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Sample records for bonded amalgam restorations

  1. Amalgam Restorations: To Bond or Not.

    PubMed

    Larson, Thomas D

    2015-01-01

    This article will review the use of various liners used to eliminate microleakage in amalgam restorations. It will review the literature about whether amalgam restorations are improved by using a bonding process and if so specifically how it improves the patient outcome.

  2. Cusp reinforcement by bonding of amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Pilo, R; Brosh, T; Chweidan, H

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the effectivenes of several adhesives in bonding amalgam in order to recover tooth stiffness. A non-destructive experimental methodology was adopted, using strain gauges bonded to the midbuccal surfaces of 40 teeth, with sequential evaluation of loaded intact, prepared and restored stages of the same tooth. Continuous strain measurement as a function of the applied load was acquired by A/D equipment and a data acquisition programme. The strain-force behaviour of the sound teeth under non-axial force up to 97.5 N served as the baseline. The five experimental groups (8 x 5) consisted of control (no adhesive) and four different adhesives. One-way analysis of variance with repeated measures was calculated for the deformation ratio, relative stiffness and recovery values. Reductions in tooth structure by cutting a mesio-occlusal-distal preparation, width one-third intercuspal distance, resulted in 39-52% loss of buccal cusp stiffness. Non-bonded amalgam produced negligible increase (5%) in the stiffness recovery values of the buccal cusps. The adhesives splinted the cusps together, thereby decreasing cuspal flexure and increasing relative stiffness values. Recovery values obtained ranged from 39% to 61%. Assuming that cusp fracture occurs as a result of brittle tooth structure fatigue, amalgam adhesives may contribute to the strengthening of weakened cusps.

  3. Bond strength of repaired amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Rey, Rosalia; Mondragon, Eduardo; Shen, Chiayi

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated the interfacial flexural strength (FS) of amalgam repairs and the optimal combination of repair materials and mechanical retention required for a consistent and durable repair bond. Amalgam bricks were created, each with 1 end roughened to expose a fresh surface before repair. Four groups followed separate repair protocols: group 1, bonding agent with amalgam; group 2, bonding agent with composite resin; group 3, mechanical retention (slot) with amalgam; and group 4, slot with bonding agent and amalgam. Repaired specimens were stored in artificial saliva for 1, 10, 30, 120, or 360 days before being loaded to failure in a 3-point bending test. Statistical analysis showed significant changes in median FS over time in groups 2 and 4. The effect of the repair method on the FS values after each storage period was significant for most groups except the 30-day storage groups. Amalgam-amalgam repair with adequate condensation yielded the most consistent and durable bond. An amalgam bonding agent could be beneficial when firm condensation on the repair surface cannot be achieved or when tooth structure is involved. Composite resin can be a viable option for amalgam repair in an esthetically demanding region, but proper mechanical modification of the amalgam surface and selection of the proper bonding system are essential.

  4. Effect of restoration size on fracture resistance of bonded amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Lindemuth, J S; Hagge, M S; Broome, J S

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of restoration size on the fracture strength of amalgam restorations bonded with Amalgambond Plus (with HPA). Research has shown that this adhesive is dispersed throughout the unset amalgam during condensation and that a decrease in diametral tensile strength, proportional to the amount of adhesive incorporated into the unset amalgam, has resulted. Smaller cavity preparations have a higher ratio of surface area to volume than do larger preparations, and it was anticipated that a proportionately greater amount of adhesive would be incorporated into smaller amalgam restorations. Sixty extracted human molars were divided into four groups of 15 teeth and mounted in tray acrylic-filled PVC cylinders. Shallow approximo-occlusal channels were prepared in two groups. One group was restored with Amalgambond Plus and Tytin amalgam, the other with just Tytin amalgam. Larger proximo-occlusal preparations were made in the remaining two groups, then restored in the same fashion. Samples were stored in 37 degrees C for at least 24 hours, then thermocycled from 5-55 degrees C 1000 times with a one-minute dwell time. Specimens were mounted in a Universal Testing Machine, and a chisel was applied to the restorations in compression mode at a crosshead speed of 5.0 mm/minute until bulk fracture of the amalgam occurred. The results indicated no difference in bulk fracture strengths between large amalgam restorations restored with and without Amalgambond Plus. However, small amalgam restorations restored with Amalgambond Plus exhibited significantly greater (p < 0.025) bulk fracture strengths than small amalgam restorations restored without use of the adhesive.

  5. Fracture resistance of teeth restored with the bonded amalgam technique.

    PubMed

    Dias de Souza, G M; Pereira, G D; Dias, C T; Paulillo, L A

    2001-01-01

    This study evaluated the fracture resistance of maxillary premolars with MOD Class II cavity preparations restored with silver amalgam (G1), Scotchbond Multi Purpose Plus and silver amalgam (G2) and Panavia F and silver amalgam (G3). After the restorations were made, the specimens were stored at 37 degrees C for 24 hours at 100% humidity and submitted to the compression test. Statistical analysis of the data (ANOVA and Tukey Test) revealed no significant differences among the three groups that were studied.

  6. A 3-year randomized clinical trial evaluating two different bonded posterior restorations: Amalgam versus resin composite

    PubMed Central

    Kemaloglu, Hande; Pamir, Tijen; Tezel, Huseyin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the performance and postoperative sensitivity of a posterior resin composite with that of bonded amalgam in 40 (n = 20) large sized cavities and to evaluate whether resin composite could be an alternative for bonded amalgam. Materials and Methods: This was a randomized clinical trial. Twenty patients in need of at least two posterior restorations were recruited. Authors randomly assigned one half of the restorations to receive bonded amalgam and the other half to composite restorations. Forty bonded amalgams (n = 20) and composites (n = 20) were evaluated for their performance on modified-US Public Health Service criteria and postoperative sensitivity using visual analogue scale (VAS) for 36-months. Results: Success rate of this study was 100%. First clinical alterations were rated as Bravo after 1 year in marginal discoloration, marginal adaptation, anatomical form, and surface roughness for both amalgam and composite. At the 3rd year, overall “Bravo” rated restorations were 12 for bonded amalgam and 13 for resin composites. There were no significant differences among the VAS scores of composites and bonded amalgams for all periods (P > 0.05) except for the comparisons at the 3rd year evaluation (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Within the limitation of this study, both resin composite and bonded amalgam were clinically acceptable. Postoperative sensitivity results tend to decrease more in composite restorations rather than amalgams. Therefore, it was concluded that posterior resin composite can be used even in large sized cavities. PMID:27011734

  7. A 3-year randomized clinical trial evaluating two different bonded posterior restorations: Amalgam versus resin composite.

    PubMed

    Kemaloglu, Hande; Pamir, Tijen; Tezel, Huseyin

    2016-01-01

    To compare the performance and postoperative sensitivity of a posterior resin composite with that of bonded amalgam in 40 (n = 20) large sized cavities and to evaluate whether resin composite could be an alternative for bonded amalgam. This was a randomized clinical trial. Twenty patients in need of at least two posterior restorations were recruited. Authors randomly assigned one half of the restorations to receive bonded amalgam and the other half to composite restorations. Forty bonded amalgams (n = 20) and composites (n = 20) were evaluated for their performance on modified-US Public Health Service criteria and postoperative sensitivity using visual analogue scale (VAS) for 36-months. Success rate of this study was 100%. First clinical alterations were rated as Bravo after 1 year in marginal discoloration, marginal adaptation, anatomical form, and surface roughness for both amalgam and composite. At the 3(rd) year, overall "Bravo" rated restorations were 12 for bonded amalgam and 13 for resin composites. There were no significant differences among the VAS scores of composites and bonded amalgams for all periods (P > 0.05) except for the comparisons at the 3(rd) year evaluation (P < 0.05). Within the limitation of this study, both resin composite and bonded amalgam were clinically acceptable. Postoperative sensitivity results tend to decrease more in composite restorations rather than amalgams. Therefore, it was concluded that posterior resin composite can be used even in large sized cavities.

  8. Bonded amalgam restorations: using a glass-ionomer as an adhesive liner.

    PubMed

    Chen, R S; Liu, C C; Cheng, M R; Lin, C P

    2000-01-01

    Due to the lack of adhesiveness of amalgam to tooth structure, several adhesive cements have been utilized in bonded amalgam restorations. This study evaluated whether Fuji-II glass-ionomer cement is an appropriate adhesive liner in bonded amalgam restorations. Two adhesive composite luting cements (Amalgambond Plus and Panavia-21) and Copalite cavity liner were compared. The study was conducted in two phases. In the first part, we quantitatively assessed the tensile bond strengths as well as the failure modes of amalgam bonded to human dentin, using different adhesive liners. In each group, the flat dentin surface was treated with the assigned adhesive cement with a Teflon mold, followed by condensation of amalgam (Valiant PhD) onto it. Each group's mean tensile bond strengths were recorded and the statistical analysis by one way ANOVA showed no significant differences among groups (p > 0.05). Similar to the fracture patterns of the Amalgambond Plus and Panavia-21 groups, the failure mode of Fuji-II group was predominantly adhesive fracture. In the second part, the fracture strengths of amalgam restored teeth were measured using different adhesive liners. Standard MOD cavities were prepared in each tooth except for the intact tooth group. After treatment with the assigned adhesives or varnish, the cavities were restored with amalgam. Fracture strengths were then measured and the fractured interfaces examined using a scanning electron microscope. The fracture strengths of the intact tooth, Amalgambond Plus, Panavia-21 and Fuji-II groups were significantly higher than those of the Copalite and prepared cavity without restoration groups (p < 0.01). Accordingly, Fuji-II glass-ionomer cement, when used as an adhesive liner of amalgam restoration, may effectively reinforce the remaining tooth structure and, therefore, enhance the fracture resistance of the amalgam-restored teeth.

  9. Review of bonded amalgam restorations, and assessment in a general practice over five years.

    PubMed

    Smales, R J; Wetherell, J D

    2000-01-01

    This study reviewed the literature on bonded amalgam restorations and assessed the failure, marginal fracture and marginal staining behavior of 366 Permite C amalgam restorations lined with five dentin bonding resins (Scotchbond 2, Panavia Ex, Amalgambond, Amalgambond Plus, Geristore) and a polyamide cavity varnish (Barrier). The restorations were placed in the posterior permanent teeth of 190 adult patients and examined at intervals over periods of up to five years. There were five restoration failures (1.4%), usually from tooth fracture, involving Class II preparations in molar teeth. No instances of persistent pulpal sensitivity or recurrent caries were reported. The marginal deterioration of the restorations was assessed indirectly using photographs for comparison with two standard sets of enlarged color transparencies. Most of the marginal fracture and marginal staining scores were low, with little difference between the six lining materials at any period.

  10. The bonded amalgam restoration--a review of the literature and report of its use in the treatment of four cases of cracked-tooth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bearn, D R; Saunders, E M; Saunders, W P

    1994-05-01

    Recent interest in amalgam as a restorative material has been directed toward the development of the bonded amalgam restoration. The literature regarding the theoretical and clinical aspects of this technique is reviewed. Four cases of successful treatment of cracked-tooth syndrome with the bonded amalgam restoration are presented.

  11. Microleakage in conventional and bonded amalgam restorations: influence of cavity volume.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Adriana Fernandes; Piva, Evandro; Demarco, Flávio Fernando; Correr Sobrinho, Lourenço; Osinga, Prudêncio Willy Rodo

    2006-01-01

    This study verified the relationship between the volume and microleakage of conventional and bonded amalgam restorations. Also, the microleakage influence of intermediate materials, substrates and the direction of sectioning was investigated. Fifty-six bovine incisors were selected. Standard Class V cavities were prepared in buccal and lingual surfaces. For each tooth, two cavity sizes were prepared, corresponding to two cavity volumes: one larger (A) and the other smaller (B). The cervical wall was located in cementum/dentin and the incisal wall in enamel. The teeth were distributed in four groups (n=28) according to the intermediate material employed (glass-ionomer cement, resin cement, adhesive system and copal varnish-control). The materials were applied following manufacturers' directions. After restoration, the teeth were submitted to thermal cycling. They were then immersed in a dye solution and sectioned in two directions inciso-cervical (IC) and mesio-distal (MD) sections to evaluate the microleakage. Data were subjected to non-parametric statistical analysis (Wilcoxon's paired test and Kruskal-Wallis test). No significant difference was found between the two cavity sizes. Leakage in enamel was statistically lower than in the cementum/dentin interface (p < 0.05). In some situations, glass-ionomer or resin cement lined amalgam restorations presented less dye leakage than copal varnish lined restorations (p < 0.05). No significant difference was observed in microleakage between IC or MD sectioning. Within the limitations of this study, it was concluded that cavity size and direction of section were not significant factors for microleakage, while substrate and intermediate materials had a significant effect on the sealing ability in amalgam restorations.

  12. Evaluation of dental adhesive systems with amalgam and resin composite restorations: comparison of microleakage and bond strength results.

    PubMed

    Neme, A L; Evans, D B; Maxson, B B

    2000-01-01

    A variety of laboratory tests have been developed to assist in predicting the clinical performance of dental restorative materials. Additionally, more than one methodology is in use for many types of tests performed in vitro. This project assessed and compared results derived from two specific laboratory testing methods, one for bond strength and one for microleakage. Seven multi-purpose dental adhesives were tested with the two methodologies in both amalgam and resin composite restorations. Bond strength was determined with a punch-out method in sections of human molar dentin. Microleakage was analyzed with a digital imaging system (Image-Pro Plus, Version 1.3) to determine the extent of dye penetration in Class V preparations centered at the CEJ on both the buccal and lingual surfaces of human molar teeth. There were 32 treatment groups (n = 10); seven experimental (dental adhesives) and one control (copal varnish, 37% phosphoric acid) followed by restoration with either amalgam or resin composite. Specimens were thermocycled 500 times in 5 degrees and 55 degrees C water with a one-minute dwell time. Bond strength and microleakage values were determined for each group. ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls tests demonstrated an interaction between restorative material and adhesive system with a significant difference among adhesives (p < 0.05). Using a multi-purpose adhesive system resulted in both a statistically significant increase in bond strength and a statistically significant decrease in extent of microleakage (p < 0.05). The effect of the adhesive upon both microleakage and bond strength was greater in the resin composite restorations than in the amalgam restorations. Bond strength testing was more discriminating than microleakage evaluation in identifying differences among materials.

  13. Composite veneering of complex amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Demarco, Flávio Fernando; Zanchi, César Henrique; Bueno, Márcia; Piva, Evandro

    2007-01-01

    In large posterior cavities, indirect restorations could provide improved performance when compared to direct restorations, but with higher cost and removal of sound tooth structure. Improved mechanical properties have resulted in good clinical performance for amalgam in large cavities but without an esthetic appearance. Resin composites have become popular for posterior restorations, mainly because of good esthetic results. A restorative technique is presented that combines the esthetic properties of directly bonded resin composite and the wide range of indications for amalgam in stress-bearing areas.

  14. Cusp fracture resistance in composite-amalgam combined restorations.

    PubMed

    Franchi, M; Breschi, L; Ruggeri, O

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the in vitro resistance to fracture and microleakage in composite-amalgam combined restorations. Seventeen Class I cavities with unsupported enamel walls prepared in extracted permanent molar teeth were treated with a bonding agent (Scotchbond MP, 3M Dental), the buccal cusps were reinforced with a composite resin (Z-100, 3M Dental) and the cavities were then restored with amalgam (Permite, Oral B). All teeth were load tested using a special fatigue-stress apparatus, immersed in a dye solution and then sectioned for examination by stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Fractures in enamel supported by composite were present in 11 cases while 12 specimens included fractures in enamel supported by bonded amalgam. Microleakage was observed in 16% of the enamel-amalgam interfaces, 10% of the dentin-amalgam interfaces, 7% of the amalgam-composite interfaces, 4% of the composite-enamel interfaces and 11% of the composite-dentin interfaces. Bonded amalgam appears to be as effective as bonded composite in supporting undermined enamel in terms of resistance to fracture, but composite may have better marginal adaptation to enamel compared to bonded amalgam. Good marginal adaptation may be observed between amalgam and composite in composite-amalgam restorations.

  15. An In Vitro Evaluation of the Use of Resin Liners to Reduce Microleakage and Improve Bond Strength of Amalgam Restorations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    their assistance with the illustrations and photographs used in this thesis. To my Air Force colleagues, Dr. Charles B. Hermesch and Dr. David F...Brannstrom M. Dentin and pulp in restorative dentistry. Castelnuovo: Wolfe Medical Publication, 1982:70. 16. Wing G, Lyell JS. The marginal seal of amalgam...like lesions in vitro: the effect of fluoride cavity liner and cavity varnish. Br Dent J 1973;134:530-6. 76. Barber D, Lyell J, Massler M. Effectiveness

  16. Local adverse effects of amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    McCullough, M J; Tyas, M J

    2008-02-01

    Amalgam has been used for the restoration of teeth for well over 100 years, and is the most successful of the direct restorative materials with respect to longevity. Despite the increasing use of tooth-coloured materials, with advantages of aesthetics and adhesion, amalgam is one of the most widely used dental restorative materials. One of the principal disadvantages of amalgam, apart from aesthetics, is that it may have adverse biological effects, both locally and systemically. Locally, it can cause an erythematous lesion on the adjacent oral soft tissues (tongue and buccal mucosa), and systemically free mercury in the amalgam may give rise to a hypersensitivity reaction. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature concerning the local adverse reactions to dental amalgam. The focus will be on the reactions of the oral mucosa, and brief consideration will be given to laboratory cytotoxicity of dental amalgam and its components, and to the 'amalgam tattoo'.

  17. Long-term deterioration of composite resin and amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Smales, R J

    1991-01-01

    Previous long-term longitudinal studies of two different methods of placing an auto-cured conventional anterior composite resin, and of a low- and a high-copper amalgam alloy, had shown similar restoration survivals despite the different resin treatment methods used or the types of amalgam alloy placed. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to assess several clinical factors or characteristics of these restorations that were believed to affect the survival of the restorative materials. The 950 composite resin and the 1042 amalgam restorations examined were placed by many operators in numerous patients attending a dental hospital. The composite resin restorations were placed using unetched- and etched-enamel-bonding treatment methods, and the amalgam restorations were polished after insertion. Clinical ratings supplemented by color transparencies were used for the assessment of four factors for the resin, and four factors for the amalgam restoration. Significant deterioration differences were found for several of the clinical factors assessed for both the two different composite resin treatment methods, and for the two different amalgam alloys, which were not directly related to the restoration survivals.

  18. Shear bond strength of dental amalgam bonded to dentin.

    PubMed

    Covey, D A; Moon, P C

    1991-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the shear bond strength of dental amalgam bonded to dentin with adhesives. Four groups of 15 permanent posterior teeth were used in this study. The occlusal enamel of the teeth was removed to produce a flat dentin surface. The teeth were embedded in phenolic rings with acrylic resin. Vinyl polysiloxane ring molds 4 mm thick with 4.5 mm circular openings were attached to the exposed dentin surface. Adhesives applied to the dentin surfaces prior to amalgam placement and condensation included: Amalgambond, a 4-META/TBB-MMA, HEMA based system (A), Panavia EX, a modified phosphate ester of Bis-GMA luting system (P), and Ketac-Cem, a glass ionomer luting cement (K). A dentin bonding agent and composite resin restoration system (Scotchbond 2/Silux Plus) was included for comparison. The specimens were stored in 37 degrees C water for 7 days prior to testing. Shear bond tests were done in an Instron machine at a crosshead speed of 0.02 inches per minute. The data were analyzed by ANOVA at 5% level of significance. The differences in shear bond strengths of the four test groups were not statistically significant (P = 0.115). Fracture patterns of the bonded amalgams, examined by SEM, were adhesive in appearance for Groups A and K and cohesive for Group P.

  19. Evaluation of various concentrations of alkaline surface treatment on interfacial bond strengths of amalgam bonded to amalgam.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Asaad Javaid; Ahmad, Asif; Mohammad, Taqi; Khan, Zahid Akhter

    2013-09-01

    This study was done to assess the influence of alkaline surface modification on interfacial bond strength of existing fractured (old) amalgam restoration bonded to fresh amalgam. Old and Fresh amalgam interfaced samples were prepared by applying a 4-methacryloyloxyethy trimellitate anhydride (4-META) containing adhesive. The adhesive used was Amalgabond (Parkell, Farmingdale, NY 11735, USA). Four concentrations of calcium hydroxide Ca(OH)2 solutions were used as a surface modifiers for old amalgam to increase the pH of the amalgam surfaces. The concentrations used were 2.5, 5, 10 and 15%. Direct measurement of the interfacial bond strength was carried out using an electromechanical universal tensile testing machine at crosshead speed of 10mm per minute. Results show that all the calcium hydroxide modified samples produced the increased tensile bond strength (TBS) as compared to their control group. The highest values of bond strength were achieved using 15% Ca(OH)2 solution as surface modifier. Pretreatment of fractured amalgam with calcium hydroxide improves the bond strength of 4-META adhesives. Its use in repair of amalgam may therefore be considered.

  20. Clinical evaluation of Dycal under amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Pereira, J C; Manfio, A P; Franco, E B; Lopes, E S

    1990-04-01

    Sixty-eight clinical amalgam restorations were removed to examine the consistency of the calcium hydroxide bases. The variation of the base consistency was influenced by the age and/or clinical profile of teeth and the status of the restorations. The clinical conditions affected the calcium hydroxide base consistency.

  1. Improving orthodontic bonding to silver amalgam.

    PubMed

    Zachrisson, B U; Büyükyilmaz, T; Zachrisson, Y O

    1995-01-01

    Flat rectangular tabs (n = 84) prepared from lathe-cut amalgam (ANA 2000) were subjected to aluminum oxide sandblasting or roughening with a diamond bur. Mandibular incisor edgewise brackets were bonded to these tabs using: Concise (Bis-GMA resin); one of three metal-bonding adhesives, viz., Superbond C&B (4-META resin), Panavia Ex (10-MDP Bis-GMA resin) or Geristore (composite base); and Concise after application of the intermediate resins All-Bond 2 Primers A+B, or the Scotch-Bond Multi-Purpose (SBMP) system. All specimens were stored in water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours before tensile bond strength testing. Alignment and uniform loading during testing were secured by engaging a hook in a circular ring soldered onto the bracket slot before bonding. Similar control brackets (n = 12) were bonded with Concise to extracted caries-free mandibular incisors. Bond failure sites were classified by a modified ARI system. Mean tensile bond strengths in the experimental group ranged from 3.4 to 6.4 MPa--significantly weaker than the control sample (13.2 MPa). Bond failure generally occurred at the amalgam/adhesive interface. Superbond C&B created the strongest bonds to amalgam; according to ANOVA and Duncan's Multiple-Range test, they were significantly stronger than the bonds with Panavia Ex and Concise, with Geristore in between. However, the bond strength of Concise to sandblasted amalgam was comparable to the Superbond C&B bonds when coupled with an intermediate application of All-Bond 2 Primers A+B. The SBMP, on the other hand, was less effective.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Proximal Contact Repair of Complex Amalgam Restorations.

    PubMed

    Zguri, M N; Casey, J A; Jessup, J P; Vandewalle, K S

    2017-01-12

    The carving of a complex amalgam restoration may occasionally result in light proximal contact with the adjacent tooth. The purpose of this study was to investigate the strength of complex amalgam restorations repaired with a proximal slot amalgam preparation. Extracted human third molars of similar coronal size were sectioned 1 mm apical to the height of the contour using a saw and were randomly distributed into 9 groups of 10 teeth each. One pin was placed at each line angle of the flattened dentinal tooth surface. A metal matrix band was placed and an admixed alloy was condensed and carved to create a full crown contour but with a flat occlusal surface. A proximal slot was prepared with or without a retention groove and repaired using a single-composition spherical amalgam 15 minutes, 24 hours, one week, or six months after the initial crown condensation. The specimens were stored for 24 hours in 37°C water before fracture at the marginal ridge using a round-ended blade in a universal testing machine. The control group was not repaired. The mean maximum force in newtons and standard deviation were determined per group. Data were analyzed with a 2-way analysis of variance as well as Tukey and Dunnett tests (α=0.05). Significant differences were found between groups based on type of slot preparation (p=0.017) but not on time (p=0.327), with no significant interaction (p=0.152). No significant difference in the strength of the marginal ridge was found between any repair group and the unrepaired control group (p>0.076). The proximal repair strength of a complex amalgam restoration was not significantly different from an unrepaired amalgam crown. Placing a retention groove in the proximal slot preparation resulted in significantly greater fracture strength than a slot with no retention grooves. Time of repair had no significant effect on the strength of the repair.

  3. Comparison of shear bond strength of amalgam bonded to primary and permanent dentin.

    PubMed

    Mahdi, S; Bahman, S; Arghavan, A B; Fatemeh, M

    2008-06-01

    Amalgam's non-adhesive characteristics necessitate cavity preparations incorporating retentive features, which often require the removal of non-carious tooth structure. Use of adhesives beneath amalgam restorations, would be helpful to overcome this disadvantage. This study was undertaken to compare the mean shear bond strength of amalgam bonded to primary and permanent dentin, to evaluate the efficacy of amalgam adhesives in pediatric dentistry.27 primary and 28 permanent posterior teeth with intact buccal or lingual surfaces were grounded to expose dentin and wet-polished with 400-grit silicone carbide paper. Scotchbond Multi Purpose Plus adhesive system was applied to the dentin surfaces and light cured. Amalgam was condensed onto the treated dentin through a plastic mold.shear bond strength testing was done using an Instron Universal testing machine, at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min.The data were analyzed by independent samples t-test The difference among the two groups was not statistically significant (p>0.05) Bonded amalgam showed the same level of bond strength to primary and permanent dentin; so, application of amalgam bonding agents in pediatric dentistry can be recommended.

  4. In vivo and in vitro evaluations of microleakage around Class I amalgam and composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Alptekin, Tuncay; Ozer, Fusan; Unlu, Nimet; Cobanoglu, Nevin; Blatz, Markus B

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated and compared microleakage values of in vivo and in vitro placed Class I amalgam restorations with or without three different lining materials and posterior composite restorations with two dentin bonding agents. For the in vivo group, 72 standardized Class I cavities were prepared on the occlusal surfaces of molars scheduled for extraction. The test groups (n = 12) were: amalgam without lining (A), amalgam with cavity varnish (A+C), amalgam with Clearfil SE Bond (A+CSE), amalgam with Clearfil 2V (A+C2V), composite with Clearfil SE Bond (C+CSE) and composite with Protect Bond (C+PB). The restored teeth were extracted after seven days. The same grouping, materials and techniques were used in 72 extracted molars for the in-vitro part of the study. The specimens were immersed in basic fuchsin for 24 hours and sectioned. Microleakage was examined and scored at 20x magnification. Statistical analyses were performed with the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests with the 5% level of significance. Overall, the in vivo and in vitro test groups were not different from each other. No significant differences in microleakage values were observed between the unlined and lined amalgam groups (p > 0.05). However, since lined amalgam restorations did not reveal any marginal leakage, the application of an adhesive bonding material under the amalgam restorations can be considered. In general, cavity varnish was not as effective as adhesive bonding agents in preventing microleakage in amalgam restorations. Composite restorations demonstrated higher leakage values than amalgam restorations (p < 0.05), except for A+C (p > 0.05) in the in vivo group. There was no significant difference between the two composite groups for in vitro and in vivo conditions (p > 0.05).

  5. Shear bond strength of brackets bonded to amalgam with different intermediate resins and adhesives.

    PubMed

    Germec, Derya; Cakan, Umut; Ozdemir, Fulya Isik; Arun, Tulin; Cakan, Murat

    2009-04-01

    The aims of this study were to compare, in vitro, the shear bond strength (SBS) of stainless steel orthodontic brackets bonded to silver amalgam with the use of three different intermediate resins and two different adhesives, and to evaluate bond failure mode. Forty-five amalgam specimens were divided into three equal groups. In groups 1 and 2, the brackets were bonded with Unite (3M Unitek) using Reliance Metal Primer (RMP; Reliance Orthodontic Products) and Power Bond OLC (PB OLC; Ortho Organizers Inc.) as intermediate resins, respectively. In group 3, Resinomer and One-Step Plus (OS+; Bisco Inc.) were used. Thirty bovine teeth served as the controls to test bracket bonding to acid-etched enamel with Unite and Resinomer-OS+. After thermocycling from 10 to 50 degrees C 1000 times, all samples were tested for SBS. Bond failure sites were classified using a modified adhesive remnant index (ARI) system. Data were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance, post hoc Tukey multiple comparison and chi-square tests. The results showed that the mean SBS to amalgam surfaces were significantly lower than those to etched bovine enamel (P<0.001). There were no statistically significant differences in mean SBS between the amalgam bonding groups (P>0.05). For the ARI, significant differences were found between the amalgam- and enamel-bonding groups (P<0.001). The mean SBS of stainless steel orthodontic brackets bonded to amalgam surfaces with RMP, PB OLC, OS+ intermediate resins and Unite and Resinomer adhesives was significantly lower than to etched bovine enamel. Bond failure occurred at the amalgam-adhesive interface regardless of the adhesive system and without damage to the amalgam restoration.

  6. Improved orthodontic bonding to silver amalgam. Part 2. Lathe-cut, admixed, and spherical amalgams with different intermediate resins.

    PubMed

    Büyükyilmaz, T; Zachrisson, B U

    1998-08-01

    Flat rectangular tabs (n = 270) prepared from spherical (Tytin), admixed (Dispersalloy) or lathe-cut amalgam (ANA 2000) were subjected to aluminum oxide sandblasting with either 50-mu or 90-mu abrasive powder. Mandibular incisor edgewise brackets were bonded to these tabs. An intermediate resin was used, either All-Bond 2 Primers A + B or a 4-META product--Amalgambond Plus (AP) or Reliance Metal Primer (RMP)--followed by Concise. All specimens were stored in water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours and thermocycled 1000 times from 5 degrees C to 55 degrees C and back before tensile bond strength testing. The bond strength of Concise to etched enamel of extracted, caries-free premolars was used as a control. Bond failure sites were classified using a modified adhesive remnant index (ARI) system. Results were expressed as mean bond strength with SD, and as a function relating the probability of bond failure to stress by means of Weibull analysis. Mean tensile bond strength in the experimental groups ranged from 2.9 to 11.0 MPa--significantly weaker than the control sample (16.0 MPa). Bond failure invariably occurred at the amalgam/adhesive interface. The strongest bonds were created to the spherical and lathe-cut amalgams (range 6.8 to 11.0 MPa). Bonds to the spherical amalgam were probably more reliable. The intermediate application of the 4-META resins AP and RMP generally created significantly stronger bonds to all three basic types of amalgam products than the bonds obtained with the All-Bond 2 primers. The effect of abrasive-particle size on bond strength to different amalgam surfaces was not usually significant (p > 0.05). The implications of these findings are discussed in relationship to clinical experience bonding orthodontic attachments to large amalgam restorations in posterior teeth.

  7. [Enamel-dentinal adhesives in amalgam restorations. Review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Cadenaro, M; Gregorig, G

    2000-06-01

    Amalgam is still the material most often used to restore posterior teeth, since it is easy to use, it has a low cost and a long clinical life. However, its use requires the solutions of several problems: lack of adhesion to tooth structure, marginal leakage, postoperative sensitivity and susceptibility to corrosion. In order to combine the advantages of dentinal adhesives with the excellent mechanical properties and good long clinical behaviour of amalgam, their use under amalgam restorations has been proposed. Adhesives improve marginal sealing and guarantee an additional retention to restorations, due to the formation of a layer linked with micromechanical bonds both to the tooth and the amalgam; they create a barrier that occludes dentinal tubules access, protecting the pulp. In this article the results of several in vitro studies performed to assess amalgam restorations properties are summarized. Present knowledge, based on an accurate literature review, allows to consider bonded amalgam restorations as a real progress in conservative dentistry: if long-term longitudinal studies, that are presently carried out, confirm the good short-term results, bonded restorations will represent the solution of choice for amalgam application.

  8. Marginal behaviour of self-etch adhesive/composite and combined amalgam-composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Kournetas, Nikos; Kakaboura, Afrodite; Giftopoulos, Dimitrios; Chakmachi, Magdad; Rahiotis, Christos; Geis-Gerstorfer, J

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the marginal and internal adaptation in self-etching adhesive (SEA)/composite restorations with combined amalgam-resin-based composite restorations in the proximal box with and without bonding agent beneath amalgam both before and after load-cycling. Class II restorations, were manufactured as following a) Bonding agent (Clearfil Liner Bond 2V, Kuraray) beneath amalgam (Tytin, SDS Kerr) and resin-based composite (Clearfil APX, Kuraray) with SEA, b) Amalgam without bonding agent and resin-based composite with SEA and c) Resin-based composite with SEA. Each group divided into two equal subgroups (n=8). Marginal and internal adaptation of first subgroup evaluated after 7-day water storage and of the second after load-cycling in chewing simulator for 1.2 x 10(6) cycles. Marginal and internal adaptation at cervical and amalgam-composite sites evaluated by videomicroscope and ranked as "excellent"/"non-excellent". Slices of restorations examined under optical microscope to determine the quality of bonding layer. Defects in cervical adaptation observed in the three restorative techniques examined prior loading. Amalgam-composite combination in proximal surface provided comparable marginal and internal adaptation results at cervical wall, to self-etching-composite combination. Portion (25-37.5%) of amalgam-resin-based composite interfaces in proximal box presented no perfect sealing. The application of bonding agent beneath amalgam resulted in relatively inferior cervical adaptation. Loading resulted in fewer excellent restorations in all three restorative techniques but not in a statistically significant level.

  9. 12-year survival of composite vs. amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Opdam, N J M; Bronkhorst, E M; Loomans, B A C; Huysmans, M C D N J M

    2010-10-01

    Information about the long-term clinical survival of large amalgam and composite restorations is still lacking. This retrospective study compares the longevity of three- and four-/five-surface amalgam and composite restorations relative to patients' caries risk. Patient records from a general practice were used for data collection. We evaluated 1949 large class II restorations (1202 amalgam/747 composite). Dates of placement, replacement, and failure were recorded, and caries risk of patients was assessed. Survival was calculated from Kaplan-Meier statistics. After 12 years, 293 amalgam and 114 composite restorations had failed. Large composite restorations showed a higher survival in the combined population and in the low-risk group. For three-surface restorations in high-risk patients, amalgam showed better survival.

  10. Comparison of the push-out shear bond strength of four types of glass ionomers when used to bond amalgam: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Vinod Babu; Ramachandran, S; Indira, R; Shankar, P

    2011-01-01

    Background: Dental amalgam is the primary direct posterior restorative material used worldwide, but it have certain shortcomings due to the lack of adhesiveness to the cavity. The introduction of the concept of bonded amalgam helped improve the use of amalgam as a restorative material. Aim: Evaluation of the comparative push-out shear bond strength of four types of conventional glass ionomers used to bond amalgam to tooth in simulated class I situations. Materials and Methods: Four chemical cure glass ionomers are used: GC Fuji I, GC Fuji II, GC Fuji III and GC Fuji VII, and are compared with unbonded amalgam. The push-out bond strength was tested using the Instron Universal Testing Machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Statistical Analysis: One-way ANOVA and post hoc Bonferroni tests were used to analyze the data. Results: The results showed that the use of glass ionomer to bond amalgam resulted in an increase in the bond strength of amalgam. The Type VII glass ionomer showed the highest bond strength in comparison with the other glass ionomers. Conclusions: Conventional glass ionomer bonds to amalgam and shows a beneficial increase in the bond strength of the restoration in comparison with unbonded amalgam. PMID:22144798

  11. Effect of composite/amalgam thickness on fracture resistance of maxillary premolar teeth, restored with combined amalgam-composite restorations

    PubMed Central

    Firouzmandi, Maryam; Doozandeh, Maryam; Abbasi, Sanaz

    2016-01-01

    Background Combined amalgam-composite restorations have been used through many years to benefit from the advantages of both dental amalgam and composite resin. Two variations have been mentioned for this technique, this study investigated the fracture resistance of maxillary premolar teeth with extended mesio-occluso-distal (MOD) cavities, restored with the two variations of combined amalgam-composite restorations. Material and Methods Sixty intact extracted premolar teeth were randomly divided into 6 groups (G1-G6) of 10 teeth. G1; consisted of intact teeth and G2; consisted of teeth with MOD preparations were assigned as the positive and negative control groups respectively. Other experimental groups after MOD preparations were as follows: G3, amalgam restoration; G4, composite restoration; G5 combined amalgam-composite restoration with amalgam placement only on 1mm of the gingival floor of the proximal boxes; G6, combined amalgam-composite restoration with amalgam placement to the height of contact area of the proximal surface of the tooth. Fracture strength of the specimens was measured and the data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). The level of significance was P<0.05. Fracture mode of the specimens was also recorded. Results G1 had the highest value of fracture resistance (1736.90 N). G2 and G3 had the lowest fracture resistance (775.70 N and 874.70 N, respectively). The difference between G 4, 5 and 6 was not statistically significant. However, G4, G5 and G6 showed significantly higher resistance to fracture compared to G2 and G3. Fracture modes were favorable in all of the study groups except in G6. Conclusions Fracture resistance of the premolars restored with the two variations of combined amalgam-composite restoration was similar to that achieved with composite restoration alone and more than that of amalgam restoration alone. It can be concluded that the thickness of amalgam in combined amalgam-composite restorations did not

  12. [Is amalgam stained dentin a proper substrate for bonding resin composite?].

    PubMed

    Scholtanus, J D

    2016-06-01

    After the removal of amalgam restorations, black staining of dentin is often observed, which is attributed to the penetration of corrosion products from amalgam. A study was carried out to determine whether this amalgam stained dentin is a proper substrate for bonding resin composites. A literature study and an in vitro study showed that Sn and Zn in particular are found in amalgam stained dentin, and this was the case only in demineralised dentin. In vitro, demineralised dentin acted as porte d'entrÈe for amalgam corrosion products. Bond strength tests with 5 adhesive strategies showed no differences between bond strengths to amalgam stained and to sound dentin, but did show different failure types. A clinical study showed good survival of extensive cusp replacing resin composite restorations. No failures were attributed to inadequate adhesion. It is concluded that staining of dentin by amalgam corrosion products has no negative effect upon bond strength of resin composite. It is suggested that Sn and Zn may have a beneficial effect upon dentin, thus compensating the effects of previous carious attacks, preparation trauma and physico-chemical challenges during clinical lifetime.

  13. Secondary caries formation in vitro around glass ionomer-lined amalgam and composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Dionysopoulos, P; Kotsanos, N; Papadogianis, Y

    1996-08-01

    The aim of this in vitro secondary caries study was to examine the glass-ionomer liner's effect on wall-lesion inhibition when a conventional and a light-cured glass ionomer liner was placed under amalgam and composite resin restorations. Class V preparations in extracted upper premolars were used and ten restorations were used for each of the following groups: (i) two layers of copal varnish and amalgam; (ii) conventional glass-ionomer and amalgam; (iii) light-cured glass-ionomer and amalgam; (iv) bonding agent and light-cured composite resin; (v) conventional glass-ionomer, bonding agent and light-cured composite resin; (vi) light-cured glass-ionomer, extended 0.3 mm short of the enamel margin bonding agent and light-cured composite resin; and (vii) light-cured glass-ionomer, extended 1 mm short of the enamel margin, bonding agent and light-cured composite resin. The teeth were thermocycled and artificial caries were created using an acid-gel. The results of this study showed that artificial recurrent caries can be reduced significantly (P < 0.05) with a glass-ionomer liner under amalgam restorations. The results also showed that when the light-cured glass-ionomer liner was placed 0.3 mm from the cavosurface margin under composite resin restoration, the artificial recurrent caries reduced significantly (P < 0.05).

  14. Determination of light elements in amalgam restorations. [Dental amalgam

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, A.L.; Jones, K.W.; Kraner, H.W.; Osborne, J.W.; Nelson, G.V.

    1982-01-01

    Rutherford backscattering has been used to measure the major elemental compositions in the near-surface regions of freshly prepared and used samples of dental amalgam. A depletion from bulk stoichiometry of the major elements, which indicates an accumulation of lighter elements on the surface of the materials, has been observed. Increases in the F, Na, Cl, P, O, C, and N concentrations between freshly prepared samples and used samples were measured by observation of gamma rays produced by proton and deuteron induced reactions.

  15. Rugosimetric analysis of amalgam restorations polished using different techniques.

    PubMed

    Pereira, M A; Centola, A L; do Nascimento, T N; Turbino, M L

    1998-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to submit specimens with amalgam restorations to 4 different polishing techniques and one control group without polishing. The specimens were then submitted to rugosimetric analysis and the differences compared.

  16. Bond strength of resin composite to differently conditioned amalgam.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, M; Vallittu, P K; Huysmans, M-C; Kalk, W; Vahlberg, T

    2006-01-01

    Bulk fracture of teeth, where a part of the amalgam restoration and/or the cusp is fractured, is a common clinical problem. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surface conditioning methods on the shear bond strength of a hybrid resin composite to fresh amalgam. Amalgams (N=84) were condensed into acrylic and randomly assigned to one of the following treatments (N=6): (1) Alloy primer + opaquer, (2) Air-particle abrasion (50 micro m Al(2)O(3)) + alloy primer + opaquer, (3) Silica coating (30 micro m SiO(x)) + silanization + opaquer, (4) Opaquer + pre-impregnated continuous bidirectional E-glass fibre sheets, (5) Silica coating + silanization + fibre sheets, (6) Silica coating + silanization + opaquer + fibre sheet application. Non-conditioned amalgam surfaces were considered as control group (7). The mean surface roughness depth (R(Z)) was measured from the control group and air-abraded amalgam surfaces. The resin composite was bonded to the conditioned amalgam specimens using polyethylene molds. All specimens were tested under dry and thermocycled (6.000, 5-55 degrees C, 30 s) conditions. The shear bond strength of resin composite to amalgam substrates was measured in a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). Surface roughness values for the non-conditioned control group (R(Z) approximately 0.14 micro m) and for air-particle abraded surfaces with either Al(2)O(3) or SiO(x) (R(Z) approximately 0.19 micro m and R(Z) approximately 0.16 micro m, respectively) did not show significant differences (p=0.23) (One-way ANOVA). In dry conditions, silica coating and silanization followed by fibre sheet application exhibited significantly higher results (14.8+/-5.6 MPa) than those of the groups conditioned with alloy primer (2.2+/-0.7 MPa) (p<0.001), air-particle abrasion+alloy primer (4.4+/-2.0 MPa, p<0.001), silica coating+silanization alone (6.2+/-0.8 MPa, p=0.009) or non-conditioned group (1.4+/-0.6, p<0.001). Silica coating and silanization followed

  17. Bond strength comparison of amalgam repair protocols using resin composite in situations with and without dentin exposure.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Schoonbeek, Geert; Gökçe, Bülent; Cömlekoglu, Erhan; Dündar, Mine

    2010-01-01

    The replacement of defective amalgam restorations leads to loss of tooth material and weakens the tooth, creating an increased risk of cusp fracture. The repair of such defects is a minimal intervention technique. The current study compared the repair bond strengths of a resin composite to amalgam and an amalgam-dentin complex after various surface conditioning methods. The specimens (N = 50) consisted of sound human canines with cylindrical preparations (diameter: 2.3 mm, depth: 3 mm) with amalgam-dentin complex (N = 30, n = 10/per group) and two groups with amalgam only (N = 20, n = 10/per group). The teeth were embedded in auto-polymerized polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). The preparations were filled with non-Gamma 2 amalgam. The enamel was removed to expose dentin. The specimens with the amalgam-dentin complex were randomly assigned to one of the following conditioning methods: Group 1: Silicacoating amalgam, etching dentin, silane application on amalgam, primer/bonding on dentin, opaquer on amalgam, resin composite on both; Group 2: Etching dentin, silicacoating amalgam, silane application on amalgam, primer/bonding on dentin, opaquer on amalgam, resin composite on both and Group 3: Etching dentin, primer/bonding on dentin, opaquer, resin composite. The specimens with only amalgam were assigned to one of the following conditioning methods: Group 4: Silicacoating, silane application, opaquer, resin composite and Group 5: Opaquer, resin composite. For the two control groups, where no dentin was involved (Groups 4 and 5), bonding was achieved only on amalgam and Group 5 had no conditioning. The specimens were kept in water at 37 degrees C for five weeks before bond strength (MPa +/- SD) testing (Universal Testing Machine). After debonding, the failure types were analyzed. The results were significantly affected by the surface conditioning method (ANOVA). Only dentin conditioning (Group 3) showed the highest bond strength (39.9 +/- 14). The unconditioned control

  18. Microleakage and SEM interfacial micromorphology of amalgam restorations using three adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Toledano, M; Osorio, E; Osorio, R; García-Godoy, F

    2000-08-01

    This study evaluated the microleakage and interfacial micromorphology of Class V cervical amalgam restorations lined with OptiBond, AElitebond, or Panavia 21. Unlined amalgams served as control. Cavities were treated with each dentin bonding system according to the manufacturers' instructions and restored with Tytin non-gamma 2 spherical amalgam. After one week of storage in tap water at 37 degrees C, the specimens were thermocycled (1000 cycles, 6-60 degrees C, 30s dwell time). Microleakage was assessed by means of basic fuchsin dye penetration and recorded according to an ordinal scale. None of the systems tested in this study completely eliminated microleakage. Kruskal-Wallis one-way ANOVA and Mann-Whitney U test found that on the occlusal wall, Panavia 21 and the control group had the least leakage (P<0.05). No statistically significant differences were found at dentin margins (P>0.05). Wilcoxon matched pairs signed rank test found that Panavia 21 and the control group had less leakage at the occlusal than at the dentin margins (P<0.05); when AElitebond and OptiBond groups were evaluated, microleakage at the enamel and at the dentin margins was similar for each group. With the adhesive systems, perhaps the hydrophilic bonding agents incorporated the dye during specimen immersion and/or sectioning. The use of adhesives may not be as worthy as resin cements for sealing and bonding amalgam restorations to enamel and dentin.

  19. A systematic technique for carving amalgam and composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Kilistoff, A

    2011-01-01

    Both amalgam and composite restorations can quickly and accurately be carved using a systematic technique. By following the outlined steps, anatomically accurate restorations can be easily achieved. Inlay wax is used as a training medium to negate the setting constraints and as a high fidelity simulation.

  20. Bonding of adhesive resin luting agents to metal and amalgam.

    PubMed

    Osman, Saad A; McCabe, John F; Walls, Angus W G

    2008-12-01

    The shear bond strength of three adhesives, Panavia 21, Superbond, All Bond C&B Cement, and a dual cure resin (Variolink), to Ni-Cr-Be (Rexillium III), Midigold (Type III gold) and Amalgam (Sybraloy) were determined. Fifteen samples were prepared using 800 grit abrasive papers for Ni-Cr and Midi-Gold, and 100 grit papers for amalgam. Ni-Cr-Be and Midi-Gold samples were sandblasted for 30 s and steam cleaned for 10 s. The adhesives were bonded to the samples using gelatine capsules and were matured for 24 h in water at 37 degrees C. The samples were debonded in shear using an Instron at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min. The data was analysed using ANOVA and a Tukey test. The bond strength of Superbond to both metal alloys was significantly higher (P<0.05) than any of the materials tested, with the exception Panavia 21 to gold. The bond strength of All Bond C&B cement had shown to be not significant difference from those of Panavia 21 and Variolink, when bonded to Rexillium and Midi-Gold, respectively. The bond strength of All Bond C&B Cement to amalgam was significantly greater (P<0.05) than those of the other materials tested. The shear bond strength to gold showed lower bonding for all adhesives when compared with Rexillium (P<.001). The ranking of bond strength to both alloys was as follows: Superbond>Panavia 21>All Bond C&B>Variolink. The nature of substrate to be used for bonding and the adhesive material itself are important factors in bonding which can be achieved between cast metals and prepared teeth with amalgam filling. Superbond should be successful as an adhesive for the attachment of all substrates tested, with the possible exception of amalgam, for which All Bond C&B Cement gives the best result.

  1. A review of the amalgapin technique for complex amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Eberting, J J

    2000-01-01

    For many years, large amalgam restorations have been retained with stainless steel pins or dentinal slots. In 1980, Shavell introduced the amalgapin technique for what he termed "complex" amalgam restorations. This technique consisted of preparing dentin chambers 1.0-2.0 mm deep just inside the dentinoenamel junction. As the technique became more popular, comparisons of its fracture strength to that of stainless steel pins were evaluated. This article reviews the literature concerning the amalgapin technique, examines its resistance compared to other retentive means, and discusses the method of preparation.

  2. Substitution of amalgam restorations: participative training to standardize criteria.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Elaine Toledo Pitanga; Ferreira e Ferreira, Efigênia

    2004-01-01

    Considering that the variations on clinical judgment with respect to replacement of restorations are a problem which affects dentistry, the aim of this study was to elaborate, implement and evaluate a programme of participative training to standardize criteria for the evaluation of amalgam restorations. Five professors of Integrated Clinic of the School of Dentistry of the University of Vale do Rio Doce (UNIVALE), Brazil, visually and radiographically evaluated 28 extracted permanent teeth presenting amalgam restorations. The research was developed in four distinct phases: first--the teeth were evaluated according to individual criteria to determine whether restorations should be replaced or not; second--the examiners participated in a training programme with the objective of standardizing the evaluation criteria; third--soon after the training, the teeth were re-evaluated using the adopted standardized criteria; fourth--five months after the training, the procedures on third phase were repeated. For each restoration the examiners registered the main reason for considering the restoration: satisfactory, requiring total substitution, requiring partial substitution or requiring finishing/polishing. After participating in the training programme the examiners presented a statistically significant reduction (sign test: Z = 0.4989, p = 0.0022) in indicating the need to substitute restorations, result which was maintained five months after training. This programme of participative training can be organized and implemented to standardize the criteria to evaluate amalgam restorations achieving satisfactory results with an impact on clinical practice.

  3. Fracture resistance of premolars with bonded class II amalgams.

    PubMed

    Dias de Souza, Grace Mendonça; Pereira, Gisele Damiana Silveira; Dias, Carlos Tadeu Santos; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei Sartini

    2002-01-01

    This study evaluated the fracture resistance of maxillary premolars with MOD cavity preparation and simulated periodontal ligament. The teeth were restored with silver amalgam (G1), Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus and silver amalgam (G2) and Panavia F and silver amalgam (G3). After restorations were made, the specimens were stored at 37 degrees C for 24 hours at 100% humidity and submitted to the compression test in the Universal Testing Machine (Instron). The statistical analysis of the results (ANOVA and Tukey Test) revealed that the fracture resistance of group 2 (G2=105.720 kgF) was superior to those of groups 1 (G1=72.433 kgF) and 3 (G3=80.505 kgF) that did not differ between them.

  4. Evidence summary: which dental liners under amalgam restorations are more effective in reducing postoperative sensitivity?

    PubMed

    Nasser, Mona

    2011-06-10

    Since August 2009, members of the Primary Care Dentistry Research Forum (www.dentistryresearch.org) have taken part in an online vote to identify questions in day-to-day practice that they felt most needed to be answered with conclusive research. The question that receives the most votes each month forms the subject of a critical appraisal of the relevant literature. Each month a new round of voting takes place to decide which further questions will be reviewed. Dental practitioners and dental care professionals are encouraged to take part in the voting and submit their own questions to be included in the vote by joining the website. The paper below details a summary of the findings of the ninth critical appraisal. In order to address the question raised by dentistry research forum, first a search was conducted for systematic reviews on the topic. There was one systematic review retrieved comparing bonded amalgam restorations versus non-bonded amalgam restorations. However, there was no other systematic review identified assessing the effectiveness of dental liners under amalgam restorations in general. Therefore, a search was conducted for any randomised controlled trial (RCT) comparing use of a lining under amalgam restorations versus no lining or RCTs comparing differing lining materials under amalgam against each other. There were eight relevant RCTs identified. Due to the low quality, small sample sizes or lack of adequate reporting of the outcome data, the evidence is inadequate to claim or refute a difference in postoperative sensitivity between different dental liners. Further well-conducted RCTs are needed to answer this question. These RCTs would be preferably included and synthesised in a systematic review.

  5. Early failure of Class II resin composite versus Class II amalgam restorations placed by dental students.

    PubMed

    Overton, J D; Sullivan, Diane J

    2012-03-01

    Using the information from remake request slips in a dental school's predoctoral clinic, we examined the short-term survival of Class II resin composite restorations versus Class II dental amalgam restorations. In the student clinic, resin composite is used in approximately 58 percent of Class II restorations placed, and dental amalgam is used in the remaining 42 percent. In the period examined, Class II resin composite restorations were ten times more likely to be replaced at no cost to the patient than Class II dental amalgam restorations. A total of eighty-four resin composite restorations and six amalgam restorations were replaced due to an identified failure.

  6. The future of dental amalgam: a review of the literature. Part 3: Mercury exposure from amalgam restorations in dental patients.

    PubMed

    Eley, B M

    1997-05-10

    This is the third article in a series of seven on the future of dental amalgam and covers mercury exposure from functioning dental amalgam restorations in patients. It firstly discusses the evidence for mercury release from amalgam fillings by considering the mechanisms of mercury release and its measurement in the expired air and the intra-oral air. In this connection it also discusses the various factors involved in the accurate measurement and calculation of mercury levels in these situations. It finally describes the various attempts to calculate the daily mercury dose from dental amalgam fillings and considers the likely accuracy of these calculations.

  7. The Post-Amalgam Era: Norwegian Dentists’ Experiences with Composite Resins and Repair of Defective Amalgam Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Kopperud, Simen E.; Staxrud, Frode; Espelid, Ivar; Tveit, Anne Bjørg

    2016-01-01

    Amalgam was banned as a dental restorative material in Norway in 2008 due to environmental considerations. An electronic questionnaire was sent to all dentists in the member register of the Norwegian Dental Association (NTF) one year later, to evaluate dentists’ satisfaction with alternative restorative materials and to explore dentists’ treatment choices of fractured amalgam restorations. Replies were obtained from 61.3%. Composite was the preferred restorative material among 99.1% of the dentists. Secondary caries was the most commonly reported cause of failure (72.7%), followed by restoration fractures (25.1%). Longevity of Class II restorations was estimated to be ≥10 years by 45.8% of the dentists, but 71.2% expected even better longevity if the restoration was made with amalgam. Repair using composite was suggested by 24.9% of the dentists in an amalgam restoration with a fractured cusp. Repair was more often proposed among young dentists (p < 0.01), employees in the Public Dental Service (PDS) (p < 0.01) and dentists working in counties with low dentist density (p = 0.03). There was a tendency towards choosing minimally invasive treatment among dentists who also avoided operative treatment of early approximal lesions (p < 0.01). Norwegian dentists showed positive attitudes towards composite as a restorative material. Most dentists chose minimally- or medium invasive approaches when restoring fractured amalgam restorations. PMID:27110804

  8. The Post-Amalgam Era: Norwegian Dentists' Experiences with Composite Resins and Repair of Defective Amalgam Restorations.

    PubMed

    Kopperud, Simen E; Staxrud, Frode; Espelid, Ivar; Tveit, Anne Bjørg

    2016-04-22

    Amalgam was banned as a dental restorative material in Norway in 2008 due to environmental considerations. An electronic questionnaire was sent to all dentists in the member register of the Norwegian Dental Association (NTF) one year later, to evaluate dentists' satisfaction with alternative restorative materials and to explore dentists' treatment choices of fractured amalgam restorations. Replies were obtained from 61.3%. Composite was the preferred restorative material among 99.1% of the dentists. Secondary caries was the most commonly reported cause of failure (72.7%), followed by restoration fractures (25.1%). Longevity of Class II restorations was estimated to be ≥10 years by 45.8% of the dentists, but 71.2% expected even better longevity if the restoration was made with amalgam. Repair using composite was suggested by 24.9% of the dentists in an amalgam restoration with a fractured cusp. Repair was more often proposed among young dentists (p < 0.01), employees in the Public Dental Service (PDS) (p < 0.01) and dentists working in counties with low dentist density (p = 0.03). There was a tendency towards choosing minimally invasive treatment among dentists who also avoided operative treatment of early approximal lesions (p < 0.01). Norwegian dentists showed positive attitudes towards composite as a restorative material. Most dentists chose minimally- or medium invasive approaches when restoring fractured amalgam restorations.

  9. Adhesives, silver amalgam.

    PubMed

    1995-09-01

    The most recent advancement in silver amalgam is use of resin formulations to bond metal to tooth both chemically &/or physically, Since, historically, amalgam has been used successfully without adhesion to tooth, obvious clinical question is: Why is bonding now desirable? Two major clinical reasons to bond are: (1) Adhesive can increase fracture resistance of amalgam restored teeth & decrease cusp fractures; & (2) Seal provided by adhesive can greatly decrease, & often eliminate post-operative sensitivity. Following report summarizes CRA laboratory study of shear bond strength & sealing capability of 23 commercial adhesives used to bond 2 types of silver amalgam to tooth structure.

  10. Resistance of composite and amalgam core foundations retained with and without pins and bonding agents.

    PubMed

    Imbery, Terence A; Swigert, Ryan; Richman, Brian; Sawicki, Vincent; Pace, Lauren; Moon, Peter C

    2010-01-01

    To compare the resistance of different amalgam and composite core foundations retained by pins, bonding agents, or both, 100 molars were mounted in acrylic resin and their occlusal surfaces were reduced to expose dentin. Pins were inserted at the four line angles of the teeth and matrices were placed. Bonding agents were applied according to the manufacturers' instructions. Amalgam was handcondensed and composite was incrementally added and photocured. Restorations were adjusted to produce specimens (n = 10) 5 mm in height with a 1 mm bevel at the axial-occlusal surface. After immersion in deionized water for 24 hours, specimens were loaded at a 45 degree angle on their beveled surfaces in a Universal Testing Machine at a crosshead speed of 0.02 in./minute. ANOVA and Tukey's tests indicated that FluoroCore 2 (with or without pins) was statistically stronger than all other combinations (p < 0.05).

  11. Amalgam and composite posterior restorations: curriculum versus practice in operative dentistry at a US dental school.

    PubMed

    Ottenga, Marc E; Mjör, Ivar

    2007-01-01

    This study recorded the number of preclinical lecture and simulation laboratory sessions spent teaching the preparation and placement of amalgam and resin composite posterior restorations. These data were compared to the use of both materials in the operative clinic as placed by third- and fourth-year students. The number of posterior restorations inserted by the students, expressed as a function of the number of restoration surfaces, was also evaluated. The results show that the teaching of posterior restorations pre-clinically has consistently favored amalgam 2.5 to 1 during the last three years. However, clinically, resin composite is being used for posterior restorations 2.3 times more often than amalgam. The only instance that favored amalgam over composite during the last year was in the placement of four surface posterior restorations. This shift in emphasis from amalgam to composite needs to be addressed within dental educational institutions so that newly graduated dentists are prepared to place composite restorations properly.

  12. Amalgam

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Kevin

    2012-09-05

    Amalgam is a system that allows you to generate collections of files that work with conventional tools but take up minimal extra space on storage. If you already are archiving files in a file system and don't want to make multiple copies of whole files in order to ship the data somewhere then this system is for you. Amalgam consists of tools that allow you to create and get information about '.amalgam' files which contain just the metadata associated with a set of files. It also contains a fuse file system that, using amalgam files, will dynamically create traditional tar files. With this setup, you can see multiple orders of magnitude reduction in storage requirements for temporary data collections.

  13. Amalgam

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Kevin

    2012-09-05

    Amalgam is a system that allows you to generate collections of files that work with conventional tools but take up minimal extra space on storage. If you already are archiving files in a file system and don't want to make multiple copies of whole files in order to ship the data somewhere then this system is for you. Amalgam consists of tools that allow you to create and get information about '.amalgam' files which contain just the metadata associated with a set of files. It also contains a fuse file system that, using amalgam files, will dynamically create traditional tar files. With this setup, you can see multiple orders of magnitude reduction in storage requirements for temporary data collections.

  14. Factors associated with postoperative sensitivity of amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Al-Omari, Qasem D; Al-Omari, Wael M; Omar, Ridwaan

    2009-01-01

    Postoperative sensitivity is a common clinical problem with restorative treatments. To identify factors that may be predictive of reported postoperative sensitivity to cold following placement of class I and II amalgam restorations in primary carious lesions. One hundred and twenty patients were recruited. Patients were telephoned on days two and seven postoperatively and asked about sensitivity to cold and its intensity. If sensitivity remained up to day seven, patients were also contacted on days 30 and 90. Of the 51 teeth that had sensitivity at day two, 17 experienced mild pain, 26 were moderately painful and eight had severe pain. The percentage of females experiencing postoperative sensitivity was higher than that of males at days two, seven and 30 (P=0.000, 0.016 and 0.028, respectively). Younger patients reported significantly more postoperative sensitivity than older ones at day two (P=0.010) but not at days seven and 30 (P=0.157 and 0.877). Postoperative sensitivity did not differ among the different tooth types at days two, seven and 30 (P=0.219, 0.236 and 0.338, respectively), nor with respect to class I and class II cavities at days two, seven and 30 (P=0.219, 0.769 and 0.259, respectively). Patients who had some pre-operative pain had significantly more postoperative sensitivity (P=0.000, 0.000, and 0.004 at days two, seven and 30, respectively). Regression analysis suggested that younger patients, females, and pre-operative sensitivity to cold might be predictive of postoperative sensitivity following placement of amalgam restorations.

  15. Effects of different surface conditioning methods on the bond strength of composite resin to amalgam.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, M; Koolman, C; Aladag, A; Dündar, M

    2011-01-01

    Repairing amalgam restorations with composite resins using surface conditioning methods is a conservative treatment approach. This study investigated the effects of different conditioning methods that could be used for repair of amalgam fractures. Amalgam (N=96) was condensed into cavities within autopolymerizing polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), and the exposed surface of each specimen (diameter, 6 mm; thickness, 2 mm) was ground finished. The specimens were randomly divided into nine experimental groups (n=12 per group), depending on the conditioning method used. The control group had natural central incisors with amalgam (n=12). The combination of the following conditioning methods was tested: silicacoating (Sc), sandblasting (Sb), metal primers, coupling agents, fiber (Fb) application, and opaquers (O). Five types of silanes, metal primers, or adhesives (Visiobond [V], Porcelain Photobond [PP], Alloy Primer [AP], Unibond sealer [Us], ESPE-Sil [ES]), and four opaquers, namely, Clearfil St Opaquer (CstO), Sinfony (S), Miris (M), and an experimental Opaquer (EO-Cavex), were used. The groups were as follows: group 1, Sc+ES+S+V; group 2, Sc+ES+CstO+V; group 3, Sc+ES+M+V; group 4, Sc+ES+EO+V; group 5, Sb+AP+S; group 6, Sb+AP+PP+CstO; group 7, Sc+ES+S+Fb+V+Fb; group 8-control, SC+ES+V; and group 9, Etch+Sc+ES+S+Us. One repair composite was used for all groups (Clearfil Photo Bond Posterior, Kuraray, Tokyo, Japan). Shear bond strengths (SBSs) (MPa ± SD) were evaluated after 5 weeks of water storage (analysis of variance [ANOVA], Tukey honestly significant differences [HSD], α=0.05). Group 1 exhibited significantly higher values (35.5 ± 4.1) than were seen in group 4 (19.4 ± 8.9), group 6 (19.1 ± 7.8), and group 8 (20.1 ± 4.1) (p<0.05). Group 9 exhibited significantly lower values (8.3 ± 3.4) than were noted in groups 1 to 3 (35.5 ± 4.1; 27 ± 12.5; 24.4 ± 5.1, respectively) (p<0.05). Group 7 (16.4 ± 5.9) showed significantly lower values than were observed in

  16. Decisions of practitioners regarding placement of amalgam and composite restorations in general practice settings.

    PubMed

    Pink, F E; Minden, N J; Simmonds, S

    1994-01-01

    This study was undertaken to analyze the current reasons practitioners in general practice settings choose to place amalgam and composite restorations. Data were gathered on individual restorations in the clinical setting to provide information on reasons practitioners state that restorations are placed, the type of material most often placed in different restoration classifications, and the age of restorations at the time of replacement. The results of this study indicate that approximately one-half of all restorations, both amalgam and composite, were placed to treat primary caries. One-half of the remaining restorations placed, i.e., not including those with primary caries, were placed to treat recurrent caries. With respect to restorative materials, amalgam was most often placed in class 1 and class 2 situations (88.9% of the amalgam restorations reported), while composite was most often placed in class 3, 4, or 5 situations (77.4% of the composite restorations reported). From the total data set returned for replaced restorations, only 20% of the data forms reported on verified longevity of the restoration being replaced. Analysis of these data gave a calculated median longevity for amalgam and composite restorations of 10 years and 5 years respectively.

  17. The effectiveness of four-cavity treatment systems in sealing amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Leean A; Wilson, Nairn H F

    2002-01-01

    Amalgam does not bond to tooth tissue; therefore, restorations using such material are prone to leakage despite the deposition of corrosion products. This study evaluated the effectiveness of four cavity treatment systems placed in vivo in sealing restorations of amalgam. Four cavity treatment systems were investigated in this study: Cervitec, Gluma One Bond, Panavia 21 and Copaliner Dentin Varnish and Sealant. No cavity treatment was placed in an additional group to serve as a control. The teeth were extracted within 15 minutes of restoration placement. The specimens were thermocycled (5-55 +/- 2 degrees C, 500 cycles), immersed in a dye solution, sectioned and scored for leakage. Scanning electron microscopy also examined features of the tooth/restoration interfaces. There were statistically significant differences among the groups regarding leakage scores (p = 0.00). None of the materials tested consistently prevented leakage; however, use of Copaliner Dentin Varnish and Sealant resulted in less overall, occlusal and cervical microleakage than any other systems tested. Significantly more leakage was observed in relation to the cervical portions of the cavities (p = 0.00). No significant differences were identified between the leakage scores obtained for the buccal and palatal (lingual) cavities and the different tooth types (p = 0.52 and 0.83, respectively). A level of significance of 0.05 was selected in all cases. The benefits of the materials tested in this study need to be evaluated using robust, long-term clinical studies. Further work should continue to develop laboratory tests that predict the behavior and performance of cavity sealants in clinical service.

  18. The release of mercury from amalgam restorations and its health effects: a review.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Howard W; Charlton, David G

    2009-01-01

    Amalgam has successfully been used as a restorative material in dentistry for over a century. It has proven to be a cost-effective, wear-resistant material which, when properly placed, can provide many years of service. However, amalgam's popularity has decreased in recent years due, in part, to patient concerns about its potential for adversely affecting their health. Other reasons for its reduced use include the increased emphasis on more esthetic restorative materials and environmental concerns regarding the amount of mercury discharged into wastewater from dental offices. Controversy persists about amalgam's possible role in causing health problems due to its release of mercury. Although conclusive evidence is lacking that directly correlates amalgam with adverse health effects, clinicians should remain knowledgeable about mercury release from amalgam in order to intelligently address their patients' concerns. This article reviews the latest published scientific literature to provide this information.

  19. Minor changes in serum levels of cytokines after removal of amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Björkman, Lars; Brokstad, Karl A; Moen, Ketil; Jonsson, Roland

    2012-06-01

    Dental amalgam restorations release mercury and silver which is absorbed and distributed in the body. Animal studies have shown that both elements may interfere with the host by activation of the immune system in genetically susceptible strains at exposure levels relevant to those from dental amalgam restorations. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis of no change over time in concentrations of a number of immune mediators in serum after removal of all dental amalgam restorations in patients with health complaints attributed to their amalgam restorations and compare with a healthy reference group. Twenty patients previously examined at a specialty unit for health complaints attributed to dental materials were included in a clinical trial and had all amalgam restorations replaced with other dental restorative materials. Serum samples were collected before amalgam removal and 3 and 12 months after the removal was finished. Twenty blood donors matched for age and gender were used as comparison group. A fluorescent bead-based (Luminex) immunoassay kit was used to measure cytokines, chemokines and growth factors in serum. At baseline, the patient group had slightly higher values for GM-CSF, IL-6, IL-2R, IFN-alpha, IL-7, and IL-12p40/p70 compared with the reference group. After amalgam removal a decrease towards the median value of the reference group was found for GM-CSF, IL-8, and IL-7. In conclusion, removal of all dental amalgam restorations and replacement with other dental restorative materials was associated with decreased concentrations of Th1-type proinflammatory markers in serum.

  20. Variations in survival time for amalgam and resin composite restorations: a population based cohort analysis.

    PubMed

    Birch, S; Price, R; Andreou, P; Jones, G; Portolesi, A

    2016-09-01

    To estimate the association between the restorative material used and time to further treatment across population cohorts with universal coverage for dental treatment. Cohort study of variation in survival time for tooth restorations over time and by restoration material used based on an Accelerated Failure Time model. Primary dental care clinics. Members of Canada's First Nations and Inuit population covered by the Non-Insured Health Benefits program of Health Canada for the period April 1, 1999 to March 31, 2012. Tooth restorations using resin composite or amalgam material. Survival time of restoration to further treatment. Median survival time for resin composite was 51 days longer than amalgam, for restorations placed in 1999-2000. This difference was not statistically significant (p⟩0.05). Median survival times were lower for females, older subjects. Those visiting the dentist annually, and decreased monotonically over time from 11.2 and 11.3 years for resin composite and amalgam restorations respectively placed in 1999-2000 to 6.9 and 7.0 years for those placed in 2009-10. Resin composite restorations performed no better than amalgams over the study period, but cost considerably more. With the combination of the overall decrease in survival times for both resin composite and amalgam restorations and the increase in use of resin composite, the costs of serving Health Canada's Non-Insured Health Benefits population will rise considerably, even without any increase in the incidence of caries.

  1. Efficacy of preformed metal crowns vs. amalgam restorations in primary molars: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Randall, R C; Vrijhoef, M M; Wilson, N H

    2000-03-01

    The authors evaluated the treatment efficacy of preformed metal crowns, or PMCs, vs. amalgam restorations in primary molars by means of a literature review and meta-analysis. From a literature search, the authors selected clinical studies that evaluated treatment with PMCs vs. amalgam control restorations in primary molars and provided data against which treatment outcomes could be compared. Ten studies with durations ranging from 1.6 to 10 years fulfilled the selection criteria. Their failure rates, based on need for subsequent treatment or retention of the restoration at final evaluation, ranged from 1.9 to 30.3 percent for PMCs and 11.6 to 88.7 percent for amalgam restorations. Overall, PMCs demonstrated greater longevity and reduced retreatment need compared with amalgam control restorations. The odds ratio for all studies fell within the boundary favoring treatment with PMCs. Analysis of the literature, though mainly retrospective studies, demonstrated evidence of a more favorable outcome for PMCs than for amalgam restorations in primary molars requiring multisurface restorations.

  2. Lichenoid reaction associated with silver amalgam restoration in a Bombay blood group patient: A case report.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Rohini Rangarao; Mattigatti, Sudha S; Mahaparale, Rushikesh R; Kamble, Amit P

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic relationship between the oral lichenoid reaction (OLR) and dental restorative materials has been confirmed many times. An OLR affecting oral mucosa in direct contact with an amalgam restoration represents a delayed, type IV, cell mediated immune response to mercury or one of the other constituents of the dental amalgam. Bombay blood group patients are more prone to this. A case of bilateral OLR is presented, which is present in relation to amalgam restoration. The lesion healed up after the replacement of restorations with an intermediate restorative material. The clinician should be aware of all the possible pathological etiologies of white lesions. If there is any doubt about the nature or management of a usual oral lesion, a referral to an appropriate specialist is mandatory.

  3. Twelve-year survival of 2-surface composite resin and amalgam premolar restorations placed by dental students.

    PubMed

    Naghipur, Safa; Pesun, Igor; Nowakowski, Anthony; Kim, Aaron

    2016-09-01

    Composite resin and amalgam restorations are indicated for the restoration of posterior teeth. With increased esthetic demands, long-term clinical studies are required to evaluate the restorative success and reasons for failure of these materials. The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the survival and reasons for failure of directly placed 2-surface composite resin restorations and directly placed 2-surface amalgam restorations on premolars placed by Canadian dental students. Using The University of Manitoba's dental management software and paper charts, all 2-surface composite resin and 2-surface amalgam restorations placed on premolars between January 1, 2002, and May 30, 2014, were included. Short-term failure (within 2 years), long-term failure, and reasons for failure were collected. A Kaplan-Meier survival estimate with an associated P value comparing composite resin to amalgam restoration curves was performed using SPSS statistical software. Over 12 years, 1695 composite resin and 1125 amalgam 2-surface premolar restorations were placed. Of these restorations, 134 composite resins (7.9%) and 66 amalgams (5.9%) failed. Short-term failures (2 years or less) consisted of 57 composite resin (4%) and 23 amalgam (2.3%) restorations. Long-term failures (greater than 2 years) consisted of 77 composite resin (4.5%) and 43 amalgam (3.8%) restorations. After 12 years of service, the survival probability of composite resin restorations was 86% and that of amalgam restorations 91.5%. The differences in composite resin and amalgam survival curves were also found to be statistically significant (P=.009 for Log-rank test). The main reasons for failure were recurrent caries and fracture of the tooth being restored. Within the limitations of this study, both composite resin and amalgam restorations had acceptable success rates and similar failure modes. Recurrent caries was still the most common reason for failure. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for

  4. Replacing Amalgam Restorations: A Standardized Protocol Based on Analyzing Tissue Physicochemical Modifications.

    PubMed

    Decup, Franck; Epaillard, Alexandre; Chemla, Florence

    2015-12-01

    Almost 60% of operative dentistry is devoted to replacing restorations. When practitioners have to replace an amalgam restoration, they tend to opt for an adhesive restoration, as it is conservative of tooth tissues and mimics the natural appearance of teeth. Based on a literature review, the aim of this article is to determine the best tissue approach when replacing an old amalgam by a new adhesive restoration. After analyzing and understanding tissue alterations due to the amalgam corrosion process, the authors propose an analytical approach to managing the situation. Both tissue orientated and specific mechanical approaches are developed and should be implemented to carry out the optimal clinical procedure and achieve the most conservative and durable treatment.

  5. Clinical Success Rate of Compomer and Amalgam Class II Restorations in First Primary Molars: A Two-year Study.

    PubMed

    Ghaderi, Faezeh; Mardani, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. The majority of failures in Class II amalgam restorations occur in the first primary molar teeth; in addition, use of compomer instead of amalgam for primary molar teeth restorations is a matter of concern. The aim ofthe present study was to compare the success rate of Class II compomer and amalgam restorations in the first primary molars. Materials and methods. A total of 17 amalgams and 17 compomer restorations were placed in 17 children based on a split-mouth design. Restorations were assessed at 12- and 24-month intervals for marginal integrity, the anatomic form and recurrent caries. Data were analyzed with SPSS 11. Chi-squared test was applied for the analysis. Statistical significance was set at P<0.05. Results. A total 34 restorations of 28 restorations (14 pairs) of the total restorations still survived after 24 months. Compomerrestorations showed significantly better results in marginal integrity. Recurrent caries was significantly lower incompomer restorations compared to amalgam restorations. Cumulative success rate at 24-month interval was significantlyhigher in compomer restorations compared to amalgam restorations. There was no statistically significant difference inanatomic form between the two materials. Conclusion. Compomer appears to be a suitable alternative to amalgam for Class II restorations in the first primary mo-lars.

  6. Placement and replacement rates of amalgam and composite restorations on posterior teeth in a military population.

    PubMed

    Owen, Benjamin D; Guevara, Peter H; Greenwood, William

    2017-01-01

    Replacement rates of direct dental restorations have been reported to be 37% to 70%, occupying a large proportion of a general dentist's time. Variations in the rate of initial placement and replacement of direct dental restorations may be associated with material placed (amalgam or composite), age, caries risk of the patient, and other factors. The purpose of this research was to clarify where the majority of patient care time is spent as a restorative Army dentist regarding either the initial placement or replacement of failed restorations; and how the location, caries risk, and material used (amalgam or composite) affects replacement rates. This retrospective cross-sectional study gathered data from 600 randomly selected military patient dental records. All paper records were reviewed and cross checked with the digital record and digital x-ray databases. Record review was limited to all direct dental restorations placed in the posterior dentition within the past 2 years (March 2011 to March 2013). Statistical analysis was accomplished using chi-square tests and logistic regression analyses. Of the 600 charts reviewed, 525 were male, 75 were female, with an average age of 26 years (SD=6), ranging from 17 to 54 years. A third of the patients were classified as high, moderate, and low caries risk, respectively. The total number of posterior direct dental restorations placed was 2,117. Initial restorations totaled 1,429 (67.5%), and replacement restorations placed totaled 688 (32.5%). Four hundred forty-one of the 688 direct dental restorations replaced were amalgam (64%), the 247 remaining direct restorations replaced were composite (36%). Mandibular first molar dental restorations were replaced the most often (23.1%) while mandibular first premolar restorations were replaced the least often (0.9%). Older patients were more likely to have replacement of an existing restoration. Military dentists spend about one-third (32.5%) of their time replacing existing direct

  7. In vitro comparison of the shear bond strength of amalgam to tooth structure using two bonding agents--lutting glass ionomer and 4-META.

    PubMed

    Sheela, K; Sudeep, P T; Hegde, V; Francis, R F; Bhat, K S; Sundeep, P T

    1998-01-01

    Bonding dental amalgam to tooth structure using 4-META has become an accepted clinical procedure. Glass ionomer cements possess the ability to bind to tooth structure as well as to the components of dental amalgam. The present in vitro study evaluates the shear bond strength of amalgam to tooth structure using luting glass ionomer as a bond mediating agent, and compares with that obtained using 4-META. Results indicate that it is possible to bond amalgam to tooth structure using a thin layer of glass ionomer cement. The shear bond strength of glass ionomer cement mediated bond is significant and may be adequate for clinical application.

  8. Thermocycling and dwell times in microleakage evaluation for bonded restorations.

    PubMed

    Rossomando, K J; Wendt, S L

    1995-01-01

    To answer criticisms of an insufficient number of cycles in thermocycling in an earlier paper (Wendt et al., 1992), this study was initiated to evaluate the effect of different dwell times during long-term thermocycling in microleakage analysis of bonded restoratives. A total of 90 resin-bonded restorations, Tytin/Liner F, (Kerr/Bisco), APH/Universal Bond 3, (LD Caulk) and Heliomolar/Syntac, (Vivadent), were inserted in Class V preparations in human third molars. Group A restorations were stored in 0.5% basic fuchsin dye for 166 h. Group B restorations were thermocycled for 5000 cycles in 0.5% basic fuchsin dye baths at 5 +/- 1 degrees C and 55 +/- 1 degrees C with a dwell time of 10 s in each bath. Group C was thermocycled as in Group B but with a dwell time of 60 s. Readings by defined criteria were taken from each of two 1 mm sections along the cemental margin. There were no significant differences (p < 0.05) in the extent of dye penetration at the tooth restoration interface for the thermocycled composite restorations when compared to composite restorations with no thermocycling. There was a significant difference (p < 0.05) in the extent of dye penetration at the tooth restoration interface for the thermocycled amalgam restorations when compared to dye-exposed amalgam specimens with no thermocycling. During microleakage analysis, the need for thermocycling is dependent upon the extent the restorative is thermally conductive in relation to its mass. The dwell time should be clinically relevant, i.e., 10 s, and is important only if the restorative is thermally conductive.

  9. The cost-effectiveness of large amalgam and crown restorations over a 10-year period.

    PubMed

    Kolker, Justine L; Damiano, Peter C; Flach, Stephen D; Bentler, Suzanne E; Armstrong, Steven R; Caplan, Daniel J; Kuthy, Raymond A; Warren, John J; Jones, Michael P; Dawson, Deborah V

    2006-01-01

    To assist clinical decision making for an individual patient or on a community level, this study was done to determine the differences in costs and effectiveness of large amalgams and crowns over 5 and 10 years when catastrophic subsequent treatment (root canal therapy or extraction) was the outcome. Administrative data for patients seen at the University of Iowa, College of Dentistry for 1735 large amalgam and crown restorations in 1987 or 1988 were used. Annual costs and effectiveness values were calculated. Costs of initial treatment (large amalgam or crown), and future treatments were determined, averaged and discounted. The effectiveness measure was defined as the number of years a tooth remained in a state free of catastrophic subsequent treatment. Years free of catastrophic treatment were averaged, and discounted. The years free of catastrophic treatment accounted for individuals who dropped out or withdrew from the study. Teeth with crowns had higher effectiveness values at a much higher cost than teeth restored with large amalgams. The cost of an addition year free of catastrophic treatment for crowns was 1088.41 dollars at 5 years and 500.10 dollars at 10 years. Teeth in women had more favorable cost-effectiveness ratios than those in men, and teeth in the maxillary arch had more favorable cost-effectiveness ratios than teeth in the mandibular arch. Neither the large amalgam or crown restoration had both the lowest cost and the highest effectiveness. The higher incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for crowns should be considered when making treatment decisions between large amalgam and crown restorations.

  10. Healing of oral lichenoid lesions after replacing amalgam restorations: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Issa, Y; Brunton, P A; Glenny, A M; Duxbury, A J

    2004-11-01

    We sought to systematically review the literature related to oral lichenoid lesions (OLLs) and amalgam restorations. Cohort and case-controlled studies (no randomized controlled trials or controlled clinical trials available) were reviewed with respect to inclusion criteria and data on patients with OLLs, treatment interventions, and the measurement of outcomes. Fourteen cohort and 5 case-controlled trials met the criteria. The study population consisted of 1158 patients (27% male and 73% female; age range, 23-79 years). From 16% to 91% of patients had positive patch test results for at least 1 mercury compound. Of 1158 patients, 636 had to have their restorations replaced. The follow-up period ranged from 2 months to 9 1/2 years. Complete healing ranged from 37.5% to 100%. The greatest improvements were seen in lesions in close contact with amalgam. Protocols must be standardized to obtain valid results. The replacement of amalgam restorations can result in the resolution or improvement of OLLs. Patch testing seems to be of limited value. The topographic relationship between an OLL and an amalgam restoration is a useful--but not conclusive--marker.

  11. Amalgam shear bond strength to dentin using single-bottle primer/adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Cobb, D S; Denehy, G E; Vargas, M A

    1999-10-01

    To evaluate the in vitro shear bond strengths (SBS) of a spherical amalgam alloy (Tytin) to dentin using several single-bottle primer/adhesive systems both alone: Single Bond (SB), OptiBond Solo (Sol), Prime & Bond 2.1 (PB), One-Step (OS) and in combination with the manufacturer's supplemental amalgam bonding agent: Single Bond w/3M RelyX ARC (SBX) and Prime & Bond 2.1 w/Amalgam Bonding Accessory Kit (PBA). Two, three-component adhesive systems, Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SBMP) and Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus w/light curing (S + V) and w/o light curing (S+) were used for comparison. One hundred eight extracted human third molars were mounted lengthwise in phenolic rings with acrylic resin. The proximal surfaces were ground to expose a flat dentin surface, then polished to 600 grit silicon carbide paper. The teeth were randomly assigned to 9 groups (n = 12), and dentin surfaces in each group were treated with an adhesive system according to the manufacturer's instructions, except for S + V specimens, where the adhesive was light cured for 10 s before placing the amalgam. Specimens were then secured in a split Teflon mold, having a 3 mm diameter opening and amalgam was triturated and condensed onto the treated dentin surfaces. Twenty minutes after condensation, the split mold was separated. Specimens were placed in distilled water for 24 hrs, then thermocycled (300 cycles, between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C, with 12 s dwell time). All specimens were stored in 37 degrees C distilled water for 7 days, prior to shear strength testing using a Zwick Universal Testing Machine at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. The highest to the lowest mean dentin shear bond strength values (MPa) for the adhesive systems tested were: S + V (10.3 +/- 2.3), SBX (10.2 +/- 3.5), PBA, (6.4 +/- 3.6), SOL (5.8 +/- 2.5), SBMP (5.7 +/- 1.8), S+ (4.8 +/- 2.3), PB (2.7 +/- 2.6), SB (2.7 +/- 1.1) and OS (2.5 +/- 1.8). One-way ANOVA and Duncan's Multiple Range Test indicated significant

  12. Comparison of wear and clinical performance between amalgam, composite and open sandwich restorations: 2-year results.

    PubMed

    Sachdeo, A; Gray, Gordon B; Sulieman, M A; Jagger, Daryll C

    2004-03-01

    There has been some disquiet over the use of mercury containing restorative materials. The most commonly used alternative is composite resin but this has the potential disadvantage associated with wear and marginal leakage, which in turn, has proven to result in secondary caries and sensitivity. To overcome the shortcomings of a directly placed composite restoration, the glass-ionomer/composite open sandwich technique was introduced followed by the subsequent introduction of compomer systems. The aims of this study were to evaluate the wear and clinical performance of a control group of amalgam restorations compared with that of a group of posterior composite resin restorations fillings and a group of compomer/composite open sandwich restorations placed by a single general dental practitioner. The duration of the study was 2 years. One hundred and thirty three (71.4%) patients were successfully recalled and the wear and clinical performance of each restoration after 6, 12 and 24 months was measured, indirectly. There was no statistically significant difference recorded between the groups at 6 months or 1 year (p > 0.05). However, at the end of the 2-year study, there was a significantly lower rate of wear recorded for the control amalgam restorations compared with other two groups (p = 0.033). There was no statistically significant difference in wear recorded between the two groups of tooth-coloured restorations (p > 0.05). With regards to clinical performance of the restorations, occlusal and proximal contacts in each group of restoration remained satisfactory throughout the study.

  13. Restoration of posterior teeth in clinical practice: evidence base for choosing amalgam versus composite.

    PubMed

    Kovarik, Robert E

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the current use of amalgam versus resin composite in posterior restorations and the evidence-base for choosing between these two treatment options. While much research has been published on the issue of the clinical use of amalgam versus resin composite, there are several issues that limit the true evidence-base on the subject. Furthermore, while the majority of published studies on posterior composites would seem to indicate equivalent clinical performance of resin composite to amalgam restorations, the studies that should be weighted much more heavily (randomized controlled trials) do not support the slant of the rest of the literature. As part of an evidence-based approach to private practice, clinicians need to be aware of the levels of evidence in the literature and need to properly inform patients of the true clinical outcomes that are associated with the use of amalgam versus resin composite for posterior restorations, so that patients are themselves making informed decisions about their dental care.

  14. Effect of radiofrequency radiation from Wi-Fi devices on mercury release from amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Paknahad, Maryam; Mortazavi, S M J; Shahidi, Shoaleh; Mortazavi, Ghazal; Haghani, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Dental amalgam is composed of approximately 50% elemental mercury. Despite concerns over the toxicity of mercury, amalgam is still the most widely used restorative material. Wi-Fi is a rapidly using local area wireless computer networking technology. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that evaluates the effect of exposure to Wi-Fi signals on mercury release from amalgam restorations. Standard class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces of 20 non-carious extracted human premolars. The teeth were randomly divided into 2 groups (n = 10). The control group was stored in non-environment. The specimens in the experimental groups were exposed to a radiofrequency radiation emitted from standard Wi Fi devices at 2.4 GHz for 20 min. The distance between the Wi-Fi router and samples was 30 cm and the router was exchanging data with a laptop computer that was placed 20 m away from the router. The concentration of mercury in the artificial saliva in the groups was evaluated by using a cold-vapor atomic absorption Mercury Analyzer System. The independent t test was used to evaluate any significant differences in mercury release between the two groups. The mean (±SD) concentration of mercury in the artificial saliva of the Wi-Fi exposed teeth samples was 0.056 ± .025 mg/L, while it was only 0.026 ± .008 mg/L in the non-exposed control samples. This difference was statistically significant (P =0.009). Exposure of patients with amalgam restorations to radiofrequency radiation emitted from conventional Wi-Fi devices can increase mercury release from amalgam restorations.

  15. The future of dental amalgam: a review of the literature. Part 7: Possible alternative materials to amalgam for the restoration of posterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Eley, B M

    1997-07-12

    This is the last in a series of articles on the future of dental amalgam. It considers possible alternative materials to amalgam for the restoration of posterior teeth. The materials discussed are gold inlays, gold foil, gallium alloys, and tooth coloured non-metal alternatives including glass-ionomer cements, composite resins, glass-ionomer-resin hybrids, compomers and ceramics. The clinical indications for these restorations are first described along with their potential clinical problems and their mean survival rates in comparison with dental amalgam. Secondly, the safety of composite resins is considered and potential toxic and hypersensitive effects of these materials are discussed. Finally, it is concluded that the present evidence does not appear to demonstrate that dental amalgam is hazardous to the health of the general population. It does, however, recommend that in continuing to use amalgam dentists must use strict mercury hygiene procedures to avoid risk to their staff and contamination of the environment. It seems that mercury contamination of the environment is likely to be the main reason for any future government action against the continued clinical use of dental amalgam.

  16. An in vitro Evaluation of Microleakage of Posterior Teeth Restored with Amalgam, Composite and Zirconomer – A Stereomicroscopic Study

    PubMed Central

    Punia, Sandhya Kapoor; Bhat, Surekha; Singh, Gautam; Goyal, Pravesh; Oza, Swapnil; Raiyani, Chirag M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Numerous restorative materials are being used in dentistry to achieve adequate strength and restore aesthetics. However, a perfect ideal restorative material has still eluded dentist. Dental amalgam is versatile material with self-sealing property, but is unaesthetic. Other restorative materials like, composites require conservative preparation, but exhibits polymerisation shrinkage resulting in microleakage. To overcome these drawbacks a high strength restorative material reinforced with ceramic and zirconia fillers known as zirconomer has been introduced. The aim of this study was to evaluate the micro-leakage of these three different restorative materials. Materials and Methods Thirty non-carious human permanent first and second molars were utilized in this study. Class I cavities were prepared on the occlusal surface; cavities were then restored with amalgam, composite and zirconomer as per manufacture’s instruction. All samples were stored for 24 hours in distilled water followed by thermocycling. The entire tooth surface was painted with two coats of varnish to within 1mm of the restoration margins. The teeth were immersed in dye. Teeth were sectioned and observed under stereomicroscope. Results In this study the zirconomer exhibited the highest micro leakage as compared to composite and amalgam but composite having higher micro leakage as compared to amalgam and lower micro leakage as compared to zirconomer. Conclusion Even though composite and amalgam are being marketed aggressively and new material like zirconomer are on origin, amalgam still proves to be one of the best materials. PMID:26393208

  17. Preservation-based approaches to restore posterior teeth with amalgam, resin or a combination of materials.

    PubMed

    Baghdadi, Ziad D

    2002-02-01

    This review is a systematic assessment, from the literature, of the status quo of dental amalgam, resin-based composite and glass-ionomer restorations for carious lesions as it applies to new concepts, coupled with clinical research. Scientifically based and practical new materials and techniques are recommended to include in contemporary practice throughout the world. Clinical and laboratory studies which have been carried out in light of modern conservative principles, and in light of the current emphasis of treating dental caries as a disease process were reviewed and discussed. An approach to managing carious lesions based upon selected advantages of dental amalgam, resin-based composite and glass-ionomer technology applied to what is termed "preservation-based" approaches to restoring teeth has been synthesized. Researched evidence contradicts the notion of "extension for prevention" in favor of maintaining sound tooth structure which would translate into more patients with healthy dentitions for entire lifetimes.

  18. Loss of sound tooth structure when replacing amalgam restorations by adhesive inlays.

    PubMed

    Moscovich, H; Creugers, N H; De Kanter, R J; Roeters, F J

    1998-01-01

    The replacement of amalgam restorations by adhesive inlays requires an adjustment to the cavity form. This often necessitates the removal of sound tooth substance. Undercuts may be blocked out by a base, but an extensive use of glass ionomer for this purpose is not recommended due to the weak mechanical properties of this material. The present study estimated the amount of sound tissue removed when a given amalgam preparation was reshaped for an adhesive inlay without the use of a base. An MOD amalgam preparation was created in an acrylic tooth. Twenty copies were distributed among 20 operators, who were requested to transform the preparation into an adhesive inlay preparation, removing as little material as possible. One control preparation with parallel walls was produced. All teeth were weighed before and after the alteration. The preparations' volumes were calculated: original amalgam preparation 0.130 ml, parallel preparation 0.136 ml. The minimum removal necessary was therefore 0.006 ml. The amount removed by the operators varied, with a mean volume of 0.0138 +/- 0.004 ml. Statistical analysis showed that for the given preparation, significantly more material was removed than necessary for undercut elimination. On average, more than twice the minimal volume of material was lost. This loss can be minimized by developing alternative techniques for undercut elimination.

  19. Periapical status of non-root-filled teeth with resin composite, amalgam, or full crown restorations: a cross-sectional study of a Swedish adult population.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Victoria; Petersson, Kerstin; Wolf, Eva; Akerman, Sigvard

    2014-09-01

    Experimental studies show that dental pulp cells respond unfavorably to contact with resin composite restorative material. Hypothetically, in a random population, the frequency of apical periodontitis should be higher for teeth restored with resin composite than with amalgam. Therefore, the aim was to compare the periapical status of non-root-filled teeth restored with resin composite, amalgam, or laboratory-fabricated crowns in an adult Swedish population. The subjects comprised 440 individuals from a randomly selected sample of 1,000 adult residents of a Swedish county. The type, material, and quality of the restorations were recorded for all non-root-filled teeth by clinical examination and intraoral clinical photographs. Periapical status was evaluated on panoramic radiographs. The association between periapical status and type, material, and quality of the restorations was analyzed using the chi-square test and logistic regression analysis. There was no significant difference in the frequency of apical periodontitis (AP) between teeth restored with resin composite or amalgam (1.3% and 1.1%, respectively). The frequency of AP for teeth restored with laboratory-fabricated crowns was significantly higher (6.3%). Regression analysis showed no association between AP and resin composite restorations but a significant association with laboratory-fabricated crowns. The results indicate that the risk of damage to the pulp-dentin complex from exposure to resin composite material and dentin bonding agents shown in experimental studies is not reflected in the clinical setting. However, in the study sample, AP was diagnosed in a significantly higher proportion of teeth restored with laboratory-fabricated crowns. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The effect of thermocycling on the determination of microleakage in Permite amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Rajbaran, S; Dannheimer, M; De Wet, F

    2009-10-01

    Microleakage is an important clinical performance parameter of restorative materials. A literature review of the effect of thermocycling on microleakage revealed an incongruity of results. The aim of this study was to describe the effect of thermocycling on microleakage in Class V Permite amalgam restorations. Class V cavities were prepared at the mesial and distal cemento-enamel junctions of 20 extracted, sound, human molar teeth. Cavities were treated with Polyvar cavity varnish and restored with Permite amalgam as per manufacturer's directions. Teeth were randomly divided into two groups of 10 teeth each. After one day only one group was thermocycled for 500 hundred cycles (5 - 55 degrees C; dwell time of 30 seconds: transfer time of 10 seconds). Teeth were subsequently submersed in 0.5% Basic Fuchsin solution (24 hours: room temperature), then cleaned and embedded in polyester potting resin. Teeth were sectioned longitudinally along the long axis of the tooth into three slices using the Isomet low speed saw. Microleakage was scored under a light microscope at 10 times magnification. While microleakage at cementum margins was significantly and negatively influenced by thermocycling, enamel margins appeared to be significantly unaffected. The effect of thermocycling on the determination of microleakage was only significant at the cementum margins of Permite restorations.

  1. Patients give meaning to changes in health complaints before, during and after the replacement of amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Levey, Emily; Carson, Susan; Innes, Nicola

    2015-12-01

    Qualitative, explorative and reflexive thematic analysis. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were carried out with 12 participants who had all taken part in a previous amalgam removal trial. Follow-up; three months and one, three and five years after amalgam restoration removal and replacement. Interviews were carried out by two researchers at a different location from clinical follow-up. Transcripts were analysed by reading through the written material to establish common themes. NVivo9 software was used to assist further organising themes. Themes were then refined and condensed into the presented findings, which included selected quotes. The authors found the following themes to be important to patients in giving meaning to health complaints before, during and after amalgam removal: Something is not working: betrayed by the body. You are out there on your own. Not being sure of the importance of amalgam removal. The relief experienced after amalgam is removed. To accept, to give up, or to continue the search. For this group of patients, it was important to remove dental amalgam restorations. However, it remains uncertain of how critical this actually was in relation to their experienced changes in health complaints, as they did not feel that they could credit all positive change to the amalgam removal. For some participants it meant this was no longer a source of worry and for others it helped them move towards accepting their health status.

  2. Legislation and informed consent brochures for dental patients receiving amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Cochran, Amy A; Cross, Catherine L; Wack, Courtney A; Long, William B; Newkirk, Anthony T

    2008-01-01

    In 2008, Norway banned the use of mercury for amalgam restorations. Four states in the United States have developed Informed Consent Brochures for amalgam restorations that must be given to their dental patients. The authors describe a patient who had a large cavity in his left lower molar tooth no.18 that had to be removed by an oral surgeon. When the patient went to the oral surgeon, the surgeon told the patient that he would replace the carious tooth with a gold implant. He was not given an Informed Consent Brochure regarding dental restorative materials. The oral surgeon extracted the carious tooth, replacing the tooth with a supposed gold crown implant. On his yearly dental examination, his dentist took an x-ray of his dental implant and explained that the x-ray could not distinguish whether the implant contained either gold or mercury. Consequently, the dentist referred him to a dental clinic in which the dental implant could be removed without mercury contamination of the patient's neurologic system during the extraction of the implant from the root canal. During the removal of the dental restoration, the dentist found build up expanding into the root canal that had a black color. The crown and underlying tooth were sent to ALT BioScience for analysis. Elemental analysis of the crown and underlying tooth confirmed the presence of mercury in the restoration. The patient should have been given an Informed Consent Brochure by the dentist that described the dental restoration that was used in the dental implant.

  3. [Illnesses caused by amalgam?].

    PubMed

    Staehle, H J

    1998-02-15

    As side effects of dental amalgam have been mentioned allergy, oral lichen, electro-galvanism, amalgam tattoos of gingiva or oral mucosa, and undesirable esthetics. Patients with amalgam restorations show increased mercury levels in different body fluids compared to amalgam-free controls. An intoxication due to dental amalgam fillings, however, is not to be expected-despite equivocal statements in the literature. In contrast, recent studies revealed that dental amalgam contributes to mercury exposure less than assumed few years ago. Therefore, amalgam will stay an option as a restorative material in future. The removal of intact amalgam fillings in the intention of "detoxification" is not science-based. Successful caries prevention (e.g. due to the widespread use of fluoride) and the further development of esthetic restorative materials based on composite resins will limit the utilisation of amalgam. Thus, alternative materials have not been shown to have a lower rate of side effects (e.g. allergy) compared to amalgam.

  4. Curriculum time compared to clinical procedures in amalgam and composite posterior restorations in U.S. dental schools: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Rey, Rosalia; Nimmo, Susan; Childs, Gail S; Behar-Horenstein, Linda S

    2015-03-01

    Dental clinicians have an expanding range of biomaterial choices for restoring tooth structure. Scientific developments in cariology, advances in dental biomaterials, and patients' esthetic concerns have led to a reduction in amalgam restorations and an increase in composite restorations. The aim of this study was to compare teaching time with students' clinical procedures in amalgam and composite posterior restorations in dental schools across the United States. Academic deans in 60 schools were invited to complete a survey that asked for the amount of instructional time for amalgam and composite posterior restorations and the number of clinical restorations performed by their Classes of 2009, 2010, and 2011. Of these 60, 12 returned surveys with complete data, for a 20% response rate. Responses from these schools showed little change in lecture and preclinical laboratory instruction from 2009 to 2011. There was a slight increase in two-surface restorations for both amalgam and composites; however, the total number of reported composite and amalgam restorations remained the same. Of 204,864 restorations reported, 53% were composite, and 47% were amalgam. There were twice as many multisurface large or complex amalgam restorations as composites. One-surface composite restorations exceeded amalgams. Among the participating schools, there was little to no change between curriculum time and clinical procedures. Findings from this preliminary study reflect a modest increase in two-surface resin-based restorations placed by dental students from 2009 to 2011 and little change in curricular time devoted to teaching amalgam restorations. The total number of posterior composite restorations placed by students in these schools was slightly higher than amalgams.

  5. Trends in material choice for posterior restorations in an Israeli dental school: composite resin versus amalgam.

    PubMed

    Ben-Gal, Gilad; Weiss, Ervin I

    2011-12-01

    According to a recent American Dental Association survey, posterior composite resin restorations now outnumber amalgam restorations in the United States. Dental schools around the world vary considerably in the extent to which they teach the use of composite resins. We aimed to determine if there has been an increase in the placement of posterior composite restorations in an Israeli dental school and if faculty experience affects the type of posterior restoration placed. In this retrospective study, we recorded and analyzed all the restorations performed by undergraduate students in the last five academic years at the Hebrew University Hadassah School of Dental Medicine in Jerusalem. All clinical records of student treatments between 2004 and 2009 were screened, and direct restorations were registered. Out of 6,094 posterior restorations performed during the study period, 42.3 percent were made of composite resin, increasing from 36.8 percent in 2004-05 to 48.5 percent in 2008-09, an increase of 11.7 percent. When clinical instructors were asked to state their preference if they themselves were to undergo posterior restoration, similar results were obtained. Instructors with less than ten years' experience preferred posterior composite resin restorations in 54.8 percent of the hypothetical situations, compared with 37.2 percent preferred by instructors with ten years of experience or more. It appears that the use of composite resin was influenced mainly by the prevailing trend and was not based on scientific evidence. Dental faculties should define criteria, based on up-to-date clinical studies, for using new materials, taking into consideration differences among instructors regarding treatment concept.

  6. Class I and Class II silver amalgam and resin composite posterior restorations: teaching approaches in Canadian faculties of dentistry.

    PubMed

    McComb, Dorothy

    2005-06-01

    A 10-question survey was mailed to the 10 Canadian faculties of dentistry to determine current approaches to teaching undergraduates about silver amalgam and resin composite for posterior restorations in adults and children. Responses were received from all 10 pedodontic programs and from 8 of the 10 operative and restorative programs. The use of silver amalgam and posterior composite for restorations of primary and permanent teeth is covered in the curricula of all dental schools, but the relative emphasis on the 2 materials varies. In the operative and restorative programs, curriculum time devoted to silver amalgam is either greater than or equal to that devoted to posterior composite. Five of the 8 schools reported greater educational emphasis on silver amalgam for the permanent dentition; however, course directors noted that the preference among patients seen in clinics is tending toward composite restorations. Curricula appear designed to educate students about the optimal use of both materials. Requirements for performance of restorations during training generally do not specify the type of material; these requirements range from 60 restorations to 250 surfaces. Five of the 8 schools conduct clinical competency tests with both materials. The responses from the pedodontic programs were more diverse. The proportion of curriculum time devoted to each type of material in these programs ranged from less than 25% to more than 75%. Five schools reported more emphasis on silver amalgam, 3 schools reported equal emphasis, and 2 schools reported more emphasis on posterior composite. No clinical requirements were specified in any of the undergraduate pedodontic programs. Within some of the faculties, there were differences between the operative and restorative program and the pedodontic program with respect to emphasis on different materials for the posterior dentition.

  7. Durability of amalgam in the restoration of class II cavities in primary molars: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, N M; Neumann, A

    2007-03-01

    To review the available literature on the durability of amalgam when used to restore interproximal (class II) cavities in primary molars. The literature was searched using OVID Medline and EMBASE from 1966 to 2006. The search plan of the electronic databases included: "dental amalgam or amalgam or alloy" and "deciduous or primary or milk or first or baby or natal" or "tooth or teeth or dentition" and "permanent restorations or permanent fillings". Relevant prospective clinical studies were reviewed by 2 reviewers against a set of defined criteria. Papers were graded according to the number of criteria met as A = >90%, B1 = 75%, B2 = 50% and C = <50%. No study achieved a Grade A; four studies rated Grade B1 and thirteen B2. Seven studies were rated Grade C. A wide range of failure rates for amalgam were reported from 0 - 58%. However, in the context of a controlled clinical environment in a developed country the failure rate varied between 0 and 22%. Amalgam remains an appropriate choice of material for the restoration of the primary dentition. However, factors other than durability are increasingly influencing its use in clinical practice.

  8. Effects of mercury release from amalgam dental restorations during cremation on soil mercury levels of three New Zealand crematoria

    SciTech Connect

    Nieschmidt, A.K.; Kim, N.D.

    1997-05-01

    A vast amount of research has been undertaken in the last 15-20 years on the corrosion reactions occurring in dental amalgam, release of mercury from amalgam restorations, and the toxic effects of this released mercury on the human body. However, one environmental aspect of amalgam dental restorations that has not received a great deal of attention is the release of mercury during cremation. Mercury is liberated during cremation both because dental amalgams are unstable at cremation temperatures (650-700{degrees}C) and because the free mercury metal is highly volatile. In New Zealand, 58% of deaths are followed by cremation and this figure is likely to rise in the future. This increasing use of cremation as the method of corpse disposal, coupled with the fact that each amalgam restoration is approximately 50% mercury, implies that a significant amount of mercury may be emitted into the environment every year. This study examines mercury released from crematoria in New Zealand. 20 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Seal, replacement or monitoring amalgam restorations with occlusal marginal defects? Results of a 10-year clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Moncada, G; Fernández, E; Mena, K; Martin, J; Vildósola, P; De Oliveira Junior, O B; Estay, J; Mjör, I A; Gordan, V V

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this prospective and blind clinical trial was to assess the effectiveness of sealing localized marginal defects of amalgam restoration that were initially scheduled to be replaced. A cohort of twenty six patients with 60 amalgam restorations (n=44Class I and n=16Class II), that presented marginal defects deviating from ideal (Bravo) according to USPHS criteria, were assigned to either sealing or replacement groups: A: sealing n=20, Replacement n=20, and no treatment (n=20). Two blind examiners evaluated the restorations at baseline (K=0.74) and after ten years (K=0.84) according with USPHS criteria, in four parameters: marginal adaptation (MA), secondary caries (SC), marginal staining (MS) and teeth sensitivity (TS). Multiple comparison of restorations degradation/upgrade was analyzed by Friedman test and the comparisons within groups were performed by Wilcoxon test. After 10 years, 44 restorations were assessed (73.3%), Group A: n=14 and Group B: n=16; and Group C: n=14 sealing and replacement amalgam restorations presented similar level of quality in MA (p=0.76), SC (p=0.25) and TS (p=0.52), while in MS (p=0.007) presented better performance in replacement group after 10-years. Most of the occlusal amalgam restorations with marginal gaps showed similar long term outcomes than the restorations were sealed, replaced, or not treated over a 10-year period. Most of the restorations of the three groups were clinically acceptable, under the studied parameters. All restorations had the tendency to present downgrade/deterioration over time.

  10. Fracture resistance of prepared teeth restored with bonded inlay restorations.

    PubMed

    St-Georges, Annie J; Sturdevant, John R; Swift, Edward J; Thompson, Jeffrey Y

    2003-06-01

    intact, prepared, and restored human maxillary premolars. Fifty intact, noncarious human maxillary premolars were divided into 5 groups of 10 and were mounted with their roots imbedded in autopolymerized acrylic. In the first group, the teeth were intact with no preparation. In the other 4 groups, Class II MOD preparations were made with a water-cooled high-speed hand piece. In 1 group, the cavity preparations were restored with bonded CAD/CAM ceramic inlays. In 2 groups, the preparations were restored with bonded CAD/CAM composite inlays (acid etched or air particle abraded). In the final group, the teeth were prepared but unrestored. Specimens were tested individually in a universal testing machine, in which a 4.82-mm-diameter steel sphere plunger was mounted in the crosshead moving at 0.5 mm/min. The plunger contacted the facial and lingual triangular ridges beyond the margins of the restorations. Peak load to fracture (N) was measured for each specimen. Means were calculated and analyzed with analysis of variance (PRestoring the teeth with ceramic or composite inlays did not significantly strengthen the teeth under this testing system. Of the restored teeth, those restored with indirect composite inlays cemented following manufacturer's recommendations had the highest fracture resistance. Within the limitations of this study, under static compression load testing, bonded inlay restorations did not strengthen maxillary premolars with large MOD preparations.

  11. Validity and reliability of methods for the detection of secondary caries around amalgam restorations in primary teeth.

    PubMed

    Braga, Mariana Minatel; Chiarotti, Ana Paula Sturion; Imparato, José Carlos Pettorossi; Mendes, Fausto Medeiros

    2010-01-01

    Secondary caries has been reported as the main reason for restoration replacement. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the performance of different methods--visual inspection, laser fluorescence (DIAGNOdent), radiography and tactile examination--for secondary caries detection in primary molars restored with amalgam. Fifty-four primary molars were photographed and 73 suspect sites adjacent to amalgam restorations were selected. Two examiners evaluated independently these sites using all methods. Agreement between examiners was assessed by the Kappa test. To validate the methods, a caries-detector dye was used after restoration removal. The best cut-off points for the sample were found by a Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) analysis, and the area under the ROC curve (Az), and the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the methods were calculated for enamel (D2) and dentine (D3) thresholds. These parameters were found for each method and then compared by the McNemar test. The tactile examination and visual inspection presented the highest inter-examiner agreement for the D2 and D3 thresholds, respectively. The visual inspection also showed better performance than the other methods for both thresholds (Az = 0.861 and Az = 0.841, respectively). In conclusion, the visual inspection presented the best performance for detecting enamel and dentin secondary caries in primary teeth restored with amalgam.

  12. Streptococcus mutans-induced secondary caries adjacent to glass ionomer cement, composite resin and amalgam restorations in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gama-Teixeira, Adriana; Simionato, Maria Regina Lorenzeti; Elian, Silvia Nagib; Sobral, Maria Angela Pita; Luz, Maria Aparecida Alves de Cerqueira

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define, in vitro, the potential to inhibit secondary caries of restorative materials currently used in dental practice. Standard cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of fifty extracted human third molars. The teeth were randomly divided into five groups, each one restored with one of the following materials: glass ionomer cement (GIC); amalgam; light-cured composite resin; ion-releasing composite; and light-cured, fluoride-containing composite resin. The teeth were thermocycled, sterilized with gamma irradiation, exposed to a cariogenic challenge using a bacterial system using Streptococcus mutans, and then prepared for microscopic observation. The following parameters were measured in each lesion formed: extension, depth, and caries inhibition area. The outer lesions developed showed an intact surface layer and had a rectangular shape. Wall lesions were not observed inside the cavities. After Analysis of Variance and Component of Variance Models Analysis, it was observed that the GIC group had the smallest lesions and the greatest number of caries inhibition areas. The lesions developed around Amalgam and Ariston pHc restorations had an intermediate size and the largest lesions were observed around Z-100 and Heliomolar restorations. It may be concluded that the restorative materials GIC, amalgam and ion-releasing composites may reduce secondary caries formation.

  13. Secondary caries adjacent to amalgam restorations lined with a fluoridated dentin desensitizer.

    PubMed

    García-Godoy, F; Flaitz, C M; Hicks, M J

    1998-12-01

    To determine the in vitro effect of a fluoridated dentin desensitizer solution (DentinBloc) on (1) secondary caries formation, and (2) the interfacial adaptation when used as a cavity liner before amalgam (Dis-persalloy) placement. 24 macroscopically caries-free molars were selected. Class V cavity preparations on mesial and distal surfaces were placed along the cemento-enamel junction, providing an enamel margin and a root surface margin. DentinBloc was applied prior to alloy restoration in the experimental group for 60 s (the excess was removed with cotton pellets), while a copal cavity varnish (Copalite) was used before alloy restoration in the control group. Polarized light evaluation was performed on longitudinal sections (24 caries risk sites for enamel and dentin margins in each group). Alloy-tooth interfaces were evaluated by SEM. Wall lesions were present in 100% of caries-risk sites for the control group, while 58% of enamel risk sites and 50% of root risk sites had wall lesions in the DentinBloc group. Surface lesion depth was reduced 13% at enamel margins and by 18% at root margins in the experimental group when compared to the control group. Relatively small interface gaps between the alloy and tooth surfaces were seen in both groups, but these were less for the root surface margins (2-5 microns) than for the enamel margins (5-15 microns).

  14. [Black or white--Which choice for the molars? Part 2. Which does one choose for the restoration of posterior teeth: amalgam or composite?].

    PubMed

    De Moor, Roeland; Delmé, Katleen

    2008-01-01

    The two direct dental restorative materials most commonly used today are silver-mercury amalgam and resin-based composite. The survival of dental amalgam restorations is twice as high than for composite fillings: polymerisation shrinkage, deficient marginal adaptation, higher wear rates, defective contact points leading to food impaction, insufficiently converted composite at the bottom of the cavity are problems that cannot be underestimated when using resin-composite. This does not imply that there is no weakness for amalgam: the need for retentive cavities at the cost of healthy tooth substance, weakening of the tooth's strength by cutting through the tooth crown's ridges, the risk of fracture of remaining tooth substance (mostly buccal and lingual surfaces) as the result of the cavity design, and the lack of adhesion between amalgam and tooth substance. Retaining a tooth's strength by the replacement of amalgam by resin-composites is not always the correct solution. In this respect, it can be questioned whether it is not appropriate to repair failing (extensive) amalgam restorations as to replace them with resin-composites. Research in this respect has demonstrated that dentists still are not convinced of this treatment option. Restoring a tooth in its original build-up or structure and function within the oral cavity is the basis of the biomimetic principle: the use of composite appears to be more obvious than restoring with amalgam. In the present survey pro's and con's of amalgams and resin-composites for the restoration of posterior teeth are weighted. The conclusion demonstrates that there is still a place for dental amalgam in modern restorative dentistry when plastic filling materials are used for the direct tooth repair or restoration.

  15. A technical report on repair of amalgam-dentin complex.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, M; Salihoğlu-Yener, E

    2011-01-01

    This clinical report describes a repair protocol for cusp fracture of a failed amalgam-dentin complex. A maxillary right first premolar with an amalgam restoration presented a buccal cusp fracture. Chairside repair has been undertaken by conditioning the existing amalgam restoration with silica coating (30 μm CoJet®-Sand), phosphoric acid etching the beveled enamel surface, priming dentin, and application of a bonding agent on both enamel and dentin. Thereafter, the amalgam was silanized (ESPE®-Sil), and opaque resin was applied and polymerized to mask the amalgam. The fractured buccal cusp was modeled using resin composite (Clearfil Photo Posterior) and photo-polymerized. Finally, the amalgam was refinished and refurbished and the composite was finished and polished.

  16. On modeling and nanoanalysis of caries-affected dentin surfaces restored with Zn-containing amalgam and in vitro oral function.

    PubMed

    Toledano, Manuel; Aguilera, Fátima S; Osorio, Estrella; López-López, Modesto T; Cabello, Inmaculada; Toledano-Osorio, Manuel; Osorio, Raquel

    2015-12-19

    The aim of this research was to assess the influence of mechanical loading on the ability of Zn-free versus Zn-containing amalgams to promote remineralization at the dentin interface. Sound and caries-affected dentin surfaces (CAD) were restored using Zn-free or Zn-containing dental amalgams. Midcoronal dentin surfaces were studied by (1) atomic force microscopy analysis (including plot and phase imaging, nanoindentation test [modulus of Young (Ei), nanoroughness measurements, and fibril diameter assessment], (2) Raman spectroscopy/cluster analysis, (3) x-ray diffraction, (4) field emission electron microscope and energy-dispersive analysis, for morphological, mechanical, and physicochemical characterization. Analyses were performed before amalgam placement and after amalgam removal, at 24 h and 3 weeks of load cycling. Zn-free and Zn-containing amalgams restorations promoted an increase in the modulus of Young of CAD surfaces, after 3 weeks of load cycling; at this time, Zn-containing amalgams attained higher Ei than Zn-free restorations. Zn-containing amalgams induced tubular occlusion after load cycling, in both sound and CAD. Zn free-amalgams promoted remineralization of both intertubular and peritubular dentin in CAD substrata. These minerals were identified as calcium-phosphate deposits and crystals as hydroxyl-apatite with augmented crystallographic maturity but with some components of lattice distortion. Crosslinking of collagen diminished and secondary structure of collagen increased in CAD substrate restored with Zn-containing amalgam after 3 weeks of load cycling, indicating an advanced preservation, molecular organization, and orientation of collagen fibrils after load cycling. Plot and phase images permitted to observe the topographical changes which were promoted by the mineral deposits; in general, the indexes related to higher remineralization gave rise to a decrease of nanoroughness and an augmentation of the bandwidth of the collagen fibrils. Zn

  17. Biocompatibility of a flowable composite bonded with a self-etching adhesive compared with a glass lonomer cement and a high copper amalgam.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Yasushi; Seki, Yuichi; Sasafuchi, Yasutaka; Arakawa, Makoto; Burrow, Michael F; Otsuki, Masayuki; Tagami, Junji

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the pulpal response and in-vivo microleakage of a flowable composite bonded with a self-etching adhesive and compared the results with a glass ionomer cement and amalgam. Cervical cavities were prepared in monkey teeth. The teeth were randomly divided into three groups. A self-etching primer system (Imperva FluoroBond, Shofu) was applied to the teeth in one of the experimental groups, and the cavities were filled with a flowable composite (SI-BF-2001-LF, Shofu). In the other groups, a glass ionomer cement (Fuji II, GC) or amalgam (Dispersalloy, Johnson & Johnson) filled the cavity. The teeth were then extracted after 3, 30 and 90 days, fixed in 10% buffered formalin solution and prepared according to routine histological techniques. Five micrometer sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin or Brown and Brenn gram stain for bacterial observation. No serious inflammatory reaction of the pulp, such as necrosis or abscess formation, was observed in any of the experimental groups. Slight inflammatory cell infiltration was the main initial reaction, while deposition of reparative dentin was the major long-term reaction in all groups. No bacterial penetration along the cavity walls was detected in the flowable composite or glass ionomer cement except for one case at 30 days in the glass ionomer cement. The flowable composite bonded with self-etching adhesive showed an acceptable biological com- patibility to monkey pulp. The in vivo sealing ability of the flowable composite in combination with the self-etching adhesive was considered comparable to glass ionomer cement. Amalgam restorations without adhesive liners showed slight bacterial penetration along the cavity wall.

  18. Bacteriology of deep carious lesions underneath amalgam restorations with different pulp-capping materials - an in vivo analysis

    PubMed Central

    NEELAKANTAN, Prasanna; RAO, Chandragiri Venkata Subba; INDRAMOHAN, Jamuna

    2012-01-01

    Microorganisms remaining in dentin following cavity preparation may induce pulp damage, requiring the use of pulp-capping agents with antimicrobial activity underneath permanent restorations. Objective The aims of this study were to analyze the bacteriological status of carious dentin and to assess the efficacy of different base underneath silver amalgam restorations. Material and Methods This study was conducted on 50 patients aged 13 to 30 years. Sterile swabs were used to take samples after cavity preparation, which was assessed by microbiological culture to identify the microorganisms present. Following this, cavities were restored with silver amalgam, using one of the materials being investigated, as the base: calcium hydroxide (Group II), polyantibiotic paste (Group III), a novel light-cured fluoride-releasing hydroxyapatite-based liner (Group IV) and mineral trioxide aggregate - MTA (Group V). In Group I, the cavities were restored with silver amalgam, without any base. After 3 months, the amalgam was removed and samples taken again and analyzed for the microbial flora. Results Lactobacilli were the most commonly isolated microorganisms in the samples of carious dentin. Groups IV and V showed negative culture in the 3-month samples. There was no statistically significant difference between Groups I, II and III. There was no significant difference between Groups IV and V (p>0.05). Both Groups IV and V showed significantly better results when compared to Groups I, II and III (p<0.05). Conclusions The hydroxyapatite-based liner and MTA performed significantly better in terms of antibacterial activity than the other materials. PMID:22666827

  19. Poor quality evidence suggests that failure rates for atraumatic restorative treatment and conventional amalgam are similar.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Dominic

    2012-06-01

    The Medline, Cochrane CENTRAL, Biomed Central, Database of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), OpenJ-Gate, Bibliografia Brasileira de Odontologia (BBO), LILACS, IndMed, Sabinet, Scielo, Scirus (Medicine), OpenSIGLE and Google Scholar databases were searched. Hand searching was performed for journals not indexed in the databases. References of included trials were checked. Prospective clinical trials with test and control groups with a follow up of at least one year were included. Data abstraction was conducted independently and clinical and methodologically homogeneous data were pooled using a fixed-effects model. Eighteen trials were included. From these 32 individual dichotomous datasets were extracted and analysed. The majority of the results show no differences between both types of intervention. A high risk of selection-, performance-, detection- and attrition bias was identified. Existing research gaps are mainly due to lack of trials and small sample size. The current evidence indicates that the failure rate of high-viscosity GIC/ART restorations is not higher than, but similar to that of conventional amalgam fillings after periods longer than one year. These results are in line with the conclusions drawn during the original systematic review. There is a high risk that these results are affected by bias, and thus confirmation by further trials with suitably high numbers of participants is needed.

  20. An elementary study of deformation of molar teeth during amalgam restorative procedures.

    PubMed

    Bell, J G

    1977-06-01

    A technique using an optical comparator was employed to examine the dimensional changes resulting from cavity preparation, application of the matrix and packing with amalgam in three extracted molar teeth. The changes have been reported and the nature of the change discussed. A modification in the use of the matrix and amalgam packing technique is suggested.

  1. Reactions of connective tissue to amalgam, intermediate restorative material, mineral trioxide aggregate, and mineral trioxide aggregate mixed with chlorhexidine.

    PubMed

    Sumer, Mahmut; Muglali, Mehtap; Bodrumlu, Emre; Guvenc, Tolga

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this study was to histopathologically examine the biocompatibility of the high-copper amalgam, intermediate restorative material (IRM), mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), and MTA mixed with chlorhexidine (CHX). This study was conducted to observe the rat subcutaneous connective tissue reaction to the implanted tubes filled with amalgam, IRM, MTA, and MTA mixed with CHX. The animals were sacrificed 15, 30, and 60 days after the implantation procedure. The implant sites were excised and prepared for histological evaluation. Sections of 5 to 6 microm thickness were cut by a microtome and stained with hemotoxylin eosin and examined under a light microscope. The inflammatory reactions were categorized as weak (none or few inflammatory cells < or =25 cells), moderate (>25 cells), and severe (a lot of inflammatory cells not to be counted, giant cells, and granulation tissue). Thickness of fibrous capsules measured five different areas by the digital imaging and the mean values were scored. Amalgam, IRM, and MTA mixed with CHX caused a weak inflammatory response on days 15, 30, and 60. MTA provoked an initial severe inflammatory response that subsided at the 30 and 60 day study period. A clear fibrous capsule was observed beginning from the 15 days in all of the groups. Within the limits of this study, amalgam, IRM, MTA, and MTA mixed with CHX materials were surrounded by fibrous connective tissue indicated that they were well tolerated by the tissues, therefore, MTA/CHX seemed to be biocompatible.

  2. Staining of residual caries under freshly-packed amalgam restorations exposed to tea/chlorhexidine in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kidd, E A; Joyston-Bechal, S; Smith, M M

    1990-08-01

    Discoloration around restorations may lead practitioners to suspect recurrent caries. Dentists, using conventional optical and tactile criteria, often fail to render the enamel-dentine junction completely caries-free during cavity preparation. The aim of the present laboratory study was to test the hypothesis that such residual caries could take up stain from tea and hence affect clinical judgement on the presence of recurrent disease. Cavities were prepared in freshly extracted carious teeth and restored with amalgam. Specimens were then temperature cycled in tea and chlorhexidine or in tea alone to encourage leakage. Subsequent removal of restorations showed staining of parts of the enamel-dentine junctions and histological examination showed these stained areas to correspond to areas of demineralization. Similarly prepared caries-free teeth showed no such staining. Thus residual caries in teeth with leaking restorations can, in the laboratory, take up stain. If this were to happen in vivo, stained residual caries could subsequently be misdiagnosed as recurrent caries.

  3. Removal of amalgam, glass-ionomer cement and compomer restorations: changes in cavity dimensions and duration of the procedure.

    PubMed

    Szep, Susanne; Baum, C; Alamouti, C; Schmidt, D; Gerhardt, T; Heidemann, D

    2002-01-01

    This study investigated changes in the dimensions of Class II cavities following the removal of amalgam, glass ionomer and compomer restorations. In 30 extracted caries-free human molars, preparation for 60 mesio-occlusal and occluso-distal cavities (two cavities per tooth) occurred. With a CEREC 3 laser triangulation sensor and software-based construction analysis, the dimensions of the cavities at seven defined sites were measured. The cavities were randomized into four groups. Group 1 was restored with Ketac-Fil glass-ionomer cement, Group 2 with amalgam and Group 3 with Compoglass F compomer. In Group 4, Compoglass F was used in combination with photochromic Tetric Flow Chroma as a cavity liner. The completed restorations were then removed using 2x magnification and the cavities were once again controlled using the laser system. The duration of the removal procedure was also recorded. Changes in cavity dimensions (depth, height and width) following removal of the restorations were significantly smaller in Groups 1 and 2. Groups 3 and 4 were characterized by a significant overextension of the cavities compared to Groups 1 and 2 in all three dimensions. Group 4, with Tetric Flow Chroma as a cavity liner, showed better results than Group 3, but this improvement was not statistically significant. The duration of the removal procedure was significantly shorter in Group 2 than in the other groups.

  4. Biocompatibility of dental amalgams.

    PubMed

    Uçar, Yurdanur; Brantley, William A

    2011-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this review paper is to review the literature regarding the toxicology of mercury from dental amalgam and evaluate current statements on dental amalgam. Materials and Methods. Two key-words "dental amalgam" and "toxicity" were used to search publications on dental amalgam biocompatibility published in peer-reviewed journals written in English. Manual search was also conducted. The most recent declarations and statements were evaluated using information available on the internet. Case reports were excluded from the study. Results. The literature show that mercury released from dental amalgam restorations does not contribute to systemic disease or systemic toxicological effects. No significant effects on the immune system have been demonstrated with the amounts of mercury released from dental amalgam restorations. Only very rarely have there been reported allergic reactions to mercury from amalgam restorations. No evidence supports a relationship between mercury released from dental amalgam and neurological diseases. Almost all of the declarations accessed by the internet stated by official organizations concluded that current data are not sufficient to relate various complaints and mercury release from dental amalgam. Conclusions. Available scientific data do not justify the discontinuation of amalgam use from dental practice or replacement with alternative restorative dental materials.

  5. Bonded restorations for the prevention and treatment of the cracked-tooth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Geurtsen, W; García-Godoy, F

    1999-12-01

    Several reports revealed that the cracked-tooth syndrome is a common problem in dental practice, which often results in extraction of the affected incompletely fractured teeth. Predominantly restored teeth suffer from these incomplete fractures. Therefore, it is of outstanding importance to stabilize teeth weakened due to cavity preparation. Besides full cuspal coverage by partial or full crowns, bonded restorations have been proposed for internal splinting of restored teeth. Although contradictory data have been published, there is evidence that bonded amalgam or resin-based composite restorations (RBC) do not increase fracture resistance of teeth with wide occlusal-proximal cavities to values similar to sound, unrestored controls. Indirectly fabricated RBC inlays and various ceramic inlays, however, increased fracture strength to levels as high as those of sound caries-free teeth. Therefore, it is recommended that weakened teeth with wide cavities be strengthened by full cuspal coverage with cast or ceramic restorations, by bonded ceramic inlays, or by indirectly-fabricated bonded RBC composite inlays.

  6. Comparison of antibacterial activity of glass-ionomer cement and amalgam in class two restorations by Streptococcus mutans count analysis at fixed intervals: an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Tegginmani, Veeresh S; Goel, Beenarani; Uppin, Virendra; Horatti, Priya; Kumar, L S Vijay; Nainani, Abhinav

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the influence of glass ionomer cement and amalgam restoration on the level of Streptococcus mutans in the interproximal plaque at periodic intervals and also to compare these values. Seventeen adult patients having two proximal carious lesions on any quadrant of the jaw (either opposing or contralateral) were selected for this study. Carious lesions were diagnosed clinically and from bitewing radiographs. Of the two carious lesions, one was restored with glass ionomer cermet cement and another with amalgam. Plaque samples were collected from interproximal areas before and at 1 month and 3 months post-treatment in a test tube containing 5 ml of modified Stuart's liquid transport fluid. Identification of organisms in the colony was done after Gram staining. Comparison of values before restoration and after restoration at 1 month interval showed a statistically significant decrease (p<0.001). Similarly, comparison of values before and after restorations at 3 months also showed statistically significant decrease (p<0.02). But comparison of restorations of 1 and 3 months intervals showed no statistical significant difference (p>0.05). Glass ionomer restorations have definite advantage over the amalgam, as the tunnel preparation is more conservative and fluoride release from the glass ionomer inhibits the growth of S. mutans in the plaque. Glass ionomer cement should be preferred over amalgam in conservatively prepared restorations as it reduces the microbial activities due to fluoride release.

  7. Biocompatibility of Dental Amalgams

    PubMed Central

    Uçar, Yurdanur; Brantley, William A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this review paper is to review the literature regarding the toxicology of mercury from dental amalgam and evaluate current statements on dental amalgam. Materials and Methods. Two key-words “dental amalgam” and “toxicity” were used to search publications on dental amalgam biocompatibility published in peer-reviewed journals written in English. Manual search was also conducted. The most recent declarations and statements were evaluated using information available on the internet. Case reports were excluded from the study. Results. The literature show that mercury released from dental amalgam restorations does not contribute to systemic disease or systemic toxicological effects. No significant effects on the immune system have been demonstrated with the amounts of mercury released from dental amalgam restorations. Only very rarely have there been reported allergic reactions to mercury from amalgam restorations. No evidence supports a relationship between mercury released from dental amalgam and neurological diseases. Almost all of the declarations accessed by the internet stated by official organizations concluded that current data are not sufficient to relate various complaints and mercury release from dental amalgam. Conclusions. Available scientific data do not justify the discontinuation of amalgam use from dental practice or replacement with alternative restorative dental materials. PMID:22145006

  8. Randomized clinical comparison of endodontically treated teeth restored with amalgam or with fiber posts and resin composite: five-year results.

    PubMed

    Mannocci, Francesco; Qualtrough, Alison J E; Worthington, Helen V; Watson, Timothy F; Pitt Ford, Thomas R

    2005-01-01

    Prospective clinical studies comparing the results of different types of restorations of endodontically treated teeth are lacking. This study compared the clinical success rate of endodontically treated premolars restored with fiber posts and direct composite to the restorations of premolars using amalgam. Premolars with Class II carious lesions were selected and randomly assigned to one of two experimental groups: (1) restoration with amalgam or (2) restoration with fiber posts and composite. One hundred and nine teeth were included in Group 1 and 110 in Group 2. Patients were recalled after 1, 3 and 5 years. No statistically significant difference was found between the proportion of failed teeth in the two experimental groups. Significant differences were observed between the proportion of root fractures (p=0.029) and caries (p=0.047), with more root fractures and less caries observed in the teeth restored with amalgam at the five-year recall. Within the limits of this study, it can be concluded that restorations with fiber posts and composite were found to be more effective than amalgam in preventing root fractures but less effective in preventing secondary caries.

  9. Absence of carious lesions at margins of glass-ionomer cement and amalgam restorations: An update of systematic review evidence

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This article aims to update the existing systematic review evidence elicited by Mickenautsch et al. up to 18 January 2008 (published in the European Journal of Paediatric Dentistry in 2009) and addressing the review question of whether, in the same dentition and same cavity class, glass-ionomer cement (GIC) restored cavities show less recurrent carious lesions on cavity margins than cavities restored with amalgam. Methods The systematic literature search was extended beyond the original search date and a further hand-search and reference check was done. The quality of accepted trials was assessed, using updated quality criteria, and the risk of bias was investigated in more depth than previously reported. In addition, the focus of quantitative synthesis was shifted to single datasets extracted from the accepted trials. Results The database search (up to 10 August 2010) identified 1 new trial, in addition to the 9 included in the original systematic review, and 11 further trials were included after a hand-search and reference check. Of these 21 trials, 11 were excluded and 10 were accepted for data extraction and quality assessment. Thirteen dichotomous datasets of primary outcomes and 4 datasets with secondary outcomes were extracted. Meta-analysis and cumulative meta-analysis were used in combining clinically homogenous datasets. The overall results of the computed datasets suggest that GIC has a higher caries-preventive effect than amalgam for restorations in permanent teeth. No difference was found for restorations in the primary dentition. Conclusion This outcome is in agreement with the conclusions of the original systematic review. Although the findings of the trials identified in this update may be considered to be less affected by attrition- and publication bias, their risk of selection- and detection/performance bias is high. Thus, verification of the currently available results requires further high-quality randomised control trials. PMID

  10. Interface corrosion in amalgam-to-amalgam and amalgam-to-nonprecious metal crown couplings.

    PubMed

    Schimelmitz, H; Bapna, M S; Punwani, I; Ashrafi, S H; Anderson, A W

    1986-02-01

    This study examined the contact surface area in the coupling of a class II amalgam restoration with another class II amalgam restoration or with a stainless steel or nickel-chrome crown in 1% NaCl solution. The characterization of interfaces was carried out by using SEM and EDX microanalysis. The results indicate that the coupling of an amalgam-stainless steel crown and an amalgam-inconel crown in NaCl solution forms a deposit on the crown surfaces. This deposit contains all the constituents of corrodible phases of amalgam, including Zn. If amalgam restorations in adjoining teeth are contemplated, non-Zn-containing amalgam alloys of the same composition should be considered.

  11. Dental amalgam: An update

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Ramesh; Wadhwani, Kulvinder Kaur; Tikku, Aseem Prakash; Chandra, Anil

    2010-01-01

    Dental amalgam has served as an excellent and versatile restorative material for many years, despite periods of controversy. The authors review its history, summarize the evidence with regard to its performance and offer predictions for the future of this material. The PubMed database was used initially; the reference list for dental amalgam featured 8641 articles and 13 publications dealing with recent advances in dental amalgam. A forward search was undertaken on selected articles and using some author names. For the present, amalgam should remain the material of choice for economic direct restoration of posterior teeth. When esthetic concerns are paramount, tooth-colored materials, placed meticulously, can provide an acceptable alternative. All alternative restorative materials and procedures, however, have certain limitations. PMID:21217947

  12. Dental amalgam: An update.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Ramesh; Wadhwani, Kulvinder Kaur; Tikku, Aseem Prakash; Chandra, Anil

    2010-10-01

    Dental amalgam has served as an excellent and versatile restorative material for many years, despite periods of controversy. The authors review its history, summarize the evidence with regard to its performance and offer predictions for the future of this material. The PubMed database was used initially; the reference list for dental amalgam featured 8641 articles and 13 publications dealing with recent advances in dental amalgam. A forward search was undertaken on selected articles and using some author names. For the present, amalgam should remain the material of choice for economic direct restoration of posterior teeth. When esthetic concerns are paramount, tooth-colored materials, placed meticulously, can provide an acceptable alternative. All alternative restorative materials and procedures, however, have certain limitations.

  13. Increased mercury release from dental amalgam restorations after exposure to electromagnetic fields as a potential hazard for hypersensitive people and pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, Ghazal; Mortazavi, S M J

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades, the use of common sources of electromagnetic fields such as Wi-Fi routers and mobile phones has been increased enormously all over the world. There is ongoing concern that exposure to electromagnetic fields can lead to adverse health effects. It has recently been shown that even low doses of mercury are capable of causing toxicity. Therefore, efforts are initiated to phase down or eliminate the use of mercury amalgam in dental restorations. Increased release of mercury from dental amalgam restorations after exposure to electromagnetic fields such as those generated by MRI and mobile phones has been reported by our team and other researchers. We have recently shown that some of the papers which reported no increased release of mercury after MRI, may have some methodological errors. Although it was previously believed that the amount of mercury released from dental amalgam cannot be hazardous, new findings indicate that mercury, even at low doses, may cause toxicity. Based on recent epidemiological findings, it can be claimed that the safety of mercury released from dental amalgam fillings is questionable. Therefore, as some individuals tend to be hypersensitive to the toxic effects of mercury, regulatory authorities should re-assess the safety of exposure to electromagnetic fields in individuals with amalgam restorations. On the other hand, we have reported that increased mercury release after exposure to electromagnetic fields may be risky for the pregnant women. It is worth mentioning that as a strong positive correlation between maternal and cord blood mercury levels has been found in some studies, our findings regarding the effect of exposure to electromagnetic fields on the release of mercury from dental amalgam fillings lead us to this conclusion that pregnant women with dental amalgam fillings should limit their exposure to electromagnetic fields to prevent toxic effects of mercury in their fetuses. Based on these findings, as infants

  14. Critical appraisal: dental amalgam update--part II: biological effects.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Michael J; Swift, Edward J

    2013-12-01

    Dental amalgam restorations have been controversial for over 150 years. In Part I of this Critical Appraisal, the clinical efficacy of dental amalgam was updated. Here in Part II, the biological effects of dental amalgam are addressed.

  15. A 24-month Evaluation of Amalgam and Resin-Based Composite Restorations: Findings from The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    PubMed Central

    McCracken, Michael S.; Gordan, Valeria V.; Litaker, Mark S.; Funkhouser, Ellen; Fellows, Jeffrey L.; Shamp, Douglass G.; Qvist, Vibeke; Meral, Jeffrey S.; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Knowing which factors influence restoration longevity can help clinicians make sound treatment decisions. The authors analyzed data from the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network to identify predictors of early failures of amalgam and resin-based composite (RBC) restorations. Methods This prospective cohort study gathered information from clinicians and offices participating in the network. Clinicians completed a baseline data collection form at the time of restoration placement, and annually thereafter. Data collected included patient factors, practice factors, and dentist factors, and were analyzed using mixed-model logistic regression. Results A total of 226 practitioners followed 6,218 direct restorations in 3,855 patients; 386 restorations failed (6.6 percent) during the mean follow-up period of 23.7 (SD 8.8) months. The number of tooth surfaces restored at baseline predicted subsequent restoration failure; large restorations were over 4 times more likely to fail. Material was not significantly associated with longevity; neither was tooth type. Patient age was highly associated with failure (p<0.0001). The failure rate for children was 5 percent, compared to 12 percent in persons 65 years old or older. Dentist gender and practice workload were significantly associated with restoration longevity. Conclusions In this prospective cohort study, these factors significantly predicted an increased failure rate for amalgam and RBC restorations: older patient age and a higher number of surfaces restored at baseline, with other key baseline variables taken into account. Material choice was not significantly predictive in these early results. Clinical Implications Understanding risk factors for early restoration failure may lead to more-effective patient care. PMID:23729455

  16. Dental Amalgam

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pin it Email Print Dental amalgam is a dental filling material which is used to fill cavities caused by ... tooth structure. Dental amalgam is one type of dental filling material used to repair tooth structure that has been ...

  17. Shear bond strength of partial coverage restorations to dentin

    PubMed Central

    Agustín-Panadero, Rubén; Alonso-Pérez-Barquero, Jorge; Fons-Font, Antonio; Solá-Ruíz, María-Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Background When partial coverage restorations (veneers, inlays, onlays…) must be cemented to dentin, bond strength may not reach the same predictable values as to enamel. The purpose of this study was: 1. To compare, with a shear bond test, the bond strength to dentin of a total-etch and a self-etching bonding agent. 2. To determine whether creating microretention improves the bond strength to dentin. Material and Methods Two bonding agents were assayed, Optibond FL® (Kerr), two-bottle adhesive requiring acid etching, and Clearfil SE Bond® (Kuraray), two-bottle self-etching adhesive. The vestibular, lingual, distal and mesial surfaces of ten molars (n=10) were ground to remove all enamel and 40 ceramic samples were cemented with Variolink II® (Ivoclar Vivadent). Half the molar surfaces were treated to create round microretention (pits) to determine whether these could influence bond strength to dentin. The 40 molar surfaces were divided into four groups (n=10): Optibond FL (O); Clearfil SE (C); Optibond FL + microretention (OM); Clearfil SE + micro retention (CM). A shear bond test was performed and the bond failures provoked examined under an optical microscope. Results O=35.27±8.02 MPa; C=36.23±11.23 MPa; OM=28.61±6.27 MPa; CM=27.01±7.57 MPa. No statistically significant differences were found between the adhesives. Optibond FL showed less statistical dispersion than Clearfil SE. The presence of microretentions reduced bond strength values regardless of the adhesive used. Conclusions 1. Clearfil SE self-etching adhesive and Optibond FL acid-etch showed adequate bond strengths and can be recommended for bonding ceramic restorations to dentin. 2. The creation of round microretention pits compromises these adhesives’ bond strength to dentin. Key words:Adhesion to dentin, bonding agent, Optibond FL, Clearfil SE, microretention, shear bond test. PMID:26330937

  18. Durability of bonds and clinical success of adhesive restorations

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Ricardo M.; Manso, Adriana P.; Geraldeli, Saulo; Tay, Franklin R.; Pashley, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Resin-dentin bond strength durability testing has been extensively used to evaluate the effectiveness of adhesive systems and the applicability of new strategies to improve that property. Clinical effectiveness is determined by the survival rates of restorations placed in non-carious cervical lesions (NCCL). While there is evidence that the bond strength data generated in laboratory studies somehow correlates with the clinical outcome of NCCL restorations, it is questionable whether the knowledge of bonding mechanisms obtained from laboratory testing can be used to justify clinical performance of resin-dentin bonds. There are significant morphological and structural differences between the bonding substrate used in in vitro testing versus the substrate encountered in NCCL. These differences qualify NCCL as a hostile substrate for bonding, yielding bond strengths that are usually lower than those obtained in normal dentin. However, clinical survival time of NCCL restorations often surpass the durability of normal dentin tested in the laboratory. Likewise, clinical reports on the long-term survival rates of posterior composite restorations defy the relatively rapid rate of degradation of adhesive interfaces reported in laboratory studies. This article critically analyzes how the effectiveness of adhesive systems is currently measured, to identify gaps in knowledge where new research could be encouraged. The morphological and chemical analysis of bonded interfaces of resin composite restorations in teeth that had been in clinical service for many years, but were extracted for periodontal reasons, could be a useful tool to observe the ultrastructural characteristics of restorations that are regarded as clinically acceptable. This could help determine how much degradation is acceptable for clinical success. PMID:22192252

  19. Nanoleakage of cervical restorations of four dentin bonding systems.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Burrow, M F; Tyas, M J

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the degree of nanoleakage of restorations placed in cervical preparations with dentin bonding systems. The dentin bonding systems used were Single Bond, One Coat Bond, Prime & Bond NT/NRC, and PermaQuik. Ten saucer-shaped cervical preparations were bonded with one of the dentin bonding systems and restored with Silux Plus resin composite in each group. After 24 hours storage in 37 degrees C water, restorations were finished and the surrounding tooth surfaces were coated with nail varnish. The samples were immersed in 50% w/v solution of silver nitrate for 24 hours, and exposed to photodeveloping solution for 8 hours. The samples were cut longitudinally through the center, polished, carbon coated and observed in a Field Emission SEM using backscattered electron mode. The degree of silver penetration along the preparation wall was observed and calculated as a percentage of the total preparation wall length. Results were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and LSD tests. PermaQuik demonstrated the lowest leakage score and the least silver deposition within the hybrid layer, while Prime & Bond NT/NRC showed the greatest leakage scores and the most silver deposition within the hybrid layer. Different nanoleakage patterns were observed for the different adhesive systems. First, the composition of each adhesive system may play a role in the different leakage patterns. Second, the current dentin bonding systems used in this study did not achieve perfect sealing at the restoration-dentin interface. This may influence the durability of the bond to dentin.

  20. Bonding of restorative materials to dentin with various luting agents.

    PubMed

    Peutzfeldt, A; Sahafi, A; Flury, S

    2011-01-01

    The aim was to compare eight types of luting agents when used to bond six indirect, laboratory restorative materials to dentin. Cylinders of the six restorative materials (Esteticor Avenir [gold alloy], Tritan [titanium], NobelRondo [feldspathic porcelain], Finesse All-Ceramic [leucite-glass ceramic], Lava [zirconia], and Sinfony [resin composite]) were ground and air-abraded. Cylinders of feldspathic porcelain and glass ceramic were additionally etched with hydrofluoric acid and were silane-treated. The cylinders were luted to ground human dentin with eight luting agents (DeTrey Zinc [zinc phosphate cement], Fuji I [conventional glass ionomer cement], Fuji Plus [resin-modified glass ionomer cement], Variolink II [conventional etch-and-rinse resin cement], Panavia F2.0 and Multilink [self-etch resin cements], and RelyX Unicem Aplicap and Maxcem [self-adhesive resin cements]). After water storage at 37°C for one week, the shear bond strength of the specimens (n=8/group) was measured, and the fracture mode was stereomicroscopically examined. Bond strength data were analyzed with two-factorial analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Newman-Keuls' Multiple Range Test (α=0.05). Both the restorative material and the luting agent had a significant effect on bond strength, and significant interaction was noted between the two variables. Zinc phosphate cement and glass ionomer cements produced the lowest bond strengths, whereas the highest bond strengths were found with the two self-etch and one of the self-adhesive resin cements. Generally, the fracture mode varied markedly with the restorative material. The luting agents had a bigger influence on bond strength between restorative materials and dentin than was seen with the restorative material.

  1. [Amalgam allergy and amalgam controversy].

    PubMed

    Lübbe, J; Wüthrich, B

    1996-04-20

    Safety concerns regarding dental amalgam have been voiced ever since its introduction 150 years ago. As most people have amalgam fillings, the issue has received extensive coverage in the lay as well as the medical medical media. This has led to confusion about the terms amalgam allergy, mercury burden and intoxication, and amalgam disease, an understanding of which is crucial in consideration of this controversy. Allergy to amalgam is rare and should be investigated by a specialist, as diagnosis may result in a decision to remove dental amalgam. Dental amalgam is the most important source of mercury burden in the general population. Occupational exposure to mercury within established exposure limits reaches levels much higher without evidence of intoxication. However, mercury released from dental amalgam induces measurable organ effects. Amalgam disease has been introduced as a term to identify patients who typically ascribe a variety of symptoms to their amalgam fillings. Current literature lacks sound evidence of a role for amalgam in human disease other than allergy.

  2. Quantitative microleakage of some dentinal bonding restorative systems.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, T; Retief, D H

    1993-03-01

    The quantitative microleakage of class V cementum (dentin) cavities restored with six dentinal bonding restorative systems was determined in vitro. Ninety extracted human permanent first and second mandibular and maxillary premolars were used in this study. Class V preparations were made in cementum (dentin) at the root facial surfaces. The preparations were restored with 1) a dentin bonding system containing 2% HEMA and BisGMA and a light-cured microfilled composite; 2) the same materials only substituting META/MMA base and TBB catalyst monomers for the BisGMA sealer; 3) a dentin bonding system containing 35% HEMA with META/MMA base and TBB catalyst, and a light-cured hybrid composite; 5) the same dentin bonding system only substituting the 35% glycerylmethacrylate for the 35% HEMA and using the microfilled composite; and 6) the previously described system with a substitution of 0.5 mol EDTA for the 10% citric acid -3% FeCl3. Fifteen teeth were restored with each procedure. The restorations were finished with 12-bladed carbide burs 15 min after placement, the teeth were stored in saline at 37 degrees C for 24 h, finished with Sof-Lex discs and then thermocycled in 2% methylene blue solution 500 times between 50 degrees C and 8 degrees C with a dwell time of 15 s. Quantitative microleakage was determined by a spectrophotometric dye-recovery method and expressed in microgram/dye/restoration. The data were analyzed by ANOVA, Student-Newman-Keuls and Kruskal-Wallis tests. The quantitative microleakage of the teeth restored with the adhesive systems containing 35% glyceryl methacrylate was significantly reduced. The bonding mechanism of glyceryl methacrylate is not known.

  3. Benefits and disadvantages of tooth-coloured alternatives to amalgam.

    PubMed

    Roulet, J F

    1997-11-01

    To give the practising dentist scientifically based data to assist him/her in the responsible decision-making process necessary to weigh the options available to the patient if she/he prefers not to have an amalgam placed. Based on the literature and on the research work, which was done in the author's department, the indications and limitations of the known alternatives of amalgam were formulated. DESCRIPTION OF ALTERNATIVES TO AMALGAM: With the exception of cast gold restorations, all alternatives require the strict use of adhesive techniques. When compared with similar amalgam restorations, placing composite restorations (if they are indicated) takes approximately 2.5 times longer because complex incremental techniques are needed. Despite all the efforts, direct composite restorations placed in large cavities still show unacceptable amounts of marginal openings. Tooth-coloured inlays are a better alternative for large restorations. These restorations must be inserted with adhesive techniques. With composite inlays it is difficult to achieve a composite-composite bond. Ceramic inlays may be micromechanically bonded to the luting composite. They all show clinically a good marginal behaviour and the use of ultrasonic energy may further simplify the application technique of aesthetic inlays. Papers describing the different techniques were used as a base for the corresponding chapter. To assess and compare the longevity of the different restoration types, literature data were used. We limited ourselves to papers reporting at least 5-year clinical data. Longitudinal, clinically controlled studies were preferred. However, to be more complete, retrospective, cross sectional studies were also included. LONGEVITY OF POSTERIOR RESTORATIONS: Amalgam shows excellent longevity data with studies up to 20 years. The average annual failure rate is 0.3-6.9%. Posterior composites are in the same range (0.5-6.6%), however, the study times are much shorter (max. 10 years). For tooth

  4. Effect of dentin surface roughness on the shear bond strength of resin bonded restorations.

    PubMed

    Koodaryan, Roodabeh; Hafezeqoran, Ali; Poursoltan, Sajjad

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether dentin surface preparation with diamond rotary instruments of different grit sizes affects the shear bond strength of resin-bonded restorations. The buccal enamel of 60 maxillary central incisors was removed with a low speed diamond saw and wet ground with silicon carbide papers. The polished surfaces of the teeth were prepared with four groups of rotary diamond burs with super-coarse (SC), coarse (C), medium (M), and fine (F) grit sizes. Following surface preparation, 60 restorations were casted with nickel-chromium alloy and bonded with Panavia cement. To assess the shear bond strength, the samples were mounted on a universal testing machine and an axial load was applied along the cement-restoration interface at the crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The acquired data was analyzed with one way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc test (α=.05). The mean ± SD shear bond strengths (in MPa) of the study groups were 17.75 ± 1.41 for SC, 13.82 ± 1.13 for C, 10.40 ± 1.45 for M, and 7.13 ± 1.18 for F. Statistical analysis revealed the significant difference among the study groups such that the value for group SC was significantly higher than that for group F (P<.001). Dentin surface roughness created by diamond burs of different grit sizes considerably influences the shear bond strength of resin bonded restorations.

  5. Extent of tooth decay in the mouth and increased need for replacement of dental restorations: the New England Children's Amalgam Trial.

    PubMed

    Trachtenberg, Felicia; Maserejian, Nancy Nairi; Tavares, Mary; Soncini, Jennifer Ann; Hayes, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between baseline caries experience and the restoration replacement rate in children. The 5-year New England Children's Amalgam Trial recruited 534 6- to 10-year-old children with 2 or more carious posterior teeth. The association between decoy and longevity of restorations was assessed. Restorations with no follow-up (N = 391) were excluded from analysis. The average follow-up was 3.0 +/- 1.6 years in 489 children. Restorations with follow-up (N = 3,604) were placed in mouths with a median of 15 dfs/DFS and 8 dft/DFT. The need for replacement increased significantly (P < or = .001) with increasing numbers of dfs/DFS and dft/DFT. After 5 years of follow-up, at least 15% of restorations in a mouth with > or = 14 dfs/DFS needed replacement, compared to 9% for 2 to 5 dfs/DFS. Comparing dft/DFT after 5 years of follow-up, there was a 23% replacement rate for > or = 12 dft/DFT compared to 10% for 2 to 3 dft/DFT. Decoy in the mouth had a greater association with the need for replacement due to new caries compared to replacement due to recurrent caries. Children with more decoy at the time of restoration placement were at higher risk for replacement of restorations.

  6. Penetration of amalgam constituents into dentine.

    PubMed

    Scholtanus, Johannes D; Ozcan, Mutlu; Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte D N J M

    2009-05-01

    Amalgam restorations are replaced by adhesively placed composite resin restorations at an increasing rate. After the removal of amalgam dentine often shows marked dark discoloration that is attributed to the penetration of corrosion products from overlying amalgams. It is questioned whether penetration of metals into dentine affects the dentine as a substrate for adhesive procedures. This study has been performed to clarify the origin of dark discoloration of dentine by metals from amalgam with special regards to corrosion products. A review of the literature has been performed using Medline database. As keywords dentine and amalgam, subsequently combined with penetration, interface, crevice, interaction, corrosion, were used. This was followed up by extensive hand search using reference lists of relevant articles. Data in the literature have been gathered from extracted amalgam filled teeth and from artificially aged amalgam filled teeth. Corrosion studies have been performed in vivo aged teeth as well as in vitro. Sn is the main element, followed by Zn and Cu, that is consistently found in dentine underneath amalgam, as well as in amalgam corrosion products and in marginal seal deposits. Penetration of elements from amalgam has only been observed in discolored and in demineralised dentine. Darkly discolored dentine as found underneath amalgam restorations contains amalgam corrosion products and is demineralised. Therefore it must be considered a different substrate for clinical procedures than sound dentine.

  7. Effect of dentin surface roughness on the shear bond strength of resin bonded restorations

    PubMed Central

    Koodaryan, Roodabeh; Poursoltan, Sajjad

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE This study aimed to investigate whether dentin surface preparation with diamond rotary instruments of different grit sizes affects the shear bond strength of resin-bonded restorations. MATERIALS AND METHODS The buccal enamel of 60 maxillary central incisors was removed with a low speed diamond saw and wet ground with silicon carbide papers. The polished surfaces of the teeth were prepared with four groups of rotary diamond burs with super-coarse (SC), coarse (C), medium (M), and fine (F) grit sizes. Following surface preparation, 60 restorations were casted with nickel-chromium alloy and bonded with Panavia cement. To assess the shear bond strength, the samples were mounted on a universal testing machine and an axial load was applied along the cement-restoration interface at the crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The acquired data was analyzed with one way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc test (α=.05). RESULTS The mean ± SD shear bond strengths (in MPa) of the study groups were 17.75 ± 1.41 for SC, 13.82 ± 1.13 for C, 10.40 ± 1.45 for M, and 7.13 ± 1.18 for F. Statistical analysis revealed the significant difference among the study groups such that the value for group SC was significantly higher than that for group F (P<.001). CONCLUSION Dentin surface roughness created by diamond burs of different grit sizes considerably influences the shear bond strength of resin bonded restorations. PMID:27350858

  8. Porcelain laminate veneer restorations bonded with a three-liquid silane bonding agent and a dual-activated luting composite.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Hideo; Aida, Yukiko; Ishikawa, Yumi; Tanoue, Naomi

    2006-12-01

    This clinical report describes the fabrication and bonding of porcelain laminate veneer restorations in a patient with anterior open spaces. Laminate veneer restorations made of feldspathic porcelain were etched with 5% hydrofluoric acid, rinsed under tap water, ultrasonically cleaned with methanol, and primed with a chemically activated three-liquid silane bonding agent (Clearfil Porcelain Bond). The enamel surfaces were etched with 40% phosphoric acid, rinsed with water, and primed with a two-liquid bonding agent (Clearfil New Bond) that contained a hydrophobic phosphate (10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate; MDP). The restorations were bonded with a dual-activated luting composite (Clapearl DC). The veneers have been functioning satisfactorily for an observation period of one year. Combined use of the Clearfil bonding agents and Clapearl DC luting composite is an alternative to conventional materials for seating porcelain laminate veneer restorations, although the system is inapplicable to dentin bonding.

  9. Shear Bond Strength of Three Orthodontic Bonding Systems on Enamel and Restorative Materials

    PubMed Central

    Ebeling, Jennifer; Schauseil, Michael; Stein, Steffen; Roggendorf, Matthias; Korbmacher-Steiner, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this in vitro study was to determine the shear bond strength (SBS) and adhesive remnant index (ARI) score of two self-etching no-mix adhesives (iBond™ and Scotchbond™) on different prosthetic surfaces and enamel, in comparison with the commonly used total etch system Transbond XT™. Materials and Methods. A total of 270 surfaces (1 enamel and 8 restorative surfaces, n = 30) were randomly divided into three adhesive groups. In group 1 (control) brackets were bonded with Transbond XT primer. In the experimental groups iBond adhesive (group 2) and Scotchbond Universal adhesive (group 3) were used. The SBS was measured using a Zwicki 1120™ testing machine. The ARI and SBS were compared statistically using the Kruskal–Wallis test (P ≤ 0.05). Results. Significant differences in SBS and ARI were found between the control group and experimental groups. Conclusions. Transbond XT showed the highest SBS on human enamel. Scotchbond Universal on average provides the best bonding on all other types of surface (metal, composite, and porcelain), with no need for additional primers. It might therefore be helpful for simplifying bonding in orthodontic procedures on restorative materials in patients. If metal brackets have to be bonded to a metal surface, the use of a dual-curing resin is recommended. PMID:27738633

  10. Shear Bond Strength of Three Orthodontic Bonding Systems on Enamel and Restorative Materials.

    PubMed

    Hellak, Andreas; Ebeling, Jennifer; Schauseil, Michael; Stein, Steffen; Roggendorf, Matthias; Korbmacher-Steiner, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this in vitro study was to determine the shear bond strength (SBS) and adhesive remnant index (ARI) score of two self-etching no-mix adhesives (iBond™ and Scotchbond™) on different prosthetic surfaces and enamel, in comparison with the commonly used total etch system Transbond XT™. Materials and Methods. A total of 270 surfaces (1 enamel and 8 restorative surfaces, n = 30) were randomly divided into three adhesive groups. In group 1 (control) brackets were bonded with Transbond XT primer. In the experimental groups iBond adhesive (group 2) and Scotchbond Universal adhesive (group 3) were used. The SBS was measured using a Zwicki 1120™ testing machine. The ARI and SBS were compared statistically using the Kruskal-Wallis test (P ≤ 0.05). Results. Significant differences in SBS and ARI were found between the control group and experimental groups. Conclusions. Transbond XT showed the highest SBS on human enamel. Scotchbond Universal on average provides the best bonding on all other types of surface (metal, composite, and porcelain), with no need for additional primers. It might therefore be helpful for simplifying bonding in orthodontic procedures on restorative materials in patients. If metal brackets have to be bonded to a metal surface, the use of a dual-curing resin is recommended.

  11. An in vitro comparison of diagnostic accuracy of cone beam computed tomography and phosphor storage plate to detect simulated occlusal secondary caries under amalgam restoration

    PubMed Central

    Shahidi, Shoaleh; Zadeh, Nahal Kazerooni; Sharafeddin, Farahnaz; Shahab, Shahriar; Bahrampour, Ehsan; Hamedani, Shahram

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was aimed to compare the diagnostic accuracy and feasibility of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) with phosphor storage plate (PSP) in detection of simulated occlusal secondary caries. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro descriptive-comparative study, a total of 80 slots of class I cavities were prepared on 80 extracted human premolars. Then, 40 teeth were randomly selected out of this sample and artificial carious lesions were created on these teeth by a round diamond bur no. 1/2. All 80 teeth were restored with amalgam fillings and radiographs were taken, both with PSP system and CBCT. All images were evaluated by three calibrated observers. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was used to compare the diagnostic accuracy of two systems. SPSS (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) was adopted for statistical analysis. The difference between Az value of bitewing and CBCT methods were compared by pairwise comparison method. The inter- and intra-operator agreement was assessed by kappa analysis (P < 0.05). Results: The mean Az value for bitewings and CBCT was 0.903 and 0.994, respectively. Significant differences were found between PSP and CBCT (P = 0.010). The kappa value for inter-observer agreement was 0.68 and 0.76 for PSP and CBCT, respectively. The kappa value for intra-observer agreement was 0.698 (observer 1, P = 0.000), 0.766 (observer 2, P = 0.000) and 0.716 (observer 3, P = 0.000) in PSP method, and 0.816 (observer 1, P = 0.000), 0.653 (observer 2, P = 0.000) and 0.744 (observer 3, P = 0.000) in CBCT method. Conclusion: This in vitro study, with a limited number of samples, showed that the New Tom VGI Flex CBCT system was more accurate than the PSP in detecting the simulated small secondary occlusal caries under amalgam restoration. PMID:25878682

  12. Amalgam--Resurrection and redemption. Part 1: the clinical and legal mythology of anti-amalgam.

    PubMed

    Wahl, M J

    2001-01-01

    Dental amalgam has come under attack for its allegedly poor physical properties and clinical performance in addition to its poor appearance. It has been claimed that the American Dental Association has a hidden agenda to protect amalgam and that other countries have banned its use. A literature search revealed that the vast majority of amalgam restorations do not cause fractured cusps or have recurrent caries. Most amalgam restorations have been shown to last longer than resin composite restorations. In addition, the materials and techniques involved in amalgam restorations have vastly improved in recent years. Like resin composite restorations, amalgam restorations can often be repaired. The American Dental Association has no vested interest in protecting amalgam. The use of amalgam has not been banned in any country in the European Union. According to the latest scientific information available, dental amalgam is a remarkably durable and long-lasting restorative material. Although its appearance is unesthetic, its clinical performance and effectiveness are unsurpassed by those of resin composite.

  13. Direct Contra Naïve-Indirect Comparison of Clinical Failure Rates between High-Viscosity GIC and Conventional Amalgam Restorations: An Empirical Study

    PubMed Central

    Mickenautsch, Steffen; Yengopal, Veerasamy

    2013-01-01

    Background Naïve-indirect comparisons are comparisons between competing clinical interventions’ evidence from separate (uncontrolled) trials. Direct comparisons are comparisons within randomised control trials (RCTs). The objective of this empirical study is to test the null-hypothesis that trends and performance differences inferred from naïve-indirect comparisons and from direct comparisons/RCTs regarding the failure rates of amalgam and direct high-viscosity glass-ionomer cement (HVGIC) restorations in permanent posterior teeth have similar direction and magnitude. Methods A total of 896 citations were identified through systematic literature search. From these, ten and two uncontrolled clinical longitudinal studies for HVGIC and amalgam, respectively, were included for naïve-indirect comparison and could be matched with three out twenty RCTs. Summary effects sizes were computed as Odds ratios (OR; 95% Confidence intervals) and compared with those from RCTs. Trend directions were inferred from 95% Confidence interval overlaps and direction of point estimates; magnitudes of performance differences were inferred from the median point estimates (OR) with 25% and 75% percentile range, for both types of comparison. Mann-Whitney U test was applied to test for statistically significant differences between point estimates of both comparison types. Results Trends and performance differences inferred from naïve-indirect comparison based on evidence from uncontrolled clinical longitudinal studies and from direct comparisons based on RCT evidence are not the same. The distributions of the point estimates differed significantly for both comparison types (Mann–Whitney U  =  25, nindirect  =  26; ndirect  =  8; p  =  0.0013, two-tailed). Conclusion The null-hypothesis was rejected. Trends and performance differences inferred from either comparison between HVGIC and amalgam restorations failure rates in permanent posterior teeth are not the same. It is

  14. Direct contra naïve-indirect comparison of clinical failure rates between high-viscosity GIC and conventional amalgam restorations: an empirical study.

    PubMed

    Mickenautsch, Steffen; Yengopal, Veerasamy

    2013-01-01

    Naïve-indirect comparisons are comparisons between competing clinical interventions' evidence from separate (uncontrolled) trials. Direct comparisons are comparisons within randomised control trials (RCTs). The objective of this empirical study is to test the null-hypothesis that trends and performance differences inferred from naïve-indirect comparisons and from direct comparisons/RCTs regarding the failure rates of amalgam and direct high-viscosity glass-ionomer cement (HVGIC) restorations in permanent posterior teeth have similar direction and magnitude. A total of 896 citations were identified through systematic literature search. From these, ten and two uncontrolled clinical longitudinal studies for HVGIC and amalgam, respectively, were included for naïve-indirect comparison and could be matched with three out twenty RCTs. Summary effects sizes were computed as Odds ratios (OR; 95% Confidence intervals) and compared with those from RCTs. Trend directions were inferred from 95% Confidence interval overlaps and direction of point estimates; magnitudes of performance differences were inferred from the median point estimates (OR) with 25% and 75% percentile range, for both types of comparison. Mann-Whitney U test was applied to test for statistically significant differences between point estimates of both comparison types. Trends and performance differences inferred from naïve-indirect comparison based on evidence from uncontrolled clinical longitudinal studies and from direct comparisons based on RCT evidence are not the same. The distributions of the point estimates differed significantly for both comparison types (Mann-Whitney U  =  25, n(indirect)  =  26; n(direct)  =  8; p  =  0.0013, two-tailed). The null-hypothesis was rejected. Trends and performance differences inferred from either comparison between HVGIC and amalgam restorations failure rates in permanent posterior teeth are not the same. It is recommended that clinical practice

  15. The amalgam controversy. An evidence-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Dodes, J E

    2001-03-01

    There are a number of patients and health care professionals who believe dental amalgam restorations are a factor in a host of diseases and conditions. They have been influenced by anecdotal case reports in the medical and dental literature, research published in the refereed literature and media stories concerning the alleged dangers of amalgam restorations. The author uses an evidence-based approach in analyzing the data both supporting and condemning the continued use of amalgam restorations. He reviewed the articles from both peer-reviewed and non-peer-reviewed sources and evaluated their relevance, research design and statistical analysis, as well as whether the conclusions follow from the data. There are numerous logical and methodological errors in the anti-amalgam literature. The author concludes that the evidence supporting the safety of amalgam restorations is compelling. Amalgam restorations remain safe and effective. Dentists should educate patients and other health care professionals who may be mistakenly concerned about amalgam safety.

  16. Phase down of amalgam

    PubMed Central

    AL-Rabab’ah, Mohammad A.; Bustani, Mohammad A.; Khraisat, Ameen S.; Sawair, Faleh A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the knowledge of Jordanian dentists toward phase down of dental amalgam as recommended by the Minamata Convention, and their training and competency in placing posterior composites. Methods This study was conducted through structured questionnaire interviews with randomly selected cohort of dentists in Jordan between March 2015 and June 2015. Out of 230 dentists who were invited, 196 (85.2%) agreed to participate. Dentists were asked if they know about the Minamata Convention. They were also asked about their training in placement of posterior composite. Results Out of the 196 interviewed, only 13.8% know about Minamata Convention and 17% had an undergraduate training in favor of placing composites in posterior teeth. Approximately 50% of those dentists were not trained in using rubber dam when placing posterior composites, while only 38.3% had training in sectional matrix placement. Undergraduate training did not influence (p=0.00) the dentists’ decision to remove old amalgam based on patient’s demands. Only 28.1% were of the opinion of discontinuing the use of amalgam due to its alleged health and environmental hazards. There was no general agreement on the type of composite, liner, and bonding strategy when placing posterior composites. Conclusion Dentists are not well informed on the Minamata Convention and the phase down of amalgam. Training in posterior composite placement should be given more room in undergraduate curriculum and continuous dental education. PMID:27874155

  17. Bacterial leakage of mineral trioxide aggregate as compared with zinc-free amalgam, intermediate restorative material, and Super-EBA as a root-end filling material.

    PubMed

    Fischer, E J; Arens, D E; Miller, C H

    1998-03-01

    Several dye leakage studies have demonstrated the fact that mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) leaks significantly less than other root-end filling materials. The purpose of this study was to determine the time needed for Serratia marcescens to penetrate a 3 mm thickness of zinc-free amalgam, Intermediate Restorative Material (IRM), Super-EBA, and MTA when these materials were used as root-end filling materials. Fifty-six, single-rooted extracted human teeth were cleaned and shaped with a series of .04 Taper rotary instruments (Pro-series 29 files). Once the canals were prepared in a crown down approach, the ends were resected and 48 root-end cavities were ultrasonically prepared to a 3 mm depth. The teeth were then steam sterilized. Using an aseptic technique, under a laminar air flow hood, the root-end cavities were filled with amalgam, IRM, Super-EBA, and MTA. Four root-end cavities were filled with thermoplasticized gutta-percha without a root canal sealer and served as positive controls. Another four root-end cavities were filled with sticky wax covered with two layers of nail polish and served as negative controls. The teeth were attached to presterilized (ethylene oxide gas) plastic caps, and the root ends were placed into 12-ml vials of phenol red broth. Using a micropipette, a tenth of a milliliter of S. marcescens was placed into the root canal of each tooth. To test the sterility of the apparatus set-up, the root canals of two teeth with test root-end filling materials and one tooth from the positive and negative control groups were filled with sterile saline. The number of days required for S. marcescens to penetrate the four root-end filling materials and grow in the phenol red broth was recorded and analyzed. Most of the samples filled with zinc-free amalgam leaked bacteria in 10 to 63 days. IRM began leaking 28 to 91 days. Super-EBA began leaking 42 to 101 days. MTA did not begin leaking until day 49. At the end of the study, four of the MTA samples

  18. Amalgam--resurrection and redemption. Part 2: The medical mythology of anti-amalgam.

    PubMed

    Wahl, M J

    2001-10-01

    Mercury-containing amalgam restorative material has come under attack for its alleged harmful effects on systemic health. A literature search revealed that amalgam restorations release small quantities of mercury but apparently not enough to cause systemic health problems. Mercury from dental amalgam restorations cannot be linked to kidney damage, Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, other central nervous system diseases, "amalgam disease," mental disorders, damage to the immune system, increases in antibiotic resistance, or harmful reproductive effects. Dentists occupationally exposed to mercury have not been shown to suffer harmful reproductive or other systemic health effects, provided proper mercury hygiene is used. There are legitimate health concerns about alternative restorative materials, including resin composite. According to the latest scientific information available, dental amalgam remains a safe and effective restorative material.

  19. Comparison of fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth using different coronal restorative materials: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Monga, Prashant; Sharma, Vivek; Kumar, Sukesh

    2009-01-01

    Aim/Objective: To evaluate the in vitro effect of bonded restorations on the fracture resistance of root canal-treated teeth. Materials and Methods: One hundred twenty extracted, maxillary, permanent premolars were collected. After preparing the access cavity, the teeth were biomechanically prepared and obturated. Samples were divided into six groups based on the type of restorative material used to restore them. Teeth were embedded in acrylic resin and their fracture strength was measured using a Universal Testing Machine. Data were evaluated statistically using one-way ANOVA-F and unpaired t-test. Results: Teeth restored with bonded amalgam and composite resin showed higher fracture resistance than those restored with conventional amalgam. Fracture strengths of bonded restorations and intact teeth were not statistically different. The results suggested that the group restored with conventional amalgam had the lowest fracture resistance. No statistically significant differences were found between the bonded amalgam and composite resin groups. Conclusion: Conventional amalgam core showed the least fracture resistance whereas; composite resin and bonded amalgam core showed fracture resistance was similar to that of natural tooth. PMID:20543925

  20. Dental amalgam and mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Mackert, J.R. Jr. )

    1991-08-01

    This paper looks at the issues of the current amalgam controversy: the daily dose of mercury from amalgam, hypersensitivity to mercury, claims of adverse effects from amalgam mercury and alleged overnight 'cures.' In addition, the toxicity and allergenicity of the proposed alternative materials are examined with the same kind of scrutiny applied by the anti-amalgam group to dental amalgam. 100 references.

  1. Shear strength of resin developed by four bonding agents used with cast metal restorations.

    PubMed

    Reilly, B; Davis, E L; Joynt, R B; Quevedo, J

    1992-07-01

    The evolution of the acid etch technique has made possible a more conservative approach to the fabrication of cast metal restorations. The resin bonding technique, however, places a greater burden for success on the selection of a bonding agent. This study examined the shear bond strength durability of cast metal restorations bonded to tooth structure with one of four metal adhesive bonding agents. Results indicated stronger bonds for restorations cemented with Panavia EX bonding agent than with any of the other bonding agents tested, both with and without exposure to thermal stress. Although it was one of the easier materials with which to work, Panavia EX bonding agent requires the additional step of applying an agent to prevent oxygen contact in the setting process.

  2. Dental amalgam: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Eggleston, D W

    1989-09-01

    Since the 1800s, dental amalgam has been the most commonly used dental restorative material. Each year, dentistry in the United States uses over 100 tons of mercury, continuing a controversy regarding mercury's safety for patients and dental personnel.

  3. Dental amalgam--environmental aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Arenholt-Bindslev, D. )

    1992-09-01

    Increasing knowledge about the risk of toxic effects caused by anthropogenic mercury accumulation in ecosystems has resulted in a growing pressure for reduction of the discharge of mercury waste. Consequently, the mercury waste problems of dental clinics have been given increased attention, and restrictions on handling and discharge of contaminated waste have been established in several countries. Major amalgam particles from trituration surplus of those produced during the carving and burnishing of new amalgam restorations are generally collected in coarse filters and sold for refinement. Minor amalgam particles released by production of new fillings or by removal of old restorations partly sediment in tubes and drains. The remaining particles are carried with the waste water stream to the local purifying plant. In Scandinavia, the industrial discharge of mercury-contaminated waste water has been reduced to a minimum. According to recent investigations, dental clinics appear to be responsible for the major amount of mercury collected in the sludge generated in purifying plants. If threshold values for heavy metal content, including mercury, are exceeded, the sludge is not allowed to be recycled as fertilizer. Installation of an approved amalgam-separating apparatus in dental clinics is now mandatory in several countries--for example, Switzerland, Germany, Sweden, and Denmark. Approval of amalgam separators is based on national testing programs, including clinical or laboratory tests demanding 95-99% separating efficiency. 18 refs.

  4. Novel Amalgams for In-Space Parts Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, Calvin; VanHoose, James R.; Grugel, Richard N.

    2012-01-01

    Sound amalgams can be fabricated by substituting Ga-In liquid for mercury; Cu-coated steel fibers bond well with the amalgam components. Inclusion of steel fibers significantly improved mechanical properties. An application scenario utilizing amalgams for in-space parts fabrication and repair was suggested. Procedure and materials need to be optimized

  5. The influence of a packable resin composite, conventional resin composite and amalgam on molar cuspal stiffness.

    PubMed

    Molinaro, J D; Diefenderfer, K E; Strother, J M

    2002-01-01

    Packable resin composites may offer improved properties and clinical performance over conventional resin composites or dental amalgam. This in vitro study examined the cuspal stiffness of molars restored with a packable resin composite, a conventional posterior microfilled resin composite and amalgam. Forty-eight intact caries-free human third molars were distributed into four treatment groups (n=12) so that the mean cross-sectional areas of all groups were equal. Standardized MOD cavity preparations were made and specimens restored using one of four restorative materials: (1) a spherical particle amalgam (Tytin); (2) Tytin amalgam with a dentin adhesive liner (OptiBond Solo); (3) a conventional microfilled posterior resin composite (Heliomolar); (4) a packable posterior resin composite (Prodigy Posterior). Cuspal stiffness was measured using a Bionix 200 biomaterials testing machine (MTS). Specimens were loaded vertically to 300 N at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/minute. Stiffness was measured at 10 intervals: (1) prior to cavity preparation (intact); (2) following cavity preparation, but before restoration; (3) seven days after restoration; then (4) 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 12 months after restoration. All specimens were stored at 37 degrees C in deionized water throughout the study and thermocycled (5 degrees/55 degrees C; 2000 cycles) monthly for 12 months. Repeated Measures ANOVA revealed significant differences among treatment groups over time (p<0.0001). Cavity preparation reduced cuspal stiffness by more than 60%. At 12 months, the cuspal stiffness of restored teeth was, on average, 58% that of intact specimens. Neither the packable nor the conventional resin composite increased cuspal stiffness over that of amalgam.

  6. Repair of porcelain/metal restoration with resin bonded overcasting.

    PubMed

    Wood, M; Litkowski, L J; Thompson, V P; Church, T

    1992-01-01

    Porcelain occasionally fractures from ceramometal fixed partial dentures following final cementation. Repair of these porcelain fractures can be a challenging task. When the problem occurs on anterior teeth, it is especially difficult because the repair must not only be durable, but esthetically pleasing as well. Although composite resins can be used for some repairs, it is often difficult to match the color and texture to the surrounding intact porcelain. In addition, the bonding between the resin and porcelain is susceptible to margin leakage, which may ultimately cause an esthetic failure. Techniques involving a cemented porcelain-fused-to-metal overcasting have often been successful in restoring the fixed partial denture to form and function. Although the esthetic result of a porcelain/metal overcasting can be quite successful, retention of the overcasting is sometimes poor. The compromised retention and resistance form is due to lack of interproximal walls on the underlying fractured unit. To improve the retention of the overcasting, the following technique of tin plating the overcasting and fractured unit prior to cementing with a composite resin cement is presented.

  7. Mercury release during autoclave sterilization of amalgam.

    PubMed

    Parsell, D E; Karns, L; Buchanan, W T; Johnson, R B

    1996-05-01

    Natural teeth are an invaluable teaching tool for preclinical instruction in operative dentistry and endodontic techniques. Cavity preparation in teeth containing amalgam restorations is a realistic simulation of an often experienced clinical situation. As various pathogens are contained in saliva, teeth must be disinfected before use by students. The purpose of this study is to indirectly evaluate whether mercury vapor is released from amalgam restorations in such teeth during steam autoclave sterilization. Mercury vapor detection, sample mass changes and x-ray fluorescence data were collected from experimental steam autoclave sterilization of amalgam samples sealed in autoclave bags. All of the data showed evidence of mercury vapor generation coincident to steam autoclave sterilization. Mercury vapor levels within the room where amalgam was exposed to steam autoclave sterilization reached levels that constitute an unnecessary health risk to dental personnel. The volume of amalgam tested simulated that contained in 175 amalgam restored teeth. Initial venting of the autoclave chamber produced mercury vapor concentrations significantly in excess of OSHA vapor concentration ceiling levels. Thus, the use of a steam autoclave for sterilization of amalgam containing teeth for use in preclinical laboratory exercises may be harmful to personnel involved.

  8. Do Laboratory Results Concerning High-Viscosity Glass-Ionomers versus Amalgam for Tooth Restorations Indicate Similar Effect Direction and Magnitude than that of Controlled Clinical Trials? - A Meta-Epidemiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Mickenautsch, Steffen; Yengopal, Veerasamy

    2015-01-01

    Background A large percentage of evidence concerning dental interventions is based on laboratory research. The apparent wealth of laboratory evidence is sometimes used as basis for clinical inference and recommendations for daily dental practice. In this study two null-hypotheses are tested: whether trial results from laboratory and controlled clinical trials concerning the comparison of high-viscosity glass-ionomer cements (HVGIC) to amalgam for restorations placed in permanent posterior teeth have: (i) similar effect direction and (ii) similar effect magnitude. Methods 7 electronic databases were searched, as well as reference lists. Odds ratios (OR) and Standardised Mean Differences (SMD) with 95% Confidence intervals were computed for extracted dichotomous and continuous data, respectively. Pooled effect estimates for laboratory and clinical data were computed to test for effect direction. Odds ratios were converted into SMDs. SMDs from laboratory and clinical data were statistically compared to test for differences in effect magnitude. The analysed results were further investigated within the context of potential influencing or confounding factors using a Directed acyclic graph. Results Of the accepted eight laboratory and nine clinical trials, 13 and 21 datasets could be extracted, respectively. The pooled results of the laboratory datasets were highly statistically significant in favor of amalgam. No statistically significant differences, between HVGICs and amalgam, were identified for clinical data. For effect magnitude, statistically significant differences between clinical and laboratory trial results were found. Both null-hypotheses were rejected. Conclusion Laboratory results concerning high-viscosity glass-ionomers versus amalgam for tooth restorations do not indicate similar effect direction and magnitude than that of controlled clinical trials. PMID:26168274

  9. Clinical assessment of a fluoride-containing amalgam.

    PubMed

    Skartveit, L; Tveit, A B; Mjör, I A; Aas, H T

    1986-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the marginal breakdown as a measure of clinical behavior of fillings made with two conventional amalgam alloys, one of which contained 1% stannous fluoride. Children requiring class II restorations in both mandibular molars received conventional amalgam (New True Dentalloy (R] in one molar and a fluoride-containing amalgam (Fluor Alloy (R)) in the other. Impressions of the filled teeth were taken just after polishing and at 1-yr intervals up to a 2-yr period. Plastic models were made and evaluated under a stereomicroscope. The results showed that the fluoride-containing amalgam presented slightly better margins than the conventional amalgam after 2 yr.

  10. Effect of surface roughness on amalgam repair using adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Giannini, Marcelo; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei Sartini; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of three surface treatments and two adhesive systems on the shear bond strength of old and freshly placed amalgam. The results suggested that the intact amalgam showed a significantly higher strength than repaired groups and the strongest repaired specimens were made when the amalgam surfaces were roughened with a diamond bur or microetcher. The adhesive systems showed no significant differences on bond strength with the same superficial texture.

  11. The effects of glass ionomer and flowable composite liners on the fracture resistance of open-sandwich class II restorations.

    PubMed

    Güray Efes, Begüm; Yaman, Batu Can; Gümüştaş, Burak; Tıryakı, Murat

    2013-01-01

    This in vitro study aimed to investigate the effects of glass-ionomer and flowable composite liners on the fracture resistance of Class II amalgam and composite restorations. Group 1 cavities were restored with amalgam and Group 4 cavities with nanofill composite after the application of a dentin-bonding agent. For the remaining groups, light-cured-glass-ionomer liner was used in a gingival floor proximal box (Groups 2, 5) or flowable composite was used as a liner (Groups 3, 6), the remainder of the cavity was restored with amalgam (Groups 2, 3) or composite (Groups 5, 6). The restorations were loaded in compression to failure. The data was analyzed using Tukey's multiple comparison test. The fracture resistance was significantly higher (p<0.05) in Group 3 than in all other groups, except Group 2 (p>0.05). Flowable composite, glass-ionomer liners increased the fracture resistance of open-sandwich Class II amalgam restorations.

  12. Microshear Bond Strength of Tri-Calcium Silicate-based Cements to Different Restorative Materials.

    PubMed

    Cengiz, Esra; Ulusoy, Nuran

    To evaluate the microshear bond strength of tri-calcium silicate-based materials to different restorative materials. Thirty-five disks of TheraCal LC and Biodentine were fabricated using teflon molds according to manufacturers' instructions. Then the specimens were randomly divided into 7 groups according to the materials applied: Fuji IX, Fuji II, Equia Fil, Vertise Flow, Filtek Bulk Fill Posterior Restorative, Filtek Z250 with Prime&Bond NT and with Clearfil SE Bond. All restorative materials were placed onto the disks using tygon tubes. Following a storage period, the specimens underwent microshear bond strength testing in a universal testing machine, and fracture modes were analyzed. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test. For all restorative materials, TheraCal LC showed significantly higher μSBS values compared to Biodentine. GIC based materials showed the lowest μSBS for TheraCal and Biodentine. For Biodentine, Filtek Z250 applied with Prime&Bond NT and Filtek Bulk Fill Posterior Restorative applied with Scotchbond Universal Adhesive exhibited the highest μSBS, while Filtek Z250 applied with Clearfil SE Bond revealed the highest bond strength to TheraCal LC. For all restorative materials tested in this study, TheraCal LC showed higher μSBS compared to Biodentine. For both TheraCal LC and Biodentine, the placement of GIC-based materials prior to composite resin restorations might decrease the bond strength. Composite resins applied with self-etching adhesives increased the bond strength of TheraCal LC; however, for Biodentine, application of etch-and-rinse adhesives may improve the adhesion of composite resins.

  13. [Dentin bonding of cements. The bonding of cements with dentin in combination with various indirect restorative materials].

    PubMed

    Peutzfeldt, Anne; Sahafi, Alireza; Flury, Simon

    2011-01-01

    The number of both luting agents and restorative materials available on the market has rapidly increased. This study compared various types of luting agents when used to bond different indirect, laboratory restorative materials to dentin. Cylinders were produced of six restorative materials (gold alloy, titanium, feldspathic porcelain, leucite-glass ceramic, zirconia, and an indirect resin composite). Following relevant pretreatment, the end surface of the cylinders were luted to ground, human dentin with eight different luting agents (DeTrey Zinc [zinc phosphate cement], Fuji I [conventional glass ionomer cement], Fuji Plus [resin-modified glass ionomer cement], Variolink II [conventional etch-and-rinse resin cement], Panavia F2.0 and Multilink [self-etch resin cements], RelyX Unicem Aplicap and Maxcem [self-adhesive resin cements]). After water storage at 37 °C for one week, the shear bond strength of the specimens was measured and the fracture mode was examined stereo-microscopically. Restorative material and luting agent both had a significant effect on bond strength and there was a significant interaction between the two variables. The zinc phosphate cement and the glass ionomer cements resulted in the lowest bond strengths, whereas the highest bond strengths were found with the two self-etch and one of the self-adhesive resin cements.

  14. The future of dental amalgam: a review of the literature. Part 1: Dental amalgam structure and corrosion.

    PubMed

    Eley, B M

    1997-04-12

    This is the first article in a series of seven on the future of dental amalgam. Dental amalgam is still the most useful restorative material for posterior teeth and has been used successfully for over 100 years. The history of dental amalgam since its introduction in 1819 and the controversies about its use between 1834 and today are described. The composition of the various dental amalgams in clinical use today are then reported. It finally covers the corrosion of amalgams since this is the means by which metals, including mercury, can be released.

  15. Has resin-based composite replaced amalgam?

    PubMed

    Christensen, Gordon J; Child, Paul L

    2010-02-01

    The major health organizations in the world continue to accept amalgam use, but the "amalgam war" of the 1800s is still going on. The end is not in sight. There is little disagreement that amalgam serves well and, although controversial, it appears to have minimal to no health hazards. There is a wide variation in the relative amount of amalgam placed in developed countries, and many dentists in North America do not use it. However, amalgam is still being used at least some of the time by the majority of practitioners in North America, and most of those practitioners also place resin-based composite in Class II locations. The evolution from amalgam to tooth-colored restorations has been a slow and tumultuous journey. The acceptability of resin-based composite in Class II locations continues to be a question for some dentists, while others have concluded that amalgam is "dead." It would be highly desirable if some of dentists using the alleged poisonous properties of amalgam as a "practice building" ploy would find more legitimate methods to increase their practice activity.

  16. Comparative in vitro study of the shear bond strength of brackets bonded with restorative and orthodontic resins.

    PubMed

    Isber, Hassan; Ambrosio, Aldrieli Regina; Carvalho, Paulo Eduardo Guedes; Valle-Corotti, Karyna Martins do; Siqueira, Danilo Furquim

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of brackets bonded with different restorative systems and compare it with that afforded by an established orthodontic bonding system. Seventy human bicuspids were used, divided into five different groups with 14 teeth each. Whereas a specific orthodontic bonding resin (Transbond™ XT) was used in the control group, the restorative systems Charisma, Tetric Ceram, TPH Spectrum and Z100 were used in the other four groups. Seven days after bonding the brackets to the samples, shear forces were applied under pressure in a universal testing machine. The data collected was evaluated using the ANOVA test and, when a difference was identified, the Tukey test was applied. A 5% level of significance was adopted. The mean results of the shear bond strength tests were as follows: Group 1 (Charisma), 14.98 MPa; Group 2 (Tetric Ceram), 15.16 MPa; Group 3 (TPH), 17.70 MPa; Group 4 (Z100), 13.91 MPa; and Group 5 or control group (Transbond™ XT), 17.15 MPa. No statistically significant difference was found among the groups. It was concluded that all tested resins have sufficient bond strength to be recommended for bonding orthodontic brackets.

  17. Success rate of resin bonded restorative dentistry bridges.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Saqib; Abidi, Yawar Ali; Hosein, Tasleem

    2003-12-01

    To assess the success rate of resin bonded bridges. A descriptive cross-sectional study. Fatima Jinnah Dental College Hospital, Karachi between August 1998 and August 2002. Seventy resin bonded bridges fitted in 60 patients were clinically assessed for debonding. The inclusion criteria included minimal reduction of teeth with minimal occlusal contacts. Patients were excluded if teeth had a large discrepancy of space and heavy occlusion. The retainers were designed self retentive and covered the maximum tooth surface lingually and proximally. Impressions were taken and resin bonded bridges were fabricated and bonded. Information regarding the patient's data, bonding and debonding was collected on a proforma and was analysed using SPSS version 10.0. Seventy resin-bonded bridges had been in place for an average of 33 months. The results showed a 94.3% success rate. Statistically significant results were found between anterior bridges and posterior bridges for bonding status (p< 0.05). Results were not significant where maxillary versus mandibular bridges were compared for bonding status. (p>0.05). Resin bonded bridges achieved a high level of clinical success in the study.

  18. About Dental Amalgam Fillings

    MedlinePlus

    ... a powdered alloy composed of silver, tin, and copper. Approximately 50% of dental amalgam is elemental mercury ... to react with and bind together the silver/copper/tin alloy particles to form an amalgam. Dental ...

  19. In vitro marginal adaptation of high-viscosity resin composite restorations bonded to dentin cavities.

    PubMed

    Rahiotis, Christos; Tzoutzas, John; Kakaboura, Afrodite

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the marginal adaptation of high-viscosity resin composite restoratives bonded to dentin in a cylindrical cavity model. The buccal enamel of 64 human premolars was removed and cylindrical cavities 3 mm in diameter and 1.3 mm in depth were prepared on each dentin surface. The cavities were divided into 8 groups of 8 cavities each and restored according to the manufacturers' instructions with the following adhesive/composite systems: Bond 1/Alert, Stae/Glacier, OptiBond Solo/Prodigy Condensable, One-Step/Pyramid, Solidbond/Solitaire, Prime&Bond NT/Surefil, One Coat Bond/Synergy, and Scotchbond 1/Z250. The composite surfaces were pressed against mylar strips, covered with cover slips, and photopolymerized in a single increment for 40 s. The restorations were polished with wet SiC papers of 320 to 1000 grit size to expose dentin margins. The marginal adaptation was evaluated immediately after photopolymerization and again after 1 week of storage in water at 37 +/- 1 degrees C. Evaluation was performed under a metallographic microscope at 200X magnification by recording the frequency of gap-free restorations (GF), the percentage length of the debonded margins relative to the cavity periphery (DM), the width of the maximum marginal gap (MG), and the marginal index (MI = MG x DM / 100). The results were statistically analyzed with one-way ANOVA and the Mann-Whitney U-test at alpha = 0.05. No incidence of gaps was found in 62.5% of One Coat Bond/Synergy and 37.5% of OptiBond Solo/Prodigy Condensable restorations. All the other restorative systems exhibited restorations with gaps. One Coat Bond/Synergy, Scotchbond 1/Z250, and OptiBond Solo/Prodigy Condensable were the groups with the lowest DM values, while Stae/Glacier showed the highest DM values. One Coat Bond/Synergy and OptiBond Solo/Prodigy Condensable revealed the lowest MI values and Stae/Glacier the highest. No statistically significant differences were recorded between

  20. [The impact of ultrasonic dental hygiene procedures on the bonding strength of restorations].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, D L; Mel'nik, A A; Laze, R; Petrikas, O A; Petrikas, I V

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasonic calculus scaling has become a common oral hygiene procedure in patients with composite restorations, dental veneers, orthodontic brackets. The aim of the study was to evaluate in vitro the influence of the EMS-ultrasonic system scaling on the flowable composite bond strength to the tooth enamel, dentine, and e-max ceramic. The samples were divided into three groups: 1 group (composite bonded to enamel), 2 group (composite bonded to dentine), 3 group (composite bonded to e-max ceramic). The bonded samples were loaded to failure in the universal testing machine. The shear bond strength was calculated in newtons (N). T (Student's)-test was used to evaluate the data. Significantly lower bond strengths were observed with the ultrasonic treated samples in each groups. The EMS-ultrasonic system scaling significantly decreases the flowable composite bond strength to the tooth enamel, dentine, and e-max ceramic.

  1. Shear bond strengths of self-adhesive luting resins fixing dentine to different restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Congxiao; Degrange, Michel

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the bond strengths of three self-adhesive resin cements (Rely X Unicem, Maxcem and Multilink Sprint) fixing dentine to four different restorative substrates (Ni-Cr alloy, E-Max glass-ceramic, Y-TZP Zirconia and Adoro micro-filled composite) and to compare their performances with those of two conventional dual-cured luting cements (Variolink II + Total-etch Excite DSC and Multilink Automix + Self-etching Primer A + B). Cylindric specimens (5 x 5 mm) were prepared with the four restorative materials for bonding to human dentine. Three surface treatments were performed depending on the restorative material: (i) Al2O3 50 microm sandblasting (Ni-Cr, Adoro), (ii) #800 SiC polishing (Zirconia, E-Max), (iii) hydrofluoric acid (HF)-etching (E-Max). Twenty-five groups (n = 10) were designed according to luting cements, restorative materials and surface pre-treatments. In some experimental groups, Variolink II and Multilink Automix were coupled with, respectively, a silane primer (Monobond S) and an alloy/zirconia primer (Multilink A/Z primer). Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 h and then loaded in shear until failure. Variolink II and Multilink Automix showed the highest bond strengths, regardless of the restorative substrate, when used with dentine bonding systems and primers, while the weakest bonds were with Maxcem. The bond strength recorded with the two other self-adhesive cements depended on the nature of the restorative substrate. Increasing retention at the interfaces (i.e., HF ceramic etching) and using specific primers significantly improves the bond strength of luted restorative materials to dentine.

  2. Effect of cyclic loading on the bond strength of class II restorations with different composite materials.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Andrea Nóbrega; Mitsui, Fabio Hiroyuki Ogata; Silva, Flávia; Peris, Alessandra Rezende; Bedran-Russo, Ana; Marchi, Giselle Maria

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of cyclic loading on the bond strength of Class II restorations using different composite materials. Class II preparations with gingival margins located in dentin were performed on the mesial surface of 80 bovine incisors. The teeth were randomly allocated to eight groups (n=10) according to resin composite (Filtek Z250, Filtek Supreme, Tetric Ceram HB and Esthet-X) and use of cyclic loading. The restorations were bonded with the Single Bond adhesive system. Simulated aging groups were cyclic loaded for 200,000 cycles with 80N load (2Hz). The specimens were vertically sectioned (two slabs per restoration) and further trimmed into an hour-glass shape at the adhesive interface to obtain a final bonded area 1 mm2. Samples were placed in an apparatus and tested under tension using a universal testing machine. The data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey test with a 95% confidence level. Aged groups presented significantly lower means when compared to the groups that were not aged (p=0.03). However, significant differences among composite materials were not observed (p=0.17). Regardless of the restorative composite material used, it could be concluded that the bond strength of Class II restorations at the gingival wall was affected by simulated cyclic loading.

  3. Effect of Self-etch Adhesives on Self-sealing Ability of High-Copper Amalgams

    PubMed Central

    Moazzami, Saied Mostafa; Moosavi, Horieh; Moddaber, Maryam; Parvizi, Reza; Moayed, Mohamad Hadi; Mokhber, Nima; Meharry, Michael; B Kazemi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: Similar to conventional amalgam, high-copper amalgam alloy may also undergo corrosion, but it takes longer time for the resulting products to reduce microleakage by sealing the micro-gap at the tooth/amalgam interface. Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of self-etch adhesives with different pH levels on the interfacial corrosion behavior of high-copper amalgam restoration and its induction potential for self-sealing ability of the micro-gap in the early hours after setting by means of Electro-Chemical Tests (ECTs). Materials and Method: Thirty cylindrical cavities of 4.5mm x 4.7mm were prepared on intact bicuspids. The samples were divided into five main groups of application of Adhesive Resin (AR)/ liner/ None (No), on the cavity floor. The first main group was left without an AR/ liner (No). In the other main groups, the types of AR/ liner used were I-Bond (IB), Clearfil S3 (S3), Single Bond (SB) and Varnish (V). Each main group (n=6) was divided into two subgroups (n=3) according to the types of the amalgams used, either admixed ANA 2000 (ANA) or spherical Tytin (Tyt). The ECTs, Open Circuit Potential (OCP), and the Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR) for each sample were performed and measured 48 hours after the completion of the samples. Results: The Tyt-No and Tyt-IB samples showed the highest and lowest OCP values respectively. In LPR tests, the Rp values of ANA-V and Tyt-V were the highest (lowest corrosion rate) and contrarily, the ANA-IB and Tyt-IB samples, with the lowest pH levels, represented the lowest Rp values (highest corrosion rates). Conclusion: Some self-etch adhesives may increase interfacial corrosion potential and self-sealing ability of high-copper amalgams. PMID:27942548

  4. Effect of Self-etch Adhesives on Self-sealing Ability of High-Copper Amalgams.

    PubMed

    Moazzami, Saied Mostafa; Moosavi, Horieh; Moddaber, Maryam; Parvizi, Reza; Moayed, Mohamad Hadi; Mokhber, Nima; Meharry, Michael; B Kazemi, Reza

    2016-12-01

    Similar to conventional amalgam, high-copper amalgam alloy may also undergo corrosion, but it takes longer time for the resulting products to reduce microleakage by sealing the micro-gap at the tooth/amalgam interface. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of self-etch adhesives with different pH levels on the interfacial corrosion behavior of high-copper amalgam restoration and its induction potential for self-sealing ability of the micro-gap in the early hours after setting by means of Electro-Chemical Tests (ECTs). Thirty cylindrical cavities of 4.5mm x 4.7mm were prepared on intact bicuspids. The samples were divided into five main groups of application of Adhesive Resin (AR)/ liner/ None (No), on the cavity floor. The first main group was left without an AR/ liner (No). In the other main groups, the types of AR/ liner used were I-Bond (IB), Clearfil S(3) (S(3)), Single Bond (SB) and Varnish (V). Each main group (n=6) was divided into two subgroups (n=3) according to the types of the amalgams used, either admixed ANA 2000 (ANA) or spherical Tytin (Tyt). The ECTs, Open Circuit Potential (OCP), and the Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR) for each sample were performed and measured 48 hours after the completion of the samples. The Tyt-No and Tyt-IB samples showed the highest and lowest OCP values respectively. In LPR tests, the Rp values of ANA-V and Tyt-V were the highest (lowest corrosion rate) and contrarily, the ANA-IB and Tyt-IB samples, with the lowest pH levels, represented the lowest Rp values (highest corrosion rates). Some self-etch adhesives may increase interfacial corrosion potential and self-sealing ability of high-copper amalgams.

  5. Effect of provisional restorations on the final bond strengths of porcelain laminate veneers.

    PubMed

    Aykent, F; Usumez, A; Ozturk, A N; Yucel, M T

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of the different provisional restorations cementation techniques on the final bond strengths of porcelain laminate veneers (PLVs). Thirty-six extracted human central incisors were sectioned 2 mm below the cemento-enamel junction, and crown parts were embedded into self-cure acrylic resin. Standardized PLV preparations were carried out on labial surfaces of the teeth. Then the teeth were randomly divided into three groups of 12 each. In group 1, provisional restorations were cemented with eugenol-free cement. In group 2, prepared teeth surfaces were first coated with a desensitizing agent then provisional restorations were cemented with resin cement. In group 3, provisional restorations were not fabricated to serve as control. After specimens were stored in distilled water for 2 weeks, provisional restorations were removed and final IPS Empress 2 ceramic veneers were bonded with a dual-curing resin. Two microtensile samples from each tooth measuring 1.2 x 1.2 x 5 mm were prepared. These sections were subjected to microtensile testing and failure values were recorded. The data were analysed by one-way anova and Tukey HSD tests. The PLVs, placed on the tooth surface that had received a dentine desensitizer and provisional restorations luted with resin cement (group 2), showed the lowest bond strength in all test groups. But no statistically significant differences were found between the bond strength of PLVs in control group (no provisional restorations) and group 1 (provisional restorations cemented with eugenol-free cement before final cementations). Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) examination of this study also showed that the bonding to enamel surface was better in control group and group 1 than group 2.

  6. Effects of flowable resin on bond strength and gap formation in Class I restorations.

    PubMed

    Miguez, Patricia A; Pereira, Patricia N R; Foxton, Richard M; Walter, Ricardo; Nunes, Mauro F; Swift, Edward J

    2004-11-01

    This study measured resin/dentin bond strengths and evaluated gap formation at the pulpal floor of occlusal composite restorations using a flowable resin as a liner with either bulk or incremental placement of the restorative composite. Class I occlusal preparations were made in 16 extracted molars, and were randomly divided into two groups for restoration using either One-Step adhesive (OS, BISCO) and Renew composite (RW, BISCO) or OptiBond SOLO adhesive (SOLO, Kerr) and Herculite XRV composite (XRV, Kerr). A flowable resin [AEliteFlo (AE, BISCO) or Revolution (RV, Kerr)] was applied as a liner in half of the specimens of each group. The lined and unlined groups were restored with composite cured in bulk, or cured in 1.5 mm increments. After 24 h in water, the teeth were sectioned into 0.7-mm thick slabs and were examined with an optical microscope (400 x) to determine the presence of internal resin-dentin gaps. The gap-free specimens were trimmed and were subjected to microtensile bond strength testing. Specimens that contained gaps had Knoop hardness of the restorative material measured. All incrementally filled restorations were well adapted to the pulpal floor but nearly all bulk-cured specimens had gaps between the flowable and the hybrid composites. The use of a flowable resin increased the bond strength of OS, but not SOLO. The incremental technique prevented gap formation regardless of the use of a flowable resin. In contrast, the use of a flowable composite did not guarantee gap-free restorations or improved bond strength of resin to dentin in bulk-filled restorations.

  7. [Dental amalgams and mercury polemic in Abidjan].

    PubMed

    Avoaka-Boni, M-C; Adou-Assoumou, N M; Sinan, A A; Abouattier-Mansilla, E C

    2007-12-01

    Dental amalgam is metallic biomaterials which has raised a number of controversies in the past few years, because of mercury potential toxicity. Considering the significance of theses controversies, this study was carried out with a view to evaluating the behaviour of Abidjan-based practitioners with respect to dental amalgam. The contemplated objective is to determine the frequency in the use of dental amalgam, to identify the problems encountered using dental amalgam and to propose solutions for fighting mercury contamination. The results show that dental amalgam is used in 81.8% for posterior teeth restoration. The side effects mentioned are metallic taste, gingival tattoo, galvanic corrosion and tooth pain. This is why 21.8 % of practitioners believe that the controversy over dental amalgam has merits while 45.5% hold the contrary opinion because of lack of scientific arguments. However, considering the absence of means to treat amalgam waste, dentist practitioners and authorities have to get involved to fight against mercury contamination.

  8. Human brain mercury levels related to exposure to amalgam fillings.

    PubMed

    Ertaş, E; Aksoy, A; Turla, A; Karaarslan, E S; Karaarslan, B; Aydın, A; Eken, A

    2014-08-01

    The safety of dental amalgam as the primary material in dental restoration treatments has been debated since its introduction. It is widely accepted that amalgam restorations continuously release elemental mercury (Hg) vapor, which is inhaled and absorbed by the body and distributed to tissues, including the brain. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the presence of amalgam fillings is correlated with brain Hg level. The Hg levels in the parietal lobes of the brains of 32 cadavers were analyzed with an atomic absorption spectrometer with the mercury hydride system. A total of 32 brain samples were tested; of these, 10 were from cadavers with amalgam fillings, while 22 of them were amalgam free. Hg was detected in 60.0% (6 of 10) of the samples in the amalgam group and in 36.3% (8 of 22) in the amalgam-free group. The average Hg level of the amalgam group was 0.97 ± 0.83 µg/g (minimum: 0.3 µg/g and maximum: 2.34 µg/g), and in the amalgam-free group, it was 1.06 ± 0.57 µg/g (minimum: 0.17 µg/g and maximum: 1.76 µg/g). The results of the present study showed no correlation between the presence of amalgam fillings and brain Hg level.

  9. Treatment of extended anterior crown fractures using Type IIIA bonded porcelain restorations.

    PubMed

    Magne, Pascal; Magne, Michel

    2005-05-01

    Novel-design bonded porcelain restorations, the so-called Type IIIA BPRs, represent a reliable and effective procedure when restoring large parts of the coronal volume and length in the anterior dentition. While traditional treatment approaches involve the removal of large amounts of sound tooth substance (with adverse effects on the pulp, gingivae and crown biomechanics, as well as serious financial consequences), the use of adhesive technology instead can provide maximum preservation of tissues and limited costs. Considerable advantages, such as the economical and noninvasive treatment of crown-fractured teeth, are inherent to Type IIIA bonded porcelain restorations, reducing the need for preprosthetic interventions (e.g., root canal therapy and crown-lengthening) and the use of intraradicular posts. This article, illustrated with cases with up to eight and 10 years' follow-up, sets the scientific foundations of this concept, as well as important considerations about function, strength, tooth preparation, laboratory technique, and bonding optimization.

  10. Bond strength of restorative materials to hydroxyapatite inserts and dimensional changes of insert-containing restorations during polymerization.

    PubMed

    Lezaja, Maja; Veljovic, Djordje; Manojlovic, Dragica; Milosevic, Milos; Mitrovic, Nenad; Janackovic, Djordje; Miletic, Vesna

    2015-02-01

    To determine the shear bond strength (SBS) between synthetic controlled porous hydroxyapatite (HAP) inserts and restorative materials and dimensional changes of insert-containing restorations during curing. Cylinder-shaped HAP inserts (4mm in diameter, 1.6mm thick) were cemented in dentin discs (5mm×1.6mm), cut mid-coronally from human third molars, using one of the following materials: universal microhybrid composite Filtek Z250, flowable composite Filtek Ultimate or glass-ionomer Vitrebond (all 3M ESPE). SBS of the same materials to HAP inserts was tested in a universal testing machine. Three-dimensional digital image correlation system Aramis (GOM) was used to measure strains and displacements. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA with Tukey's post-test (α=0.05). SBS of restorative materials to HAP inserts ranged between 12.2±2.1MPa (Filtek Z250) and 0.7±0.4MPa (Filtek Z250 without an adhesive). The 'total-etch' approach of adhesive application significantly increased SBS of both Filtek Z250 (12.2±2.1MPa) and Filtek Ultimate flowable (9.5±2.5MPa) compared to the 'self-etch' approach (8.2±1.6MPa and 4.4±0.9MPa, respectively) (p<0.05). HAP inserts reduced polymerization shrinkage to below 0.5% as well as displacements in the central region of the restorations. Peripheral shrinkage of restorative materials was similar with and without HAP inserts as were displacements of Filtek Z250 and Vitrebond. Replacing major part of dentin clinically, especially in large cavities, HAP inserts may shorten clinical working time, improve dimensional stability of the restoration by reducing central shrinkage and displacements and provide adhesive bonding to universal composites following a 'total-etch' approach. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The potential adverse health effects of dental amalgam.

    PubMed

    Brownawell, Amy M; Berent, Stanley; Brent, Robert L; Bruckner, James V; Doull, John; Gershwin, Eric M; Hood, Ronald D; Matanoski, Genevieve M; Rubin, Raphael; Weiss, Bernard; Karol, Meryl H

    2005-01-01

    There is significant public concern about the potential health effects of exposure to mercury vapour (Hg(0)) released from dental amalgam restorations. The purpose of this article is to provide information about the toxicokinetics of Hg(0), evaluate the findings from the recent scientific and medical literature, and identify research gaps that when filled may definitively support or refute the hypothesis that dental amalgam causes adverse health effects. Dental amalgam is a widely used restorative dental material that was introduced over 150 years ago. Most standard dental amalgam formulations contain approximately 50% elemental mercury. Experimental evidence consistently demonstrates that Hg(0) is released from dental amalgam restorations and is absorbed by the human body. Numerous studies report positive correlations between the number of dental amalgam restorations or surfaces and urine mercury concentrations in non-occupationally exposed individuals. Although of public concern, it is currently unclear what adverse health effects are caused by the levels of Hg(0) released from this restoration material. Historically, studies of occupationally exposed individuals have provided consistent information about the relationship between exposure to Hg(0) and adverse effects reflecting both nervous system and renal dysfunction. Workers are usually exposed to substantially higher Hg(0) levels than individuals with dental amalgam restorations and are typically exposed 8 hours per day for 20-30 years, whereas persons with dental amalgam restorations are exposed 24 hours per day over some portion of a lifetime. This review has uncovered no convincing evidence pointing to any adverse health effects that are attributable to dental amalgam restorations besides hypersensitivity in some individuals.

  12. Shear Bond Strength of Resin Buttons to Lithium Disilicate and Leucite Reinforced Feldspathic Restorations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-01

    composite resin buttons to apply a more consistent force to the tooth. This allows for more predictable tooth movements. When either traditional...Protocols have been proposed for porcelain repair with composite resin and resin bonding of ceramic restorations to teeth. Bonding composite to porcelain...to enhance micromechanical retention of composite resin to the porcelain. 8 With hydrofluoric acid care must be exercised due to its extremely

  13. Eroded dentin does not jeopardize the bond strength of adhesive restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Janaina Barros; Lenzi, Tathiane Larissa; Tedesco, Tamara Kerber; Guglielmi, Camila de Almeida Brandão; Raggio, Daniela Prócida

    2012-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the bond strength of adhesive restorative materials to sound and eroded dentin. Thirty-six bovine incisors were embedded in acrylic resin and ground to obtain flat buccal dentin surfaces. Specimens were randomly allocated in 2 groups: sound dentin (immersion in artificial saliva) and eroded dentin (pH cycling model - 3× / cola drink for 7 days). Specimens were then reassigned according to restorative material: glass ionomer cement (KetacTM Molar Easy Mix), resin-modified glass ionomer cement (VitremerTM) or adhesive system with resin composite (Adper Single Bond 2 + Filtek Z250). Polyethylene tubes with an internal diameter of 0.76 mm were placed over the dentin and filled with the material. The microshear bond test was performed after 24 h of water storage at 37ºC. The failure mode was evaluated using a stereomicroscope (400×). Bond strength data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc tests (α = 0.05). Eroded dentin showed bond strength values similar to those for sound dentin for all materials. The adhesive system showed the highest bond strength values, regardless of the substrate (p < 0.0001). For all groups, the adhesive/mixed failure prevailed. In conclusion, adhesive materials may be used in eroded dentin without jeopardizing the bonding quality. It is preferable to use an etch-and-rinse adhesive system because it shows the highest bond strength values compared with the glass ionomer cements tested.

  14. Novel fabrication method for zirconia restorations: bonding strength of machinable ceramic to zirconia with resin cements.

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, Soichi; Terui, Yuichi; Higuchi, Daisuke; Goto, Daisuke; Hotta, Yasuhiro; Manabe, Atsufumi; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    A novel method was developed to fabricate all-ceramic restorations which comprised CAD/CAM-fabricated machinable ceramic bonded to CAD/CAM-fabricated zirconia framework using resin cement. The feasibility of this fabrication method was assessed in this study by investigating the bonding strength of a machinable ceramic to zirconia. A machinable ceramic was bonded to a zirconia plate using three kinds of resin cements: ResiCem (RE), Panavia (PA), and Multilink (ML). Conventional porcelain-fused-to-zirconia specimens were also prepared to serve as control. Shear bond strength test (SBT) and Schwickerath crack initiation test (SCT) were carried out. SBT revealed that PA (40.42 MPa) yielded a significantly higher bonding strength than RE (28.01 MPa) and ML (18.89 MPa). SCT revealed that the bonding strengths of test groups using resin cement were significantly higher than those of Control. Notably, the bonding strengths of RE and ML were above 25 MPa even after 10,000 times of thermal cycling -adequately meeting the ISO 9693 standard for metal-ceramic restorations. These results affirmed the feasibility of the novel fabrication method, in that a CAD/CAM-fabricated machinable ceramic is bonded to a CAD/CAM-fabricated zirconia framework using a resin cement.

  15. Amalgam use and waste management by Pakistani dentists: an environmental perspective.

    PubMed

    Mumtaz, R; Ali Khan, A; Noor, N; Humayun, S

    2010-03-01

    To assess amalgam use and waste management protocols practised by Pakistani dentists, a cross-sectional study was made of 239 dentists in Islamabad and Rawalpindi, recruited by convenience and cluster sampling. Amalgam was the most frequently used restorative material, with the choice dictated by patients' financial constraints. While 90.4% of dentists perceived amalgam as a health risk, only 46.4% considered it an environmental hazard. The majority disposed of amalgam waste in the trash, down the sink or as hospital waste. Very few (5.9%) had an amalgam separator installed in their dental office. Amalgam waste management protocols and mercury recycling should be introduced in Pakistan.

  16. Impact of intracoronal dentin treatment prior to bleaching on bond strength of restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Zanconato-Carvalho, Erica Moreno; Bruniera, João Felipe; Faria, Natália Spadini de; Colucci, Vivian; Messias, Danielle Cristine

    2014-01-01

    Surface treatment of dentin before the bleaching procedure may affect its permeability and influence the bond strength of restorative materials. This study evaluated the influence of surface treatment before the bleaching on shear bond strength (SBT) of restorative materials to intracoronal dentin. Dentin slabs were subjected to surface treatment: no bleaching (control - CON), no surface treatment + bleaching (HP), 37% phosphoric acid + bleaching (PA) and Er:YAG laser + bleaching (L). After the bleaching procedure, specimens (n=10) were restored with: microhybrid composite resin (MH), flowable composite resin (F), and resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC). The shear test was carried out. ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05) showed significant difference for surface treatment and restorative materials (p<0.05). CON presented higher STB and was statistically different from HP (p<0.05). PA and L showed intermediate values and were statistically similar to CON and HP (p>0.05). STB for MH and F were higher than RMGIC (p<0.05), and did not differ from each other (p>0.05). The surface treatments with phosphoric acid and Er:YAG laser before the bleaching procedure provided shear bond strength at the same level of unbleached dentin and the composite resins presented superior bond strength to the intracoronal dentin.

  17. The Dental Amalgam Toxicity Fear: A Myth or Actuality

    PubMed Central

    Rathore, Monika; Singh, Archana; Pant, Vandana A.

    2012-01-01

    Amalgam has been used in dentistry since about 150 years and is still being used due to its low cost, ease of application, strength, durability, and bacteriostatic effect. When aesthetics is not a concern it can be used in individuals of all ages, in stress bearing areas, foundation for cast-metal and ceramic restorations and poor oral hygiene conditions. Besides all, it has other advantages like if placed under ideal conditions, it is more durable and long lasting and least technique sensitive of all restorative materials, but, concern has been raised that amalgam causes mercury toxicity. Mercury is found in the earth's crust and is ubiquitous in the environment, so even without amalgam restorations everyone is exposed to small but measurable amount of mercury in blood and urine. Dental amalgam restorations may raise these levels slightly, but this has no practical or clinical significance. The main exposure to mercury from dental amalgam occurs during placement or removal of restoration in the tooth. Once the reaction is complete less amount of mercury is released, and that is far below the current health standard. Though amalgam is capable of producing delayed hypersensitivity reactions in some individuals, if the recommended mercury hygiene procedures are followed the risks of adverse health effects could be minimized. For this review the electronic databases and PubMed were used as data sources and have been evaluated to produce the facts regarding amalgam's safety and toxicity. PMID:22778502

  18. The dental amalgam toxicity fear: a myth or actuality.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Monika; Singh, Archana; Pant, Vandana A

    2012-05-01

    Amalgam has been used in dentistry since about 150 years and is still being used due to its low cost, ease of application, strength, durability, and bacteriostatic effect. When aesthetics is not a concern it can be used in individuals of all ages, in stress bearing areas, foundation for cast-metal and ceramic restorations and poor oral hygiene conditions. Besides all, it has other advantages like if placed under ideal conditions, it is more durable and long lasting and least technique sensitive of all restorative materials, but, concern has been raised that amalgam causes mercury toxicity. Mercury is found in the earth's crust and is ubiquitous in the environment, so even without amalgam restorations everyone is exposed to small but measurable amount of mercury in blood and urine. Dental amalgam restorations may raise these levels slightly, but this has no practical or clinical significance. The main exposure to mercury from dental amalgam occurs during placement or removal of restoration in the tooth. Once the reaction is complete less amount of mercury is released, and that is far below the current health standard. Though amalgam is capable of producing delayed hypersensitivity reactions in some individuals, if the recommended mercury hygiene procedures are followed the risks of adverse health effects could be minimized. For this review the electronic databases and PubMed were used as data sources and have been evaluated to produce the facts regarding amalgam's safety and toxicity.

  19. Mechanical versus chemical retention for restoring complex restorations: what is the evidence?

    PubMed

    Vaught, Randall L

    2007-10-01

    This article reports the findings from a study conducted to answer this research question: can adhesive resin liners provide retention that is the same as dentinal pins or pots and slots when restoring complex amalgam restorations? The study methodology consisted of two components: a review of the literature and a survey to assess methods and materials that general practitioners use in their clinical practice for restoring complex amalgam restorations. Even though a vast majority of the general practitioners surveyed reported using dentinal pins or pots and slots, the occurrence or frequency of use was under 50 percent. It was also reported from the survey that over half the respondents are using adhesive resin liners exclusively when restoring complex restorations. New and improved materials allow general practitioners to restore complex restorations without the risks associated with the placement of pins or pots and slots. A review of the available literature indicates that adhesive resin liners may be used as an alternative or adjunct to mechanical retention. Because of the improvements of bonding strength of adhesive resin liners, dentinal pins and pots and slots should not be the only methods considered when faculty assist students in the development of treatment plans for patients who need complex amalgam restorations.

  20. Challenges to the clinical placement and evaluation of adhesively-bonded, cervical composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Shisei; Yokota, Hiroaki; Yokota, Haruka; Hayashi, Yoshihiko

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of non-carious cervical lesions (NCCLs) has been increasing. The clinical performance of resin composites in NCCLS was previously unsatisfactory due to their non-retentive forms and margins lying on dentin. In order to address this problem, a lot of effort has been put into developing new dentin adhesives and restorative techniques. This article discusses these challenges and the criteria used for evaluating clinical performance as they relate to clinical studies, especially long-term clinical trials. Polymerization contraction, thermal changes and occlusal forces generate debonding stresses at adhesive interfaces. In laboratory studies, we have investigated how these stresses can be relieved by various restorative techniques and how bond strength and durability can be enhanced. Lesion forms, restorative techniques, adhesives (adhesive strategies, bond strengths, bond durability, and the relationship between enamel and dentin bond strengths) were found to have a complex relationship with microleakage. With regard to some restorative techniques, only several short-term clinical studies were available. Although in laboratory tests marginal sealing improved with a low-viscosity resin liner, an enamel bevel or prior enamel etching with phosphoric acid, clinical studies failed to detect significant effects associated with these techniques. Long-term clinical trials demonstrated that adhesive bonds continuously degraded in various ways, regardless of the adhesion strategy used. Early loss of restoration may no longer be the main clinical problem when reliable adhesives are properly used. Marginal discoloration increased over time and may become a more prominent reason for repair or replacement. Reliable and standardized criteria for the clinical evaluation of marginal discoloration should be established as soon as possible and they should be based on evidence and a policy of minimal intervention. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by

  1. Dental amalgam: A review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Eggleston, D.W.

    1989-09-01

    Since the 1800s, dental amalgam has been the most commonly used dental restorative material. Each year, dentistry in the United States uses over 100 tons of mercury, continuing a controversy regarding mercury's safety for patients and dental personnel. 65 references.

  2. Shear Bond Strength of Repair Systems to New CAD/CAM Restorative Materials.

    PubMed

    Üstün, Özlem; Büyükhatipoğlu, Işıl Keçik; Seçilmiş, Aslı

    2016-11-23

    To evaluate the bond strength of repair systems (Ceramic Repair, Clearfil Repair) to computer-aided design/computer-assisted machining (CAD/CAM) restorative materials (IPS e.max CAD, Vita Suprinity, Vita Enamic, Lava Ultimate). Thermally aged CAD/CAM restorative material specimens (5000 cycles between 5°C and 55°C) were randomly divided into two groups according to the repair system: Ceramic Repair (37% phosphoric acid + Monobond-S + Heliobond + Tetric N Ceram) or Clearfil Repair (40% phosphoric acid + mixture of Clearfil Porcelain Bond Activator and Clearfil SE Bond Primer + Clearfil SE Bond + Filtek Z250). The resin composite was light-cured on conditioned specimens. All specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours and then additionally aged for 5000 thermal cycles. The shear bond strength test was performed using a universal testing machine (0.5 mm/min). Two-way ANOVA was used to detect significance differences according to the CAD/CAM material and composite repair system factors. Subgroup analyses were conducted using the least significant difference post-hoc test. The results of two-way ANOVA indicated that bond strength values varied according to the restorative materials (p < 0.05). No significant differences were observed between the CAD/CAM restorative materials (p > 0.05), except in the Vita Suprinity group (p < 0.05). Moreover, no differences were observed between the repair systems. Both the Clearfil and Ceramic repair systems used in the study allow for successful repairs. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  3. Orofacial granulomatosis related to amalgam fillings.

    PubMed

    Ellison, R; Green, C; Gibson, J; Ghaffar, S

    2013-11-01

    This paper reports on a case of Orofacial Granulomatosis (OFG) in which the presence of amalgam fillings appears to have played a part in the aetiology. Once these restorations were removed and replaced with an alternative composite restorative material, all symptoms and signs of OFG resolved completely. This case highlights the necessity to include dental metals in the patch test battery when performing delayed patch testing on patients with OFG.

  4. Contemporary adhesives: marginal adaptation and microtensile bond strength of class II composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Rena; Nikaido, Toru; Tagami, Junji; Hickel, Reinhard; Kunzelmann, Karl-Heinz

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate the marginal adaptation (in terms of % continuous margin) and microtensile bond strength (microTBS) of the enamel and dentin of direct class II composite restorations. 32 standardized class II cavities were prepared with the gingival margin of one box occlusal to the cementum-enamel junction (CEJ) and one gingival floor extended beyond the CEJ. The teeth (n= 8) were restored using one of four adhesive systems [Adper Scotchbond Multi Purpose (SMPP), Adper Scotchbond 1 XT (S1XT), Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB), or Clearfil Tri-S Bond (CTSB)] with incrementally placed composite restorations before being stored in water (24 hours), thermocycled (2,000 cycles, 5 to 55 degrees C) and mechanically loaded (50,000 cycles, 50 N). Marginal adaptation was evaluated by SEM. Additionally, the teeth were sectioned and trimmed to obtain specimens for microTBS testing. All adhesive systems exhibited "continuous margins" in enamel over 95.4%, whereas "continuous margins" in dentin ranged from 60.2 to 84.8%. CSEB and CTSB yielded significantly more "continuous margins" between the adhesive restoration and dentin than SMPP or S1XT (P< 0.05). The mean microTBSs (MPa) for enamel were 40.5 (SMPP), 37.3 (S1XT), 30.8 (CSEB) and 23.2 (CTSB), and for dentin, they were 37.7 (SMPP), 33.0 (S1XT), 37.3 (CSEB) and 29.0 (CTSB).

  5. Bonding of flowable resin composite restorations to class 1 occlusal cavities with and without cyclic load stress.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Takatoshi; Maseki, Toshio; Nara, Yoichiro

    2016-01-01

    To examine the bonding of flowable resin composite restorations (F-restoration) to class 1 occlusal cavities with and without cyclic load stress, compared with that of a universal resin composite restoration (U-restoration). Two flowable composites and one universal composite (control) were applied with an adhesive system to 42 standardized class 1 occlusal cavities. The restored specimens were subjected to cyclic load stress and no stress modes. The microtensile bond strength (μ-TBS) of the dentin floor was measured. The U-restoration did not show pretesting failure. The F-restorations exhibited pretesting failure, regardless of the stress mode. The μ-TBS was not significantly different among the three restorations, regardless of the stress mode. The cyclic load stress did not influence the μ-TBS of the F-restorations; however, it significantly reduced μ-TBS in the U-restoration. The bonding reliability of the F-restorations was inferior to that of the U-restoration, for both stress modes.

  6. Electrical activity in dental amalgam of submerged divers during welding.

    PubMed

    Ortendahl, T W; Holland, R I

    1987-10-01

    Divers performing underwater manual metal arc welding/cutting (UMMA) have complained about a metallic taste phenomenon. In several dives with voluntary leakage in their diving suits, potential alterations in dental amalgam were registered when they performed UMMA. Polarization resistance values were obtained for the test amalgam cylinders used and the diver's dental restorations. These values, along with the recorded potential values of the amalgam test cylinders and of the diver's dental restorations, enabled us to calculate the depolarizing current, using the law of Ohm. The current depolarizing the amalgam test cylinder did not differ significantly from the mean intermetallic currents between the dental restorations. The clinical effect of intraoral currents when performing UMMA welding should be regarded as small, whereas considerably higher currents should not be ruled out in an intense cutting situation.

  7. A comparison of fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with bonded partial restorations and full-coverage porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Abhishek; Musani, Smita; Dugal, Ramandeep; Jain, Nikhil; Railkar, Bhargavi; Mootha, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of bonded partial restorations compared with full-coverage porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) crowns as a viable treatment option for endodontically treated posterior teeth. Forty-five recently extracted maxillary first premolars were collected, endodontically treated, and mounted in acrylic blocks. The specimens were randomly divided into three groups and prepared to receive their respective restorations. The teeth in group 1 received full-coverage porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns. The teeth in group 2 received bonded partial restorations made from pressed ceramics (lithium disilicate) involving a functional cusp (palatal). Finally, group 3 received bonded partial restorations made from pressed ceramics involving the buccal cusp and keeping a functional cusp (palatal) intact. All group 1 restorations were cemented using glass ionomer cement. Restorations in groups 2 and 3 were bonded using a dual-cured resin cement. All specimens were subjected to an aging process and tested for shear bond strength using a universal loading machine. The mean force applied in Newtons to cause failure for group I was 674.90 ± 94.16 N, for group 2, 463.46 ± 61.11 N, and for group 3, 849.33 ± 68.92 N. P values obtained using one-way analysis of variance showed a highly significant difference between groups 2 and 3 (P = .001), groups 1 and 2 (P = .001), and groups 1 and 3 (P = .001). The fracture modes observed in all groups involved restorations and tooth fracture. This in vitro study suggests that endodontically treated posterior teeth with intact functional cusps can be restored with bonded partial porcelain restorations. However, if the loss of tooth structure involves the functional cusp, full-coverage PFM crowns are the treatment of choice.

  8. Crevice corrosion products of dental amalgam

    SciTech Connect

    Sutow, E.J.; Jones, D.W.; Hall, G.C.; Owen, C.G. )

    1991-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the in vitro corrosion products that resulted from crevice corrosion of low- and high-copper dental amalgams. Specimens were potentiostatically polarized in a chloride-containing electrolyte while set against a PTFE surface to form a crevice. After 16 h, corrosion products were examined by light microscopy, SEM, EDS, and XRD. Analysis showed the presence of three previously reported products (Sn4(OH)6Cl2, SnO, and Cu2O) and a new product, CuCl, which formed on high-copper, {gamma} 2-free amalgams. Thermodynamic considerations show that CuCl is stable for the reported in vivo potentials of amalgam restorations and the high acidity and high chloride ion concentration associated with crevice corrosion.

  9. DESENSITIZING BIOACTIVE AGENTS IMPROVES BOND STRENGTH OF INDIRECT RESIN-CEMENTED RESTORATIONS: PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    PubMed Central

    Pires-De-Souza, Fernanda de Carvalho Panzeri; de Marco, Fabíola Fiorezi; Casemiro, Luciana Assirati; Panzeri, Heitor

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the bond strength of indirect composite restorations cemented with a resin-based cement associated with etch-and-rinse and self-etching primer adhesive systems to dentin treated or not with a bioactive material. Materials and Method: Twenty bovine incisor crowns had the buccal enamel removed and the dentin ground flat. The teeth were assigned to 4 groups (n=5): Group I: acid etching + Prime & Bond NT (Dentsply); Group II: application of a bioactive glass (Biosilicato®)+ acid etching + Prime & Bond NT; Group III: One-up Bond F (J Morita); Group IV: Biosilicato® + One-up Bond F. Indirect composite resin (Artglass, Kulzer) cylinders (6x10mm) were fabricated and cemented to the teeth with a dualcure resin-based cement (Enforce, Dentsply). After cementation, the specimens were stored in artificial saliva at 37oC for 30 days and thereafter tested in tensile strength in a universal testing machine (EMIC) with 50 kgf load cell at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Failure modes were assessed under scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test (95% level of confidence). Results: Groups I, II and III had statistically similar results (p>0.05). Group IV had statistically significant higher bond strength means (p<0.05) than the other groups. The analysis of the debonded surfaces showed a predominance of adhesive failure mode for Group III and mixed failure mode for the other groups. Conclusion: The use of desensitizing agent did not affect negatively the bonding of the indirect composite restorations to dentin, independently of the tested adhesive systems. PMID:19089114

  10. Interaction of peroxides with amalgam: a case report.

    PubMed

    Deliperi, Simone

    2007-01-01

    Nightguard vital bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide was shown to have some minor effects on certain brands of amalgam mainly related to mercury release. However, in this case report, amalgam staining of the bleaching tray was detected in correspondence of the left and right first upper molars following tooth whitening for a week. These teeth presented mesio occlusal distal amalgam fillings with superficial chipping at the cavosurface margins. The same phenomena did not occur in the mouth with other amalgam intracoronal restorations not showing marginal defects. No decay or discoloration was noted around the amalgam fillings both in the upper and lower teeth. At the 1-week recall visit, patient was recommended to avoid the bleaching gel application in the maxillary first molar teeth. The existing fillings were replaced with composite resin restorations after a 2-week elapse time. The unusual amalgam staining of the bleaching tray suggests that amalgam restorations with defective cavosurface margins should be monitored during the tooth whitening therapy. Alternatively, their replacement should be considered prior to bleaching.

  11. Use of resin-bonded partial coverage ceramic restorations to treat incomplete fractures in posterior teeth: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Liebenberg, W H

    1996-11-01

    The objective of restorative treatment of teeth with incomplete fractures is to minimize flexure of the compromised cusps to prevent propagation of the crack. These goals can be addressed with resin-bonded posterior ceramic restorations, but long-term integrity rests on the efficiency of the restoration's bond to the dental hard tissues. Success is dependent on diligent operative performance throughout the entire procedure. Some tips for achieving successful preparation, provisionalization, and partial-coverage restoration of the incompletely fractured posterior tooth are discussed.

  12. Maternal-fetal distribution of mercury ( sup 203 Hg) released from dental amalgam fillings

    SciTech Connect

    Vimy, M.J.; Takahashi, Y.; Lorscheider, F.L. )

    1990-04-01

    In humans, the continuous release of Hg vapor from dental amalgam tooth restorations is markedly increased for prolonged periods after chewing. The present study establishes a time-course distribution for amalgam Hg in body tissues of adult and fetal sheep. Under general anesthesia, five pregnant ewes had twelve occlusal amalgam fillings containing radioactive 203Hg placed in teeth at 112 days gestation. Blood, amniotic fluid, feces, and urine specimens were collected at 1- to 3-day intervals for 16 days. From days 16-140 after amalgam placement (16-41 days for fetal lambs), tissue specimens were analyzed for radioactivity, and total Hg concentrations were calculated. Results demonstrate that Hg from dental amalgam will appear in maternal and fetal blood and amniotic fluid within 2 days after placement of amalgam tooth restorations. Excretion of some of this Hg will also commence within 2 days. All tissues examined displayed Hg accumulation. Highest concentrations of Hg from amalgam in the adult occurred in kidney and liver, whereas in the fetus the highest amalgam Hg concentrations appeared in liver and pituitary gland. The placenta progressively concentrated Hg as gestation advanced to term, and milk concentration of amalgam Hg postpartum provides a potential source of Hg exposure to the newborn. It is concluded that accumulation of amalgam Hg progresses in maternal and fetal tissues to a steady state with advancing gestation and is maintained. Dental amalgam usage as a tooth restorative material in pregnant women and children should be reconsidered.

  13. Influence of eugenol-containing temporary restorations on bond strength of composite to dentin.

    PubMed

    Yap, A U; Shah, K C; Loh, E T; Sim, S S; Tan, C C

    2001-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of eugenol-containing temporary restorations on bond strength of composite to dentin. Thirty-two freshly extracted human molars were embedded and horizontally sectioned at a level 2 mm from the central fossa to obtain a flat dentin surface. The teeth were randomly divided into four groups of eight teeth. Specimens in Group 1 (control) received no pre-treatment with any temporary restorations. Group 2 and 3 specimens were covered with IRM (eugenol-containing) mixed at powder: liquid (P:L) ratio of 10 g: 1 g and 10 g: 2 g, respectively. Specimens in Group 4 were covered with polycarboxylate cement (eugenol-free) mixed at a P:L ratio of 2.85 g: 1 g. The temporary restorations were mechanically removed with an ultrasonic scaler after one-week storage in distilled water at 37 degrees C. The dentin surfaces were cleaned with pumice-water slurry and treated with Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus bonding system according to manufacturer's instructions. Composite (Z100) columns (3 mm diameter, 2 mm high) were applied and shear bond testing was carried out after 24 hours storage in distilled water at 37 degrees C using an Instron Universal testing machine with a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/minute. The mode of failure was examined using a stereomicroscope at X40 magnification. Results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA/Scheffes's post-hoc test at significance level 0.05. Ranking of bond strengths was as follows: Group 1 (22.58 MPa) > Group 2 (21.14 MPa) > Group 4 (15.35 MPa) > Group 3 (13.02 MPa). Group 3 had significantly lower bond strength than Groups 1 and 2. No significant difference in dentin bond strength was observed between the Group 1 (control) and Groups 2 and 4. Although the predominant mode of failure for Groups 1, 2 and 4 was cohesive in dentin, all specimens in Group 3 exhibited adhesive failure. Pre-treatment with polycarboxylate cement or IRM mixed at P:L ratio of 10 g: 1 g did not affect shear bond strength of composite to

  14. 43 CFR 3215.12 - What will BLM do if I do not restore the face amount or file a new bond?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... face amount or file a new bond? 3215.12 Section 3215.12 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to... restore the face amount or file a new bond? If we collect against your bond and you do not restore it to the original face amount, we may shut in any well(s) or utilization facilities covered by that bond...

  15. 43 CFR 3215.12 - What will BLM do if I do not restore the face amount or file a new bond?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... face amount or file a new bond? 3215.12 Section 3215.12 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to... restore the face amount or file a new bond? If we collect against your bond and you do not restore it to the original face amount, we may shut in any well(s) or utilization facilities covered by that bond...

  16. 43 CFR 3215.12 - What will BLM do if I do not restore the face amount or file a new bond?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... face amount or file a new bond? 3215.12 Section 3215.12 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to... restore the face amount or file a new bond? If we collect against your bond and you do not restore it to the original face amount, we may shut in any well(s) or utilization facilities covered by that bond...

  17. 43 CFR 3215.12 - What will BLM do if I do not restore the face amount or file a new bond?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... face amount or file a new bond? 3215.12 Section 3215.12 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to... restore the face amount or file a new bond? If we collect against your bond and you do not restore it to the original face amount, we may shut in any well(s) or utilization facilities covered by that bond...

  18. A resin alternative for posterior teeth: questions and answers on dental amalgam.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Michael J

    2003-06-01

    Amalgam has been used to restore cavities in posterior teeth for over 100 years, but formulations used today are different from those used a century ago. Amalgam restorations have been blamed for a number of problems, such as cusp fracture and higher rates of secondary caries. This article discusses these issues, along with possible toxic effects, in the light of current literature.

  19. Evaluation of Bond Strength, Marginal Integrity, and Fracture Strength of Bulk- vs Incrementally-filled Restorations.

    PubMed

    de Assis, Fernanda Silva; Lima, Suellen Nogueira Linares; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Bhandi, Shilpa H; Pinto, Shelon Cristina Souza; Malaquias, Pamela; Loguercio, Alessandro D; Bandéca, Matheus Coelho

    This study evaluated the effect of application technique and preparation size on the fracture strength (FS), microtensile bond strength (μTBS) and marginal integrity (MI) of direct resin composite restorations. Conservative (5 × 2 × 2 mm) or extended (5 × 4 × 2 mm) preparations below the cementoenamel junction were performed in 140 human maxillary premolars (n = 70 per group). After adhesive application (XP Bond), half of each group was restored with the bulk technique (one 4-mm increment of Surefill SDR Flow plus one 1-mm horizontal capping layer of TPH3 [Spectrum TPH3 resin composite]) and half incrementally (TPH3 in three horizontal incremental layers, 1.5 to 2 mm each), all using a metal matrix band. After storage (24 h at 37°C), the proximal surfaces of each tooth were polished with Sof-Lex disks. For FS measurement, 60 restorations were mounted in a universal testing machine and subjected to a compressive axial load applied parallel to the long axis of the tooth, running at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. For μTBS testing, 40 teeth were longitudinally sectioned to obtain resin-dentin bonded sticks from the cavity floor (bonded area: 0.8 mm2). Specimens were tested in tension at 0.5 mm/min. The external marginal integrity of both proximal surfaces was analyzed using SEM of epoxy resin replicas. The μTBS, marginal integrity, and fracture resistance data were subjected to two-way ANOVA, and Tukey's post-hoc test was used for pair-wise comparisons (a = 0.05). Fracture resistance, microtensile bond strength, and marginal integrity values were not statistically significantly affected by application technique or preparation size (p = 0.71, p = 0.82, and p = 0.77, respectively). The use of a bulk-fill flowable composite associated with a conventional resin composite as a final capping layer did not jeopardize the fracture strength, bond strength to dentin, or marginal integrity of posterior restorations.

  20. Advancing Discontinuous Fiber-Reinforced Composites above Critical Length for Replacing Current Dental Composites and Amalgam

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Richard C.

    2017-01-01

    breakage is expected from greater interlaminar shearing as the PFC accentuates straining deflections compared to amalgam at the higher modulus tooth enamel margins during loading. Preliminary testing for experimental FRCs with fibers above Lc demonstrated three-body wear even less than enamel to reduce the possibility of marginal ditching as a factor in secondary caries seen with both PFCs and amalgam. Further, FRC molding compounds with chopped fibers above Lc properly impregnated with photocure resin can pack with condensing forces higher than the amalgam to eliminate voids in the proximal box commonly seen with dental PFCs and reestablish interproximal contacts better than amalgam. Subsequent higher FRC packing forces can aid in squeezing monomer, resin, particulate and nanofibers deeper into adhesive mechanical bond retention sites and then leave a higher concentration of insoluble fibers and particulate as moisture barriers at the cavity margins. Also, FRC molding compounds can incorporate triclosan antimicrobial and maintain a strong packing condensing force that cannot be accomplished with PFCs which form a sticky gluey consistency with triclosan. In addition, large FRC packing forces allow higher concentrations of the hydrophobic ethoxylated bis phenol A dimethacrylate (BisEMA) low-viscosity oligomer resin that reduces water sorption and solubility to then still maintain excellent consistency. Therefore, photocure molding compounds with fibers above Lc appear to have many exceptional properties and design capabilities as improved alternatives for replacing both PFCs and amalgam alloys in restorative dental care. PMID:28691101

  1. Fatigue load of teeth restored with bonded direct composite and indirect ceramic inlays in MOD class II cavity preparations.

    PubMed

    Shor, Alexander; Nicholls, Jack I; Phillips, Keith M; Libman, Warren J

    2003-01-01

    This study compared the fatigue life of human maxillary premolars restored with direct composites and indirect ceramic inlays in mesio-occlusodistal (MOD) cavities. Ten human maxillary premolars were divided into two groups of five and restored with (1) direct composite restorations, or (2) pressed ceramic restorations. Standardized MOD cavities were prepared for both groups. Teeth in the direct composite group were restored with Z250 composite and Single Bond adhesive, and those in the ceramic group were restored with IPS Empress ceramic inlays. The ceramic inlays were luted with Single Bond and RelyX ARC cement. Under the applied test load of 11.17 kg, strain measurements were recorded from an electric resistance stain gauge bonded to the buccal surface. These strains were recorded for the (1) intact tooth, (2) cavity preparation, and (3) restored tooth. These strain measurements were used to calculate the relative tooth compliance values for each tooth. The fatigue loading was applied until reinforcement loss was registered by the strain gauge. A one-way ANOVA showed no significant compliance difference between the intact and restored tooth conditions, and no significant difference in fatigue cycles to failure between the two groups. There were both adhesive and cohesive failures in both restoration groups, indicating that the adhesive joint is not the only weak link in these restorations.

  2. The use of dental amalgam in pediatric dentistry: review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Osborne, J W; Summitt, J B; Roberts, H W

    2002-01-01

    Dental amalgam is widely used as a restorative material even though it is not esthetic and there has been extensive anti-amalgam rhetoric. Although other materials have improved greatly, amalgam has the proven safety record and best cost-to-benefit ratio. Clinical evidence indicates that, in the posterior permanent dentition--where esthetics is not a primary concern--the small, minimally prepared, amalgam restoration, with its margins and any caries-susceptible fissures sealed with resin fissure sealant, is the restoration with the best survival. Amalgam also remains the best direct restorative option when larger restorations are required. In the primary dentition, the data indicates that resin-based composite and resin-modified glass-ionomer serve very well.

  3. Resin-bonded restorations: a strategy for managing anterior tooth loss in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Zitzmann, Nicola U; Özcan, Mutlu; Scherrer, Susanne S; Bühler, Julia M; Weiger, Roland; Krastl, Gabriel

    2015-04-01

    In children or adolescents with anterior tooth loss, space closure with the patient's own teeth should be considered as the first choice to avoid lifelong restorative needs. Thorough diagnostics and treatment planning are required when autotransplantation or orthodontic space closure is considered. If these options are not indicated and a single tooth implant restoration is considered, implant placement should be postponed until adulthood, particularly in young women and in patients with hyperdivergent skeletal growth pattern. A ceramic resin-bonded fixed dental prosthesis with 1 retainer is an excellent treatment solution for the interim period; it may also serve as a long-term restoration, providing that sound enamel structure is present, sufficient framework dimensions have been provided, adhesive cementation techniques have been meticulously applied, and functional contacts of the cantilever pontic avoided. In contrast, a resin-bonded fixed dental prosthesis with a metal framework and retentive preparation is indicated if the palatal enamel structure is compromised, interocclusal clearance is limited, splinting (such as after orthodontic treatment) is required, or more than 1 tooth has to be replaced. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Shear bond strengths of resin-modified glass-ionomer restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Swift, E J; Pawlus, M A; Vargas, M A

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of resin-modified glass-ionomer restorative materials to dentin. The materials tested were Fuji II LC, Geristore, Photac-Fil, VariGlass VLC, and Vitremer. Ketac-Fil, a conventional glass ionomer, was used as the control. The occlusal surfaces of 60 extracted molars were ground flat in dentin using 600-grit silicon carbide abrasive paper. Dentin surfaces were treated according to manufacturers' instructions, and restorative materials were applied using gelatin capsule matrices. Shear bond strengths were determined after the specimens were thermocycled 500 times. Mean bond strengths of the resin-modified glass ionomers ranged from 1.4 MPa (Photac-Fil) to 12.3 MPa (Fuji II LC). Except for Photac-Fil, all values were significantly higher than the control. Pairwise comparisons between the means for Fuji II LC and Vitremer, Vitremer and Geristore, and Geristore and VariGlass were not significantly different.

  5. [The influence of different opaque thickness on the bond strength of porcelain-fused-to metal restoration].

    PubMed

    Xu, Kan; He, Fan; Geng, Yi

    2009-12-01

    To study the influence of different opaque thickness on the bond strength of porcelain-fused-to metal (PFM) restorations. The testing sheets were made as the samples of ISO9693. With different sintering temperature and different opaque thickness on the bond strength of PFM restorations, the primary pressure of porcelain crack was measured by using three-points-bending test. Statistical analysis was carried out using a SPSS 10.0 software package. A post hoc multiple comparison test (Student-Newman-Keuls) was performed to evaluate the differences between the individual groups. In low sintering temperature group, the thin layer of opaque significantly improved the bond strength compared with thick layer of opaque (P<0.05). In high sintering temperature group, the thickness of opaque has no significant influence on the PFM bonding strength. Using the opaque, the bonding strength was better than those without opaque. The thickness of opaque has a little influence on the PFM bonding strength.

  6. Effect of two abrasive systems on resin bonding to laboratory-processed indirect resin composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Bouschlicher, M R; Cobb, D S; Vargas, M A

    1999-01-01

    This study compared two methods of surface roughening or preparation, with or without the use of proprietary surface wetting agents, to evaluate their effect on resin cement adhesion to the following laboratory-processed, indirect restorations: Artglass (AG), belleGlass HP (BG), Concept (C), and Targis (T). Methods of surface roughening or preparation included microetching with aluminum oxide (AO): 50 microns at 34 psi and silanized silica coating, CoJet-Sand (CJ): 30 microns at 34 psi. Artglass and Concept were tested with and without the use of their respective surface wetting agents: Artglass Liquid (AGL) and Special Bond II (SB). One hundred twenty specimens, each consisting of a pair of cylinders (7.0 x 3 mm and 4.3 x 3 mm) were fabricated. The larger cylinder or base was embedded in self-curing resin in a phenolic ring, and bonding surfaces were finished with 320-grit silicon carbide paper. Specimen pairs for each restorative material were randomly assigned to treatment groups (n = 10) and received the following surface treatments prior to cementation: group 1 (AG/AO/+AGL), group 2 (AG/AO/-AGL), group 3 (AG/CJ/+AGL), group 4 (AG/CJ/-AGL), group 5 (BG/AO), group 6 (BG/CJ), group 7 (C/AO/+SB), group 8 (C/AO/-SB), group 9 (C/CJ/+SB), group 10 (C/CJ/-SB), group 11 (T/AO), and group 12 (T/CJ). Specimen pairs were cemented with a dual-cure resin cement (Dual) and a standardized force of 1 MPa. Specimens were light-cured 40 seconds per side (80 s total), then thermocycled 300 times at between 5 degrees and 55 degrees C. Shear bond strengths (MPa) were determined using a Zwick Materials Testing Machine at a crosshead speed of 5 mm per minute. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncan's multiple range test (alpha = 0.05) by restoration type indicated no significant differences in shear bond strength between BG group 5 (29.8 +/- 5.8), BG group 6 (28.3 +/- 4.3), T group 11 (29.3 +/- 4.9), and T group 12 (29.0 +/- 4.4). Shear bond strength in AG group 3 (35.9 +/- 3

  7. Shear bond strength of bulk-fill and nano-restorative materials to dentin.

    PubMed

    Colak, Hakan; Ercan, Ertugrul; Hamidi, Mehmet Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Bulk-fill composite materials are being developed for preparation depths of up to 4 mm in an effort to simplify and improve the placement of direct composite posterior restorations. The aim of our study was to compare shear-bond strength of bulk-fill and conventional posterior composite resins. In this study, 60 caries free extracted human molars were used and sectioned parallel to occlusal surface to expose midcoronal dentin. The specimens were randomly divided into four groups. Total-etch dentine bonding system (Adper Scotchbond 1XT, 3M ESPE) was applied to dentin surface in all the groups to reduce variability in results. Then, dentine surfaces covered by following materials. Group I: SonicFill Bulk-Fill, Group II: Tetric EvoCeram (TBF), Group III: Herculite XRV Ultra, and Group IV: TBF Bulk-Fill, 2 mm × 3 mm cylindrical restorations were prepared by using application apparatus. Shear bond testing was measured by using a universal testing machine. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests were performed to evaluate the data. The highest value was observed in Group III (14.42 ± 4.34) and the lowest value was observed in Group IV (11.16 ± 2.76) and there is a statistically significant difference between these groups (P = 0.046). However, there is no statistically significant difference between the values of other groups. In this study, Group III was showed higher strength values. There is a need for future studies about long-term bond strength and clinical success of these adhesive and bulk-fill systems.

  8. Shear bond strength of bulk-fill and nano-restorative materials to dentin

    PubMed Central

    Colak, Hakan; Ercan, Ertugrul; Hamidi, Mehmet Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Bulk-fill composite materials are being developed for preparation depths of up to 4 mm in an effort to simplify and improve the placement of direct composite posterior restorations. The aim of our study was to compare shear-bond strength of bulk-fill and conventional posterior composite resins. Materials and Methods: In this study, 60 caries free extracted human molars were used and sectioned parallel to occlusal surface to expose midcoronal dentin. The specimens were randomly divided into four groups. Total-etch dentine bonding system (Adper Scotchbond 1XT, 3M ESPE) was applied to dentin surface in all the groups to reduce variability in results. Then, dentine surfaces covered by following materials. Group I: SonicFill Bulk-Fill, Group II: Tetric EvoCeram (TBF), Group III: Herculite XRV Ultra, and Group IV: TBF Bulk-Fill, 2 mm × 3 mm cylindrical restorations were prepared by using application apparatus. Shear bond testing was measured by using a universal testing machine. Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney U-tests were performed to evaluate the data. Results: The highest value was observed in Group III (14.42 ± 4.34) and the lowest value was observed in Group IV (11.16 ± 2.76) and there is a statistically significant difference between these groups (P = 0.046). However, there is no statistically significant difference between the values of other groups. In this study, Group III was showed higher strength values. Conclusion: There is a need for future studies about long-term bond strength and clinical success of these adhesive and bulk-fill systems. PMID:27011738

  9. Bond and fracture strength of metal-ceramic restorations formed by selective laser sintering

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Eun-Jeong; Kim, Woong-Chul; Kim, Hae-Young

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to compare the fracture strength of the metal and the bond strength in metal-ceramic restorations produced by selective laser sintering (SLS) and by conventional casting (CAST). MATERIALS AND METHODS Non-precious alloy (StarLoy C, DeguDent, Hanau, Germany) was used in CAST group and metal powder (SP2, EOS GmbH, Munich, Germany) in SLS group. Metal specimens in the form of sheets (25.0 × 3.0 × 0.5 mm) were produced in accordance with ISO 9693:1999 standards (n=30). To measure the bond strength, ceramic was fired on a metal specimen and then three-point bending test was performed. In addition, the metal fracture strength was measured by continuing the application of the load. The values were statistically analyzed by performing independent t-tests (α=.05). RESULTS The mean bond strength of the SLS group (50.60 MPa) was higher than that of the CAST group (46.29 MPa), but there was no statistically significant difference. The metal fracture strength of the SLS group (1087.2 MPa) was lower than that of the CAST group (2399.1 MPa), and this difference was statistically significant. CONCLUSION In conclusion the balling phenomenon and the gap formation of the SLS process may increase the metal-ceramic bond strength. PMID:25177469

  10. Push-Out Bond Strength of Restorations with Bulk-Fill, Flow, and Conventional Resin Composites

    PubMed Central

    Caixeta, Rodrigo Vieira; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Kaneshima, Edmilson Nobumitu; Barbosa, Aline Silvestre; Picolotto, Cassiana Pedrotti; Lima, Ana Eliza de Souza; Gonini Júnior, Alcides; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strengths of composite restorations made with different filler amounts and resin composites that were photoactivated using a light-emitting diode (LED). Thirty bovine incisors were selected, and a conical cavity was prepared in the facial surface of each tooth. All preparations were etched with Scotchbond Etching Gel, the Adper Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus adhesive system was applied followed by photoactivation, and the cavities were filled with a single increment of Filtek Z350 XT, Filtek Z350 XT Flow, or bulk-fill X-tra fil resin composite (n = 10) followed by photoactivation. A push-out test to determine bond strength was conducted using a universal testing machine. Data (MPa) were submitted to Student's t-test at a 5% significance level. After the test, the fractured specimens were examined using an optical microscope under magnification (10x). Although all three composites demonstrated a high prevalence of adhesive failures, the bond strength values of the different resin composites photoactivated by LED showed that the X-tra fil resin composite had a lower bond strength than the Filtek Z350 XT and Filtek Z350 XT Flow resin composites. PMID:26457322

  11. Push-Out Bond Strength of Restorations with Bulk-Fill, Flow, and Conventional Resin Composites.

    PubMed

    Caixeta, Rodrigo Vieira; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Kaneshima, Edmilson Nobumitu; Barbosa, Aline Silvestre; Picolotto, Cassiana Pedrotti; Lima, Ana Eliza de Souza; Gonini Júnior, Alcides; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strengths of composite restorations made with different filler amounts and resin composites that were photoactivated using a light-emitting diode (LED). Thirty bovine incisors were selected, and a conical cavity was prepared in the facial surface of each tooth. All preparations were etched with Scotchbond Etching Gel, the Adper Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus adhesive system was applied followed by photoactivation, and the cavities were filled with a single increment of Filtek Z350 XT, Filtek Z350 XT Flow, or bulk-fill X-tra fil resin composite (n = 10) followed by photoactivation. A push-out test to determine bond strength was conducted using a universal testing machine. Data (MPa) were submitted to Student's t-test at a 5% significance level. After the test, the fractured specimens were examined using an optical microscope under magnification (10x). Although all three composites demonstrated a high prevalence of adhesive failures, the bond strength values of the different resin composites photoactivated by LED showed that the X-tra fil resin composite had a lower bond strength than the Filtek Z350 XT and Filtek Z350 XT Flow resin composites.

  12. Clinical performance of enamel-dentine bonded all-ceramic restorations: retrospective evaluation in a postgraduate clinic.

    PubMed

    Printzell, Lisa; Haseid, Carl Fredrik; Ekfeldt, Anders; Hjortsjö, Carl

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the clinical survival and success of five dif- ferent types of adhesive bonded all-ceramic restorations, in a postgraduate clinic. All ceramic enamel-dentin adhesive bonded restorations, either partial (n=94) or full coverage (n=145), were assessed by clinical examination using a modified Californian Dental Association (CDA) system for quality evaluation of dental care and a questionnaire assessing patient satis- faction (VAS) of 29 subjects with 239 restorations. The same 3-step adhesive bonding system in combination with dual-cured resin composite cement was used for all restorations Rubber dam was used for moisture control.The ceramics were evaluated with respect to patient satisfaction, esthetics, technical and biological complications. The reasons for treatment were mineralisation disorders (n=82), trauma (n=40), esthetic (n=57) and pathological tooth wear (n=60). Observation period for the restorations was up to 71 month (mean 33). All restorations were in place at the examinations (l00% survival rate). Number offractures and infractions were 28 and 20 respectively giving a 69% success rate. No significant difference was observed between full coverage and partial coverage restorations. Most of the fractures were small chippings of the veneering porcelain. From a biological point of view subgingival location of the restoration margin showed a significant correlation with bleeding on probing.The esthetic outcome seemed to depend on the ability of the selected veneering material to mask a severe tooth discoloration.The patients reported a high degree of satisfaction with both the esthetics and the function of their restorations. In conclusion all-ceramic enamel-dentin-bonded restorations demonstrated good short-term survival rate.The success rate was found to be lower. Both technical and biological complica- tions were present but mainly without any need of correction.The patients were in general very satisfied

  13. Clinical effectiveness of direct class II restorations - a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Heintze, Siegward D; Rousson, Valentin

    2012-08-01

    More than five hundred million direct dental restorations are placed each year worldwide. In about 55% of the cases, resin composites or compomers are used, and in 45% amalgam. The longevity of posterior resin restorations is well documented. However, data on resin composites that are placed without enamel/dentin conditioning and resin composites placed with self-etching adhesive systems are missing. The database SCOPUS was searched for clinical trials on posterior resin composites without restricting the search to the year of publication. The inclusion criteria were: (1) prospective clinical trial with at least 2 years of observation; (2) minimum number of restorations at last recall = 20; (3) report on dropout rate; (4) report of operative technique and materials used; (5) utilization of Ryge or modified Ryge evaluation criteria. For amalgam, only those studies were included that directly compared composite resin restorations with amalgam. For the statistical analysis, a linear mixed model was used with random effects to account for the heterogeneity between the studies. P-values under 0.05 were considered significant. Of the 373 clinical trials, 59 studies met the inclusion criteria. In 70% of the studies, Class II and Class I restorations had been placed. The overall success rate of composite resin restorations was about 90% after 10 years, which was not different from that of amalgam. Restorations with compomers had a significantly lower longevity. The main reason for replacement were bulk fractures and caries adjacent to restorations. Both of these incidents were infrequent in most studies and accounted only for about 6% of all replaced restorations after 10 years. Restorations with macrofilled composites and compomer suffered significantly more loss of anatomical form than restorations with other types of material. Restorations that were placed without enamel acid etching and a dentin bonding agent showed significantly more marginal staining and detectable

  14. Class II composite resin restorations with two polymerization techniques: relationship between microtensile bond strength and marginal leakage.

    PubMed

    Cenci, MaximilianoSérgio; Demarco, FlávioFernando; de Carvalho, RicardoMarins

    2005-08-01

    To determine the relationship between leakage and microtensile bond strength in the same specimen of direct Class II composite restorations performed with two polymerization techniques. Class II slot preparations were made in 40 non-carious human third molars and restored using Single Bond and P-60 (3M ESPE) according to the manufacturer's indications. Half of the preparations had the cervical margin in enamel and half in dentin. Teeth were incrementally restored either with direct polymerization from occlusal surface or with indirect polymerization through translucent matrices and reflective wedges. Teeth were isolated with nail varnish and immersed in fucsin for 24h. Subsequently, they were sectioned into slabs that were measured for leakage (mm), and trimmed to obtain hour-glass shaped specimens for microtensile bond test. Fractured specimens were examined under magnification (40 x) to evaluate the fracture mode. Data were analyzed with Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis (microleakage), two-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls tests (bond strength). The relationship between microleakage and microtensile bond strength were analyzed with Spearman's correlation test. There were no significant effects of polymerization technique and margin location on both leakage and bond strength (p>0.05). Bond strengths were higher in preparations with enamel margins than in preparations with dentin margins, when restored with indirect polymerization technique (p<0.05). No significant correlation was found between leakage and bond strength (p>0.05). Polymerization techniques had no influence on microleakage and bond strength of Class II composite restorations, and there was no relationship between these variables when evaluated in the same specimen.

  15. Amalgam tattoo: a cause of sinusitis?

    PubMed Central

    PARIZI, José Luiz Santos; NAI, Gisele Alborghetti

    2010-01-01

    Little attention has been paid to the toxicity of silver amalgam fillings, which have been used over the centuries in Dentistry. Amalgam particles may accidentally and/or traumatically be embedded into the submucosal tissue during placement of a restoration and perpetuate in such area. This article presents a case of amalgam tattoo and investigates whether it is related to the patient's repeated episodes of sinusitis. The patient was a 46-year-old woman with a 2 mm diameter radiopaque lesion in the right oral mucosa detected on a panoramic radiograph and presented as a black macula clinically. A complete surgical resection was carried out. The histopathological examination revealed deposits of dark-brownish pigments lining the submucosal tissue with adjacent lymphocytic inflammatory infiltrate and multinucleated giant cells phagocyting pigments. There was a negative staining for both iron and melanin. One year after lesion removal, the patient reported that the sinusitis crises had ceased after repeated episodes for years. It may be speculated that the inflammatory process related to amalgam tattoo seems to lead to a local immune response that causes sinusitis because it enhances the human leukocyte antigen DR (HLA-DR) tissue expression. PMID:20379688

  16. Amalgam tattoo: a cause of sinusitis?

    PubMed

    Parizi, José Luiz Santos; Nai, Gisele Alborghetti

    2010-01-01

    Little attention has been paid to the toxicity of silver amalgam fillings, which have been used over the centuries in Dentistry. Amalgam particles may accidentally and/or traumatically be embedded into the submucosal tissue during placement of a restoration and perpetuate in such area. This article presents a case of amalgam tattoo and investigates whether it is related to the patient's repeated episodes of sinusitis. The patient was a 46-year-old woman with a 2 mm diameter radiopaque lesion in the right oral mucosa detected on a panoramic radiograph and presented as a black macula clinically. A complete surgical resection was carried out. The histopathological examination revealed deposits of dark-brownish pigments lining the submucosal tissue with adjacent lymphocytic inflammatory infiltrate and multinucleated giant cells phagocyting pigments. There was a negative staining for both iron and melanin. One year after lesion removal, the patient reported that the sinusitis crises had ceased after repeated episodes for years. It may be speculated that the inflammatory process related to amalgam tattoo seems to lead to a local immune response that causes sinusitis because it enhances the human leukocyte antigen DR (HLA-DR) tissue expression.

  17. Dental amalgam: is this the end?

    PubMed

    Taut, Cristina

    Dental amalgam is a reliable and effective restorative material with a well-established role in modern dentistry. Throughout the years its mercury content and the risks posed to human health were main topics of interest for many scientists. This paper offers a review of the scientific literature on the health and environmental impact of mercury in dentistry published over the last decade. A variety of peer-reviewed, epidemiological and large-scale clinical studies on dental amalgam, as well as published reports of professional and governmental bodies, were organised thematically and analysed. The most relevant findings of the aforementioned literature are reported. No reliance has been placed on unpublished work or publicly available opinions that are not scientifically based. In order to offer an appropriate view on the topic the toxicology, health impacts and possible environmental threats are briefly presented in relation to the relevant literature published in the last ten years. It is almost unanimously accepted that dental amalgam is a safe material, with little or insignificant adverse effect on general health. However, current and mostly unfounded environmental concerns may result in the implementation of new across the board legislation that could lead to a global dental amalgam "phase out".

  18. Combination Effect of Hemostatic and Disinfecting Agents on Micro-leakage of Restorations Bonded with Different Bonding Systems

    PubMed Central

    H, Farhadpour; F, Sharafeddin; Sc, Akbarian; B, Azarian

    2016-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Hemostatic agents may affect the micro-leakage of different adhesive systems. Also, chlorhexidine has shown positive effects on micro-leakage. However, their interaction effect has not been reported yet. Objectives: To evaluate the effect of contamination with a hemostatic agent on micro-leakage of total- and self-etching adhesive systems and the effect of chlorhexidine application after the removal of the hemostatic agent. Materials and Methods: Standardized Class V cavity was prepared on each of the sixty caries free premolars at the cemento-enamel junction, with the occlusal margin located in enamel and the gingival margin in dentin. Then, the specimens were randomly divided into 6 groups (n = 10) according to hemostatic agent (H) contamination, chlorhexidine (CHX) application, and the type of adhesive systems (Adper Single Bond and Clearfil SE Bond) used. After filling the cavities with resin composite, the root apices were sealed with utility wax. Furthermore, all the surfaces, except for the restorations and 1mm from the margins, were covered with two layers of nail varnish. The teeth were immersed in a 0.5% basic fuschin dye for 24 hours, rinsed, blot-dried and sectioned longitudinally through the center of the restorations bucco- lingualy. The sections were examined using a stereomicroscope and the extension of dye penetration was analyzed according to a non-parametric scale from 0 to 3. Statistical analysis was performed using Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U-test. Results: While ASB group showed no micro-leakage in enamel, none of the groups showed complete elimination of micro-leakage from the dentin. Regarding micro-leakage at enamel, and dentin margins, there was no significant difference between groups 1 and 2, 1 and 3, and 2 and 3 (p > 0.05). A significantly lower micro-leakage at the enamel and dentin margins was observed in group 3, compared to group 6. No significant difference was observed between groups 4 and 5 in

  19. Combination Effect of Hemostatic and Disinfecting Agents on Micro-leakage of Restorations Bonded with Different Bonding Systems.

    PubMed

    H, Farhadpour; F, Sharafeddin; Sc, Akbarian; B, Azarian

    2016-09-01

    Hemostatic agents may affect the micro-leakage of different adhesive systems. Also, chlorhexidine has shown positive effects on micro-leakage. However, their interaction effect has not been reported yet. To evaluate the effect of contamination with a hemostatic agent on micro-leakage of total- and self-etching adhesive systems and the effect of chlorhexidine application after the removal of the hemostatic agent. Standardized Class V cavity was prepared on each of the sixty caries free premolars at the cemento-enamel junction, with the occlusal margin located in enamel and the gingival margin in dentin. Then, the specimens were randomly divided into 6 groups (n = 10) according to hemostatic agent (H) contamination, chlorhexidine (CHX) application, and the type of adhesive systems (Adper Single Bond and Clearfil SE Bond) used. After filling the cavities with resin composite, the root apices were sealed with utility wax. Furthermore, all the surfaces, except for the restorations and 1mm from the margins, were covered with two layers of nail varnish. The teeth were immersed in a 0.5% basic fuschin dye for 24 hours, rinsed, blot-dried and sectioned longitudinally through the center of the restorations bucco- lingualy. The sections were examined using a stereomicroscope and the extension of dye penetration was analyzed according to a non-parametric scale from 0 to 3. Statistical analysis was performed using Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U-test. While ASB group showed no micro-leakage in enamel, none of the groups showed complete elimination of micro-leakage from the dentin. Regarding micro-leakage at enamel, and dentin margins, there was no significant difference between groups 1 and 2, 1 and 3, and 2 and 3 (p > 0.05). A significantly lower micro-leakage at the enamel and dentin margins was observed in group 3, compared to group 6. No significant difference was observed between groups 4 and 5 in enamel (p = 0.35) and dentin (p = 0.34). Group 6 showed significantly

  20. Microtensile bond strength of different components of core veneered all-ceramic restorations.

    PubMed

    Aboushelib, Moustafa N; de Jager, Niek; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J; Feilzer, Albert J

    2005-10-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the core-veneer bond strength and the cohesive strength of the components of three commercial layered all-ceramic systems. Two surface treatments for the core surface finish and different veneering ceramics with different thermal expansion coefficients (TEC) were applied. The selected systems were two CAD-CAM ceramics; Cercon and Vita Mark II and one pressable system; (IPS)Empress 2 for layering technique. Standardized core specimens were fabricated according to the manufacturer's instructions, or polished with 1200 siliconcarbide polishing paper. The core specimens were veneered with either its manufacturer's veneer or an experimental veneer with higher TEC. The obtained micro-bars were subjected to the microtensile bond strength test. The obtained data were analyzed using one and two-way ANOVA. A finite element analysis (FEA) model of the test setup was analyzed. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was carried out at the fracture surface. The core materials were significantly stronger than the veneering materials and the layered core-veneer specimens of which the results were statistically comparable. Polishing the core surfaces did not have an effect on the core-veneer bond strength. Experimental veneer with higher TEC resulted in massive fractures in both the core and veneering material. SEM and FEA demonstrated fracture pattern and mechanism of failure. The core-veneer bond strength is one of the weakest links of layered all-ceramic restorations and has a significant role in their success. To exploit fully the high strength of zirconium oxide cores, further research work is needed to improve its bond with its corresponding veneering material.

  1. Bonding performance and interfacial characteristics of short fiber-reinforced resin composite in comparison with other composite restoratives.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength (SBS) and surface free-energy (SFE) of short fiber-reinforced resin composite (SFRC), using different adhesive systems, in comparison with other composite restoratives. The resin composites used were everX Posterior (EP), Clearfil AP-X (CA), and Filtek Supreme Ultra Universal Restorative (FS). The adhesive systems used were Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SM), Clearfil SE Bond (CS), and G-Premio Bond (GB). Resin composite was bonded to dentin, and SBS was determined after 24 h of storage in distilled water and after 10,000 thermal cycles (TCs). The SFEs of the resin composites and the adhesives were determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids. The SFE values and SFE characteristics were not influenced by the type of resin composite, but were influenced by the type of adhesive system. The results of this study suggest that the bonding performance and interfacial characteristics of SFRC are the same as for other composite restoratives, but that these parameters are affected by the type of adhesive system. The bonding performance of SFRC was enhanced by thermal cycling in a manner similar to that for other composite restoratives. © 2016 Eur J Oral Sci.

  2. Amalgam to tooth-coloured materials--implications for clinical practice and dental education: governmental restrictions and amalgam-usage survey results.

    PubMed

    Burke, F J Trevor

    2004-07-01

    To review governmental guidelines on amalgam use worldwide and to assess trends in the usage of amalgam and composite materials in restoration of posterior teeth. A letter was sent to 24 government health agencies or representative organisations requesting details of regulations pertaining to amalgam use. A literature search was carried out in order to identify papers in which the incidence of amalgam and composite restorations was stated. Ten replies were received, indicating few restrictions on the use of amalgam. Results obtained from published work appear to indicate that amalgam use is declining, but at rates which are unclear in many countries because of the paucity of published data. Amalgam use has been found to be decreasing in the USA, Australia and Scandinavia, with lesser decreases being apparent in the UK. There are few restrictions to the use of amalgam worldwide. In countries where data are available, such as USA, Australia and Scandinavia, amalgam use has been found to be decreasing, with smaller decreases being apparent in the UK.

  3. An effect of immediate dentin sealing on the shear bond strength of resin cement to porcelain restoration

    PubMed Central

    Cho, In-Ho

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to determine differences in shear bond strength to human dentin using immediate dentin sealing (IDS) technique compared to delayed dentin sealing (DDS). MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty extracted human molars were divided into 4 groups with 10 teeth each. The control group was light-cured after application of dentin bonding agent (Excite® DSC) and cemented with Variolink® II resin cement. IDS/SE (immediate dentin sealing, Clearfil™ SE Bond) and IDS/SB (immediate dentin sealing, AdapterTM Single Bond 2) were light-cured after application of dentin bonding agent (Clearfil™ SE Bond and Adapter™ Sing Bond 2, respectively), whereas DDS specimens were not treated with any dentin bonding agent. Specimens were cemented with Variolink® II resin cement. Dentin bonding agent (Excite® DSC) was left unpolymerized until the application of porcelain restoration. Shear strength was measured using a universal testing machine at a speed of 5 mm/min and evaluated of fracture using an optical microscope. RESULTS The mean shear bond strengths of control group and IDS/SE group were not statistically different from another at 14.86 and 11.18 MPa. Bond strength of IDS/SE group had a significantly higher mean than DDS group (3.14 MPa) (P < .05). There were no significance in the mean shear bond strength between IDS/SB (4.11 MPa) and DDS group. Evaluation of failure patterns indicates that most failures in the control group and IDS/SE groups were mixed, whereas failures in the DDS were interfacial. CONCLUSION When preparing teeth for indirect ceramic restoration, IDS with Clearfil™ SE Bond results in improved shear bond strength compared with DDS. PMID:21165186

  4. Effects of three restorative techniques in the bond strength and nanoleakage at gingival wall of Class II restorations subjected to simulated aging.

    PubMed

    de Mattos Pimenta Vidal, Cristina; Pavan, Sabrina; Briso, André Luiz Fraga; Bedran-Russo, Ana Karina

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the effects of simulated aging in bond strength and nanoleakage of class II restorations using three different restorative techniques. Class II preparations (n = 12) were restored using: FS - composite resin Filtek Supreme Plus (3M/ESPE); RMGIC + FS - resin-modified glass ionomer cement Vitrebond Plus (3M/ESPE) + FS; and FFS + FS - flowable composite resin Filtek Supreme Plus Flowable (3M ESPE) + FS. The teeth were assigned into two groups: Control and Simulated Aging - Thermal/Mechanical cycling (3,000 cycles, 20-80 °C/500,000 cycles, 50 N). From each tooth, two slabs were assessed to microtensile bond strength test (μTBS) (MPa), and two slabs were prepared for nanoleakage assessment, calculated as penetration along the restoration margin considering the penetration length (%) and as the area of silver nitrate particle deposition (μm(2)). Data were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey's post hoc test (p < 0.05). FS presented the highest μTBS to dentin (22.39 ± 7.55 MPa) after simulated aging, while the presence of flowable resin significantly decreased μTBS (14.53 ± 11.65 MPa) when compared to no aging condition. Both control and aging groups of RMGIC + FS presented the highest values of silver nitrate penetration (89.90 ± 16.31 % and 97.14 ± 5.76 %) and deposition area (33.05 ± 12.49 and 28.08 ± 9.76 μm(2)). Nanoleakage was not affected by simulated aging. FS presented higher bond strength and lower nanoleakage and was not affected by simulated aging. Use of flowable resin compromised the bond strength after simulated aging. The use of an intermediate layer did not improve the dentin bond strength neither reduced nanoleakage at the gingival margins of class II restorations under simulated aging conditions.

  5. Evaluation of Marginal Leakage and Shear Bond Strength of Bonded Restorations in Primary Teeth after Caries Removal by Conventional and Chemomechanical Techniques.

    PubMed

    Pravin Maru, Viral; Shakuntala, Bethur Siddaiah; Dharma, Nagarathna

    2014-01-01

    Background/Purpose. To evaluate and compare the marginal leakage and shear bond strength between conventional and Papacarie techniques of caries removal in primary molars. Materials and Methods. Sixty freshly extracted human carious primary molars were randomly divided into two groups: group I-caries removal by conventional method and group II-caries removal using Papacarie. After bonded restorations, both groups were further randomly subdivided into four subgroups for marginal leakage and shear bond strength evaluation. Results. Papacarie treated teeth (46.70%) showed less marginal leakage when compared to conventionally treated teeth (86.70%) for caries removal. The mean shear bond strength was found more in Papacarie treated teeth (12.91 MPa) than in those treated conventionally (9.64 MPa) for caries removal. Conclusion. Papacarie showed less marginal leakage and more shear bond strength when compared to those treated conventionally for caries removal.

  6. Evaluation of Marginal Leakage and Shear Bond Strength of Bonded Restorations in Primary Teeth after Caries Removal by Conventional and Chemomechanical Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Pravin Maru, Viral; Shakuntala, Bethur Siddaiah; Dharma, Nagarathna

    2014-01-01

    Background/Purpose. To evaluate and compare the marginal leakage and shear bond strength between conventional and Papacarie techniques of caries removal in primary molars. Materials and Methods. Sixty freshly extracted human carious primary molars were randomly divided into two groups: group I—caries removal by conventional method and group II—caries removal using Papacarie. After bonded restorations, both groups were further randomly subdivided into four subgroups for marginal leakage and shear bond strength evaluation. Results. Papacarie treated teeth (46.70%) showed less marginal leakage when compared to conventionally treated teeth (86.70%) for caries removal. The mean shear bond strength was found more in Papacarie treated teeth (12.91 MPa) than in those treated conventionally (9.64 MPa) for caries removal. Conclusion. Papacarie showed less marginal leakage and more shear bond strength when compared to those treated conventionally for caries removal. PMID:27437487

  7. XP BOND in self-curing mode used for luting porcelain restorations. Part B: Placement and 6-month report.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Marco; Raffaelli, Ornella; Cagidiaco, Maria Crysanti; Grandini, Simone

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this clinical study was to evaluate the postoperative hypersensitivity of Empress II inlays/onlays luted under clinical conditions with XP BOND in combination with SCA and Calibra cured in self-curing mode. Fifty-three restorations were placed in 38 patients in March and April 2006. No patient received more than two restorations. Luting procedures were performed following manufacturers' instructions. The restorations were evaluated after 2 weeks and 6 months for postoperative hypersensitivity, marginal discoloration, marginal integrity, secondary caries, maintenance of interproximal contact, and fracture. At the 2-week recall, the postoperative hypersensitivity was reported in only 10 and after 6 months in only 3 patients. All other parameters showed alpha scores. All the evaluated restorations were in place and acceptable. The postoperative hypersensitivity recorded after using XP BOND and Calibra in self-curing mode was clinically acceptable.

  8. Heat Treatment Influences Monomer Conversion and Bond Strength of Indirect Composite Resin Restorations.

    PubMed

    Magne, Pascal; Malta, Daniel Alexandre Menezes Pedrosa; Enciso, Reyes; Monteiro-Junior, Sylvio

    2015-12-01

    To assess the resin microtensile bond strength (MTBS) and the degree of conversion (DC) of indirect composite resin restorations polymerized with light and heat. Two direct (Filtek Z100 and Premise) and one indirect (Premise Indirect) composite resins were polymerized with a combination of light and heat (138°C for 20 min). For MTBS, 42 cylinders were fabricated (n = 7). After the surface treatment, cylinders were bonded to each other using adhesive resin (Optibond FL). Specimens were stored in water for 24 h. Another 15 cylinders (n = 5) were fabricated for determining degree of conversion using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry immediately and at 24 h. The MTBS and the DC was submitted to two-way ANOVA. The interaction with existing data was explored with univariate ANOVA and two-way ANOVA. Tukey's HSD post-hoc test was used to detect pairwise differences (α = 0.05). The MTBS to light and heat polymerized Z100 was 75.7 MPa, significantly higher than that to Premise (58.6 MPa) and Premise Indirect (63.9 MPa). The immediate DC for Z100, Premise, and Premise Indirect were 51.0%, 68.7%, and 61.8%, respectively. The DC at 24 h ranged from 53.4% (Z100) to 72.8% (Premise Indirect) and significantly increased for Premise Indirect only. Comparison with previously published data revealed that the heat treatment increased both MTBS and DC of Premise and Premise Indirect. Z100 showed better bond strength but lower DC. Heat treatment and a 24-h delay before delivery can benefit DC of Premise Indirect. The increase in DC of Premise and Premise Indirect did not affect their bond strength.

  9. Dental amalgam and multiple sclerosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Aminzadeh, Kevin K; Etminan, Mahyar

    2007-01-01

    Amalgam restorations have long been controversial due to their mercury content. Allegations that the mercury may be linked to nervous disorders such as Alzheimer's, chronic fatigue syndrome, and multiple sclerosis (MS) have fueled the calls for the removal of amalgam restorations from dentists' armamentarium. To explore and quantify the association between amalgam restorations and MS we have conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature. A systematic search in Medline (from 1966 to April 2006), EMBASE (2006, Week 16), and the Cochrane library (Issue 2, 2006) for English-language articles meeting specific definitions of MS and amalgam exposure was conducted. Studies were also identified using the references of retrieved articles. Studies were independently reviewed by two authors and disagreements were resolved by consensus. Studies were selected based on an a priori of defined criteria. Odds ratios (ORs) or relative risks were pooled using the random effects model. Heterogeneity was assessed using Q statistics. The pooled OR for the risk of MS among amalgam users was consistent, with a slight, nonstatistically significant increase between amalgam use and risk of MS. Future studies that take into consideration the amalgam restoration size and surface area along with the duration of exposure are needed in order to definitively rule out any link between amalgam and MS.

  10. Posterior composite restoration update: focus on factors influencing form and function.

    PubMed

    Bohaty, Brenda S; Ye, Qiang; Misra, Anil; Sene, Fabio; Spencer, Paulette

    2013-01-01

    Restoring posterior teeth with resin-based composite materials continues to gain popularity among clinicians, and the demand for such aesthetic restorations is increasing. Indeed, the most common aesthetic alternative to dental amalgam is resin composite. Moderate to large posterior composite restorations, however, have higher failure rates, more recurrent caries, and increased frequency of replacement. Investigators across the globe are researching new materials and techniques that will improve the clinical performance, handling characteristics, and mechanical and physical properties of composite resin restorative materials. Despite such attention, large to moderate posterior composite restorations continue to have a clinical lifetime that is approximately one-half that of the dental amalgam. While there are numerous recommendations regarding preparation design, restoration placement, and polymerization technique, current research indicates that restoration longevity depends on several variables that may be difficult for the dentist to control. These variables include the patient's caries risk, tooth position, patient habits, number of restored surfaces, the quality of the tooth-restoration bond, and the ability of the restorative material to produce a sealed tooth-restoration interface. Although clinicians tend to focus on tooth form when evaluating the success and failure of posterior composite restorations, the emphasis must remain on advancing our understanding of the clinical variables that impact the formation of a durable seal at the restoration-tooth interface. This paper presents an update of existing technology and underscores the mechanisms that negatively impact the durability of posterior composite restorations in permanent teeth.

  11. Bonding state of metal-free CAD/CAM onlay restoration after cyclic loading with and without immediate dentin sealing.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Noriko; Maseki, Toshio; Nara, Yoichiro

    2017-05-31

    To examine the bonding state of metal-free CAD/CAM onlay restorations made from two popular resin composite blocks and a typical glass-ceramic block after cyclic loading, with and without immediate dentin sealing (IDS). Standardized mesial-distal-occlusalbuccal (MODB) cavities in 24 extracted human molars were prepared. The intra-cavity dentin surfaces of half of the cavities were immediately sealed with all-in-one adhesive and flowable composite, while those of the other half were not. All cavities were scanned, from which CAD/CAM onlays were fabricated from three types of block and cemented with an adhesive resin cement system. The restored specimens were subjected to cyclic loading and the intra-cavity microtensile bond strength was measured. IDS improves not only the internal bond strength, but also the bond reliability of metal-free CAD/CAM onlay restorations. The resin composite block seems to be more effective than a typical glass-ceramic block for achieving both high bond strength and excellent bond reliability.

  12. Dentin bonding performance and interface observation of an MMA-based restorative material.

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, Junichi; Inoue, Go; Nikaido, Toru; Ikeda, Masaomi; Sadr, Alireza; Tagami, Junji

    2016-07-30

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate bonding performance and dentin interface acid resistance using a 4-META/MMA-TBB based restorative material (BF) compared to a conventional 4-META/MMA-TBB resin cement (SB), and the effect of sodium fluoride (NaF) addition to the materials. Dentin surfaces were treated with 10% citric acid-3% ferric chloride (10-3) or 4-META containing self-etching primer (TP), followed by application of BF or SB polymer powders with or without NaF, to evaluate microtensile bond strength (µTBS) in six experimental groups; 10-3/SB, 10-3/BF, TP/SB, TP/BF, TP/SB/NaF and TP/BF/NaF. SEM observation of the resin-dentin interface was performed after acid-base challenge to evaluate interfacial dentin resistance to acid attack. TP/BF showed highest µTBS, while NaF polymers decreased µTBS. TP/BF showed funnel-shaped erosion at the interface, however, NaF polymers improved acid resistance of interface. In conclusion, BF demonstrated high µTBSs and low acid-resistance at the interface. NaF addition enhanced acid resistance but decreased µTBS.

  13. Restorative resins: hardness and strength vs. quantity of remaining double bonds.

    PubMed

    Asmussen, E

    1982-12-01

    It has been hypothesized that the Wallace indentation hardness of smooth surface resins is a factor of prime importance for the abrasion by food of Class 1 restorations. In the present work factors affecting the hardness of polymers were investigated. In addition the tensile strength of composite resins was measured and related to the catalytic system of the polymer. It was found that for a given composition of the monomer the Wallace hardness number increased with increasing content of inhibitor, decreased with increasing content of peroxide, and was unaffected by changes in the content of amine. The hardness was well correlated with the quantity of double bonds remaining in the polymer. BISGMA-based polymers showed no variation in hardness when the originating monomer varied with respect to content of a bi- or a trifunctional diluting monomer. Light-polymerized polymers were relatively hard as compared to chemically cured materials of adequate setting time. The tensile strength of composite resins was predominantly determined by the monomer content of peroxide and increased herewith. The tensile strength was well correlated with the quantity of remaining double bonds in the constituting polymer.

  14. Bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to self-adhesive resin cement: the effect of surface treatments.

    PubMed

    Elsaka, Shaymaa E

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of different surface treatments on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to self-adhesive resin cement. Two types of CAD/CAM restorative materials (Vita Enamic [VE] and Lava Ultimate [LU]) were used. The specimens were divided into five groups in each test according to the surface treatment performed; Gr 1 (control; no treatment), Gr 2 (sandblasted [SB]), Gr 3 (SB+silane [S]), Gr 4 (hydrofluoric acid [HF]), and Gr 5 (HF+S). A dual-curing self-adhesive resin cement (Bifix SE [BF]) was applied to each group for testing the adhesion after 24 h of storage in distilled water or after 30 days using the μTBS test. Following fracture testing, specimens were examined with a stereomicroscope and SEM. Surface roughness and morphology of the CAD/CAM restorative materials were characterized after treatment. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test. The surface treatment, type of CAD/CAM restorative material, and water storage periods showed a significant effect on the μTBS (p<0.001). For the LU/BF system, there was no significant difference in the bond strength values between different surface treatments (p>0.05). On the other hand, for the VE/BF system, surface treatment with HF+S showed higher bond strength values compared with SB and HF surface treatments (p<0.05). Surface roughness and SEM analyses showed that the surface topography of CAD/CAM restorative materials was modified after treatments. The effect of surface treatments on the bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to resin cement is material dependent. The VE/BF CAD/CAM material provided higher bond strength values compared with the LU/BF CAD/CAM material.

  15. Long-term nanoleakage depth and pattern of cervical restorations bonded with different adhesives.

    PubMed

    Mobarak, E H; Daifalla, L E

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of water storage on nanoleakage depth and the pattern of cervical cavities bonded with different adhesives. For nanoleakage depth evaluation, standardized cervical cavities (2 mm in diameter) were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of 36 intact human premolars. Specimens were divided into three groups (n=12) according to the three adhesive systems used: an etch-and-rinse adhesive (SBMP, Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE) and two single-step self-etch adhesives; one was mild and acetone based (IB-iBond, Kulzer), while the other was strong water based (PL, Adper Prompt L-Pop, 3M ESPE). All cavities were restored using Filtek Z250 (3M ESPE) resin composite. For each adhesive, specimens (n=12 with 24 restored cavities) were subdivided into three subgroups (n=4 with eight cavities) according to the storage period before examination (24 hours, three or six months). Another duplicate of teeth was prepared in the same way for nanoleakage pattern evaluation. After storage, the specimens were placed in 50%W/V silver nitrate solution for 24 hours and immersed in a photo-developing solution for eight hours. Thereafter, the specimens were sectioned buccolingually, polished, and examined by scanning electron microscopy. For nanoleakage pattern, specimens were treated in the same way as for nanoleakage depth except that they were additionally immersed in 10% EDTA for five seconds after polishing. Silver penetration percentage was calculated to the total length of the tooth-restoration interface. Data were analyzed with two-way analysis of variance, Kruskal-Wallis, and post hoc tests. After 24 hours, the least amount of nanoleakage depth was recorded for IB, while the highest was recorded for PL. For stored specimens, there was no significant difference among the nanoleakage depths of all adhesives. The tested adhesives recorded different nanoleakage patterns; however, there was an increase in the intensity and continuity of silver

  16. Mercury exposure and risks from dental amalgam in the US population, post-2000.

    PubMed

    Richardson, G M; Wilson, R; Allard, D; Purtill, C; Douma, S; Gravière, J

    2011-09-15

    Dental amalgam is 50% metallic mercury (Hg) by weight and Hg vapour continuously evolves from in-place dental amalgam, causing increased Hg content with increasing amalgam load in urine, faeces, exhaled breath, saliva, blood, and various organs and tissues including the kidney, pituitary gland, liver, and brain. The Hg content also increases with maternal amalgam load in amniotic fluid, placenta, cord blood, meconium, various foetal tissues including liver, kidney and brain, in colostrum and breast milk. Based on 2001 to 2004 population statistics, 181.1 million Americans carry a grand total of 1.46 billion restored teeth. Children as young as 26 months were recorded as having restored teeth. Past dental practice and recently available data indicate that the majority of these restorations are composed of dental amalgam. Employing recent US population-based statistics on body weight and the frequency of dentally restored tooth surfaces, and recent research on the incremental increase in urinary Hg concentration per amalgam-filled tooth surface, estimates of Hg exposure from amalgam fillings were determined for 5 age groups of the US population. Three specific exposure scenarios were considered, each scenario incrementally reducing the number of tooth surfaces assumed to be restored with amalgam. Based on the least conservative of the scenarios evaluated, it was estimated that some 67.2 million Americans would exceed the Hg dose associated with the reference exposure level (REL) of 0.3 μg/m(3) established by the US Environmental Protection Agency; and 122.3 million Americans would exceed the dose associated with the REL of 0.03 μg/m(3) established by the California Environmental Protection Agency. Exposure estimates are consistent with previous estimates presented by Health Canada in 1995, and amount to 0.2 to 0.4 μg/day per amalgam-filled tooth surface, or 0.5 to 1 μg/day/amalgam-filled tooth, depending on age and other factors.

  17. Amalgam components drift in teeth-toxicity risks: A preliminary approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, M. L.; Pinheiro, T.; Barreiros, M. A.; Casaca, C.; Cunha, A. S.; Chevallier, P.

    1998-03-01

    The use of ion beam techniques applied to teeth studies have been extensive in what concerns the major elements distribution. However, it is not clarified whether amalgam components are absorbed and drifted through teeth material, although the toxicity of the elements used in amalgams, such as Hg, are well known. This work is an attempt to assess a possible teeth contamination originated by the amalgams. Therefore, teeth with metallic amalgam, as well as healthy ones, were studied. The teeth were longitudinally cut and each slice was scanned from the inner region to the surface enamel for elemental profiles determination purposes using Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and Synchrotron Radiation X-ray Fluorescence (SRXRF) techniques. High levels of Zn, Ag, Sn, Hg and Pb were found along the scanned teeth restored with the metallic amalgam. The elemental distribution patterns suggest diffusion of these elements in the teeth material from amalgam constituents.

  18. Posterior composite restoration update: focus on factors influencing form and function

    PubMed Central

    Bohaty, Brenda S; Ye, Qiang; Misra, Anil; Sene, Fabio; Spencer, Paulette

    2013-01-01

    Restoring posterior teeth with resin-based composite materials continues to gain popularity among clinicians, and the demand for such aesthetic restorations is increasing. Indeed, the most common aesthetic alternative to dental amalgam is resin composite. Moderate to large posterior composite restorations, however, have higher failure rates, more recurrent caries, and increased frequency of replacement. Investigators across the globe are researching new materials and techniques that will improve the clinical performance, handling characteristics, and mechanical and physical properties of composite resin restorative materials. Despite such attention, large to moderate posterior composite restorations continue to have a clinical lifetime that is approximately one-half that of the dental amalgam. While there are numerous recommendations regarding preparation design, restoration placement, and polymerization technique, current research indicates that restoration longevity depends on several variables that may be difficult for the dentist to control. These variables include the patient’s caries risk, tooth position, patient habits, number of restored surfaces, the quality of the tooth–restoration bond, and the ability of the restorative material to produce a sealed tooth–restoration interface. Although clinicians tend to focus on tooth form when evaluating the success and failure of posterior composite restorations, the emphasis must remain on advancing our understanding of the clinical variables that impact the formation of a durable seal at the restoration–tooth interface. This paper presents an update of existing technology and underscores the mechanisms that negatively impact the durability of posterior composite restorations in permanent teeth. PMID:23750102

  19. The effect of prophylaxis method on microtensile bond strength of indirect restorations to dentin.

    PubMed

    Soares, C J; Pereira, J C; Souza, S J B; Menezes, M S; Armstrong, S R

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different materials used for dentin prophylaxis on the microtensile bond strengths (μTBS) of adhesively cemented indirect composite restorations. Sixty bovine incisors had the buccal surface ground with wet #600-grit silicon carbide abrasive paper to obtain a flat exposed superficial dentin and were submitted to different prophylaxis protocols, as follows: 3% hydrogen peroxide (HydP); 0.12% chlorhexidine (Chlo); sodium bicarbonate jet (SodB); 50-μm aluminum oxide air abrasion (AirA); pumice paste (PumP), and control group-water spray (Cont). After prophylaxis protocols a resin composite block (3.0 mm × 5.0 mm × 5.0 mm) was adhesively cemented using dual resin cement (Rely X ARC). After 24 hours of water storage, specimens were serially sectioned perpendicular to the bonded interface into 1-mm-thick slices. Each specimen was trimmed with a diamond bur to an hourglass shape with a cross-sectional area of approximately 1.0 mm(2) at the bonded area. Specimens were tested (μTBS) at 0.5 mm/min using a universal testing machine. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the effects of prophylaxis techniques on dentin. Bond strength data (MPa) were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and failure mode by Fisher test (α=0.05). μTBS data, means (SD), were (different superscripted letters indicate statistically significant differences): AirA, 25.2 (7.2)(a); PumP, 24.1 (7.8)(a); Chlo, 21.5 (5.6)(a); Cont, 20.6 (8.1)(a); HydP(,) 15.5 (7.6)(b); and SodB(,) 11.5 (4.4)(c). The use of aluminum oxide air abrasion, pumice paste, and chlorhexidine before acid etching did not significantly affect μTBS to dentin; however, the use of hydrogen peroxide and sodium bicarbonate jet significantly reduced μTBS.

  20. Evaluation of bond strength and thickness of adhesive layer according to the techniques of applying adhesives in composite resin restorations.

    PubMed

    de Menezes, Fernando Carlos Hueb; da Silva, Stella Borges; Valentino, Thiago Assunção; Oliveira, Maria Angélica Hueb de Menezes; Rastelli, Alessandra Nara de Souza; Conçalves, Luciano de Souza

    2013-01-01

    Adhesive restorations have increasingly been used in dentistry, and the adhesive system application technique may determine the success of the restorative procedure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the application technique of two adhesive systems (Clearfil SE Bond and Adper Scotchbond MultiPurpose) on the bond strength and adhesive layer of composite resin restorations. Eight human third molars were selected and prepared with Class I occlusal cavities. The teeth were restored with composite using various application techniques for both adhesives, according to the following groups (n = 10): group 1 (control), systems were applied and adhesive was immediately light activated for 20 seconds without removing excesses; group 2, excess adhesive was removed with a gentle jet of air for 5 seconds; group 3, excess was removed with a dry microbrushtype device; and group 4, a gentle jet of air was applied after the microbrush and then light activation was performed. After this, the teeth were submitted to microtensile testing. For the two systems tested, no statistical differences were observed between groups 1 and 2. Groups 3 and 4 presented higher bond strength values compared with the other studied groups, allowing the conclusion that excess adhesive removal with a dry microbrush could improve bond strength in composite restorations. Predominance of adhesive fracture and thicker adhesive layer were observed via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in groups 1 and 2. For groups 3 and 4, a mixed failure pattern and thinner adhesive layer were verified. Clinicians should be aware that excess adhesive may negatively affect bond strength, whereas a thin, uniform adhesive layer appears to be favorable.

  1. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHWEST OF GOLD AMALGAMATION ROOM, SHOWING AMALGAMATION BARREL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHWEST OF GOLD AMALGAMATION ROOM, SHOWING AMALGAMATION BARREL AT CENTER FOREGROUND, BULLION FURNACE IN LARGE HOOD BEHIND IT, AND GOLD RETORT IN BACKGROUND HOOD. NOTE OVERHEAD MONORAIL FOR MATERIALS HANDLING. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  2. Influence of dentin conditioning on bond strength of light-cured ionomer restorative materials and polyacid-modified composite resins.

    PubMed

    Buchalla, W; Attin, T; Hellwig, E

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the dentin bond strength of restorative materials containing both glass ionomer and composite resin components. Three resin-modified glass ionomer restorative materials (Fuji II LC, Photac-Fil, Vitremer), three polyacid-modified composite resins (Dyract, Ionosit Fil, VariGlass VLC), a hybrid composite (blend-a-lux) and a chemical-cured glass ionomer cement (ChemFil Superior) were investigated for dentin tensile bond strength with and without conditioning of the tooth surfaces. For each material, tensile bond strength was determined using five conditioned and five unconditioned bovine tooth specimens. Conditioning of the specimens was performed according to the manufacturers' instructions. The tensile bond strength was tested with a universal testing machine. Statistical analysis was performed with analysis of variance, the Scheffe's-test and the Student's t-test. All materials showed higher adhesion to conditioned dentin than to unconditioned specimens. Except for Photac-Fil, the bond strength to conditioned dentin of all resin-modified glass ionomer restorative materials and polyacid-modified composite resins was higher as compared to the chemical-cured glass ionomer and the hybrid composite. However, these differences were not statistically significant. All polyacid-modified composite resins resulted in higher bond strengths to conditioned dentin as compared to the resin-modified glass ionomer restorative materials. These differences were statistically significant only for VariGlass VLC as compared to Photac-Fil. In order to improve adhesion of the tested materials to dentin it is highly recommended to follow the manufacturers' instructions concerning dentin conditioning.

  3. Mercury Amalgam Diffusion in Human Teeth Probed Using Femtosecond LIBS.

    PubMed

    Bello, Liciane Toledo; da Ana, Patricia Aparecida; Santos, Dário; Krug, Francisco José; Zezell, Denise Maria; Vieira, Nilson Dias; Samad, Ricardo Elgul

    2017-01-01

    In this work the diffusion of mercury and other elements from amalgam tooth restorations through the surrounding dental tissue (dentin) was evaluated using femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (fs-LIBS). To achieve this, seven deciduous and eight permanent extracted human molar teeth with occlusal amalgam restorations were half-sectioned and analyzed using pulses from a femtosecond laser. The measurements were performed from the amalgam restoration along the amalgam/dentin interface to the apical direction. It was possible to observe the presence of metallic elements (silver, mercury, copper and tin) emission lines, as well as dental constituent ones, providing fingerprints of each material and comparable data for checking the consistence of the results. It was also shown that the elements penetration depth values in each tooth are usually similar and consistent, for both deciduous and permanent teeth, indicating that all the metals diffuse into the dentin by the same mechanism. We propose that this diffusion mechanism is mainly through liquid dragging inside the dentin tubules. The mercury diffused further in permanent teeth than in deciduous teeth, probably due to the longer diffusion times due to the age of the restorations. It was possible to conclude that the proposed femtosecond-LIBS system can detect the presence of metals in the dental tissue, among the tooth constituent elements, and map the distribution of endogenous and exogenous chemical elements, with a spatial resolution that can be brought under 100 µm.

  4. Dentin surface treatment using a non-thermal argon plasma brush for interfacial bonding improvement in composite restoration

    PubMed Central

    Ritts, Andy Charles; Li, Hao; Yu, Qingsong; Xu, Changqi; Yao, Xiaomei; Hong, Liang; Wang, Yong

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the treatment effects of non-thermal atmospheric gas plasmas on dentin surfaces for composite restoration. Extracted unerupted human third molars were used by removing the crowns and etching the exposed dentin surfaces with 35% phosphoric acid gel. The dentin surfaces were treated by using a non-thermal atmospheric argon plasma brush for various durations. The molecular changes of the dentin surfaces were analyzed using FTIR/ATR and an increase in carbonyl groups on dentin surfaces was detected with plasma treated dentin. Adper Single Bond Plus adhesive and Filtek Z250 dental composite were applied as directed. To evaluate the dentin/composite interfacial bonding, the teeth thus prepared were sectioned into micro-bars as the specimens for tensile test. Student Newman Keuls tests showed that the bonding strength of the composite restoration to peripheral dentin was significantly increased (by 64%) after 30 s plasma treatment. However, the bonding strength to plasma treated inner dentin did not show any improvement. It was found that plasma treatment of peripheral dentin surface up to 100 s gave an increase in interfacial bonding strength, while a prolong plasma treatment of dentin surfaces, e.g., 5 min treatments, showed a decrease in interfacial bonding strength. PMID:20831586

  5. [New direct restorative materials].

    PubMed

    Hickel, R; Dasch, W; Janda, R; Tyas, M; Anusavice, K

    1999-04-01

    People worldwide have become increasingly aware of the potential adverse effects on the environment, of pollution control and of toxic effects of food, drugs and biomaterials. Amalgam and its potential toxic side effects (still scientifically unproven) continue to be discussed with increasing controversy by the media in some countries. Consequently, new direct restorative materials are now being explored by dentists, materials scientists and patients who are searching for the so-called 'amalgam substitute' or 'amalgam alternative'. From a critical point of view some of the new direct restorative materials are good with respect in aesthetics, but all material characteristics must be considered, such as mechanical properties, biological effects, and longterm clinical behaviour.

  6. In vitro shear bond strength of the Amalgambond Plus system.

    PubMed

    van der Vyver, P J; de Wet, F A; Dearlove, W R

    1995-06-01

    The bonding of composite resins to dentine by means of dentine bonding agents is common practice. Although amalgam has been used for many years, no attempt had been made to bond it chemically to tooth structure. Amalgambond Plus (ABP) was developed to bond amalgam (as well as composite) to various substrates. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ABP system for its ability to bond amalgam, as well as composite, to dentine, and also to assess the strength of the product when bonding composite to set amalgam. The following values (MPa) were obtained for the different ABP variations: Amalgam to Dentine (with HPA): 5.20; Amalgam to Dentine (without HPA): 3.26; Composite to Dentine (without HPA): 17.57; Composite to Amalgam (without HPA): 12.00. It can be concluded that Amalgambond Plus gives varying bond strengths to different substrates, with the highest value obtained when used to bond Composite to Dentine.

  7. Removal of dental amalgam fillings and its influence on saliva morphological picture - case report.

    PubMed

    Łapińska, J; Kasacka, I

    2011-01-01

    The influence of dental restorative materials on patients' general and oral health is the main interest of many researchers but the question of their safety is still under consideration. An otherwise healthy 23-year-old patient with no history of oral abnormalities was examined. Dental amalgam restorations were replaced by composite resin material. Salivary smears prepared two days and two weeks after the amalgam removal were compared with those taken before the procedure.

  8. Marginal adaptation of class V restorations with current-generation dentin-bonding agents: effect of different dentin surface treatments.

    PubMed

    Cavalheiro, Jessica Patrícia; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Borges, Álvaro Henrique; Bandéca, Matheus Coelho; dos Santos, Reidson Stanley Soares; de Campos, Edson Alves; Saad, José Roberto Cury; Dantas, Andréa Abi Rached; de Andrade, Marcelo Ferrarezi

    2014-05-01

    This study sought to assess the use of chlorhexidine with several excipients as a dentin surface treatment and its effect on marginal adaptation of class V restorations with current-generation dentin bonding agents. A total of 120 human third molars were selected and allocated into 12 groups, with standardized buccal class V restorations randomly divided into preconditioned dentin rinsed with: water; water + chlorhexidine; ethanol; or ethanol + chlorhexidine. After rinsing of dentin (previously conditioned with 35% phosphoric acid) with the test solutions, the Adper single bond 2, prime and bond 2.1, and Excite bonding systems were applied randomly. Restorations were performed with Filtek™ Z350 XT composite resin. The resulting specimens were subjected to thermal and mechanical load cycling. Quantitative analysis of marginal adaptation was performed on epoxy replicas by means of scanning electron microscopy. Results were assessed by means of the Kruskal-Wallis test (percentages of continuous margins) and Wilcoxon test (differences between percentages of continuous margins before and after thermal cycling and mechanical loading), at a significance level of p < 0.05. Outcomes in the chlorhexidine-treated groups were not superior to those obtained with other treatments.

  9. In vitro microtensile bond strength of four adhesives tested at the gingival and pulpal walls of class II restorations

    PubMed Central

    Purk, John H.; Healy, Matthew; Dusevich, Vladimir; Glaros, Alan; Eick, J. David

    2007-01-01

    Background The authors compared the microtensile bond strength of teeth restored with four adhesives at the gingival and pulpal cavity walls of Class II resin-based composite restorations. Methods Five pairs of extracted third molars received two Class II preparations/restorations in each tooth. The authors randomly assigned each preparation to one of four adhesive groups: Adper Scotchbond Multipurpose Dental Adhesive (SBMP) (3M ESPE, St. Paul, Minn.), Clearfil SE Bond (CFSE) (Kuraray America, New York City), Prime & Bond NT (PBNT) (Dentsply Caulk, Milford, Del.) and PQ1 (Ultradent, South Jordan, Utah). They restored the teeth and obtained microtensile specimens from each cavity wall. Specimens were tested on a testing machine until they failed. Results The mean (± standard deviation) bond strengths (in megapascals) were as follows: SBMP (pulpal), 36.4 (17.2); SBMP (gingival), 29.7 (15.3); CFSE (pulpal), 50.8 (13.6); CFSE (gingival), 50.2 (14.0); PBNT (pulpal), 38.3 (19.2); PBNT (gingival), 38.9 (17.7); PQ1 (pulpal), 58.7 (8.7); and PQ1 (gingival), 54.5 (18.5). A two-way analysis of variance found an adhesive effect (P < .001) but no location effect (P > .05). Conclusions PQ1 and CFSE performed the best. The results showed no significant difference in microtensile bond strength at the gingival wall versus the pulpal wall. Clinical Implications Under in vitro conditions, a total-etch ethanol-based adhesive (PQ1) failed cohesively more often than did the other adhesives tested. PMID:17012721

  10. In vitro microtensile bond strength of four adhesives tested at the gingival and pulpal walls of Class II restorations.

    PubMed

    Purk, John H; Healy, Matthew; Dusevich, Vladimir; Glaros, Alan; Eick, J David

    2006-10-01

    The authors compared the microtensile bond strength of teeth restored with four adhesives at the gingival and pulpal cavity walls of Class II resin-based composite restorations. Five pairs of extracted third molars received two Class II preparations/restorations in each tooth. The authors randomly assigned each preparation to one of four adhesive groups: Adper Scotchbond Multipurpose Dental Adhesive (SBMP) (3M ESPE, St. Paul, Minn.), Clearfil SE Bond (CFSE) (Kuraray America, New York City), Prime & Bond NT (PBNT) (Dentsply Caulk, Milford, Del.) and PQ1 (Ultradent, South Jordan, Utah). They restored the teeth and obtained microtensile specimens from each cavity wall. Specimens were tested on a testing machine until they failed. The mean (+/- standard deviation) bond strengths (in megapascals) were as follows: SBMP (pulpal), 36.4 (17.2); SBMP (gingival), 29.7 (15.3); CFSE (pulpal), 50.8 (13.6); CFSE (gingival), 50.2 (14.0); PBNT (pulpal), 38.3 (19.2); PBNT (gingival), 38.9 (17.7); PQ1 (pulpal), 58.7 (8.7); and PQ1 (gingival), 54.5 (18.5). A two-way analysis of variance found an adhesive effect (P < .001) but no location effect (P >.05). PQ1 and CFSE performed the best. The results showed no significant difference in microtensile bond strength at the gingival wall versus the pulpal wall. Under in vitro conditions, a total-etch ethanol-based adhesive (PQ1) failed cohesively more often than did the other adhesives tested.

  11. Effect of antibacterial varnishes applied to root dentin on shear bond strength of tooth-colored restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Yonca; Baseren, Meserret

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of certain varnishes on the bond strength of different tooth-colored restorative materials applied to root dentin. One-hundred and eighty tooth slabs, including mesial and distal surfaces, were attained through dividing the teeth, then embedding them in methylmethacrylate. The root surfaces were ground flat through cementum, exposing the dentin. The samples were then randomly divided into three main groups: Group 1: Cervitec; Group 2: Fluor Protector and Group 3: No applications (control). Cervitec and Fluor Protector were applied to the root dentin surfaces according to the manufacturer's instructions. All the samples were kept in artificial saliva for six months. Each main group was subdivided into five groups of 12 teeth each: Group A: Flowable Resin Composite (Grandio Flow); Group B: Microhybrid Resin Composite (Artemis); Group C: Polyacid Modified Resin Composite (Dyract Extra); Group D: Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (Vitremer) and Group E: Conventional Glass-Ionomer Cement (Ionofil Molar). Restorative materials were applied to the root dentin surfaces using a cylindrical mold. After thermocycling (1000 cycles, 5 degrees C/55 degrees C, dwell time 30 seconds), the shear bond strength of the restored samples was determined by a universal testing machine (Zwick Test Machine, Zwick GmbH & Co, Ulm, Germany) at a 5 mm/minute crosshead speed. Failure mode was determined under a stereomicroscope. The data were evaluated statistically by using one-way Analysis of Variance and Duncan tests (p< or =0.05). In the fluoride varnish group, all of the restorative materials except for Ionofil Molar, showed lower bond strengths when compared to the control group (p<0.05). In the Cervitec group, Artemis and Dyract Extra showed lower bond strengths; whereas, Ionofil Molar showed a higher bond strength than the control group (p<0.05). The highest percentage of cohesive fracture was observed in Artemis and Dyract Extra in the control group.

  12. Mercury Exposure Levels in Children with Dental Amalgam Fillings

    PubMed Central

    Miriam Varkey, Indu; Shetty, Rajmohan; Hegde, Amitha

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT% Objectives: Mercury combined with other metals to form solid amalgams has long been used in reconstructive dentistry but its use has been controversial since at least the middle of the 19th century. The exposure and body burden of mercury reviews have consistently stated that there is a deficiency of adequate epidemiological studies addressing this issue. Fish and dental amalgam are two major sources of human exposure to organic (MeHg) and inorganic Hg respectively. Materials and methods: A total of 150 subjects aged between 9 and 14 years were divided into two groups of 75 subjects each depending on their diet, i.e. seafood or nonseafood consuming. Each category was subdivided into three groups based on number of restorations. Scalp hair and urine samples were collected at baseline and 3 months later to assess the organic and inorganic levels of mercury respectively by atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS). Results: The mean values of urinary mercury (inorganic mercury) in the group of children with restorations were 1.5915 μg/l as compared to 0.0130 μg/l in the groups with no amalgam restorations (p < 0.001) (Wilcoxon sign rank test and paired t-test). The hair mercury levels (organic mercury) varied signi-ficantly between the fsh-eating group and nonfsh-eating group, the average values being 1.03 μg/l and 0.84 μg/l respectively (p < 0.001) (Mann-Whitney U-test and paired t-test). Conclusion and significance: The notion about the mercury being released from the amalgam restorations as a sole exposure source needs to be put to a rest, as environmental factors collectively overpower the exposure levels from restorations alone. How to cite this article: Varkey IM, Shetty R, Hegde A. Mercury Exposure Levels in Children with Dental Amalgam Fillings. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(3):180-185. PMID:25709298

  13. Shear bond strength of brackets on restorative materials: Comparison on various dental restorative materials using the universal primer Monobond® Plus.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Thomas; Elsner, Laura; Hirschfelder, Ursula; Hanke, Sebastian

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to analyze surfaces consisting of different restorative materials for shear bond strength (SBS) and failure patterns of metal and ceramic brackets. Bonding involved the use of a universal primer (Monobond® Plus, Ivoclar Vivadent). Six restorative materials were tested, including one composite resin (Clearfil Majesty™ Posterior, Kuraray Noritake Dental), one glass-ceramic material (IPS Empress® Esthetic, Ivoclar Vivadent), one oxide-ceramic material (CORiTEC Zr transpa Disc, imes-icore), two base-metal alloys (remanium® star, Dentaurum; Colado® CC, Ivoclar Vivadent), and one palladium-based alloy (Callisto® 75 Pd, Ivoclar Vivadent). Bovine incisors served as controls. Both metal and ceramic brackets (discovery®/discovery® pearl; Dentaurum) were bonded to the restorative surfaces after sandblasting and pretreatment with Monobond® Plus. A setup modified from DIN 13990-2 was used for SBS testing and adhesive remnant index (ARI)-based analysis of failure patterns. The metal brackets showed the highest mean SBS values on the glass-ceramic material (68.61 N/mm(2)) and the composite resin (67.58 N/mm(2)) and the lowest mean SBS on one of the base-metal alloys (Colado® CC; 14.01 N/mm(2)). The ceramic brackets showed the highest mean SBS on the glass-ceramic material (63.36 N/mm(2)) and the lowest mean SBS on the palladium-based alloy (38.48 N/mm(2)). Significant differences between the metal and ceramic brackets were observed in terms of both SBS values and ARI scores (p < 0.05). Under both bracket types, fractures of the composite-resin and the glass-ceramic samples were observed upon debonding. Opaque restorative materials under metal brackets were found to involve undercuring of the adhesive. Monobond® Plus succeeded in generating high bond strengths of both bracket types on all restorative surfaces. Given our observations of cohesive fracture (including cases of surface avulsion) of the composite-resin and the glass

  14. The future of dental amalgam: a review of the literature. Part 2: Mercury exposure in dental practice.

    PubMed

    Eley, B M

    1997-04-26

    This is the second article in a series of seven on the future of dental amalgam. It describes the means of exposure to mercury which can occur in dental surgeries from the storage of mercury, preparation and placement of dental amalgam restorations, polishing dental amalgam restorations, the removal of amalgam fillings and the storage of waste amalgam. It also reports on the monitoring of dental practices and studies on the mercury air levels in dental surgeries and blood and urine levels in dentists and their staff. Also, studies which compare these levels with the health and neurobehaviour of dentists and their staff are included. In addition, it discusses post-mortem studies of the mercury levels in body organs in dentists and controls. It then recommends methods for the safe handling of mercury and dental amalgam. Finally, it discusses the issues surrounding the release of mercury into the environment from dental practices and industry.

  15. Effect of different photoactivation methods on the bond strength of composite resin restorations by push-out test.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Leonardo Gonçalves; Alonso, Roberta Caroline Bruschi; Correr, Gisele Maria; Brandt, William Cunha; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho

    2008-03-01

    Modulated curing methods could lead to a higher probability of bond preservation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of 7 curing methods on bond strength of composite resin restorations. Seventy bovine incisors were selected. A conical cavity was prepared in the buccal surface. Adper Single Bond adhesive system was applied according to the manufacturer's instructions, and the cavities were filled with a single increment of Esthet X (Dentsply/Caulk). The specimens were randomly assigned into 7 groups (n = 10) according to the photoactivation method: (1) continuous light 700 (700 mW/cm2) (control); (2) continuous light 150 (150 mW/cm2); (3) continuous light 250 (250 mW/cm2); (4) soft-start 75 (75 mW/cm2) + 700 mW/cm2); (5) soft-start 150 (150 mW/cm2 + 700 mW/cm2); (6) pulse-delay (150 mW/cm2 + 3 minutes + 700 mW/cm2); and (7) intermittent light (cycles at 600 mW/cm2). The energy density for all groups was 14 J/cm2. The bond strength of the composite restorations was measured by performing the push-out test in a universal testing machine (Instron). The results were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey test (P < .05). Pulse-delay, soft-start 150, and soft-start 75 methods showed a significant increase in bond strength when compared with the control continuous light 700 method. Low power density and intermittent light groups showed intermediate results. Modulation of the energy density during light curing of composite resins using pulse-delay or soft-start methods increased the bond strength of composite restorations.

  16. Is it the end of the road for dental amalgam? A critical review.

    PubMed

    Shenoy, Arvind

    2008-07-01

    The longevity of dental restorations is dependent on many factors, including those related to materials, the dentist, and the patient. Dental amalgams have successfully served the profession for over a century. The main reasons for restoration failure are secondary caries, fracture of the bulk of the restoration or of the tooth, and marginal deficiencies and wear. The importance of direct-placement, aesthetic, tooth-colored restorative materials is still increasing. Amalgam restorations are being replaced because of alleged adverse health effects and inferior aesthetic appearance. All alternative restorative materials and procedures, however, have certain limitations. This article will attempt to critically analyse both amalgams and resin based composites, through an evaluation of scientific literature.

  17. Is it the end of the road for dental amalgam? A critical review

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Arvind

    2008-01-01

    The longevity of dental restorations is dependent on many factors, including those related to materials, the dentist, and the patient. Dental amalgams have successfully served the profession for over a century. The main reasons for restoration failure are secondary caries, fracture of the bulk of the restoration or of the tooth, and marginal deficiencies and wear. The importance of direct-placement, aesthetic, tooth-colored restorative materials is still increasing. Amalgam restorations are being replaced because of alleged adverse health effects and inferior aesthetic appearance. All alternative restorative materials and procedures, however, have certain limitations. This article will attempt to critically analyse both amalgams and resin based composites, through an evaluation of scientific literature. PMID:20142895

  18. [Abrasion measurements in vivo in occlusal composite and amalgam fillings].

    PubMed

    Meier, C; Lutz, F

    1978-09-01

    A new method for quantitative measurement of occlusal wear on restorations is described. In a clinical evaluation with four different composites and an amalgam the method proved to be simple in execution and very exact. Statistical analysis after 7 months has shown significant differences in wear resistance of the different materials. The nature of the resulting wear was electron optically examined. Typical structural surface characteristics were observed for each of the different materials. More recently developed composities utilizing extremly small filler particles (Aerosil) seem to be comparable to amalgam in wear resistance.

  19. Shear-bond strength of a new self-adhering flowable restorative material to dentin of primary molars.

    PubMed

    Pacifici, Edoardo; Chazine, Michelle; Vichi, Alessandro; Grandini, Simone; Goracci, Cecilia; Ferrari, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength to dentin of primary molars of a new self-adhering flowable resin composite with two ionomer-based cements and one flowable resin composite in combination with two different adhesive systems. Fifty primary molars were grinded on the occlusal surface to obtain flat dentin substrate and randomly divided into 5 groups (n = 10): OFL:Phosphoric Acid/Optibond FL/Premise Flow; OAO:Optibond All-In-One/Premise Flowable; II:Polyacrylic Acid/Fuji II; IX:Polyacrylic Acid/Fuji IX; V:Vertise Flow. Cylinders (3mm diameter - 5mm height) of restorative material were built-up in three increments over the dentin surfaces. A shear load was applied until failure. Bond strength values were statistically analysed with Kruskall-Wallis ANOVA followed by Dunn's test (P < .05). Differences in failure mode distribution were assessed with Chi-square (P < .05). OFL and OAO recorded significantly higher bond strengths than the other groups. Adhesive failures were evident in all groups except OFL and OAO, in which also cohesive failures in dentin were observed. Vertise Flow established on primary dentin bond strengths values similar to those of glass ionomer cements routinely used for restorations of primary teeth. The combination of flowable resin with etch-and-rinse or all-in-one adhesives obtained higher bond strength values, thus involving a more complex handling.

  20. Marginal adaptation and microtensile bond strength of composite indirect restorations bonded to dentin treated with adhesive and low-viscosity composite.

    PubMed

    de Andrade, Oswaldo S; de Goes, Mario F; Montes, Marcos A J R

    2007-03-01

    This study evaluated the marginal adaptation of composite indirect restorations bonded with dual curing resin cement after different strategies to seal dentin. Different bonding techniques associated or not with a low-viscosity composite resin (LVCR) were utilized. In addition, the bond strength between composite resin and pre-sealed dentin was evaluated in the buccal and pulpal walls of class I cavities, prepared for indirect restorations. Thirty-three freshly extracted human molars were used for this study, divided into three groups (n=11) representing different techniques to seal dentin-(Group 1) Conventional technique: the adhesive system was applied and polymerized just before the cementation of the indirect restoration; (Group 2) Dual bonding technique: a first layer of the adhesive system was applied and polymerized just after preparation, and a second layer just before the final cementation; (Group 3) Resin coating technique: a LVCR was applied and polymerized after the first layer of the adhesive system, and before the impression. A further application of the adhesive system was performed before the placement of the restoration. The restorations were polished and a solution of acid red propylene-glycol was dropped on each specimen's occlusal surface for 10 s. The dye penetrations were captured under stereoscopic lens and the images were transferred to a computer with a measurement program, in order to determine the extension of the dye penetration. The microtensile bond strength test (muTBS) was applied on pulpal (P) and buccal (B) walls of the restorations for Groups 1-3. The subgroups for muTBS were: Group 1P (n=13); Group 1B (n=7); Group 2P (n=6); Group 2B (n=14); Group 3P (n=14); Group 3B (n=15). All specimens were sectioned to obtain an area of 0.8 mm2. The specimens were mounted on a microtensile device and fractured using a universal testing machine at a cross-head speed of 1mm/min. Failure modes were analyzed by SEM. One-way ANOVA and multiple

  1. Adhesive/Dentin Interface: The Weak Link in the Composite Restoration

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Paulette; Ye, Qiang; Park, Jonggu; Topp, Elizabeth M.; Misra, Anil; Marangos, Orestes; Wang, Yong; Bohaty, Brenda S.; Singh, Viraj; Sene, Fabio; Eslick, John; Camarda, Kyle; Katz, J. Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Results from clinical studies suggest that more than half of the 166 million dental restorations that were placed in the United States in 2005 were replacements for failed restorations. This emphasis on replacement therapy is expected to grow as dentists use composite as opposed to dental amalgam to restore moderate to large posterior lesions. Composite restorations have higher failure rates, more recurrent caries, and increased frequency of replacement as compared to amalgam. Penetration of bacterial enzymes, oral fluids, and bacteria into the crevices between the tooth and composite undermines the restoration and leads to recurrent decay and premature failure. Under in vivo conditions the bond formed at the adhesive/dentin interface can be the first defense against these noxious, damaging substances. The intent of this article is to review structural aspects of the clinical substrate that impact bond formation at the adhesive/dentin interface; to examine physico-chemical factors that affect the integrity and durability of the adhesive/dentin interfacial bond; and to explore how these factors act synergistically with mechanical forces to undermine the composite restoration. The article will examine the various avenues that have been pursued to address these problems and it will explore how alterations in material chemistry could address the detrimental impact of physico-chemical stresses on the bond formed at the adhesive/dentin interface. PMID:20195761

  2. 21 CFR 872.3070 - Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. 872..., and amalgam alloy. (a) Identification. Dental amalgam is a device that consists of a combination of elemental mercury, supplied as a liquid in bulk, sachet, or predosed capsule form, and amalgam...

  3. 21 CFR 872.3070 - Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. 872..., and amalgam alloy. (a) Identification. Dental amalgam is a device that consists of a combination of elemental mercury, supplied as a liquid in bulk, sachet, or predosed capsule form, and amalgam...

  4. 21 CFR 872.3070 - Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. 872..., and amalgam alloy. (a) Identification. Dental amalgam is a device that consists of a combination of elemental mercury, supplied as a liquid in bulk, sachet, or predosed capsule form, and amalgam...

  5. 21 CFR 872.3070 - Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. 872..., and amalgam alloy. (a) Identification. Dental amalgam is a device that consists of a combination of elemental mercury, supplied as a liquid in bulk, sachet, or predosed capsule form, and amalgam...

  6. 21 CFR 872.3070 - Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. 872..., and amalgam alloy. (a) Identification. Dental amalgam is a device that consists of a combination of elemental mercury, supplied as a liquid in bulk, sachet, or predosed capsule form, and amalgam...

  7. [Amalgam, composite and compomer: microbiological study].

    PubMed

    Zogheib, C M; Hardan, L; Khoury, C Kassis; Naaman, N Bou Abboud

    2012-03-01

    Restorative materials have different consequences on the periodontium. The surface of these materials may influence gingival health and cause in some instances gingival inflammation. The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare, in a healthy periodontium, intracrevicular plaque bacteria (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Tannerella forsythensis and Treponema denticola), at day 0 and at 6 months, around subgingivally located amalgam, composite and compomer fillings. All the tests were negative (less than 0.1% of the sum of 103 cells), since none of the investigated pathogens were detected. It has been concluded that the material used does not have direct effect on the bacteria species developed around the restorations at this short time period.

  8. Effect of postoperative peroxide bleaching on the marginal seal of composite restorations bonded with self-etch adhesives.

    PubMed

    Roubickova, A; Dudek, M; Comba, L; Housova, D; Bradna, P

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of peroxide bleaching on the marginal seal of composite restorations bonded with several adhesive systems. Combined cylindrical Class V cavities located half in enamel and half in dentin were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of human molars. The cavities were bonded with the self-etch adhesives Clearfil SE-Bond (CLF), Adper Prompt (ADP), and iBond (IBO) and an etch-and-rinse adhesive Gluma Comfort Bond (GLU) and restored with a microhybrid composite Charisma. Experimental groups were treated 25 times for eight hours per day with a peroxide bleaching gel Opalescence PF 20, while the control groups were stored in distilled water for two months and then subjected to a microleakage test using a dye penetration method. Scanning electron microscopy was used to investigate the etching and penetration abilities of the adhesives and morphology of debonded restoration-enamel interfaces after the microleakage tests. Statistical analyses were performed using nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney, and Wilcoxon tests at p=0.05. The microleakage of all GLU groups was low and not significantly affected by peroxide bleaching. Low microleakage was recorded for CLF control groups, but after bleaching, a small but significant increase in microleakage at the enamel margin indicated its sensitivity to peroxide bleaching. For ADP and IBO control groups, the microleakage at the enamel margins was significantly higher than for GLU and CLF and exceeded that at the dentin margins. Bleaching did not induce any significant changes in the microleakage. Electron microscopy analysis indicated that in our experimental setup, decreased adhesion and mechanical resistance of the ADP- and IBO-enamel interfaces could be more important than the chemical degradation effects induced by the peroxide bleaching gel.

  9. The use of amalgam in pediatric dentistry: new insights and reappraising the tradition.

    PubMed

    Fuks, Anna B

    2015-01-01

    The debate on amalgam led to its being phased out in some countries. Results of clinical trials report failure rates of amalgams ranging from 12 percent to over 70 percent. Treatment of caries should meet the needs of each particular patient, based on his/her caries risk. In general, for small occlusal lesions, a conservative preventive resin restoration would be more appropriate than the classic Class I amalgam preparation. For proximal lesions, amalgam would be indicated for two-surface Class II preparations that do not extend beyond the line angles of primary teeth. This recommendation might not be appropriate for high-risk patients or restoring primary first molars in children four years old and younger where stainless steel crowns have demonstrated better longevity. Currently, amalgam demonstrates the best clinical success for Class II restorations that extend beyond the proximal line angles of permanent molars. The need to reduce the use of amalgam as a mercury-containing material is inevitable when aiming to reduce environmental contamination. It is important always to praise prevention and constantly search for biologically safe materials regarding health, clinical work, and environment. The purpose of this report was to summarize several factors that affect the effectiveness, advantages, and disadvantages of using dental amalgam in primary teeth.

  10. Secondary Caries Development in in situ Gaps next to Composite and Amalgam.

    PubMed

    Kuper, Nicolien K; Montagner, Anelise F; van de Sande, Françoise H; Bronkhorst, Ewald M; Opdam, Niek J M; Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte D J N M

    2015-01-01

    This in situ study investigated the secondary caries development in dentin in gaps next to composite and amalgam. For 21 days, 14 volunteers wore a modified occlusal splint containing human dentin samples with an average gap of 215 µm (SD=55 µm) restored with three different materials: Filtek Supreme composite, Clearfil AP-X composite and Tytin amalgam. Eight times a day, the splint with samples was dipped in a 20% sucrose solution for 10 min. Before and after caries development, specimens were imaged with transversal wavelength independent microradiography, and lesion depth (LD) and mineral loss (ML) were calculated. The LD and ML of the three restoration materials were compared within patients using paired t tests (α=5%). In total 38 composite samples (Filtek n=19 and AP-X n=19) and 19 amalgam samples could be used for data analysis. AP-X composite presented the highest mean values of LD and ML of the three restorative materials. Amalgam showed statistically significantly less ML (Δ=452 µm×vol%) than the combined composite materials (p=0.036). When comparing amalgam to the separate composite materials, only AP-X composite showed higher ML (Δ=515 µm×vol%) than amalgam (p=0.034). Analysis of LD showed the same trends, but these were not statistically significant. In conclusion, amalgam showed reduced secondary caries progression in dentin in gaps compared to composite materials tested in this in situ model.

  11. Evaluation of bond strength of silorane and methacrylate based restorative systems to dentin using different cavity models

    PubMed Central

    ISAAC, Stephano Zerlottini; BERGAMIN, Ana Claudia Pietrobom; TURSSI, Cecília Pedroso; do AMARAL, Flávia Lucisano Botelho; BASTING, Roberta Tarkany; FRANÇA, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength (µTBS) to dentin of two different restorative systems: silorane-based (P90), and methacrylate-based (P60), using two cavity models. Material and Methods Occlusal enamel of 40 human third molars was removed to expose flat dentin surface. Class I cavities with 4 mm mesial-distal width, 3 mm buccal-lingual width and 3 mm depth (C-factor=4.5) were prepared in 20 teeth, which were divided into two groups (n=10) restored with P60 and P90, bulk-filled after dentin treatment according to manufacturer's instructions. Flat buccal dentin surfaces were prepared in the 20 remaining teeth (C-factor=0.2) and restored with resin blocks measuring 4x3x3 mm using the two restorative systems (n=10). The teeth were sectioned into samples with area between 0.85 and 1.25 mm2 that were submitted to µTBS testing, using a universal testing machine (EMIC) at speed of 0.5 mm/min. Fractured specimens were analyzed under stereomicroscope and categorized according to fracture pattern. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey Kramer tests. Results For flat surfaces, P60 obtained higher bond strength values compared with P90. However, for Class I cavities, P60 showed significant reduction in bond strength (p<0.05). No statistical difference between restorative systems was shown for Class I cavity model (p>0.05), or between Class I Cavity and Flat Surface group, considering P90 restorative system (p>0.05). Regarding fracture pattern, there was no statistical difference among groups (p=0.0713) and 56.3% of the fractures were adhesive. Conclusion It was concluded that methacrylate-based composite µTBS was influenced by cavity models, and the use of silorane-based composite led to similar bond strength values compared to the methacrylate-based composite in cavities with high C-factor. PMID:24212992

  12. Novel Amalgams for In-Space Fabrication of Replacement Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, Calvin T.; Van Hoose, James R.; Grugel, R. N.

    2012-01-01

    Being able to fabricate replacement parts during extended space flight missions precludes the weight, storage volume, and speculation necessary to accommodate spares. Amalgams, widely used in dentistry, are potential candidates for fabricating parts in microgravity environments as they are moldable, do not require energy for melting, and do not pose fluid handling problems. Unfortunately, amalgams have poor tensile strength and the room temperature liquid component is mercury. To possibly resolve these issues a gallium-indium alloy was substituted for mercury and small steel fibers were mixed in with the commercial alloy powder. Subsequent microscopic examination of the novel amalgam revealed complete bonding of the components, and mechanical testing of comparable samples showed those containing steel fibers to have a significant improvement in strength. Experimental procedures, microstructures, and test results are presented and discussed in view of further improving properties.

  13. The Influence of Different Restorative Materials on Secondary Caries Development in situ

    PubMed Central

    van de Sande, Françoise H.; Opdam, Niek J.M.; Truin, Gert Jan; Bronkhorst, Ewald M.; de Soet, Johannes J.; Cenci, Maximiliano S.; Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The effect of direct restorative materials on caries lesion formation was investigated with an 8-week in situ study with split-mouth design, testing the hypothesis that no difference in mineral loss next to a restoration would be found between different composite-based-materials and amalgam. Methods: Six groups (n=18) of restored dentin samples were prepared using amalgam, a microhybrid, a nanohybrid and a silorane composite. The composites were adhesively bonded with systems with or without an antibacterial monomer (Clearfil-SE-Protect, Clearfil-SE-bond, respectively), except for the silorane group (Silorane- System-Adhesive). Non-restored dentin samples were used as control (primary caries). Samples were inserted into slots, in lower prosthesis especially made for the experiment. Subjects were instructed to dip the lower prosthesis in a sucrose solution 4 times per day. At baseline and 8 weeks, samples were radiographed extra-orally and the integrated mineral loss was calculated. Data were statistically analyzed using multiple linear regression with a multilevel model (p=0.05). Results: Nine subjects were selected, and only outer lesions were observed. The hypothesis was partially rejected, as the microhybrid composite bonded with the antibacterial system and the nanohybrid composite presented statistically significant lower mineral loss compared to amalgam. Also, no significant differences were seen for these groups compared to control. Conclusion: Within the limits of this study, the restorative material may influence outer lesion progression. Amalgam was not found to be related to lower secondary caries progression in dentin compared to composite-based materials after 8 weeks in situ. PMID:25010541

  14. Restorative material and loading type influence on the biomechanical behavior of wedge shaped cervical lesions.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Fabrícia Araújo; Zeola, Livia Fávaro; de Almeida Milito, Giovana; Reis, Bruno Rodrigues; Pereira, Rodrigo Dantas; Soares, Paulo Vinícius

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the influence of restorative materials used on the rehabilitation of MOD cavities and loading type, on biomechanical behavior of wedge-shaped (WS) lesions in endodontically treated maxillary premolars. The investigation was conducted by 3D finite element analysis (FEA) and strain gauge test. Six models were generated, with MOD cavities and endodontic treatment: A (MOD amalgam restoration), R (MOD composite restoration), AL (A + cervical lesion (L)), RL, ALR (A + cervical lesion restored with composite (LR)), and RLR. Each model underwent two compressive loading (100N): axial and oblique-45° angle to the long axis on the buccal cusp. The models were analyzed by von Mises criteria. For strain gauge test, 14 standardized maxillary premolars were treated according to the groups described for FEA. Two strain gauges were bonded on each sample submitted to compressive loading in a mechanical testing machine. A presented higher stress concentration and strain values than R. Oblique loading promoted highest stress concentration and strain rates for all groups. ALR and RLR presented similar stress-strain distribution pattern when compared to A and R. The interaction between MOD cavity restored with amalgam and oblique loading propitiated the highest stress concentration and strain values on cervical region and WS lesion. The MOD cavity restored with composite resin is a better option than amalgam to improve the biomechanical behavior of wedge-shaped lesion, avoiding dental failure. In addition, the occlusal interferences must be removed, allowing homogeneous contact distribution and preventing WS lesion progression.

  15. Chemomechanical caries removal in primary molars : evaluation of marginal leakage and shear bond strength in bonded restorations--an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Viral, P M; Nagarathna, C; Shakuntala, B S

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate and compare the efficiency, marginal leakage and shear bond strength of Carisolv and Papacarie in primary molars. Freshly extracted 60 human carious primary molars were randomly divided into two experimental groups--Group I [caries removal by Carisolv] and Group II [caries removal by Papacarie]. The amount of time taken for complete caries removal was recorded using a stopwatch. After bonded restorations, both the experimental groups were further randomly subdivided into four experimental groups and subjected to marginal leakage and shear bond strength evaluation. Papacarie [337.67 +/- 18.13] was clinically more efficient than Carisolv [461.33 +/- 27.76] in removing caries with respect to time in seconds. 66.7% of teeth treated with Carisolv did not show any marginal leakage as compared to 20% with Papacarie. The mean [ +/- SD] shear bond strength of Carisolv [9.67 +/- 3.80] treated teeth was slightly more when compared to Papacarie [8.36 +/- 4.51]. Papacarie was clinically more efficient in caries removal but showed significantly more marginal leakage than Carisolv.

  16. An evaluation of a lathe-cut high-copper amalgam alloy.

    PubMed

    Knibbs, P J; Plant, C G; Shovelton, D S; Jones, P A

    1987-09-01

    Modification of an amalgam alloy may give rise to improved physical properties. The physical properties of a newly formulated, single-composition lathe-cut amalgam alloy were studied and found to be superior to those of a conventional lathe-cut amalgam alloy. However, such modification in formulation may result in changes in the clinical handling properties of the material. The high-copper amalgam alloy was assessed by a panel of general practitioners who found that the general handling properties of the material were similar to those of conventional lathe-cut amalgam alloys. The longer term performance of the high-copper alloy was assessed by means of a blind, controlled clinical trial carried out by two operators. A 1-year assessment of the resulting restorations and tooth replicas could not distinguish between the high-copper alloy and a conventional alloy. The two alloys had both given good clinical results.

  17. The effect of resin cement type and cleaning method on the shear bond strength of resin cements for recementing restorations.

    PubMed

    Koodaryan, Roodabeh; Hafezeqoran, Ali; Khakpour Maleki, Amin

    2017-04-01

    This laboratory study assessed the effect of different dentin cleaning procedures on shear bond strength of resin cements for recementing prosthesis. 4 × 4 flat surface was prepared on the labial surface of 52 maxillary central incisors. Metal frames (4 × 4 × 1.5 mm) were cast with nickel-chromium alloy. All specimens were randomly divided into 2 groups to be cemented with either Panavia F2.0 (P) or RelyX Ultimate (U) cement. The initial shear bond strength was recorded by Universal Testing Machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Debonded specimens were randomly allocated into 2 subgroups (n = 13) according to the dentin cleaning procedures for recementation. The residual cement on bonded dentin surfaces was eliminated with either pumice slurry (p) or tungsten carbide bur (c). The restorations were rebonded with the same cement and were subjected to shear test. Data failed the normality test (P < .05), thus were analyzed with Mann Whitney U-test, Wilcoxon signed rank test, and two-way ANOVA after logarithmic transformation (α = .05). The initial shear bond strength of group P was significantly higher than group U (P = .001). Pc and Uc groups presented higher bond strength after recementation compared to the initial bond strength. However, it was significant only in Pc group (P = .034). The specimens recemented with Panavia F2.0 provided higher bond strength than RelyX Ultimate cement. Moreover, a tungsten carbide bur was a more efficient method in removing the residual resin cement and increased the bond strength of Panavia F2.0 cement after recementation.

  18. The effect of resin cement type and cleaning method on the shear bond strength of resin cements for recementing restorations

    PubMed Central

    Koodaryan, Roodabeh; Khakpour Maleki, Amin

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE This laboratory study assessed the effect of different dentin cleaning procedures on shear bond strength of resin cements for recementing prosthesis. MATERIALS AND METHODS 4 × 4 flat surface was prepared on the labial surface of 52 maxillary central incisors. Metal frames (4 × 4 × 1.5 mm) were cast with nickel-chromium alloy. All specimens were randomly divided into 2 groups to be cemented with either Panavia F2.0 (P) or RelyX Ultimate (U) cement. The initial shear bond strength was recorded by Universal Testing Machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Debonded specimens were randomly allocated into 2 subgroups (n = 13) according to the dentin cleaning procedures for recementation. The residual cement on bonded dentin surfaces was eliminated with either pumice slurry (p) or tungsten carbide bur (c). The restorations were rebonded with the same cement and were subjected to shear test. Data failed the normality test (P < .05), thus were analyzed with Mann Whitney U-test, Wilcoxon signed rank test, and two-way ANOVA after logarithmic transformation (α = .05). RESULTS The initial shear bond strength of group P was significantly higher than group U (P = .001). Pc and Uc groups presented higher bond strength after recementation compared to the initial bond strength. However, it was significant only in Pc group (P = .034). CONCLUSION The specimens recemented with Panavia F2.0 provided higher bond strength than RelyX Ultimate cement. Moreover, a tungsten carbide bur was a more efficient method in removing the residual resin cement and increased the bond strength of Panavia F2.0 cement after recementation. PMID:28435620

  19. The use of bonded partial ceramic restorations to recover heavily compromised teeth.

    PubMed

    Politano, Gianfranco; Fabianelli, Andrea; Papacchini, Federica; Cerutti, Antonio

    Restorative procedures are accompanied by a reduction of tooth stability, a decrease of fracture resistance, and an increase in deflection of weakened cusps. The choice between a direct or an indirect restorative technique, mainly in posterior areas, is a challenge, and involves biomechanical, anatomical, functional, esthetic, and financial considerations. In this article, the pros and cons of direct restorations are examined, as well as an analysis of indirect restorations and an overview of dental ceramics. In particular, several clinical uses of lithium disilicate overlays with a circumferential adhesive ferrule effect are proposed: heavily compromised vital teeth with thin walls, cracked teeth, and endodontically treated molars. Clinical procedures are described step by step on the basis of data from scientific literature. In conclusion, the use of lithium disilicate in combination with adhesive technologies can lead to a more conservative, economic, and esthetic approach in the restoration of heavily compromised teeth.

  20. Use of self-curing composite resins to facilitate amalgam repair.

    PubMed

    Lacy, A M; Rupprecht, R; Watanabe, L

    1992-01-01

    Resin cements, which have been shown to adhere to various metal alloys, were investigated as possible repair adhesives for dental amalgam. Test bars of repaired amalgam, formed by condensing new alloy against previously set alloy with or without the use of "adhesive" resins, were subjected to three-point bending measurements of transverse fracture strength. The results indicated that application of adhesive resin did not improve the breaking strength of the repaired specimens from that of specimens prepared without the use of such resins. The breaking strength of all repaired specimens was approximately 15% of the transverse fracture strength of the original intact amalgam bars. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that there was an intermixing of fresh amalgam and unset interfacial resin, which led to mechanical bonding of these materials, but there was no evidence of adhesion of the resin to the previously set amalgam.

  1. Synergistic effects of sodium 
ascorbate and acetone to restore compromised bond strength 
after enamel bleaching.

    PubMed

    Boruziniat, Alireza; Manafi, Safa; Cehreli, Zafer C

    To evaluate the effect of a new experimental solution containing sodium ascorbate (SA) and acetone on reversing compromised bonding to enamel immediately after bleaching. The buccal surface of intact, extracted human premolars (n = 60) was bleached. The teeth were then randomly assigned to 6  groups according to the type of pretreatment applied prior to adhesive procedures: 10% SA in acetone-water solution applied for 1 and 5 min (groups 1 and 2, respectively); aqueous solution of 10% SA applied for 10 min (group 3); 100% acetone applied for 10 min (group 4); no pretreatment (negative control; group 5). An additional group (positive control; group 6) comprised unbleached teeth (n = 12). Two composite microcylinders were bonded on each specimen for evaluation of microshear bond strength (MBS) and failure modes. Data were analyzed using the one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc and chi-square tests at P = 0.05. Groups 1 and 2 yielded similar MBS values to groups 4 and 6 (positive control). The mean MBS of groups 3 and 5 (negative control) were similar, and significantly lower than that of the positive control group. The application of 10% SA in an acetone-water solution prior to bonding procedures can restore compromised enamel bond strength to its unbleached state within a clinically acceptable time of 1 min.

  2. Influence of periodontal ligament simulation on bond strength and fracture resistance of roots restored with fiber posts.

    PubMed

    Marchionatti, Ana Maria Estivalete; Wandscher, Vinícius Felipe; Broch, Juliana; Bergoli, César Dalmolin; Maier, Juliana; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Kaizer, Osvaldo Bazzan

    2014-01-01

    Considering that periodontal ligament simulation may influence the stress distribution over teeth restored with intraradicular retainers, this study aimed to assess the combined effect of mechanical cycling and periodontal ligament simulation on both the bond strength between fiber posts and root dentin and the fracture resistance of teeth restored using glass fiber posts. Ninety roots were randomly distributed into 3 groups (n=10) (C-MC: control; P-MC: polyether; AS-MC: addition silicone) to test bond strength and 6 groups (n=10) (C: control; P: polyether; AS: addition silicone, without mechanical cycling, and C-MC, P-MC and AS-MC with mechanical cycling) to test fracture strength, according to the material used to simulate the periodontal ligament. For the bond strength test, fiber posts were cemented, cores were built, mechanical cycling was applied (2×10(6) cycles, 88 N, 2.2 Hz, and 45º incline), and the teeth cut into 3 slices (2 mm), which were then subjected to the push-out test at 1 mm/min. For the fracture strength test, fiber posts were cemented, cores were built, and half of the groups received mechanical cycling, followed by the compressive strength (45° to the long axis and 1 mm/min) performed on all groups. Periodontal ligament simulation did not affect the bond strength (p=0.244) between post and dentin. Simulation of periodontal ligament (p=0.153) and application of mechanical cycling (p=0.97) did not affect fracture resistance. The materials used to simulate the periodontal ligament did not affect fracture or bond strength, therefore periodontal ligament simulation using the tested materials could be considered optional in the conditions of the study.

  3. Influence of periodontal ligament simulation on bond strength and fracture resistance of roots restored with fiber posts

    PubMed Central

    MARCHIONATTI, Ana Maria Estivalete; WANDSCHER, Vinícius Felipe; BROCH, Juliana; BERGOLI, César Dalmolin; MAIER, Juliana; VALANDRO, Luiz Felipe; KAIZER, Osvaldo Bazzan

    2014-01-01

    Objective Considering that periodontal ligament simulation may influence the stress distribution over teeth restored with intraradicular retainers, this study aimed to assess the combined effect of mechanical cycling and periodontal ligament simulation on both the bond strength between fiber posts and root dentin and the fracture resistance of teeth restored using glass fiber posts. Material and Methods Ninety roots were randomly distributed into 3 groups (n=10) (C-MC: control; P-MC: polyether; AS-MC: addition silicone) to test bond strength and 6 groups (n=10) (C: control; P: polyether; AS: addition silicone, without mechanical cycling, and C-MC, P-MC and AS-MC with mechanical cycling) to test fracture strength, according to the material used to simulate the periodontal ligament. For the bond strength test, fiber posts were cemented, cores were built, mechanical cycling was applied (2×106 cycles, 88 N, 2.2 Hz, and 45º incline), and the teeth cut into 3 slices (2 mm), which were then subjected to the push-out test at 1 mm/min. For the fracture strength test, fiber posts were cemented, cores were built, and half of the groups received mechanical cycling, followed by the compressive strength (45° to the long axis and 1 mm/min) performed on all groups. Results Periodontal ligament simulation did not affect the bond strength (p=0.244) between post and dentin. Simulation of periodontal ligament (p=0.153) and application of mechanical cycling (p=0.97) did not affect fracture resistance. Conclusions The materials used to simulate the periodontal ligament did not affect fracture or bond strength, therefore periodontal ligament simulation using the tested materials could be considered optional in the conditions of the study. PMID:25466478

  4. Bonding All-Ceramic Restorations with Two Resins Cement Techniques: A Clinical Report of Three-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Anchieta, Rodolfo Bruniera; Rocha, Eduardo Passos; de Almeida, Erika Oliveira; Junior, Amilcar Chagas Freitas; Martini, Ana Paula

    2011-01-01

    Ceramics have been widely used for esthetic and functional improvements. The resin cement is the material of choice for bonding ceramics to dental substrate and it can also dictate the final esthetic appearance and strength of the restoration. The correct use of the wide spectrum of resin luting agents available depends on the dental tooth substrate. This article presents three-year clinical results of a 41 years old female patient B.H.C complaining about her unattractive smile. Two all-ceramic crowns and two laminates veneers were placed in the maxillary incisors and cemented with a self-adhesive resin luting cement and conventional resin luting cement, respectively. After a three-year follow-up, the restorations and cement/teeth interface were clinically perfect with no chipping, fractures or discoloration. Proper use of different resin luting cements shows clinical appropriate behavior after a three-year follow-up. Self-adhesive resin luting cement may be used for cementing all-ceramic crowns with high predictability of success, mainly if there is a large dentin surface available for bonding and no enamel at the finish line. Otherwise, conventional resin luting agent should be used for achieving an adequate bonding strength to enamel. PMID:21912505

  5. Bonding all-ceramic restorations with two resins cement techniques: a clinical report of three-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Anchieta, Rodolfo Bruniera; Rocha, Eduardo Passos; de Almeida, Erika Oliveira; Junior, Amilcar Chagas Freitas; Martini, Ana Paula

    2011-08-01

    Ceramics have been widely used for esthetic and functional improvements. The resin cement is the material of choice for bonding ceramics to dental substrate and it can also dictate the final esthetic appearance and strength of the restoration. The correct use of the wide spectrum of resin luting agents available depends on the dental tooth substrate. This article presents three-year clinical results of a 41 years old female patient B.H.C complaining about her unattractive smile. Two all-ceramic crowns and two laminates veneers were placed in the maxillary incisors and cemented with a self-adhesive resin luting cement and conventional resin luting cement, respectively. After a three-year follow-up, the restorations and cement/teeth interface were clinically perfect with no chipping, fractures or discoloration. Proper use of different resin luting cements shows clinical appropriate behavior after a three-year follow-up. Self-adhesive resin luting cement may be used for cementing all-ceramic crowns with high predictability of success, mainly if there is a large dentin surface available for bonding and no enamel at the finish line. Otherwise, conventional resin luting agent should be used for achieving an adequate bonding strength to enamel.

  6. Influence of Er:YAG laser irradiation distance on the bond strength of a restorative system to enamel.

    PubMed

    Chimello-Sousa, Daniela Thomazatti; de Souza, Aline Evangelista; Chinelatti, Michelle Alexandra; Pécora, Jesus Djalma; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka; Milori Corona, Silmara Aparecida

    2006-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate in vitro the effect of Er:YAG laser on bonding to enamel, varying the irradiation distance. Tensile bond strength of an adhesive restorative system to non-irradiated and irradiated enamel surfaces was evaluated. Thirty caries-free human third molars were sectioned in mesio-distal direction and embedded in acrylic resin. Enamel was flattened, and a 3-mm-diameter bonding area was demarcated. Specimens were randomly assigned into six groups: groups I-V were treated with the Er:YAG laser (80 mJ/2 Hz), varying the irradiation distance (11, 12 mm-focused, 14, 16 and 17 mm, respectively), followed by 35% phosphoric acid etching. Control group (VI) received treatment with phosphoric acid alone. Single Bond adhesive system was applied on the conditioned enamel, and composite resin cones, bonded to enamel, were fabricated with Z250. After storage, samples were tested in tensile to failure (50 kgf and 0.5 mm/min). Means in MPa were: I-9.67 (+/-3.44); II-13.29 (+/-2.65); III-13.33 (+/-2.22); IV-14.87 (+/-3.58); V-16.43 (+/-4.52); VI-22.90 (+/-3.03). ANOVA and Tukey test revealed statistically significant decrease of bond strength in group I (P < 0.05). Groups II-IV presented similar results, as did groups IV and V. Control group (VI) yielded the best overall performance (P < 0.05). Er:YAG laser irradiation adversely affected adhesion to enamel. However, bond strength was influenced by the irradiation distance, thus being stronger with the increase of distance to the target tissue.

  7. Amalgam Contact Hypersensitivity Lesion: An Unusual Presentation-Report Of A Rare Case

    PubMed Central

    Ramnarayan, BK; Maligi, PM; Smitha, T; Patil, US

    2014-01-01

    Amalgam or its components may cause Type IV hypersensitivity reactions on the oral mucosa. These amalgam contact hypersensitivity lesions (ACHL) present as white striae and plaques, erythematous, erosive, atrophic, or ulcerative lesions. Postinflammatory pigmentation in such lesions and pigmentation due to amalgam incorporation in the soft tissue have been reported in the literature. However, ACHL presenting primarily as a black pigmented lesion is extremely rare if not reported. The clinician should be aware of one such presentation of ACHL; we report a unique case of ACHL in a 30-year-old female with such a pigmented lesion in close contact with amalgam restorations. The lesion regressed considerably in a year after replacement of the restoration with posterior composites. PMID:25364611

  8. Amalgam contact hypersensitivity lesion: an unusual presentation-report of a rare case.

    PubMed

    Ramnarayan, Bk; Maligi, Pm; Smitha, T; Patil, Us

    2014-09-01

    Amalgam or its components may cause Type IV hypersensitivity reactions on the oral mucosa. These amalgam contact hypersensitivity lesions (ACHL) present as white striae and plaques, erythematous, erosive, atrophic, or ulcerative lesions. Postinflammatory pigmentation in such lesions and pigmentation due to amalgam incorporation in the soft tissue have been reported in the literature. However, ACHL presenting primarily as a black pigmented lesion is extremely rare if not reported. The clinician should be aware of one such presentation of ACHL; we report a unique case of ACHL in a 30-year-old female with such a pigmented lesion in close contact with amalgam restorations. The lesion regressed considerably in a year after replacement of the restoration with posterior composites.

  9. Mercury release of amalgams with various silver contents after exposure to bleaching agent

    PubMed Central

    Bahari, Mahmoud; Alizadeh Oskoee, Parnian; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Pouralibaba, Firoz; Morsali Ahari, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background. Since it is possible for carbamide peroxide (CP) bleaching agent to contact old amalgam restorations, the present in vitro study evaluated the amount of dissolved mercury released from amalgam restorations with various percent-ages of silver content subsequent to the use of 15% CP. Methods. Thirty ANA 2000 amalgam disks with 43.1% silver content and thirty ANA 70 amalgam disks with 69.3% silver content were prepared. In each group, 15 samples were randomly placed in glass tubes containing 15% CP (as experimental groups) and the remaining 15 samples were placed in buffered phosphate solution (as control groups) with the same 3-mL volume for 48 hours. Subsequently, the amount of mercury dissolved in each test tube was measured using Mercury Analyzing System (Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption, MASLO, Shimadzu, Japan). Data was analyzed with two-way ANOVA and a post hoc Tukey test. (α = 0.05). Results. The amount of mercury released after exposure to CP was significantly higher than that released after exposure to buffered phosphate (P < 0.001). In addition, the amount of mercury released from dental amalgam with a silver content of 43% was significantly higher than that released from dental amalgam with a silver content of 69% (P < 0.001). Conclusion. The amount of mercury release is inversely proportional to the silver content of dental amalgam. PMID:27429729

  10. In vitro evaluation of the effect of deproteinization on the marginal leakage of resin restorations using three bonding agents

    PubMed Central

    Ravishanker, Padmanabhan; Chaitanya, Krishna

    2012-01-01

    Background: The perfect sealing of the tooth/restoration interface is important to prevent bacteria penetration that may lead to secondary caries and also, when dentin is involved, prevent excessive fluid movement in the dentinal tubules that may cause hypersensitivity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of deproteinization and application of reducing agent on the marginal integrity of composite restorations using three different bonding agents (Prime & Bond NT, AdheSE and G-Bond). Materials and Methods: Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surface of 90 recently extracted human premolars and were divided into three groups (I, II, and III) based on the adhesives. Each group was subdivided into three subgroups of 10 each according to the surface treatment: application according to clinical protocol; etching with 37% phosphoric acid for 15 seconds/5% NaOCl; 10% sodium ascorbate after etching/NaOCl. The cavities were restored with Filtek Z 350 nanocomposite. The specimens were sectioned and evaluated under stereomicroscope. The morphology of the resin-dentin interface was visualized using SEM. Statistical analysis was done using Kruskal-Wallis one-way ANOVA followed by a Mann-Whitney U- test (P<0.05). Results: Group I showed significantly least microleakage among the groups. No significant difference in microleakage was found between groups I and II. Within the subgroups for each group, no significant difference in microleakage scores was observed. SEM micrographs presented gap free areas in group I and varying degrees of gaps in the other two groups. Conclusion: Etch and rinse adhesives were tenable for deproteinization than self etch adhesives. PMID:23162588

  11. Effective application duration of sodium ascorbate antioxidant in reducing microleakage of bonded composite restoration in intracoronally-bleached teeth

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Young; Kwon, Tae-Yub

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to determine an appropriate application duration of sodium ascorbate (SA) antioxidant gel in reducing microleakage of bonded composite restoration in intracoronally-bleached teeth. Materials and Methods Eighty endodontically-treated human incisors were randomly divided into eight groups: control, no bleaching; IB and DB, immediate and delayed bonding after bleaching, respectively; S10m, S60m, S24h, S3d and S7d, bleaching + SA gel for 10 min, 60 min, 24 hr, 3 day and 7 day, respectively. For bleaching, a mixture of 30% hydrogen peroxide and sodium perborate was applied for 7 day. All access cavities were restored using One-Step adhesive (Bisco Inc.) and then Aelite LS Packable composite (Bisco Inc.). The bonded specimens were subjected to 500 thermal cycles, immersed in 1% methylene blue for 8 hr, and longitudinally sectioned. Microleakage was assessed with a 0 - 4 scoring system and analyzed using nonparametric statistical methods (α = 0.05). Results Group IB showed a significantly higher microleakge than the control group (p = 0.006) and group DB a statistically similar score to the control group (p > 0.999). Although groups S10m, S60m, and S24h exhibited significantly higher scores than group DB (p < 0.05), the microleakage in groups S3d and S7d was statistically similar to that in group DB (p = 0.771, p > 0.999). Conclusions Application of SA gel for 3 day after nonvital bleaching was effective in reducing microleakage of composite restoration in intracoronally-bleached teeth. PMID:23493742

  12. Microleakage in Resin Composite Restoration following Antimicrobial Pre-treatments with 2% Chlorhexidine and Clearfil Protect Bond

    PubMed Central

    Hameed, Hisham; Babu, Biju P; Sagir, V M Mohammed; Chiriyath, Kennet J; Mathias, Jones; Shaji, A P

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate microleakage in resin composite restorations after antimicrobial pre – treatments Materials and Methods: Forty freshly extracted non carious human premolars were procured. In all forty premolar specimens, class V preparation of standard dimension were prepared and were randomly divided into three experimental and one control group. In all control and experimental groups the class V preparations were restored with FILTEK Z350 composite restorative material. The experimental groups included different self etching primers and 2% Chlorhexidine gluconate. The control group included Xeno III and no antimicrobial pre-treatment was done for the control group. Thereafter these specimens were thermocycled, dried and sealed with nail varnish, leaving 1mm around the restoration and immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsin for 24 hours and then the specimens were subjected for microleakage evaluation. The results were statistically analyzed by Kruskal Wallis Test and Mann Whitney ‘U’ test. Results: Results indicate that group II (2% chlorhexidine gluconate group) had the minimum mean value (15.05) and group III(Clearfil protect Bond group) and IV(control group) had the maximum mean microleakage at the enamel margin (23.00). At the gingival margin the lowest mean microleakage values were obtained with group I (Clearfil SE bond group) and group II (2% chlorhexidine gluconate) (20.25) and highest with group III and group IV (20.85). The difference was not statistically significant both at the enamel margin and the dentin margin (p>0.05). Interpretation & Conclusions: Within the limitations of this in-vitro study, we conclude that: None of the materials tested in this study completely eliminated microleakage at the enamel and at the gingival margin.All of the tested materials provided better sealing at the enamel margin than at the gingival margin. PMID:26229374

  13. Extreme masking: achieving predictable outcomes in challenging situations with lithium disilicate bonded restorations.

    PubMed

    Hatai, Yugo

    2014-01-01

    In contemporary dentistry, we have a vast range of materials to choose from, and metal free restorations have become the premier materials for achieving the ultimate in both esthetics and durability. Metal-free restorations are utilized with more conservative preparations to preserve the vital natural dentition, and have proven to be superior alternatives to traditional porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) restorations in many cases. There are always "pros and cons" when selecting materials, and to make the best choice it is essential for dental professionals to plan precisely and understand their options in any clinical situation. Selecting suitable materials and techniques involves consideration of the following factors: - Esthetic zone. - Required strength based on the patient's occlusion/dental habits. - Preparation reduction. - Position of the margin. - Type of restoration/preparation. - The treating clinician's philosophy. - Stump shade. Final shade. One of the most significant challenges in the metal-free dentistry is the reproduction of natural dentition without the influence of a "negative stump" - a very dark or metal core showing through the final restorations. There are many factors to be considered when working on such a case, and controlling the opacity of the coping and crown is the key to success. This article presents a unique "outside of the box" technique that provides consistent, predictable and durable restorations, which provide the best possible esthetic outcome.

  14. The 24-year clinical performance of porcelain laminate veneer restorations bonded with a two-liquid silane primer and a tri-n-butylborane-initiated adhesive resin.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Mitsuo; Matsumura, Hideo

    2014-09-01

    This report describes the bonding technique and clinical course of porcelain laminate veneer restorations applied to discolored maxillary incisors and canines. The patient was an 18-year-old woman, and tooth reduction was limited to the enamel. Laminate veneer restorations were made with a feldspathic porcelain material (Cosmotech Porcelain). After try-in, enamel surfaces were etched with 65% phosphoric acid gel, and a tri-n-butylborane-initiated resin (Super-Bond C&B) was applied as a bonding agent. The inner surface of the restorations was etched with 5% hydrofluoric acid gel (HF Gel) and treated with a two-liquid silane primer (Porcelain Liner M), after which the Super-Bond resin was applied. Each restoration was seated with a dual-activated composite luting agent (Cosmotech Composite). After 24 years and 8 months, the restorations are functioning satisfactorily. The luting system and bonding technique described in this report are an option for seating laminate veneer restorations made of silica-based tooth-colored ceramics.

  15. Influence of different light sources on microtensile bond strength and gap formation of resin cement under porcelain inlay restorations.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, A N; Usumez, A

    2004-09-01

    Clinical success with ceramic inlays/onlays has been assisted by the ability to develop a reliable bond of composite resin to dental tissues. The purpose of this study was to test the efficiency of two different light sources on microtensile bond strength and the gap formation of resin cement under class II porcelain inlay restorations. Standardized mesio-occlusal cavities were prepared in 30 freshly extracted, intact human premolar teeth. Then impressions were made and ceramic inlays were fabricated. In the cementation process, the resin cement/inlay combinations were exposed to two different photopolymerization units. The polymerizations through 15 specimens were performed with a conventional halogen light source for 60 s, and the other specimens were cured by a plasma arc light for 9 s. After the cementation process, two 1.2 x 1.2 mm wide 'I' shape sections per tooth were produced with a sectioning machine and sections were subjected to microtensile testing after 24 h or 1 week. Gap formation of specimens cured by different photopolymerization units were evaluated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Statistically significant differences were found between the microtensile bond strength of inlays exposed to conventional light and plasma arc curing unit (P < 0.001). Plasma arc curing units make it possible to polymerize composite in much shorter times than conventional curing unit. However, the samples polymerized with conventional halogen light produced better microtensile bond strength than the plasma arc unit.

  16. Influence of cavity configuration on microleakage around Class V restorations bonded with seven self-etching adhesives.

    PubMed

    Santini, Ario; Ivanovic, Vladimir; Ibbetson, Richard; Milia, Egle

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate microleakage around Class V resin composite restorations with different cavity configurations, bonded with one of seven self-etching materials or with an adhesive using the total-etch technique. Ninety-six human molars and premolars were randomly assigned to eight groups and bonded with one of seven self-etching adhesives--Prompt-L-Pop (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA), Adper Prompt-L-Pop (3M ESPE), Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray Medical, Okayama, Japan), Prime & Bond NT/NRC (Dentsply DeTrey, Konstanz, Germany), Xeno III (Dentsply DeTrey), One-Up Bond (Tokuyama Dental, Tokuyama, Japan), AdheSE (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein)-or with Prime & Bond NT (Dentsply DeTrey) using a separate total-etch technique. Cavities were cut in both the lingual and buccal surfaces and were approximately 3 mm mesiodistally, 1.5 mm deep, and 2.0 mm occlusogingivally. Selected at random, box-shaped cavities were cut on one side and V-shaped cavities were cut on the contralateral side. After bonding, the cavities were incrementally filled with a microhybrid composite (Tetric Ceram, Ivoclar Vivadent), cured, and immediately polished with Sof-Lex (3M ESPE) disks. The teeth were thermocycled, and the specimens were examined for microleakage using Procion Brilliant Red (ICI, Slough, UK) as a marker. Comparisons of both gingival and enamel margins within each of the groups showed no significant difference owing to configuration factor (C-factor; p > .5 in all cases, calculated with Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric analysis of variance [ANOVA]) and Dunn's multiple comparison test). All groups showed microleakage at the gingival margins irrespective of C-factor or bonding agent (box-shaped cavities, p = .8862; V-shaped cavities, p = .9623; using the ANOVA). Microleakage was not observed at all enamel margins regardless of C-factor or bonding agent, and there were no significant differences between the groups (box-shaped cavities, p = .9869; V-shaped cavities

  17. Effect of bleaching on restorative materials and restorations--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Attin, Thomas; Hannig, Christian; Wiegand, Annette; Attin, Rengin

    2004-11-01

    Internal and external bleaching procedures utilizing 3-35% hydrogen peroxide solutions or hydrogen peroxide releasing agents, such as carbamide peroxide or sodium perborate, can be used for whitening of teeth. The purpose of the review article was to summarize and discuss the available information concerning the effects of peroxide releasing bleaching agents on dental restorative materials and restorations. Information from all original scientific full papers or reviews listed in PubMed or ISI Web of Science (search term: bleaching AND (composite OR amalgam OR glass ionomer OR compomer OR resin OR alloy) were included in the review. Existing literature reveals that bleaching therapies may have a negative effect on physical properties, marginal integrity, enamel and dentin bond strength, and color of restorative materials as investigated in numerous in vitro studies. However, there are no reports in literature indicating that bleaching may exert a negative impact on existing restorations requiring renewal of the restorations under clinical conditions. Bleaching may exert a negative influence on restorations and restorative materials. Advice is provided based on the current literature to minimize the impact of bleaching therapies on restorative materials and restorations.

  18. [Application of gypsum-bonded investment containing niobium carbide on casting of alloy for metal-ceramic restoration].

    PubMed

    Tsuruta, S; Ban, S; Hasegawa, J; Hayashi, S; Iiyama, K; Yamamura, Y

    1990-07-01

    Experimental gypsum-bonded investments containing 0.5-5.0 wt% NbC were prepared by mechanical mixing of each powder. Setting and thermal expansion measurement, compressive strength and casting accuracy for Ni-Cr alloy for metal-ceramic restoration were investigated. Analysis of NbC during heating was carried out by X-ray diffraction, TG-DTA and SEM. NbC was oxidized to Nb2O5 with a volume change between 300-600 degrees C, as in the following equation: 2NbC + 4 1/2O2----Nb2O5 + 2CO2 The theoretical volume of 1/2Nb2O5 calculated from the lattice constants according to JCPDS file was approximately 4 times larger than that of NbC. The experimental investments of 70 wt% cristobalite and 30 wt% gypsum containing 2.0, 3.0 and 5.0 wt% NbC showed large thermal expansion of 7.0, 10.0 and 13.0% respectively. The investment containing 2.0 wt% NbC showed nearly the same casting accuracy for Ni-Cr alloys for metal-ceramic restoration as the commercial phosphate-bonded investment.

  19. Cementation of prosthetic restorations: from conventional cementation to dental bonding concept.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Marcela Filié; Rocha, Eduardo Passos; Assunção, Wirley Gonçalves

    2011-05-01

    The cementation procedure of metal-free fixed partial dentures exhibits special characteristics about the porcelains and cementation agents, which turns the correct association between these materials necessary. Our purpose in this literature review was to point the main groups of cements associated to metal-free restoration and discuss about the advantages, disadvantages, and recommendations of each one. Our search was confined to the electronic databases PubMed and SciELO and to books about this matter. There are essentially 3 types of hard cement: conventional, resin, or a hybrid of the two. The metal-free restorations can be fixed with conventional or resin cements. The right choice of luting material is of vital importance to the longevity of dental restorative materials. Conventional cements are advantageous when good compressive straight, good film thickness, and water dissolution resistance are necessary. However, they need an ideal preparation, and they are not acid dissolution resistant. Conventional cements are indicated to porcelains that cannot be acid etched. Resin cements represent the choice to metal-free restoration cementation because they present better physical properties and aesthetic than conventional agents.

  20. EFFECT OF DEPROTEINIZATION AND TUBULAR OCCLUSION ON MICROTENSILE BOND STRENGTH AND MARGINAL MICROLEAKAGE OF RESIN COMPOSITE RESTORATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Baseggio, Wagner; Consolmagno, Elaine Cristina; de Carvalho, Flávia Lunardelli Negreiros; Ueda, Julio Katuhide; Schmitt, Vera Lucia; Formighieri, Luis Alberto; Naufel, Fabiana Scarparo

    2009-01-01

    Dentin adhesion procedure presents limitations, especially regarding to lifetime stability of formed hybrid layer. Alternative procedures have been studied in order to improve adhesion to dentin. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the influence of deproteinization or dentin tubular occlusion, as well as the combination of both techniques, on microtensile bond strength μTBS) and marginal microleakage of composite resin restorations. Material and Methods: Extracted erupted human third molars were randomly divided into 4 groups. Dentin surfaces were treated with one of the following procedures: (A) 35% phosphoric acid gel (PA) + adhesive system (AS); (B) PA + 10% NaOCl + AS; (C) PA + oxalate + AS and (D) PA + oxalate + 10% NaOCl + AS. Bond strength data were analyzed statistically by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test. The microleakage scores were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney non-parametric tests. Significance level was set at 0.05 for all analyses. Results: μTBS data presented statistically lower values for groups D and B, ranking data as A>C>B>D. The use of oxalic acid resulted in microleakage reduction along the tooth/restoration interface, being significant when used alone. On the other hand, the use of 10% NaOCl alone or in combination with oxalic acid, resulted in increased microleakage. Conclusions: Dentin deproteinization with 10% NaOCl or in combination with oxalate significantly compromised both the adhesive bond strength and the microleakage at interface. Tubular occlusion prior to adhesive system application seems to be a useful technique to reduce marginal microleakage. PMID:19936527

  1. [Dental amalgam: a toxicological evaluation].

    PubMed

    Hansen, D J; Hørsted-Bindslev, P; Tarp, U

    1993-09-20

    During the latest decades the use of dental amalgam has been discussed with respect to potential toxic effects of the mercury component. In order to evaluate potential risks from this practice the recent literature is reviewed. Corrosion of fillings results in liberation of mercury. The absorption from this source in the Danish population can be estimated to be one to five micrograms/24 hrs. This exposure level is far below that accepted in occupational exposure and far below the minimum toxic level. Investigation of placental transfer of mercury has not provided any reason to avoid using amalgam during pregnancy. Micromercurialism or metal syndrome is claimed to be related to amalgam fillings. This syndrome consists mainly of complaints from the central nervous system, but also from muscles, joints and the gastrointestinal tract. The symptoms are non-specific and the documentation of the existence of such a syndrome related to mercury exposure is weak. The symptoms reported can be due to other chemical exposures, but psycho-social conditions may also play an important role. Information on disappearance of symptoms after removal of fillings may be a result of a placebo effect, which may be suggested until controlled experiments are performed. For this reason the use of chelating therapy is not indicated. Allergic contact eczema observed in few individuals is the only problem documented in connection with the use of amalgam fillings.

  2. Bond strength of different restorative materials to light-curable mineral trioxide aggregate.

    PubMed

    Cantekin, K

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the bond strength of methacrylate-based (MB) composites, silorane-based (SB) composites, and glass-ionomer cement (GIC) in comparison to TheraCal and to compare those findings with the reference pulp capping material (MTA). A total of 90 acrylic blocks were prepared. Each of the blocks were prepared as 15 mm high and 10 mm diameter and the blocks had a 2 mm high and a 5 mm diameter central hole. In 45 of the samples, the holes were fully filled with TheraCal and in the other 45 samples, the holes were fully filled with MTA. The TheraCal and the MTA samples were randomly divided into 3 subgroups of 15 specimens each: Group-1: Methacrylate-based (MB) composite; Group-2: Silorane-based (SB) composite; and Group-3: Glass-ionomer cement (GIC). For the shear bond strength (SBS) test, each block was secured in a universal testing machine. After the SBS test, the fractured surfaces were examined under a stereomicroscope at ×25 magnification. The analysis of variance that compared the experimental groups revealed the presence of significant differences among the groups (P < 0.001). The highest (19.3 MPa) and the lowest (3.4 MPa) bond strength value were recorded for the MB composite-TheraCal and the GIC-TheraCal, respectively.There were significant differences in bond strength between the TheraCal and the MTA groups for the MB composite subgroup (P < 0.001) and the SB composite subgroup (P < 0.05); however, there was no significant difference in bond strength for the GIC subgroup (P ≯ 0.05). Conlusions: The results from this in vitro study suggest that the new pulp capping material, known as light-curable MTA, showed clinically acceptable and higher shear bond scores compared to MTA when used with the MB composite.

  3. XP BOND in self-curing mode used for luting porcelain restorations. Part A: Microtensile test.

    PubMed

    Raffaelli, Ornella; Cagidiaco, Maria Crysanti; Goracci, Cecilia; Ferrari, Marco

    2007-01-01

    To assess the bond strength to dentin of an experimental adhesive and the proprietary resin cement used in different curing modes to lute ceramic disks of different thicknesses. Empress II disks (Ivoclar-Vivadent) were luted to dentin using XP BOND (Dentsply [XP]) in combination with the proprietary self-curing activator (SCA) and cement Calibra (Dentsply [C]). Curing of the adhesive was induced either by mixing with the activator (activator, groups 3 to 6) or by light irradiation for 20 s (group 2). The cement was either light cured for 40 s through the ceramic onlay (groups 1 to 5) or cured chemically (groups 6 and 7). Groups 2 and 4 were compared with group 1, in which Prime & Bond NT (Dentsply DeTrey) was tested as control. In groups 3 and 6, 2-mm-thick onlays were luted with XP+SCA, and the cement was light cured for 40 s or autocured for 5 min, respectively. These groups were compared with group 7, in which Syntac (Ivoclar Vivadent) was applied with C and, in order to reproduce the handling procedures of group 6 (although contrary to manufacturer's instructions), no light irradiation was provided for the adhesive or the cement. The influence of onlay thickness (2, 3, 4 mm) on the bond strength developed by XP+SCA/C was assessed by comparing groups 3, 4, 5. In these groups, C was light cured for 40 s through the onlay. Microtensile beams were obtained from the luted teeth. Bond strengths not including pretest failures (in parentheses: value including pretest failures as 0 MPa) were 21.0 (17.5) MPa in group 1, 24.9 (21.2) MPa in group 2, 23.7 (21.3) MPa in group 3, 29.9 (26.7) MPa in group 4, 30.3 (24.6) MPa in group 5, 28.6 (24.6) MPa in group 6, and 17.1 (9.2) MPa in group 7. Statistically significant differences were found between groups 1 and 4, groups 3 and 5, and groups 6 and 7. The bonding potential of XP BOND used with the activator or light cured in combination with Calibra in self- or dual-curing mode outperformed that of a control adhesive

  4. Dental composites and amalgam and physical development in children.

    PubMed

    Maserejian, N N; Hauser, R; Tavares, M; Trachtenberg, F L; Shrader, P; McKinlay, S

    2012-11-01

    Resin-based composite dental restoration materials may release bisphenol-A, an endocrine-disrupting chemical. Using secondary analysis of a randomized clinical safety trial of amalgam vs. composites, we tested the hypothesis that dental restoration materials affect children's growth. Children (N = 218 boys, N = 256 girls) aged 6 to 10 yrs at baseline with ≥ 2 decayed posterior teeth were randomized to amalgam or composites (bisphenol-A-diglycidyl-dimethacrylate composite for permanent teeth, urethane-dimethacrylate compomer for primary teeth) for treatment of posterior caries throughout follow-up. Primary outcomes for this analysis were 5-year changes in BMI-for-age z-scores, body fat percentage (BF%), and height velocity; exploratory analyses (n = 113) examined age at menarche. Results showed no significant differences between treatment assignment and changes in physical development in boys [(composites vs. amalgam) BF%, 4.9 vs. 5.7, p = 0.49; (BMI-z-score) 0.13 vs. 0.25, p = 0.36] or girls (8.8 vs. 7.7, p = 0.95; 0.36 vs. 0.21, p = 0.49). Children with more treatment on primary teeth had greater increases in BF% regardless of material type. Girls assigned to composites had lower risk of menarche during follow-up (hazard ratio = 0.57, 95% CI 0.35-0.95). Overall, there were no significant differences in physical development over 5 years in children treated with composites or amalgam. Additional studies examining these restoration materials in relation to age at menarche are warranted (clinicaltrials.gov number NCT00065988).

  5. [Mercury loading from amalgam fillings].

    PubMed

    Wirz, J; Ivanović, D; Schmidli, F

    1990-01-01

    Recently, the dental filling material amalgam has again been a target of criticism, especially within the mass media. The controversy has been further fueled by the combination of the patients' desire for fillings to match tooth colouring and this latest wave of artificially created fear of the poison mercury. The investigation submitted here is seen as a contribution toward clearing up the issue of any risk. Using flameless atom absorption spectroscopy, blood and urine samples were taken from four test groups and examined for their mercury content. Two of the participating groups tested (dentists and assistants) were actively processing mercury while the other two, one with and one without amalgam fillings, served as control groups. In the daily preparation of amalgam, dental staff working in the dental office were subject to greater exposure to mercury vapours. Their blood readings, therefore, were double those of the control group, while their urine readings were much higher than those for people not working with mercury. The two control groups (with and without amalgam fillings) showed no significant difference in mercury levels, which implies that these slight traces of mercury can be attributed to food and the environment. Although the mercury readings of the dental office personnel were twice as high as that of the control group, there was no threat of mercury poisoning for any of the four groups. The continued use of amalgam fillings in teeth can be recommended without reservation and at no risk to the patient. Particular measures must be taken to guarantee the safety of office staff.

  6. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength and microleakage of tricalcium silicate-based restorative material and radioopaque posterior glass ionomer restorative cement in primary and permanent teeth: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Raju, Vignesh Guptha; Venumbaka, Nilaya Reddy; Mungara, Jayanthi; Vijayakumar, Poornima; Rajendran, Sakthivel; Elangovan, Arun

    2014-01-01

    Restoration of carious primary molars is still a major concern while treating the young children that too in deep carious lesion which extends below the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ) where pulp protection and achieving adequate marginal seal are very important to prevent secondary caries. The needs were met with the development of new materials. One such of new bioactive material is tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine), recommended for restoring deep lesions. To evaluate and compare shear bond strength and microleakage of tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine) and glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP) in primary and permanent teeth. Occlusal surface of crowns were ground flat. PVC molds were stabilized over flat dentin surface and filled with tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine)/glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP) according to group ascertained. Shear bond strength was evaluated using universal testing machine (INSTRON). Standardized Class II cavities were prepared on both primary and permanent teeth, and then restored with tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine)/glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP) according to group ascertained, over which composite resin material was restored using an open sandwich technique. Microleakage was assessed using dye penetration. Microleakage was examined using a stereomicroscope. RESULTS showed that glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP) exhibited better shear bond strength than tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine). Mean microleakage score for glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP) in permanent teeth was 1.52 and for primary teeth was 1.56. The mean microleakage for tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine) in permanent teeth was 0.76 and for primary teeth was 0.60. Glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP) exhibited more microleakage than tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine), which was statistically significant

  7. Evaluation of a conditioning method to improve core-veneer bond strength of zirconia restorations.

    PubMed

    Teng, Jili; Wang, Hang; Liao, Yunmao; Liang, Xing

    2012-06-01

    The high strength and fracture toughness of zirconia have supported its extensive application in esthetic dentistry. However, the fracturing of veneering porcelains remains one of the primary causes of failure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate, with shear bond strength testing, the effect of a simple and novel surface conditioning method on the core-veneer bond strength of a zirconia ceramic system. The shear bond strength of a zirconia core ceramic to the corresponding veneering porcelain was tested by the Schmitz-Schulmeyer method. Thirty zirconia core specimens (10 × 5 × 5 mm) were layered with a veneering porcelain (5 × 3 × 3 mm). Three different surface conditioning methods were evaluated: polishing with up to 1200 grit silicon carbide paper under water cooling, airborne-particle abrasion with 110 μm alumina particles, and modification with zirconia powder coating before sintering. A metal ceramic system was used as a control group. All specimens were subjected to shear force in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The shear bond strength values were analyzed with 1-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc pairwise comparisons (α=.05). The fractured specimens were examined with a scanning electron microscope to observe the failure mode. The mean (SD) shear bond strength values in MPa were 47.02 (6.4) for modified zirconia, 36.66 (8.6) for polished zirconia, 39.14 (6.5) for airborne-particle-abraded zirconia, and 46.12 (7.1) for the control group. The mean bond strength of the control (P=.028) and modified zirconia groups (P=.014) was significantly higher than that of the polished zirconia group. The airborne-particle-abraded group was not significantly different from any other group. Scanning electron microscopy evaluation showed that cohesive fracture in the veneering porcelain was the predominant failure mode of modified zirconia, while the other groups principally fractured at the interface. Modifying the zirconia surface

  8. Influence of irradiance on the push-out bond strength of composite restorations photoactivated by LED.

    PubMed

    Segreto, Dario; Brandt, William Cunha; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenco; Sinhoreti, Mario Alexandre Coelho; Consani, Simonides

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the bond strength of resin composites to dental structure photoactivated with a light emitting diode (LED) curing unit. One hundred bovine incisors were selected and a conical cavity was prepared in the facial surface of each tooth. Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray CO., LTD. Osaka, Japan) adhesive system was applied, and the cavities were filled with a single increment of Filtektrade mark Z250 (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) or Esthet-X (Dentsply-Caulk - Mildford, DE, USA). The specimens were assigned to ten groups (n=10) according to the irradiance used: 100, 200, 300, 400, or 500 mW/cm(2). Photoactivation was accomplished using an Ultrablue IS LED (DMC Equipamentos LTDA, São Carlos, SP, Brazil). The radiant exposure time was kept constant. A push-out test was conducted in a universal testing machine. Bond strength values were submitted to a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and a Tukey's test at the 5% significance level. The bond strength of the Z250 was higher than the Eshet-X (p<0.05). However, the modulation of irradiance adjusted to the same radiant exposure had no influence on Z250. The bond strength using an irradiance of 100mW/cm(2) was higher than the other levels for Esthet-X. When composites were compared, no significant differences were detected between them for activation with irradiances of 100 and 200 mW/cm(2). The modulation of the luminous energy emitted by LED was almost unable to provide significant differences among the groups for both composites, except for a lower irradiance of Esthet-X.

  9. A galvanic study of different amalgams.

    PubMed

    Wang Chen, C P; Greener, E H

    1977-01-01

    Due to the difference in open circuit potential (OCP) versus SCE for Aristaloy amalgam (-969 mV) and Dispersalloy amalgam (-549 mV) in Ringer's solution at 25 degrees C, a galvanic cell was created with Dispersalloy amalgam as cathode and Aristaloy amalgam as anode. The galvanic corrosion current was studied as a function of time for the above cell as well as for a cell of type III dental gold (OCP is +0-5 mV) versus Aristaloy amalgam. The initial corrosion current of the latter cell (105 micronA) is about twice that for the cell of Aristaloy amalgam versus Dispersalloy amalgam (54 micronA), however, their passivating behaviour is quite similar. Also, an interrupted galvanic corrosion test simulating the oral 'make and break' situation was performed. A much higher corrosion current than the steady state was found when the two electrodes resumed contact.

  10. Effect of flowable composite liner and glass ionomer liner on class II gingival marginal adaptation of direct composite restorations with different bonding strategies.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Vivek; Singla, Mamta; Yadav, Suman; Yadav, Harish

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to comparatively evaluate the effect of flowable composite resin liner and resin modified glass ionomer liner on gingival marginal adaptation of class II cavities restored using three bonding agents (Single Bond 3M ESPE, One Coat Self Etching Bond Coltene Whaledent; Adper Easy Bond Self-Etch Adhesive 3M ESPE) and respective composite resins, under cyclic loading. The marginal adaptation was evaluated in terms of 'continuous margin' (CM) at the gingival margin. Ninety class II cavities with margins extending 1mm below the cement-enamel junction were prepared in extracted mandibular third molars. The samples were divided into three groups: no liner placement; 0.5-1mm thick flowable resin liner placement (Filtek Z350 XT flowable resin) on gingival floor and; light cure glass ionomer (Ketac N100) liner. The groups were further subdivided into three sub-groups on the basis of the bonding agents used. Cavities were restored with composite resins (Z350 for Single Bond and Adper Easy Bond; and Synergy D6 Universal, for One Coat Self Etching Bond) in 2mm increments and the samples were mechanically loaded (60N, 1,50,000 cycles). Marginal adaptation was evaluated using a low vacuum scanning electron microscope. Statistical analysis was done with two way ANOVA with Holm-Sidak's correction for multiple comparisons. Placement of flowable composite liner significantly improved the CM values of Single Bond (78±11%) and One Coat Self Etching Bond (77±9%) compared with no liner group, but the values of CM of Adper Easy Bond were not improved (61±12%). Placement of glass ionomer liner significantly improved the values of CM in all the sub-groups (78±9%, 72±10% and 77±10% for Single Bond, One Coat Self Etching Bond & Adper Easy Bond respectively) compared with no liner group. Placement of liners improved the values of 'continuous margin' in the gingival floor of the proximal cavities restored with composite resins using different bonding

  11. High-field MRI and mercury release from dental amalgam fillings.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, S M J; Neghab, M; Anoosheh, S M H; Bahaeddini, N; Mortazavi, G; Neghab, P; Rajaeifard, A

    2014-04-01

    Mercury is among the most toxic nonradioactive elements which may cause toxicity even at low doses. Some studies showed release of mercury from dental amalgam fillings in individuals who used mobile phone. This study was conducted to assess the effect of high-field MRI on mercury release from dental amalgam filling. We studied two groups of students with identical tooth decays requiring a similar pattern of restorative dentistry. They were exposed to a magnetic flux density of 1.5 T produced by a MRI machine. 16 otherwise healthy students with identical dental decay participated in this study. They underwent similar restorative dentistry procedures and randomly divided into two groups of MRI-exposed and control arms. Urinary concentrations of mercury in the control subjects were measured before (hour 0) and 48 and 72 hrs after amalgam restoration, using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. Urinary concentrations of mercury in exposed individuals were determined before (hour 0), and 24, 48, 72 and 96 hrs after amalgam restoration. Unlike control subjects, they underwent conventional brain MRI (15 min, 99 slices), 24 hrs after amalgam restoration. The mean±SD urinary mercury levels in MRI-exposed individuals increased linearly from a baseline value of 20.70±17.96 to 24.83±22.91 μg/L 72 hrs after MRI. In the control group, the concentration decreased linearly from 20.70±19.77 to 16.14±20.05 μg/L. The difference between urinary mercury in the exposed and control group, 72 hrs after MRI (96 h after restoration),was significant (p=0.046). These findings provide further support for the noxious effect of MRI (exposure to strong magnetic field)and release of mercury from dental amalgam fillings.

  12. [In vitro evaluation of mercury leakage from dental amalgam using atomic absorption spectrophotometry].

    PubMed

    Lugliè, P F; Filia, G; Chessa, G; Calaresu, G

    1999-06-01

    The use of silver amalgam as a tooth filler is under constant critical review because of its mercury content. After a review of the literature on this subject, in vitro spectrophotometry was used to assay the release of mercury by these amalgams in basal conditions. The experiment was conducted in two phases using standard doses of amalgam. In Phase 1 Black Class I cavities were created in extracted teeth that were big enough to take the required dose of amalgam. In some cases the material was inserted in a single operation, while in others the amalgam was introduced in three stages. Some of the cavities were cleansed with cotton buds bathed in ethyl alcohol, while others were not. All the drilled teeth were imbued in a bath of artificial saliva held at a constant temperature. In the second experiment, crushed amalgam was immersed in a similar bath of artificial saliva but otherwise untreated. The saliva was assayed after different time lapses using atomic absorption spectrophotometry and the FIAS technique. The results showed extremely variable but always modest quantities of free mercury in the artificial saliva. The findings suggest that not all the mercury available in the amalgamation phase is involved in the formation of the crystalline reticulum and that the percentage of mercury bonded is different every time. While the titre of free mercury encountered was always extremely low and hard to predict, it cannot be ignored.

  13. Managing the phase-down of amalgam: Part I. Educational and training issues.

    PubMed

    Lynch, C D; Wilson, N H F

    2013-08-01

    Following the recently agreed Minamata Convention, a phase-down in the use of dental amalgam will become a priority for the profession. With a lead-in period of a number of years, important changes in the mind-set of the profession are required to ensure that patient safety is not compromised. Posterior composites have been a viable, and in many cases preferable, alternative to amalgam for many years. However, notwithstanding considerable developments in dental school teaching on the application and placement of posterior composites, growing evidence to support the use of composites in the restoration of posterior teeth and advances in composite systems, many practitioners remain reluctant to place composite rather than amalgam. This paper considers the present and future use of posterior composites and highlights ways in which dental school teaching and continuing professional development (CPD) may contribute to the successful phase-down, and now inevitable discontinuation, in the use of dental amalgam.

  14. The effect of different restoration techniques on the fracture resistance of endodontically-treated molars.

    PubMed

    Cobankara, Funda Kont; Unlu, Nimet; Cetin, Ali Riza; Ozkan, Hatice Buyukozer

    2008-01-01

    This study compared the fracture resistance of endodontically-treated mandibular molars with mesio-occluso-distal (MOD) cavities restored using different restoration techniques. Sixty sound extracted mandibular molars were randomly assigned to six groups (n=10). Group 1 did not receive any preparation. The teeth in Groups 2-6 received root canal treatment and a MOD cavity preparation. The teeth in Group 2 were kept unrestored. Group 3 was restored conventionally with amalgam. Group 4 was restored with a dentin bonding system (DBS, Clearfil SE Bond) and resin composite (CR) (Clearfil Photoposterior). Group 5 was restored with indirect hybrid ceramic inlay material (Estenia). In Group 6, polyethylene ribbon fiber (Ribbond) was inserted into cavities in a buccal-to-lingual direction and the teeth were then restored with DBS and CR. After finishing and polishing, the specimens, except for Group 2, were loaded to failure by a chewing simulation device (60,000 cycles x 50 N load, 1.3 Hz frequency) in an artificial environment at 37 degrees C. Each tooth was subjected to compressive loading perpendicular to the occlusal surface at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute. The mean loads necessary to fracture were recorded in Newtons and the results were statistically analyzed. The mean fracture values were as follows: Group 1: 2485.3 +/- 193.98a, Group 2: 533.9 +/- 59.4a, Group 3: 1705.8 +/- 135.7a, Group 4: 2033.3 +/- 137.6cd, Group 5: 2121.3 +/- 156.5d, Group 6: 1908.9 +/- 132.2cd. There were statistically significant differences between the groups annotated with different letters. Thus, Group 1 (intact teeth) had the greatest fracture resistance and Group 2 (non-restored teeth) the poorest. No statistically significant differences were found between Groups 3 (amalgam), 4 (resin composite) and 6 (polyethylene ribbon fiber reinforced composite) (p > 0.05). Group 5 (indirect hybrid ceramic inlay) had greater fracture resistance than Group 3 (p < 0.05). Within the limitations of

  15. Amalgam ablation with the Er:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigdor, Harvey A.; Visuri, Steven R.; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.

    1995-04-01

    Any laser that will be used by dentist to replace the dental drill (handpiece) must remove dental hard tissues safely. These lasers must also have the ability to ablate the restorative dental materials which are present in the teeth being treated. Prior to any laser being used to treat humans a thorough knowledge of the effects of the laser treatment on dental materials must be understood. Cores of dental amalgam were created and sliced into thin wafers for this experiment. Ablation efficiency and thermal changes were evaluated with and without water. It appears as if the Er:YAG laser can effectively ablate amalgam dental material with and without water. The water prevents the temperature from increasing much above baseline and does not reduce efficiency of ablation.

  16. A new modification for improving shear bond strength and other mechanical properties of conventional glass-ionomer restorative materials.

    PubMed

    El-Negoly, Salwa A; El-Fallal, Abeer A; El-Sherbiny, Ibrahim M

    2014-02-01

    To study the effect of addition of poly(acrylamide-co-sodium acrylate) copolymer and/or TiO2 nanoparticles on the mechanochemical properties of conventional glass ionomer (GIC)-based restorative materials. The copolymer was prepared, characterized and then added, either separately or in combination with different proportions of TiO2 nanoparticles to the conventional GIC powder. The developed composites were characterized using FTIR spectrometry, x-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy. The mechanical properties of the obtained series of modified GIC formulations were investigated in comparison with other formulations containing only TiO2 nanoparticles through testing their compressive strength, flexural strength, and dentin shear bond strength. The preliminary data of the study showed a significant increase in the compressive strength of the conventional GIC after addition of 3% and 5% TiO2 nanoparticles by weight, but 7% decreased it. Upon addition of copolymer, the compressive strength was lower than that of the conventional GIC. The highest average compressive strength value was obtained upon incorporation of 7% 1:1 combination of copolymer-TiO2 nanoparticles. The results also demonstrated a significant increase in the flexural strength values after addition of both copolymer and TiO2 nanoparticles to the GIC powder. In addition, the results revealed a significant increase in values of dentin shear bond strength after copolymer addition with the highest value noted upon addition of 7% by weight of copolymer. The new series of modified glass ionomers developed here can be tailored to act as restorative materials with high quality performance in high stress-bearing areas.

  17. Influence of adhesive systems and flowable composite lining on bond strength of class II restorations submitted to thermal and mechanical stresses.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Andrea Nóbrega; Mitsui, Fabio Hiroyuki Ogata; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi; Marchi, Giselle Maria

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of adhesive systems and flowable composite lining on bond strength to gingival margins of Class II restorations after thermal/mechanical stresses. Proximal cavities were prepared in 90 bovine incisors. Teeth were assigned into nine groups (n = 10), according to the combination of bonding agent [Single Bond (SB), Optibond Solo Plus (OP), Prime & Bond NT (NT)] and layer (1 mm) of flowable composite Filtek Flow (FF) [absent, one layer, two layers]. Materials were applied according to manufacturers' instructions, and FF layers were photoactivated separately. Restorations were concluded with composite resin and were submitted to thermal (1000x, 5-55 degrees C) and mechanical stresses (100,000x, 80 N). For microtensile evaluation, slabs from the gingival bonded interface were obtained, tested under tension, and their failure mode was observed by scanning electron microscopy. Bond strength data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA/Tukey's test. No interaction was observed between adhesive systems and FF lining (p = 0.89). Also, no significant difference was found between bond strength values, whether or not FF layers were used (p = 0.33). However, bonding systems demonstrated significant differences (p = 0.01). SB and NT presented means higher than those observed with OP. Fracture modes varied considerably between experimental groups, and a greater frequency of cohesive failures was noted when FF layers were used. 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Effect of whitening toothpastes on bonding of restorative materials to enamel of primary teeth.

    PubMed

    Abdelmegid, F Y

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro investigation was to measure shear bond strength (SBS) of a resin composite and a resin-modified glass ionomer to enamel of primary teeth after application of different whitening toothpastes (WTs). Eighty labial enamel surfaces of primary incisors were randomly distributed into 8 groups of 10 each according to the surface treatment and bonding material. G1 and G2, control (brushed with water without WT); G3 and G4, (brushed with Colgate Optic White WT [Colgate-Palmolive Company, New York, NY, USA]), G5 and G6, (brushed with Crest Pro-Health Whitening WT [Procter and Gamble, Cincinnati, OH, USA]) and G7 and G8, (brushed with Arm and Hammer Advance White Extreme Whitening with Stain Defense WT [Church and Dwight Co., Princeton, NJ, USA]). SBS was measured at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min and the type of bond failure was assessed using a stereomicroscope. There was significant difference between SBS of composite resin in groups 1, 3, 5, and 7 (P < 0.001), but no difference between resin-modified glass ionomer in groups 2, 4, 6, and 8 (P < 0.056). SBS of group 1 (control) was greater than groups 3, 5, and 7. There was a significant difference between group 1 and group 2 as well as group 7 and group 8 (P < 0.001). WTs affect SBS of resin composite, but not resin-modified glass ionomer to enamel of primary teeth. No difference of failure modes between different groups of tested materials.

  19. The effect of oxalate desensitizers on the microleakage of resin composite restorations bonded by etch and rinse adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Motamedi, Mehran; Alavi, Ali Asghar; Namvar, Babak

    2010-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of an oxalate desensitizer (OX) on the marginal microleakage of resin composite restorations bonded by two three-step and two two-step etch and rinse adhesives. Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces of 126 extracted premolars at the cementoenamel junction and randomly divided into nine groups of 14 each. In the control groups (1-4), four adhesives were applied, respectively, including Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SBMP), Optibond FL (OBFL), One-Step Plus (OS) and Excite (EX). In the experimental groups (5-8), the same adhesives, in combination with OX (BisBlock), were applied. And, in one group, OX was applied without any adhesive, as the negative control group (9). All the groups were restored with a resin composite. After 24 hours of storage in distilled water and thermocycling, the samples were placed in 1% methylene blue dye solution. The dye penetration was evaluated using a stereomicroscope. The data were analyzed using non-parametric tests. The OX application, in combination with OBFL and EX, resulted in significantly increasing microleakage at the gingival margins (p < 0.05), while it had no effect on OS and SBMP (p > 0.05). At the occlusal margins, no significant difference in microleakage was observed after OX application for each of four adhesives (p > 0.05).

  20. An esthetic solution for single-implant restorations - type III porcelain veneer bonded to a screw-retained custom abutment: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Magne, Pascal; Magne, Michel; Jovanovic, Sascha A

    2008-01-01

    A new esthetic solution to restore dental implants in combination with limited interdental, facial or labial, or interocclusal space is presented. This article describes the translational application of novel-design porcelain veneers and adhesive restorative principles in the implant realm. A patient is presented who was treated with a single implant-supported restoration replacing a missing mandibular lateral incisor and partially collapsed interdental space. A screw-retained custom metal ceramic abutment was combined with a bonded porcelain restoration. This unique design was motivated by the limited restorative space and subgingival implant shoulder. It was also developed as a solution to the interference of the screw-access channel with the incisal edge, therefore providing the surgeon with more options during implant axis selection. The porcelain-to-porcelain adhesive approach was used instead of traditional principles of retention and resistance form of the abutment.

  1. Effect of LED curing on the microleakage, shear bond strength and surface hardness of a resin-based composite restoration.

    PubMed

    Oberholzer, Theunis G; Du Preez, Ignatius C; Kidd, M

    2005-06-01

    To determine the effect of Light emitting diode (LED) curing on dental resins, microleakage, shear bond strength and surface hardness of a dental composite cured with different LEDs were determined and compared with conventional halogen curing. For microleakage, Class V cavities were restored with Esthet-X, divided into groups, and exposed to one of the curing protocols (Elipar Freelight in soft start and standard modes; Ultra-Lume 2; Spectrum 800). Standard dye penetration tests were performed and the data summarised in a 2-way contingency table of observed frequencies. The Chi-square test was used (p<0.05) to test for significant differences between the lights. For surface hardness, samples of Esthet-X were exposed to the light-curing units (LCUs). Vickers hardness was determined on the upper and the bottom surfaces. Data was subjected to statistical analysis using ANOVA (p<0.05). Shear bond strength was determined using a push out method. Comparisons (ANOVA, p<0.05) were made between the different curing protocols. No significant difference in microleakage could be demonstrated between the different LCUs at the enamel side (p=0.60). At the dentin side only the Elipar Freelight (soft start), could significantly reduce microleakage (p<0.01). The hardness score for the halogen light was significantly lower than for the LED lights (p<0.01). The Spectrum 800 and the Elipar Freelight (soft start) have significantly higher shear bond strengths than the others (p<0.01). It was concluded that the LED source is more efficient for a comparable overall power output.

  2. Dental Cements for Luting and Bonding Restorations: Self-Adhesive Resin Cements.

    PubMed

    Manso, Adriana P; Carvalho, Ricardo M

    2017-10-01

    Self-adhesive resin cements combine easy application of conventional luting materials with improved mechanical properties and bonding capability of resin cements. The presence of functional acidic monomers, dual cure setting mechanism, and fillers capable of neutralizing the initial low pH of the cement are essential elements of the material and should be understood when selecting the ideal luting material for each clinical situation. This article addresses the most relevant aspects of self-adhesive resin cements and their potential impact on clinical performance. Although few clinical studies are available to establish solid clinical evidence, the information presented provides clinical guidance in the dynamic environment of material development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Bond strength of luting cements to core foundation materials.

    PubMed

    Hewlett, Sandra; Wadenya, Rose O; Mante, Francis K

    2010-03-01

    The purpose was to compare the shear bond strength of luting cements to foundation materials and to determine the effect of storage in lactate buffer solution. Disks that were 8 mm in diameter and 2-mm thick were fabricated from foundation substrates: amalgam, composite resin, resin-modified glass ionomer, and glass ionomer (n = 20). Cylinders that were 2 mm in diameter and 4 mm in length of resin luting cement, resin-modified glass ionomer luting cement, and a glass ionomer luting cement were bonded to the foundation substrate materials. Shear bond strength of each foundation substrate material/cement pair was determined with a universal testing machine after 24 hours. A second set of specimens was tested after storage in a 0.01M lactate buffer solution for 24 hours. A three-way analysis of variance followed by pair-wise comparisons was performed to compare bond strengths (P < .05). The resin cement provided the highest (P < .05) bond strengths to amalgam, composite resin, and resin-modified glass ionomer foundation materials while the glass ionomer cement showed the lowest bond strength (P < .05) to composite resin and glass ionomer foundation restoration materials. After immersion in a 0.01M lactate buffer solution, the shear bond strength of all the material combinations was significantly lower (P < .05) than nonimmersed specimens, except the bonds between composite resin foundation and resin luting cement, which significantly increased (P < .05) in strength. The resin cement had the highest bond strength to most foundation substrates investigated. The highest bond was observed between the composite resin foundation and resin cement. This bond was also the most durable on immersion in lactic acid.

  4. The association between amalgam dental surfaces and urinary mercury levels in a sample of Albertans, a prevalence study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to quantify the relationship between number of dental amalgam surfaces and urinary mercury levels. Methods This study uses participant data from a large philanthropic chronic disease prevention program in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Urine samples were analysed for mercury levels (measured in μg/g-creatinine). T-tests were used to determine if differences in urine mercury were statistically significant between persons with no dental amalgam surfaces and one or more dental amalgam surfaces. Linear regression was used to estimate the change in urinary mercury per amalgam surface. Results Urinary mercury levels were statistically significantly higher in participants with amalgam surfaces, with an average difference of 0.55 μg/g-creatinine. Per amalgam surface, we estimated an expected increase of 0.04 μg/g-creatinine. Measured urinary mercury levels were also statistically significantly higher in participants with dental amalgam surfaces following the oral administration of 2,3-dimercaptopropane-l-sulfonate (DMPS) and meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) which are used to mobilize mercury from the blood and tissues. Discussion Our estimates indicate that an individual with seven or more dental amalgam surfaces has 30% to 50% higher urinary mercury levels than an individual without amalgams. This is consistent with past literature that has identified seven amalgam surfaces as an unsafe level of exposure to mercury vapor. Our analysis suggests that continued use of silver amalgam dental fillings for restorative dentistry is a non-negligible, unnecessary source of mercury exposure considering the availability of composite resin alternatives. PMID:23984857

  5. Environmental hazard evaluation of amalgam scrap.

    PubMed

    Fan, P L; Chang, S B; Siew, C

    1992-11-01

    Amalgam scrap was subjected to two different Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) extraction procedures to determine if it presents an environmental hazard. The results indicate that concentrations of mercury and silver in the extracts do not exceed the EPA's maximum allowable concentrations. It was concluded that amalgam scrap is not a hazardous solid waste. Proper handling of amalgam scrap disposal by recycling is, however, highly recommended.

  6. Neurodevelopmental Outcomes at 5 Years in Children Exposed Prenatally to Maternal Dental Amalgam: The Seychelles Child Development Nutrition Study

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Gene E.; van Wijngaarden, Edwin; Love, Tanzy M.T.; McSorley, Emeir M.; Bonham, Maxine P.; Mulhern, Maria S.; Yeates, Alison J.; Davidson, Philip W.; Shamlaye, Conrad F.; Strain, J.J.; Thurston, Sally W.; Harrington, Donald; Zareba, Grazyna; Wallace, Julie M.W.; Myers, Gary J.

    2013-01-01

    Limited human data are available to assess the association between prenatal mercury vapor (Hg0) exposure from maternal dental amalgam restorations and neurodevelopment of children. We evaluated the association between maternal dental amalgam status during gestation and children’s neurodevelopmental outcomes at 5 years in the Seychelles Child Development Nutrition Study (SCDNS). Maternal amalgam status was determined prospectively in a longitudinal cohort study examining the associations of prenatal exposure to nutrients and methylmercury (MeHg) with neurodevelopment. A total of 236 mother-child pairs initially enrolled in the SCDNS in 2001 were eligible to participate. Maternal amalgam status was measured as number of amalgam surfaces (the primary metric) and number of occlusal points. The neurodevelopmental assessment battery was comprised of age-appropriate tests of cognitive, language, and perceptual functions, and scholastic achievement. Linear regression analysis controlled for MeHg exposure, maternal fatty acid status, and other covariates relevant to child development. Maternal amalgam status evaluation yielded an average of 7.0 surfaces (range 0–28) and 11.0 occlusal points (range 0–40) during pregnancy. Neither the number of maternal amalgam surfaces nor occlusal points were associated with any outcome. Our findings do not provide evidence to support a relationship between prenatal exposure to Hg0 from maternal dental amalgam and neurodevelopmental outcomes in children at 5 years of age. PMID:23856391

  7. Neurodevelopmental outcomes at 5 years in children exposed prenatally to maternal dental amalgam: the Seychelles Child Development Nutrition Study.

    PubMed

    Watson, Gene E; van Wijngaarden, Edwin; Love, Tanzy M T; McSorley, Emeir M; Bonham, Maxine P; Mulhern, Maria S; Yeates, Alison J; Davidson, Philip W; Shamlaye, Conrad F; Strain, J J; Thurston, Sally W; Harrington, Donald; Zareba, Grazyna; Wallace, Julie M W; Myers, Gary J

    2013-01-01

    Limited human data are available to assess the association between prenatal mercury vapor (Hg⁰)) exposure from maternal dental amalgam restorations and neurodevelopment of children. We evaluated the association between maternal dental amalgam status during gestation and children's neurodevelopmental outcomes at 5 years in the Seychelles Child Development Nutrition Study (SCDNS). Maternal amalgam status was determined prospectively in a longitudinal cohort study examining the associations of prenatal exposure to nutrients and methylmercury (MeHg) with neurodevelopment. A total of 236 mother-child pairs initially enrolled in the SCDNS in 2001 were eligible to participate. Maternal amalgam status was measured as number of amalgam surfaces (the primary metric) and number of occlusal points. The neurodevelopmental assessment battery was comprised of age-appropriate tests of cognitive, language, and perceptual functions, and scholastic achievement. Linear regression analysis controlled for MeHg exposure, maternal fatty acid status, and other covariates relevant to child development. Maternal amalgam status evaluation yielded an average of 7.0 surfaces (range 0-28) and 11.0 occlusal points (range 0-40) during pregnancy. Neither the number of maternal amalgam surfaces nor occlusal points were associated with any outcome. Our findings do not provide evidence to support a relationship between prenatal exposure to Hg⁰ from maternal dental amalgam and neurodevelopmental outcomes in children at 5 years of age.

  8. Corrosion Penetration in Crevices of Dental Amalgam.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-09-07

    AD-AC59 301 LOCKHEED MISSILES AND SPACE CO INC PALO ALTO CALIF PA-ETC F/6 A/S .9 CORROSION PENETRATION IN CREVICES OF DENTAL AMALGAM. (U) SEP 78 T...OF RE;-ORT & PERIOD COVERED ./CORROSION PENETRATION IN CREVICES OF _. Itm . / DENTAL AMALGAM, - . .... ,,, T 7 AUTHOR(s) / L S i DG3t1 , T. Katan and...identify by block number) amalgam corrosion, crevice corrosion, dental amalgam. 20.- ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse side If necessary and Identify by

  9. [Amalgam fillings and T-lymphocyte changes].

    PubMed

    Giuliani, M; Rumi, C; Marciani, F; Boari, A; Rumi, G; Di Felice, R

    1990-07-01

    Dental amalgam and nickel alloys have been considered quite safe. Previous authors reported the effect of dental amalgam and nickel alloys on human T-lymphocytes modifications after amalgam dental fillings, into dose-dependence of any modifications and into possible temporary. Eight patients were subjected to dental care with amalgam dental fillings. Drawings of blood were executed at start, fifteen days after late fillings and two months later. The results about modifications of T-lymphocytes were not univocal. We believe, at now, that temporary modifications of the immunity seem to be related to a cytotoxic mechanism.

  10. A study of high copper amalgams. I. A comparison of amalgamation on high copper alloy tablets.

    PubMed

    Okabe, T; Mitchell, R; Butts, M B; Wright, A H; Fairhurst, C W

    1978-01-01

    Two types of high copper alloy powder have been amalgamated by plating tablets of compacted powder with Hg. Gamma1 Ag-Hg crystals form on both types of tablet. On one type, zeta Cu-Sn crystals are also formed. An amalgamation mechanism for this latter type of high copper amalgam is discussed.

  11. Shear bond strength of different dentin substitute restorative materials to dentin of primary teeth.

    PubMed

    Abdelmegid, Faika; Salama, Fouad; Albogami, Nawaf; Albabtain, Muhannad; Alqahtani, Abdulkareem

    2016-01-01

    This in vitro investigation compared the shear bond strength (SBS) of four dentin substitute/replacement materials to caries-affected dentin of primary teeth. Dentin surfaces were randomly divided into four groups of 12 each according to the material used as follows: SDR/Smart Dentin Replacement, Biodentine, Multicore Flow, and Fuji II LC. The SBS was measured and failure modes were determined. There was a statistically significant difference in the mean values of SBS among the four materials (F=741.523, p<0.0001). The mean values of SBS of SDR were statistically significantly higher followed by Multicore Flow compared to the other groups. The mean values of the four materials were significantly different from each other in all combinations of pairs of four materials. The SBS between the four dentin substitute/replacement materials to dentin of primary teeth was significantly different. The highest SBS was for SDR followed by Multicore Flow then Fuji II LC and the lowest was for Biodentine.

  12. Characterisation of baroque tin amalgam mirrors of the historical Green Vault in Dresden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zywitzki, O.; Nedon, W.; Kopte, T.; Modes, T.

    2008-07-01

    The historical Green Vault, one of Europe’s most sumptuous treasure chambers, has reopened in September 2006 in the Dresden Royal Palace. For the baroque presentation of the artworks the special properties of tin amalgam mirrors are of great importance. A comprehensive analytic characterisation was necessary for restoration and reconstruction. The different original casting glasses were analysed in respect of chemical composition, roughness, waviness and optical properties like chromaticity coordinates and transmittance. The microstructure of the tin amalgam layers were investigated on metallographic cross-sections and by X-ray diffraction. The investigations reveal that the tin amalgam layers are composed of γ-HgSn6-10 phase with a grain size between 5 and 50 μm surrounded by a thin mercury phase with about 2 wt. % tin. However the most important property of the baroque tin amalgam mirrors is a relative low reflectivity of about 59% which is drastically lower than for silver mirrors with a reflectivity of about 96%. According to the characterisation results a suitable glass for reconstruction was selected. The mirror layers were produced by historical tin amalgam technology for the rooms not destroyed by bombarding of Dresden in February 1945. For the completely destroyed Jewel Room pure tin layers were deposited by magnetron sputtering. The results show that this new technology enables an adequate substitute for the original tin amalgam layers.

  13. Applications of total-etch adhesive bonding.

    PubMed

    Strassler, Howard E

    2003-06-01

    The concept of total-etch adhesion for enamel and dentin is well accepted. Although new techniques with self-etching adhesives have been introduced, there needs to be more reported clinical trials before making a complete switch to these systems. Currently, the only adhesive systems with long-term data to support confidence and success with their clinical use are total-etch systems. Applications for using a total-etch adhesive bonding technique include sealants, orthodontic brackets, anterior composite resins, posterior composite resins, bonded dental silver amalgam, resin cementation with posts, all-metal, porcelain-metal, composite resin, and ceramic restorations, splinting, core foundations, and conservative treatment of the worn dentition. This article will review the concepts for clinical success with total-etch adhesion for a wide range of clinical applications.

  14. The future of dental amalgam: a review of the literature. Part 5: Mercury in the urine, blood and body organs from amalgam fillings.

    PubMed

    Eley, B M

    1997-06-14

    This is the fifth article in a series of seven on the future of dental amalgam. This covers the studies of mercury distribution to the blood, body organs and the fetus and its excretion in the urine and faeces of humans and experimental animals. It firstly describes the clinical studies comparing the blood and urine mercury levels in patients with and without amalgam fillings and goes on to consider attempts which have been made to calculate tolerable mercury thresholds for the urine. It secondly describes the studies on the body distribution of mercury from amalgam restorations in experimental animals and human cadavers. It finally describes the studies of mercury distribution to the fetus during pregnancy and includes both studies of experimental animals and human clinical studies. The factors affecting the accuracy of these calculations and the relevance of these results is also extensively discussed.

  15. Comparative Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Luting Cements to Different Core Buildup Materials in Lactic Acid Buffer Solution

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Siddharam M.; Desai, Raviraj G.; Arabbi, Kashinath C.; Prakash, Ved

    2015-01-01

    Aim and Objectives The core buildup material is used to restore badly broken down tooth to provide better retention for fixed restorations. The shear bond strength of a luting agent to core buildup is one of the crucial factors in the success of the cast restoration. The aim of this invitro study was to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of luting cements with different core buildup materials in lactic acid buffer solution. Materials and Methods Two luting cements {Traditional Glass Ionomer luting cement (GIC) and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer luting cement (RMGIC)} and five core buildup materials {Silver Amalgam, Glass ionomer (GI), Glass Ionomer Silver Reinforced (GI Silver reinforced), Composite Resin and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer(RMGIC)} were selected for this study. Total 100 specimens were prepared with 20 specimens for each core buildup material using a stainless steel split metal die. Out of these 20 specimens, 10 specimens were bonded with each luting cement. All the bonded specimens were stored at 370c in a 0.01M lactic acid buffer solution at a pH of 4 for 7days. Shear bond strength was determined using a Universal Testing Machine at a cross head speed of 0.5mm/min. The peak load at fracture was recorded and shear bond strength was calculated. The data was statistically analysed using Two-way ANOVA followed by HOLM-SIDAK method for pair wise comparison at significance level of p<0.05. Results Two-Way ANOVA showed significant differences in bond strength of the luting cements (p<0.05) and core materials (p<0.05) and the interactions (p<0.05). Pairwise comparison of luting cements by HOLM-SIDAK test, showed that the RMGIC luting cement had higher shear bond strength values than Traditional GIC luting cement for all the core buildup materials. RMGIC core material showed higher bond strength values followed by Composite resin, GI silver reinforced, GI and silver amalgam core materials for both the luting agents. Conclusion Shear bond strength of

  16. Comparative Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Luting Cements to Different Core Buildup Materials in Lactic Acid Buffer Solution.

    PubMed

    Patil, Siddharam M; Kamble, Vikas B; Desai, Raviraj G; Arabbi, Kashinath C; Prakash, Ved

    2015-08-01

    The core buildup material is used to restore badly broken down tooth to provide better retention for fixed restorations. The shear bond strength of a luting agent to core buildup is one of the crucial factors in the success of the cast restoration. The aim of this invitro study was to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of luting cements with different core buildup materials in lactic acid buffer solution. Two luting cements {Traditional Glass Ionomer luting cement (GIC) and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer luting cement (RMGIC)} and five core buildup materials {Silver Amalgam, Glass ionomer (GI), Glass Ionomer Silver Reinforced (GI Silver reinforced), Composite Resin and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer(RMGIC)} were selected for this study. Total 100 specimens were prepared with 20 specimens for each core buildup material using a stainless steel split metal die. Out of these 20 specimens, 10 specimens were bonded with each luting cement. All the bonded specimens were stored at 37(0)c in a 0.01M lactic acid buffer solution at a pH of 4 for 7days. Shear bond strength was determined using a Universal Testing Machine at a cross head speed of 0.5mm/min. The peak load at fracture was recorded and shear bond strength was calculated. The data was statistically analysed using Two-way ANOVA followed by HOLM-SIDAK method for pair wise comparison at significance level of p<0.05. Two-Way ANOVA showed significant differences in bond strength of the luting cements (p<0.05) and core materials (p<0.05) and the interactions (p<0.05). Pairwise comparison of luting cements by HOLM-SIDAK test, showed that the RMGIC luting cement had higher shear bond strength values than Traditional GIC luting cement for all the core buildup materials. RMGIC core material showed higher bond strength values followed by Composite resin, GI silver reinforced, GI and silver amalgam core materials for both the luting agents. Shear bond strength of RMGIC luting cement was significantly higher than

  17. Three-year clinical evaluation of cuspal coverage with combined composite-amalgam in endodontically-treated maxillary premolars.

    PubMed

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Memarpour, Mahtab; Doozandeh, Maryam

    2010-01-01

    This clinical study evaluated the clinical performance of cuspal coverage with combined composite-amalgam restorations in endodontically-treated maxillary premolars over a three-year period. Thirty-six maxillary premolars, each with a Class II cavity in 36 patients ranging in age between 28 and 52 years, were selected after endodontic treatment. After reduction of the buccal and palatal cusps, internal coverage and veneering of the reduced buccal cusp was performed with composite. The remaining cavity and reduced palatal cusp were restored with high-copper amalgam. The restorations were evaluated at baseline and in one-, two- and three-year recalls with USPHS criteria. Changes in characteristics of the restorations were analyzed with the Cochran Q-test at a significance level of p < 0.05. Most of the restorations received an overall score of alpha, except two restorations, which showed a slight discrepancy at the composite-amalgam interface after one year (p > 0.05). Four restorations exhibited slight discoloration of the composite veneering after three years (p < 0.05). No restoration exhibited fracture after three years. It was concluded that combined composite-amalgam cusp coverage of endodontically-treated maxillary premolars showed acceptable clinical performance after three years.

  18. Properties of amalgams made from lathe-cut, high Cu amalgam alloys.

    PubMed

    Espevik, S

    1980-01-01

    Two alloys for dental amalgams made from lathe-cut powder with high Cu content have been developed. The alloys have been characterized with respect to physical properties and microstructure. The strongest amalgam exhibited minimal dimensional changes during setting and had low flow and creep values. It had the highest Cu content of the two amalgams investigated and no gamma 2 phase. The epsilon and eta' phases may dispersion-strenthen the amalgam which in compressive strength was comparable to the strongest amalgams available. A new mechanism for gamma 2 disappearance is suggested where Cu replaces Hg directly in the gamma 2 phase thus forming the eta' phase.

  19. New direct restorative materials. FDI Commission Project.

    PubMed

    Hickel, R; Dasch, W; Janda, R; Tyas, M; Anusavice, K

    1998-02-01

    People worldwide have become increasingly aware of the potential adverse effects on the environment, of pollution control and of toxic effects of food, drugs and biomaterials. Amalgam and its potential toxic side effects (still scientifically unproven) continue to be discussed with increasing controversy by the media in some countries. Consequently, new direct restorative materials are now being explored by dentists, materials scientists and patients who are searching for the so-called 'amalgam substitute' or 'amalgam alternative'. From a critical point of view some of the new direct restorative materials are good with respect to aesthetics, but all material characteristics must be considered, such as mechanical properties, biological effects, and longterm clinical behaviour.

  20. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... is intended for filling dental caries. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental amalgamator. 872.3100 Section 872.3100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A...

  1. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... is intended for filling dental caries. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental amalgamator. 872.3100 Section 872.3100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A...

  2. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... is intended for filling dental caries. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental amalgamator. 872.3100 Section 872.3100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A...

  3. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... is intended for filling dental caries. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dental amalgamator. 872.3100 Section 872.3100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A...

  4. Mercury amalgam dental fillings: an epidemiologic assessment.

    PubMed

    Bates, Michael N

    2006-07-01

    Dental amalgam fillings containing approximately 50% mercury have been used for almost 200 years and have been controversial for almost the same time. Allegations of effects caused by amalgams have involved many diseases. Recent evidence that small amounts of mercury are continuously released from amalgam fillings has fuelled the controversy. This is a comprehensive review of the epidemiologic evidence for the safety of dental amalgam fillings, with an emphasis on methodological issues and identifying gaps in the literature. Studies show little evidence of effects on general chronic disease incidence or mortality. Limited evidence exists for an association with multiple sclerosis, but few studies on either Alzheimer's or Parkinson's diseases. The preponderance of evidence suggests no renal effects and that ill-defined symptom complexes, including chronic fatigue syndrome, are not caused by amalgams. There is little direct evidence that can be used to assess reproductive hazards. Overall, few relevant epidemiologic studies are available. Most prior assessments of possible amalgam health effects have been based on comparisons of dental mercury exposures with occupational exposures causing harm. However, the amalgam-exposed population contains a broader, possibly more susceptible, spectrum of people. Common limitations of population-based studies of dental amalgam effects include inadequate longitudinal exposure assessment and negative confounding by better access to dental care in higher socioeconomic groups. Better designed studies are needed, particularly for investigation of neurodegenerative diseases and effects on infants and children.

  5. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... is intended for filling dental caries. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental amalgamator. 872.3100 Section 872.3100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A dental...

  6. Overexpression of the rhodanese PspE, a single cysteine-containing protein, restores disulfide bond formation to an Escherichia coli strain lacking DsbA

    PubMed Central

    Chng, Shu-Sin; Dutton, Rachel J.; Denoncin, Katleen; Vertommen, Didier; Collet, Jean-Francois; Kadokura, Hiroshi; Beckwith, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Summary Escherichia coli uses the DsbA/DsbB system for introducing disulfide bonds into proteins in the cell envelope. Deleting either dsbA or dsbB or both reduces disulfide bond formation but does not entirely eliminate it. Whether such background disulfide bond forming activity is enzyme-catalyzed is not known. To identify possible cellular factors that might contribute to the background activity, we studied the effects of overexpressing endogenous proteins on disulfide bond formation in the periplasm. We find that overexpressing PspE, a periplasmic rhodanese, partially restores substantial disulfide bond formation to a dsbA strain. This activity depends on DsbC, the bacterial disulfide bond isomerase, but not on DsbB. We show that overexpressed PspE is oxidized to the sulfenic acid form and reacts with substrate proteins to form mixed disulfide adducts. DsbC either prevents the formation of these mixed disulfides or resolves these adducts subsequently. In the process, DsbC itself gets oxidized and proceeds to catalyze disulfide bond formation. Although this PspE/DsbC system is not responsible for the background disulfide bond forming activity, we suggest that it might be utilized in other organisms lacking the DsbA/DsbB system. PMID:22809289

  7. Fatigue resistance of bovine teeth restored with resin-bonded fiber posts: effect of post surface conditioning.

    PubMed

    Zamboni, Sandra C; Baldissara, Paolo; Pelogia, Fernanda; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Scotti, Roberto; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of post surface conditioning on the fatigue resistance of bovine teeth restored with resin-bonded fiber-reinforced composite (FRC). Root canals of 20 single-rooted bovine teeth (16 mm long) were prepared to 12 mm using a preparation drill of a double-tapered fiber post system. Using acrylic resin, each specimen was embedded (up to 3.0 mm from the cervical part of the specimen) in a PVC cylinder and allocated into one of two groups (n = 10) based on the post surface conditioning method: acid etching plus silanization or tribochemical silica coating (30 pm SiO(x) + silanization). The root canal dentin was etched (H2PO3 for 30 seconds), rinsed, and dried. A multi-step adhesive system was applied to the root dentin and the fiber posts were cemented with resin cement. The specimens were submitted to one million fatigue cycles. After fatigue testing, a score was given based on the number of fatigue cycles until fracture. All of the specimens were resistant to fatigue. No fracture of the root or the post and no loss of retention of the post were observed. The methodology and the results of this study indicate that tribochemical silica coating and acid etching performed equally well when dynamic mechanical loading was used.

  8. Mercury generation potential from dental waste amalgam.

    PubMed

    Drummond, James L; Cailas, Michael D; Croke, Kevin

    2003-09-01

    The main objective of this study was to quantify the total amount of amalgam used in dental offices in the state of Illinois and to estimate the fractions of amalgam waste material generated during dental procedures. A second objective was to estimate the fractions of non-contact, contact, and tooth retained amalgam through an in vitro study. The collection system consisted of containers placed in six dental offices and clinics to collect the material from the in-line trap (contact amalgam) and the excess dental amalgam not placed into the oral cavity (non-contact amalgam). In order to have comparable results, the data was adjusted by the number of dental chairs being used and the number of working days. The range for the non-contact amalgam was from 0 to 102 g, and for the contact amalgam, from 2 to 16 g. The median estimate of non-contact amalgam generated from the 6 dental offices was 421 mg/day/chair, whereas the median estimate of contact amalgam was 64 mg/day/chair. For the in vitro study, 40 one and two surface amalgams (bicuspids and molars), was distributed as follows, 46+/-20% in the tooth, 43+/-19% as non-contact amalgam, and 11+/-4% as contact amalgam. Based on survey data from the ADA concerning the number of working days per year, the number of practicing dentists, a 50%, by weight, mercury content in amalgam, and the generation estimates from this project, it was estimated that the practicing dentists in the State of Illinois (6455) have the potential to generate 947 kg of non-contact mercury per year, which is recyclable, and 144 kg of contact mercury which has the potential to be discarded in the environment, or be partially recycled. If this approach is applied to the total population of practicing dentist in the United States (123,641), then 18,159 kg of recyclable, non-contact mercury may be generated per year, whereas 2763 kg of contact mercury may be discarded in the environment, or be partially recycled.

  9. Making High-Tensile-Strength Amalgam Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Structural components made of amalgams can be made to have tensile strengths much greater than previously known to be possible. Amalgams, perhaps best known for their use in dental fillings, have several useful attributes, including room-temperature fabrication, corrosion resistance, dimensional stability, and high compressive strength. However, the range of applications of amalgams has been limited by their very small tensile strengths. Now, it has been discovered that the tensile strength of an amalgam depends critically on the sizes and shapes of the particles from which it is made and, consequently, the tensile strength can be greatly increased through suitable choice of the particles. Heretofore, the powder particles used to make amalgams have been, variously, in the form of micron-sized spheroids or flakes. The tensile reinforcement contributed by the spheroids and flakes is minimal because fracture paths simply go around these particles. However, if spheroids or flakes are replaced by strands having greater lengths, then tensile reinforcement can be increased significantly. The feasibility of this concept was shown in an experiment in which electrical copper wires, serving as demonstration substitutes for copper powder particles, were triturated with gallium by use of a mortar and pestle and the resulting amalgam was compressed into a mold. The tensile strength of the amalgam specimen was then measured and found to be greater than 10(exp 4) psi (greater than about 69 MPa). Much remains to be done to optimize the properties of amalgams for various applications through suitable choice of starting constituents and modification of the trituration and molding processes. The choice of wire size and composition are expected to be especially important. Perusal of phase diagrams of metal mixtures could give insight that would enable choices of solid and liquid metal constituents. Finally, whereas heretofore, only binary alloys have been considered for amalgams

  10. A Comparison between Shear Bond Strength of VMK Master Porcelain with Three Base-metal Alloys (Ni-cr-T3, VeraBond, Super Cast) and One Noble Alloy (X-33) in Metal-ceramic Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadzadeh, A; Neshati, A; Mousavi, N; Epakchi, S; Dabaghi Tabriz, F; Sarbazi, AH

    2013-01-01

    Statement of Problem: The increase in the use of metal-ceramic restorations and a high prevalence of porcelain chipping entails introducing an alloy which is more compatible with porcelain and causes a stronger bond between the two. This study is to compare shear bond strength of three base-metal alloys and one noble alloy with the commonly used VMK Master Porcelain. Materials and Method: Three different groups of base-metal alloys (Ni-cr-T3, Super Cast, and VeraBond) and one group of noble alloy (X-33) were selected. Each group consisted of 15 alloy samples. All groups went through the casting process and change from wax pattern into metal disks. The VMK Master Porcelain was then fired on each group. All the specimens were put in the UTM; a shear force was loaded until a fracture occurred and the fracture force was consequently recorded. The data were analyzed by SPSS Version 16 and One-Way ANOVA was run to compare the shear strength between the groups. Furthermore, the groups were compared two-by-two by adopting Tukey test. Results: The findings of this study revealed shear bond strength of Ni-Cr-T3 alloy was higher than the three other alloys (94 MPa or 330 N). Super Cast alloy had the second greatest shear bond strength (80. 87Mpa or 283.87 N). Both VeraBond (69.66 MPa or 245 N) and x-33 alloys (66.53 MPa or 234 N) took the third place. Conclusion: Ni-Cr-T3 with VMK Master Porcelain has the greatest shear bond strength. Therefore, employment of this low-cost alloy is recommended in metal-ceramic restorations. PMID:24724144

  11. Restoring Bonds of Respect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brokenleg, Martin

    2014-01-01

    In writing about the Circle of Courage, Martin Brokenleg and his co-authors brought together different professions, racial backgrounds, and upbringing (Brendtro, Brokenleg, & Van Bockern, 2002). While the Circle of Courage philosophy transcends culture, they initially used Native American images and stories to express these ideas. Because…

  12. Restoring Bonds of Respect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brokenleg, Martin

    2014-01-01

    In writing about the Circle of Courage, Martin Brokenleg and his co-authors brought together different professions, racial backgrounds, and upbringing (Brendtro, Brokenleg, & Van Bockern, 2002). While the Circle of Courage philosophy transcends culture, they initially used Native American images and stories to express these ideas. Because…

  13. Do Dental Resin Composites Accumulate More Oral Biofilms and Plaque than Amalgam and Glass Ionomer Materials?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Melo, Mary A.S.; Weir, Michael D.; Reynolds, Mark A.; Bai, Yuxing; Xu, Hockin H.K.

    2016-01-01

    A long-time drawback of dental composites is that they accumulate more biofilms and plaques than amalgam and glass ionomer restorative materials. It would be highly desirable to develop a new composite with reduced biofilm growth, while avoiding the non-esthetics of amalgam and low strength of glass ionomer. The objectives of this study were to: (1) develop a protein-repellent composite with reduced biofilms matching amalgam and glass ionomer for the first time; and (2) investigate their protein adsorption, biofilms, and mechanical properties. Five materials were tested: A new composite containing 3% of protein-repellent 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC); the composite with 0% MPC as control; commercial composite control; dental amalgam; resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI). A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model with human saliva as inoculum was used to investigate metabolic activity, colony-forming units (CFU), and lactic acid production. Composite with 3% MPC had flexural strength similar to those with 0% MPC and commercial composite control (p > 0.1), and much greater than RMGI (p < 0.05). Composite with 3% MPC had protein adsorption that was only 1/10 that of control composites (p < 0.05). Composite with 3% MPC had biofilm CFU and lactic acid much lower than control composites (p < 0.05). Biofilm growth, metabolic activity and lactic acid on the new composite with 3% MPC were reduced to the low level of amalgam and RMGI (p > 0.1). In conclusion, a new protein-repellent dental resin composite reduced oral biofilm growth and acid production to the low levels of non-esthetic amalgam and RMGI for the first time. The long-held conclusion that dental composites accumulate more biofilms than amalgam and glass ionomer is no longer true. The novel composite is promising to finally overcome the major biofilm-accumulation drawback of dental composites in order to reduce biofilm acids and secondary caries. PMID:28774007

  14. Do Dental Resin Composites Accumulate More Oral Biofilms and Plaque than Amalgam and Glass Ionomer Materials?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Melo, Mary A S; Weir, Michael D; Reynolds, Mark A; Bai, Yuxing; Xu, Hockin H K

    2016-11-01

    A long-time drawback of dental composites is that they accumulate more biofilms and plaques than amalgam and glass ionomer restorative materials. It would be highly desirable to develop a new composite with reduced biofilm growth, while avoiding the non-esthetics of amalgam and low strength of glass ionomer. The objectives of this study were to: (1) develop a protein-repellent composite with reduced biofilms matching amalgam and glass ionomer for the first time; and (2) investigate their protein adsorption, biofilms, and mechanical properties. Five materials were tested: A new composite containing 3% of protein-repellent 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC); the composite with 0% MPC as control; commercial composite control; dental amalgam; resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI). A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model with human saliva as inoculum was used to investigate metabolic activity, colony-forming units (CFU), and lactic acid production. Composite with 3% MPC had flexural strength similar to those with 0% MPC and commercial composite control (p > 0.1), and much greater than RMGI (p < 0.05). Composite with 3% MPC had protein adsorption that was only 1/10 that of control composites (p < 0.05). Composite with 3% MPC had biofilm CFU and lactic acid much lower than control composites (p < 0.05). Biofilm growth, metabolic activity and lactic acid on the new composite with 3% MPC were reduced to the low level of amalgam and RMGI (p > 0.1). In conclusion, a new protein-repellent dental resin composite reduced oral biofilm growth and acid production to the low levels of non-esthetic amalgam and RMGI for the first time. The long-held conclusion that dental composites accumulate more biofilms than amalgam and glass ionomer is no longer true. The novel composite is promising to finally overcome the major biofilm-accumulation drawback of dental composites in order to reduce biofilm acids and secondary caries.

  15. Inlay shading effect on the photopolymerization kinetic of a dental composite material used as bonding system in an indirect restoration technique.

    PubMed

    Simeone, Michele; Lanza, Alessandro; Rengo, Sandro; Aversa, Raffaella; Apicella, Davide; Apicella, Antonio

    2005-08-01

    To define the inlay shading effect on the polymerization levels and kinetics of a light activated bonding system for an indirect restoration technique. For the bonding system, an adhesive: Excite (Ivoclar-vivadent) and a composite: Z250 (3M-ESPE, St Paul Minnesota, USA) were investigated. A Demetron (Kerr USA) light curing unit was used. The composite inlay blocks of 2 mm thick were used for the experiment (Artglass A2 Heraeus, Kulzer, Dormagen, Germany). The bonding composite was photocured using a 2 mm composite inlay block as a shielding system while the adhesive was shielded by a 2.3 mm thick wafer, composed of the inlay material and the previously cured bonding composite. The kinetics and levels of polymerization were measured by a differential scanning calorimeter technique (DSC 25, Mettler, Orange, CA, Toledoh, küsnacht, switzerland). The inlay shielded dental composite reaches a significantly lower level of polymerization compared to the unshielded composite. Inlay shielded composite, has a slower polymerization kinetic compared to unshielded composite. The resin adhesive shielded by the inlay-composite wafer reaches polymerization values not significantly different from those of the unshielded adhesive. The degree of cure of the light-cured composite resins for use as a base for indirect composite restorations, may be severely reduced as a result of inlay shielding.

  16. Indentation creep behavior of a direct-filling silver alternative to amalgam.

    PubMed

    Xu, H H; Liao, H; Eichmiller, F C

    1998-12-01

    Amalgam creep has been identified as a key parameter associated with marginal breakdown and corrosion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the time-dependent deformation (creep) of a novel silver filling material as an alternative to amalgam. We made the silver specimens by pressing a precipitated powder at room temperature to a density that can be achieved in clinical hand consolidation. The surface of the silver was either polished or burnished. To examine local contact creep and the effect of surface finishing, we used an indentation creep method in which a Vickers indenter was loaded on the specimen surface at a load of 10 N with dwell times of 5 sec to 6x10(4) sec. We used a bonded-interface technique to examine subsurface creep mechanisms. The flexural strength (mean+/-SD; n = 10) was 86+/-20 MPa for amalgam, 180+/-21 MPa for polished silver, and 209+/-19 MPa for burnished silver-values which are significantly different from each other (family confidence coefficient = 0.95; Tukey's multiple-comparison test). Indentation creep manifested as hardness number decreasing with increased dwell time. With dwell time increasing from 5 sec to 6x10(4) sec, the hardness number of amalgam was reduced by approximately 80%; that of the polished silver and the burnished silver was reduced by only 40%. Subsurface creep in amalgam consisted of the shape change of the alloy particles from spherical to elongated shapes, and the separation of matrix grains from each other, possibly due to grain-boundary sliding. Creep of the polished silver occurred by densification reducing porosity and increasing hardness; that of the burnished silver occurred by the displacement of the burnished layer. These results suggest that, due to creep-induced subsurface work-hardening and densification, the consolidated silver exhibits a higher resistance to indentation creep than does amalgam. The hardness number of silver approaches that of amalgam after prolonged indentation loading.

  17. Radiochemical separation of gold by amalgam exchange

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruch, R.R.

    1970-01-01

    A rapid and simple method for the radiochemical separation of gold after neutron activation. The technique is based on treatment with a dilute indium-gold amalgam, both chemical reduction and isotopic exchange being involved. The counting efficiency for 198Au in small volumes of the amalgam is good. Few interferences occur and the method is applicable to clays, rocks, salts and metals. The possibility of determining silver, platinum and palladium by a similar method is mentioned. ?? 1970.

  18. A comparative study of shear bond strength between metal and ceramic brackets and artificially aged composite restorations using different surface treatments.

    PubMed

    Eslamian, Ladan; Borzabadi-Farahani, Ali; Mousavi, Nasim; Ghasemi, Amir

    2012-10-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the shear bond strength (SBS) between ceramic brackets (CBs) and resin composite restorations (RCRs) prepared using different surface treatments. The findings were also compared with a similar study that used stainless steel brackets (SSBs). Forty-five premolars were restored with a nano-hybrid composite resin (Tetric EvoCeram) and randomly assigned to three surface treatment groups: group 1, 5 per cent hydrofluoric acid (HF); group 2, air abrasion (50 μm alumina particles); and group 3, diamond bur. Specimens were bonded with CBs (Fascination) and exposed to thermo-cycling (500 cycles). The shear force at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute was transmitted to brackets. The adhesive remnant index (ARIs) scores were recorded after bracket failure. The analysis of SBS variance (P < 0.01) and chi-square test of ARIs scores (P < 0.01) revealed significant differences among three groups tested. The SBS in group 3 (mean: 26.34 ± 4.76 MPa) and group 2 (mean: 26.68 ± 5.93 MPa) was significantly higher than group 1 (mean: 16.25 ± 5.42 MPa). The SBS was significantly higher in CBs (mean: 23.09 ± 7.19 MPa) compared to SSBs (mean: 15.56 ± 5.13 MPa). High ARIs (100 per cent) occurred in SSBs treated with a diamond bur, whereas CBs primarily failed at the resin-adhesive interface (P < 0.01). In two-thirds of the specimens (SSBs or CBs), no adhesive was left on the restoration after HF conditioning. The ARIs profile of CBs and SSBs that received surface treatments with air abrasion were similar (P > 0.05) and bond failure occurred mainly in adhesive-bracket base and resin-adhesive interfaces. The diamond bur surface treatment is recommended as a safe and cost-effective method of bonding CBs to RCRs.

  19. Comparison of Microleakage of Class V Cavities restored with the Embrace WetBond Class V Composite Resin and Conventional Opallis Composite Resin.

    PubMed

    Tavangar, Maryam; Zohri, Zahra; Sheikhnezhad, Hosein; Shahbeig, Shahrzad

    2017-10-01

    This study was undertaken to compare the micro-leakage of class V cavities restored with the newly introduced Embrace WetBond class V (EWC) composite resin and conventional Opallis composite resin. In this in vitro study, class V cavities were prepared on 30 extracted bovine incisors, with the gingival floor and the coronal margin of the cavities 1 mm apical and coronal to the cementoenamel junction (CEJ) respectively. The cavities measured 3 mm in length, 2 mm in width, and 1.5 mm in depth. The teeth were randomly divided into two groups. In group I, the cavities were restored with Opallis composite resin in association with ExciTE adhesive system (total-etch); in group II, the EWC composite resin was used for restorations. After 500 thermocycling procedures, the teeth were immersed in 0.5% fuchsin solution for 24 hours. Then, the samples were placed within a polyester model and sectioned in the buccolingual direction. The samples were evaluated under a stereomicroscope at ×30 for the penetration of dye. The enamel and dentin margins were evaluated separately. To test ordinal results, we used nonparametric statistical methods. To find out whether each independent composite groups I and II came from the same populations, we used Mann-Whitney U test and to compare two related samples' coronal margin and gingival margin, Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used. There was significantly more microleakage in group II at both the enamel and dentin margins (coronal margin: p = 0.04; gingival margin: p = 0.21). In both groups, microleakage at gingival margins was significantly higher than that at coronal margins (group I: p = 0.008; group II: p = 0.26). Despite the high speed and the short process of restoration with Embrace WetBond, it is not a reliable restorative material for class V cavities due to its inadequate marginal seal.

  20. Evaluating the effect of antioxidant agents on shear bond strength of tooth-colored restorative materials after bleaching: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Feiz, Atiyeh; Mosleh, Hamid; Nazeri, Rahman

    2017-07-01

    The main objective of the present study was to make a systematic review of how antioxidant agents affect shear bond strength of tooth-colored restorative materials after bleaching. Electronic search was used to extract the related articles on the targeted key words such as "antioxidant", "dental bleaching" and "shear bond strength" (SBS) from MeSH, PubMed, Medline, and Cochrane electronic data bases. These articles were all published before 2016. Inclusion criteria were restricted to English journal articles concerning humans, clinical trials, cohorts and case-control studies. Therefore, systematic reviews, case reports, letters to editors, editorials and congress abstracts were excluded from the analysis. Most studies conducted on the issue have produced experimental data which are rather controversial, and there is no general agreement about the reported outcomes. As an illustration, most studies have not considered the relationship between the type of antioxidant materials and the shear bond strength. In point of fact, some researchers (e.g Kimyai et al.) have concluded that antioxidants like gel and solution leave similar effects on SBS. Alternatively, certain studies (e.g., Kunt et al.) have produced inconclusive data regarding the impact of one week postponement of the restorative process on SBS after the bleaching process. The results of the studies evaluating the role of various adhesive systems used after bleaching have demonstrated that regardless of the type of adhesive system used, applying antioxidants before restorative procedures can adversely affect the bleaching agents utilized for SBS. It has also been suggested that the type of the adhesive system used might be correlated with the magnitude of SBS. The results obtained from the systematic review of the articles under investigation reflected that the use of antioxidant agents, regardless of their type, form, concentration and duration of application, can improve SBS after bleaching. Copyright

  1. Effect of Nd:YAG laser pulse energy on mercury vapor release from the dental amalgam.

    PubMed

    Oskoee, Siavash Savadi; Bahari, Mahmoud; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Rikhtegaran, Sahand; Puralibaba, Firooz; Ajami, Hamidreza

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different pulse energies of Nd:YAG laser on the amalgam ablation, and its effect on the amount of mercury vapor release from amalgam. Toxic vapor release from amalgam restorations at the laser focus site is possible. Forty-five amalgam samples (4 mm in diameter and 5 mm in height) were placed in sealed containers and underwent Nd:YAG laser irradiation with pulse energies of 50, 150, and 250 mJ at a distance of 1 mm from the amalgam surface for 4 sec. Subsequently, 150 mL of air was collected from the inside of the container using an Apex Pump to analyze the amount of mercury vapor in the air samples using a mercury vapor analyzer. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests (p<0.05). The amount of mercury vapor release significantly increased with an increase in the pulse energy of Nd:YAG laser (p<0.001). In addition, the amount of mercury vapor release with 250 mJ pulse energy was significantly higher compared with the standard mercury vapor concentration (50 μg/m(3)) (p<0.001). Nd:YAG laser produced cavities on the amalgam surface, which increased in size with an increase in the energy of the laser beam. The amount of mercury vapor significantly increased with an increase in the pulse energy of the laser beam, and was significantly higher than the standard mercury vapor concentration with 250 mJ pulse energy.

  2. Radiochemical separation of gallium by amalgam exchange

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruch, R.R.

    1969-01-01

    An amalgam-exchange separation of radioactive gallium from a number of interfering radioisotopes has been developed. A dilute (ca. 0.3%) gallium amalgam is agitated with a slightly acidic solution of 72Ga3+ containing concentrations of sodium thiocyanate and either perchlorate or chloride. The amalgam is then removed and the radioactive gallium stripped by agitation with dilute nitric acid. The combined exchange yield of the perchlorate-thiocyanate system is 90??4% and that of the chloride-thiocyanate system is 75??4%. Decontamination yields of most of the 11 interfering isotopes studied were less than 0.02%. The technique is applicable for use with activation analysis for the determination of trace amounts of gallium. ?? 1969.

  3. 75 FR 33169 - Dental Devices: Classification of Dental Amalgam, Reclassification of Dental Mercury, Designation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ... of Special Controls for Dental Amalgam, Mercury, and Amalgam Alloy; Technical Amendment AGENCY: Food... designated special controls for dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. The effective date of the rule... structural defects in teeth. Dental amalgam is a combination of elemental mercury (liquid) and amalgam...

  4. 21 CFR 872.3110 - Dental amalgam capsule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental amalgam capsule. 872.3110 Section 872.3110...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3110 Dental amalgam capsule. (a) Identification. A dental amalgam capsule is a container device in which silver alloy is intended to be mixed with...

  5. Effect of various endodontic irrigants on the push-out bond strength of biodentine and conventional root perforation repair materials.

    PubMed

    Guneser, Mehmet Burak; Akbulut, Makbule Bilge; Eldeniz, Ayce Unverdi

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of various endodontic irrigants on the push-out bond strength of Biodentine (Septodont, Saint Maur des Fossés, France) in comparison with contemporary root perforation repair materials. Midroot dentin of canine teeth was horizontally sectioned into 1-mm-thick slices. The canal space of each dentin slice was enlarged with a diamond bur to 1.4 mm in diameter. The samples were divided into 5 groups (n = 40), and the following materials were placed, respectively: Biodentine, ProRoot MTA (Dentsply Tulsa Dental, Tulsa, OK), amalgam, Dyract AP (Dentsply DeTrey, Konstanz, Germany), and intermediate restorative material (IRM, Dentsply DeTrey). The samples were wrapped in wet gauze for 10 minutes and divided into 3 subgroups (n = 10) to be immersed into 3.5% sodium hypochlorite, 2% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX), or saline for 30 minutes. No irrigation was performed in the controls (n = 10), and a wet cotton pellet was placed over each test material. After incubation for 48 hours, the dislodgement resistance of the samples was measured using a universal testing machine. The samples were examined under a stereomicroscope to determine the nature of the bond failures. Biodentine showed significantly higher push-out bond strength than MTA (P < .05). The statistical ranking of push-out bond strength values was as follows: Dyract AP > amalgam ≥ IRM ≥ Biodentine > MTA. The push-out bond strength of Dyract AP, amalgam, IRM, and Biodentine was not significantly different when immersed in NaOCl, CHX, and saline solutions, whereas MTA lost strength when exposed to CHX. Biodentine showed considerable performance as a perforation repair material even after being exposed to various endodontic irrigants, whereas MTA had the lowest push-out bond strength to root dentin. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Fatigue resistance and failure mode of novel-design anterior single-tooth implant restorations: influence of material selection for type III veneers bonded to zirconia abutments.

    PubMed

    Magne, Pascal; Paranhos, Maria Paula Gandolfi; Burnett, Luiz Henrique; Magne, Michel; Belser, Urs Christoph

    2011-02-01

    This study assessed the fatigue resistance and failure mode of type III porcelain and composite resin veneers bonded to custom zirconia implant abutments. Twenty-four standardized zirconia implant abutments were fabricated. Using the CEREC 3 machine, type III veneers of standardized shape were milled in ceramic Vita Mark II or in composite resin Paradigm MZ100. The intaglio surfaces of the restorations were hydrofluoric acid etched and silanated (Mark II) or airborne-particle abraded and silanated (MZ100). The fitting surface of the abutments was airborne-particle abraded, cleaned, and inserted into a bone level implant (BLI RC SLActive 10 mm). All veneers (n=24) were adhesively luted with a zirconia primer (Z-Prime Plus), adhesive resin (Optibond FL) and a pre-heated light-curing composite resin (Filtek Z100). Cyclic isometric chewing (5 Hz) was simulated, starting with a load of 40 N, followed by stages of 80, 120, 160, 200, 240, and 280 N (20,000 cycles each). Samples were loaded until fracture or to a maximum of 140,000 cycles. Groups were compared using the life table survival analysis (Logrank test at P=.05). Mark II and MZ100 specimens fractured at an average load of 216 N and 229 N (survival rate of 17% and 8%), respectively, with no difference in survival probability (P=.18). Among the fractured samples, 40% of the failures were at the abutment level for Mark II and 27% were at the abutment level for MZ100. No exclusive adhesive failures were observed. Type III Mark II and Paradigm MZ100 veneers showed similar fatigue resistance when bonded to custom non-retentive zirconia implant abutments. The bond was strong enough to induce abutment fractures. MZ100 presented a higher percentage of "friendly" failures, i.e. maintaining the restoration-abutment adhesive interface and the abutment itself intact. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. Influence of the LED curing source and selective enamel etching on dentin bond strength of self-etch adhesives in class I composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Souza-Junior, Eduardo José; Araújo, Cíntia Tereza Pimenta; Prieto, Lúcia Trazzi; Paulillo, Luís Alexandre Maffei Sartini

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the LED curing unit and selective enamel etching on dentin microtensile bond strength (μTBS) for self-etch adhesives in class I composite restorations. On 96 human molars, box-shaped class I cavities were made maintaining enamel margins. Self-etch adhesives (Clearfil SE - CSE and Clearfil S(3) - S3) were used to bond a microhybrid composite. Before adhesive application, half of the teeth were enamel acid-etched and the other half was not. Adhesives and composites were cured with the following light curing units (LCUs): one polywave (UltraLume 5 - UL) and two single-peak (FlashLite 1401 - FL and Radii Cal - RD) LEDs. The specimens were then submitted to thermomechanical aging and longitudinally sectioned to obtain bonded sticks (0.9 mm(2)) to be tested in tension at 0.5 mm/min. The failure mode was then recorded. The μTBS data were submitted to a three-way ANOVA and Tukey's (α = 0.05). For S3, the selective enamel-etching provided lower μTBS values (20.7 ± 2.7) compared to the non-etched specimens (26.7 ± 2.2). UL yielded higher μTBS values (24.1 ± 3.2) in comparison to the photoactivation approach with FL (18.8 ±3.9) and RD (19.9 ±1.8) for CSE. The two-step CSE was not influenced by the enamel etching (p ≥ 0.05). Enamel acid etching in class I composite restorations affects the dentin μTBS of the one-step self-etch adhesive Clearfil S(3), with no alterations for Clearfil SE bond strength. The polywave LED promoted better bond strength for the two-step adhesive compared to the single-peak ones.

  8. Effect of surface treatments on the tensile bond strength of repaired water-aged anterior restorative micro-fine hybrid resin composite.

    PubMed

    Fawzy, Amr S; El-Askary, Farid S; Amer, Mohamed A

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize changes in surface topography associated with different surface treatments and their effect on tensile bond strength (TBS) of repaired water-aged anterior restorative micro-fine hybrid resin composite. The TBS of repaired resin-based composite slabs either non-treated or exposed to different mechanical and/or chemical surface treatment procedures were measured. The cohesive tensile strength of non-repaired intact slabs was used as a control group. The topographical effects of acid etching, grinding, and grinding followed by acid etching were characterized by AFM and SEM. All repaired groups showed significantly lower TBS than the control group. The TBS of repaired groups was ranged from 15% to 59% of the cohesive tensile strength of the control group (18.8+/-4.5MPa). The surface roughness of the non-treated aged specimens was significantly higher than other treated specimens. Specimens treated by acid etching showed significant increase in surface area compared to the non-treated and treated specimens. Aging process resulted in the formation of degradable surface layer which adversely affects the repair bond strength. The use of silane primer prior to the application of the adhesive after mechanical grinding, with or without the use of 37% phosphoric acid etching; improves the repair bond strength.

  9. Amalgam Surface Treatment by Different Output Powers of Er:YAG Laser:SEM Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Mohammad Hashem; Hassanpour, Mehdi; Etemadi, Ardavan; Ranjbar Omrani, Ladan; Darvishpour, Hojat; Chiniforush, Nasim

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate amalgam surfaces treated by different output powers of erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Twenty-one amalgam blocks (8 mm × 8 mm, 3 mm thickness) were prepared by condensing silver amalgam (into putty impression material. After keeping them for 24 hours in distilled water, they were divided into 7 groups as follow: G1: Er:YAG laser (1 W, 50 mJ), G2: Er:YAG laser (2 W, 100 mJ), G3: Er:YAG laser (3 W, 150 mJ), G4: Sandblast, G5: Sandblast + Er:YAG laser (1 W, 50 mJ), G6: Sandblast +Er:YAG laser (2 W, 100 mJ) and G7: Sandblast +Er:YAG laser (3 W, 150 mJ). Then after preparation of all samples, they were examined by SEM. The SEM results of amalgam surfaces treated by different output powers of Er:YAG laser showed some pitting areas with non-homogenous irregularities Conclusion: It seems that the application of sandblasting accompanied by Er:YAG laser irradiation can provide proper surface for bonding of orthodontic brackets.

  10. Amalgam Surface Treatment by Different Output Powers of Er:YAG Laser:SEM Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Mohammad Hashem; Hassanpour, Mehdi; Etemadi, Ardavan; Ranjbar Omrani, Ladan; Darvishpour, Hojat; Chiniforush, Nasim

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate amalgam surfaces treated by different output powers of erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Methods: Twenty-one amalgam blocks (8 mm × 8 mm, 3 mm thickness) were prepared by condensing silver amalgam (into putty impression material. After keeping them for 24 hours in distilled water, they were divided into 7 groups as follow: G1: Er:YAG laser (1 W, 50 mJ), G2: Er:YAG laser (2 W, 100 mJ), G3: Er:YAG laser (3 W, 150 mJ), G4: Sandblast, G5: Sandblast + Er:YAG laser (1 W, 50 mJ), G6: Sandblast +Er:YAG laser (2 W, 100 mJ) and G7: Sandblast +Er:YAG laser (3 W, 150 mJ). Then after preparation of all samples, they were examined by SEM. Results: The SEM results of amalgam surfaces treated by different output powers of Er:YAG laser showed some pitting areas with non-homogenous irregularities Conclusion: It seems that the application of sandblasting accompanied by Er:YAG laser irradiation can provide proper surface for bonding of orthodontic brackets. PMID:26705463

  11. MicroCT analysis of a retrieved root restored with a bonded fiber-reinforced composite dowel: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lorenzoni, Fabio Cesar; Bonfante, Estevam A; Bonfante, Gerson; Martins, Leandro M; Witek, Lukasz; Silva, Nelson R F A

    2013-08-01

    This evaluation aimed to (1) validate micro-computed tomography (microCT) findings using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging, and (2) quantify the volume of voids and the bonded surface area resulting from fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) dowel cementation technique using microCT scanning technology/3D reconstructing software. A fiberglass dowel was cemented in a condemned maxillary lateral incisor prior to its extraction. A microCT scan was performed of the extracted tooth creating a large volume of data in DICOM format. This set of images was imported to image-processing software to inspect the internal architecture of structures. The outer surface and the spatial relationship of dentin, FRC dowel, cement layer, and voids were reconstructed. Three-dimensional spatial architecture of structures and volumetric analysis revealed that 9.89% of the resin cement was composed of voids and that the bonded area between root dentin and cement was 60.63% larger than that between cement and FRC dowel. SEM imaging demonstrated the presence of voids similarly observed using microCT technology (aim 1). MicroCT technology was able to nondestructively measure the volume of voids within the cement layer and the bonded surface area at the root/cement/FRC interfaces (aim 2). The interfaces at the root dentin/cement/dowel represent a timely and relevant topic where several efforts have been conducted in the past few years to understand their inherent features. MicroCT technology combined with 3D reconstruction allows for not only inspecting the internal arrangement rendered by fiberglass adhesively bonded to root dentin, but also estimating the volume of voids and contacted bond area between the dentin and cement layer. © 2013 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  12. Mercury in dental amalgam--a public health concern?

    PubMed

    Flanders, R A

    1992-01-01

    Dental amalgam has been the subject of intermittent controversy since it was introduced into dental practice approximately 150 years ago. The controversy has centered on the use of mercury in dental amalgam and the potential health implications to dental patients and dental health professionals from mercury exposure. In recent years the debate over the use of dental amalgam has intensified due to several articles in professional journals and media coverage by television and the press. This paper reviews the recent literature regarding dental amalgam, describes the activities of the antiamalgamists, examines the alternatives to dental amalgam, and reviews the recommendations for additional research. The existing scientific evidence does not demonstrate that mercury in dental amalgam poses a public health hazard. However, researchers on both sides of the controversy agree that much remains to be examined about the health implications of dental amalgam and that the subject merits continued research.

  13. Electrical potentials of restorations in subjects without oral complaints.

    PubMed

    Muller, A W; Van Loon, L A; Davidson, C L

    1990-09-01

    The electrical potentials of 183 amalgam and 11 precious metal restorations, and one set of brackets, were measured. None of the 28 subjects had galvanism, leukoplakia, oral lichen planus, or toxic or allergic reactions to restorations. The potentials of the amalgam restorations increased with age, from about -350 mV NHE at 30 days, to about +100 mV NHE after more than 1000 days. In most subjects potential differences of more than 50 mV were present between restorations; this phenomenon is therefore assumed to be common in healthy populations.

  14. Marginal microleakage of cervical composite resin restorations bonded using etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives: two dimensional vs. three dimensional methods

    PubMed Central

    Khoroushi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study was evaluated the marginal microleakage of two different adhesive systems before and after aging with two different dye penetration techniques. Materials and Methods Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of 48 human molars. Clearfil SE Bond and Single Bond (self-etching and etch-and-rinse systems, respectively) were applied, each to half of the prepared cavities, which were restored with composite resin. Half of the specimens in each group underwent 10,000 cycles of thermocycling. Microleakage was evaluated using two dimensional (2D) and three dimensional (3D) dye penetration techniques separately for each half of each specimen. Data were analyzed with SPSS 11.5 (SPSS Inc.), using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests (α = 0.05). Results The difference between the 2D and 3D microleakage evaluation techniques was significant at the occlusal margins of Single bond groups (p = 0.002). The differences between 2D and 3D microleakage evaluation techniques were significant at both the occlusal and cervical margins of Clearfil SE Bond groups (p = 0.017 and p = 0.002, respectively). The difference between the 2D and 3D techniques was significant at the occlusal margins of non-aged groups (p = 0.003). The difference between these two techniques was significant at the occlusal margins of the aged groups (p = 0.001). The Mann-Whitney test showed significant differences between the two techniques only at the occlusal margins in all specimens. Conclusions Under the limitations of the present study, it can be concluded that the 3D technique has the capacity to detect occlusal microleakage more precisely than the 2D technique. PMID:27200275

  15. Infrared laser irradiation of dental enamel using submicrosecond laser pulses with and without an applied water layer: effect on bond strength to restorative materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, Anupama V.; Staninec, Michal; Le, Charles Q.; Fried, Daniel

    2004-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that during IR laser irradiation at CO2 and Er:YAG laser wavelengths, residual particles of fused non-apatite calcium phosphate phases accumulate that may inhibit adhesion to restorative materials. A layer of water added to the enamel surface before ablation prevents the accumulation of such phases. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of laser pulse duration and wavelength with and without the added water layer on the bond strength of composite to laser prepared enamel surfaces. The surfaces of bovine enamel were irradiated by three lasers systems: a 0.5-μs Er:YSGG laser. a 25-μs Er:YAG laser and a 5-μs TEA CO2 laser operating at 9.6-μm. A motion control system and a pressurized spray system incorporating a microprocessor controlled pulsed nozzle for water delivery, were used to ensure uniform treatment of the entire surface. There was no significant reduction in the shear-bond strength of enamel to composite for the shorter erbium laser pulses if a water-spray was not used, in contrast to previous results for the 200-μs free-running Er:YAG laser in which the water-spray resulted in significantly higher bond-strengths. Shear-bond strengths for both erbium laser systems were significantly higher than for the CO2 laser irradiated samples and the negative control (no acid-etch) but significantly lower than the positive control group (phosphoric acid-etch). The application of the water-spray markedly influenced the surface morphology for all three laser systems with the most uniform surface preparation being produced by the 25-μs Er:YAG laser and the 5-μs CO2 laser with the water-spray.

  16. Evaluation of the long-term corrosion behavior of dental amalgams: influence of palladium addition and particle morphology.

    PubMed

    Colon, Pierre; Pradelle-Plasse, Nelly; Galland, Jacques

    2003-05-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the long-term corrosion behavior of experimental amalgams as a function of particle morphology and palladium content. Samples of four experimental high copper amalgams were prepared according to ADA specifications. Two of them had the same chemical composition but one had lathe cut particles (LCP) and the other had spherical particles (SP). The two others had spherical powders with an addition of 0.5 wt% of palladium (SP 0.5) and 1 wt% of palladium(SP 1) for the other. Corrosion resistance was evaluated by electrochemical techniques in Ringer's solution in a thermostated cell at 37 degrees C for samples aged 5, 8, 12, 16 months and 10 years. Potentiokinetic curves were drawn and the potential and the current density corresponding to the first anodic peak were registered. For all the amalgam samples the corrosion behavior improves over the 10-year period. SP samples exhibit a better behavior than LCP. Palladium addition improves corrosion behavior as compared to samples without palladium. No real difference is found regarding the amount of palladium between 0.5 and 1%. The potentials progress from a range between 0 and 20 mV/SCE to a range of 60-80 after 10 years. The stabilization of the potential begins after only 16 months. Except for the LCP, all the values converge to the same level of 80 mV/SCE. The addition of no more than 0.5 wt% Palladium in a high copper amalgam powder improves the corrosion behavior of the amalgam up to a period of 10 years. The potential of the first anodic peak increases for each amalgam, probably in relation to the evolution of the structure of the material. Clinically, it is of interest to consider the good electrochemical behavior of older restorations when contemplating the repair or replacement of such fillings. At the same time, galvanic current can occur when a new amalgam restoration is placed in contact with an old one even if the same amalgam is used. In this situation, the new

  17. Estimation by a 24-hour study of the daily dose of intra-oral mercury vapor inhaled after release from dental amalgam

    SciTech Connect

    Berglund, A. )

    1990-10-01

    The difficulties associated with estimations of daily doses of inhaled mercury vapor released from dental amalgam are considerable. Existing data are often unreliable, especially if they are based on a single or a small series of samples of intra-oral concentrations of mercury vapor before, during, and after chewing stimulation. In the present paper, the aim was to obtain a more representative estimation of the daily dose of mercury vapor inhaled from amalgam fillings by measurement of amounts of mercury vapor released in the oral cavity during 24 h, under conditions that were as normal as possible. A series of measurements was carried out on each of 15 subjects, with at least nine occlusal surfaces restored with dental amalgam, and on five subjects without any amalgam restorations. The subjects had to follow a standardized schedule for 24 h, whereby they ate, drank, and brushed their teeth at pre-determined time periods. The amount of mercury vapor released per time unit was measured at intervals of 30-45 min by means of a measuring system based on atomic absorption spectrophotometry. None of the subjects was professionally exposed to mercury, and all of their amalgam fillings were more than one year old. Study casts were made for each subject, and the area of the amalgam surfaces was measured. Samples of urine and saliva were analyzed so that values for the mercury concentrations and the rate of release of mercury into saliva could be obtained. The average frequency of fish meals per month was noted.

  18. Analysis of Resin-Dentin Interface Morphology and Bond Strength Evaluation of Core Materials for One Stage Post-Endodontic Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Bitter, Kerstin; Gläser, Christin; Neumann, Konrad; Blunck, Uwe; Frankenberger, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Restoration of endodontically treated teeth using fiber posts in a one-stage procedure gains more popularity and aims to create a secondary monoblock. Data of detailed analyses of so called “post-and-core-systems” with respect to morphological characteristics of the resin-dentin interface in combination with bond strength measurements of fiber posts luted with these materials are scarce. The present study aimed to analyze four different post-and-core-systems with two different adhesive approaches (self-etch and etch-and-rinse). Materials and Methods Human anterior teeth (n = 80) were endodontically treated and post space preparations and post placement were performed using the following systems: Rebilda Post/Rebilda DC/Futurabond DC (Voco) (RB), Luxapost/Luxacore Z/Luxabond Prebond and Luxabond A+B (DMG) (LC), X Post/Core X Flow/XP Bond and Self Cure Activator (Dentsply DeTrey) (CX), FRC Postec/MultiCore Flow/AdheSE DC (Ivoclar Vivadent) (MC). Adhesive systems and core materials of 10 specimens per group were labeled using fluorescent dyes and resin-dentin interfaces were analyzed using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM). Bond strengths were evaluated using a push-out test. Data were analyzed using repeated measurement ANOVA and following post-hoc test. Results CLSM analyses revealed significant differences between groups with respect to the factors hybrid layer thickness (p<0.0005) and number of resin tags (p = 0.02; ANOVA). Bond strength was significantly affected by core material (p = 0.001), location inside the root canal (p<0.0005) and incorporation of fluorescent dyes (p = 0.036; ANOVA). CX [7.7 (4.4) MPa] demonstrated significantly lower bond strength compared to LC [14.2 (8.7) MPa] and RB [13.3 (3.7) MPa] (p<0.05; Tukey HSD) but did not differ significantly from MC [11.5 (3.5) MPa]. Conclusion It can be concluded that bond strengths inside the root canal were not affected by the adhesive approach of the post

  19. Analysis of resin-dentin interface morphology and bond strength evaluation of core materials for one stage post-endodontic restorations.

    PubMed

    Bitter, Kerstin; Gläser, Christin; Neumann, Konrad; Blunck, Uwe; Frankenberger, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Restoration of endodontically treated teeth using fiber posts in a one-stage procedure gains more popularity and aims to create a secondary monoblock. Data of detailed analyses of so called "post-and-core-systems" with respect to morphological characteristics of the resin-dentin interface in combination with bond strength measurements of fiber posts luted with these materials are scarce. The present study aimed to analyze four different post-and-core-systems with two different adhesive approaches (self-etch and etch-and-rinse). Human anterior teeth (n = 80) were endodontically treated and post space preparations and post placement were performed using the following systems: Rebilda Post/Rebilda DC/Futurabond DC (Voco) (RB), Luxapost/Luxacore Z/Luxabond Prebond and Luxabond A+B (DMG) (LC), X Post/Core X Flow/XP Bond and Self Cure Activator (Dentsply DeTrey) (CX), FRC Postec/MultiCore Flow/AdheSE DC (Ivoclar Vivadent) (MC). Adhesive systems and core materials of 10 specimens per group were labeled using fluorescent dyes and resin-dentin interfaces were analyzed using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM). Bond strengths were evaluated using a push-out test. Data were analyzed using repeated measurement ANOVA and following post-hoc test. CLSM analyses revealed significant differences between groups with respect to the factors hybrid layer thickness (p<0.0005) and number of resin tags (p = 0.02; ANOVA). Bond strength was significantly affected by core material (p = 0.001), location inside the root canal (p<0.0005) and incorporation of fluorescent dyes (p = 0.036; ANOVA). CX [7.7 (4.4) MPa] demonstrated significantly lower bond strength compared to LC [14.2 (8.7) MPa] and RB [13.3 (3.7) MPa] (p<0.05; Tukey HSD) but did not differ significantly from MC [11.5 (3.5) MPa]. It can be concluded that bond strengths inside the root canal were not affected by the adhesive approach of the post-and-core-system. All systems demonstrated homogenous hybrid layer formation and

  20. Antibacterial properties of amalgam and composite resin materials used as cores under crowns.

    PubMed

    Al Ghadban, A; Al Shaarani, F

    2012-06-01

    The Aim of this Study was to compare the bacterial growth in the bulk of both amalgam and fluoridated composite resin materials used as cores under crowns at core's surface (in the superficial area of the bulk) and depth levels. With 24 lower premolars, 12 of them were restored with metal posts and amalgam cores (group 1). The rest were restored with glass Fiber-reinforced Composite (FRC) posts and fluoridated composite resin cores (group 2). All specimens were covered with aluminium crowns cemented with resin cement, and then they were soaked in natural saliva for three months. Excoriations abraded from the superficial and the depth areas of the core materials were cultured under aerobic conditions on blood agar plates. After incubation for 2 days, colonies formed on the plates were identified, and the CFU mg(-1) counts were recorded accordingly. Statistical analysis was performed using an independent sample T test. The mean values of CFU mg(-1) counts in group 2 excoriations (surface 39.75, and depth 9.75) were higher than the group 1 excoriations (surface 1.67, and depth 0.42). This study supports the use of amalgam for building up cores due to its antibacterial properties. Composite resin, however, enhanced sizable bacterial growth despite the presence of fluoride.

  1. [Amount of mercury from dental amalgam filling released into the atmosphere by cremation].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, M; Kishimoto, T; Yamamura, Y; Tabuse, M; Akama, Y; Satoh, H

    1994-07-01

    Mercury in dental amalgam filling is released into the atmosphere by cremation and is a suspected source of mercury pollution. The amount of mercury released was measured at three crematoriums. First, mercury levels in the atmosphere were measured. Mercury existed mainly in the gaseous form in ambient air. The concentration of atmospheric mercury at the three crematoriums (S, T and M) ranged from 4.3 to 19.7ng/m3, which was nearly identical to levels in our university surveyed as the control area and also to the levels of atmospheric mercury in general in Japan. Secondly, the amount of mercury release from T crematorium was estimated using official published statistical data in Japan and calculated as follows: sigma[(age specific number of dead that were cremated) x (the number of restored teeth by age category) x (mercury content per amalgam filling (0.6 g))] x (prevalence rate of restoration with amalgam). The amount of mercury released from this crematorium was estimated to be approximately 9.4 kg per year, or a daily release of 26 g into the ambient air. These results indicate that mercury release by cremation is similar to that from other man-made sources.

  2. Effect of dental amalgam on gene expression profiles in rat cerebrum, cerebellum, liver and kidney.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yoshifumi; Tsuruta, Shozo; Honda, Akiko; Fujiwara, Yasuyuki; Satoh, Masahiko; Yasutake, Akira

    2012-01-01

    Dental amalgam is a source of exposure to elemental mercury vapor in the general population. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effect of elemental mercury vapor exposure from dental amalgam restorations on gene expression profiles. Out of 26,962 rat genes, mercury vapor was found to increase the expression of 1 gene (Atp1b3) and decrease the expression of 1 gene (Tap1) in the cerebrum, increase the expression of 1 gene (Dnaja2) in the cerebellum, increase the expression of 2 genes (Actb and Timm23) and decrease the expression of 1 gene (Spink3) in the liver, increase the expression of 2 genes (RT1-Bb and Mgat5) and decrease the expression of 6 genes (Tnfaip8, Rara, Slc2a4, Wdr12, Pias4 and Timm13) in the kidney.

  3. The effect of graded glass-zirconia structure on the bond between core and veneer in layered zirconia restorations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruoyu; Sun, Ting; Zhang, Yanli; Zhang, Yaokun; Jiang, Danyu; Shao, Longquan

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that a graded glass-zirconia structure can strengthen the core-veneer bond in layered zirconia materials. A graded glass-zirconia structure was fabricated by infiltrating glass compositions developed in our laboratory into a presintered yttria tetrahedral zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) substrate by the action of capillary forces. The wettability of the infiltrated glass and Y-TZP substrate was investigated by the sessile drop technique. The microstructures of the graded glass-zirconia structure were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The phase structure characterization in the graded glass-zirconia structure were identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The elastic modulus and hardness of the graded glass-zirconia structure were evaluated from nanoindentations. Further, the shear bond strength (SBS) of the graded glass-zirconia structure and veneering porcelain was also evaluated. SEM images confirmed the formation of the graded glass-zirconia structure. Glass frits wet the Y-TZP substrate at 1200 °C with a contact angle of 43.2°. Only a small amount of t-m transformation was observed in as-infiltrated Y-TZP specimens. Nanoindentation studies of the glass-zirconia graded structure showed that the elastic modulus and hardness of the surface glass layer were higher than those of the dense Y-TZP layer. The mean SBS values for the graded glass-zirconia structure and veneering porcelain (24.35 ± 0.40 MPa) were statistically higher than those of zirconia and veneering porcelain (9.22 ± 0.20 MPa) (P<0.05). A graded glass-zirconia structure can be fabricated by the glass infiltration/densification technique, and this structure exhibits a strong core-veneer bond. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Direct metallic amalgam alternative: a research update.

    PubMed

    Eichmiller, F C; Marjenhoff, W A; Dariel, M P; Lashmore, D S

    1996-01-01

    Discussions between two group leaders at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) led to the suggestion that a mercury-free, silver-based material could be used for dental direct-filling applications. This concept brought about a new approach that, nonetheless, is still based on powder technology such as amalgams. The resulting material also retains the tin and silver components of conventional amalgams. The condensation of a loose powder mixture into a cohesive solid relies, however, on cold-welding across atomically clean silver-silver interfaces after a mild acid treatment of the surfaces. The National Institute of Dental Research (NIDR) and American Dental Association Health Foundation (ADAHF) became involved in the research in 1992, and ADAHF scientists continue to collaborate with NIST metallurgists and electrochemists toward the further development of this promising new technology.

  5. Micro-PIXE study of metal loss from dental amalgam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meesat, Ridthee; Sudprasert, Wanwisa; Guibert, Edouard; Wang, Liping; Chappuis, Thibault; Whitlow, Harry J.

    2017-08-01

    Mercury amalgams have been a topic of controversy ever since their introduction over 150 years ago as a dental material. An interesting question is if metals are released from the amalgam into the enamel and dentine tissue. To elucidate this PIXE mapping was used to investigate metal redistribution in an extracted molar tooth with a ∼30 year old high-Cu content amalgam filling. The tooth was sectioned and polished, and elemental mapping carried out on the amalgam/enamel, bulk amalgam and the wear surface of the amalgam. As expected, the amalgam was multiphase amalgam comprising of Cu-rich and Ag-rich grains with non-uniform distribution of Hg. The amalgam/dentine interface was clearly defined with amalgam elements on one side and C and P from hydroxyapatite on the other side with evidence of only slight interface corrosion. The peaks for Cu Hg and Zn were isolated from interfering signals with concentrations in the enamel tissue, observed to be at, or below the method detection limit. The proximity in energy of the Sn L α and Ca K α , peaks and the background on the Hg M α gave signal overlap which increased the MDL for these elements. Remarkably, a course grain texture in the amalgam was observed just below the biting surface of the amalgam which might be associated with tribochemical processes from mastication. This coupled with the clear absence of the amalgam metals from tooth tissue, even in close proximity to the interface, suggests that for this sample, release of Hg occurred via erosion or dissolution in saliva.

  6. Recovery of silver residues from dental amalgam.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Heloísa Aparecida Barbosa da Silva; Iano, Flávia Godoy; da Silva, Thelma Lopes; de Oliveira, Rodrigo Cardoso; de Menezes, Manoel Lima; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo

    2010-01-01

    Dental amalgam residues are probably the most important chemical residues generated from clinical dental practice because of the presence of heavy metals among its constituents, mainly mercury and silver. The purpose of this study was to develop an alternative method for the recovery of silver residues from dental amalgam. The residue generated after vacuum distillation of dental amalgam for the separation of mercury was initially diluted with 32.5% HNO3, followed by precipitation with 20% NaCl. Sequentially, under constant heating and agitation with NaOH and sucrose, the sample was reduced to metallic silver. However, the processing time was too long, which turned this procedure not viable. In another sequence of experiments, the dilution was accomplished with concentrated HNO3 at 90 degrees C, followed by precipitation with 20% NaCl. After washing, the pellet was diluted with concentrated NH4OH, water and more NaCl in order to facilitate the reaction with the reducer. Ascorbic acid was efficiently used as reducer, allowing a fast reduction, thus making the procedure viable. The proposed methodology is of easy application and does not require sophisticated equipment or expensive reagents.

  7. Fracture resistance of cuspal coverage of endodontically treated maxillary premolars with combined composite-amalgam compared to other techniques.

    PubMed

    Shafiei, F; Memarpour, M; Karimi, F

    2011-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated the fracture resistance of teeth restored with combined composite-amalgam for cuspal coverage compared to direct coverage with composite (with or without an amalgam base) and composite onlay. Seventy-two intact maxillary premolars were randomly divided into six groups (n=12). The two control groups were G1, intact teeth (negative control), and G2, mesio-occlusodistal preparation only (positive control). Each of the four experimental groups used a different type of restoration for the prepared teeth: G3, direct composite cusp coverage; G4, composite onlay; G5, direct composite coverage with an amalgam base; and G6, combined composite-amalgam cuspal coverage. After thermocycling, fracture strength was tested. The data were analyzed with analysis of variance and the least significant differences post hoc tests (α=0.05). Mean fracture resistance in the six groups (in N) were G1, 1101 ±1 86; G2, 228 ± 38; G2, 699 ± 161; G4, 953 ± 185; G5, 859 ± 146; and G6, 772 ± 154. There were significant differences between G1 and all the other groups except for G4 and between G2 and all the other groups. Fracture strength in G3 also differed significantly compared to G4 and G5. The difference between G4 and G6 was statistically significant (p<0.05), but the difference between G3 and G6 was not (p>0.05).

  8. Experimental dental bio-adhesives for direct restorations: the influence of PMnEDM homologs structure on bond strength.

    PubMed

    Kupka, Tomasz W; Gibas, Mirosław; Dabrowska, Agnieszka; Tanasiewicz, Marta; Malec, Witold

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of PMnEDM dental monomer homologs chemical structure on shear bond strength between polymer-based composite and alloy. Four light-cured experimental universal dental bio-adhesives (group codes: A (PMDM), B (PM2EDM), C (PM3EDM), D (PM4EDM)) were preliminarily evaluated with respect to sensitivity to ambient light, curing time, depth of cure, and uncured film thickness according to standardized procedures. Appropriate tests were performed to measure shear bond strength (SBS) of polymer-based composite to cobalt-based alloy with the use of the adhesives investigated. Variability of results was evaluated by use of the coefficient of variation (CV). Results were estimated with the aid of one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), performed on the logarithmic values, with alpha=0.05 significance level. All materials passed the requirements according to physicochemical properties. Except for formulation D, all results estimating SBS were positive with respect to standardized requirements. The uppermost mean SBS was achieved for the A adhesive (11.45 MPa) and appeared to be significantly different compared to D one (5.07 MPa) (p=0.0495). Also the B adhesive, having slightly lower mean SBS value (10.50 MPa) exhibited a significant difference in respect to D one (p=0.0455). The means for other trial pairs did not differ statistically. The materials here studied might be considered to have a practical use in dental clinics, especially the formulations B and C.

  9. Pressable feldspathic inlays in premolars: effect of cementation strategy and mechanical cycling on the adhesive bond between dentin and restoration.

    PubMed

    Feitosa, Sabrina Alves; Corazza, Pedro Henrique; Cesar, Paulo Francisco; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of the cementation strategy and mechanical cycling (MC) on the microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of feldspathic inlays cemented to premolars. Forty-eight human premolars were prepared and porcelain inlays were produced. Specimens were allocated into 3 groups, based on the cementation strategy: 1) conventional adhesive cementation (RelyX ARC, 3M ESPE): application of etch-and-rinse single bottle adhesive to dentin / ceramic surface treated with hydrofluoric acid (HF) and silane (S) / cementation with resin cement; 2) simplified cementation using a self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U100, 3M ESPE); 3) modified simplified cementation using a self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U100, 3M ESPE) with HF+S treatment. Half of the specimens from each group were submitted to MC (2x106 pulses, frequency = 4 Hz, load = 100 N). Each specimen was serially sliced for MTBS and the failures were classified. The stress distribution analysis using FEA was verified. All of the bar-samples from G2 were lost during cutting of the specimens. Mechanical-cycling had no significant effect on bond strength, whereas cementation strategy significant affected MTBS results. The most common type of failure was cohesive of cement. FEA showed that stresses were concentrated mainly at the loading region going up to the root fixation. Porcelain inlays cemented with conventional resin cement or self-adhesive resin cement should be associated with ceramic surface treatment. FEA showed the most critical zone for failure is located in the cement region close to the marginal crest.

  10. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR DETERMINING AMALGAM DECOMPOSITION RATE

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, R.W.; Wright, C.C.

    1962-04-24

    A method and apparatus for measuring the rate at which an amalgam decomposes in contact with aqueous solutions are described. The amalgam and an aqueous hydroxide solution are disposed in an electrolytic cell. The amalgam is used as the cathode of the cell, and an electrode and anode are disposed in the aqueous solution. A variable source of plating potential is connected across the cell. The difference in voltage between the amalgam cathode and a calibrated source of reference potential is used to control the variable source to null the difference in voltage and at the same time to maintain the concentration of the amalgam at some predetermined constant value. The value of the current required to maintain this concentration constant is indicative of the decomposition rate of the amalgam. (AEC)

  11. Engineered disulfide bonds restore chaperone-like function of DJ-1 mutants linked to familial Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Logan, Todd; Clark, Lindsay; Ray, Soumya S

    2010-07-13

    Loss-of-function mutations such as L166P, A104T, and M26I in the DJ-1 gene (PARK7) have been linked to autosomal-recessive early onset Parkinson's disease (PD). Cellular and structural studies of the familial mutants suggest that these mutations may destabilize the dimeric structure. To look for common dynamical signatures among the DJ-1 mutants, short MD simulations of up to 1000 ps were conducted to identify the weakest region of the protein (residues 38-70). In an attempt to stabilize the protein, we mutated residue Val 51 to cysteine (V51C) to make a symmetry-related disulfide bridge with the preexisting Cys 53 on the opposite subunit. We found that the introduction of this disulfide linkage stabilized the mutants A104T and M26I against thermal denaturation, improved their ability to scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS), and restored a chaperone-like function of blocking alpha-synuclein aggregation. The L166P mutant was far too unstable to be rescued by introduction of the V51C mutation. The results presented here point to the possible development of pharmacological chaperones, which may eventually lead to PD therapeutics.

  12. 48. INTERIOR VIEW FROM THE WEST END OF THE AMALGAMATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. INTERIOR VIEW FROM THE WEST END OF THE AMALGAMATION TABLES LOOKING NORTH TOWARDS THE STAMP BATTERIES WITH AMALGAM TRAPS SHOWN IN THE BOTTOM FOREGROUND. NOTE THE EXTANT EQUIPMENT IN THE FOREGROUND THAT THE PARK USES TO INTERPRET THE MILL. FROM LEFT TO RIGHT, A SCREEN FROM THE MORTAR BOX, A STAMP STOP. A (HUMAN'S) SHOE, A DIE FROM THE BOTTOM OF A MORTAR BOX, AN AMALGAM SCRAPPER AND AN AMALGAM BUCKET. - Standard Gold Mill, East of Bodie Creek, Northeast of Bodie, Bodie, Mono County, CA

  13. Conventional glass ionomers as posterior restorations. A status report for the American Journal of Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Naasan, M A; Watson, T F

    1998-02-01

    The search for a material to replace amalgam continues as a major quest in materials science. Resin composites may offer one solution but an alternative class of material, the glass ionomer cements (GICs) may have some potential for fulfilling this role. GICs were first introduced to the dental profession in 1976, and have now become an accepted part of the dental armamentarium, especially for use in low load bearing situations. They possess a low coefficient of thermal expansion similar to that of tooth structure, physicochemical bonding to both enamel and dentin, and the release of fluoride ions into the adjacent tooth tissue. These properties help to reduce marginal leakage and may contribute to a reduced incidence of recurrent decay in the restored tooth. Fluoride released into the ambient fluids has a caries-preventive effect in neighboring teeth by enhancing remineralization and inhibiting demineralization of the dental hard tissues. The main criticisms of the GICs are their brittleness, poor surface polish, porosity and surface wear. To overcome some of these deficiencies, considerable attention has been directed at improving their physical properties, especially with the addition of metal powders, the metal-modified GICs. Different metal powders have been tried, including alloys of silver and tin, pure silver, gold, titanium, palladium and stainless steel. There is conflicting data as to whether or not these materials are sufficiently strong for use in high stress restorations, especially their potential use as replacement materials for amalgam fillings.

  14. Influence of pH cycling on the microtensile bond strength of self-etching adhesives containing MDPB and fluoride to dentin and microhardness of enamel and dentin adjacent to restorations.

    PubMed

    Pedrosa, Vivianne Oliveira; Flório, Flávia Martão; Turssi, Cecília Pedroso; Amaral, Flávia Lucisano; Basting, Roberta Tarkany; França, Fabiana Mantovani

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate the influence of pH cycling on microtensile bond strength (µTBS) and fracture pattern of MDPB- and fluoride-containing self-etching adhesive systems to dentin, and on the cross-sectional Knoop microhardness (CSMH) of enamel and dentin adjacent to restorations. The two-step self-etching adhesive Clearfil SE Bond (SE; Kuraray), the two-step MDPBand fluoride-containing adhesive Clearfil Protect Bond (PB; Kuraray), and the one-step fluoride-containing adhesive One-Up Bond F Plus (OU; Tokuyama) were used to bond resin composite to midcoronal dentin surfaces (for µTBS testing) or to Class V cavities (for CSMH testing). µTBS and CSMH tests were performed after a 15-day period of pH cycling or storage in artificial saliva. µTBS to dentin was not affected by pH cycling or storage in artificial saliva; however, µTBS values found for PB were higher than those observed for OU. No difference existed among the µTBS values shown by PB, OU, and SE. The fracture pattern was affected by both pH cycling and adhesive system. In enamel, there was no difference in CSMH values provided by the different adhesive systems and storage media, regardless of the distance and depth from restoration. In dentin, PB and SE showed the highest CSMH values, which differed from those obtained for OU. Significantly higher CSMH values were found 100 µm from the restoration margin for all adhesive systems tested. The bond strength and microhardness in the vicinity of restorations were adhesive dependent, with MDPB and fluoride exerting no effect on the performance of the adhesive systems.

  15. Influence of different conditioning methods on the shear bond strength of novel light-curing nano-ionomer restorative to enamel and dentin.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Yonca; Ozel, Emre; Attar, Nuray; Ozge Bicer, Ceren

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate shear bond strength (SBS) between a light-curing nano-ionomer restorative and enamel or dentin after acid etching, after erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser etching, or after combined treatment. Forty third molars were selected, the crowns were sectioned, and 80 tooth slabs were obtained. The specimens were assigned to two groups, which were divided into four subgroups(n = 10). Group 1 [enamel (e)], treated with 37% phosphoric acid (A) + Ketac nano-primer (K); group 2 [dentin (d)], (A) + (K); group 3(e), Er:YAG laser etching (L) + (A) + (K); group 4(d), (L) + (A) + (K); group 5(e), (L) + (K); group 6(d), (L) + (K); group 7(e), (K); group 8(d), (K). The SBS of the specimens was measured with a universal test machine (1 mm/min). Data were analyzed by independent samples t-test, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and a post-hoc Duncan test (p < 0.05). No difference was determined between groups 3 and 5 (p > 0.05). Group 7 exhibited higher SBS values than those of groups 3 and 5 (p < 0.05). Group 1 showed higher SBSs than those of groups 3, 5 and 7 (p < 0.05). There was no significant difference between groups 4 and 6 (p > 0.05). No difference was observed between groups 2 and 4 (p > 0.05). However, group 2 presented higher SBSs than did group 6 (p < 0.05). Group 8 exhibited the highest SBS values when compared with groups 2, 4 and 6 (p < 0.05). Er:YAG laser adversely affected the adhesion of the light-curing nano-ionomer restorative to both enamel and dentin.

  16. In vitro fracture resistance of root-filled teeth using new-generation dentine bonding adhesives.

    PubMed

    Hürmüzlü, F; Serper, A; Siso, S H; Er, K

    2003-11-01

    To compare the fracture resistance of root-filled premolar teeth restored with new-generation dentine bonding adhesives. Sixty extracted single-rooted human maxillary premolar teeth were used. Access cavities were prepared, and the roots were instrumented with K-files to an apical size 50 using a step-back technique. Root fillings were accomplished using gutta percha (Sure-Endo, Seoul, Korea) and AH Plus root canal sealer (Dentsply DeTrey, Konstanz, Germany) using the lateral condensation technique. The teeth were then randomly divided into six groups of 10 teeth each. A mesiodistocclusal (MOD) cavity was prepared in the teeth to the level of the canal orifices so that the thickness of the buccal wall of the teeth measured 2 mm at the occlusal surface and 3 mm at the cemento-enamel junction. Preparations were restored using the following adhesive systems: Etch & Prime 3.0 (Degussa AG, Hanau, Germany), Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray, Osaka, Japan), Prompt L-Pop (ESPE, Seefeld, Germany), Panavia F (Kuraray, Osaka, Japan), Optibond Plus (Kerr, Orange, CA, USA) and Admira Bond (Voco, Cuxhaven, Germany); all preparations except those of the Panavia F and Admira Bond groups were further restored with resin composites. The Panavia F group was restored with amalgam and the Admira Bond group with Ormocer (Voco, Cuxhaven, Germany). The teeth were mounted in a Universal Testing Machine (Hounsfield, Surrey, UK), and the buccal walls were subjected to a slowly increasing compressive force until fracture occurred. The force of fracture of the walls of each tooth was recorded and the results in the various groups were compared. Statistical analysis of the data was accomplished using one-way anova. There was no significant difference in the fracture resistance of any of the test groups. In this laboratory study, the type of dentine bonding agents had no influence in the fracture resistance of teeth.

  17. The tarnished history of a posterior restoration.

    PubMed

    Rose, M D; Costello, J P

    1998-11-14

    Galvanic corrosion is an electrochemical reaction between dissimilar metals that has the potential to cause unpleasant and even painful biological effects intra-orally. A case is presented where a full gold crown underwent galvanic change after being placed in contact with an amalgam restoration.

  18. Restoration Materials and Secondary Caries Using an In Vitro Biofilm Model

    PubMed Central

    van de Sande, F.H.; Opdam, N.J.M.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; de Soet, J.J.; Cenci, M.S.; Huysmans, M.C.D.J.N.M.

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated whether restoration materials and adhesives influence secondary caries formation in gaps using a short-term in vitro biofilm model. Sixty enamel–dentin blocks were restored with 6 different restoration materials with or without adhesives (n = 10 per group) with a gap: 1) Clearfil AP-X composite, 2) Clearfil AP-X composite + SE Bond, 3) Clearfil AP-X composite + ProtectBond, 4) Filtek Silorane composite, 5) Filtek Silorane composite + Silorane System adhesive, or 6) Tytin amalgam. Specimens were subjected to an intermittent 1% sucrose biofilm model for 20 days to create artificial caries lesions. Lesion progression in the enamel–dentin next to the different materials was measured in lesion depth (LD) and mineral loss (ML) using transversal wavelength independent microradiography (T-WIM). A regression analysis was used to compare the LD and ML of the different restoration materials at 4 measurement locations: 1 location at the surface of the enamel, 1 location at the wall of the enamel, and 2 locations at the wall of the dentin. A statistically significant effect of AP-X composite with Protect Bond was found for LD and ML at the WallDentin1 location, leading to less advanced wall lesions. An additional finding was that gap size was also statistically significant at the 2 wall locations in dentin, leading to increasing lesion progression with wider gaps. In conclusion, adhesives can influence wall lesion development in gaps. Protect Bond showed significantly less caries progression compared to bare restoration materials or other adhesives in this short-term in vitro biofilm model. PMID:25297114

  19. Allergy to dental materials with special reference to the use of amalgam and polymethylmethacrylate.

    PubMed

    Kaaber, S

    1990-12-01

    The increase in new clinical materials with questionable biological properties and the corresponding increase in awareness in patients to health hazards from dental materials are two important problems of modern clinical dentistry. Based upon evidence from clinical research the hypersensitivity problems related to the use of silver amalgam and acrylic denture base materials are reviewed to define possible risk groups among dental patients. In silver amalgam therapy the main risk group is patients with contact lesions in the oral mucosa adjacent to the restorations, as this group exhibits a high frequency of skin sensitivity to mercury and other base materials in dental amalgam. Among denture wearers a corresponding risk group has been observed among patients with previous allergic diseases and burning mouth syndrome. In these cases a high incidence of skin sensitivity reactions to denture allergens has been observed, usually to methylmethacrylate monomer and formaldehyde. Some possible pathogenic mechanisms leading to a contact allergy of the oral mucosa in these patient groups are discussed.

  20. [Responsible management of dental amalgam mercury: a review of its impact on health].

    PubMed

    Méndez-Visag, Christhian

    2014-01-01

    This review discusses the implications of dental amalgam used in dentistry. We first focus on the status of the fetus, which is the most vulnerable to mercury exposure from maternal dental amalgams because of the chronic form and potential magnitude of exposure. And second, our work covers the awareness of environmental repercussions involved with continued use of this restorative material, a persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic chemical, when best management practices (BMPs) of mercury from the WHO and the American Dental Association are not followed. Although the use of dental amalgam is in decline in the public and private sectors, it is necessary that the measures disseminated by the WHO on BMPs are implemented by professional dentists and taught by academic institutions that may continue to teach its use. It is also essential to promote from the undergraduate level the ethical values and responsibility to health and the environment, considering that the poor handling of mercury contributes to the global burden of environmental mercury. Finally, the findings support important modifications in the clinical field, the principle of precaution, and logistical aspects of the profession in the process of reducing and eventually eliminating the use of mercury.

  1. Association between History of Dental Amalgam Fillings and Risk of Parkinson’s Disease: A Population-Based Retrospective Cohort Study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yung-Chuang; Chang, Cheng-Wei; Lee, Hsin-Lin; Chuang, Chuan-Chung; Chiu, Hsien-Chung; Li, Wan-Yun; Horng, Jorng-Tzong; Fu, Earl

    2016-01-01

    The impact of dental amalgam on the development of Parkinson’s disease (PD) is still uncertain, although a positive association between dental amalgam and PD has been found in a few case-control studies. The patients with amalgam fillings restored between 2000 and 2008 were identified by using the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) in Taiwan. The same number of patients who had no new amalgam filling restored was matched by sex, age, and treatment date. Both cohorts were followed up from the treatment date until the date of diagnosis of PD, death, or the end of the year 2008. The individuals who received amalgam fillings had a significantly higher risk of PD afterward (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]=1.583, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.122–2.234, p=0.0089) than those who did not. In the individuals who received amalgam fillings, being diagnosed with diabetes or hyperlipidemia demonstrated a significantly lower HR of PD occurrence than in the patients without diabetes or hyperlipidemia (HR=0.449, 95% CI=0.254–0.794, p=0.0059; HR=0.445, 95% CI=0.260–0.763, p=0.0032) after adjusting for comorbidities and Charlson-Deyo Comorbidity Index (CCI) scores. Meanwhile, hypertension increased the hazard risk of PD (HR=1.645, 95% CI=1.098–2.464, p=0.0159). The patients exposed to dental amalgam fillings were 1.583 times more likely to have PD afterward compared to their non-exposed counterparts after adjusting for comorbidities and CCI scores. PMID:27906991

  2. Association between History of Dental Amalgam Fillings and Risk of Parkinson's Disease: A Population-Based Retrospective Cohort Study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yung-Chuang; Chang, Cheng-Wei; Lee, Hsin-Lin; Chuang, Chuan-Chung; Chiu, Hsien-Chung; Li, Wan-Yun; Horng, Jorng-Tzong; Fu, Earl

    2016-01-01

    The impact of dental amalgam on the development of Parkinson's disease (PD) is still uncertain, although a positive association between dental amalgam and PD has been found in a few case-control studies. The patients with amalgam fillings restored between 2000 and 2008 were identified by using the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) in Taiwan. The same number of patients who had no new amalgam filling restored was matched by sex, age, and treatment date. Both cohorts were followed up from the treatment date until the date of diagnosis of PD, death, or the end of the year 2008. The individuals who received amalgam fillings had a significantly higher risk of PD afterward (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]=1.583, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.122-2.234, p=0.0089) than those who did not. In the individuals who received amalgam fillings, being diagnosed with diabetes or hyperlipidemia demonstrated a significantly lower HR of PD occurrence than in the patients without diabetes or hyperlipidemia (HR=0.449, 95% CI=0.254-0.794, p=0.0059; HR=0.445, 95% CI=0.260-0.763, p=0.0032) after adjusting for comorbidities and Charlson-Deyo Comorbidity Index (CCI) scores. Meanwhile, hypertension increased the hazard risk of PD (HR=1.645, 95% CI=1.098-2.464, p=0.0159). The patients exposed to dental amalgam fillings were 1.583 times more likely to have PD afterward compared to their non-exposed counterparts after adjusting for comorbidities and CCI scores.

  3. Scalp Hair and Urine Mercury Content of Children in the Northeast United States: The New England Children’s Amalgam Trial

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Julie E.; Trachtenberg, Felicia L.; Barregard, Lars; Bellinger, David; McKinlay, Sonja

    2008-01-01

    Children may be at particular risk from toxic effects of mercury (Hg). Previous studies of hair (organic) and urine (inorganic) Hg levels in US children were unable to assess Hg levels while accounting for exposure to amalgam dental restorations. This analysis describes, over a 5-year period, levels and correlates/predictors of scalp hair (H-Hg) and urinary (U-Hg) mercury in 534 New England Children’s Amalgam Trial (NECAT) participants, aged 6–10 years and without exposure to dental amalgam at baseline. Results: Mean H-Hg levels were between 0.3 and 0.4 μg/g over 5 years. 17–29% of children had H-Hg levels ≥0.5μg/g, and 5.0 to 8.5% of children had levels ≥1μg/g, in any given study year. In adjusted models, fish consumption frequency was the most robust predictor of high H-Hg. U-Hg mean levels were between 0.7 to 0.9 μg/g creatinine over two years. The percentage of those with U-Hg≥2.3μg/g creatinine ranged from 4 to 6%. Number of amalgam restorations had a significant dose-response relationship with U-Hg level. Daily gum chewing in the presence of amalgam was associated with high U-Hg. PMID:17961541

  4. Assessing microleakage of different class V restorations after Er:YAG laser and bur preparation.

    PubMed

    Corona, S A M; Borsatto, M C; Pecora, J D; De SA Rocha, R A S; Ramos, T S; Palma-Dibb, R G

    2003-10-01

    This study assessed in vitro marginal leakage of class V cavities prepared by turbine and Er:YAG laser and restored with different materials. Sixty cavities with enamel and dentine margins were prepared and assigned to six groups: I, II, III by turbine and IV, V, VI by Er:YAG laser. The following restorative systems were used: groups I and IV: Bond 1 + Alert; II and V: Fuji II LC; III and VI: SBMP + Dispersalloy. After finishing, specimens were thermocycled for 8 h and 45 min (500 cycles), isolated, immersed in a 0.2% Rhodamine B solution, sectioned oro-facially and analysed for leakage. The dye penetration means (%) were: occlusal I: 10.09 (+/- 21.28), II: 3.25 (+/- 10.27), III: 0, IV: 41.77 (+/- 42.48), V: 23.37 (+/- 33.79), VI: 12.66 (+/- 24.06); cervical I: 16.49 (+/- 26.67), II: 4.34 (+/- 13.71), III: 0, IV: 37.71 (+/- 30.47), V: 39.56 (+/- 43.35) and VI: 72.53 (+/- 37.79). The use of Er:YAG laser for cavity preparation yielded higher degree of marginal leakage, as compared with the use of conventional air-turbine. The enamel interface provided better marginal sealing, comparing with dentine/cementum margin. As to the cavity preparation device (i.e. laser or bur), the analysis of the results showed that bonded amalgam and Fuji II LC provided less infiltration, than Alert. On the other hand, for lased cavities, Alert provided the best results, similar to those of Fuji II LC and superior to those reached by bonded amalgam.

  5. 21 CFR 872.3110 - Dental amalgam capsule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental amalgam capsule. 872.3110 Section 872.3110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3110 Dental amalgam capsule. (a) Identification....

  6. 21 CFR 872.3110 - Dental amalgam capsule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental amalgam capsule. 872.3110 Section 872.3110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3110 Dental amalgam capsule. (a) Identification....

  7. 21 CFR 872.3110 - Dental amalgam capsule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental amalgam capsule. 872.3110 Section 872.3110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3110 Dental amalgam capsule. (a) Identification....

  8. 21 CFR 872.3110 - Dental amalgam capsule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dental amalgam capsule. 872.3110 Section 872.3110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3110 Dental amalgam capsule. (a) Identification....

  9. [Amalgam risk assessment with coverage of references up to 2005].

    PubMed

    Mutter, J; Naumann, J; Walach, H; Daschner, F

    2005-03-01

    Amalgam, which has been in use in dentistry for 150 years, consists of 50 % elemental mercury and a mixture of silver, tin, copper and zinc. Minute amounts of mercury vapour are released continuously from amalgam. Amalgam contributes substantially to human mercury load. Mercury accumulates in some organs, particularly in the brain, where it can bind to protein more tightly than other heavy metals (e. g. lead, cadmium). Therefore, the elimination half time is assumed to be up to 1 - 18 years in the brain and bones. Mercury is assumed to be one of the most toxic non-radioactive elements. There are pointers to show that mercury vapour is more neurotoxic than methyl-mercury in fish. Review of recent literature suggests that mercury from dental amalgam may lead to nephrotoxicity, neurobehavioural changes, autoimmunity, oxidative stress, autism, skin and mucosa alterations or non-specific symptoms and complaints. The development of Alzheimer's disease or multiple sclerosis has also been linked to low-dose mercury exposure. There may be individual genetical or acquired susceptibilities for negative effects from dental amalgam. Mercury levels in the blood, urine or other biomarkers do not reflect the mercury load in critical organs. Some studies regarding dental amalgam reveal substantial methodical flaws. Removal of dental amalgam leads to permanent improvement of various chronic complaints in a relevant number of patients in various trials. Summing up, available data suggests that dental amalgam is an unsuitable material for medical, occupational and ecological reasons.

  10. Domination Number of Vertex Amalgamation of Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahyuni, Y.; Utoyo, M. I.; Slamin

    2017-06-01

    For a graph G = (V, E), a subset S of V is called a dominating set if every vertex x in V is either in S or adjacent to a vertex in S. The domination number γ ( G ) is the minimum cardinality of the dominating set of G. The dominating set of G with a minimum cardinality denoted by γ ( G )-set. Let G 1, G 2, …, Gt be subgraphs of the graph G. If the union of all these subgraphs is G and their intersection is {v}, then we say that G is the vertex-amalgamation of G 1, G 2, …, Gt at vertex v. Based on the membership of the common vertex v in the γ ( Gi )-set, there exist three conditions to be considered. First, if v elements of every γ ( Gi )-set, second if there is no γ ( Gi )-set containing v, and third if either v is element of γ ( Gi )-set for 1 ≤ i ≤ p or there is no γ ( Gi )-set containing v for p < i ≤ t . For these three conditions, the domination number of G as vertex-amalgamation of G 1, G 2, …, Gt at vertex v can be determined.

  11. Copper allergy from dental copper amalgam?

    PubMed

    Gerhardsson, Lars; Björkner, Bert; Karlsteen, Magnus; Schütz, Andrejs

    2002-05-06

    A 65-year-old female was investigated due to a gradually increasing greenish colour change of her plastic dental splint, which she used to prevent teeth grinding when sleeping. Furthermore, she had noted a greenish/bluish colour change on the back of her black gloves, which she used to wipe her tears away while walking outdoors. The investigation revealed that the patient had a contact allergy to copper, which is very rare. She had, however, had no occupational exposure to copper. The contact allergy may be caused by long-term exposure of the oral mucosa to copper from copper-rich amalgam fillings, which were frequently used in childhood dentistry up to the 1960s in Sweden. The deposition of a copper-containing coating on the dental splint may be caused by a raised copper intake from drinking water, increasing the copper excretion in saliva, in combination with release of copper due to electrochemical corrosion of dental amalgam. The greenish colour change of the surface of the splint is probably caused by deposition of a mixture of copper compounds, e.g. copper carbonates. Analysis by the X-ray diffraction technique indicates that the dominant component is copper oxide (Cu2O and CuO). The corresponding greenish/bluish discoloration observed on the back of the patient's gloves may be caused by increased copper excretion in tears.

  12. Terrane amalgamation in the Philippine Sea margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Robert; Nichols, Gary J.

    1990-09-01

    The Philippine Sea plate includes plateaus of thickened crust interpreted as imbricated ophiolite and arc-related terranes of late Mesozoic-early Tertiary age separated by thinner oceanic crust. The arrival of plateaus at the subducting southwest margin of the Philippine Sea plate has caused the Philippine Trench to propagate southward in increments and caused transfer of terranes to the Philippine margin. New data from the Halmahera region indicate that the position, nature and evolution of plate boundaries have been strongly influenced by the heterogeneous character of the Philippine Sea plate. At present the Philippine Trench terminates at an oceanic plateau which is structurally continuous with an old forearc and ophiolite terrane on Halmahera. The position of this terrane has caused Philippine Sea plate-Eurasia convergence to be transferred from subduction at the Philippine Trench to the Molucca Sea Collision Zone through a broad NE-SW dextral transpressional zone across Halmahera. This plate boundary configuration is unstable and requires the future development of a new subduction zone to the east of Halmahera which will result in amalgamation of the Halmahera ophiolite terrane to the Philippine margin. In the Halmahera region amalgamation of terranes to the evolving Philippine microcontinent is currently in process.

  13. Dental devices: classification of dental amalgam, reclassification of dental mercury, designation of special controls for dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2009-08-04

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule classifying dental amalgam into class II, reclassifying dental mercury from class I to class II, and designating a special control to support the class II classifications of these two devices, as well as the current class II classification of amalgam alloy. The three devices are now classified in a single regulation. The special control for the devices is a guidance document entitled, "Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Dental Amalgam, Mercury, and Amalgam Alloy." This action is being taken to establish sufficient regulatory controls to provide reasonable assurance of the safety and effectiveness of these devices. Elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register, FDA is announcing the availability of the guidance document that will serve as the special control for the devices.

  14. Mercury in saliva and feces after removal of amalgam fillings.

    PubMed

    Björkman, L; Sandborgh-Englund, G; Ekstrand, J

    1997-05-01

    The toxicological consequences of exposure to mercury (Hg) from dental amalgam fillings is a matter of debate in several countries. The purpose of this study was to obtain data on Hg concentrations in saliva and feces before and after removal of dental amalgam fillings. In addition Hg concentrations in urine, blood, and plasma were determined. Ten subjects had all amalgam fillings removed at one dental session. Before removal, the median Hg concentration in feces was more than 10 times higher than in samples from an amalgam free reference group consisting of 10 individuals (2.7 vs 0.23 mumol Hg/kg dry weight, p < 0.001). A considerable increase of the Hg concentration in feces 2 days after amalgam removal (median 280 mumol Hg/kg dry weight) was followed by a significant decrease. Sixty days after removal the median Hg concentration was still slightly higher than in samples from the reference group. In plasma, the median Hg concentration was 4 nmol/liter at baseline. Two days after removal the median Hg concentration in plasma was increased to 5 nmol/liter and declined subsequently to 1.3 nmol/liter by Day 60. In saliva, there was an exponential decline in the Hg concentration during the first 2 weeks after amalgam removal (t 1/2 = 1.8 days). It was concluded that amalgam fillings are a significant source of Hg in saliva and feces. Hg levels in all media decrease considerably after amalgam removal. The uptake of amalgam mercury in the GI tract in conjunction with removal of amalgam fillings seems to be low.

  15. A study of high copper amalgams. II. Amalgamation on a Hg-plated high copper alloy containing 30 wt% Cu.

    PubMed

    Okabe, T; Mitchell, R; Wright, A H; Fairhurst, C W

    1978-01-01

    The amalgamation reaction of a low silver, high copper alloy powder has been investigated by plating tablets of compacted powder with Hg. Both gamma1 Ag-Hg and micro Cu-Sn crystals form on the tablets. In spite of large differences in composition, these tablets amalgamated similarly to the T tablets studied and reported in Part I.

  16. Frequency of restoration replacement in posterior teeth for U.S. Navy and Marine Corps personnel.

    PubMed

    Laccabue, M; Ahlf, R L; Simecek, J W

    2014-01-01

    There are no recent data that describe the replacement rates of resin composite and dental amalgam restorations placed by US Navy dentists. Information is needed to provide the best possible care for our military personnel which would minimize the probability of dental emergencies, especially for those who are deployed. The purpose of this study was to determine if the frequency of posterior restoration replacement in military personnel differed based on the type of restorative material utilized. Data contained in dental records in an observational study (retrospective cohort) were evaluated to identify resin composite and dental amalgam restorations placed by navy dentists in posterior teeth. The status of all erupted, unerupted, missing, and replaced teeth was documented. The type and condition of all existing restorations were recorded for each posterior tooth. Investigators reviewed 2921 dental records, and of those, 247 patients met the criteria for inclusion in the study. A total of 1050 restorations (485 resin composite and 565 amalgam) were evaluated. A Cox proportional hazards model was adjusted for number of tooth surfaces restored, caries risk, and filled posterior surfaces at initial exam. The overall rate of replacement for all restorations in the sample was 5.7% during the average 2.8-year follow-up. No significant elevation of risk for restoration replacement existed when comparing resin composite and amalgam. Both the number of restored surfaces and caries risk status were independent risk factors for replacement. When restoring multisurface cavity preparations, providers placed amalgams by an approximate 2:1 ratio over resin composites for this study population. The results for this study show that no difference existed in the rate of replacement for amalgam vs resin composite. When restorations increased from just a single occlusal surface to additional surfaces, the rate of replacement was elevated and statistically significant for both materials

  17. Minimally invasive prosthetic restoration of posterior tooth loss with resin-bonded, wing-retained, and inlay-retained fixed dental prostheses fabricated from monolithic zirconia: A clinical report of two patients.

    PubMed

    Bömicke, Wolfgang; Karl, Jochen; Rammelsberg, Peter

    2017-04-01

    The esthetics and biocompatibility of ceramic resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses (RBFDPs) are regarded as better than those of their metal ceramic counterparts. However, a high incidence of complications in the posterior arches of ceramic RBFDPs initiated a process of continuous and evolving design development. This clinical report describes 2 successful restorations of a missing posterior tooth with monolithic zirconia RBFDPs with 2 different retainer designs: retentively prepared adhesive wings and inlays.

  18. Setting reactions in dental amalgam. Part 2. The kinetics of amalgamation.

    PubMed

    Okabe, T; Mitchell, R J

    1996-01-01

    The literature on the setting mechanisms of dental amalgams made from powders of silver-rich alloys of tin and/or copper has been critically reviewed. Part 2 is a review of the kinetics of the reactions that convert the mixture of alloy powder and liquid mercury to hardened amalgam containing the phases and microstructures described in Part 1. It is emphasized that amalgamation is a non-equilbrium process in which hardened microstructures are determined as much by kinetics as by chemistry. The setting reaction begins with dissolution of silver and tin into liquid mercury; most of the product phases precipitate in the liquid mercury. The processes that produce supersaturation in the liquid mercury and the subsequent nucleation and growth of solid phases are considered. Mass balance relationships that provide insight into the factors that control the volume fraction of the undesirable gamma 2 Sn-Hg phase are described. The nucleation and growth of eta' Cu-Sn crystals are also discussed; it is found that these crystals nucleate on copper-rich phases and grow into the liquid mercury. Finally, aspects of the setting reaction that are controlled by intergranular and interphase diffusion in the solid are discussed. These aspects include: the supersaturation of silver and tin within the liquid mercury, nucleation and growth of the beta 1 Ag-Hg phase in the surfaces of alloy particles, and the decomposition of initially formed gamma 2 Sn-Hg.

  19. Amalgam toxicity--environmental and occupational hazards.

    PubMed

    Hörsted-Bindslev, Preben

    2004-07-01

    To discuss briefly the recent developments in mercury production, consumption and waste handling especially in relation to the use of mercury in dentistry. Furthermore, to discuss the toxicological and reproductive aspects of the mercury body burden of dental personnel. The data discussed are primarily based on published scientific studies and on publications and reviews from governmental and other official authorities which have been published within the last 10 years, References have been traced manually or by MEDLINE. Global production and consumption of mercury is decreasing, as is the production of amalgam fillings in some countries. By proper measures it is possible to further reduce the environmental burden of mercury from dental clinics. In general, the mercury body burden of the dental personnel can be kept below the normally accepted toxicological limits and reproductive effects have not been proven provided a proper mercury hygiene regimen is adopted.

  20. Interaction of uranium amalgam with nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Kuranov, K.V.; Maslennikov, A.G.; Peretrukhin, V.F.

    1985-07-01

    The authors study the interaction with nitrogen of uranium amalgam with a metal content of 600-1000 mg/ml Hg in the temperature range of 350-800 degrees C. They establish that the principle product of the interaction is nonstoichiothermic uranium nitride UN (X = 1.5-1.8). Preliminary washing with dimethylsulfoxide and acetonitrile allows the content of uranium dioxide obtained to be reduced to 3-4 mole %. The authors hypothesize that in the interaction with nitrogen not only metallic uranium dissolved in the mercury takes part, but also thermally unstable intermetallic compounds of the composition UHg /SUB x/ (x = 1-4). An increase in the temperature up to 800 degrees together with a reduction of the partial pressure of the nitrogen to 70 torr does not lead to the formation of stoichiothermic uranium mononitride.

  1. The challenge for innovation in direct restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Bayne, S; Petersen, P E; Piper, D; Schmalz, G; Meyer, D

    2013-11-01

    During the past 50 years, a series of key UN conferences have established a framework to minimize human health risks from environmental exposures to key chemicals. In January 2013, more than 140 countries agreed to the text of new treaty to minimize Hg effects on the environment (the Minamata Convention). Dental caries is omnipresent around the globe, affecting 60% to 90% of school children and most adults, and producing discomfort that affects quality of life. Dental amalgam is frequently used to treat carious lesions and its use releases mercury into the environment. The best way to avoid the use of dental amalgam is to emphasize caries prevention. Alternatives to amalgam are suitable in some applications, but no replacement for amalgam has been found for large posterior restorations. For any restorative material, safety and environmental impacts are part of clinical risk assessment. Safety is freedom from unacceptable risks. Risk is a combination of probability of exposure and severity of harm. Best management practices are crucial to manage dental amalgam, but these impose additional that are disproportionately more for developing countries. The Minamata Convention seeks a phase-out of all mercury-based products except dental amalgam, where a phase-down is the present goal. For dentistry, the most important focus is the promotion of caries prevention and research on new materials.

  2. [Corrosion of titanium in presence of dental amalgams and fluorides].

    PubMed

    Di Carlo, F; Cassinelli, C; Morra, M; Ronconi, L F; Andreasi Bassi, M; De Muro, G; Quaranta, A

    2003-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the behaviour of titanium (Ti) in precipitant condition, and more precisely the resistance against corrosion of Ti in presence of fluorides and the electrochemical interaction between Ti- amalgam couples in fluorinated solution. The experimental test was made with the use of an electrochemical cell. The following materials were tested: commercially pure Ti and 2 types of amalgams, the Persistalloy (Prs) and the IQC. Palladium (IQC.P). The free corrosion potential of Ti and the amalgams, the polarization curves of both amalgams and the corrosion current of the Ti-amalgam couples in the measurements were performed in 3 different electrolytic solutions: Ringer solution, fluorinated neutral Ringer solution and acid fluorinated solution. The three corrosive media are described. The results showed that Ti could be damaged by the presence of fluorides with an acid pH: Ti potential becomes more negative in acid fluorinated solution. The corrosion currents between Ti and amalgam couples were considered: the amalgams underwent anodic oxidation in neutral Ringer, but a reversal phenomenon occurred in the fluorinated acid solution: Ti was damaged and the amalgams both Prs and IQC.P became the cathodic partner of the couple. In neutral fluorinated solution the IQC.P amalgam induced a significantly higher corrosion of Ti, when compared to the Prs one. Results clearly show the dependence of the Ti corrosion behaviour on the pH and composition of the solution and that the outcome of the damage is affected by the composition of other metals.

  3. Comparative in vitro evaluation of internal adaptation of resin-modified glass ionomer, flowable composite and bonding agent applied as a liner under composite restoration: A scanning electron microscope study.

    PubMed

    Soubhagya, M; Goud, K Mallikarjun; Deepak, B S; Thakur, Sophia; Nandini, T N; Arun, J

    2015-04-01

    The use of resin-modified glass Ionomer cement in sandwich technique is widely practiced with the advent of various newer generation of composites the bond between resin-modified glass Ionomer and these resins should be validated. This study is done to evaluate the interfacial microgaps between different types of liners and dentin, liners and composite (Filtek p60 [FLp60]) using scanning electron microscope (SEM). Standardized Class V preparations were performed in buccal/lingual surfaces of 30 caries, crack and defect-free extracted human third molars. The prepared teeth were divided into three groups. Group I: Single bond (SB), Group II: SB + synergy flow, Group III: SB + vitrebond. They were restored with composite resin FLp60, according to the manufacturer instructions. The SB + vitrebond, cross-sectioned through the canter of the restoration. The specimens were fixed, dehydrated, polished, and processed for SEM. The internal adaptation of the materials to the axial wall was analyzed under SEM with ×1000 magnification. The data obtained were analyzed with nonparametric tests (Kruskal-Wallis, P < 0.05). flowable composite or resin-modified glass ionomer applied in conjunction with adhesive resulted in statistically wider microgaps than occurred when the dentin was only hybridized prior to the restoration. Hybridization of dentin only provides superior sealing of the dentin-restoration interface than does flowable resin or resin-modified glass ionomer.

  4. Comparative evaluation of strength of various core restorative materials for endodontically treated anterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Dabas, V K

    2000-01-01

    In the present study, four restorative materials were used for the restoration of endodontically treated anterior teeth and their strength were compared with that of natural teeth. 100 freshly extracted Maxillary Central Incisors were used. The teeth were restored with Pin-retained amalgam-core buildups, Dowel-post with Glass ionomer-Amalgam alloy combination Cast Core build up. The natural tooth showed the maximum strength. Though some of the restorative materials showed promising results, none of them is able to show strength anywhere near to that of natural tooth.

  5. Stress Relaxation of High-Copper Amalgam Alloys,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-03-10

    Unlimited ~~~ 17. DISTRIBUTION STA ~~EMENT (of th. ab.traci .nt. r.d In Block 20. i di f ferent from Report) 1$. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES IS. KEY WORDS...Contlnu• on r.v.,a. aid. SI n.c...ay aid Id.ntlfy by block niaib. r) Amalgam alloys; high—copper amalgam alloys; viscoelastic properties and stress...relaxation. 20. ABSTRACT (Ge.~~~j . ai r, ,.,.. .i~~ II ne.ma y d Sd.nsSfr by block n~~~)5 tress relaxation of sevenhigh— copper dental amalgam alloys was

  6. Dycal: physical properties and resistance to amalgam condensation.

    PubMed

    Shorer, V; Hirschfeld, Z; Grajower, R

    1984-03-01

    Simulated clinical experiments showed that the hand condensation of amalgam on single or multiple layers of Dycal in Class II cavities does not cause significant fracture or displacement of the liner. Cyclic loading experiments demonstrated that the plastic deformation of Dycal decreases and its stiffness increases with each additional load cycle. This indicates that minor displacement of Dycal during amalgam condensation occurs mainly during the first thrusts with the condenser, and that its mechanical properties are improved by repeated condensation with heavy pressure. Cyclic loading tests may be of considerable value in the evaluation of the performance of liners during amalgam condensation.

  7. Health Complaints Attributed to Dental Amalgam: A Retrospective Survey Exploring Perceived Health Changes Related to Amalgam Removal

    PubMed Central

    Kristoffersen, Agnete Egilsdatter; Alræk, Terje; Stub, Trine; Hamre, Harald Johan; Björkman, Lars; Musial, Frauke

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many patients have complex health complaints they attribute to dental amalgam. There is some evidence of symptom relief after removal of amalgam. Objective: The aims of this study were to assess the total symptom load in patients with all their amalgam fillings removed, and to investigate the self-reported improvement of health with regard to precautions taken under amalgam removal and time since removal. Methods: The survey was distributed to all members (n=999) of the Norwegian Dental patients association in 2011. The study participants returned the questionnaires anonymously by means of a pre-stamped envelope. The questionnaire asked for sociodemographic data, subjectively perceived health status, complaints persisting after amalgam removal and self-reported changes in symptoms after amalgam removal. Results: A total of 324 participants were included in the study. The majority of the participants reported improved health after amalgam removal, even though the mean degree of severity of complaints was still high. Exhaustion and musculoskeletal complaints were most severe, and reflects the fact that 38% of the participants reported poor to very poor current health. With regard to amalgam removal, associations between improved health, number of precautions applied, and time since removal were found. Conclusion: Most of the participants in this study reported improvement of health after amalgam removal even though they still suffered a high complaint load. Since absolute symptom load is a robust predictor for general health outcome and socioeconomic burden for society, a possible intervention, which enables patients to further improve their health status is desirable. PMID:28217190

  8. The future of dental amalgam: a review of the literature. Part 6: Possible harmful effects of mercury from dental amalgam.

    PubMed

    Eley, B M

    1997-06-28

    This is the sixth article in a series of seven on the future of dental amalgam. It considers the possible toxic and allergic effects which could occur as a result of exposure to mercury from dental amalgam. The main toxic effects covered are neurotoxicity, kidney dysfunction, reduced immunocompetence, effects on the oral and intestinal bacterial flora, fetal and birth effects and effects on general health. The relevant studies in all these areas are described and extensively discussed. In addition, the possible development of hypersensitivity to mercury from amalgam is described and the production of delayed hypersensitivity contact reactions on the skin and mucous membrane, including lichenoid lesions, are considered.

  9. The prevalence of postoperative sensitivity in teeth restored with Class II composite resin restorations.

    PubMed

    Borgmeijer, P J; Kreulen, C M; van Amerongen, W E; Akerboom, H B; Gruythuysen, R J

    1991-01-01

    Postoperative sensitivity is one of the problems a dentist can encounter after restoration of a tooth with composite resin. To reduce the possible causes of these complaints, the operative procedure has been adapted to some suggestions of other investigators. In this study the postoperative sensitivity was evaluated in a comparison between composite resin and amalgam: 244 (standard) class II restorations were made by three dentists in fifty-six patients. Each patient received one or two series of four experimental restorations: three of composite resin (Herculite XR, Clearfil Ray Posterior, Visiomolar) and one of amalgam (Tytin). All restorations were made according to a fixed protocol. The occurrence of postoperative sensitivity was recorded. Fifty-seven restorations showed a varying period of postoperative sensitivity; no case lasted longer than half a year. Molars have more postoperative sensitivity than premolars; the difference, however, is not significant (P greater than 0.05). The study shows further that there is no difference in postoperative sensitivity between restorations of composite resin and those of amalgam. The occurrence of postoperative sensitivity does not seem to be influenced by the choice of treatment procedure, type of tooth (premolar/molar), or by the patient or the dentist.

  10. British Society of Prosthodontics Debate on the Implications of the Minamata Convention on Mercury to Dental Amalgam--Should our Patients be Worried?.

    PubMed

    Austin, Rupert; Eliyas, Shiyana; Burke, F J Trevor; Taylor, Phil; Toner, James; Briggs, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, the Minamata Convention on Mercury called for a global phase-down of amalgam use, with a view to reduce environmental mercury pollution. This will significantly impact UK dentistry, given the still extensive use of amalgam in U.K. general dental practice. However, until now there has been little national discussion or debate. In Spring 2015, The British Society of Prosthodontics dedicated a significant part of its Annual Conference to debating the implications of this issue. Clinical case examples were discussed with audience interaction and voting facilitated using innovative Audience Response System Technology. A remarkable range of concerns and opinions were given. The debate elicited specific concerns amongst clinicians regarding the suitability of mercury-free alternatives to amalgam; particularly where cavities are large and extend beneath the gingival anatomy. There are also anecdotal reports of Dental Foundation (DF) dentists not being adequately taught the use of dental amalgam in undergraduate dental schools. CPD/CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Many clinicians, especially those treating patients for whom moisture control is challenging, feel that amalgam should remain available for clinicians to choose in certain clinical circumstances for the restoration of posterior teeth, even in the event of a complete phase-down.

  11. Mercury recovery in situ of four different dental amalgam separators.

    PubMed

    Hylander, Lars D; Lindvall, Anders; Uhrberg, Roland; Gahnberg, Lars; Lindh, Ulf

    2006-07-31

    Amalgam separators are used to physically remove dental amalgam from waste water in dental clinics. They are thereby supposed to reduce mercury (Hg) emissions to the municipal waste water system to acceptable levels. We here present results from a comparative study in situ of three amalgam separators available on the market, all with a claimed efficiency of 99% according to Danish and ISO protocols, and using sedimentation as the principle of separation. We also present corresponding data for an investigational prototype of an improved separator. The obtained efficiency of the three commercial separators is far below what is stated by the manufacturer and by authorities assumed to be the efficiency in clinical conditions. They reduced Hg emissions by 79 - 91%, leaving an average Hg content in outgoing waste water of 1.5 mg L(-1). However, the prototype separator participating in this study retained 99.9% of the waste water Hg emissions, leaving an average Hg content in outgoing waste water of 0.004 mg L(-1). Physical restrictions prohibit sedimentary type separators to recover the Hg fractions causing the largest damages in wastewater treatment plants. This fraction is not considered in the ISO protocol for testing amalgam separators, which therefore needs to be revised. Abolishing the use of dental amalgam and cleaning the tubing systems is the most efficient long-term solution to reduce Hg emissions from dental clinics. Until then, Hg emissions originating from placing, polishing or removing existing amalgam fillings, should be counteracted by the use of low-emission amalgam separators, already on the market or presently being developed for use alone or together with sedimentary type amalgam separators.

  12. Mercury from dental amalgam: exposure and risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Koral, Stephen M

    2013-02-01

    There has long been an undercurrent within the dental profession of anti-amalgam sentiment, a "mercury-free" movement. To assess whether anything is or is not scientifically wrong with amalgam, one must look to the vast literature on exposure, toxicology, and risk assessment of mercury. The subject of risk assessment goes straight to the heart of the debate over whether a malgam is safe, or not, for unrestricted use in dentistry in the population at large.

  13. Durable bonds at the adhesive/dentin interface: an impossible mission or simply a moving target?

    PubMed Central

    SPENCER, Paulette; Jonggu PARK, Qiang YE; MISRA, Anil; BOHATY, Brenda S.; SINGH, Viraj; PARTHASARATHY, Ranga; SENE, Fábio; de Paiva GONÇALVES, Sérgio Eduardo; LAURENCE, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Composite restorations have higher failure rates, more recurrent caries and increased frequency of replacement as compared to dental amalgam. Penetration of bacterial enzymes, oral fluids, and bacteria into the crevices between the tooth and composite undermines the restoration and leads to recurrent decay and failure. The gingival margin of composite restora tions is particularly vulnerable to decay and at this margin, the adhesive and its seal to dentin provides the primary barrier between the prepared tooth and the environment. The intent of this article is to examine physico-chemical factors that affect the integrity and durability of the adhesive/dentin interfacial bond; and to explore how these factors act synergistically with mechanical forces to undermine the composite restoration. The article will examine the various avenues that have been pursued to address these problems and it will explore how alterations in material chemistry could address the detrimental impact of physico-chemical stresses on the bond formed at the adhesive/dentin interface. PMID:24855586

  14. Restorative material and other tooth-specific variables associated with the decision to repair or replace defective restorations: findings from The Dental PBRN

    PubMed Central

    Gordan, Valeria V.; Riley, Joseph L.; Worley, Donald C.; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Using data from dentists participating in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN), the study had 2 main objectives: (1) to identify and quantify the types of restorative materials in the existing failed restorations; and (2) to identify and quantify the materials used to repair or replace those failed restorations. Methods This cross-sectional study used a consecutive patient/restoration recruitment design. Practitioner-investigators recorded data on consecutive restorations in permanent teeth that needed repair or replacement. Data included the primary reason for repair or replacement, tooth surface(s) involved, restorative materials used, and patient demographics. Results Data for 9,875 restorations were collected from 7,502 patients in 197 practices for which 75% of restorations were replaced and 25% repaired. Most of the restorations that were either repaired or replaced were amalgam (56%) for which most (56%) of the material used was direct tooth-colored. The restorative material was 5 times more likely to be changed when the original restoration was amalgam (OR=5.2, p<.001). The likelihood of changing an amalgam restoration differed as a function of the tooth type (OR=3.0, p<.001), arch (OR=6.6, p<.001); and number of surfaces in the original restoration (OR=12.2, p<.001). Conclusion The probability of changing from amalgam to another restorative material differed with several characteristics of the original restoration. The change was most likely to take place when (1) the treatment was a replacement; (2) the tooth was not a molar; (3) the tooth was in the maxillary arch; and (4) the original restoration involved a single surface. PMID:22342563

  15. Restorative material and other tooth-specific variables associated with the decision to repair or replace defective restorations: findings from The Dental PBRN.

    PubMed

    Gordan, Valeria V; Riley, Joseph L; Worley, Donald C; Gilbert, Gregg H

    2012-05-01

    Using data from dentists participating in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN), the study had 2 main objectives: (1) to identify and quantify the types of restorative materials in the existing failed restorations; and (2) to identify and quantify the materials used to repair or replace those failed restorations. This cross-sectional study used a consecutive patient/restoration recruitment design. Practitioner-investigators recorded data on consecutive restorations in permanent teeth that needed repair or replacement. Data included the primary reason for repair or replacement, tooth surface(s) involved, restorative materials used, and patient demographics. Data for 9875 restorations were collected from 7502 patients in 197 practices for which 75% of restorations were replaced and 25% repaired. Most of the restorations that were either repaired or replaced were amalgam (56%) for which most (56%) of the material used was direct tooth-coloured. The restorative material was 5 times more likely to be changed when the original restoration was amalgam (OR=5.2, p<.001). The likelihood of changing an amalgam restoration differed as a function of the tooth type (OR=3.0, p<.001), arch (OR=6.6, p<.001); and number of surfaces in the original restoration (OR=12.2, p<.001). The probability of changing from amalgam to another restorative material differed with several characteristics of the original restoration. The change was most likely to take place when (1) the treatment was a replacement; (2) the tooth was not a molar; (3) the tooth was in the maxillary arch; and (4) the original restoration involved a single surface. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Restorative material and other tooth-specific variables associated with the decision to repair or replace defective restorations: findings from the dental PBRN.

    PubMed

    Gordan, Valeria V; Riley, Joseph L; Worley, Donald C; Gilbert, Gordon H

    2014-03-01

    Using data from dentists participating in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN), the study had 2 main objectives: (1) to identify and quantify the types of restorative materials in the existing failed restorations; and (2) to identify and quantify the materials used to repair or replace those failed restorations. This cross-sectional study used a consecutive patient/restoration recruitment design. Practitioner-investigators recorded data on consecutive restorations in permanent teeth that needed repair or replacement. Data included the primary reason for repair or replacement, tooth surface(s) involved, restorative materials used, and patient demographics. Data for 9,875 restorations were collected from 7,502 patients in 197 practices for which 75% of restorations were replaced and 25% repaired. Most of the restorations that were either repaired or replaced were amalgam (56%) for which most (56%) of the material used was direct tooth-colored. The restorative material was 5 times more likely to be changed when the original restoration was amalgam (OR = 5.2, p < .001). The likelihood of changing an amalgam restoration differed as a function of the tooth type (OR = 3.0, p < .001), arch (OR = 6.6, p < .001); and number of surfaces in the original restoration (OR = 12.2, p < .001). The probability of changing from amalgam to another restorative material differed with several characteristics of the original restoration. The change was most likely to take place when (1) the treatment was a replacement; (2) the tooth was not a molar; (3) the tooth was in the maxillary arch; and (4) the original restoration involved a single surface.

  17. The effects of dentin and intaglio indirect ceramic optimized polymer restoration surface treatment on the shear bond strength of resin cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puspitarini, A.; Suprastiwi, E.; Usman, M.

    2017-08-01

    Ceramic optimized polymer (ceromer) bonds to the tooth substrate through resin cements. The bond strength between dentin, resin cement, and ceromer depends on the applied surface treatment. To analyze the effects of dentin and intaglio ceromer surface treatment on the shear bond strength self-adhesive resin cement. Forty-five dentin premolar and ceromer specimens were bonded with resin cement and divided into three groups as follows: in group 1, no treatment was applied; in group 2, dentin surface treatment was carried out with acid etching and a bonding agent; and in group 3, dentin surface treatment was carried out with acid etching, a bonding agent, and intaglio ceromer surface treatment with etching and silane. All specimens were incubated at 37 °C for 24 hours, and the shear bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine. Group 3 showed the highest shear bond strength, followed by group 2. The surface treatment of dentin and intaglio ceromer showed significantly improved shear bond strength in the group comparison. Dentin and intaglio ceromer surface treatment can improved the shear bond strength self-adhesive resin cement.

  18. Re-Treatment Decisions for Failed Posterior Restorations among Dentists in Kuwait

    PubMed Central

    Alomari, Qasem; Al-Kanderi, Bader; Qudeimat, Muawia; Omar, Ridwaan

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To compare re-treatment choices for MOD amalgam or resin composite restorations with or without cusp fracture among dentists in Kuwait. Methods: A random sample of 158 dentists completed a questionnaire designed to obtain socio-demographic, educational and work-related information and their choices for re-treatment of four scenarios of failed restorations on lower first molars: 1. MOD amalgam restoration; 2. MOD composite restoration; 3. MOD amalgam restoration with cuspal fracture; 4. MOD composite restoration with cuspal fracture. Re-treatment options were: re-treating with amalgam; re-treating with composite; placing an onlay; or, placing a crown. For the purpose of analysis, responses were dichotomized into re-treatment with a direct or indirect restoration. Results: For cases 1 and 2, most participants chose to re-treat with amalgam restoration and for cases 3 and 4, most chose to place an indirect restoration. In general, an increased tendency towards the indirect option was associated with increased age, being a male and being a specialist. Tendencies to place an indirect restoration did not differ between cases 1 and 2 (P=1.0) or cases 3 and 4 (P=0.317), although the tendency to do so was significantly greater in case 3 than 1 (P=0.000) and case 4 than 2 (P=0.000). Conclusions: The variation noted among dentists regarding their stated choices for re-treating failed posterior restorations appeared to be associated with gender, education and experience factors. A tendency towards indirect restorations was seen when the restoration is associated with a fractured cusp. PMID:20046479

  19. Indirect resin composite restorations bonded to dentin using self-adhesive resin cements applied with an electric current-assisted method.

    PubMed

    Gotti, Valeria Bisinoto; Feitosa, Victor Pinheiro; Sauro, Salvatore; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Correr, Americo Bortolazzo

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the effects of an electric current-assisted application on the bond strength and interfacial morphology of self-adhesive resin cements bonded to dentin. Indirect resin composite build-ups were luted to prepared dentin surfaces using two self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem and BisCem) and an ElectroBond device under 0, 20, or 40 μA electrical current. All specimens were submitted to microtensile bond strength test and to interfacial SEM analysis. The electric current-assisted application induced no change (P > 0.05) on the overall bond strength, although RelyX Unicem showed significantly higher bond strength (P < 0.05) than BisCem. Similarly, no differences were observed in terms of interfacial integrity when using the electrical current applicator.

  20. Effect of light-curing, pressure, oxygen inhibition, and heat on shear bond strength between bis-acryl provisional restoration and bis-acryl repair materials.

    PubMed

    Shim, Ji-Suk; Lee, Jeong-Yol; Choi, Yeon-Jo; Shin, Sang-Wan; Ryu, Jae-Jun

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to discover a way to increase the bond strength between bis-acryl resins, using a comparison of the shear bond strengths attained from bis-acryl resins treated with light curing, pressure, oxygen inhibition, and heat. Self-cured bis-acryl resin was used as both a base material and as a repair material. Seventy specimens were distributed into seven groups according to treatment methods: pressure - stored in a pressure cooker at 0.2 Mpa; oxygen inhibition- applied an oxygen inhibitor around the repaired material,; heat treatment - performed heat treatment in a dry oven at 60℃, 100℃, or 140℃. The shear bond strength was measured with a universal testing machine, and the shear bond strength (MPa) was calculated from the peak load of failure. A comparison of the bond strength between the repaired specimens was conducted using one-way ANOVA and Tukey multiple comparison tests (α=.05). There were no statistically significant differences in the shear bond strength between the control group and the light curing, pressure, and oxygen inhibition groups. However, the heat treatment groups showed statistically higher bond strengths than the groups treated without heat, and the groups treated at a higher temperature resulted in higher bond strengths. Statistically significant differences were seen between groups after different degrees of heat treatment, except in groups heated at 100℃ and 140℃. Strong bonding can be achieved between a bis-acryl base and bis-acryl repair material after heat treatment.

  1. Effect of smokeless tobacco on surface roughness of dental restorations.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Shani O; Griffin, Gerald D; Meyer, Nicole; Pelaez, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Surface alterations of dental restorations can result in increased plaque biofilm. This leads to increased risk of premature restoration failure. Smokeless tobacco, in common use by some US military personnel, represents a potential source for surface alteration. If smokeless tobacco causes an untoward effect, selection of a more resistant restorative material could increase restoration longevity, thus minimizing lost work time and costs associated with replacement of failed restorations. Comparatively assess the effect of smokeless tobacco/salivary substitute mixture on altering surface roughness of amalgam, composite resin, and resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI) restorations. Sixty cubic restorations (3 groups of 20) were fabricated using a 4 mm by 3 mm Teflon mold. One examiner assessed the restorations at time points representing zero days, one day, one week, 2 weeks, one month, and 3 months. The data obtained were collected using a surface profilometer, measured in micrometers. Data were statistically analyzed using 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test. A difference was significant if P< .05. Confidence levels with a 95% overall rating received a clinically acceptable classification. The 2-way ANOVA test detected significant differences between baseline, one day, one week, 2 weeks, one month, and 3-month data for surface roughness (P<.05). With respect to time and restoration type, results proved statistically significant with P<.0001. All restorations were statistically significant with respect to change in surface roughness with RMGIs showing the greatest surface roughness alteration. Smokeless tobacco mixed with a salivary substitute altered restoration surface roughness over time. Resin-modified glass isonomer restorations demonstrate the greatest alteration of surface roughness, with amalgam restorations showing the least. Amalgam remains the preferential restorative material in patients who use smokeless tobacco.

  2. Zinc-Containing Restorations Create Amorphous Biogenic Apatite at the Carious Dentin Interface: A X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) Crystal Lattice Analysis.

    PubMed

    Toledano, Manuel; Aguilera, Fátima S; López-López, Modesto T; Osorio, Estrella; Toledano-Osorio, Manuel; Osorio, Raquel

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this research was to assess the ability of amalgam restorations to induce amorphous mineral precipitation at the caries-affected dentin substrate. Sound and caries-affected dentin surfaces were subjected to both Zn-free and Zn-containing dental amalgam restorations. Specimens were submitted to thermocycling (100,000 cycles/5°C-55°C, 3 months). Dentin surfaces were studied by atomic force microscopy (nanoroughness), X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive analysis, for physical and morphological surface characterization. Zn-containing amalgam placement reduced crystallinity, crystallite size, and grain size of calcium phosphate crystallites at the dentin surface. Both microstrain and nanoroughness were augmented in caries-affected dentin restored with Zn-containing amalgams. Caries-affected dentin showed the shortest mineral crystallites (11.04 nm), when Zn-containing amalgams were used for restorations, probably leading to a decrease of mechanical properties which might favor crack propagation and deformation. Sound dentin restored with Zn-free amalgams exhibited a substantial increase in length of grain particles (12.44 nm) embedded into dentin crystallites. Zn-containing amalgam placement creates dentin mineralization and the resultant mineral was amorphous in nature. Amorphous calcium phosphate provides a local ion-rich environment, which is considered favorable for in situ generation of prenucleation clusters, promotong further dentin remineralization.

  3. Microleakage between endodontic temporary restorative materials placed at different times.

    PubMed

    Pai, S F; Yang, S F; Sue, W L; Chueh, L H; Rivera, E M

    1999-06-01

    Occlusal endodontic access preparations are occasionally made in teeth without removing the original restoration. However, microleakage between restorative materials that are placed at different times has not been extensively studied. Therefore, our objective was to compare microleakage at three areas: between an access opening restorative material and the cavity wall; between an additional material placed later to patch a secondary opening in the first restorative material and the original restorative material itself; and between the secondarily placed material and the cavity wall. Standard endodontic access preparations were made in 120 noncarious, nonrestored crowns of extracted human molars. These teeth were divided into six experimental groups. Another four molars were controls. The endodontic access cavities were restored with either IRM or amalgam as the primary restorative material. After 14 days, half of the primary restorations was removed, and this defect was filled with a secondary restorative material: IRM, Caviton, or a double seal of Caviton and IRM. Microleakage was measured linearly as the extent of basic fuchsin dye penetration under a stereomicroscope after thermal cycling (5 degrees and 55 degrees C for 100 cycles) and tooth sectioning. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used for statistical analysis. Results indicated significantly less microleakage between primary and secondary restorative materials placed at different times than microleakage between primary temporary restorative materials and the access cavity wall, regardless of the type of primary restorative material used (IRM or amalgam).

  4. The Chemical Forms of Mercury in Aged and Fresh Dental Amalgam Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    George, Graham N.; Singh, Satya P.; Hoover, Jay; Pickering, Ingrid J.

    2009-01-01

    Mercury-containing dental amalgam is known to be a source of human exposure to mercury. We have explored the use of electron-yield Hg LIII X-ray absorption spectroscopy to characterize the chemical nature of dental amalgam surfaces. We find that the method is practical, and that it shows extensive mercury depletion in the surface of the aged amalgam with significant differences between old and fresh amalgam surfaces. Whereas the fresh amalgam gives spectra that are typical of metallic mercury, the aged amalgam is predominantly β-mercuric sulfide. The toxicological implications of these results are discussed. PMID:19842619

  5. Determination of ablation threshold for composite resins and amalgam irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, A. Z.; Freschi, L. R.; Samad, R. E.; Zezell, D. M.; Gouw-Soares, S. C.; Vieira, N. D., Jr.

    2010-03-01

    The use of laser for caries removal and cavity preparation is already a reality in the dental clinic. The objective of the present study was to consider the viability of ultrashort laser pulses for restorative material selective removal, by determining the ablation threshold fluence for composite resins and amalgam irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses. Lasers pulses centered at 830 nm with 50 fs of duration and 1 kHz of repetition rate, with energies in the range of 300 to 770 μJ were used to irradiate the samples. The samples were irradiated using two different geometrical methods for ablation threshold fluence determinations and the volume ablation was measured by optical coherence tomography. The shape of the ablated surfaces were analyzed by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The determined ablation threshold fluence is 0.35 J/cm2 for the composite resins Z-100 and Z-350, and 0.25 J/cm2 for the amalgam. These values are half of the value for enamel in this temporal regime. Thermal damages were not observed in the samples. Using the OCT technique (optical coherence tomography) was possible to determine the ablated volume and the total mass removed.

  6. Monte Carlo dose calculation in dental amalgam phantom

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Mohd. Zahri Abdul; Yusoff, A. L.; Osman, N. D.; Abdullah, R.; Rabaie, N. A.; Salikin, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    It has become a great challenge in the modern radiation treatment to ensure the accuracy of treatment delivery in electron beam therapy. Tissue inhomogeneity has become one of the factors for accurate dose calculation, and this requires complex algorithm calculation like Monte Carlo (MC). On the other hand, computed tomography (CT) images used in treatment planning system need to be trustful as they are the input in radiotherapy treatment. However, with the presence of metal amalgam in treatment volume, the CT images input showed prominent streak artefact, thus, contributed sources of error. Hence, metal amalgam phantom often creates streak artifacts, which cause an error in the dose calculation. Thus, a streak artifact reduction technique was applied to correct the images, and as a result, better images were observed in terms of structure delineation and density assigning. Furthermore, the amalgam density data were corrected to provide amalgam voxel with accurate density value. As for the errors of dose uncertainties due to metal amalgam, they were reduced from 46% to as low as 2% at d80 (depth of the 80% dose beyond Zmax) using the presented strategies. Considering the number of vital and radiosensitive organs in the head and the neck regions, this correction strategy is suggested in reducing calculation uncertainties through MC calculation. PMID:26500401

  7. Mechanical Properties Comparing Composite Fiber Length to Amalgam

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Richard C.; Liu, Perng-Ru

    2016-01-01

    Photocure fiber-reinforced composites (FRCs) with varying chopped quartz-fiber lengths were incorporated into a dental photocure zirconia-silicate particulate-filled composite (PFC) for mechanical test comparisons with a popular commercial spherical-particle amalgam. FRC lengths included 0.5-mm, 1.0 mm, 2.0 mm, and 3.0 mm all at a constant 28.2 volume percent. Four-point fully articulated fixtures were used according to American Standards Test Methods with sample dimensions of 2×2×50 mm3 across a 40 mm span to provide sufficient Euler flexural bending and prevent top-load compressive shear error. Mechanical properties for flexural strength, modulus, yield strength, resilience, work of fracture, critical strain energy release, critical stress intensity factor, and strain were obtained for comparison. Fiber length subsequently correlated with increasing all mechanical properties, p < 1.1×10−5. Although the modulus was significantly statistically higher for amalgam than all composites, all FRCs and even the PFC had higher values than amalgam for all other mechanical properties. Because amalgams provide increased longevity during clinical use compared to the standard PFCs, modulus would appear to be a mechanical property that might sufficiently reduce margin interlaminar shear stress and strain-related microcracking that could reduce failure rates. Also, since FRCs were tested with all mechanical properties that statistically significantly increased over the PFC, new avenues for future development could be provided toward surpassing amalgam in clinical longevity. PMID:27642629

  8. Microstructure in gold-containing Ag3Sn-amalgam.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, M L

    1976-01-01

    The present study was conducted in order to understand the microstructural characteristics in dental amalgam which consists of both spherical and irregular Ag3Sn alloy particles with gold substituted in varying amounts for silver (0, 9, and 15%). Spherical alloy particles were used as obtained from Western Gold and Platinum and irregular alloy particles were prepared in the laboratory and then employed in the present study. The amalgam was prepared from the alloy particles by the trituration and condensation method. The polished and etched samples were studied using the techniques of X-ray diffraction, optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy. The microstructure in both types amalgam studied after two weeks of preparation contains gamma (unreacted Ag3Sn particles), gamma1 (Ag2Hg3), and gamma2 (Sn7-8Hg) phases in pure Ag3Sn-amalgam and gamma, gamma1, and (Au-Sn) phases in gold-containing amalgam. The The (Au-Sn) phase existed in the form of rings surrounding the gamma grains and acted as a barrier for mercury diffusion in Ag3Sn particles.

  9. Monte Carlo dose calculation in dental amalgam phantom.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Mohd Zahri Abdul; Yusoff, A L; Osman, N D; Abdullah, R; Rabaie, N A; Salikin, M S

    2015-01-01

    It has become a great challenge in the modern radiation treatment to ensure the accuracy of treatment delivery in electron beam therapy. Tissue inhomogeneity has become one of the factors for accurate dose calculation, and this requires complex algorithm calculation like Monte Carlo (MC). On the other hand, computed tomography (CT) images used in treatment planning system need to be trustful as they are the input in radiotherapy treatment. However, with the presence of metal amalgam in treatment volume, the CT images input showed prominent streak artefact, thus, contributed sources of error. Hence, metal amalgam phantom often creates streak artifacts, which cause an error in the dose calculation. Thus, a streak artifact reduction technique was applied to correct the images, and as a result, better images were observed in terms of structure delineation and density assigning. Furthermore, the amalgam density data were corrected to provide amalgam voxel with accurate density value. As for the errors of dose uncertainties due to metal amalgam, they were reduced from 46% to as low as 2% at d80 (depth of the 80% dose beyond Zmax) using the presented strategies. Considering the number of vital and radiosensitive organs in the head and the neck regions, this correction strategy is suggested in reducing calculation uncertainties through MC calculation.

  10. Amalgam buildups: shear strength and dentin sealing properties.

    PubMed

    Pashley, E L; Comer, R W; Parry, E E; Pashley, D H

    1991-01-01

    The retentive strength and sealing properties of amalgam buildups were compared in vitro in three groups of specimens. All teeth were prepared with flat, nonretentive surfaces. In the first group, the amalgam buildups were retained by four self-threading Minim pins. In the second group, retention was provided by a circumferential slot prepared in the dentin just inside the DEJ. The third group utilized an adhesive resin for retention. Dentin permeability was measured as a hydraulic conductance before and after placement of the amalgam buildups and before and after thermocycling. All methods of retention sealed dentin very well even in the absence of cavity varnish. The 90 degree retentive strength was: pins, 10.3 +/- 0.9 MPa; slots, 4.1 +/- 0.5 MPa; resin, 3.1 +/- 0.8 MPa (mean +/- SEM).

  11. FRIENDSHIP CHOICES OF MULTIRACIAL ADOLESCENTS: RACIAL HOMOPHILY, BLENDING, OR AMALGAMATION?*

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Jamie Mihoko; Kao, Grace

    2009-01-01

    Using the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health), we utilize the concepts of homophily, blending, and amalgamation to describe the possible friendship patterns of multiracials. Homophily occurs when multiracials are most likely to choose other multiracials as friends. Blending occurs when friendship patterns of multiracials are somewhere in-between those of their monoracial counterparts. Amalgamation consists of friendship patterns that are similar to one of their monoracial counterparts. All groups exhibit signs of amalgamation such that non-white multiracials resemble Blacks, and White multiracials resemble whites except for Black-White multiracials. Black-Whites, Asian-Whites, and Asian-Blacks also exhibit signs of blending, while only Native American multiracials show signs of homophily. Multiracials have different experiences depending on their specific racial composition, and while they seem to bridge the distance between racial groups, their friendship patterns also fall along Black and White lines. PMID:19727415

  12. Integrated starting and running amalgam assembly for an electrodeless fluorescent lamp

    DOEpatents

    Borowiec, Joseph Christopher; Cocoma, John Paul; Roberts, Victor David

    1998-01-01

    An integrated starting and running amalgam assembly for an electrodeless SEF fluorescent lamp includes a wire mesh amalgam support constructed to jointly optimize positions of a starting amalgam and a running amalgam in the lamp, thereby optimizing mercury vapor pressure in the lamp during both starting and steady-state operation in order to rapidly achieve and maintain high light output. The wire mesh amalgam support is constructed to support the starting amalgam toward one end thereof and the running amalgam toward the other end thereof, and the wire mesh is rolled for friction-fitting within the exhaust tube of the lamp. The positions of the starting and running amalgams on the wire mesh are jointly optimized such that high light output is achieved quickly and maintained, while avoiding any significant reduction in light output between starting and running operation.

  13. Incorporation of CAD/CAM Restoration Into Navy Dentistry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-09-26

    restoration involves placing restorative materials, such as dental amalgam and resin -based composites , directly into the preparation of the tooth...porcelain/ceramic - three surfaces D2644 Onlay - porcelain/ceramic - four or more surfaces D2662 Onlay - resin -based composite - two surfaces D2663...Onlay - resin -based composite - three surfaces D2664 Onlay - resin -based composite - four or more surfaces D2710 Crown - resin -based composite

  14. Microstructure of dental amalgams containing high and low copper contents.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, M L; Asgar, K

    1977-12-01

    Microstructure of commercial dental alloys and their amalgams were studied primarily by x-ray diffraction, optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, and x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction revealed more phases than normally reported in these materials. Presence of new phase was discussed and their formation mechanism understood. Some phases having interacting 2 theta degrees values with others were properly identified. Both new and conventional dental alloys and their amalgams, namely Tytin, Sybraloy, Dispersalloy, Kerr Spheraloy, Caulk Spherical, Shofu Spherical, and Caulk 20th Century Microcut were used to complete the investigation.

  15. Improper waste disposal of silver-mercury amalgam.

    PubMed

    de Souza, J P B Lollobrigida; Nozawa, S R; Honda, R T

    2012-05-01

    The objective of this work was to estimate the quantity of mercury residue present in dental amalgam that is generated and discarded in the city of Manaus (Amazon-Brazil). For this purpose, the locations of amalgam usage (10 public and 31 private dental clinics), the method by which the residue is discarded (14 clinics improper disposal), and the analysis of total mercury in the sediment of the controlled landfill (2.68-3 μgHg/g), were described. It was concluded that: there are dental clinics in the city that discard mercury residue into the common waste disposal system, which contravenes health safety standards.

  16. [Antibacterial properties of two conventional and two high copper dental amalgams].

    PubMed

    Günyakti, N; Misirligil, A; Gökay, O

    1989-05-01

    Two conventional and two high copper dental amalgams (Non gamma 2) has been investigated for their antibacterial properties. The high copper dental amalgam, Ana 2000 possessed a very small range of antibacterial propertie against Lac. acidophilus and Staph. epidermidis, while other amalgams found to have no antibacterial activity against the ten tested microorganism strains.

  17. Backscattering from dental restorations and splint materials during therapeutic radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Farman, A.G.; Sharma, S.; George, D.I.; Wilson, D.; Dodd, D.; Figa, R.; Haskell, B.

    1985-08-01

    Models were constructed to simulate as closely as possible the human oral cavity. Radiation absorbed doses were determined for controls and various test situations involving the presence of dental restorative and splint materials during cobalt-60 irradiation of the models. Adjacent gold full crowns and adjacent solid dental silver amalgam cores both increased the dose to the interproximal gingivae by 20%. Use of orthodontic full bands for splinting the jaws increased the dose to the buccal tissues by an average of 10%. Augmentation of dose through backscatter radiation was determined to be only slight for intracoronal amalgam fillings and stainless steel or plastic bracket splints.

  18. Trend of posterior teeth restoration at ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Gbadebo, S O; Anifowose, O O; Ogunrinde, T J

    2013-01-01

    A Dental amalgam is the most used restorative material in the posterior region of the mouth and has proven to be remarkably durable; however there has been a global change in recent years to restore posterior teeth with composite resin. To ascertain the trend of posterior teeth cavity restorations at the University College Hospital (UCH) Ibadan, Nigeria. A-5year retrospective analysis of all the restored posterior cavities at the Dental Conservation Clinic, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria. Class of cavities, the teeth affected, and the type of restoration made, the outcome and the demographics of the patients were part recorded. The data were analyzed using SPSS Version 20, for frequencies, and means were used for continuous variables while chi square was used to compare the categorical variables (P ≤0.05). A total of 845 teeth were restored during the study period in 368(43.6 %) males and 477(56.4 %) females with mean age of 40.4 ±15.92 years and male to female ratio of 1:1.3. While the first and second molars were the most (62.6%) restored teeth, Class I cavity was the most restored (42.4%) cavity and the majority (80.4%) of the restorations was done with composite. There was a statistical significant reduction in use of amalgam in restoring posterior teeth over the 5 year period. (p=0.000). The use of amalgam as choice material for restoration of posterior teeth is gradually being replaced by composite in our environment which emphasizes the need to ensure the quality and durability of the composites used.

  19. Coordinating a Large, Amalgamated REU Program with Multiple Funding Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiorini, Eugene; Myers, Kellen; Naqvi, Yusra

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the challenges of organizing a large REU program amalgamated from multiple funding sources, including diverse participants, mentors, and research projects. We detail the program's structure, activities, and recruitment, and we hope to demonstrate that the organization of this REU is not only beneficial to its…

  20. Solidification/Stabilization of Elemental Mercury Waste by Amalgamation

    SciTech Connect

    Yim, S. P.; Ahn, B. G.; Lee, H. J.; Shon, J. S.; Chung, H.; Kim, K. J.; Lee, C. K.

    2003-02-24

    Experiments on solidification of elemental mercury waste were conducted by amalgamation with several metal powders such as copper, zinc, tin, brass and bronze. Unlike the previous studies which showed a dispersible nature after solidification, the waste forms were found to possess quite large compressive strengths in both copper and bronze amalgam forms. The durability was also confirmed by showing very minor changes of strength after 90 days of water immersion. Leachability from the amalgam forms is also shown to be low: measured mercury concentration in the leachate by the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) was well below the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) limit. Long term leaching behavior by Accelerated Leach Test (ALT) has shown that the leaching process was dominated by diffusion and the effective diffusion coefficient was quite low (around 10-19 cm2/sec). The mercury vapor concentration from the amalgam forms were reduced to a 20% level of that for elemental mercury and to one-hundredth after 3 months.

  1. Test of Picture-Text Amalgams in Procedural Texts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, David Edey

    Designed to assess how people read and comprehend information presented in picture-text amalgams in procedural texts, this instrument presents various combinations of text information and illustrative information on slides. Subjects are assigned to one of four conditions and directed to follow the i