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Sample records for bone fractures

  1. Bone fracture repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100077.htm Bone fracture repair - series—Indications To use the sharing features ... Go to slide 4 out of 4 Overview Fractures of the bones are classified in a number ...

  2. Calcaneus (Heel Bone) Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Calcaneus (Heel Bone) Fractures cont. Page ( 5 ) • Early motion. Many doctors encourage motion of the foot and ankle early in the ... therapy. Specific exercises can improve the range of motion in your foot and ankle, and strengthen supporting ...

  3. Frontal bone fractures.

    PubMed

    Marinheiro, Bruno Henrique; de Medeiros, Eduardo Henrique Pantosso; Sverzut, Cássio Edvard; Trivellato, Alexandre Elias

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the epidemiology, treatment, and complications of frontal bone fractures associated, or not, with other facial fractures. This evaluation also sought to minimize the influence of the surgeon's skills and the preference for any rigid internal fixation system. The files from 3758 patients who attended the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Department of the School of Dentistry of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, from March 2004 to November 2011 and presented with facial trauma were scanned, and 52 files were chosen for the review. Eleven (21.15%) of these patients had pure fractures of the frontal bone, and trauma incidence was more prevalent in men (92.3%), whites (61.53%), and adults (50%). Despite the use of helmets at the moment of the trauma, motorcycle crashes were the most common etiological factor (32.69%). Fracture of the anterior wall of the frontal sinus with displacement was the main injury observed (54.9%), and the most common treatment was internal fixation with a plate and screws (45.09%). Postoperative complications were observed in 35.29% of the cases. The therapy applied was effective in handling this type of fracture, and the success rate was comparable to that reported in other published studies.

  4. Fracture healing in osteoporotic bone.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Wing Hoi; Miclau, Theodore; Chow, Simon Kwoon-Ho; Yang, Frank F; Alt, Volker

    2016-06-01

    As the world population rises, osteoporotic fracture is an emerging global threat to the well-being of elderly patients. The process of fracture healing by intramembranous ossification or/and endochondral ossification involve many well-orchestrated events including the signaling, recruitment and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) during the early phase; formation of a hard callus and extracellular matrix, angiogenesis and revascularization during the mid-phase; and finally callus remodeling at the late phase of fracture healing. Through clinical and animal research, many of these factors are shown to be impaired in osteoporotic bone. Animal studies related to post-menopausal estrogen deficient osteoporosis (type I) have shown healing to be prolonged with decreased levels of MSCs and decreased levels of angiogenesis. Moreover, the expression of estrogen receptor (ER) was shown to be delayed in ovariectomy-induced osteoporotic fracture. This might be related to the observed difference in mechanical sensitivity between normal and osteoporotic bones, which requires further experiments to elucidate. In mice fracture models related to senile osteoporosis (type II), it was observed that chondrocyte and osteoblast differentiation were impaired; and that transplantation of juvenile bone marrow would result in enhanced callus formation. Other factors related to angiogenesis and vasculogenesis have also been noted to be impaired in aged models, affecting the degradation of cartilaginous matrixes and vascular invasion; the result is changes in matrix composition and growth factors concentrations that ultimately impairs healing during age-related osteoporosis. Most osteoporotic related fractures occur at metaphyseal sites clinically, and reports have indicated that differences exist between diaphyseal and metaphyseal fractures. An animal model that satisfies three main criteria (metaphyseal region, plate fixation, osteoporosis) is suggested for future research for

  5. Complications of Nasal Bone Fractures.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Yeom, Seung Han; Hwang, Suk Hyun

    2017-01-27

    The aim of this study was to perform a systematic review of the treatment of nasal bone fractures. The search terms ("nasal bone fracture" AND complication) and ("nasal bone fracture" AND [anosmia OR olfaction OR olfactory nerve OR smell]) and (anosmia AND ["nasal preparation" OR "nasal antiseptics"]) were used to search PubMed and SCOPUS. Of the 500 titles, 40 full papers were reviewed. One paper was excluded, and 3 mined papers were added. Ultimately, 12 papers were analyzed. The overall deformity rate was 10.4% ± 4.8%. No significant differences were found between patients who underwent closed reduction (14.7% ± 7.3%) and those who underwent open reduction (9.4% ± 4.4%), between those who underwent local anesthesia (5.8% ± 4.5%), and those who underwent general anesthesia (8.8% ± 3.8%), or between those who received timely treatment (5.7%) and those whose treatment was delayed (9.0%). Septal deviation occurred in 10.0% of patients as a sequela of nasal bone fracture. The nasal obstruction rate was 10.5% ± 5.3%. Fewer patients of nasal obstruction occurred in the open reduction patients (6.9% ± 4.4%) than in the closed reduction patients (15.2%). One patient of epiphora and 1 patient of diplopia were reportedAmong the 77 patients with nasal bone fractures, 29 (37.7% ± 11.3%) complained of olfactory disturbances. No significant associations were found between the type of fracture and the presence of olfactory disturbances. It is recommended for providers to explain to patients that approximately one-tenth of nasal bone fractures exhibit deformity, septal deviation, or nasal obstruction after surgery. Surgeons should take considerable care to avoid the olfactory mucosa during reduction surgery.

  6. Bone Fracture Exacerbates Murine Ischemic Cerebral Injury

    PubMed Central

    Degos, Vincent; Maze, Mervyn; Vacas, Susana; Hirsch, Jan; Guo, Yi; Shen, Fanxia; Jun, Kristine; van Rooijen, Nico; Gressens, Pierre; Young, William L.; Su, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Background Bone fracture increases alarmins and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the blood, and provokes macrophage infiltration and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in the hippocampus. We recently reported that stroke is an independent risk factor after bone surgery for adverse outcome, the impact of bone fracture on stroke outcome is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that bone fracture, shortly after ischemic stroke, enhances stroke-related injuries by augmenting the neuroinflammatory response. Methods Tibia fracture (bone fracture) was induced in mice one day after permanent occlusion of the distal middle cerebral artery (stroke). High-mobility-group box chromosomal protein-1 (HMGB1) was tested to mimic the bone fracture effects. HMGB1 neutralizing antibody and clodrolip (macrophage depletion) were tested to attenuate the bone fracture effects. Neurobehavioral function (n=10), infarct volume, neuronal death, and macrophages/microglia-infiltration (n=6–7) were analyzed three days after. Results We found that mice with both stroke and bone fracture had larger infarct volumes (mean percentage of ipsilateral hemisphere±SD: 30±7% vs. 12±3%, n=6, P<0.001) more severe neurobehavioral dysfunction, and more macrophages/microglia in the peri-infarct region than mice with stroke only. Intraperitoneal injection of HMGB1 mimicked, whereas neutralizing HMGB1 attenuated, the bone fracture effects and the macrophage/microglia infiltration. Depleting macrophages with clodrolip also attenuated the aggravating effects of bone fracture on stroke lesion and behavioral dysfunction. Conclusions These novel findings suggest that bone fracture shortly after stroke enhances stroke injury via augmented inflammation through HMGB1 and macrophage/microglia infiltration. Interventions to modulate early macrophage/microglia activation could be therapeutic goals to limit the adverse consequences of bone fracture after stroke. PMID:23438676

  7. Bone. Maximizing bone health--magnesium, BMD and fractures.

    PubMed

    Nieves, Jeri W

    2014-05-01

    The contribution of nutrition to bone health has been heavily debated for many years resulting in unclear recommendations for patients regarding prevention of bone loss and subsequent fractures. A recent cohort study has examined the relationships between magnesium intake, BMD and fractures.

  8. [Bone fracture and the healing mechanisms. Fragility fracture and bone quality].

    PubMed

    Mawatari, Taro; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2009-05-01

    Fracture occurs in bone having less than normal elastic resistance without any violence. Numerous terms have been used to classify various types of fractures from low trauma events; "fragility fracture", "stress fracture", "insufficiency fracture", "fatigue fracture", "pathologic fracture", etc. The definitions of these terms and clinical characteristics of these fractures are discussed. Also state-of-the-art bone quality assessments; Finite element analysis of clinical CT scans, assessments of the Microdamage, and the Cross-links of Collagen are introduced in this review.

  9. Management of complication from temporal bone fractures.

    PubMed

    Cvorovic, Ljiljana; Ljiljana, Cvorovic; Jovanovic, Milan B; Markovic, Marko; Milutinovic, Zoran; Strbac, M

    2012-02-01

    The objective of the study is to review clinical findings and outcomes in patients with temporal bone fractures, and to show an incidence and management of complications. It is the retrospective clinical study and the study took place at tertiary referral center. Fifty-two patients with temporal bone fractures. Data were collected from patients' charts and clinical review. Patients were classified into five groups according to the CT scan. The primary endpoint of study was to show management of possible complication from temporal bone fractures and to analyze association with intracranial injuries. The second endpoint was to show incompleteness of traditionally classification of fracture type. Of the 52 patients with 54 fractures, 27 (50%) had longitudinal fractures, 4 (7.4%) had transverse fractures, 17 (31.5%) had temporal squama-mastoid fractures, 4 (7.4%) had mixed fractures and 2 (3.7%) had isolated meatal fracture. Fifty-eight percent of patients had at least one intracranial pathologic finding, of which 11% had two or more. Persistent conductive hearing loss was noted in 8 of 16 affected patients. The facial paralysis occurred in seven patients. One patient had benign paroxysmal positional vertigo developed 3 weeks after injury. In conclusion, rarely temporal bone fractures are isolated injures. The squama-mastoid fracture in most cases associated with intracranial injuries. Coordination between the neurosurgeon and otologist is essential in the care of such patients. Further large studies will be done to give a more complete classification of temporal bone fractures which will include all fracture patterns and predict clinical outcome.

  10. Black bone disease in a healing fracture.

    PubMed

    Thiam, Desmond; Teo, Tse Yean; Malhotra, Rishi; Tan, Kong Bing; Chee, Yu Han

    2016-01-28

    Black bone disease refers to the hyperpigmentation of bone secondary to prolonged usage of minocycline. We present a report of a 34-year-old man who underwent femoral shaft fracture fixation complicated by deep infection requiring debridement. The implants were removed 10 months later after long-term treatment with minocycline and fracture union. A refracture of the femoral shaft occurred 2 days after implant removal and repeat fixation was required. Intraoperatively, abundant heavily pigmented and dark brown bone callus was noted over the old fracture site. There was no evidence of other bony pathology and the appearance was consistent with minocycline-associated pigmentation. As far as we are aware, this is the first case of black bone disease affecting callus within the interval period of bone healing. We also discuss the relevant literature on black bone disease to bring light on this rare entity that is an unwelcomed surprise to operating orthopaedic surgeons.

  11. Preventing painful age-related bone fractures

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Michelle L; Chartier, Stephane R; Mitchell, Stefanie A

    2016-01-01

    Age-related bone fractures are usually painful and have highly negative effects on a geriatric patient’s functional status, quality of life, and survival. Currently, there are few analgesic therapies that fully control bone fracture pain in the elderly without significant unwanted side effects. However, another way of controlling age-related fracture pain would be to preemptively administer an osteo-anabolic agent to geriatric patients with high risk of fracture, so as to build new cortical bone and prevent the fracture from occurring. A major question, however, is whether an osteo-anabolic agent can stimulate the proliferation of osteogenic cells and build significant amounts of new cortical bone in light of the decreased number and responsiveness of osteogenic cells in aging bone. To explore this question, geriatric and young mice, 20 and 4 months old, respectively, received either vehicle or a monoclonal antibody that sequesters sclerostin (anti-sclerostin) for 28 days. From days 21 to 28, animals also received sustained administration of the thymidine analog, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), which labels the DNA of dividing cells. Animals were then euthanized at day 28 and the femurs were examined for cortical bone formation, bone mineral density, and newly borne BrdU+ cells in the periosteum which is a tissue that is pivotally involved in the formation of new cortical bone. In both the geriatric and young mice, anti-sclerostin induced a significant increase in the thickness of the cortical bone, bone mineral density, and the proliferation of newly borne BrdU+ cells in the periosteum. These results suggest that even in geriatric animals, anti-sclerostin therapy can build new cortical bone and increase the proliferation of osteogenic cells and thus reduce the likelihood of painful age-related bone fractures. PMID:27837171

  12. [Bone disease with Pain. Colles' fracture].

    PubMed

    Yajima, Hiroshi

    2008-11-01

    The distal radius is one of the most commonly fractured long bone. Colles' fracture results from a fall on the dorsiflexed and pronated hand. The dinner-fork deformity is the typical deformity of the Colles' fracture. For patients with no or a little displacement, conservative treatment is applied. The non-bridge type external fixator is applied for patients without an intra articular fracture. For patients with a comminuted fracture, the locking plate (volar approach) is recommended. During the healing period, shoulder, elbow and finger exercise should be insisted.

  13. [Bone fracture and the healing mechanisms. Pathophysiology and classification of osteoporotic fractures].

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Hideaki

    2009-05-01

    Bone provides momentary strength and fatigue strength, and bone strength decreases with age. In elderly men and women with fragile bones osteoporotic fractures frequently occur. Fragility fracture occurs as a consequence of the decrease in momentary strength, and fragility fracture is one of the pathological fractures. In patients with the decrease in fatigue strength, insufficiency fractures frequently occurs. Insufficiency fracture is the same term as stress or fatigue fracture.

  14. Ulnar nerve paralysis after forearm bone fracture.

    PubMed

    Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Ruschel, Paulo Henrique; Huyer, Rodrigo Guimarães

    2016-01-01

    Paralysis or nerve injury associated with fractures of forearm bones fracture is rare and is more common in exposed fractures with large soft-tissue injuries. Ulnar nerve paralysis is a rare condition associated with closed fractures of the forearm. In most cases, the cause of paralysis is nerve contusion, which evolves with neuropraxia. However, nerve lacerations and entrapment at the fracture site always need to be borne in mind. This becomes more important when neuropraxia appears or worsens after reduction of a closed fracture of the forearm has been completed. The importance of diagnosing this injury and differentiating its features lies in the fact that, depending on the type of lesion, different types of management will be chosen.

  15. Bone tissue engineering and regenerative medicine: targeting pathological fractures.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duong T; Burg, Karen J L

    2015-01-01

    Patients with bone diseases have the highest risk of sustaining fractures and of suffering from nonunion bone healing due to tissue degeneration. Current fracture management strategies are limited in design and functionality and do not effectively promote bone healing within a diseased bone environment. Fracture management approaches include pharmaceutical therapy, surgical intervention, and tissue regeneration for fracture prevention, fracture stabilization, and fracture site regeneration, respectively. However, these strategies fail to accommodate the pathological nature of fragility fractures, leading to unwanted side effects, implant failures, and nonunions. To target fragility fractures, fracture management strategies should include bioactive bone substitutes designed for the pathological environment. However, the clinical outcome of these materials must be predictable within various disease environments. Initial development of a targeted treatment strategy should focus on simulating the physiological in vitro bone environment to predict clinical effectiveness of the engineered bone. An in vitro test system can facilitate reduction of implant failures and non-unions in fragility fractures.

  16. Fracture, aging and disease in bone

    SciTech Connect

    Ager, J.W.; Balooch, G.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2006-02-01

    From a public health perspective, developing a detailed mechanistic understanding of the well-known increase in fracture risk of human bone with age is essential. This also represents a challenge from materials science and fracture mechanics viewpoints. Bone has a complex, hierarchical structure with characteristic features ranging from nanometer to macroscopic dimensions; it is therefore significantly more complex than most engineering materials. Nevertheless, by examining the micro-/nano-structural changes accompanying the process of aging using appropriate multiscale experimental methods and relating them to fracture mechanics data, it is possible to obtain a quantitative picture of how bone resists fracture. As human cortical bone exhibits rising ex vivo crack-growth resistance with crack extension, its fracture toughness must be evaluated in terms of resistance-curve (R-curve) behavior. While the crack initiation toughness declines with age, the more striking finding is that the crack-growth toughness declines even more significantly and is essentially absent in bone from donors exceeding 85 years in age. To explain such an age-induced deterioration in the toughness of bone, we evaluate its fracture properties at multiple length scales, specifically at the molecular and nanodimensions using pico-force atomic-force microscopy, nanoindentation and vibrational spectroscopies, at the microscale using electron microscopy and hard/soft x-ray computed tomography, and at the macroscale using R-curve measurements. We show that the reduction in crack-growth toughness is associated primarily with a degradation in the degree of extrinsic toughening, in particular involving crack bridging, and that this occurs at relatively coarse size-scales in the range of tens to hundreds of micrometers. Finally, we briefly describe how specific clinical treatments, e.g., with steroid hormones to treat various inflammatory conditions, can prematurely damage bone, thereby reducing its

  17. Mechanistic fracture criteria for the failure of human cortical bone

    SciTech Connect

    Nalla, Ravi K.; Kinney, John H.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2002-12-13

    A mechanistic understanding of fracture in human bone is critical to predicting fracture risk associated with age and disease. Despite extensive work, a mechanistic framework for describing how the underlying microstructure affects the failure mode in bone is lacking.

  18. Evaluation of Associated Carpal Bone Fractures in Distal Radial Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Youn Moo; Kim, Sang Bum; Yi, Jin Woong; Park, Cheol Yong; Yoon, Jeong Yong; Kim, Doo Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate the frequency and distribution of associated carpal bone fractures (CBFs) in distal radial fractures (DRFs). Methods Three hundred and thirteen patients who underwent surgical treatment for DRFs between March 2007 and January 2010 were reviewed retrospectively. In this study, 223 patients who had preoperative computed tomography (CT) were included. We investigated the frequency and distribution of associated CBFs on CT scans. The relationship between the frequency of associated CBFs and patient factors such as age, gender, body mass index, and the mechanism of injury was assessed. Results CBFs were complicated in 46 of 223 DRFs (20.9%). The distribution of CBFs was 23 cases in the triquetrum, 16 in the lunate, 12 in the scaphoid, five in the hamate, and four in the pisiform. Among the 46 cases, a fracture of one carpal bone occurred in 36 cases, two in seven cases, three in two cases, and four in one case. In 10 of the 46 cases, associated CBFs occurred in more than two carpal bones. No significant differences were observed for age, sex, body mass index, or the mechanism of injury between patients with DRFs and CBFs and those without CBFs. Conclusions Because CBFs that mainly occur in the proximal carpal row are complicated in DRFs at a relatively high frequency, assessment of carpal bones using CT scans is beneficial. PMID:23730472

  19. Role of cortical bone in hip fracture.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    In this review, I consider the varied mechanisms in cortical bone that help preserve its integrity and how they deteriorate with aging. Aging affects cortical bone in two ways: extrinsically through its effects on the individual that modify its mechanical loading experience and 'milieu interieur'; and intrinsically through the prolonged cycle of remodelling and renewal extending to an estimated 20 years in the proximal femur. Healthy femoral cortex incorporates multiple mechanisms that help prevent fracture. These have been described at multiple length scales from the individual bone mineral crystal to the scale of the femur itself and appear to operate hierarchically. Each cortical bone fracture begins as a sub-microscopic crack that enlarges under mechanical load, for example, that imposed by a fall. In these conditions, a crack will enlarge explosively unless the cortical bone is intrinsically tough (the opposite of brittle). Toughness leads to microscopic crack deflection and bridging and may be increased by adequate regulation of both mineral crystal size and the heterogeneity of mineral and matrix phases. The role of osteocytes in optimising toughness is beginning to be worked out; but many osteocytes die in situ without triggering bone renewal over a 20-year cycle, with potential for increasing brittleness. Furthermore, the superolateral cortex of the proximal femur thins progressively during life, so increasing the risk of buckling during a fall. Besides preserving or increasing hip BMD, pharmaceutical treatments have class-specific effects on the toughness of cortical bone, although dietary and exercise-based interventions show early promise.

  20. Impact and risk factors of post-stroke bone fracture.

    PubMed

    Huo, Kang; Hashim, Syed I; Yong, Kimberley L Y; Su, Hua; Qu, Qiu-Min

    2016-02-20

    Bone fracture occurs in stroke patients at different times during the recovery phase, prolonging recovery time and increasing medical costs. In this review, we discuss the potential risk factors for post-stroke bone fracture and preventive methods. Most post-stroke bone fractures occur in the lower extremities, indicating fragile bones are a risk factor. Motor changes, including posture, mobility, and balance post-stroke contribute to bone loss and thus increase risk of bone fracture. Bone mineral density is a useful indicator for bone resorption, useful to identify patients at risk of post-stroke bone fracture. Calcium supplementation was previously regarded as a useful treatment during physical rehabilitation. However, recent data suggests calcium supplementation has a negative impact on atherosclerotic conditions. Vitamin D intake may prevent osteoporosis and fractures in patients with stroke. Although drugs such as teriparatide show some benefits in preventing osteoporosis, additional clinical trials are needed to determine the most effective conditions for post-stroke applications.

  1. Bone mineral density testing after fragility fracture

    PubMed Central

    Posen, Joshua; Beaton, Dorcas E.; Sale, Joanna; Bogoch, Earl R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine the proportion of patients with fragility fractures who can be expected to have low bone mineral density (BMD) at the time of fracture and to assist FPs in deciding whether to refer patients for BMD testing. Data sources MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL were searched from the earliest available dates through September 2009. Study selection English-language articles reporting BMD test results of patients with fragility fractures who were managed in an orthopedic environment (eg, fracture clinic, emergency management by orthopedic surgeons, inpatients) were eligible for review. While the orthopedic environment has been identified as an ideal point for case finding, FPs are often responsible for investigation and treatment. Factors that potentially influenced BMD test results (eg, selection of fracture types, exclusion criteria) were identified. Studies with 2 or more selection factors of potential influence were flagged, and rates of low BMD were calculated including and excluding these studies. Synthesis The distribution of the proportion of persons with low BMD was summarized across studies using descriptive statistics. We calculated lower boundaries on this distribution, using standard statistical thresholds, to determine a lower threshold of the expected rate of low BMD. Conclusion Family physicians evaluating patients with fragility fractures can expect that at least two-thirds of patients with fragility fractures who are older than 50 years of age will have low BMD (T score ≤ −1.0). With this a priori expectation, FPs might more readily conduct a fracture risk assessment and pursue warranted fracture risk reduction strategies following fragility fracture. PMID:24336562

  2. Navigated long-bone fracture reduction.

    PubMed

    Kahler, David M

    2009-02-01

    The first computer-assisted orthopaedic trauma procedures were limited to navigated drill-guide applications, in which the computer was used to predict the trajectory of the drill guide relative to stored radiographic images. By 2003, software for fracture reduction was commercially available. The ability to perform a minimally invasive fracture reduction with the aid of stored images, combined with navigated insertion of internal fixation, has long been considered the highest achievement in image-guided fracture surgery. It is now possible to apply computer-assisted techniques to all fractures that have traditionally been treated with the aid of intraoperative fluoroscopic control. Less-invasive fixation of long-bone fractures is often complicated by malrotation or shortening of the injured extremity, sometimes requiring reoperation. Recent developments in computer-assisted surgery now allow the orthopaedic surgeon to precisely match the anatomy of the injured extremity to that of the uninjured limb with respect to length and rotational alignment. This is particularly important in comminuted fractures, for which there are no anatomic clues to guide accurate reduction, and in the correction of malreduced fractures. Although computer-assisted technology is now readily available, it has not yet found widespread acceptance in the orthopaedic trauma community. New software workflows (i.e., the step-by-step progression through various screens in the software program during a computer-guided procedure) specific to individual procedures and implants may hasten adoption of these techniques.

  3. Alveolar Bone Fracture: Pathognomonic Sign for Clinical Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Gutmacher, Zvi; Peled, Eli; Norman, Doron; Lin, Shaul

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Dental injuries, especially luxation and avulsion, are common. Dental trauma can cause alveolar bone fracture that can lead to tooth loss and malocclusion. Single tooth alveolar bone fractures are difficult to identify unless it protrudes through the overlying mucosa and can be visualized. Pain, malocclusion, and tooth mobility provide signs of suspected alveolar bone fractures. Integrity of the proximate alveolar bone should be examined for fractures where avulsion, luxation, or other tooth trauma is detected. Any suggestion of alveolar fractures should be further investigated with an appropriate radiograph. Summary: This case report shows a pathognomonic sign that detects and diagnosis single tooth alveolar bone fractures, i.e., a localized hematoma crossing the attached gingiva from the free gingival margin to the vestibular mucosa. This should serve as a warning for localized alveolar bone fracture. A visualized hematoma and gentle, careful palpation may help detect covered fractures when the overlying mucosa is not perforated.

  4. Fractures and stresses in Bone Spring sandstones

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, J.C.; Warpinski, N.R.; Sattler, A.R.; Northrop, D.A.

    1990-09-01

    This project is a collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and Harvey E. Yates Company being conducted under the auspices of the Oil Recovery Technology Partnership. The project seeks to apply perspectives related to the effects of natural fractures, stress, and sedimentology to the simulation and production of low-permeability gas reservoirs to low-permeability oil reservoirs as typified by the Bone Spring sandstones of the Permian Basin, southeast New Mexico. This report presents the results and analysis obtained in 1989 from 233 ft of oriented core, comprehensive suite of logs, various in situ stress measurements, and detailed well tests conducted in conjunction with the drilling of two development wells. Natural fractures were observed in core and logs in the interbed carbonates, but there was no direct evidence of fractures in the sandstones. However, production tests of the sandstones indicated permeabilities and behavior typical of a dual porosity reservoir. A general northeast trend for the maximum principal horizontal stress was observed in an elastic strain recovery measurements and in strikes of drilling-induced fractures; this direction is subparallel to the principal fracture trend observed in the interbed carbonates. Many of the results presented are believed to be new information for the Bone Spring sandstones. 57 figs., 18 tabs.

  5. Bilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss following unilateral temporal bone fracture.

    PubMed

    Hunchaisri, Niran

    2009-06-01

    Temporal bone fractures usually cause unilateral sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) by fracture that violated otic capsule of that side. Bilateral SNHL from unilateral temporal bone fracture were rarely seen. Labyrinthine concussion was considered to be the pathogenesis in these cases. This article reports an additional case of bilateral SNHL from unilateral temporal bone fracture but in a different pattern of SNHL which may result from an occlusion of the internal auditory artery.

  6. Bone fragility fractures in hemodialysis patients: Croatian surveys.

    PubMed

    Šimunović, Iva; Pavlović, Draško; Kudumija, Boris; Mihaljević, Dubravka; Lovčić, Vesna; Jakić, Marko

    2015-03-01

    Disturbances of bone mineral metabolism are common complications of chronic kidney disease with bone fractures as one of the most important consequences. The aim of this study was to estimate prevalence of bone fractures among Croatian hemodialysis patients and to determine the possible fracture risk. The study was carried out in 767 hemodialysis patients from nine Croatian hemodialysis centers. Demographic, laboratory and bone fracture data were collected from medical records as well as therapy with vitamin D analogs. Fragility fractures were defined according to the World Health Organization definition. In 31 patient a total of 36 fractures were recorded. The prevalence of patients with bone fractures was 4.0%. The mean age of patients with fractures was 68.6 years. There were 9 male and 22 female patients with frac- tures. The mean hemodialysis duration was 63.3 months. Among all fractures the most common were hip fractures (39%) followed by forearm fractures (22%). This is the first study regarding epidemiology of bone fractures in Croatian hemodialysis patients. The prevalence of patients with bone fractures in our group of hemodialysis patients is high. Fractures were more frequent among women and older patients, patients who have been longer on dialysis and in patients with higher concentration of PTH.

  7. [Clinical study on mandibular bone fractures].

    PubMed

    Bahk, J S

    1989-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate and to classify the patients of mandibular bone fracture who were hospitalized in the Kang-nam General Hospital. We observed clinically 57 patients from July 1983 to August 1988. The results obtained were as follows: 1. The ratio of male to female was about 6.1:1. 2. The highest age incidence was 3rd decade age group. 3. The most frequent etiologic factor was falling-down (36.8%). The next factors were fist-blow (31.6%), traffic accident (15.8%), sports (5.3%) and works (5.3%) in order. 4. The most frequent site of mandibular fractures was symphyseal area (23.1%), and mandibular angle (20.5%), condyle (19.2%), body (19.2%), alveolar bone (9.0%) and ramus (7.7%) were next in order.

  8. Early Onset of Laying and Bumblefoot Favor Keel Bone Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Gebhardt-Henrich, Sabine G.; Fröhlich, Ernst K. F.

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary Numerous studies have documented a high prevalence of keel bone fractures in laying hens. In this longitudinal study, 80 white and brown laying hens were regularly checked for keel bone deviations and fractures while egg production was individually monitored. About 62% of the hens had broken keel bones at depopulation. More new fractures occurred during the time when laying rates were highest. Hens with broken keel bones at depopulation had laid their first egg earlier than hens with intact keel bones. All birds with bumblefoot on both feet had a fracture at depopulation. Abstract Numerous studies have demonstrated influences of hybrid, feed, and housing on prevalence of keel bone fractures, but influences of behavior and production on an individual level are less known. In this longitudinal study, 80 white and brown laying hens were regularly checked for keel bone deviations and fractures while egg production was individually monitored using Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) from production until depopulation at 65 weeks of age. These focal birds were kept in eight pens with 20 hens per pen in total. About 62% of the hens had broken keel bones at depopulation. The occurrence of new fractures was temporally linked to egg laying: more new fractures occurred during the time when laying rates were highest. Hens with fractured keel bones at depopulation had laid their first egg earlier than hens with intact keel bones. However, the total number of eggs was neither correlated with the onset of egg laying nor with keel bone fractures. All birds with bumblefoot on both feet had a fracture at depopulation. Hens stayed in the nest for a longer time during egg laying during the ten days after the fracture than during the ten days before the fracture. In conclusion, a relationship between laying rates and keel bone fractures seems likely. PMID:26633520

  9. Distal radial fractures heal by direct woven bone formation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Descriptions of fracture healing almost exclusively deal with shaft fractures and they often emphasize endochondral bone formation. In reality, most fractures occur in metaphyseal cancellous bone. Apart from a study of vertebral fractures, we have not found any histological description of cancellous bone healing in humans. Patients and methods We studied histological biopsies from the central part of 12 distal radial fractures obtained during surgery 6–28 days after the injury, using routine hematoxylin and eosin staining. Results New bone formation was seen in 6 cases. It was always in the form of fetal-like, disorganized woven bone. It seldom had contact with old trabeculae and appeared to have formed directly in the marrow. Cartilage was scarce or absent. The samples without bone formation showed only necrosis, scar, or old cancellous bone. Interpretation The histology suggests that cells in the midst of the marrow respond to the trauma by direct formation of bone, independently of trabecular surfaces. PMID:23570338

  10. Women with previous stress fractures show reduced bone material strength

    PubMed Central

    Duarte Sosa, Daysi; Fink Eriksen, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — Bone fragility is determined by bone mass, bone architecture, and the material properties of bone. Microindentation has been introduced as a measurement method that reflects bone material properties. The pathogenesis of underlying stress fractures, in particular the role of impaired bone material properties, is still poorly understood. Based on the hypothesis that impaired bone material strength might play a role in the development of stress fractures, we used microindentation in patients with stress fractures and in controls. Patients and methods — We measured bone material strength index (BMSi) by microindentation in 30 women with previous stress fractures and in 30 normal controls. Bone mineral density by DXA and levels of the bone markers C-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type-1 collagen (CTX) and N-terminal propeptide of type-1 procollagen (P1NP) were also determined. Results — Mean BMSi in stress fracture patients was significantly lower than in the controls (SD 72 (8.7) vs. 77 (7.2); p = 0.02). The fracture subjects also had a significantly lower mean bone mineral density (BMD) than the controls (0.9 (0.02) vs. 1.0 (0.06); p = 0.03). Bone turnover—as reflected in serum levels of the bone marker CTX—was similar in both groups, while P1NP levels were significantly higher in the women with stress fractures (55 μg/L vs. 42 μg/L; p = 0.03). There was no correlation between BMSi and BMD or bone turnover. Interpretation — BMSi was inferior in patients with previous stress fracture, but was unrelated to BMD and bone turnover. The lower values of BMSi in patients with previous stress fracture combined with a lower BMD may contribute to the increased propensity to develop stress fractures in these patients. PMID:27321443

  11. The AO Pediatric Comprehensive Classification of Long Bone Fractures (PCCF)

    PubMed Central

    Joeris, Alexander; Lutz, Nicolas; Blumenthal, Andrea; Slongo, Theddy; Audigé, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose To achieve a common understanding when dealing with long bone fractures in children, the AO Pediatric Comprehensive Classification of Long Bone Fractures (AO PCCF) was introduced in 2007. As part of its final validation, we present the most relevant fracture patterns in the upper extremities of a representative population of children classified according to the PCCF. Patients and methods We included children and adolescents (0–17 years old) diagnosed with 1 or more long bone fractures between January 2009 and December 2011 at the university hospitals in Bern and Lausanne (Switzerland). Patient charts were retrospectively reviewed and fractures were classified from standard radiographs. Results Of 2,292 upper extremity fractures in 2,203 children and adolescents, 26% involved the humerus and 74% involved the forearm. In the humerus, 61%, and in the forearm, 80% of single distal fractures involved the metaphysis. In adolescents, single humerus fractures were more often epiphyseal and diaphyseal fractures, and among adolescents radius fractures were more often epiphyseal fractures than in other age groups. 47% of combined forearm fractures were distal metaphyseal fractures. Only 0.7% of fractures could not be classified within 1 of the child-specific fracture patterns. Of the single epiphyseal fractures, 49% were Salter-Harris type-II (SH II) fractures; of these, 94% occurred in schoolchildren and adolescents. Of the metaphyseal fractures, 58% showed an incomplete fracture pattern. 89% of incomplete fractures affected the distal radius. Of the diaphyseal fractures, 32% were greenstick fractures. 24 Monteggia fractures occurred in pre-school children and schoolchildren, and 2 occurred in adolescents. Interpretation The pattern of pediatric fractures in the upper extremity can be comprehensively described according to the PCCF. Prospective clinical studies are needed to determine its clinical relevance for treatment decisions and prognostication

  12. The AO Pediatric Comprehensive Classification of Long Bone Fractures (PCCF).

    PubMed

    Joeris, Alexander; Lutz, Nicolas; Blumenthal, Andrea; Slongo, Theddy; Audigé, Laurent

    2017-04-01

    Background and purpose - To achieve a common understanding when dealing with long bone fractures in children, the AO Pediatric Comprehensive Classification of Long Bone Fractures (AO PCCF) was introduced in 2007. As part of its final validation, we present the most relevant fracture patterns in the upper extremities of a representative population of children classified according to the PCCF. Patients and methods - We included children and adolescents (0-17 years old) diagnosed with 1 or more long bone fractures between January 2009 and December 2011 at the university hospitals in Bern and Lausanne (Switzerland). Patient charts were retrospectively reviewed and fractures were classified from standard radiographs. Results - Of 2,292 upper extremity fractures in 2,203 children and adolescents, 26% involved the humerus and 74% involved the forearm. In the humerus, 61%, and in the forearm, 80% of single distal fractures involved the metaphysis. In adolescents, single humerus fractures were more often epiphyseal and diaphyseal fractures, and among adolescents radius fractures were more often epiphyseal fractures than in other age groups. 47% of combined forearm fractures were distal metaphyseal fractures. Only 0.7% of fractures could not be classified within 1 of the child-specific fracture patterns. Of the single epiphyseal fractures, 49% were Salter-Harris type-II (SH II) fractures; of these, 94% occurred in schoolchildren and adolescents. Of the metaphyseal fractures, 58% showed an incomplete fracture pattern. 89% of incomplete fractures affected the distal radius. Of the diaphyseal fractures, 32% were greenstick fractures. 24 Monteggia fractures occurred in pre-school children and schoolchildren, and 2 occurred in adolescents. Interpretation - The pattern of pediatric fractures in the upper extremity can be comprehensively described according to the PCCF. Prospective clinical studies are needed to determine its clinical relevance for treatment decisions and

  13. Effect of groove on bone fracture toughness.

    PubMed

    Norman, T L; Vashishth, D; Burr, D B

    1992-12-01

    When testing for the effects of bone orientation on mode I fracture toughness, compact tension specimens are grooved with a V-notch to provide a crack guide. The effect of grooving on the expressions for the critical stress intensity factor (Kc) and the critical strain energy release rate (Gc) for mode I fracture toughness was investigated. Experiments were performed using grooved and ungrooved bovine compact tension specimens. The results indicate that the standard expression used to determine Kc for a compact tension specimen requires modification. The thickness (B) must be modified to account for the thickness between the grooves (Bn). The thickness used in the standard expression is replaced by an effective thickness written as (BBn)0.5. It was also found that the thickness between the grooves should be used in the standard formula for Gc.

  14. [Atlas fracture due to aneurysmal bone cyst after minor trauma].

    PubMed

    Topp, T; Krüger, A; Zettl, R; Figiel, J; Ruchholtz, S; Frangen, T M

    2014-05-01

    Aneurysmal bone cysts predominantly occur in young adults and the long bones, the lumbar spine and the pelvis are mainly affected. This article presents the case of a 22-year-old woman with the very rare localization of an aneurysmal bone cyst of the atlas and an atlas fracture after a minor trauma. The initial radiological diagnosis was a suspicted aneurysmal bone cyst which was confirmed histologically. Due to the unstable fracture it was decided to carry out surgical treatment with occipitocervical stabilization in combination with a transoral bone graft. After a period of 11 months the fracture had completely healed and the implants were removed without any complications.

  15. Probabilistic Risk Assessment for Bone Fracture - Bone Fracture Risk Module (BFxRM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Licata, Angelo; Myers, Jerry G.; Lewandowski, Beth

    2013-01-01

    This presentation summarizes the concepts, development, and application of NASA's Bone Fracture Risk Module (BFxRM). The overview includes an assessmnet of strenghts and limitations of the BFxRM and proposes a numebr of discussion questions to the panel regarding future development avenues for this simulation system.

  16. Muscle-bone Interactions During Fracture Healing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    equal vascu- larization in healed bone and non-unions in animal studies as well as in human patients20,24-26. In a murine open tibial fracture model...the periosteum is intact, repair occurs largely through endochondral ossification driven by a periosteal supply of cells10,47-50. Indeed, in open...activated to serve as a secondary supply of cells when the periosteal supply becomes compro- mised52,53. These recent findings of muscle’s ability to

  17. From brittle to ductile fracture of bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterlik, Herwig; Roschger, Paul; Klaushofer, Klaus; Fratzl, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Toughness is crucial to the structural function of bone. Usually, the toughness of a material is not just determined by its composition, but by the ability of its microstructure to dissipate deformation energy without propagation of the crack. Polymers are often able to dissipate energy by viscoplastic flow or the formation of non-connected microcracks. In ceramics, well-known toughening mechanisms are based on crack ligament bridging and crack deflection. Interestingly, all these phenomena were identified in bone, which is a composite of a fibrous polymer (collagen) and ceramic nanoparticles (carbonated hydroxyapatite). Here, we use controlled crack-extension experiments to explain the influence of fibre orientation on steering the various toughening mechanisms. We find that the fracture energy changes by two orders of magnitude depending on the collagen orientation, and the angle between collagen and crack propagation direction is decisive in switching between different toughening mechanisms.

  18. From brittle to ductile fracture of bone.

    PubMed

    Peterlik, Herwig; Roschger, Paul; Klaushofer, Klaus; Fratzl, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Toughness is crucial to the structural function of bone. Usually, the toughness of a material is not just determined by its composition, but by the ability of its microstructure to dissipate deformation energy without propagation of the crack. Polymers are often able to dissipate energy by viscoplastic flow or the formation of non-connected microcracks. In ceramics, well-known toughening mechanisms are based on crack ligament bridging and crack deflection. Interestingly, all these phenomena were identified in bone, which is a composite of a fibrous polymer (collagen) and ceramic nanoparticles (carbonated hydroxyapatite). Here, we use controlled crack-extension experiments to explain the influence of fibre orientation on steering the various toughening mechanisms. We find that the fracture energy changes by two orders of magnitude depending on the collagen orientation, and the angle between collagen and crack propagation direction is decisive in switching between different toughening mechanisms.

  19. Early Onset of Laying and Bumblefoot Favor Keel Bone Fractures.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt-Henrich, Sabine G; Fröhlich, Ernst K F

    2015-11-27

    Numerous studies have demonstrated influences of hybrid, feed, and housing on prevalence of keel bone fractures, but influences of behavior and production on an individual level are less known. In this longitudinal study, 80 white and brown laying hens were regularly checked for keel bone deviations and fractures while egg production was individually monitored using Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) from production until depopulation at 65 weeks of age. These focal birds were kept in eight pens with 20 hens per pen in total. About 62% of the hens had broken keel bones at depopulation. The occurrence of new fractures was temporally linked to egg laying: more new fractures occurred during the time when laying rates were highest. Hens with fractured keel bones at depopulation had laid their first egg earlier than hens with intact keel bones. However, the total number of eggs was neither correlated with the onset of egg laying nor with keel bone fractures. All birds with bumblefoot on both feet had a fracture at depopulation. Hens stayed in the nest for a longer time during egg laying during the ten days after the fracture than during the ten days before the fracture. In conclusion, a relationship between laying rates and keel bone fractures seems likely.

  20. The AO Pediatric Comprehensive Classification of Long Bone Fractures (PCCF)

    PubMed Central

    Audigé, Laurent; Slongo, Theddy; Lutz, Nicolas; Blumenthal, Andrea; Joeris, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose The AO Pediatric Comprehensive Classification of Long Bone Fractures (PCCF) describes the localization and morphology of fractures, and considers severity in 2 categories: (1) simple, and (2) multifragmentary. We evaluated simple and multifragmentary fractures in a large consecutive cohort of children diagnosed with long bone fractures in Switzerland. Patients and methods Children and adolescents treated for fractures between 2009 and 2011 at 2 tertiary pediatric surgery hospitals were retrospectively included. Fractures were classified according to the AO PCCF. Severity classes were described according to fracture location, patient age and sex, BMI, and cause of trauma. Results Of all trauma events, 3% (84 of 2,730) were diagnosed with a multifragmentary fracture. This proportion was age-related: 2% of multifragmentary fractures occurred in school­children and 7% occurred in adolescents. In patients diagnosed with a single fracture only, the highest percentage of multifragmentation occurred in the femur (12%, 15 of 123). In fractured paired radius/ulna bones, multifragmentation occurred in 2% (11 of 687); in fractured paired tibia/fibula bones, it occurred in 21% (24 of 115), particularly in schoolchildren (5 of 18) and adolescents (16 of 40). In a multivariable regression model, age, cause of injury, and bone were found to be relevant prognostic factors of multifragmentation (odds ratio (OR) > 2). Interpretation Overall, multifragmentation in long bone fractures in children was rare and was mostly observed in adolescents. The femur was mostly affected in single fractures and the lower leg was mostly affected in paired-bone fractures. The clinical relevance of multifragmentation regarding growth and long-term functional recovery remains to be determined. PMID:27882814

  1. The AO Pediatric Comprehensive Classification of Long Bone Fractures (PCCF).

    PubMed

    Audigé, Laurent; Slongo, Theddy; Lutz, Nicolas; Blumenthal, Andrea; Joeris, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Background and purpose - The AO Pediatric Comprehensive Classification of Long Bone Fractures (PCCF) describes the localization and morphology of fractures, and considers severity in 2 categories: (1) simple, and (2) multifragmentary. We evaluated simple and multifragmentary fractures in a large consecutive cohort of children diagnosed with long bone fractures in Switzerland. Patients and methods - Children and adolescents treated for fractures between 2009 and 2011 at 2 tertiary pediatric surgery hospitals were retrospectively included. Fractures were classified according to the AO PCCF. Severity classes were described according to fracture location, patient age and sex, BMI, and cause of trauma. Results - Of all trauma events, 3% (84 of 2,730) were diagnosed with a multifragmentary fracture. This proportion was age-related: 2% of multifragmentary fractures occurred in school-children and 7% occurred in adolescents. In patients diagnosed with a single fracture only, the highest percentage of multifragmentation occurred in the femur (12%, 15 of 123). In fractured paired radius/ulna bones, multifragmentation occurred in 2% (11 of 687); in fractured paired tibia/fibula bones, it occurred in 21% (24 of 115), particularly in schoolchildren (5 of 18) and adolescents (16 of 40). In a multivariable regression model, age, cause of injury, and bone were found to be relevant prognostic factors of multifragmentation (odds ratio (OR) > 2). Interpretation - Overall, multifragmentation in long bone fractures in children was rare and was mostly observed in adolescents. The femur was mostly affected in single fractures and the lower leg was mostly affected in paired-bone fractures. The clinical relevance of multifragmentation regarding growth and long-term functional recovery remains to be determined.

  2. Variability and Anisotropy of Fracture Toughness of Cortical Bone Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Wahab, Adel; Nordin, Norhaziqah; Silberschmidt, Vadim

    2012-08-01

    Bones form protective and load-bearing framework of the body. Therefore, their structural integrity is vital for the quality of life. Unfortunately, bones can only sustain a load until a certain limit, beyond which they fail. Therefore, it is essential to study their mechanical and fracture behaviours in order to get an in-depth understanding of the origins of its fracture resistance that, in turn, can assist diagnosis and prevention of bone's trauma. This can be achieved by studying mechanical properties of bone, such as its fracture toughness. Generally, most of bone fractures occur for long bones that consist mostly of cortical bone. Therefore, in this study, only a cortical bone tissue was studied. Since this tissue has an anisotropic behaviour and possesses hierarchical and complex structure, in this paper, an experimental analysis for the fracture toughness of cortical bone tissue is presented in terms of J-integral. The data was obtained using single-edge-notch bending (SENB) cortical specimens of bone tested in a three-point bending setup. Variability of values of fracture toughness was investigated by testing specimens cut from different cortex positions of bovine femur called anterior, posterior, medial, and lateral. In addition, anisotropy ratios of fracture toughness were considered by examining specimens cut from three different orientations: longitudinal, transverse and radial. Moreover, in order to link cortical bone fracture mechanisms with its underlying microstructure, fracture surfaces of specimens from different cortices and along different orientations were studied. Experimental results of this study provide a clear understanding of both variability and anisotropy of cortical bone tissue with regard to its fracture toughness.

  3. Analyzing the cellular contribution of bone marrow to fracture healing using bone marrow transplantation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Colnot, C. . E-mail: colnotc@orthosurg.ucsf.edu; Huang, S.; Helms, J.

    2006-11-24

    The bone marrow is believed to play important roles during fracture healing such as providing progenitor cells for inflammation, matrix remodeling, and cartilage and bone formation. Given the complex nature of bone repair, it remains difficult to distinguish the contributions of various cell types. Here we describe a mouse model based on bone marrow transplantation and genetic labeling to track cells originating from bone marrow during fracture healing. Following lethal irradiation and engraftment of bone marrow expressing the LacZ transgene constitutively, wild type mice underwent tibial fracture. Donor bone marrow-derived cells, which originated from the hematopoietic compartment, did not participate in the chondrogenic and osteogenic lineages during fracture healing. Instead, the donor bone marrow contributed to inflammatory and bone resorbing cells. This model can be exploited in the future to investigate the role of inflammation and matrix remodeling during bone repair, independent from osteogenesis and chondrogenesis.

  4. Possible benefits of strontium ranelate in complicated long bone fractures.

    PubMed

    Alegre, Duarte Nuno; Ribeiro, Costa; Sousa, Carlos; Correia, João; Silva, Luís; de Almeida, Luís

    2012-02-01

    Osteoporosis drugs are prescribed to prevent fragility fractures, which is the principal aim of the management of osteoporosis. However, if fracture does occur, then it is also important to promote a fast and uneventful healing process. Despite this, little is known about the effect of osteoporosis drugs on bone healing in humans. Strontium ranelate is an osteoporosis agent that increases bone formation and reduces bone resorption and may therefore be beneficial in fracture healing. We report four cases of fracture non-union for up to 20 months. Treatment with strontium ranelate (2 g/day) for between 6 weeks and 6 months appeared to contribute to bone consolidation in the four cases. Animal studies support beneficial effects of strontium ranelate on bone healing via improvement of bone material properties and microarchitecture in the vicinity of the fracture. The clinical cases described herein provide new information on these effects, in the absence of randomized controlled studies on the clinical efficacy of pharmacological treatments in osteoporosis in fracture repair. Further studies are necessary. Fracture healing is an important topic in orthopedic research and is also a concern for patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis. Evidence from case reports and animal studies suggests that strontium ranelate improves bone microarchitecture and accelerates fracture healing. A positive effect of osteoporosis treatments on bone healing is an interesting possibility and merits further clinical research.

  5. The AO Pediatric Comprehensive Classification of Long Bone Fractures (PCCF)

    PubMed Central

    Joeris, Alexander; Lutz, Nicolas; Blumenthal, Andrea; Slongo, Theddy; Audigé, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose To achieve a common understanding when dealing with long bone fractures in children, the AO Pediatric Comprehensive Classification of Long Bone Fractures (AO PCCF) was introduced in 2007. As part of its final validation, we present the most relevant fracture patterns in the lower extremities of a representative population of children classified according to the PCCF. Patients and methods We included patients up to the age of 17 who were diagnosed with 1 or more long bone fractures between January 2009 and December 2011 at either of 2 tertiary care university hospitals in Switzerland. Patient charts were retrospectively reviewed. Results More lower extremity fractures occurred in boys (62%, n = 341). Of 548 fractured long bones in the lower extremity, 25% involved the femur and 75% the lower leg. The older the patients, the more combined fractures of the tibia and fibula were sustained (adolescents: 50%, 61 of 123). Salter-Harris (SH) fracture patterns represented 66% of single epiphyseal fractures (83 of 126). Overall, 74 of the 83 SH patterns occurred in the distal epiphysis. Of all the metaphyseal fractures, 74 of 79 were classified as incomplete or complete. Complete oblique spiral fractures accounted for 57% of diaphyseal fractures (120 of 211). Of all fractures, 7% (40 of 548) were classified in the category "other", including 29 fractures that were identified as toddler’s fractures. 5 combined lower leg fractures were reported in the proximal metaphysis, 40 in the diaphysis, 26 in the distal metaphysis, and 8 in the distal epiphysis. Interpretation The PCCF allows classification of lower extremity fracture patterns in the clinical setting. Re-introduction of a specific code for toddler’s fractures in the PCCF should be considered. PMID:27882811

  6. The AO Pediatric Comprehensive Classification of Long Bone Fractures (PCCF).

    PubMed

    Joeris, Alexander; Lutz, Nicolas; Blumenthal, Andrea; Slongo, Theddy; Audigé, Laurent

    2017-04-01

    Background and purpose - To achieve a common understanding when dealing with long bone fractures in children, the AO Pediatric Comprehensive Classification of Long Bone Fractures (AO PCCF) was introduced in 2007. As part of its final validation, we present the most relevant fracture patterns in the lower extremities of a representative population of children classified according to the PCCF. Patients and methods - We included patients up to the age of 17 who were diagnosed with 1 or more long bone fractures between January 2009 and December 2011 at either of 2 tertiary care university hospitals in Switzerland. Patient charts were retrospectively reviewed. Results - More lower extremity fractures occurred in boys (62%, n = 341). Of 548 fractured long bones in the lower extremity, 25% involved the femur and 75% the lower leg. The older the patients, the more combined fractures of the tibia and fibula were sustained (adolescents: 50%, 61 of 123). Salter-Harris (SH) fracture patterns represented 66% of single epiphyseal fractures (83 of 126). Overall, 74 of the 83 SH patterns occurred in the distal epiphysis. Of all the metaphyseal fractures, 74 of 79 were classified as incomplete or complete. Complete oblique spiral fractures accounted for 57% of diaphyseal fractures (120 of 211). Of all fractures, 7% (40 of 548) were classified in the category "other", including 29 fractures that were identified as toddler's fractures. 5 combined lower leg fractures were reported in the proximal metaphysis, 40 in the diaphysis, 26 in the distal metaphysis, and 8 in the distal epiphysis. Interpretation - The PCCF allows classification of lower extremity fracture patterns in the clinical setting. Re-introduction of a specific code for toddler's fractures in the PCCF should be considered.

  7. Occurrence and pattern of long bone fractures in growing dogs with normal and osteopenic bones.

    PubMed

    Kumar, K; Mogha, I V; Aithal, H P; Kinjavdekar, P; Singh, G R; Pawde, A M; Kushwaha, R B

    2007-11-01

    A retrospective study was undertaken to record the occurrence and pattern of long bone fractures, and the efficacy of Intramedullary (IM) Steinmann pin fixing in growing dogs. All the records of growing dogs during a 10-year-period were screened to record the cause of trauma, the age and sex of the animal, the bone involved, the type and location of the fracture, the status of fixation, alignment, maintenance of fixation and fracture healing. The results were analysed and comparisons were made between growing dogs with normal and osteopenic bones. Among the 310 cases of fractures recorded, the bones were osteopenic in 91 cases (29%). Minor trauma was the principal cause of fracture in dogs with osteopenia (25%), and indigenous breeds were most commonly affected (38%). Fractures in dogs with osteopenic bones were most commonly recorded in the age group of 2-4 months (53%), whereas fractures in normal dogs were almost equally distributed between 2 and 8 months of age. Male dogs were affected significantly more often in both groups. In osteopenic bones, most fractures were recorded in the femur (56%), and they were distributed equally along the length of the bone. Whereas in normal bones, fractures were almost equally distributed in radius/ulna, femur and tibia, and were more often recorded at the middle and distal third of long bones. Oblique fractures were most common in both groups; however, comminuted fractures were more frequent in normal bones, whereas incomplete fractures were more common in osteopenic bones. Ninety-nine fracture cases treated with IM pinning (66 normal, 33 osteopenic) were evaluated for the status of fracture reduction and healing. In a majority of the cases (61%) with osteopenic bones, the diameter of the pin was relatively smaller than the diameter of the medullary cavity (<70-75%), whereas in 68% of the cases in normal bones the pin diameter was optimum. The status of fracture fixing was satisfactory to good in significantly more

  8. Bone scanning in the detection of occult fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Batillas, J.; Vasilas, A.; Pizzi, W.F.; Gokcebay, T.

    1981-07-01

    The potential role of bone scanning in the early detection of occult fractures following acute trauma was investigated. Technetium 99m pyrophosphate bone scans were obtained in patients with major clinical findings and negative or equivocal roentgenograms following trauma. Bone scanning facilitated the prompt diagnosis of occult fractures in the hip, knee, wrist, ribs and costochondral junctions, sternum, vertebrae, sacrum, and coccyx. Several illustrative cases are presented. Roentgenographic confirmation occurred following a delay of days to weeks and, in some instances, the roentgenographic findings were subtle and could be easily overlooked. This study demonstrates bone scanning to be invaluable and definitive in the prompt detection of occult fractures.

  9. Advanced Glycation End-products and Bone Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Vashishth, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Bone does not turn over uniformly, and becomes susceptible to post-translational modification by non-enzymatic glycation (NEG). NEG of bone causes the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) and this process is accelerated with aging, diabetes and antiresorptive postmenopausal osteoporosis therapy. Due to the elevated incidence of fracture associated with aging and diabetes, several studies have attempted to measure and evaluate AGEs as biomarkers for fracture risk. Here current methods of estimating AGEs in bone by liquid chromatography and fluorometric assay are summarized and the relationships between AGEs and fracture properties at whole bone, apparent tissue and matrix levels are discussed. PMID:27158323

  10. Surgical management of metastatic long bone fractures: principles and techniques.

    PubMed

    Scolaro, John Alan; Lackman, Richard D

    2014-02-01

    Management of metastatic long bone fractures requires identification of the lesion and the use of sound fracture fixation principles to relieve pain and restore function. The treating surgeon must understand the principles of pathologic fracture fixation before initiating treatment. Because these fractures occur in the context of a progressive systemic disease, management typically involves a multidisciplinary approach. When considering surgical stabilization of these fractures, the abnormal (or absent) healing environment associated with diseased bone and the overall condition of the patient must be taken into account. The goal of surgery is to obtain a rigid mechanical construct, which allows for early mobility and weight bearing. This can be achieved using internal fixation with polymethyl methacrylate cement or segmental resection and joint reconstruction. Prosthetic joint arthroplasty is a more reliable means of fracture management when insufficient bone is present for fixation. Prophylactic stabilization of impending pathologic fractures can reduce the morbidity associated with metastatic lesions.

  11. [Diagnosis of the scaphoid bone : Fractures, nonunion, circulation, perfusion].

    PubMed

    Kahl, T; Razny, F K; Benter, J P; Mutig, K; Hegenscheid, K; Mutze, S; Eisenschenk, A

    2016-11-01

    The clinical relevance of scaphoid bone fractures is reflected by their high incidence, accounting for approximately 60 % among carpal fractures and for 2-3 % of all fractures. With adequate therapy most scaphoid bone fractures heal completely without complications. Insufficient immobilization or undiagnosed fractures increase the risk of nonunion and the development of pseudarthrosis.X-ray examination enables initial diagnosis of scaphoid fracture in 70-80 % of cases. Positive clinical symptoms by negative x‑ray results require further diagnostics by multi-slice spiral CT (MSCT) or MRI to exclude or confirm a fracture. In addition to the diagnosis and description of fractures MSCT is helpful for determining the stage of nonunion. Contrast enhanced MRI is the best method to assess the vitality of scaphoid fragments.

  12. Probabilistic Risk Assessment for Astronaut Post Flight Bone Fracture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Beth; Myers, Jerry; Licata, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Space flight potentially reduces the loading that bone can resist before fracture. This reduction in bone integrity may result from a combination of factors, the most common reported as reduction in astronaut BMD. Although evaluating the condition of bones continues to be a critical aspect of understanding space flight fracture risk, defining the loading regime, whether on earth, in microgravity, or in reduced gravity on a planetary surface, remains a significant component of estimating the fracture risks to astronauts. This presentation summarizes the concepts, development, and application of NASA's Bone Fracture Risk Module (BFxRM) to understanding pre-, post, and in mission astronaut bone fracture risk. The overview includes an assessment of contributing factors utilized in the BFxRM and illustrates how new information, such as biomechanics of space suit design or better understanding of post flight activities may influence astronaut fracture risk. Opportunities for the bone mineral research community to contribute to future model development are also discussed. Methods: To investigate the conditions in which spaceflight induced changes to bone plays a critical role in post-flight fracture probability, we implement a modified version of the NASA Bone Fracture Risk Model (BFxRM). Modifications included incorporation of variations in physiological characteristics, post-flight recovery rate, and variations in lateral fall conditions within the probabilistic simulation parameter space. The modeled fracture probability estimates for different loading scenarios at preflight and at 0 and 365 days post-flight time periods are compared. Results: For simple lateral side falls, mean post-flight fracture probability is elevated over mean preflight fracture probability due to spaceflight induced BMD loss and is not fully recovered at 365 days post-flight. In the case of more energetic falls, such as from elevated heights or with the addition of lateral movement

  13. A Direct Role of Collagen Glycation in Bone Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Poundarik, Atharva A.; Wu, Ping-Cheng; Evis, Zafer; Sroga, Grazyna E.; Ural, Ani; Rubin, Mishaela; Vashishth, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Non-enzymatic glycation (NEG) is an age-related process accelerated by diseases like diabetes, and causes the accumulation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs). NEG-mediated modification of bone’s organic matrix, principally collagen type-I, has been implicated in impairing skeletal physiology and mechanics. Here, we present evidence, from in vitro and in vivo models, and establish a causal relationship between collagen glycation and alterations in bone fracture at multiple length scales. Through atomic force spectroscopy, we established that NEG impairs collagen’s ability to dissipate energy. Mechanical testing of in vitro glycated human bone specimen revealed that AGE accumulation due to NEG dramatically reduces the capacity of organic and mineralized matrix to creep and caused bone to fracture under impact at low levels of strain (3000–5000 μstrain) typically associated with fall. Fracture mechanics tests of NEG modified human cortical bone of varying ages, and their age-matched controls revealed that NEG disrupted microcracking based toughening mechanisms and reduced bone propagation and initiation fracture toughness across all age groups. A comprehensive mechanistic model, based on experimental and modeling data, was developed to explain how NEG and AGEs are causal to, and predictive of bone fragility. Furthermore, fracture mechanics and indentation testing on diabetic mice bones revealed that diabetes mediated NEG severely disrupts bone matrix quality in vivo. Finally, we show that AGEs are predictive of bone quality in aging humans and have diagnostic applications in fracture risk. PMID:26530231

  14. Maxillary antral bone grafts for repair of orbital fractures.

    PubMed

    Copeland, M; Meisner, J

    1991-04-01

    Use of bone from the maxillary antrum to repair defects in the orbital floor was described more than 20 years ago but has not been reported for correction of orbital rim fractures. The method is appealing because the source is contiguous with the recipient site; enhanced exposure might allow better fracture reduction and evacuation of debris and hematoma from the maxillary sinus. The intraoral approach also avoids an external incision and scar, prevents such complications as pneumothorax or dural perforation, and reduces postoperative pain. In 60 cases of orbital and zygomatic complex fractures seen between 1985 and 1990, less than 8% required more extensive graft material than the maxillary antra could provide. To assess the potential advantages of local over extraanatomical bone grafts, we evaluated maxillary antral bone grafts obtained through buccal sulcus incisions in 14 patients for restoration following fractures of the orbit. Several of these patients are described. Bone union was complete in all patients and there was no morbidity related to infection, oroantral fistula formation, dehiscence, or disfigurement. Sufficient bone was available from the uninvolved contralateral side to repair even severely comminuted fractures. In zygomatic complex fractures, maxillary antral grafts appeared to provide additional strength in the region of the fractured maxillary buttress. The success of the procedure in our experience, coupled with the safety of bone harvesting from this source, and the avoidance of an external scar make maxillary antral bone well suited to reconstruction of all areas of the orbit.

  15. Diabetes and Its Effect on Bone and Fracture Healing

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Hongli; Xiao, E.; Graves, Dana T.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that increases fracture risk and interferes with bone formation and impairs fracture healing. Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) both increase fracture risk and have several common features that affect bone including hyperglycemia and increased AGE formation, ROS generation, and inflammation. These factors affect both osteoblasts and osteoclasts lead to increased osteoclasts and reduced numbers of osteoblasts and bone formation. In addition to fracture healing, T1DM and T2DM impair bone formation under conditions of perturbation such as bacteria induced periodontal bone loss, which reduces expression of factors that stimulate osteoblasts such as BMPs and growth factors and increase osteoblast apoptosis. PMID:26254939

  16. Advances in the fracture mechanics of cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Bonfield, W

    1987-01-01

    As cortical bone is a semi-brittle solid, its fracture is dependent not only on the magnitude of the applied stress, but also on the nature of any intrinsic or introduced cracks. Consequently a variety of fracture mechanics techniques have been utilised to evaluate the fracture toughness of cortical bone, including the single edge notched, centre notched cylindrical and compact tension methods, and values have been established for the critical stress intensity factor (Kc) and the critical strain energy release rate (Gc). The Kc and Gc values obtained depend on the orientation of the cortical bone, as well as on bone density, the velocity of crack propagation and specimen geometry. The significance of these fracture mechanics parameters for cortical bone is critically reviewed.

  17. [Pathological proximal femur fracture: consider also primary bone tumour].

    PubMed

    van de Sande, Michiel A J; van Rijswijk, Carla S P; Dijkstra, P D Sander; Taminiau, Antonie M H

    2010-01-01

    Two male and one female patient, aged 64, 70 and 51 respectively, were surgically treated for pathological fracture of the proximal femur without preoperative biopsy. In contrast to their benign radiological diagnosis, all three patients were finally diagnosed as having a malignant primary bone tumour. The proximal femur is the primary location of pathological fractures in the appendicular skeleton. Metastases to bone are the most common cause of a destructive lesion of the skeleton in an adult. Although rare, a primary bone tumour must be included in differential diagnosis of a pathological fracture. A systematic diagnostic strategy is critical to avoid complications that make curative treatment impossible. A solitary bone lesion seen on radiography should never be assumed to be a bone metastasis. Without further diagnostic research, surgical treatment for a pathological fracture should never be commenced before a definitive diagnosis is made.

  18. Bone mass, size and previous fractures as predictors of prospective fractures in an osteoporotic referral population.

    PubMed

    Eklund, Fredrik; Nordström, Anna; Björnstig, Ulf; Nordström, Peter

    2009-10-01

    The influence of bone mass, bone size and previous low energy fractures upon prospective fractures has not been investigated in a referral osteoporotic population. We investigated the association between bone mass, bone size, previous fractures, body constitution, and prospective validated fractures in 5701 women and 1376 men, aged 30 years and older. Bone mass measurements of the femoral neck were collected at a single study center in Sweden. Most of the subjects were measured on suspicion of osteoporosis. Data on validated low energy retrospective and prospective fractures in the cohort were collected from the corresponding health care district. Bone mineral density (BMD, g/cm(2)) and estimated volumetric BMD (vBMD, g/cm(3)) were shown to be good independent predictors for fracture in both women and men (Hazard ratio per standard deviation decrease (HR)=1.27-1.52, p<0.05). Bone size did not predict prospective fractures in either sex (HR=0.91-0.99, p>0.05), and bone size completely explained the higher BMD in men than in women. In women, retrospective low energy fractures (HR=1.78, p<0.001) and height (HR=1.02, p=0.006) were additional independent predictors of osteoporotic fractures after adjusting for age and BMD. In conclusion, we show that in a large osteoporotic referral population, age, BMD and previous fractures are independent predictors of prospective low energy fractures. These results add additional strength to the recent change in focus towards a multivariate analysis when assessing the future risk of fracture.

  19. Closed reduction of a fractured bone

    MedlinePlus

    Fracture reduction - closed ... pain medicine you receive. There may be new fractures that occur with the reduction. If the reduction ... BD, Jupiter JBl, Krettek C, Anderson PA. Closed fracture management. In: Browner BD, Jupiter JB, Krettek C, ...

  20. Prediction of osteoporotic fractures by postural instability and bone density.

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, T; Sambrook, P; Kelly, P; Jones, G; Lord, S; Freund, J; Eisman, J

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate the utility of risk factors such as bone mineral density, lifestyle, and postural stability in the prediction of osteoporotic fractures. DESIGN--Longitudinal, epidemiological, and population based survey. SETTING--City of Dubbo, New South Wales. SUBJECTS--All residents of Dubbo aged > or = 60 on 1 January 1989. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Incidence of fracture for individual subjects. RESULTS--The overall incidence of atraumatic fractures in men and women was 1.9% and 3.1% per annum respectively. The predominant sites of fracture were hip (18.9%), distal radius (18.5%), ribs and humerus (11.9% in each case), and ankle and foot (9.1% and 6.6% respectively). Major predictors of fractures in men and women were femoral neck bone mineral density, body sway, and quadriceps strength. Age, years since menopause, height, weight, and lifestyle factors were also correlated with bone mineral density and body sway and hence were indirect risk factors for fracture. Discriminant function analysis correctly identified 96% and 93% (sensitivities 88% and 81%) of men and women, respectively, who subsequently developed atraumatic fractures. Predictions based on this model indicated that a woman with a bone mineral density in the lowest quartile in the hip together with high body sway had a 8.4% probability of fracture per annum. This represented an almost 14-fold increase in risk of fracture compared with a woman in the highest bone mineral density quartile with low postural sway. An individual with all three predictors in the "highest risk" quartile had a 13.1% risk of fracture per annum. CONCLUSIONS--Bone mineral density, body sway, and muscle strength are independent and powerful synergistic predictors of fracture incidence. PMID:8251809

  1. Equine cortical bone exhibits rising R-curve fracture mechanics.

    PubMed

    Malik, C L; Stover, S M; Martin, R B; Gibeling, J C

    2003-02-01

    Previous studies of the fracture properties of cortical bone have suggested that the fracture toughness increases with crack length, which is indicative of rising R-curve behavior. Based on this indirect evidence and the similarity of bone to ceramic matrix composites, we hypothesized that bone would exhibit rising R-curve behavior in the transverse orientation and that the characteristics of the R-curves would be regionally dependent within the cortex due to variations in bone microstructure and toughening mechanisms. To test these hypotheses, we conducted R-curve experiments on specimens from equine third metacarpal bones using standard fracture mechanics testing methods. Compact type specimens from the dorsal and lateral regions in the middle of the diaphysis were oriented for crack propagation transverse to the longitudinal axis of the bone. The test results demonstrate that equine cortical bone exhibits rising R-curve behavior during transverse crack propagation as hypothesized. Statistical analyses of the crack growth initiation toughness, K0, the peak toughness, Kpeak, and the crack extension at peak toughness, deltaa, revealed significant regional differences in these characteristics. Specifically, the lateral cortex displayed higher crack growth initiation and peak toughnesses. The dorsal cortex exhibited greater crack extension at the peak of crack growth resistance. Scanning electron microscopy revealed osteon pullout on fracture surfaces from the dorsal cortex and but not in the lateral cortex. Taken together, the significant differences in R-curves and the SEM fractography indicate that the fracture mechanisms acting in equine cortical bone are regionally dependent.

  2. [Glucocorticoid and Bone. Fracture risk of steroid-induced osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Saeko

    2014-09-01

    Bone loss occurred early after starting oral glucocorticoid (GC) therapy and the risk of fracture increased rapidly within 3 to 6 months. Fracture risk decreased rapidly after stopping GC therapy. Strong relationships were found between cumulative dose of GC and loss of BMD and between daily dose and fracture risk. Short term use, intermittent use, and inhaled use of higher dose of GC increased fracture risk. There are insufficient data to determine if short term use, intermittent use, or inhaled use of lower dose of GC increased the fracture risk.

  3. Bone metabolism and fracture risk in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Toru; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu

    2012-01-01

    Osteoporosis and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), both prevalent in aging and westernized societies, adversely affect the health of elderly people by causing fractures and vascular complications, respectively. Recent experimental and clinical studies show that the disorders are etiologically related through the actions of osteocalcin and adiponectin. Meta-analyses of multiple clinical studies show that the hip fracture risk of T2DM patients is increased 1.4-1.7-fold compared with non-DM controls, even though the patients' bone mineral density (BMD) is not diminished. Vertebral fracture risk of the T2DM patients is also increased, and BMD measurement is not sensitive enough to assess this risk. These findings suggest that bone fragility in T2DM patients depends on bone quality deterioration rather than bone mass reduction. Surrogate markers are therefore needed to supplement the partial effectiveness of BMD testing in assessing the fracture risk of the T2DM patients. Markers related to advanced glycation end products may be candidates. These substances modulate bone quality in DM. Until research establishes the usefulness of surrogate markers, physicians should assess fracture risk in T2DM patients not only by measuring the BMD, but also by taking a fracture history and evaluating prior vertebral fractures using spinal X-rays.

  4. [Pathological and metabolic bone diseases: Clinical importance for fracture treatment].

    PubMed

    Oheim, R

    2015-12-01

    Pathological and metabolic bone diseases are common and relevant occurrences in orthopedics and trauma surgery; however, fractures are often treated as being the illness itself and not seen as the symptom of an underlying bone disease. This is why further diagnostics and systemic treatment options are often insufficiently considered in the routine treatment of fractures. This review focuses on osteoporosis, osteopetrosis, hypophosphatasia and Paget's disease of bone.In patients with osteoporotic vertebral or proximal femur fractures, pharmaceutical treatment to prevent subsequent fractures is an integral part of fracture therapy together with surgical treatment. Osteopetrosis is caused by compromised osteoclastic bone resorption; therefore, even in the face of an elevated bone mass, vitamin D3 supplementation is crucial to avoid clinically relevant hypocalcemia. Unspecific symptoms of the musculoskeletal system, especially together with stress fractures, are typically found in patients suffering from hypophosphatasia. In these patients measurement of alkaline phosphatase shows reduced enzyme activity. Elevated levels of alkaline phosphatase are found in Paget's disease of bone where bisphosphonates are still the treatment of choice.

  5. Mortality associated with bone fractures in COPD patients

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Yasunaga, Hideo; Sakamoto, Yukiyo; Hasegawa, Wakae; Takeshima, Hideyuki; Urushiyama, Hirokazu; Jo, Taisuke; Matsui, Hiroki; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Nagase, Takahide

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective COPD is well known to frequently coexist with osteoporosis. Bone fractures often occur and may affect mortality in COPD patients. However, in-hospital mortality related to bone fractures in COPD patients has been poorly studied. This retrospective study investigated in-hospital mortality of COPD patients with bone fractures using a national inpatient database in Japan. Methods Data of COPD patients admitted with bone fractures, including hip, vertebra, shoulder, and forearm fractures to 1,165 hospitals in Japan between July 2010 and March 2013, were extracted from the Diagnosis Procedure Combination database. The clinical characteristics and mortalities of the patients were determined. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was also performed to determine the factors associated with in-hospital mortality of COPD patients with hip fractures. Results Among 5,975 eligible patients, those with hip fractures (n=4,059) were older, had lower body mass index (BMI), and had poorer general condition than those with vertebral (n=1,477), shoulder (n=281), or forearm (n=158) fractures. In-hospital mortality was 7.4%, 5.2%, 3.9%, and 1.3%, respectively. Among the hip fracture group, surgical treatment was significantly associated with lower mortality (adjusted odds ratio, 0.43; 95% confidence interval, 0.32–0.56) after adjustment for patient backgrounds. Higher in-hospital mortality was associated with male sex, lower BMI, lower level of consciousness, and having several comorbidities, including pneumonia, lung cancer, congestive heart failure, chronic liver disease, and chronic renal failure. Conclusion COPD patients with hip fractures had higher mortality than COPD patients with other types of fracture. Surgery for hip fracture was associated with lower mortality than conservative treatment. PMID:27703343

  6. Identifying novel clinical surrogates to assess human bone fracture toughness

    PubMed Central

    Granke, Mathilde; Makowski, Alexander J; Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Does, Mark D; Nyman, Jeffry S

    2015-01-01

    Fracture risk does not solely depend on strength but also on fracture toughness, i.e. the ability of bone material to resist crack initiation and propagation. Because resistance to crack growth largely depends on bone properties at the tissue level including collagen characteristics, current X-ray based assessment tools may not be suitable to identify age-, disease-, or treatment-related changes in fracture toughness. To identify useful clinical surrogates that could improve the assessment of fracture resistance, we investigated the potential of 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and reference point indentation (RPI) to explain age-related variance in fracture toughness. Harvested from cadaveric femurs (62 human donors), single-edge notched beam (SENB) specimens of cortical bone underwent fracture toughness testing (R-curve method). NMR-derived bound water showed the strongest correlation with fracture toughness properties (r=0.63 for crack initiation, r=0.35 for crack growth, and r=0.45 for overall fracture toughness; p<0.01). Multivariate analyses indicated that the age-related decrease in different fracture toughness properties were best explained by a combination of NMR properties including pore water and RPI-derived tissue stiffness with age as a significant covariate (adjusted R2 = 53.3%, 23.9%, and 35.2% for crack initiation, crack growth, and overall toughness, respectively; p<0.001). These findings reflect the existence of many contributors to fracture toughness and emphasize the utility of a multimodal assessment of fracture resistance. Exploring the mechanistic origin of fracture toughness, glycation-mediated, non-enzymatic collagen crosslinks and intra-cortical porosity are possible determinants of bone fracture toughness and could explain the sensitivity of NMR to changes in fracture toughness. Assuming fracture toughness is clinically important to the ability of bone to resist fracture, our results suggest that improvements in fracture

  7. Identifying Novel Clinical Surrogates to Assess Human Bone Fracture Toughness.

    PubMed

    Granke, Mathilde; Makowski, Alexander J; Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Does, Mark D; Nyman, Jeffry S

    2015-07-01

    Fracture risk does not solely depend on strength but also on fracture toughness; ie, the ability of bone material to resist crack initiation and propagation. Because resistance to crack growth largely depends on bone properties at the tissue level, including collagen characteristics, current X-ray based assessment tools may not be suitable to identify age-related, disease-related, or treatment-related changes in fracture toughness. To identify useful clinical surrogates that could improve the assessment of fracture resistance, we investigated the potential of (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and reference point indentation (RPI) to explain age-related variance in fracture toughness. Harvested from cadaveric femurs (62 human donors), single-edge notched beam (SENB) specimens of cortical bone underwent fracture toughness testing (R-curve method). NMR-derived bound water showed the strongest correlation with fracture toughness properties (r = 0.63 for crack initiation, r = 0.35 for crack growth, and r = 0.45 for overall fracture toughness; p < 0.01). Multivariate analyses indicated that the age-related decrease in different fracture toughness properties were best explained by a combination of NMR properties including pore water and RPI-derived tissue stiffness with age as a significant covariate (adjusted R(2)  = 53.3%, 23.9%, and 35.2% for crack initiation, crack growth, and overall toughness, respectively; p < 0.001). These findings reflect the existence of many contributors to fracture toughness and emphasize the utility of a multimodal assessment of fracture resistance. Exploring the mechanistic origin of fracture toughness, glycation-mediated nonenzymatic collagen crosslinks and intracortical porosity are possible determinants of bone fracture toughness and could explain the sensitivity of NMR to changes in fracture toughness. Assuming fracture toughness is clinically important to the ability of bone to resist fracture

  8. Method for improved prediction of bone fracture risk using bone mineral density in structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cann, Christopher E. (Inventor); Faulkner, Kenneth G. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A non-invasive in-vivo method of analyzing a bone for fracture risk includes obtaining data from the bone such as by computed tomography or projection imaging which data represents a measure of bone material characteristics such as bone mineral density. The distribution of the bone material characteristics is used to generate a finite element method (FEM) mesh from which load capability of the bone can be determined. In determining load capability, the bone is mathematically compressed, and stress, strain force, force/area versus bone material characteristics are determined.

  9. Basic concepts regarding fracture healing and the current options and future directions in managing bone fractures.

    PubMed

    Bigham-Sadegh, Amin; Oryan, Ahmad

    2015-06-01

    Fracture healing is a complex physiological process, which involves a well-orchestrated series of biological events. Repair of large bone defects resulting from trauma, tumours, osteitis, delayed unions, non-unions, osteotomies, arthrodesis and multifragmentary fractures is a current challenge of surgeons and investigators. Different therapeutic modalities have been developed to enhance the healing response and fill the bone defects. Different types of growth factors, stem cells, natural grafts (autografts, allografts or xenografts) and biologic- and synthetic-based tissue-engineered scaffolds are some of the examples. Nevertheless, these organic and synthetic materials and therapeutic agents have some significant limitations, and there are still no well-approved treatment modalities to meet all the expected requirements. Bone tissue engineering is a newer option than the traditional grafts and may overcome many limitations of the bone graft. To select an appropriate treatment strategy in achieving a successful and secure healing, more information concerning injuries of bones, their healing process and knowledge of the factors involved are required. The main goals of this work are to present different treatment modalities of the fractured bones and to explain how fractures normally heal and what factors interfere with fracture healing. This study provides an overview of the processes of fracture healing and discusses the current therapeutic strategies that have been claimed to be effective in accelerating fracture healing.

  10. The fracture properties and toughening mechanisms of bone and dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koester, Kurt John

    The mechanical properties of bone and dentin and in particular their fracture properties, are the subject of intense research. The relevance of these properties is increasing as our population ages and fracture incidence impacts the lives of a greater portion of the population. A robust framework is needed to understand the fracture properties of bone and dentin to guide researchers as they attempt to characterize the effects of aging, disease, and pharmaceutical treatments on the properties of these mineralized tissues. In the present work, this framework is provided and applied to human bone, human dentin, and animal bone. In situ electron microscopy was also used to identify the salient toughening mechanisms in bone and dentin. It was found that bone and dentin are extrinsically toughened materials and consequently their fracture properties are best characterized utilizing a crack-growth resistance approach. A description of the different mechanical measurements commonly employed when using small animal models (rats and mice) to evaluate the influence of drug therapies on bone fragility is provided. A study where these properties were measured for a large population of wild-type rats and mice was also conducted. Given my findings, it was determined that for the most complete understanding of small animal bone it was necessary to measure strength and toughness. Strength measurements probe the flaw distribution and toughness measurements to evaluate the resistance to facture in the presence of a single dominant worst-case flaw.

  11. Evaluation of bone surrogates for indirect and direct ballistic fractures.

    PubMed

    Bir, Cynthia; Andrecovich, Chris; DeMaio, Marlene; Dougherty, Paul J

    2016-04-01

    The mechanism of injury for fractures to long bones has been studied for both direct ballistic loading as well as indirect. However, the majority of these studies have been conducted on both post-mortem human subjects (PMHS) and animal surrogates which have constraints in terms of storage, preparation and testing. The identification of a validated bone surrogate for use in forensic, medical and engineering testing would provide the ability to investigate ballistic loading without these constraints. Two specific bone surrogates, Sawbones and Synbone, were evaluated in comparison to PMHS for both direct and indirect ballistic loading. For the direct loading, the mean velocity to produce fracture was 121 ± 19 m/s for the PMHS, which was statistically different from the Sawbones (140 ± 7 m/s) and Synbone (146 ± 3 m/s). The average distance to fracture in the indirect loading was .70 cm for the PMHS. The Synbone had a statistically similar average distance to fracture (.61 cm, p=0.54) however the Sawbones average distance to fracture was statistically different (.41 cm, p<0.05). Fractures patterns were found to be comparable to the PMHS for tests conducted with Synbones, however the input parameters were slightly varied to produce similar results. The fractures patterns with the Sawbones were not found to be as comparable to the PMHS. An ideal bone surrogate for ballistic testing was not identified and future work is warranted.

  12. [Mechanobiology and bone metabolism: Clinical relevance for fracture treatment].

    PubMed

    Haffner-Luntzer, M; Liedert, A; Ignatius, A

    2015-12-01

    Mechanical stimuli are known to significantly influence bone metabolism and fracture healing. Various studies have demonstrated the involvement of complex molecular mechanotransduction pathways, such as the Wnt/beta-catenin, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and estrogen receptor signaling pathways in mechanotransduction. Mechanotransduction is influenced by aging and the comorbidities of the patient. Pharmacological modulation of signal transduction influences bone formation and the mechanosensitivity of skeletal tissue. The combination of pharmacological and biomechanical therapies may be useful for the treatment of fractures with impaired healing.

  13. Novel Therapeutic Strategy for the Prevention of Bone Fractures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    loss of muscle and bone mass with age Aging; Osteoporosis ; Fractures 7 mhamrick@georgiahealth.edu Table of Contents...the bone marrow microenvironment with aging, revealing a novel therapeutic target for the prevention of osteoporosis .  Discovery that the myostatin...expression. Growth Factors. 2011 Hamrick, MW. A role for myokines in muscle-bone interactions. Exercise & Sports Science Reviews 39: 43-47

  14. Assessment of the Genetic Variation in Bone Fracture Healing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-01

    variations in both structural and material properties of bone development will be recapitulated in the developmental mechanism(s) that controls the bone’s... structural geometry and material properties during fracture healing. Two goals were set out in the proposal to test this hypothesis. The first was to...determine how variations in basic bone structure and material properties in three in bred strains of mice is translated into the healing process of

  15. Bone mineral density predicts fractures in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    West, Sarah L; Lok, Charmaine E; Langsetmo, Lisa; Cheung, Angela M; Szabo, Eva; Pearce, Dawn; Fusaro, Maria; Wald, Ron; Weinstein, Jordan; Jamal, Sophie A

    2015-05-01

    Fractures are common in chronic kidney disease (CKD). The optimal methods by which to assess fracture risk are unknown, in part, due to a lack of prospective studies. We determined if bone mineral density (BMD) by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and/or high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HRpQCT) could predict fractures in men and women ≥18 years old with stages 3 to 5 CKD. BMD was measured by DXA (at the total hip, lumbar spine, ultradistal, and 1/3 radius) and by HRpQCT (at the radius), and subjects were followed for 2 years for incident morphometric spine fractures and low-trauma clinical fractures. The mean age of the subjects was 62 years with equal numbers having stages 3, 4, and 5 CKD. Over 2 years there were 51 fractures in 35 subjects. BMD by DXA at baseline was significantly lower at all sites among those with incident fractures versus those without. For example, the mean BMD at the total hip in those with incident fractures was 0.77 g/cm2 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.73 to 0.80) and in those without fracture was 0.95 g/cm2 (95% CI, 0.92 to 0.98). Almost all baseline HRpQCT measures were lower in those with incident fracture versus those without. For example, volumetric BMD in those with incident fractures was 232 mg HA/cm3 (95% CI, 213 to 251) and in those without fracture was 317.6 mg HA/cm3 (95% CI, 306 to 329.1). Bone loss occurred in all subjects, but was significantly greater among those with incident fractures. Our data demonstrate that low BMD (by DXA and HRpQCT) and a greater annualized percent decrease in BMD are risk factors for subsequent fracture in men and women with predialysis CKD.

  16. Inflammation, bone loss and fracture risk in spondyloarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Briot, Karine; Roux, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis (ie, low bone mineral density) is common in ankylosing spondylitis, related to both systemic inflammation and decreased mobility. Vertebral fracture risk is increased; acute back pain in these patients is not always a flare-up of the disease, as it can be related to bone complications. Intervertebral disc fractures in the ankylosed spine are associated with severe neurological complications. As expected from pathophysiology, treatments effective against inflammation have a positive effect on bone, and prospective open studies have shown that tumour-necrosis-factor blockers can improve bone mineral density at the spine and the hip. There is so far no evidence of a decreased risk of fractures with such treatment. PMID:26509065

  17. Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    A fracture is a break, usually in a bone. If the broken bone punctures the skin, it is called an open ... falls, or sports injuries. Other causes are low bone density and osteoporosis, which cause weakening of the ...

  18. In Vitro Fracture of Human Cortical Bone: Local Fracture Criteria and Toughening Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Nalla, R; Stolken, J; Kinney, J; Ritchie, R

    2004-08-18

    A micro-mechanistic understanding of bone fracture that encompasses how cracks interact with the underlying microstructure and defines their local failure mode is lacking, despite extensive research on the response of bone to a variety of factors like aging, loading, and/or disease. Micro-mechanical models for fracture incorporating such local failure criteria have been widely developed for metallic and ceramic materials systems; however, few such deliberations have been undertaken for the fracture of bone. In fact, although the fracture event in mineralized tissues such as bone is commonly believed to be locally strain controlled, until recently there has been little experimental evidence to support this widely held belief. In the present study, a series of in vitro experiments involving a double-notch bend test geometry are performed in order to shed further light on the nature of the local cracking events that precede catastrophic fracture in bone and to define their relationship to the microstructure. Specifically, crack-microstructure interactions are examined to determine the salient toughening mechanisms in human cortical bone and to characterize how these may affect the anisotropy in fracture properties. Based on preliminary micro-mechanical models of these processes, in particular crack deflection and uncracked ligament bridging, the relative importance of these toughening mechanisms is established.

  19. Development of an injectable pseudo-bone thermo-gel for application in small bone fractures.

    PubMed

    Kondiah, Pariksha J; Choonara, Yahya E; Kondiah, Pierre P D; Kumar, Pradeep; Marimuthu, Thashree; du Toit, Lisa C; Pillay, Viness

    2017-03-30

    A pseudo-bone thermo-gel was synthesized and evaluated for its physicochemical, mechanical and rheological properties, with its application to treat small bone fractures. The pseudo-bone thermo-gel was proven to have thermo-responsive properties, behaving as a solution in temperatures below 25°C, and forming a gelling technology when maintained at physiological conditions. Poly propylene fumerate (PPF), Pluronic F127 and PEG-PCL-PEG were strategically blended, obtaining a thermo-responsive delivery system, to mimic the mechanical properties of bone with sufficient matrix hardness and resilience. A Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) class II drug, simvastatin, was loaded in the pseudo-bone thermo-gel, selected for its bone healing properties. In vitro release analysis was undertaken on a series of experimental formulations, with the ideal formulations obtaining its maximum controlled drug release profile up to 14days. Ex vivo studies were undertaken on an induced 4mm diameter butterfly-fractured osteoporotic human clavicle bone samples. X-ray, ultrasound as well as textural analysis, undertaken on the fractured bones before and after treatment displayed significant bone filling, matrix hardening and matrix resilience properties. These characteristics of the pseudo-bone thermo-gel thus proved significant potential for application in small bone fractures.

  20. How tough is bone? Application of elastic-plastic fracture mechanics to bone.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jiahau; Mecholsky, John J; Clifton, Kari B

    2007-02-01

    Bone, with a hierarchical structure that spans from the nano-scale to the macro-scale and a composite design composed of nano-sized mineral crystals embedded in an organic matrix, has been shown to have several toughening mechanisms that increases its toughness. These mechanisms can stop, slow, or deflect crack propagation and cause bone to have a moderate amount of apparent plastic deformation before fracture. In addition, bone contains a high volumetric percentage of organics and water that makes it behave nonlinearly before fracture. Many researchers used strength or critical stress intensity factor (fracture toughness) to characterize the mechanical property of bone. However, these parameters do not account for the energy spent in plastic deformation before bone fracture. To accurately describe the mechanical characteristics of bone, we applied elastic-plastic fracture mechanics to study bone's fracture toughness. The J integral, a parameter that estimates both the energies consumed in the elastic and plastic deformations, was used to quantify the total energy spent before bone fracture. Twenty cortical bone specimens were cut from the mid-diaphysis of bovine femurs. Ten of them were prepared to undergo transverse fracture and the other 10 were prepared to undergo longitudinal fracture. The specimens were prepared following the apparatus suggested in ASTM E1820 and tested in distilled water at 37 degrees C. The average J integral of the transverse-fractured specimens was found to be 6.6 kPa m, which is 187% greater than that of longitudinal-fractured specimens (2.3 kPa m). The energy spent in the plastic deformation of the longitudinal-fractured and transverse-fractured bovine specimens was found to be 3.6-4.1 times the energy spent in the elastic deformation. This study shows that the toughness of bone estimated using the J integral is much greater than the toughness measured using the critical stress intensity factor. We suggest that the J integral method is

  1. Bone imaging and fracture risk assessment in kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Sophie A; Nickolas, Thomas L

    2015-06-01

    Fractures are more common and are associated with greater morbidity and morality in patients with kidney disease than in members of the general population. Thus, it is troubling that in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients there has been a paradoxical increase in fracture rates over the past 20 years compared to the general population. Increased fracture incidence in CKD patients may be driven in part by the lack of screening for fracture risk. In the general population, dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is the clinical standard to stratify fracture risk, and its use has contributed to decreases in fracture incidence. In contrast, in CKD, fracture risk screening with DXA has been uncommon due to its unclear efficacy in predicting fracture and its inability to predict type of renal osteodystrophy. Recently, several prospective studies conducted in patients across the spectrum of kidney disease have demonstrated that bone mineral density measured by DXA predicts future fracture risk and that clinically relevant information regarding fracture risk is provided by application of the World Health Organization cutoffs for osteopenia and osteoporosis to DXA measures. Furthermore, novel high-resolution imaging tools, such as high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT), have been used to elucidate the effects of kidney disease on cortical and trabecular microarchitecture and bone strength and to identify potential targets for strategies that protect against fractures. This review will discuss the updated epidemiology of fractures in CKD, fracture risk screening by DXA, and the utility of state-of-the art imaging methods to uncover the effects of kidney disease on the skeleton.

  2. New regenerative treatment for tooth and periodontal bone defect associated with posttraumatic alveolar bone crush fracture.

    PubMed

    Kiyokawa, Kensuke; Kiyokawa, Munekatsu; Takagi, Mikako; Rikimaru, Hideaki; Fukaya, Takuji

    2009-05-01

    We developed a new regenerative treatment of tooth and periodontal defect and tooth dislocation associated with posttraumatic alveolar bone crush fracture in the region of the maxillary anterior teeth. Using this method, dislocated teeth are first extracted and crushed alveolar bone is debrided. The dislocated teeth are then reimplanted, and cancellous iliac bone (bone marrow) is grafted to the area surrounding the teeth to regenerate periodontal bone. Tooth reimplantation was completely successful in 2 cases, and periodontal bone regenerated to a sufficient height with the iliac bone graft. Compared with the general method of treatment with a prosthesis (bridge), when using this method to treat cases such as these, there is no sacrifice of healthy teeth adjacent to the defect, and sufficient esthetic and functional recovery is possible. It is thought that this method could be applied as a new treatment of alveolar bone fracture in the future.

  3. Axial and appendicular bone density predict fractures in older women

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, D. M.; Cummings, S. R.; Genant, H. K.; Nevitt, M. C.; Palermo, L.; Browner, W.

    1992-01-01

    To determine whether measurement of hip and spine bone mass by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) predicts fractures in women and to compare the predictive value of DEXA with that of single-photon absorptiometry (SPA) of appendicular sites, we prospectively studied 8134 nonblack women age 65 years and older who had both DEXA and SPA measurements of bone mass. A total of 208 nonspine fractures, including 37 wrist fractures, occurred during the follow-up period, which averaged 0.7 years. The risk of fracture was inversely related to bone density at all measurement sites. After adjusting for age, the relative risks per decrease of 1 standard deviation in bone density for the occurrence of any fracture was 1.40 for measurement at the proximal femur (95% confidence interval 1.20-1.63) and 1.35 (1.15-1.58) for measurement at the spine. Results were similar for all regions of the proximal femur as well as SPA measurements at the calcaneus, distal radius, and proximal radius. None of these measurements was a significantly better predictor of fractures than the others. Furthermore, measurement of the distal radius was not a better predictor of wrist fracture (relative risk 1.64: 95% CI 1.13-2.37) than other sites, such as the lumbar spine (RR 1.56; CI 1.07-2.26), the femoral neck (RR 1.65; CI 1.12-2.41), or the calcaneus (RR 1.83; CI 1.26-2.64). We conclude that the inverse relationship between bone mass and risk of fracture in older women is similar for absorptiometric measurements made at the hip, spine, and appendicular sites.

  4. Mechanical design optimization of bioabsorbable fixation devices for bone fractures.

    PubMed

    Lovald, Scott T; Khraishi, Tariq; Wagner, Jon; Baack, Bret

    2009-03-01

    Bioabsorbable bone plates can eliminate the necessity for a permanent implant when used to fixate fractures of the human mandible. They are currently not in widespread use because of the low strength of the materials and the requisite large volume of the resulting bone plate. The aim of the current study was to discover a minimally invasive bioabsorbable bone plate design that can provide the same mechanical stability as a standard titanium bone plate. A finite element model of a mandible with a fracture in the body region is subjected to bite loads that are common to patients postsurgery. The model is used first to determine benchmark stress and strain values for a titanium plate. These values are then set as the limits within which the bioabsorbable bone plate must comply. The model is then modified to consider a bone plate made of the polymer poly-L/DL-lactide 70/30. An optimization routine is run to determine the smallest volume of bioabsorbable bone plate that can perform and a titanium bone plate when fixating fractures of this considered type. Two design parameters are varied for the bone plate design during the optimization analysis. The analysis determined that a strut style poly-L-lactide-co-DL-lactide plate of 690 mm2 can provide as much mechanical stability as a similar titanium design structure of 172 mm2. The model has determined a bioabsorbable bone plate design that is as strong as a titanium plate when fixating fractures of the load-bearing mandible. This is an intriguing outcome, considering that the polymer material has only 6% of the stiffness of titanium.

  5. Micro-CT evaluation of bone defects: applications to osteolytic bone metastases, bone cysts, and fracture.

    PubMed

    Buie, Helen R; Bosma, Nick A; Downey, Charlene M; Jirik, Frank R; Boyd, Steven K

    2013-11-01

    Bone defects can occur in various forms and present challenges to performing a standard micro-CT evaluation of bone quality because most measures are suited to homogeneous structures rather than ones with spatially focal abnormalities. Such defects are commonly associated with pain and fragility. Research involving bone defects requires quantitative approaches to be developed if micro-CT is to be employed. In this study, we demonstrate that measures of inter-microarchitectural bone spacing are sensitive to the presence of focal defects in the proximal tibia of two distinctly different mouse models: a burr-hole model for fracture healing research, and a model of osteolytic bone metastases. In these models, the cortical and trabecular bone compartments were both affected by the defect and were, therefore, evaluated as a single unit to avoid splitting the defects into multiple analysis regions. The burr-hole defect increased mean spacing (Sp) by 27.6%, spacing standard deviation (SpSD) by 113%, and maximum spacing (Spmax) by 72.8%. Regression modeling revealed SpSD (β=0.974, p<0.0001) to be a significant predictor of the defect volume (R(2)=0.949) and Spmax (β=0.712, p<0.0001) and SpSD (β=0.271, p=0.022) to be significant predictors of the defect diameter (R(2)=0.954). In the mice with osteolytic bone metastases, spacing parameters followed similar patterns of change as reflected by other imaging technologies, specifically bioluminescence data which is indicative of tumor burden. These data highlight the sensitivity of spacing measurements to bone architectural abnormalities from 3D micro-CT data and provide a tool for quantitative evaluation of defects within a bone.

  6. [Effect of vitamin D on bone mineral density; bone strength and fracture prevention].

    PubMed

    Okuizumi, Hiroyasu; Harada, Atsushi

    2006-07-01

    Although vitamin D improves bone mineral density 0.66% per year at spine site and 1.23% per year at femoral neck site, respectively, vitamin D is useful for preventing osteoporotic fractures, especially hip fractures in the elderly. Vitamin D affects microstructure and bone turnover for osteoporotic bone to become strong bone. And vitamin D improves muscle function to prevent falls in the elderly. Moreover the appropriate amount and treatment target of vitamin D must be considered for the elderly with many different diseases.

  7. Estimating the timing of long bone fractures: correlation between the postmortem interval, bone moisture content, and blunt force trauma fracture characteristics*.

    PubMed

    Wieberg, Danielle A M; Wescott, Daniel J

    2008-09-01

    There is very limited knowledge about how long perimortem fracture characteristics persist into the postmortem interval (PMI). Therefore, in this study, 60 porcine long bones were exposed to natural taphonomic conditions and fractured with a steel bone breaking apparatus every 28 days throughout a 141-day period. Differences between macroscopic blunt force trauma fracture characteristics (fracture angle, surface morphology, and outline) were examined to determine if they varied over time or in relationship to bone moisture content (ash weight) and overall assessment. There are significant relationships between (1) PMI and percent ash weight (%AW), fracture surface, and fracture angle and (2) %AW and fracture surface and fracture angle. Bone moisture content correlates significantly with fracture morphology and other characteristics commonly used by forensic anthropologists to determine the timing of traumatic injuries. However, fracture characteristics normally associated with perimortem trauma can persist long into the PMI.

  8. Modeling orthotropic elasticity, localized plasticity and fracture in trabecular bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, D. T.; Elkhodary, K. I.; Fouad, Y.; Greene, M. S.; Sabet, F. A.; Qian, J.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, W. K.; Jasiuk, I.

    2016-09-01

    This work develops a model for the mechanical response of trabecular bone including plasticity, damage and fracture. It features a resultant lamellar orientation that captures trabecular strut anisotropic elasticity, and introduces asymmetric J2 plasticity with isotropic hardening to capture evolving strut tensile and compressive dissipative properties. A continuum compatibility based damage and fracture criterion is also proposed to model fracture surface generation. We investigated fracture of a trabecular bone network under a compressive load, for which failure modes of both tension and compression were identified at the strut level. The predicted trabecular network response was found to fall within the range of experimental results reported in literature. We also investigated the response of idealized struts under compression, tension and bending using our model. Individual struts were found to exhibit micro-buckling under compression and micro-necking under tension. These instabilities are however masked by the multiplicity and complexity of strut orientations at the trabecular network level.

  9. Exercise in youth: High bone mass, large bone size, and low fracture risk in old age.

    PubMed

    Tveit, M; Rosengren, B E; Nilsson, J Å; Karlsson, M K

    2015-08-01

    Physical activity is favorable for peak bone mass but if the skeletal benefits remain and influence fracture risk in old age is debated. In a cross-sectional controlled mixed model design, we compared dual X-ray absorptiometry-derived bone mineral density (BMD) and bone size in 193 active and retired male elite soccer players and 280 controls, with duplicate measurements of the same individual done a mean 5 years apart. To evaluate lifetime fractures, we used a retrospective controlled study design in 397 retired male elite soccer players and 1368 controls. Differences in bone traits were evaluated by Student's t-test and fracture risk assessments by Poisson regression and Cox regression. More than 30 years after retirement from sports, the soccer players had a Z-score for total body BMD of 0.4 (0.1 to 0.6), leg BMD of 0.5 (0.2 to 0.8), and femoral neck area of 0.3 (0.0 to 0.5). The rate ratio for fracture after career end was 0.6 (0.4 to 0.9) and for any fragility fracture 0.4 (0.2 to 0.9). Exercise-associated bone trait benefits are found long term after retirement from sports together with a lower fracture risk. This indicates that physical activity in youth could reduce the burden of fragility fractures.

  10. [Hyponatraemia is a risk factor for osteoporosis and bone fracture].

    PubMed

    Amar, Anas Ould Si; Holm, Jakob Præst; Jensen, Jens-Erik Beck

    2016-09-12

    There is increasing evidence that mild hyponatraemia is associated with fractures. This association seems to be partially mediated by a reduced bone mass and an in-creased risk of falling. Large population studies have shown that other factors such as bone quality may be important. Hyponatraemia should not be considered a benign and asymptomatic condition, and an increased awareness, especially in the elderly patients with chronic hypona-traemia, is warranted. Sodium status should be evaluated in patients who experience falls, fractures or are at increased risk of having osteoporosis.

  11. WNT16 influences bone mineral density, cortical bone thickness, bone strength, and osteoporotic fracture risk.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hou-Feng; Tobias, Jon H; Duncan, Emma; Evans, David M; Eriksson, Joel; Paternoster, Lavinia; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Lehtimäki, Terho; Bergström, Ulrica; Kähönen, Mika; Leo, Paul J; Raitakari, Olli; Laaksonen, Marika; Nicholson, Geoffrey C; Viikari, Jorma; Ladouceur, Martin; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Prince, Richard L; Sievanen, Harri; Leslie, William D; Mellström, Dan; Eisman, John A; Movérare-Skrtic, Sofia; Goltzman, David; Hanley, David A; Jones, Graeme; St Pourcain, Beate; Xiao, Yongjun; Timpson, Nicholas J; Smith, George Davey; Reid, Ian R; Ring, Susan M; Sambrook, Philip N; Karlsson, Magnus; Dennison, Elaine M; Kemp, John P; Danoy, Patrick; Sayers, Adrian; Wilson, Scott G; Nethander, Maria; McCloskey, Eugene; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Eastell, Richard; Liu, Jeff; Spector, Tim; Mitchell, Braxton D; Streeten, Elizabeth A; Brommage, Robert; Pettersson-Kymmer, Ulrika; Brown, Matthew A; Ohlsson, Claes; Richards, J Brent; Lorentzon, Mattias

    2012-07-01

    We aimed to identify genetic variants associated with cortical bone thickness (CBT) and bone mineral density (BMD) by performing two separate genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analyses for CBT in 3 cohorts comprising 5,878 European subjects and for BMD in 5 cohorts comprising 5,672 individuals. We then assessed selected single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for osteoporotic fracture in 2,023 cases and 3,740 controls. Association with CBT and forearm BMD was tested for ∼2.5 million SNPs in each cohort separately, and results were meta-analyzed using fixed effect meta-analysis. We identified a missense SNP (Thr>Ile; rs2707466) located in the WNT16 gene (7q31), associated with CBT (effect size of -0.11 standard deviations [SD] per C allele, P = 6.2 × 10(-9)). This SNP, as well as another nonsynonymous SNP rs2908004 (Gly>Arg), also had genome-wide significant association with forearm BMD (-0.14 SD per C allele, P = 2.3 × 10(-12), and -0.16 SD per G allele, P = 1.2 × 10(-15), respectively). Four genome-wide significant SNPs arising from BMD meta-analysis were tested for association with forearm fracture. SNP rs7776725 in FAM3C, a gene adjacent to WNT16, was associated with a genome-wide significant increased risk of forearm fracture (OR = 1.33, P = 7.3 × 10(-9)), with genome-wide suggestive signals from the two missense variants in WNT16 (rs2908004: OR = 1.22, P = 4.9 × 10(-6) and rs2707466: OR = 1.22, P = 7.2 × 10(-6)). We next generated a homozygous mouse with targeted disruption of Wnt16. Female Wnt16(-/-) mice had 27% (P<0.001) thinner cortical bones at the femur midshaft, and bone strength measures were reduced between 43%-61% (6.5 × 10(-13)bone strength, and risk of fracture.

  12. Roles of Chondrocytes in Endochondral Bone Formation and Fracture Repair.

    PubMed

    Hinton, R J; Jing, Y; Jing, J; Feng, J Q

    2017-01-01

    The formation of the mandibular condylar cartilage (MCC) and its subchondral bone is an important but understudied topic in dental research. The current concept regarding endochondral bone formation postulates that most hypertrophic chondrocytes undergo programmed cell death prior to bone formation. Under this paradigm, the MCC and its underlying bone are thought to result from 2 closely linked but separate processes: chondrogenesis and osteogenesis. However, recent investigations using cell lineage tracing techniques have demonstrated that many, perhaps the majority, of bone cells are derived via direct transformation from chondrocytes. In this review, the authors will briefly discuss the history of this idea and describe recent studies that clearly demonstrate that the direct transformation of chondrocytes into bone cells is common in both long bone and mandibular condyle development and during bone fracture repair. The authors will also provide new evidence of a distinct difference in ossification orientation in the condylar ramus (1 ossification center) versus long bone ossification formation (2 ossification centers). Based on our recent findings and those of other laboratories, we propose a new model that contrasts the mode of bone formation in much of the mandibular ramus (chondrocyte-derived) with intramembranous bone formation of the mandibular body (non-chondrocyte-derived).

  13. Fracture toughness and work of fracture of hydrated, dehydrated, and ashed bovine bone.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jiahau; Daga, Amit; Kumar, Rajendra; Mecholsky, John J

    2008-01-01

    Bone, a tri-phase composite, consists of nano-sized apatite minerals, an organic component, and water. Heat-treated bovine cortical bone has been proposed as a candidate for void-filling bone substitute. However, the toughness of heat-treated bone is not yet fully studied. Fracture toughness (K(c)) and work of fracture (W(f)) of hydrated, dehydrated, and ashed bovine bone were estimated using a single-edge V-notched beam method. Thermal gravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis were used to determine the temperature at which the organics and water were removed. Dehydrated specimens were obtained by placing the samples in a 60 degrees C vacuum oven for 24h or a 110 degrees C furnace for 2h. Ashed specimens were obtained by heat-treating samples at 600 degrees C for 24h. K(c) of bovine specimens decreased from 5.5MPa.m(1/2) for hydrated bone, to 3.8MPa.m(1/2) for dehydrated specimens, and to 0.36MPa.m(1/2) for ashed specimens. W(f) decreased from 7.1 to 1.1kJ/m(2) for dehydrated specimens, and to 0.04kJ/m(2) for ashed specimens. The main reasons for the significant decreases in K(c) and W(f) may be attributed to water's ability in stabilizing collagen structure and to the organics' ability in making bone more ductile. Because of the large decrease in fracture toughness and work of fracture, we suggest that ashed bone is not appropriate for load-bearing bone substitute in areas where bone experiences loadings in flexure.

  14. Noncontact optical sensor for bone fracture diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Bishitz, Yael; Ozana, Nisan; Beiderman, Yevgeny; Tenner, Felix; Schmidt, Michael; Mico, Vicente; Garcia, Javier; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2015-01-01

    We present the first steps of a device suitable for detection of broken and cracked bones. The approach is based on temporal tracking of back reflected secondary speckle patterns generated when illuminating the limb with a laser and while applying periodic pressure stimulation via a loud speaker. Preliminary experiments are included showing the validity of the proposed device for detection of damaged bones. PMID:25798293

  15. Repairing Fractured Bones by Use of Bioabsorbable Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.

    2006-01-01

    A proposed method of surgical repair of fractured bones would incorporate recent and future advances in the art of composite materials. The composite materials used in this method would be biocompatible and at least partly bioabsorbable: that is, during the healing process following surgery, they would be wholly or at least partly absorbed into the bones and other tissues in which they were implanted. Relative to the traditional method, the proposed method would involve less surgery, pose less of a risk of infection, provide for better transfer of loads across fracture sites, and thereby promote better healing while reducing the need for immobilization by casts and other external devices. One requirement that both the traditional and proposed methods must satisfy is to fix the multiple segments of a broken bone in the correct relative positions. Mechanical fixing techniques used in the traditional method include the use of plates spanning the fracture site and secured to the bone by screws, serving of wire along the bone across the fracture site, insertion of metallic intramedullary rods through the hollow portion of the fractured bone, and/or inserting transverse rods through the bone, muscle, and skin to stabilize the fractured members. After the bone heals, a second surgical operation is needed to remove the mechanical fixture(s). In the proposed method, there would be no need for a second surgical operation. The proposed method is based partly on the observation that in the fabrication of a structural member, it is generally more efficient and reliable to use multiple small fasteners to transfer load across a joint than to use a single or smaller number of larger fasteners, provided that the stress fields of neighboring small fasteners do not overlap or interact. Also, multiple smaller fasteners are more reliable than are larger and fewer fasteners. However, there is a trade-off between structural efficiency and the cost of insertion time and materials. The

  16. LORENZ: a system for planning long-bone fracture reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Burgstaller, Wolfgang; Wirth, Joachim; Baumann, Bernard; Jacob, Augustinus L.; Bieri, Kurt; Traud, Stefan; Strub, Michael; Regazzoni, Pietro; Messmer, Peter

    2003-05-01

    Long bone fractures belong to the most common injuries encountered in clinical routine trauma surgery. Preoperative assessment and decision making is usually based on standard 2D radiographs of the injured limb. Taking into account that a 3D - imaging modality such as computed tomography (CT) is not used for diagnosis in clinical routine, we have designed LORENZ, a fracture reduction planning tool based on such standard radiographs. Taking into account the considerable success of so-called image free navigation systems for total knee replacement in orthopaedic surgery, we assume that a similar tool for long bone fracture reposition should have considerable impact on computer-aided trauma surgery in a standard clinical routine setup. The case for long bone fracture reduction is, however, somewhat more complicated since not only scale independent angles indicating biomechanical measures such as varus and valgus are involved. Reduction path planning requires that the individual anatomy and the classification of the fracture is taken into account. In this paper, we present the basic ideas of this planning tool, it's current state, and the methodology chosen. LORENZ takes one or more conventional radiographs of the broken limb as input data. In addition, one or more x-rays of the opposite healthy bone are taken and mirrored if necessary. A most adequate CT model is being selected from a database; currently, this is achieved by using a scale space approach on the digitized x-ray images and comparing standard perspective renderings to these x-rays. After finding a CT-volume with a similar bone, a triangulated surface model is generated, and the surgeon can break the bone and arrange the fragments in 3D according to the x-ray images of the broken bone. Common osteosynthesis plates and implants can be loaded from CAD-datasets and are visualized as well. In addition, LORENZ renders virtual x-ray views of the fracture reduction process. The hybrid surface/voxel rendering

  17. Paracetamol (acetaminophen) use, fracture and bone mineral density.

    PubMed

    Williams, Lana J; Pasco, Julie A; Henry, Margaret J; Sanders, Kerrie M; Nicholson, Geoffrey C; Kotowicz, Mark A; Berk, Michael

    2011-06-01

    Paracetamol is the most widely prescribed simple analgesic and antipyretic. It exerts its effects via cyclooxygenase and endocannabinoid pathways, which may affect signalling in bone cells and hence influence bone metabolism. Given the high rates of paracetamol use in the community and the evidence linking its mechanism of action to bone metabolism, we aimed to investigate the association between paracetamol use, fracture, and bone mineral density (BMD) in women participating in the Geelong Osteoporosis Study (GOS). Cases (n = 569) were women aged ≥ 50 years identified from radiological reports as having sustained a fracture between 1994 and 1996. Controls (n = 775) were women without fracture recruited from the same region during this period. BMD was measured at the spine, hip, total body and forearm using dual energy absorptiometry. Medication use, medical history and lifestyle factors were self-reported. There were 69 (12.1%) paracetamol users among the cases and 63 (8.1%) among the controls. Paracetamol use increased the odds for fracture (OR = 1.56, 95%CI 1.09-2.24, p = 0.02). Adjustment for BMD at the spine, total hip and forearm did not confound the association. However, incorporating total body BMD into the model attenuated the association (adjusted OR = 1.46, 95%CI 1.00-2.14, p = 0.051). Further adjustment for age, weight, physical activity, smoking, alcohol, calcium intake, medication use, medical conditions, falls and previous fracture did not explain the association. These data suggest that paracetamol use is a risk factor for fracture, although the mechanism of action remains unclear.

  18. Cortical bone fracture analysis using XFEM - case study.

    PubMed

    Idkaidek, Ashraf; Jasiuk, Iwona

    2016-06-11

    We aim to achieve an accurate simulation of human cortical bone fracture using the extended finite element method within a commercial finite element software abaqus. A two-dimensional unit cell model of cortical bone is built based on a microscopy image of the mid-diaphysis of tibia of a 70-year-old human male donor. Each phase of this model, an interstitial bone, a cement line, and an osteon, are considered linear elastic and isotropic with material properties obtained by nanoindentation, taken from literature. The effect of using fracture analysis methods (cohesive segment approach versus linear elastic fracture mechanics approach), finite element type, and boundary conditions (traction, displacement, and mixed) on cortical bone crack initiation and propagation are studied. In this study cohesive segment damage evolution for a traction separation law based on energy and displacement is used. In addition, effects of the increment size and mesh density on analysis results are investigated. We find that both cohesive segment and linear elastic fracture mechanics approaches within the extended finite element method can effectively simulate cortical bone fracture. Mesh density and simulation increment size can influence analysis results when employing either approach, and using finer mesh and/or smaller increment size does not always provide more accurate results. Both approaches provide close but not identical results, and crack propagation speed is found to be slower when using the cohesive segment approach. Also, using reduced integration elements along with the cohesive segment approach decreases crack propagation speed compared with using full integration elements. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Treatment of proximal fifth metatarsal bone fractures in athletes.

    PubMed

    Japjec, M; Starešinić, M; Starjački, M; Žgaljardić, I; Štivičić, J; Šebečić, B

    2015-11-01

    Proximal fifth metatarsal (V MT) bone fractures are common injuries that are a major diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Lawrence and Botte considered different treatment options and the possibility of recovery and divided these fractures into three different regions: tuberosity avulsion fractures (zone I), acute fractures of the metaphysis at the level of the intermetatarsal junction (zone II) and proximal diaphysis stress fracture (zone III). A total of 42 athletes with fracture of the V MT bone in zone II and III were treated in our institution during a 6-year period. All patients were offered surgical treatment, but nine patients refused surgery. Thus, the patients were divided into two groups: group 1 comprised 33 patients who underwent an intramedullary screw fixation operation under regional anaesthesia immediately after the fracture was diagnosed; group 2 contained the remaining nine patients who had refused surgery and received conservative therapy with non-weight-bearing short-leg casts or orthosis. Follow-up ranged from 6 to 24 months. All fractures healed in group 1: healing occurred within 8 weeks in 26 patients and was prolonged to 16 to 18 weeks in four patients. In group 2, fractures healed in four patients but did not heal in five patients even after 6 months. Four of the five patients in whom the fracture did not heal required subsequent osteosynthesis because they had constant problems that caused absence from sport. After the operation, their fractures healed in an average of 10 weeks. One patient decided not to undergo the operation due to the absence of subjective symptoms. Three patients in group 1 who started intensive training sustained a refracture and underwent re-operation in which osteosynthesis was performed with a stronger screw. The fractures then healed again. Treatment results were evaluated radiologically and clinically using the Modified Foot Score. Results in group 1 were significantly better than those in group 2 and there

  20. Fracture induced mobilization and incorporation of bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells for bone healing.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Mifune, Yutaka; Kawamoto, Atsuhiko; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Shoji, Taro; Iwasaki, Hiroto; Suzuki, Takahiro; Oyamada, Akira; Horii, Miki; Yokoyama, Ayumi; Nishimura, Hiromi; Lee, Sang Yang; Miwa, Masahiko; Doita, Minoru; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Asahara, Takayuki

    2008-04-01

    We recently reported that systemic administration of peripheral blood (PB) CD34+ cells, an endothelial progenitor cell (EPC)-enriched population, contributed to fracture healing via vasculogenesis/angiogenesis. However, pathophysiological role of EPCs in fracture healing process has not been fully clarified. Therefore, we investigated the hypothesis whether mobilization and incorporation of bone marrow (BM)-derived EPCs may play a pivotal role in appropriate fracture healing. Serial examinations of Laser doppler perfusion imaging and histological capillary density revealed that neovascularization activity at the fracture site peaked at day 7 post-fracture, the early phase of endochondral ossifification. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis demonstrated that the frequency of BM cKit+Sca1+Lineage- (Lin-) cells and PB Sca1+Lin- cells, which are EPC-enriched fractions, significantly increased post-fracture. The Sca1+ EPC-derived vasuculogenesis at the fracture site was confirmed by double immunohistochemistry for CD31 and Sca1. BM transplantation from transgenic donors expressing LacZ transcriptionally regulated by endothelial cell-specific Tie-2 promoter into wild type also provided direct evidence that EPCs contributing to enhanced neovascularization at the fracture site were specifically derived from BM. Animal model of systemic administration of PB Sca1+Lin- Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP)+ cells further confirmed incorporation of the mobilized EPCs into the fracture site for fracture healing. These findings indicate that fracture may induce mobilization of EPCs from BM to PB and recruitment of the mobilized EPCs into fracture sites, thereby augment neovascularization during the process of bone healing. EPCs may play an essential role in fracture healing by promoting a favorable environment through neovascularization in damaged skeletal tissue.

  1. Bone mass and microarchitecture in CKD patients with fracture.

    PubMed

    Nickolas, Thomas L; Stein, Emily; Cohen, Adi; Thomas, Valerie; Staron, Ronald B; McMahon, Donald J; Leonard, Mary B; Shane, Elizabeth

    2010-08-01

    Patients with predialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD) have increased risk for fracture, but the structural mechanisms underlying this increased skeletal fragility are unknown. We measured areal bone mineral density (aBMD) by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry at the spine, hip, and radius, and we measured volumetric BMD (vBMD), geometry, and microarchitecture by high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) at the radius and tibia in patients with CKD: 32 with fracture and 59 without fracture. Patients with fracture had lower aBMD at the spine, total hip, femoral neck, and the ultradistal radius, the last having the strongest association with fracture. By HR-pQCT of the radius, patients with fracture had lower cortical area and thickness, total and trabecular vBMD, and trabecular number and greater trabecular separation and network heterogeneity. At the tibia, patients with fracture had significantly lower cortical area, thickness, and total and cortical density. Total vBMD at both radius and tibia most strongly associated with fracture. By receiver operator characteristic curve analysis, patients with longer duration of CKD had area under the curve of >0.75 for aBMD at both hip sites and the ultradistal radius, vBMD and geometry at the radius and tibia, and microarchitecture at the tibia. In summary, patients with predialysis CKD and fractures have lower aBMD by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and lower vBMD, thinner cortices, and trabecular loss by HR-pQCT. These density and structural differences may underlie the increased susceptibility to fracture among patients with CKD.

  2. Modelling of bone fracture and strength at different length scales: a review

    PubMed Central

    Sabet, Fereshteh A.; Raeisi Najafi, Ahmad; Hamed, Elham; Jasiuk, Iwona

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we review analytical and computational models of bone fracture and strength. Bone fracture is a complex phenomenon due to the composite, inhomogeneous and hierarchical structure of bone. First, we briefly summarize the hierarchical structure of bone, spanning from the nanoscale, sub-microscale, microscale, mesoscale to the macroscale, and discuss experimental observations on failure mechanisms in bone at these scales. Then, we highlight representative analytical and computational models of bone fracture and strength at different length scales and discuss the main findings in the context of experiments. We conclude by summarizing the challenges in modelling of bone fracture and strength and list open topics for scientific exploration. Modelling of bone, accounting for different scales, provides new and needed insights into the fracture and strength of bone, which, in turn, can lead to improved diagnostic tools and treatments of bone diseases such as osteoporosis. PMID:26855749

  3. [Bone Cell Biology Assessed by Microscopic Approach. The effects of bisphosphonates on bone remodeling, microdamage accumulation and fracture repair process].

    PubMed

    Mashiba, Tasuku

    2015-10-01

    Basically bisphosphonates are the agents that prevent the deterioration of bone structure due to suppressed bone remodeling although they are able to increase the thickness of cortical bone by suppressing bone resorption in the cortical surfaces. On the other hand, suppression of bone remodeling allows microdamage accumulation by impaired repair of damages, therefore, severe remodeling suppression over long time period could promote bone fatigue process, leading to fatigue fractures such as atypical femoral fracture. The use of bisphosphonate after fracture may delays natural fracture healing process due to suppressed callus remodeling. Bisphosphonate that has high binding affinity to bone easily accumulates in bone, therefore, easily causes severely suppressed bone turnover following long term treatment, and its effects last longer even after withdrawal.

  4. Aging and Fracture of Human Cortical Bone and Tooth Dentin

    SciTech Connect

    Ager, Joel; Koester, Kurt J.; Ager III, Joel W.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2008-05-07

    Mineralized tissues, such as bone and tooth dentin, serve as structural materials in the human body and, as such, have evolved to resist fracture. In assessing their quantitative fracture resistance or toughness, it is important to distinguish between intrinsic toughening mechanisms which function ahead of the crack tip, such as plasticity in metals, and extrinsic mechanisms which function primarily behind the tip, such as crack bridging in ceramics. Bone and dentin derive their resistance to fracture principally from extrinsic toughening mechanisms which have their origins in the hierarchical microstructure of these mineralized tissues. Experimentally, quantification of these toughening mechanisms requires a crack-growth resistance approach, which can be achieved by measuring the crack-driving force, e.g., the stress intensity, as a function of crack extension ("R-curve approach"). Here this methodology is used to study of the effect of aging on the fracture properties of human cortical bone and human dentin in order to discern the microstructural origins of toughness in these materials.

  5. Aging and fracture of human cortical bone and tooth dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koester, Kurt J.; Ager, Joel W.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2008-06-01

    Mineralized tissues, such as bone and tooth dentin, serve as structural materials in the human body and, as such, have evolved to resist fracture. In assessing their quantitative fracture resistance or toughness, it is important to distinguish between intrinsic toughening mechanisms, which function ahead of the crack tip, such as plasticity in metals, and extrinsic mechanisms, which function primarily behind the tip, such as crack bridging in ceramics. Bone and dentin derive their resistance to fracture principally from extrinsic toughening mechanisms, which have their origins in the hierarchical microstructure of these mineralized tissues. Experimentally, quantification of these toughening mechanisms requires a crack-growth resistance approach, which can be achieved by measuring the crack-driving force (e.g., the stress intensity) as a function of crack extension (“R-curve approach”). Here this methodology is used to study the effect of aging on the fracture properties of human cortical bone and human dentin in order to discern the microstructural origins of toughness in these materials.

  6. Optimal Treatment of Malignant Long Bone Fracture: Influence of Method of Repair and External Beam Irradiation on the Pathway and Efficacy of Fracture Healing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Long Bone Fracture: Influence of Method of Repair and External Beam Irradiation on the Pathway and Efficacy of Fracture Healing 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...in the fifth quarter of the award. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Fracture healing , bone healing , endochondral ossification, intramembranous ossification...irradiation, radiotherapy, pathologic fractures, bony metastasis, bone cancer, animal model , rat model 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF

  7. Vitamin D and bone fracture mechanisms: what about the non-bone 'D'efense?

    PubMed

    Annweiler, C; Beauchet, O

    2010-04-01

    Osteoporosis is a public health concern because of its high prevalence and consequences in terms of morbidity, mortality and health care costs (1). This growing epidemic highlights the problem of the 'knowledge paradox': on one hand there is an increase in medical knowledge about osteoporotic fractures but, on the other hand, the amount of bone fractures keeps increasing (1-3). In this context, any strategy preventing the occurrence of bone fractures, such as vitamin D supplementation, is welcome. For instance, a very recent meta analysis from Bischoff-Ferarri et al. underlined the efficacy of oral supplemental vitamin D, regardless of any additional calcium supplementation, in non-vertebral fractures prevention among more than 42,000 adults aged 65 years and older (2).

  8. Cytology of bone lesions by intraoperative sampling during fracture treatment.

    PubMed

    Kinias, Ioannis S; Rammou-Kinia, Rea

    2002-03-01

    Cytology was performed on 314 patients who were treated by surgery for hip joint fracture, to determine and evaluate the role, accuracy, and perspective of intraoperative bone sampling. Specimens were collected from bone lesions during surgery by imprints or driller washing in normal saline. The results were compared with those of subsequent biopsies or clinical follow-up. All 13 neoplastic cases (malignant or benign) were identified by cytology. An accuracy rate of 69.2% was achieved by this method when the type and origin of the neoplasms were to be conclusive. There were no false-positive diagnoses, and all benign conditions showed negative results on cytology (specificity and sensitivity of 100%). Cytology can play a valuable role in the diagnosis of bone lesions. The morphologic diagnostic criteria allow for a high level of diagnostic accuracy of cytologic assessments in most cases of bone lesions, no matter the sampling technique.

  9. Measurement of the microstructural fracture toughness of cortical bone using indentation fracture.

    PubMed

    Mullins, L P; Bruzzi, M S; McHugh, P E

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the use of indentation fracture as a method of measuring toughness at the microscale in cortical bone. Indentation fracture employs sharp indenters to initiate cracks, whose length can be used to calculate the toughness of the material. Only a cube corner indenter tip is found to initiate cracks at a suitable size scale for microstructural measurement. Cracks from 7 to 56 microm in length are produced using loads from 0.05 to 3N. Preliminary data predicts rising toughness with increasing crack length (rising R-curve behaviour) at the microscale. This technique provides a new insight into fracture in cortical bone since it allows the investigator to observe mechanisms and measure toughness at a size scale at which in vivo damage is known to exist.

  10. The role of adaptive bone formation in the etiology of stress fracture.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Julie M; Popp, Kristin L; Yanovich, Ran; Bouxsein, Mary L; Matheny, Ronald W

    2016-08-05

    Stress fractures are common injuries with load-bearing activities. Stress fractures have been reported in the scientific literature for over a century; however, the etiology continues to be investigated with important distinctions made between the contributions of the tissue-level processes of bone remodeling and modeling. In response to novel repetitive loading, increased bone remodeling may serve to replace fatigue-damaged bone while at the same time creating temporary porosity. Much attention has been given to the role of remodeling in the etiology of stress fracture; however, the role of bone modeling has received less attention. Modest increases in modeling, via bone formation on the periosteal surface of long bones in response to mechanical loading, greatly increases the fatigue resistance of bone. Thus, enhancing this adaptive bone formation is a promising target for stress fracture prevention, and a focus on adaptive bone formation may reveal novel risk factors for stress fracture.

  11. Outcome of unstable fractures of metacarpal and phalangeal bones treated by bone tie

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, Jagannath B; Jayasheelan, Nikil; Savur, Amaranth; Mathews, Rejith

    2016-01-01

    Background: Unstable fractures of the metacarpal and phalangeal bones of the hand need surgical stabilization which should be rigid enough for early active mobilization. Conventional methods of open reduction and stabilization in the form of composite fixation or screws with or without plates have served the purpose but can be definitely improvised addressing both biological and mechanical principles of fixation. Materials and Methods: 34 patients (29 males and 5 females) with an average age of 32 years (range 10–64 years) with unstable fractures of the metacarpal and phalangeal bones of hand who were treated with the modified bone tie between June 2009 and June 2013 were included in this study. 42 fractures, involving the 31 metacarpals and 11 phalanges were included. We have not used this technique in fractures involving the terminal phalanges. Thirty nine of the fractures were treated with K-wires along with the modified bone tie, whereas the other two cases were treated with modified bone tie alone and in one case the bone tie has been used along with the external fixator. The nature of injuries were Road Traffic Accident (n = 24), domestic/industrial injuries (n = 8) and blast (n = 2) injuries. Etiology was crush (n = 24), blunt (n = 7) and incised (n = 3) injuries, respectively. Twenty seven patients were involved with single fractures (either metacarpal or the phalanges), 6 patients had two fractures (both metacarpals or phalanges or one each of metacarpal and phalanx), and 1 patient had three fractures in this study. Dominant hand was involved in 14 patients (40%). Results: We achieved excellent to good results in 83% of 42 fractures within an average period of 10 weeks. Postoperative grip strength of 85% was achieved with in an average period of 12 weeks. Twenty six (20 metacarpals and 6 phalanges) of the 42 fractures regained >85% of the total active movements (TAMs) compared to the contralateral side were considered excellent results. All patients were

  12. The Photodynamic Bone Stabilization System: a minimally invasive, percutaneous intramedullary polymeric osteosynthesis for simple and complex long bone fractures

    PubMed Central

    Vegt, Paul; Muir, Jeffrey M; Block, Jon E

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of osteoporotic long bone fractures is difficult due to diminished bone density and compromised biomechanical integrity. The majority of osteoporotic long bone fractures occur in the metaphyseal region, which poses additional problems for surgical repair due to increased intramedullary volume. Treatment with internal fixation using intramedullary nails or plating is associated with poor clinical outcomes in this patient population. Subsequent fractures and complications such as screw pull-out necessitate additional interventions, prolonging recovery and increasing health care costs. The Photodynamic Bone Stabilization System (PBSS) is a minimally invasive surgical technique that allows clinicians to repair bone fractures using a light-curable polymer contained within an inflatable balloon catheter, offering a new treatment option for osteoporotic long bone fractures. The unique polymer compound and catheter application provides a customizable solution for long bone fractures that produces internal stability while maintaining bone length, rotational alignment, and postsurgical mobility. The PBSS has been utilized in a case series of 41 fractures in 33 patients suffering osteoporotic long bone fractures. The initial results indicate that the use of the light-cured polymeric rod for this patient population provides excellent fixation and stability in compromised bone, with a superior complication profile. This paper describes the clinical uses, procedural details, indications for use, and the initial clinical findings of the PBSS. PMID:25540600

  13. The Photodynamic Bone Stabilization System: a minimally invasive, percutaneous intramedullary polymeric osteosynthesis for simple and complex long bone fractures.

    PubMed

    Vegt, Paul; Muir, Jeffrey M; Block, Jon E

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of osteoporotic long bone fractures is difficult due to diminished bone density and compromised biomechanical integrity. The majority of osteoporotic long bone fractures occur in the metaphyseal region, which poses additional problems for surgical repair due to increased intramedullary volume. Treatment with internal fixation using intramedullary nails or plating is associated with poor clinical outcomes in this patient population. Subsequent fractures and complications such as screw pull-out necessitate additional interventions, prolonging recovery and increasing health care costs. The Photodynamic Bone Stabilization System (PBSS) is a minimally invasive surgical technique that allows clinicians to repair bone fractures using a light-curable polymer contained within an inflatable balloon catheter, offering a new treatment option for osteoporotic long bone fractures. The unique polymer compound and catheter application provides a customizable solution for long bone fractures that produces internal stability while maintaining bone length, rotational alignment, and postsurgical mobility. The PBSS has been utilized in a case series of 41 fractures in 33 patients suffering osteoporotic long bone fractures. The initial results indicate that the use of the light-cured polymeric rod for this patient population provides excellent fixation and stability in compromised bone, with a superior complication profile. This paper describes the clinical uses, procedural details, indications for use, and the initial clinical findings of the PBSS.

  14. Characteristics of bone turnover in the long bone metaphysis fractured patients with normal or low Bone Mineral Density (BMD).

    PubMed

    Wölfl, Christoph; Schweppenhäuser, Daniela; Gühring, Thorsten; Takur, Caner; Höner, Bernd; Kneser, Ulrich; Grützner, Paul Alfred; Kolios, Leila

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of osteoporotic fractures increases as our population ages. Until now, the exact biochemical processes that occur during the healing of metaphyseal fractures remain unclear. Diagnostic instruments that allow a dynamic insight into the fracture healing process are as yet unavailable. In the present matched pair analysis, we study the time course of the osteoanabolic markers bone specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP) and transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1), as well as the osteocatabolic markers crosslinked C-telopeptide of type-I-collagen (β-CTX) and serum band 5 tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP5b), during the healing of fractures that have a low level of bone mineral density (BMD) compared with fractures that have a normal BMD. Between March 2007 and February 2009, 30 patients aged older than 50 years who suffered a metaphyseal fracture were included in our study. BMDs were verified by dual energy Xray absorptiometry (DXEA) scans. The levels of BTMs were examined over an 8-week period. Osteoanabolic BAP levels in those with low levels of BMD were significantly different from the BAP levels in those with normal BMD. BAP levels in the former group increased constantly, whereas the latter group showed an initial strong decrease in BAP followed by slowly rising values. Osteocatabolic β-CTX increased in the bone of the normal BMD group constantly, whereas these levels decreased significantly in the bone of the group with low BMD from the first week. TRAP5b was significantly reduced in the low level BMD group. With this work, we conduct first insights into the molecular biology of the fracture healing process in patients with low levels of BMD that explains the mechanism of its fracture healing. The results may be one reason for the reduced healing qualities in bones with low BMD.

  15. BIOMATERIAL IMPLANTS IN BONE FRACTURES PRODUCED IN RATS FIBULAS

    PubMed Central

    Shirane, Henrique Yassuhiro; Oda, Diogo Yochizumi; Pinheiro, Thiago Cerizza; Cunha, Marcelo Rodrigues da

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the importance of collagen and hydroxyapatite in the regeneration of fractures experimentally induced in the fibulas of rats. Method: 15 rats were used. These were subjected to surgery to remove a fragment from the fibula. This site then received a graft consisting of a silicone tubes filled with hydroxyapatite and collagen. Results: Little bone neoformation occurred inside the tubes filled with the biomaterials. There was more neoformation in the tubes with collagen. Conclusion: The biomaterials used demonstrated biocompatibility and osteoconductive capacity that was capable of stimulating osteogenesis, even in bones with secondary mechanical and morphological functions such as the fibula of rats. PMID:27047813

  16. Unusual Foreign Bone Fragment in Femoral Open Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Sadoni, Hanon; Arti, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Femoral shaft fracture is one of the typical bone fractures due to high energy trauma and may occur as an open fracture. Some foreign materials may enter the fracture site such as sand, cloth particles and so on. Case Presentation: A 28-year-old motorcycle riding military member and his collaborator were received in the hospital because of multiple traumas due to a fall in a hollow during a surveillance mission. His collaborator died because of head trauma and multiple severe open fractures. When fixing the patients femoral fracture, a large femoral butterfly fragment was removed from the patient’s thigh as a foreign segment. The patient’s femur was fixed with a plate and screws. No femoral defect was detected during surgery or post-operative X-rays and CT scan. The removed segment was not a part of the patient’s femur. Conclusions: Surgical and post-surgical findings showed that this segment was not related to the patient’s femur. The foreign segment may have belonged to the other victim of this trauma. PMID:27218050

  17. Hyponatremia associated with large-bone fracture in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Harminder S; Gilles, Emmanuelle; DeVita, Maria V; Panagopoulos, Georgia; Michelis, Michael F

    2009-01-01

    Hyponatremia has been shown to be associated with gait disturbances, decreased mentation, and falls. The study objective was to determine the incidence of hyponatremia in patients who experienced a substantial skeletal fracture (hip/pelvis/femur). During an 18-month period from March 2007 to August 2008 serum sodium levels were evaluated in 364 cases of bone fracture in patients aged 65 years or older and in 364 nonfracture patients aged 65 years and older seen in an urban emergency room setting. The incidence of hyponatremia in patients with fractures was more than double that of nonfracture patients (9.1% and 4.1%, respectively; P = 0.007). The degree of hyponatremia was noted to be mild to moderate. Mean serum sodium of the entire fracture group was 131 +/- 2 mEq/L. In the fracture group the patients were 75.3% female, while females comprised 66.2% of the nonfracture group (P = 0.02). Of fracture patients with hyponatremia, 24.2% were taking antidepressants [3/4 of which were selective serotonin receptor inhibitors (SSRIs)], while none were taking these medications in the nonfracture group. Attention regarding careful follow-up of serum sodium levels in elderly patients seems appropriate.

  18. Irradiated human chondrocytes expressing bone morphogenetic protein 2 promote healing of osteoporotic bone fracture in rats.

    PubMed

    Yi, Youngsuk; Choi, Kyoung Baek; Lim, Chae-Lyul; Hyun, Jong-Pil; Lee, Hyeon-Youl; Lee, Kun Bok; Yun, Lillian; Ayverdi, Asli; Hwang, Sally; Yip, Vivian; Noh, Moon Jong; Lee, Kwan Hee

    2009-10-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) was selected as a transgene to regenerate osteoporotic bone defects after several BMPs were tested using a bone formation study in nude mice. Human chondrocytes were transduced with a BMP2-containing retroviral vector, and single clones were selected. The cells were characterized over numerous passages for growth and BMP2 expression. The single clones were irradiated and tested for viability. BMP2 expression lasted for 3 weeks before dying off completely after approximately 1 month. Irradiated and non-irradiated transduced chondrocytes successfully healed fractures in osteoporotic rats induced by ovariectomy. The osteoinducing effect of irradiated cells was better than that of their non-irradiated counterparts or a chondrocytes-only control. This study showed that delivering BMP2 from the transduced and irradiated chondrocytes could be an effective and safe method of repairing osteoporotic bone fractures.

  19. Influence of Fatigue Loading and Bone Turnover on Bone Strength and Pattern of Experimental Fractures of the Tibia in Mice.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Nicolas; Gerbaix, Maude; Ominsky, Michael; Ammann, Patrick; Kostenuik, Paul J; Ferrari, Serge L

    2016-07-01

    Bone fragility depends on bone mass, structure, and material properties, including damage. The relationship between bone turnover, fatigue damage, and the pattern and location of fractures, however, remains poorly understood. We examined these factors and their integrated effects on fracture strength and patterns in tibia. Adult male mice received RANKL (2 mg/kg/day), OPG-Fc (5 mg/kg 2×/week), or vehicle (Veh) 2 days prior to fatigue loading of one tibia by in vivo axial compression, with treatments continuing up to 28 more days. One day post fatigue, crack density was similarly increased in fatigued tibiae from all treatment groups. After 28 days, the RANKL group exhibited reduced bone mass and increased crack density, resulting in reduced bone strength, while the OPG-Fc group had greater bone mass and bone strength. Injury repair altered the pattern and location of fractures created by ex vivo destructive testing, with fractures occurring more proximally and obliquely relative to non-fatigued tibia. A similar pattern was observed in both non-fatigued and fatigued tibia of RANKL. In contrast, OPG-Fc prevented this fatigue-related shift in fracture pattern by maintaining fractures more distal and transverse. Correlation analysis showed that bone strength was predominantly determined by aBMD with minor contributions from structure and intrinsic strength as measured by nanoindentation and cracks density. In contrast, fracture location was predicted equally by aBMD, crack density and intrinsic modulus. The data suggest that not only bone strength but also the fracture pattern depends on previous damage and the effects of bone turnover on bone mass and structure. These observations may be relevant to further understand the mechanisms contributing to fracture pattern in long bone with different levels of bone remodeling, including atypical femur fracture.

  20. Insulin-like growth factor 1, glycation and bone fragility: implications for fracture resistance of bone.

    PubMed

    Sroga, Grażyna E; Wu, Ping-Cheng; Vashishth, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Despite our extensive knowledge of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) action on the growing skeleton, its role in skeletal homeostasis during aging and age-related development of certain diseases is still unclear. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) derived from glucose are implicated in osteoporosis and a number of diabetic complications. We hypothesized that because in humans and rodents IGF1 stimulates uptake of glucose (a glycation substrate) from the bloodstream in a dose-dependent manner, the decline of IGF1 could be associated with the accumulation of glycation products and the decreasing resistance of bone to fracture. To test the aforementioned hypotheses, we used human tibial posterior cortex bone samples to perform biochemical (measurement of IGF1, fluorescent AGEs and pentosidine (PEN) contents) and mechanical tests (crack initiation and propagation using compact tension specimens). Our results for the first time show a significant, age-independent association between the levels of IGF1 and AGEs. Furthermore, AGEs (fAGEs, PEN) predict propensity of bone to fracture (initiation and propagation) independently of age in human cortical bone. Based on these results we propose a model of IGF1-based regulation of bone fracture. Because IGF1 level increases postnatally up to the juvenile developmental phase and decreases thereafter with aging, we propose that IGF1 may play a protective role in young skeleton and its age-related decline leads to bone fragility and an increased fracture risk. Our results may also have important implications for current understanding of osteoporosis- and diabetes-related bone fragility as well as in the development of new diagnostic tools to screen for fragile bones.

  1. [Multiple long bone fractures in a child with pycnodysostosis. A case report].

    PubMed

    Rojas, Paula I; Niklitschek, Nathia E; Sepúlveda, Matías F

    2016-06-01

    Fractures are an important entity to consider in pediatric patients. There are certain diseases in which bones fracture with a minimal trauma. Pycnodysostosis is an autosomal recessive unusual type of cráneo metaphyseal dysplasia, that presents frequently as fracture in a pathological bone. A 9 year old caucasian female, diagnosed with pycnodysostosis, was admitted with a right femur fracture as a result of a low energy trauma. Radiographic studies showed bilateral femur fractures, proximal fracture and non-union in antecurvatum of the left tibia. Pycnodysostosis is a rare disease, generally diagnosed at an early age by growth restriction, frequent fractures or fractures with low energy trauma. Therapy alternatives are limited, and no permanent cure has been developed. If a patient has dysmorphic facial features and fractures in a pathological bone, it is important to suspect bone dysplasia, such as pycnodysostosis and its differential diagnoses.

  2. Sacral Stress Fracture following the Bone Union of Lumbar Spondylolysis

    PubMed Central

    Imaizumi, Hideki; Takano, Hiroyuki; Saitoh, Hideo; Murakami, Taishi; Kanabuchi, Ryuichi; Sekiya, Motohiko

    2016-01-01

    While 22 articles have reported on sacral stress fractures, it is a rare injury and its etiology is not well known. We present the case of a 16-year-old male who presented with low back pain in 2015. He was a high school soccer player with a previous history of a bilateral L5 lumbar spondylolysis in 2014. The patient refrained from soccer and wore a brace for six months. Two months after restarting soccer, he again complained of low back pain. After 1 year, a lumbar spine computed tomography revealed the bone union of the spondylolysis. At his first visit to our hospital, his general and neurological conditions were normal and laboratory data were within the normal range. Sacral coronal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the left sacral ala revealed an oblique lineal signal void surrounding bone marrow edema. Based on his symptoms, sports history, and MRI, he was diagnosed with a sacral stress fracture. He again refrained from soccer; his low back pain soon improved, and, after 1 year, the abnormal signal change had disappeared on sacral MRI. Recurrent low back pain case caused by a sacral stress fracture occurring after the bone union of lumbar spondylolysis is uncommon. PMID:28050170

  3. Bone fracture consolidates faster with low-power laser

    SciTech Connect

    Trelles, M.A.; Mayayo, E.

    1987-01-01

    Low-power laser radiation is currently used in the treatment of pain and osteoarticular inflammation. However, the mechanisms of the laser biostimulating effects on tissue are still not completely understood. With laser treatment, we have achieved activation of osseous regeneration in human bone fractures. After 7 years of positive clinical control in human beings, we decided to start an experimental study of fractures in the tibia of mice, histologically controlling its reparation after exposure to 632 nm. He/Ne laser in doses of 2.4 Joules in one point was used. The radiation was directly applied to the area of fracture in a series of 12 treatments (one treatment every second day). By optic microscope we observed, in the treated animals, an important increase in vascularization and faster formation of osseous tissue with a dense trabecular net compared to the control group, which presented only chondroid tissue and poor vascularization corresponding to an earlier stage of bone consolidation (controls were also analyzed by electron microscopy). Potentially, the laser effect might modulate the function of osteocytes, promoting faster metabolism and reaction of bone callus.

  4. Fractures of the central and third tarsal bones in horses.

    PubMed

    Tulamo, R M; Bramlage, L R; Gabel, A A

    1983-06-01

    The case histories and follow-up data for 11 horses with slab fractures of the central or 3rd tarsal bones were examined for information pertaining to the diagnosis, which was difficult to identify, treatment, which was proven ineffective, and the prognosis, which was shown to be poor for return to racing. The purpose of the study was to define the results that could be obtained by nonoperative methods, in an attempt to determine whether surgical treatment was advisable. Nine of the horses were Standardbreds and 2 were Thoroughbreds; all horses were 2 to 4 years old and were being exercised at race speed when the injury occurred. The diagnosis usually was made at the referral examination, some time after injury. Distention of the tibiotarsal joint usually developed following fracture of the central tarsal bone. In some fractures, local anesthetic injection or multiple radiographic views were required for diagnosis. Not all fracture planes were demonstrable radiographically. Prolonged rest was ineffective in restoring athletic soundness. Lag screw fixation was used in 1 horse, the only horse in the series that raced successfully after injury.

  5. Interfacial fracture toughness of synthetic bone-cement interface

    PubMed Central

    Tong, J

    2008-01-01

    Conventionally, the bonding strength of bone-cement interface is obtained by mechanical strength testing which tends to produce large variability between specimens and test methods. In this work, interfacial fracture toughness of synthetic bone-cement interface has been determined using sandwiched Brazilian disk specimens. Experiments were carried out under selected loading angles from 0 to 25 degrees to achieve full loading conditions from mode I to mode II. Solutions for complex stress intensity factors as well as strain energy release rates were obtained for a sandwich disk with a finite interlayer using the finite element method. Phase angles were obtained at a fixed distance to the crack tip. The fracture loads were obtained from the load displacement curves and the values of interfacial fracture toughness were calculated from the fracture loads and the finite element J-integral solutions. The implication of this information on the assessment of fixation in acetabular replacements was discussed in the light of in-vitro fatigue testing of implanted acetabula. PMID:19325935

  6. Interfacial fracture toughness of synthetic bone-cement interface.

    PubMed

    Tong, J

    2006-06-15

    Conventionally, the bonding strength of bone-cement interface is obtained by mechanical strength testing which tends to produce large variability between specimens and test methods. In this work, interfacial fracture toughness of synthetic bone-cement interface has been determined using sandwiched Brazilian disk specimens. Experiments were carried out under selected loading angles from 0 to 25 degrees to achieve full loading conditions from mode I to mode II. Solutions for complex stress intensity factors as well as strain energy release rates were obtained for a sandwich disk with a finite interlayer using the finite element method. Phase angles were obtained at a fixed distance to the crack tip. The fracture loads were obtained from the load displacement curves and the values of interfacial fracture toughness were calculated from the fracture loads and the finite element J-integral solutions. The implication of this information on the assessment of fixation in acetabular replacements was discussed in the light of in-vitro fatigue testing of implanted acetabula.

  7. Limits of internal fixation in long-bone fracture.

    PubMed

    Nieto, H; Baroan, C

    2017-02-01

    Alternatives to internal fixation of long-bone fracture comprise, depending on location, external fixation or joint replacement. Limitations comprise risk of infection and functional outcome quality, which vary according to technique. The present study examines these limitations, based on comparative or large-scale studies from which certain significant results emerge. Four main questions are dealt with: (1) the present role of locking plates; (2) conditions for intramedullary nailing in Gustilo grade IIIb open fracture; (3) the limitations of conversion from external fixation to intramedullary nailing in open lower leg fracture; (4) and the limitations of definitive anterograde femoral nailing in multiple trauma. Locking plate fixation has yet to prove clinical superiority in any of the anatomic sites for which good-quality comparative analyses are available. Infection risk in Gustilo grade IIIb open lower leg fracture is equivalent when treated by intramedullary nailing or external fixation, if wound care and debridement are effective, antibiotherapy is initiated rapidly and skin cover is restored within 7days. Conversion from primary external fixation to intramedullary nailing is possible if the external fixator was fitted less than 28days previously and skin cover was restored within 7days. The pulmonary and systemic impact of peripheral lesions or definitive anterograde intramedullary nailing of femoral fracture in multiple trauma calls for caution and what is known as "damage-control orthopedics" (DCO), a term covering the general consequences of both the initial trauma and its treatment. Femoral intramedullary nailing is thus contraindicated in case of hemorrhagic shock (blood pressure<90mmHg), hypothermia (<33°C), coagulation disorder (platelet count<90,000) or peripheral lesions such as multiple long-bone fractures, crushed limb or primary pulmonary contusion. In such cases, external fixation or retrograde nailing with a small-diameter nail and without

  8. Distinct frequency dependent effects of whole-body vibration on non-fractured bone and fracture healing in mice.

    PubMed

    Wehrle, Esther; Wehner, Tim; Heilmann, Aline; Bindl, Ronny; Claes, Lutz; Jakob, Franz; Amling, Michael; Ignatius, Anita

    2014-08-01

    Low-magnitude high-frequency vibration (LMHFV) provokes anabolic effects in non-fractured bone; however, in fracture healing, inconsistent results were reported and optimum vibration conditions remain unidentified. Here, we investigated frequency dependent effects of LMHFV on fracture healing. Twelve-week-old, female C57BL/6 mice received a femur osteotomy stabilized using an external fixator. The mice received whole-body vibrations (20 min/day) with 0.3g peak-to-peak acceleration and a frequency of either 35 or 45 Hz. After 10 and 21 days, the osteotomized femurs and intact bones (contra-lateral femurs, lumbar spine) were evaluated using bending-testing, µ-computed tomography, and histomorphometry. In non-fractured trabecular bone, vibration with 35 Hz significantly increased the relative amount of bone (+28%) and the trabecular number (+29%), whereas cortical bone was not influenced. LMHFV with 45 Hz failed to provoke anabolic effects in trabecular or cortical bone. Fracture healing was not significantly influenced by whole-body vibration with 35 Hz, whereas 45 Hz significantly reduced bone formation (-64%) and flexural rigidity (-34%) of the callus. Although the exact mechanisms remain open, our results suggest that small vibration setting changes could considerably influence LMHFV effects on bone formation in remodeling and repair, and even disrupt fracture healing, implicating caution when treating patients with impaired fracture healing.

  9. Impaction bone grafting and cemented stem revision in periprosthetic hip fractures: a novel surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Dearden, Paul M; Bobak, Peter P; Giannoudis, Peter V

    2014-01-01

    With an ageing population, and increasing longevity of hip arthroplasty prostheses, the incidence of periprosthetic femoral fractures is rising. We present a simple and easily reproducible technique for reduction of any periprosthetic fracture that requires bone graft augmentation. This method facilitates impaction bone grafting to reconstitute lost bone stock and revision using a cemented implant.

  10. Effect of CoCl₂ on fracture repair in a rat model of bone fracture.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiang; Liu, Liming; Feng, Mingli; An, Shuai; Zhou, Meng; Li, Zheng; Qi, Jiajian; Shen, Huiliang

    2015-10-01

    Low oxygen availability is known to activate the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) pathway, which is involved in the impairment of fracture healing. However, the role of low oxygen in fracture healing remains to be fully elucidated. In the present study, rats were divided into two groups and treated with CoCl2 or saline, respectively. Mice with tibial fractures were sacrificed at 14, 28 and 42 days subsequent to fracture. Autoradiography was performed to measure healing of the bone tissue. In addition, the effects of cobalt chloride (CoCl2) on the expression of two major angiogenic mediators, HIF‑1α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), as well as the osteoblast markers runt‑related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and osteocalcin (OC) were determined at mRNA and protein levels by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Systemic administration of CoCl2 (15 mg/kg/day intraperitoneally) significantly promoted fracture healing and mechanical strength. The present study demonstrated that in rats treated with CoCl2, the expression of HIF‑1α, VEGF, Runx2, ALP and OC was significantly increased at mRNA and protein levels, and that CoCl2 treatment enhances fracture repair in vivo.

  11. A Rare Combination Open Fracture Dislocation of Elbow with Open Fracture both Bones Forearm with Radial Nerve Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Shivanna, Deepak; Aski, Bahubali; Manjunath, Dayanand; Bhatnagar, Abhinav

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The injury pattern of open fracture dislocation of elbow with fracture both bones forearm with radial nerve injury is very rare. Very few reports are there in literature related to this kind of injury. However this combination is first of its kind. This rare injury needs special attention by early intervention and biological fixation to achieve good results. Case Report: A 22 year old female presented to us with history of road traffic accident. On evaluation patient had combination of open fracture dislocation of elbow with open diaphyseal fracture of both forearm bones with radial nerve palsy. The patient was treated in emergency and followed for 2 years. Conclusion: Open fracture dislocation of elbow is a rare entity. Our case additionally had open fracture both the bones forearm with radial nerve palsy. Early intervention and biological fixation with minimal invasion gives good results in terms of range of movements and patient satisfaction. PMID:27298951

  12. More-than-minimal-trauma fractures are associated with low bone density: an 8-year prospective study.

    PubMed

    Pereira, L; Bliuc, D; Stanford, P; Eisman, J A; Center, J R

    2017-01-01

    Few studies have examined the relationship between more-than-minimal-trauma fractures and bone density. This study demonstrated that more-than-minimal-trauma fractures are associated with lower bone density similar to that seen in minimal trauma fractures. Men and women over 50 years with a more-than-minimal-trauma fracture should be investigated to exclude low bone density.

  13. An interface finite element model can be used to predict healing outcome of bone fractures.

    PubMed

    Alierta, J A; Pérez, M A; García-Aznar, J M

    2014-01-01

    After fractures, bone can experience different potential outcomes: successful bone consolidation, non-union and bone failure. Although, there are a lot of factors that influence fracture healing, experimental studies have shown that the interfragmentary movement (IFM) is one of the main regulators for the course of bone healing. In this sense, computational models may help to improve the development of mechanical-based treatments for bone fracture healing. Hence, based on this fact, we propose a combined repair-failure mechanistic computational model to describe bone fracture healing. Despite being a simple model, it is able to correctly estimate the time course evolution of the IFM compared to in vivo measurements under different mechanical conditions. Therefore, this mathematical approach is especially suitable for modeling the healing response of bone to fractures treated with different mechanical fixators, simulating realistic clinical conditions. This model will be a useful tool to identify factors and define targets for patient specific therapeutics interventions.

  14. [Fracture toughness of cortical bone in tension, shear, and tear--a comparison of longitudinal and transverse fracture].

    PubMed

    Feng, Z

    1997-09-01

    The fracture toughness at crack initiation was determined for bovine cortical bone under tension (mode I), shear (mode II), and tear (mode III). A total of 130 compact tension specimens, compact shear specimens and triple pantleg specimens were used for the measurement of fracture toughness under tension, shear, and tear, respectively. Multiple-sample compliance method was utilized to measure the critical strain energy release rate (Gc) at the a/W = 0.55 (crack length, a, to specimen width, W, ratio). The critical stress intensity factor (Kc) was also calculated from the critical loading (PQ) of the specimens at the a/W = 0.55. The effect of the anisotropy of bone on its resistance to crack initiation under shear and tear loading was investigated as well. The fracture toughness of bone with precrack orientations parallel(designed as longitudinal fracture) to and that with precrack orientations normal (designed as transverse fracture) to the longitudinal axis of bone were compared. In longitudinal fracture, the critical strain energy release rates(Gc) of cortical bone under tension, shear, and tear were 644 +/- 102, 2430 +/- 836, and 1723 +/- 486 N/m, respectively. In transverse fracture, the critical strain energy release rates(Gc) of cortical bone under tesion, shear, and tear were 1374 +/- 183, 4710 +/- 1284, and 4016 +/- 948 N/m, respectively. An analysis of variance demonstrated that the crack initiation fracture toughness of bone under shear and tear loading is significantly greater than that under tensile loading in both longitudinal and transverse fracture. Our results also suggest that cortical bone has been "designed" to prevent crack initiation in transverse fracture under tension, shear, and tesar.

  15. Automatic retrieval of bone fracture knowledge using natural language processing.

    PubMed

    Do, Bao H; Wu, Andrew S; Maley, Joan; Biswal, Sandip

    2013-08-01

    Natural language processing (NLP) techniques to extract data from unstructured text into formal computer representations are valuable for creating robust, scalable methods to mine data in medical documents and radiology reports. As voice recognition (VR) becomes more prevalent in radiology practice, there is opportunity for implementing NLP in real time for decision-support applications such as context-aware information retrieval. For example, as the radiologist dictates a report, an NLP algorithm can extract concepts from the text and retrieve relevant classification or diagnosis criteria or calculate disease probability. NLP can work in parallel with VR to potentially facilitate evidence-based reporting (for example, automatically retrieving the Bosniak classification when the radiologist describes a kidney cyst). For these reasons, we developed and validated an NLP system which extracts fracture and anatomy concepts from unstructured text and retrieves relevant bone fracture knowledge. We implement our NLP in an HTML5 web application to demonstrate a proof-of-concept feedback NLP system which retrieves bone fracture knowledge in real time.

  16. Anti-IL-20 monoclonal antibody promotes bone fracture healing through regulating IL-20-mediated osteoblastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yu-Hsiang; Chiu, Yi-Shu; Chen, Wei-Yu; Huang, Kuo-Yuan; Jou, I-Ming; Wu, Po-Tin; Wu, Chih-Hsing; Chang, Ming-Shi

    2016-01-01

    Bone loss and skeletal fragility in bone fracture are caused by an imbalance in bone remodeling. The current challenge in bone fracture healing is to promote osteoblastogenesis and bone formation. We aimed to explore the role of IL-20 in osteoblastogenesis, osteoblast differentiation and bone fracture. Serum IL-20 was significantly correlated with serum sclerostin in patients with bone fracture. In a mouse model, anti-IL-20 monoclonal antibody (mAb) 7E increased bone formation during fracture healing. In vitro, IL-20 inhibited osteoblastogenesis by upregulating sclerostin, and downregulating osterix (OSX), RUNX2, and osteoprotegerin (OPG). IL-20R1 deficiency attenuated IL-20-mediated inhibition of osteoblast differentiation and maturation and reduced the healing time after a bone fracture. We conclude that IL-20 affects bone formation and downregulates osteoblastogenesis by modulating sclerostin, OSX, RUNX2, and OPG on osteoblasts. Our results demonstrated that IL-20 is involved in osteoregulation and anti-IL-20 mAb is a potential therapeutic for treating bone fracture or metabolic bone diseases. PMID:27075747

  17. [Bone fracture and the healing mechanisms. The mechanical stress for fracture healing in view of distraction osteogenesis].

    PubMed

    Yukata, Kiminori; Takahashi, Mitsuhiko; Yasui, Natsuo

    2009-05-01

    It is generally accepted that moderate mechanical stress influences the course of fracture healing. A flexible fixation of the fractured site can induce fracture callus formation, whereas an unstable fixation can lead to a nonunion. The relationship between mechanical stress and the process of bone regeneration or healing remains incompletely understood. Distraction osteogenesis is a surgical technique that, using appropriate mechanical tension-stress, does not break the callus but rather it stimulates and maintains osteogenesis. The common principles of distraction osteogenesis are osteotomy and slow progressive distraction by an external fixation device. Interest in bone regeneration associated with mechanical stress might lead to better understanding of the fracture healing process.

  18. The biomechanical effect of bone quality and fracture topography on locking plate fixation in periprosthetic femoral fractures.

    PubMed

    Leonidou, Andreas; Moazen, Mehran; Lepetsos, Panagiotis; Graham, Simon M; Macheras, George A; Tsiridis, Eleftherios

    2015-02-01

    Optimal management of periprosthetic femoral fractures (PFF) around a well fixed prosthesis (Vancouver B1) remains controversial as adequate fixation needs to be achieved without compromising the stability of the prosthesis. The aim of this study was to highlight the effect of bone quality i.e. canal thickness ratio (CTR), and fracture topography i.e. fracture angle and its position in relation to the stem, on the biomechanics of a locking plate for a Vancouver B1 fracture. A previously corroborated simplified finite element model of a femur with a cemented total hip replacement stem was used in this study. Canal thickness ratio (CTR) and fracture topography were altered in several models and the effect of these variations on the von Mises stress on the locking plate as well as the fracture displacement was studied. Increasing the CTR led to reduction of the von Mises stress on the locking plate as well as the fracture movement. In respect to the fracture angle with the medial cortex, it was shown that acute angles resulted in lower von Mises stress on the plate as opposed to obtuse angles. Furthermore, acute fracture angles resulted in lower fracture displacement compared to the other fractures considered here. Fractures around the tip of the stem had the same biomechanical effect on the locking plate. However, fractures more distal to the stem led to subsequent increase of stress, strain, and fracture displacement. Results highlight that in good bone quality and acute fracture angles, single locking plate fixation is perhaps an appropriate management method. On the contrary, for poor bone quality and obtuse fracture angles alternative management methods might be required as the fixation might be under higher risk of failure. Clinical studies for the management of PFF are required to further support our findings.

  19. Molecular signaling in bone fracture healing and distraction osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z; Luyten, F P; Lammens, J; Dequeker, J

    1999-04-01

    The process of fracture healing has been described in detail in many histological studies. Recent work has focused on the mechanisms by which growth and differentiation factors regulate the fracture healing process. Rapid progress in skeletal cellular and molecular biology has led to the identification of many signaling molecules associated with the formation of skeletal tissues, including members of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) superfamily and the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) family. Increasing evidence indicates that they are critical regulators of cellular proliferation, differentiation, extracellular matrix biosynthesis and mineralization. Limb lengthening procedure (distraction osteogenesis) is a relevant model to investigate the in vivo correlation between mechanical stimulation and biological responses as the callus is stretched by a proper rate and rhythm of mechanical strain. This model also provides additional insights into the molecular and cellular events during bone fracture repair. TGF-beta 1 was significantly increased in both the distracted callus and the fracture callus. The increased level of TGF-beta 1, together with a low concentration of calcium and an enhanced level of collagen synthesis, was maintained in the distracted callus as long as mechanical strain was applied. Less mineralization is also associated with a low level of osteocalcin production. These observations provide further insights into the molecular basis for the cellular events during distraction osteogenesis.

  20. [New Developments in CKD-MBD. Bone quality and fracture in patients with chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yoshiko; Yamato, Hideyuki

    2014-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients have an extremely increased risk of fragility fractures, but the underling pathophysiological mechanisms remain obscure. Recently, the progresses of analysis technology have revealed the changes of bone quality in CKD condition. In particular, we can observe the characteristic changes of bone microarchitecture and bone chemical compositions in both human bone biopsy samples and experimental animal bones. Here, I will provide a short review on these bone quality factors and discuss on the relationship between bone quality and fracture in CKD patients.

  1. [Epithelioid hemangioendothelioma of bone complicated by femoral fracture].

    PubMed

    Charfi, L; Mrad, K; Karray, S; Sassi, S; Driss, M; Abbes, I; Ben Romdhane, K

    2005-12-01

    A 54-year-old man was seen with a fracture of the left femur. Plain radiographs revealed a 40-mm lytic centromedullary lesion. Magnetic resonance T1- and T2-weighted sequences showed high and low signals. After stabilization of the fracture, the tumor was removed followed by reconstruction with a vascularized fibula. The pathological examination demonstrated proliferation of non atypical CD34 and CD31 positive epithelioid cells with few lumens, accompanied by abundant fibrous stroma, sometimes masking tumor cells. Satisfactory motion was achieved with no recurrence at 20 months follow-up. Bone hemangioendothelioma can simulate metastasis and must be distinguished by immunohistochemistry. Prognosis is a subject of debate as the tumor is considered to exhibit intermediate malignancy by some authors while other consider it to be a malignant tumor.

  2. Assessing Bone Mineral Density Following Acute Hip Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Wiggin, Molly; Hemmati, Pouya; Switzer, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: In older patients, bone mineral density (BMD) diminishes with age, increasing susceptibility to femoral neck fractures. Evidence has emerged that patients who should have dual x-ray absorptiometry scans to evaluate their bone health are not doing so. Because computed tomography (CT) attenuation has now been correlated with BMD thresholds relating to osteoporosis, virtually any existing CT scan that includes the L1 vertebra can be used to assess BMD. This study evaluates the utility of CT attenuation in characterizing BMD in patients after femoral neck fractures. Methods: The electronic medical records of adults who presented to a level I trauma center with hip fractures were evaluated for eligibility. Those with a CT scan of the abdomen or other CT scan with a complete view of the L1 vertebra were included. To measure attenuation, a region of interest was selected to include the body of the L1 vertebra in the axial plane and exclude the cortices and posterior venous complex. Results: Of the 589 patients reviewed, 217 met inclusion criteria; 112 were aged 18 to 64, while 105 were ≥65. Eight (7.1%) patients in the younger cohort had a mean CT attenuation below the 110-HU threshold set for 90% specificity, whereas 31 (29.5%) patients in the older cohort had a mean CT attenuation below this threshold. Using the 160-HU threshold set for 90% sensitivity, 39 (34.8%) patients of the younger cohort and 74 (70%) patients of the older cohort were osteoporotic; all differences in CT attenuation by age were strongly significant (P < .0001). Conclusions: A significantly larger proportion of older patients with hip fractures had osteoporosis, helping validate the utility of CT attenuation in this context. In addition, a large proportion of these patients already had these images available, thus potentially helping limit cost and unnecessary medical investigations. PMID:26246948

  3. Sphenoid Sinus and Sphenoid Bone Fractures in Patients with Craniomaxillofacial Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Cantini Ardila, Jorge Ernesto; Mendoza, Miguel Ángel Rivera; Ortega, Viviana Gómez

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Sphenoid bone fractures and sphenoid sinus fractures have a high morbidity due to its association with high-energy trauma. The purpose of this study is to describe individuals with traumatic injuries from different mechanisms and attempt to determine if there is any relationship between various isolated or combined fractures of facial skeleton and sphenoid bone and sphenoid sinus fractures. Methods We retrospectively studied hospital charts of all patients who reported to the trauma center at Hospital de San José with facial fractures from December 2009 to August 2011. All patients were evaluated by computed tomography scan and classified into low-, medium-, and high-energy trauma fractures, according to the classification described by Manson. Design This is a retrospective descriptive study. Results The study data were collected as part of retrospective analysis. A total of 250 patients reported to the trauma center of the study hospital with facial trauma. Thirty-eight patients were excluded. A total of 212 patients had facial fractures; 33 had a combination of sphenoid sinus and sphenoid bone fractures, and facial fractures were identified within this group (15.5%). Gender predilection was seen to favor males (77.3%) more than females (22.7%). The mean age of the patients was 37 years. Orbital fractures (78.8%) and maxillary fractures (57.5%) were found more commonly associated with sphenoid sinus and sphenoid bone fractures. Conclusions High-energy trauma is more frequently associated with sphenoid fractures when compared with medium- and low-energy trauma. There is a correlation between facial fractures and sphenoid sinus and sphenoid bone fractures. A more exhaustive multicentric case-control study with a larger sample and additional parameters will be essential to reach definite conclusions regarding the spectrum of fractures of the sphenoid bone associated with facial fractures. PMID:24436756

  4. Immature myeloid cells are critical for enhancing bone fracture healing through angiogenic cascade.

    PubMed

    Levy, Seth; Feduska, Joseph M; Sawant, Anandi; Gilbert, Shawn R; Hensel, Jonathan A; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan

    2016-12-01

    Bone fractures heal with overlapping phases of inflammation, cell proliferation, and bone remodeling. Osteogenesis and angiogenesis work in concert to control many stages of this process, and when one is impaired it leads to failure of bone healing, termed a nonunion. During fracture repair, there is an infiltration of immune cells at the fracture site that not only mediate the inflammatory responses, but we hypothesize they also exert influence on neovasculature. Thus, further understanding the effects of immune cell participation throughout fracture healing will reveal additional knowledge as to why some fractures heal while others form nonunions, and lead to development of novel therapeutics modulating immune cells, to increase fracture healing and prevent nonunions. Using novel femoral segmental and critical-size defect models in mice, we identified a systemic and significant increase in immature myeloid cell (IMC) infiltration during the initial phase of fracture healing until boney union is complete. Using gemcitabine to specifically ablate the IMC population, we confirmed delayed bone healing. Further, adoptive transfer of IMC increased bone growth in a nonunion model, signifying the role of this unique cell population in fracture healing. We also identified IMC post-fracture have the ability to increase endothelial cell migration, and tube formation, signaling the essential communication between the immune system and angiogenesis as a requirement for proper bone healing. Based on this data we propose that IMC may play a significant role in fracture healing and therapeutic targeting of IMC after fracture would minimize the chances of eventual nonunion pathology.

  5. The use of deep frozen and irradiated bone allografts in the reconstruction of tibial plateau fractures.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wei; Fu, Li; Liu, Jianguo; Li, Dongsong; Qi, Xin

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the clinical behavior of deep frozen and irradiated bone allografts in the treatment of depressed tibial plateau fractures. Twenty-two patients with a tibial plateau fracture were treated with cancellous bone allografts. The bone allograft preparation process included fresh-freezing at -70 °C for 4 weeks and gamma-irradiation at 25 kGy. All of the patients were followed for 1-2 years. The clinical effects were assessed using the Rasmussen score for tibial head fractures and X-rays. Postoperatively, the average excellent and fair Rasmussen scores were 88.9%. Only one patient developed an infection, with no integration between allograft and recipient bone observed. All of the other bone allografts were incorporated successfully, and no osteoporosis or sclerosis was observed. The frozen and gamma-irradiated bone allograft is a good alternative in the treatment of tibial plateau fractures, which we have shown can integrate with the surrounding host bone.

  6. Treatment of nonunions of long bone fractures with shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ching-Jen

    2003-10-01

    A prospective clinical study investigated the effectiveness of shock waves in the treatment of 72 patients with 72 nonunions of long bone fractures (41 femurs, 19 tibias, 7 humeri, 1 radius, 3 ulnas and 1 metatarsal). The doses of shock waves were 6000 impulses at 28 kV for the femur and tibia, 3000 impulses at 28 kV for the humerus, 2000 impulses at 24 kV for the radius and ulna, and 1000 impulses at 20 kV for the metatarsal. The results of treatment were assessed clinically, and fracture healing was assessed with plain x-rays and tomography. The rate of bony union was 40% at 3 months, 60.9% at 6 months and 80% at 12 months followup. Shock wave treatment was most successful in hypertrophic nonunions and nonunions with a defect and was least effective in atrophic nonunions. There were no systemic complications or device-related problems. Local complications included petechiae and hematoma formation that resolved spontaneously. In the author's experience, the results of the shock wave treatment were similar to the results of surgical treatment for chronic nonunions with no surgical risks. Shock wave treatment is a safe and effective alternative method in the treatment of chronic nonunions of long bones.

  7. An in vitro study of ultrasound signal loss across simple fractures in cortical bone mimics and bovine cortical bone samples.

    PubMed

    Dodd, S P; Cunningham, J L; Miles, A W; Gheduzzi, S; Humphrey, V F

    2007-03-01

    Measurements have been performed on Sawbones and bovine cortical bone samples at 200 kHz using an axial transmission technique to investigate the factors that determine how ultrasonic waves propagate across a simulated fracture. The peak amplitude of the first arrival signal (FAS) was studied. Results taken from intact specimens were compared with those produced when a simple transverse fracture was introduced. These fracture simulation experiments were found to be consistent with Finite Difference modelling of the experimental conditions. The peak amplitude showed a characteristic variation across the fracture caused by interference between reradiated and scattered/diffracted waves at the fracture site and a net Fracture Transmission Loss (FTL). For small fracture gaps, the change in amplitude was sensitive to the presence of the fracture. This sensitivity suggests that this parameter could be a good quantitative indicator for the fracture healing process assuming the relative change in this parameter brought about by healing is measurable.

  8. PREVALENCE OF HEALED LONG-BONE FRACTURES IN WILD CARNIVORES FROM THE NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES.

    PubMed

    Argyros, George C; Roth, Aaron J

    2016-09-01

    Museum specimens representing 12 species of terrestrial carnivores from the northeastern United States were inspected for evidence of healed long-bone fractures. Of 413 individuals, 18 (4.4%) exhibited healed fractures. Thirteen (72.2%) occurred in hind limbs; five (27.8%) occurred in forelimbs. Mustelids had the highest prevalence of healed long-bone fractures (38.8%) of all observed fractures. Within family, 5.6% of Canidae and 2.8% of Mustelidae exhibited healed fractures. Bobcats had the highest taxon prevalence of fractures, 18%. Observational data to assess use of and behavior near roads could provide insight to causes of fracture. Capture in combination with noninvasive examination techniques could be employed to determine incidence of healed fractures in wild populations. Individuals with healed fractures could then be tracked via radio telemetry to determine if these animals behave differently than uninjured conspecifics, and assess long-term survivability and fitness.

  9. FRAX and fracture prediction without bone mineral density.

    PubMed

    Kanis, J A; Harvey, N C; Johansson, H; Odén, A; Leslie, W D; McCloskey, E V

    2015-01-01

    The major application of FRAX in osteoporosis is to direct pharmacological interventions to those at high risk of fracture. Whereas the efficacy of osteoporosis treatment, with the possible exception of alendronate, is largely independent of baseline bone mineral density (BMD), it remains a widely held perception that osteoporosis therapies are only effective in the presence of low BMD. Thus, the use of FRAX in the absence of BMD to identify individuals requiring therapy remains the subject of some debate and is the focus of this review. The clinical risk factors used in FRAX have high evidence-based validity to identify a risk responsive to intervention. The selection of high-risk individuals with FRAX, without knowledge of BMD, preferentially selects for low BMD and thus identifies a risk that is responsive to pharmacological intervention. The prediction of fractures with the use of clinical risk factors alone in FRAX is comparable to the use of BMD alone to predict fractures and is suitable, therefore, in the many countries where facilities for BMD testing are sparse. In countries where access to BMD is greater, FRAX can be used without BMD in the majority of cases and BMD tests reserved for those close to a probability-based intervention threshold. Thus concerns surrounding the use of FRAX in clinical practice without information on BMD are largely misplaced.

  10. Modeling of an initial stage of bone fracture healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yanfei; Lekszycki, Tomasz

    2015-09-01

    In case of the secondary bone fracture healing, four characteristic steps are often distinguished. The first stage, hematoma and clot formation, which is an object of our study, is important because it prepares the environment for the following stages. In this work, a new mathematical model describing basic effects present short after the injury is proposed. The main idea is based on the assumption that blood leaking from the ruptured blood vessels propagates into a poroelastic saturated tissue close to the fracture and mixes with the interstitial liquid present in pores. After certain time period from the first contact with surrounding tissue, the solidification of blood in the fluid mixture starts. This results in clot formation. By assuming the time necessary to initiate solidification and critical saturation of blood in the mixture, the shape and the structure of blood clot could be determined. In numerical example, proposed mathematical formulas were used to study the size of the gap between fractured parts and its effect in blood clot formation.

  11. Roller blade falls--a new cause of temporal bone fractures: case reports.

    PubMed

    Weinberger, D G; Selesnick, S H

    1994-09-01

    Skating on wheels-in-line skates (roller blading) is an increasingly popular activity. We present two cases of temporal bone fractures from roller blading falls, and review the literature on temporal bone fractures resulting from recreational activities. Since trauma from roller blading may result in significant morbidity, the use of helmets is strongly recommended.

  12. Nose fracture

    MedlinePlus

    Fracture of the nose; Broken nose; Nasal fracture; Nasal bone fracture; Nasal septal fracture ... A fractured nose is the most common fracture of the face. It ... with other fractures of the face. Sometimes a blunt injury can ...

  13. Significant forefoot varus deformity resulting in progressive stress fractures of all lesser metatarsal bones.

    PubMed

    van der Vlies, Cornelis H; Ponsen, Kees J; Besselaar, Philip P; Goslings, J Carel

    2007-01-01

    Stress fractures may occur in any bone, but appear most frequently in the metatarsal bones. Consecutive stress fractures of all lesser metatarsals in a short period are rare, and only a few cases have been described in the literature. We report an unusual case of a young man with consecutive stress fractures of four adjacent lesser metatarsal bones. The etiology was in all probability the fixed forefoot varus deformity. This foot deformity may impose increased mechanical loads across the lateral aspect of the foot that, in turn, may result in stress fractures involving the lesser metatarsals. In our patient conservative treatment finally resulted in a satisfactory outcome.

  14. Biochemical markers of bone turnover, hip bone loss, and fracture in older men: the MrOS study.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Douglas C; Garnero, Patrick; Harrison, Stephanie L; Cauley, Jane A; Eastell, Richard; Ensrud, Kris E; Orwoll, Eric

    2009-12-01

    We used data from the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study to test the hypothesis that men with higher levels of bone turnover would have accelerated bone loss and an elevated risk of fracture. MrOS enrolled 5995 subjects >65 yr; hip BMD was measured at baseline and after a mean follow-up of 4.6 yr. Nonspine fractures were documented during a mean follow-up of 5.0 yr. Using fasting serum collected at baseline and stored at -190 degrees C, bone turnover measurements (type I collagen N-propeptide [PINP]; beta C-terminal cross-linked telopeptide of type I collagen [betaCTX]; and TRACP5b) were obtained on 384 men with nonspine fracture (including 72 hip fractures) and 947 men selected at random. Among randomly selected men, total hip bone loss was 0.5%/yr among those in the highest quartile of PINP (>44.3 ng/ml) and 0.3%/yr among those in the lower three quartiles (p = 0.01). Fracture risk was elevated among men in the highest quartile of PINP (hip fracture relative hazard = 2.13; 95% CI: 1.23, 3.68; nonspine relative hazard = 1.57, 95% CI: 1.21, 2.05) or betaCTX (hip fracture relative hazard = 1.76, 95 CI: 1.04, 2.98; nonspine relative hazard = 1.29, 95% CI: 0.99, 1.69) but not TRACP5b. Further adjustment for baseline hip BMD eliminated all associations between bone turnover and fracture. We conclude that higher levels of bone turnover are associated with greater hip bone loss in older men, but increased turnover is not independently associated with the risk of hip or nonspine fracture.

  15. Predicting the external formation of callus tissues in oblique bone fractures: idealised and clinical case studies.

    PubMed

    Comiskey, D; MacDonald, B J; McCartney, W T; Synnott, K; O'Byrne, J

    2013-11-01

    It is proposed that the external asymmetric formation of callus tissues that forms naturally about an oblique bone fracture can be predicted computationally. We present an analysis of callus formation for two cases of bone fracture healing: idealised and subject-specific oblique bone fractures. Plane strain finite element (FE) models of the oblique fractures were generated to calculate the compressive strain field experienced by the immature callus tissues due to interfragmentary motion. The external formations of the calluses were phenomenologically simulated using an optimisation style algorithm that iteratively removes tissue that experiences low strains from a large domain. The resultant simulated spatial formation of the healing tissues for the two bone fracture cases showed that the calluses tended to form at an angle equivalent to the angle of the oblique fracture line. The computational results qualitatively correlated with the callus formations found in vivo. Consequently, the proposed methods show potential as a means of predicting callus formation in pre-clinical testing.

  16. The diabetic paradox: Bone mineral density and fracture in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Botella Martínez, Sonsoles; Varo Cenarruzabeitia, Nerea; Escalada San Martin, Javier; Calleja Canelas, Amparo

    2016-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus prevalence and morbidity are increasing. Osteoporotic fractures are among the 'non-classical' complications of diabetes and been overlooked for a long time, maybe because of their complex diagnostic and therapeutic approach. The usual tools for preventing fragility fractures (such as the fracture risk assessment tool and bone densitometry) underestimate risk of fractures in type2 diabetic patients. New techniques, such as trabecular bone score or bone turnover markers, could be useful, but greater scientific evidence is required to recommend their use in clinical practice. The special characteristics of their pathophysiology result in decreased bone remodeling with normal or even increased bone mineral density, but with low quality. These changes lead to the occurrence of osteoporotic fractures without evidence of densitometric changes, which could be called 'the diabetic paradox'.

  17. Development and validation of a predictive bone fracture risk model for astronauts.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Emily S; Lewandowski, Beth; Licata, Angelo; Myers, Jerry G

    2009-11-01

    There are still many unknowns in the physiological response of human beings to space, but compelling evidence indicates that accelerated bone loss will be a consequence of long-duration spaceflight. Lacking phenomenological data on fracture risk in space, we have developed a predictive tool based on biomechanical and bone loading models at any gravitational level of interest. The tool is a statistical model that forecasts fracture risk, bounds the associated uncertainties, and performs sensitivity analysis. In this paper, we focused on events that represent severe consequences for an exploration mission, specifically that of spinal fracture resulting from a routine task (lifting a heavy object up to 60 kg), or a spinal, femoral or wrist fracture due to an accidental fall or an intentional jump from 1 to 2 m. We validated the biomechanical and bone fracture models against terrestrial studies of ground reaction forces, skeletal loading, fracture risk, and fracture incidence. Finally, we predicted fracture risk associated with reference missions to the moon and Mars that represented crew activities on the surface. Fracture was much more likely on Mars due to compromised bone integrity. No statistically significant gender-dependent differences emerged. Wrist fracture was the most likely type of fracture, followed by spinal and hip fracture.

  18. Femoral fracture after harvesting of autologous bone graft using a reamer/irrigator/aspirator.

    PubMed

    Giori, Nicholas J; Beaupre, Gary S

    2011-02-01

    A case of postoperative fracture in the donor femur after obtaining autologous bone graft with a reamer/irrigator/aspirator is presented. This procedure was successful in healing a difficult femoral nonunion, but the patient sustained a fracture of the contralateral (bone graft donor) femur 20 days after surgery. A mechanical analysis is conducted of this case and recommendations are made. Unrestricted weightbearing on a limb that has undergone reamer/irrigator/aspirator bone graft harvesting, particularly in a noncompliant patient, is probably inadvisable. If possible, one should obtain bone graft from the same limb as the fracture being treated because this will leave the patient with one unaltered limb for mobilization.

  19. Bone Transport for Limb Reconstruction Following Severe Tibial Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Fürmetz, Julian; Soo, Chris; Behrendt, Wolf; Thaller, Peter H.; Siekmann, Holger; Böhme, Jörg; Josten, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    A common treatment of tibial defects especially after infections is bone transport via external fixation. We compare complications and outcomes of 25 patients treated with a typical Ilizarov frame or a hybrid system for bone reconstruction of the tibia. Average follow up was 5.1 years. Particular interest was paid to the following criteria: injury type, comorbidities, development of osteitis and outcome of the different therapies. The reason for segmental resection was a second or third grade open tibia fractures in 24 cases and in one case an infection after plate osteosynthesis. Average age of the patients was 41 years (range 19 to 65 years) and average defect size 6.6 cm (range 3.0 to 13.4 cm). After a mean time of 113 days 23 tibial defects were reconstructed, so we calculated an average healing index of 44.2 days/cm. Two patients with major comorbidities needed a below knee amputation. The presence of osteitis led to a more complicated course of therapy. In the follow up patients with an Ilizarov frame had better results than patients with hybrid systems. Bone transport using external fixation is suitable for larger defect reconstruction. With significant comorbidities, however, a primary amputation or other methods must be considered. PMID:27114814

  20. The facial-bone fractures among fatally injured car occupants in frontal collisions.

    PubMed

    Nikolic, S D; Atanasijevic, T C; Popovic, V M; Soc, M V

    2009-04-01

    The retrospective study was performed of all deceased car-occupants in frontal car collisions in order to identify persons with facial-bone fractures. The sample consisted of 482 cases: 378 males and 104 females, average age of 39.59+/-16.01 years. There were 239 car-drivers, 194 front-seat passengers, and 49 rear-seat passengers. In 46 of 482 cases, single fracture of upper facial bones was established: nasal fractures were the most common, followed by zygomatic. In 118 of 482 cases, fracture of upper facial bones was established, as well as 70 cases of jawbone. The fractured facial bones either of the upper or lower face could not be a factor that predicts the position of the deceased in the motor vehicle at the moment of injury (lambda=0.989, p>0.05). The multi-fractured facial-bones were very often associated with the multi-fractured cranial bones - 85 cases (chi(2) =138.75, df=8, p<0.001), as well as jawbone fracture - 35 cases (chi(2) =20.52, df=4, p<0.001). Brain injuries were more present and more severe (coup and contrecoup-contusion and brain laceration) if more facial-bone fractures were involved (chi(2) =147.99, df=8, p<0.001). Cases with only contrecoup brain contusions, associated with multi-fractured facial-bones, were rare - 6 of 118. These fractures are very often associated with cranial fractures, as well as with brain injuries and were caused by intensive contact of the deceased's head with the car's pillar.

  1. Bone graft

    MedlinePlus

    Autograft - bone; Allograft - bone; Fracture - bone graft; Surgery - bone graft; Autologous bone graft ... Fuse joints to prevent movement Repair broken bones (fractures) that have bone loss Repair injured bone that ...

  2. Integrity of the osteocyte bone cell network in osteoporotic fracture: Implications for mechanical load adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuliwaba, J. S.; Truong, L.; Codrington, J. D.; Fazzalari, N. L.

    2010-06-01

    The human skeleton has the ability to modify its material composition and structure to accommodate loads through adaptive modelling and remodelling. The osteocyte cell network is now considered to be central to the regulation of skeletal homeostasis; however, very little is known of the integrity of the osteocyte cell network in osteoporotic fragility fracture. This study was designed to characterise osteocyte morphology, the extent of osteocyte cell apoptosis and expression of sclerostin protein (a negative regulator of bone formation) in trabecular bone from the intertrochanteric region of the proximal femur, for postmenopausal women with fragility hip fracture compared to age-matched women who had not sustained fragility fracture. Osteocyte morphology (osteocyte, empty lacunar, and total lacunar densities) and the degree of osteocyte apoptosis (percent caspase-3 positive osteocyte lacunae) were similar between the fracture patients and non-fracture women. The fragility hip fracture patients had a lower proportion of sclerostin-positive osteocyte lacunae in comparison to sclerostin-negative osteocyte lacunae, in contrast to similar percent sclerostin-positive/sclerostin-negative lacunae for non-fracture women. The unexpected finding of decreased sclerostin expression in trabecular bone osteocytes from fracture cases may be indicative of elevated bone turnover and under-mineralisation, characteristic of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Further, altered osteocytic expression of sclerostin may be involved in the mechano-responsiveness of bone. Optimal function of the osteocyte cell network is likely to be a critical determinant of bone strength, acting via mechanical load adaptation, and thus contributing to osteoporotic fracture risk.

  3. Fracture mechanics of bone--the effects of density, specimen thickness and crack velocity on longitudinal fracture.

    PubMed

    Behiri, J C; Bonfield, W

    1984-01-01

    The fracture mechanics parameters of critical stress intensity factor (Kc) and critical strain energy release rate (Gc) for longitudinal fracture of bovine tibia cortical bone were determined by the compact tension method. It was demonstrated that, for a given bone density, Kc and Gc depended on the loading rate, and resultant crack velocity, with a maximum in fracture toughness (Kc approximately 6.3 MNm-3/2, Gc approximately 2900 Jm-2) at a crack velocity approximately 10(-3) ms-1. For a given loading rate, or crack velocity, an increase in bone density, in the range from 1.92 to 2.02 Mgm-3, produced increases in Kc and Gc, but a variation in specimen thickness (from 0.5 to 2 mm) had no effect on the measured fracture mechanics parameters.

  4. Sarcopenia and fragility fractures: molecular and clinical evidence of the bone-muscle interaction.

    PubMed

    Tarantino, Umberto; Piccirilli, Eleonora; Fantini, Massimo; Baldi, Jacopo; Gasbarra, Elena; Bei, Roberto

    2015-03-04

    Bone and muscle tissues are in close relationship, and the aging process is a factor involved in the loss of the functionality of both bones and muscles.➤ Sarcopenia and osteoporosis are linked from a biological and functional perspective and are related to an increased fracture risk in the elderly.➤ The increased fracture risk in sarcopenic and osteoporotic subjects is due to the decline of muscle mass and strength, the decrease in bone mineral density, and limited mobility.

  5. Bone Repair on Fractures Treated with Osteosynthesis, ir Laser, Bone Graft and Guided Bone Regeneration: Histomorfometric Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos Aciole, Jouber Mateus; dos Santos Aciole, Gilberth Tadeu; Soares, Luiz Guilherme Pinheiro; Barbosa, Artur Felipe Santos; Santos, Jean Nunes; Pinheiro, Antonio Luiz Barbosa

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate, through the analysis of histomorfometric, the repair of complete tibial fracture in rabbits fixed with osteosynthesis, treated or not with infrared laser light (λ780 nm, 50 mW, CW) associated or not to the use of hydroxyapatite and guided bone regeneration (GBR). Surgical fractures were created, under general anesthesia (Ketamina 0,4 ml/Kg IP and Xilazina 0,2 ml/Kg IP), on the dorsum of 15 Oryctolagus rabbits that were divided into 5 groups and maintained on individual cages, at day/night cycle, fed with solid laboratory pelted diet and had water ad libidum. On groups II, III, IV and V the fracture was fixed with wire osteosynthesis. Animals of groups III and V were grafted with hydroxyapatite and GBR technique used. Animals of groups IV and V were irradiated at every other day during two weeks (16 J/cm2, 4×4 J/cm2). Observation time was that of 30 days. After animal death (overdose of general anesthetics) the specimes were routinely processed to wax and underwent histological analysis by light microscopy. The histomorfometric analysis showed an increased bone neoformation, increased collagen deposition, less reabsorption and inflammation when laser was associated to the HATCP. It is concluded that IR laser light was able to accelerate fracture healing and the association with HATCP and GBR resulted on increased deposition of CHA.

  6. VEGF serum concentrations in patients with long bone fractures: a comparison between impaired and normal fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Sarahrudi, Kambiz; Thomas, Anita; Braunsteiner, Tomas; Wolf, Harald; Vécsei, Vilmos; Aharinejad, Seyedhossein

    2009-10-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays an important role in the bone repair process as a potent mediator of angiogenesis and it influences directly osteoblast differentiation. Inhibiting VEGF suppresses angiogenesis and callus mineralization in animals. However, no data exist so far on systemic expression of VEGF with regard to delayed or failed fracture healing in humans. One hundred fourteen patients with long bone fractures were included in the study. Serum samples were collected over a period of 6 months following a standardized time schedule. VEGF serum concentrations were measured. Patients were assigned to one of two groups according to their course of fracture healing. The first group contained 103 patients with physiological fracture healing. Eleven patients with delayed or nonunions formed the second group of the study. In addition, 33 healthy volunteers served as controls. An increase of VEGF serum concentration within the first 2 weeks after fracture in both groups with a following decrease within 6 months after trauma was observed. Serum VEGF concentrations in patients with impaired fracture healing were higher compared to the patients with physiological healing during the entire observation period. However, statistically significant differences were not observed at any time point between both groups. VEGF concentrations in both groups were significantly higher than those in controls. The present results show significantly elevated serum concentrations of VEGF in patients after fracture of long bones especially at the initial healing phase, indicating the importance of VEGF in the process of fracture healing in humans.

  7. Association of microstructural and mechanical properties of cancellous bone and their fracture risk assessment tool scores

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dengke; Li, Xin; Tao, Cheng; Dai, Ruchun; Ni, Jiangdong; Liao, Eryuan

    2015-01-01

    This study is to investigate the association between fracture probabilities determined by using the fracture risk assessment tool (FRAX) and the microstructure and mechanical properties of femoral bone trabecula in osteoporosis (OP) and osteoarthritis (OA) patients with hip replacements. By using FRAX, we evaluated fracture risks of the 102 patients with bone replacements. Using micro CT scanning, we obtained the analysis parameters of microstructural properties of cancellous bone. Through morphometric observations, fatigue tests and compression tests, we obtained parameters of mechanical properties of cancellous bones. Relevant Pearson analysis was performed to investigate the association between the fracture probability and the microstructure and mechanical properties of femoral bone trabecula in patients. Fifteen risk factors in FRAX were compared between OP and OA patients. FRAX hip fracture risk score and major osteoporotic in OP and OA patients were significantly different. FRAX was associated with tissue bone mineral density and volumetric bone mineral density. Our study suggests that the probabilities of major osteoporotic and hip fracture using FRAX is associated with bone mass but not with micro bone quality. PMID:26064297

  8. Relating Crack-tip Deformation to Mineralization and Fracture Resistance in Human Femur Cortical Bone

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kwai S.; Chan, Candace K.; Nicolella, Daniel P.

    2009-01-01

    The risk of bone fracture increases with age because of a variety of factors that include, among others, decreasing bone quantity and quality. Despite recent advances, the roles of bone microstructure and trace mineralization in the fracture process are not well understood. In this study, we utilize a combination of in-situ fracture toughness testing, digital strain mapping, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques to characterize the near-tip strain field, fracture toughness, and chemical elements on the fracture surface of bone specimens from donors of two ages (48-year-old and 78-year-old females). We show that age-related embrittlement of bone fracture is associated with higher near-tip strains by lamellar shear and crack defection at lamellar interfaces in the young bone and their absence in the old bone. The different near-tip deformation behaviors may be associated with the presence of Si and Zn in the young bone but more Ca and P and the lack of Si and Zn in the old bone. PMID:19497396

  9. Thrombospondin-2 influences the proportion of cartilage and bone during fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Douglas K; Meganck, Jeffrey A; Terkhorn, Shawn; Rajani, Rajiv; Naik, Amish; O'Keefe, Regis J; Goldstein, Steven A; Hankenson, Kurt D

    2009-06-01

    Thrombospondin-2 (TSP2) is a matricellular protein with increased expression during growth and regeneration. TSP2-null mice show accelerated dermal wound healing and enhanced bone formation. We hypothesized that bone regeneration would be enhanced in the absence of TSP2. Closed, semistabilized transverse fractures were created in the tibias of wildtype (WT) and TSP2-null mice. The fractures were examined 5, 10, and 20 days after fracture using microCT, histology, immunohistochemistry, quantitative RT-PCR, and torsional mechanical testing. Ten days after fracture, TSP2-null mice showed 30% more bone by microCT and 40% less cartilage by histology. Twenty days after fracture, TSP2-null mice showed reduced bone volume fraction and BMD. Mice were examined 5 days after fracture during the stage of neovascularization and mesenchymal cell influx to determine a cellular explanation for the phenotype. TSP2-null mice showed increased cell proliferation with no difference in apoptosis in the highly cellular fracture callus. Although mature bone and cartilage is minimal 5 days after fracture, TSP2-null mice had reduced expression of collagen IIa and Sox9 (chondrocyte differentiation markers) but increased expression of osteocalcin and osterix (osteoblast differentiation markers). Importantly, TSP2-null mice had a 2-fold increase in vessel density that corresponded with a reduction in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and Glut-1 (markers of hypoxia inducible factor [HIF]-regulated transcription). Finally, by expressing TSP2 using adenovirus starting 3 days after fracture, chondrogenesis was restored in TSP2-null mice. We hypothesize that TSP2 expressed by cells in the fracture mesenchyme regulates callus vascularization. The increase in vascularity increases tissue oxemia and decreases HIF; thus, undifferentiated cells in the callus develop into osteoblasts rather than chondrocytes. This leads to an alternative strategy for achieving fracture healing with reduced

  10. Premenopausal Women with a Distal Radial Fracture Have Deteriorated Trabecular Bone Density and Morphology Compared with Controls without a Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Rozental, Tamara D.; Deschamps, Laura N.; Taylor, Alexander; Earp, Brandon; Zurakowski, David; Day, Charles S.; Bouxsein, Mary L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Measurement of bone mineral density by dual x-ray absorptiometry combined with clinical risk factors is currently the gold standard in diagnosing osteoporosis. Advanced imaging has shown that older patients with fragility fractures have poor bone microarchitecture, often independent of low bone mineral density. We hypothesized that premenopausal women with a fracture of the distal end of the radius have similar bone mineral density but altered bone microarchitecture compared with control subjects without a fracture. Methods: Forty premenopausal women with a recent distal radial fracture were prospectively recruited and matched with eighty control subjects without a fracture. Primary outcome variables included trabecular and cortical microarchitecture at the distal end of the radius and tibia by high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography. Bone mineral density at the wrist, hip, and lumbar spine was also measured by dual x-ray absorptiometry. Results: The fracture and control groups did not differ with regard to age, race, or body mass index. Bone mineral density was similar at the femoral neck, lumbar spine, and distal one-third of the radius, but tended to be lower in the fracture group at the hip and ultradistal part of the radius (p = 0.06). Trabecular microarchitecture was deteriorated in the fracture group compared with the control group at both the distal end of the radius and distal end of the tibia. At the distal end of the radius, the fracture group had lower total density and lower trabecular density, number, and thickness compared with the control group (–6% to –14%; p < 0.05 for all). At the distal end of the tibia, total density, trabecular density, trabecular thickness, and cortical thickness were lower in the fracture group than in the control group (–7% to –14%; p < 0.01). Conditional logistic regression showed that trabecular density, thickness, separation, and distribution of trabecular separation remained

  11. Bone-Muscle Indices as Risk Factors for Fractures in Men: The Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study

    PubMed Central

    Wong, A.K.O.; Cawthon, P.M.; Peters, K.W.; Cummings, S.R.; Gordon, C.L; Sheu, Y.; Ensrud, K.; Petit, M.; Zmuda, J.M.; Orwoll, E.; Cauley, J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess bone-muscle (B-M) indices as risk factors for incident fractures in men. Methods Participants of the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study completed a peripheral quantitative computed tomography scan at 66% of their tibial length. Bone macrostructure, mechanical properties and muscle area were computed. Areal bone mineral density (aBMD) and body composition was assessed with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Four year incident non-spine and clinical vertebral fractures were ascertained. B-M indices were expressed as bone-to-muscle ratios for: strength, mass and area. Discriminative power and hazards ratios (HR) for fractures were reported. Results In 1163 men (age: 77.2 ± 5.2 years, BMI: 28.0 ± 4.0 kg/m2, 7.7% ≥ 1 fracture), B-M indices were smaller in fractured men except for bending and areal indices. Smaller B-M indices were associated with increased fracture risk (HR: 1.30 to 1.74) independent of age and body mass index. Strength and mass indices remained significant after accounting for lumbar spine aBMD. B-M indices did not improve fracture discrimination beyond total hip aBMD. However, aBMD already explains part of the variance in B-M indices. Conclusion Mass and bending B-M indices are risk factors for fractures men, but may not improve fracture risk prediction beyond that provided by total hip aBMD. PMID:25198219

  12. The fracture mechanics of human bone: influence of disease and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A; Busse, Björn; Ritchie, Robert O

    2015-01-01

    Aging and bone diseases are associated with increased fracture risk. It is therefore pertinent to seek an understanding of the origins of such disease-related deterioration in bone's mechanical properties. The mechanical integrity of bone derives from its hierarchical structure, which in healthy tissue is able to resist complex physiological loading patterns and tolerate damage. Indeed, the mechanisms through which bone derives its mechanical properties make fracture mechanics an ideal framework to study bone's mechanical resistance, where crack-growth resistance curves give a measure of the intrinsic resistance to the initiation of cracks and the extrinsic resistance to the growth of cracks. Recent research on healthy cortical bone has demonstrated how this hierarchical structure can develop intrinsic toughness at the collagen fibril scale mainly through sliding and sacrificial bonding mechanisms that promote plasticity. Furthermore, the bone-matrix structure develops extrinsic toughness at much larger micrometer length-scales, where the structural features are large enough to resist crack growth through crack-tip shielding mechanisms. Although healthy bone tissue can generally resist physiological loading environments, certain conditions such as aging and disease can significantly increase fracture risk. In simple terms, the reduced mechanical integrity originates from alterations to the hierarchical structure. Here, we review how human cortical bone resists fracture in healthy bone and how changes to the bone structure due to aging, osteoporosis, vitamin D deficiency and Paget's disease can affect the mechanical integrity of bone tissue. PMID:26380080

  13. Can Deterministic Mechanical Size Effects Contribute to Fracture and Microdamage Accumulation in Trabecular Bone?

    PubMed Central

    Siegmund, Thomas; Allen, Matthew R.; Burr, David B.

    2010-01-01

    Failure of bone under monotonic and cyclic loading is related to the bone mineral density, the quality of the bone matrix and the evolution of microcracks. The theory of linear elastic fracture mechanics has commonly been applied to describe fracture in bone. Evidence is presented that bone failure can be described through a non-linear theory of fracture. Thereby, deterministic size effects are introduced. Concepts of a non-linear theory are applied to discern how the interaction among bone matrix constituents (collagen and mineral), microcrack characteristics, and trabecular architecture can create distinctively differences in the fracture resistance at the bone tissue level. The nonlinear model is applied to interpret pre-clinical data concerning the effects of anti-osteoporotic agents on bone properties. The results show that bisphosphonate (BP) treatments that suppress bone remodeling will change trabecular bone in ways such that the size of the failure process zone relative to the trabecular thickness is reduced. Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) that suppress bone remodeling will change trabecular bone in ways such that the size of the failure process zone relative to the trabecular thickness is increased. The consequences of these changes are reflected in bone mechanical response and predictions are consistent with experimental observations in the animal model which show that BP treatment is associated with more brittle fracture and microcracks without altering the average length of the cracks, whereas SERM treatments lead to a more ductile fracture and mainly increase crack length with a smaller increase in microcrack density. The model suggests that BPs may be more effective in cases in which bone mass is very low, whereas SERMS may be more effective when milder osteoporotic symptoms are present. PMID:20398678

  14. Vitamin D deficiency induces early signs of aging in human bone, increasing the risk of fracture.

    PubMed

    Busse, Björn; Bale, Hrishikesh A; Zimmermann, Elizabeth A; Panganiban, Brian; Barth, Holly D; Carriero, Alessandra; Vettorazzi, Eik; Zustin, Josef; Hahn, Michael; Ager, Joel W; Püschel, Klaus; Amling, Michael; Ritchie, Robert O

    2013-07-10

    Vitamin D deficiency is a widespread medical condition that plays a major role in human bone health. Fracture susceptibility in the context of low vitamin D has been primarily associated with defective mineralization of collagenous matrix (osteoid). However, bone's fracture resistance is due to toughening mechanisms at various hierarchical levels ranging from the nano- to the microstructure. Thus, we hypothesize that the increase in fracture risk with vitamin D deficiency may be triggered by numerous pathological changes and may not solely derive from the absence of mineralized bone. We found that the characteristic increase in osteoid-covered surfaces in vitamin D-deficient bone hampers remodeling of the remaining mineralized bone tissue. Using spatially resolved synchrotron bone mineral density distribution analyses and spectroscopic techniques, we observed that the bone tissue within the osteoid frame has a higher mineral content with mature collagen and mineral constituents, which are characteristic of aged tissue. In situ fracture mechanics measurements and synchrotron radiation micro-computed tomography of the crack path indicated that vitamin D deficiency increases both the initiation and propagation of cracks by 22 to 31%. Thus, vitamin D deficiency is not simply associated with diminished bone mass. Our analyses reveal the aged nature of the remaining mineralized bone and its greatly decreased fracture resistance. Through a combination of characterization techniques spanning multiple size scales, our study expands the current clinical understanding of the pathophysiology of vitamin D deficiency and helps explain why well-balanced vitamin D levels are essential to maintain bone's structural integrity.

  15. Pathological fractures of the proximal femur due to solitary bone cyst: classification, methods of treatment.

    PubMed

    Miu, A

    2015-01-01

    Fractures are a very important issue in a child's orthopedic pathology. Neglected a good amount of time, being considered "not too serious", or "rare", having better and faster healing methods and not leaving sequels, like in the case of adults, a child's fractures remain an important chapter of traumatology in general. Because of the raising prevalence of child osteoarticular traumas, as well as new less invasive treatment methods, this theme is always to date. The paper analyzes particular cases of bone fractures that appeared due to minor traumas, on bones with a high brittleness, localized especially on the long bones. Although these fractures on a pathological bone can be seen at all levels of the human skeleton, this paper focuses on fractures located in the proximal third part of the femur. A group of children admitted in the Pediatric Orthopedic Department of "M.S. Curie" Hospital-Bucharest with this diagnostic, were analyzed between 2009 and 2013.

  16. Residual stress effects on fracture energies of cement-bone and cement-implant interfaces.

    PubMed

    Zor, Mehmet; Küçük, Mümin; Aksoy, Sami

    2002-04-01

    The effects of residual stresses, which are caused by the temperature difference arising after polymerisation of bone cement, on the fracture energies of cement bone and cement-implant interfaces have been examined by using both experimental and numerical works. Only fracture loads of the test specimen having interfacial cracks have been measured in the experimental stage. The values of fracture loads and temperature difference after polymerisation have been applied to finite element models of the test specimens to calculate critical J-integral values of these both interfaces in the numerical stage. In addition, fracture energies of bone and cement, have been obtained by experimentally, using three-point bending test method The results have shown that residual stresses can produce changes in the fracture energies of these bimaterial systems, especially in cement implant interface and J(Ic) values of interfaces are considerably smaller than the experimentally determined J(Ic) values of cement and bone.

  17. Long bone fractures identified in the Joseon Dynasty human skeletons of Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Deog Kyeom; Kim, Myeung Ju; Kim, Yi-Suk; Oh, Chang Seok; Lee, Sang-Seob; Lim, Sang Beom; Ki, Ho Chul; Shin, Dong Hoon

    2013-09-01

    Fracture is one of the pathological signs most frequently encountered in archaeologically obtained bones. To expand the paleopathological knowledge on traumatic injuries, it is desirable to secure data on long bone fractures from as wide a geographic and temporal range as possible. We present, for the first time, evidence of long bone fractures in a 16th-18th century Joseon skeletal series (n=96). In this study, we found 3 Colles' fractures of the radius in 2 individual cases. The pattern of fractures was unique. Although previous reports show that the ulna is broken more often than the radius, ulnar fracture associated with fending off a blunt attack was rare in our series (1/7 cases). Transverse fractures, typically caused by intentional violence, were also very rare (1/7 cases) in this study. These results may reflect the relatively tranquil lives of the Joseon people in 16th-18th century Korea. We also found post-fracture complications such as deformations, bone length shortening, and osteomyelitis. The present study would be of interest to medical scientists in related fields because it is one of the few studies conducted on long bone fractures among pre-modern societies in East Asian countries, thus far.

  18. Anti-DKK1 antibody promotes bone fracture healing through activation of β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hongting; Wang, Baoli; Li, Jia; Xie, Wanqing; Mao, Qiang; Li, Shan; Dong, Fuqiang; Sun, Yan; Ke, Hua-Zhu; Babij, Philip; Tong, Peijian; Chen, Di

    2015-02-01

    In this study we investigated if Wnt/β-catenin signaling in mesenchymal progenitor cells plays a role in bone fracture repair and if DKK1-Ab promotes fracture healing through activation of β-catenin signaling. Unilateral open transverse tibial fractures were created in CD1 mice and in β-catenin(Prx1ER) conditional knockout (KO) and Cre-negative control mice (C57BL/6 background). Bone fracture callus tissues were collected and analyzed by radiography, micro-CT (μCT), histology, biomechanical testing and gene expression analysis. The results demonstrated that treatment with DKK1-Ab promoted bone callus formation and increased mechanical strength during the fracture healing process in CD1 mice. DKK1-Ab enhanced fracture repair by activation of endochondral ossification. The normal rate of bone repair was delayed when the β-catenin gene was conditionally deleted in mesenchymal progenitor cells during the early stages of fracture healing. DKK1-Ab appeared to act through β-catenin signaling to enhance bone repair since the beneficial effect of DKK1-Ab was abrogated in β-catenin(Prx1ER) conditional KO mice. Further understanding of the signaling mechanism of DKK1-Ab in bone formation and bone regeneration may facilitate the clinical translation of this anabolic agent into therapeutic intervention.

  19. Joint loading modality: its application to bone formation and fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, P; Malacinski, G M; Yokota, H

    2008-07-01

    Sports-related injuries such as impact and stress fractures often require a rehabilitation programme to stimulate bone formation and accelerate fracture healing. This review introduces a recently developed joint loading modality and evaluates its potential applications to bone formation and fracture healing in post-injury rehabilitation. Bone is a dynamic tissue whose structure is constantly altered in response to its mechanical environments. Indeed, many loading modalities can influence the bone remodelling process. The joint loading modality is, however, able to enhance anabolic responses and accelerate wound healing without inducing significant in situ strain at the site of bone formation or fracture healing. This review highlights the unique features of this loading modality and discusses its potential underlying mechanisms as well as possible clinical applications.

  20. Serum leptin, bone mineral density and the healing of long bone fractures in men with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Liu, Linjuan; Pan, Zhanpeng; Zeng, Yanjun

    2015-11-16

    Previously reported fracture rates in patients with spinal cord injury range from 1% to 20%. However, the exact role of spinal cord injury in bone metabolism has not yet been clarified. In order to investigate the effects of serum leptin and bone mineral density on the healing of long bone fractures in men with spinal cord injury, 15 male SCI patients and 15 matched controls were involved in our study. The outcome indicated that at 4 and 8 weeks after bone fracture, callus production in patients with spinal cord injury was lower than that in controls. Besides, bone mineral density was significantly reduced at 2, 4 and 8 weeks. In addition, it was found that at each time point, patients with spinal cord injury had significantly higher serum leptin levels than controls and no association was found between serum leptin level and bone mineral density of lumbar vertebrae. Moreover, bone mineral density was positively correlated with bone formation in both of the groups. These findings suggest that in early phases i.e. week 4 and 8, fracture healing was impaired in patients with spinal cord injury and that various factors participated in the complicated healing process, such as hormonal and mechanical factors.

  1. Predicting Hip Fracture Type With Cortical Bone Mapping (CBM) in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study

    PubMed Central

    Gee, Andrew H; Tonkin, Carol; Ewing, Susan K; Cawthon, Peggy M; Black, Dennis M; Poole, Kenneth ES

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hip fracture risk is known to be related to material properties of the proximal femur, but fracture prediction studies adding richer quantitative computed tomography (QCT) measures to dual‐energy X‐ray (DXA)‐based methods have shown limited improvement. Fracture types have distinct relationships to predictors, but few studies have subdivided fracture into types, because this necessitates regional measurements and more fracture cases. This work makes use of cortical bone mapping (CBM) to accurately assess, with no prior anatomical presumptions, the distribution of properties related to fracture type. CBM uses QCT data to measure the cortical and trabecular properties, accurate even for thin cortices below the imaging resolution. The Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study is a predictive case‐cohort study of men over 65 years old: we analyze 99 fracture cases (44 trochanteric and 55 femoral neck) compared to a cohort of 308, randomly selected from 5994. To our knowledge, this is the largest QCT‐based predictive hip fracture study to date, and the first to incorporate CBM analysis into fracture prediction. We show that both cortical mass surface density and endocortical trabecular BMD are significantly different in fracture cases versus cohort, in regions appropriate to fracture type. We incorporate these regions into predictive models using Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate hazard ratios, and logistic regression to estimate area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Adding CBM to DXA‐based BMD leads to a small but significant (p < 0.005) improvement in model prediction for any fracture, with AUC increasing from 0.78 to 0.79, assessed using leave‐one‐out cross‐validation. For specific fracture types, the improvement is more significant (p < 0.0001), with AUC increasing from 0.71 to 0.77 for trochanteric fractures and 0.76 to 0.82 for femoral neck fractures. In contrast, adding DXA‐based BMD to a

  2. An intermaxillary fixation screw traction wire: an aid for facial bone fracture repair.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myung-Good; Yoo, Roh-Eul; Chang, Hak; Kwon, Sung-Tack; Baek, Rong-Min; Minn, Kyung-Won

    2009-07-01

    We have devised a new technique to improve stabilization of fractured facial bone fractures (frontal sinus fractures, zygomatic fractures, mandibular condyle fractures) by intermaxillary fixation screw traction wires (stainless steel wires through intermaxillary fixation screws). A retrospective study evaluating intermaxillary fixation screw traction wires was performed. We have used this technique for 3 cases of frontal sinus fractures, 9 cases of zygomatic fractures, and 7 cases of mandibular condyle fractures. After dissection of a fractured site, a hole is drilled on the fractured bone where it does not interfere with positioning the plate across the fracture line. After an intermaxillary fixation screw is inserted, a stainless steel wire is tied through a hole in the screw head. By the aid of wire for traction, the displaced fractured bone is easily aligned to the proper position. Plates and screws are applied readily on the predetermined area. A retrospective study on 19 patients using intermaxillary fixation screw traction wires was performed. The diagnoses and associated complications of the cases were recorded. No associated complication as a result of using this technique was identified. The use of intermaxillary fixation screw traction wire enhances stabilization and visualization without possible risk for surrounding soft tissue injury using, a sharp traction device like a bone hook. An intermaxillary fixation screw traction wire is an useful aid for visualization and stabilization during facial bone fracture reduction, particularly where exposure is difficult such as in the condylar region of the mandible. And unlike a classic traction wire, the intermaxillary fixation screw traction wire has almost no risk of having it loosened from the screw.

  3. Influence of housing system and design on bone strength and keel bone fractures in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, L J; McKinstry, J L; Avery, N C; Knowles, T G; Brown, S N; Tarlton, J; Nicol, C J

    2011-10-15

    The main objectives of the study were to provide an accurate assessment of current levels of old breaks in end-of-lay hens housed in a variety of system designs and identify the important risk factors. Sixty-seven flocks housed in eight broad subcategories were assessed at the end of the production period. Within each flock, the presence of keel fractures was determined and the tibia, humerus and keel bones dissected for measurement of breaking strength. For each house, variations in internal design and perching provision were categorised and the effective heights of the differing structures recorded. All systems were associated with alarmingly high levels of keel damage although variation in mean prevalence between systems was evident with flocks housed in furnished cages having the lowest prevalence (36 per cent) despite also having significantly weaker bones and flocks housed in all systems equipped with multilevel perches showing the highest levels of damage (over 80 per cent) and the highest severity scores.

  4. Atypical subtrochanteric femoral shaft fractures: role for mechanics and bone quality.

    PubMed

    van der Meulen, Marjolein C H; Boskey, Adele L

    2012-08-29

    Bisphosphonates are highly effective agents for reducing osteoporotic fractures in women and men, decreasing fracture incidence at the hip and spine up to 50%. In a small subset of patients, however, these agents have recently been associated with 'atypical femoral fractures' (AFFs) in the subtrochanteric region or the diaphysis. These fractures have several atypical characteristics, including occurrence with minimal trauma; younger age than typical osteoporotic fractures; occurrence at cortical, rather than cancellous sites; early radiographic appearance similar to that of a stress fracture; transverse fracture pattern rather than the familiar spiral or transverse-oblique morphologies; initiation on the lateral cortex; and high risk of fracture on the contralateral side, at the same location as the initial fracture. Fracture is a mechanical phenomenon that occurs when the loads applied to a structure such as a long bone exceed its load-bearing capacity, either due to a single catastrophic overload (traumatic failure) or as a result of accumulated damage and crack propagation at sub-failure loads (fatigue failure). The association of AFFs with no or minimal trauma suggests a fatigue-based mechanism that depends on cortical cross-sectional geometry and tissue material properties. In the case of AFFs, bisphosphonate treatment may alter cortical tissue properties, as these agents are known to alter bone remodeling. This review discusses the use of bisphosphonates, their effects on bone remodeling, mechanics and tissue composition, their significance as an effective therapy for osteoporosis, and why these agents may increase fracture risk in a small population of patients.

  5. Mechanical test and fractal analysis on anisotropic fracture of cortical bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Dagang; Chen, Bin; Ye, Wei; Gou, Jihua; Fan, Jinghong

    2015-12-01

    The mechanical properties of the cortical bone of fresh bovine femora along three different directions are tested through four-point bending experiments. It is indicated that the fracture energy along the transversal direction of the bone is distinctly larger than those of the longitudinal and radial directions. The fracture surfaces of the three different directions are observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). It is shown that the roughness of the fracture surface of the transversal direction is obviously larger than those of the fracture surfaces of the longitudinal and radial directions. It is also revealed that the osteons in the bone are perpendicular to the fracture surface of the transversal direction and parallel to the fracture surfaces of the longitudinal and radial directions. Based on these experimental results, the fractal dimensions of the fracture surfaces of different directions are calculated by box-counting method in MATLAB. The calculated results show that the fractal dimension of the fracture surface of the transversal direction is remarkably larger than those of the fracture surfaces of the longitudinal and radial directions. The fracture energies of different directions are also calculated based on their fractal models. It is denoted that the fracture energy of the transversal direction is remarkably larger than those of the longitudinal and radial directions. The calculated results are in good agreement with the tested results.

  6. The role of bone marrow-derived cells in bone fracture repair in a green fluorescent protein chimeric mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, Kazuhiro . E-mail: s3061@nms.ac.jp; Ogawa, Rei; Migita, Makoto; Hanawa, Hideki; Ito, Hiromoto; Orimo, Hideo

    2005-05-27

    We investigated the role of bone marrow cells in bone fracture repair using green fluorescent protein (GFP) chimeric model mice. First, the chimeric model mice were created: bone marrow cells from GFP-transgenic C57BL/6 mice were injected into the tail veins of recipient wild-type C57BL/6 mice that had been irradiated with a lethal dose of 10 Gy from a cesium source. Next, bone fracture models were created from these mice: closed transverse fractures of the left femur were produced using a specially designed device. One, three, and five weeks later, fracture lesions were extirpated for histological and immunohistochemical analyses. In the specimens collected 3 and 5 weeks after operation, we confirmed calluses showing intramembranous ossification peripheral to the fracture site. The calluses consisted of GFP- and osteocalcin-positive cells at the same site, although the femur consisted of only osteocalcin-positive cells. We suggest that bone marrow cells migrated outside of the bone marrow and differentiated into osteoblasts to make up the calluses.

  7. Evaluation of the Etiologies of Implant Fracture in Patients With Fractures of the Implants of Lower Limbs’ Long Bones

    PubMed Central

    Yeganeh, Ali; Otoukesh, Babak; Kaghazian, Peyman; Yeganeh, Nima; Boddohi, Bahram; Moghtadaei, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Orthopedics implants are important tools for treatment of bone fractures. Despite available recommendations for designing and making the implants, there are multiple cases of fracture of these implants in the body. Hence, in this study the frequency of failure of implants in long bones of lower extremities was evaluated. Methods and Materials: In this cross-sectional study, two types of fractured implants in the body were analyzed and underwent metalogical, mechanical, and modeling and stress-bending analysis. Results: The results revealed that the main cause of fractures was decreased mechanical resistance due to inappropriate chemical composition (especially decreased percentages of Nickel and Molybdenum). Conclusions: It may be concluded that following the standard chemical composition and use of optimal making method are the most important works for prevention of failure of implants. PMID:26843735

  8. Biochemical Markers of Bone Turnover in Percutaneous Vertebroplasty for Osteoporotic Compression Fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Komemushi, Atsushi Tanigawa, Noboru; Kariya, Shuji; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Shomura, Yuzo; Tokuda, Takanori; Nomura, Motoo; Terada, Jiro; Kamata, Minoru; Sawada, Satoshi

    2008-03-15

    Purpose. To evaluate relationships between biochemical markers of bone turnover, bone mineral density, and new compression fractures following vertebroplasty. Methods. Initially, we enrolled 30 consecutive patients with vertebral compression fractures caused by osteoporosis. Twenty-three of the 30 patients visited our hospital for follow-up examinations for more than 4 weeks after vertebroplasty. The patients were divided into two groups: patients with new fractures (group F) and patients with no new fractures (group N). We analyzed differences in the following parameters between these two groups: serum bone alkaline phosphatase, urinary crosslinked N-telopeptide of type I collagen, urinary deoxypyridinoline, and bone mineral density. Next, the patients were divided into another two groups: patients with higher risk (group H: urinary crosslinked N-telopeptide of type I collagen >54.3 nmol BCE/mmol Cr or urinary deoxypyridinoline >7.6 nmol/mmol Cr, and serum bone alkaline phosphatase <29.0 U/l) and patients with lower risk (group L). We analyzed the difference in the rate of new fractures between these two groups. Results. We identified 9 new fractures in 7 patients. There were no significant differences between groups F and N. We identified 5 new fractures in 3 of the 4 patients in group H, and 4 new fractures in 4 of the 19 patients in group L. There was a significant difference in the rate of new fractures between groups H and L. Conclusions. A combination of high levels of bone resorption markers and normal levels of bone formation markers may be associated with increased risk of new recurrent fractures after percutaneous vertebroplasty.

  9. Risk Assessment of Bone Fracture During Space Exploration Missions to the Moon and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Beth E.; Myers, Jerry G.; Nelson, Emily S.; Griffin, Devon

    2008-01-01

    The possibility of a traumatic bone fracture in space is a concern due to the observed decrease in astronaut bone mineral density (BMD) during spaceflight and because of the physical demands of the mission. The Bone Fracture Risk Module (BFxRM) was developed to quantify the probability of fracture at the femoral neck and lumbar spine during space exploration missions. The BFxRM is scenario-based, providing predictions for specific activities or events during a particular space mission. The key elements of the BFxRM are the mission parameters, the biomechanical loading models, the bone loss and fracture models and the incidence rate of the activity or event. Uncertainties in the model parameters arise due to variations within the population and unknowns associated with the effects of the space environment. Consequently, parameter distributions were used in Monte Carlo simulations to obtain an estimate of fracture probability under real mission scenarios. The model predicts an increase in the probability of fracture as the mission length increases and fracture is more likely in the higher gravitational field of Mars than on the moon. The resulting probability predictions and sensitivity analyses of the BFxRM can be used as an engineering tool for mission operation and resource planning in order to mitigate the risk of bone fracture in space.

  10. Risk Assessment of Bone Fracture During Space Exploration Missions to the Moon and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Beth E.; Myers, Jerry G.; Nelson, Emily S.; Licatta, Angelo; Griffin, Devon

    2007-01-01

    The possibility of a traumatic bone fracture in space is a concern due to the observed decrease in astronaut bone mineral density (BMD) during spaceflight and because of the physical demands of the mission. The Bone Fracture Risk Module (BFxRM) was developed to quantify the probability of fracture at the femoral neck and lumbar spine during space exploration missions. The BFxRM is scenario-based, providing predictions for specific activities or events during a particular space mission. The key elements of the BFxRM are the mission parameters, the biomechanical loading models, the bone loss and fracture models and the incidence rate of the activity or event. Uncertainties in the model parameters arise due to variations within the population and unknowns associated with the effects of the space environment. Consequently, parameter distributions were used in Monte Carlo simulations to obtain an estimate of fracture probability under real mission scenarios. The model predicts an increase in the probability of fracture as the mission length increases and fracture is more likely in the higher gravitational field of Mars than on the moon. The resulting probability predictions and sensitivity analyses of the BFxRM can be used as an engineering tool for mission operation and resource planning in order to mitigate the risk of bone fracture in space.

  11. Diabetes and bone health: the relationship between diabetes and osteoporosis-associated fractures.

    PubMed

    Kurra, Salila; Siris, Ethel

    2011-07-01

    It is well established that osteoporosis and diabetes are prevalent diseases with significant associated morbidity and mortality. The relationship between diabetes and bone disease is less well defined but recent data seem to suggest that diabetes and the complications associated with it can be detrimental to bone health. Furthermore, it appears that thiazolidinediones, medications used in the treatment of diabetes, can also cause bone loss and increase the risk of fracture. This article will review the relationship between diabetes and bone health.

  12. Haploinsufficiency of endogenous parathyroid hormone-related peptide impairs bone fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yin-He; Qiu, Yong; Han, Xiao-Dong; Xiong, Jin; Chen, Yi-Xin; Shi, Hong-Fei; Karaplis, Andrew

    2013-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that endogenous parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) plays a central role in the physiological regulation of bone formation. However, it is unclear whether endogenous PTHrP plays an important function in enhancing bone fracture healing. To determine whether endogenous PTHrP haploinsufficiency impaired bone fracture healing, closed mid-diaphyseal femur fractures were created in 8-week-old wild-type and Pthrp(+/-) mice. Callus tissue properties were analysed 1, 2 and 4 weeks after fracture by radiography, histology, histochemistry, immunohistochemistry and molecular biology. The size of the calluses was reduced 2 weeks after fracture, and the fracture repairs were poor 4 weeks after fractures, in Pthrp(+/-) compared with wild-type mice. Cartilaginous callus areas were reduced 1 week after fracture, but were increased 2 weeks after fracture in Pthrp(+/-) mice. There was a reduction in the number of ostoblasts, alkaline phosphatase (ALP)-positive areas, Type I collagen immunopositive areas, mRNA levels of ALP, Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and Type I collagen, Runx2 and insulin-like growth factor-1 protein levels, the number of osteoclasts and the surface in callus tissues in Pthrp(+/-) compared with wild-type mice. These results demonstrate that endogenous PTHrP haploinsufficiency impairs the fracture repair process by reducing cartilaginous and bony callus formation, with downregulation of osteoblastic gene and protein expression and a reduction in endochondral bone formation, osteoblastic bone formation and osteoclastic bone resorption. Together, the results indicate that endogenous PTHrP plays an important role in fracture healing.

  13. Reference point indentation is not indicative of whole mouse bone measures of stress intensity fracture toughness

    PubMed Central

    Carriero, Alessandra; Bruse, Jan L.; Oldknow, Karla J.; Millán, José Luis; Farquharson, Colin; Shefelbine, Sandra J.

    2014-01-01

    Bone fragility is a concern for aged and diseased bone. Measuring bone toughness and understanding fracture properties of the bone are critical for predicting fracture risk associated with age and disease and for preclinical testing of therapies. A reference point indentation technique (BioDent) has recently been developed to determine bone's resistance to fracture in a minimally invasive way by measuring the indentation distance increase (IDI) between the first and last indentations over cyclic indentations in the same position. In this study, we investigate the relationship between fracture toughness KC and reference point indentation parameters (i.e. IDI, total indentation distance (TID) and creep indentation distance (CID)) in bones from 38 mice from six types (C57Bl/6, Balb, oim/oim, oim/+, Phospho1−/− and Phospho1 wild type counterpart). These mice bone are models of healthy and diseased bone spanning a range of fracture toughness from very brittle (oim/oim) to ductile (Phospho1−/−). Left femora were dissected, notched and tested in 3-point bending until complete failure. Contralateral femora were dissected and indented in 10 sites of their anterior and posterior shaft surface over 10 indentation cycles. IDI, TID and CID were measured. Results from this study suggest that reference point indentation parameters are not indicative of stress intensity fracture toughness in mouse bone. In particular, the IDI values at the anterior mid-diaphysis across mouse types overlapped, making it difficult to discern differences between mouse types, despite having extreme differences in stress intensity based toughness measures. When more locations of indentation were considered, the normalised IDIs could distinguish between mouse types. Future studies should investigate the relationship of the reference point indentation parameters for mouse bone in other material properties of the bone tissue in order to determine their use for measuring bone quality. PMID:25280470

  14. Reference point indentation is not indicative of whole mouse bone measures of stress intensity fracture toughness.

    PubMed

    Carriero, Alessandra; Bruse, Jan L; Oldknow, Karla J; Millán, José Luis; Farquharson, Colin; Shefelbine, Sandra J

    2014-12-01

    Bone fragility is a concern for aged and diseased bone. Measuring bone toughness and understanding fracture properties of the bone are critical for predicting fracture risk associated with age and disease and for preclinical testing of therapies. A reference point indentation technique (BioDent) has recently been developed to determine bone's resistance to fracture in a minimally invasive way by measuring the indentation distance increase (IDI) between the first and last indentations over cyclic indentations in the same position. In this study, we investigate the relationship between fracture toughness KC and reference point indentation parameters (i.e. IDI, total indentation distance (TID) and creep indentation distance (CID)) in bones from 38 mice from six types (C57Bl/6, Balb, oim/oim, oim/+, Phospho1(-/-) and Phospho1 wild type counterpart). These mice bone are models of healthy and diseased bone spanning a range of fracture toughness from very brittle (oim/oim) to ductile (Phospho1(-/-)). Left femora were dissected, notched and tested in 3-point bending until complete failure. Contralateral femora were dissected and indented in 10 sites of their anterior and posterior shaft surface over 10 indentation cycles. IDI, TID and CID were measured. Results from this study suggest that reference point indentation parameters are not indicative of stress intensity fracture toughness in mouse bone. In particular, the IDI values at the anterior mid-diaphysis across mouse types overlapped, making it difficult to discern differences between mouse types, despite having extreme differences in stress intensity based toughness measures. When more locations of indentation were considered, the normalised IDIs could distinguish between mouse types. Future studies should investigate the relationship of the reference point indentation parameters for mouse bone in other material properties of the bone tissue in order to determine their use for measuring bone quality.

  15. [Recruitment of osteogenic cells to bone formation sites during development and fracture repair - German Version].

    PubMed

    Böhm, A-M; Dirckx, N; Maes, C

    2016-04-01

    Recruitment of osteoblast lineage cells to their bone-forming locations is essential for skeletal development and fracture healing. In developing bones, osteoprogenitor cells invade the cartilage mold to establish the primary ossification center. Similarly, osteogenic cells infiltrate and populate the callus tissue that is formed following an injury. Proper bone development and successful fracture repair must, therefore, rely on controlled temporal and spatial navigation cues guiding the cells to the sites where new bone formation is needed. Some cellular mechanisms and molecular pathways involved have been elucidated.

  16. Effect of Obesity on Bone Healing After Foot and Ankle Long Bone Fractures.

    PubMed

    Thorud, Jakob C; Mortensen, Spencer; Thorud, Jennifer L; Shibuya, Naohiro; Maldonado, Yolanda Munoz; Jupiter, Daniel C

    As obesity has become more common, fractures in the obese population have become more frequent. Concern exists regarding alterations in bone health and healing in obese patients. A matched case-control study was performed at 1 institution to evaluate whether an association exists between nonunion and a high body mass index in metatarsal and ankle fractures. A total of 48 patients with nonunion were identified, and control patients matched 2 to 1 (n = 96) were selected. The control patients were matched for age, sex, and fracture type. No association was identified between nonunion and the continuous body mass index (p = .23) or morbid obesity, with a body mass index of ≥40 kg/m(2) (p = .51). However, the results from both univariate and multivariate analysis suggested that patients with a current alcohol problem or a history of an alcohol problem might have a greater risk of nonunion. The odds ratio of a patient with a history of alcohol use experiencing nonunion was 2.7 (95% confidence interval 1.2 to 6.2). Further studies are warranted to confirm these findings.

  17. The Pathobiology of Diabetes Mellitus in Bone Metabolism, Fracture Healing, and Complications.

    PubMed

    Forslund, Johan M; Archdeacon, Michael T

    2015-10-01

    Complications and inferior outcomes of fractures in the setting of diabetes mellitus (DM) are well documented. The incidence of DM is increasing rapidly, particularly in an aging and obese population. Thus, the combination of DM and fracture is becoming a serious health problem worldwide. As many fractures are relatively uncomplicated in the healthy patient population, a concerted effort to improve outcomes of fractures in patients with DM is warranted. In this article, we review relevant studies and examine the pathobiological mechanisms influencing fracture outcomes, including complications related to bone and soft-tissue healing, and infection.

  18. Intramedullary bone cementing for the treatment of Colles fracture in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Kazuo; Osamura, Naoki; Hagiwara, Norio; Yamauchi, Daisuke; Tomita, Katsuro

    2004-01-01

    Eighteen patients with Colles fractures, mean age 70 years (range 55-91), were treated by intramedullary bone cementing. The best indication for this technique was an unstable extra-articular Colles fracture with osteoporosis. Bone cement was packed into the canal that was made by curettage of intramedullary cancellous bone from the dorsal fracture site. Intramedullary cementing caused little bleeding from the medullary canal and no irritation of the extensor tendons. Because of rigid fixation, patients could use the affected hand for light activities without any external orthosis the day after surgery. Cortical healing was seen in all cases within three months and there was no cement loosening or other complications during the mean 28 month (range 6-43) follow up period. Intramedullary bone cementing is one of the optimal treatments for Colles fractures in elderly patients.

  19. Evaluation of a single miniplate use in treatment of zygomatic bone fracture.

    PubMed

    Mohammadinezhad, Cyrus

    2009-09-01

    Different methods of internal fixation of simple displaced zygomatic fracture, such as wiring, miniplate, and screw fixation, were compared for postreduction rotational stability caused by muscular forces. This study was performed to evaluate the minimally invasive therapy in cases of zygomatic bone fracture. Seventeen patients were treated by percutaneous hook reduction and miniplate fixation along the frontozygomatic suture. Postoperatively, repositioning of aesthetic and stability and also bone ends approximation were assessed clinically and radiologically. The patients were followed up for 6 to 49 months. Preoperative symptoms were subsided except the infraorbital sensitivity disturbances in one of the patients. Postoperative complications such as diplopia and hematoma were minimal and subsided by time. In this study, orbitozygomatic, commuted, and zygomatic bone fractures simultaneously with diplopia were excluded. We showed that treatment of an isolated zygomatic bone fracture according to aesthetic and functional requirements may be achieved by insertion of a single miniplate at the lateral rim of the orbit.

  20. On the multiscale origins of fracture resistance in human bone and its biological degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Barth, Holly D.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2012-03-09

    Akin to other mineralized tissues, human cortical bone can resist deformation and fracture due to the nature of its hierarchical structure, which spans the molecular to macroscopic length-scales. Deformation at the smallest scales, mainly through the composite action of the mineral and collagen, contributes to bone?s strength or intrinsic fracture resistance, while crack-tip shielding mechanisms active on the microstructural scale contribute to the extrinsic fracture resistance once cracking begins. The efficiency with which these structural features can resist fracture at both small and large length-scales becomes severely degraded with such factors as aging, irradiation and disease. Indeed aging and irradiation can cause changes to the cross-link profile at fibrillar length-scales as well as changes at the three orders of magnitude larger scale of the osteonal structures, both of which combine to inhibit the bone's overall resistance to the initiation and growth of cracks.

  1. Design of Fracture Fixation Plate for Necessary and Sufficient Bone Stress Shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishna, Kotlanka; Sridhar, Idapalapati; Sivashanker, Sathiamoorthy; Khong, Kok Sun; Ghista, Dhanjoo N.

    The objective of treating the fractured bone is to achieve painless functioning of the bone and undisturbed healing at the fracture. Internal fixation by stiff bone-plate is one of the standard methods to achieve these objectives. Recently, there is considerable interest in the usage of compliant plates to enhance bone healing with reduced stress shielding. Herein, first an analytical solution is developed to determine screw forces in the bone-plate assembly that conforms the plate and the bone under bending load. Based on the analytical calculations, an optimal fixator plate selection criterion for necessary and sufficient stress shielding is proposed. Second, effectiveness of employing a non-homogeneous stiffness graded (SG) plate rather than a homogeneous stainless steel (SS) plate for stress shielding is investigated using a finite element method. It is found that stress shielding on bone by SG plate is less compared to SS plate.

  2. Mechanistic aspects of fracture and R-curve behavior in elk antler bone

    SciTech Connect

    Launey, Maximilien E.; Chen, Po-Yu; McKittrick, Joanna; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2009-11-23

    Bone is an adaptative material that is designed for different functional requirements; indeed, bones have a variety of properties depending on their role in the body. To understand the mechanical response of bone requires the elucidation of its structure-function relationships. Here, we examine the fracture toughness of compact bone of elk antler which is an extremely fast growing primary bone designed for a totally different function than human (secondary) bone. We find that antler in the transverse (breaking) orientation is one of the toughest biological materials known. Its resistance to fracture is achieved during crack growth (extrinsically) by a combination of gross crack deflection/twisting and crack bridging via uncracked 'ligaments' in the crack wake, both mechanisms activated by microcracking primarily at lamellar boundaries. We present an assessment of the toughening mechanisms acting in antler as compared to human cortical bone, and identify an enhanced role of inelastic deformation in antler which further contributes to its (intrinsic) toughness.

  3. Assessing Bone Quality in Terms of Bone Mineral Density, Buckling Ratio and Critical Fracture Load

    PubMed Central

    Anitha, D

    2014-01-01

    Background Bone mineral density (BMD) is used as a sole parameter in the diagnosis of osteoporosis. Due to the ease of acquirement of BMD, clinical diagnosis still involves its usage although the limitations of BMD are quite well-established. Therefore, this preliminary study hoped to reduce the errors introduced by BMD alone by incorporating geometric and structural predictors simultaneously to observe if strength was implicitly dependent on the geometry and BMD. Hence, we illustrated the triadic relationship between BMD, buckling ratio (BR) and critical fracture load (Fcr). Methods The geometric predictor was the BR as it involves both the changes in the periosteum and the cortical thickness. Also, structural changes were monitored by finite element (FE) analysis-predicted Fcr. These BR and Fcr measurements were plotted with their respective femoral neck BMD values in elderly female patients (n=6) in a 3-year follow-up study, treated with ibandronate. Results In all the three-dimensional plots (baseline, mid and final year), high Fcr values were found at regions containing high BMD and low BR values. Quantitatively, this was also proven where an averaged highest Fcr across the three years had a relatively higher BMD (46%) and lower BR (19%) than that of the averaged lowest Fcr. The dependence of FE predicted strength on both the geometry and bone density was illustrated. Conclusions We conclude that use of triadic relationships for the evaluation of osteoporosis and hip fractures with the combination of strength, radiology-derived BR and bone density will lay the foundation for more accurate predictions in the future. PMID:25489572

  4. Effect of long-term exposure to fluoride in drinking water on risks of bone fractures.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Liang, C; Slemenda, C W; Ji, R; Sun, S; Cao, J; Emsley, C L; Ma, F; Wu, Y; Ying, P; Zhang, Y; Gao, S; Zhang, W; Katz, B P; Niu, S; Cao, S; Johnston, C C

    2001-05-01

    Findings on the risk of bone fractures associated with long-term fluoride exposure from drinking water have been contradictory. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of bone fracture, including hip fracture, in six Chinese populations with water fluoride concentrations ranging from 0.25 to 7.97 parts per million (ppm). A total of 8266 male and female subjects > or =50 years of age were enrolled. Parameters evaluated included fluoride exposure, prevalence of bone fractures, demographics, medical history, physical activity, cigarette smoking, and alcohol consumption. The results confirmed that drinking water was the only major source of fluoride exposure in the study populations. A U-shaped pattern was detected for the relationship between the prevalence of bone fracture and water fluoride level. The prevalence of overall bone fracture was lowest in the population of 1.00-1.06 ppm fluoride in drinking water, which was significantly lower (p < 0.05) than that of the groups exposed to water fluoride levels > or =4.32 and < or =0.34 ppm. The prevalence of hip fractures was highest in the group with the highest water fluoride (4.32-7.97 ppm). The value is significantly higher than the population with 1.00-1.06 ppm water fluoride, which had the lowest prevalence rate. It is concluded that long-term fluoride exposure from drinking water containing > or =4.32 ppm increases the risk of overall fractures as well as hip fractures. Water fluoride levels at 1.00-1.06 ppm decrease the risk of overall fractures relative to negligible fluoride in water; however, there does not appear to be similar protective benefits for the risk of hip fractures.

  5. Computer assisted preoperative planning of bone fracture reduction: Simulation techniques and new trends.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Delgado, Juan J; Paulano-Godino, Félix; PulidoRam-Ramírez, Rubén; Jiménez-Pérez, J Roberto

    2016-05-01

    The development of support systems for surgery significantly increases the likelihood of obtaining satisfactory results. In the case of fracture reduction interventions these systems enable surgery planning, training, monitoring and assessment. They allow improvement of fracture stabilization, a minimizing of health risks and a reduction of surgery time. Planning a bone fracture reduction by means of a computer assisted simulation involves several semiautomatic or automatic steps. The simulation deals with the correct position of osseous fragments and fixation devices for a fracture reduction. Currently, to the best of our knowledge there is no computer assisted methods to plan an entire fracture reduction process. This paper presents an overall scheme of the computer based process for planning a bone fracture reduction, as described above, and details its main steps, the most common proposed techniques and their main shortcomings. In addition, challenges and new trends of this research field are depicted and analyzed.

  6. Multiple Low Energy Long Bone Fractures in the Setting of Rothmund-Thomson Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Beckmann, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Rothmund-Thomson syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive genodermatosis characterized by a poikilodermatous rash starting in infancy as well as various skeletal anomalies, juvenile cataracts, and predisposition to certain cancers. Although Rothmund-Thomson syndrome is associated with diminished bone mineral density in addition to multiple skeletal abnormalities, there are few reports of the association with stress fractures or pathologic fractures in low energy trauma or delayed healing of fractures. Presented is a case of a young adult male with Rothmund-Thomson syndrome presenting with multiple episodes of long bone fractures caused by low energy trauma with one of the fractures exhibiting significantly delayed healing. The patient was also found to have an asymptomatic stress fracture of the lower extremity, another finding of Rothmund-Thomson syndrome rarely reported in the literature. A thorough review of the literature and comprehensive presentation of Rothmund-Thomson syndrome is provided in conjunction with our case. PMID:26617641

  7. Design and experimental evaluation of adjustable bone plates for mandibular fracture fixation.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, Thomas M; Slocum, Alexander H; Seldin, Edward B

    2012-01-03

    Conventional bone plates are commonly used for surgical mandibular fracture fixation. Improper alignment between bone segments, however, can result in malocclusion. Current methods of fixation require a surgeon to visually align segments of bone and affix a metal plate using bone screws, after which little can be done to adjust alignment. A method of adjusting fracture alignment after plate placement, without screw removal, presents an improvement over costly and risky revision surgery. A modified bone plate has been designed with a deformable section to give surgeons the ability to reduce misalignments at the fracture site. The mechanics of deformation for various adjustment mechanisms was explored analytically, numerically, and experimentally to ensure that the adjustable plate is comparable to conventional bone plates. A static force of 358.8 N is required to deform the adjustable bone plate, compared with predicted values of 351 N using numerical simulation and 362 N using a simple beam theory. Dynamic testing was performed to simulate in vivo loading conditions and evaluate load-capacity in both deformed and un-deformed bone plates. Results indicate that bending stiffness of a rectangular bone plate is 709 N/mm, compared with 174 N/mm for an octagonal plate and 176 N/mm for standard plates. Once deformed, the rectangular and octagonal plates had a stiffness of 323 N/mm and 228 N/mm, respectively. Un-deformed and deformed adjustable bone plates have efficacy in bone segment fixation and healing.

  8. Experimental fracture model versus osteotomy model in metacarpal bone plate fixation.

    PubMed

    Ochman, S; Vordemvenne, T; Paletta, J; Raschke, M J; Meffert, R H; Doht, S

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Osteotomy or fracture models can be used to evaluate mechanical properties of fixation techniques of the hand skeleton in vitro. Although many studies make use of osteotomy models, fracture models simulate the clinical situation more realistically. This study investigates monocortical and bicortical plate fixation on metacarpal bones considering both aforementioned models to decide which method is best suited to test fixation techniques. Methods. Porcine metacarpal bones (n = 40) were randomized into 4 groups. In groups I and II bones were fractured with a modified 3-point bending test. The intact bones represented a further control group to which the other groups after fixation were compared. In groups III and IV a standard osteotomy was carried out. Bones were fixated with plates monocortically (group I, III) and bicortically (group II, IV) and tested for failure. Results. Bones fractured at a mean maximum load of 482.8 N ± 104.8 N with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 21.7%, mean stiffness was 122.3 ± 35 N/mm. In the fracture model, there was a significant difference (P = 0.01) for maximum load of monocortically and bicortically fixed bones in contrast to the osteotomy model (P = 0.9). Discussion. In the fracture model, because one can use the same bone for both measurements in the intact state and the bone-plate construct states, the impact of inter-individual differences is reduced. In contrast to the osteotomy model there are differences between monocortical and bicortical fixations in the fracture model. Thus simulation of the in vivo situation is better and seems to be suitable for the evaluation of mechanical properties of fixation techniques on metacarpals.

  9. Clinical factors affecting pathological fracture and healing of unicameral bone cysts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Unicameral bone cyst (UBC) is the most common benign lytic bone lesion seen in children. The aim of this study is to investigate clinical factors affecting pathological fracture and healing of UBC. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 155 UBC patients who consulted Nagoya musculoskeletal oncology group hospitals in Japan. Sixty of the 155 patients had pathological fracture at presentation. Of 141 patients with follow-up periods exceeding 6 months, 77 were followed conservatively and 64 treated by surgery. Results The fracture risk was significantly higher in the humerus than other bones. In multivariate analysis, ballooning of bone, cyst in long bone, male sex, thin cortical thickness and multilocular cyst were significant adverse prognostic factors for pathological fractures at presentation. The healing rates were 30% and 83% with observation and surgery, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that fracture at presentation and history of biopsy were good prognostic factors for healing of UBC in patients under observation. Conclusion The present results suggest that mechanical disruption of UBC such as fracture and biopsy promotes healing, and thus watchful waiting is indicated in these patients, whereas patients with poor prognostic factors for fractures should be considered for surgery. PMID:24884661

  10. Are the High Hip Fracture Rates Among Norwegian Women Explained by Impaired Bone Material Properties?

    PubMed

    Duarte Sosa, Daysi; Vilaplana, Laila; Güerri, Roberto; Nogués, Xavier; Wang-Fagerland, Morten; Diez-Perez, Adolfo; F Eriksen, Erik

    2015-10-01

    Hip fracture rates in Norway rank among the highest in the world, more than double that of Spanish women. Previous studies were unable to demonstrate significant differences between the two populations with respect to bone mass or calcium metabolism. In order to test whether the difference in fracture propensity between both populations could be explained by differences in bone material quality we assessed bone material strength using microindentation in 42 Norwegian and 46 Spanish women with normal BMD values, without clinical or morphometric vertebral fractures, no clinical or laboratory signs of secondary osteoporosis, and without use of drugs with known influence on bone metabolism. Bone material properties were assessed by microindentation of the thick cortex of the mid tibia following local anesthesia of the area using the Osteoprobe device (Active Life Scientific, Santa Barbara, CA, USA). Indentation distance was standardized against a calibration phantom of methylmethacrylate and results, as percentage of this reference value, expressed as bone material strength index units (BMSi). We found that the bone material properties reflected in the BMSi value of Norwegian women was significantly inferior when compared to Spanish women (77 ± 7.1 versus 80.7 ± 7.8, p < 0.001). Total hip BMD was significantly higher in Norwegian women (1.218 g/cm(2) versus 0.938 g/cm(2) , p < 0.001) but regression analysis revealed that indentation values did not vary with BMD r(2)  = 0.03 or age r(2)  = 0.04. In conclusion Norwegian women show impaired bone material properties, higher bone mass, and were taller than Spanish women. The increased height will increase the impact on bone after falls, and impaired bone material properties may further enhance the risk fracture after such falls. These ethnic differences in bone material properties may partly explain the higher propensity for fracture in Norwegian women.

  11. Brief Report: Bone Fractures in Children and Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumeyer, Ann M.; O'Rourke, Julia A.; Massa, Alexandra; Lee, Hang; Lawson, Elizabeth A.; McDougle, Christopher J.; Misra, Madhusmita

    2015-01-01

    Peripubertal boys with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have lower bone mineral density (BMD) than typically developing controls. However, it is not clear whether lower BMD in ASD results in an increased fracture rate. This study examined the rate of fractures in children and adults with and without ASD using a national database of emergency room…

  12. Design of a Model of Forearm Bone Fractures for Educational Purposes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jastaniah, Saddig; Hamdan, Abdulrahman; Alhadrami, Abdullah; Almatrafi, Talal; Arif, Ahmed; Almalki, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    This work explores a new approach to demonstrate possible forearm fractures in humans as an educating means for student radiographers. The Design of abnormal bones are not normally available as phantoms; the manufacturer usually produces normal human musculoskeletal models for educational purposes. Hence fractures and abnormalities are usually…

  13. Extensive Periosteal Chondroma in the Middle Phalanx with Pathological Fracture Reconstructed with Strut Bone Grafting.

    PubMed

    Serigano, Kenji; Ikeda, Masayoshi; Mochida, Joji

    2015-01-01

    We report of a pathological fracture of the middle phalanx of the little finger due to periosteal chondroma. The periosteal chondroma occupied an extensive area of the middle phalanx extending to the proximal interphalangeal joint, and the fracture involved the distal interphalangeal articular surface. The fracture was internally fixed using a strut bone grafting after resection of the chondroma. One year and four months after the operation, remodeling of the phalanx had completed without recurrence and functional loss.

  14. Transverse and Oblique Long Bone Fracture Evaluation by Low Order Ultrasonic Guided Waves: A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Liu, Dan; Xu, Kailiang; Le, Lawrence H.; Wang, Weiqi

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves have recently been used in fracture evaluation and fracture healing monitoring. An axial transmission technique has been used to quantify the impact of the gap breakage width and fracture angle on the amplitudes of low order guided wave modes S0 and A0 under a 100 kHz narrowband excitation. In our two dimensional finite-difference time-domain (2D-FDTD) simulation, the long bones are modeled as three layers with a soft tissue overlay and marrow underlay. The simulations of the transversely and obliquely fractured long bones show that the amplitudes of both S0 and A0 decrease as the gap breakage widens. Fixing the crack width, the increase of the fracture angle relative to the cross section perpendicular to the long axis enhances the amplitude of A0, while the amplitude of S0 shows a nonmonotonic trend with the decrease of the fracture angle. The amplitude ratio between the S0 and A0 modes is used to quantitatively evaluate the fracture width and angles. The study suggests that the low order guided wave modes S0 and A0 have potentials for transverse and oblique bone fracture evaluation and fracture healing monitoring. PMID:28182135

  15. The effect of strain rate on fracture toughness of human cortical bone: a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Ural, Ani; Zioupos, Peter; Buchanan, Drew; Vashishth, Deepak

    2011-10-01

    Evaluating the mechanical response of bone under high loading rates is crucial to understanding fractures in traumatic accidents or falls. In the current study, a computational approach based on cohesive finite element modeling was employed to evaluate the effect of strain rate on fracture toughness of human cortical bone. Two-dimensional compact tension specimen models were simulated to evaluate the change in initiation and propagation fracture toughness with increasing strain rate (range: 0.08-18 s(-1)). In addition, the effect of porosity in combination with strain rate was assessed using three-dimensional models of micro-computed tomography-based compact tension specimens. The simulation results showed that bone's resistance against the propagation of a crack decreased sharply with increase in strain rates up to 1 s(-1) and attained an almost constant value for strain rates larger than 1 s(-1). On the other hand, initiation fracture toughness exhibited a more gradual decrease throughout the strain rates. There was a significant positive correlation between the experimentally measured number of microcracks and the fracture toughness found in the simulations. Furthermore, the simulation results showed that the amount of porosity did not affect the way initiation fracture toughness decreased with increasing strain rates, whereas it exacerbated the same strain rate effect when propagation fracture toughness was considered. These results suggest that strain rates associated with falls lead to a dramatic reduction in bone's resistance against crack propagation. The compromised fracture resistance of bone at loads exceeding normal activities indicates a sharp reduction and/or absence of toughening mechanisms in bone during high strain conditions associated with traumatic fracture.

  16. Micro-Finite Element analysis will overestimate the compressive stiffness of fractured cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Arias-Moreno, Andrés Julián; Ito, Keita; van Rietbergen, Bert

    2016-09-06

    Recently, micro-Finite Element (micro-FE) analysis based on High Resolution peripheral Quantitative CT (HRpQCT) images was introduced to quantify the state of fracture healing (de Jong et al., 2014). That study suggested that the direct post-fracture stiffness may be overestimated by micro-FE. The aim of this study was to investigate this further by measuring the loss in stiffness of cancellous bone samples under compressive loading and to compare this with predictions based on micro-FE analyses and bone microstructural and fracture morphology. Sixty porcine trabecular cores were micro-CT scanned and tested in compression before and after inducing a fracture in 4 different manners. The loss in stiffness as measured in the experiment was compared to that calculated from micro-FE analysis. Additionally, bone morphology parameters and fracture thickness were calculated. The experimentally measured loss in stiffness ranged from 37% to 80%. The losses calculated from the micro-FE analyses were lower and ranged from 36% to 61%, while in one case an increase in stiffness was calculated. For 2 of the 4 experiments, the results of the experiment and micro-FE analyses were significantly different. Only for very smooth fractures good agreement was obtained between FE and experimental results. The loss in stiffness did not correlate with any investigated bone morphology parameter or the thickness of the fracture region. It was concluded that micro-FE analysis can severely overestimate the stiffness of fractured bone depending on the type of fracture, but in the case of smooth fractures good estimates are possible.

  17. Value of bone scintigraphy for detection and ageing of vertebral fractures in patients with severe osteoporosis and correlation between bone scintigraphy and mineral bone density.

    PubMed

    Kucukalic-Selimovic, Elma; Begic, Amela

    2004-01-01

    Osteoporosis is the most common of the metabolic bone diseases, and is an important cause of morbidity in the elderly. Bone scintigraphy is used to detect skeletal lesions at the earliest possible time, to monitor the course of the skeletal discase and to evaluate the metabolic activity of skeletal lesions. The aim of this study was to determine, by using the bone scan age of vertebral fractures in patients with severe osteoporosis, and make correlation between bone scintigraphy and mineral bone density. Material and methods 30 female patients were studied with bone scintigraphy after BMD.BMD was measurred with DEXA Hologic QDR 4500 Elite System. Correlation between T-score and uptake of radiofarmaceutical (Tc-99mMDP) was 0.849, and it was high. Intensity of uptake of Tc-99m MDP scintigraphy is an accurate method for the detection and ageing of fractures in osteoporotic patients.

  18. Bone-density-specific fracture risk: A population-based study of the relationship between osteoporosis and vertebral fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Melton, L.J.; Wahner, H.W.; Richelson, L.S.; O'Fallon, W.M.; Dunn, W.L.; Riggs, B.L.

    1985-05-01

    The search for a specific level of bone density that clearly distinguishes patients with osteoporosis from those without has been largely unsuccessful. A different, ''gradient of risk'' model was used to assess the effect of various degrees of osteoporosis on the prevalence of vertebral fractures. The authors measured spinal (L/sub 1/-L/sub 4/) bone mineral (BM) with dual photon absorptiometry in an age-stratified random sample of Rochester, Minnesota women greater than or equal to 35 years old to estimate the distribution of spinal BM in the population of adult woman. The authors also assessed BM among women in the sample who had one or more vertebral fractures to estimate both the total number of women with vertebral fractures in the population and the distribution of spinal BM in such women. These population-based estimates were then used to calculate the prevalence rate of vertebral fracture at various levels of spinal BM. Women with spinal BM greater than or equal to 1.40 g/cm/sup 2/ were free of vertebral fractures. Among women with BM between 1.00 and 1.39 g/cm/sup 2/, the prevalence of vertebral fractures was about 7%. The prevalence rate increased as spinal BM decreased further. Among women with spinal BM<0.60 g/cm/sup 2/, all had at least one vertebral fracture (prevalence=100%). These data indicate that osteoporosis is a necessary cause of age-related vertebral fractures and, at certain low levels, is a sufficient cause of such fractures in conjunction with the activities of daily living.

  19. Acute abdominal pain following fracture of a heterotopically formed bone incorporating a prolene mesh.

    PubMed

    Nageswaran, H; Dunkley, A

    2010-09-01

    A case is presented of severe abdominal pain around a healed scar following fracture of a heterotopically formed bone. This should be considered an unusual differential diagnosis in patients with acute pain of unknown origin who had open abdominal surgery in the past. To our knowledge, we have also reported the first case of hetertopic bone formation incorporating a prolene mesh.

  20. Timing of long bone fracture fixation in severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Jamjoom, Bakur A; Jamjoom, Abdulhakim B

    2012-04-01

    We present a review of the published evidence on the optimal timing for long bone fracture fixation in severe traumatic brain injury (TBI); a matter that remains under debate. Fifteen retrospective articles (level II-3 evidence) were considered suitable for the review. We conclude that the published evidence does not provide a definitive answer to the optimal timing of long bone fracture surgery in severe TBI, and a randomized controlled trial is required. We recommend a safe strategy that combines damage control surgery with a period of monitoring of intracranial pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure, and if available brain tissue oxygen until the patient is considered fit for the fracture fixation.

  1. Manual strangulation: experimental approach to the genesis of hyoid bone fractures.

    PubMed

    Lebreton-Chakour, Catherine; Godio-Raboutet, Yves; Torrents, Romain; Chaumoitre, Kathia; Boval, Catherine; Bartoli, Christophe; Adalian, Pascal; Piercecchi-Marti, Marie-Dominique; Thollon, Lionel

    2013-05-10

    Discovery of a fracture of the hyoid bone during forensic autopsy is a feature that raises suspicions of constriction of the neck. Studies have shown the influence of gender and build of the individual on the morphology of this bone. Our aims were to confirm these findings and to develop an experimental protocol for simulating manual strangulation in order to determine the force required to fracture the hyoid bone and the influence of anthropometric parameters on this force. A total of 77 intact hyoid bones were obtained, scanned, modeled, measured and embedded in resin. Using a hydraulic press, we applied force to the distal extremity of the greater horn. The relationships between the parameters of sex, weight and height of the subject, anteroposterior length of the hyoid, width between the greater horns, angle, fusion of the greater horns and force applied were analyzed. Our study confirmed sexual dimorphism, shown by greater length in males (>37.8 mm) than in females, and a larger angle in females (a shorter bone with a width>43.7 mm and an angle>31°01). The study confirmed the positive correlation between the length of the hyoid and the weight and height of the subject (p<0.05). Sixty-seven of the 77 hyoid bones fractured during the experiment (87% fracture rate). Of the fractures, 48% occurred at the junction between the body and the greater horns, 49% in the greater horns (mean distance from the distal extremity of the horn 17.33±4.37 mm), and 3% in the median part of the body. No significant association was found between gender and type of fracture, or between fusion or non-fusion of the horn (p>0.05). Fused bones were not more susceptible to fracture than non-fused bones. Fracture occurred at a mean force of 30.55 N (±18.189). Multiple linear regression showed a significant negative correlation between force required for fracture and age, weight and height of the subject, anteroposterior length and angle. The younger the individual, the slighter their

  2. Predicting Hip Fracture Type With Cortical Bone Mapping (CBM) in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study.

    PubMed

    Treece, Graham M; Gee, Andrew H; Tonkin, Carol; Ewing, Susan K; Cawthon, Peggy M; Black, Dennis M; Poole, Kenneth E S

    2015-11-01

    Hip fracture risk is known to be related to material properties of the proximal femur, but fracture prediction studies adding richer quantitative computed tomography (QCT) measures to dual-energy X-ray (DXA)-based methods have shown limited improvement. Fracture types have distinct relationships to predictors, but few studies have subdivided fracture into types, because this necessitates regional measurements and more fracture cases. This work makes use of cortical bone mapping (CBM) to accurately assess, with no prior anatomical presumptions, the distribution of properties related to fracture type. CBM uses QCT data to measure the cortical and trabecular properties, accurate even for thin cortices below the imaging resolution. The Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study is a predictive case-cohort study of men over 65 years old: we analyze 99 fracture cases (44 trochanteric and 55 femoral neck) compared to a cohort of 308, randomly selected from 5994. To our knowledge, this is the largest QCT-based predictive hip fracture study to date, and the first to incorporate CBM analysis into fracture prediction. We show that both cortical mass surface density and endocortical trabecular BMD are significantly different in fracture cases versus cohort, in regions appropriate to fracture type. We incorporate these regions into predictive models using Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate hazard ratios, and logistic regression to estimate area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Adding CBM to DXA-based BMD leads to a small but significant (p < 0.005) improvement in model prediction for any fracture, with AUC increasing from 0.78 to 0.79, assessed using leave-one-out cross-validation. For specific fracture types, the improvement is more significant (p < 0.0001), with AUC increasing from 0.71 to 0.77 for trochanteric fractures and 0.76 to 0.82 for femoral neck fractures. In contrast, adding DXA-based BMD to a CBM-based predictive model

  3. Material Mismatch Effect on the Fracture of a Bone-Composite Cement Interface.

    PubMed

    Khandaker, M; Tarantini, S

    2012-12-01

    The interfacial mechanics at the bone-implant interface is a critical issue for implant fixation and the filling of bone defects created by tumors and/or their excision. Our previous study found that micron and nano sizes MgO particles improved the fracture toughness of bone-cement interfaces under tension loading. The strength of bonding of different types of bone with different types of implants may not be the same. The aims of this research were to determine the influences of material mismatch due to bone orientation and a magnesium oxide (MgO) filler material for PMMA bone cement on the mechanical strength between bone and bone cement specimens. This research studied the longitudinal and transverse directions bovine cortical bone as different bone materials and poly Methyl MethAcrylate (PMMA) bone cement with and without MgO additives as different implant materials. The scope of work for this study was: (1) to determine the bending strength and modulus of different bone and bone cement specimens, (2) to determine whether inclusion of MgO particles on PMMA has any influence on these mechanical properties of PMMA, and (3) to determine whether bone orientation and inclusion of MgO particles with PMMA has any influence on the interface strength between bone and PMMA. This study showed that bone orientation has statistically significant effect on the bonding strength between bone and bone cement specimens (P value<0.05). This study also found that while MgO additive decreased the bending strength and modulus of PMMA bone cement, but the inclusion of MgO additives with PMMA bone cement has no statistically significant effect on the bonding strength between bone and bone cement specimens (P value>0.05).

  4. Microscopic Pattern of Bone Fractures as an Indicator of Blast Trauma: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Pechníková, Marketa; Mazzarelli, Debora; Poppa, Pasquale; Gibelli, Daniele; Scossa Baggi, Emilio; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2015-09-01

    The assessment of fractures is a key issue in forensic anthropology; however, very few studies deal with the features of fractures due to explosion in comparison with other traumatic injuries. This study focuses on fractures resulting from blast trauma and two types of blunt force trauma (manual compression and running over), applied to corpses of pigs; 163 osteons were examined within forty fractures by the transmission light microscopy. Blast lesions showed a higher percentage of fracture lines through the Haversian canal, whereas in other types of trauma, the fractures went across the inner lamellae. Significant differences between samples hit by blast energy and those runover or manually compressed were observed (p<0.05). The frequency of pattern A is significantly higher in exploded bones than in runover and compressed. Microscopic analysis of the fracture line may provide information about the type of trauma, especially for what concerns blast trauma.

  5. Simulation of fracture of the bone implant with the porous structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobenkov, M. V.; Kulkov, S. N.

    2016-08-01

    Different approaches to bone defects reconstruction with the use of ceramic materials have been developed recently. Ceramics are identical with bone matrix, provide biomedical compatibility with bone tissue and possess high strength. But with an overall high strength ceramic implants destruct in dynamic mode. The paper presents a study of the effect of the porosity gradient on the destruction of the bone implants under dynamic loading. It is shown that the fracture behavior of the bone implants is changed with increasing levels of the gradient of porosity.

  6. Elbow dislocation with ipsilateral diaphyseal forearm bone fracture: A rare injury report with literature review.

    PubMed

    Goni, Vijay; Behera, Prateek; Meena, Umesh Kumar; Gopinathan, Nirmal raj; Akkina, Narendranadh; Arjun, R H H

    2015-01-01

    Dislocation of the elbow along with shaft fractures of both bones of the ipsilateral forearm is a rare injury though elbow dislocation or fracture of the forearm bones may occur separately. Such injuries need a concentric reduction of the dislocation and an anatomical fixation of forearm bones for optimal functional outcomes. We report a case of elbow dislocation with fracture of the lateral condyle of the humerus along with fractures of shafts of the radius and ulna in a 44-year-old female. Closed reduction of the elbow and operative stabilization of all fractures were done with good clinical, radiological and functional outcomes in 2 years follow-up period. A significant degree of force is needed to produce a combined dislocation of a joint and fracture of bones around that joint and these complex injuries may be missed if the clinician is not aware of the possibility of such injuries. The fact that the previously reported cases had a posterolateral dislocation while our case had a posteromedial dislocation and a fracture of the lateral humeral condyle as well makes it unique in its presentation and worth reporting. We have also included an up to date literature review on this topic.

  7. Early stages of bone fracture healing: formation of a fibrin-collagen scaffold in the fracture hematoma.

    PubMed

    Echeverri, L F; Herrero, M A; Lopez, J M; Oleaga, G

    2015-01-01

    This work is concerned with the sequence of events taking place during the first stages of bone fracture healing, from bone breakup until the formation of early fibrous callus (EFC). The latter provides a scaffold over which subsequent remodeling processes will eventually result in successful bone repair. Specifically, some mathematical models are proposed to estimate the time required for (1) the formation immediately after fracture of a fibrin clot, described in terms of a phase transition in a polymerization process, and (2) the onset of EFC which is produced when fibroblasts arising from differentiation of chemotactically recruited mesenchymal stem cells remodel a previous fibrin clot by releasing a collagen matrix over it. An attempt has been made to keep models as simple as possible, so that a explicit dependence of the estimates obtained on relevant biochemical parameters involved is obtained.

  8. Effect of the deformation rate on the nature of compound bone tissue fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnis, A. É.

    1983-01-01

    An electron microscopic study showed that the major type of fracture of moist bone tissue is viscous fracture with the extrusion of elements on various structural levels. Larger elements are found at lower deformation rates, and finer elements are found at higher ɛ11. The longitudinal shear deformation between the osteons and interosteon ground substance, between the individual lamellae in the osteons, between the collagen-mineral fibers and interfibrillar ground substance, and between hydroxyapatite crystals and collagen molecules largely accounts for the viscoelastic properties of bone tissue. Processes occurring on some structural level of bone tissue predominate at certain specific deformation rates.

  9. [Recommended soy and soy products intake to prevent bone fracture and osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Uenishi, Kazuhiro

    2005-08-01

    Soy contains isoflavones, which are phytoestrogens, and its intake may help to prevent some diseases including menopausal disorder, osteoporosis, and breast cancer. Natto, a fermented soy product, is rich in vitamin K, which also contributes to bone health. In this report, we overviewed peer-reviewed papers showing relationship between soy product intake and risks of bone fracture and osteoporosis. It is suggested that that intake of soy products is not strongly enough to conclude but possible to be efficient in prevention of bone fracture and osteoporosis.

  10. Bone Geometry as a Predictor of Tissue Fragility and Stress Fracture Risk

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    S, Casagrande D, Jepsen KJ. The relationship between continued periosteal apposition and bone fragility. Poster presentation at the American Society...al. Stress fractures and tibial bone width. A risk factor. J Bone Jt Surg Br, 69:326- 329, 1987. Jepsen, KJ, Pennington, DE, Lee, Y-L, Warman, M...medial- lateral (ML) widths were determined for tibial diaphyses from 17 male donors 17–46 years of age. A slen- derness index was defined as the

  11. Partnership for fragility bone fracture care provision and prevention program (P4Bones): study protocol for a secondary fracture prevention pragmatic controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Fractures associated with bone fragility in older adults signal the potential for secondary fracture. Fragility fractures often precipitate further decline in health and loss of mobility, with high associated costs for patients, families, society and the healthcare system. Promptly initiating a coordinated, comprehensive pharmacological bone health and falls prevention program post-fracture may improve osteoporosis treatment compliance; and reduce rates of falls and secondary fractures, and associated morbidity, mortality and costs. Methods/design This pragmatic, controlled trial at 11 hospital sites in eight regions in Quebec, Canada, will recruit community-dwelling patients over age 50 who have sustained a fragility fracture to an intervention coordinated program or to standard care, according to the site. Site study coordinators will identify and recruit 1,596 participants for each study arm. Coordinators at intervention sites will facilitate continuity of care for bone health, and arrange fall prevention programs including physical exercise. The intervention teams include medical bone specialists, primary care physicians, pharmacists, nurses, rehabilitation clinicians, and community program organizers. The primary outcome of this study is the incidence of secondary fragility fractures within an 18-month follow-up period. Secondary outcomes include initiation and compliance with bone health medication; time to first fall and number of clinically significant falls; fall-related hospitalization and mortality; physical activity; quality of life; fragility fracture-related costs; admission to a long term care facility; participants’ perceptions of care integration, expectations and satisfaction with the program; and participants’ compliance with the fall prevention program. Finally, professionals at intervention sites will participate in focus groups to identify barriers and facilitating factors for the integrated fragility fracture prevention program

  12. The loss of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) reduces bone toughness and fracture toughness.

    PubMed

    Makowski, Alexander J; Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Wadeer, Sandra A; Whitehead, Jack M; Rowland, Barbara J; Granke, Mathilde; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita; Yang, Xiangli; Nyman, Jeffry S

    2014-05-01

    Even though age-related changes to bone tissue affecting fracture risk are well characterized, only a few matrix-related factors have been identified as important to maintaining fracture resistance. As a gene critical to osteoblast differentiation, activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) is possibly one of these important factors. To test the hypothesis that the loss of ATF4 affects the fracture resistance of bone beyond bone mass and structure, we harvested bones from Atf4+/+ and Atf4-/- littermates at 8 and 20 weeks of age (n≥9 per group) for bone assessment across several length scales. From whole bone mechanical tests in bending, femurs from Atf4-/- mice were found to be brittle with reduced toughness and fracture toughness compared to femurs from Atf4+/+ mice. However, there were no differences in material strength and in tissue hardness, as determined by nanoindentation, between the genotypes, irrespective of age. Tissue mineral density of the cortex at the point of loading as determined by micro-computed tomography was also not significantly different. However, by analyzing local composition by Raman Spectroscopy (RS), bone tissue of Atf4-/- mice was found to have higher mineral to collagen ratio compared to wild-type tissue, primarily at 20 weeks of age. From RS analysis of intact femurs at 2 orthogonal orientations relative to the polarization axis of the laser, we also found that the organizational-sensitive peak ratio, ν1Phosphate per Amide I, changed to a greater extent upon bone rotation for Atf4-deficient tissue, implying bone matrix organization may contribute to the brittleness phenotype. Target genes of ATF4 activity are not only important to osteoblast differentiation but also in maintaining bone toughness and fracture toughness.

  13. The Loss of Activating Transcription Factor 4 (ATF4) Reduces Bone Toughness and Fracture Toughness

    PubMed Central

    Makowski, Alexander J.; Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Waader, Sandra A.; Whitehead, Jack M.; Rowland, Barbara J.; Granke, Mathilde; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita; Yang, Xiangli; Nyman, Jeffry S.

    2014-01-01

    Even though age-related changes to bone tissue affecting fracture risk are well characterized, only a few matrix-related factors have been identified as important to maintaining fracture resistance. As a gene critical to osteoblast differentiation, activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) is possibly one of the seimportant factors. To test the hypothesis that the loss of ATF4 affects the fracture resistance of bone beyond bone mass and structure, we harvested bones from Atf4+/+ and Atf4−/− littermates at 8 and 20 weeks of age (n≥9 per group) for bone assessment across several length scales. From whole bone mechanical tests in bending, femurs from Atf4−/− mice were found to be brittle with reduced toughness and fracture toughness compared to femurs from Atf4+/+ mice. However, there were no differences in material strength and in tissue hardness, as determined by nanoindentation, between the genotypes, irrespective age. Tissue mineral density of the cortex at the point of loading as determined by micro-computed tomography was also not significantly different. However, by analyzing local composition by Raman Spectroscopy (RS), bone tissue of Atf4−/− mice was found to have higher mineral to collagen ratio compared to wild-type tissue, primarily at 20 weeks of age. From RS analysis of intact femurs at 2 orthogonal orientations relative to the polarization axis of the laser, we also found that the organizational-sensitive peak ratio, ν1 Phosphate per Amide I, changed to a greater extent upon bone rotation for Atf4-deficient tissue, implying bone matrix organization may contribute to the brittleness phenotype. Target genes of ATF4 activity are not only important to osteoblast differentiation but also maintaining bone toughness and fracture toughness. PMID:24509412

  14. Association of antiepileptic drugs, vitamin D, and calcium supplementation with bone fracture occurrence in epilepsy patients.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Patricio S; Perez, David L; Abner, Erin; Ryan, Melody

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study is to determine whether calcium and vitamin D supplementation reduces the risk of bone fractures in adult epilepsy patients. Records were obtained on 7716 patients with epilepsy prescribed antiepileptic drugs (AED) from the Veteran Affairs Hospital in Lexington, Kentucky. We performed a single center, retrospective cohort study to examine the proportion of fractures in 3303 patients on AED who took supplements compared to patients on AED not taking supplements. Patients prescribed long-term AEDs taking calcium and vitamin D were as likely to have fractures as those who did not take these supplements (11.7% vs. 9.9%, χ(2)=0.59, p=0.44). Phenytoin use was associated with a statistically significant increased risk of fractures OR=1.55 (1.10-2.24). Thus, in this group of patients with epilepsy on AED, bone fractures were not prevented in individuals taking calcium and vitamin D supplementation.

  15. Long-bone fractures in llamas and alpacas: 28 cases (1998-2008).

    PubMed

    Knafo, S Emmanuelle; Getman, Liberty M; Richardson, Dean W; Fecteau, Marie-Eve

    2012-07-01

    Treatment and outcome of camelids with long-bone fractures are described. Medical records (1998-2008) of camelids (n = 28) with long-bone fractures were reviewed for signalment, time to presentation, fracture type, method of repair, duration of hospitalization, and post-operative complications. Follow-up information was obtained via telephone interviews with owners. Mean age and weight at presentation were 3.4 years and 56.3 kg, respectively. Twenty-six fractures were treated with internal fixation (n = 11), external fixation (n = 10), combination of internal and external fixation (n = 3), amputation (n = 1), and external fixation followed by amputation (n = 1). Long-term follow-up information was obtained for 19 of the 26 animals. The post-operative complication rate was 23% and owner satisfaction was high. Animals with open fractures were more likely to experience complications. Internal fixation was associated with superior alignment and outcome. Internal fixation techniques should be recommended for camelids.

  16. Brief report: bone fractures in children and adults with autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Neumeyer, Ann M; O'Rourke, Julia A; Massa, Alexandra; Lee, Hang; Lawson, Elizabeth A; McDougle, Christopher J; Misra, Madhusmita

    2015-03-01

    Peripubertal boys with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have lower bone mineral density (BMD) than typically developing controls. However, it is not clear whether lower BMD in ASD results in an increased fracture rate. This study examined the rate of fractures in children and adults with and without ASD using a national database of emergency room visits (Nationwide Emergency Department Sample). A higher odds ratio for hip fractures in children and young adults (3-22 years) as well as older adults (23-50 years) with ASD than those without ASD, and a higher odds ratio for forearm and spine fractures in women ages 23-50 with ASD were found. Further studies are necessary to better understand the decreased bone density in ASD and its implications for fracture development.

  17. Increased fracture risk and low bone mineral density in patients with loeys-dietz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tan, Eric W; Offoha, Roosevelt U; Oswald, Gretchen L; Skolasky, Richard L; Dewan, Ashvin K; Zhen, Gehua; Shapiro, Jay R; Dietz, Harry C; Cao, Xu; Sponseller, Paul D

    2013-08-01

    Loeys-Dietz syndrome is a recently recognized connective tissue disorder with widespread systemic involvement. Little is known about its skeletal phenotype. Our goal was to investigate the risk of fracture and incidence of low bone mineral density in patients with Loeys-Dietz syndrome. We performed a cross-sectional, descriptive, survey-based study with subsequent chart review from July 2011 to April 2012. Fifty-seven patients (26 men, 31 women) with Loeys-Dietz syndrome confirmed by genetic testing completed the survey (average age, 25.3 years; range, 0.9-79.6 years). There were a total of 51 fractures (33 patients): 35 fractures in the upper extremities, 14 in the lower extremities, and two in the spine. Fourteen patients (24.6%) reported two or more fractures. There was a 50% risk of fracture by age 14 years. The incidence of any fracture in this cohort was 3.86 per 100 person-years. Seventeen patients had dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans available for review, 11 (64.7%) of whom had at least one fracture. Thirteen included lumbar spine absorptiometry reports; eight (61.5%) indicated low or very low bone mineral density. In the left hip, ten of 14 participants (71.4%) had low or very low bone mineral density. In the left femoral neck, nine of 13 participants (69.2%) had low or very low bone mineral density. The lowest Z- and T-scores were not associated with an increased number of fractures. Patients with Loeys-Dietz syndrome have a high risk of fracture and a high incidence of low bone mineral density.

  18. Third metacarpal condylar fatigue fractures in equine athletes occur within previously modelled subchondral bone.

    PubMed

    Whitton, R Christopher; Trope, Gareth D; Ghasem-Zadeh, Ali; Anderson, Garry A; Parkin, Timothy D H; Mackie, Eleanor J; Seeman, Ego

    2010-10-01

    Bone modelling and remodelling reduce the risk of fatigue fractures; the former by adapting bone to its loading circumstances, the latter by replacing fatigued bone. Remodelling transiently increases porosity because of the normal delay in onset of the formation phase of the remodelling sequence. Protracted intense loading suppresses remodelling leaving modelling as the only means of maintaining bone strength. We therefore hypothesized that race horses with fatigue fractures of the distal third metacarpal bone (MC3) will have reduced porosity associated with suppressed remodelling while continued adaptive modelling will result in higher volume fraction (BV/TV) at this site. Using high resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT), we measured the distal aspect of the MC3 obtained at postmortem from 13 thoroughbred race horses with condylar fractures of the MC3 (cases), 8 horses without fractures (training controls), 14 horses with a fracture at another site (fractured controls) and 9 horses resting from training (resting controls). Porosity of the subchondral bone of MC3 was lower in cases than resting controls (12±1.4% vs. 18±1.6%, P=0.017) although areas of focal porosity were observed adjacent to fractures in 6/13 horses. BV/TV of the distal metacarpal epiphysis tended to be higher in horses with condylar fractures (0.79±0.015) than training controls (0.74±0.019, P=0.070), but also higher in controls with a fracture elsewhere (0.79±0.014) than the training controls (0.74±0.019, P=0.040). BV/TV was higher in horses over three years of age than those aged two or three years (0.79±0.01 vs. 0.74±0.01, P=0.016). All metacarpal condylar fractures occurred within focal areas of high BV/TV. We infer that intense training in equine athletes suppresses remodelling of third metacarpal subchondral bone limiting damage repair while modelling increases regional bone volume in an attempt to minimise local stresses but may fail to offset bone

  19. Advantages of modified osteosynthesis in treatment of osteoporotic long bones fractures--experimental model.

    PubMed

    Sisljagić, Vladimir; Jovanović, Savo; Mrcela, Tomislav; Radić, Radivoje; Belovari, Tatjana

    2009-12-01

    In surgery of fractured long bones, a patient suffering from osteoporosis represents constant challenge to a surgeon and applied material and instruments that need to destroy as little as possible of an already damaged bone. One potential way of increasing the contact surface between the implants and osteoporotic bone is injection of bone cement (methyl-metacrilat, Palakos) into a prepared screw bed. This method of osteosynthesis was therefore subjected to experimental research to prove that application of modified osteosynthesis using bone cement in treatment of fractures in osteoporotic patients has advantage over the standard method of osteosynthesis because this modified method enables significantly greater firmness and stability of the osteosynthesis, which is the essential precondition of a successful fracture healing. The research was carried out on six macerated cadaveric preparations of a shin bone from the osteological collection from Institute for Anatomy, School of Medicine, University "J. J. Strossmayer". All samples of long bones were artificially broken in the middle part of the diaphysis and then standard osteosynthesis and modified osteosynthesis with screws filled with bone cement were performed on the samples. Results show that under identical static action of the moment of torsion in the modified osteosynthesis torsion angle deviation is lower than in the standard osteosynthesis. In modified osteosynthesis with bone cement the first results for angle of torsion deviation greater than 0.2 degrees were noticed after 120 minutes, while in the standard method of osteosynthesis they were noticed already in the first minute.

  20. Assessment of function-graded materials as fracture fixation bone-plates under combined loading conditions using finite element modelling.

    PubMed

    Fouad, H

    2011-05-01

    In previous work by Fouad (Medical Engineering and Physics 2010 [23]), 3D finite element (FE) models for fractured bones with function-graded (FG) bone-plates and traditional bone-plates made of stainless steel (SS) and titanium (Ti) alloy were examined under compressive loading conditions using the ABAQUS Code. In this study, the effects of the presence of the torsional load in addition to the compressive load on the predicted stresses of the fracture fixation bone-plate system are examined at different healing stages. The effects on the stress on the fracture site when using contacted and non-contacted bone-plate systems are also studied. The FE modelling results indicate that the torsional load has significant effects on the resultant stress on the fracture fixation bone-plate system, which should be taken into consideration during the design and the analysis. The results also show that the stress shielding at the fracture site decreases significantly when using FG bone-plates compared to Ti alloy or SS bone-plates. The presence of a gap between the bone and the plate results in a remarkable reduction in bone stress shielding at the fracture site. Therefore, the significant effects of using an FG bone-plate with a gap and the presence of torsional load on the resultant stress on the fracture fixation bone-plate system should be taken into consideration.

  1. Ability of Ultrasonography in Detection of Different Extremity Bone Fractures; a Case Series Study

    PubMed Central

    Bozorgi, Farzad; Shayesteh Azar, Massoud; Montazer, Seyed Hossein; Chabra, Aroona; Heidari, Seyed Farshad; Khalilian, Alireza

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Despite radiography being the gold standard in evaluation of orthopedic injuries, using bedside ultrasonography has several potential supremacies such as avoiding exposure to ionizing radiation, availability in pre-hospital settings, being extensively accessible, and ability to be used on the bedside. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasonography in detection of extremity bone fractures. Methods: This study is a case series study, which was prospectively conducted on multiple blunt trauma patients, who were 18 years old or older, had stable hemodynamic, Glasgow coma scale 15, and signs or symptoms of a possible extremity bone fracture. After initial assessment, ultrasonography of suspected bones was performed by a trained emergency medicine resident and prevalence of true positive and false negative findings were calculated compared to plain radiology. Results: 108 patients with the mean age of 44.6 ± 20.4 years were studied (67.6% male). Analysis was done on 158 sites of fracture, which were confirmed with plain radiography. 91 (57.6%) cases were suspected to have upper extremity fracture(s) and 67 (42.4%) to have lower ones. The most frequent site of injuries were forearm (36.7%) in upper limbs and leg (27.8%) in lower limbs. Prevalence of true positive and false negative cases for fractures detected by ultrasonography were 59 (64.8%) and 32 (35.52%) for upper and 49 (73.1%) and 18 (26.9%) for lower extremities, respectively. In addition, prevalence of true positive and false negative detected cases for intra-articular fractures were 24 (48%) and 26 (52%), respectively. Conclusion The present study shows the moderate sensitivity (68.3%) of ultrasonography in detection of different extremity bone fractures. Ultrasonography showed the best sensitivity in detection of femur (100%) and humerus (76.2%) fractures, respectively. It had low sensitivity in detection of in intra-articular fractures. PMID:28286822

  2. THE EFFECT OF STRAIN RATE ON FRACTURE TOUGHNESS OF HUMAN CORTICAL BONE: A FINITE ELEMENT STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Ural, Ani; Zioupos, Peter; Buchanan, Drew; Vashishth, Deepak

    2011-01-01

    Evaluating the mechanical response of bone under high loading rates is crucial to understanding fractures in traumatic accidents or falls. In the current study, a computational approach based on cohesive finite element modeling was employed to evaluate the effect of strain rate on fracture toughness of human cortical bone. Two-dimensional compact tension specimen models were simulated to evaluate the change in initiation and propagation fracture toughness with increasing strain rate (range: 0.08 to 18 s−1). In addition, the effect of porosity in combination with strain rate was assessed using three-dimensional models of microcomputed tomography-based compact tension specimens. The simulation results showed that bone’s resistance against the propagation of fracture decreased sharply with increase in strain rates up to 1 s−1 and attained an almost constant value for strain rates larger than 1 s−1. On the other hand, initiation fracture toughness exhibited a more gradual decrease throughout the strain rates. There was a significant positive correlation between the experimentally measured number of microcracks and the fracture toughness found in the simulations. Furthermore, the simulation results showed that the amount of porosity did not affect the way initiation fracture toughness decreased with increasing strain rates, whereas it exacerbated the same strain rate effect when propagation fracture toughness was considered. These results suggest that strain rates associated with falls lead to a dramatic reduction in bone’s resistance against crack propagation. The compromised fracture resistance of bone at loads exceeding normal activities indicates a sharp reduction and/or absence of toughening mechanisms in bone during high strain conditions associated with traumatic fracture. PMID:21783112

  3. Vitamin E and the Healing of Bone Fracture: The Current State of Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Borhanuddin, Boekhtiar; Mohd Fozi, Nur Farhana; Naina Mohamed, Isa

    2012-01-01

    Background. The effect of vitamin E on health-related conditions has been extensively researched, with varied results. However, to date, there was no published review of the effect of vitamin E on bone fracture healing. Purpose. This paper systematically audited past studies of the effect of vitamin E on bone fracture healing. Methods. Related articles were identified from Medline, CINAHL, and Scopus databases. Screenings were performed based on the criteria that the study must be an original study that investigated the independent effect of vitamin E on bone fracture healing. Data were extracted using standardised forms, followed by evaluation of quality of reporting using ARRIVE Guidelines, plus recalculation procedure for the effect size and statistical power of the results. Results. Six animal studies fulfilled the selection criteria. The study methods were heterogeneous with mediocre reporting quality and focused on the antioxidant-related mechanism of vitamin E. The metasynthesis showed α-tocopherol may have a significant effect on bone formation during the normal bone remodeling phase of secondary bone healing. Conclusion. In general, the effect of vitamin E on bone fracture healing remained inconclusive due to the small number of heterogeneous and mediocre studies included in this paper. PMID:23304211

  4. Characterizing the composition of bone formed during fracture healing using scanning electron microscopy techniques.

    PubMed

    Perdikouri, Christina; Tägil, Magnus; Isaksson, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    About 5-10% of all bone fractures suffer from delayed healing, which may lead to non-union. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) can be used to induce differentiation of osteoblasts and enhance the formation of the bony callus, and bisphosphonates help to retain the newly formed callus. The aim of this study was to investigate if scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) can identify differences in the mineral composition of the newly formed bone compared to cortical bone from a non-fractured control. Moreover, we investigate whether the use of BMPs and bisphosphonates-alone or combined-may have an effect on bone mineralization and composition. Twelve male Sprague-Dawley rats at 9 weeks of age were randomly divided into four groups and treated with (A) saline, (B) BMP-7, (C) bisphosphonates (Zoledronate), and (D) BMP-7 + Zoledronate. The rats were sacrificed after 6 weeks. All samples were imaged using SEM and chemically analyzed with EDS to quantify the amount of C, N, Ca, P, O, Na, and Mg. The Ca/P ratio was the primary outcome. In the fractured samples, two areas of interest were chosen for chemical analysis with EDS: the callus and the cortical bone. In the non-fractured samples, only the cortex was analyzed. Our results showed that the element composition varied to a small extent between the callus and the cortical bone in the fractured bones. However, the Ca/P ratio did not differ significantly, suggesting that the mineralization at all sites is similar 6 weeks post-fracture in this rat model.

  5. Assessment of Regional Bone Density in Fractured Vertebrae Using Quantitative Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Hany A.G.; Mac-Thiong, Jean-Marc; Levasseur, Annie; Parent, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Study Design Cohort study. Purpose The aim of this study is to propose and evaluate a new technique to assess bone mineral density of fractured vertebrae using quantitative computed tomography (QCT). Overview of Literature There is no available technique to estimate bone mineral density (BMD) at the fractured vertebra because of the alterations in bony structures at the fracture site. Methods Forty patients with isolated fracture from T10 to L2 were analyzed from the vertebrae above and below the fracture level. Apparent density (AD) was measured based on the relationship between QCT images attenuation coefficients and the density of calibration objects. AD of 8 independent regions of interest (ROI) within the vertebral body and 2 ROI within the pedicles of vertebrae above and below the fractured vertebra were measured. At the level of the fractured vertebra, AD was measured at the pedicles, which are typically intact. AD of the fractured vertebral body was linearly interpolated, based on the assumption that AD at the fractured vertebra is equivalent to the average AD measured in vertebrae adjacent to the fracture. Estimated and measured AD of the pedicles at the fractured level were compared to verify our assumption of linear interpolation from adjacent vertebrae. Results The difference between the measured and the interpolated density of the pedicles at the fractured vertebra was 0.006 and 0.003 g/cm3 for right and left pedicle respectively. The highest mean AD located at the pedicles and the lowest mean AD was found at the anterior ROI of the vertebral body. Significant negative correlation exist between age and AD of ROI in the vertebral body. Conclusions This study suggests that the proposed technique is adequate to estimate the AD of a fractured vertebra from the density of adjacent vertebrae. PMID:28243370

  6. Ultrasonography in the diagnosis of nasal bone fractures: a comparison with conventional radiography and computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lee, In Sook; Lee, Jung-Hoon; Woo, Chang-Ki; Kim, Hak Jin; Sol, Yu Li; Song, Jong Woon; Cho, Kyu-Sup

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the diagnostic efficacy of ultrasonography (US) with radiography and multi-detector computed tomography (CT) for the detection of nasal bone fractures. Forty-one patients with a nasal bone fracture who underwent prospective US examinations were included. Plain radiographs and CT images were obtained on the day of trauma. For US examinations, radiologist used a linear array transducer (L17-5 MHz) in 24 patients and hockey-stick probe (L15-7 MHz) in 17. The bony component of the nose was divided into three parts (right and left lateral nasal walls, and midline of nasal bone). Fracture detection by three modalities was subjected to analysis. Furthermore, findings made by each modality were compared with intraoperative findings. Nasal bone fractures were located in the right lateral wall (n = 28), midline of nasal bone (n = 31), or left lateral wall (n = 31). For right and left lateral nasal walls, CT had greater sensitivity and specificity than US or radiography, and better agreed with intraoperative findings. However, for midline fractures of nasal bone, US had higher specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value than CT. Although two US evaluations showed good agreements at all three sites, US findings obtained by the hockey-stick probe showed closer agreement with intraoperative findings for both lateral nasal wall and midline of nasal bone. Although CT showed higher sensitivity and specificity than US or radiography, US found to be helpful for evaluating the midline of nasal bone. Furthermore, for US examinations of the nasal bone, a smaller probe and higher frequency may be required.

  7. Bone metabolism and fracture risk in type 2 diabetes mellitus [Review].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Toru; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu

    2011-01-01

    Osteoporosis and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are now prevalent in aging and westernized societies, and adversely affect the health of the elderly people by causing fractures and vascular complications, respectively. Recent experimental and clinical studies show that both disorders are etiologically related to each other through the actions of osteocalcin and adiponectin. Meta-analyses of multiple clinical studies show that hip fracture risk of T2DM patients is increased to 1.4 to 1.7-folds, although BMD of the patients is not diminished. Vertebral fracture risk of T2DM patients is also increased, and BMD is not useful for assessing its risk. These findings suggest that bone fragility in T2DM depends on bone quality deterioration rather than bone mass reduction. Thus, surrogate markers are needed to replace the insensitivity of BMD in assessing fracture risks of T2DM patients. Markers related to advanced glycation end products as well as insulin-like growth factor-I may be such candidates, because these substances were experimentally shown to modulate bone quality in DM. In practice, it is important for physicians to assess fracture risk in T2DM patients by evaluating prior VFs and fracture histories using spine X-ray and interview, respectively, until the usefulness of surrogate markers is established.

  8. Childhood Obesity as a Risk Factor for Bone Fracture: A Mechanistic Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Eun; Hsieh, Min-Heng; Soni, Bharat K.; Zayzafoon, Majd; Allison, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the risk of bone fracture sustained by obese children exposed to falls. We hypothesized that the bone fracture risk of obese children would be greater than that of their nonobese counterparts. Design and Methods We developed finite element-based computational models for children that reflected various levels of obesity by varying body mass and the thickness of the subcutaneous adipose tissue layer. The models took account of both the momentum effect of variation of body mass and the cushion effect of variation of soft tissue thickness and examined these two contradictory effects on pelvic bone fracture risk through a set of sideways fall simulations with a range of impact speeds. Results The critical impact speed that yielded pelvic bone fracture decreased as the levels of obesity increased, which meant that the momentum effect of a greater body mass took precedence over the cushion effect of the soft tissue layer. Conclusions The result suggests that obese children have a greater risk of pelvic bone fracture than do their nonobese counterparts in sideways falls. A further implication is that current child safety devices, systems, and regulations will need to be revisited as the prevalence of child obesity increases. PMID:23512354

  9. Fractal properties of cancellous bone of the iliac crest in vertebral crush fracture.

    PubMed

    Fazzalari, N L; Parkinson, I H

    1998-07-01

    Fractal analysis is a method for describing complex shapes, including the cancellous structure of bone. It describes the surface texture and form of individual trabecular profiles and the overall cancellous structure. Sixty-four postmenopausal women with symptoms of back pain were referred for investigation for osteoporosis. The patients were divided into two groups for comparison: vertebral crush fracture (n = 31, mean age 68.58 +/- 6.47 years), and no vertebral crush fracture (n = 33, mean age 63.36 +/- 7.21 years). Cores of cancellous bone, 3 mm in diameter, were taken from the iliac crest and sectioned. A box-counting method implemented on an image analyzer was used to measure the fractal dimension. Three fractal dimensions describing trabecular surface texture (fractal 1), trabecular shape (fractal 2), and trabecular arrangement (fractal 3) were measured, indicating that cancellous bone has sectional self-similarity. Conventional histomorphometry was also performed on the samples. The results show that fractal 2 is significantly lower in the vertebral crush fracture group than in the nonfracture group (1.15 +/- 0.10 < 1.23 +/- 0.090, p < 0.0013). The histomorphometric analysis shows that bone surface total volume (p < 0.0002), trabecular number (p < 0.0001), and osteoid surface bone surface (p < 0.028) are significantly lower in the fracture group than the nonfracture group. Eroded surface/bone surface (p < 0.056) follows this trend, whereas trabecular separation (p < 0.001) is significantly higher in the fracture group than in the nonfracture group. Fractal 1 and fractal 3 were not significantly different between study groups. The fractal dimension detects changes in the cancellous architecture and gives information about iliac bone transformation in postmenopausal women with vertebral fracture.

  10. Success of long bone fracture healing in ancient Egypt: a paleoepidemiological study of the Giza Necropolis skeletons.

    PubMed

    Erfan Zaki, Moushira

    2013-01-01

    Complications may provide information regarding the management of fractures in ancient populations. The aim of this study was to determine the rates of long-bone fractures and the proportion of misalignments as indicators of failed treatment or no treatment at all in skeletons from the Giza Necropolis dating to the Old Kingdom period (2700-2190 BC). We visually examined for fractures 2287 long bones of 204 adult skeletons (112 male and 92 female) and took x-rays of fractured bones in standard AP and ML views, so that we can analyse misalignments. Fractures were found in 45 of the 2287 examined long bones (1.97 %). Most of the fractures healed with good alignment, most likely as a result of successful treatment, and only three fractures showed misalignment.

  11. Bone Mineral Density, Bone Turnover Markers and Fractures in Patients with Systemic Sclerosis: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Atteritano, Marco; Sorbara, Stefania; Bagnato, Gianluca; Miceli, Giovanni; Sangari, Donatella; Morgante, Salvatore; Visalli, Elisa; Bagnato, Gianfilippo

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of our study was to elucidate the pathophysiology of systemic sclerosis-related osteoporosis and the prevalence of vertebral fragility fracture in postmenopausal women with systemic sclerosis (SSc). Methodology Fifty-four postmenopausal women with scleroderma and 54 postmenopausal controls matched for age, BMI, and smoking habits were studied. BMD was measured by dual energy-x-ray absorptiometry at spine and femur, and by ultrasonography at calcaneus The markers of bone turnover included serum osteocalcin and urinary deoxypyridinoline. All subjects had a spine X-ray to ascertain the presence of vertebral fractures. Results bone mineral density at lumbar spine (BMD 0.78±0.08 vs 0.88±0.07; p<0,001), femoral neck (BMD: 0.56±0.04 vs 0.72±0.07; p<0,001) and total femur (BMD: 0.57±0.04 vs 0.71±0.06; p<0,001) and ultrasound parameter at calcaneus (SI: 80.10±5.10 vs 94.80±6.10 p<0,001) were significantly lower in scleroderma compared with controls; bone turnover markers and parathyroid hormone level were significantly higher in scleroderma compared with controls, while serum of 25(OH)D3 was significantly lower. In scleroderma group the serum levels of 25(OH)D3 significantly correlated with PTH levels, BMD, stiffness index and bone turnover markers. One or more moderate or severe vertebral fractures were found in 13 patients with scleroderma, wherease in control group only one patient had a mild vertebral fracture. Conclusion Our data shows, for the first time, that vertebral fractures are frequent in subjects with scleroderma, and suggest that lower levels of 25(OH)D3 may play a role in the risk of osteoporosis and vertebral fractures. PMID:23818972

  12. Use of a compact sandwich specimen to evaluate fracture toughness and interfacial bonding of bone.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Lankford, J; Agrawal, C M

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop a reliable and statistically valid test to measure the fracture toughness of small specimens of bone, and by extension, prosthetic materials, using a compact sandwich specimen. Samples of bone were sandwiched between holders of a different material and using this specimen configuration a new technique was developed to test the fracture toughness of the bone interlayer. The effects of different specimens sizes and holder materials were investigated empirically. Using finite element analysis a correction factor was determined to account for the finite thickness of the interlayer and the analytical solutions governing the test specimen were accordingly modified. Bulk compact tension specimens of bone were tested for comparison. Both wet and dry bone were evaluated and the fracture surface morphology characterized using scanning electron microscopy. The results indicate no statistically significant differences between the fracture toughness values obtained from the compact tension and sandwich specimens. The application of this technique to the testing of interfacial bonding between bone and biomaterials is discussed.

  13. Impaction bone grafting for periprosthetic fractures around a total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Bishoy; Pavlou, George; Shah, Nikhil; Macheras, George; Tsiridis, Eleftherios

    2014-11-01

    The incidence of periprosthetic fractures has been reported to be between 1 and 20.9% and appears to be on the rise. Fractures that occur around the femoral stem, particularly when the stem is loose or there is a loss of bone stock pose a technical challenge. These are rare injuries and there is considerable debate regarding their optimal treatment. Reconstruction with large segment endoprosthetic replacement is an acceptable solution for elderly patients who have limited functional demands and where the prosthesis is expected to outlive the patient. The younger patient poses a much greater challenge, the bone must be reconstituted and the femoral canal geometry must sufficiently restored to allow the stable insertion of a prosthesis. There are very few techniques that exist in this scenario. One such technique is impaction bone grafting and revision to a long smooth tapered cemented stem. This allows the restoration of bone stock and the stable insertion of a prosthesis. The aim of this article is to discuss the theory behind impaction bone grafting, the technical aspects and challenges of this technique, including fracture reduction methods, and to appraise all the literature available on impaction bone grafting for periprosthetic fractures.

  14. Mechanisms of hyoid bone fracture after modelling: evaluation of anthropological criteria defining two relevant models.

    PubMed

    Pollard, J; Piercecchi-Marti, M D; Thollon, L; Bartoli, C; Adalian, Pascal; Bécart-Robert, A; Tournel, G; Hédouin, V; Panuel, M; Gosset, D; Leonetti, G

    2011-10-10

    Several studies have attempted to describe the morphology of the hyoid bone, while other authors have focused on discovering the role of this bone in the occurrence of fractures. Hyoid fractures are known to be dependent on the force applied against the bone, or on the location at which the force is applied. We wished to assess the value of defining one or more models of the hyoid bone by analyzing variations in the size and angle of the various component parts of the bone relative to the sex and morphology of an individual (height and weight) in a sample of 72 bones obtained during forensic autopsy at our institution. Statistical analyses were developed using SAS software (Statistical Analysis System, version 9.2). We observed that the length of the hyoid bone and the angle between the greater horns differed significantly between men and women. Length was significantly greater in men (38.20 ± 4.67 mm) than in women (30.49 ± 7.90 mm) and the angle between the greater horns of the hyoid bone was larger in women (36.46 ± 13.77°) than in men (27.56 ± 13.02°). There was also a statistically significant correlation between the body mass index of an individual and the length of the hyoid bone. As weight increased, the hyoid bone was found to be longer. The weight of an individual was also significantly correlated with the angle of the hyoid bone, with lower weight resulting in larger angles of the bone. Furthermore, hierarchical classification enabled the hyoid bone to be differentiated into two groups or clusters according to anthropometric measurements. ROC curves were used to determine threshold values of length, width and angle to classify the hyoid bones in these two clusters: the first was composed of individuals with longer hyoid bones, and the second of individuals with greater hyoid bone widths and wider angles. Logistic regression showed male gender was more frequently associated with the first group. The morphology of the hyoid bone can be differentiated

  15. Bone mineral density deficits and fractures in survivors of childhood cancer.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Carmen L; Ness, Kirsten K

    2013-12-01

    Although substantial increases in survival rates among children diagnosed with cancer have been observed in recent decades, survivors are at risk of developing therapy-related chronic health conditions. Among children and adolescents treated for cancer, acquisition of peak bone mass may be compromised by cancer therapies, nutritional deficiencies, and reduced physical activity. Accordingly, failure to accrue optimal bone mass during childhood may place survivors at increased risk for deficits in bone density and fracture in later life. Current recommendations for the treatment of bone density decrements among cancer survivors include dietary counseling and supplementation to ensure adequate calcium and vitamin D intake. Few strategies exist to prevent or treat bone loss. Moving forward, studies characterizing the trajectory of changes in bone density over time will facilitate the development of interventions and novel therapies aimed at minimizing bone loss among survivors of childhood cancer.

  16. TNFRSF11B gene polymorphisms, bone mineral density, and fractures in Slovak postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Boroňová, Iveta; Bernasovská, Jarmila; Mačeková, Soňa; Petrejčíková, Eva; Tomková, Zlatica; Kľoc, Ján; Poráčová, Janka; Blaščáková, Marta Mydlárová; Litavcová, Eva

    2015-02-01

    Osteoporosis is a common disease that is characterized by low bone mineral density (BMD), deterioration in bone microarchitecture, and increased fracture risk. Due to its important role in bone biology, the TNFRSF11B gene, coding for OPG, has been considered as a candidate gene for osteoporosis. In this study, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) A163G, T245G, and G1181C (rs3102735, rs3134069, and rs2073618, respectively) within the TNFRSF11B gene were studied for association with BMD and fracture incidence in a cohort of 327 postmenopausal Slovak women. Genomic DNA was extracted and purified from peripheral blood leukocytes by the commercial kit JetQuick (Genomed GmbH, Germany) using a standard protocol. Genotyping was performed using the Custom TaqMan® SNP Genotyping Assays. The lumbar L1-L4 spine BMD (g/cm(2)) and T-score in the subgroup of Slovak postmenopausal women with osteoporotic fractures were significantly lower than those in the subgroup of women without fracture (p = 0.0025; p = 0.0009). We identified the T245G (rs3134069) polymorphism in the TNFRSF11B gene associated with osteoporotic fractures (vertebral fractures: p = 0.0320; non-vertebral fractures: p = 0.0005; all fractures: 0.0000). The polymorphism T245G (rs3134069) in the TNFRSF11B gene could be used together with other genetic markers to identify individuals at high risk of osteoporotic fractures. The results from the present study provided more evidence to reveal the role of TNFRSF11B gene polymorphisms in BMD and the risk of osteoporotic fractures.

  17. Combined Measures of Dynamic Bone Quality and Postural Balance--A Fracture Risk Assessment Approach in Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Amit; Watts, Nelson B; Dwivedi, Alok; Shukla, Rakesh; Mani, Ashutosh; Diab, Dima

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated functional measures of neuromuscular integrity and bone's resistance to fracture as a combined tool in discriminating osteoporosis patients with and without fractures. Functional aspects of neuromuscular integrity were quantified with a noninvasive measure of static and dynamic functional postural stability (FPS), and fracture resistance was obtained with bone shock absorption in patients with osteoporosis aged 65-85 and compared our measures with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX [World Health Organization Collaborating Center for Metabolic Bone Diseases, Sheffield, UK]) in women with osteoporosis, some with and some without vertebral fractures. Patients with vertebral fracture showed larger static FPS (postural sway excursion) in the mediolateral and anterior-posterior directions, suggesting poorer balance. Most of the variables of dynamic FPS showed significant differences between fracture and no-fracture groups (e.g., the fracture group took significantly longer during turning, implying poorer dynamic balance control). Also, compared with healthy control subjects, all 4 dynamic FPS responses for osteoporosis patients with and without fracture were significantly poorer, suggesting potential risk for falls. In summary, patients with osteoporosis who have vertebral fractures (compared with patients with similarly low bone mineral density and other nonfracture risk fractures) have not only lower bone shock absorption damping (ζ) but also increased postural imbalance.

  18. Supplementary vitamin C does not accelerate bone healing in a rat tibia fracture model

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Vincenzo; Albuquerque, Rodrigo Pires e; do Amaral, Ney Pecegueiro; Chame, Cristiano Curcio; de Souza, Fabio; Apfel, Mara Íbis Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of ascorbic acid supplementation on bone healing after rat tibia fracture. Methods Thirty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into Vitamin C (Group A) and sham (Group B) groups (15 rats each). Group A received 200 mg intraperitoneally per kg per day of ascorbic acid and Group B was given saline 5 ml per kg per day intraperitoneally once a day. The animals were caged in pairs and allowed free access to tap water and a standard rodent chow ad libitum. Fractures were produced manually, they were not stabilized, and unprotected weight-bearing was allowed. At two, four, and six weeks post-fracture, the rats in both groups were anesthetized and sacrificed by cervical dislocation. Callus tissue was dissected, prepared, and analyzed histologically. Histomorphological analysis was performed at six weeks post-fracture and the extent of fracture healing was determined using a five-point scale. Results There were no histological and histomorphological differences between drug-treated animals and the sham in the three different stages studied. By six weeks post-fracture, the five animals of each group had a complete bone union. Conclusion Under the studied conditions, intraperitoneal Vitamin C supplementation does not accelerate the fracture healing process after experimental tibia fracture in rats. Level of evidence: Level 2, individual study with experimental design. PMID:24453572

  19. Bone Fractures Following External Beam Radiotherapy and Limb-Preservation Surgery for Lower Extremity Soft Tissue Sarcoma: Relationship to Irradiated Bone Length, Volume, Tumor Location and Dose

    SciTech Connect

    Dickie, Colleen I.; Parent, Amy L.; Griffin, Anthony M.; Fung, Sharon; Chung, Peter W.M.; Catton, Charles N.; Ferguson, Peter C.; Wunder, Jay S.; Bell, Robert S.; Sharpe, Michael B.; O'Sullivan, Brian

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To examine the relationship between tumor location, bone dose, and irradiated bone length on the development of radiation-induced fractures for lower extremity soft tissue sarcoma (LE-STS) patients treated with limb-sparing surgery and radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Of 691 LE-STS patients treated from 1989 to 2005, 31 patients developed radiation-induced fractures. Analysis was limited to 21 fracture patients (24 fractures) who were matched based on tumor size and location, age, beam arrangement, and mean total cumulative RT dose to a random sample of 53 nonfracture patients and compared for fracture risk factors. Mean dose to bone, RT field size (FS), maximum dose to a 2-cc volume of bone, and volume of bone irradiated to >=40 Gy (V40) were compared. Fracture site dose was determined by comparing radiographic images and surgical reports to fracture location on the dose distribution. Results: For fracture patients, mean dose to bone was 45 +- 8 Gy (mean dose at fracture site 59 +- 7 Gy), mean FS was 37 +- 8 cm, maximum dose was 64 +- 7 Gy, and V40 was 76 +- 17%, compared with 37 +- 11 Gy, 32 +- 9 cm, 59 +- 8 Gy, and 64 +- 22% for nonfracture patients. Differences in mean, maximum dose, and V40 were statistically significant (p = 0.01, p = 0.02, p = 0.01). Leg fractures were more common above the knee joint. Conclusions: The risk of radiation-induced fracture appears to be reduced if V40 <64%. Fracture incidence was lower when the mean dose to bone was <37 Gy or maximum dose anywhere along the length of bone was <59 Gy. There was a trend toward lower mean FS for nonfracture patients.

  20. Bilateral Facial Paralysis Caused by Temporal Bone Fracture: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ghiasi, Samad; Banaei, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although bilateral facial nerve palsy is a rare condition, its etiology is more detectable than the unilateral type. A temporal bone fracture is one cause of bilateral facial nerve palsy, contributing in 3% of the cases. Case Presentation Here, we report the case of a 35-year-old man complaining of bilateral incomplete eye closure, two weeks after a closed head injury caused by a motor vehicle accident. Conclusions The high resolution computed tomography findings revealed a bilateral temporal bone fracture line, which extended to the fallopian canal. With regard to treatment, near complete recovery was obvious after two weeks of treatment with oral corticosteroids. Overall, bilateral facial palsy is hard to diagnose; therefore, clinical suspicion and the early detection of facial nerve injuries is necessary for good nerve recovery in temporal bone fractures. PMID:27679786

  1. Spontaneous Bone Regeneration in an Open Segmental Fracture of the Forearm with Extruded Middle Segment

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Bibek K; Vaishya, Raju

    2016-01-01

    Open segmental fractures of both bones of the forearm with the loss of the middle segment of the radius is a rare injury in children. An eight-year-old boy presented to our clinic four days following a road traffic accident. The child’s mother was carrying a 12-cm long extruded and soiled segment of the radius bone. The extruded bone segment seemed necrotic, and we decided not to use it for replantation. The wound over the forearm fracture was infected. It was debrided and regularly dressed until it became healthy. We planned to use a fibular graft for the gap and to fix the graft with a Kirschner wire (K-wire). The operation was delayed due to the poor wound condition. At the four-week follow-up, we noticed unexpected signs of bone regeneration in the bone defect of the radius. After eight weeks, a complete spontaneous reconstruction of the bone was noted. This case highlights the excellent healing potential of the bones in children, where even if a long segment of the bone is lost, we can expect spontaneous complete regeneration of the bone if the periosteum is intact and continuous. PMID:27738571

  2. Loss of Gi G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Signaling in Osteoblasts Accelerates Bone Fracture Healing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liping; Hsiao, Edward C; Lieu, Shirley; Scott, Mark; O'Carroll, Dylan; Urrutia, Ashley; Conklin, Bruce R; Colnot, Celine; Nissenson, Robert A

    2015-10-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are key regulators of skeletal homeostasis and are likely important in fracture healing. Because GPCRs can activate multiple signaling pathways simultaneously, we used targeted disruption of G(i) -GPCR or activation of G(s) -GPCR pathways to test how each pathway functions in the skeleton. We previously demonstrated that blockade of G(i) signaling by pertussis toxin (PTX) transgene expression in maturing osteoblastic cells enhanced cortical and trabecular bone formation and prevented age-related bone loss in female mice. In addition, activation of G(s) signaling by expressing the G(s) -coupled engineered receptor Rs1 in maturing osteoblastic cells induced massive trabecular bone formation but cortical bone loss. Here, we test our hypothesis that the G(i) and G(s) pathways also have distinct functions in fracture repair. We applied closed, nonstabilized tibial fractures to mice in which endogenous G(i) signaling was inhibited by PTX, or to mice with activated G(s) signaling mediated by Rs1. Blockade of endogenous G(i) resulted in a smaller callus but increased bone formation in both young and old mice. PTX treatment decreased expression of Dkk1 and increased Lef1 mRNAs during fracture healing, suggesting a role for endogenous G(i) signaling in maintaining Dkk1 expression and suppressing Wnt signaling. In contrast, adult mice with activated Gs signaling showed a slight increase in the initial callus size with increased callus bone formation. These results show that G(i) blockade and G(s) activation of the same osteoblastic lineage cell can induce different biological responses during fracture healing. Our findings also show that manipulating the GPCR/cAMP signaling pathway by selective timing of G(s) and G(i) -GPCR activation may be important for optimizing fracture repair.

  3. Osteopenia and bone fractures in a man with anorexia nervosa and hypogonadism

    SciTech Connect

    Rigotti, N.A.; Neer, R.M.; Jameson, L.

    1986-07-18

    Women with anorexia nervosa have reduced skeletal mass. Both anorexia and osteopenia are less common in men. We describe a 22-year-old man with anorexia nervosa and severe osteopenia involving both cortical and trabecular bone who developed a pelvic fracture and multiple vertebral compression fractures. He was found to have secondary hypogonadotropic hypogonadism that was reversible with weight gain. This case illustrates the need to consider osteopenia as a potential complication of anorexia nervosa in males as well as females.

  4. Temporal bone fracture following blunt trauma caused by a flying fish.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, D; Karam, M; Danino, J; Flax-Goldenberg, R; Joachims, H Z

    1998-10-01

    Blunt trauma to the temporal region can cause fracture of the skull base, loss of hearing, vestibular symptoms and otorrhoea. The most common causes of blunt trauma to the ear and surrounding area are motor vehicle accidents, violent encounters, and sports-related accidents. We present an obscure case of a man who was struck in the ear by a flying fish while wading in the sea with resulting temporal bone fracture, sudden deafness, vertigo, cerebrospinal fluid otorrhoea, and pneumocephalus.

  5. Novel Therapeutic Strategy for the Prevention of Bone Fractures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    activin-like kinase receptor 4 and 5 BMP-9, -10, 11 bone morphogenetic protein-9, -10, -11 BMSC bone marrow stromal cell Dkk1 gene encoding...chondrocytes as well as bone marrow stromal cells in vitro (Elkasrawy et al. 2011a). The Wnt signaling factor Dkk1 is significantly upregulated with...binding protein Fzd3 is significantly downregulated with myostatin treatment (Fig. 2). Dkk1 is a molecule that inhibits the Wnt signaling pathway

  6. Ultrasound imaging of long bone fractures and healing with the split-step fourier imaging method.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongjiang; Le, Lawrence H; Sacchi, Mauricio D; Lou, Edmond H M

    2013-08-01

    We applied the split-step Fourier imaging method to back-propagate the ultrasound zero-offset wavefields acquired on the bone surface to the sources of scatterers, which are the reflecting interfaces. The method required, as an input, an estimated slowness (reciprocal of half the velocity) model to map the time-dependent sonogram to the depth image, which provides the geometric properties of the interfaces. The slowness was approximated by a depth-dependent term and a first-order spatially varying perturbation. Simulated data sets were used to validate the method. The reconstructed images show proper mapping of the interfaces and the fracture, and a reasonable cortical thickness measurement with 8.3% error. The images also illustrate clearly the bone fracture healing process of a 1-mm-wide 45° inclined crack with different in-filled tissue velocities for various healing stages. Reconstruction of a fractured bone plate using data from an in vitro experiment is also presented. This study suggests that the proposed imaging method has good potential in quantification of bone fractures and monitoring of the fracture healing process.

  7. New classification system for long-bone fractures supplementing the AO/OTA classification.

    PubMed

    Garnavos, Christos; Kanakaris, Nikolaos K; Lasanianos, Nikolaos G; Tzortzi, Paraskevi; West, Robert M

    2012-05-01

    This article describes a novel, clinically oriented classification system for long-bone fractures that is simple, reliable, and useful to predict treatment method, complications, and outcome. The reliability and memorability of the new classification were statistically tested and compared with the AO-Müller/Orthopaedic Trauma Association (AO/OTA) long-bone fracture classification. The proposed classification system was also clinically validated with a targeted pilot study designed for content and clinical outcome retrospectively reviewing 122 closed tibial shaft fractures, which were used as a representative paradigm of long-bone fractures. Statistical evaluation showed that the proposed classification system had improved inter- and intraobserver variation agreement and easier memorability compared with the AO/OTA classification system. The clinical validation study showed its predictive value regarding selection of treatment method, complication rate, and injury outcome.The proposed classification system proved simple, reliable, and memorable. Its clinical value appeared strong enough to justify the organization of larger studies for a complete assessment of its clinical usefulness for all long-bone fractures.

  8. Clinical and surgical approach of severe bone fragility fracture: clinical case of 4 fragility fracture in patient with heavy osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Giannotti, Stefano; Bottai, Vanna; Pini, Erica; Dell’Osso, Giacomo; De Paola, Gaia; Guido, Giulio

    2013-01-01

    Summary An accurate diagnosis of osteoporosis and a proper treatment are today recognized to be the most important facts for prevention and for a correct arrangement and treatment of fragility fractures. In the text the Authors describe a case of severe osteoporosis aggravated by 2 femur fractures and 2 periprosthetic fractures occurred in 2 months. In such cases the orthopaedic surgeon needs to formulate first a clinical osteoporotic pattern, than its treatment together with a surgery suitable choice, that has to take into consideration of the bone structural characteristics. In the case described one can note that fractures healing occurred thanks to both an improvement in surgical techniques and antiosteoporotic pharmacological support; in the specific case the Authors used strontium ranelate for its osteoinductive capacity. In our opinion is crucial that the treatment used by orthopaedic surgeons is not related only to the “by-hand” treatment but take into consideration both the underlying disease and the possibility of positively affect bone healing with specific drug therapy. PMID:23858312

  9. Effects of fatigue induced damage on the longitudinal fracture resistance of cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Lloyd; Codrington, John; Parkinson, Ian

    2014-07-01

    As a composite material, cortical bone accumulates fatigue microdamage through the repetitive loading of everyday activity (e.g. walking). The accumulation of fatigue microdamage is thought to contribute to the occurrence of fragility fractures in older people. Therefore it is beneficial to understand the relationship between microcrack accumulation and the fracture resistance of cortical bone. Twenty longitudinally orientated compact tension fracture specimens were machined from a single bovine femur, ten specimens were assigned to both the control and fatigue damaged groups. The damaged group underwent a fatigue loading protocol to induce microdamage which was assessed via fluorescent microscopy. Following fatigue loading, non-linear fracture resistance tests were undertaken on both the control and damaged groups using the J-integral method. The interaction of the crack path with the fatigue induced damage and inherent toughening mechanisms were then observed using fluorescent microscopy. The results of this study show that fatigue induced damage reduces the initiation toughness of cortical bone and the growth toughness within the damage zone by three distinct mechanisms of fatigue-fracture interaction. Further analysis of the J-integral fracture resistance showed both the elastic and plastic component were reduced in the damaged group. For the elastic component this was attributed to a decreased number of ligament bridges in the crack wake while for the plastic component this was attributed to the presence of pre-existing fatigue microcracks preventing energy absorption by the formation of new microcracks.

  10. Treatment with Carnitine Enhances Bone Fracture Healing under Osteoporotic and/or Inflammatory Conditions.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Ali; Halici, Zekai; Albayrak, Abdulmecit; Polat, Beyzagul; Karakus, Emre; Yildirim, Omer Selim; Bayir, Yasin; Cadirci, Elif; Ayan, Arif Kursad; Aksakal, Ahmet Murat

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of carnitine on bone healing in ovariectomy (OVX) and inflammation (INF)-induced osteoporotic rats. The rats were randomly divided into nine groups (n = 8 animals per group): sham-operated (Group 1: SHAM); sham + magnesium silicate (Mg-silicate) (Group 2: SHAM + INF); ovariectomy (Group 3: OVX); ovariectomy + femoral fracture (Group 4: OVX + FRC); ovariectomy + femoral fracture + Mg-silicate (Group 5: OVX + FRC + INF); ovariectomy + femoral fracture + carnitine 50 mg/kg (Group 6: OVX + FRC + CAR50); ovariectomy + femoral fracture + carnitine 100 mg/kg (Group 7: OVX + FRC + CAR100); ovariectomy + femoral fracture + Mg-silicate + carnitine 50 mg/kg (Group 8: OVX + FRC + INF + CAR50); and ovariectomy + femoral fracture + Mg-silicate + carnitine 100 mg/kg (Group 9: OVX + FRC + INF + CAR100). Eight weeks after OVX, which allowed for osteoporosis to develop, INF was induced with subcutaneous Mg-silicate. On day 80, all of the rats in groups 4-9 underwent fracture operation on the right femur. Bone mineral density (BMD) showed statistically significant improvements in the treatment groups. The serum markers of bone turnover (osteocalcin and osteopontin) and pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumour necrosis factor α, interleukin 1β and interleukin 6) were decreased in the treatment group. The X-ray images showed significantly increased callus formation and fracture healing in the groups treated with carnitine. The present results show that in a rat model with osteoporosis induced by ovariectomy and Mg-silicate, treatment with carnitine improves the healing of femur fractures.

  11. Antibiotic Impregnated Bone Cement for the Treatment of Osteomelitis and Severe Open Fractures: Expanded Options for Surgeons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    Impregnated Bone Cement for the treatment of Osteomelitis and Severe Open Fractures: Expanded Options for Surgeons PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: CDR...34Antibiotic Impregnated Bone Cement for the treatment of Osteomelitis 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-07-1-0221 and Severe Open Fractures: Expanded Options for

  12. In situ observation of fracture behavior of canine cortical bone under bending.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zilan X; Xu, Zhi-Hui; An, Yuehuei H; Li, Xiaodong

    2016-05-01

    Cortical bone provides many important body functions and maintains the rigidness and elasticity of bone. A common failure mode for bone structure is fracture under a bending force. In the current study, the fracture behavior of canine cortical bone under three-point bending was observed in situ using an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning electron microscope (SEM), and an optical microscope to examine the fracture process in detail. Nanoindentation was carried out to determine the elastic modulus and hardness of different building blocks of the canine cortical bone. The results have shown that the special structure of Haversian systems has significant effects on directing crack propagation. Although Haversian systems contain previously believed weak points, and micro-cracks initiate within Haversian systems, our findings have demonstrated that macro-cracks typically form around the boundaries of Haversian systems, i.e. the cement lines. Micro-cracks that developed inside Haversian systems have the functions of absorbing and dissipating energy and slow down on expanding when interstitial tissue cannot hold any more pressure, then plastic deformation and fracture occur.

  13. CaMKK2 Inhibition in Enhancing Bone Fracture Healing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    study to establish the following: (1) Reliable and reproducible surgical procedures for creating a transverse femoral fracture and fixing it with an...Reliable and reproducible surgical procedures for creating a transverse femoral fracture and fixing it with an intramedullary device. 2) The treatment...disinfected with alternating scrubs of betadine and alcohol. Sterile instruments were used to make a small incision (approximately 2 mm). A 25 gauge

  14. High rates of death and hospitalization follow bone fracture among hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Tentori, Francesca; McCullough, Keith; Kilpatrick, Ryan D; Bradbury, Brian D; Robinson, Bruce M; Kerr, Peter G; Pisoni, Ronald L

    2014-01-01

    Altered bone structure and function contribute to the high rates of fractures in dialysis patients compared to the general population. Fracture events may increase the risk of subsequent adverse clinical outcomes. Here we assessed the incidence of post-fracture morbidity and mortality in an international cohort of 34,579 in-center hemodialysis patients in the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (DOPPS). We estimated country-specific rates of fractures requiring a hospital admission and associated length of stay in the hospital. Incidence rates of death and of a composite event of death/rehospitalization were estimated for 1 year after fracture. Overall, 3% of participants experienced a fracture. Fracture incidence varied across countries, from 12 events/1000 patient-years (PY) in Japan to 45/1000 PY in Belgium. In all countries, fracture rates were higher in the hemodialysis group compared to those reported for the general population. Median length of stay ranged from 7 to 37 days in the United States and Japan, respectively. In most countries, postfracture mortality rates exceeded 500/1000 PY and death/rehospitalization rates exceeded 1500/1000 PY. Fracture patients had higher unadjusted rates of death (3.7-fold) and death/rehospitalization (4.0-fold) compared to the overall DOPPS population. Mortality and hospitalization rates were highest in the first month after the fracture and declined thereafter. Thus, the high frequency of fractures and increased adverse outcomes following a fracture pose a significant health burden for dialysis patients. Fracture prevention strategies should be identified and applied broadly in nephrology practices.

  15. Trans-scaphoid perilunate dislocation with fractured carpal bones in a child.

    PubMed

    Ji, J-H; Shafi, M; Moon, C-Y; Park, S-E

    2010-02-01

    Transcarpal fractures and dislocations in children are rarely reported in the orthopedics literature. This is a report of a 10-year-old boy who sustained a trans-scaphoid perilunate dislocation with fractures across the carpal structure: these included injuries to the scaphoid, capitate and triquetrum bones. Treatment consisted in a closed reduction for the dislocation and using the dorsal approach of an open reduction with internal fixation of the fractures. The injury healed well with a full return of good wrist function. This unusual pattern of injury is described so that it may be more readily appreciated in the future.

  16. Osteoporotic Fracture Risk Assessment Using Bone Mineral Density in Korean: A Community-based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Eun Jin; Lee, Young-Kyun; Choi, Hyung Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background Fracture-risk assessment tool (FRAX) using just clinical risk factors of osteoporosis has been developed to estimate individual risk of osteoporotic fractures. We developed prediction model of fracture risk using bone mineral density (BMD) as well as clinical risk factors in Korean, and assessed the validity of the final model. Methods To develop and validate an osteoporotic FRAX, a total of 768 Korean men and women aged 50 to 90 years were followed for 7 years in a community-based cohort study. BMD as well as clinical risk factors for osteoporotic fracture including age, sex, body mass index, history of fragility fracture, family history of fracture, smoking status, alcohol intake, use of oral glucocorticoid, rheumatoid arthritis, and other causes of secondary osteoporosis were assessed biannually. Results During the follow-up period, 86 osteoporotic fractures identified (36 in men and 50 in women). The developed prediction models showed high discriminatory power and had goodness of fit. Conclusions The developed a Korean specific prediction model for osteoporotic fractures can be easily used as a screening tool to identify individual with high risk of osteoporotic fracture. Further studies for validation are required to confirm the clinical feasibility in general Korean population. PMID:26981519

  17. Apparent fracture toughness of acrylic bone cement: effect of test specimen configuration and sterilization method.

    PubMed

    Lewis, G

    1999-01-01

    The plane strain fracture toughness of Palacos R bone cement was determined using linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) principles and three different test specimen configurations: single edge notched three-point (SENB), rectangular compact tension (RCT), and chevron notched short rod (CNSR). Another aspect of the study was an investigation of the effect of three methods used to sterilize the powder constituents of the cement-none, gamma irradiation and ethylene oxide--on the fracture toughness of the fully polymerized material. A detailed justification is provided for using LEFM. The fracture toughness results obtained using the CNSR specimens were, on average, 14 and 16% higher than those obtained using the SENB and RCT types, respectively. These differences are accounted for in terms of differences in four aspects of these specimen configuration (namely, residual stress effects, loading rate, material inhomogeneity, and the nature of the test). For a given specimen configuration, gamma irradiation produced a statistically significant decrease in fracture toughness which, it is suggested, is due to the concomitant depreciation in molecular weight. For a given cement type, there is no statistically significant difference in fracture toughness results obtained using SENB and RCT specimens. It is thus suggested that either of these configurations can be used to determine the fracture toughness of acrylic bone cement.

  18. Pathologic fracture after radiation therapy for primary non-Hodgkin's malignant lymphoma of bone

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, S.H.; Walz, B.J.

    1983-08-01

    Between 1963 and 1981, 32 patients with biopsy proven non-Hodgkin's lymphoma involving bone were treated at the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology either with radiation alone or in conjunction with chemotherapy. An unexpectedly high rate of fracture at the site of the tumor was observed. Six patients were excluded because they survived less than six months after the completion of radiotherapy or were lost to follow-up within six months. There were 15 appendicular and 17 axial sites treated. Local control was achieved in 30 of 32. There were 10 patients with appendicular lesions of which seven suffered a fracture. Of the seven patients with lesions in a weight bearing bone, six suffered fractures. Twenty-six sites of involvement received less than 5000 rad. Of the six patients receiving high dose, two presented with pathologic fractures of the femur requiring surgical stabilization and the remaining four patients suffered subsequent fractures 7 to 30 months after completion of therapy. Two of these six had local recurrence of disease. It appears that involvement of the appendicular skeleton by lymphoma frequently results in fracture. Doses of 5000 rad or greater do not increase the probability of local control but may contribute to the risk of fracture following radiotherapy.

  19. The importance and the differences of bone morphogenetic proteins for osteoporotic hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Dincel, V Ercan; Sepici-Dincel, Aylin

    2014-06-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), major contributors to tissue repair, have become one of the most exciting fields in rheumatic and orthopaedic research. In our study we aimed to evaluate the relationship between osteoporotic hip fractures and the serum levels of BMPs to reveal their potential roles in the diagnosis of patients. The study group included 62 patients with osteoporotic hip fracture (Group 1; intertrochanteric fracture, Group 2; collum femoris fracture) and the control group. All fractures were due to low energy trauma, simple falls. For all subjects BMD measurements were in agreement for osteoporosis and no significant differences were observed between the two fracture groups. Biochemical markers; BMP-4 and BMP-7 (pg/mL) were determined by commercial Elisa kits from the serum samples. The mean and standard error values of serum samples for BMP-4 and BMP-7 in Group 1 (100.70 +/- 10.03, 74.41 +/- 6.31 respectively) and in Group 2 (112.34 +/- 11.52, 81.91 +/- 10.14 respectively) were not statistically different however for both groups only BMP-7 values increased statistically when compared to the control group. BMP-7 measurements may not only serve as potential biochemical markers for determining disease severity but also the increased levels, an osteogenic factor and bone stimulating agent in vivo, after trauma elevated levels are adaptive or protective and therefore may reduce the severity of the fracture.

  20. Micro and nano MgO particles for the improvement of fracture toughness of bone-cement interfaces.

    PubMed

    Khandaker, Morshed; Li, Yanling; Morris, Tracy

    2013-03-15

    The objective of this study was to determine whether inclusion of magnesium oxide (MgO) in micro and nanoparticulate forms in poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) cement has any influence on the fracture toughness of bone-cement interfaces. An interfacial fracture mechanics technique was used to compare the values of fracture toughness (KIC) among bone-PMMA, bone-PMMA with micro MgO particles and bone-PMMA with nano MgO particles interfaces. This study found that the values of KIC of bone-PMMA with micro MgO particles and bone-PMMA with nano MgO particles interfaces were significantly higher when compared to the values of KIC of the bone-PMMA interface (p<0.0001). Results indicated that the addition of the micro and nano MgO particles to PMMA improved the quality of bone-cement union.

  1. Intrinsic material property differences in bone tissue from patients suffering low-trauma osteoporotic fractures, compared to matched non-fracturing women.

    PubMed

    Vennin, S; Desyatova, A; Turner, J A; Watson, P A; Lappe, J M; Recker, R R; Akhter, M P

    2017-04-01

    Osteoporotic (low-trauma) fractures are a significant public health problem. Over 50% of women over 50yrs. of age will suffer an osteoporotic fracture in their remaining lifetimes. While current therapies reduce skeletal fracture risk by maintaining or increasing bone density, additional information is needed that includes the intrinsic material strength properties of bone tissue to help develop better treatments, since measurements of bone density account for no more than ~50% of fracture risk. The hypothesis tested here is that postmenopausal women who have sustained osteoporotic fractures have reduced bone quality, as indicated with measures of intrinsic material properties compared to those who have not fractured. Transiliac biopsies (N=120) were collected from fracturing (N=60, Cases) and non-fracturing postmenopausal women (N=60, age- and BMD-matched Controls) to measure intrinsic material properties using the nano-indentation technique. Each biopsy specimen was embedded in epoxy resin and then ground, polished and used for the nano-indentation testing. After calibration, multiple indentations were made using quasi-static (hardness, modulus) and dynamic (storage and loss moduli) testing protocols. Multiple indentations allowed the median and variance to be computed for each type of measurement for each specimen. Cases were found to have significantly lower median values for cortical hardness and indentation modulus. In addition, cases showed significantly less within-specimen variability in cortical modulus, cortical hardness, cortical storage modulus and trabecular hardness, and more within-specimen variability in trabecular loss modulus. Multivariate modeling indicated the presence of significant independent mechanical effects of cortical loss modulus, along with variability of cortical storage modulus, cortical loss modulus, and trabecular hardness. These results suggest mechanical heterogeneity of bone tissue may contribute to fracture resistance

  2. Research perspectives: The 2013 AAOS/ORS research symposium on Bone Quality and Fracture Prevention.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Eve; Lane, Joseph M; Boskey, Adele L

    2014-07-01

    Bone fracture resistance is determined by the amount of bone present ("bone quantity") and by a number of other geometric and material factors grouped under the term "bone quality." In May 2013, a workshop was convened among a group of clinicians and basic science investigators to review the current state of the art in Bone Quality and Fracture Prevention and to make recommendations for future directions for research. The AAOS/ORS/OREF workshop was attended by 64 participants, including two representatives of the National Institutes of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases and 13 new investigators whose posters stimulated additional interest. A key outcome of the workshop was a set of recommendations regarding clinically relevant aspects of both bone quality and quantity that clinicians can use to inform decisions about patient care and management. The common theme of these recommendations was the need for more education of clinicians in areas of bone quality and for basic science studies to address specific topics of pathophysiology, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of altered bone quality. In this report, the organizers with the assistance of the speakers and other attendees highlight the major findings of the meeting that justify the recommendations and needs for this field.

  3. Non-osteoporotic women with low-trauma fracture present altered birefringence in cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Ascenzi, Maria-Grazia; Chin, Jesse; Lappe, Joan; Recker, Robert

    2016-03-01

    Areal bone mineral density (BMD) by DXA, although an important index, does not accurately assess risk of fragility fracture. Another bone structural parameter, the orientation of type I collagen, is known to add to risk determination, independently of BMD. Accordingly, we investigated the Haversian systems of transiliac crest biopsies from non-osteoporotic women with low-trauma fractures, matched to healthy women without fracture by age and BMD. We employed circularly polarized light (CPL) microscopy because 1) each of the extinct and bright birefringent signals of CPL corresponds to a specific collagen arrangement; and 2) CPL can employ magnification suitable to provide data, of manageable size, from the whole cortical component of a section of biopsy. Under CPL, the coaxial layers of osteons, called lamellae, appear either birefringent extinct or bright. On a section transverse to the Haversian system, the extinct lamella comprises mainly collagen forming small angles, and the bright lamella comprises mainly collagen forming large angles, relative to the general orientation of the Haversian system. We performed semi-automatic morphometry for birefringent and structural parameters for which we computed intra- and inter-observer errors. The statistical analysis used a linear mixed model to compare fracturing and non-fracturing groups while addressing pairing of fracturing and non-fracturing subjects, and linear regression to assess differences between matched subjects. We found significant reduction in 1) lamellar width and area for extinct lamella and bright lamella; 2) percentage of extinct birefringence in osteons, and 3) single osteon area; in the fracturing group; and in lamellar width in the fracturing subject of all pairs. Our results evidence the need to investigate, in a larger sample of subjects, the distribution of collagen orientation as a parameter diagnostic of increased fracture risk.

  4. Effects of TZD Use and Discontinuation on Fracture Rates in ACCORD Bone Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haiying; Ambrosius, Walter T.; Sood, Ajay; Josse, Robert G.; Bonds, Denise E.; Schnall, Adrian M.; Vittinghoff, Eric; Bauer, Douglas C.; Banerji, Mary Ann; Cohen, Robert M.; Hamilton, Bruce P.; Isakova, Tamara; Sellmeyer, Deborah E.; Simmons, Debra L.; Shibli-Rahhal, Amal; Williamson, Jeff D.; Margolis, Karen L.

    2015-01-01

    Context: In trials, thiazolidinediones (TZDs) increase fracture risk in women, but the effects of discontinuation are unknown. Objective: The objective was to investigate the effects of TZD use and discontinuation on fractures in women and men. Design: This was a longitudinal observational cohort study using data from the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) trial bone ancillary study. Duration of TZD use and discontinuation during ACCORD, assessed every 2–4 months at clinic visits, were modeled as time-varying covariates in proportional hazards models for occurrence of first non-spine fracture. Participants: We studied a total of 6865 participants in ACCORD BONE. Main Outcome Measures: Main outcome measures were centrally adjudicated non-spine fracture. Results: Average age was 62.4 (SD, 6.6) years; average duration of diabetes was 11.1 (SD, 7.8) years. Rosiglitazone was used by 74% and pioglitazone by 13% of participants. During a mean follow-up of 4.8 (SD, 1.5) years, 262 men and 287 women experienced at least one non-spine fracture. The fracture rate was higher in women with 1–2 years of TZD use (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.32; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.49, 3.62) or >2 years of TZD use (HR = 2.01; 95% CI, 1.35, 2.98), compared with no use. The fracture rate was reduced in women who had discontinued TZD use for 1–2 years (HR = 0.57; 95% CI, 0.35, 0.92) or > 2 years (HR = 0.42; 95% CI, 0.24, 0.74) compared with current users. TZD use and discontinuation were not associated with non-spine fractures in men. Conclusions: TZD use was associated with increased non-spine fractures in women, but not men, with type 2 diabetes. When women discontinued TZD use, the fracture effects were attenuated. PMID:26305617

  5. Bone Density Changes After Radiation for Extremity Sarcomas: Exploring the Etiology of Pathologic Fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Dhakal, Sughosh; Chen, Jeffrey; McCance, Sean; Rosier, Randy; O'Keefe, Regis; Constine, Louis S.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: The incidental irradiation (RT) of adjacent bone that takes place during treatment of soft tissue extremity sarcomas is generally presumed to 'weaken' the bone by decreasing its density, which subsequently increases the risk for pathologic fracture. This investigation intended to assess the relative effects on bone density of both RT and diminished mechanical loading secondary to tumor-induced and therapy-induced functional extremity impairment. Methods and Materials: 19 patients treated with surgical excision and RT for soft tissue extremity sarcomas had bone density measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry at four sites: the irradiated (A) and contralateral (B) bone, and an uninvolved bone (C) in the treated extremity and its contralateral counterpart (D). Analysis included (1) [A-B], (2) [C-D], (3) [(A-B), - (C-D)], and (4) [(A-B)/B - (C-D)/D]. Results: The mean bone density for all irradiated sites was increased 0.08 {+-} 0.22 g/cm{sup 2} (variance) compared to the contralateral unirradiated side when corrected for weight-bearing effects (3). An average increase in bone density of 9 {+-} 22% (p = 0.08) was also seen when the differences were divided by individual control densities to normalize variation in density of different anatomic sites (4). Conclusions: RT does not routinely decrease bone density when corrected for weight bearing or mechanical effects. The pathogenesis for the known increased risk of pathologic fracture in irradiated bones is likely multifactorial, including possible alterations in bone remodeling that can result in stable, or even increased, bone density. Further clinical and basic studies are needed to confirm our unexpected findings.

  6. Use of radiography to identify keel bone fractures in laying hens and assess healing in live birds.

    PubMed

    Richards, G J; Nasr, M A; Brown, S N; Szamocki, E M G; Murrell, J; Barr, F; Wilkins, L J

    2011-09-10

    The aim of this study was to use radiography to assess and characterise naturally occurring keel bone fractures in laying hens and monitor live birds over several weeks to examine the healing process. Twenty-four Lohmann brown commercial laying hens with varying degrees of keel bone fracture were used in the study. Birds were radiographed regularly over six weeks and the radiographic features and changing appearance of keel bone fractures were evaluated. The radiographic characteristics of old and new fractures were categorised and indicated that 80 per cent of birds entering the study with new fractures had healed after 35 days and five birds had incurred new fractures irrespective of their original fracture status.

  7. Biomechanical investigation of titanium elastic nail prebending for treating diaphyseal long bone fractures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Nien; Lee, Pei-Yuan; Chang, Chih-Wei; Ho, Yi-Hung; Peng, Yao-Te; Chang, Chih-Han; Li, Chun-Ting

    2016-12-02

    This study numerically investigated the deformation of titanium elastic nails prebent at various degrees during implantation into the intramedullary canal of fractured bones and the mechanism by which this prebending influenced the stability of the fractured bone. Three degrees of prebending the implanted portions of the nails were used: equal to, two times, and three times the diameter of the intramedullary canal. Furthermore, a simulated diaphyseal fracture with a 5-mm gap was created in the middle shaft portion of the bone fixed with two elastic nails in a double C-type configuration. End caps were simulated using a constraint equation. To confirm that the simulation process is able to present the mechanical response of the nail inside the intramedullary, an experiment was conducted by using sawbone for validation. The results indicated that increasing the degrees of nail prebending facilitated straightening the nails against the inner aspect of canal after implantation, with increase in stability under torsion. Furthermore, reducing nail prebending caused a larger portion of the nails to move closer to the loading site and center of bone after implantation; the use of end caps prevented the nail tips from collapsing and increased axial stability. End cap use was critical for preventing the nail tips from collapsing and for increasing the stability of the nails prebent at a degree equal to the diameter of the canal with insufficient frictional force between the nail and canal. Therefore, titanium elastic nail prebending in a double C-type configuration with a degree three times the diameter of the canal represents a superior solution for treating transverse fractures without a gap, whereas that with a degree equal to the diameter of the intramedullary canal and combined with end cap use represents an advanced solution for treating comminuted fractures in a diaphyseal long bone fracture.

  8. The Extravehicular Suit Impact Load Attenuation Study for Use in Astronaut Bone Fracture Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Beth E.; Gilkey, Kelly M.; Sulkowski, Christina M.; Samorezov, Sergey; Myers, Jerry G.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Integrated Medical Model (IMM) assesses the risk, including likelihood and impact of occurrence, of all credible in-flight medical conditions. Fracture of the proximal femur is a traumatic injury that would likely result in loss of mission if it were to happen during spaceflight. The low gravity exposure causes decreases in bone mineral density which heightens the concern. Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center have quantified bone fracture probability during spaceflight with a probabilistic model. It was assumed that a pressurized extravehicular activity (EVA) suit would attenuate load during a fall, but no supporting data was available. The suit impact load attenuation study was performed to collect analogous data. METHODS: A pressurized EVA suit analog test bed was used to study how the offset, defined as the gap between the suit and the astronaut s body, impact load magnitude and suit operating pressure affects the attenuation of impact load. The attenuation data was incorporated into the probabilistic model of bone fracture as a function of these factors, replacing a load attenuation value based on commercial hip protectors. RESULTS: Load attenuation was more dependent on offset than on pressurization or load magnitude, especially at small offsets. Load attenuation factors for offsets between 0.1 - 1.5 cm were 0.69 +/- 0.15, 0.49 +/- 0.22 and 0.35 +/- 0.18 for mean impact forces of 4827, 6400 and 8467 N, respectively. Load attenuation factors for offsets of 2.8 - 5.3 cm were 0.93 +/- 0.2, 0.94 +/- 0.1 and 0.84 +/- 0.5, for the same mean impact forces. Reductions were observed in the 95th percentile confidence interval of the bone fracture probability predictions. CONCLUSIONS: The reduction in uncertainty and improved confidence in bone fracture predictions increased the fidelity and credibility of the fracture risk model and its benefit to mission design and operational decisions.

  9. TRPV4 deficiency causes sexual dimorphism in bone metabolism and osteoporotic fracture risk.

    PubMed

    van der Eerden, B C J; Oei, L; Roschger, P; Fratzl-Zelman, N; Hoenderop, J G J; van Schoor, N M; Pettersson-Kymmer, U; Schreuders-Koedam, M; Uitterlinden, A G; Hofman, A; Suzuki, M; Klaushofer, K; Ohlsson, C; Lips, P J A; Rivadeneira, F; Bindels, R J M; van Leeuwen, J P T M

    2013-12-01

    We explored the role of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) in murine bone metabolism and association of TRPV4 gene variants with fractures in humans. Urinary and histomorphometrical analyses demonstrated reduced osteoclast activity and numbers in male Trpv4(-/-) mice, which was confirmed in bone marrow-derived osteoclast cultures. Osteoblasts and bone formation as shown by serum procollagen type 1 amino-terminal propeptide and histomorphometry, including osteoid surface, osteoblast and osteocyte numbers were not affected in vivo. Nevertheless, osteoblast differentiation was enhanced in Trpv4(-/-) bone marrow cultures. Cortical and trabecular bone mass was 20% increased in male Trpv4(-/-) mice, compared to sex-matched wild type (Trpv4(+/+)) mice. However, at the same time intracortical porosity was increased and bone matrix mineralization was reduced. Together, these lead to a maximum load, stiffness and work to failure of the femoral bone, which were not different compared to Trpv4(+/+) mice, while the bone material was less resistant to stress and less elastic. The differential impacts on these determinants of bone strength were likely responsible for the lack of any changes in whole bone strength in the Trpv4(-/-) mice. None of these skeletal parameters were affected in female Trpv4(-/-) mice. The T-allele of rs1861809 SNP in the TRPV4 locus was associated with a 30% increased risk (95% CI: 1.1-1.6; p=0.013) for non-vertebral fracture risk in men, but not in women, in the Rotterdam Study. Meta-analyses with the population-based LASA study confirmed the association with non-vertebral fractures in men. This was lost when the non-population-based studies Mr. OS and UFO were included. In conclusion, TRPV4 is a male-specific regulator of bone metabolism, a determinant of bone strength, and a potential risk predictor for fractures through regulation of bone matrix mineralization and intra-cortical porosity. This identifies TRPV4 as a unique sexually

  10. Fracture resistance behaviour of gamma-irradiation sterilized cortical bone protected with a ribose pre-treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodside, Carman Mitchell

    Structural bone allograft reconstructions are often implemented to repair large skeletal defects. To ensure the biological safety of the patient, allograft material is routinely sterilized with gamma-irradiation prior to implantation. The sterilization process damages the tissue, specifically the collagen protein network, leading to severe losses in the mechanical properties of the bone. Our lab has begun developing a ribose pre-treatment that can protect bone from these harmful effects. The goals of the present study were to develop a method to measure the fracture toughness of bone, an important clinical failure mode, and implement it to determine the effectiveness of the ribose pre-treatment on fracture toughness. We have shown that the ribose pre-treatment is successful at protecting some of the original fracture toughness of sterilized bone, and that the connectivity of the collagen network is an important contributor to the fracture resistance of bone.

  11. Evidence for efficacy of drugs affecting bone metabolism in preventing hip fracture.

    PubMed Central

    Kanis, J. A.; Johnell, O.; Gullberg, B.; Allander, E.; Dilşen, G.; Gennari, C.; Lopes Vaz, A. A.; Lyritis, G. P.; Mazzuoli, G.; Miravet, L.

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine the effects of taking drugs affecting bone metabolism on the risk of hip fracture in women aged over 50 years. DESIGN--Retrospective, population based, case-control study by questionnaire. SETTING--14 centres in six countries in southern Europe. SUBJECTS--2086 women with hip fracture and 3532 control women matched for age. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Number of drugs affecting bone metabolism taken and length taken for. RESULTS--Women taking drugs affecting bone metabolism had a significantly decreased risk of hip fracture. After adjustment for differences in other risk factors, the relative risk of hip fractures was 0.55 (95% confidence interval 0.31 to 0.85) in women taking oestrogens, 0.75 (0.60 to 0.94) in those taking calcium, and 0.69 (0.51 to 0.92) in those taking calcitonin. The fall in risk was not significant for anabolic steroids (0.6 (0.29 to 1.22)). Neither vitamin D nor fluorides were associated with a significant decrease in the risk of hip fracture. The effect on hip fracture risk increased significantly with increasing duration of exposure (risk ratio 0.8 (0.61 to 1.05) for less than median exposure v 0.66 (0.5 to 0.88) for greater than median exposure). Drugs were equally effective in older and younger women, with the exception of oestrogen. CONCLUSIONS--Oestrogen, calcium, and calcitonins significantly decrease the risk of hip fracture. Short term intervention late in the natural course of osteoporosis may have significant effects on the incidence of hip fracture. PMID:1463947

  12. Compressive fatigue and fracture toughness behavior of injectable, settable bone cements.

    PubMed

    Harmata, Andrew J; Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Granke, Mathilde; Guelcher, Scott A; Nyman, Jeffry S

    2015-11-01

    Bone grafts used to repair weight-bearing tibial plateau fractures often experience cyclic loading, and there is a need for bone graft substitutes that prevent failure of fixation and subsequent morbidity. However, the specific mechanical properties required for resorbable grafts to optimize structural compatibility with native bone have yet to be established. While quasi-static tests are utilized to assess weight-bearing ability, compressive strength alone is a poor indicator of in vivo performance. In the present study, we investigated the effects of interfacial bonding on material properties under conditions that re-capitulate the cyclic loading associated with weight-bearing fractures. Dynamic compressive fatigue properties of polyurethane (PUR) composites made with either unmodified (U-) or polycaprolactone surface-modified (PCL-) 45S5 bioactive glass (BG) particles were compared to a commercially available calcium sulfate and phosphate-based (CaS/P) bone cement at physiologically relevant stresses (5-30 MPa). Fatigue resistance of PCL-BG/polymer composite was superior to that of the U-BG/polymer composite and the CaS/P cement at higher stress levels for each of the fatigue failure criteria, related to modulus, creep, and maximum displacement, and was comparable to human trabecular bone. Steady state creep and damage accumulation occurred during the fatigue life of the PCL-BG/polymer and CaS/P cement, whereas creep of U-BG/polymer primarily occurred at a low number of loading cycles. From crack propagation testing, fracture toughness or resistance to crack growth was significantly higher for the PCL-BG composite than for the other materials. Finally, the fatigue and fracture toughness properties were intermediate between those of trabecular and cortical bone. These findings highlight the potential of PCL-BG/polyurethane composites as weight-bearing bone grafts.

  13. Novel Therapeutic Strategy for the Prevention of Bone Fractures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    bone morphogenetic protein-9, -10, -11 BMSC bone marrow stromal cell Dkk1 gene encoding Dickkopf-related protein 1 ERK extracellular signal...Elkasrawy et al. 2011a). The Wnt signaling factor Dkk1 is significantly upregulated with myostatin treatment during TGF-β1-induced chondrogenesis, and...with myostatin treatment (Fig. 2). Dkk1 is a molecule that inhibits the Wnt signaling pathway by binding to and antagonizing LRP5/6, forming a ternary

  14. [Combined treatment of long tubular bone fractures and false joints using the bioplastic material collapan (Russia)].

    PubMed

    Kesian, G A; Berchenko, G N; Urazgil'deev, R Z; Arsen'ev, I G; Mikelaishvili, D S; Karapetian, G S

    2008-01-01

    This experimental morphological study on 32 dogs was designed to evaluate the efficiency of hydroxyapatite containing preparation collapan used to promote healing of segmented femur defects. Implantation of collapan was shown to greatly contribute to the formation, maturation and remodelling of bone callus. Combined treatment of 165 patients with comminuted fractures and 148 ones with false joints of long tubular bones using collapan implants proved to efficaciously promote bone consolidation in 99.4% of the total 313 subjects. Collapan activated reparative osteogenesis, reduced the duration of hospitalization, the frequency of inflammatory complications, and the requirement of secondary inpatient care.

  15. An unusual case of hypercortisolism with multiple weight-bearing bone fractures.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Georgios; Uebelhart, Brigitte; Goumaz, Michel; Zawadynski, Sophie; Rizzoli, Rene

    2013-09-01

    Glucocorticoid excess, either from exogenous exposure or through endogenous overproduction, is a common cause of secondary osteoporosis. We report a 52-year-old woman presenting with multiple stress fractures of the lower extremities, despite various osteoporosis therapeutic regimens. Investigations led to the diagnosis of hypercortisolism of pituitary origin. Pituitary surgery was unsuccessful, justifying a treatment of ketoconazole. In the absence of densitometric osteoporosis, assessment of bone microstructure using high resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography revealed alterations of both the cortical and trabecular compartments. This case illustrates that hypercortisolism may cause bone fragility in the absence of marked changes in areal bone mineral density.

  16. Goal-directed ultrasound in the detection of long-bone fractures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshburn, Thomas H.; Legome, Eric; Sargsyan, Ashot; Li, Shannon Melton James; Noble, Vicki A.; Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Sims, Carrie; Robinson, David

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: New portable ultrasound (US) systems are capable of detecting fractures in the remote setting. However, the accuracy of ultrasound by physicians with minimal ultrasound training is unknown. METHODS: After one hour of standardized training, physicians with minimal US experience clinically evaluated patients presenting with pain and trauma to the upper arm or leg. The investigators then performed a long-bone US evaluation, recording their impression of fracture presence or absence. Results of the examination were compared with routine plain or computer aided radiography (CT). RESULTS: 58 patients were examined. The sensitivity and specificity of US were 92.9% and 83.3%, and of the physical examination were 78.6% and 90.0%, respectively. US provided improved sensitivity with less specificity compared with physical examination in the detection of fractures in long bones. CONCLUSION: Ultrasound scans by minimally trained clinicians may be used to rule out a long-bone fracture in patients with a medium to low probability of fracture.

  17. Bone mineral density in young Indian adults with traumatic proximal femoral fractures. A case control study.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Divesh; Kumar, Sudhir; Arora, Anil; Aggarwal, Aditya Nath; Bhargava, S K

    2010-06-01

    There is scarcity of data on osteoporosis in India for the age group of 20-40 years when peak bone mass is achieved. This study aimed to assess bone mineral density (BMD) in patients in this age group with traumatic proximal femoral fractures, and to compare it with age matched controls. Thirty patients aged 20 to 40 years with traumatic proximal femoral fractures and 30 healthy volunteers within the same age group were included in the study. Radiographs of the pelvis were taken to determine the Singh index, and DEXA scan of the unaffected hip was done to assess BMD. Fracture cases were compared with controls for significant difference in BMD. The male to female ratio of the study was 2:1. Based on Singh's index, 60% of fracture cases and 20% of controls were osteoporotic. T scores by DEXA revealed that 24 patients with fracture and 22 controls had osteopenia or osteoporosis. There was a significant difference in the Singh index between the two groups and no significant difference in BMD assessed by DEXA scan. No agreement was found between BMD determined by DEXA and Singh's index. The study points that our population fails to attain an adequate peak bone mass. It also questions the applicability of Western data to Indian population. The findings also indicate that Singh's Index cannot substitute DEXA for diagnosis of osteoporosis.

  18. Deformation and Fracture Mechanisms of Bone and Nacre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rizhi; Gupta, Himadri S.

    2011-08-01

    Bone and nacre are the most-known biological hard tissues to materials researchers. Although highly mineralized, both bone and nacre are amazingly tough and exhibit remarkable inelasticity, properties that are still beyond the reach of many modern ceramic materials. Very interestingly, the two hard tissues seem to have adopted totally different structural strategies for achieving mechanical robustness. Starting from a true nanocomposite of the mineralized collagen fibril and following up to seven levels of hierarchical organization, bone is built on a structure with extreme complexity. In contrast, nacre possesses a structure of surprising simplicity. Polygonal mineral tablets of micrometer size are carefully cemented together into a macroscopic wonder. A comparative analysis of the structure-property relations in bone and nacre helps us to unveil the underlying mechanisms of this puzzling phenomenon. In this review, we critically compare the various levels of structures and their mechanical contributions between bone and nacre, with a focus on inelasticity and the toughening process. We demonstrate that, although nacre and bone differ from each other in many aspects, they have adopted very similar deformation and toughening mechanisms.

  19. A 5-year exercise program in pre- and peripubertal children improves bone mass and bone size without affecting fracture risk.

    PubMed

    Detter, Fredrik T L; Rosengren, Björn E; Dencker, Magnus; Nilsson, J-Å; Karlsson, Magnus K

    2013-04-01

    We studied the effect in children of an exercise intervention program on fracture rates and skeletal traits. Fractures were registered for 5 years in a population-based prospective controlled exercise intervention study that included children aged 6-9 years at study start, 446 boys and 362 girls in the intervention group and 807 boys and 780 girls in the control group. Intervention subjects received 40 min/school day of physical education and controls, 60 min/week. In 73 boys and 48 girls in the intervention group and 52 boys and 48 girls in the control group, bone mineral density (BMD, g/cm(2)) and bone area (mm(2)) were followed annually by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, after which annual changes were calculated. At follow-up we also assessed trabecular and cortical volumetric BMD (g/cm(3)) and bone structure by peripheral computed tomography in the tibia and radius. There were 20.0 fractures/1,000 person-years in the intervention group and 18.5 fractures/1,000 person-years in the control group, resulting in a rate ratio of 1.08 (0.79-1.47) (mean and 95 % CI). The gain in spine BMD was higher in both girls (difference 0.01 g/cm(2), 0.005-0.019) and boys (difference 0.01 g/cm(2), 0.001-0.008) in the intervention group. Intervention girls also had higher gain in femoral neck area (difference 0.04 mm(2), 0.005-0.083) and at follow-up larger tibial bone mineral content (difference 0.18 g, 0.015-0.35), larger tibial cortical area (difference 17 mm(2), 2.4-31.3), and larger radial cross-sectional area (difference 11.0 mm(2), 0.63-21.40). As increased exercise improves bone mass and in girls bone size without affecting fracture risk, society ought to encourage exercise during growth.

  20. Projection-reflection ultrasound images using PE-CMOS sensor: a preliminary bone fracture study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Shih-Chung B.; Liu, Chu-Chuan; Freedman, Matthew T.; Mun, Seong-Ki; Kula, John; Lasser, Marvin E.; Lasser, Bob; Wang, Yue Joseph

    2008-03-01

    In this study, we investigated the characteristics of the ultrasound reflective image obtained by a CMOS sensor array coated with piezoelectric material (PE-CMOS). The laboratory projection-reflection ultrasound prototype consists of five major components: an unfocused ultrasound transducer, an acoustic beam splitter, an acoustic compound lens, a PE-CMOS ultrasound sensing array (Model I400, Imperium Inc. Silver Spring, MD), and a readout circuit system. The prototype can image strong reflective materials such as bone and metal. We found this projection-reflection ultrasound prototype is able to reveal hairline bone fractures with and without intact skin and tissue. When compared, the image generated from a conventional B-scan ultrasound on the same bone fracture is less observable. When it is observable with the B-scan system, the fracture or crack on the surface only show one single spot of echo due to its scan geometry. The corresponding image produced from the projection-reflection ultrasound system shows a bright blooming strip on the image clearly indicating the fracture on the surface of the solid material. Speckles of the bone structure are also observed in the new ultrasound prototype. A theoretical analysis is provided to link the signals as well as speckles detected in both systems.

  1. Perceived messages about bone health after a fracture are not consistent across healthcare providers.

    PubMed

    Sale, Joanna E M; Hawker, Gillian; Cameron, Cathy; Bogoch, Earl; Jain, Ravi; Beaton, Dorcas; Jaglal, Susan; Funnell, Larry

    2015-01-01

    To examine messages perceived by members of an osteoporosis (OP) patient group from various healthcare providers regarding bone health. We conducted a phenomenological (qualitative) study in members of an OP patient group who resided in Canada, had sustained a fragility fracture at 50+ years old, and were not taking antiresorptive medication at the time of that fracture. Participants were interviewed for approximately 1 h by telephone and responded to questions about visits to healthcare providers for their bone health and what was discussed during those visits. We analyzed the data guided by Giorgi's methodology. We interviewed 28 members (2 males, 26 females; 78 % response rate), aged 51-89 years old. Most participants perceived that their specialist was more interested than their primary care physician in bone health and took the time to discuss issues with them. Participants perceived very few messages from the fracture clinic and other providers. We found many instances where perceived messages within and across various healthcare providers were inconsistent, suggesting there is a need to raise awareness of bone health management guidelines to providers who treat fracture patients.

  2. Vitamin A: Is it a risk factor for Osteoporosis and bone fracture?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Results from observational studies of the association between vitamin A intake or serum retinol concentration and bone mineral density or fracture are mixed. However, serum retinol is a poor measure of vitamin A status as it is subject to homeostatic control over a wide physiologic range of hepatic...

  3. [Calcium and vitamin D in bone metabolism: Clinical importance for fracture treatment].

    PubMed

    Amling, M

    2015-12-01

    A balanced calcium homeostasis is of critical importance not only for bone remodeling, the physiological process of bone resorption and bone formation that constantly renews bone throughout life but also for normal fracture healing. Given that disturbances of calcium homeostasis are present in 50 % of the German population and that this might result in delayed fracture healing after correct surgical treatment, this paper focusses on calcium and vitamin D in the daily practice in orthopedics and trauma surgery. To ensure the required enteral calcium uptake the following three conditions are required: (1) sufficient calcium intake via the nutrition, (2) a 25-hydroxyvitamin D serum level > 30 µg/l and (3) the presence of sufficient gastric acidification. Given the endemic vitamin D deficiency in Germany as well as the constantly increasing number of people using proton pump inhibitors on a regular basis, it is necessary to closely connect trauma orthopedic surgery and osteological treatment. The first issue to be dealt with is to control and if needed normalize calcium homeostasis in order to allow a normal undisturbed fracture healing process after both conservative as well as operative treatment of fractures.

  4. Risedronate decreases bone resorption and improves low back pain in postmenopausal osteoporosis patients without vertebral fractures.

    PubMed

    Ohtori, Seiji; Akazawa, Tsutomu; Murata, Yasuaki; Kinoshita, Tomoaki; Yamashita, Masaomi; Nakagawa, Koichi; Inoue, Gen; Nakamura, Junichi; Orita, Sumihisa; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Kishida, Shunji; Takaso, Masashi; Eguchi, Yawara; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Suzuki, Munetaka; Aoki, Yasuchika; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2010-02-01

    Elderly postmenopausal women who have osteoporosis sometimes experience low back pain, however, the relationship between low back pain and osteoporosis in the absence of vertebral fractures remains unclear. We examined the relationship between bone mineral density (BMD), bone resorption and low back pain in elderly female patients who did not have osteoporotic vertebral fractures. The average BMD was 0.675 g/cm(2) when assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Patients were excluded from the study if they had vertebral fractures revealed by radiography, CT scans or MRI. Bisphosphonate (risedronate) was administered for 4 months. The visual analogue scale (VAS) pain score, Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RDQ), Short Form-36 (SF-36) questionnaire, BMD and N-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (NTx; a marker for bone resorption) were examined before and after treatment. DEXA did not increase significantly, but serum and urinary NTx were decreased (-51.4% and -62.0%, respectively) after 4 months of risedronate treatment (p<0.01). The assessment was repeated using the VAS score, RDQ and SF-36, which revealed an improvement after risedronate treatment (p<0.01). A decrease in serum and urinary NTx was associated with improvement of low back pain, suggesting that despite the absence of vertebral fractures, bone resorption due to osteoporosis may cause low back pain.

  5. Hedgehog signaling mediates woven bone formation and vascularization during stress fracture healing

    PubMed Central

    Kazmers, Nikolas H.; McKenzie, Jennifer A.; Shen, Tony S.; Long, Fanxin; Silva, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is critical in developmental osteogenesis, and recent studies suggest it may also play a role in regulating osteogenic gene expression in the post-natal setting. However, there is a void of studies directly assessing the effect of Hh inhibition on post-natal osteogenesis. This study utilized a cyclic loading-induced ulnar stress fracture model to evaluate the hypothesis that Hh signaling contributes to osteogenesis and angiogenesis during stress fracture healing. Immediately prior to loading, adult rats were given GDC-0449 (Vismodegib - a selective Hh pathway inhibitor; 50mg/kg orally twice daily), or vehicle. Hh signaling was upregulated in response to stress fracture at 3d (Ptch1, Gli1 expression), and was markedly inhibited by GDC-0449 at 1d and 3d in the loaded and non-loaded ulnae. GDC-0449 did not affect Hh ligand expression (Shh, Ihh, Dhh) at 1d, but decreased Shh expression by 37% at 3d. GDC-0449 decreased woven bone volume (−37%) and mineral density (−17%) at 7d. Dynamic histomorphometry revealed that the 7d callus was composed predominantly of woven bone in both groups. The observed reduction in woven bone occurred concomitantly with decreased expression of Alpl and Ibsp, but was not associated with differences in early cellular proliferation (as determined by callus PCNA staining at 3d), osteoblastic differentiation (Osx expression at 1d and 3d), chondrogenic gene expression (Acan, Sox9, and Col2α1 expression at 1d and 3d), or bone resorption metrics (callus TRAP staining at 3d, Rankl and Opg expression at 1d and 3d). To evaluate angiogenesis, vWF immunohistochemistry showed that GDC-0449 reduced fracture callus blood vessel density by 55% at 3d, which was associated with increased Hif1α gene expression (+30%). Dynamic histomorphometric analysis demonstrated that GDC-0449 also inhibited lamellar bone formation. Lamellar bone analysis of the loaded limb (directly adjacent to the woven bone callus) showed that GDC-0449

  6. Hedgehog signaling mediates woven bone formation and vascularization during stress fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Kazmers, Nikolas H; McKenzie, Jennifer A; Shen, Tony S; Long, Fanxin; Silva, Matthew J

    2015-12-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is critical in developmental osteogenesis, and recent studies suggest it may also play a role in regulating osteogenic gene expression in the post-natal setting. However, there is a void of studies directly assessing the effect of Hh inhibition on post-natal osteogenesis. This study utilized a cyclic loading-induced ulnar stress fracture model to evaluate the hypothesis that Hh signaling contributes to osteogenesis and angiogenesis during stress fracture healing. Immediately prior to loading, adult rats were given GDC-0449 (Vismodegib - a selective Hh pathway inhibitor; 50mg/kg orally twice daily), or vehicle. Hh signaling was upregulated in response to stress fracture at 3 days (Ptch1, Gli1 expression), and was markedly inhibited by GDC-0449 at 1 day and 3 days in the loaded and non-loaded ulnae. GDC-0449 did not affect Hh ligand expression (Shh, Ihh, Dhh) at 1 day, but decreased Shh expression by 37% at 3 days. GDC-0449 decreased woven bone volume (-37%) and mineral density (-17%) at 7 days. Dynamic histomorphometry revealed that the 7 day callus was composed predominantly of woven bone in both groups. The observed reduction in woven bone occurred concomitantly with decreased expression of Alpl and Ibsp, but was not associated with differences in early cellular proliferation (as determined by callus PCNA staining at 3 days), osteoblastic differentiation (Osx expression at 1 day and 3 days), chondrogenic gene expression (Acan, Sox9, and Col2α1 expression at 1 day and 3 days), or bone resorption metrics (callus TRAP staining at 3 days, Rankl and Opg expression at 1 day and 3 days). To evaluate angiogenesis, vWF immunohistochemistry showed that GDC-0449 reduced fracture callus blood vessel density by 55% at 3 days, which was associated with increased Hif1α gene expression (+30%). Dynamic histomorphometric analysis demonstrated that GDC-0449 also inhibited lamellar bone formation. Lamellar bone analysis of the loaded limb (directly adjacent

  7. Fracture Risk and Areal Bone Mineral Density in Adolescent Females with Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Faje, Alexander T.; Fazeli, Pouneh K.; Miller, Karen K.; Katzman, Debra K.; Ebrahimi, Seda; Lee, Hang; Mendes, Nara; Snelgrove, Deirdre; Meenaghan, Erinne; Misra, Madhusmita; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Objective To (i) compare fracture prevalence in adolescent females with anorexia nervosa (AN) vs. normal-weight controls and (ii) examine whether reductions in areal bone mineral density (aBMD) predict fracture risk in females with AN. Methods 418 females (310 with active AN and 108 normal-weight controls) 12–22 years old were studied cross-sectionally. Lifetime fracture history was recorded by a physician during participant interviews. Body composition and aBMD measurements of the whole body, whole body less head, lumbar spine, and hip were assessed by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and bone mineral apparent density (BMAD) was calculated for the lumbar spine. Results Participants with AN and normal-weight controls did not differ for chronological age, sexual maturity, or height. The lifetime prevalence of prior fracture was 59.8% higher in those with AN compared to controls (31.0 % versus 19.4 %, p = 0.02), and the fracture incidence rate peaked in our cohort after the diagnosis of AN. Lower aBMD and lumbar BMAD were not associated with a higher prevalence of fracture in the AN or control group on univariate or multivariate analyses. Compared to controls, fracture prevalence was significantly higher in the subgroup of girls with AN who had normal aBMD or only modest reductions of aBMD (Z-scores > −1 or −1.5). Discussion This is the first study to show that the risk of fracture during childhood and adolescence is significantly higher in patients with AN than in normal-weight controls. Fracture prevalence is increased in this cohort of subjects with AN even without significant reductions in aBMD. PMID:24430890

  8. Bone strength measured by peripheral quantitative computed tomography and the risk of nonvertebral fractures: the osteoporotic fractures in men (MrOS) study.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Yahtyng; Zmuda, Joseph M; Boudreau, Robert M; Petit, Moira A; Ensrud, Kristine E; Bauer, Douglas C; Gordon, Christopher L; Orwoll, Eric S; Cauley, Jane A

    2011-01-01

    Many fractures occur in individuals without osteoporosis defined by areal bone mineral density (aBMD). Inclusion of other aspects of skeletal strength may be useful in identifying at-risk subjects. We used surrogate measures of bone strength at the radius and tibia measured by peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) to evaluate their relationships with nonvertebral fracture risk. Femoral neck (FN) aBMD, measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), also was included. The study population consisted of 1143 white men aged 69+ years with pQCT measures at the radius and tibia from the Minneapolis and Pittsburgh centers of the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study. Principal-components analysis and Cox proportional-hazards modeling were used to identify 21 of 58 pQCT variables with a major contribution to nonvertebral incident fractures. After a mean 2.9 years of follow-up, 39 fractures occurred. Men without incident fractures had significantly greater bone mineral content, cross-sectional area, and indices of bone strength than those with fractures by pQCT. Every SD decrease in the 18 of 21 pQCT parameters was significantly associated with increased fracture risk (hazard ration ranged from 1.4 to 2.2) independent of age, study site, body mass index (BMI), and FN aBMD. Using area under the receiver operation characteristics curve (AUC), the combination of FN aBMD and three radius strength parameters individually increased fracture prediction over FN aBMD alone (AUC increased from 0.73 to 0.80). Peripheral bone strength measures are associated with fracture risk and may improve our ability to identify older men at high risk of fracture.

  9. Osteoblast-derived WNT16 represses osteoclastogenesis and prevents cortical bone fragility fractures

    PubMed Central

    Movérare-Skrtic, Sofia; Henning, Petra; Liu, Xianwen; Nagano, Kenichi; Saito, Hiroaki; Börjesson, Anna E; Sjögren, Klara; Windahl, Sara H; Farman, Helen; Kindlund, Bert; Engdahl, Cecilia; Koskela, Antti; Zhang, Fu-Ping; Eriksson, Emma E; Zaman, Farasat; Hammarstedt, Ann; Isaksson, Hanna; Bally, Marta; Kassem, Ali; Lindholm, Catharina; Sandberg, Olof; Aspenberg, Per; Sävendahl, Lars; Feng, Jian Q; Tuckermann, Jan; Tuukkanen, Juha; Poutanen, Matti; Baron, Roland; Lerner, Ulf H; Gori, Francesca; Ohlsson, Claes

    2015-01-01

    The WNT16 locus is a major determinant of cortical bone thickness and nonvertebral fracture risk in humans. The disability, mortality and costs caused by osteoporosis-induced nonvertebral fractures are enormous. We demonstrate here that Wnt16-deficient mice develop spontaneous fractures as a result of low cortical thickness and high cortical porosity. In contrast, trabecular bone volume is not altered in these mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that WNT16 is osteoblast derived and inhibits human and mouse osteoclastogenesis both directly by acting on osteoclast progenitors and indirectly by increasing expression of osteoprotegerin (Opg) in osteoblasts. The signaling pathway activated by WNT16 in osteoclast progenitors is noncanonical, whereas the pathway activated in osteoblasts is both canonical and noncanonical. Conditional Wnt16 inactivation revealed that osteoblast-lineage cells are the principal source of WNT16, and its targeted deletion in osteoblasts increases fracture susceptibility. Thus, osteoblast-derived WNT16 is a previously unreported key regulator of osteoclastogenesis and fracture susceptibility. These findings open new avenues for the specific prevention or treatment of nonvertebral fractures, a substantial unmet medical need. PMID:25306233

  10. Subject specific finite element modeling of periprosthetic femoral fracture using element deactivation to simulate bone failure.

    PubMed

    Miles, Brad; Kolos, Elizabeth; Walter, William L; Appleyard, Richard; Shi, Angela; Li, Qing; Ruys, Andrew J

    2015-06-01

    Subject-specific finite element (FE) modeling methodology could predict peri-prosthetic femoral fracture (PFF) for cementless hip arthoplasty in the early postoperative period. This study develops methodology for subject-specific finite element modeling by using the element deactivation technique to simulate bone failure and validate with experimental testing, thereby predicting peri-prosthetic femoral fracture in the early postoperative period. Material assignments for biphasic and triphasic models were undertaken. Failure modeling with the element deactivation feature available in ABAQUS 6.9 was used to simulate a crack initiation and propagation in the bony tissue based upon a threshold of fracture strain. The crack mode for the biphasic models was very similar to the experimental testing crack mode, with a similar shape and path of the crack. The fracture load is sensitive to the friction coefficient at the implant-bony interface. The development of a novel technique to simulate bone failure by element deactivation of subject-specific finite element models could aid prediction of fracture load in addition to fracture risk characterization for PFF.

  11. New miniplate for osteosynthesis of mandibular angle fractures designed to improve formation of new bone.

    PubMed

    Pituru, Teodora Silagieva; Bucur, Alexandru; Gudas, Claudiu; Pituru, Silviu-Mirel; Marius Dinca, Octavian

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to present the study of a new miniplate designed to keep the maximum strains developed in the cortical bone near the fracture line during accidental biting to values below the threshold causing bone resorption. Designed to offer maximum fracture stability with minimal implanted volume and patient intrusion, the design uses a novel approach to account for the effects of the distance from the fracture line to the nearest screws. Its geometry minimizes the peak forces that can develop during most cases of mandible biomechanical loadings. A three-dimensional (3D) osteosynthesis finite element model for a human mandible confirmed the operational effectiveness of the miniplate. It also provided numerical estimates for the strains and screw forces in the cortical surface during incisor bites with clinically relevant forces of 200 N. Two prototypes, 0.6 mm and 0.8 mm in thickness, were repeatedly tested on fractured sheep mandibles, fixed in a purpose-built jig, to loads up to 150% of the maximum forces developed by human patients. The tests indicated good fracture stability, and the proof tests carried for each of the two prototypes terminated at more than 350 N due to failure of the loading cable and respectively, secondary mandible fractures occurring away from the miniplate.

  12. [Kidney and bone update : the 5-year history and future of CKD-MBD. Disorders of musculoskeletal system in CKD ; bone fracture and periarticular calcification].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shunsuke; Taniguchi, Masatomo

    2012-07-01

    Chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) affects life expectancy through vascular calcification, and impairs patient's activity of daily living (ADL) and quality of life (QOL) through bone fracture and periarticular calcification. In CKD patients, vitamin D deficiency and secondary hyperparathyroidism impairs bone strength, and muscle dysfunction related to vitamin D deficiency also causes easy fall, leading to the high risk of bone fracture. Bone fracture not only aggravates ADL and QOL but increases the risk of mortality. Periarticular calcification such as tumoral calcinosis in relation to CKD-MBD causes restricted range of articular motion, leading to the deterioration of patient's ADL and QOL. Because bone fragility and tumoral calcinosis occurs in relation to CKD-MBD, the appropriate management of CKD-MBD is madatory.

  13. Bone tissue heterogeneity is associated with fracture toughness: a polarization Raman spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makowski, Alexander J.; Granke, Mathilde; Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita; Nyman, Jeffry S.

    2015-02-01

    Polarization Raman Spectroscopy has been used to demonstrate microstructural features and collagen fiber orientation in human and mouse bone, concurrently measuring both organization and composition; however, it is unclear as to what extent these measurements explain the mechanical quality of bone. In a cohort of age and gender matched cadaveric cortical bone samples (23-101 yr.), we show homogeneity of both composition and structure are associated with the age related decrease in fracture toughness. 64 samples were machined into uniform specimens and notched for mechanical fracture toughness testing and polished for Raman Spectroscopy. Fingerprint region spectra were acquired on wet bone prior to mechanical testing by sampling nine different microstructural features spaced in a 750x750 μm grid in the region of intended crack propagation. After ASTM E1820 single edge notched beam fracture toughness tests, the sample was dried in ethanol and the osteonal-interstitial border of one osteon was samples in a 32x32 grid of 2μm2 pixels for two orthogonal orientations relative to the long bone axis. Standard peak ratios from the 9 separate microstructures show heterogeneity between structures but do not sufficiently explain fracture toughness; however, peak ratios from mapping highlight both lamellar contrast (ν1Phos/Amide I) and osteon-interstitial contrast (ν1Phos/Proline). Combining registered orthogonal maps allowed for multivariate analysis of underlying biochemical signatures. Image entropy and homogeneity metrics of single principal components significantly explain resistance to crack initiation and propagation. Ultimately, a combination of polarization content and multivariate Raman signatures allowed for the association of microstructural tissue heterogeneity with fracture resistance.

  14. Bone turnover biomarkers and risk of osteoporotic hip fracture in an Asian population

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Zhaoli; Wang, Renwei; Ang, Li-Wei; Yuan, Jian-Min; Koh, Woon-Puay

    2015-01-01

    While epidemiologic studies suggest that bone turnover biomarkers may predict hip fracture risk, findings are inconsistent and Asian data are lacking. We conducted a matched case-control (1:1) study nested in the Singapore Chinese Health Study, a population-based prospective cohort of Chinese men and women (45–74 years) recruited from 1993–1998 in Singapore. One hundred cases with incident hip fracture and 100 individually matched controls were randomly selected from 63,257 participants. Serum bone turnover biomarkers, namely bone alkaline phosphatase (bone ALP), osteocalcin (OC), procollagen type I N propeptide (PINP), N-terminal and C-terminal crosslinking telopeptide of type I collagen (NTX-I and CTX-I) were measured using immunoassays. Hip fracture cases had significantly higher serum levels of OC, PINP, CTX-I and NTX-I than controls (p<0.05). There was a dose-dependent positive relationship between OC, PINP, CTX-I and NTX-I and risk of hip fracture (all Ps for trend≤0.006), where the risk was significantly increased by 4.32–8.23 folds for the respective BTM [Quartile (Q) 4 vs. Q1]. The odds ratio [OR (95% CI)] at the highest quartile (Q4) was 6.63 (2.02–21.18) for PINP and 4.92 (1.67–14.51) for CTX-I. The joint effect of PINP and CTX-I showed a 7-fold increase in risk (OR: 7.36; 95% CI: 2.53–21.41) comparing participants with higher levels of PINP (Q4) and CTX-I (Q3-Q4) to those with low levels of PINP (Q1-Q3) and CTX-I (Q1-Q2). Our data demonstrated that higher serum levels of bone turnover biomarkers were associated with increased risk of hip fracture in an Asian population. PMID:26555636

  15. Molecular mechanisms controlling bone formation during fracture healing and distraction osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ai-Aql, Z S; Alagl, A S; Graves, D T; Gerstenfeld, L C; Einhorn, T A

    2008-02-01

    Fracture healing and distraction osteogenesis have important applications in orthopedic, maxillofacial, and periodontal treatment. In this review, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate fracture repair are contrasted with bone regeneration that occurs during distraction osteogenesis. While both processes have many common features, unique differences are observed in the temporal appearance and expression of specific molecular factors that regulate each. The relative importance of inflammatory cytokines in normal and diabetic healing, the transforming growth factor beta superfamily of bone morphogenetic mediators, and the process of angiogenesis are discussed as they relate to bone repair. A complete summary of biological activities and functions of various bioactive factors may be found at COPE (Cytokines & Cells Online Pathfinder Encyclopedia), http://www.copewithcytokines.de/cope.cgi.

  16. Nonenzymatic Glycation and Degree of Mineralization Are Higher in Bone From Fractured Patients With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Farlay, Delphine; Armas, Laura A G; Gineyts, Evelyne; Akhter, Mohammed P; Recker, Robert R; Boivin, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Low-energy fractures are frequent complications in type 1 diabetes mellitus patients (T1DM). Modifications of bone intrinsic composition might be a potential cause of fragility observed in diabetic subjects. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) were found in numerous connective tissues from T1DM patients. However, whether AGEs are present at high levels in bone matrix from diabetic subjects is unknown. Moreover, whether elevated AGEs in the bone matrix impair mineralization has not been addressed in humans. The purposes of this study were 1) to determine whether bone matrix from fracturing and nonfracturing T1DM contained more AGEs than bone from healthy patients (CTL), and 2) to compare the degree of mineralization of bone and hardness between fracturing and nonfracturing T1DM versus CTL. We analyzed iliac crest bone biopsies from 5 fracturing T1DM patients, 5 nonfracturing T1DM patients, and 5 healthy subjects, all age- and sex-matched. AGEs (pentosidine) in bone matrix was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography separately in trabecular and cortical bone. The degree of mineralization of bone (DMB) was assessed by digitized microradiography, and mechanical properties by micro- and nanohardness tests. Trabecular bone from fracturing T1DM exhibited significantly higher levels of pentosidine than CTL (p = 0.04) and was more mineralized than nonfracturing T1DM (p = 0.04) and CTL (p = 0.04). Trabecular bone was not significantly different in pentosidine between nonfracturing T1DM and CTL. Cortical bone from nonfracturing T1DM was not significantly different from CTL. Positive correlations were found between HbA1c and pentosidine (r' = 0.79, p < 0.003) and between HbA1c and DMB (r' = 0.64, p < 0.02). Both modifications could lead to less flexible bone (reduced modulus of elasticity) and a tendency toward low-energy fractures in T1DM patients.

  17. Association of QCT Bone Mineral Density and Bone Structure With Vertebral Fractures in Patients With Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Borggrefe, Jan; Giravent, Sarah; Thomsen, Felix; Peña, Jaime; Campbell, Graeme; Wulff, Asmus; Günther, Andreas; Heller, Martin; Glüer, Claus C

    2015-07-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is used for staging osteolytic lesions and detecting fractures in patients with multiple myeloma (MM). In the OsteoLysis of Metastases and Plasmacell-infiltration Computed Tomography 2 study (OLyMP-CT) study we investigated whether patients with and without vertebral fractures show differences in bone mineral density (BMD) or microstructure that could be used to identify patients at risk for fracture. We evaluated whole-body CT scans in a group of 104 MM patients without visible osteolytic lesions using an underlying lightweight calibration phantom (Image Analysis Inc., Columbia, KY, USA). QCT software (StructuralInsight) was used for the assessment of BMD and bone structure of the T11 or T12 vertebral body. Age-adjusted standardized odds ratios (sORs) per SD change were derived from logistic regression analyses, and areas under the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve (AUCs) analyses were calculated. Forty-six of the 104 patients had prevalent vertebral fractures (24/60 men, 22/44 women). Patients with fractures were not significantly older than patients without fractures (mean ± SD, 64 ± 9.2 versus 62 ± 12.3 years; p = 0.4). Trabecular BMD in patients with fractures versus without fractures was 169 ± 41 versus 192 ± 51 mg/cc (AUC = 0.62 ± 0.06, sOR = 1.6 [1.1 to 2.5], p = 0.02). Microstructural variables achieved optimal discriminatory power at bone thresholds of 150 mg/cc. Best fracture discrimination for single microstructural variables was observed for trabecular separation (Tb.Sp) (AUC = 0.72 ± 0.05, sOR = 2.4 (1.5 to 3.9), p < 0.0001). In multivariate models AUCs improved to 0.77 ± 0.05 for BMD and Tb.Sp, and 0.79 ± 0.05 for Tb.Sp and trabecular thickness (Tb.Th). Compared to BMD values, these improvements of AUC values were statistically significant (p < 0.0001). In MM patients, QCT-based analyses of bone structure derived from routine CT

  18. Micro-CT analysis with multiple thresholds allows detection of bone formation and resorption during ultrasound-treated fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Theresa A; Patel, Payal; Parvizi, Javad; Antoci, Valentin; Shapiro, Irving M

    2009-05-01

    Multiple threshold algorithms applied to microcomputed tomography analysis were used to probe the effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on fracture healing. Rat femurs were fractured in accordance with IACUC guidelines. Ultrasound treatment was administered daily to one femur; the contralateral bone was treated with a sham transducer. Each week for 3 weeks healing fractures were harvested and scanned by micro-CT. Remodeling activity was confirmed by evaluation of TRAP activity. Using thresholds of 331-700 and 225-330, area of cortical bone, and new bone formation, respectively, were identified, and by inference, regions of bone resorption. The increased sensitivity of this multithresholding procedure revealed that ultrasound treatment significantly increased the rate of fracture healing in vivo by activating both new bone formation and by increasing the removal of cortical bone in a time- and site-specific manner. At week 1, compared to the proximal side, there was a significant increase in new bone formation distal to the fracture site. Removal of the existing cortical bone followed the same pattern at week 2. Results of the study indicate that at sites of bone turnover, this multithresholding analytical technique can be used to provide quantitative information on bone formation, as well as resorption.

  19. Pathological fracture of the femur in a patient with Paget's disease of bone: a case report.

    PubMed

    Petrescu, Pompiliu HoraŢiu; Izvernariu, Dragoş Andrei; Iancu, Cătălina; Dinu, Gabriel Ovidiu; Berceanu-Văduva, Marcel Mihai; Crişan, Dan; Iacob, Mihaela; Bucur, Venera Margareta; RăuŢia, Ion Călin; Prejbeanu, Ion Radu; Dema, Sorin; DuŢă, Ciprian Constantin

    2016-01-01

    Paget's disease of bone is a benign disease characterized by exaggerated remodeling of the bone matrix after osteoclast-mediated bone destruction. Its etiology is still unknown, despite the fact that it was discovered and described in 1877, but genetic factors and environmental triggers were shown to play their part in the pathogenesis of the disease. The main clinical presentations of the disease are related to bone pain and deformities. Radiological diagnosis is the main detection tool, though many monostotic Paget's disease cases may remain undiagnosed. We present the case of an 81-year-old male patient admitted to the Clinic of Orthopedics, Emergency County Hospital, Timisoara, Romania, with intense pain and deformity of the upper left thigh. Radiological examination performed shows a complete fracture of the upper third diaphysis of the left femur with suggestive signs for Paget's disease of the bone therefore a biopsy was taken and the patient was treated by surgical realignment with favorable evolution. He was discharged 13 days after surgery. The biopsy of the bone revealed extensive bone remodeling with numerous osteoclasts and extensive bone matrix deposition, unevenly stained and unevenly mineralized and reverse cement lines, which are consistent with the diagnosis of Paget's disease of the bone. Histomorphometric analysis show intense matrix deposition with a highly active remodeling process. Computed tomography (CT) scans were performed three years later and show the extension of the disease into the lower half of the left femur.

  20. CaMKK2 Inhibition in Enhancing Bone Fracture Healing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-01

    Einhorn, 1986) in the right femurs of 10- week old anesthetized male mice after first inserting an intramedullary pin (25 gauge needle, approx. 0.5...intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of saline or STO-609 (10 µmol/kg mouse body weight) were performed for 6 weeks . Progression of fracture healing was...permeable inhibitor STO-609 protects from ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis. Moreover, treatment of 32 week old male mice with STO-609 reverses age

  1. Novel Intramedullary-Fixation Technique for Long Bone Fragility Fractures Using Bioresorbable Materials

    PubMed Central

    Nishizuka, Takanobu; Kurahashi, Toshikazu; Hara, Tatsuya; Hirata, Hitoshi; Kasuga, Toshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Almost all of the currently available fracture fixation devices for metaphyseal fragility fractures are made of hard metals, which carry a high risk of implant-related complications such as implant cutout in severely osteoporotic patients. We developed a novel fracture fixation technique (intramedullary-fixation with biodegradable materials; IM-BM) for severely weakened long bones using three different non-metallic biomaterials, a poly(l-lactide) (PLLA) woven tube, a nonwoven polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) fiber mat, and an injectable calcium phosphate cement (CPC). The purpose of this work was to evaluate the feasibility of IM-BM with mechanical testing as well as with an animal experiment. To perform mechanical testing, we fixed two longitudinal acrylic pipes with four different methods, and used them for a three-point bending test (N = 5). The three-point bending test revealed that the average fracture energy for the IM-BM group (PLLA + CPC + PHA) was 3 times greater than that of PLLA + CPC group, and 60 to 200 times greater than that of CPC + PHA group and CPC group. Using an osteoporotic rabbit distal femur incomplete fracture model, sixteen rabbits were randomly allocated into four experimental groups (IM-BM group, PLLA + CPC group, CPC group, Kirschner wire (K-wire) group). No rabbit in the IM-BM group suffered fracture displacement even under full weight bearing. In contrast, two rabbits in the PLLA + CPC group, three rabbits in the CPC group, and three rabbits in the K-wire group suffered fracture displacement within the first postoperative week. The present work demonstrated that IM-BM was strong enough to reinforce and stabilize incomplete fractures with both mechanical testing and an animal experiment even in the distal thigh, where bone is exposed to the highest bending and torsional stresses in the body. IM-BM can be one treatment option for those with severe osteoporosis. PMID:25111138

  2. Prediction of Incident Major Osteoporotic and Hip Fractures by Trabecular Bone Score (TBS) and Prevalent Radiographic Vertebral Fracture in Older Men.

    PubMed

    Schousboe, John T; Vo, Tien; Taylor, Brent C; Cawthon, Peggy M; Schwartz, Ann V; Bauer, Douglas C; Orwoll, Eric S; Lane, Nancy E; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Ensrud, Kristine E

    2016-03-01

    Trabecular bone score (TBS) has been shown to predict major osteoporotic (clinical vertebral, hip, humerus, and wrist) and hip fractures in postmenopausal women and older men, but the association of TBS with these incident fractures in men independent of prevalent radiographic vertebral fracture is unknown. TBS was estimated on anteroposterior (AP) spine dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans obtained at the baseline visit for 5979 men aged ≥65 years enrolled in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study and its association with incident major osteoporotic and hip fractures estimated with proportional hazards models. Model discrimination was tested with Harrell's C-statistic and with a categorical net reclassification improvement index, using 10-year risk cutpoints of 20% for major osteoporotic and 3% for hip fractures. For each standard deviation decrease in TBS, there were hazard ratios of 1.27 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.17 to 1.39) for major osteoporotic fracture, and 1.20 (95% CI 1.05 to 1.39) for hip fracture, adjusted for FRAX with bone mineral density (BMD) 10-year fracture risks and prevalent radiographic vertebral fracture. In the same model, those with prevalent radiographic vertebral fracture compared with those without prevalent radiographic vertebral fracture had hazard ratios of 1.92 (95% CI 1.49 to 2.48) for major osteoporotic fracture and 1.86 (95% CI 1.26 to 2.74) for hip fracture. There were improvements of 3.3%, 5.2%, and 6.2%, respectively, of classification of major osteoporotic fracture cases when TBS, prevalent radiographic vertebral fracture status, or both were added to FRAX with BMD and age, with minimal loss of correct classification of non-cases. Neither TBS nor prevalent radiographic vertebral fracture improved discrimination of hip fracture cases or non-cases. In conclusion, TBS and prevalent radiographic vertebral fracture are associated with incident major osteoporotic fractures in older men independent of each other

  3. Fractal lacunarity of trabecular bone and magnetic resonance imaging: New perspectives for osteoporotic fracture risk assessment

    PubMed Central

    Zaia, Annamaria

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis represents one major health condition for our growing elderly population. It accounts for severe morbidity and increased mortality in postmenopausal women and it is becoming an emerging health concern even in aging men. Screening of the population at risk for bone degeneration and treatment assessment of osteoporotic patients to prevent bone fragility fractures represent useful tools to improve quality of life in the elderly and to lighten the related socio-economic impact. Bone mineral density (BMD) estimate by means of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry is normally used in clinical practice for osteoporosis diagnosis. Nevertheless, BMD alone does not represent a good predictor of fracture risk. From a clinical point of view, bone microarchitecture seems to be an intriguing aspect to characterize bone alteration patterns in aging and pathology. The widening into clinical practice of medical imaging techniques and the impressive advances in information technologies together with enhanced capacity of power calculation have promoted proliferation of new methods to assess changes of trabecular bone architecture (TBA) during aging and osteoporosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has recently arisen as a useful tool to measure bone structure in vivo. In particular, high-resolution MRI techniques have introduced new perspectives for TBA characterization by non-invasive non-ionizing methods. However, texture analysis methods have not found favor with clinicians as they produce quite a few parameters whose interpretation is difficult. The introduction in biomedical field of paradigms, such as theory of complexity, chaos, and fractals, suggests new approaches and provides innovative tools to develop computerized methods that, by producing a limited number of parameters sensitive to pathology onset and progression, would speed up their application into clinical practice. Complexity of living beings and fractality of several physio-anatomic structures suggest

  4. Fractal lacunarity of trabecular bone and magnetic resonance imaging: New perspectives for osteoporotic fracture risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Zaia, Annamaria

    2015-03-18

    Osteoporosis represents one major health condition for our growing elderly population. It accounts for severe morbidity and increased mortality in postmenopausal women and it is becoming an emerging health concern even in aging men. Screening of the population at risk for bone degeneration and treatment assessment of osteoporotic patients to prevent bone fragility fractures represent useful tools to improve quality of life in the elderly and to lighten the related socio-economic impact. Bone mineral density (BMD) estimate by means of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry is normally used in clinical practice for osteoporosis diagnosis. Nevertheless, BMD alone does not represent a good predictor of fracture risk. From a clinical point of view, bone microarchitecture seems to be an intriguing aspect to characterize bone alteration patterns in aging and pathology. The widening into clinical practice of medical imaging techniques and the impressive advances in information technologies together with enhanced capacity of power calculation have promoted proliferation of new methods to assess changes of trabecular bone architecture (TBA) during aging and osteoporosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has recently arisen as a useful tool to measure bone structure in vivo. In particular, high-resolution MRI techniques have introduced new perspectives for TBA characterization by non-invasive non-ionizing methods. However, texture analysis methods have not found favor with clinicians as they produce quite a few parameters whose interpretation is difficult. The introduction in biomedical field of paradigms, such as theory of complexity, chaos, and fractals, suggests new approaches and provides innovative tools to develop computerized methods that, by producing a limited number of parameters sensitive to pathology onset and progression, would speed up their application into clinical practice. Complexity of living beings and fractality of several physio-anatomic structures suggest

  5. Novel Therapeutic Strategy for the Prevention of Bone Fractures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    contribute to greater overall age-related mortality ( Bertram et al., 2011). The growth, development, and aging of muscle and bone are closely linked. Pediatric...available in PMC 2014 February 20. N IH -PA Author M anuscript N IH -PA Author M anuscript N IH -PA Author M anuscript References Bertram M, Norman R, Kemp L

  6. A bispecific antibody targeting sclerostin and DKK-1 promotes bone mass accrual and fracture repair

    PubMed Central

    Florio, Monica; Gunasekaran, Kannan; Stolina, Marina; Li, Xiaodong; Liu, Ling; Tipton, Barbara; Salimi-Moosavi, Hossein; Asuncion, Franklin J.; Li, Chaoyang; Sun, Banghua; Tan, Hong Lin; Zhang, Li; Han, Chun-Ya; Case, Ryan; Duguay, Amy N.; Grisanti, Mario; Stevens, Jennitte; Pretorius, James K.; Pacheco, Efrain; Jones, Heidi; Chen, Qing; Soriano, Brian D.; Wen, Jie; Heron, Brenda; Jacobsen, Frederick W.; Brisan, Emil; Richards, William G.; Ke, Hua Zhu; Ominsky, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of the Wnt antagonist sclerostin increases bone mass in patients with osteoporosis and in preclinical animal models. Here we show increased levels of the Wnt antagonist Dickkopf-1 (DKK-1) in animals treated with sclerostin antibody, suggesting a negative feedback mechanism that limits Wnt-driven bone formation. To test our hypothesis that co-inhibition of both factors further increases bone mass, we engineer a first-in-class bispecific antibody with single residue pair mutations in the Fab region to promote efficient and stable cognate light–heavy chain pairing. We demonstrate that dual inhibition of sclerostin and DKK-1 leads to synergistic bone formation in rodents and non-human primates. Furthermore, by targeting distinct facets of fracture healing, the bispecific antibody shows superior bone repair activity compared with monotherapies. This work supports the potential of this agent both for treatment and prevention of fractures and offers a promising therapeutic approach to reduce the burden of low bone mass disorders. PMID:27230681

  7. Contralateral Cochlear Labyrinthine Concussion without Temporal Bone Fracture: Unusual Posttraumatic Consequence

    PubMed Central

    Méndez, D.; Silva, J. M. Duque; del Álamo, P. Ortega

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Labyrinthine concussion is a term used to describe a rare cause of sensorineural hearing loss with or without vestibular symptoms occurring after head trauma. Isolated damage to the inner ear without involving the vestibular organ would be designated as a cochlear labyrinthine concussion. Hearing loss is not a rare finding in head trauma that involves petrous bone fractures. Nevertheless it generally occurs ipsilateral to the side of the head injury and extraordinarily in the contralateral side and moreover without the presence of a fracture. Case Report. The present case describes a 37-year-old patient with sensorineural hearing loss and tinnitus in his right ear after a blunt head trauma of the left-sided temporal bone (contralateral). Otoscopy and radiological images showed no fractures or any abnormalities. A severe sensorineural hearing loss was found in his right ear with a normal hearing of the left side. Conclusion. The temporal bone trauma requires a complete diagnostic battery which includes a neurotologic examination and a high resolution computed tomography scan in the first place. Hearing loss after a head injury extraordinarily occurs in the contralateral side of the trauma as what happened in our case. In addition, the absence of fractures makes this phenomenon even more unusual. PMID:27738540

  8. Mechanistic aspects of fracture and R-curve behavior in human cortical bone

    SciTech Connect

    Nalla, Ravi K.; Kruzic, Jamie J.; Kinney, John H.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2004-04-28

    An understanding of the evolution of toughness is essential for the mechanistic interpretation of the fracture of cortical bone. In the present study, in vitro fracture experiments were conducted on human cortical bone in order to identify and quantitatively assess the salient toughening mechanisms. The fracture toughness was found to rise linearly with crack extension (i.e., rising resistance- or R-curve behavior) with a mean crack-initiation toughness, K0 of B2MPaOm for crack growth in the proximal distal direction. Uncracked ligament bridging, which was observed in the wake of the crack, was identified as the dominant toughening mechanism responsible for the observed R-curve behavior. The extent and nature of the bridging zone was examined quantitatively using multicutting compliance experiments in order to assess the bridging zone length and estimate the bridging stress distribution. Additionally, time-dependent cracking behavior was observed at stress intensities well below those required for overload fracture; specifically, slow crack growth occurred at growth rates of approx. 2 x 10-9 m/s at stress intensities approx. 35 percent below the crack-initiation toughness. In an attempt to measure slower growth rates, it was found that the behavior switched to a regime dominated by time dependent crack blunting, similar to that reported for dentin; however, such blunting was apparent over much slower time scales in bone, which permitted subcritical crack growth to readily take place at higher stress intensities.

  9. Coded excitation of ultrasonic guided waves in long bone fracture assessment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huilin; Wu, Shengju; Ta, Dean; Xu, Kailiang; Wang, Weiqi

    2014-07-01

    Ultrasonic guided wave (GW) assessment of long bone fracture have conventionally been based on pulse excitation. However, the high attenuation during propagation diminishes the amplitude of received GWs and results in low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The Barker code (BC) excitation and the optimal binary code (OBC) excitation were utilized in this study to overcome this limitation. Both simulations and in vitro experiments were performed on the fractured cortical bone plate model, and measured signals from both the BC and OBC excitations were decoded using the finite impulse response least squares inverse filter (FIR-LSIF) and then compared with sine pulse (SP) excited signals. The results suggest the efficiency of coded excitation for amplitude and SNR improvement. Furthermore, time-frequency representation (TFR) analysis was applied to experimental signals; with increasing fracture depth, energy transformation between predominate GW modes A1 and S2 was confirmed. These results show the potential of using BC and OBC excitations to evaluate the depth of long bone fracture.

  10. Mechanistic aspects of fracture and R-curve behavior in human cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Nalla, R K; Kruzic, J J; Kinney, J H; Ritchie, R O

    2005-01-01

    An understanding of the evolution of toughness is essential for the mechanistic interpretation of the fracture of cortical bone. In the present study, in vitro fracture experiments were conducted on human cortical bone in order to identify and quantitatively assess the salient toughening mechanisms. The fracture toughness was found to rise linearly with crack extension (i.e., rising resistance- or R-curve behavior) with a mean crack-initiation toughness, K0 of approximately 2 MPa square root m for crack growth in the proximal-distal direction. Uncracked ligament bridging, which was observed in the wake of the crack, was identified as the dominant toughening mechanism responsible for the observed R-curve behavior. The extent and nature of the bridging zone was examined quantitatively using multi-cutting compliance experiments in order to assess the bridging zone length and estimate the bridging stress distribution. Additionally, time-dependent cracking behavior was observed at stress intensities well below those required for overload fracture; specifically, slow crack growth occurred at growth rates of approximately 2 x 10(-9) m/s at stress intensities approximately 35% below the crack-initiation toughness. In an attempt to measure slower growth rates, it was found that the behavior switched to a regime dominated by time-dependent crack blunting, similar to that reported for dentin; however, such blunting was apparent over much slower time scales in bone, which permitted subcritical crack growth to readily take place at higher stress intensities.

  11. Painful pathologic fracture of the humerus: percutaneous osteoplasty with bone marrow nails under hybrid computed tomography and fluoroscopic guidance.

    PubMed

    Anselmetti, Giovanni Carlo; Manca, Antonio; Chiara, Gabriele; Tutton, Sean; Iussich, Gabriella; Gino, Giancarlo; Grignani, Giovanni; Ortega, Cinzia; Moselli, Nora; Regge, Daniele

    2011-07-01

    A case of a 75-year-old patient with a painful pathologic humeral shaft fracture, with unacceptably high surgical risk and unsatisfactory analgesia is reported. In this case, impaired arm function and persistent pain with conservative management resulted in a poor quality of life. Palliation with image-guided percutaneous osteoplasty was considered. Because of potential cement leakage, inadequate fracture reduction, the site of the fracture, and the mobility of the joints in that area, image-guided percutaneous delivery of metallic bone marrow nails implanted together with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) osteoplasty was performed. This procedure achieved humeral shaft stabilization, bone fragment alignment, fracture reduction, and pain relief.

  12. Biomechanics of bone-fracture fixation by stiffness-graded plates in comparison with stainless-steel plates

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, VK; Ramakrishna, K; Ghista, Dhanjoo N

    2005-01-01

    Background In the internal fixation of fractured bone by means of bone-plates fastened to the bone on its tensile surface, an on-going concern has been the excessive stress-shielding of the bone by the excessively-stiff stainless-steel plate. The compressive stress-shielding at the fracture-interface immediately after fracture-fixation delays callus formation and bone healing. Likewise, the tensile stress-shielding of the layer of the bone underneath the plate can cause osteoporosis and decrease in tensile strength of this layer. Method In order to address this problem, we propose to use stiffness-graded plates. Accordingly, we have computed (by finite-element analysis) the stress distribution in the fractured bone fixed by composite plates, whose stiffness is graded both longitudinally and transversely. Results It can be seen that the stiffness-graded composite-plates cause less stress-shielding (as an example: at 50% of the healing stage, stress at the fracture interface is compressive in nature i.e. 0.002 GPa for stainless steel plate whereas stiffness graded plates provides tensile stress of 0.002 GPa. This means that stiffness graded plate is allowing the 50% healed bone to participate in loadings). Stiffness-graded plates are more flexible, and hence permit more bending of the fractured bone. This results in higher compressive stresses induced at the fractured faces accelerate bone-healing. On the other hand, away from the fracture interface the reduced stiffness and elastic modulus of the plate causes the neutral axis of the composite structure to be lowered into the bone resulting in the higher tensile stress in the bone-layer underneath the plate, wherein is conducive to the bone preserving its tensile strength. Conclusion Stiffness graded plates (with in-built variable stiffness) are deemed to offer less stress-shielding to the bone, providing higher compressive stress at the fractured interface (to induce accelerated healing) as well as higher tensile

  13. Finite element modeling of the influence of hand position and bone properties on the Colles' fracture load during a fall.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Drew; Ural, Ani

    2010-08-01

    Distal forearm fracture is one of the most frequently observed osteoporotic fractures, which may occur as a result of low energy falls such as falls from a standing height and may be linked to the osteoporotic nature of the bone, especially in the elderly. In order to prevent the occurrence of radius fractures and their adverse outcomes, understanding the effect of both extrinsic and intrinsic contributors to fracture risk is essential. In this study, a nonlinear fracture mechanics-based finite element model is applied to human radius to assess the influence of extrinsic factors (load orientation and load distribution between scaphoid and lunate) and intrinsic bone properties (age-related changes in fracture properties and bone geometry) on the Colles' fracture load. Seven three-dimensional finite element models of radius were created, and the fracture loads were determined by using cohesive finite element modeling, which explicitly represented the crack and the fracture process zone behavior. The simulation results showed that the load direction with respect to the longitudinal and dorsal axes of the radius influenced the fracture load. The fracture load increased with larger angles between the resultant load and the dorsal axis, and with smaller angles between the resultant load and longitudinal axis. The fracture load also varied as a function of the load ratio between the lunate and scaphoid, however, not as drastically as with the load orientation. The fracture load decreased as the load ratio (lunate/scaphoid) increased. Multiple regression analysis showed that the bone geometry and the load orientation are the most important variables that contribute to the prediction of the fracture load. The findings in this study establish a robust computational fracture risk assessment method that combines the effects of intrinsic properties of bone with extrinsic factors associated with a fall, and may be elemental in the identification of high fracture risk individuals

  14. Statistical analysis of the behavior of fracture toughness of compound bioceramic artificial bone.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shilian; Xu, Renping; Li, Ruoqi

    2011-12-01

    We show the manufacturing procedure of the test specimen of the compound bioceramic artificial bone, conduct experiments to measure its fracture toughness, and conclude that the experiment data conform to the two-parameter Weibull distribution with scale parameter β = 0.527369 and form parameter α = 5.24317. Furthermore, compound bioceramic artificial bone is of a high level of crack sensitivity and its data for the fracture toughness is has a high dispersion. We also analyze the evolution of the confidence level of the reliability of its fracture toughness. With the increase of the confidence level γ, the crack sensitivity increases, but the median, the discreteness, and the confidence intervals decrease. The size of the test specimen influences the experiment for the fracture toughness, the measured values and their dispersion, and there exists the conversion between size of the test specimen and that of the real device. We extend the results to introduce the statistic model of the size effect of the fracture toughness.

  15. Evaluating Bone Health in Egyptian Children with Forearm Fractures: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Elbatrawy, Salwa; Gobashy, Amr; Moreira, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine the likelihood of vitamin D deficiency and low bone mineral density in Egyptian children with forearm fractures. Methods. A case control study of 46 children aged 3 to 10 years with or without forearm fractures. Validated questionnaires were used to assess calcium and vitamin D intake as well as sun exposure. Serum calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, and 25-hydroxy-vitamin D were collected. Bone mineral density was evaluated using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Results. Compared to the Control group, calcium and vitamin D intake was lower in the Cases group (p = 0.03). Cases had higher Body Mass Index than Controls, p = 0.01. Children in the Cases group had lower mean serum calcium values 8.3 ± 1.4 compared to 9.3 ± 1.1 in Controls (p = 0.01). Alkaline phosphatase was higher in Cases 265 ± 65.8 than Controls 226 ± 54.6 (p = 0.03). Vitamin D and bone mineral density scores were significantly lower in the Cases group (p < 0.05). Conclusion. Our data shows an increased rate of vitamin D deficiency and decreased bone mineral density in Egyptian children with forearm fractures. PMID:27651803

  16. A LINEAR ACTUATED TORSIONAL DEVICE TO REPLICATE CLINICALLY RELEVANT SPIRAL FRACTURES IN LONG BONES

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, W. Brent; Troy, Karen L.

    2012-01-01

    To better understand the mechanisms underlying spiral fracture we would like to carry out biomechanical tests of long bones loaded in torsion to failure. A device was fabricated to perform torsional tests of long bones using a single-axis linear actuator. The principal operation of the device was to transform the vertical displacement of a material testing machine’s linear actuator into rotational movement using a spur gear and rack system. Accuracy and precision of the device were quantified using cast-acrylic rods with known torque-rotation behavior. Cadaveric experimentation was used to replicate a clinically relevant spiral fracture in eleven human proximal tibiae; strain gage data were recorded for a single specimen. The device had an experimental error less than 0.2 Nm and was repeatable to within 0.3%. Strain gage data were in line with those expected from pure torsion and the cadaveric tibiae illustrated spiral fractures at ultimate torque and rotation values of 130.6 ± 53.2 Nm and 8.3 ± 1.5°, respectively. Ultimate torque was highly correlated with DXA assessed bone mineral density (r = 0.87; p<0.001). The device presented is applicable to any torsional testing of long bone when only a single-axis linear actuator is available. PMID:23025174

  17. A linear-actuated torsional device to replicate clinically relevant spiral fractures in long bones.

    PubMed

    Edwards, W Brent; Troy, Karen L

    2012-09-01

    To better understand the mechanisms underlying spiral fracture we would like to carry out biomechanical tests of long bones loaded in torsion to failure. A device was fabricated to perform torsional tests of long bones using a single-axis linear actuator. The principal operation of the device was to transform the vertical displacement of a material testing machine's linear actuator into rotational movement using a spur gear and rack system. Accuracy and precision of the device were quantified using cast-acrylic rods with known torque-rotation behavior. Cadaveric experimentation was used to replicate a clinically relevant spiral fracture in eleven human proximal tibiae; strain-gage data were recorded for a single specimen. The device had an experimental error of less than 0.2 Nm and was repeatable to within 0.3%. Strain gage data were in line with those expected from pure torsion and the cadaveric tibiae illustrated spiral fractures at ultimate torque and rotation values of 130.6 +/- 53.2 Nm and 8.3 +/- 1.5 degrees, respectively. Ultimate torque was highly correlated with DXA assessed bone mineral density (r = 0.87; p < 0.00 1). The device presented is applicable to any torsional testing of long bone when only a single-axis linear actuator is available.

  18. Use of bone graft substitutes in the management of tibial plateau fractures.

    PubMed

    Goff, Thomas; Kanakaris, Nikolaos K; Giannoudis, Peter V

    2013-01-01

    The current available evidence for the use of bone graft substitutes in the management of subchondral bone defects associated with tibial plateau fractures as to their efficiency and safety has been collected following a literature review of the Ovid MEDLINE (1948-Present) and EMBASE (1980-Present). Nineteen studies were analysed reporting on 672 patients (674 fractures), with a mean age of 50.35 years (range 15-89), and a gender ratio of 3/2 males/females. The graft substitutes evaluated in the included studies were calcium phosphate cement, hydroxyapatite granules, calcium sulphate, bioactive glass, tricalcium phosphate, demineralised bone matrix, allografts, and xenograft. Fracture healing was uneventful in over 90% of the cases over a variant period of time. Besides two studies reporting on injectable calcium phosphate cement excellent incorporation was reported within 6 to 36 months post-surgery. No correlation was made by any of the authors between poor incorporation/resorption and adverse functional or radiological outcome. Secondary collapse of the knee joint surface ≥ 2 mm was reported in 8.6% in the biological substitutes (allograft, DBM, and xenograft), 5.4% in the hydroxyapatite, 3.7% in the calcium phosphate cement, and 11.1% in the calcium sulphate cases. The recorded incidence of primary surgical site and donor site infection (3.6%) was not statistically significant different, however donor site-related pain was reported up to 12 months following autologous iliac bone graft (AIBG) harvest. Shorter total operative time, greater tolerance of early weight bearing, improved early functional outcomes within the first year post-surgery was also recorded in the studies reporting on the use of injectable calcium phosphate cement (Norian SRS). Despite a lack of good quality randomised control trials, there is arguably sufficient evidence supporting the use of bone graft substitutes at the clinical setting of depressed plateau fractures.

  19. Can we stop bone loss and prevent hip fractures in the elderly?

    PubMed

    Meunier, P J; Chapuy, M C; Arlot, M E; Delmas, P D; Duboeuf, F

    1994-01-01

    The two main determinants of hip fractures are falls and bone loss leading to an intrinsic femoral fragility. Substantial femoral bone loss continues throughout old age, with a continuous and exponential increase in the risk of hip fracture; thus any reduction or arrest of this loss will induce an important reduction in the incidence of hip fracture. Preventive measures may be achieved during childhood by increasing peak bone mass with calcium and exercise, by using long-term estrogen replacement therapy after menopause, but also by using vitamin D and calcium supplements for late prevention in the elderly. Vitamin D insufficiency and a deficit in calcium intake are very common in the elderly living either in institutions or at home and the cumulative response to these deficits is a negative calcium balance which stimulates parathyroid hormone secretion. This senile secondary hyperparathyroidism is one of the determinants of femoral bone loss and can be reversed by calcium and vitamin D supplements. We have shown in a 3-year controlled prospective study that the daily use of supplements (1.2 g calcium and 800 IU vitamin D3) given in a large population of 3270 elderly ambulatory women living in nursing homes reduced the number of hip fractures by 23% (intention-to-treat analysis). In parallel, serum parathyroid hormone concentrations were reduced by 28% and low baseline serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration returned to normal values. After 18 months of treatment the bone density of the total proximal femoral region had increased by 2.7% in the vitamin D3-calcium group and decreased by 4.6% in the placebo group (p < 0.001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Characterization of Fatty Acid Composition in Bone Marrow Fluid From Postmenopausal Women: Modification After Hip Fracture.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Melissa; Pino, Ana María; Fuenzalida, Karen; Rosen, Clifford J; Seitz, Germán; Rodríguez, J Pablo

    2016-10-01

    Bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT) is associated with low bone mass, although the functional consequences for skeletal maintenance of increased BMAT are currently unclear. BMAT might have a role in systemic energy metabolism, and could be an energy source as well as an endocrine organ for neighboring bone cells, releasing cytokines, adipokines and free fatty acids into the bone marrow microenvironment. The aim of the present report was to compare the fatty acid composition in the bone marrow supernatant fluid (BMSF) and blood plasma of postmenopausal women women (65-80 years old). BMSF was obtained after spinning the aspirated bone marrow samples; donors were classified as control, osteopenic or osteoporotic after dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Total lipids from human bone marrow fluid and plasma were extracted, converted to the corresponding methyl esters, and finally analyzed by a gas chromatographer coupled with a mass spectrometer. Results showed that fatty acid composition in BMSF was dynamic and distinct from blood plasma, implying significance in the locally produced lipids. The fatty acid composition in the BMSF was enriched in saturated fatty acid and decreased in unsaturated fatty acids as compared to blood plasma, but this relationship switched in women who suffered a hip fracture. On the other hand, there was no relationship between BMSF and bone mineral density. In conclusion, lipid composition of BMSF is distinct from the circulatory compartment, most likely reflecting the energy needs of the marrow compartment. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2370-2376, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Failure modelling of trabecular bone using a non-linear combined damage and fracture voxel finite element approach.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Noel M; McDonnell, Pat; Mullins, Liam; Wilson, Niall; O'Mahoney, Denis; McHugh, Peter E

    2013-04-01

    Trabecular bone tissue failure can be considered as consisting of two stages: damage and fracture; however, most failure analyses of 3D high-resolution trabecular bone samples are confined to damage mechanisms only, that is, without fracture. This study aims to develop a computational model of trabecular bone consisting of an explicit representation of complete failure, incorporating damage criteria, fracture criteria, cohesive forces, asymmetry and large deformation capabilities. Following parameter studies on a test specimen, and experimental testing of bone sample to complete failure, the asymmetric critical tissue damage and fracture strains of ovine vertebral trabecular bone were calibrated and validated to be compression damage -1.16 %, tension damage 0.69 %, compression fracture -2.91 % and tension fracture 1.98 %. Ultimate strength and post-ultimate strength softening were captured by the computational model, and the failure of individual struts in bending and shear was also predicted. This modelling approach incorporated a cohesive parameter that provided a facility to calibrate ductile-brittle behaviour of bone tissue in this non-linear geometric and non-linear constitutive property analyses tool. Finally, the full accumulation of tissue damage and tissue fracture has been monitored from range of small magnitude (normal daily loading) through to specimen yielding, ultimate strength and post-ultimate strength softening.

  2. Male Astronauts Have Greater Bone Loss and Risk of Hip Fracture Following Long Duration Spaceflights than Females

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellman, Rachel; Sibonga, Jean; Bouxsein, Mary

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews bone loss in males and compares it to female bone loss during long duration spaceflight. The study indicates that males suffer greater bone loss than females and have a greater risk of hip fracture. Two possible reason for the greater male bone loss are that the pre-menopausal females have the estrogen protection and the greater strength of men max out the exercise equipment that provide a limited resistance to 135 kg.

  3. [Axial-fracture dislocation of the carpal bone, report of three cases and literature review].

    PubMed

    Ayala-Hernández, E; Arroniz-Sosa, M; Bermúdez-Soto, I; Ochoa-Noyola, Z

    2014-01-01

    We report three cases of axial-fracture dislocation of the carpal bone treated in our department. The three men were between thirty and forty years old who had a work related crushing fracture. We performed an open reduction and stabilization with pins in all cases; patients were then referred to physical medicine and rehabilitation. We assessed the wrist function at ten months using the Mayo Wrist Score and with X-rays to evaluate postoperative results. In this summary we present three examples of patients who suffered these injuries with "good", "satisfactory" and "poor" outcomes.

  4. A rare combined injury of dorsal fracture-dislocation of four carpometacarpal joints and trapezium, trapezoid and distal radius bone fractures.

    PubMed

    Touloupakis, Georgios; Stuflesser, Wilfried; Antonini, Guido; Ferrara, Fabrizio; Crippa, Cornelio; Lettera, Maria Gabriella

    2016-05-06

    Incorrect or delayed diagnosis and treatment of the carpometacarpal fracture-dislocations is often associated with poor prognosis. We present a rare case of unusual pattern of injury, involving dorsal dislocation of four ulnar carpometacarpal joints, associated with fracture of the trapezium, a burst fracture of the trapezoid  bone and an extra-articular fracture of the third distal  of the radius. The first surgical intervention was followed by unsatisfactory results, confirmed by the CT scans. A second surgery followed and an open reduction and pinning with K wires performed. Post-operative follow up lasting for nine months revealed a very good surgical outcome.

  5. [Research on the relationship between populations' long-term exposure to fluoride in drinking water and bone fracture in China].

    PubMed

    Liang, C; Ji, R; Cao, J; Cheng, X

    2001-09-01

    There are contradictory reports on the prevalence of bone fractures associated with long-term fluoride exposure from drinking water. The prevalence of bone fracture in six rural areas of China and the exposure of fluoride in drinking water was investigated. The data including medical history and demographic information, bone fractures, fluoride content in drinking water, physical activity, cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption and dietary intakes were collected. A retrospective epidemiological study by using the same design, method, quality control and the same questionnaire was conducted. A total of 8266 male and female over 50 years of age were divided into 6 groups by the fluoride concentrations in drinking water. The subjects in each group exposed to different levels of fluoride (0.25-0.34, 0.58-0.73, 1.00-1.06, 1.45-2.19, 2.62-3.58 and 4.32-7.97 mg/L) were 1363, 1407, 1370, 1574, 1051 and 1501 respectively. It has been confirmed that drinking water was the only major source of fluoride exposure in the studied populations. The total bone fracture rates were 7.41%, 6.40%, 5.11%, 6.04%, 6.09% and 7.40% in each group. Natural bone fracture rates in each group were 3.01%, 2.21%, 1.31%, 1.65%, 1.43% and 3.66% respectively. The prevalence of bone fracture and water fluoride level appeared a U-shaped relationship. The prevalence of total bone fracture and natural bone fracture in the population with fluoride 1.00-1.06 mg/L in drinking water was the lowest, compared with the groups exposed to fluoride higher than 4.32 mg/L and lower than 0.73 mg/L. The highest prevalence of hip fracture was in the group with higher water fluoride (4.32-7.97 mg/L) exposure. In general, the prevalence of hip fracture was lower and stable up to 1.06 mg/L of fluoride in drinking water, and then it appeared to rise. Based on the data collected in this investigation, it is concluded that the long-term fluoride exposure from drinking water higher than 4.32 mg/L might increase the risk of

  6. Replacement, refinement, and reduction: necessity of standardization and computational models for long bone fracture repair in animals.

    PubMed

    Reifenrath, Janin; Angrisani, Nina; Lalk, Mareike; Besdo, Silke

    2014-08-01

    In the field of fracture healing it is essential to know the impacts of new materials. Fracture healing of long bones is studied in various animal models and extrapolated for use in humans, although there are differences between the micro- and macrostructure of human versus animal bone. Unfortunately, recommended standardized models for fracture repair studies do not exist. Many different study designs with various animal models are used. Concerning the general principles of replacement, refinement and reduction in animal experiments (three "Rs"), a standardization would be desirable to facilitate better comparisons between different studies. In addition, standardized methods allow better prediction of bone healing properties and implant requirements with computational models. In this review, the principles of bone fracture healing and differences between osteotomy and artificial fracture models as well as influences of fixation devices are summarized. Fundamental considerations regarding animal model choice are discussed, as it is very important to know the limitations of the chosen model. In addition, a compendium of common animal models is assembled with special focus on rats, rabbits, and sheep as most common fracture models. Fracture healing simulation is a basic tool in reducing the number of experimental animals, so its progress is also presented here. In particular, simulation of different animal models is presented. In conclusion, a standardized fracture model is of utmost importance for the best adaption of simulation to experimental setups and comparison between different studies. One of the basic goals should be to reach a consensus for standardized fracture models.

  7. EFFECT OF LOW-LEVEL LASER (GAAS, 904HM) FOR BONE REPAIR ON FRACTURES IN RATS

    PubMed Central

    Léo, Jorge Alfredo; Cunha, Alessanda da; de Oliveira, Elias Félix; Prado, Reuder Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the effects of low-level laser therapy (GaAs, 904 nm) for bone repair on tibial fractures in rats. Methods: Forty rats were divided into four groups of 10 animals: control group without fracture (CG); fracture group without treatment (EG II); fracture group treated with laser at 10 J/cm2 (EG III); and fracture group treated with laser at 15 J/cm2 (EG IV). The fracture was produced surgically and the treatment lasted 45 days, done on alternate days. After treatment completion, the rats were sacrificed. The tibias were radiographed and subjected to mechanical three-point flexion tests in order to evaluate the maximum force (N) required to break them. Results: The observed maximum force values (N) were: control group (CG) of 51.5 N ± 7.9 N; EG II 17.2 N ± 7.8 N; EG III 16.6 N ± 12.1 N; and EG IV 30.3 N ± 7.8 N. There were statistically significant differences between the control group and the experimental groups and also between experimental group IV and the other experimental groups (II and III). Radiographs showed callus formation in all the fractured groups, thus indicating that they had undergone the normal tissue repair process. Conclusion: EG IV, which underwent laser therapy with a dosage of 15 J/cm2, showed the highest maximum force value (N) among the experimental groups, thus demonstrating the influence of higher laser dosage on bone repair. PMID:27042627

  8. Pathologic fracture of the distal radius in a 25-year-old patient with a large unicameral bone cyst

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Distal radius fractures (DRF) are often referred to as osteoporosis indicator fractures as their incidence increases from age 45. In the group of young adults, distal radius fractures normally result from high-energy trauma. Wrist fractures in young patients without adequate trauma thus raise suspicion of a pathologic fracture. In this report we present the case of a fractured unicameral bone cyst (UBC) at the distal radius in a young adult. To the author’s best knowledge, this is the first detailed report in an UBC at the distal radius causing a pathologic DRF in an adult patient. Case presentation A 25-year-old otherwise healthy male presented to our Emergency Department after a simple fall on his right outstretched hand. Extended diagnostics revealed a pathologic, dorsally displaced, intra-articular distal radius fracture secondary to a unicameral bone cyst occupying almost the whole metaphysis of the distal radius. To stabilize the fracture, a combined dorsal and volar approach was used for open reduction and internal fixation. A tissue specimen for histopathological examination was gathered and the lesion was filled with an autologous bone graft harvested from the ipsilateral femur using a reamer-irrigator-aspirator (RIA) system. Following one revision surgery due to an intra-articular step-off, the patient recovered without further complications. Conclusions Pathologic fractures in young patients caused by unicameral bone cysts require extended diagnostics and adequate treatment. A single step surgical treatment is reasonable if fracture and bone cyst are treated appropriately. Arthroscopically assisted fracture repair may be considered in intra-articular fractures or whenever co-pathologies of the carpus are suspected. PMID:24925068

  9. Fabrication of a customized bone scaffold using a homemade medical 3D printer for comminuted fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Do-Kun; Jung, Joo-Young; Shin, Han-Back; Kim, Moo-Sub; Choe, Bo-Young; Kim, Sunmi; Suh, Tae Suk; Lee, Keum Sil; Xing, Lei

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to show a 3D printed reconstruction model of a bone destroyed by a comminuted fracture. After a thoracic limb of a cow with a comminuted fracture was scanned by using computed tomography, a scaffold was designed by using a 3D modeling tool for its reconstruction and fabricated by using a homemade medical 3D printer. The homemade medical 3D printer was designed for medical use. In order to reconstruct the geometry of the destroyed bone, we use the geometry of a similar section (reference geometry) of normal bone in the 3D modeling process. The missing part between the destroyed ridge and the reference geometry was filled with an effective space by using a manual interpolation. Inexpensive materials and free software were used to construct the medical 3D printer system. The fabrication of the scaffold progressed according to the design of reconstructed bone by using this medical 3D printer. The material of the scaffold was biodegradable material, and could be transplanted into the human body. The fabricated scaffold was correctly inserted into the fractured bone in place of the destroyed portion, with good agreement. According to physical stress test results, the performance of printing resolution was 0.1 mm. The average geometrical error of the scaffold was below 0.3 mm. The reconstructed bone by using the fabricated scaffold was able to support the weight of the human body. No process used to obtain the result was complex or required many resources. The methods and results in this study show several possible clinical applications in fields such as orthopedics or oncology without a need to purchase high-price instruments for 3D printing.

  10. Analysis of fracture healing in osteopenic bone caused by disuse: experimental study.

    PubMed

    Paiva, A G; Yanagihara, G R; Macedo, A P; Ramos, J; Issa, J P M; Shimano, A C

    2016-03-01

    Osteoporosis has become a serious global public health issue. Hence, osteoporotic fracture healing has been investigated in several previous studies because there is still controversy over the effect osteoporosis has on the healing process. The current study aimed to analyze two different periods of bone healing in normal and osteopenic rats. Sixty, 7-week-old female Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups: unrestricted and immobilized for 2 weeks after osteotomy (OU2), suspended and immobilized for 2 weeks after osteotomy (OS2), unrestricted and immobilized for 6 weeks after osteotomy (OU6), and suspended and immobilized for 6 weeks after osteotomy (OS6). Osteotomy was performed in the middle third of the right tibia 21 days after tail suspension, when the osteopenic condition was already set. The fractured limb was then immobilized by orthosis. Tibias were collected 2 and 6 weeks after osteotomy, and were analyzed by bone densitometry, mechanical testing, and histomorphometry. Bone mineral density values from bony calluses were significantly lower in the 2-week post-osteotomy groups compared with the 6-week post-osteotomy groups (multivariate general linear model analysis, P<0.000). Similarly, the mechanical properties showed that animals had stronger bones 6 weeks after osteotomy compared with 2 weeks after osteotomy (multivariate general linear model analysis, P<0.000). Histomorphometry indicated gradual bone healing. Results showed that osteopenia did not influence the bone healing process, and that time was an independent determinant factor regardless of whether the fracture was osteopenic. This suggests that the body is able to compensate for the negative effects of suspension.

  11. Analysis of fracture healing in osteopenic bone caused by disuse: experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, A.G.; Yanagihara, G.R.; Macedo, A.P.; Ramos, J.; Issa, J.P.M.; Shimano, A.C.

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis has become a serious global public health issue. Hence, osteoporotic fracture healing has been investigated in several previous studies because there is still controversy over the effect osteoporosis has on the healing process. The current study aimed to analyze two different periods of bone healing in normal and osteopenic rats. Sixty, 7-week-old female Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups: unrestricted and immobilized for 2 weeks after osteotomy (OU2), suspended and immobilized for 2 weeks after osteotomy (OS2), unrestricted and immobilized for 6 weeks after osteotomy (OU6), and suspended and immobilized for 6 weeks after osteotomy (OS6). Osteotomy was performed in the middle third of the right tibia 21 days after tail suspension, when the osteopenic condition was already set. The fractured limb was then immobilized by orthosis. Tibias were collected 2 and 6 weeks after osteotomy, and were analyzed by bone densitometry, mechanical testing, and histomorphometry. Bone mineral density values from bony calluses were significantly lower in the 2-week post-osteotomy groups compared with the 6-week post-osteotomy groups (multivariate general linear model analysis, P<0.000). Similarly, the mechanical properties showed that animals had stronger bones 6 weeks after osteotomy compared with 2 weeks after osteotomy (multivariate general linear model analysis, P<0.000). Histomorphometry indicated gradual bone healing. Results showed that osteopenia did not influence the bone healing process, and that time was an independent determinant factor regardless of whether the fracture was osteopenic. This suggests that the body is able to compensate for the negative effects of suspension. PMID:26840708

  12. An Examination of the Transition of Fracture Characteristics in Long Bones from Fresh to Dry in Central Florida: Evaluating the Timing of Injury.

    PubMed

    Green, Ashley E; Schultz, John J

    2017-03-01

    It is important to conduct timing of injury research analyzing fracture characteristics at known postmortem intervals (PMI) because bone can retain fresh characteristics throughout the PMI. Defleshed pig (Sus scrofa) long bones were fractured weekly in two environments (full sun and shade) over 14 weeks in Central Florida and fracture characteristics were categorized (N = 136) for analysis. Results of analysis of variance (ANOVA) using time in weeks (PMI) as a dependent variable indicate significant relationships between PMI and Fracture Angle (p < 0.001), Fracture Surface (p < 0.001), and Fracture Outline (p < 0.001). Fracture characteristics associated with perimortem trauma (smooth Fracture Surfaces and curved or V-shaped Fracture Outlines) were commonly observed. Analysis of fracture characteristics for each environment demonstrated similar patterns. Overall, the loss of only fresh fracture characteristics for each bone was noted earlier in the PMI for the Central Florida region than previously reported.

  13. Scaphoid fracture fixation: localization of bones through statistical model to ultrasound registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anas, Emran Mohammad Abu; Rasoulian, Abtin; St. John, Paul; Pichora, David; Mousavi, Parvin; Lessoway, Victoria A.; Seitel, Alexander; Hacihaliloglu, Ilker; Rohling, Robert; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2015-03-01

    Percutaneous treatment of scaphoid fractures has found increasing interest in recent years as it promises to minimize soft-tissue damage, and minimizes the risk of infections and the loss of the joint stability. However, as this procedure is mostly performed on 2D fluoroscopic images, the accurate localization of the scaphoid bone for fracture fixation renders extremely challenging. In this work, we thus propose the integration of a statistical wrist model with 3D intraoperative ultrasound for accurate localization of the scaphoid bone. We utilize a previously developed statistical wrist model and register it to bone surfaces in ultrasound images using a probabilistic approach that involves expectation-maximization. We utilize local phase symmetry to detect features in noisy ultrasound images; in addition, we use shadow information in ultrasound images to enhance and set apart bone from other features. Feasibility experiments are performed by registering the wrist model to 3D ultrasound volumes of two different wrists at two different wrist positions. And the result indicates a potential of the proposed technique for localization of the scaphoid bone in ultrasound images.

  14. Outcomes and complication rates of different bone grafting modalities in long bone fracture nonunions: a retrospective cohort study in 182 patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Novel bone substitutes have challenged the notion of autologous bone grafting as the ‘gold standard’ for the surgical treatment of fracture nonunions. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that autologous bone grafting is equivalent to other bone grafting modalities in the management of fracture nonunions of the long bones. Methods A retrospective review of patients with fracture nonunions included in two prospective databases was performed at two US level 1 trauma centers from January 1, 1998 (center 1) or January 1, 2004 (center 2), respectively, until December 31, 2010 (n = 574). Of these, 182 patients required adjunctive bone grafting and were stratified into the following cohorts: autograft (n = 105), allograft (n = 38), allograft and autograft combined (n = 16), and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) with or without adjunctive bone grafting (n = 23). The primary outcome parameter was time to union. Secondary outcome parameters consisted of complication rates and the rate of revision procedures and revision bone grafting. Results The autograft cohort had a statistically significant shorter time to union (198 ± 172–225 days) compared to allograft (416 ± 290–543 days) and exhibited a trend towards earlier union when compared to allograft/autograft combined (389 ± 159–619 days) or rhBMP-2 (217 ± 158–277 days). Furthermore, the autograft cohort had the lowest rate of surgical revisions (17%) and revision bone grafting (9%), compared to allograft (47% and 32%), allograft/autograft combined (25% and 31%), or rhBMP-2 (27% and 17%). The overall new-onset postoperative infection rate was significantly lower in the autograft group (12.4%), compared to the allograft cohort (26.3%) (P < 0.05). Conclusion Autologous bone grafting appears to represent the bone grafting modality of choice with regard to safety and efficiency in the surgical management of long bone fracture nonunions. PMID:24016227

  15. Mixed-mode I+II fracture characterization of human cortical bone using the Single Leg Bending test.

    PubMed

    Silva, F G A; de Moura, M F S F; Dourado, N; Xavier, J; Pereira, F A M; Morais, J J L; Dias, M I R

    2016-02-01

    Mixed-mode I+II fracture characterization of human cortical bone was analyzed in this work. A miniaturized version of the Single Leg Bending test (SLB) was used owing to its simplicity. A power law criterion was verified to accurately describe the material fracture envelop under mixed-mode I+II loading. The crack tip opening displacements measured by digital image correlation were used in a direct method to determine the cohesive law mimicking fracture behavior of cortical bone. Cohesive zone modeling was used for the sake of validation. Several fracture quantities were compared with the experimental results and the good agreement observed proves the appropriateness of the proposed procedure for fracture characterization of human bone under mixed-mode I+II loading.

  16. [Forensic medical estimation of gunshot fractures of the flat bones].

    PubMed

    Dubrovin, I A; Dubrovina, I A

    2012-01-01

    The principal characteristics of the investigations into the mechanisms of gunshot injuries are considered. The general and peculiar features of gunshot fractures and the pathological processes underlying them are discussed. The theory of bullet impact effect put forward by the Russian surgeons in the late XIXth century is verified. The explanation is proposed for the physical nature of direct and side impacts and the phenomenon of a temporary oscillating cavity from the standpoint of the theory of bullet impact effect. The new forensic medical criteria for the gunshot origin of an injury have been developed that allow the gunshot distance and the geometric characteristics of the bullet to be determined. A methodological basis for the determination of the long-range gunshot distance has been created. The results of the present study may be of interest for criminal lawyers and military specialists.

  17. Association of bone turnover markers with volumetric bone loss, periosteal apposition, and fracture risk in older men and women: the AGES-Reykjavik longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Marques, E A; Gudnason, V; Lang, T; Sigurdsson, G; Sigurdsson, S; Aspelund, T; Siggeirsdottir, K; Launer, L; Eiriksdottir, G; Harris, T B

    2016-12-01

    Association between serum bone formation and resorption markers and cortical and trabecular bone loss and the concurrent periosteal apposition in a population-based cohort of 1069 older adults was assessed. BTM levels moderately reflect the cellular events at the endosteal and periosteal surfaces but are not associated with fracture risk.

  18. In silico design of treatment strategies in wound healing and bone fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Geris, L; Schugart, R; Van Oosterwyck, H

    2010-06-13

    Wound and bone fracture healing are natural repair processes initiated by trauma. Over the last decade, many mathematical models have been established to investigate the healing processes in silico, in addition to ongoing experimental work. In recent days, the focus of the mathematical models has shifted from simulation of the healing process towards simulation of the impaired healing process and the in silico design of treatment strategies. This review describes the most important causes of failure of the wound and bone fracture healing processes and the experimental models and methods used to investigate and treat these impaired healing cases. Furthermore, the mathematical models that are described address these impaired healing cases and investigate various therapeutic scenarios in silico. Examples are provided to illustrate the potential of these in silico experiments. Finally, limitations of the models and the need for and ability of these models to capture patient specificity and variability are discussed.

  19. An Elastic Analysis of a Plated Bone to Determine Fracture Gap Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, F. W.; Vannah, W. M.

    1985-01-01

    An elastic analysis to determine fracture gap motions occurring in the osteotomized and plated canine femur was performed using the finite element program NASTRAN. The femur was idealized as a hollow right cylinder, and transverse anisotropy was assumed for the elastic properties of the bone. A 3-D 360 degree model consisting of 224 isoparametric quadrilateral hexahedral and 11 beam elements was created. A range of plate stiffnesses was tested by varying the modulus of elasticity of the plate from 207 GPa to 1 GPA. Moments were applied in the plane of the plate, about the axis of the plate, and in the plane of the screws. Results showed that, for plates of typical geometry and elastic modulus under 10 GPa, the contribution to fracture gap motion occurring due to deformation in the bone was negligible compared to that contribution from deformation in the plate.

  20. The effect of simvastatin treatment on bone repair of femoral fracture in animal model.

    PubMed

    Issa, João Paulo Mardegan; Ingraci de Lucia, Conrado; Dos Santos Kotake, Bruna Gabriela; Gonçalves Gonzaga, Miliane; Tocchini de Figueiredo, Fellipe Augusto; Mizusaki Iyomasa, Daniela; Macedo, Ana Paula; Ervolino, Edilson

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the fracture healing area in osteoporotic femur of female rats restrained by stainless steel wire by statin administration in two different doses (5 mg and 20 mg). Ninety female rats were divided into six groups (n = 15): SH, SH-5 mg, SH-20 mg, OVX, OVX-5 mg, and OVX-20 mg. The surgery consisted of the fracture of the left femur bone and stabilization by K-wire and the administration was restricted and weekly controlled in the drinking water. The euthanasia was conducted at three different moments, five animals per period: 7 d, 14 d, and 28 d. Densitometry, zymography, and histological analyses showed a significant difference between some groups. According to these findings, simvastatin promoted a positive action for bone repair, especially in the osteometabolic group treated with 20 mg of the drug.

  1. Post-traumatic transient cortical blindness in a child with occipital bone fracture.

    PubMed

    Ng, Rachel H C

    2016-12-01

    Cortical blindness as sequelae of trauma has been reported in literature but mostly in the setting of occipital cortex or visual tract damages. We present a case of transient cortical blindness in a child following a closed head injury with a non-displaced occipital bone fracture and underlying occipital lobe contusion. We discuss the pathophysiology behind Post-traumatic transient cortical blindness, relevant investigations, and current management.

  2. Epihyoid bone fracture associated with tongue deviation in an adult dog

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Marcelo; Kani, Yukitaka; Mieres, Marcelo; Mansilla, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    An 8-month-old male Rhodesian ridgeback dog was evaluated for right lingual deviation, mild dysphagia, and inability to retract the tongue. Transverse and three-dimensional computed tomography reconstruction images revealed a transverse fracture of the left epihyoid bone. After 4 months of conservative management, that included assisted feeding of a semi-liquid diet or small volumes of food and analgesics, the dog recovered. PMID:27587884

  3. Effectiveness of elcatonin for alleviating pain and inhibiting bone resorption in patients with osteoporotic vertebral fractures.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shinya; Yoshida, Akira; Kono, Shinjiro; Oguma, Tadanori; Hasegawa, Kyoichi; Ito, Manabu

    2016-11-09

    Elderly patients with osteoporotic vertebral fractures often experience severe pain that reduces their quality of life (QOL). Calcitonin, a bone resorption inhibitor, has been reported to alleviate pain in such patients; however, few clinical studies have demonstrated this effect. The objective of this study was to compare changes in pain scores, activities of daily living (ADL), QOL, bone resorption, bone mineral density (BMD), and fracture healing among patients with new vertebral fractures who received different treatment modalities. We conducted an open-label, multicenter, randomized, parallel control group study comprising 107 female patients ≥55 years old with acute back pain from vertebral fracture. All subjects received either intramuscular injections of elcatonin, a derivative of calcitonin, or an oral nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) combined with an active vitamin D3 (VD3) analogue for 6 months. The pain was assessed using a visual analogue scale, and ADL and QOL were assessed using questionnaires. BMD was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. A two-tailed significance level of 5% was used. The elcatonin IM group had significantly higher QOL score at 2 weeks and later, and significantly lower VAS and ADL scores than those in the NSAID + VD3 group at 1 month and later. The elcatonin IM group had significantly reduced TRACP-5b levels compared with those in the NSAID + VD3 group at 3 months and later and significantly higher percent changes in BMD than the NSAID + VD3 group. These results suggest that elcatonin significantly alleviated pain, inhibited bone resorption, and improved ADL, QOL, and BMD compared with NSAID + VD3.

  4. Impaired bone health and asymptomatic vertebral compressions in fracture-prone children: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Mäyränpää, Mervi K; Viljakainen, Heli T; Toiviainen-Salo, Sanna; Kallio, Pentti E; Mäkitie, Outi

    2012-06-01

    Frequent fractures in children may be a sign of impaired bone health, but it remains unestablished when and how fracture-prone children should be assessed. This prospective study elucidated skeletal characteristics and predisposing factors in children with recurrent fractures. Findings were used to establish guidelines for screening. During a 12-month period we recorded fracture history for all children (n = 1412) treated for an acute fracture at a large university hospital. All apparently healthy children over 4 years of age, who had sustained: (1) at least one vertebral fracture; (2) two long-bone fractures before age 10 years; or (3) three long-bone fractures before age 16 years, were recruited. They underwent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), laboratory tests, and spinal radiography. Information regarding family history and lifestyle factors were collected. Findings were compared with healthy controls. Sixty-six fracture-prone children (44 males, mean age 10.7 years; 5% of all children with fractures) were identified. Altogether, they had sustained 183 long-bone fractures (median 3, range 0–7); 11 children had sustained vertebral fracture(s). Patients had significantly lower bone mineral density (BMD) at lumbar spine (p < 0.001), hip (p = 0.007), and whole body (p < 0.001) than the controls; only 5 children (8%) had a BMD Z-score < −2.0. Asymptomatic vertebral compressions were prevalent, especially in those under 10 years of age. Hypercalciuria (11%) and hyperphosphaturia (22%) were significantly more prevalent than in controls. Serum concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (S-25OHD) was below 50 nmol/L in 55%; low levels were associated with low BMD and vertebral compressions. The fracture-prone children had lower calcium intake, less physical activity, and more often had siblings with fractures than the controls. The findings suggest that a thorough pediatric evaluation, including DXA and spinal radiography, is often indicated

  5. A Novel Low-Molecular-Weight Compound Enhances Ectopic Bone Formation and Fracture Repair

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Eugene; Sangadala, Sreedhara; Boden, Scott D.; Yoshioka, Katsuhito; Hutton, William C.; Oliver, Colleen; Titus, Louisa

    2013-01-01

    Background: Use of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) is expensive and may cause local side effects. A small synthetic molecule, SVAK-12, has recently been shown in vitro to potentiate rhBMP-2-induced transdifferentiation of myoblasts into the osteoblastic phenotype. The aims of this study were to test the ability of SVAK-12 to enhance bone formation in a rodent ectopic model and to test whether a single percutaneous injection of SVAK-12 can accelerate callus formation in a rodent femoral fracture model. Methods: Collagen disks with rhBMP-2 alone or with rhBMP-2 and SVAK-12 were implanted in a standard athymic rat chest ectopic model, and radiographic analysis was performed at four weeks. In a second set of rats (Sprague-Dawley), SVAK-12 was percutaneously injected into the site of a closed femoral fracture. The fractures were analyzed radiographically and biomechanically (with torsional testing) five weeks after surgery. Results: In the ectopic model, there was dose-dependent enhancement of rhBMP-2 activity with use of SVAK-12 at doses of 100 to 500 μg. In the fracture model, the SVAK-12-treated group had significantly higher radiographic healing scores than the untreated group (p = 0.028). Biomechanical testing revealed that the fractured femora in the 200 to 250-μg SVAK-12 group were 43% stronger (p = 0.008) and 93% stiffer (p = 0.014) than those in the control group. In summary, at five weeks the femoral fracture group injected with SVAK-12 showed significantly improved radiographic and biomechanical evidence of healing compared with the controls. Conclusions: A single local dose of a low-molecular-weight compound, SVAK-12, enhanced bone-healing in the presence of low-dose exogenous rhBMP-2 (in the ectopic model) and endogenous rhBMPs (in the femoral fracture model). Clinical Relevance: This study demonstrates that rhBMP-2 responsiveness can be enhanced by a novel small molecule, SVAK-12. Local application of anabolic small molecules has

  6. Randomised trial assessing the impact of framing of fracture risk and osteoporosis treatment benefits in patients undergoing bone densitometry

    PubMed Central

    Kalluru, Rama; Petrie, Keith J; Grey, Andrew; Nisa, Zaynah; Horne, Anne M; Gamble, Greg D; Bolland, Mark J

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The accuracy of patients' perception of risk is important for decisions about treatment in many diseases. We framed the risk of fracture and benefits of treatment in different ways and assessed the impact on patients' perception of fracture risk and intentions to take medication. Design Randomised trial of 4 different presentations of fracture risk and likely benefits from osteoporosis treatment. Setting Academic centre. Participants 200 patients undergoing bone densitometry. Intervention Presentation that framed the patient's absolute fracture risk either as the chance of having or not having an event, with their likely benefits from osteoporosis treatment in natural frequencies or numbers needed to treat. Outcomes Participants' views about their fracture risk and the need for osteoporosis treatment. Results The median 5-year fracture risk threshold participants regarded as high enough to consider preventative medication was 50–60%, and did not change substantially after the presentation. The median (Q1, Q3) 5-year risk initially estimated by participants was 20% (10, 50) for any fracture and 19% (10, 40) for hip fracture. 61% considered their fracture risk was low or very low, and 59–67% considered their fracture risk was lower than average. These participant estimates were 2–3 times higher than Garvan calculator estimates for any fracture, and 10–20 times higher for hip fracture. Participant estimates of fracture risk halved after the presentation, but remained higher than the Garvan estimates (1.5–2 times for any fracture, 5–10 times for hip fracture). There was no difference in these outcomes between the randomised groups. Participants' intentions about taking medication to prevent fractures were not substantially affected by receiving information about fracture risk and treatment benefits. Conclusions Altering the framing of estimated fracture risks and treatment benefits had little effect on participants' perception of the need to take

  7. Bone strength and management of postmenopausal fracture risk with antiresorptive therapies: considerations for women’s health practice

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Angela M; Frame, Heather; Ho, Michael; Mackinnon, Erin S; Brown, Jacques P

    2016-01-01

    Bone strength – and, hence, fracture risk – reflects the structural and material properties of the skeleton, which changes with bone turnover during aging and following effective pharmacotherapy. A variety of powerful new techniques (quantitative computed tomography, as well as peripheral quantitative computed tomography and high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography) provide precise images of bone structure and can be used to model the response of specific bones to different types of mechanical load. This review explores the various components of bone strength and the clinical significance of measures, such as bone mineral density, bone turnover markers, and modern imaging data, with regard to fracture risk in women with postmenopausal osteoporosis, before and after initiating antiresorptive therapy. These imaging and related techniques offer an ever-clearer picture of the changes in bone structure and bone mineral metabolism during normal aging and in osteoporosis, as well as in response to treatment. However, because the newer techniques are not yet available in routine practice, validated tools for absolute fracture risk assessment remain essential for clinical decision making. These tools, which are tailored to patient risk data in individual countries, are based on bone mineral density and other readily available clinical data. In addition, bone turnover marker measurements can be useful in assessing risk and guiding treatment decisions for women with postmenopausal osteoporosis. Such tests may be used before starting a patient on antiresorptive therapy and for ongoing monitoring of treatment effectiveness. PMID:27729815

  8. Correlation of fat embolism severity and subcutaneous fatty tissue crushing and bone fractures.

    PubMed

    Bolliger, Stephan Andreas; Muehlematter, Karin; Thali, Michael Josef; Ampanozi, Garyfalia

    2011-05-01

    Pulmonary fat embolism (PFE) is frequently encountered in blunt trauma. The clinical manifestation ranges from no impairment in light cases to death due to right-sided heart failure or hypoxaemia in severe cases. Occasionally, pulmonary fat embolism can give rise to a fat embolism syndrome (FES), which is marked by multiorgan failure, respiratory disorders, petechiae and often death. It is well known that fractures of long bones can lead to PFE. Several authors have argued that PFE can arise due to mere soft tissue injury in the absence of fractures, a claim other authors disagree upon. In this study, we retrospectively examined 50 victims of blunt trauma with regard to grade and extent of fractures and crushing of subcutaneous fatty tissue and presence and severity of PFE. Our results indicate that PFE can arise due to mere crushing of subcutaneous fat and that the fracture grade correlated well with PFE severity (p = 0.011). The correlation between PFE and the fracture severity (body regions affected by fractures and fracture grade) showed a lesser significant correlation (p = 0.170). The survival time (p = 0.567), the amount of body regions affected by fat crushing (p = 0.336) and the fat crush grade (p = 0.485) did not correlate with the PFE grade, nor did the amount of body regions affected by fractures. These results may have clinical implications for the assessment of a possible FES development, as, if the risk of a PFE is known, preventive steps can be taken.

  9. The therapeutic effects of alfacalcidol on bone strength, muscle metabolism and prevention of falls and fractures.

    PubMed

    Schacht, E; Richy, F; Reginster, J-Y

    2005-01-01

    Established osteoporosis in older patients of both sexes is characterized by decoupled bone remodelling induced by sex hormone deficits and by somatopause, but also by lack of vitamin D and reduced synthesis of the D-Hormone (calcitriol; 1.25 (OH)2D) in the kidneys and bone, as well as from lack of receptors and/or receptor affinity for D-Hormone in the target organs. Parallel to the decreased bone strength a loss of muscle power occurs, together with an increase in balance disorders and an increasing risk of "intrinsic", nonsyncopal locomotoric falls. In alfacalcidol therapy, D-Hormone is provided to the body in circumvention of its own regulation, by means of which higher hormone concentrations can be achieved in the target tissues than by administration of plain vitamin D. In vitro and in vivo experiments have provided growing evidence that D-Hormone analogs tend to normalize PTH, lead to an increase in the number and activity of osteoblasts, reduce the activity of osteoclasts, and might thus normalize the "high bone turnover" in elderly osteoporotic patients ("supercoupling"). In addition, it has been shown that D-Hormone analogs are able to increase muscle power and walking distance in elderly D-Hormone deficient patients. Besides the known effect on the vertebral fracture rate, new clinical data confirm that D-Hormone analogs might reduce peripheral fractures by reducing falls. The expanded understanding of the pathogenesis of glucocorticoid- induced osteoporosis with its disturbed calcium homeostasis and the pharmacological effects of alfacalcidol, which counteract such iatrogenic bone loss, contribute to the understanding of its clinical efficacy in this most frequent form of secondary osteoporosis. Due to its recently discovered immunomodulating properties, alfacalcidol might find a slot in the management of bone loss caused by chronic inflammatory diseases or by organ transplantations. Alfacalcidol has multifactorial effects, among which the best known

  10. Subchondral bone cysts with fractures of the extensor processes in a horse.

    PubMed

    Scott, E A; Snyder, S P; Schmotzer, W B; Pool, R

    1991-09-01

    Probable cause of fracture in a Paint gelding was a congenital bone defect involving the extensor process area of the right and left forelimb distal phalanges. Radiographically and histologically, subchondral bone cysts at the fracture lines were suspected. These cysts were thought to have developed in association with abnormal ossification centers at the extensor process areas of the third phalanx. Partial avulsion of weak extensor processes would then occur from natural forces exerted on these weakened bony prominences via the common digital extensor tendon. Support for osteochondrosis as a cause of this bone cyst formation was seen in histologic examination of fragments removed. Within the bony trabeculae, a dysplastic focus of cartilage with mineralized plaques and osseous tissues was observed. Findings supported a diagnosis of osteochondrosis, to the extent that the disease is presently understood in horses. Surgical correction by fragment removal was performed to circumvent progression of degenerative joint disease, which was evident as partial cartilage erosion of the distal dorsal articular surface of the second phalanx and fracture fragments. Recovery from surgery was rapid, and several months after surgery, the horse was sound for pleasure riding.

  11. Larynx Trauma and Hyoid Bone Fracture after Bite Injury in Dog: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Manchi, George; Brunnberg, Mathias M.; Shahid, Muhammad; Al Aiyan, Ahmad; Brunnberg, Leo; Stein, Silke

    2016-01-01

    An 8-year-old male Jack Russell crossbreed dog was admitted to our hospital with dyspnea and shock following a dog-bite injury on the ventral neck. Radiographs revealed subcutaneous emphysema and bilateral thyrohyoid bone fractures. Intraoperatively, rupture of both sternohyoid muscles, both hyoepiglotticus muscles, both thyrohyoid muscles, and a partial cranial rupture of the superficial sphincter colli muscle were detected. Part of the epiglottis was detached from the thyroid cartilage. The patient’s severed muscles and torn epiglottis were reattached using a simple interrupted suture pattern. Hyoepiglotticus muscles could not be identified. The bilateral thyrohyoid bone fractures were repaired with intraosseous wire suture. A temporary tracheostomy tube and an esophageal feeding tube were placed postoperatively. The dog was discharged after 8 days, re-examined at 2 and 6 months and laryngeal and pharyngeal function were evaluated as normal. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first report of a dog that presented with laryngeal trauma with hyoid bone fracture and acute dyspnea that underwent surgical treatment resulting in an acceptable outcome. PMID:27579303

  12. PUFAs, Bone Mineral Density, and Fragility Fracture: Findings from Human Studies1

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Amanda B

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a global health problem that leads to an increased incidence of fragility fracture. Recent dietary patterns of Western populations include higher than recommended intakes of n–6 (ω-6) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) relative to n–3 (ω-3) PUFAs that may result in a chronic state of sterile whole body inflammation. Findings from human bone cell culture experiments have revealed both benefits and detriments to bone-related outcomes depending on the quantity and source of PUFAs. Findings from observational and randomized controlled trials suggest that higher fatty fish intake is strongly linked with reduced risk of fragility fracture. Moreover, human studies largely support a greater intake of total PUFAs, total n–6 (ω-6) fatty acid, and total n–3 (ω-3) fatty acid for higher bone mineral density and reduced risk of fragility fracture. Less consistent evidence has been observed when investigating the role of long chain n–3 (ω-3) PUFAs or the ratio of n–6 (ω-6) PUFAs to n–3 (ω-3) PUFAs. Aspects to consider when interpreting the current literature involve participant characteristics, study duration, diet assessment tools, and the primary outcome measure. PMID:26980813

  13. PUFAs, Bone Mineral Density, and Fragility Fracture: Findings from Human Studies.

    PubMed

    Longo, Amanda B; Ward, Wendy E

    2016-03-01

    Osteoporosis is a global health problem that leads to an increased incidence of fragility fracture. Recent dietary patterns of Western populations include higher than recommended intakes of n-6 (ω-6) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) relative to n-3 (ω-3) PUFAs that may result in a chronic state of sterile whole body inflammation. Findings from human bone cell culture experiments have revealed both benefits and detriments to bone-related outcomes depending on the quantity and source of PUFAs. Findings from observational and randomized controlled trials suggest that higher fatty fish intake is strongly linked with reduced risk of fragility fracture. Moreover, human studies largely support a greater intake of total PUFAs, total n-6 (ω-6) fatty acid, and total n-3 (ω-3) fatty acid for higher bone mineral density and reduced risk of fragility fracture. Less consistent evidence has been observed when investigating the role of long chain n-3 (ω-3) PUFAs or the ratio of n-6 (ω-6) PUFAs to n-3 (ω-3) PUFAs. Aspects to consider when interpreting the current literature involve participant characteristics, study duration, diet assessment tools, and the primary outcome measure.

  14. One-stage emergency treatment of open grade IIIB tibial shaft fractures with bone loss.

    PubMed

    Tropet, Y; Garbuio, P; Obert, L; Jeunet, L; Elias, B

    2001-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the authors' experience with emergency reconstruction of severe tibial shaft fractures. Five male patients were admitted to the emergency room with a grade IIIB open tibial shaft fracture with bone loss (average age, 33 years; age range, 18-65 years). Injuries were the result of motorcycle accidents (N = 2), pedestrian accidents (N = 1), gunshot wound (N = 1), and paragliding fall (N = 1). Primary emergent one-stage management for all patients consisted of administration of antibiotics, debridement, stabilization by locked intramedullary nailing, bone grafting from the iliac crest, and coverage using free muscle flaps (four latissimus dorsi and one gracilis). The average follow-up was 21 months (range, 8 months-3.5 years). Partial weight bearing with no immobilization was started at 3 months, and full weight bearing began 5 months after trauma. No angular complications and no nonunions were observed. There was one case of superficial infection without osteitis. All fractures healed within 6 months in 4 patients and within 10 months in 1 patient. At the last follow-up examination, ankle and knee motion was normal and no pain was noted, except for 1 patient who had associated lesions (ankle motion reduced by 50%). Aggressive emergency management of severe open tibial fractures provides good results. It improves end results markedly, not only by reducing tissue loss from infection, but also reducing healing and rehabilitation times.

  15. Vertebral deformities identified by vertebral fracture assessment: associations with clinical characteristics and bone mineral density.

    PubMed

    Jacobs-Kosmin, Dana; Sandorfi, Nora; Murray, Heather; Abruzzo, John L

    2005-01-01

    Whether vertebral fractures identified on radiographs are painful or not, they are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Vertebral fractures on X-rays correlate with low bone mineral density (BMD) at the spine and hip in addition to several clinical characteristics. Evidence suggests that vertebral deformities detected by X-ray and by vertebral fracture assessment (VFA) show good agreement. We examined the relationship between VFA-detected vertebral deformities and patient characteristics as well as BMD by analyzing the records of 432 patients who had undergone dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans with VFA. Patients' demographic data and T-scores were obtained from patient questionnaires and DXA scans. We categorized vertebral deformities by type and severity. Patients with vertebral deformities were significantly older and more likely to report a history of fracture after childhood. Significantly more estrogen use was reported in patients without deformity. Those with deformities had significantly lower T-scores at the femoral neck and total hip but not at the spine. Increased severity and number of deformities correlated with lower T-scores at the total hip and femoral neck but not the spine. In conclusion, vertebral deformities detected by VFA, like those on X-ray, correlate with both clinical characteristics and reduced bone mass at the hip. These relationships, in addition to rapid performance, convenience, and minimal radiation exposure, indicate VFA-detected vertebral deformities are a valuable adjunct in identifying patients in need of additional evaluation and treatment.

  16. Plasma B vitamins, homocysteine and their relation with bone loss and hip fracture in elderly men and women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated homocysteine is a strong risk factor for osteoporotic fractures among elders, yet it may be a marker for low B vitamin status. Objective: To examine the associations of plasma concentrations of folate, vitamin B12, vitamin B6 and homocysteine with bone loss and hip fracture risk in elderly...

  17. Correlations between indentation modulus and mineral density in bone-fracture calluses

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Pui L.; Morgan, Elise F.

    2009-01-01

    The mechanical properties of a healing bone fracture depend not only on the geometry of the fracture callus but also on the material properties of the callus tissues. Despite the biomechanical importance of callus tissues in restoring mechanical integrity to the injured bone, little is known about the material properties of these tissues and whether these properties can be estimated non-invasively. This study used nanoindentation to quantify the spatial variations in indentation modulus throughout the fracture callus and correlated the measurements of modulus with measurements of tissue mineral density (TMD) obtained from images from micro-computed tomography (µCT). Fracture calluses were harvested from rats 24 days following creation of a full-thickness, transverse osteotomy in the femoral mid-diaphysis. Calluses were imaged using µCT, and the average TMD and the median grayvalue (X-ray attenuation) of five, pre-defined volumes of interest (VOIs) in each callus were computed. Nanoindentation was then performed at multiple, regularly spaced locations across 150 µm-thick, sagittal sections of the calluses. The indentation modulus ranged from 0.51 to 1680 MPa throughout the callus, with the highest moduli in the center of the fracture gap and the lowest in the periphery of the gap (P < 0.05). TMD was also highest in the center of the gap (P < 0.05). An increasing trend in both modulus and TMD was observed in the regions of the callus adjacent to the periosteal surfaces of the cortex. While no correlation was found between the average indentation modulus in a given VOI and the median grayvalue of that VOI, the average indentation modulus and the average TMD were positively correlated (R = 0.70, P < 0.05). Together, these findings establish the spatial heterogeneity in the mechanical behavior of tissues in fracture calluses and indicate that the indentation modulus of these tissues can be estimated by non-invasive measurements of tissue mineralization. PMID:21669846

  18. Modified Boyd’s Dual Onlay Bone Graft Technique for 15 Years Old Neglected Nonunion Fracture both Bone Forearm with Severe Angular Deformity: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ramprasath, Dhurvas Ramlal; Thirunarayanan, Vasudevan; Ezhilmaran, Duraisamy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Neglected case of nonunion of fracture both bones forearm with deformity is very difficult to manage. Treatment options are minimal. Identifying such a case in literature is also very rare. One such rare case is discussed here. Case Report: Here, we present a case of a 65-year-old male patient, who was operated 15 years back for fracture both bones forearm, with 3.5 mm dynamic compression plate. Fracture went into nonunion and plate was broken. The patient presented to us 15 years later in August 2013 with nonunion, broken, and loosened implants and varus deformity of 90°. Implants were removed, sequential correction of deformity was done, using external fixators. After deformity correction was achieved, nonunion was managed by modified Boyd’s dual onlay bone graft technique. Conclusion: Modified Boyd’s dual onlay bone graft technique is an effective method in achieving union and restoration of functions, even in patients with resistant nonunion. PMID:28164051

  19. Ibandronate dose response is associated with increases in bone mineral density and reductions in clinical fractures: results of a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sebba, Anthony I; Emkey, Ronald D; Kohles, Joseph D; Sambrook, Philip N

    2009-03-01

    This meta-analysis pooled data from the four phase III clinical trials of ibandronate to assess the relationship between ibandronate dose, changes in bone mineral density, and rates of both clinical and non-vertebral fractures. Individual patient data from the intent-to-treat population of the BONE, IV fracture prevention, MOBILE, and DIVA studies were included for analysis. The relationship between ibandronate dose and bone mineral density at both the lumbar spine and at the total hip was assessed qualitatively. The relationship between lumbar spine bone mineral density and clinical fracture rate, and the relationship between total hip bone mineral density and non-vertebral fracture rate, were assessed both qualitatively and using mathematical models. A total of 8710 patients were included in this analysis. Both lumbar spine and total hip bone mineral density were observed to increase with increasing ibandronate dose. The incidence of all clinical fractures was observed to decrease as lumbar spine bone mineral density increased. A statistically significant inverse linear relationship was observed between percent change in lumbar spine bone mineral density and the rate of clinical fractures (P=0.005). A non-significant curvilinear relationship was observed between percent change in total hip bone mineral density and non-vertebral fracture rate. Increased ibandronate exposure is associated with increasing gains in the lumbar spine bone mineral density and decreasing clinical fracture rates. A non-linear relationship may exist between increases in the total hip bone mineral density and non-vertebral fracture rate.

  20. Change in hip bone mineral density and risk of subsequent fractures in older men.

    PubMed

    Cawthon, Peggy M; Ewing, Susan K; Mackey, Dawn C; Fink, Howard A; Cummings, Steven R; Ensrud, Kristine E; Stefanick, Marcia L; Bauer, Doug C; Cauley, Jane A; Orwoll, Eric S

    2012-10-01

    Low bone mineral density (BMD) increases fracture risk; how changes in BMD influence fracture risk in older men is uncertain. BMD was assessed at two to three time points over 4.6 years using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) for 4470 men aged ≥65 years in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study. Change in femoral neck BMD was estimated using mixed effects linear regression models. BMD change was categorized as "accelerated" (≤-0.034 g/cm(2) ), "expected" (between 0 and -0.034 g/cm(2) ), or "maintained" (≥0 g/cm(2) ). Fractures were adjudicated by central medical record review. Multivariate proportional hazards models estimated the risk of hip, nonspine/nonhip, and nonspine fracture over 4.5 years after the final BMD measure, during which time 371 (8.3%) men experienced at least one nonspine fracture, including 78 (1.7%) hip fractures. Men with accelerated femoral neck BMD loss had an increased risk of nonspine (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.0; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-2.8); nonspine/nonhip (HR = 1.6; 95% CI 1.1-2.3); and hip fracture (HR = 6.3; 95% CI 2.7-14.8) compared with men who maintained BMD over time. No difference in risk was seen for men with expected loss. Adjustment for the initial BMD measure did not alter the results. Adjustment for the final BMD measure attenuated the change in BMD-nonspine fracture and the change in BMD-nonspine/nonhip relationships such that they were no longer significant, whereas the change in the BMD-hip fracture relationship was attenuated (HR = 2.6; 95% CI 1.1-6.4). Total hip BMD change produced similar results. Accelerated decrease in BMD is a strong, independent risk factor for hip and other nonspine fractures in men.

  1. Assessing vertebral fracture risk on volumetric quantitative computed tomography by geometric characterization of trabecular bone structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Checefsky, Walter A.; Abidin, Anas Z.; Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Bauer, Jan S.; Baum, Thomas; Wismüller, Axel

    2016-03-01

    The current clinical standard for measuring Bone Mineral Density (BMD) is dual X-ray absorptiometry, however more recently BMD derived from volumetric quantitative computed tomography has been shown to demonstrate a high association with spinal fracture susceptibility. In this study, we propose a method of fracture risk assessment using structural properties of trabecular bone in spinal vertebrae. Experimental data was acquired via axial multi-detector CT (MDCT) from 12 spinal vertebrae specimens using a whole-body 256-row CT scanner with a dedicated calibration phantom. Common image processing methods were used to annotate the trabecular compartment in the vertebral slices creating a circular region of interest (ROI) that excluded cortical bone for each slice. The pixels inside the ROI were converted to values indicative of BMD. High dimensional geometrical features were derived using the scaling index method (SIM) at different radii and scaling factors (SF). The mean BMD values within the ROI were then extracted and used in conjunction with a support vector machine to predict the failure load of the specimens. Prediction performance was measured using the root-mean-square error (RMSE) metric and determined that SIM combined with mean BMD features (RMSE = 0.82 +/- 0.37) outperformed MDCT-measured mean BMD (RMSE = 1.11 +/- 0.33) (p < 10-4). These results demonstrate that biomechanical strength prediction in vertebrae can be significantly improved through the use of SIM-derived texture features from trabecular bone.

  2. [Bone cement dry prosthetic with internal fixation treat senile osteoporotic femoral fractures].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Y; Rong, X X; Chen, P; Xu, Y J; Zhu, G X

    2017-03-01

    Objective: To explore the treatment of senile osteoporotic femoral fractures after using internal fixation of bone cement dry prosthetic. Methods: Twelve patients aged from 74 to 94 years with mean age of (84.0±2.5) years with internal fixation of bone cement dry prosthetic surgery who were treated at Department of Orthopaedics in Nanjing Medical University Affiliated Wuxi Second Hospital between May 2013 and May 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. There were 8 male and 4 female, 10 cases of tumble and 2 cases of traffic injury. The fracture types with AO type included 1 case of A1 type, 5 cases of A2 type, 3 cases of A3 type, 1 case of B1 type, 2 cases of B2 type. The steel plate internal fixation with bone cement dry prosthetic method was chosen to treat senile severe femoral fracture. Postoperative observation of postoperative pain assessment, hip joint activity and walking ability were evaluated. Paired simple t test and Wilcoxon rank sum test were used to compare the differences of pain score and the ability to walk. Results: Twelve cases received an average of (16.0±3.6) months follow-up. The average hospitalization days are (9.0±1.4) days and average of intraoperative time was (68.0±10.6) minutes. Intraoperative blood loss compared to normal was (106.0±24.2) ml. Patients began walking load and activities in two weeks. The gait and joint activities gradually restored and there were no obvious deformity and no loose internal fixation. All of the patients didn't have fracture shift with breaking plates or screws deformation and have no bone cement reaction. The walking ability was (4.1±0.9) points, the hip joint activities were 98.5°±7.7° and pain scores were 1.22±0.58 by Holden grading standards. The differences of walking ability (Z=-3.126, P<0.05) and pain scores (t=23.047, P<0.001) between pre- and post-operative were statistically significant. One patient had contralateral hip pain, 2 patients had lateral thigh pain, 10 patients returned to

  3. Once-yearly zoledronic acid in the prevention of osteoporotic bone fractures in postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Lambrinoudaki, Irene; Vlachou, Sophia; Galapi, Fotini; Papadimitriou, Dimitra; Papadias, K

    2008-01-01

    Zoledronic acid is a nitrogen-containing, third-generation bisphosphonate that has recently been approved for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis as an annual intravenous infusion. Zoledronic acid is an antiresorptive agent which has a high affinity for mineralized bone and especially for sites of high bone turnover. Zoledronic acid is excreted by the kidney without further metabolism. Zoledronic acid administered as a 5 mg intravenous infusion annually increases bone mineral density in the lumbar spine and femoral neck by 6.7% and 5.1% respectively and reduces the incidence of new vertebral and hip fractures by 70% and 41% respectively in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. Most common side effects are post-dose fever, flu-like symptoms, myalgia, arthralgia, and headache which usually occur in the first 3 days after infusion and are self-limited. Rare adverse effects include renal dysfunction, hypocalcemia, atrial fibrillation, and osteonecrosis of the jaw. PMID:18982915

  4. Subchondral Insufficiency Fracture of the Femoral Head treated with Core Decompression and Bone Void Filler Support

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Hiren; Kamath, Atul F.

    2016-01-01

    Subchondral insufficiency fracture of the femoral head (SIFFH) is characterized by acute onset hip pain without overt trauma. It appears as a low intensity band with bone marrow edema on T1-weighted MRI. The most common course of treatment is protected weight bearing for a period of several weeks. Total hip arthroplasty (THA) has been commonly used if the patient does not respond to the initial protected weight bearing treatment. We present a case of a 48-year-old male with SIFFH who was treated with core hip decompression and bone void filler as a hip-preserving alternative to THA. The patient has an excellent clinical and radiographic result at final follow up. Core hip decompression with bone void filler is a less invasive alternative to THA, and may be a preferred initial treatment strategy for SIFFH in the young and active patient who has failed conservative measures. PMID:27517074

  5. Detection of Bone Marrow Edema in Nondisplaced Hip Fractures: Utility of a Virtual Unenhanced Dual-Energy CT Application.

    PubMed

    Kellock, Trenton T; Nicolaou, Savvas; Kim, Sandra S Y; Al-Busaidi, Sultan; Louis, Luck J; O'Connell, Tim W; Ouellette, Hugue A; McLaughlin, Patrick D

    2017-03-16

    Purpose To quantify the sensitivity and specificity of dual-energy computed tomographic (CT) virtual noncalcium images in the detection of nondisplaced hip fractures and to assess whether obtaining these images as a complement to bone reconstructions alters sensitivity, specificity, or diagnostic confidence. Materials and Methods The clinical research ethics board approved chart review, and the requirement to obtain informed consent was waived. The authors retrospectively identified 118 patients who presented to a level 1 trauma center emergency department and who underwent dual-energy CT for suspicion of a nondisplaced traumatic hip fracture. Clinical follow-up was the standard of reference. Three radiologists interpreted virtual noncalcium images for traumatic bone marrow edema. Bone reconstructions for the same cases were interpreted alone and then with virtual noncalcium images. Diagnostic confidence was rated on a scale of 1 to 10. McNemar, Fleiss κ, and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used for statistical analysis. Results Twenty-two patients had nondisplaced hip fractures and 96 did not have hip fractures. Sensitivity with virtual noncalcium images was 77% and 91% (17 and 20 of 22 patients), and specificity was 92%-99% (89-95 of 96 patients). Sensitivity increased by 4%-5% over that with bone reconstruction images alone for two of the three readers when both bone reconstruction and virtual noncalcium images were used. Specificity remained unchanged (99% and 100%). Diagnostic confidence in the exclusion of fracture was improved with combined bone reconstruction and virtual noncalcium images (median score: 10, 9, and 10 for readers 1, 2, and 3, respectively) compared with bone reconstruction images alone (median score: 9, 8, and 9). Conclusion When used as a supplement to standard bone reconstructions, dual-energy CT virtual noncalcium images increased sensitivity for the detection of nondisplaced traumatic hip fractures and improved diagnostic confidence in

  6. Detection of occult, undisplaced hip fractures with a dual-energy CT algorithm targeted to detection of bone marrow edema.

    PubMed

    Reddy, T; McLaughlin, P D; Mallinson, P I; Reagan, A C; Munk, P L; Nicolaou, S; Ouellette, H A

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe our initial clinical experience with dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) virtual non-calcium (VNC) images for the detection of bone marrow (BM) edema in patients with suspected hip fracture following trauma. Twenty-five patients presented to the emergency department at a level 1 trauma center between January 1, 2011 and January 1, 2013 with clinical suspicion of hip fracture and normal radiographs were included. All CT scans were performed on a dual-source, dual-energy CT system. VNC images were generated using prototype software and were compared to regular bone reconstructions by two musculoskeletal radiologists in consensus. Radiological and/or clinical diagnosis of fracture at 30-day follow-up was used as the reference standard. Twenty-one patients were found to have DECT-VNC signs of bone marrow edema. Eighteen of these 21 patients were true positive and three were false positive. A concordant fracture was clearly seen on bone reconstruction images in 15 of the 18 true positive cases. In three cases, DECT-VNC was positive for bone marrow edema where bone reconstruction CT images were negative. Four patients demonstrated no DECT-VNC signs of bone marrow edema: two cases were true negative, two cases were false negative. When compared with the gold standard of hip fracture determined at retrospective follow-up, the sensitivity of DECT-VNC images of the hip was 90 %, specificity was 40 %, positive predictive value was 86 %, and negative predictive value was 50 %. Our initial experience would suggest that DECT-VNC is highly sensitive but poorly specific in the diagnosis of hip fractures in patients with normal radiographs. The value of DECT-VNC primarily lies in its ability to help detect fractures which may be subtle or undetectable on bone reconstruction CT images.

  7. Altered distributions of bone tissue mineral and collagen properties in women with fragility fractures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen Xiang; Lloyd, Ashley A; Burket, Jayme C; Gourion-Arsiquaud, Samuel; Donnelly, Eve

    2016-03-01

    Heterogeneity of bone tissue properties is emerging as a potential indicator of altered bone quality in pathologic tissue. The objective of this study was to compare the distributions of tissue properties in women with and without histories of fragility fractures using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) imaging. We extended a prior study that examined the relationship of the mean FTIR properties to fracture risk by analyzing in detail the widths and the tails of the distributions of FTIR properties in biopsies from fracture and non-fracture cohorts. The mineral and matrix properties of cortical and trabecular iliac crest tissue were compared in biopsies from women with a history of fragility fracture (+Fx; n=21, age: mean 54±SD 15y) and with no history of fragility fracture (-Fx; n=12, age: 57±5y). A subset of the patients included in the -Fx group were taking estrogen-plus-progestin hormone replacement therapy (HRT) (-Fx+HRT n=8, age: 58±5y) and were analyzed separately from patients with no history of HRT (-Fx-HRT n=4, age: 56±7y). When the FTIR parameter mean values were examined by treatment group, the trabecular tissue of -Fx-HRT patients had a lower mineral:matrix ratio (M:M) and collagen maturity (XLR) than that of -Fx+HRT patients (-22% M:M, -18% XLR) and +Fx patients (-17% M:M, -18% XLR). Across multiple FTIR parameters, tissue from the -Fx-HRT group had smaller low-tail (5th percentile) values than that from the -Fx+HRT or +Fx groups. In trabecular collagen maturity and crystallinity (XST), the -Fx-HRT group had smaller low-tail values than those in the -Fx+HRT group (-16% XLR, -5% XST) and the +Fx group (-17% XLR, -7% XST). The relatively low values of trabecular mineral:matrix ratio and collagen maturity and smaller low-tail values of collagen maturity and crystallinity observed in the -Fx-HRT group are characteristic of younger tissue. Taken together, our data suggest that the presence of newly formed tissue that includes small/imperfect crystals

  8. Dipyrone has no effects on bone healing of tibial fractures in rats

    PubMed Central

    Gali, Julio Cesar; Sansanovicz, Dennis; Ventin, Fernando Carvalho; Paes, Rodrigo Henrique; Quevedo, Francisco Carlos; Caetano, Edie Benedito

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of dipyrone on healing of tibial fractures in rats. METHODS: Fourty-two Wistar rats were used, with mean body weight of 280g. After being anesthetized, they were submitted to closed fracture of the tibia and fibula of the right posterior paw through manual force. The rats were randomly divided into three groups: the control group that received a daily intraperitoneal injection of saline solution; group D-40, that received saline injection containing 40mg/Kg dipyrone; and group D-80, that received saline injection containing 80mg/Kg dipyrone. After 28 days the rats were sacrificed and received a new label code that was known by only one researcher. The fractured limbs were then amputated and X-rayed. The tibias were disarticulated and subjected to mechanical, radiological and histological evaluation. For statistical analysis the Kruskal-Wallis test was used at a significance level of 5%. RESULTS: There wasn't any type of dipyrone effect on healing of rats tibial fractures in relation to the control group. CONCLUSION: Dipyrone may be used safely for pain control in the treatment of fractures, without any interference on bone healing. Level of Evidence II, Controlled Laboratory Study. PMID:25246852

  9. Treatment of Pathological Bone Fractures in a Patient with McCune-Albright Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kollerova, Jana; Koller, Tomas; Zelinkova, Zuzana; Kostalova, Ludmila; Payer, Juraj

    2013-01-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome is a rare genetic disorder with typical skeletal and endocrine manifestations. The disease course is complicated by recurrent fractures resulting from polyostotic fibrous dysplasia and the treatment is thus primarily directed at the reduction of the risk of fractures. However, due to the complex mechanism of the skeletal damage the standard antiporotic therapeutics are ineffective. We report here a case of a 31-year-old female, diagnosed with the McCune-Albright syndrome in early childhood. She was suffering from extensive bone involvement, complicated by recurrent fractures despite the treatment with bisphosphonates. In addition, the disease course was complicated by the impairment of several endocrine functions-precocious puberty, hyperestrogenism, and hyperthyroidism for which a total thyroidectomy was performed. During the operation, two enlarged parathyroid glands were removed. This resulted in severe hypocalcaemia in the postoperative period with a need for supplementation with very high calcium and vitamin D doses. After this episode, the patient has remained free of fractures. We discuss here the corrected thyroid function, the supplementation with unconventionally high doses of vitamin D and calcium, and the termination of bisphosphonates treatment as presumable factors contributing to the reduced fracture risk in this patient.

  10. Chondrocyte BMP2 signaling plays an essential role in bone fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Mi, Meng; Jin, Hongting; Wang, Baoli; Yukata, Kiminori; Sheu, Tzong-Jen; Ke, Qiao Han; Tong, Peijian; Im, Hee-Jeong; Xiao, Guozhi; Chen, Di

    2013-01-10

    The specific role of endogenous Bmp2 gene in chondrocytes and in osteoblasts in fracture healing was investigated by generation and analysis of chondrocyte- and osteoblast-specific Bmp2 conditional knockout (cKO) mice. The unilateral open transverse tibial fractures were created in these Bmp2 cKO mice. Bone fracture callus samples were collected and analyzed by X-ray, micro-CT, histology analyses, biomechanical testing and gene expression assays. The results demonstrated that the lack of Bmp2 expression in chondrocytes leads to a prolonged cartilage callus formation and a delayed osteogenesis initiation and progression into mineralization phase with lower biomechanical properties. In contrast, when the Bmp2 gene was deleted in osteoblasts, the mice showed no significant difference in the fracture healing process compared to control mice. These findings suggest that endogenous BMP2 expression in chondrocytes may play an essential role in cartilage callus maturation at an early stage of fracture healing. Our studies may provide important information for clinical application of BMP2.

  11. Correlation of bone fragments reposition and related parameters in thoracolumbar burst fractures patients

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Jianhui; Lin, Haibin; Niu, Susheng; Wu, Xianwei; Wu, Yujun; Zhang, Huaizhi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine if thoracolumbar vertebral body collapse or canal compromise (CC) is associated with reposition of bone fragment. We retrospective review medical charts of patients with thoracolumbar burst fractures from July 2010 to September 2013. The fractures were classified according to the Arbeit Fuer Osteoosynthese (AO) classification system. Neurological status was classified according to American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA). Patients were divided into two groups (reposition group and non-reposition group) according to whether the bone fragments were reposition or non-reposition after surgery. Mimics measured mid-sagittal canal diameter (MSD), transverse canal diameter (TCD), local kyphosis (LK) and calculated anterior vertebral body compression ratio (AVBCR), middle vertebral body compression ratio (MVBCR), posterior vertebral body compression ratio (PVBCR), and mid-sagittal canal diameter compression ratio (MSDCR) on the preoperative CT image. The results indicated that 55 patients were included in the study. There are 35 patients with reposition of bone fragment and 20 patients with non-reposition of bone fragment after surgery. There were significant difference on MSD (t = 3.258, P = 0.002), TCD (t = 2.197, P = 0.032), AVBCR (t = -2.063, P = 0.044), MVBCR (t = -2.526, P = 0.015), PVBCR (t = -2.211, P = 0.031), MSDCR (t = -4.975, P = 0.000) between two groups before surgery. There was a significant correlation between reposition of bone fragment and AO classification (OR = 5.251, P = 0.022), and MSDCR (OR = 7.366, P = 0.007). There was no significant correlation between reposition and AVBCR, MVBCR, PVBCR, LK, MSD and TCD. In conclusion, this study indicates that AO classification and MSDCR are predictors of reposition of bone fragment. PMID:26379913

  12. A small interfering RNA targeting Lnk accelerates bone fracture healing with early neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Yohei; Ii, Masaaki; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Kawamoto, Atsuhiko; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Akimaru, Hiroshi; Mifune, Yutaka; Shoji, Taro; Fukui, Tomoaki; Asahi, Michio; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Asahara, Takayuki

    2013-09-01

    Lnk, an intracellular adapter protein, is expressed in hematopoietic cell lineages, which has recently been proved as an essential inhibitory signaling molecule for stem cell self-renewal in the stem cell factor-c-Kit signaling pathway with enhanced hematopoietic and osteogenic reconstitution in Lnk-deficient mice. Moreover, the therapeutic potential of hematopoietic stem/endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) for fracture healing has been demonstrated with mechanistic insight into vasculogenesis/angiogenesis and osteogenesis enhancement in the fracture sites. We report here, Lnk siRNA-transfected endothelial commitment of c-kit+/Sca-1+/lineage- subpopulations of bone marrow cells have high EPC colony-forming capacity exhibiting endothelial markers, VE-Cad, VEGF and Ang-1. Lnk siRNA-transfected osteoblasts also show highly osteoblastic capacity. In vivo, locally transfected Lnk siRNA could successfully downregulate the expression of Lnk at the fracture site up to 1 week, and radiological and histological examination showed extremely accelerated fracture healing in Lnk siRNA-transfected mice. Moreover, Lnk siRNA-transfected mice exhibited sufficient therapeutic outcomes with intrinstic enhancement of angiogenesis and osteogenesis, specifically, the mice demonstrated better blood flow recovery in the sites of fracture. In our series of experiments, we clarified that a negatively regulated Lnk system contributed to a favorable circumstance for fracture healing by enhancing vasculogenesis/angiogenesis and osteogenesis. These findings suggest that downregulation of Lnk system may have the clinical potential for faster fracture healing, which contributes to the reduction of delayed unions or non-unions.

  13. Aromatase Inhibitor-Associated Bone Fractures: A Case-Cohort GWAS and Functional Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mohan; Goss, Paul E.; Ingle, James N.; Kubo, Michiaki; Furukawa, Yoichi; Batzler, Anthony; Jenkins, Gregory D.; Carlson, Erin E.; Nakamura, Yusuke; Schaid, Daniel J.; Chapman, Judy-Anne W.; Shepherd, Lois E.; Ellis, Matthew J.; Khosla, Sundeep; Wang, Liewei

    2014-01-01

    Bone fractures are a major consequence of osteoporosis. There is a direct relationship between serum estrogen concentrations and osteoporosis risk. Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) greatly decrease serum estrogen levels in postmenopausal women, and increased incidence of fractures is a side effect of AI therapy. We performed a discovery case-cohort genome-wide association study (GWAS) using samples from 1071 patients, 231 cases and 840 controls, enrolled in the MA.27 breast cancer AI trial to identify genetic factors involved in AI-related fractures, followed by functional genomic validation. Association analyses identified 20 GWAS single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) signals with P < 5E-06. After removal of signals in gene deserts and those composed entirely of imputed SNPs, we applied a functional validation “decision cascade” that resulted in validation of the CTSZ-SLMO2-ATP5E, TRAM2-TMEM14A, and MAP4K4 genes. These genes all displayed estradiol (E2)-dependent induction in human fetal osteoblasts transfected with estrogen receptor-α, and their knockdown altered the expression of known osteoporosis-related genes. These same genes also displayed SNP-dependent variation in E2 induction that paralleled the SNP-dependent induction of known osteoporosis genes, such as osteoprotegerin. In summary, our case-cohort GWAS identified SNPs in or near CTSZ-SLMO2-ATP5E, TRAM2-TMEM14A, and MAP4K4 that were associated with risk for bone fracture in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer patients treated with AIs. These genes displayed E2-dependent induction, their knockdown altered the expression of genes related to osteoporosis, and they displayed SNP genotype-dependent variation in E2 induction. These observations may lead to the identification of novel mechanisms associated with fracture risk in postmenopausal women treated with AIs. PMID:25148458

  14. Characterizing trabecular bone structure for assessing vertebral fracture risk on volumetric quantitative computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Checefsky, Walter A.; Abidin, Anas Z.; Tsai, Halley; Wang, Xixi; Hobbs, Susan K.; Bauer, Jan S.; Baum, Thomas; Wismüller, Axel

    2015-03-01

    While the proximal femur is preferred for measuring bone mineral density (BMD) in fracture risk estimation, the introduction of volumetric quantitative computed tomography has revealed stronger associations between BMD and spinal fracture status. In this study, we propose to capture properties of trabecular bone structure in spinal vertebrae with advanced second-order statistical features for purposes of fracture risk assessment. For this purpose, axial multi-detector CT (MDCT) images were acquired from 28 spinal vertebrae specimens using a whole-body 256-row CT scanner with a dedicated calibration phantom. A semi-automated method was used to annotate the trabecular compartment in the central vertebral slice with a circular region of interest (ROI) to exclude cortical bone; pixels within were converted to values indicative of BMD. Six second-order statistical features derived from gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) and the mean BMD within the ROI were then extracted and used in conjunction with a generalized radial basis functions (GRBF) neural network to predict the failure load of the specimens; true failure load was measured through biomechanical testing. Prediction performance was evaluated with a root-mean-square error (RMSE) metric. The best prediction performance was observed with GLCM feature `correlation' (RMSE = 1.02 ± 0.18), which significantly outperformed all other GLCM features (p < 0.01). GLCM feature correlation also significantly outperformed MDCTmeasured mean BMD (RMSE = 1.11 ± 0.17) (p< 10-4). These results suggest that biomechanical strength prediction in spinal vertebrae can be significantly improved through characterization of trabecular bone structure with GLCM-derived texture features.

  15. Biomechanics of North Atlantic Right Whale Bone: Mandibular Fracture as a Fatal Endpoint for Blunt Vessel-Whale Collision Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    collision mortality using a multi- scale finite element model. Complete, transverse fracture of the right whale mandible, an injury seen only in right...bone cortex and at the ends of long bones. Generally, the change from compact to cortical bone occurs over rapidly over a small spatial scale and the...values contained within the corresponding voxel. This number is compared to the attenuation value of water and displayed on a scale of arbitrary units

  16. CERAMENT treatment of fracture defects (CERTiFy): protocol for a prospective, multicenter, randomized study investigating the use of CERAMENT™ BONE VOID FILLER in tibial plateau fractures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bone graft substitutes are widely used for reconstruction of posttraumatic bone defects. However, their clinical significance in comparison to autologous bone grafting, the gold-standard in reconstruction of larger bone defects, still remains under debate. This prospective, randomized, controlled clinical study investigates the differences in pain, quality of life, and cost of care in the treatment of tibia plateau fractures-associated bone defects using either autologous bone grafting or bioresorbable hydroxyapatite/calcium sulphate cement (CERAMENT™|BONE VOID FILLER (CBVF)). Methods/Design CERTiFy (CERament™ Treatment of Fracture defects) is a prospective, multicenter, controlled, randomized trial. We plan to enroll 136 patients with fresh traumatic depression fractures of the proximal tibia (types AO 41-B2 and AO 41-B3) in 13 participating centers in Germany. Patients will be randomized to receive either autologous iliac crest bone graft or CBVF after reduction and osteosynthesis of the fracture to reconstruct the subchondral bone defect and prevent the subsidence of the articular surface. The primary outcome is the SF-12 Physical Component Summary at week 26. The co-primary endpoint is the pain level 26 weeks after surgery measured by a visual analog scale. The SF-12 Mental Component Summary after 26 weeks and costs of care will serve as key secondary endpoints. The study is designed to show non-inferiority of the CBVF treatment to the autologous iliac crest bone graft with respect to the physical component of quality of life. The pain level at 26 weeks after surgery is expected to be lower in the CERAMENT bone void filler treatment group. Discussion CERTiFy is the first randomized multicenter clinical trial designed to compare quality of life, pain, and cost of care in the use of the CBVF and the autologous iliac crest bone graft in the treatment of tibia plateau fractures. The results are expected to influence future treatment

  17. Chondrocytes transdifferentiate into osteoblasts in endochondral bone during development, postnatal growth and fracture healing in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin; von der Mark, Klaus; Henry, Stephen; Norton, William; Adams, Henry; de Crombrugghe, Benoit

    2014-12-01

    One of the crucial steps in endochondral bone formation is the replacement of a cartilage matrix produced by chondrocytes with bone trabeculae made by osteoblasts. However, the precise sources of osteoblasts responsible for trabecular bone formation have not been fully defined. To investigate whether cells derived from hypertrophic chondrocytes contribute to the osteoblast pool in trabecular bones, we genetically labeled either hypertrophic chondrocytes by Col10a1-Cre or chondrocytes by tamoxifen-induced Agc1-CreERT2 using EGFP, LacZ or Tomato expression. Both Cre drivers were specifically active in chondrocytic cells and not in perichondrium, in periosteum or in any of the osteoblast lineage cells. These in vivo experiments allowed us to follow the fate of cells labeled in Col10a1-Cre or Agc1-CreERT2 -expressing chondrocytes. After the labeling of chondrocytes, both during prenatal development and after birth, abundant labeled non-chondrocytic cells were present in the primary spongiosa. These cells were distributed throughout trabeculae surfaces and later were present in the endosteum, and embedded within the bone matrix. Co-expression studies using osteoblast markers indicated that a proportion of the non-chondrocytic cells derived from chondrocytes labeled by Col10a1-Cre or by Agc1-CreERT2 were functional osteoblasts. Hence, our results show that both chondrocytes prior to initial ossification and growth plate chondrocytes before or after birth have the capacity to undergo transdifferentiation to become osteoblasts. The osteoblasts derived from Col10a1-expressing hypertrophic chondrocytes represent about sixty percent of all mature osteoblasts in endochondral bones of one month old mice. A similar process of chondrocyte to osteoblast transdifferentiation was involved during bone fracture healing in adult mice. Thus, in addition to cells in the periosteum chondrocytes represent a major source of osteoblasts contributing to endochondral bone formation in vivo.

  18. Effect of Long-Term Use of Bisphosphonates on Forearm Bone: Atypical Ulna Fractures in Elderly Woman with Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Atbasi, Zafer; Kavadar, Gülis; Demiralp, Bahtiyar

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a common musculoskeletal disease of the elderly population characterized by decreased bone mineral density and subsequent fractures. Bisphosphonates are a widely accepted drug therapy which act through inhibition of bone resorption and prevent fractures. However, in long-term use, atypical bisphosphonate induced fractures may occur, particularly involving the lower weight bearing extremity. Atypical ulna fracture associated with long-term bisphosphonate use is rarely reported in current literature. We present a 62-year-old woman with atypical ulna due to long-term alendronate therapy without a history of trauma or fall. Clinicians should be aware of stress fracture in a patient who has complaints of upper extremity pain and history of long-term bisphosphonate therapy. PMID:27595031

  19. Aromatase inhibitors associated musculoskeletal disorders and bone fractures in postmenopausal breast cancer patients: a result from Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lu; Wang, Jue; Xue, Dan-Dan; He, Wei

    2014-09-01

    As the prognosis of early breast cancer patients improves, the long-term safety of aromatase inhibitors (AIs) is increasingly important. In the present study, we retrospectively investigated the incidences of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) and bone fractures in a cohort of Chinese postmenopausal patients with breast cancer. Data of postmenopausal patients with breast cancer were collected. Among which, 70 patients received AIs therapy (median follow-up of 32.5 months), 52 patients received tamoxifen (TAM), and 89 patients received no endocrine therapy (NE). Baseline characteristics, incidence of MSDs and bone fractures were analyzed and compared. When compared with NE group (40.4 %, 36/89), more patients in AIs group developed MSDs (72.9 %, 51/70, adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 3.30, 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 1.59-6.88, P = 0.001). But no difference was found between TAM group (36.5 %, 19/52, AOR = 0.70, 95 % CI = 0.32-1.52, P = 0.372) and NE group. About 39.7 months after initial AIs therapy, nine patients in AI group developed bone fractures in different sites, and the bone fracture rate was significantly increased (12.9 %, 9/70, adjusted hazard ratio (AHR) = 20.08, 95 % CI = 1.72-234.08, P = 0.017) in comparison with NE group (1.1 %, 1/89). Moreover, the bone fracture rate of TAM group was not different from NE group (1.9 %, 1/52, AHR = 2.64, 95 % CI = 0.14-48.73, P = 0.513). AIs therapy may induce increased rates of MSDs and bone fractures in Chinese population of postmenopausal breast cancer patients, whereas TAM therapy did not help reduce the incidences of MSDs and bone fractures.

  20. Delayed Union of a Sacral Fracture: Percutaneous Navigated Autologous Cancellous Bone Grafting and Screw Fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Huegli, R. W. Messmer, P.; Jacob, A. L.; Regazzoni, P.; Styger, S.; Gross, T.

    2003-09-15

    Delayed or non-union of a sacral fracture is a serious clinical condition that may include chronic pain, sitting discomfort, gait disturbances, neurological problems, and inability to work. It is also a difficult reconstruction problem. Late correction of the deformity is technically more demanding than the primary treatment of acute pelvic injuries. Open reduction, internal fixation (ORIF), excision of scar tissue, and bone grafting often in a multi-step approach are considered to be the treatment of choice in delayed unions of the pelvic ring. This procedure implies the risk of neurological and vascular injuries, infection, repeated failure of union, incomplete correction of the deformity, and incomplete pain relief as the most important complications. We report a new approach for minimally invasive treatment of a delayed union of the sacrum without vertical displacement. A patient who suffered a Malgaigne fracture (Tile C1.3) was initially treated with closed reduction and percutaneous screw fixation (CRPF) of the posterior pelvic ring under CT navigation and plating of the anterior pelvic ring. Three months after surgery he presented with increasing hip pain caused by a delayed union of the sacral fracture. The lesion was successfully treated percutaneously in a single step procedure using CT navigation for drilling of the delayed union, autologous bone grafting, and screw fixation.

  1. Stress fractures of the base of the metatarsal bones in young trainee ballet dancers.

    PubMed

    Albisetti, Walter; Perugia, Dario; De Bartolomeo, Omar; Tagliabue, Lorenzo; Camerucci, Emanuela; Calori, Giorgio Maria

    2010-02-01

    Classical ballet is an art form requiring extraordinary physical activity, characterised by rigorous training. These can lead to many overuse injuries arising from repetitive minor trauma. The purpose of this paper is to report our experience in the diagnosis and treatment of stress fractures at the base of the second and third metatarsal bones in young ballet dancers. We considered 150 trainee ballet dancers from the Ballet Schools of "Teatro Alla Scala" of Milan from 2005 to 2007. Nineteen of them presented with stress fractures of the base of the metatarsal bones. We treated 18 dancers with external shockwave therapy (ESWT) and one with pulsed electromagnetic fields (EMF) and low-intensity ultrasound (US); all patients were recommended rest. In all cases good results were obtained. The best approach to metatarsal stress fractures is to diagnose them early through clinical examination and then through X-ray and MRI. ESWT gave good results, with a relatively short time of rest from the patients' activities and a return to dancing without pain.

  2. Stress fractures of the base of the metatarsal bones in young trainee ballet dancers

    PubMed Central

    Albisetti, Walter; De Bartolomeo, Omar; Tagliabue, Lorenzo; Camerucci, Emanuela; Calori, Giorgio Maria

    2009-01-01

    Classical ballet is an art form requiring extraordinary physical activity, characterised by rigorous training. These can lead to many overuse injuries arising from repetitive minor trauma. The purpose of this paper is to report our experience in the diagnosis and treatment of stress fractures at the base of the second and third metatarsal bones in young ballet dancers. We considered 150 trainee ballet dancers from the Ballet Schools of "Teatro Alla Scala" of Milan from 2005 to 2007. Nineteen of them presented with stress fractures of the base of the metatarsal bones. We treated 18 dancers with external shockwave therapy (ESWT) and one with pulsed electromagnetic fields (EMF) and low-intensity ultrasound (US); all patients were recommended rest. In all cases good results were obtained. The best approach to metatarsal stress fractures is to diagnose them early through clinical examination and then through X-ray and MRI. ESWT gave good results, with a relatively short time of rest from the patients’ activities and a return to dancing without pain. PMID:19415273

  3. Stress Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    Stress fractures Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Stress fractures are tiny cracks in a bone. They're caused by ... up and down or running long distances. Stress fractures can also arise from normal use of a ...

  4. Greenstick Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    Greenstick fractures Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff A greenstick fracture occurs when a bone bends and cracks, instead of breaking completely into separate pieces. The fracture looks similar to what happens when you try ...

  5. The relative contributions of non-enzymatic glycation and cortical porosity on the fracture toughness of aging bone

    PubMed Central

    Tang, S.Y.; Vashishth, D.

    2010-01-01

    The risk of fracture increases with age due to the decline of bone mass and bone quality. One of the age-related changes in bone quality occurs through the formation and accumulation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) due to non-enzymatic glycation (NEG). However as a number of other changes including increased porosity occur with age and affect bone fragility, the relative contribution of AGEs on the fracture resistance of aging bone is unknown. Using a high-resolution nonlinear finite element model that incorporate cohesive elements and micro-computed tomography-based 3d meshes, we investigated the contribution of AGEs and cortical porosity on the fracture toughness of human bone. The results show that NEG caused a 52% reduction in propagation fracture toughness (R-curve slope). The combined effects of porosity and AGEs resulted in an 88% reduction in propagation toughness. These findings are consistent with previous experimental results. The model captured the age-related changes in the R-curve toughening by incorporating bone quantity and bone quality changes, and these simulations demonstrate the ability of the cohesive models to account for the irreversible dynamic crack growth processes affected by the changes in post-yield material behavior. By decoupling the matrix-level effects due to NEG and intracortical porosity, we are able to directly determine the effects of NEG on fracture toughness. The outcome of this study suggests that it may be important to include the age-related changes in the material level properties by using finite element analysis towards the prediction of fracture risk. PMID:21056419

  6. High-resolution-cone beam tomography analysis of bone microarchitecture in patients with acromegaly and radiological vertebral fractures.

    PubMed

    Maffezzoni, Filippo; Maddalo, Michele; Frara, Stefano; Mezzone, Monica; Zorza, Ivan; Baruffaldi, Fabio; Doglietto, Francesco; Mazziotti, Gherardo; Maroldi, Roberto; Giustina, Andrea

    2016-11-01

    Vertebral fractures are an emerging complication of acromegaly but their prediction is still difficult occurring even in patients with normal bone mineral density. In this study we evaluated the ability of high-resolution cone-beam computed tomography to provide information on skeletal abnormalities associated with vertebral fractures in acromegaly. 40 patients (24 females, 16 males; median age 57 years, range 25-72) and 21 healthy volunteers (10 females, 11 males; median age 60 years, range: 25-68) were evaluated for trabecular (bone volume/trabecular volume ratio, mean trabecular separation, and mean trabecular thickness) and cortical (thickness and porosity) parameters at distal radius using a high-resolution cone-beam computed tomography system. All acromegaly patients were evaluated for morphometric vertebral fractures and for mineral bone density by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at lumbar spine, total hip, femoral neck, and distal radius. Acromegaly patients with vertebral fractures (15 cases) had significantly (p < 0.05) lower bone volume/trabecular volume ratio, greater mean trabecular separation, and higher cortical porosity vs. nonfractured patients, without statistically significant differences in mean trabecular thickness and cortical thickness. Fractured and nonfractured acromegaly patients did not have significant differences in bone density at either skeletal site. Patients with acromegaly showed lower bone volume/trabecular volume ratio (p = 0.003) and mean trabecular thickness (p < 0.001) and greater mean trabecular separation (p = 0.02) as compared to control subjects, without significant differences in cortical thickness and porosity. This study shows for the first time that abnormalities of bone microstructure are associated with radiological vertebral fractures in acromegaly. High-resolution cone-beam computed tomography at the distal radius may be useful to evaluate and predict the effects of acromegaly on bone

  7. The relative contributions of non-enzymatic glycation and cortical porosity on the fracture toughness of aging bone.

    PubMed

    Tang, S Y; Vashishth, D

    2011-01-11

    The risk of fracture increases with age due to the decline of bone mass and bone quality. One of the age-related changes in bone quality occurs through the formation and accumulation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) due to non-enzymatic glycation (NEG). However as a number of other changes including increased porosity occur with age and affect bone fragility, the relative contribution of AGEs on the fracture resistance of aging bone is unknown. Using a high-resolution nonlinear finite element model that incorporate cohesive elements and micro-computed tomography-based 3d meshes, we investigated the contribution of AGEs and cortical porosity on the fracture toughness of human bone. The results show that NEG caused a 52% reduction in propagation fracture toughness (R-curve slope). The combined effects of porosity and AGEs resulted in an 88% reduction in propagation toughness. These findings are consistent with previous experimental results. The model captured the age-related changes in the R-curve toughening by incorporating bone quantity and bone quality changes, and these simulations demonstrate the ability of the cohesive models to account for the irreversible dynamic crack growth processes affected by the changes in post-yield material behavior. By decoupling the matrix-level effects due to NEG and intracortical porosity, we are able to directly determine the effects of NEG on fracture toughness. The outcome of this study suggests that it may be important to include the age-related changes in the material level properties by using finite element analysis towards the prediction of fracture risk.

  8. Fracture toughness and fatigue crack propagation rate of short fiber reinforced epoxy composites for analogue cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Chong, Alexander C M; Miller, Forrest; Buxton, McKee; Friis, Elizabeth A

    2007-08-01

    Third-generation mechanical analogue bone models and synthetic analogue cortical bone materials manufactured by Pacific Research Laboratories, Inc. (PRL) are popular tools for use in mechanical testing of various orthopedic implants and biomaterials. A major issue with these models is that the current third-generation epoxy-short fiberglass based composite used as the cortical bone substitute is prone to crack formation and failure in fatigue or repeated quasistatic loading of the model. The purpose of the present study was to compare the tensile and fracture mechanics properties of the current baseline (established PRL "third-generation" E-glass-fiber-epoxy) composite analogue for cortical bone to a new composite material formulation proposed for use as an enhanced fourth-generation cortical bone analogue material. Standard tensile, plane strain fracture toughness, and fatigue crack propagation rate tests were performed on both the third- and fourth-generation composite material formulations using standard ASTM test techniques. Injection molding techniques were used to create random fiber orientation in all test specimens. Standard dog-bone style tensile specimens were tested to obtain ultimate tensile strength and stiffness. Compact tension fracture toughness specimens were utilized to determine plane strain fracture toughness values. Reduced thickness compact tension specimens were also used to determine fatigue crack propagation rate behavior for the two material groups. Literature values for the same parameters for human cortical bone were compared to results from the third- and fourth-generation cortical analogue bone materials. Tensile properties of the fourth-generation material were closer to that of average human cortical bone than the third-generation material. Fracture toughness was significantly increased by 48% in the fourth-generation composite as compared to the third-generation analogue bone. The threshold stress intensity to propagate the crack

  9. Remote optical configuration of pigmented lesion detection and diagnosis of bone fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozana, Nisan; Bishitz, Yael; Beiderman, Yevgeny; Garcia, Javier; Zalevsky, Zeev; Schwarz, Ariel

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we present a novel approach of realizing a safe, simple, and inexpensive sensor applicable to bone fractures and pigmented lesions detection. The approach is based on temporal tracking of back-reflected secondary speckle pattern generated while illuminating the affected area with a laser and applying periodic pressure to the surface via a controlled vibration. The use of such a concept was already demonstrated for non-contact monitoring of various bio-medical parameters such as heart rate, blood pulse pressure, concentration of alcohol and glucose in the blood stream and intraocular pressure. The presented technique is a safe and effective method of detecting bone fractures in populations at risk. When applied to pigmented lesions, the technique is superior to visual examination in avoiding many false positives and resultant unnecessary biopsies. Applying a series of different vibration frequencies at the examined tissue and analyzing the 2-D speckle pattern trajectory in response to the applied periodic pressure creates a unique signature for each and different pigmented lesion. Analyzing these signatures is the first step toward detection of malignant melanoma. In this paper we present preliminary experiments that show the validity of the developed sensor for both applications: the detection of damaged bones as well as the classification of pigmented lesions.

  10. The metaphyseal bone defect predicts outcome in reverse shoulder arthroplasty for proximal humerus fracture sequelae.

    PubMed

    Greiner, Stefan; Uschok, Stephan; Herrmann, Sebastian; Gwinner, Clemens; Perka, Carsten; Scheibel, Markus

    2014-06-01

    Reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) represents an established procedure for treatment of fracture sequelae (FS) after proximal humerus fractures. The present work evaluates which factors are of influence for the clinical outcome. Fifty cases (mean age 69, range 44-89) have been evaluated postoperatively clinically [Constant Score (CS)] and radiographically (mean FU 34; range 24-93 months). The type of primary treatment, the amount of a metaphyseal bone defect, the preoperative status of the rotator cuff, the number of previous operative interventions and the type of FS according to Boileau were analysed whether they are of influence for clinical outcome. The mean CS increased significantly from 16.9 ± 6.7 preoperatively to 54.1 ± 15.7 points postoperatively. The CS of primary conservative treatment was significantly higher in comparison to primary operative treatment. Patients with a metaphyseal bone defect of more than 3 cm had significantly lower CS results. Degenerative changes of the teres minor muscle also had a significant negative influence on clinical results. Score results decreased with increasing number of previous operations. There were no significant difference in between patients classified as Boileau type I and II (category 1) compared to types III and IV (category 2). RSA significantly improved the clinical result. A metaphyseal bone defect and preoperative degeneration of the teres minor showed to be negative prognostic factors. Primary operative treatment and the number of previous operations also negatively influenced the clinical result.

  11. Location of Vertebral Fractures is Associated with Bone Mineral Density and History of Traumatic Injury.

    PubMed

    Watt, Jennifer; Crilly, Richard

    2017-04-01

    The upper and lower thoracolumbar spine have been associated with different biomechanical outcomes. This concept, as it applies to osteoporotic fracture risk, has not been well documented. This was a case-control study of 120 patients seen in an osteoporosis clinic. Vertebral fractures were identified from lateral radiographs using Genant's semi-quantitative assessment method. An association between bone mineral density (BMD) T-scores and vertebral fracture location was assessed. In an additional analysis, the association between a history of any traumatic injury and possible predictor variables was also explored. The median age of patients was 75 (IQR 67-80), and 84.2% of patients were female. A history of trauma was reported by 46.7% of patients. A vertebral fracture in the lower thoracolumbar spine (T11-L4) was associated with significantly higher femoral neck (p < 0.001), lumbar (p = 0.005), trochanteric (p = 0.002), intertrochanteric (p < 0.001), and total hip (p = 0.0006) BMD T-scores. The odds of having a femoral neck (OR 0.24, 95% CI 0.07-0.75, p = 0.01) or total hip (OR 0.19, 95% CI 0.06-0.65, p = 0.008) T-score less than -2.5 was also lower among patients with vertebral fractures in the lower thoracolumbar spine. A fracture in the upper thoracolumbar spine (T4-T10) decreased the odds of having a history of traumatic injury (OR 0.32, 95% CI 0.14-0.76, p = 0.01), while a non-vertebral fracture increased the odds of such an injury (OR 2.41, 95% CI 1.10-5.32, p = 0.03). Vertebral fractures in the lower thoracolumbar spine are associated with higher BMD T-scores. This should be studied further to understand possible correlations with patients' future fracture risk.

  12. Metabolic syndrome and the risk of bone fractures: A Meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Libo; Lv, Xiaohong; Wei, Dailin; Yue, Feng; Guo, Jinying; Zhang, Tie

    2016-03-01

    Increasing evidence has suggested an association between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and bone fractures. However, because of controversial results it is still not clear whether this effect is protective or detrimental. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis of prospective studies to assess the association between them. Pertinent studies were identified by searching PubMed and EMBASE databases until the end of July 2015. Summary relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations between MetS and fracture risk were estimated with random effects models. Our meta-analysis included five prospective studies. The summarized RRs of any type of fractures for MetS were 0.76 (95%CI: 0.59-0.97, P = 0.026) with moderate heterogeneity (I(2) = 63.80%, P = 0.064). Notably, subgroup analyses by gender showed that significant inverse associations were observed only in men (summarized RR = 0.66; 95%CI = 0.51-0.86, P = 0.002; I(2) = 27.90%, P = 0.235; n = 5) but not in women (summarized RR = 0.96, 95%CI: 0.60-1.54, P = 0.866; I(2) = 83.40%, P = 0.002; n = 3). However, the difference of the pooled RRs from the two subgroups did not reach statistical significance with a test of interaction (p = 0.179 for the interaction test). When pooling the RRs of non-vertebral fractures, significant inverse associations were similarly observed in men (RR = 0.72, 95%CI: 0.52-0.99, P = 0.048) but not in women (RR = 0.99, 95%CI: 0.60-1.64, P = 0.969). There was no evidence of publication bias. Our findings demonstrated that MetS was significantly associated with a lower fracture risk. There might be gender differences in the relationship of MetS with fractures, but further confirmation is needed.

  13. Value of Measuring Bone Microarchitecture in Fracture Discrimination in Older Women with Recent Hip Fracture: A Case-control Study with HR-pQCT

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Tracy Y.; Hung, Vivian W. Y.; Cheung, Wing-Hoi; Cheng, Jack C. Y.; Qin, Ling; Leung, Kwok-Sui

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to determine whether loss of volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) and deterioration of microarchitecture imaged by high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography at the distal radius/tibia provided additional information in fracture discrimination in postmenopausal women with recent hip fracture. This case-control study involved 24 postmenopausal Chinese women with unilateral femoral neck fracture (average [SD] age: 79.6[5.6]) and 24 age-matched women without any history of fracture. Each SD decrease in T-score at femoral neck (FN) was associated with a higher fracture risk (odds ratio: 6.905, p = 0.001). At the distal radius, fracture women had significantly lower total vBMD (−17.5%), fewer (−20.3%) and more unevenly spaced (81.4%) trabeculae, and thinner cortices (−14.0%) (all p < 0.05). At the distal tibia, vBMD was on average −4.7% (cortical) to −25.4% (total) lower, trabecular microarchitecture was on average −19.8% (number) to 102% (inhomogeneity) inferior, cortices were thinner (−21.1%) and more porous (18.2%) (all p < 0.05). Adding parameters of vBMD and microarchitecture in multivariate models did not offer additional discriminative capacity of fracture status compared with using T-score at FN. In old postmenopausal women with already excessive loss of bone mass, measuring bone microarchitecture may provide limited added value to improve identification of risk of femoral neck fracture. PMID:27670149

  14. Experimental study of high-energy fractures delayed operation in promote bone healing

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Zhi-Jun; Li, Zhong; Li, Jing

    2015-01-01

    To investigate role of delayed operation to stimulate growth of strong external callus in high-energy fractures, and explore a new way for bone healing. Twenty adult dogs were employed, and randomly divided into four groups, including group A-D. The dogs underwent osteotomy by wire saw in middle of femur, electric coagulation damaged surrounding periosteum, forming a 1 cm defect. Group A were internal fixed 14 days after osteotomy (higher-energy fractures delayed operation), Group B and C were internal fixed immediately (no delayed operation), Group D were internal fixed 14 days after osteotomy (delayed operation, but resected granulations around extremities). The results showed that groups of early fixed have no external callus growth and almost no growth in internal callus, these conditions leads to atrophy nonunion. On contrary, the porosis was strong and callus union was steady in group A and D, which have a delayed operation. In conclusion, early surgical fixation of high-energy fracture restrains external callus growth, easily lead to poor callus healing phenomenon of low-quality. Delayed surgical fixation can begin to repair soft tissues injury, stimulate external callus growth and improve fracture healing, so a small incision open reduction produce more robust growth effect than closed reduction. PMID:26379852

  15. Treatment of Distal Radius Fracture Nonunion With Posterior Interosseous Bone Flap

    PubMed Central

    Saremi, Hossein; Shahryar-Kamrani, Reza; Ghane, Bahareh; Yavarikia, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background Nonunion of distal radius fractures is disabling. Treatment is difficult and the results are not predictable. However, posterior interosseous bone flap (PIBF) has been successful in treating forearm nonunion. Objectives To treat distal radius fracture nonunion with PIBF as a new procedure. Patients and Methods This prospective non-randomized cohort study was performed at two hospitals in Tehran between January 2011 and September 2015. PIBFs were applied in nine patients (10 nonunions) with a mean age of 55 years. Union success rate, grip strength, wrist range of motion, and forearm rotation were then evaluated. Results Although four of the patients had a history of infection, all participants achieved fracture union at a mean time of 3.8 months. Grip strength improved by 12.4 kg. There was also 36° improvement in wrist flexion, 20° improvement in wrist extension, 60° improvement in forearm supination, and 46° improvement in forearm pronation. The range of motion and grip strength improvements were significant. Conclusions Pedicled PIBF is a new option for treating distal radius fracture nonunion. The results are predictable in achieving union and good function, and this technique can be successfully used in cases with extensive soft-tissue damage or infection. PMID:27703802

  16. An investigation of animal and human bones for predicting probable location of fractures.

    PubMed

    Manarvi, Irfan

    2016-08-01

    Predicting location of fracture in animal and human bones has been a keen area of research for the past few decades. It has been established that it is various types of stress that results into bone failure. Past studies were mostly based on experimental testing of variety of bones with limited accuracy equipment leading to experimental errors. An effort has been made in present research to use latest experimental testing equipment in parallel with some modern techniques and tools such as 3D scanners for creating computer models and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) to conduct structural analysis that could allow unlimited changes in boundary conditions expected to be faced by a bone. Human tibia was selected for this study. Its properties of hardness and deformation due to applied stress were investigated experimentally through destructive testing. We observed loads at which it started to crack along with its location. It was followed by FEA of its 3D scanned model. Boundary conditions were set close to experimental testing. Experimental results were compared to FEA to establish how accurately simulations could be used the load values leading to cracks as well as their location. Literature on simultaneous use of FEA and experimental testing for the same bone is limited. Here the objective was to formulate a process of analyzing human bones through FEA rather than experimental testing in future studies. The research also demonstrates that experimental tests have the limitations of specimen availability and also its number to conduct large number of tests for repeatability as well as varying test conditions. Whereas once a 3D scan of a bone is obtained, the same could be used for FEA by changing boundary conditions in computer software to simulate variety of testing conditions. FEA has proven itself as a reliable tool for such applications in aerospace, automotive, ship and marine and building structures. Its application in biomechanical has limited contributions.

  17. Osteoporosis and Prevalent Fractures among Adult Filipino Men Screened for Bone Mineral Density in a Tertiary Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Amy A.; Valdez, Valerie Ann U.; Mercado-Asis, Leilani B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Osteoporosis in men is markedly underdiagnosed and undertreated despite higher morbidity and mortality associated with fractures. This study aimed to characterize adult Filipino men with osteopenia, osteoporosis and prevalent fractures. Methods A cross-sectional study of 184 Filipino men ≥50 years screened for bone mineral density was performed. Age, weight, body mass index (BMI), Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool for Asians (OSTA) score, smoking status, family history of fracture, diabetes mellitus, physical inactivity, and T-score were considered. Results Of the 184 patients, 40.2% and 29.9% have osteopenia and osteoporosis. Sixteen (21.6%) and 18 (32.1%) osteopenic and osteoporotic men have fragility hip, spine, or forearm fractures. Men aged 50 to 69 years have the same risk of osteoporosis and fractures as those ≥70 years. While hip fractures are higher in osteoporotic men, vertebral fractures are increased in both osteopenic and osteoporotic men. Mere osteopenia predicts the presence of prevalent fractures. A high risk OSTA score can predict fracture. A BMI <21 kg/m2 (P<0.05) and current smoking are associated with osteoporosis. Conclusion A significant fraction of Filipino men with osteopenia and osteoporosis have prevalent fractures. Our data suggest that fractures occur in men <70 years even before osteoporosis sets in. Low BMI, high OSTA score, and smoking are significant risk factors of osteoporosis. PMID:27546872

  18. Surface Reconstruction from Parallel Curves with Application to Parietal Bone Fracture Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Majeed, Abdul; Mt Piah, Abd Rahni; Ridzuan Yahya, Zainor

    2016-01-01

    Maxillofacial trauma are common, secondary to road traffic accident, sports injury, falls and require sophisticated radiological imaging to precisely diagnose. A direct surgical reconstruction is complex and require clinical expertise. Bio-modelling helps in reconstructing surface model from 2D contours. In this manuscript we have constructed the 3D surface using 2D Computerized Tomography (CT) scan contours. The fracture part of the cranial vault are reconstructed using GC1 rational cubic Ball curve with three free parameters, later the 2D contours are flipped into 3D with equidistant z component. The constructed surface is represented by contours blending interpolant. At the end of this manuscript a case report of parietal bone fracture is also illustrated by employing this method with a Graphical User Interface (GUI) illustration. PMID:26967643

  19. Surface Reconstruction from Parallel Curves with Application to Parietal Bone Fracture Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Abdul; Mt Piah, Abd Rahni; Ridzuan Yahya, Zainor

    2016-01-01

    Maxillofacial trauma are common, secondary to road traffic accident, sports injury, falls and require sophisticated radiological imaging to precisely diagnose. A direct surgical reconstruction is complex and require clinical expertise. Bio-modelling helps in reconstructing surface model from 2D contours. In this manuscript we have constructed the 3D surface using 2D Computerized Tomography (CT) scan contours. The fracture part of the cranial vault are reconstructed using GC1 rational cubic Ball curve with three free parameters, later the 2D contours are flipped into 3D with equidistant z component. The constructed surface is represented by contours blending interpolant. At the end of this manuscript a case report of parietal bone fracture is also illustrated by employing this method with a Graphical User Interface (GUI) illustration.

  20. Closed head experimental traumatic brain injury increases size and bone volume of callus in mice with concomitant tibial fracture

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Rhys D; Grills, Brian L; Church, Jarrod E; Walsh, Nicole C; McDonald, Aaron C; Agoston, Denes V; Sun, Mujun; O’Brien, Terence J; Shultz, Sandy R; McDonald, Stuart J

    2016-01-01

    Concomitant traumatic brain injury (TBI) and long bone fracture are commonly observed in multitrauma and polytrauma. Despite clinical observations of enhanced bone healing in patients with TBI, the relationship between TBI and fracture healing remains poorly understood, with clinical data limited by the presence of several confounding variables. Here we developed a novel trauma model featuring closed-skull weight-drop TBI and concomitant tibial fracture in order to investigate the effect of TBI on fracture healing. Male mice were assigned into Fracture + Sham TBI (FX) or Fracture + TBI (MULTI) groups and sacrificed at 21 and 35 days post-injury for analysis of healing fractures by micro computed tomography (μCT) and histomorphometry. μCT analysis revealed calluses from MULTI mice had a greater bone and total tissue volume, and displayed higher mean polar moment of inertia when compared to calluses from FX mice at 21 days post-injury. Histomorphometric results demonstrated an increased amount of trabecular bone in MULTI calluses at 21 days post-injury. These findings indicate that closed head TBI results in calluses that are larger in size and have an increased bone volume, which is consistent with the notion that TBI induces the formation of a more robust callus. PMID:27682431

  1. Combined Microwave Ablation and Cementoplasty in Patients with Painful Bone Metastases at High Risk of Fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Pusceddu, Claudio; Sotgia, Barbara Fele, Rosa Maria; Ballicu, Nicola; Melis, Luca

    2016-01-15

    PurposeTo retrospectively evaluate the effectiveness of computed tomography-guided percutaneous microwave ablation (MWA) and cementoplasty in patients with painful bone metastases at high risk of fracture.Materials and MethodsThirty-five patients with 37 metastatic bone lesions underwent computed tomography-guided MWA combined with cementoplasty (polymethylmethacrylate injection). Vertebrae, femur, and acetabulum were the intervention sites and the primary end point was pain relief. Pain severity was estimated by visual analog scale (VAS) before treatment; 1 week post-treatment; and 1, 6, and 12 months post-treatment. Functional outcome was assessed by improved patient walking ability. Radiological evaluation was performed at baseline and 3 and 12 months post-procedure.ResultsIn all patients, pain reduction occurred from the first week after treatment. The mean reduction in the VAS score was 84, 90, 90 % at week 1, month 1, and month 6, respectively. Improved walking ability occurred in 100 and 98 % of cases at the 1- and 6-month functional outcome evaluations, respectively. At the 1-year evaluation, 25 patients were alive, and 10 patients (28 %) had died because of widespread disease. The mean reduction in the VAS score and improvement in surviving patients’ walking ability were 90 and 100 %, respectively. No patients showed evidence of local tumor recurrence or progression and pathological fracture in the treated sites.ConclusionOur results suggest that MWA combined with osteoplasty is safe and effective when treating painful bone metastases at high risk of fracture. The number of surviving patients at the 1-year evaluation confirms the need for an effective and long-lasting treatment.

  2. Trabecular volumetric bone mineral density is associated with previous fracture during childhood and adolescence in males: the GOOD study.

    PubMed

    Darelid, Anna; Ohlsson, Claes; Rudäng, Robert; Kindblom, Jenny M; Mellström, Dan; Lorentzon, Mattias

    2010-03-01

    Areal bone mineral density (aBMD) measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) has been associated with fracture risk in children and adolescents, but it remains unclear whether this association is due to volumetric BMD (vBMD) of the cortical and/or trabecular bone compartments or bone size. The aim of this study was to determine whether vBMD or bone size was associated with X-ray-verified fractures in men during growth. In total, 1068 men (aged 18.9 +/- 0.6 years) were included in the population-based Gothenburg Osteoporosis and Obesity Determinants (GOOD) Study. Areal BMD was measured by DXA, whereas cortical and trabecular vBMD and bone size were measured by peripheral quantitative computerized tomography (pQCT). X-ray records were searched for fractures. Self-reported fractures in 77 men could not be confirmed in these records. These men were excluded, resulting in 991 included men, of which 304 men had an X-ray-verified fracture and 687 were nonfracture subjects. Growth charts were used to establish the age of peak height velocity (PHV, n = 600). Men with prevalent fractures had lower aBMD (lumbar spine 2.3%, p = .005; total femur 2.6%, p = .004, radius 2.1%, p < .001) at all measured sites than men without fracture. Using pQCT measurements, we found that men with a prevalent fracture had markedly lower trabecular vBMD (radius 6.6%, p = 7.5 x 10(-8); tibia 4.5%, p = 1.7 x 10(-7)) as well as a slightly lower cortical vBMD (radius 0.4%, p = .0012; tibia 0.3%, p = .015) but not reduced cortical cross-sectional area than men without fracture. Every SD decrease in trabecular vBMD of the radius and tibia was associated with 1.46 [radius 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.26-1.69; tibia 95% CI 1.26-1.68] times increased fracture prevalence. The peak fracture incidence coincided with the timing of PHV (+/-1 year). In conclusion, trabecular vBMD but not aBMD was independently associated with prevalent X-ray-verified fractures in young men. Further studies are

  3. Biomechanical comparison of straight and helical compression plates for fixation of transverse and oblique bone fractures: Modeling and experiments.

    PubMed

    Sezek, Sinan; Aksakal, Bunyamin; Gürger, Murat; Malkoc, Melih; Say, Y

    2016-08-12

    Total deformation and stability of straight and helical compression plates were studied by means of the finite element method (FEM) and in vitro biomechanical experiments. Fixations of transverse (TF) and oblique (45°) bone (OF) fractures have been analyzed on sheep tibias by designing the straight compression (SP) and Helical Compression Plate (HP) models. The effects of axial compression, bending and torsion loads on both plating systems were analyzed in terms of total displacements. Numerical models and experimental models suggested that under compression loadings, bone fracture gap closures for both fracture types were found to be in the favor of helical plate designs. The helical plate (HP) fixations provided maximum torsional resistance compared to the (SP) fixations. The fracture gap closure and stability of helical plate fixation for transverse fractures was determined to be higher than that found for the oblique fractures. The comparison of average compression stress, bending and torsion moments showed that the FEM and experimental results are in good agreement and such designs are likely to have a positive impact in future bone fracture fixation designs.

  4. Association of Increased Urinary Albumin With Risk of Incident Clinical Fracture and Rate of Hip Bone Loss: the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study.

    PubMed

    Fink, Howard A; Vo, Tien N; Langsetmo, Lisa; Barzilay, Joshua I; Cauley, Jane A; Schousboe, John T; Orwoll, Eric S; Canales, Muna T; Ishani, Areef; Lane, Nancy E; Ensrud, Kristine E

    2016-12-24

    Prior studies suggest that increased urine albumin is associated with a heightened fracture risk in women, but results in men are unclear. We used data from Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS), a prospective cohort study of community-dwelling men aged ≥65 years, to evaluate the association of increased urine albumin with subsequent fractures and annualized rate of hip bone loss. We calculated albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR) from urine collected at the 2003-2005 visit. Subsequent clinical fractures were ascertained from triannual questionnaires and centrally adjudicated by review of radiographic reports. Total hip BMD was measured by DXA at the 2003-2005 visit and again an average of 3.5 years later. We estimated risk of incident clinical fracture using Cox proportional hazards models, and annualized BMD change using ANCOVA. Of 2982 men with calculable ACR, 9.4% had ACR ≥30 mg/g (albuminuria) and 1.0% had ACR ≥300 mg/g (macroalbuminuria). During a mean of 8.7 years of follow-up, 20.0% of men had an incident clinical fracture. In multivariate-adjusted models, neither higher ACR quintile (p for trend 0.75) nor albuminuria (HR versus no albuminuria, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.65 to 1.20) was associated with increased risk of incident clinical fracture. Increased urine albumin had a borderline significant, multivariate-adjusted, positive association with rate of total hip bone loss when modeled in ACR quintiles (p = 0.06), but not when modeled as albuminuria versus no albuminuria. Macroalbuminuria was associated with a higher rate of annualized hip bone loss compared to no albuminuria (-1.8% more annualized loss than in men with ACR <30 mg/g; p < 0.001), but the limited prevalence of macroalbuminuria precluded reliable estimates of its fracture associations. In these community-dwelling older men, we found no association between urine albumin levels and risk of incident clinical fracture, but found a borderline significant, positive association with rate of hip

  5. The regeneration and augmentation of bone with injectable osteogenic cell sheet in a rat critical fracture healing model.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takamasa; Akahane, Manabu; Morita, Yusuke; Omokawa, Shohei; Nakano, Kenichi; Kira, Tsutomu; Onishi, Tadanobu; Inagaki, Yusuke; Okuda, Akinori; Kawate, Kenji; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2015-08-01

    Limitations in the current treatment strategies make cases with compromised bone healing challenging clinical problems. Osteogenic cell sheets (OCSs), fabricated from rat bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), contain enriched osteoblasts and extracellular matrix. Here, we evaluated whether the minimally invasive percutaneous injection of OCSs without a scaffold could be used as a treatment to increase bone regeneration in a critical fracture healing model. Critical fracture healing model was created in the femora of 60 male Fischer 344 inbred rats using marrow ablation and periosteal removal. The rats were then randomly divided into two groups. Six hours after fracture, one group received an injection of OCSs (OCS group), while the second group was injected with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) (control group). Fracture healing was evaluated using radiological, histological, micro-computed tomography (CT) and biomechanical analyses. The radiological and histological evaluations demonstrated enhanced bone regeneration in the OCS group compared with that in the control group. By 12 weeks, the hard callus had been remodelled via recorticalization in the OCS group. By contrast, no fracture union was found in the rats in the control group. Biomechanical testing revealed a significantly higher maximum bending load in the OCS group compared with that in the control group. The results of the present study demonstrate that the injection of entire OCSs can enhance bone regeneration and lead to bony union in a critical fracture healing model. Therefore, this procedure offers a minimally invasive technique to promote hard tissue reconstruction and, in particular, bone repair strategies for cases with compromised bone healing.

  6. Prevalent role of porosity and osteonal area over mineralization heterogeneity in the fracture toughness of human cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Granke, Mathilde; Makowski, Alexander J; Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Nyman, Jeffry S

    2016-09-06

    Changes in the distribution of bone mineralization occurring with aging, disease, or treatment have prompted concerns that alterations in mineralization heterogeneity may affect the fracture resistance of bone. Yet, so far, studies assessing bone from hip fracture cases and fracture-free women have not reached a consensus on how heterogeneity in tissue mineralization relates to skeletal fragility. Owing to the multifactorial nature of toughening mechanisms occurring in bone, we assessed the relative contribution of heterogeneity in mineralization to fracture resistance with respect to age, porosity, and area fraction of osteonal tissue. The latter parameters were extracted from quantitative backscattered electron imaging of human cortical bone sections following R-curve tests of single-edge notched beam specimens to determine fracture toughness properties. Microstructural heterogeneity was determined as the width of the mineral distribution (bulk) and as the sill of the variogram (local). In univariate analyses of measures from 62 human donors (21 to 101 years), local but not bulk heterogeneity as well as pore clustering negatively correlated with fracture toughness properties. With age as covariate, heterogeneity was a significant predictor of crack initiation, though local had a stronger negative contribution than bulk. When considering all potential covariates, age, cortical porosity and area fraction of osteons explained up to 50% of the variance in bone׳s crack initiation toughness. However, including heterogeneity in mineralization did not improve upon this prediction. The findings of the present work stress the necessity to account for porosity and microstructure when evaluating the potential of matrix-related features to affect skeletal fragility.

  7. Bone changes due to glucocorticoid application in an ovariectomized animal model for fracture treatment in osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Lill, C A; Gerlach, U V; Eckhardt, C; Goldhahn, J; Schneider, E

    2002-05-01

    induction are comparable to the human situation. The sheep model presented seems to meet the criteria for an osteoporosis model for fracture treatment with respect to mechanical and morphometric bone properties.

  8. Ankle fracture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Malleolar fracture; Tri-malleolar; Bi-malleolar; Distal tibia fracture; Distal fibula fracture; Malleolus fracture ... Some ankle fractures may require surgery when: The ends of the bone are out of line with each other (displaced). The ...

  9. Management of maxillary alveolar bone fracture and severely intruded maxillary central incisor: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Yonezawa, Hisanobu; Yanamoto, Souichi; Hoshino, Tomonori; Yamada, Shin-Ichi; Fujiwara, Taku; Umeda, Masahiro

    2013-10-01

    An 11-year-old male who injured his maxilla and right maxillary central incisor and lip during a fall was presented to our hospital. His lower lip and upper gingiva were lacerated with swelling and epistaxis, and he had a maxillary alveolar bone fracture and severe intrusion of the right maxillary central incisor, which had penetrated the floor of the nasal cavity with avulsion. Under local anesthesia, we repositioned the incisor and bone segment and fixed them with a titanium micromesh plate and self-tapping screws and splints. The incisor was also treated by root canal 3 days after the operation and was restored with a crown. We performed root canal filling 1 month later. Five months later, the plate and screws were removed. In prognosis of our case, no symptoms of inflammatory root resorption or ankylosis have observed for more than 1 year and 6 months of follow up based on both clinical and radiographic findings.

  10. Characterization methods of bone-implant-interfaces of bioresorbable and titanium implants by fracture mechanical means.

    PubMed

    Tschegg, E K; Lindtner, R A; Doblhoff-Dier, V; Stanzl-Tschegg, S E; Holzlechner, G; Castellani, C; Imwinkelried, T; Weinberg, A

    2011-07-01

    Bioresorbable materials for implants have become increasingly researched over the last years. The bone-implant-interfaces of three different implant materials, namely a new bioresorbable magnesium alloy, a new self-reinforced polymer implant and a conventional titanium alloy, were tested using various methods: push-out tests, SEM and EDX analyses as well as surface analyses based on stereoscopic 3D pictures were conducted. The fracture energy is proposed as a very significant reference value for characterizing the mechanical performance of a bone-implant system. By using a video-extensometer system instead of, as is commonly done, tracking the movement of the crosshead in the push-out tests, the accuracy of measurement could be increased.

  11. Healing of fracturing-bone disease occurring in patients on dialysis. A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Milne, F J; Hudson, G A; Meyers, A M; Baily, P; Barmeir, E; Dubowitz, B; Reis, P

    1982-06-19

    Ten patients developed fracturing-bone disease (osteomalacia) while on dialysis against water with high levels of aluminium. Eight patients remained on dialysis, using de-ionized or reverse-osmosis water, and 2 received a renal transplant. Clinical improvement as regards bone pain and proximal muscle weakness occurred in 6 months and radiographic evidence of healing of the pseudofractures was seen at approximately 12 months. Associated osteopenia and hyperparathyroidism were found in most patients, but no significant change in either was noted during the study period. The serum parathyroid hormone levels rose significantly in the patients who remained on dialysis. The chest and pelvic deformities typical of healed osteomalacia were seen. This dramatic improvement can only be attributed to the removal of some water-borne element, either by changing the water used in the dialysis or by successful renal transplantation. Aluminium-containing phosphate binders were used throughout the study in the patients on dialysis, and hypophosphataemia was never a feature.

  12. The effects of exercise on bone. Basic concepts and implications for the prevention of fractures

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Cosimo Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Osteogenic dynamic loads delivered to the skeleton during exercise prevent aging-associated bone fragility. Moreover, because of its pleiotropic favourable effects on health, exercise improves quality of life, and specific types of exercise increase muscle strength, a known predictor of bone strength, and coordination and balance, and so reduce the risk of fallrelated fractures. Exercise should definitely be the mainstay of the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis; often however, physicians don’t have enough know-how for evidencebased prescription of exercise. Moreover, the lack of facilities for safe implementation of the exercise programs compound the problem. Scientific societies and health authorities should invest in patient and physicians education about exercise and in promoting facilities (Gyms) devoted to training of persons with, or at risk of, metabolic diseases (osteoporosis, obesity, diabetes), like Metagym in Florence, Italy. PMID:22461250

  13. Evidence for Altered Canonical Wnt Signaling in the Trabecular Bone of Elderly Postmenopausal Women with Fragility Femoral Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Bolamperti, Simona; Villa, Isabella; Spinello, Alice; Manfredini, Greta; Mezzadri, Umberto; Ometti, Marco; Fraschini, Gianfranco; Guidobono, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Wnt signaling, a major regulator of bone formation and homeostasis, might be involved in the bone loss of osteoporotic patients and the consequent impaired response to fracture. Therefore we analyzed Wnt-related, osteogenic, and adipogenic genes in bone tissue of elderly postmenopausal women undergoing hip replacement for either femoral fracture or osteoarthritis. Bone specimens derived from the intertrochanteric region of the femurs of 25 women with fracture (F) and 29 with osteoarthritis without fracture (OA) were analyzed. Specific miRNAs were analyzed in bone and in matched blood samples. RUNX2, BGP, and OPG showed lower expression in F than in OA samples, while OSX, OPN, BSP, and RANKL were not different. Inhibitory genes of Wnt pathway were lower in F versus OA. β-Catenin protein levels were higher in F versus OA, whereas its cotranscriptional regulator (Lef1) was lower in F group. miR-204, which targets RUNX2, and miR-130a, which inhibits PPARγ, were lower and higher, respectively, in F versus OA serum samples. The present study showed an inefficient Wnt signal transduction in F group despite higher β-catenin protein levels, consistent with the expected overall postfracture systemic activation towards osteogenesis. This transcriptional inefficiency could contribute to the osteoporotic bone fragility. PMID:27999816

  14. Resuscitative Long-Bone Sonography for the Clinician: Usefulness and Pitfalls of Focused Clinical Ultrasound to Detect Long-Bone Fractures During Trauma Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Al-Kadi, Azzam S; Gillman, Lawrence M; Ball, Chad G; Panebianco, Nova L; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W

    2009-08-01

    Bone has one of the highest acoustic densities (AD) in the human body. Traditionally, bone has been considered to be a hindrance to the use of ultrasound (US), as US waves are reflected by the dense matrix and obscure underlying structures. The intense wave reflection, however, can clearly illustrate the cortical bony anatomy of long bones, making cortical disruption obvious. Ultrasound can be used at the bedside concurrently with the overall trauma resuscitation, and may potentially limit the patient's and treating team's exposure to ionizing radiation, corroborate clinical findings, and augment procedural success. The extended focused assessment with sonography for trauma (EFAST) is an essential tool in the resuscitation of severe torso trauma, frequently demonstrating intra- pericardial and intra-peritoneal fluid, inferring hemo/pneumothoraces, and demonstrating cardiac function. Although it is typically considered as a diagnosis of exclusion, multiple long-bone fractures may be a source of shock and can be quickly confirmed at the bedside with EFAST. Further, the early detection of long-bone fractures can also aid in the early stabilization of severely injured patients. Sonographic evaluation for long-bone fractures may be particularly useful in austere environments where other imaging modalities are limited, such as in the battlefield, developing world, and space. While prospective study has been limited, selected series have demonstrated high accuracy among both physician and para-medical clinicians in detecting long-bone fractures. Pitfalls in this technique include reduced accuracy with the small bones of the hands and feet, as well as great reliance on user experience.

  15. LRP4 association to bone properties and fracture and interaction with genes in the Wnt- and BMP signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jitender; Swanberg, Maria; McGuigan, Fiona; Callreus, Mattias; Gerdhem, Paul; Akesson, Kristina

    2011-09-01

    Osteoporosis is a common complex disorder in postmenopausal women leading to changes in the micro-architecture of bone and increased risk of fracture. Members of the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) gene family regulates the development and physiology of bone through the Wnt/β-catenin (Wnt) pathway that in turn cross-talks with the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway. In two cohorts of Swedish women: OPRA (n=1002; age 75 years) and PEAK-25 (n=1005; age 25 years), eleven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from Wnt pathway genes (LRP4; LRP5; G protein-coupled receptor 177, GPR177) were analyzed for association with Bone Mineral Density (BMD), rate of bone loss, hip geometry, quantitative ultrasound and fracture. Additionally, interaction of LRP4 with LRP5, GPR177 and BMP2 were analyzed. LRP4 (rs6485702) was associated with higher total body (TB) and lumbar spine (LS) BMD in the PEAK-25 cohort (p=0.006 and 0.005 respectively), and interaction was observed with LRP5 (p=0.007) and BMP2 (p=0.004) for TB BMD. LRP4 also showed significant interaction with LRP5 for femoral neck (FN) and LS BMD in this cohort. In the OPRA cohort, LRP4 polymorphisms were associated with significantly lower fracture incidence overall (p=0.008-0.001) and fewer hip fractures (rs3816614, p=0.006). Significant interaction in the OPRA cohort was observed for LRP4 with BMP2 and GPR177 for FN BMD as well as for rate of bone loss at TB and FN (p=0.007-0.0001). In conclusion, LRP4 and interaction between LRP4 and genes in the Wnt and BMP signaling pathways modulate bone phenotypes including peak bone mass and fracture, the clinical endpoint of osteoporosis.

  16. Correlations between posterior longitudinal ligament status and size of bone fragment in thoracolumbar burst fractures

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhaohui; Zhou, Yanhong; Li, Ningning; Xie, Xiangtao

    2015-01-01

    This study aim to determine the correlation between the size of bone fragment and injury of posterior longitudinal ligament (PLL). In this study retrospectively analyze medical chart of patients with thoracolumbar burst fractures from June 2010 to December 2012. Patients were divided into two groups (Intact group and Disrupted group) according to the result of MRI assessing status of PLL. All the fractures were classified according to the Arbeit Fuer Osteoosynthese (AO) classification system. Neurological status was classified according to American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA). Mimics measured the height and width of bone fragment (HBF and WBF), transverse canal diameter (TCD) and calculate the height of posterior wall of the injury vertebrae, ratio of height of bone fragment occupying height of posterior wall of vertebrae body (RHBF) and ratio of width of bone fragment occupying transverse canal diameter (RWBF). The results indicated that 52 patients were included in the study. There are 31 patients with intact PLL and 21 patients with disrupted PLL. There was significant difference on the HBF (t = -3.646, P = 0.001), WBF (t = -3.615, P = 0.001), RHBF (t = -4.124, P = 0.000) and RWBF (t = -3.305, P = 0.002) between the intact group and injury group. There was a significant correlation between injury of PLL and ASIA grade (OR = 7.851, P = 0.005), and AO classification (OR = 6.401, P = 0.011), and RHBF (OR = 6.455, P = 0.011), and HBF (OR = 5.208, P = 0.022). In conclusion, the results of this study indicate that AO classification, ASIA grade, HBF and RHBF could act as the predictors of injury of PLL. PMID:25932230

  17. Does a childhood fracture predict low bone mass in young adulthood? A 27-year prospective controlled study.

    PubMed

    Buttazzoni, Christian; Rosengren, Bjorn E; Tveit, Magnus; Landin, Lennart; Nilsson, Jan-Åke; Karlsson, Magnus K

    2013-02-01

    A fracture in childhood is associated with low bone mineral density (BMD), but it is debated whether a fracture at growth also predicts low BMD in young adulthood. The purpose of this work was to gender-specifically evaluate whether children with a fracture are at increased risk of low BMD in young adulthood. Distal forearm BMD (g/cm2) was measured with single-photon absorptiometry (SPA) in 47 boys and 26 girls (mean age 10 years, range 3-16 years) with an index fracture and in 41 boys and 43 girls (mean age 10 years, range 4-16 years) with no fracture. BMD was re-measured mean 27 years later with the same SPA apparatus and with dual-energy absorptiometry (DXA), quantitative ultrasound (QUS), and peripheral computed tomography (pQCT). Individual Z-scores were calculated using the control cohort as reference population. Data are presented as means with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) within brackets and correlation with Pearson's correlation coefficient. Boys with an index fracture had at fracture event a distal forearm BMD Z-score of -0.4 (95% CI, -0.7 to -0.1) and at follow-up -0.4 (95% CI, -0.7 to -0.1). Corresponding values in girls were -0.2 (95% CI, -0.5 to 0.1) and -0.3 (95% CI, -0.7 to 0.1). The deficit in absolute bone mass was driven by men with index fractures in childhood due to low energy rather than moderate or high energy. There were no changes in BMD Z-score during the follow-up period. The BMD deficit at follow-up was in boys with an index fracture verified with all advocated techniques. A childhood fracture in men was associated with low BMD and smaller bone size in young adulthood whereas the deficit in women did not reach statistical significance.

  18. Demineralized Bone Matrix Add-On for Acceleration of Bone Healing in Atypical Subtrochanteric Femoral Fracture: A Consecutive Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Kulachote, Noratep; Sirisreetreerux, Norachart; Chanplakorn, Pongsthorn; Fuangfa, Praman; Suphachatwong, Chanyut; Wajanavisit, Wiwat

    2016-01-01

    Background. Delayed union and nonunion are common complications in atypical femoral fractures (AFFs) despite having good fracture fixation. Demineralized bone matrix (DBM) is a successfully proven method for enhancing fracture healing of the long bone fracture and nonunion and should be used in AFFs. This study aimed to compare the outcome after subtrochanteric AFFs (ST-AFFs) fixation with and without DBM. Materials and Methods. A prospective study was conducted on 9 ST-AFFs patients using DBM (DBM group) during 2013-2014 and compared with a retrospective consecutive case series of ST-AFFs patients treated without DBM (2010–2012) (NDBM group, 9 patients). All patients were treated with the same standard guideline and followed up until fractures completely united. Postoperative outcomes were then compared. Results. DBM group showed a significant shorter healing time than NDBM group (28.1 ± 14.4 versus 57.9 ± 36.8 weeks, p = 0.04). Delayed union was found in 4 patients (44%) in DBM group compared with 7 patients (78%) in NDBM group (p > 0.05). No statistical difference of nonunion was demonstrated between both groups (DBM = 1 and NDBM = 2, p > 0.05). Neither postoperative infection nor severe local tissue reaction was found. Conclusions. DBM is safe and effective for accelerating the fracture healing in ST-AFFx and possibly reduces nonunion after fracture fixation. Trial registration number is TCTR20151021001. PMID:27022610

  19. CORRELATION BETWEEN CALCANEAL BONE ULTRASOUND MEASUREMENTS AND DENSITOMETRY AMONG POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN WITH FRACTURES CAUSED BY BONE FRAGILITY

    PubMed Central

    Moraes, Frederico Barra; Oliveira, Lindomar Guimarães de; Novais, Pierre de Souza; Melo, Murilo Rodrigues; Guimarães, Mara Lúcia Rassi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the correlation between ultrasound (US) measurement on the calcaneus and bone densitometry (DEXA), among postmenopausal women who already presented fragility fractures. Methods: 35 postmenopausal women over 40 years of age, with the ability to walk and presenting osteoporotic fractures of the wrist or spine, without previous treatment for osteoporosis, were analyzed in a retrospective cohort. Of these, 16 were under 60 and 19 were over 60. The broadband ultrasound