-resin composite interface. DIC and AE confirmed interfacial debonding immediately before fracture of the dentin ring. Results showed that the mean bond strength with EB (14.9±1.9 MPa) was significantly higher than with MP (13.2±2.4 MPa) or SB (12.9±3.0 MPa) (p<0.05); no significant difference was found between MP and SB (p>0.05). Z100 (14.5±2.3 MPa) showed higher bond strength than Z250 (12.7±2.5 MPa) (p<0.05). Majority of specimens (91.3%) showed an adhesive failure mode. EB failed mostly at the dentin-adhesive interface, whereas MP at the composite-adhesive interface; specimens with SB failed at the composite-adhesive interface and cohesively in the adhesive. Conclusions The BDT variant showed to be a suitable alternative for measuring the bond strength between dentin and composite, with zero premature failure, reduced variability in the measurements, and consistent failure at the dentin-composite interface. PMID:27395367

  17. Microtensile bond strength test and failure analysis to assess bonding characteristics of different adhesion approaches to ground versus unground enamel.

    PubMed

    Hipólito, Vinicius Di; Alonso, Roberta Caroline Bruschi; Carrilho, Marcela Rocha de Oliveira; Anauate Netto, Camillo; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho; Goes, Mario Fernando de

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the bonding characteristics to ground and unground enamel obtained with different strategies. For this purpose, 24 sound third-molars were bisected mesiodistally to obtain tooth halves. A flat enamel area was delimited in the tooth sections, which were randomly distributed into 8 groups (n=6), according to the enamel condition (ground and unground) and adhesive system (Adper Single Bond 2 - SB2; Adper Prompt L-Pop - PLP; Adper Prompt - AD; Clearfil SE Bond - SE). Each system was applied according manufacturers' instructions and a 6-mm-high resin composite "crown" was incrementally built up on bonded surfaces. Hourglass-shaped specimens with 0.8 mm(2) cross-section were produced. Microtensile bond strength (μTBS) was recorded and the failure patterns were classified. Results were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). There were no statistically significant differences among the μTBS values of SB2, PLP and AD (p>0.05). SE values were significantly lower (p0.05). There was prevalence of cohesive failure within enamel, adhesive system and resin composite for SB2. The self-etch systems produced higher incidence of cohesive failures in the adhesive system. Enamel condition did not determine significant differences on bonding characteristics for the same bonding system. In conclusion, the bonding systems evaluated in this study resulted in specific μTBS and failure patterns due to the particular interaction with enamel.

  18. Bond strength of different endodontic sealers to dentin: push-out test

    PubMed Central

    BARBIZAM, João Vicente Baroni; TROPE, Martin; TANOMARU-FILHO, Mario; TEIXEIRA, Erica Cappelletto Nogueira; TEIXEIRA, Fabricio Batista

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the bond strength of different root canal sealers to dentin. Material and Methods Forty extracted single-rooted human teeth were examined and the coronal and middle thirds of the canals were prepared with a 1.50 mm post drill (FibreKor Post System, Pentron). The teeth were allocated in two experimental groups, irrigated with 2.5% NaOCl+17% EDTA or saline solution (control group) and instrumented using Race rotary files (FKG) to a size #40 at the working length. Then, the groups were divided into four subgroups and filled with Epiphany sealer (Group 1), EndoREZ (Group 2), AH26 (Group 3) and Grossman's Sealer (Group 4). After 2 weeks of storage in 100% humidity at 37ºC, all teeth were sectioned transversally into 2-mm-thick discs. Push-out tests were performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min using a universal testing machine. The maximum load at failure was recorded and expressed in MPa. Results Means (±SD) in root canals irrigated with 2.5% NaOCl and 17% EDTA were: G1 (21.6±6.0), G2 (15.2±3.7), G3 (14.6±4.5) and G4 (11.7±4.1).Two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test showed the highest bond strength for the Epiphany's group (p< 0.01) when compared to the other tested sealers. Saline solution decreased the values of bond-strength (p<0.05) for all sealers. Conclusion Epiphany sealer presented higher bond strength values to dentin in both irrigating protocols, and the use of 2.5% NaOCl and 17% EDTA increased the bond strength values for all sealers. PMID:22231001

  19. Orthodontic brackets removal under shear and tensile bond strength resistance tests - a comparative test between light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, P. C. G.; Porto-Neto, S. T.; Lizarelli, R. F. Z.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2008-03-01

    We have investigated if a new LEDs system has enough efficient energy to promote efficient shear and tensile bonding strength resistance under standardized tests. LEDs 470 ± 10 nm can be used to photocure composite during bracket fixation. Advantages considering resistance to tensile and shear bonding strength when these systems were used are necessary to justify their clinical use. Forty eight human extracted premolars teeth and two light sources were selected, one halogen lamp and a LEDs system. Brackets for premolar were bonded through composite resin. Samples were submitted to standardized tests. A comparison between used sources under shear bonding strength test, obtained similar results; however, tensile bonding test showed distinct results: a statistical difference at a level of 1% between exposure times (40 and 60 seconds) and even to an interaction between light source and exposure time. The best result was obtained with halogen lamp use by 60 seconds, even during re-bonding; however LEDs system can be used for bonding and re-bonding brackets if power density could be increased.

  20. The Effects of Cavity Preparation and Composite Resin on Bond Strength and Stress Distribution Using the Microtensile Bond Test.

    PubMed

    Braga, Ssl; Oliveira, Lrs; Rodrigues, R B; Bicalho, A A; Novais, V R; Armstrong, S; Soares, C J

    2017-10-04

    To evaluate the effect of flowable bulk-fill or conventional composite resin on bond strength and stress distribution in flat or mesio-occlusal-distal (MOD) cavity preparations using the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) test. Forty human molars were divided into two groups and received either standardized MOD or flat cavity preparations. Restorations were made using the conventional composite resin Z350 (Filtek Z350XT, 3M-ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA) or flowable bulk-fill (FBF) composite resin (Filtek Bulk Fill Flowable, 3M-ESPE). Postgel shrinkage was measured using the strain gauge technique (n=10). The Z350 buildup was made in two increments of 2.0 mm, and the FBF was made in a single increment of 4.0 mm. Six rectangular sticks were obtained for each tooth, and each section was used for μTBS testing at 1.0 mm/min. Polymerization shrinkage was modeled using postgel shrinkage data. The μTBS data were analyzed statistically using a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and the postgel shrinkage data were analyzed using a one-way ANOVA with Tukey post hoc test. The failure modes were analyzed using a chi-square test (α=0.05). Our results show that both the type of cavity preparation and the composite resin used affect the bond strength and stress distribution. The Z350 composite resin had a higher postgel shrinkage than the FBF composite resin. The μTBS of the MOD preparation was influenced by the type of composite resin used. Irrespective of composite resin, flat cavity preparations resulted in higher μTBS than MOD preparations (p<0.001). Specifically, in flat-prepared cavities, FBF composite resin had a similar μTBS relative to Z350 composite resin. However, in MOD-prepared cavities, those with FBF composite resin had higher μTBS values than those with Z350 composite resin. Adhesive failure was prevalent for all tested groups. The MOD preparation resulted in higher shrinkage stress than the flat preparation, irrespective of composite resin. For MOD

  1. Acrylic mechanical bond tests

    SciTech Connect

    Wouters, J.M.; Doe, P.J.

    1991-02-01

    The tensile strength of bonded acrylic is tested as a function of bond joint thickness. 0.125 in. thick bond joints were found to posses the maximum strength while the acceptable range of joints varied from 0.063 in. to almost 0.25 in. Such joints are used in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory.

  2. Evaluating Resin-Dentin Bond by Microtensile Bond Strength Test: Effects of Various Resin Composites and Placement Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Moosavi, Horieh; Maleknejad, Fatemeh; Forghani, Maryam; Afshari, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This in vitro study evaluated the microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of a methacrylate-based compared to a silorane-based resin composite in Class I cavity using different placement techniques. Materials and Methods: Class I cavities with dimension of (4 mm long, 4 mm wide, 3 mm deep) were prepared in extracted sound human molars. The teeth were randomly divided into six groups. The first three groups were filled with Filtek P90 using three methods of insertion; bulk, incremental and snow-plow, and the remaining three groups were filled with Clearfil AP-X using the same three placement techniques. After 24 hours of storage in water at 37°C, the specimens were thermocycled to 1000 cycles. Specimens were prepared for MTBS testing by creating bonded beams obtained from the pulpal floor. Statistical analysis used: Statistical analyses of data were performed by two-way ANOVA/Tukey (α=.05). Results: The experiment showed significant differences between the two resin composites with regard to filling techniques (P<0.05). The MTBS was significantly higher in each of Filtek P90 subgroup compared to Clearfil AP-X ones (P<0.05). With respect to filling technique in both resin composites, bulk insertion showed the significantly lowest MTBS (P<0.05), while no significant difference was found between the outcome of incremental and snow-plow techniques (P>0.05). Conclusion: Silorane-based resin composite as opposed to methacrylate based resin composite and layering placements in contrast to bulk filling method had higher microtensile bond strength. PMID:26966466

  3. New method for rapid testing of bond strength for wood adhesives

    Treesearch

    James M. Wescott; Michael J. Birkeland; Amy E. Traska; Charles R. Frihart; Brice N. Dally

    2007-01-01

    In developing new adhesives for wood bonding, the testing of bond performance can often be a limiting factor in the development process. Evaluating the bond performance of an adhesive that can be prepared in less than a day often takes several days using standard performance tests. This testing slows the development process and may cause a company to abandon a...

  4. Effect of testing methods on the bond strength of resin to zirconia-alumina ceramic: microtensile versus shear test.

    PubMed

    Valandro, Luiz F; Ozcan, Mutlu; Amaral, Regina; Vanderlei, Aleska; Bottino, Marco A

    2008-11-01

    This study tested the bond strength of a resin cement to a glass-infiltrated zirconia-alumina ceramic after three conditioning methods and using two test methods (shear-SBS versus microtensile-MTBS). Ceramic blocks for MTBS and ceramic disks for SBS were fabricated. Three surface conditioning (SC) methods were evaluated: (1) 110-microm Al2O3+silanization; (2) Chairside silica coating+silanization; (3) Laboratory silica coating+silanization. Following surface conditioning, the resin cement (Panavia F) was bonded to the conditioned ceramics. Although no statistically significant differences (p = 0.1076) were seen between the test methods, results yielded with the different surface conditioning methods showed statistically significant differences (p < 0.0001) (SC2 = SC3 > SC1). As for the interaction between the factors, two-way ANOVA showed that it was not statistically significant (p = 0.1443). MTBS test resulted in predominantly mixed failure (85%), but SBS test resulted in exclusively adhesive failure. On the effects of different surface conditioning methods, chairside and laboratory tribochemical silica coating followed by silanization showed higher bond strength results compared to those of aluminum oxide abrasion and silanization, independent of the test method employed.

  5. Strength of Chemical Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, Jerry D.

    1973-01-01

    Students are not generally made aware of the extraordinary magnitude of the strengths of chemical bonds in terms of the forces required to pull them apart. Molecular bonds are usually considered in terms of the energies required to break them, and we are not astonished at the values encountered. For example, the Cl2 bond energy, 57.00 kcal/mole, amounts to only 9.46 x 10(sup -20) cal/molecule, a very small amount of energy, indeed, and impossible to measure directly. However, the forces involved in realizing the energy when breaking the bond operate over a very small distance, only 2.94 A, and, thus, f(sub ave) approx. equals De/(r - r(sub e)) must be very large. The forces involved in dissociating the molecule are discussed in the following. In consideration of average forces, the molecule shall be assumed arbitrarily to be dissociated when the atoms are far enough separated so that the potential, relative to that of the infinitely separated atoms, is reduced by 99.5% from the potential of the molecule at the equilibrium bond length (r(sub e)) for Cl2 of 1.988 A this occurs at 4.928 A.

  6. Effect of root canal rinsing protocol on dentin bond strength of two resin cements using three different method of test

    PubMed Central

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Sheikhi, Mohammadreza; Soleimani, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    Background Different studies have used different tests to evaluate bond strength of resin cements to root dentin. In this in vitrostudy, three different tests were used to evaluate the bond strength of two resin cements to root dentin using two root dentin irrigation protocols. Material and Methods Ninety-six intact single-rooted teeth were selected for this study. Forty-eight teeth, with a root length of 15mm, were randomly divided into two groups and irrigated with normal saline or 2.5% sodium hypochlorite solutions during root canal preparation, respectively. For each 12 specimens from each group, fiber post #1 was bonded using an etch-and-rinse (Duo-Link) and a self-adhesive (BisCem) resin cement, respectively. After incubation, two specimens were prepared for the push-out test from the middle thirds of the roots. In another 24 teeth, after two 1.5-mm sections were prepared from the middle thirds of the prepared roots, sections of the post were bonded in two subgroups with each of the cements mentioned above and the samples were prepared for the pull-out test. For shear test, the crowns of 48 teeth were cut away, the dentin surfaces were prepared, the two irrigation solutions were used, and the resin cements were bonded. Data collected from the three tests were evaluated by ANOVA, post-hoc Tukey and Weibull tests (α=0.05). Results There were significant differences in the mean bond strength values between the three bond strength tests (P<0.001). Rinsing protocol and cement type resulted in similar variations in the mean bond strength in all tests (P>0.05). Conclusions Under the limitations of the present study, the method of the test used had an effect on the recorded bond strength between the resin cement and root dentin. Cement type and irrigation protocol resulted in similar variations with all the tests. Push-out and shear tests exhibited more coherent results. Key words:Bond strength, endodontically treated tooth, fiber post, resin cement, sodium

  7. Analysis of bond strength by pull out test on fiber glass posts cemented in different lengths.

    PubMed

    Webber, Mariana Benedetti Ferreira; Michida, Silvia Masae de Araújo; Marson, Fabiano Carlos; de Oliveira, Giovani Corrêa; Silva, Cleverson de Oliveira E

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate, by means of pull-out test, the bond strength of fiberglass posts when cemented with different lengths in endodontically treated teeth. Sixty single-rooted bovine roots were cut in the cementoenamel junction with 21 mm length. They were endodontically treated and randomly divided into three groups (n = 20). Group 1 - Preparation of 2/3 of the remaining roots; Group 2 - Preparation of ½ of the remaining roots and Group 3 - Preparation of ¼ of remaining roots. For all groups it were used posts n = 3 (Exacto, Angelus, Brazil), and cemented with self-etching resin cement (RelyXU200). After cementing posts, the samples were thermocycled (10.000 cycles/5°C and 55°C). The pull-out test was performed on a universal testing machine (EMIC - DL500) and the values obtained were statistically analyzed by analysis of variance (one-factor ANOVA) and multiple comparison test of Tukey, with level of significance of 5%. The mean values ± standard deviation in Newtons (N) were: Group 1 = 120.5 (±42.8) A, Group 2 = 103.1 (±31.2) AB, Group 3 = 41.2 (±22.4) C, P < 0.005. The preparation of ½ of remaining root appears to be a viable alternative when 2/3 of the preparation of the remaining root is not possible, but more results are needed for clinical validation.

  8. Shear versus micro-shear bond strength test: a finite element stress analysis.

    PubMed

    Placido, Eliane; Meira, Josete B C; Lima, Raul González; Muench, Antonio; de Souza, Roberto Martins; Ballester, Rafael Yagüe

    2007-09-01

    This study aimed at comparing the stress distribution in shear and micro-shear test set-ups using finite element analysis, and suggesting some parameter standardization that might have important influence on the results. Two-dimensional plane strain finite element analysis was performed using MSCPatran and MSCMarc softwares. Model configurations were based on published experimental shear and micro-shear test set-ups and material properties were assumed to be isotropic, homogeneous and linear-elastic. Typical values of elastic modulus and Poisson's ratios were assigned to composite, dentin and adhesive. Loading conditions considered a single-node concentrated load at different distances from the dentin-adhesive interface, and proportional geometry (1:5 scale, but fixed adhesive layer thickness in 50microm) with similar calculated nominal strength. The maximum tensile and shear stresses, and stress distribution along dentin-adhesive interfacial nodes were analyzed. Stress distribution was always non-uniform and greatly differed between shear and micro-shear models. A pronounced stress concentration was observed at the interfacial edges due to the geometric change: stress values farther exceeded the nominal strength and tensile stresses were much higher than shear stresses. For micro-shear test, the relatively thicker adhesive layer and use of low modulus composites may lead to relevant stress intensification. An appropriate loading distance was established for each test (1mm for shear and 0.1mm for micro-shear) in which stress concentration would be minimal, and should be standardized for experimental assays. The elastic modulus of bonded composites, relative adhesive layer thickness and load application distance are important parameters to be standardized, once they influence stress concentration.

  9. Comparison of bond strength of different endodontic sealers to root dentin: An in vitro push-out test

    PubMed Central

    Madhuri, G. Vijaya; Varri, Sujana; Bolla, Nagesh; Mandava, Pragna; Akkala, Lakshmi Swathi; Shaik, Jaheer

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To compare the bond strength of four different endodontic sealers to root dentin through push-out test design. Materials and Methods: Forty single-rooted teeth with completely formed apices were selected. Teeth were decoronated, and working length was determined. Instrumentation and irrigation were performed. The teeth were divided into four groups based upon the sealer used. Group 1: Bioceramic sealer (Endosequence), Group 2: Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) based sealer (MTA Fill apex), Group 3: Epoxy resin based sealer (MM-Seal), and Group 4: Dual cure resin-based sealer (Hybrid Root Seal). Manipulation and application of the sealer was done as per the manufacturer instructions. All the teeth were obturated using 6% gutta-percha. After obturation, each tooth was prepared for push-out test with root slices of 2 mm thickness using universal testing machine. Results: The highest bond strength was found in Group 1 (Endosequence) (P < 0.05) compared to other groups. The lowest bond strength was found in Group 2 (MTA Fill apex). Statistical analysis is done by two-way ANOVA and Newman-Keuls multiple post hoc. Conclusion: The push-out bond strength of Bioceramic sealer was highest followed by resin-based sealer and lowest bond strength was observed in MTA-based sealer. PMID:27656067

  10. Strength Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Londeree, Ben R.

    1981-01-01

    Postural deviations resulting from strength and flexibility imbalances include swayback, scoliosis, and rounded shoulders. Screening tests are one method for identifying strength problems. Tests for the evaluation of postural problems are described, and exercises are presented for the strengthening of muscles. (JN)

  11. Strength Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Londeree, Ben R.

    1981-01-01

    Postural deviations resulting from strength and flexibility imbalances include swayback, scoliosis, and rounded shoulders. Screening tests are one method for identifying strength problems. Tests for the evaluation of postural problems are described, and exercises are presented for the strengthening of muscles. (JN)

  12. Bond strengths of conventional and simplified bonding systems.

    PubMed

    Wilder, A D; Swift, E J; May, K N; Waddell, S L

    1998-06-01

    To compare the shear bond strengths of composite to dentin using conventional (three-component) and simplified (two-component) adhesive systems. 100 bovine teeth were mounted in phenolic rings and ground to 600-grit to obtain 90 flat facial dentin surfaces and 10 flat facial enamel surfaces. The dentin specimens were assigned to nine treatment groups of 10 teeth each. Three groups were assigned to conventional, three-component bonding systems: All-Bond 2, OptiBond FL, and Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus. Six groups were assigned to simplified, two-component bonding systems: Clearfil Liner Bond 2, Fuji Bond LC, One-Step, OptiBond Solo, Prime & Bond 2.1, and Tenure Quik with Fluoride. The enamel specimens were used as the control group with Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus Adhesive. Each ground surface was first conditioned according to the manufacturers' directions. After rinsing, the surface of each specimen was left visibly moist prior to application of the bonding system. Each bonding system was applied according to its manufacturer's directions. The corresponding composite restorative materials were applied in 4.4 mm diameter molds to the adhesive surface and light-cured from four directions. The completed specimens were stored in water 48 hours before testing. Shear bond strengths were measured using an Instron universal testing machine. Data were subjected to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparison test. Mean shear bond strengths of the conventional systems ranged from 16.3 to 20.6 MPa. Mean shear bond strengths of the simplified systems ranged from 14.7 to 17.4 MPa. The mean shear bond strength of the control (enamel bonding) was 21.4 MPa. The mean shear bond strengths of the conventional and simplified systems were not significantly different from each other or from the control system.

  13. Analysis of Bond Strength by Pull Out Test on Fiber Glass Posts Cemented in Different Lengths

    PubMed Central

    Webber, Mariana Benedetti Ferreira; Michida, Silvia Masae de Araújo; Marson, Fabiano Carlos; de Oliveira, Giovani Corrêa; Silva, Cleverson de Oliveira e

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate, by means of pull-out test, the bond strength of fiberglass posts when cemented with different lengths in endodontically treated teeth. Materials and Methods: Sixty single-rooted bovine roots were cut in the cementoenamel junction with 21 mm length. They were endodontically treated and randomly divided into three groups (n = 20). Group 1 - Preparation of 2/3 of the remaining roots; Group 2 - Preparation of ½ of the remaining roots and Group 3 - Preparation of ¼ of remaining roots. For all groups it were used posts n = 3 (Exacto, Angelus, Brazil), and cemented with self-etching resin cement (RelyXU200). After cementing posts, the samples were thermocycled (10.000 cycles/5°C and 55°C). The pull-out test was performed on a universal testing machine (EMIC - DL500) and the values obtained were statistically analyzed by analysis of variance (one-factor ANOVA) and multiple comparison test of Tukey, with level of significance of 5%. Results: The mean values ± standard deviation in Newtons (N) were: Group 1 = 120.5 (±42.8) A, Group 2 = 103.1 (±31.2) AB, Group 3 = 41.2 (±22.4) C, P < 0.005. Conclusion: The preparation of ½ of remaining root appears to be a viable alternative when 2/3 of the preparation of the remaining root is not possible, but more results are needed for clinical validation. PMID:25954063

  14. Effect of curing and silanizing on composite repair bond strength using an improved micro-tensile test method

    PubMed Central

    Eliasson, Sigfus Thor; Dahl, Jon E.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: To evaluate the micro-tensile repair bond strength between aged and new composite, using silane and adhesives that were cured or left uncured when new composite was placed. Methods: Eighty Filtek Supreme XLT composite blocks and four control blocks were stored in water for two weeks and thermo-cycled. Sandpaper ground, etched and rinsed specimens were divided into two experimental groups: A, no further treatment and B, the surface was coated with bis-silane. Each group was divided into subgroups: (1) Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose, (2) Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose adhesive, (3) Adper Scotchbond Universal, (4) Clearfil SE Bond and (5) One Step Plus. For each adhesive group, the adhesive was (a) cured according to manufacturer’s instructions or (b) not cured before repair. The substrate blocks were repaired with Filtek Supreme XLT. After aging, they were serially sectioned, producing 1.1 × 1.1 mm square test rods. The rods were prepared for tensile testing and tensile strength calculated at fracture. Type of fracture was examined under microscope. Results: Leaving the adhesive uncured prior to composite repair placement increased the mean tensile values statistically significant for all adhesives tested, with or without silane pretreatment. Silane surface treatment improved significantly (p < 0.001) tensile strength values for all adhesives, both for the cured and uncured groups. The mean strength of the control composite was higher than the strongest repair strength (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Application of freshly made silane and a thin bonding layer, rendered higher tensile bond strength. Not curing the adhesive before composite placement increased the tensile bond strength. PMID:28642928

  15. Effect of curing and silanizing on composite repair bond strength using an improved micro-tensile test method.

    PubMed

    Eliasson, Sigfus Thor; Dahl, Jon E

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the micro-tensile repair bond strength between aged and new composite, using silane and adhesives that were cured or left uncured when new composite was placed. Methods: Eighty Filtek Supreme XLT composite blocks and four control blocks were stored in water for two weeks and thermo-cycled. Sandpaper ground, etched and rinsed specimens were divided into two experimental groups: A, no further treatment and B, the surface was coated with bis-silane. Each group was divided into subgroups: (1) Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose, (2) Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose adhesive, (3) Adper Scotchbond Universal, (4) Clearfil SE Bond and (5) One Step Plus. For each adhesive group, the adhesive was (a) cured according to manufacturer's instructions or (b) not cured before repair. The substrate blocks were repaired with Filtek Supreme XLT. After aging, they were serially sectioned, producing 1.1 × 1.1 mm square test rods. The rods were prepared for tensile testing and tensile strength calculated at fracture. Type of fracture was examined under microscope. Results: Leaving the adhesive uncured prior to composite repair placement increased the mean tensile values statistically significant for all adhesives tested, with or without silane pretreatment. Silane surface treatment improved significantly (p < 0.001) tensile strength values for all adhesives, both for the cured and uncured groups. The mean strength of the control composite was higher than the strongest repair strength (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Application of freshly made silane and a thin bonding layer, rendered higher tensile bond strength. Not curing the adhesive before composite placement increased the tensile bond strength.

  16. Wood Bond Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    A joint development program between Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection Technologies and The Weyerhaeuser Company resulted in an internal bond analyzer (IBA), a device which combines ultrasonics with acoustic emission testing techniques. It is actually a spinoff from a spinoff, stemming from a NASA Lewis invented acousto-ultrasonic technique that became a system for testing bond strength of composite materials. Hartford's parent company, Acoustic Emission Technology Corporation (AET) refined and commercialized the technology. The IBA builds on the original system and incorporates on-line process control systems. The IBA determines bond strength by measuring changes in pulsar ultrasonic waves injected into a board. Analysis of the wave determines the average internal bond strength for the panel. Results are displayed immediately. Using the system, a mill operator can adjust resin/wood proportion, reduce setup time and waste, produce internal bonds of a consistent quality and automatically mark deficient products.

  17. Effect of different photoactivation methods on the bond strength of composite resin restorations by push-out test.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Leonardo Gonçalves; Alonso, Roberta Caroline Bruschi; Correr, Gisele Maria; Brandt, William Cunha; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho

    2008-03-01

    Modulated curing methods could lead to a higher probability of bond preservation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of 7 curing methods on bond strength of composite resin restorations. Seventy bovine incisors were selected. A conical cavity was prepared in the buccal surface. Adper Single Bond adhesive system was applied according to the manufacturer's instructions, and the cavities were filled with a single increment of Esthet X (Dentsply/Caulk). The specimens were randomly assigned into 7 groups (n = 10) according to the photoactivation method: (1) continuous light 700 (700 mW/cm2) (control); (2) continuous light 150 (150 mW/cm2); (3) continuous light 250 (250 mW/cm2); (4) soft-start 75 (75 mW/cm2) + 700 mW/cm2); (5) soft-start 150 (150 mW/cm2 + 700 mW/cm2); (6) pulse-delay (150 mW/cm2 + 3 minutes + 700 mW/cm2); and (7) intermittent light (cycles at 600 mW/cm2). The energy density for all groups was 14 J/cm2. The bond strength of the composite restorations was measured by performing the push-out test in a universal testing machine (Instron). The results were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey test (P < .05). Pulse-delay, soft-start 150, and soft-start 75 methods showed a significant increase in bond strength when compared with the control continuous light 700 method. Low power density and intermittent light groups showed intermediate results. Modulation of the energy density during light curing of composite resins using pulse-delay or soft-start methods increased the bond strength of composite restorations.

  18. Effects of joining and testing parameters on the adhesive strength of epoxy-bonded aluminum and beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, M.A.; Hermes, R.; Margevicius, R.W.

    1999-03-01

    Hollow spherical targets are frequently fabricated by the joining of two adhesively bonded hemispheres. Other materials used for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments, including aluminum, stainless steel, sapphire, and various plastics, are also bonded using adhesives. This paper presents the mechanical testing results of Dexter-Hysol EA9330. The base metals were either an aluminum 6061-T6 or beryllium S200D. The uniaxial tensile (from room to liquid helium temperatures), lap shear, and creep properties of the adhesive under consideration were evaluated. The authors found that the highest lap shear strength was obtained when the test panel was assembled with fresh adhesive (time = 0 min.) and degraded to about 77% of that value in 120 minutes. Butt tensile strength increased from about 8 ksi (1 ksi = 1000 lbs/in{sup 2} = 6.90 MPa) at room temperature to about 19 ksi at {minus}269 C for both the aluminum and beryllium base metals. The lap shear strength decreased from about 5 ksi at room temperature to about 3 ksi at cryogenic temperatures. Creep tests in both butt tensile and lap shear configurations demonstrated a very narrow stress level for which the time to failure decreased from over 720 hours to less than 20. Finally, the authors found that the surface treatment is critical to achieving the highest strength adhesive bonds. Some inconclusive but interesting test data is presented opening the way for further investigation.

  19. Nondestructive Determination of Bond Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Although many nondestructive techniques have been applied to detect disbonds in adhesive joints, no absolutely reliable nondestructive method has been developed to detect poor adhesion and evaluate the strength of bonded joints prior to the present work which used nonlinear ultrasonic methods to investigate adhesive bond cure conditions. Previously, a variety of linear and nonlinear ultrasonic methods with water coupling had been used to study aluminum-adhesive-aluminum laminates, prepared under different adhesive curing conditions, for possible bond strength determination. Therefore, in the course of this research effort, a variety of finite-amplitude experimental methods which could possibly differentiate various cure conditions were investigated, including normal and oblique incidence approaches based on nonlinear harmonic generation as well as several non-collinear two-wave interaction approaches. Test samples were mechanically scanned in various ways with respect to the focus of a transmitting transducer operated at several variable excitation frequencies and excitation levels. Even when powerful sample-related resonances were exploited by means of a frequency scanning approach, it was very difficult to isolate the nonlinear characteristics of adhesive bonds. However, a multi-frequency multi-power approach was quite successful and reliable. Ultrasonic tone burst signals at increasing power levels, over a wide frequency range, were transmitted through each bond specimen to determine its excitation dependent nonlinear harmonic resonance behavior. Relative amplitude changes were observed particularly in the higher harmonic spectral data and analyzed using a local displacement and strain analysis in the linear approximation. Two analysis approaches of the excitation-dependent data at specific resonances were found to be quite promising. One of these approaches may represent a very robust algorithm for classifying an adhesive bond as being properly cured or not

  20. Effect of impression technique on bond strength.

    PubMed

    Su, Jiaping; Hobson, Ross S; McCabe, John F

    2004-01-01

    If the effects of surface preparation (eg, acid etching, laser preparation, crystal growth) are to be investigated on the same tooth from which the bond strength is recorded, a method of surface replication is required that does not affect the subsequent bond. This study investigated the effect of 2 different methods of taking impressions on bond strength. Three groups of 11 mandibular incisors were used. The labial enamel was etched with 37% phosphoric acid for 30 seconds. Group A (control) had no impression taken; in group B (silicone), impressions were taken with silicone impression material before bonding; in group C (polyether), an impression was taken with polyether before bonding. After the impressions were taken, GAC brackets (A Company, San Diego, Calif) were bonded to the labial surfaces of the etched enamel with Transbond XT light-cured composite (3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif). Teeth with bonded brackets were stored in water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours, and then bond strength was measured on a testing machine. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was also recorded. The lowest bond strength was found after silicone replication (mean [standard deviation]: 8.6 [1.7] MPa) and the highest in the control group (21.2 [4.0] MPa). There was no significant difference between the control group and the polyether replication group (19.1 [4.7] MPa). The surface detail replications of polyether and silicone were found to be identical. It was concluded that polyether had no significant effect on bond strength and was suitable for surface replication before bonding. Polyether allows replication of the enamel surface without a significant effect on bond strength, and this technique could be used to examine the relationship between enamel preparation techniques and subsequent bond strength between composite and enamel.

  1. In vitro microtensile bond strength of four adhesives tested at the gingival and pulpal walls of class II restorations

    PubMed Central

    Purk, John H.; Healy, Matthew; Dusevich, Vladimir; Glaros, Alan; Eick, J. David

    2007-01-01

    Background The authors compared the microtensile bond strength of teeth restored with four adhesives at the gingival and pulpal cavity walls of Class II resin-based composite restorations. Methods Five pairs of extracted third molars received two Class II preparations/restorations in each tooth. The authors randomly assigned each preparation to one of four adhesive groups: Adper Scotchbond Multipurpose Dental Adhesive (SBMP) (3M ESPE, St. Paul, Minn.), Clearfil SE Bond (CFSE) (Kuraray America, New York City), Prime & Bond NT (PBNT) (Dentsply Caulk, Milford, Del.) and PQ1 (Ultradent, South Jordan, Utah). They restored the teeth and obtained microtensile specimens from each cavity wall. Specimens were tested on a testing machine until they failed. Results The mean (± standard deviation) bond strengths (in megapascals) were as follows: SBMP (pulpal), 36.4 (17.2); SBMP (gingival), 29.7 (15.3); CFSE (pulpal), 50.8 (13.6); CFSE (gingival), 50.2 (14.0); PBNT (pulpal), 38.3 (19.2); PBNT (gingival), 38.9 (17.7); PQ1 (pulpal), 58.7 (8.7); and PQ1 (gingival), 54.5 (18.5). A two-way analysis of variance found an adhesive effect (P < .001) but no location effect (P > .05). Conclusions PQ1 and CFSE performed the best. The results showed no significant difference in microtensile bond strength at the gingival wall versus the pulpal wall. Clinical Implications Under in vitro conditions, a total-etch ethanol-based adhesive (PQ1) failed cohesively more often than did the other adhesives tested. PMID:17012721

  2. In vitro microtensile bond strength of four adhesives tested at the gingival and pulpal walls of Class II restorations.

    PubMed

    Purk, John H; Healy, Matthew; Dusevich, Vladimir; Glaros, Alan; Eick, J David

    2006-10-01

    The authors compared the microtensile bond strength of teeth restored with four adhesives at the gingival and pulpal cavity walls of Class II resin-based composite restorations. Five pairs of extracted third molars received two Class II preparations/restorations in each tooth. The authors randomly assigned each preparation to one of four adhesive groups: Adper Scotchbond Multipurpose Dental Adhesive (SBMP) (3M ESPE, St. Paul, Minn.), Clearfil SE Bond (CFSE) (Kuraray America, New York City), Prime & Bond NT (PBNT) (Dentsply Caulk, Milford, Del.) and PQ1 (Ultradent, South Jordan, Utah). They restored the teeth and obtained microtensile specimens from each cavity wall. Specimens were tested on a testing machine until they failed. The mean (+/- standard deviation) bond strengths (in megapascals) were as follows: SBMP (pulpal), 36.4 (17.2); SBMP (gingival), 29.7 (15.3); CFSE (pulpal), 50.8 (13.6); CFSE (gingival), 50.2 (14.0); PBNT (pulpal), 38.3 (19.2); PBNT (gingival), 38.9 (17.7); PQ1 (pulpal), 58.7 (8.7); and PQ1 (gingival), 54.5 (18.5). A two-way analysis of variance found an adhesive effect (P < .001) but no location effect (P >.05). PQ1 and CFSE performed the best. The results showed no significant difference in microtensile bond strength at the gingival wall versus the pulpal wall. Under in vitro conditions, a total-etch ethanol-based adhesive (PQ1) failed cohesively more often than did the other adhesives tested.

  3. Machine Gun Liner Bond Strength

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    investigation does not constitute a complete analysis of liner failures in the M2 machine gun. The fact that two different liner-failure modes were...An order-of-magnitude estimate can be made of the bond strength in this case using a standard elastic analysis and some reasonable assumptions... analysis of the forces on the machine gun bullet, it was found that the measured bond strength was adequate to resist the reaction forces produced when

  4. A pilot study for evaluation of bond strength of orthodontic brackets to enamel using a new impact test machine.

    PubMed

    Hendry, R E; Gilgrass, T; Chung, L; MacPherson, R; Yang, T H J; Reuben, R L

    2008-01-01

    We report an in-vitro pilot study to assess the ability of a new impact test machine to evaluate bond strength of orthodontic brackets to tooth enamel. A total of 37 extracted premolar teeth were bonded with APC Plus MBT Victory orthodontic brackets. Bond strength was tested using a new pendulum-based instrumented impact test machine. The maximum stress, the impact energy and interaction time required to debond the brackets were recorded. Of the total tested, 9 samples were successfully debonded with no obvious damage to the tooth surface although 28 samples fractured through the enamel and dentine. There was a statistically significant difference between the maximum stress required to debond the bracket and that required to fracture the tooth, a higher stress being required to debond the bracket. Significantly less stress was required to fracture older teeth. The high incidence of tooth fracture suggests a need to modify the impact test protocol. The lack of a simulated periodontal ligament, which is present clinically and acts as a shock absorber, may have contributed to the high failure rate, although the striking position of the pendulum also needs to be considered.

  5. Academy of Dental Materials guidance on in vitro testing of dental composite bonding effectiveness to dentin/enamel using micro-tensile bond strength (μTBS) approach.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Steve; Breschi, Lorenzo; Özcan, Mutlu; Pfefferkorn, Frank; Ferrari, Marco; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2017-02-01

    An ideal dental adhesive should provide retentive strength, marginal seal, be relatively simple to achieve and demonstrate clinical durability. Future improvements in adhesive bonding to tooth structure require in vitro test methods that provide reliable data for materials development and/or evaluation of experimental variables. The objective of this project was to identify a test method that is relatively easy to perform, repeatable and ultimately useful for predicting clinical outcomes. The Academy of Dental Materials initiated a project to develop and distribute guidance documents on laboratory test methods that are useful for the evaluation of dental adhesives and cements, composite resins and ceramics. The dental adhesive sub-group has identified the micro-tensile bond strength test, especially after subjecting the specimens to a durability challenge, as currently the best practical surrogate measure of dental composite restoration retention. The following μTBS guidance is meant to aid the researcher in conducting the μTBS test. The authors, while recognizing the limitations of a static, strength-based test method, welcome comments and suggestions for improvements of this guidance document in future revisions. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of panel alignment and surface finish on bond strength

    SciTech Connect

    Wouters, J.M.; Doe, P.J.; Baker, W.E.

    1991-10-01

    The flexural strength of bonded acrylic is tested as a function of panel alignment and bond surface finish. Bond strength was shown to be highly dependent on both parameters with only a narrow range of values yielding a high strength bond. This study was performed for the heavy water-containing acrylic vessel for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory detector.

  7. Effect of resin cement type on the microtensile bond strength to lithium disilicate ceramic and dentin using different test assemblies.

    PubMed

    Marocho, Susana María; Ozcan, Mutlu; Amaral, Regina; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2013-08-01

    This study evaluated the microtensile bond strength (µTBS) of 3 different resin cements to lithium-disilicate ceramic using two assemblies: ceramic-cement-ceramic (CCC) and ceramic-cement-dentin (CCD). The bonding surfaces of lithium disilicate ceramic blocks (5 × 5 × 4 mm) (Nblock = 90) were etched with 4% hydrofluoric acid for 20 s and silanized. Flat dentin surfaces of human third molars were conditioned according to the respective manufacturer's specifications for three types of resin cements (ML: Multilink, Ivoclar-Vivadent; PF: Panavia F, Kuraray; SB: Super Bond C&B, Sun Medical). While one set of ceramic blocks (n = 30) was cemented to another equal set (CCC assembly), another set of ceramic blocks (n = 30) was cemented on flat dentin (CCD assembly). The bonded specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 h, and then sectioned along the x- and y-axes to obtain nontrimmed beam specimens. The beam specimens were randomly divided into two conditions: dry condition (DC - immediate testing); and aging condition (AC - thermocycling 12,000 times + water storage for 150 days). The µTBS bond strength test was performed using a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). After debonding, the substrate and adherent surfaces were analyzed using a scanning electron microscope to categorize the failure types. The data were statistically evaluated using 2-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (5%). While the mean µTBS of CCC assemblies were significantly influenced by the cement type (p < 0.05) and aging (p < 0.05), CCD assemblies showed a significant effect of the cement (p < 0.05) but not the aging (p > 0.05). Without aging (DC), the mean µTBS (MPa) of SB (26.9) and PF (26.9) were significantly higher than ML (18.5) (p < 0.05). For CCC after aging (AC), SB (26.6) showed higher mean µTBS than those of PF (16.4) and ML (18.5) (p < 0.05). However, in CCD after AC, no significant difference was found between the groups (p > 0.05). In both CCC and CCD assemblies, pre-test

  8. A new method of evaluation of fracture patterns following microtensile bond strength testing using polarized light microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hamama, Hamdi H; Yiu, Cynthia K Y; Burrow, Michael F

    2014-08-01

    This work describes a new method using polarized light microscopy to determine the failure modes of fractured beams following microtensile bond strength testing. The outcomes were validated using SEM and EDX elemental analysis. Resin adhesives and resin composites bonded to caries-free dentin samples as well as disks of adhesive and composite were observed with reflected polarized light microscopy (PLM) to obtain standard images. A set of beams fractured in the microtensile bond test were observed with PLM and compared with the standard images to determine failure mode through PLM color matching with the standard dentin, adhesive, or composite images. Samples were analyzed by EDX under SEM and compared with the PLM outcomes. Reflected PLM images showed that the fractured surfaces covered with resin-based materials (adhesives or composite) appeared pink in color, in contrast to dentin surfaces, which appeared yellow. EDX mapping together with SEM observation confirmed the results obtained by PLM. The results of EDX mapping and SEM observation showed that the use of polarized light microscopy is a simple, viable method for differentiation between the resin-covered dentin surfaces for determining fracture pattern analysis after bond testing.

  9. Bond strength of a calcium silicate-based sealer tested in bulk or with different main core materials.

    PubMed

    Nagas, Emre; Cehreli, Zafer; Uyanik, Mehmet Ozgur; Durmaz, Veli

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of a calcium silicate-based sealer (iRoot SP), with or without a core material, on bond strength to radicular dentin, in comparison with various contemporary root filling systems. Root canals of freshly extracted single-rooted teeth (n = 60) were instrumented using rotary instruments. The roots were randomly assigned to one of the following experimental groups: (1) a calcium silicate-based sealer without a core material (bulk-fill); (2) a calcium silicate-based sealer + gutta-percha; (3) a calcium silicate-based sealer + Resilon; (4) a methacrylate resin-based sealer (RealSeal SE) + Resilon; (5) an epoxy resin-based sealer (AH Plus) + gutta-percha, and (6) a mineral trioxide aggregate-based endodontic sealer (MTA Fillapex) + gutta-percha. Four 1-mm-thick sections were obtained from the coronal aspect of each root (n = 40 slices/group). Push-out bond strength testing was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min, and the bond strength data were analyzed statistically by one-way analysis of variance and Tukey tests (p < 0.05). The highest and lowest debonding values were obtained for the calcium silicate-based sealer bulk-fill and mineral trioxide aggregate-based endodontic sealer + gutta-percha groups, respectively (p < 0.05). It was concluded that the calcium silicate-based sealer showed higher resistance to dislocation in the bulk-filled form than in conjunction with the tested core filling materials. When the calcium silicate-based sealer was placed in bulk, its dislocation resistance was similar to that of commonly used sealer + core root filling systems. Thus, the concept of using a calcium silicate-based sealer in bulk can be more easily advocated in clinical practice.

  10. Dynamic strength of molecular adhesion bonds.

    PubMed

    Evans, E; Ritchie, K

    1997-04-01

    In biology, molecular linkages at, within, and beneath cell interfaces arise mainly from weak noncovalent interactions. These bonds will fail under any level of pulling force if held for sufficient time. Thus, when tested with ultrasensitive force probes, we expect cohesive material strength and strength of adhesion at interfaces to be time- and loading rate-dependent properties. To examine what can be learned from measurements of bond strength, we have extended Kramers' theory for reaction kinetics in liquids to bond dissociation under force and tested the predictions by smart Monte Carlo (Brownian dynamics) simulations of bond rupture. By definition, bond strength is the force that produces the most frequent failure in repeated tests of breakage, i.e., the peak in the distribution of rupture forces. As verified by the simulations, theory shows that bond strength progresses through three dynamic regimes of loading rate. First, bond strength emerges at a critical rate of loading (> or = 0) at which spontaneous dissociation is just frequent enough to keep the distribution peak at zero force. In the slow-loading regime immediately above the critical rate, strength grows as a weak power of loading rate and reflects initial coupling of force to the bonding potential. At higher rates, there is crossover to a fast regime in which strength continues to increase as the logarithm of the loading rate over many decades independent of the type of attraction. Finally, at ultrafast loading rates approaching the domain of molecular dynamics simulations, the bonding potential is quickly overwhelmed by the rapidly increasing force, so that only naked frictional drag on the structure remains to retard separation. Hence, to expose the energy landscape that governs bond strength, molecular adhesion forces must be examined over an enormous span of time scales. However, a significant gap exists between the time domain of force measurements in the laboratory and the extremely fast scale

  11. Tensile Bond Strength of Latex-Modified Bonded Concrete Overlays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Cameron; Ramseyer, Chris

    2010-10-01

    The tensile bond strength of bonded concrete overlays was tested using the in-situ pull-off method described in ASTM C 1583 with the goal of determining whether adding latex to the mix design increases bond strength. One slab of ductile concrete (f'c > 12,000 psi) was cast with one half tined, i.e. roughened, and one half steel-troweled, i.e. smooth. The slab surface was sectioned off and overlay mixtures containing different latex contents cast in each section. Partial cores were drilled perpendicular to the surface through the overlay into the substrate. A tensile loading device applied a direct tensile load to each specimen and the load was increased until failure occurred. The tensile bond strength was then calculated for comparison between the specimens.

  12. Bonding resin thixotropy and viscosity influence on dentine bond strength.

    PubMed

    Niem, Thomas; Schmidt, Alexander; Wöstmann, Bernd

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the influence of bonding resin thixotropy and viscosity on dentine tubule penetration, blister formation and consequently on dentine bond strength as a function of air-blowing pressure (air-bp) intensity. Two HEMA-free, acetone-based, one-bottle self-etch adhesives with similar composition except disparate silica filler contents and different bonding resin viscosities were investigated. The high-filler-containing adhesive (G-Bond) featured a lower viscous bonding resin with inherent thixotropic resin (TR) properties compared to the low-filler-containing adhesive (iBond) exhibiting a higher viscous bonding resin with non-thixotropic resin (NTR) properties. Shear bond strength tests for each adhesive with low (1.5bar; 0.15MPa; n=16) and high (3.0bar; 0.30MPa; n=16) air-bp application were performed after specimen storage in distilled water (24h; 37.0±1.0°C). Results were analysed using a Student's t-test to identify statistically significant differences (p<0.05). Fracture surfaces of TR adhesive specimens were morphologically characterised by SEM. Statistically significant bond strength differences were obtained for the thixotropic resin adhesive (high-pressure: 24.6MPa, low-pressure: 9.6MPa). While high air-bp specimens provided SEM images revealing resin-plugged dentine tubules, resin tags and only marginally blister structures, low air-bp left copious droplets and open dentine tubules. In contrast, the non-thixotropic resin adhesive showed no significant bond strength differences (high-pressure: 9.3MPa, low-pressure: 7.6MPa). A pressure-dependent distinct influence of bonding resin thixotropy and viscosity on dentine bond strength has been demonstrated. Stronger adhesion with high air-bp application is explained by improved resin fluidity and facilitated resin penetration into dentine tubules. Filler particles used in adhesive systems may induce thixotropic effects in bonding resin layers, accounting for improved free-flowing resin properties. In

  13. High bonding temperatures greatly improve soy adhesive wet strength

    Treesearch

    Charles R. Frihart; Thomas Coolidge; Chera Mock; Eder Valle

    2016-01-01

    Soy wood adhesive bond strengths reported in different literature studies are difficult to compare because a variety of temperatures and other conditions have been used for the bonding and testing step. Some reports have indicated bond strengths are sensitive to bonding temperature, but the reason(s) for this has not been intensively investigated. Although these prior...

  14. In vitro bond strength and fatigue stress test evaluation of different adhesive cements used for fixed space maintainer cementation

    PubMed Central

    Cantekin, Kenan; Delikan, Ebru; Cetin, Secil

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purposes of this research were to (1) compare the shear-peel bond strength (SPBS) of a band of a fixed space maintainer (SM) cemented with five different adhesive cements; and (2) compare the survival time of bands of SM with each cement type after simulating mechanical fatigue stress. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five teeth were used to assess retentive strength and another 50 teeth were used to assess the fatigue survival time. SPBS was determined with a universal testing machine. Fatigue testing was conducted in a ball mill device. Results: The mean survival time of bands cemented with R & D series Nova Glass-LC (6.2 h), Transbond Plus (6.7 h), and R & D series Nova Resin (6.8 h) was significantly longer than for bands cemented with Ketac-Cem (5.4 h) and GC Equia (5.2 h) (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Although traditional glass ionomer cement (GIC) cement presented higher retentive strength than resin-based cements (resin, resin modified GIC, and compomer cement), resin based cements, especially dual cure resin cement (nova resin cement) and compomer (Transbond Plus), can be expected to have lower failure rates for band cementation than GIC (Ketac-Cem) in the light of the results of the ball mill test. PMID:25202209

  15. Effects of Resin Hydrophilicity on Dentin Bond Strength

    PubMed Central

    Nishitani, Y.; Yoshiyama, M.; Donnelly, A.M.; Agee, K.A.; Sword, J.; Tay, F.R.; Pashley, D.H.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if hydrophobic resins can be coaxed into dentin wet with ethanol instead of water. The test hypothesis was that dentin wet with ethanol would produce higher bond strengths for hydrophobic resins than would dentin wet with water. This study examined the microtensile bond strength of 5 experimental adhesives (50 wt% ethanol/50% comonomers) of various degrees of hydrophilicity to acid-etched dentin that was left moist with water, moist with ethanol, or air-dried. Following composite buildups, hourglass-shaped slabs were prepared from the bonded teeth for microtensile testing. For all 3 types of dentin surfaces, higher bond strengths were achieved with increased resin hydrophilicity. The lowest bond strengths were obtained on dried dentin, while the highest bond strengths were achieved when dentin was bonded moist with ethanol. Wet-bonding with ethanol achieved higher bond strengths with hydrophobic resins than were possible with water-saturated matrices. PMID:17062742

  16. Analysis of the coefficient of variation in shear and tensile bond strength tests.

    PubMed

    Romano, Fábio Lourenço; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi; Magnani, Maria Beatriz Borges de Araújo; Nouer, Darcy Flávio

    2005-09-01

    The coefficient of variation is a dispersion measurement that does not depend on the unit scales, thus allowing the comparison of experimental results involving different variables. Its calculation is crucial for the adhesive experiments performed in laboratories because both precision and reliability can be verified. The aim of this study was to evaluate and to suggest a classification of the coefficient variation (CV) for in vitro experiments on shear and tensile strengths. The experiments were performed in laboratory by fifty international and national studies on adhesion materials. Statistical data allowing the estimation of the coefficient of variation was gathered from each scientific article since none of them had such a measurement previously calculated. Excel worksheet was used for organizing the data while the sample normality was tested by using Shapiro Wilk tests (alpha = 0.05) and the Statistical Analysis System software (SAS). A mean value of 6.11 (SD = 1.83) for the coefficient of variation was found by the data analysis and the data had a normal distribution (p>0.05). A range classification was proposed for the coefficient of variation from such data, that is, it should be considered low for a value lesser than 2.44; intermediate for a value between 2.44 and 7.94, high for a value between 7.94 and 9.78, and finally, very high for a value greater than 9.78. Such classification can be used as a guide for experiments on adhesion materials, thus making the planning easier as well as revealing precision and validity concerning the data.

  17. Testing Adhesive Bonds to Cloths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomann, David G.

    1987-01-01

    Nondestructive tool simple and inexpensive. Easy-to-use tool nondestructively tests strength of adhesive bond between cloth and straight rigid edge. Developed for testing advanced flexible reusable surface insulation.

  18. Microshear bond strength of self-etching adhesives to caries-affected dentin identified using the dye permeability test.

    PubMed

    Mobarak, Enas H; El-Badrawy, Wafa H

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare microshear bond strength (µSBS) of different adhesives to normal dentin (ND) and caries-affected dentin (AD) as differentiated using the dye permeability test. One hundred freshly extracted carious teeth were ground to expose normal and cariesaffected dentin. Differentiation between both substrates was carried out using microhardness and a new dye permeability method. Ground teeth were divided into 5 groups according to the adhesive tested; Clearfil SE Bond (SE), Clearfil DC Bond (DC) (Kuraray), Bond Force (BF) (Tokuyama), AdheseOne (AH) (Ivoclar), Adper Prompt-L-pop (PR) (3M ESPE). Adhesives were applied to selected substrate, and composite cylinders (0.9 mm diameter x 0.7 mm length) were formed. After 24 h, specimens were subjected to microshear testing at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Failure modes were determined using a stereomicroscope at 40X magnification. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests. Normal dentin was permeable for the dye, while caries-affected dentin was impermeable. Vickers hardness numbers (VHN) for normal and caries-affected dentin were 63.98 ± 3.24 and 62.40 ± 3.49 respectively, which were not significantly different (p > 0.05). µSBS values were: SE-ND = 22.34 ± 6.4, SE-AD = 18.70 ± 4.0, BF-ND = 24.52 ± 4.9, BF-AD = 18.31 ± 4.9, DC-ND = 24.49 ± 8.0, DC-AD = 18.97 ± 9.4, AH-ND = 17.21 ± 6.8, AH-AD = 17.03 ± 10.3, PR-ND = 13.67 ± 4.4, PR-AD = 7.31 ± 2.4 MPa. A statistically significant difference was found among the adhesive systems to both normal (p < 0.01) and caries-affected dentin (p < 0.001). However, µSBS of SE, DC, and AH adhesives to normal dentin were not significantly different from those of caries-affected dentin (p > 0.05). The permeability test was an effective tool to differentiate between normal and caries-affected dentin. Some adhesive systems showed no significant difference in their bond to normal or affected dentin.

  19. Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded to Zirconium Crowns

    PubMed Central

    Mehmeti, Blerim; Azizi, Bleron; Kelmendi, Jeta; Iljazi-Shahiqi, Donika; Alar, Željko

    2017-01-01

    Background An increasing demand for esthetic restorations has resulted in an increased use of all-ceramic restorations, such as zirconium. However, one of the challenges the orthodontist must be willing to face is how to increase bond strength between the brackets and various ceramic restorations.Bond strength can beaffected bybracket type, by the material that bracketsaremade of, and their base surface design or retention mode. ​ Aim: of this study was to perform a comparative analysis of the shear bond strength (SBS) of metallic and ceramic orthodontic brackets bonded to all-zirconium ceramic surfaces used for prosthetic restorations, and also to evaluate the fracture mode of these two types of orthodontic brackets. Material and methods Twenty samples/semi-crowns of all-zirconium ceramic, on which orthodontic brackets were bonded, 10 metallic and 10 ceramic polycrystalline brackets, were prepared for this research. SBS has been testedby Universal Testing Machine, with a load applied using a knife edged rod moving at a fixed rate of 1 mm/min, until failure occurred. The force required to debond the brackets was recorded in Newton, then SBS was calculated to MPa. In addition, the samples were analyzed using a digital camera magnifier to determine Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI). Statistical data were processed using t-test, and the level of significance was set at α = 0.05. Results Higher shear bond strength values were observed in metallic brackets bonded to zirconium crowns compared tothoseof ceramic brackets, with a significant difference. During the test, two of the ceramic brackets were partially or totally damaged. Conclusion Metallic brackets, compared to ceramic polycrystalline brackets, seemed tocreate stronger adhesion with all-zirconium surfaces due to their better retention mode. Also, ceramic brackets showed higher fragility during debonding. PMID:28827846

  20. Evaluation of thermal compatibility between core and veneer dental ceramics using shear bond strength test and contact angle measurement.

    PubMed

    Benetti, Paula; Della Bona, Alvaro; Kelly, J Robert

    2010-08-01

    To test the hypotheses that shear bond strength (sigma(s)) and contact angle (theta) are influenced by the thermal expansion/contraction behavior of bilayered all-ceramic systems. Glass-infiltrated ceramics (A - In-Ceram ALUMINA) and zirconia-reinforced alumina (Z - In- Ceram ZIRCONIA) were veneered with feldspathic ceramics (7 - VM7; 9 - VM9; 13 - VM13), yielding 6 experimental groups. Surface roughness (Ra) of A and Z core ceramic disks (12 mm diameter x 1.2 mm high) was measured to assure that values were similar. A cylinder of veneer (2 mm diameter x 2 mm high) was fired onto the center of all core disks, cooled under identical conditions and tested for sigma(s) to failure (n=20). For the theta evaluation (n=10) similar specimens (veneer 1 mm high) were overfired to develop an equilibrium theta that was then measured from digital images (AutoCAD 2006). Published thermal expansion data were used. The mean values of sigma(s) (MPa) and theta (degrees) for the core-veneer ceramic groups were, respectively: A7 (19.4+/-4.7; 49+/-4.7); Z7 (23.4+/-6.2; 56+/-4.9); A9 (0.9+/-1.6; 55+/-5.8); Z9 (9.8+/-5.7; 59.8+/-2.9); A13 (0; 70+/-6.0); Z13 (0; 67.2+/-6.3). As the difference in coefficient of thermal expansion (coreveneer) increases, the theta value increases (r=0.95) and the sigma(s) value decreases (r=-0.92), pbond strength test of core-veneer ceramics are influenced by the thermal expansion behavior of these all-ceramic systems. Copyright 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cryogenic evaluation of epoxy bond strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albritton, N.; Young, W.

    The purpose of the work presented here was to determine methods of optimizing the adhesion of a particular epoxy (CTD-101K, Composite Technology Development Inc.) to a particular nickel-based alloy substrate (Incoloy ® 908, Inco Alloys International) for cryogenic applications. Initial efforts were focused on surface preparation of the substrate material via various mechanical and chemical cleaning techniques. Test samples, fabricated to simulate the conduit-to-insulation interface, were put through a mock heat treat and vacuum/pressure impregnation process. Samples were compression/shear load tested to compare the bond strengths at room temperature and liquid nitrogen temperature. The resulting data indicate that acid etching creates a higher bond strength than the other tested techniques and that the bond formed is stronger at cryogenic temperatures than at room temperature. A description of the experiment along with the resulting data is presented here.

  2. Bond strength of thermally recycled metal brackets.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, J J; Ackerman, R J

    1983-03-01

    Bracket recycling has emerged concurrently with the practice of direct bonding. This study was undertaken to determine the effect of recycling on the retention of mesh-backed stainless steel brackets. Mesh strand diameter was measured on forty new brackets. These brackets were bonded to recently extracted human premolar teeth, and the tensile force required to fracture each bond was recorded. The brackets were then reconditioned by a thermal process. The mesh strand size was remeasured and the tensile test was repeated. It was found that (1) mesh strand diameter decreased 7 percent during the reconditioning process (93.89 microns +/- 3.17 S.D. compared to 87.07 microns +/- 4.76 S.D., z = 17.62, P less than 1 X 10(-5) ), (2) new bracket bonds were 6 percent stronger than recycled bracket bonds (43.88 pounds +/- 7.98 S.D. bond strength), and (3) reduction in mesh strand diameter during the reconditioning process did not correlate with changes in bond strength between initial and recycled bonding (Pearson r = 0.038).

  3. Shear bond strength of dental amalgam bonded to dentin.

    PubMed

    Covey, D A; Moon, P C

    1991-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the shear bond strength of dental amalgam bonded to dentin with adhesives. Four groups of 15 permanent posterior teeth were used in this study. The occlusal enamel of the teeth was removed to produce a flat dentin surface. The teeth were embedded in phenolic rings with acrylic resin. Vinyl polysiloxane ring molds 4 mm thick with 4.5 mm circular openings were attached to the exposed dentin surface. Adhesives applied to the dentin surfaces prior to amalgam placement and condensation included: Amalgambond, a 4-META/TBB-MMA, HEMA based system (A), Panavia EX, a modified phosphate ester of Bis-GMA luting system (P), and Ketac-Cem, a glass ionomer luting cement (K). A dentin bonding agent and composite resin restoration system (Scotchbond 2/Silux Plus) was included for comparison. The specimens were stored in 37 degrees C water for 7 days prior to testing. Shear bond tests were done in an Instron machine at a crosshead speed of 0.02 inches per minute. The data were analyzed by ANOVA at 5% level of significance. The differences in shear bond strengths of the four test groups were not statistically significant (P = 0.115). Fracture patterns of the bonded amalgams, examined by SEM, were adhesive in appearance for Groups A and K and cohesive for Group P.

  4. Shear bond strength of the Tenure Solution dentin bonding system.

    PubMed

    Barkmeier, W W; Cooley, R L

    1989-10-01

    A liquid solution of an oxalate bonding system containing NTG-GMA and PMDM has become commercially available. The bond strength of this oxalate adhesive (Tenure Solution) to dentin was determined by bonding composite resin cylinders to extracted teeth. The bond strengths obtained in this study are compared to the bond strengths obtained in earlier studies with the first and second generation oxalate adhesives whose components were supplied as powders and required mixing. The oxalate solutions developed significantly higher bond strengths than the original powder type systems.

  5. Shear bond strength and physicochemical interactions of XP Bond.

    PubMed

    Lattaa, Mark A

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of composite to dentin and enamel using the new etch-and-rinse adhesive XP Bond compared to other adhesives (OptiBond Solo Plus, Adper Scotchbond 1 XT, Syntac Classic). Shear bond strength (MPa) was measured by shearing a resin cylinder 4.5 mm in diameter from prepared buccal surfaces of human third molars using an Instron Testing Machine equipped with a chisel-shaped rod. In addition, micro-Raman spectroscopy was performed to determine if there was a chemical interaction between the resin adhesive and dentin and enamel. Significant differences were observed among the dentin and enamel values generated with the adhesives tested. XP Bond generated statistically similar values to Optibond Solo Plus and Adper Scotchbond 1 XT to both enamel and dentin. Syntac Classic generated significantly lower values to both enamel and dentin. Micro-Raman spectroscopy showed a complete infiltration of resin into the demineralized dentin zone. In addition, it strongly suggested a chemical interaction with XP Bond and components of dentin. It is hypothesized that this interaction is due to the formation of calcium phosphate complexes derived from mineral apatite in the dentin and phosphate esters in the adhesive.

  6. Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Newer Bonding Systems on Superficial and Deep Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, R Veena; Siddaraju, Kishore; Nagaraj, Hema; Poluri, Ramya Krishna

    2015-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of nanocomposite resin to superficial dentin and deep dentin using two different dentin bonding systems. Materials and Methods: All teeth were sectioned at various levels (superficial dentin: Dentin within 0.5-1 mm of dentinoenamel junction; deep dentin: Dentin within 0.5 mm of the highest pulp horn) using a Carborundum Disc and embedded in acrylic block of specific size. Selected specimens (60 premolar teeth) were grouped randomly into three groups, the groups were differentiated into superficial dentin, deep dentin, and control group which were further divided into sub Group A and Subgroup B containing 10 teeth each, depending on the bonding agents used. In Subgroup A, Tetric N Bond, and in Subgroup B Single Bond Universal were used. In the control group no bonding agent was used. The specimens were thermocycled for 500 cycles between 5°C and 55°C water bath for 40 s. Finally, the specimens were subjected to shear bond strength study under INSTRON machine (Universal Testing Machine). The maximum shear bond strengths were noted at the time of fracture (de-bonding) of the restorative material. Results were analyzed using ANOVA test, Bonferroni test, and paired t-test. Results: Bond strength values of fifth generation bonding system (Tetric N Bond) showed higher mean shear bond strength compared to seventh generation bonding system (Single Bond Universal). There was a significant fall in bond strength values as one reaches deeper levels of dentin from superficial to deep dentin. Conclusion: There was a significant difference between the bond strength of fifth generation bonding system (Tetric N Bond) and seventh generation bonding system (Single Bond Universal). Decrease in the bond strength values is seen for the deeper level of dentin as compared to superficial dentin. PMID:26435613

  7. Analysis of tensile bond strengths using Weibull statistics.

    PubMed

    Burrow, Michael F; Thomas, David; Swain, Mike V; Tyas, Martin J

    2004-09-01

    Tensile strength tests of restorative resins bonded to dentin, and the resultant strengths of interfaces between the two, exhibit wide variability. Many variables can affect test results, including specimen preparation and storage, test rig design and experimental technique. However, the more fundamental source of variability, that associated with the brittle nature of the materials, has received little attention. This paper analyzes results from micro-tensile tests on unfilled resins and adhesive bonds between restorative resin composite and dentin in terms of reliability using the Weibull probability of failure method. Results for the tensile strengths of Scotchbond Multipurpose Adhesive (3M) and Clearfil LB Bond (Kuraray) bonding resins showed Weibull moduli (m) of 6.17 (95% confidence interval, 5.25-7.19) and 5.01 (95% confidence interval, 4.23-5.8). Analysis of results for micro-tensile tests on bond strengths to dentin gave moduli between 1.81 (Clearfil Liner Bond 2V) and 4.99 (Gluma One Bond, Kulzer). Material systems with m in this range do not have a well-defined strength. The Weibull approach also enables the size dependence of the strength to be estimated. An example where the bonding area was changed from 3.1 to 1.1 mm diameter is shown. Weibull analysis provides a method for determining the reliability of strength measurements in the analysis of data from bond strength and tensile tests on dental restorative materials.

  8. Evaluation of stresses developed in different bracket-cement-enamel systems using finite element analysis with in vitro bond strength tests

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to determine the bond strength of different orthodontic bracket materials (ceramic, stainless steel, and titanium) as well as stresses developed in bracket-cement-enamel systems using finite element (FE) analysis. Methods One hundred and thirty-five extracted human caries-free upper central incisors were divided into three groups (n = 45/group) according to the type of orthodontic bracket materials (stainless steel, ceramic, and titanium). Each group was further subdivided into three subgroups (n = 15/group) according to the bond strength test loading mode (shear short side, shear long side, and tensile). After debonding, the fractured specimen was examined, and the adhesive remnant index (ARI) was determined. FE analysis models analyzed the stress distribution within the cement and enamel. Bond strengths were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test, and the ARI scores were analyzed using chi-square (χ2) test. Results Shear loading at the short side of the bracket resulted in the highest bond strength and lowest maximum principal stress both on cement and enamel compared with the other loading modes (P < 0.05). Ceramic brackets presented with higher bond strength and lower maximum principal stress than metallic brackets (P < 0.05). There was a significant difference for ARI scores between the type of brackets (χ2 = 64.852, P < 0.001). Conclusion The findings suggest that the manner of loading orthodontic brackets and the selection of orthodontic bracket materials affect the bond strength and stresses developed both on cement and enamel. PMID:24934213

  9. Bond strength of repaired amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Rey, Rosalia; Mondragon, Eduardo; Shen, Chiayi

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated the interfacial flexural strength (FS) of amalgam repairs and the optimal combination of repair materials and mechanical retention required for a consistent and durable repair bond. Amalgam bricks were created, each with 1 end roughened to expose a fresh surface before repair. Four groups followed separate repair protocols: group 1, bonding agent with amalgam; group 2, bonding agent with composite resin; group 3, mechanical retention (slot) with amalgam; and group 4, slot with bonding agent and amalgam. Repaired specimens were stored in artificial saliva for 1, 10, 30, 120, or 360 days before being loaded to failure in a 3-point bending test. Statistical analysis showed significant changes in median FS over time in groups 2 and 4. The effect of the repair method on the FS values after each storage period was significant for most groups except the 30-day storage groups. Amalgam-amalgam repair with adequate condensation yielded the most consistent and durable bond. An amalgam bonding agent could be beneficial when firm condensation on the repair surface cannot be achieved or when tooth structure is involved. Composite resin can be a viable option for amalgam repair in an esthetically demanding region, but proper mechanical modification of the amalgam surface and selection of the proper bonding system are essential.

  10. Push-out bond strengths of two fiber post types bonded with different dentin bonding agents.

    PubMed

    Topcu, Fulya Toksoy; Erdemir, Ugur; Sahinkesen, Gunes; Mumcu, Emre; Yildiz, Esra; Uslan, Ibrahim

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the regional push-out bond strengths for two fiber-reinforced post types using three different dentin bonding agents. Sixty single-rooted extracted human first premolar teeth were sectioned below the cemento-enamel junction, and the roots were endodontically treated. Following standardized post space preparations, the roots were divided into two fiber-post groups (Glassix and Carbopost), and further divided into three subgroups of 10 specimens each for the bonding systems self-etching dentin bonding agents (Clearfil SE Bond and Optibond all-in-one), and total-etching dentin bonding agent (XP Bond). A dual-cure resin luting cement (Maxcem) was then placed in the post spaces and posts were then seated into the root canals polymerized through the cervical portion. The roots were then cut into 3-mm thick sections. Push-out tests were performed at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The data were analyzed with multivariate ANOVA (alpha = 0.05). The morphology of interface between different dentin bonding agents from the cervical sections were analyzed with SEM. Glass fiber-reinforced posts demonstrated significantly higher push-out bond strengths than carbon fiber-reinforced posts (p < 0.001). Bond strength values decreased significantly from the cervical to the apical root canal regions (p < 0.001). Self-etching dentin adhesive Clearfil SE Bond and total-etching dentin adhesive XP Bond demonstrated similar bond strengths values and this was significantly higher compared with the Optibond all-in-one in cervical root canal region. In conclusion, in all root segments, the glass fiber-reinforced posts provided significantly increased post retention than the carbon fiber-reinforced posts, regardless of the adhesive used.

  11. Enamel and dentin bond strength following gaseous ozone application.

    PubMed

    Cadenaro, Milena; Delise, Chiara; Antoniollo, Francesca; Navarra, Ottavia Chiara; Di Lenarda, Roberto; Breschi, Lorenzo

    2009-08-01

    To evaluate the effects of gaseous ozone application on enamel and dentin bond strength produced by two self-etching adhesive systems. The shear bond strength test was conducted to assess adhesion on enamel (protocol 1), while the microtensile bond strength test was performed on dentin (protocol 2). Protocol 1: 96 bovine incisors were randomly divided into 4 groups, and enamel surfaces were bonded in accordance with the following treatments: (1E) ozone + Clearfil Protect Bond; (2E) Clearfil Protect Bond (control); (3E) ozone + Xeno III; (4E) Xeno III (control). Ozone gas was applied for 80 s. Shear bond strength was measured with a universal testing machine. Protocol 2: 40 noncarious human molars were selected. Middle/deep dentin was exposed and bonded in accordance with the following treatments: (1D) ozone+Clearfil Protect Bond; (2D) Clearfil Protect Bond (control); (3D) ozone+Xeno III (4D) Xeno III (control). Four-mm-thick buildups were built on the adhesives, then specimens were sectioned in accordance with the nontrimming technique. Specimens were stressed until failure occurred, and failure modes were analyzed. Shear bond and microtensile bond strength data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test. No statistical differences were found between ozone treated specimens and controls, neither on enamel nor on dentin irrespective of the tested adhesive. Clearfil Protect Bond showed higher bond strength to enamel than Xeno III, irrespective of the ozone treatment (p < 0.05). The use of ozone gas to disinfect the cavity before placing a restoration had no influence on immediate enamel and dentin bond strength.

  12. Bond strength to surface enamel for different tooth types.

    PubMed

    Hobson, R S; McCabe, J F; Hogg, S D

    2001-03-01

    Fixed appliance therapy in orthodontics relies on the effective bonding of brackets to surface enamel. Bracket de-bonding during treatment is both inconvenient and costly to both dentist and patient. Factors which control the efficacy of the bond are not fully understood. For example, there has never been a study to determine the efficacy of bonding to different teeth in the dentition. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible differences in bond strength to acid etched enamel on the different teeth of the dentition. Two hundred and forty extracted sound human teeth were collected from white Caucasian subjects between the age of 10 and 22 years. Approximately 20 teeth of each tooth type were bonded using a standard acid etch technique with 'A company' stainless steel brackets using a light cured composite (Transbond, 3M Unitek). Shear bond strength (24 h) was measured using an Instron testing machine. Tooth type was found to have a significant effect on bond strength (p<0.001). The greatest mean bond strength was found on the lower first molar teeth, and the lowest on the upper first molar teeth. In the upper arch, bond strength was greater on anterior teeth than posterior teeth (p<0.001). In the lower arch bond strength was weaker on anterior teeth than posterior teeth (p<0.001). The results have profound implications for bond strength testing of dental composites to enamel as well as to the expectations of bond reliability in orthodontic therapy. The findings suggest that, in order to achieve meaningful comparisons, enamel bond strength measurements should be made using the same tooth type, or that appropriate stratification of groups of test teeth should be used. These findings may also explain, in part, variability in enamel bonding efficacy despite the best efforts of the dental practitioner.

  13. Influence of dentin pretreatment on bond strength of universal adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Poggio, Claudio; Beltrami, Riccardo; Colombo, Marco; Chiesa, Marco; Scribante, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The purpose of the present study was to compare bond strength of different universal adhesives under three different testing conditions: when no pretreatment was applied, after 37% phosphoric acid etching and after glycine application. Materials and methods: One hundred and fifty bovine permanent mandibular incisors were used as a substitute for human teeth. Five different universal adhesives were tested: Futurabond M+, Scotchbond Universal, Clearfil Universal Bond, G-Premio BOND, Peak Universal Bond. The adhesive systems were applied following each manufacturer’s instructions. The teeth were randomly assigned to three different dentin surface pretreatments: no pretreatment agent (control), 37% phosphoric acid etching, glycine pretreatment. The specimens were placed in a universal testing machine in order to measure and compare bond strength values. Results: The Kruskal–Wallis analysis of variance and the Mann–Whitney test were applied to assess significant differences among the groups. Dentin pretreatments provided different bond strength values for the adhesives tested, while similar values were registered in groups without dentin pretreatment. Conclusions: In the present report, dentin surface pretreatment did not provide significant differences in shear bond strength values of almost all groups. Acid pretreatment lowered bond strength values of Futurabond and Peak Universal Adhesives, whereas glycine pretreatment increased bond strength values of G Praemio Bond adhesive system. PMID:28642929

  14. Shear bond strength of partial coverage restorations to dentin

    PubMed Central

    Agustín-Panadero, Rubén; Alonso-Pérez-Barquero, Jorge; Fons-Font, Antonio; Solá-Ruíz, María-Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Background When partial coverage restorations (veneers, inlays, onlays…) must be cemented to dentin, bond strength may not reach the same predictable values as to enamel. The purpose of this study was: 1. To compare, with a shear bond test, the bond strength to dentin of a total-etch and a self-etching bonding agent. 2. To determine whether creating microretention improves the bond strength to dentin. Material and Methods Two bonding agents were assayed, Optibond FL® (Kerr), two-bottle adhesive requiring acid etching, and Clearfil SE Bond® (Kuraray), two-bottle self-etching adhesive. The vestibular, lingual, distal and mesial surfaces of ten molars (n=10) were ground to remove all enamel and 40 ceramic samples were cemented with Variolink II® (Ivoclar Vivadent). Half the molar surfaces were treated to create round microretention (pits) to determine whether these could influence bond strength to dentin. The 40 molar surfaces were divided into four groups (n=10): Optibond FL (O); Clearfil SE (C); Optibond FL + microretention (OM); Clearfil SE + micro retention (CM). A shear bond test was performed and the bond failures provoked examined under an optical microscope. Results O=35.27±8.02 MPa; C=36.23±11.23 MPa; OM=28.61±6.27 MPa; CM=27.01±7.57 MPa. No statistically significant differences were found between the adhesives. Optibond FL showed less statistical dispersion than Clearfil SE. The presence of microretentions reduced bond strength values regardless of the adhesive used. Conclusions 1. Clearfil SE self-etching adhesive and Optibond FL acid-etch showed adequate bond strengths and can be recommended for bonding ceramic restorations to dentin. 2. The creation of round microretention pits compromises these adhesives’ bond strength to dentin. Key words:Adhesion to dentin, bonding agent, Optibond FL, Clearfil SE, microretention, shear bond test. PMID:26330937

  15. Enamel Bond Strength of New Universal Adhesive Bonding Agents.

    PubMed

    McLean, D E; Meyers, E J; Guillory, V L; Vandewalle, K S

    2015-01-01

    Universal bonding agents have been introduced for use as self-etch or etch-and-rinse adhesives depending on the dental substrate and clinician's preference. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of composite to enamel using universal adhesives compared to a self-etch adhesive when applied in self-etch and etch-and-rinse modes over time. Extracted human third molars were used to create 120 enamel specimens. The specimens were ground flat and randomly divided into three groups: two universal adhesives and one self-etch adhesive. Each group was then subdivided, with half the specimens bonded in self-etch mode and half in etch-and-rinse mode. The adhesives were applied as per manufacturers' instructions, and composite was bonded using a standardized mold and cured incrementally. The groups were further divided into two subgroups with 10 specimens each. One subgroup was stored for 24 hours and the second for six months in 37°C distilled water and tested in shear. Failure mode was also determined for each specimen. A three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) found a significant difference between groups based on bonding agent (p<0.001) and surface treatment (p<0.001) but not on time (p=0.943), with no significant interaction (p>0.05). Clearfil SE in etch-and-rinse and self-etch modes had more mixed fractures than either universal adhesive in either mode. Etching enamel significantly increased the SBS of composite to enamel. Clearfil SE had significantly greater bond strength to enamel than either universal adhesive, which were not significantly different from each other.

  16. Shear bond strength of two resin cements to human root dentin using three dentin bonding agents.

    PubMed

    Gogos, C; Stavrianos, C; Kolokouris, I; Economides, N; Papadoyannis, I

    2007-01-01

    This study compared the bond strength of two resin cements to human root dentin when used with three bonding agents. The materials used were Rely X ARC and Perma Cem, two one-bottle bonding agents (Single Bond, Bond-1) and one self-etching bonding agent (Clearfil SE Bond). The dentin was obtained from single rooted human teeth, and the specimens were treated with either 15% EDTA or 37% phosphoric acid to remove the smear layer, except in groups where the self-etching bonding agent was used. The resin cements were placed on dentin surfaces with the use of bonding agents. Shear bond strength (SBS) was tested using a single plane shear test assembly. The dentin specimens were divided into 10 groups. Eight groups were pre-treated with EDTA or phosphoric acid to remove the smear layer, followed by a bonding agent (Bond-1 or Single Bond) and resin cement (Rely X or Perma Cem). In the two remaining groups, the smear layer was left intact, and the two resins cements were used in combination with the self-etching bonding agent (Clearfil SE Bond). No statistically significant differences were observed among the eight groups treated with one-bottle bonding agents. The mean bond strengths of the two groups treated with the self-etching bonding agent did not differ significantly from each other but were both significantly greater than the bond strengths of all the other groups. The results of this study also showed that EDTA can be used as an alternative to phosphoric acid in bonding procedures for resin cements. However, the bond strengths of resin cements, in combination with a self-etching bonding agent, were significantly greater than those of the same cements when used with one-bottle bonding agents.

  17. Bond strength to root dentin and fluid filtration test of AH Plus/gutta-percha, EndoREZ and RealSeal systems

    PubMed Central

    MAHDI, Alaa Abdul; BOLAÑOS-CARMONA, Victoria; GONZALEZ-LOPEZ, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the bond strength and seal ability produced by AH Plus/gutta-percha, EndoREZ and RealSeal systems to root canal dentin. Material and Methods Sixty extracted single-root human teeth, instrumented manually to size 40, were divided into three groups (n=20) according to the sealer used; G1: AH Plus, G2: EndoREZ, and G3: RealSeal sealers. After filling using the lateral condensation technique, each sealer group was randomly divided into two subgroups according to the tests applied (n=10 for µPush-out test and n=10 for fluid filtration test). A fluid filtration method was used for quantitative evaluation of apical leakage. Four 1-mm-thick slices (cervical and medium level) were obtained from each root sample and a µPush-out test was performed. Failure modes were examined under microscopy at 40x, and a one-way ANOVA was applied to analyze the permeability. Non-parametrical statistics for related (Friedman's and Wilcoxon's rank tests) or unrelated samples (Kruskal-Wallis' and Mann-Whitney's tests) allowed for comparisons of µPush-out strength values among materials at the different levels. Statistical significance was accepted for p values <.05. Results There are no significant differences among fluid filtration of the three sealers. The sealer/core material does not significantly influence the µPush-out bond strength values (F=2.49; p=0.10), although statistically significant differences were detected with regard to root level (Chi2=23.93; p<0.001). AH Plus and RealSeal obtained higher bond strength to intraradicular dentin in the medium root slices. Conclusions There are no significant differences between the permeability and global µPush-out bond strength to root canal dentin achieved by AH Plus/gutta-percha, EndoREZ and RealSeal systems. PMID:24037078

  18. Effect of surface treatments and bonding agents on the bond strength of repaired composites.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Andrea Nóbrega; De Lima, Adriano Fonseca; Peris, Alessandra Rezende; Mitsui, Fabio Hiroyuki Ogata; Marchi, Giselle Maria

    2007-01-01

    An adequate repair procedure depends on high bond strength between the existing composite and the new composite. To evaluate the effect of surface treatments and bonding procedures on the bond strength of repairs performed 24 hours after composite polymerization. Composite specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. Specimens were allocated into 12 groups (N=10) according to the combination of surface treatment (none, air abrasion, diamond bur) and bonding procedure (none, Single Bond after H(3)PO(4) cleansing, Clearfil SE Bond after H(3)PO(4) cleansing, Clearfil SE Bond without H(3)PO(4) cleansing). The ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of the composite was tested in nonrepaired specimens. Twenty-four hours after repair, specimens were sectioned into three slabs and trimmed to an hourglass shape (1 mm(2) area). Slabs were tested under tension and mean bond strengths analyzed with two-way analysis of variance/Tukey and Dunnett tests (alpha=5%). Two groups resulted in repair bond strengths similar to composite UTS: air abrasion combined with Clearfil SE Bond after H(3)PO(4) cleansing, and air abrasion combined with Clearfil SE Bond without H(3)PO(4) cleansing. Combinations of surface treatments and bonding procedures were not statistically different. When repair procedure was performed 24 hours after composite polymerization, different combinations of surface treatments and bonding procedures affected repair bond strength similarly. There was no statistical difference between the repair bond strength of groups air-abraded and bonded with the self-etching system and composite UTS. Only air abrasion associated with a self-etching system provided repair bond strength comparable to composite UTS.

  19. The bond strengths of resin systems to etched enamel.

    PubMed

    Short, G M; Hembree, J H; McKnight, J P

    1976-11-01

    This study was undertaken to compare the resin-enamel bond strengths of seven anterior restorative resins using the acid-etch technique. Six of the materials (Restodent, Enamelite, Smile, Nuva-System, Concise, and Adaptic) were composite resins. Only one, Sevriton, was an unfilled resin. Of the seven, only Sevriton and Smile were not designed for the acid-etch technique. Of the materials tested, Sevriton and Enamelite had the weakest bonds. There was no significant difference in the bond strength among Nuva-System, Smile, and Restodent; the bonds of all these were stronger than those of Sevriton and Enamelite. Concise showed a significantly greater bond strength than all the other materials in the study except Adaptic and the Nuva-System. The resin-enamel bond strength of Adaptic was of a greater magnitude than that of all other test materials.

  20. Wood structure and adhesive bond strength

    Treesearch

    Charles R. Frihart

    2006-01-01

    Much of the literature on the bonding of wood and other lignocellulosic materials has concentrated on traditional adhesion theories. This has led to misconceptions because wood is a porous material on both the macroscopic and microscopic levels. A better understanding of wood bonding can be developed by investigating the theories of adhesion and bond strength, taking...

  1. Finite element analysis and bond strength of a glass post to intraradicular dentin: comparison between microtensile and push-out tests.

    PubMed

    Soares, Carlos J; Santana, Fernanda R; Castro, Carolina G; Santos-Filho, Paulo C F; Soares, Paulo V; Qian, Fang; Armstrong, Steven R

    2008-10-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that the stress distribution and bond strength of glass posts to intraradicular dentin is influenced by the mechanical testing methodology. Thirty single rooted endodontically treated teeth were prepared for luting of tapered fiber-glass posts (Reforpost, Angelus, Londrina, PR, Brazil) with a conventional adhesive system and resin luting cement (Adper Scotchbond Multi-purpose, Rely X ARC, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA). The teeth were randomly divided (n=10 per group) into micro-push-out (Mpo), hourglass- (Mh) and rectangular stick-shaped (Ms) microtensile testing groups before sectioning each root into five 1-mm-thick specimens. During specimen preparation for microTBS testing 46/50 stick and 4/50 hourglass specimens prematurely failed; therefore, the Ms group could not be included in the mechanical testing. The remaining specimens were tested at 0.5 mm/min until bond failure. Stress distribution within each specimen type for the three mechanical test methods was analyzed by finite element analysis (FEA). Qualitative analyses were carried out through Von Mises, XY and Sy criterion. Mpo and Mh had a mean microTBS of 11.89+/-6.55 and 14.98+/-12.72 MPa, respectively, which was not significantly different (p=0.1311). The push-out test demonstrated a more homogenous stress distribution by FEA and less variability in mechanical testing. Therefore, the recommended testing method for determining the bond strength of glass posts to intraradicular dentin is by Mpo.

  2. Bond strength with custom base indirect bonding techniques.

    PubMed

    Klocke, Arndt; Shi, Jianmin; Kahl-Nieke, Bärbel; Bismayer, Ulrich

    2003-04-01

    Different types of adhesives for indirect bonding techniques have been introduced recently. But there is limited information regarding bond strength with these new materials. In this in vitro investigation, stainless steel brackets were bonded to 100 permanent bovine incisors using the Thomas technique, the modified Thomas technique, and light-cured direct bonding for a control group. The following five groups of 20 teeth each were formed: (1) modified Thomas technique with thermally cured base composite (Therma Cure) and chemically cured sealant (Maximum Cure), (2) Thomas technique with thermally cured base composite (Therma Cure) and chemically cured sealant (Custom I Q), (3) Thomas technique with light-cured base composite (Transbond XT) and chemically cured sealant (Sondhi Rapid Set), (4) modified Thomas technique with chemically cured base adhesive (Phase II) and chemically cured sealant (Maximum Cure), and (5) control group directly bonded with light-cured adhesive (Transbond XT). Mean bond strengths in groups 3, 4, and 5 were 14.99 +/- 2.85, 15.41 +/- 3.21, and 13.88 +/- 2.33 MPa, respectively, and these groups were not significantly different from each other. Groups 1 (mean bond strength 7.28 +/- 4.88 MPa) and 2 (mean bond strength 7.07 +/- 4.11 MPa) showed significantly lower bond strengths than groups 3, 4, and 5 and a higher probability of bond failure. Both the original (group 2) and the modified (group 1) Thomas technique were able to achieve bond strengths comparable to the light-cured direct bonded control group.

  3. Surface treatments to improve bond strength in removable partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Kim-Hai, Nguyen; Esquivel-Upshaw, Josephine; Clark, Arthur E

    2003-01-01

    The metal and resin interface of removable partial dentures is weakened by the poor bond strength between the two materials. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that surface treatments--consisting of air abrasion, with aluminum oxide, tin plating and oxidation, and silanation, either alone or in combination--will improve the bond strength of acrylic resin to metal. Statistical analysis revealed that air abrasion, tin plating/oxidation, and silanation all showed significantly higher bond strength than either abrasion and tin plating, abrasion and silanation, or abrasion alone. Air abrasion demonstrated the greatest effect on improving bond strength. The mean bond strength of samples subjected to a combination of air abrasion, tin plating and oxidation, and silanation was significantly greater than any other combination treatment.

  4. Bond strength of direct and indirect bonded brackets after thermocycling.

    PubMed

    Daub, Jacob; Berzins, David W; Linn, Brandon James; Bradley, Thomas Gerard

    2006-03-01

    Thermocycling simulates the temperature dynamics in the oral environment. With direct bonding, thermocycling reduces the bond strength of orthodontic adhesives to tooth structure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strengths (SBS) of one direct and two indirect bonding methods/adhesives after thermocycling. Sixty human premolars were divided into three groups. Teeth in group 1 were bonded directly with Transbond XT. Teeth in group 2 were indirect bonded with Transbond XT/Sondhi Rapid Set, which is chemically cured. Teeth in group 3 were indirect bonded with Enlight LV/Orthosolo and light cured. Each sample was thermocycled between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C for 500 cycles. Mean SBS in groups 1, 2, and 3 were not statistically significantly different (13.6 +/- 2.9, 12.3 +/- 3.0, and 11.6 +/- 3.2 MPa, respectively; P > .05). However, when these values were compared with the results of a previous study using the same protocol, but without thermocycling, the SBS was reduced significantly (P = .001). Weibull analysis further showed that group 3 had the lowest bonding survival rate at the minimum clinically acceptable bond-strength range. The Adhesive Remnant Index was also determined, and group 2 had a significantly (P < .05) higher percentage of bond failures at the resin/enamel interface.

  5. Dentin bond strengths of simplified adhesives: effect of dentin depth.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Guilherme Carpena; Perdigão, Jorge; Lopes, Mariana de F; Vieira, Luiz Clovis Cardoso; Baratieri, Luiz Narciso; Monteiro, Sylvio

    2006-06-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of 3 simplified adhesive systems applied on shallow vs deep dentin. For superficial dentin, 30 human molars were sectioned with a diamond saw to expose dentin immediately below the dentoenamel junction. For deep dentin, 30 molars were sectioned 3 mm below the dentoenamel junction. The teeth were mounted, polished to 600-grit, and randomly assigned to 3 groups (n=10): Single Bonda and OptiBond Solo, total-etch adhesives, and Clearfil Liner Bond 2V, a self-etching primer adhesive. Adhesives were applied, the restorative material Filtek Z250 inserted in a No. 5 gelatin capsule, and light-cured. After 24 hours in water at 37 degrees C, shear bond strength was measured with an Instron at 5 mm/min. The data were analyzed with 2-way ANOVA and Duncan's post-hoc test. The results showed the following shear bond strengths (mean +/- SD in MPa): Single Bond/superficial dentin = 22.1 +/- 2.8; Single Bond/deep dentin = 14.2 +/- 7.0; OptiBond Solo/superficial dentin = 18.9 +/- 4.1; OptiBond Solo/deep dentin = 18.4 +/- 4.8; Clearfil Liner Bond 2V/superficial dentin = 21.0 +/- 7.4; Clearfil Liner Bond 2V/deep dentin = 17.6 +/- 5.9. There were no significant differences between mean shear bond strength for the factor "adhesive system" (P>.822). The Duncan's test showed that Single Bond resulted in higher shear bond strength on superficial dentin than on deep dentin. The mean shear bond strength for Clearfil Liner Bond 2V and OptiBond Solo were not influenced by dentin depth. When data were pooled for dentin depth, deep dentin resulted in statistically lower bond strengths than superficial dentin (P<.01). The influence of dentin depth on shear bond strength depends on the specific composition of the dentin adhesive.

  6. Bond strength of luting cements to core foundation materials.

    PubMed

    Hewlett, Sandra; Wadenya, Rose O; Mante, Francis K

    2010-03-01

    The purpose was to compare the shear bond strength of luting cements to foundation materials and to determine the effect of storage in lactate buffer solution. Disks that were 8 mm in diameter and 2-mm thick were fabricated from foundation substrates: amalgam, composite resin, resin-modified glass ionomer, and glass ionomer (n = 20). Cylinders that were 2 mm in diameter and 4 mm in length of resin luting cement, resin-modified glass ionomer luting cement, and a glass ionomer luting cement were bonded to the foundation substrate materials. Shear bond strength of each foundation substrate material/cement pair was determined with a universal testing machine after 24 hours. A second set of specimens was tested after storage in a 0.01M lactate buffer solution for 24 hours. A three-way analysis of variance followed by pair-wise comparisons was performed to compare bond strengths (P < .05). The resin cement provided the highest (P < .05) bond strengths to amalgam, composite resin, and resin-modified glass ionomer foundation materials while the glass ionomer cement showed the lowest bond strength (P < .05) to composite resin and glass ionomer foundation restoration materials. After immersion in a 0.01M lactate buffer solution, the shear bond strength of all the material combinations was significantly lower (P < .05) than nonimmersed specimens, except the bonds between composite resin foundation and resin luting cement, which significantly increased (P < .05) in strength. The resin cement had the highest bond strength to most foundation substrates investigated. The highest bond was observed between the composite resin foundation and resin cement. This bond was also the most durable on immersion in lactic acid.

  7. The effect of air thinning on dentin adhesive bond strength.

    PubMed

    Hilton, T J; Schwartz, R S

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if air thinning three dentin adhesives would affect bond strength to dentin. Ninety human molars were mounted in acrylic and the occlusal surfaces ground to expose a flat dentin surface. Thirty teeth were randomly assigned to one of the following dentin bonding agent/composite combinations: A) Universal Bond 3/TPH (Caulk), B) All-Bond 2/Bis-Fil-P (Bisco), and C) Scotchbond Multi-Purpose/Z-100 (3m). The primers were applied following the manufacturers' instructions. The adhesives were applied by two methods. A thin layer of adhesive was applied with a brush to 15 specimens in each group and light cured. Adhesive was brushed on to the remaining 15 teeth in the group, air thinned for 3 seconds, and then polymerized. The appropriate composite was applied in 2 mm increments and light cured utilizing a 5 mm-in-diameter split Teflon mold. Following 3 months of water storage, all groups were shear tested to failure on an Instron Universal Testing Machine. Bond strength was significantly higher in all groups when the dentin bonding agent was painted on without being air thinned. Scotchbond Multi-Purpose had significantly higher bond strength than All-Bond 2, which had significantly higher bond strength than Universal Bond 3.

  8. The effect of saliva on shear bond strengths of hydrophilic bonding systems.

    PubMed

    Webster, M J; Nanda, R S; Duncanson, M G; Khajotia, S S; Sinha, P K

    2001-01-01

    Failure of orthodontic bonded attachments and brackets is mostly attributed to contamination of the enamel surface. To overcome this problem, materials have been developed that purportedly overcome the moisture and contaminants present in the oral environment. This study compared the shear bond strengths of 2 lightcured hydrophilic bonding systems, Transbond XT with MIP (3M/Unitek, Monrovia, Calif) and Assure (Reliance Orthodontics, Itasca, Ill) with a hydrophobic bonding system, Transbond XT with XT primer (3M/Unitek). Comparison tests were conducted under 4 enamel surface conditions: (1) etched and dried; (2) etched and moistened with artificial saliva; (3) etched, primed, and moistened with artificial saliva; and (4) etched, primed, moistened with artificial saliva, and reprimed. In addition, an adhesive remnant index score was used to determine the amount of adhesive remaining on the tooth. Stainless steel brackets with mesh-backed pads (n = 144) were bonded to bovine teeth. Bond strength was then tested in shear using an Instron mechanical testing instrument. There were significant differences in the bond strengths among the products (P <.05), within surface treatments (P <.05), and among the different bonding materials in combination with various surface treatments (P <.05). Treatments 1 and 4 showed the highest mean bond strengths adhesive remnant index scores, whereas treatments 2 and 3 showed the lowest mean bond strengths and scores.

  9. Effects of argon laser curing on dentin shear bond strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, G. L.; Blankenau, Richard J.

    1996-04-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the ability of the argon laser to polymerize light activated materials and improve enamel shear bond strengths. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of the argon laser on dentin shear bond strengths of current dentin bonding systems. Argon laser (HGM Model 8) at 231 mw and 280 mw, 5 second bonding agent, 10 seconds composite and a conventional curing light (Translux EC/Kulzer) at 10 seconds bonding agent, 20 second composite were used to polymerize samples of dentin bonding systems: Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus (3M) and Prime Bond (Dentsply/Caulk), both with TPH (Dentsply/Caulk) composite. A flat dentin bonding site (600 grit) was prepared on the buccal surface of extracted human teeth. Twelve samples were made for each set of parameters for both laser and conventional light totaling 60 samples. Samples were stored in distilled water in light- proof containers for 24 hours at 37 degree(s)C. Shear bond strengths (MPa) were determined for each sample on the Instron testing machine. Mean values were calculated for each set of data and ANOVA with Fisher PLSD were used for statistical analysis. The argon laser provided bond strengths that were 21 - 24% greater than those of the conventional curing light system.

  10. Effect of dimethyl sulfoxide wet-bonding technique on hybrid layer quality and dentin bond strength.

    PubMed

    Stape, Thiago Henrique Scarabello; Tjäderhane, Leo; Marques, Marcelo Rocha; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Martins, Luís Roberto Marcondes

    2015-06-01

    This study examined the effect of a dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) wet bonding technique on the resin infiltration depths at the bonded interface and dentin bond strength of different adhesive systems. Flat dentin surfaces of 48 human third molars were treated with 50% DMSO (experimental groups) or with distilled water (controls) before bonding using an etch-and-rinse (SBMP: Scotchbond Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE) or a self-etch (Clearfil: Clearfil SE Bond, Kuraray) adhesive system. The restored crown segments (n=12/group) were stored in distilled water (24h) and sectioned for interfacial analysis of exposed collagen using Masson's Trichrome staining and for microtensile bond strength testing. The extent of exposed collagen was measured using light microscopy and a histometric analysis software. Failure modes were examined by SEM. Data was analyzed by two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey Test (α=0.05). The interaction of bonding protocol and adhesive system had significant effects on the extension of exposed collagen matrix (p<0.0001) and bond strength (p=0.0091). DMSO-wet bonding significantly reduced the extent of exposed collagen matrix for SBMP and Clearfil (p<0.05). Significant increase in dentin bond strength was observed on DMSO-treated specimens bonded with SBMP (p<0.05), while no differences were observed for Clearfil (p>0.05). DMSO-wet bonding was effective to improve the quality of resin-dentin bonds of the tested etch-and-rinse adhesives by reducing the extent of exposed collagen matrix at the base of the resin-dentin biopolymer. The improved penetration of adhesive monomers is reflected as an increase in the immediate bond strength when the DMSO-wet bonding technique is used with a water-based etch-and-rinse adhesive. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Strength of Multiple Parallel Biological Bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Sulchek, T A; Friddle, R W; Noy, A

    2005-12-07

    Multivalent interactions play a critical role in a variety of biological processes on both molecular and cellular levels. We have used molecular force spectroscopy to investigate the strength of multiple parallel peptide-antibody bonds using a system that allowed us to determine the rupture forces and the number of ruptured bonds independently. In our experiments the interacting molecules were attached to the surfaces of the probe and sample of the atomic force microscope with flexible polymer tethers, and unique mechanical signature of the tethers determined the number of ruptured bonds. We show that the rupture forces increase with the number of interacting molecules and that the measured forces obey the predictions of a Markovian model for the strength of multiple parallel bonds. We also discuss the implications of our results to the interpretation of force spectroscopy measurements in multiple bond systems.

  12. Influence of Water Storage and Bonding Material on Bond Strength of Metallic Brackets to Ceramic.

    PubMed

    Costa, Ana Rosa; Correr, Américo Bortolazzo; Consani, Simonides; Giorgi, Maria Cecília Caldas; Vedovello, Silvia Amélia; Vedovello Filho, Mário; Santos, Eduardo Cesar Almada; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the influence of water storage (24 h and 6 months), and Transbond XT and Fuji Ortho LC bonding materials on the bond strength of metallic brackets bonded to feldspathic ceramic. Four cylinders of feldspathic ceramic were etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid for 60 s. Each cylinder received two layers of silane. Metallic brackets were bonded to the cylinders using Transbond XT or Fuji Ortho LC. Light-activation was carried out with 40 s total exposure time using Bluephase G2. Half the specimens for each bonding materials (n=20) were stored in distilled water at 37 °C for 24 h and the other half for 6 months. Shear bond strength testing was performed after storage times at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was used to evaluate the amount of adhesive remaining on the ceramic surface at ×8 magnification. Data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p<0.05). Transbond XT showed significantly higher bond strength (p<0.05) than Fuji Ortho LC. Significant differences in bond strength (p<0.05) were found when 24 h and 6 months storage times were compared between materials. ARI showed a predominance of score 0 for all groups, and higher scores at 1, 2 and 3 for 24 h storage time. In conclusion, storage time and bonding materials showed significant influence on the bond strength of brackets to ceramic.

  13. Comparison of shear bond strength and bonding time of a novel flash-free bonding system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Moonyoung; Kanavakis, Georgios

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the bonding time, shear bond strength (SBS), and adhesive residue index (ARI) of APC(TM) Flash-Free bonding system. Thirty-six extracted human maxillary premolars were randomly divided into three groups (12 per group) and used for this in vitro study: group 1, APC Flash-Free Adhesive Coated Appliance System; group 2, Clarity ADVANCED Ceramic Bracket pasted manually; group 3 (control group), 3M APC PLUS Adhesive prepasted brackets bonded with the extruded flash removed. Bonding time was measured using a stopwatch. Bond strength was measured using an Instron at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min. The ARI was graded on a scale from 1 to 5. Repeated-measures analysis of variance and post hoc Tukey tests were used for statistical analysis. It took significantly (P < .001) less time to bond in the APC Flash-Free Adhesive group (30.7 ± 3.3 seconds) compared with the control group (41.8 ± 4.0 seconds) and the manual group (39.2 ± 2.8 seconds). The APC Flash-Free Adhesive coated bracket had significantly (P < .001) greater SBS (13.7 ± 2.2 MPa) compared with the control group (10.8 ± 2.0 MPa) and the manual group (10.4 ± 1.4 MPa). The ARI was significantly (P < .001) greater with the APC Flash-Free Adhesive coated bracket compared with that of the other two groups. Compared with other methods of bonding, the APC Flash-Free Adhesive Coated System can potentially reduce bonding time while increasing SBS.

  14. Strength of a bifurcated H bond.

    PubMed

    Feldblum, Esther S; Arkin, Isaiah T

    2014-03-18

    Macromolecules are characterized by their particular arrangement of H bonds. Many of these interactions involve a single donor and acceptor pair, such as the regular H-bonding pattern between carbonyl oxygens and amide H(+)s four residues apart in α-helices. The H-bonding potential of some acceptors, however, leads to the phenomenon of overcoordination between two donors and one acceptor. Herein, using isotope-edited Fourier transform infrared measurements and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we measured the strength of such bifurcated H bonds in a transmembrane α-helix. Frequency shifts of the (13)C=(18)O amide I mode were used as a reporter of the strength of the bifurcated H bond from a thiol and hydroxyl H(+) at residue i + 4. DFT calculations yielded very similar frequency shifts and an energy of -2.6 and -3.4 kcal/mol for the thiol and hydroxyl bifurcated H bonds, respectively. The strength of the intrahelical bifurcated H bond is consistent with its prevalence in hydrophobic environments and is shown to significantly impact side-chain rotamer distribution.

  15. Disinfectant storage media and composite/metal bond strength.

    PubMed

    Williams, V D; Díaz-Arnold, A M; Fotos, P G

    1994-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of three disinfection procedures on the tensile bond strength of Panavia resin composite cement. Alloy cylinders were bonded and stored in: (1) 0.2% chlorhexidine; (2) 2% activated glutaraldehyde; (3) distilled water and sterilized with ethylene oxide; and (4) distilled water. Solutions were monitored for bacterial cultures and pH changes regularly for 90 days after which all samples were tested to tensile failure. ANOVA showed no significant difference between mean group bond strengths. A direct positive correlation was demonstrated between solution pH and bond strengths (r = 0.98). All groups were found to represent effective methods for preventing bacterial growth in storage solutions during long term cement bonding studies.

  16. Gap measurement and bond strength of five selected adhesive systems bonded to tooth structure.

    PubMed

    Arbabzadeh, F; Gage, J P; Young, W G; Shahabi, S; Swenson, S M

    1998-06-01

    The ability of a restorative material to bond and seal the interface with tooth structure is perhaps the most significant factor in determining resistance to marginal caries. Thus, the quality and durability of marginal seal and bond strength are major considerations in the selection of restorative materials. The purpose of this study was to compare the bond strength and marginal discrepancies of five adhesive systems: All-Bond 2, Clearfil Liner Bond, KB 200, ProBond and AELITE Bond. Twenty-five buccal and 25 lingual cavities were prepared in 25 caries-free extracted molar teeth, giving 10 cavities for each of the 5 adhesive systems. All teeth were restored with the resin composite Pertac Hybrid, or PRISMA Total Performance Hybrid with their appropriate adhesive systems. After restoration, the teeth were thermocycled, were stained with a 1.5% aqueous solution of a procion dye (reactive orange 14) and sectioned coronally with a saw microtome. Three sections of 200 microns thickness were prepared from each restoration which were then examined microscopically to measure marginal gap widths using a confocal tandem microscope. Shear bond strength measurements were carried out on the dentine bond using a universal testing machine. The All-Bond 2 adhesive system was found to have higher shear bond strength and to have the least gap width at the cementodentinal margin.

  17. A comparison of bond strength between direct- and indirect-bonding methods.

    PubMed

    Linn, Brandon James; Berzins, David W; Dhuru, Virendra B; Bradley, Thomas Gerard

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength and the sites of bond failure for brackets bonded to teeth, using two indirect-bonding material protocols and a direct-bonding technique. Sixty extracted human premolars were collected and randomly divided into three groups. The direct-bonded group (group 1) used a light-cured adhesive and primer (Transbond XT). One indirect-bonded group (group 2) consisted of a chemical-cured primer (Sondhi Rapid Set) and light-cured adhesive (Transbond XT), whereas the other group (group 3) used a light-cured primer (Orthosolo) and adhesive (Enlight LV). Forty hours after bonding, the samples were debonded. Mean shear bond strengths were 16.27, 13.83, and 14.76 MPa for groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. A one-way analysis of variance showed no significant difference in mean bond strength between groups (P = .21). Furthermore, a Weibull analysis showed all three groups tested provided over a 90% survival rate at normal masticatory and orthodontic force levels. For each tooth, an Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) score was determined. Group 2 was found to have a significantly lower ARI score (P < .05) compared with groups 1 and 3. In addition, Pearson correlation coefficients indicated no strong correlation between bond strength and ARI score within or across all groups.

  18. Pauling bond strength, bond length and electron density distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Gerald V.; Ross, Nancy L.; Cox, David F.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Iversen, Bo B.; Spackman, M. A.

    2014-01-18

    A power law regression equation, = 1.46(<ρ(rc)>/r)-0.19, connecting the average experimental bond lengths, , with the average accumulation of the electron density at the bond critical point, <ρ(rc)>, between bonded metal M and oxygen atoms, determined at ambient conditions for oxide crystals, where r is the row number of the M atom, is similar to the regression equation R(M-O) = 1.39(ρ(rc)/r)-0.21 determined for three perovskite crystals for pressures as high as 80 GPa. The two equations are also comparable with those, = 1.43(/r)-0.21, determined for a large number of oxide crystals at ambient conditions and = 1.39(/r)-0.22, determined for geometry optimized hydroxyacid molecules, that connect the bond lengths to the average Pauling electrostatic bond strength, , for the M-O bonded interactions. On the basis of the correspondence between the two sets of equations connecting ρ(rc) and the Pauling bond strength s with bond length, it appears that Pauling’s simple definition of bond strength closely mimics the accumulation of the electron density between bonded pairs of atoms. The similarity of the expressions for the crystals and molecules is compelling evidence that the M-O bonded interactions for the crystals and molecules 2 containing the same bonded interactions are comparable. Similar expressions, connecting bond lengths and bond strength, have also been found to hold for fluoride, nitride and sulfide molecules and crystals. The Brown-Shannon bond valence, σ, power law expression σ = [R1/(R(M-O)]N that has found wide use in crystal chemistry, is shown to be connected to a more universal expression determined for oxides and the perovskites, <ρ(rc)> = r[(1.41)/]4.76, demonstrating that the bond valence for a bonded interaction is likewise closely connected to the accumulation of the electron density between the bonded atoms. Unlike the Brown-Shannon expression, it is universal in that it holds for the M

  19. In vitro Comparative Evaluation of Tensile Bond Strength of 6(th), 7(th) and 8(th) Generation Dentin Bonding Agents.

    PubMed

    Kamble, Suresh S; Kandasamy, Baburajan; Thillaigovindan, Ranjani; Goyal, Nitin Kumar; Talukdar, Pratim; Seal, Mukut

    2015-05-01

    Newer dentin bonding agents were developed to improve the quality of composite restoration and to reduce time consumption in its application. The aim of the present study was to evaluate tensile bond strength of 6(th), 7(th) and 8(th) generation bonding agents by in vitro method. Selected 60 permanent teeth were assigned into 20 in each group (Group I: 6(th) generation bonding agent-Adper SE plus 3M ESPE, Group II: 7(th) generation bonding agent-G-Bond GC Corp Japan and Group III: 8(th) generation dentin adhesives-FuturaBond, DC, Voco, Germany). With high-speed diamond disc, coronal dentin was exposed, and selected dentin bonding agents were applied, followed by composite restoration. All samples were saved in saline for 24 h and tensile bond strength testing was done using a universal testing machine. The obtained data were tabulated and statistically analyzed using ANOVA test. The tensile bond strength readings for 6(th) generation bonding agent was 32.2465, for 7(th) generation was 31.6734, and for 8(th)-generation dentine bonding agent was 34.74431. The highest tensile bond strength was seen in 8(th) generation bonding agent compared to 6(th) and 7(th) generation bonding agents. From the present study it can be conclude that 8(th) generation dentine adhesive (Futura DC, Voco, Germany) resulted in highest tensile bond strength compared to 6(th) (Adper SE plus, 3M ESPE) and 7(th) generation (G-Bond) dentin bonding agents.

  20. Shear bond strengths of a single-step bonding system to enamel and dentin.

    PubMed

    Nikaido, T; Nakajima, M; Higashi, T; Kanemura, N; Pereira, P N; Tagami, J

    1997-06-01

    An experimental primer was developed as a single-step bonding system for resin-modified glass ionomer cements (GIC). Efficacy of this primer on adhesion of resin-modified GICs and resin composite to enamel and dentin was evaluated by shear bond test and SEM observation. Good bond strengths to enamel were obtained (> 11 MPa), whereas significantly low bond strengths to dentin were obtained using a single coat of the primer. However, double-coating improved the bond strengths to dentin (> 8 MPa). SEM observations indicated that the primer functioned as a mild conditioner to remove the smear layer on enamel or dentin surfaces. A hybrid layer was observed at the cross-sectional view of the GIC/dentin interface. These findings suggested that good adhesion to enamel and dentin could be achieved using a single-step bonding system.

  1. Glass Fiber Post/Composite Core Systems Bonded to Human Dentin: Analysis of Tensile Load vs Calculated Tensile Strength of Various Systems Using Pull-out Tests.

    PubMed

    Keul, Christine; Köhler, Patrick; Hampe, Rüdiger; Roos, Malgorzata; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    Pull-out testing was used to determine the tensile load (TL) and tensile strength (TS) of five different fiber post systems bonded to human intracanal dentin. 120 caries-free premolars, canines, and maxillary central incisors were divided into 5 different groups for 5 fiber post systems (n = 24): 1. RelyX Fiber Post 3D (RX3D); 2. RelyX Fiber Post (RX); 3. Luxa- Post (LP); 4. FibreKleer 4X Tapered Post (FK); 5. ParaPost Taper Lux (PP). The teeth were prepared and posts inserted. Core buildups were performed with the corresponding product's resin composite. All specimens were stored in water for 24 h at 37°C. TL and TS were tested on half of the specimens (n = 12/group). The remaining samples were thermocycled (10,000 x 5°C/55°C) before testing. TL was directly measured and TS was calculated using the bonding surface. Failure modes were identified using a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using twoway ANOVA with the post-hoc Scheffé test, as well as the chi-squared test (p < 0.05). FK and LP resulted in the lowest mean TL but were not significantly different from those of RX and RX3D. The highest mean TL and TS were observed for PP. Nevertheless, PP fell within the same statistical subset as RX3D and RX. Thermocycling showed no impact on the results. RX3D predominantly showed debonding of the post plus core buildup from the tooth; all other systems mainly demonstrated detachment of the core from the posts. PP, RX, and RX3D together with an adhesive core buildup yielded the highest bond strength to human dentin. Parameters TL and TS showed the same tendencies and statistical evidence.

  2. Evaluation of shear bond strength of porcelain bonded to laser welded titanium surface and determination of mode of bond failure.

    PubMed

    Patil, Narendra P; Dandekar, Minal; Nadiger, Ramesh K; Guttal, Satyabodh S

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of porcelain to laser welded titanium surface and to determine the mode of bond failure through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrophotometry (EDS). Forty five cast rectangular titanium specimens with the dimension of 10 mm x 8 mm x 1 mm were tested. Thirty specimens had a perforation of 2 mm diameter in the centre. These were randomly divided into Group A and B. The perforations in the Group B specimens were repaired by laser welding using Cp Grade II titanium wire. The remaining 15 specimens were taken as control group. All the test specimens were layered with low fusing porcelain and tested for shear bond strength. The debonded specimens were subjected to SEM and EDS. Data were analysed with 1-way analysis of variance and Student's t-test for comparison among the different groups. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed no statistically significant difference in shear bond strength values at a 5% level of confidence. The mean shear bond strength values for control group, Group A and B was 8.4 +/- 0.5 Mpa, 8.1 +/- 0.4 Mpa and 8.3 +/- 0.3 Mpa respectively. SEM/EDS analysis of the specimens showed mixed and cohesive type of bond failure. Within the limitations of the study laser welding did not have any effect on the shear bond strength of porcelain bonded to titanium.

  3. Bond strength of binary titanium alloys to porcelain.

    PubMed

    Yoda, M; Konno, T; Takada, Y; Iijima, K; Griggs, J; Okuno, O; Kimura, K; Okabe, T

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the bond strength between porcelain and experimental cast titanium alloys. Eleven binary titanium alloys were examined: Ti-Cr (15, 20, 25 wt%), Ti-Pd (15, 20, 25 wt%), Ti-Ag (10, 15, 20 wt%), and Ti-Cu (5, 10 wt%). As controls, the bond strengths for commercially pure titanium (KS-50, Kobelco, Japan) and a high noble gold alloy (KIK, Ishifuku, Japan) were also examined. Castings were made using a centrifugal casting unit (Ticast Super R, Selec Co., Japan). Commercial porcelain for titanium (TITAN, Noritake, Japan) was applied to cast specimens. The bond strengths were evaluated using a three-point bend test according to ISO 9693. Since the elastic modulus value is needed to evaluate the bond strength, the modulus was measured for each alloy using a three-point bend test. Results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA/S-N-K test (alpha = 0.05). Although the elastic moduli of the Ti-Pd alloys were significantly lower than those of other alloys (p = 0.0001), there was a significant difference in bond strength only between the Ti-25Pd and Ti-15Ag alloys (p = 0.009). The strengths determined for all the experimental alloys ranged from 29.4 to 37.2MPa, which are above the minimum value required by the ISO specification (25 MPa).

  4. Influence of silane and solvated bonding agents on the bond strength to glass-fibre posts.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Aline S; Ramalho, Elisa S; Spazzin, Aloísio O; Naves, Lucas Z; Moraes, Rafael R

    2013-12-01

    The combined use of silane and solvated bonding agents on the bond strength to glass-fibre posts was investigated. A model Bis-GMA/HEMA adhesive was formulated with no solvent, 30% of ethanol or 80% of acetone. The surfaces of rectangular-shaped posts were silanated or not and one of the agents was applied, except for the control group. Cylinders of resin cement (RelyX ARC, 3M ESPE, Saint Paul, MN, USA) were built-up on the surfaces (n = 20) and submitted to shear testing. All groups showed higher bond strengths when the surfaces were silanated. When no silanization was carried out, the use of bonding agents, either solvated or non-solvated, increased the bond strengths. All groups treated with both silane and bonding agent showed higher bond strengths than the group that was only silanated. Control and ethanol-based adhesives were similar, whereas the acetone-based agent yielded higher bond strengths. Adhesive failures were predominant. Combination of silane and adhesive enhanced the bond to fibre posts.

  5. Effects of dentin depth and cavity configuration on bond strength.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, T; Sano, H; Burrow, M F; Tagami, J; Pashley, D H

    1999-04-01

    During polymerization of resin composites, shrinkage stresses compete with resin-dentin bonds in a manner that can cause failure of the bond, depending upon the configuration of the cavity, its depth, and the restorative technique. The hypothesis tested in this study was that the effect of cavity configuration (C) and remaining dentin thickness (RDT) influence resin bond strength to the dentin of Class I cavity floors. The occlusal enamel was ground to expose a flat superficial dentin surface as a control (superficial dentin, C-factor = 1) in human extracted third molars. Cavities 3 mm long x 4 mm wide were prepared to a depth 2 mm below the ground dentin surfaces (deep dentin within cavity floor, C-factor = 3). To assess the relationship between C-factor and RDT, we removed the walls of cavities, making a deep flat surface for bonding (deep dentin, C-factor = 1). The teeth were restored with either Clearfil Liner Bond II (LB II), One-Step (OS), or Super-Bond D Liner (DL), followed by Clearfil Photo Posterior resin composite. After 24 hrs' storage in water, the teeth were sectioned vertically into 3 or 4 slabs (0.7 mm thick) and trimmed for the micro-tensile bond test so that we could determine the strength of the resin bonds to the pulpal floor. All groups gave high bond strengths to superficial dentin, but OS and DL gave significantly lower bond strengths to flat deep dentin when the C-factor was 1. When the C-factor was increased to 3 by the creation of a three-dimensional cavity preparation, the bond strengths of all materials fell (range, 21 to 35%), but the difference was significant (p < 0.05) only with DL. SEM observations of failure patterns showed that specimens with high bond strengths tended to exhibit cohesive failures within the hybrid layer, while specimens exhibiting low bond strengths showed failures at the top of the hybrid layer. Some adhesives do not bond well to deep dentin, making them more susceptible to polymerization shrinkage stress that

  6. Evaluation of bond strength of orthodontic brackets without enamel etching

    PubMed Central

    Boruziniat, Alireza; Motaghi, Shiva; Moghaddas, Mohmmadjavad

    2015-01-01

    Background To compare the shear bond strength of brackets with and without enamel etching. Material and Methods In this study, 60 sound premolars were randomly divided into four different groups: 1- TXE group: Enamel etching+Transbond XT adhesive+ Transbond XT composite. 2- TXS group: Transbond plus self-etch adhesive+ Transbond XT composite. 3- PQ1E group: Enamel etching+ PQ1 adhesive+ Transbond XT composite. 4- PQ1 group: PQ1 adhesive+ Transbond XT composite. The shear bond strengths of brackets were evaluated using universal testing machine at cross head speed of 0.5 mm/min. The Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) was also measured. One-way ANOVA, Tukey’s post hoc, Kruskal-wallis and Mann-Witney U test were used for data analysis. Results There was a significant difference between etched and unetched groups respect to SBS and ARI (p<0.05), however; no significant difference was observed between unetched group and self-etch adhesive group (p>> 0.05). The shear bond strength of PQ1 group was the least but in acceptable range and its ARI was less than other groups. Conclusions PQ1 adhesive can be used for bracket bonding without enamel etching with adequate bond strength and minimal ARI. Key words:Bracket, shear bond strength, filled-adhesive, self-etch adhesive. PMID:26535100

  7. A novel bonding method for fabrication of PET planar nanofluidic chip with low dimension loss and high bonding strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Zhifu; Qi, Liping; Zou, Helin; Sun, Lei; Xu, Shenbo

    2015-08-01

    Plastic planar nanofluidic chips are becoming increasingly important for biological and chemical applications. However, the majority of the present bonding methods for planar nanofluidic chips suffer from high dimension loss and low bonding strength. In this work, a novel thermal bonding technique based on O2 plasma and ethanol treatment was proposed. With the assistance of O2 plasma and ethanol, the PET (polyethylene terephthalate) planar nanofluidic chip can be bonded at a low bonding temperature of 50 °C. To increase the bonding rate and bonding strength, the O2 plasma parameters and thermal bonding parameters were optimized during the bonding process. The tensile test indicates that the bonding strength of the PET planar nanofluidic chip can reach 0.954 MPa, while the auto-fluorescence test demonstrates that there is no leakage or blockage in any of the bonded micro- or nanochannels.

  8. Bond strength analysis of custom base variables in indirect bonding techniques.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Michael A; Drummond, James L; BeGole, Ellen A

    2008-01-01

    Various methods are used to prepare the cured composite-adhesive interface for orthodontic indirect bonding. The intent of this study was to determine the effect on the shear bond strength of the following variables: use of a filled flowable composite resin as an adhesive, light air-abrasion of the cured composite bracket pad, and wetting the cured composite bracket pad with an unfilled resin. The sample of 240 brackets was divided into 2 groups of 120 each. The first group was further divided into 4 groups of 30 each. Brackets were bonded to bovine incisors with a filled flowable composite resin (Filtek, 3M ESPE, St Paul Minn), but the bracket pads were prepared differently in the 4 groups: unfilled resin was applied (Orthosolo, Ormco, Glendora, Calif), the surface was air abraded, the surface was air abraded followed by application of an unfilled resin (Orthosolo), and a control group. A matching sample of 120 brackets was bonded without the flowable composite as an adhesive. The different bracket pad preparations were chosen to represent the various techniques clinicians use in indirect bonding. The shear bond strength was measured on a universal testing machine. Two-way ANOVA analysis showed significant differences in the shear bond strength among the different surface preparations, but not between the use and nonuse of flowable composite. The Scheffé test showed that the mean shear bond strength of the air-abraded surface was significantly higher than all other surface preparations. Air abrading orthodontic bracket-pad composite surfaces in indirect bonding increased the shear bond strength, whereas the use of flowable composite did not affect bond strengths.

  9. Insulation bonding test system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beggs, J. M.; Johnston, G. D.; Coleman, A. D.; Portwood, J. N.; Saunders, J. M.; Redmon, J. W.; Porter, A. C. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A method and a system for testing the bonding of foam insulation attached to metal is described. The system involves the use of an impacter which has a calibrated load cell mounted on a plunger and a hammer head mounted on the end of the plunger. When the impacter strikes the insulation at a point to be tested, the load cell measures the force of the impact and the precise time interval during which the hammer head is in contact with the insulation. This information is transmitted as an electrical signal to a load cell amplifier where the signal is conditioned and then transmitted to a fast Fourier transform (FFT) analyzer. The FFT analyzer produces energy spectral density curves which are displayed on a video screen. The termination frequency of the energy spectral density curve may be compared with a predetermined empirical scale to determine whether a igh quality bond, good bond, or debond is present at the point of impact.

  10. Effect of bond thickness on fracture and fatigue strength of adhesively bonded composite joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Ramamurthy, G.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental investigation of composite to composite bonded joints was undertaken to study the effect of bond thickness on debond growth rate under cyclic loading and critical strain energy release rate under static loading. Double cantilever beam specimens of graphite/epoxy adherends bonded with EC 3445 were tested under mode I loading. A different behavior of fracture and fatigue strength was observed with variation of bondline thickness.

  11. Effect of latex glove contamination on bond strength.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Howard W; Bartoloni, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    This study examined the effect of powdered and powder-free latex glove contamination on bond strength. Sixty caries-free human third molars were mounted in acrylic, sectioned with a diamond saw to expose a flat occlusal dentin surface, and finished with 400- and 600-grit silicon carbide paper. Teeth were assigned to one of 5 groups: 1) no latex glove contamination (control); 2) powdered latex glove contamination before etching; 3) powder-free latex glove contamination before etching; 4) powdered latex glove contamination after dentin bonding agent application but prior to resin composite placement; 5) powder-free latex glove contamination after dentin bonding agent application but prior to resin composite placement. Excite dentin bonding agent was used per manufacturer's instructions. Z-250 resin composite was applied in 2- x 2-mm increments using a split Teflon mold, each light cured for 20 s. Bonded samples were thermocycled 500 cycles between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C water baths. Specimens were stored in 37 degrees C distilled water. One-week shear bond strength values were determined using a Tinius Olsen testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Results were analyzed with one-way ANOVA (alpha = 0.05). No significant difference (p = 0.47) in bond strength was found between the experimental groups and the control. Groups 1, 2, 3, and 5 exhibited predominantly mixed failures while the majority of samples in Group 4 showed adhesive failures. Under the conditions of this study, contamination of dentin by powdered or powder-free latex gloves did not significantly affect bond strength. Future research should be directed toward evaluating the effects of dentin contamination on bond strength of other bonding agents and include ultrastuctural examination in determining what role, if any, powder plays as a contaminant.

  12. Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Pulp Capping Biomaterials after Application of Three Different Bonding Systems

    PubMed Central

    Jaberi-Ansari, Zahra; Mahdilou, Maryam; Ahmadyar, Maryam; Asgary, Saeed

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims. Bonding of composite resin filling materials to pulp protecting agents produces an adhesive joint which is important for the quality of filling as well as success of restoration. We aimed to assess the bond strength of composite resin to three pulp capping biomaterials: Pro Root mineral trioxide aggregate (PMTA), Root MTA (RMTA) and calcium enriched mixture (CEM) cement, using three bonding systems [a total-etch (Single Bond) and two self-etch systems (Protect bond and SE Bond)]. Materials and methods. Ninety acrylic molds, each containing a 6×2-mm hole, were divided into 3 groups and filled with PMTA, RMTA and CEM cements. The samples in each experimental group were then randomly divided into 3 sub-groups; Single Bond, Protect Bond and SE Bond bonding systems were applied to the tested materials. Cylindrical forms of composite resin (Z100, 2×2 mm) were placed onto the samples and cured. Shear bond strength values were measured for 9 subgroups using a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA. Results. The average shear bond strengths of Z100 composite resin after application of Single Bond, Protect Bond and SE Bond systems were as follows; PMTA: 5.1±2.42, 4.56±1.96 and 4.52±1.7; RMTA: 4.71±1.77, 4.31±0.56 and 4.79±1.88; and CEM cement: 4.75±1.1, 4.54±1.59 and 4.64±1.78 MPa, respectively. The type of pulp capping material, bonding system and their interacting effects did not have a significant effect on the bond strengths of composite resin to pulp capping biomaterials. Conclusion. Within the limitations of this in vitrostudy, bond strength of composite resin to two types of MTA as well as CEM cement were similar following application of the total-etch or self-etch bonding systems. PMID:24082986

  13. Bond strength of composite resin to pulp capping biomaterials after application of three different bonding systems.

    PubMed

    Jaberi-Ansari, Zahra; Mahdilou, Maryam; Ahmadyar, Maryam; Asgary, Saeed

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims. Bonding of composite resin filling materials to pulp protecting agents produces an adhesive joint which is important for the quality of filling as well as success of restoration. We aimed to assess the bond strength of composite resin to three pulp capping biomaterials: Pro Root mineral trioxide aggregate (PMTA), Root MTA (RMTA) and calcium enriched mixture (CEM) cement, using three bonding systems [a total-etch (Single Bond) and two self-etch systems (Protect bond and SE Bond)]. Materials and methods. Ninety acrylic molds, each containing a 6×2-mm hole, were divided into 3 groups and filled with PMTA, RMTA and CEM cements. The samples in each experimental group were then randomly divided into 3 sub-groups; Single Bond, Protect Bond and SE Bond bonding systems were applied to the tested materials. Cylindrical forms of composite resin (Z100, 2×2 mm) were placed onto the samples and cured. Shear bond strength values were measured for 9 subgroups using a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA. Results. The average shear bond strengths of Z100 composite resin after application of Single Bond, Protect Bond and SE Bond systems were as follows; PMTA: 5.1±2.42, 4.56±1.96 and 4.52±1.7; RMTA: 4.71±1.77, 4.31±0.56 and 4.79±1.88; and CEM cement: 4.75±1.1, 4.54±1.59 and 4.64±1.78 MPa, respectively. The type of pulp capping material, bonding system and their interacting effects did not have a significant effect on the bond strengths of composite resin to pulp capping biomaterials. Conclusion. Within the limitations of this in vitrostudy, bond strength of composite resin to two types of MTA as well as CEM cement were similar following application of the total-etch or self-etch bonding systems.

  14. Effect of moisture, saliva, and blood contamination on the shear bond strength of brackets bonded with a conventional bonding system and self-etched bonding system

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Mandava; Mohamed, Shamil; Nayak, Krishna; Shetty, Sharath Kumar; Talapaneni, Ashok Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Background: The success of bonding brackets to enamel with resin bonding systems is negatively affected by contamination with oral fluids such as blood and saliva. The new self-etch primer systems combine conditioning and priming agents into a single application, making the procedure more cost effective. Objective: The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of moisture, saliva and blood contamination on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with conventional bonding system and self-etch bonding system. Materials and Methods: Each system was examined under four enamel surface conditions (dry, water, saliva, and blood), and 80 human teeth were divided into two groups with four subgroups each of 10 according to enamel surface condition. Group 1 used conventional bonding system and Group 2 used self-etched bonding system. Subgroups 1a and 2a under dry enamel surface conditions; Subgroups 1b and 2b under moist enamel surface condition; Subgroups 3a and 3b under saliva enamel surface condition and Subgroup 4a and 4b under blood enamel surface condition. Brackets were bonded, and all the samples were then submitted to a shear bond test with a universal testing machine with a cross head speed of 1mm/sec. Results: The results showed that the contamination reduced the shear bond strength of all groups. In self-etch bonding system water and saliva had significantly higher bond strength when compared to other groups. Conclusion: It was concluded that the blood contamination showed lowest bond strength from both bonding systems. Self-etch bonding system resulted in higher bond strength than conventional bonding system under all conditions except the dry enamel surface. PMID:24678210

  15. Shear bond strength of ceramic and metallic orthodontic brackets bonded with self-etching primer and conventional bonding adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Arash, Valiollah; Naghipour, Fatemeh; Ravadgar, Mehdi; Karkhah, Ahmad; Barati, Mohammad Saleh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Adult patients typically require high-quality orthodontic treatment for ceramic brackets, but some clinicians remain concerned about the bond strength of these brackets. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the shear bond strength and de-bonding characteristics of metallic and ceramic brackets bonded with two types of bonding agents. Methods In an experimental study done in 2013 in Babol, Iran, 120 extracted human maxillary premolar teeth were randomly divided into four groups as follows: HM group: metallic bracket/conventional bonding agent; SM group: metallic bracket/Transbond self-etching primer; HC group: ceramic bracket/conventional bonding agent; SC group: ceramic bracket/Transbond self-etching primer. Twenty-four hours after thermocycling (1000 cycle, 5 °C–55 °C), the shear bond strength values were measured. The amount of resin remaining on the tooth surface (adhesive remnant index: ARI) was determined under a stereomicroscope. Enamel detachment index was evaluated under a scanning electron microscope. To perform statistical analysis, ANOVA, Kruskal–Wallis, and Tukey post-hoc tests were applied. The level of significance was set at p <0.05. Results The mean shear bond strength values (MPa ± SD) were group HM=12.59, group SM=11.15, group HC=7.7, and group SC=7.41. Bond strength differences between groups HM and SM (p=0.063) and between HC and SC (p=0.091) were not statistically significant. There were significant differences between HM and HC and between SM and SC groups (p < 0.05). Insignificant differences were found in ARI among all groups. Conclusion Our findings indicated that the metallic brackets had higher bond strengths in comparison with ceramic brackets. In addition, self-etching primer was able to produce fewer bonds compared with the conventional technique. Many samples showed the bracket-adhesive interface failure or failure inside the adhesive. PMID:28243410

  16. An evaluation and comparison of shear bond strength of composite resin to dentin, using newer dentin bonding agents

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Mithra N; Bhandary, Shruti

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the shear bond strength of Total etch Prime and Bond NT and self etch newer dentin bonding agents Clearfil S3, Xeno III Bond, Clearfil Protect Bond and G Bond used to bond composite resin to dentin, and to compare the difference in the shear bond strengths of the self etch newer dentin bonding agents. Hundred freshly extracted noncarious human maxillary premolar teeth were selected. The occlusal surfaces of each tooth were ground to prepare flat dentin surfaces at a depth of 1.5 mm and were randomly grouped, with twenty specimens in each: Group I - Prime and Bond NT, Group II - Clearfil Protect Bond, Group III - Xeno III Bond, Group IV - Clearfil S3 Bond, Group V - G Bond. Each group was treated with its respective bonding agents, as per the manufacturers' instructions Clearfill – Kuraray, Japan, G bond – GC Tokyo, Japan, Xeno- De Trey Densply, Germany. Blocks or Cylinders of composite resin were built up using Teflon mold and cured. Shear bond strengths were tested using Instron Universal testing machine and recorded in Mpa. The results were statistically analyzed using One-way anova and Tukeys HSD test. The total etch adhesive showed higher shear bond strength than self etching adhesives (P < 0.001). Within the limitations of this in vitro study, it can be concluded that all the adhesive agents evaluated showed optimal shear bond strength 17-20 Mpa, except G bond. However, shear bond strength of composite resin to dentin is better with one bottle total etch adhesive than with the newer self etching bonding agents. PMID:20142888

  17. Shear bond strength of aesthetic materials bonded to Ni-Cr alloy.

    PubMed

    Almilhatti, Hercules Jorge; Giampaolo, Eunice Teresinha; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo; Machado, Ana Lúcia; Pavarina, Ana Cláudia

    2003-03-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the shear bond strength of four materials used as aesthetic material bonded to Ni-Cr alloy. Sixty-eight alloy discs were prepared and divided equally into four groups, and received four treatments for veneering: conventional feldspathic porcelain (Noritake EX-3) and three light-cured prosthodontic composite resins (Artglass, Solidex and Targis). The aesthetic materials were applied after metal structure conditioning in accordance with the manufacturers' recommendations. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 7 days. A universal testing machine was used to measure the shear bond strength of the specimens at a cross head speed of 0.5 mm/min. Fractured specimens were examined by using both optical and scanning electron microscope. The analysis of variance and Tukey's test showed that the strongest mean shear bond was obtained with Noritake EX-3 (mean shear bond strength 42.90+/-7.82 MPa). For composites, the highest mean shear bond strength was observed for Targis (12.30+/-1.57 MPa); followed by Solidex (11.94+/-1.04 MPa) and Artglass (10.04+/-0.75 MPa). Optical analysis of the fractured surfaces indicated that for Targis and Noritake EX-3 all failures were a mixture of both cohesive and adhesive patterns. As for Artglass and Solidex, the fractures were mainly adhesive in nature. The Solidex system was equivalent to the Targis system in bond strength and exhibited greater strength than the Artglass system. The porcelain fused-to-metal showed considerably higher shear bond strength than the three metal-resin bonding techniques.

  18. Bond strength with various etching times on young permanent teeth

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.N.; Lu, T.C. )

    1991-07-01

    Tensile bond strengths of an orthodontic resin cement were compared for 15-, 30-, 60-, 90-, or 120-second etching times, with a 37% phosphoric acid solution on the enamel surfaces of young permanent teeth. Fifty extracted premolars from 9- to 16-year-old children were used for testing. An orthodontic composite resin was used to bond the bracket directly onto the buccal surface of the enamel. The tensile bond strengths were tested with an Instron machine. Bond failure interfaces between bracket bases and teeth surfaces were examined with a scanning electron microscope and calculated with mapping of energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry. The results of tensile bond strength for 15-, 30-, 60-, or 90-second etching times were not statistically different. For the 120-second etching time, the decrease was significant. Of the bond failures, 43%-49% occurred between bracket and resin interface, 12% to 24% within the resin itself, 32%-40% between resin and tooth interface, and 0% to 4% contained enamel fragments. There was no statistical difference in percentage of bond failure interface distribution between bracket base and resin, resin and enamel, or the enamel detachment. Cohesive failure within the resin itself at the 120-second etching time was less than at other etching times, with a statistical significance. To achieve good retention, to decrease enamel loss, and to reduce moisture contamination in the clinic, as well as to save chairside time, a 15-second etching time is suggested for teenage orthodontic patients.

  19. Effect of calcium removal on dentin bond strengths.

    PubMed

    Perdigão, J; Eiriksson, S; Rosa, B T; Lopes, M; Gomes, G

    2001-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine the microtensile bond strengths (mu TBS) of 3 dental adhesives when applied to dentin decalcified with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). The null hypothesis tested was that the removal of calcium from dentin would not influence the bond strengths. Eighteen extracted human molars were cut in 2 equal halves. One half served as the control, having no EDTA treatment, while the other half was assigned to 1 of 3 periods (1 hour, 24 hours, or 100 hours) of decalcification with buffered 0.5 mol/L EDTA. Middle dentin was bonded with 1 of 3 dentin adhesive groups: a self-etching primer, Clearfil SE Bond (SE); an acetone-based total-etch adhesive, Prime&Bond NT (NT); and an ethanol- and water-based total-etch adhesive, Single Bond (SB). The specimens were restored with Z-250 resin composite and sectioned in 0.9 +/- 0.2 mm2 sticks that were tested in tensile mode. For each adhesive, the control group (not decalcified) resulted in statistically higher bond strengths than the treatment groups. For specimens that were not decalcified, SE and SB had statistically similar bond strengths, but both resulted in statistically higher bond strengths than NT. For specimens decalcified for 1 hour, SE resulted in statistically higher bond strengths than either SB or NT, which were ranked in the same statistical group. SE was the only dentin adhesive to result in measurable mu TBS after decalcification with EDTA for 24 hours, while SB/24 hour and NT/24 hour specimens debonded spontaneously prior to testing. All the specimens treated with EDTA for 100 hours debonded prior to testing. Three conclusions were drawn: (1) All 3 adhesive systems included in this project bonded significantly better to calcified than to decalcified dentin, regardless of their composition; (2) The self-etching primer-based adhesive ranked consistently equal to or better than the 2 total-etch-based adhesives, regardless of the EDTA decalcification time; and (3

  20. The microhardness of bleached dentine and its bond strength to a dentine bonding agent.

    PubMed

    Dadoun, M P; Bartlett, D W

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the hardness of a bleached dentine surface and its bond strength to a dentine-bonding agent. Thirty teeth were randomly divided into a test and control group. The teeth were hemi-sectioned, the cut surfaces ground flat and the test surfaces bleached with a 10% aqueous solution of carbamide peroxide continuously for 4 days. Hardness was determined using a Vickers microhardness test. The bond between Coltene 'One Coat Bond' and bleached and unbleached dentine was evaluated by measuring shear bond strength using an Instron machine. The mean hardness of dentine before and after bleaching was 62.5 (10.2) and 53.6 (7.3) and this difference was statistically different (p<0.001). For the controls immersed in water the hardness was before 60.8 (standard deviation: 7.2) and after 59.6 (8.2) respectively. The mean shear bond strength for the unbleached was 5.5MPa (1.6) and for the bleached samples was 3.3MPa (1.8) and this difference was statistically significant (p<0.002). Under these study conditions the Vickers hardness and bond strength to dentine was reduced by bleaching.

  1. CHARACTERIZATION OF MONOLITHIC FUEL FOIL PROPERTIES AND BOND STRENGTH

    SciTech Connect

    D E Burkes; D D Keiser; D M Wachs; J S Larson; M D Chapple

    2007-03-01

    Understanding fuel foil mechanical properties, and fuel / cladding bond quality and strength in monolithic plates is an important area of investigation and quantification. Specifically, what constitutes an acceptable monolithic fuel – cladding bond, how are the properties of the bond measured and determined, and what is the impact of fabrication process or change in parameters on the level of bonding? Currently, non-bond areas are quantified employing ultrasonic determinations that are challenging to interpret and understand in terms of irradiation impact. Thus, determining mechanical properties of the fuel foil and what constitutes fuel / cladding non-bonds is essential to successful qualification of monolithic fuel plates. Capabilities and tests related to determination of these properties have been implemented at the INL and are discussed, along with preliminary results.

  2. Influence of adhesive systems on bond strength between fiber posts and composite resin cores in a pull-out test design.

    PubMed

    Wrbas, Karl-Thomas; Schirrmeister, Jörg Fabian; Altenburger, Markus Jörg; Agrafioti, Anastasia; Kielbassa, Andrej Michael

    2007-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of post surface conditioning with adhesive systems on tensile bond strength between two composite resin core systems and FRP posts (ER DentinPost). Forty-eight posts were trimmed at the coronal part, and the upper part of 3 mm was covered with a standardized composite resin core build-up. Twenty-four posts were treated with the respective adhesive systems. Four groups were formed: G1 - ClearfilCore; G2 - Clearfil New Bond + ClearfilCore; G3 - MultiCore Flow; and G4 - AdheSE + MultiCore Flow. Mean (SD) bond strengths in MPa were 7.53 (0.89) for ClearfilCore and 8.08 (0.93) for New Bond + ClearfilCore; 5.80 (0.39) for MultiCore Flow and 5.92 (0.43) for AdheSE + MultiCore Flow. ClearfilCore achieved significantly higher bond strengths than MultiCore Flow (two-way ANOVA; p<0.0001). In conclusion, composite resin core materials exerted a significant influence on tensile bond strength, while adhesive systems did not significantly affect the results.

  3. Effect of dentin surface roughness on the shear bond strength of resin bonded restorations.

    PubMed

    Koodaryan, Roodabeh; Hafezeqoran, Ali; Poursoltan, Sajjad

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether dentin surface preparation with diamond rotary instruments of different grit sizes affects the shear bond strength of resin-bonded restorations. The buccal enamel of 60 maxillary central incisors was removed with a low speed diamond saw and wet ground with silicon carbide papers. The polished surfaces of the teeth were prepared with four groups of rotary diamond burs with super-coarse (SC), coarse (C), medium (M), and fine (F) grit sizes. Following surface preparation, 60 restorations were casted with nickel-chromium alloy and bonded with Panavia cement. To assess the shear bond strength, the samples were mounted on a universal testing machine and an axial load was applied along the cement-restoration interface at the crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The acquired data was analyzed with one way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc test (α=.05). The mean ± SD shear bond strengths (in MPa) of the study groups were 17.75 ± 1.41 for SC, 13.82 ± 1.13 for C, 10.40 ± 1.45 for M, and 7.13 ± 1.18 for F. Statistical analysis revealed the significant difference among the study groups such that the value for group SC was significantly higher than that for group F (P<.001). Dentin surface roughness created by diamond burs of different grit sizes considerably influences the shear bond strength of resin bonded restorations.

  4. Shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded to various esthetic pontic materials.

    PubMed

    Maryanchik, Igor; Brendlinger, Eric J; Fallis, Drew W; Vandewalle, Kraig S

    2010-05-01

    In this in-vitro study, we compared the shear bond strengths of orthodontic brackets bonded to various commonly used esthetic pontic materials. Prefabricated denture teeth (acrylic resin, Trubyte, Dentsply, York, Pa) and samples made from Integrity (bis-acryl composite resin, Dentsply Caulk, Milford, Del) and Alike (polymethylmethacrylate resin, GC America, Alsip, Ill) were used to represent the more common esthetic provisional materials. Each material group contained 30 samples; a total of 90 samples were bonded in the same fashion with APC PLUS maxillary lateral incisor brackets (3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif). Each material group was then divided into 2 testing subgroups. One subgroup was tested for shear bond strength 24 hours after bonding, and the other subgroup was tested after bonding and storage in distilled water at 37 degrees C for a week. Each bracket was loaded perpendicularly in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm per minute until bonding failure. The mean shear bond strength and standard deviation were determined for each group. Analysis of variance (ANOVA, 2-factor and 1-factor) with Tukey HSD post-hoc tests, Student t tests, and Mann-Whitney U tests were used to test the main effects of pontic materials and time of loading (alpha = 0.05). The data were stratified, and 1-way ANOVA tests were performed with the Bonferroni adjustment (alpha = 0.01) to examine the effect of the pontic material on shear bond strength after either 1 day or 7 days of storage. Significant differences were found based on pontic material and time (P <0.05), but there was a significant interaction (P = 0.044), making the results uninterpretable. At 1 day, the Integrity material had a significantly higher mean shear bond strength than both Alike and the denture tooth materials (P <0.001). However, at 7 days, both Integrity and Alike had significantly higher mean shear bond strengths compared with the prefabricated denture tooth (P <0.001). Although the use

  5. Dentine bond strength and antimicrobial activity evaluation of adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    André, Carolina Bosso; Gomes, Brenda Paula Figueiredo Almeida; Duque, Thais Mageste; Stipp, Rafael Nobrega; Chan, Daniel Chi Ngai; Ambrosano, Glaucia Maria Bovi; Giannini, Marcelo

    2015-04-01

    This study evaluated the dentine bond strength (BS) and the antibacterial activity (AA) of six adhesives against strict anaerobic and facultative bacteria. Three adhesives containing antibacterial components (Gluma 2Bond (glutaraldehyde)/G2B, Clearfil SE Protect (MDPB)/CSP and Peak Universal Bond (PUB)/chlorhexidine) and the same adhesive versions without antibacterial agents (Gluma Comfort Bond/GCB, Clearfil SE Bond/CSB and Peak LC Bond/PLB) were tested. The AA of adhesives and control groups was evaluated by direct contact method against four strict anaerobic and four facultative bacteria. After incubation, according to the appropriate periods of time for each microorganism, the time to kill microorganisms was measured. For BS, the adhesives were applied according to manufacturers' recommendations and teeth restored with composite. Teeth (n=10) were sectioned to obtain bonded beams specimens, which were tested after artificial saliva storage for one week and one year. BS data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey test. Saliva storage for one year reduces the BS only for GCB. In general G2B and GCB required at least 24h for killing microorganisms. PUB and PLB killed only strict anaerobic microorganisms after 24h. For CSP the average time to eliminate the Streptococcus mutans and strict anaerobic oral pathogens was 30 min. CSB showed no AA against facultative bacteria, but had AA against some strict anaerobic microorganisms. Storage time had no effect on the BS for most of the adhesives. The time required to kill bacteria depended on the type of adhesive and never was less than 10 min. Most of the adhesives showed stable bond strength after one year and the Clearfil SE Protect may be a good alternative in restorative procedures performed on dentine, considering its adequate bond strength and better antibacterial activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Tensile bond strength of metal bracket bonding to glazed ceramic surfaces with different surface conditionings.

    PubMed

    Akhoundi, Ms Ahmad; Kamel, M Rahmati; Hashemi, Sh Mahmood; Imani, M

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the tensile bond strength of metal brackets bonding to glazed ceramic surfaces using three various surface treatments. Forty two glazed ceramic disks were assigned to three groups. In the first and second groups the specimens were etched with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid (HFA). Subsequently in first group, ceramic primer and adhesive were applied, but in second group a bonding agent alone was used. In third group, specimens were treated with 35% phosphoric acid followed by ceramic primer and adhesive application. Brackets were bonded with light cure composites. The specimens were stored in distilled water in the room temperature for 24 hours and thermocycled 500 times between 5°C and 55°C. The universal testing machine was used to test the tensile bond strength and the adhesive remenant index scores between three groups was evaluated. The data were subjected to one-way ANOVA, Tukey and Kruskal-Wallis tests respectively. The tensile bond strength was 3.69±0.52 MPa forfirst group, 2.69±0.91 MPa for second group and 3.60±0.41 MPa for third group. Group II specimens showed tensile strength values significantly different from other groups (P<0.01). In spite of limitations in laboratory studies it may be concluded that in application of Scotch bond multipurpose plus adhesive, phosphoric acid can be used instead of HFA for bonding brackets to the glazed ceramic restorations with enough tensile bond strength.

  7. Characterization of Dentine to Assess Bond Strength of Dental Composites

    PubMed Central

    Liaqat, Saad; Aljabo, Anas; Khan, Muhammad Adnan; Ben Nuba, Hesham; Bozec, Laurent; Ashley, Paul; Young, Anne

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to develop alternating dentine adhesion models that could help in the evaluation of a self-bonding dental composite. For this purpose dentine from human and ivory was characterized chemically and microscopically before and after acid etching using Raman and SEM. Mechanical properties of dentine were determined using 3 point bend test. Composite bonding to dentine, with and without use of acid pre-treatment and/or the adhesive, were assessed using a shear bond test. Furthermore, micro gap formation after restoration of 3 mm diameter cavities in dentine was assessed by SEM. Initial hydroxyapatite level in ivory was half that in human dentine. Surface hydroxyapatites decreased by approximately half with every 23 s of acid etch. The human dentine strength (56 MPa) was approximately double that of ivory, while the modulus was almost comparable to that of ivory. With adhesive use, average shear bond strengths were 30 and 26 MPa with and without acid etching. With no adhesive, average bond strength was 6 MPa for conventional composites. This, however, increased to 14 MPa with a commercial flowable “self–bonding” composite or upon addition of low levels of an acidic monomer to the experimental composite. The acidic monomer additionally reduced micro-gap formation with the experimental composite. Improved bonding and mechanical properties should reduce composite failures due to recurrent caries or fracture respectively.

  8. Shear bond strengths of different adhesive systems to biodentine.

    PubMed

    Odabaş, Mesut Enes; Bani, Mehmet; Tirali, Resmiye Ebru

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the shear bond strength of different adhesive systems to Biodentine with different time intervals. Eighty specimens of Biodentine were prepared and divided into 8 groups. After 12 minutes, 40 samples were randomly selected and divided into 4 groups of 10 each: group 1: (etch-and-rinse adhesive system) Prime & Bond NT; group 2: (2-step self-etch adhesive system) Clearfil SE Bond; group 3: (1-step self-etch adhesive systems) Clearfil S(3) Bond; group 4: control (no adhesive). After the application of adhesive systems, composite resin was applied over Biodentine. This procedure was repeated 24 hours after mixing additional 40 samples, respectively. Shear bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine, and the data were subjected to 1-way analysis of variance and Scheffé post hoc test. No significant differences were found between all of the adhesive groups at the same time intervals (12 minutes and 24 hours) (P > .05). Among the two time intervals, the lowest value was obtained for group 1 (etch-and-rinse adhesive) at a 12-minute period, and the highest was obtained for group 2 (two-step self-etch adhesive) at a 24-hour period. The placement of composite resin used with self-etch adhesive systems over Biodentine showed better shear bond strength.

  9. Shear Bond Strengths of Different Adhesive Systems to Biodentine

    PubMed Central

    Odabaş, Mesut Enes; Bani, Mehmet; Tirali, Resmiye Ebru

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the shear bond strength of different adhesive systems to Biodentine with different time intervals. Eighty specimens of Biodentine were prepared and divided into 8 groups. After 12 minutes, 40 samples were randomly selected and divided into 4 groups of 10 each: group 1: (etch-and-rinse adhesive system) Prime & Bond NT; group 2: (2-step self-etch adhesive system) Clearfil SE Bond; group 3: (1-step self-etch adhesive systems) Clearfil S3 Bond; group 4: control (no adhesive). After the application of adhesive systems, composite resin was applied over Biodentine. This procedure was repeated 24 hours after mixing additional 40 samples, respectively. Shear bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine, and the data were subjected to 1-way analysis of variance and Scheffé post hoc test. No significant differences were found between all of the adhesive groups at the same time intervals (12 minutes and 24 hours) (P > .05). Among the two time intervals, the lowest value was obtained for group 1 (etch-and-rinse adhesive) at a 12-minute period, and the highest was obtained for group 2 (two-step self-etch adhesive) at a 24-hour period. The placement of composite resin used with self-etch adhesive systems over Biodentine showed better shear bond strength. PMID:24222742

  10. Shear bond strength of brackets rebonded with a fluoride-releasing and -recharging adhesive system.

    PubMed

    Endo, Toshiya; Ozoe, Rieko; Shinkai, Koichi; Aoyagi, Makiko; Kurokawa, Hiroomi; Katoh, Yoshiroh; Shimooka, Shohachi

    2009-05-01

    To ascertain the effects of repeated bonding on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with a fluoride-releasing and -recharging adhesive system with a self-etching primer in comparison with two other types of adhesive system. A total of 48 premolars were collected and divided equally into three groups of 16. Each group was assigned one of three adhesive systems: Transbond XT, Transbond Plus, or a fluoride-releasing and -recharging adhesive system, Beauty Ortho Bond. Shear bond strength was measured 24 hours after bracket bonding, with the bonding/debonding procedures repeated twice after the first debonding. A universal testing machine was used to determine shear bond strengths, and bracket/adhesive failure modes were evaluated with the adhesive remnant index after each debonding. At every debonding sequence, all of these three adhesive systems had a shear bond strength of 6 MPa, which is a minimum requirement for clinical use. Transbond XT and Transbond Plus had significantly higher mean shear bond strengths than did Beauty Ortho Bond at each debonding. No significant differences in mean bond strength were observed between the three debondings in each adhesive system. Bond failure at the enamel/adhesive interface occurred more frequently in Beauty Ortho Bond than in Transbond XT or Transbond Plus. The fluoride-releasing and -recharging adhesive system with the self-etching primer (Beauty Ortho Bond) had clinically sufficient shear bond strength in repeated bracket bonding; this finding can help orthodontists to decrease the risk of damage to enamel at debonding.

  11. Bond strength of adhesive resin cement with different adhesive systems

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzoni e Silva, Fabrizio; Pamato, Saulo; Kuga, Milton-Carlos; Só, Marcus-Vinicius-Reis

    2017-01-01

    Background To assess the immediate bond strength of a dual-cure adhesive resin cement to the hybridized dentin with different bonding systems. Material and Methods Fifty-six healthy human molars were randomly divided into 7 groups (n=8). After 3 longitudinal sections, the central cuts were included in PVC matrix and were submitted to dentin hybridization according to the groups: G1 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (Apder™ Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE), G2 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (Optibond™ FL, Kerr), G3 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (All-Bond 3®, Bisco), G4 - etch & rinse simplified system (Adper™ Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE), G5 - self-etching system with one step (Bond Force, Tokuyama), G6 - universal system in moist dentin (Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE), G7 - universal system in dry dentin (Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE). Then all groups received the cementing of a self-adhesive resin cement cylinder (Duo-link, Bisco) made from a polypropylene matrix. In the evaluation of bond strength, the samples were subjected to the microshear test and evaluated according to the fracture pattern by optical microscopy. Results The Kruskal-Wallis test suggests a statistically significant difference between groups (p=0,039), and Tukey for multiple comparisons, indicating a statistically significant difference between G3 and G4 (p<0.05). It was verified high prevalence of adhesive failures, followed by mixed failure and cohesive in dentin. Conclusions The technique and the system used to dentin hybridization are able to affect the immediate bond strength of resin cement dual adhesive. Key words:Adhesion, adhesive resin cement, adhesive systems, microshear. PMID:28149471

  12. Shear bond strength of new and recycled brackets to enamel.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Stenyo Wanderley; Consani, Simonides; Nouer, Darcy Flávio; Magnani, Maria Beatriz Borges de Araújo; Nouer, Paulo Roberto Aranha; Martins, Laura Moura

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate in vitro the shear bond strength of recycled orthodontic brackets. S2C-03Z brackets (Dental Morelli, Brazil) were bonded to the buccal surfaces of 50 extracted human premolars using Concise Orthodontic chemically cured composite resin (3M, USA). The teeth were randomly assigned to 5 groups (n=10), as follows. In group I (control), the bonded brackets remained attached until shear testing (i.e., no debonding/rebonding). In groups II, III and IV, the bonded brackets were detached and rebonded after recycling by 90-microm particle aluminum oxide blasting, silicon carbide stone grinding or an industrial process at a specialized contractor company (Abzil-Lancer, Brazil), respectively. In group V, the bonded brackets were removed and new brackets were bonded to the enamel surface. Shear bond strength was tested in an Instron machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test at 5% significance level. There was no statistically significant difference (p>0.05) between the control brackets (0.52 kgf/mm2), brackets recycled by aluminum oxide blasting (0.34 kgf/mm2) and new brackets attached to previously bonded teeth (0.43 kgf/mm2). Brackets recycled by the specialized company (0.28 kgf/mm2) and those recycled by silicon carbide stone grinding (0.14 kgf/mm2) showed the lowest shear strength means and differed statistically from control brackets (0.52 kgf/mm2) (p<0.05). In conclusion, the outcomes of this study showed that bracket recycling using 90-microm aluminum oxide particle air-abrasion was efficient and technically simple, and might provide cost reduction for orthodontists and patients alike.

  13. Evaluation of shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with Er-YAG laser etching

    PubMed Central

    Raji, S. Hamid; Birang, Reza; Majdzade, Fateme; Ghorbanipour, Reza

    2012-01-01

    Background: Based on contradictory findings concerning the use of lasers for enamel etching, the purpose of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength of teeth prepared for bonding with Er-YAG laser etching and compare them with phosphoric acid etching. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study forty – eight premolars, extracted for orthodontic purposes were randomly divided in to three groups. Thirty-two teeth were exposed to laser energy for 25 s: 16 teeth at 100 mj setting and 16 teeth at 150 mj setting. Sixteen teeth were etched with 37% phosphoric acid. The shear bond strength of bonded brackets with the Transbond XT adhesive system was measured with the Zwick testing machine. Descriptive statistics, Kolmogorov–Smirnov test, of homogeneity of variances, one- way analysis of variances and Tukey's test and Kruskal Wallis were used to analyze the data. Results: The mean shear bond strength of the teeth lased with 150 mj was 12.26 ± 4.76 MPa, which was not significantly different from the group with acid etching (15.26 ± 4.16 MPa). Irradiation with 100 mj resulted in mean bond strengths of 9.05 ± 3.16 MPa, which was significantly different from that of acid etching (P < 0.001). Conclusions: laser etching at 150 and 100 mj was adequate for bond strength but the failure pattern of brackets bonded with laser etching is dominantly at adhesive – enamel interface and is not safe for enamel during debonding. PMID:23087733

  14. Shear bond strength of indirect composite material to monolithic zirconia.

    PubMed

    Sari, Fatih; Secilmis, Asli; Simsek, Irfan; Ozsevik, Semih

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of surface treatments on bond strength of indirect composite material (Tescera Indirect Composite System) to monolithic zirconia (inCoris TZI). Partially stabilized monolithic zirconia blocks were cut into with 2.0 mm thickness. Sintered zirconia specimens were divided into different surface treatment groups: no treatment (control), sandblasting, glaze layer & hydrofluoric acid application, and sandblasting + glaze layer & hydrofluoric acid application. The indirect composite material was applied to the surface of the monolithic zirconia specimens. Shear bond strength value of each specimen was evaluated after thermocycling. The fractured surface of each specimen was examined with a stereomicroscope and a scanning electron microscope to assess the failure types. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey LSD tests (α=.05). Bond strength was significantly lower in untreated specimens than in sandblasted specimens (P<.05). No difference between the glaze layer and hydrofluoric acid application treated groups were observed. However, bond strength for these groups were significantly higher as compared with the other two groups (P<.05). Combined use of glaze layer & hydrofluoric acid application and silanization are reliable for strong and durable bonding between indirect composite material and monolithic zirconia.

  15. Shear bond strength of indirect composite material to monolithic zirconia

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE This study aimed to evaluate the effect of surface treatments on bond strength of indirect composite material (Tescera Indirect Composite System) to monolithic zirconia (inCoris TZI). MATERIALS AND METHODS Partially stabilized monolithic zirconia blocks were cut into with 2.0 mm thickness. Sintered zirconia specimens were divided into different surface treatment groups: no treatment (control), sandblasting, glaze layer & hydrofluoric acid application, and sandblasting + glaze layer & hydrofluoric acid application. The indirect composite material was applied to the surface of the monolithic zirconia specimens. Shear bond strength value of each specimen was evaluated after thermocycling. The fractured surface of each specimen was examined with a stereomicroscope and a scanning electron microscope to assess the failure types. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey LSD tests (α=.05). RESULTS Bond strength was significantly lower in untreated specimens than in sandblasted specimens (P<.05). No difference between the glaze layer and hydrofluoric acid application treated groups were observed. However, bond strength for these groups were significantly higher as compared with the other two groups (P<.05). CONCLUSION Combined use of glaze layer & hydrofluoric acid application and silanization are reliable for strong and durable bonding between indirect composite material and monolithic zirconia. PMID:27555895

  16. Experimental investigation of bond strength under high loading rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michal, Mathias; Keuser, Manfred; Solomos, George; Peroni, Marco; Larcher, Martin; Esteban, Beatriz

    2015-09-01

    The structural behaviour of reinforced concrete is governed significantly by the transmission of forces between steel and concrete. The bond is of special importance for the overlapping joint and anchoring of the reinforcement, where rigid bond is required. It also plays an important role in the rotational capacity of plastic hinges, where a ductile bond behaviour is preferable. Similar to the mechanical properties of concrete and steel also the characteristics of their interaction changes with the velocity of the applied loading. For smooth steel bars with its main bond mechanisms of adhesion and friction, nearly no influence of loading rate is reported in literature. In contrast, a high rate dependence can be found for the nowadays mainly used deformed bars. For mechanical interlock, where ribs of the reinforcing steel are bracing concrete material surrounding the bar, one reason can be assumed to be in direct connection with the increase of concrete compressive strength. For splitting failure of bond, characterized by the concrete tensile strength, an even higher dynamic increase is observed. For the design of Structures exposed to blast or impact loading the knowledge of a rate dependent bond stress-slip relationship is required to consider safety and economical aspects at the same time. The bond behaviour of reinforced concrete has been investigated with different experimental methods at the University of the Bundeswehr Munich (UniBw) and the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Ispra. Both static and dynamic tests have been carried out, where innovative experimental apparatuses have been used. The bond stress-slip relationship and maximum pull-out-forces for varying diameter of the bar, concrete compressive strength and loading rates have been obtained. It is expected that these experimental results will contribute to a better understanding of the rate dependent bond behaviour and will serve for calibration of numerical models.

  17. Microtensile bond strength to enamel affected by hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Yaman, Batu Can; Ozer, Fusun; Cabukusta, Cigdem Sozen; Eren, Meltem M; Koray, Fatma; Blatz, Markus B

    2014-02-01

    This study compared the microtensile bond strengths (μTBS) of two different self-etching (SE) and etchand- rinse (ER) adhesive systems to enamel affected by hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta (HPAI) and analyzed the enamel etching patterns created by the two adhesive systems using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Sixteen extracted HPAI-affected molars were used for the bond strength tests and 2 molars were examined under SEM for etching patterns. The control groups consisted of 12 healthy third molars for μTBS tests and two molars for SEM. Mesial and distal surfaces of the teeth were slightly ground flat. The adhesive systems and composite resin were applied to the flat enamel surfaces according to the manufacturers' instructions. The tooth slabs containing composite resin material on their mesial and distal surfaces were cut in the mesio-distal direction with a slow-speed diamond saw. The slabs were cut again to obtain square, 1-mm-thick sticks. Finally, each stick was divided into halves and placed in the μTBS tester. Bond strength tests were performed at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests. There was no significant difference between the bond strength values of ER and SE adhesives (p > 0.05). However, significant differences were found between HPAI and control groups (p < 0.05). HPAI-affected enamel surfaces exhibited mild intra- and inter-prismatic enamel etching patterns after orthophosphoric acid application, while conditioning of HPAI-affected enamel with SE primer created a slightly rough and grooved surface. SE and ER adhesive systems provide similar bond strengths to HPAI-affected enamel surfaces.

  18. The effect of surface treatments and bonding regimens on microtensile bond strengths of repaired composite: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Gouri Smita; Manjunath, MK

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To assess the microtensile bond strength of repaired composite resin that was surface treated by diamond point or silicon carbide followed by bonding using either only total- etch bonding regimen or silane coupling agent with adhesive resin. Materials and Methods: Fourteen composite blocks were aged under deionized water for 14 days. The bonding surface was prepared with coarse diamond point or silicon carbide. Two blocks with no surface treatment were used as control groups. The bonding regimen was either total-etch bonding regimen or silane coupling agent and bonding agent. The aged samples were then bonded to new composite. Five sections per block (each 1mm thick) were prepared; cut to obtain an adhesive zone of approximately 1mm2 and subjected to microtensile bond strength testing. Results: The highest bond strength was obtained by surface treatment by coarse diamond point and total etch bonding regimen and least by silicon carbide and silane. A statistically significant difference was seen in all the four groups. Conclusions: Surface treatment by a coarse diamond point and total-etch bonding regimen provides highest bond strength. Thus, a simpler treatment regimen can contribute to a better bond strength in repaired composites. PMID:23112489

  19. Shear bond strength of seventh generation bonding agents on dentin of primary teeth--an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Geoffrey; Rich, Alfred P; Finkelman, Matthew D; Defuria, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    This controlled, randomized, in vitro study evaluated the shear bond strength of several seventh generation bonding agents on the dentin of primary teeth. Six different adhesives were used: Xeno IV, Clearfil S3 Bond, Adper Prompt-L-Pop, AdheSE One, Bond Force, and Optibond (control). Ninety primary teeth were prepared by wet grinding with a 320-grit silicon carbide paper on a polishing wheel running at 110 RPM. After 24 hours of storage in water, shear bond strengths of each group were determined. The mean shear bond strength of the tested adhesive systems to primary dentin was 12.27 MPa. One-way ANOVA testing showed a statistically significant difference between adhesive products (P < 0.001). Tukey HSD post hoc tests were used to assess which means were significantly different from one another. There was no statistically significant difference between the fifth generation adhesive system (Optibond) and the two seventh generation systems (Xeno IV and Bond Force), with Optibond exhibiting a lower mean shear bond strength compared to Bond Force. Within the limitations of this study, there is a significant difference between seventh generation bonding materials. Bond Force and Optibond appear to exhibit higher shear bond strengths than the other products.

  20. Comparison of shear bond strength of amalgam bonded to primary and permanent dentin.

    PubMed

    Mahdi, S; Bahman, S; Arghavan, A B; Fatemeh, M

    2008-06-01

    Amalgam's non-adhesive characteristics necessitate cavity preparations incorporating retentive features, which often require the removal of non-carious tooth structure. Use of adhesives beneath amalgam restorations, would be helpful to overcome this disadvantage. This study was undertaken to compare the mean shear bond strength of amalgam bonded to primary and permanent dentin, to evaluate the efficacy of amalgam adhesives in pediatric dentistry.27 primary and 28 permanent posterior teeth with intact buccal or lingual surfaces were grounded to expose dentin and wet-polished with 400-grit silicone carbide paper. Scotchbond Multi Purpose Plus adhesive system was applied to the dentin surfaces and light cured. Amalgam was condensed onto the treated dentin through a plastic mold.shear bond strength testing was done using an Instron Universal testing machine, at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min.The data were analyzed by independent samples t-test The difference among the two groups was not statistically significant (p>0.05) Bonded amalgam showed the same level of bond strength to primary and permanent dentin; so, application of amalgam bonding agents in pediatric dentistry can be recommended.

  1. Bond strength of glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) grouted anchors

    SciTech Connect

    Bellavance, E.; Xu, H.; Benmokrane, B.

    1995-11-01

    This paper describes the results of laboratory and field pull-out tests on cement grouted glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) anchors. As an alternative for grouted steel anchors, GFRP bars have many advantages over steel tendons, and can avoid corrosion and some difficulties in transportation, handling, and installation. Three types of 36 GFRP anchors and 20 steel anchors installed in three types of host media: steel pipe, concrete block, and rock mass were tested in the laboratory as well as in the field. The bond strength, load carrying capacity, load-displacement behavior, and critical bond length of cement grouted GFRP anchors were examined in comparison with conventional steel anchors.

  2. In vitro Comparative Evaluation of Tensile Bond Strength of 6th, 7th and 8th Generation Dentin Bonding Agents

    PubMed Central

    Kamble, Suresh S; Kandasamy, Baburajan; Thillaigovindan, Ranjani; Goyal, Nitin Kumar; Talukdar, Pratim; Seal, Mukut

    2015-01-01

    Background: Newer dentin bonding agents were developed to improve the quality of composite restoration and to reduce time consumption in its application. The aim of the present study was to evaluate tensile bond strength of 6th, 7th and 8th generation bonding agents by in vitro method. Materials and Methods: Selected 60 permanent teeth were assigned into 20 in each group (Group I: 6th generation bonding agent-Adper SE plus 3M ESPE, Group II: 7th generation bonding agent-G-Bond GC Corp Japan and Group III: 8th generation dentin adhesives-FuturaBond, DC, Voco, Germany). With high-speed diamond disc, coronal dentin was exposed, and selected dentin bonding agents were applied, followed by composite restoration. All samples were saved in saline for 24 h and tensile bond strength testing was done using a universal testing machine. The obtained data were tabulated and statistically analyzed using ANOVA test. Results: The tensile bond strength readings for 6th generation bonding agent was 32.2465, for 7th generation was 31.6734, and for 8th-generation dentine bonding agent was 34.74431. The highest tensile bond strength was seen in 8th generation bonding agent compared to 6th and 7th generation bonding agents. Conclusion: From the present study it can be conclude that 8th generation dentine adhesive (Futura DC, Voco, Germany) resulted in highest tensile bond strength compared to 6th (Adper SE plus, 3M ESPE) and 7th generation (G-Bond) dentin bonding agents. PMID:26028901

  3. Effect of grape seed extracts on bond strength of bleached enamel using fifth and seventh generation bonding agents

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Sathish; Ghonmode, Wasudeo Namdeo; Saujanya, K P; Jaju, Neha; Tambe, Varsha H; Yawalikar, Priya P

    2013-01-01

    Background: The objective of this in-vitro study was to evaluate the effect of grape seed extract (oligomericproanthocyanidin complexes [OPCs]) on the bond strength of composite resin to bleached enamel using 5th and 7th generations of bonding agents. Materials & Methods: Eighty maxillary central incisors were randomly assigned to four groups as follows: Group I (n=20): no bleaching (control); Group II (n=20): bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide gel, without the use of an antioxidant; Group III (n=20): bleaching followed by the use of 10% sodium ascorbate; Group IV (n=20) : bleaching followed by the use of 5% proanthocyanidin solution. All the four groups were further subdivided into two groups of ten teeth each depending on the adhesive system used in order to bond the resin composite to enamel surfaces. Subgroup A: 5th generation bonding agent and subgroup B : 7th generation bonding agent. Shear bond strength of the specimens was tested under universal testing machine. Results: The shear bond strength values were observed to be significantly higher in teeth treated with 10% sodium ascorbate and 5% proanthocyanidin as compared to the group in which no antioxidant was used. Also, bonding with 5th generation bonding agent resulted in significantly higher shear bond strength when compared to the 7th generation bonding agent. Conclusion: The use of grape seed extract as an antioxidant after bleaching significantly improves the bond strength of composite resin to bleached enamel. 5th generation bonding agents have higher shear bond strength of composite resin to enamel. How to cite this article: Abraham S, Ghonmode WN, Saujanya KP, Jaju N, Tambe VH, Yawalikar PP. Effect of grape seed extract on bond strength of bleached enamel using fifth and seventh generation bonding agents. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(6):101-7 . PMID:24453453

  4. Shear bond strength of orthodontic buccal tubes to porcelain

    PubMed Central

    Purmal, Kathiravan; Alam, Mohammad K.; Sukumaran, Prema

    2013-01-01

    Background: Bonding of molar tubes is becoming more popular in orthodontics. Occasionally, these bonding are done on posterior porcelain crowns or bridges. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of buccal tubes on feldspathic porcelain crowns with two different methods. Materials and Methods: Forty porcelain right molar crowns were fabricated for this study. The crowns were randomly divided into two groups. In group 1, the crowns were etched with 9.6% hydrofluoric acid, silane coupling agent applied, coated with bonding primer and bonded with Transbond XT (3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif). In group 2, the crowns were etched with phosphoric acid 37%, silane coupling agent applied, coated with bonding primer and bonded with Transbond XT. All the crowns were stored for 24 hours at 37°C and thermo-cycled before the shear bond test. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to determine whether significant difference were present between the groups. Results: The results of the analysis of variance (F = 0.23) indicated the shear bond strength of group 1 (3.57 ± 0.87 MPa) was not significantly different (P > 0.05) from group 2 (3.46 ± 0.65 Mpa). Fisher's exact test for the adhesive remnant index (ARI) revealed significant difference between both groups (P < 0.05). Eighty percent of group 1 buccal tubes failed at buccal tube/resin interface and eighty percent of group 2 mostly failed at porcelain/resin interface. Conclusion: Etching with phosphoric acid with the use of silane coupling agent would be safer and should make it easier for clinicians to clean the adhesive on the porcelain surface after debonding. PMID:23878568

  5. Strength of adhesive-bonded hybrid structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirschke, L.; Prinz, R.; Schnell, H.

    1979-01-01

    Structures prepared from materials with different thermal and mechanical properties by means of fiber-strengthened binders can fail in a number of ways. The present lecture is focused on failures through debonding at the metal or at the fiber-reinforced plastic. A method for calculating the stress distribution in adhesive layers as a function of the load is outlined, and its usefulness in providing insight into the behavior of bonds in hybrid structures is noted. Means of eliminating the unfavorable effects of temperature, humidity, creep and relaxation on the bonds in the manufacture of hybrid structures are examined, along with test methods developed for such structures.

  6. In vitro tensile bond strength of reconditioned brackets.

    PubMed

    Wright, W L; Powers, J M

    1985-03-01

    This study evaluated the effects of four rebonding procedures on in vitro tensile bond strength of four filled diacrylate adhesives on orthodontic brackets. The four procedures were thermal reconditioning, chemical reconditioning, removal of residual adhesive with a green stone, and grinding the mesh base with a green stone. The mesh-base, stainless steel brackets were bonded to plastic cylinders and the tensile bond force necessary to cause bond failure was recorded. The initial bond strengths for the no-mix adhesive and both two-paste systems were significantly greater than the tensile bond strengths for any rebonding condition. Different rebonding conditions reduced tensile bone strength to differing degrees, using each of these three adhesives. The initial bond strength for the visible, light-cured adhesive was not significantly different from three of the four rebonding conditions and was lower than the initial bond strength of the other three adhesives.

  7. Repair Bond Strength of Aged Resin Composite after Different Surface and Bonding Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Wendler, Michael; Belli, Renan; Panzer, Reinhard; Skibbe, Daniel; Petschelt, Anselm; Lohbauer, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of different mechanical surface treatments and chemical bonding protocols on the tensile bond strength (TBS) of aged composite. Bar specimens were produced using a nanohybrid resin composite and aged in distilled water for 30 days. Different surface treatments (diamond bur, phosphoric acid, silane, and sandblasting with Al2O3 or CoJet Sand), as well as bonding protocols (Primer/Adhesive) were used prior to application of the repair composite. TBS of the specimens was measured and the results were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Student–Newman–Keuls test (α = 0.05). Mechanically treated surfaces were characterized under SEM and by profilometry. The effect of water aging on the degree of conversion was measured by means of FTIR-ATR spectroscopy. An important increase in the degree of conversion was observed after aging. No significant differences in TBS were observed among the mechanical surface treatments, despite variations in surface roughness profiles. Phosphoric acid etching significantly improved repair bond strength values. The cohesive TBS of the material was only reached using resin bonding agents. Application of an intermediate bonding system plays a key role in achieving reliable repair bond strengths, whereas the kind of mechanical surface treatment appears to play a secondary role. PMID:28773669

  8. Bond Strength of 5th, 6th and 7th Generation Bonding Agents to Intracanal Dentin of Primary Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Afshar, Hossein; Baradaran Nakhjavani, Yahya; Rahro Taban, Sedighe; Baniameri, Zahra; Nahvi, Azam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This in-vitro study sought to assess the push-out bond strength of a total etch and 2 self-etch bonding systems to intracanal dentin of primary anterior teeth (PAT). Materials and Methods: Thirty-six primary anterior teeth were randomly divided into 3 groups of 5th generation (Single Bond 2), 6th generation (Clearfil SE) and 7th generation (Single Bond Universal) bonding agents. The canal orifice was restored with composite resin and the push-out test was carried out to assess the bond strength. After applying the push-out load, specimens were evaluated under a light microscope at 40X magnification. One-way ANOVA and log-rank test on Kaplan-Meier curves were applied for the comparison of bond strength among the 3 groups. Results: The mean± standard deviation (SD) bond strength was 13.6±5.33 MPa for Single Bond 2, 13.85±5.86 MPa for Clearfil SE and 12.28±5.24 MPa for Single Bond Universal. The differences in bond strength among the 3 groups were not statistically significant (P>0.05). Conclusion: All three bonding agents are recommended for use with composite posts in PAT. However, due to high technical sensitivity of the Total Etch system, single or two-step self etch systems may be preferred for uncooperative children. PMID:26056518

  9. Retentive shear strengths of various bonding attachment bases.

    PubMed

    Lopez, J I

    1980-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether any of the commercially available attachment bases had significantly better retentive properties. This was determined by their shear strengths after all were bonded to bovine incisors with Auto-Tach. The mean shear strengths of sixteen bases were statistically compared to each other at 24 hours and at 30 days. In addition, the data were converted to pounds per square inch to ascertain if the size of the base significantly influenced the mean shear strength. It was concluded that (1). one of the foil mesh bases tested for shear strength was significantly superior to the two other base designs (indents with undercuts and solid bases with perforations); (2). mechanical retention of the attachment bases to the adhesive was not significantly affected after being placed in distilled water at 37 degrees C. either for 24 hours or for 30 days; (3). smaller foil mesh bases could be used without sacrificing significant shear strength.

  10. [Bonding agent influence on shear bond strength of titanium/polyglass interface].

    PubMed

    Oyafuso, Denise Kanashiro; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Itinoche, Marcos Koiti; Nasraui, Anna Paula; Costa, Elza Maria Valadares da

    2003-09-01

    There is little information regarding bond strengths of polyglass to metal alloys. This study evaluated the influence of bonding system on shear bond strength of a composite resin (Artglass/Heraeus Kulzer) to cast titanium (Ti). Twenty metallic structures (4mm in diameter, 5mm thick) of titanium grade I were cast shaped and abraded with 250mm aluminum oxide and separated into two groups. For each group was applied one bonding system (Siloc or Retention Flow) before opaque and dentin polymer superposition. This procedure was managed using teflon matrices. They were manipulated and polymerized according to the manufacturer's recommendations. The samples were stored in distilled water for 24 hours at 37º and thermocycled (5º and 55ºC/500 cycles). Shear bond strength tests were performed by using an Instron Universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 5mm/min. Results were analyzed statistically with one-way ANOVA (a=0,5) and they indicated that the Retention Flow system was statistically better than Siloc (20.74 MPa and 11.65 MPa , respectively). It was possible to conclude that the bonding agent influenced the adhesion between polymer and cast titanium.

  11. Contribution of Hydrogen Bonds to Paper Strength Properties.

    PubMed

    Przybysz, Piotr; Dubowik, Marcin; Kucner, Marta Anna; Przybysz, Kazimierz; Przybysz Buzała, Kamila

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the influence of hydrogen bonds between fibres on static and dynamic strength properties of paper. A commercial bleached pinewood kraft pulp was soaked in water, refined in a PFI, and used to form paper webs in different solvents, such as water, methanol, ethanol, n-propanol and n-butanol, to determine the effect of their dipole moment on static and dynamic strength properties of resulting paper sheets. Paper which was formed in water, being the solvent of the highest dipole moment among the tested ones, showed the highest breaking length and tear resistance. When paper webs were formed in n-butanol, which was the least polar among the solvents, these parameters were reduced by around 75%. These results provide evidence of the importance of water in paper web formation and strong impact of hydrogen bonds between fibres on strength properties of paper.

  12. Contribution of Hydrogen Bonds to Paper Strength Properties

    PubMed Central

    Przybysz, Piotr; Dubowik, Marcin; Kucner, Marta Anna; Przybysz, Kazimierz; Przybysz Buzała, Kamila

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the influence of hydrogen bonds between fibres on static and dynamic strength properties of paper. A commercial bleached pinewood kraft pulp was soaked in water, refined in a PFI, and used to form paper webs in different solvents, such as water, methanol, ethanol, n-propanol and n-butanol, to determine the effect of their dipole moment on static and dynamic strength properties of resulting paper sheets. Paper which was formed in water, being the solvent of the highest dipole moment among the tested ones, showed the highest breaking length and tear resistance. When paper webs were formed in n-butanol, which was the least polar among the solvents, these parameters were reduced by around 75%. These results provide evidence of the importance of water in paper web formation and strong impact of hydrogen bonds between fibres on strength properties of paper. PMID:27228172

  13. Development of an Explosive Bonding Process for Producing High Strength Bonds between Niobium and 6061-T651 Aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T A; Elmer, J W; Brasher, D; Butler, D; Riddle, R

    2005-09-23

    An explosive bonding procedure for joining 9.5 mm thick niobium plate to 203 mm thick 6061-T651 Al plate has been developed in order to maximize the bond tensile and impact strengths and the amount of bonded material across the surface of the plate. This procedure improves upon previous efforts, in which the 9.5 mm thick niobium plate is bonded directly to 6061-T4 Al plate. In this improved procedure, thin Nb and Al interlayers are explosively clad between the thicker niobium and aluminum plates. Bonds produced using these optimized parameters display a tensile strength of approximately 255 MPa and an impact strength per unit area of approximately 0.148 J/mm{sup 2}. Specialized mechanical testing geometries and procedures are required to measure these bond properties because of the unique bond geometry. In order to ensure that differences in the thermal expansion coefficients of aluminum and niobium do not adversely affect the bond strength, the effects of thermal cycling at temperatures between -22 C and 45 C on the mechanical properties of these bonds have also been investigated by testing samples in both the as-received and thermal cycled conditions. Based on the results obtained from this series of mechanical tests, thermal cycling is shown to have no adverse effect on the resulting tensile and impact strengths of the bonds produced using the optimized bonding parameters.

  14. Shear Bond Strength of Two Types of Glass Ionomer to Bleached Dentin: Effect of Delayed Bonding and Antioxidant Agent

    PubMed Central

    Omrani, Ladan Ranjbar; Sabouri, Parastoo; Abbasi, Mehdi; Ahmadi, Elham; Ghavam, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Studies have shown a reduction in bond strength of composites and glass ionomer to bleached enamel and dentin. Several methods have been proposed to reverse compromised bond strength. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of delayed bonding and application of antioxidant agent on the bond strength of reinforced self-cured (Fuji IX) and light-cured glass ionomers (Fuji II LC) to bleached dentin. Material: Eighty extracted third molars were randomly divided into 8 groups. Buccal dentin surfaces received different treatments: Two control groups: no treatment + bonding Fuji IX or Fuji II LC. Two immediate bonding groups: bleaching + bonding Fuji IX or Fuji II LC. Two delayed bonding groups: bleaching + 7 days delay + bonding Fuji IX or Fuji II LC. Two sodium ascorbate application groups: Bleaching + application of 10% sodium ascorbate + bonding Fuji IX or Fuji II LC. All samples were tested for shear bond strength. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to compare the mean and standard deviations among groups, followed by the Tukey’s test for significant interaction. Results: No statistically significant difference was detected in shear bond strength of Fuji IX to bleached or normal dentin. Although a significant reduction was found shear bond strength values of Fuji II LC to bleached dentin, no significant difference was observed between no bleaching group and those treated with 10% sodium ascorbate or 7 days of delay in bonding for both types of glass ionomer. Conclusion: Bleaching had no significant effect on shear bond strength of Fuji IX to dentin; this type of GI can be used immediately after bleaching. PMID:28217187

  15. Micro-tensile bond strength of adhesive systems applied on occlusal primary enamel.

    PubMed

    Ramires-Romito, Ana Cláudia; Reis, Alessandra; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; de Góes, Mario Fernando; Grande, Rosa Helena Miranda

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the micro-tensile bond strength of adhesive systems (OptiBond Solo, Kerr; Prime & Bond NT, Dentsply) on occlusal surface of primary molars. The adhesives were tested under manufacturers' specifications and after contamination of the bonding site with saliva. Hourglass cylindrical-shaped samples were obtained and subjected to a tensile force. No significant difference was observed among the groups. OptiBond Solo and Prime & Bond NT showed similar values of bond strengths when applied on occlusal enamel of primary molar under either saliva contamination or not.

  16. Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Enamel: Assessment of Two Ethanol Wet-Bonding Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Rafizadeh, Mojgan; Samimi, Pouran

    2014-01-01

    Objective Ethanol wet-bonding (EWB) technique has been stated to decrease degradation of resin-dentin bond. This study evaluated the effect of two EWB techniques on composite resin-to-enamel bond strength. Materials and Methods: Silicon carbide papers were used to produce flat enamel surfaces on the buccal faces of forty-five molars. OptiBond FL (OFL) adhesive was applied on enamel surfaces in three groups of 15 namely: Enamel surface and OFL (control);Protocol 1 of the EWB technique: absolute ethanol was applied to water-saturated acid-etched enamel surfaces for 1 minute before the application of ethanol-solvated hydrophobic adhesive resin of OFL 3 times;Protocol 2: progressive ethanol replacement; water was gradually removed from the enamel matrix using ascending ethanol concentrations before OFL application. Composite build-ups were made and the specimens were stored for 24 hours at 37°C and 100% relative humidity. Shear bond strength test was performed using a universal testing machine at 1 mm/min crosshead speed. Fracture patterns were evaluated microscopically. Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Fisher’s exact test (α=0.05). Results: There were no significant differences in bond strength between the groups (P=0.73). However, regarding failure patterns, the highest cohesive enamel fractures were recorded in groups 2 and 3. Conclusion: In this study, although both methods of EWB did not influence immediate bond strength of composite resin to enamel, the majority of failure patterns occurred cohesively in enamel. PMID:24910690

  17. [The impact of ultrasonic dental hygiene procedures on the bonding strength of restorations].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, D L; Mel'nik, A A; Laze, R; Petrikas, O A; Petrikas, I V

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasonic calculus scaling has become a common oral hygiene procedure in patients with composite restorations, dental veneers, orthodontic brackets. The aim of the study was to evaluate in vitro the influence of the EMS-ultrasonic system scaling on the flowable composite bond strength to the tooth enamel, dentine, and e-max ceramic. The samples were divided into three groups: 1 group (composite bonded to enamel), 2 group (composite bonded to dentine), 3 group (composite bonded to e-max ceramic). The bonded samples were loaded to failure in the universal testing machine. The shear bond strength was calculated in newtons (N). T (Student's)-test was used to evaluate the data. Significantly lower bond strengths were observed with the ultrasonic treated samples in each groups. The EMS-ultrasonic system scaling significantly decreases the flowable composite bond strength to the tooth enamel, dentine, and e-max ceramic.

  18. Microtensile bond strength of silorane-based composite specific adhesive system using different bonding strategies

    PubMed Central

    Bastos, Laura Alves; Sousa, Ana Beatriz Silva; Drubi-Filho, Brahim; Panzeri Pires-de-Souza, Fernanda de Carvalho

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of pre-etching on the bond strength of silorane-based composite specific adhesive system to dentin. Materials and Methods Thirty human molars were randomly divided into 5 groups according to the different bonding strategies. For teeth restored with silorane-based composite (Filtek Silorane, 3M ESPE), the specific self-etching adhesive system (Adhesive System P90, 3M ESPE) was used with and without pre-etching (Pre-etching/Silorane and Silorane groups). Teeth restored with methacrylate based-composite (Filtek Z250, 3M ESPE) were hybridized with the two-step self-etching system (Clearfil SE Bond, Kuraray), with and without pre-etching (Pre-etching/Methacrylate and Methacrylate groups), or three-step adhesive system (Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE) (Three-step/Methacrylate group) (n = 6). The restored teeth were sectioned into stick-shaped test specimens (1.0 × 1.0 mm), and coupled to a universal test machine (0.5 mm/min) to perform microtensile testing. Results Pre-etching/Methacrylate group presented the highest bond strength values, with significant difference from Silorane and Three-step/Methacrylate groups (p < 0.05). However, it was not significantly different from Preetching/Silorane and Methacrylate groups. Conclusions Pre-etching increased bond strength of silorane-based composite specific adhesive system to dentin. PMID:25671209

  19. Wheelchair armrest strength testing.

    PubMed

    Cooper, R A; Rentschler, A J; O'Connor, T J; Ster, J F

    2000-01-01

    There are about 1.4 million manual wheelchair users, 100,000 electric-powered wheelchair users, and 60,000 electric-powered scooter users. The current study was undertaken to determine if the fasteners of a clamp-type armrest receiver were prone to failure. The first test was used to examine the potential misalignment of the armrest receiver components that attach it to the frame. The second test was to evaluate the entire armrest using the American National Standards Institute/Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America armrest static strength standard. Finally, we conducted three fatigue tests. The first fatigue test was performed by repeating the static stability tests multiple times. The last two tests were a modified version of the double-drum wheelchair fatigue test used to apply repeated loading and vibration simultaneously. A paired t-test showed that there is no statistically significant difference (p = 0.08), with a confidence of 95%, between critical alignment measurements. The armrest including the receiver passed the standard requirement of a force of 760 N being applied outward at 15 degrees. During fatigue testing, we found that armrests did not exhibit any visible or functional damage. Upon completion of the tests, the armrests and receivers functioned properly. At about 100,289 cycles on a double-drum test machine, three bolts failed on each armrest receiver when the screws were loosened to have only five threads engaged prior to commencing the test. The design of the armrest tested was in compliance with existing national and international standards. Currently, both International Standards Organization and American National Standards Institute/Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society committees are developing standards for seating systems that will include static, impact, and fatigue strength testing of devices like lateral torso supports, lateral hip support, etc. Methods similar to those

  20. [Studies on bond strength and hardness of base materials].

    PubMed

    Suga, T; Chiba, E; Shinya, A; Yokozuka, S

    1989-04-01

    Since base materials are used in the construction of abutment teeth and the cavity walls of the teeth with healthy pulp, they need considerable bonding and mechanical strength depending on the site of application. In the present study we examined bonding strength, Martens-Mayer hardness and Vickers hardness of base materials in comparison with natural dentin in order to reevaluate them in terms of prosthetic materials and to provide assessment criteria for their application to prosthetic treatment. The results were as follows: 1) The bonding test showed the lowest value (4.6kgf/cm2) in calcium hydroxide FR (HFR) and the highest (47.9kgf/cm2) in HY-Bond polycarboxylate cement (CHC), a type of polycarboxylate cement. 2) In the test of bonding strength with various types of cement, calcium hydroxide preparations and zinc phosphate cement showed low values (4.6-23.5kgf/cm2) while polycarboxylate cement and glass-ionomer cement showed relatively high values (17.8-40.5kgf/cm2). 3) The Martens-Mayer hardness test showed the highest value (10.82 x 10(4] in dentin cement (GDE) and the lowest (1.09 x 10(4] in propack (EPR). 4) The Vickers hardness test showed the highest value (82) in neo-protect cement (ZPR) and the lowest (1) in propack (EPR). 5) In both Martens-Mayer and Vickers hardness tests with various types of cement, zinc phosphate cement and glass- ionomer cement showed high values, while low values were obtained in calcium hydroxide preparations and zinc-oxide eugenol cement. 6) Zinc phosphate cement and glass-ionomer cement showed no statistically significant differences from natural dentin in either Martens-Mayer hardness or Vickers hardness.

  1. Effect of Sonic Vibrations on Bond Strength of Fiberglass Posts Bonded to Root Dentin.

    PubMed

    Mushashe, Amanda Mahammad; Amaral, Rodrigo Otavio Jatahy Ferreira do; Rezende, Carlos Eduardo Edwards; Filho, Flares Baratto; Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes da; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia

    2017-01-01

    Sonic vibrations may improve the bond strength and durability of fiberglass posts by improving adhesive penetration into dentin as well as the cement flow. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of sonic vibrations on the bond strength between fiberglass posts and root dentin using the pull-out test. Bovine roots were endodontically treated and divided randomly into four groups (n=12): Group C - conventional cementation (control); Group SA - sonic vibration (Smart Sonic Device, FGM) of the adhesive system and conventional post accommodation; SP group - conventional adhesive application and sonic vibration of the post during accommodation; and SASP - sonic vibration of the system adhesive and the post during accommodation. The posts were cleaned, treated with a silane and adhesive system (Ambar, FGM), and cemented with a dual-cured resin cement (Allcem Core, FGM). After 24 h, the specimens were subjected to mechanical tests and failure analyses. Representative specimens were analyzed by a scanning electron microscope to observe the cementation line. The results were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test (a=5%). The bond strengths were as follows: SASP (90.9±27.1 N), C (121.4±60.6 N), SA (127.6±31.8 N) and SP (156.4±41.3 N). The use of sonic vibrations during the application of adhesive or post cementation separately did not affect the bond strength but had a negative effect when used for both procedures.

  2. Microtensile bond strength of lithium disilicate ceramics to resin adhesives.

    PubMed

    Aboushelib, Moustafa N; Sleem, Donia

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the influence of the internal structure of lithium disilicate glass ceramics (LDC) on the microtensile bond strength to a resin adhesive using two surface treatments. Milling blocks of three types of LDC were sectioned (4 mm thick) using a precision cutting machine: IPS Empress 2 (conventional LDC), IPSe.max CAD (a refined crystal high strength LDC), and Celtra (zirconia reinforced LDC). Cut specimens received crystallization heat treatment as suggested by the manufacturers. Two surface treatments were performed on each group: hydrofluoric acid etching (HF) and airborne particle abrasion using 50-μm glass beads, while the as-cut surface served as control. Treated surfaces were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The disks were coated with a silane primer and bonded to pre-aged resin composite disks (Tetric EvoCeram) using a resin adhesive (Variolink II) and then stored in water for 3 months. Bonded specimens were sectioned into micro-bars (1x1x6 mm) and microtensile bond strength test (MTBS) was performed. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test (α=0.05). Statistical analysis revealed significant differences in microtensile bond strength values between different LDCs (F=67, p<0.001), different surface treatments (F=232, p<0.001), and interaction between LDC and surface treatments (F=10.6, p<0.001). Microtensile bond strength of Celtra ceramic (30.4±4.6 MPa) was significantly higher than both IPS Empress 2 (21.5±5.9 MPa) and IPSe.max ceramics (25.8±4.8 MPa), which had almost comparable MTBS values. SEM images demonstrated homogenous glassy matrix and reinforcing zirconia fillers characteristic of Celtra ceramic. Heat treatment resulted in growth and maturation of lithium disilicate crystals. Particle abrasion resulted in abrasion of the glass matrix and exposure of lithium disilicate crystals, while HF etching produced a microrough surface, which resulted in higher MTBS values and reduction in the percentage

  3. Impact of oxalate desensitizer combined with ethylene-diamine tetra acetic acid-conditioning on dentin bond strength of one-bottle adhesives during dry bonding

    PubMed Central

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Doozandeh, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Background: Elimination of water entrapment in hybrid layer during bonding procedure would increase bonding durability. Aims: This study evaluated the effect of oxalate desensitizer (OX) pretreatment on bond strength of three one-bottle adhesives to ethylene-diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA)-conditioned dentin under dry bonding. Materials and Methods: Three adhesive systems, One-Step Plus (OS), Optibond Solo Plus (OP) and Adper Single Bond (SB) were bonded on dentin surfaces under four bonding conditions: (1) Wet-bonding on acid-etched dentin, (2) wet bonding on EDTA-conditioned dentin, (3) dry bonding on EDTA-conditioned dentin, (4) dry bonding associated with OX on the EDTA-conditioned dentin. After storage and thermo cycling, shear bond strength test was performed. Data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and Tukey tests. Results: Wet bonding with EDTA or acid etching showed similar bond strength for test adhesives. Dry bonding with EDTA significantly decreased the bond strength of OS, but it had no effect on the bonding of OP and SB. OX application in the forth bonding condition, in comparison with the third condition, had a negative effect on the bond strength of OP, but not influence on OS and SB. Conclusions: The use of an OX on EDTA-conditioned dentin compromised the bonding efficacy of OS and OP under dry bonding but compatible for SB. PMID:23833461

  4. Enamel and dentin bond strength and bonding mechanism to dentin of Gluma CPS to primary teeth.

    PubMed

    Fritz, U; García-Godoy, F; Finger, W J

    1997-01-01

    This study evaluated the shear bond strength to enamel and dentin and bonding mechanism to dentin of Gluma CPS bonding system to primary teeth enamel and dentin. Pekafill hybrid composite was used. Ten specimens were immersed in deionized water at 37 degrees C for twenty-four hours and ten other specimens were subjected to a thermocycling procedure (2000 cycles between 5 degrees and 55 degrees C, dwell time fifteen seconds). After water storage or thermocycling, the bonded cylinders were sheared and the bond strength calculated. After debonding, the failure sites of all samples were evaluated microscopically. The data were analyzed with an ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls test. In ten other primary molars, the buccal surfaces were ground flat on wet SiC papers to expose peripheral dentin. Cylindrical buttjoint cavities were prepared with a cylindrical diamond bur. The cavities were treated with Gluma CPS and filled with pekafill as described above. After fifteen-minute water storage, filling excess was removed and marginal integrity and bonding mechanism of five restorations was examined with a light microscope. Five other restorations were evaluated after storage in water at 37 degrees C for twenty-four hours. Maximal gap widths and hybrid layer thickness were determined. The results showed that thermocycling did not affect the shear bond strength to enamel or dentin. There was a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) between the shear bond strength values obtained in enamel and dentin. The maximal gap width was not significantly different between specimens that were stored in water for fifteen minutes or twenty-four hours. The average hybrid layer thickness was 11.7 +/- 1.1 micrograms. All specimens revealed a resin cohesive failure very close to enamel or dentin surface. The etch patterns produced on the abraded enamel surface were uniform and deeper as compared to the sample that was pumiced. This was also confirmed in the epoxy replicas.

  5. Does Bonding Approach Influence the Bond Strength of Universal Adhesive to Dentin of Primary Teeth?

    PubMed

    Lenzi, Tathiane Larissa; Soares, Fabio Zovico Maxnuck; de Oliveira Rocha, Rachel

    To evaluate the effect of bonding strategy on microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of a new universal adhesive system to primary tooth dentin. Flat dentin surfaces from 25 primary molars were assigned to 5 groups according to the adhesive and bonding approach: Adper Single Bond 2 (two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive) and Clearfil SE Bond (two-step self-etch system), as controls; Scotchbond Universal Adhesive-self-etch, dry or wet-bonding etch-and-rinse strategies. Composite buildups were constructed and the teeth were sectioned to obtain bonded sticks (0.8 mm(2)) to be tested under tension at 1mm/min. The μTBS means were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests (α = 0.05). Failure mode was evaluated using a stereomicroscope (400×). Universal adhesive applied following both dry and wet-bonding etch-and-rinse strategies showed similar bond strength compared with control adhesive systems. Self-etch approach resulted in the lowest μTBS values. For all groups, adhesive/mixed failure prevailed. The percentage of premature debonded specimens was higher when the universal adhesive was used as self-etch mode. The universal adhesive does not share the same versatility of being used in the etch-and-rinse and self-etch approaches; however, the use of the new adhesive following either wet or dry-bonding may be a suitable option as alternative to two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive protocol.

  6. Effect of cleaning dentine with soap and pumice on shear bond strength of dentine-bonding agents.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, M; Paul, S J; Lüthy, H; Schärer, P

    1997-06-01

    This in vitro study reports on the cleaning effect of different soaps on the shear bond strength of various dentine-bonding agents. Human teeth were coated with provisional cements for 24 h or for 14 days. After removing the provisional cements with a scaler, the dentinal surface was cleaned with a cotton pellet and non-fluoridated flour of pumice and soap for 10 sec. Different dentine-bonding agents and a luting resin were bonded to the dentinal surface according to manufacturers' instructions with the bonding agent and the composite material being light-cured at the same time. The bonding agents were tested under intrapulpal pressure and with thermal cycling to imitate physiological conditions. Compared with cleaning the dentine with water and pumice, all soaps investigated in this study decreased the shear bond strength values of the tested dentine-bonding agents considerably.

  7. Effect of dentin surface roughness on the shear bond strength of resin bonded restorations

    PubMed Central

    Koodaryan, Roodabeh; Poursoltan, Sajjad

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE This study aimed to investigate whether dentin surface preparation with diamond rotary instruments of different grit sizes affects the shear bond strength of resin-bonded restorations. MATERIALS AND METHODS The buccal enamel of 60 maxillary central incisors was removed with a low speed diamond saw and wet ground with silicon carbide papers. The polished surfaces of the teeth were prepared with four groups of rotary diamond burs with super-coarse (SC), coarse (C), medium (M), and fine (F) grit sizes. Following surface preparation, 60 restorations were casted with nickel-chromium alloy and bonded with Panavia cement. To assess the shear bond strength, the samples were mounted on a universal testing machine and an axial load was applied along the cement-restoration interface at the crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The acquired data was analyzed with one way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc test (α=.05). RESULTS The mean ± SD shear bond strengths (in MPa) of the study groups were 17.75 ± 1.41 for SC, 13.82 ± 1.13 for C, 10.40 ± 1.45 for M, and 7.13 ± 1.18 for F. Statistical analysis revealed the significant difference among the study groups such that the value for group SC was significantly higher than that for group F (P<.001). CONCLUSION Dentin surface roughness created by diamond burs of different grit sizes considerably influences the shear bond strength of resin bonded restorations. PMID:27350858

  8. Shear bond strengths produced by composite and compomer light cured orthodontic adhesives.

    PubMed

    Rock, W P; Abdullah, M S

    1997-01-01

    To test the shear bond strengths obtained when orthodontic brackets were bonded ex vivo using a composite resin and a compomer orthodontic adhesive. Specimens were tested in a special jig made to fit an Instron testing machine. After debonding, the adhesive remaining on bracket bases and enamel surfaces was mapped. Bond strengths ranged from 8 to 23 MPa with the composite resin producing higher strengths than the compomer for similar combinations of variables. Bond strength was increased by longer curing and a longer debond interval and was higher for brackets with mesh bases than undercut bases. More compomer remained on the enamel surface after debonding than did the composite resin. The compomer produced bond strengths within the range considered to be clinically acceptable in other studies. If it was clinically successful as an orthodontic adhesive a compomer would confer the advantage that fluoride release would help to minimize the onset of early caries around bonded brackets.

  9. The effect of mineral bond strength and adsorbed water on fault gouge frictional strength

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrow, C.A.; Moore, Diane E.; Lockner, D.A.

    2000-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the tendency of many fault gouge minerals to take on adsorbed or interlayer water may strongly influence their frictional strength. To test this hypothesis, triaxial sliding experiments were conducted on 15 different single-mineral gouges with various water-adsorbing affinities. Vacuum dried samples were sheared at 100 MPa, then saturated with water and sheared farther to compare dry and wet strengths. The coefficients of friction, μ, for the dry sheet-structure minerals (0.2-0.8), were related to mineral bond strength, and dropped 20-60% with the addition of water. For non-adsorbing minerals (μ = 0.6-0.8), the strength remained unchanged after saturation. These results confirm that the ability of minerals to adsorb various amounts of water is related to their relative frictional strengths, and may explain the anomalously low strength of certain natural fault gouges.

  10. Flexural and Microtensile Bond Strength of Bulk Fill Materials.

    PubMed

    Öznurhan, F; Ünal, M; Kapdan, A; Öztürk, C

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the flexural and μTBS of bulk-fill materials. Bulk-fill materials SDR, X-trabase (XTR) and TetricEvoCeramBulkFill (EVO) were used in this study. To test flexural strength, 25x2x2mm samples were prepared and tested with three point bending test. To test the microtensile bond strength (μTBS), two blocks (4x4x4mm) were prepared for each material. In Group A+B, acid-etching was applied to the surface of one of these blocks and no acid-etching was applied in Group B. After applying bonding agent, two blocks were placed into the mold and composite resin (COMP; Tetric N-Ceram) was applied with incremental layering. To evaluate the μTBS of primary dentin, the bulk-fill materials were applied to flat dentin up to 4mm. The new blocks and the teeth were sectioned to obtain sticks and the sticks were loaded in tension until failure. Flexural and microtensile bond strength was calculated based on failure load. The ranking of materials with regards to flexural strength values were SDR>XTR>EVO>COMP,respectively. In GroupA+B, the μTBS values were XTR>SDR>EVO and were XTR>EVO>SDR in GroupB (p>0.05). The μTBS values of these materials to dentin were XTR>EVO>SDR (p>0.05). Within the limitations of this study, the use of a bonding agent without acid-etching showed positive interactions between base materials and composite resin and there were no significant differences in μTBS of these materials to dentin.

  11. Bond strengths of three chemical adhesive cements adhered to a nickel-chromium alloy for direct bonded retainers.

    PubMed

    Atta, M O; Smith, B G; Brown, D

    1990-02-01

    Sandblasted surfaces of a beryllium-free, nickel-chromium alloy were bonded with one of three chemical adhesives. After either immersion in water for up to 6 months or thermal cycling between 5 degrees and 60 degrees C for 500 cycles, the bonded specimens were tested for both shear and tensile strength. The highest values of tensile and shear bond strengths were found with Panavia Ex material, and these values showed no significant changes after thermal cycling. For ABC cement and for Super-Bond C & B material, the strength of the bond was significantly improved with thermal cycling. However, immersion in water for 6 months caused a significant decrease in the strength of the bond of specimens adhered with ABC cement.

  12. Comparison of Shear Bond Strength of RMGI and Composite Resin for Orthodontic Bracket Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Yassaei, Soghra; Davari, Abdolrahim; Goldani Moghadam, Mahjobeh; Kamaei, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI) and composite resin for bonding metal and ceramic brackets. Materials and Methods: Eighty-eight human premolars extracted for orthodontic purposes were divided into 4 groups (n=22). In groups 1 and 2, 22 metal and ceramic brackets were bonded using composite resin (Transbond XT), respectively. Twenty-two metal and ceramic brackets in groups 3 and 4, respectively were bonded using RMGI (Fuji Ortho LC, Japan). After photo polymerization, the teeth were stored in water and thermocycled (500 cycles between 5° and 55°). The SBS value of each sample was determined using a Universal Testing Machine. The amount of residual adhesive remaining on each tooth was evaluated under a stereomicroscope. Statistical analyses were done using two-way ANOVA. Results: RMGI bonded brackets had significantly lower SBS value compared to composite resin bonded groups. No statistically significant difference was observed between metal and ceramic brackets bonded with either the RMGI or composite resin. The comparison of the adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores between the groups indicated that the bracket failure mode was significantly different among groups (P<0.001) with more adhesive remaining on the teeth bonded with composite resin. Conclusion: RMGIs have significantly lower SBS compared to composite resin for orthodontic bonding purposes; however the provided SBS is still within the clinically acceptable range. PMID:25628663

  13. Comparison of Shear Bond Strength of RMGI and Composite Resin for Orthodontic Bracket Bonding.

    PubMed

    Yassaei, Soghra; Davari, Abdolrahim; Goldani Moghadam, Mahjobeh; Kamaei, Ahmad

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI) and composite resin for bonding metal and ceramic brackets. Eighty-eight human premolars extracted for orthodontic purposes were divided into 4 groups (n=22). In groups 1 and 2, 22 metal and ceramic brackets were bonded using composite resin (Transbond XT), respectively. Twenty-two metal and ceramic brackets in groups 3 and 4, respectively were bonded using RMGI (Fuji Ortho LC, Japan). After photo polymerization, the teeth were stored in water and thermocycled (500 cycles between 5° and 55°). The SBS value of each sample was determined using a Universal Testing Machine. The amount of residual adhesive remaining on each tooth was evaluated under a stereomicroscope. Statistical analyses were done using two-way ANOVA. RMGI bonded brackets had significantly lower SBS value compared to composite resin bonded groups. No statistically significant difference was observed between metal and ceramic brackets bonded with either the RMGI or composite resin. The comparison of the adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores between the groups indicated that the bracket failure mode was significantly different among groups (P<0.001) with more adhesive remaining on the teeth bonded with composite resin. RMGIs have significantly lower SBS compared to composite resin for orthodontic bonding purposes; however the provided SBS is still within the clinically acceptable range.

  14. Shear bond strength of bonding to enamel with different laser irradiation distances.

    PubMed

    Başaran, Güvenç; Hamamcı, Nihal; Akkurt, Atılım

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength of bonding to enamel following laser etching with the Er:YAG or Er,Cr:YSGG laser using different irradiation distances. Of 99 extracted human premolar teeth, 90 were divided equally into nine groups. In the control group (group A) the teeth were etched with 38% phosphoric acid. In the laser groups (groups B-I) the enamel surface of the teeth was laser-irradiated, groups B-E with the Er:YAG laser and groups F-I with the Er,Cr:YSGG laser at distances of 1, 2, 4 and 6 mm, respectively. The shear bond strengths were tested using a universal testing machine. The shear bond strengths associated with the Er:YAG laser at 4 and 6 mm and the Er,Cr:YSGG laser at 2, 4 and 6 mm were significantly less than the strengths obtained with the other irradiation distances (p<0.001). The Er:YAG laser at 1 mm and the Er,Cr:YSGG laser at 1 mm etched enamel in the same manner (p>0.05). This finding was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy examination. Irradiation distance did influence the strength of adhesion to enamel. The mean shear bond strengths and enamel surface etching obtained with the Er:YAG laser at 1 and 2 mm and the Er,Cr:YSGG laser at 1 mm were comparable to that obtained with acid etching.

  15. Effect of enamel pretreatments on bond strength of compomer.

    PubMed

    Glasspoole, E A; Erickson, R L; Davidson, C L

    2001-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of various enamel surface treatments on the bond strength of a compomer to enamel. Ground bovine enamel specimens were divided into four groups. A compomer (F2000, 3M) was bonded to the specimens using different enamel surface treatments. Two groups examined the effect of application of the F2000 self-etching primer/adhesive (3M) with respect to static or dynamic priming. A third examined use of the primer/adhesive after phosphoric acid etching, and the fourth (control) group provided bond strength of the compomer to phosphoric acid etched enamel with a resin bonding system (Single Bond, 3M). Shear bond strengths for the specimens were measured after 24h storage in water at 37 degrees C. Effects of the various surface treatments on enamel were examined by SEM. Significant differences in bond strength of compomer to enamel were found that were related to the various surface pretreatments. Dynamic priming resulted in higher enamel bond strengths than static priming, and the best bond strengths were obtained when the enamel was etched with phosphoric acid. SEM analysis showed that depth of etch and resin penetration was also directly related to the bond strengths measured. Bond strength of compomer to enamel is significantly affected by the method of pretreatment of the enamel.

  16. Shear bond strength of one-step self-etch adhesives: pH influence

    PubMed Central

    Poggio, Claudio; Beltrami, Riccardo; Scribante, Andrea; Colombo, Marco; Chiesa, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of four one-step self-etch adhesives with different pH values to enamel and dentin. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, 200 bovine permanent mandibular incisors were used. Four one-step self-etch adhesives with different pH values were tested both on enamel and on dentin: Adper™ Easy Bond Self-Etch Adhesive (pH = 0.8-1), Futurabond NR (pH=2), G-aenial Bond (pH = 1.5), Clearfil S3 Bond (pH = 2.7). After adhesive systems application, a nanohybrid composite resin was inserted into the bonded surface. The specimens were placed in a universal testing machine. The shear bond strength was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min until the sample rupture. The shear bond strength values (MPa) of the different groups were compared with analysis of variance after that Kolmogorov and Smirnov tests were applied to assess normality of distributions. P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: In enamel shear bond strength, the highest shear bond strength values were reported with Futurabond NR (P < 0.01); however, no significant differences were found with Clearfil S3 Bond. The others adhesive systems showed lower shear bond strength values with significant differences between them (P < 0.05). When comparing the dentin shear bond strength, the lowest shear bond strength values were reported with Clearfil S3 Bond (P < 0.05), while there were no significant differences among the other three products (P > 0.05). Conclusion: The pH values of adhesive systems did not influence significantly their shear bond strength to enamel or dentin. PMID:26005459

  17. Bond strength and durability of glass ionomer cements used as bonding agents in the placement of orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Klockowski, R; Davis, E L; Joynt, R B; Wieczkowski, G; MacDonald, A

    1989-07-01

    One potential risk of orthodontic treatment is the development of surface decalcification in association with use of brackets and bands. A bonding agent that could render tooth structure more resistant to the caries process clearly would reduce the negative iatrogenic outcomes of orthodontic therapy and thereby benefit the patient. Glass ionomer cement (GIC) bonds chemically to both enamel and dentin. In addition its high fluoride content makes enamel more resistant to caries. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond strength and durability of GIC when used as a bonding agent in the placement of orthodontic brackets. The materials tested were three GICs (Ketac-Fil, Ketac-Cem, and Chelon) and a standard bonding agent currently in widespread use (Rely-A-Bond). Brackets were attached to the facial surface of 96 premolar specimens and half the specimens for each bonding agent were thermocycled. Bond shear strength was determined with an Instron testing device by applying a load to the occlusal margin of each bracket to the point of failure. A two-way ANOVA indicated a significant bonding agent by thermocycling interaction (F = 4.78, p less than 0.01). Thermocycling decreased bond strength significantly for all materials, but had the greatest impact on Rely-A-Bond. However, Rely-A-Bond provided the strongest bond with and without thermocycling. Although bond strength for the standard orthodontic bonding agent deteriorates significantly under thermal stress, these results suggest that it is still greater than the bond strength provided by GIC materials.

  18. Shear bond strength of brackets bonded to amalgam with different intermediate resins and adhesives.

    PubMed

    Germec, Derya; Cakan, Umut; Ozdemir, Fulya Isik; Arun, Tulin; Cakan, Murat

    2009-04-01

    The aims of this study were to compare, in vitro, the shear bond strength (SBS) of stainless steel orthodontic brackets bonded to silver amalgam with the use of three different intermediate resins and two different adhesives, and to evaluate bond failure mode. Forty-five amalgam specimens were divided into three equal groups. In groups 1 and 2, the brackets were bonded with Unite (3M Unitek) using Reliance Metal Primer (RMP; Reliance Orthodontic Products) and Power Bond OLC (PB OLC; Ortho Organizers Inc.) as intermediate resins, respectively. In group 3, Resinomer and One-Step Plus (OS+; Bisco Inc.) were used. Thirty bovine teeth served as the controls to test bracket bonding to acid-etched enamel with Unite and Resinomer-OS+. After thermocycling from 10 to 50 degrees C 1000 times, all samples were tested for SBS. Bond failure sites were classified using a modified adhesive remnant index (ARI) system. Data were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance, post hoc Tukey multiple comparison and chi-square tests. The results showed that the mean SBS to amalgam surfaces were significantly lower than those to etched bovine enamel (P<0.001). There were no statistically significant differences in mean SBS between the amalgam bonding groups (P>0.05). For the ARI, significant differences were found between the amalgam- and enamel-bonding groups (P<0.001). The mean SBS of stainless steel orthodontic brackets bonded to amalgam surfaces with RMP, PB OLC, OS+ intermediate resins and Unite and Resinomer adhesives was significantly lower than to etched bovine enamel. Bond failure occurred at the amalgam-adhesive interface regardless of the adhesive system and without damage to the amalgam restoration.

  19. Shear bond strength of a new polycarbonate bracket--an in vitro study with 14 adhesives.

    PubMed

    Akin-Nergiz, N; Nergiz, I; Behlfelt, K; Platzer, U

    1996-06-01

    Shear bond strength and failure location were used to evaluate the effectiveness of plastic bracket primers for bonding diacrylate adhesives on a new fibre-reinforced polycarbonate bracket. Maxillary incisor polycarbonate and mesh-based brackets as control were bonded to human incisors with 14 different adhesives (four filled diacrylate two-paste, six diacrylate one-step and four power-liquid acrylic adhesives), and after thermo-cycling for 2000 cycles between 5 degrees and 55 degrees C, tested in shear. A non-parametric test (Mann-Whitney U test) was used to compare the shear bond strength of the polycarbonate brackets with the mesh based brackets and a One-way test (according to Scheffe) to compare the shear bond strength of different adhesives. The following conclusions can be made: 1. Seven of the 14 adhesives used in this study with both types of brackets demonstrated adequate shear bond strength values for the clinical application. The exceptions were: Achieve Mix, No-Mix:30 Silkon, Lee Insta-Bond, Ortho-Loc and Bond-Eze, all with too low a shear bond strength for one or both types of brackets, and finally Quasar, which used with the plastic brackets sometimes caused enamel fractures, due to high bond strength. 2. The adhesives with their own plastic primer demonstrated higher blood strength values than those without plastic primer, and two-paste adhesives used with plastic primer displayed a higher bond strength than the other adhesives. 3. Generally, the shear bond strength values of the one-step adhesives were lower compared with the two-paste adhesives. 4. The liquid-powder adhesives demonstrated very different values for bond strength.

  20. An In-vitro Comparison of Bond Strength of Different Sealers/Obturation Systems to Root Dentin Using Push-out Test at 2 Weeks and 3 Months Post Obturation.

    PubMed

    Yap, Wai Ying; Che Ab Aziz, Zeti Adura; Azami, Noor Hayati; Al-Haddad, Afaf Yahya; Khan, Asfand Ali

    2017-09-19

    To evaluate the push-out bond strength and failure modes of different sealers/obturation systems to intra-radicular dentin at 2 weeks and 3 months' post obturation compared to AH Plus®/gutta-percha. One hundred and eighty (180) root slices from sixty (60) single-canal anterior teeth were prepared and assigned to 5 experimental groups (n=36 in each group), designated as G1: AH Plus®/Gutta-percha; G2: TotalFill BCTM sealer/BC coated gutta-percha; G3: TotalFill BCTM sealer/gutta-percha; G4: EndoREZ® sealer/EndoREZ® coated gutta-percha and G5: EndoREZ® sealer/gutta-percha. Push-out bond strengths of eighteen (18) root slices in each group were assessed at 2 weeks and the other 18 at 3 months' post obturation using universal testing machine. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA. Independent t-test was used to compare mean push-out bond strength for each group at 2 weeks and 3 months' interval. The mean push-out bond strengths of G4 and G5 were significantly lower than G1, G2 and G3 (p<0.05) at both 2 weeks (G1: 1.46±0.29, G2: 1.74±0.43MPa, G3: 1.74±0.43MPa, G4: 0.66±0.31, G5: 0.74±0.47) and 3 months' post obturation (G1: 1.70±1.05, G2: 3.69±1.20MPa, G3: 2.84±0.83MPa, G4: 0.14±0.05, G5: 0.24±0.10). The mean push-out bond strengths of G2: (3.69±1.20MPa) and G3: (2.84±0.83MPa) were higher at 3 months compared to 2 weeks post obturation (G2: 1.74±0.43MPa and G3: 1.33±0.29MPa. TotalFill BCTM obturation system (G2) and TotalFill BCTM sealer/gutta-percha (G3) showed comparable bond strength to AH Plus®. Their bond strength increased over time whereas EndoREZ® obturation system (G4) and EndoRez sealer (G5) had low push-out bond strength which decreased over time. ©2017The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Evaluation of micro-shear bond strength of resin modified glass-ionomer to composite resins using various bonding systems

    PubMed Central

    Kasraie, Shahin; Shokripour, Mohadese; Safari, Mahin

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to compare the micro-shear bond strength between composite and resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI) by different adhesive systems. Materials and Methods: A total of 16 discs of RMGI with a diameter of 15 mm and a thickness of 2 mm were randomly divided into four groups (n = 4). Four cylinders of composite resin (z250) were bonded to the RMGI discs with Single Bond, Clearfil SE Bond and Clearfil S3 Bond in Groups 1-3, respectively. The fourth group was the control. Samples were tested by a mechanical testing machine with a strain rate of 0.5 mm/min. Failure mode was assessed under a stereo-microscope. Results: The means of micro-shear bond strength values for Groups 1-4 were 14.45, 23.49, 16.23 and 5.46 MPa, respectively. Using a bonding agent significantly increased micro-shear bond strength (P = 0.0001). Conclusion: Micro-shear bond strength of RMGI to composite increased significantly with the use of adhesive resin. The bond strength of RMGI to composite resin could vary depending upon the type of adhesive system used. PMID:24347892

  2. Inlays made from a hybrid material: adaptation and bond strengths.

    PubMed

    Bottino, M A; Campos, F; Ramos, N C; Rippe, M P; Valandro, L F; Melo, R M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the internal fit, marginal adaptation, and bond strengths of inlays made of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing feldspathic ceramic and polymer-infiltrated ceramic. Twenty molars were randomly selected and prepared to receive inlays that were milled from both materials. Before cementation, internal fit was achieved using the replica technique by molding the internal surface with addition silicone and measuring the cement thicknesses of the pulpal and axial walls. Marginal adaptation was measured on the occlusal and proximal margins of the replica. The inlays were then cemented using resin cement (Panavia F2.0) and subjected to two million thermomechanical cycles in water (200 N load and 3.8-Hz frequency). The restored teeth were then cut into beams, using a lathe, for microtensile testing. The contact angles, marginal integrity, and surface patterns after etching were also observed. Statistical analysis was performed using two-way repeated measures analysis of variance (p<0.05), the Tukey test for internal fit and marginal adaptation, and the Student t-test for bond strength. The failure types (adhesive or cohesive) were classified on each fractured beam. The results showed that the misfit of the pulpal walls (p=0.0002) and the marginal adaptation (p=0.0001) of the feldspathic ceramic were significantly higher when compared to those of the polymer-infiltrated ceramic, while the bond strength values of the former were higher when compared to those of the latter. The contact angle of the polymer-infiltrated ceramic was also higher. In the present study, the hybrid ceramic presented improved internal and marginal adaptation, but the bond strengths were higher for the feldspathic ceramic.

  3. Bond strength of multi-step and simplified-step systems.

    PubMed

    Tjan, A H; Castelnuovo, J; Liu, P

    1996-12-01

    To measure and compare the in vitro shear bond strength (SBS) of the following three pairs of multi- and simplified-step dentin bonding systems: OptiBond vs. OptiBond FL, All-Bond 2 vs. One-Step, and Tenure vs. Tenure Quik. 60 extracted human mandibular molars were sectioned perpendicular to the long axis 1 mm above the CEJ to expose the dentin bonding surface. After being wet-ground to 600 grit with SiC abrasive papers, rinsed and dried, the teeth were individually mounted in phenolic rings with epoxy resin, and randomly assigned into six equal groups of 10 each. The dentin surfaces were treated with the above mentioned dentin bonding systems, and a gelatin cylinder filled with resin composite (Pertac-Hybrid) was directly bonded to each pretreated surface. After 7-day storage in 37 degrees C water followed by thermocycling, the specimens were shear tested to failure on an Instron machine. Data were analyzed by independent t-tests, one-way ANOVA, and Duncan's Multiple Comparison tests at alpha = 0.05. Except for the pair Tenure/Tenure Quik, the differences between the pairs All-Bond 2/One-Step and OptiBond/OptiBond FL were statistically significant with All-Bond 2 and OptiBond FL yielding higher shear bond strength (P < 0.05). Findings of this study indicated that OptiBond FL was the only simplified-step system showing improved bond strength.

  4. Influence of argon laser curing on resin bond strength.

    PubMed

    Hinoura, K; Miyazaki, M; Onose, H

    1993-04-01

    Light cured resin composites are usually cured with halogen lamps whose light output decreases with time and distance to the resin surface. This study compared bond strengths of resins to tooth structure cured with either an argon laser or a conventional halogen light. The enamel and dentin of bovine incisors were ground on the buccal surface with wet #600 grit SiC paper. A 4 x 2 mm mold was placed on the tooth surface and Scotchbond 2/Silux and Clearfil Photobond/Photo Clearfil A were placed into the molds and cured using a Quick Light or an argon laser for exposure times of 10, 20, and 30 seconds, and distances of 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 mm from the resin surface. The intensity of the Quick Light was measured as 510 mW/cm2 at 470 +/- 15 nm and the intensity of the argon laser was adjusted to 510 mW/cm2 before curing. Shear bond tests at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min were performed after 24 hours of storage in water. The bond strengths obtained with the halogen lamp and the laser were not significantly different at the same exposure times and at 0.0 or 0.5 mm from the resin surface. The laser cured bond strengths did not decrease with increasing distance whereas there was a significant decrease in halogen bond strengths at distances greater than 0.5 mm for both resins. The use of the laser might provide a clinical advantage in cases where the curing light source cannot be brought into proximity to the surface of the resin.

  5. Regional bond strengths of adhesive resins to pulp chamber dentin.

    PubMed

    Belli, S; Zhang, Y; Pereira, P N; Ozer, F; Pashley, D H

    2001-08-01

    Microleakage of oral microorganisms, which can occur due to the lack of sealing ability of permanent restorative materials, may cause failure of root canal treatments. Although a great deal of research has been done on sealing enamel and coronal dentin with resins, little research has been done on the adhesion of resins to the walls of pulp chambers. The purpose of this study was to evaluate regional bond strengths of two adhesive systems to the walls of pulp chambers. A section was made horizontally through the middle of the pulp chamber of extracted human third molars to divide the chamber into upper and lower halves. The pulp tissue was removed and the tooth segments were then divided into treatment subgroups. The pulp chambers were bonded with C&B Metabond (Parkell) or One-Step (Bisco), with or without 5% NaOCI pretreatment. The microtensile bond strengths of these resins to four different pulp chamber regions (bottom, wall, roof, and pulp horn areas) were then measured using an Instron machine. The data were expressed in MPa and were analyzed by a three-way ANOVA. Statistically significant differences were found among the test groups (p < 0.001). One-Step produced higher bond strengths to all pulp chamber regions except the floor, compared with C&B Metabond. The results indicated that high bond strengths can be achieved between adhesive resins and the various regions of the pulp chamber. This should permit the use of a thick layer of unfilled resin along the floor of the pulp chamber and over the canal orifices as a secondary protective seal after finishing root canal therapy.

  6. Characterization of Fuel-Cladding Bond Strength Using Laser Shock

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Smith; David L. Cottle; Barry H. Rabin

    2014-04-01

    This paper describes new laser-based capabilities for characterization of fuel-cladding bond strength in nuclear fuels, and presents preliminary results obtained from studies on as-fabricated monolithic fuel consisting of uranium-10 wt.% molybdenum alloys clad in 6061 aluminum by hot isostatic pressing. Two complementary experimental methods are employed, laser-shock testing and laser-ultrasonic imaging. Measurements are spatially localized, non-contacting and require minimum specimen preparation, and are therefore ideally suited for applications involving radioactive materials, including irradiated materials. The theoretical principles and experimental approaches employed in characterization of nuclear fuel plates are described. The ability to measure layer thicknesses, elastic properties of the constituents, and the location and nature of laser-shock induced debonds is demonstrated, and preliminary bond strength measurement results are discussed.

  7. Bond strength of Epiphany sealer prepared with resinous solvent.

    PubMed

    Rached-Junior, Fuad Jacob Abi; Souza-Gabriel, Aline Evangelista; Alfredo, Edson; Miranda, Carlos Eduardo Saraiva; Silva-Sousa, Yara Teresinha Correa; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damião

    2009-02-01

    This study evaluated in vitro the bond strength of Epiphany sealer prepared with resinous solvent of Epiphany system (Thinning resin) by using a push-out test. Forty maxillary canines were sectioned transversally below the cementoenamel junction to provide 4-mm-thick dentin disks that were centered in aluminum rings and embedded in acrylic resin. Root canals were prepared with tapered diamond bur. Intraradicular dentin was treated with 1% NaOCl for 30 minutes, 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid for 5 minutes, and flushed with distilled water for 1 minute. The specimens were randomly distributed into 4 groups (n = 10) according to the filling material: GI, Epiphany without photoactivation; GII, Epiphany prepared with solvent without photoactivation; GIII, Epiphany followed by photoactivation; and GIV, Epiphany prepared with solvent followed by photoactivation. After the setting time, the specimens were submitted to the push-out test. The highest mean value (14.91 +/- 2.82 MPa) was obtained with Epiphany prepared with solvent followed by photoactivation (GIV), which was statistically different (P < .01) from the other groups. Groups I (8.15 +/- 2.47 MPa), II (9.46 +/- 2.38 MPa), and III (9.80 +/- 2.51 MPa) had inferior bond strength values and were statistically similar among themselves (P > .01). The resinous solvent of Epiphany system increased the bond strength of Epiphany sealer to dentin walls when followed by photoactivation.

  8. The influence of a dentin desensitizer on the microtensile bond strength of two bonding systems.

    PubMed

    Seara, S F; Erthal, B S; Ribeiro, M; Kroll, L; Pereira, G D S

    2002-01-01

    A laboratory study evaluated the influence of a dentin desensitizer (D/Sense 2) on the microtensile bond strength of two adhesive systems: a self-etching primer (Bistite II SC) and a one-bottle adhesive (Prime & Bond 2.1). Sixteen crown dentin discs were obtained from extracted sound human third molars. Dentin surfaces were ground with 600 grit silicon carbide (SiC) abrasive papers to produce a standardized smear layer. Teeth were randomly divided into four groups (n=4). G1-D/Sense 2 + Prime & Bond 2.1; G2-D/Sense 2 + Bistite II SC; G3- and G4-dentin surfaces were bonded with Prime & Bond 2.1 and Bistite II SC, respectively, with no previous treatment with D/Sense 2. Eight mm high resin composite crowns (TPH Spectrum) were incrementally built-up on the treated surfaces. One sample from each group was prepared for evaluation of the hybrid layer on SEM. The specimens for the microtensile test were serially sectioned perpendicular to the adhesive layer to obtain 1 mm2 bounded sticks. Then, each stick was submitted to the microtensile test performed at a 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed. One-way ANOVA and Tukey test showed statistically significant differences among the groups (p<0.05). Values in MPa were: G1-17.85; G2-9.88; G3-35.16; G4-15.57. Based on the results of this study, it can be concluded that the D/Sense 2 desensitizer decreased the bond strength of Prime & Bond 2.1 and Bistite II SC bonding systems.

  9. Microtensile bond strength of eleven contemporary adhesives to dentin.

    PubMed

    Inoue, S; Vargas, M A; Abe, Y; Yoshida, Y; Lambrechts, P; Vanherle, G; Sano, H; Van Meerbeek, B

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the microtensile bond strength (microTBS) of eleven contemporary adhesives to dentin, including three one-step self-etch systems, four two-step self-etch systems, three two-step total-etch systems, and one three-step total-etch system. Resin composite (Z100) was bonded to flat, mid-coronal dentin from 33 extracted human third molars using the adhesives strictly according to the respective manufacturer's instructions. After storage overnight in 37 degrees C water, the bonded specimens were sectioned into 3 to 6 slabs of approximately 1 mm thickness and 2.5 mm width. They were then trimmed into an hourglass shape resulting in an interface area of approximately 1 mm2, and subsequently subjected to microTBS testing with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The microTBS varied from 30.0 MPa for the one-step self-etch adhesive Prompt L-Pop 2 (ESPE) to 63.1 MPa for the three-step total-etch adhesive OptiBond FL (Kerr), the latter being the only one that significantly differed from all other microTBS values. Although not significantly different, one-step self-etch adhesives tended to have lower microTBS than two-step self-etch and two-step total-etch adhesives. Specimen failures during sample preparation occurred with Prompt L-Pop 2 (4 pretesting failures out of 17 specimens) and NRC/Prime & Bond NT (7 pretesting failures out of 14 specimens). Adhesives with simplified application procedures, either following a total-etch or self-etch approach, produced lower bond strengths to dentin than a conventional three-step total-etch adhesive. Some concern exists regarding the consistency in bonding effectiveness to dentin of some self-etch adhesives.

  10. Correlation between the strength of glass ionomer cements and their bond strength to bovine teeth.

    PubMed

    Hibino, Yasushi; Kuramochi, Ken-ichi; Harashima, Atsushi; Honda, Muneaki; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Nagasawa, Yuko; Yamaga, Taniichiro; Nakajima, Hiroshi

    2004-12-01

    This study examined the possible correlation between the strength of glass ionomers and their adhesive strength to bovine teeth. The shear bond strengths of three different brands of glass ionomer mixed at four different P/L ratios to bovine teeth were measured 24 hours after the cement specimens were prepared. The correlation between shear bond strength and mechanical strength reported in our previous study was also examined. No significant (p > 0.05) increases in the bond strength to bovine teeth were found in any of the cements when the mixing ratio increased. The present study showed no significant (p > 0.05) correlation between mechanical strength of cement and its bond strength to bovine teeth. Rather than trying to increase the strength of the cement, it would be more effective to enhance the adhesive bond strength through procedures such as surface conditioning or cleaning of the tooth structure when glass ionomers are used as luting agents.

  11. Bond strength of composite luting cement to zirconia ceramic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Derand, Tore; Molin, Margareta; Kvam, Ketil

    2005-12-01

    To evaluate the bond strength of dental resin agent to zirconia ceramic after surface pre-treatment with different techniques. Specimens of hot isostatic pressed yttrium-oxide-partially-stabilized zirconia blocks (ZF) were fabricated (Procera Zircon, Nobel Biocare, Sweden) and compared to glossy dense zirconia blocks (ZG). Four groups of specimens with different surface treatment were prepared. Group I: ZF (n = 5) and ZG (n = 5) without any pre-treatment, Group II: ZF-s (n = 5) and ZG-s (n = 5) treated with silane solution, Group III: ZF-P (n = 10) and ZG-P (n = 10) treated with RF plasma spraying (hexamethyldisiloxane) using a reactor (Plasma Electronic, Germany), Group IV: ZF-p (n = 10) and ZG-p (n = 10) treated with micro pearls of low fusing porcelain (720 degrees C) on the surfaces. Composite cylinders (Charisma, Hereus Kulzer, Dormagen, Germany) were luted with Variolink II (Ivoclar-Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein) to the test specimens. The specimens were then stored in air for 1 h before shear loading in a universal testing machine (LRX, Lloyd Instruments, Farnham, England) until failure. No statistical difference was found between the untreated ZF and ZG specimens (Group I) neither between the specimens treated with silane (Group II). Plasma spraying treatment improved bond strength by a factor of three (p < 0.001). Treatment with low fusing porcelain micro pearls increased the bond strength by a factor of 10 compared to untreated surfaces (p < 0.001). No significant difference was seen between the surfaces treated ZF-p and ZG-p specimens. The thickness of the glass pearls layer did not exceed 5 microm. SEM showed dense grain borders of ZF and a flat glossy texture of ZG. Treatment of zirconia ceramic surfaces with plasma spraying or a low fusing porcelain pearl layer significantly increased the bond strength of resin cement to the ceramic surface.

  12. In Vitro Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Nanocomposites to Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Vellanki, Vinay Kumar; Shetty, Vikram K; Kushwah, Sudhanshu; Goyal, Geeta; Chandra, S.M. Sharath

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To compare the shear bond strength of nanocomposites to dentin using three different types of adhesive systems; and to test few specimens under Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) for analysing whether the bond failure is adhesive or cohesive. Materials and Methods: Sixty human premolar teeth were selected and were randomly grouped, with 20 specimens in each group: group 1 - fluoride releasing dentin bonding agent; group 2 - antibacterial containing dentin bonding agent; and group 3 - one step conventional self etch adhesive. Each group was treated with its respective bonding agents, composite resin build up was done, and shear bond strengths were tested using Instron Universal testing machine. Few of the specimens were tested under SEM. Results: The results were statistically analysed using One-way ANOVA and paired t-test. It was observed that group 3 has the highest shear bond strength followed by group 2, and then group 1. Adhesive failures and mixed failures were most frequent types of failures as seen under SEM. Conclusion: Addition of antimicrobial agent decreases the bond strength of dentin bonding agent and addition of fluoride further decreases the bond strength. From SEM results it can be concluded that the zone of failure could not be defined and also that the failure mode was independent of the dentin bonding agent used. PMID:25738077

  13. Experimental and Theoretical Investigations on Bond Strength of GFRP Rebars in Normal and High Strength Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eswanth, P.; Dhinakaran, G.

    2017-07-01

    Bond behavior between GFRP bars and concrete is the most important parameter for constructing corrosion free structures by implementing the material. Serviceability of reinforced concrete structures are controlled by bond behavior. GFRP materials behave differently from reinforcing steel in terms of bond. They are of non-homogeneous and anisotropic. Due to this outstanding behavior, there is a difference in transfer of loads between GFRP bars and concrete which made it as an idealized choice of a material. In the present work, the bond strength of GFRP bars in normal and high strength concrete was studied. In total, 12 specimens containing 12 mm, 16 mm diameter rebars which were embedded in 150 mm x 150 mm x 150 mm cubes were investigated. The specimens were subjected to direct tension pull out test in accordance with IS 2770 part 1. The comparison of bond properties of GFRP rebar in normal and high strength concrete showed that pull out load of non-metallic rebar fell well within the range.

  14. Shear bond strength of different retainer wires and bonding adhesives in consideration of the pretreatment process.

    PubMed

    Reicheneder, Claudia; Hofrichter, Bernd; Faltermeier, Andreas; Proff, Peter; Lippold, Carsten; Kirschneck, Christian

    2014-11-28

    We aimed to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of three different retainer wires and three different bonding adhesives in consideration of the pretreatment process of enamel surface sandblasting. 400 extracted bovine incisors were divided into 10 groups of 20 paired specimens each. 10 specimens of each group were pretreated by enamel sandblasting. The retainer wires Bond-A-Braid™, GAC-Wildcat®-Twistflex and everStick®ORTHO were bonded to the teeth with the adhesives Transbond™-LR, Tetric-EvoFlow™ and Stick®FLOW and then debonded measuring the SBS. While sandblasting generally increased SBS for all tested combinations, the retainer wires bonded with Transbond™-LR showed the highest SBS both with and without prior sandblasting. Significantly lower SBS were found for Tetric-EvoFlow™ that were comparable to those for everStick®ORTHO. Pretreatment of enamel surfaces by sandblasting increased the SBS of all retainer-wires. Transbond™-LR showed the best results compared to Tetric-EvoFlow™ and everStick®ORTHO, while all combinations used provided sufficient bonding strengths for clinical use.

  15. Shear bond strength of a new low-shrinkage flowable composite for orthodontic bracket bonding.

    PubMed

    Cantekin, Kenan; Buyuk, Suleyman Kutalmis

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the shear bond strength (SBS) and adhesive remnant index (ARI) value a new generation low-shrinkage flowable composite compared to a conventional bonding adhesive and several flowable composites. One hundred and fifty sound human premolars extracted for orthodontic treatment were randomly divided into five groups of 30 teeth each. Brackets were bonded to the teeth in each group with a conventional bonding composite, three flowable composites, and a new generation flowable composite. SBS values of these brackets were recorded via an Instron testing machine. ARI scores were determined after the failure of brackets. There was a statistically significant difference between flowable composites (P<.01). The mean bond strength for the conventional bonding composite group was significantly greater than that of each of the other four groups (P<.001). There were significant differences (chi-square=29.02; P=.00) among the groups. The demineralization and microleakage-inhibiting effects and simple application of the new low polymerization shrinking flowable composite indicate that it might be considered for clinical use in orthodontic patients, especially those with inadequate oral hygiene.

  16. Effect of pine bark extract on bond strength of brackets bonded to bleached human tooth enamel.

    PubMed

    Aksakalli, Sertac; Ileri, Zehra; Karacam, Nejla

    2013-11-01

    The purpose was to investigate the effect of pine bark (proanthocyanidin, natural antioxidant) solution on the shear bond strength (SBS) of metal brackets bonded with composite resin to human enamel after bleaching with hydrogen peroxide (HP). Sixty recently extracted premolars were divided into an experimental group (n = 45), which was bleached with 40% HP, and a control group (n = 15), which was not bleached. The experimental group was further divided into three sub-groups. Specimens in group IB (n = 15) were bonded immediately after bleaching; specimens in group SA (n = 15) were bleached, then treated with 10% sodium ascorbate and then bonded; group PB specimens (n = 15) were bleached, then treated with 5% pine bark solution and bonded. The specimens were debonded with Universal testing machine. The adhesive remnant index was calculated. No significant differences in shear bond strength were noted when the pine bark treated group was compared with the control group and sodium ascorbate group (p > 0.05). Treating the bleached enamel surface with 10% sodium ascorbate or 5% pine bark solution reverses the SBS reduction. So, as a natural antioxidant and less hazardous, clinicians can choose pine bark solution instead of sodium ascorbate.

  17. Effect of bonding material, etching time and silane on the bond strength of metallic orthodontic brackets to ceramic.

    PubMed

    Costa, Ana Rosa; Correr, Américo Bortolazzo; Puppin-Rontani, Regina Maria; Vedovello, Silvia Amélia; Valdrighi, Heloísa Cristina; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Vedovello Filho, Mário

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of metallic orthodontic brackets to feldspathic ceramic with different etching times, bonding materials and with or without silane application. Cylinders of feldspathic ceramic were etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid for 20 or 60 s. For each etching time, half of the cylinders received two layers of silane. Metallic brackets were bonded to the cylinders using Transbond XT (3M Unitek) or Fuji Ortho LC (GC). Light-activation was carried out with total exposure time of 40 s using UltraLume 5. Shear bond strength testing was performed after 24 h storage. Data were submitted to three-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was used to evaluate the amount of adhesive remaining on the ceramic surface at ×8 magnification. Specimens etched for 60 s had significantly higher bond strength compared with 20 s. The application of silane was efficient in increasing the shear bond strength between ceramic and both fixed materials. Transbond XT showed significantly higher (p<0.05) bond strength than Fuji Orth LC. There was a predominance of ARI score 0 (clean ceramic failure surface) for all groups, with an increase in scores 1, 2 and 3 (adhesive material increasingly present on ceramic failure aspect) for the 60-s etching time. In conclusion, 60-s etching time, silane and Transbond XT improved significantly the shear bond strength of brackets to ceramic.

  18. An Ex-vivo Shear and tensile bond strengths of orthodontic molar tubes bonded using different techniques

    PubMed Central

    Alwahadni, Ahed

    2017-01-01

    Background Molar bonding procedures need continuous improvement to be widely accepted clinically and eventually replace molar bands. Material and Methods The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of enamel micro-abrasion and silane coating of the base of molar tubes on shear and tensile bond strengths of orthodontic molar tubes. A total of 200 third molars were randomly allocated into five groups of 40 teeth as follows: group 1: molar tubes bonded to etched teeth (37% phosphoric acid gel; control group); group 2: molar tubes bonded to etched teeth (37% phosphoric acid) with the addition of silane to the base of molar tubes; group 3: molar tubes bonded to teeth pre-treated with 18% hydrochloric acid and pumice (micro-abrasion); group 4: molar tubes bonded to teeth pre-treated with microabrasion with the addition of silane to the base of molar tubes; group 5: molar tubes bonded to teeth pre-treated with microabrasion before conventional acid etching combined with the addition of silane to the base of molar tubes. The bond strength testing was performed using a computer control electromechanical universal testing machine. Results The highest mean shear and tensile bond strengths were recorded in group 5 (13.81±2.54MPa and 13.97±2.29 MPa, respectively). Micro-abrasion alone (group 3) and the combination of enamel micro-abrasion and the addition of silane (group 4) produced bond strength values comparable to the control. Conclusions Enamel surface pre-treatment (micro abrasion) before conventional acid etching combined with the addition of silane to the base of the molar tube produced the highest bond strengths among all tested groups. Key words:Molar, shear strength, tensile strength, orthodontic appliances. PMID:28298990

  19. Effect of ceramic surface treatment on tensile bond strength to a resin cement.

    PubMed

    Della Bona, Alvaro; Anusavice, Kenneth J; Hood, James A A

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the following hypotheses: (1) hydrofluoric acid (HF)-treated ceramic surfaces produce the highest tensile bond strength to resin cements, independent of the ceramic microstructure and composition; and (2) the tensile bond strength test is appropriate for analysis of interfacial adhesion for ceramic-bonded-to-resin systems. Ceramic specimens were polished with 1-micron alumina abrasive and divided into four groups of 10 specimens for each of seven ceramic types. One of the following surface treatments was applied: (1) 10% ammonium bifluoride (ABF) for 1 minute; (2) 9.6% HF for 2 minutes; (3) 4% acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) for 2 minutes; and (4) a silane coupling agent. The surface-treated areas were coated with an adhesive resin and bonded to a resin cement. Specimens were loaded to failure in tension using a testing machine. Tensile bond strength data were statistically analyzed, and fracture surfaces were examined to determine the mode of failure. Silane-treated surfaces showed statistically higher mean tensile bond strength values than surfaces treated with any etchant (HF, ABF, APF). HF produced statistically higher mean tensile bond strengths than ABF and APF. All failures occurred in the adhesion zone. The tensile bond strength test is adequate for analysis of the adhesive zone of resin-ceramic systems. The chemical adhesion produced by silane promoted higher mean bond strength values than the micromechanical retention produced by any etchant for the resin-ceramic systems used in this study.

  20. Comparative evaluation of impact strength of fragment bonded teeth and intact teeth: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Venugopal, L; Lakshmi, M Narasimha; Babu, Devatha Ashok; Kiran, V Ravi

    2014-06-01

    To test and compare the impact strength of fragment bonded teeth with that of intact teeth by using impact testing machine (pendulum type) as a mode of load. Forty extracted, maxillary, central incisors selected for this study (20 control group and 20 experimental group). In experimental group, teeth crowns were fractured with a microtome at 2.5 mm from mesioincisal angle cervically, fractured portion is attached to original crown portion with 3 M single bond dentin bonding agent and 3 M Z '100', composite resin. Impact strength of fragment bonded teeth and intact teeth tested with impact testing machine and compared. Mean impact strength of fragment bonded teeth (30.76 KJ/M(2) ) is not statistically significant deferent from mean impact strength of intact teeth (31.11 KJ/M(2) ). Mean impact strength of fragment bonded teeth is not statistically different with that of intact teeth. Hence, after fracture of teeth if it is restored with fragment reattachment by using 3 M single bond dentin bonding agent and 3 M Z '100' composite resin is having impact strength like that of intact teeth. How to cite the article: Venugopal L, Lakshmi MN, Babu DA, Kiran VR. Comparative evaluation of impact strength of fragment bonded teeth and intact teeth: An in vitro study. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(3):73-6.

  1. Bond strength of different adhesives to normal and caries-affected dentins.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Wei; Hou, Ben-xiang; Lü, Ya-lin

    2010-02-05

    Currently, several systems of dentin substrate-reacting adhesives are available for use in the restorative treatment against caries. However, the bond effectiveness and property of different adhesive systems to caries-affected dentin are not fully understood. The objective of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of different adhesives to both normal dentin (ND) and caries-affected dentin (CAD) and to analyze the dentin/adhesive interfacial characteristics. Twenty eight extracted human molars with coronal medium carious lesions were randomly assigned to four groups according to adhesives used. ND and CAD were bonded with etch-and-rinse adhesive Adper Single Bond 2 (SB2) or self-etching adhesives Clearfil SE Bond (CSE), Clearfil S(3) Bond (CS3), iBond GI (IB). Rectangular sticks of resin-dentin bonded interfaces 0.9 mm(2) were obtained. The specimens were subjected to microtensile bond strength (microTBS) testing at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Mean microTBS was statistically analyzed with analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Student-Newman-Keuls tests. Interfacial morphologies were analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Etch-and-rinse adhesive Adper(TM) Single Bond 2 yielded high bond strength when applied to both normal and caries-affected dentin. The two-step self-etching adhesive Clearfil SE Bond generated the highest bond strength to ND among all adhesives tested but a significantly reduced strength when applied to CAD. For the one-step self-etching adhesives, Clearfil S(3) Bond and iBond GI, the bond strength was relatively low regardless of the dentin type. SEM interfacial analysis revealed that hybrid layers were thicker with poorer resin tag formation and less resin-filled lateral branches in the CAD than in the ND for all the adhesives tested. The etch-and-rinse adhesive performed more effectively to caries-affected dentin than the self-etching adhesives.

  2. Effects of the desensitizing agents Gluma and Hyposen on the tensile bond strength of dentin adhesives.

    PubMed

    Kobler, Annett; Schaller, Hans Günter; Gernhardt, Christian R

    2008-12-01

    To evaluate the influence of two desensitizers (Gluma Desensitizer and Hyposen) on the tensile bond strength of three different dentin adhesives. 90 freshly extracted third molars were specially prepared to allow simulation of dentin perfusion. The specimens were divided at random into nine groups: Group AC: Clearfil New Bond/Clearfil Core; Group AX: Xeno III/Tetric Flow; Group AA: AdheSE/Tetric Flow; Group BC: Gluma/Clearfil New Bond/Clearfil Core; Group BX: Gluma/Xeno III/Tetric Flow; Group BA: Gluma/AdheSE/Tetric Flow; Group CC: Hyposen/Clearfil New Bond/Clearfil Core; Group CX: Hyposen/Xeno III/Tetric Flow; Group CA: Hyposen/AdheSE/Tetric Flow. Tensile bond strength of the above mentioned bonding agents was measured using a universal testing machine. The following tensile bond strengths were obtained (mean values and standard deviations in MPa): Group AC: 11.05 +/- 1.92, Group AX: 6.01 +/- 1.35, Group AA: 8.91 +/- 1.20, Group BC: 10.25 +/- 1.44, Group BX: 7.17 +/- 1.24, Group BA: 10.35 +/- 1.26, group CC: 8.11 +/- 0.70, Group CX: 8.03 +/- 1.20, Group CA: 9.22 +/- 1.75. Statistical analysis showed a significant influence of the variable, dentin bonding agent on tensile bond strength (ANOVA, Tukey's, P < 0.05). Treatment with Hyposen in combination with Clearfil New Bond resulted in significantly lower bond strength values. Gluma had no significant influence on bond strength of the three adhesive systems. Within the limitations of an in vitro investigation it can be concluded that Gluma did not significantly affect the bond strength of any of the adhesive systems tested. Hyposen significantly decreased the bond strength values of Clearfil New Bond.

  3. Influence of environmental conditions on dentin bond strengths of recently developed dentin bonding systems.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, M; Rikuta, A; Tsubota, K; Yunoki, I; Onose, H

    2001-03-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the influence of temperature and relative humidity (RH) on the bond strengths of several recently developed dentin bonding systems. Six environmental conditions, (A) 25+/-0.5 degrees C, 50+/-5% RH, (B) 25+/-0.5 degrees C, 80+/-5% RH, (C) 25+/-0.5 degrees C, 95+/-5 % RH, (D) 37+/-0.5 degrees C, 50 +/-5 % RH, (E) 37+/-0.5 degrees C, 80+/-5% RH, (F) 37+/-0.5 degrees C, 95+/-5 % RH were used. Bovine mandibular incisors were mounted in self-curing resin and the facial surfaces were ground on wet #600 SiC paper to expose the dentin. After the tooth surface had been treated according to each manufacturer's instructions, adhesives were applied, followed by condensation of resin composites into a mold placed on the dentin surface. Fifteen specimens per group were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 h, and then shear-tested at a cross-head speed of 1.0 mm/min. Statistical analysis was carried out with two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's test (P<0.05). Dentin bond strengths decreased with increasing relative humidity but were not influenced by environmental temperature. Even though one-bottle adhesive systems require a wet dentin surface, their bond strengths are affected by an increase in environmental humidity.

  4. Fatigue strength of a single lap joint SPR-bonded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Franco, G.; Fratini, L.; Pasta, A.

    2011-05-01

    In the last years, hybrid joints, meaning with this the joints which consist in combining a traditional mechanical joint to a layer of adhesive, are gradually attracting the attention of various sectors of the construction of vehicles and transportation industries, for their better performance compared to just mechanical joints (self-piercing riveting SPR, riveting, and so on) or just to bonded joints. The paper investigates the fatigue behavior of a single lap joint self-piercing riveted (SPR) and bonded throughout fatigue tests. The considered geometric configuration allowed the use of two rivets placed longitudinally; an epoxy resin was used as adhesive. In the first part of the work static characterization of the joints was carried out through tensile tests. Then fatigue tests were made with the application of different levels of load. The fatigue curves were also obtained at the varying the distance between the two rivets in order to better assess the joint strength for a given length of overlap.

  5. Bond Strength of Resin Cements to Noble and Base Metal Alloys with Different Surface Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Raeisosadat, Farkhondeh; Ghavam, Maryam; Hasani Tabatabaei, Masoomeh; Arami, Sakineh; Sedaghati, Maedeh

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The bond strength of resin cements to metal alloys depends on the type of the metal, conditioning methods and the adhesive resins used. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of resin cements to base and noble metal alloys after sand blasting or application of silano-pen. Materials and Method: Cylinders of light cured Z 250 composite were cemented to “Degubond 4” (Au Pd) and “Verabond” (Ni Cr) alloys by either RelyX Unicem or Panavia F2, after sandblasting or treating the alloys with Silano-Pen. The shear bond strengths were evaluated. Data were analyzed by three-way ANOVA and t tests at a significance level of P<0.05. Results: When the alloys were treated by Silano-Pen, RelyX Unicem showed a higher bond strength for Degubond 4 (P=0.021) and Verabond (P< 0.001). No significant difference was observed in the bond strength of Panavia F2 to the alloys after either of surface treatments, Degubond 4 (P=0.291) and Verabond (P=0.899). Panavia F2 showed a higher bond strength to sandblasted Verabond compared to RelyX Unicem (P=0.003). The bond strength of RelyX Unicem was significantly higher to Silano-Pen treated Verabond (P=0.011). The bond strength of the cements to sandblasted Degubond 4 showed no significant difference (P=0.59). RelyX Unicem had a higher bond strength to Silano-Pen treated Degubond 4 (P=0.035). Conclusion: The bond strength of resin cements to Verabond alloy was significantly higher than Degubond 4. RelyX Unicem had a higher bond strength to Silano-Pen treated alloys. Surface treatments of the alloys did not affect the bond strength of Panavia F2. PMID:25628687

  6. Shear bond strength of epoxy resin-based endodontic sealers to bovine dentin after ozone application.

    PubMed

    Bojar, Witold; Czarnecka, Beata; Pryliński, Mariusz; Walory, Jarosław

    2009-01-01

    The idea of using ozone to disinfect root canals is of recent origin. The wide acceptance of epoxy resin-based sealers lead us to investigate whether ozone can influence the adhesion to the dentin. In this study, we tested the shear bond strength of AH Plus and EZ Fill. Forty freshly extracted bovine teeth were randomly divided into 5 groups. 16 of these samples were treated with ozone for 60 seconds (HealOzone, Kavo). 8 samples were conditioned with the G Bond bonding system. The groups tested were: (1) AH Plus, (2) AH Plus and ozone, (3) EZ Fill, (4) EZ Fill and ozone, (5) AH Plus and G Bond. 48 hours after being prepared the specimens were tested for shear bond strength. Statistical analysis showed significant differences between materials (AH Plus > EZ Fill) and significant, positive influence of ozone and bonding agent on the shear bond strength.

  7. Temperature rise and shear bond strength of bondable buccal tubes bonded by various light sources.

    PubMed

    Ulusoy, Cagri; Irmak, Ozgür; Bagis, Yildirim Hakan; Ulusoy, Ozgür Ilke Atasoy

    2008-08-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to determine the intrapulpal temperature changes and to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of bondable buccal tubes bonded by high-intensity light sources. Ninety caries-free human first molar teeth extracted for periodontal reasons were used. For the temperature measurement test, 30 teeth were randomly divided into three groups (n = 10) whereas 60 teeth were used in three groups (n = 20) for SBS testing. Three light sources, high-intensity halogen, blue light-emitting diode (LED), and xenon plasma arc (PAC), were used for polymerization of Transbond XT. Temperature variations (Delta T) were recorded by a K-type thermocouple wire connected to a data logger. For SBS testing, a universal testing machine was used at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute until buccal tube bonding failure occurred. Data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test. The high-intensity halogen light resulted in significantly (P < 0.01) higher intrapulpal temperature changes than the LED or PAC. The results of the shear bond test revealed significant (P < 0.05) differences only between the halogen and LED groups. The findings of the present investigation showed that high-intensity curing devices can safely be used in bonding buccal tubes to molar teeth without causing a deleterious effect on the dental pulp.

  8. Bond strength of dental nanocomposites repaired with a bulkfill composite

    PubMed Central

    Kerimova, Leyla; Baltacioglu, İsmail H.; Kiremitçi, Arlin

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to analyze the bond strength of aged resin based nanocomposites repaired with the same and bulk fill composites. Material and Methods Seventy-two disc shaped resin composites consisted of three different nanocomposite resins (Filtek Ultimate/FU, Herculite XRV Ultra/HXRV, and Reflectys/R) were produced. After storing the samples for 8 weeks in distilled water, each material was combined with the same material or the bulk-fill composite resin system (Filtek Ultimate+Filtek Ultimate/Group-1; Filtek Ultimate+Tetric BF/Group-2; Herculite XRV+Herculite XRV/Group-3; Herculite XRV+Tetric BF/ Group-4; Reflectys+Reflectys/Group 5; Reflectys+Tetric BF/Group-6), for repair. Then specimens were subjected to shear bond strength testing(SBS), and the debonded surfaces were examined. Results There was a significant difference among three materials(repaired with itself+bulk fill) for SBS testing values (p=0.001). FU and R were found to be similar, while HXRV was significantly different from them. A significant difference between group-1 and 2 (p=0.006) was detected, while there were no differences between group 3 and 4 (p= 0.142), and 5 and 6 (p=0.346). Among the six groups, repair SBS testing values with TBF were higher than repair with itself except for FU. Conclusions The bulk-fill repaired materials showed higher bond strength except for FU, which showed the highest SBS value when repaired with itself. An increased incidence of adhesive fracture was observed at low strengths. Key words:Resin-based composites, nanofillers, surface treatment, macro-shear, repair. PMID:28298988

  9. The impact of chlorhexidine mouth rinse on the bond strength of polycarbonate orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Farouk Ahmed; Hashem, Mohammed Ibrahim; Chalisserry, Elna P; Anil, Sukumaran

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of the current in-vivo study was to assess the effect of using 0.12% chlorhexidine (CHX) mouth rinse, before bonding, on shear bond strength of polycarbonate brackets bonded with composite adhesive. Eighteen orthodontic patients with a mean age 21.41 ± 1.2 years, who were scheduled to have 2 or more first premolars extracted, were included in this study. Patients were referred for an oral prophylaxis program which included, in part, the use of a mouth rinse. Patients were divided into 2 groups, a test group of 9 patients who used 0.12% CHX gluconate mouth rinse twice daily and a control group of 9 patients who used a mouth rinse without CHX, but with same color. After 1 week, polycarbonate brackets were bonded to first premolars with Transbond XT composite adhesive. Premolars were extracted after 28 days and tested for shear bond strength on a universal testing machine. Student's t-test was used to compare shear bond strengths of both groups. No statistically significant difference was found in bond strengths' values between both groups. The test group (with CHX) has mean shear bond strength of 14.21 ± 2.42 MPa whereas the control group (without CHX) revealed a mean strength of 14.52 ± 2.31 MPa. The use of 0.12% CHX mouth rinse, for one week before bonding, did not affect the shear bond strength of polycarbonate brackets bonded with Transbond composite. Furthermore, these brackets showed clinically acceptable bond strength.

  10. Shear bond strengths of composite resin and giomer to mineral trioxide aggregate at different time intervals.

    PubMed

    Ajami, Amir-Ahmad; Bahari, Mahmoud; Hassanpour-Kashani, Arezoo; Abed-Kahnamoui, Mehdi; Savadi-Oskoee, Ayda; Azadi-Oskoee, Farhad

    2017-07-01

    The efficacy of the bond between the restorative materials and the pulp capping materials has an important role in the success of vital pulp therapy. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of composite resin and giomer to MTA at different time intervals after mixing of MTA. Ninety cylindrical MTA samples were prepared and assigned to two groups (n=45) based on the restorative materials used (composite resin or giomer). Each group was subdivided into 3 subgroups (n=15) based on the evaluation intervals (immediately, 2.45 hours and 3 days after mixing MTA). After the bonding procedures, the shear bond strengths of the samples were measured in MPa at a strain rate of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed with repeated-measures ANOVA, post hoc tests and t-test (P<0.05). Bond strength of composite resin was minimum at baseline but it increased significantly 2.45 hours after mixing MTA (P=0.002), with no significant changes in bond strength up to three days (P=0.08). Bond strength of giomer did not exhibit any significant changes from baseline to 2.45 hours after mixing MTA (P=078); however, at 3 days it reached a minimum (P=0.000). In addition, the means of bond strength of composite resin 2.45 hours and 3 days after mixing were significantly higher than those of giomer (P=0.001 and P=0.000, respectively). Bond strengths of composite resin 2.45 hours and also 3 days after mixing were significantly higher than those of giomer. In addition, the shear bond strength of giomer decreased over time; however, the shear bond strength of composite resin increased. Key words:Composite resin, Giomer, Shear bond strength, Vital pulp therapy.

  11. Shear bond strengths of a two-paste system resin luting agent used to bond alloys to enamel.

    PubMed

    Dixon, D L; Breeding, L C

    1997-08-01

    Adhesive resin luting agents are used to successfully bond the metal surfaces of fixed prostheses to teeth. Panavia 21 luting agent is a new addition to the series of Panavia adhesive resin luting agents. This investigation measured the shear bond strengths of two types of alloy specimens (Olympia and Rexillium III) bonded to prepared human enamel (etched and unetched) with Panavia 21. After a simulated porcelain firing sequence, the alloy specimens were bonded to the teeth and subjected to shear testing after water storage for 2 weeks, thermocycling for 500 cycles, and water storage for an additional 2 weeks. Data were analyzed with a two-way analysis of variance (alpha = 0.05). The shear bond strengths of Rexillium III and tinplated Olympia specimens bonded to prepared and unetched enamel were significantly lower than for specimens bonded to prepared and etched enamel with Panavia 21 luting agent.

  12. Proanthocyanidins Alter Adhesive/Dentin Bonding Strengths when Included in a Bonding System

    PubMed Central

    Hechler, Benjamin; Yao, Xiaomei; Wang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the effect of proanthocyanidins (PA) incorporation into a bonding system on dentin/adhesive bond stability following long-term storage in buffer and collagenase. Methods Human dentin surfaces were bonded with no PA (0-PA), PA incorporated in the primer (PA-primer), or PA incorporated in the adhesive (PA-adhesive), and composite build-ups were created. Following sectioning into beams, bonded specimens were stored in buffer or collagenase for 0, 1, 4, 26, or 52 weeks before being tested for microtensile bond strength (μTBS). ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD post-hoc were performed. Fractured surfaces were viewed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results Both bonding system and storage time but not storage medium significantly affected μTBS. Initially, 0-PA and PA-primer were superior to PA-adhesive, and after 1 week both PA groups were inferior to 0-PA. However, after 4 weeks PA-adhesive had significantly increased and 0-PA significantly decreased such that all three groups were equal. Thereafter, both PA-primer/adhesive groups trended with an increase (the 0-PA group remaing consistent) such that at 52 weeks PA-primer samples were significantly stronger (p < 0.001) or nearly so (p = 0.08) when compared to 0-PA samples. SEM revealed that initial fractures tended to occur at the middle/bottom of the hybrid layer for 0-PA and PA-primer groups but at the top of the hybrid layer/in the adhesive for PA-adhesive. After 4 weeks, however, all groups fractured similarly at the middle/bottom of the hybrid layer. Clinical Significance PA incorporation into a bonding system significantly alters interfacial bonding strengths, and its incorporation may stabilize the interface and protect degradation over time under clinical conditions. PMID:23243975

  13. Effect of adhesive layers on microshear bond strength of nanocomposite resin to dentin

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahim, Mohamed I.

    2017-01-01

    Background Bond strength of adhesive layer can absorb unwanted stresses of polymerization shrinkage in composite resin restorations; increased microshear bond strength can prevent failure of restoration materials, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of adhesive layers on microshear bond strength of nanocomposite resin to dentin. Material and Methods Two different types of adhesive systems: universal adhesive (ExciTE) and newly developed adhesive (Nano-Bond), and one type of light-cured resin restorative material (Nanocomposite resin) were used in this study. The occlusal surfaces of extracted human molar teeth were ground perpendicular to the long axis of each tooth to expose a flat dentin surface. The adhesives were applied on dentin surfaces (single application or double application). Nanocomposite resin was then placed and light cured for 40 seconds. After 24 hours of immersion in water at 37°C, then subjected to thermocycling before testing, a microshear bond test was carried out. The data were analyzed by a two-way ANOVA. For comparison between groups, Tukey’s post-hoc test was used. Results The mean bond strengths of ExciTE and Nano-Bond adhesives with a single application were 8.8 and 16.6 MPa, respectively. The mean bond strengths of ExciTE and Nano-Bond adhesives with double application were 13.2 and 21.8MPa, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in microshear bond strengths between the single application of Nano-Bond and the double application of ExciTE adhesives. Conclusions Microshear bond strength increased significantly as the applied adhesive layer was doubled. Key words:Adhesive, microshear, bond, strength, nanocomposite. PMID:28210433

  14. The effect of crystal orientation on the cryogenic strength of hydroxide catalysis bonded sapphire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haughian, K.; Douglas, R.; van Veggel, A. A.; Hough, J.; Khalaidovski, A.; Rowan, S.; Suzuki, T.; Yamamoto, K.

    2015-04-01

    Hydroxide catalysis bonding has been used in gravitational wave detectors to precisely and securely join components of quasi-monolithic silica suspensions. Plans to operate future detectors at cryogenic temperatures has created the need for a change in the test mass and suspension material. Mono-crystalline sapphire is one candidate material for use at cryogenic temperatures and is being investigated for use in the KAGRA detector. The crystalline structure of sapphire may influence the properties of the hydroxide catalysis bond formed. Here, results are presented of studies of the potential influence of the crystal orientation of sapphire on the shear strength of the hydroxide catalysis bonds formed between sapphire samples. The strength was tested at approximately 8 K; this is the first measurement of the strength of such bonds between sapphire at such reduced temperatures. Our results suggest that all orientation combinations investigated produce bonds of sufficient strength for use in typical mirror suspension designs, with average strengths >23 MPa.

  15. Failure strength prediction for adhesively bonded single lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Niat Mahmud

    For adhesively bonded joint, failure strength depends on many factors such as material properties (both adhesive and adherend), specimen geometries, test environments, surface preparation procedures, etc. Failure occurs inside constitutive materials or along joint interfaces. Based on location, adhesively bonded failure mode can be classified as adhesive failure mode, cohesive failure mode and adherend failure mode. Failure mode directly affects the failure strength of joint. For last eight decades, researchers have developed analytical, empirical or semi-empirical methods capable of predicting failure strength for adhesively bonded joints generating either cohesive failure or adherend failure. Applicability of most of the methods is limited to particular cases. In this research, different failure modes for single lap joints (SLJs) were generated experimentally using epoxy based paste adhesive. Based on experimental data and analytical study, simplified failure prediction methods were developed for each failure mode. For adhesive failure mode, it is observed that peel stress distributions concur along interface near crack initiation points. All SLJs for this test endured consistent surface treatments. Geometric parameters of the joints were varied to study their effect on failure strength. Peel stress distributions were calculated using finite analysis (FEA). Based on peel stress distribution near crack initiation point, a failure model is proposed. Numerous analytical, empirical and semi-empirical models are available for predicting failure strengths of SLJs generating cohesive failures. However, most of the methods in the literature failed to capture failure behavior of SLJs having thickness of adhesive layer as variable. Cohesive failure mode was generated experimentally using aluminum as adherend and epoxy adhesive considering thickness of adhesive layers as variable within SLJs. Comparative study was performed among various methods. It was observed that

  16. Bond strength of cementitious borehole plugs in welded tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Akgun, H.; Daemen, J.J.K.

    1991-02-01

    Axial loads on plugs or seals in an underground repository due to gas, water pressures and temperature changes induced subsequent to waste and plug emplacement lead to shear stresses at the plug/rock contact. Therefore, the bond between the plug and rock is a critical element for the design and effectiveness of plugs in boreholes, shafts or tunnels. This study includes a systematic investigation of the bond strength of cementitious borehole plugs in welded tuff. Analytical and numerical analysis of borehole plug-rock stress transfer mechanics is performed. The interface strength and deformation are studied as a function of Young`s modulus ratio of plug and rock, plug length and rock cylinder outside-to-inside radius ratio. The tensile stresses in and near an axially loaded plug are analyzed. The frictional interface strength of an axially loaded borehole plug, the effect of axial stress and lateral external stress, and thermal effects are also analyzed. Implications for plug design are discussed. The main conclusion is a strong recommendation to design friction plugs in shafts, drifts, tunnels or boreholes with a minimum length to diameter ratio of four. Such a geometrical design will reduce tensile stresses in the plug and in the host rock to a level which should minimize the risk of long-term deterioration caused by excessive tensile stresses. Push-out tests have been used to determine the bond strength by applying an axial load to cement plugs emplaced in boreholes in welded tuff cylinders. A total of 130 push-out tests have been performed as a function of borehole size, plug length, temperature, and degree of saturation of the host tuff. The use of four different borehole radii enables evaluation of size effects. 119 refs., 42 figs., 20 tabs.

  17. Shear Bond Strength of Three Orthodontic Bonding Systems on Enamel and Restorative Materials

    PubMed Central

    Ebeling, Jennifer; Schauseil, Michael; Stein, Steffen; Roggendorf, Matthias; Korbmacher-Steiner, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this in vitro study was to determine the shear bond strength (SBS) and adhesive remnant index (ARI) score of two self-etching no-mix adhesives (iBond™ and Scotchbond™) on different prosthetic surfaces and enamel, in comparison with the commonly used total etch system Transbond XT™. Materials and Methods. A total of 270 surfaces (1 enamel and 8 restorative surfaces, n = 30) were randomly divided into three adhesive groups. In group 1 (control) brackets were bonded with Transbond XT primer. In the experimental groups iBond adhesive (group 2) and Scotchbond Universal adhesive (group 3) were used. The SBS was measured using a Zwicki 1120™ testing machine. The ARI and SBS were compared statistically using the Kruskal–Wallis test (P ≤ 0.05). Results. Significant differences in SBS and ARI were found between the control group and experimental groups. Conclusions. Transbond XT showed the highest SBS on human enamel. Scotchbond Universal on average provides the best bonding on all other types of surface (metal, composite, and porcelain), with no need for additional primers. It might therefore be helpful for simplifying bonding in orthodontic procedures on restorative materials in patients. If metal brackets have to be bonded to a metal surface, the use of a dual-curing resin is recommended. PMID:27738633

  18. Shear Bond Strength of Three Orthodontic Bonding Systems on Enamel and Restorative Materials.

    PubMed

    Hellak, Andreas; Ebeling, Jennifer; Schauseil, Michael; Stein, Steffen; Roggendorf, Matthias; Korbmacher-Steiner, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this in vitro study was to determine the shear bond strength (SBS) and adhesive remnant index (ARI) score of two self-etching no-mix adhesives (iBond™ and Scotchbond™) on different prosthetic surfaces and enamel, in comparison with the commonly used total etch system Transbond XT™. Materials and Methods. A total of 270 surfaces (1 enamel and 8 restorative surfaces, n = 30) were randomly divided into three adhesive groups. In group 1 (control) brackets were bonded with Transbond XT primer. In the experimental groups iBond adhesive (group 2) and Scotchbond Universal adhesive (group 3) were used. The SBS was measured using a Zwicki 1120™ testing machine. The ARI and SBS were compared statistically using the Kruskal-Wallis test (P ≤ 0.05). Results. Significant differences in SBS and ARI were found between the control group and experimental groups. Conclusions. Transbond XT showed the highest SBS on human enamel. Scotchbond Universal on average provides the best bonding on all other types of surface (metal, composite, and porcelain), with no need for additional primers. It might therefore be helpful for simplifying bonding in orthodontic procedures on restorative materials in patients. If metal brackets have to be bonded to a metal surface, the use of a dual-curing resin is recommended.

  19. Tensile bond strength of resin luting cement to a porcelain-fusing noble alloy.

    PubMed

    Stoknorm, R; Isidor, F; Ravnholt, G

    1996-01-01

    This study evaluated the tensile bond strength of resin composites to a noble alloy for ceramic bonding after various surface treatments. The flat end of bars cast in the alloy were used as test specimens. Eighteen clinically relevant combinations of luting agent, airborne particle abrasion, and surface treatment were applied. After surface treatment, two bars were bonded together. Resin cement, either dual-polymerizing (Twinlook) or chemically polymerizing (Panavia EX, Panavia 21, or RBBC), was used as a luting agent. The specimens were subjected to 1,000 thermal cycles between 15 degrees C and 60 degrees C before tensile bond strength testing. The highest median bond strengths were obtained using the Silicoater MD method/Twinlook (20.6 to 26.1 MPa) or with tin-plating/ Panavia EX (24.0 MPa), but more low values were recorded among the latter specimens. Tin-plating/Panavia 21 gave median tensile bond strengths (18.1 MPa) similar to tin-plating/Panavia EX. The Silicoater MD method resulted in similar bond strengths with or without the addition of a layer of Opaquer. The traditional Silicoater method (8.0 to 12.4 MPa) gave significantly lower median tensile bond strength values, and the lost sugar crystals method resulted in a tensile bond strength of 15.4 MPa.

  20. Torsion Testing of Diffusion Bonded LIGA Formed Nickel

    SciTech Connect

    Buchheit, T.E.; Christenson, T.R.; Schmale, D.T.

    1999-01-27

    A test technique has been devised which is suitable for the testing of the bond strength of batch diffusion bonded LIGA or DXRL defined structures. The method uses a torsion tester constructed with the aid of LIGA fabrication and distributed torsion specimens which also make use of the high aspect ratio nature of DXRL based processing. Measurements reveal achieved bond strengths of 130MPa between electroplated nickel with a bond temperature of 450 C at 7 ksi pressure which is a sufficiently low temperature to avoid mechanical strength degradation.

  1. In vitro shear bond strength of the Amalgambond Plus system.

    PubMed

    van der Vyver, P J; de Wet, F A; Dearlove, W R

    1995-06-01

    The bonding of composite resins to dentine by means of dentine bonding agents is common practice. Although amalgam has been used for many years, no attempt had been made to bond it chemically to tooth structure. Amalgambond Plus (ABP) was developed to bond amalgam (as well as composite) to various substrates. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ABP system for its ability to bond amalgam, as well as composite, to dentine, and also to assess the strength of the product when bonding composite to set amalgam. The following values (MPa) were obtained for the different ABP variations: Amalgam to Dentine (with HPA): 5.20; Amalgam to Dentine (without HPA): 3.26; Composite to Dentine (without HPA): 17.57; Composite to Amalgam (without HPA): 12.00. It can be concluded that Amalgambond Plus gives varying bond strengths to different substrates, with the highest value obtained when used to bond Composite to Dentine.

  2. Bond Strength of Composite to Dentin using Resin-Modified Glass Ionomers as Bonding Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-02

    59 MDW/SGVU SUBJECT: Professional Presentation Approval 2 MAR 20 16 l. Your paper, entitl ed Bond Strength of Composite to Dentin using Resin ...Vandewalle /Civ/SGDTG (59th CSPG/SGVU) DECS I 5-009 PROTOCOL TITLE Bond Strength of Composite to Dentin using Resin -modified Glass lonomers as...Bonding Agents 1. TITLE OF MATERIAL TO BE PUBLISHED OR PRESENTED B ond Strength of Composite to Dentin using Resin -modified Glass lonomers 2. IS THIS

  3. Strength, ultrasonic and metallurgical evaluation of diffusion bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Ojard, G.C.; Buck, O.; Rehbein, D.K.

    1993-10-01

    Diffusion bonding allows similar and dissimilar materials to be bonded together in near net shape. However, differentiation of almost perfect diffusion bonds, with little variation in their acoustic response, is of critical importance since relatively significant changes in bond strength may be a consequence. Challenge is to find ultrasonic techniques sensitive enough to detect small imperfections at interface. Diffusion bonds have been produced that show only a slight variation in a single frequency reflection measurement. The total energy, reflected from bond line, can differentiate these diffusion bonds. This evaluation is based on Parseval`s theorem which states that energy in time domain is proportional to energy in the frequency domain. This measurement takes advantage of presence of voids in the diffusion bonds as well as of the interdiffusion zone. Cu and Ni were chosen as the materials to be bonded due to the case of microstructural control. Diffusion bonds fabricated of Ti-6Al-4V are also discussed.

  4. Evaluation of Bond Strength, Marginal Integrity, and Fracture Strength of Bulk- vs Incrementally-filled Restorations.

    PubMed

    de Assis, Fernanda Silva; Lima, Suellen Nogueira Linares; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Bhandi, Shilpa H; Pinto, Shelon Cristina Souza; Malaquias, Pamela; Loguercio, Alessandro D; Bandéca, Matheus Coelho

    This study evaluated the effect of application technique and preparation size on the fracture strength (FS), microtensile bond strength (μTBS) and marginal integrity (MI) of direct resin composite restorations. Conservative (5 × 2 × 2 mm) or extended (5 × 4 × 2 mm) preparations below the cementoenamel junction were performed in 140 human maxillary premolars (n = 70 per group). After adhesive application (XP Bond), half of each group was restored with the bulk technique (one 4-mm increment of Surefill SDR Flow plus one 1-mm horizontal capping layer of TPH3 [Spectrum TPH3 resin composite]) and half incrementally (TPH3 in three horizontal incremental layers, 1.5 to 2 mm each), all using a metal matrix band. After storage (24 h at 37°C), the proximal surfaces of each tooth were polished with Sof-Lex disks. For FS measurement, 60 restorations were mounted in a universal testing machine and subjected to a compressive axial load applied parallel to the long axis of the tooth, running at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. For μTBS testing, 40 teeth were longitudinally sectioned to obtain resin-dentin bonded sticks from the cavity floor (bonded area: 0.8 mm2). Specimens were tested in tension at 0.5 mm/min. The external marginal integrity of both proximal surfaces was analyzed using SEM of epoxy resin replicas. The μTBS, marginal integrity, and fracture resistance data were subjected to two-way ANOVA, and Tukey's post-hoc test was used for pair-wise comparisons (a = 0.05). Fracture resistance, microtensile bond strength, and marginal integrity values were not statistically significantly affected by application technique or preparation size (p = 0.71, p = 0.82, and p = 0.77, respectively). The use of a bulk-fill flowable composite associated with a conventional resin composite as a final capping layer did not jeopardize the fracture strength, bond strength to dentin, or marginal integrity of posterior restorations.

  5. Self-etch bonding agent beneath sealant: Bond strength for laser-irradiated enamel

    PubMed Central

    Borsatto, Maria Cristina; Giuntini, Jackelline de Lemes; Contente, Marta Maria Martins Giamatei; Gomes-Silva, Jaciara Miranda; Torres, Carolina Paes; Galo, Rodrigo

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study evaluated the in vitro shear bond strength (SBS) of a resin-based pit-and-fissure sealant (Fluroshield [F], Dentsply/Caulk) associated with either an etch-and-rinse (Adper Single Bond 2 [SB], 3M/ESPE) or a two-step self-etch adhesive system (Adper SE Plus [SE], 3M/ESPE) on Er: YAG laser-irradiated enamel. Materials and Methods: Seventeen sound third molar crowns were embedded in acrylic resin, and the mesial–distal enamel surfaces were flattened. The enamel sites were irradiated with a 2.94-μm wavelength Er: YAG laser (120 mJ, 4 Hz, noncontact mode/17 mm, 20 s). The specimens were randomly assigned to three groups according to the bonding technique: I - 37% phosphoric acid etching + SB + F; II - SE + F and III - F applied to acid-etched enamel, without an intermediate layer of bonding agent. In all of the groups, a 3-mm diameter enamel-bonding site was demarcated and the sealant cylinders were bonded. After 24 hours in distilled water, the shear bond strength was tested at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. The data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test. The debonded specimens were examined with a stereomicroscope to assess the failure modes. Results: The mean SBS values in MPa were I = 6.39 (±1.44); II = 9.50 (±2.79); and III = 5.26 (±1.82). No statistically significant differences were observed between groups I and III; SE/F presented a significantly higher SBS than that of the other groups (P = 0.001). With regard to the failure mode, groups I (65%) and II (75%) presented adhesive failures, while group III showed 50% adhesive failure. Cohesive failure did not occur. Conclusion: The application of the two-step self-etch bonding agent (Adper SE Plus) beneath the resin pit-and-fissure sealant placement resulted in a significantly higher bond strength for the Er:YAG laser-irradiated enamel. PMID:24926208

  6. Microshear bond strength according to dentin cleansing methods before recementation

    PubMed Central

    Taşar, Simge; Ulusoy, Mutahhar Muhammed

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to determine the efficiency of Erbium, Chromium: Yttrium-Scandium-Gallium-Garnet laser in different output powers for removing permanent resin cement residues and therefore its influence on microshear bond strength compared to other cleaning methods. MATERIALS AND METHODS 90 extracted human molars were sectioned in 1 mm thickness. Resin cement was applied to surface of sliced teeth. After the removal of initial cement, 6 test groups were prepared by various dentin surface treatment methods as follows: no treatment (Group 1), ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid application (Group 2), Endosolv R application (Group 3), 1.25 W Erbium, Chromium:Yttrium-Scandium-Gallium-Garnet laser irradiation (Group 4), 2 W Erbium, Chromium:Yttrium-Scandium-Gallium-Garnet laser irradiation (Group 5) and 3.5 W Erbium, Chromium:Yttrium-Scandium-Gallium-Garnet laser irradiation (Group 6). The topography and morphology of the treated dentin surfaces were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (n=2 for each group). Following the repetitive cementation, microshear bond strength between dentin and cement (n=26 in per group) were measured with universal testing machine and the data were analyzed by Kruskal Wallis H Test with Bonferroni correction (P<.05). Fracture patterns were investigated by light microscope. RESULTS Mean microshear bond strength ± SD (MPa) for each group was 34.9 ± 17.7, 32.1 ± 15.8, 37.8 ± 19.3, 31.3 ± 12.7, 44.4 ± 13.6, 40.2 ± 13.2 respectively. Group 5 showed significantly difference from Group 1, Group 2 and Group 4. Also, Group 6 was found statistically different from Group 4. CONCLUSION 2 W and 3.5 W Erbium, Chromium: Yttrium-Scandium-Gallium-Garnet laser application were found efficient in removing resin residues. PMID:24843391

  7. Microshear bond strength evaluation of surface pretreated zirconia ceramics bonded to dentin

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Shenbagakuttalam; Ebenezar, Ambrose Vedamanickam Rajesh; Anand, Nirupa; Rajkumar, Kothandaraman; Mahalaxmi, Sekar; Srinivasan, Narasimhan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To comparatively assess the micro shear bond strength (MSBS) of dentin bonded surface pre-treated zirconia ceramics. Materials and Methods: Zirconia blocks were sectioned into 50 cubical blocks. The blocks were further categorized into five groups (n = 10 each). Group I: No treatment was performed on zirconia samples; Group II: The zirconia samples were sand-blasted; Group III: Group II + etched with 9.8% of hydrofluoric (HF) acid for 60 s; Group IV: The sandblasted zirconia samples were selectively infiltrated with low fusing porcelain; and Group V: Group IV + etched using 9.8% HF acid gel. The zirconia specimens were then bonded to dentin samples, and the samples were tested for MSBS evaluation using universal testing machine. Results: The MSBS of all the four experimental groups shows greater value than group I. Among the experimental groups, group V and group IV do not show any statistical significant difference, whereas the mean MSBS of groups IV and V were statistically greater than group III and group II. However, groups I, II, and III do not show any statistical significant difference in mean MSBS values between them. Conclusion: Selective infiltration etching of zirconia ceramics provides the highest bond strength with resin cement. PMID:26038654

  8. Shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded to deciduous teeth with different etching times.

    PubMed

    Abu Alhaija, E S J; Irshaid, S M; Alwahadni, A M S

    2012-09-01

    This was to compare shear bond strength (SBS) of brackets bonded to deciduous teeth with that of permanent teeth, to evaluate the effect of increasing etching time on the SBS of brackets bonded to deciduous teeth and to evaluate the modes of bond failure after de-bonding. ex vivo study. A total of 120 freshly extracted human maxillary teeth were divided into six groups of 20 teeth each as follows: Group 1, permanent canines with 15-second etching time; Group 2, first premolars with 15-second etching time; Group 3, deciduous canines with 15-second etching time; Group 4, deciduous first molars with 15-second etching time; Group 5, deciduous canines with 30-second etching time; Group 6, deciduous first molars with 30-second etching time. After bonding, all specimens were thermocycled from 5 °C to 55 °C and back to 5 °C 500 times. The modified ARI was used to determine the mode of bond failure. Comparison between groups was performed using Univariate General Linear Model (UGLM) and chi-squared tests. SBS for permanent and deciduous teeth etched for 15 seconds averaged 106.60 ± 34.69 N and 96.90 ± 28.51 N, respectively. SBS for deciduous teeth etched for 15 seconds (91.90 ± 32.90 N and 101.80 ± 23.12 N for canines and molars respectively) and 30 seconds (110.40 ± 30.11 N and 94.20 ± 25.74 N for canines and molars, respectively). No significant differences were recorded between the different groups. Bond failure at the enamel-adhesive interface occurred more frequently in the deciduous teeth groups, while failure at bracket-adhesive interface occurred more frequently in the permanent teeth group. SBS of brackets bonded to deciduous teeth was comparable to that of permanent teeth.

  9. The contribution of chemical bonding to the short- and long-term enamel bond strengths.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenliang; Wang, Xiaomiao; Zhang, Ling; Liang, Bing; Tang, Tian; Fu, Baiping; Hannig, Matthias

    2013-07-01

    MDP (10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogenphosphate) has been proven to possess chemical bonding ability to tooth hard tissues, but its contribution to the enamel bond strength has not been recognized. The aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of chemical bonding to the short- and long-term bovine enamel micro-tensile bond strengths (μTBS). The acid-etched enamel surfaces were treated without any primer (control) or with one of three MDP-containing primers (containing different ratio of MDP/HEMA/Bis-GMA, Kuraray Co.) for 5s, water-sprayed and air-dried. Subsequently, the pretreated enamel surfaces were applied with an etch-and-rinse adhesive Durafill Bond (Heraeus Kulzer) and placed with composite resin Durafill VS (Heraeus Kulzer). The specimens were prepared for μTBS tests after 24-h or 1-yr water storage. The etched enamel surfaces treated with or without MDP-containing primers were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The acid-etched enamel treated with the MDP-primers for a very short time could produce the greater enamel μTBS than the control did (p<0.05), and change enamel micromorphology. No significant different μTBS were found between 24-h and 1-yr water storage (p>0.05). The chemical bonding of MDP on the enamel surfaces was re-confirmed by XPS. The additional chemical bonding of MDP around the enamel crystallites of the etched enamel substrate could significantly increase the short- and long-term enamel μTBS, and their μTBS surpass those of the etch-and-rinse adhesive alone. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of a whitening agent application on enamel bond strength of self-etching primer systems.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Masashi; Sato, Hikaru; Sato, Tomomi; Moore, B Keith; Platt, Jeffrey A

    2004-06-01

    Though reduction in bond strength after tooth whitening has been reported, little is known about it's effect on enamel bond strength of two-step bonding systems that exclude phosphoric acid etching prior to bonding agent application. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of whitening procedure using an in-office whitening agent on enamel bond strength of self-etching primer systems. Three self-etching primer systems, Imperva Fluoro Bond, Mac Bond II, Clearfil SE Bond, and a one-bottle adhesive system Single Bond as a control material, were used. Bovine mandibular incisors were mounted in self-curing resin and the facial enamel or dentin surfaces were ground wet on 600-grit SiC paper. An in-office whitening agent, Hi-Lite was applied on the tooth surface according to the manufacturer's instruction. Bonding procedures were done soon after rinsing off the whitening agent or after 24 hours storage in distilled water. Specimens without whitening procedure were prepared as controls. Fifteen specimens per test group were stored in 37 degrees C distilled water for 24 hours, then shear tested at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/minute. One-way ANOVA followed by Duncan multiple range test were used for statistical analysis of the results. For the specimens made soon after rinsing off the whitening agent, a significant decrease in enamel bond strength was observed for all the bonding systems used. For the specimens made after 24 hours storage in water, a small decrease in enamel bond strength was observed and no significant differences were found compared to those of controls (without whitening). From the results of this study, enamel bond strengths of the self-etching primer systems might be affected to a lesser degree after rinsing with water followed by 24 hours storage in water.

  11. Comparative in vitro study of the shear bond strength of brackets bonded with restorative and orthodontic resins.

    PubMed

    Isber, Hassan; Ambrosio, Aldrieli Regina; Carvalho, Paulo Eduardo Guedes; Valle-Corotti, Karyna Martins do; Siqueira, Danilo Furquim

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of brackets bonded with different restorative systems and compare it with that afforded by an established orthodontic bonding system. Seventy human bicuspids were used, divided into five different groups with 14 teeth each. Whereas a specific orthodontic bonding resin (Transbond™ XT) was used in the control group, the restorative systems Charisma, Tetric Ceram, TPH Spectrum and Z100 were used in the other four groups. Seven days after bonding the brackets to the samples, shear forces were applied under pressure in a universal testing machine. The data collected was evaluated using the ANOVA test and, when a difference was identified, the Tukey test was applied. A 5% level of significance was adopted. The mean results of the shear bond strength tests were as follows: Group 1 (Charisma), 14.98 MPa; Group 2 (Tetric Ceram), 15.16 MPa; Group 3 (TPH), 17.70 MPa; Group 4 (Z100), 13.91 MPa; and Group 5 or control group (Transbond™ XT), 17.15 MPa. No statistically significant difference was found among the groups. It was concluded that all tested resins have sufficient bond strength to be recommended for bonding orthodontic brackets.

  12. Effect of high frequency ultrasonic agitation on the bond strength of self-etching adhesives.

    PubMed

    Bagis, Bora; Turkaslan, Suha; Vallittu, Pekka K; Lassila, Lippo V J

    2009-10-01

    To investigate the effect of high frequency ultrasonic agitation on the microtensile bond strengths of different self-etching adhesives. Thirty-six human molars were wet ground occlusally until dentin was exposed. The one-step self-etching adhesives Clearfil S3 Bond, G-Bond, and Futurabond NR were tested in this study. In the control groups, bonding procedures were performed according to the manufacturers' instructions. In the experimental groups, bonding materials were applied with a 1 MHz therapeutic ultrasonic device on the dentin surfaces. The composite crown was built up incrementally to a height of 5 mm. Each tooth was serially sectioned into rectangular beams, and the specimens were subjected to microtensile testing. Failure modes were observed under a stereomicroscope and classified. Randomly selected specimens from each group were observed with SEM. Two-factor ANOVA indicated that both the adhesive system and the ultrasonic agitation effect influenced bond strength (p < 0.05). The bond strength of G-Bond adhesive to dentin was higher after ultrasonic agitation (p < 0.05), whereas ultrasonic agitation of Futurabond and S3 Bond did not affect bond strength values (p > 0.05). Failure after the test was commonly due to adhesive failure in the dentin. High-frequency ultrasonic agitation of self-etching adhesives during their application may enhance their bonding performance.

  13. Method of bond strength evaluation for silicon direct wafer bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spivak, Alexander; Avagyan, Avag; Davies, Brady R.

    2001-09-01

    A crack-opening method used for characterization of silicon direct wafer bonding (DWB) techniques was analyzed. Mathematical model describing the influence of the pattern shape on the wafer pair resistance curve, so-called the R-curve, was developed. Two-dimensional patterns were created on a mirror-polished silicon wafer surface by a combination of photolithography, deposition and etching steps. Experimental observations did show that structured wafers can be used for large bond energy measurements. We propose utilization of structured wafers for bond energy measurements. It allows R-curve shape manipulation, increases the method sensitivity, and reduces probability of wafer failure. The resulting theory can also be used for developing new experimental methods for large bond energy measurements.

  14. Bonding performance of different adhesive systems to deproteinized dentin: microtensile bond strength and scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Barbosa de Souza, Fábio; Silva, Cláudio Heliomar Vicente; Guenka Palma Dibb, Regina; Sincler Delfino, Carina; Carneiro de Souza Beatrice, Lúcia

    2005-10-01

    Deproteinization has been shown to optimize dentin bonding, but differences in adhesive composition should be considered. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of dentin deproteinization on microtensile bond strength (microTBS) of four total-etch adhesive systems (Single Bond/SB, Prime & Bond NT/PB, One Coat Bond/OC, and PQ1/PQ). The ultrastructure of the resin-dentin interfaces was also examined using scanning electron microscopy. Tukey's multiple-comparison tests indicated that PB and PQ produced significantly higher microTBS (p<0.05) after dentin deproteinization (PB=61.53 MPa, PQ=58.18 MPa). This treatment provided statistically lower results for SB (39.08 MPa), but the microTBS of OC to dentin was unaffected by dentin deproteinization. The bonding performance on deproteinized dentin surfaces depended on the characteristics of each adhesive system, as well as the adhesive dentin specificity to the oxidant effect of sodium hypochlorite. Incorporation of fillers in the adhesive, a possible self-etching action, and the presence of a volatile solvent (acetone) were the main factors for a better union between the adhesive system and deproteinized substrate. (c) 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2005.

  15. Effect of ultrasonic agitation on bond strength of self-etching adhesives to dentin.

    PubMed

    Bagis, Bora; Turkarslan, Suha; Tezvergil-Mutluay, Arzu; Uctasli, Sadullah; Vallittu, Pekka K; Lassila, Lippo V J

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of ultrasonic treatment on the microtensile bond strength of self-etching adhesives to dentin. Forty-two human molars were wet ground occlusally until dentin was exposed. Clearfil S3 Bond, Futurabond NR (one-bottle) and Clearfil SE Bond (two-bottle) self-etching bonding systems were used in this study. In control groups, bonding procedures were performed according to the manufacturers' instructions. In the experimental groups, bonding materials were applied with an ultrasonic scaler. When using Clearfil SE Bond, the ultrasonic device was used either during priming or the bonding stage. The composite was then built up to 5 mm in height. Each tooth was serially sectioned into rectangular beams. The beams were categorized also according to positional status as marginal or central. Beams were subjected to microtensile testing after 24 h of water storage. Failure modes were observed with a stereomicroscope and classified. Randomly selected tested beams from each group were examined with SEM. Three-factor ANOVA results indicated that the adhesive bonding system had a significant effect on bond strength (p < 0.001), whereas ultrasonic agitation and the position of the tested beam (marginal vs central) had no effect on bond strength (p > 0.05). Failure after the test was commonly due to adhesive breakdown associated with partial cohesive failure in the dentin. The mean (SD) microtensile bond strengths to dentin for S3 Bond, Futurabond NR, Clearfil SE Bond in the control group were 44.3 (11.7), 35.3 (12.0), 25.1 (8.8), resp, and in the ultrasonic group 39.3 (14.2), 31.3 (13.5), 35.5 (13.5) at priming and 32.6 (16.2) at bonding. Ultrasonic agitation during application of self-etching adhesives had no effect on bonding performance of the self-etching adhesive.

  16. The effect of adhesive type and thickness on bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Mackay, F

    1992-02-01

    Fine-mesh based brackets were bonded to plastic cylinders using four different adhesives. Adhesive thickness was controlled using a bonding jig. The bond was then tested to failure using a shear force. Each adhesive had its own minimum thickness, probably related to its viscosity. Increasing the thickness of the adhesiveness to 0.26 mm, using a stainless steel spacer had minimal effect on their mean shear bond strength.

  17. Effect of Bleaching and Thermocycling on Resin-Enamel Bond Strength

    PubMed Central

    Moosavi, Horieh; Mohammadipour, Hamideh Sadat; Ghavamnasiri, Marjaneh; Alizadeh, Sanaz

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of bleaching and thermocycling on microshear bond strength of bonded resin composites to enamel. Enamel slices were prepared from ninety-six intact human premolars and resin composite cylinders were bonded by using Adper Single Bond 2 + Filtek Z350 or Filtek silorane adhesive and resin composite. Each essential group was randomly subdivided to two subgroups: control and bleaching. In bleaching group, 35% hydrogen peroxide was applied on samples. Thermocycling procedure was conducted between 5°C and 55°C, for 3.000 cycles on the half of each subgroup specimen. Then microshear bond strength was tested. Methacrylate-based resin composite had higher bond strength than silorane-based one. The meyhacrylate-based group without bleaching along with thermocycling showed the most bond strength, while bleaching with 35% carbamide peroxide on silorane-based group without thermocycling showed the least microshear bond strength. Bleaching caused a significant degradation on shear bond strength of silorane-based resin composites that bonded using self-etch adhesive resin systems. PMID:26839550

  18. The internal bond and shear strength of hardwood veneered particleboard composites

    Treesearch

    P. Chow; J.J. Janowiak; E.W. Price

    1986-01-01

    The effects of several accelerated aging tests and weather exposures on hardwood reconstituted structural composite panels were evaluated. The results indicated that the internal bond and shear by tension loading strength reductions of the panels were affected by the exposure test method. The ranking of the effects of various exposure tests on strength values in an...

  19. [Bond strength evaluation of four adhesive systems to dentin in vitro].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ximei; Xing, Lu; Xu, Haiping; Jiang, Zhe; Su, Qin

    2012-08-01

    To compare the adhesive strength and observe the bonding interface. According to statistic analysis and scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation, the resistance capacity of four adhesive systems is evaluated. Prime & Bond NT (PBNT), Tetric N-Bond (TNB), Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB), G Bond (GB) were bonded to the occlusal surfaces and mesial surfaces of third molars respectively. The mesial resins received shear force experiment and the fracture load were recorded. The tensile bond strength (TBS) of the remaining parts were tested. The interfacial configuration were observed under SEM. In the shear bond strength (SBS) experiment, PBNT and TNB showed the best result, but there was no significant difference between them (P>0.05). The SBS of PBNT was stronger than that of CSEB and GB (P<0.05). The SBS of TNB was stronger than that of GB (P<0.05). There was no significant difference between TNB and CSEB (P>0.05). In accordance with the shear force result, the TBS of PBNT and TNB was larger than CSEB and GB (P<0.05). Under SEM, resin tags of PBNT and TNB were longer and slender, the bonding layer was thick. Resin tags of CSEB were shorter, the ones of GB were the fewest and shortest. Compared to self-etching system, total-etching system could reach better bonding strength. There is some connection between the interfacial configuration of adhesives and bond strength of them.

  20. Microtensile bond strength of repaired indirect resin composite

    PubMed Central

    Suputtamongkol, Kallaya; Angkoonsit, Duangjai; Kaewthong, Sunattha; Charoonanan, Piyanan

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of surface treatments on microtensile bond strengths (MTBSs) of two types of indirect resin composites bonded to a conventional direct resin composite. MATERIALS AND METHODS Indirect resin composite blocks of Ceramage and SR Nexco were prepared in a plastic mold having a dimension of 10 × 10 × 4 mm. These composite blocks were divided into three groups according to their surface treatments: Group1: Sandblast (SB); Group2: Sandblast and ultrasonically clean (SB+UL); Group3: Sandblast plus silane (SB+SI). After bonding with direct resin composite, indirect-direct resin composite blocks were kept in distilled water for 24 hours at 37℃ and cut into microbars with the dimension of 1 × 1 × 8 mm. Microbar specimens (n = 40 per group) were loaded using a universal testing machine. Failure modes and compositions were evaluated by SEM. The statistical analyses of MTBS were performed by two-way ANOVA and Dunnett's test at α = .05. RESULTS Surface treatments and brands had effects on the MTBS without an interaction between these two factors. For SR Nexco, the MTBSs of SB and SB+SI group were significantly higher than that of SB+UL. For Ceramage, the MTBSs of SB and SB+SI were significantly higher than that of SB+UL. The mean MTBS of the Ceramage specimens was significantly higher than that of SR Nexco for all surface treatments. CONCLUSION Sandblasting with or without silane application could improve the bond strengths of repaired indirect resin composites to a conventional direct resin composite. PMID:28243390

  1. Microtensile bond strength of repaired indirect resin composite.

    PubMed

    Visuttiwattanakorn, Porntida; Suputtamongkol, Kallaya; Angkoonsit, Duangjai; Kaewthong, Sunattha; Charoonanan, Piyanan

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of surface treatments on microtensile bond strengths (MTBSs) of two types of indirect resin composites bonded to a conventional direct resin composite. Indirect resin composite blocks of Ceramage and SR Nexco were prepared in a plastic mold having a dimension of 10 × 10 × 4 mm. These composite blocks were divided into three groups according to their surface treatments: Group1: Sandblast (SB); Group2: Sandblast and ultrasonically clean (SB+UL); Group3: Sandblast plus silane (SB+SI). After bonding with direct resin composite, indirect-direct resin composite blocks were kept in distilled water for 24 hours at 37℃ and cut into microbars with the dimension of 1 × 1 × 8 mm. Microbar specimens (n = 40 per group) were loaded using a universal testing machine. Failure modes and compositions were evaluated by SEM. The statistical analyses of MTBS were performed by two-way ANOVA and Dunnett's test at α = .05. Surface treatments and brands had effects on the MTBS without an interaction between these two factors. For SR Nexco, the MTBSs of SB and SB+SI group were significantly higher than that of SB+UL. For Ceramage, the MTBSs of SB and SB+SI were significantly higher than that of SB+UL. The mean MTBS of the Ceramage specimens was significantly higher than that of SR Nexco for all surface treatments. Sandblasting with or without silane application could improve the bond strengths of repaired indirect resin composites to a conventional direct resin composite.

  2. Antimicrobial properties and dentin bonding strength of magnesium phosphate cements.

    PubMed

    Mestres, G; Abdolhosseini, M; Bowles, W; Huang, S-H; Aparicio, C; Gorr, S-U; Ginebra, M-P

    2013-09-01

    The main objective of this work was to assess the antimicrobial properties and the dentin-bonding strength of novel magnesium phosphate cements (MPC). Three formulations of MPC, consisting of magnesium oxide and a phosphate salt, NH4H2PO4, NaH2PO4 or a mixture of both, were evaluated. As a result of the setting reaction, MPC transformed into either struvite (MgNH4PO4·6H2O) when NH4H2PO4 was used or an amorphous magnesium sodium phosphate when NaH2PO4 was used. The MPC had appropriate setting times for hard tissue applications, high early compressive strengths and higher strength of bonding to dentin than commercial mineral trioxide aggregate cement. Bacteriological studies were performed with fresh and aged cements against three bacterial strains, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (planktonic and in biofilm) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. These bacteria have been associated with infected implants, as well as other frequent hard tissue related infections. Extracts of different compositions of MPC had bactericidal or bacteriostatic properties against the three bacterial strains tested. This was associated mainly with a synergistic effect between the high osmolarity and alkaline pH of the MPC. These intrinsic antimicrobial properties make MPC preferential candidates for applications in dentistry, such as root fillers, pulp capping agents and cavity liners.

  3. A comparison of shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with four different orthodontic adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sudhir; Tandon, Pradeep; Nagar, Amit; Singh, Gyan P; Singh, Alka; Chugh, Vinay K

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study is to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of stainless steel (SS) orthodontic brackets bonded with four different orthodontic adhesives. Materials and Methods: Eighty newly extracted premolars were bonded to 0.022 SS brackets (Ormco, Scafati, Italy) and equally divided into four groups based on adhesive used: (1) Rely-a-Bond (self-cure adhesive, Reliance Orthodontic Product, Inc., Illinois, USA), (2) Transbond XT (light-cure adhesive, 3M Unitek, CA, USA), (3) Transbond Plus (sixth generation self-etch primer, 3M Unitek, CA, USA) with Transbond XT (4) Xeno V (seventh generation self-etch primer, Dentsply, Konstanz, Germany) with Xeno Ortho (light-cure adhesive, Dentsply, Konstanz, Germany) adhesive. Brackets were debonded with a universal testing machine (Model No. 3382 Instron Corp., Canton, Mass, USA). The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was recordedIn addition, the conditioned enamel surfaces were observed under a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results: Transbond XT (15.49 MPa) attained the highest bond strength. Self-etching adhesives (Xeno V, 13.51 MPa; Transbond Plus, 11.57 MPa) showed clinically acceptable SBS values and almost clean enamel surface after debonding. The analysis of variance (F = 11.85, P < 0.0001) and Chi-square (χ2 = 18.16, P < 0.05) tests revealed significant differences among groups. The ARI score of 3 (i.e., All adhesives left on the tooth) to be the most prevalent in Transbond XT (40%), followed by Rely-a-Bond (30%), Transbond Plus with Transbond XT (15%), and Xeno V with Xeno Ortho (10%). Under SEM, enamel surfaces after debonding of the brackets appeared porous when an acid-etching process was performed on the surfaces of Rely-a-Bond and Transbond XT, whereas with self-etching primers enamel presented smooth and almost clean surfaces (Transbond Plus and Xeno V group). Conclusion: All adhesives yielded SBS values higher than the recommended bond strength (5.9-7–8 MPa), Seventh generation

  4. [Microbeading resin-bonded retainers. 1. Tensile bond strengths and durability].

    PubMed

    Kato, T; Sakai, H; Nomura, H; Kondo, Y; Yatani, H; Yamashita, A

    1989-12-01

    With the development of adhesive luting resins that adheres both dental alloys and tooth enamel has been widely used the resin-bonded fixed partial denture recently. Since we experienced, however, that the metal retainers without mechanical retention such as channels were often dislodged with metal interface failure, the more durable bonding between a luting resin and a metal has been desired. This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of microbeading onto the adherent metal surface on the tensile adhesive strength between an adhesive luting resin and a dental alloy. Maxgold equivalent to Type IV gold and Panavia EX were used as an adherent metal and a luting resin, respectively. The following conclusions were drawn: 1. Microbeading on the adherent metal surface made no contribution to an increase of the tensile adhesive strength, unless the adherent surface treatment was achieved. However, once 50 microns alumina blasting and tin plating were achieved on the microbeaded metal surface, the tensile adhesive strength was significantly increased. 2. Taking into account the fabrication technique and the tensile adhesive strength, the optimum diameter of microbeads seems to be 150 microns. 3. In the result of various accelerative durability tests (invasion tests in 70 and 100 degrees C water, thermal cycling between 4 and 60 degrees C water), the durability of 150 microns microbeaded metal surface on which 50 microns alumina blasting and tin plating were achieved was much better than that of the smooth metal surface.

  5. Effects of etching time on enamel bond strengths.

    PubMed

    Triolo, P T; Swift, E J; Mudgil, A; Levine, A

    1993-12-01

    This study evaluated the effects of etching time on bond strengths of composite to enamel. Proximal surfaces of extracted molars were etched with either a conventional etchant (35% phosphoric acid) or one of two dentin/enamel conditioners, 10% maleic acid (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Etchant), or a solution of oxalic acid, aluminum nitrate, and glycine (Gluma 1 & 2 Conditioner). Each agent was applied for 15, 30, or 60 seconds. Specimens etched with 35% phosphoric acid had the highest mean bond strengths at each etching time. At the manufacturer's recommended application times, the other two agents gave significantly lower shear bond strengths than phosphoric acid.

  6. The significance of nanoparticles on bond strength of polymer concrete to steel

    DOE PAGES

    Douba, A.; Genedy, M.; Matteo, E. N.; ...

    2017-01-03

    Here, polymer concrete (PC) is a commonly used material in construction due to its improved durability and good bond strength to steel substrate. PC has been suggested as a repair and seal material to restore the bond between the cement annulus and the steel casing in wells that penetrate formations under consideration for CO2 sequestration. Nanoparticles including Multi-Walled Carbon Nano Tubes (MWCNTs), Aluminum Nanoparticles (ANPs) and Silica Nano particles (SNPs) were added to an epoxy-based PC to examine how the nanoparticles affect the bond strength of PC to a steel substrate. Slant shear tests were used to determine the bondmore » strength of PC incorporating nanomaterials to steel; results reveal that PC incorporating nanomaterials has an improved bond strength to steel substrate compared with neat PC. In particular, ANPs improve the bond strength by 51% over neat PC. Local shear stresses, extracted from Finite Element (FE) analysis of the slant shear test, were found to be as much as twice the apparent/average shear/bond strength. These results suggest that the impact of nanomaterials is higher than that shown by the apparent strength. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) measurements of epoxy with and without nanomaterials showed ANPs to influence curing of epoxy, which might explain the improved bond strength of PC incorporating ANPs.« less

  7. Bond strength of adhesive/composite combinations to dentin involving total- and self-etch adhesives.

    PubMed

    Molla, Karlheinz; Park, Hyun-Jung; Haller, Bernd

    2002-01-01

    To compare the bonding potential to human dentin of adhesive/composite combinations including five 2-step and two 3-step total-etch (TE) bonding systems, two systems with self-conditioning (SC) primers, and one SC all-in-one adhesive by use of the microtensile bond test. Hybrid resin composites were bonded to the occlusal dentin of 50 extracted human molars. After water storage (37 degrees C, 24 h), 31-mm-thick slabs were cut from the middle of the teeth perpendicular to their long axis. Microtensile bond strength was determined and debonded surfaces were examined under the SEM for mode of failure. GLM multivariate procedure for repeated measurements, Student-Newman-Keuls test (SPSS version 10.0; p = 0.05). Mean bond strengths of the simplified (2-step) TE systems (OptiBond Solo, Gluma One Bond, Solobond M, Prime&Bond NT, One Coat Bond; 19.9 MPa to 39.9 MPa) were not significantly lower than that of the traditional 3-step TE systems (EBS Multi: 26.0 MPa; OptiBond FL: 32.7 MPa), and not related to phosphoric acid concentration. Dentin treatment with SC primers (Clearfil Liner Bond 2: 22.0 MPa; Clearfil Liner Bond 2V: 22.4 MPa) was as effective as etching with phosphoric acid. The SC all-in-one adhesive (Etch&Prime 3.0: 10.1 MPa) produced significantly lower bond strength than all other systems evaluated. The use of adhesive/composite combinations including simplified bonding systems does not necessarily result in reduced bond strength to dentin. SC primers offer a promising alternative to phosphoric acid etching as far as bonding to dentin is concerned. In contrast, the SC all-in-one adhesive evaluated needs to be improved.

  8. Comparison of shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with light emitting diode (LED).

    PubMed

    Rachala, Madhukar Reddy; Yelampalli, Muarlidhar Reddy

    2010-01-01

    Light-emitting diode (LED) light curing units (LCU) have recently been used to polymerize resin-based orthodontic adhesives and preliminary studies indicate their use has been successful. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) oforthodontic brackets bonded to enamel with a LED LCU (LEDMAX 4, Hilux, Kulzer comp.) at 10, 20 and 40 seconds and comparing them with that of 40 seconds light exposure from a conventional halogen-based LCU (Hilux unit, Heraeus Kulzer comp.). Also to assess the amount of adhesive remaining on the tooth after debonding using Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI). 120 extracted human premolars were divided into 4 groups of 30 each. After photo polymerization, all the samples were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours and then subjected to a shear force with universal testing machine until bracket failure. All the recordings were evaluated statistically ANOVA and Turkey tests revealed that, no statistically significant differences were found among the shear bond strengths of 40 sec halogen (10.15 +/- 1.55), 20 sec LED (9.58 +/- 1.71) and 40 sec LED (10.34 +/- 1.83) cured groups; but the bond strength of 10 sec cure LED group (7.56 +/- 1.47) showed significantly lower than the other groups. Chi-square comparisons indicated that there were no significant differences in the ARI scores between the 4 groups tested. The results of this study are promising for orthodontic application of LED curing units in clinics, but further in vivo trials should be performed before validation.

  9. Effect of antioxidant treatment on the shear bond strength of composite resin to bleached enamel.

    PubMed

    Kunt, Göknil Ergün; Yılmaz, Nergiz; Sen, Selma; Dede, Doğu Ömür

    2011-09-01

    This study examined the antioxidant treatment on the shear bond strength of composite resin to enamel after bleaching with two different bleaching systems. Seventy flat enamel surfaces were prepared from freshly extracted human molars using a low speed diamond saw. Then the specimens were divided into seven random groups (n = 10) to apply different procedures; namely, bleaching with White Smile and bonding with composite resin (G1), bleaching with White Smile, treatment with ascorbic acid and bonding with composite resin (G2), bleaching with White Smile, immersing in artificial saliva for 2 weeks and bonding with composite resin (G3), bleaching with Opalesence and bonding with composite resin (G4), bleaching with Opalesence, treatment with ascorbic acid and bonding with composite resin (G5) and bleaching with Opalesence, immersing in artificial saliva for 2 weeks and bonding with composite resin (G6). Another group was used as a control group. Shear bond test was performed on all specimens and data were analyzed using one way ANOVA and Bonferroni's test (p < 0.05). Bond strengths of bleached specimens were significantly lower than those of non-bleached specimens. No statistical difference was found in bond strength between the bleached and non-bleached groups when the antioxidant treatment was carried out. Ten per cent ascorbic acid treatment was found to be an effective method to reverse the compromised bond strength.

  10. Shear bond strength of veneering porcelain to porous zirconia.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takashi; Sugano, Tsuyoshi; Usami, Hirofumi; Wakabayashi, Kazumichi; Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Sekino, Tohru; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2014-01-01

    In this study, two types of porous zirconia and dense zirconia were used. The flexural strength of non-layered zirconia specimens and those of the layered zirconia specimens with veneering porcelain were examined. Furthermore, the shear bond strength of veneering porcelain to zirconia was examined. The flexural strength of the non-layered specimens was 1,220 MPa for dense zirconia and 220 to 306 MPa for porous zirconia. The flexural strength of the layered specimens was 360 MPa for dense zirconia and 132 to 156 MPa for porous zirconia, when a load was applied to the porcelain side. The shear bond strength of porcelain veneered to dense zirconia was 27.4 MPa and that of porcelain veneered to porous zirconia was 33.6 to 35.1 MPa. This suggests that the veneering porcelain bonded strongly to porous zirconia although porous zirconia has a lower flexural strength than dense zirconia.

  11. Push-Out Bond Strength of Bioceramic Materials in a Synthetic Tissue Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Shokouhinejad, Noushin; Razmi, Hasan; Nekoofar, Mohammad Hossein; Sajadi, Sepideh; Dummer, Paul MH.; Khoshkhounejad, Mehrfam

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study compared the push-out bond strength of EndoSequence Root Repair Material (ERRM) and Bioaggregate (BA), new bioceramic materials, to that of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) after incubation in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), a synthetic tissue fluid, for either 1 week or 2 months. Materials and Methods: One-hundred and twenty root sections were filled with ProRoot MTA, BA, or ERRM. Each tested material was then randomly divided into two subgroups (n = 20): root sections were immersed in PBS for 1 week or 2 months. The bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine. After that, the failure modes were examined with stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The push-out data and failure mode categories were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and chi-square tests, respectively. Results: The bond strength of ERRM was significantly higher than that of BA and MTA at both incubation periods. No significant difference was found between the bond strength of MTA and BA at either 1 week or 2 months. Increasing the incubation time to 2 months resulted in a significant increase in bond strength of all the materials. The failure mode was mainly mixed for MTA and BA, but cohesive for ERRM at both incubation periods. Conclusion: ERRM had significantly higher bond strength to root canal walls compared to MTA and BA. Increasing the incubation time significantly improved the bond strength and bioactive reaction products of all materials. PMID:24910665

  12. Push-out bond strength of bioceramic materials in a synthetic tissue fluid.

    PubMed

    Shokouhinejad, Noushin; Razmi, Hasan; Nekoofar, Mohammad Hossein; Sajadi, Sepideh; Dummer, Paul Mh; Khoshkhounejad, Mehrfam

    2013-11-01

    This study compared the push-out bond strength of EndoSequence Root Repair Material (ERRM) and Bioaggregate (BA), new bioceramic materials, to that of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) after incubation in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), a synthetic tissue fluid, for either 1 week or 2 months. One-hundred and twenty root sections were filled with ProRoot MTA, BA, or ERRM. Each tested material was then randomly divided into two subgroups (n = 20): root sections were immersed in PBS for 1 week or 2 months. The bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine. After that, the failure modes were examined with stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The push-out data and failure mode categories were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and chi-square tests, respectively. The bond strength of ERRM was significantly higher than that of BA and MTA at both incubation periods. No significant difference was found between the bond strength of MTA and BA at either 1 week or 2 months. Increasing the incubation time to 2 months resulted in a significant increase in bond strength of all the materials. The failure mode was mainly mixed for MTA and BA, but cohesive for ERRM at both incubation periods. ERRM had significantly higher bond strength to root canal walls compared to MTA and BA. Increasing the incubation time significantly improved the bond strength and bioactive reaction products of all materials.

  13. The effect of dentine location and tubule orientation on the bond strengths between resin and dentine.

    PubMed

    Phrukkanon, S; Burrow, M F; Tyas, M J

    1999-05-01

    This study determined the influence of dentine structure on the micro-tensile bond strengths between resin and dentine of two different dentine adhesive systems (Single Bond, 3M Dental Products, St Paul, MN; MF-102 (experimental self-etching primer), GC Corporation, Tokyo, Japan). The study was separated into two main parts: bond strength measurement and investigation of the bonding interface. Twenty-two human premolars were used for the bond strength measurement. Each tooth was cut vertically, separating the tooth into mesio-distal halves. One half of the tooth was used to bond to a surface perpendicular to the dentinal tubules and other half to bond to a surface parallel to the tubules. For each half, six locations of dentine were bonded. Each material was used in accordance to the manufacturer's directions. Cylindrical hourglass-shaped specimens of 1.2 mm diameter at the bonded interface were manufactured. The bonds were stressed in tension at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Mean bond strengths were compared using LSD, one-way ANOVA, and Student's t-test. The fractured surfaces were examined under a scanning electron microscope, and the frequency of fracture modes was compared using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. For the investigation of the bonded interface, four teeth were prepared by the same procedure used for the bond test specimens. The bonded interfaces were observed after an acid-base treatment or fracturing across the bonded interface, prior to investigation with a field-emission scanning electron microscope. For Single Bond, the bond strengths for mid-root dentine were significantly lower than for other locations (p < 0.05). For MF-102, there was no significant difference for all locations (p > 0.05). MF-102 bonded well to all locations of dentine while Single Bond showed a porous zone at the base of the hybrid layer. The bonds were not influenced by tubule orientation. The results indicate that the bond for Single Bond may be affected by

  14. Strength of a weak bond connecting flexible polymer chains.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, E; Ritchie, K

    1999-01-01

    Bond dissociation under steadily rising force occurs most frequently at a time governed by the rate of loading (Evans and Ritchie, 1997 Biophys. J. 72:1541-1555). Multiplied by the loading rate, the breakage time specifies the force for most frequent failure (called bond strength) that obeys the same dependence on loading rate. The spectrum of bond strength versus log(loading rate) provides an image of the energy landscape traversed in the course of unbonding. However, when a weak bond is connected to very compliant elements like long polymers, the load applied to the bond does not rise steadily under constant pulling speed. Because of nonsteady loading, the most frequent breakage force can differ significantly from that of a bond loaded at constant rate through stiff linkages. Using generic models for wormlike and freely jointed chains, we have analyzed the kinetic process of failure for a bond loaded by pulling the polymer linkages at constant speed. We find that when linked by either type of polymer chain, a bond is likely to fail at lower force under steady separation than through stiff linkages. Quite unexpectedly, a discontinuous jump can occur in bond strength at slow separation speed in the case of long polymer linkages. We demonstrate that the predictions of strength versus log(loading rate) can rationalize conflicting results obtained recently for unfolding Ig domains along muscle titin with different force techniques. PMID:10233061

  15. Microleakage and shear bond strength of orthodontc brackets bonded to hypomineralized enamel following different surface preparations

    PubMed Central

    Shahabi, Mostafa; Mohamadipour, Hamideh; Moosavi, Horieh

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study investigated the effects of several conditioning methods on shear bond strength (SBS) and microleakage of orthodontic brackets bonded to demineralized enamel. Study Design: One hundred premolars were selected and immersed in a cariogenic solution for 12 weeks. The teeth were randomly assigned into 5 groups. In groups 1 and 2, the teeth underwent acid etching for 30 and 120 seconds, respectively. In group 3, a combination of laser and acid etching was employed. A self-etch primer (SEP) was applied in group 4 and in group 5, the teeth were exposed to acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) for 4 minutes before etching. After bracket bonding, the teeth were immersed in methylen blue for 12 hours and then were mounted in acrylic resin. SBS was determined with an Instron Universal Testing Machine and the amount of microleakage under the brackets was assessed under a stereomicroscope. Results: The lowest SBS was related to the SEP group and the highest one was observed in the specimens prepared by APF+acid etching. There was a significant difference in SBS (p=0.009), but not in microleakage (p=0.971) of the study groups. The SBS of the specimens treated with SEP was significantly Lower than the other groups, which were not significantly different from each other. The SEP group displayed a higher frequency of bond failure at the enamel-adhesive interface. Conclusions: Enamel preparation with SEP provided the lowest SBS among the groups. All groups showed some degree of microleakage. There was no significant correlation between SBS and microleakage. Key words:Bond strength, microleakage, bonding, self-etch primer, Er:YAG laser. PMID:24790708

  16. Effects of tin plating on base metal alloy-ceramic bond strength.

    PubMed

    Değer, S; Caniklioglu, M B

    1998-01-01

    This study investigated the metal-ceramic bonding of treated metal surfaces. The study was divided into two parts. In Part I, the depth of tin diffusion from a tin-plated bone metal alloy surface was measured using an energy-dispersive spectrometer. In Part II the metal-ceramic bond strength was determined using a shear test. The weakest bonding was observed in the directly tin-plated group, and the strongest metal-ceramic bonding was maintained in the tin-diffused group. A controlled oxidation produced the greatest bond strengths. With the base metal alloys tested, diffusion under the argon environment was conducive to a stronger metal-ceramic bond. The metal oxidation rate should approximate the ceramic vitrification rate, and the diffusion rate of the metal elements should be slower than the vitrification rate to obtain the strongest metal-ceramic bond.

  17. Shear bond strength between an indirect composite veneering material and zirconia ceramics after thermocycling.

    PubMed

    Komine, Futoshi; Kobayashi, Kazuhisa; Saito, Ayako; Fushiki, Ryosuke; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Matsumura, Hideo

    2009-12-01

    The present study evaluated the shear bond strength between an indirect composite material and zirconium dioxide (zirconia) ceramics after thermocycling. A total of 80 zirconia (Katana) discs were divided into five groups and primed with one of following agents: All Bond 2 Primer B (ABB), Alloy Primer (ALP), AZ Primer (AZP), Estenia Opaque Primer (EOP), and Porcelain Liner M Liquid A (PLA). An indirect composite material (Estenia C&B) was then bonded to the primed zirconia. One-half of the specimens (n = 8) in each group were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 h, and the remaining eight specimens were thermocycled 5,000 times before shear bond strength testing. Mean bond strengths before thermocycling varied from 10.1 to 15.6 MPa; bond strengths after thermocycling ranged from 4.3 to 17.6 MPa. The ALP group had the highest strengths after thermocycling; there were no significant differences among the PLA, AZP, and EOP groups. The bond strength values for PLA, AZP, EOP, and ALP did not decrease with thermocycling. The application of an acidic functional monomer containing carboxylic anhydride (4-META), phosphonic acid (6-MHPA), or phosphate monomer (MDP) provided durable bond strength between Estenia C&B indirect composite and Katana zirconia.

  18. Bond strengths of lingual orthodontic brackets bonded with light-cured composite resins cured by transillumination.

    PubMed

    King, L; Smith, R T; Wendt, S L; Behrents, R G

    1987-04-01

    A method of curing light-cured composite resins by transillumination to cement acid-etched fixed partial dentures was adapted to bond solid mesh-backed lingual orthodontic brackets. Results of this investigation showed that the bond strengths of the orthodontic brackets bonded with light-cured composite resins were significantly less (P less than 0.05) than the bond strengths of the orthodontic brackets cemented with traditional adhesives and orthodontic composite resins. Notwithstanding, the bond strengths achieved with the transilluminated light-cured composite resins should be adequate to withstand the forces of mastication and orthodontic movements. There was no correlation of bond strengths of the brackets cemented with the transilluminated light-cured composite resins when compared to the faciolingual widths of the teeth.

  19. Resin-to-enamel bond strengths with various etching times.

    PubMed

    Gilpatrick, R O; Ross, J A; Simonsen, R J

    1991-01-01

    It has been advocated recently that etching times of enamel be reduced from 60 seconds to as low as 15 seconds. However, the minimal etching time needed to achieve adequate retention of composite resin to enamel has not been identified. In this study, an attempt was made to find the minimal enamel-etching time that still allowed adequate bond strength of composite resin to enamel surfaces. Adequate bond strength was defined as equivalent to the bond strength established for the conventional 60-second etch. Results seemed to indicate that a 5-second etch was sufficient to allow adequate bond strength; however, further study is required to determine the effects of short etching times on microleakage.

  20. Dentin bond strength and degree of conversion evaluation of experimental self-etch adhesive systems

    PubMed Central

    Yazdi, Fatemeh-Maleknejad; Atai, Mohammad; Zeynali, Mahsa

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different concentrations of 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (10-MDP) monomer in one-step self-etch experimental adhesives on dentinal microshear bond strength (µSBS), their degree of conversion and bonded micro structure. Material and Methods Composite resin cylinders (Clearfil AP-X) were bonded on human sound molar dentinal surfaces by using five experimental one-step self-etching adhesives (1-SEAs) containing 0% (E0), 5% (E5), 10% (E10), 15% (E15), 20% (E20) (by weight) 10-MDP monomer and Clearfil S3 Bond (CS3) as a control. After 24 hours, microshear bond strength was tested. The degree of conversion was also measured using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Interfacial ultrastructure was observed under a scanning electron microscope in all the groups. Results A higher microshear bond strength was observed with adhesives containing 10% and 15% 10-MDP in comparison to study groups (P<.05). Clearfil S3 Bond and 10% MDP had a significantly greater degree of conversion than other groups (P<.05). Conclusions The amount of functional monomer in 1-SEAs influences both the bonding performance and degree of conversion; 10% 10-MDP showed the best combination of bond strength and degree of conversion. Key words:Self-etch adhesives, 10-MDP, bond strength, degree of conversion. PMID:26155340

  1. Effect of phosphoric acid etching on the shear bond strength of two self-etch adhesives.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, Camila

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of optional phosphoric acid etching on the shear bond strength (SBS) of two self-etch adhesives to enamel and dentin. Ninety-six bovine mandibular incisors were ground flat to obtain enamel and dentin substrates. A two-step self-etch adhesive (FL-Bond II) and a one-step self-etch adhesive (BeautiBond) were applied with and without a preliminary acid etching to both the enamel and dentin. The specimens were equally and randomly assigned to 4 groups per substrate (n=12) as follows: FL-Bond II etched; FL-Bond II un-etched; BeautiBond etched; BeautiBond un-etched. Composite cylinders (Filtek Z100) were bonded onto the treated tooth structure. The shear bond strength was evaluated after 24 hours of storage (37°C, 100% humidity) with a testing machine (Ultra-tester) at a speed of 1 mm/min. The data was analyzed using a two-way ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey's test with a significance level of p<0.05. A field emission scanning electron microscope was used for the failure mode analysis. Both adhesives evidenced a significant decrease in the dentin SBS with the use of an optional phosphoric acid-etching step (p<0.05). Preliminary phosphoric acid etching yielded significantly higher enamel SBS for FL-Bond II (p<0.05) only, but not for BeautiBond. FL-Bond II applied to un-etched dentin demonstrated the highest mean bond strength (37.7±3.2 MPa) and BeautiBond applied to etched dentin showed the lowest mean bond strength (18.3±6.7 MPa) among all tested groups (p<0.05). The use of a preliminary acid-etching step with 37.5% phosphoric acid had a significant adverse effect on the dentin bond strength of the self-etch adhesives evaluated while providing improvement on the enamel bond strength only for FL-Bond II. This suggests that the potential benefit that may be derived from an additional etching step with phosphoric acid does not justify the risk of adversely affecting the bond strength to dentin.

  2. Microtensile bond strength of contemporary adhesives to primary enamel and dentin.

    PubMed

    Marquezan, Marcela; da Silveira, Bruno Lopes; Burnett, Luiz Henrique; Rodrigues, Célia Regina Martins Delgado; Kramer, Paulo Floriani

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess bond strength of three self-etching and two total-etch adhesive systems bonded to primary tooth enamel and dentin. Forty extracted primary human molars were selected and abraded in order to create flat buccal enamel and occlusal dentin surfaces. Teeth were assigned to one of the adhesive systems: Adper Scotch Bond Multi Purpose, Adper Single Bond 2, Adper Prompt L-Pop, Clearfil SE Bond and AdheSE. Immediately to adhesive application, a composite resin (Filtek Z250) block was built up. After 3 months of water storage, each sample was sequentially sectioned in order to obtain sticks with a square cross-sectional area of about 0.72 mm2. The specimens were fixed lengthways to a microtensile device and tested using a universal testing machine with a 50-N load cell at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Microtensile bond strength values were recorded in MPa and compared by Analysis of Variance and the post hoc Tukey test (a = 0.05). In enamel, Clearfil SE Bond presented the highest values, followed by Adper Single Bond 2, AdheSE and Adper Scotch Bond Multi Purpose, without significant difference. The highest values in dentin were obtained with Adper Scotch Bond Multi Purpose and all other adhesives did not present significant different values from that, except Adper Prompt L-Pop that achieved the lowest bond strength in both substrates. Adper Scotch Bond Multi Purpose and Adper Single Bond 2 presented significantly lower values in enamel than in dentin although all other adhesives presented similar results in both substrates. contemporary adhesive systems present similar behaviors when bonded to primary teeth, with the exception of the one-step self-etching system; and self-etching systems can achieve bond strength values as good in enamel as in dentin of primary teeth.

  3. Shear Bond Strengths and Morphological Evaluation of Filled and Unfilled Adhesive Interfaces to Enamel and Dentine

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, Vajihesadat; Fathi, Mohammadhosein; Ataei, Ebrahim; Khodaeian, Niloufar; Askari, Navid

    2012-01-01

    In this laboratory study shear bond strengths of three filled and one unfilled adhesive systems to enamel and dentine were compared. Forty-eight extracted intact noncarious human mandibular molars were randomly assigned to two groups of 24 one for bonding to enamel and the other for bonding to dentine. Buccal and lingual surfaces of each tooth were randomly assigned for application of each one of filled (Prime & Bond NT (PBNT), Optibond Solo Plus (OBSP), and Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB)) and unfilled (Single Bond (SB)) adhesive systems (n = 12). A universal resin composite was placed into the translucent plastic cylinders (3 mm in diameter and 2 mm in length) and seated against the enamel and dentine surfaces and polymerized for 40 seconds. Shear bond strength was determined using a universal testing machine, and the results were statistically analyzed using two-way ANOVA, one-way ANOVA, t-test, and Tukey HSD post hoc test with a 5% level of significance.There were no statistically significant differences in bond strength between the adhesive systems in enamel, but CSEB and SB exhibited significantly higher and lower bond strength to dentine, respectively, than the other tested adhesive systems while there were no statistically significant differences between PBNT and OBSP. PMID:23209471

  4. Composite resin bond strength to caries-affected dentin contaminated with 3 different hemostatic agents.

    PubMed

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Hosseini-Shirazi, Moeen; Farahbod, Foroozan; Keshani, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Bonding of composite resins to sound and caries-affected dentin in cervical areas may necessitate the use of hemostatic agents to control sulcular fluid and hemorrhage. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the bond strengths of a self-etching adhesive system to sound and caries-affected dentin after the use of 3 different hemostatic agents. Composite resin cylinders were bonded to 48 caries-affected and 48 sound dentin surfaces in 8 groups. Groups 1-4 utilized caries-affected dentin: group 1, uncontaminated control; 2, ViscoStat; 3, ViscoStat Clear; and 4, trichloroacetic acid (TCA). Groups 5-8 utilized sound dentin: group 5, uncontaminated control; 6, ViscoStat; 7, ViscoStat Clear; and 8, TCA. The hemostatic agents were applied for 2 minutes and rinsed. After 500 rounds of thermocycling, shear bond strength tests were carried out. Data were analyzed with 1- and 2-way analyses of variance, t test, and post hoc Tukey tests at a significance level of P < 0.05. Bond strength was significantly influenced by dentin type (F = 38.23; P = 0.0001) and hemostatic agent (F = 6.32; P = 0.001). Furthermore, groups 2 and 6 (ViscoStat) showed significantly lower bond strength values than the control groups (groups 1 and 5) in both affected and sound dentin (P = 0.043 and P = 0.009, respectively). Within the limitations of this study, the bond strength of composite resin to caries-affected dentin was significantly reduced compared to that with sound dentin. Among the studied hemostatic agents, ViscoStat resulted in a greater decrease in dentin bond strength. Contamination of both sound and caries-affected dentin with hemostatic agents decreased composite resin bond strength. Of the 3 hemostatic agents used, ViscoStat Clear appeared to have the least detrimental effect on bond strength.

  5. Influence of oil contamination on in vitro bond strength of bonding agents to dental substrates.

    PubMed

    Matos, Adriana Bona; Oliveira, Denise Cerqueira; Vieira, Samuel Nilo; Netto, Narciso Garone; Powers, John M

    2008-04-01

    To evaluate the influence of cleaning procedures (pumice, anionic detergent and both procedures together) on the tensile bond strength of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive systems to bovine enamel and dentin in vitro. Eighty non-carious, bovine incisors were extracted, embedded in acrylic resin to obtain enamel/dentin specimens. Flat bonding surfaces were obtained by grinding. Groups were divided according to substrate (enamel or dentin), adhesive system [etch-and-rinse, Adper Single Bond 2 (SB) or self-etch, Clearfil Protect Bond (PB)]; and cleaning substances (pumice, anionic detergent and their combination). The teeth were randomly divided into 20 groups (n=8): G1--Enamel (E) + SB; G2--E + oil (O) + SB; G3--E + O + Pumice (P) + SB; G4--E + O + Tergentol (T) + SB; G5--E + O + P + T + SB; G6--E + PB; G7--E + O + PB; G8--E + O + P + PB; G9--E + O + T + PB; G10--E + O + P + T + PB; G11--Dentin (D) + SB; G12 D + SB + O; G13--D + SB + O + P; G14--D + SB + O + T;G15--D + SB + O + P + T; G16--D + PB; G17--D + O + PB +; G18--D + O + P + PB; G19--D + O + T + PB; G20--D + O + P + T + PB. Specimens were contaminated with handpiece oil for 5 seconds before bonding. Adhesive systems and resin composite were applied according to manufacturers' instructions. Specimens were tested in tension after 24 hours of immersion using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. Bond strengths were analyzed with ANOVA. Failure sites were observed and recorded. Tensile bond strength in MPa were: G1 (23.6 +/- 0.9); G2 (17.3 +/- 2.2); G3 (20.9 +/- 0.9); G4 (20.6 +/- 0.5); G5 (18.7 +/- 2.3); G6 (23.0 +/- 1.0); G7 (21.5 +/- 2.4); G8 (19.9 +/- 1.3); G9 (22.1 +/- 1.2); G10 (19.1 +/- 1.2); G11 (18.8 +/- 1.3); G12 (15.7 +/- 2.1); G13 (17.8 +/- 3.3); G14 (15.3 +/- 2.9); G15 (15.6 +/- 1.9); G16 (14.7 +/- 2.3); G17 (5.5 +/- 0.9); G18 (19.3 +/- 1.8); G19 (15.6 +/- 1.6); G20 (20.3 +/- 3.9). Statistical analysis showed that the main factors substrate and cleaning were

  6. Papain-based gel for biochemical caries removal: influence on microtensile bond strength to dentin.

    PubMed

    Piva, Evandro; Ogliari, Fabrício Aulo; Moraes, Rafael Ratto de; Corá, Felipe; Henn, Sandrina; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of a papain-based gel (Papacárie) for chemo-mechanical caries removal on bond strength to dentin. Human molars were assigned to the following groups: Group 1: sound teeth were flattened to expose dentin; Group 2: after flattening of surfaces, the papain-based gel was applied on the sound dentin; Group 3: overlying enamel from carious teeth was removed and mechanical excavation of dentin was conducted; Group 4: chemo-mechanical excavation of carious dentin was conducted using the papain-based gel. The Prime&Bond NT or Clearfil SE Bond adhesive systems were used for restorative procedures. A microtensile bond strength test was performed, and the modes of failure were determined under SEM. The data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p < or = 0.05). No significant differences were observed between the sound dentin groups. For both excavation methods, Clearfil presented a significantly higher bond strength than Prime&Bond NT. Also, for Clearfil, the mechanically excavated samples disclosed a significantly higher bond strength than the chemo-mechanically ones. For Prime&Bond NT, no significant differences were detected between the excavation methods. Predominance of mixed failures for the sound substrate and of adhesive failures for the carious dentin one was detected. The bond strength to carious dentin of the self-etching system was negatively affected by chemo-mechanical excavation using the papain-based gel.

  7. Effects of potassium nitrate and oxalate desensitizer agents on shear bond strengths of orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Türkkahraman, Hakan; Adanir, Necdet

    2007-11-01

    To evaluate the effects of potassium nitrate and oxalate desensitizer agents on shear bond strengths of orthodontic brackets. Forty-five extracted human premolar teeth were randomly assigned to three groups of 15 each. UltraEZ potassium nitrate desensitizer was applied on teeth in the first group, while BisBlock oxalate desensitizer was applied on teeth in the second group. The third group served as a control. Orthodontic brackets were bonded with a light cure composite resin and cured with a halogen light. After bonding, the shear bond strength of the brackets was tested with a universal testing machine. The highest shear bond strengths were measured in Group III. The shear bond strength in Groups I and II was significantly lower than in Group III (P < .001). Significant difference was also found between Group I and Group II (P < .01). Orthodontic brackets bonded to enamel treated with potassium nitrate and oxalate desensitizers showed significantly lower bond strengths than did brackets bonded to untreated enamel.

  8. Bond Strength of Resin Cements to Dentin Using New Universal Bonding Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-30

    34Bond Strength of Resin Cements to Dentin Using New Universal Bonding Agents" Materials Repaired with Composite Resin " 7. Intended publication...incompatibilities with self-curing composite materials. Low bond strength between self-curing composite resins , such as resin cements and core materials...of self-cure composite materials or dual-cure materials that are not adequately light cured (Tay et al., 2003). Most resin cement systems that use

  9. Bond strength of the porcelain repair system to all-ceramic copings and porcelain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang J; Cheong, Chan Wook; Wright, Robert F; Chang, Brian M

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength of the porcelain repair system on alumina and zirconia core ceramics, comparing this strength with that of veneering porcelain. Veneering ceramic (n = 12), alumina core (n = 24), and zirconia core (n = 24) blocks measuring 10 × 5 × 5 mm(3) were fabricated. Veneering ceramic blocks were used as the control. Alumina and zirconia core blocks were divided into 2 groups (n = 12 each), and a slot (2 × 2 × 4 mm(3)) filled with veneering ceramics was prepared into one of the alumina and zirconia core groups (n = 12). Followed by surface treatments of micro-abrasion with 30 μm alumina particles, etching with 35% phosphoric acid and silane primer and bond, composite resin blocks (2 × 2 × 2 mm(3)) were built up and light polymerized onto the treated surfaces by 3 configurations: (a) composite blocks bonded onto veneering ceramic surface alone, (b) composite blocks bonded onto alumina core or zirconia core surfaces, (c) a 50% surface area of the composite blocks bonded to veneering ceramics and the other 50% surface area of the composite blocks to alumina core or zirconia core surfaces. The shear bond strength of the composite to each specimen was tested by a universal testing machine at a 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed. The shear bond strength was analyzed by unpaired t-tests for within the configuration groups and ANOVA for among the different configuration groups. When the mean shear bond strength was compared within groups of the same configuration, there were no statistically significant differences. Comparison of the shear bond strength among groups of different configurations revealed statistically significant differences. The mean shear bond strength of composite onto 100% veneering ceramic surface and composite onto 50% veneering 50% all-ceramic cores was statistically higher than that of composite onto 100% all-ceramic cores; however, the differences of the shear bond strength of composite bonded

  10. Eroded dentin does not jeopardize the bond strength of adhesive restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Janaina Barros; Lenzi, Tathiane Larissa; Tedesco, Tamara Kerber; Guglielmi, Camila de Almeida Brandão; Raggio, Daniela Prócida

    2012-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the bond strength of adhesive restorative materials to sound and eroded dentin. Thirty-six bovine incisors were embedded in acrylic resin and ground to obtain flat buccal dentin surfaces. Specimens were randomly allocated in 2 groups: sound dentin (immersion in artificial saliva) and eroded dentin (pH cycling model - 3× / cola drink for 7 days). Specimens were then reassigned according to restorative material: glass ionomer cement (KetacTM Molar Easy Mix), resin-modified glass ionomer cement (VitremerTM) or adhesive system with resin composite (Adper Single Bond 2 + Filtek Z250). Polyethylene tubes with an internal diameter of 0.76 mm were placed over the dentin and filled with the material. The microshear bond test was performed after 24 h of water storage at 37ºC. The failure mode was evaluated using a stereomicroscope (400×). Bond strength data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc tests (α = 0.05). Eroded dentin showed bond strength values similar to those for sound dentin for all materials. The adhesive system showed the highest bond strength values, regardless of the substrate (p < 0.0001). For all groups, the adhesive/mixed failure prevailed. In conclusion, adhesive materials may be used in eroded dentin without jeopardizing the bonding quality. It is preferable to use an etch-and-rinse adhesive system because it shows the highest bond strength values compared with the glass ionomer cements tested.

  11. Novel fabrication method for zirconia restorations: bonding strength of machinable ceramic to zirconia with resin cements.

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, Soichi; Terui, Yuichi; Higuchi, Daisuke; Goto, Daisuke; Hotta, Yasuhiro; Manabe, Atsufumi; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    A novel method was developed to fabricate all-ceramic restorations which comprised CAD/CAM-fabricated machinable ceramic bonded to CAD/CAM-fabricated zirconia framework using resin cement. The feasibility of this fabrication method was assessed in this study by investigating the bonding strength of a machinable ceramic to zirconia. A machinable ceramic was bonded to a zirconia plate using three kinds of resin cements: ResiCem (RE), Panavia (PA), and Multilink (ML). Conventional porcelain-fused-to-zirconia specimens were also prepared to serve as control. Shear bond strength test (SBT) and Schwickerath crack initiation test (SCT) were carried out. SBT revealed that PA (40.42 MPa) yielded a significantly higher bonding strength than RE (28.01 MPa) and ML (18.89 MPa). SCT revealed that the bonding strengths of test groups using resin cement were significantly higher than those of Control. Notably, the bonding strengths of RE and ML were above 25 MPa even after 10,000 times of thermal cycling -adequately meeting the ISO 9693 standard for metal-ceramic restorations. These results affirmed the feasibility of the novel fabrication method, in that a CAD/CAM-fabricated machinable ceramic is bonded to a CAD/CAM-fabricated zirconia framework using a resin cement.

  12. Effect of silica coating on the bond strength of milled pure titanium to dental porcelain.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jiantao; Ye, Xiuhua; Chang, Shaohai; Liu, Lang; Zhang, Yiping; Lin, Shiyao

    2016-10-01

    The creation of a high bond strength between machined computer-manufactured pure titanium and porcelain remains problematic, and the effects of a silica coating on the bond strength of milled pure titanium bonded to dental porcelain require further investigation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of machined pure titanium, with an intermediate coating of silica, to dental porcelain. In this work, 24 specimens of milled pure titanium were prepared and randomly divided into test and control groups, in which the test group was coated with silica using the sol-gel dipping technique. The metal-ceramic bond strength was evaluated, according to ISO 9693 standards, using the three-point bending test, and scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectroscopy were used to study the microstructure and elemental composition of the specimens. The bonding strength of the silica-coated group was significantly higher than that of the control group, and more residual porcelain on the metal surface could be observed in the silica-coated group. Therefore, the application of a silica intermediate coating produced using the sol-gel method could significantly improve the bond strength between machined pure titanium and porcelain.

  13. Effect of Pedestal Temperature on Bonding Strength and Deformation Characteristics for 5N Copper Wire Bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gurbinder; Haseeb, A. S. M. A.

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, copper has increasingly been used to replace gold to create wire-bonded interconnections in microelectronics. While engineers and researchers in the semiconductor packaging field are continuously working on this transition from gold to copper wires to reduce costs, the challenge remains in producing robust and reliable joints for semiconductor devices. This research paper investigates the effect of pedestal temperature on bonding strength and deformation for 99.999% purity (5N) copper wire bonding on nickel-palladium-gold (NiPdAu) bond pads. With increasing pedestal temperature, significant thinning of the copper ball bond can be achieved, resulting in higher as-bonded ball shear strengths while producing no pad damage. This can be helpful for low-k devices with thin structures, so as to prevent the use of excessive bond force and ultrasonic energy during copper wire bonding.

  14. Tensile bond strength and SEM evaluation of caries-affected dentin using dentin adhesives.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, M; Sano, H; Burrow, M F; Tagami, J; Yoshiyama, M; Ebisu, S; Ciucchi, B; Russell, C M; Pashley, D H

    1995-10-01

    Tensile bond strength measurements are commonly used for the evaluation of dentin adhesive systems. Most tests are performed using extracted non-carious human or bovine dentin. However, the adhesion of resins to caries-affected dentin is still unclear. The objectives of this study were to test the hypothesis that bonding to caries-affected dentin is inferior to bonding to normal dentin, and that the quality of the hybrid layer plays a major role in creating good adhesion. We used a micro-tensile bond strength test to compare test bond strengths made to either caries-affected dentin or normal dentin, using three commercial adhesive systems (All Bond 2, Scotchbond Multi-Purpose, and Clearfil Liner Bond II). For scanning electron microscopy, the polished interfaces between the adhesive bond and dentin were subjected to brief exposure to 10% phosphoric acid solution and 5% sodium hypochlorite, so that the quality of the hybrid layers could be observed. Bonding to normal dentin with either All Bond 2 (26.9 +/- 8.8 MPa) or Clearfil Liner Bond II (29.5 +/- 10.9 MPa) showed tensile bond strengths higher than those to caries-affected dentin (13.0 +/- 3.6 MPa and 14.0 +/- 4.3 MPa, respectively). The tensile bond strengths obtained with Scotchbond Multi-Purpose were similar in normal and caries-affected dentin (20.3 +/- 5.5 MPa and 18.5 +/- 4.0 MPa, respectively). The hybrid layers created by All Bond 2 in normal dentin and by Clearfil Liner Bond II in normal or caries-affected dentin showed phosphoric acid and sodium hypochlorite resistance, whereas the hybrid layers created by All Bond 2 in caries-affected dentin and those created by Scotchbond Multi-Purpose to normal and caries-affected dentin showed partial susceptibility to the acid and sodium hypochlorite treatment. The results indicate that the strength of adhesion to dentin depends upon both the adhesive system used and the type of dentin. Moreover, the quality of the hybrid layer may not always contribute

  15. Effects of different silanes and acid concentrations on bond strength of brackets to porcelain surfaces.

    PubMed

    Trakyali, Göksu; Malkondu, Ozlem; Kazazoğlu, Ender; Arun, Tülin

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the optimum silane-coupling agent and the optimum concentration of acid agent when bonding to porcelain surfaces. Eighty deglazed feldspathic porcelain discs with a diameter of 10 mm and a thickness of 2 mm mounted in acrylic resin blocks were randomly divided into four groups. In groups 1 and 2, the porcelain surfaces were etched with 9.6 per cent hydrofluoric (HF) acid and in groups 3 and 4 with 5 per cent HF acid. In groups 1 and 3, the Dynalock maxillary central incisor brackets were bonded with Pulpdent silane and Unite bonding adhesive and in groups 2 and 4 with Reliance silane and Unite. Shear forces were applied to the samples using an Instron universal test machine. The non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis test was used to determine significant differences in bond strengths between the four groups and Dunn's multiple comparison test to compare subgroups. The mean bond strengths and standard deviations of groups 1 to 4 were 5.51 +/- 1.19, 6.54 +/- 0.002, 4.55 +/- 1.93, and 6.39 +/- 0.45 MPa, respectively. Specimens bonded with Reliance showed a statistically significantly higher in vitro bond strength than those bonded with Pulpdent. The concentration of etching gels did not result in any statistically significant difference on the in vitro bond strength when evaluated separately.

  16. Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets and Disinclusion Buttons: Effect of Water and Saliva Contamination

    PubMed Central

    Sfondrini, Maria Francesca; Fraticelli, Danilo; Gandini, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of water and saliva contamination on the shear bond strength and failure site of orthodontic brackets and lingual buttons. Materials and Methods. 120 bovine permanent mandibular incisors were randomly divided into 6 groups of 20 specimens each. Both orthodontic brackets and disinclusion buttons were tested under three different enamel surface conditions: (a) dry, (b) water contamination, and (c) saliva contamination. Brackets and buttons were bonded to the teeth and subsequently tested using a Instron universal testing machine. Shear bond strength values and adhesive failure rate were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA and Tukey tests (strength values) and Chi squared test (ARI Scores). Results. Noncontaminated enamel surfaces showed the highest bond strengths for both brackets and buttons. Under water and saliva contamination orthodontic brackets groups showed significantly lower shear strengths than disinclusion buttons groups. Significant differences in debond locations were found among the groups under the various enamel surface conditions. Conclusions. Water and saliva contamination of enamel during the bonding procedure lowers bond strength values, more with orthodontic brackets than with disinclusion buttons. PMID:23762825

  17. Evaluation of shear bond strength of composite resin bonded to alloy treated with sandblasting and electrolytic etching.

    PubMed

    Goswami, M M; Gupta, S H; Sandhu, H S

    2014-03-01

    Conservation of natural tooth structure precipitated the emergence of resin-retained fixed partial dentures. The weakest link in this modality is the bond between resin cement and alloy of the retainer. Various alloy surface treatment have been recommended to improve alloy-resin bond. This in vitro study was carried out to observe changes in the Nickel-Chromium alloy (Wiron 99, Bego) surface following sandblasting or electrolytic etching treatment by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and to evaluate the shear bond strength of a resin luting cement bonded to the surface treated alloy. 80 alloy blocks were cast and divided into four groups of 20 each. In groups-A & B, the test surfaces were treated by sandblasting with 50 and 250 μm sized aluminium oxide particles respectively. In groups-C & D, the test surfaces were first treated by sandblasting with 50 and 250 μm sized aluminium oxide particles respectively followed by electrolytic etching. Test surfaces were observed under SEM at 1,000× magnification. Two alloy blocks of each group were luted together by a resin luting cement (Rely X, 3M) and their shear bond strength was tested. The mean shear bond strength in MPa of groups-A to D were 6.44 (±0.74), 8.18 (±0.51), 14.45 (±0.59) and 17.43 (±1.20) respectively. Group-D showed bond strength that is more than clinically acceptable bond strength. It is recommended that before luting resin-retained fixed partial dentures, the fitting surface of the retainer should be electrolytically etched to achieve adequate micromechanical retention.

  18. Effect of layered manufacturing techniques, alloy powders, and layer thickness on metal-ceramic bond strength.

    PubMed

    Ekren, Orhun; Ozkomur, Ahmet; Ucar, Yurdanur

    2017-07-06

    Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) and direct metal laser melting (DMLM) have become popular for fabricating the metal frameworks of metal-ceramic restorations. How the type of layered manufacturing device, layer thickness, and alloy powder may affect the bond strength of ceramic to metal substructure is unclear. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the bond strength of dental porcelain to metal frameworks fabricated using different layered manufacturing techniques (DMLS and DMLM), Co-Cr alloy powders, and layer thicknesses and to evaluate whether a correlation exists between the bond strength and the number of ceramic remnants on the metal surface. A total of 75 bar-shaped metal specimens (n=15) were fabricated using either DMLS or DMLM. The powder alloys used were Keramit NP-S and EOS-Cobalt-Chrome SP-2 with layer thicknesses of 20 μm and 30 μm. After ceramic application, the metal-ceramic bond strength was evaluated with a 3-point-bend test. Three-way ANOVA followed by the Tukey honest significance difference test were used for statistical analysis (α=.05). De-bonding surface microstructure was observed with scanning electron microscopy. Energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis was conducted to evaluate the correlation between ceramic remnants on the metal surface and bond strength values. The mean bond strength value of DMLS was significantly higher than that of DMLM. While no statistically significant difference was found between layer thicknesses, alloy powders closely affected bond strength. Statistical comparisons revealed that the highest bond strength could be achieved with DMLS-Cobalt-Chrome SP2-20μm, and the lowest bond strength was observed in DMLS-Keramit NP-S-20μm (P≤.05). No correlation was found between porcelain remnants on the metal surface and bond strength values. The layered manufacturing device and the alloy powders evaluated in the current study closely affected the bond strength of dental porcelain to a metal framework

  19. Intrinsic bond strength of metal films on polymer substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Donald R.; Osaki, Hiroyuki

    1990-01-01

    A semiquantitative method for the measurement of the intrinsic bond strength between elastic substrates and elastic films that fail by brittle fracture is described. Measurements on a polyethylene terephthalate (PET)-Ni couple were used to verify the essential features of the analysis. It was found that the interfacial shear strength of Ni on PET doubled after ion etching.

  20. Intrinsic bond strength of metal films on polymer substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Donald R.; Osaki, Hiroyuki

    1990-01-01

    A semiquantitative method for the measurement of the intrinsic bond strength between elastic substrates and elastic films that fail by brittle fracture is described. Measurements on a polyethylene terephthalate (PET)-Ni couple were used to verify the essential features of the analysis. It was found that the interfacial shear strength of Ni on PET doubled after ion etching.

  1. Influence of different methods of cleaning custom bases on the shear bond strength of indirectly bonded brackets.

    PubMed

    Kanashiro, Lylian K; Robles-Ruíz, Julissa J; Ciamponi, Ana L; Medeiros, Igor S; Tortamano, André; Paiva, João B

    2014-09-01

    To determine the influence on shear bond strength and bond failure location of four cleaning methods for orthodontic bracket custom bases. In vitro laboratory study. Eighty bovine teeth were divided at random into four groups. The bracket custom bases were cleaned with different methods: group 1 with methyl methacrylate monomer, group 2 with acetone, group 3 with 50 μm aluminium oxide particles and group 4 with detergent. The brackets were indirectly bonded onto the teeth with the Sondhi Rapid-Set self-curing adhesive. The maximum required shear bond strength to debond the brackets was recorded. The bond failure location was evaluated using the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI). One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) analysis (P<0·05) was used to detect significant differences in the bond strength. Kaplan-Meier survival plots and log-rank test were done to compare the survival distribution between the groups. The Kruskal-Wallis test (P<0·05) was used to evaluate the differences in the ARI scores. The mean bond strengths in groups 1, 2, 3 and 4 were 23·7±5·0, 25·3±5·1, 25·6±3·7 and 25·7±4·2 MPa, respectively. There were no significant statistically differences in either the bond strength or the ARI score between the groups. The four custom base-cleaning methods presented the same efficiencies on indirect bond of the brackets; thus, practitioners can choose the method that works best for them. © 2014 British Orthodontic Society.

  2. Shear strength of resin developed by four bonding agents used with cast metal restorations.

    PubMed

    Reilly, B; Davis, E L; Joynt, R B; Quevedo, J

    1992-07-01

    The evolution of the acid etch technique has made possible a more conservative approach to the fabrication of cast metal restorations. The resin bonding technique, however, places a greater burden for success on the selection of a bonding agent. This study examined the shear bond strength durability of cast metal restorations bonded to tooth structure with one of four metal adhesive bonding agents. Results indicated stronger bonds for restorations cemented with Panavia EX bonding agent than with any of the other bonding agents tested, both with and without exposure to thermal stress. Although it was one of the easier materials with which to work, Panavia EX bonding agent requires the additional step of applying an agent to prevent oxygen contact in the setting process.

  3. Reliability tests of ultrasonic and thermosonic wire bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizak, T.; Kociubiński, A.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents analysis of mechanical strength and reliability of wire bonds in context of the applied bonding technique, wire material and substrate type used as well as bonding parameters. The investigation conducted includes a selection of parameters affecting process of effective wire bonds forming by 53XX F&K Delvotec Bonder and implementation of wire bonds with ultrasonic and thermosonic techniques, using various substrates combined with gold and aluminum 25 μm diameter wires. Furthermore, reliability and quality test made by bond pull technique have been presented and discussed.

  4. Enamel Wetness Effects on Microshear Bond Strength of Different Bonding Agents (Adhesive Systems): An in vitro Comparative Evaluation Study.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Girish; Mishra, Vinay K

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of enamel wetness on microshear bond strength using different adhesive systems. To evaluate microshear bond strength of three bonding agents on dry enamel; to evaluate microshear bond strength of three bonding agents on wet enamel; and to compare microshear bond strength of three different bonding agents on dry and wet enamel. Sixty extracted noncarious human premolars were selected for this study. Flat enamel surfaces of approximately 3 mm were obtained by grinding the buccal surfaces of premolars with water-cooled diamond disks. This study evaluated one etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Single Bond 2) and two self-etching adhesive systems (Clearfil SE Bond and Xeno-V). The specimens were divided into two groups (n = 30). Group I (dry) was air-dried for 30 seconds and in group II (wet) surfaces were blotted with absorbent paper to remove excess water. These groups were further divided into six subgroups (n = 10) according to the adhesives used. The resin composite, Filtek Z 250, was bonded to flat enamel surfaces that had been treated with one of the adhesives, following the manufacturer's instructions. After being stored in water at 37°C for 24 hours, bonded specimens were stressed in universal testing machine (Fig. 3) at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The data were evaluated with one-way and two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), t-test, and Tukey's Multiple Post hoc tests (a = 0.05). The two-way ANOVA and Tukey's Multiple Post hoc tests showed significant differences among adhesive systems, but wetness did not influence microshear bond strength (p = 0.1762). The one-way ANOVA and t-test showed that the all-in-one adhesive (Xeno-V) was the only material influenced by the presence of water on the enamel surface. Xeno-V showed significantly higher microshear bond strength when the enamel was kept wet. Single Bond 2 adhesive showed significantly higher microshear bond strength as compared with Xeno-V adhesive but no

  5. Evaluation of the bond strength between aged composite cores and luting agent

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate effect of different surface treatment methods on the bond strength between aged composite-resin core and luting agent. MATERIALS AND METHODS Seventy-five resin composites and also seventy-five zirconia ceramic discs were prepared. 60 composite samples were exposed to thermal aging (10,000 cycles, 5 to 55℃) and different surface treatment. All specimens were separated into 5 groups (n=15): 1) Intact specimens 2) Thermal aging-air polishing 3) Thermal aging- Er:YAG laser irradiation 4) Thermal aging- acid etching 5) Thermal-aging. All specimens were bonded to the zirconia discs with resin cement and fixed to universal testing machine and bond strength testing loaded to failure with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The fractured surface was classified as adhesive failure, cohesive failure and adhesive-cohesive failure. The bond strength data was statistically compared by the Kruskal-Wallis method complemented by the Bonferroni correction Mann-Whitney U test. The probability level for statistical significance was set at α=.05. RESULTS Thermal aging and different surface treatment methods have significant effect on the bond strength between composite-resin cores and luting-agent (P<.05). The mean baseline bond strength values ranged between 7.07 ± 2.11 and 26.05 ± 6.53 N. The highest bond strength of 26.05 ± 6.53 N was obtained with Group 3. Group 5 showed the lowest value of bond strength. CONCLUSION Appropriate surface treatment method should be applied to aged composite resin cores or aged-composites restorations should be replaced for the optimal bond strength and the clinical success. PMID:25932308

  6. Blood contamination effect on shear bond strength of an orthodontic hydrophilic resin

    PubMed Central

    da CUNHA, Taís de Morais Alves; BEHRENS, Bruna Ariela; NASCIMENTO, Denise; RETAMOSO, Luciana Borges; LON, Luís Filipe Siu; TANAKA, Orlando; GUARIZA FILHO, Odilon

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess the impact of blood contamination on shear bond strength (SBS) and bond failure pattern of metallic brackets bonded using a new hydrophilic resin. Material and Methods Eighty human premolars were randomly allocated into 4 groups (n=20) according to the bonding material and contamination pattern. GI: brackets bonded with the Transbond XT conventional system without contamination; GII: brackets bonded with the Transbond XT conventional system with blood contamination; GIII: brackets bonded with the Transbond Self Etching Primer and Transbond Plus Color without contamination; GIV: brackets bonded with the Transbond Self Etching Primer and Transbond Plus Color with blood contamination. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 24 h and then submitted to SBS test at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. After bond failure, the enamel surfaces were observed under an optical microscope at 40x magnification. Results Blood contamination decreased (P<0.05) shear bond strength when both the hydrophobic (GII) and the hydrophilic resin (GIV) were used. However, the bond strength of Transbond Color Change group was significantly higher (P<0.05) than that of the Transbond XT conventional system group under blood contamination condition. Under dry conditions no difference was observed between the hydrophobic and hydrophilic resin groups. Regarding the bond failure pattern, when blood contaminated the enamel, the adhesive remnant index (ARI) showed predominance of scores 0 and 1, which indicates low adhesion to enamel. Conclusions Although there was a significant decrease in the shear bond strength for both adhesive systems under blood contamination, the hydrophilic system showed significantly higher bond strength than the hydrophobic resin adhesive. Therefore, it is advisable to use the hydrophilic resin under risk of blood contamination. PMID:22437684

  7. Shear bond strength of composite bonded with three adhesives to Er,Cr:YSGG laser-prepared enamel.

    PubMed

    Türkmen, Cafer; Sazak-Oveçoğlu, Hesna; Günday, Mahir; Güngör, Gülşad; Durkan, Meral; Oksüz, Mustafa

    2010-06-01

    To assess in vitro the shear bond strength of a nanohybrid composite resin bonded with three adhesive systems to enamel surfaces prepared with acid and Er,Cr:YSGG laser etching. Sixty extracted caries- and restoration-free human maxillary central incisors were used. The teeth were sectioned 2 mm below the cementoenamel junction. The crowns were embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin with the labial surfaces facing up. The labial surfaces were prepared with 0.5-mm reduction to receive composite veneers. Thirty specimens were etched with Er,Cr:YSGG laser. This group was also divided into three subgroups, and the following three bonding systems were then applied on the laser groups and the other three unlased groups: (1) 37% phosphoric acid etch + Bond 1 primer/adhesive (Pentron); (2) Nano-bond self-etch primer (Pentron) + Nano-bond adhesive (Pentron); and (3) all-in-one adhesive-single dose (Futurabond NR, Voco). All of the groups were restored with a nanohybrid composite resin (Smile, Pentron). Shear bond strength was measured with a Zwick universal test device with a knife-edge loading head. The data were analyzed with two-factor ANOVA. There were no significant differences in shear bond strength between self-etch primer + adhesive and all-in-one adhesive systems for nonetched and laser-etched enamel groups (P > .05). However, bond strength values for the laser-etched + Bond 1 primer/adhesive group (48.00 +/- 13.86 MPa) were significantly higher than the 37% phosphoric acid + Bond 1 primer/adhesive group (38.95 +/- 20.07 MPa) (P < .05). The Er,Cr:YSGG laser-powered hydrokinetic system etched the enamel surface more effectively than 37% phosphoric acid for subsequent attachment of composite material.

  8. [The influence of different opaque thickness on the bond strength of porcelain-fused-to metal restoration].

    PubMed

    Xu, Kan; He, Fan; Geng, Yi

    2009-12-01

    To study the influence of different opaque thickness on the bond strength of porcelain-fused-to metal (PFM) restorations. The testing sheets were made as the samples of ISO9693. With different sintering temperature and different opaque thickness on the bond strength of PFM restorations, the primary pressure of porcelain crack was measured by using three-points-bending test. Statistical analysis was carried out using a SPSS 10.0 software package. A post hoc multiple comparison test (Student-Newman-Keuls) was performed to evaluate the differences between the individual groups. In low sintering temperature group, the thin layer of opaque significantly improved the bond strength compared with thick layer of opaque (P<0.05). In high sintering temperature group, the thickness of opaque has no significant influence on the PFM bonding strength. Using the opaque, the bonding strength was better than those without opaque. The thickness of opaque has a little influence on the PFM bonding strength.

  9. Evaluation of various concentrations of alkaline surface treatment on interfacial bond strengths of amalgam bonded to amalgam.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Asaad Javaid; Ahmad, Asif; Mohammad, Taqi; Khan, Zahid Akhter

    2013-09-01

    This study was done to assess the influence of alkaline surface modification on interfacial bond strength of existing fractured (old) amalgam restoration bonded to fresh amalgam. Old and Fresh amalgam interfaced samples were prepared by applying a 4-methacryloyloxyethy trimellitate anhydride (4-META) containing adhesive. The adhesive used was Amalgabond (Parkell, Farmingdale, NY 11735, USA). Four concentrations of calcium hydroxide Ca(OH)2 solutions were used as a surface modifiers for old amalgam to increase the pH of the amalgam surfaces. The concentrations used were 2.5, 5, 10 and 15%. Direct measurement of the interfacial bond strength was carried out using an electromechanical universal tensile testing machine at crosshead speed of 10mm per minute. Results show that all the calcium hydroxide modified samples produced the increased tensile bond strength (TBS) as compared to their control group. The highest values of bond strength were achieved using 15% Ca(OH)2 solution as surface modifier. Pretreatment of fractured amalgam with calcium hydroxide improves the bond strength of 4-META adhesives. Its use in repair of amalgam may therefore be considered.

  10. Effect of hyperbaric oxygen profiles on the bond strength of repaired composite resin

    PubMed Central

    Mossa, Hossam; ElKhatat, Essam; Hassan, Ahmed M.; Baroudi, Kusai; Beshr, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study was performed to evaluate the bond strength of repaired three types of composite resins under various hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) profiles with various session numbers. Materials and Methods: Sixty specimens of three types of composite resin (nanofilled composite, nanohybrid composite and microfilled composite) each type of composite was divided into four group according to various profiles of HBO treatment (control, 2bar, 3 bar and 5 bar). Then, the specimens were repaired; thermocycled, the tensile bond strength were measured. Then the data were analyzed by One-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc test (α = 0.05). Results: The highest bond strength was obtained for the repaired nanofilled composite resin specimens while; the lowest bond strength was obtained for the repaired microfilled composite resin specimens. The highest tensile bond strength was recorded for the specimens who treated with the highest pressure of HBO. Conclusion: The bond strength of repaired nanofilled composite resins is better than the other types of composite resin. The highest pressure of HBO, the highest bond strength of repaired composite resins. PMID:27195232

  11. Effect of hyperbaric oxygen profiles on the bond strength of repaired composite resin.

    PubMed

    Mossa, Hossam; ElKhatat, Essam; Hassan, Ahmed M; Baroudi, Kusai; Beshr, Khaled

    2016-04-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the bond strength of repaired three types of composite resins under various hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) profiles with various session numbers. Sixty specimens of three types of composite resin (nanofilled composite, nanohybrid composite and microfilled composite) each type of composite was divided into four group according to various profiles of HBO treatment (control, 2bar, 3 bar and 5 bar). Then, the specimens were repaired; thermocycled, the tensile bond strength were measured. Then the data were analyzed by One-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc test (α = 0.05). The highest bond strength was obtained for the repaired nanofilled composite resin specimens while; the lowest bond strength was obtained for the repaired microfilled composite resin specimens. The highest tensile bond strength was recorded for the specimens who treated with the highest pressure of HBO. The bond strength of repaired nanofilled composite resins is better than the other types of composite resin. The highest pressure of HBO, the highest bond strength of repaired composite resins.

  12. Effects of dentin surface treatments on shear bond strength of glass-ionomer cements

    PubMed Central

    Poggio, Claudio; Beltrami, Riccardo; Scribante, Andrea; Colombo, Marco; Lombardini, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Summary Aim The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength of a conventional glass-ionomer cement (GIC) and a resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC) to dentin. Materials and methods 80 bovine permanent incisors were used. 40 cylindrical specimens of a GIC (Fuji IX GP Extra) and 40 cylindrical specimens of a RMGIC (Fuji II LC) were attached to the dentin. The teeth were then randomly assigned to 8 groups of equal size (n=10), 4 for every type of glass-ionomer cement, corresponding to type of dentin surface treatments. Group 1: GC Cavity Conditioner; Group 2: 37% phosphoric acid gel; Group 3: Clearfil SE Bond; Group 4: no dentin conditioning (control). The specimens were placed in a universal testing machine (Model 3343, Instron Corp., Canton, Mass., USA) and subsequently tested for shear bond strength (MPa). Results ANOVA showed the presence of significant differences among the various groups. Post hoc Tukey test showed different values of shear bond strength for Fuji IX GP Extra and for Fuji II LC. The different conditioners variably influence the adhesion of the glass-ionomer cements tested. Conclusions. RMGIC shear bond to dentin was higher than GIC. The use of a Self-etch adhesive system improved the shear bond strength values of RMGIC and lowered the shear bond strength values of GIC significantly. PMID:24753797

  13. Effect of bioglass and silica coating of zirconia substrate on its bond strength to resin cement.

    PubMed

    Moezzizadeh, Maryam; Nojedehian, Hanieh; Valizadeh Haghi, Haleh

    2017-01-31

    This study aimed to assess the effect of bioglass and silica coating of zirconia substrate on its bond strength to resin cement. A total of 120 specimens were used in this in-vitro, experimental study. Zirconia discs measuring 10×7×2 mm were cut from Y-TZP zirconia blocks, sintered, cleaned and received different surface treatments of sandblasting, bioglass powder coating+etching, bioglass powder coating+etching+silanization, bioglass slurry coating+etching, bioglass slurry coating+etching+silanization, silica coating+silanization, silica coating+etching+silanization and no treatment group (control). Then the microshear bond strength testing and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis were done. Data were analyzed using the Mann Whitney U and the Kruskal Wallis tests. Significant differences existed in bond strength of different groups (p<0.001). The sandblasted and bioglass coated groups showed higher and the colloidal silica-coated groups showed lower bond strength compared to the control group.

  14. Immediate vs delayed repair bond strength of a nanohybrid resin composite.

    PubMed

    El-Askary, Farid S; El-Banna, Ahmed H; van Noort, Richard

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate both the immediate and water-stored repair tensile bond strength (TBS) of a nanohybrid resin composite using different bonding protocols. One hundred sixty half hourglass-shaped slabs were prepared. Eighty half-slabs were wet ground immediately after light curing using high-speed abrasive burs, while the other half-slabs were stored in water for one month (delayed) and then wet ground for repair. Each set of the 80 repaired slabs was split into two groups to be tested for TBS after 24 h or 1 month of water storage. For all repaired slabs, either immediate or delayed, four bonding procedures were used involving wet and dry bonding with a 3-step etch-and-rinse adhesive with or without silane pretreatment. TBS tests were performed at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. To determine the cohesive strength of the resin composite itself, which served as the reference, additional whole slabs were prepared and tested in tension after a 24-h (n = 10) and a 1-month storage period (n = 10). Failure modes were evaluated using a stereomicroscope at 40X magnification. Three-way ANOVA was run to test the effect of water storage, testing time, bonding protocols, and their interactions on the repair TBS, which was given as a percentage of the reference values. For the immediate repair groups, the repair TBS ranged from 40% to 61.9% after 24-h storage and from 26% to 53.1% after 1-month water storage compared to the TBS of the whole slabs. For the delayed repair group, the repaired TBS ranged from 47.2% to 63.6% for the 24-h repairs and from 32.2% to 44.2% for the test groups stored in water for 1 month. Three-way ANOVA revealed that water storage had no significant effect on the repair TBS (p = 0.619). Both testing time and bonding protocols had a significant effect on the repair TBS (p = 0.001). The interactions between the independent variables (water storage, testing time, and bonding protocols) had no significant effect (p = 0.067). The repair bond strength was

  15. Bond strength of adhesive systems with different solvents to dry and wet dentin.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Melissa Aline; Rangel, Patrícia Maria; Barcellos, Daphne Câmara; Pagani, Clovis; Rocha Gomes Torres, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluates bond strength between dentin and composite using adhesives with different solvents to dry and wet dentin. Ninety bovine incisors were used; the vestibular surfaces were worn by the exposure of an area with a diameter of 4 mm of dentin. The specimens were divided into 6 groups, according to the type of adhesive used and hydratation stals: Group SB-wet: Single Bond 2 in wet dentin, Group SBdry: Single Bond 2 in dry dentin, Group SL-wet: Solobond M in wet dentin, Group SL-dry: Solobond M in dentin dry. Group XPwet: XP Bond in wet dentin, Group XP-dry: XP Bond in dentin dry. They were cut to obtain specimens in the shape of stick with 1 × 1 mm and subjected to microtensile test in universal testing machine with a cross speed of 1mm/min. The data were analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey's tests (5%). ANOVA showed significant differences for surface treatment and interaction, but no difference was found for adhesive factor. The Tukey's test showed that the samples with wet dentin shown higher values of bond strength. The adhesive did not influence in the bond strength. The groups with wet dentin showed higher values of bond strength than groups with dry dentin.

  16. Shear Bond Strength of Four Different Repair Materials Applied to Bis-acryl Resin Provisional Materials Measured 10 Minutes, One Hour, and Two Days After Bonding.

    PubMed

    Shim, Js; Park, Yj; Manaloto, Acf; Shin, Sw; Lee, Jy; Choi, Yj; Ryu, Jj

    2013-12-19

    SUMMARY This study investigated the shear bond strength of repaired provisional restoration materials 1) to compare the bond strengths between bis-acryl resin and four different materials and 2) to investigate the effect of the amount of time elapsed after bonding on the bond strength. The self-cured bis-acryl resin (Luxatemp) was used as the base material, and four different types of resins (Luxatemp, Protemp, Z350 flowable, and Z350) were used as the repair materials. Specimens were divided into three groups depending on the point of time of shear bond strength measurement: 10 minutes, one hour, and 48 hours. Shear bond strengths were measured with a universal testing machine, and the fracture surface was examined with a video measuring system. Two-way analysis of variance revealed that the repair materials (p<0.001) and the amount of time elapsed after bonding (p<0.001) significantly affected the repair strength. All of the repaired materials showed increasing bond strength with longer storage time. The highest bond strength and cohesive failure were observed for bonding between Luxatemp base and Luxatemp at 48 hours after bonding.

  17. Shear bond strength of four different repair materials applied to bis-acryl resin provisional materials measured 10 minutes, one hour, and two days after bonding.

    PubMed

    Shim, Js; Park, Yj; Manaloto, Acf; Shin, Sw; Lee, Jy; Choi, Yj; Ryu, Jj

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the shear bond strength of repaired provisional restoration materials 1) to compare the bond strengths between bis-acryl resin and four different materials and 2) to investigate the effect of the amount of time elapsed after bonding on the bond strength. The self-cured bis-acryl resin (Luxatemp) was used as the base material, and four different types of resins (Luxatemp, Protemp, Z350 flowable, and Z350) were used as the repair materials. Specimens were divided into three groups depending on the point of time of shear bond strength measurement: 10 minutes, one hour, and 48 hours. Shear bond strengths were measured with a universal testing machine, and the fracture surface was examined with a video measuring system. Two-way analysis of variance revealed that the repair materials (p<0.001) and the amount of time elapsed after bonding (p<0.001) significantly affected the repair strength. All of the repaired materials showed increasing bond strength with longer storage time. The highest bond strength and cohesive failure were observed for bonding between Luxatemp base and Luxatemp at 48 hours after bonding.

  18. In vitro evaluation of the bond strength of composite resin foundation materials to dentin.

    PubMed

    Al-Ansari, Asim; Al-Harbi, Fahad; Baba, Nadim Z

    2015-10-01

    Achieving adequate bonding of composite resin foundation materials to dentin can be a challenge. Bonding can be affected by the type of bonding material and method used. The purpose of this in vitro study was to test the bond strengths of selected dual-polymerizing composite resin foundation materials to dentin using light, chemical, or dual-polymerized adhesive systems. Eighty freshly extracted human third molars were sectioned vertically into mesial and distal halves and embedded in acrylic resin using a copper cylinder. Specimens were divided into 16 groups. Each group received a resin foundation that was bonded to dentin according to each manufacturer's instructions. All tested foundations were dual polymerized except Tetric Ceram, which was light polymerized. BisCore, Build-it, CompCore, CoreRestore, and FluoroCore resin foundation materials were bonded to dentin with the use of the corresponding adhesives in 3 different bonding methods: adhesive was light polymerized; adhesive was chemically polymerized; and adhesive was dual polymerized. Each specimen was seated in a custom shear test device, and a load was applied with the descending rod of the jig from a mechanical testing machine with a perpendicular force to the dentin-adhesive interface. Statistical analysis was performed using 2-way ANOVA and post hoc pairwise comparison with Tukey test when statistically significant differences were found (α=.05). Resin foundation materials bonded to dentin with light-polymerized adhesives produced significantly higher bond strengths than when bonded with chemically or dual-polymerized adhesives. No significant difference was found between the single-component and multiple-components adhesives used with Tetric Ceram and BisCore foundations (P=.083). However, BisCore used with All-Bond 2 adhesive (multiple components) produced significantly lower bond strengths than when used with One-Step (P=.024). Adhesive failure was the most common failure location. Cohesive

  19. The effect of washing water temperature on resin-dentin micro-shear bond strength

    PubMed Central

    Malekipour, Mohammad Reza; Shirani, Farzaneh; Ebrahimi, Mehrnoush

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of washing water temperature on the micro-shear bond strength (μSBS) of composite resin to dentin using a two-step etch-and-rinse system and a two-step self-etching system. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, the intact dentins of buccal and lingual surfaces of healthy third molars were exposed. Dentin surfaces were rinsed with different temperatures of distilled water (20 s) before applying Single Bond (SB) or Clearfil SE Bond(SE). After applying the adhesive, composite cylinders (0.8 mm diameter and 1 mm length) were bonded to the teeth surfaces. After storing the specimens in 37°C distilled water for 48 h and thermocycling, μSBS test was done. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance, post hoc Tukey tests, paired samples t-test, and Fisher exact test (α = 0.05). Results: Temperature and interaction of temperature and type of bonding agent affected the bond strength. The bond strength of SB groups was significantly higher at 50°C washing than 5°C (P = 0.003) and 22°C (P = 0.019), but no significant difference was observed between SE groups. The bond strength of SE was significantly higher at 22°C than that of SB (P = 0.031), whereas the bond strength of SB was significantly higher at 50°C than that of SE (P = 0.007). Conclusion: The use of high-temperature washing water is an appropriate method to enhance bond strength in etch-and-rinse systems. PMID:27076833

  20. Fatigue strength of a single lap joint SPR-bonded

    SciTech Connect

    Di Franco, G.; Fratini, L.; Pasta, A.

    2011-05-04

    In the last years, hybrid joints, meaning with this the joints which consist in combining a traditional mechanical joint to a layer of adhesive, are gradually attracting the attention of various sectors of the construction of vehicles and transportation industries, for their better performance compared to just mechanical joints (self-piercing riveting SPR, riveting, and so on) or just to bonded joints.The paper investigates the fatigue behavior of a single lap joint self-piercing riveted (SPR) and bonded throughout fatigue tests. The considered geometric configuration allowed the use of two rivets placed longitudinally; an epoxy resin was used as adhesive. In the first part of the work static characterization of the joints was carried out through tensile tests. Then fatigue tests were made with the application of different levels of load. The fatigue curves were also obtained at the varying the distance between the two rivets in order to better assess the joint strength for a given length of overlap.

  1. Innovative use of adhesive interface characteristics to nondestructively quantify the strength of bonded joints.

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, Dennis Patrick; Duvall, Randy L.; Rackow, Kirk A.

    2010-05-01

    Advances in structural adhesives have permitted engineers to contemplate the use of bonded joints in areas that have long been dominated by mechanical fasteners and welds. Although strength, modulus, and toughness have been improved in modern adhesives, the typical concerns with using these polymers still exist. These include concerns over long-term durability and an inability to quantify bond strength (i.e., identify weak bonds) in adhesive joints. Bond deterioration in aging structures and bond strength in original construction are now critical issues that require more than simple flaw detection. Whether the structure involves metallic or composite materials, it is necessary to extend inspections beyond the detection of disbond flaws to include an assessment of the strength of the bond. Use of advanced nondestructive inspection (NDI) methods to measure the mechanical properties of a bonded joint and associated correlations with post-inspection failure tests have provided some clues regarding the key parameters involved in assessing bond strength. Recent advances in ultrasonic- and thermographic-based inspection methods have shown promise for measuring such properties. Specialized noise reduction and signal enhancement schemes have allowed thermographic interrogations to image the subtle differences between bond lines of various strengths. Similarly, specialized ultrasonic (UT) inspection techniques, including laser UT, guided waves, UT spectroscopy, and resonance methods, can be coupled with unique signal analysis algorithms to accurately characterize the properties of weak interfacial bonds. The generation of sufficient energy input levels to derive bond strength variations, the production of sufficient technique sensitivity to measure such minor response variations, and the difficulty in manufacturing repeatable weak bond specimens are all issues that exacerbate these investigations. The key to evaluating the bond strength lies in the ability to exploit the

  2. Tensile Bond Strength of Self Adhesive Resin Cement After Various Surface Treatment of Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Sekhri, Sahil; Garg, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In self adhesive resin cements adhesion is achieved to dental surface without surface pre-treatment, and requires only single step application. This makes the luting procedure less technique-sensitive and decreases postoperative sensitivity. Aim The purpose of this study was to evaluate bond strength of self adhesive resin after surface treatment of enamel for bonding base metal alloy. Materials and Methods On the labial surface of 64 central incisor rectangular base metal block of dimension 6 mm length, 5mm width and 1 mm height was cemented with RelyX U200 and Maxcem Elite self adhesive cements with and without surface treatment of enamel. Surface treatment of enamel was application of etchant, one step bonding agent and both. Tensile bond strength of specimen was measured with universal testing machine at a cross head speed of 1mm/min. Results Least tensile bond strength (MPa) was in control group i.e. 1.33 (0.32) & 1.59 (0.299), Highest bond strength observed when enamel treated with both etchant and bonding agent i.e. 2.72 (0.43) & 2.97 (0.19) for Relyx U200 and Elite cement. When alone etchant and bonding agent were applied alone bond strength is 2.19 (0.18) & 2.24 (0.47) for Relyx U200, and 2.38 (0.27) 2.49 (0.16) for Max-cem elite. Mean bond strength was higher in case of Max-cem Elite as compared to RelyX U200 resin cement, although differences were non–significant (p > 0.05). Conclusion Surface treatment of enamel increases the bond strength of self adhesive resin cement. PMID:26894165

  3. Influence of crosshead speed on micro-tensile bond strength of two-step adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kanako; Miyazaki, Masashi; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Tsubota, Keishi; Rikuta, Akitomo

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of crosshead speed on the micro-tensile bond strength of two separate adhesive systems to dentin. The systems used were the Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray Medical) and the Single Bond (3M ESPE) combined with a resin composite Clearfil AP-X (Kuraray Medical). Dentin surfaces of bovine madibular incisors were primed with self-etching primer followed by air blowing for Clearfil SE Bond, or etched with phosphoric acid followed by rinsing with distilled water for Single Bond, and adhesive was applied. The resin composite was then built up in three layers and light activated. After 24 h storage in water, specimens were sectioned and trimmed to a cross-sectional area of 1 mm(2) and subjected to a micro-tensile bond-strength test. Ten samples per test group were tested at crosshead speeds of 0.5, 1.0, 5.0 and 10.0 mm/min. Micro-tensile bond-strength values (in MPa) were calculated from the peak load at failure divided by the specimen surface area. Two-way ANOVA was performed at the 0.05 probability level. The mean dentin bond strength at different crosshead speeds ranged from 34.6 to 37.1MPa for Clearfil SE Bond and from 44.3 to 50.4 MPa for Single Bond. There was no significant difference among the same adhesive systems with the different crosshead speeds tested. The influence of the crosshead speed might be negligible when measuring micro-tensile bond strengths.

  4. Bond strength of resin composite to differently conditioned amalgam.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, M; Vallittu, P K; Huysmans, M-C; Kalk, W; Vahlberg, T

    2006-01-01

    Bulk fracture of teeth, where a part of the amalgam restoration and/or the cusp is fractured, is a common clinical problem. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surface conditioning methods on the shear bond strength of a hybrid resin composite to fresh amalgam. Amalgams (N=84) were condensed into acrylic and randomly assigned to one of the following treatments (N=6): (1) Alloy primer + opaquer, (2) Air-particle abrasion (50 micro m Al(2)O(3)) + alloy primer + opaquer, (3) Silica coating (30 micro m SiO(x)) + silanization + opaquer, (4) Opaquer + pre-impregnated continuous bidirectional E-glass fibre sheets, (5) Silica coating + silanization + fibre sheets, (6) Silica coating + silanization + opaquer + fibre sheet application. Non-conditioned amalgam surfaces were considered as control group (7). The mean surface roughness depth (R(Z)) was measured from the control group and air-abraded amalgam surfaces. The resin composite was bonded to the conditioned amalgam specimens using polyethylene molds. All specimens were tested under dry and thermocycled (6.000, 5-55 degrees C, 30 s) conditions. The shear bond strength of resin composite to amalgam substrates was measured in a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). Surface roughness values for the non-conditioned control group (R(Z) approximately 0.14 micro m) and for air-particle abraded surfaces with either Al(2)O(3) or SiO(x) (R(Z) approximately 0.19 micro m and R(Z) approximately 0.16 micro m, respectively) did not show significant differences (p=0.23) (One-way ANOVA). In dry conditions, silica coating and silanization followed by fibre sheet application exhibited significantly higher results (14.8+/-5.6 MPa) than those of the groups conditioned with alloy primer (2.2+/-0.7 MPa) (p<0.001), air-particle abrasion+alloy primer (4.4+/-2.0 MPa, p<0.001), silica coating+silanization alone (6.2+/-0.8 MPa, p=0.009) or non-conditioned group (1.4+/-0.6, p<0.001). Silica coating and silanization followed

  5. Effect of Chlorhexidine on Dentin Bond Strength of Two Adhesive Systems after Storage in Different Media.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Enio Marcos; Glir, Daniel Hatschbach; Gill, Allana Walesca Martins Castanho; Giovanini, Allan Fernando; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) application during the bonding protocol on microshear bond strength of two adhesive systems, after storage in different media. Seventy-two human molars had their crowns cut in half and embedded in PVC cylinders with acrylic resin. The specimens were randomly divided into experimental groups (n=12) according to the adhesive system (Ambar and Single Bond 2), use of CHX in the bonding protocol, and time interval (24 h and 15 days) in the storage media (distilled water, mineral oil and 1% sodium hypochlorite - NaOCl). Adhesive systems were applied in accordance to manufacturers' recommendations, with or without the use of CHX, and resin composite (Z350 XT) cylinders were placed on the hybridized dentin. After photoactivation, the specimens were stored in distilled water, mineral oil and 1% NaOCl for 24 h and 15 days. Microshear bond strength was determined at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until fracture. The bond strength data were analyzed statistically by 4-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=5%). Use of CHX in the bonding protocol did not cause loss of bond strength in any of the evaluated situations, irrespective of time and storage medium. The storage medium had no influence on bond strength values after 15 days when the bond protocol without CHX application was used. However, the use of CHX in the protocol influenced negatively the bond strength values for Single Bond 2 after 15 days storage in distilled water and 1% NaOCl.

  6. Shear bond strength of resin composite bonded with two adhesives: Influence of Er: YAG laser irradiation distance

    PubMed Central

    Shirani, Farzaneh; Birang, Reza; Malekipour, Mohammad Reza; Hourmehr, Zahra; Kazemi, Shantia

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dental surfaces prepared with different Er:YAG laser distance may have different characteristics compared with those prepared with conventional instruments. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Er:YAG laser irradiation distance from enamel and dentin surfaces on the shear bond strength of composite with self-etch and etch and rinse bonding systems compared with conventional preparation method. Materials and Methods: Two hundred caries-free human third molars were randomly divided into twenty groups (n = 10). Ten groups were designated for enamel surface (E1-E10) and ten for dentin surface (D1-D10). Er: YAG laser (2940 nm) was used on the E1-E8 (240 mJ, 25 Hz) and D1-D8 (140 mJ, 30 Hz) groups at four different distances of 0.5 (standard), 2, 4 and 11 mm. Control groups (E9, E10, D9 and D10) were ground with medium grit diamond bur. The enamel and dentin specimens were divided into two subgroups that were bonded with either Single Bond or Clearfil SE Bond. Resin composite (Z100) was dispensed on prepared dentin and enamel. The shear bond strengths were tested using a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed by SPSS12 statistical software using three way analysis of variance, Tukey and independent t-test. P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: There was a significant difference between enamel and dentin substrates (P < 0.001) and between lased and un-lased groups; the un-lased group had significantly higher bond strength (P < 0.001). Shear bond strength increased significantly with an increase in the laser irradiation distance (P < 0.05) on enamel surfaces (in both bonding agent subgroups) and on dentin surfaces (in the Single Bond subgroup). Conclusion: Laser irradiation decreases shear bond strength. Irradiation distance affects shear bond strength and increasing the distance would decrease the negative effects of laser irradiation. PMID:25540665

  7. The Effect of Different Disinfecting Agents on Bond Strength of Resin Composites

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed Hassan, Ahmed; Ali Goda, Ahmed; Baroudi, Kusai

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different disinfectant agents on bond strength of two types of resin composite materials. Methods. A total of 80 sound posterior teeth were used. They were divided into four groups (n = 20) according to the dentin surface pretreatment (no treatment, chlorhexidine gluconate 2%, sodium hypochlorite 4%, and EDTA 19%). Each group was divided into two subgroups according to the type of adhesive (prime and bond 2.1 and Adper easy one). Each subgroup was further divided into two subgroups according to the type of resin composite (TPH spectrum and Tetric EvoCeram). Shear bond strength between dentin and resin composite was measured using Universal Testing Machine. Data collected were statistically analyzed by t-test and one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc test. Results. It was found that dentin treated with EDTA recorded the highest shear bond strength values followed by sodium hypochlorite and then chlorhexidine groups while the control group showed the lowest shear bond strength. Conclusions. The surface treatment of dentin before bonding application has a great effect on shear bond strength between resin composite and dentin surface. PMID:25477961

  8. Evaluation of bond strength of various margin ceramics to a zirconia ceramic.

    PubMed

    Cömlekoğlu, M Erhan; Dündar, Mine; Ozcan, Mutlu; Güngör, M Ali; Gökçe, Bülent; Artunç, Celal

    2008-10-01

    This study evaluated the bond strengths of four different margin ceramics based on fluoroapatite and feldspath to a zirconia ceramic. Zirconia cores (Zirconzahn) (N=28, n=7/margin ceramic group) were fabricated according to the manufacturers' instructions (diameter: 4mm; thickness: 2mm) and ultrasonically cleaned. Four different margin ceramics (thickness: 5mm) (Cerabien Zr, Noritake; Ceramco PFZ, Ceramco; e.max, Ivoclar Vivadent and Triceram, Dentaurum) were vibrated and condensed in a stainless steel mould and fired onto their zirconia cores. After trying the specimens in the mould for minor adjustments, they were again ultrasonically cleaned and embedded in PMMA. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 1 week and shear bond strength (MPa+/-S.D.) tests were performed in a universal testing machine (crosshead speed: 0.5mm/min). Failure modes were recorded under SEM. Significant effect of margin ceramic types were found on the bond strength values (P<0.05). The mean bond strength values of Ceramco margin ceramic to zirconia was significantly lower (25.4+/-4.5 MPa) (P<0.05) than those of Cerabien (31.6+/-6.4 MPa), e.max (35.9+/-8.4 MPa), and Triceram margin ceramic (38.8+/-7.1 MPa) systems. Margin ceramics, compatible with zirconia framework material tested in the present study, exhibited high bond strength values. Variations in thermal expansion coefficients might influence their bond strength values.

  9. Bond strength of a light-cured and two auto-cured glass ionomer liners.

    PubMed

    Holtan, J R; Nystrom, G P; Olin, P S; Rudney, J; Douglas, W H

    1990-10-01

    Ninety-nine extracted human molar teeth were used in this study comparing the shear bond strengths on dentine of one light-cured and two auto-cured polyalkenoate (glass ionomer) cements. Bond strength can be influenced by differences in tooth structure. A balanced-incomplete block design (Hull and Nie, 1981) was used to reduce variation attributable to such differences. Cements were applied to paired dentine surfaces in combinations such that 66 tooth sides were treated with each material. A light-cured dentinal adhesive and composite resin restorative material were then placed and shear bond strength testing was conducted exactly 24 h after the completion of each specimen. Mean forces (MPa) for the three materials were compared using an appropriate analysis of variance model (balanced-incomplete-blocks) The shear bond strengths (MPa) of the light-cured liner (Espe, Seefeld/Oberbay, FRG) was 4.71 +/- 1.16. Vitrabond showed the greatest variance of all three materials tested, however this material's average bond strength was greater than the maximum achieved for the other materials. Student-Newman-Keuls comparison of means showed that all cements differed significantly from each other (alpha = 0.05). It is concluded that the light-cured glass ionomer liner exhibited significantly better shear bond strength performance than the two auto-cured glass ionomers tested.

  10. Microtensile and Microshear Bond Strength of an Antibacterial Self-Etching System to Primary Tooth Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Sibel; Tosun, Gül; Koyutürk, Alp Erdin; Şener, Yaḡmur; Şengün, Abdulkadir; Özer, Füsun; Imazato, Satoshi

    2008-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the bonding ability of antibacterial bonding system to primary dentin was not different from the parental material which did not contain any antibacterial component. Methods Extracted human non-carious primary molars were ground to expose the coronal dentin, and then randomly divided into two experimental groups: treatment with Clearfil Protect Bond or with Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray Medical Inc.). Composite-dentin sticks with a cross-sectional area of approximately 0.90 mm2 were prepared and subsequently subjected to microtensile bond strength (μTBS) and microshear bond strength (μSBS) tests. For the μTBS tests, specimens were attached to an Instron testing machine with a cyanoacrylate adhesive. For μSBS testing, the sticks were mechanically fixed to the μSBS testing apparatus. The bonds were stressed in shear or tension at a crosshead speed of 1mm/min until failure occurred. Resin-dentin interfaces produced by each system were examined using SEM. The data were analyzed with Mann-Whitney’s U test. Results The μTBS and μSBS of Clearfil Protect Bond were 30.69±9.71 and 9.94±3.78 MPa, respectively. Clearfil SE Bond showed significantly greater values of 37.31±9.57 and 12.83±3.15 MPa, respectively. SEM analysis demonstrated similar micro-morphological features including the thickness of the hybrid layer for both materials. Conclusions It was showed that antibacterial self-etching system Clearfil Protect Bond showed lower bond strength values compared to primary dentin than that of to Clearfil SE Bond on primary dentin. (Eur J Dent 2008;2:11–17) PMID:19212503

  11. Physicochemical Properties and Dentin Bond Strength of a Tricalcium Silicate-Based Retrograde Material.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Camila de Paula Telles Pires; Viapiana, Raqueli; Bosso-Martelo, Roberta; Guerreiro-Tanomaru, Juliane Maria; Camilleri, Josette; Tanomaru-Filho, Mário

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the physicochemical properties and the apical dentin bond strength of the tricalcium silicate-based Biodentine in comparison to white MTA and zinc oxide eugenol-based cement (ZOE). Setting time and radiopacity were evaluated according to ISO 6876:2012 specification. Final setting time, compressive strength and pH were also assessed. Material's bond strength to the apical root canal dentin was measured by the push-out assay. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey-Krammer post-hoc test. Biodentine presented the shortest initial (16.2±1.48 min) and final setting time (35.4±5.55 min). Radiopacity of Biodentine (2.79±0.27 mmAl) does not agree with ISO 6876:2012 specifications. On the other hand, Biodentine showed higher compressive strength after 21 days (37.22±5.27 MPa) and higher dentin bond strength (11.2±2.16 MPa) in comparison to white MTA (27.68±3.56 MPa for compressive strength and 2.98±0.64 MPa for bond strength) (p<0.05). Both MTA and Biodentine produced an alkaline environment (approximately pH 10) (p>0.05) compared to ZOE (pH 7). It may be concluded that Biodentine exhibited faster setting, higher long-term compressive strength and bond strength to the apical dentin than MTA and ZOE.

  12. Role of enamel deminerlization and remineralization on microtensile bond strength of resin composite

    PubMed Central

    Rizvi, Abbas; Zafar, Muhammad S.; Al-Wasifi, Yasser; Fareed, Wamiq; Khurshid, Zohaib

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study is aimed to establish the microtensile bond strength of enamel following exposure to an aerated drink at various time intervals with/without application of remineralization agent. In addition, degree of remineralization and demineralization of tooth enamel has been assessed using polarized light microscopy. Materials and Methods: Seventy extracted human incisors split into two halves were immersed in aerated beverage (cola drink) for 5 min and stored in saliva until the time of microtensile bond testing. Prepared specimens were divided randomly into two study groups; remineralizing group (n = 70): specimens were treated for remineralization using casein phosphopeptides and amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) remineralization agent (Recaldent™; GC Europe) and control group (n = 70): no remineralization treatment; specimens were kept in artificial saliva. All specimens were tested for microtensile bond strength at regular intervals (1 h, 1 days, 2 days, 1 week, and 2 weeks) using a universal testing machine. The results statistically analyzed (P = 0.05) using two-way ANOVA test. Results: Results showed statistically significant increase in bond strength in CPP-ACP tested group (P < 0.05) at all-time intervals. The bond strength of remineralizing group samples at 2 days (~13.64 megapascals [MPa]) is comparable to that of control group after 1 week (~12.44 MPa). Conclusions: CPP-ACP treatment of teeth exposed to an aerated drink provided significant increase in bond strength at a shorter interval compared to teeth exposed to saliva alone. PMID:27403057

  13. Influence of Hot-Etching Surface Treatment on Zirconia/Resin Shear Bond Strength

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Pin; Yang, Xin; Jiang, Ting

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effect of hot-etching surface treatment on the shear bond strength between zirconia ceramics and two commercial resin cements. Ceramic cylinders (120 units; length: 2.5 mm; diameter: 4.7 mm) were randomly divided into 12 groups (n = 10) according to different surface treatments (blank control; airborne-particle-abrasion; hot-etching) and different resin cements (Panavia F2.0; Superbond C and B) and whether or not a thermal cycling fatigue test (5°–55° for 5000 cycles) was performed. Flat enamel surfaces, mounted in acrylic resin, were bonded to the zirconia discs (diameter: 4.7 mm). All specimens were subjected to shear bond strength testing using a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. All data were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and multiple-comparison least significant difference tests (α = 0.05). Hot-etching treatment produced higher bond strengths than the other treatment with both resin cements. The shear bond strength of all groups significantly decreased after the thermal cycling test; except for the hot-etching group that was cemented with Panavia F2.0 (p < 0.05). Surface treatment of zirconia with hot-etching solution enhanced the surface roughness and bond strength between the zirconia and the resin cement. PMID:28793699

  14. Bleaching effects on shear bond strengths of orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Martins, Mariana M; de Oliveira Almeida, Marco A; Elias, Carlos N; de Moraes Mendes, Alvaro

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the influence of 35% hydrogen peroxide on orthodontic bracket adhesion at zero hour, 24 hours, 7, 21 and 56 days after dental bleaching. Ninety bovine incisors were prepared for adhesion test and adhesive remnant index (ARI) determination. The 35% hydrogen peroxide was used as a bleaching agent and the Transbond XT as a bonding agent. Statiscally significant differences were observed between all the groups (p<0.001) and were observed in the comparison of zero hour and control group (p<0.001) and in the comparison of zero hour and 24 hours (p<0.001). ARI scores (0, 1, 2 e 3) also showed statiscally differences between all the groups (p=0.011) and at the comparison of all the test groups with the control: zero hour (p=0.001), 24 hours (p=0.009), 7 days (p=0.018), 21 days (p<0.001) e 56 days (p=0.004). The shear bond strength values became significantly lower when the bracket was bonded immediately after bleaching and quickly returned to control level in 24 hours. In seven days, there was a slight increase that was not significant and recovered to normal values in the next weeks. Different patterns of fractures were observed in bleached enamel when ARI scores were analyzed. The control group showed a high frequency of 3 score and none of zero score, the opposite behavior was observed in the test groups. Copyright © 2011 Società Italiana di Ortodonzia SIDO. Published by Elsevier Srl. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of proanthocyanidin incorporation into dental adhesive resin on resin-dentine bond strength.

    PubMed

    Epasinghe, D J; Yiu, C K Y; Burrow, M F; Tay, F R; King, N M

    2012-03-01

    This study evaluated the effect of proanthocyanidin (PA) incorporation into experimental dental adhesives on resin-dentine bond strength. Four experimental hydrophilic adhesives containing different PA concentrations were prepared by combining 50wt% resin comonomer mixtures with 50wt% ethanol. Proanthocyanidin was added to the ethanol-solvated resin to yield three adhesives with PA concentrations of 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0wt%, respectively. A PA-free adhesive served as the control. Flat dentine surfaces from 40 extracted third molars were etched with 32% phosphoric acid. The specimens were randomly assigned to one of the four adhesive groups. Two layers of one of the four experimental adhesives were applied to the etched dentine and light-cured for 20s. Composite build-ups were performed using Filtek Z250 (3M ESPE). After storage in distilled water at 37°C for 24h, twenty-four bonded teeth were sectioned into 0.9 mm×0.9 mm beams and stressed to failure under tension for bond strength testing. Bond strength data were evaluated by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Interfacial nanoleakage was examined in the remaining teeth using a field-emission scanning electron microscope and analysed using the Chi-square test (α=0.05). No significant difference in bond strength was found amongst PA-free, 1% and 2% PA adhesives. However, incorporation of 3% PA into the adhesive significantly lowered bond strength as demonstrated by a greater number of adhesive failures and more extensive nanoleakage along the bonded interface. Incorporation of 2% proanthocyanidin into dental adhesives has no adverse effect on dentine bond strength. The addition of proanthocyanidin to an experimental adhesive has no adverse effect on the immediate resin-dentine bond strength when the concentration of proanthocyanidin in the adhesive is less than or equal to 2%. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Bond strength comparison of color-change adhesives for orthodontic bonding using a self-etching primer

    PubMed Central

    Ekhlassi, Sara; English, Jeryl D; Ontiveros, Joe C; Powers, John M; Bussa, Harry I; Frey, Gary N; Colville, Clark D; Ellis, Randy K

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to compare the shear bond strengths of two color-change adhesives with a commonly used conventional light-cure adhesive while using a self-etching primer, and to compare any changes in shear bond strengths over time. Methods One hundred and eighty extracted bovine incisors were randomly divided into nine groups of 20 teeth each. The teeth were prepared with a self-etching primer (Transbond™ Plus) Metal lower incisor brackets were bonded directly to each tooth with two different color-change adhesives (TransbondPlus and Grēngloo™) and a control (Transbond XT). The teeth were debonded at three different time points (15 minutes, 24 hours, 1 week) using an Instron at 1.0 mm/min. The teeth that were to be debonded at 24 hours and 1 week were stored in distilled water at 37°C to simulate the oral environment. The data were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance and with Fisher’s protected least-significant difference multiple comparisons test at the P < 0.05 level of significance. Adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores were calculated for each debonded tooth. Results Transbond Plus at 1 week had the highest mean shear bond strength (14.7 mPa). Grēngloo tested at 24 hours had the lowest mean shear bond strength (11.3 mPa). The mean shear bond strengths for the remaining seven groups had a range of 12–14.5 mPa. Grēngloo had >80% samples presenting with an ARI score of 1 at all times. Interestingly, both Transbond groups had ARI scores of 3 in more than 50% of their samples. Conclusion Time had no significant effect on the mean shear bond strength of Transbond XT, Grēngloo, or Transbond Plus adhesive. PMID:23674913

  17. Long-term durability of resin dentin interface: nanoleakage vs. microtensile bond strength.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Mamiko; Pereira, Patricia N R; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Tagami, Junji; Pashley, David H

    2002-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that long-term durability of resin bonds to dentin is directly related to the nanoleakage of dentin bonding systems. Extracted human third molars were ground flat with 600-grit SiC paper under running water to expose middle dentin. Clearfil Liner Bond 2V (LB2V) or Fluoro Bond (FB) was applied to dentin surfaces according to the manufacturer's instructions. A crown was built-up with Clearfil AP-X resin composite, and the specimens were stored in water for 24 hours at 37 degrees C. The bonded assemblies were vertically sectioned into approximately 0.7 mm thick slabs and trimmed for microtensile bond test. All slabs were immersed in individual bottles of water at 37 degrees C, which was changed every day. Specimens were incubated for one day, and three, six, and nine months, and at the specified time period, they were randomly divided to two subgroups: 50% AgNO3 and the control. In the 50% AgNO3 subgroup, the slabs were immersed for one hour in 50% AgNO3, followed by exposure in a photo-developing solution for 12 hours just prior to debonding. The specimens in the control subgroup were soaked in water until debonding. Then, all specimens were subjected to microtensile bond testing. The debonded specimens of the AgNO3 subgroup had micrographs subjected to image analysis by NIH Image PC (Scion, Fredrick, MD, USA), and the area of silver penetration was quantitated. The bond strength data and silver penetration areas were subjected to two- and three-way ANOVA and Fisher's PLSD test at the 95% level of confidence. Regression analysis was used to test the relationship between bond strengths and the silver penetration area at each time period. For both adhesive systems, the bond strengths gradually decreased over time, although there were no statistically significant differences in the FB bond strength among the four time periods tested (p>0.05). Silver penetration in specimens bonded with LB2V and FB gradually increased over time

  18. Protein Modifiers Generally Provide Limited Improvement in Wood Bond Strength of Soy Flour Adhesives

    Treesearch

    Charles R. Frihart; Linda Lorenz

    2013-01-01

    Soy flour adhesives using a polyamidoamine-epichlorohydrin (PAE) polymeric coreactant are used increasingly as wood adhesives for interior products. Although these adhesives give good performance, higher bond strength under wet conditions is desirable. Wet strength is important for accelerated tests involving the internal forces generated by the swelling of wood and...

  19. Effect of preoxidation on the bond strength of titanium and porcelain.

    PubMed

    Mahale, K M; Nagda, S J

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of preoxidation on porcelain titanium- bond strength and the effect of paste bonder (adhesive) on the titanium porcelain bond strength. 11 specimens of commercially pure titanium (26 x 7 x 3 mm) were prepared by different heat treatments in programmable dental furnace. Identification of the oxides formed on the metal surface was conducted with an X-Ray diffractometer with CuKalpha radiation. Vickers hardness numbers were determine. Additional 50 specimens of commercially pure titanium were used to bond with low fusing porcelain. The bond strength was measured in a universal testing machine. X-ray diffraction analysis of the surface of pure titanium revealed that the relative peak intensity of alpha -Ti decreased and that of TiO2 increased with increasing firing temperature. The Vickers hardness number decreased initially as the temperature increased but it increased remarkably above 900 degrees C & was harder in air than vacuum. The tensile shear bond strength was highest in the green stage i.e. without preoxidation of metal, and decreased above 900 degrees C, and was the lowest in the group without paste bonder application. The difference in bond strengths was statistically highly significant for all groups. Preoxidation under vacuum before porcelain firing can effectively improve bonding. The adhesive provided with the low fusing porcelain helps in the bond between titanium & porcelain.

  20. Dentin bond strength of light-cured glass-ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Hinoura, K; Miyazaki, M; Onose, H

    1991-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of surface treatments and irradiation conditions on the bond strength of light-cured glass-ionomer cements to dentin. The light-cured glass-ionomer cements used in this study were Vitrabond, XR Ionomer, and Fuji Lining LC. Three experiments were designed to study the influence of the following factors on bond strength to dentin: (1) effect of the surface treatment of the dentin, (2) effect of the irradiation time, (3) effect of an increase in the interval between mixing of the cement and irradiation. Samples were stored in water for 24 hours, after which shear bond testing was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min. For Vitrabond, the Scotchprep and Gluma 2 treatments gave the greatest shear bond strengths. For XR Ionomer and Fuji Lining LC, the Scotchprep treatment gave the greatest shear bond strengths. The bond strengths for all cements increased with prolonged irradiation time. Bond strengths decreased with a longer elapsed time between mixing and light-curing. This means that light-curing should be done soon after the cement is placed. The failure mode was found to be cohesive in the ionomer.

  1. Comparative evaluation of the enamel bond strength of ‘etch-and-rinse’ and ‘all-in-one’ bonding agents on cut and uncut enamel surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Deepu; Singbal, Kiran Prabhakar; Kamat, Sharad

    2011-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: To compare tensile bond strength of an ‘etch-and-rinse’ bonding agent (Single bond,3M ESPE, MN, USA) with an ‘all-in-one’ bonding agent (iBond, Heraeus Kulzer, NY, USA) on cut and uncut enamel surfaces. The null hypothesis tested is that the ‘all-in-one’ bonding agent matches the ‘etch-and-rinse’ bonding agent in terms of tensile bond strength to enamel. Materials and Methods: Forty extracted human mandibular teeth were used for the study. Twenty teeth with intact enamel surfaces were divided into two groups of 10 teeth each. The enamel surfaces of the 20 teeth were prepared and assigned to two more groups of 10 teeth each. One group each of intact and prepared enamel surfaces were used to bond with the ‘etch-and-rinse’ bonding agent [Single bond (SB), 3M ESPE, MN, USA] and the other two groups one each of intact and prepared enamel surfaces were used to bond with the ‘all-in-one’ bonding agent [ iBond (IB), Heraeus Kulzer, NY, USA]. The tensile bond strength was measured on the universal testing machine (Unitek, 9450 PC, FIE, INDIA) at a cross head speed of 1 mm / minute. Results: The results were statistically analyzed using a one-way ANOVA and student ‘t’ test. The values for the ‘etch-and-rinse’ bonding agent SB were significantly higher for both the cut and uncut surfaces, compared to the ‘all-in-one’ bonding agent IB (P < 0.05). The all-in-one bonding agent resulted in a higher bond strength on the cut enamel surfaces. Conclusions: Based on the results, it is advisable to use the ‘etch-and-rinse system’ in a clinical situation requiring bonding on enamel alone. PMID:21814355

  2. Comparative evaluation of the enamel bond strength of 'etch-and-rinse' and 'all-in-one' bonding agents on cut and uncut enamel surfaces.

    PubMed

    Patil, Deepu; Singbal, Kiran Prabhakar; Kamat, Sharad

    2011-04-01

    To compare tensile bond strength of an 'etch-and-rinse' bonding agent (Single bond,3M ESPE, MN, USA) with an 'all-in-one' bonding agent (iBond, Heraeus Kulzer, NY, USA) on cut and uncut enamel surfaces. The null hypothesis tested is that the 'all-in-one' bonding agent matches the 'etch-and-rinse' bonding agent in terms of tensile bond strength to enamel. Forty extracted human mandibular teeth were used for the study. Twenty teeth with intact enamel surfaces were divided into two groups of 10 teeth each. The enamel surfaces of the 20 teeth were prepared and assigned to two more groups of 10 teeth each. One group each of intact and prepared enamel surfaces were used to bond with the 'etch-and-rinse' bonding agent [Single bond (SB), 3M ESPE, MN, USA] and the other two groups one each of intact and prepared enamel surfaces were used to bond with the 'all-in-one' bonding agent [ iBond (IB), Heraeus Kulzer, NY, USA]. The tensile bond strength was measured on the universal testing machine (Unitek, 9450 PC, FIE, INDIA) at a cross head speed of 1 mm / minute. The results were statistically analyzed using a one-way ANOVA and student 't' test. The values for the 'etch-and-rinse' bonding agent SB were significantly higher for both the cut and uncut surfaces, compared to the 'all-in-one' bonding agent IB (P < 0.05). The all-in-one bonding agent resulted in a higher bond strength on the cut enamel surfaces. Based on the results, it is advisable to use the 'etch-and-rinse system' in a clinical situation requiring bonding on enamel alone.

  3. Effect of thermocycling and surface treatment on repair bond strength of composite

    PubMed Central

    Kiomarsi, Nazanin; Saburian, Pardis; Chiniforush, Nasim; Karazifard, Mohammad-Javd

    2017-01-01

    Background Repair of composite restorations is a conservative method that can increase the longevity and durability of restorations while preserving the tooth structure. Achieving a suitable bond between the old and new composite is difficult. To overcome this problem, some methods have been recommended to increase the repair bond strength of composite.This study aimed to assess the effect of aging by thermocycling (5,000 and 10,000 cycles) and mechanical surface treatments (Er,Cr:YSGG laser and bur) on repair shear bond strength of composite resin. Material and Methods Totally, 120 composite blocks measuring 6x4x4 mm were fabricated of Filtek Z250 composite and were randomly divided into three groups (n=40) based on initial aging protocol: (a) no aging: storage in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours, (b) 5,000 thermal cycles, (c) 10,000 thermal cycles. Each group was then randomly divided into two subgroups (n=20) based on mechanical surface treatment (laser and bur). The laser and bur-prepared surfaces were silanized and Adper Single Bond 2 was then applied. The repair composite was bonded to surfaces. Half of the samples in each subgroup (n=10) were subjected to 5,000 thermal cycles to assess durability of bond. The remaining half were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours and all samples were then subjected to shear bond strength testing in a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. Data (in megapascals) were subjected to one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test (P=0.05). Mode of failure was determined under a stereomicroscope. Results Bur preparation significantly improved the bond strength compared to laser (P<0.001). Aging by 10,000 thermal cycles significantly decreased the repair bond strength of composite (P<0.001). No significant difference was noted in this regard between distilled water and 5,000 thermal cycles groups (P=0.699). Primary bond strength and bond strength after 5,000 thermal cycles in the same subgroups were not

  4. EFFECT OF 2% IODINE DISINFECTING SOLUTION ON BOND STRENGTH TO DENTIN

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Nelson Renato Franca Alves; Calamia, Christine S.; Coelho, Paulo G; Carrilho, Marcela Rocha de Oliveira; de Carvalho, Ricardo Marins; Caufield, Page; Thompson, Van P.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Disinfection of dentin surfaces is desirable so long as it does not interfere with subsequent bonding of adhesive resins. Objective: To test the null hypothesis that bond strengths to dentin are not affected by previous application of an iodine disinfecting solution. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four extracted non-carious molars were selected. Occlusal enamel was removed producing a flat dentin substrate. Test teeth were all treated with 2% Iodine disclosing/disinfecting solution (I2DDS) for 20 sec and rinsed for 20 sec followed by the application of self- or total- etching bonding systems, generating five adhesive groups (n=3): Single Bond;; Prime & Bond NT; Clearfil SE Bond; Opti-Bond Plus. The control groups (n=3 per adhesive) had no disclosing/disinfectant application prior to adhesive application. A 4-mm thick resin restoration was built up on each tooth for microtensile testing. Statistical analyses between experimental and control groups were performed by student's t-test (α = 0.05). Results: In general, experimental groups (previously treated with I2DDS) showed significantly lower bond strength values when compared with their respective controls (p<0.05), except for group Prime &Bond I2 that did not significantly differ from its control (p>0.05). Conclusion: Acetone-base adhesive systems seem not to be affected by the application of I2DDS prior to etching and bonding procedures. PMID:19089238

  5. Strength of an Explosively-Formed Bond

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    for tests C42 and C43 . ..........................................................5 Figure 6. Axisymmetric finite-element model...no interference between the pusher plug and gun tube. Tests with samples C43 and C42 resulted in a maximum load of over 60 × 103 lb. The load...42 C 43 Figure 5. Load-displacement curves for tests C42 and C43 . 6 The test with sample C41 continued until a load of 70 × 103 lb was

  6. Effect of composition of experimental fluorinated soft lining materials on bond strength to denture base resin.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Yoshihito; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Akiba, Norihisa; Hibino, Yasushi; Nagasawa, Yuko; Sumi, Yasunori; Minakuchi, Shunsuke

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of the composition of experimental fluorinated soft lining materials on bond strength to denture base resin. Vinylidene fluoride/hexafluoro propylene copolymer (2-6F), tridecafluorooctyl methacrylate (13FMA), methoxy diethylene glycol methacrylate (MDGMA), and silica (as filler) were used for fabrication of the experimental soft lining materials. Nine experimental soft lining materials having various compositions of 2-6F, 13FMA, and MDGMA were prepared. Shear and tensile bond strength tests were performed before and after immersion in water. The water sorption for the materials was also measured. An increase in the content of acrylic monomer, MDGMA, in the experimental materials increased the bond strength before immersion in water but reduced the bond strength after immersion in water as compared to that before immersion in water. The inclusion of fluorinated monomer (13FMA) in the materials appeared to affect water sorption.

  7. Ionizing irradiation affects the microtensile resin dentin bond strength under simulated clinical conditions.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Suman; Yadav, Harish

    2013-03-01

    This study evaluated the effect of ionizing radiations on resin-dentin interface in terms of marginal adaptation and micro-tensile bond strength under thermocycling and mechanical loading. Forty extracted human mandibular third molars were divided into four groups. GR I: No Irradiation and Class II MO cavities were prepared that were restored with composite restorations; GR II: Teeth were irradiated and restored; GR III: Teeth were restored and irradiated; GR IV: Teeth were restored during irradiation dosage fractions. All samples were thermal and mechanical loaded with 5000 cycles, 5 ± 2-55 ± 2°C, dwell time 30 s and 150,000 cycles at 60N. Resin-dentin slabs were trimmed into dumbbell-shaped slabs and microtensile bond strength was measured. The bond strength data was analyzed by one-way analysis of variance test. Irradiation before tooth preparation deteriorated the microtensile bond strength.

  8. Influence of previous acid etching on bond strength of universal adhesives to enamel and dentin.

    PubMed

    Torres, Carlos Rocha Gomes; Zanatta, Rayssa Ferreira; Silva, Tatiane Josefa; Huhtala, Maria Filomena Rocha Lima; Borges, Alessandra Bühler

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of acid pretreatment on the bond strength of composite resin bonded to enamel and dentin with 2 different universal self-etching adhesives. The null hypothesis was that the acid treatment performed prior to adhesive application would not significantly change the bond strength to enamel or dentin for either universal adhesive tested. A sample of 112 bovine incisors were selected and embedded in acrylic resin. Half were ground until a flat enamel surface was obtained, and the other half were polished until a 6 × 6-mm area of dentin was exposed, resulting into 2 groups (n = 56). The enamel and dentin groups were divided into 2 subgroups according to the adhesive system applied: Futurabond U or Scotchbond Universal. Each of these subgroups was divided into 2 additional subgroups (n = 14); 1 subgroup received phosphoric acid pretreatment, and 1 subgroup did not. The bond strength was assessed with a microtensile test. Data from enamel and dentin specimens were analyzed separately using 1-way analysis of variance. The acid pretreatment did not significantly change the bond strength of the adhesives tested, either to enamel (P = 0.4161) or to dentin (P = 0.4857). The acid etching pretreatment did not affect the bond strength to dentin and enamel when the tested universal multipurpose adhesive systems were used.

  9. Effect of Fluoride and Simplified Adhesive Systems on the Bond Strength of Primary Molars and Incisors.

    PubMed

    Firoozmand, Leily Macedo; Noleto, Lawanne Ellen Carvalho; Gomes, Isabella Azevedo; Bauer, José Roberto de Oliveira; Ferreira, Meire Coelho

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was evaluate in vitro the influence of simplified adhesive systems (etch-and-rinse and self-etching) and 1.23% acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) on the microshear bond strength (μ-SBS) of composite resins on primary molars and incisors. Forty primary molars and forty incisors vestibular enamel was treated with either the self-etching Clearfil SE Bond (CSE, Kuraray) or etch-and-rinse Adper Single Bond 2 (SB2, 3M/ESPE) adhesive system. Each group was subdivided based on the prior treatment of the enamel with or without the topical application of 1.23% APF. Thereafter, matrices were positioned and filled with composite resin and light cured. After storage in distilled water at 37 ± 1°C for 24 h, the specimens were submitted to μ-SBS in a universal testing machine. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (p < 0.05) showed that the prior application of 1.23% APF led to a significant reduction in bond strength. The type of adhesive exerted no significant influence bond strength. In the inter-group analysis, however, significantly bond strength reduction was found for the incisors when CSE was employed with APF. Adhesive failure was the most common type of fracture. The bond strength was affected by the prior application of 1.23% APF and type of tooth.

  10. Shear bond strength of four resin cements used to lute ceramic core material to human dentin.

    PubMed

    Altintas, Subutayhan; Eldeniz, Ayçe Unverdi; Usumez, Aslihan

    2008-12-01

    This study evaluated the effect of four resin cements on the shear bond strength of a ceramic core material to dentin. One hundred twenty molar teeth were embedded in a self-curing acrylic resin. The occlusal third of the crowns were sectioned under water cooling. All specimens were randomly divided into four groups of 30 teeth each according to the resin cement used. One hundred twenty cylindrical-shaped, 2.7-mm wide, 3-mm high ceramic core materials were heat-pressed. The core cylinders were then luted with one of the four resin systems to dentin (Super-Bond C&B, Chemiace II, Variolink II, and Panavia F). Half of the specimens (n = 15) were tested after 24 hours; the other half (n = 15) were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 1 day and then thermocycled 1000 times between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C prior to testing. Shear bond strength of each specimen was measured using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The bond strength values were calculated in MPa, and the results were statistically analyzed using a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD tests. The shear bond strength varied significantly depending on the resin cement used (p < 0.05). The differences in the bond strengths after thermocycling were not remarkable as compared with the corresponding prethermal cycling groups (p > 0.05). Significant interactions were present between resin cement and thermocycling (p < 0.05). After 24 hours, the specimens luted with Variolink II (5.3 +/- 2.2 MPa) showed the highest shear bond strength, whereas the specimens luted with Chemiace II (1.6 +/- 0.4 MPa) showed the lowest. After thermocycling, the bond strength values of specimens luted with Chemiace II (1.1 +/- 0.1 MPa) and Super-Bond C&B (1.7 +/- 0.4 MPa) decreased; however, this was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). The increase in the shear bond strength values in the Panavia F (4.5 +/- 0.7 MPa) and Variolink II (5.5 +/- 2.1 MPa) groups after thermocycling

  11. Evaluation of the shear bond strength of nanocomposite on carious and sound deciduous dentin.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Seema; Nandlal, B

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of conventional composites with nanocomposites in carious and sound deciduous dentin with the use of self-etching adhesive. Human primary molars were ground to obtain flat dentin surfaces and divided into two groups: Carious dentin and sound dentin group. The carious teeth specimens were prepared by removing infected dentin and area with affected dentin was used for bonding composite. Teeth with carious and sound dentin were subdivided in two groups (n = 15) based on the type of the composite into conventional composite group and nanocomposite group. The composite was bonded to the teeth with self-etching adhesive. All the bonded specimens were stored in distilled water for 24 hours at 37°C before shear bond testing. Independent t-test and analysis of variance were applied to the results. The results indicated that the nanocomposite offered significantly higher bond strength compared to conventional composite. In addition presence of affected dentin significantly reduced the bond strength of both the composite types. How to cite this article: Deshmukh S, Nandlal B. Evaluation of the Shear Bond Strength of Nanocomposite on Carious and Sound Deciduous Dentin. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012;5(1): 25-28.

  12. Evaluation of the Shear Bond Strength of Nanocomposite on Carious and Sound Deciduous Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Nandlal, B

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: The aim of the study was to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of conventional composites with nanocomposites in carious and sound deciduous dentin with the use of self-etching adhesive. Methodology: Human primary molars were ground to obtain flat dentin surfaces and divided into two groups: Carious dentin and sound dentin group. The carious teeth specimens were prepared by removing infected dentin and area with affected dentin was used for bonding composite. Teeth with carious and sound dentin were subdivided in two groups (n = 15) based on the type of the composite into conventional composite group and nanocomposite group. The composite was bonded to the teeth with self-etching adhesive. All the bonded specimens were stored in distilled water for 24 hours at 37°C before shear bond testing. Independent t-test and analysis of variance were applied to the results. Results: The results indicated that the nanocomposite offered significantly higher bond strength compared to conventional composite. In addition presence of affected dentin significantly reduced the bond strength of both the composite types. How to cite this article: Deshmukh S, Nandlal B. Evaluation of the Shear Bond Strength of Nanocomposite on Carious and Sound Deciduous Dentin. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012;5(1): 25-28. PMID:25206130

  13. Effect of Intermediate Agents and Preheated Composites on Repair Bond Strength of Silorane-Based Composites

    PubMed Central

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Daryadar, Marzieh

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Repairing composite restorations is a challenging procedure especially when two different types of composites are used. This study aimed to compare the repair strength of silorane-based composite (SC) (Filtek P90) with that of preheated SC, methacrylate composite (MC)(Z250), flowable MC (Filtek Supreme Plus) and different adhesive/composite combinations. Materials and Methods: Eighty-four SC specimens were fabricated and randomly divided into seven groups (G). In the control group (G7), SC was bonded immediately to SC. The other specimens were water-aged for two months and were then roughened, etched and repaired with the following materials: G1) Silorane Adhesive Bond (SAB)/SC; G2) Preheated SC; G3) SAB/MC; G4) Adper Single Bond (SB)/MC; G5) Flowable MC/MC; G6) Preheated MC. After water storage and thermocycling, the repaired specimens were subjected to shear bond strength testing. The data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey’s test. Results: Preheated SC and MC, flowable MC and SAB/SC resulted in bond strength comparable to that of the control group. Preheated SC showed significantly higher bond strength when compared to SAB/MC (P=0.04) and SB/MC (P<0.001). Bond strength of SB/MC was significantly lower than that of the other groups (P<0.05), except for SAB/SC and SAB/MC. Conclusion: All repairing materials except for SB/MC resulted in bond strength values comparable to that of the control group. Repair with preheated SC yielded the highest bond strength. PMID:27148378

  14. Effect of laser welding on the titanium composite tensile bond strength.

    PubMed

    Galo, Rodrigo; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; Rodrigues, Renata Cristina Silveira; Pagnano, Valéria de Oliveira; de Mattos, Maria da Glória Chiarello

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the shear bond strength between commercially pure titanium, with and without laser welding, after airbone-particle abrasion (Al(2)O(3)) and 2 indirect composites. Sixty-four specimens were cast and divided into 2 groups with and without laser welding. Each group was divided in 4 subgroups, related to Al(2)O(3) grain size: A - 250 microm; B - 180 microm; C- 110 microm; and D - 50 microm. Composite rings were formed around the rods and light polymerized using UniXS unit. Specimens were invested and their shear bond strength at failure was measured with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 2.0 mm/min. Statistical analysis was carried out with ANOVA and Tukey's test (alpha=0.05). The highest bond strength means were recorded in 250 microm group without laser welding. The lowest shear bond strength means were recorded in 50 microm group with laser welding. Statistically significant differences (p<0.05) were found between all groups. In conclusion, airborne particle abrasion yielded significantly lower bond strength as the Al(2)O(3) particle size decreased. Shear bond strength decreased in the laser welded specimens.

  15. Shear Strength of Partially Bonded Concrete-Rock Interfaces for Application in Dam Stability Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krounis, Alexandra; Johansson, Fredrik; Larsson, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    The shear strength of the concrete-rock interface has a substantial influence on the sliding stability of concrete gravity dams founded on rock. While several studies have been done on concrete-rock contacts, there remains uncertainty regarding the peak shear strength of partially bonded interfaces. There exists, in particular, an uncertainty regarding the contribution from surface roughness of the unbonded parts to the peak shear strength of the interface due to the dependency of mobilized strength on shear displacement. In this study, a series of 24 direct shear tests are performed under CNL conditions on concrete-rock samples with different bonding conditions. Tests on samples with fully bonded and unbonded interfaces are conducted to study the strain compatibility of the different contacts, while the results of samples with partially bonded interfaces are evaluated in the context of linking the joint roughness of the unbonded parts to the peak shear strength of the interface. The results indicate that a significant part of the surface roughness of the unbonded parts is mobilized prior to degradation of bond strength, in particular for interfaces with low bonding percentages. It is recommended that further research should be conducted to understand how the contribution from roughness change with an increase in scale and degree of matedness.

  16. Shear bond strengths and microleakage of four types of dentin adhesive materials.

    PubMed

    Ateyah, Nasrien Z; Elhejazi, Ahmed A

    2004-02-15

    The aim of this investigation was to compare the microleakage of composite resin (Z-100) and shear bond strength to bovine dentin using different types of adhesive systems (Scotch Bond Multi-Purpose, All-Bond 2, One-Step, and Perma Quick) to compare and correlate microleakage to shear bond strength. For the microleakage aspect of the study, 20 class V were prepared (bovine incisors) with 90-degree cavosurface margins and were located at the cemento-enamel junction using a template. Each dentin bonding system was applied to five cavities following the manufacturer's instructions and restored with Z-100 composite resin. After 24 hours of storage in distilled water at 37 degrees C, the teeth were immersed in 2% basic fuchsin dye. All teeth were sectioned in a mesiodistal direction using a diamond saw, and each section was then inspected under a stereomacroscope. For the shear bond strength aspect of the study, 20 bovine incisors were centrally horizontally mounted in Teflon mold with cold cure acrylic resin. Flat labial dentin surfaces were prepared using different grit silicon carbide abrasive wheels. Five specimens were used for each of the bonding agent systems. Each specimen was bonded with restorative composite resin (Z-100) and applied to the treated dentinal surface through a split Teflon mold. All specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. The bonds were stressed using shear forces at a crosshead speed of 0.5mm/min using an Instron Universal testing machine. Findings indicate none of the systems tested in this study were free from microleakage. Scotch bond multi-purpose achieved the best seal, with One-Step being second best, while All-Bond 2 and Perma Quick had the poorest seal. However, there were significant differences among the shear bond strengths of the four bonding systems tested. Scotch Bond Multi-Purpose has a higher bond strength to composite resin when compared to the other dentin adhesives. The study also concluded

  17. Bond strengths evaluation of laser ceramic bracket debonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostalová, T.; Jelinková, H.; Šulc, J.; Němec, M.; Fibrich, M.; Jelínek, M.; Michalík, P.; Bučková, M.

    2012-09-01

    Ceramic brackets often used for an orthodontic treatment can lead to problems such as enamel tear outs because of their low fracture resistance and high bond strengths. Therefore the aim of our study was to investigate the positive laser radiation effect on bracket debonding. Moreover, the influence of the enamel shape surface under the bracket and laser radiation power on the debonding strength was investigated. The source of the radiation was the longitudinally diode-pumped Tm:YAP laser operating at 1997 nm. To eliminate the tooth surface roughness the flat enamel surface was prepared artificially and the bracket was bonded on it. The debonding was accomplished by Tm:YAP laser radiation with different the power value while recording the temperature rise in the pulp. To simulate the debonding process in vivo the actual bond strength was measured by the digital force gauge. The results were analyzed by scanning electron microscope.

  18. [Bonding strength of resin and tooth enamel after teeth bleaching with cold plasma].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Meng-meng; Wang, Guo-min; Sun, Ke; Li, Ying-long; Pan, Jie

    2016-02-18

    To investigate the immediate bond strength and surface structure of resin and the tooth enamel which treated by cold plasma. In the study, 40 bovine incisors were divided into two equal parts. In this sense, all enamel adhesive samples were prepared and then randomly divided into 4 groups (n =20). group 1: acid + single bond 2+resin composite (control group); group 2:beyond bleaching+ acid+single bond 2+resin composite; group 3: treated by cold plasma for 5 minutes+ acid+single bond 2+resin composite; group 4: treated by cold plasma for 5 minutes+single bond 2+resin composite. Single bond 2 bonding system and Filtek Z250 resin were used in this experiment. The shear bond strength was tested by universal testing machine. The surface of the enamel in different processes was observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Statistical analyses by the single factor analysis of variance and multiple pairwise comparisons were performed with SPSS 17.0 . The shear bond strength of group 4 (8.60 MPa) was significantly lower than that of the other three groups (P<0.05). The shear bond strength of group 2 (17.89 MPa) was higher than that of group 4, but lower than group 1 and group 3 (P<0.05).There was no significant difference between group 1 (34.82 MPa) and group 3 (34.69 MPa). Scanning electron microscope indicated that the enamel treated by cold plasma had slight molten form, which was different from etched enamel surface.The fractured surface of group 3 was mix fracture, which was similar to the control group (group 1). Compared with the conventional clinic bleaching, immediate bond strength of resin-enamel that treated by cold plasma has not been affected.

  19. Effect of two different dentin desensitizers on shear bond strength of two different bonding agents to dentin: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Shekhar; Krishnaswamy, Manjunath Mysore

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study was to compare the effect of two different desensitizers on shear bond strength of two different fifth-generation single-bottle adhesive agents on dentin surface. Sixty human premolars were taken and divided into six groups of 10 samples each. The first two groups were the control groups and were not pretreated with any desensitizer; the remaining four groups were the experimental groups and were pretreated with either Denshield™ or Sensodent-K™ desensitizer. The specimens in each group were subjected to acid etching, application of adhesive (Single Bond or Prime and Bond NT), and application of hybrid composite resin (Z-100) according to the standard protocol. The specimens were subjected to shear bond strength testing, using a Lloyds universal testing machine (EZ20), followed by stereomicroscopic evaluation of the fracture mode at the debonded interface. Statistically significant difference existed between the two bonding agents in the control groups (group 1 and 2), with Prime and Bond NT showing higher bond strength than Single Bond. No statistically significant difference existed between either control or pretreated with any desensitizer when either of the adhesive systems was used. Prime and Bond NT showed statistically higher bond strength value when teeth were pretreated with Sensodent-K™ (groups 5 and 6). No statistically significant difference in bond strength values were observed between the bonding agents when pretreated with Denshield™ desensitizer.

  20. Bond strength of adhesives to dentin contaminated with smoker's saliva.

    PubMed

    Pinzon, Lilliam M; Oguri, Makoto; O'Keefe, Kathy; Dusevish, Vladimir; Spencer, Paulette; Powers, John M; Marshall, Grayson W

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of contamination with smoker's and non-smoker's saliva on the bond strength of resin composite to superficial dentin using different adhesive systems. The interfacial structure between the resin and dentin was evaluated for each treatment using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Freshly extracted human molars were ground with 600-grit SiC paper to expose the superficial dentin. Adhesives [One-Up-Bond-F-Plus (OUFP) and Adper-Prompt-L-Pop (APLP)] and resin composite (TPHSpectrum) were bonded to the dentin (n = 8/group, 180 total specimens) under five surface conditions: control (adhesive applied following manufacturers' instructions); saliva, then 5-s air dry, then adhesive; adhesive, saliva, 5-s air dry; adhesive, saliva, 5-s water rinse, 5-s air dry (ASW group); and adhesive, saliva, 5-s water rinse, 5-s air dry, reapply adhesive (ASWA group). After storage in water at 37 degrees C for 24 h, the specimens were debonded under tension at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. ESEM photomicrographs of the dentin/adhesive interfaces were taken. Mean bond strength ranged from 8.1 to 24.1 MPa. Fisher's protected least significant difference (P = 0.05) intervals for critical adhesive, saliva, and surface condition differences were 1.3, 1.3, and 2.1 MPa, respectively. There were no significant differences in bond strength to dentin between contamination by smoker's and nonsmoker's saliva, but bond strengths were significantly different between adhesive systems, with OUFP twice as strong as APLP under almost all conditions. After adhesive application and contamination with either smoker's or nonsmoker's saliva followed by washing and reapplication of the adhesive (ASWA group), the bond strength of both adhesive systems was the same as that of the control group.

  1. Adhesive bond strengths to enamel and dentin using recommended and extended treatment times.

    PubMed

    Kimmes, Nicole S; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Erickson, Robert L; Latta, Mark A

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effect of different enamel and dentin conditioning times on the shear bond strength of a resin composite using etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive systems. Shear bond strengths were determined following treatment of flat ground human enamel and dentin surfaces (4000 grit) with 11 adhesive systems: 1) AdheSE One Viva Pen-(ASE), 2) Adper Prompt L-Pop-(PLP), 3) Adper Single Bond Plus-(SBP), 4) Clearfil SE Bond-(CSE), 5) Clearfil S3 Bond-(CS3), 6) OptiBond All-In-One-(OBA), 7) OptiBond Solo Plus-(OBS), 8) Peak SE-(PSE), 9) Xeno IV-(X4), 10) Xeno V-(X5) and 11) XP Bond-(XPB) using recommended treatment times and an extended treatment time of 60 seconds (n = 10/group). Composite (Z100) to enamel and dentin bond strengths (24 hours) were determined using Ultradent fixtures and debonded with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute. The data were analyzed with a three-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Fisher's LSD post hoc test. The highest shear bond strengths (MPa) to enamel were achieved by the three etch-and-rinse systems at both the recommended treatment time (SBP-40.5 +/- 6.1; XPB-38.7 +/- 3.7; OBS- 35.2 +/- 6.2) and the extended treatment time (SBP-44.5 +/- 8.1; XPB-40.9 +/- 5.7; OBS-35.0 +/- 4.5). Extending the enamel treatment time did not produce a significant change (p > 0.05) in bond strength for the 11 adhesive systems tested. OBS generated the highest (46.2 +/- 7.9) bond strengths to dentin at the recommended treatment time. At the extended treatment time X4 (42.2 +/- 11.7), PSE (42.1 +/- 9.7) and OBS (41.4 +/- 8.0) produced the highest bond strengths to dentin. The bond strength change between recommend and extended treatment times was significant (p < 0.05) for PSE, but the other 10 systems did not exhibit any significant change.

  2. Delayed Application Effect on Bond Strength of a Unidose Bonding Adhesive.

    PubMed

    Lane, James A; Hughey, Samantha J; Gregory, Paul N; Versluis-Tantbirojn, Daranee; Simon, James F; Harrison, Janet; Versluis, Antheunis

    2016-10-01

    Adequate bonding between tooth structure and a composite is among the factors affecting long-term clinical success. Adhesives contain solvents, which are known to evaporate. The researchers sought to determine whether bond strength could be adversely affected when a package of a popular adhesive was left open during a patient visit.

  3. Influence of the direction of tubules on bond strength to dentin.

    PubMed

    Ogata, M; Okuda, M; Nakajima, M; Pereira, P N; Sano, H; Tagami, J

    2001-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of the direction of dentinal tubules on resin-dentin tensile bond strength (mu TBS) using four commercially available bonding systems and observed the resin-dentin interfaces with an SEM. The dentin bonding systems used in this study were Clearfil Liner Bond II (LB, Kuraray), Imperva Fluoro Bond (FB, Shofu), Single Bond (SB, 3M) and One-Step (OS, BISCO). Thirty-six extracted caries-free human molars were used for micro tensile bond testing and eight additional teeth were used for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The teeth were divided into two groups according to the direction of the dentinal tubules at the resin-dentin interface: a perpendicular group, in which the occlusal enamel was removed perpendicular to the long axis of the tooth, and a parallel group, in which the mesial half of the tooth was removed parallel to the long axis of the tooth, and the coronal dentin surface was used for bonding. After the flat dentin surfaces were polished with #600 silicon carbide paper, each surface was treated with one of the four adhesive systems according to the manufacturer's recommendation, then covered with resin composite (Clearfil AP-X, Kuraray) to provide sufficient bulk for micro-tensile bond testing. After 24 hours in 37 degrees C water, the resin-bonded teeth were serially sliced perpendicular to the adhesive surface, the adhesive interface trimmed to a cross sectional area of 1 mm2 and subjected to tensile forces at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Statistical analysis of the tensile bond strengths were performed using two-way ANOVA and Fisher's PLSD test at 95% level of confidence. The tensile bond strength of the group with tubules parallel to the bonded interface was higher than that of tubules cut perpendicularly. This tendency reached statistical significance using SB and OS.

  4. Influence of etching time and bonding strategies on the microshear bond strength of self- and light-cured pit-and-fissure sealants.

    PubMed

    Souza-Junior, Eduardo José; Borges, Boniek Castillo Dutra; Montes, Marcos Antônio Japiassú Resende; Alonso, Roberta Caroline Bruschi; Ambrosano, Glaucia Maria Bovi; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the impact of extended etching and bonding strategies on the microshear bond strength of three sealant materials. Two pit-and-fissure sealants [FluroShield, Dentsply (light-cured) and AlphaSeal, DFL (self-cured)] and one light-cured flowable composite resin (Permaflo, Ultradent) were evaluated according to different enamel etching times (15 s or 30 s) and bonding procedures (no adhesive application, application of primer/hydrophobic resin or hydrophobic resin only). Intact enamel blocks were obtained from bovine teeth and sealed via the tested protocols. After 24 h, the microshear bond strength test was performed in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Failure modes were classified by stereomicroscopy. Data were submitted to a three-way ANOVA and to Tukey's test (α=0.05). There was no statistically significant difference (p>0.05) among the materials. Permaflo showed higher bond strength when etched for 30 s alone. Enamel overetching decreased the bond strength of the light-cured sealant. Primer/bond previous treatment improved bond performance for AlphaSeal. In conclusion, from the tested conditions, all sealant materials presented similar bond strength values in relation to bonding protocol and etching time. The flowable composite can be used as a pit-and-fissure sealant. The use of a three-step adhesive system was essential for the self-cured sealant application.

  5. Effect of varying etching times on the bond strength of ceramic brackets.

    PubMed

    Olsen, M E; Bishara, S E; Boyer, D B; Jakobsen, J R

    1996-04-01

    Damage to the enamel surface when debonding orthodontic ceramic brackets has been a clinical concern. Ideally, bond failure at the bracket-adhesive interface should occur without damaging the enamel surface. The purpose of this study was to determine the shear bond strength and debonding failure modes of ceramic brackets with varying etching times. Sixty freshly extracted human premolars were pumiced and divided into six groups of 10 teeth. Each group was assigned an etching time interval of either 30, 20, 15, 10, 5, or 0 seconds with 37% phosphoric acid. Ceramic orthodontic brackets were bonded to each etched tooth by using the same orthodontic bonding system. The teeth were mounted in phenolic rings and stored in deionized water at 37 degrees C for 48 hours. A Zwick universal testing machine (Zwick GmbH and Co., Ulm, Germany) was used to determine shear bond strengths. The residual adhesive on the enamel surface was evaluated with the Adhesive Remnant Index. The results of the analysis of variance indicated that there were significant differences in bond strengths between the various etching times (p=0.0001). The Duncan multiple range test revealed that the 5-second and no etch group exhibited significantly lower bond strengths. The results of the Chi square test evaluating the residual adhesives on the enamel surface also revealed significant differences (p=0.0001). However, when the 5- and 0-second groups were dropped from the test, the Chi square test revealed no significant differences between the 30-, 20-, 15-, and 10-second groups (p=0.211). In conclusion, decreasing etching time between 30 and 10 seconds does not significantly affect either bond strength or the site of bond failure.

  6. Microtensile bond strength of nonmetallic dowels bonded to radicular dentin with self-etch adhesives.

    PubMed

    Abo El-Ela, Omar A; Atta, Osama A; El-Mowafy, Omar

    2009-02-01

    The bonding potential of nonmetallic dowels to root dentin, particularly with new self-etch adhesives, has not been fully investigated. The aim of this study was to determine microtensile bond strength (microTBS) of nonmetallic dowels, including a novel glass fiber dowel, when bonded to radicular dentin with self-etch adhesives. Crowns of extracted anterior teeth were severed, and endodontic treatment was performed. Teeth were divided into six groups according to dowel/adhesive. Teeth received dowels as follows: group I: Light Post + Clearfil-SE Bond/Panavia-F (SE/PF), group II: Light Post + Xeno III/Panavia-F (XN/PF), group III: ParaPost Fiber White + SE/PF, group IV: ParaPost Fiber White + XN/PF, group V: everStick Post + SE/PF, and group VI: everStick Post + XN/PF. Teeth were sectioned to produce 1 mm specimens from both cervical and middle thirds with the dowel at the center. Specimens were tested in a special machine, and microTBS values were determined. Mean microTBS values and SDs in MPa for the cervical region were as follows: group I: 10.36 (1.88), group II: 8.51 (1.41), group III: 11.61 (1.06), group IV: 9.37 (1.61), group V: 14.22 (1.16), and group VI: 12.97 (1.69). Group V had the highest mean value-significantly higher than the means of groups I, II, III, and IV (p < 0.0001 to p < 0.02). For the middle region: group I, 9.72 (1.61); group II, 7.62 (1.42); group III, 10.28 (0.75); group IV, 8.48 (1.51); group V, 13.23 (1.06); group VI, 11.07 (1.49). Group V also had highest mean value-significantly higher than the means of groups I, II, III, and IV (p < 0.0001 to p < 0.004). everStick glass fiber dowel, bonded with either adhesive, showed the highest microTBS. Microtensile bond strengths were not significantly different with cervical root dentin than with middle root dentin.

  7. Effect of various intraoral repair systems on the shear bond strength of composite resin to zirconia

    PubMed Central

    Han, In-Hae; Kang, Dong-Wan; Chung, Chae-Heon; Choe, Han-Cheol

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE This study compared the effect of three intraoral repair systems on the bond strength between composite resin and zirconia core. MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty zirconia specimens were divided into three groups according to the repair method: Group I- CoJet™ Repair System (3M ESPE) [chairside silica coating with 30 µm SiO2 + silanization + adhesive]; Group II- Ceramic Repair System (Ivoclar Vivadent) [etching with 37% phosphoric acid + Zirconia primer + adhesive]; Group III- Signum Zirconia Bond (Heraus) [Signum Zirconia Bond I + Signum Zirconia Bond II]. Composite resin was polymerized on each conditioned specimen. The shear bond strength was tested using a universal testing machine, and fracture sites were examined with FE-SEM. Surface morphology and wettability after surface treatments were examined additionally. The data of bond strengths were statistically analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Tamhane post hoc test (α=.05). RESULTS Increased surface roughness and the highest wettability value were observed in the CoJet sand treated specimens. The specimens treated with 37% phosphoric acid and Signum Zirconia Bond I did not show any improvement of surface irregularity, and the lowest wettability value were found in 37% phosphoric acid treated specimens. There was no significant difference in the bond strengths between Group I (7.80 ± 0.76 MPa) and III (8.98 ± 1.39 MPa). Group II (3.21 ± 0.78 MPa) showed a significant difference from other groups (P<.05). CONCLUSION The use of Intraoral silica coating system and the application of Signum Zirconia Bond are effective for increasing the bond strength of composite resin to zirconia. PMID:24049565

  8. Bond strength investigations and structural applicability of composite fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) rebars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachlakev, Damian Ivanov

    The composite FRP rebars research at Oregon State University was initiated in 1993 principally to develop a non-metallic hollow reinforcement. It was recognized that the tensile properties of such reinforcement are unquestionably superior to steel, but its performance in concrete could be problematic. The bond between FRP rebars and concrete was identified as a critical area of concern. The purpose of this study is (i) to analyze a variety of FRP and steel reinforcing units; (ii) to advance the knowledge of bond mechanism, failure modes, and parameters influencing the bond strength; (iii) to compare composite rebars to conventional steel and to assess their applicability as reinforcing members. Commercially available FRP rebars were investigated. Particular emphasis was given to a hollow glass FRP rod designed at Oregon State University. Several parameters were investigated, including: failure mode, concrete compressive strength, rebar diameter and circumference/cross section ratio, embedment length, concrete cover, and microstructure of the composite rebars. It was recognized that the ASTM C234-90 pull-out standard is test of concrete strength. Therefore, a modified pull-out test was developed for evaluating the bond strength behavior. A newly developed European bond test procedure was compared with locally modified version of the pull-out method. The new procedure was used for the first time in the United States. The study demonstrated a phenomenon, not reported in the published research at this time, defined as a size effect. The size effects result in lower bond strength with increasing area of the interface between FRP bars and concrete. The next phase of the research was dedicated to the hollow glass FRP rebar. The goal was to compare its bond properties to conventional steel and solid FRP bars. The study led to two new phenomena not described in the literature previously. Results showed that the concrete compressive strength does not significantly affect the

  9. Strength of hydrogen bonds of water depends on local environment.

    PubMed

    Huš, Matej; Urbic, Tomaz

    2012-04-14

    In-depth knowledge of water-water potential is important for devising and evaluating simple water models if they are to accurately describe water properties and reflect various solvation phenomena. Water-water potential depends upon inter-molecular distance, relative orientation of water molecules, and also local environment. When placed at a favorable distance in a favorable orientation, water molecules exhibit a particularly strong attractive interaction called hydrogen bond. Although hydrogen bond is very important for its effects on the elements of life, industrial applications, and bulk water properties, there is no scientific consensus on its true nature and origin. Using quantum-mechanical methods, hydrogen bond strength was calculated in different local environments. A simple empirical linear relationship was discovered between maximum hydrogen bond strength and the number of water molecules in the local environment. The local environment effect was shown to be considerable even on the second coordination shell. Additionally, a negative linear correlation was found between maximum hydrogen bond strength and the distance, at which it was observed. These results provide novel insights into the nature of hydrogen bonding.

  10. Bond Strength of Composite CFRP Reinforcing Bars in Timber.

    PubMed

    Corradi, Marco; Righetti, Luca; Borri, Antonio

    2015-07-03

    The use of near-surface mounted (NSM) fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP) bars is an interesting method for increasing the shear and flexural strength of existing timber members. This article examines the behaviour of carbon FRP (CFRP) bars in timber under direct pull-out conditions. The objective of this experimental program is to investigate the bond strength between composite bars and timber: bars were epoxied into small notches made into chestnut and fir wood members using a commercially-available epoxy system. Bonded lengths varied from 150 to 300 mm. Failure modes, stress and strain distributions and the bond strength of CFRP bars have been evaluated and discussed. The pull-out capacity in NSM CFRP bars at the onset of debonding increased with bonded length up to a length of 250 mm. While CFRP bar's pull-out was achieved only for specimens with bonded lengths of 150 and 200 mm, bar tensile failure was mainly recorded for bonded lengths of 250 and 300 mm.

  11. Bond Strength of Composite CFRP Reinforcing Bars in Timber

    PubMed Central

    Corradi, Marco; Righetti, Luca; Borri, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The use of near-surface mounted (NSM) fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP) bars is an interesting method for increasing the shear and flexural strength of existing timber members. This article examines the behaviour of carbon FRP (CFRP) bars in timber under direct pull-out conditions. The objective of this experimental program is to investigate the bond strength between composite bars and timber: bars were epoxied into small notches made into chestnut and fir wood members using a commercially-available epoxy system. Bonded lengths varied from 150 to 300 mm. Failure modes, stress and strain distributions and the bond strength of CFRP bars have been evaluated and discussed. The pull-out capacity in NSM CFRP bars at the onset of debonding increased with bonded length up to a length of 250 mm. While CFRP bar’s pull-out was achieved only for specimens with bonded lengths of 150 and 200 mm, bar tensile failure was mainly recorded for bonded lengths of 250 and 300 mm. PMID:28793423

  12. Bond strength of a fluoride-releasing bracket adhesive. Experimental study.

    PubMed

    Graf, I; Breier, M; Huck, L; Schwarze, C W

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine a new fluoride-releasing light-cured filling composite for its bonding and debonding qualities when used as a bracket adhesive. The material investigated was a hybrid composite containing a chemically modified fluoride apatite, which is claimed to provide the enamel with phosphate, calcium, and fluoride ions in the presence of an acid pH, recharging its resources of these ions through fluoride-containing toothpastes used in daily oral hygiene. Concurrently suitability as an enamel conditioner was tested in a new self-etching primer, which does not require water rinsing but is gently air dried instead. For comparison a conventional light-cure single-component adhesive was used together with 37% orthophosphoric acid. After application of the respective conditioners, mesh-backed metal brackets were bonded to 20 human premolars in each of the 2 adhesive groups and subjected to a shear test. Bond failure location was evaluated using the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI). Average bond strength of the experimental bracket adhesive and the conventional etchant was 8.96 MPa. Conditioning with the self-etching primer led to a decrease of mean shear bond strength values to 6.55 MPa. Highest bond strength was determined in the control group (12.19 MPa). The bond strength results obtained in the shear test recommend the new material as a bracket adhesive to be used with orthophosphoric acid for etching.

  13. Influence of glass particle size of resin cements on bonding to glass ceramic: SEM and bond strength evaluation.

    PubMed

    Valentini, Fernanda; Moraes, Rafael R; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana; Boscato, Noéli

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of the filler particle size (micron or submicron) of experimental resin cements on the microtensile bond strength to a glass-ceramic pretreated with hydrofluoric acid (HFA) etching or alumina airborne-particle abrasion (AA). Cements were obtained from a Bis-GMA/TEGDMA mixture filled with 60 mass% micron-sized (1 ± 0.2 µm) or submicron-sized (180 ± 30 µm) Ba-Si-Al glass particles. Ceramic blocks (PM9; VITA) were treated with 10% HFA for 60 s or AA for 15 s. Silane and adhesive were applied. Ceramic blocks were bonded to resin composite blocks (Z250; 3M ESPE) using one of the cements. Bonded specimens were sectioned into beams (n = 20/group) and subjected to microtensile bond strength tests. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls' tests (5%). Failure modes were classified under magnification. Morphologies of the treated ceramic surfaces and bonded interfaces were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. The HFA-submicron group had lower bond strengths than the other groups. All AA-submicron specimens debonded prematurely. Mixed failures were predominant for HFA groups, whereas interfacial failures predominated for AA groups. SEM revealed a honeycomb-like aspect in the HFA-treated ceramic, whereas the AA-treated groups showed an irregular retentive pattern. Continuity of cement infiltration along the bonded interface was more uniform for HFA-treated compared to AA-treated specimens. Cracks toward the bulk of the ceramic were observed in AA-treated specimens. Particle size significantly influenced the ceramic bond strength, whereas surface treatment had a minor effect.

  14. Evaluation of shear bond strength of metallic and ceramic brackets bonded to enamel prepared with self-etching primer.

    PubMed

    Uysal, Tancan; Ustdal, Ayca; Kurt, Gokmen

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of different metallic and ceramic bracket bonding combinations using self-etching primers (SEPs). Eighty freshly extracted human premolar teeth were randomly divided into four equal groups for bonding with ceramic or metallic brackets as follows: group 1, metallic brackets bonded with conventional acid etching; group 2, metallic brackets bonded with Transbond Plus Self-Etching primer (TPSEP); group 3, ceramic brackets bonded as per group 1; group 4, ceramic brackets bonded as per group 2. The SBS of these brackets was measured and recorded in megapascals (MPa). The adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores were determined after bracket failure. Data were analyzed with the analysis of variance, Tukey, and chi-square tests. The bond strength of group 3 (mean: 36.7 +/- 11.8 MPa) was significantly higher than group 4 (mean: 26.6 +/- 8.9 MPa; P < 0.05), group 1 (mean: 25.5 +/- 5.1 MPa; P < 0.01), and group 2 (mean: 22.9 +/- 7.3 MPa; P < 0.001). No significant differences in debond locations were found among the groups (P > 0.05). Compared with conventional acid etching, SEPs significantly decreased the SBS of ceramic orthodontic brackets.

  15. Disinclusion of unerupted teeth by mean of self-ligating brackets: Effect of blood contamination on shear bond strength

    PubMed Central

    Sfondrini, Maria F.; Gatti, Sara; Gandini, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the effect of blood contamination on the shear bond strength and failure site of three different orthodontic self-ligating brackets. Study Design: 240 bovine permanent mandibular incisors were randomly divided into 12 groups of 20 specimens each. Orthodontic self-ligating brackets were tested under four different enamel surface conditions: a) dry, b) blood contamination before priming, c) blood contamination after priming, d) blood contamination before and after priming. Brackets were bonded to the teeth and subsequently tested using a Instron universal testing machine. Shear bond strength values and adhesive failure rate were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA and Tukey tests (strength values), and Chi squared test (ARI Scores). Results: Non-contaminated enamel surfaces showed highest bond strengths for all self ligating brackets. Under blood-contamination shear bond strengths lowered for all brackets tested. Groups contaminated before and after primer application showed the lowest shear bond strength. Significant differences in debond locations were found among the groups under the various enamel surface conditions. Conclusions: Blood contamination of enamel during the bonding procedure lowers bond strength values of self ligating brackets, expecially when contamination occur in different times of the bonding procedure. Key words:Disinclusion, self ligating brackets, blood, contamination, enamel, orthodontics, oral surgery. PMID:23229253

  16. Comparison of enamel and dentin shear bond strengths of current dental bonding adhesives from three bond generations.

    PubMed

    Meharry, M R; Moazzami, S M; Li, Y

    2013-01-01

    Durability is still a major challenge in adhesive dentistry. One of the biggest areas of development has been to simplify the bonding process by using all-in-one adhesives. The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) to dentin and enamel of nine dental bonding agents (DBAs) from three generations after simulated aging. For this study, 108 sound extracted human molars were randomly assigned to nine groups (n=12). The sample teeth were mounted in self-cure acrylic resin sectioned to provide paired enamel and dentin samples. All samples were polished with 240 and 600-grit silicon carbide sandpaper and randomly grouped according to the product and substrates (enamel or dentin). Herculite Ultra resin composite cylinders were bonded on each test surface, stored in 100% humidity at 37°C for 24 hours, and then thermocyled for 1,000 cycles at 5°C and 55°C. SBS testing was performed using an Ultratester at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Statistical analysis included two-factor analysis of variance, one-sample Wilcoxon and Kruskal-Wallis tests, and the Scheffe post hoc test at an alpha level of 0.05 using SAS version 9.2. Significant differences in SBS were observed between the sixth- and seventh-generation DBAs (p=0.002) but not between the sixth- and fourth-generation DBAs. Scheffe post hoc tests for the sixth-generation DBAs showed that some DBAs yielded significantly higher enamel SBS than others, but not as much as dentin SBS. As for the seventh-generation DBAs, similar post hoc tests showed significant variations in SBS between substrates (enamel and dentin) and DBAs tested. Significant main effects were also found for the different substrates for the fourth-generation (F[1,96]=10.532; p=0.003) and seventh-generation (F[1,96]=22.254; p<0.001) DBAs, but not for the sixth-generation DBAs (F[1,96]=1.895, p=0.172). The SBS was higher on dentin than enamel for the fourth- and seventh-generation DBAs. As expected, fourth- and sixth-generation DBAs

  17. Bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement to enamel and dentin.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Virgílio Vilas Boas; Rodrigues, José Roberto; da Silva, João Maurício Ferraz; Pagani, Clovis; Souza, Rodrigo Othávio Assunção

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of surface treatments and thermocycling on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of self-adhesive resin cement to human enamel and dentin. Eighty human third molars were selected. The crowns of 40 teeth were transversally sectioned, exposing the mid-coronal dentin. The buccal surfaces of the other 40 teeth were grinded to obtain a 5 mm2 flat enamel area. Eighty resin blocks were produced and cemented to the dental surfaces with RelyX Unicem, then grouped according to the surface treatment (n=10): UnicemC with no conditioning, UnicemP with 37% phosphoric acid/15 s, and UnicemPA with 37% phosphoric acid/15 s plus adhesive bonding (Single Bond 2). There were two control groups, one for enamel and the other for dentin: VR with 37% phosphoric acid/15 s plus adhesive bonding (Single Bond 2) plus Variolink II. The enamel-dentin resin cement blocks were sectioned to produce non-trimmed bar specimens, which were divided into two storage conditions: dry, μTBS immediately after cutting; TC (5,000 x; 5°C/55°C). The samples were submitted to μTBS, and data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test. The results showed statistical differences between UnicemC and the others. UnicemPA and VR showed better bond strength to dentin during the period before and after thermocycling, respectively. For the enamel, UnicemP showed better bond strength for both situations. Only for UnicemPA did the thermocycling significantly decrease the bond strength values. Within the limits of this study, it could be concluded that the bond strength is influenced by the surface treatments, and that thermocycling decreases the bond strength of all groups, but significantly only for UnicemPA.

  18. Microshear Bond Strength of Tri-Calcium Silicate-based Cements to Different Restorative Materials.

    PubMed

    Cengiz, Esra; Ulusoy, Nuran

    To evaluate the microshear bond strength of tri-calcium silicate-based materials to different restorative materials. Thirty-five disks of TheraCal LC and Biodentine were fabricated using teflon molds according to manufacturers' instructions. Then the specimens were randomly divided into 7 groups according to the materials applied: Fuji IX, Fuji II, Equia Fil, Vertise Flow, Filtek Bulk Fill Posterior Restorative, Filtek Z250 with Prime&Bond NT and with Clearfil SE Bond. All restorative materials were placed onto the disks using tygon tubes. Following a storage period, the specimens underwent microshear bond strength testing in a universal testing machine, and fracture modes were analyzed. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test. For all restorative materials, TheraCal LC showed significantly higher μSBS values compared to Biodentine. GIC based materials showed the lowest μSBS for TheraCal and Biodentine. For Biodentine, Filtek Z250 applied with Prime&Bond NT and Filtek Bulk Fill Posterior Restorative applied with Scotchbond Universal Adhesive exhibited the highest μSBS, while Filtek Z250 applied with Clearfil SE Bond revealed the highest bond strength to TheraCal LC. For all restorative materials tested in this study, TheraCal LC showed higher μSBS compared to Biodentine. For both TheraCal LC and Biodentine, the placement of GIC-based materials prior to composite resin restorations might decrease the bond strength. Composite resins applied with self-etching adhesives increased the bond strength of TheraCal LC; however, for Biodentine, application of etch-and-rinse adhesives may improve the adhesion of composite resins.

  19. Effect of cleaning methods on bond strength of self-etching adhesive to dentin

    PubMed Central

    Bronzato, Juliana Delatorre; Cecchin, Doglas; Miyagaki, Daniela Cristina; de Almeida, José Flávio Affonso; Ferraz, Caio Cezar Randi

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of cleaning methods to remove zinc oxide-eugenol-based root canal sealer (Endomethasone) on the bond strength of the self-etching adhesive to dentin. Materials and Methods: Twenty crowns of bovine incisors were cut to expose the pulp chamber. A zinc oxide- and eugenol-based sealer was placed for 10 min in contact with the pulp chamber dentin. Specimens were divided into four groups according to the cleaning method of dentin used: G1, no root canal sealer (control); G2, 0.9% sodium chlorite (NaCl); G3, ethanol; and G4, followed by diamond drill. After cleaning, the teeth were restored with composite resin and Clearfil SE Bond. All specimens were sectioned to produce rectangular sticks and dentin/resin interface was submitted to microtensile bond testing. The mean bond strengths were analyzed using ANOVA/Tukey (α = 0.05). Results: G3 and G4 showed bond strengths similar to the G1 (P > 0.05). A significant decrease in the bond strength in the G2 was observed (P < 0.05). G1, G3, and G4, the predominant failure mode was the mixed type. The prevalence of adhesive failure mode was verified in the G2. Conclusion: The cleaning methods affected the bond strength of the self-etching adhesive to dentin differently. PMID:26957789

  20. Haemostatic agents on the shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin

    PubMed Central

    Anil, Akansha; Sekhar, Anand; Ginjupalli, Kishor

    2015-01-01

    Background Dentin surface contaminated with haemostatic agents can interfere with the bonding of self-adhesive resin cement. Therefore the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of various haemostatic agents such as Aluminium chloride, Ferric sulphate and Tannic acid on the shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin luting agent. Material and Methods The buccal surfaces of extracted premolars were flattened to expose the dentine. The teeth were then randomly divided into four groups. In Group I Aluminium Chloride was applied on the flattened dentinal surface, in Group II Ferric Sulphate was applied to exposed dentin surface, in Group III tannic acid was applied on to the dentinal surface, and the control group, i.e. Group IV was rinsed with saline. After the surface treatment, all the teeth were air dried. Then a predetermined dimension of RelyX™ U200 self-adhesive resin cement was bonded to the pretreated dentin surfaces. The samples were then stored under 370C in distilled water for 24 hours under 100 % humidity. Following this each sample was tested for shear bond strength with an Instron testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. Results There was significant difference in the shear bond strength of control and tannic acid contaminated group (p<0.05), whereas there was no significant differences between the shear bond strength between control and aluminium chloride and ferric sulphate groups (p>0.05). Conclusions The usage of haemostatic agent can negatively affect the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement (Rely X) on to the dentin surface. As per the study Tannic acid significantly weakened the bond between the self-adhesive resin and dentin. Key words:Aluminium chloride, Ferric sulphate, haemostatic agent, self-adhesive resin cement, shear bond strength, Tannic acid. PMID:26330930

  1. Effect of different intracoronal bleaching methods on shear bond strength of ceramic brackets bonded to bleached enamel: An in-vitro study.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Vikas; Kumar, Piush; Sharma, Payal; Shetty, Divya

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the effect of different intracoronal bleaching methods on the shear bond strength and site of failure of ceramic brackets. Sixty freshly extracted human maxillary incisors were randomly divided into four groups (n = 15). Endodontic access cavity was prepared and root canals were filled, root fillings were removed 2mm apical to the cementoenamel junction, and a 2-mmthick layer of glass ionomer cement base was applied. Group 1 served as the control. Intracoronal bleaching was performed with 35% carbamide peroxide in group 2, sodium perborate in group 3, and 37.5% hydrogen peroxide in group 4. The teeth were immersed in artificial saliva for 4 weeks before bracket bonding. Ceramic brackets were bonded with composite resin and cured with LED light. After bonding, the shear bond strength of the brackets was tested with a universal testing machine. The site of bond failure was determined by modified ARI (Adhesive Remnant Index). The highest value of shear bond strength was measured in control group (18.67 ± 1.59 MPa), which was statistically significant from groups 2,3, and 4. There was no significant difference between groups 2 and 4. The lowest shear bond strength was measured in group 3. ARI scores were not significant from each other. Intracoronal bleaching significantly affected the shear bond strength of ceramic brackets even after 4 weeks of bleaching. Bleaching with sodium perborate affects shear bond strength more adversely than does bleaching with other agents like hydrogen peroxide and carbamide peroxide.

  2. Advanced Statistical Analyses to Reduce Inconsistency of Bond Strength Data.

    PubMed

    Minamino, T; Mine, A; Shintani, A; Higashi, M; Kawaguchi-Uemura, A; Kabetani, T; Hagino, R; Imai, D; Tajiri, Y; Matsumoto, M; Yatani, H

    2017-08-01

    This study was designed to clarify the interrelationship of factors that affect the value of microtensile bond strength (µTBS), focusing on nondestructive testing by which information of the specimens can be stored and quantified. µTBS test specimens were prepared from 10 noncarious human molars. Six factors of µTBS test specimens were evaluated: presence of voids at the interface, X-ray absorption coefficient of resin, X-ray absorption coefficient of dentin, length of dentin part, size of adhesion area, and individual differences of teeth. All specimens were observed nondestructively by optical coherence tomography and micro-computed tomography before µTBS testing. After µTBS testing, the effect of these factors on µTBS data was analyzed by the general linear model, linear mixed effects regression model, and nonlinear regression model with 95% confidence intervals. By the general linear model, a significant difference in individual differences of teeth was observed ( P < 0.001). A significantly positive correlation was shown between µTBS and length of dentin part ( P < 0.001); however, there was no significant nonlinearity ( P = 0.157). Moreover, a significantly negative correlation was observed between µTBS and size of adhesion area ( P = 0.001), with significant nonlinearity ( P = 0.014). No correlation was observed between µTBS and X-ray absorption coefficient of resin ( P = 0.147), and there was no significant nonlinearity ( P = 0.089). Additionally, a significantly positive correlation was observed between µTBS and X-ray absorption coefficient of dentin ( P = 0.022), with significant nonlinearity ( P = 0.036). A significant difference was also observed between the presence and absence of voids by linear mixed effects regression analysis. Our results showed correlations between various parameters of tooth specimens and µTBS data. To evaluate the performance of the adhesive more precisely, the effect of tooth variability and a method to reduce

  3. Shear bond strength of veneering ceramic to coping materials with different pre-surface treatments.

    PubMed

    Tarib, Natasya Ahmad; Anuar, Norsamihah; Ahmad, Marlynda

    2016-10-01

    Pre-surface treatments of coping materials have been recommended to enhance the bonding to the veneering ceramic. Little is known on the effect on shear bond strength, particularly with new coping material. The aim of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength of veneering ceramic to three coping materials: i) metal alloy (MA), ii) zirconia oxide (ZO), and iii) lithium disilicate (LD) after various pre-surface treatments. Thirty-two (n = 32) discs were prepared for each coping material. Four pre-surface treatments were prepared for each sub-group (n = 8); a) no treatment or control (C), b) sandblast (SB), c) acid etch (AE), and d) sandblast and acid etch (SBAE). Veneering ceramics were applied to all discs. Shear bond strength was measured with a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparisons tests. Mean shear bond strengths were obtained for MA (19.00 ± 6.39 MPa), ZO (24.45 ± 5.14 MPa) and LD (13.62 ± 5.12 MPa). There were statistically significant differences in types of coping material and various pre-surface treatments (P<.05). There was a significant correlation between coping materials and pre-surface treatment to the shear bond strength (P<.05). Shear bond strength of veneering ceramic to zirconia oxide was higher than metal alloy and lithium disilicate. The highest shear bond strengths were obtained in sandblast and acid etch treatment for zirconia oxide and lithium disilicate groups, and in acid etch treatment for metal alloy group.

  4. Shear bond strength of veneering ceramic to coping materials with different pre-surface treatments

    PubMed Central

    Anuar, Norsamihah; Ahmad, Marlynda

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Pre-surface treatments of coping materials have been recommended to enhance the bonding to the veneering ceramic. Little is known on the effect on shear bond strength, particularly with new coping material. The aim of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength of veneering ceramic to three coping materials: i) metal alloy (MA), ii) zirconia oxide (ZO), and iii) lithium disilicate (LD) after various pre-surface treatments. MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty-two (n = 32) discs were prepared for each coping material. Four pre-surface treatments were prepared for each sub-group (n = 8); a) no treatment or control (C), b) sandblast (SB), c) acid etch (AE), and d) sandblast and acid etch (SBAE). Veneering ceramics were applied to all discs. Shear bond strength was measured with a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparisons tests. RESULTS Mean shear bond strengths were obtained for MA (19.00 ± 6.39 MPa), ZO (24.45 ± 5.14 MPa) and LD (13.62 ± 5.12 MPa). There were statistically significant differences in types of coping material and various pre-surface treatments (P<.05). There was a significant correlation between coping materials and pre-surface treatment to the shear bond strength (P<.05). CONCLUSION Shear bond strength of veneering ceramic to zirconia oxide was higher than metal alloy and lithium disilicate. The highest shear bond strengths were obtained in sandblast and acid etch treatment for zirconia oxide and lithium disilicate groups, and in acid etch treatment for metal alloy group. PMID:27826383

  5. Bond strength of adhesive systems to Er,Cr:YSGG laser-irradiated dentin.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Adriana Oliveira; Reis, Andr Figueiredo; de Oliveira, Marcelo Tavares; de Freitas, Patr Cia Moreira; Aranha, Ana Cec Lia Corr A; Eduardo, Carlos de Paula; Giannini, Marcelo

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation and different adhesive procedures on bond strength of two bonding agents to dentin. Studies have shown that laser-irradiated dentinal tissue yields lower bond strengths than does nonirradiated dentin. In this study, different treatment methods of laser irradiating dentin were studied to enhance the bond strength of bonding agents to nonirradiated dentin. Third molars were wet ground with SiC until the occlusal flat dentin surface was exposed, and the teeth were randomly assigned to six groups (n=5). A two-step self-etching primer (Clearfil SE Bond, G1) and a two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive (Single Bond Plus, G2) were applied to the nonirradiated dentin surface according to manufacturer's instructions, as control groups. In G3 and G4, the same adhesives were applied after Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation, whereas in G5 and G6 adhesives were applied after Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation, phosphoric acid etching, and NaOCl deproteinization of etched dentin. The Er,Cr:YSGG laser worked at 2.78??m and the repetition rate was fixed at 20?Hz. Composite blocks were built on bonded surfaces and the teeth were stored for 24?h at 37?C. Restored teeth were vertically and serially sectioned to obtain bonded specimens for the bond strength test. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (?=5%). Laser irradiation reduced bond strengths for the two adhesives, regardless of acid etching and deproteinization of dentin post-irradiation (p<0.05). The self-etching primer system showed higher bond strengths to laser irradiated dentin than did Single Bond Plus (p<0.05). The adhesive systems applied to normal dentin yielded higher bond strengths than when they were applied to laser irradiated dentin (p<0.05). The self-etching primer seemed to be less affected by dentin irradiation with Er,Cr:YSGG laser. The additional etching and NaOCl solution did not overcome the effects of laser irradiation on

  6. Shear strength of a thermal barrier coating parallel to the bond coat

    SciTech Connect

    Cruse, T.A.; Dommarco, R.C.; Bastias, P.C.

    1998-01-01

    The static and low cycle fatigue strength of an air plasma sprayed (APS) partially stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coating (TBC) is experimentally evaluated. The shear testing utilized the Iosipescu shear test arrangement. Testing was performed parallel to the TBC-substrate interface. The TBC testing required an innovative use of steel extensions with the TBC bonded between the steel extensions to form the standard Iosipescu specimen shape. The test method appears to have been successful. Fracture of the TBC was initiated in shear, although unconstrained specimen fractures propagated at the TBC-bond coat interface. The use of side grooves on the TBC was successful in keeping the failure in the gage section and did not appear to affect the shear strength values that were measured. Low cycle fatigue failures were obtained at high stress levels approaching the ultimate strength of the TBC. The static and fatigue strengths do not appear to be markedly different from tensile properties for comparable TBC material.

  7. Effect of cyclic impact load on shear bond strength of zirconium dioxide ceramics.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Naoko; Shinya, Akikazu; Yokoyama, Daiichiro; Gomi, Harunori; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2011-06-01

    To investigate the influence of cyclic impact load and the number of load cycles on compressive shear bond strength under the three different cements. The following materials were used: Super Bond C&B (SB) and Panavia Fluoro Cement (PF) as adhesive resin cements, Fuji Luting (FL) as a resin-modified glass-ionomer cement, and zirconium dioxide ceramics as adherend. Before the shear bond test, three different impact loading conditions (compressive direction, shear direction, and no impact) and the number of load cycles (1 to 106 cycles), were performed. A total of 189 specimens (n = 3/group) were randomly assigned to groups and tested. A cyclic impact test was performed by applying a load of 98N at a distance of 40 mm and a loading cycle frequency of 1 Hz. All results were statistically analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparison test. Shear bond strengths of SB, PF, and FL subjected to no cyclic impact load were 21.6 to 53.8 MPa in SB, 27.0 to 63.6 MPa in PF, and 20.0 to 35.9 MPa in FL. The shear bond strength of SB and PF increased to a certain degree from one to 105 cycles, while FL did likewise from one to 104 cycles. The shear bond strengths of SB, PF, and FL were greatest without cyclic impact, followed by compressive and then shear cyclic impact.

  8. Shear bond strength of resin composite to enamel and dentin submitted to a carbamide peroxide dentifrice.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Bruna Maria Covre Garcia; Flório, Flávia Martão; Basting, Roberta Tarkany

    2007-10-01

    To assess the shear bond strength of resin composite to human enamel and dentin after using a whitening dentifrice containing carbamide peroxide for 21 days. Thirty enamel and 30 dentin slabs were embedded, flattened and randomly divided into three groups (n=10) that received different treatments: carbamide peroxide containing dentifrice (Rembrandt Plus), fluoride containing dentifrice (Close Up with fluoride), and immersion in artificial saliva as the control group. Applications were made for a 15-minute period daily, immersing the slabs in a suspension with distilled water and dentifrice in the ratio of 3:1 (weight) for 21 days. For the rest of the time, the slabs were kept in an artificial saliva solution. After the last application, an adhesive system (Single Bond) was used to bond resin-based composite cylinders (Z100) to the enamel and dentin surfaces for the shear bond strength tests. These tests were carried out in a universal testing machine at a speed of 0.5 mm/minute. ANOVA and the Tukey test for enamel and Kruskal-Wallis and the Dunn Method for dentin, showed significant differences between slabs treated with Rembrandt Plus (REM) and the artificial saliva control group, with higher values for REM (P < 0.05). There were no differences in mean bond strengths of enamel and dentin treated with Close Up with fluoride (CLO) and REM, nor were any differences shown between CLO and the artificial saliva control group. A whitening dentifrice containing carbamide peroxide increased the bond strength of restorative systems.

  9. Enamel and dentin bond strengths of a new self-etch adhesive system.

    PubMed

    Walter, Ricardo; Swift, Edward J; Boushell, Lee W; Braswell, Krista

    2011-12-01

    statement of problem:  Self-etch adhesives typically are mildly acidic and therefore less effective than etch-and-rinse adhesives for bonding to enamel.   The purpose of this study was to evaluate the enamel and dentin shear bond strengths of a new two-step self-etch adhesive system, OptiBond XTR (Kerr Corporation, Orange, CA, USA).   The labial surfaces of 80 bovine teeth were ground to create flat, 600-grit enamel or dentin surfaces. Composite was bonded to enamel or dentin using the new two-step self-etch system or a three-step etch-and-rinse (OptiBond FL, Kerr), two-step self-etch (Clearfil SE Bond, Kuraray America, Houston, TX, USA), or one-step self-etch adhesive (Xeno IV, Dentsply Caulk, Milford, DE, USA). Following storage in water for 24 hours, shear bond strengths were determined using a universal testing machine. The enamel and dentin data sets were subjected to separate analysis of variance and Tukey's tests. Scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate the effects of each system on enamel.   Mean shear bond strengths to enamel ranged from 18.1 MPa for Xeno IV to 41.0 MPa for OptiBond FL. On dentin, the means ranged from 33.3 MPa for OptiBond FL to 47.1 MPa for Clearfil SE Bond. OptiBond XTR performed as well as Clearfil SE Bond on dentin and as well as OptiBond FL on enamel. Field emission scanning electron microscope revealed that OptiBond XTR produced an enamel etch pattern that was less defined than that of OptiBond FL (37.5% phosphoric acid) but more defined than that of Clearfil SE Bond or Xeno IV.   The new two-step self-etch adhesive system formed excellent bonds to enamel and dentin in vitro. OptiBond XTR, a new two-step self-etch adhesive system, is a promising material for bonding to enamel as well as to dentin. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Evaluation of Bond Strength of Pressed and Layered Veneering Ceramics to Nickel-Chromium Alloy

    PubMed Central

    Farzin, Mitra; Khaledi, Amir Alireza; Malekpour, Behnam; Naseri, Mohammad Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem The success of metal- ceramic- restorations (MCR) depends on the presence of strong bond between porcelain and metal substructure. Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of hot pressing technique on the bond strength of a metal-porcelain composite in comparison to layering technique. Materials and Method Thirty Nickel-Chromium specimens were produced by two methods; conventional porcelain layering on metal and hot pressing (n=15). Bond strengths of all specimens were assessed by the means of three–point bending test according to ISO 9693: 1999 (E) instructions. The data were analyzed using Students t-test (p< 0.001). Results The mean ± SD bond strength of conventional and hot pressing technique was 48.29 ± 6.02 and 56.52 ± 4.97, respectively. Therefore, the conventional layering technique yielded significantly lower mean bond strength values than hot pressing technique (p< 0.001). Conclusion This study showed that it is possible to improve metal–porcelain bond strength significantly by applying an overpressure during porcelain firing. PMID:26535402

  11. In vitro analysis of shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index of different metal brackets

    PubMed Central

    Henkin, Fernanda de Souza; de Macêdo, Érika de Oliveira Dias; Santos, Karoline da Silva; Schwarzbach, Marília; Samuel, Susana Maria Werner; Mundstock, Karina Santos

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: There is a great variety of orthodontic brackets in the Brazilian market, and constantly evaluating them is critical for professionals to know their properties, so as to be able to choose which product best suits their clinical practice. Objectives: To evaluate the bond strength and the adhesive remnant index (ARI) of different brands of metal brackets. Material and Methods: A total of 105 bovine incisors were used, and brackets of different brands were bonded to teeth. Seven different bracket brands were tested (MorelliTM, American OrthodonticsTM, TP OrthodonticsTM, Abzil-3MTM, OrthometricTM, TecnidentTM and UNIDENTM). Twenty-four hours after bonding, shear bond strength test was performed; and after debonding, the ARI was determined by using an optical microscope at a 10-fold increase. Results: Mean shear bond strength values ranged from 3.845 ± 3.997 (MorelliTM) to 9.871 ± 5.106 MPa (TecnidentTM). The majority of the ARI index scores was 0 and 1. Conclusion: Among the evaluated brackets, the one with the lowest mean shear bond strength values was MorelliTM. General evaluation of groups indicated that a greater number of bond failure occurred at the enamel/adhesive interface. PMID:28125142

  12. Effect of 10% Sodium Ascorbate on Shear Bond Strength of Bleached Teeth - An in-vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Ponnappa, K C; Nitin, Mirdha; Ramesh, Sachhi; Sharanappa, Kambale; Nishant, Ajgaonkar

    2015-01-01

    Background Patient often requires some additional interventions such as replacement of old restorations, laminates and veneers after bleaching, for aesthetic purposes. The residual oxygen inhibits polymerization of resin based materials which results in reduced bond strength of the restorations. Some techniques are available to solve the clinical problems related to the post bleach compromised bond strength. Objectives The purpose of this study is to evaluate, the role of 10% sodium ascorbate on reversing the compromised bond strength and compare enamel shear bond strength of 5th and 6th generation dentine bonding agents on bleached and unbleached teeth. Materials and Methods Eighty freshly extracted human anterior teeth were assigned in to Group A and Group B of 40 teeth each. Samples in both groups were subdivided in to 4 subgroups of 10 teeth each. In Group A composite resins was bonded using 5th generation dentine bonding agent (3M Single Bond) and Group B was bonded using 6th generation (3M ESPE Adper SE Plus). Subgroups were subjected to the procedure as, A1;B1 etching and bonding (control), A2; B2 bleaching, etching and immediate bonding, A3; B3 bleaching,10% ascorbic acid treatment for 10 minutes after that etching and bonding immediately, A4; B4 bleaching, storage in artificial saliva for 4 days and then etching and bonding. Pola office, in office bleach (SDI (082216) was used for bleaching. The specimens were subjected to shear load in a Universal testing machine to evaluate bond strength. Results A decrease in bond strength was seen with 6th generation adhesive system compared to 5th generation bonding system, which is statistically significant, p<0.001. Conclusion Treating the bleached enamel surfaces when treated with 10% sodium ascorbate, which reverses the compromised bond strength and is a good alternative to delayed bonding. PMID:26393201

  13. The effect of enamel bleaching on the shear bond strengths of metal and ceramic brackets.

    PubMed

    Oztaş, E; Bağdelen, G; Kiliçoğlu, H; Ulukapi, H; Aydin, I

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of bleaching and delayed bonding on the shear bond strengths of metal and ceramic brackets bonded with light and chemically cure composite resin to human enamel. One hundred and twenty extracted human premolar teeth were randomly divided into three groups of 40 each. The first two groups were bleached with 20 per cent carbamide peroxide (CP) at-home bleaching agent. No bleaching procedures were applied to the third group and served as control. The first two and control groups were divided into equal subgroups according to different adhesive-bracket combinations. Specimens in group 1 (n = 40) were bonded 24 hours after bleaching process was completed while the specimens in group 2 (n = 40) were bonded 14 days after. The specimens in all groups were debonded with a Universal testing machine while the modified adhesive remnant index was used to evaluate fracture properties. No statistically significant differences were found between the shear bond strengths of metal and ceramic brackets bonded to bleached enamel after 24 hours, 14 days, and unbleached enamel with light or chemical cure adhesives (P > 0.05). The mode of failure was mostly at the bracket/adhesive interface and cohesive failures within the resin were also observed. Our findings indicated that at-home bleaching agents that contain 20 per cent CP did not significantly affect the shear bond strength of metal and ceramic orthodontic brackets to enamel when bonding is performed 24 hours or 14 days after bleaching.

  14. Effects of coloring procedures on zirconia/veneer ceramics bond strength

    PubMed Central

    Özat, Pelin; Eroğlu, Erdal

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The most common failure seen in restorations with a zirconia core is total or layered delamination of the ceramic veneer. In the present study, the shear bond strengths between veneering ceramics and colored zirconia oxide core materials were evaluated. MATERIALS AND METHODS Zirconia discs (15 × 12 × 1.6 mm) were divided into 11 groups of 12 discs each. Groups were colored according to the Vita Classic scale: A3, B1, C4, D2, and D4. Each group was treated with the recommended shading time for 3 s, or with prolonged shading for 60 s, except for the control group. Samples were veneered with 3 mm thick and 3.5 mm in diameter translucent ceramic and subjected to shear test in a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's HSD tests were used for comparisons of the groups having the same shading times. A paired t-test was used for groups of the same color (3 s/60 s). RESULTS Among the 11 groups investigated C4 (3 s) had the highest bond strength with a value of 36.40 MPa, while A3 (3 s) showed the lowest bond strength with a value of 29.47 MPa. CONCLUSION Coloring procedures can affect zirconia/ceramic bond strength. However, the results also showed that bond strengths of all the investigated groups were clinically acceptable. PMID:25551004

  15. Effects of coloring procedures on zirconia/veneer ceramics bond strength.

    PubMed

    Tuncel, İlkin; Özat, Pelin; Eroğlu, Erdal

    2014-12-01

    The most common failure seen in restorations with a zirconia core is total or layered delamination of the ceramic veneer. In the present study, the shear bond strengths between veneering ceramics and colored zirconia oxide core materials were evaluated. Zirconia discs (15 × 12 × 1.6 mm) were divided into 11 groups of 12 discs each. Groups were colored according to the Vita Classic scale: A3, B1, C4, D2, and D4. Each group was treated with the recommended shading time for 3 s, or with prolonged shading for 60 s, except for the control group. Samples were veneered with 3 mm thick and 3.5 mm in diameter translucent ceramic and subjected to shear test in a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's HSD tests were used for comparisons of the groups having the same shading times. A paired t-test was used for groups of the same color (3 s/60 s). Among the 11 groups investigated C4 (3 s) had the highest bond strength with a value of 36.40 MPa, while A3 (3 s) showed the lowest bond strength with a value of 29.47 MPa. Coloring procedures can affect zirconia/ceramic bond strength. However, the results also showed that bond strengths of all the investigated groups were clinically acceptable.

  16. Influence of chlorhexidine application on longitudinal adhesive bond strength in deciduous teeth.

    PubMed

    Leitune, Vicente Castelo Branco; Portella, Fernando Freitas; Bohn, Priscila Veit; Collares, Fabrício Mezzomo; Samuel, Susana Maria Werner

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of applying 2% chlorhexidine for 30 seconds after phosphoric acid conditioning of dentin on the immediate and long-term bond strengths in deciduous teeth. The occlusal enamel was removed from 40 human sound deciduous molars, which were exfoliated by natural means, and the dentin was conditioned with 37% phosphoric acid for 15 seconds and washed with running water. The specimens were divided into two groups of 20 teeth. The test group received an application of 2% chlorhexidine for 30 seconds prior to a three-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system, whereas the control group received only the adhesive system. Three cylindrical restorations were made with a composite resin for each tooth. Ten teeth in each group were submitted to a microshear bond strength test after 24 hours, while the remaining teeth were stored in distilled water at 37 °C for 6 months before testing the microshear bond strength. The test group had a higher bond strength than did the control group after 6 months of storage. No statistical differences were found when groups with the same dentin treatment were compared at different times. Short applications of chlorhexidine at low concentrations prevent hybrid layer degradation and positively affect bond strength over time.

  17. The effect of ultrafast fiber laser application on the bond strength of resin cement to titanium.

    PubMed

    Ates, Sabit Melih; Korkmaz, Fatih Mehmet; Caglar, Ipek Satıroglu; Duymus, Zeynep Yeşil; Turgut, Sedanur; Bagis, Elif Arslan

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of ultrafast fiber laser treatment on the bond strength between titanium and resin cement. A total of 60 pure titanium discs (15 mm × 2 mm) were divided into six test groups (n = 10) according to the surface treatment used: group (1) control, machining; group (2) grinding with a diamond bur; group (3) ultrafast fiber laser application; group (4) resorbable blast media (RBM) application; group (5) electro-erosion with copper; and group (6) sandblasting. After surface treatments, resin cements were applied to the treated titanium surfaces. Shear bond strength testing of the samples was performed with a universal testing machine after storing in distilled water at 37 °C for 24 h. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD post hoc test were used to analyse the data (P < 0.05). The highest bond strength values were observed in the laser application group, while the lowest values were observed in the grinding group. Sandblasting and laser application resulted in significantly higher bond strengths than control treatment (P < 0.05). Ultrafast fiber laser treatment and sandblasting may improve the bond strength between resin cement and titanium.

  18. Effect of Aging on Bond Strength of Two Soft Lining Materials to a Denture Base Polymer.

    PubMed

    Salloum, Alaa'a M

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was evaluation the effect of immersion in distilled water and inorganic artificial saliva on the shear bond strength of a heat-polymerized and an auto-polymerized silicone-based denture lining materials. The denture liners investigated were Molloplast-B (heat-polymerized), and Mollosil plus (auto-polymerized). The soft liner specimens were 10 × 10 × 2.5 mm and were processed between two poly(methylmethacrylate) plates. Thirty shear specimens for each type of test lining material were prepared. Specimens were divided equally into three groups for each test lining material: first group, specimens were tested after 48 h of preparation without immersion; second group, specimens were tested following immersion in distilled water at 37 °C for 12 months; and third group, specimens were tested following immersion in inorganic artificial saliva at 37 °C for 12 months. Shear bond strength was measured using an universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 40 mm/min and failure mode (adhesive, cohesive and mixed) after debonding was assessed. Data were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) (α = 0.05). ANOVA was followed by Bonferroni post hoc tests for pairwise comparisons. A significant difference in shear bond strength was detected between Molloplast-B and Mollosil plus following immersion in distilled water and artificial saliva. Molloplast-B demonstrated considerably higher shear strength than Mollosil plus after immersion. Shear strengths of the lining materials investigated reduced significantly after immersion in both solutions. Visual examination after separation revealed that the soft materials tested exhibited mostly adhesive failure. The effect of immersion in distilled water and inorganic artificial saliva on bond strength of test lining materials was perceivable; however, both of them had acceptable bond strength and might be proper for long-term use.

  19. Effects of modifying the bonding protocol on the shear bond strength of metallic and ceramic orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Thais Maria Friere; Janson, Guilherme; Somensi, Joyce; Pinzan, Arnaldo; Francisconi, Paulo Afonso Silveira; Sathler, Renata; Henriques, Jose Fernando Castanha

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the in vitro shear bond strength and failure site of metallic and ceramic orthodontic brackets with modified bonding protocols. Sixty bovine mandibular incisors with similar anatomy were selected and divided into six groups (n = 10). In the first protocol, metallic and ceramic brackets were bonded according to the manufacturers' directions (controls); in the second protocol, the step of photocuring with the primer agent was eliminated; and in the third protocol, the primer agent was applied on the tooth and on the bracket base, followed by application of the composite adhesive on the bracket base, with one-step photocure. The same orthodontic adhesive was used for all groups. Shear bond strengths were measured and adhesive remnant index scores (ARI) were determined after bracket failure. The results demonstrated similar shear bond strengths in the protocols but presented significantly greater values for the metallic groups (two-way ANOVA, P < 0.05). ARI scores were compared with chi-square tests, and the ceramic brackets had significantly greater ARI scores compared to the metallic brackets. Based on these results, the manufacturer's bonding protocol can be modified to save clinical time without compromising adhesion of the brackets.

  20. Effect of Mucoprotein on the Bond Strength of Resin Composite to Human Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Pinzon, Lilliam M; Powers, John M; O'Keefe, Kathy; Dusevish, Vladimir; Spencer, Paulette; Marshall, Grayson W

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the bond strength and analyze the morphology of the dentin-adhesive interface of two etch and rinse and two self-etch adhesive systems with two kinds of artificial saliva (with and without 450 mg/L mucin) contamination under different conditions of decontaminating the interface. Bonded specimens were sectioned perpendicularly to the bonded surface in 1-mm thick slabs. These 1-mm thick slabs were remounted in acrylic blocks and sectioned in sticks perpendicular to the bonding interfaces with a 1-mm2 area. Nine specimens from each condition were tested after 24 hours on a testing machine (Instron) at a speed of 0.5 mm/min for a total of 360 specimens. Means and standard deviations of bond strength (MPa) were calculated. ANOVA showed significant differences as well as Fisher's PLSD intervals (p<0.05). Different groups results ranges: Control group 34-60 MPa, saliva without mucin 0-52 MPa, and saliva with mucin 0-57 MPa. Failure sites were mixed, adhesive failure was common for the low bond strength results. P&BNT with ideal conditions and following the manufacturer's instructions (control) had the highest bond strengths and the dentin-adhesive interface exhibited an ideal morphology of a etch and rinse system. SEM gave complementary visual evidence of the effect in the dentin/adhesive interface structure with some contaminated conditions compared to their respective control groups. This in-vitro artificial saliva model with and without mucin showed that an organic component of saliva could increase or decrease the bond strength depending on the specific bonding agent and decontamination procedure. PMID:14505182

  1. Effect of mucoprotein on the bond strength of resin composite to human dentin

    PubMed Central

    Powers, John M.; O’Keefe, Kathy L.; Dusevish, Vladimir; Spencer, Paulette; Marshall, Grayson W.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the bond strength and analyze the morphology of the dentin-adhesive interface of two etch and rinse and two self-etch adhesive systems with two kinds of artificial saliva (with and without 450 mg/L mucin) contamination under different conditions of decontaminating the interface. Bonded specimens were sectioned perpendicularly to the bonded surface in 1-mm thick slabs. These 1-mm thick slabs were remounted in acrylic blocks and sectioned in sticks perpendicular to the bonding interfaces with a 1-mm2 area. Nine specimens from each condition were tested after 24 h on a testing machine (Instron) at a speed of 0.5 mm/min for a total of 360 specimens. Mean and standard deviations of bond strength (MPa) were calculated. ANOVA showed significant differences as well as Fisher’s PLSD intervals (p < 0.05). The following values are the results for different groups: Control group 34–60 MPa, saliva without mucin 0–52 MPa, and saliva with mucin 0–57 MPa. Failure sites were mixed and adhesive failure was common for the low bond strength results. P&BNT with ideal conditions and following the manufacturer’s instructions (control) had the highest bond strengths and the dentin-adhesive interface exhibited an ideal morphology of etch-and-rinse system. SEM gave complementary visual evidence of the effect in the dentin/adhesive interface structure with some contaminated conditions compared with their respective control groups. This in vitro artificial saliva model with and without mucin showed that an organic component of saliva could increase or decrease the bond strength depending on the specific bonding agent and decontamination procedure. PMID:21516294

  2. Effect of mucoprotein on the bond strength of resin composite to human dentin.

    PubMed

    Pinzon, Lilliam Marie; Powers, John M; O'Keefe, Kathy L; Dusevish, Vladimir; Spencer, Paulette; Marshall, Grayson W

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the bond strength and analyze the morphology of the dentin-adhesive interface of two etch and rinse and two self-etch adhesive systems with two kinds of artificial saliva (with and without 450 mg/L mucin) contamination under different conditions of decontaminating the interface. Bonded specimens were sectioned perpendicularly to the bonded surface in 1-mm thick slabs. These 1-mm thick slabs were remounted in acrylic blocks and sectioned in sticks perpendicular to the bonding interfaces with a 1-mm(2) area. Nine specimens from each condition were tested after 24 h on a testing machine (Instron) at a speed of 0.5 mm/min for a total of 360 specimens. Mean and standard deviations of bond strength (MPa) were calculated. ANOVA showed significant differences as well as Fisher's PLSD intervals (p < 0.05). The following values are the results for different groups: Control group 34-60 MPa, saliva without mucin 0-52 MPa, and saliva with mucin 0-57 MPa. Failure sites were mixed and adhesive failure was common for the low bond strength results. P&BNT with ideal conditions and following the manufacturer's instructions (control) had the highest bond strengths and the dentin-adhesive interface exhibited an ideal morphology of etch-and-rinse system. SEM gave complementary visual evidence of the effect in the dentin/adhesive interface structure with some contaminated conditions compared with their respective control groups. This in vitro artificial saliva model with and without mucin showed that an organic component of saliva could increase or decrease the bond strength depending on the specific bonding agent and decontamination procedure.

  3. Effect of surface conditioning methods on the bond strength of luting cement to ceramics.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2003-12-01

    This study evaluated the effect of three different surface conditioning methods on the bond strength of a Bis-GMA based luting cement to six commercial dental ceramics. Six disc shaped ceramic specimens (glass ceramics, glass infiltrated alumina, glass infiltrated zirconium dioxide reinforced alumina) were used for each test group yielding a total number of 216 specimens. The specimens in each group were randomly assigned to one of the each following treatment conditions: (1) hydrofluoric acid etching, (2) airborne particle abrasion, (3) tribochemical silica coating. The resin composite luting cement was bonded to the conditioned and silanized ceramics using polyethylene molds. All specimens were tested at dry and thermocycled (6.000, 5-55 degrees C, 30 s) conditions. The shear bond strength of luting cement to ceramics was measured in a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). In dry conditions, acid etched glass ceramics exhibited significantly higher results (26.4-29.4 MPa) than those of glass infiltrated alumina ceramics (5.3-18.1 MPa) or zirconium dioxide (8.1 MPa) (ANOVA, P<0.001). Silica coating with silanization increased the bond strength significantly for high-alumina ceramics (8.5-21.8 MPa) and glass infiltrated zirconium dioxide ceramic (17.4 MPa) compared to that of airborne particle abrasion (ANOVA, P<0.001). Thermocycling decreased the bond strengths significantly after all of the conditioning methods tested. Bond strengths of the luting cement tested on the dental ceramics following surface conditioning methods varied in accordance with the ceramic types. Hydrofluoric acid gel was effective mostly on the ceramics having glassy matrix in their structures. Roughening the ceramic surfaces with air particle abrasion provided higher bond strengths for high-alumina ceramics and the values increased more significantly after silica coating/silanization.

  4. Tensile bond strength of composite to air-abraded dentin.

    PubMed

    Geitel, Birgit; Wischnewski, Regine; Jahn, Klaus-Roland; Barthel, R Claudia; Zimmer, Stefan; Roulet, Jean-François

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of air abrasive treatment of dentin surfaces on the tensile bond strength between dentin and two different composite-adhesive-systems Multi-Purpose/Z100 and OptiBond FL/Herculite XR). The crowns of 200 maxillary central incisors were embedded in resin and then ground to expose a dentin surface 5 mm in diameter. The surfaces were etched or abraded by using a KCP 1000 device with different treatment conditions. Adhesive systems were applied according to the manufacturer's instructions and composite cylinders were bonded to the conditioned dentinal surface using a split mold. Tensile bond strength values and failure modes were then determined. Tensile bond strength values of the acid-etched dentin-composite-interface were significantly higher than for the interface between air-abraded dentin and composite, independent of the composite-adhesive-system used. The light microscopic evaluation showed mainly adhesive and combined adhesive-cohesive fractures. Significantly more adhesive fractures could be observed between abraded dentin and composite than between etched dentin and composite.

  5. Shear bond strength of a hot pressed Au-Pd-Pt alloy-porcelain dental composite.

    PubMed

    Henriques, B; Soares, D; Silva, F S

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of hot pressing on the shear bond strength of a Au-Pt-Pd alloy-porcelain composite. Several metal-porcelain composites specimens were produced by two different routes: conventional porcelain fused to metal (PFM) and hot pressing. In the latter case, porcelain was hot pressed onto a polished surface (PPPS) as well as a roughened one (PPRS). Bond strength of all metal-porcelain composites were assessed by the means of a shear test performed in a universal test machine (crosshead speed: 0.5 mm/min) until fracture. Interfaces of fractured specimens as well as undestroyed interface specimens were examined with optical microscope, stereomicroscope, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS). The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA followed by Tuckey's test (p<0.05). Shear bond strength of conventional PFM specimens were in line with the upper range of literature data (83±14 MPa). Hot pressing proved to significantly increase bond strength between metal and porcelain (p<0.05). For both polished and roughened surface the shear bond strength values for hot pressed specimens were 120±16 MPa and 129±5 MPa, respectively, which represents an improvement of more than 50% relatively to a conventional PFM. Roughened surface did not have a significant effect on bond strength of hot pressed specimens (p>0.05). This study shows that it is possible to significantly improve metal-porcelain bond strength by applying an overpressure during porcelain firing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Bond strength to high-crystalline content zirconia after different surface treatments.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Grace M Dias; Silva, Nelson R F A; Paulillo, Luis A M S; De Goes, Mario F; Rekow, E Dianne; Thompson, Van P

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of primers, luting systems and aging on bond strength to zirconium oxide substrates. Eighteen zirconia discs (19.5 x 4 mm) were polished and treated (n = 3) either with a MDP primer (Md) or with a MDP and VBATDT primer (MV). In the control group (n = 3) no surface chemical treatment was performed. Zirconia specimens were cemented to prepolymerized composite discs utilizing resin cements - RelyX Unicem or Panavia 21 (RU and Pa, respectively). After 24 h, samples were sectioned for microtensile testing and returned to water at 37 degrees C for two different periods before being tested: 72 h or 60 days + thermocycling (5-55 degrees C/5000 cycles). Bond strength testing was performed at 1 mm/min. Values in MPa were analyzed through ANOVA and Tukey's Studentized Range (HSD) (p > 0.05). The application of MV primer resulted in the highest bond strength (22.77 MPa), statistically superior to Md primer (12.78 MPa), and control groups presented the lowest values (9.17 MPa). When luting systems were compared, RU promoted the highest bond strength (16.07 MPa) in comparison with Pa (13.75 MPa). The average bond strength decrease after aging (9.35 MPa) when compared with initial values (20.46 MPa). The results presented by this in vitro study suggest that a chemical surface treatment based on the MDP and VBATDT combination may improve bond strength between zirconia and luting system, without any previous mechanical treatment, depending on the luting system used. This chemical treatment may result in a reliable alternative to achieve adequate and durable bond strength.

  7. Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Feldspathic CAD/CAM Ceramic with Dentin using 2 Bonding Agents and 2 Surface Treatments- An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramaniam, Muthukumar; Chidambaranathan, Ahila Singaravel; Srinivasan, Suganya

    2015-01-01

    Background All ceramics are the material of choice for aesthetic tooth replacements. The success of all ceramic restoration depends on the bond between the ceramic and the tooth surface hence this study was done to evaluate the shear bond strength of Feldspathic CAD/CAM ceramic with <5% hydrofluoric acid and hydrofluoric acid combined with silane coupling agent. Aim To evaluate the shear bond strength of Feldspathic CAD/CAM ceramic with Dentin using bonding agents Prime & Bond NT, XenoIII and surface treatments <5% hydrofluric acid, hydrofluric acid combined with silane coupling agent. Materials and Methods Forty cylinders with 6mm diameter and 5mm height were milled from CEREC Blocs through CAD/CAM technology. Cerec blocks were bonded to etch freshly extracted tooth surface using a self etch and total etch bonding agent. The samples were divided into 4 groups. Group A1-Ceramic cylinders were treated with < 5% HF and bonded using Prime & Bond NT and Variolink II. Group A2- treated with < 5% HF and silane coupling agent and bonded same as group A1. Group B1- treated with < 5% HF and bonded using Xeno III and Variolink II. Group B2- treated with < 5% HF and silane coupling agent, and bonded same as Group A3. The shear bond strength was evaluated after 24 hours by Storing in distilled water in Instron 3385 universal testing machine with 10-KN force. Results Statistical analysis was done using student’s t-test and Lavene’s test. The p-value <0.05 shows significant difference in bond strength between A1 and A2 & B1and B2. Conclusion The application of a silane coupling agent to the ceramic surface after etching with hydrofluoric acid increased the adhesion strength with both bonding agents. Student’s t-test revealed a significant effect of silanization. PMID:26674522

  8. Braze alloy holds bonding strength over wide temperature range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Copper-based quaternary alloys of the solid solution type is used for vacuum furnace brazing of large stainless steel components at a maximum temperature of 1975 deg F. The alloy has high bonding strength and good ductility over a temperature range extending from the cryogenic region to approximately 800 deg F.

  9. Influence of different repair procedures on bond strength of adhesive filling materials to etched enamel in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hannig, Christian; Hahn, Petra; Thiele, Patrick-Philipp; Attin, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Contamination of etched enamel with repair bond agents during repair of dental restorations may interfere with the bonding of composite to enamel. This study examined the bond strength of adhesive filling materials to etched bovine enamel after pre-treatment with the repair systems Monobond S, Silibond and Co-Jet. The materials Tetric Ceram, Dyract and Definite and their corresponding bonding agents (Syntac Single Comp, Prime & Bond NT, Etch and Prime) were tested in combination with the repair systems. One hundred and thirty-five enamel specimens were etched (37% phosphoric acid, 60 seconds) and equally distributed among three groups (A-C). In Group A, the repair materials were applied on etched enamel followed by applying the composite materials without using their respective bonding material. In Group B, the composite materials were placed on etched enamel after applying the repair materials and bonding agents. In control Group C, the composite materials and bonding agents were applied on etched enamel without using the repair systems. In each sub-group, every composite material was applied on 15 specimens. Samples were stored in artificial saliva for 14 days and thermocycled 1,000 times (5 degrees C/55 degrees C). The shear bond strength of the samples were then determined in a universal testing machine (ISO 10477). Applying Monobond or Silibond followed by the use of its respective bonding agents resulted in a bond strength that was not statistically different from the controls for all filling materials (Group C). The three composites that used Monobond and Silibond without applying the corresponding bonding agent resulted in bond strengths that were significantly lower than the controls. Utilizing the Co-Jet-System drastically reduced the bond strength of composites on etched enamel. Contamination of etched enamel with the repairing bonding agents Monobond and Silibond does not interfere with bond strength if the application of Monobond and Silibond is

  10. Effects of endodontic tri-antibiotic paste on bond strengths of dentin adhesives to coronal dentin

    PubMed Central

    Mirzakoucheki, Parvin; Walter, Ricardo; Jahromi, Maryam Zare; Mirsattari, Sanaz; Akbarzadeh, Navid

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of tri-antibiotic paste (TAP) on microtensile bond strengths (MTBS) of dental adhesives to dentin. Materials and Methods Sixty extracted molars had their occlusal surfaces flattened to expose dentin. They were divided into two groups, i.e., control group with no dentin treatment and experimental group with dentin treatment with TAP. After 10 days, specimens were bonded using self-etch (Filtek P90 adhesive) or etch-and-rinse (Adper Single Bond Plus) adhesives and restored with composite resin. Teeth were sectioned into beams, and the specimens were subjected to MTBS test. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests. Results There was a statistically significant interaction between dentin treatment and adhesive on MTBS to coronal dentin (p = 0.003). Despite a trend towards worse MTBS being noticed in the experimental groups, TAP application showed no significant effect on MTBS (p = 0.064). Conclusions The etch-and-rinse adhesive Adper Single Bond Plus presented higher mean bond strengths than the self-etch adhesive Filtek P90, irrespective of the group. The superior bond performance for Adper Single Bond when compared to Filtek P90 adhesive was confirmed by a fewer number of adhesive failures. The influence of TAP in bond strength is insignificant. PMID:25984475

  11. Comparison of the shear bond strengths of conventional mesh bases and sandblasted orthodontic bracket bases.

    PubMed

    Lugato, Isabel Cristina Prado Torres; Pignatta, Lilian Maria Brisque; Arantes, Flávia de Moraes; Santos, Eduardo César Almada

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to compare in vitro the shear bond strength between metallic brackets (Abzil) with conventional mesh bases and metallic brackets with bases industrially sandblasted with aluminum oxide using three adhesive systems, in order to assess the influence of sandblasting on adhesiveness and to compare 3 different bonding systems. Two hundred and forty bovine incisors were used and randomly divided into 6 groups (40 teeth in each group), according to the bracket base and to the bonding system. The brackets were direct-bonded in bovine teeth with 3 adhesive systems: System A - conventional Transbond XT (3M - Unitek); System B - Transbond Plus Self Etching Primer + Transbond XT (3M - Unitek) and System C - Fuji ORTHO LC resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement in capsules (GC Corp.). Shear bond strength tests were performed 24 hours after bonding, in a DL-3000 universal testing machine (EMIC), using a load cell of 200 kgf and a speed of 1 mm/min. The results were submitted to statistical analysis and showed no significant difference between conventional and sandblasted bracket bases. However, comparison between the bonding systems presented significantly different results. System A (14.92 MPa) and system C (13.24 MPa) presented statistically greater shear bond strength when compared to system B (10.66 MPa). There was no statistically significant difference between system A and system C.

  12. Evaluation of flexural, diametral tensile, and shear bond strength of composite repairs.

    PubMed

    Imbery, T A; Gray, T; DeLatour, F; Boxx, C; Best, A M; Moon, P C

    2014-01-01

    Repairing composite restorations may be a more conservative treatment than replacing the entire restoration. The objective of this in vitro study was to determine the best repair method by measuring flexural, diametral tensile, and shear bond strength of repaired composites in which the surfaces were treated with chemical primers (Add & Bond or Silane Bond Enhancer), a bonding agent (Optibond Solo Plus [OBSP]), or mechanical retention with a bonding agent. Filtek Supreme Ultra shade B1B was placed in special molds to fabricate specimens that served to test the flexural, diametral tensile, or shear strength of the inherent resin substrate. The same molds were modified to make specimens for testing repair strength of the resin. Repairs were made immediately or after aging in deionized water at 37°C for seven days. All repair sites were finished with coarse Sof-Lex discs to simulate finishing new restorations or partially removing aged restorations. Repair surfaces were treated with one of the following: 1) phosphoric-acid etching and OBSP; 2) Add & Bond; 3) phosphoric-acid etching, Silane Bond Enhancer, and OBSP; or 4) quarter round bur, phosphoric-acid etching, and OBSP. Specimens were placed back in the original molds to fabricate specimens for diametral tensile or flexural testing or in an Ultradent jig to make specimens for shear bond testing. Composite resin in shade B5B was polymerized against the treated surfaces to make repairs. Two negative control groups for the three testing methods consisted of specimens in which repairs were made immediately or after aging without any surface treatments. Controls and experimental repairs were aged (water 37°C, 24 hours) before flexural, diametral tensile, or shear testing in an Instron Universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Experimental flexural repair strengths ranged from 26.4% to 88.6% of the inherent substrate strength. Diametral tensile repair strengths ranged from 40% to 80% of the inherent

  13. Effects of adhesion promoters on the shear bond strengths of orthodontic brackets to fluorosed enamel.

    PubMed

    Adanir, Necdet; Türkkahraman, Hakan; Yalçin Güngör, Ahmet

    2009-06-01

    The aims of this in vitro study were to evaluate the effect of enamel fluorosis on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets and to determine whether adhesion promoter, Enhance LC, increases the bond strength of brackets to fluorosed enamel. Forty-five (30 fluorosed and 15 non-fluorosed) non-carious fresh human premolar teeth, extracted for orthodontic reasons and without any caries or visible defects, were used in this study. The fluorosed teeth were selected according to the modified Thylstrup and Fejerskov index, which is based on the clinical changes in fluorosed teeth. In groups 1 (fluorosed teeth) and 3 (control), the brackets were bonded with Light Bond composite resin and cured with a halogen light. In group 2, Enhance LC was applied to fluorosed enamel before bonding. After bonding, the SBS of the brackets was tested with a universal testing machine. One-way analysis of variance and Tukey multiple comparison tests were used to compare the SBS of the groups. Any adhesive remaining after debonding was assessed and scored according to the modified adhesive remnant index. The results showed that while fluorosis significantly reduced the bond strengths of the orthodontic brackets (mean 13.94 +/- 3.24 MPa; P < 0.01), Enhance LC significantly increased bond strength on fluorosed enamel (mean 18.22 +/- 5.97 Mpa; P < 0.05). Groups 1 and 3 had greater bond failures at the composite-bracket interface, whereas group 2 showed bond failure primarily at the enamel-composite interface.

  14. BOND STRENGTH AND MORPHOLOGY OF ENAMEL USING SELF-ETCHING ADHESIVE SYSTEMS WITH DIFFERENT ACIDITIES

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Sandra Kiss; Reis, Alessandra; Pelizzaro, Arlete; Dal-Bianco, Karen; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Arana-Chavez, Victor Elias; Grande, Rosa Helena Miranda

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the bond strength and the morphology of enamel after application of self-etching adhesive systems with different acidities. The tested hypothesis was that the performance of the self-etching adhesive systems does not vary for the studied parameters. Material and methods: Composite resin (Filtek Z250) buildups were bonded to untreated (prophylaxis) and treated (burcut or SiC-paper) enamel surfaces of third molars after application of four self-etching and two etch-and-rinse adhesive systems (n=6/condition): Clearfil SE Bond (CSE); OptiBond Solo Plus Self-Etch (OP); AdheSe (AD); Tyrian Self Priming Etching (TY), Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus (SBMP) and Adper Single Bond (SB). After storage in water (24 h/37°C), the bonded specimens were sectioned into sticks with 0.8 mm2 cross-sectional area and the microtensile bond strength was tested at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The mean bond strength values (MPa) were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). The etching patterns of the adhesive systems were also observed with a scanning electron microscope. Results: The main factor adhesive system was statistically significant (p<0.05). The mean bond strength values (MPa) and standard deviations were: CSE (20.5±3.5), OP (11.3±2.3), AD (11.2±2.8), TY (11.1±3.0), SBMP (21.9±4.0) and SB (24.9±3.0). Different etching patterns were observed for the self-etching primers depending on the enamel treatment and the pH of the adhesive system. Conclusion: Although there is a tendency towards using adhesive systems with simplified application procedures, this may compromise the bonding performance of some systems to enamel, even when the prismless enamel is removed. PMID:19668991

  15. Effect of 2% Chlorhexidine Digluconate on the Bond Strength to Normal versus Caries-Affected Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Komori, Paula C. P.; Pashley, David H.; Tjäderhane, Leo; Breschi, Lorenzo; Mazzoni, Annalisa; de Goes, Mario Fernando; Wang, Linda; Carrilho, Marcela R.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY This study evaluated the effect of 2% chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX) used as a therapeutic primer on the long-term bond strengths of two etch-and-rinse adhesives to normal (ND) and caries-affected (CAD) dentin. Forty extracted human molars with coronal carious lesions, surrounded by normal dentin, were selected for this study. Flat surfaces of two types of dentin (i.e. ND and CAD) were prepared with a water-cooled high speed diamond disc, and then acid-etched, rinsed and air-dried. In control groups, dentin was re-hydrated with distilled water, blot-dried and bonded with a three-step (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose-MP) or a two-step (Single Bond 2-SB) etch-and-rinse adhesive. In experimental groups, dentin was re-hydrated with 2% CHX (60 s), blot-dried and bonded with the same adhesives. Resin composite build-ups were made. Specimens were prepared for microtensile bond testing in accordance with the non-trimming technique and then tested either immediately or after 6-month storage in artificial saliva. Data were analyzed by ANOVA/Bonferroni tests (α = 0.05). CHX did not affect the immediate bond strength to ND or CAD (p>0.05). CHX treatment significantly lowered the loss of bond strength after 6 months seen in control bonds for ND (p<0.05), but it did not alter the bond strength of CAD (p>0.05). Application of MP on CHX-treated ND or CAD produced bonds that did not change over 6 months of storage. PMID:19363971

  16. Carbon Nanotube Bonding Strength Enhancement Using Metal "Wicking" Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, James L.; Dickie, Matthew R.; Kowalczyk, Robert S.; Liao, Anna; Bronikowski, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes grown from a surface typically have poor bonding strength at the interface. A process has been developed for adding a metal coat to the surface of carbon nano tubes (CNTs) through a wicking process, which could lead to an enhanced bonding strength at the interface. This process involves merging CNTs with indium as a bump-bonding enhancement. Classical capillary theory would not normally allow materials that do not wet carbon or graphite to be drawn into the spacings by capillary action because the contact angle is greater than 90 degrees. However, capillary action can be induced through JPL's ability to fabricate oriented CNT bundles to desired spacings, and through the use of deposition techniques and temperature to control the size and mobility of the liquid metal streams and associated reservoirs. A reflow and plasma cleaning process has also been developed and demonstrated to remove indium oxide, and to obtain smooth coatings on the CNT bundles.

  17. Effect of thermocycling on the shear bond strength of different resins bonded to thermoplastic foil applied in occlusal splint therapy.

    PubMed

    Wieckiewicz, Mieszko; Boening, Klaus W; Richter, Gert; Wieckiewicz, Wlodzimierz

    2015-04-01

    Temporomandibular disorders are a group of symptoms related to the impaired function of the temporomandibular joints and associated muscles. Occlusal splint therapy is a common treatment in the aforementioned syndrome. One of the methods of manufacturing occlusal splints is to place a polymer on thermoplastic foil. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of light- and self-cured resins bonded to thermoplastic foil dependent on artificial aging. Thirty cylinders composed of light-cured resin and 30 cylinders made of self-cured resin were attached to 60 rectangular thermoplastic plates. All specimens were divided into six groups. A control study was conducted for groups 1 and 2. The other preparation groups were subjected to thermocycling by setting appropriately 1000 cycles for groups 3 and 4 and 3000 cycles for groups 5 and 6 in distilled water. Bond strength was measured in a universal testing machine. The results were subjected to statistical analysis using the Mann-Whitney U test (p ≤ 0.05). The statistics revealed that the values of the shear bond strength for specimens composed of self-cured resin after 1000 and 3000 thermocycles were significantly higher than on those made of light-cured resin (p = 0.003 and p = 0.002). The shear bond strength between the self-cured resin and the thermoplastic foil was higher and more resistant to aging than the shear bond strength between the light-cured resin and the thermoplastic foil. © 2014 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  18. Shear bond strength in zirconia veneered ceramics using two different surface treatments prior veneering.

    PubMed

    Gasparić, Lana Bergman; Schauperl, Zdravko; Mehulić, Ketij

    2013-03-01

    Aim of the study was to assess the effect of different surface treatments on the shear bond strength (SBS) of the veneering ceramics to zirconia core. In a shear test the influence of grinding and sandblasting of the zirconia surface on bonding were assessed. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS statistical package (version 17.0, SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) and Microsoft Office Excel 2003 (Microsoft, Seattle, WA, USA). There was a significant difference between the groups considering shear bond strength (SBS) values, i.e. ground and sandblasted samples had significantly higher SBS values than only ground samples (mean difference = -190.67; df = 10, t = -6.386, p < 0.001). The results of the present study indicate that ground and sandblasted cores are superior to ground cores, allowing significantly higher surface roughness and significantly higher shear bond strength between the core and the veneering material.

  19. In vitro comparison of the tensile bond strength of denture adhesives on denture bases.

    PubMed

    Kore, Doris R; Kattadiyil, Mathew T; Hall, Dan B; Bahjri, Khaled

    2013-12-01

    With several denture adhesives available, it is important for dentists to make appropriate patient recommendations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the tensile bond strength of denture adhesives on denture base materials at time intervals of up to 24 hours. Fixodent, Super Poligrip, Effergrip, and SeaBond denture adhesives were tested with 3 denture base materials: 2 heat-polymerized (Lucitone 199 and SR Ivocap) and 1 visible-light-polymerized (shade-stable Eclipse). Artificial saliva with mucin was used as a control. Tensile bond strength was tested in accordance with American Dental Association specifications at 5 minutes, 3 hours, 6 hours, 12 hours, and 24 hours after applying the adhesive. Maximum forces before failure were recorded in megapascals (MPa), and the data were subjected to a 2-way analysis of variance (α=.05). All 4 adhesives had greater tensile bond strength than the control. Fixodent, Super Poligrip, and SeaBond had higher tensile bond strength values than Effergrip. All adhesives had the greatest tensile bond strength at 5 minutes and the least at 24 hours. The 3 denture bases produced significantly different results with each adhesive (P<.001). Lucitone 199 with the adhesives had the greatest tensile bond strength, followed by Ivocap and Eclipse. All 4 adhesives had greater tensile bond strength than the control, and all 4 adhesives were strongest at the 5-minute interval. On all 3 types of denture bases, Effergrip produced significantly lower tensile bond strength, and Fixodent, Super Poligrip, and SeaBond produced significantly higher tensile bond strength. At 24 hours, the adhesive-base combinations with the highest tensile bond strength were Fixodent on Lucitone 199, Fixodent on Eclipse, Fixodent on Ivocap, and Super Poligrip on Ivocap. Copyright © 2013 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Initial and fatigue bond strengths of chromatic and light-cured adhesives.

    PubMed

    Lee, June M L; Georgiou, George; Jones, Steven P

    2010-11-01

    To compare the initial and fatigue shear bond strengths of a chromatic adhesive with a light-cured adhesive in an ex vivo laboratory study. Hydroxyapatite discs were used as the bonding substrate. They were produced by cold uni-axial compression at 20 tons, sintered at 1300 degrees C and embedded in epoxy resin before grinding and polishing. One hundred and fifty upper left central incisor brackets were bonded to the discs with Transbond PLUS Color Change (3M Unitek, Monrovia, CA, USA) while another 150 similar brackets were bonded with Transbond XT (3M Unitek, Monrovia, CA, USA). Seventy-five brackets from each group were subjected to cyclic loading (5000 cycles at 2 Hz) at 50 per cent of the mean bond strength in a Dartec Series HC 10 Testing Machine. Initial (unfatigued) and fatigued bond strengths were determined by applying a shear force at the bracket-substrate interface using a custom-made metal jig in an Instron Universal Testing Machine. One-way ANOVA with Bonferroni post-hoc correction and two-way ANOVA were used to analyse the differences between the initial and fatigue mean shear bond strengths of the adhesives. The survival and bond reliability of both adhesives were evaluated with the Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses. The initial mean shear bond strength for Transbond PLUS Color Change (16.72 MPa) was higher than Transbond XT (15.11 MPa), but this was not statistically significant (p = 0.109). The fatigue mean shear bond strength for Transbond XT (15.87 MPa) was similar to that of Transbond PLUS Color Change (15.33 MPa), and the difference was not statistically significant (p > 0.999). There were no significant differences when the effects of the material (p = 0.264) or fatiguing (p = 0.512) were considered separately, but in combination, the effect on bond strength was statistically significant (p = 0.026). The survival analysis showed that both adhesives demonstrated similar survival patterns in the unfatigued and fatigued states. Analysis

  1. Shear bond strength of self-etch and total-etch bonding systems at different dentin depths.

    PubMed

    Villela-Rosa, Ana Carolina Maito; Gonçalves, Mariane; Orsi, Iara Augusta; Miani, Paola Kirsten

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dentin shear bond strength of four adhesive systems (Adper Single Bond 2, Adper Prompt L-Pop, Magic Bond DE and Self Etch Bond) in regards to buccal and lingual surfaces and dentin depth. Forty extracted third molars had roots removed and crowns bisected in the mesiodistal direction. The buccal and lingual surfaces were fixed in a PVC/acrylic resin ring and were divided into buccal and lingual groups assigned to each selected adhesive. The same specimens prepared for the evaluation of superficial dentin shear resistance were used to evaluate the different depths of dentin. The specimens were identified and abraded at depths of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mm. Each depth was evaluated by ISO TR 11405 using an EMIC-2000 machine regulated at 0.5 mm/min with a 200 Kgf load cell. We performed statistical analyses on the results (ANOVA, Tukey and Scheffé tests). Data revealed statistical differences (p < 0.01) in the adhesive and depth variation as well as adhesive/depth interactions. The Adper Single Bond 2 demonstrated the highest mean values of shear bond strength. The Prompt L-Pop product, a self-etching adhesive, revealed higher mean values compared with Magic Bond DE and Self Etch Bond adhesives, a total and self-etching adhesive respectively. It may be concluded that the shear bond strength of dentin is dependent on material (adhesive system), substrate depth and adhesive/depth interaction.

  2. Effect of Self-etching Adhesives on the Bond Strength of Glass-Ionomer Cements

    PubMed Central

    Jaberi Ansari, Zahra; Panahandeh, Narges; Tabatabaei Shafiei, Zahra Sadat; Akbarzadeh Baghban, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Statement of Problem: Adequate bond strength between glass ionomer cements and composite resin is necessary for the success of the sandwich technique. Purpose of Study: This study assessed the micro-shear bond strength of composite resin to glass-ionomer cements (GIC) using self-etch adhesives with different pH values. Materials and Methods: One hundred specimens (6×4×2 mm) were made using Fuji II and Fuji II LC GICs and treated with different adhesives as follows: Group 1:Fuji II+ Adper Prompt L-Pop, Group-2: Fuji II+SE bond, Group-3: Fuji II + AdheSE, Group-4:Fuji II+ Protect bond, Group-5: Fuji II + Single bond, Group-6:Fuji II LC+ Adper Prompt LPop, Group-7: Fuji II LC+SE bond, Group-8:Fuji II LC+ AdheSE, Group-9: Fuji II LC+ Protect bond, and Group-10: Fuji II LC+ Single bond. Each group consisted of 10 specimens. A cylinder of Z100 composite resin was placed on each sample and