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Sample records for bonded amalgam restorations

  1. Amalgam Restorations: To Bond or Not.

    PubMed

    Larson, Thomas D

    2015-01-01

    This article will review the use of various liners used to eliminate microleakage in amalgam restorations. It will review the literature about whether amalgam restorations are improved by using a bonding process and if so specifically how it improves the patient outcome.

  2. Cusp reinforcement by bonding of amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Pilo, R; Brosh, T; Chweidan, H

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the effectivenes of several adhesives in bonding amalgam in order to recover tooth stiffness. A non-destructive experimental methodology was adopted, using strain gauges bonded to the midbuccal surfaces of 40 teeth, with sequential evaluation of loaded intact, prepared and restored stages of the same tooth. Continuous strain measurement as a function of the applied load was acquired by A/D equipment and a data acquisition programme. The strain-force behaviour of the sound teeth under non-axial force up to 97.5 N served as the baseline. The five experimental groups (8 x 5) consisted of control (no adhesive) and four different adhesives. One-way analysis of variance with repeated measures was calculated for the deformation ratio, relative stiffness and recovery values. Reductions in tooth structure by cutting a mesio-occlusal-distal preparation, width one-third intercuspal distance, resulted in 39-52% loss of buccal cusp stiffness. Non-bonded amalgam produced negligible increase (5%) in the stiffness recovery values of the buccal cusps. The adhesives splinted the cusps together, thereby decreasing cuspal flexure and increasing relative stiffness values. Recovery values obtained ranged from 39% to 61%. Assuming that cusp fracture occurs as a result of brittle tooth structure fatigue, amalgam adhesives may contribute to the strengthening of weakened cusps.

  3. Bond strength of repaired amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Rey, Rosalia; Mondragon, Eduardo; Shen, Chiayi

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated the interfacial flexural strength (FS) of amalgam repairs and the optimal combination of repair materials and mechanical retention required for a consistent and durable repair bond. Amalgam bricks were created, each with 1 end roughened to expose a fresh surface before repair. Four groups followed separate repair protocols: group 1, bonding agent with amalgam; group 2, bonding agent with composite resin; group 3, mechanical retention (slot) with amalgam; and group 4, slot with bonding agent and amalgam. Repaired specimens were stored in artificial saliva for 1, 10, 30, 120, or 360 days before being loaded to failure in a 3-point bending test. Statistical analysis showed significant changes in median FS over time in groups 2 and 4. The effect of the repair method on the FS values after each storage period was significant for most groups except the 30-day storage groups. Amalgam-amalgam repair with adequate condensation yielded the most consistent and durable bond. An amalgam bonding agent could be beneficial when firm condensation on the repair surface cannot be achieved or when tooth structure is involved. Composite resin can be a viable option for amalgam repair in an esthetically demanding region, but proper mechanical modification of the amalgam surface and selection of the proper bonding system are essential.

  4. Bond strength of repaired amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Rey, Rosalia; Mondragon, Eduardo; Shen, Chiayi

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated the interfacial flexural strength (FS) of amalgam repairs and the optimal combination of repair materials and mechanical retention required for a consistent and durable repair bond. Amalgam bricks were created, each with 1 end roughened to expose a fresh surface before repair. Four groups followed separate repair protocols: group 1, bonding agent with amalgam; group 2, bonding agent with composite resin; group 3, mechanical retention (slot) with amalgam; and group 4, slot with bonding agent and amalgam. Repaired specimens were stored in artificial saliva for 1, 10, 30, 120, or 360 days before being loaded to failure in a 3-point bending test. Statistical analysis showed significant changes in median FS over time in groups 2 and 4. The effect of the repair method on the FS values after each storage period was significant for most groups except the 30-day storage groups. Amalgam-amalgam repair with adequate condensation yielded the most consistent and durable bond. An amalgam bonding agent could be beneficial when firm condensation on the repair surface cannot be achieved or when tooth structure is involved. Composite resin can be a viable option for amalgam repair in an esthetically demanding region, but proper mechanical modification of the amalgam surface and selection of the proper bonding system are essential. PMID:26325656

  5. Mechanical retention versus bonding of amalgam and gallium alloy restorations.

    PubMed

    Eakle, W S; Staninec, M; Yip, R L; Chavez, M A

    1994-10-01

    The retention of amalgam and gallium alloy restorations in proximal box forms was measured in vitro, and three different adhesives to conventional undercuts were compared. For control, restorations were placed without undercuts or adhesives. No significant difference was found between amalgam and gallium alloys with each of the five methods of retention used. Alloys placed without retention or adhesives were significantly less retentive than all other groups. When Tytin alloy was used, no difference was found in retention among the restorations retained with Panavia or All-Bond adhesive or an occlusal dovetail and retention grooves, but Amalgambond adhesive was less retentive than all three of these methods. When gallium alloy was used, both Panavia and All-Bond adhesive were more retentive than undercuts, but the effect of Amalgambond adhesive was more retentive than undercuts, but the effect of Amalgambond adhesive was comparable to that of undercuts. The results of this study indicate that adhesives could be used in place of traditional undercuts to retain amalgam and gallium alloys, thus saving a considerable amount of tooth structure. PMID:7990038

  6. Effect of restoration size on fracture resistance of bonded amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Lindemuth, J S; Hagge, M S; Broome, J S

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of restoration size on the fracture strength of amalgam restorations bonded with Amalgambond Plus (with HPA). Research has shown that this adhesive is dispersed throughout the unset amalgam during condensation and that a decrease in diametral tensile strength, proportional to the amount of adhesive incorporated into the unset amalgam, has resulted. Smaller cavity preparations have a higher ratio of surface area to volume than do larger preparations, and it was anticipated that a proportionately greater amount of adhesive would be incorporated into smaller amalgam restorations. Sixty extracted human molars were divided into four groups of 15 teeth and mounted in tray acrylic-filled PVC cylinders. Shallow approximo-occlusal channels were prepared in two groups. One group was restored with Amalgambond Plus and Tytin amalgam, the other with just Tytin amalgam. Larger proximo-occlusal preparations were made in the remaining two groups, then restored in the same fashion. Samples were stored in 37 degrees C for at least 24 hours, then thermocycled from 5-55 degrees C 1000 times with a one-minute dwell time. Specimens were mounted in a Universal Testing Machine, and a chisel was applied to the restorations in compression mode at a crosshead speed of 5.0 mm/minute until bulk fracture of the amalgam occurred. The results indicated no difference in bulk fracture strengths between large amalgam restorations restored with and without Amalgambond Plus. However, small amalgam restorations restored with Amalgambond Plus exhibited significantly greater (p < 0.025) bulk fracture strengths than small amalgam restorations restored without use of the adhesive. PMID:11203813

  7. A 3-year randomized clinical trial evaluating two different bonded posterior restorations: Amalgam versus resin composite

    PubMed Central

    Kemaloglu, Hande; Pamir, Tijen; Tezel, Huseyin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the performance and postoperative sensitivity of a posterior resin composite with that of bonded amalgam in 40 (n = 20) large sized cavities and to evaluate whether resin composite could be an alternative for bonded amalgam. Materials and Methods: This was a randomized clinical trial. Twenty patients in need of at least two posterior restorations were recruited. Authors randomly assigned one half of the restorations to receive bonded amalgam and the other half to composite restorations. Forty bonded amalgams (n = 20) and composites (n = 20) were evaluated for their performance on modified-US Public Health Service criteria and postoperative sensitivity using visual analogue scale (VAS) for 36-months. Results: Success rate of this study was 100%. First clinical alterations were rated as Bravo after 1 year in marginal discoloration, marginal adaptation, anatomical form, and surface roughness for both amalgam and composite. At the 3rd year, overall “Bravo” rated restorations were 12 for bonded amalgam and 13 for resin composites. There were no significant differences among the VAS scores of composites and bonded amalgams for all periods (P > 0.05) except for the comparisons at the 3rd year evaluation (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Within the limitation of this study, both resin composite and bonded amalgam were clinically acceptable. Postoperative sensitivity results tend to decrease more in composite restorations rather than amalgams. Therefore, it was concluded that posterior resin composite can be used even in large sized cavities. PMID:27011734

  8. Shear bond strength, failure modes, and confocal microscopy of bonded amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Cianconi, Luigi; Conte, Gabriele; Mancini, Manuele

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the shear bond strength, failure modes, and confocal microscopy of two different amalgam alloy restorations lined with five adhesive systems. Two regular-set high-copper dental amalgam alloys, Amalcap Plus and Valiant Ph.D, and five commercially available adhesive systems were selected. One hundred and twenty freshly-extracted human third molars were used for the study. The results were statistically evaluated using two-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA). The shear bond strength (SBS) of amalgam to dentin was significantly affected by both the adhesive (p<0.0001) and amalgam alloy (p<0.0002). Regarding mode of failure (MF), among samples restored with Valiant Ph.D, 31 of 50 exhibited adhesive failure, and 19 displayed mixed failure. Laser optical microscopy (OM) of the bonded interface revealed the presence of a good hybrid layer was evident in all experimental groups. Higher bond strengths were measured for four of the five adhesives when used in combination with the spherical alloy. PMID:21383518

  9. Cusp Fracture Resistance of Maxillary Premolars Restored with the Bonded Amalgam Technique Using Various Luting Agents

    PubMed Central

    Marchan, Shivaughn M.; Coldero, Larry; White, Daniel; Smith, William A. J.; Rafeek, Reisha N.

    2009-01-01

    Objective. This in vitro study uses measurements of fracture resistance to compare maxillary premolars restored with the bonded amalgam technique using a new resin luting cement, glass ionomer, and resin-modified glass ionomer as the bonding agents. Materials. Eighty-five sound maxillary premolars were selected and randomly assigned to one of five test groups of 17 teeth each. One group of intact teeth served as the control. The remaining groups were prepared to a standard cavity form relative to the dimensions of the overall tooth and restored with amalgam alone or a bonded amalgam using one of three luting agents: RelyX Arc (a new resin luting cement), RelyX luting (a resin-modified glass ionomer), or Ketac-Cem μ (a glass ionomer) as the bonding agents. Each tooth was then subjected to compressive testing until catastrophic failure occurred. The mean loads at failure of each group were statistically compared using ANOVA with a post hoc Bonferroni test. Results. It was found that regardless of the luting cement used for the amalgam bonding technique, there was little effect on the fracture resistance of teeth. Conclusion. Cusp fracture resistance of premolars prepared with conservative MOD cavity preparations is not improved by using an amalgam-bonding technique compared to similar cavities restored with amalgam alone. PMID:20339450

  10. Fracture resistance of teeth with Class II bonded amalgam and new tooth-colored restorations.

    PubMed

    Görücü, Jale; Ozgünaltay, Gül

    2003-01-01

    This study compared the cuspal fracture resistance of posterior teeth restored with four different adhesive restorations. Fifty sound, maxillary human premolars were randomly divided into a control group and four experimental groups with 10 teeth in each. Specimens in the first group were intact teeth that were tested as unprepared. The remaining four groups received mesio-oclusodistal cavity preparations and were restored with a hybrid composite (Filtek Z250), a packable composite (Filtek P60), an ormocer (Definite) and an amalgam (SDI Permite) with an amalgam bonding agent (Amalgam Bond Plus). All groups were stored in water at 37 degrees C for 15 days and thermocycled 1000 times between 5 degrees-55 degrees C. The specimens were preloaded five times in compression to 10 kg using two metal rods that contacted only the teeth on the cuspal inclines. The teeth were then loaded occlusally in an Instron Universal Testing Machine until fracture occurred. The means of force required to fracture the teeth in each of the five groups was analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey Test. The difference between the mean cuspal fracture resistance of the unprepared control teeth and those restored with amalgam groups was found to be statistically significant (p < 0.05). No significant differences in resistance to cuspal fracture were found among the restoration groups, the unprepared control group and those teeth restored with hybrid composite, packable composite and ormocer groups (p > 0.05).

  11. Combined amalgam and composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Abu-Hanna, Amer A; Mjör, Ivar A

    2004-01-01

    All indirect restorative techniques involving cast metals, ceramics or resin-based materials are expensive compared to directly placed restorations. A restorative technique is presented that combines the esthetic properties of directly bonded resin-based composite material and the wide range of indications for dental amalgam in stress-bearing areas.

  12. Microleakage in primary teeth restored by conventional or bonded amalgam technique.

    PubMed

    Myaki, S I; Rodrigues, C R; Raggio, D P; Flores, T A; Matson, M R

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate marginal leakage in class V restorations in primary teeth restored with amalgam, using three different techniques. Thirty maxillary anterior primary teeth, clinically sound and naturally exfoliated, were used. In group 1 (n = 10), two thin layers of a copal varnish (Cavitine) were applied. In group 2 (n = 10), Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus, a dual adhesive system, was used according to manufacturer instructions. In group 3 (n = 10), One-Step adhesive system in combination with a low-viscosity resin (Resinomer) were used according to manufacturer instructions. All samples were restored with a high-copper dental amalgam alloy (GS 80, SDI). After restoration, the samples were stored in normal saline at 37 degrees C for 72 h. The specimens were polished, thermocycled (500 cycles, 5 degrees and 55 degrees C, 30-s dwell time) and impermeabilized with fingernail polish to within 1.0 mm of the restoration margins. The teeth were then placed in 0.5% methylene blue for 4 h. Finally, the samples were sectioned and evaluated for marginal leakage. The Kruskal-Wallis test showed that the filled adhesive resin (group 3) had the least microleakage. There was no significant difference between groups 1 and 2.

  13. Composite veneering of complex amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Demarco, Flávio Fernando; Zanchi, César Henrique; Bueno, Márcia; Piva, Evandro

    2007-01-01

    In large posterior cavities, indirect restorations could provide improved performance when compared to direct restorations, but with higher cost and removal of sound tooth structure. Improved mechanical properties have resulted in good clinical performance for amalgam in large cavities but without an esthetic appearance. Resin composites have become popular for posterior restorations, mainly because of good esthetic results. A restorative technique is presented that combines the esthetic properties of directly bonded resin composite and the wide range of indications for amalgam in stress-bearing areas.

  14. Bonded amalgam sealants: two-year clinical results.

    PubMed

    Staninec, M; Eakle, W S; Silverstein, S; Marshall, G W; Artiga, N

    1998-03-01

    The authors used bonded amalgams as pit and fissure sealants without mechanical preparation. They compared the two-year retention of the bonded amalgams with that of resin-based pit and fissure sealants. Clinical examinations at six months, one year and two years revealed no difference between the retention of the two sealants. This technique opens up the possibility of using bonded amalgam in pits and fissures surrounding very conservative preparations in a preventive amalgam restoration. PMID:9529807

  15. Lichenoid reaction associated to amalgam restoration.

    PubMed

    Segura-Egea, Juan José; Bullón-Fernández, Pedro

    2004-01-01

    Hypersensitivity to mercury associated with amalgam restorations may occur and present in one of two different ways. Most commonly it presents as an oral lichenoid reaction affecting oral mucosa in direct contact with an amalgam restoration and represents a delayed, type IV, cell mediated immune response to mercury or one of the other constituents of the dental amalgam. We report a case of oral lichenoid reaction associated to amalgam restoration. A 38 year-old woman presented a caries lesion of tooth #37. A Blacks class I preparation was performed and filled with amalgam. After 19 months, intra-oral examination revealed atrophic lesion, lightly erythematous, affecting the left buccal mucous. The lesion contacted directly with the amalgam restoration in the lower first molar. The right buccal mucosa was normal. His medical history was unremarkable, he was taking no medication and had no known allergies. However, the patient had felt certain rare sensation in that zone when eating sharp meals. Biopsy showed histological changes compatible with oral lichen planus. The patient decided not to change again the restoration, because she did not have important annoyances and she did not wish to be treated again. Other restorations were performed with composite resins, and no reaction was evidenced in the mucosa. PMID:15580119

  16. Effect of bonded amalgam on the fracture resistance of teeth.

    PubMed

    Eakle, W S; Staninec, M; Lacy, A M

    1992-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether amalgam bonded to tooth structure with an adhesive resin cement can increase the fracture resistance of restored teeth. Extracted paired upper premolars were prepared for G.V. Black type mesioocclusodistal amalgam restorations. In one tooth of each pair (the experimental group), the enamel walls were etched with phosphoric acid and were painted with an adhesive resin (Panavia), and amalgam was condensed and carved. For the other tooth in each pair (the control group), amalgam was placed in the same manner but was not etched and lined with resin. The teeth were thermocycled and mounted for testing and then were loaded until fracture. A significant difference (p less than 0.05, the paired Student's t-test) was found in the force needed to fracture the bonded amalgam group (70.5 +/- 21.6 kg) compared with that needed to fracture the conventional amalgam group (60.3 +/- 16.8 kg). SEM examination of fractures at the interface occurred predominantly within the resin. PMID:1501170

  17. Electrochemical study of insulating properties of dental amalgam bonding polymers.

    PubMed

    Toumelin-Chemla, F; Degrange, M

    1998-06-01

    The standard techniques used for amalgam restorations often result in a lack of adhesion to mineralized dental tissues. The bonding of amalgam with polymer has been suggested to improve its adaptation to dental tissues. Moreover the polymer involved in the bonding should inhibit the corrosion and the diffusion of metallic ions. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the capacity of bonded amalgam to prevent ionic diffusion and migration. In this respect, an original method employing electrochemical techniques was used to determine the leakage current of bonded amalgam restorations. The electrochemical behaviour of conventional and bonded amalgam restorations was compared using a potentiostat driven by a computerized system (Voltamaster, Radiometer Analytical) with software for specific applications such as chronoamperometry or cyclic voltammetry. Samples of recently extracted teeth of young patients were first examined, and then the results were checked by other experimental assays using protected and unprotected copper sticks. The measurements obtained with chronoamperometry (E = +300 mV/SCE) in Ringer's solution at 37 degrees C showed that after polarization for 30 h the oxidation current decreased threefold for bonded samples (10 microA cm(-2)) as compared with the unprotected samples (35 microA cm(-2)). These results, as well as those obtained with the copper wires, demonstrated that even with two layers of adhesive the bonded joint is permeable to ions probably as a result of the hydrophylic properties of HEMA, a component of the adhesive. However, using five layers of adhesive reduced the ionic current by a factor as large as 10(6).

  18. Bonded amalgam sealants and adhesive resin sealants: five-year clinical results.

    PubMed

    Staninec, Michal; Artiga, Nelson; Gansky, Stuart A; Marshall, Grayson W; Eakle, Stephan

    2004-05-01

    Bonded amalgams were used as pit-and-fissure sealants without mechanical preparation. They were compared with resin-based pit-and-fissure sealants for retention over a 5-year period. Clinical examinations at 6 months, 1 year, 2 years, and 5 years revealed no difference between the two techniques. Although amalgam sealants may not be practical by themselves, they can be used to seal pits and fissures surrounding very conservative preparations, in the "preventive amalgam restoration." Conventional amalgam retentive features and 90-degree cavosurface margins may not be necessary when bonding is used with amalgam. PMID:15130073

  19. Radiopacities in dentine under amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Rudolphy, M P; van Amerongen, J P; ten Cate, J M

    1994-01-01

    Radiopacities, caused by tin or zinc deposits in partly demineralized dental tissue, are frequently seen under amalgam restorations. The aim of this study was to determine to what extent these radiopaque areas could be identified by Caries Detector (1% acid red in propylene glycol) which is claimed to stain the irreversibly demineralized dentine. Twenty-eight extracted teeth showing radiopacities under amalgam fillings were selected. The restorations were removed, and Caries Detector was applied. Caries was excavated until the dentine did no longer stain with the Caries Detector. Standardized radiographs were taken at different stages. In all teeth the radiopaque areas stained with the Caries Detector. Visual inspection of the radiographs, taken after excavation, revealed that the radiopacities had disappeared completely in 6 teeth; in 5 teeth a very small part of the radiopaque area remained; in 17 teeth the cavity floor appeared as a thin white line on X-ray. Overall, line scan analysis confirmed the data obtained by visual observation. The residual radiopacities and radiopaque lines were a very small fraction of the initial radiopacities. Therefore, it is concluded that the radiopaque zone under amalgam fillings represents almost entirely an area of irreversibly demineralized dentine as indicated by the Caries Detector.

  20. Maximum bond strength of dental luting cement to amalgam alloy.

    PubMed

    Mojon, P; Hawbolt, E B; MacEntee, M I; Belser, U C

    1989-11-01

    Although dental amalgam is used frequently under artificial crowns for restoration of severely damaged teeth, there is little information available on the bond between luting cements and this alloy. This study was designed for determination of the strength of the bond between a dental amalgam alloy and three crown-luting cements. Cylinders of dental amalgam were joined in pairs, with use of a zinc-phosphate, a glass-ionomer, and an acrylic-adhesive resin cement. The tensile-fracture stress of 45 samples of each cement was measured with a universal testing machine, and subjected to a Weibull analysis. The fractured surfaces were examined under low magnification with use of a light microscope, and at low and high magnifications with use of a scanning electron microscope, for evaluation of the appearance of the fractured joints. The Weibull analysis demonstrated that the adhesive resin cement provided a stronger and more predictable bond than either the zinc-phosphate or the glass-ionomer cement. The appearance of the fractured surfaces gave no indication of the strength of the joints, a feature that is common to brittle materials. The results suggest that crowns placed on teeth offering a large amalgam-alloy surface could be retained more predictably with an adhesive resin cement.

  1. Comparison of the push-out shear bond strength of four types of glass ionomers when used to bond amalgam: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Vinod Babu; Ramachandran, S; Indira, R; Shankar, P

    2011-01-01

    Background: Dental amalgam is the primary direct posterior restorative material used worldwide, but it have certain shortcomings due to the lack of adhesiveness to the cavity. The introduction of the concept of bonded amalgam helped improve the use of amalgam as a restorative material. Aim: Evaluation of the comparative push-out shear bond strength of four types of conventional glass ionomers used to bond amalgam to tooth in simulated class I situations. Materials and Methods: Four chemical cure glass ionomers are used: GC Fuji I, GC Fuji II, GC Fuji III and GC Fuji VII, and are compared with unbonded amalgam. The push-out bond strength was tested using the Instron Universal Testing Machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Statistical Analysis: One-way ANOVA and post hoc Bonferroni tests were used to analyze the data. Results: The results showed that the use of glass ionomer to bond amalgam resulted in an increase in the bond strength of amalgam. The Type VII glass ionomer showed the highest bond strength in comparison with the other glass ionomers. Conclusions: Conventional glass ionomer bonds to amalgam and shows a beneficial increase in the bond strength of the restoration in comparison with unbonded amalgam. PMID:22144798

  2. Effect of composite/amalgam thickness on fracture resistance of maxillary premolar teeth, restored with combined amalgam-composite restorations

    PubMed Central

    Firouzmandi, Maryam; Doozandeh, Maryam; Abbasi, Sanaz

    2016-01-01

    Background Combined amalgam-composite restorations have been used through many years to benefit from the advantages of both dental amalgam and composite resin. Two variations have been mentioned for this technique, this study investigated the fracture resistance of maxillary premolar teeth with extended mesio-occluso-distal (MOD) cavities, restored with the two variations of combined amalgam-composite restorations. Material and Methods Sixty intact extracted premolar teeth were randomly divided into 6 groups (G1-G6) of 10 teeth. G1; consisted of intact teeth and G2; consisted of teeth with MOD preparations were assigned as the positive and negative control groups respectively. Other experimental groups after MOD preparations were as follows: G3, amalgam restoration; G4, composite restoration; G5 combined amalgam-composite restoration with amalgam placement only on 1mm of the gingival floor of the proximal boxes; G6, combined amalgam-composite restoration with amalgam placement to the height of contact area of the proximal surface of the tooth. Fracture strength of the specimens was measured and the data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). The level of significance was P<0.05. Fracture mode of the specimens was also recorded. Results G1 had the highest value of fracture resistance (1736.90 N). G2 and G3 had the lowest fracture resistance (775.70 N and 874.70 N, respectively). The difference between G 4, 5 and 6 was not statistically significant. However, G4, G5 and G6 showed significantly higher resistance to fracture compared to G2 and G3. Fracture modes were favorable in all of the study groups except in G6. Conclusions Fracture resistance of the premolars restored with the two variations of combined amalgam-composite restoration was similar to that achieved with composite restoration alone and more than that of amalgam restoration alone. It can be concluded that the thickness of amalgam in combined amalgam-composite restorations did not

  3. Determination of light elements in amalgam restorations. [Dental amalgam

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, A.L.; Jones, K.W.; Kraner, H.W.; Osborne, J.W.; Nelson, G.V.

    1982-01-01

    Rutherford backscattering has been used to measure the major elemental compositions in the near-surface regions of freshly prepared and used samples of dental amalgam. A depletion from bulk stoichiometry of the major elements, which indicates an accumulation of lighter elements on the surface of the materials, has been observed. Increases in the F, Na, Cl, P, O, C, and N concentrations between freshly prepared samples and used samples were measured by observation of gamma rays produced by proton and deuteron induced reactions.

  4. A clinical evaluation of occlusal composite and amalgam restorations: one- and two-year results.

    PubMed

    Gibson, G B; Richardson, A S; Patton, R E; Waldman, R

    1982-03-01

    A two-year study was conducted to compare the qualitative advantages, if any, of a conventional, cold-curing composite resin to amalgam in occlusal Class I cavities in posterior teeth. The composite was placed into modified, conservative cavity preparations using the acid etch technique. Sixty-one pairs of contralateral restorations were evaluated. Forty-six percent of the amalgams and 42.6% of the composites were considered sound. The major deficiency of each material was rough or chipped margins of the amalgams (38%) and worn surfaces of the composites (26%). The use of conservative cavity preparations and the acid-etch technique with bonding agent and final glaze improved the longevity of the composite restorations compared to previous studies. However, the improvement does not suggest that this method will have a long-term effect on clinical success nor does it indicate that composite is superior to amalgam other than in marginal integrity and esthetics.

  5. Bond strength of resin composite to differently conditioned amalgam.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, M; Vallittu, P K; Huysmans, M-C; Kalk, W; Vahlberg, T

    2006-01-01

    Bulk fracture of teeth, where a part of the amalgam restoration and/or the cusp is fractured, is a common clinical problem. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surface conditioning methods on the shear bond strength of a hybrid resin composite to fresh amalgam. Amalgams (N=84) were condensed into acrylic and randomly assigned to one of the following treatments (N=6): (1) Alloy primer + opaquer, (2) Air-particle abrasion (50 micro m Al(2)O(3)) + alloy primer + opaquer, (3) Silica coating (30 micro m SiO(x)) + silanization + opaquer, (4) Opaquer + pre-impregnated continuous bidirectional E-glass fibre sheets, (5) Silica coating + silanization + fibre sheets, (6) Silica coating + silanization + opaquer + fibre sheet application. Non-conditioned amalgam surfaces were considered as control group (7). The mean surface roughness depth (R(Z)) was measured from the control group and air-abraded amalgam surfaces. The resin composite was bonded to the conditioned amalgam specimens using polyethylene molds. All specimens were tested under dry and thermocycled (6.000, 5-55 degrees C, 30 s) conditions. The shear bond strength of resin composite to amalgam substrates was measured in a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). Surface roughness values for the non-conditioned control group (R(Z) approximately 0.14 micro m) and for air-particle abraded surfaces with either Al(2)O(3) or SiO(x) (R(Z) approximately 0.19 micro m and R(Z) approximately 0.16 micro m, respectively) did not show significant differences (p=0.23) (One-way ANOVA). In dry conditions, silica coating and silanization followed by fibre sheet application exhibited significantly higher results (14.8+/-5.6 MPa) than those of the groups conditioned with alloy primer (2.2+/-0.7 MPa) (p<0.001), air-particle abrasion+alloy primer (4.4+/-2.0 MPa, p<0.001), silica coating+silanization alone (6.2+/-0.8 MPa, p=0.009) or non-conditioned group (1.4+/-0.6, p<0.001). Silica coating and silanization followed

  6. Bond strength comparison of amalgam repair protocols using resin composite in situations with and without dentin exposure.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Schoonbeek, Geert; Gökçe, Bülent; Cömlekoglu, Erhan; Dündar, Mine

    2010-01-01

    The replacement of defective amalgam restorations leads to loss of tooth material and weakens the tooth, creating an increased risk of cusp fracture. The repair of such defects is a minimal intervention technique. The current study compared the repair bond strengths of a resin composite to amalgam and an amalgam-dentin complex after various surface conditioning methods. The specimens (N = 50) consisted of sound human canines with cylindrical preparations (diameter: 2.3 mm, depth: 3 mm) with amalgam-dentin complex (N = 30, n = 10/per group) and two groups with amalgam only (N = 20, n = 10/per group). The teeth were embedded in auto-polymerized polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). The preparations were filled with non-Gamma 2 amalgam. The enamel was removed to expose dentin. The specimens with the amalgam-dentin complex were randomly assigned to one of the following conditioning methods: Group 1: Silicacoating amalgam, etching dentin, silane application on amalgam, primer/bonding on dentin, opaquer on amalgam, resin composite on both; Group 2: Etching dentin, silicacoating amalgam, silane application on amalgam, primer/bonding on dentin, opaquer on amalgam, resin composite on both and Group 3: Etching dentin, primer/bonding on dentin, opaquer, resin composite. The specimens with only amalgam were assigned to one of the following conditioning methods: Group 4: Silicacoating, silane application, opaquer, resin composite and Group 5: Opaquer, resin composite. For the two control groups, where no dentin was involved (Groups 4 and 5), bonding was achieved only on amalgam and Group 5 had no conditioning. The specimens were kept in water at 37 degrees C for five weeks before bond strength (MPa +/- SD) testing (Universal Testing Machine). After debonding, the failure types were analyzed. The results were significantly affected by the surface conditioning method (ANOVA). Only dentin conditioning (Group 3) showed the highest bond strength (39.9 +/- 14). The unconditioned control

  7. Bond strength comparison of amalgam repair protocols using resin composite in situations with and without dentin exposure.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Schoonbeek, Geert; Gökçe, Bülent; Cömlekoglu, Erhan; Dündar, Mine

    2010-01-01

    The replacement of defective amalgam restorations leads to loss of tooth material and weakens the tooth, creating an increased risk of cusp fracture. The repair of such defects is a minimal intervention technique. The current study compared the repair bond strengths of a resin composite to amalgam and an amalgam-dentin complex after various surface conditioning methods. The specimens (N = 50) consisted of sound human canines with cylindrical preparations (diameter: 2.3 mm, depth: 3 mm) with amalgam-dentin complex (N = 30, n = 10/per group) and two groups with amalgam only (N = 20, n = 10/per group). The teeth were embedded in auto-polymerized polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). The preparations were filled with non-Gamma 2 amalgam. The enamel was removed to expose dentin. The specimens with the amalgam-dentin complex were randomly assigned to one of the following conditioning methods: Group 1: Silicacoating amalgam, etching dentin, silane application on amalgam, primer/bonding on dentin, opaquer on amalgam, resin composite on both; Group 2: Etching dentin, silicacoating amalgam, silane application on amalgam, primer/bonding on dentin, opaquer on amalgam, resin composite on both and Group 3: Etching dentin, primer/bonding on dentin, opaquer, resin composite. The specimens with only amalgam were assigned to one of the following conditioning methods: Group 4: Silicacoating, silane application, opaquer, resin composite and Group 5: Opaquer, resin composite. For the two control groups, where no dentin was involved (Groups 4 and 5), bonding was achieved only on amalgam and Group 5 had no conditioning. The specimens were kept in water at 37 degrees C for five weeks before bond strength (MPa +/- SD) testing (Universal Testing Machine). After debonding, the failure types were analyzed. The results were significantly affected by the surface conditioning method (ANOVA). Only dentin conditioning (Group 3) showed the highest bond strength (39.9 +/- 14). The unconditioned control

  8. Evidence summary: which dental liners under amalgam restorations are more effective in reducing postoperative sensitivity?

    PubMed

    Nasser, Mona

    2011-06-10

    Since August 2009, members of the Primary Care Dentistry Research Forum (www.dentistryresearch.org) have taken part in an online vote to identify questions in day-to-day practice that they felt most needed to be answered with conclusive research. The question that receives the most votes each month forms the subject of a critical appraisal of the relevant literature. Each month a new round of voting takes place to decide which further questions will be reviewed. Dental practitioners and dental care professionals are encouraged to take part in the voting and submit their own questions to be included in the vote by joining the website. The paper below details a summary of the findings of the ninth critical appraisal. In order to address the question raised by dentistry research forum, first a search was conducted for systematic reviews on the topic. There was one systematic review retrieved comparing bonded amalgam restorations versus non-bonded amalgam restorations. However, there was no other systematic review identified assessing the effectiveness of dental liners under amalgam restorations in general. Therefore, a search was conducted for any randomised controlled trial (RCT) comparing use of a lining under amalgam restorations versus no lining or RCTs comparing differing lining materials under amalgam against each other. There were eight relevant RCTs identified. Due to the low quality, small sample sizes or lack of adequate reporting of the outcome data, the evidence is inadequate to claim or refute a difference in postoperative sensitivity between different dental liners. Further well-conducted RCTs are needed to answer this question. These RCTs would be preferably included and synthesised in a systematic review.

  9. Early failure of Class II resin composite versus Class II amalgam restorations placed by dental students.

    PubMed

    Overton, J D; Sullivan, Diane J

    2012-03-01

    Using the information from remake request slips in a dental school's predoctoral clinic, we examined the short-term survival of Class II resin composite restorations versus Class II dental amalgam restorations. In the student clinic, resin composite is used in approximately 58 percent of Class II restorations placed, and dental amalgam is used in the remaining 42 percent. In the period examined, Class II resin composite restorations were ten times more likely to be replaced at no cost to the patient than Class II dental amalgam restorations. A total of eighty-four resin composite restorations and six amalgam restorations were replaced due to an identified failure.

  10. The Post-Amalgam Era: Norwegian Dentists’ Experiences with Composite Resins and Repair of Defective Amalgam Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Kopperud, Simen E.; Staxrud, Frode; Espelid, Ivar; Tveit, Anne Bjørg

    2016-01-01

    Amalgam was banned as a dental restorative material in Norway in 2008 due to environmental considerations. An electronic questionnaire was sent to all dentists in the member register of the Norwegian Dental Association (NTF) one year later, to evaluate dentists’ satisfaction with alternative restorative materials and to explore dentists’ treatment choices of fractured amalgam restorations. Replies were obtained from 61.3%. Composite was the preferred restorative material among 99.1% of the dentists. Secondary caries was the most commonly reported cause of failure (72.7%), followed by restoration fractures (25.1%). Longevity of Class II restorations was estimated to be ≥10 years by 45.8% of the dentists, but 71.2% expected even better longevity if the restoration was made with amalgam. Repair using composite was suggested by 24.9% of the dentists in an amalgam restoration with a fractured cusp. Repair was more often proposed among young dentists (p < 0.01), employees in the Public Dental Service (PDS) (p < 0.01) and dentists working in counties with low dentist density (p = 0.03). There was a tendency towards choosing minimally invasive treatment among dentists who also avoided operative treatment of early approximal lesions (p < 0.01). Norwegian dentists showed positive attitudes towards composite as a restorative material. Most dentists chose minimally- or medium invasive approaches when restoring fractured amalgam restorations. PMID:27110804

  11. Amalgam

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Kevin

    2012-09-05

    Amalgam is a system that allows you to generate collections of files that work with conventional tools but take up minimal extra space on storage. If you already are archiving files in a file system and don't want to make multiple copies of whole files in order to ship the data somewhere then this system is for you. Amalgam consists of tools that allow you to create and get information about '.amalgam' files which contain just the metadata associated with a set of files. It also contains a fuse file system that, using amalgam files, will dynamically create traditional tar files. With this setup, you can see multiple orders of magnitude reduction in storage requirements for temporary data collections.

  12. Amalgam

    2012-09-05

    Amalgam is a system that allows you to generate collections of files that work with conventional tools but take up minimal extra space on storage. If you already are archiving files in a file system and don't want to make multiple copies of whole files in order to ship the data somewhere then this system is for you. Amalgam consists of tools that allow you to create and get information about '.amalgam' files which containmore » just the metadata associated with a set of files. It also contains a fuse file system that, using amalgam files, will dynamically create traditional tar files. With this setup, you can see multiple orders of magnitude reduction in storage requirements for temporary data collections.« less

  13. The combined composite resin and amalgam restoration for posterior teeth: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Roda, R S; Zwicker, P F

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a technique for restoring maxillary posterior teeth with a combined composite resin and amalgam restoration when the preparation extends buccally into an esthetically critical area. This technique has two major advantages over traditional combined restorations: it requires only one clinical appointment, and it provides an esthetically acceptable result while maintaining the advantages of an amalgam restoration. A clinical assessment of 12 of these restorations, in vivo for 0.8 to 6.4 years, is presented. All but one restoration received a score of excellent or acceptable.

  14. Lichenoid reaction associated with silver amalgam restoration in a Bombay blood group patient: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Rohini Rangarao; Mattigatti, Sudha S.; Mahaparale, Rushikesh R.; Kamble, Amit P.

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic relationship between the oral lichenoid reaction (OLR) and dental restorative materials has been confirmed many times. An OLR affecting oral mucosa in direct contact with an amalgam restoration represents a delayed, type IV, cell mediated immune response to mercury or one of the other constituents of the dental amalgam. Bombay blood group patients are more prone to this. A case of bilateral OLR is presented, which is present in relation to amalgam restoration. The lesion healed up after the replacement of restorations with an intermediate restorative material. The clinician should be aware of all the possible pathological etiologies of white lesions. If there is any doubt about the nature or management of a usual oral lesion, a referral to an appropriate specialist is mandatory. PMID:27217647

  15. Lichenoid reaction associated with silver amalgam restoration in a Bombay blood group patient: A case report.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Rohini Rangarao; Mattigatti, Sudha S; Mahaparale, Rushikesh R; Kamble, Amit P

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic relationship between the oral lichenoid reaction (OLR) and dental restorative materials has been confirmed many times. An OLR affecting oral mucosa in direct contact with an amalgam restoration represents a delayed, type IV, cell mediated immune response to mercury or one of the other constituents of the dental amalgam. Bombay blood group patients are more prone to this. A case of bilateral OLR is presented, which is present in relation to amalgam restoration. The lesion healed up after the replacement of restorations with an intermediate restorative material. The clinician should be aware of all the possible pathological etiologies of white lesions. If there is any doubt about the nature or management of a usual oral lesion, a referral to an appropriate specialist is mandatory.

  16. Need for informed consent for dentists who use mercury amalgam restorative material as well as technical considerations in removal of dental amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Greene, Jill Amanda; Cochran, Amy A; Kelley, Angela R; Gubler, K Dean; Olson, Brianna M; Hudson, Mary Anne; Woode, Dayna R; Long, William B; McGregor, Walter; Yoder, Carolyn; Hopkins, Debra B; Saepoff, Jessica P

    2007-01-01

    Amalgam restorative material generally contains 50% mercury (Hg) in a complex mixture of copper, tin, silver, and zinc. It has been well documented that this mixture continually emits mercury vapor, which is dramatically increased by chewing, eating, brushing, and drinking hot liquids. Mercury has been demonstrated to have damaging effects on the kidney, central nervous system, and cardiovascular system, and has been implicated in gingival tattoos. While mercury amalgams may result in detrimental exposure to the patient, they can also be a danger in dental practices. In Europe, the federal governments of Norway, Finland, Denmark, and Sweden have enacted legislation requiring that dental patients receive informed consent information about the dental restorative material that will be used. In the United States, a few state governments have enacted informed consent legislation for dental patients receiving dental restorations. These state legislations were enacted by Maine, California, Connecticut, and Vermont. It is a sad tragedy that mercury is causing such health damage to many people. The American Dental Association has said for the past 150 years that the mercury in amalgam is safe and does not leak; however, no clinical studies were ever done and the Food and Drug Administration approved amalgam under a grandfather clause. Subsequent studies have shown this claim of safety not to be true. Over ten years ago, the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Journal published a comprehensive article calling mercury restorative material a major source of mercury exposure to the U.S. population. The authors of this paper recommend that federal and state legislation be passed throughout our country to ensure that consent forms are given to patients receiving silver-mercury amalgam restorative material.

  17. Replacing Amalgam Restorations: A Standardized Protocol Based on Analyzing Tissue Physicochemical Modifications.

    PubMed

    Decup, Franck; Epaillard, Alexandre; Chemla, Florence

    2015-12-01

    Almost 60% of operative dentistry is devoted to replacing restorations. When practitioners have to replace an amalgam restoration, they tend to opt for an adhesive restoration, as it is conservative of tooth tissues and mimics the natural appearance of teeth. Based on a literature review, the aim of this article is to determine the best tissue approach when replacing an old amalgam by a new adhesive restoration. After analyzing and understanding tissue alterations due to the amalgam corrosion process, the authors propose an analytical approach to managing the situation. Both tissue orientated and specific mechanical approaches are developed and should be implemented to carry out the optimal clinical procedure and achieve the most conservative and durable treatment. PMID:26767237

  18. The effect of 3 T MRI on microleakage of amalgam restorations

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, S; Misirlioğlu, M

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effects of 3 T magnetic field on microleakage of amalgam restorations containing three different types of silver (Ag). Methods: 60 extracted teeth were restored with three different types of amalgam filling materials. Restored teeth were sectioned mesiodistally and divided into experimental and control groups. Experimental groups were exposed to a magnetic field of 3 T for 20 min. All samples were plunged into 2% basic fuchsin solution and examined under a digital microscope by three different observers with regard to microleakage. Results: Statistical analysis showed significant differences in microleakage between the groups exposed to MRI and controls, whereas differences in microleakage between amalgam types were insignificant. Conclusions: The primary risk of MRI systems arises from the effects of its strong magnetic field on objects containing ferromagnetic materials. An MRI of 1.5 T is known to be safe for amalgam restorations. However, our research indicates that MRI is not completely devoid of any effects on amalgam restorations. PMID:23674614

  19. Clinical Success Rate of Compomer and Amalgam Class II Restorations in First Primary Molars: A Two-year Study

    PubMed Central

    Ghaderi, Faezeh; Mardani, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. The majority of failures in Class II amalgam restorations occur in the first primary molar teeth; in addition, use of compomer instead of amalgam for primary molar teeth restorations is a matter of concern. The aim ofthe present study was to compare the success rate of Class II compomer and amalgam restorations in the first primary molars. Materials and methods. A total of 17 amalgams and 17 compomer restorations were placed in 17 children based on a split-mouth design. Restorations were assessed at 12- and 24-month intervals for marginal integrity, the anatomic form and recurrent caries. Data were analyzed with SPSS 11. Chi-squared test was applied for the analysis. Statistical significance was set at P<0.05. Results. A total 34 restorations of 28 restorations (14 pairs) of the total restorations still survived after 24 months. Compomerrestorations showed significantly better results in marginal integrity. Recurrent caries was significantly lower incompomer restorations compared to amalgam restorations. Cumulative success rate at 24-month interval was significantlyhigher in compomer restorations compared to amalgam restorations. There was no statistically significant difference inanatomic form between the two materials. Conclusion. Compomer appears to be a suitable alternative to amalgam for Class II restorations in the first primary mo-lars. PMID:26236434

  20. Are there acceptable alternatives to amalgam?

    PubMed

    Mackert, J Rodway; Wahl, Michael J

    2004-07-01

    Amalgam has been the material of choice for restoring posterior teeth for more than 100 years. The past 25 years have witnessed significant advances in restorative materials themselves and in the bonding systems for retaining a restoration in the prepared tooth. As a result, there has been a shift toward resin composite materials during this same period because of concerns about the esthetics and biocompatibility of dental amalgam. In addition, other materials such as glass ionomer cements, ceramic inlays and onlays, and gold alloys have been used as alternatives to amalgam. This article will review recent studies on the longevity and biocompatibility of these alternatives to dental amalgam.

  1. Clinical Evaluation of Reasons for Replacement of Amalgam Restorations in Patients Referring to a Dental School in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Pouralibaba, Firoz; Joulaei, Mohammad; Kashefimehr, Atabak; Pakdel, Farzaneh; Jamali, Zahra; Esmaeili, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Background and aims The present study evaluated the most common reasons for replacing amalgam restorations in a university clinic. Materials and methods A total of 217 restorations which needed to be replaced were clinically and radiographically evaluated in a period of 4 months. The frequencies of reasons for replacing amalgam restorations were calculated: The assessed items included recurrent caries, tooth structure fracture (functional or non-functional cusps), amalgam bulk fracture, amalgam marginal fracture, proximal overhangs, and esthetics. Data were analyzed using Fischer’s exact test. Results Both in vital teeth and teeth which had undergone root canal therapy, the most common reason for amalgam replacement was cusp fracture, with the fracture of non-functional cusps being statistically significant. Recurrent caries was the second most common reason for amalgam replacement. In Class I restorations, the most common reasons were recurrent caries and esthetics, with no statistical significance. The most frequent problem in Class II restorations was fracture of non-functional cusps, with a statistical significance in three-surface restorations. Conclusion According to the results, failing to reduce undermined cusps and neglectful caries removal are the reasons for majority of amalgam restoration replacements. These issues should be emphasized in the curriculum for dental students and continuing education courses. PMID:22991598

  2. An in vitro Evaluation of Microleakage of Posterior Teeth Restored with Amalgam, Composite and Zirconomer – A Stereomicroscopic Study

    PubMed Central

    Punia, Sandhya Kapoor; Bhat, Surekha; Singh, Gautam; Goyal, Pravesh; Oza, Swapnil; Raiyani, Chirag M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Numerous restorative materials are being used in dentistry to achieve adequate strength and restore aesthetics. However, a perfect ideal restorative material has still eluded dentist. Dental amalgam is versatile material with self-sealing property, but is unaesthetic. Other restorative materials like, composites require conservative preparation, but exhibits polymerisation shrinkage resulting in microleakage. To overcome these drawbacks a high strength restorative material reinforced with ceramic and zirconia fillers known as zirconomer has been introduced. The aim of this study was to evaluate the micro-leakage of these three different restorative materials. Materials and Methods Thirty non-carious human permanent first and second molars were utilized in this study. Class I cavities were prepared on the occlusal surface; cavities were then restored with amalgam, composite and zirconomer as per manufacture’s instruction. All samples were stored for 24 hours in distilled water followed by thermocycling. The entire tooth surface was painted with two coats of varnish to within 1mm of the restoration margins. The teeth were immersed in dye. Teeth were sectioned and observed under stereomicroscope. Results In this study the zirconomer exhibited the highest micro leakage as compared to composite and amalgam but composite having higher micro leakage as compared to amalgam and lower micro leakage as compared to zirconomer. Conclusion Even though composite and amalgam are being marketed aggressively and new material like zirconomer are on origin, amalgam still proves to be one of the best materials. PMID:26393208

  3. Preservation-based approaches to restore posterior teeth with amalgam, resin or a combination of materials.

    PubMed

    Baghdadi, Ziad D

    2002-02-01

    This review is a systematic assessment, from the literature, of the status quo of dental amalgam, resin-based composite and glass-ionomer restorations for carious lesions as it applies to new concepts, coupled with clinical research. Scientifically based and practical new materials and techniques are recommended to include in contemporary practice throughout the world. Clinical and laboratory studies which have been carried out in light of modern conservative principles, and in light of the current emphasis of treating dental caries as a disease process were reviewed and discussed. An approach to managing carious lesions based upon selected advantages of dental amalgam, resin-based composite and glass-ionomer technology applied to what is termed "preservation-based" approaches to restoring teeth has been synthesized. Researched evidence contradicts the notion of "extension for prevention" in favor of maintaining sound tooth structure which would translate into more patients with healthy dentitions for entire lifetimes. PMID:12074231

  4. The effects of the Nd:YAG laser on amalgam dental restorative material.

    PubMed

    Cernavin, I; Hogan, S P

    1999-06-01

    The Nd:YAG laser has been marketed as an instrument for use on both hard and soft dental tissues. Its potential for use on hard tissues is limited but it may be the instrument of choice for use in certain soft tissue procedures. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of the Nd:YAG laser on amalgam restorations which are frequently placed on tooth surfaces adjacent to areas of soft tissue which may be subjected to the laser. The amalgam used was Tytin. The laser firing was controlled by a computer and a constant repetition rate of 40 Hz was used. Energy per pulse was altered as follows: 30 mJ, 40 mJ, 60 mJ, 80 mJ, 120 mJ and 140 mJ. Exposure times of 0.05 s (2 pulses), 0.125 s (5 pulses), 0.25 s (10 pulses), 0.5 s (20 pulses), 1 s (40 pulses), 2 s (80 pulses), 3 s (120 pulses), 4 s (160 pulses), and 5 s (200 pulses) were used. The width of defect was measured using a measuring microscope with 10x magnification and it was established that the damage threshold lies between 0.125 s (5 pulses) and 0.25 s (10 pulses) for 30 mJ per pulse. Scanning electron microscope observations revealed that the melting of amalgam at exposure times of 5 s actually decreased the size of the observed defect. The data were analysed using a two-way ANOVA statistical test. There was a significant (p < 0.001) correlation between the width of the defect and exposure time up to an exposure time of 4 s and the width of defect and the energy per pulse setting. The findings indicate that amalgam restorations are damaged by inadvertent laser exposure and clinicians must take measures to protect such restorations during lasing of soft tissues.

  5. Reinforcement of Unsupported Enamel by Restorative Materials and Dentin Bonding Agents: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaei, M.; Ghavam, M.; Rostamzadeh, T.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Preservation of unsupported occlusal enamel after removal of underlying carious dentin may result in maintenance of aesthetics as well as wear resistance against the opposing enamel. This study investigates the influence of different restorative materials and bonding agents on reinforcement of unsupported enamel in molars and compares it with sound dentin. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, forty- five extracted human molars were selected and randomly divided into five groups of nine. All lingual cusps were cut off. The dentin underlying the buccal cusps was removed in all groups except the positive control. The negative control group received no restorations. After application of varnish and Panavia F, spherical amalgam (Sina) and after application of Single-Bond (3M), composite resin (Tetric Ceram) was used to replace missing dentin. All specimens were thermocycled, then mounted in acrylic resin using a surveyor. Lingual inclination of facial cusps was positioned horizontally. Load was applied by an Instron machine at a crosshead speed of 10 mm/min until fracture. Data were subjected to ANOVA (one way) and Post hoc Test (Duncan). Results: Statistically significant differences were found between the five groups (P<0.001); however, no significant difference was revealed between bonded amalgam and the positive control groups (P=0.762). Composite and amalgam had the same effect (P=0.642), while the composite and negative group had no significant difference (P=0.056). Conclusion: Bonded amalgam systems (Panavia F) could reinforce the undermined occlusal enamel effectively. PMID:21998780

  6. Effects of the Nd:YAG laser on amalgam dental restorative material: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cernavin, Igor; Hogan, Sean P.

    1996-09-01

    The Nd:YAG laser has been marketed as an instrument for use on both hard and soft dental tissues. Its potential for use on hard tissues is limited but it may be the instrument of choice for use in certain soft tissue procedures. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of the Nd:YAG laser on amalgam restorations which frequently occur on tooth surfaces adjacent to areas of soft tissue which may be subjected to the laser. The amalgam used was Tytin. The laser firing was controlled by a computer and a constant repetition rate of 40 Hz was used. Energy per pulse was altered as follows, 30 mJ, 40 mJ, 60 mJ, 80 mJ, 120 mJ and 140 mJ. Exposure times of 0.05 sec, 0.125 sec, 0.25 sec, 0.5 sec, 1 sec, 2 sec, 3 sec, 4 sec, and 5 sec were used. The width of defect was measured using a Nikon measurescope with 10x magnification and it was established that the damage threshold lies between 0.125 sec and 0.25 sec for 30 mJ per pulse. The data was analyzed using a one way ANOVA statistical test. There was a significant correlation between the width of the defect and energy per pulse setting as well as exposure time. The findings indicate that amalgam restorations are prone to damage from inadvertent laser exposure and clinicians must take measures to protect such restorations during lasing of soft tissues.

  7. Progression of radiopacities and radiolucencies under amalgam restorations on bite-wing radiographs.

    PubMed

    Rudolphy, M P; Gorter, Y; van Loveren, C; Poorterman, J H; van Amerongen, J P

    1997-01-01

    Radiolucent and radiopaque areas in the dentine under amalgam fillings represent demineralized tissue. The aim of this study was to investigate whether caries progresses in radiolucent and radiopaque areas under amalgam fillings, by assessing their enlargement longitudinally on bite-wing radiographs. Bite-wings from dentitions of persons aged 17, 20 and 23 years were compared. For a 3-year evaluation, 365 teeth with class I and class II amalgam restorations were available on bite-wings; 16 radiopacities, 46 radiolucencies and 28 combinations could be followed longitudinally. All radiopacities remained the same size, 14 radiolucencies enlarged and 8 combinations enlarged. For a 6-year evaluation, 236 filled teeth were available; 10 radiopacities, 30 radiolucencies and 11 combinations could be compared longitudinally. All radiopacities remained the same size, 12 radiolucencies enlarged and 6 combinations enlarged. Because the radiopaque areas had not enlarged visibly on bite-wing radiographs over 3 or even 6 years, it was concluded that radiopacities may be non-progressing caries. A substantial number of radiolucent areas, with or without concomitant radiopacities, did not enlarge while radiolucent areas are considered as progressing caries.

  8. Legislation and informed consent brochures for dental patients receiving amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Cochran, Amy A; Cross, Catherine L; Wack, Courtney A; Long, William B; Newkirk, Anthony T

    2008-01-01

    In 2008, Norway banned the use of mercury for amalgam restorations. Four states in the United States have developed Informed Consent Brochures for amalgam restorations that must be given to their dental patients. The authors describe a patient who had a large cavity in his left lower molar tooth no.18 that had to be removed by an oral surgeon. When the patient went to the oral surgeon, the surgeon told the patient that he would replace the carious tooth with a gold implant. He was not given an Informed Consent Brochure regarding dental restorative materials. The oral surgeon extracted the carious tooth, replacing the tooth with a supposed gold crown implant. On his yearly dental examination, his dentist took an x-ray of his dental implant and explained that the x-ray could not distinguish whether the implant contained either gold or mercury. Consequently, the dentist referred him to a dental clinic in which the dental implant could be removed without mercury contamination of the patient's neurologic system during the extraction of the implant from the root canal. During the removal of the dental restoration, the dentist found build up expanding into the root canal that had a black color. The crown and underlying tooth were sent to ALT BioScience for analysis. Elemental analysis of the crown and underlying tooth confirmed the presence of mercury in the restoration. The patient should have been given an Informed Consent Brochure by the dentist that described the dental restoration that was used in the dental implant.

  9. Curriculum time compared to clinical procedures in amalgam and composite posterior restorations in U.S. dental schools: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Rey, Rosalia; Nimmo, Susan; Childs, Gail S; Behar-Horenstein, Linda S

    2015-03-01

    Dental clinicians have an expanding range of biomaterial choices for restoring tooth structure. Scientific developments in cariology, advances in dental biomaterials, and patients' esthetic concerns have led to a reduction in amalgam restorations and an increase in composite restorations. The aim of this study was to compare teaching time with students' clinical procedures in amalgam and composite posterior restorations in dental schools across the United States. Academic deans in 60 schools were invited to complete a survey that asked for the amount of instructional time for amalgam and composite posterior restorations and the number of clinical restorations performed by their Classes of 2009, 2010, and 2011. Of these 60, 12 returned surveys with complete data, for a 20% response rate. Responses from these schools showed little change in lecture and preclinical laboratory instruction from 2009 to 2011. There was a slight increase in two-surface restorations for both amalgam and composites; however, the total number of reported composite and amalgam restorations remained the same. Of 204,864 restorations reported, 53% were composite, and 47% were amalgam. There were twice as many multisurface large or complex amalgam restorations as composites. One-surface composite restorations exceeded amalgams. Among the participating schools, there was little to no change between curriculum time and clinical procedures. Findings from this preliminary study reflect a modest increase in two-surface resin-based restorations placed by dental students from 2009 to 2011 and little change in curricular time devoted to teaching amalgam restorations. The total number of posterior composite restorations placed by students in these schools was slightly higher than amalgams.

  10. Curriculum time compared to clinical procedures in amalgam and composite posterior restorations in U.S. dental schools: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Rey, Rosalia; Nimmo, Susan; Childs, Gail S; Behar-Horenstein, Linda S

    2015-03-01

    Dental clinicians have an expanding range of biomaterial choices for restoring tooth structure. Scientific developments in cariology, advances in dental biomaterials, and patients' esthetic concerns have led to a reduction in amalgam restorations and an increase in composite restorations. The aim of this study was to compare teaching time with students' clinical procedures in amalgam and composite posterior restorations in dental schools across the United States. Academic deans in 60 schools were invited to complete a survey that asked for the amount of instructional time for amalgam and composite posterior restorations and the number of clinical restorations performed by their Classes of 2009, 2010, and 2011. Of these 60, 12 returned surveys with complete data, for a 20% response rate. Responses from these schools showed little change in lecture and preclinical laboratory instruction from 2009 to 2011. There was a slight increase in two-surface restorations for both amalgam and composites; however, the total number of reported composite and amalgam restorations remained the same. Of 204,864 restorations reported, 53% were composite, and 47% were amalgam. There were twice as many multisurface large or complex amalgam restorations as composites. One-surface composite restorations exceeded amalgams. Among the participating schools, there was little to no change between curriculum time and clinical procedures. Findings from this preliminary study reflect a modest increase in two-surface resin-based restorations placed by dental students from 2009 to 2011 and little change in curricular time devoted to teaching amalgam restorations. The total number of posterior composite restorations placed by students in these schools was slightly higher than amalgams. PMID:25729027

  11. The failure of amalgam dental restorations due to cyclic fatigue crack growth.

    PubMed

    Arola, D; Huang, M P; Sultan, M B

    1999-06-01

    In this study a restored mandibular molar with different Class II amalgam preparations was examined to analyze the potential for restoration failure attributed to cyclic fatigue crack growth. A finite element analysis was used to determine the stress distribution along the cavo-surface margin which results from occlusal loading of each restoration. The cyclic crack growth rate of sub-surface flaws located along the dentinal cavo-surface margin were determined utilizing the Paris law. Based on similarities in material properties and lack of fatigue property data for dental biomaterials, the cyclic fatigue crack growth parameters for engineering ceramics were used to approximate the crack growth behavior. It was found that flaws located within the dentine along the buccal and lingual margins can significantly reduce the fatigue life of restored teeth. Sub-surface cracks as short as 25 microm were found capable of promoting tooth fracture well within 25 years from the time of restoration. Furthermore, cracks longer than 100 microm reduced the fatigue life to less than 5 years. Consequently, sub-surface cracks introduced during cavity preparation with conventional dental burrs may serve as a principal source for premature restoration failure.

  12. In vivo assessment of secondary caries and dentin characteristics after traditional amalgam restorations

    PubMed Central

    de Assunção Pinheiro, Isauremi Vieira; Borges, Boniek Castillo Dutra; de Lima, Kenio Costa

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate in vivo the occurrence of secondary caries and dentin characteristics in permanent molars after traditional amalgam restorations, by means of clinical visual examination, radiographs and laser-induced fluorescence (LF) (DIAGNOdent). Methods: Thirty first permanent molars of 30 schoolchildren in the 7 to14 year-old age group were included. Caries was removed by hand. Thus, indirect pulp capping was performed with glass-ionomer cement (GIC), the cavity was varnished and amalgam filled. LF was measured before and after cavity preparation and after a 12-month observation period. Dentin color after cavity preparation and after the 12-month observation period was recorded. Recurrent caries was also investigated by visual clinical and radiographic examinations, in addition to dentin thickness between pulp and indirect GIC pulp capping. Data was analyzed by ANOVA for repeated measurements, paired “t” test and descriptive statistic. Results: There were statistically significant differences (P<.05) among LF scores for dentin in all periods evaluated, with the lowest scores shown after 12 month of observation. There was no statistical difference between dentin color after cavity preparation and following 12 months of observation. Moreover, there was no recurrent caries attack at 12-month follow-up; dentin thickness between pulp and indirect GIC pulp capping was similar between baseline and final observation periods. It was concluded that the clinical restorative procedure using hand caries removal, indirect pulp capping with GIC, varnishing and amalgam filling the cavity did not provide secondary caries and increased dentin mineral content after 12 months. PMID:22904654

  13. In vivo fractures of endodontically treated posterior teeth restored with amalgam.

    PubMed

    Hansen, E K; Asmussen, E; Christiansen, N C

    1990-04-01

    The cumulative survival rate (retention of both cusps) and the fracture pattern of 1639 endodontically treated posterior teeth were assessed in a retrospective study. All teeth had an MO/DO or an MOD cavity restored with amalgam without cuspal overlays. The 20-year survival rate of teeth with an MO/DO cavity was markedly higher than that of teeth with an MOD cavity. The lowest survival rate was found for the upper premolars with an MOD cavity: 28% of these teeth fractured within 3 years after endodontic therapy, 57% were lost after 10 years, and 73% after 20 years. Generally, the cusp most prone to fracture was the lingual one, and lingual fractures caused significantly more damage to the periodontal tissues than did facial or total crown fractures. The severity of periodontal damage increased with posterior location of the tooth. By far the most serious failures, irrespective of the cavity type, were found for the upper second molar, as 10 of 29 fractures led to extraction. It is concluded that amalgam, especially in MOD cavities, is an unacceptable material for restoration of endodontically treated posterior teeth if used without cuspal overlays. PMID:2132209

  14. The use of amalgam powder and calcium hydroxide to recreate a radiopaque image of a lost dental restoration.

    PubMed

    Shiroma, Calvin Y

    2002-05-01

    Radiographs of dental restorations are highly reliable when used to identify postmortem dental remains. A problem exists if key dental restorations are missing or defective, which results in the loss of a comparative radiographic image. This article describes a simple method allowing the odontologist to quickly recreate a temporary radiopaque restoration. This article presents a method of using amalgam powder (radiopaque material) and calcium hydroxide (radiopaque material and transport medium for the amalgam powder) to recreate a radiopaque image on a tooth that has lost a dental restoration. Amalgam powder and calcium hydroxide is easily obtained (in any dental office), fairly clean, easy to manipulate, inexpensive, inert, stable, and able to be removed without damaging the dental remains. The amalgam powder/calcium hydroxide mixture can easily be re-shaped or modified to reflect the radiopaque image of the original restoration. Radiographic comparison of the "restored" dental remains to the antemortem radiographs is now possible. The use of this technique is presented in a case report. PMID:12051346

  15. The use of amalgam powder and calcium hydroxide to recreate a radiopaque image of a lost dental restoration.

    PubMed

    Shiroma, Calvin Y

    2002-05-01

    Radiographs of dental restorations are highly reliable when used to identify postmortem dental remains. A problem exists if key dental restorations are missing or defective, which results in the loss of a comparative radiographic image. This article describes a simple method allowing the odontologist to quickly recreate a temporary radiopaque restoration. This article presents a method of using amalgam powder (radiopaque material) and calcium hydroxide (radiopaque material and transport medium for the amalgam powder) to recreate a radiopaque image on a tooth that has lost a dental restoration. Amalgam powder and calcium hydroxide is easily obtained (in any dental office), fairly clean, easy to manipulate, inexpensive, inert, stable, and able to be removed without damaging the dental remains. The amalgam powder/calcium hydroxide mixture can easily be re-shaped or modified to reflect the radiopaque image of the original restoration. Radiographic comparison of the "restored" dental remains to the antemortem radiographs is now possible. The use of this technique is presented in a case report.

  16. Effects of mercury release from amalgam dental restorations during cremation on soil mercury levels of three New Zealand crematoria

    SciTech Connect

    Nieschmidt, A.K.; Kim, N.D.

    1997-05-01

    A vast amount of research has been undertaken in the last 15-20 years on the corrosion reactions occurring in dental amalgam, release of mercury from amalgam restorations, and the toxic effects of this released mercury on the human body. However, one environmental aspect of amalgam dental restorations that has not received a great deal of attention is the release of mercury during cremation. Mercury is liberated during cremation both because dental amalgams are unstable at cremation temperatures (650-700{degrees}C) and because the free mercury metal is highly volatile. In New Zealand, 58% of deaths are followed by cremation and this figure is likely to rise in the future. This increasing use of cremation as the method of corpse disposal, coupled with the fact that each amalgam restoration is approximately 50% mercury, implies that a significant amount of mercury may be emitted into the environment every year. This study examines mercury released from crematoria in New Zealand. 20 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Seal, replacement or monitoring amalgam restorations with occlusal marginal defects? Results of a 10-year clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Moncada, G; Fernández, E; Mena, K; Martin, J; Vildósola, P; De Oliveira Junior, O B; Estay, J; Mjör, I A; Gordan, V V

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this prospective and blind clinical trial was to assess the effectiveness of sealing localized marginal defects of amalgam restoration that were initially scheduled to be replaced. A cohort of twenty six patients with 60 amalgam restorations (n=44Class I and n=16Class II), that presented marginal defects deviating from ideal (Bravo) according to USPHS criteria, were assigned to either sealing or replacement groups: A: sealing n=20, Replacement n=20, and no treatment (n=20). Two blind examiners evaluated the restorations at baseline (K=0.74) and after ten years (K=0.84) according with USPHS criteria, in four parameters: marginal adaptation (MA), secondary caries (SC), marginal staining (MS) and teeth sensitivity (TS). Multiple comparison of restorations degradation/upgrade was analyzed by Friedman test and the comparisons within groups were performed by Wilcoxon test. After 10 years, 44 restorations were assessed (73.3%), Group A: n=14 and Group B: n=16; and Group C: n=14 sealing and replacement amalgam restorations presented similar level of quality in MA (p=0.76), SC (p=0.25) and TS (p=0.52), while in MS (p=0.007) presented better performance in replacement group after 10-years. Most of the occlusal amalgam restorations with marginal gaps showed similar long term outcomes than the restorations were sealed, replaced, or not treated over a 10-year period. Most of the restorations of the three groups were clinically acceptable, under the studied parameters. All restorations had the tendency to present downgrade/deterioration over time. PMID:26231302

  18. Microleakage in amalgam restorations: influence of cavity cleanser solutions and anticariogenic agents.

    PubMed

    Piva, E; Martos, J; Demarco, F F

    2001-01-01

    This study evaluated in vitro the influence of five solutions used to treat cavity preparations on microleakage of amalgam restorations. Seventy-two standard Class V cavities were prepared in buccal and lingual surfaces of 36 recently extracted human third molars. The cervical wall was located in cementum and the occlusal wall was located in enamel. Specimens were randomly divided into six groups (n=12) according to the solution employed to treat the cavities: Group I-2.5% sodium hypochlorite; Group II-Calcium hydroxide solution; Group III-1.23% Acidulated phosphate fluoride; Group IV-2% digluconate of chlorhexidine; Group V-anionic detergent solution (1.25% sodium lauryl sulfate) and Group VI-control group. The solutions were applied for one minute, followed by washing and drying. Two coats of copal varnish were applied in each cavity. The cavities were filled with capsuled amalgam GS-80 (SDI). After finishing and polishing, the specimens were submitted for thermal cycling followed by immersion in methylene blue. Then, the specimens were sectioned and microleakage was evaluated based on a standard ranking under magnification (40x). Data were subjected to statistical analysis using non-parametric tests. Results of the study concluded that leakage was higher in cementum than enamel (p<0.01). The substances employed have no influence on microleakage except for sodium hypochlorite, which increased leakage values in enamel (p<0.05).

  19. The effect of thermocycling on the bonding of different restorative materials to access opening through porcelain fused to metal restorations

    PubMed Central

    AL-Moaleem, Mohammed M.; Shah, Farhan Khalid; Khan, Nausheen Saied

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE Porcelain fused to metal (PFM) crowns provide the best treatment option for teeth that have a large or defective restoration. More than 20% of teeth with PFM crowns or bridges require non-surgical root canal treatment (NSRCT). This may be due to the effect of restorative procedures and the possible leakage of bacteria and or their by-products, which leads to the demise of the tooth pulp. Thus, this study was planned to compare the ability of the restorative materials to seal perforated PFM specimens. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study evaluates the ability of amalgam, composite or compomer restorative materials to close perforated PFM specimen's in-vitro. Ninety PFM specimens were constructed using Ni-Cr alloys and feldspathic porcelain, and then they were divided into 3 groups: amalgam (A), composite + Exite adhesive bond (B) and compomer + Syntac adhesive bond (C). All the PFM samples were embedded in an acrylic block to provide complete sealing of the hole from the bottom side. After the aging period, each group was further divided into 3 equal subgroups according to the thermocycling period (one week for 70 cycles, one month for 300 cycles and three months for 900 cycles). Each subgroup was put into containers containing dye (Pelikan INK), one maintained at 5℃ and the other at 55℃, each cycle for 30 sec time. The data obtained was analyzed by SPSS, 2006 using one way ANOVA test and student t-test and significant difference level at (P<.01). RESULTS The depth of dye penetration was measured at the interfaces of PFM and filling materials using Co-ordinate Vernier Microscope. The lowest levels of the dye penetration for the three groups, as well as subgroups were during the first week. The values of dye leakage had significantly increased by time intervals in subgroups A and C. CONCLUSION It was seen that amalgam showed higher leakage than composite while compomer showed the lowest level of leakage. PMID:22259701

  20. Validity and reliability of methods for the detection of secondary caries around amalgam restorations in primary teeth.

    PubMed

    Braga, Mariana Minatel; Chiarotti, Ana Paula Sturion; Imparato, José Carlos Pettorossi; Mendes, Fausto Medeiros

    2010-01-01

    Secondary caries has been reported as the main reason for restoration replacement. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the performance of different methods--visual inspection, laser fluorescence (DIAGNOdent), radiography and tactile examination--for secondary caries detection in primary molars restored with amalgam. Fifty-four primary molars were photographed and 73 suspect sites adjacent to amalgam restorations were selected. Two examiners evaluated independently these sites using all methods. Agreement between examiners was assessed by the Kappa test. To validate the methods, a caries-detector dye was used after restoration removal. The best cut-off points for the sample were found by a Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) analysis, and the area under the ROC curve (Az), and the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the methods were calculated for enamel (D2) and dentine (D3) thresholds. These parameters were found for each method and then compared by the McNemar test. The tactile examination and visual inspection presented the highest inter-examiner agreement for the D2 and D3 thresholds, respectively. The visual inspection also showed better performance than the other methods for both thresholds (Az = 0.861 and Az = 0.841, respectively). In conclusion, the visual inspection presented the best performance for detecting enamel and dentin secondary caries in primary teeth restored with amalgam.

  1. [Black or white--Which choice for the molars? Part 2. Which does one choose for the restoration of posterior teeth: amalgam or composite?].

    PubMed

    De Moor, Roeland; Delmé, Katleen

    2008-01-01

    The two direct dental restorative materials most commonly used today are silver-mercury amalgam and resin-based composite. The survival of dental amalgam restorations is twice as high than for composite fillings: polymerisation shrinkage, deficient marginal adaptation, higher wear rates, defective contact points leading to food impaction, insufficiently converted composite at the bottom of the cavity are problems that cannot be underestimated when using resin-composite. This does not imply that there is no weakness for amalgam: the need for retentive cavities at the cost of healthy tooth substance, weakening of the tooth's strength by cutting through the tooth crown's ridges, the risk of fracture of remaining tooth substance (mostly buccal and lingual surfaces) as the result of the cavity design, and the lack of adhesion between amalgam and tooth substance. Retaining a tooth's strength by the replacement of amalgam by resin-composites is not always the correct solution. In this respect, it can be questioned whether it is not appropriate to repair failing (extensive) amalgam restorations as to replace them with resin-composites. Research in this respect has demonstrated that dentists still are not convinced of this treatment option. Restoring a tooth in its original build-up or structure and function within the oral cavity is the basis of the biomimetic principle: the use of composite appears to be more obvious than restoring with amalgam. In the present survey pro's and con's of amalgams and resin-composites for the restoration of posterior teeth are weighted. The conclusion demonstrates that there is still a place for dental amalgam in modern restorative dentistry when plastic filling materials are used for the direct tooth repair or restoration.

  2. On modeling and nanoanalysis of caries-affected dentin surfaces restored with Zn-containing amalgam and in vitro oral function.

    PubMed

    Toledano, Manuel; Aguilera, Fátima S; Osorio, Estrella; López-López, Modesto T; Cabello, Inmaculada; Toledano-Osorio, Manuel; Osorio, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research was to assess the influence of mechanical loading on the ability of Zn-free versus Zn-containing amalgams to promote remineralization at the dentin interface. Sound and caries-affected dentin surfaces (CAD) were restored using Zn-free or Zn-containing dental amalgams. Midcoronal dentin surfaces were studied by (1) atomic force microscopy analysis (including plot and phase imaging, nanoindentation test [modulus of Young (Ei), nanoroughness measurements, and fibril diameter assessment], (2) Raman spectroscopy/cluster analysis, (3) x-ray diffraction, (4) field emission electron microscope and energy-dispersive analysis, for morphological, mechanical, and physicochemical characterization. Analyses were performed before amalgam placement and after amalgam removal, at 24 h and 3 weeks of load cycling. Zn-free and Zn-containing amalgams restorations promoted an increase in the modulus of Young of CAD surfaces, after 3 weeks of load cycling; at this time, Zn-containing amalgams attained higher Ei than Zn-free restorations. Zn-containing amalgams induced tubular occlusion after load cycling, in both sound and CAD. Zn free-amalgams promoted remineralization of both intertubular and peritubular dentin in CAD substrata. These minerals were identified as calcium-phosphate deposits and crystals as hydroxyl-apatite with augmented crystallographic maturity but with some components of lattice distortion. Crosslinking of collagen diminished and secondary structure of collagen increased in CAD substrate restored with Zn-containing amalgam after 3 weeks of load cycling, indicating an advanced preservation, molecular organization, and orientation of collagen fibrils after load cycling. Plot and phase images permitted to observe the topographical changes which were promoted by the mineral deposits; in general, the indexes related to higher remineralization gave rise to a decrease of nanoroughness and an augmentation of the bandwidth of the collagen fibrils. Zn

  3. Bacteriology of deep carious lesions underneath amalgam restorations with different pulp-capping materials - an in vivo analysis

    PubMed Central

    NEELAKANTAN, Prasanna; RAO, Chandragiri Venkata Subba; INDRAMOHAN, Jamuna

    2012-01-01

    Microorganisms remaining in dentin following cavity preparation may induce pulp damage, requiring the use of pulp-capping agents with antimicrobial activity underneath permanent restorations. Objective The aims of this study were to analyze the bacteriological status of carious dentin and to assess the efficacy of different base underneath silver amalgam restorations. Material and Methods This study was conducted on 50 patients aged 13 to 30 years. Sterile swabs were used to take samples after cavity preparation, which was assessed by microbiological culture to identify the microorganisms present. Following this, cavities were restored with silver amalgam, using one of the materials being investigated, as the base: calcium hydroxide (Group II), polyantibiotic paste (Group III), a novel light-cured fluoride-releasing hydroxyapatite-based liner (Group IV) and mineral trioxide aggregate - MTA (Group V). In Group I, the cavities were restored with silver amalgam, without any base. After 3 months, the amalgam was removed and samples taken again and analyzed for the microbial flora. Results Lactobacilli were the most commonly isolated microorganisms in the samples of carious dentin. Groups IV and V showed negative culture in the 3-month samples. There was no statistically significant difference between Groups I, II and III. There was no significant difference between Groups IV and V (p>0.05). Both Groups IV and V showed significantly better results when compared to Groups I, II and III (p<0.05). Conclusions The hydroxyapatite-based liner and MTA performed significantly better in terms of antibacterial activity than the other materials. PMID:22666827

  4. Biomechanical Stress Analysis of Mandibular First Permanent Molar; Restored with Amalgam and Composite Resin: A Computerized Finite Element Study

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakar, AR

    2010-01-01

    Normal mastication with its varying magnitude and direction generates considerable reactionary stresses in teeth and their supporting tissues. The structure of the human tooth and its supporting tissues is a complex assemblage of materials of varied mechanical properties. The finite element method (FEM), a modern technique of numerical stress analysis, has the great advantage of being applicable to solids of irregular geometry and heterogeneous material properties and therefore ideally suited to the examination of structural behavior of teeth. The mandibular first permanent molar is one of the earliest permanent teeth to erupt in the oral cavity and hence most prone to caries. The purpose of the present study was to construct a two-dimensional FE model of the mandibular first permanent molar and its supporting structures, using a FE software called NISA II-Display III, EMRC, USA to study the following: • To compare stress distributions patterns when a modeled Class I Cavity was restored with dental amalgam and composite resin. • To compare the stress distributions pattern when the load was applied to different to locations, i.e.: At the mesial cusp tip, and at the center of the occlusal surface. Both amalgam and composite resin showed similar stress distribution pattern, however, the magnitudes of stresses generated in the tooth restored with composite resin were higher. Thus, amalgam is a better restorative material in distributing stresses.

  5. Reactions of connective tissue to amalgam, intermediate restorative material, mineral trioxide aggregate, and mineral trioxide aggregate mixed with chlorhexidine.

    PubMed

    Sumer, Mahmut; Muglali, Mehtap; Bodrumlu, Emre; Guvenc, Tolga

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this study was to histopathologically examine the biocompatibility of the high-copper amalgam, intermediate restorative material (IRM), mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), and MTA mixed with chlorhexidine (CHX). This study was conducted to observe the rat subcutaneous connective tissue reaction to the implanted tubes filled with amalgam, IRM, MTA, and MTA mixed with CHX. The animals were sacrificed 15, 30, and 60 days after the implantation procedure. The implant sites were excised and prepared for histological evaluation. Sections of 5 to 6 microm thickness were cut by a microtome and stained with hemotoxylin eosin and examined under a light microscope. The inflammatory reactions were categorized as weak (none or few inflammatory cells < or =25 cells), moderate (>25 cells), and severe (a lot of inflammatory cells not to be counted, giant cells, and granulation tissue). Thickness of fibrous capsules measured five different areas by the digital imaging and the mean values were scored. Amalgam, IRM, and MTA mixed with CHX caused a weak inflammatory response on days 15, 30, and 60. MTA provoked an initial severe inflammatory response that subsided at the 30 and 60 day study period. A clear fibrous capsule was observed beginning from the 15 days in all of the groups. Within the limits of this study, amalgam, IRM, MTA, and MTA mixed with CHX materials were surrounded by fibrous connective tissue indicated that they were well tolerated by the tissues, therefore, MTA/CHX seemed to be biocompatible.

  6. Effect of amalgam corrosion products in non-discolored dentin on the bond strength of replaced composite resin

    PubMed Central

    Ghavamnasiri, Marjaneh; Eslami, Samaneh; Ameri, Hamide; Chasteen, Joseph E.; Majidinia, Sara; Moghadam, Fatemeh Velayaty

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effect of amalgam corrosion products in non-discolored dentin on the bond strength of replaced composite resin. Materials and Methods: One hundred and sixty-one Class I cavities were prepared on extracted premolars and divided into seven groups. Group 1: Light-cured composite; Groups 2, 3, and 4: Amalgam stored in 37°C normal saline for respectively 1, 3, and 6 months and then replaced with composite leaving the cavity walls intact. Groups 5, 6, and 7: Identical to Groups 2, 3, and 4, except the cavity walls were extended 0.5 mm after amalgam removal. Eighteen specimens from each group were selected for shear bond strength testing, while on remaining five samples, elemental microanalysis was conducted. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney and Freidman (α = 0.05). Results: There was a significant difference between Groups 1 and 4 and also between Group 1 and Groups 5, 6, and 7. However, Groups 1, 2, and 3 showed no significant difference regarding bond strength. Bond strengths of Group 4 was significantly less than Groups 2 and 3. However, Groups 5, 6, and 7 showed similar bond strength. There was no difference among all groups in terms of metal elements at any storage times. PMID:25657522

  7. Effect of surface treatment with sandblasting and Er,Cr:YSGG laser on bonding of stainless steel orthodontic brackets to silver amalgam

    PubMed Central

    Kachoei, Mojgan; Rikhtegaran, Sahand; Fathalizadeh, Farzaneh; Navimipour, Elmira J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Satisfactory bonding of orthodontic attachments to amalgam is a challenge for orthodontists. The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the shear bond strength of stainless steel orthodontic brackets to silver amalgam treated with sandblasting and Er,Cr:YSGG laser. Study Design: Fifty-four amalgam discs were prepared, polished and divided into three groups: In group 1 (the control group) the premolar brackets were bonded using Panavia F resin cement without any surface treatment; in groups 2 and 3, the specimens were subjected to sandblasting and Er,Cr:YSGG laser respectively, before bracket bonding. After immersing in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours, all the specimens were tested for shear bond strength. Bond failure sites were evaluated under a stereomicroscope. Data was analyzed using one-way ANOVA and a post hoc Tukey test. Results: The highest and lowest shear bond strength values were recorded in the laser and control groups, respectively. There were significant differences in mean shear bond strength values between the laser and the other two groups (p<0.05). However, there were no significant differences between the sandblast and control groups (p=0.5). Conclusions: Amalgam surface treatment with Er,Cr:YSGG laser increased shear bond strength of stainless steel orthodontic brackets. Key words: Amalgam, surface treatment, shear bond strength, sandblasting, Er,Cr:YSGG laser. PMID:22143706

  8. Randomized clinical comparison of endodontically treated teeth restored with amalgam or with fiber posts and resin composite: five-year results.

    PubMed

    Mannocci, Francesco; Qualtrough, Alison J E; Worthington, Helen V; Watson, Timothy F; Pitt Ford, Thomas R

    2005-01-01

    Prospective clinical studies comparing the results of different types of restorations of endodontically treated teeth are lacking. This study compared the clinical success rate of endodontically treated premolars restored with fiber posts and direct composite to the restorations of premolars using amalgam. Premolars with Class II carious lesions were selected and randomly assigned to one of two experimental groups: (1) restoration with amalgam or (2) restoration with fiber posts and composite. One hundred and nine teeth were included in Group 1 and 110 in Group 2. Patients were recalled after 1, 3 and 5 years. No statistically significant difference was found between the proportion of failed teeth in the two experimental groups. Significant differences were observed between the proportion of root fractures (p=0.029) and caries (p=0.047), with more root fractures and less caries observed in the teeth restored with amalgam at the five-year recall. Within the limits of this study, it can be concluded that restorations with fiber posts and composite were found to be more effective than amalgam in preventing root fractures but less effective in preventing secondary caries. PMID:15765952

  9. Utilization of ceromer inlays/onlays for replacement of amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Koczarski, M J

    1998-05-01

    Fiber-reinforced Ceromer technology has been recommended for a variety of restorations, including inlays/onlays, crowns and bridges, and direct restorations. Ideal restorative dental materials must exhibit adequate physical properties and fit, as well as ease and predictability of fabrication and repair. The Ceromer restorative material combines the positive attributes of indirect composite restorations, feldspathic ceramics, and cast-gold restorations. This article reviews the material properties and aesthetic characteristics inherent to Ceromers, as well as the appropriate preparation and adhesive techniques for inlay/onlay restorations.

  10. [Microleakage of four different amalgam binding systems].

    PubMed

    Oberholzer, T G; Grobler, S R; Rossouw, R J; van Wyk Kotze, T J; Grobler-Rabie, A

    2001-02-01

    This-study was undertaken to evaluate and compare microleakage in class V cavities in human teeth which were lined with Amalgambond Plus with HPA (Parkell, USA), Optibond Solo (Kerr, U.S.A.), Fuji Plus (GC Corporation, Japan) and Prime & Bond 2.1 (Dentsply, Switzerland), and then restored with Logic amalgam (SDI Australia). The restored teeth were thermocycled in basic fuchsin dye, sectioned, and evaluated for dye penetration. The interdiffusion zones were viewed in a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). The results showed that no bonding system could totally eliminate microleakage. Statistical analysis revealed significant differences between Amalgambond Plus with HPA and Prime & Bond 2.1, Fuji Plus as well as Optibond Solo, for both the enamel and dentine sides. No significant differences were found between Prime & Bond 2.1, Fuji Plus and Optibond Solo, for both the enamel and dentine sides. Amalgambond Plus showed significantly more leakage at dentine sides while Prime & Bond 2.1 showed significantly more leakage at enamel sides. The CLSM revealed hybrid layers of different thicknesses, resin penetration into tubules, as well as resin incorporation within the spherical particles of the amalgam. Optibond Solo, Fuji Plus and Prime & Bond 2.1 can serve to improve the marginal seal of amalgam restorations.

  11. Extended indications for directly bonded composite restorations: a clinician's view.

    PubMed

    Roeters, J J

    2001-01-01

    Adhesive techniques play an important role in almost every discipline of dentistry. Compared to conventional direct and indirect techniques, the direct adhesively bonded composite restoration offers many advantages. This article summarizes and illustrates some of them.

  12. Conservative indirect restorations for posterior teeth. Cast versus bonded ceramic.

    PubMed

    Donovan, T E; Chee, W W

    1993-07-01

    The practitioner today has a number of alternative restorative modalities from which to chose when faced with the necessity of restoring posterior teeth. The primary options with extensively broken down posterior teeth are cast gold and bonded ceramic inlays, onlays, and partial veneer restorations. The dentist and informed patient should make the choice of which modality is appropriate based on a number of criteria. Certainly, based on the criteria of basic physical properties, potential for marginal integrity and stability of that integrity, cast gold is the material of choice. In terms of conservation of tooth structure and systemic biocompatibility, both restoration types are excellent. With regard to effects on long-term pulpal health, much remains unknown with many of the materials used with bonded restorations at the present time. Conservative cast gold restorations have proved to be very successful in this regard over the long term. The potential for tooth strengthening with bonded restorations is certainly an exciting, but as yet, unproven, clinical reality. Thus, until those clinical data are available, the most predictable means of restoration of extensively broken down posterior teeth is with partial-coverage cast gold, protecting cusps at risk as required (Fig. 9). As mentioned previously, cast gold inlays are also a very conservative and predictable restoration (Fig. 10). Both cast gold and bonded ceramic restorations are technically demanding, but the details required to produce excellent gold castings are well defined, and can be learned readily. Much remains to be learned regarding the materials and the techniques used to fabricate bonded ceramic restorations. Priority issues would seem to be reaching a consensus regarding the details of tooth preparation and the development of improved luting resins with improved wear resistance. Simplified techniques to improve the quality of the fit of these types of restoration also are of paramount importance

  13. Functional and aesthetic guidelines for stress-reduced direct posterior composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Deliperi, S

    2012-01-01

    Amalgam has been used in the restoration of structurally compromised posterior teeth for many years. When placing large amalgam restorations, replacement of weak cusps with restorative material is recommended to prevent tooth fracture. This recommendation can be modified with new guidelines using modern adhesive techniques. Semidirect and indirect inlay/onlay composite restorations have progressively replaced amalgam restorations over the past 20 years. Lately, single visit direct resin-bonded composite (RBC) restorations have also been used as a viable alternative to conventional indirect restorations. This paper is intended to introduce a step-by-step protocol for the direct restoration of structurally compromised posterior teeth using RBCs with stress-reducing protocols.

  14. Long-term clinical evaluation of fracture and pulp injury following glass-ionomer cement or composite resin applied as a base filling in teeth restored with amalgam.

    PubMed

    De C Luz, M A; Ciaramicoli-Rodrigues, M T; Garone Netto, N; De Lima, A C

    2001-07-01

    The aim of this research was to analyse the long-term clinical behaviour of two dental materials applied as filling under silver amalgam restorations: glass-ionomer cement (GIC) and composite resin with adhesive system (CR). In this study, 117 posterior teeth (29 premolars and 88 molars) were selected with carious lesions which resulted in great loss of dentin and cusps with unsupported enamel. After caries removal, cavities were prepared and totally filled with GIC or with CR. In a following visit, new cavities were prepared, leaving the employed filling material as a base and support for the enamel, which were then restored with silver amalgam. Restorations were evaluated periodically after 6 months and up to 5 years. Both fracture and pulpal involvement rates were low. Although differences could be observed in the behaviour of the materials, statistical survival estimation showed that the performances of GIC and CR as filling material were similar. There was a significant association both between kind of tooth (molar or premolar) and long-term survival of the restorations; and between degree of unsupported enamel and the same long-term survival. Our results confirmed that the technique in which GIC or CR are used as filling under silver amalgam restorations is clinically acceptable. PMID:11422695

  15. Dental Amalgam

    MedlinePlus

    ... Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam Dental Amalgam Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Dental amalgam is a dental filling material which is ...

  16. Shear bond strength of partial coverage restorations to dentin

    PubMed Central

    Agustín-Panadero, Rubén; Alonso-Pérez-Barquero, Jorge; Fons-Font, Antonio; Solá-Ruíz, María-Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Background When partial coverage restorations (veneers, inlays, onlays…) must be cemented to dentin, bond strength may not reach the same predictable values as to enamel. The purpose of this study was: 1. To compare, with a shear bond test, the bond strength to dentin of a total-etch and a self-etching bonding agent. 2. To determine whether creating microretention improves the bond strength to dentin. Material and Methods Two bonding agents were assayed, Optibond FL® (Kerr), two-bottle adhesive requiring acid etching, and Clearfil SE Bond® (Kuraray), two-bottle self-etching adhesive. The vestibular, lingual, distal and mesial surfaces of ten molars (n=10) were ground to remove all enamel and 40 ceramic samples were cemented with Variolink II® (Ivoclar Vivadent). Half the molar surfaces were treated to create round microretention (pits) to determine whether these could influence bond strength to dentin. The 40 molar surfaces were divided into four groups (n=10): Optibond FL (O); Clearfil SE (C); Optibond FL + microretention (OM); Clearfil SE + micro retention (CM). A shear bond test was performed and the bond failures provoked examined under an optical microscope. Results O=35.27±8.02 MPa; C=36.23±11.23 MPa; OM=28.61±6.27 MPa; CM=27.01±7.57 MPa. No statistically significant differences were found between the adhesives. Optibond FL showed less statistical dispersion than Clearfil SE. The presence of microretentions reduced bond strength values regardless of the adhesive used. Conclusions 1. Clearfil SE self-etching adhesive and Optibond FL acid-etch showed adequate bond strengths and can be recommended for bonding ceramic restorations to dentin. 2. The creation of round microretention pits compromises these adhesives’ bond strength to dentin. Key words:Adhesion to dentin, bonding agent, Optibond FL, Clearfil SE, microretention, shear bond test. PMID:26330937

  17. Increased mercury release from dental amalgam restorations after exposure to electromagnetic fields as a potential hazard for hypersensitive people and pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, Ghazal; Mortazavi, S M J

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades, the use of common sources of electromagnetic fields such as Wi-Fi routers and mobile phones has been increased enormously all over the world. There is ongoing concern that exposure to electromagnetic fields can lead to adverse health effects. It has recently been shown that even low doses of mercury are capable of causing toxicity. Therefore, efforts are initiated to phase down or eliminate the use of mercury amalgam in dental restorations. Increased release of mercury from dental amalgam restorations after exposure to electromagnetic fields such as those generated by MRI and mobile phones has been reported by our team and other researchers. We have recently shown that some of the papers which reported no increased release of mercury after MRI, may have some methodological errors. Although it was previously believed that the amount of mercury released from dental amalgam cannot be hazardous, new findings indicate that mercury, even at low doses, may cause toxicity. Based on recent epidemiological findings, it can be claimed that the safety of mercury released from dental amalgam fillings is questionable. Therefore, as some individuals tend to be hypersensitive to the toxic effects of mercury, regulatory authorities should re-assess the safety of exposure to electromagnetic fields in individuals with amalgam restorations. On the other hand, we have reported that increased mercury release after exposure to electromagnetic fields may be risky for the pregnant women. It is worth mentioning that as a strong positive correlation between maternal and cord blood mercury levels has been found in some studies, our findings regarding the effect of exposure to electromagnetic fields on the release of mercury from dental amalgam fillings lead us to this conclusion that pregnant women with dental amalgam fillings should limit their exposure to electromagnetic fields to prevent toxic effects of mercury in their fetuses. Based on these findings, as infants

  18. Durability of bonds and clinical success of adhesive restorations

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Ricardo M.; Manso, Adriana P.; Geraldeli, Saulo; Tay, Franklin R.; Pashley, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Resin-dentin bond strength durability testing has been extensively used to evaluate the effectiveness of adhesive systems and the applicability of new strategies to improve that property. Clinical effectiveness is determined by the survival rates of restorations placed in non-carious cervical lesions (NCCL). While there is evidence that the bond strength data generated in laboratory studies somehow correlates with the clinical outcome of NCCL restorations, it is questionable whether the knowledge of bonding mechanisms obtained from laboratory testing can be used to justify clinical performance of resin-dentin bonds. There are significant morphological and structural differences between the bonding substrate used in in vitro testing versus the substrate encountered in NCCL. These differences qualify NCCL as a hostile substrate for bonding, yielding bond strengths that are usually lower than those obtained in normal dentin. However, clinical survival time of NCCL restorations often surpass the durability of normal dentin tested in the laboratory. Likewise, clinical reports on the long-term survival rates of posterior composite restorations defy the relatively rapid rate of degradation of adhesive interfaces reported in laboratory studies. This article critically analyzes how the effectiveness of adhesive systems is currently measured, to identify gaps in knowledge where new research could be encouraged. The morphological and chemical analysis of bonded interfaces of resin composite restorations in teeth that had been in clinical service for many years, but were extracted for periodontal reasons, could be a useful tool to observe the ultrastructural characteristics of restorations that are regarded as clinically acceptable. This could help determine how much degradation is acceptable for clinical success. PMID:22192252

  19. Dental amalgam: An update

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Ramesh; Wadhwani, Kulvinder Kaur; Tikku, Aseem Prakash; Chandra, Anil

    2010-01-01

    Dental amalgam has served as an excellent and versatile restorative material for many years, despite periods of controversy. The authors review its history, summarize the evidence with regard to its performance and offer predictions for the future of this material. The PubMed database was used initially; the reference list for dental amalgam featured 8641 articles and 13 publications dealing with recent advances in dental amalgam. A forward search was undertaken on selected articles and using some author names. For the present, amalgam should remain the material of choice for economic direct restoration of posterior teeth. When esthetic concerns are paramount, tooth-colored materials, placed meticulously, can provide an acceptable alternative. All alternative restorative materials and procedures, however, have certain limitations. PMID:21217947

  20. Crowns and other extra-coronal restorations: resin-bonded metal restorations.

    PubMed

    Walls, A W G; Nohl, F S A; Wassell, R W

    2002-08-10

    Resin-bonded metal restorations is the final part of the series. Cast metal restorations which rely on adhesion for attachment to teeth are attractive because of their potential to be much more conservative of tooth structure than conventional crowns which rely on preparation features providing macromechanical resistance and retention.

  1. A 24-month Evaluation of Amalgam and Resin-Based Composite Restorations: Findings from The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    PubMed Central

    McCracken, Michael S.; Gordan, Valeria V.; Litaker, Mark S.; Funkhouser, Ellen; Fellows, Jeffrey L.; Shamp, Douglass G.; Qvist, Vibeke; Meral, Jeffrey S.; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Knowing which factors influence restoration longevity can help clinicians make sound treatment decisions. The authors analyzed data from the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network to identify predictors of early failures of amalgam and resin-based composite (RBC) restorations. Methods This prospective cohort study gathered information from clinicians and offices participating in the network. Clinicians completed a baseline data collection form at the time of restoration placement, and annually thereafter. Data collected included patient factors, practice factors, and dentist factors, and were analyzed using mixed-model logistic regression. Results A total of 226 practitioners followed 6,218 direct restorations in 3,855 patients; 386 restorations failed (6.6 percent) during the mean follow-up period of 23.7 (SD 8.8) months. The number of tooth surfaces restored at baseline predicted subsequent restoration failure; large restorations were over 4 times more likely to fail. Material was not significantly associated with longevity; neither was tooth type. Patient age was highly associated with failure (p<0.0001). The failure rate for children was 5 percent, compared to 12 percent in persons 65 years old or older. Dentist gender and practice workload were significantly associated with restoration longevity. Conclusions In this prospective cohort study, these factors significantly predicted an increased failure rate for amalgam and RBC restorations: older patient age and a higher number of surfaces restored at baseline, with other key baseline variables taken into account. Material choice was not significantly predictive in these early results. Clinical Implications Understanding risk factors for early restoration failure may lead to more-effective patient care. PMID:23729455

  2. Critical appraisal: dental amalgam update--part II: biological effects.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Michael J; Swift, Edward J

    2013-12-01

    Dental amalgam restorations have been controversial for over 150 years. In Part I of this Critical Appraisal, the clinical efficacy of dental amalgam was updated. Here in Part II, the biological effects of dental amalgam are addressed.

  3. Fracture resistance of teeth restored with dentin-bonded crowns.

    PubMed

    Burke, F J; Watts, D C

    1994-05-01

    While dentin-bonded crowns may hold esthetic advantages over metal-ceramic restorations, and minimal tooth preparation may also be appropriate, resistance to fracture of the restored unit is an important consideration. Dentin-bonded crowns were placed on standardized preparations in two groups of 10 maxillary premolar teeth in vitro. The preparations differed only in degree of taper. The restored specimens were subjected to compressive loading at 1 mm/min from a steel bar placed along the midline fissure. Mean fracture loads of 0.77 kN (6-degree taper) and 0.71 kN (8-degree taper) were recorded for the groups of prepared teeth, and a mean fracture load of 0.97 kN was obtained for a group of unprepared controls. Statistical analysis indicated that there was no significant difference between the fracture load of the 6-degree taper group and that of the sound control teeth.

  4. Mercury toxicity and dental amalgam

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, M.; Osborne, J.W.; Hanson, A.L.

    1982-01-01

    There is adequate evidence that dental amalgam restorations, during and after placement, results in the release of Hg into the patients's body. Whether the Hg released from amalgam is due to placement procedures, surface abrasion, or later corrosion breakdown, there is evidence that a low level Hg release continues for years. With new and more accurate techniques of measuring Hg levels, especially in tissue and blood, additional studies are necessary to relate blood-Hg levels with dental amalgam restorations. Studies must relate existing restorations as well as the placement of new restorations to body-Hg levels. It is possible that we have accepted a potentially dangerous material as being safe.

  5. Clinical guidelines for indirect resin restorations.

    PubMed

    Shannon, A

    1997-06-01

    Ongoing advances in adhesive dentistry have made it possible to successfully and predictably bond tooth-supporting restorations using conservative preparation techniques. Improvements in the durability and esthetic properties of tooth-colored restorative materials have also increased the range of available treatment options. However, dentists have been slow to accept both direct and indirect posterior esthetics. This article provides a step-by-step technique for practitioners who choose to treat their patients with indirect resin esthetic restorations. It will not discuss other posterior restorative treatment techniques or materials (i.e. gold, porcelain, amalgam, bonded amalgam, or direct resin).

  6. Does bonding to dentin reduce microleakage of composite restorations?

    PubMed

    Faria-e-silva, André L; Soares, Paulo V; Baroni, Daniela B; Menezes, Murilo S; Santos-Filho, Paulo C F; Soares, Carlos J; Aguiar, Flávio H B; Martins, Luís R M

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of adhesive application only to enamel on the marginal microleakage of composite resin restorations performed with different adhesive systems. Standardized cylinder-shaped cavities were prepared on the buccal surface of eighty bovine incisors. Two etch-and-rinse (Adper Scotchbond Multi-purpose [3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN USA] and Adper Single Bond 2 [3M ESPE]) and two self-etching (Clearfil SE Bond [Kuraray, Osaka, Japan] and Adper Prompt [3M ESPE]) adhesive systems were evaluated. The adhesives were applied only to enamel or to both dentin and enamel. After adhesive light-activation, the cavities were restored with composite resin. The samples were coated with two layers of nail polish, except an area of 1-mm wide around of the restoration, and immersed in a methylene blue solution. Afterwards, the specimens were ground in order to obtain powder which was immersed in absolute alcohol. The solutions were centrifuged and the supernatant was analyzed using an absorbance spectrophotometer. Linear regression was used to estimate the dye concentration. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's tests (alpha = 0.05). The etch-and-rinse adhesives showed lower microleakage means compared to those of the self-etching adhesives. Adper Prompt presented higher microleakage means. There was no difference between the modes of application of the adhesive on the cavity for all adhesive systems, except for Clearfil SE Bond. This showed lower microleakage when applied to the whole cavity. Bonding to dentin may not reduce microleakage of composite restorations. PMID:22928376

  7. Effect of dentin surface roughness on the shear bond strength of resin bonded restorations

    PubMed Central

    Koodaryan, Roodabeh; Poursoltan, Sajjad

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE This study aimed to investigate whether dentin surface preparation with diamond rotary instruments of different grit sizes affects the shear bond strength of resin-bonded restorations. MATERIALS AND METHODS The buccal enamel of 60 maxillary central incisors was removed with a low speed diamond saw and wet ground with silicon carbide papers. The polished surfaces of the teeth were prepared with four groups of rotary diamond burs with super-coarse (SC), coarse (C), medium (M), and fine (F) grit sizes. Following surface preparation, 60 restorations were casted with nickel-chromium alloy and bonded with Panavia cement. To assess the shear bond strength, the samples were mounted on a universal testing machine and an axial load was applied along the cement-restoration interface at the crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The acquired data was analyzed with one way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc test (α=.05). RESULTS The mean ± SD shear bond strengths (in MPa) of the study groups were 17.75 ± 1.41 for SC, 13.82 ± 1.13 for C, 10.40 ± 1.45 for M, and 7.13 ± 1.18 for F. Statistical analysis revealed the significant difference among the study groups such that the value for group SC was significantly higher than that for group F (P<.001). CONCLUSION Dentin surface roughness created by diamond burs of different grit sizes considerably influences the shear bond strength of resin bonded restorations. PMID:27350858

  8. Shear Bond Strength of Three Orthodontic Bonding Systems on Enamel and Restorative Materials

    PubMed Central

    Ebeling, Jennifer; Schauseil, Michael; Stein, Steffen; Roggendorf, Matthias; Korbmacher-Steiner, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this in vitro study was to determine the shear bond strength (SBS) and adhesive remnant index (ARI) score of two self-etching no-mix adhesives (iBond™ and Scotchbond™) on different prosthetic surfaces and enamel, in comparison with the commonly used total etch system Transbond XT™. Materials and Methods. A total of 270 surfaces (1 enamel and 8 restorative surfaces, n = 30) were randomly divided into three adhesive groups. In group 1 (control) brackets were bonded with Transbond XT primer. In the experimental groups iBond adhesive (group 2) and Scotchbond Universal adhesive (group 3) were used. The SBS was measured using a Zwicki 1120™ testing machine. The ARI and SBS were compared statistically using the Kruskal–Wallis test (P ≤ 0.05). Results. Significant differences in SBS and ARI were found between the control group and experimental groups. Conclusions. Transbond XT showed the highest SBS on human enamel. Scotchbond Universal on average provides the best bonding on all other types of surface (metal, composite, and porcelain), with no need for additional primers. It might therefore be helpful for simplifying bonding in orthodontic procedures on restorative materials in patients. If metal brackets have to be bonded to a metal surface, the use of a dual-curing resin is recommended. PMID:27738633

  9. Amalgam at the new millennium.

    PubMed

    Berry, T G; Summitt, J B; Chung, A K; Osborne, J W

    1998-11-01

    Dental amalgam has served as an excellent and versatile restorative material for many years, despite periods of controversy. The authors review its history, summarize the evidence in regard to its performance and offer predictions for the future of this material. For the present, amalgam should remain the material of choice for economical direct restoration of posterior teeth. When esthetic concerns are paramount, tooth-colored materials, placed meticulously, can provide an acceptable alternative.

  10. An in vitro comparison of diagnostic accuracy of cone beam computed tomography and phosphor storage plate to detect simulated occlusal secondary caries under amalgam restoration

    PubMed Central

    Shahidi, Shoaleh; Zadeh, Nahal Kazerooni; Sharafeddin, Farahnaz; Shahab, Shahriar; Bahrampour, Ehsan; Hamedani, Shahram

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was aimed to compare the diagnostic accuracy and feasibility of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) with phosphor storage plate (PSP) in detection of simulated occlusal secondary caries. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro descriptive-comparative study, a total of 80 slots of class I cavities were prepared on 80 extracted human premolars. Then, 40 teeth were randomly selected out of this sample and artificial carious lesions were created on these teeth by a round diamond bur no. 1/2. All 80 teeth were restored with amalgam fillings and radiographs were taken, both with PSP system and CBCT. All images were evaluated by three calibrated observers. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was used to compare the diagnostic accuracy of two systems. SPSS (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) was adopted for statistical analysis. The difference between Az value of bitewing and CBCT methods were compared by pairwise comparison method. The inter- and intra-operator agreement was assessed by kappa analysis (P < 0.05). Results: The mean Az value for bitewings and CBCT was 0.903 and 0.994, respectively. Significant differences were found between PSP and CBCT (P = 0.010). The kappa value for inter-observer agreement was 0.68 and 0.76 for PSP and CBCT, respectively. The kappa value for intra-observer agreement was 0.698 (observer 1, P = 0.000), 0.766 (observer 2, P = 0.000) and 0.716 (observer 3, P = 0.000) in PSP method, and 0.816 (observer 1, P = 0.000), 0.653 (observer 2, P = 0.000) and 0.744 (observer 3, P = 0.000) in CBCT method. Conclusion: This in vitro study, with a limited number of samples, showed that the New Tom VGI Flex CBCT system was more accurate than the PSP in detecting the simulated small secondary occlusal caries under amalgam restoration. PMID:25878682

  11. The effects of restorative composite resins on the cytotoxicity of dentine bonding agents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyunghwan; Son, Kyung Mi; Kwon, Ji Hyun; Lim, Bum-Soon; Yang, Hyeong-Cheol

    2013-01-01

    During restoration of damaged teeth in dental clinics, dentin bonding agents are usually overlaid with restorative resin composites. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of restorative resin composites on cytotoxicity of dentin bonding agents. Dentin bonding agents were placed on glass discs, pre-cured and uncured resin composite discs. Bonding agents on the glass discs and composite resins discs were light cured and used for agar overlay cytotoxicity testing. Dentin bonding agents on composite resin discs exhibited far less cytotoxicity than that on glass discs. The polymerization of resin composite increased the surface hardness and decreased the cytotoxicity of bonding agents. In conclusion, composite resins in dental restorations are expected to enhance the polymerization of dentin bonding agents and reduce the elution of resin monomers, resulting in the decrease of cytotoxicity.

  12. Comparison of fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth using different coronal restorative materials: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Monga, Prashant; Sharma, Vivek; Kumar, Sukesh

    2009-01-01

    Aim/Objective: To evaluate the in vitro effect of bonded restorations on the fracture resistance of root canal-treated teeth. Materials and Methods: One hundred twenty extracted, maxillary, permanent premolars were collected. After preparing the access cavity, the teeth were biomechanically prepared and obturated. Samples were divided into six groups based on the type of restorative material used to restore them. Teeth were embedded in acrylic resin and their fracture strength was measured using a Universal Testing Machine. Data were evaluated statistically using one-way ANOVA-F and unpaired t-test. Results: Teeth restored with bonded amalgam and composite resin showed higher fracture resistance than those restored with conventional amalgam. Fracture strengths of bonded restorations and intact teeth were not statistically different. The results suggested that the group restored with conventional amalgam had the lowest fracture resistance. No statistically significant differences were found between the bonded amalgam and composite resin groups. Conclusion: Conventional amalgam core showed the least fracture resistance whereas; composite resin and bonded amalgam core showed fracture resistance was similar to that of natural tooth. PMID:20543925

  13. [Water absorption of five dental resins used in bonded restorations].

    PubMed

    Gillet, D; Dupuis, V

    2002-12-01

    The actual restorative dentistry need to bond material which are under the constraint of saliva likely, as all liquid, to enter inside the product with time and to modify its characteristics. In this study, we compare the behaviour of five materials opposite water absorption, in vitro, until one year: two composite resins (Tetric et Pertac II), two ceromer (ceromer (Tetric ceram et Tetric flow) and one compomer (Hytac(r)). Each pastille weight is expressed in percentage of initial weight. All materials loose weight in the first hours except Tetric ceram which stay stable. At 48 h, all materials except Pertac II get back their initial weight. At long-term, all the materials are stable with a profit of 1% for Hytac, 0.5% for Tetric, Tetric ceram et Tetric flow and a loss of à 0.3% for Pertac II. As a result of this study, we understand why the clinical used of Hytac must be done following strict conditions.

  14. Amalgam tattoo.

    PubMed

    Tran, Hien T; Anandasabapathy, Niroshana; Soldano, Anthony C

    2008-01-01

    A 53-year-old woman with a history of melanoma status-post excision two years prior presented with a 4-month history of 4, dark-brown macules on the inferior surface of her tongue. A biopsy specimen showed a squamous mucosa with chronic submucosal inflammation and brown pigment. The clinical and histopathologic findings were consistent with a diagnosis of amalgam tattoo. Amalgam tattoos are common, oral pigmented lesions that clinically present as isolated, blue, grey, or black macules on the gingivae, the buccal and alveolar mucosae, the palate, and/or the tongue. They are due to deposition of a mixture of silver, tin, mercury, copper, and zinc, which are components of an amalgam filling, into the oral soft tissues. Amalgam tattoos can either be treated surgically or with a Q-switched ruby laser. In the case of our patient with the history of melanoma, her oral lesions proved not to be the more dire diagnosis of malignant melanoma. PMID:18627755

  15. Amalgam hazards. An assessment of research

    SciTech Connect

    Mandel, I.D. )

    1991-08-01

    Although mercury vapor in high concentration can have deleterious effects on several organ systems, there is no evidence of risk at the levels generated by chewing with amalgam restorations. Epidemiological studies relating amalgam exposure to health outcomes are recommended, however, to provide the profession and the public a full sense of security.

  16. Fracture resistance of teeth restored with class II bonded composite resin.

    PubMed

    Eakle, W S

    1986-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether composite resin bonded to enamel or to both enamel and dentin can increase the fracture resistance of teeth with Class II cavity preparations. Extracted maxillary pre-molars with MOD slot preparations were restored with composite resin bonded to enamel (P-30 and Enamel Bond) or composite resin bonded to enamel and dentin (P-30 and Scotch-bond). Teeth in a control group were prepared but left unrestored. All teeth were loaded occlusally in a universal testing machine until they fractured. Means of forces required to fracture teeth in each of the three groups were statistically compared (one-way ANOVA and Bonferroni t test). Teeth restored with combined enamel- and dentin-bonded composite resins were significantly more resistant to fracture than were similarly prepared but unrestored teeth and also than teeth restored with enamel-bonded composite resin (p less than 0.05). A significant difference was not demonstrated between the enamel-bonded group and the unrestored group. Further testing is needed to determine the durability of the bonds between tooth and restoration in the clinical setting. PMID:3511111

  17. Dental amalgam and mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Mackert, J.R. Jr. )

    1991-08-01

    This paper looks at the issues of the current amalgam controversy: the daily dose of mercury from amalgam, hypersensitivity to mercury, claims of adverse effects from amalgam mercury and alleged overnight 'cures.' In addition, the toxicity and allergenicity of the proposed alternative materials are examined with the same kind of scrutiny applied by the anti-amalgam group to dental amalgam. 100 references.

  18. Comparative in vitro study of the shear bond strength of brackets bonded with restorative and orthodontic resins.

    PubMed

    Isber, Hassan; Ambrosio, Aldrieli Regina; Carvalho, Paulo Eduardo Guedes; Valle-Corotti, Karyna Martins do; Siqueira, Danilo Furquim

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of brackets bonded with different restorative systems and compare it with that afforded by an established orthodontic bonding system. Seventy human bicuspids were used, divided into five different groups with 14 teeth each. Whereas a specific orthodontic bonding resin (Transbond™ XT) was used in the control group, the restorative systems Charisma, Tetric Ceram, TPH Spectrum and Z100 were used in the other four groups. Seven days after bonding the brackets to the samples, shear forces were applied under pressure in a universal testing machine. The data collected was evaluated using the ANOVA test and, when a difference was identified, the Tukey test was applied. A 5% level of significance was adopted. The mean results of the shear bond strength tests were as follows: Group 1 (Charisma), 14.98 MPa; Group 2 (Tetric Ceram), 15.16 MPa; Group 3 (TPH), 17.70 MPa; Group 4 (Z100), 13.91 MPa; and Group 5 or control group (Transbond™ XT), 17.15 MPa. No statistically significant difference was found among the groups. It was concluded that all tested resins have sufficient bond strength to be recommended for bonding orthodontic brackets.

  19. Novel Amalgams for In-Space Parts Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, Calvin; VanHoose, James R.; Grugel, Richard N.

    2012-01-01

    Sound amalgams can be fabricated by substituting Ga-In liquid for mercury; Cu-coated steel fibers bond well with the amalgam components. Inclusion of steel fibers significantly improved mechanical properties. An application scenario utilizing amalgams for in-space parts fabrication and repair was suggested. Procedure and materials need to be optimized

  20. Dental amalgam--environmental aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Arenholt-Bindslev, D. )

    1992-09-01

    Increasing knowledge about the risk of toxic effects caused by anthropogenic mercury accumulation in ecosystems has resulted in a growing pressure for reduction of the discharge of mercury waste. Consequently, the mercury waste problems of dental clinics have been given increased attention, and restrictions on handling and discharge of contaminated waste have been established in several countries. Major amalgam particles from trituration surplus of those produced during the carving and burnishing of new amalgam restorations are generally collected in coarse filters and sold for refinement. Minor amalgam particles released by production of new fillings or by removal of old restorations partly sediment in tubes and drains. The remaining particles are carried with the waste water stream to the local purifying plant. In Scandinavia, the industrial discharge of mercury-contaminated waste water has been reduced to a minimum. According to recent investigations, dental clinics appear to be responsible for the major amount of mercury collected in the sludge generated in purifying plants. If threshold values for heavy metal content, including mercury, are exceeded, the sludge is not allowed to be recycled as fertilizer. Installation of an approved amalgam-separating apparatus in dental clinics is now mandatory in several countries--for example, Switzerland, Germany, Sweden, and Denmark. Approval of amalgam separators is based on national testing programs, including clinical or laboratory tests demanding 95-99% separating efficiency. 18 refs.

  1. Do Laboratory Results Concerning High-Viscosity Glass-Ionomers versus Amalgam for Tooth Restorations Indicate Similar Effect Direction and Magnitude than that of Controlled Clinical Trials? - A Meta-Epidemiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Mickenautsch, Steffen; Yengopal, Veerasamy

    2015-01-01

    Background A large percentage of evidence concerning dental interventions is based on laboratory research. The apparent wealth of laboratory evidence is sometimes used as basis for clinical inference and recommendations for daily dental practice. In this study two null-hypotheses are tested: whether trial results from laboratory and controlled clinical trials concerning the comparison of high-viscosity glass-ionomer cements (HVGIC) to amalgam for restorations placed in permanent posterior teeth have: (i) similar effect direction and (ii) similar effect magnitude. Methods 7 electronic databases were searched, as well as reference lists. Odds ratios (OR) and Standardised Mean Differences (SMD) with 95% Confidence intervals were computed for extracted dichotomous and continuous data, respectively. Pooled effect estimates for laboratory and clinical data were computed to test for effect direction. Odds ratios were converted into SMDs. SMDs from laboratory and clinical data were statistically compared to test for differences in effect magnitude. The analysed results were further investigated within the context of potential influencing or confounding factors using a Directed acyclic graph. Results Of the accepted eight laboratory and nine clinical trials, 13 and 21 datasets could be extracted, respectively. The pooled results of the laboratory datasets were highly statistically significant in favor of amalgam. No statistically significant differences, between HVGICs and amalgam, were identified for clinical data. For effect magnitude, statistically significant differences between clinical and laboratory trial results were found. Both null-hypotheses were rejected. Conclusion Laboratory results concerning high-viscosity glass-ionomers versus amalgam for tooth restorations do not indicate similar effect direction and magnitude than that of controlled clinical trials. PMID:26168274

  2. Dental Amalgam Exposure and Urinary Mercury Levels in Children: The New England Children’s Amalgam Trial

    PubMed Central

    Maserejian, Nancy Nairi; Trachtenberg, Felicia L.; Assmann, Susan F.; Barregard, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Background Urinary mercury (U-Hg) excretion is a commonly used biomarker for mercury exposure from dental amalgam restorations. Objectives Our goal was to determine the most efficient measure of dental amalgam exposure for use in analyses concerning U-Hg in children. Methods We analyzed time-sensitive longitudinal amalgam exposure data in children randomized to amalgam restorations (n = 267) during the 5-year New England Children’s Amalgam Trial. We calculated 8 measures of amalgam, evaluating current versus cumulative exposure, teeth versus surfaces, and total versus posterior occlusal amalgams. Urine samples collected during follow-up years 3–5 were analyzed for mercury excretion. Multivariate models for current and cumulative U-Hg excretion estimated associations between exposures and U-Hg. Results At the end of follow-up, the average (± SD) cumulative exposure was 10.3 ± 6.1 surfaces and 5.7 ± 2.9 teeth ever filled with amalgam, corresponding to 30 ± 21 surface-years. Amalgam measures and U-Hg were moderately correlated. Of amalgam exposure measures, the current total of amalgam surfaces was the most robust predictor of current U-Hg, whereas posterior occlusal surface-years was best for cumulative U-Hg. In multivariate models, each additional amalgam surface present was associated with a 9% increase in current U-Hg, and each additional posterior occlusal surface-year was associated with a 3% increase in cumulative U-Hg excretion (p < 0.001). Conclusions One single measure of amalgam exposure is insufficient. Studies of cumulative effects of mercury from amalgam exposure in children are likely to have improved validity and precision if time-sensitive amalgam exposure measures are used. In contrast, simple counts of current amalgam fillings are adequate to capture amalgam-related current U-Hg. PMID:18288327

  3. Mercury release during autoclave sterilization of amalgam.

    PubMed

    Parsell, D E; Karns, L; Buchanan, W T; Johnson, R B

    1996-05-01

    Natural teeth are an invaluable teaching tool for preclinical instruction in operative dentistry and endodontic techniques. Cavity preparation in teeth containing amalgam restorations is a realistic simulation of an often experienced clinical situation. As various pathogens are contained in saliva, teeth must be disinfected before use by students. The purpose of this study is to indirectly evaluate whether mercury vapor is released from amalgam restorations in such teeth during steam autoclave sterilization. Mercury vapor detection, sample mass changes and x-ray fluorescence data were collected from experimental steam autoclave sterilization of amalgam samples sealed in autoclave bags. All of the data showed evidence of mercury vapor generation coincident to steam autoclave sterilization. Mercury vapor levels within the room where amalgam was exposed to steam autoclave sterilization reached levels that constitute an unnecessary health risk to dental personnel. The volume of amalgam tested simulated that contained in 175 amalgam restored teeth. Initial venting of the autoclave chamber produced mercury vapor concentrations significantly in excess of OSHA vapor concentration ceiling levels. Thus, the use of a steam autoclave for sterilization of amalgam containing teeth for use in preclinical laboratory exercises may be harmful to personnel involved.

  4. An investigation of the shear bond strength of compomer restorative material to enamel and dentine.

    PubMed

    Gray, G B; Kataria, V; McManus, S; Jagger, D C

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of one step adhesives on the shear bond strength of a compomer restorative material to both enamel and dentine. Human extracted teeth were used for the study. Ten samples were prepared for both enamel and dentine specimens for each of the five groups: Tooth, no etch, Prime and Bond NT (P+B NT); tooth, Non-Rinse Conditioner (NRC), P+B NT; tooth, NRC, Prime and Bond 2.1 (P+B 2.1); tooth, etch, P+B NT; tooth, etch, P+B 2.1. The specimens were subjected to bond testing. The shear bond strength was measured using an Inston 1193 testing machine using a cross head speed of 1 mm/minute. The specimens were tested to destruction. The results show that for the enamel specimens the highest bond strength was recorded for those specimens subjected to Etch, P+B 2.1 (22.1 MPa) and Etch P+B NT (20.0 MPa). The groups of specimens which did not undergo etching had very low bond strengths ranging from 11.4 MPa for NRC, P+B 2.1, 8.5 MPa for NRC P+B NT to 6.9 MPa for P+B NT. For the dentine specimens, for all of the groups, the shear bond strengths were low. Those groups subjected to etching produced the highest values of 7.9 MPa for NRC P+B 2.1 with the lowest value of 6.1 MPa for NRC P+B NT. These bond strengths were significantly lower than those achieved for bonding to enamel. Prime and Bond NT and Prime and Bond 2.1, used in conjunction with acid etching, produce satisfactory bond strengths of compomer restorative material to enamel. Bond strengths to dentine were low.

  5. Treatment of extended anterior crown fractures using Type IIIA bonded porcelain restorations.

    PubMed

    Magne, Pascal; Magne, Michel

    2005-05-01

    Novel-design bonded porcelain restorations, the so-called Type IIIA BPRs, represent a reliable and effective procedure when restoring large parts of the coronal volume and length in the anterior dentition. While traditional treatment approaches involve the removal of large amounts of sound tooth substance (with adverse effects on the pulp, gingivae and crown biomechanics, as well as serious financial consequences), the use of adhesive technology instead can provide maximum preservation of tissues and limited costs. Considerable advantages, such as the economical and noninvasive treatment of crown-fractured teeth, are inherent to Type IIIA bonded porcelain restorations, reducing the need for preprosthetic interventions (e.g., root canal therapy and crown-lengthening) and the use of intraradicular posts. This article, illustrated with cases with up to eight and 10 years' follow-up, sets the scientific foundations of this concept, as well as important considerations about function, strength, tooth preparation, laboratory technique, and bonding optimization. PMID:16033038

  6. Eroded dentin does not jeopardize the bond strength of adhesive restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Janaina Barros; Lenzi, Tathiane Larissa; Tedesco, Tamara Kerber; Guglielmi, Camila de Almeida Brandão; Raggio, Daniela Prócida

    2012-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the bond strength of adhesive restorative materials to sound and eroded dentin. Thirty-six bovine incisors were embedded in acrylic resin and ground to obtain flat buccal dentin surfaces. Specimens were randomly allocated in 2 groups: sound dentin (immersion in artificial saliva) and eroded dentin (pH cycling model - 3× / cola drink for 7 days). Specimens were then reassigned according to restorative material: glass ionomer cement (KetacTM Molar Easy Mix), resin-modified glass ionomer cement (VitremerTM) or adhesive system with resin composite (Adper Single Bond 2 + Filtek Z250). Polyethylene tubes with an internal diameter of 0.76 mm were placed over the dentin and filled with the material. The microshear bond test was performed after 24 h of water storage at 37ºC. The failure mode was evaluated using a stereomicroscope (400×). Bond strength data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc tests (α = 0.05). Eroded dentin showed bond strength values similar to those for sound dentin for all materials. The adhesive system showed the highest bond strength values, regardless of the substrate (p < 0.0001). For all groups, the adhesive/mixed failure prevailed. In conclusion, adhesive materials may be used in eroded dentin without jeopardizing the bonding quality. It is preferable to use an etch-and-rinse adhesive system because it shows the highest bond strength values compared with the glass ionomer cements tested. PMID:22714927

  7. Transitional bonding for segmented treatment: a two-phase restorative approach.

    PubMed

    Grabiel, Jeffrey C

    2015-04-01

    When extensive dental therapy is needed, as in cases of severe attrition, interim restorations are useful in determining whether or not the proposed treatment will be successful. Transitional resin bonding is one type of interim method. In this case report, a 60-year-old patient presented with severely worn maxillary and mandibular anterior teeth; he desired treatment to be done in a timely fashion so as to be ready to attend an important wedding. Due to the urgency in timing and the complexity of the case, the treatment plan was a two-phase approach that included an initial esthetic and occlusal design to create a diagnostic wax-up followed by placement of transitional composite resin bonding, and then placement of indirect porcelain restorations. This transitional bonding approach allowed comprehensive treatment to be completed at a pace suitable to the patient's needs.

  8. An evaluation of strength of composite resin restorations using different bonding agents--an in-vitro study.

    PubMed

    Ansari, A A

    2004-01-01

    In the recent years, the scope of conservative dentistry with emphasis on esthetics has increased by leaps and bounds in enhancing individual personality. Composite resins are important for aesthetic restorations in dentistry, specifically in operative dentistry. But without bonding agents the success of composite restorations is minimized. Researchers are constantly endeavoring to improve the quality of bonding agents. The advent of new bonding systems which are capable of bonding both enamel & dentin has opened new avenues in the field of restorative dentistry. With the market floating with new bonding agents claiming superior bonding properties, this study was undertaken to investigate the degree of bond strength produced by three commercially available bonding agents (Syntac, Scotchbond 1, & Clearfil SE) with composite resin (Esthet-X) taken for the experimental procedure. PMID:15855709

  9. Rubber dam usage related to restoration quality and survival.

    PubMed

    Smales, R J

    1993-05-01

    The effects of rubber dam or cotton roll isolation on the initial quality and later survival of 644 amalgam and 149 anterior enamel-bonded composite resin restorations were evaluated over periods of up to 15 and 10 years, respectively. All restorations were placed by one operator and their quality assessed at the time of finishing, using seven clinical characteristics. The influence of six other clinical parameters on the survival of the restorations was also evaluated. There were no clinically-significant differences present in the initial high quality of the restorations, or in their later survivals, which could be directly related to the use or otherwise of rubber dam. Overall, the restoration survivals were excellent. However, there were significantly more amalgam restoration failures, from bulk fracture, in patients with severe bruxism.

  10. Human brain mercury levels related to exposure to amalgam fillings.

    PubMed

    Ertaş, E; Aksoy, A; Turla, A; Karaarslan, E S; Karaarslan, B; Aydın, A; Eken, A

    2014-08-01

    The safety of dental amalgam as the primary material in dental restoration treatments has been debated since its introduction. It is widely accepted that amalgam restorations continuously release elemental mercury (Hg) vapor, which is inhaled and absorbed by the body and distributed to tissues, including the brain. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the presence of amalgam fillings is correlated with brain Hg level. The Hg levels in the parietal lobes of the brains of 32 cadavers were analyzed with an atomic absorption spectrometer with the mercury hydride system. A total of 32 brain samples were tested; of these, 10 were from cadavers with amalgam fillings, while 22 of them were amalgam free. Hg was detected in 60.0% (6 of 10) of the samples in the amalgam group and in 36.3% (8 of 22) in the amalgam-free group. The average Hg level of the amalgam group was 0.97 ± 0.83 µg/g (minimum: 0.3 µg/g and maximum: 2.34 µg/g), and in the amalgam-free group, it was 1.06 ± 0.57 µg/g (minimum: 0.17 µg/g and maximum: 1.76 µg/g). The results of the present study showed no correlation between the presence of amalgam fillings and brain Hg level.

  11. A comparison of fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with bonded partial restorations and full-coverage porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Abhishek; Musani, Smita; Dugal, Ramandeep; Jain, Nikhil; Railkar, Bhargavi; Mootha, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of bonded partial restorations compared with full-coverage porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) crowns as a viable treatment option for endodontically treated posterior teeth. Forty-five recently extracted maxillary first premolars were collected, endodontically treated, and mounted in acrylic blocks. The specimens were randomly divided into three groups and prepared to receive their respective restorations. The teeth in group 1 received full-coverage porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns. The teeth in group 2 received bonded partial restorations made from pressed ceramics (lithium disilicate) involving a functional cusp (palatal). Finally, group 3 received bonded partial restorations made from pressed ceramics involving the buccal cusp and keeping a functional cusp (palatal) intact. All group 1 restorations were cemented using glass ionomer cement. Restorations in groups 2 and 3 were bonded using a dual-cured resin cement. All specimens were subjected to an aging process and tested for shear bond strength using a universal loading machine. The mean force applied in Newtons to cause failure for group I was 674.90 ± 94.16 N, for group 2, 463.46 ± 61.11 N, and for group 3, 849.33 ± 68.92 N. P values obtained using one-way analysis of variance showed a highly significant difference between groups 2 and 3 (P = .001), groups 1 and 2 (P = .001), and groups 1 and 3 (P = .001). The fracture modes observed in all groups involved restorations and tooth fracture. This in vitro study suggests that endodontically treated posterior teeth with intact functional cusps can be restored with bonded partial porcelain restorations. However, if the loss of tooth structure involves the functional cusp, full-coverage PFM crowns are the treatment of choice.

  12. Laboratory evaluation of phosphate ester bonding agents.

    PubMed

    Souza, M H; Retief, D H; Russell, C M; Denys, F R

    1994-04-01

    Two dentin bonding agents that contain phosphorus esters, (Clearfil Photo Bond and Panavia), and a bonding agent for porcelain, (Clearfil Porcelain Bond), have been introduced for bonding to enamel, dentin, amalgam, cast metal alloys and porcelain. The shear bond strengths were determined to enamel (Procedure A), to dentin (Procedure B), to amalgam (Procedure C), of amalgam to dentin (Procedure D), to cast metal alloy (Procedure E) and to porcelain (Procedure F). Also the quantitative microleakage of Class V restorations in cementum (dentin) was evaluated (Procedure G). The components were applied as directed by the manufacturer and a light-cured resin composite for posterior teeth, (Clearfil Photo Posterior) used. The mean +/- SD of the shear bond strengths recorded in MPa were: A = 24.15 +/- 3.65; B = 11.30 +/- 3.12; C = 13.77 +/- 3.42; D = 4.26 +/- 0.92; E = 17.84 +/- 3.19; F = 13.45 +/- 4.12. The quantitative microleakage (G) was 0.55 +/- 0.34 mg dye/restoration.

  13. Use of resin-bonded partial coverage ceramic restorations to treat incomplete fractures in posterior teeth: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Liebenberg, W H

    1996-11-01

    The objective of restorative treatment of teeth with incomplete fractures is to minimize flexure of the compromised cusps to prevent propagation of the crack. These goals can be addressed with resin-bonded posterior ceramic restorations, but long-term integrity rests on the efficiency of the restoration's bond to the dental hard tissues. Success is dependent on diligent operative performance throughout the entire procedure. Some tips for achieving successful preparation, provisionalization, and partial-coverage restoration of the incompletely fractured posterior tooth are discussed.

  14. Bond strength of resin-modified glass ionomer restorative materials using a no-rinse conditioner.

    PubMed

    Suihkonen, Rian W; Vandewalle, Kraig S; Dossett, Jon M

    2012-01-01

    A paste-paste resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI) restorative material has been introduced recently with a new conditioner that requires no rinsing. The purpose of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of an encapsulated RMGI (Fuji II LC) and a new paste-paste RMGI (Fuji Filling LC) to dentin conditioned with 20% polyacrylic acid (Cavity Conditioner), a new no-rinse conditioner (Self Conditioner,), or no conditioner. Mounted human third molars were flattened and the dentin surface was conditioned. The RMGI restorative materials were mixed and incrementally inserted into a mold and photocured. The specimens were loaded until failure in a universal testing machine after 24 hours of storage in distilled water. Fuji II LC had significantly greater bond strength to dentin than Fuji Filling LC. The use of Cavity Conditioner or Self Conditioner resulted in bond strengths that were not significantly different from each other; however, both produced greater bond strengths than those in the non-conditioned groups. PMID:23220322

  15. The dental amalgam toxicity fear: a myth or actuality.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Monika; Singh, Archana; Pant, Vandana A

    2012-05-01

    Amalgam has been used in dentistry since about 150 years and is still being used due to its low cost, ease of application, strength, durability, and bacteriostatic effect. When aesthetics is not a concern it can be used in individuals of all ages, in stress bearing areas, foundation for cast-metal and ceramic restorations and poor oral hygiene conditions. Besides all, it has other advantages like if placed under ideal conditions, it is more durable and long lasting and least technique sensitive of all restorative materials, but, concern has been raised that amalgam causes mercury toxicity. Mercury is found in the earth's crust and is ubiquitous in the environment, so even without amalgam restorations everyone is exposed to small but measurable amount of mercury in blood and urine. Dental amalgam restorations may raise these levels slightly, but this has no practical or clinical significance. The main exposure to mercury from dental amalgam occurs during placement or removal of restoration in the tooth. Once the reaction is complete less amount of mercury is released, and that is far below the current health standard. Though amalgam is capable of producing delayed hypersensitivity reactions in some individuals, if the recommended mercury hygiene procedures are followed the risks of adverse health effects could be minimized. For this review the electronic databases and PubMed were used as data sources and have been evaluated to produce the facts regarding amalgam's safety and toxicity.

  16. The Dental Amalgam Toxicity Fear: A Myth or Actuality

    PubMed Central

    Rathore, Monika; Singh, Archana; Pant, Vandana A.

    2012-01-01

    Amalgam has been used in dentistry since about 150 years and is still being used due to its low cost, ease of application, strength, durability, and bacteriostatic effect. When aesthetics is not a concern it can be used in individuals of all ages, in stress bearing areas, foundation for cast-metal and ceramic restorations and poor oral hygiene conditions. Besides all, it has other advantages like if placed under ideal conditions, it is more durable and long lasting and least technique sensitive of all restorative materials, but, concern has been raised that amalgam causes mercury toxicity. Mercury is found in the earth's crust and is ubiquitous in the environment, so even without amalgam restorations everyone is exposed to small but measurable amount of mercury in blood and urine. Dental amalgam restorations may raise these levels slightly, but this has no practical or clinical significance. The main exposure to mercury from dental amalgam occurs during placement or removal of restoration in the tooth. Once the reaction is complete less amount of mercury is released, and that is far below the current health standard. Though amalgam is capable of producing delayed hypersensitivity reactions in some individuals, if the recommended mercury hygiene procedures are followed the risks of adverse health effects could be minimized. For this review the electronic databases and PubMed were used as data sources and have been evaluated to produce the facts regarding amalgam's safety and toxicity. PMID:22778502

  17. Resin-bonded restorations: a strategy for managing anterior tooth loss in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Zitzmann, Nicola U; Özcan, Mutlu; Scherrer, Susanne S; Bühler, Julia M; Weiger, Roland; Krastl, Gabriel

    2015-04-01

    In children or adolescents with anterior tooth loss, space closure with the patient's own teeth should be considered as the first choice to avoid lifelong restorative needs. Thorough diagnostics and treatment planning are required when autotransplantation or orthodontic space closure is considered. If these options are not indicated and a single tooth implant restoration is considered, implant placement should be postponed until adulthood, particularly in young women and in patients with hyperdivergent skeletal growth pattern. A ceramic resin-bonded fixed dental prosthesis with 1 retainer is an excellent treatment solution for the interim period; it may also serve as a long-term restoration, providing that sound enamel structure is present, sufficient framework dimensions have been provided, adhesive cementation techniques have been meticulously applied, and functional contacts of the cantilever pontic avoided. In contrast, a resin-bonded fixed dental prosthesis with a metal framework and retentive preparation is indicated if the palatal enamel structure is compromised, interocclusal clearance is limited, splinting (such as after orthodontic treatment) is required, or more than 1 tooth has to be replaced. PMID:25702966

  18. Dental amalgam: A review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Eggleston, D.W.

    1989-09-01

    Since the 1800s, dental amalgam has been the most commonly used dental restorative material. Each year, dentistry in the United States uses over 100 tons of mercury, continuing a controversy regarding mercury's safety for patients and dental personnel. 65 references.

  19. Shear bond strength of bulk-fill and nano-restorative materials to dentin

    PubMed Central

    Colak, Hakan; Ercan, Ertugrul; Hamidi, Mehmet Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Bulk-fill composite materials are being developed for preparation depths of up to 4 mm in an effort to simplify and improve the placement of direct composite posterior restorations. The aim of our study was to compare shear-bond strength of bulk-fill and conventional posterior composite resins. Materials and Methods: In this study, 60 caries free extracted human molars were used and sectioned parallel to occlusal surface to expose midcoronal dentin. The specimens were randomly divided into four groups. Total-etch dentine bonding system (Adper Scotchbond 1XT, 3M ESPE) was applied to dentin surface in all the groups to reduce variability in results. Then, dentine surfaces covered by following materials. Group I: SonicFill Bulk-Fill, Group II: Tetric EvoCeram (TBF), Group III: Herculite XRV Ultra, and Group IV: TBF Bulk-Fill, 2 mm × 3 mm cylindrical restorations were prepared by using application apparatus. Shear bond testing was measured by using a universal testing machine. Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney U-tests were performed to evaluate the data. Results: The highest value was observed in Group III (14.42 ± 4.34) and the lowest value was observed in Group IV (11.16 ± 2.76) and there is a statistically significant difference between these groups (P = 0.046). However, there is no statistically significant difference between the values of other groups. In this study, Group III was showed higher strength values. Conclusion: There is a need for future studies about long-term bond strength and clinical success of these adhesive and bulk-fill systems. PMID:27011738

  20. Push-Out Bond Strength of Restorations with Bulk-Fill, Flow, and Conventional Resin Composites

    PubMed Central

    Caixeta, Rodrigo Vieira; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Kaneshima, Edmilson Nobumitu; Barbosa, Aline Silvestre; Picolotto, Cassiana Pedrotti; Lima, Ana Eliza de Souza; Gonini Júnior, Alcides; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strengths of composite restorations made with different filler amounts and resin composites that were photoactivated using a light-emitting diode (LED). Thirty bovine incisors were selected, and a conical cavity was prepared in the facial surface of each tooth. All preparations were etched with Scotchbond Etching Gel, the Adper Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus adhesive system was applied followed by photoactivation, and the cavities were filled with a single increment of Filtek Z350 XT, Filtek Z350 XT Flow, or bulk-fill X-tra fil resin composite (n = 10) followed by photoactivation. A push-out test to determine bond strength was conducted using a universal testing machine. Data (MPa) were submitted to Student's t-test at a 5% significance level. After the test, the fractured specimens were examined using an optical microscope under magnification (10x). Although all three composites demonstrated a high prevalence of adhesive failures, the bond strength values of the different resin composites photoactivated by LED showed that the X-tra fil resin composite had a lower bond strength than the Filtek Z350 XT and Filtek Z350 XT Flow resin composites. PMID:26457322

  1. Bond and fracture strength of metal-ceramic restorations formed by selective laser sintering

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Eun-Jeong; Kim, Woong-Chul; Kim, Hae-Young

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to compare the fracture strength of the metal and the bond strength in metal-ceramic restorations produced by selective laser sintering (SLS) and by conventional casting (CAST). MATERIALS AND METHODS Non-precious alloy (StarLoy C, DeguDent, Hanau, Germany) was used in CAST group and metal powder (SP2, EOS GmbH, Munich, Germany) in SLS group. Metal specimens in the form of sheets (25.0 × 3.0 × 0.5 mm) were produced in accordance with ISO 9693:1999 standards (n=30). To measure the bond strength, ceramic was fired on a metal specimen and then three-point bending test was performed. In addition, the metal fracture strength was measured by continuing the application of the load. The values were statistically analyzed by performing independent t-tests (α=.05). RESULTS The mean bond strength of the SLS group (50.60 MPa) was higher than that of the CAST group (46.29 MPa), but there was no statistically significant difference. The metal fracture strength of the SLS group (1087.2 MPa) was lower than that of the CAST group (2399.1 MPa), and this difference was statistically significant. CONCLUSION In conclusion the balling phenomenon and the gap formation of the SLS process may increase the metal-ceramic bond strength. PMID:25177469

  2. Compressive shear bond strength of core buildup materials.

    PubMed

    Görücü, Jale; Saygili, Gülbin; Ozgünaltay, Gül

    2006-04-01

    New tooth-colored restorative materials have been developed with the goal of replacing amalgam. These restoratives are marketed as packable composite and ormocer. The purpose of the present study was to compare the compressive shear bond strengths of these new materials with that of hybrid composite and amalgam as core materials. Standardized core buildups were made on four groups of extracted molars, with 10 teeth per group. Three tooth-colored restorative materials (Filtek Z 250, Filtek P 60, and Definite) and an amalgam (SDI Permite) were used. Specimens were placed in a special jig at a 45-degree angle. The compressive shear bond strength was obtained using a universal testing machine. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare the groups, and pairwise comparisons were made by Mann-Whitney U test (P < .05). Filtek P 60, a packable composite resin, had the greatest compressive shear bond strength values in all instances, and the ormocer (Definite) had the lowest. The strengths of packable composite, hybrid composite, and amalgam as core materials were not significantly different (P > .05).

  3. Maternal-fetal distribution of mercury ( sup 203 Hg) released from dental amalgam fillings

    SciTech Connect

    Vimy, M.J.; Takahashi, Y.; Lorscheider, F.L. )

    1990-04-01

    In humans, the continuous release of Hg vapor from dental amalgam tooth restorations is markedly increased for prolonged periods after chewing. The present study establishes a time-course distribution for amalgam Hg in body tissues of adult and fetal sheep. Under general anesthesia, five pregnant ewes had twelve occlusal amalgam fillings containing radioactive 203Hg placed in teeth at 112 days gestation. Blood, amniotic fluid, feces, and urine specimens were collected at 1- to 3-day intervals for 16 days. From days 16-140 after amalgam placement (16-41 days for fetal lambs), tissue specimens were analyzed for radioactivity, and total Hg concentrations were calculated. Results demonstrate that Hg from dental amalgam will appear in maternal and fetal blood and amniotic fluid within 2 days after placement of amalgam tooth restorations. Excretion of some of this Hg will also commence within 2 days. All tissues examined displayed Hg accumulation. Highest concentrations of Hg from amalgam in the adult occurred in kidney and liver, whereas in the fetus the highest amalgam Hg concentrations appeared in liver and pituitary gland. The placenta progressively concentrated Hg as gestation advanced to term, and milk concentration of amalgam Hg postpartum provides a potential source of Hg exposure to the newborn. It is concluded that accumulation of amalgam Hg progresses in maternal and fetal tissues to a steady state with advancing gestation and is maintained. Dental amalgam usage as a tooth restorative material in pregnant women and children should be reconsidered.

  4. An in vitro comparison of metal and transparent matrices used for bonded class II resin composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Müllejans, Rolf; Badawi, M O F; Raab, W H M; Lang, H

    2003-01-01

    This study compared excess formation of direct bonded Class II restorations using different matrix systems-metal or transparent. Sixty freshly extracted, non-carious, posterior human teeth were used. In all of the teeth, standardized MOD-cavities were prepared with the gingivoproximal margins located 1.0-1.5 mm cervical to the cemento-enamel junction. The prepared teeth were randomly assigned to six groups. Half were restored using metal matrices and wooden wedges; the other half were restored using transparent matrices and reflective wedges. Three different material systems were used to fill the cavities: 1) a hybrid composite (Tetric) plus an adhesive bonding agent (Syntac Classic), 2) a flowable composite (Tetric Flow) plus Syntac Classic and 3) a compomer (Dyract AP) together with an adhesive bonding agent designed for compomers (Prime & Bond NT). After the specimens were preserved in saline solution, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) assessed the amount of overhang formation at the restoration margins. The data collected indicated the use of transparent matrices resulted in significantly higher amounts of excess material at the restoration margins compared with metal matrices. Moreover, there was no significant difference between the materials when the same matrix was used. All of the dental restorations examined displayed material overhang. Based on these findings, the authors concluded that the type of matrix exerts a major impact on overhang formation, with metal matrices resulting in significantly less excess material buildup.

  5. Bonding performance and interfacial characteristics of short fiber-reinforced resin composite in comparison with other composite restoratives.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength (SBS) and surface free-energy (SFE) of short fiber-reinforced resin composite (SFRC), using different adhesive systems, in comparison with other composite restoratives. The resin composites used were everX Posterior (EP), Clearfil AP-X (CA), and Filtek Supreme Ultra Universal Restorative (FS). The adhesive systems used were Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SM), Clearfil SE Bond (CS), and G-Premio Bond (GB). Resin composite was bonded to dentin, and SBS was determined after 24 h of storage in distilled water and after 10,000 thermal cycles (TCs). The SFEs of the resin composites and the adhesives were determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids. The SFE values and SFE characteristics were not influenced by the type of resin composite, but were influenced by the type of adhesive system. The results of this study suggest that the bonding performance and interfacial characteristics of SFRC are the same as for other composite restoratives, but that these parameters are affected by the type of adhesive system. The bonding performance of SFRC was enhanced by thermal cycling in a manner similar to that for other composite restoratives.

  6. A single disulfide bond restores thermodynamic and proteolytic stability to an extensively mutated protein.

    PubMed Central

    Roesler, K. R.; Rao, A. G.

    2000-01-01

    The potential for engineering stable proteins with multiple amino acid substitutions was explored. Eleven lysine, five methionine, two tryptophan, one glycine, and three threonine substitutions were simultaneously made in barley chymotrypsin inhibitor-2 (CI-2) to substantially improve the essential amino acid content of the protein. These substitutions were chosen based on the three-dimensional structure of CI-2 and an alignment of homologous sequences. The initial engineered protein folded into a wild-type-like structure, but had a free energy of unfolding of only 2.2 kcal/mol, considerably less than the wild-type value of 7.5 kcal/mol. Restoration of the lysine mutation at position 67 to the wild-type arginine increased the free energy of unfolding to 3.1 kcal/mol. Subsequent cysteine substitutions at positions 22 and 82 resulted in disulfide bond formation and a protein with nearly wild-type thermodynamic stability (7.0 kcal/mol). None of the engineered proteins retained inhibitory activity against chymotrypsin or elastase, and all had substantially reduced inhibitory activity against subtilisin. The proteolytic stabilities of the proteins correlated with their thermodynamic stabilities. Reduction of the disulfide bond resulted in substantial loss of both thermodynamic and proteolytic stabilities, confirming that the disulfide bond, and not merely the cysteine substitutions, was responsible for the increased stability. We conclude that it is possible to replace over a third of the residues in CI-2 with minimal disruption of stability and structural integrity. PMID:11045611

  7. Oral lichenoid contact lesions to mercury and dental amalgam--a review.

    PubMed

    McParland, Helen; Warnakulasuriya, Saman

    2012-01-01

    Human oral mucosa is subjected to many noxious stimuli. One of these substances, in those who have restorations, is dental amalgam which contains mercury. This paper focuses on the local toxic effects of amalgam and mercury from dental restorations. Components of amalgam may, in rare instances, cause local side effects or allergic reactions referred to as oral lichenoid lesions (OLLs). OLLs to amalgams are recognised as hypersensitivity reactions to low-level mercury exposure. The use of patch testing to identify those susceptible from OLL is explored, and recommendations for removing amalgam fillings, when indicated are outlined. We conclude that evidence does not show that exposure to mercury from amalgam restorations poses a serious health risk in humans, except for an exceedingly small number of hypersensitivity reactions that are discussed.

  8. Evaluation of Marginal Leakage and Shear Bond Strength of Bonded Restorations in Primary Teeth after Caries Removal by Conventional and Chemomechanical Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Pravin Maru, Viral; Shakuntala, Bethur Siddaiah; Dharma, Nagarathna

    2014-01-01

    Background/Purpose. To evaluate and compare the marginal leakage and shear bond strength between conventional and Papacarie techniques of caries removal in primary molars. Materials and Methods. Sixty freshly extracted human carious primary molars were randomly divided into two groups: group I—caries removal by conventional method and group II—caries removal using Papacarie. After bonded restorations, both groups were further randomly subdivided into four subgroups for marginal leakage and shear bond strength evaluation. Results. Papacarie treated teeth (46.70%) showed less marginal leakage when compared to conventionally treated teeth (86.70%) for caries removal. The mean shear bond strength was found more in Papacarie treated teeth (12.91 MPa) than in those treated conventionally (9.64 MPa) for caries removal. Conclusion. Papacarie showed less marginal leakage and more shear bond strength when compared to those treated conventionally for caries removal. PMID:27437487

  9. Partial-prep bonded restorations in the anterior dentition: Long-term gingival health and predictability. A case report.

    PubMed

    Molina, Ivan Contreras; Molina, Gil Contreras; Stanley, Kyle; Lago, Carlo; Xavier, Clessius Ferreira; Volpato, Claudia Angela Maziero

    2016-01-01

    Bonded porcelain restorations are a predictable and durable treatment option that can restore not only the strength and function of the teeth but also the esthetic appearance. One important issue in adhesive dentistry is the preservation of sound enamel. Following biomimetic principles, employing minimally invasive applications and adhesive technologies is of paramount importance for successful restorations. While it is widely accepted that minimally invasive restorative techniques should be favored, there is still some controversy over the noninvasive approaches. The purpose of this article is to question the complete "no-prep veneer" concept due to the possible negative effects on periodontal health caused by excessive contour and overhangs of the ceramic restoration, and to propose a new method to assess the quality and longevity of veneers with a partial-prep concept. PMID:26417617

  10. Dentin bonding performance and interface observation of an MMA-based restorative material.

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, Junichi; Inoue, Go; Nikaido, Toru; Ikeda, Masaomi; Sadr, Alireza; Tagami, Junji

    2016-07-30

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate bonding performance and dentin interface acid resistance using a 4-META/MMA-TBB based restorative material (BF) compared to a conventional 4-META/MMA-TBB resin cement (SB), and the effect of sodium fluoride (NaF) addition to the materials. Dentin surfaces were treated with 10% citric acid-3% ferric chloride (10-3) or 4-META containing self-etching primer (TP), followed by application of BF or SB polymer powders with or without NaF, to evaluate microtensile bond strength (µTBS) in six experimental groups; 10-3/SB, 10-3/BF, TP/SB, TP/BF, TP/SB/NaF and TP/BF/NaF. SEM observation of the resin-dentin interface was performed after acid-base challenge to evaluate interfacial dentin resistance to acid attack. TP/BF showed highest µTBS, while NaF polymers decreased µTBS. TP/BF showed funnel-shaped erosion at the interface, however, NaF polymers improved acid resistance of interface. In conclusion, BF demonstrated high µTBSs and low acid-resistance at the interface. NaF addition enhanced acid resistance but decreased µTBS.

  11. Interactions between dental amalgams and the oral environment.

    PubMed

    Marek, M

    1992-09-01

    Dental amalgam fillings interact in a complex way with the environment in the oral cavity as they are subjected to chemical, biological, mechanical, and thermal forces. These forces change the restoration's appearance and properties, while metal ions, amalgam debris, non-metallic corrosion products, and mercury vapor are released into the oral cavity. The phenomena and conditions that affect the amalgam/environment interaction include the chemistry and biochemistry of the environment, formation of biofilms on the amalgam surfaces, existence of localized corrosion cells, galvanic contacts with other metallic restorations, abrasion during mastication, and synergistic effects of the different forces. Corrosion processes result in a degradation of the functional amalgam properties, while tarnishing reactions cause discoloration. Corrosion degradation of amalgam fillings is due mainly to localized corrosion cells in pores and crevices. Corrosion on occlusal surfaces is accelerated by abrasion during mastication, which removes the protective surface films. The average total amounts of metal species, including mercury, released per day in vivo from a restoration have not been determined. Much of the reported indirect evidence for high mercury release rates is either unreliable or controversial. A more detailed investigation is needed and will require the development of more sophisticated techniques of sampling in vivo, as well as both experimental and theoretical modeling in vitro.

  12. Posterior composite restoration update: focus on factors influencing form and function.

    PubMed

    Bohaty, Brenda S; Ye, Qiang; Misra, Anil; Sene, Fabio; Spencer, Paulette

    2013-01-01

    Restoring posterior teeth with resin-based composite materials continues to gain popularity among clinicians, and the demand for such aesthetic restorations is increasing. Indeed, the most common aesthetic alternative to dental amalgam is resin composite. Moderate to large posterior composite restorations, however, have higher failure rates, more recurrent caries, and increased frequency of replacement. Investigators across the globe are researching new materials and techniques that will improve the clinical performance, handling characteristics, and mechanical and physical properties of composite resin restorative materials. Despite such attention, large to moderate posterior composite restorations continue to have a clinical lifetime that is approximately one-half that of the dental amalgam. While there are numerous recommendations regarding preparation design, restoration placement, and polymerization technique, current research indicates that restoration longevity depends on several variables that may be difficult for the dentist to control. These variables include the patient's caries risk, tooth position, patient habits, number of restored surfaces, the quality of the tooth-restoration bond, and the ability of the restorative material to produce a sealed tooth-restoration interface. Although clinicians tend to focus on tooth form when evaluating the success and failure of posterior composite restorations, the emphasis must remain on advancing our understanding of the clinical variables that impact the formation of a durable seal at the restoration-tooth interface. This paper presents an update of existing technology and underscores the mechanisms that negatively impact the durability of posterior composite restorations in permanent teeth.

  13. The effect of prophylaxis method on microtensile bond strength of indirect restorations to dentin.

    PubMed

    Soares, C J; Pereira, J C; Souza, S J B; Menezes, M S; Armstrong, S R

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different materials used for dentin prophylaxis on the microtensile bond strengths (μTBS) of adhesively cemented indirect composite restorations. Sixty bovine incisors had the buccal surface ground with wet #600-grit silicon carbide abrasive paper to obtain a flat exposed superficial dentin and were submitted to different prophylaxis protocols, as follows: 3% hydrogen peroxide (HydP); 0.12% chlorhexidine (Chlo); sodium bicarbonate jet (SodB); 50-μm aluminum oxide air abrasion (AirA); pumice paste (PumP), and control group-water spray (Cont). After prophylaxis protocols a resin composite block (3.0 mm × 5.0 mm × 5.0 mm) was adhesively cemented using dual resin cement (Rely X ARC). After 24 hours of water storage, specimens were serially sectioned perpendicular to the bonded interface into 1-mm-thick slices. Each specimen was trimmed with a diamond bur to an hourglass shape with a cross-sectional area of approximately 1.0 mm(2) at the bonded area. Specimens were tested (μTBS) at 0.5 mm/min using a universal testing machine. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the effects of prophylaxis techniques on dentin. Bond strength data (MPa) were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and failure mode by Fisher test (α=0.05). μTBS data, means (SD), were (different superscripted letters indicate statistically significant differences): AirA, 25.2 (7.2)(a); PumP, 24.1 (7.8)(a); Chlo, 21.5 (5.6)(a); Cont, 20.6 (8.1)(a); HydP(,) 15.5 (7.6)(b); and SodB(,) 11.5 (4.4)(c). The use of aluminum oxide air abrasion, pumice paste, and chlorhexidine before acid etching did not significantly affect μTBS to dentin; however, the use of hydrogen peroxide and sodium bicarbonate jet significantly reduced μTBS. PMID:22616925

  14. The effect of prophylaxis method on microtensile bond strength of indirect restorations to dentin.

    PubMed

    Soares, C J; Pereira, J C; Souza, S J B; Menezes, M S; Armstrong, S R

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different materials used for dentin prophylaxis on the microtensile bond strengths (μTBS) of adhesively cemented indirect composite restorations. Sixty bovine incisors had the buccal surface ground with wet #600-grit silicon carbide abrasive paper to obtain a flat exposed superficial dentin and were submitted to different prophylaxis protocols, as follows: 3% hydrogen peroxide (HydP); 0.12% chlorhexidine (Chlo); sodium bicarbonate jet (SodB); 50-μm aluminum oxide air abrasion (AirA); pumice paste (PumP), and control group-water spray (Cont). After prophylaxis protocols a resin composite block (3.0 mm × 5.0 mm × 5.0 mm) was adhesively cemented using dual resin cement (Rely X ARC). After 24 hours of water storage, specimens were serially sectioned perpendicular to the bonded interface into 1-mm-thick slices. Each specimen was trimmed with a diamond bur to an hourglass shape with a cross-sectional area of approximately 1.0 mm(2) at the bonded area. Specimens were tested (μTBS) at 0.5 mm/min using a universal testing machine. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the effects of prophylaxis techniques on dentin. Bond strength data (MPa) were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and failure mode by Fisher test (α=0.05). μTBS data, means (SD), were (different superscripted letters indicate statistically significant differences): AirA, 25.2 (7.2)(a); PumP, 24.1 (7.8)(a); Chlo, 21.5 (5.6)(a); Cont, 20.6 (8.1)(a); HydP(,) 15.5 (7.6)(b); and SodB(,) 11.5 (4.4)(c). The use of aluminum oxide air abrasion, pumice paste, and chlorhexidine before acid etching did not significantly affect μTBS to dentin; however, the use of hydrogen peroxide and sodium bicarbonate jet significantly reduced μTBS.

  15. Dental amalgam: is this the end?

    PubMed

    Taut, Cristina

    Dental amalgam is a reliable and effective restorative material with a well-established role in modern dentistry. Throughout the years its mercury content and the risks posed to human health were main topics of interest for many scientists. This paper offers a review of the scientific literature on the health and environmental impact of mercury in dentistry published over the last decade. A variety of peer-reviewed, epidemiological and large-scale clinical studies on dental amalgam, as well as published reports of professional and governmental bodies, were organised thematically and analysed. The most relevant findings of the aforementioned literature are reported. No reliance has been placed on unpublished work or publicly available opinions that are not scientifically based. In order to offer an appropriate view on the topic the toxicology, health impacts and possible environmental threats are briefly presented in relation to the relevant literature published in the last ten years. It is almost unanimously accepted that dental amalgam is a safe material, with little or insignificant adverse effect on general health. However, current and mostly unfounded environmental concerns may result in the implementation of new across the board legislation that could lead to a global dental amalgam "phase out".

  16. Dental amalgam, mercury toxicity, and renal autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Guzzi, Gianpaolo; Fogazzi, Giovanni Battista; Cantù, Mariadele; Minoia, Claudio; Ronchi, Anna; Pigatto, Paolo D; Severi, Gianluca

    2008-01-01

    Chronic exposure to elemental metallic mercury may induce an immunological glomerular disease. Since humans are exposed to mercury vapor (Hg0) from dental amalgam restorations and kidney is an important target organ of mercury vapor and mercury deposition in kidney increases proportionally with the dose, our aim was to test the occurrence of specific antibodies to antiglomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM-IgG) among individuals with adverse effects to mercury from dental amalgam fillings. We selected a group of patients (n=24) with a history of long-term exposure to mercury vapor from mercury-containing amalgam fillings and showing adverse effects that were laboratory confirmed. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were used to evaluate serum levels of antibodies to anti-GBM-IgG. None of the patients showed evidence of anti-GBM autoimmunity, either in subgroups with strong allergy to mercury or its compounds (i.e., organic mercury) or in those patients who had past thimerosal-containing vaccines coverage (7 of 24). There was no evidence of the presence of circulating anti-GBM antibodies in subjects suffering from adverse events due to long-term exposure to mercury from dental amalgams, even in individuals who presented allergy to mercury.

  17. Dentin surface treatment using a non-thermal argon plasma brush for interfacial bonding improvement in composite restoration.

    PubMed

    Ritts, Andy C; Li, Hao; Yu, Qingsong; Xu, Changqi; Yao, Xiaomei; Hong, Liang; Wang, Yong

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the treatment effects of non-thermal atmospheric gas plasmas on dentin surfaces used for composite restoration. Extracted unerupted human third molars were prepared by removing the crowns and etching the exposed dentin surfaces with 35% phosphoric acid gel. The dentin surfaces were treated using a non-thermal atmospheric argon plasma brush for various periods of time. The molecular changes of the dentin surfaces were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry/attenuated total reflectance (FTIR/ATR), and an increase in the amount of carbonyl groups was detected on plasma-treated dentin surfaces. Adper Single Bond Plus adhesive and Filtek Z250 dental composite were applied as directed. To evaluate the dentin/composite interfacial bonding, the teeth thus prepared were sectioned into micro-bars and analyzed using tensile testing. Student-Newman-Keuls tests showed that the bonding strength of the composite restoration to peripheral dentin was significantly increased (by 64%) after 30 s of plasma treatment. However, the bonding strength to plasma-treated inner dentin did not show any improvement. It was found that plasma treatment of the peripheral dentin surface for up to 100 s resulted in an increase in the interfacial bonding strength, while prolonged plasma treatment of dentin surfaces (e.g. 5 min) resulted in a decrease in the interfacial bonding strength.

  18. A dose-dependent relationship between mercury exposure from dental amalgams and urinary mercury levels: a further assessment of the Casa Pia Children's Dental Amalgam Trial.

    PubMed

    Geier, D A; Carmody, T; Kern, J K; King, P G; Geier, Mark R

    2012-01-01

    Dental amalgams are a commonly used dental restorative material, and amalgams are about 50% mercury (Hg). In our study, urinary Hg levels was examined in children of age 8-18 years, with and without dental amalgam fillings, from a completed clinical trial (parent study) that was designed to evaluate the potential health consequences of prolonged exposure to Hg from dental amalgam fillings. Our study was designed to determine whether there was a significant dose-dependent correlation between increasing Hg exposure from dental amalgams and urinary Hg levels. Hg exposure depends on the size and number of teeth with dental amalgams. Overall, consistent with the results observed in the parent study, there was a statistically significant dose-dependent correlation between cumulative exposure to Hg from dental amalgams and urinary Hg levels, after covariate adjustment. Further, it was observed that urinary Hg levels increased by 18% to 52% among 8 to 18 year old individuals, respectively, with an average exposure to amalgams, in comparison to study subjects with no exposure to amalgams. The results of our study suggest that dental amalgams contribute to ongoing Hg exposure in a dose-dependent fashion.

  19. Comparative evaluation of bond strengths of different core materials with various luting agents used for cast crown restorations.

    PubMed

    Nayakar, Ramesh P; Patil, Narendra P; Lekha, K

    2012-09-01

    The coronal cast restoration continues to be used commonly to restore mutilated, endodontically treated teeth. The tensile bond strength of luting cements is of critical importance as many of failures are at the core and the crown interface. An invitro study with aim to evaluate and compare bond strengths of luting cements between different core materials and cast crowns. A total of 45 extracted identical mandibular second premolars were endodontically treated and divided into 3 groups of 15 each. Specimens in first group were restored with cast post and core (Group C), and specimens in second group were restored with stainless steel parapost and composite core material (Group B) and specimens in third group were restored with stainless steel parapost and glass ionomer core build (Group G). Standardized crown preparation was done for all the specimens to receive cast crowns. Each group was further divided into 3 subgroups and were cemented using 3 different luting cements namely, resin cement, polycarboxylate cement, glass ionomer cement (Type I). The samples of each subgroup (n = 5) were subjected to tensile testing using Universal Testing Machine at a crosshead speed of 2 mm/min till the dislodgement of crown from the core surface was observed. The bond strengths were significantly different according one way ANOVA (F-150.76 and p < 0.0000). The results of the study showed that the specimens cemented with resin cement in cast core, composite core and glass ionomer core exhibited significantly higher bond strengths as compared to specimens cemented with glass ionomer and polycarboxylate cement. Composite resin core and resin cement combinations were superior to all other cement and core combinations tested.

  20. Role of bonding agents in the repair of composite resin restorations.

    PubMed

    Staxrud, Frode; Dahl, Jon E

    2011-08-01

    Six commonly used composite resin materials and recommended bonding systems were tested to assess shear bond strength at the interface between aged and new composites with and without bonding. Test specimens were aged in water for 60 d before new composite was placed. Shear bond strength was assessed after 22 ± 2 h (Test 1) and after additional ageing by thermocycling (5-55°C/5,000 cycles) (Test 2). After an additional 180 d in water, the aged specimens were randomly divided into three groups to blind the test with respect to the aged composite. New composites were placed on aged specimens (two groups with and one without bonding agent) and thermocycled (Test 3). After 24 h (Test 1), the mean shear bond strength of the test specimens was 21-26 MPa when bonding agents were used, as opposed to 10-15 MPa without bonding agents. After thermocycling (Test 2), the mean shear bond strength was 16-23 MPa with a bonding agent and 17 MPa without a bonding agent. After 180 d in water and subsequent thermocycling (Test 3), the mean shear bond strength was 9-13 MPa with bonding agent and 2-3 MPa when no bonding agent was used. The results of this study therefore indicate that the use of bonding agents significantly improves the quality of composite repair. PMID:21726294

  1. Role of bonding agents in the repair of composite resin restorations.

    PubMed

    Staxrud, Frode; Dahl, Jon E

    2011-08-01

    Six commonly used composite resin materials and recommended bonding systems were tested to assess shear bond strength at the interface between aged and new composites with and without bonding. Test specimens were aged in water for 60 d before new composite was placed. Shear bond strength was assessed after 22 ± 2 h (Test 1) and after additional ageing by thermocycling (5-55°C/5,000 cycles) (Test 2). After an additional 180 d in water, the aged specimens were randomly divided into three groups to blind the test with respect to the aged composite. New composites were placed on aged specimens (two groups with and one without bonding agent) and thermocycled (Test 3). After 24 h (Test 1), the mean shear bond strength of the test specimens was 21-26 MPa when bonding agents were used, as opposed to 10-15 MPa without bonding agents. After thermocycling (Test 2), the mean shear bond strength was 16-23 MPa with a bonding agent and 17 MPa without a bonding agent. After 180 d in water and subsequent thermocycling (Test 3), the mean shear bond strength was 9-13 MPa with bonding agent and 2-3 MPa when no bonding agent was used. The results of this study therefore indicate that the use of bonding agents significantly improves the quality of composite repair.

  2. Renal Effects of Dental Amalgam in Children: The New England Children’s Amalgam Trial

    PubMed Central

    Barregard, Lars; Trachtenberg, Felicia; McKinlay, Sonja

    2008-01-01

    Background Mercury is nephrotoxic and dental amalgam is a source of mercury exposure. Methods Children 6–10 years of age (n = 534) with two or more posterior teeth with caries but no prior amalgam restorations, were randomized to one of two treatments—amalgam or resin composite (white fillings)—used for caries treatment during 5 years of follow-up. The primary outcome was change in IQ, but important secondary outcomes were effects on markers of glomerular and tubular kidney function: urinary excretion of albumin, alpha-1-microglobulin (A1M), γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (γ-GT), and N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase (NAG). These markers were measured on several occasions during the trial, together with urinary mercury and covariates. We evaluated the results using repeated-measures analyses. Results There were no significant differences between treatment groups in average levels of renal biomarkers, nor significant effects of number of dental amalgams on these markers. There was, however, a significantly increased prevalence of microalbuminuria (MA) among children in the amalgam group in years 3–5 (adjusted odds ratio 1.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.1–2.9). Most of these cases are likely to be temporary MA, but 10 children in the amalgam group had MA in both years 3 and 5, versus 2 children in the composite group (p = 0.04). There were no differences in the occurrence of high levels of renal tubular markers (A1M, γ-GT, or NAG). Conclusions The increase in MA may be a random finding, but should be tested further. The results did not support recent findings in an observational study of an effect of low-level mercury on tubular biomarkers in children. PMID:18335109

  3. Evidence-based concepts and procedures for bonded inlays and onlays. Part II. Guidelines for cavity preparation and restoration fabrication.

    PubMed

    Rocca, Giovanni Tommaso; Rizcalla, Nicolas; Krejci, Ivo; Dietschi, Didier

    2015-01-01

    The second part of this article series presents an evidence-based update of clinical protocols and procedures for cavity preparation and restoration selection for bonded inlays and onlays. More than ever, tissue conservation dictates preparation concepts, even though some minimal dimensions still have to be considered for all restorative materials. In cases of severe bruxism or tooth fragilization, CAD/CAM composite resins or pressed CAD/CAM lithium disilicate glass ceramics are often recommended, although this choice relies mainly on scarce in vitro research as there is still a lack of medium- to long-term clinical evidence. The decision about whether or not to cover a cusp can only be made after a multifactorial analysis, which includes cavity dimensions and the resulting tooth biomechanical status, as well as occlusal and esthetic factors. The clinical impact of the modern treatment concepts that were outlined in the previous article - Dual Bonding (DB)/Immediate Dentin Sealing (IDS), Cavity Design Optimization (CDO), and Cervical Margins Relocation (CMR) - are described in detail in this article and discussed in light of existing clinical and scientific evidence for simpler, more predictable, and more durable results. Despite the wide choice of restorative materials (composite resin or ceramic) and techniques (classical or CAD/CAM), the cavity for an indirect restoration should meet five objective criteria before the impression. PMID:26171443

  4. Evidence-based concepts and procedures for bonded inlays and onlays. Part II. Guidelines for cavity preparation and restoration fabrication.

    PubMed

    Rocca, Giovanni Tommaso; Rizcalla, Nicolas; Krejci, Ivo; Dietschi, Didier

    2015-01-01

    The second part of this article series presents an evidence-based update of clinical protocols and procedures for cavity preparation and restoration selection for bonded inlays and onlays. More than ever, tissue conservation dictates preparation concepts, even though some minimal dimensions still have to be considered for all restorative materials. In cases of severe bruxism or tooth fragilization, CAD/CAM composite resins or pressed CAD/CAM lithium disilicate glass ceramics are often recommended, although this choice relies mainly on scarce in vitro research as there is still a lack of medium- to long-term clinical evidence. The decision about whether or not to cover a cusp can only be made after a multifactorial analysis, which includes cavity dimensions and the resulting tooth biomechanical status, as well as occlusal and esthetic factors. The clinical impact of the modern treatment concepts that were outlined in the previous article - Dual Bonding (DB)/Immediate Dentin Sealing (IDS), Cavity Design Optimization (CDO), and Cervical Margins Relocation (CMR) - are described in detail in this article and discussed in light of existing clinical and scientific evidence for simpler, more predictable, and more durable results. Despite the wide choice of restorative materials (composite resin or ceramic) and techniques (classical or CAD/CAM), the cavity for an indirect restoration should meet five objective criteria before the impression.

  5. [Restoring esthetics and function of posterior teeth using direct composite restoration].

    PubMed

    Samet, N

    2001-10-01

    The growing demand for esthetic restorations in the posterior segments and the reports from all over the world concerning the possibility of a toxic effect of amalgam brought to the development of the composite resin materials. These allow excellent esthetic results without compromising the quality and long-term stability of the restorations. Out of the various types of posterior esthetic restorations, the most available are the direct ones. There are several substantial differences between fabricating amalgam or posterior composite restorations. The most significant difference concerns bonding to the tooth structures. The key to success in these restorations is the understanding of the reasons for failure, and the ways to prevent them. The failures are divided into two groups: biological failures--namely secondary caries, and mechanical failures--namely fracture and abrasion. The other key is understanding the materials used and their proper handling. This article illustrates in detail a step-by-step procedure the sequence of fabricating a posterior composite restoration in a posterior mandibular tooth, describing both techniques and materials used.

  6. Immune Function Effects of Dental Amalgam in Children: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Shenker, Bruce J.; Maserejian, Nancy N.; Zhang, Annie; McKinlay, Sonja

    2010-01-01

    Background Dental amalgam is a widely used restorative material containing 50% elemental mercury that emits mercury vapor. No randomized clinical trials have determined whether there are adverse immunologic effects associated with this low-level mercury exposure in children. The objective of this study was to evaluate a sub-population of the New England Children’s Amalgam Trial (NECAT) for in vitro manifestations of immunotoxic effects of dental amalgam. Methods A randomized clinical trial in which children requiring dental restorative treatment were randomized to either amalgam for posterior restorations or resin composite. A total of 66 children, aged 6–10 years, were assessed for total white cell numbers, T-cell, B-cell, neutrophil and monocyte responsiveness over a five-year period. Owing to the small number of participants, the study is exploratory in nature with limited statistical power. Results The mean number of tooth surfaces restored during the five-year period was 7.8 for the amalgam group and 10.1 for composite group. In the amalgam group there was a slight, but not statistically significant, decline in responsiveness of T-cells and monocytes at 5–7 days post treatment; no differences were consistently observed at 6, 12 or 60 months. Conclusions This study confirms that treatment of children with dental amalgams leads to increased, albeit low level, exposure to mercury. In this exploratory analysis of immune function, amalgam exposure did not cause overt immune deficits, although small transient effects were observed 5–7 days post restoration. Clinical implications These findings suggest that immunotoxic effects of amalgam restorations in children need not be a concern when choosing this restorative dental material. PMID:18978388

  7. Mercury exposure and risks from dental amalgam in the US population, post-2000.

    PubMed

    Richardson, G M; Wilson, R; Allard, D; Purtill, C; Douma, S; Gravière, J

    2011-09-15

    Dental amalgam is 50% metallic mercury (Hg) by weight and Hg vapour continuously evolves from in-place dental amalgam, causing increased Hg content with increasing amalgam load in urine, faeces, exhaled breath, saliva, blood, and various organs and tissues including the kidney, pituitary gland, liver, and brain. The Hg content also increases with maternal amalgam load in amniotic fluid, placenta, cord blood, meconium, various foetal tissues including liver, kidney and brain, in colostrum and breast milk. Based on 2001 to 2004 population statistics, 181.1 million Americans carry a grand total of 1.46 billion restored teeth. Children as young as 26 months were recorded as having restored teeth. Past dental practice and recently available data indicate that the majority of these restorations are composed of dental amalgam. Employing recent US population-based statistics on body weight and the frequency of dentally restored tooth surfaces, and recent research on the incremental increase in urinary Hg concentration per amalgam-filled tooth surface, estimates of Hg exposure from amalgam fillings were determined for 5 age groups of the US population. Three specific exposure scenarios were considered, each scenario incrementally reducing the number of tooth surfaces assumed to be restored with amalgam. Based on the least conservative of the scenarios evaluated, it was estimated that some 67.2 million Americans would exceed the Hg dose associated with the reference exposure level (REL) of 0.3 μg/m(3) established by the US Environmental Protection Agency; and 122.3 million Americans would exceed the dose associated with the REL of 0.03 μg/m(3) established by the California Environmental Protection Agency. Exposure estimates are consistent with previous estimates presented by Health Canada in 1995, and amount to 0.2 to 0.4 μg/day per amalgam-filled tooth surface, or 0.5 to 1 μg/day/amalgam-filled tooth, depending on age and other factors.

  8. Creep-fatigue as a possible cause of dental amalgam margin failure.

    PubMed

    Williams, P T; Hedge, G L

    1985-03-01

    Fracture of the margins is the most common cause of failure of dental amalgam restorations. Both corrosion and creep have been identified as possible contributors to this type of failure. The stresses that induce creep may arise from the continued setting expansion of the amalgam, the formation of corrosion products, mastication, or from the thermal expansion of the amalgam during ingestion of hot foods. The latter two are low-frequency cyclic stresses. The amalgams used in dentistry have fusion temperatures only about 40 degrees C above mouth temperature, and they experience grain boundary sliding during creep deformation. Since grain boundary sliding, low-frequency cyclic stresses, and a temperature near the fusion temperature of the alloy are prerequisites for so-called "creep-fatigue fracture", this type of fracture may contribute to amalgam margin failure. Amalgam made from seven different alloys was condensed into stainless steel dies. After being allowed to set for seven days, the specimens were thermally cycled between 4 degrees C and 50 degrees C for 500 and 1000 cycles. Amalgam margin integrity was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy both before and after each cycling period. The amount of margin fracture was calculated after 1000 cycles. Thermal cycling of amalgam restorations placed in stainless steel dies resulted in predominantly intergranular fracturing of the amalgam margins, indicating that creep-fatigue failure may be a significant contributor to in vivo margin fracturing. PMID:3855901

  9. Adhesive/Dentin interface: the weak link in the composite restoration.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Paulette; Ye, Qiang; Park, Jonggu; Topp, Elizabeth M; Misra, Anil; Marangos, Orestes; Wang, Yong; Bohaty, Brenda S; Singh, Viraj; Sene, Fabio; Eslick, John; Camarda, Kyle; Katz, J Lawrence

    2010-06-01

    Results from clinical studies suggest that more than half of the 166 million dental restorations that were placed in the United States in 2005 were replacements for failed restorations. This emphasis on replacement therapy is expected to grow as dentists use composite as opposed to dental amalgam to restore moderate to large posterior lesions. Composite restorations have higher failure rates, more recurrent caries, and increased frequency of replacement as compared to amalgam. Penetration of bacterial enzymes, oral fluids, and bacteria into the crevices between the tooth and composite undermines the restoration and leads to recurrent decay and premature failure. Under in vivo conditions the bond formed at the adhesive/dentin interface can be the first defense against these noxious, damaging substances. The intent of this article is to review structural aspects of the clinical substrate that impact bond formation at the adhesive/dentin interface; to examine physico-chemical factors that affect the integrity and durability of the adhesive/dentin interfacial bond; and to explore how these factors act synergistically with mechanical forces to undermine the composite restoration. The article will examine the various avenues that have been pursued to address these problems and it will explore how alterations in material chemistry could address the detrimental impact of physico-chemical stresses on the bond formed at the adhesive/dentin interface.

  10. Evaluation of bond strength of silorane and methacrylate based restorative systems to dentin using different cavity models

    PubMed Central

    ISAAC, Stephano Zerlottini; BERGAMIN, Ana Claudia Pietrobom; TURSSI, Cecília Pedroso; do AMARAL, Flávia Lucisano Botelho; BASTING, Roberta Tarkany; FRANÇA, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength (µTBS) to dentin of two different restorative systems: silorane-based (P90), and methacrylate-based (P60), using two cavity models. Material and Methods Occlusal enamel of 40 human third molars was removed to expose flat dentin surface. Class I cavities with 4 mm mesial-distal width, 3 mm buccal-lingual width and 3 mm depth (C-factor=4.5) were prepared in 20 teeth, which were divided into two groups (n=10) restored with P60 and P90, bulk-filled after dentin treatment according to manufacturer's instructions. Flat buccal dentin surfaces were prepared in the 20 remaining teeth (C-factor=0.2) and restored with resin blocks measuring 4x3x3 mm using the two restorative systems (n=10). The teeth were sectioned into samples with area between 0.85 and 1.25 mm2 that were submitted to µTBS testing, using a universal testing machine (EMIC) at speed of 0.5 mm/min. Fractured specimens were analyzed under stereomicroscope and categorized according to fracture pattern. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey Kramer tests. Results For flat surfaces, P60 obtained higher bond strength values compared with P90. However, for Class I cavities, P60 showed significant reduction in bond strength (p<0.05). No statistical difference between restorative systems was shown for Class I cavity model (p>0.05), or between Class I Cavity and Flat Surface group, considering P90 restorative system (p>0.05). Regarding fracture pattern, there was no statistical difference among groups (p=0.0713) and 56.3% of the fractures were adhesive. Conclusion It was concluded that methacrylate-based composite µTBS was influenced by cavity models, and the use of silorane-based composite led to similar bond strength values compared to the methacrylate-based composite in cavities with high C-factor. PMID:24212992

  11. Amalgam components drift in teeth-toxicity risks: A preliminary approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, M. L.; Pinheiro, T.; Barreiros, M. A.; Casaca, C.; Cunha, A. S.; Chevallier, P.

    1998-03-01

    The use of ion beam techniques applied to teeth studies have been extensive in what concerns the major elements distribution. However, it is not clarified whether amalgam components are absorbed and drifted through teeth material, although the toxicity of the elements used in amalgams, such as Hg, are well known. This work is an attempt to assess a possible teeth contamination originated by the amalgams. Therefore, teeth with metallic amalgam, as well as healthy ones, were studied. The teeth were longitudinally cut and each slice was scanned from the inner region to the surface enamel for elemental profiles determination purposes using Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and Synchrotron Radiation X-ray Fluorescence (SRXRF) techniques. High levels of Zn, Ag, Sn, Hg and Pb were found along the scanned teeth restored with the metallic amalgam. The elemental distribution patterns suggest diffusion of these elements in the teeth material from amalgam constituents.

  12. Microstructural studies of dental amalgams using analytical transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooghan, Tejpal Kaur

    Dental amalgams have been used for centuries as major restorative materials for decaying teeth. Amalgams are prepared by mixing alloy particles which contain Ag, Sn, and Cu as the major constituent elements with liquid Hg. The study of microstructure is essential in understanding the setting reactions and improving the properties of amalgams. Until the work reported in this dissertation, optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and x-ray diffractometry (XRD) were used commonly to analyze amalgam microstructures. No previous systematic transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study has been performed due to sample preparation difficulties and composite structure of dental amalgams. The goal of this research was to carry out detailed microstructural and compositional studies of dental amalgams. This was accomplished using the enhanced spatial resolution of the TEM and its associated microanalytical techniques, namely, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS) and micro-microdiffraction (mumuD). A new method was developed for thinning amalgam samples to electron transparency using the "wedge technique." Velvalloy, a low-Cu amalgam, and Tytin, a high-Cu amalgam, were the two amalgams characterized. Velvalloy is composed of a Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1)/HgSnsb{7-9}\\ (gammasb2) matrix surrounding unreacted Agsb3Sn (gamma) particles. In addition, hitherto uncharacterized reaction layers between Agsb3Sn(gamma)/Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb2)\\ and\\ Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1)/HgSnsb{7-9}\\ (gammasb2) were observed and analyzed. An Ag-Hg-Sn (betasb1) phase was clearly identified for the first time. In Tytin, the matrix consists of Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1) grains. Fine precipitates of Cusb6Snsb5\\ (etasp') are embedded inside the gammasb1 and at the grain boundaries. These precipitates are responsible for the improved creep resistance of Tytin compared to Velvalloy. The additional Cu has completely eliminated the gammasb

  13. Evaluation of Microleakage of Silorane and Methacrylate Based Composite Materials in Class I Restorations by Using Two Different Bonding Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Alshetili, Mohsen S; Aldeyab, Sultan S

    2015-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the microleakage of silorane-based composite material (Filtek P90) with that of two homologous methacrylate-based composites materials (Filtek Z250 and Filtek Z250 XT), by using two different bonding techniques. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted human maxillary first premolars prepared for standardized Class I cavities (4 mm × 2 mm × 2 mm) were randomly divided into three groups. Group A (n = 20) was filled with Filtek Z250 (Methacrylate) using single bond universal total etching technique, Group B (n = 20) was filled with Filtek Z250 XT (Methacrylate) using single bond universal self-etching technique and Group C (n = 20) restored with Filtek P90 (Silorane) with dedicated two-step self-etching prime and bond adhesive system (P90 system adhesive). Teeth were subjected to thermocycling regime (500×, 5-55°C), and dye penetration by immersing in 2% methylene blue for 24 h. Tooth sectioning was performed, and extent of the dye penetration was scored based on dye penetration scale to evaluate the microleakage. Statistical analysis included descriptive statistics and inferential statistics of Kruskal–Wallis test to compare the mean ranks between groups. Results: There was no significant difference observed for microleakage among the three composite materials tested in the present study. However, the cavities restored with silorane (Filtek P90) based composite displayed higher microleakage than the Filtek Z250, Z250 XT. Conclusion: All the restorative systems tested in this study exhibited microleakage, but the silorane technology showed more microleakage when compared to the methacrylate-based composite systems. PMID:26668473

  14. Does amalgam affect the immune system? A controversial issue.

    PubMed

    Eneström, S; Hultman, P

    1995-03-01

    Although in use for more than 150 years, dental amalgam has been questioned more or less vigorously as a dental restoration material due to its alleged health hazard. Humans are exposed to mercury and the other main dental amalgam metals (Ag, Sn, Cu, Zn) via vapour, corrosion products in swallowed saliva, and direct absorption into the blood from the oral cavity. Dental amalgam fillings are the most important source of mercury exposure in the general population. Local, and in some instances, systemic hypersensitivity reactions to dental amalgam metals, especially mercury, occur at a low frequency among amalgam bearers. Experimental and clinical data strongly indicate that these and other subclinical systemic adverse immunological reactions to dental amalgam metals in humans will be linked to certain MHC genotypes, and affect only a small number of the exposed individuals. These individuals will be very difficult to detect in a mixed population of susceptible and resistant individuals, including persons with alleged symptoms due to dental amalgam fillings, where many of the individuals are likely to suffer from conditions with no proven immunological background such as multiple chemical sensitivity syndrome. Intensified studies should be performed to identify such susceptible MHC genotypes, taking advantage of the reported cases of more heavily metal-exposed humans with systemic autoimmune reactions. Further studies will also be needed to ascertain whether the combined exposure to the metals in dental amalgam may lower the threshold for adverse immunological reactions, since recent studies have shown that the metals in alloy, especially silver, may induce autoimmunity in genetically susceptible mice.

  15. Evaluation of the Effect of Different Ferrule Designs on Fracture Resistance of Maxillary Incisors Restored with Bonded Posts and Cores

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavi Izadi, Z.; Jalalian, E.; Eyvaz Ziaee, A.; Zamani, L.; Javanshir, B.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: In cases of severe hard tissue loss, 2 mm circumferential ferrule is difficult to achieve. So in these cases we should use different ferrule designs. This in vitro study investigated the effect of different ferrule designs on the fracture resistance of teeth restored with bonded post and cores. Materials and Methods: Forty freshly-extracted central incisors were endodontically treated. The teeth were randomly divided into four groups; group 1 were teeth with 2 mm circumferential ferrule above the CEJ, group 2 were teeth with 2 mm ferrule only on the palatal side of the teeth, group 3 consisted of teeth with 2 mm ferrule only on the facial side and group 4 were teeth with 2 mm ferrule on the palatal and facial side of teeth with interproximal concavities. All teeth were restored with fiber posts and composite cores. The specimen was mounted on a universal testing machine and compressive load was applied to the long axis of the specimen until failure occurred. Results: The fracture resistance was 533.79 ± 232.28 in group 1, 634.75± 133.35 in group 2, 828.90 ±118.27 in group 3 and 678.78± 160.20 in group 4. The post hoc analysis showed statistically significant difference between groups 1 and 3. Conclusions: The results of this in vitro study showed that facial ferrule increases the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with bonded post and cores. PMID:21998789

  16. Influence of periodontal ligament simulation on bond strength and fracture resistance of roots restored with fiber posts

    PubMed Central

    MARCHIONATTI, Ana Maria Estivalete; WANDSCHER, Vinícius Felipe; BROCH, Juliana; BERGOLI, César Dalmolin; MAIER, Juliana; VALANDRO, Luiz Felipe; KAIZER, Osvaldo Bazzan

    2014-01-01

    Objective Considering that periodontal ligament simulation may influence the stress distribution over teeth restored with intraradicular retainers, this study aimed to assess the combined effect of mechanical cycling and periodontal ligament simulation on both the bond strength between fiber posts and root dentin and the fracture resistance of teeth restored using glass fiber posts. Material and Methods Ninety roots were randomly distributed into 3 groups (n=10) (C-MC: control; P-MC: polyether; AS-MC: addition silicone) to test bond strength and 6 groups (n=10) (C: control; P: polyether; AS: addition silicone, without mechanical cycling, and C-MC, P-MC and AS-MC with mechanical cycling) to test fracture strength, according to the material used to simulate the periodontal ligament. For the bond strength test, fiber posts were cemented, cores were built, mechanical cycling was applied (2×106 cycles, 88 N, 2.2 Hz, and 45º incline), and the teeth cut into 3 slices (2 mm), which were then subjected to the push-out test at 1 mm/min. For the fracture strength test, fiber posts were cemented, cores were built, and half of the groups received mechanical cycling, followed by the compressive strength (45° to the long axis and 1 mm/min) performed on all groups. Results Periodontal ligament simulation did not affect the bond strength (p=0.244) between post and dentin. Simulation of periodontal ligament (p=0.153) and application of mechanical cycling (p=0.97) did not affect fracture resistance. Conclusions The materials used to simulate the periodontal ligament did not affect fracture or bond strength, therefore periodontal ligament simulation using the tested materials could be considered optional in the conditions of the study. PMID:25466478

  17. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHWEST OF GOLD AMALGAMATION ROOM, SHOWING AMALGAMATION BARREL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHWEST OF GOLD AMALGAMATION ROOM, SHOWING AMALGAMATION BARREL AT CENTER FOREGROUND, BULLION FURNACE IN LARGE HOOD BEHIND IT, AND GOLD RETORT IN BACKGROUND HOOD. NOTE OVERHEAD MONORAIL FOR MATERIALS HANDLING. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  18. Mercury Exposure Levels in Children with Dental Amalgam Fillings

    PubMed Central

    Miriam Varkey, Indu; Shetty, Rajmohan; Hegde, Amitha

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT% Objectives: Mercury combined with other metals to form solid amalgams has long been used in reconstructive dentistry but its use has been controversial since at least the middle of the 19th century. The exposure and body burden of mercury reviews have consistently stated that there is a deficiency of adequate epidemiological studies addressing this issue. Fish and dental amalgam are two major sources of human exposure to organic (MeHg) and inorganic Hg respectively. Materials and methods: A total of 150 subjects aged between 9 and 14 years were divided into two groups of 75 subjects each depending on their diet, i.e. seafood or nonseafood consuming. Each category was subdivided into three groups based on number of restorations. Scalp hair and urine samples were collected at baseline and 3 months later to assess the organic and inorganic levels of mercury respectively by atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS). Results: The mean values of urinary mercury (inorganic mercury) in the group of children with restorations were 1.5915 μg/l as compared to 0.0130 μg/l in the groups with no amalgam restorations (p < 0.001) (Wilcoxon sign rank test and paired t-test). The hair mercury levels (organic mercury) varied signi-ficantly between the fsh-eating group and nonfsh-eating group, the average values being 1.03 μg/l and 0.84 μg/l respectively (p < 0.001) (Mann-Whitney U-test and paired t-test). Conclusion and significance: The notion about the mercury being released from the amalgam restorations as a sole exposure source needs to be put to a rest, as environmental factors collectively overpower the exposure levels from restorations alone. How to cite this article: Varkey IM, Shetty R, Hegde A. Mercury Exposure Levels in Children with Dental Amalgam Fillings. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(3):180-185. PMID:25709298

  19. The 24-year clinical performance of porcelain laminate veneer restorations bonded with a two-liquid silane primer and a tri-n-butylborane-initiated adhesive resin.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Mitsuo; Matsumura, Hideo

    2014-09-01

    This report describes the bonding technique and clinical course of porcelain laminate veneer restorations applied to discolored maxillary incisors and canines. The patient was an 18-year-old woman, and tooth reduction was limited to the enamel. Laminate veneer restorations were made with a feldspathic porcelain material (Cosmotech Porcelain). After try-in, enamel surfaces were etched with 65% phosphoric acid gel, and a tri-n-butylborane-initiated resin (Super-Bond C&B) was applied as a bonding agent. The inner surface of the restorations was etched with 5% hydrofluoric acid gel (HF Gel) and treated with a two-liquid silane primer (Porcelain Liner M), after which the Super-Bond resin was applied. Each restoration was seated with a dual-activated composite luting agent (Cosmotech Composite). After 24 years and 8 months, the restorations are functioning satisfactorily. The luting system and bonding technique described in this report are an option for seating laminate veneer restorations made of silica-based tooth-colored ceramics. PMID:25231150

  20. [Study on porcelain veneer restorations. 2. Influence of hydrofluoric acid on bonding strength at the porcelain-resin interface].

    PubMed

    Gomi, A; Ikeda, M; Takeuchi, N; Ban, Y; Kamiya, K; Kanamori, K; Asai, T; Senda, A

    1990-06-01

    Recently, porcelain veneer restoratives have been introduced to the general practice, and their clinical performances have been confirmed through many longterm clinical investigations. It is expected that porcelain veneer restorations will perform successfully in esthetic, conservative and abhesive dentistry. It is an well known fact that the micro-mechanical bonding strength at the porcelain-resin interface which is achieved through the application of hydrofluoric acid to the porcelain surface is quite a strong bonding mechanism. However, there are very few studies reporting on the acid treatment of porcelain surfaces. The authors have been studying the influence of hydrofluoric acid on porcelain surfaces, and in our previous report we reported, the degrees of corroded porcelain treated with different concentrations of hydrofluoric acid for different durations of application. In the present study, shear bonding strength was measured between resin cements and porcelain surfaces treated with different concentrations (4, 6, 8%) of hydrofluoric acid and for different durations (1 to 24 min.), and the appropriate treatment of porcelain surfaces with regard to the bonding strength was determined. The results obtained were as follows. 1. As the treating time increased with any concentration (4, 6, 8%) of hydrofluoric acid, corrosion of the porcelain surface became more intense. Hardly any evidence of corrosion was observed on any porcelain surface treated for one minute, so it seems that the treatment of porcelain surfaces using 4 to 8% hydrofluoric acids should be continued for over three minutes. 2. Observation of the surface profile by SEM showed no significant differences between the surfaces treated for 3, 6, 12 and 24 minutes. 3. It was not clear as to how the differences of hydrofluoric acid concentrations (4, 6, 8%) plus the differences in the kinds of porcelain (Super Porcelain AAA, NORITAKE Co. Ltd., VMK 68, Vita Zahnfabrik Gmbh & Co., Cosmotech Porcelain, G

  1. The use of amalgam in pediatric dentistry: new insights and reappraising the tradition.

    PubMed

    Fuks, Anna B

    2015-01-01

    The debate on amalgam led to its being phased out in some countries. Results of clinical trials report failure rates of amalgams ranging from 12 percent to over 70 percent. Treatment of caries should meet the needs of each particular patient, based on his/her caries risk. In general, for small occlusal lesions, a conservative preventive resin restoration would be more appropriate than the classic Class I amalgam preparation. For proximal lesions, amalgam would be indicated for two-surface Class II preparations that do not extend beyond the line angles of primary teeth. This recommendation might not be appropriate for high-risk patients or restoring primary first molars in children four years old and younger where stainless steel crowns have demonstrated better longevity. Currently, amalgam demonstrates the best clinical success for Class II restorations that extend beyond the proximal line angles of permanent molars. The need to reduce the use of amalgam as a mercury-containing material is inevitable when aiming to reduce environmental contamination. It is important always to praise prevention and constantly search for biologically safe materials regarding health, clinical work, and environment. The purpose of this report was to summarize several factors that affect the effectiveness, advantages, and disadvantages of using dental amalgam in primary teeth.

  2. Influence of dental biofilm on release of mercury from amalgam exposed to carbamide peroxide.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Doron; Blank, Ori; Rotstein, Ilan

    2003-10-15

    Tooth bleaching is a popular procedure in modern aesthetic dentistry. Bleaching agents may affect amalgam restorations by altering the release of mercury. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of biofilm-coated amalgam restorations on the release of mercury in the presence of carbamide peroxide. Samples of SDI and Valliant amalgams were submerged for either 14 days or 7 months in buffered KCl after which they were coated with saliva, bacteria, and polysaccharides. The samples were exposed to 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) for 24 h. The amount of mercury released was examined for 120 h. Results showed that most of mercury release occurred within the first 24 h, after which the release rate decreased sharply. After 120 h the release of mercury from the tested samples was minimal and similar to the control group. The presence of biofilm coating on the amalgam samples did not induce the release of mercury but tended to reduce mercury release into the surrounding environment. CP induces the release of mercury from amalgam samples. However, the presence of biofilm did not prevent large amounts of mercury release from amalgam coated with biofilms and exposed to CP. This study indicates that dental biofilm may retard the release of mercury from amalgam restorations.

  3. [Application of gypsum-bonded investment containing niobium carbide on casting of alloy for metal-ceramic restoration].

    PubMed

    Tsuruta, S; Ban, S; Hasegawa, J; Hayashi, S; Iiyama, K; Yamamura, Y

    1990-07-01

    Experimental gypsum-bonded investments containing 0.5-5.0 wt% NbC were prepared by mechanical mixing of each powder. Setting and thermal expansion measurement, compressive strength and casting accuracy for Ni-Cr alloy for metal-ceramic restoration were investigated. Analysis of NbC during heating was carried out by X-ray diffraction, TG-DTA and SEM. NbC was oxidized to Nb2O5 with a volume change between 300-600 degrees C, as in the following equation: 2NbC + 4 1/2O2----Nb2O5 + 2CO2 The theoretical volume of 1/2Nb2O5 calculated from the lattice constants according to JCPDS file was approximately 4 times larger than that of NbC. The experimental investments of 70 wt% cristobalite and 30 wt% gypsum containing 2.0, 3.0 and 5.0 wt% NbC showed large thermal expansion of 7.0, 10.0 and 13.0% respectively. The investment containing 2.0 wt% NbC showed nearly the same casting accuracy for Ni-Cr alloys for metal-ceramic restoration as the commercial phosphate-bonded investment.

  4. Effect of etchant variability on shear bond strength of all ceramic restorations - an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Pattanaik, Seema; Wadkar, Aarti P

    2011-03-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the effect of pre-luting surface treatments by 3 different etchant used at 3 different etching periods and their effect on shear bond strength of IPS Empress 2 luted to tooth by dual cure resin cement. Fifty samples of ceramic were divided into four groups as group I control group: No surface treatment, group II: Etched with Hydrofluoric (HF) acid (4.9%), group III: Etched with Ammonium bifluoride acid (9.4%) and group IV: Etched with Phosphoric acid (37%). Group II, III and IV were further divided into 3 Subgroups; namely A, B and C according to the etching periods (20, 60 and 120 s) respectively. The shear bond strength was determined by using a Universal testing Machine. The morphological changes of the surface treated ceramic samples prior to luting to tooth and mode of the fracture failure after shear bond test were observed by using a Scanning Electron Microscope. The mean shear bond strength was highest when IPS Empress 2 ceramic samples were surface treated using 4.9% Hydrofluoric acid gel and 9.4% Ammonium bifluoride acid for 120 s. The least mean shear bond strength was noticed in case of control group, where no surface treatment was done and samples treated by 37% Phosphoric acid. Thus it could be concluded, that Ammonium bifluoride could be an appropriate alternative to be used instead of HF acid. 120 s etching showed highest bond strength values for HF acid (4.9%) and Ammonium bifluoride (9.4%).

  5. Novel Amalgams for In-Space Fabrication of Replacement Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, Calvin T.; Van Hoose, James R.; Grugel, R. N.

    2012-01-01

    Being able to fabricate replacement parts during extended space flight missions precludes the weight, storage volume, and speculation necessary to accommodate spares. Amalgams, widely used in dentistry, are potential candidates for fabricating parts in microgravity environments as they are moldable, do not require energy for melting, and do not pose fluid handling problems. Unfortunately, amalgams have poor tensile strength and the room temperature liquid component is mercury. To possibly resolve these issues a gallium-indium alloy was substituted for mercury and small steel fibers were mixed in with the commercial alloy powder. Subsequent microscopic examination of the novel amalgam revealed complete bonding of the components, and mechanical testing of comparable samples showed those containing steel fibers to have a significant improvement in strength. Experimental procedures, microstructures, and test results are presented and discussed in view of further improving properties.

  6. Ceramic Inlays: Effect of Mechanical Cycling and Ceramic Type on Restoration-dentin Bond Strength.

    PubMed

    Trindade, F Z; Kleverlaan, C J; da Silva, L H; Feilzer, A J; Cesar, P F; Bottino, M A; Valandro, L F

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the bond strength between dentin and five different ceramic inlays in permanent maxillary premolars, with and without mechanical cycling. One hundred permanent maxillary premolars were prepared and divided into 10 groups (n=10) according to the ceramic system (IPS e.Max Press; IPS e.Max CAD; Vita PM9; Vita Mark II; and Vita VM7) and the mechanical cycling factor (with and without [100 N, 2 Hz, 1.2×10(6) cycles]). The inlays were adhesively cemented, and all of the specimens were cut into microbars (1×1 mm, nontrimming method), which were tested under microtensile loading. The failure mode was classified and contact angle, roughness, and microtopographic analyses were performed on each ceramic surface. The mechanical cycling had a significant effect (p=0.0087) on the bond strength between dentin and IPS e.max Press. The Vita Mark II group had the highest bond strength values under both conditions, with mechanical cycling (9.7±1.8 MPa) and without (8.2±1.9 MPa), while IPS e.Max CAD had the lowest values (2.6±1.6 and 2.2±1.4, respectively). The adhesive failure mode at the ceramic/cement interface was the most frequent. Vita Mark II showed the highest value of average roughness. IPS e.max Press and Vita Mark II ceramics presented the lowest contact angles. In conclusion, the composition and manufacturing process of ceramics seem to have an influence on the ceramic surface and resin cement bond strength. Mechanical cycling did not cause significant degradation on the dentin and ceramic bond strength under the configuration used. PMID:27455117

  7. Restoration of Strip Crown with a Resin-Bonded Composite Cement in Early Childhood Caries

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Mi-ae; Kim, Ah-hyeon; Shim, Youn-soo; An, So-youn

    2013-01-01

    Background. Early childhood caries is a widely prevalent disease throughout the world. It is necessary to treat this condition in early childhood; however, child behavior management may be particularly challenging during treatment. To overcome this challenge, we used Carigel to remove caries and RelyX Unicem resin cement for strip crown restoration. It not only has the desired aesthetic effect but is also more effective for primary teeth, which are used for a shorter period than permanent teeth are. Case Presentation. We report a case of three pediatric patients with early childhood caries, in whom caries was removed by using Carigel to avoid the risk of pulpal exposure associated with high-speed handpieces. Subsequently, aesthetic restoration was performed using strip crown with RelyX Unicem self-adhesive resin cement. Conclusion. RelyX Unicem has the following advantages: (1) not requiring have any special skills for the dentist for performing the procedure, (2) decreased occurrence of bubbles during injection of the cement, and (3) overall short duration of the procedure. Thus, it is appropriate for the treatment of pediatric patients whose behavior is difficult to manage. However, further studies are required in order to establish the use of RelyX Unicem as a stable restorative material in early childhood caries. PMID:24490090

  8. Mercury release of amalgams with various silver contents after exposure to bleaching agent

    PubMed Central

    Bahari, Mahmoud; Alizadeh Oskoee, Parnian; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Pouralibaba, Firoz; Morsali Ahari, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background. Since it is possible for carbamide peroxide (CP) bleaching agent to contact old amalgam restorations, the present in vitro study evaluated the amount of dissolved mercury released from amalgam restorations with various percent-ages of silver content subsequent to the use of 15% CP. Methods. Thirty ANA 2000 amalgam disks with 43.1% silver content and thirty ANA 70 amalgam disks with 69.3% silver content were prepared. In each group, 15 samples were randomly placed in glass tubes containing 15% CP (as experimental groups) and the remaining 15 samples were placed in buffered phosphate solution (as control groups) with the same 3-mL volume for 48 hours. Subsequently, the amount of mercury dissolved in each test tube was measured using Mercury Analyzing System (Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption, MASLO, Shimadzu, Japan). Data was analyzed with two-way ANOVA and a post hoc Tukey test. (α = 0.05). Results. The amount of mercury released after exposure to CP was significantly higher than that released after exposure to buffered phosphate (P < 0.001). In addition, the amount of mercury released from dental amalgam with a silver content of 43% was significantly higher than that released from dental amalgam with a silver content of 69% (P < 0.001). Conclusion. The amount of mercury release is inversely proportional to the silver content of dental amalgam. PMID:27429729

  9. Mercury release of amalgams with various silver contents after exposure to bleaching agent.

    PubMed

    Bahari, Mahmoud; Alizadeh Oskoee, Parnian; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Pouralibaba, Firoz; Morsali Ahari, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background. Since it is possible for carbamide peroxide (CP) bleaching agent to contact old amalgam restorations, the present in vitro study evaluated the amount of dissolved mercury released from amalgam restorations with various percent-ages of silver content subsequent to the use of 15% CP. Methods. Thirty ANA 2000 amalgam disks with 43.1% silver content and thirty ANA 70 amalgam disks with 69.3% silver content were prepared. In each group, 15 samples were randomly placed in glass tubes containing 15% CP (as experimental groups) and the remaining 15 samples were placed in buffered phosphate solution (as control groups) with the same 3-mL volume for 48 hours. Subsequently, the amount of mercury dissolved in each test tube was measured using Mercury Analyzing System (Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption, MASLO, Shimadzu, Japan). Data was analyzed with two-way ANOVA and a post hoc Tukey test. (α = 0.05). Results. The amount of mercury released after exposure to CP was significantly higher than that released after exposure to buffered phosphate (P < 0.001). In addition, the amount of mercury released from dental amalgam with a silver content of 43% was significantly higher than that released from dental amalgam with a silver content of 69% (P < 0.001). Conclusion. The amount of mercury release is inversely proportional to the silver content of dental amalgam. PMID:27429729

  10. Etching patterns of Co-Cr alloys for bonded cast restorations.

    PubMed

    Ekstrand, K; Ruyter, I E

    1987-09-01

    Resin-bonded bridges may replace missing teeth and act as splints in periodontal treatment. The objective of this study was to investigate the etch pattern after electrolytic etching of selected Co-Cr alloys in hydrochloric acid and to assess the changes in alloy composition after different etching times. The alloys investigated were Vitallium, Wironit, Wironium, Nobilium Hard, and Niranium NN. Alloy specimens were electrolytically etched in a hydrochloric acid solution for 1, 2, 5, and 10 min. The etched specimens were examined in a light microscope and a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Different etching patterns were revealed in the various alloys. Microprobe analyses after the etching of Vitallium showed generally that Co was released and that Cr content increased at the surface. PMID:3305640

  11. A significant dose-dependent relationship between mercury exposure from dental amalgams and kidney integrity biomarkers: a further assessment of the Casa Pia children's dental amalgam trial.

    PubMed

    Geier, D A; Carmody, T; Kern, J K; King, P G; Geier, M R

    2013-04-01

    Dental amalgams are a commonly used dental restorative material. Amalgams are about 50% mercury (Hg), and Hg is known to significantly accumulate in the kidney. It was hypothesized that because Hg accumulates in the proximal tubules (PTs), glutathione-S-transferases (GST)-α (suggestive of kidney damage at the level of PT) would be expected to be more related to Hg exposure than GST-π (suggestive of kidney damage at the level of the distal tubules). Urinary biomarkers of kidney integrity were examined in children of 8-18 years old, with and without dental amalgam fillings, from a completed clinical trial (parent study). Our study determined whether there was a significant dose-dependent correlation between increasing Hg exposure from dental amalgams and GST-α and GST-π as biomarkers of kidney integrity. Overall, the present study, using a different and more sensitive statistical model than the parent study, revealed a statistically significant dose-dependent correlation between cumulative exposure to Hg from dental amalgams and urinary levels of GST-α, after covariate adjustment; where as, a nonsignificant relationship was observed with urinary levels of GST-π. Furthermore, it was observed that urinary GST-α levels increased by about 10% over the 8-year course of the study among individuals with an average exposure to amalgams among the study subjects from the amalgam group, in comparison with study subjects with no exposure to dental amalgams. The results of our study suggest that dental amalgams contribute to ongoing kidney damage at the level of the PTs in a dose-dependent fashion.

  12. 21 CFR 872.3070 - Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. 872... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3070 Dental amalgam, mercury... elemental mercury, supplied as a liquid in bulk, sachet, or predosed capsule form, and amalgam...

  13. 21 CFR 872.3070 - Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. 872... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3070 Dental amalgam, mercury... elemental mercury, supplied as a liquid in bulk, sachet, or predosed capsule form, and amalgam...

  14. 21 CFR 872.3070 - Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. 872... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3070 Dental amalgam, mercury... elemental mercury, supplied as a liquid in bulk, sachet, or predosed capsule form, and amalgam...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3070 - Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. 872... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3070 Dental amalgam, mercury... elemental mercury, supplied as a liquid in bulk, sachet, or predosed capsule form, and amalgam...

  16. Effect of rubber dam isolation on restoration deterioration.

    PubMed

    Smales, R J

    1992-10-01

    The consequence of using either rubber dam or cotton roll isolation on the subsequent clinical deterioration of 546 polished amalgam and 148 anterior enamel-bonded resin composite restorations was evaluated over periods of up to 15 and 10 years, respectively. Double-blind assessments for several clinical factors or parameters of the restorations were made using both direct and indirect observation methods. The transformed rating scores obtained were evaluated using a mixed model analysis of variance. With very few exceptions, all restoration placements were of high quality, and there were relatively few unsatisfactory rating scores given for any of the clinical factors assessed over the study. The low mean deterioration scores for most of the clinical factors assessed were also fairly similar, irrespective of the isolation method used. Therefore, although a statistically significant difference was found between the two isolation methods for marginal fracture of the composites, the clinical relevance of this difference is questionable.

  17. Tensile creep of dental amalgam.

    PubMed

    Greener, E H; Szurgot, K; Lautenschlager, E P

    1982-04-01

    Rather than the usual compressive dental creep, various types of one week old dental amalgams were continuously monitored in tensile creep. Testing was done at 37, 45 and 50 degrees C, in a specially designed apparatus capable of 0 to 60 degrees C while maintaining a constant true tensile stress of 17 MPa. For the first time, the classical four stages of creep were observed at elevated temperatures in the low Cu amalgams, including creep rupture. The high Cu systems displayed only transient creep up to 50 degrees C and no rupture. Approximately one half the stress was needed in tension to provide the equivalent creep in compression. PMID:7082735

  18. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... and dental alloy particles, such as silver, tin, zinc, and copper. The mixed dental amalgam material... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental amalgamator. 872.3100 Section 872.3100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A...

  19. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... and dental alloy particles, such as silver, tin, zinc, and copper. The mixed dental amalgam material... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dental amalgamator. 872.3100 Section 872.3100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A...

  20. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... and dental alloy particles, such as silver, tin, zinc, and copper. The mixed dental amalgam material... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental amalgamator. 872.3100 Section 872.3100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A...

  1. Dental composites and amalgam and physical development in children.

    PubMed

    Maserejian, N N; Hauser, R; Tavares, M; Trachtenberg, F L; Shrader, P; McKinlay, S

    2012-11-01

    Resin-based composite dental restoration materials may release bisphenol-A, an endocrine-disrupting chemical. Using secondary analysis of a randomized clinical safety trial of amalgam vs. composites, we tested the hypothesis that dental restoration materials affect children's growth. Children (N = 218 boys, N = 256 girls) aged 6 to 10 yrs at baseline with ≥ 2 decayed posterior teeth were randomized to amalgam or composites (bisphenol-A-diglycidyl-dimethacrylate composite for permanent teeth, urethane-dimethacrylate compomer for primary teeth) for treatment of posterior caries throughout follow-up. Primary outcomes for this analysis were 5-year changes in BMI-for-age z-scores, body fat percentage (BF%), and height velocity; exploratory analyses (n = 113) examined age at menarche. Results showed no significant differences between treatment assignment and changes in physical development in boys [(composites vs. amalgam) BF%, 4.9 vs. 5.7, p = 0.49; (BMI-z-score) 0.13 vs. 0.25, p = 0.36] or girls (8.8 vs. 7.7, p = 0.95; 0.36 vs. 0.21, p = 0.49). Children with more treatment on primary teeth had greater increases in BF% regardless of material type. Girls assigned to composites had lower risk of menarche during follow-up (hazard ratio = 0.57, 95% CI 0.35-0.95). Overall, there were no significant differences in physical development over 5 years in children treated with composites or amalgam. Additional studies examining these restoration materials in relation to age at menarche are warranted (clinicaltrials.gov number NCT00065988).

  2. Dental Composites and Amalgam and Physical Development in Children

    PubMed Central

    Maserejian, N.N.; Hauser, R.; Tavares, M.; Trachtenberg, F.L.; Shrader, P.; McKinlay, S.

    2012-01-01

    Resin-based composite dental restoration materials may release bisphenol-A, an endocrine-disrupting chemical. Using secondary analysis of a randomized clinical safety trial of amalgam vs. composites, we tested the hypothesis that dental restoration materials affect children’s growth. Children (N = 218 boys, N = 256 girls) aged 6 to 10 yrs at baseline with ≥ 2 decayed posterior teeth were randomized to amalgam or composites (bisphenol-A-diglycidyl-dimethacrylate composite for permanent teeth, urethane-dimethacrylate compomer for primary teeth) for treatment of posterior caries throughout follow-up. Primary outcomes for this analysis were 5-year changes in BMI-for-age z-scores, body fat percentage (BF%), and height velocity; exploratory analyses (n = 113) examined age at menarche. Results showed no significant differences between treatment assignment and changes in physical development in boys [(composites vs. amalgam) BF%, 4.9 vs. 5.7, p = 0.49; (BMI-z-score) 0.13 vs. 0.25, p = 0.36] or girls (8.8 vs. 7.7, p = 0.95; 0.36 vs. 0.21, p = 0.49). Children with more treatment on primary teeth had greater increases in BF% regardless of material type. Girls assigned to composites had lower risk of menarche during follow-up (hazard ratio = 0.57, 95% CI 0.35-0.95). Overall, there were no significant differences in physical development over 5 years in children treated with composites or amalgam. Additional studies examining these restoration materials in relation to age at menarche are warranted (clinicaltrials.gov number NCT00065988). PMID:22972857

  3. High-field MRI and mercury release from dental amalgam fillings.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, S M J; Neghab, M; Anoosheh, S M H; Bahaeddini, N; Mortazavi, G; Neghab, P; Rajaeifard, A

    2014-04-01

    Mercury is among the most toxic nonradioactive elements which may cause toxicity even at low doses. Some studies showed release of mercury from dental amalgam fillings in individuals who used mobile phone. This study was conducted to assess the effect of high-field MRI on mercury release from dental amalgam filling. We studied two groups of students with identical tooth decays requiring a similar pattern of restorative dentistry. They were exposed to a magnetic flux density of 1.5 T produced by a MRI machine. 16 otherwise healthy students with identical dental decay participated in this study. They underwent similar restorative dentistry procedures and randomly divided into two groups of MRI-exposed and control arms. Urinary concentrations of mercury in the control subjects were measured before (hour 0) and 48 and 72 hrs after amalgam restoration, using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. Urinary concentrations of mercury in exposed individuals were determined before (hour 0), and 24, 48, 72 and 96 hrs after amalgam restoration. Unlike control subjects, they underwent conventional brain MRI (15 min, 99 slices), 24 hrs after amalgam restoration. The mean±SD urinary mercury levels in MRI-exposed individuals increased linearly from a baseline value of 20.70±17.96 to 24.83±22.91 μg/L 72 hrs after MRI. In the control group, the concentration decreased linearly from 20.70±19.77 to 16.14±20.05 μg/L. The difference between urinary mercury in the exposed and control group, 72 hrs after MRI (96 h after restoration),was significant (p=0.046). These findings provide further support for the noxious effect of MRI (exposure to strong magnetic field)and release of mercury from dental amalgam fillings.

  4. [Management of wastes from dental amalgam by dentists in Burkina Faso and Morocco].

    PubMed

    Chala, S; Sawadogo, A; Sakout, M; Abdallaoui, F

    2012-12-01

    Dental amalgam is a metallic restorative material that is used for direct filling of carious lesions since many years. The use of this material generates solid and particulate wastes that present potential challenges to the environment. This study was carried out to assess amalgam use and waste management protocols practiced by Moroccan and Burkinabe dentists. A cross-sectional study was made of 79 in Rabat, Sale and Temara in Morocco and 56 in Ouagadougou, Bobo-Dioulasso in Burkina-Faso. The results showed that 69.5% of dental amalgam waste in Morocco vs 49.9% in Burkina-Faso was disposed with household waste which is a problem for both the environment and a risk to human being. Proper methods of dental amalgam waste disposal should be carried out to prevent indirect mercury poisoning for human.

  5. A galvanic study of different amalgams.

    PubMed

    Wang Chen, C P; Greener, E H

    1977-01-01

    Due to the difference in open circuit potential (OCP) versus SCE for Aristaloy amalgam (-969 mV) and Dispersalloy amalgam (-549 mV) in Ringer's solution at 25 degrees C, a galvanic cell was created with Dispersalloy amalgam as cathode and Aristaloy amalgam as anode. The galvanic corrosion current was studied as a function of time for the above cell as well as for a cell of type III dental gold (OCP is +0-5 mV) versus Aristaloy amalgam. The initial corrosion current of the latter cell (105 micronA) is about twice that for the cell of Aristaloy amalgam versus Dispersalloy amalgam (54 micronA), however, their passivating behaviour is quite similar. Also, an interrupted galvanic corrosion test simulating the oral 'make and break' situation was performed. A much higher corrosion current than the steady state was found when the two electrodes resumed contact.

  6. Comparative Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Luting Cements to Different Core Buildup Materials in Lactic Acid Buffer Solution

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Siddharam M.; Desai, Raviraj G.; Arabbi, Kashinath C.; Prakash, Ved

    2015-01-01

    Aim and Objectives The core buildup material is used to restore badly broken down tooth to provide better retention for fixed restorations. The shear bond strength of a luting agent to core buildup is one of the crucial factors in the success of the cast restoration. The aim of this invitro study was to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of luting cements with different core buildup materials in lactic acid buffer solution. Materials and Methods Two luting cements {Traditional Glass Ionomer luting cement (GIC) and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer luting cement (RMGIC)} and five core buildup materials {Silver Amalgam, Glass ionomer (GI), Glass Ionomer Silver Reinforced (GI Silver reinforced), Composite Resin and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer(RMGIC)} were selected for this study. Total 100 specimens were prepared with 20 specimens for each core buildup material using a stainless steel split metal die. Out of these 20 specimens, 10 specimens were bonded with each luting cement. All the bonded specimens were stored at 370c in a 0.01M lactic acid buffer solution at a pH of 4 for 7days. Shear bond strength was determined using a Universal Testing Machine at a cross head speed of 0.5mm/min. The peak load at fracture was recorded and shear bond strength was calculated. The data was statistically analysed using Two-way ANOVA followed by HOLM-SIDAK method for pair wise comparison at significance level of p<0.05. Results Two-Way ANOVA showed significant differences in bond strength of the luting cements (p<0.05) and core materials (p<0.05) and the interactions (p<0.05). Pairwise comparison of luting cements by HOLM-SIDAK test, showed that the RMGIC luting cement had higher shear bond strength values than Traditional GIC luting cement for all the core buildup materials. RMGIC core material showed higher bond strength values followed by Composite resin, GI silver reinforced, GI and silver amalgam core materials for both the luting agents. Conclusion Shear bond strength of

  7. Amalgam ablation with the Er:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigdor, Harvey A.; Visuri, Steven R.; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.

    1995-04-01

    Any laser that will be used by dentist to replace the dental drill (handpiece) must remove dental hard tissues safely. These lasers must also have the ability to ablate the restorative dental materials which are present in the teeth being treated. Prior to any laser being used to treat humans a thorough knowledge of the effects of the laser treatment on dental materials must be understood. Cores of dental amalgam were created and sliced into thin wafers for this experiment. Ablation efficiency and thermal changes were evaluated with and without water. It appears as if the Er:YAG laser can effectively ablate amalgam dental material with and without water. The water prevents the temperature from increasing much above baseline and does not reduce efficiency of ablation.

  8. A Comparison between Shear Bond Strength of VMK Master Porcelain with Three Base-metal Alloys (Ni-cr-T3, VeraBond, Super Cast) and One Noble Alloy (X-33) in Metal-ceramic Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadzadeh, A; Neshati, A; Mousavi, N; Epakchi, S; Dabaghi Tabriz, F; Sarbazi, AH

    2013-01-01

    Statement of Problem: The increase in the use of metal-ceramic restorations and a high prevalence of porcelain chipping entails introducing an alloy which is more compatible with porcelain and causes a stronger bond between the two. This study is to compare shear bond strength of three base-metal alloys and one noble alloy with the commonly used VMK Master Porcelain. Materials and Method: Three different groups of base-metal alloys (Ni-cr-T3, Super Cast, and VeraBond) and one group of noble alloy (X-33) were selected. Each group consisted of 15 alloy samples. All groups went through the casting process and change from wax pattern into metal disks. The VMK Master Porcelain was then fired on each group. All the specimens were put in the UTM; a shear force was loaded until a fracture occurred and the fracture force was consequently recorded. The data were analyzed by SPSS Version 16 and One-Way ANOVA was run to compare the shear strength between the groups. Furthermore, the groups were compared two-by-two by adopting Tukey test. Results: The findings of this study revealed shear bond strength of Ni-Cr-T3 alloy was higher than the three other alloys (94 MPa or 330 N). Super Cast alloy had the second greatest shear bond strength (80. 87Mpa or 283.87 N). Both VeraBond (69.66 MPa or 245 N) and x-33 alloys (66.53 MPa or 234 N) took the third place. Conclusion: Ni-Cr-T3 with VMK Master Porcelain has the greatest shear bond strength. Therefore, employment of this low-cost alloy is recommended in metal-ceramic restorations. PMID:24724144

  9. Corrosion behavior and microhardness of three amalgams.

    PubMed

    Patsurakos, A; Moberg, L E

    1988-08-01

    The marginal microhardness of three different types of amalgam was tested after 2 months' immersion in an aqueous solution of NaCl (85 mM) and phosphates (Na2HPO4 100 mM and NaH2PO4 100 mM). Amalgams immersed in distilled water were used as controls. The microhardness tests were conducted at a distance of 50 micron from the margins and at the bulk of each specimen. The solutions were analyzed for Sn, Cu, Zn, Ag, and Hg by means of atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). A statistically significant reduction in the marginal microhardness after immersion in the test solution was found for the conventional and the high-Cu single composition amalgam but not for the high-Cu blended amalgam. SEM-examination of cross-sections of the amalgams revealed small areas of subsurface grain boundary corrosion, no deeper than 10 micron for all the amalgams. The SEM-examination of the specimens and AAS analysis of the solutions indicated that the reduction in marginal microhardness was attributed mainly to corrosion of the Cu-rich phases for the high-Cu single composition amalgam and to corrosion of the gamma 2 phase for the conventional amalgam. The phosphates reduced the corrosion of the amalgams in the presence of NaCl. It is concluded that the marginal strength of dental amalgams in a corrosive environment is largely dependent upon their corrosion resistance.

  10. Restoring Bonds of Respect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brokenleg, Martin

    2014-01-01

    In writing about the Circle of Courage, Martin Brokenleg and his co-authors brought together different professions, racial backgrounds, and upbringing (Brendtro, Brokenleg, & Van Bockern, 2002). While the Circle of Courage philosophy transcends culture, they initially used Native American images and stories to express these ideas. Because…

  11. Neurodevelopmental outcomes at 5 years in children exposed prenatally to maternal dental amalgam: the Seychelles Child Development Nutrition Study.

    PubMed

    Watson, Gene E; van Wijngaarden, Edwin; Love, Tanzy M T; McSorley, Emeir M; Bonham, Maxine P; Mulhern, Maria S; Yeates, Alison J; Davidson, Philip W; Shamlaye, Conrad F; Strain, J J; Thurston, Sally W; Harrington, Donald; Zareba, Grazyna; Wallace, Julie M W; Myers, Gary J

    2013-01-01

    Limited human data are available to assess the association between prenatal mercury vapor (Hg⁰)) exposure from maternal dental amalgam restorations and neurodevelopment of children. We evaluated the association between maternal dental amalgam status during gestation and children's neurodevelopmental outcomes at 5 years in the Seychelles Child Development Nutrition Study (SCDNS). Maternal amalgam status was determined prospectively in a longitudinal cohort study examining the associations of prenatal exposure to nutrients and methylmercury (MeHg) with neurodevelopment. A total of 236 mother-child pairs initially enrolled in the SCDNS in 2001 were eligible to participate. Maternal amalgam status was measured as number of amalgam surfaces (the primary metric) and number of occlusal points. The neurodevelopmental assessment battery was comprised of age-appropriate tests of cognitive, language, and perceptual functions, and scholastic achievement. Linear regression analysis controlled for MeHg exposure, maternal fatty acid status, and other covariates relevant to child development. Maternal amalgam status evaluation yielded an average of 7.0 surfaces (range 0-28) and 11.0 occlusal points (range 0-40) during pregnancy. Neither the number of maternal amalgam surfaces nor occlusal points were associated with any outcome. Our findings do not provide evidence to support a relationship between prenatal exposure to Hg⁰ from maternal dental amalgam and neurodevelopmental outcomes in children at 5 years of age.

  12. The effect of an erbium, chromium: yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet laser on the microleakage and bond strength of silorane and micro-hybrid composite restorations

    PubMed Central

    Korkmaz, Fatih Mehmet; Baygin, Ozgul; Tuzuner, Tamer; Bagis, Bora; Arslan, Ipek

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the microleakage and bond strength of Class V silorane-based and universal micro-hybrid composite restorations prepared either with diamond bur or with an erbium, chromium: yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er, Cr:YSGG) laser. Materials and Methods: A total of 160 molar teeth were used for microleakage assessment and shear bond strength (SBS) test. The specimens were prepared using either diamond bur or 3 W-, 4 W- and 5 W-20 Hz Er, Cr:YSGG laser irradiation. All specimens were subjected to thermocycling (500 times at 5 ± 2°C to 55 ± 2°C, dwell time 15 s and transfer time 10 s). Microleakage was assessed using a 0.5% basic-fuchsin solution. The bond strengths were determined using a microtensile tester at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The Kruskal Wallis test was used for the analysis of microleakage and a one-way analysis of variance test was used to analyze the SBS (P < 0.05). Results: No statistically significant differences were found (P > 0.05) between Er, Cr:YSGG laser and bur preparation methods regarding microleakage and bond strength values. Conclusion: Irradiation with Er, Cr:YSGG laser was confirmed to be as effective as conventional methods for preparing cavities before adhesive restorations. PMID:24966726

  13. Characterisation of baroque tin amalgam mirrors of the historical Green Vault in Dresden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zywitzki, O.; Nedon, W.; Kopte, T.; Modes, T.

    2008-07-01

    The historical Green Vault, one of Europe’s most sumptuous treasure chambers, has reopened in September 2006 in the Dresden Royal Palace. For the baroque presentation of the artworks the special properties of tin amalgam mirrors are of great importance. A comprehensive analytic characterisation was necessary for restoration and reconstruction. The different original casting glasses were analysed in respect of chemical composition, roughness, waviness and optical properties like chromaticity coordinates and transmittance. The microstructure of the tin amalgam layers were investigated on metallographic cross-sections and by X-ray diffraction. The investigations reveal that the tin amalgam layers are composed of γ-HgSn6-10 phase with a grain size between 5 and 50 μm surrounded by a thin mercury phase with about 2 wt. % tin. However the most important property of the baroque tin amalgam mirrors is a relative low reflectivity of about 59% which is drastically lower than for silver mirrors with a reflectivity of about 96%. According to the characterisation results a suitable glass for reconstruction was selected. The mirror layers were produced by historical tin amalgam technology for the rooms not destroyed by bombarding of Dresden in February 1945. For the completely destroyed Jewel Room pure tin layers were deposited by magnetron sputtering. The results show that this new technology enables an adequate substitute for the original tin amalgam layers.

  14. Hg, Bi, Cu and Zn distribution in human teeth treated by dental amalgam measured by synchrotron microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, M. L.; Marques, J. P.; Brito, J.; Casaca, C.; Cunha, A. S.

    2002-11-01

    Human teeth restored with dental amalgam were analysed by a synchrotron microprobe to evaluate the diffusion of its major constituents, Cu, Zn and Hg, throughout the tooth structures. We measured the elemental distribution inside the tooth from the root to the enamel, specially the region around the amalgam, after its total removal. Hg is present only in restored teeth and concentration profiles show strongly increased levels of this element close to the amalgam region, reaching 500 μg g -1 in one or two cases, decreasing strongly to the inner part of the tooth. Pb concentration profiles do not seem to be affected by metallic amalgam. Very high concentrations of Bi were found in one of the restored teeth, reaching more than 2000 μg g -1, decreasing sharply to the outer regions. The distribution of Mn, Fe, Cu and Zn was also determined in order to evaluate elemental influences by amalgam components. No significant changes in elemental concentrations were detected for Mn and Fe between healthy and restored teeth. However, the levels of Zn and Cu are increased in restored teeth. An X-ray fluorescence set-up with microprobe capabilities, 100 μm of spatial resolution and an energy of 18 keV, installed at LURE synchrotron (France) was used.

  15. 21 CFR 872.3070 - Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. 872.3070 Section 872.3070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3070 Dental amalgam,...

  16. Effect of Surface Polishing on Mercury Release from Dental Amalgam After Treatment 16% Carbamide Peroxide Gel

    PubMed Central

    Azarsina, M.; Kasraei, Sh.; Masoum, T.; Khamverdi, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This study evaluated the effect of surface polishing on mercury release from dental amalgam after treatment with 16% carbamide peroxide gel. Materials and Methods: Ninety-six samples from two different amalgam brands were prepared in truncated cone-shaped PVC polymer molds with an external surface area of 195 mm2. Half of the specimens were polished with green and red rubber, a brush and tin oxide paste at low speed. Samples were treated with 16% carbamide peroxide gel in tubes containing 3 mL of carbamide peroxide gel and 0.1 mL of distilled water for 14 and 28 hours. Subsequently, carbamide peroxide gel on the sample surfaces was rinsed away with 7.0 mL of distilled water until the volume of each tube increased to 10 mL. The mercury level of each solution was measured using the VAV–440 mercury analyzer system. Considering the surface area of each amalgam disc, mercury amounts were calculated in μg/mm2. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA. Results: There were significant differences between the mean levels of mercury release from polished vs. unpolished amalgam surfaces after treatment with 16% carbamide peroxide. Increasing the storage time from 14 to 28 hours did not result in significant changes in the amount of mercury release. There was no significant interaction effect between amalgam surface polish and storage time statistically. Conclusion: Polished amalgam restorations release less mercury after treatment with carbamide peroxide bleaching gel in comparison with unpolished amalgam restorations. PMID:21998805

  17. Selective targeting of protein, water, and mineral in dentin using UV and IR pulse lasers: the effect on the bond strength to composite restorative materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Karishma K.; Staninec, Michal; Sarma, Anupama V.; Fried, Daniel

    2004-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that during the laser irradiation of dentin and bone, thermal damage can be minimized by using a highly absorbed laser wavelength, laser pulses shorter than the thermal relaxation time of the deposited laser energy at that wavelength, and the addition of a layer of water to the tissue surface before ablation. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of laser pulse duration and wavelength with and without the added water layer on the bond strength of composite to laser prepared dentin surfaces. The specific hypothesis that was tested was that thermal damage to the collagen matrix in dentin compromises the bond strength to composite restorative materials. Three laser systems were employed that were tuned to water, collagen and mineral absorption with pulse durations less than the thermal relaxation time of the deposited energy. The surfaces of human dentin were irradiated by laser irradiation from free-running and Q-switched Er:YSGG lasers (2.79-μm), pulsed CO2 lasers operating at 9.6-μm and a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operating at 355-nm. A motion control system and a pressurized spray system incorporating a microprocessor controlled pulsed nozzle for water delivery, were used to ensure uniform treatment of the entire surface. Shear bond testing was used to evaluate the adhesive strength in order to access the suitability of laser treated surfaces for bonding. All the laser groups had significantly lower bond strengths than the positive acid etch control group. The highest bond strengths were for the short (<5-μs) Er:YSGG and CO2 groups with water. Laser groups without water had significantly reduced bond strengths.

  18. The effect of the presence and presentation mode of co-initiators on the microtensile bond strength of dual-cured adhesive systems used in indirect restorations.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Samantha Cristine Santos Xisto Braga; de Oliveira, Marcelo Tavares; Arrais, Cesar Augusto Galvão; Giannini, Marcelo

    2008-01-01

    This study compared the microtensile bond strength (microTBS) of indirect resin composite restorations to dentin when fifth-generation adhesive systems were either light-activated or left in the uncured state prior to cementation. The systems used in this study were Prime&Bond NT (NT-Dentsply) and Excite (EX-Ivoclar-Vivadent) or their dual-cured versions containing co-initiators with different presentation modes (as solution or salts) Prime&Bond NT Dual-cure (NTD-Dentsply) and Excite DSC (DSC-Ivoclar Vivadent). The bonding agents were applied to the flattened occlusal dentin surfaces of 40 human third molars according to the manufacturers' instructions and were light-activated (XL3000/3M ESPE) for 10 seconds (LP) or left in the uncured state (SP). The respective resin cements Calibra (Dentsply Caulk) and Variolink II (Ivoclar Vivadent) were applied to pre-cured resin composite discs (2 mm thick/Z-250/3M ESPE) that were fixed to the bonded dentin surfaces. The restored teeth were light-activated according to the manufacturers' instructions for five minutes after cementation and water-stored at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. The teeth were then both mesial-distally and buccal-lingually sectioned to obtain bonded specimens (0.8 mm2). Each specimen was tested in tension at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute until failure. The data (MPa [SD]) were analyzed by 3-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test (p < .05). The results showed that the presence of a co-initiator decreased microTBS for NT, while no significant difference in microTBS was noted between EX and DSC, regardless of the curing mode. All SP groups exhibited lower microTBS than the LP groups. The results suggest that coinitiators presented as a solution may decrease microTBS to dentin of the evaluated adhesive systems in indirect resin composite restorations. Light-activation of the adhesive layer prior to indirect cementation was crucial for higher microTBS on dentin.

  19. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental amalgamator. 872.3100 Section 872.3100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A...

  20. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental amalgamator. 872.3100 Section 872.3100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A...

  1. A self-designed instrument to evaluate cavosurface angle for class I amalgam cavity preparation: A learning aid.

    PubMed

    Arora, Ankit; Acharya, Shashi Rashmi; Ballal, Vasudev; Sharma, Padmaja

    2012-07-01

    Fighting the controversies, amalgam, as a posterior restorative material has survived till date. The fate of amalgam restoration is determined by geometry of the cavity preparation and cavosurface angle is one integral part of the cavity, which decides the marginal characteristics of the restoration and health of the tooth. Low edge strength of amalgam highlights the importance of cavosurface angle. However, at the same time conservation of the tooth also should be considered. This article presents a self-designed instrument to evaluate and obtain a cavosurface angle close to 110°. The design of the instrument also helps in evaluating parameters, such as depth of the cavity, undercut angle, and allows finishing of the buccal or lingual walls.

  2. Making High-Tensile-Strength Amalgam Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Structural components made of amalgams can be made to have tensile strengths much greater than previously known to be possible. Amalgams, perhaps best known for their use in dental fillings, have several useful attributes, including room-temperature fabrication, corrosion resistance, dimensional stability, and high compressive strength. However, the range of applications of amalgams has been limited by their very small tensile strengths. Now, it has been discovered that the tensile strength of an amalgam depends critically on the sizes and shapes of the particles from which it is made and, consequently, the tensile strength can be greatly increased through suitable choice of the particles. Heretofore, the powder particles used to make amalgams have been, variously, in the form of micron-sized spheroids or flakes. The tensile reinforcement contributed by the spheroids and flakes is minimal because fracture paths simply go around these particles. However, if spheroids or flakes are replaced by strands having greater lengths, then tensile reinforcement can be increased significantly. The feasibility of this concept was shown in an experiment in which electrical copper wires, serving as demonstration substitutes for copper powder particles, were triturated with gallium by use of a mortar and pestle and the resulting amalgam was compressed into a mold. The tensile strength of the amalgam specimen was then measured and found to be greater than 10(exp 4) psi (greater than about 69 MPa). Much remains to be done to optimize the properties of amalgams for various applications through suitable choice of starting constituents and modification of the trituration and molding processes. The choice of wire size and composition are expected to be especially important. Perusal of phase diagrams of metal mixtures could give insight that would enable choices of solid and liquid metal constituents. Finally, whereas heretofore, only binary alloys have been considered for amalgams

  3. Extensive amalgam tattoo on the alveolar-gingival mucosa.

    PubMed

    Galletta, Vivian C; Artico, Gabriela; Dal Vechio, Aluana M C; Lemos Jr, Celso A; Migliari, Dante A

    2011-01-01

    Amalgam tattoos are common exogenous pigmented lesions of the oral mucosa occurring mainly by inadvertent placement of amalgam particles into soft tissues. The diagnosis of amalgam tattoo is simple, usually based on clinical findings associated with presence or history of amalgam fillings removal. Intraoral X-rays may be helpful in detecting amalgam-related radiopacity. In cases where amalgam tattoo cannot be differentiated from other causes of oral pigmentation, a biopsy should be performed. This article deals with an extensive amalgam tattoo lesion which required a biopsy for a definitive diagnosis. PMID:22147048

  4. Radiochemical separation of gold by amalgam exchange

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruch, R.R.

    1970-01-01

    A rapid and simple method for the radiochemical separation of gold after neutron activation. The technique is based on treatment with a dilute indium-gold amalgam, both chemical reduction and isotopic exchange being involved. The counting efficiency for 198Au in small volumes of the amalgam is good. Few interferences occur and the method is applicable to clays, rocks, salts and metals. The possibility of determining silver, platinum and palladium by a similar method is mentioned. ?? 1970.

  5. Infrared laser irradiation of dental enamel using submicrosecond laser pulses with and without an applied water layer: effect on bond strength to restorative materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, Anupama V.; Staninec, Michal; Le, Charles Q.; Fried, Daniel

    2004-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that during IR laser irradiation at CO2 and Er:YAG laser wavelengths, residual particles of fused non-apatite calcium phosphate phases accumulate that may inhibit adhesion to restorative materials. A layer of water added to the enamel surface before ablation prevents the accumulation of such phases. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of laser pulse duration and wavelength with and without the added water layer on the bond strength of composite to laser prepared enamel surfaces. The surfaces of bovine enamel were irradiated by three lasers systems: a 0.5-μs Er:YSGG laser. a 25-μs Er:YAG laser and a 5-μs TEA CO2 laser operating at 9.6-μm. A motion control system and a pressurized spray system incorporating a microprocessor controlled pulsed nozzle for water delivery, were used to ensure uniform treatment of the entire surface. There was no significant reduction in the shear-bond strength of enamel to composite for the shorter erbium laser pulses if a water-spray was not used, in contrast to previous results for the 200-μs free-running Er:YAG laser in which the water-spray resulted in significantly higher bond-strengths. Shear-bond strengths for both erbium laser systems were significantly higher than for the CO2 laser irradiated samples and the negative control (no acid-etch) but significantly lower than the positive control group (phosphoric acid-etch). The application of the water-spray markedly influenced the surface morphology for all three laser systems with the most uniform surface preparation being produced by the 25-μs Er:YAG laser and the 5-μs CO2 laser with the water-spray.

  6. Marginal microleakage of cervical composite resin restorations bonded using etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives: two dimensional vs. three dimensional methods

    PubMed Central

    Khoroushi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study was evaluated the marginal microleakage of two different adhesive systems before and after aging with two different dye penetration techniques. Materials and Methods Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of 48 human molars. Clearfil SE Bond and Single Bond (self-etching and etch-and-rinse systems, respectively) were applied, each to half of the prepared cavities, which were restored with composite resin. Half of the specimens in each group underwent 10,000 cycles of thermocycling. Microleakage was evaluated using two dimensional (2D) and three dimensional (3D) dye penetration techniques separately for each half of each specimen. Data were analyzed with SPSS 11.5 (SPSS Inc.), using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests (α = 0.05). Results The difference between the 2D and 3D microleakage evaluation techniques was significant at the occlusal margins of Single bond groups (p = 0.002). The differences between 2D and 3D microleakage evaluation techniques were significant at both the occlusal and cervical margins of Clearfil SE Bond groups (p = 0.017 and p = 0.002, respectively). The difference between the 2D and 3D techniques was significant at the occlusal margins of non-aged groups (p = 0.003). The difference between these two techniques was significant at the occlusal margins of the aged groups (p = 0.001). The Mann-Whitney test showed significant differences between the two techniques only at the occlusal margins in all specimens. Conclusions Under the limitations of the present study, it can be concluded that the 3D technique has the capacity to detect occlusal microleakage more precisely than the 2D technique. PMID:27200275

  7. Analysis of Resin-Dentin Interface Morphology and Bond Strength Evaluation of Core Materials for One Stage Post-Endodontic Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Bitter, Kerstin; Gläser, Christin; Neumann, Konrad; Blunck, Uwe; Frankenberger, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Restoration of endodontically treated teeth using fiber posts in a one-stage procedure gains more popularity and aims to create a secondary monoblock. Data of detailed analyses of so called “post-and-core-systems” with respect to morphological characteristics of the resin-dentin interface in combination with bond strength measurements of fiber posts luted with these materials are scarce. The present study aimed to analyze four different post-and-core-systems with two different adhesive approaches (self-etch and etch-and-rinse). Materials and Methods Human anterior teeth (n = 80) were endodontically treated and post space preparations and post placement were performed using the following systems: Rebilda Post/Rebilda DC/Futurabond DC (Voco) (RB), Luxapost/Luxacore Z/Luxabond Prebond and Luxabond A+B (DMG) (LC), X Post/Core X Flow/XP Bond and Self Cure Activator (Dentsply DeTrey) (CX), FRC Postec/MultiCore Flow/AdheSE DC (Ivoclar Vivadent) (MC). Adhesive systems and core materials of 10 specimens per group were labeled using fluorescent dyes and resin-dentin interfaces were analyzed using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM). Bond strengths were evaluated using a push-out test. Data were analyzed using repeated measurement ANOVA and following post-hoc test. Results CLSM analyses revealed significant differences between groups with respect to the factors hybrid layer thickness (p<0.0005) and number of resin tags (p = 0.02; ANOVA). Bond strength was significantly affected by core material (p = 0.001), location inside the root canal (p<0.0005) and incorporation of fluorescent dyes (p = 0.036; ANOVA). CX [7.7 (4.4) MPa] demonstrated significantly lower bond strength compared to LC [14.2 (8.7) MPa] and RB [13.3 (3.7) MPa] (p<0.05; Tukey HSD) but did not differ significantly from MC [11.5 (3.5) MPa]. Conclusion It can be concluded that bond strengths inside the root canal were not affected by the adhesive approach of the post

  8. Restoration of occlusal vertical dimension by means of a silica-coated onlay removable partial denture in conjunction with dentin bonding: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Trushkowsky, R D; Guiv, B

    1991-09-01

    The prosthesis described in this article allowed restoration of occlusal height by means of an onlay removable partial denture and composite resin bonded veneers. Reasons for its selection are: 1. It is a reversible procedure. 2. The patient can easily clean any plaque accumulation due to supragingival margins. 3. The cost to the patient was much lower than that of a fixed prostheses. 4. Chair time is less than with a fixed prosthesis. 5. Tooth structure remains relatively unaltered except for recontouring prior to onlay construction. 6. Repairs are easily done. 7. The onlays of the removable partial denture transfer the occlusal load on the abutment teeth along their long axes. 8. The procedure is less stressful and fatiguing to the patient than that involving a fixed prosthesis.

  9. [Esthetic restoration of the posterior sector. State of the art].

    PubMed

    Prati, C; Tiozzi, E; Giommoni, E

    Patient's aesthetic requirements have increased in the past few years. The limited resistance of composites to wear has delayed their universal adoption for restoration of Class I and II cavity preparations in adult teeth. Although the potential use for posterior composite resin appears promising, the point at which such materials may be regarded as ideal, reliable, routine alternatives to silver amalgam has not been reached for materials of previous generation. To resolve some of the problems associated with the posterior composite resin, new materials (photo-cured GIC, multi step bonding agent, improved composite resins as P-50, Heliomolar Radiopaque, Ray Post) and new techniques have been introduced. In this paper the problems and questions raised with the use of posterior composites have been discussed.

  10. [Despite all--do we have an appropriate substitute for amalgam?].

    PubMed

    Levin, L; Samorodnitzky-Naveh, G; Coval, M; Geiger, S B

    2008-04-01

    The ultimate success or failure of a restored tooth is largely dependent on clinical management. Clinicians may choose from a number of restorative materials, different clinical techniques and cavity preparation procedures. Composite resin has been used for nearly 50 years as a restorative material in dentistry. The use of this material has recently increased as a result of patients' demands for esthetic restorations. Failure of dental restorations is a major concern in dental practice. Replacement of failed restorations constitutes the majority of operative work. Clinicians should be aware of the longevity of, and likely reasons for the failure of, direct posterior restorations. Higher failure rates were observed in resin-based composite restorations as compares amalgam restorations. Secondary caries was the main reason for failure. Posterior interproximal resin-based composite restorations should be considered with caution, and their limited long-term performance should be kept in mind. Patients should be informed about the potential longevity of restorative treatment for posterior teeth as they make decisions about treatment for their oral restorative needs.

  11. Radiochemical separation of gallium by amalgam exchange

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruch, R.R.

    1969-01-01

    An amalgam-exchange separation of radioactive gallium from a number of interfering radioisotopes has been developed. A dilute (ca. 0.3%) gallium amalgam is agitated with a slightly acidic solution of 72Ga3+ containing concentrations of sodium thiocyanate and either perchlorate or chloride. The amalgam is then removed and the radioactive gallium stripped by agitation with dilute nitric acid. The combined exchange yield of the perchlorate-thiocyanate system is 90??4% and that of the chloride-thiocyanate system is 75??4%. Decontamination yields of most of the 11 interfering isotopes studied were less than 0.02%. The technique is applicable for use with activation analysis for the determination of trace amounts of gallium. ?? 1969.

  12. [Functional dental anatomy and amalgam].

    PubMed

    Tavernier, B; Colon, P

    1989-01-01

    Very often, the functional dental anatomy are reflected during the rehabilitation of posterior quadrants. However, the placement, the shaping in correct relation of the different dental components are indispensable conditions to respect, in order to achieve an adequate integration of the restoration within the neuro-muscular system. A clinical protocol is proposed in order to reconcile the anatomical and biological prerequisite and the setting time of modern alloys.

  13. 21 CFR 872.3110 - Dental amalgam capsule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dental amalgam capsule. 872.3110 Section 872.3110...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3110 Dental amalgam capsule. (a) Identification. A dental amalgam capsule is a container device in which silver alloy is intended to be mixed with...

  14. 21 CFR 872.3110 - Dental amalgam capsule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental amalgam capsule. 872.3110 Section 872.3110...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3110 Dental amalgam capsule. (a) Identification. A dental amalgam capsule is a container device in which silver alloy is intended to be mixed with...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3110 - Dental amalgam capsule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental amalgam capsule. 872.3110 Section 872.3110...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3110 Dental amalgam capsule. (a) Identification. A dental amalgam capsule is a container device in which silver alloy is intended to be mixed with...

  16. Amalgam Surface Treatment by Different Output Powers of Er:YAG Laser:SEM Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Mohammad Hashem; Hassanpour, Mehdi; Etemadi, Ardavan; Ranjbar Omrani, Ladan; Darvishpour, Hojat; Chiniforush, Nasim

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate amalgam surfaces treated by different output powers of erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Methods: Twenty-one amalgam blocks (8 mm × 8 mm, 3 mm thickness) were prepared by condensing silver amalgam (into putty impression material. After keeping them for 24 hours in distilled water, they were divided into 7 groups as follow: G1: Er:YAG laser (1 W, 50 mJ), G2: Er:YAG laser (2 W, 100 mJ), G3: Er:YAG laser (3 W, 150 mJ), G4: Sandblast, G5: Sandblast + Er:YAG laser (1 W, 50 mJ), G6: Sandblast +Er:YAG laser (2 W, 100 mJ) and G7: Sandblast +Er:YAG laser (3 W, 150 mJ). Then after preparation of all samples, they were examined by SEM. Results: The SEM results of amalgam surfaces treated by different output powers of Er:YAG laser showed some pitting areas with non-homogenous irregularities Conclusion: It seems that the application of sandblasting accompanied by Er:YAG laser irradiation can provide proper surface for bonding of orthodontic brackets. PMID:26705463

  17. Estimation by a 24-hour study of the daily dose of intra-oral mercury vapor inhaled after release from dental amalgam

    SciTech Connect

    Berglund, A. )

    1990-10-01

    The difficulties associated with estimations of daily doses of inhaled mercury vapor released from dental amalgam are considerable. Existing data are often unreliable, especially if they are based on a single or a small series of samples of intra-oral concentrations of mercury vapor before, during, and after chewing stimulation. In the present paper, the aim was to obtain a more representative estimation of the daily dose of mercury vapor inhaled from amalgam fillings by measurement of amounts of mercury vapor released in the oral cavity during 24 h, under conditions that were as normal as possible. A series of measurements was carried out on each of 15 subjects, with at least nine occlusal surfaces restored with dental amalgam, and on five subjects without any amalgam restorations. The subjects had to follow a standardized schedule for 24 h, whereby they ate, drank, and brushed their teeth at pre-determined time periods. The amount of mercury vapor released per time unit was measured at intervals of 30-45 min by means of a measuring system based on atomic absorption spectrophotometry. None of the subjects was professionally exposed to mercury, and all of their amalgam fillings were more than one year old. Study casts were made for each subject, and the area of the amalgam surfaces was measured. Samples of urine and saliva were analyzed so that values for the mercury concentrations and the rate of release of mercury into saliva could be obtained. The average frequency of fish meals per month was noted.

  18. Antibacterial properties of amalgam and composite resin materials used as cores under crowns.

    PubMed

    Al Ghadban, A; Al Shaarani, F

    2012-06-01

    The Aim of this Study was to compare the bacterial growth in the bulk of both amalgam and fluoridated composite resin materials used as cores under crowns at core's surface (in the superficial area of the bulk) and depth levels. With 24 lower premolars, 12 of them were restored with metal posts and amalgam cores (group 1). The rest were restored with glass Fiber-reinforced Composite (FRC) posts and fluoridated composite resin cores (group 2). All specimens were covered with aluminium crowns cemented with resin cement, and then they were soaked in natural saliva for three months. Excoriations abraded from the superficial and the depth areas of the core materials were cultured under aerobic conditions on blood agar plates. After incubation for 2 days, colonies formed on the plates were identified, and the CFU mg(-1) counts were recorded accordingly. Statistical analysis was performed using an independent sample T test. The mean values of CFU mg(-1) counts in group 2 excoriations (surface 39.75, and depth 9.75) were higher than the group 1 excoriations (surface 1.67, and depth 0.42). This study supports the use of amalgam for building up cores due to its antibacterial properties. Composite resin, however, enhanced sizable bacterial growth despite the presence of fluoride. PMID:22852523

  19. Antibacterial properties of amalgam and composite resin materials used as cores under crowns.

    PubMed

    Al Ghadban, A; Al Shaarani, F

    2012-06-01

    The Aim of this Study was to compare the bacterial growth in the bulk of both amalgam and fluoridated composite resin materials used as cores under crowns at core's surface (in the superficial area of the bulk) and depth levels. With 24 lower premolars, 12 of them were restored with metal posts and amalgam cores (group 1). The rest were restored with glass Fiber-reinforced Composite (FRC) posts and fluoridated composite resin cores (group 2). All specimens were covered with aluminium crowns cemented with resin cement, and then they were soaked in natural saliva for three months. Excoriations abraded from the superficial and the depth areas of the core materials were cultured under aerobic conditions on blood agar plates. After incubation for 2 days, colonies formed on the plates were identified, and the CFU mg(-1) counts were recorded accordingly. Statistical analysis was performed using an independent sample T test. The mean values of CFU mg(-1) counts in group 2 excoriations (surface 39.75, and depth 9.75) were higher than the group 1 excoriations (surface 1.67, and depth 0.42). This study supports the use of amalgam for building up cores due to its antibacterial properties. Composite resin, however, enhanced sizable bacterial growth despite the presence of fluoride.

  20. Restoration materials and secondary caries using an in vitro biofilm model.

    PubMed

    Kuper, N K; van de Sande, F H; Opdam, N J M; Bronkhorst, E M; de Soet, J J; Cenci, M S; Huysmans, M C D J N M

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated whether restoration materials and adhesives influence secondary caries formation in gaps using a short-term in vitro biofilm model. Sixty enamel-dentin blocks were restored with 6 different restoration materials with or without adhesives (n = 10 per group) with a gap: 1) Clearfil AP-X composite, 2) Clearfil AP-X composite + SE Bond, 3) Clearfil AP-X composite + ProtectBond, 4) Filtek Silorane composite, 5) Filtek Silorane composite + Silorane System adhesive, or 6) Tytin amalgam. Specimens were subjected to an intermittent 1% sucrose biofilm model for 20 days to create artificial caries lesions. Lesion progression in the enamel-dentin next to the different materials was measured in lesion depth (LD) and mineral loss (ML) using transversal wavelength independent microradiography (T-WIM). A regression analysis was used to compare the LD and ML of the different restoration materials at 4 measurement locations: 1 location at the surface of the enamel, 1 location at the wall of the enamel, and 2 locations at the wall of the dentin. A statistically significant effect of AP-X composite with Protect Bond was found for LD and ML at the WallDentin1 location, leading to less advanced wall lesions. An additional finding was that gap size was also statistically significant at the 2 wall locations in dentin, leading to increasing lesion progression with wider gaps. In conclusion, adhesives can influence wall lesion development in gaps. Protect Bond showed significantly less caries progression compared to bare restoration materials or other adhesives in this short-term in vitro biofilm model. PMID:25297114

  1. Restoration materials and secondary caries using an in vitro biofilm model.

    PubMed

    Kuper, N K; van de Sande, F H; Opdam, N J M; Bronkhorst, E M; de Soet, J J; Cenci, M S; Huysmans, M C D J N M

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated whether restoration materials and adhesives influence secondary caries formation in gaps using a short-term in vitro biofilm model. Sixty enamel-dentin blocks were restored with 6 different restoration materials with or without adhesives (n = 10 per group) with a gap: 1) Clearfil AP-X composite, 2) Clearfil AP-X composite + SE Bond, 3) Clearfil AP-X composite + ProtectBond, 4) Filtek Silorane composite, 5) Filtek Silorane composite + Silorane System adhesive, or 6) Tytin amalgam. Specimens were subjected to an intermittent 1% sucrose biofilm model for 20 days to create artificial caries lesions. Lesion progression in the enamel-dentin next to the different materials was measured in lesion depth (LD) and mineral loss (ML) using transversal wavelength independent microradiography (T-WIM). A regression analysis was used to compare the LD and ML of the different restoration materials at 4 measurement locations: 1 location at the surface of the enamel, 1 location at the wall of the enamel, and 2 locations at the wall of the dentin. A statistically significant effect of AP-X composite with Protect Bond was found for LD and ML at the WallDentin1 location, leading to less advanced wall lesions. An additional finding was that gap size was also statistically significant at the 2 wall locations in dentin, leading to increasing lesion progression with wider gaps. In conclusion, adhesives can influence wall lesion development in gaps. Protect Bond showed significantly less caries progression compared to bare restoration materials or other adhesives in this short-term in vitro biofilm model.

  2. Restoration Materials and Secondary Caries Using an In Vitro Biofilm Model

    PubMed Central

    van de Sande, F.H.; Opdam, N.J.M.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; de Soet, J.J.; Cenci, M.S.; Huysmans, M.C.D.J.N.M.

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated whether restoration materials and adhesives influence secondary caries formation in gaps using a short-term in vitro biofilm model. Sixty enamel–dentin blocks were restored with 6 different restoration materials with or without adhesives (n = 10 per group) with a gap: 1) Clearfil AP-X composite, 2) Clearfil AP-X composite + SE Bond, 3) Clearfil AP-X composite + ProtectBond, 4) Filtek Silorane composite, 5) Filtek Silorane composite + Silorane System adhesive, or 6) Tytin amalgam. Specimens were subjected to an intermittent 1% sucrose biofilm model for 20 days to create artificial caries lesions. Lesion progression in the enamel–dentin next to the different materials was measured in lesion depth (LD) and mineral loss (ML) using transversal wavelength independent microradiography (T-WIM). A regression analysis was used to compare the LD and ML of the different restoration materials at 4 measurement locations: 1 location at the surface of the enamel, 1 location at the wall of the enamel, and 2 locations at the wall of the dentin. A statistically significant effect of AP-X composite with Protect Bond was found for LD and ML at the WallDentin1 location, leading to less advanced wall lesions. An additional finding was that gap size was also statistically significant at the 2 wall locations in dentin, leading to increasing lesion progression with wider gaps. In conclusion, adhesives can influence wall lesion development in gaps. Protect Bond showed significantly less caries progression compared to bare restoration materials or other adhesives in this short-term in vitro biofilm model. PMID:25297114

  3. Handling characteristics of gallium alloy for dental restoration.

    PubMed

    Mash, L K; Miller, B H; Nakajima, H; Collard, S M; Guo, I Y; Okabe, T

    1993-12-01

    The handling characteristics of a gallium alloy (Gallium Alloy GF) were compared to those of a spherical high-copper amalgam (Tytin). Ten dentists each restored four identical MO preparations in acrylic typodont teeth (no. 30), two with amalgam and two with gallium alloy. Each restoration was evaluated immediately following completion by the operator for six clinically relevant criteria. Each criterion was scored between 1 and 5, where 1 = very poor, 2 = poor, 3 = fair, 4 = good, and 5 = very good. Three two-sided Mann-Whitney tests were used to compare the median scores for significant differences (P < 0.05). The first test indicated no significant difference between scores for the first- and second-placed restorations, within criteria and within alloy type (n = 10). The second test indicated a significant difference between amalgam and gallium alloy, within criteria and within restoration sequence (n = 10), for each criterion except resistance to fracture during removal of the matrix band. The third test indicated a significant difference between amalgam and gallium alloy, within each criteria, combining scores for first- and second-placed restorations (n = 20). During simulated clinical placement, amalgam was rated significantly higher than gallium alloy in each handling characteristic evaluated.

  4. Effect of dental amalgam on gene expression profiles in rat cerebrum, cerebellum, liver and kidney.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yoshifumi; Tsuruta, Shozo; Honda, Akiko; Fujiwara, Yasuyuki; Satoh, Masahiko; Yasutake, Akira

    2012-01-01

    Dental amalgam is a source of exposure to elemental mercury vapor in the general population. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effect of elemental mercury vapor exposure from dental amalgam restorations on gene expression profiles. Out of 26,962 rat genes, mercury vapor was found to increase the expression of 1 gene (Atp1b3) and decrease the expression of 1 gene (Tap1) in the cerebrum, increase the expression of 1 gene (Dnaja2) in the cerebellum, increase the expression of 2 genes (Actb and Timm23) and decrease the expression of 1 gene (Spink3) in the liver, increase the expression of 2 genes (RT1-Bb and Mgat5) and decrease the expression of 6 genes (Tnfaip8, Rara, Slc2a4, Wdr12, Pias4 and Timm13) in the kidney.

  5. Analyses of dental pulp in restored teeth.

    PubMed

    Lentz, D L; Buchanan, J T; Basinger, D R

    1989-03-01

    Restored teeth were extracted from test animals at four time intervals (1 hour, 1 day, 1 week, and 3 months) following amalgam insertion. Extracted teeth were frozen in liquid nitrogen, cryo-fractured so as to expose the pulps and then freeze-dried. Pulps were analyzed for mercury content by energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) and atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). Mercury levels appeared below the detection limits of EDS but could be detected by AAS which showed the highest readings seven days after amalgam insertion. PMID:2740863

  6. Comparative in vitro evaluation of internal adaptation of resin-modified glass ionomer, flowable composite and bonding agent applied as a liner under composite restoration: A scanning electron microscope study

    PubMed Central

    Soubhagya, M; Goud, K Mallikarjun; Deepak, B S; Thakur, Sophia; Nandini, T N; Arun, J

    2015-01-01

    Background: The use of resin-modified glass Ionomer cement in sandwich technique is widely practiced with the advent of various newer generation of composites the bond between resin-modified glass Ionomer and these resins should be validated. This study is done to evaluate the interfacial microgaps between different types of liners and dentin, liners and composite (Filtek p60 [FLp60]) using scanning electron microscope (SEM). Materials and Methods: Standardized Class V preparations were performed in buccal/lingual surfaces of 30 caries, crack and defect-free extracted human third molars. The prepared teeth were divided into three groups. Group I: Single bond (SB), Group II: SB + synergy flow, Group III: SB + vitrebond. They were restored with composite resin FLp60, according to the manufacturer instructions. The SB + vitrebond, cross-sectioned through the canter of the restoration. The specimens were fixed, dehydrated, polished, and processed for SEM. The internal adaptation of the materials to the axial wall was analyzed under SEM with ×1000 magnification. Results: The data obtained were analyzed with nonparametric tests (Kruskal–Wallis, P < 0.05). flowable composite or resin-modified glass ionomer applied in conjunction with adhesive resulted in statistically wider microgaps than occurred when the dentin was only hybridized prior to the restoration. Conclusion: Hybridization of dentin only provides superior sealing of the dentin-restoration interface than does flowable resin or resin-modified glass ionomer. PMID:25954067

  7. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR DETERMINING AMALGAM DECOMPOSITION RATE

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, R.W.; Wright, C.C.

    1962-04-24

    A method and apparatus for measuring the rate at which an amalgam decomposes in contact with aqueous solutions are described. The amalgam and an aqueous hydroxide solution are disposed in an electrolytic cell. The amalgam is used as the cathode of the cell, and an electrode and anode are disposed in the aqueous solution. A variable source of plating potential is connected across the cell. The difference in voltage between the amalgam cathode and a calibrated source of reference potential is used to control the variable source to null the difference in voltage and at the same time to maintain the concentration of the amalgam at some predetermined constant value. The value of the current required to maintain this concentration constant is indicative of the decomposition rate of the amalgam. (AEC)

  8. 48. INTERIOR VIEW FROM THE WEST END OF THE AMALGAMATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. INTERIOR VIEW FROM THE WEST END OF THE AMALGAMATION TABLES LOOKING NORTH TOWARDS THE STAMP BATTERIES WITH AMALGAM TRAPS SHOWN IN THE BOTTOM FOREGROUND. NOTE THE EXTANT EQUIPMENT IN THE FOREGROUND THAT THE PARK USES TO INTERPRET THE MILL. FROM LEFT TO RIGHT, A SCREEN FROM THE MORTAR BOX, A STAMP STOP. A (HUMAN'S) SHOE, A DIE FROM THE BOTTOM OF A MORTAR BOX, AN AMALGAM SCRAPPER AND AN AMALGAM BUCKET. - Standard Gold Mill, East of Bodie Creek, Northeast of Bodie, Bodie, Mono County, CA

  9. Effect of pellicle on galvanic corrosion of amalgam.

    PubMed

    Holland, R I

    1984-02-01

    Galvanic corrosion of amalgam, induced by contact with a type IV dental casting gold alloy, was determined under simulated oral conditions in an electrochemical cell. The effect of a pellicle layer formed by 1 h exposure to saliva in the oral cavity was determined. Pellicle on the amalgam had no effect on the maximum corrosion rate or the 2 h corrosion charge, whereas pellicle on the gold alloy substantially reduced both these parameters of the conventional low-copper amalgam; the corrosion of the high-copper amalgam was less and was not influenced by pellicle formation.

  10. [Clinical problems of microleakage of restorative materials in primary teeth].

    PubMed

    Gonzalez Marquez, M I; Gonzalez Rodriguez, E; Menendez Nunez, M

    1990-10-01

    The purpose of this research is to evaluate the clinical problems associated with microleakage of different restorative materials. We have compared the microleakage when we restore Class II cavities in primary molars with amalgams and with posterior composite resins. The results of this study suggest that posterior composite resins present more frequently pulp inflammation, necrosis, marginal discoloration and secondary marginal caries. This factors mus to be considered when we choose a material for temporary restoration.

  11. Scalp Hair and Urine Mercury Content of Children in the Northeast United States: The New England Children’s Amalgam Trial

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Julie E.; Trachtenberg, Felicia L.; Barregard, Lars; Bellinger, David; McKinlay, Sonja

    2008-01-01

    Children may be at particular risk from toxic effects of mercury (Hg). Previous studies of hair (organic) and urine (inorganic) Hg levels in US children were unable to assess Hg levels while accounting for exposure to amalgam dental restorations. This analysis describes, over a 5-year period, levels and correlates/predictors of scalp hair (H-Hg) and urinary (U-Hg) mercury in 534 New England Children’s Amalgam Trial (NECAT) participants, aged 6–10 years and without exposure to dental amalgam at baseline. Results: Mean H-Hg levels were between 0.3 and 0.4 μg/g over 5 years. 17–29% of children had H-Hg levels ≥0.5μg/g, and 5.0 to 8.5% of children had levels ≥1μg/g, in any given study year. In adjusted models, fish consumption frequency was the most robust predictor of high H-Hg. U-Hg mean levels were between 0.7 to 0.9 μg/g creatinine over two years. The percentage of those with U-Hg≥2.3μg/g creatinine ranged from 4 to 6%. Number of amalgam restorations had a significant dose-response relationship with U-Hg level. Daily gum chewing in the presence of amalgam was associated with high U-Hg. PMID:17961541

  12. An approach to biomimetics: the natural CAD/CAM restoration: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Schlichting, Luís Henrique; Schlichting, Kathryn Klemz; Stanley, Kyle; Magne, Michel; Magne, Pascal

    2014-02-01

    Those in the dental field have always pursued the perfect dental material for the treatment of compromised teeth. Gold, amalgam, composite resin, glass ionomer, and porcelain have been used. Tooth-like restorative materials (composite resin and porcelain) combined with an effective hard tissue bond have met the growing demand for esthetic or metal-free restorations in the past 15 to 20 years. However, none of those materials can fully mimic the unique properties of dentin (compliance and crack-stopping behavior) and enamel (wear resistance, function). The aim of this article is to report the restoration of an extensively damaged tooth with a natural restoration obtained by milling an extracted third molar tooth with a computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) system. The main benefit of this novel technique is the replacement of lost tissues by actual enamel and dentin, with the potential to recover mechanical, esthetic, and biologic properties. The indication for extracting third molars and premolars because of impaction or for orthodontic reasons makes these posterior teeth readily available. The innovation of the method presented here is the optimal use of the extracted tooth substrate thanks to its positioning technique in the CAD/CAM milling chamber.

  13. Dental devices: classification of dental amalgam, reclassification of dental mercury, designation of special controls for dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy; technical amendment. Final rule; technical amendment.

    PubMed

    2010-06-11

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published a final rule in the Federal Register of August 4, 2009 (74 FR 38686) which classified dental amalgam as a class II device, reclassified dental mercury from class I to class II, and designated special controls for dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. The effective date of the rule was November 2, 2009. The final rule was published with an inadvertent error in the codified section. This document corrects that error. This action is being taken to ensure the accuracy of the agency's regulations.

  14. Dentin bonding--state of the art 1999.

    PubMed

    Perdigão, J; Lopes, M

    1999-12-01

    The adhesion of restorative materials to the hard components of tooth structure has been a goal pursued by many researchers ever since Buonocore established the foundation for adhesive and preventive dentistry. Based on the industrial use of phosphoric acid to obtain better adhesion of paints and resin coatings to metal surfaces, Buonocore proposed that phosphoric acid could be used to transform the surface of enamel to "render it more receptive to adhesion." Subsequent research indicated that the formation of taglike resin prolongations into the enamel microporosities was the leading bonding mechanism of resin to phosphoric acid-etched enamel. The enamel bonding agents of the 1960s and 1970s progressively evolved into complex multibottle or universal adhesives in the early 1990s, which were designed to bond to enamel, dentin, composite, amalgam, porcelain, and non-precious metal. Although bonding to enamel has been a dependable technique, bonding to dentin still represents an overwhelming task because dentin is a naturally wet organic tissue penetrated by a tubular maze containing the odontoblastic process, which communicates with the pulp. This intrinsic moisture may actually benefit the chemistry of the newest adhesive systems, which must be applied on moist dentin to be effective. In fact, the collapse of the collagen that occurs on air-drying may prevent the adhesive monomers from penetrating the network of nano-channels formed by the dissolution of hydroxyapatite crystals between collagen fibrils. In view of the complexity of the mechanisms associated with these mechanisms, the objective of this review article is to summarize the most recent concepts in dentin bonding.

  15. Restorative material and other tooth-specific variables associated with the decision to repair or replace defective restorations: findings from The Dental PBRN

    PubMed Central

    Gordan, Valeria V.; Riley, Joseph L.; Worley, Donald C.; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Using data from dentists participating in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN), the study had 2 main objectives: (1) to identify and quantify the types of restorative materials in the existing failed restorations; and (2) to identify and quantify the materials used to repair or replace those failed restorations. Methods This cross-sectional study used a consecutive patient/restoration recruitment design. Practitioner-investigators recorded data on consecutive restorations in permanent teeth that needed repair or replacement. Data included the primary reason for repair or replacement, tooth surface(s) involved, restorative materials used, and patient demographics. Results Data for 9,875 restorations were collected from 7,502 patients in 197 practices for which 75% of restorations were replaced and 25% repaired. Most of the restorations that were either repaired or replaced were amalgam (56%) for which most (56%) of the material used was direct tooth-colored. The restorative material was 5 times more likely to be changed when the original restoration was amalgam (OR=5.2, p<.001). The likelihood of changing an amalgam restoration differed as a function of the tooth type (OR=3.0, p<.001), arch (OR=6.6, p<.001); and number of surfaces in the original restoration (OR=12.2, p<.001). Conclusion The probability of changing from amalgam to another restorative material differed with several characteristics of the original restoration. The change was most likely to take place when (1) the treatment was a replacement; (2) the tooth was not a molar; (3) the tooth was in the maxillary arch; and (4) the original restoration involved a single surface. PMID:22342563

  16. 21 CFR 872.3110 - Dental amalgam capsule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental amalgam capsule. 872.3110 Section 872.3110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3110 Dental amalgam capsule. (a) Identification....

  17. 21 CFR 872.3110 - Dental amalgam capsule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental amalgam capsule. 872.3110 Section 872.3110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3110 Dental amalgam capsule. (a) Identification....

  18. [Amalgam risk assessment with coverage of references up to 2005].

    PubMed

    Mutter, J; Naumann, J; Walach, H; Daschner, F

    2005-03-01

    Amalgam, which has been in use in dentistry for 150 years, consists of 50 % elemental mercury and a mixture of silver, tin, copper and zinc. Minute amounts of mercury vapour are released continuously from amalgam. Amalgam contributes substantially to human mercury load. Mercury accumulates in some organs, particularly in the brain, where it can bind to protein more tightly than other heavy metals (e. g. lead, cadmium). Therefore, the elimination half time is assumed to be up to 1 - 18 years in the brain and bones. Mercury is assumed to be one of the most toxic non-radioactive elements. There are pointers to show that mercury vapour is more neurotoxic than methyl-mercury in fish. Review of recent literature suggests that mercury from dental amalgam may lead to nephrotoxicity, neurobehavioural changes, autoimmunity, oxidative stress, autism, skin and mucosa alterations or non-specific symptoms and complaints. The development of Alzheimer's disease or multiple sclerosis has also been linked to low-dose mercury exposure. There may be individual genetical or acquired susceptibilities for negative effects from dental amalgam. Mercury levels in the blood, urine or other biomarkers do not reflect the mercury load in critical organs. Some studies regarding dental amalgam reveal substantial methodical flaws. Removal of dental amalgam leads to permanent improvement of various chronic complaints in a relevant number of patients in various trials. Summing up, available data suggests that dental amalgam is an unsuitable material for medical, occupational and ecological reasons.

  19. [Amalgam risk assessment with coverage of references up to 2005].

    PubMed

    Mutter, J; Naumann, J; Walach, H; Daschner, F

    2005-03-01

    Amalgam, which has been in use in dentistry for 150 years, consists of 50 % elemental mercury and a mixture of silver, tin, copper and zinc. Minute amounts of mercury vapour are released continuously from amalgam. Amalgam contributes substantially to human mercury load. Mercury accumulates in some organs, particularly in the brain, where it can bind to protein more tightly than other heavy metals (e. g. lead, cadmium). Therefore, the elimination half time is assumed to be up to 1 - 18 years in the brain and bones. Mercury is assumed to be one of the most toxic non-radioactive elements. There are pointers to show that mercury vapour is more neurotoxic than methyl-mercury in fish. Review of recent literature suggests that mercury from dental amalgam may lead to nephrotoxicity, neurobehavioural changes, autoimmunity, oxidative stress, autism, skin and mucosa alterations or non-specific symptoms and complaints. The development of Alzheimer's disease or multiple sclerosis has also been linked to low-dose mercury exposure. There may be individual genetical or acquired susceptibilities for negative effects from dental amalgam. Mercury levels in the blood, urine or other biomarkers do not reflect the mercury load in critical organs. Some studies regarding dental amalgam reveal substantial methodical flaws. Removal of dental amalgam leads to permanent improvement of various chronic complaints in a relevant number of patients in various trials. Summing up, available data suggests that dental amalgam is an unsuitable material for medical, occupational and ecological reasons. PMID:15789284

  20. Durable bonds at the adhesive/dentin interface: an impossible mission or simply a moving target?

    PubMed Central

    SPENCER, Paulette; Jonggu PARK, Qiang YE; MISRA, Anil; BOHATY, Brenda S.; SINGH, Viraj; PARTHASARATHY, Ranga; SENE, Fábio; de Paiva GONÇALVES, Sérgio Eduardo; LAURENCE, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Composite restorations have higher failure rates, more recurrent caries and increased frequency of replacement as compared to dental amalgam. Penetration of bacterial enzymes, oral fluids, and bacteria into the crevices between the tooth and composite undermines the restoration and leads to recurrent decay and failure. The gingival margin of composite restora tions is particularly vulnerable to decay and at this margin, the adhesive and its seal to dentin provides the primary barrier between the prepared tooth and the environment. The intent of this article is to examine physico-chemical factors that affect the integrity and durability of the adhesive/dentin interfacial bond; and to explore how these factors act synergistically with mechanical forces to undermine the composite restoration. The article will examine the various avenues that have been pursued to address these problems and it will explore how alterations in material chemistry could address the detrimental impact of physico-chemical stresses on the bond formed at the adhesive/dentin interface. PMID:24855586

  1. Dental devices: classification of dental amalgam, reclassification of dental mercury, designation of special controls for dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2009-08-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule classifying dental amalgam into class II, reclassifying dental mercury from class I to class II, and designating a special control to support the class II classifications of these two devices, as well as the current class II classification of amalgam alloy. The three devices are now classified in a single regulation. The special control for the devices is a guidance document entitled, "Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Dental Amalgam, Mercury, and Amalgam Alloy." This action is being taken to establish sufficient regulatory controls to provide reasonable assurance of the safety and effectiveness of these devices. Elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register, FDA is announcing the availability of the guidance document that will serve as the special control for the devices.

  2. Effect of light-curing, pressure, oxygen inhibition, and heat on shear bond strength between bis-acryl provisional restoration and bis-acryl repair materials

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Ji-Suk; Lee, Jeong-Yol; Choi, Yeon-Jo; Shin, Sang-Wan

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE This study aimed to discover a way to increase the bond strength between bis-acryl resins, using a comparison of the shear bond strengths attained from bis-acryl resins treated with light curing, pressure, oxygen inhibition, and heat. MATERIALS AND METHODS Self-cured bis-acryl resin was used as both a base material and as a repair material. Seventy specimens were distributed into seven groups according to treatment methods: pressure - stored in a pressure cooker at 0.2 Mpa; oxygen inhibition- applied an oxygen inhibitor around the repaired material,; heat treatment - performed heat treatment in a dry oven at 60℃, 100℃, or 140℃. The shear bond strength was measured with a universal testing machine, and the shear bond strength (MPa) was calculated from the peak load of failure. A comparison of the bond strength between the repaired specimens was conducted using one-way ANOVA and Tukey multiple comparison tests (α=.05). RESULTS There were no statistically significant differences in the shear bond strength between the control group and the light curing, pressure, and oxygen inhibition groups. However, the heat treatment groups showed statistically higher bond strengths than the groups treated without heat, and the groups treated at a higher temperature resulted in higher bond strengths. Statistically significant differences were seen between groups after different degrees of heat treatment, except in groups heated at 100℃ and 140℃. CONCLUSION Strong bonding can be achieved between a bis-acryl base and bis-acryl repair material after heat treatment. PMID:25722837

  3. Restoring the worn dentition.

    PubMed

    Ibsen, R L; Ouellet, D F

    1992-01-01

    Strong dental materials and dental porcelains are providing dentists with restorative opportunities that are more conservative because they require less destruction of healthy tooth structure and yield a more esthetic result. In cases of severe wear due to attrition, abrasion, and erosion, this process can be stopped, restoring the esthetics and function by using proper techniques and materials. The case report described in this article demonstrates the conservative restoration of severe wear due to attrition and erosion. Teeth were lengthened, wear was restored, and further wear was ceased by using a combination of bonded porcelain, a heat, light, and self-cure resin system, and a new glass-ionomer restorative material. The result was a strong, durable restoration (that required no anesthesia) with high esthetics.

  4. Thin resin coating by dual-application of all-in-one adhesives improves dentin bond strength of resin cements for indirect restorations.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Rena; Nikaido, Toru; Ariyoshi, Meu; Kitayama, Shuzo; Sadr, Alireza; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2010-10-01

    This study was evaluated the tensile bond strength (TBS) of resin cements to bovine dentin resin-coated with all-in-one adhesive systems. Each of the dual-polymerizing resin cements; Link Max, Clearfil Esthetic Cement, Bistite II and Chemiace II were used to bond indirect resin disks to bovine dentin, as control, or coated by single-application or by dual-application of an adhesive system from the same manufacturer; G-Bond, Clearfil Tri-S Bond, Tokuyama Bond Force and Hybrid-Coat (n=10). After 24-hour water storage, TBSs were measured. The fracture pattern and the adhesive interface were observed using an SEM. Dual-application of the adhesive yielded significantly higher TBSs compared to control and single-application groups for all materials (p<0.001). From the limited information of this study, it was concluded that dual-application of all-in-one adhesive systems created a thin coating on dentin, and significantly improved the bond strengths of resin cements.

  5. Thin resin coating by dual-application of all-in-one adhesives improves dentin bond strength of resin cements for indirect restorations.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Rena; Nikaido, Toru; Ariyoshi, Meu; Kitayama, Shuzo; Sadr, Alireza; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2010-10-01

    This study was evaluated the tensile bond strength (TBS) of resin cements to bovine dentin resin-coated with all-in-one adhesive systems. Each of the dual-polymerizing resin cements; Link Max, Clearfil Esthetic Cement, Bistite II and Chemiace II were used to bond indirect resin disks to bovine dentin, as control, or coated by single-application or by dual-application of an adhesive system from the same manufacturer; G-Bond, Clearfil Tri-S Bond, Tokuyama Bond Force and Hybrid-Coat (n=10). After 24-hour water storage, TBSs were measured. The fracture pattern and the adhesive interface were observed using an SEM. Dual-application of the adhesive yielded significantly higher TBSs compared to control and single-application groups for all materials (p<0.001). From the limited information of this study, it was concluded that dual-application of all-in-one adhesive systems created a thin coating on dentin, and significantly improved the bond strengths of resin cements. PMID:20823621

  6. British Society of Prosthodontics Debate on the Implications of the Minamata Convention on Mercury to Dental Amalgam--Should our Patients be Worried?.

    PubMed

    Austin, Rupert; Eliyas, Shiyana; Burke, F J Trevor; Taylor, Phil; Toner, James; Briggs, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, the Minamata Convention on Mercury called for a global phase-down of amalgam use, with a view to reduce environmental mercury pollution. This will significantly impact UK dentistry, given the still extensive use of amalgam in U.K. general dental practice. However, until now there has been little national discussion or debate. In Spring 2015, The British Society of Prosthodontics dedicated a significant part of its Annual Conference to debating the implications of this issue. Clinical case examples were discussed with audience interaction and voting facilitated using innovative Audience Response System Technology. A remarkable range of concerns and opinions were given. The debate elicited specific concerns amongst clinicians regarding the suitability of mercury-free alternatives to amalgam; particularly where cavities are large and extend beneath the gingival anatomy. There are also anecdotal reports of Dental Foundation (DF) dentists not being adequately taught the use of dental amalgam in undergraduate dental schools. CPD/CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Many clinicians, especially those treating patients for whom moisture control is challenging, feel that amalgam should remain available for clinicians to choose in certain clinical circumstances for the restoration of posterior teeth, even in the event of a complete phase-down.

  7. British Society of Prosthodontics Debate on the Implications of the Minamata Convention on Mercury to Dental Amalgam--Should our Patients be Worried?.

    PubMed

    Austin, Rupert; Eliyas, Shiyana; Burke, F J Trevor; Taylor, Phil; Toner, James; Briggs, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, the Minamata Convention on Mercury called for a global phase-down of amalgam use, with a view to reduce environmental mercury pollution. This will significantly impact UK dentistry, given the still extensive use of amalgam in U.K. general dental practice. However, until now there has been little national discussion or debate. In Spring 2015, The British Society of Prosthodontics dedicated a significant part of its Annual Conference to debating the implications of this issue. Clinical case examples were discussed with audience interaction and voting facilitated using innovative Audience Response System Technology. A remarkable range of concerns and opinions were given. The debate elicited specific concerns amongst clinicians regarding the suitability of mercury-free alternatives to amalgam; particularly where cavities are large and extend beneath the gingival anatomy. There are also anecdotal reports of Dental Foundation (DF) dentists not being adequately taught the use of dental amalgam in undergraduate dental schools. CPD/CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Many clinicians, especially those treating patients for whom moisture control is challenging, feel that amalgam should remain available for clinicians to choose in certain clinical circumstances for the restoration of posterior teeth, even in the event of a complete phase-down. PMID:27024898

  8. Mercury (Hg) burden in children: the impact of dental amalgam.

    PubMed

    Al-Saleh, Iman; Al-Sedairi, Al Anoud

    2011-07-15

    The risks and benefits of using mercury (Hg) in dental amalgam have long been debated. This study was designed to estimate Hg body burden and its association with dental amalgam fillings in 182 children (ages: 5-15 years) living in Taif City. Hg was measured in urine (UHg), hair (HHg) and toenails (NHg) by the Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer with Vapor Generator Accessory system. Urinary Hg levels were calculated as both micrograms per gram creatinine (μg/g creatinine) and micrograms per liter (μg/L). We found that children with amalgam fillings (N=106) had significantly higher UHg-C levels than children without (N=76), with means of 3.763 μg/g creatinine versus 3.457 μg/g creatinine, respectively (P=0.019). The results were similar for UHg (P=0.01). A similar pattern was also seen for HHg, with means of 0.614 μg/g (N=97) for children with amalgam versus 0.242 μg/g (N=74) for those without amalgam fillings (P=0). Although the mean NHg was higher in children without amalgam (0.222 μg/g, N=61) versus those with (0.163 μg/g, N=101), the relationship was not significant (P=0.069). After adjusting for many confounders, the multiple logistic regression model revealed that the levels of UHg-C and HHg were 2.047 and 5.396 times higher, respectively, in children with dental amalgam compared to those without (P<0.01). In contrast, a significant inverse relationship was seen between NHg levels and dental amalgam fillings (P=0.003). Despite the controversy surrounding the health impact of dental amalgam, this study showed some evidence that amalgam-associated Hg exposure might be related with symptoms of oral health, such as aphthous ulcer, white patches, and a burning-mouth sensation. Further studies are needed to reproduce these findings. The present study showed that significant numbers of children with or without amalgam had Hg levels exceeding the acceptable reference limits. The detrimental neurobehavioral and/or nephrotoxic effects of such an increased Hg on

  9. [Experience with amalgams manufactured by Southern Dental Industries (Australia)].

    PubMed

    Tarján, I; Gábris, K; Balaton, P; Dénes, J

    1990-09-01

    The gamma 2 phaseless amalgam of the firm Southern Dental Industries (SDI) was tested. None of the 205 fillings showed level deviations, unevenness, secondary caries and breakage. A minimum size gap was found in 2 cases.

  10. A scanning transmission electron microscopy study of two dental amalgams.

    PubMed

    Williams, K R

    1983-10-01

    Two fully aged amalgam alloys were examined using a scanning transmission electron microscope both in the transmission and scanning mode. The dispersed type amalgam containing a distribution of silver-copper spheres in addition to the Ag3Sn powder showed a markedly reduced gamma 1 grain size compared to a conventional Ag3Sn type amalgam. It is suggested that the increased compressive creep strength of the dispersed type material is a direct result of the reduced gamma 1 grain size and not due to a dispersion hardening effect from the cores of the remaining Ag-Cu spheres. Similarly, the formation of complex Cu-Sn intermediate phases at the Ag-Cu sphere surfaces are unlikely to lead to a dispersion strengthening effect. It is postulated that the reduced grain size in high copper amalgams is a consequence of the enhanced nucleating effect of a copper based phase on gamma 1. PMID:6640049

  11. Aggravated neuromuscular symptoms of mercury exposure from dental amalgam fillings.

    PubMed

    Akbal, Ayla; Yılmaz, Hınç; Tutkun, Engin; Köş, Durdu Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Dental amalgam fillings are widely used all over the world. However, their mercury content can lead to various side effects and clinical problems. Acute or chronic mercury exposure can cause several side effects on the central nerve system, renal and hepatic functions, immune system, fetal development and it can play a role on exacerbation of neuromuscular diseases. In this case, we will present a patient with vacuolar myopathy whose symptoms were started and aggravated with her dental amalgam fillings.

  12. Mercury from dental amalgam: exposure and risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Koral, Stephen M

    2013-02-01

    There has long been an undercurrent within the dental profession of anti-amalgam sentiment, a "mercury-free" movement. To assess whether anything is or is not scientifically wrong with amalgam, one must look to the vast literature on exposure, toxicology, and risk assessment of mercury. The subject of risk assessment goes straight to the heart of the debate over whether a malgam is safe, or not, for unrestricted use in dentistry in the population at large.

  13. Mercury recovery in situ of four different dental amalgam separators.

    PubMed

    Hylander, Lars D; Lindvall, Anders; Uhrberg, Roland; Gahnberg, Lars; Lindh, Ulf

    2006-07-31

    Amalgam separators are used to physically remove dental amalgam from waste water in dental clinics. They are thereby supposed to reduce mercury (Hg) emissions to the municipal waste water system to acceptable levels. We here present results from a comparative study in situ of three amalgam separators available on the market, all with a claimed efficiency of 99% according to Danish and ISO protocols, and using sedimentation as the principle of separation. We also present corresponding data for an investigational prototype of an improved separator. The obtained efficiency of the three commercial separators is far below what is stated by the manufacturer and by authorities assumed to be the efficiency in clinical conditions. They reduced Hg emissions by 79 - 91%, leaving an average Hg content in outgoing waste water of 1.5 mg L(-1). However, the prototype separator participating in this study retained 99.9% of the waste water Hg emissions, leaving an average Hg content in outgoing waste water of 0.004 mg L(-1). Physical restrictions prohibit sedimentary type separators to recover the Hg fractions causing the largest damages in wastewater treatment plants. This fraction is not considered in the ISO protocol for testing amalgam separators, which therefore needs to be revised. Abolishing the use of dental amalgam and cleaning the tubing systems is the most efficient long-term solution to reduce Hg emissions from dental clinics. Until then, Hg emissions originating from placing, polishing or removing existing amalgam fillings, should be counteracted by the use of low-emission amalgam separators, already on the market or presently being developed for use alone or together with sedimentary type amalgam separators. PMID:16182343

  14. Teaching the placement of posterior resin-based composite restorations in Spanish dental schools

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Christopher; McConnell, Robert; Wilson, Nairn

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: In an area of esthetic dentistry such as posterior composites, in which new materials and techniques are being devolved continuously, it is important to confirm that dental students have a clear understanding of the basic principles of clinical application of this knowledge. Considering that the preparation of dental graduates in Spain may be of interest to competent dental authorities and employers with whom they can work worldwide, this study investigated the teaching of posterior composite restorations in Spanish dental schools. Study design: In late 2009⁄ early 2010, a questionnaire seeking information on the teaching of posterior composites was emailed to the professor responsible for teaching operative dentistry in each of the fifteen dental schools having complete undergraduate dental degree programs in Spain. Results: The response rate was 100%. Most investigated topics did not show noteworthy differences depending on whether the schools were public or private. Variations were found among Spanish dental schools in both the amount and content of the teaching programs concerning posterior composite restorations. Differences were recorded in the teaching of cavity design, contraindications to composite placement, indications for liners and bases, matrix and wedging techniques, composite and bonding systems, light curing and finishing procedures for composite restorations. More consistency was observed in teaching methods of moisture-control, indirect composites and amalgam bonding. Conclusions: As recommended in previously surveyed countries, efforts must be made to promote harmonization of dental curricula to make it easier for graduates to work elsewhere, and to ensure they meet the needs of their patients on entering independent practice. Key words:Aesthetic dentistry, composite restoration, dental education, teaching program, undergraduate dental student. PMID:22322491

  15. High mercury emissions from dental clinics despite amalgam separators.

    PubMed

    Hylander, Lars D; Lindvall, Anders; Gahnberg, Lars

    2006-06-01

    Mercury (Hg) as amalgam has been used as a dental filling material for more than 150 years. Thereby, dentists and their patients have been directly exposed to Hg, and the public and the environment indirectly exposed via Hg emissions from incinerators and Hg in waste water from households and dental clinics. Due to the toxic properties of Hg and bioaccumulation in biota of Hg emitted via dental clinic waste water, amalgam separators were introduced in Sweden in the 1980s. Although these amalgam separators in the certification process are required to remove at least 95% of incoming Hg in a standardized laboratory test, their efficiency in practical use has not been properly investigated. Here we present actual Hg emissions via waste water from 12 dental clinics equipped with the same type of amalgam separator based on sedimentation. All waste water was collected for four consecutive working days, initially at ordinary operating conditions and a second time after a thorough revision and cleaning of the discharge system. The results indicate that mercury emissions from dental clinics can be reduced by an improved design of the discharge system, a sensible use of high pressure water cleaning, and regular maintenance, including replacement of amalgam separators and filters at certain intervals. The study also indicates that banning Hg in dentistry is the one long-term way to stop Hg emissions from dental amalgam.

  16. Corrosion of dental amalgams in solutions of organic acids.

    PubMed

    Palaghias, G

    1986-06-01

    A conventional and two high copper amalgams were tested in 0.5% aqueous solutions of acetic, formic, lactic and succinic acid. The corrosion behavior of the amalgams in the different solutions was evaluated by analyzing the soluble corrosion products using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer every month during a 6-month experimental period. The high copper amalgams showed a high dissolution rate in formic and lactic acid solutions from the initial stages of immersion when compared to the conventional. Later a marked decrease of the dissolution rate could be observed but it still remained at high levels. In acetic acid the amounts of elements dissolved from high copper amalgams were much less. Conventional amalgam released much smaller amounts of elements in almost all solutions tested except in the case of silver in lactic acid. Finally, in succinic acid solution, the amounts of elements dissolved were unexpectedly small considering the low pH of the solution and the dissolution rates of the amalgams in the other organic acid solutions. PMID:3461548

  17. Association between caries location and restorative material treatment provided

    PubMed Central

    Lubisich, Erinne B.; Hilton, Thomas J.; Ferracane, Jack L.; Pashova, Hristina I.; Burton, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This cross-sectional study by the Northwest PRECEDENT practitioners correlated the location of caries diagnosed in the past 12 months with treatment provided. Methods An oral health survey was conducted on up to 20 patients per practice for 101 practices in the Northwest PRECEDENT network. A total of 1943 eligible patients were randomly assessed for the location of and treatment provided for caries lesions diagnosed within the past 12 months. Regression analysis using Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE) was performed to assess association of treatment to tooth location and surface characterization, adjusting for age, practice location (urban/rural), dentist gender, and experience level. The analysis accounts for clustering by practice using robust variance estimates. Results Overall, 55.4% of patients exhibited recent caries and 42.8% received treatment for at least one permanent tooth. 18% of treated teeth were treated with amalgam, and 72% were treated with composite. This percentage varied as a function of tooth surface characteristics, patient characteristics, and dentist characteristics. The results suggest that restoration selection does depend on tooth type and which surfaces are being restored. The odds of a molar receiving an amalgam restoration are 2.44 (95% CI=1.81–3.30) times higher as compared to a bicuspid, adjusting for all other covariates. When the restoration includes the occlusal surface of a tooth the odds are 0.42 (95% CI=0.20–0.89) times as great that amalgam will be placed. When the restoration includes the mesial or distal surface of the tooth the odds for amalgam restoration are 2.49 (95% CI=1.25–4.95) times higher compared to when it does not include these surfaces. Conclusion Restorative material choice varied based on caries location and practitioner gender. PMID:21256915

  18. Determination of ablation threshold for composite resins and amalgam irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, A. Z.; Freschi, L. R.; Samad, R. E.; Zezell, D. M.; Gouw-Soares, S. C.; Vieira, N. D., Jr.

    2010-03-01

    The use of laser for caries removal and cavity preparation is already a reality in the dental clinic. The objective of the present study was to consider the viability of ultrashort laser pulses for restorative material selective removal, by determining the ablation threshold fluence for composite resins and amalgam irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses. Lasers pulses centered at 830 nm with 50 fs of duration and 1 kHz of repetition rate, with energies in the range of 300 to 770 μJ were used to irradiate the samples. The samples were irradiated using two different geometrical methods for ablation threshold fluence determinations and the volume ablation was measured by optical coherence tomography. The shape of the ablated surfaces were analyzed by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The determined ablation threshold fluence is 0.35 J/cm2 for the composite resins Z-100 and Z-350, and 0.25 J/cm2 for the amalgam. These values are half of the value for enamel in this temporal regime. Thermal damages were not observed in the samples. Using the OCT technique (optical coherence tomography) was possible to determine the ablated volume and the total mass removed.

  19. The Chemical Forms of Mercury in Aged and Fresh Dental Amalgam Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    George, Graham N.; Singh, Satya P.; Hoover, Jay; Pickering, Ingrid J.

    2009-01-01

    Mercury-containing dental amalgam is known to be a source of human exposure to mercury. We have explored the use of electron-yield Hg LIII X-ray absorption spectroscopy to characterize the chemical nature of dental amalgam surfaces. We find that the method is practical, and that it shows extensive mercury depletion in the surface of the aged amalgam with significant differences between old and fresh amalgam surfaces. Whereas the fresh amalgam gives spectra that are typical of metallic mercury, the aged amalgam is predominantly β-mercuric sulfide. The toxicological implications of these results are discussed. PMID:19842619

  20. Conservative approach to restore the first molar with extensive destruction: A 30-month follow-up.

    PubMed

    Mondelli, Rafael Francisco; Azevedo, Larissa Marinho; Silva, Luciana Mendonça; Garrido, Ana Miriam; Ishikiriama, Sérgio Kiyoshi; Mondelli, José

    2013-01-01

    The available options for restoring multiple surface cavities are: amalgam, composite resin, or indirect restorations. Adhesive system and intradentinal pin-retained composite resin restorations should have a similar performance to pin-retained amalgam, regarding resistance to support occlusal forces. Polymerization shrinkage is a major concern when performing direct posterior composite resin restorations and the incremental insertion technique can provide less stress and outstanding margin behavior. Intradentinal pins can potentially enhance composite resin's retention, while reducing gaps caused by polymerization shrinkage. This article reports a clinical case involving an extensive restoration on a posterior tooth with cusp loss that was successfully treated using an intradentinal pin and direct nano-hybrid composite resin restoration. PMID:23534051

  1. [Restoration materials in overdenture abutment teeth].

    PubMed

    Keltjens, H M; Creugers, T J; van 't Hof, M A; Creugers, N H

    2000-08-01

    To assess the performance of amalgam, resin composite and resin-modified glass ionomer cement as filling material in overdenture abutment teeth, 155 restorations were made to seal the root canal orifices in 49 patients. The three restorative materials were randomly assigned to the abutment teeth using a number of balancing criteria. All patients were reviewed every six months and received the same preventive regimen. Survival was assessed at two levels: complete survival even without maintenance treatments (Scomp) and survival of the original restoration independent from eventual maintenance treatments (Sorig). The calculated overall survival of Sorig and Scomp were 63 +/- 6% and 57 +/- 6% respectively (mean +/- SE). At both levels no statistically significant differences were observed between the survival of the investigated materials. The results of this study did not point out a superior restorative material for the seal of root canal orifices of overdenture abutment teeth. The distribution of failures over the patients indicated a certain patient dependency.

  2. Mercury Vapor Sorption and Amalgamation with a Thin Gold Film.

    PubMed

    Hou, Tingting; Chen, Miao; Greene, George W; Horn, Roger G

    2015-10-21

    Understanding the amalgamation mechanisms between mercury and gold is of fundamental interest and importance to many mercury sensing applications. However, there is only limited and piecemeal discussion in the literature of the mechanisms by which Au-Hg amalgams are formed on thin Au films. Here, we present a comprehensive description of a series of morphological changes occurring in a thin polycrystalline Au film during Au-Hg amalgamation investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). These microscopic investigations enable us to offer a coherent explanation for the features and the mechanisms of amalgamation of Hg with Au in the film. We also use an optical technique (fringes of equal chromatic order, FECO) to observe changes in optical thickness and reflectivity of the film. Amalgamation reactions in the film render it inhomogeneous, thus making optical techniques unsuitable as a method for quantitative monitoring of Hg vapor using Au films of this type.

  3. Silver-tin alloys and amalgams: electrochemical considerations.

    PubMed

    Mueller, H J

    1980-01-01

    The corrosion potential and anodic polarization profiles of a representative number of silver-tin alloys and their corresponding amalgams in a physiological solution were determined and compared to their microstructures. For the alloys with tin-content greater than 27%(wt) and for all amalgams, the corrosion process is related to the attack of free tin for the alloys and to the gamma-2 tin for the amalgams. The gamma-2 concentration in the amalgams increases with an increase in tin-content. For alloys with tin-content less than 27%, the corrosion process is even more restricted than for the process observed with pure silver. From a developed theory based upon the potential-time and polarization results, association of the O2 reduction process on a SnO cathodic film to an intermediate specie of H2O2 is made. The rate of H2O2 decomposition on a SnO surface in a four electron process is thought to control the O2 reduction overvoltage. The O2 reduction overvoltage decreases with increases in the silver-content of the amalgam, particularily seen with the 8 and 12% tin compositions. Due to the polarization induced corrosion process, a phase with high silver and high mercury concentrations was observed over the unreacted particles.

  4. Monte Carlo dose calculation in dental amalgam phantom.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Mohd Zahri Abdul; Yusoff, A L; Osman, N D; Abdullah, R; Rabaie, N A; Salikin, M S

    2015-01-01

    It has become a great challenge in the modern radiation treatment to ensure the accuracy of treatment delivery in electron beam therapy. Tissue inhomogeneity has become one of the factors for accurate dose calculation, and this requires complex algorithm calculation like Monte Carlo (MC). On the other hand, computed tomography (CT) images used in treatment planning system need to be trustful as they are the input in radiotherapy treatment. However, with the presence of metal amalgam in treatment volume, the CT images input showed prominent streak artefact, thus, contributed sources of error. Hence, metal amalgam phantom often creates streak artifacts, which cause an error in the dose calculation. Thus, a streak artifact reduction technique was applied to correct the images, and as a result, better images were observed in terms of structure delineation and density assigning. Furthermore, the amalgam density data were corrected to provide amalgam voxel with accurate density value. As for the errors of dose uncertainties due to metal amalgam, they were reduced from 46% to as low as 2% at d80 (depth of the 80% dose beyond Zmax) using the presented strategies. Considering the number of vital and radiosensitive organs in the head and the neck regions, this correction strategy is suggested in reducing calculation uncertainties through MC calculation.

  5. Dental amalgam: few proven harmful effects but many ongoing concerns.

    PubMed

    2008-12-01

    (1) Dental amalgam is one of the main sources of exposure to mercury in industrialised countries; (2) At high doses, mercury is both neurotoxic and nephrotoxic. A suspected link exists between chronic exposure to low doses of mercury derived from dental amalgam and renal, neurodegenerative or neurobehavioural disorders, but it has not been established; (3) Some individual cases are troubling, but epidemiological studies show no major effects in the general population. Various hypotheses have been proposed to explain why some people may be more sensitive than others to the effects of low-dose mercury; (4) More and more countries, especially Sweden, recommend that the use of amalgam should be restricted, particularly in pregnant women and children; (5) As part of a global strategy to eliminate mercury, the European Parliament has asked the Commission to draft legislation limiting the use of mercury in dental amalgam; (6) Evaluation of the risk-benefit balances of alternatives to dental amalgam does not provide sufficient data on which to base an informed choice between available options.

  6. Comparison of release of mercury from three dental amalgams.

    PubMed

    Chew, C L; Soh, G; Lee, A S; Yeoh, T S

    1989-07-01

    Mercury release from dental amalgams has generated considerable concern in recent years and is the subject of this study. Specimens of one admixed high-copper amalgam (Contour), one lathe-cut low-copper amalgam (SDI), and a new tin- and copper-free amalgam claimed to be non-mercury-releasing (Composil) were evaluated for release of mercury when incubated in purified water at 37 degrees C. Measurement of mercury was done by cold-vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometry, and the amount released was expressed as micrograms/cm2/24 hr. Study was conducted over a four-week period. Results show that Contour and SDI released similar insignificant amounts (mean release of less than 0.1 microgram/cm2/24 hr) compared with Composil (mean release of 41.0 micrograms/cm2/24 hr). The difference in release by Composil compared with that by Contour and SDI is highly significant (P less than 0.001). The implications of chronic release of mercury from dental amalgams are discussed. Long-term release studies are in progress.

  7. Mechanical Properties Comparing Composite Fiber Length to Amalgam

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Richard C.; Liu, Perng-Ru

    2016-01-01

    Photocure fiber-reinforced composites (FRCs) with varying chopped quartz-fiber lengths were incorporated into a dental photocure zirconia-silicate particulate-filled composite (PFC) for mechanical test comparisons with a popular commercial spherical-particle amalgam. FRC lengths included 0.5-mm, 1.0 mm, 2.0 mm, and 3.0 mm all at a constant 28.2 volume percent. Four-point fully articulated fixtures were used according to American Standards Test Methods with sample dimensions of 2×2×50 mm3 across a 40 mm span to provide sufficient Euler flexural bending and prevent top-load compressive shear error. Mechanical properties for flexural strength, modulus, yield strength, resilience, work of fracture, critical strain energy release, critical stress intensity factor, and strain were obtained for comparison. Fiber length subsequently correlated with increasing all mechanical properties, p < 1.1×10−5. Although the modulus was significantly statistically higher for amalgam than all composites, all FRCs and even the PFC had higher values than amalgam for all other mechanical properties. Because amalgams provide increased longevity during clinical use compared to the standard PFCs, modulus would appear to be a mechanical property that might sufficiently reduce margin interlaminar shear stress and strain-related microcracking that could reduce failure rates. Also, since FRCs were tested with all mechanical properties that statistically significantly increased over the PFC, new avenues for future development could be provided toward surpassing amalgam in clinical longevity. PMID:27642629

  8. Mechanical Properties Comparing Composite Fiber Length to Amalgam

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Richard C.; Liu, Perng-Ru

    2016-01-01

    Photocure fiber-reinforced composites (FRCs) with varying chopped quartz-fiber lengths were incorporated into a dental photocure zirconia-silicate particulate-filled composite (PFC) for mechanical test comparisons with a popular commercial spherical-particle amalgam. FRC lengths included 0.5-mm, 1.0 mm, 2.0 mm, and 3.0 mm all at a constant 28.2 volume percent. Four-point fully articulated fixtures were used according to American Standards Test Methods with sample dimensions of 2×2×50 mm3 across a 40 mm span to provide sufficient Euler flexural bending and prevent top-load compressive shear error. Mechanical properties for flexural strength, modulus, yield strength, resilience, work of fracture, critical strain energy release, critical stress intensity factor, and strain were obtained for comparison. Fiber length subsequently correlated with increasing all mechanical properties, p < 1.1×10−5. Although the modulus was significantly statistically higher for amalgam than all composites, all FRCs and even the PFC had higher values than amalgam for all other mechanical properties. Because amalgams provide increased longevity during clinical use compared to the standard PFCs, modulus would appear to be a mechanical property that might sufficiently reduce margin interlaminar shear stress and strain-related microcracking that could reduce failure rates. Also, since FRCs were tested with all mechanical properties that statistically significantly increased over the PFC, new avenues for future development could be provided toward surpassing amalgam in clinical longevity.

  9. Mercury Vapor Sorption and Amalgamation with a Thin Gold Film.

    PubMed

    Hou, Tingting; Chen, Miao; Greene, George W; Horn, Roger G

    2015-10-21

    Understanding the amalgamation mechanisms between mercury and gold is of fundamental interest and importance to many mercury sensing applications. However, there is only limited and piecemeal discussion in the literature of the mechanisms by which Au-Hg amalgams are formed on thin Au films. Here, we present a comprehensive description of a series of morphological changes occurring in a thin polycrystalline Au film during Au-Hg amalgamation investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). These microscopic investigations enable us to offer a coherent explanation for the features and the mechanisms of amalgamation of Hg with Au in the film. We also use an optical technique (fringes of equal chromatic order, FECO) to observe changes in optical thickness and reflectivity of the film. Amalgamation reactions in the film render it inhomogeneous, thus making optical techniques unsuitable as a method for quantitative monitoring of Hg vapor using Au films of this type. PMID:26486235

  10. Surface characterization of amalgam made with Hg-In liquid alloy.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, H; Akaiwa, Y; Hashimoto, H; Ferracane, J L; Okabe, T

    1997-01-01

    When amalgam was triturated with Hg-In liquid alloys instead of pure mercury, the resultant amalgams released a significantly smaller amount of mercury vapor during setting. To understand the mechanisms responsible for the drastic decrease in mercury evaporation from the In-containing amalgam, we used Auger Electron Spectroscopy to examine surface oxide films on amalgams made with Hg-10 wt% In or pure mercury. The surface of the In-containing amalgam was rapidly covered with both indium and tin oxide films. Greater amounts of oxygen were found on the gamma 1 Ag-Hg matrix in the In-containing amalgam than in the amalgam without indium. The rapid formation of the oxide film contributes to a reduction in the mercury release from the In-containing amalgam by forming an effective barrier to evaporation. PMID:9042085

  11. Integrated starting and running amalgam assembly for an electrodeless fluorescent lamp

    DOEpatents

    Borowiec, Joseph Christopher; Cocoma, John Paul; Roberts, Victor David

    1998-01-01

    An integrated starting and running amalgam assembly for an electrodeless SEF fluorescent lamp includes a wire mesh amalgam support constructed to jointly optimize positions of a starting amalgam and a running amalgam in the lamp, thereby optimizing mercury vapor pressure in the lamp during both starting and steady-state operation in order to rapidly achieve and maintain high light output. The wire mesh amalgam support is constructed to support the starting amalgam toward one end thereof and the running amalgam toward the other end thereof, and the wire mesh is rolled for friction-fitting within the exhaust tube of the lamp. The positions of the starting and running amalgams on the wire mesh are jointly optimized such that high light output is achieved quickly and maintained, while avoiding any significant reduction in light output between starting and running operation.

  12. FRIENDSHIP CHOICES OF MULTIRACIAL ADOLESCENTS: RACIAL HOMOPHILY, BLENDING, OR AMALGAMATION?*

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Jamie Mihoko; Kao, Grace

    2009-01-01

    Using the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health), we utilize the concepts of homophily, blending, and amalgamation to describe the possible friendship patterns of multiracials. Homophily occurs when multiracials are most likely to choose other multiracials as friends. Blending occurs when friendship patterns of multiracials are somewhere in-between those of their monoracial counterparts. Amalgamation consists of friendship patterns that are similar to one of their monoracial counterparts. All groups exhibit signs of amalgamation such that non-white multiracials resemble Blacks, and White multiracials resemble whites except for Black-White multiracials. Black-Whites, Asian-Whites, and Asian-Blacks also exhibit signs of blending, while only Native American multiracials show signs of homophily. Multiracials have different experiences depending on their specific racial composition, and while they seem to bridge the distance between racial groups, their friendship patterns also fall along Black and White lines. PMID:19727415

  13. Effects of palladium addition on properties of dental amalgams.

    PubMed

    Chung, K

    1992-05-01

    Palladium-containing amalgam alloys were developed utilizing the atomization method. Single-compositional type alloys were fabricated and palladium was substituted for silver in concentrations up to 5 w/o. Alloy powder with a particle size of less than 45 microns was collected and triturated with mercury. Creep, compressive strength and dimensional change tests were performed according to ADA Specification No. 1 along with controls of Tytin, Valiant and Valiant-Ph.D. Values for creep decreased and compressive strength increased markedly with additions of palladium. Current densities of the experimental amalgams containing palladium were determined to be an order of magnitude less than the original amalgams in the electrochemical test. A trend of positive relationships between properties and palladium additions was indicated.

  14. Modified bonded bridge space maintainer.

    PubMed

    Liegeois, F; Limme, M

    1999-01-01

    The premature loss of primary teeth can create the need for space maintenance and restoration of function. This article presents a fixed bonded space maintainer, which allows space to be maintained with economy of dental tissues.

  15. An estimate for the rank of the intersection of subgroups in free amalgamated products of two groups with normal finite amalgamated subgroup

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharov, Alexander O

    2013-02-28

    We generalize the estimate for the rank of intersection of subgroups in free products of groups, proved earlier by Ivanov and Dicks (which is analogous to the Hanna Neumann inequality in free groups) to the case of free amalgamated products of groups with normal finite amalgamated subgroup. We also prove that the estimate obtained is sharp and cannot be further improved when the amalgamated product contains an involution. Bibliography: 11 titles.

  16. Solidification/Stabilization of Elemental Mercury Waste by Amalgamation

    SciTech Connect

    Yim, S. P.; Ahn, B. G.; Lee, H. J.; Shon, J. S.; Chung, H.; Kim, K. J.; Lee, C. K.

    2003-02-24

    Experiments on solidification of elemental mercury waste were conducted by amalgamation with several metal powders such as copper, zinc, tin, brass and bronze. Unlike the previous studies which showed a dispersible nature after solidification, the waste forms were found to possess quite large compressive strengths in both copper and bronze amalgam forms. The durability was also confirmed by showing very minor changes of strength after 90 days of water immersion. Leachability from the amalgam forms is also shown to be low: measured mercury concentration in the leachate by the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) was well below the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) limit. Long term leaching behavior by Accelerated Leach Test (ALT) has shown that the leaching process was dominated by diffusion and the effective diffusion coefficient was quite low (around 10-19 cm2/sec). The mercury vapor concentration from the amalgam forms were reduced to a 20% level of that for elemental mercury and to one-hundredth after 3 months.

  17. Management of large radicular cyst associated with amalgam particles in cystic lining.

    PubMed

    Borkar, Swati A; Dhupar, Vikas; Gadkar, Abhilasha M; Nivedita, C K V S

    2016-01-01

    The failure of amalgam retrofilling and presence of an associated cystic lesion makes surgical endodontic intervention inevitable. Amalgam retrofilling can also give rise to mucoperiosteal tattoo formation and allow incorporation of amalgam particles in the cystic lining. Such a finding has not yet been reported in the endodontic literature. This case report describes the successful endodontic management of a large radicular cyst associated with failed amalgam retrofilling, mucoperiosteal tattoo and amalgam particles dispersed in the epithelial cystic lining. All four mandibular incisors associated with the lesion presented with Weine Type II canal anatomy. The follow-up revealed clinical and radiographic signs of healing. PMID:27217645

  18. Management of large radicular cyst associated with amalgam particles in cystic lining

    PubMed Central

    Borkar, Swati A.; Dhupar, Vikas; Gadkar, Abhilasha M.; Nivedita, C.K.V.S.

    2016-01-01

    The failure of amalgam retrofilling and presence of an associated cystic lesion makes surgical endodontic intervention inevitable. Amalgam retrofilling can also give rise to mucoperiosteal tattoo formation and allow incorporation of amalgam particles in the cystic lining. Such a finding has not yet been reported in the endodontic literature. This case report describes the successful endodontic management of a large radicular cyst associated with failed amalgam retrofilling, mucoperiosteal tattoo and amalgam particles dispersed in the epithelial cystic lining. All four mandibular incisors associated with the lesion presented with Weine Type II canal anatomy. The follow-up revealed clinical and radiographic signs of healing. PMID:27217645

  19. Costing dental restorations in public sector dental clinics.

    PubMed

    Khairiyah, Abdul Muttalib; Razak, Ishak Abdul; Raja-Latifah, Raja Jalludin; Tan, Bee Siew; Norain, Abu Talib; Noor-Aliyah, Ismail; Natifah, Che Salleh; Rauzi, Ismail

    2009-04-01

    The objective of this study is to share cost analysis methodology and to obtain cost estimates for posterior restorations in public sector dental clinics. Two urban and 2 rural dental clinics in Selangor state were selected. Only cases of 1 posterior restoration per visit by dental officers were included over 6 months. One capsulated amalgam type, 1 capsulated tooth-colored, and 1 non-capsulated tooth-colored material were selected. A clinical pathway form was formulated to collect data per patient. Annual capital and recurrent expenditures were collected per clinic. The mean cost of an amalgam restoration was RM 30.96 (sdRM 7.86); and tooth-colored restorations ranged from RM 33.00 (sdRM 8.43) to RM 41.10 (sdRM 10.61). Wherein 1 USD = RM 2.8. Restoration costs were 35% to 55% higher in clinics in rural areas than in urban areas. The findings demonstrate economy of scale for clinic operation and restoration costs with higher patient load. Costs per restoration were higher in rural than in urban dental clinics. More studies are recommended to address the dearth of dental costs data in Malaysia.

  20. Reasons for Placement of Restorations on Previously Unrestored Tooth Surfaces by Dental PBRN Dentists

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Marcelle M.; Gordan, Valeria V.; Qvist, Vibeke; Litaker, Mark S.; Rindal, D. Brad; Williams, O.D.; Fellows, Jeffrey L.; Ritchie, Lloyd K.; Mjör, Ivar A.; McClelland, Jocelyn; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To identify and quantify the reasons for placing restorations on unrestored permanent tooth surfaces and the dental materials used by Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN; www.DentalPBRN.org) dentists. Methods A total of 229 DPBRN practitioner-investigators collected data on 9,890 consecutive restorations from 5,810 patients. Information included: (1) reasons for restoring; (2) tooth and surfaces restored; and (3) restorative materials employed. Results Primary caries (85%) and non-carious defects (15%), which included abrasion/ abfraction/ erosion lesions and tooth fracture, were the main reasons for placement of restorations. Restorations due to caries were frequently placed on occlusal surfaces (49%), followed by distal, mesial, buccal/facial, lingual/palatal, and incisal surfaces. Amalgam was used for 46% of the molar and 45% of the premolar restorations. Directly placed resin-based composite (RBC) was used for 48% of the molar, 49% of the premolar, and 92% of the anterior restorations. Conclusion Dental caries on occlusal and proximal surfaces of molar teeth are the main reasons for placing restorations on previously unrestored tooth surfaces by DPBRN practitioner-investigators. RBC is the material most commonly used for occlusal and anterior restorations. Amalgam remains the material of choice to restore proximal caries in posterior teeth, although there are significant differences by DPBRN region. PMID:20354094

  1. Compositions of surface layers formed on amalgams in air, water, and saline.

    PubMed

    Hanawa, T; Gnade, B E; Ferracane, J L; Okabe, T; Watari, F

    1993-12-01

    The surface layers formed on both a zinc-free and a zinc-containing dental amalgam after polishing and aging in air, water, or saline, were characterized using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to determine the compositions of the surface layers which might govern the release of mercury from amalgam. The XPS data revealed that the formation of the surface layer on the zinc-containing amalgam was affected by the environment in which the amalgam was polished and aged, whereas that on the zinc-free amalgam was not affected. In addition, among the elements contained in amalgam, zinc was the most reactive with the environment, and was preferentially dissolved from amalgam into water or saline. Mercury atoms existed in the metallic state in the surface layer.

  2. River restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohl, Ellen; Angermeier, Paul L.; Bledsoe, Brian; Kondolf, G. Mathias; Macdonnell, Larry; Merritt, David M.; Palmer, Margaret A.; Poff, N. Leroy; Tarboton, David

    2005-10-01

    River restoration is at the forefront of applied hydrologic science. However, many river restoration projects are conducted with minimal scientific context. We propose two themes around which a research agenda to advance the scientific basis for river restoration can be built. First, because natural variability is an inherent feature of all river systems, we hypothesize that restoration of process is more likely to succeed than restoration aimed at a fixed end point. Second, because physical, chemical, and biological processes are interconnected in complex ways across watersheds and across timescales, we hypothesize that restoration projects are more likely to be successful in achieving goals if undertaken in the context of entire watersheds. To achieve restoration objectives, the science of river restoration must include (1) an explicit recognition of the known complexities and uncertainties, (2) continued development of a theoretical framework that enables us to identify generalities among river systems and to ask relevant questions, (3) enhancing the science and use of restoration monitoring by measuring the most effective set of variables at the correct scales of measurement, (4) linking science and implementation, and (5) developing methods of restoration that are effective within existing constraints. Key limitations to river restoration include a lack of scientific knowledge of watershed-scale process dynamics, institutional structures that are poorly suited to large-scale adaptive management, and a lack of political support to reestablish delivery of the ecosystem amenities lost through river degradation. This paper outlines an approach for addressing these shortcomings.

  3. [The application of universal adhesives in dental bonding].

    PubMed

    Guo, Jingmei; Lei, Wenlong; Yang, Hongye; Huang, Cui

    2016-03-01

    The bonding restoration has become an important clinical technique for the development of dental bonding technology. Because of its easy operation and the maximum preservation of tooth tissues, bonding repair is widely used in dental restoration. The recent multi-mode universal adhesives have brought new progress in dental bonding restoration. In this article the universal adhesives were reviewed according to its definition, development, improvement, application features and possible problems.

  4. A study of the fracture resistance of nyyar cores of three restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Ferrier, Stephen; Sekhon, Balraj S; Brunton, Paul A

    2008-01-01

    Despite the successful use of dental amalgam for coronal-radicular dowel and core build-up in endodontically-treated posterior teeth, newer materials offer many potential advantages over amalgam and have better patient acceptance. This study compared the fracture resistance of coronal-radicular restorations made from three different direct restorative materials. Sixty human premolars were selected, 45 of which were root treated and decoronated. Fifteen of these premolars were restored using amalgam, 15 with composite and 15 using resin-modified glass ionomer. The 15 unrestored teeth were used as a control group. All the teeth were mounted in acrylic within steel containers and subjected to compressive loading to failure on a universal testing machine. The force required to fracture each core specimen was recorded as well as the proportion of core lost due to failure. The results showed dental amalgam as having the highest fracture resistance (mean 1.93kN, sd 0.22) followed by resin-modified glass ionomer (mean 1.05kN, sd 0.20), sound tooth (mean 0.79kN, sd 0.20) and composite (mean 0.75kN, sd 0.11). The differences among all groups were significant. These results demonstrate that, although resin-modified glass ionomer is significantly weaker than amalgam, these restorations were stronger than unrestored teeth and failed at forces in excess of those encountered in normal mastication. Amalgam cores, along with resin-modified glass ionomer, tended to fail less catastrophically than the other materials and, given their strength, would remain the material of choice in situations where abnormally high forces are expected.

  5. The Microfloral Analysis of Secondary Caries Biofilm around Class I and Class II Composite and Amalgam Fillings

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Secondary caries is responsible for 60 percent of all replacement restorations in the typical dental practice. The diversity of the bacterial sources and the different types of filling materials could play a role in secondary caries. The aim of this study was to determine and compare the microbial spectrum of secondary caries biofilms around amalgam and composite resin restorations. Methods Clinical samples were collected from freshly extracted teeth diagnosed with clinical secondary caries. Samples were categorized into four groups according to the types of restoration materials and the classification of the cavity. Biofilms were harvested from the tooth-restoration interface using a dental explorer and after dilution were incubated on special agars. The bacteria were identified using the biochemical appraisal system. Statistical calculations were carried out using SPSS11.5 software to analyze the prevalence of the bacteria involved in secondary caries. Results Samples from a total of four groups were collected: two groups were collected from amalgam restorations, each had 21 samples from both Class I and Class II caries; and the other two groups were from composite resin restorations, each had 13 samples from both class I and class II caries. Our results showed: (1) Anaerobic species were dominant in both restoration materials. (2) In terms of the types of individual bacteria, no significant differences were found among the four groups according to the geometric mean of the detected bacteria (P > 0.05). However, there were significant differences among the detected bacteria within each group (P < 0.05). The composition of each bacterium had no statistical difference among the four groups (P > 0.05), but showed significant differences among the detected bacteria in each group (P < 0.05). (3) Among the four groups, there were no significant differences for the detection rate of each bacterium (P > 0.05), however, the detection rate of each bacterium

  6. Guidelines for Direct Adhesive Composite Restoration.

    PubMed

    Society Of Cariology And Endodontology, Chinese Stomatological Association Csa

    2015-01-01

    Direct adhesive composite restoration, a technique to restore tooth defects by bonding composite resin materials, has been widely used in the restoration of dental caries or other tooth defects. Retention of composite resin restoration mainly relies on bonding strength between the materials and dental tissue. The clinical outcomes rely greatly on the regulated clinical practice of dentists. In 2011, the Society of Cariology and Endodontology of Chinese Stomatological Association (CSA) published the 'Practices and evaluation criteria of composite resin bonded restoration (Discussion Version)'. Since then, opinions and comments regarding the 'Discussion Version' have been widely circulated within the Society. The final version of the guideline was based on systematic reviews of scientific literature and requirements for the edit of technical guidelines, and through several rounds of discussions, revisions and supplements. The society recommends this guideline for clinicians to use in their practices, when conducting direct composite restorations.

  7. Exploiting the higher specificity of silver amalgamation: selective detection of mercury(II) by forming Ag/Hg amalgam.

    PubMed

    Deng, Li; Ouyang, Xiangyuan; Jin, Jianyu; Ma, Cheng; Jiang, Ying; Zheng, Jing; Li, Jishan; Li, Yinhui; Tan, Weihong; Yang, Ronghua

    2013-09-17

    Heavy metal ion pollution poses severe risks in human health and the environment. Driven by the need to detect trace amounts of mercury, this article demonstrates, for the first time, that silver/mercury amalgamation, combining with DNA-protected silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), can be used for rapid, easy and reliable screening of Hg(2+) ions with high sensitivity and selectivity over competing analytes. In our proposed approach, Hg(2+) detection is achieved by reducing the mercury species to elemental mercury, silver atoms were chosen as the mercury atoms' acceptors by forming Ag/Hg amalgam. To signal fluorescently this silver amalgamation event, a FAM-labeled ssDNA was employed as the signal reporter. AgNPs were grown on the DNA strand that resulted in greatly quenching the FAM fluorescence. Formation of Ag/Hg amalgam suppresses AgNPs growth on the DNA, leading to fluorescence signal increase relative to the fluorescence without Hg(2+) ions, as well as marked by fluorescence quenching. This FAM fluorescence enhancement can be used for detection of Hg(2+) at the a few nanomolar level. Moreover, due to excellent specificity of silver amalgamation with mercury, the sensing system is highly selective for Hg(2+) and does not respond to other metal ions with up to millimolar concentration levels. This sensor is successfully applied to determination of Hg(2+) in tap water, spring water and river water samples. The results shown herein have important implications in the development of new fluorescent sensors for the fast, easy, and selective detection and quantification of Hg(2+) in environmental and biological samples. PMID:23937672

  8. Introducing the Clark Class II restoration.

    PubMed

    Clark, David

    2007-10-01

    As we introduce the concepts summarized in this article to practicing dentists, they show a broad spectrum of responses from shock and disbelief to sheer exuberance. As these cavity shapes are implemented we will see a dramatic reduction in the rate of tooth fracturing. We also anticipate that these restorations will outlast the class II amalgams that have served so well in the past. This very brief article can only touch on the dramatic differences of this minimally traumatic and incredibly durable direct composite. A full instructional DVD together with a textbook and hands-on courses are available and recommended.

  9. Restoring primary anterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Waggoner, William F

    2002-01-01

    A variety of esthetic restorative materials are available for restoring primary incisors. Knowledge of the specific strengths, weakness, and properties of each material will enhance the clinician's ability to make the best choice of selection for each individual situation. Intracoronal restorations of primary teeth may utilize resin composites, glass ionomer cements, resin-modified ionomers, or polyacid-modified resins. Each has distinct advantages and disadvantages and the clinical conditions of placement may be a strong determining factor as to which material is utilized. Full coronal restoration of primary incisors may be indicated for a number of reasons. Crowns available for restoration of primary incisors include those that are directly bonded onto the tooth, which generally are a resin material, and those crowns that are luted onto the tooth and are some type of stainless steel crown. However, due to lack of supporting clinical data, none of the crowns can be said to be superior to the others under all circumstances. Though caries in the mandibular region is rare, restorative solutions for mandibular incisors are needed. Neither stainless steel crowns nor celluloid crown forms are made specifically for mandibular incisors. Many options exist to repair carious primary incisors, but there is insufficient controlled, clinical data to suggest that one type of restoration is superior to another. This does not discount the fact that dentists have been using many of these crowns for years with much success. Operator preferences, esthetic demands by parents, the child's behavior, and moisture and hemorrhage control are all variables which affect the decision and ultimate outcome of whatever restorative treatment is chosen.

  10. Restoring primary anterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Waggoner, William F

    2002-01-01

    A variety of esthetic restorative materials are available for restoring primary incisors. Knowledge of the specific strengths, weakness, and properties of each material will enhance the clinician's ability to make the best choice of selection for each individual situation. Intracoronal restorations of primary teeth may utilize resin composites, glass ionomer cements, resin-modified ionomers, or polyacid-modified resins. Each has distinct advantages and disadvantages and the clinical conditions of placement may be a strong determining factor as to which material is utilized. Full coronal restoration of primary incisors may be indicated for a number of reasons. Crowns available for restoration of primary incisors include those that are directly bonded onto the tooth, which generally are a resin material, and those crowns that are luted onto the tooth and are some type of stainless steel crown. However, due to lack of supporting clinical data, none of the crowns can be said to be superior to the others under all circumstances. Though caries in the mandibular region is rare, restorative solutions for mandibular incisors are needed. Neither stainless steel crowns nor celluloid crown forms are made specifically for mandibular incisors. Many options exist to repair carious primary incisors, but there is insufficient controlled, clinical data to suggest that one type of restoration is superior to another. This does not discount the fact that dentists have been using many of these crowns for years with much success. Operator preferences, esthetic demands by parents, the child's behavior, and moisture and hemorrhage control are all variables which affect the decision and ultimate outcome of whatever restorative treatment is chosen. PMID:12412967

  11. Bent Bonds and Multiple Bonds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Edward A.; Gillespie, Ronald J.

    1980-01-01

    Considers carbon-carbon multiple bonds in terms of Pauling's bent bond model, which allows direct calculation of double and triple bonds from the length of a CC single bond. Lengths of these multiple bonds are estimated from direct measurements on "bent-bond" models constructed of plastic tubing and standard kits. (CS)

  12. [Key points in anterior esthetic restorations with all ceramic].

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaoping; Qian, Dongdong; Yuan, Yu; Meng, Xiangfeng

    2013-04-01

    This paper introduced the key points in fabricating anterior esthetic restorations with all ceramic materials, including pre-operative smile design, standard tooth preparation, provisional restoration fabrication, all ceramic materials selection, all ceramic restoration bonding, ceramic crack and fracture prevention. And then, the authors summarized and reviewed the clinical common problems in anterior esthetic restorations. PMID:23662547

  13. [Key points in anterior esthetic restorations with all ceramic].

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaoping; Qian, Dongdong; Yuan, Yu; Meng, Xiangfeng

    2013-04-01

    This paper introduced the key points in fabricating anterior esthetic restorations with all ceramic materials, including pre-operative smile design, standard tooth preparation, provisional restoration fabrication, all ceramic materials selection, all ceramic restoration bonding, ceramic crack and fracture prevention. And then, the authors summarized and reviewed the clinical common problems in anterior esthetic restorations.

  14. Mercury vapour exposure during dental student training in amalgam removal

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Amalgam that is used for dental fillings contains approximately 50% elemental mercury. During dental student training, amalgam is often removed by drilling without the use of water spray and suction, which are protective measures in preventing mercury aerosol. In this study we measured mercury vapor levels in ambient air during amalgam removal as is typically performed in dental training. Methods Mercury vapor levels in ambient air were measured in a dental school laboratory during removal of amalgam fillings from artificial teeth set into a dental jaw simulator. Mercury vapor was measured under three conditions (25 measurements each): with the simultaneous use of water spray and suction, with the use of suction only, and with the use of neither suction nor water spray. These three conditions are all used during dental student training. Results were compared to Alberta occupational exposure limits for mercury vapor in order to assess potential occupational risk to students. Analysis of variance testing was used to compare data obtained under the three conditions. Results When water spray and suction were used, mercury vapor levels ranged from 4.0 to 19.0 μg/m3 (arithmetic mean = 8.0 μg/m3); when suction only was used, mercury vapor levels ranged from 14.0 to 999.0 (999.0 μg/m3 represents the high limit detection of the Jerome analyzer) (arithmetic mean = 141.0 μg/m3); when neither suction nor water was used, the vapor levels ranged from 34.0 to 796.0 μg/m3 (arithmetic mean = 214.0 μg/m3). Conclusions The Alberta Occupational Health and Safety threshold limit value for mercury vapor over an eight-hour time-weighted period is 25.0 μg/m3. The absolute ceiling for mercury vapor, not to be exceeded at any time, is 125.0 μg/m3. When both water spray and suction were used, mercury vapor levels were consistently below this threshold. When suction without water spray was used, mercury vapor levels exceeded the safety threshold 8% of

  15. Utilization of composite resins and direct bonding following periodontal treatment.

    PubMed

    Cvitko, E; Denehy, G E

    1993-05-01

    When restoring dentition compromised by periodontal treatment, good aesthetics must be achieved without compromising the periodontal health. Improved composite resin systems and new dentin bonding agents offer excellent restorative options. The learning objective of this article is a review of composite resins and direct bonding for aesthetic restorations. Two cases are presented to illustrate the procedure.

  16. Seven-year clinical evaluation of painful cracked teeth restored with a direct composite restoration.

    PubMed

    Opdam, Niek J M; Roeters, Joost J M; Loomans, Bas A C; Bronkhorst, Ewald M

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate long-term clinical effectiveness of treating painful cracked teeth with a direct bonded composite resin restoration. The hypothesis tested was that cracked teeth treated with or without cuspal coverage showed the same performance. Forty-one patients attended a dental practice with a painful cracked tooth that was restored with a direct composite resin restoration. Twenty teeth were restored without and 21 with cuspal coverage. After 7 years, 40 teeth could be evaluated. Three teeth without cuspal coverage needed an endodontic treatment, of which 2 failed as a result of fracture. No significant differences were found for tooth or pulp survival. Three more repairable restoration failures were recorded. Mean annual failure rate of restorations without cuspal coverage was 6%; no failures in restorations with cuspal coverage occurred (P = .009). A direct bonded composite resin restoration can be a successful treatment for a cracked tooth.

  17. A model for amalgamation in group decision making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutello, Vincenzo; Montero, Javier

    1992-01-01

    In this paper we present a generalization of the model proposed by Montero, by allowing non-complete fuzzy binary relations for individuals. A degree of unsatisfaction can be defined in this case, suggesting that any democratic aggregation rule should take into account not only ethical conditions or some degree of rationality in the amalgamating procedure, but also a minimum support for the set of alternatives subject to the group analysis.

  18. Dental Composite Restorations and Psychosocial Function in Children

    PubMed Central

    Trachtenberg, Felicia L.; Hauser, Russ; McKinlay, Sonja; Shrader, Peter; Tavares, Mary; Bellinger, David C.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Resin-based dental materials may intraorally release their chemical components and bisphenol A. The New England Children’s Amalgam Trial found that children randomized to amalgam had better psychosocial outcomes than those assigned to composites for posterior tooth restorations. The objective of this study was to examine whether greater exposure to dental composites is associated with psychosocial problems in children. METHODS: Analysis of treatment-level data from the New England Children’s Amalgam Trial, a 2-group randomized safety trial comparing amalgam with the treatment plan of bisphenol A-glycidyl methacrylate (bisGMA)-based composite and urethane dimethacrylate–based polyacid-modified composite (compomer), among 534 children aged 6 to 10 years at baseline. Psychosocial function at follow-up (n = 434) was measured by using the self-reported Behavior Assessment System for Children (BASC-SR) and parent-reported Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). RESULTS: Children with higher cumulative exposure to bisGMA-based composite had poorer follow-up scores on 3 of 4 BASC-SR global scales: Emotional Symptoms (β = 0.8, SE = 0.3, P = .003), Clinical Maladjustment (β = 0.7, SE = 0.3, P = .02), and Personal Adjustment (β = –0.8, SE = 0.2, P = .002). Associations were stronger with posterior-occlusal (chewing) surfaces, where degradation of composite was more likely. For CBCL change, associations were not statistically significant. At-risk or clinically significant scores were more common among children with greater exposure for CBCL Total Problem Behaviors (16.3% vs 11.2%, P-trend = .01) and numerous BASC-SR syndromes (eg, ≥13 vs 0 surface-years, Interpersonal Relations 13.7% vs 4.8%, P-trend = .01). No associations were found with compomer, nor with amalgam exposure levels among children randomized to amalgam. CONCLUSIONS: Greater exposure to bisGMA-based dental composite restorations was associated with impaired psychosocial function

  19. Use of tooth-coloured restorations in the management of toothwear.

    PubMed

    Allen, P F

    2003-12-01

    The problem of toothwear appears to be increasing in both children and adults. Recent developments in bonding and aesthetic restorations have added to the dentist's armamentarium for restoring worn teeth. Bonded ceramic and composite restorations offer the possibility of conservative restoration of teeth already damaged by toothwear. Despite this, concern still remains regarding the durability and clinical performance of these restorations. This paper reviews the currently available techniques for providing tooth-coloured restorations in toothwear cases. PMID:14710567

  20. Preservation & Restoration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 2000

    2000-01-01

    This theme issue on preservation and restoration presents selected resources for elementary and secondary education that include Web sites, CD-ROM and software, videos, books, magazines, and professional resources as well as classroom activities. Age levels are specified for most materials. I Sidebars discuss restoring a masterpiece, a bug's life,…

  1. Effect of rubber dam on mercury exposure during amalgam removal.

    PubMed

    Kremers, L; Halbach, S; Willruth, H; Mehl, A; Welzl, G; Wack, F X; Hickel, R; Greim, H

    1999-06-01

    It was the aim of this investigation to treat 20 volunteers with maximally 5 amalgam fillings by the same comprehensive protocol in which all removals with (n = 8) and without (n = 12) rubber dam had been performed within a few months. Nine amalgam-related parameters indicated a close matching of both groups before removal. In the group without rubber dam, mercury (Hg) levels in plasma increased significantly above preremoval values at days 1 and 3 after removal; they decreased significantly below preremoval values at day 30 in the rubber-dam group and at day 100 in both groups. Excretion rates did not increase significantly in either group, but decreased significantly at day 100 in the protected group. Peak plasma-Hg was 0.6 ng/mL on average at day one and decreased with halftimes of 3 and 43 d in subjects protected by rubber dam. The results indicated that concentrations of total mercury in plasma responded rapidly to changes in the amalgam status and reflected the actual absorption most reliably. Notably, plasma-Hg levels were sensitive enough to detect a transient attenuation of the additional exposure by using rubber dam during the removal of only a few fillings. However, being small in magnitude and lasting 100 d at best, the rubber-dam effect had minor toxicological relevance.

  2. Direct Ceromers: assuring restorative integrity with selective application of two viscosities.

    PubMed

    Liebenberg, W H

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of an ideal direct restoration include pulpal health, biocompatibility, occlusal stability, anatomical restitution, marginal perfection, and interproximal integrity. While tooth-colored composites have replaced amalgam as the restorative material of choice for many dental professionals, the utilization of composite materials of two different viscosities has proven effective in increasing strength and adaptation, and facilitating placement of anterior and posterior restorations. Several newly enhanced composite combinations have begun to allay reservations about directly placed tooth-colored restorations. This article classifies the ideal handling characteristics and benefits of a recently introduced, direct Ceromer system (Tetric Flow and Tetric Ceram, Ivoclar Vivadent, Amherst, NY.)

  3. Interactions between cavity preparation and restoration events and their effects on pulp vitality.

    PubMed

    Wisithphrom, Kessiri; Murray, Peter E; About, Imad; Windsor, L Jack

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the precise effect and rank the importance of cavity preparation and restoration variables on human pulp vitality. Fifty-three Class V unexposed cavities were prepared and restored with calcium hydroxide/amalgam, resin-modified glass ionomer, zinc oxide-eugenol, resin composite, or zinc polycarboxylate materials. Pulp vitality was reduced by the remaining dentin thickness of the cavity preparations, whereas the other variables, including the type of restorative material, had little effect. Restorative materials cause minimal pulp damage in isolation; it is more important to minimize the removal of intact dentin to maintain the vitality of teeth.

  4. Patients' experiences of changes in health complaints before, during, and after removal of dental amalgam.

    PubMed

    Sjursen, Therese T; Binder, Per-Einar; Lygre, Gunvor B; Helland, Vigdis; Dalen, Knut; Björkman, Lars

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we explore how patients with health complaints attributed to dental amalgam experienced and gave meaning to changes in health complaints before, during, and after removal of all amalgam fillings. We conducted semistructured qualitative interviews with 12 participants from the treatment group in a Norwegian amalgam removal trial. Interviews took place within a couple months of the final follow-up 5 years after amalgam removal. Using the NVivo9 software, we conducted an explorative and reflective thematic analysis and identified the following themes: Something is not working: betrayed by the body, You are out there on your own, Not being sure of the importance of amalgam removal, The relief experienced after amalgam removal, and To accept, to give up, or to continue the search. We discuss the findings in the context of patients' assigning meaning to illness experiences.

  5. Patients’ experiences of changes in health complaints before, during, and after removal of dental amalgam

    PubMed Central

    Sjursen, Therese T.; Binder, Per-Einar; Lygre, Gunvor B.; Helland, Vigdis; Dalen, Knut; Björkman, Lars

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we explore how patients with health complaints attributed to dental amalgam experienced and gave meaning to changes in health complaints before, during, and after removal of all amalgam fillings. We conducted semistructured qualitative interviews with 12 participants from the treatment group in a Norwegian amalgam removal trial. Interviews took place within a couple months of the final follow-up 5 years after amalgam removal. Using the NVivo9 software, we conducted an explorative and reflective thematic analysis and identified the following themes: Something is not working: betrayed by the body, You are out there on your own, Not being sure of the importance of amalgam removal, The relief experienced after amalgam removal, and To accept, to give up, or to continue the search. We discuss the findings in the context of patients’ assigning meaning to illness experiences. PMID:26112454

  6. Attitudes of some European dental undergraduate students to the placement of direct restorative materials in posterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Lynch, C D; Guillem, S E; Nagrani, B; Gilmour, A S M; Ericson, D

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this article was to report on the attitudes, opinions and confidences of final year dental students in three European schools towards the restoration of posterior teeth and in particular towards the use of amalgam and resin composite. One hundred and twenty-eight pre-piloted questionnaires were distributed to final year dental students in Cardiff, Dublin and Malmö. The questionnaire sought information relating to various opinions and attitudes towards the use of amalgam and resin composite in posterior teeth. Information was returned anonymously. Ninety-one completed questionnaires were returned (response rate=71%; Cardiff: n =40, Dublin: n=24, Malmö: n=27). Ninety-three per cent of Malmö students (n=24), 67% of Dublin students (n=16) and 60% of Cardiff students (n=24) reported that they feel confident when placing posterior resin composites. One hundred per cent of Malmö students (n=27), 75% of Cardiff students (n=30) and 33% of Dublin students (n=8) would prefer to have a resin composite rather than amalgam, placed in one of their own posterior teeth. Eighty-five per cent of Malmö students (n=23), 30% of Cardiff students (n=12) and 25% of Dublin students (n=6) perceive amalgam as being harmful to the environment. For the restoration of a posterior tooth in a pregnant female, 44% of students (n=40) would place a resin composite restoration, and 7% (n=6) would place an amalgam restoration, while 32% (n=29) would place a temporary restoration. Students at Malmö report that they place more posterior resin composites and have greater confidence at placing posterior resin composites than students at Cardiff or Dublin. There was confusion relating to the choice of restorative materials for pregnant females. Large variations in restorative strategies among graduates must be considered as dental professionals can practice in all countries within the European Union.

  7. Factors affecting the placement or replacement of direct restorations in a dental school

    PubMed Central

    Silvani, Samara; Trivelato, Roberta Ferreira; Nogueira, Ruchele Dias; Gonçalves, Luciano de Souza; Geraldo-Martins, Vinícius Rangel

    2014-01-01

    Context: The knowledge of the reasons for the placement of direct restorations makes possible to trace an epidemiological profile of a specific population and to direct the teaching of dentistry to techniques that are commonly used today and will be continued performed in the future. Purpose: The aim of this study was to verify the reasons for placement and replacement of direct restorations in patients treated in the Dental Clinic of the Uberaba University – Brazil. Materials and Methods: This study evaluated 306 restorative procedures carried out on 60 patients. During the treatment planning, a form that contained information about the patient's gender, tooth number, the classification of restorations, the reasons for placement and replacement of amalgam and tooth-colored restorations, the material that had to be removed and the new material used to fill the cavities was filled for each patient. Statistical analysis was carried out using Chi-square test (α = 0.05). Results: The data showed that most of the patients were female (66.7%). Of all the restorations placed, 60.45% were 1st-time placements, while 39.55% were replacements. For 1st-time restorations, the main reason for placement was primary caries (76.76%), followed by non-carious cervical lesions (15.14%). The amalgam restorations were replaced more frequently (67.77%). The primary reason for replacements was the presence of secondary caries (for both previous amalgam (42.68%) and composite (66.67%) restorations (P < 0.05). The resin composite was the most indicated material for the new restorations (98.04%) (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The main reason for placement of direct restorations was primary caries, while secondary caries was the main reason for replacements. In almost all cases, the material used to fill the cavities was the resin composite. PMID:24808696

  8. The effect of occlusal forces on restorations.

    PubMed

    Larson, Thomas D

    2014-09-01

    This review will focus on the effect occlusal forces, both normal masticatory force and paranormal bruxing and clenching force, have on various restorative materials and their interaction with the teeth through a variety of bonding mechanisms. Salient physical properties of each of the materials will be reviewed, as well as the effect occlusal force has on restoration durability.

  9. Magnetic field effects on dental amalgam in divers welding and cutting electrically underwater

    SciTech Connect

    Ortendahl, T.W.; Hoegstedt, P.

    1988-11-01

    Divers have for some years been complaining about a metallic taste in the mouth while electrically welding and cutting underwater. This paper reports on results from an assessment of this problem. It was hypothesized that the magnetic fields arising from the welding or cutting current could correlate with the reported symptoms. The intraoral magnetic flux density was calculated to 1.15 mT, at 650 ADC, in a normal cutting situation. This was verified in vivo. This magnetic field was shown to contain an AC component that is a candidate for inducing secondary currents in the oral tissues and restorative materials. Five submerged divers exposed to a magnetic field of 0.35 mT did not report any metallic taste. Magnetophosphenes were reported by 1 diver. (Magnetophosphenes are luminous impressions due to excitement of the retina by a magnetic field in addition to or in place of impingement of light rays.) Only a slight shielding effect to magnetic fields was observed due to a copper-brass helmet. An in vitro model for exposure of dental amalgams to magnetic fields was designed. Recommendations for decreasing the magnetic field surrounding the diver in practical work is given.

  10. Rondeau Seminars amalgamated mid-sagittal (lateral) cephalometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Palencar, Adrian J

    2014-01-01

    The author presents a comprehensive International Association for Orthodontics--Rondeau Seminars Amalgamated Mid-sagittal (Lateral) Cephalometric Analysis. Norms on the Cephalometric Data Sheet are age and gender specific for the Caucasian population and the postings are color coded for visual attraction. If the patient is ofa different ethnic group, the Norms should be adjusted accordingly. This Cephalometric Analysis is comprised often Sections, in alphabetical order and twenty nine Factors. The author expanded Rondeau Seminars Cephalometric Analysis by only six Factors, thus fulfilling the requirement for the case presentation for the Fellow of the IAO and the Diplomate ofthe IBO.

  11. Dental amalgam and urinary mercury concentrations: a descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dental amalgam is a source of elemental and inorganic mercury. The safety of dental amalgam in individuals remains a controversial issue. Urinary mercury concentrations are used to assess chronic exposure to elemental mercury. At present, there are no indications of mercury-associated adverse effects at levels below 5 μg Hg/g creatinine (Cr) or 7 μg Hg/L (urine). The purpose of the present study is to determine the overall urinary mercury level in the Canadian general population in relation to the number of dental amalgam surfaces. Methods Data come from the 2007/09 Canadian Health Measures Survey, which measured urinary mercury concentrations in a nationally representative sample of 5,418 Canadians aged 6–79 years. Urinary mercury concentrations were stratified by sex, age, and number of dental amalgam surfaces. Results The overall mean urinary mercury concentration varied between 0.12 μg Hg/L and 0.31 μg Hg/L or 0.13 μg Hg/g Cr and 0.40 μg Hg/g Cr. In general, females showed slightly higher mean urinary mercury levels than men. The overall 95th percentile was 2.95 μg Hg/L, the 99th percentile was 7.34E μg Hg/L, and the 99.9th percentile was 17.45 μg Hg/L. Expressed as μg Hg/g Cr, the overall 95th percentile was 2.57 μg Hg/g Cr, the 99th percentile was 5.65 μg Hg/g Cr, and the 99.9th percentiles was 12.14 μg Hg/g Cr. Overall, 98.2% of participants had urinary mercury levels below 7 μg Hg/L and 97.7% had urinary mercury levels below 5 μg Hg/g Cr. All data are estimates for the Canadian population. The estimates followed by the letter “E” should be interpreted with caution due to high sampling variability (coefficient of variation 16.6%-33.3%). Conclusions The mean urinary mercury concentrations in the general Canadian population are significantly lower than the values considered to pose any risks for health. PMID:24015978

  12. EDS and μ-XRF mapping of amalgam degradation products in ancient mirrors.

    PubMed

    Arizio, E; Orsega, E F; Falcone, R; Vallotto, M

    2014-12-01

    An amalgam mirror is a mirror type, used from the fifteenth century until the end of the nineteenth century, where the reflective layer is constituted by a tin amalgam layer adhered to a glass sheet. In this work, two amalgam mirrors samples were studied by scanning electron microscopy with an energy dispersive spectrometer and by micro-X-ray fluorescence elemental mapping to go deeply into the understanding of the degradation mechanism of the amalgam layer of ancient mirrors. The investigation has been focused for the first time on the reflective surface of the amalgam layer adherent to the glass sheet to better understand the processes of amalgam corrosion. The two amalgam degradation compounds, romarchite and cassiterite, has been spatially differentiated by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) maps. SEM images and micro-X-ray fluorescence and EDS maps showed that the amalgam degradation products grow up to form hemispherical stratified calottes. This structure is probably due to a mechanism involves cyclic phases and oxygen radial diffusion from a superficial oxidation nucleus.

  13. Corrosion of dental amalgam and mercury vapor emission in vitro.

    PubMed

    Moberg, L E

    1988-10-01

    Amalgam specimens were immersed for 30 days in 1) water, 2) 0.9% NaCl in water, 3) 0.9% NaCl and 10 mM phosphate buffer in water, and 4) 0.9% NaCl, 7.7 mM phosphate, and 6.1 mM citric acid in water. The solutions were stored in stoppered glass tubes. Hg-drops were immersed in solutions 1, 2, and 3. The concentration of mercury vapor in the air above the solutions was measured once a day. After 30 days the amounts of Cu, Zn, Hg, and Ag in the solutions were analyzed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The results showed that 0.9% NaCl alone or in combination with the additives increased the amounts of elements released into the solutions. The concentration of Hg0 in the glass tubes increased with the amount of Hg in the solutions, with the exception of solution No. 3, from which significantly less Hg0 evaporated. The results indicate that the composition of the saliva, oral hygiene and dietary factors may be determinants of Hg0 emission from amalgams in the oral cavity.

  14. Galvanic corrosion and cytotoxic effects of amalgam and gallium alloys coupled to titanium.

    PubMed

    Bumgardner, J D; Johansson, B I

    1996-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine and compare the galvanic corrosion of a conventional, a dispersed high-copper, and a palladium-enriched spherical high-copper amalgam and a gallium alloy coupled to titanium in saline and cell culture solutions, and to evaluate the effects of the couples on cultured cells. The potentials and charge transfers between amalgams and titanium were measured by electrochemical corrosion methods. Cytotoxicity of the couples, as indicated by the uptake of neutral red vital stain, was determined in 24-h direct contact human gingival fibroblast cell cultures. Results of this study indicated that before connecting the high-copper amalgams to titanium, the amalgams exhibited more positive potentials which resulted in initial negative charge transfers, i.e. corrosion of titanium. However, this initial corrosion appeared to cause titanium to passivate, and a shift in galvanic currents to positive charge transfers, i.e. corrosion of the amalgam samples. Lower galvanic currents were measured for the amalgam-titanium couples as compared to the gallium alloy-titanium couple. Coupling the conventional or the palladium-enriched high-copper amalgams to titanium did not significantly affect the uptake of neutral red as compared to cells not exposed to any test alloy. However, significant cytotoxic effects were observed when the dispersed-type high-copper amalgam and the gallium alloy were coupled to titanium. Even though the corrosion currents measured for these couples were less than gold alloys coupled to amalgam, these results suggest there is the potential for released galvanic corrosion products to become cytotoxic. These data warrant further investigations into the effects of coupling amalgam and gallium alloys to titanium in the oral environment.

  15. Comparison of microleakage from stainless steel crowns margins used with different restorative materials: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Memarpour, Mahtab; Derafshi, Reza; Razavi, Mahshid

    2016-01-01

    Background: Obtaining optimal marginal adaption with prefabricated stainless steel crowns (SSCs) is difficult, especially after removing dental caries or defects in cervical areas. This situation requires the use of an SSC after tooth reconstruction. This study evaluated microleakage and material loss with five restorative materials at SSC margins. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty primary molar teeth were randomly divided into six groups (n = 20). Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces of the teeth in groups 1-5. Cavities were restored with amalgam, resin-based composite, glass ionomer (GI), zinc phosphate, or reinforced zinc oxide eugenol (Zonalin). Group 6 without cavity preparation was used as a control. Restorations with SSCs were prepared according to standard methods. Then, SSCs were fitted so that the crown margins overlaid the restorative materials and cemented with GI. After thermocycling, the specimens were placed in 0.5% fuchsin and sectioned. The proportions of mircoleakage and material loss were evaluated with a digital microscope. Statistical analysis was performed with Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney tests. Results: The groups differed significantly (P < 0.001). Amalgam and GI showed the least microleakage. Amalgam restorations had significantly less microleakage than the other materials (P < 0.05). Microleakage was greatest with resin-based composite, followed by Zonalin. Material loss was greater in samples restored with Zonalin and zinc phosphate. Conclusion: When SSC margins overlaid the restoration materials, cavity restoration with amalgam or GI before SSC placement led to less microleakage and material loss. Regarding microleakage and material loss, resin-based composite, zinc phosphate, and Zonalin were not suitable options. PMID:26962309

  16. Discrimination of tooth layers and dental restorative materials using cutting sounds.

    PubMed

    Zakeri, Vahid; Arzanpour, Siamak; Chehroudi, Babak

    2015-03-01

    Dental restoration begins with removing carries and affected tissues with air-turbine rotary cutting handpieces, and later restoring the lost tissues with appropriate restorative materials to retain the functionality. Most restoration materials eventually fail as they age and need to be replaced. One of the difficulties in replacing failing restorations is discerning the boundary of restorative materials, which causes inadvertent removal of healthy tooth layers. Developing an objective and sensor-based method is a promising approach to monitor dental restorative operations and to prevent excessive tooth losses. This paper has analyzed cutting sounds of an air-turbine handpiece to discriminate between tooth layers and two commonly used restorative materials, amalgam and composite. Support vector machines were employed for classification, and the averaged short-time Fourier transform coefficients were selected as the features. The classifier performance was evaluated from different aspects such as the number of features, feature scaling methods, classification schemes, and utilized kernels. The total classification accuracies were 89% and 92% for cases included composite and amalgam materials, respectively. The obtained results indicated the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  17. Natural restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Kamlet, K.S.

    1993-02-01

    After a company pays millions of dollars to clean up contaminated site, its liability may not be over. It may have to spend tens of millions more to restore damaged natural resources under an oft-overlooked Superfund program. Examples of liability are cited in this report from the Exxon Valdez oil spill and a pcb leak which contaminated a harbor.

  18. Bond Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollack, Rachel H.

    2000-01-01

    Notes trends toward increased borrowing by colleges and universities and offers guidelines for institutions that are considering issuing bonds to raise money for capital projects. Discussion covers advantages of using bond financing, how use of bonds impacts on traditional fund raising, other cautions and concerns, and some troubling aspects of…

  19. Sticker Bonding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Laura Corbin

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a science activity on the bonding of chemical compounds. Assigns students the role of either a cation or anion and asks them to write the ions they may bond with. Assesses students' understanding of charge, bonding, and other concepts. (YDS)

  20. [Ceramic bonded veneers. Toward a minimal prosthesis].

    PubMed

    Touati, B; Plissart-Vanackere, A

    1990-01-01

    For years, odontology for aesthetic purposes meant significant tissue mutilation. Now, with bonded porcelain veneers, it is possible to achieve both an aesthetic result and a veneer preparation while restoring the function of anterior teeth. The clinical forms of such thin bonded restorations may vary considerably, from a simple veneer to a 3/4 crown. Although after five years of experience, prosthetic "enamelling" appears to be totally reliable, only long-term clinical results will determine the fatigue of thinly applied ceramics.

  1. Macroinvertebrate community assembly in pools created during peatland restoration.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lee E; Ramchunder, Sorain J; Beadle, Jeannie M; Holden, Joseph

    2016-11-01

    Many degraded ecosystems are subject to restoration attempts, providing new opportunities to unravel the processes of ecological community assembly. Restoration of previously drained northern peatlands, primarily to promote peat and carbon accumulation, has created hundreds of thousands of new open water pools. We assessed the potential benefits of this wetland restoration for aquatic biodiversity, and how communities reassemble, by comparing pool ecosystems in regions of the UK Pennines on intact (never drained) versus restored (blocked drainage-ditches) peatland. We also evaluated the conceptual idea that comparing reference ecosystems in terms of their compositional similarity to null assemblages (and thus the relative importance of stochastic versus deterministic assembly) can guide evaluations of restoration success better than analyses of community composition or diversity. Community composition data highlighted some differences in the macroinvertebrate composition of restored pools compared to undisturbed peatland pools, which could be used to suggest that alternative end-points to restoration were influenced by stochastic processes. However, widely used diversity metrics indicated no differences between undisturbed and restored pools. Novel evaluations of restoration using null models confirmed the similarity of deterministic assembly processes from the national species pool across all pools. Stochastic elements were important drivers of between-pool differences at the regional-scale but the scale of these effects was also similar across most of the pools studied. The amalgamation of assembly theory into ecosystem restoration monitoring allows us to conclude with more certainty that restoration has been successful from an ecological perspective in these systems. Evaluation of these UK findings compared to those from peatlands across Europe and North America further suggests that restoring peatland pools delivers significant benefits for aquatic fauna by

  2. Macroinvertebrate community assembly in pools created during peatland restoration.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lee E; Ramchunder, Sorain J; Beadle, Jeannie M; Holden, Joseph

    2016-11-01

    Many degraded ecosystems are subject to restoration attempts, providing new opportunities to unravel the processes of ecological community assembly. Restoration of previously drained northern peatlands, primarily to promote peat and carbon accumulation, has created hundreds of thousands of new open water pools. We assessed the potential benefits of this wetland restoration for aquatic biodiversity, and how communities reassemble, by comparing pool ecosystems in regions of the UK Pennines on intact (never drained) versus restored (blocked drainage-ditches) peatland. We also evaluated the conceptual idea that comparing reference ecosystems in terms of their compositional similarity to null assemblages (and thus the relative importance of stochastic versus deterministic assembly) can guide evaluations of restoration success better than analyses of community composition or diversity. Community composition data highlighted some differences in the macroinvertebrate composition of restored pools compared to undisturbed peatland pools, which could be used to suggest that alternative end-points to restoration were influenced by stochastic processes. However, widely used diversity metrics indicated no differences between undisturbed and restored pools. Novel evaluations of restoration using null models confirmed the similarity of deterministic assembly processes from the national species pool across all pools. Stochastic elements were important drivers of between-pool differences at the regional-scale but the scale of these effects was also similar across most of the pools studied. The amalgamation of assembly theory into ecosystem restoration monitoring allows us to conclude with more certainty that restoration has been successful from an ecological perspective in these systems. Evaluation of these UK findings compared to those from peatlands across Europe and North America further suggests that restoring peatland pools delivers significant benefits for aquatic fauna by

  3. Direct and indirect adhesive restorative materials: a review.

    PubMed

    Kugel, G

    2000-11-01

    Esthetic restorative materials require a bonding procedure in order to be durable and reliable. In order to accomplish this ideal, the bonding system must be biocompatible, bond indifferently to enamel and dentin, have sufficient strength to resist masticator forces, have mechanical properties close to those of tooth structures, be resistant to degradation in the oral environment and easy to use. This paper reviews the published literature on direct and indirect adhesive restorative materials.

  4. Restoring Ancestral Language, Restoring Identity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bannon, Kay T.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the Cherokee Language Renewal Program that was designed to help Cherokee elementary school children learn to function in the dominant culture without sacrificing their own cultural heritage. Explains how the program got started, and reports on how it helps restore a cultural identify to a people who are at risk of losing their identity.…

  5. 48 CFR 228.102-70 - Defense Environmental Restoration Program construction contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Restoration Program construction contracts. 228.102-70 Section 228.102-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations... BONDS AND INSURANCE Bonds 228.102-70 Defense Environmental Restoration Program construction contracts. For Defense Environmental Restoration Program construction contracts entered into pursuant to 10...

  6. 48 CFR 228.102-70 - Defense Environmental Restoration Program construction contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Restoration Program construction contracts. 228.102-70 Section 228.102-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations... BONDS AND INSURANCE Bonds 228.102-70 Defense Environmental Restoration Program construction contracts. For Defense Environmental Restoration Program construction contracts entered into pursuant to 10...

  7. Biomarkers of kidney integrity in children and adolescents with dental amalgam mercury exposure: findings from the Casa Pia children's amalgam trial.

    PubMed

    Woods, James S; Martin, Michael D; Leroux, Brian G; DeRouen, Timothy A; Bernardo, Mario F; Luis, Henrique S; Leitão, Jorge G; Kushleika, John V; Rue, Tessa C; Korpak, Anna M

    2008-11-01

    Mercury is toxic to the kidney, and dental amalgam is a source of mercury exposure. Few studies have evaluated the effects of dental amalgam on kidney function in a longitudinal context in children. Here, we evaluated urinary concentrations of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) alpha and pi as biomarkers of renal proximal and distal tubular integrity, respectively, and albumin as a biomarker of glomerular integrity in children and adolescents 8-18 years of age over a 7-year course of dental amalgam treatment. Five hundred seven children, 8-12 years of age at baseline, participated in a clinical trial to evaluate the neurobehavioral and renal effects of dental amalgam in children. Subjects were randomized to either dental amalgam or resin composite treatments. Urinary GSTs alpha and pi, albumin, and creatinine concentrations were measured at baseline and annually in all subjects. Results were evaluated using linear regression analysis. GST-alpha concentrations were similar between treatment groups and in each sex and race (white vs. non-white) group in each follow-up year. GST-pi levels tended upward over the course of follow-up by four- to six-fold. This increase was seen in all groups irrespective of the treatment, race, or gender. Females had GST-pi levels approximately twice those of males at all ages. Albumin concentrations were constant throughout the follow-up period and did not differ by treatment, although females had 39% higher albumin levels than males. Additionally, we found no significant effects of amalgam treatment on the proportion of children with microalbuminuria (>30 mg/g creatinine). These findings are relevant within the context of children's health risk assessment as relates to the safety of mercury exposure from dental amalgam on kidney function. These data also provide normative values for sensitive indices of renal functional integrity that may serve in the evaluation of children and adolescents with renal disorders.

  8. Biomarkers of kidney integrity in children and adolescents with dental amalgam mercury exposure: Findings from the Casa Pia children's amalgam trial

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, James S. Martin, Michael D.; Leroux, Brian G.; DeRouen, Timothy A.; Bernardo, Mario F.; Luis, Henrique S.; Leitao, Jorge G.; Kushleika, John V.; Rue, Tessa C.; Korpak, Anna M.

    2008-11-15

    Mercury is toxic to the kidney, and dental amalgam is a source of mercury exposure. Few studies have evaluated the effects of dental amalgam on kidney function in a longitudinal context in children. Here, we evaluated urinary concentrations of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) {alpha} and {pi} as biomarkers of renal proximal and distal tubular integrity, respectively, and albumin as a biomarker of glomerular integrity in children and adolescents 8-18 years of age over a 7-year course of dental amalgam treatment. Five hundred seven children, 8-12 years of age at baseline, participated in a clinical trial to evaluate the neurobehavioral and renal effects of dental amalgam in children. Subjects were randomized to either dental amalgam or resin composite treatments. Urinary GSTs {alpha} and {pi}, albumin, and creatinine concentrations were measured at baseline and annually in all subjects. Results were evaluated using linear regression analysis. GST-{alpha} concentrations were similar between treatment groups and in each sex and race (white vs. non-white) group in each follow-up year. GST-{pi} levels tended upward over the course of follow-up by four- to six-fold. This increase was seen in all groups irrespective of the treatment, race, or gender. Females had GST-{pi} levels approximately twice those of males at all ages. Albumin concentrations were constant throughout the follow-up period and did not differ by treatment, although females had 39% higher albumin levels than males. Additionally, we found no significant effects of amalgam treatment on the proportion of children with microalbuminuria (>30 mg/g creatinine). These findings are relevant within the context of children's health risk assessment as relates to the safety of mercury exposure from dental amalgam on kidney function. These data also provide normative values for sensitive indices of renal functional integrity that may serve in the evaluation of children and adolescents with renal disorders.

  9. Various Effects of Sandblasting of Dental Restorative Materials

    PubMed Central

    Nishigawa, Goro; Maruo, Yukinori; Irie, Masao; Maeda, Naoto; Yoshihara, Kumiko; Nagaoka, Noriyuki; Matsumoto, Takuya; Minagi, Shogo

    2016-01-01

    Background Sandblasting particles which remain on the surfaces of dental restorations are removed prior to cementation. It is probable that adhesive strength between luting material and sandblasting particle remnants might exceed that with restorative material. If that being the case, blasting particles adhere to sandblasted material surface could be instrumental to increasing adhesive strength like underlying bonding mechanism between luting material and silanized particles of tribochemical silica coating-treated surface. We hypothesize that ultrasonic cleaning of bonding surfaces, which were pretreated with sandblasting, may affect adhesive strength of a resin luting material to dental restorative materials. Methods We therefore observed adhesive strength of resin luting material to aluminum oxide was greater than those to zirconia ceramic and cobalt-chromium alloy beforehand. To measure the shear bond strengths of resin luting material to zirconia ceramic and cobalt-chromium alloy, forty specimens of each restorative material were prepared. Bonding surfaces were polished with silicon abrasive paper and then treated with sandblasting. For each restorative material, 40 sandblasted specimens were equally divided into two groups: ultrasonic cleaning (USC) group and non-ultrasonic cleaning (NUSC) group. After resin luting material was polymerized on bonding surface, shear test was performed to evaluate effect of ultrasonic cleaning of bonding surfaces pretreated with sandblasting on bond strength. Results For both zirconia ceramic and cobalt-chromium alloy, NUSC group showed significantly higher shear bond strength than USC group. Conclusions Ultrasonic cleaning of dental restorations after sandblasting should be avoided to retain improved bonding between these materials. PMID:26764913

  10. Restoration Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    In the accompanying photos, a laboratory technician is restoring the once-obliterated serial number of a revolver. The four-photo sequence shows the gradual progression from total invisibility to clear readability. The technician is using a new process developed in an applications engineering project conducted by NASA's Lewis Research Center in conjunction with Chicago State University. Serial numbers and other markings are frequently eliminated from metal objects to prevent tracing ownership of guns, motor vehicles, bicycles, cameras, appliances and jewelry. To restore obliterated numbers, crime laboratory investigators most often employ a chemical etching technique. It is effective, but it may cause metal corrosion and it requires extensive preparatory grinding and polishing. The NASA-Chicago State process is advantageous because it can be applied without variation to any kind of metal, it needs no preparatory work and number recovery can be accomplished without corrosive chemicals; the liquid used is water.

  11. Adjunctive role of dental restorations in personal identification of burnt victims

    PubMed Central

    Vandrangi, Sameer Kumar; Radhika, MB; Paremala, K; Reshma, V; Sudhakara, M; Hosthor, Sreelatha S

    2016-01-01

    Background: Fire remains one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality throughout the world and identification of a body from the fatal fire remains a daunting task. Several forensic cases involve interpretation of burnt human bodies from airline and automobile accidents, bombings and unlawful cremation. Fire is also involved in homicides, suicides, accidental death, arson and in attempts to destroy forensic evidence in criminal cases. Soft tissue destruction from fire can be so extensive that conventional methods of identification may be impossible. However, teeth survive even high temperatures due to their resistant composition and so, obviously, the restorative material housed in the teeth are even more secure and can yield valuable information in personal identification. Aim: To assess the usefulness of most common restorations in personal identification in burnt cases. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 40 extracted teeth which were divided into four groups (Group 1 - Unrestored teeth, Group 2 - Amalgam restored, Group 3 - Glass ionomer restored and Group 4 - Composite resin restored teeth. The effect of incineration at 200°C, 400°C, 600°C, 800°C, 1000°C for 15 min at each target temperature followed by subsequent cooling was studied. Results: Amalgam restoration was resistant and intact even at 1000°C, whereas GIC and composite restoration are identifiable till 600°C, the residual cavity preparation leaves a clue for narrowing down the spectrum of identification. PMID:27194881

  12. Effect of inhibitory species on electrochemical corrosion of high copper amalgam.

    PubMed

    Naguib, E A

    1994-07-01

    This investigation evaluates the corrosion potential of high copper amalgam containing inhibitory species, sodium phosphate and sodium citrate, in artificial saliva at different pH levels. The data revealed that the phosphate incorporated in high copper amalgam leads to increase in passivation of the alloy as compared to less or even negative effect of citrate incorporation. The linear steady potential of the amalgam was closer to the reversible potentials corresponding to hydrogen evolution and tin oxide formation. The corrosion potential does not respond reversibly to pH of the saliva solution due to the pronounced passivation of the high pH levels. PMID:9588156

  13. The coming demise of the cast gold restoration?

    PubMed

    Christensen, G J

    1996-08-01

    Cast gold restorations have overall characteristics unavailable in any other restorative procedure for inlays and onlays, including low restoration wear; low wear of opposing teeth; lack of breakage; burnishability-malleability; and proven long-term service. Bonding cast gold restorations with resin cement improves their characteristics even more. However, they are not tooth-colored, which eliminates them from consideration for many patients. Although tooth-colored inlays and onlays, both ceramic and filled polymer, are increasing in use, and their serviceability is acceptable at a moderate level, cast gold restorations remain the standard of care for long-term indirect restorative service.

  14. Gradual surface degradation of restorative materials by acidic agents.

    PubMed

    Hengtrakool, Chanothai; Kukiattrakoon, Boonlert; Kedjarune-Leggat, Ureporn

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of acidic agents on surface roughness and characteristics of four restorative materials. Fifty-two discs were created from each restorative material: metal-reinforced glass ionomer cement (Ketac-S), resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Fuji II LC), resin composite (Filtek Z250), and amalgam (Valiant-PhD); each disc was 12 mm in diameter and 2.5 mm thick. The specimens were divided into four subgroups (n=13) and immersed for 168 hours in four storage media: deionized water (control); citrate buffer solution; green mango juice; and pineapple juice. Surface roughness measurements were performed with a profilometer, both before and after storage media immersion. Surface characteristics were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Statistical significance among each group was analyzed using two-way repeated ANOVA and Tukey's tests. Ketac-S demonstrated the highest roughness changes after immersion in acidic agents (p<0.05), followed by Fuji II LC. Valiant-PhD and Filtek Z250 illustrated some minor changes over 168 hours. The mango juice produced the greatest degradation effect of all materials tested (p<0.05). SEM photographs demonstrated gradual surface changes of all materials tested after immersions. Of the materials evaluated, amalgam and resin composite may be the most suitable for restorations for patients with tooth surface loss.

  15. Gradual surface degradation of restorative materials by acidic agents.

    PubMed

    Hengtrakool, Chanothai; Kukiattrakoon, Boonlert; Kedjarune-Leggat, Ureporn

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of acidic agents on surface roughness and characteristics of four restorative materials. Fifty-two discs were created from each restorative material: metal-reinforced glass ionomer cement (Ketac-S), resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Fuji II LC), resin composite (Filtek Z250), and amalgam (Valiant-PhD); each disc was 12 mm in diameter and 2.5 mm thick. The specimens were divided into four subgroups (n=13) and immersed for 168 hours in four storage media: deionized water (control); citrate buffer solution; green mango juice; and pineapple juice. Surface roughness measurements were performed with a profilometer, both before and after storage media immersion. Surface characteristics were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Statistical significance among each group was analyzed using two-way repeated ANOVA and Tukey's tests. Ketac-S demonstrated the highest roughness changes after immersion in acidic agents (p<0.05), followed by Fuji II LC. Valiant-PhD and Filtek Z250 illustrated some minor changes over 168 hours. The mango juice produced the greatest degradation effect of all materials tested (p<0.05). SEM photographs demonstrated gradual surface changes of all materials tested after immersions. Of the materials evaluated, amalgam and resin composite may be the most suitable for restorations for patients with tooth surface loss. PMID:21903509

  16. Knowledge and Attitudes of General Dental Practitioners Towards Posterior Composite Restorations in Northern Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The restoration of posterior teeth with composite restoration is a common clinical practice nowadays. Opinions regarding posterior composite restorations vary among dentists. The aim of the present study was to determine the knowledge and opinions of general dental practitioners towards composite resins for posterior teeth restorations. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire was devised to elicit information regarding placement of composite restoration in posterior teeth in northern Saudi Arabia. It was distributed to 230 dentists by hand and e-mail. A response rate 136 (59%) was obtained. The questionnaire sought details about case selection criteria for composite restoration, problems associated with composites and reasons for selecting composite restoration in posterior teeth. The data was processed and analysed by SPSS statistical software 19. Frequencies and percentages were calculated for various responses of the participants. Results: Regarding the selection of composite restoration in posterior teeth, 97% of the dentists did not prefer composite placement for class I restoration with heavy occlusal contacts. 83% of the participants did not select composite for class II restoration. 78% of the respondents opted for restoring composites in small defects. Patients’ aesthetic demands (90%), amalgam replacement (22%) and restoration of endodontically treated teeth (42%) were the contributing factors. Regarding the problems associated with posterior composite restorations. Recurrent caries (87%), post-operative sensitivity (84%), restoration fracture (83%) and polymerization shrinkage (73%) were the major problems reported by respondents associated with composite restorations. The other minor concerns were wear (60%), contact build up in case of class II cavity restorations (51%) and isolation for composite restorations (36%). Conservative cavity preparation (78%), aesthetics (73%) and patient preference (65%) were the main reasons for choosing

  17. High Tensile Strength Amalgams for In-Space Fabrication and Repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.

    2006-01-01

    Amalgams are well known for their use in dental practice as a tooth filling material. They have a number of useful attributes that include room temperature fabrication, corrosion resistance, dimensional stability, and very good compressive strength. These properties well serve dental needs but, unfortunately, amalgams have extremely poor tensile strength, a feature that severely limits other potential applications. Improved material properties (strength and temperature) of amalgams may have application to the freeform fabrication of repairs or parts that might be necessary during an extended space mission. Advantages would include, but are not limited to: the ability to produce complex parts, a minimum number of processing steps, minimum crew interaction, high yield - minimum wasted material, reduced gravity compatibility, minimum final finishing, safety, and minimum power consumption. The work presented here shows how the properties of amalgams can be improved by changing particle geometries in conjunction with novel engineering metals.

  18. High Tensile Strength Amalgams for In-Space Repair and Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.

    2005-01-01

    Amalgams are defined as an alloy of mercury with one or more other metals. These, along with those based on gallium (also liquid at near room temperature), are widely used in dental practice as a tooth filling material. Amalgams have a number of useful attributes that indude room temperature compounding. corrosion resistance, dimensional stability, and good compressive strength. These properties well serve dental needs but, unfortunately, amalgams have extremely poor tensile strength, a feature that severely limits their applications. The work presented here demonstrates how, by modifying particle geometry, the tensile strength of amalgams can be increased and thus extending the range of potential applications. This is relevant to, for example, the freeform fabrication of replacement parts that might be necessary during an extended space mission. Advantages, i.e. Figures-of-Merit. include the ability to produce complex parts, minimum crew interaction, high yield - minimum wasted material, reduced gravity compatibility, minimum final finishing, safety, and minimum power consumption.

  19. New science challenges old notion that mercury dental amalgam is safe.

    PubMed

    Homme, Kristin G; Kern, Janet K; Haley, Boyd E; Geier, David A; King, Paul G; Sykes, Lisa K; Geier, Mark R

    2014-02-01

    Mercury dental amalgam has a long history of ostensibly safe use despite its continuous release of mercury vapor. Two key studies known as the Children's Amalgam Trials are widely cited as evidence of safety. However, four recent reanalyses of one of these trials now suggest harm, particularly to boys with common genetic variants. These and other studies suggest that susceptibility to mercury toxicity differs among individuals based on multiple genes, not all of which have been identified. These studies further suggest that the levels of exposure to mercury vapor from dental amalgams may be unsafe for certain subpopulations. Moreover, a simple comparison of typical exposures versus regulatory safety standards suggests that many people receive unsafe exposures. Chronic mercury toxicity is especially insidious because symptoms are variable and nonspecific, diagnostic tests are often misunderstood, and treatments are speculative at best. Throughout the world, efforts are underway to phase down or eliminate the use of mercury dental amalgam.

  20. DETERMINATION OF TOTAL MERCURY IN FISH TISSUES USING PYROLYSIS ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY WITH GOLD AMALGAMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple and rapid procedure for measuring total mercury in fish tissues is evaluated and
    compared with conventional techniques. Using an automated instrument incorporating combustion, preconcentration by amalgamation with gold, and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), mill...

  1. Mercury exposure from dental amalgam fillings: absorbed dose and the potential for adverse health effects.

    PubMed

    Mackert, J R; Berglund, A

    1997-01-01

    This review examines the question of whether adverse health effects are attributable to amalgam-derived mercury. The issue of absorbed dose of mercury from amalgam is addressed first. The use of intra-oral Hg vapor measurements to estimate daily uptake must take into account the differences between the collection volume and flow rate of the measuring instrument and the inspiratory volume and flow rate of air through the mouth during inhalation of a single breath. Failure to account for these differences will result in substantial overestimation of the absorbed dose. Other factors that must be considered when making estimates of Hg uptake from amalgam include the accurate measurement of baseline (unstimulated) mercury release rates and the greater stimulation of Hg release afforded by chewing gum relative to ordinary food. The measured levels of amalgam-derived mercury in brain, blood, and urine are shown to be consistent with low absorbed doses (1-3 micrograms/day). Published relationships between the number of amalgam surfaces and urine levels are used to estimate the number of amalgam surfaces that would be required to produce the 30 micrograms/g creatinine urine mercury level stated by WHO to be associated with the most subtle, pre-clinical effects in the most sensitive individuals. From 450 to 530 amalgam surfaces would be required to produce the 30 micrograms/g creatinine urine mercury level for people without any excessive gum-chewing habits. The potential for adverse health effects and for improvement in health following amalgam removal is also addressed. Finally, the issue of whether any material can ever be completely exonerated of claims of producing adverse health effects is considered.

  2. Survival rate of sealed, refurbished and repaired defective restorations: 4-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Eduardo M; Martin, Javier A; Angel, Pablo A; Mjör, Ivar A; Gordan, Valeria V; Moncada, Gustavo A

    2011-01-01

    The most common treatment in general dental practice is the replacement of restorations affected by secondary caries or marginal deficiencies. Alternative treatments to replacement of defective restorations, such as marginal sealing, refurbishment and repair, have demonstrated improvement of their clinical properties with minimal intervention. The aim of this clinical study was to estimate the median survival time (MST) of marginal sealing, repair and refurbishment of amalgam and resin-based composite restorations with localized defects as a treatment to increase the restoration longevity. A cohort of 66 patients, with 271 class I and II restorations clinically diagnosed with localized defects was longitudinally assessed. Each restoration was assigned to one of the following 5 groups: Marginal Sealing (n=48), Refurbishment (n=73), Repair (n=27), Replacement (n=42), and Untreated (n=81). Two calibrated examiners assessed the restorations at baseline and annually during 4 years, using the modified Ryge criteria: marginal adaptation, anatomic form, roughness, secondary caries and luster. Fifty-two patients with 208 restorations were assessed after 4 years; the distribution of restorations in the groups was as follows: Marginal Sealing (n=36), Refurbishment (n=63), Repair (n=21), Replacement (n=28) and Untreated (n=60). Kaplan Meier test indicated that the Sealed margins group showed the lowest MST while the Repair group showed the highest MST for restorations examined after 4 years of follow up. Defective amalgam and resin-based composite restorations treated by sealing of marginal gaps, refurbishment of anatomic form, luster or roughness, and repair of secondary caries lesions, had their longevity increased.

  3. A direct approach to restore anterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Denehy, G E

    2000-11-01

    When selecting the correct treatment for a patient with anterior esthetic problems, the dentist must choose between direct and indirect procedures. With situations allowing conservative treatment, direct resin restoration should be given strong consideration. Advances in materials and techniques that can positively affect this choice include pre-restorative bleaching procedures, new bonding agents, and new highly esthetic direct resin systems. A procedure is described to maximize esthetics and minimize finishing time during direct resin placement.

  4. [A PhD completed 5. Restoration survival in the composite resin age].

    PubMed

    van de Sande, F H

    2016-09-01

    The article describes studies aimed at investigating factors that can influence composite restoration survival in posterior teeth, focusing on the main reasons for failure of direct restorations - fracture and secondary-caries. Since direct composite resin restaurations seem to be more prone to secondary caries when compared to amalgam, one study was performed to evaluate the influence of materials on secondary caries lesion formation in situ. Also, in most clinical studies evaluating restoration survival, there is a tendency to focus on materials factors. Two retrospective clinical investigations, a meta-analysis with primary data of clinical studies and a systematic review were performed to assess the influence of patient-, materials-, and tooth-related variables in posterior composite restoration survival. Composite resins were not related with higher mineral loss when compared to amalgam. Tooth type, number of restored surfaces and patient-related factors like a high caries risk and occlusal wear were consistently found to influence composite resin restoration survival in posterior teeth, whereas materials factors were not consistently implicated with the survivalrate. PMID:27643497

  5. [A PhD completed 5. Restoration survival in the composite resin age].

    PubMed

    van de Sande, F H

    2016-09-01

    The article describes studies aimed at investigating factors that can influence composite restoration survival in posterior teeth, focusing on the main reasons for failure of direct restorations - fracture and secondary-caries. Since direct composite resin restaurations seem to be more prone to secondary caries when compared to amalgam, one study was performed to evaluate the influence of materials on secondary caries lesion formation in situ. Also, in most clinical studies evaluating restoration survival, there is a tendency to focus on materials factors. Two retrospective clinical investigations, a meta-analysis with primary data of clinical studies and a systematic review were performed to assess the influence of patient-, materials-, and tooth-related variables in posterior composite restoration survival. Composite resins were not related with higher mineral loss when compared to amalgam. Tooth type, number of restored surfaces and patient-related factors like a high caries risk and occlusal wear were consistently found to influence composite resin restoration survival in posterior teeth, whereas materials factors were not consistently implicated with the survivalrate.

  6. Current status of zirconia restoration.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Takashi; Nakamura, Takashi; Matsumura, Hideo; Ban, Seiji; Kobayashi, Taira

    2013-10-01

    During the past decade, zirconia-based ceramics have been successfully introduced into the clinic to fabricate fixed dental prostheses (FDPs), along with a dental computer-aided/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) system. In this article (1) development of dental ceramics, (2) the current status of dental CAD/CAM systems, (3) CAD/CAM and zirconia restoration, (4) bond between zirconia and veneering ceramics, (5) bond of zirconia with resin-based luting agents, (6) surface finish of zirconia restoration and antagonist enamel wear, and (7) clinical evaluation of zirconia restoration are reviewed. Yttria partially stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline (Y-TZP) showed better mechanical properties and superior resistance to fracture than other conventional dental ceramics. Furthermore, ceria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline and alumina nanocomposites (Ce-TZP/A) had the highest fracture toughness and had resistance to low-temperature aging degradation. Both zirconia-based ceramics have been clinically available as an alternative to the metal framework for fixed dental prostheses (FDPs). Marginal adaptation of zirconia-based FDPs is acceptable for clinical application. The most frequent clinical complication with zirconia-based FDPs was chipping of the veneering porcelain that was affected by many factors. The mechanism for the bonding between zirconia and veneering ceramics remains unknown. There was no clear evidence of chemical bonding and the bond strength between zirconia and porcelain was lower than that between metal and porcelain. There were two alternatives proposed that might avoid chipping of veneering porcelains. One was hybrid-structured FDPs comprising CAD/CAM-fabricated porcelain parts adhering to a CAD/CAM fabricated zirconia framework. Another option was full-contour zirconia FDPs using high translucent zirconia. Combined application of silica coating and/or silane coupler, and 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate is

  7. Current status of zirconia restoration.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Takashi; Nakamura, Takashi; Matsumura, Hideo; Ban, Seiji; Kobayashi, Taira

    2013-10-01

    During the past decade, zirconia-based ceramics have been successfully introduced into the clinic to fabricate fixed dental prostheses (FDPs), along with a dental computer-aided/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) system. In this article (1) development of dental ceramics, (2) the current status of dental CAD/CAM systems, (3) CAD/CAM and zirconia restoration, (4) bond between zirconia and veneering ceramics, (5) bond of zirconia with resin-based luting agents, (6) surface finish of zirconia restoration and antagonist enamel wear, and (7) clinical evaluation of zirconia restoration are reviewed. Yttria partially stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline (Y-TZP) showed better mechanical properties and superior resistance to fracture than other conventional dental ceramics. Furthermore, ceria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline and alumina nanocomposites (Ce-TZP/A) had the highest fracture toughness and had resistance to low-temperature aging degradation. Both zirconia-based ceramics have been clinically available as an alternative to the metal framework for fixed dental prostheses (FDPs). Marginal adaptation of zirconia-based FDPs is acceptable for clinical application. The most frequent clinical complication with zirconia-based FDPs was chipping of the veneering porcelain that was affected by many factors. The mechanism for the bonding between zirconia and veneering ceramics remains unknown. There was no clear evidence of chemical bonding and the bond strength between zirconia and porcelain was lower than that between metal and porcelain. There were two alternatives proposed that might avoid chipping of veneering porcelains. One was hybrid-structured FDPs comprising CAD/CAM-fabricated porcelain parts adhering to a CAD/CAM fabricated zirconia framework. Another option was full-contour zirconia FDPs using high translucent zirconia. Combined application of silica coating and/or silane coupler, and 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate is

  8. Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Newer Bonding Systems on Superficial and Deep Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, R Veena; Siddaraju, Kishore; Nagaraj, Hema; Poluri, Ramya Krishna

    2015-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of nanocomposite resin to superficial dentin and deep dentin using two different dentin bonding systems. Materials and Methods: All teeth were sectioned at various levels (superficial dentin: Dentin within 0.5-1 mm of dentinoenamel junction; deep dentin: Dentin within 0.5 mm of the highest pulp horn) using a Carborundum Disc and embedded in acrylic block of specific size. Selected specimens (60 premolar teeth) were grouped randomly into three groups, the groups were differentiated into superficial dentin, deep dentin, and control group which were further divided into sub Group A and Subgroup B containing 10 teeth each, depending on the bonding agents used. In Subgroup A, Tetric N Bond, and in Subgroup B Single Bond Universal were used. In the control group no bonding agent was used. The specimens were thermocycled for 500 cycles between 5°C and 55°C water bath for 40 s. Finally, the specimens were subjected to shear bond strength study under INSTRON machine (Universal Testing Machine). The maximum shear bond strengths were noted at the time of fracture (de-bonding) of the restorative material. Results were analyzed using ANOVA test, Bonferroni test, and paired t-test. Results: Bond strength values of fifth generation bonding system (Tetric N Bond) showed higher mean shear bond strength compared to seventh generation bonding system (Single Bond Universal). There was a significant fall in bond strength values as one reaches deeper levels of dentin from superficial to deep dentin. Conclusion: There was a significant difference between the bond strength of fifth generation bonding system (Tetric N Bond) and seventh generation bonding system (Single Bond Universal). Decrease in the bond strength values is seen for the deeper level of dentin as compared to superficial dentin. PMID:26435613

  9. An overview of treatment considerations for esthetic restorations: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sadowsky, Steven Judd

    2006-12-01

    Controversy persists regarding the treatment planning criteria for esthetic restorations. This article reviews the literature regarding the biocompatibility, marginal adaptation, color matching, patient selection, technique sensitivity, and mode and rate of failure of tooth-colored restorations. A Medline search was completed for the period from 1986 to 2006, along with a manual search, to identify pertinent English peer-reviewed articles and textbooks. The key words used were amalgam, posterior composite resin, ceramic inlays/onlays, CEREC, porcelain laminate veneers, all-ceramic crowns, and all-ceramic fixed partial dentures.

  10. Is dental amalgam safe for humans? The opinion of the scientific committee of the European Commission

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    It was claimed by the Scientific Committee on Emerging and Newly Identified Health Risks (SCENIHR)) in a report to the EU-Commission that "....no risks of adverse systemic effects exist and the current use of dental amalgam does not pose a risk of systemic disease..." [1, available from: http://ec.europa.eu/health/ph_risk/committees/04_scenihr/docs/scenihr_o_016.pdf]. SCENIHR disregarded the toxicology of mercury and did not include most important scientific studies in their review. But the real scientific data show that: (a) Dental amalgam is by far the main source of human total mercury body burden. This is proven by autopsy studies which found 2-12 times more mercury in body tissues of individuals with dental amalgam. Autopsy studies are the most valuable and most important studies for examining the amalgam-caused mercury body burden. (b) These autopsy studies have shown consistently that many individuals with amalgam have toxic levels of mercury in their brains or kidneys. (c) There is no correlation between mercury levels in blood or urine, and the levels in body tissues or the severity of clinical symptoms. SCENIHR only relied on levels in urine or blood. (d) The half-life of mercury in the brain can last from several years to decades, thus mercury accumulates over time of amalgam exposure in body tissues to toxic levels. However, SCENIHR state that the half-life of mercury in the body is only "20-90 days". (e) Mercury vapor is about ten times more toxic than lead on human neurons and with synergistic toxicity to other metals. (f) Most studies cited by SCENIHR which conclude that amalgam fillings are safe have severe methodical flaws. PMID:21232090

  11. Distinguishing Bonds.

    PubMed

    Rahm, Martin; Hoffmann, Roald

    2016-03-23

    The energy change per electron in a chemical or physical transformation, ΔE/n, may be expressed as Δχ̅ + Δ(VNN + ω)/n, where Δχ̅ is the average electron binding energy, a generalized electronegativity, ΔVNN is the change in nuclear repulsions, and Δω is the change in multielectron interactions in the process considered. The last term can be obtained by the difference from experimental or theoretical estimates of the first terms. Previously obtained consequences of this energy partitioning are extended here to a different analysis of bonding in a great variety of diatomics, including more or less polar ones. Arguments are presented for associating the average change in electron binding energy with covalence, and the change in multielectron interactions with electron transfer, either to, out, or within a molecule. A new descriptor Q, essentially the scaled difference between the Δχ̅ and Δ(VNN + ω)/n terms, when plotted versus the bond energy, separates nicely a wide variety of bonding types, covalent, covalent but more correlated, polar and increasingly ionic, metallogenic, electrostatic, charge-shift bonds, and dispersion interactions. Also, Q itself shows a set of interesting relations with the correlation energy of a bond.

  12. Amalgamating eastern Gondwana: The evolution of the Circum-Indian Orogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Alan S.; Pisarevsky, Sergei A.

    2005-08-01

    The Neoproterozoic global reorganisation that saw the demise of Rodinia and the amalgamation of Gondwana took place during an incredibly dynamic period of Earth evolution. To better understand the palaeogeography of these times, and hence help quantify the interrelations between tectonics and other Earth systems, we here integrate Neoproterozoic palaeomagnetic solutions from the various blocks that made up eastern Gondwana, with the large amount of recent geological data available from the orogenic belts that formed as eastern Gondwana amalgamated. From this study, we have: (1) identified large regions of pre-Neoproterozoic crust within late Neoproterozoic/Cambrian orogenic belts that significantly modify the geometry and number of continental blocks present in the Neoproterozoic world; (2) suggested that one of these blocks, Azania, which consists of Archaean and Palaeoproterozoic crust within the East African Orogen of Madagascar, Somalia, Ethiopia and Arabia, collided with the Congo/Tanzania/Bangweulu Block at ˜ 650-630 Ma to form the East African Orogeny; (3) postulated that India did not amalgamate with any of the Gondwana blocks until the latest Neoproterozoic/Cambrian forming the Kuunga Orogeny between it and Australia/Mawson and coeval orogenesis between India and the previously amalgamated Congo/Tanzania/Bangweulu-Azania Block (we suggest the name 'Malagasy Orogeny' for this event); and, (4) produced a palaeomagnetically and geologically permissive model for Neoproterozoic palaeogeography between 750 and 530 Ma, from the detritus of Rodinia to an amalgamated Gondwana.

  13. [Cavity preparation and restorative therapy in articles, published by the Fogorvosi Szemle in the last hundred years].

    PubMed

    Nemes, Júlia; Duhaj, Szilvia; Nyárasdy, Ida

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this review is to overview the development achieved in restorative therapy based on the publications in Fogorvosi Szemle during the past hundred years. The top quality of the restorative therapy was, and still has been the inlay, but nowadays the esthetic inlay -- fixed with adhesive material -- has priority over the gold inlay. The quality of amalgam fillings has been recently improved by using high-copper containing amalgam alloys. The development on the field of adhesive material and methods made it possible to give up the routine use of any conventional base material. The place of gingival wall of the cavity moved from subgingival position into supragingival position. The macro retention has been replaced by micro retention, and nowadays the cavity preparation prefers minimal-invasive techniques.

  14. Bonds Boom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Cathryn

    1989-01-01

    The combined effect of the "Serrano" decision and Proposition 13 left California school districts with aging, overcrowded facilities. Chico schools won a $18.5 million general obligation bond election for facilities construction. With $11 billion needed for new school construction, California will need to tap local sources. A sidebar outlines…

  15. Yankee bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Delaney, P. )

    1993-10-01

    Yankee and Euromarket bonds may soon find their way into the financing of power projects in Latin America. For developers seeking long-term commitments under build, own, operate, and transfer (BOOT) power projects in Latin America, the benefits are substantial.

  16. Restoring primary anterior teeth: updated for 2014.

    PubMed

    Waggoner, William F

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to review the current literature associated with the techniques and materials for the restoration of primary anterior teeth and make clinical recommendations based upon the available literature. A variety of esthetic restorative materials are available to utilize for restoring primary incisors. Awareness of the specific strengths, weakness, and properties of each material can enhance the clinician's ability to make the best choice of selection for each individual situation. Intracoronal restorations of primary teeth may utilize resin composites, glass ionomer cements, resin-modified ionomers, or polyacid-modified resins. Full coronal restoration of primary incisors may be indicated for a number of reasons. Crowns available for restoration of primary incisors include those that are directly bonded onto the tooth, which generally are a resin material, and crowns that are luted onto the tooth and are either some type of stainless steel or zirconia crown. There is insufficient controlled, clinical data to suggest that one type of restoration is superior to another. Operator preferences, esthetic demands by parents, the child's behavior, the amount of tooth structure remaining, and moisture and hemorrhage control are all variables that affect the decision and ultimate outcome of whatever restorative solution is chosen. PMID:25905657

  17. Swedish dentists' decisions on preparation techniques and restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, H; Mejàre, I; Espelid, I; Tveit, A B

    2000-06-01

    This study aimed at mapping the preparation techniques and restorative materials that Swedish dentists are using for primary approximal and occlusal carious lesions. It involved sending a pre-coded questionnaire to a random sample of 923 dentists, with eight items concerning approximal and occlusal restorative preparation techniques and dental materials. Responses were received from 651 (70.5%) dentists. To restore a primary approximal carious lesion in an adolescent with low caries activity and good oral hygiene, the tunnel preparation was chosen by 48% of the dentists, the saucer-shaped preparation by 32%, and the traditional Class II preparation by 20%. The most common preparation technique for restoring an occlusal carious lesion was removal of the carious part only, which was chosen by 74% of the dentists. For a lower second molar with a minor occlusal caries lesion combined with a suspected dentin lesion as judged radiographically, about half of the dentists chose to restore the carious part only and 27% would seal the rest of the fissure system in addition. For a similar lesion with no obvious radiolucency in the dentin, about 1/3 chose the 'no treatment' alternative, 1/3 fluoride treatment, and the rest fissure sealing or other techniques. Composite was used most often and amalgam least often for both approximal and occlusal carious lesions.

  18. Benchmarking parameter-free AMaLGaM on functions with and without noise.

    PubMed

    Bosman, Peter A N; Grahl, Jörn; Thierens, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    We describe a parameter-free estimation-of-distribution algorithm (EDA) called the adapted maximum-likelihood Gaussian model iterated density-estimation evolutionary algorithm (AMaLGaM-ID[Formula: see text]A, or AMaLGaM for short) for numerical optimization. AMaLGaM is benchmarked within the 2009 black box optimization benchmarking (BBOB) framework and compared to a variant with incremental model building (iAMaLGaM). We study the implications of factorizing the covariance matrix in the Gaussian distribution, to use only a few or no covariances. Further, AMaLGaM and iAMaLGaM are also evaluated on the noisy BBOB problems and we assess how well multiple evaluations per solution can average out noise. Experimental evidence suggests that parameter-free AMaLGaM can solve a wide range of problems efficiently with perceived polynomial scalability, including multimodal problems, obtaining the best or near-best results among all algorithms tested in 2009 on functions such as the step-ellipsoid and Katsuuras, but failing to locate the optimum within the time limit on skew Rastrigin-Bueche separable and Lunacek bi-Rastrigin in higher dimensions. AMaLGaM is found to be more robust to noise than iAMaLGaM due to the larger required population size. Using few or no covariances hinders the EDA from dealing with rotations of the search space. Finally, the use of noise averaging is found to be less efficient than the direct application of the EDA unless the noise is uniformly distributed. AMaLGaM was among the best performing algorithms submitted to the BBOB workshop in 2009.

  19. Microleakage and Micrographic Evaluation of Composite Restorations with Various Bases over ZOE Layer in Pulpotomized Primary Molars

    PubMed Central

    Bargrizan, M.; Mirkarimi, M.; Rezamand, M.; Eskandarion, S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Zinc oxide eugenol (ZOE) under composite restorations should be covered with a suitable material in order to prevent the harmful effect of ZOE on the composite. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate microleakage of composite restorations in pulpotomized primary molars with different bases for covering the ZOE layer and to assess the distance between different layers. Materials and Methods Proximo-occlusal cavities were prepared in 78 extracted second primary molars. Carious lesions were removed and pulpotomy was carried out. Zinc oxide eugenol paste was placed in 2-mm thickness. The teeth were randomly divided in 6 groups and restored as follows: 1. Light-cured composite; 2. Resin-modified glass-ionomer and composite resin; 3. Glass-ionomer and composite resin; 4. Light-cured calcium hydroxide and composite resin; 5. Calcium hydroxide and composite resin; 6. Amalgam and composite resin. The restored specimens were thermocycled for 500 cycles (5°C/55°C) and microleakage was assessed by dye penetration technique. Three specimens from each group were processed for scanning electron microscope evaluation to determine the distance between the layers. The results were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests. Results Microleakage assessment revealed significant differences between the groups (P=0.04), with the amalgam group exhibiting the lowest microleakage values. In SEM micrographs no significant differences were observed in the distance between ZOE base layers (P=0.94) and base-composite layers (P=0.47); however, the amalgam group had the lowest distances. Conclusion The use of amalgam over zinc oxide eugenol layer in pulpotomized primary molars decreases microleakage. PMID:22509457

  20. The dual bonding technique: a modified method to improve adhesive luting procedures.

    PubMed

    Paul, S J; Schärer, P

    1997-12-01

    Indirect restorative procedures usually require temporary restorations for protection of the pulp and for restoring the patients esthetic and functional needs. The use of temporary cements, either with or without eugenol, however, considerably decreases the adhesion of the bond on dentin if--according to the conventional technique--such dentin bonding systems are applied once at the moment of final cementation. With a dual application of the dentin bonding agents a considerable increase in bond strength values was discovered. This article presents a modified luting procedure called the "dual bonding technique."

  1. Theoretical models of mercury dissolution from dental amalgams in neutral and acidic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keanini, Russell G.; Ferracane, Jack L.; Okabe, Toru

    2001-06-01

    This article reports an experimental and theoretical investigation of mercury dissolution from dental amalgams immersed in neutral (noncorrosive) and acidic (corrosive) flows. Atomic absorption spectrophotometric measurements of Hg loss indicate that in neutral flow, surface oxide films formed in air prior to immersion persist and effectively suppress significant mercury release. In acidic (pH 1) flows, by contrast, oxide films are unstable and dissolve; depending on the amalgam’s material composition, particularly its copper content, two distinct mercury release mechanisms are initiated. In low copper amalgam, high initial mercury release rates are observed and appear to reflect preferential mercury dissolution from unstable Sn8Hg ( γ 2) grains within the amalgam matrix. In high copper amalgam, mercury release rates are initially low, but increase with time. Microscopic examination suggests that this feature reflects corrosion of copper from grains of Cu6Sn5 ( η') and consequent exposure of Ag2Hg3 ( γ 1) grains; the latter serve as internal mercury release sites and become more numerous as corrosion proceeds. Three theoretical models are proposed in order to explain observed dissolution characteristics. Model I, applicable to high and low copper amalgams in neutral flow, assumes that mercury dissolution is mediated by solid diffusion within the amalgam, and that a thin oxide film persists on the amalgam’s surface and lumps diffusive in-film transport into an effective convective boundary condition. Model II, applicable to low copper amalgam in acidic flow, assumes that the amalgam’s external oxide film dissolves on a short time scale relative to the experimental observation period; it neglects corrosive suppression of mercury transport. Model III, applicable to high copper amalgam in acidic flow, assumes that internal mercury release sites are created by corrosion of copper in η' grains and that corrosion proceeds via an oxidation-reduction reaction

  2. Cyclic conjugacy separability and conjugacy separability of certain amalgamated free products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, H. M.; Wong, K. B.; Wong, P. C.

    2015-12-01

    In this note, we study cyclic conjugacy separability and conjugacy separability of generalized free products. We first prove the criterions for generalized free products to be cyclic conjugacy separable and conjugacy separable. Our method involved a concept first introduced by G. Baumslag, called filterations. This method makes our criterions clearer and easier for applications. We then extend our criterions to generalized free products of polycyclic-by-finite groups or surface groups amalgamating a central subgroup. Finally, we show that generalized free products of free groups or finitely generated torsion-free nilpotent groups amalgamating an infinite cyclic subgroup are both cyclic conjugacy separable and conjugacy separable.

  3. Artifacts resembling budding bacteria produced in placer-gold amalgams by nitric acid leaching

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watterson, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    Microscopic filiform morphologies in gold which are indistinguishable from forms originally interpreted as bacterial in origin were produced in the laboratory by treating amalgams made from natural and artificial gold with hot nitric acid. Textures ranging from cobblestone to deeply crenulated to nodular filiform were produced in the laboratory from all tested natural and artificial gold amalgams; analogous textures widespread in Alaskan placer gold may have a similar inorganic origin. These results indicate that morphology alone cannot be considered adequate evidence of microbial involvement in gold formation. -Author

  4. Artifacts resembling budding bacteria produced in placer-gold amalgams by nitric acid leaching

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watterson, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    Microscopic filiform morphologies in gold which are indistinguishable from forms originally interpreted as bacterial in origin were produced in the laboratory by treating amalgams made from natural and artificial gold with hot nitric acid. Textures ranging from cobblestone to deeply crenulated to nodular filiform were produced in the laboratory from all tested natural and artificial gold amalgams; analogous textures widespread in Alaskan placer gold may have a similar inorganic origin. These results indicate that morphology alone cannot be considered adequate evidence of microbial involvement in gold formation.

  5. Effects of high temperature on different restorations in forensic identification: Dental samples and mandible

    PubMed Central

    Patidar, Kalpana A; Parwani, Rajkumar; Wanjari, Sangeeta

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The forensic odontologist strives to utilize the charred human dentition throughout each stage of dental evaluation, and restorations are as unique as fingerprints and their radiographic morphology as well as the types of filling materials are often the main feature for identification. The knowledge of detecting residual restorative material and composition of unrecovered adjacent restoration is a valuable tool-mark in the presumptive identification of the dentition of a burned victim. Gold, silver amalgam, silicate restoration, and so on, have a different resistance to prolonged high temperature, therefore, the identification of burned bodies can be correlated with adequate qualities and quantities of the traces. Most of the dental examination relies heavily on the presence of the restoration as well as the relationship of one dental structure to another. This greatly narrows the research for the final identification that is based on postmortem data. Aim: The purpose of this study is to examine the resistance of teeth and different restorative materials, and the mandible, to variable temperature and duration, for the purpose of identification. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 72 extracted teeth which were divided into six goups of 12 teeth each based on the type of restorative material. (Group 1 - unrestored teeth, group 2 - teeth restored with Zn3(PO4)2, group 3 - with silver amalgam, group 4 with glass ionomer cement, group 5 - Ni-Cr-metal crown, group 6 - metal ceramic crown) and two specimens of the mandible. The effect of incineration at 400°C (5 mins, 15 mins, 30 mins) and 1100°C (15 mins) was studied. Results: Damage to the teeth subjected to variable temperatures and time can be categorized as intact (no damage), scorched (superficially parched and discolored), charred (reduced to carbon by incomplete combustion) and incinerated (burned to ashes). PMID:21189989

  6. Diffusion bonding

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert C.

    1976-06-22

    1. A method for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding, comprising the steps of coating at least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces with nickel, positioning a coated surface portion in a contiguous relationship with an other surface portion, subjecting the contiguously disposed surface portions to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure, applying a force upon the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other, heating the contiguous surface portions to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, substantially uniformly decreasing the applied force while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature, and maintaining a portion of the applied force at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions.

  7. Longevity of direct restorations in stress-bearing posterior cavities: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Rho, Y-J; Namgung, C; Jin, B-H; Lim, B-S; Cho, B-H

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this retrospective clinical study were to compare the longevities of direct posterior amalgam restorations (AMs) and resin composite restorations (RCs) that were subjected to occlusal stresses and to investigate variables predictive of their outcome. A total of 269 AMs and RCs filled in Class I and II cavities of posterior teeth were evaluated with Kaplan-Meier survival estimator and multivariate Cox proportional hazard model. Seventy-one retreated restorations were reviewed from dental records. The other 198 restorations still in use were evaluated according to modified US Public Health Service (USPHS) criteria by two investigators. The longevity of RCs was significantly lower than that of AMs (AM = 8.7 years and RC = 5.0 years, p<0.05), especially in molars. The prognostic variables, such as age, restorative material, tooth type, operator group, diagnosis, cavity classification, and gender, affected the longevity of the restorations (multivariate Cox regression analysis, p<0.05). However, among the restorations working in oral cavities, their clinical performance evaluated with modified USPHS criteria showed no statistical difference between both restoratives. In contrast to the short longevity of RCs relative to AMs, the clinical performance of RCs working in oral cavities was observed to be not different from that of AMs. This suggests that once a RC starts to fail, it happens in a rapid progression. As posterior esthetic restorations, RCs must be observed carefully with periodic follow-ups for early detection and timely repair of failures.

  8. In vitro electrical impedance spectroscopy of human dentine: the effect of restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Berta; Botta, Pablo M; Varela, Purificación; Martín, Benjamín; Fondado, Alfonso; Rivas, Jose

    2008-04-01

    The influence of different restorative materials on in vitro dielectric properties of sound dentine was investigated. The studied samples were three-layer materials consisting of successive disks of dentine and silver amalgam or nanohybrid composite resin. Before being tested, the samples were maintained in physiological solution never more than 48 h from the extraction. Also, sections of intact dentine were similarly prepared for electrical measurements. Complex dielectric permittivity of these specimens was determined in a wide frequency range using the parallel-plate capacitor technique. Very similar dielectric responses of intact dentine and amalgam-dentine material were observed. This is explained on the basis of high dc conductivity exhibited by both samples. In contrast, resin-dentine specimen revealed a much more insulating behavior. A simple theoretical model for heterogeneous systems could be applied to these dental three-layer materials. The dielectric properties of restored dentine are strongly dependent on the kind of restorative material employed in each case. This suggests that electrical data should be used carefully in caries diagnosis on restored teeth.

  9. Chalcogen bond: a sister noncovalent bond to halogen bond.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weizhou; Ji, Baoming; Zhang, Yu

    2009-07-16

    A sister noncovalent bond to halogen bond, termed chalcogen bond, is defined in this article. By selecting the complexes H(2)CS...Cl(-), F(2)CS...Cl(-), OCS...Cl(-), and SCS...Cl(-) as models, the bond-length change, interaction energy, topological property of the electron charge density and its Laplacian, and the charge transfer of the chalcogen bond have been investigated in detail theoretically. It was found that the similar misshaped electron clouds of the chalcogen atom and the halogen atom result in the similar properties of the chalcogen bond and the halogen bond. Experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  10. [The stamp technique for direct composite restoration].

    PubMed

    Perrin, Philippe; Zimmerli, Brigitte; Jacky, Daniel; Lussi, Adrian; Helbling, Christoph; Ramseyer, Simon

    2013-01-01

    The indications for direct resin composite restorations are nowadays extended due to the development of modern resin materials with improved material properties. However, there are still some difficulties regarding handling of resin composite material, especially in large restorations. The reconstruction of a functional and individual occlusion is difficult to achieve with direct application techniques. The aim of the present publication was to introduce a new "stamp"-technique for placing large composite restorations. The procedure of this "stamp"-technique is presented by three typical indications: large single-tooth restoration, occlusal rehabilitation of a compromised occlusal surface due to erosions and direct fibre-reinforced fixed partial denture. A step-by-step description of the technique and clinical figures illustrates the method. Large single-tooth restorations can be built-up with individual, two- piece silicone stamps. Large occlusal abrasive and/or erosive defects can be restored by copying the wax-up from the dental technician using the "stamp"-technique. Even fiber-reinforced resin-bonded fixed partial dentures can be formed with this intraoral technique with more precision and within a shorter treatment time. The presented "stamp"-technique facilitates the placement of large restoration with composite and can be recommended for the clinical use.

  11. When Old and New Regionalism Collide: Deinstitutionalization of Regions and Resistance Identity in Municipality Amalgamations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerbauer, Kaj; Paasi, Anssi

    2013-01-01

    Regions as well as their identities and borders are social and discursive constructs that are produced and removed in contested, historically contingent and context-bound processes of institutionalization and deinstitutionalization. This article studies the deinstitutionalization of regions in the context of municipality amalgamations and the…

  12. 75 FR 10331 - In the Matter of: Amalgamated Explorations, Inc., Areawide Cellular, Inc., Genomed, Inc., Global...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION In the Matter of: Amalgamated Explorations, Inc., Areawide Cellular, Inc., Genomed, Inc., Global Maintech Corp., Military Resale Group, Inc., Verado Holdings, Inc., and World Transport Authority, Inc.; Order of Suspension of Trading It...

  13. Colorimetric Signal Amplification Assay for Mercury Ions Based on the Catalysis of Gold Amalgam.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhengbo; Zhang, Chenmeng; Gao, Qinggang; Wang, Guo; Tan, Lulu; Liao, Qing

    2015-11-01

    Mercury is a major threat to the environment and to human health. It is highly desirable to develop a user-friendly kit for on-site mercury detection. Such a method must be able to detect mercury below the threshold levels (10 nM) for drinking water defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Herein, we for the first time reported catalytically active gold amalgam-based reaction between 4-nitrophenol and NaBH4 with colorimetric sensing function. We take advantage of the correlation between the catalytic properties and the surface area of gold amalgam, which is proportional to the amount of the gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-bound Hg(2+). As the concentration of Hg(2+) increases until the saturation of Hg onto the AuNPs, the catalytic performance of the gold amalgam is much stronger due to the formation of gold amalgam and the increase of the nanoparticle surface area, leading to the decrease of the reduction time of 4-nitrophenol for the color change. This sensing system exhibits excellent selectivity and ultrahigh sensitivity up to the 1.45 nM detection limit. The practical use of this system for Hg(2+) determination in tap water samples is also demonstrated successfully.

  14. Fostering Constructivist Communities of Learners in the Amalgamated Multi-Discipline of Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mintrop, Heinrich

    2004-01-01

    This paper shows how the knowledge structures and traditions of the amalgamated multi-discipline of social studies at once help and hinder the use of constructivist instructional models. I interpret the planning process of two "Fostering a Community of Learners" units and examine how these two units are implemented by four teachers, given their…

  15. Electrolytic method for the production of lithium using a lithium-amalgam electrode

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.; Krikorian, Oscar H.; Homsy, Robert V.

    1979-01-01

    A method for recovering lithium from its molten amalgam by electrolysis of the amalgam in an electrolytic cell containing as a molten electrolyte a fused-salt consisting essentially of a mixture of two or more alkali metal halides, preferably alkali metal halides selected from lithium iodide, lithium chloride, potassium iodide and potassium chloride. A particularly suitable molten electrolyte is a fused-salt consisting essentially of a mixture of at least three components obtained by modifying an eutectic mixture of LiI-KI by the addition of a minor amount of one or more alkali metal halides. The lithium-amalgam fused-salt cell may be used in an electrolytic system for recovering lithium from an aqueous solution of a lithium compound, wherein electrolysis of the aqueous solution in an aqueous cell in the presence of a mercury cathode produces a lithium amalgam. The present method is particularly useful for the regeneration of lithium from the aqueous reaction products of a lithium-water-air battery.

  16. Current Teaching of Proximal Retention Grooves for Class II Amalgam Preparations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, David L.

    1992-01-01

    A survey gathered information on methods of class II amalgam preparation taught in 59 dental schools. Focus was on the teaching and testing of proximal retention groove use, stated rationale for placing retention grooves, and the relationship of the instruction to board criteria for cavity preparation. (MSE)

  17. Treatment of amalgam tattoo with an Er,Cr:YSGG laser.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Hasan Guney; Bayindir, Hakan; Kusakci-Seker, Basak; Tasar, Simge; Kurtulmus-Yilmaz, Sevcan

    2010-08-01

    Amalgam tattoos are common, asymptomatic, pigmented oral lesions that clinically exist as isolated, blue, gray, or black macules on the gingival, buccal, and alveolar mucosae, the palate, and/or the tongue. In this case report, the successful use of an erbium, chromium-doped:yttrium, scandium, gallium, and garnet laser for the removal of an amalgam tattoo is explained. A 46-year-old man is presented with a half decade history of an amalgam tattoo on his left maxillary premolar-molar gingiva. Depigmentation procedure was performed under topical anesthesia with the use of an erbium, chromium-doped:yttrium, scandium, gallium, and garnet laser at 2 W in the soft tissue pulsed mode for 10 min. The pigmented tissue was completely removed. The de-epithelialization area healed completely on the 10th day after treatment. The period of healing was uneventful. The amalgam tattoo was completely removed with erbium, chromium-doped:yttrium, scandium, gallium, and garnet laser, and the treated area healed without any adverse effect. PMID:25427187

  18. 75 FR 33169 - Dental Devices: Classification of Dental Amalgam, Reclassification of Dental Mercury, Designation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ... Administration (FDA) published a final rule in the Federal Register of August 4, 2009 (74 FR 38686) which... (powder), which is composed primarily of silver, tin, and copper (74 FR 38686). The final rule classified... previous classification of amalgam alloy in the codified section of the final rule (74 FR 38686 at...

  19. A study of alternative metal particle structures and mixtures for dental amalgams based on mercury additions.

    PubMed

    Marquez, J A; Murr, L E; Agüero, V

    2000-08-01

    The perception that mercury in dental amalgam is toxic to the human organism has prompted worldwide efforts by the scientific community to develop alternative amalgam-like materials that utilize little or no mercury. In this investigation, an attempt is made to develop a new dental alloy system by adding liquid mercury to silver-coated Ag4Sn intermetallic particles in lesser amounts than are used in conventional amalgam alloys. An effort to precipitate the important eta-prime (Cu6Sn5) phase was made by adding pure Cu and Sn powders to the alloy formulation during trituration. Tytin a popular Ag-Sn-Cu single-composition, spray-atomized conventional dental alloy was used as the control to obtain baseline data for comparisons of microstructures and mechanical properties. Amalgamation of the coated particles with mercury, with or without the addition of Cu and Sn powders, mostly produced specimens with chemically non-coherent microstructures that were relatively weak in compression. These results were due, in part, to mercury's inability to chemically wet the Ag-coated particles and Cu and Sn powders because of naturally occurring surface oxide films. The strongest specimens tested had silver dendritic coatings, resulting in compression strength values up to 40% of the control's. Their higher strength is attributed to mechanical interlocking at the particle/matrix interfaces.

  20. Real-Time Plasmonic Monitoring of Single Gold Amalgam Nanoalloy Electrochemical Formation and Stripping.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun-Gang; Fossey, John S; Li, Meng; Xie, Tao; Long, Yi-Tao

    2016-03-01

    Direct electrodeposition of mercury onto gold nanorods on an ITO substrate, without reducing agents, is reported. The growth of single gold amalgam nanoalloy particles and subsequent stripping was monitored in real-time monitoring by plasmonic effects and single-nanoparticle dark-field spectroelectrochemistry techniques. Time-dependent scattering spectral information conferred insight into the growth and stripping mechanism of a single nanoalloy particle. Four critical stages were observed: First, rapid deposition of Hg atoms onto Au nanorods; second, slow diffusion of Hg atoms into Au nanorods; third, prompt stripping of Hg atoms from Au nanorods; fourth, moderate diffusion from the inner core of Au nanorods. Under high Hg(2+) concentrations, homogeneous spherical gold amalgam nanoalloys were obtained. These results demonstrate that the morphology and composition of individual gold amalgam nanoalloys can be precisely regulated electrochemically. Moreover, gold amalgam nanoalloys with intriguing optical properties, such as modulated plasmonic lifetimes and quality factor Q, could be obtained. This may offer opportunities to extend applications in photovoltaic energy conversion and chemical sensing. PMID:26942394

  1. Pi Bond Orders and Bond Lengths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herndon, William C.; Parkanyi, Cyril

    1976-01-01

    Discusses three methods of correlating bond orders and bond lengths in unsaturated hydrocarbons: the Pauling theory, the Huckel molecular orbital technique, and self-consistent-field techniques. (MLH)

  2. The effect of oxidizing water on metallic restorations in the mouth: in vitro reduction behavior of oxidizing water.

    PubMed

    Nishida, T

    1997-03-01

    Mouth-rinsing with oxydized water which contains electrolytically generated chlorine is known to hinder dental plaque formation and growth, but it also accelerates the deterioration of metallic restorations in the mouth. The present work consists of an in vitro study to elucidate the electrochemical reactions involved in the reduction of oxydized water on dental alloys through a systematic investigation of the potentiostatic polarization behavior of dental alloy electrodes. The five dental alloys selected for investigation were gold alloy, gold alloy containing platinum, silver-palladium-gold alloy, conventional amalgam and high copper amalgam. The corrosion potentials of all dental alloy electrodes were shown to be more noble in oxydized water than in 0.1N sodium chloride solution. The potential differences between the corrosion potentials were relatively small in the case of amalgam electrodes. The polarization curves for all of the dental alloy electrodes in oxydized water revealed reduction currents of chlorine, hypochlorous acid, dissolved oxygen and oxonium ion. The reduction of chlorine and hypochlorous acid started at a more noble potential than that of dissolved oxygen. The dental alloys studied, except the amalgams, did not dissolve excessively at the corrosion potentials in oxydized water.

  3. Smile transformations with the use of direct composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Sameni, Abdi

    2013-01-01

    Mutual concerns shared by dentists and patients regarding removal of natural tooth structure affirm the need for non-invasive restorative treatments. Direct composite restorations are among today's conservative treatment modalities. Direct bonding procedures provide patients with an alternative to high biologic risk and expensive indirect porcelain restorations. This article discusses the principles involved in smile design cases, ways to successfully combine different treatment modalities, and materials to achieve outstanding esthetic and functional results. The article also demonstrates the versatility of today's composite materials for direct smile design restorations.

  4. Repair or replacement of defective restorations by dentists in The Dental PBRN

    PubMed Central

    Gordan, Valeria V.; Riley, Joseph L.; Geraldeli, Saulo; Rindal, D. Brad; Qvist, Vibeke; Fellows, Jeffrey L.; Kellum, H. Paul; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To (1) determine whether dentists in Dental Practice-based Research Network practices are more likely to repair versus replace a restoration that they diagnose as defective; (2) quantify the specific reasons for repairing or replacing; and (3) test the hypothesis that certain dentist, patient, and restoration-related variables are associated with the decision to repair versus replace. Methods This cross-sectional study used a consecutive patient/restoration recruitment design. Practitioner-investigators recorded data on consecutive restorations in permanent teeth that needed repair or replacement. DPBRN is a consortium of participating practices and dental organizations in the United States and Scandinavia. Data included the primary reason for repair or replacement, tooth surface(s) involved, restoration materials used, and patient demographics. Results Data for 9,484 restorations were collected from 7,502 patients in 197 practices. 75% (7,073) of restorations were replaced and 25% (2,411) repaired. Secondary caries was the main reason (43%, n=4,124) for treatment. Factors associated with greater likelihood of repair versus replace (p<.05) included: fewer years since dental school graduation, practicing in a solo or small group practice, being the dentist who placed the original restoration, older patient age, original restorative material was not amalgam, restoration of a molar, and fewer surfaces in the old restoration. Conclusion DPBRN dentists were more likely to replace than repair. Secondary caries was the most common reason for repairing or replacing existing restorations. Certain dentist, patient, and restoration-related variables were associated with the repair versus replace decision. PMID:22653939

  5. Open Photoacoustic Cell Technique as a Tool for Thermal and Thermo-Mechanical Characterization of Teeth and Their Restorative Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichardo-Molina, J. L.; Gutiérrez-Juárez, G.; Huerta-Franco, R.; Vargas-Luna, M.; Cholico, P.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2005-01-01

    The thermal diffusivity and thermal expansion coefficient of teeth and three of their most common restorative materials (Amalgam Phase Alloy, Ionomer Fuji II LC, and Resin 3MFPITEK Lutine TMZ250) were studied by means of the open photoacoustic technique. These results were then used as a basis for the theoretical simulation of the photothermal process taking place as a consequence of modulated illumination of a two-layer system formed by the tooth and the restorative material. The model accounts for the coupling of thermal waves and thermoelastic vibration in the two-layer system.

  6. Sealing and dentin bond strengths of adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Del Nero, M O; de la Macorra, J C

    1999-01-01

    The objectives of this research were (1) to analyze the variations of the permeability of dentin after restoration with two polyacid-modified resin composites (Compoglass, Dyract) and four single-bottle adhesives (Prime & Bond 2.0, Syntac Single Component, OptiBond Solo, and Single Bond--Scotch Bond 1 in Europe--immediately (approximately 1 hour) after insertion. A perfusion system with distilled water was used at a pressure of 32.5 cm of water; (2) to study the bond strength of their interfaces; and (3) to find the correlation, if any, between both parameters. None of the materials used produced a complete cessation in fluid filtration. Tensile bond strengths were very low (maximum: P&B = 3.96 MPa) probably because of the very large bonding surfaces used (mean bonded surface area = 88.8 mm2). No significant correlation was found between tensile bond strength and the sealing ability for any material.

  7. Practitioner, patient, and caries lesion characteristics associated with type of material used to restore carious teeth: findings from The Dental PBRN

    PubMed Central

    Makhija, Sonia K; Gordan, Valeria V.; Gilbert, Gregg H.; Litaker, Mark S.; Rindal, D. Brad; Pihlstrom, Daniel J.; Qvist, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    Background The authors conducted a study to identify factors associated with material use by dentists in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) when placing the first restoration on permanent tooth surfaces. Methods A total of 182 DPBRN practitioner-investigators provided data on 5,599 posterior teeth with caries. Practitioner-investigators completed an enrollment questionnaire that included the dentist’s age, gender, practice workload, practice type, and years since graduation. When a consented patient presented with a previously un-restored carious surface, practitioner-investigators recorded patient and tooth characteristics. Results Amalgam was used more often than direct resin-based composite (RBC) for posterior carious lesions. Practitioner/practice characteristics (years since graduation and type of practice); patient characteristics (gender, race, age, and dental insurance); and lesion characteristics (tooth location and surface, pre-and post-operative depth) were associated with the type of restorative material used. Conclusions There are several practitioner/practice, patient, and lesion characteristics significantly associated with use of amalgam and RBC: region, years since graduation, dental insurance, tooth location and surface, and pre-and post-operative depth. Clinical implications Amalgam remains a material commonly used by United States dentists to restore posterior caries lesions. PMID:21628683

  8. [Multiple agenesis and prosthetic restoration].

    PubMed

    Renault, P

    1990-03-01

    Cases of multiple agenesia present some difficulties in the treatment planing. Three situations may be encountered: limited agenesia, restored by a fixed, bonded or cemented prosthesis, multiple uni- or bimaxillary agenesia without remaining of deciduous teeth, restored by a fixed, bonded or cemented prosthesis or the partial adjacent prosthesis, multiple uni- or bimaxillary agenesia with remaining of deciduous teeth, restored by means of a supra-dental prosthesis. The first two situations have been described in dental literature and are relatively easy to treat. The same is not true for the third situation, where the decision to keep the temporary teeth considerably increases the difficulty of prosthetic restoration. This subject will be illustrated by the presentation of a clinical case of multiple bi-maxillary agenesia. The patient has: on the maxilla: an absence of 9 permanent teeth (18, 15, 14, 12, 22, 23, 24, 25, 28) and the presence of 4 deciduous teeth (62, 63, 64, 65), on the mandible: an absence of all permanent teeth, with the exception of 36 and 46, and the remaining of 4 deciduous teeth (75, 73, 83, 84). The remaining of deciduous teeth and the presence of a very high inter-arch space led to opting for dental coverage so as to keep the deciduous teeth and a proper vertical dimension. The patient wished to solve his "problem" in the maxilla first, and is not wanting to undergo the extraction of his deciduous teeth. The following therapeutic proposal was adapted: On the maxilla, a three-step procedure: first step: building of metal copings on 13, 16 and 26 and metal-ceramic crowns on 11 and 21, second step: building of telescop crowns on 16 and 26 and clasps on 13, 11 and 21, third step: casting of the removable partial denture framework and soldering to the telescop crowns and clasps. On the mandible, a provisional restoration using a supra-dental resin removable partial denture with ceramic occlusal surfaces was adopted. The aesthetic and functional

  9. Bonded Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Another spinoff to the food processing industry involves a dry lubricant developed by General Magnaplate Corp. of Linden, N.J. Used in such spacecraft as Apollo, Skylab and Viking, the lubricant is a coating bonded to metal surfaces providing permanent lubrication and corrosion resistance. The coating lengthens equipment life and permits machinery to be operated at greater speed, thus increasing productivity and reducing costs. Bonded lubricants are used in scores of commercia1 applications. They have proved particularly valuable to food processing firms because, while increasing production efficiency, they also help meet the stringent USDA sanitation codes for food-handling equipment. For example, a cookie manufacturer plagued production interruptions because sticky batter was clogging the cookie molds had the brass molds coated to solve the problem. Similarly, a pasta producer faced USDA action on a sanitation violation because dough was clinging to an automatic ravioli-forming machine; use of the anti-stick coating on the steel forming plates solved the dual problem of sanitation deficiency and production line downtime.

  10. Restoration technology branch

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2007-01-01

    The mission of Leetown Science Center (LSC), Restoration Technology Branch (RTB) is to conduct research needed to restore or protect the chemical, physical and biological integrity of desirable aquatic systems.

  11. Effects of elevated temperatures on different restorative materials: An aid to forensic identification processes

    PubMed Central

    Pol, Chetan A.; Ghige, Suvarna K.; Gosavi, Suchitra R.; Hazarey, Vinay K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Heat-induced alterations to dental and restorative materials can be of great interest to forensic dentistry. Knowing the specific optical behavior of dental materials can be of high importance as recognition of changes induced by high temperatures can lead to the determination of material which was used in a dental restoration, facilitating identification of burned human remains. Aim: To observe the effects of predetermined temperatures (200°C–400°C–600°C–800°C–1000°C) on unrestored teeth and different restorative materials macroscopically and then examine them under a stereomicroscope for the purpose of identification. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 375 extracted teeth which were divided into five groups of 75 teeth each as follows: group 1- unrestored teeth, group 2- teeth restored with all-ceramic crowns, Group 3- with class I silver amalgam filling, group 4- with class I composite restoration, and group 5- with class I glass ionomer cement restoration. Results: Unrestored and restored teeth display a series of specific macroscopic & stereomicroscopic structural changes for each range of temperature. Conclusion: Dental tissues and restorative materials undergo a series of changes which correlate well with the various temperatures to which they were exposed. These changes are a consequence of the nature of the materials and their physicochemical characteristics. PMID:26005305

  12. Embryotoxicity assays for leached components from dental restorative materials

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Currently, there are no suitable assays available to evaluate the embryotoxicity of leached components from restorative dental materials. Methods The effect of the medium conditioned by composites and amalgam on mouse blastocysts in vitro was tested. The materials were also subcutaneously implanted, and the effect of the medium supplemented with serum from the host blood was evaluated in the embryotoxicity assay. The embryo implantation rate in the material-transplanted mothers was also evaluated. Results The results show that while the culture in media conditioned by amalgams did not affect blastocyst development, the medium conditioned by composites caused blastocyst degeneration and apoptosis. The development of blastocysts in a medium containing serum obtained from animals after transplantation was, however, without effect. Finally, inconsistent reduction in the implantation rate in transplanted mothers was observed. Conclusions In this study, we provide examples of in vitro and in vivo tests that may be used to evaluate embryotoxicity for dental materials. Our results show that leached components from our composite-material induced embryotoxicity in vitro, however, no toxicity was observed when subcutaneously implanted in vivo. This highlights the necessity of integrated in vitro and in vivo tests for valuable predictive estimation of embryotoxicity for complex materials. PMID:21978455

  13. Linking restoration ecology with coastal dune restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lithgow, D.; Martínez, M. L.; Gallego-Fernández, J. B.; Hesp, P. A.; Flores, P.; Gachuz, S.; Rodríguez-Revelo, N.; Jiménez-Orocio, O.; Mendoza-González, G.; Álvarez-Molina, L. L.

    2013-10-01

    Restoration and preservation of coastal dunes is urgently needed because of the increasingly rapid loss and degradation of these ecosystems because of many human activities. These activities alter natural processes and coastal dynamics, eliminate topographic variability, fragment, degrade or eliminate habitats, reduce diversity and threaten endemic species. The actions of coastal dune restoration that are already taking place span contrasting activities that range from revegetating and stabilizing the mobile substrate, to removing plant cover and increasing substrate mobility. Our goal was to review how the relative progress of the actions of coastal dune restoration has been assessed, according to the ecosystem attributes outlined by the Society of Ecological Restoration: namely, integrity, health and sustainability and that are derived from the ecological theory of succession. We reviewed the peer reviewed literature published since 1988 that is listed in the ISI Web of Science journals as well as additional references, such as key books. We exclusively focused on large coastal dune systems (such as transgressive and parabolic dunefields) located on natural or seminatural coasts. We found 150 articles that included "coastal dune", "restoration" and "revegetation" in areas such as title, keywords and abstract. From these, 67 dealt specifically with coastal dune restoration. Most of the studies were performed in the USA, The Netherlands and South Africa, during the last two decades. Restoration success has been assessed directly and indirectly by measuring one or a few ecosystem variables. Some ecosystem attributes have been monitored more frequently (ecosystem integrity) than others (ecosystem health and sustainability). Finally, it is important to consider that ecological succession is a desirable approach in restoration actions. Natural dynamics and disturbances should be considered as part of the restored system, to improve ecosystem integrity, health and

  14. Nonthermal Atmospheric Plasmas in Dental Restoration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Liu, Q; Yu, Q S; Wang, Y

    2016-05-01

    It is well known that the service life of contemporary composite restoration is unsatisfactory, and longevity of dentin bonding is one of the major culprits. Bonding is essentially a hybridization process in which dental substrate and adhesive resin interact with each other through an exchange process. Thus, the longevity of dentin bonding can only be improved with enhanced qualities in substrate, adhesive resin, and their interaction within the hybridization zone. This review aims to collect and summarize recent advances in utilizing nonthermal atmospheric plasmas (NTAPs)-a novel technology that delivers highly reactive species in a gaseous medium at or below physiologic temperature-to improve the durability of dentin bonding by addressing these 3 issues simultaneously. Overall, NTAP has demonstrated efficacies in improving a number of critical properties for dentin bonding, including deactivation of oral pathogens, modification of surface chemistry/properties, resin polymerization, improvement in adhesive-dentin interactions, and establishment of auxiliary bonding mechanism. While a few preliminary studies have indicated the benefit of NTAP to bond strength and stability, additional researches are warranted to employ knowledge acquired so far and to evaluate these properties in a systematic way.

  15. Nonthermal Atmospheric Plasmas in Dental Restoration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Liu, Q; Yu, Q S; Wang, Y

    2016-05-01

    It is well known that the service life of contemporary composite restoration is unsatisfactory, and longevity of dentin bonding is one of the major culprits. Bonding is essentially a hybridization process in which dental substrate and adhesive resin interact with each other through an exchange process. Thus, the longevity of dentin bonding can only be improved with enhanced qualities in substrate, adhesive resin, and their interaction within the hybridization zone. This review aims to collect and summarize recent advances in utilizing nonthermal atmospheric plasmas (NTAPs)-a novel technology that delivers highly reactive species in a gaseous medium at or below physiologic temperature-to improve the durability of dentin bonding by addressing these 3 issues simultaneously. Overall, NTAP has demonstrated efficacies in improving a number of critical properties for dentin bonding, including deactivation of oral pathogens, modification of surface chemistry/properties, resin polymerization, improvement in adhesive-dentin interactions, and establishment of auxiliary bonding mechanism. While a few preliminary studies have indicated the benefit of NTAP to bond strength and stability, additional researches are warranted to employ knowledge acquired so far and to evaluate these properties in a systematic way. PMID:26848068

  16. Comparison of chlorine and chloramine in the release of mercury from dental amalgam.

    PubMed

    Stone, Mark E; Scott, John W; Schultz, Stephen T; Berry, Denise L; Wilcoxon, Monte; Piwoni, Marv; Panno, Brent; Bordson, Gary

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to compare the ability of chlorine (HOCl/OCl(-)) and monochloramine (NH(2)Cl) to mobilize mercury from dental amalgam. Two types of amalgam were used in this investigation: laboratory-prepared amalgam and samples obtained from dental-unit wastewater. For disinfectant exposure simulations, 0.5 g of either the laboratory-generated or clinically obtained amalgam waste was added to 250 mL amber bottles. The amalgam samples were agitated by end-over-end rotation at 30 rpm in the presence of 1 mg/L chlorine, 10 mg/L chlorine, 1 mg/L monochloramine, 10 mg/L monochloramine, or deionized water for intervals of 0 h, 2 h, 4 h, 8 h, and 24 h for the clinically obtained amalgam waste samples and 4 h and 24 h for the laboratory-prepared samples. Chlorine and monochloramine concentrations were measured with a spectrophotometer. Samples were filtered through a 0.45 microm membrane filter and analyzed for mercury with USEPA standard method 245.7. When the two sample types were combined, the mean mercury level in the 1 mg/L chlorine group was 0.020 mg/L (n=25, SD=0.008). The 10 mg/L chlorine group had a mean mercury concentration of 0.59 mg/L (n=25, SD=1.06). The 1 mg/L chloramine group had a mean mercury level of 0.023 mg/L (n=25, SD=0.010). The 10 mg/L chloramine group had a mean mercury level of 0.024 mg/L (n=25, SD=0.011). Independent samples t-tests showed that there was a significant difference between the natural log mercury measurements of 10 mg/L chlorine compared to those of 1 mg/L and 10 mg/L chloramine. Changing from chlorine to chloramine disinfection at water treatment plants would not be expected to produce substantial increases in dissolved mercury levels in dental-unit wastewater.

  17. Element sensitive X-ray micro tomography for determination of the metal diffusion in teeth with amalgam fillings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masschaele, B.; Baechler, S.; Cauwels, P.; Cloetens, P.; Dierick, M.; Jolie, J.; Mondelaers, W.

    2001-06-01

    Element sensitive X-ray tomography has been applied to detect the metal diffusion from the amalgam tooth filling into the tooth. By performing tomographies with energies above and below the K-edges of the various metals of the amalgam, it is possible to determine their distribution. Here presented are the results of measurements at ID15 and ID19 of the ESRF. To improve the sensitivity of our measurements a method for contrast enhancement for projections was developed.

  18. Three-year Clinical Evaluation of Different Restorative Resins in Class I Restorations.

    PubMed

    Yazici, Ar; Ustunkol, I; Ozgunaltay, G; Dayangac, B

    2013-12-19

    SUMMARY The aim of the present study was to evaluate the three-year clinical performance of a nanofilled resin composite, a packable resin composite, and silorane-based resin restorations in Class I occlusal cavities. Twenty-eight patients with at least three similar-sized occlusal lesions in molar teeth participated in the study. A total of 84 Class I occlusal restorations were placed: 28 with nanofilled resin composite (Filtek Supreme), 28 with packable resin composite (P60), and 28 with silorane-based resin (Filtek Silorane). Filtek Supreme and P60 were used with their respective etch-and-rinse adhesive system, Adper Single Bond 2, and Filtek Silorane was used with its respective self-etch adhesive, Filtek Silorane Adhesive. All restorations were placed by the same operator. The restorations were evaluated at baseline, at six months, and annually for three years according to modified US Public Health Service criteria by two calibrated examiners who did not know which restorative resin had been used. The three restorative materials for each category were compared using the χ(2) test at a significance level of 0.05. Cochran's Q test was used to compare the changes across the five time points for each restorative material. McNemar's test followed by Bonferroni adjustment was used when significance differences were found. At the end of the three years, 60 restorations were evaluated in 20 patients, with a recall rate of 71.4%. The retention rate was 100% for all restorative resins. Eight restorations from the P60 group, ten from the Filtek Supreme group, and nine from the Filtek Silorane group were rated Bravo for marginal discoloration. For marginal adaptation, three P60, five Filtek Supreme, and 11 Filtek Silorane restorations were rated Bravo. No statistically significant differences in overall clinical performance were found between the restorative materials except for marginal adaptation. P60 showed the best marginal adaptation at the end of the three years

  19. Three-year clinical evaluation of different restorative resins in class I restorations.

    PubMed

    Yazici, A R; Ustunkol, I; Ozgunaltay, G; Dayangac, B

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the three-year clinical performance of a nanofilled resin composite, a packable resin composite, and silorane-based resin restorations in Class I occlusal cavities. Twenty-eight patients with at least three similar-sized occlusal lesions in molar teeth participated in the study. A total of 84 Class I occlusal restorations were placed: 28 with nanofilled resin composite (Filtek Supreme), 28 with packable resin composite (P60), and 28 with silorane-based resin (Filtek Silorane). Filtek Supreme and P60 were used with their respective etch-and-rinse adhesive system, Adper Single Bond 2, and Filtek Silorane was used with its respective self-etch adhesive, Filtek Silorane Adhesive. All restorations were placed by the same operator. The restorations were evaluated at baseline, at six months, and annually for three years according to modified US Public Health Service criteria by two calibrated examiners who did not know which restorative resin had been used. The three restorative materials for each category were compared using the χ (2) test at a significance level of 0.05. Cochran's Q test was used to compare the changes across the five time points for each restorative material. McNemar's test followed by Bonferroni adjustment was used when significance differences were found. At the end of the three years, 60 restorations were evaluated in 20 patients, with a recall rate of 71.4%. The retention rate was 100% for all restorative resins. Eight restorations from the P60 group, ten from the Filtek Supreme group, and nine from the Filtek Silorane group were rated Bravo for marginal discoloration. For marginal adaptation, three P60, five Filtek Supreme, and 11 Filtek Silorane restorations were rated Bravo. No statistically significant differences in overall clinical performance were found between the restorative materials except for marginal adaptation. P60 showed the best marginal adaptation at the end of the three years. No

  20. Effect of mercury (Hg) dental amalgam fillings on renal and oxidative stress biomarkers in children.

    PubMed

    Al-Saleh, Iman; Al-Sedairi, Al anoud; Elkhatib, Rola

    2012-08-01

    We examined the effect of mercury (Hg) associated with dental amalgam fillings on biomarkers of renal and oxidative stress in children between the ages of 5-15.5 years. Urine samples were analyzed for N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG), α(1)-microglobulin (α(1)-MG), β(2)-microglobulin (β(2)-MG), retinol binding protein (RBP), albumin (ALB), 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and malondialdehyde (MDA). The level of urinary Hg (UHg-C) was calculated as μg/g creatinine. Multiple regression analyses revealed that the excretion of urinary NAG was significantly associated with the presence of dental amalgam fillings (β=0.149, P=0.03) and the levels of UHg-C (β=0.531, P=0), with an interaction between the two (P=0). The increase in urinary NAG in relation to UHg-C levels had a dose-effect pattern. The lowest observed effect was seen at UHg-C levels above 1.452 μg/g creatinine, which is lower than previously reported. In contrast, α(1)-MG was negatively associated with the presence of dental amalgam fillings (β=-0.270, P=0), but positively with UHg-C levels (β=0.393, P=0). There were 7 children without, and one child with, dental amalgam fillings with urinary α(1)-MG levels above the reference limit of >7 mg/g creatinine. Even though α(1)-MG seems to be a reliable biomarker for early changes in renal functions, it might exert its effect only at a higher level of exposure. An inverse relationship was also observed between urinary 8-OHdG levels and the presence of dental amalgam fillings. This might suggest that the dental amalgam does not increase DNA damage but reduces the capacity to repair DNA, leading to lower urinary excretion of 8-OHdG. On the other hand, we found that Hg affected the excretion of urinary 8-OHdG in a dose-related pattern that was mostly associated with long-term exposure to low Hg levels. Urinary NAG levels were positively associated with urinary MDA levels (β=0.516, P=0) but not with 8-OHdG (β=0.134, P=0.078) after adjustment for

  1. Apical leakage following CO2 laser apicoectomy and conventional amalgam retrofilling: a comparative study in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.; Cavalcanti, P. H. H. A.; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.

    1999-05-01

    To perform this study, 40 extracted single rooted human teeth were used to compare dye leakage between apicoectomy following amalgam retrofill and apicoectomy using CO2 laser irradiation. All the 40 teeth were endodontically treated and than were separate in two groups of 20 teeth each. A bur was used to ressect the apexes of the sample of group I followed by silver amalgam retrofill. the 20 teeth of group II had their apexes ressected with a Carbon Dioxide laser beam. All the samples were submerged into a methylene blue dye solution, washed, longitudinally sectioned and graded upon the level of leakage by two separate examiners. The result showed a perfect concordance between both examiners and also, a non significant difference on the level of leakage in the two groups.

  2. Enhancement in resistivity resolution based on the data sets amalgamation technique at Bukit Bunuh, Perak, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson Bery, Andy; Saad, Rosli; Hidayah, I. N. E.; Azwin, I. N.; Saidin, Mokhtar

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we have carried out a study with the main objective to enhance the resolution of the electrical resistivity inversion model by introducing the data sets amalgamation technique to be used in the data processing stage. Based on the model resistivity with topography results, the data sets amalgamation technique for pole-dipole and wenner- schlumberger arrays are successful in identifying the boundary or interface of the overburden and weathered granite. Although the electrical resistivity method is well known, the proper selection of an array and appropriate inversion parameters setting such as damping factors are important in order to achieve the study objective and to image the target at the Earth's subsurface characterizations.

  3. Steady-state transfer and depletion kinetics of mercury from amalgam fillings.

    PubMed

    Halbach, S; Welzl, G; Kremers, L; Willruth, H; Mehl, A; Wack, F X; Hickel, R; Greim, H

    2000-10-01

    In 29 volunteers with a low amalgam load, the number of amalgam-covered tooth surfaces and the occlusal area of the fillings were determined. Before and at select times after removal of all amalgams, concentrations of total mercury were measured by cold-vapor atomic absorption in plasma and erythrocytes as well as in urine together with the excretion rate. Absorbed daily doses were estimated from intraoral Hg emission by two separate methods. The transfer of Hg from the fillings via the oral cavity and blood to urinary excretion was evaluated according to the most representative combination of parameters. This consisted of occlusal area (1), absorbed dose (2), Hg concentration in plasma (3) and urinary excretion (4). Pairwise correlation coefficients were 0.49 for parameters 1 vs. 2, and 0.75 each for parameters 2 vs. 3 and 3 vs. 4. Within 9 days after removal of the fillings, a transient increase in Hg levels was observed in plasma only; in the group without a rubber dam, concentrations increased significantly above pre-removal values at days 1 and 3, whereas they decreased significantly below pre-removal values at day 30 in the rubber-dam group and at day 100 in both groups. Excretion rates decreased significantly at day 100 in the protected group. Peak plasma-Hg was 0.6 ng/ml on average at day 1 and decreased with halftimes of 3 and 43 days in subjects protected by a rubber dam. The results indicated that concentrations of total mercury in plasma responded rapidly to changes in the amalgam status and reflected the actual absorption most reliably. Notably, plasma-Hg levels were sensitive enough to detect a transient attenuation of the additional exposure after using a rubber dam during the removal of only a few fillings. However, being small in magnitude and lasting 100 days at best, the rubber-dam effect had minor toxicological relevance.

  4. Watershed Restoration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Julie Thompson; Betsy Macfarlan

    2007-09-27

    In 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy issued the Eastern Nevada Landscape Coalition (ENLC) funding to implement ecological restoration in Gleason Creek and Smith Valley Watersheds. This project was made possible by congressionally directed funding that was provided through the US Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of the Biomass Program. The Ely District Bureau of Land Management (Ely BLM) manages these watersheds and considers them priority areas within the Ely BLM district. These three entities collaborated to address the issues and concerns of Gleason Creek and Smith Valley and prepared a restoration plan to improve the watersheds’ ecological health and resiliency. The restoration process began with watershed-scale vegetation assessments and state and transition models to focus on restoration sites. Design and implementation of restoration treatments ensued and were completed in January 2007. This report describes the restoration process ENLC undertook from planning to implementation of two watersheds in semi-arid Eastern Nevada.

  5. In vitro corrosion behaviour and microhardness of high-copper amalgams with platinum and indium.

    PubMed

    Ilikli, B G; Aydin, A; Işimer, A; Alpaslan, G

    1999-02-01

    Samples prepared from Luxalloy, GS-80, Permite-C and Logic and polished after 24 h by traditional methods were stored in polypropylene tubes containing phosphate-buffered saline solutions (pH 3.5 and 6.5) and distilled water. The amounts of mercury, silver, tin, copper, zinc, platinum and indium in the test solutions were determined at the first, second, eighth, 52nd and 78th week by atomic absorption spectrometry. At the end of the eighth week the amalgam samples were removed from solutions and evaluated by Rockwell Super Scial Microhardness tester. Statistically significant low amounts of metal ions were measured for Permite-C containing indium and Logic containing platinum. The microhardness test results showed that there were statistically significant increases in the microhardness of Permite-C and Logic. As a result it was shown that the amalgam samples were affected from corrosion conditions to different degrees. Sample of the Logic group that was stored in distilled water, showed smoother surface properties than other amalgam samples containing high copper. However, it was observed that samples of Permite-C group had the smoothest surface properties.

  6. Sealing ability of MTA, Super EBA, Vitremer and amalgam as root-end filling materials.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Cecília Luiz; Cenci, Maximiliano Sérgio; Demarco, Flávio Fernando

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the root-end sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA Angelus), reinforced zinc oxide-eugenol cement (Super EBA), resin-modified glass ionomer (Vitremer) and zinc-free amalgam (GS-80) (control). The root canals of eighty human lower molars were accessed, cleansed, shaped and obturated. Apexes were resected and cavities were prepared. Teeth were divided into 4 groups of 40 cavities, root-end filled with the materials, and immersed in methylene blue for 72 h at 37 degrees C. Roots were then sectioned transversally at each millimeter and evaluated under magnification, observing the dye penetration in each section. Data were evaluated using Kruskal-Wallis test at a 5% level of significance, showing the differences among all materials (p < 0.001). The crescent order of microleakage was MTA < Vitremer < Super EBA < amalgam. Higher leakage levels were observed in the first millimeter sections of amalgam, Vitremer and MTA, when compared with the third millimeter section (p < 0.05).

  7. Effect of masticatory cycles on tooth compression and resultant leakage of amalgam retrofills.

    PubMed

    Blum, J Y; Esber, S; Parahy, E; Franquin, J C

    1997-10-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the effect of changes in tooth structure due to masticatory cycles on amalgam retrofillings performed to different cavity depths. Forty upper maxillary first molars were tested. In the obturated palatal root apical amalgam was inserted to different depths (1.5 and 3 mm). Eight casts were built, each having four sample molars. To block the teeth, the vestibular roots were embedded in resin (palatal root was left free). The eight remaining retrofilled teeth served as controls and were not submitted to occlusal forces. A mechanical device to simulate masticatory cycles subjected the teeth to 500,000 to three million cycles. Leakage was assessed from dye penetration observations. The values of microleakage were analyzed and compared, and strain gauges were used to assess structural modifications to the tooth. The leakage of all retrofilled obturations increased in correlation with the number of masticatory cycles. At three million cycles, root length compression was 0.3 +/- 0.02%. Leakage was significantly less for the deeper cavity preparations at all stages. This in vitro study suggests a significant effect by root compression due to masticatory loads on the leakage of retrofilled amalgam obturations. PMID:9587270

  8. Determination of the cathode and anode voltage drops in high power low-pressure amalgam lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilyak, L. M.; Vasiliev, A. I. Kostyuchenko, S. V.; Sokolov, D. V.; Startsev, A. Yu.; Kudryavtsev, N. N.

    2011-12-15

    For the first time, cathode and anode drops of powerful low-pressure amalgam lamps were measured. The lamp discharge current is 3.2 A, discharge current frequency is 43 kHz, linear electric power is 2.4 W/cm. The method of determination of a cathode drop is based on the change of a lamp operating voltage at variation of the electrode filament current at constant discharge current. The total (cathode plus anode) drop of voltage was measured by other, independent ways. The maximum cathode fall is 10.8 V; the anode fall corresponding to the maximal cathode fall is 2.4 V. It is shown that in powerful low pressure amalgam lamps the anode fall makes a considerable contribution (in certain cases, the basic one) to heating of electrodes. Therefore, the anode fall cannot be neglected, at design an electrode and ballast of amalgam lamps with operating discharge current frequency of tens of kHz.

  9. Comparison of two all-in-one adhesives bonded to non-carious cervical lesions--results at 3 years.

    PubMed

    Burrow, Michael F; Tyas, Martin J

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of S(3) Bond (Kuraray Corp., Japan) and G-Bond (GC Corp., Japan) all-in-one bonding agents, over 3 years in non-carious cervical lesions (NCCLs). Ethics Committee approval was obtained, and 60 restorations were placed in 11 patients aged 45-84 years (mean 60.5 years), using either Clearfil ST resin composite (Kuraray) and S(3) Bond or Gradia resin composite (GC) and G-Bond alternately, without phosphoric acid etch on the uncut enamel margins. Patients were recalled at 6 months, 1 year, 2 years and 3 years, and photographs were taken for assessment of colour match and marginal discoloration. One patient was not available at 3 years, resulting in 54 restorations being available for evaluation. One restoration of S(3)/Clearfil ST was lost at 2 years, giving retention rates of 97% for S(3) and 100% for G-Bond. At 3 years, six restorations for S(3)/Clearfil ST showed slight marginal discoloration and one restoration pronounced marginal staining. For G-Bond/Gradia at 3 years, 11 restorations exhibited slight marginal staining and one restoration pronounced marginal staining. Most restorations were bonded to sclerotic dentin. Statistical analysis of marginal staining showed no significant difference between the two restoration groups. The degree of marginal staining was almost identical for both materials and tended to be in larger restorations. Both S(3) and G-Bond all-in-one bonding systems appear to be good adhesives for the restoration of NCCL for the length of the current study. Restoration of NCCLs with the newer all-in-one adhesives appears to be a viable alternative technique to more complicated adhesive materials. PMID:21789590

  10. Chemical Bonds II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, R. T.

    1972-01-01

    The continuation of a paper discussing chemical bonding from a bond energy viewpoint, with a number of examples of single and multiple bonds. (Part I appeared in volume 1 number 3, pages 16-23, February 1972.) (AL)

  11. What Determines Bond Costs. Municipal Bonds Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Douglas; And Others

    Public officials in small towns who participate infrequently in the bond market need information about bond financing. This publication, one in a series of booklets published by the Western Rural Development Center using research gathered between 1967-77, discusses factors influencing the marketability and cost of bond financing for towns and…

  12. In vitro lymphoproliferative assays with HgCl2 cannot identify patients with systemic symptoms attributed to dental amalgam.

    PubMed

    Cederbrant, K; Gunnarsson, L G; Hultman, P; Norda, R; Tibbling-Grahn, L

    1999-08-01

    Dental amalgam is suspected, by some exposed individuals, to cause various systemic psychological, sensory, and neurological symptoms. Since not all amalgam-bearers experience such reactions, an individual characteristic--for example, a susceptible immune system--might explain these conditions. In vitro lymphocyte proliferation is a valuable tool in the diagnosis of allergy. With HgCl2 as the antigen, however, the test is hampered, because Hg2+ can cause unspecific lymphocyte proliferation, optimal at 1.4 to 9.5 micrograms HgCl2/mL. Recently, the use of suboptimal HgCl2 concentrations (< or = 0.5 microgram/mL) has been suggested to circumvent these problems. The main aim of this study was to investigate whether patients with systemic symptoms alleged to result from the presence of dental amalgam differ from healthy controls, with reference to in vitro lymphoproliferative responses to HgCl2 < or = 0.5 microgram/mL. Three different test protocols--lymphocyte transformation test (LTT) in micro- and macro-cultures, and the memory lymphocyte immunostimulation assay (MELISA)--were used. Other immune parameters--such as a standard patch test for dental materials, the number of T- and B-lymphocytes, monocytes, granulocytes, and NK cells in peripheral blood, allergic symptoms, and predisposition--were also investigated. Twenty-three amalgam patients, 30 healthy blood donors with amalgam, ten healthy subjects without amalgam, and nine patients with oral lichen planus (OLP) adjacent to dental amalgam and a positive patch test to Hg0 were tested. None of the investigated immune parameters revealed any significant differences between amalgam patients and controls. The sensitivity of in vitro lymphocyte proliferation ranged from 33 to 67%, with the OLP patients as a positive control group, and the specificity from 0 to 70% for healthy controls with a negative patch test to Hg0. Thus, despite the use of HgCl2 < or = 0.5 microgram/mL, a high frequency of positive results was

  13. Restoring the smile: Inexpensive biologic restorations

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Neeti P.

    2014-01-01

    Extensive breakdown of primary teeth to the cervical level and their loss in very young children is not uncommon. Owing to increasing concerns over self-appearance, due considerations to esthetic aspects in addition to restoring function are necessary aspects of rehabilitation of mutilated teeth to help children grow into a psychologically balanced personality. The present article describes rehabilitation of grossly decayed teeth with biologic restorations such as dentine posts, dentine post and core and biologic shell crown. This treatment modality provided a cost-effective esthetic solution. PMID:25097656

  14. Amalgam tattoo: report of an unusual clinical presentation and the use of energy dispersive X-ray analysis as an aid to diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, J.P. Jr.; Greer, J.L.; Daniels, D.S.

    1985-01-01

    An unusual appearing gingival amalgam pigmentation (amalgam tattoo) that completely surrounded the maxillary right first premolar in a 13-year-old boy is presented. Because of the wide distribution and apparent clinical progression of the discoloration, an excisional biopsy was performed. The histopathologic diagnosis of amalgam pigmentation was confirmed in paraffin sections by energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis. Silver, tin, and mercury were detected in the specimen.

  15. Bonding Durability of Four Adhesive Systems

    PubMed Central

    Seyed Tabai, Elaheh; Mohammadi Basir, Mahshid

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to compare the durability of four adhesive systems by assessing their microtensile bond strength (MTBS) and microleakage during six months of water storage. Materials and Methods: A total of 128 human third molars were used. The adhesives tested were Scotch Bond Multipurpose (SBMP), Single Bond (SB), Clearfil-SE bond (CSEB), and All-Bond SE (ABSE). After sample preparation for MTBS testing, the microspecimens were subjected to microtensile tester after one day and six months of water storage. For microleakage evaluation, facial and lingual class V cavities were prepared and restored with composite. After thermocycling, microleakage was evaluated. Bond strength values were subjected to one-way ANOVA and Tamhane’s test, and the microleakage data were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis, Dunn, Mann Whitney and Wilcoxon tests (P<0.05). Results: Single Bond yielded the highest and ABSE yielded the lowest bond strength at one day and six months. Short-term bond strength of SBMP and CSEB was similar. After six months, a significant decrease in bond strength was observed in ABSE and SBMP groups. At one day, ABSE showed the highest microleakage at the occlusal margin; however, at the gingival margin, there was no significant difference among groups. Long-term microleakage of all groups at the occlusal margins was similar, whilst gingival margins of SBMP and SB showed significantly higher microleakage. Conclusion: The highest MTBS and favorable sealability were obtained by Clearfil SE bond. Water storage had no effect on microleakage of self-etch adhesives at the gingival margin or MTBS of CSEB and SB. PMID:27123015

  16. Ionizing irradiation affects the microtensile resin dentin bond strength under simulated clinical conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Suman; Yadav, Harish

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study evaluated the effect of ionizing radiations on resin–dentin interface in terms of marginal adaptation and micro-tensile bond strength under thermocycling and mechanical loading. Materials and Methods: Forty extracted human mandibular third molars were divided into four groups. GR I: No Irradiation and Class II MO cavities were prepared that were restored with composite restorations; GR II: Teeth were irradiated and restored; GR III: Teeth were restored and irradiated; GR IV: Teeth were restored during irradiation dosage fractions. All samples were thermal and mechanical loaded with 5000 cycles, 5 ± 2-55 ± 2°C, dwell time 30 s and 150,000 cycles at 60N. Resin–dentin slabs were trimmed into dumbbell-shaped slabs and microtensile bond strength was measured. The bond strength data was analyzed by one-way analysis of variance test. Results and Conclusions: Irradiation before tooth preparation deteriorated the microtensile bond strength. PMID:23716968

  17. Utah Paiute Tribal Restoration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Allen C.

    The Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah Restoration Act (1980) restored federal recognition of the tribe after a quarter century of ambiguous political status, and resulted in significant improvements of educational status of tribal members and intensification of the political presence of Southern Paiutes. Following the Paiute Indian Termination Act…

  18. Power system restoration issues

    SciTech Connect

    Adibi, M.M. ); Kafka, R.J. )

    1991-04-01

    This article describes some of the problems encountered in the three phases of power system restoration (PSR). The three phases of PSR are: Planning for restart and reintegration of the bulk power supply; Actions during system degradation for saving and retaining critical sources of power; Restoration when the power system has stabilized at some degraded level.

  19. Gill's 'History' restored

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurn, Mark

    2009-06-01

    Note about the restoration of the copy of Sir David Gill's 'A History and Description of the Royal Observatory, Cape of Good Hope' in the Library of the Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge. The book was restored with funds provided by the SHA in thanks for facilities for meetings provided to the Institute.

  20. Indirect porcelain veneer technique for restoring intrinsically stained teeth.

    PubMed

    Cutbirth, S T

    1992-01-01

    Indirect porcelain veneers are often the ideal restoration for intrinsically stained teeth. This article details a step-by-step procedure for esthetically restoring discolored teeth. Porcelain laminate veneers are often indicated when teeth bleaching or direct composite bonding procedures cannot provide the desired esthetic result. Veneers are more appealing to many patients than full coverage crowns because of the more conservative tooth preparation required. If technique details are followed meticulously and cases are appropriately selected, porcelain veneers are not only durable but also promote marvelous gingival health and may be the most esthetic anterior dental restoration.

  1. Retributive and restorative justice.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Michael; Okimoto, Tyler G; Feather, Norman T; Platow, Michael J

    2008-10-01

    The emergence of restorative justice as an alternative model to Western, court-based criminal justice may have important implications for the psychology of justice. It is proposed that two different notions of justice affect responses to rule-breaking: restorative and retributive justice. Retributive justice essentially refers to the repair of justice through unilateral imposition of punishment, whereas restorative justice means the repair of justice through reaffirming a shared value-consensus in a bilateral process. Among the symbolic implications of transgressions, concerns about status and power are primarily related to retributive justice and concerns about shared values are primarily related to restorative justice. At the core of these processes, however, lies the parties' construal of their identity relation, specifically whether or not respondents perceive to share an identity with the offender. The specific case of intergroup transgressions is discussed, as are implications for future research on restoring a sense of justice after rule-breaking.

  2. Bond strength between different bonding systems and densely sintered alumina with sandblasted surfaces or as produced.

    PubMed

    Papia, Evaggelia; Vult von Steyern, Per

    2008-01-01

    The traditional zinc phosphate cementation technique for crowns and fixed partial dentures (FPDs) is based on mechanical retention where the geometry of the prepared tooth provides retention for the restoration. In clinical situations where mechanical retention is compromised or regarded insufficient, a bonding system can be used to provide retention. This study investigates whether bond strengths of different bonding systems to densely sintered high-strength alumina ceramics are sufficient. One hundred twenty pairs of industrially manufactured specimens--one block and one cylinder-shaped disc of densely sintered alumina--were used. The cementation surfaces of the blocks were sandblasted with 110-microm aluminium oxide while the cementation surfaces of the discs were left untreated, as produced. The pairs were then bonded with one of six different bonding systems. Each bonding group of 20 samples was randomly divided into thermocycled and non-thermocycled subgroups (n=10). Both subgroups were stored 1 week in distilled water (37 degrees C). During this week, the thermocycled subgroup underwent 5000 thermocycles (5 degrees C-55 degrees C). Following pre-treatment, the specimens were loaded until fracture in a universal testing machine to determine shear bond strength. Data were analysed using student's t-test and a one-way ANOVA. Fractured interfaces were examined under a light microscope to classify the failure mode of the debonded area as adhesive, cohesive, or a combination of the two. The highest bond strengths, achieved with two of the bonding systems, were significantly higher than the remaining bonding systems, irrespective of pretreatment--(p>0.001). The predominant failure mode for both treated and untreated surfaces was adhesive. Two of the six tested bonding systems achieved sufficient shear bond strength to densely sintered alumina. Furthermore, recommendations on whether to use surface-treated or as produced densely sintered alumina must be based on

  3. Chlorhexidine Preserves Dentin Bond in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Carrilho, M. R. O.; Carvalho, R. M.; de Goes, M. F.; di Hipólito, V.; Geraldeli, S.; Tay, F. R.; Pashley, D. H.; Tjäderhane, L.

    2008-01-01

    Loss of hybrid layer integrity compromises resin-dentin bond stability. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) may be partially responsible for hybrid layer degradation. Since chlorhexidine inhibits MMPs, we hypothesized that chlorhexidine would decelerate the loss of resin-dentin bonds. Class I preparations in extracted third molars were sectioned into two halves. One half was customarily restored (etch-and-rinse adhesive/resin composite), and the other was treated with 2% chlorhexidine after being acid-etched before restoration. Specimens were stored in artificial saliva with/without protease inhibitors. Microtensile bond strengths and failure mode distribution under SEM were analyzed immediately after specimens' preparation and 6 months later. With chlorhexidine, significantly better preservation of bond strength was observed after 6 months; protease inhibitors in the storage medium had no effect. Failure analysis showed significantly less failure in the hybrid layer with chlorhexidine, compared with controls after 6 months. In conclusion, this in vitro study suggests that chlorhexidine might be useful for the preservation of dentin bond strength. PMID:17189470

  4. Impact of rehabilitation with metal-ceramic restorations on oral health-related quality of life.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Gisele Rodrigues; Roscoe, Marina Guimarães; Ribeiro, Cristianne Pacheco; da Mota, Adérito Soares; Martins, Luís Roberto Marcondes; Soares, Carlos José

    2012-01-01

    Dental ceramics present excellent ability to reproduce the natural teeth regarding esthetic and biomechanics. Recently, due to the advancement of ceramic technology, metal-free restorations were developed. However, the traditional metal-ceramic restorations still present the requirements of high strength, long survival in the oral environment and favorable aesthetics. In this context, it is essential to know the specificity of each ceramic system available in order to apply it properly to various clinical situations. This report describes an integrated rehabilitation using metal-ceramic restorations of a patient at 50 years of age, who presented edentulous spaces, and previous unsatisfactory composite and amalgam restorations, and indirect metallic restorations, leading to compromised quality of life in both functional and psychosocial aspects. The impact on quality of life was measured using a generic instrument, OHIP-14, validated for the World Health Organization, which covers both the biological and the psychosocial dimensions. This instrument was applied to the patient before and after treatment. The patient had an overall OHIP-14 score of 28 before the treatment and after treatment the score decreased to 0, showing that dental and oral health conditions are factors that do impact on the quality of life. Rehabilitation has provided functional and aesthetic restorations, harmony of the stomatognathic system and improvement of life quality.

  5. Composite resins and bonded porcelain: the postamalgam era?

    PubMed

    Magne, Pascal

    2006-02-01

    The growing demand of patients for esthetic or metal-free restorations, together with the ongoing interest of the dental profession for tissue-preserving materials have led to the actual development of posterior adhesive restorations. It is now clearly established that a new biomimetic approach to restorative dentistry is possible through the structured use of "tooth-like" restorative materials (composite resins and porcelain) and the generation of a hard tissue bond (enamel and dentin bonding). Scientific studies and clinical experience have validated use of bonded tooth-colored restorations, and we may have entered the so-called "postamalgam era". These significant changes have already impacted daily general practice, including pediatric dentists in California, but it is now critical to assure that the corresponding evidence-based process is integrated to the predoctoral programs statewide and nationwide. This paper reviews the foundations of this evolution, based on maximum tissue preservation and sound biomechanics, the so-called "biomimetic principle". Using scientific evidence and clinical experience, a model for the adequate use of current restorative systems is presented. This work, illustrated with cases with up to 10 and 14 years' follow-up, sets the ground rules for the clinical performance of the posterior esthetic restoration. Important considerations about tooth preparation, matrix techniques, layering methods, immediate dentin sealing and base lining are presented.

  6. Bonding the gap between petralit and ceromers: with case reviews.

    PubMed

    Adams, T C

    2000-01-01

    The search for a metal-free, aesthetic restoration with optimal strength, longevity, and comfort easily dates back to the 19th century. However, the popularity of adhesively retained restorations has reached an all-time high due to improvements in wear, post-op sensitivity, bond material and strength, and aesthetic quality. Targis/Vectris, a ceromer restorative material introduced in 1997 by Ivoclar-Williams, is a ceramic optimized polymer that produces a strong fiber-reinforced tooth-colored restoration. It allows the clinician to fabricate metal-free restorations without the fracture potential seen with ceramic materials. Long-term longitudinal studies of this restorative material will be the litmus test, but we now have 10-year studies that show very promising results.

  7. [Research progress of bonding strength between porcelain veneer and enamel].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hong; Zhang, Fu-qiang

    2014-02-01

    Porcelain veneer had gained more and more attention in dental clinical applications due to its advantages such as good esthetic effects and minor invasiveness. The reliable and consistent adhesive bonding were the key to success. The enamel which featured high mineralization and low moisture would be the ideal bonding part for porcelain veneer. This article was aimed to summarize the research progress regarding to those factors that might had effect on the bonding strength between the porcelain veneer and the enamel including the restoration types of resin adhesives and bonding surface preparations. PMID:24608629

  8. [Research progress of bonding strength between porcelain veneer and enamel].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hong; Zhang, Fu-qiang

    2014-02-01

    Porcelain veneer had gained more and more attention in dental clinical applications due to its advantages such as good esthetic effects and minor invasiveness. The reliable and consistent adhesive bonding were the key to success. The enamel which featured high mineralization and low moisture would be the ideal bonding part for porcelain veneer. This article was aimed to summarize the research progress regarding to those factors that might had effect on the bonding strength between the porcelain veneer and the enamel including the restoration types of resin adhesives and bonding surface preparations.

  9. Survey on the teaching and use in dental schools of resin-based materials for restoring posterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Liew, Zunliang; Nguyen, Edward; Stella, Rita; Thong, Irene; Yip, Natalia; Zhang, Felix; Burrow, Michael F; Tyas, Martin J

    2011-02-01

    A survey was conducted of 100 dental schools worldwide to investigate the current teaching of posterior resin composite restorations. A 20 multi-part question questionnaire was emailed to the selected schools. Schools were selected by ability to understand and respond in English. The questionnaire consisted of four open-ended questions and 16 closed questions on topics such as material selection for restoring posterior teeth, preclinical teaching of resin composite for posterior teeth, restoration size, contraindications, matrix placement methods, lining use, adhesive selection and finishing. Forty-six schools responded. The outcomes showed all schools included the teaching of resin composite for posterior restorations but varied. The majority of schools (63%) no longer taught amalgam as the preferred posterior restorative material. Half of the schools surveyed set numerical clinical requirements for restoration placement. Australian schools had no requirements whilst 92% of Asian schools did. There was a consensus that larger restorations were less suitable for resin composite. Selection of adhesives depended on region. Generally, the schools surveyed showed minor variations philosophically in teaching of the use and placement of resin composite restorations.

  10. Using Multiple Bonding Strategies.

    PubMed

    Larson, Thomas D

    2015-01-01

    There are many ways to bond to tooth structure, some micro-mechanical some chemical, some a combination. Different dentin bonding materials have different bonding strengths to differently prepared surfaces, and because of differences in their nature, different areas of tooth structure present peculiar bonding challenges. This paper will review a variety of material types, elucidating their particular bonding strengths and commenting on improved bonding strategies to increase durability, strength, and favorable pulpal response. In this discussion, resin dentin bonding systems, glass ionomers, Gluma, resin cements, and newer combined products will br reviewed. PMID:26485903

  11. Using Multiple Bonding Strategies.

    PubMed

    Larson, Thomas D

    2015-01-01

    There are many ways to bond to tooth structure, some micro-mechanical some chemical, some a combination. Different dentin bonding materials have different bonding strengths to differently prepared surfaces, and because of differences in their nature, different areas of tooth structure present peculiar bonding challenges. This paper will review a variety of material types, elucidating their particular bonding strengths and commenting on improved bonding strategies to increase durability, strength, and favorable pulpal response. In this discussion, resin dentin bonding systems, glass ionomers, Gluma, resin cements, and newer combined products will br reviewed.

  12. Distribution of toxic elements in teeth treated with amalgam using μ-energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, M.; Ferreira, C.; Carvalho, M. L.; Santos, J. P.; Pessanha, S.

    2016-08-01

    Over the years, the presence of mercury in amalgam fillings has raised some safety concerns. Amalgam is one of the most commonly used tooth fillings and contains approximately 50% of elemental mercury and 50% of other metals, mostly silver, tin and copper. Amalgam can release small amounts of mercury vapor over time, and patients can absorb these vapors by inhaling or ingesting them. In this study, 10 human teeth treated with dental amalgam were analyzed using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) to study the diffusion of its constituents, Ag, Cu, Sn and Hg. The used EDXRF setup, makes use of a polycapillary lens to focus radiation up to 25 μm allowing the mapping of the elemental distribution in the samples. Quantification was performed using the inbuilt software based on the Fundamental Parameters method for bulk samples, considering a hydroxyapatite matrix. The teeth were longitudinally cut and each slice was scanned from the surface enamel to the inner region (dentin and pulp cavity). Mercury concentration profiles show strong levels of this element close to the amalgam region, decreasing significantly in the dentin, and increasing again up to 40,000 μg·g- 1 in the cavity were the pulp used to exist when the tooth was vital.

  13. Amalgam, an axon guidance Drosophila adhesion protein belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily: over-expression, purification and biophysical characterization.

    PubMed

    Zeev-Ben-Mordehai, Tzviya; Paz, Aviv; Peleg, Yoav; Toker, Lilly; Wolf, Sharon G; Rydberg, Edwin H; Sussman, Joel L; Silman, Israel

    2009-02-01

    Amalgam, a multi-domain member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, possesses homophilic and heterophilic cell adhesion properties. It is required for axon guidance during Drosophila development in which it interacts with the extracellular domain of the transmembrane protein, neurotactin, to promote adhesion. Amalgam was heterologously expressed in Pichia pastoris, and the secreted protein product, bearing an NH(2)-terminal His(6)Tag, was purified from the growth medium by metal affinity chromatography. Size exclusion chromatography separated the purified protein into two fractions: a major, multimeric fraction and a minor, dimeric one. Two protocols to reduce the percentage of multimers were tested. In one, protein induction was performed in the presence of the zwitterionic detergent CHAPS, yielding primarily the dimeric form of amalgam. In a second protocol, agitation was gradually reduced during the course of the induction and antifoam was added daily to reduce the air/liquid interfacial foam area. This latter protocol lowered the percentage of multimer 2-fold, compared to constant agitation. Circular dichroism measurements showed that the dimeric fraction had a high beta-sheet content, as expected for a protein with an immunoglobulin fold. Dynamic light scattering and sedimentation velocity measurements showed that the multimeric fraction displays a monodisperse distribution, with R(H)=16 nm. When co-expressed together with amalgam the ectodomain of neurotactin copurified with it. Furthermore, both purified fractions of amalgam were shown to interact with Torpedo californica acetylcholinesterase, a structural homolog of neurotactin.

  14. How Dentists Diagnose and Treat Defective Restorations: Evidence from The Dental PBRN

    PubMed Central

    Gordan, Valeria V; Garvan, Cynthia W; Richman, Joshua S; Fellows, Jeffrey L; Rindal, D. Brad; Qvist, Vibeke; Heft, Marc W.; Williams, O Dale; Gilbert, Gregg H

    2010-01-01

    Objectives to (1) identify and quantify the types of treatment that dentists in general dental practice use to manage defective dental restorations; and (2) identify characteristics that are associated with these dentists’ decisions to replace existing restorations. The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) comprises dentists in outpatient practices from five regions: AL/MS: Alabama/Mississippi, FL/GA: Florida/Georgia, MN: dentists employed by HealthPartners and private practitioners in Minnesota, PDA: Permanente Dental Associates in cooperation with Kaiser Permanente’s Center for Health Research, and SK: Denmark, Norway, and Sweden. Methods A questionnaire was sent to all DPBRN practitioner-investigators who reported doing at least some restorative dentistry (n=901). Questions included clinical case scenarios that used text and clinical photographs of defective restorations. Dentists were asked what type of treatment, if any, they would do in each scenario. Treatment options ranged from no treatment to full replacement of the restoration, with or without different preventive treatment options. We used logistic regression to analyze associations between the decision to intervene surgically (repair or replace) and specific dentist, practice, and patient characteristics. Results 512 (57%) DPBRN practitioner-investigators completed the survey. A total of 65% of dentists would replace a composite restoration when the defective margin is located on dentin; 49% would repair it when the defective margin is located on enamel. Most (52%) would not intervene surgically when the restoration in the scenario was amalgam. Dentists participating in solo or small private practice (SPP) chose surgical intervention more often than dentists who participate in large group practices (LGP) or in public health practices (PHP) (p<.0001). Dentists who do not routinely assess caries risk during treatment planning were more likely to intervene surgically and less likely to

  15. A technique to improve the esthetic aspects of CAD/CAM composite resin restorations.

    PubMed

    Rocca, Giovanni Tommaso; Bonnafous, François; Rizcalla, Nicolas; Krejci, Ivo

    2010-10-01

    Bonded indirect computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) restorations are increasingly gaining popularity for the restoration of large defects in posterior teeth. In addition to ceramic blocks, composite resin blocks have been developed. Composite resins blocks may have improved mechanical properties, but have poor esthetics. Thus, an esthetic modification of the restoration after machine milling may be necessary. A step-by-step procedure for the external esthetic layering of a composite CAD/CAM restoration is described. This technique can be used to repair or modify any composite resin restoration.

  16. Bearing restoration by grinding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanau, H.; Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.; Chen, S. M.; Bull, H. L.

    1976-01-01

    A joint program was undertaken by the NASA Lewis Research Center and the Army Aviation Systems Command to restore by grinding those rolling-element bearings which are currently being discarded at aircraft engine and transmission overhaul. Three bearing types were selected from the UH-1 helicopter engine (T-53) and transmission for the pilot program. No bearing failures occurred related to the restoration by grinding process. The risk and cost of a bearing restoration by grinding programs was analyzed. A microeconomic impact analysis was performed.

  17. Dynamic heterogeneity in hydrogen-bonded polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Muresan, Adrian S.; Jeu, Wim H. de; Dubbeldam, Johan L. A.; Schoot, Paul van der; Kautz, Holger; Sijbesma, Rint P.; Monkenbusch, Michael

    2006-09-15

    We report on neutron spin echo experiments on hydrogen-bonded polymers and compare the experimentally found dynamical structure factor with theoretical predictions. Surprisingly, we find that in the melt phase the expected scaling of the Rouse dynamics is not satisfied. We propose an explanation based upon the large spatial volume occupied by the connecting groups. When the effects of these bulky groups on the local friction are taken into account, the usual scaling behavior is restored.

  18. Fracture resistance of posterior teeth restored with modern restorative materials

    PubMed Central

    Hamouda, Ibrahim M.; Shehata, Salah H.

    2011-01-01

    We studied the fracture resistance of maxillary premolars restored with recent restorative materials. Fifty maxillary premolars were divided into five groups: Group 1 were unprepared teeth; Group 2 were teeth prepared without restoration; Group 3 were teeth restored with tetric ceram HB; Group 4 were teeth restored with InTen S; and Group 5 were teeth restored with Admira. The samples were tested using a universal testing machine. Peak loads at fracture were recorded. The teeth restored with Admira had the highest fracture resistance followed by those restored with InTen-S and tetric ceram HB. Prepared, unrestored teeth were the weakest group. There was a significant difference between the fracture resistance of intact teeth and the prepared, unrestored teeth. There was also a significant difference among the tested restorative materials. Teeth restored with Admira showed no significant difference when compared with the unprepared teeth. It was concluded that the teeth restored with Admira exhibited the highest fracture resistance. PMID:23554719

  19. Use of copper shavings to remove mercury from contaminated groundwater or wastewater by amalgamation.

    PubMed

    Huttenloch, Petra; Roehl, Karl Ernst; Czurda, Kurt

    2003-09-15

    The efficacy of copper shavings (Cu(0)) for the removal of Hg2+ from aqueous solution by amalgamation is demonstrated. Two kinds of copper shavings were investigated: (a) chemically processed shavings (Fluka) and (b) recycled shavings from scrap metal. Batch sorption experiments yielded very high retardation coefficients of 28 850-82 830 for the concentration range studied (1-10 000 microg/L Hg2+ dissolved in distilled water or in a 0.01 M CaCl2 matrix solution). Sorption data were well-described bythe Freundlich isotherm equation. Kinetic batch sorption experiments showed that 96-98% of Hg2+ was removed within 2 h. Column experiments were performed with a mercury solution containing 1000 microg/L Hg in a 0.01 M CaCl2 matrix with a flow rate of 0.5 m/d. No mercury breakthrough (c/c(0) = 0.5) could be detected after more than 2300 percolated pore volumes, and the high retardation coefficients determined in the batch studies could be confirmed. Copper was released from the shavings due to the amalgamation process and to copper corrosion by oxygen, resulting in concentrations of mobilized copper of 0.2-0.6 mg/L. Due to their high efficiency in removing Hg2+ from aqueous solution, the use of copper shavings for the removal of mercury from contaminated water is suggested, employing a sequential system of mercury amalgamation followed by the removal of mobilized copper by an ion exchanger such as zeolites. Possible applications could be in environmental technologies such as wastewater treatment or permeable reactive barriers for in situ groundwater remediation.

  20. The release, tissue distribution and excretion of mercury from experimental amalgam tattoos.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, S. W.; Eley, B. M.

    1986-01-01

    Following the subcutaneous implantation of powdered dental amalgam in guinea pigs, there was an initial extrusion of material from the healing implantation wounds. Longer-term release of mercury from the lesions was demonstrated by linear regression analysis of the mercury contents of implant sites removed after time periods of up to 2 years. Raised mercury levels were detected in the blood, bile, kidneys, liver, spleen and lungs of implanted animals; by far the highest concentrations were found in the renal cortex. Mercury was excreted with the urine and, to a lesser extent, the faeces. The pattern of mercury redistribution resembled that seen following chronic exposure to mercuric compounds. PMID:3801303

  1. Structural chemistry and number theory amalgamized: crystal structure of Na11Hg52.

    PubMed

    Hornfeck, Wolfgang; Hoch, Constantin

    2015-12-01

    The recently elucidated crystal structure of the technologically important amalgam Na11Hg52 is described by means of a method employing some fundamental concept of number theory, namely modular arithmetical (congruence) relations observed between a slightly idealized set of atomic coordinates. In combination with well known ideas from group theory, regarding lattice-sublattice transformations, these allow for a deeper mutual understanding of both and provide the structural chemist with a slightly different kind of spectacles, thus enabling a distinct viw on complex crystal structures in general.

  2. How to bond to root canal dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nica, Luminita; Todea, Carmen; Furtos, Gabriel; Baldea, Bogdan

    2014-01-01

    Bonding to root canal dentin may be difficult due to various factors: the structural characteristic of the root canal dentin, which is different from that of the coronal dentin; the presence of the organic tissue of the dental pulp inside the root canal, which has to be removed during the cleaning-shaping of the root canal system; the smear-layer resulted after mechanical instrumentation, which may interfere with the adhesion of the filling materials; the type of the irrigants used in the cleaning protocol; the type of the sealer and core material used in the obturation of the endodontic space; the type of the materials used for the restoration of the endodontically treated teeth. The influence of the cleaning protocol, of the root canal filling material, of the type of the adhesive system used in the restoration of the treated teeth and of the region of the root canal, on the adhesion of several filling and restorative materials to root canal dentin was evaluated in the push-out bond strength test on 1-mm thick slices of endodontically treated human teeth. The results showed that all these factors have a statistically significant influence on the push-out bond strength. Formation of resin tags between radicular dentin and the investigated materials was observed in some of the samples at SEM analysis.

  3. Assessing ex vivo dental biofilms and in vivo composite restorations using cross-polarization optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, R.; Aparicio, C.; Chityala, R.; Chen, R.; Fok, A.; Rudney, J.

    2012-01-01

    A cross-polarization 1310-nm optical coherence tomography system (CP-OCT), using a beam splitter based design, was used to assess ex vivo growth of complex multi-species dental biofilms. These biofilm microcosms were derived from plaque samples along the interface of composite or amalgam restoration in children with a history of early childhood caries. This paper presents a method of measuring the mean biofilm height of mature biofilms using CP-OCT. For our in vivo application, the novel swept source based CP-OCT intraoral probe (Santec Co. Komaki, Japan) dimensions and system image acquisition speed (20 image frames/second) allowed imaging pediatric subjects as young as 4 years old. The subsurface enamel under the interface of composite resin restorations of pediatric subjects were imaged using CP-OCT. Cavitated secondary caries is clearly evident from sound resin composite restorations.

  4. Ecosystem restoration: Chapter 4

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cullinane Thomas, Catherine M.; Skrabis, K. E.; Gascoigne, William

    2012-01-01

    The Department of the Interior extensively supports―through its mission, policy, programs, and funding― the study, planning, implementation, and monitoring of ecosystem restoration. This commitment is reflected in the Department's FY2011-2016 Strategic Plan.

  5. Restoration of Ailing Wetlands

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Oswald J.

    2012-01-01

    It is widely held that humankind's destructive tendencies when exploiting natural resources leads to irreparable harm to the environment. Yet, this thinking runs counter to evidence that many ecological systems damaged by severe natural environmental disturbances (e.g., hurricanes) can restore themselves via processes of natural recovery. The emerging field of restoration ecology is capitalizing on the natural restorative tendencies of ecological systems to build a science of repairing the harm inflicted by humans on natural environment. Evidence for this, for example, comes from a new meta-analysis of 124 studies that synthesizes recovery of impacted wetlands worldwide. While it may take up to two human generations to see full recovery, there is promise, given human will, to restore many damaged wetlands worldwide. PMID:22291573

  6. ESTUARINE HABITAT RESTORATION

    SciTech Connect

    Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.

    2015-09-01

    Restoring estuarine habitats generally means repairing damages caused by humans and natural forces. Because of the extensive human occupation, development, and use of coastal areas for centuries, the extensive estuarine habitats have been either destroyed or significantly impaired.

  7. Restoration of ailing wetlands.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Oswald J

    2012-01-01

    It is widely held that humankind's destructive tendencies when exploiting natural resources leads to irreparable harm to the environment. Yet, this thinking runs counter to evidence that many ecological systems damaged by severe natural environmental disturbances (e.g., hurricanes) can restore themselves via processes of natural recovery. The emerging field of restoration ecology is capitalizing on the natural restorative tendencies of ecological systems to build a science of repairing the harm inflicted by humans on natural environment. Evidence for this, for example, comes from a new meta-analysis of 124 studies that synthesizes recovery of impacted wetlands worldwide. While it may take up to two human generations to see full recovery, there is promise, given human will, to restore many damaged wetlands worldwide.

  8. Hydroxide-catalyzed bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwo, Dz-Hung (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method of bonding substrates by hydroxide-catalyzed hydration/dehydration involves applying a bonding material to at least one surface to be bonded, and placing the at least one surface sufficiently close to another surface such that a bonding interface is formed between them. A bonding material of the invention comprises a source of hydroxide ions, and may optionally include a silicate component, a particulate filling material, and a property-modifying component. Bonding methods of the invention reliably and reproducibly provide bonds which are strong and precise, and which may be tailored according to a wide range of possible applications. Possible applications for bonding materials of the invention include: forming composite materials, coating substrates, forming laminate structures, assembly of precision optical components, and preparing objects of defined geometry and composition. Bonding materials and methods of preparing the same are also disclosed.

  9. Preformed resin-veneered stainless steel crowns for restoration of primary incisors.

    PubMed

    Croll, T P; Helpin, M L

    1996-05-01

    Stainless steel crown forms with bonded resin veneers for primary incisors are commercially available to dentists. This type of preveneered crown was developed to serve as a convenient, durable, reliable, and esthetic solution to the difficult challenge of restoring severely carious primary incisors. This article describes preveneered crowns, reviews their advantages and disadvantages, and details a technique for placement of such restorations.

  10. Preformed resin-veneered stainless steel crowns for restoration of primary incisors.

    PubMed

    Croll, T P; Helpin, M L

    1996-05-01

    Stainless steel crown forms with bonded resin veneers for primary incisors are commercially available to dentists. This type of preveneered crown was developed to serve as a convenient, durable, reliable, and esthetic solution to the difficult challenge of restoring severely carious primary incisors. This article describes preveneered crowns, reviews their advantages and disadvantages, and details a technique for placement of such restorations. PMID:8941812

  11. Inverse relationship between tensile bond strength and dimensions of bonded area.

    PubMed

    Escribano, Nuria I; Del-Nero, Maria O; de la Macorra, Jose C

    2003-07-15

    It is a known fact that there is a relationship between magnitude of bonded area and laboratory tensile test results. This relationship has been described for a range of areas between 1 and 10 mm(2), in extracted, nonperfused teeth. The aim of this study is to test this relationship in perfused teeth, with bonded areas ranging from 0.7 to 110.9 mm(2). Dentin of 92 sound third human molars was exposed and perfused, and three groups of bonded areas (BA) were delimited: small (0.69-1.89 mm(2)), medium (8.66-19.54 mm(2)), and large (58.91-110.86 mm(2)). Tensile bond strength (TBS) of three adhesive restorative systems was found. The best nonlinear curve estimation was searched (SPSS 9.0) between TBS and BA, for each and all materials. The best estimation was, for all materials, TBS = 4.17 + 10.35/BA (p < 0.0001).

  12. Microleakage reduction from newer esthetic restorative materials in permanent molars.

    PubMed

    Ferdianakis, K

    1998-01-01

    Through use of new technologies, such as air-abrasive devices, caries detector dyes, modern technology can increase the speed, comfort and success of dental restorations. However the issue of marginal adaptation has been an ongoing technical problem. Today with the more frequent use of posterior composite resins, poor marginal adaptation of resin is still the major cause of failure of the restoration. Material contraction from polymerization and possibly inappropriate preparation design are key factors in the longevity of the restorations. This study attempts to determine the more effective material and technique for reducing microleakage in composite restorations. An in vitro study using three hybrid composite resins was done to evaluate marginal microleakage. Extracted molars were chosen and evaluated for caries through the use of caries detector dye. Using air-abrasion, caries were removed and minimal preparations were done. The samples were divided into two groups. First group was restored with Herculite XRV and Heliomolar paste composites resins. The second group was restored with Revolution flowable composite resin. Also Opti-bond and Fortify were used as a bonding agent and surface penetrating sealant respectively. The teeth were properly finished, thermocycled and evaluated for leakage using 2% basic fuschin detector dye. All data were subjected to the nonparametric Mann-Whitney Rank Sum Test. The results revealed that Herculite XRV and Heliomolar paste composites had significantly higher microleakage formation (P < 0.03), and also they presented higher void formation (P < 0.0001) than Revolution flowable composite resin.

  13. Resin cementation of zirconia ceramics with different bonding agents

    PubMed Central

    Tanış, Merve Çakırbay; Akay, Canan; Karakış, Duygu

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of sandblasting and different chemical bonding agents on shear bond strength of zirconia and conventional resin cement. In this study, 35 zirconia specimens were treated as follows: Group I: control; Group II: sandblasting; Group III: sandblasting + Monobond S; Group IV: sandblasting + Monobond Plus; Group V: sandblasting + Z-Prime Plus. The specimens in each group were bonded with conventional composite resin cement Variolink II. After cementation, specimens were stored in distilled water (at 37 °C) for 24 h and shear test was performed. The highest shear bond strength values were observed in Groups IV and V. The lowest shear bond strength values were observed in Group I. Using 10-methacryloyloxy-decyl dihydrogenphosphate monomer-containing priming agents, e.g. Monobond Plus and Z-PRIME Plus, combined with sandblasting can be an effective method for resin bonding of zirconia restorations. PMID:26019653

  14. Validity of bond strength tests: A critical review: Part I

    PubMed Central

    Sirisha, Kantheti; Rambabu, Tankonda; Shankar, Yalavarthi Ravi; Ravikumar, Pabbati

    2014-01-01

    Adhesive systems are selected based on their bond strengths achieved while testing in laboratories. These bond strengths can predict the longevity of a restoration to some extent. There were several discrepancies in the reported bond strengths. To critically review the reliability of macro-bond strength tests used to evaluate resin-tooth interface. Relevant literature published between January 1983 and May 2013 was collected from PubMed database, Google scholar, and hand-searched journals of Conservative Dentistry, Endodontics and Dental materials. Variables that influence the test outcome are categorized into substrate-related factors, factors related to specimen properties, preparation of specimens, and test methodology. Impact of these variables on the test outcome is critically analyzed. There is lack of a standard format for reporting the bond strength tests, which could lead to misinterpretation of the data and bonding abilities of adhesives. PMID:25125840

  15. Validity of bond strength tests: A critical review: Part I.

    PubMed

    Sirisha, Kantheti; Rambabu, Tankonda; Shankar, Yalavarthi Ravi; Ravikumar, Pabbati

    2014-07-01

    Adhesive systems are selected based on their bond strengths achieved while testing in laboratories. These bond strengths can predict the longevity of a restoration to some extent. There were several discrepancies in the reported bond strengths. To critically review the reliability of macro-bond strength tests used to evaluate resin-tooth interface. Relevant literature published between January 1983 and May 2013 was collected from PubMed database, Google scholar, and hand-searched journals of Conservative Dentistry, Endodontics and Dental materials. Variables that influence the test outcome are categorized into substrate-related factors, factors related to specimen properties, preparation of specimens, and test methodology. Impact of these variables on the test outcome is critically analyzed. There is lack of a standard format for reporting the bond strength tests, which could lead to misinterpretation of the data and bonding abilities of adhesives. PMID:25125840

  16. A study of composite restorations as a tool in forensic identification

    PubMed Central

    Hemasathya, Bahavathi Ananthan; Balagopal, Sundaresan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Comparing ante-mortem and post-mortem dental data is a principal method of identification in forensic odontology. Radiographic images of amalgam have been used in dental forensics for identification due to their unique appearance. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate whether radio-opaque composite restorations have a potential for identification in forensic odontology. Materials and Methods: Thirty typodont mandibular first molar teeth were prepared with Class-II (proximo-occlusal) cavities and restored with a radio-opaque composite (Tetric N-Ceram). Two sets of standardized radiographs were taken from the 30 teeth, keeping the radiological parameters constant. One set of these 30 radiographs was named as SET 1. Ten randomly chosen radiographs from the other set and two other radiographs of Class-II composite restorations in typodont teeth constituted SET 2. Thirty dentally trained examiners were asked to match the 12 radiographic images of SET 2 with those of SET 1. Results: The results show that 15 examiners were able to correctly match all the 12 images. Statistical analysis was done using kappa statistical test. Conclusion: This study shows that, if the post-mortem radiographs are accurate duplicates of ante-mortem radiographs of composite restorations, then the shape of the composite restoration is unique and can be used for identification. PMID:23960413

  17. Potential of Brass to Remove Inorganic Hg(II) from Aqueous Solution through Amalgamation.

    PubMed

    Wenke, Axel; Bollen, Anne; Richard, Jan-Helge; Biester, Harald

    2016-06-01

    Brass shavings (CuZn45) were tested for their efficiency to remove Hg(II) from contaminated groundwater through amalgamation. The study was focused on long-term retention efficiency, the understanding of the amalgamation process and kinetics, and influences of filter surface alteration. Column tests were performed with brass filters (thickness 3 to 9 cm) flushed with 1000 μg/L Hg solution for 8 hours under different flow rates (300 to 600 mL/h). Brass filters consistently removed >98% of Hg from solution independent of filter thickness and flow rate. In a long-term experiment (filter thickness 2 cm), Hg retention decreased from 96 to 92% within 2000 hours. Batch and column experiments for studying kinetics of Hg removal indicate ~100% Hg removal from solution within only 2 hours. Solid-phase mercury thermo-desorption analysis revealed that Hg(0) diffusion into the brass surface controls kinetics of mercury retention. Brass surface alteration could be observed, but did not influence Hg retention.

  18. Potential of Brass to Remove Inorganic Hg(II) from Aqueous Solution through Amalgamation.

    PubMed

    Wenke, Axel; Bollen, Anne; Richard, Jan-Helge; Biester, Harald

    2016-06-01

    Brass shavings (CuZn45) were tested for their efficiency to remove Hg(II) from contaminated groundwater through amalgamation. The study was focused on long-term retention efficiency, the understanding of the amalgamation process and kinetics, and influences of filter surface alteration. Column tests were performed with brass filters (thickness 3 to 9 cm) flushed with 1000 μg/L Hg solution for 8 hours under different flow rates (300 to 600 mL/h). Brass filters consistently removed >98% of Hg from solution independent of filter thickness and flow rate. In a long-term experiment (filter thickness 2 cm), Hg retention decreased from 96 to 92% within 2000 hours. Batch and column experiments for studying kinetics of Hg removal indicate ~100% Hg removal from solution within only 2 hours. Solid-phase mercury thermo-desorption analysis revealed that Hg(0) diffusion into the brass surface controls kinetics of mercury retention. Brass surface alteration could be observed, but did not influence Hg retention. PMID:27225782

  19. A quantitative method of measuring the microleakage of thermocycled or non-thermocycled posterior tooth restorations.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Dos Santos, Alex José Souza; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei Sartini; Lovadino, José Roberto

    2003-01-01

    This study quantified microleakage in restorations made with three packable resin composites-Solitaire, SureFil and P60; one hybrid resin composite-Z250 and an amalgam-Dispersalloy, with or without the thermocycling process. Sixty sound, freshly extracted human molars were sectioned mesiodistally, creating buccal and lingual blocks. One hundred blocks with the flattest surface were selected. Cylindrical cavities with a diameter of 1.85 +/- 0.05 mm and a depth of 1.5 mm were prepared with a special diamond bur. The blocks were randomly assigned to 10 test groups (n = 10): five restorative materials and two thermal stress groups (thermocycled groups at 3,000 cycles at 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C with a dwell time of one minute at each temperature, or non-thermocycled). After the thermocycling test, the samples were immersed in 2% methylene blue for 12 hours. The samples were ground and the powder prepared for analysis in an absorbance spectrophotometer. All the results were statistically analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis test and the Mann Whitney test. For the non-thermocycled groups, the means (microg/ml) of microleakage were: Amalgam-4.279 (a); Solitaire-4.148 (ab); Z250-3.418 (abc); P60-3.184 (bc); SureFil-2.890 (c). For the thermocycled groups, the means were: Amalgam-7.572 (a); Solitaire-5.471 (a); Z250-4.330 (ab); P60-3.418 (bc) and SureFil-2.779 (c). Thermocycling analysis showed no significant differences between the thermocycled and non-thermocycled groups for each material tested. It was concluded that no test material prevented microleakage. Only SureFil and P60 showed leakage means significantly lower than amalgam, with SureFil showing lower leakage than Solitaire. P60 only showed lower leakage than Solitaire in the thermocycled groups and Z250 showed results similar to the others materials. PMID:14653296

  20. Diffusion bonding aeroengine components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, G. A.; Broughton, T.

    1988-10-01

    The use of diffusion bonding processes at Rolls-Royce for the manufacture of titanium-alloy aircraft engine components and structures is described. A liquid-phase diffusion bonding process called activated diffusion bonding has been developed for the manufacture of the hollow titanium wide chord fan blade. In addition, solid-state diffusion bonding is being used in the manufacture of hollow vane/blade airfoil constructions mainly in conjunction with superplastic forming and hot forming techniques.

  1. Effects of green tea on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets after in-office vital bleaching.

    PubMed

    Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Lopes, Murilo Baena; Oltramari-Navarro, Paula Vanessa; Fernandes, Thais Maria; Schwertner, Renata de Castro Alves; Ursi, Wagner José Silva

    2016-01-01

    The application of bleaching agents before placement of resin-bonded fixed appliances significantly, but temporarily, reduces bond strength to tooth structure. Antioxidants have been studied as a means to remove residual oxygen that compromises bonding to bleached enamel. This in vitro study evaluated whether green tea (GT) could restore the shear bond strength between bonded orthodontic brackets and bleached enamel. Six experimental groups were compared: group 1, no bleaching plus bracket bonding (positive control); group 2, bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) plus bracket bonding (negative control); group 3, 35% HP plus 10% sodium ascorbate (SA) plus bracket bonding; group 4, 35% HP plus 10% GT plus bracket bonding; group 5, no bleaching plus 10% SA plus bracket bonding; group 6, no bleaching plus 10% GT plus bracket bonding. Results suggested that GT, like SA, may be beneficial for bracket bonding immediately after bleaching. PMID:27148662

  2. Failure Rate of Direct High-Viscosity Glass-Ionomer Versus Hybrid Resin Composite Restorations in Posterior Permanent Teeth - a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Mickenautsch, Steffen; Yengopal, Veerasamy

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Traditionally, resin composite restorations are claimed by reviews of the dental literature as being superior to glass-ionomer fillings in terms of restoration failures in posterior permanent teeth. The aim of this systematic review is to answer the clinical question, whether conventional high-viscosity glass-ionomer restorations, in patients with single and/or multi-surface cavities in posterior permanent teeth, have indeed a higher failure rate than direct hybrid resin composite restorations. Methods Eight databases were searched until December 02, 2013. Trials were assessed for bias risks, in-between datasets heterogeneity and statistical sample size power. Effects sizes were computed and statistically compared. A total of 55 citations were identified through systematic literature search. From these, 46 were excluded. No trials related to high-viscosity glass-ionomers versus resin composite restorations for direct head-to-head comparison were found. Three trials related to high-viscosity glass-ionomers versus amalgam and three trials related to resin composite versus amalgam restorations could be included for adjusted indirect comparison, only. Results The available evidence suggests no difference in the failure rates between both types of restoration beyond the play of chance, is limited by lack of head-to-head comparisons and an insufficient number of trials, as well as by high bias and in-between-dataset heterogeneity risk. The current clinical evidence needs to be regarded as too poor in order to justify superiority claims regarding the failure rates of both restoration types. Sufficiently large-sized, parallel-group, randomised control trials with high internal validity are needed, in order to justify any clinically meaningful judgment to this topic. PMID:26962372

  3. Bond percolation in films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korneta, W.; Pytel, Z.

    1988-04-01

    Bond percolation in films with simple cubic structure is considered. It is assumed that the probability of a bond being present between nearest-neighbor sites depends on the distances to surfaces. Based on the relation between the Potts model and the bond percolation model, and using the mean-field approximation, the phase diagram and profiles of the percolation probability have been obtained.

  4. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, B. A.; Tyeryar, J. R.; Hodges, W. T.

    1984-01-01

    Adhesive bonding in the aerospace industry typically utilizes autoclaves or presses which have considerable thermal mass. As a consequence, the rates of heatup and cooldown of the bonded parts are limited and the total time and cost of the bonding process is often relatively high. Many of the adhesives themselves do not inherently require long processing times. Bonding could be performed rapidly if the heat was concentrated in the bond lines or at least in the adherends. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts were developed to utilize induction heating techniques to provide heat directly to the bond line and/or adherends without heating the entire structure, supports, and fixtures of a bonding assembly. Bonding times for specimens are cut by a factor of 10 to 100 compared to standard press bonding. The development of rapid adhesive bonding for lap shear specimens (per ASTM D1003 and D3163), for aerospace panel bonding, and for field repair needs of metallic and advanced fiber reinforced polymeric matrix composite structures are reviewed.

  5. Acrylic mechanical bond tests

    SciTech Connect

    Wouters, J.M.; Doe, P.J.

    1991-02-01

    The tensile strength of bonded acrylic is tested as a function of bond joint thickness. 0.125 in. thick bond joints were found to posses the maximum strength while the acceptable range of joints varied from 0.063 in. to almost 0.25 in. Such joints are used in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory.

  6. Selected mechanical and physical properties and clinical application of a new low-shrinkage composite restoration.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Sillas; Botta, Ana Carolina; Phark, Jin-Ho; Sadan, Avishai

    2009-09-01

    Polymerization shrinkage is a major concern for bonded direct posterior restorations. Recently, a new low-shrinkage composite resin restorative material was developed. However, few data are available regarding clinical manipulation of this composite. Silorane-based composites represent an alternative to conventional methacrylate-based composites for direct posterior restorations. This article critically discusses the latest peer-reviewed reports related to polymerization, bonding, polishing, and color stability of silorane composite, focusing on its clinical application. Initial evaluation of this new category of composite material shows acceptable mechanical and physical properties.

  7. Selected mechanical and physical properties and clinical application of a new low-shrinkage composite restoration.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Sillas; Botta, Ana Carolina; Phark, Jin-Ho; Sadan, Avishai

    2009-09-01

    Polymerization shrinkage is a major concern for bonded direct posterior restorations. Recently, a new low-shrinkage composite resin restorative material was developed. However, few data are available regarding clinical manipulation of this composite. Silorane-based composites represent an alternative to conventional methacrylate-based composites for direct posterior restorations. This article critically discusses the latest peer-reviewed reports related to polymerization, bonding, polishing, and color stability of silorane composite, focusing on its clinical application. Initial evaluation of this new category of composite material shows acceptable mechanical and physical properties. PMID:19639087

  8. Creating esthetic composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Grin, D

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a fabrication technique to assist dental technicians creating esthetic indirect composite restorations. After the teeth have been prepared and the models completed, the technician can begin the fabrication process. Translucent dentin is selected to reduce opacity and enhance the blend with the remaining dentition. High chroma modifiers can then be placed into the fossa area to replicate dentin seen in natural dentition. Different incisal materials can then be layered into the build-up to regulate the value of the restoration. Special effects such as hypocalcification are placed internally to mimic naturally occurring esthetics. Realistic anatomy is created using a small-tipped instrument directly into the final layer of uncured enamel material. Fissure characterization is placed in the restoration to match existing dentition. Fit and margins are verified on separate dies to minimize discrepancies. Path of insertion and proximal contacts are established on a solid model to minimize chairside adjustments.

  9. Restoring the prairie

    SciTech Connect

    Mlot, C.

    1990-12-01

    The US DOE at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, Illinois, prairie restoration is taking place in order to conserve the rich topsoil. This is the largest of many prairie restoration experiments. Big bluestem grass (Andropogon gerardi), blue grama (Bouteloua gracilis), and buffalo grass (Buchloe dactyloides) are the main initial grasses grown. After their growth reaches enough biomass to sustain a fire, other prairie plants such as purple prairie clover and dropseed grass appear. The goal of this is to provide a generous refuge for disappearing native plants and animals, a site for scientific research, and a storehouse of genes adapted to a region that produces much of the worlds food. Plans for restoring the marsh and oak savanna, also native to the Fermilab site are also in the works.

  10. Indirect aesthetic adhesive restoration with fibre-reinforced composite resin.

    PubMed

    Corona, S A M; Garcia, P P N S; Palma-Dibb, R G; Chimello, D T

    2004-10-01

    This paper describes the restoration of an endodontically treated upper first molar with a fibre-reinforced onlay indirect composite resin restoration. The clinical and radiographic examination confirmed that the tooth had suffered considerable loss of structure. Therefore, an indirect restoration was indicated. First, a core was built with resin-modified glass ionomer cement, followed by onlay preparation, mechanical/chemical gingival retraction and impression with addition-cured silicone. After the laboratory phase, the onlay was tried in, followed by adhesive bonding and occlusal adjustment. It can be concluded that fibre-reinforced aesthetic indirect composite resin restoration represented, in the present clinical case, an aesthetic and conservative treatment option. However, the use of fibres should be more extensively studied to verify the real improvement in physical and mechanical properties.

  11. Primary incisor restoration using resin-veneered stainless steel crowns.

    PubMed

    Croll, T P

    1998-01-01

    The restoration of primary incisors with extensive caries lesions is a clinical challenge of severe dimensions. Not only are these teeth difficult to restore, but the patient's behavior can affect the treatment negatively. Requirements for an acceptable restoration include natural color; durability; adhesive cementation that is biocompatible with the pulp; easily and rapidly placed; requires only one treatment visit. Compared to other options, stainless steel crowns are the easiest to place. The most attractive restoration for these cases today is the adhesively bonded resin-composite crown, made by using acetate crown-form matrices, but this is being surpassed by the stainless steel crown forms (3M Unitek) that can be preveneered. This article describes a step-by-step method of placing preveneered stainless steel crowns for primary incisors. PMID:9617447

  12. Glass-ionomer Cements in Restorative Dentistry: A Critical Appraisal.

    PubMed

    Almuhaiza, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Glass-ionomer cements (GICs) are mainstream restorative materials that are bioactive and have a wide range of uses, such as lining, bonding, sealing, luting or restoring a tooth. Although the major characteristics of GICs for the wider applications in dentistry are adhesion to tooth structure, fluoride releasing capacity and tooth-colored restorations, the sensitivity to moisture, inherent opacity, long-term wear and strength are not as adequate as desired. They have undergone remarkable changes in their composition, such as the addition of metallic ions or resin components to their composition, which contributed to improve their physical properties and diversified their use as a restorative material of great clinical applicability. The light-cured polymer reinforced materials appear to have substantial benefits, while retaining the advantages of fluoride release and adhesion. Further research should be directed towards improving the properties, such as strength and esthetics without altering its inherent qualities, such as adhesion and fluoride releasing capabilities. PMID:27340169

  13. Restoration of Shoulder Function.

    PubMed

    Boe, Chelsea C; Elhassan, Bassem T

    2016-08-01

    Restoration of shoulder function in patients with brachial plexus injury can be challenging. Initial reported efforts were focused on stabilizing the shoulder, improving inferior subluxation and restoring abduction and flexion of the joint. Recent advancements and improved understanding of coordinated shoulder motion and the biomechanical properties of the muscles around the shoulder applicable to tendon transfer have expanded available surgical options to improve shoulder function, specifically external rotation. Despite the advances in reconstructive options, brachial plexus injury remains a serious problem that requires complex surgical solutions, prolonged recovery, and acceptance of functional loss. PMID:27387074

  14. Fluid flow after resin-composite restoration in extracted carious teeth.

    PubMed

    Banomyong, Danuchit; Palamara, Joseph E A; Messer, Harold H; Burrow, Michael F

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate fluid flow in dentin after restoration of carious teeth with resin composite bonded with a total-etching adhesive, with or without glass-ionomer cement lining. The roots of extracted third molars were removed and the crowns were connected to a fluid flow-measuring device. Each carious lesion was stained with caries detector dye and caries was removed using slow-speed burs and spoon excavators. Caries-excavated teeth were divided into two groups for restoration with resin composite bonded with a total-etch adhesive: (i) without lining; and (ii) lined with glass-ionomer cement before bonding. In non-carious teeth, cavities of similar dimensions were prepared, divided into two groups, and restored in the same manner. Fluid flow was recorded, after restoration, for up to 1 month. Caries-affected dentin was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the bonded interfaces were observed using a confocal laser scanning microscope. No significant difference in fluid flow was observed between the two restorative procedures or between the carious and non-carious groups. The SEM images showed that the dentinal tubules of acid-etched, caries-affected dentin were usually still occluded, while some were patent. Limited penetration of fluorescent dye into dentin and into the bonded interfaces of restored carious teeth was observed.

  15. One-year clinical evaluation of posterior packable resin composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Loguercio, A D; Reis, A; Rodrigues Filho, L E; Busato, A L

    2001-01-01

    This study evaluated the clinical performance of four packable resin composite restorative materials in posterior teeth (Class I and II) compared with one hybrid composite after one year. Eighty-four restorations were placed in 16 patients. Each patient received at least five restorations. The tested materials were: (1) Solitaire + Solid Bond; (2) ALERT + Bond-1; (3) Surefil + Prime & Bond NT (4) Filtek P60 + Single Bond and; (5) TPH Spectrum + Prime & Bond 2.1. All restorations were made using rubber dam isolation, and the cavity design was restricted to the elimination of carious tissue. Deeper cavities were covered with calcium hydroxide and/or glass ionomer cement. In shallow and medium cavities, no protection was performed except for the respective adhesive system used in each group. Each adhesive system and resin composite was placed according to the manufacturer's instructions. One week later, the restorations were finished/polished and evaluated according to the USPHS modified criteria. All patients attended the one-year recall, and the 84 restorations were evaluated at that time based on the same evaluation criteria. The scores were submitted to statistical analysis (Chi-square test, p<0.05). Solitaire and TPH showed some fractures at marginal ridges. Solitaire, ALERT and TPH showed some concerns related to color match and surface texture. Surefil and Filtek P60 showed an excellent clinical performance after one year.

  16. Bonding thermoplastic polymers

    DOEpatents

    Wallow, Thomas I.; Hunter, Marion C.; Krafcik, Karen Lee; Morales, Alfredo M.; Simmons, Blake A.; Domeier, Linda A.

    2008-06-24

    We demonstrate a new method for joining patterned thermoplastic parts into layered structures. The method takes advantage of case-II permeant diffusion to generate dimensionally controlled, activated bonding layers at the surfaces being joined. It is capable of producing bonds characterized by cohesive failure while preserving the fidelity of patterned features in the bonding surfaces. This approach is uniquely suited to production of microfluidic multilayer structures, as it allows the bond-forming interface between plastic parts to be precisely manipulated at micrometer length scales. The bond enhancing procedure is easily integrated in standard process flows and requires no specialized equipment.

  17. The Minamata Convention on Mercury: attempting to address the global controversy of dental amalgam use and mercury waste disposal.

    PubMed

    Mackey, Tim K; Contreras, John T; Liang, Bryan A

    2014-02-15

    In October 2013, a new international binding treaty instrument called the Minamata Convention on Mercury opened for signature in Minamata City, Japan, the site of arguably the worst public health and environmental disaster involving mercury contamination. The treaty aims to curb the significant health and environmental impacts of mercury pollution and includes provisions addressing the mining, export and import, storage, and waste management of products containing mercury. Importantly, a provision heavily negotiated in the treaty addresses the use of dental fillings using mercury amalgam, an issue that has been subject to decades of global controversy. Though use of dental amalgam is widespread and has benefits, concerns have been raised regarding the potential for human health risk and environmental damage from emissions and improper waste management. While the Minamata Convention attempts to address these issues by calling for a voluntary phase-down of dental amalgam use and commitment to other measures, it falls short by failing to require binding and measurable targets to achieve these goals. In response, the international community should begin exploring ways to strengthen the implementation of the dental amalgam treaty provisions by establishing binding phase-down targets and milestones as well as exploring financing mechanisms to support treaty measures. Through strengthening of the Convention, stakeholders can ensure equitable access to global oral health treatment while also promoting responsible environmental stewardship.

  18. Simple Bond Cleavage

    SciTech Connect

    Gary S. Groenewold

    2005-08-01

    Simple bond cleavage is a class of fragmentation reactions in which a single bond is broken, without formation of new bonds between previously unconnected atoms. Because no bond making is involved, simple bond cleavages are endothermic, and activation energies are generally higher than for rearrangement eliminations. The rate of simple bond cleavage reactions is a strong function of the internal energy of the molecular ion, which reflects a loose transition state that resembles reaction products, and has a high density of accessible states. For this reason, simple bond cleavages tend to dominate fragmentation reactions for highly energized molecular ions. Simple bond cleavages have negligible reverse activation energy, and hence they are used as valuable probes of ion thermochemistry, since the energy dependence of the reactions can be related to the bond energy. In organic mass spectrometry, simple bond cleavages of odd electron ions can be either homolytic or heterolytic, depending on whether the fragmentation is driven by the radical site or the charge site. Simple bond cleavages of even electron ions tend to be heterolytic, producing even electron product ions and neutrals.

  19. Evaluation of the effect of tooth and dental restoration material on electron dose distribution and production of photon contamination in electron beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bahreyni Toossi, Mohammad Taghi; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Akbari, Fatemeh; Mehrpouyan, Mohammad; Sobhkhiz Sabet, Leila

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of tooth and dental restoration materials on electron dose distribution and photon contamination production in electron beams of a medical linac. This evaluation was performed on 8, 12 and 14 MeV electron beams of a Siemens Primus linac. MCNPX Monte Carlo code was utilized and a 10 × 10 cm(2) applicator was simulated in the cases of tooth and combinations of tooth and Ceramco C3 ceramic veneer, tooth and Eclipse alloy and tooth and amalgam restoration materials in a soft tissue phantom. The relative electron and photon contamination doses were calculated for these materials. The presence of tooth and dental restoration material changed the electron dose distribution and photon contamination in phantom, depending on the type of the restoration material and electron beam's energy. The maximum relative electron dose was 1.07 in the presence of tooth including amalgam for 14 MeV electron beam. When 100.00 cGy was prescribed for the reference point, the maximum absolute electron dose was 105.10 cGy in the presence of amalgam for 12 MeV electron beam and the maximum absolute photon contamination dose was 376.67 μGy for tooth in 14 MeV electron beam. The change in electron dose distribution should be considered in treatment planning, when teeth are irradiated in electron beam radiotherapy. If treatment planning can be performed in such a way that the teeth are excluded from primary irradiation, the potential errors in dose delivery to the tumour and normal tissues can be avoided.

  20. Resin bonding to primary teeth using three adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Mazzeo, N; Ott, N W; Hondrum, S O

    1995-01-01

    In vitro bond strengths of three resin adhesive systems were tested using 111 primary teeth. Ninety-six flat dentin surface specimens were divided into six groups consisting of 16 primed or 16 unprimed samples for each adhesive system. The remaining 15 tooth samples were divided into three groups of five to determine each adhesive system's bond strength to primary etched enamel. Resin buttons were polymerized to all specimens with visible light, thermocycled for 2000 cycles between 5 and 55 degrees C, and shear bond strength was measured with a Instron Testing Machine (Instron Engineering Corp, Canton, MA). ANOVA and multiple comparison tests showed that Optibond Multiuse Bonding Agent had a statistically greater mean shear bond strength to primary dentin (20.5 +/- 3.5 MPa) than Prisma Universal Bond 3 Multi-purpose Bonding System (9.1 +/- 4.4 MPa), Scotchbond Multi-purpose Dental Adhesive System (7.3 +/- 3.7 MPa), and primary etched enamel (9.8 +/- 4.4 MPa) at P < 0.05. This study demonstrated that resin adhesive systems may achieve bond strengths to primary dentin comparable to those of primary enamel, and that these bonds may be as strong as bonds to permanent enamel and dentin. These adhesive systems may allow more confident esthetic restoration of primary anterior teeth.

  1. Restoring Fossil Creek

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flaccus, Kathleen; Vlieg, Julie; Marks, Jane C.; LeRoy, Carri J.

    2004-01-01

    Fossil Creek had been dammed for the past 90 years, and plans were underway to restore the stream. The creek runs through Central Arizona and flows from the high plateaus to the desert, cutting through the same formations that form the Grand Canyon. This article discusses the Fossil Creek monitoring project. In this project, students and teachers…

  2. Model for Coastal Restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Thom, Ronald M.; Judd, Chaeli

    2007-07-27

    Successful restoration of wetland habitats depends on both our understanding of our system and our ability to characterize it. By developing a conceptual model, looking at different spatial scales and integrating diverse data streams: GIS datasets and NASA products, we were able to develop a dynamic model for site prioritization based on both qualitative and quantitative relationships found in the coastal environment.

  3. 14. EAST ELEVATION, COTTAGE. EXTERIOR NEARLY RESTORED. INTERIOR UNDERGOING RESTORATION. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. EAST ELEVATION, COTTAGE. EXTERIOR NEARLY RESTORED. INTERIOR UNDERGOING RESTORATION. EUCALYPTUS TREE PLANTED BY GERTRUDE KEIL PLANNED FOR REMOVAL. - Gold Ridge Farm, 7777 Bodega Avenue, Sebastopol, Sonoma County, CA

  4. [Influence of implant restoration on traditional restoration idea].

    PubMed

    Liu, H C

    2016-01-01

    Implant restoration affected the traditional restoration idea. Artificial implant restoration has a profound influence on the design of dental restoration. Implant supported prostheses have not only changed the method of oral rehabilitation, but also integrated revolutionary concept with the traditional treatment protocol. By using implants, posterior missing molars can be effectively restored and thus eliminating the disadvantages of traditional removable partial denture for Kennedy classification Ⅰ, Ⅱ partically edentulous dentition. Full edentulous arch can also be restored with implant fixed denture which provide much better oral health related quality of life compared with the traditional complete denture. It is useful to master the theory and skills of artificial implant restoration, and to provide a reference for the restoration of oral physiological function.

  5. Weak bond screening system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, S. Y.; Chang, F. H.; Bell, J. R.

    Consideration is given to the development of a weak bond screening system which is based on the utilization of a high power ultrasonic (HPU) technique. The instrumentation of the prototype bond strength screening system is described, and the adhesively bonded specimens used in the system developmental effort are detailed. Test results obtained from these specimens are presented in terms of bond strength and level of high power ultrasound irradiation. The following observations were made: (1) for Al/Al specimens, 2.6 sec of HPU irradiation will screen weak bond conditions due to improper preparation of bonding surfaces; (2) for composite/composite specimens, 2.0 sec of HPU irradiation will disrupt weak bonds due to under-cured conditions; (3) for Al honeycomb core with composite skin structure, 3.5 sec of HPU irradiation will disrupt weak bonds due to bad adhesive or oils contamination of bonding surfaces; and (4) for Nomex honeycomb with Al skin structure, 1.3 sec of HPU irradiation will disrupt weak bonds due to bad adhesive.

  6. Design and evaluation of a filter-based chairside amalgam separation system.

    PubMed

    Stone, Mark E; Cohen, Mark E; Berry, Denise L; Ragain, James C

    2008-06-15

    This study evaluated the ability of a chairside filtration system to remove particulate-based mercury (Hg) from dental-unit wastewater. Prototypes of the chairside filtration system were designed and fabricated using reusable filter chambers with disposable filter elements. The system was installed in five dental operatories utilizing filter elements with nominal pore sizes of 50 microm, 15 microm, 1 microm, 0.5 microm, or with no system installed (control). Daily chairside wastewater samples were collected on ten consecutive days from each room and brought to the laboratory for processing. After processing the wastewater samples, Hg concentrations were determined with cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (USEPA method 7470A). Filter systems were exchanged after ten samples were collected so that all five of the configurations were evaluated in each room (with assignment order balanced by a Latin Square). The numbers of surfaces of amalgam placed and removed per day were tracked in each room. In part two, new filter systems with the 0.5 microm filter elements were installed in the five dental operatories and vacuum levels at the high-velocity evacuation cannula tip were measured with a vacuum gauge. In part three of the study, the chairside filtration system utilizing 0.5 microm and 15 microm filter elements was evaluated utilizing the ISO 11143 testing protocol, a laboratory test of amalgam separator efficiency utilizing amalgam samples of known particle size distribution. Mean Hg per chair per day (no filter installed) was 1087.38 mg (SD = 993.92 mg). Mean Hg per chair per day for the 50 microm, 15 microm, 1 microm, 0.5 microm filter configurations was 79.13 mg (SD = 71.40 mg), 23.55 mg (SD = 23.25 mg), 17.68 mg (SD = 17.35 mg), and 4.25 mg (SD = 6.35 mg), respectively (n = 50 for all groups). Calculated removal efficiencies from the clinical samples were 92.7%, 97.8%, 98.4%, and 99.6%, respectively. ANCOVA on data from the four filter groups, with amalgam

  7. Finite element stress analysis of short-post core and over restorations prepared with different restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Gurbuz, Taskin; Sengul, Fatih; Altun, Ceyhan

    2008-07-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the effect on the distribution of stress with the use of short-post cores and over restorations composed of different materials. The restorative materials used were namely two different composite resin materials (Valux Plus and Tetric Flow), a polyacid-modified resin material (Dyract AP), and a woven polyethylene fiber combination (Ribbond Fiber + Bonding agent + Tetric Flow). Finite element analysis (FEA) was used to develop a model for the maxillary primary anterior teeth. A masticatory force of 100 N was applied at 148 degrees to the incisal edge of the palatal surface of the crown model. Stress distributions and stress values were compared using von Mises criteria. The tooth model was assumed to be isotropic, homogeneous, elastic, and asymmetrical. It was observed that the highest stress usually occurred in the cervical area of the tooth when Tetric Flow was used as the short-post core and over restoration material. The same maximum stress value was also obtained when Ribbond fiber + Tetric Flow material was used for the short-post core. The results of FEA showed that the mechanical properties and elastic modulus of the restorative material influenced the stresses generated in enamel, dentin, and restoration when short-post core restorations were loaded incisally. Resin-based restorative materials with higher elastic moduli were found to be unsuitable as short-post core materials in endodontically treated maxillary primary anterior teeth. PMID:18833762

  8. Finite element stress analysis of short-post core and over restorations prepared with different restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Gurbuz, Taskin; Sengul, Fatih; Altun, Ceyhan

    2008-07-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the effect on the distribution of stress with the use of short-post cores and over restorations composed of different materials. The restorative materials used were namely two different composite resin materials (Valux Plus and Tetric Flow), a polyacid-modified resin material (Dyract AP), and a woven polyethylene fiber combination (Ribbond Fiber + Bonding agent + Tetric Flow). Finite element analysis (FEA) was used to develop a model for the maxillary primary anterior teeth. A masticatory force of 100 N was applied at 148 degrees to the incisal edge of the palatal surface of the crown model. Stress distributions and stress values were compared using von Mises criteria. The tooth model was assumed to be isotropic, homogeneous, elastic, and asymmetrical. It was observed that the highest stress usually occurred in the cervical area of the tooth when Tetric Flow was used as the short-post core and over restoration material. The same maximum stress value was also obtained when Ribbond fiber + Tetric Flow material was used for the short-post core. The results of FEA showed that the mechanical properties and elastic modulus of the restorative material influenced the stresses generated in enamel, dentin, and restoration when short-post core restorations were loaded incisally. Resin-based restorative materials with higher elastic moduli were found to be unsuitable as short-post core materials in endodontically treated maxillary primary anterior teeth.

  9. Clinical challenges and the relevance of materials testing for posterior composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Sarrett, David C

    2005-01-01

    Posterior composite restorations have been in use for approximately 30 years. The early experiences with this treatment indicated there were more clinical challenges and higher failure rates than amalgam restorations. Since the early days of posterior composites, many improvements in materials, techniques, and instruments for placing these restorations have occurred. This paper reviews what is known regarding current clinical challenges with posterior composite restorations and reviews the primary method for collecting clinical performance data. This review categorizes the challenges as those related to the restorative materials, those related to the dentist, and those related to the patient. The clinical relevance of laboratory tests is discussed from the perspective of solving the remaining clinical challenges of current materials and of screening new materials. The clinical problems related to early composite materials are no longer serious clinical challenges. Clinical data indicate that secondary caries and restoration fracture are the most common clinical problems and merit further investigation. The effect of the dentist and patient on performance of posterior composite restorations is unclear and more clinical data from hypothesis-driven clinical trials are needed to understand these factors. Improvements in handling properties to ensure void-free placement and complete cure should be investigated to improve clinical outcomes. There is a general lack of data that correlates clinical performance with laboratory materials testing. A proposed list of materials tests that may predict performance in a variety of clinical factors is presented. Polymerization shrinkage and the problems that have been attributed to this property of composite are reviewed. There is a lack of evidence that indicates polymerization shrinkage is the primary cause of secondary caries. It is recommended that composite materials be developed with antibacterial properties as a way of

  10. Modelling the longevity of dental restorations by means of a CBR system.

    PubMed

    Aliaga, Ignacio J; Vera, Vicente; De Paz, Juan F; García, Alvaro E; Mohamad, Mohd Saberi

    2015-01-01

    The lifespan of dental restorations is limited. Longevity depends on the material used and the different characteristics of the dental piece. However, it is not always the case that the best and longest lasting material is used since patients may prefer different treatments according to how noticeable the material is. Over the last 100 years, the most commonly used material has been silver amalgam, which, while very durable, is somewhat aesthetically displeasing. Our study is based on the collection of data from the charts, notes, and radiographic information of restorative treatments performed by Dr. Vera in 1993, the analysis of the information by computer artificial intelligence to determine the most appropriate restoration, and the monitoring of the evolution of the dental restoration. The data will be treated confidentially according to the Organic Law 15/1999 on 13 December on the Protection of Personal Data. This paper also presents a clustering technique capable of identifying the most significant cases with which to instantiate the case-base. In order to classify the cases, a mixture of experts is used which incorporates a Bayesian network and a multilayer perceptron; the combination of both classifiers is performed with a neural network.

  11. Modelling the Longevity of Dental Restorations by means of a CBR System

    PubMed Central

    Aliaga, Ignacio J.; Vera, Vicente; García, Alvaro E.

    2015-01-01

    The lifespan of dental restorations is limited. Longevity depends on the material used and the different characteristics of the dental piece. However, it is not always the case that the best and longest lasting material is used since patients may prefer different treatments according to how noticeable the material is. Over the last 100 years, the most commonly used material has been silver amalgam, which, while very durable, is somewhat aesthetically displeasing. Our study is based on the collection of data from the charts, notes, and radiographic information of restorative treatments performed by Dr. Vera in 1993, the analysis of the information by computer artificial intelligence to determine the most appropriate restoration, and the monitoring of the evolution of the dental restoration. The data will be treated confidentially according to the Organic Law 15/1999 on 13 December on the Protection of Personal Data. This paper also presents a clustering technique capable of identifying the most significant cases with which to instantiate the case-base. In order to classify the cases, a mixture of experts is used which incorporates a Bayesian network and a multilayer perceptron; the combination of both classifiers is performed with a neural network. PMID:25866792

  12. Bonded semiconductor substrate

    DOEpatents

    Atwater, Jr.; Harry A. , Zahler; James M.

    2010-07-13

    Ge/Si and other nonsilicon film heterostructures are formed by hydrogen-induced exfoliation of the Ge film which is wafer bonded to a cheaper substrate, such as Si. A thin, single-crystal layer of Ge is transferred to Si substrate. The bond at the interface of the Ge/Si heterostructures is covalent to ensure good thermal contact, mechanical strength, and to enable the formation of an ohmic contact between the Si substrate and Ge layers. To accomplish this type of bond, hydrophobic wafer bonding is used, because as the invention demonstrates the hydrogen-surface-terminating species that facilitate van der Waals bonding evolves at temperatures above 600.degree. C. into covalent bonding in hydrophobically bound Ge/Si layer transferred systems.

  13. Ecosystem Restoration Research at GWERD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ground Water and Ecosystems Restoration Division, Ada, OK Mission: Conduct research and technical assistance to provide the scientific basis to support the development of strategies and technologies to protect and restore ground water, surface water, and ecosystems impacted b...

  14. Comparative study of mechanical properties of dental restorative materials and dental hard tissues in compressive loads

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Yeop

    2014-01-01

    There are two objectives. One is to show the differences in the mechanical properties of various dental restorative materials compared to those of enamel and dentin. The other is to ascertain which dental restorative materials are more suitable for clinical treatments. Amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy were processed as dental restorative material specimens. The specimens (width, height, and length of 1.2, 1.2, and 3.0 mm, respectively) were compressed at a constant loading speed of 0.1 mm/min. The maximum stress (115.0 ± 40.6, 55.0 ± 24.8, 291.2 ± 45.3, 274.6 ± 52.2, 2206.0 ± 522.9, and 953.4 ± 132.1 MPa), maximum strain (7.8% ± 0.5%, 4.0% ± 0.1%, 12.7% ± 0.8%, 32.8% ± 0.5%, 63.5% ± 14.0%, and 45.3% ± 7.4%), and elastic modulus (1437.5 ± 507.2, 1548.4 ± 583.5, 2323.4 ± 322.4, 833.1 ± 92.4, 3895.2 ± 202.9, and 2222.7 ± 277.6 MPa) were evident for amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy, respectively. The reference hardness value of amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy was 90, 420, 130–135, 86.6–124.2, 1250, and 349, respectively. Since enamel grinds food, its abrasion resistance is important. Therefore, hardness value should be prioritized for enamel. Since dentin absorbs bite forces, mechanical properties should be prioritized for dentin. The results suggest that gold alloy simultaneously has a hardness value lower than enamel (74.8 ± 18.1), which is important in the wear of the opposing natural teeth, and higher maximum stress, maximum strain, and elastic modulus than dentin (193.7 ± 30.6 MPa, 11.9% ± 0.1%, 1653.7 ± 277.9 MPa, respectively), which are important considering the rigidity to absorb bite forces. PMID:25352921

  15. BONDING ALUMINUM METALS

    DOEpatents

    Noland, R.A.; Walker, D.E.

    1961-06-13

    A process is given for bonding aluminum to aluminum. Silicon powder is applied to at least one of the two surfaces of the two elements to be bonded, the two elements are assembled and rubbed against each other at room temperature whereby any oxide film is ruptured by the silicon crystals in the interface; thereafter heat and pressure are applied whereby an aluminum-silicon alloy is formed, squeezed out from the interface together with any oxide film, and the elements are bonded.

  16. Chemical bonding technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plueddemann, E.

    1986-01-01

    Primers employed in bonding together the various material interfaces in a photovoltaic module are being developed. The approach develops interfacial adhesion by generating actual chemical bonds between the various materials bonded together. The current status of the program is described along with the progress toward developing two general purpose primers for ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA), one for glass and metals, and another for plastic films.

  17. Comparison of aesthetic posterior restorations.

    PubMed

    Trushkowsky, R D

    1991-09-01

    In the past decade there has been an increased desire by the profession and the public for an aesthetic restoration that will restore a posterior tooth to its original form and function. The currently available aesthetic posterior restoration materials and techniques are porcelain, cast ceramic, direct composite, direct-indirect composite, indirect composite, and CAD-CAM fabrications. The indications and contraindications of these restorative materials and proper diagnosis and case selection are described.

  18. Equilibrium CO bond lengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demaison, Jean; Császár, Attila G.

    2012-09-01

    Based on a sample of 38 molecules, 47 accurate equilibrium CO bond lengths have been collected and analyzed. These ultimate experimental (reEX), semiexperimental (reSE), and Born-Oppenheimer (reBO) equilibrium structures are compared to reBO estimates from two lower-level techniques of electronic structure theory, MP2(FC)/cc-pVQZ and B3LYP/6-311+G(3df,2pd). A linear relationship is found between the best equilibrium bond lengths and their MP2 or B3LYP estimates. These (and similar) linear relationships permit to estimate the CO bond length with an accuracy of 0.002 Å within the full range of 1.10-1.43 Å, corresponding to single, double, and triple CO bonds, for a large number of molecules. The variation of the CO bond length is qualitatively explained using the Atoms in Molecules method. In particular, a nice correlation is found between the CO bond length and the bond critical point density and it appears that the CO bond is at the same time covalent and ionic. Conditions which permit the computation of an accurate ab initio Born-Oppenheimer equilibrium structure are discussed. In particular, the core-core and core-valence correlation is investigated and it is shown to roughly increase with the bond length.

  19. Volume restoration and facial aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Glasgold, Mark J; Glasgold, Robert A; Lam, Samuel M

    2008-11-01

    This article discusses the rationale for the use of volume restoration to restore natural, youthful contours to an aging face. Topics discussed include the discrepancy that can exist between patients' stated wishes and optimal results and the concepts of framing the eye, creating highlights, and restoring facial shape and volume.

  20. Engineering approaches to ecosystem restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, D.F.

    1998-07-01

    This proceedings CD ROM contains 127 papers on developing and evaluating engineering approaches to wetlands and river restoration. The latest engineering developments are discussed, providing valuable insights to successful approaches for river restoration, wetlands restoration, watershed management, and constructed wetlands for stormwater and wastewater treatment. Potential solutions to a wide variety of ecosystem concerns in urban, suburban, and coastal environments are presented.