Science.gov

Sample records for bone regeneration gbr

  1. Guided bone regeneration (GBR) utilizing injectable Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) delivery gel

    PubMed Central

    Kaigler, Darnell; Silva, Eduardo A.; Mooney, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Vascularization underlies the success of guided bone regeneration (GBR) procedures. This study evaluated the regenerative potential of GBR in combination with Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) delivery, via an injectable hydrogel system. Methods Critical-sized defects were created in rat calvariae and GBR procedures were performed with a collagen membrane either alone (control), plus bolus delivery of VEGF, or plus application of VEGF releasing hydrogels (VEGF - Alg). Four and eight weeks following treatment, defect sites were evaluated with microcomputed tomographic and histomorphometric analyses for blood vessel and bone formation. Results At four weeks, relative to the control condition, the bolus addition of VEGF did not affect blood vessel density within the defect site; yet, the application of the VEGF+ Alg significantly (p< 0.05) increased blood vessel density. Though there was no difference in bone regeneration at four weeks, at eight weeks, there was a significant (p < 0.05) increase in bone regeneration in the VEGF + Alg treated defects. Conclusions These data demonstrated that the application of VEGF + Alg enhanced early angiogenesis while at a later timepoint, it enhanced bone regeneration. Controlled delivery approaches of angiogenic growth factors used adjunctively with GBR may be a promising strategy for enhancing outcomes of GBR. PMID:22668339

  2. Guided bone regeneration (GBR) using cortical bone pins in combination with leukocyte- and platelet-rich fibrin (L-PRF).

    PubMed

    Toffler, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Two of the fundamental requisites for guided bone regeneration (GBR) are space maintenance and primary soft-tissue closure. Allogeneic cortical bone pins measuring 2 mm in diameter in customized lengths can protect surrounding graft materials, support bioresorbable membrane barriers, and resist wound compression from the overlying soft tissues. In addition, a second-generation platelet concentrate, leukocyte- and platelet-rich fibrin (L-PRF), may be incorporated into the augmentation procedure to provide multiple growth factors, accelerate wound healing, and aid in the maintenance of primary closure over the grafted materials. Highlighting two case reports, this article features a GBR technique that uses bone pins in combination with L-PRF membranes to provide both horizontal and vertical ridge augmentation at severely compromised implant sites.

  3. Mechanisms of Guided Bone Regeneration: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Kerns, David G

    2014-01-01

    Post-extraction crestal bone resorption is common and unavoidable which can lead to significant ridge dimensional changes. To regenerate enough bone for successful implant placement, Guided Bone Regeneration (GBR) is often required. GBR is a surgical procedure that uses barrier membranes with or without particulate bone grafts or/and bone substitutes. There are two approaches of GBR in implant therapy: GBR at implant placement (simultaneous approach) and GBR before implant placement to increase the alveolar ridge or improve ridge morphology (staged approach). Angiogenesis and ample blood supply play a critical role in promoting bone regeneration. PMID:24894890

  4. Assessment of bone healing on tibial fractures treated with wire osteosynthesis associated or not with infrared laser light and biphasic ceramic bone graft (HATCP) and guided bone regeneration (GBR): Raman spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastos de Carvalho, Fabíola; Aciole, Gilberth Tadeu S.; Aciole, Jouber Mateus S.; Silveira, Landulfo, Jr.; Nunes dos Santos, Jean; Pinheiro, Antônio L. B.

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate, through Raman spectroscopy, the repair of complete tibial fracture in rabbits fixed with wire osteosynthesis - WO, treated or not with infrared laser light (λ 780nm, 50mW, CW) associated or not to the use of HATCP and GBR. Surgical fractures were created under general anesthesia (Ketamine 0.4ml/Kg IP and Xilazine 0.2ml/Kg IP), on the tibia of 15 rabbits that were divided into 5 groups and maintained on individual cages, at day/night cycle, fed with solid laboratory pelted diet and had water ad libidum. On groups II, III, IV and V the fracture was fixed with WO. Animals of groups III and V were grafted with hydroxyapatite + GBR technique. Animals of groups IV and V were irradiated at every other day during two weeks (16J/cm2, 4 x 4J/cm2). Observation time was that of 30 days. After animal death the specimens were kept in liquid nitrogen for further analysis by Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy showed significant differences between groups (p<0.001). It is concluded that IR laser light was able to accelerate fracture healing and the association with HATCP and GBR resulted on increased deposition of calcium hydroxyapatite.

  5. Guided bone regeneration using individualized ceramic sheets.

    PubMed

    Malmström, J; Anderud, J; Abrahamsson, P; Wälivaara, D-Å; Isaksson, S G; Adolfsson, E

    2016-10-01

    Guided bone regeneration (GBR) describes the use of membranes to regenerate bony defects. A membrane for GBR needs to be biocompatible, cell-occlusive, non-toxic, and mouldable, and possess space-maintaining properties including stability. The purpose of this pilot study was to describe a new method of GBR using individualized ceramic sheets to perfect bone regeneration prior to implant placement; bone regeneration was assessed using traditional histology and three-dimensional (3D) volumetric changes in the bone and soft tissue. Three patients were included. After full-thickness flap reflection, the individualized ceramic sheets were fixed. The sites were left to heal for 7 months. All patients were evaluated preoperatively and at 7 months postoperative using cone beam computed tomography and 3D optical equipment. Samples of the regenerated bone and soft tissue were collected and analyzed. The bone regenerated in the entire interior volume of all sheets. Bone biopsies revealed newly formed trabecular bone with a lamellar structure. Soft tissue biopsies showed connective tissue with no signs of an inflammatory response. This was considered to be newly formed periosteum. Thus ceramic individualized sheets can be used to regenerate large volumes of bone in both vertical and horizontal directions independent of the bone defect and with good biological acceptance of the material. PMID:27364369

  6. Membranes for the Guided Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Woon; Kim, Seong-Gon

    2014-01-01

    Many kinds of membrane have been used for the guided bone regeneration (GBR) technique. However, most membranes do not fulfill all requirements for the ideal membrane for the GBR technique. Among them, collagen membrane has been most widely used. However, its high price and weak tensile strength in wet condition are limitations for wide clinical application. Synthetic polymers have also been used for the GBR technique. Recently, silk based membrane has been considered as a membrane for the GBR technique. Despite many promising preclinical data for use of a silk membrane, clinical data regarding the silk membrane has been limited. However, silk based material has been used clinically as vessel-tie material and an electrospun silk membrane was applied successfully to patients. No adverse effect related to the silk suture has been reported. Considering that silk membrane can be provided to patients at a cheap price, its clinical application should be encouraged. PMID:27489841

  7. Nanomaterials and bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Tao; Xie, Jing; Liao, Jinfeng; Zhang, Tao; Lin, Shiyu; Lin, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    The worldwide incidence of bone disorders and conditions has been increasing. Bone is a nanomaterials composed of organic (mainly collagen) and inorganic (mainly nano-hydroxyapatite) components, with a hierarchical structure ranging from nanoscale to macroscale. In consideration of the serious limitation in traditional therapies, nanomaterials provide some new strategy in bone regeneration. Nanostructured scaffolds provide a closer structural support approximation to native bone architecture for the cells and regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration, which results in the formation of functional tissues. In this article, we focused on reviewing the classification and design of nanostructured materials and nanocarrier materials for bone regeneration, their cell interaction properties, and their application in bone tissue engineering and regeneration. Furthermore, some new challenges about the future research on the application of nanomaterials for bone regeneration are described in the conclusion and perspectives part. PMID:26558141

  8. Osteogenesis effect of guided bone regeneration combined with alveolar cleft grafting: assessment by cone beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Xiao, W-L; Zhang, D-Z; Chen, X-J; Yuan, C; Xue, L-F

    2016-06-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) allows for a significantly lower radiation dose than conventional computed tomography (CT) scans and provides accurate images of the alveolar cleft area. The osteogenic effect of guided bone regeneration (GBR) vs. conventional alveolar bone grafting alone for alveolar cleft defects was evaluated in this study. Sixty alveolar cleft patients were divided randomly into two groups. One group underwent GBR using acellular dermal matrix film combined with alveolar bone grafting using iliac crest bone grafts (GBR group), while the other group underwent alveolar bone grafting only (non-GBR group). CBCT images were obtained at 1 week and at 3 months following the procedure. Using Simplant 11.04 software, the bone resorption rate was calculated and compared between the two groups. The bone resorption rate from 1 week to 3 months following bone grafting without the GBR technique was 36.50±5.04%, whereas the bone resorption rate using the GBR technique was 31.69±5.50% (P=0.017). The application of autogenous iliac bone combined with the GBR technique for alveolar bone grafting of alveolar cleft patients can reduce bone resorption and result in better osteogenesis.

  9. Osteogenesis effect of guided bone regeneration combined with alveolar cleft grafting: assessment by cone beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Xiao, W-L; Zhang, D-Z; Chen, X-J; Yuan, C; Xue, L-F

    2016-06-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) allows for a significantly lower radiation dose than conventional computed tomography (CT) scans and provides accurate images of the alveolar cleft area. The osteogenic effect of guided bone regeneration (GBR) vs. conventional alveolar bone grafting alone for alveolar cleft defects was evaluated in this study. Sixty alveolar cleft patients were divided randomly into two groups. One group underwent GBR using acellular dermal matrix film combined with alveolar bone grafting using iliac crest bone grafts (GBR group), while the other group underwent alveolar bone grafting only (non-GBR group). CBCT images were obtained at 1 week and at 3 months following the procedure. Using Simplant 11.04 software, the bone resorption rate was calculated and compared between the two groups. The bone resorption rate from 1 week to 3 months following bone grafting without the GBR technique was 36.50±5.04%, whereas the bone resorption rate using the GBR technique was 31.69±5.50% (P=0.017). The application of autogenous iliac bone combined with the GBR technique for alveolar bone grafting of alveolar cleft patients can reduce bone resorption and result in better osteogenesis. PMID:26876144

  10. Asymmetric Collagen/chitosan Membrane Containing Minocycline-loaded Chitosan Nanoparticles for Guided Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Shiqing; Adayi, Aidina; Liu, Zihao; Li, Meng; Wu, Mingyao; Xiao, Linghao; Sun, Yingchun; Cai, Qing; Yang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Xu; Gao, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Infections caused by pathogens colonization at wound sites in the process of bone healing are considered as one of the major reasons for the failure of guided bone regeneration (GBR). The objective of this study was to prepare a novel asymmetric collagen/chitosan GBR membrane containing minocycline-loaded chitosan nanoparticles. The morphologies of the membranes and nanoparticles were observed by SEM and TEM, respectively. The characterization and biocompatibility of the membranes was evaluated. The effect of the membrane on bone regeneration was assessed using the critical-size at cranial defect model. TEM images showed the spherical morphology of the nanoparticles. The results of SEM indicated that the asymmetric membrane contained a dense collagen layer and a loose chitosan layer. An in vitro experiment showed that the membrane can inhibit bacterial growth and promote osteoblasts and fibroblasts growth. The membrane showed the ability to promote angiogenesis and enhance bone regeneration in vivo. An asymmetric collagen/chitosan GBR membrane can be fabricated by loading minocycline encapsulated chitosan nanoparticles, and shows satisfactory biocompatibility and barrier function, which enhances bone regeneration. Therefore, this antibacterial GBR membrane is a promising therapeutic approach to prevent infection and guide bone regeneration. PMID:27546177

  11. Asymmetric Collagen/chitosan Membrane Containing Minocycline-loaded Chitosan Nanoparticles for Guided Bone Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shiqing; Adayi, Aidina; Liu, Zihao; Li, Meng; Wu, Mingyao; Xiao, Linghao; Sun, Yingchun; Cai, Qing; Yang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Xu; Gao, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Infections caused by pathogens colonization at wound sites in the process of bone healing are considered as one of the major reasons for the failure of guided bone regeneration (GBR). The objective of this study was to prepare a novel asymmetric collagen/chitosan GBR membrane containing minocycline-loaded chitosan nanoparticles. The morphologies of the membranes and nanoparticles were observed by SEM and TEM, respectively. The characterization and biocompatibility of the membranes was evaluated. The effect of the membrane on bone regeneration was assessed using the critical-size at cranial defect model. TEM images showed the spherical morphology of the nanoparticles. The results of SEM indicated that the asymmetric membrane contained a dense collagen layer and a loose chitosan layer. An in vitro experiment showed that the membrane can inhibit bacterial growth and promote osteoblasts and fibroblasts growth. The membrane showed the ability to promote angiogenesis and enhance bone regeneration in vivo. An asymmetric collagen/chitosan GBR membrane can be fabricated by loading minocycline encapsulated chitosan nanoparticles, and shows satisfactory biocompatibility and barrier function, which enhances bone regeneration. Therefore, this antibacterial GBR membrane is a promising therapeutic approach to prevent infection and guide bone regeneration. PMID:27546177

  12. Bone regeneration in dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Tonelli, Paolo; Duvina, Marco; Barbato, Luigi; Biondi, Eleonora; Nuti, Niccolò; Brancato, Leila; Rose, Giovanna Delle

    2011-01-01

    Summary The edentulism of the jaws and the periodontal disease represent conditions that frequently leads to disruption of the alveolar bone. The loss of the tooth and of its bone of support lead to the creation of crestal defects or situation of maxillary atrophy. The restoration of a functional condition involves the use of endosseous implants who require adequate bone volume, to deal with the masticatory load. In such situations the bone need to be regenerated, taking advantage of the biological principles of osteogenesis, osteoinduction and osteoconduction. Several techniques combine these principles with different results, due to the condition of the bone base on which we operate changes, the surgical technique that we use, and finally for the bone metabolic conditions of the patient who can be in a state of systemic osteopenia or osteoporosis; these can also affect the result of jaw bone reconstruction. PMID:22461825

  13. Nanocomposites and bone regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Roshan; Deng, Meng; Laurencin, Cato T.; Kumbar, Sangamesh G.

    2011-12-01

    This manuscript focuses on bone repair/regeneration using tissue engineering strategies, and highlights nanobiotechnology developments leading to novel nanocomposite systems. About 6.5 million fractures occur annually in USA, and about 550,000 of these individual cases required the application of a bone graft. Autogenous and allogenous bone have been most widely used for bone graft based therapies; however, there are significant problems such as donor shortage and risk of infection. Alternatives using synthetic and natural biomaterials have been developed, and some are commercially available for clinical applications requiring bone grafts. However, it remains a great challenge to design an ideal synthetic graft that very closely mimics the bone tissue structurally, and can modulate the desired function in osteoblast and progenitor cell populations. Nanobiomaterials, specifically nanocomposites composed of hydroxyapatite (HA) and/or collagen are extremely promising graft substitutes. The biocomposites can be fabricated to mimic the material composition of native bone tissue, and additionally, when using nano-HA (reduced grain size), one mimics the structural arrangement of native bone. A good understanding of bone biology and structure is critical to development of bone mimicking graft substitutes. HA and collagen exhibit excellent osteoconductive properties which can further modulate the regenerative/healing process following fracture injury. Combining with other polymeric biomaterials will reinforce the mechanical properties thus making the novel nano-HA based composites comparable to human bone. We report on recent studies using nanocomposites that have been fabricated as particles and nanofibers for regeneration of segmental bone defects. The research in nanocomposites, highlight a pivotal role in the future development of an ideal orthopaedic implant device, however further significant advancements are necessary to achieve clinical use.

  14. Dental implants with versus without peri-implant bone defects treated with guided bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Peñarrocha-Diago, Maria; Peñarrocha-Diago, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Background The guided bone regeneration (GBR) technique is highly successful for the treatment of peri-implant bone defects. The aim was to determine whether or not implants associated with GBR due to peri-implant defects show the same survival and success rates as implants placed in native bone without defects. Material and Methods Patients with a minimum of two submerged dental implants: one suffering a dehiscence or fenestration defect during placement and undergoing simultaneous guided bone regeneration (test group), versus the other entirely surrounded by bone (control group) were treated and monitored annually for three years. Complications with the healing procedure, implant survival, implant success and peri-implant marginal bone loss were assessed. Statistical analysis was performed with non-parametric tests setting an alpha value of 0.05. Results Seventy-two patients and 326 implants were included (142 test, 184 control). One hundred and twenty-five dehiscences (average height 1.92±1.11) and 18 fenestrations (average height 3.34±2.16) were treated. At 3 years post-loading, implant survival rates were 95.7% (test) and 97.3% (control) and implant success rates were 93.6% and 96.2%, respectively. Mean marginal bone loss was 0.54 (SD 0.26 mm) for the test group and 0.43 (SD 0.22 mm) for the control group. No statistically significant differences between both groups were found. Conclusions Within the limits of this study, implants with peri-implant defects treated with guided bone regeneration exhibited similar survival and success rates and peri-implant marginal bone loss to implants without those defects. Large-scale randomized controlled studies with longer follow-ups involving the assessment of esthetic parameters and hard and soft peri-implant tissue stability are needed. Key words:Guided bone regeneration, peri-implant defects, dental implants, marginal bone level, success rate, survival rate. PMID:26330931

  15. Biocompatibility, resorption and biofunctionality of a new synthetic biodegradable membrane for guided bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hoornaert, Alain; d'Arros, Cyril; Heymann, Marie-Francoise; Layrolle, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Membranes for guided bone regeneration (GBR) were prepared from the synthetic biodegradable polymer poly-D,L-lactic/glycolic acid (PLGA). This GBR membrane has a bi-layered structure with a dense film to prevent gingival fibroblast ingrowth and ensure mechanical function, and a micro-fibrous layer to support colonization by osteogenic cells and promote bone regeneration. Hydrolysis and biodegradation were both studied in vitro through soaking in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and in vivo by implantation in the subcutis of rats for 4, 8, 16, 26, 48 and 52 weeks. Histology revealed an excellent colonization of the micro-fibrous layer by cells with a minimal inflammatory reaction during resorption. GBR using the synthetic PLGA membrane was evaluated on critical-size calvaria defects in rats for 4 and 8 weeks. Radiographs, micro-computed tomography and histology showed bone regeneration with the PLGA membrane, while the defects covered with a collagen membrane showed a limited amount of mineralized bone, similar to that of the defect left empty. The biofunctionality of the PLGA membranes was also compared to collagen membranes in mandible defects in rabbits, associated or not with beta-tricalcium phosphate granules. This study revealed that the bi-layered synthetic membrane made of PLGA was safer, more biocompatible, and had a greater controlled resorption rate and bone regeneration capacity than collagen membranes. This new PLGA membrane could be used in pre-implantology and peri-odontology surgery. PMID:27509180

  16. Improving gingival smile by means of guided bone regeneration principles

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Carlos Eduardo de Almeida; Brandão, Roberto Carlos Bodart; Martinelli, Carolina Borges; Pignaton, Túlio Bonna

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: This study evaluated the effectiveness of guided bone regeneration (GBR) carried out with xenogenic bone substitute (Bio-OssTM) and collagen resorbable membrane (Bio-GideTM) to improve gingival smile (GS) in patients with excessive vertical maxillary growth (EVMG). Methods: Twelve healthy women aged between 20 and 49 years old (mean age of 26 years), with 5 mm or more of gingival exposure during fully posed smile (FPS) due to EVMG, were included. Baseline digital photographs were taken with standardized head position at rest and FPS. In eight out of 12 cases, crown lengthening procedure was indicated and the initial incision was made 2 to 4 mm from the gingival margin. In four cases, with no indication for crown lengthening procedure, a sulcular incision was performed. GBR was performed in all cases, using micro screws and/or titanium mesh associated with Bio-OssTM and Bio-GideTM. After 10 days, sutures were removed. Recall appointments were scheduled at 1, 6, and 12 months when standardized photographs were again taken. ImageToolTM software was used to measure the gingival exposure (GE) during FPS from the standardized close-up smile photographs at baseline and 12 months. Results: GE mean at baseline was 275.44 mm2. After 12 months, patients who undergone exclusively GBR procedure, presented GE reduction of 40.7%, ∆ = 112.01 mm2 (statistically significant, p = 0.12), and patients who had crown lengthening associated with the graft had a reduction of 60%, ∆ = 167.01 mm2. Conclusion: Our results using GBR to improve GS in cases of EVMG showed an exceptionally high patient acceptance and satisfaction. One-year follow-up confirmed stable results. PMID:27409660

  17. Stem Cell Therapy for Craniofacial Bone Regeneration: A Randomized, Controlled Feasibility Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kaigler, Darnell; Pagni, Giorgio; Park, Chan Ho; Braun, Thomas M.; Holman, Lindsay A.; Yi, Erica; Tarle, Susan A.; Bartel, Ronnda L.; Giannobile, William V.

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell therapy offers potential in the regeneration of craniofacial bone defects; however, it has not been studied clinically. Tissue repair cells (TRCs) isolated from bone marrow represent a mixed stem and progenitor population enriched in CD90- and CD14-positive cells. In this phase I/II, randomized, controlled feasibility trial, we investigated TRC cell therapy to reconstruct localized craniofacial bone defects. Twenty-four patients requiring localized reconstruction of jawbone defects participated in this longitudinal trial. For regenerative therapy, patients were randomized to receive either guided bone regeneration (GBR) or TRC transplantation. At 6 or 12 weeks following treatment, clinical and radiographic assessments of bone repair were performed. Bone biopsies were harvested and underwent quantitative micro-computed tomographic (μCT) and bone histomorphometric analyses. Oral implants were installed, subsequently restored, and functionally loaded with tooth restorations. Reconstructed sites were assessed for 1 year following therapy. No study-related, serious adverse events were reported. Following therapy, clinical, radiographic, tomographic, and histological measures demonstrated that TRC therapy accelerated alveolar bone regeneration compared to GBR therapy. Additionally, TRC treatment significantly reduced the need for secondary bone grafting at the time of oral implant placement with a fivefold decrease in implant bony dehiscence exposure (residual bone defects) as compared to GBR-treated sites (p < 0.01). Transplantation of TRCs for treatment of alveolar bone defects appears safe and accelerates bone regeneration, enabling jawbone reconstruction with oral implants. The results from this trial support expanded studies of TRC therapy in the treatment of craniofacial deformities (ClinicalTrials.gov number CT00755911). PMID:22776413

  18. Decellularization and Delipidation Protocols of Bovine Bone and Pericardium for Bone Grafting and Guided Bone Regeneration Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Ferroni, Letizia; Guazzo, Riccardo; Sbricoli, Luca; De Benedictis, Giulia; Finotti, Luca; Isola, Maurizio; Bressan, Eriberto; Zavan, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    The combination of bone grafting materials with guided bone regeneration (GBR) membranes seems to provide promising results to restore bone defects in dental clinical practice. In the first part of this work, a novel protocol for decellularization and delipidation of bovine bone, based on multiple steps of thermal shock, washes with detergent and dehydration with alcohol, is described. This protocol is more effective in removal of cellular materials, and shows superior biocompatibility compared to other three methods tested in this study. Furthermore, histological and morphological analyses confirm the maintenance of an intact bone extracellular matrix (ECM). In vitro and in vivo experiments evidence osteoinductive and osteoconductive properties of the produced scaffold, respectively. In the second part of this study, two methods of bovine pericardium decellularization are compared. The osmotic shock-based protocol gives better results in terms of removal of cell components, biocompatibility, maintenance of native ECM structure, and host tissue reaction, in respect to the freeze/thaw method. Overall, the results of this study demonstrate the characterization of a novel protocol for the decellularization of bovine bone to be used as bone graft, and the acquisition of a method to produce a pericardium membrane suitable for GBR applications. PMID:26191793

  19. Bone Repair on Fractures Treated with Osteosynthesis, ir Laser, Bone Graft and Guided Bone Regeneration: Histomorfometric Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos Aciole, Jouber Mateus; dos Santos Aciole, Gilberth Tadeu; Soares, Luiz Guilherme Pinheiro; Barbosa, Artur Felipe Santos; Santos, Jean Nunes; Pinheiro, Antonio Luiz Barbosa

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate, through the analysis of histomorfometric, the repair of complete tibial fracture in rabbits fixed with osteosynthesis, treated or not with infrared laser light (λ780 nm, 50 mW, CW) associated or not to the use of hydroxyapatite and guided bone regeneration (GBR). Surgical fractures were created, under general anesthesia (Ketamina 0,4 ml/Kg IP and Xilazina 0,2 ml/Kg IP), on the dorsum of 15 Oryctolagus rabbits that were divided into 5 groups and maintained on individual cages, at day/night cycle, fed with solid laboratory pelted diet and had water ad libidum. On groups II, III, IV and V the fracture was fixed with wire osteosynthesis. Animals of groups III and V were grafted with hydroxyapatite and GBR technique used. Animals of groups IV and V were irradiated at every other day during two weeks (16 J/cm2, 4×4 J/cm2). Observation time was that of 30 days. After animal death (overdose of general anesthetics) the specimes were routinely processed to wax and underwent histological analysis by light microscopy. The histomorfometric analysis showed an increased bone neoformation, increased collagen deposition, less reabsorption and inflammation when laser was associated to the HATCP. It is concluded that IR laser light was able to accelerate fracture healing and the association with HATCP and GBR resulted on increased deposition of CHA.

  20. Scaffold Design for Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Polo-Corrales, Liliana; Latorre-Esteves, Magda; Ramirez-Vick, Jaime E.

    2014-01-01

    The use of bone grafts is the standard to treat skeletal fractures, or to replace and regenerate lost bone, as demonstrated by the large number of bone graft procedures performed worldwide. The most common of these is the autograft, however, its use can lead to complications such as pain, infection, scarring, blood loss, and donor-site morbidity. The alternative is allografts, but they lack the osteoactive capacity of autografts and carry the risk of carrying infectious agents or immune rejection. Other approaches, such as the bone graft substitutes, have focused on improving the efficacy of bone grafts or other scaffolds by incorporating bone progenitor cells and growth factors to stimulate cells. An ideal bone graft or scaffold should be made of biomaterials that imitate the structure and properties of natural bone ECM, include osteoprogenitor cells and provide all the necessary environmental cues found in natural bone. However, creating living tissue constructs that are structurally, functionally and mechanically comparable to the natural bone has been a challenge so far. This focus of this review is on the evolution of these scaffolds as bone graft substitutes in the process of recreating the bone tissue microenvironment, including biochemical and biophysical cues. PMID:24730250

  1. Surgical Approaches Based on Biological Objectives: GTR versus GBR Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Pagni, Giorgio; Rasperini, Giulio

    2013-01-01

    Guided tissue regenerative (GTR) therapies are performed to regenerate the previously lost tooth supporting structure, thus maintaining the aesthetics and masticatory function of the available dentition. Alveolar ridge augmentation procedures (GBR) intend to regain the alveolar bone lost following tooth extraction and/or periodontal disease. Several biomaterials and surgical approaches have been proposed. In this paper we report biomaterials and surgical techniques used for periodontal and bone regenerative procedures. Particular attention will be adopted to highlight the biological basis for the different therapeutic approaches. PMID:23843792

  2. A novel silk fibroin nanofibrous membrane for guided bone regeneration: a study in rat calvarial defects

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shijun; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Feng; Zhou, Xichao; Zuo, Baoqi; You, Xinran; Gao, Yang; Liu, Hongchen; Tang, Hailiang

    2015-01-01

    A novel membrane for guided bone regeneration (GBR), constituting silk fibroin (SF) nanofiber from native silk nanofibril solution, was prepared by electrospinning process. Another barrier membrane, a collagen-type membrane (Bio-Gide®), was used as a comparative sample. Twelve healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this study. Bilateral round defects were created in the calvarial bone. The bone regenerative efficacy was evaluated in rat calvarial defects. Animals were killed at 4 and 12 weeks. Bone regeneration was analyzed using micro-computed tomography and histological analysis. The SF nanofibrous membrane showed superior results with regard to mechanical tensile properties. At 4 weeks, the bone volume and collagen I positive areas in the SF group were greater than in the Bio-Gide group. At 12 weeks, the defect had completely healed with new bone in both the groups. In conclusion, the SF nanofibrous membranes showed satisfactory mechanical stability, good biocompatibility, slow degradability, and improved new bone regeneration without any adverse inflammatory reactions. Considering the low cost and low risk of disease transmission, the SF nanofibrous membrane is a potential candidate for GBR therapy compared with the widely used collagen membranes. PMID:26807172

  3. Bone regeneration and stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Arvidson, K; Abdallah, B M; Applegate, L A; Baldini, N; Cenni, E; Gomez-Barrena, E; Granchi, D; Kassem, M; Konttinen, Y T; Mustafa, K; Pioletti, D P; Sillat, T; Finne-Wistrand, A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This invited review covers research areas of central importance for orthopaedic and maxillofacial bone tissue repair, including normal fracture healing and healing problems, biomaterial scaffolds for tissue engineering, mesenchymal and foetal stem cells, effects of sex steroids on mesenchymal stem cells, use of platelet-rich plasma for tissue repair, osteogenesis and its molecular markers. A variety of cells in addition to stem cells, as well as advances in materials science to meet specific requirements for bone and soft tissue regeneration by addition of bioactive molecules, are discussed. PMID:21129153

  4. Guided bone regeneration is promoted by the molecular events in the membrane compartment.

    PubMed

    Turri, Alberto; Elgali, Ibrahim; Vazirisani, Forugh; Johansson, Anna; Emanuelsson, Lena; Dahlin, Christer; Thomsen, Peter; Omar, Omar

    2016-04-01

    The working hypothesis of guided bone regeneration (GBR) is that the membrane physically excludes non-osteogenic tissues from interfering with bone healing. However, the underlying mechanisms are insufficiently explained. This study aimed to investigate the molecular and structural pattern of bone healing in trabecular bone defects, with and without naturally derived resorbable membrane. Defects were created in rat femurs and treated with the membrane or left empty (sham). After 3d, 6d and 28d, the defect sites and membranes were harvested and analyzed with histology, histomorphometry, quantitative-polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), Western blot (WB) and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Histomorphometry demonstrated that the presence of the membrane promoted bone formation in early and late periods. This was in parallel with upregulation of cell recruitment and coupled bone remodeling genes in the defect. Cells recruited into the membrane expressed signals for bone regeneration (BMP-2, FGF-2, TGF-β1 and VEGF). Whereas the native membrane contained FGF-2 but not BMP-2, an accumulation of FGF-2 and BMP-2 proteins and immunoreactive cells were demonstrated by WB and IHC in the in vivo implanted membrane. The results provide cellular and molecular evidence suggesting a novel role for the membrane during GBR, by acting as a bioactive compartment rather than a passive barrier. PMID:26828682

  5. Bone repair following bone grafting hydroxyapatite guided bone regeneration and infra-red laser photobiomodulation: a histological study in a rodent model.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Antonio Luiz B; Martinez Gerbi, Marleny E; de Assis Limeira, Francisco; Carneiro Ponzi, Elizabeth Arruda; Marques, Aparecida M C; Carvalho, Carolina Montagn; de Carneiro Santos, Rafael; Oliveira, Priscila Chagas; Nóia, Manuela; Ramalho, Luciana Maria Pedreira

    2009-03-01

    The aim of the investigation was to assess histologically the effect of laser photobiomodulation (LPBM) on a repair of defects surgically created in the femurs of rats. Forty-five Wistar rats were divided into four groups: group I (control); group II (LPBM); group III (hydroxyapatite guided bone regeneration; HA GBR); group IV (HA GBR LPBM). The animals in the irradiated groups were subjected to the first irradiation immediately after surgery, and it was repeated every day for 2 weeks. The animals were killed 15 days, 21 days and 30 days after surgery. When the groups irradiated with implant and membrane were compared, it was observed that the repair of the defects submitted to LPBM was also processed faster, starting from the 15th day. At the 30th day, the level of repair of the defects was similar in the irradiated groups and those not irradiated. New bone formation was seen inside the cavity, probably by the osteoconduction of the implant, and, in the irradiated groups, this new bone formation was incremental. The present preliminary data seem to suggest that LPMB therapy might have a positive effect upon early wound healing of bone defects treated with a combination of HA and GBR.

  6. Collagen for bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana Marina; Gentile, Piergiorgio; Chiono, Valeria; Ciardelli, Gianluca

    2012-09-01

    In the last decades, increased knowledge about the organization, structure and properties of collagen (particularly concerning interactions between cells and collagen-based materials) has inspired scientists and engineers to design innovative collagen-based biomaterials and to develop novel tissue-engineering products. The design of resorbable collagen-based medical implants requires understanding the tissue/organ anatomy and biological function as well as the role of collagen's physicochemical properties and structure in tissue/organ regeneration. Bone is a complex tissue that plays a critical role in diverse metabolic processes mediated by calcium delivery as well as in hematopoiesis whilst maintaining skeleton strength. A wide variety of collagen-based scaffolds have been proposed for different tissue engineering applications. These scaffolds are designed to promote a biological response, such as cell interaction, and to work as artificial biomimetic extracellular matrices that guide tissue regeneration. This paper critically reviews the current understanding of the complex hierarchical structure and properties of native collagen molecules, and describes the scientific challenge of manufacturing collagen-based materials with suitable properties and shapes for specific biomedical applications, with special emphasis on bone tissue engineering. The analysis of the state of the art in the field reveals the presence of innovative techniques for scaffold and material manufacturing that are currently opening the way to the preparation of biomimetic substrates that modulate cell interaction for improved substitution, restoration, retention or enhancement of bone tissue function. PMID:22705634

  7. Enhanced bioactivity of polyvinylidene chloride films using argon ion bombardment for guided bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shuichiro; Hayashi, Tatsuhide; Asakura, Masaki; Hamajima, Soichiro; Sato, Yamato; Sasaki, Keisuke; Okabe, Eijiro; Kawase, Mayu; Ando, Masahiko; Kawai, Tatsushi; Noguchi, Toshihide

    2014-09-01

    Polyvinylidene chloride (PVDC) is a long chain carbon synthetic polymer. The objective of this study was to improve the bioactivity of PVDC films through surface modification using argon (Ar) ion bombardment to create Ar-modified PVDC films (Ar-PVDC) to address the clinical problems of guided bone regeneration (GBR), which is technique-sensitive, and low bone regenerative ability. First, the effects of Ar ion bombardment, a low temperature plasma etching technique widely used in industry, on PVDC film wettability, surface chemistry, and morphology were confirmed. Next, fibroblast-like and osteoblast-like cell attachment and proliferation on Ar-PVDC were assessed. As a preclinical in vivo study, Ar-PVDC was used to cover a critical-sized bone defect on rat calvaria and osteoconductivity was evaluated by micro-computed tomography analysis and histological examinations. We found that the contact angle of PVDC film decreased by 50° because of the production of -OH groups on the PVDC film surface, though surface morphological was unchanged at 30 min after Ar ion bombardment. We demonstrated that cell attachment increased by about 40% and proliferation by more than 140% because of increased wettability, and 2.4 times greater bone regeneration was observed at week 3 with Ar-PVDC compared with untreated PVDC films. These results suggest that Ar ion bombardment modification of PVDC surfaces improves osteoconductivity, indicating its potential to increase bone deposition during GBR. PMID:24893861

  8. Enhanced bioactivity of polyvinylidene chloride films using argon ion bombardment for guided bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shuichiro; Hayashi, Tatsuhide; Asakura, Masaki; Hamajima, Soichiro; Sato, Yamato; Sasaki, Keisuke; Okabe, Eijiro; Kawase, Mayu; Ando, Masahiko; Kawai, Tatsushi; Noguchi, Toshihide

    2014-09-01

    Polyvinylidene chloride (PVDC) is a long chain carbon synthetic polymer. The objective of this study was to improve the bioactivity of PVDC films through surface modification using argon (Ar) ion bombardment to create Ar-modified PVDC films (Ar-PVDC) to address the clinical problems of guided bone regeneration (GBR), which is technique-sensitive, and low bone regenerative ability. First, the effects of Ar ion bombardment, a low temperature plasma etching technique widely used in industry, on PVDC film wettability, surface chemistry, and morphology were confirmed. Next, fibroblast-like and osteoblast-like cell attachment and proliferation on Ar-PVDC were assessed. As a preclinical in vivo study, Ar-PVDC was used to cover a critical-sized bone defect on rat calvaria and osteoconductivity was evaluated by micro-computed tomography analysis and histological examinations. We found that the contact angle of PVDC film decreased by 50° because of the production of -OH groups on the PVDC film surface, though surface morphological was unchanged at 30 min after Ar ion bombardment. We demonstrated that cell attachment increased by about 40% and proliferation by more than 140% because of increased wettability, and 2.4 times greater bone regeneration was observed at week 3 with Ar-PVDC compared with untreated PVDC films. These results suggest that Ar ion bombardment modification of PVDC surfaces improves osteoconductivity, indicating its potential to increase bone deposition during GBR.

  9. Efficacy of rhBMP-2 loaded PCL/PLGA/β-TCP guided bone regeneration membrane fabricated by 3D printing technology for reconstruction of calvaria defects in rabbit.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jin-Hyung; Yoon, Min-Chul; Jeong, Chang-Mo; Jang, Jinah; Jeong, Sung-In; Cho, Dong-Woo; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2014-11-10

    We successfully fabricated a three-dimensional (3D) printing-based PCL/PLGA/β-TCP guided bone regeneration (GBR) membrane that slowly released rhBMP-2. To impregnate the GBR membrane with intact rhBMP-2, collagen solution encapsulating rhBMP-2 (5 µg ml(-1)) was infused into pores of a PCL/PLGA/β-TCP membrane constructed using a 3D printing system with four dispensing heads. In a release profile test, sustained release of rhBMP-2 was observed for up to 28 d. To investigate the efficacy of the GBR membrane on bone regeneration, PCL/PLGA/β-TCP membranes with or without rhBMP-2 were implanted in an 8 mm calvaria defect of rabbits. Bone formation was evaluated at weeks 4 and 8 histologically and histomorphometrically. A space making ability of the GBR membrane was successfully maintained in both groups, and significantly more new bone was formed at post-implantation weeks 4 and 8 by rhBMP-2 loaded GBR membranes. Interestingly, implantation with rhBMP-2 loaded GBR membranes led to almost entire healing of calvaria defects within 8 weeks.

  10. Engineered matrices for bone regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winn, Shelley R.; Hu, Yunhua; Pugh, Amy; Brown, Leanna; Nguyen, Jesse T.; Hollinger, Jeffrey O.

    2000-06-01

    Traditional therapies of autografts and allogeneic banked bone can promote reasonable clinical outcome to repair damaged bone. However, under certain conditions the success of these traditional approaches plummets, providing the incentive for researchers to develop clinical alternatives. The evolving field of tissue engineering in the musculoskeletal system attempts to mimic many of the components from the intact, healthy subject. Those components consist of a biologic scaffold, cells, extracellular matrix, and signaling molecules. The bone biomimetic, i.e., an engineered matrix, provides a porous structural architecture for the regeneration and ingrowth of osseous tissue at the site of injury. To further enhance the regenerative cascade, our strategy has involved porous biodegradable scaffolds containing and releasing signaling molecules and providing a suitable environment for cell attachment, growth and differentiation. In addition, the inclusion of genetically modified osteogenic precursor cells has brought the technology closer to developing a tissue-engineered equivalent. The presentation will describe various formulations and the methods utilized to evaluate the clinical utility of these biomimetics.

  11. The effect of bacterial cellulose membrane compared with collagen membrane on guided bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Youn-Mook; Jeong, Sung In; An, Sung-Jun; Kang, Seong-Soo

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE This study was to evaluate the effects of bacterial cellulose (BC) membranes as a barrier membrane on guided bone regeneration (GBR) in comparison with those of the resorbable collagen membranes. MATERIALS AND METHODS BC membranes were fabricated using biomimetic technology. Surface properties were analyzed, Mechanical properties were measured, in vitro cell proliferation test were performed with NIH3T3 cells and in vivo study were performed with rat calvarial defect and histomorphometric analysis was done. The Mann-Whitney U test and the Wilcoxon signed rank test was used (α<.05). RESULTS BC membrane showed significantly higher mechanical properties such as wet tensile strength than collagen membrane and represented a three-dimensional multilayered structure cross-linked by nano-fibers with 60 % porosity. In vitro study, cell adhesion and proliferation were observed on BC membrane. However, morphology of the cells was found to be less differentiated, and the cell proliferation rate was lower than those of the cells on collagen membrane. In vivo study, the grafted BC membrane did not induce inflammatory response, and maintained adequate space for bone regeneration. An amount of new bone formation in defect region loaded with BC membrane was significantly similar to that of collagen membrane application. CONCLUSION BC membrane has potential to be used as a barrier membrane, and efficacy of the membrane on GBR is comparable to that of collagen membrane. PMID:26816579

  12. Regenerate augmentation with bone marrow concentrate after traumatic bone loss.

    PubMed

    Gessmann, Jan; Köller, Manfred; Godry, Holger; Schildhauer, Thomas Armin; Seybold, Dominik

    2012-01-01

    Distraction osteogenesis after post-traumatic segmental bone loss of the tibia is a complex and time-consuming procedure that is often complicated due to prolonged consolidation or complete insufficiency of the regenerate. The aim of this feasibility study was to investigate the potential of bone marrow aspiration concentrate (BMAC) for percutaneous regenerate augmentation to accelerate bony consolidation of the regenerate. Eight patients (age 22-64) with an average posttraumatic bone defect of 82.4 mm and concomitant risk factors (nicotine abuse, soft-tissue defects, obesity and/or circulatory disorders) were treated with a modified Ilizarov external frame using an intramedullary cable transportation system. At the end of the distraction phase, each patient was treated with a percutaneously injection of autologous BMAC into the centre of the regenerate. The concentration factor was analysed using flow cytometry. The mean follow up after frame removal was 10 (4-15) months. With a mean healing index (HI) of 36.9 d/cm, bony consolidation of the regenerate was achieved in all eight cases. The mean concentration factor of the bone marrow aspirate was 4.6 (SD 1.23). No further operations concerning the regenerate were needed and no adverse effects were observed with the BMAC procedure. This procedure can be used for augmentation of the regenerate in cases of segmental bone transport. Further studies with a larger number of patients and control groups are needed to evaluate a possible higher success rate and accelerating effects on regenerate healing.

  13. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of chitosan/β-glycerol phosphate composite membrane for guided bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jun; Liang, Jie; Wen, Yong; Sun, Xiaoning; Li, Tiejun; Zhang, Gairong; Sun, Kangning; Xu, Xin

    2014-09-01

    Chitosan and β-glycerol phosphate (CS/β-GP) composite, with a thermosensitive sol-gel transition behavior, has been tested as one of the viable materials for barrier membrane fabrication. These studies have provided us with a new concept for a guided bone regeneration (GBR) membrane design. The composition, porous structure of the membrane, and the neutral mild preparation procedures make the CS/β-GP membrane a potentially active guide for bone regeneration. In this study, the CS/β-GP composite membrane, with different concentrations of β-GP, was studied to assess their potential utility in GBR application. The initial attachment of the ST2 stromal cell line to the CS/β-GP composite membrane was better than their attachment to the pure CS membrane. The proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation of the cells were much higher on the CS/β-GP composite membrane as compared to the pure CS membrane (p < 0.05). A mild inflammatory response was observed around the implanted CS/β-GP composite membrane without any foreign body reaction that continued up to 4 weeks of postsurgery. This primary study indicated that the in vitro and in vivo bioactivities of the CS/β-GP composite membrane fulfilled the requirements for GBR technique.

  14. Bone Regeneration in Iliac Crestal Defects: An Experimental Study on Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Lorusso, Felice; Ravera, Lorenzo; Mortellaro, Carmen; Piattelli, Adriano

    2016-01-01

    Background. Oral rehabilitation of partially fully edentulous patients with dental implants has become a routine procedure in clinical practice. In a site with a lack of bone GBR is a surgical procedure that provides an augmentation in terms of volume for the insertion of dental implants. Materials and Methods. In the iliac crest of six sheep 4 defects were created where an implant was inserted, three of them with different biomaterials and a control site. All animals were sacrificed after a 4-month healing period. All specimens were processed and analyzed with histomorphometry. Statistical evaluation was done to evaluate percentage of bone defect filled by new bone. Results. All experimental groups showed an increase of the new bone. Higher and highly statistically significant differences were found in the percentages of bone defect filled by new bone in group filled with corticocancellous 250–1000 microns particulate porcine bone mix. Conclusions. This study demonstrates that particulate porcine bone mix and porcine corticocancellous collagenate prehydrated bone mix when used as scaffold are able to induce bone regeneration. Moreover, these data suggest that these biomaterials have higher biocompatibility and are capable of inducing faster and greater bone formation. PMID:27413746

  15. MicroRNAs and Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Nakasa, Tomoyuki; Yoshizuka, Masaaki; Andry Usman, Muhammad; Elbadry Mahmoud, Elhussein; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2015-01-01

    Bone has multiple functions, both morphologically and physiologically, and it frequently features in the pathological condition, including fracture and osteoporosis. For bone regeneration therapy, the regulation of osteoblast differentiation is important. MicroRNA (miRNA)s are short noncoding RNA which regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. MiRNAs play an important role not only in a variety of other cellular processes including differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis but also in the pathogenesis of human diseases. Recently, miRNAs have been known to participate in osteoblast differentiation by regulating several signaling pathways including transcription factors. New insight into the mechanism during osteogenes is affected by miRNAs has been gained. Moreover, therapeutic trials for bone diseases including osteoporosis, fracture and bone defects targeting miRNAs have been examined in animal models. MiRNA therapy will enable development of a bone regeneration therapy. PMID:27019619

  16. Regenerate augmentation with bone marrow concentrate after traumatic bone loss

    PubMed Central

    Gessmann, Jan; Köller, Manfred; Godry, Holger; Schildhauer, Thomas Armin; Seybold, Dominik

    2012-01-01

    Distraction osteogenesis after post-traumatic segmental bone loss of the tibia is a complex and time-consuming procedure that is often complicated due to prolonged consolidation or complete insufficiency of the regenerate. The aim of this feasibility study was to investigate the potential of bone marrow aspiration concentrate (BMAC) for percutaneous regenerate augmentation to accelerate bony consolidation of the regenerate. Eight patients (age 22–64) with an average posttraumatic bone defect of 82.4 mm and concomitant risk factors (nicotine abuse, soft-tissue defects, obesity and/or circulatory disorders) were treated with a modified Ilizarov external frame using an intramedullary cable transportation system. At the end of the distraction phase, each patient was treated with a percutaneously injection of autologous BMAC into the centre of the regenerate. The concentration factor was analysed using flow cytometry. The mean follow up after frame removal was 10 (4–15) months. With a mean healing index (HI) of 36.9 d/cm, bony consolidation of the regenerate was achieved in all eight cases. The mean concentration factor of the bone marrow aspirate was 4.6 (SD 1.23). No further operations concerning the regenerate were needed and no adverse effects were observed with the BMAC procedure. This procedure can be used for augmentation of the regenerate in cases of segmental bone transport. Further studies with a larger number of patients and control groups are needed to evaluate a possible higher success rate and accelerating effects on regenerate healing. PMID:22577502

  17. Tissue engineering strategies for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Amit S; Mikos, Antonios G

    2005-01-01

    Bone loss due to trauma or disease is an increasingly serious health problem. Current clinical treatments for critical-sized defects are problematic and often yield poor healing due to the complicated anatomy and physiology of bone tissue, as well as the limitations of medical technology. Bone tissue engineering offers a promising alternative strategy of healing severe bone injuries by utilizing the body's natural biological response to tissue damage in conjunction with engineering principles. Osteogenic cells, growth factors, and biomaterial scaffolds form the foundation of the many bone tissue engineering strategies employed to achieve repair and restoration of damaged tissue. An ideal biomaterial scaffold will provide mechanical support to an injured site and also deliver growth factors and cells into a defect to encourage tissue growth. Additionally, this biomaterial should degrade in a controlled manner without causing a significant inflammatory response. The following chapter highlights multiple strategies and the most recent advances in various areas of research for bone tissue regeneration.

  18. Novel applications of statins for bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Sarita R.; Werlang, Caroline A.; Kasper, F. Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2015-01-01

    The use of statins for bone regeneration is a promising and growing area of research. Statins, originally developed to treat high cholesterol, are inhibitors of the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl, the rate-limiting enzyme of the mevalonate pathway. Because the mevalonate pathway is responsible for the synthesis of a wide variety of important biochemical molecules, including cholesterol and other isoprenoids, the effects of statins are pleiotropic. In particular, statins can greatly affect the process of bone turnover and regeneration via effects on important cell types, including mesenchymal stem cells, osteoblasts, endothelial cells, and osteoclasts. Statins have also been shown to have anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties that may be useful since infection can derail normal bone healing. This review will explore the pleiotropic effects of statins, discuss the current use of statins for bone regeneration, particularly with regard to biomaterials-based controlled delivery, and offer perspectives on the challenges and future directions of this emerging area of bone tissue engineering. PMID:26543666

  19. Gene Therapy Approaches for Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Franceschi, Renny T.; Yang, Shuying; Rutherford, R. Bruce; Krebsbach, Paul H.; Zhao, Ming; Wang, Dian

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy represents a promising approach for delivering regenerative molecules to specific tissues including bone. Several laboratories have shown that virus-based BMP expression vectors can stimulate osteoblast differentiation and bone formation in vivo. Both in vivo and ex vivo transduction of cells can induce bone formation at ectopic and orthotopic sites. Adenovirus and direct DNA delivery of genes encoding regenerative molecules can heal critical-sized defects of cranial and long bones. Although osteogenic activity can be demonstrated for individual BMP vectors, substantial synergies may be achieved using combinatorial gene therapy to express complimentary osteogenic signals including specific combinations of BMPs or BMPs and transcription factors. Further control of the bone regeneration process may also be achieved through the use of inducible promoters that can be used to control the timing and magnitude of expression for a particular gene. Using these types of approaches, it should be possible to mimic natural processes of bone development and fracture repair and, in so doing, be able to precisely control both the amount and type of bone regenerated. PMID:14745239

  20. Bone Adaptation and Regeneration - New Developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein-Nulend, Jenneke; Bacabac, Rommel Gaud

    osteocytes sensing different canalicular flow patterns around cutting cone and reversal zone during loading, thus determining the bone's structure. Disturbances in architecture and permeability of the 3D porous network will affect transduction of mechanical loads to the mechanosensors. Uncovering the cellular and mechanical basis of the osteocyte's response to loading represents a significant challenge to our understanding of cellular mechanotransduction and bone remodeling. In view of the importance of mechanical stress for maintaining bone strength, mechanical stimuli have great potential for providing a therapeutic approach for bone (re)generation.

  1. Effects of mechanical loading on the degradability and mechanical properties of the nanocalcium-deficient hydroxyapatite–multi(amino acid) copolymer composite membrane tube for guided bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Hong; Yang, Hongsheng; Xiong, Yan; Zhang, Bin; Ren, Cheng; Min, Li; Zhang, Wenli; Yan, Yonggang; Li, Hong; Pei, Fuxing; Tu, Chongqi

    2013-01-01

    Background and methods Guided bone regeneration (GBR) is a new treatment for bone defects, and the property of membrane is critical to the success of GBR. This study focuses on a novel membrane tube for GBR, which was prepared by a nanocalcium-deficient hydroxyapatite–multi(amino acid) copolymer (n-CDHA-MAC) composite. The biomechanical strength and degradability of this membrane tube under mechanical loading after immersion in phosphate-buffered solution were investigated to evaluate the effects of mechanical loading on the membrane tube. The membrane-tube group with no mechanical loading and femora bone were used as controls. Results The compressive strength and bending strength of n-CDHA-MAC membrane tubes were 66.4 ± 10.2 MPa and 840.7 ± 12.1 MPa, which were lower than those of the goats’ femoral bones (69.0 ± 5.5 MPa and 900.2 ± 17.3 MPa), but there were no significant (P > 0.05) differences. In the in vitro degradability experiment, all membrane tubes were degradable and showed a surface-erosion degradation model. The PH of solution fluctuated from 7.2 to 7.5. The weight and mechanical strength of loaded tubes decreased more quickly than nonloaded ones, with significant differences (P < 0.05). However, the strength of the loaded group after degradation achieved 20.4 ± 1.2 MPa, which was greater than the maximum mechanical strength of 4.338 MPa based on goat femoral middle stationary state by three-dimensional finite-element analysis. Conclusions n-CDHA-MAC membrane tubes have good biomechanical strength during degradation under mechanical loading. Therefore, this membrane tube is an ideal GBR membrane for critical size defects of long bones in goats for animal experiments. PMID:23946651

  2. Immunomodulation regulates mesenchymal stem cell-based bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Su, Y; Shi, S; Liu, Y

    2014-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based regenerative medicine represents a promising frontier for bone reconstruction. Significant efforts have been devoted to clarifying the capacities of MSCs to repair or reconstruct bone tissue. This review provides a concise summary of current knowledge pertaining to the possible mechanisms of MSC action in the regeneration of bone, with particular focus on the interplay between donor MSCs and host immune response in the process of new bone regeneration.

  3. Proresolving nanomedicines activate bone regeneration in periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Van Dyke, T E; Hasturk, H; Kantarci, A; Freire, M O; Nguyen, D; Dalli, J; Serhan, C N

    2015-01-01

    Therapies to reverse tissue damage from osteolytic inflammatory diseases are limited by the inability of current tissue-engineering procedures to restore lost hard and soft tissues. There is a critical need for new therapeutics in regeneration. In addition to scaffolds, cells, and soluble mediators necessary for tissue engineering, control of endogenous inflammation is an absolute requirement for success. Although significant progress has been made in understanding natural resolution of inflammation pathways to limit uncontrolled inflammation in disease, harnessing the biomimetic properties of proresolving lipid mediators has not been demonstrated. Here, we report the use of nano-proresolving medicines (NPRM) containing a novel lipoxin analog (benzo-lipoxin A4, bLXA4) to promote regeneration of hard and soft tissues irreversibly lost to periodontitis in the Hanford miniature pig. In this proof-of-principle experiment, NPRM-bLXA4 dramatically reduced inflammatory cell infiltrate into chronic periodontal disease sites treated surgically and dramatically increased new bone formation and regeneration of the periodontal organ. These findings indicate that NPRM-bLXA4 is a mimetic of endogenous resolving mechanisms with potent bioactions that offers a new therapeutic tissue-engineering approach for the treatment of chronic osteolytic inflammatory diseases.

  4. Proresolving nanomedicines activate bone regeneration in periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Van Dyke, T E; Hasturk, H; Kantarci, A; Freire, M O; Nguyen, D; Dalli, J; Serhan, C N

    2015-01-01

    Therapies to reverse tissue damage from osteolytic inflammatory diseases are limited by the inability of current tissue-engineering procedures to restore lost hard and soft tissues. There is a critical need for new therapeutics in regeneration. In addition to scaffolds, cells, and soluble mediators necessary for tissue engineering, control of endogenous inflammation is an absolute requirement for success. Although significant progress has been made in understanding natural resolution of inflammation pathways to limit uncontrolled inflammation in disease, harnessing the biomimetic properties of proresolving lipid mediators has not been demonstrated. Here, we report the use of nano-proresolving medicines (NPRM) containing a novel lipoxin analog (benzo-lipoxin A4, bLXA4) to promote regeneration of hard and soft tissues irreversibly lost to periodontitis in the Hanford miniature pig. In this proof-of-principle experiment, NPRM-bLXA4 dramatically reduced inflammatory cell infiltrate into chronic periodontal disease sites treated surgically and dramatically increased new bone formation and regeneration of the periodontal organ. These findings indicate that NPRM-bLXA4 is a mimetic of endogenous resolving mechanisms with potent bioactions that offers a new therapeutic tissue-engineering approach for the treatment of chronic osteolytic inflammatory diseases. PMID:25389003

  5. Photocrosslinkable and elastomeric hydrogels for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Teena; Xavier, Janet R; Cross, Lauren; Jaiswal, Manish K; Mondragon, Eli; Kaunas, Roland; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K

    2016-04-01

    Nanocomposite biomaterials are extensively investigated for cell and tissue engineering applications due their unique physical, chemical and biological characteristics. Here, we investigated the mechanical, rheological, and degradation properties of photocrosslinkable and elastomeric nanocomposite hydrogels from nanohydroxyapatite (nHAp) and gelatin methacryloyl (GelMA). The addition of nHAp resulted in a significant increase in mechanical stiffness and physiological stability. Cells readily adhere and proliferate on the nanocomposite surfaces. Cyclic stretching of cells on the elastomeric nanocomposites revealed that nHAp elicited a stronger alignment response in the direction of strain. In vitro studies highlight enhanced bioactivity of nanocomposites as determined by alkaline phosphate (ALP) activity. Overall, the elastomeric and photocrosslinkable nanocomposite hydrogels can be used for minimally invasive therapy for bone regeneration.

  6. Bone regenerates via dedifferentiation of osteoblasts in the zebrafish fin.

    PubMed

    Knopf, Franziska; Hammond, Christina; Chekuru, Avinash; Kurth, Thomas; Hans, Stefan; Weber, Christopher W; Mahatma, Gina; Fisher, Shannon; Brand, Michael; Schulte-Merker, Stefan; Weidinger, Gilbert

    2011-05-17

    While mammals have a limited capacity to repair bone defects, zebrafish can completely regenerate amputated bony structures of their fins. Fin regeneration is dependent on formation of a blastema, a progenitor cell pool accumulating at the amputation plane. It is unclear which cells the blastema is derived from, whether it forms by dedifferentiation of mature cells, and whether blastema cells are multipotent. We show that mature osteoblasts dedifferentiate and form part of the blastema. Osteoblasts downregulate expression of intermediate and late bone differentiation markers and induce genes expressed by bone progenitors. Dedifferentiated osteoblasts proliferate in a FGF-dependent manner and migrate to form part of the blastema. Genetic fate mapping shows that osteoblasts only give rise to osteoblasts in the regenerate, indicating that dedifferentiation is not associated with the attainment of multipotency. Thus, bone can regenerate from mature osteoblasts via dedifferentiation, a finding with potential implications for human bone repair. PMID:21571227

  7. Recent advances in bone regeneration using adult stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zigdon-Giladi, Hadar; Rudich, Utai; Michaeli Geller, Gal; Evron, Ayelet

    2015-04-26

    Bone is a highly vascularized tissue reliant on the close spatial and temporal association between blood vessels and bone cells. Therefore, cells that participate in vasculogenesis and osteogenesis play a pivotal role in bone formation during prenatal and postnatal periods. Nevertheless, spontaneous healing of bone fracture is occasionally impaired due to insufficient blood and cellular supply to the site of injury. In these cases, bone regeneration process is interrupted, which might result in delayed union or even nonunion of the fracture. Nonunion fracture is difficult to treat and have a high financial impact. In the last decade, numerous technological advancements in bone tissue engineering and cell-therapy opened new horizon in the field of bone regeneration. This review starts with presentation of the biological processes involved in bone development, bone remodeling, fracture healing process and the microenvironment at bone healing sites. Then, we discuss the rationale for using adult stem cells and listed the characteristics of the available cells for bone regeneration. The mechanism of action and epigenetic regulations for osteogenic differentiation are also described. Finally, we review the literature for translational and clinical trials that investigated the use of adult stem cells (mesenchymal stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells and CD34(+) blood progenitors) for bone regeneration.

  8. Hyperbaric Oxygen Promotes Proximal Bone Regeneration and Organized Collagen Composition during Digit Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sammarco, Mimi C.; Simkin, Jennifer; Cammack, Alexander J.; Fassler, Danielle; Gossmann, Alexej; Marrero, Luis; Lacey, Michelle; Van Meter, Keith; Muneoka, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is critical for optimal bone regeneration. While axolotls and salamanders have retained the ability to regenerate whole limbs, mammalian regeneration is restricted to the distal tip of the digit (P3) in mice, primates, and humans. Our previous study revealed the oxygen microenvironment during regeneration is dynamic and temporally influential in building and degrading bone. Given that regeneration is dependent on a dynamic and changing oxygen environment, a better understanding of the effects of oxygen during wounding, scarring, and regeneration, and better ways to artificially generate both hypoxic and oxygen replete microenvironments are essential to promote regeneration beyond wounding or scarring. To explore the influence of increased oxygen on digit regeneration in vivo daily treatments of hyperbaric oxygen were administered to mice during all phases of the entire regenerative process. Micro-Computed Tomography (μCT) and histological analysis showed that the daily application of hyperbaric oxygen elicited the same enhanced bone degradation response as two individual pulses of oxygen applied during the blastema phase. We expand past these findings to show histologically that the continuous application of hyperbaric oxygen during digit regeneration results in delayed blastema formation at a much more proximal location after amputation, and the deposition of better organized collagen fibers during bone formation. The application of sustained hyperbaric oxygen also delays wound closure and enhances bone degradation after digit amputation. Thus, hyperbaric oxygen shows the potential for positive influential control on the various phases of an epimorphic regenerative response. PMID:26452224

  9. Hyperbaric Oxygen Promotes Proximal Bone Regeneration and Organized Collagen Composition during Digit Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sammarco, Mimi C; Simkin, Jennifer; Cammack, Alexander J; Fassler, Danielle; Gossmann, Alexej; Marrero, Luis; Lacey, Michelle; Van Meter, Keith; Muneoka, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is critical for optimal bone regeneration. While axolotls and salamanders have retained the ability to regenerate whole limbs, mammalian regeneration is restricted to the distal tip of the digit (P3) in mice, primates, and humans. Our previous study revealed the oxygen microenvironment during regeneration is dynamic and temporally influential in building and degrading bone. Given that regeneration is dependent on a dynamic and changing oxygen environment, a better understanding of the effects of oxygen during wounding, scarring, and regeneration, and better ways to artificially generate both hypoxic and oxygen replete microenvironments are essential to promote regeneration beyond wounding or scarring. To explore the influence of increased oxygen on digit regeneration in vivo daily treatments of hyperbaric oxygen were administered to mice during all phases of the entire regenerative process. Micro-Computed Tomography (μCT) and histological analysis showed that the daily application of hyperbaric oxygen elicited the same enhanced bone degradation response as two individual pulses of oxygen applied during the blastema phase. We expand past these findings to show histologically that the continuous application of hyperbaric oxygen during digit regeneration results in delayed blastema formation at a much more proximal location after amputation, and the deposition of better organized collagen fibers during bone formation. The application of sustained hyperbaric oxygen also delays wound closure and enhances bone degradation after digit amputation. Thus, hyperbaric oxygen shows the potential for positive influential control on the various phases of an epimorphic regenerative response.

  10. On-Demand Guided Bone Regeneration with Microbial Protection of Ornamented SPU Scaffold with Bismuth-Doped Single Crystalline Hydroxyapatite: Augmentation and Cartilage Formation.

    PubMed

    Selvakumar, M; Srivastava, Priyanka; Pawar, Harpreet Singh; Francis, Nimmy K; Das, Bodhisatwa; Sathishkumar, G; Subramanian, Bhuvaneshwaran; Jaganathan, Saravana Kumar; George, Gibin; Anandhan, S; Dhara, Santanu; Nando, Golok B; Chattopadhyay, Santanu

    2016-02-17

    Guided bone regeneration (GBR) scaffolds are futile in many clinical applications due to infection problems. In this work, we fabricated GBR with an anti-infective scaffold by ornamenting 2D single crystalline bismuth-doped nanohydroxyapatite (Bi-nHA) rods onto segmented polyurethane (SPU). Bi-nHA with high aspect ratio was prepared without any templates. Subsequently, it was introduced into an unprecedented synthesized SPU matrix based on dual soft segments (PCL-b-PDMS) of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), by an in situ technique followed by electrospinning to fabricate scaffolds. For comparison, undoped pristine nHA rods were also ornamented into it. The enzymatic ring-opening polymerization technique was adapted to synthesize soft segments of PCL-b-PDMS copolymers of SPU. Structure elucidation of the synthesized polymers is done by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Sparingly, Bi-nHA ornamented scaffolds exhibit tremendous improvement (155%) in the mechanical properties with excellent antimicrobial activity against various human pathogens. After confirmation of high osteoconductivity, improved biodegradation, and excellent biocompatibility against osteoblast cells (in vitro), the scaffolds were implanted in rabbits by subcutaneous and intraosseous (tibial) sites. Various histological sections reveal the signatures of early cartilage formation, endochondral ossification, and rapid bone healing at 4 weeks of the critical defects filled with ornamented scaffold compared to SPU scaffold. This implies osteogenic potential and ability to provide an adequate biomimetic microenvironment for mineralization for GBR of the scaffolds. Organ toxicity studies further confirm that no tissue architecture abnormalities were observed in hepatic, cardiac, and renal tissue sections. This finding manifests the feasibility of fabricating a mechanically adequate nanofibrous SPU scaffold by a biomimetic strategy and the advantages of Bi

  11. Bioactive and Biodegradable Nanocomposites and Hybrid Biomaterials for Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Allo, Bedilu A.; Costa, Daniel O.; Dixon, S. Jeffrey; Mequanint, Kibret; Rizkalla, Amin S.

    2012-01-01

    Strategies for bone tissue engineering and regeneration rely on bioactive scaffolds to mimic the natural extracellular matrix and act as templates onto which cells attach, multiply, migrate and function. Of particular interest are nanocomposites and organic-inorganic (O/I) hybrid biomaterials based on selective combinations of biodegradable polymers and bioactive inorganic materials. In this paper, we review the current state of bioactive and biodegradable nanocomposite and O/I hybrid biomaterials and their applications in bone regeneration. We focus specifically on nanocomposites based on nano-sized hydroxyapatite (HA) and bioactive glass (BG) fillers in combination with biodegradable polyesters and their hybrid counterparts. Topics include 3D scaffold design, materials that are widely used in bone regeneration, and recent trends in next generation biomaterials. We conclude with a perspective on the future application of nanocomposites and O/I hybrid biomaterials for regeneration of bone. PMID:24955542

  12. Preparation of electrospun fiber mats using siloxane-containing vaterite and biodegradable polymer hybrids for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Fujikura, Kie; Lin, Sen; Nakamura, Jin; Obata, Akiko; Kasuga, Toshihiro

    2013-11-01

    An electrospun fiber mat using a new composite consisting of siloxane-containing vaterite (SiV) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) (denoted by SiPLGVH) was prepared with the aim of applying it as a membrane for use in a guided bone regeneration (GBR) system. Another electrospun fiber mat using a previously described composite consisting of SiV and poly(L-lactic acid) (denoted by SiPVH) was also prepared as a comparative sample. SiPLG VH fiber mats showed superior results in terms of mechanical tensile properties and cellular behavior. Their elongation before failure was about eight times higher than that of SiPVH. The numbers of osteoblast-like cells that proliferated on the SiPLGVH fiber mats, regardless of the hydroxyapatite coating, were comparable to that of SiPVH. The cells spread more, two dimensionally, on the SiPLGVH fiber mats, since the pores between fibers were narrowed down because of swelling of the PLGA matrix during cell culture. This two-dimensional cellular proliferation quality on the SiPLGVH fiber mats is expected to be suitable for materials used in GBR, leading to control of infiltration of the soft tissue and great tissue integration with the surrounding tissue.

  13. [The results of resonance frequency analysis by dental implantation after bone augmentation for alveolar bone atrophy].

    PubMed

    Kulakov, A A; Braĭlovskaia, T V; Osman, B M; Bedretdinov, R M; Dzhakoniia, V D

    2014-01-01

    The report concerns dental implantation effectiveness in case of jawbone atrophy. Thirty patients were included in the study to reveal resonance frequency analysis rates of intraosseous dental implants by dental implant placement with bone augmentation using the veneer technique of cortico-cancellous blocks and guided bone regeneration (GBR) with biodegradable membranes and pins having poly (dl- lactic acid) base.

  14. Mesenchymal stem cells: mechanisms and role in bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yunhao; Guan, Junjie; Zhang, Changqing

    2014-01-01

    Stimulating bone growth and regeneration, especially in patients with delayed union or non-union of bone, is a challenge for orthopaedic surgeons. Treatments employed for bone regeneration are based on the use of cells, biomaterials and factors. Among these therapies, cell treatment with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has a number of advantages as MSCs: (1) are multipotent cells that can migrate to sites of injury; (2) are capable of suppressing the local immune response; and (3) are available in large quantities from the patients themselves. MSC therapies have been used for stimulating bone regeneration in animal models and in patients. Methods of application range from direct MSC injection, seeding MSCs on synthetic scaffolds, the use of gene-modified MSCs, and hetero-MSCs application. However, only a small number of these cell-based strategies are in clinical use, and none of these treatments has become the gold standard treatment for delayed or non-union of bone. PMID:25335795

  15. Effect of Polycaprolactone Scaffold Permeability on Bone Regeneration In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mitsak, Anna G.; Kemppainen, Jessica M.; Harris, Matthew T.

    2011-01-01

    Successful bone tissue engineering depends on the scaffold's ability to allow nutrient diffusion to and waste removal from the regeneration site, as well as provide an appropriate mechanical environment. Since bone is highly vascularized, scaffolds that provide greater mass transport may support increased bone regeneration. Permeability encompasses the salient features of three-dimensional porous scaffold architecture effects on scaffold mass transport. We hypothesized that higher permeability scaffolds will enhance bone regeneration for a given cell seeding density. We manufactured poly-ɛ-caprolactone scaffolds, designed to have the same internal pore design and either a low permeability (0.688×10−7m4/N-s) or a high permeability (3.991×10−7m4/N-s), respectively. Scaffolds were seeded with bone morphogenic protein-7-transduced human gingival fibroblasts and implanted subcutaneously in immune-compromised mice for 4 and 8 weeks. Micro-CT evaluation showed better bone penetration into high permeability scaffolds, with blood vessel infiltration visible at 4 weeks. Compression testing showed that scaffold design had more influence on elastic modulus than time point did and that bone tissue infiltration increased the mechanical properties of the high permeability scaffolds at 8 weeks. These results suggest that for polycaprolactone, a more permeable scaffold with regular architecture is best for in vivo bone regeneration. This finding is an important step toward the end goal of optimizing a scaffold for bone tissue engineering. PMID:21395465

  16. Maxillofacial-derived stem cells regenerate critical mandibular bone defect.

    PubMed

    Steinhardt, Yair; Aslan, Hadi; Regev, Eran; Zilberman, Yoram; Kallai, Ilan; Gazit, Dan; Gazit, Zulma

    2008-11-01

    Stem cell-based bone tissue regeneration in the maxillofacial complex is a clinical necessity. Genetic engineering of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to follow specific differentiation pathways may enhance the ability of these cells to regenerate and increase their clinical relevance. MSCs isolated from maxillofacial bone marrow (BM) are good candidates for tissue regeneration at sites of damage to the maxillofacial complex. In this study, we hypothesized that MSCs isolated from the maxillofacial complex can be engineered to overexpress the bone morphogenetic protein-2 gene and induce bone tissue regeneration in vivo. To demonstrate that the cells isolated from the maxillofacial complex were indeed MSCs, we performed a flow cytometry analysis, which revealed a high expression of mesenchyme-related markers and an absence of non-mesenchyme-related markers. In vitro, the MSCs were able to differentiate into osteogenic, chondrogenic, and adipogenic lineages. Gene delivery of the osteogenic gene BMP2 via an adenoviral vector revealed high expression levels of BMP2 protein that induced osteogenic differentiation of these cells in vitro and induced bone formation in an ectopic site in vivo. In addition, implantation of genetically engineered maxillofacial BM-derived MSCs into a mandibular defect led to regeneration of tissue at the site of the defect; this was confirmed by performing micro-computed tomography analysis. Histological analysis of the mandibles revealed osteogenic differentiation of implanted cells as well as bone tissue regeneration. We conclude that maxillofacial BM-derived MSCs can be genetically engineered to induce bone tissue regeneration in the maxillofacial complex and that this finding may be clinically relevant. PMID:18636943

  17. Guided bone regeneration in distal mandibular atrophy by means of a preformed titanium foil: a case series.

    PubMed

    Andreasi Bassi, M; Andrisani, C; Lopez, M A; Gaudio, R M; Lombardo, L; Lauritano, D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this case series was to evaluate the clinical outcome of preformed titanium foil (PTF) to perform guided bone regeneration (GBR) in posterior mandibular atrophies. Thirteen patients (4 male; 9 female; mean age 58.85±10.16 years), with class II division C atrophy, according to Misch, were selected to perform GBR by means of PTF, using a moldable allograft paste as graft material. The devices, made of a 0.2mm thick pure titanium foil, were pre-shaped using stereolithographic models obtained from CT-scan of the patients’ recipient sites. In the second stage, performed at 6.35±2.15 months, 23 cylindrical two-piece implants were placed and the devices removed. At four months, the implants were exposed and submitted to progressive prosthetic load for a span of 4 months. The cases were finalized by means of metal-ceramic cementable restorations. The post finalization follow-up was at 12 months. Survival rate (i.e. SVR) was 100% since no fixtures were lost. At the one-year follow up, the clinical appearance of the soft tissues was optimal and no pathological signs on probing were recorded. The success rate (i.e. SCR) was 82.6% and the average peri-implant bone reabsorption was 0.99±0.59 mm. The results suggest good potentialities of this method for bone volume augmentation in distal mandibular atrophies, allowing to maximize the outcome and simplifying the surgical phase. PMID:27469550

  18. Cellular reactions of osteoblast-like cells to a novel nanocomposite membrane for guided bone regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Yao; Liu, Man; Wang, Shao-An; Mo, An-Chun; Huang, Cui; Zuo, Yi; Li, Ji-Dong

    2008-11-01

    This study investigated the bioactivity and biocompatibility of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (n-HA)/Polyamide-66 (PA66) nanocomposite membrane and expanded-polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE) membrane (as control) to MG63 osteoblast-like cells. The attachment and proliferation of the cells on the porous surface of nHA/PA66 membrane and the surface of e-PTFE membrane were evaluated by scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation and the MTT assay. The bioactivity of the cells on the surface of the two membranes was evaluated by testing cell viability and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities. The results suggested that the bioresponse of MG63 osteoblast-like cells on the porous surface of nHA/PA66 membrane was better than the bioresponse on the opposite surface of e-PTFE membrane. Because of a better cell attachment manner, there is a potential utilization of the guided bone regeneration (GBR) membrane to substitute nHA/PA66 membrane for e-PTFE membrane.

  19. Nell-1-induced bone regeneration in calvarial defects.

    PubMed

    Aghaloo, Tara; Cowan, Catherine M; Chou, Yu-Fen; Zhang, Xinli; Lee, Haofu; Miao, Steve; Hong, Nichole; Kuroda, Shun'ichi; Wu, Benjamin; Ting, Kang; Soo, Chia

    2006-09-01

    Many craniofacial birth defects contain skeletal components requiring bone grafting. We previously identified the novel secreted osteogenic molecule NELL-1, first noted to be overexpressed during premature bone formation in calvarial sutures of craniosynostosis patients. Nell-1 overexpression significantly increases differentiation and mineralization selectively in osteoblasts, while newborn Nell-1 transgenic mice significantly increase premature bone formation in calvarial sutures. In the current study, cultured calvarial explants isolated from Nell-1 transgenic newborn mice (with mild sagittal synostosis) demonstrated continuous bone growth and overlapping sagittal sutures. Further investigation into gene expression cascades revealed that fibroblast growth factor-2 and transforming growth factor-beta1 stimulated Nell-1 expression, whereas bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 had no direct effect. Additionally, Nell-1-induced osteogenesis in MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts through reduction in the expression of early up-regulated osteogenic regulators (OSX and ALP) but induction of later markers (OPN and OCN). Grafting Nell-1 protein-coated PLGA scaffolds into rat calvarial defects revealed the osteogenic potential of Nell-1 to induce bone regeneration equivalent to BMP-2, whereas immunohistochemistry indicated that Nell-1 reduced osterix-producing cells and increased bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin, and BMP-7 expression. Insights into Nell-1-regulated osteogenesis coupled with its ability to stimulate bone regeneration revealed a potential therapeutic role and an alternative to the currently accepted techniques for bone regeneration. PMID:16936265

  20. Functionalized mesoporous bioactive glass scaffolds for enhanced bone tissue regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xingdi; Zeng, Deliang; Li, Nan; Wen, Jin; Jiang, Xinquan; Liu, Changsheng; Li, Yongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Mesoporous bioactive glass (MBG), which possesses excellent bioactivity, biocompatibility and osteoconductivity, has played an important role in bone tissue regeneration. However, it is difficult to prepare MBG scaffolds with high compressive strength for applications in bone regeneration; this difficulty has greatly hindered its development and use. To solve this problem, a simple powder processing technique has been successfully developed to fabricate a novel type of MBG scaffold (MBGS). Furthermore, amino or carboxylic groups could be successfully grafted onto MBGSs (denoted as N-MBGS and C-MBGS, respectively) through a post-grafting process. It was revealed that both MBGS and the functionalized MBGSs could significantly promote the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of bMSCs. Due to its positively charged surface, N-MBGS presented the highest in vitro osteogenic capability of the three samples. Moreover, in vivo testing results demonstrated that N-MBGS could promote higher levels of bone regeneration compared with MBGS and C-MBGS. In addition to its surface characteristics, it is believed that the decreased degradation rate of N-MBGS plays a vital role in promoting bone regeneration. These findings indicate that MBGSs are promising materials with potential practical applications in bone regeneration, which can be successfully fabricated by combining a powder processing technique and post-grafting process. PMID:26763311

  1. Bringing computational models of bone regeneration to the clinic.

    PubMed

    Carlier, Aurélie; Geris, Liesbet; Lammens, Johan; Van Oosterwyck, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Although the field of bone regeneration has experienced great advancements in the last decades, integrating all the relevant, patient-specific information into a personalized diagnosis and optimal treatment remains a challenging task due to the large number of variables that affect bone regeneration. Computational models have the potential to cope with this complexity and to improve the fundamental understanding of the bone regeneration processes as well as to predict and optimize the patient-specific treatment strategies. However, the current use of computational models in daily orthopedic practice is very limited or inexistent. We have identified three key hurdles that limit the translation of computational models of bone regeneration from bench to bed side. First, there exists a clear mismatch between the scope of the existing and the clinically required models. Second, most computational models are confronted with limited quantitative information of insufficient quality thereby hampering the determination of patient-specific parameter values. Third, current computational models are only corroborated with animal models, whereas a thorough (retrospective and prospective) assessment of the computational model will be crucial to convince the health care providers of the capabilities thereof. These challenges must be addressed so that computational models of bone regeneration can reach their true potential, resulting in the advancement of individualized care and reduction of the associated health care costs. PMID:25903383

  2. Chemically modified RNA activated matrices enhance bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Elangovan, Satheesh; Khorsand, Behnoush; Do, Anh-Vu; Hong, Liu; Dewerth, Alexander; Kormann, Michael; Ross, Ryan D; Sumner, D Rick; Allamargot, Chantal; Salem, Aliasger K

    2015-11-28

    There exists a dire need for improved therapeutics to achieve predictable bone regeneration. Gene therapy using non-viral vectors that are safe and efficient at transfecting target cells is a promising approach to overcoming the drawbacks of protein delivery of growth factors. Here, we investigated the transfection efficiency, cytotoxicity, osteogenic potential and in vivo bone regenerative capacity of chemically modified ribonucleic acid (cmRNA) (encoding BMP-2) complexed with polyethylenimine (PEI) and made comparisons with PEI complexed with conventional plasmid DNA (encoding BMP-2). The polyplexes were fabricated at an amine (N) to phosphate (P) ratio of 10 and characterized for transfection efficiency using human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). The osteogenic potential of BMSCs treated with these polyplexes was validated by determining the expression of bone-specific genes, osteocalcin and alkaline phosphatase as well as through the detection of bone matrix deposition. Using a calvarial bone defect model in rats, it was shown that PEI-cmRNA (encoding BMP-2)-activated matrices promoted significantly enhanced bone regeneration compared to PEI-plasmid DNA (BMP-2)-activated matrices. Our proof of concept study suggests that scaffolds loaded with non-viral vectors harboring cmRNA encoding osteogenic proteins may be a powerful tool for stimulating bone regeneration with significant potential for clinical translation. PMID:26415855

  3. Organ printing: the future of bone regeneration?

    PubMed

    Fedorovich, Natalja E; Alblas, Jacqueline; Hennink, Wim E; Oner, F Cumhur; Dhert, Wouter J A

    2011-12-01

    In engineered bone grafts, the combined actions of bone-forming cells, matrix and bioactive stimuli determine the eventual performance of the implant. The current notion is that well-built 3D constructs include the biological elements that recapitulate native bone tissue structure to achieve bone formation once implanted. The relatively new technology of organ/tissue printing now enables the accurate 3D organization of the components that are important for bone formation and also addresses issues, such as graft porosity and vascularization. Bone printing is seen as a great promise, because it combines rapid prototyping technology to produce a scaffold of the desired shape and internal structure with incorporation of multiple living cell types that can form the bone tissue once implanted.

  4. Chitin and chitosan composites for bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Jayachandran; Vinodhini, P Angelin; Sudha, Prasad N; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2014-01-01

    In the present world, where there is increased obesity and poor physical activity, the occurrence of bone disorders has also been increased steeply. Therefore, a significant progress has been made in organ transplantation, surgical reconstruction, and the use of artificial prostheses to treat the loss or failure of an organ or bone tissue in the recent years. Bone contains considerable amounts of minerals and proteins. The major component of bone is hydroxyapatite [Ca(10)(PO(4))(6)(OH)(2)] (60-65%) and is one of the most stable forms of calcium phosphate and it occurs along with other materials including collagen, chondroitin sulfate, keratin sulfate, and lipids. To remedy bone defects, new natural and synthetic materials are needed, which will have very similar properties as that of natural bone. Bone tissue engineering is a relatively new and emerging field, which paves the way for bone repair or regeneration. Polymers can serve as a matrix to support cell growth by having various properties such as biocompatibility, biodegradability, porosity, charge, mechanical strength, and hydrophobicity. Considerable attention has been given to chitin and chitosan composite materials and their applications in the field of bone tissue engineering in the recent years, which are natural biopolymers. This chapter reviews the various composites of chitin and chitosan, which are proved to be potential materials for bone tissue regeneration. PMID:25300543

  5. Pharmacokinetics of gentamicin eluted from a regenerating bone graft substitute

    PubMed Central

    Stravinskas, M.; Horstmann, P.; Ferguson, J.; Hettwer, W.; Tarasevicius, S.; Petersen, M. M.; McNally, M. A.; Lidgren, L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Deep bone and joint infections (DBJI) are directly intertwined with health, demographic change towards an elderly population, and wellbeing. The elderly human population is more prone to acquire infections, and the consequences such as pain, reduced quality of life, morbidity, absence from work and premature retirement due to disability place significant burdens on already strained healthcare systems and societal budgets. DBJIs are less responsive to systemic antibiotics because of poor vascular perfusion in necrotic bone, large bone defects and persistent biofilm-based infection. Emerging bacterial resistance poses a major threat and new innovative treatment modalities are urgently needed to curb its current trajectory. Materials and Methods We present a new biphasic ceramic bone substitute consisting of hydroxyapatite and calcium sulphate for local antibiotic delivery in combination with bone regeneration. Gentamicin release was measured in four setups: 1) in vitro elution in Ringer’s solution; 2) local elution in patients treated for trochanteric hip fractures or uncemented hip revisions; 3) local elution in patients treated with a bone tumour resection; and 4) local elution in patients treated surgically for chronic corticomedullary osteomyelitis. Results The release pattern in vitro was comparable with the obtained release in the patient studies. No recurrence was detected in the osteomyelitis group at latest follow-up (minimum 1.5 years). Conclusions This new biphasic bone substitute containing antibiotics provides safe prevention of bone infections in a range of clinical situations. The in vitro test method predicts the in vivo performance and makes it a reliable tool in the development of future antibiotic-eluting bone-regenerating materials. Cite this article: M. Stravinskas, P. Horstmann, J. Ferguson, W. Hettwer, M. Nilsson, S. Tarasevicius, M. M. Petersen, M. A. McNally, L. Lidgren. Pharmacokinetics of gentamicin eluted from a regenerating

  6. A histological evaluation for guided bone regeneration induced by a collagenous membrane.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Yuya; Amizuka, Norio; Nakadate, Masayoshi; Ohnishi, Hideo; Fujii, Noritaka; Oda, Kimimitsu; Nomura, Shuichi; Maeda, Takeyasu

    2005-11-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the histological changes during ossification and cellular events including osteogenic differentiation responding to collagenous bioresorbable membranes utilized for GBR. Standardized artificial bony defects were prepared at rat maxillae, and covered with a collagenous bioresorbable membrane. These animals were sacrificed at 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks after the GBR-operation. The paraffin sections were subject to tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) enzyme histochemistry and immunohistochemistry for alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteopontin (OP) and osteocalcin (OC). In the first week of the experimental group, woven bone with ALP-positive osteoblasts occupied the lower half of the cavity. The collagenous membrane included numerous ALP-negative cells and OP-immunoreactive extracellular matrices. At 2 weeks, the ALP-, OP- and OC-immunoreactivity came to be recognizable in the region of collagenous membrane. Since ALP-negative soft tissue separated the collagenous membrane and the new bone originating from the cavity bottom, the collagenous membrane appeared to induce osteogenesis in situ. At 3 weeks, numerous collagen fibers of the membrane were embedded in the adjacent bone matrix. At 4 weeks, the membrane-associated and the cavity-derived bones had completely integrated, showing the same height of the periosteal ridge as the surrounding alveolar bones. The collagen fibers of a GBR-membrane appear to participate in osteogenic differentiation. PMID:15885767

  7. Biological approaches to bone regeneration by gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Franceschi, R T

    2005-12-01

    Safe, effective approaches for bone regeneration are needed to reverse bone loss caused by trauma, disease, and tumor resection. Unfortunately, the science of bone regeneration is still in its infancy, with all current or emerging therapies having serious limitations. Unlike current regenerative therapies that use single regenerative factors, the natural processes of bone formation and repair require the coordinated expression of many molecules, including growth factors, bone morphogenetic proteins, and specific transcription factors. As will be developed in this article, future advances in bone regeneration will likely incorporate therapies that mimic critical aspects of these natural biological processes, using the tools of gene therapy and tissue engineering. This review will summarize current knowledge related to normal bone development and fracture repair, and will describe how gene therapy, in combination with tissue engineering, may mimic critical aspects of these natural processes. Current gene therapy approaches for bone regeneration will then be summarized, including recent work where combinatorial gene therapy was used to express groups of molecules that synergistically interacted to stimulate bone regeneration. Last, proposed future directions for this field will be discussed, where regulated gene expression systems will be combined with cells seeded in precise three-dimensional configurations on synthetic scaffolds to control both temporal and spatial distribution of regenerative factors. It is the premise of this article that such approaches will eventually allow us to achieve the ultimate goal of bone tissue engineering: to reconstruct entire bones with associated joints, ligaments, or sutures. Abbreviations used: BMP, bone morphogenetic protein; FGF, fibroblast growth factor; AER, apical ectodermal ridge; ZPA, zone of polarizing activity; PZ, progress zone; SHH, sonic hedgehog; OSX, osterix transcription factor; FGFR, fibroblast growth factor

  8. Remodeling of bone and bones: effects of altered mechanical stress on the regeneration of transplanted bones.

    PubMed

    Storey, E; Feik, S A

    1986-06-01

    We divided 116 rats weighing 50 gm into four groups with tails either left in situ or transplanted as follows: straight in situ: untreated controls; bent in situ: five caudal vertebrae (CV) in the loop; straight transplants: three CV skinned and transplanted autologously; and bent transplants: five CV skinned, bent to form a loop, and transplanted autologously. Tails were radiographed weekly up to 6 weeks and at 12 weeks, and microradiographic and histological studies were undertaken on selected specimens. At 12 weeks the bones in the apex of the loop of tails left in situ appeared bent with a straight-to-convex shaft on the outer side and a thicker, more concave one on the inner side. In the transplanted bent segments the bone shaft died and initially the reverse occurred: the outer shaft thickened and the inner resorbed completely. A new concave inner diaphysis then formed so that the bones in both instances were essentially similar in final shape. In the bent transplants the surviving osteogenic tissues regenerated and, adapting to the altered forces, formed a new bone shaft. This involved a change in the direction, amount, and nature of endochondral, periosteal, and regenerative growth and subsequent remodeling of bone. The results support previous observations that, within limits, the strain in the osteogenic envelope is an important factor in adaptation of bones to changing stress and that, where the envelope is deficient, the surviving tissues have the capacity to regenerate and repair defects in the bone so that it best resists the changing stresses applied to it.

  9. Chondrogenically differentiated mesenchymal stromal cell pellets stimulate endochondral bone regeneration in critical-sized bone defects.

    PubMed

    van der Stok, J; Koolen, M K E; Jahr, H; Kops, N; Waarsing, J H; Weinans, H; van der Jagt, O P

    2014-02-19

    Grafting bone defects or atrophic non-unions with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs)-based grafts is not yet successful. MSC-based grafts typically use undifferentiated or osteogenically differentiated MSCs and regenerate bone through intramembranous ossification. Endochondral ossification might be more potent but requires chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs. Here, we determined if chondrogenically differentiated MSC (ch-MSC) pellets could induce bone regeneration in an orthotopic environment through endochondral ossification. Undifferentiated MSC pellets (ud-MSC) and ch-MSC pellets were generated from MSCs of human donors cultured on chondrogenic medium for respectively 3 (ud-MSC) and 21 (ch-MSC) days. A 6 mm femoral bone defect was made and stabilised with an internal plate in 27 athymic rats. Defects were left empty for 6 weeks to develop an atrophic non-union before they were grafted with ch-MSC pellets or ud-MSC pellets. Micro-CT scans made 4 and 8 weeks after grafting showed that ch-MSC pellets resulted in significantly more bone than ud-MSC pellets. This regenerated bone could completely bridge the defect, but the amount of bone regeneration was donor-dependent. Histology after 7 and 14 days showed slowly mineralising pellets containing hypertrophic chondrocytes, as well as TRAP-positive and CD34-positive cells around the ch-MSC pellets, indicating osteoclastic resorption and vascularisation typical for endochondral ossification. In conclusion, grafting critical femoral bone defects with chondrogenically differentiated MSC pellets led to rapid and pronounced bone regeneration through endochondral ossification and may therefore be a more successful MSC-based graft to repair large bone defects or atrophic non-unions. But, since bone regeneration was donor-depend, the generation of potent chondrogenically differentiated MSC pellets for each single donor needs to be established first.

  10. Nanocomposite Membranes Enhance Bone Regeneration Through Restoring Physiological Electric Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuehui; Zhang, Chenguang; Lin, Yuanhua; Hu, Penghao; Shen, Yang; Wang, Ke; Meng, Song; Chai, Yuan; Dai, Xiaohan; Liu, Xing; Liu, Yun; Mo, Xiaoju; Cao, Cen; Li, Shue; Deng, Xuliang; Chen, Lili

    2016-08-23

    Physiological electric potential is well-known for its indispensable role in maintaining bone volume and quality. Although implanted biomaterials simulating structural, morphological, mechanical, and chemical properties of natural tissue or organ has been introduced in the field of bone regeneration, the concept of restoring physiological electric microenvironment remains ignored in biomaterials design. In this work, a flexible nanocomposite membrane mimicking the endogenous electric potential is fabricated to explore its bone defect repair efficiency. BaTiO3 nanoparticles (BTO NPs) were first coated with polydopamine. Then the composite membranes are fabricated with homogeneous distribution of Dopa@BTO NPs in poly(vinylidene fluoridetrifluoroethylene) (P(VDF-TrFE)) matrix. The surface potential of the nanocomposite membranes could be tuned up to -76.8 mV by optimizing the composition ratio and corona poling treatment, which conform to the level of endogenous biopotential. Remarkably, the surface potential of polarized nanocomposite membranes exhibited a dramatic stability with more than half of original surface potential remained up to 12 weeks in the condition of bone defect. In vitro, the membranes encouraged bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) activity and osteogenic differentiation. In vivo, the membranes sustainably maintained the electric microenvironment giving rise to rapid bone regeneration and complete mature bone-structure formation. Our findings evidence that physiological electric potential repair should be paid sufficient attention in biomaterials design, and this concept might provide an innovative and well-suited strategy for bone regenerative therapies. PMID:27389708

  11. Biomimetic strategies for bone repair and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Raucci, Maria G; Guarino, Vincenzo; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2012-01-01

    The osseointegration rate of implants is related to their composition and surface roughness. Implant roughness favors both bone anchoring and biomechanical stability. Osteoconductive calcium phosphate (Ca-P) coatings promote bone healing and apposition, leading to the rapid biological fixation of implants. It has been clearly shown in many publications that Ca-P coating accelerates bone formation around the implant. This review discusses two main routes for the manufacturing of polymer-based osteoconductive scaffolds for tissue engineering, namely the incorporation of bioceramic particles in the scaffold and the coating of a scaffold with a thin layer of apatite through a biomimetic process.

  12. Biomimetic Strategies for Bone Repair and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Raucci, Maria G.; Guarino, Vincenzo; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2012-01-01

    The osseointegration rate of implants is related to their composition and surface roughness. Implant roughness favors both bone anchoring and biomechanical stability. Osteoconductive calcium phosphate (Ca-P) coatings promote bone healing and apposition, leading to the rapid biological fixation of implants. It has been clearly shown in many publications that Ca-P coating accelerates bone formation around the implant. This review discusses two main routes for the manufacturing of polymer-based osteoconductive scaffolds for tissue engineering, namely the incorporation of bioceramic particles in the scaffold and the coating of a scaffold with a thin layer of apatite through a biomimetic process. PMID:24955638

  13. Mechanical testing of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-7 regenerated bone in sheep mandibles.

    PubMed

    Kontaxis, A; Abu-Serriah, M; Ayoub, A F; Barbenel, J C

    2004-01-01

    A new method was developed in this study for testing excised sheep mandibles as a cantilever. The method was used to determine the strength and stiffness of sheep hemi-mandibles including a 35 mm defect bridged by regenerated bone. Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-7 (rhBMP-7) in a bovine collagen type-I carrier was used for the bone regeneration. Initial tests on ten intact sheep mandibles confirmed that the strength, stiffness and area beneath the load-deformation curves of the right and left hemi-mandibles were not significantly different, confirming the validity of using the contra-lateral hemi-mandible as a control side. Complete bone regeneration occurred in six hemi-mandibles treated with rhBMP, but the quality and mechanical properties of the bone were very variable. The new bone in three samples contained fibrous tissue and was weaker and less stiff than the contra-lateral side (strength, 10-20 per cent; stiffness, 6-15 per cent). The other half had better-quality bone and was significantly stiffer and stronger (p < 0.05), with strength 45-63 per cent and stiffness 35-46 per cent of the contra-lateral side. Hemi-mandibles treated with collagen alone had no regenerated bone bridge suggesting that 35 mm is a critical-size bone defect. PMID:15648662

  14. Nanotechnology in the targeted drug delivery for bone diseases and bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wenyi; Wu, Chengtie; Chen, Jiezhong; Xiao, Yin

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a vigorous research area and one of its important applications is in biomedical sciences. Among biomedical applications, targeted drug delivery is one of the most extensively studied subjects. Nanostructured particles and scaffolds have been widely studied for increasing treatment efficacy and specificity of present treatment approaches. Similarly, this technique has been used for treating bone diseases including bone regeneration. In this review, we have summarized and highlighted the recent advancement of nanostructured particles and scaffolds for the treatment of cancer bone metastasis, osteosarcoma, bone infections and inflammatory diseases, osteoarthritis, as well as for bone regeneration. Nanoparticles used to deliver deoxyribonucleic acid and ribonucleic acid molecules to specific bone sites for gene therapies are also included. The investigation of the implications of nanoparticles in bone diseases have just begun, and has already shown some promising potential. Further studies have to be conducted, aimed specifically at assessing targeted delivery and bioactive scaffolds to further improve their efficacy before they can be used clinically.

  15. Distribution of radiological density in bone regenerate in relation to cyclic displacements of bone fragments.

    PubMed

    Filipiak, Jaroslaw; Krawczyk, Artur; Morasiewicz, Leszek

    2009-01-01

    We asked how bone fragment displacement could influence the distribution of radiological density in bone regenerate formed during the process of bone lengthening. The metatarsi of 21 sheep were lengthened by 20 mm by the Ilizarov method. The bone fragments were externally fixed with a specially designed ring external fixator equipped with linear actuator driver system. The test sheep were divided into three experimental groups: the G1 and G2 groups (N = 8) and the GR group (N = 5)--the reference group. In the case of sheep from the G1 and G2 groups, the lengthening was supplemented with mechanical stimulation of the regenerate in the form of cyclic bone fragment displacements (CBFDs) with the amplitudes of 1 mm (G1) and 2 mm (G1). Mechanical stimulation was applied over 30 days for 1 h per day with a frequency of 1 Hz. Eight weeks after the procedure the sheep were sacrificed in accordance with the required procedures. The analysis of the degree of bone regenerate mineralization involved the studies based on the CT scanning. The analysis of the results obtained is based on the paramenter called the degree of regenerate mineralization (RMD). The analysis of radiological density was carried out in the selected measurement areas. Such an area was located in three horizontal zones, taking into account the regenerate height, i.e. in its middle part (half regenerate length); the top part, 2 mm from the edge of the proximal fragment; and the bottom part, 2 mm from the edge of the distal fragment. The value of the RMD parameter varies significantly, depending on the bone regenerate area. The results obtained show that the CBFD = 2 mm accelerates the rate of mineralization of an eight-week-old regenerate. In the case of CBFD = 1 mm, the mineralization rate is lower by more than a dozen per cent.

  16. Craniofacial defect regeneration using engineered bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Hallgrimsson, Benedikt; Putnins, Edward E

    2011-10-01

    Large craniofacial bony defects remain a significant clinical challenge. Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) constitute a multipotent population. Previously, we developed a novel approach for BM-MSC expansion on 3D CultiSpher-S gelatin microcarrier beads in spin culture with preservation of their multipotentiality, reduction of apoptosis, and enhancement of bone formation in vivo. Here, we hypothesized that such cultured BM-MSCs without exogenous growth factors would respond to the orthopedic microenvironment, thus promoting craniofacial defect regeneration. BM-MSCs isolated from green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic rats were ex vivo expanded and transplanted into critical-sized (5-mm diameter) rat calvaria defects. Gelatin beads or defect alone served as controls. By 28 and 42 days, rats were sacrificed for microcomputed tomography (microCT), histologic, and immunohistochemistry examination. MicroCT results demonstrated that BM-MSCs were a statistically significant factor contributing to new bone volume regeneration. Histologic assessment showed that the BM-MSCs group produced more and higher quality new bone compared with beads or defect-alone groups in both osteoinductive and osteoconductive manners. Specifically, immunohistochemical staining identified GFP(+) cells residing in new bone lacunae in conjunction with non-GFP(+) cells. Therefore, ex vivo expanded BM-MSCs at least in part regenerated critical-sized calvaria defects by osteogenic differentiation in vivo.

  17. [Contribution of low-intensity pulsed ultrasounds to bone regeneration].

    PubMed

    Gleizal, A; Lavandier, B; Paris, M; Béra, J-C

    2011-09-01

    A maxillo-facial surgeon manages patients with bone defects due to trauma, malformations or of iatrogenic origin. The surgical management has potentially deleterious effects and its cost for society is increasing. Hence, it is crucial to develop techniques stimulating bone growth, stimulating the regeneration of a fracture or filling bone deficit. Ultrasounds (US), vibrations of the same nature as sound but with frequencies above the highest audible frequency for men (above 20 kHz), are used in many fields, particularly in medicine, usually at frequencies of around 0.5 to 5 MHz (million cycles per second). Their biological effects are not fully understood yet, but it is well known that US have effects on organic tissues when their mechanical energy is converted into thermic energy. These effects induce vasodilation and modification of membrane permeability. Several publications present the benefit of US for the stimulation of bone regeneration after a fracture. We present an overview of current knowledge on the effect of pulsed ultrasound on craniofacial bone regeneration, with study results conducted within Inserm unit U1032 in Lyon, the current reference lab on this issue. PMID:21820690

  18. [The influence of mesenchymal stem cells on bone tissue regeneration upon implantation of demineralized bone matrix].

    PubMed

    Krugliakov, P V; Sokolova, I B; Zin'kova, N N; Viĭde, S V; Cherednichenko, N N; Kisliakova, T V; Polyntsev, D G

    2005-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are resident pluripotent cells of bone marrow stroma. MSC are able to differentiate into chondroblasts, adipocytes, neurons, glia, cardiomyocytes, or osteoblasts. The problem of MSC usage in cell therapy of bone defects is widely discussed at present. The experiments were carried out using rats of inbred line Wistar-Kyoto. MSC were isolated from bone marrow and cultivated in vitro. Demineralized bone matrices (DBM) were obtained from parietal bones of rats and hens. Part of DBM was loaded with MSC. Bone defects were made in cranium parietal regions. DBM with or without MSC or metal plates were transplanted in these regions. It was shown that the application of MSC increased angiogenesis and osteogenesis in the damaged bone. The implantation of rat's DBM with MSC led to the formation of a full value bone. MSC suppressed inflammation, when transplantation of hen's DBM was carried out. The application of MSC always improved bone tissue regeneration.

  19. Pullulan microcarriers for bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Aydogdu, Hazal; Keskin, Dilek; Baran, Erkan Turker; Tezcaner, Aysen

    2016-06-01

    Microcarrier systems offer a convenient way to repair bone defects as injectable cell carriers that can be applied with small incisions owing to their small size and spherical shape. In this study, pullulan (PULL) microspheres were fabricated and characterized as cell carriers for bone tissue engineering applications. PULL was cross-linked by trisodium trimetaphosphate (STMP) to enhance the stability of the microspheres. Improved cytocompatibility was achieved by silk fibroin (SF) coating and biomimetic mineralization on the surface by incubating in simulated body fluid (SBF). X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescent microscopy analysis confirmed biomimetic mineralization and SF coating on microspheres. The degradation analysis revealed that PULL microspheres had a slow degradation rate with 8% degradation in two weeks period indicating that the microspheres would support the formation of new bone tissue. Furthermore, the mechanical tests showed that the microspheres had a high mechanical stability that was significantly enhanced with the biomimetic mineralization. In vitro cell culture studies with SaOs-2 cells showed that cell viability was higher on SF and SBF coated microspheres on 7th day compared to PULL ones under dynamic conditions. Alkaline phosphatase activity was higher for SF coated microspheres in comparison to uncoated microspheres when dynamic culture condition was applied. The results suggest that both organic and inorganic surface modifications can be applied on PULL microspheres to prepare a biocompatible microcarrier system with suitable properties for bone tissue engineering. PMID:27040238

  20. Development of laminated fiber-reinforced nanocomposites for bone regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Weijie

    There have been numerous efforts to develop synthetic and/or natural tissue engineering scaffolds that are suitable for bone regeneration applications to replace autograft and allograft bones. Current biomaterials as a scaffold for bone regeneration are limited by the extent of degradation concurrent with bone formation, mechanical strength, and the extent of osteogenic differentiation of marrow stromal cells migrating from the surrounding tissues. In this project, a novel laminated nanocomposite scaffold is fabricated, consisting of poly (L-lactide ethylene oxide fumarate) (PLEOF) hydrogel reinforced with poly (L-lactic acid) (PLLA) electrospun nanofibers and hydroxyapatite (HA) nanoparticles. PLEOF is a novel in situ crosslinkable macromer synthesized from biocompatible building units which can be functionalized with bioactive peptides like the cell-adhesive Arg--Gly--Asp (RGD) amino acid sequence. The hydrophilicity and degradation rate of the macromer can be tailored to a particular application by controlling the ratio of PEG to PLA blocks in the macromer and the unsaturated fumarate units can be used for in-situ crosslinking. The PLLA nanofibers were electrospun from high molecular weight PLLA. The laminated nanocomposites were fabricated by dry-hand lay up technique followed by compression molding and thermal crosslinking. The laminated nanocomposites were evaluated with respect to degradation, water uptake, mechanical strength, and the extent of osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal (BMS) cells. Laminates with or without HA nanoparticles showed modulus values much higher than that of trabecular bone (50-100 MPa). The effect of laminated nanocomposites on osteogenic differentiation of BMS cells was determined in terms of cell number, ALPase activity and calcium content. Our results demonstrate that grafting RGD peptide and HA nanoparticles to a PLEOF hydrogel reinforced with PLLA nanofibers synergistically enhance osteogenic differentiation of BMS

  1. Bone regeneration performance of surface-treated porous titanium.

    PubMed

    Amin Yavari, Saber; van der Stok, Johan; Chai, Yoke Chin; Wauthle, Ruben; Tahmasebi Birgani, Zeinab; Habibovic, Pamela; Mulier, Michiel; Schrooten, Jan; Weinans, Harrie; Zadpoor, Amir Abbas

    2014-08-01

    The large surface area of highly porous titanium structures produced by additive manufacturing can be modified using biofunctionalizing surface treatments to improve the bone regeneration performance of these otherwise bioinert biomaterials. In this longitudinal study, we applied and compared three types of biofunctionalizing surface treatments, namely acid-alkali (AcAl), alkali-acid-heat treatment (AlAcH), and anodizing-heat treatment (AnH). The effects of treatments on apatite forming ability, cell attachment, cell proliferation, osteogenic gene expression, bone regeneration, biomechanical stability, and bone-biomaterial contact were evaluated using apatite forming ability test, cell culture assays, and animal experiments. It was found that AcAl and AnH work through completely different routes. While AcAl improved the apatite forming ability of as-manufactured (AsM) specimens, it did not have any positive effect on cell attachment, cell proliferation, and osteogenic gene expression. In contrast, AnH did not improve the apatite forming ability of AsM specimens but showed significantly better cell attachment, cell proliferation, and expression of osteogenic markers. The performance of AlAcH in terms of apatite forming ability and cell response was in between both extremes of AnH and AsM. AcAl resulted in significantly larger volumes of newly formed bone within the pores of the scaffold as compared to AnH. Interestingly, larger volumes of regenerated bone did not translate into improved biomechanical stability as AnH exhibited significantly better biomechanical stability as compared to AcAl suggesting that the beneficial effects of cell-nanotopography modulations somehow surpassed the benefits of improved apatite forming ability. In conclusion, the applied surface treatments have considerable effects on apatite forming ability, cell attachment, cell proliferation, and bone ingrowth of the studied biomaterials. The relationship between these properties and the bone

  2. Infection, inflammation, and bone regeneration: a paradoxical relationship.

    PubMed

    Thomas, M V; Puleo, D A

    2011-09-01

    Various strategies have been developed to promote bone regeneration in the craniofacial region. Most of these interventions utilize implantable materials or devices. Infections resulting from colonization of these implants may result in local tissue destruction in a manner analogous to periodontitis. This destruction is mediated via the expression of various inflammatory mediators and tissue-destructive enzymes. Given the well-documented association among microbial biofilms, inflammatory mediators, and tissue destruction, it seems reasonable to assume that inflammation may interfere with bone healing and regeneration. Paradoxically, recent evidence also suggests that the presence of certain pro-inflammatory mediators is actually required for bone healing. Bone injury (e.g., subsequent to a fracture or surgical intervention) is followed by a choreographed cascade of events, some of which are dependent upon the presence of pro-inflammatory mediators. If inflammation resolves promptly, then proper bone healing may occur. However, if inflammation persists (which might occur in the presence of an infected implant or graft material), then the continued inflammatory response may result in suboptimal bone formation. Thus, the effect of a given mediator is dependent upon the temporal context in which it is expressed. Better understanding of this temporal sequence may be used to optimize regenerative outcomes. PMID:21248364

  3. Histomorphological evaluation of Compound bone of Granulated Ricinus in bone regeneration in rabbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavan Mateus, Christiano; Orivaldo Chierice, Gilberto; Okamoto, Tetuo

    2011-09-01

    Histological evaluation is an effective method in the behavioral description of the qualitative and quantitative implanted materials. The research validated the performance of Compound bone of Granulated Ricinus on bone regeneration with the histomorphological analysis results. Were selected 30 rabbits, females, divided into 3 groups of 10 animals (G1, G2, G3) with a postoperative time of 45, 70 and 120 days respectively. Each animal is undergone 2 bone lesions in the ilium, one implemented in the material: Compound bone of Granulated Ricinus and the other for control. After the euthanasia, the iliac bone was removed, identified and subjected to histological procedure. The evaluation histological, histomorphological results were interpreted and described by quantitative and qualitative analysis based facts verified in the three experimental groups evaluating the rate of absorption of the material in the tissue regeneration, based on the neo-bone formation. The histomorphologic results classified as a material biocompatible and biologically active. Action in regeneration by bone resorption occurs slowly and gradually. Knowing the time and rate of absorption and neo-formation bone biomaterial, which can be determined in the bone segment applicable in the clinical surgical area.

  4. Bone Regeneration from PLGA Micro-Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Oller, Inmaculada; Padial-Molina, Miguel; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; O'Valle, Francisco; Jódar-Reyes, Ana Belén; Peula-García, Jose Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) is one of the most widely used synthetic polymers for development of delivery systems for drugs and therapeutic biomolecules and as component of tissue engineering applications. Its properties and versatility allow it to be a reference polymer in manufacturing of nano- and microparticles to encapsulate and deliver a wide variety of hydrophobic and hydrophilic molecules. It additionally facilitates and extends its use to encapsulate biomolecules such as proteins or nucleic acids that can be released in a controlled way. This review focuses on the use of nano/microparticles of PLGA as a delivery system of one of the most commonly used growth factors in bone tissue engineering, the bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2). Thus, all the needed requirements to reach a controlled delivery of BMP2 using PLGA particles as a main component have been examined. The problems and solutions for the adequate development of this system with a great potential in cell differentiation and proliferation processes under a bone regenerative point of view are discussed. PMID:26509156

  5. Bone Regeneration from PLGA Micro-Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Oller, Inmaculada; Padial-Molina, Miguel; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; O'Valle, Francisco; Jódar-Reyes, Ana Belén; Peula-García, Jose Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) is one of the most widely used synthetic polymers for development of delivery systems for drugs and therapeutic biomolecules and as component of tissue engineering applications. Its properties and versatility allow it to be a reference polymer in manufacturing of nano- and microparticles to encapsulate and deliver a wide variety of hydrophobic and hydrophilic molecules. It additionally facilitates and extends its use to encapsulate biomolecules such as proteins or nucleic acids that can be released in a controlled way. This review focuses on the use of nano/microparticles of PLGA as a delivery system of one of the most commonly used growth factors in bone tissue engineering, the bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2). Thus, all the needed requirements to reach a controlled delivery of BMP2 using PLGA particles as a main component have been examined. The problems and solutions for the adequate development of this system with a great potential in cell differentiation and proliferation processes under a bone regenerative point of view are discussed. PMID:26509156

  6. Excavating the Role of Aloe Vera Wrapped Mesoporous Hydroxyapatite Frame Ornamentation in Newly Architectured Polyurethane Scaffolds for Osteogenesis and Guided Bone Regeneration with Microbial Protection.

    PubMed

    Selvakumar, M; Pawar, Harpreet Singh; Francis, Nimmy K; Das, Bodhisatwa; Dhara, Santanu; Chattopadhyay, Santanu

    2016-03-01

    Guided bone regeneration (GBR) scaffolds are unsuccessful in many clinical applications due to a high incidence of postoperative infection. The objective of this work is to fabricate GBR with an anti-infective electrospun scaffold by ornamenting segmented polyurethane (SPU) with two-dimensional Aloe vera wrapped mesoporous hydroxyapatite (Al-mHA) nanorods. The antimicrobial characteristic of the scaffold has been retrieved from the prepared Al-mHA frame with high aspect ratio (∼14.2) via biosynthesis route using Aloe vera (Aloe barbadensis miller) extract. The Al-mHA frame was introduced into an unprecedented SPU matrix (solution polymerized) based on combinatorial soft segments of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL), poly(ethylene carbonate) (PEC), and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), by an in situ technique followed by electrospinning to fabricate scaffolds. For comparison, pristine mHA nanorods are also ornamented into it. An enzymatic ring-opening polymerization technique was adapted to synthesize soft segment of (PCL-PEC-b-PDMS). Structure elucidation of the synthesized polymers is established by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Sparingly, Al-mHA ornamented scaffolds exhibit tremendous improvement (175%) in the mechanical properties with promising antimicrobial activity against various human pathogens. After confirmation of high osteoconductivity, improved biodegradation, and excellent biocompatibility against osteoblast-like MG63 cells (in vitro), the scaffolds were implanted in rabbits as an animal model by subcutaneous and intraosseous (tibial) sites. Improved in vivo biocompatibilities, biodegradation, osteoconductivity, and the ability to provide an adequate biomimetic environment for biomineralization for GBR of the scaffolds (SPU and ornamented SPUs) have been found from the various histological sections. Early cartilage formation, endochondral ossification, and rapid bone healing at 4 weeks were found in the defects filled with Al-mHA ornamented

  7. Excavating the Role of Aloe Vera Wrapped Mesoporous Hydroxyapatite Frame Ornamentation in Newly Architectured Polyurethane Scaffolds for Osteogenesis and Guided Bone Regeneration with Microbial Protection.

    PubMed

    Selvakumar, M; Pawar, Harpreet Singh; Francis, Nimmy K; Das, Bodhisatwa; Dhara, Santanu; Chattopadhyay, Santanu

    2016-03-01

    Guided bone regeneration (GBR) scaffolds are unsuccessful in many clinical applications due to a high incidence of postoperative infection. The objective of this work is to fabricate GBR with an anti-infective electrospun scaffold by ornamenting segmented polyurethane (SPU) with two-dimensional Aloe vera wrapped mesoporous hydroxyapatite (Al-mHA) nanorods. The antimicrobial characteristic of the scaffold has been retrieved from the prepared Al-mHA frame with high aspect ratio (∼14.2) via biosynthesis route using Aloe vera (Aloe barbadensis miller) extract. The Al-mHA frame was introduced into an unprecedented SPU matrix (solution polymerized) based on combinatorial soft segments of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL), poly(ethylene carbonate) (PEC), and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), by an in situ technique followed by electrospinning to fabricate scaffolds. For comparison, pristine mHA nanorods are also ornamented into it. An enzymatic ring-opening polymerization technique was adapted to synthesize soft segment of (PCL-PEC-b-PDMS). Structure elucidation of the synthesized polymers is established by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Sparingly, Al-mHA ornamented scaffolds exhibit tremendous improvement (175%) in the mechanical properties with promising antimicrobial activity against various human pathogens. After confirmation of high osteoconductivity, improved biodegradation, and excellent biocompatibility against osteoblast-like MG63 cells (in vitro), the scaffolds were implanted in rabbits as an animal model by subcutaneous and intraosseous (tibial) sites. Improved in vivo biocompatibilities, biodegradation, osteoconductivity, and the ability to provide an adequate biomimetic environment for biomineralization for GBR of the scaffolds (SPU and ornamented SPUs) have been found from the various histological sections. Early cartilage formation, endochondral ossification, and rapid bone healing at 4 weeks were found in the defects filled with Al-mHA ornamented

  8. Stromal cells and stem cells in clinical bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Grayson, Warren L.; Bunnell, Bruce A.; Martin, Elizabeth; Frazier, Trivia; Hung, Ben P.; Gimble, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Stem-cell-mediated bone repair has been used in clinical trials for the regeneration of large craniomaxillofacial defects, to slow the process of bone degeneration in patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head and for prophylactic treatment of distal tibial fractures. Successful regenerative outcomes in these investigations have provided a solid foundation for wider use of stromal cells in skeletal repair therapy. However, employing stromal cells to facilitate or enhance bone repair is far from being adopted into clinical practice. Scientific, technical, practical and regulatory obstacles prevent the widespread therapeutic use of stromal cells. Ironically, one of the major challenges lies in the limited understanding of the mechanisms via which transplanted cells mediate regeneration. Animal models have been used to provide insight, but these models largely fail to reproduce the nuances of human diseases and bone defects. Consequently, the development of targeted approaches to optimize cell-mediated outcomes is difficult. In this Review, we highlight the successes and challenges reported in several clinical trials that involved the use of bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal or adipose-tissue-derived stromal cells. We identify several obstacles blocking the mainstream use of stromal cells to enhance skeletal repair and highlight technological innovations or areas in which novel techniques might be particularly fruitful in continuing to advance the field of skeletal regenerative medicine. PMID:25560703

  9. Bacterial Cellulose-Hydroxyapatite Nanocomposites for Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Saska, S.; Barud, H. S.; Gaspar, A. M. M.; Marchetto, R.; Ribeiro, S. J. L.; Messaddeq, Y.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and to evaluate the biological properties of bacterial cellulose-hydroxyapatite (BC-HA) nanocomposite membranes for bone regeneration. Nanocomposites were prepared from bacterial cellulose membranes sequentially incubated in solutions of CaCl2 followed by Na2HPO4. BC-HA membranes were evaluated in noncritical bone defects in rat tibiae at 1, 4, and 16 weeks. Thermogravimetric analyses showed that the amount of the mineral phase was 40%–50% of the total weight. Spectroscopy, electronic microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray analyses, and X-ray diffraction showed formation of HA crystals on BC nanofibres. Low crystallinity HA crystals presented Ca/P a molar ratio of 1.5 (calcium-deficient HA), similar to physiological bone. Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy analysis showed bands assigned to phosphate and carbonate ions. In vivo tests showed no inflammatory reaction after 1 week. After 4 weeks, defects were observed to be completely filled in by new bone tissue. The BC-HA membranes were effective for bone regeneration. PMID:21961004

  10. Cellular compatibility of a gamma-irradiated modified siloxane-poly(lactic acid)-calcium carbonate hybrid membrane for guided bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Naoshi; Machigashira, Miho; Yamashita, Daisuke; Shirakata, Yoshinori; Kasuga, Toshihiro; Noguchi, Kazuyuki; Ban, Seiji

    2011-01-01

    A bi-layered silicon-releasable membrane consisting of a siloxane-poly(lactic acid) (PLA)-vaterite hybrid material (Si-PVH) microfiber mesh and a PLA microfiber mesh has been developed by an electrospinning method for guided bone regeneration (GBR) application. The bi-layered membrane was modified to a three-laminar structure by sandwiching an additional PLA microfiber mesh between the Si-PVH and PLA microfiber meshes (Si-PVH/PLA membrane). In this study, the influence of gamma irradiation, used for sterilization, on biological properties of the Si-PVH/PLA membrane was evaluated with osteoblasts and fibroblasts. After gamma irradiation, while the average molecular weight of the Si-PVH/PLA membrane decreased, the Si-PVH/PLA membrane promoted cell proliferation and differentiation (alkaline phosphatase activity and calcification) of osteoblasts, compared with the poly(lactide-co-glycolide) membrane. These results suggest that the gamma-irradiated Si-PVH/PLA membrane is biocompatible with both fibroblasts and osteoblasts, and may have an application for GBR. PMID:21946495

  11. Skeletal cell fate decisions within periosteum and bone marrow during bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Colnot, Céline

    2009-02-01

    Bone repair requires the mobilization of adult skeletal stem cells/progenitors to allow deposition of cartilage and bone at the injury site. These stem cells/progenitors are believed to come from multiple sources including the bone marrow and the periosteum. The goal of this study was to establish the cellular contributions of bone marrow and periosteum to bone healing in vivo and to assess the effect of the tissue environment on cell differentiation within bone marrow and periosteum. Results show that periosteal injuries heal by endochondral ossification, whereas bone marrow injuries heal by intramembranous ossification, indicating that distinct cellular responses occur within these tissues during repair. [corrected] Next, lineage analyses were used to track the fate of cells derived from periosteum, bone marrow, and endosteum, a subcompartment of the bone marrow. Skeletal progenitor cells were found to be recruited locally and concurrently from periosteum and/or bone marrow/endosteum during bone repair. Periosteum and bone marrow/endosteum both gave rise to osteoblasts, whereas the periosteum was the major source of chondrocytes. Finally, results show that intrinsic and environmental signals modulate cell fate decisions within these tissues. In conclusion, this study sheds light into the origins of skeletal stem cells/progenitors during bone regeneration and indicates that periosteum, endosteum, and bone marrow contain pools of stem cells/progenitors with distinct osteogenic and chondrogenic potentials that vary with the tissue environment.

  12. Real-Time Assessment of Guided Bone Regeneration in Standardized Calvarial Defects in Rats Using Bio-Oss With and Without Collagen Membrane: An In Vivo Microcomputed Tomographic and Histologic Experiment.

    PubMed

    Nooh, Nasser; Ramalingam, Sundar; Al-Kindi, Mohammed; Al-Rasheed, Abdulaziz; Al-Hamdan, Khalid S; Al-Hezaimi, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    In vivo microcomputed tomography (μCT) enables real-time assessment of bone regeneration. The aim of this μCT and histologic experiment was to assess guided bone regeneration (GBR) around standardized calvarial defects in rats using particulate graft material (Bio-Oss) with and without collagen membranes (CMs). Eighteen female Sprague-Dawley rats aged 6 weeks and weighing 300 g were used. With the rats under general anesthesia, calvaria were exposed and a full-thickness standardized defect was created on the parietal bone. For treatment, rats were randomly assigned to the following three groups: (1) CM group; (2) Bio-Oss group; and (3) Bio-Oss + CM group. Bone volume and bone mineral density (BMD) of newly formed bone (NFB) and remnant bone particles were measured at baseline and 2, 4, 6, and 10 weeks after the operations using real-time in vivo μCT. At 10 weeks, all animals were sacrificed and calvarial tissues were assessed histologically. In the CM group, a significant increase in mean ± standard deviation (SD) BMD of NFB was observed at 6 weeks (0.32 ± 0.02 g/mm(3)) (P < .01) compared with baseline. In the Bio-Oss group, mean ± SD volume (3.03 ± 0.14 mm(3)) (P < .05) and BMD (0.14 ± 0.01 g/mm(3)) of NFB significantly increased at 6 weeks compared with baseline (P < .01). In the Bio-Oss + CM group, mean ± SD volume (0.98 ± 0.19 mm(3)) and BMD (0.13 ± 0.01 g/mm(3)) of NFB significantly increased at 4 weeks compared with baseline (P < .01). In th Bio-Oss + CM group, mean ± SD volume (3.5 ± 0.7 mm(3)) and BMD (0.44 ± 0.03 g/mm(3)) of remnant bone particles were significantly reduced at 10 weeks compared with baseline values (5.8 ± 0.96 mm(3) and 1.3 ± 0.02 g/mm(3)) (P < .05). Although histologic analysis revealed NFB in all the study groups, the Bio-Oss + CM group exhibited the most. The results of this study revealed that, in real time, new bone formation starts as early as 4 weeks in standardized calvarial defects undergoing GBR with Bio-Oss + CM

  13. Porous calcium phosphate cement for alveolar bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Félix Lanao, R P; Hoekstra, J W M; Wolke, J G C; Leeuwenburgh, S C G; Plachokova, A S; Boerman, O C; van den Beucken, J J J P; Jansen, J A

    2014-06-01

    The present study aimed to provide information on material degradation and subsequent alveolar bone formation, using composites consisting of calcium phosphate cement (CPC) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) with different microsphere morphology (hollow vs dense). In addition to the plain CPC-PLGA composites, loading the microspheres with the growth factors platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) was investigated. A total of four different CPC composites were applied into one-wall mandible bone defects in beagle dogs in order to evaluate them as candidates for alveolar bone regeneration. These composites consisted of CPC and hollow or dense PLGA microspheres, with or without the addition of PDGF-IGF growth factor combination (CPC-hPLGA, CPC-dPLGA, CPC-hPLGAGF , CPC-dPLGAGF ). Histological evaluation revealed significantly more bone formation in CPC-dPLGA than in CPC-hPLGA composites. The combination PDGF-IGF enhanced bone formation in CPC-hPLGA materials, but significantly more bone formation occurred when CPC-dPLGA was used, with or without the addition of growth factors. The findings demonstrated that CPC-dPLGA composite was the biologically superior material for use as an off-the-shelf material, due to its good biocompatibility, enhanced degradability and superior bone formation.

  14. Hierarchically engineered fibrous scaffolds for bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sachot, Nadège; Castaño, Oscar; Mateos-Timoneda, Miguel A.; Engel, Elisabeth; Planell, Josep A.

    2013-01-01

    Surface properties of biomaterials play a major role in the governing of cell functionalities. It is well known that mechanical, chemical and nanotopographic cues, for example, influence cell proliferation and differentiation. Here, we present a novel coating protocol to produce hierarchically engineered fibrous scaffolds with tailorable surface characteristics, which mimic bone extracellular matrix. Based on the sol–gel method and a succession of surface treatments, hollow electrospun polylactic acid fibres were coated with a silicon–calcium–phosphate bioactive organic–inorganic glass. Compared with pure polymeric fibres that showed a completely smooth surface, the coated fibres exhibited a nanostructured topography and greater roughness. They also showed improved hydrophilic properties and a Young's modulus sixfold higher than non-coated ones, while remaining fully flexible and easy to handle. Rat mesenchymal stem cells cultured on these fibres showed great cellular spreading and interactions with the material. This protocol can be transferred to other structures and glasses, allowing the fabrication of various materials with well-defined features. This novel approach represents therefore a valuable improvement in the production of artificial matrices able to direct stem cell fate through physical and chemical interactions. PMID:23985738

  15. Osteoinductive silk-silica composite biomaterials for bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Mieszawska, Aneta J.; Fourligas, Nikolaos; Georgakoudi, Irene; Ouhib, Nadia; Belton, David J.; Perry, Carole C.; Kaplan, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Osteoinductive and biodegradable composite biomaterials for bone regeneration were prepared by combining silk fibroin with silica particles. The influence of these composite systems on osteogenesis was evaluated with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) subjected to osteogenic differentiation. hMSCs adhered, proliferated, and differentiated towards osteogenic lineages on silk/silica films. The addition of the silica to the silk films influenced gene expression leading to upregulation of bone sialoprotein (BSP) and collagen type 1 (Col 1) osteogenic markers. Evidence for early bone formation in the form of collagen fibers and apatite nodules was obtained on the silk/silica films. Collagen fibers were closely associated with apatite deposits and overall collagen content was higher for the silica containing samples. Also, smaller sized silica particles (24 nm – 2 μm) with large surface area facilitated silica biodegradation in vitro through particle dissolution, leading to ~5 fold decrease in silica content over 10 weeks. These results indicate suitability of silk/silica composite system towards bone regeneration, where degradation/remodeling rates of the organic and inorganic components can be controlled. PMID:20817293

  16. Systemic administration of lithium improves distracted bone regeneration in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuemei; Zhu, Songsong; Jiang, Xiaowen; Li, Yunfeng; Song, Donghui; Hu, Jing

    2015-06-01

    Lithium, popular in psychology field, has been recognized as an activator component of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. The effect of lithium on osteogenesis or on the human fracture risk has been widely reported. However, little is known on its role in distraction osteogenesis to date. In this study, the effect of systematic administrated lithium on distraction osteogenesis in a rat model was investigated. The osteotomy was performed on the right tibia in 40 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Then they were randomly assigned into two equal groups (n = 20/group), which underwent Lithium or saline treatment through gastric gavage until the day they were killed. One week after the osteotomy, the tibias were distracted for 14 days (rate 0.6 mm/day). Following 8 weeks consolidation period, the distracted tibias in both groups were harvested and examined by X-ray plain radiography, histology, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, Micro-CT, and biomechanical tests. The results showed that lithium group possessed higher bone mineral density, more mature new bone tissue, and better regenerated bone mass continuity in the distraction gaps without any local or systemic adverse effects was encountered. This study suggested lithium could increase bony callus ossification volume and accelerate distracted tissue mineralization to facilitate bone regeneration in distraction gap.

  17. Preparation and In Vitro Biological Evaluation of Octacalcium Phosphate/Bioactive Glass-Chitosan/ Alginate Composite Membranes Potential for Bone Guided Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Xu, Sanzhong; Chen, Xiaoyi; Yang, Xianyan; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Guojing; Shao, Huifeng; He, Yong; Gou, Zhongru

    2016-06-01

    The chitosan/alginate-trace element-codoped octacalcium phosphate/nano-sized bioactive glass (CS/ALG-teOCP/nBG) composite membranes were prepared by a layer-by-layer coating method for the functional requirement of guided bone regeneration (GBR). The morphology, mechanical properties and moisture content of the membranes was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation, mechanical and swelling test. The results showed that the teOCP/nBG distributed uniformly in the composite membranes, and such as-prepared composite membrane exhibited an excellent tensile strength, accompanying with mechanical decay with immersion in aqueous medium. Cell culture and MTT assays showed that the surface microstructure and the ion dissolution products from teOCP/nBG components could enhance the cell proliferation, and especially the composite membranes was suitable for supporting the adhesion and growth behavior of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) in comparison with the CS/ALG pure polymer membranes. These results suggest that the new CS/ALG-teOCP/nBG composite membrane is highly bioactive and biodegradable, and favorable for guiding bone regeneration. PMID:27427599

  18. Variations to the Nanotube Surface for Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Frandsen, Christine J.; Brammer, Karla S.; Jin, Sungho

    2013-01-01

    The complex mechanisms of the bone cell-surface interactions are yet to be completely understood, and researchers continue to strive to uncover the fully optimized implant material for perfect osseointegration. A particularly fascinating area of research involves the study of nanostructured surfaces, which are believed to enhance osteogenic behavior, possibly due to the mimicry of components of the extracellular matrix of bone. There is a growing body of data that emphasizes the promise of the titanium oxide (TiO2) nanotube architecture as an advanced orthopedic implant material. The review herein highlights findings regarding TiO2 nanotube surfaces for bone regeneration and the osteogenic effects of minute changes to the surface such as tube size and surface chemistry. PMID:23710182

  19. Efficacy of Mucograft vs Conventional Resorbable Collagen Membranes in Guided Bone Regeneration Around Standardized Calvarial Defects in Rats: A Histologic and Biomechanical Assessment.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, Sundar; Basudan, Amani; Babay, Nadir; Al-Rasheed, Abdulaziz; Nooh, Nasser; Nagshbandi, Jafar; Aldahmash, Abdullah; Atteya, Muhammad; Al-Hezaimi, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Guided bone regeneration (GBR) using a porcine-derived collagen matrix (Mucograft [MG], Geistlich) has not yet been reported. The aim of this histologic and biomechanical study was to compare the efficacy of MG versus resorbable collagen membranes (RCMs) in facilitating GBR around standardized rat calvarial defects. Forty female Wistar albino rats with a mean age and weight of 6 to 9 weeks and 250 to 300 g, respectively, were used. With the rats under general anesthesia, the skin over the calvaria was exposed using a full-thickness flap. A 4.6-mm-diameter standardized calvarial defect was created in the left parietal bone. For treatment, the rats were randomly divided into four groups (n = 10 per group): (1) MG group: the defect was covered with MG; (2) RCM group: the defect was covered with an RCM; (3) MG + bone group: the defect was filled with bone graft particles and covered by MG; and (4) RCM + bone group: the defect was filled with bone graft particles and covered by an RCM. Primary closure was achieved using interrupted resorbable sutures. The animals were sacrificed at 8 weeks after the surgical procedures. Qualitative histologic analysis and biomechanical assessment to identify hardness and elastic modulus of newly formed bone (NFB) were performed. Collected data were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance. Histologic findings revealed NFB with fibrous connective tissue in all groups. The quantity of NFB was highest in the RCM + bone group. Statistically significant differences in the hardness (F = 567.69, dfN = 3, dfD = 36, P < .001) and elastic modulus (F = 294.19, dfN = 3, dfD = 36, P < .001) of NFB were found between the groups. Although the RCM + bone group had the highest mean ± standard deviation (SD) hardness of NFB (531.4 ± 24.9 MPa), the RCM group had the highest mean ± SD elastic modulus of NFB (18.63 ± 1.89 GPa). The present study demonstrated that RCMs are better than MG at enhancing new bone formation in standardized

  20. Salicylic Acid-Based Polymers for Guided Bone Regeneration Using Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Sangeeta; Mitchell, Ashley; Yu, Weiling; Snyder, Sabrina; Uhrich, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) is used clinically to promote spinal fusion, treat complex tibia fractures, and to promote bone formation in craniomaxillofacial surgery. Excessive bone formation at sites where BMP-2 has been applied is an established complication and one that could be corrected by guided tissue regeneration methods. In this study, anti-inflammatory polymers containing salicylic acid [salicylic acid-based poly(anhydride-ester), SAPAE] were electrospun with polycaprolactone (PCL) to create thin flexible matrices for use as guided bone regeneration membranes. SAPAE polymers hydrolyze to release salicylic acid, which is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. PCL was used to enhance the mechanical integrity of the matrices. Two different SAPAE-containing membranes were produced and compared: fast-degrading (FD-SAPAE) and slow-degrading (SD-SAPAE) membranes that release salicylic acid at a faster and slower rate, respectively. Rat femur defects were treated with BMP-2 and wrapped with FD-SAPAE, SD-SAPAE, or PCL membrane or were left unwrapped. The effects of different membranes on bone formation within and outside of the femur defects were measured by histomorphometry and microcomputed tomography. Bone formation within the defect was not affected by membrane wrapping at BMP-2 doses of 12 μg or more. In contrast, the FD-SAPAE membrane significantly reduced bone formation outside the defect compared with all other treatments. The rapid release of salicylic acid from the FD-SAPAE membrane suggests that localized salicylic acid treatment during the first few days of BMP-2 treatment can limit ectopic bone formation. The data support development of SAPAE polymer membranes for guided bone regeneration applications as well as barriers to excessive bone formation. PMID:25813520

  1. Salicylic Acid-Based Polymers for Guided Bone Regeneration Using Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Sangeeta; Mitchell, Ashley; Yu, Weiling; Snyder, Sabrina; Uhrich, Kathryn; O'Connor, J Patrick

    2015-07-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) is used clinically to promote spinal fusion, treat complex tibia fractures, and to promote bone formation in craniomaxillofacial surgery. Excessive bone formation at sites where BMP-2 has been applied is an established complication and one that could be corrected by guided tissue regeneration methods. In this study, anti-inflammatory polymers containing salicylic acid [salicylic acid-based poly(anhydride-ester), SAPAE] were electrospun with polycaprolactone (PCL) to create thin flexible matrices for use as guided bone regeneration membranes. SAPAE polymers hydrolyze to release salicylic acid, which is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. PCL was used to enhance the mechanical integrity of the matrices. Two different SAPAE-containing membranes were produced and compared: fast-degrading (FD-SAPAE) and slow-degrading (SD-SAPAE) membranes that release salicylic acid at a faster and slower rate, respectively. Rat femur defects were treated with BMP-2 and wrapped with FD-SAPAE, SD-SAPAE, or PCL membrane or were left unwrapped. The effects of different membranes on bone formation within and outside of the femur defects were measured by histomorphometry and microcomputed tomography. Bone formation within the defect was not affected by membrane wrapping at BMP-2 doses of 12 μg or more. In contrast, the FD-SAPAE membrane significantly reduced bone formation outside the defect compared with all other treatments. The rapid release of salicylic acid from the FD-SAPAE membrane suggests that localized salicylic acid treatment during the first few days of BMP-2 treatment can limit ectopic bone formation. The data support development of SAPAE polymer membranes for guided bone regeneration applications as well as barriers to excessive bone formation.

  2. Real-Time Assessment of Guided Bone Regeneration in Standardized Calvarial Defects Using a Combination of Bone Graft and Platelet-Derived Growth Factor With and Without Collagen Membrane: An In Vivo Microcomputed Tomographic and Histologic Experiment in Rats.

    PubMed

    Alrasheed, Abdulaziz; Al-Ahmari, Fatemah; Ramalingam, Sundar; Nooh, Nasser; Wang, Cun-Yu; Al-Hezaimi, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present in vivo microcomputed tomography (μCT) and histologic experiment was to assess the efficacy of guided bone regeneration (GBR) around standardized calvarial defects using recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor (rhPDGF) with and without resorbable collagen membrane (RCM). A total of 50 female Wistar albino rats with a mean age of 7.5 months and mean weight of 275 g were used. The calvarium was exposed following midsagittal scalp incision and flap reflection. A full-thickness standardized calvarial defect (4.6 mm diameter) was created. Study animals were randomly divided into five groups based on biomaterials used for GBR within the defect: (1) no treatment (negative control), (2) bone graft alone (BG), (3) bone graft covered by RCM (BG + RCM), (4) bone graft soaked in rhPDGF (BG + rhPDGF), and (5) bone graft soaked in rhPDGF and covered with RCM (BG + rhPDGF + RCM). In vivo μCT for determination of newly formed bone volume (NFBV) and mineral density (NFBMD) and remnant bone particles volume (RBPV) and mineral density (RBPMD) was done at baseline and at 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks postoperatively. Eight weeks following surgery, the animals were sacrificed and harvested calvarial specimens were subjected to histologic and biomechanical analysis. There was an increase in NFBV and NFBMD associated with a corresponding decrease in RBPV and RBPMD in all the study groups. Two-way analysis of variance revealed significant differences in the measured values within and between the groups across the timelines examined during the study period (P < .05). While the NFBV was significantly higher in the bone graft, BG + RCM, and BG + rhPDGF + RCM groups, the NFBMD was similar in all the groups except negative control. The greatest decreases in RBPV and RBPMD were observed in the BG + rhPDGF + RCM group in comparison to the other groups. Similarly, BG + rhPDGF + RCM groups had hardness and elastic modulus similar to that of natural bone. The in vivo

  3. Evaluation of Bone Regeneration on Polyhydroxyethyl-polymethyl Methacrylate Membrane in a Rabbit Calvarial Defect Model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Somin; Hwang, Yawon; Kashif, Muhammad; Jeong, Dosun; Kim, Gonhyung

    This study was conducted to evaluate the capacity of guiding bone regeneration of polyhydroxyethyl-polymethyl methacrylate (PHEMA-PMMA) membrane as a guided tissue regeneration membrane for bone defects. Two 8-mm diameter transosseous round defects were made at the parietal bone of 18 New Zealand White rabbits. Defects were covered with or without PHEMA-PMMA membrane. Radiological and histological evaluation revealed that the bone tissue over the defect was more regenerated with time in both groups. However, there was significantly more bone regeneration at 8 weeks in the experimental group than the control group (p<0.05). There was no sign of membrane degradation or tissue inflammation and no invasion of muscle and fibrous tissue into defects. PHEMA-PMMA is a potential material for guided tissue regeneration membrane as it induces no adverse tissue reaction and effectively supports selective bone regeneration.

  4. Evaluation of Bone Regeneration on Polyhydroxyethyl-polymethyl Methacrylate Membrane in a Rabbit Calvarial Defect Model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Somin; Hwang, Yawon; Kashif, Muhammad; Jeong, Dosun; Kim, Gonhyung

    This study was conducted to evaluate the capacity of guiding bone regeneration of polyhydroxyethyl-polymethyl methacrylate (PHEMA-PMMA) membrane as a guided tissue regeneration membrane for bone defects. Two 8-mm diameter transosseous round defects were made at the parietal bone of 18 New Zealand White rabbits. Defects were covered with or without PHEMA-PMMA membrane. Radiological and histological evaluation revealed that the bone tissue over the defect was more regenerated with time in both groups. However, there was significantly more bone regeneration at 8 weeks in the experimental group than the control group (p<0.05). There was no sign of membrane degradation or tissue inflammation and no invasion of muscle and fibrous tissue into defects. PHEMA-PMMA is a potential material for guided tissue regeneration membrane as it induces no adverse tissue reaction and effectively supports selective bone regeneration. PMID:27566076

  5. Osteostatin-coated porous titanium can improve early bone regeneration of cortical bone defects in rats.

    PubMed

    van der Stok, Johan; Lozano, Daniel; Chai, Yoke Chin; Amin Yavari, Saber; Bastidas Coral, Angela P; Verhaar, Jan A N; Gómez-Barrena, Enrique; Schrooten, Jan; Jahr, Holger; Zadpoor, Amir A; Esbrit, Pedro; Weinans, Harrie

    2015-05-01

    A promising bone graft substitute is porous titanium. Porous titanium, produced by selective laser melting (SLM), can be made as a completely open porous and load-bearing scaffold that facilitates bone regeneration through osteoconduction. In this study, the bone regenerative capacity of porous titanium is improved with a coating of osteostatin, an osteoinductive peptide that consists of the 107-111 domain of the parathyroid hormone (PTH)-related protein (PTHrP), and the effects of this osteostatin coating on bone regeneration were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. SLM-produced porous titanium received an alkali-acid-heat treatment and was coated with osteostatin through soaking in a 100 nM solution for 24 h or left uncoated. Osteostatin-coated scaffolds contained ∼0.1 μg peptide/g titanium, and in vitro 81% was released within 24 h. Human periosteum-derived osteoprogenitor cells cultured on osteostatin-coated scaffolds did not induce significant changes in osteogenic (alkaline phosphatase [ALP], collagen type 1 [Col1], osteocalcin [OCN], runt-related transcription factor 2 [Runx2]), or angiogenic (vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF]) gene expression; however, it resulted in an upregulation of osteoprotegerin (OPG) gene expression after 24 h and a lower receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RankL):OPG mRNA ratio. In vivo, osteostatin-coated, porous titanium implants increased bone regeneration in critical-sized cortical bone defects (p=0.005). Bone regeneration proceeded until 12 weeks, and femurs grafted with osteostatin-coated implants and uncoated implants recovered, respectively, 66% and 53% of the original femur torque strength (97±31 and 77±53 N·mm, not significant). In conclusion, the osteostatin coating improved bone regeneration of porous titanium. This effect was initiated after a short burst release and might be related to the observed in vitro upregulation of OPG gene expression by osteostatin in osteoprogenitor

  6. Osteostatin-coated porous titanium can improve early bone regeneration of cortical bone defects in rats.

    PubMed

    van der Stok, Johan; Lozano, Daniel; Chai, Yoke Chin; Amin Yavari, Saber; Bastidas Coral, Angela P; Verhaar, Jan A N; Gómez-Barrena, Enrique; Schrooten, Jan; Jahr, Holger; Zadpoor, Amir A; Esbrit, Pedro; Weinans, Harrie

    2015-05-01

    A promising bone graft substitute is porous titanium. Porous titanium, produced by selective laser melting (SLM), can be made as a completely open porous and load-bearing scaffold that facilitates bone regeneration through osteoconduction. In this study, the bone regenerative capacity of porous titanium is improved with a coating of osteostatin, an osteoinductive peptide that consists of the 107-111 domain of the parathyroid hormone (PTH)-related protein (PTHrP), and the effects of this osteostatin coating on bone regeneration were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. SLM-produced porous titanium received an alkali-acid-heat treatment and was coated with osteostatin through soaking in a 100 nM solution for 24 h or left uncoated. Osteostatin-coated scaffolds contained ∼0.1 μg peptide/g titanium, and in vitro 81% was released within 24 h. Human periosteum-derived osteoprogenitor cells cultured on osteostatin-coated scaffolds did not induce significant changes in osteogenic (alkaline phosphatase [ALP], collagen type 1 [Col1], osteocalcin [OCN], runt-related transcription factor 2 [Runx2]), or angiogenic (vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF]) gene expression; however, it resulted in an upregulation of osteoprotegerin (OPG) gene expression after 24 h and a lower receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RankL):OPG mRNA ratio. In vivo, osteostatin-coated, porous titanium implants increased bone regeneration in critical-sized cortical bone defects (p=0.005). Bone regeneration proceeded until 12 weeks, and femurs grafted with osteostatin-coated implants and uncoated implants recovered, respectively, 66% and 53% of the original femur torque strength (97±31 and 77±53 N·mm, not significant). In conclusion, the osteostatin coating improved bone regeneration of porous titanium. This effect was initiated after a short burst release and might be related to the observed in vitro upregulation of OPG gene expression by osteostatin in osteoprogenitor

  7. Bioactive and biodegradable silica biomaterial for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shunfeng; Wang, Xiaohong; Draenert, Florian G; Albert, Olga; Schröder, Heinz C; Mailänder, Volker; Mitov, Gergo; Müller, Werner E G

    2014-10-01

    Biosilica, a biocompatible, natural inorganic polymer that is formed by an enzymatic, silicatein-mediated reaction in siliceous sponges to build up their inorganic skeleton, has been shown to be morphogenetically active and to induce mineralization of human osteoblast-like cells (SaOS-2) in vitro. In the present study, we prepared beads (microspheres) by encapsulation of β-tricalcium phosphate [β-TCP], either alone (control) or supplemented with silica or silicatein, into the biodegradable copolymer poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) [PLGA]. Under the conditions used, ≈5% β-TCP, ≈9% silica, and 0.32μg/mg of silicatein were entrapped into the PLGA microspheres (diameter≈800μm). Determination of the biocompatibility of the β-TCP microspheres, supplemented with silica or silicatein, revealed no toxicity in the MTT based cell viability assay using SaOS-2 cells. The adherence of SaOS-2 cells to the surface of silica-containing microspheres was higher than for microspheres, containing only β-TCP. In addition, the silica-containing β-TCP microspheres and even more pronounced, a 1:1 mixture of microspheres containing β-TCP and silica, and β-TCP and silicatein, were found to strongly enhance the mineral deposition by SaOS-2 cells. Using these microspheres, first animal experiments with silica/biosilica were performed in female, adult New Zealand White rabbits to study the effect of the inorganic polymer on bone regeneration in vivo. The microspheres were implanted into 5mm thick holes, drilled into the femur of the animals, applying a bilateral comparison study design (3 test groups with 4-8 animals each). The control implant on one of the two hind legs contained microspheres with only β-TCP, while the test implant on the corresponding leg consisted either of microspheres containing β-TCP and silica, or a 1:1 mixture of microspheres, supplemented with β-TCP and silica, and β-TCP and silicatein. The results revealed that tissue/bone sections of silica

  8. Cord blood--an alternative source for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Marcus; Zilkens, Christoph; Bittersohl, Bernd; Krauspe, Rüdiger

    2009-09-01

    Bone regeneration is one of the best investigated pathways in mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) biology. Therefore strong efforts have been made to introduce tissue engineering and cell therapeutics as an alternative treatment option for patients with bone defects. This review of the literature gives an overview of MSC biology aiming for clinical application including advantages but also specific challenges and problems which are associated with cord blood derived stromal cell (CB-MSC) as a source for bone regeneration. The use of postnatal CB-MSC is ethically uncomplicated and requires no invasive harvesting procedure. Moreover, most data document a high osteogenic potential of CB-MCS and also low immunoreactivity compared with other MSC types. The expression profile of CB-MSC during osteogenic differentiation shows similarities to that of other MSC types. Within the umbilical cord different MSC types have been characterized which are potent to differentiate into osteoblasts. In contrast to a large number of in vitro investigations there are only few in vivo studies available so far.

  9. Drug-eluting scaffolds for bone and cartilage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Huang, Charlotte L; Lee, Wei Li; Loo, Joachim S C

    2014-06-01

    The advances in strategies for bone and cartilage regeneration have been centered on a concept that describes the close relationship between osteogenic cells, osteoconductive scaffolds, delivery growth factors and the mechanical environment. The dynamic nature of the tissue repair process involves intricate mimicry of signals expressed in the biological system in response to an injury. Recently, synergistic strategies involving hybrid delivery systems that provide sequential dual delivery of biomolecules and relevant topological cues received great attention. Future advances in tissue regeneration will therefore depend on multidisciplinary strategies that encompass the crux of tissue repair aimed at constructing the ideal functional regenerative scaffold. Here, functional scaffolds delivering therapeutics are reviewed in terms of their controlled release and healing capabilities. PMID:24239726

  10. Application of VEGFA and FGF-9 Enhances Angiogenesis, Osteogenesis and Bone Remodeling in Type 2 Diabetic Long Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wallner, Christoph; Schira, Jessica; Wagner, Johannes Maximilian; Schulte, Matthias; Fischer, Sebastian; Hirsch, Tobias; Richter, Wiltrud; Abraham, Stephanie; Kneser, Ulrich; Lehnhardt, Marcus; Behr, Björn

    2015-01-01

    Although bone regeneration is typically a reliable process, type 2 diabetes is associated with impaired or delayed healing processes. In addition, angiogenesis, a crucial step in bone regeneration, is often altered in the diabetic state. In this study, different stages of bone regeneration were characterized in an unicortical bone defect model comparing transgenic type 2 diabetic (db-/db-) and wild type (WT) mice in vivo. We investigated angiogenesis, callus formation and bone remodeling at early, intermediate and late time points by means of histomorphometry as well as protein level analyses. In order to enhance bone regeneration, defects were locally treated with recombinant FGF-9 or VEGFA. Histomorphometry of aniline blue stained sections indicated that bone regeneration is significantly decreased in db-/db- as opposed to WT mice at intermediate (5 days post operation) and late stages (7 days post operation) of bone regeneration. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis revealed significantly decreased levels of RUNX-2, PCNA, Osteocalcin and PECAM-1 in db-/db- defects. In addition, osteoclastogenesis is impaired in db-/db- indicating altered bone remodeling. These results indicate significant impairments in angiogenesis and osteogenesis in type 2 diabetic bones. Importantly, angiogenesis, osteogenesis and bone remodeling could be reconstituted by application of recombinant FGF-9 and, in part, by VEGFA application. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that type 2 diabetes affects angiogenesis, osteogenesis and subsequently bone remodeling, which in turn leads to decreased bone regeneration. These effects could be reversed by local application of FGF-9 and to a lesser degree VEGFA. These data could serve as a basis for future therapeutic applications aiming at improving bone regeneration in the type 2 diabetic patient population. PMID:25742620

  11. Direct or indirect stimulation of adenosine A2A receptors enhances bone regeneration as well as bone morphogenetic protein-2

    PubMed Central

    Mediero, Aránzazu; Wilder, Tuere; Perez-Aso, Miguel; Cronstein, Bruce N.

    2015-01-01

    Promoting bone regeneration and repair of bone defects is a need that has not been well met to date. We have previously found that adenosine, acting via A2A receptors (A2AR) promotes wound healing and inhibits inflammatory osteolysis and hypothesized that A2AR might be a novel target to promote bone regeneration. Therefore, we determined whether direct A2AR stimulation or increasing endogenous adenosine concentrations via purine transport blockade with dipyridamole regulates bone formation. We determined whether coverage of a 3 mm trephine defect in a mouse skull with a collagen scaffold soaked in saline, bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2; 200 ng), 1 μM CGS21680 (A2AR agonist, EC50 = 160 nM), or 1 μM dipyridamole (EC50 = 32 nM) promoted bone regeneration. Microcomputed tomography examination demonstrated that CGS21680 and dipyridamole markedly enhanced bone regeneration as well as BMP-2 8 wk after surgery (60 ± 2%, 79 ± 2%, and 75 ± 1% bone regeneration, respectively, vs. 32 ± 2% in control, P < 0.001). Blockade by a selective A2AR antagonist (ZM241385, 1 μM) or deletion of A2AR abrogated the effect of CGS21680 and dipyridamole on bone regeneration. Both CGS21680 and dipyridamole treatment increased alkaline phosphatase-positive osteoblasts and diminished tartrate resistance acid phosphatase-positive osteoclasts in the defects. In vivo imaging with a fluorescent dye for new bone formation revealed a strong fluorescent signal in treated animals that was equivalent to BMP-2. In conclusion, stimulation of A2AR by specific agonists or by increasing endogenous adenosine levels stimulates new bone formation as well as BMP-2 and represents a novel approach to stimulating bone regeneration.—Mediero, A., Wilder, T., Perez-Aso, M., Cronstein, B. N. Direct or indirect stimulation of adenosine A2A receptors enhances bone regeneration as well as bone morphogenetic protein-2. PMID:25573752

  12. A Therapeutic Potential for Marine Skeletal Proteins in Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Green, David W.; Padula, Matthew P.; Santos, Jerran; Chou, Joshua; Milthorpe, Bruce; Ben-Nissan, Besim

    2013-01-01

    A vital ingredient for engineering bone tissue, in the culture dish, is the use of recombinant matrix and growth proteins to help accelerate the growth of cultivated tissues into clinically acceptable quantities. The skeletal organic matrices of calcifying marine invertebrates are an untouched potential source of such growth inducing proteins. They have the advantage of being ready-made and retain the native state of the original protein. Striking evidence shows that skeleton building bone morphogenic protein-2/4 (BMP) and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) exist within various marine invertebrates such as, corals. Best practice mariculture and the latest innovations in long-term marine invertebrate cell cultivation can be implemented to ensure that these proteins are produced sustainably and supplied continuously. This also guarantees that coral reef habitats are not damaged during the collection of specimens. Potential proteins for bone repair, either extracted from the skeleton or derived from cultivated tissues, can be identified, evaluated and retrieved using chromatography, cell assays and proteomic methods. Due to the current evidence for bone matrix protein analogues in marine invertebrates, together with the methods established for their production and retrieval there is a genuine prospect that they can be used to regenerate living bone for potential clinical use. PMID:23574983

  13. Nanotechnology in the targeted drug delivery for bone diseases and bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Wenyi; Wu, Chengtie; Chen, Jiezhong; Xiao, Yin

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a vigorous research area and one of its important applications is in biomedical sciences. Among biomedical applications, targeted drug delivery is one of the most extensively studied subjects. Nanostructured particles and scaffolds have been widely studied for increasing treatment efficacy and specificity of present treatment approaches. Similarly, this technique has been used for treating bone diseases including bone regeneration. In this review, we have summarized and highlighted the recent advancement of nanostructured particles and scaffolds for the treatment of cancer bone metastasis, osteosarcoma, bone infections and inflammatory diseases, osteoarthritis, as well as for bone regeneration. Nanoparticles used to deliver deoxyribonucleic acid and ribonucleic acid molecules to specific bone sites for gene therapies are also included. The investigation of the implications of nanoparticles in bone diseases have just begun, and has already shown some promising potential. Further studies have to be conducted, aimed specifically at assessing targeted delivery and bioactive scaffolds to further improve their efficacy before they can be used clinically. PMID:23836972

  14. Effect of rhBMP-2 Immobilized Anorganic Bovine Bone Matrix on Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Jung-Bo; Yang, June-Jip; Choi, Kyung-Hee; Bae, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Jeong-Yeol; Kim, Sung-Eun; Shin, Sang-Wan

    2015-01-01

    Anorganic bovine bone matrix (Bio-Oss®) has been used for a long time for bone graft regeneration, but has poor osteoinductive capability. The use of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) has been suggested to overcome this limitation of Bio-Oss®. In the present study, heparin-mediated rhBMP-2 was combined with Bio-Oss® in animal experiments to investigate bone formation performance; heparin was used to control rhBMP-2 release. Two calvarial defects (8 mm diameter) were formed in a white rabbit model and then implanted or not (controls) with Bio-Oss® or BMP-2/Bio-Oss®. The Bio-Oss® and BMP-2/Bio-Oss® groups had significantly greater new bone areas (expressed as percentages of augmented areas) than the non-implanted controls at four and eight weeks after surgery, and the BMP-2/Bio-Oss® group (16.50 ± 2.87 (n = 6)) had significantly greater new bone areas than the Bio-Oss® group (9.43 ± 3.73 (n = 6)) at four weeks. These findings suggest that rhBMP-2 treated heparinized Bio-Oss® markedly enhances bone regeneration. PMID:26184187

  15. Conditioned media from mesenchymal stem cells enhanced bone regeneration in rat calvarial bone defects.

    PubMed

    Osugi, Masashi; Katagiri, Wataru; Yoshimi, Ryoko; Inukai, Takeharu; Hibi, Hideharu; Ueda, Minoru

    2012-07-01

    Tissue engineering has recently become available as a treatment procedure for bone augmentation. However, this procedure has several problems, such as high capital investment and expensive cell culture, complicated safety and quality management issues regarding cell handling, and patient problems with the invasive procedure of cell collection. Moreover, it was reported that stem cells secrete many growth factors and chemokines during their cultivation, which could affect cellular characteristics and behavior. This study investigated the effect of stem-cell-cultured conditioned media on bone regeneration. Cultured conditioned media from human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC-CM) enhanced the migration, proliferation, and expression of osteogenic marker genes, such as osteocalcin and Runx2, of rat MSCs (rMSCs) in vitro. MSC-CM includes cytokines such as insulin-like growth factor-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor. In vivo, a prepared bone defect of a rat calvarial model was implanted in five different rat groups using one of the following graft materials: human MSCs/agarose (MSCs), MSC-CM/agarose (MSC-CM), Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium without serum [DMEM(-)]/agarose [DMEM(-)], PBS/agarose (PBS), and defect only (Defect). After 4 and 8 weeks, implant sections were evaluated using microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) and histological analysis. Micro-CT analysis indicated that the MSC-CM group had a greater area of newly regenerated bone compared with the other groups (p<0.05) and histological analysis at 8 weeks indicated that the newly regenerated bone bridge almost covered the defect. Interestingly, the effects of MSC-CM were stronger than those of the MSC group. In vivo imaging and immunohistochemical staining of transgenic rats expressing green fluorescent protein also showed that migration of rMSCs to the bone defect in the MSC-CM group was greater than in the other groups. These results demonstrated that MSC-CM can regenerate bone

  16. Generation of clinical grade human bone marrow stromal cells for use in bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Robey, Pamela G; Kuznetsov, Sergei A; Ren, Jiaqiang; Klein, Harvey G; Sabatino, Marianna; Stroncek, David F

    2015-01-01

    In current orthopaedic practice, there is a need to increase the ability to reconstruct large segments of bone lost due to trauma, resection of tumors and skeletal deformities, or when normal regenerative processes have failed such as in non-unions and avascular necrosis. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells), when used in conjunction with appropriate carriers, represent a means by which to achieve bone regeneration in such cases. While much has been done at the bench and in pre-clinical studies, moving towards clinical application requires the generation of clinical grade cells. What is described herein is an FDA-approved cell manufacturing procedure for the ex vivo expansion of high quality, biologically active human BMSCs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Stem Cells and Bone. PMID:25064527

  17. Investigation of potential injectable polymeric biomaterials for bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Dreifke, Michael B.; Ebraheim, Nabil A.; Jayasuriya, Ambalangodage C.

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the potential injectable polymeric biomaterial scaffolds currently being investigated for application in bone tissue regeneration. Two types of injectable biomaterial scaffolds are focused in this review, including injectable microspheres and injectable gels. The injectable microspheres section covers several polymeric materials, including poly(l-lactide-co-glycolide)-PLGA, poly (propylene fumarate), and chitosan. The injectable gel section covers alginate gels, hyaluronan hydrogels, poly(ethylene-glycol)-PEG hydrogels, and PEG-PLGA copolymer hydrogels. This review focuses on the effect of cellular behaviorin vitro andin vivo in terms of material properties of polymers, such as biodegradation, biocompatibility, porosity, microsphere size, and cross-linking nature. Injectable polymeric biomaterials offer a major advantage for orthopedic applications by allowing the ability to use noninvasive or minimally invasive treatment methods. Therefore, combining injectable polymeric biomaterial scaffolds with cells have a significant potential to treat orthopedic bone defects, including spine fusion, and craniofacial and periodontal defects. PMID:23401336

  18. Guided bone regeneration using an allograft material: review and case presentations.

    PubMed

    Bhola, Monish; Kinaia, Bassam M; Chahine, Katy

    2008-10-01

    Post extraction sites may have residual ridge deformities with insufficient bone present for future implant placement. This presents a challenge to the clinician attempting to obtain optimum results. To predictably augment these areas and obtain aesthetically pleasing results, bone grafting may be required. Guided bone regeneration with an allograft material is a predictable means by which to solve this challenge. This article describes three case presentations utilizing on allograft material for bone regeneration prior to implant placement.

  19. Mechanical properties of a biodegradable bone regeneration scaffold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, B. D.; Oldham, J. B.; He, S. L.; Zobitz, M. E.; Payne, R. G.; An, K. N.; Currier, B. L.; Mikos, A. G.; Yaszemski, M. J.

    2000-01-01

    Poly (Propylene Fumarate) (PPF), a novel, bulk erosion, biodegradable polymer, has been shown to have osteoconductive effects in vivo when used as a bone regeneration scaffold (Peter, S. J., Suggs, L. J., Yaszemski, M. J., Engel, P. S., and Mikos, A. J., 1999, J. Biomater. Sci. Polym. Ed., 10, pp. 363-373). The material properties of the polymer allow it to be injected into irregularly shaped voids in vivo and provide mechanical stability as well as function as a bone regeneration scaffold. We fabricated a series of biomaterial composites, comprised of varying quantities of PPF, NaCl and beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP), into the shape of right circular cylinders and tested the mechanical properties in four-point bending and compression. The mean modulus of elasticity in compression (Ec) was 1204.2 MPa (SD 32.2) and the mean modulus of elasticity in bending (Eb) was 1274.7 MPa (SD 125.7). All of the moduli were on the order of magnitude of trabecular bone. Changing the level of NaCl from 20 to 40 percent, by mass, did not decrease Ec and Eb significantly, but did decrease bending and compressive strength significantly. Increasing the beta-TCP from 0.25 g/g PPF to 0.5 g/g PPF increased all of the measured mechanical properties of PPF/NVP composites. These results indicate that this biodegradable polymer composite is an attractive candidate for use as a replacement scaffold for trabecular bone.

  20. Effect of preparation route on the degradation behavior and ion releasability of siloxane-poly(lactic acid)-vaterite hybrid nonwoven fabrics for guided bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wakita, Takashi; Nakamura, Jin; Ota, Yoshio; Obata, Akiko; Kasuga, Toshihiro; Ban, Seiji

    2011-01-01

    Two types of nonwoven fabric, consisting of siloxane-doped vaterite (SiV) and poly(lactic acid) (PLA), for guided bone regeneration (GBR) were prepared by an electrospinning. One of the fabrics, SiV-PLA(M), was derived from PLA mixed with the solution of SiV dispersed in chloroform. Another one, SiV-PLA(K), was derived from a composite prepared by kneading SiV and PLA while heating at 200°C. The SiV-PLA(K) fabric shows higher degradability in dilute NaOH aq. than the SiV-PLA(M) fabric. To improve the cellular compatibility of the fabric, the fibers were coated with hydroxyapatite (HA) by soaking in simulated body fluid. The HA-coated SiV-PLA(K) fabric showed the release of silicate ions; the amount was reduced by 1/5 to 1/8 compared with that of the HA-coated SiV-PLA(M) fabric, and the excessive release was controlled. The preparation route of kneading at 200°C led to formation of a fabric with degradation behavior and ion releasability effective for bone regeneration.

  1. Guided Bone Regeneration in Long-Bone Defects with a Structural Hydroxyapatite Graft and Collagen Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Walker, John A.; Singleton, Brian M.; Hernandez, Jesus W.; Son, Jun-Sik; Kim, Su-Gwan; Oh, Daniel S.; Appleford, Mark R.; Ong, Joo L.; Wenke, Joseph C.

    2013-01-01

    There are few synthetic graft alternatives to treat large long-bone defects resulting from trauma or disease that do not incorporate osteogenic or osteoinductive factors. The aim of this study was to test the additional benefit of including a permeable collagen membrane guide in conjunction with a preformed porous hydroxyapatite bone graft to serve as an improved osteoconductive scaffold for bone regeneration. A 10-mm-segmental long-bone defect model in the rabbit radius was used. The hydroxyapatite scaffolds alone or with a collagen wrap were compared as experimental treatment groups to an empty untreated defect as a negative control or a defect filled with autologous bone grafts as a positive control. All groups were evaluated after 4 and 8 weeks of in vivo implantation using microcomputed tomography, mechanical testing in flexure, and histomorphometry. It was observed that the use of the wrap resulted in an increased bone volume regenerated when compared to the scaffold-only group (59% greater at 4 weeks and 27% greater after 8 weeks). Additionally, the increase in density of the regenerated bone from 4 to 8 weeks in the wrap group was threefold than that in the scaffold group. The use of the collagen wrap showed significant benefits of increased interfacial bone in-growth (149% greater) and periosteal remodeling (49%) after 4 weeks compared to the scaffold-alone with the two groups being comparable after 8 weeks, by when the collagen membrane showed close-to-complete resorption. While the autograft and wrap groups showed significantly greater flexural strength than the defect group after 8 weeks, the scaffold-alone group was not significantly different from the other three groups. It is most likely that the wrap shows improvement of function by acting like a scaffold for periosteal callus ossification, maintaining the local bone-healing environment while reducing fibrous infiltration (15% less than scaffold only at 4 weeks). This study indicates that the use of

  2. A Novel Nanosilver/Nanosilica Hydrogel for Bone Regeneration in Infected Bone Defects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shiwen; Guo, Yuchen; Dong, Yuliang; Wu, Yunshu; Cheng, Lei; Wang, Yongyue; Xing, Malcolm; Yuan, Quan

    2016-06-01

    Treating bone defects in the presence of infection is a formidable clinical challenge. The use of a biomaterial with the dual function of bone regeneration and infection control is a novel therapeutic approach to this problem. In this study, we fabricated an innovative, dual-function biocomposite hydrogel containing nanosilver and nanosilica (nAg/nSiO2) particles and evaluated its characteristics using FT-IR, SEM, swelling ratio, and stiffness assays. The in vitro antibacterial analysis showed that this nAg/nSiO2 hydrogel inhibited both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In addition, this nontoxic material could promote osteogenic differentiation of rat bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). We then created infected bone defects in rat calvaria in order to evaluate the function of the hydrogel in vivo. The hydrogel demonstrated effective antibacterial ability while promoting bone regeneration in these defects. Our results indicate that this nAg/nSiO2 hydrogel has the potential to both control infection and to promote bone healing in contaminated defects.

  3. Enhancing dermal and bone regeneration in calvarial defect surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zanotti, Bruno; Zingaretti, Nicola; Almesberger, Daria; Verlicchi, Angela; Stefini, Roberto; Ragonese, Mauro; Guarneri, Gianni Franco; Parodi, Pier Camillo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: To optimize the functional and esthetic result of cranioplasty, it is necessary to choose appropriate materials and take steps to preserve and support tissue vitality. As far as materials are concerned, custom-made porous hydroxyapatite implants are biomimetic, and therefore, provide good biological interaction and biointegration. However, before it is fully integrated, this material has relatively low mechanical resistance. Therefore, to reduce the risk of postoperative implant fracture, it would be desirable to accelerate regeneration of the tissues around and within the graft. Objectives: The objective was to determine whether integrating growth-factor-rich platelet gel or supportive dermal matrix into hydroxyapatite implant cranioplasty can accelerate bone remodeling and promote soft tissue regeneration, respectively. Materials and Methods: The investigation was performed on cranioplasty patients fitted with hydroxyapatite cranial implants between 2004 and 2010. In 7 patients, platelet gel was applied to the bone/prosthesis interface during surgery, and in a further 5 patients, characterized by thin, hypotrophic skin coverage of the cranial lacuna, a sheet of dermal matrix was applied between the prosthesis and the overlying soft tissue. In several of the former groups, platelet gel mixed with hydroxyapatite granules was used to fill small gaps between the skull and the implant. To confirm osteointegration, cranial computed tomography (CT) scans were taken at 3-6 month intervals for 1-year, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to confirm dermal integrity. Results: Clinical examination performed a few weeks after surgery revealed good dermal regeneration, with thicker, healthier skin, apparently with a better blood supply, which was confirmed by MRI at 3-6 months. Furthermore, at 3-6 months, CT showed good biomimetism of the porous hydroxyapatite scaffold. Locations at which platelet gel and hydroxyapatite granules were used to fill gaps

  4. Efficacy of Honeycomb TCP-induced Microenvironment on Bone Tissue Regeneration in Craniofacial Area.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Satoko; Takabatake, Kiyofumi; Tsujigiwa, Hidetsugu; Watanabe, Toshiyuki; Tokuyama, Eijiro; Ito, Satoshi; Nagatsuka, Hitoshi; Kimata, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Artificial bone materials that exhibit high biocompatibility have been developed and are being widely used for bone tissue regeneration. However, there are no biomaterials that are minimally invasive and safe. In a previous study, we succeeded in developing honeycomb β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) which has through-and-through holes and is able to mimic the bone microenvironment for bone tissue regeneration. In the present study, we investigated how the difference in hole-diameter of honeycomb β-TCP (hole-diameter: 75, 300, 500, and 1600 μm) influences bone tissue regeneration histologically. Its osteoconductivity was also evaluated by implantation into zygomatic bone defects in rats. The results showed that the maximum bone formation was observed on the β-TCP with hole-diameter 300μm, included bone marrow-like tissue and the pattern of bone tissue formation similar to host bone. Therefore, the results indicated that we could control bone tissue formation by creating a bone microenvironment provided by β-TCP. Also, in zygomatic bone defect model with honeycomb β-TCP, the result showed there was osseous union and the continuity was reproduced between the both edges of resected bone and β-TCP, which indicated the zygomatic bone reproduction fully succeeded. It is thus thought that honeycomb β-TCP may serve as an excellent biomaterial for bone tissue regeneration in the head, neck and face regions, expected in clinical applications. PMID:27279797

  5. Efficacy of Honeycomb TCP-induced Microenvironment on Bone Tissue Regeneration in Craniofacial Area

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Satoko; Takabatake, Kiyofumi; Tsujigiwa, Hidetsugu; Watanabe, Toshiyuki; Tokuyama, Eijiro; Ito, Satoshi; Nagatsuka, Hitoshi; Kimata, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Artificial bone materials that exhibit high biocompatibility have been developed and are being widely used for bone tissue regeneration. However, there are no biomaterials that are minimally invasive and safe. In a previous study, we succeeded in developing honeycomb β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) which has through-and-through holes and is able to mimic the bone microenvironment for bone tissue regeneration. In the present study, we investigated how the difference in hole-diameter of honeycomb β-TCP (hole-diameter: 75, 300, 500, and 1600 μm) influences bone tissue regeneration histologically. Its osteoconductivity was also evaluated by implantation into zygomatic bone defects in rats. The results showed that the maximum bone formation was observed on the β-TCP with hole-diameter 300μm, included bone marrow-like tissue and the pattern of bone tissue formation similar to host bone. Therefore, the results indicated that we could control bone tissue formation by creating a bone microenvironment provided by β-TCP. Also, in zygomatic bone defect model with honeycomb β-TCP, the result showed there was osseous union and the continuity was reproduced between the both edges of resected bone and β-TCP, which indicated the zygomatic bone reproduction fully succeeded. It is thus thought that honeycomb β-TCP may serve as an excellent biomaterial for bone tissue regeneration in the head, neck and face regions, expected in clinical applications. PMID:27279797

  6. Use of osteoplastic material to guide bone tissue regeneration deffect.

    PubMed

    Machavariani, A; Mazmishvili, K; Grdzelidze, T; Menabde, G; Amiranashvili, I

    2011-12-01

    The goal of research was study of restoration processes in jaw-teeth bone defects by application of osteoplastic materials in the experiment. The experiment was performed over 32 white (6-12 month old) rats; the animals were divided into 2 groups; 16 animals were enrolled in the first group; the section was performed in the edge of lower jaw; the lower jaw body was revealed. Under the effect of the dental drilling machine and the # 1 cooling mean by the fissure bohrium (distilled water) the defect of the dimension of 2x2 mm was created; the defect was washed by 0/9% saline to remove the bone sawdust; the wound was sutured tightly, in layers. The second group of the experiment was staffed with 16 animals (main group); the similar bone defect of the size 2 x 2mm was created on the rat's jaw's body. After washing of modeled defect we inserted osteopathic materials PORESORB-TCP crystals with the size of 0,6-1.0 mm the wound was sutured tightly, in layers. After the 3-rd, 15-th, 30-th and 90-th days from the date of operation there was performed X-ray and morphological examination over the animals in the control as well as the main group. The analysis of the examination performed over the experimental materials showed that in the control group in samples taken at 90th day the defects were not completely restored. In the test group in samples taken at 90th day reparative regeneration is confirmed. This is stimulated by the factor that within the main group's animals the defect regeneration process is supported with the osteoplastic material PORESORB-TCP.

  7. Monolithic and assembled polymer-ceramic composites for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Nandakumar, Anandkumar; Cruz, Célia; Mentink, Anouk; Tahmasebi Birgani, Zeinab; Moroni, Lorenzo; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Habibovic, Pamela

    2013-03-01

    The rationale for the use of polymer-ceramic composites for bone regeneration stems from the natural composition of bone, with collagen type I and biological apatite as the main organic and inorganic constituents, respectively. In the present study composite materials of PolyActive™ (PA), a poly(ethylene oxide terephthalate)/poly(butylene terephtalate) co-polymer, and hydroxyapatite (HA) at a weight ratio of 85:15 were prepared by rapid prototyping (RP) using two routes. In the first approach pre-extruded composite filaments of PA-HA were processed using three-dimensional fibre deposition (3DF) (conventional composite scaffolds). In the second approach PA scaffolds were fabricated using 3DF and combined with HA pillars produced inside stereolithographic moulds that fitted inside the pores of the PA three-dimensional structure (assembled composite scaffolds). Analysis of calcium and phosphate release in a simulated physiological solution, not containing calcium or phosphate, revealed significantly higher values for the HA pillars compared with other scaffolds. Release in simulated body fluid saturated with respect to HA did not show significant differences among the different scaffolds. Human mesenchymal stromal cells were cultured on polymer (3DF), conventional composite (3DF-HA) and assembled composite (HA assembled in 3DF) scaffolds and assessed for morphology, metabolic activity, DNA amount and gene expression of osteogenic markers using real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Scanning electron microscopy images showed that the cells attached to and infiltrated all the scaffolds. Assembled composites had a higher metabolic activity compared with 3DF-HA scaffolds while no significant differences were observed in DNA amounts. Gene expression of osteopontin in the assembled composite was significantly higher compared with the conventional composites. The strategy of composite fabrication by assembly appears to be a promising alternative to the

  8. [Bone regeneration over plastic implants after mandibular resection breaking the continuity].

    PubMed

    Utz, W

    1977-04-01

    In young patients, bone regeneration may start from the region of the temporo-mandibular joint and from the peripheral mandibular stump in cases of continuity defects of the mandible. A resin graft implanted for soft tissue reconstruction is collar-like surrounded by bone which is developing into a functionally and anatomically full regenerate over many years, in correspondence to periosteal and desmal growth stimuli. In adults, regeneration is minimal.

  9. Double-layered cell transfer technology for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Akazawa, Keiko; Iwasaki, Kengo; Nagata, Mizuki; Yokoyama, Naoki; Ayame, Hirohito; Yamaki, Kazumasa; Tanaka, Yuichi; Honda, Izumi; Morioka, Chikako; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Komaki, Motohiro; Kishida, Akio; Izumi, Yuichi; Morita, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    For cell-based medicine, to mimic in vivo cellular localization, various tissue engineering approaches have been studied to obtain a desirable arrangement of cells on scaffold materials. We have developed a novel method of cell manipulation called "cell transfer technology", enabling the transfer of cultured cells onto scaffold materials, and controlling cell topology. Here we show that using this technique, two different cell types can be transferred onto a scaffold surface as stable double layers or in patterned arrangements. Various combinations of adherent cells were transferred to a scaffold, amniotic membrane, in overlapping bilayers (double-layered cell transfer), and transferred cells showed stability upon deformations of the material including folding and trimming. Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells from periodontal ligaments (PDLSC) and osteoblasts, using double-layered cell transfer significantly enhanced bone formation, when compared to single cell type transplantation. Our findings suggest that this double-layer cell transfer is useful to produce a cell transplantation material that can bear two cell layers. Moreover, the transplantation of an amniotic membrane with PDLSCs/osteoblasts by cell transfer technology has therapeutic potential for bone defects. We conclude that cell transfer technology provides a novel and unique cell transplantation method for bone regeneration. PMID:27624174

  10. Double-layered cell transfer technology for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Akazawa, Keiko; Iwasaki, Kengo; Nagata, Mizuki; Yokoyama, Naoki; Ayame, Hirohito; Yamaki, Kazumasa; Tanaka, Yuichi; Honda, Izumi; Morioka, Chikako; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Komaki, Motohiro; Kishida, Akio; Izumi, Yuichi; Morita, Ikuo

    2016-09-14

    For cell-based medicine, to mimic in vivo cellular localization, various tissue engineering approaches have been studied to obtain a desirable arrangement of cells on scaffold materials. We have developed a novel method of cell manipulation called "cell transfer technology", enabling the transfer of cultured cells onto scaffold materials, and controlling cell topology. Here we show that using this technique, two different cell types can be transferred onto a scaffold surface as stable double layers or in patterned arrangements. Various combinations of adherent cells were transferred to a scaffold, amniotic membrane, in overlapping bilayers (double-layered cell transfer), and transferred cells showed stability upon deformations of the material including folding and trimming. Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells from periodontal ligaments (PDLSC) and osteoblasts, using double-layered cell transfer significantly enhanced bone formation, when compared to single cell type transplantation. Our findings suggest that this double-layer cell transfer is useful to produce a cell transplantation material that can bear two cell layers. Moreover, the transplantation of an amniotic membrane with PDLSCs/osteoblasts by cell transfer technology has therapeutic potential for bone defects. We conclude that cell transfer technology provides a novel and unique cell transplantation method for bone regeneration.

  11. Double-layered cell transfer technology for bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Akazawa, Keiko; Iwasaki, Kengo; Nagata, Mizuki; Yokoyama, Naoki; Ayame, Hirohito; Yamaki, Kazumasa; Tanaka, Yuichi; Honda, Izumi; Morioka, Chikako; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Komaki, Motohiro; Kishida, Akio; Izumi, Yuichi; Morita, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    For cell-based medicine, to mimic in vivo cellular localization, various tissue engineering approaches have been studied to obtain a desirable arrangement of cells on scaffold materials. We have developed a novel method of cell manipulation called “cell transfer technology”, enabling the transfer of cultured cells onto scaffold materials, and controlling cell topology. Here we show that using this technique, two different cell types can be transferred onto a scaffold surface as stable double layers or in patterned arrangements. Various combinations of adherent cells were transferred to a scaffold, amniotic membrane, in overlapping bilayers (double-layered cell transfer), and transferred cells showed stability upon deformations of the material including folding and trimming. Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells from periodontal ligaments (PDLSC) and osteoblasts, using double-layered cell transfer significantly enhanced bone formation, when compared to single cell type transplantation. Our findings suggest that this double-layer cell transfer is useful to produce a cell transplantation material that can bear two cell layers. Moreover, the transplantation of an amniotic membrane with PDLSCs/osteoblasts by cell transfer technology has therapeutic potential for bone defects. We conclude that cell transfer technology provides a novel and unique cell transplantation method for bone regeneration. PMID:27624174

  12. Bone regeneration strategy inspired by the study of calcification behavior in deer antler.

    PubMed

    Shi, Haishan; Yu, Tao; Li, Zhaoyang; Lu, William; Zhang, Ming; Ye, Jiandong

    2015-12-01

    Bone regeneration has attracted much attention from various researchers and inspired numerous strategies for bone formation. In this study, rapid calcification of deer antlers was studied to unravel bone biology by investigating mineral composition, morphology and microstructure. Calcification model was hypothesized and preliminarily established by in vitro experiments. In our model, mineral deposition and phase conversions in the gel matrix were mimicked. Results revealed that mineral metabolism including deposition and phase conversion plays key roles in calcification in vivo, which inspired the bone regeneration strategy with three main components, i.e. enhanced mineral nucleation, mineral ions sources and crystals habits. Rapid mineral metabolism of implant apatite biomaterials was supposed as the critical aspect of bone regeneration. This study will provide a relatively ideal model for peer bone regeneration studies.

  13. Synthetic Bone Substitute Engineered with Amniotic Epithelial Cells Enhances Bone Regeneration after Maxillary Sinus Augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Barboni, Barbara; Mangano, Carlo; Valbonetti, Luca; Marruchella, Giuseppe; Berardinelli, Paolo; Martelli, Alessandra; Muttini, Aurelio; Mauro, Annunziata; Bedini, Rossella; Turriani, Maura; Pecci, Raffaella; Nardinocchi, Delia; Zizzari, Vincenzo Luca; Tetè, Stefano; Piattelli, Adriano; Mattioli, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence has been provided that a cell-based therapy combined with the use of bioactive materials may significantly improve bone regeneration prior to dental implant, although the identification of an ideal source of progenitor/stem cells remains to be determined. Aim In the present research, the bone regenerative property of an emerging source of progenitor cells, the amniotic epithelial cells (AEC), loaded on a calcium-phosphate synthetic bone substitute, made by direct rapid prototyping (rPT) technique, was evaluated in an animal study. Material And Methods Two blocks of synthetic bone substitute (∼0.14 cm3), alone or engineered with 1×106 ovine AEC (oAEC), were grafted bilaterally into maxillary sinuses of six adult sheep, an animal model chosen for its high translational value in dentistry. The sheep were then randomly divided into two groups and sacrificed at 45 and 90 days post implantation (p.i.). Tissue regeneration was evaluated in the sinus explants by micro-computer tomography (micro-CT), morphological, morphometric and biochemical analyses. Results And Conclusions The obtained data suggest that scaffold integration and bone deposition are positively influenced by allotransplantated oAEC. Sinus explants derived from sheep grafted with oAEC engineered scaffolds displayed a reduced fibrotic reaction, a limited inflammatory response and an accelerated process of angiogenesis. In addition, the presence of oAEC significantly stimulated osteogenesis either by enhancing bone deposition or making more extent the foci of bone nucleation. Besides the modulatory role played by oAEC in the crucial events successfully guiding tissue regeneration (angiogenesis, vascular endothelial growth factor expression and inflammation), data provided herein show that oAEC were also able to directly participate in the process of bone deposition, as suggested by the presence of oAEC entrapped within the newly deposited osteoid matrix and by their ability to switch

  14. Bioactive glasses: Importance of structure and properties in bone regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hench, Larry L.; Roki, Niksa; Fenn, Michael B.

    2014-09-01

    This review provides a brief background on the applications, mechanisms and genetics involved with use of bioactive glass to stimulate regeneration of bone. The emphasis is on the role of structural changes of the bioactive glasses, in particular Bioglass, which result in controlled release of osteostimulative ions. The review also summarizes the use of Raman spectroscopy, referred to hereto forward as bio-Raman spectroscopy, to obtain rapid, real time in vitro analysis of human cells in contact with bioactive glasses, and the osteostimulative dissolution ions that lead to osteogenesis. The bio-Raman studies support the results obtained from in vivo studies of bioactive glasses, as well as extensive cell and molecular biology studies, and thus offers an innovative means for rapid screening of new bioactive materials while reducing the need for animal testing.

  15. Engineering Pre-vascularized Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Barabaschi, Giada D G; Manoharan, Vijayan; Li, Qing; Bertassoni, Luiz E

    2015-01-01

    Survival of functional tissue constructs of clinically relevant size depends on the formation of an organized and uniformly distributed network of blood vessels and capillaries. The lack of such vasculature leads to spatio-temporal gradients in oxygen, nutrients and accumulation of waste products inside engineered tissue constructs resulting in negative biological events at the core of the scaffold. Unavailability of a well-defined vasculature also results in ineffective integration of scaffolds to the host vasculature upon implantation. Arguably, one of the greatest challenges in engineering clinically relevant bone substitutes, therefore, has been the development of vascularized bone scaffolds. Various approaches ranging from peptide and growth factor functionalized biomaterials to hyper-porous scaffolds have been proposed to address this problem with reasonable success. An emerging alternative to address this challenge has been the fabrication of pre-vascularized scaffolds by taking advantage of biomanufacturing techniques, such as soft- and photo-lithography or 3D bioprinting, and cell-based approaches, where functional capillaries are engineered in cell-laden scaffolds prior to implantation. These strategies seek to engineer pre-vascularized tissues in vitro, allowing for improved anastomosis with the host vasculature upon implantation, while also improving cell viability and tissue development in vitro. This book chapter provides an overview of recent methods to engineer pre-vascularized scaffolds for bone regeneration. We first review the development of functional blood capillaries in bony structures and discuss controlled delivery of growth factors, co-culture systems, and on-chip studies to engineer vascularized cell-laden biomaterials. Lastly, we review recent studies using microfabrication techniques and 3D printing to engineer pre-vascularized scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. PMID:26545745

  16. Osteoblast mineralization with composite nanofibrous substrate for bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Venugopal, Jayarama Reddy; Giri Dev, Venkateshwarapuram Rengaswami; Senthilram, Thinakaran; Sathiskumar, Dhayalan; Gupta, Deepika; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2011-01-01

    Several studies are currently ongoing to construct synthetic bone-like materials with composites of natural and polymeric materials with HA (hydroxyapatite). The present study aims to fabricate composite nanofibrous substrate of Chit/HA (chitosan/HA - 80:25) prepared by dissolving in TFA/DCM (trifluoroacetic acid/dichloromethane) (70:30, w/w) for 5 days and electrospun to fabricate a scaffold for bone tissue engineering. HA (25 wt %) was sonicated for 30 min to obtain a homogenous dispersion of nanoparticles within the Chit (80 wt %) matrix for fabricating composite nanofibrous scaffold (Chit/HA). The nanofibres of Chit and Chit/HA were obtained with fibre diameters of 274 ± 75 and 510 ± 198 nm, respectively, and characterized by FESEM (field emission scanning electron microscopy) and FTIR (Fourier transform infrared). The interaction of hFOBs (human fetal osteoblasts) and nanofibrous substrates were analysed for cell morphology (FESEM), mineralization [ARS (Alizarin Red-S) staining], quantification of minerals and finally identified the elements present in Chit/HA/osteoblasts by EDX (energy-dispersive X-ray) analysis. EDX analysis confirmed that the spherulites contain calcium and phosphorus, the major constituents in calcium phosphate apatite, the mineral phase of the bone. Mineralization was increased significantly (P<0.001) up to 108% in Chit/HA compared with Chit nanofibres. These results confirmed that the electrospun composite Chit/HA nanofibrous substrate is a potential biocomposite material for the proliferation and mineralization of hFOBs required for enhanced bone tissue regeneration. PMID:20923413

  17. Engineering Pre-vascularized Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Barabaschi, Giada D G; Manoharan, Vijayan; Li, Qing; Bertassoni, Luiz E

    2015-01-01

    Survival of functional tissue constructs of clinically relevant size depends on the formation of an organized and uniformly distributed network of blood vessels and capillaries. The lack of such vasculature leads to spatio-temporal gradients in oxygen, nutrients and accumulation of waste products inside engineered tissue constructs resulting in negative biological events at the core of the scaffold. Unavailability of a well-defined vasculature also results in ineffective integration of scaffolds to the host vasculature upon implantation. Arguably, one of the greatest challenges in engineering clinically relevant bone substitutes, therefore, has been the development of vascularized bone scaffolds. Various approaches ranging from peptide and growth factor functionalized biomaterials to hyper-porous scaffolds have been proposed to address this problem with reasonable success. An emerging alternative to address this challenge has been the fabrication of pre-vascularized scaffolds by taking advantage of biomanufacturing techniques, such as soft- and photo-lithography or 3D bioprinting, and cell-based approaches, where functional capillaries are engineered in cell-laden scaffolds prior to implantation. These strategies seek to engineer pre-vascularized tissues in vitro, allowing for improved anastomosis with the host vasculature upon implantation, while also improving cell viability and tissue development in vitro. This book chapter provides an overview of recent methods to engineer pre-vascularized scaffolds for bone regeneration. We first review the development of functional blood capillaries in bony structures and discuss controlled delivery of growth factors, co-culture systems, and on-chip studies to engineer vascularized cell-laden biomaterials. Lastly, we review recent studies using microfabrication techniques and 3D printing to engineer pre-vascularized scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

  18. Bone regeneration with plasma-rich-protein following enucleation of traumatic bone cyst

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, Priya; Kumar, Krishna; Ramakrishna, T.; Bhadranna, Abhishek

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic bone cyst is an uncommon non-epithelium lined cavity and is seen frequently in young individuals. The lesion occurs more commonly in the mandible, involving the posterior region. It is generally asymptomatic and is diagnosed on routine radiographic examination. The cystic cavity is usually empty and there is scanty material for histological examination. Surgical curettage is usually done and recurrence is rare. A case of traumatic bone cyst occurring in the anterior region of mandible in a young boy is presented. Following surgical intervention, plasma-rich-protein was placed in the cystic cavity. The lesion showed progressive resolution and bone regeneration of the cystic cavity within a short period of time. PMID:24926221

  19. Macroporous hydrogels upregulate osteogenic signal expression and promote bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Betz, Martha W; Yeatts, Andrew B; Richbourg, William J; Caccamese, John F; Coletti, Domenick P; Falco, Erin E; Fisher, John P

    2010-05-10

    The objective of this work was to investigate the effects of macroporous hydrogel architecture on the osteogenic signal expression and differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). In particular, we have proposed a tissue engineering approach for orbital bone repair based on a cyclic acetal biomaterial formed from 5-ethyl-5-(hydroxymethyl)-beta,beta-dimethyl-1,3-dioxane-2-ethanol diacrylate (EHD) and poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA). The EHD monomer and PEGDA polymer may be fabricated into macroporous EH-PEG hydrogels by radical polymerization and subsequent porogen leaching, a novel technique for hydrophilic gels. We hypothesized that EH-PEG hydrogel macroporosity facilitates intercellular signaling among hMSCs. To investigate this phenomenon, hMSCs were loaded into EH-PEG hydrogels with varying pore size and porosity. The viability of hMSCs, the expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), BMP receptor type 1A, and BMP receptor type 2 by hMSCs, and the differentiation of hMSCs were then assessed. Results demonstrate that macroporous EH-PEG hydrogels support hMSCs and that this macroporous environment promotes a dramatic increase in BMP-2 expression by hMSCs. This upregulation of BMP-2 expression is associated by a more rapid hMSC differentiation, as measured by alkaline phosphatase expression. Altering hMSC interactions with the EH-PEG hydrogel surface, by the addition of fibronectin, did not appear to augment BMP-2 expression. We therefore speculate that EH-PEG hydrogel macroporosity facilitates autocrine and paracrine signaling by localizing endogenously expressed factors within the hydrogel's pores and thus promotes hMSC osteoblastic differentiation and bone regeneration. PMID:20345129

  20. Strontium-rich injectable hybrid system for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Neves, Nuno; Campos, Bruno B; Almeida, Isabel F; Costa, Paulo C; Cabral, Abel Trigo; Barbosa, Mário A; Ribeiro, Cristina C

    2016-02-01

    Current challenges in the development of scaffolds for bone regeneration include the engineering of materials that can withstand normal dynamic physiological mechanical stresses exerted on the bone and provide a matrix capable of supporting cell migration and tissue ingrowth. The objective of the present work was to develop and characterize a hybrid polymer–ceramic injectable system that consists of an alginate matrix crosslinked in situ in the presence of strontium(Sr), incorporating a ceramic reinforcement in the form of Sr-rich microspheres. The incorporation of Sr in the microspheres and in the vehicle relies on the growing evidence that Sr has beneficial effects in bone remodeling and in the treatment of osteopenic disorders and osteoporosis. Sr-rich porous hydroxyapatite microspheres with a uniform size and a mean diameter of 555 μm were prepared, and their compression strength and friability tested. A 3.5% (w/v) ultrapure sodium alginate solution was used as the vehicle and its in situ gelation was promoted by the addition of calcium (Ca) or Sr carbonate and Glucone-δ-lactone. Gelation times varied with temperature and crosslinking agent, being slower for Sr than for Ca, but adequate for injection in both cases. Injectability was evaluated using a device employed in vertebroplasty surgical procedures, coupled to a texture analyzer in compression mode. Compositions with 35%w of microspheres presented the best compromise between injectability and compression strength of the system, the force required to extrude it being lower than 100 N.Micro CT analysis revealed a homogeneous distribution of the microspheres inside the vehicle, and a mean inter-microspheres space of 220 μm. DMA results showed that elastic behavior of the hybrid is over the viscous one and that the higher storage modulus was obtained for the 3.5%Alg–35%Sr-HAp-Sr formulation.

  1. Strontium-rich injectable hybrid system for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Neves, Nuno; Campos, Bruno B; Almeida, Isabel F; Costa, Paulo C; Cabral, Abel Trigo; Barbosa, Mário A; Ribeiro, Cristina C

    2016-02-01

    Current challenges in the development of scaffolds for bone regeneration include the engineering of materials that can withstand normal dynamic physiological mechanical stresses exerted on the bone and provide a matrix capable of supporting cell migration and tissue ingrowth. The objective of the present work was to develop and characterize a hybrid polymer–ceramic injectable system that consists of an alginate matrix crosslinked in situ in the presence of strontium(Sr), incorporating a ceramic reinforcement in the form of Sr-rich microspheres. The incorporation of Sr in the microspheres and in the vehicle relies on the growing evidence that Sr has beneficial effects in bone remodeling and in the treatment of osteopenic disorders and osteoporosis. Sr-rich porous hydroxyapatite microspheres with a uniform size and a mean diameter of 555 μm were prepared, and their compression strength and friability tested. A 3.5% (w/v) ultrapure sodium alginate solution was used as the vehicle and its in situ gelation was promoted by the addition of calcium (Ca) or Sr carbonate and Glucone-δ-lactone. Gelation times varied with temperature and crosslinking agent, being slower for Sr than for Ca, but adequate for injection in both cases. Injectability was evaluated using a device employed in vertebroplasty surgical procedures, coupled to a texture analyzer in compression mode. Compositions with 35%w of microspheres presented the best compromise between injectability and compression strength of the system, the force required to extrude it being lower than 100 N.Micro CT analysis revealed a homogeneous distribution of the microspheres inside the vehicle, and a mean inter-microspheres space of 220 μm. DMA results showed that elastic behavior of the hybrid is over the viscous one and that the higher storage modulus was obtained for the 3.5%Alg–35%Sr-HAp-Sr formulation. PMID:26652437

  2. Imaging regenerating bone tissue based on neural networks applied to micro-diffraction measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Campi, G.; Pezzotti, G.; Fratini, M.; Ricci, A.; Burghammer, M.; Cancedda, R.; Mastrogiacomo, M.; Bukreeva, I.; Cedola, A.

    2013-12-16

    We monitored bone regeneration in a tissue engineering approach. To visualize and understand the structural evolution, the samples have been measured by X-ray micro-diffraction. We find that bone tissue regeneration proceeds through a multi-step mechanism, each step providing a specific diffraction signal. The large amount of data have been classified according to their structure and associated to the process they came from combining Neural Networks algorithms with least square pattern analysis. In this way, we obtain spatial maps of the different components of the tissues visualizing the complex kinetic at the base of the bone regeneration.

  3. Bioactive behavior of silicon substituted calcium phosphate based bioceramics for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ather Farooq; Saleem, Muhammad; Afzal, Adeel; Ali, Asghar; Khan, Afsar; Khan, Abdur Rahman

    2014-02-01

    Bone graft substitutes are widely used for bone regeneration and repair in defect sites resulting from aging, disease, trauma, or accident. With invariably increasing clinical demands, there is an urgent need to produce artificial materials, which are readily available and are capable of fast and guided skeletal repair. Calcium phosphate based bioactive ceramics are extensively utilized in bone regeneration and repair applications. Silicon is often utilized as a substituent or a dopant in these bioceramics, since it significantly enhances the ultimate properties of conventional biomaterials such as surface chemical structure, mechanical strength, bioactivity, biocompatibility, etc. This article presents an overview of the silicon substituted bioceramics, which have emerged as efficient bone replacement and bone regeneration materials. Thus, the role of silicon in enhancing the biological performance and bone forming capabilities of conventional calcium phosphate based bioceramics is identified and reviewed.

  4. Guided bone regeneration in standardized calvarial defects using beta-tricalcium phosphate and collagen membrane: a real-time in vivo micro-computed tomographic experiment in rats.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, Sundar; Al-Rasheed, Abdulaziz; ArRejaie, Aws; Nooh, Nasser; Al-Kindi, Mohammed; Al-Hezaimi, Khalid

    2016-05-01

    Guided bone regeneration (GBR) procedures using graft materials have been used for reconstruction of osseous defects. The aim of the present in vivo micro-computed tomographic (µCT) and histologic study was to assess in real time the bone regeneration at GBR sites in standardized experimental calvarial defects (diameter 3.3 mm) using β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) with and without collagen membrane (CM). A single full-thickness calvarial defect was created on the left parietal bone in young female Wistar albino rats (n = 30) weighing approximately 300 g and aged about 6 weeks. The animals were randomly divided into three groups for treatment, based on calvarial defect filling material: (1) control group (n = 10); (2) β-TCP + CM group (n = 10); (3) β-TCP group (n = 10). Real-time in vivo µCT analyses were performed immediately after surgery and at 2, 4, 6 and 10 weeks to determine the volume and mineral density of the newly formed bone (BVNFB, MDNFB) and remaining β-TCP particles (VRBP, MDRBP). The animals were killed at 10 weeks and calvarial specimens were evaluated histologically. In the control group, MDNFB increased significantly at 6 weeks (0.32 ± 0.002 g/mm(3), P < 0.01) compared to that at baseline. In β-TCP + CM group, BVNFB (1.10 ± 0.12 mm(3), P < 0.01) and MDNFB (0.13 ± 0.02 g/mm(3), P < 0.01) significantly increased at the 4th week than baseline. In the β-TCP group, BVNFB (1.13 ± 0.12 mm(3), P < 0.01) and MDNFB (0.14 ± 0.01 g/mm(3), P < 0.01) significantly increased at 6 weeks compared to that at baseline. Significant reduction in VRBP was neither seen in the β-TCP + CM group nor in the β-TCP group. While in the β-TCP + CM group MDRBP was reduced significantly at 6 weeks (0.44 ± 0.9 g/mm(3), P < 0.01) from baseline (0.98 ± 0.03 g/mm(3)), similar significant reduction in MDRBP from baseline (0.92 ± 0.07 g/mm(3)) was seen only at 10 weeks (0.45 ± 0.06 g/mm(3), P < 0.05) in the β-TCP group. Histologic findings at 10 weeks revealed

  5. Cartilage and bone cells do not participate in skeletal regeneration in Ambystoma mexicanum limbs.

    PubMed

    McCusker, Catherine D; Diaz-Castillo, Carlos; Sosnik, Julian; Q Phan, Anne; Gardiner, David M

    2016-08-01

    The Mexican Axolotl is one of the few tetrapod species that is capable of regenerating complete skeletal elements in injured adult limbs. Whether the skeleton (bone and cartilage) plays a role in the patterning and contribution to the skeletal regenerate is currently unresolved. We tested the induction of pattern formation, the effect on cell proliferation, and contributions of skeletal tissues (cartilage, bone, and periosteum) to the regenerating axolotl limb. We found that bone tissue grafts from transgenic donors expressing GFP fail to induce pattern formation and do not contribute to the newly regenerated skeleton. Periosteum tissue grafts, on the other hand, have both of these activities. These observations reveal that skeletal tissue does not contribute to the regeneration of skeletal elements; rather, these structures are patterned by and derived from cells of non-skeletal connective tissue origin.

  6. Cartilage and bone cells do not participate in skeletal regeneration in Ambystoma mexicanum limbs.

    PubMed

    McCusker, Catherine D; Diaz-Castillo, Carlos; Sosnik, Julian; Q Phan, Anne; Gardiner, David M

    2016-08-01

    The Mexican Axolotl is one of the few tetrapod species that is capable of regenerating complete skeletal elements in injured adult limbs. Whether the skeleton (bone and cartilage) plays a role in the patterning and contribution to the skeletal regenerate is currently unresolved. We tested the induction of pattern formation, the effect on cell proliferation, and contributions of skeletal tissues (cartilage, bone, and periosteum) to the regenerating axolotl limb. We found that bone tissue grafts from transgenic donors expressing GFP fail to induce pattern formation and do not contribute to the newly regenerated skeleton. Periosteum tissue grafts, on the other hand, have both of these activities. These observations reveal that skeletal tissue does not contribute to the regeneration of skeletal elements; rather, these structures are patterned by and derived from cells of non-skeletal connective tissue origin. PMID:27316294

  7. Integrin-specific hydrogels functionalized with VEGF for vascularization and bone regeneration of critical-size bone defects.

    PubMed

    García, José R; Clark, Amy Y; García, Andrés J

    2016-04-01

    Vascularization of bone defects is considered a crucial component to the successful regeneration of large bone defects. Although vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been delivered to critical-size bone defect models to augment blood vessel infiltration into the defect area, its potential to increase bone repair remains ambiguous. In this study, we investigated whether integrin-specific biomaterials modulate the effects of VEGF on bone regeneration. We engineered protease-degradable, VEGF-loaded poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels functionalized with either a triple-helical, α2 β1 integrin-specific peptide GGYGGGP(GPP)5 GFOGER(GPP)5 GPC (GFOGER) or an αv β3 integrin-targeting peptide GRGDSPC (RGD). Covalent incorporation of VEGF into the PEG hydrogel allowed for protease degradation-dependent release of the protein while maintaining VEGF bioactivity. When applied to critical-size segmental defects in the murine radius, GFOGER-functionalized VEGF-free hydrogels exhibited significantly increased vascular volume and density and resulted in a larger number of thicker blood vessels compared to RGD-functionalized VEGF-free hydrogels. VEGF-loaded RGD hydrogels increased vascularization compared to VEGF-free RGD hydrogels, but the levels of vascularization for these VEGF-containing RGD hydrogels were similar to those of VEGF-free GFOGER hydrogels. VEGF transiently increased bone regeneration in RGD hydrogels but had no effect at later time points. In GFOGER hydrogels, VEGF did not show an effect on bone regeneration. However, VEGF-free GFOGER hydrogels resulted in increased bone regeneration compared to VEGF-free RGD hydrogels. These findings demonstrate the importance of integrin-specificity in engineering constructs for vascularization and associated bone regeneration.

  8. Electrospun fibers immobilized with bone forming peptide-1 derived from BMP7 for guided bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Jun; Lee, Ji-Hye; Cho, Hyeong-Jin; Kim, Hyung Keun; Yoon, Taek Rim; Shin, Heungsoo

    2013-07-01

    The development of ideal barrier membranes with appropriate porosity and bioactivity is essential for the guidance of new bone formation in orthopedic and craniomaxillofacial surgery. In this study, we developed bioactive electrospun fibers based on poly (lactide-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) by immobilizing bone-forming peptide 1 (BFP1) derived from the immature region of bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP7). We exploited polydopamine chemistry for the immobilization of BFP1; polydopamine (PD) was coated on the electrospun PLGA fibers, on which BFP1 was subsequently immobilized under weakly basic conditions. The immobilization of BFP1 was verified by characterizing the surface chemical composition and quantitatively measured by fluorescamine assay. The immobilization of BPF1 on the electrospun fibers supported the compact distribution of collagen I and the spreading of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). SEM micrographs demonstrated the aggregation of globular mineral accretions, with significant increases in ALP activity and calcium deposition when hMSCs were cultured on fibers immobilized with BFP1 for 14 days. We then implanted the prepared fibers onto mouse calvarial defects and analyzed bone formation after 2 months. Semi-quantification of bone growth from representative X-ray images showed that the bone area was approximately 20% in the defect-only group, while the group implanted with PLGA fibers showed significant improvements of 44.27 ± 7.37% and 57.59 ± 15.24% in the groups implanted with PD-coated PLGA and with BFP1-coated PLGA, respectively. Based on these results, our approach may be a promising tool to develop clinically-applicable bioactive membranes for guided bone regeneration."

  9. Locally delivered salicylic acid from a poly(anhydride-ester): impact on diabetic bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wada, Keisuke; Yu, Weiling; Elazizi, Mohamad; Barakat, Sandrine; Ouimet, Michelle A; Rosario-Meléndez, Roselin; Fiorellini, Joseph P; Graves, Dana T; Uhrich, Kathryn E

    2013-10-10

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) involves metabolic changes that can impair bone repair, including a prolonged inflammatory response. A salicylic acid-based poly(anhydride-ester) (SA-PAE) provides controlled and sustained release of salicylic acid (SA) that locally resolves inflammation. This study investigates the effect of polymer-controlled SA release on bone regeneration in diabetic rats where enhanced inflammation is expected. Fifty-six Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to two groups: diabetic group induced by streptozotocin (STZ) injection or normoglycemic controls injected with citrate buffer alone. Three weeks after hyperglycemia development or vehicle injection, 5mm critical sized defects were created at the rat mandibular angle and treated with SA-PAE/bone graft mixture or bone graft alone. Rats were euthanized 4 and 12weeks after surgery, then bone fill percentage in the defect region was assessed by micro-computed tomography (CT) and histomorphometry. It was observed that bone fill increased significantly at 4 and 12weeks in SA-PAE/bone graft-treated diabetic rats compared to diabetic rats receiving bone graft alone. Accelerated bone formation in normoglycemic rats caused by SA-PAE/bone graft treatment was observed at 4weeks but not at 12weeks. This study shows that treatment with SA-PAE enhances bone regeneration in diabetic rats and accelerates bone regeneration in normoglycemic animals.

  10. Effective Bone Regeneration Using Thermosensitive Poly(N-Isopropylacrylamide) Grafted Gelatin as Injectable Carrier for Bone Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhiwei; Wang, Yang; Ma, Shiqing; Duan, Shun; Yang, Xiaoping; Gao, Ping; Zhang, Xu; Cai, Qing

    2015-09-01

    In this study, thermosensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) was grafted onto gelatin via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The chemical structure of PNIPAAm-grafted gelatin (Gel-PNIPAAm) was confirmed by XPS, ATR-IR, and (1)H NMR characterizations. Gel-PNIPAAm aqueous solution exhibited sol-to-gel transformation at physiological temperature, and was studied as injectable hydrogel for bone defect regeneration in a cranial model. The hydrogel was biocompatible and demonstrated the ability to enhance bone regeneration in comparison with the untreated group (control). With the incorporation of rat bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) into the hydrogel, the bone regeneration rate was further significantly enhanced. As indicated by micro-CT, histological (H&E and Masson) and immunohistochemical (osteocalcin and osteopontin) staining, newly formed woven bone tissue was clearly detected at 12 weeks postimplantation in the hydrogel/BMSCs treated group, showing indistinguishable boundary with surrounding host bone tissues. The results suggested that the thermosensitive Gel-PNIPAAm hydrogel was an excellent injectable delivery vehicle of BMSCs for in vivo bone defect regeneration. PMID:26266480

  11. A novel peptide-modified and gene-activated biomimetic bone matrix accelerating bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Pan, Haitao; Zheng, Qixin; Yang, Shuhua; Guo, Xiaodong; Wu, Bin; Zou, Zhenwei; Duan, Zhixia

    2014-08-01

    The osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) can be regulated by systemic or local growth factor, especially by transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1). However, how to maintain the bioactivity of exogenous TGF-β1 is a great challenge due to its short half-life time. The most promising solution is to transfer TGF-β1 gene into seed cells through transgenic technology and then transgenic cells to continuously secret endogenous TGF-β1 protein via gene expression. In this study, a novel non-viral vector (K)16GRGDSPC was chemically linked to bioactive bone matrices PLGA-[ASP-PEG]n using cross-linker to construct a novel non-viral gene transfer system. TGF-β1 gene was incubated with this system and subsequently rabbit-derived BMSCs were co-cultured with this gene-activated PLGA-[ASP-PEG]n, while co-cultured with PLGA-[ASP-PEG]n modified with (K)16GRGDSPC only and original PLGA-[ASP-PEG]n as control. Thus we fabricated three kinds of composites: Group A (BMSCs-TGF-β1DNA-(K)16GRGDSPC-PLGA-[ASP-PEG]n composite); Group B (BMSCs-(K)16GRGDSPC-PLGA-[ASP-PEG]n composite); and Group C (BMSCs-PLGA-[ASP-PEG]n composite). TGF-β1 and other osteogenic phenotype markers of alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, osteopontin and type I collagen in Group A were all significantly higher than the other two groups ex vivo. In vivo, 15-mm long segmental rabbit bone defects were created and randomly implanted the aforementioned composites separately, and then fixed with plate-screws. The results demonstrated that the implants in Group A significantly accelerated bone regeneration compared with the other implants based on X-rays, histological and biomechanical examinations. Therefore, we conclude this novel peptide-modified and gene-activated biomimetic bone matrix of TGF-β1DNA-(K)16GRGDSPC-PLGA-[ASP-PEG]n is a very promising scaffold biomaterial for accelerating bone regeneration. PMID:24115366

  12. Influence of structural load-bearing scaffolds on mechanical load- and BMP-2-mediated bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Anna M; Mason, Devon E; Lin, Angela S P; Guldberg, Robert E; Boerckel, Joel D

    2016-09-01

    A common design constraint in functional tissue engineering is that scaffolds intended for use in load-bearing sites possess similar mechanical properties to the replaced tissue. Here, we tested the hypothesis that in vivo loading would enhance bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2)-mediated bone regeneration in the presence of a load-bearing PLDL scaffold, whose pores and central core were filled with BMP-2-releasing alginate hydrogel. First, we evaluated the effects of in vivo mechanical loading on bone regeneration in the structural scaffolds. Second, we compared scaffold-mediated bone regeneration, independent of mechanical loading, with alginate hydrogel constructs, without the structural scaffold, that have been shown previously to facilitate in vivo mechanical stimulation of bone formation. Contrary to our hypothesis, mechanical loading had no effect on bone formation, distribution, or biomechanical properties in structural scaffolds. Independent of loading, the structural scaffolds reduced bone formation compared to non-structural alginate, particularly in regions in which the scaffold was concentrated, resulting in impaired functional regeneration. This is attributable to a combination of stress shielding by the scaffold and inhibition of cellular infiltration and tissue ingrowth. Collectively, these data question the necessity of scaffold similarity to mature tissue at the time of implantation and emphasize development of an environment conducive to cellular activation of matrix production and ultimate functional regeneration.

  13. Nanoparticles of cobalt-substituted hydroxyapatite in regeneration of mandibular osteoporotic bones

    PubMed Central

    Ignjatović, Nenad; Ajduković, Zorica; Savić, Vojin; Najman, Stevo; Mihailović, Dragan; Vasiljević, Perica; Stojanović, Zoran; Uskoković, Vuk; Uskoković, Dragan

    2012-01-01

    Indications exist that paramagnetic calcium phosphates may be able to promote regeneration of bone faster than their regular, diamagnetic counterparts. In this study, analyzed was the influence of paramagnetic cobalt-substituted hydroxyapatite nanoparticles on osteoporotic alveolar bone regeneration in rats. Simultaneously, biocompatibility of the material was tested in vitro, on osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 and epithelial Caco-2 cells in culture. The material was shown to be biocompatible and nontoxic when added to epithelial monolayers in vitro, while it caused a substantial decrease in the cell viability as well as deformation of the cytoskeleton and cell morphology when incubated with the osteoblastic cells. In the course of six months after the implantation of the material containing different amounts of cobalt, ranging from 5 – 12 wt%, in the osteoporotic alveolar bone of the lower jaw, the following parameters were investigated: histopathological parameters, alkaline phosphatase and alveolar bone density. The best result in terms of osteoporotic bone tissue regeneration was observed for hydroxyapatite nanoparticles with the largest content of cobalt ions. The histological analysis showed a high level of reparatory ability of the nanoparticulate material implanted in the bone defect, paralleled by a corresponding increase in the alveolar bone density. The combined effect of growth factors from autologous plasma admixed to cobalt-substituted hydroxyapatite was furthermore shown to have a crucial effect on the augmented osteoporotic bone regeneration upon the implantation of the biomaterial investigated in this study. PMID:23090835

  14. Graded Porous β-Tricalcium Phosphate Scaffolds Enhance Bone Regeneration in Mandible Augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jingwen; Kang, Yunqing; Browne, Christopher; Jiang, Ting; Yang, Yunzhi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Bone augmentation requires scaffold to promote forming of natural bone structure. Currently, most of the reported bone scaffolds are porous solids with uniform pores. The aim of the currentstudy is to evaluate the effect of a graded porous β-tricalcium phosphate scaffolds on alveolar bone augmentation. Three groups of scaffolds were fabricated by a template-casting method: (1) graded porous scaffolds with large pores in the center and small pores at theperiphery, (2) scaffolds with large uniform pores, and (3) scaffolds with small uniform pores. Bone augmentation on rabbit mandible wasinvestigated by microcomputed tomography, sequential fluorescentlabeling, and histologic examination 3 months after implantation.The result presents that all the scaffold groups maintain their augmented bone height after 3-month observation, whereas the autograftinggroup presents an obvious bone resorption. Microcomputed tomography reveals that the graded porous group has significantly greater volume of new bone (P < 0.05) and similar bone density compared with the uniform pores groups. Bone substance distributes unevenly in all the 3 experimental groups. Greater bone volume can be observed in the area closer to the bone bed. The sequential fluorescentlabeling observation reveals robust bone regeneration in the first month and faster bone growth in the graded porous scaffold group than that in the large porous scaffold group. Histologic examinationsconfirm bone structure in the aspect of distribution, activity, and maturity. We conclude that graded porous designed biodegradableβ-tricalcium phosphate scaffolds are beneficial to promote bone augmentation in the aspect of bone volume. PMID:25675019

  15. Cotton-wool-like bioactive glasses for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Poologasundarampillai, G; Wang, D; Li, S; Nakamura, J; Bradley, R; Lee, P D; Stevens, M M; McPhail, D S; Kasuga, T; Jones, J R

    2014-08-01

    Inorganic sol-gel solutions were electrospun to produce the first bioactive three-dimensional (3-D) scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration with a structure like cotton-wool (or cotton candy). This flexible 3-D fibrous structure is ideal for packing into complex defects. It also has large inter-fiber spaces to promote vascularization, penetration of cells and transport of nutrients throughout the scaffold. The 3-D fibrous structure was obtained by electrospinning, where the applied electric field and the instabilities exert tremendous force on the spinning jet, which is required to be viscoelastic to prevent jet break up. Previously, polymer binding agents were used with inorganic solutions to produce electrospun composite two-dimensional fibermats, requiring calcination to remove the polymer. This study presents novel reaction and processing conditions for producing a viscoelastic inorganic sol-gel solution that results in fibers by the entanglement of the intermolecularly overlapped nanosilica species in the solution, eliminating the need for a binder. Three-dimensional cotton-wool-like structures were only produced when solutions containing calcium nitrate were used, suggesting that the charge of the Ca(2+) ions had a significant effect. The resulting bioactive silica fibers had a narrow diameter range of 0.5-2μm and were nanoporous. A hydroxycarbonate apatite layer was formed on the fibers within the first 12h of soaking in simulated body fluid. MC3T3-E1 preosteoblast cells cultured on the fibers showed no adverse cytotoxic effect and they were observed to attach to and spread in the material.

  16. Hydroxyapatite-calcium sulfate-hyaluronic acid composite encapsulated with collagenase as bone substitute for alveolar bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Sadhasivam; Fang, Yen-Hsin; Sivasubramanian, Savitha; Lin, Feng-Huei; Lin, Chun-pin

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is a very severe inflammatory condition of the periodontium that progressively damages the soft tissue and destroys the alveolar bone that supports the teeth. The bone loss is naturally irreversible because of limited reparability of the teeth. Advancement in tissue engineering provides an effective regeneration of osseous defects with suitable dental implants or tissue-engineered constructs. This study reports a hydroxyapatite, calcium sulfate hemihydrate and hyaluronic acid laden collagenase (HAP/CS/HA-Col) as a bone substitute for the alveolar bone regeneration. The composite material was mechanically tested and the biocompatibility was evaluated by WST-1 assay. The in vivo bone formation was assessed in rat with alveolar bone defects and the bone augmentation by the HAP/CS/HA-Col composite was confirmed by micro-CT images and histological examination. The mechanical strength of 6.69 MPa with excellent biocompatibility was obtained for the HAP/CS/HA-Col composite. The collagenase release profile had facilitated the acceleration of bone remodeling process and it was confirmed by the findings of micro-CT and H&E staining. The bone defects implanted with HAP/CS/HA composite containing 2 mg/mL type I collagenase have shown improved new bone formation with matured bone morphology in comparison with the HAP/CS/HA composite that lacks the collagenase and the porous hydroxyapatite (p-HAP) granules. The said findings demonstrated that the collagenase inclusion in HAP/CS/HA composite is a feasible approach for the alveolar bone regeneration and the same design can also be applied to other defective tissues.

  17. Hydroxyapatite-calcium sulfate-hyaluronic acid composite encapsulated with collagenase as bone substitute for alveolar bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Sadhasivam; Fang, Yen-Hsin; Sivasubramanian, Savitha; Lin, Feng-Huei; Lin, Chun-pin

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is a very severe inflammatory condition of the periodontium that progressively damages the soft tissue and destroys the alveolar bone that supports the teeth. The bone loss is naturally irreversible because of limited reparability of the teeth. Advancement in tissue engineering provides an effective regeneration of osseous defects with suitable dental implants or tissue-engineered constructs. This study reports a hydroxyapatite, calcium sulfate hemihydrate and hyaluronic acid laden collagenase (HAP/CS/HA-Col) as a bone substitute for the alveolar bone regeneration. The composite material was mechanically tested and the biocompatibility was evaluated by WST-1 assay. The in vivo bone formation was assessed in rat with alveolar bone defects and the bone augmentation by the HAP/CS/HA-Col composite was confirmed by micro-CT images and histological examination. The mechanical strength of 6.69 MPa with excellent biocompatibility was obtained for the HAP/CS/HA-Col composite. The collagenase release profile had facilitated the acceleration of bone remodeling process and it was confirmed by the findings of micro-CT and H&E staining. The bone defects implanted with HAP/CS/HA composite containing 2 mg/mL type I collagenase have shown improved new bone formation with matured bone morphology in comparison with the HAP/CS/HA composite that lacks the collagenase and the porous hydroxyapatite (p-HAP) granules. The said findings demonstrated that the collagenase inclusion in HAP/CS/HA composite is a feasible approach for the alveolar bone regeneration and the same design can also be applied to other defective tissues. PMID:26454048

  18. Production of new 3D scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration by rapid prototyping.

    PubMed

    Fradique, R; Correia, T R; Miguel, S P; de Sá, K D; Figueira, D R; Mendonça, A G; Correia, I J

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of bone disorders, whether due to trauma or pathology, has been trending upward with the aging of the worldwide population. The currently available treatments for bone injuries are rather limited, involving mainly bone grafts and implants. A particularly promising approach for bone regeneration uses rapid prototyping (RP) technologies to produce 3D scaffolds with highly controlled structure and orientation, based on computer-aided design models or medical data. Herein, tricalcium phosphate (TCP)/alginate scaffolds were produced using RP and subsequently their physicochemical, mechanical and biological properties were characterized. The results showed that 60/40 of TCP and alginate formulation was able to match the compression and present a similar Young modulus to that of trabecular bone while presenting an adequate biocompatibility. Moreover, the biomineralization ability, roughness and macro and microporosity of scaffolds allowed cell anchoring and proliferation at their surface, as well as cell migration to its interior, processes that are fundamental for osteointegration and bone regeneration.

  19. Exosome: A Novel Approach to Stimulate Bone Regeneration through Regulation of Osteogenesis and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yunhao; Sun, Ruixin; Wu, Chuanlong; Wang, Lian; Zhang, Changqing

    2016-01-01

    The clinical need for effective bone regeneration therapy remains in huge demands. However, the current “gold standard” treatments of autologous and allogeneic bone grafts may result in various complications. Furthermore, safety considerations of biomaterials and cell-based treatment require further clarification. Therefore, developing new therapies with stronger osteogenic potential and a lower incidence of complications is worthwhile. Recently, exosomes, small vesicles of endocytic origin, have attracted attention in bone regeneration field. The vesicles travel between cells and deliver functional cargoes, such as proteins and RNAs, thereby regulating targeted cells differentiation, commitment, function, and proliferation. Much evidence has demonstrated the important roles of exosomes in osteogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. In this review, we summarize the properties, origins and biogenesis of exosomes, and the recent reports using exosomes to regulate osteogenesis and promote bone regeneration. PMID:27213355

  20. Delayed bone regeneration is linked to chronic inflammation in murine muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Khalil, Rana; Yang, Frank; Mortreux, Marie; Lieu, Shirley; Yu, Yan-Yiu; Wurmser, Maud; Pereira, Catia; Relaix, Frédéric; Miclau, Theodore; Marcucio, Ralph S.; Colnot, Céline

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients exhibit skeletal muscle weakness with continuous cycles of muscle fiber degeneration/regeneration, chronic inflammation, low bone mineral density and increased risks of fracture. Fragility fractures and associated complications are considered as a consequence of the osteoporotic condition in these patients. Here, we aimed to establish the relationship between muscular dystrophy and fracture healing by assessing bone regeneration in mdx mice, a model of DMD with absence of osteoporosis. Our results illustrate that muscle defects in mdx mice impact the process of bone regeneration at various levels. In mdx fracture calluses, both cartilage and bone deposition were delayed followed by a delay in cartilage and bone remodeling. Vascularization of mdx fracture calluses was also decreased during the early stages of repair. Dystrophic muscles are known to contain elevated numbers of macrophages contributing to muscle degeneration. Accordingly, we observed increased macrophage recruitment in the mdx fracture calluses and abnormal macrophage accumulation throughout the process of bone regeneration. These changes in the inflammatory environment subsequently had an impact on the recruitment of osteoclasts and the remodeling phase of repair. Further damage to the mdx muscles, using a novel model of muscle trauma, amplified both the chronic inflammatory response and the delay in bone regeneration. In addition, PLX3397 treatment of mdx mice, a cFMS inhibitor in monocytes, partially rescued the bone repair defect through increasing cartilage deposition and decreasing macrophage number. In conclusion, chronic inflammation in mdx mice contributes to the fracture healing delay and is associated with a decrease in angiogenesis and a transient delay in osteoclast recruitment. By revealing the role of dystrophic muscle in regulating the inflammatory response during bone repair, our results emphasize the implication of muscle in the normal bone

  1. Delayed bone regeneration is linked to chronic inflammation in murine muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Abou-Khalil, Rana; Yang, Frank; Mortreux, Marie; Lieu, Shirley; Yu, Yan-Yiu; Wurmser, Maud; Pereira, Catia; Relaix, Frédéric; Miclau, Theodore; Marcucio, Ralph S; Colnot, Céline

    2014-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients exhibit skeletal muscle weakness with continuous cycles of muscle fiber degeneration/regeneration, chronic inflammation, low bone mineral density, and increased risks of fracture. Fragility fractures and associated complications are considered as a consequence of the osteoporotic condition in these patients. Here, we aimed to establish the relationship between muscular dystrophy and fracture healing by assessing bone regeneration in mdx mice, a model of DMD with absence of osteoporosis. Our results illustrate that muscle defects in mdx mice impact the process of bone regeneration at various levels. In mdx fracture calluses, both cartilage and bone deposition were delayed followed by a delay in cartilage and bone remodeling. Vascularization of mdx fracture calluses was also decreased during the early stages of repair. Dystrophic muscles are known to contain elevated numbers of macrophages contributing to muscle degeneration. Accordingly, we observed increased macrophage recruitment in the mdx fracture calluses and abnormal macrophage accumulation throughout the process of bone regeneration. These changes in the inflammatory environment subsequently had an impact on the recruitment of osteoclasts and the remodeling phase of repair. Further damage to the mdx muscles, using a novel model of muscle trauma, amplified both the chronic inflammatory response and the delay in bone regeneration. In addition, PLX3397 treatment of mdx mice, a cFMS (colony stimulating factor receptor 1) inhibitor in monocytes, partially rescued the bone repair defect through increasing cartilage deposition and decreasing the number of macrophages. In conclusion, chronic inflammation in mdx mice contributes to the fracture healing delay and is associated with a decrease in angiogenesis and a transient delay in osteoclast recruitment. By revealing the role of dystrophic muscle in regulating the inflammatory response during bone repair, our results

  2. Combination of BMP-2-releasing gelatin/β-TCP sponges with autologous bone marrow for bone regeneration of X-ray-irradiated rabbit ulnar defects.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Masaya; Hokugo, Akishige; Takahashi, Yoshitake; Nakano, Takayoshi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of gelatin sponges incorporating β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) granules (gelatin/β-TCP sponges) to enhance bone regeneration at a segmental ulnar defect of rabbits with X-ray irradiation. After X-ray irradiation of the ulnar bone, segmental critical-sized defects of 20-mm length were created, and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2)-releasing gelatin/β-TCP sponges with or without autologous bone marrow were applied to the defects to evaluate bone regeneration. Both gelatin/β-TCP sponges containing autologous bone marrow and BMP-2-releasing sponges enhanced bone regeneration at the ulna defect to a significantly greater extent than the empty sponges (control). However, in the X-ray-irradiated bone, the bone regeneration either by autologous bone marrow or BMP-2 was inhibited. When combined with autologous bone marrow, the BMP-2 exhibited significantly high osteoinductivity, irrespective of the X-ray irradiation. The bone mineral content at the ulna defect was similar to that of the intact bone. It is concluded that the combination of bone marrow with the BMP-2-releasing gelatin/β-TCP sponge is a promising technique to induce bone regeneration at segmental bone defects after X-ray irradiation.

  3. Hard tissue regeneration using bone substitutes: an update on innovations in materials.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Swapan Kumar; Lee, Byong Taek

    2015-05-01

    Bone is a unique organ composed of mineralized hard tissue, unlike any other body part. The unique manner in which bone can constantly undergo self-remodeling has created interesting clinical approaches to the healing of damaged bone. Healing of large bone defects is achieved using implant materials that gradually integrate with the body after healing is completed. Such strategies require a multidisciplinary approach by material scientists, biological scientists, and clinicians. Development of materials for bone healing and exploration of the interactions thereof with the body are active research areas. In this review, we explore ongoing developments in the creation of materials for regenerating hard tissues. PMID:25995658

  4. Hard tissue regeneration using bone substitutes: an update on innovations in materials.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Swapan Kumar; Lee, Byong Taek

    2015-05-01

    Bone is a unique organ composed of mineralized hard tissue, unlike any other body part. The unique manner in which bone can constantly undergo self-remodeling has created interesting clinical approaches to the healing of damaged bone. Healing of large bone defects is achieved using implant materials that gradually integrate with the body after healing is completed. Such strategies require a multidisciplinary approach by material scientists, biological scientists, and clinicians. Development of materials for bone healing and exploration of the interactions thereof with the body are active research areas. In this review, we explore ongoing developments in the creation of materials for regenerating hard tissues.

  5. Hard tissue regeneration using bone substitutes: an update on innovations in materials

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Swapan Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Bone is a unique organ composed of mineralized hard tissue, unlike any other body part. The unique manner in which bone can constantly undergo self-remodeling has created interesting clinical approaches to the healing of damaged bone. Healing of large bone defects is achieved using implant materials that gradually integrate with the body after healing is completed. Such strategies require a multidisciplinary approach by material scientists, biological scientists, and clinicians. Development of materials for bone healing and exploration of the interactions thereof with the body are active research areas. In this review, we explore ongoing developments in the creation of materials for regenerating hard tissues. PMID:25995658

  6. Targeting the hypoxic response in bone tissue engineering: A balance between supply and consumption to improve bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Stiers, Pieter-Jan; van Gastel, Nick; Carmeliet, Geert

    2016-09-01

    Bone tissue engineering is a promising therapeutic alternative for bone grafting of large skeletal defects. It generally comprises an ex vivo engineered combination of a carrier structure, stem/progenitor cells and growth factors. However, the success of these regenerative implants largely depends on how well implanted cells will adapt to the hostile and hypoxic host environment they encounter after implantation. In this review, we will discuss how hypoxia signalling may be used to improve bone regeneration in a tissue-engineered construct. First, hypoxia signalling induces angiogenesis which increases the survival of the implanted cells as well as stimulates bone formation. Second, hypoxia signalling has also angiogenesis-independent effects on mesenchymal cells in vitro, offering exciting new possibilities to improve tissue-engineered bone regeneration in vivo. In addition, studies in other fields have shown that benefits of modulating hypoxia signalling include enhanced cell survival, proliferation and differentiation, culminating in a more potent regenerative implant. Finally, the stimulation of endochondral bone formation as a physiological pathway to circumvent the harmful effects of hypoxia will be briefly touched upon. Thus, angiogenic dependent and independent processes may counteract the deleterious hypoxic effects and we will discuss several therapeutic strategies that may be combined to withstand the hypoxia upon implantation and improve bone regeneration. PMID:26768117

  7. Immediate placement and provisionalization of maxillary anterior single implant with guided bone regeneration, connective tissue graft, and coronally positioned flap procedures.

    PubMed

    Waki, Tomonori; Kan, Joseph Y K

    2016-01-01

    Immediate implant placement and provisionalization in the esthetic zone have been documented with success. The benefit of immediate implant placement and provisionalization is the preservation of papillary mucosa. However, in cases with osseous defects presenting on the facial bony plate, immediate implant placement procedures have resulted in facial gingival recession. Subepithelial connective tissue grafts for immediate implant placement and provisionalization procedures have been reported with a good esthetic outcome. Biotype conversion around implants with subepithelial connective tissue grafts have been advocated, and the resulting tissues appear to be more resistant to recession. The dimensions of peri-implant mucosa in a thick biotype were significantly greater than in a thin biotype. Connective tissue graft with coronally positioned flap procedures on natural teeth has also been documented with success. This article describes a technique combining immediate implant placement, provisionalization, guided bone regeneration (GBR), connective tissue graft, and a coronally positioned flap in order to achieve more stable peri-implant tissue in facial osseous defect situations.

  8. Immediate placement and provisionalization of maxillary anterior single implant with guided bone regeneration, connective tissue graft, and coronally positioned flap procedures.

    PubMed

    Waki, Tomonori; Kan, Joseph Y K

    2016-01-01

    Immediate implant placement and provisionalization in the esthetic zone have been documented with success. The benefit of immediate implant placement and provisionalization is the preservation of papillary mucosa. However, in cases with osseous defects presenting on the facial bony plate, immediate implant placement procedures have resulted in facial gingival recession. Subepithelial connective tissue grafts for immediate implant placement and provisionalization procedures have been reported with a good esthetic outcome. Biotype conversion around implants with subepithelial connective tissue grafts have been advocated, and the resulting tissues appear to be more resistant to recession. The dimensions of peri-implant mucosa in a thick biotype were significantly greater than in a thin biotype. Connective tissue graft with coronally positioned flap procedures on natural teeth has also been documented with success. This article describes a technique combining immediate implant placement, provisionalization, guided bone regeneration (GBR), connective tissue graft, and a coronally positioned flap in order to achieve more stable peri-implant tissue in facial osseous defect situations. PMID:27092345

  9. BMP2 Genetically Engineered MSCs and EPCs Promote Vascularized Bone Regeneration in Rat Critical-Sized Calvarial Bone Defects

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaoning; Dziak, Rosemary; Yuan, Xue; Mao, Keya; Genco, Robert; Swihart, Mark; Sarkar, Debanjan; Li, Chunyi; Wang, Changdong; Lu, Li; Andreadis, Stelios; Yang, Shuying

    2013-01-01

    Current clinical therapies for critical-sized bone defects (CSBDs) remain far from ideal. Previous studies have demonstrated that engineering bone tissue using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is feasible. However, this approach is not effective for CSBDs due to inadequate vascularization. In our previous study, we have developed an injectable and porous nano calcium sulfate/alginate (nCS/A) scaffold and demonstrated that nCS/A composition is biocompatible and has proper biodegradability for bone regeneration. Here, we hypothesized that the combination of an injectable and porous nCS/A with bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) gene-modified MSCs and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) could significantly enhance vascularized bone regeneration. Our results demonstrated that delivery of MSCs and EPCs with the injectable nCS/A scaffold did not affect cell viability. Moreover, co-culture of BMP2 gene-modified MSCs and EPCs dramatically increased osteoblast differentiation of MSCs and endothelial differentiation of EPCs in vitro. We further tested the multifunctional bone reconstruction system consisting of an injectable and porous nCS/A scaffold (mimicking the nano-calcium matrix of bone) and BMP2 genetically-engineered MSCs and EPCs in a rat critical-sized (8 mm) caviarial bone defect model. Our in vivo results showed that, compared to the groups of nCS/A, nCS/A+MSCs, nCS/A+MSCs+EPCs and nCS/A+BMP2 gene-modified MSCs, the combination of BMP2 gene -modified MSCs and EPCs in nCS/A dramatically increased the new bone and vascular formation. These results demonstrated that EPCs increase new vascular growth, and that BMP2 gene modification for MSCs and EPCs dramatically promotes bone regeneration. This system could ultimately enable clinicians to better reconstruct the craniofacial bone and avoid donor site morbidity for CSBDs. PMID:23565253

  10. Bone regeneration associated with nontherapeutic and therapeutic surface coatings for dental implants in osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Alghamdi, Hamdan S; Jansen, John A

    2013-06-01

    Oral implantology is considered as the treatment of choice for replacing missing teeth in elderly people. However, implant complications may occur in patients with osteoporosis. The pathogenesis underlying osteoporosis is due to an alteration in bone cell response to hormonal, nutritional, and aging factors. For such challenging situations, improved bone regeneration has been shown around dental implants for certain surface modifications. These modifications include coatings of titanium implants with calcium phosphate (CaP) ceramics. Surface coating developments also allow for the addition of organic biomolecules, like growth factors, into the inorganic coatings that increase the bone formation process at the bone-implant interface. The application of therapeutic-based coatings is becoming a rapidly growing research field of interest. CaP-coated implants have the ability to incorporate anti-osteoporotic drugs, which then can be locally released over time from an implant surface in a controlled manner. Thus, it can be anticipated that nontherapeutic and/or therapeutic coated implants can significantly increase low bone density as well as improve impaired bone regeneration in osteoporosis. This review aims to provide a thorough understanding of the underlying mechanisms for impaired bone regeneration around dental implants in osteoporosis. Secondly, the review will focus on biological interactions and beneficial role of the surface-coated (i.e., nontherapeutics and therapeutics) bone implants in osteoporotic bone tissue.

  11. The axolotl limb: a model for bone development, regeneration and fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Hutchison, Cara; Pilote, Mireille; Roy, Stéphane

    2007-01-01

    Among vertebrates, urodele amphibians (e.g., axolotls) have the unique ability to perfectly regenerate complex body parts after amputation. The limb has been the most widely studied due to the presence of three defined axes and its ease of manipulation. Hence, the limb has been chosen as a model to study the process of skeletogenesis during axolotl development, regeneration and to analyze this animal's ability to heal bone fractures. Extensive studies have allowed researchers to gain some knowledge of the mechanisms controlling growth and pattern formation in regenerating and developing limbs, offering an insight into how vertebrates are able to regenerate tissues. In this study, we report the cloning and characterization of two axolotl genes; Cbfa-1, a transcription factor that controls the remodeling of cartilage into bone and PTHrP, known for its involvement in the differentiation and maturation of chondrocytes. Whole-mount in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry results show that Cbfa-1, PTHrP and type II collagen are expressed during limb development and regeneration. These genes are expressed during specific stages of limb development and regeneration which are consistent with the appearance of skeletal elements. The expression pattern for Cbfa-1 in late limb development was similar to the expression pattern found in the late stages of limb regeneration (i.e. re-development phase) and it did not overlap with the expression of type II collagen. It has been reported that the molecular mechanisms involved in the re-development phase of limb regeneration are a recapitulation of those used in developing limbs; therefore the detection of Cbfa-1 expression during regeneration supports this assertion. Conversely, PTHrP expression pattern was different during limb development and regeneration, by its intensity and by the localization of the signal. Finally, despite its unsurpassed abilities to regenerate, we tested whether the axolotl was able to regenerate non

  12. Drug loaded homogeneous electrospun PCL/gelatin hybrid nanofiber structures for anti-infective tissue regeneration membranes.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jiajia; He, Min; Liu, Hao; Niu, Yuzhao; Crawford, Aileen; Coates, Phil D; Chen, Dafu; Shi, Rui; Zhang, Liqun

    2014-11-01

    Infection is the major reason for guided tissue regeneration/guided bone regeneration (GTR/GBR) membrane failure in clinical application. In this work, we developed GTR/GBR membranes with localized drug delivery function to prevent infection by electrospinning of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) and gelatin blended with metronidazole (MNA). Acetic acid (HAc) was introduced to improve the miscibility of PCL and gelatin to fabricate homogeneous hybrid nanofiber membranes. The effects of the addition of HAc and the MNA content (0, 1, 5, 10, 20, 30, and 40 wt.% of polymer) on the properties of the membranes were investigated. The membranes showed good mechanical properties, appropriate biodegradation rate and barrier function. The controlled and sustained release of MNA from the membranes significantly prevented the colonization of anaerobic bacteria. Cells could adhere to and proliferate on the membranes without cytotoxicity until the MNA content reached 30%. Subcutaneous implantation in rabbits for 8 months demonstrated that MNA-loaded membranes evoked a less severe inflammatory response depending on the dose of MNA than bare membranes. The biodegradation time of the membranes was appropriate for tissue regeneration. These results indicated the potential for using MNA-loaded PCL/gelatin electrospun membranes as anti-infective GTR/GBR membranes to optimize clinical application of GTR/GBR strategies.

  13. Stem cell technology for bone regeneration: current status and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Asatrian, Greg; Pham, Dalton; Hardy, Winters R; James, Aaron W; Peault, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Continued improvements in the understanding and application of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have revolutionized tissue engineering. This is particularly true within the field of skeletal regenerative medicine. However, much remains unknown regarding the native origins of MSC, the relative advantages of different MSC populations for bone regeneration, and even the biologic safety of such unpurified, grossly characterized cells. This review will first summarize the initial discovery of MSC, as well as the current and future applications of MSC in bone tissue engineering. Next, the relative advantages and disadvantages of MSC isolated from distinct tissue origins are debated, including the MSC from adipose, bone marrow, and dental pulp, among others. The perivascular origin of MSC is next discussed. Finally, we briefly comment on pluripotent stem cell populations and their possible application in bone tissue engineering. While continually expanding, the field of MSC-based bone tissue engineering and regeneration shows potential to become a clinical reality in the not-so-distant future.

  14. Effect of simvastatin versus low level laser therapy (LLLT) on bone regeneration in rabbit's tibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheith, Mostafa E.; Khairy, Maggie A.

    2014-02-01

    Simvastatin is a cholesterol lowering drug which proved effective on promoting bone healing. Recently low level laser therapy (LLLT) proved its effect as a biostimulator promoting bone regeneration. This study aims to compare the effect of both Simvastatin versus low level laser on bone healing in surgically created bone defects in rabbit's tibia. Material and methods: The study included 12 New Zealand white rabbits. Three successive 3mm defects were created in rabbits tibia first defect was left as control, second defect was filled with Simvastatin while the third defect was acted on with Low Level Laser (optical fiber 320micrometer). Rabbits were sacrificed after 48 hours, 1 week and 2 weeks intervals. Histopathology was conducted on the three defects Results: The histopathologic studies showed that the bony defects treated with the Low Level Laser showed superior healing patterns and bone regeneration than those treated with Simvastatin. While the control defect showed the least healing pattern.

  15. Bone regeneration in sheep using acropora coral, a natural resorbable scaffold, and autologous mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Manassero, Mathieu; Viateau, Véronique; Deschepper, Mickael; Oudina, Karim; Logeart-Avramoglou, Delphine; Petite, Hervé; Bensidhoum, Morad

    2013-07-01

    Tissue constructs containing mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are an appealing strategy for repairing massive segmental bone defects. However, their therapeutic effectiveness does not match that of autologous bone grafts; among the complicating reasons, the scaffold resorbability has been identified as a critical feature for achieving bone regeneration. In the present study, the osteogenic potential of constructs obtained by expanding autologous MSC onto granules of Acropora coral, a natural fully-resorbable scaffold, was investigated. MSC adhered and proliferated well in vitro after 1 week. When implanted in vivo into long-bone, critical-size defects in sheep (n=5), these constructs exhibited a two-fold increase in bone formation 6 months postimplantation compared to Acropora scaffolds alone (n=5). Interestingly, osteogenesis, mediated by MSC, within these constructs was found continuous not only with the bony stumps, but also at the core of the implants. Scaffold resorption was almost complete at 6 months, leading to full bone regeneration in one animal. Acropora coral appear to be an appealing scaffold for bone tissue engineering because it supported in vitro MSC adhesion and proliferation. Moreover, these results provided evidence that MSC could promote bone regeneration in sheep when loaded one a natural fully resorbable scaffold.

  16. Biocomposite cryogels as tissue-engineered biomaterials for regeneration of critical-sized cranial bone defects.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Ruchi; Goel, Sudhir Kumar; Gupta, Kailash Chand; Kumar, Ashok

    2014-02-01

    Analysis of the in vivo regeneration capability of any tissue-engineered biomaterial is necessary once it shows potential characteristics during in vitro studies. Thus, we applied polyvinyl alcohol-tetraethylorthosilicate-alginate-calcium oxide (PTAC) biocomposite cryogel on critical-sized cranial bone defects in wistar rats for examining the comparative bone regeneration of cryogel-treated and nontreated defects over a period of 4 weeks. An in-depth analysis was performed from macroscopic level till the gene level. Bone regeneration in cryogel-treated defects was clearly evident from the results, whereas the nontreated group did not show any defect healing except at few peripheral areas. At the macroscopic level, micro-computed tomography analysis revealed new bone formation. This was further confirmed at the cellular level, wherein, new bone formation was demonstrated by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Osteoblastic differentiation was further validated by immunohistological staining of runt-related transcription factor-2 (Runx-2) protein and via calcium-phosphate crystal formation after 2 weeks through scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Finally, at the gene level, real-time PCR analysis confirmed the mRNA expression of osteoblastic markers, that is, runx-2, collagen type I (Col I), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and osteocalcin (OCN). Therefore, the results of in vivo cranial defect model studies suggest that PTAC biocomposite cryogels can show suitable potential for human bone regeneration. PMID:24147880

  17. Biocomposite cryogels as tissue-engineered biomaterials for regeneration of critical-sized cranial bone defects.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Ruchi; Goel, Sudhir Kumar; Gupta, Kailash Chand; Kumar, Ashok

    2014-02-01

    Analysis of the in vivo regeneration capability of any tissue-engineered biomaterial is necessary once it shows potential characteristics during in vitro studies. Thus, we applied polyvinyl alcohol-tetraethylorthosilicate-alginate-calcium oxide (PTAC) biocomposite cryogel on critical-sized cranial bone defects in wistar rats for examining the comparative bone regeneration of cryogel-treated and nontreated defects over a period of 4 weeks. An in-depth analysis was performed from macroscopic level till the gene level. Bone regeneration in cryogel-treated defects was clearly evident from the results, whereas the nontreated group did not show any defect healing except at few peripheral areas. At the macroscopic level, micro-computed tomography analysis revealed new bone formation. This was further confirmed at the cellular level, wherein, new bone formation was demonstrated by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Osteoblastic differentiation was further validated by immunohistological staining of runt-related transcription factor-2 (Runx-2) protein and via calcium-phosphate crystal formation after 2 weeks through scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Finally, at the gene level, real-time PCR analysis confirmed the mRNA expression of osteoblastic markers, that is, runx-2, collagen type I (Col I), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and osteocalcin (OCN). Therefore, the results of in vivo cranial defect model studies suggest that PTAC biocomposite cryogels can show suitable potential for human bone regeneration.

  18. Synergistic effects of dimethyloxalylglycine and butyrate incorporated into α-calcium sulfate on bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Woo, Kyung Mi; Jung, Hong-Moon; Oh, Joung-Hwan; Rahman, Saeed Ur; Kim, Soung Min; Baek, Jeong-Hwa; Ryoo, Hyun-Mo

    2015-01-01

    Osteogenesis is closely related to angiogenesis, and the combined delivery of angiogenic and osteogenic factors has been suggested to enhance bone regeneration. Small molecules have been explored as alternatives to growth factors for tissue regeneration applications. In this study, we examined the effects of the combined application of angiogenic and osteogenic small molecules on bone regeneration using a prolyl hydroxylase, dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG), and a histone deacetylase inhibitor, butyrate. In a critical size bone defect model in rats, DMOG and butyrate, which were incorporated into α calcium sulfate (αCS), resulted in synergistic enhancements in bone and blood vessel formation, eventually leading to bone healing, as confirmed by micro-CT and histological analyses. In MC4 pre-osteoblast cultures, DMOG and butyrate enhanced the pro-angiogenic responses and osteoblast differentiation, respectively, which were evaluated based on the levels of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α protein and the expression of pro-angiogenic molecules (VEGF, home oxidase-1, glucose transporter-1) and by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the expression of osteoblast phenotype marker molecules (ALP, α1(I)col, osteocalcin, and bone sialoprotein). DMOG combined with butyrate synergistically improved osteoblast differentiation and pro-angiogenic responses, the levels of which were drastically increased in the cultures on αCS disks. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that αCS increased the level of HIF-1α and as a consequence VEGF expression, and supported osteoblast differentiation through the release of calcium ions from the αCS. Altogether, the results of this study provide evidence that a combination treatment with the small molecules DMOG and butyrate can expedite the process of bone regeneration and that αCS can be an efficient delivery vehicle for the small molecules for bone regeneration.

  19. Bone Regeneration Based on Tissue Engineering Conceptions — A 21st Century Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Henkel, Jan; Woodruff, Maria A.; Epari, Devakara R.; Steck, Roland; Glatt, Vaida; Dickinson, Ian C.; Choong, Peter F. M.; Schuetz, Michael A.; Hutmacher, Dietmar W.

    2013-01-01

    The role of Bone Tissue Engineering in the field of Regenerative Medicine has been the topic of substantial research over the past two decades. Technological advances have improved orthopaedic implants and surgical techniques for bone reconstruction. However, improvements in surgical techniques to reconstruct bone have been limited by the paucity of autologous materials available and donor site morbidity. Recent advances in the development of biomaterials have provided attractive alternatives to bone grafting expanding the surgical options for restoring the form and function of injured bone. Specifically, novel bioactive (second generation) biomaterials have been developed that are characterised by controlled action and reaction to the host tissue environment, whilst exhibiting controlled chemical breakdown and resorption with an ultimate replacement by regenerating tissue. Future generations of biomaterials (third generation) are designed to be not only osteoconductive but also osteoinductive, i.e. to stimulate regeneration of host tissues by combining tissue engineering and in situ tissue regeneration methods with a focus on novel applications. These techniques will lead to novel possibilities for tissue regeneration and repair. At present, tissue engineered constructs that may find future use as bone grafts for complex skeletal defects, whether from post-traumatic, degenerative, neoplastic or congenital/developmental “origin” require osseous reconstruction to ensure structural and functional integrity. Engineering functional bone using combinations of cells, scaffolds and bioactive factors is a promising strategy and a particular feature for future development in the area of hybrid materials which are able to exhibit suitable biomimetic and mechanical properties. This review will discuss the state of the art in this field and what we can expect from future generations of bone regeneration concepts. PMID:26273505

  20. Platelet-derived growth factor inhibits bone regeneration induced by osteogenin, a bone morphogenetic protein, in rat craniotomy defects.

    PubMed Central

    Marden, L J; Fan, R S; Pierce, G F; Reddi, A H; Hollinger, J O

    1993-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is a potent moderator of soft tissue repair through induction of the inflammatory phase of repair and subsequent enhanced collagen deposition. We examined the effect of recombinant BB homodimer PDGF (rPDGF-BB) applied to rat craniotomy defects, treated with and without bovine osteogenin (OG), to see if bone regeneration would be stimulated. Implants containing 0, 20, 60, or 200 micrograms rPDGF-BB, reconstituted with insoluble rat collagenous bone matrix containing 0, 30, or 150 micrograms OG, were placed into 8-mm craniotomies. After 11 d, 21 of the 144 rats presented subcutaneous masses superior to the defect sites. The masses, comprised of serosanguinous fluid encapsulated by fibrous connective tissue, were larger and occurred more frequently in rats treated with 200 micrograms rPDGF-BB, and were absent in rats not treated with rPDGF-BB. The masses underwent resorption within 28 d after surgery. OG (2-256 micrograms) caused a dose-dependent increase in radiopacity and a marked regeneration of calcified tissue in a dose-dependent fashion within defect sites. However, OG-induced bone regeneration was inhibited 17-53% in the presence of rPDGF-BB. These results suggest that rPDGF-BB inhibited OG-induced bone regeneration and stimulated a soft tissue repair wound phenotype and response. Images PMID:8254045

  1. Guided bone regeneration with subperiosteal implants of PTFE and hydroxyapatite physical barriers in rats.

    PubMed

    de Macedo, Nelson Luiz; de Macedo, Luís Guilherme Scavone; Matuda, Fábio de Silva; Ouchi, Suzana Martins; Monteiro, Adriana Socorro Ferreira; Carvalho, Yasmin Rodarte

    2003-01-01

    Regeneration of periodontal and alveolar ridge defects utilizing membranes is a well-established procedure in reconstructive surgery. Biomaterial characteristics and membrane design employed in guided tissue regeneration (GTR) techniques play an important role in good results. The purpose of this histologic experimental study in rats was to compare the use of two physical barriers in the osteopromotion by using GTR principles in bone defects created in tibias. Fifteen animals divided into 3 groups were used: group I (non-porous polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) barrier), group II (coral hydroxyapatite (HA) blocks), and group III (defects that received no physical barrier). Histological examination showed varied amounts of newly formed bone beneath both types of barriers. The non-porous PTFE barrier showed better results than the HA group. The results of this study suggest that bone regeneration can be successfully enhanced by a submerged membrane technique.

  2. Current Progress in Bioactive Ceramic Scaffolds for Bone Repair and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Chengde; Deng, Youwen; Feng, Pei; Mao, Zhongzheng; Li, Pengjian; Yang, Bo; Deng, Junjie; Cao, Yiyuan; Shuai, Cijun; Peng, Shuping

    2014-01-01

    Bioactive ceramics have received great attention in the past decades owing to their success in stimulating cell proliferation, differentiation and bone tissue regeneration. They can react and form chemical bonds with cells and tissues in human body. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the application of bioactive ceramics for bone repair and regeneration. The review systematically summarizes the types and characters of bioactive ceramics, the fabrication methods for nanostructure and hierarchically porous structure, typical toughness methods for ceramic scaffold and corresponding mechanisms such as fiber toughness, whisker toughness and particle toughness. Moreover, greater insights into the mechanisms of interaction between ceramics and cells are provided, as well as the development of ceramic-based composite materials. The development and challenges of bioactive ceramics are also discussed from the perspective of bone repair and regeneration. PMID:24646912

  3. Efficacy of Mucograft vs Conventional Resorbable Collagen Membranes in Guided Bone Regeneration Around Standardized Calvarial Defects in Rats: An In Vivo Microcomputed Tomographic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Basudan, Amani; Babay, Nadir; Ramalingam, Sundar; Nooh, Nasser; Al-Kindi, Mohammed; Al-Rasheed, Abdulaziz; Al-Hezaimi, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this in vivo microcomputed tomographic (μCT) study was to compare the efficacy of Mucograft (MG) vs resorbable collagen membranes (RCMs) in facilitating guided bone regeneration (GBR) around standardized calvarial defects in rats. Forty female Wistar albino rats with a mean age and weight of 6 to 9 weeks and 250 to 300 g, respectively, were used. With the rats under general anesthesia, the skin over the calvaria was exposed using a full-thickness flap. A standardized calvarial defect with a 4.6-mm diameter was created in the left parietal bone. For treatment, the rats were randomly divided into four groups (n = 10 per group): (1) defects covered with MG (MG group); (2) defects covered with an RCM (RCM group); (3) defects filled with xenograft bone particles and covered by MG (MG + bone group); and (4) defects filled with xenograft bone particles and covered by an RCM (RCM + bone group). Primary closure was achieved using interrupted resorbable sutures. The animals underwent high-resolution, three-dimensional μCT scans at baseline and at 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks after the surgical procedures. Data regarding volume and bone mineral density (BMD) of newly formed bone (NFB) and bone particles revealed an increase in the volume of NFB in all the groups from baseline to 8 weeks. The MG group had the lowest volume of NFB (mean ± standard deviation [SD], 1.32 ± 0.22 mm(3)). No significant differences in mean ± SD values for volume of NFB were observed between the RCM (3.50 ± 0.24 mm(3)) and MG + bone (3.87 ± 0.36 mm(3)) groups, but their values were significantly lower than that of the RCM + bone group (2.95 ± 0.15 mm(3), F = 131.91, dfN = 2, dfD = 27, P < .001). Significant differences in BMD of NFB between the groups (F = 332.46, dfN = 3, dfD = 36, P < .001) and during different data collection periods (F = 97.04, dfN = 3, dfD = 36, P < .01) were observed, with the RCM group having the highest mean ± SD BMD of NFB (0.42 ± 0.05 g/mm(3)). Significant

  4. [Experimental study on the fabrication of bioactive membrane for inducing bone regeneration].

    PubMed

    Tian, Weidong; Bao, Chongyun; Liu, Lei; Tang, Wei; Zheng, Xiaohui; Li, Shengwei; Xiong, Chengdong

    2004-10-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a bioactive membrane for inducing bone regeneration. The membrane was composed of polylactic acid, collagen, recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2). The PLA + collagen + rhBMP-2 membrane was fabricated by solvent-casting and cool-drying. The mechanic properties of this compound membrane were tested. The two surfaces of membrane were observed by SEM. Degradability of PLA was evaluated by SEM observation and molecular weight measure in vitro and in vivo. The compound membranes were implanted in rabbit muscles. The samples were obtained when animals were sacrificed at different periods: 2 weeks, 1, 2, 3, 6 months after surgery. The biodegradability and biocompatibility of the membrane were evaluated. The heterotopic bone inducing activity of BMP was identified. The results indicated that the strength at extension to failure of the compound membrane was 36.4MPa at 2.3% strain. The compound membrane was found bearing active factor on its coarse side, which can induce bone regeneration. After implantation in vivo, the membrane maintained the structure for three months and degraded in 6 months. Based on histological analysis, there was no obvious inflammation. Heterotopic bone was induced. We could conclude that the PLA + collagen + rhBMP-2 membrane is an absorbable compound membrane that possesses good biocompatibility, adequate mechanic properties and excellent property of bone induction. It could be applied as an ideal membrane for inducing bone regeneration. PMID:15553872

  5. Modeling Vascularized Bone Regeneration Within a Porous Biodegradable CaP Scaffold Loaded with Growth Factors

    PubMed Central

    Sun, X; Kang, Y; Bao, J; Zhang, Y; Yang, Y; Zhou, X

    2013-01-01

    Osteogenetic microenvironment is a complex constitution in which extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules, stem cells and growth factors each interact to direct the coordinate regulation of bone tissue development. Importantly, angiogenesis improvement and revascularization are critical for osteogenesis during bone tissue regeneration processes. In this study, we developed a three-dimensional (3D) multi-scale system model to study cell response to growth factors released from a 3D biodegradable porous calcium phosphate (CaP) scaffold. Our model reconstructed the 3D bone regeneration system and examined the effects of pore size and porosity on bone formation and angiogenesis. The results suggested that scaffold porosity played a more dominant role in affecting bone formation and angiogenesis compared with pore size, while the pore size could be controlled to tailor the growth factor release rate and release fraction. Furthermore, a combination of gradient VEGF with BMP2 and Wnt released from the multi-layer scaffold promoted angiogenesis and bone formation more readily than single growth factors. These results demonstrated that the developed model can be potentially applied to predict vascularized bone regeneration with specific scaffold and growth factors. PMID:23566802

  6. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopic analysis of regenerated bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benetti, Carolina; Kazarain, Sergei G.; Alves, Marco A. V.; Blay, Alberto; Correa, Luciana; Zezell, Denise M.

    2014-03-01

    The cutting of bone is routinely required in medical procedures, especially in dental applications. In such cases, bone regeneration and new bone quality can determine the success of the treatment. This study investigated the main spectral differences of undamaged and healed bone using the ATR-FTIR spectroscopy technique. Three rabbits were submitted to a surgical procedure; a small piece of bone (3x3 mm2) was removed from both sides of their jaws using a high speed drill. After 15 days, the rabbits were euthanized and the jaws were removed. A bone slice was cut from each side of the jaw containing regions of undamaged and newly formed bone, resulting in six samples which were polished for spectroscopic comparison. The samples were analyzed by FTIR spectroscopy using a diamond ATR accessory. Spectral characteristics were compared and particular attention was paid to the proportion of phosphate to amide I bands and the width of the phosphate band. The results show that the ratio of phosphate to amide I is smaller in new bone tissue than in the undamaged bone, indicating a higher organic content in the newly formed bone. The analysis of the width of the phosphate band suggests a crystallinity difference between both tissues, since the width was higher in the new bone than in the natural bone. These results suggest that the differences observed in bone aging processes by FTIR spectroscopic can be applied to the study of healing processes.

  7. Relevance of fiber integrated gelatin-nanohydroxyapatite composite scaffold for bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Shamaz, Bibi Halima; Anitha, A; Vijayamohan, Manju; Kuttappan, Shruthy; Nair, Shantikumar; Nair, Manitha B

    2015-10-01

    Porous nanohydroxyapatite (nanoHA) is a promising bone substitute, but it is brittle, which limits its utility for load bearing applications. To address this issue, herein, biodegradable electrospun microfibrous sheets of poly(L-lactic acid)-(PLLA)-polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) were incorporated into a gelatin-nanoHA matrix which was investigated for its mechanical properties, the physical integration of the fibers with the matrix, cell infiltration, osteogenic differentiation and bone regeneration. The inclusion of sacrificial fibers like PVA along with PLLA and leaching resulted in improved cellular infiltration towards the center of the scaffold. Furthermore, the treatment of PLLA fibers with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide enhanced their hydrophilicity, ensuring firm anchorage between the fibers and the gelatin-HA matrix. The incorporation of PLLA microfibers within the gelatin-nanoHA matrix reduced the brittleness of the scaffolds, the effect being proportional to the number of layers of fibrous sheets in the matrix. The proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells was augmented on the fibrous scaffolds in comparison to those scaffolds devoid of fibers. Finally, the scaffold could promote cell infiltration, together with bone regeneration, upon implantation in a rabbit femoral cortical defect within 4 weeks. The bone regeneration potential was significantly higher when compared to commercially available HA (Surgiwear™). Thus, this biomimetic, porous, 3D composite scaffold could be offered as a promising candidate for bone regeneration in orthopedics.

  8. Relevance of fiber integrated gelatin-nanohydroxyapatite composite scaffold for bone tissue regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halima Shamaz, Bibi; Anitha, A.; Vijayamohan, Manju; Kuttappan, Shruthy; Nair, Shantikumar; Nair, Manitha B.

    2015-10-01

    Porous nanohydroxyapatite (nanoHA) is a promising bone substitute, but it is brittle, which limits its utility for load bearing applications. To address this issue, herein, biodegradable electrospun microfibrous sheets of poly(L-lactic acid)-(PLLA)-polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) were incorporated into a gelatin-nanoHA matrix which was investigated for its mechanical properties, the physical integration of the fibers with the matrix, cell infiltration, osteogenic differentiation and bone regeneration. The inclusion of sacrificial fibers like PVA along with PLLA and leaching resulted in improved cellular infiltration towards the center of the scaffold. Furthermore, the treatment of PLLA fibers with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide enhanced their hydrophilicity, ensuring firm anchorage between the fibers and the gelatin-HA matrix. The incorporation of PLLA microfibers within the gelatin-nanoHA matrix reduced the brittleness of the scaffolds, the effect being proportional to the number of layers of fibrous sheets in the matrix. The proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells was augmented on the fibrous scaffolds in comparison to those scaffolds devoid of fibers. Finally, the scaffold could promote cell infiltration, together with bone regeneration, upon implantation in a rabbit femoral cortical defect within 4 weeks. The bone regeneration potential was significantly higher when compared to commercially available HA (Surgiwear™). Thus, this biomimetic, porous, 3D composite scaffold could be offered as a promising candidate for bone regeneration in orthopedics.

  9. Bone regeneration: molecular and cellular interactions with calcium phosphate ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Barrère, Florence; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; de Groot, Klaas

    2006-01-01

    Calcium phosphate bioceramics are widely used in orthopedic and dental applications and porous scaffolds made of them are serious candidates in the field of bone tissue engineering. They have superior properties for the stimulation of bone formation and bone bonding, both related to the specific interactions of their surface with the extracellular fluids and cells, ie, ionic exchanges, superficial molecular rearrangement and cellular activity. PMID:17717972

  10. Spontaneous Bone Regeneration in an Open Segmental Fracture of the Forearm with Extruded Middle Segment

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Bibek K; Vaishya, Raju

    2016-01-01

    Open segmental fractures of both bones of the forearm with the loss of the middle segment of the radius is a rare injury in children. An eight-year-old boy presented to our clinic four days following a road traffic accident. The child’s mother was carrying a 12-cm long extruded and soiled segment of the radius bone. The extruded bone segment seemed necrotic, and we decided not to use it for replantation. The wound over the forearm fracture was infected. It was debrided and regularly dressed until it became healthy. We planned to use a fibular graft for the gap and to fix the graft with a Kirschner wire (K-wire). The operation was delayed due to the poor wound condition. At the four-week follow-up, we noticed unexpected signs of bone regeneration in the bone defect of the radius. After eight weeks, a complete spontaneous reconstruction of the bone was noted. This case highlights the excellent healing potential of the bones in children, where even if a long segment of the bone is lost, we can expect spontaneous complete regeneration of the bone if the periosteum is intact and continuous. PMID:27738571

  11. Ultrastructure of regenerated bone mineral surrounding hydroxyapatite-alginate composite and sintered hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Andre L; Barreto, Isabela C; Maciel, William Q; Rosa, Fabiana P; Rocha-Leão, Maria H; Werckmann, Jacques; Rossi, Alexandre M; Borojevic, Radovan; Farina, Marcos

    2012-01-01

    We report the ultrastructure of regenerated bone surrounding two types of biomaterials: hydroxyapatite-alginate composite and sintered hydroxyapatite. Critical defects in the calvaria of Wistar rats were filled with micrometer-sized spherical biomaterials and analyzed after 90 and 120 days of implantation by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflectance microscopy, respectively. Infrared spectroscopy showed that hydroxyapatite of both biomaterials became more disordered after implantation in the rat calvaria, indicating that the biological environment induced modifications in biomaterials structure. We observed that the regenerated bone surrounding both biomaterials had a lamellar structure with type I collagen fibers alternating in adjacent lamella with angles of approximately 90°. In each lamella, plate-like apatite crystals were aligned in the c-axis direction, although a rotation around the c-axis could be present. Bone plate-like crystal dimensions were similar in regenerated bone around biomaterials and pre-existing bone in the rat calvaria. No epitaxial growth was observed around any of the biomaterials. A distinct mineralized layer was observed between new bone and hydroxyapatite-alginate biomaterial. This region presented a particular ultrastructure with crystallites smaller than those of the bulk of the biomaterial, and was possibly formed during the synthesis of alginate-containing composite or in the biological environment after implantation. Round nanoparticles were observed in regions of newly formed bone. The findings of this work contribute to a better understanding of the role of hydroxyapatite based biomaterials in bone regeneration processes at the nanoscale.

  12. Strong and rapid induction of osteoblast differentiation by Cbfa1/Til-1 overexpression for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Hiroko; Uemura, Toshimasa

    2005-01-28

    Core binding factor alpha-1 (Cbfa1), known as an essential transcription factor for osteogenic lineage, has two major N-terminal isoforms: Pebp2alphaA and Til-1. To study the roles of these isoforms in bone regeneration, we applied an adenoviral vector carrying their genes to transduce primary osteoprogenitor cells in vitro and in vivo. Overexpression of the two isoforms induced rapid and marked osteoblast differentiation, with Til-1 being more effective in vitro, by examination of the alkaline phosphatase activity, calcium content, and Alizarin red staining. Til-1 overexpressing cells/porous ceramic composites were transplanted into subcutaneous and bone defect sites in Fischer rats (cultured bone transplantation model) and markedly affected in vivo bone formation and osteoblast markers. The results demonstrated that the reconstitution of bone tissues, such as cortical bone and trabecular bone was accelerated by implantation of Til-1 overexpressing cells/porous ceramic composites. Moreover, the new bone formation by Til-1 overexpression appeared to reflect replacement of new bone within the implant boundaries. To ascertain whether implanted Cbfa1 overexpressing cells could differentiate into osteogenic cells to create bone or whether it stimulated the surrounding recipient tissue to regenerate bone, implanted male donor cells were visualized by fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis. The proportion of implanted cells in the presumptive bone forming region was over 80% and did not change throughout from 3 days to 8 weeks after implantation. These findings suggested that the newly formed bone in the porous area of the scaffold is mostly produced by the implanted donor cells or their derived cells, effectively by Til-1 overexpression.

  13. Cellular therapy in bone-tendon interface regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rothrauff, Benjamin B; Tuan, Rocky S

    2014-01-01

    The intrasynovial bone-tendon interface is a gradual transition from soft tissue to bone, with two intervening zones of uncalcified and calcified fibrocartilage. Following injury, the native anatomy is not restored, resulting in inferior mechanical properties and an increased risk of re-injury. Recent in vivo studies provide evidence of improved healing when surgical repair of the bone-tendon interface is augmented with cells capable of undergoing chondrogenesis. In particular, cellular therapy in bone-tendon healing can promote fibrocartilage formation and associated improvements in mechanical properties. Despite these promising results in animal models, cellular therapy in human patients remains largely unexplored. This review highlights the development and structure-function relationship of normal bone-tendon insertions. The natural healing response to injury is discussed, with subsequent review of recent research on cellular approaches for improved healing. Finally, opportunities for translating in vivo findings into clinical practice are identified. PMID:24326955

  14. Umbilical cord and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell seeding on macroporous calcium phosphate for bone regeneration in rat cranial defects

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenchuan; Liu, Jun; Manuchehrabadi, Navid; Weir, Michael D.; Zhu, Zhimin; Xu, Hockin H.K.

    2014-01-01

    Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) are inexhaustible and can be harvested at a low cost without an invasive procedure. However, there has been no report on comparing hUCMSCs with human bone marrow MSCs (hBMSCs) for bone regeneration in vivo. The aim of this study was to investigate hUCMSC and hBMSC seeding on macroporous calcium phosphate cement (CPC), and to compare their bone regeneration in critical-sized cranial defects in rats. Cell attachment, osteogenic differentiation and mineral synthesis on RGD-modified macroporous CPC were investigated in vitro. Scaffolds with cells were implanted in 8-mm defects of athymic rats. Bone regeneration was investigated via micro-CT and histological analysis at 4, 12, and 24 weeks. Three groups were tested: CPC with hUCMSCs, CPC with hBMSCs, and CPC control without cells. Percentage of live cells and cell density on CPC in vitro were similarly good for hUCMSCs and hBMSCs. Both cells had high osteogenic expressions of alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, collagen I, and Runx2. Bone mineral density and trabecular thickness in hUCMSC and hBMSC groups in vivo were greater than those of CPC control group. New bone amount for hUCMSC-CPC and hBMSC-CPC constructs was increased by 57% and 88%, respectively, while blood vessel density was increased by 15% and 20%, than CPC control group at 24 weeks. hUCMSC-CPC and hBMSC-CPC groups generally had statistically similar bone mineral density, new bone amount and vessel density. In conclusion, hUCMSCs seeded on CPC were shown to match the bone regeneration efficacy of hBMSCs in vivo for the first time. Both hUCMSC-CPC and hBMSC-CPC constructs generated much more new bone and blood vessels than CPC without cells. Macroporous RGD-grafted CPC with stem cell seeding is promising for craniofacial and orthopedic repairs. PMID:24054499

  15. Sulfated hyaluronan improves bone regeneration of diabetic rats by binding sclerostin and enhancing osteoblast function.

    PubMed

    Picke, Ann-Kristin; Salbach-Hirsch, Juliane; Hintze, Vera; Rother, Sandra; Rauner, Martina; Kascholke, Christian; Möller, Stephanie; Bernhardt, Ricardo; Rammelt, Stefan; Pisabarro, M Teresa; Ruiz-Gómez, Gloria; Schnabelrauch, Matthias; Schulz-Siegmund, Michaela; Hacker, Michael C; Scharnweber, Dieter; Hofbauer, Christine; Hofbauer, Lorenz C

    2016-07-01

    Bone fractures in patients with diabetes mellitus heal poorly and require innovative therapies to support bone regeneration. Here, we assessed whether sulfated hyaluronan included in collagen-based scaffold coatings can improve fracture healing in diabetic rats. Macroporous thermopolymerized lactide-based scaffolds were coated with collagen including non-sulfated or sulfated hyaluronan (HA/sHA3) and inserted into 3 mm femoral defects of non-diabetic and diabetic ZDF rats. After 12 weeks, scaffolds coated with collagen/HA or collagen/sHA3 accelerated bone defect regeneration in diabetic, but not in non-diabetic rats as compared to their non-coated controls. At the tissue level, collagen/sHA3 promoted bone mineralization and decreased the amount of non-mineralized bone matrix. Moreover, collagen/sHA3-coated scaffolds from diabetic rats bound more sclerostin in vivo than the respective controls. Binding assays confirmed a high binding affinity of sHA3 to sclerostin. In vitro, sHA3 induced BMP-2 and lowered the RANKL/OPG expression ratio, regardless of the glucose concentration in osteoblastic cells. Both sHA3 and high glucose concentrations decreased the differentiation of osteoclastic cells. In summary, scaffolds coated with collagen/sHA3 represent a potentially suitable biomaterial to improve bone defect regeneration in diabetic conditions. The underlying mechanism involves improved osteoblast function and binding sclerostin, a potent inhibitor of Wnt signaling and osteoblast function. PMID:27131598

  16. Sulfated hyaluronan improves bone regeneration of diabetic rats by binding sclerostin and enhancing osteoblast function.

    PubMed

    Picke, Ann-Kristin; Salbach-Hirsch, Juliane; Hintze, Vera; Rother, Sandra; Rauner, Martina; Kascholke, Christian; Möller, Stephanie; Bernhardt, Ricardo; Rammelt, Stefan; Pisabarro, M Teresa; Ruiz-Gómez, Gloria; Schnabelrauch, Matthias; Schulz-Siegmund, Michaela; Hacker, Michael C; Scharnweber, Dieter; Hofbauer, Christine; Hofbauer, Lorenz C

    2016-07-01

    Bone fractures in patients with diabetes mellitus heal poorly and require innovative therapies to support bone regeneration. Here, we assessed whether sulfated hyaluronan included in collagen-based scaffold coatings can improve fracture healing in diabetic rats. Macroporous thermopolymerized lactide-based scaffolds were coated with collagen including non-sulfated or sulfated hyaluronan (HA/sHA3) and inserted into 3 mm femoral defects of non-diabetic and diabetic ZDF rats. After 12 weeks, scaffolds coated with collagen/HA or collagen/sHA3 accelerated bone defect regeneration in diabetic, but not in non-diabetic rats as compared to their non-coated controls. At the tissue level, collagen/sHA3 promoted bone mineralization and decreased the amount of non-mineralized bone matrix. Moreover, collagen/sHA3-coated scaffolds from diabetic rats bound more sclerostin in vivo than the respective controls. Binding assays confirmed a high binding affinity of sHA3 to sclerostin. In vitro, sHA3 induced BMP-2 and lowered the RANKL/OPG expression ratio, regardless of the glucose concentration in osteoblastic cells. Both sHA3 and high glucose concentrations decreased the differentiation of osteoclastic cells. In summary, scaffolds coated with collagen/sHA3 represent a potentially suitable biomaterial to improve bone defect regeneration in diabetic conditions. The underlying mechanism involves improved osteoblast function and binding sclerostin, a potent inhibitor of Wnt signaling and osteoblast function.

  17. Pilot in vivo animal study of bone regeneration by fractional Er: YAG-laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altshuler, Gregory B.; Belikov, Andrey V.; Shatilova, Ksenia V.; Yaremenko, Andrey I.; Zernitskiy, Alexander Y.; Zernitckaia, Ekaterina A.

    2016-04-01

    The histological structure of the rabbit parietal bone during its regeneration after fractional Er: YAG-laser (λ=2.94μm) treatment was investigated by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stain. In 48 days after fractional laser treatment, bone samples contained micro-cavities and fragments of necrotic tissue with empty cellular lacuna and coagulated protein of bone matrix. In this case, necrotic lesions appeared around the periphery of micro-cavities created by laser radiation. Fragmentation of detrital mass and partial substitution of micro-cavities with fatty bone marrow were observed in bone samples in 100 days after fractional laser treatment, in contrast to the earlier period. Partial filling of micro-cavities edges by fibrous tissue with presence of osteoblasts on their inner surface was observed in 100 days also, that indicates regenerative processes in the bone.

  18. Mesoporous bioactive glasses: structure characteristics, drug/growth factor delivery and bone regeneration application

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chengtie; Chang, Jiang

    2012-01-01

    The impact of bone diseases and trauma in the whole world has increased significantly in the past decades. Bioactive glasses are regarded as an important bone regeneration material owing to their generally excellent osteoconductivity and osteostimulativity. A new class of bioactive glass, referred to as mesoporous bioglass (MBG), was developed 7 years ago, which possess a highly ordered mesoporous channel structure and a highly specific surface area. The study of MBG for drug/growth factor delivery and bone tissue engineering has grown significantly in the past several years. In this article, we review the recent advances of MBG materials, including the preparation of different forms of MBG, composition–structure relationship, efficient drug/growth factor delivery and bone tissue engineering application. By summarizing our recent research, the interaction of MBG scaffolds with bone-forming cells, the effect of drug/growth factor delivery on proliferation and differentiation of tissue cells and the in vivo osteogenesis of MBG scaffolds are highlighted. The advantages and limitations of MBG for drug delivery and bone tissue engineering have been compared with microsize bioactive glasses and nanosize bioactive glasses. The future perspective of MBG is discussed for bone regeneration application by combining drug delivery with bone tissue engineering and investigating the in vivo osteogenesis mechanism in large animal models. PMID:23741607

  19. Functionalized PLGA-doped zirconium oxide ceramics for bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lupu-Haber, Yael; Pinkas, Oded; Boehm, Stefanie; Scheper, Thomas; Kasper, Cornelia; Machluf, Marcelle

    2013-12-01

    Bone tissue engineering is an alternative approach to bone grafts. In our study we aim to develop a composite scaffold for bone regeneration made of doped zirconium oxide (ZrO2) conjugated with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) particles for the delivery of growth factors. In this composite, the PLGA microspheres are designed to release a crucial growth factor for bone formation, bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2). We found that by changing the polymer's molecular weight and composition, we could control microsphere loading, release and size. The BMP2 released from PLGA microspheres retained its biological activity and increased osteoblastic marker expression in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Uncapped PLGA microspheres were conjugated to ZrO2 scaffolds using carbodiimide chemistry, and the composite scaffold was shown to support hMSCs growth. We also demonstrated that human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) can be co-cultured with hMSCs on the ZrO2 scaffold for future vascularization of the scaffold. The ZrO2 composite scaffold could serve as a bone substitute for bone grafting applications with the added ability of releasing different growth factors needed for bone regeneration.

  20. Development of high strength hydroxyapatite for bone tissue regeneration using nanobioactive glass composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, Pragya; Dalai, Sridhar; Sudera, Prerna; Sivam, Santosh Param; Vijayalakshmi, S.; Sharma, Pratibha

    2013-02-01

    With an increasing demand of biocompatible bone substitutes for the treatment of bone diseases and bone tissue regeneration, bioactive glass composites are being tested to improvise the osteoconductive as well as osteoinductive properties. Nanobioactive glass (nBG) composites, having composition of SiO2 70 mol%, CaO 26 mol % and P2O5 4 mol% were prepared by Freeze drying method using PEG-PPG-PEG co-polymer. Polymer addition improves the mechanical strength and porosity of the scaffold of nBG. Nano Bioactive glass composites upon implantation undergo specific reactions leading to the formation of crystalline hydroxyapatite (HA). This is tested in vitro using Simulated Body Fluid (SBF). This high strength hydroxyapatite (HA) layer acts as osteoconductive in cellular environment, by acting as mineral base of bones, onto which new bone cells proliferate leading to new bone formation. Strength of the nBG composites as well as HA is in the range of cortical and cancellous bone, thus proving significant for bone tissue regeneration substitutes.

  1. Development of high strength hydroxyapatite for bone tissue regeneration using nanobioactive glass composites

    SciTech Connect

    Shrivastava, Pragya; Dalai, Sridhar; Vijayalakshmi, S.; Sudera, Prerna; Sivam, Santosh Param; Sharma, Pratibha

    2013-02-05

    With an increasing demand of biocompatible bone substitutes for the treatment of bone diseases and bone tissue regeneration, bioactive glass composites are being tested to improvise the osteoconductive as well as osteoinductive properties. Nanobioactive glass (nBG) composites, having composition of SiO{sub 2} 70 mol%, CaO 26 mol % and P{sub 2}O{sub 5} 4 mol% were prepared by Freeze drying method using PEG-PPG-PEG co-polymer. Polymer addition improves the mechanical strength and porosity of the scaffold of nBG. Nano Bioactive glass composites upon implantation undergo specific reactions leading to the formation of crystalline hydroxyapatite (HA). This is tested in vitro using Simulated Body Fluid (SBF). This high strength hydroxyapatite (HA) layer acts as osteoconductive in cellular environment, by acting as mineral base of bones, onto which new bone cells proliferate leading to new bone formation. Strength of the nBG composites as well as HA is in the range of cortical and cancellous bone, thus proving significant for bone tissue regeneration substitutes.

  2. [Bone regeneration in implantology. The use of Gore-Tex membranes: GTAM].

    PubMed

    Davarpanah, M; Tecucianu, J F; Slama, M; Celletti, R

    1991-05-01

    The use of expanded polytetrafluorethylene membranes to attain bone regeneration around dental implants is described. Membranes discourage "non-desirable" cells form colonizing the healing site. These cells are essentially derived from gingival epithelium and gingival connective tissue. It is suggested that this procedure could be employed directly after tooth extraction.

  3. Bone Regeneration after Treatment with Covering Materials Composed of Flax Fibers and Biodegradable Plastics: A Histological Study in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gedrange, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the osteogenic potential of new flax covering materials. Bone defects were created on the skull of forty rats. Materials of pure PLA and PCL and their composites with flax fibers, genetically modified producing PHB (PLA-transgen, PCL-transgen) and unmodified (PLA-wt, PCL-wt), were inserted. The skulls were harvested after four weeks and subjected to histological examination. The percentage of bone regeneration by using PLA was less pronounced than after usage of pure PCL in comparison with controls. After treatment with PCL-transgen, a large amount of new formed bone could be found. In contrast, PCL-wt decreased significantly the bone regeneration, compared to the other tested groups. The bone covers made of pure PLA had substantially less influence on bone regeneration and the bone healing proceeded with a lot of connective tissue, whereas PLA-transgen and PLA-wt showed nearly comparable amount of new formed bone. Regarding the histological data, the hypothesis could be proposed that PCL and its composites have contributed to a higher quantity of the regenerated bone, compared to PLA. The histological studies showed comparable bone regeneration processes after treatment with tested covering materials, as well as in the untreated bone lesions.

  4. Bone Regeneration after Treatment with Covering Materials Composed of Flax Fibers and Biodegradable Plastics: A Histological Study in Rats.

    PubMed

    Gredes, Tomasz; Kunath, Franziska; Gedrange, Tomasz; Kunert-Keil, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the osteogenic potential of new flax covering materials. Bone defects were created on the skull of forty rats. Materials of pure PLA and PCL and their composites with flax fibers, genetically modified producing PHB (PLA-transgen, PCL-transgen) and unmodified (PLA-wt, PCL-wt), were inserted. The skulls were harvested after four weeks and subjected to histological examination. The percentage of bone regeneration by using PLA was less pronounced than after usage of pure PCL in comparison with controls. After treatment with PCL-transgen, a large amount of new formed bone could be found. In contrast, PCL-wt decreased significantly the bone regeneration, compared to the other tested groups. The bone covers made of pure PLA had substantially less influence on bone regeneration and the bone healing proceeded with a lot of connective tissue, whereas PLA-transgen and PLA-wt showed nearly comparable amount of new formed bone. Regarding the histological data, the hypothesis could be proposed that PCL and its composites have contributed to a higher quantity of the regenerated bone, compared to PLA. The histological studies showed comparable bone regeneration processes after treatment with tested covering materials, as well as in the untreated bone lesions.

  5. Bone Regeneration after Treatment with Covering Materials Composed of Flax Fibers and Biodegradable Plastics: A Histological Study in Rats.

    PubMed

    Gredes, Tomasz; Kunath, Franziska; Gedrange, Tomasz; Kunert-Keil, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the osteogenic potential of new flax covering materials. Bone defects were created on the skull of forty rats. Materials of pure PLA and PCL and their composites with flax fibers, genetically modified producing PHB (PLA-transgen, PCL-transgen) and unmodified (PLA-wt, PCL-wt), were inserted. The skulls were harvested after four weeks and subjected to histological examination. The percentage of bone regeneration by using PLA was less pronounced than after usage of pure PCL in comparison with controls. After treatment with PCL-transgen, a large amount of new formed bone could be found. In contrast, PCL-wt decreased significantly the bone regeneration, compared to the other tested groups. The bone covers made of pure PLA had substantially less influence on bone regeneration and the bone healing proceeded with a lot of connective tissue, whereas PLA-transgen and PLA-wt showed nearly comparable amount of new formed bone. Regarding the histological data, the hypothesis could be proposed that PCL and its composites have contributed to a higher quantity of the regenerated bone, compared to PLA. The histological studies showed comparable bone regeneration processes after treatment with tested covering materials, as well as in the untreated bone lesions. PMID:27597965

  6. Bone Regeneration after Treatment with Covering Materials Composed of Flax Fibers and Biodegradable Plastics: A Histological Study in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gedrange, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the osteogenic potential of new flax covering materials. Bone defects were created on the skull of forty rats. Materials of pure PLA and PCL and their composites with flax fibers, genetically modified producing PHB (PLA-transgen, PCL-transgen) and unmodified (PLA-wt, PCL-wt), were inserted. The skulls were harvested after four weeks and subjected to histological examination. The percentage of bone regeneration by using PLA was less pronounced than after usage of pure PCL in comparison with controls. After treatment with PCL-transgen, a large amount of new formed bone could be found. In contrast, PCL-wt decreased significantly the bone regeneration, compared to the other tested groups. The bone covers made of pure PLA had substantially less influence on bone regeneration and the bone healing proceeded with a lot of connective tissue, whereas PLA-transgen and PLA-wt showed nearly comparable amount of new formed bone. Regarding the histological data, the hypothesis could be proposed that PCL and its composites have contributed to a higher quantity of the regenerated bone, compared to PLA. The histological studies showed comparable bone regeneration processes after treatment with tested covering materials, as well as in the untreated bone lesions. PMID:27597965

  7. Angiogenic and Osteogenic Potential of Bone Repair Cells for Craniofacial Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Pagni, Giorgio; Park, Chan-Ho; Tarle, Susan A.; Bartel, Ronnda L.; Giannobile, William V.

    2010-01-01

    There has been increased interest in the therapeutic potential of bone marrow derived cells for tissue engineering applications. Bone repair cells (BRCs) represent a unique cell population generated via an ex vivo, closed-system, automated cell expansion process, to drive the propagation of highly osteogenic and angiogenic cells for bone engineering applications. The aims of this study were (1) to evaluate the in vitro osteogenic and angiogenic potential of BRCs, and (2) to evaluate the bone and vascular regenerative potential of BRCs in a craniofacial clinical application. BRCs were produced from bone marrow aspirates and their phenotypes and multipotent potential characterized. Flow cytometry demonstrated that BRCs were enriched for mesenchymal and vascular phenotypes. Alkaline phosphatase and von Kossa staining were performed to assess osteogenic differentiation, and reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the expression levels of bone specific factors. Angiogenic differentiation was determined through in vitro formation of tube-like structures and fluorescent labeling of endothelial cells. Finally, 6 weeks after BRC transplantation into a human jawbone defect, a biopsy of the regenerated site revealed highly vascularized, mineralized bone tissue formation. Taken together, these data provide evidence for the multilineage and clinical potential of BRCs for craniofacial regeneration. PMID:20412009

  8. Stem Cells for Bone Regeneration: From Cell-Based Therapies to Decellularised Engineered Extracellular Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, James N.; Peretti, Giuseppe M.; Scotti, Celeste

    2016-01-01

    Currently, autologous bone grafting represents the clinical gold standard in orthopaedic surgery. In certain cases, however, alternative techniques are required. The clinical utility of stem and stromal cells has been demonstrated for the repair and regeneration of craniomaxillofacial and long bone defects although clinical adoption of bone tissue engineering protocols has been very limited. Initial tissue engineering studies focused on the bone marrow as a source of cells for bone regeneration, and while a number of promising results continue to emerge, limitations to this technique have prompted the exploration of alternative cell sources, including adipose and muscle tissue. In this review paper we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of cell sources with a focus on adipose tissue and the bone marrow. Additionally, we highlight the relatively recent paradigm of developmental engineering, which promotes the recapitulation of naturally occurring developmental processes to allow the implant to optimally respond to endogenous cues. Finally we examine efforts to apply lessons from studies into different cell sources and developmental approaches to stimulate bone growth by use of decellularised hypertrophic cartilage templates. PMID:26997959

  9. Characterization of Scaffold Carriers for BMP9-Transduced Osteoblastic Progenitor Cells in Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shui, Wei; Zhang, Wenwen; Yin, Liangjun; Nan, Guoxin; Liao, Zhan; Zhang, Hongmei; Wang, Ning; Wu, Ningning; Chen, Xian; Wen, Sheng; He, Yunfeng; Deng, Fang; Zhang, Junhui; Luu, Hue H.; Shi, Lewis L; Hu, Zhenming; Haydon, Rex C.; Mok, James; He, Tong-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Successful bone tissue engineering at least requires sufficient osteoblast progenitors, efficient osteoinductive factors, and biocompatible scaffolding materials. We have demonstrated that BMP9 is one of the most potent factors in inducing osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal progenitors. To facilitate the potential use of cell-based BMP9 gene therapy for bone regeneration, we characterize the in vivo osteoconductive activities and bone regeneration potential of three clinically-used scaffold materials, type I collagen sponge, hydroxyapatite-tricalcium phosphate (HA-TCP) and demineralized bone matrix (DBM), using BMP9-expressing C2C12 osteoblastic progenitor cells. We find that recombinant adenovirus-mediated BMP9 expression effectively induces osteogenic differentiation in C2C12 cells. Although direct subcutaneous injection of BMP9-transduced C2C12 cells forms ectopic bony masses, subcutaneous implantation of BMP9-expressing C2C12 cells with collagen sponge or HA-TCP scaffold yields the most robust and mature cancellous bone formation, whereas the DBM carrier group forms no or minimal bone masses. Our results suggest that collagen sponge and HA-TCP scaffold carriers may provide more cell-friendly environment to support the survival, propagation, and ultimately differentiation of BMP9-expressing progenitor cells. This line of investigation should provide important experimental evidence for further pre-clinical studies in BMP9-mediated cell based approach to bone tissue engineering. PMID:24133046

  10. [The possibilities and perspectives of using scaffold technology for bone regeneration].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A N; Norkin, I A; Puchin'ian, D M

    2014-01-01

    The article deals with the one of the topical problem of tissue engineering--the design and implementation of biomaterials that could replace and repair bone defects. This review presents the recent studies of the potential of scaffold technology in bone tissue regeneration. This article contains information about the basic parameters and properties of modern scaffold systems. The results of experimental in vitro and in vivo studies on the use of matrices made of various materials are shown. Advantages and disadvantages of various materials used for the production of scaffolds are discussed. Attention is paid to the advantages combinations of different materials to achieve the desired structural and functional properties. Particular attention is paid to technologies and systems of targeted delivery and controlled release of factors that stimulate bone tissue regeneration. Different strategies for modulating tissue reactions and immune responses that take place during scaffold implantation are presented.

  11. The scope and sequence of growth factor delivery for vascularized bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bayer, E A; Gottardi, R; Fedorchak, M V; Little, S R

    2015-12-10

    Bone regeneration is a complex process, that in vivo, requires the highly coordinated presentation of biochemical cues to promote the various stages of angiogenesis and osteogenesis. Taking inspiration from the natural healing process, a wide variety of growth factors are currently being released within next generation tissue engineered scaffolds (in a variety of ways) in order to heal non-union fractures and bone defects. This review will focus on the delivery of multiple growth factors to the bone regeneration niche, specifically 1) dual growth factor delivery signaling and crosstalk, 2) the importance of growth factor timing and temporal separation, and 3) the engineering of delivery systems that allow for temporal control over presentation of soluble growth factors. Alternative methods for growth factor presentation, including the use of gene therapy and platelet-rich plasma scaffolds, are also discussed.

  12. Chromatin modifiers and histone modifications in bone formation, regeneration, and therapeutic intervention for bone-related disease.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Jonathan A R; Stein, Janet L; Westendorf, Jennifer J; van Wijnen, Andre J

    2015-12-01

    Post-translational modifications of chromatin such as DNA methylation and different types of histone acetylation, methylation and phosphorylation are well-appreciated epigenetic mechanisms that confer information to progeny cells during lineage commitment. These distinct epigenetic modifications have defined roles in bone, development, tissue regeneration, cell commitment and differentiation, as well as disease etiologies. In this review, we discuss the role of these chromatin modifications and the enzymes regulating these marks (methyltransferases, demethylases, acetyltransferases, and deacetylases) in progenitor cells, osteoblasts and bone-related cells. In addition, the clinical relevance of deregulated histone modifications and enzymes as well as current and potential therapeutic interventions targeting chromatin modifiers are addressed.

  13. Bone Defect Regeneration by a Combination of a β-Tricalcium Phosphate Scaffold and Bone Marrow Stromal Cells in a Non-Human Primate Model

    PubMed Central

    Masaoka, Tomokazu; Yoshii, Toshitaka; Yuasa, Masato; Yamada, Tsuyoshi; Taniyama, Takashi; Torigoe, Ichiro; Shinomiya, Kenichi; Okawa, Atsushi; Morita, Sadao; Sotome, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Reconstruction of large bone defects is a great challenge in orthopedic research. In the present study, we prepared composites of bone marrow-derived stromal cells (BMSCs) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) with three novel aspects: proliferation of BMSCs with continuous dexamethasone treatment, cell loading under low pressure, and use of autologous plasma as the cell loading medium. The effectiveness of the resulting composite for large bone-defect reconstruction was tested in a non-human primate model, and the bone union capability of the regenerated bones was examined. Materials and Methods: Primary surgery: Bone defects (5 cm long) were created in the left femurs of nine cynomolgus monkeys with resection of the periosteum (five cases) or without resection (four cases), and porous β-TCP blocks were transplanted into the defects. Secondary surgery: Bone marrow aspirates harvested from seven of the nine monkeys were cultured with dexamethasone, and BMSCs were obtained. BMSCs were suspended in autologous plasma and introduced into a porous β-TCP block under low-pressure conditions. The BMSC/β-TCP composites were transplanted into bone defects created at the same sites as the primary surgery. Bone union evaluation: Five regenerated femurs were shortened by osteotomy surgery 8 to 15 months after transplantation of the β-TCP/BMSC composites, and bone union was evaluated radiographically. Results: After the primary surgery and treatment with β-TCP alone, one of the five periosteum-resected monkeys and two of the four periosteum-preserved monkeys exhibited successful bone reconstruction. In contrast, five of the seven cases treated with the β-TCP/MSC composite showed successful bone regeneration. In four of the five osteotomy cases, bone union was confirmed. Conclusion: We validated the effectiveness of a novel β-TCP/BMSC composite for large bone defect regeneration and confirmed the bone union capability of the regenerated bone. PMID:27073583

  14. Use of platelet lysate for bone regeneration - are we ready for clinical translation?

    PubMed

    Altaie, Ala; Owston, Heather; Jones, Elena

    2016-02-26

    Current techniques to improve bone regeneration following trauma or tumour resection involve the use of autograft bone or its substitutes supplemented with osteoinductive growth factors and/or osteogenic cells such as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Although MSCs are most commonly grown in media containing fetal calf serum, human platelet lysate (PL) offers an effective alternative. Bone marrow - derived MSCs grown in PL-containing media display faster proliferation whilst maintaining good osteogenic differentiation capacity. Limited pre-clinical investigations using PL-expanded MSCs seeded onto osteoconductive scaffolds indicate good potential of such constructs to repair bone in vivo. In an alternative approach, nude PL-coated scaffolds without seeded MSCs have been proposed as novel regenerative medicine devices. Even though methods to coat scaffolds with PL vary, in vitro studies suggest that PL allows for MSC adhesion, migration and differentiation inside these scaffolds. Increased new bone formation and vascularisation in comparison to uncoated scaffolds have also been observed in vivo. This review outlines the state-of-the-art research in the field of PL for ex vivo MSC expansion and in vivo bone regeneration. To minimise inconsistency between the studies, further work is required towards standardisation of PL preparation in terms of the starting material, platelet concentration, leukocyte depletion, and the method of platelet lysis. PL quality control procedures and its "potency" assessment are urgently needed, which could include measurements of key growth and attachment factors important for MSC maintenance and differentiation. Furthermore, different PL formulations could be tailor-made for specific bone repair indications. Such measures would undoubtedly speed up clinical translation of PL-based treatments for bone regeneration. PMID:26981170

  15. Optimization of tyrosine-derived polycarbonate terpolymers for bone regeneration scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resurreccion-Magno, Maria Hanshella C.

    Tyrosine-derived polycarbonates (TyrPC) are a versatile class of polymers highly suitable for bone tissue engineering. Among the tyrosine-derived polycarbonates, poly(DTE carbonate) has an FDA masterfile that documents its biocompatibility and non-toxicity and has shown potential utility in orthopedics due to its osteoconductive properties and strength. DTE stands for desaminotyrosyl-tyrosine ethyl ester and is the most commonly used tyrosine-derived monomer. However, in vitro degradation studies showed that poly(DTE carbonate) did not completely resorb even after four years of incubation in phosphate buffered saline. Thus for bone regeneration, which only requires a temporary implant until the bone heals, poly(DTE carbonate) would not be the best choice. The goal of the present research was to optimize a scaffold composition for bone regeneration that is based on desaminotyrosyl-tyrosine alkyl ester (DTR), desaminotyrosyl-tyrosine (DT) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). Five areas of research were presented: (1) synthesis and characterization of a focused library of TyrPC terpolymers; (2) evaluation of the effects of how small changes on the composition affected the mechanism and kinetics of polymer degradation and erosion; (3) fabrication of bioactive three-dimensional porous scaffold constructs for bone regeneration; (4) assessment of osteogenic properties in vitro using pre-osteoblasts; and (5) evaluation of bone regeneration potential, with or without recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2), in vivo using a critical sized defect (CSD) rabbit calvaria (cranium) model. Small changes in the composition, such as changing the R group of DTR from ethyl to methyl, varying the mole percentages of DT and PEG, and using a different PEG block length, affected the overall properties of these polymers. Porous scaffolds were prepared by a combination of solvent casting, porogen leaching and phase separation techniques. Calcium phosphate was coated on the

  16. Endochondral Ossification for Enhancing Bone Regeneration: Converging Native Extracellular Matrix Biomaterials and Developmental Engineering In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, S. Connor; Berkland, Cory J.; Bonewald, Lynda F.

    2015-01-01

    Autologous bone grafting (ABG) remains entrenched as the gold standard of treatment in bone regenerative surgery. Consequently, many marginally successful bone tissue engineering strategies have focused on mimicking portions of ABG's “ideal” osteoconductive, osteoinductive, and osteogenic composition resembling the late reparative stage extracellular matrix (ECM) in bone fracture repair, also known as the “hard” or “bony” callus. An alternative, less common approach that has emerged in the last decade harnesses endochondral (EC) ossification through developmental engineering principles, which acknowledges that the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in developmental skeletogenesis, specifically EC ossification, are closely paralleled during native bone healing. EC ossification naturally occurs during the majority of bone fractures and, thus, can potentially be utilized to enhance bone regeneration for nearly any orthopedic indication, especially in avascular critical-sized defects where hypoxic conditions favor initial chondrogenesis instead of direct intramembranous ossification. The body's native EC ossification response, however, is not capable of regenerating critical-sized defects without intervention. We propose that an underexplored potential exists to regenerate bone through the native EC ossification response by utilizing strategies which mimic the initial inflammatory or fibrocartilaginous ECM (i.e., “pro-” or “soft” callus) observed in the early reparative stage of bone fracture repair. To date, the majority of strategies utilizing this approach rely on clinically burdensome in vitro cell expansion protocols. This review will focus on the confluence of two evolving areas, (1) native ECM biomaterials and (2) developmental engineering, which will attempt to overcome the technical, business, and regulatory challenges that persist in the area of bone regeneration. Significant attention will be given to native “raw” materials

  17. Composite biopolymers for bone regeneration enhancement in bony defects.

    PubMed

    Jahan, K; Tabrizian, M

    2016-01-01

    For the past century, various biomaterials have been used in the treatment of bone defects and fractures. Their role as potential substitutes for human bone grafts increases as donors become scarce. Metals, ceramics and polymers are all materials that confer different advantages to bone scaffold development. For instance, biocompatibility is a highly desirable property for which naturally-derived polymers are renowned. While generally applied separately, the use of biomaterials, in particular natural polymers, is likely to change, as biomaterial research moves towards mixing different types of materials in order to maximize their individual strengths. This review focuses on osteoconductive biocomposite scaffolds which are constructed around natural polymers and their performance at the in vitro/in vivo stages and in clinical trials.

  18. 3D-Printed Scaffolds and Biomaterials: Review of Alveolar Bone Augmentation and Periodontal Regeneration Applications

    PubMed Central

    Asa'ad, Farah; Giannì, Aldo Bruno; Giannobile, William V.; Rasperini, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    To ensure a successful dental implant therapy, the presence of adequate vertical and horizontal alveolar bone is fundamental. However, an insufficient amount of alveolar ridge in both dimensions is often encountered in dental practice due to the consequences of oral diseases and tooth loss. Although postextraction socket preservation has been adopted to lessen the need for such invasive approaches, it utilizes bone grafting materials, which have limitations that could negatively affect the quality of bone formation. To overcome the drawbacks of routinely employed grafting materials, bone graft substitutes such as 3D scaffolds have been recently investigated in the dental field. In this review, we highlight different biomaterials suitable for 3D scaffold fabrication, with a focus on “3D-printed” ones as bone graft substitutes that might be convenient for various applications related to implant therapy. We also briefly discuss their possible adoption for periodontal regeneration. PMID:27366149

  19. In vivo evaluation of a simvastatin-loaded nanostructured lipid carrier for bone tissue regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Xinxin; Niu, Mao; Zhang, Te; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Zhonglei; Wu, Wangxi; Zhang, Qi; Lai, Chunhua; Zhou, Lei

    2016-03-01

    Alveolar bone loss has long been a challenge in clinical dental implant therapy. Simvastatin (SV) has been demonstrated to exert excellent anabolic effects on bone. However, the successful use of SV to increase bone formation in vivo largely depends on the local concentration of SV at the site of action, and there have been continuing efforts to develop an appropriate delivery system. Specifically, nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC) systems have become a popular type of encapsulation carrier system. Therefore, SV-loaded NLCs (SNs) (179.4 nm in diameter) were fabricated in this study, and the osteogenic effect of the SNs was evaluated in a critical-sized rabbit calvarial defect. Our results revealed that the SNs significantly enhanced bone formation in vivo, as evaluated by hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining, immunohistochemistry, and a fluorescence analysis. Thus, this novel nanostructured carrier system could be a potential encapsulation carrier system for SV in bone regeneration applications.

  20. 3D-Printed Scaffolds and Biomaterials: Review of Alveolar Bone Augmentation and Periodontal Regeneration Applications.

    PubMed

    Asa'ad, Farah; Pagni, Giorgio; Pilipchuk, Sophia P; Giannì, Aldo Bruno; Giannobile, William V; Rasperini, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    To ensure a successful dental implant therapy, the presence of adequate vertical and horizontal alveolar bone is fundamental. However, an insufficient amount of alveolar ridge in both dimensions is often encountered in dental practice due to the consequences of oral diseases and tooth loss. Although postextraction socket preservation has been adopted to lessen the need for such invasive approaches, it utilizes bone grafting materials, which have limitations that could negatively affect the quality of bone formation. To overcome the drawbacks of routinely employed grafting materials, bone graft substitutes such as 3D scaffolds have been recently investigated in the dental field. In this review, we highlight different biomaterials suitable for 3D scaffold fabrication, with a focus on "3D-printed" ones as bone graft substitutes that might be convenient for various applications related to implant therapy. We also briefly discuss their possible adoption for periodontal regeneration. PMID:27366149

  1. IL-17-producing γδ T cells enhance bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Takehito; Okamoto, Kazuo; Nakashima, Tomoki; Nitta, Takeshi; Hori, Shohei; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Takayanagi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Immune responses are crucial not only for host defence against pathogens but also for tissue maintenance and repair after injury. Lymphocytes are involved in the healing process after tissue injury, including bone fracture and muscle damage. However, the specific immune cell subsets and mediators of healing are not entirely clear. Here we show that γδ T cells produce IL-17A, which promotes bone formation and facilitates bone fracture healing. Repair is impaired in IL-17A-deficient mice due to a defect in osteoblastic bone formation. IL-17A accelerates bone formation by stimulating the proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation of mesenchymal progenitor cells. This study identifies a novel role for IL-17-producing γδ T cells in skeletal tissue regeneration. PMID:26965320

  2. Engineering scaffolds integrated with calcium sulfate and oyster shell for enhanced bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yue; Yang, Shizhou; Liu, Jianli; Xu, Huazi; Shi, Zhongli; Lin, Zhongqing; Ying, Xiaozhou; Guo, Peng; Lin, Tiao; Yan, Shigui; Huang, Qing; Peng, Lei

    2014-08-13

    Engineering scaffolds combinging natural biomineral and artificially synthesized material hold promising potential for bone tissue regeneration. In this study, novel bioactive calcium sulfate/oyster shell (CS/OS) composites were prepared. Comparing to CS scaffold, the CS/OS composites with a controllable degradation rate displayed enhanced mineral nodule formation, higher alkaline phosphate (ALP) activity and increased proliferation rate while treated osteocytes. In CS/OS composites group, elevated mRNA levels of key osteogenic genes including bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), osterix (Osx), and osteocalcin (OCN) were observed. Furthermore, The up-regulation of BMP-2 and type I collagen (COL-I) was observed for CS/OS composites relative to a CS group. Scaffolds were implanted into critical-sized femur cavity defects in rabbits to investigate the osteogenic capacity of the composites in vivo. The CS/OS scaffolds with proper suitable times and mechanical strength strongly promoted osteogenic tissue regeneration relative to the regeneration capacity of CS scaffolds, as indicated by the results of histological staining. These results suggest that the OS-modified CS engineering scaffolds with improved mechanical properties and bioactivity would facilitate the development of a new strategy for clinic bone defect regeneration. PMID:25033438

  3. Engineering scaffolds integrated with calcium sulfate and oyster shell for enhanced bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yue; Yang, Shizhou; Liu, Jianli; Xu, Huazi; Shi, Zhongli; Lin, Zhongqing; Ying, Xiaozhou; Guo, Peng; Lin, Tiao; Yan, Shigui; Huang, Qing; Peng, Lei

    2014-08-13

    Engineering scaffolds combinging natural biomineral and artificially synthesized material hold promising potential for bone tissue regeneration. In this study, novel bioactive calcium sulfate/oyster shell (CS/OS) composites were prepared. Comparing to CS scaffold, the CS/OS composites with a controllable degradation rate displayed enhanced mineral nodule formation, higher alkaline phosphate (ALP) activity and increased proliferation rate while treated osteocytes. In CS/OS composites group, elevated mRNA levels of key osteogenic genes including bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), osterix (Osx), and osteocalcin (OCN) were observed. Furthermore, The up-regulation of BMP-2 and type I collagen (COL-I) was observed for CS/OS composites relative to a CS group. Scaffolds were implanted into critical-sized femur cavity defects in rabbits to investigate the osteogenic capacity of the composites in vivo. The CS/OS scaffolds with proper suitable times and mechanical strength strongly promoted osteogenic tissue regeneration relative to the regeneration capacity of CS scaffolds, as indicated by the results of histological staining. These results suggest that the OS-modified CS engineering scaffolds with improved mechanical properties and bioactivity would facilitate the development of a new strategy for clinic bone defect regeneration.

  4. The role of barrier membranes for guided bone regeneration and restoration of large bone defects: current experimental and clinical evidence

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of large bone defects represents a great challenge in orthopedic and craniomaxillofacial surgery. Although there are several methods for bone reconstruction, they all have specific indications and limitations. The concept of using barrier membranes for restoration of bone defects has been developed in an effort to simplify their treatment by offering a sinlge-staged procedure. Research on this field of bone regeneration is ongoing, with evidence being mainly attained from preclinical studies. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current experimental and clinical evidence on the use of barrier membranes for restoration of bone defects in maxillofacial and orthopedic surgery. Although there are a few promising preliminary human studies, before clinical applications can be recommended, future research should aim to establish the 'ideal' barrier membrane and delineate the need for additional bone grafting materials aiming to 'mimic' or even accelerate the normal process of bone formation. Reproducible results and long-term observations with barrier membranes in animal studies, and particularly in large animal models, are required as well as well-designed clinical studies to evaluate their safety, efficacy and cost-effectiveness. PMID:22834465

  5. Bioengineering strategies for regeneration of craniofacial bone: a review of emerging technologies.

    PubMed

    Ward, B B; Brown, S E; Krebsbach, P H

    2010-11-01

    Although advances in surgical techniques and bone grafting have significantly improved the functional and cosmetic restoration of craniofacial structures lost because of trauma or disease, there are still significant limitations in our ability to regenerate these tissues. The regeneration of oral and craniofacial tissues presents a formidable challenge that requires synthesis of basic science, clinical science, and engineering technology. Tissue engineering is an interdisciplinary field of study that addresses this challenge by applying the principles of engineering to biology and medicine toward the development of biological substitutes that restore, maintain, and improve normal function. This review will explore the impact of biomaterials design, stem cell biology and gene therapy on craniofacial tissue engineering.

  6. Functionalized d-form self-assembling peptide hydrogels for bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    He, Bin; Ou, Yunsheng; Zhou, Ao; Chen, Shuo; Zhao, Weikang; Zhao, Jinqiu; Li, Hong; Zhu, Yong; Zhao, Zenghui; Jiang, Dianming

    2016-01-01

    Bone defects are very common in orthopedics, and there is great need to develop suitable bone grafts for transplantation in vivo. However, current bone grafts still encounter some limitations, including limited availability, immune rejection, poor osteoinduction and osteoconduction, poor biocompatibility and degradation properties, etc. Self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffolds have emerged as an important substrate for cell culture and bone regeneration. We report on the structural features (eg, Congo red staining, circular dichroism spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and rheometry assays) and osteogenic ability of d-RADA16-RGD peptide hydrogels (with or without basic fibroblast growth factor) due to the better stability of peptide bonds formed by these peptides compared with those formed by l-form peptides, and use them to fill the femoral condyle defect of Sprague Dawley rat model. The bone morphology change, two-dimensional reconstructions using microcomputed tomography, quantification of the microcomputed tomography analyses as well as histological analyses have demonstrated that RGD-modified d-form peptide scaffolds are able to enhance extensive bone regeneration. PMID:27114701

  7. Expression of osteoblastic and osteoclastic genes during spontaneous regeneration and autotransplantation of goldfish scale: a new tool to study intramembranous bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Thamamongood, Thiparpa Aime; Furuya, Ryo; Fukuba, Shunsuke; Nakamura, Masahisa; Suzuki, Nobuo; Hattori, Atsuhiko

    2012-06-01

    Complementary DNA of osteoblast-specific genes (dlx5, runx2a, runx2b, osterix, RANKL, type I collagen, ALP, and osteocalcin) was cloned from goldfish (Carassius auratus) scale. Messenger RNA expressions were analyzed during spontaneous scale regeneration. Dlx5 had an early peak of expression on day 7, whereas osterix was constantly expressed during days 7-21. Runx2, a major osteoblastic transcription factor in mammalian bone, did not show any significant expression. The expressions of two functional genes, type I collagen and ALP, continually increased after day 7, while that of osteocalcin increased on day 14. As for osteoclastic markers, in addition to the cloning of two functional genes, TRAP and cathepsin K, in our previous study, we here cloned the transcription factor NFATc1 to use as an early osteoclastic marker. Using these bone markers, we investigate the signal key that controls the onset of scale resorption and regeneration by performing intra-scale-pocket autotransplantation of five groups of modified scales, namely, 1) methanol-fixed scale, 2) proteinase K-treated cell-free scale, 3) polarity reversal (upside-down) scale, 4) U-shape trimmed scale, and 5) circular-hole perforated scale. In this autotransplantation, each ontogenic scale was pulled out, modified, and then re-inserted into the same scale pocket. At post-transplant, inside the pockets of all modified transplant groups, new regenerating scales formed, attaching to the ongoing resorbed transplants. Autotransplantation of methanol-fixed scale, proteinase K-treated cell-free scale, and polarity reversal (upside-down) scale triggered scale resorption and scale regeneration. These two processes of scale resorption and regeneration occurred in accordance with osteoclastic and osteoblastic marker gene expressions. These results were microscopically confirmed using TRAP and ALP staining. Regarding the autotransplantation of U-shape trimmed and circular-hole perforated scales, new scales regenerated

  8. Paracrine effect of mesenchymal stem cells derived from human adipose tissue in bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Linero, Itali; Chaparro, Orlando

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation has proved to be a promising strategy in cell therapy and regenerative medicine. Although their mechanism of action is not completely clear, it has been suggested that their therapeutic activity may be mediated by a paracrine effect. The main goal of this study was to evaluate by radiographic, morphometric and histological analysis the ability of mesenchymal stem cells derived from human adipose tissue (Ad-MSC) and their conditioned medium (CM), to repair surgical bone lesions using an in vivo model (rabbit mandibles). The results demonstrated that both, Ad-MSC and CM, induce bone regeneration in surgically created lesions in rabbit's jaws, suggesting that Ad-MSC improve the process of bone regeneration mainly by releasing paracrine factors. The evidence of the paracrine effect of MSC on bone regeneration has a major impact on regenerative medicine, and the use of their CM can address some issues and difficulties related to cell transplants. In particular, CM can be easily stored and transported, and is easier to handle by medical personnel during clinical procedures.

  9. [Osteoplasty of extensive jaw defects by protected bone regeneration using large pore resorbable implant].

    PubMed

    Blecher, J C; Lemperle, S M; Howaldt, H P

    2000-09-01

    This study was performed to demonstrate a protected bone regeneration method using macroporous resorbable sheets for the treatment of extended lower and upper jaw defects. By applying mechanical protection of bony defects with, e.g. membranes or titanium mesh, soft tissue prolapse as well as pressure on bone transplants which contributes to partial resorption can be avoided. The use of a pressure-resistant, resorbable, macroporous sheet combines the advantage of protected bone regeneration and complete resorption of the implanted sheet. The macroporous structure facilitates capillary ingrowth from the surrounding soft tissue. The sheet is made of 70:30 Poly(L-co-DL)-lactate with thermoplastic character and can be used as a container for autologous spongiosa or other osteoinductive and -conductive bone graft substitutes. In a pilot study, seven patients with lower jaw defects resulting from large cysts or tumor resections, some affecting the continuity of the mandible, were treated with this method. Following a protocol, X-rays were obtained to document the bony regeneration. The positive experience with this pilot study encouraged a multicenter project involving five university hospitals and 50 patients. The application of resorbable sheets in combination with transplantation of mersilized autologous spongiosa is currently being investigated. In future studies, fillings of sheets with osteoconductive and -inductive materials are planned. PMID:11094523

  10. Ihha induces hybrid cartilage-bone cells during zebrafish jawbone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Paul, Sandeep; Schindler, Simone; Giovannone, Dion; de Millo Terrazzani, Alexandra; Mariani, Francesca V; Crump, J Gage

    2016-06-15

    The healing of bone often involves a cartilage intermediate, yet how such cartilage is induced and utilized during repair is not fully understood. By studying a model of large-scale bone regeneration in the lower jaw of adult zebrafish, we show that chondrocytes are crucial for generating thick bone during repair. During jawbone regeneration, we find that chondrocytes co-express genes associated with osteoblast differentiation and produce extensive mineralization, which is in marked contrast to the behavior of chondrocytes during facial skeletal development. We also identify the likely source of repair chondrocytes as a population of Runx2(+)/Sp7(-) cells that emanate from the periosteum, a tissue that normally contributes only osteoblasts during homeostasis. Analysis of Indian hedgehog homolog a (ihha) mutants shows that the ability of periosteal cells to generate cartilage in response to injury depends on a repair-specific role of Ihha in the induction as opposed to the proliferation of chondrocytes. The large-scale regeneration of the zebrafish jawbone thus employs a cartilage differentiation program distinct from that seen during development, with the bone-forming potential of repair chondrocytes potentially due to their derivation from osteogenic cells in the periosteum. PMID:27122168

  11. Short-time survival and engraftment of bone marrow stromal cells in an ectopic model of bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Giannoni, Paolo; Scaglione, Silvia; Daga, Antonio; Ilengo, Cristina; Cilli, Michele; Quarto, Rodolfo

    2010-02-01

    In tissue-engineered applications bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are combined with scaffolds to target bone regeneration; animal models have been devised and the cells' long-term engraftment has been widely studied. However, in regenerated bone, the cell number is severely reduced with respect to the initially seeded BMSCs. This reflects the natural low cellularity of bone but underlines the selectivity of the differentiation processes. In this respect, we evaluated the short-term survival of BMSCs, transduced with the luciferase gene, after implantation of cell-seeded scaffolds in a nude mouse model. Cell proliferation/survival was assessed by bioluminescence imaging: light production was decreased by 30% on the first day, reaching a 50% loss within 48 h. Less than 5% of the initial signal remained after 2 months in vivo. Apoptotic BMSCs were detected within the first 2 days of implantation. Interestingly, the initial frequency of clonogenic progenitors matched the percentage of in vivo surviving cells. Cytokines and inflammation may contribute to the apoptotic onset at the implant milieu. However, preculturing cells with tumor necrosis factor alpha enhanced survival, allowing detection of 8.1% of the seeded BMSCs 2 months after implantation. Thus culturing conditions may reduce the apoptotic overload of seeded osteoprogenitors, strengthening the constructs' osteogenic potential.

  12. Attenuated Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2–Mediated Bone Regeneration in a Rat Model of Composite Bone and Muscle Injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mon-Tzu A.; Uhrig, Brent A.; Boerckel, Joel David; Huebsch, Nathaniel; Lundgren, Taran L.; Warren, Gordon L.; Guldberg, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Extremity injuries involving large bone defects with concomitant severe muscle damage are a significant clinical challenge often requiring multiple treatment procedures and possible amputation. Even if limb salvage is achieved, patients are typically left with severe short- and long-term disabilities. Current preclinical animal models do not adequately mimic the severity, complexity, and loss of limb function characteristic of these composite injuries. The objectives of this study were to establish a composite injury model that combines a critically sized segmental bone defect with an adjacent volumetric muscle loss injury, and then use this model to quantitatively assess human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2)–mediated tissue regeneration and restoration of limb function. Surgeries were performed on rats in three experimental groups: muscle injury (8-mm-diameter full-thickness defect in the quadriceps), bone injury (8-mm nonhealing defect in the femur), or composite injury combining the bone and muscle defects. Bone defects were treated with 2 μg of rhBMP-2 delivered in the pregelled alginate injected into a cylindrical perforated nanofiber mesh. Bone regeneration was quantitatively assessed using microcomputed tomography, and limb function was assessed using gait analysis and muscle strength measurements. At 12 weeks postsurgery, treated bone defects without volumetric muscle loss were consistently bridged. In contrast, the volume and mechanical strength of regenerated bone were attenuated by 45% and 58%, respectively, in the identically treated composite injury group. At the same time point, normalized muscle strength was reduced by 51% in the composite injury group compared to either single injury group. At 2 weeks, the gait function was impaired in all injury groups compared to baseline with the composite injury group displaying the greatest functional deficit. We conclude that sustained delivery of rhBMP-2 at a dose sufficient to induce bridging of

  13. [Mandibular bone tissue regeneration after the introduction of the implantation system performed on the basis of carbon composite material].

    PubMed

    Chetvertnykh, V A; Loginova, N P; Astashina, N B; Rogozhnikov, G I; Rapekta, S I

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the processes of regeneration of bone tissue after the introduction of new implant systems. In the experiment, performed on 10 male pigs of Landras breed aged 50-55 days and weighing 17-18.5 kg, the time course of histological changes was studied in the area of mandibular regeneration after the formation of tissue defect and the introduction of the implant of a proposed construction. Morphological analysis of the experimental results 90, 180 and 270 days after the operation demonstrated the process of reparative regeneration of damaged bone along implant-bone block boundaries. Bone repair proceeded through the stage of formation of the woven bone with its progressive substitution by the lamellar bone, with the maintenance of the shape, size and symmetry of the damaged organ. PMID:23805619

  14. [Mandibular bone tissue regeneration after the introduction of the implantation system performed on the basis of carbon composite material].

    PubMed

    Chetvertnykh, V A; Loginova, N P; Astashina, N B; Rogozhnikov, G I; Rapekta, S I

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the processes of regeneration of bone tissue after the introduction of new implant systems. In the experiment, performed on 10 male pigs of Landras breed aged 50-55 days and weighing 17-18.5 kg, the time course of histological changes was studied in the area of mandibular regeneration after the formation of tissue defect and the introduction of the implant of a proposed construction. Morphological analysis of the experimental results 90, 180 and 270 days after the operation demonstrated the process of reparative regeneration of damaged bone along implant-bone block boundaries. Bone repair proceeded through the stage of formation of the woven bone with its progressive substitution by the lamellar bone, with the maintenance of the shape, size and symmetry of the damaged organ.

  15. Mandibular Jaw Bone Regeneration Using Human Dental Cell-Seeded Tyrosine-Derived Polycarbonate Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weibo; Zhang, Zheng; Chen, Shuang; Macri, Lauren; Kohn, Joachim; Yelick, Pamela C

    2016-07-01

    Here we present a new model for alveolar jaw bone regeneration, which uses human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) combined with tyrosine-derived polycarbonate polymer scaffolds [E1001(1k)] containing beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) [E1001(1k)/β-TCP]. E1001(1k)/β-TCP scaffolds (5 mm diameter × 1 mm thickness) were fabricated to fit a 5 mm rat mandibular ramus critical bone defect. Five experimental groups were examined in this study: (1) E1001(1k)/β-TCP scaffolds seeded with a high density of hDPCs, 5.0 × 10(5) hDPCs/scaffold (CH); (2) E1001(1k)/β-TCP scaffolds seeded with a lower density of hDPCs, 2.5 × 10(5) hDPCs/scaffold (CL); (3) acellular E1001(1k)/β-TCP scaffolds (SA); (4) acellular E1001(1k)/β-TCP scaffolds supplemented with 4 μg recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP); and (5) empty defects (EDs). Replicate hDPC-seeded and acellular E1001(1k)/β-TCP scaffolds were cultured in vitro in osteogenic media for 1 week before implantation for 3 and 6 weeks. Live microcomputed tomography (μCT) imaging at 3 and 6 weeks postimplantation revealed robust bone regeneration in the BMP implant group. CH and CL groups exhibited similar uniformly distributed mineralized tissue coverage throughout the defects, but less than the BMP implants. In contrast, SA-treated defects exhibited sparse areas of mineralized tissue regeneration. The ED group exhibited slightly reduced defect size. Histological analyses revealed no indication of an immune response. In addition, robust expression of dentin and bone differentiation marker expression was observed in hDPC-seeded scaffolds, whereas, in contrast, BMP and SA implants exhibited only bone and not dentin differentiation marker expression. hDPCs were detected in 3-week but not in 6-week hDPC-seeded scaffold groups, indicating their survival for at least 3 weeks. Together, these results show that hDPC-seeded E1001(1k)/β-TCP scaffolds support the rapid regeneration of osteo

  16. Mandibular Jaw Bone Regeneration Using Human Dental Cell-Seeded Tyrosine-Derived Polycarbonate Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weibo; Zhang, Zheng; Chen, Shuang; Macri, Lauren; Kohn, Joachim; Yelick, Pamela C

    2016-07-01

    Here we present a new model for alveolar jaw bone regeneration, which uses human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) combined with tyrosine-derived polycarbonate polymer scaffolds [E1001(1k)] containing beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) [E1001(1k)/β-TCP]. E1001(1k)/β-TCP scaffolds (5 mm diameter × 1 mm thickness) were fabricated to fit a 5 mm rat mandibular ramus critical bone defect. Five experimental groups were examined in this study: (1) E1001(1k)/β-TCP scaffolds seeded with a high density of hDPCs, 5.0 × 10(5) hDPCs/scaffold (CH); (2) E1001(1k)/β-TCP scaffolds seeded with a lower density of hDPCs, 2.5 × 10(5) hDPCs/scaffold (CL); (3) acellular E1001(1k)/β-TCP scaffolds (SA); (4) acellular E1001(1k)/β-TCP scaffolds supplemented with 4 μg recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP); and (5) empty defects (EDs). Replicate hDPC-seeded and acellular E1001(1k)/β-TCP scaffolds were cultured in vitro in osteogenic media for 1 week before implantation for 3 and 6 weeks. Live microcomputed tomography (μCT) imaging at 3 and 6 weeks postimplantation revealed robust bone regeneration in the BMP implant group. CH and CL groups exhibited similar uniformly distributed mineralized tissue coverage throughout the defects, but less than the BMP implants. In contrast, SA-treated defects exhibited sparse areas of mineralized tissue regeneration. The ED group exhibited slightly reduced defect size. Histological analyses revealed no indication of an immune response. In addition, robust expression of dentin and bone differentiation marker expression was observed in hDPC-seeded scaffolds, whereas, in contrast, BMP and SA implants exhibited only bone and not dentin differentiation marker expression. hDPCs were detected in 3-week but not in 6-week hDPC-seeded scaffold groups, indicating their survival for at least 3 weeks. Together, these results show that hDPC-seeded E1001(1k)/β-TCP scaffolds support the rapid regeneration of osteo

  17. Aged Male Rats Regenerate Cortical Bone with Reduced Osteocyte Density and Reduced Secretion of Nitric Oxide After Mechanical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Tayim, Riyad J.; McElderry, John-David; Morris, Michael D.; Goldstein, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical loading is integral to the repair of bone damage. Osteocytes are mechanosensors in bone and participate in signaling through gap junction channels, which are primarily comprised of connexin 43 (Cx43). Nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) have anabolic and catabolic effects on bone, and the secretion of these molecules occurs after mechanical stimulation. The effect of age on the repair of bone tissue after damage and on the ability of regenerated bone to transduce mechanical stimulation into a cellular response is unexplored. The goal of this study was to examine (1) osteocytes and their mineralized matrix within regenerated bone from aged and mature animals and (2) the ability of regenerated bone explants from aged and mature animals to transduce cyclic mechanical loading into a cellular response through NO and PGE2 secretion. Bilateral cortical defects were created in the diaphysis of aged (21-month-old) or mature (6-month-old) male rats, and new bone tissue was allowed to grow into a custom implant of controlled geometry. Mineralization and mineral-to-matrix ratio were significantly higher in regenerated bone from aged animals, while lacunar and osteocyte density and phosphorylated (pCx43) and total Cx43 protein were significantly lower, relative to mature animals. Regenerated bone from mature rats had increased pCx43 protein and PGE2 secretion with loading and greater NO secretion relative to aged animals. Reduced osteocyte density and Cx43 in regenerated bone in aged animals could limit the establishment of gap junctions as well as NO and PGE2 secretion after loading, thereby altering bone formation and resorption in vivo. PMID:24370615

  18. Human fallopian tube mesenchymal stromal cells enhance bone regeneration in a xenotransplanted model.

    PubMed

    Jazedje, Tatiana; Bueno, Daniela F; Almada, Bruno V P; Caetano, Heloisa; Czeresnia, Carlos E; Perin, Paulo M; Halpern, Silvio; Maluf, Mariangela; Evangelista, Lucila P; Nisenbaum, Marcelo G; Martins, Marília T; Passos-Bueno, Maria R; Zatz, Mayana

    2012-06-01

    We have recently reported that human fallopian tubes, which are discarded during surgical procedures of women submitted to sterilization or hysterectomies, are a rich source of human fallopian tube mesenchymal stromal cells (htMSCs). It has been previously shown that human mesenchymal stromal cells may be useful in enhancing the speed of bone regeneration. This prompted us to investigate whether htMSCs might be useful for the treatment of osteoporosis or other bone diseases, since they present a pronounced capacity for osteogenic differentiation in vitro. Based on this prior knowledge, our aim was to evaluate, in vivo, the osteogenic capacity of htMSCs to regenerate bone through an already described xenotransplantation model: nonimmunosuppressed (NIS) rats with cranial defects. htMSCs were obtained from five 30-50 years old healthy women and characterized by flow cytometry and for their multipotenciality in vitro capacity (osteogenic, chondrogenic and adipogenic differentiations). Two symmetric full-thickness cranial defects on each parietal region of seven NIS rats were performed. The left side (LS) of six animals was covered with CellCeram (Scaffdex)-a bioabsorbable ceramic composite scaffold that contains 60% hydroxyapatite and 40% β-tricalciumphosphate-only, and the right side (RS) with the CellCeram and htMSCs (10(6) cells/scaffold). The animals were euthanized at 30, 60 and 90 days postoperatively and cranial tissue samples were taken for histological analysis. After 90 days we observed neobone formation in both sides. However, in animals euthanized 30 and 60 days after the procedure, a mature bone was observed only on the side with htMSCs. PCR and immunofluorescence analysis confirmed the presence of human DNA and thus that human cells were not rejected, which further supports the imunomodulatory property of htMSCs. In conclusion, htMSCs can be used successfully to enhance bone regeneration in vivo, opening a new field for future treatments of osteoporosis

  19. Potential of Magnetic Nanofiber Scaffolds with Mechanical and Biological Properties Applicable for Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rajendra K.; Patel, Kapil D.; Lee, Jae Ho; Lee, Eun-Jung; Kim, Joong-Hyun; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Hae-Won

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic nanofibrous scaffolds of poly(caprolactone) (PCL) incorporating magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) were produced, and their effects on physico-chemical, mechanical and biological properties were extensively addressed to find efficacy for bone regeneration purpose. MNPs 12 nm in diameter were citrated and evenly distributed in PCL solutions up to 20% and then were electrospun into nonwoven nanofibrous webs. Incorporation of MNPs greatly improved the hydrophilicity of the nanofibers. Tensile mechanical properties of the nanofibers (tensile strength, yield strength, elastic modulus and elongation) were significantly enhanced with the addition of MNPs up to 15%. In particular, the tensile strength increase was as high as ∼25 MPa at 15% MNPs vs. ∼10 MPa in pure PCL. PCL-MNP nanofibers exhibited magnetic behaviors, with a high saturation point and hysteresis loop area, which increased gradually with MNP content. The incorporation of MNPs substantially increased the degradation of the nanofibers, with a weight loss of ∼20% in pure PCL, ∼45% in 10% MNPs and ∼60% in 20% MNPs. Apatite forming ability of the nanofibers tested in vitro in simulated body fluid confirmed the substantial improvement gained by the addition of MNPs. Osteoblastic cells favored the MNPs-incorporated nanofibers with significantly improved initial cell adhesion and subsequent penetration through the nanofibers, compared to pure PCL. Alkaline phosphatase activity and expression of genes associated with bone (collagen I, osteopontin and bone sialoprotein) were significantly up-regulated in cells cultured on PCL-MNP nanofibers than those on pure PCL. PCL-MNP nanofibers subcutaneously implanted in rats exhibited minimal adverse tissue reactions, while inducing substantial neoblood vessel formation, which however, greatly limited in pure PCL. In vivo study in radial segmental defects also signified the bone regeneration ability of the PCL-MNP nanofibrous scaffolds. The magnetic, bone

  20. Intramembranous bone regeneration and implant placement using mechanical femoral marrow ablation: rodent models.

    PubMed

    Moran, Meghan M; Sena, Kotaro; McNulty, Margaret A; Sumner, D R; Virdi, Amarjit S

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we provide a detailed protocol for a model of long bone mechanical marrow ablation in the rodent, including surgical procedure, anesthesia, and pre- and post-operative care. In addition, frequently used experimental end points are briefly discussed. This model was developed to study intramembranous bone regeneration following surgical disruption of the marrow contents of long bones. In this model, the timing of the appearance of bone formation and remodeling is well-characterized and therefore the model is well-suited to evaluate the in vivo effects of various agents which influence these processes. When biomaterials such as tissue engineering scaffolds or metal implants are placed in the medullary cavity after marrow ablation, end points relevant to tissue engineering and implant fixation can also be analyzed. By sharing a detailed protocol, we hope to improve inter-laboratory reproducibility. PMID:27648259

  1. Strategies for Controlled Delivery of Growth Factors and Cells for Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Tiffany N.; Kasper, F. Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2012-01-01

    The controlled delivery of growth factors and cells within biomaterial carriers can enhance and accelerate functional bone formation. The carrier system can be designed with preprogrammed release kinetics to deliver bioactive molecules in a localized, spatiotemporal manner most similar to the natural wound healing process. The carrier can also act as an extracellular matrix-mimicking substrate for promoting osteoprogenitor cellular infiltration and proliferation for integrative tissue repair. This review discusses the role of various regenerative factors involved in bone healing and their appropriate combinations with different delivery systems for augmenting bone regeneration. The general requirements of protein, cell and gene therapy are described, with elaboration on how the selection of materials, configurations and processing affects growth factor and cell delivery and regenerative efficacy in both in vitro and in vivo applications for bone tissue engineering. PMID:22342771

  2. Basic fibroblast growth factor supports expansion of mouse compact bone-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and regeneration of bone from MSC in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yamachika, Eiki; Tsujigiwa, Hidetsugu; Matsubara, Masakazu; Hirata, Yasuhisa; Kita, Kenichiro; Takabatake, Kiyofumi; Mizukawa, Nobuyoshi; Kaneda, Yoshihiro; Nagatsuka, Hitoshi; Iida, Seiji

    2012-04-01

    Some progress has been made in development of methods to regenerate bone from cultured cells, however no method is put to practical use. Here, we developed methods to isolate, purify, and expand mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from mouse compact bone that may be used to regenerate bone in vivo. These cells were maintained in long-term culture and were capable of differentiating along multiple lineages, including chondrocyte, osteocyte, and adipocyte trajectories. We used standard cell isolation and culture methods to establish cell cultures from mouse compact bone and bone marrow. Cultures were grown in four distinct media to determine the optimal composition of culture medium for bone-derived MSCs. Putative MSCs were subjected to flow cytometry, alkaline phosphatase assays, immunohistochemical staining, and several differentiation assays to assess cell identity, protein expression, and developmental potential. Finally, we used an in vivo bone formation assay to determine whether putative MSCs were capable of regenerating bone. We found that compact bone of mice was a better source of MCSs than the bone marrow, that growth in plastic flasks served to purify MSCs from hematopoietic cells, and that MSCs grown in basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-conditioned medium were, based on multiple criteria, superior to those grown in leukemia inhibitory factor-conditioned medium. Moreover, we found that the MSCs isolated from compact bone and grown in bFGF-conditioned medium were capable of supporting bone formation in vivo. The methods and results described here have implications for understanding MSC biology and for clinical purpose.

  3. [Factors affecting bone regeneration in Ilizarov callus distraction].

    PubMed

    Fink, B; Krieger, M; Schneider, T; Menkhaus, S; Fischer, J; Rüther, W

    1995-12-01

    We evaluated the X-rays of 36 patients who underwent 50 callus distractions. With the aid of a computerized digitalisation system for analogue films, the relative X-ray density of the distraction area was calculated for each X-ray. These relative X-ray densities were figured graphically for the duration of treatment for each patient. In the consolidation phase, the graph of each patient had a logarithmic relationship. The gradients of the logarithmic density curves were considered an indicator of the quantity of new bone formation. These gradients were correlated to the following clinical parameters: age of the patient, beginning of distraction after corticotomy, average speed of distraction, average weight bearing during the distraction and consolidation phase, location of corticotomy (distal femur versus proximal tibia) and diclofenac medication. Except for the location of the corticotomy and diclofenac, all parameters had an influence on osteoneogenesis by callus distraction. The parameters affecting new bone formation the most were the age of the patient and weight bearing. Patients aged under 18 years (p = 0.005), beginning of distraction later than 8 days (p = 0.109), an average distraction speed below 1 mm/day (p = 0.079), and average weight bearing of more than 30 kg (p = 0.068 for the distraction phase and p = 0.089 for the consolidation phase) showed a quantitatively higher rate of new bone formation by callus distraction than the patients in the other groups. Patients with a shorter leg due to poliomyelitis and one patient with an amniotic leg tie showed a slower increase in X-ray density graphs than the other patients. PMID:8584945

  4. Guided bone regeneration in the treatment of periimplantitis.

    PubMed

    Persson, L G; Ericsson, I; Berglundh, T; Lindhe, J

    1996-12-01

    The objective of the present experiment was to study the soft and hard tissue healing following treatment of experimentally induced periimplantitis. 5 labrador dogs about 1-year old were used. The mandibular right and left 1st molars, 4th and 3rd premolars were removed, titanium fixtures (Brånemark System) were installed, and standard abutments were connected in a 2nd stage procedure. After 3 months experimental periimplantitis was induced by the placement of cotton floss ligatures in a submarginal position. 6 weeks later the ligatures were removed. 1 month after ligature removal, an antibiotic regimen was initiated. During a 3-week period, each dog was given tablets of amoxicillin and metronidazole. In the left side of the mandible, buccal and lingual mucoperiosteal flaps were elevated and granulation tissue within the bone craters curetted. The abutments were removed. The exposed outer surfaces and the internal part of the fixtures were carefully cleaned with a detergent (delmopinol HC1). An e-PTFE membrane was placed over each fixture and adjusted to cover the bone crater. New cover screws were fitted through the membranes to the cleaned fixtures. The implants were submerged and the flaps sutured. In the right side of the mandible no local treatment was performed. The dogs were sacrificed after 4 months and biopsies prepared for histological examination. The findings indicated that treatment of a periimplantitis lesion, including comprehensive systemic antimicrobial therapy and cleaning of submerged implants resulted in (i) the elimination of the inflammatory process in the periimplant tissues and (ii) the establishment of a dense connective tissue capsule in direct contact with the previously exposed surface of the implant system. It was also observed that (iii) new bone was frequently laid down on the pristine cover screws. PMID:9151604

  5. Physicochemical Properties and Applications of Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) for Use in Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Félix Lanao, Rosa P.; Jonker, Anika M.; Wolke, Joop G.C.; Jansen, John A.; van Hest, Jan C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) is the most often used synthetic polymer within the field of bone regeneration owing to its biocompatibility and biodegradability. As a consequence, a large number of medical devices comprising PLGA have been approved for clinical use in humans by the American Food and Drug Administration. As compared with the homopolymers of lactic acid poly(lactic acid) and poly(glycolic acid), the co-polymer PLGA is much more versatile with regard to the control over degradation rate. As a material for bone regeneration, the use of PLGA has been extensively studied for application and is included as either scaffolds, coatings, fibers, or micro- and nanospheres to meet various clinical requirements. PMID:23350707

  6. Extracellular matrix-inspired growth factor delivery systems for bone regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, Mikaël M.; Briquez, Priscilla S.; Maruyama, Kenta; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.

    2015-04-17

    Growth factors are very promising molecules to enhance bone regeneration. However, their translation to clinical use has been seriously limited, facing issues related to safety and cost-effectiveness. These problems derive from the vastly supra-physiological doses of growth factor used without optimized delivery systems. Therefore, these issues have motivated the development of new delivery systems allowing better control of the spatio-temporal release and signaling of growth factors. Because the extracellular matrix (ECM) naturally plays a fundamental role in coordinating growth factor activity in vivo, a number of novel delivery systems have been inspired by the growth factor regulatory function of the ECM. After introducing the role of growth factors during the bone regeneration process, this review exposes different issues that growth factor-based therapies have encountered in the clinic and highlights recent delivery approaches based on the natural interaction between growth factor and the ECM.

  7. Extracellular matrix-inspired growth factor delivery systems for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Martino, Mikaël M; Briquez, Priscilla S; Maruyama, Kenta; Hubbell, Jeffrey A

    2015-11-01

    Growth factors are very promising molecules to enhance bone regeneration. However, their translation to clinical use has been seriously limited, facing issues related to safety and cost-effectiveness. These problems derive from the vastly supra-physiological doses of growth factor used without optimized delivery systems. Therefore, these issues have motivated the development of new delivery systems allowing better control of the spatiotemporal release and signaling of growth factors. Because the extracellular matrix (ECM) naturally plays a fundamental role in coordinating growth factor activity in vivo, a number of novel delivery systems have been inspired by the growth factor regulatory function of the ECM. After introducing the role of growth factors during the bone regeneration process, this review exposes different issues that growth factor-based therapies have encountered in the clinic and highlights recent delivery approaches based on the natural interaction between growth factor and the ECM.

  8. Electrospun silk fibroin/poly(lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) nanofibrous scaffolds for bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zi; Lin, Ming; Xie, Qing; Sun, Hao; Huang, Yazhuo; Zhang, DanDan; Yu, Zhang; Bi, Xiaoping; Chen, Junzhao; Wang, Jing; Shi, Wodong; Gu, Ping; Fan, Xianqun

    2016-01-01

    Background Tissue engineering has become a promising therapeutic approach for bone regeneration. Nanofibrous scaffolds have attracted great interest mainly due to their structural similarity to natural extracellular matrix (ECM). Poly(lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) (PLCL) has been successfully used in bone regeneration, but PLCL polymers are inert and lack natural cell recognition sites, and the surface of PLCL scaffold is hydrophobic. Silk fibroin (SF) is a kind of natural polymer with inherent bioactivity, and supports mesenchymal stem cell attachment, osteogenesis, and ECM deposition. Therefore, we fabricated hybrid nanofibrous scaffolds by adding different weight ratios of SF to PLCL in order to find a scaffold with improved properties for bone regeneration. Methods Hybrid nanofibrous scaffolds were fabricated by blending different weight ratios of SF with PLCL. Human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) were seeded on SF/PLCL nanofibrous scaffolds of various ratios for a systematic evaluation of cell adhesion, proliferation, cytotoxicity, and osteogenic differentiation; the efficacy of the composite of hADSCs and scaffolds in repairing critical-sized calvarial defects in rats was investigated. Results The SF/PLCL (50/50) scaffold exhibited favorable tensile strength, surface roughness, and hydrophilicity, which facilitated cell adhesion and proliferation. Moreover, the SF/PLCL (50/50) scaffold promoted the osteogenic differentiation of hADSCs by elevating the expression levels of osteogenic marker genes such as BSP, Ocn, Col1A1, and OPN and enhanced ECM mineralization. In vivo assays showed that SF/PLCL (50/50) scaffold improved the repair of the critical-sized calvarial defect in rats, resulting in increased bone volume, higher trabecular number, enhanced bone mineral density, and increased new bone areas, compared with the pure PLCL scaffold. Conclusion The SF/PLCL (50/50) nanofibrous scaffold facilitated hADSC proliferation and osteogenic differentiation in

  9. In vivo bone regeneration using tubular perfusion system bioreactor cultured nanofibrous scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Yeatts, Andrew B; Both, Sanne K; Yang, Wanxun; Alghamdi, Hamdan S; Yang, Fang; Fisher, John P; Jansen, John A

    2014-01-01

    The use of bioreactors for the in vitro culture of constructs for bone tissue engineering has become prevalent as these systems may improve the growth and differentiation of a cultured cell population. Here we utilize a tubular perfusion system (TPS) bioreactor for the in vitro culture of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and implant the cultured constructs into rat femoral condyle defects. Using nanofibrous electrospun poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds, hMSCs were cultured for 10 days in vitro in the TPS bioreactor with cellular and acellular scaffolds cultured statically for 10 days as a control. After 3 and 6 weeks of in vivo culture, explants were removed and subjected to histomorphometric analysis. Results indicated more rapid bone regeneration in defects implanted with bioreactor cultured scaffolds with a new bone area of 1.23 ± 0.35 mm(2) at 21 days compared to 0.99 ± 0.43 mm(2) and 0.50 ± 0.29 mm(2) in defects implanted with statically cultured scaffolds and acellular scaffolds, respectively. At the 21 day timepoint, statistical differences (p<0.05) were only observed between defects implanted with cell containing scaffolds and the acellular control. After 42 days, however, defects implanted with TPS cultured scaffolds had the greatest new bone area with 1.72 ± 0.40 mm(2). Defects implanted with statically cultured and acellular scaffolds had a new bone area of 1.26 ± 0.43 mm(2) and 1.19 ± 0.33 mm(2), respectively. The increase in bone growth observed in defects implanted with TPS cultured scaffolds was statistically significant (p<0.05) when compared to both the static and acellular groups at this timepoint. This study demonstrates the efficacy of the TPS bioreactor to improve bone tissue regeneration and highlights the benefits of utilizing perfusion bioreactor systems to culture MSCs for bone tissue engineering.

  10. Effect of a novel load-bearing trabecular Nitinol scaffold on rabbit radius bone regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Gotman, Irena Gutmanas, Elazar Y.; Zaretzky, Asaph; Psakhie, Sergey G.

    2015-10-27

    The research aim was to evaluate the bone regeneration capability of novel load-bearing NiTi alloy (Nitinol) scaffolds in a critical-size defect (CSD) model. High strength “trabecular Nitinol” scaffolds were prepared by PIRAC (Powder Immersion Reaction Assisted Coating) annealing of the highly porous Ni foam in Ti powder at 900°C. This was followed by PIRAC nitriding to mitigate the release of potentially toxic Ni ions. Scaffolds phase composition and microstructure were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDS), and their mechanical properties were tested in compression. New Zealand white rabbits received bone defect in right radius and were divided in four groups randomly. In the control group, nothing was placed in the defect. In other groups, NiTi scaffolds were implanted in the defect: (i) as produced, (ii) loaded with bone marrow aspirate (BMA), and (iii) biomimetically CaP-coated. The animals were sacrificed after 12 weeks. The forelimbs with scaffolds were resected, fixed, sectioned and examined in SEM. New bone formation inside the scaffold was studied by EDS analysis and by the processing of backscattered electron images. Bone ingrowth into the scaffold was observed in all implant groups, mostly next to the ulna. New bone formation was strongly enhanced by BMA loading and biomimeatic CaP coating, the bone penetrating as much as 1–1.5 mm into the scaffold. The results of this preliminary study demonstrate that the newly developed high strength trabecular Nitinol scaffolds can be successfully used for bone regeneration in critical size defects.

  11. Effect of a novel load-bearing trabecular Nitinol scaffold on rabbit radius bone regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotman, Irena; Zaretzky, Asaph; Psakhie, Sergey G.; Gutmanas, Elazar Y.

    2015-10-01

    The research aim was to evaluate the bone regeneration capability of novel load-bearing NiTi alloy (Nitinol) scaffolds in a critical-size defect (CSD) model. High strength "trabecular Nitinol" scaffolds were prepared by PIRAC (Powder Immersion Reaction Assisted Coating) annealing of the highly porous Ni foam in Ti powder at 900°C. This was followed by PIRAC nitriding to mitigate the release of potentially toxic Ni ions. Scaffolds phase composition and microstructure were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDS), and their mechanical properties were tested in compression. New Zealand white rabbits received bone defect in right radius and were divided in four groups randomly. In the control group, nothing was placed in the defect. In other groups, NiTi scaffolds were implanted in the defect: (i) as produced, (ii) loaded with bone marrow aspirate (BMA), and (iii) biomimetically CaP-coated. The animals were sacrificed after 12 weeks. The forelimbs with scaffolds were resected, fixed, sectioned and examined in SEM. New bone formation inside the scaffold was studied by EDS analysis and by the processing of backscattered electron images. Bone ingrowth into the scaffold was observed in all implant groups, mostly next to the ulna. New bone formation was strongly enhanced by BMA loading and biomimeatic CaP coating, the bone penetrating as much as 1-1.5 mm into the scaffold. The results of this preliminary study demonstrate that the newly developed high strength trabecular Nitinol scaffolds can be successfully used for bone regeneration in critical size defects.

  12. Graded porous polyurethane foam: a potential scaffold for oro-maxillary bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Giannitelli, S M; Basoli, F; Mozetic, P; Piva, P; Bartuli, F N; Luciani, F; Arcuri, C; Trombetta, M; Rainer, A; Licoccia, S

    2015-06-01

    Bone tissue engineering applications demand for biomaterials offering a substrate for cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation, while inferring suitable mechanical properties to the construct. In the present study, polyurethane (PU) foams were synthesized to develop a graded porous material-characterized by a dense shell and a porous core-for the treatment of oro-maxillary bone defects. Foam was synthesized via a one-pot reaction starting from a polyisocyanate and a biocompatible polyester diol, using water as a foaming agent. Different foaming conditions were examined, with the aim of creating a dense/porous functional graded material that would perform at the same time as an osteoconductive scaffold for bone defect regeneration and as a membrane-barrier to gingival tissue ingrowth. The obtained PU was characterized in terms of morphological and mechanical properties. Biocompatibility assessment was performed in combination with bone-marrow-derived human mesenchymal stromal cells (hBMSCs). Our findings confirm that the material is potentially suitable for guided bone regeneration applications. PMID:25842142

  13. In vitro response of macrophages to ceramic scaffolds used for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Graney, Pamela L; Roohani-Esfahani, Seyed-Iman; Zreiqat, Hala; Spiller, Kara L

    2016-07-01

    Macrophages, the primary cells of the inflammatory response, are major regulators of healing, and mediate both bone fracture healing and the inflammatory response to implanted biomaterials. However, their phenotypic contributions to biomaterial-mediated bone repair are incompletely understood. Therefore, we used gene expression and protein secretion analysis to investigate the interactions in vitro between primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and ceramic scaffolds that have been shown to have varying degrees of success in promoting bone regeneration in vivo Specifically, baghdadite (Ca3ZrSi2O9) and strontium-hardystonite-gahnite (Sr-Ca2ZnSi2O7-ZnAl2O4) scaffolds were chosen as two materials that enhanced bone regeneration in vivo in large defects under load compared with clinically used tricalcium phosphate-hydroxyapatite (TCP-HA). Principal component analysis revealed that the scaffolds differentially regulated macrophage phenotype. Temporal changes in gene expression included shifts in markers of pro-inflammatory M1, anti-inflammatory M2a and pro-remodelling M2c macrophage phenotypes. Of note, TCP-HA scaffolds promoted upregulation of many M1-related genes and downregulation of many M2a- and M2c-related genes. Effects of the scaffolds on macrophages were attributed primarily to direct cell-scaffold interactions because of only minor changes observed in transwell culture. Ultimately, elucidating macrophage-biomaterial interactions will facilitate the design of immunomodulatory biomaterials for bone repair.

  14. Stem cell technology for bone regeneration: current status and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Asatrian, Greg; Pham, Dalton; Hardy, Winters R; James, Aaron W; Peault, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Continued improvements in the understanding and application of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have revolutionized tissue engineering. This is particularly true within the field of skeletal regenerative medicine. However, much remains unknown regarding the native origins of MSC, the relative advantages of different MSC populations for bone regeneration, and even the biologic safety of such unpurified, grossly characterized cells. This review will first summarize the initial discovery of MSC, as well as the current and future applications of MSC in bone tissue engineering. Next, the relative advantages and disadvantages of MSC isolated from distinct tissue origins are debated, including the MSC from adipose, bone marrow, and dental pulp, among others. The perivascular origin of MSC is next discussed. Finally, we briefly comment on pluripotent stem cell populations and their possible application in bone tissue engineering. While continually expanding, the field of MSC-based bone tissue engineering and regeneration shows potential to become a clinical reality in the not-so-distant future. PMID:25709479

  15. In vitro response of macrophages to ceramic scaffolds used for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Graney, Pamela L; Roohani-Esfahani, Seyed-Iman; Zreiqat, Hala; Spiller, Kara L

    2016-07-01

    Macrophages, the primary cells of the inflammatory response, are major regulators of healing, and mediate both bone fracture healing and the inflammatory response to implanted biomaterials. However, their phenotypic contributions to biomaterial-mediated bone repair are incompletely understood. Therefore, we used gene expression and protein secretion analysis to investigate the interactions in vitro between primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and ceramic scaffolds that have been shown to have varying degrees of success in promoting bone regeneration in vivo Specifically, baghdadite (Ca3ZrSi2O9) and strontium-hardystonite-gahnite (Sr-Ca2ZnSi2O7-ZnAl2O4) scaffolds were chosen as two materials that enhanced bone regeneration in vivo in large defects under load compared with clinically used tricalcium phosphate-hydroxyapatite (TCP-HA). Principal component analysis revealed that the scaffolds differentially regulated macrophage phenotype. Temporal changes in gene expression included shifts in markers of pro-inflammatory M1, anti-inflammatory M2a and pro-remodelling M2c macrophage phenotypes. Of note, TCP-HA scaffolds promoted upregulation of many M1-related genes and downregulation of many M2a- and M2c-related genes. Effects of the scaffolds on macrophages were attributed primarily to direct cell-scaffold interactions because of only minor changes observed in transwell culture. Ultimately, elucidating macrophage-biomaterial interactions will facilitate the design of immunomodulatory biomaterials for bone repair. PMID:27466438

  16. Hybrid Matrix Grafts to Favor Tissue Regeneration in Rabbit Femur Bone Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Goy, Dante Pascual; Gorosito, Emmanuel; Costa, Hermes S; Mortarino, Pablo; Pedemonte, Noelia Acosta; Toledo, Javier; Mansur, Herman S; Pereira, Marivalda M; Battaglino, Ricardo; Feldman, Sara

    2012-01-01

    At present, typical approaches employed to repair fractures and other bone lesions tend to use matrix grafts to promote tissue regeneration. These grafts act as templates, which promote cellular adhesion, growth and proliferation, osteoconduction, and even osteoinduction, which commonly results in de novo osteogenesis. The present work aimed to study the bone-repairing ability of hybrid matrixes (HM) prepared with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and bioactive glass in an experimental rabbit model. The HM were prepared by combining 30% bioactive glass (nominal composition of 58% SiO2 -33 % CaO - 9% P2O5) and 70% PVA. New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into the control group (C group) and two groups with bone lesions, in which one received a matrix implant HM (Implant group), while the other did not (no Implant group). Clinical monitoring showed no altered parameters from either the Implant or the no Implant groups as compared to the control group, for the variables of diet grades, day and night temperatures and hemograms. In the Implant group, radiologic and tomographic studies showed implanted areas with clean edges in femoral non-articular direction, and radio-dense images that suggest incipient integration. Minimum signs of phlogosis could be observed, whereas no signs of rejection at this imaging level could be identified. Histological analysis showed evidence of osteo-integration, with the formation of a trabecular bone within the implant. Together, these results show that implants of hybrid matrixes of bioactive glass are capable of promoting bone regeneration. PMID:22848334

  17. Nanostructured Tendon-Derived Scaffolds for Enhanced Bone Regeneration by Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Eunkyung; Alberti, Kyle; Lee, Jong Seung; Yang, Kisuk; Jin, Yoonhee; Shin, Jisoo; Yang, Hee Seok; Xu, Qiaobing; Cho, Seung-Woo

    2016-09-01

    Decellularized matrix-based scaffolds can induce enhanced tissue regeneration due to their biochemical, biophysical, and mechanical similarity to native tissues. In this study, we report a nanostructured decellularized tendon scaffold with aligned, nanofibrous structures to enhance osteogenic differentiation and in vivo bone formation of human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs). Using a bioskiving method, we prepared decellularized tendon scaffolds from tissue slices of bovine Achilles and neck tendons with or without fixation, and investigated the effects on physical and mechanical properties of decellularized tendon scaffolds, based on the types and concentrations of cross-linking agents. In general, we found that decellularized tendon scaffolds without fixative treatments were more effective in inducing osteogenic differentiation and mineralization of hADSCs in vitro. When non-cross-linked decellularized tendon scaffolds were applied together with hydroxyapatite for hADSC transplantation in critical-sized bone defects, they promoted bone-specific collagen deposition and mineralized bone formation 4 and 8 weeks after hADSC transplantation, compared to conventional collagen type I scaffolds. Interestingly, stacking of decellularized tendon scaffolds cultured with osteogenically committed hADSCs and those containing human cord blood-derived endothelial progenitor cells (hEPCs) induced vascularized bone regeneration in the defects 8 weeks after transplantation. Our study suggests that biomimetic nanostructured scaffolds made of decellularized tissue matrices can serve as functional tissue-engineering scaffolds for enhanced osteogenesis of stem cells.

  18. Graded porous polyurethane foam: a potential scaffold for oro-maxillary bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Giannitelli, S M; Basoli, F; Mozetic, P; Piva, P; Bartuli, F N; Luciani, F; Arcuri, C; Trombetta, M; Rainer, A; Licoccia, S

    2015-06-01

    Bone tissue engineering applications demand for biomaterials offering a substrate for cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation, while inferring suitable mechanical properties to the construct. In the present study, polyurethane (PU) foams were synthesized to develop a graded porous material-characterized by a dense shell and a porous core-for the treatment of oro-maxillary bone defects. Foam was synthesized via a one-pot reaction starting from a polyisocyanate and a biocompatible polyester diol, using water as a foaming agent. Different foaming conditions were examined, with the aim of creating a dense/porous functional graded material that would perform at the same time as an osteoconductive scaffold for bone defect regeneration and as a membrane-barrier to gingival tissue ingrowth. The obtained PU was characterized in terms of morphological and mechanical properties. Biocompatibility assessment was performed in combination with bone-marrow-derived human mesenchymal stromal cells (hBMSCs). Our findings confirm that the material is potentially suitable for guided bone regeneration applications.

  19. Nanostructured Tendon-Derived Scaffolds for Enhanced Bone Regeneration by Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Eunkyung; Alberti, Kyle; Lee, Jong Seung; Yang, Kisuk; Jin, Yoonhee; Shin, Jisoo; Yang, Hee Seok; Xu, Qiaobing; Cho, Seung-Woo

    2016-09-01

    Decellularized matrix-based scaffolds can induce enhanced tissue regeneration due to their biochemical, biophysical, and mechanical similarity to native tissues. In this study, we report a nanostructured decellularized tendon scaffold with aligned, nanofibrous structures to enhance osteogenic differentiation and in vivo bone formation of human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs). Using a bioskiving method, we prepared decellularized tendon scaffolds from tissue slices of bovine Achilles and neck tendons with or without fixation, and investigated the effects on physical and mechanical properties of decellularized tendon scaffolds, based on the types and concentrations of cross-linking agents. In general, we found that decellularized tendon scaffolds without fixative treatments were more effective in inducing osteogenic differentiation and mineralization of hADSCs in vitro. When non-cross-linked decellularized tendon scaffolds were applied together with hydroxyapatite for hADSC transplantation in critical-sized bone defects, they promoted bone-specific collagen deposition and mineralized bone formation 4 and 8 weeks after hADSC transplantation, compared to conventional collagen type I scaffolds. Interestingly, stacking of decellularized tendon scaffolds cultured with osteogenically committed hADSCs and those containing human cord blood-derived endothelial progenitor cells (hEPCs) induced vascularized bone regeneration in the defects 8 weeks after transplantation. Our study suggests that biomimetic nanostructured scaffolds made of decellularized tissue matrices can serve as functional tissue-engineering scaffolds for enhanced osteogenesis of stem cells. PMID:27502160

  20. Platelet-rich fibrin promotes periodontal regeneration and enhances alveolar bone augmentation.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Pan, Shuang; Dangaria, Smit J; Gopinathan, Gokul; Kolokythas, Antonia; Chu, Shunli; Geng, Yajun; Zhou, Yanmin; Luan, Xianghong

    2013-01-01

    In the present study we have determined the suitability of platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) as a complex scaffold for periodontal tissue regeneration. Replacing PRF with its major component fibrin increased mineralization in alveolar bone progenitors when compared to periodontal progenitors, suggesting that fibrin played a substantial role in PRF-induced osteogenic lineage differentiation. Moreover, there was a 3.6-fold increase in the early osteoblast transcription factor RUNX2 and a 3.1-fold reduction of the mineralization inhibitor MGP as a result of PRF application in alveolar bone progenitors, a trend not observed in periodontal progenitors. Subcutaneous implantation studies revealed that PRF readily integrated with surrounding tissues and was partially replaced with collagen fibers 2 weeks after implantation. Finally, clinical pilot studies in human patients documented an approximately 5 mm elevation of alveolar bone height in tandem with oral mucosal wound healing. Together, these studies suggest that PRF enhances osteogenic lineage differentiation of alveolar bone progenitors more than of periodontal progenitors by augmenting osteoblast differentiation, RUNX2 expression, and mineralized nodule formation via its principal component fibrin. They also document that PRF functions as a complex regenerative scaffold promoting both tissue-specific alveolar bone augmentation and surrounding periodontal soft tissue regeneration via progenitor-specific mechanisms.

  1. Bone regeneration using hyaluronic acid-based hydrogel with bone morphogenic protein-2 and human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungju; Kim, In Sook; Cho, Tae Hyung; Lee, Kyu Back; Hwang, Soon Jung; Tae, Giyoong; Noh, Insup; Lee, Sang Hoon; Park, Yongdoo; Sun, Kyung

    2007-04-01

    Acrylated hyaluronic acid (HA) was used as a scaffold for bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2) and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) for rat calvarial defect regeneration. HA was acrylated by two-step reactions: (1) introduction of an amine group using adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH); (2) acrylation by N-acryloxysuccinimide. Tetrathiolated poly(ethylene) glycol (PEG-SH(4)) was used as a cross-linker by a Michael-type addition reaction and the hydrogel was formed within 10min under physiological conditions. This hydrogel is degraded completely by 100U/ml hyaluronidase in vitro. hMSCs and/or BMP-2 was added during gelation. Cellular viability in vitro was increased up to 55% in the hydrogels with BMP-2 compared with the control. For in vivo calvarial defect regeneration, five different samples (i.e., control, hydrogel, hydrogel with BMP-2, hydrogel with MSCs, and hydrogel with BMP-2 and MSCs) were implanted for 4 weeks. The histological results demonstrated that the hydrogels with BMP-2 and MSCs had the highest expression of osteocalcin and mature bone formation with vascular markers, such as CD31 and vascular endothelial growth factors, compared with the other samples. This study demonstrated that HA base hydrogel can be used for cell and growth factor carriers for tissue regeneration. PMID:17208295

  2. Histological Study of Bone Marrow and Umbilical Cord Stromal Cell Transplantation in Regenerating Rat Peripheral Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Zarbakhsh, Sam; Goudarzi, Nasim; Shirmohammadi, Maryam; Safari, Manouchehr

    2016-01-01

    Objective Bone marrow and umbilical cord stromal cells are multipotential stem cells that have the ability to produce growth factors that play an important role in survival and generation of axons. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of the two different mesenchymal stem cells on peripheral nerve regeneration. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, a 10 mm segment of the left sciatic nerve of male Wistar rats (250-300 g) was removed with a silicone tube interposed into this nerve gap. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and human umbilical cord stromal cells (HUCSCs) were respectively obtained from rat and human. The cells were sepa- rately cultured and transplanted into the nerve gap. The sciatic nerve regeneration was evaluated by immunohistochemistry, and light and electron microscopy. Moreover, histo- morphology of the gastrocnemius muscle was observed. Results The nerve regeneration in the BMSCs and HUCSCs groups that had received the stem cells was significantly more favorable than the control group. In addition, the BM- SCs group was significantly more favorable than the HUCSCs group (P<0.05). Conclusion The results of this study suggest that both homograft BMSCs and het- erograft HUCSCs may have the potential to regenerate peripheral nerve injury and transplantation of BMSCs may be more effective than HUCSCs in rat. PMID:26862526

  3. [The value of methods of bone regeneration evaluation in limb lengthening by the Wagner, Ilizarov methods and by physeal distraction].

    PubMed

    Tesiorowski, Maciej; Kacki, Wojciech; Jasiewicz, Barbara; Rymarczyk, Adrian; Sebastianowicz, Piotr

    2005-01-01

    Limb lengthening is a long-lasting process, and during new bone formation different complications may occur. Due to this, early diagnosis of disturbances of new bone formation leading to such complications is of importance. The goal of this study is to analyze already used methods of regenerate evaluation. Material consists of retrospective data of 237 patients, who underwent limb lengthening between 1983 and 2002 by one of three methods: Wagner method, Ilizarow method and physeal distraction. During femoral lengthening by Wagner method appropriate shape of regenerate according to Hamanishi was observed in 9 cases (29.0%), and during tibia lengthening--only in 1 case (6.7%). During femoral lengthening by physeal distraction appropriate shape of regenerate (A or B according to Hamanishi) was observed in 24 cases (77.4%), and during tibia lengthening--in 11 cases (78.6%). During femoral lengthening by Ilizarow method appropriate shape of regenerate was observed in 51 cases (72.9%), and during tibia lengthening--in 46 cases (66.7%). Only in Wagner method a correlation between abnormal regenerate shape and bone consolidation complications was noted. Methods of evaluation of bone regeneration during distraction osteogenesis give only descriptive assessment. So far parameters applied for evaluation of distraction osteogenesis in Ilizarow method and physeal distraction do not allow for detailed assessment of bone regeneration process.

  4. Development of thermosensitive hydrogels of chitosan, sodium and magnesium glycerophosphate for bone regeneration applications.

    PubMed

    Lisková, Jana; Bačaková, Lucie; Skwarczyńska, Agata L; Musial, Olga; Bliznuk, Vitaliy; De Schamphelaere, Karel; Modrzejewska, Zofia; Douglas, Timothy E L

    2015-01-01

    Thermosensitive injectable hydrogels based on chitosan neutralized with sodium beta-glycerophosphate (Na-β-GP) have been studied as biomaterials for drug delivery and tissue regeneration. Magnesium (Mg) has been reported to stimulate adhesion and proliferation of bone forming cells. With the aim of improving the suitability of the aforementioned chitosan hydrogels as materials for bone regeneration, Mg was incorporated by partial substitution of Na-β-GP with magnesium glycerophosphate (Mg-GP). Chitosan/Na-β-GP and chitosan/Na-β-GP/Mg-GP hydrogels were also loaded with the enzyme alkaline phosphatase (ALP) which induces hydrogel mineralization. Hydrogels were characterized physicochemically with respect to mineralizability and gelation kinetics, and biologically with respect to cytocompatibility and cell adhesion. Substitution of Na-β-GP with Mg-GP did not negatively influence mineralizability. Cell biological testing showed that both chitosan/Na-β-GP and chitosan/Na-β-GP/Mg-GP hydrogels were cytocompatible towards MG63 osteoblast-like cells. Hence, chitosan/Na-β-GP/Mg-GP hydrogels can be used as an alternative to chitosan/Na-β-GP hydrogels for bone regeneration applications. However the incorporation of Mg in the hydrogels during hydrogel formation did not bring any appreciable physicochemical or biological benefit. PMID:25859630

  5. Triphasic scaffolds for the regeneration of the bone-ligament interface.

    PubMed

    Criscenti, G; Longoni, A; Di Luca, A; De Maria, C; van Blitterswijk, C A; Vozzi, G; Moroni, L

    2016-03-01

    A triphasic scaffold (TPS) for the regeneration of the bone-ligament interface was fabricated combining a 3D fiber deposited polycaprolactone structure and a polylactic co-glycolic acid electrospun. The scaffold presented a gradient of physical and mechanical properties which elicited different biological responses from human mesenchymal stem cells. Biological test were performed on the whole TPS and on scaffolds comprised of each single part of the TPS, considered as the controls. The TPS showed an increase of the metabolic activity with culturing time that seemed to be an average of the controls at each time point. The importance of differentiation media for bone and ligament regeneration was further investigated. Metabolic activity analysis on the different areas of the TPS showed a similar trend after 7 days in both differentiation media. Total alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity analysis showed a statistically higher activity of the TPS in mineralization medium compared to the controls. A different glycosaminoglycans amount between the TPS and its controls was detected, displaying a similar trend with respect to ALP activity. Results clearly indicated that the integration of electrospinning and additive manufacturing represents a promising approach for the fabrication of scaffolds for the regeneration of tissue interfaces, such as the bone-to-ligament one, because it allows mimicking the structural environment combining different biomaterials at different scales. PMID:26824799

  6. Development of Thermosensitive Hydrogels of Chitosan, Sodium and Magnesium Glycerophosphate for Bone Regeneration Applications

    PubMed Central

    Lisková, Jana; Bačaková, Lucie; Skwarczyńska, Agata L.; Musial, Olga; Bliznuk, Vitaliy; De Schamphelaere, Karel; Modrzejewska, Zofia; Douglas, Timothy E.L.

    2015-01-01

    Thermosensitive injectable hydrogels based on chitosan neutralized with sodium beta-glycerophosphate (Na-β-GP) have been studied as biomaterials for drug delivery and tissue regeneration. Magnesium (Mg) has been reported to stimulate adhesion and proliferation of bone forming cells. With the aim of improving the suitability of the aforementioned chitosan hydrogels as materials for bone regeneration, Mg was incorporated by partial substitution of Na-β-GP with magnesium glycerophosphate (Mg-GP). Chitosan/Na-β-GP and chitosan/Na-β-GP/Mg-GP hydrogels were also loaded with the enzyme alkaline phosphatase (ALP) which induces hydrogel mineralization. Hydrogels were characterized physicochemically with respect to mineralizability and gelation kinetics, and biologically with respect to cytocompatibility and cell adhesion. Substitution of Na-β-GP with Mg-GP did not negatively influence mineralizability. Cell biological testing showed that both chitosan/Na-β-GP and chitosan/Na-β-GP/Mg-GP hydrogels were cytocompatible towards MG63 osteoblast-like cells. Hence, chitosan/Na-β-GP/Mg-GP hydrogels can be used as an alternative to chitosan/Na-β-GP hydrogels for bone regeneration applications. However the incorporation of Mg in the hydrogels during hydrogel formation did not bring any appreciable physicochemical or biological benefit. PMID:25859630

  7. Clinical Application of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Novel Supportive Therapies for Oral Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    O'Valle, Francisco; Lanis, Alejandro; Dohan Ehrenfest, David M.; Wang, Hom-Lay; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Bone regeneration is often needed prior to dental implant treatment due to the lack of adequate quantity and quality of the bone after infectious diseases, trauma, tumor, or congenital conditions. In these situations, cell transplantation technologies may help to overcome the limitations of autografts, xenografts, allografts, and alloplastic materials. A database search was conducted to include human clinical trials (randomized or controlled) and case reports/series describing the clinical use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the oral cavity for bone regeneration only specifically excluding periodontal regeneration. Additionally, novel advances in related technologies are also described. 190 records were identified. 51 articles were selected for full-text assessment, and only 28 met the inclusion criteria: 9 case series, 10 case reports, and 9 randomized controlled clinical trials. Collectively, they evaluate the use of MSCs in a total of 290 patients in 342 interventions. The current published literature is very diverse in methodology and measurement of outcomes. Moreover, the clinical significance is limited. Therefore, the use of these techniques should be further studied in more challenging clinical scenarios with well-designed and standardized RCTs, potentially in combination with new scaffolding techniques and bioactive molecules to improve the final outcomes. PMID:26064899

  8. Platelet-Rich Plasma in Bone Regeneration: Engineering the Delivery for Improved Clinical Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Isaac A.; Growney Kalaf, Emily A.; Bowlin, Gary L.; Sell, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Human bone is a tissue with a fairly remarkable inherent capacity for regeneration; however, this regenerative capacity has its limitations, and defects larger than a critical size lack the ability to spontaneously heal. As such, the development and clinical translation of effective bone regeneration modalities are paramount. One regenerative medicine approach that is beginning to gain momentum in the clinical setting is the use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP). PRP therapy is essentially a method for concentrating platelets and their intrinsic growth factors to stimulate and accelerate a healing response. While PRP has shown some efficacy in both in vitro and in vivo scenarios, to date its use and delivery have not been optimized for bone regeneration. Issues remain with the effective delivery of the platelet-derived growth factors to a localized site of injury, the activation and temporal release of the growth factors, and the rate of growth factor clearance. This review will briefly describe the physiological principles behind PRP use and then discuss how engineering its method of delivery may ultimately impact its ability to successfully translate to widespread clinical use. PMID:25050347

  9. Triphasic scaffolds for the regeneration of the bone-ligament interface.

    PubMed

    Criscenti, G; Longoni, A; Di Luca, A; De Maria, C; van Blitterswijk, C A; Vozzi, G; Moroni, L

    2016-01-29

    A triphasic scaffold (TPS) for the regeneration of the bone-ligament interface was fabricated combining a 3D fiber deposited polycaprolactone structure and a polylactic co-glycolic acid electrospun. The scaffold presented a gradient of physical and mechanical properties which elicited different biological responses from human mesenchymal stem cells. Biological test were performed on the whole TPS and on scaffolds comprised of each single part of the TPS, considered as the controls. The TPS showed an increase of the metabolic activity with culturing time that seemed to be an average of the controls at each time point. The importance of differentiation media for bone and ligament regeneration was further investigated. Metabolic activity analysis on the different areas of the TPS showed a similar trend after 7 days in both differentiation media. Total alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity analysis showed a statistically higher activity of the TPS in mineralization medium compared to the controls. A different glycosaminoglycans amount between the TPS and its controls was detected, displaying a similar trend with respect to ALP activity. Results clearly indicated that the integration of electrospinning and additive manufacturing represents a promising approach for the fabrication of scaffolds for the regeneration of tissue interfaces, such as the bone-to-ligament one, because it allows mimicking the structural environment combining different biomaterials at different scales.

  10. Bringing new life to damaged bone: the importance of angiogenesis in bone repair and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Stegen, Steve; van Gastel, Nick; Carmeliet, Geert

    2015-01-01

    Bone has the unique capacity to heal without the formation of a fibrous scar, likely because several of the cellular and molecular processes governing bone healing recapitulate the events during skeletal development. A critical component in bone healing is the timely appearance of blood vessels in the fracture callus. Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing ones, is stimulated after fracture by the local production of numerous angiogenic growth factors. The fracture vasculature not only supplies oxygen and nutrients, but also stem cells able to differentiate into osteoblasts and in a later phase also the ions necessary for mineralization. This review provides a concise report of the regulation of angiogenesis by bone cells, its importance during bone healing and its possible therapeutic applications in bone tissue engineering. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Stem Cells and Bone".

  11. Bringing new life to damaged bone: the importance of angiogenesis in bone repair and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Stegen, Steve; van Gastel, Nick; Carmeliet, Geert

    2015-01-01

    Bone has the unique capacity to heal without the formation of a fibrous scar, likely because several of the cellular and molecular processes governing bone healing recapitulate the events during skeletal development. A critical component in bone healing is the timely appearance of blood vessels in the fracture callus. Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing ones, is stimulated after fracture by the local production of numerous angiogenic growth factors. The fracture vasculature not only supplies oxygen and nutrients, but also stem cells able to differentiate into osteoblasts and in a later phase also the ions necessary for mineralization. This review provides a concise report of the regulation of angiogenesis by bone cells, its importance during bone healing and its possible therapeutic applications in bone tissue engineering. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Stem Cells and Bone". PMID:25263520

  12. Histopathological Comparison between Bone Marrow- and Periodontium-derived Stem Cells for Bone Regeneration in Rabbit Calvaria

    PubMed Central

    Kadkhoda, Z.; Safarpour, A.; Azmoodeh, F.; Adibi, S.; Khoshzaban, A.; Bahrami, N.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Periodontitis is an important oral disease. Stem cell therapy has found its way in treatment of many diseases. Objective: To evaluate the regenerative potential of periodontal ligament-derived stem cells (PDLSCs) and osteoblast differentiated from PDLSC in comparison with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) and pre-osteoblasts in calvarial defects. Methods: After proving the existence of surface markers by flow cytometry, BM-MSCs were differentiated into osteoblasts. 5 defects were made on rabbit calvaria. 3 of them were first covered with collagen membrane and then with BM-MSCs, PDLSCs, and pre-osteoblasts. The 4th defect was filled with collagen membrane and the 5th one was served as control. After 4 weeks, histological (quantitative) and histomorphological (qualitative) surveys were performed. Results: Both cell lineages were positive for CD-90 cell marker, which was specifically related to stem cells. Alizarin red staining was done for showing mineral material. RT-PCR set up for the expression of Cbfa1 gene, BMP4 gene, and PGLAP gene, confirmed osteoblast differentiation. The findings indicated that although PDLSCs and pre-osteoblasts could be used for bone regeneration, the rate of regeneration in BM-MSCs-treated cavities was more significant (p<0.0001). Conclusion: The obtained results are probably attributable to the effective micro-environmental signals caused by different bone types and the rate of cell maturation. PMID:26889369

  13. Materials and prognostic factors of bone regeneration in periapical surgery: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Torres, Alba; Sánchez-Garcés, Maria Á

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Analyse the effectiveness of different materials and techniques used in guided tissue regeneration (GTR) applied in periapical surgery, comparing the success rate obtained in 4-wall defects and in through-and-through bone lesions as well as to establish prognostic factors. Material and Methods: A Cochrane, PubMed-MEDLINE and Scopus database search (October 2012 to March 2013) was conducted with the search terms “periapical surgery”, “surgical endodontic treatment”, “guided tissue regeneration”, “bone regeneration”, “bone grafts”, “barrier membranes” and “periapical lesions” individually and next, using the Boolean operator “AND”. The inclusion criteria were the use of GTR (bone graft and/or membrane barrier), clinical studies including at least 10 patients, 10 years aged articles published in English or French. The exclusion criteria were case reports and nonhuman studies. Results: 34 publications were selected from a total of 483. 9 of the 34 were excluded. Finally, the systematic review included 25 articles: 2 metaanalysis, 8 reviews, 13 prospective studies and 2 retrospective studies. They were stratified according to their level of scientific evidence using the SORT criteria. The 4-wall periapical and through-and-through lesions improve more their prognosis by combining bone grafts and barrier membranes than using these materials exclusively, respect to the control groups. The results show lower failure rates in 4-wall lesions than in through-and-through lesions using GTR. Conclusions: The combined GTR technique (filling material and membranes) obtains a greater success rate both in 4-wall lesions and in through-and-through lesions, respect to the control groups. The use of regeneration materials seems to be more necessary in through-and-through lesions,> 5mm lesions, lower teeth and apicomarginal lesions as they have the worst healing prognosis. In function of the articles scientific quality, a type B recommendation

  14. A living thick nanofibrous implant bifunctionalized with active growth factor and stem cells for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Eap, Sandy; Keller, Laetitia; Schiavi, Jessica; Huck, Olivier; Jacomine, Leandro; Fioretti, Florence; Gauthier, Christian; Sebastian, Victor; Schwinté, Pascale; Benkirane-Jessel, Nadia

    2015-01-01

    New-generation implants focus on robust, durable, and rapid tissue regeneration to shorten recovery times and decrease risks of postoperative complications for patients. Herein, we describe a new-generation thick nanofibrous implant functionalized with active containers of growth factors and stem cells for regenerative nanomedicine. A thick electrospun poly(ε-caprolactone) nanofibrous implant (from 700 μm to 1 cm thick) was functionalized with chitosan and bone morphogenetic protein BMP-7 as growth factor using layer-by-layer technology, producing fish scale-like chitosan/BMP-7 nanoreservoirs. This extracellular matrix-mimicking scaffold enabled in vitro colonization and bone regeneration by human primary osteoblasts, as shown by expression of osteocalcin, osteopontin, and bone sialoprotein (BSPII), 21 days after seeding. In vivo implantation in mouse calvaria defects showed significantly more newly mineralized extracellular matrix in the functionalized implant compared to a bare scaffold after 30 days' implantation, as shown by histological scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray microscopy study and calcein injection. We have as well bifunctionalized our BMP-7 therapeutic implant by adding human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The activity of this BMP-7-functionalized implant was again further enhanced by the addition of hMSCs to the implant (living materials), in vivo, as demonstrated by the analysis of new bone formation and calcification after 30 days' implantation in mice with calvaria defects. Therefore, implants functionalized with BMP-7 nanocontainers associated with hMSCs can act as an accelerator of in vivo bone mineralization and regeneration. PMID:25709432

  15. A living thick nanofibrous implant bifunctionalized with active growth factor and stem cells for bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Eap, Sandy; Keller, Laetitia; Schiavi, Jessica; Huck, Olivier; Jacomine, Leandro; Fioretti, Florence; Gauthier, Christian; Sebastian, Victor; Schwinté, Pascale; Benkirane-Jessel, Nadia

    2015-01-01

    New-generation implants focus on robust, durable, and rapid tissue regeneration to shorten recovery times and decrease risks of postoperative complications for patients. Herein, we describe a new-generation thick nanofibrous implant functionalized with active containers of growth factors and stem cells for regenerative nanomedicine. A thick electrospun poly(ε-caprolactone) nanofibrous implant (from 700 μm to 1 cm thick) was functionalized with chitosan and bone morphogenetic protein BMP-7 as growth factor using layer-by-layer technology, producing fish scale-like chitosan/BMP-7 nanoreservoirs. This extracellular matrix-mimicking scaffold enabled in vitro colonization and bone regeneration by human primary osteoblasts, as shown by expression of osteocalcin, osteopontin, and bone sialoprotein (BSPII), 21 days after seeding. In vivo implantation in mouse calvaria defects showed significantly more newly mineralized extracellular matrix in the functionalized implant compared to a bare scaffold after 30 days’ implantation, as shown by histological scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray microscopy study and calcein injection. We have as well bifunctionalized our BMP-7 therapeutic implant by adding human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The activity of this BMP-7-functionalized implant was again further enhanced by the addition of hMSCs to the implant (living materials), in vivo, as demonstrated by the analysis of new bone formation and calcification after 30 days’ implantation in mice with calvaria defects. Therefore, implants functionalized with BMP-7 nanocontainers associated with hMSCs can act as an accelerator of in vivo bone mineralization and regeneration. PMID:25709432

  16. Synthetic octacalcium phosphate: a possible carrier for mesenchymal stem cells in bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Osamu; Anada, Takahisa

    2013-01-01

    The present paper reviews biomaterial studies of synthetic octacalcium phosphate (OCP) as a scaffold of osteoblastic cells. OCP crystals have been suggested to be one of precursor phases in hydroxyapatite (HA) crystal formation in bone and tooth. The recent intensive biomaterials and tissue engineering studies using synthetic OCP disclosed the potential function of OCP as a bioactive material as well as synthetic HA materials due to its highly osteoconductive and biodegradable properties. In vitro studies showed that OCP crystals exhibit a positive effect on osteoblastic cell differentiation. In vivo studies confirmed that the materials of OCP in a granule forms and OCP-based composite materials with natural polymers, such as gelatin and collagen, enhance bone regeneration if implanted in various model bone defects with critical-sized diameters, defined as a defect which does not heal spontaneously throughout the lifetime of the animals. One of particular characteristics of OCP, found as a mechanism to enhance bone regeneration in vivo, is a process of progressive conversion from OCP to HA at physiological conditions. The OCP-HA conversion is accompanied by progressive physicochemical changes of the material properties, which affects the tissue reaction around the crystals where osteoblastic cells are encountered. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) seeded in an OCP-based material enhanced bone regeneration in the rat critical-sized calvaria defect more than that by the material alone. The overall results reveal that OCP crystals have an effect on osteoblastic cell differentiation including the differentiation of MSCs in vivo. The evidence collected experimentally in the laboratory was presented.

  17. Human iPSC-derived osteoblasts and osteoclasts together promote bone regeneration in 3D biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Ok Hee; Panicker, Leelamma M.; Lu, Qiaozhi; Chae, Jeremy J.; Feldman, Ricardo A.; Elisseeff, Jennifer H.

    2016-01-01

    Bone substitutes can be designed to replicate physiological structure and function by creating a microenvironment that supports crosstalk between bone and immune cells found in the native tissue, specifically osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) represent a powerful tool for bone regeneration because they are a source of patient-specific cells that can differentiate into all specialized cell types residing in bone. We show that osteoblasts and osteoclasts can be differentiated from hiPSC-mesenchymal stem cells and macrophages when co-cultured on hydroxyapatite-coated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/poly(L-lactic acid) (HA–PLGA/PLLA) scaffolds. Both cell types seeded on the PLGA/PLLA especially with 5% w/v HA recapitulated the tissue remodeling process of human bone via coupling signals coordinating osteoblast and osteoclast activity and finely tuned expression of inflammatory molecules, resulting in accelerated in vitro bone formation. Following subcutaneous implantation in rodents, co-cultured hiPSC-MSC/-macrophage on such scaffolds showed mature bone-like tissue formation. These findings suggest the importance of coupling matrix remodeling through osteoblastic matrix deposition and osteoclastic tissue resorption and immunomodulation for tissue development. PMID:27225733

  18. Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogels with Controlled Degradation Properties for Oriented Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, J; Siew, R; Herring, SW; Lin, ASP; Guldberg, R; Stayton, PS

    2010-01-01

    Non-healing fractures can result from trauma, disease, or age-related bone loss. While many treatments focus on restoring bone volume, few try to recapitulate bone organization. However, the native architecture of bone is optimized to provide its necessary mechanical properties. Hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogel scaffold systems with tunable degradation properties were developed for the controlled delivery of osteoinductive and angiogenic growth factors, thus affecting the quantity and quality of regenerated tissue. HA hydrogels were designed to degrade at fast, intermediate, and slow rates due to hydrolysis and further provided controlled release of cationic proteins due to electrostatic interactions. Scaffolds delivering bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) were evaluated in a rat calvarial bone critical size defect model. BMP-2 delivery from the HA hydrogels had a clear osteoinductive effect in vivo and, for all hydrogel types, BMP-2 delivery resulted in significant mineralization compared to control hydrogels. The temporal progression of this effect could be modulated by altering the degradation rate of the scaffold. All three degradation rates tested resulted in similar amounts of mineral formation at the latest (six week) time point examined. Interestingly, however, the fastest and slowest degrading scaffolds seemed to result in more organized bone than the intermediate degrading scaffold, which was designed to degrade in 6–8 weeks to match the healing time. Additionally, healing could be enhanced by co-delivery of vascular endothelial growth factor along with BMP-2. PMID:20573393

  19. Bone regeneration in strong porous bioactive glass (13–93) scaffolds with an oriented microstructure implanted in rat calvarial defects

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Rahaman, Mohamed N.; Fu, Qiang

    2012-01-01

    There is a need for synthetic bone graft substitutes to repair large bone defects resulting from trauma, malignancy, and congenital diseases. Bioactive glass has attractive properties as a scaffold material but factors that influence its ability to regenerate bone in vivo are not well understood. In the present work, the ability of strong porous scaffolds of 13–93 bioactive glass with an oriented microstructure to regenerate bone was evaluated in vivo using a rat calvarial defect model. Scaffolds with an oriented microstructure of columnar pores (porosity = 50%; pore diameter = 50–150 µm) showed mostly osteoconductive bone regeneration, and new bone formation, normalized to the available pore area (volume) of the scaffolds, increased from 37% at 12 weeks to 55% at 24 weeks. Scaffolds of the same glass with a trabecular microstructure (porosity = 80%; pore width = 100–500 µm), used as the positive control, showed bone regeneration in the pores of 25% and 46% at 12 and 24 weeks, respectively. The brittle mechanical response of the as-fabricated scaffolds changed markedly to an elasto-plastic response in vivo at both implantation times. These results indicate that both groups of 13–93 bioactive glass scaffolds could potentially be used to repair large bone defects, but scaffolds with the oriented microstructure could also be considered for the repair of loaded bone. PMID:22922251

  20. Large defect-tailored composite scaffolds for in vivo bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ronca, Alfredo; Guarino, Vincenzo; Raucci, Maria Grazia; Salamanna, Francesca; Martini, Lucia; Zeppetelli, Stefania; Fini, Milena; Kon, Elisaveta; Filardo, G; Marcacci, Maurilio; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2014-11-01

    The discovery of new strategies to repair large segmental bone defects is currently an open challenge for worldwide clinicians. In the treatment of critical-sized bone defects, an alternative strategy to traditional bone grafting is always more frequently the use of tailor-made scaffolds modelled on the final size and shape of the implant site. Here, poly-ε-caprolactone-based composite scaffolds including poly-L-lactic acid continuous fibres and hyaluronan derivates (i.e. HYAFF11®) have been investigated for the peculiar 3D architecture characterized by interconnected macroporous networks and tunable mechanical properties. Composite scaffolds were immersed in simulated body fluid solution in order to support in vivo tissue in-growth. Scaffolds loaded with autologous cells (bone marrow stromal cells) plus platelet-rich plasma and osteoconductive protein such bone morphogenetic protein-7 were also tested to evaluate eventual enhancement in bone regeneration. The morphological and mechanical properties of poly-L-lactic acid-reinforced composite scaffolds have been studied to identify the optimal scaffold design to match the implant-site requirements of sheep metatarsal defects. Dynamic mechanical tests allowed to underline the viscoelastic response of the scaffold - resulting in elastic moduli from 2.5 to 1.3 MPa, suitable to temporarily support the structural function of damaged bone tissue. In vivo preliminary investigations in a sheep model of metatarsus shaft defect also showed the attitude of the scaffold to promote osteogenesis, preferentially in association with bone marrow stromal cell and platelet-rich plasma, even if the highest amount of mature bone was reached in the case of scaffold loaded with human bone morphogenetic protein-7 released via hydrolytic degradation of HYAFF11® phases in the implant site.

  1. Vertical bone augmentation procedures: basics and techniques in dental implantology.

    PubMed

    Draenert, F G; Huetzen, D; Neff, A; Mueller, W E G

    2014-05-01

    An appropriate bony situation is essential for dental implant placement and bony support of soft tissues (pink esthetic). Loss of teeth often results in complex horizontal and vertical alveolar ridge defects. They demand advanced bone augmentation techniques for reconstruction. We present the different techniques and materials used in complex bone augmentation. Clinical cases show the application of the methods in the clinical setting. We present current techniques and materials used in complex bone augmentations. Clinical cases show the application of the methods in the clinical setting. Applied techniques include stabilized-guided bone regeneration (GBR), autologous local block augmentation, modified techniques such as Gellrich shell technique including piezosurgery, pelvic bone blocks, complex materials such as graft-derived bone blocks and their unique handling problems. Successful basic principles are reduction of cortical bone healing due to long remodeling time and possible late loss; extended application of materials with interconnecting porous system and particulate material resulting in fast healing analogous to cancellous bone; mechanical stabilization of the augmentation to allow bony healing in vertical defect situations. GBR and autologous bone blocks with minimal cortical thickness and a high volume of particulated material are most favorable techniques.

  2. High strength bioactive glass-ceramic scaffolds for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara; Baino, Francesco; Verné, Enrica

    2009-02-01

    This research work is focused on the preparation of macroporous glass-ceramic scaffolds with high mechanical strength, equivalent with cancellous bone. The scaffolds were prepared using an open-cells polyurethane sponge as a template and glass powders belonging to the system SiO(2)-P(2)O(5)-CaO-MgO-Na(2)O-K(2)O. The glass, named as CEL2, was synthesized by a conventional melting-quenching route, ground and sieved to obtain powders of specific size. A slurry of CEL2 powders, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as a binder and water was prepared in order to coat, by a process of impregnation, the polymeric template. A thermal treatment was then used to remove the sponge and to sinter the glass powders, in order to obtain a replica of the template structure. The scaffolds were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction analysis, morphological observations, density measurements, volumetric shrinkage, image analysis, capillarity tests, mechanical tests and in vitro bioactivity evaluation.

  3. Bone marrow stromal/stem cell-derived extracellular vesicles regulate osteoblast activity and differentiation in vitro and promote bone regeneration in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yunhao; Wang, Lian; Gao, Zhengliang; Chen, Genyin; Zhang, Changqing

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that extracellular vesicles (EVs) are secreted by diverse tissues and play important roles in cell-cell communication, organ interactions and tissue homeostasis. Studies have reported the use of EVs to stimulate tissue regeneration, such as hepatic cell regeneration, and to treat diseases, such as pulmonary hypertension. However, little is known about the osteogenic effect of EVs. In this study, we explore the role of bone marrow stromal cell-derived EVs in the regulation of osteoblast activity and bone regeneration. We isolated bone marrow stromal/stem cell (BMSC)-derived EVs through gradient ultracentrifugation and ultrafiltration, and tested the influence of the EVs on osteogenesis both in vivo and in vitro. The results indicated that EVs positively regulated osteogenic genes and osteoblastic differentiation but did not inhibit proliferation in vitro. Furthermore, we constructed an EVs delivery system to stimulate bone formation in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats with calvarial defects. We found that BMSC-derived EVs led to more bone formation in the critical-size calvarial bone defects. Moreover, we found that miR-196a plays an essential role in the regulation of osteoblastic differentiation and the expression of osteogenic genes. We anticipate that our assay using bone marrow stromal cell-derived EVs will become a valuable tool for promoting bone regeneration. PMID:26911789

  4. Combination of simvastatin, calcium silicate/gypsum, and gelatin and bone regeneration in rabbit calvarial defects

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Huiming; Shi, Jue; Wang, Ying; Lai, Kaichen; Yang, Xianyan; Chen, Xiaoyi; Yang, Guoli

    2016-01-01

    The present study was performed to determine whether simvastatin improves bone regeneration when combined with calcium silicate/gypsum and gelatin (CS-GEL). The surface morphology was determined using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FSEM). Degradation in vitro was evaluated by monitoring the weight change of the composites soaked in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Drug release was evaluated using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Cytotoxicity testing was performed to assess the biocompatibility of composites. Four 5 mm-diameter bone defects were created in rabbit calvaria. Three sites were filled with CS-GEL, 0.5 mg simvastatin-loaded CS-GEL (SIM-0.5) and 1.0 mg simvastatin-loaded CS-GEL (SIM-1.0), respectively, and the fourth was left empty as the control group. Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and histological analysis were carried out at 4 and 12 weeks postoperatively. The composites all exhibited three-dimensional structures and showed the residue with nearly 80% after 4 weeks of immersion. Drug release was explosive on the first day and then the release rate remained stable. The composites did not induce any cytotoxicity. The results in vivo demonstrated that the new bone formation and the expressions of BMP-2, OC and type I collagen were improved in the simvastatin-loaded CS-GEL group. It was concluded that the simvastatin-loaded CS-GEL may improve bone regeneration. PMID:26996657

  5. Combination of simvastatin, calcium silicate/gypsum, and gelatin and bone regeneration in rabbit calvarial defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Huiming; Shi, Jue; Wang, Ying; Lai, Kaichen; Yang, Xianyan; Chen, Xiaoyi; Yang, Guoli

    2016-03-01

    The present study was performed to determine whether simvastatin improves bone regeneration when combined with calcium silicate/gypsum and gelatin (CS-GEL). The surface morphology was determined using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FSEM). Degradation in vitro was evaluated by monitoring the weight change of the composites soaked in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Drug release was evaluated using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Cytotoxicity testing was performed to assess the biocompatibility of composites. Four 5 mm-diameter bone defects were created in rabbit calvaria. Three sites were filled with CS-GEL, 0.5 mg simvastatin-loaded CS-GEL (SIM-0.5) and 1.0 mg simvastatin-loaded CS-GEL (SIM-1.0), respectively, and the fourth was left empty as the control group. Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and histological analysis were carried out at 4 and 12 weeks postoperatively. The composites all exhibited three-dimensional structures and showed the residue with nearly 80% after 4 weeks of immersion. Drug release was explosive on the first day and then the release rate remained stable. The composites did not induce any cytotoxicity. The results in vivo demonstrated that the new bone formation and the expressions of BMP-2, OC and type I collagen were improved in the simvastatin-loaded CS-GEL group. It was concluded that the simvastatin-loaded CS-GEL may improve bone regeneration.

  6. Combination of simvastatin, calcium silicate/gypsum, and gelatin and bone regeneration in rabbit calvarial defects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Huiming; Shi, Jue; Wang, Ying; Lai, Kaichen; Yang, Xianyan; Chen, Xiaoyi; Yang, Guoli

    2016-01-01

    The present study was performed to determine whether simvastatin improves bone regeneration when combined with calcium silicate/gypsum and gelatin (CS-GEL). The surface morphology was determined using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FSEM). Degradation in vitro was evaluated by monitoring the weight change of the composites soaked in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Drug release was evaluated using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Cytotoxicity testing was performed to assess the biocompatibility of composites. Four 5 mm-diameter bone defects were created in rabbit calvaria. Three sites were filled with CS-GEL, 0.5 mg simvastatin-loaded CS-GEL (SIM-0.5) and 1.0 mg simvastatin-loaded CS-GEL (SIM-1.0), respectively, and the fourth was left empty as the control group. Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and histological analysis were carried out at 4 and 12 weeks postoperatively. The composites all exhibited three-dimensional structures and showed the residue with nearly 80% after 4 weeks of immersion. Drug release was explosive on the first day and then the release rate remained stable. The composites did not induce any cytotoxicity. The results in vivo demonstrated that the new bone formation and the expressions of BMP-2, OC and type I collagen were improved in the simvastatin-loaded CS-GEL group. It was concluded that the simvastatin-loaded CS-GEL may improve bone regeneration. PMID:26996657

  7. Bone cement with a modified polyphosphate network structure stimulates hard tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Hyun; Hong, Min-Ho; Kim, Min-Chul; Kwon, Jae-Sung; Ko, Yeong-Mu; Choi, Heon-Jin; Lee, Yong-Keun

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a calcium polyphosphate cement (CpPC) consisting of basic components was investigated to assess its potential for hard tissue regeneration. The added basic components for improving the structural stability, which controlled the setting time, where the setting reaction resulted in the formation of amorphous structure with a re-constructed polyphosphate. Moreover, the characteristics were controlled by the composition, which determined the polyphosphate structure. CpPC exhibited outstanding dissolution rate compared with the common biodegradable cement, brushite cement (2.5 times). Despite high amounts of dissolution products, no significant cytotoxicity ensued. Induction of calcification in MG-63 cells treated with CpPC, the level of calcification increased with increasing CpPC dissolution rate. Induced calcification was observed also in CpPC-treated ST2 cells, in contrast with MG-63 and ST2 treated with brushite cement, for which no calcification was observed. In vivo tests using a rat calvarial defect model showed that resorbed CpPC resulted in favorable host responses and promoted bone formation. Additionally, there was a significant increase in defect closure, and new bone formation progressed from CpPC mid-sites as well as defect margins. From these results, CpPC exhibits significant potential as biodegradable bone substitute for bone regeneration. PMID:27511981

  8. Bone regeneration in calvarial defects in a rat model by implantation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cell spheroids.

    PubMed

    Suenaga, Hideyuki; Furukawa, Katsuko S; Suzuki, Yukako; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Ushida, Takashi

    2015-11-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) condensation contributes to membrane ossification by enhancing their osteodifferentiation. We investigated bone regeneration in rats using the human bone marrow-derived MSC-spheroids prepared by rotation culture, without synthetic or exogenous biomaterials. Bilateral calvarial defects (8 mm) were created in nude male rats; the left-sided defects were implanted with MSC-spheroids, β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) granules, or β-TCP granules + MSC-spheroids, while the right-sided defects served as internal controls. Micro-computed tomography and immunohistochemical staining for osteocalcin/osteopontin indicated formation of new, full-thickness bones at the implantation sites, but not at the control sites in the MSC-spheroid group. Raman spectroscopy revealed similarity in the spectral properties of the repaired bone and native calvarial bone. Mechanical performance of the bones in the MSC-implanted group was good (50 and 60% those of native bones, respectively). All tests showed poor bone regeneration in the β-TCP and β-TCP + MSC-spheroid groups. Thus, significant bone regeneration was achieved with MSC-spheroid implantation into bone defects, justifying further investigation.

  9. Effect of bioactive borate glass microstructure on bone regeneration, angiogenesis, and hydroxyapatite conversion in a rat calvarial defect model.

    PubMed

    Bi, Lianxiang; Rahaman, Mohamed N; Day, Delbert E; Brown, Zackary; Samujh, Christopher; Liu, Xin; Mohammadkhah, Ali; Dusevich, Vladimir; Eick, J David; Bonewald, Lynda F

    2013-08-01

    Borate bioactive glasses are biocompatible and enhance new bone formation, but the effect of their microstructure on bone regeneration has received little attention. In this study scaffolds of borate bioactive glass (1393B3) with three different microstructures (trabecular, fibrous, and oriented) were compared for their capacity to regenerate bone in a rat calvarial defect model. 12weeks post-implantation the amount of new bone, mineralization, and blood vessel area in the scaffolds were evaluated using histomorphometric analysis and scanning electron microscopy. The amount of new bone formed was 33%, 23%, and 15%, respectively, of the total defect area for the trabecular, oriented, and fibrous microstructures. In comparison, the percent new bone formed in implants composed of silicate 45S5 bioactive glass particles (250-300μm) was 19%. Doping the borate glass with copper (0.4 wt.% CuO) had little effect on bone regeneration in the trabecular and oriented scaffolds, but significantly enhanced bone regeneration in the fibrous scaffolds (from 15 to 33%). The scaffolds were completely converted to hydroxyapatite within the 12week implantation. The amount of hydroxyapatite formed, 22%, 35%, and 48%, respectively, for the trabecular, oriented, and fibrous scaffolds, increased with increasing volume fraction of glass in the as-fabricated scaffold. Blood vessels infiltrated into all the scaffolds, but the trabecular scaffolds had a higher average blood vessel area compared with the oriented and fibrous scaffolds. While all three scaffold microstructures were effective in supporting bone regeneration, the trabecular scaffolds supported more bone formation and may be more promising in bone repair.

  10. Biodegradation, biocompatibility, and osteoconduction evaluation of collagen-nanohydroxyapatite cryogels for bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Salgado, Christiane Laranjo; Grenho, Liliana; Fernandes, Maria Helena; Colaço, Bruno Jorge; Monteiro, Fernando Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Designing biomimetic biomaterials inspired by the natural complex structure of bone and other hard tissues is still a challenge nowadays. The control of the biomineralization process onto biomaterials should be evaluated before clinical application. Aiming at bone regeneration applications, this work evaluated the in vitro biodegradation and interaction between human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSC) cultured on different collagen/nanohydroxyapatite cryogels. Cell proliferation, differentiation, morphology, and metabolic activity were assessed through different protocols. All the biocomposite materials allowed physiologic apatite deposition after incubation in simulated body fluid and the cryogel with the highest nanoHA content showed to have the highest mechanical strength (DMA). The study clearly showed that the highest concentration of nanoHA granules on the cryogels were able to support cell type's survival, proliferation, and individual functionality in a monoculture system, for 21 days. In fact, the biocomposites were also able to differentiate HBMSCs into osteoblastic phenotype. The composites behavior was also assessed in vivo through subcutaneous and bone implantation in rats to evaluate its tissue-forming ability and degradation rate. The cryogels Coll/nanoHA (30 : 70) promoted tissue regeneration and adverse reactions were not observed on subcutaneous and bone implants. The results achieved suggest that scaffolds of Coll/nanoHA (30 : 70) should be considered promising implants for bone defects that present a grotto like appearance with a relatively small access but a wider hollow inside. This material could adjust to small dimensions and when entering into the defect, it could expand inside and remain in close contact with the defect walls, thus ensuring adequate osteoconductivity.

  11. Comparative Evaluation of Nanofibrous Scaffolding for Bone Regeneration in Critical-Size Calvarial Defects

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Kyung Mi; Chen, Victor J.; Jung, Hong-Moon; Kim, Tae-Il; Shin, Hong-In; Baek, Jeong-Hwa; Ryoo, Hyun-Mo

    2009-01-01

    In a previous study we found that nanofibrous poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) scaffolds mimicking collagen fibers in size were superior to solid-walled scaffolds in promoting osteoblast differentiation and bone formation in vitro. In this study we used an in vivo model to confirm the biological properties of nanofibrous PLLA scaffolds and to evaluate how effectively they support bone regeneration against solid-walled scaffolds. The scaffolds were implanted in critical-size defects made on rat calvarial bones. Compared with solid-walled scaffolds, nanofibrous scaffolds supported substantially more new bone tissue formation, which was confirmed by micro-computed tomography measurement and von Kossa staining. Goldner's trichrome staining showed abundant collagen deposition in nanofibrous scaffolds but not in the control solid-walled scaffolds. The cells in these scaffolds were immuno-stained strongly for Runx2 and bone sialoprotein (BSP). In contrast, solid-walled scaffolds implanted in the defects were stained weakly with trichrome, Runx2, and BSP. These in vivo results demonstrate that nanofibrous architecture enhances osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. PMID:19348597

  12. Bone regeneration after surgical repositioning of impacted mandibular second molars: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shipper, Guy; Thomadakis, George

    2003-04-01

    A case is presented where the mesially impacted mandibular second molar teeth were surgically uprighted in an 11-year-old female patient. Bone regeneration is shown in the areas occupied by the impacted second molars with maturation of bone and cortication of the crest of the alveolar bone. The probing depths are also normal with no residual bony defects. This healing was achieved with no bone grafting procedure, emphasizing two important factors: to prevent/minimize any trauma to the tissues at the site of elevation and uprighting of the tooth (i.e. maintaining viable periodontal ligament cells and minimal cementum damage); and to obtain primary closure whilst allowing the tissue in the mesial defect to reorganize against the scaffold of bone. However, the procedure on the one side was complicated with necrosis and infection of the pulp space with external inflammatory root resorption. Endodontic therapy of this tooth proved to be successful with periradicular healing radiographically and re-establishment of the lamina dura. At the 3-year follow-up, the endodontically treated tooth showed no clinical and radiographic signs of pathology. The left second mandibular molar had no pulpal or periodontal postsurgical complications, which may be attributed to apparently more open apices allowing for pulp revascularization after manipulation at the time of surgery. This report illustrates unassisted wound healing that occurs in the area of uprighting with complete reconstitution of periodontal anatomy without additional regenerative procedures to augment bone.

  13. Periodontal bone regeneration in intrabony defects using osteoconductive bone graft versus combination of osteoconductive and osteostimulative bone graft: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Anushi; Kedige, Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bone loss is one of the hallmarks of periodontitis. Hence, a major focus of research into periodontal regeneration has concentrated on the initiation of Osteogenesis. Osteoinduction requires the differentiation of mesenchymal cells into osteoblasts with subsequent formation of new bone. The present study has been carried out to evaluate periodontal bone regeneration in intrabony defects using osteostimulative oleaginous calcium hydroxide suspension Osteora® (Metacura, Germany) in combination with osteoconductive bone graft Ossifi™ (Equinox Medical Technologies, Holland). Materials and Methods: A total of 22 sites in patients within the age range of 25-50 years, with intrabony defects were selected and divided into two groups (Group A and Group B) by using the split-mouth design technique. All the selected sites were assessed with the clinical parameters such as - Plaque Index, Gingival Index, Sulcus Bleeding Index, Periodontal Probing Depth, Clinical Attachment Level, Gingival Recession and radiographic parameter to assess the amount of Defect Fill. Mann-Whitey U-test and Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test has been used to find the significance of study parameters on continuous scale for the comparison between the mesial and distal bone levels. P < 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: Osteora® in combination with osteoconductive Ossifi™ showed better regenerative potential and more significant amount of bone fill in periodontal intrabony defects than when Ossifi™ was used alone (P = 0.039). Conclusion: Osteora® can be used as an adjunct to osteoconductive bone grafts, as an osteo-stimulating agent in the treatment of periodontal intrabony defects. PMID:25709671

  14. Extracorporeal shockwave enhanced regeneration of fibrocartilage in a delayed tendon-bone insertion repair model.

    PubMed

    Chow, Dick Ho Kiu; Suen, Pui Kit; Huang, Le; Cheung, Wing-Hoi; Leung, Kwok-Sui; Ng, Chun; Shi, San Qiang; Wong, Margaret Wan Nar; Qin, Ling

    2014-04-01

    Fibrous tissue is often formed in delayed healing of tendon bone insertion (TBI) instead of fibrocartilage. Extracorporeal shockwave (ESW) provides mechanical cues and upregulates expression of fibrocartilage-related makers and cytokines. We hypothesized that ESW would accelerate fibrocartilage regeneration at the healing interface in a delayed TBI healing model. Partial patellectomy with shielding at the TBI interface was performed on 32 female New Zealand White Rabbits for establishing this delayed TBI healing model. The rabbits were separated into the control and ESW group for evaluations at postoperative week 8 and 12. Shielding was removed at week 4 and a single ESW treatment was applied at week 6. Fibrocartilage regeneration was evaluated histomorphologically and immunohistochemically. Vickers hardness of the TBI matrix was measured by micro-indentation. ESW group showed higher fibrocartilage area, thickness, and proteoglycan deposition than the control in week 8 and 12. ESW increased expression of SOX9 and collagen II significantly in week 8 and 12, respectively. ESW group showed a gradual transition of hardness from bone to fibrocartilage to tendon, and had a higher Vickers hardness than the control group at week 12. In conclusion, ESW enhanced fibrocartilage regeneration at the healing interface in a delayed TBI healing model.

  15. Bone Regeneration of Rat Tibial Defect by Zinc-Tricalcium Phosphate (Zn-TCP) Synthesized from Porous Foraminifera Carbonate Macrospheres

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Joshua; Hao, Jia; Kuroda, Shinji; Bishop, David; Ben-Nissan, Besim; Milthorpe, Bruce; Otsuka, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    Foraminifera carbonate exoskeleton was hydrothermally converted to biocompatible and biodegradable zinc-tricalcium phosphate (Zn-TCP) as an alternative biomimetic material for bone fracture repair. Zn-TCP samples implanted in a rat tibial defect model for eight weeks were compared with unfilled defect and beta-tricalcium phosphate showing accelerated bone regeneration compared with the control groups, with statistically significant bone mineral density and bone mineral content growth. CT images of the defect showed restoration of cancellous bone in Zn-TCP and only minimal growth in control group. Histological slices reveal bone in-growth within the pores and porous chamber of the material detailing good bone-material integration with the presence of blood vessels. These results exhibit the future potential of biomimetic Zn-TCP as bone grafts for bone fracture repair. PMID:24351911

  16. Differentiation of rabbit bone mesenchymal stem cells into endothelial cells in vitro and promotion of defective bone regeneration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinzhong; Liu, Chao; Sun, Bin; Shi, Ce; Qiao, Chunyan; Ke, Xiaoliang; Liu, Shutai; Liu, Xia; Sun, Hongchen

    2014-04-01

    Tissue engineering strategies often fail to regenerate bones because of inadequate vascularization, especially in the reconstruction of large segmental bone defects. Large volumes of vascular endothelial cells (ECs) that functionally interact with osteoblasts during osteogenesis are difficult to obtain. In this study, we simulated bone healing by co-culturing differentiated ECs and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) either on a culture plate or on a polylactide glycolic acid (PLGA) scaffold in vitro. We also evaluated the effect of osteogenesis in repairing rabbit mandible defects in vivo. In this study, MSCs were separated from rabbit as the seed cells. After passage, the MSCs were cultured in an EC-conditioned medium to differentiate into ECs. Immunohistochemical staining analysis with CD34 showed that the induced cells had the characteristics of ECs and MSC. The induced ECs were co-cultured in vitro, and the induction of MSCs to osteoblast served as the control. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and alizarin red (AZR) staining experiments were performed, and the Coomassie brilliant blue total protein and ALP activity were measured. The MSCs proliferated and differentiated into osteoblast-like cells through direct contact between the derived ECs and MSCs. The co-cultured cells were seeded on PLGA scaffold to repair 1 cm mandible defects in the rabbit. The effectiveness of the repairs was assessed through soft X-ray and histological analyses. The main findings indicated that MSCs survived well on the scaffold and that the scaffold is biocompatible and noncytotoxic. The results demonstrated that the co-cultured MSC-derived ECs improved MSC osteogenesis and promoted new bone formation. This study may serve as a basis for the use of in vitro co-culturing techniques as an improvisation to bone tissue engineering for the repair of large bone defects.

  17. Membranes for Periodontal Regeneration--A Materials Perspective.

    PubMed

    Bottino, Marco C; Thomas, Vinoy

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disorder affecting nearly 50% of adults in the United States. If left untreated, it can lead to the destruction of both soft and mineralized tissues that constitute the periodontium. Clinical management, including but not limited to flap debridement and/or curettage, as well as regenerative-based strategies with periodontal membranes associated or not with grafting materials, has been used with distinct levels of success. Unquestionably, no single implantable biomaterial can consistently guide the coordinated growth and development of multiple tissue types, especially in very large periodontal defects. With the global aging population, it is extremely important to find novel biomaterials, particularly bioactive membranes and/or scaffolds, for guided tissue (GTR) and bone regeneration (GBR) to aid in the reestablishment of the health and function of distinct periodontal tissues. This chapter offers an update on the evolution of biomaterials (i.e. membranes and bioactive scaffolds) as well as material-based strategies applied in periodontal regeneration. The authors start by providing a brief summary of the histological characteristics and functions of the periodontium and its main pathological condition, namely periodontitis. Next, a review of commercially available GTR/GBR membranes is given, followed by a critical appraisal of the most recent advances in the development of bioactive materials that enhance the chance for clinical success of periodontal tissue regeneration.

  18. Surface chemistry and effects on bone regeneration of a novel biomimetic synthetic bone filler.

    PubMed

    Morra, Marco; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Sartori, Maria; Ferrari, Andrea; Parrilli, Annapaola; Bollati, Daniele; Baena, Ruggero Rodriguez Y; Cassinelli, Clara; Fini, Milena

    2015-04-01

    The paper presents results of physico-chemical and biological investigations of a surface-engineered synthetic bone filler. Surface analysis confirms that the ceramic phosphate granules present a collagen nanolayer to the surrounding environment. Cell cultures tests show that, in agreement with literature reports, surface-immobilized collagen molecular cues can stimulate progression along the osteogenic pathway of undifferentiated human mesenchymal cells. Finally, in vivo test in a rabbit model of critical bone defects shows statistically significant increase of bone volume and mineral apposition rate between the biomimetic bone filler and collagen-free control. All together, obtained data confirm that biomolecular surface engineering can upgrade the properties of implant device, by promoting more specific and targeted implant-host cells interactions.

  19. Lyophilized platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) promotes craniofacial bone regeneration through Runx2.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Reed, David A; Min, Liu; Gopinathan, Gokul; Li, Steve; Dangaria, Smit J; Li, Leo; Geng, Yajun; Galang, Maria-Therese; Gajendrareddy, Praveen; Zhou, Yanmin; Luan, Xianghong; Diekwisch, Thomas G H

    2014-05-14

    Freeze-drying is an effective means to control scaffold pore size and preserve its composition. The purpose of the present study was to determine the applicability of lyophilized Platelet-rich fibrin (LPRF) as a scaffold for craniofacial tissue regeneration and to compare its biological effects with commonly used fresh Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF). LPRF caused a 4.8-fold±0.4-fold elevation in Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) expression in alveolar bone cells, compared to a 3.6-fold±0.2-fold increase when using fresh PRF, and a more than 10-fold rise of alkaline phosphatase levels and mineralization markers. LPRF-induced Runx2 expression only occurred in alveolar bone and not in periodontal or dental follicle cells. LPRF also caused a 1.6-fold increase in osteoblast proliferation (p<0.001) when compared to fresh PRF. When applied in a rat craniofacial defect model for six weeks, LPRF resulted in 97% bony coverage of the defect, compared to 84% for fresh PRF, 64% for fibrin, and 16% without scaffold. Moreover, LPRF thickened the trabecular diameter by 25% when compared to fresh PRF and fibrin, and only LPRF and fresh PRF resulted in the formation of interconnected trabeculae across the defect. Together, these studies support the application of lyophilized PRF as a biomimetic scaffold for craniofacial bone regeneration and mineralized tissue engineering.

  20. Functionalization of a Collagen-Hydroxyapatite Scaffold with Osteostatin to Facilitate Enhanced Bone Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, Elaine; Thompson, Emmet M; Matsiko, Amos; O'Brien, Fergal J; López-Noriega, Adolfo

    2015-12-01

    Defects within bones caused by trauma and other pathological complications may often require the use of a range of therapeutics to facilitate tissue regeneration. A number of approaches have been widely utilized for the delivery of such therapeutics via physical encapsulation or chemical immobilization suggesting significant promise in the healing of bone defects. The study focuses on the chemical immobilization of osteostatin, a pentapeptide of the parathyroid hormone (PTHrP107-111), within a collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffold. The chemical attachment method via crosslinking supports as little as 4% release of the peptide from the scaffolds after 21 d whereas non-crosslinking leads to 100% of the peptide being released by as early as 4 d. In vitro characterization demonstrates that this cross-linking method of immobilization supports a pro-osteogenic effect on osteoblasts. Most importantly, when implanted in a critical-sized calvarial defect within a rat, these scaffolds promote significantly greater new bone volume and area compared to nonfunctionalized scaffolds (**p < 0.01) and an empty defect control (***p < 0.001). Collectively, this study suggests that such an approach of chemical immobilization offers greater spatiotemporal control over growth factors and can significantly modulate tissue regeneration. Such a system may be adopted for a range of different proteins and thus offers the potential for the treatment of various complex pathologies that require localized mediation of drug delivery.

  1. Lyophilized platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) promotes craniofacial bone regeneration through Runx2.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Reed, David A; Min, Liu; Gopinathan, Gokul; Li, Steve; Dangaria, Smit J; Li, Leo; Geng, Yajun; Galang, Maria-Therese; Gajendrareddy, Praveen; Zhou, Yanmin; Luan, Xianghong; Diekwisch, Thomas G H

    2014-01-01

    Freeze-drying is an effective means to control scaffold pore size and preserve its composition. The purpose of the present study was to determine the applicability of lyophilized Platelet-rich fibrin (LPRF) as a scaffold for craniofacial tissue regeneration and to compare its biological effects with commonly used fresh Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF). LPRF caused a 4.8-fold±0.4-fold elevation in Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) expression in alveolar bone cells, compared to a 3.6-fold±0.2-fold increase when using fresh PRF, and a more than 10-fold rise of alkaline phosphatase levels and mineralization markers. LPRF-induced Runx2 expression only occurred in alveolar bone and not in periodontal or dental follicle cells. LPRF also caused a 1.6-fold increase in osteoblast proliferation (p<0.001) when compared to fresh PRF. When applied in a rat craniofacial defect model for six weeks, LPRF resulted in 97% bony coverage of the defect, compared to 84% for fresh PRF, 64% for fibrin, and 16% without scaffold. Moreover, LPRF thickened the trabecular diameter by 25% when compared to fresh PRF and fibrin, and only LPRF and fresh PRF resulted in the formation of interconnected trabeculae across the defect. Together, these studies support the application of lyophilized PRF as a biomimetic scaffold for craniofacial bone regeneration and mineralized tissue engineering. PMID:24830554

  2. The application of induced pluripotent stem cells for bone regeneration: current progress and prospects.

    PubMed

    Teng, Songsong; Liu, Chaoxu; Krettek, Christian; Jagodzinski, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Loss of healthy bone tissue and dysosteogenesis are still common and significant problems in clinics. Cell-based therapy using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been performed in patients for quite some time, but the inherent drawbacks of these cells, such as the reductions in proliferation rate and osteogenic differentiation potential that occur with aging, greatly limit their further application. Moreover, embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have brought new hope to osteoregenerative medicine because of their full pluripotent differentiation potential and excellent performance in bone regeneration. However, the ethical issues involved in destroying human embryos and the immune reactions that occur after transplantation are two major stumbling blocks impeding the clinical application of ESCs. Instead, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), which are ESC-like pluripotent cells that are reprogrammed from adult somatic cells using defined transcription factors, are considered a more promising source of cells for regenerative medicine because they present no ethical or immunological issues. Here, we summarize the primary technologies for generating iPSCs and the biological properties of these cells, review the current advances in iPSC-based bone regeneration and, finally, discuss the remaining challenges associated with these cells, particularly safety issues and their potential application for osteoregenerative medicine.

  3. The Use of Micro- and Nanospheres as Functional Components for Bone Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huanan; Leeuwenburgh, Sander C.G.; Li, Yubao

    2012-01-01

    During the last decade, the use of micro- and nanospheres as functional components for bone tissue regeneration has drawn increasing interest. Scaffolds comprising micro- and nanospheres display several advantages compared with traditional monolithic scaffolds that are related to (i) an improved control over sustained delivery of therapeutic agents, signaling biomolecules and even pluripotent stem cells, (ii) the introduction of spheres as stimulus-sensitive delivery vehicles for triggered release, (iii) the use of spheres to introduce porosity and/or improve the mechanical properties of bulk scaffolds by acting as porogen or reinforcement phase, (iv) the use of spheres as compartmentalized microreactors for dedicated biochemical processes, (v) the use of spheres as cell delivery vehicle, and, finally, (vi) the possibility of preparing injectable and/or moldable formulations to be applied by using minimally invasive surgery. This article focuses on recent developments with regard to the use of micro- and nanospheres for bone regeneration by categorizing micro-/nanospheres by material class (polymers, ceramics, and composites) as well as summarizing the main strategies that employ these spheres to improve the functionality of scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. PMID:21806489

  4. Transcript-activated collagen matrix as sustained mRNA delivery system for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Badieyan, Zohreh Sadat; Berezhanskyy, Taras; Utzinger, Maximilian; Aneja, Manish Kumar; Emrich, Daniela; Erben, Reinhold; Schüler, Christiane; Altpeter, Philipp; Ferizi, Mehrije; Hasenpusch, Günther; Rudolph, Carsten; Plank, Christian

    2016-10-10

    Transcript therapies using chemically modified messenger RNAs (cmRNAs) are emerging as safe and promising alternatives for gene and recombinant protein therapies. However, their applications have been limited due to transient translation and relatively low stability of cmRNAs compared to DNA. Here we show that vacuum-dried cmRNA-loaded collagen sponges, termed transcript activated matrices (TAMs), can serve as depots for sustained delivery of cmRNA. TAMs provide steady state protein production for up to six days, and substantial residual expression until 11days post transfection. Another advantage of this technology was nearly 100% transfection efficiency as well as low toxicity in vitro. TAMs were stable for at least 6months at room temperature. Human BMP-2-encoding TAMs induced osteogenic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells in vitro and bone regeneration in a non-critical rat femoral bone defect model in vivo. In summary, TAMs are a promising tool for bone regeneration and potentially also for other applications in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. PMID:27586186

  5. Tuning dual-drug release from composite scaffolds for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Paris, J L; Román, J; Manzano, M; Cabañas, M V; Vallet-Regí, M

    2015-01-01

    This work presents the tuning of drug-loaded scaffolds for bone regeneration as dual-drug delivery systems. Two therapeutic substances, zoledronic acid (anti-osteoporotic drug) and ibuprofen (anti-inflammatory drug) were successfully incorporated in a controlled manner into three dimensional designed porous scaffolds of apatite/agarose composite. A high-performance liquid chromatography method was optimized to separate and simultaneously quantify the two drugs released from the dual-drug codelivery system. The multifunctional porous scaffolds fabricated show a very rapid delivery of anti-inflammatory (interesting to reduce inflammation after implantation), whereas the anti-osteoporotic drug showed sustained release behaviour (important to promote bone regeneration). Since ibuprofen release was faster than desired, this drug was encapsulated in chitosan spheres which were then incorporated into the scaffolds, obtaining a release profile suitable for clinical application. The results obtained open the possibility to simultaneously incorporate two or more drugs to an osseous implant in a controlled way improving it for bone healing application. PMID:25814035

  6. Lyophilized Platelet-Rich Fibrin (PRF) Promotes Craniofacial Bone Regeneration through Runx2

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qi; Reed, David A.; Min, Liu; Gopinathan, Gokul; Li, Steve; Dangaria, Smit J.; Li, Leo; Geng, Yajun; Galang, Maria-Therese; Gajendrareddy, Praveen; Zhou, Yanmin; Luan, Xianghong; Diekwisch, Thomas G. H.

    2014-01-01

    Freeze-drying is an effective means to control scaffold pore size and preserve its composition. The purpose of the present study was to determine the applicability of lyophilized Platelet-rich fibrin (LPRF) as a scaffold for craniofacial tissue regeneration and to compare its biological effects with commonly used fresh Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF). LPRF caused a 4.8-fold ± 0.4-fold elevation in Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) expression in alveolar bone cells, compared to a 3.6-fold ± 0.2-fold increase when using fresh PRF, and a more than 10-fold rise of alkaline phosphatase levels and mineralization markers. LPRF-induced Runx2 expression only occurred in alveolar bone and not in periodontal or dental follicle cells. LPRF also caused a 1.6-fold increase in osteoblast proliferation (p < 0.001) when compared to fresh PRF. When applied in a rat craniofacial defect model for six weeks, LPRF resulted in 97% bony coverage of the defect, compared to 84% for fresh PRF, 64% for fibrin, and 16% without scaffold. Moreover, LPRF thickened the trabecular diameter by 25% when compared to fresh PRF and fibrin, and only LPRF and fresh PRF resulted in the formation of interconnected trabeculae across the defect. Together, these studies support the application of lyophilized PRF as a biomimetic scaffold for craniofacial bone regeneration and mineralized tissue engineering. PMID:24830554

  7. Selective laser melting-produced porous titanium scaffolds regenerate bone in critical size cortical bone defects.

    PubMed

    Van der Stok, Johan; Van der Jagt, Olav P; Amin Yavari, Saber; De Haas, Mirthe F P; Waarsing, Jan H; Jahr, Holger; Van Lieshout, Esther M M; Patka, Peter; Verhaar, Jan A N; Zadpoor, Amir A; Weinans, Harrie

    2013-05-01

    Porous titanium scaffolds have good mechanical properties that make them an interesting bone substitute material for large bone defects. These scaffolds can be produced with selective laser melting, which has the advantage of tailoring the structure's architecture. Reducing the strut size reduces the stiffness of the structure and may have a positive effect on bone formation. Two scaffolds with struts of 120-µm (titanium-120) or 230-µm (titanium-230) were studied in a load-bearing critical femoral bone defect in rats. The defect was stabilized with an internal plate and treated with titanium-120, titanium-230, or left empty. In vivo micro-CT scans at 4, 8, and 12 weeks showed more bone in the defects treated with scaffolds. Finally, 18.4 ± 7.1 mm(3) (titanium-120, p = 0.015) and 18.7 ± 8.0 mm(3) (titanium-230, p = 0.012) of bone was formed in those defects, significantly more than in the empty defects (5.8 ± 5.1 mm(3) ). Bending tests on the excised femurs after 12 weeks showed that the fusion strength reached 62% (titanium-120) and 45% (titanium-230) of the intact contralateral femurs, but there was no significant difference between the two scaffolds. This study showed that in addition to adequate mechanical support, porous titanium scaffolds facilitate bone formation, which results in high mechanical integrity of the treated large bone defects.

  8. Injectable Hydrogel Composite Based Gelatin-PEG and Biphasic Calcium Phosphate Nanoparticles for Bone Regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van, Thuy Duong; Tran, Ngoc Quyen; Nguyen, Dai Hai; Nguyen, Cuu Khoa; Tran, Dai Lam; Nguyen, Phuong Thi

    2016-05-01

    Gelatin hydrogels have recently attracted much attention for tissue regeneration because of their biocompatibility. In this study, we introduce poly-ethylene glycol (PEG)—grafted gelatin containing tyramine moieties which have been utilized for in situ enzyme-mediated hydrogel preparation. The hydrogel can be used to load nanoparticles of biphasic calcium phosphate, a mixture of hydroxyapatite and β-tricalcium phosphate, and forming injectable bio-composites. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectra indicated that tyramine-functionalized polyethylene glycol-nitrophenyl carbonate ester was conjugated to the gelatin. The hydrogel composite was rapidly formed in situ (within a few seconds) in the presence of horseradish peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide. In vitro experiments with bio-mineralization on the hydrogel composite surfaces was well-observed after 2 weeks soaking in simulated body fluid solution. The obtained results indicated that the hydrogel composite could be a potential injectable material for bone regeneration.

  9. Role of Nanog in the maintenance of marrow stromal stem cells during post natal bone regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Bais, Manish V.; Shabin, Zabrina M.; Young, Megan; Einhorn, Thomas A.; Kotton, Darrell N.; Gerstnefeld, Louis C.

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog is related to marrow stromal stem cell maintenance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increasing Nanog expression is seen during post natal surgical bone repair. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog knockdown decreases post surgical bone regeneration. -- Abstract: Post natal bone repair elicits a regenerative mechanism that restores the injured tissue to its pre-injury cellular composition and structure and is believed to recapitulate the embryological processes of bone formation. Prior studies showed that Nanog, a central epigenetic regulator associated with the maintenance of embryonic stem cells (ESC) was transiently expressed during fracture healing, Bais et al. . In this study, we show that murine bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) before they are induced to undergo osteogenic differentiation express {approx}50 Multiplication-Sign the background levels of Nanog seen in murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and the W20-17 murine marrow stromal cell line stably expresses Nanog at {approx}80 Multiplication-Sign the MEF levels. Nanog expression in this cell line was inhibited by BMP7 treatment and Nanog lentivrial shRNA knockdown induced the expression of the terminal osteogenic gene osteocalcin. Lentivrial shRNA knockdown or lentiviral overexpression of Nanog in bone MSCs had inverse effects on proliferation, with knockdown decreasing and overexpression increasing MSC cell proliferation. Surgical marrow ablation of mouse tibia by medullary reaming led to a {approx}3-fold increase in Nanog that preceded osteogenic differentiation during intramembranous bone formation. Lentiviral shRNA knockdown of Nanog after surgical ablation led to an initial overexpression of osteogenic gene expression with no initial effect on bone formation but during subsequent remodeling of the newly formed bone a {approx}50% decrease was seen in the expression of terminal osteogenic gene expression and a {approx}50% loss in trabecular bone mass. This

  10. Osteogenic differentiation of amniotic fluid mesenchymal stromal cells and their bone regeneration potential.

    PubMed

    Pipino, Caterina; Pandolfi, Assunta

    2015-05-26

    In orthopedics, tissue engineering approach using stem cells is a valid line of treatment for patients with bone defects. In this context, mesenchymal stromal cells of various origins have been extensively studied and continue to be a matter of debate. Although mesenchymal stromal cells from bone marrow are already clinically applied, recent evidence suggests that one may use mesenchymal stromal cells from extra-embryonic tissues, such as amniotic fluid, as an innovative and advantageous resource for bone regeneration. The use of cells from amniotic fluid does not raise ethical problems and provides a sufficient number of cells without invasive procedures. Furthermore, they do not develop into teratomas when transplanted, a consequence observed with pluripotent stem cells. In addition, their multipotent differentiation ability, low immunogenicity, and anti-inflammatory properties make them ideal candidates for bone regenerative medicine. We here present an overview of the features of amniotic fluid mesenchymal stromal cells and their potential in the osteogenic differentiation process. We have examined the papers actually available on this regard, with particular interest in the strategies applied to improve in vitro osteogenesis. Importantly, a detailed understanding of the behavior of amniotic fluid mesenchymal stromal cells and their osteogenic ability is desirable considering a feasible application in bone regenerative medicine.

  11. Regeneration of alveolar bone following surgical and non-surgical periodontal treatment.

    PubMed

    Isidor, F; Attström, R; Karring, T

    1985-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the regeneration of alveolar bone following surgical and non-surgical periodontal treatment. A total of 16 patients who had advanced periodontitis and demonstrated angular bony defects on radiographs participated in the study. After the initial examination, they received instruction in oral hygiene and had their teeth thoroughly scaled. When the individual patient at 2 succeeding appointments had plaque on less than 20% of the tooth surfaces, one maxillary and one mandibular quadrant was treated with the modified Widman flap procedure while one of the remaining quadrants was treated with the reverse bevel flap procedure. The last quadrant was treated with root planing under local anesthesia. None of these procedures included bone contouring. Following treatment, the patients were recalled every 2 weeks for professional tooth cleaning. Radiographs taken 12 months following treatment revealed that only minor changes in the bone level had occurred in areas with horizontal bone loss following the various treatment modalities. Following the modified Widman flap procedure, however, a statistically significant coronal regrowth of bone (0.5 mm) had occurred in angular bony defects. The majority of the angular bony defects persisted following all 3 treatment modalities.

  12. Apatite-mineralized polycaprolactone nanofibrous web as a bone tissue regeneration substrate.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hye-Sun; Jang, Jun-Hyeog; Kim, Tae-Il; Lee, Hae-Hyoung; Kim, Hae-Won

    2009-03-01

    Degradable synthetic polymers with a nanofibrous structure have shown great promise in populating and recruiting cells for the reconstruction of damaged tissues. However, poor cell affinity and lack of bioactivity have limited their potential usefulness in bone regeneration. We produced polymeric nanofiber poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) with its surface mineralized with bone-like apatite for use as bone regenerative and tissue engineering matrices. PCL was first electrospun into a nanofibrous web, and the surface was further mineralized with apatite following a series of solution treatments. The surface of the mineralized PCL nanofiber was observed to be almost fully covered with nanocrystalline apatites. Through mineralization, the wettability of the nanofiber matrix was greatly improved. Moreover, the murine-derived osteoblastic cells were shown to attach and grow actively on the apatite-mineralized nanofibrous substrate. In particular, the mineralized PCL nanofibrous substrate significantly stimulated the expression of bone-associated genes, including Runx2, collagen type I, alkaline phosphatase, and osteocalcin, when compared with the pure PCL nanofiber substrate without mineralization. The currently developed polymer nanofibrous web with the bioactive mineralized surface is considered to be potentially useful as bone regenerative and tissue engineering matrices.

  13. Evaluation of the Effect of Plasma Rich in Growth Factors (PRGF) on Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Paknejad, M.; Shayesteh, Y. Soleymani; Yaghobee, S.; Shariat, S.; Dehghan, M.; Motahari, P.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Reconstruction methods are an essential prerequisite for functional rehabilitation of the stomatognathic system. Plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) offers a new and potentially useful adjunct to bone substitute materials in bone reconstructive surgery. This study was carried out to investigate the influence of PRGF and fibrin membrane on regeneration of bony defects with and without deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM) on rabbit calvaria. Materials and Methods: Twelve New Zealand white rabbits were included in this randomized, blinded, prospective study. Four equal 3.3×6.6 mm cranial bone defects were created and immediately grafted with DBBM, PRGF+DBBM, PRGF+fibrin membrane and no treatment as control. The defects were evaluated with histologic and histomorphometric analysis performed 4 and 8 weeks later. Results: Adding PRGF to DBBM led to increased bone formation as compared with the control group in 4- and 8-week intervals. In DBBM and PRGF+fibrin membrane samples, no significant increase was seen compared to the control group. There was also a significant increase in the rate of biodegradation of DBBM particles with the addition of PRGF in the 8-week interval. Neither noticeable foreign body reaction nor any severe inflammation was seen in each of the specimens evaluated. Conclusion: Under the limitation of this study, adding PRGF to DBBM enhanced osteogenesis in rabbit calvarias. Applying autologous fibrin membrane in the defects was not helpful. PMID:22924103

  14. Osteogenic differentiation of amniotic fluid mesenchymal stromal cells and their bone regeneration potential

    PubMed Central

    Pipino, Caterina; Pandolfi, Assunta

    2015-01-01

    In orthopedics, tissue engineering approach using stem cells is a valid line of treatment for patients with bone defects. In this context, mesenchymal stromal cells of various origins have been extensively studied and continue to be a matter of debate. Although mesenchymal stromal cells from bone marrow are already clinically applied, recent evidence suggests that one may use mesenchymal stromal cells from extra-embryonic tissues, such as amniotic fluid, as an innovative and advantageous resource for bone regeneration. The use of cells from amniotic fluid does not raise ethical problems and provides a sufficient number of cells without invasive procedures. Furthermore, they do not develop into teratomas when transplanted, a consequence observed with pluripotent stem cells. In addition, their multipotent differentiation ability, low immunogenicity, and anti-inflammatory properties make them ideal candidates for bone regenerative medicine. We here present an overview of the features of amniotic fluid mesenchymal stromal cells and their potential in the osteogenic differentiation process. We have examined the papers actually available on this regard, with particular interest in the strategies applied to improve in vitro osteogenesis. Importantly, a detailed understanding of the behavior of amniotic fluid mesenchymal stromal cells and their osteogenic ability is desirable considering a feasible application in bone regenerative medicine. PMID:26029340

  15. Functional regeneration of ligament-bone interface using a triphasic silk-based graft.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongguo; Fan, Jiabing; Sun, Liguo; Liu, Xincheng; Cheng, Pengzhen; Fan, Hongbin

    2016-11-01

    The biodegradable silk-based scaffold with unique mechanical property and biocompatibility represents a favorable ligamentous graft for tissue-engineering anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. However, the low efficiency of ligament-bone interface restoration barriers the isotropic silk graft to common ACL therapeutics. To enhance the regeneration of the silk-mediated interface, we developed a specialized stratification approach implementing a sequential modification on isotropic silk to constitute a triphasic silk-based graft in which three regions respectively referring to ligament, cartilage and bone layers of interface were divided, followed by respective biomaterial coating. Furthermore, three types of cells including bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs), chondrocytes and osteoblasts were respectively seeded on the ligament, cartilage and bone region of the triphasic silk graft, and the cell/scaffold complex was rolled up as a multilayered graft mimicking the stratified structure of native ligament-bone interface. In vitro, the trilineage cells loaded on the triphasic silk scaffold revealed a high proliferative capacity as well as enhanced differentiation ability into their corresponding cell lineage. 24 weeks postoperatively after the construct was implanted to repair the ACL defect in rabbit model, the silk-based ligamentous graft exhibited the enhancement of osseointegration detected by a robust pullout force and formation of three-layered structure along with conspicuously corresponding matrix deposition via micro-CT and histological analysis. These findings potentially broaden the application of silk-based ligamentous graft for ACL reconstruction and further large animal study. PMID:27566867

  16. Boon and Bane of Inflammation in Bone Tissue Regeneration and Its Link with Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Bleek, Katharina; Kwee, Brian J; Mooney, David J; Duda, Georg N

    2015-08-01

    Delayed healing or nonhealing of bone is an important clinical concern. Although bone, one of the two tissues with scar-free healing capacity, heals in most cases, healing is delayed in more than 10% of clinical cases. Treatment of such delayed healing condition is often painful, risky, time consuming, and expensive. Tissue healing is a multistage regenerative process involving complex and well-orchestrated steps, which are initiated in response to injury. At best, these steps lead to scar-free tissue formation. At the onset of healing, during the inflammatory phase, stationary and attracted macrophages and other immune cells at the fracture site release cytokines in response to injury. This initial reaction to injury is followed by the recruitment, proliferation, and differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells, synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins, angiogenesis, and finally tissue remodeling. Failure to heal is often associated with poor revascularization. Since blood vessels mediate the transport of circulating cells, oxygen, nutrients, and waste products, they appear essential for successful healing. The strategy of endogenous regeneration in a tissue such as bone is interesting to analyze since it may represent a blueprint of successful tissue formation. This review highlights the interdependency of the time cascades of inflammation, angiogenesis, and tissue regeneration. A better understanding of these inter-relations is mandatory to early identify patients at risk as well as to overcome critical clinical conditions that limit healing. Instead of purely tolerating the inflammatory phase, modulations of inflammation (immunomodulation) might represent a valid therapeutic strategy to enhance angiogenesis and foster later phases of tissue regeneration.

  17. In Vivo Bone Regeneration Using Tubular Perfusion System Bioreactor Cultured Nanofibrous Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Yeatts, Andrew B.; Both, Sanne K.; Yang, Wanxun; Alghamdi, Hamdan S.; Yang, Fang; Jansen, John A.

    2014-01-01

    The use of bioreactors for the in vitro culture of constructs for bone tissue engineering has become prevalent as these systems may improve the growth and differentiation of a cultured cell population. Here we utilize a tubular perfusion system (TPS) bioreactor for the in vitro culture of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and implant the cultured constructs into rat femoral condyle defects. Using nanofibrous electrospun poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/poly(ɛ-caprolactone) scaffolds, hMSCs were cultured for 10 days in vitro in the TPS bioreactor with cellular and acellular scaffolds cultured statically for 10 days as a control. After 3 and 6 weeks of in vivo culture, explants were removed and subjected to histomorphometric analysis. Results indicated more rapid bone regeneration in defects implanted with bioreactor cultured scaffolds with a new bone area of 1.23±0.35 mm2 at 21 days compared to 0.99±0.43 mm2 and 0.50±0.29 mm2 in defects implanted with statically cultured scaffolds and acellular scaffolds, respectively. At the 21 day timepoint, statistical differences (p<0.05) were only observed between defects implanted with cell containing scaffolds and the acellular control. After 42 days, however, defects implanted with TPS cultured scaffolds had the greatest new bone area with 1.72±0.40 mm2. Defects implanted with statically cultured and acellular scaffolds had a new bone area of 1.26±0.43 mm2 and 1.19±0.33 mm2, respectively. The increase in bone growth observed in defects implanted with TPS cultured scaffolds was statistically significant (p<0.05) when compared to both the static and acellular groups at this timepoint. This study demonstrates the efficacy of the TPS bioreactor to improve bone tissue regeneration and highlights the benefits of utilizing perfusion bioreactor systems to culture MSCs for bone tissue engineering. PMID:23865551

  18. Histopathological features of bone regeneration in a canine segmental ulnar defect model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Today, finding an ideal biomaterial to treat the large bone defects, delayed unions and non-unions remains a challenge for orthopaedic surgeions and researchers. Several studies have been carried out on the subject of bone regeneration, each having its own advantages. The present study has been designed in vivo to evaluate the effects of cellular auto-transplantation of tail vertebrae on healing of experimental critical bone defect in a dog model. Methods Six indigenous breeds of dog with 32 ± 3.6 kg average weight from both sexes (5 males and 1 female) received bilateral critical-sized ulnar segmental defects. After determining the health condition, divided to 2 groups: The Group I were kept as control I (n = 1) while in Group II (experimental group; n = 5) bioactive bone implants were inserted. The defects were implanted with either autogeneic coccygeal bone grafts in dogs with 3-4 cm diaphyseal defects in the ulna. Defects were stabilized with internal plate fixation, and the control defects were not stabilized. Animals were euthanized at 16 weeks and analyzed by histopathology. Results Histological evaluation of this new bone at sixteen weeks postoperatively revealed primarily lamellar bone, with the formation of new cortices and normal-appearing marrow elements. And also reformation cortical compartment and reconstitution of marrow space were observed at the graft-host interface together with graft resorption and necrosis responses. Finally, our data were consistent with the osteoconducting function of the tail autograft. Conclusions Our results suggested that the tail vertebrae autograft seemed to be a new source of autogenous cortical bone in order to supporting segmental long bone defects in dogs. Furthermore, cellular autotransplantation was found to be a successful replacement for the tail vertebrae allograft bone at 3-4 cm segmental defects in the canine mid- ulna. Clinical application using graft expanders or bone

  19. High-intensity Nd:YAG laser accelerates bone regeneration in calvarial defect models.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwansik; Kim, In Sook; Cho, Tae Hyung; Seo, Young-Kwon; Hwang, Soon Jung

    2015-08-01

    High-power pulsed lasers have been recently regarded to be anabolic to bone, but in vivo evidence is still lacking. This study aimed to investigate the capacity of bone repair using a high-power, Q-switched, pulsed, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd:YAG) laser, using bilateral calvarial defect models having non-critical sized, 5 mm (rat) or 8 mm (rabbit) diameter. One of the bilateral defects, which were all filled with collagen sponge or left empty, was irradiated with a Nd:YAG laser once every 2 days for 2 weeks at a constant total fluence rate (344 J/cm(2) ), output power (0.75 W), pulse repetition rate (15 pps) and wavelength (1064 nm) and examined for the laser effect. The same experimental scheme was designed using a rabbit calvarial defect model implanted with sponge, which was explored for the dose effect of output power at 0.75 and 3 W with the same quantities of the other parameters. New bone formation was evaluated by micro-computed tomography-based analysis and histological observation at 4 weeks after surgery. Laser irradiation significantly increased new bone formation by approximately 45%, not only in the sponge-filled defects of rats but also when the defects were left empty, compared to the non-irradiated group. Consistently, both doses of output power (0.75 and 3 W) enhanced new bone formation, but there was no significant difference between the two doses. This study is one of the first to demonstrate the beneficial effect of Nd:YAG lasers on the regeneration of bone defects which were left empty or filled with collagen sponge, suggesting its great potential in postoperative treatment targeting local bone healing.

  20. Polycaprolactone nanofiber interspersed collagen type-I scaffold for bone regeneration: a unique injectable osteogenic scaffold.

    PubMed

    Baylan, Nuray; Bhat, Samerna; Ditto, Maggie; Lawrence, Joseph G; Lecka-Czernik, Beata; Yildirim-Ayan, Eda

    2013-08-01

    promoting osteoblast phenotype progression for bone regeneration. PMID:23804651

  1. Structure and functional interaction of the extracellular domain of human GABA(B) receptor GBR2.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yong; Xiong, Dazhi; Mosyak, Lidia; Malito, David L; Kniazeff, Julie; Chen, Yan; Burmakina, Svetlana; Quick, Matthias; Bush, Martin; Javitch, Jonathan A; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Fan, Qing R

    2012-06-03

    Inhibitory neurotransmission is mediated primarily by GABA. The metabotropic GABA(B) receptor is a G protein-coupled receptor central to mammalian brain function. Malfunction of GABA(B) receptor has been implicated in several neurological disorders. GABA(B) receptor functions as a heterodimeric assembly of GBR1 and GBR2 subunits, where GBR1 is responsible for ligand-binding and GBR2 is responsible for G protein coupling. Here we demonstrate that the GBR2 ectodomain directly interacts with the GBR1 ectodomain to increase agonist affinity by selectively stabilizing the agonist-bound conformation of GBR1. We present the crystal structure of the GBR2 ectodomain, which reveals a polar heterodimeric interface. We also identify specific heterodimer contacts from both subunits, and GBR1 residues involved in ligand recognition. Lastly, our structural and functional data indicate that the GBR2 ectodomain adopts a constitutively open conformation, suggesting a structural asymmetry in the active state of GABA(B) receptor that is unique to the GABAergic system.

  2. Structure and functional interaction of the extracellular domain of human GABAB receptor GBR2

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Yong; Xiong, Dazhi; Mosyak, Lidia; Malito, David L.; Kniazeff, Julie; Chen, Yan; Burmakina, Svetlana; Quick, Matthias; Bush, Martin; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Fan, Qing R.

    2012-01-01

    Inhibitory neurotransmission is mediated primarily by GABA. Metabotropic GABAB receptor is a G protein coupled receptor central to mammalian brain function. Malfunction of GABAB receptor has been implicated in a number of neurological disorders. GABAB receptor functions as a heterodimeric assembly of GBR1 and GBR2 subunits, where GBR1 is responsible for ligand-binding and GBR2 is responsible for G protein coupling. Here we demonstrate that the GBR2 ectodomain directly interacts with the GBR1 ectodomain to increase agonist affinity by selectively stabilizing the agonist-bound conformation of GBR1. We present the crystal structure of the GBR2 ectodomain, which reveals a polar heterodimeric interface. We also identify specific heterodimer contacts from both subunits, and GBR1 residues involved in ligand recognition. Lastly, our structural and functional data indicate that the GBR2 ectodomain adopts a constitutively open conformation, suggesting a structural asymmetry in the active state of GABAB receptor that is unique to the GABAergic system. PMID:22660477

  3. Surface delivery of tunable doses of BMP-2 from an adaptable polymeric scaffold induces volumetric bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bouyer, Michael; Guillot, Raphael; Lavaud, Jonathan; Plettinx, Cedric; Olivier, Cécile; Curry, Véronique; Boutonnat, Jean; Coll, Jean-Luc; Peyrin, Françoise; Josserand, Véronique; Bettega, Georges; Picart, Catherine

    2016-10-01

    The rapid and effective bone regeneration of large non-healing defects remains challenging. Bioactive proteins, such as bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2, are proved their osteoinductivity, but their clinical use is currently limited to collagen as biomaterial. Being able to deliver BMP-2 from any other biomaterial would broaden its clinical use. This work presents a novel means for repairing a critical size volumetric bone femoral defect in the rat by combining a osteoinductive surface coating (2D) to a polymeric scaffold (3D hollow tube) made of commercially-available PLGA. Using a polyelectrolyte film as BMP-2 carrier, we tune the amount of BMP-2 loaded in and released from the polyelectrolyte film coating over a large extent by controlling the film crosslinking level and initial concentration of BMP-2 in solution. Using microcomputed tomography and quantitative analysis of the regenerated bone growth kinetics, we show that the amount of newly formed bone and kinetics can be modulated: an effective and fast repair was obtained in 1-2 weeks in the best conditions, including complete defect bridging, formation of vascularized and mineralized bone tissue. Histological staining and high-resolution computed tomography revealed the presence of bone regeneration inside and around the tube with spatially distinct organization for trabecular-like and cortical bones. The amount of cortical bone and its thickness increased with the BMP-2 dose. In view of the recent developments in additive manufacturing techniques, this surface-coating technology may be applied in combination with various types of polymeric or metallic scaffolds to offer new perspectives of bone regeneration in personalized medicine. PMID:27454063

  4. Surface delivery of tunable doses of BMP-2 from an adaptable polymeric scaffold induces volumetric bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bouyer, Michael; Guillot, Raphael; Lavaud, Jonathan; Plettinx, Cedric; Olivier, Cécile; Curry, Véronique; Boutonnat, Jean; Coll, Jean-Luc; Peyrin, Françoise; Josserand, Véronique; Bettega, Georges; Picart, Catherine

    2016-10-01

    The rapid and effective bone regeneration of large non-healing defects remains challenging. Bioactive proteins, such as bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2, are proved their osteoinductivity, but their clinical use is currently limited to collagen as biomaterial. Being able to deliver BMP-2 from any other biomaterial would broaden its clinical use. This work presents a novel means for repairing a critical size volumetric bone femoral defect in the rat by combining a osteoinductive surface coating (2D) to a polymeric scaffold (3D hollow tube) made of commercially-available PLGA. Using a polyelectrolyte film as BMP-2 carrier, we tune the amount of BMP-2 loaded in and released from the polyelectrolyte film coating over a large extent by controlling the film crosslinking level and initial concentration of BMP-2 in solution. Using microcomputed tomography and quantitative analysis of the regenerated bone growth kinetics, we show that the amount of newly formed bone and kinetics can be modulated: an effective and fast repair was obtained in 1-2 weeks in the best conditions, including complete defect bridging, formation of vascularized and mineralized bone tissue. Histological staining and high-resolution computed tomography revealed the presence of bone regeneration inside and around the tube with spatially distinct organization for trabecular-like and cortical bones. The amount of cortical bone and its thickness increased with the BMP-2 dose. In view of the recent developments in additive manufacturing techniques, this surface-coating technology may be applied in combination with various types of polymeric or metallic scaffolds to offer new perspectives of bone regeneration in personalized medicine.

  5. Development of porous polyurethane/strontium-substituted hydroxyapatite composites for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sariibrahimoglu, Kemal; Yang, Wanxun; Leeuwenburgh, Sander C G; Yang, Fang; Wolke, Joop G C; Zuo, Yi; Li, Yubao; Jansen, John A

    2015-06-01

    Polyurethane (PU) has been widely used for the biomedical applications but its potential for bone regeneration is limited due to its lack of osteoconductive properties. Strontium substituted hydroxyapatite (SrHA) particles, on the other hand, are known to exhibit a positive effect on bone formation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to (i) develop porous polyurethane scaffolds containing strontium SrHA nanoparticles (PU/SrHA) and (ii) compare their in vitro biological performance for applications in bone regeneration to PU scaffolds. SrHA and HA was synthesized using a conventional wet-chemical neutralization reaction at temperatures of 25, 50, and 80°C. Chemical analysis was performed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry. Synthesizing temperatures at 25 and at 50°C were selected for the composite preparation (abbreviated as HA-25, SrHA-25, HA-50, and SrHA-50, respectively). PU was synthesized from isophorone diisocyanate, polytetramethylene ether glycol, and 1,4-butanediol. Composite scaffolds were prepared by addition of HA or SrHA nanoparticles into PU scaffolds during polymer preparation. The results showed that the Sr content in HA nanoparticles increased with increasing synthesis temperature. The addition of nanoparticles decreased the elongation-at-break and tensile strength, but significantly increased the surface wettability of the PU scaffolds. In vitro degradation tests demonstrated that release of cations was significantly higher from PU/SrHA-50 composite scaffolds. Cell culture tests indicated that PU composites containing either HA or SrHA nanoparticles increased proliferation of bone marrow stem cells as compared to plain PU scaffolds, whereas osteogenic differentiation was not affected by the incorporation of HA nanoparticles irrespective of the incorporation of Sr.

  6. Microsphere-based scaffolds encapsulating tricalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vineet; Lyne, Dina V; Barragan, Marilyn; Berkland, Cory J; Detamore, Michael S

    2016-07-01

    Bioceramic mixtures of tricalcium phosphate (TCP) and hydroxyapatite (HAp) are widely used for bone regeneration because of their excellent cytocompatibility, osteoconduction, and osteoinduction. Therefore, we hypothesized that incorporation of a mixture of TCP and HAp in microsphere-based scaffolds would enhance osteogenesis of rat bone marrow stromal cells (rBMSCs) compared to a positive control of scaffolds with encapsulated bone-morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2). Poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microsphere-based scaffolds encapsulating TCP and HAp mixtures in two different ratios (7:3 and 1:1) were fabricated with the same net ceramic content (30 wt%) to evaluate how incorporation of these ceramic mixtures would affect the osteogenesis in rBMSCs. Encapsulation of TCP/HAp mixtures impacted microsphere morphologies and the compressive moduli of the scaffolds. Additionally, TCP/HAp mixtures enhanced the end-point secretion of extracellular matrix components relevant to bone tissue compared to the "blank" (PLGA-only) microsphere-based scaffolds as evidenced by the biochemical, gene expression, histology, and immunohistochemical characterization. Moreover, the TCP/HAp mixture groups even surpassed the BMP-2 positive control group in some instances in terms of matrix synthesis and gene expression. Lastly, gene expression data suggested that the rBMSCs responded differently to different TCP/HAp ratios presented to them. Altogether, it can be concluded that TCP/HAp mixtures stimulated the differentiation of rBMSCs toward an osteoblastic phenotype, and therefore may be beneficial in gradient microsphere-based scaffolds for osteochondral regeneration. PMID:27272903

  7. Development of porous polyurethane/strontium-substituted hydroxyapatite composites for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sariibrahimoglu, Kemal; Yang, Wanxun; Leeuwenburgh, Sander C G; Yang, Fang; Wolke, Joop G C; Zuo, Yi; Li, Yubao; Jansen, John A

    2015-06-01

    Polyurethane (PU) has been widely used for the biomedical applications but its potential for bone regeneration is limited due to its lack of osteoconductive properties. Strontium substituted hydroxyapatite (SrHA) particles, on the other hand, are known to exhibit a positive effect on bone formation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to (i) develop porous polyurethane scaffolds containing strontium SrHA nanoparticles (PU/SrHA) and (ii) compare their in vitro biological performance for applications in bone regeneration to PU scaffolds. SrHA and HA was synthesized using a conventional wet-chemical neutralization reaction at temperatures of 25, 50, and 80°C. Chemical analysis was performed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry. Synthesizing temperatures at 25 and at 50°C were selected for the composite preparation (abbreviated as HA-25, SrHA-25, HA-50, and SrHA-50, respectively). PU was synthesized from isophorone diisocyanate, polytetramethylene ether glycol, and 1,4-butanediol. Composite scaffolds were prepared by addition of HA or SrHA nanoparticles into PU scaffolds during polymer preparation. The results showed that the Sr content in HA nanoparticles increased with increasing synthesis temperature. The addition of nanoparticles decreased the elongation-at-break and tensile strength, but significantly increased the surface wettability of the PU scaffolds. In vitro degradation tests demonstrated that release of cations was significantly higher from PU/SrHA-50 composite scaffolds. Cell culture tests indicated that PU composites containing either HA or SrHA nanoparticles increased proliferation of bone marrow stem cells as compared to plain PU scaffolds, whereas osteogenic differentiation was not affected by the incorporation of HA nanoparticles irrespective of the incorporation of Sr. PMID:25203691

  8. Ectopic bone regeneration by human bone marrow mononucleated cells, undifferentiated and osteogenically differentiated bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in beta-tricalcium phosphate scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xinhai; Yin, Xiaofan; Yang, Dawei; Tan, Jian; Liu, Guangpeng

    2012-07-01

    case at 8 weeks. Overall, this study suggests that ectopic osteogenesis of cell/scaffold composites is more dependent on the in vitro expansion condition, and osteo-differentiated BMSCs hold the highest potential concerning in vivo bone regeneration.

  9. Human Urine Derived Stem Cells in Combination with β-TCP Can Be Applied for Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Junjie; Zhang, Jieyuan; Li, Haiyan; Zhu, Zhenzhong; Guo, Shangchun; Niu, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering requires highly proliferative stem cells that are easy to isolate. Human urine stem cells (USCs) are abundant and can be easily harvested without using an invasive procedure. In addition, in our previous studies, USCs have been proved to be able to differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes. Therefore, USCs may have great potential and advantages to be applied as a cell source for tissue engineering. However, there are no published studies that describe the interactions between USCs and biomaterials and applications of USCs for bone tissue engineering. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the interactions between USCs with a typical bone tissue engineering scaffold, beta-Tricalcium Phosphate (β-TCP), and to determine whether the USCs seeded onto β-TCP scaffold can promote bone regeneration in a segmental femoral defect of rats. Primary USCs were isolated from urine and seeded on β-TCP scaffolds. Results showed that USCs remained viable and proliferated within β-TCP. The osteogenic differentiation of USCs within the scaffolds was demonstrated by increased alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium content. Furthermore, β-TCP with adherent USCs (USCs/β-TCP) were implanted in a 6-mm critical size femoral defect of rats for 12 weeks. Bone regeneration was determined using X-ray, micro-CT, and histologic analyses. Results further demonstrated that USCs in the scaffolds could enhance new bone formation, which spanned bone defects in 5 out of 11 rats while β-TCP scaffold alone induced modest bone formation. The current study indicated that the USCs can be used as a cell source for bone tissue engineering as they are compatible with bone tissue engineering scaffolds and can stimulate the regeneration of bone in a critical size bone defect. PMID:25970295

  10. Three-Dimensional Printing of Hollow-Struts-Packed Bioceramic Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yongxiang; Zhai, Dong; Huan, Zhiguang; Zhu, Haibo; Xia, Lunguo; Chang, Jiang; Wu, Chengtie

    2015-11-01

    Three-dimensional printing technologies have shown distinct advantages to create porous scaffolds with designed macropores for application in bone tissue engineering. However, until now, 3D-printed bioceramic scaffolds only possessing a single type of macropore have been reported. Generally, those scaffolds with a single type of macropore have relatively low porosity and pore surfaces, limited delivery of oxygen and nutrition to surviving cells, and new bone tissue formation in the center of the scaffolds. Therefore, in this work, we present a useful and facile method for preparing hollow-struts-packed (HSP) bioceramic scaffolds with designed macropores and multioriented hollow channels via a modified coaxial 3D printing strategy. The prepared HSP scaffolds combined high porosity and surface area with impressive mechanical strength. The unique hollow-struts structures of bioceramic scaffolds significantly improved cell attachment and proliferation and further promoted formation of new bone tissue in the center of the scaffolds, indicating that HSP ceramic scaffolds can be used for regeneration of large bone defects. In addition, the strategy can be used to prepare other HSP ceramic scaffolds, indicating a universal application for tissue engineering, mechanical engineering, catalysis, and environmental materials.

  11. Comparison of platelet rich plasma and synthetic graft material for bone regeneration after third molar extraction

    PubMed Central

    Nathani, Dipesh B.; Sequeira, Joyce; Rao, B. H. Sripathi

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To compare the efficacy of Platelet rich plasma and synthetic graft material for bone regeneration after bilateral third molar extraction. Material and Methods: This study was conducted in 10 patients visiting the outpatient department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Yenepoya Dental College & Hospital. Patients requiring extraction of bilateral mandibular third molars were taken for the study. Following extraction, PRP (Platelet Rich Plasma) was placed in one extraction socket and synthetic graft material in form granules [combination of Hydroxyapatite (HA) and Bioactive glass (BG)] in another extraction socket. The patients were assessed for postoperative pain and soft tissue healing. Radiological assessment of the extraction site was done at 8, 12 and 16 weeks interval to compare the change in bone density in both the sockets. Results: Pain was less on PRP site when compared to HA site. Soft tissue evaluation done using gingival healing index given by Landry et al showed better healing on PRP site when compared to HA site. The evaluation of bone density by radiological assessment showed the grey level values calculated at 4 months at the PRP site were comparatively higher than HA site. Conclusion: The study showed that the platelet rich plasma is a better graft material than synthetic graft material in terms of soft tissue and bone healing. However a more elaborate study with a larger number of clinical cases is very much essential to be more conclusive regarding the efficacy of both the materials. PMID:26981473

  12. Lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal as factor of oxidative homeostasis supporting bone regeneration with bioactive glasses.

    PubMed

    Mrakovcic, Lidija; Wildburger, Renate; Jaganjac, Morana; Cindric, Marina; Cipak, Ana; Borovic-Sunjic, Suzana; Waeg, Georg; Milankovic, Andrea M; Zarkovic, Neven

    2010-01-01

    Bone regeneration is a process of vital importance since fractures of long bones and large joints have a highly deleterious impact on both, individuals and society. Numerous attempts have been undertaken to alleviate this severe medical and social problem by development of novel bioactive materials, among which bioactive glass is the most attractive because of its osteoconductive and osteostimulative properties. Since lipid peroxidation is an important component of systematic stress response in patients with traumatic brain injuries and bone fractures, studies have been undertaken of the molecular mechanisms of the involvement of 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), an end product of lipid peroxidation, in cellular growth regulation. We found that HNE generated in bone cells grown in vitro on the surfaces of bioactive glasses 45S5 and 13-93. This raises an interesting possibility of combined action of HNE and ionic bioglass dissolution products in enhanced osteogenesis probably through a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. While the proposed mechanism still has to be elucidated, the finding of HNE generation on bioglass offers a new interpretation of the osteoinducting mechanisms of bioglass and suggests the possibility of tissue engineering based on manipulations of oxidative homeostasis.

  13. Preparation and characterization of fibrous chitosan-glued phosphate glass fiber scaffolds for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Kai; Wu, Zhaoying; Wei, Jie; Rűssel, Christian; Liang, Wen; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2015-08-01

    Phosphate glass fibers (PGF) have emerged as promising building blocks for constructing bone scaffolds. In this study, fibrous scaffolds (PGFS) were fabricated using a facile binding method at room temperature. PGFS exhibited an extracellular matrix-like morphology and were composed of PGF as matrix and chitosan as the natural binding glue. They showed an interconnected porous structure with a porosity of ~87% and pore size of 100-500 µm. PGFS exhibited the typical compressive stress-strain behaviour of highly porous, low-density, open-cell scaffolds. Their yield stress and modulus were ~0.38 and ~2.84 MPa, respectively, with the strength being higher than the lower bound of the compressive strength of cancellous bone. PGFS were degradable and the weight loss was about 25% after immersion in stimulated body fluid (SBF) for 28 days. In addition, the yield stress and the modulus decreased with increasing immersion time in SBF. Apatite formation could be detected on the surface of PGFS within 7 days of immersion in SBF. MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay indicated that PGFS were non-cytotoxic against bone marrow stromal cells (bMSCs) after culture for up to 72 h. These results suggest that PGFS could be promising scaffolds for bone regeneration applications. PMID:26271217

  14. Bone marrow cell transplantation is associated with fibrogenic cells apoptosis during hepatic regeneration in cholestatic rats.

    PubMed

    Nunes de Carvalho, Simone; da Cunha Lira, Dalvaci; Costa Cortez, Erika Afonso; de Andrade, Daniela Caldas; Thole, Alessandra Alves; Stumbo, Ana Carolina; de Carvalho, Lais

    2013-04-01

    Liver fibrosis is accompanied by hepatocyte death and proliferation of α-SMA(+) fibrogenic cells (activated hepatic stellate cells and myofibroblasts), which synthesize extracellular matrix components that contribute to disorganization of the hepatic parenchyma and loss of liver function. Therefore, apoptosis of these fibrogenic cells is important to hepatic regeneration. This study aimed to analyze the effect of cell therapy using bone marrow mononuclear cell (BMMNC) transplantation on α-SMA expression and on apoptosis of hepatic cells during liver fibrosis induced by bile duct ligation (BDL). Livers were collected from normal rats, fibrotic rats after 14 and 21 days of BDL, and rats that received BMMNC at 14 days of BDL and were analyzed after 7 days. Apoptosis in fibrogenic cells was analyzed by immunoperoxidase, confocal microscopy, and Western blotting, and liver regeneration was assessed by proliferating cell nuclear antigen staining. Results showed that caspase-3 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression were significantly increased in the BMMNC-treated group. Additionally, confocal microscopy analysis showed cells coexpressing α-SMA and caspase-3 in these animals, suggesting fibrogenic cell death. These results suggest a novel role for BMMNC in liver regeneration during fibrotic disease by stimulating fibrogenic cells apoptosis and hepatocyte proliferation, probably through secretion of specific cytokines that modulate the hepatic microenvironment toward an antifibrogenic balance.

  15. Guidance of in vitro migration of human mesenchymal stem cells and in vivo guided bone regeneration using aligned electrospun fibers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-hye; Lee, Young Jun; Cho, Hyeong-jin; Shin, Heungsoo

    2014-08-01

    Tissue regeneration is a complex process in which numerous chemical and physical signals are coordinated in a specific spatiotemporal pattern. In this study, we tested our hypothesis that cell migration and bone tissue formation can be guided and facilitated by microscale morphological cues presented from a scaffold. We prepared poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) electrospun fibers with random and aligned structures and investigated their effect on in vitro migration of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and in vivo bone growth using a critical-sized defect model. Using a polydopamine coating on the fibers, we compared the synergistic effects of chemical signals. The adhesion morphology of hMSCs was consistent with the direction of fiber alignment, whereas the proliferation of hMSCs was not affected. The orientation of fibers profoundly affected cell migration, in which hMSCs cultured on aligned fibers migrated 10.46-fold faster along the parallel direction than along the perpendicular direction on polydopamine-coated PLLA nanofibers. We implanted each fiber type into a mouse calvarial defect model for 2 months. The micro-computed tomography (CT) imaging demonstrated that regenerated bone area was the highest when mice were implanted with aligned fibers with polydopamine coating, indicating a positive synergistic effect on bone regeneration. More importantly, scanning electron microscopy microphotographs revealed that the direction of regenerated bone tissue appeared to be consistent with the direction of the implanted fibers, and transmission electron microscopy images showed that the orientation of collagen fibrils appeared to be overlapped along the direction of nanofibers. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the aligned nanofibers can provide spatial guidance for in vitro cell migration as well as in vivo bone regeneration, which may be incorporated as major instructive cues for the stimulation of tissue regeneration.

  16. A bioactive metallurgical grade porous silicon-polytetrafluoroethylene sheet for guided bone regeneration applications.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, E G; Clarkin, O M; Raghavendra, R; Tanner, D A

    2014-01-01

    The properties of porous silicon make it a promising material for a host of applications including drug delivery, molecular and cell-based biosensing, and tissue engineering. Porous silicon has previously shown its potential for the controlled release of pharmacological agents and in assisting bone healing. Hydroxyapatite, the principle constituent of bone, allows osteointegration in vivo, due to its chemical and physical similarities to bone. Synthetic hydroxyapatite is currently applied as a surface coating to medical devices and prosthetics, encouraging bone in-growth at their surface and improving osseointegration. This paper examines the potential for the use of an economically produced porous silicon particulate-polytetrafluoroethylene sheet for use as a guided bone regeneration device in periodontal and orthopaedic applications. The particulate sheet is comprised of a series of microparticles in a polytetrafluoroethylene matrix and is shown to produce a stable hydroxyapatite on its surface under simulated physiological conditions. The microstructure of the material is examined both before and after simulated body fluid experiments for a period of 1, 7, 14 and 30 days using Scanning Electron Microscopy. The composition is examined using a combination of Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy, Thin film X-ray diffraction, Attenuated Total Reflectance-Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and the uptake/release of constituents at the fluid-solid interface is explored using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectroscopy. Microstructural and compositional analysis reveals progressive growth of crystalline, 'bone-like' apatite on the surface of the material, indicating the likelihood of close bony apposition in vivo.

  17. Gelation and biocompatibility of injectable alginate-calcium phosphate gels for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, D Alves; van den Beucken, J J J P; Both, L L H; Bender, J; Jansen, J A; Leeuwenburgh, S C G

    2014-03-01

    An emerging approach toward development of injectable, self-setting, and fully biodegradable bone substitutes involves the combination of injectable hydrogel matrices with a dispersed phase consisting of nanosized calcium phosphate particles. Here, novel injectable composites for bone regeneration have been developed based on the combination of ultrapure alginate as the matrix phase, crystalline CaP [monetite and poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite (HA)] powders as both a dispersed mineral phase and a source of calcium for cross-linking alginate, glucono-delta-lactone (GDL) as acidifier and glycerol as both plasticizer and temporary sequestrant. The composites were maximized with respect to CaP content to obtain the highest amount of osteoconductive filler. The viscoelastic and physicochemical properties of the precursor compounds and composites were analyzed using rheometry, elemental analysis (for calcium release and uptake), acidity [by measuring pH in simulated body fluid (SBF)], general biocompatibility (subcutaneous implantation in rabbits), and osteocompatibility (implantation in femoral condyle bone defect of rabbits). The gelation of the resulting composites could be controlled from seconds to tens of minutes by varying the solubility of the CaP phase (HA vs. monetite) or amount of GDL. All composites mineralized extensively in SBF for up to 11 days. In vivo, the composites also disintegrated upon implantation in subcutaneous or bone tissue, leaving behind less degradable but osteoconductive CaP particles. Although the composites need to be optimized with respect to the available amount of calcium for cross-linking of alginate, the beneficial bone response as observed in the in vivo studies render these gels promising for minimally invasive applications as bone-filling material.

  18. Porous magnesium/PLGA composite scaffolds for enhanced bone regeneration following tooth extraction.

    PubMed

    Brown, Andrew; Zaky, Samer; Ray, Herbert; Sfeir, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Sixty percent of implant-supported dental prostheses require bone grafting to enhance bone quantity and quality prior to implant placement. We have developed a metallic magnesium particle/PLGA composite scaffold to overcome the limitations of currently used dental bone grafting materials. This is the first report of porous metallic magnesium/PLGA scaffolds synthesized using a solvent casting, salt leaching method. We found that incorporation of varying amounts of magnesium into the PLGA scaffolds increased the compressive strength and modulus, as well as provided a porous structure suitable for cell infiltration, as measured by mercury intrusion porosimetry. Additionally, combining basic-degrading magnesium with acidic-degrading PLGA led to an overall pH buffering effect and long-term release of magnesium over the course of a 10-week degradation assay, as measured with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. Using an indirect proliferation assay adapted from ISO 10993:5, it was found that extracts of medium from degrading magnesium/PLGA scaffolds increased bone marrow stromal cell proliferation in vitro, a phenomenon observed by other groups investigating magnesium's impact on cells. Finally, magnesium/PLGA scaffold biocompatibility was assessed in a canine socket preservation model. Micro-computed tomography and histological analysis showed the magnesium/PLGA scaffolds to be safer and more effective at preserving bone height than empty controls. Three-dimensional magnesium/PLGA composite scaffolds show promise for dental socket preservation and also, potentially, orthopedic bone regeneration. These scaffolds could decrease inflammation observed with clinically used PLGA devices, as well as enhance osteogenesis, as observed with previously studied magnesium devices.

  19. Bioglass/alginate composite hydrogel beads as cell carriers for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qiongyu; Han, Yan; Li, Haiyan; Chang, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Cell carrier is a useful biomedical tool to deliver particular kind of cells to a specific site for cell therapy or tissue regeneration. In the current study, 45S5 bioglass (BG) was introduced into alginate (ALG) to generate BG/ALG composite hydrogel beads as cell carriers. The ions releasing behavior, dimensional stability and in vitro bioactivity of the beads were investigated. Results showed that the BG/ALG beads revealed similar calcium ion releasing behavior as compared with ALG beads. In addition, silicon ion releasing was detected in BG/ALG beads. BG/ALG and ALG beads shared similar dimensional stability, and BG/ALG beads could induce apatite deposition on their surface after being soaked in stimulated body fluid. Then, the effects of ion extracts from hydrogel beads on cell behavior were investigated. Results confirmed that extracts of BG/ALG beads could simulate proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells as well as angiogenesis of endothelial cells. Furthermore, MC3T3-E1 cells were successfully encapsulated in hydrogel beads. BG/ALG beads enhanced the cell proliferation and stimulated osteogenic differentiation of the encapsulated MC3T3-E1 cells as compared with ALG beads. Therefore, BG/ALG composite hydrogel beads loaded with bone forming cells may be useful tools for bone regeneration and tissue engineering applications.

  20. Hierarchical Nanofibrous Microspheres with Controlled Growth Factor Delivery for Bone Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chi; Jing, Yan; Sun, Hongchen; Liu, Xiaohua

    2015-12-01

    The integration of controlled growth factor delivery and biomimetic architecture into a microsphere is a challenging but attractive strategy for developing new injectable biomaterials. In this work, a unique hierarchical nanosphere-encapsulated-in-microsphere scaffolding system is developed. First, heparin-conjugated gelatin (HG) is synthesized, which provides binding domains for bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) to stabilize this growth factor, protect it from denaturation and proteolytic degradation, and subsequently prolong its sustained release. Next, a unique approach is developed which includes a water-in-oil-in-oil double emulsion process and a thermally induced phase separation to encapsulate BMP2-binding HG nanospheres into nanofibrous microspheres. The nanofibrous microsphere is self-assembled from synthetic nanofibers, and has superior surface area, high porosity, low density, and is an excellent carrier to support cell adhesion and tissue in-growth. BMP2 in the hierarchical microsphere is released in a multiple-controlled manner by the binding with heparin and encapsulation of the nanosphere and microsphere. An in vivo calvarial defect model confirms that this microsphere is an excellent osteoinductive scaffold for enhanced bone regeneration. By choosing different growth factors, this hierarchical microsphere system can easily be applied to other types of tissue regeneration. The work expands the ability to develop new injectable biomaterials for advanced regenerative therapies.

  1. Delayed minimally invasive injection of allogenic bone marrow stromal cell sheets regenerates large bone defects in an ovine preclinical animal model.

    PubMed

    Berner, Arne; Henkel, Jan; Woodruff, Maria A; Steck, Roland; Nerlich, Michael; Schuetz, Michael A; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2015-05-01

    Cell-based tissue engineering approaches are promising strategies in the field of regenerative medicine. However, the mode of cell delivery is still a concern and needs to be significantly improved. Scaffolds and/or matrices loaded with cells are often transplanted into a bone defect immediately after the defect has been created. At this point, the nutrient and oxygen supply is low and the inflammatory cascade is incited, thus creating a highly unfavorable microenvironment for transplanted cells to survive and participate in the regeneration process. We therefore developed a unique treatment concept using the delayed injection of allogenic bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) sheets to regenerate a critical-sized tibial defect in sheep to study the effect of the cells' regeneration potential when introduced at a postinflammatory stage. Minimally invasive percutaneous injection of allogenic BMSCs into biodegradable composite scaffolds 4 weeks after the defect surgery led to significantly improved bone regeneration compared with preseeded scaffold/cell constructs and scaffold-only groups. Biomechanical testing and microcomputed tomography showed comparable results to the clinical reference standard (i.e., an autologous bone graft). To our knowledge, we are the first to show in a validated preclinical large animal model that delayed allogenic cell transplantation can provide applicable clinical treatment alternatives for challenging bone defects in the future.

  2. Bone marrow-derived progenitor cells in de novo liver regeneration in liver transplant.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Gyu; Moon, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Hee-Je; Lee, Ji Yoon; Park, Soon-Jung; Chung, Hyung-Min; Ha, Tae-Yong; Song, Gi-Won; Jung, Dong-Hwan; Park, Hojong; Kwon, Tae-Won; Cho, Yong-Pil

    2015-09-01

    The study was designed (1) to examine the hypothesis that circulating progenitor cells play a role in the process of de novo regeneration in human liver transplants and that these cells arise from a cell population originating in, or associated with, the bone marrow and (2) to investigate whether the transplanted liver volume has an effect on the circulating recipient-derived progenitor cells that generate hepatocytes during this process. Clinical data and liver tissue characteristics were analyzed in male individuals who underwent sex-mismatched adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation using dual left lobe grafts. Dual left lobe grafts were examined at the time of transplantation and 19 to 27 days after transplantation. All recipients showed recovery of normal liver function and a significant increase in the volume of the engrafted left lobes after transplantation. Double staining for a Y-chromosome probe and the CD31 antigen showed the presence of hybrid vessels composed of recipient-derived cells and donor cells within the transplanted liver tissues. Furthermore, CD34-expressing cells were observed commingling with Y-chromosome+ cells. The ratio of recipient-derived vessels and the number of Y+ CD34+ cells tended to be higher when smaller graft volumes underwent transplantation. These findings suggest that the recruitment of circulating bone marrow-derived progenitor cells could contribute to vessel formation and de novo regeneration in human liver transplants. Moreover, graft volume may be an important determinant for the active mobilization of circulating recipient-derived progenitor cells and their contribution to liver regeneration.

  3. Endogenous bone marrow MSCs are dynamic, fate-restricted participants in bone maintenance and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Park, Dongsu; Spencer, Joel A; Koh, Bong Ihn; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Fujisaki, Joji; Clemens, Thomas L; Lin, Charles P; Kronenberg, Henry M; Scadden, David T

    2012-03-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) commonly defined by in vitro functions have entered clinical application despite little definition of their function in residence. Here, we report genetic pulse-chase experiments that define osteoblastic cells as short-lived and nonreplicative, requiring replenishment from bone-marrow-derived, Mx1(+) stromal cells with "MSC" features. These cells respond to tissue stress and migrate to sites of injury, supplying new osteoblasts during fracture healing. Single cell transplantation yielded progeny that both preserve progenitor function and differentiate into osteoblasts, producing new bone. They are capable of local and systemic translocation and serial transplantation. While these cells meet current definitions of MSCs in vitro, they are osteolineage restricted in vivo in growing and adult animals. Therefore, bone-marrow-derived MSCs may be a heterogeneous population with the Mx1(+) population, representing a highly dynamic and stress responsive stem/progenitor cell population of fate-restricted potential that feeds the high cell replacement demands of the adult skeleton.

  4. Bone regeneration via novel macroporous CPC scaffolds in critical-sized cranial defects in rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kangwon; Weir, Michael D.; Lippens, Evi; Mehta, Manav; Wang, Ping; Duda, Georg N.; Kim, Woo S.; Mooney, David J.; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Calcium phosphate cement (CPC) is promising for dental and craniofacial applications due to its ability to be injected or filled into complex-shaped bone defects and molded for esthetics, and its resorbability and replacement by new bone. The objective of this study was to investigate bone regeneration via novel macroporous CPC containing absorbable fibers, hydrogel microbeads and growth factors in critical-sized cranial defects in rats. Methods Mannitol porogen and alginate hydrogel microbeads were incorporated into CPC. Absorbable fibers were used to provide mechanical reinforcement to CPC scaffolds. Six CPC groups were tested in rats: (1) Control CPC without macropores and microbeads; (2) Macroporous CPC + large fiber; (3) Macroporous CPC + large fiber + nanofiber; (4) Same as (3), but with rhBMP2 in CPC matrix; (5) Same as (3), but with rhBMP2 in CPC matrix + rhTGF-β1 in microbeads; (6) Same as (3), but with rhBMP2 in CPC matrix + VEGF in microbeads. Rats were sacrificed at 4 and 24 weeks for histological and micro-CT analyses. Results The macroporous CPC scaffolds containing porogen, absorbable fibers and hydrogel microbeads had mechanical properties similar to cancellous bone. At 4 weeks, the new bone area fraction (mean ± sd; n = 5) in CPC control group was the lowest at (14.8 ± 3.3)%, and that of group 6 (rhBMP2 + VEGF) was (31.0 ± 13.8)% (p < 0.05). At 24 weeks, group 4 (rhBMP2) had the most new bone of (38.8 ± 15.6)%, higher than (12.7 ± 5.3)% of CPC control (p < 0.05). Micro-CT revealed nearly complete bridging of the critical-sized defects with new bone for several macroporous CPC groups, compared to much less new bone formation for CPC control. Significance Macroporous CPC scaffolds containing porogen, fibers and microbeads with growth factors were investigated in rat cranial defects for the first time. Macroporous CPCs had new bone up to 2-fold that of traditional CPC control at 4 weeks, and 3-fold that of traditional CPC at 24 weeks

  5. Tyrosine-derived polycarbonate scaffolds for bone regeneration in a rabbit radius critical-size defect model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinku; McBride, Sean; Donovan, Amy; Darr, Aniq; Magno, Maria Hanshella R; Hollinger, Jeffrey O

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the study was to determine bone regeneration in a rabbit radius critical-size defect (CSD) model using a specific polymer composition (E1001(1k)) from a library of tyrosine-derived polycarbonate scaffolds coated with a calcium phosphate (CP) formulation (E1001(1k) + CP) supplemented with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2). Specific doses of rhBMP-2 (0, 17, and 35 μg/scaffold) were used. E1001(1k) + CP scaffolds were implanted in unilateral segmental defects (15 mm length) in the radial diaphyses of New Zealand White rabbits. At 4 and 8 weeks post-implantation, bone regeneration was determined using micro-computed tomography (µCT), histology, and histomorphometry. The quantitative outcome data suggest that E1001(1k) + CP scaffolds with rhBMP-2 were biocompatible and promoted bone regeneration in segmental bone defects. Histological examination of the implant sites showed that scaffolds made of E1001(1k) + CP did not elicit adverse cellular or tissue responses throughout test periods up to 8 weeks. Noteworthy is that the incorporation of a very small amount of rhBMP-2 into the scaffolds (as low as 17 μg/defect site) promoted significant bone regeneration compared to scaffolds consisting of E1001(1k) + CP alone. This finding indicates that E1001(1k) + CP may be an effective platform for bone regeneration in a critical size rabbit radius segmental defect model, requiring only a minimal dose of rhBMP-2.

  6. Fructus polygoni orentalis extract inhibited liver regeneration and proliferation of bone marrow cells of rat after partial hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Yang, J Y; Wang, J S; Liu, H B

    2015-01-01

    To study the effect of fructus polygoni orentalis extract (EFPO) on liver regeneration and proliferation of bone marrow cells on rat model of partial hepatectomy, EFPO was extracted, and 60 adult male Wistar rats were divided randomly into 6 experimental groups. Rats were treated with intergastric administration (ig) with EFPO daily. All rats were euthanized 7 days after administration, and the livers and bone marrow cells were collected. The levels of taxifolin and quercetin in EFPO were 1.238 and 0.381 mg/g, respectively. EFPO decreased the proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression of the regenerating liver. Obvious tissue damage was observed in the EFPO groups, such as a widened hepatic sinusoid cavity, several enlarged nuclei, slightly ballooning degeneration, and spotty and focal necrosis as compared to the control group. Additionally, 1.8 and 3.6 g/kg EFPO significantly inhibited proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression in bone marrows cells (P < 0.05), and induced gathering of these cells during the GO/G1 phases (P < 0.05). The karyocyte and myelosis of bone marrows cells clearly decreased, and mature erythrocytes increased (P < 0.05) in the EFPO groups. Additionally, 3.6 g/kg EFPO induced active proliferation, while the sham operation and control groups showed apparent active myelo-proliferation. The maximum dosage of mice ig EFPO was 148.8 g/kg. Our results indicate that EFPO inhibits rat liver regeneration and bone marrow cell proliferation in regenerating rat liver.

  7. A Combination of Biphasic Calcium Phosphate Scaffold with Hyaluronic Acid-Gelatin Hydrogel as a New Tool for Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thuy Ba Linh

    2014-01-01

    A novel bone substitute was fabricated to enhance bone healing by combining ceramic and polymer materials. In this study, Hyaluronic acid (HyA)–Gelatin (Gel) hydrogel was loaded into a biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) ceramic, and the resulting scaffold, with unique micro- and macroporous orientation, was evaluated for bone regeneration applications. The fabricated scaffold showed high interconnected porosity, with an average compressive strength of 2.8±0.15 MPa, which is usually recommended for cancellous bone substitution. In vitro cytocompatibility studies were conducted using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. The HyA-Gel–loaded BCP scaffold resulted in a significant increase in cell proliferation at 3 (p<0.05) and 7 days (p<0.001) and high alkaline phosphatase activities at 14 and 21 days. Furthermore, the in vivo studies showed that the implanted HyA-Gel–loaded BCP scaffold begins to degrade within 3 months after implantation. Histological sections also confirmed a rapid new bone formation and a high rate of collagen mineralization. A bone matrix formation was confirmed by positive immunohistochemistry staining of osteopontin, osteocalcin, and collagen type I. In vivo expression of extracellular matrix proteins demonstrated that this novel bone substitute holds great promise for use in stimulating new bone regeneration. PMID:24517159

  8. Bone Regeneration using an Alpha 2 Beta 1 Integrin-Specific Hydrogel as a BMP-2 Delivery Vehicle

    PubMed Central

    Shekaran, Asha; García, José R.; Clark, Amy Y.; Kavanaugh, Taylor E.; Lin, Angela S.; Guldberg, Robert E.; García, Andrés J.

    2014-01-01

    Non-healing bone defects present tremendous socioeconomic costs. Although successful in some clinical settings, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) therapies require supraphysiological dose delivery for bone repair, raising treatment costs and risks of complications. We engineered a protease-degradable poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) synthetic hydrogel functionalized with a triple helical, α2β1 integrin-specific peptide (GFOGER) as a BMP-2 delivery vehicle. GFOGER-functionalized hydrogels lacking BMP-2 directed human stem cell differentiation and produced significant enhancements in bone repair within a critical-sized bone defect compared to RGD hydrogels or empty defects. GFOGER functionalization was crucial to the BMP-2-dependent healing response. Importantly, these engineered hydrogels outperformed the current clinical carrier in repairing non-healing bone defects at low BMP-2 doses. GFOGER hydrogels provided sustained in vivo release of encapsulated BMP-2, increased osteoprogenitor localization in the defect site, enhanced bone formation and induced defect bridging and mechanically robust healing at low BMP-2 doses which stimulated almost no bone regeneration when delivered from collagen sponges. These findings demonstrate that GFOGER hydrogels promote bone regeneration in challenging defects with low delivered BMP-2 doses and represent an effective delivery vehicle for protein therapeutics with translational potential. PMID:24726536

  9. Biocompatibility of single-walled carbon nanotube composites for bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, A.; Liberati, T. A.; Verhulst, S. J.; Main, B. J.; Roberts, M. H.; Potty, A. G. R.; Pylawka, T. K.; El-Amin III, S. F.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate in vivo biocompatibility of novel single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT)/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLAGA) composites for applications in bone and tissue regeneration. Methods A total of 60 Sprague-Dawley rats (125 g to 149 g) were implanted subcutaneously with SWCNT/PLAGA composites (10 mg SWCNT and 1gm PLAGA 12 mm diameter two-dimensional disks), and at two, four, eight and 12 weeks post-implantation were compared with control (Sham) and PLAGA (five rats per group/point in time). Rats were observed for signs of morbidity, overt toxicity, weight gain and food consumption, while haematology, urinalysis and histopathology were completed when the animals were killed. Results No mortality and clinical signs were observed. All groups showed consistent weight gain, and the rate of gain for each group was similar. All groups exhibited a similar pattern for food consumption. No difference in urinalysis, haematology, and absolute and relative organ weight was observed. A mild to moderate increase in the summary toxicity (sumtox) score was observed for PLAGA and SWCNT/PLAGA implanted animals, whereas the control animals did not show any response. Both PLAGA and SWCNT/PLAGA showed a significantly higher sumtox score compared with the control group at all time intervals. However, there was no significant difference between PLAGA and SWCNT/PLAGA groups. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that SWCNT/PLAGA composites exhibited in vivo biocompatibility similar to the Food and Drug Administration approved biocompatible polymer, PLAGA, over a period of 12 weeks. These results showed potential of SWCNT/PLAGA composites for bone regeneration as the low percentage of SWCNT did not elicit a localised or general overt toxicity. Following the 12-week exposure, the material was considered to have an acceptable biocompatibility to warrant further long-term and more invasive in vivo studies. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015

  10. Bone Regeneration Using Hydroxyapatite Sponge Scaffolds with In Vivo Deposited Extracellular Matrix.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Reiza Dolendo; Padalhin, Andrew Reyes; Min, Young-Ki; Lee, Byong-Taek

    2015-11-01

    There is currently an increased interest in studying the extracellular matrix (ECM) and its potential applications for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The ECM plays an important role by providing adhesive substrates to cells during migration, morphogenesis, differentiation, and homeostasis by signaling biochemical and biomechanical cues to cells. In this study, the ECM was incorporated into hydroxyapatite by implanting sponge replica scaffolds in subcutaneous pockets in rats, and the implants were tested for bone regeneration potential. The resulting scaffolds were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, confocal microscopy, DNA and RNA quantification, tissue staining, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis, compressive strength testing, porosity, and pore size distribution analysis using bare scaffolds as a control reference. Biocompatibility was assessed using MC3T3-E1 preosteoblast cells and in vivo studies were carried out by implanting decellularized scaffolds in 11 mm radial defects in New Zealand rabbits for 4 and 8 weeks to determine the effect of the in vivo deposited ECM. Material characterization indicated that a 2-week decellularized scaffold was the best among the samples, with an evenly distributed ECM visible on hematoxylin and eosin-stained tissue sections, a compressive strength of 2.53 ± 0.68 MPa, a porosity of 58.08 ± 3.32% and a pore size distribution range of 10-150 μm. In vivo results showed no severe inflammation, with increased cell infiltration followed by dense matrix deposition after 4 weeks and new bone formation at 8 weeks. The results indicate that incorporation of an in vivo deposited ECM into ceramic scaffolds can potentially improve bone regeneration.

  11. A Novel Injectable Calcium Phosphate Cement-Bioactive Glass Composite for Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Kang; Tang, Yufei; Cheng, Zhe; Chen, Jun; Zang, Yuan; Wu, Jianwei; Kong, Liang; Liu, Shuai; Lei, Wei; Wu, Zixiang

    2013-01-01

    Background Calcium phosphate cement (CPC) can be molded or injected to form a scaffold in situ, which intimately conforms to complex bone defects. Bioactive glass (BG) is known for its unique ability to bond to living bone and promote bone growth. However, it was not until recently that literature was available regarding CPC-BG applied as an injectable graft. In this paper, we reported a novel injectable CPC-BG composite with improved properties caused by the incorporation of BG into CPC. Materials and Methods The novel injectable bioactive cement was evaluated to determine its composition, microstructure, setting time, injectability, compressive strength and behavior in a simulated body fluid (SBF). The in vitro cellular responses of osteoblasts and in vivo tissue responses after the implantation of CPC-BG in femoral condyle defects of rabbits were also investigated. Results CPC-BG possessed a retarded setting time and markedly better injectability and mechanical properties than CPC. Moreover, a new Ca-deficient apatite layer was deposited on the composite surface after immersing immersion in SBF for 7 days. CPC-BG samples showed significantly improved degradability and bioactivity compared to CPC in simulated body fluid (SBF). In addition, the degrees of cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation on CPC-BG were higher than those on CPC. Macroscopic evaluation, histological evaluation, and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) analysis showed that CPC-BG enhanced the efficiency of new bone formation in comparison with CPC. Conclusions A novel CPC-BG composite has been synthesized with improved properties exhibiting promising prospects for bone regeneration. PMID:23638115

  12. Cell seeding density is a critical determinant for copolymer scaffolds‐induced bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Leknes, Knut N.; Pedersen, Torbjorn O.; Xing, Zhe; Sun, Yang; Lie, Stein A.; Finne‐Wistrand, Anna; Mustafa, Kamal

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Constructs intended for bone tissue engineering (TE) are influenced by the initial cell seeding density. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the effect of bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs) density loaded onto copolymer scaffolds on bone regeneration. BMSCs were harvested from rat's bone marrow and cultured in media with or without osteogenic supplements. Cells were seeded onto poly(l‐lactide‐co‐ε‐caprolactone) [poly(LLA‐co‐CL)] scaffolds at two different densities: low density (1 × 106 cells/scaffold) or high density (2 × 106 cells/scaffold) using spinner modified flasks and examined after 1 and 3 weeks. Initial attachment and spread of BMSC onto the scaffolds was recorded by scanning electron microscopy. Cell proliferation was assessed by DNA quantification and cell differentiation by quantitative real‐time reverse transcriptase‐polymerized chain reaction analysis (qRT‐PCR). Five‐millimeter rat calvarial defects (24 defects in 12 rats) were implanted with scaffolds seeded with either low or high density expanded with or without osteogenic supplements. Osteogenic supplements significantly increased cell proliferation (p < 0.001). Scaffolds seeded at high cell density exhibited higher mRNA expressions of Runx2 p = 0.001, Col1 p = 0.001, BMP2 p < 0.001, BSP p < 0.001, and OC p = 0.013. More bone was formed in response to high cell seeding density (p = 0.023) and high seeding density with osteogenic medium (p = 0.038). Poly (LLA‐co‐CL) scaffolds could be appropriate candidates for bone TE. The optimal number of cells to be loaded onto scaffolds is critical for promoting Extracellular matrix synthesis and bone formation. Cell seeding density and osteogenic supplements may have a synergistic effect on the induction of new bone. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 103A: 3649–3658, 2015. PMID:26013960

  13. Evaluation of the Effect of a Gamma Irradiated DBM-Pluronic F127 Composite on Bone Regeneration in Wistar Rat

    PubMed Central

    Canciani, Barbara; Losi, Paola; Tripodi, Maria; Burchielli, Silvia; Ottoni, Priscilla; Salvadori, Piero Antonio; Soldani, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Demineralized bone matrix (DBM) is widely used for bone regeneration. Since DBM is prepared in powder form its handling properties are not optimal and limit the clinical use of this material. Various synthetic and biological carriers have been used to enhance the DBM handling. In this study we evaluated the effect of gamma irradiation on the physical-chemical properties of Pluronic and on bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) amount in DBM samples. In vivo studies were carried out to investigate the effect on bone regeneration of a gamma irradiated DBM-Pluronic F127 (DBM-PF127) composite implanted in the femur of rats. Gamma irradiation effects (25 kGy) on physical-chemical properties of Pluronic F127 were investigated by rheological and infrared analysis. The BMP-2/BMP-7 amount after DBM irradiation was evaluated by ELISA. Bone regeneration capacity of DBM-PF127 containing 40% (w/w) of DBM was investigated in transcortical holes created in the femoral diaphysis of Wistar rat. Bone porosity, repaired bone volume and tissue organization were evaluated at 15, 30 and 90 days by Micro-CT and histological analysis. The results showed that gamma irradiation did not induce significant modification on physical-chemical properties of Pluronic, while a decrease in BMP-2/BMP-7 amount was evidenced in sterilized DBM. Micro-CT and histological evaluation at day 15 post-implantation revealed an interconnected trabeculae network in medullar cavity and cellular infiltration and vascularization of DBM-PF127 residue. In contrast a large rate of not connected trabeculae was observed in Pluronic filled and unfilled defects. At 30 and 90 days the DBM-PF127 samples shown comparable results in term of density and thickness of the new formed tissue respect to unfilled defect. In conclusion a gamma irradiated DBM-PF127 composite, although it may have undergone a significant decrease in the concentration of BMPs, was able to maintains bone regeneration capability. PMID:25897753

  14. Bone morphogenetic protein signaling promotes morphogenesis of blood vessels, wound epidermis, and actinotrichia during fin regeneration in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Thorimbert, Valentine; König, Désirée; Marro, Jan; Ruggiero, Florence; Jaźwińska, Anna

    2015-10-01

    Zebrafish fin regeneration involves initial formation of the wound epidermis and the blastema, followed by tissue morphogenesis. The mechanisms coordinating differentiation of distinct tissues of the regenerate are poorly understood. Here, we applied pharmacologic and transgenic approaches to address the role of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling during fin restoration. To map the BMP transcriptional activity, we analyzed the expression of the evolutionarily conserved direct phospho-Smad1 target gene, id1, and its homologs id2a and id3. This analysis revealed the BMP activity in the distal blastema, wound epidermis, osteoblasts, and blood vessels of the regenerate. Blocking the BMP function with a selective chemical inhibitor of BMP type I receptors, DMH1, suppressed id1 and id3 expression and arrested regeneration after blastema formation. We identified several previously uncharacterized functions of BMP during fin regeneration. Specifically, BMP signaling is required for remodeling of plexus into structured blood vessels in the rapidly growing regenerate. It organizes the wound epithelium by triggering wnt5b expression and promoting Collagen XIV-A deposition into the basement membrane. BMP represents the first known signaling that induces actinotrichia formation in the regenerate. Our data reveal a multifaceted role of BMP for coordinated morphogenesis of distinct tissues during regeneration of a complex vertebrate appendage.

  15. Guided bone regeneration in pig calvarial bone defects using autologous mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells - a comparison of different tissue sources.

    PubMed

    Stockmann, Philipp; Park, Jung; von Wilmowsky, Cornelius; Nkenke, Emeka; Felszeghy, Endre; Dehner, Jan-Friedrich; Schmitt, Christian; Tudor, Christian; Schlegel, Karl Andreas

    2012-06-01

    Due to donor side morbidity and the absence of osteogenic properties in bone substitutes, there is a growing need for an alternative to traditional bone grafting within the scope of tissue engineering. This animal study was conducted to compare the in vivo osteogenic potential of adipose-derived (AD), periosteum-derived (PD) and bone marrow-derived (BM) mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSC). Autologous mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells of named tissue origin were induced into osteogenic differentiation following in vitro cell expansion. Ex vivo cultivated cells were seeded on a collagen scaffold and subsequently added to freshly created monocortical calvarial bone defects in 21 domestic pigs. Pure collagen scaffold served as a control defect. The animals were sacrificed at specific time points and de novo bone formation was quantitatively analyzed by histomorphometry. Bone volume/total defect volume (BV/TV) and the mineralization rate of newly formed bone were compared among the groups. In the early stages of wound healing, up to 30 days, the test defects did not show better bone regeneration than those in the control defect, but the bone healing process in the test defects was accelerated in the later stage compared to those in the control defect. All the test defects showed complete osseous healing after 90 days compared to those in the control defect. During the observation period, no significant differences in BV/TV and mineralization of newly formed bone among the test defects were observed. Irrespective of the tissue sources of MSC, the speed and pattern of osseous healing after cell transplantations into monocortical bone defects were comparable. Our results indicate that the efficiency of autologous AD-MSC, PD-MSC and BM-MSC transplantation following ex vivo cell expansion is not significantly different for the guided regeneration of bone defects.

  16. Guided bone regeneration in pig calvarial bone defects using autologous mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells - a comparison of different tissue sources.

    PubMed

    Stockmann, Philipp; Park, Jung; von Wilmowsky, Cornelius; Nkenke, Emeka; Felszeghy, Endre; Dehner, Jan-Friedrich; Schmitt, Christian; Tudor, Christian; Schlegel, Karl Andreas

    2012-06-01

    Due to donor side morbidity and the absence of osteogenic properties in bone substitutes, there is a growing need for an alternative to traditional bone grafting within the scope of tissue engineering. This animal study was conducted to compare the in vivo osteogenic potential of adipose-derived (AD), periosteum-derived (PD) and bone marrow-derived (BM) mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSC). Autologous mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells of named tissue origin were induced into osteogenic differentiation following in vitro cell expansion. Ex vivo cultivated cells were seeded on a collagen scaffold and subsequently added to freshly created monocortical calvarial bone defects in 21 domestic pigs. Pure collagen scaffold served as a control defect. The animals were sacrificed at specific time points and de novo bone formation was quantitatively analyzed by histomorphometry. Bone volume/total defect volume (BV/TV) and the mineralization rate of newly formed bone were compared among the groups. In the early stages of wound healing, up to 30 days, the test defects did not show better bone regeneration than those in the control defect, but the bone healing process in the test defects was accelerated in the later stage compared to those in the control defect. All the test defects showed complete osseous healing after 90 days compared to those in the control defect. During the observation period, no significant differences in BV/TV and mineralization of newly formed bone among the test defects were observed. Irrespective of the tissue sources of MSC, the speed and pattern of osseous healing after cell transplantations into monocortical bone defects were comparable. Our results indicate that the efficiency of autologous AD-MSC, PD-MSC and BM-MSC transplantation following ex vivo cell expansion is not significantly different for the guided regeneration of bone defects. PMID:21723141

  17. Strontium eluting nanofibers augment stem cell osteogenesis for bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Meka, Sai Rama Krishna; Jain, Shubham; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2016-10-01

    Strontium is known to offer a therapeutic benefit to osteoporotic patients by promoting bone formation. Thus, toward engineering scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration we have prepared polymer nanocomposite scaffolds by electrospinning. Strontium carbonate nanoparticles (nSrCO3) were added to poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) at 10 and 20wt% to develop nanocomposite fibrous scaffolds (PCL/SrC10 and PCL/SrC20) with fiber diameter in the range of 300-500nm. Incorporation of nSrCO3 decreased crystallinity and the elastic modulus of PCL. The composite scaffolds released Sr(2+) ions with up to 65ppm in 4days from the PCL/SrC20 scaffolds. Cell studies confirmed that the composite scaffold with 20% nSrCO3 enhanced proliferation of human mesenchymal stem cells in vitro. There was marked increase in mineral deposition up to four folds in PCL/SrC20 suggesting enhanced osteogenesis. This was corroborated by increased mRNA and protein expression of various osteogenic markers such as BMP-2, Osterix and Runx2 in the PCL/SrC20 fibers. Thus, incorporation of nSrCO3 in polymer scaffolds is a promising strategy for bone tissue engineering as an alternative to the use of labile growth factors to impart bioactivity to polymer scaffolds. PMID:27429299

  18. Nanoscale control of silica particle formation via silk-silica fusion proteins for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Mieszawska, Aneta J; Nadkarni, Lauren D; Perry, Carole C; Kaplan, David L

    2010-10-26

    The biomimetic design of silk/silica fusion proteins was carried out, combining the self assembling domains of spider dragline silk (Nephila clavipes) and silaffin derived R5 peptide of Cylindrotheca fusiformis that is responsible for silica mineralization. Genetic engineering was used to generate the protein-based biomaterials incorporating the physical properties of both components. With genetic control over the nanodomain sizes and chemistry, as well as modification of synthetic conditions for silica formation, controlled mineralized silk films with different silica morphologies and distributions were successfully generated; generating 3D porous networks, clustered silica nanoparticles (SNPs), or single SNPs. Silk serves as the organic scaffolding to control the material stability and multiprocessing makes silk/silica biomaterials suitable for different tissue regenerative applications. The influence of these new silk-silica composite systems on osteogenesis was evaluated with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) subjected to osteogenic differentiation. hMSCs adhered, proliferated, and differentiated towards osteogenic lineages on the silk/silica films. The presence of the silica in the silk films influenced osteogenic gene expression, with the upregulation of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone sialoprotein (BSP), and collagen type 1 (Col 1) markers. Evidence for early bone formation as calcium deposits was observed on silk films with silica. These results indicate the potential utility of these new silk/silica systems towards bone regeneration. PMID:20976116

  19. Platelet-rich plasma, plasma rich in growth factors and simvastatin in the regeneration and repair of alveolar bone.

    PubMed

    Rivera, César; Monsalve, Francisco; Salas, Juan; Morán, Andrea; Suazo, Iván

    2013-12-01

    Platelet preparations promote bone regeneration by inducing cell migration, proliferation and differentiation in the area of the injury, which are essential processes for regeneration. In addition, several studies have indicated that simvastatin (SIMV), widely used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia, stimulates osteogenesis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of treatment with either platelet-rich plasma (PRP) or plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) in combination with SIMV in the regeneration and repair of alveolar bone. The jaws of Sprague Dawley rats (n=18) were subjected to rotary instrument-induced bone damage (BD). Animals were divided into six groups: BD/H2O (n=3), distilled water without the drug and alveolar bone damage; BD/H2O/PRP (n=3), BD and PRP; BD/H2O/PRGF (n=3), BD and PRGF; BD/SIMV (n=3), BD and water with SIMV; BD/SIMV/PRP (n=3), BD, PRP and SIMV; and BD/SIMV/PRGF (n=3), BD, PRGF and SIMV. Conventional histological analysis (hematoxylin and eosin staining) revealed that the BD/SIMV group showed indicators for mature bone tissue, while the BD/SIMV/PRP and BD/SIMV/PRGF groups showed the coexistence of indicators for mature and immature bone tissue, with no statistical differences between the platelet preparations. Simvastatin did not improve the effect of platelet-rich plasma and plasma rich in growth factors. It was not possible to determine which platelet preparation produced superior effects.

  20. The effects of PRGF on bone regeneration and on titanium implant osseointegration in goats: a histologic and histomorphometric study.

    PubMed

    Anitua, Eduardo; Orive, Gorka; Pla, Rafael; Roman, Pedro; Serrano, Victoriano; Andía, Isabel

    2009-10-01

    The effect of local application of scaffold-like preparation rich in growth factors (PRGF) on bone regeneration in artificial defects and the potential effect of humidifying titanium dental implants with liquid PRGF on their osseointegration were investigated. The PRGF formulations were obtained from venous blood of three goats and applied either as a 3D fibrin scaffold (scaffold-like PRGF) in the regeneration of artificial defects or as liquid PRGF via humidifying the implants before their insertion. Initially, 12 defects were filled with scaffold-like PRGF and another 12 were used as controls. The histological analysis at 8 weeks revealed mature bone trabeculae when PRGF was used, whereas the control samples showed mainly connective tissue with incipient signs of bone formation. For the second set of experiments, 26 implants (13 humidified with liquid PRGF) were placed in the tibiae of goats. Histological and histomorphometric results demonstrated that application of liquid PRGF increased the percentage of bone-implant contact in 84.7%. The whole surface of the PRGF-treated implants was covered by newly formed bone, whereas only the upper half was surrounded in control implants. In summary, PRGF can accelerate bone regeneration in artificial defects and improve the osseointegration of titanium dental implants.

  1. Titanium-enriched hydroxyapatite-gelatin scaffolds with osteogenically differentiated progenitor cell aggregates for calvaria bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, João R; Padilla, Ricardo; Urkasemsin, Ganokon; Yoon, Kun; Goeckner, Kelly; Hu, Wei-Shou; Ko, Ching-Chang

    2013-08-01

    Adequate bony support is the key to re-establish both function and esthetics in the craniofacial region. Autologous bone grafting has been the gold standard for regeneration of problematic large bone defects. However, poor graft availability and donor-site complications have led to alternative bone tissue-engineering approaches combining osteoinductive biomaterials and three-dimensional cell aggregates in scaffolds or constructs. The goal of the present study was to generate novel cell aggregate-loaded macroporous scaffolds combining the osteoinductive properties of titanium dioxide (TiO2) with hydroxyapatite-gelatin nanocomposites (HAP-GEL) for regeneration of craniofacial defects. Here we investigated the in vivo applicability of macroporous (TiO2)-enriched HAP-GEL scaffolds with undifferentiated and osteogenically differentiated multipotent adult progenitor cell (MAPC and OD-MAPC, respectively) aggregates for calvaria bone regeneration. The silane-coated HAP-GEL with and without TiO2 additives were polymerized and molded to produce macroporous scaffolds. Aggregates of the rat MAPC were precultured, loaded into each scaffold, and implanted to rat calvaria critical-size defects to study bone regeneration. Bone autografts were used as positive controls and a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) scaffold for comparison purposes. Preimplanted scaffolds and calvaria bone from pig were tested for ultimate compressive strength with an Instron 4411(®) and for porosity with microcomputerized tomography (μCT). Osteointegration and newly formed bone (NFB) were assessed by μCT and nondecalcified histology, and quantified by calcium fluorescence labeling. Results showed that the macroporous TiO2-HAP-GEL scaffold had a comparable strength relative to the natural calvaria bone (13.8±4.5 MPa and 24.5±8.3 MPa, respectively). Porosity was 1.52±0.8 mm and 0.64±0.4 mm for TiO2-HAP-GEL and calvaria bone, respectively. At 8 and 12 weeks postimplantation into rat

  2. Bone regeneration and infiltration of an anisotropic composite scaffold: an experimental study of rabbit cranial defect repair.

    PubMed

    Li, Jidong; You, Fu; Li, Yubao; Zuo, Yi; Li, Limei; Jiang, Jiaxing; Qu, Yili; Lu, Minpeng; Man, Yi; Zou, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Tissue formation on scaffold outer edges after implantation may restrict cell infiltration and mass transfer to/from the scaffold center due to insufficient interconnectivity, leading to incidence of a necrotic core. Herein, a nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide66 (n-HA/PA66) anisotropic scaffold with axially aligned channels was prepared with the aim to enhance pore interconnectivity. Bone tissue regeneration and infiltration inside of scaffold were assessed by rabbit cranial defect repair experiments. The amount of newly formed bone inside of anisotropic scaffold was much higher than isotropic scaffold, e.g., after 12 weeks, the new bone volume in the inner pores was greater in the anisotropic scaffolds (>50%) than the isotropic scaffolds (<30%). The results suggested that anisotropic scaffolds could accelerate the inducement of bone ingrowth into the inner pores in the non-load-bearing bone defects compared to isotropic scaffolds. Thus, anisotropic scaffolds hold promise for the application in bone tissue engineering. PMID:26775692

  3. Bone regeneration and infiltration of an anisotropic composite scaffold: an experimental study of rabbit cranial defect repair.

    PubMed

    Li, Jidong; You, Fu; Li, Yubao; Zuo, Yi; Li, Limei; Jiang, Jiaxing; Qu, Yili; Lu, Minpeng; Man, Yi; Zou, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Tissue formation on scaffold outer edges after implantation may restrict cell infiltration and mass transfer to/from the scaffold center due to insufficient interconnectivity, leading to incidence of a necrotic core. Herein, a nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide66 (n-HA/PA66) anisotropic scaffold with axially aligned channels was prepared with the aim to enhance pore interconnectivity. Bone tissue regeneration and infiltration inside of scaffold were assessed by rabbit cranial defect repair experiments. The amount of newly formed bone inside of anisotropic scaffold was much higher than isotropic scaffold, e.g., after 12 weeks, the new bone volume in the inner pores was greater in the anisotropic scaffolds (>50%) than the isotropic scaffolds (<30%). The results suggested that anisotropic scaffolds could accelerate the inducement of bone ingrowth into the inner pores in the non-load-bearing bone defects compared to isotropic scaffolds. Thus, anisotropic scaffolds hold promise for the application in bone tissue engineering.

  4. Enhanced Bone Tissue Regeneration by Porous Gelatin Composites Loaded with the Chinese Herbal Decoction Danggui Buxue Tang

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen-Ling; Sheu, Shi-Yuan; Chen, Yueh-Sheng; Kao, Shung-Te; Fu, Yuan-Tsung; Kuo, Tzong-Fu; Chen, Kuo-Yu; Yao, Chun-Hsu

    2015-01-01

    Danggui Buxue Tang (DBT) is a traditional Chinese herbal decoction containing Radix Astragali and Radix Angelicae sinensis. Pharmacological results indicate that DBT can stimulate bone cell proliferation and differentiation. The aim of the study was to investigate the efficacy of adding DBT to bone substitutes on bone regeneration following bone injury. DBT was incorporated into porous composites (GGT) made from genipin-crosslinked gelatin and β-triclacium phosphates as bone substitutes (GGTDBT). The biological response of mouse calvarial bone to these composites was evaluated by in vivo imaging systems (IVIS), micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), and histology analysis. IVIS images revealed a stronger fluorescent signal in GGTDBT-treated defect than in GGT-treated defect at 8 weeks after implantation. Micro-CT analysis demonstrated that the level of repair from week 4 to 8 increased from 42.1% to 71.2% at the sites treated with GGTDBT, while that increased from 33.2% to 54.1% at GGT-treated sites. These findings suggest that the GGTDBT stimulates the innate regenerative capacity of bone, supporting their use in bone tissue regeneration. PMID:26126113

  5. The association of human mesenchymal stem cells with BMP-7 improves bone regeneration of critical-size segmental bone defects in athymic rats.

    PubMed

    Burastero, Giorgio; Scarfì, Sonia; Ferraris, Chiara; Fresia, Chiara; Sessarego, Nadia; Fruscione, Floriana; Monetti, Francesco; Scarfò, Francesca; Schupbach, Peter; Podestà, Marina; Grappiolo, Guido; Zocchi, Elena

    2010-07-01

    Critical size segmental bone defects are still a major challenge in reconstructive orthopedic surgery. Transplantation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) has been proposed as an alternative to autogenous bone graft, as MSC can be expanded in vitro and induced to differentiate into bone-regenerating osteoblasts by several bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP). The aim of this study was to investigate whether the association of hMSC and BMP-7, with providing the necessary scaffold to fill the bone loss, improved bone regeneration in a rat model of critical size segmental bone defect, compared to treatment with either hMSC or BMP-7 and the matrix. In addition, we tested whether pre-treatment of hMSC with cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR), an intracellular Ca2+ mobilizer previously shown to accelerate the in vitro expansion of hMSC (Scarfì S et al, Stem Cells, 2008), affected the osteoinductive capacity of the cells in vivo. X-ray analysis, performed 2, 10 and 16 weeks after transplantation, revealed a significantly higher score in the rats treated with hMSC and BMP-7 compared to controls, receiving either hMSC or BMP-7. Microtomography and histological analysis, performed 16weeks after transplantation, confirmed the improved bone regeneration in the animals treated with the association of hMSC and BMP-7 compared to controls. Pre-treatment with cADPR to stimulate hMSC proliferation in vitro did not affect the bone regenerating capacity of the cells in vivo. These results indicate that the association of in vitro expanded hMSC with BMP-7 provide a better osteoinductive graft compared to either hMSC or BMP-7 alone. Moreover, cADPR may be used to stimulate hMSC proliferation in vitro in order to reduce the time required to obtain a transplantable number of cells, with no adverse effect on the bone regenerating capacity of hMSC.

  6. Stem cells of the suture mesenchyme in craniofacial bone development, repair and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Takamitsu; Jeong, Jaeim; Sheu, Tzong-Jen; Hsu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The suture mesenchyme serves as a growth centre for calvarial morphogenesis and has been postulated to act as the niche for skeletal stem cells. Aberrant gene regulation causes suture dysmorphogenesis resulting in craniosynostosis, one of the most common craniofacial deformities. Owing to various limitations, especially the lack of suture stem cell isolation, reconstruction of large craniofacial bone defects remains highly challenging. Here we provide the first evidence for an Axin2-expressing stem cell population with long-term self-renewing, clonal expanding and differentiating abilities during calvarial development and homeostastic maintenance. These cells, which reside in the suture midline, contribute directly to injury repair and skeletal regeneration in a cell autonomous fashion. Our findings demonstrate their true identity as skeletal stem cells with innate capacities to replace the damaged skeleton in cell-based therapy, and permit further elucidation of the stem cell-mediated craniofacial skeletogenesis, leading to revealing the complex nature of congenital disease and regenerative medicine. PMID:26830436

  7. Endothelial progenitor cells from peripheral blood support bone regeneration by provoking an angiogenic response.

    PubMed

    Goerke, Sebastian M; Obermeyer, Julia; Plaha, Julia; Stark, G Björn; Finkenzeller, Günter

    2015-03-01

    Neovascularization is crucial for fracture healing and plays an important role in long-time graft survival in tissue engineering applications. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) can be isolated from peripheral blood avoiding donor site morbidity, which makes them attractive for autologous cell-based engineering of neovessels. However, contradictory results are published concerning the vasculogenic potential of this cell type. We could previously show that implanted human endothelial vein cells (HUVECs) gave rise to the formation of a complex functional human neovasculature in a heterotopic (subcutaneous) as well as in an orthotopic (calvarial defect) model of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice, where vessel formation could even be increased by coimplanting mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) functioning as perivascular cells. In this study, we investigated whether coimplantation of MSCs which have been predifferentiated in vitro into SMCs (SMC-MSCs) may enable pbEPCs to form blood vessels upon implantation and, if this would be the case, whether the resulting enhanced vascularization may support bone regeneration. For this purpose, pbEPCs and SMC-MSCs were mono- or cocultured in collagen matrices and seeded into scaffolds consisting of decalcified processed bovine cancellous bone (PBCB, Tutobone). Neovascularization and osteogenesis were evaluated using a calvarial bone defect-model in SCID mice. Our experiments could show that the missing vasculogenic potential of pbEPCs is not rescued by coimplantation of SMCs derived from MSCs predifferentiated along the vascular smooth muscle lineage. However, implantation of both cell types alone, or in combination induced an angiogenic response, which correlated in a positive manner with bone formation within the implants.

  8. Guided tissue regeneration and bone grafts in the treatment of furcation defects.

    PubMed

    Caffesse, R G; Nasjleti, C E; Plotzke, A E; Anderson, G B; Morrison, E C

    1993-11-01

    The present study evaluated the effects of guided tissue regeneration (GTR), with and without demineralized freeze-dried cortical bone grafts, in the treatment of furcation defects in 4 female beagle dogs with naturally occurring periodontal disease. The root surfaces were thoroughly debrided. Four weeks later, full thickness facial and lingual mucoperiosteal flaps were reflected using inverse bevel incisions on both sides of the mandible involving the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th premolar, and the 1st molar teeth. Following debridement, notches were placed on the roots at the level of supporting bone. Test quadrants were randomly selected and furcations were filled with reconstituted, demineralized, freeze-dried human cortical bone grafts. Following bone grafting, all defects were covered with an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) membrane, which was sutured with 4-0 sutures. Afterward, interproximal sutures were placed through the flaps, assuring the flaps covered the membranes completely. The contralateral side, serving as control, was treated by debridement only and application of ePTFE membrane. All membranes were removed 6 weeks after surgery. Dogs were sacrificed at 4 months after surgery. Both mesio-distal and bucco-lingual histologic sections were evaluated by descriptive histology. Linear measurements and surface area determination of the furcal tissues were carried out using the microscope attached to a digitizer. Twelve to 20 nonserial sections were made of the mid-buccal aspects of each root of each treated tooth. Half of these sections were stained with Harris' hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and the other half stained with Mallory's trichrome stain.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8295103

  9. Wound models for periodontal and bone regeneration: the role of biologic research.

    PubMed

    Sculean, Anton; Chapple, Iain L C; Giannobile, William V

    2015-06-01

    The ultimate goals of periodontal therapy remain the complete regeneration of those periodontal tissues lost to the destructive inflammatory-immune response, or to trauma, with tissues that possess the same structure and function, and the re-establishment of a sustainable health-promoting biofilm from one characterized by dysbiosis. This volume of Periodontology 2000 discusses the multiple facets of a transition from therapeutic empiricism during the late 1960s, toward regenerative therapies, which is founded on a clearer understanding of the biophysiology of normal structure and function. This introductory article provides an overview on the requirements of appropriate in vitro laboratory models (e.g. cell culture), of preclinical (i.e. animal) models and of human studies for periodontal wound and bone repair. Laboratory studies may provide valuable fundamental insights into basic mechanisms involved in wound repair and regeneration but also suffer from a unidimensional and simplistic approach that does not account for the complexities of the in vivo situation, in which multiple cell types and interactions all contribute to definitive outcomes. Therefore, such laboratory studies require validatory research, employing preclinical models specifically designed to demonstrate proof-of-concept efficacy, preliminary safety and adaptation to human disease scenarios. Small animal models provide the most economic and logistically feasible preliminary approaches but the outcomes do not necessarily translate to larger animal or human models. The advantages and limitations of all periodontal-regeneration models need to be carefully considered when planning investigations to ensure that the optimal design is adopted to answer the specific research question posed. Future challenges lie in the areas of stem cell research, scaffold designs, cell delivery and choice of growth factors, along with research to ensure appropriate gingival coverage in order to prevent gingival

  10. Wound models for periodontal and bone regeneration: the role of biologic research.

    PubMed

    Sculean, Anton; Chapple, Iain L C; Giannobile, William V

    2015-06-01

    The ultimate goals of periodontal therapy remain the complete regeneration of those periodontal tissues lost to the destructive inflammatory-immune response, or to trauma, with tissues that possess the same structure and function, and the re-establishment of a sustainable health-promoting biofilm from one characterized by dysbiosis. This volume of Periodontology 2000 discusses the multiple facets of a transition from therapeutic empiricism during the late 1960s, toward regenerative therapies, which is founded on a clearer understanding of the biophysiology of normal structure and function. This introductory article provides an overview on the requirements of appropriate in vitro laboratory models (e.g. cell culture), of preclinical (i.e. animal) models and of human studies for periodontal wound and bone repair. Laboratory studies may provide valuable fundamental insights into basic mechanisms involved in wound repair and regeneration but also suffer from a unidimensional and simplistic approach that does not account for the complexities of the in vivo situation, in which multiple cell types and interactions all contribute to definitive outcomes. Therefore, such laboratory studies require validatory research, employing preclinical models specifically designed to demonstrate proof-of-concept efficacy, preliminary safety and adaptation to human disease scenarios. Small animal models provide the most economic and logistically feasible preliminary approaches but the outcomes do not necessarily translate to larger animal or human models. The advantages and limitations of all periodontal-regeneration models need to be carefully considered when planning investigations to ensure that the optimal design is adopted to answer the specific research question posed. Future challenges lie in the areas of stem cell research, scaffold designs, cell delivery and choice of growth factors, along with research to ensure appropriate gingival coverage in order to prevent gingival

  11. Wound Models for Periodontal and Bone Regeneration: the role of biological research

    PubMed Central

    Sculean, Anton; Chapple, Iain L.C.; Giannobile, William V.

    2015-01-01

    The ultimate goal of periodontal therapy remains the complete regeneration of those periodontal tissues lost to the destructive inflammatory-immune response, or to trauma, with tissues that possess the same structure and function, and to reestablish and sustain a heath promoting biofilm from one characterised by dysbiosis. This volume discusses the multiple facets of a transition during the late 1960’s to the present day, towards regenerative therapies founded upon a clearer understanding of the biophysiology of normal structure and function, rather than empiricism. This introductory manuscript provides an overview on the requirements of appropriate in-vitro laboratory models (e.g. cell culture), of pre-clinical (i.e. animal) models and human studies for periodontal wound and bone repair. Laboratory studies may provide valuable fundamental insights into basic mechanisms involved in wound repair and regeneration, but also suffer from a uni-dimensional and simplistic approach that does not account for the complexities of the in vivo situation, where multiple cell types and interactions all contribute to definitive outcomes. Therefore, such laboratory studies require validatory research employing preclinical models specifically designed to demonstrate proof-of-concept efficacy, preliminary safety and adaptation to human disease scenarios. Small animal models provide the most economic and logistically feasible preliminary approaches, but outcomes do not necessarily translate to larger animal or human models. The advantages and limitations of all periodontal regeneration models need to be carefully considered when planning investigations to ensure that the optimal design is adopted to answer the specific research question posed. Future challenges lie in the areas of stem cell research, scaffold designs, cell delivery and choice of growth factors, along with research to ensure appropriate gingival coverage in order to prevent gingival recession during the healing phase

  12. Collagen duplicate genes of bone and cartilage participate during regeneration of zebrafish fin skeleton.

    PubMed

    Duran, I; Csukasi, F; Taylor, S P; Krakow, D; Becerra, J; Bombarely, A; Marí-Beffa, M

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish fin is widely used as a model for skeleton regeneration. For years, the nature of the fin skeleton has been controversial as its extracellular matrix shows hybrid characteristics of both bone and cartilage. The presence of co-orthologs genes also increases the complexity of these tissues. In this article, we have identified and described the expression of fibrillar collagens in zebrafish fin skeleton. We found that genes coding for types I, II, V, XI and XXVII collagens are duplicated, showing in several cases, different expression domains. We also identified specific genomic features, such as the presence of type XXIV collagen and the absence of type III collagen in the zebrafish genome. Our study showed that actinotrichia-forming cells and osteoblasts synthesize a wide variety of these fibrillar collagens during fin regeneration. An intertrichial domain expressing most of the collagens was located in the transition between the mesenchyme condensations of actinotrichia and lepidotrichia and may determine an important niche associated with fin skeleton morphogenesis. We also confirmed the hybrid nature of the fin exoskeleton and provided a complete description of those fibrillar collagens expressed during the formation of the fin skeleton. PMID:26256560

  13. Sol-gel processing of novel bioactive Mg-containing silicate scaffolds for alveolar bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Goudouri, Ourania-Menti; Vogel, Caroline; Grünewald, Alina; Detsch, Rainer; Kontonasaki, Eleana; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal tissue regeneration is an important application area of biomaterials, given the large proportion of the population affected by periodontal diseases like periodontitis. The aim of this study was the synthesis of a novel porous bioceramic scaffold in the SiO2-CaO-MgO system with specific properties targeted for alveolar bone tissue regeneration using a modification of the traditional foam replica technique. Since bioceramic scaffolds are considered brittle, scaffolds were also coated with gelatin in order to increase their mechanical stability. Gelatin was chosen for its biocompatibility, biodegradability, low-cost, and low immunogenicity. However, gelatin degrades very fast in water solutions. For this reason, two different cross-linking agents were evaluated. Genipin, a non-toxic gardenia extract and the chemical compound 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) in combination with N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS), which is also considered non-toxic. The results of the investigation indicated that all scaffolds presented an open, interconnected porosity and pores' sizes in the range of 300-600 μm, fast apatite-forming ability, biocompatibility, and suitable mechanical stability. PMID:25972398

  14. Sol-gel processing of novel bioactive Mg-containing silicate scaffolds for alveolar bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Goudouri, Ourania-Menti; Vogel, Caroline; Grünewald, Alina; Detsch, Rainer; Kontonasaki, Eleana; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal tissue regeneration is an important application area of biomaterials, given the large proportion of the population affected by periodontal diseases like periodontitis. The aim of this study was the synthesis of a novel porous bioceramic scaffold in the SiO2-CaO-MgO system with specific properties targeted for alveolar bone tissue regeneration using a modification of the traditional foam replica technique. Since bioceramic scaffolds are considered brittle, scaffolds were also coated with gelatin in order to increase their mechanical stability. Gelatin was chosen for its biocompatibility, biodegradability, low-cost, and low immunogenicity. However, gelatin degrades very fast in water solutions. For this reason, two different cross-linking agents were evaluated. Genipin, a non-toxic gardenia extract and the chemical compound 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) in combination with N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS), which is also considered non-toxic. The results of the investigation indicated that all scaffolds presented an open, interconnected porosity and pores' sizes in the range of 300-600 μm, fast apatite-forming ability, biocompatibility, and suitable mechanical stability.

  15. Collagen duplicate genes of bone and cartilage participate during regeneration of zebrafish fin skeleton.

    PubMed

    Duran, I; Csukasi, F; Taylor, S P; Krakow, D; Becerra, J; Bombarely, A; Marí-Beffa, M

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish fin is widely used as a model for skeleton regeneration. For years, the nature of the fin skeleton has been controversial as its extracellular matrix shows hybrid characteristics of both bone and cartilage. The presence of co-orthologs genes also increases the complexity of these tissues. In this article, we have identified and described the expression of fibrillar collagens in zebrafish fin skeleton. We found that genes coding for types I, II, V, XI and XXVII collagens are duplicated, showing in several cases, different expression domains. We also identified specific genomic features, such as the presence of type XXIV collagen and the absence of type III collagen in the zebrafish genome. Our study showed that actinotrichia-forming cells and osteoblasts synthesize a wide variety of these fibrillar collagens during fin regeneration. An intertrichial domain expressing most of the collagens was located in the transition between the mesenchyme condensations of actinotrichia and lepidotrichia and may determine an important niche associated with fin skeleton morphogenesis. We also confirmed the hybrid nature of the fin exoskeleton and provided a complete description of those fibrillar collagens expressed during the formation of the fin skeleton.

  16. Effect of FGF-2 on collagen tissue regeneration by human vertebral bone marrow stem cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Dong-Soo; Park, Jung-Chul; Lee, Jung-Seok; Kim, Tae-Wan; Kim, Ki-Joon; Jung, Byung-Joo; Shim, Eun-Kyung; Choi, Eun-Young; Park, So-Yon; Cho, Kyoo-Sung; Kim, Chang-Sung

    2015-01-15

    The effects of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) on collagen tissue regeneration by human bone marrow stem cells (hBMSCs) were investigated. hBMSCs were isolated from human vertebral body bone marrow during vertebral surgery and a population of hBMSCs with the characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells was observed. The FGF-2 treatment (5 ng/mL) affected on the colony-forming efficiency, proliferation, and in vitro differentiation of hBMSCs. Insoluble/soluble collagen and hydroxyproline synthesis was significantly enhanced in hBMSCs expanded with FGF-2 and the treatment of FGF-2 caused a reduction in the mRNA expression of collagen type I, but an increase of collagen types II and III along with lysyl oxidase family genes. Collagen formation was also examined using an in vivo assay model by transplanting hBMSCs into immunocompromised mice (n=4) and the histologic and immunohistochemical results revealed that significantly more collagen with a well-organized structure was formed by FGF-2-treated hBMSCs at 8 weeks posttransplantation (P<0.05). The DNA microarray assay demonstrated that genes related to extracellular matrix formation were significantly upregulated. To elucidate the underlying mechanism, chemical inhibitors against extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) were treated and following downstream expression was observed. Collectively, FGF-2 facilitated the collagen-producing potency of hBMSCs both in vitro and in vivo, rendering them more suitable for use in collagen regeneration in the clinical field.

  17. Role of platelet-rich plasma in combination with alloplastic bone substitute in regeneration of osseous defects

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Indrajeet; Gupta, Hemant; Pradhan, R; Sinha, VP; Gupta, Sumit

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Bone grafts are frequently used for the treatment of bone defects, but can cause postoperative complications, and sometimes a sufficient quantity of bone is not available. Hence, synthetic biomaterials have been used as an alternative to autogenous bone grafts. Recent clinical reports suggest that application of autologous blood plasma enriched with platelets can enhance the formation of new bone. There are very few in vitro or in vivo studies published on the efficiency of platelet-rich plasma (PRP). The objective of this study was to evaluate the alloplastic bone substitute for its osteogenic potential with or without PRP. Materials and Methods Twenty-three patients with periapical bony defects were selected for this study. Clinical parameters such as pain visual analog scale (VAS), swelling, infection, graft migration, rejection, radiographical interpretations at regular interval and scintigraphic evaluation were done to evaluate osteogenic potential of alloplastic bone substitute with or without PRP. Results The highest acceleration in bone formation was observed in groups where alloplastic bone substitute was used with PRP. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups regarding other outcome variables throughout the postoperative period. Conclusion Addition of PRP significantly accelerates vascularization of the graft, improves soft tissue healing, reduces postoperative morbidity and enhances bone regeneration. PMID:25756013

  18. Akermanite bioceramics promote osteogenesis, angiogenesis and suppress osteoclastogenesis for osteoporotic bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Xia, Lunguo; Yin, Zhilan; Mao, Lixia; Wang, Xiuhui; Liu, Jiaqiang; Jiang, Xinquan; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Lin, Kaili; Chang, Jiang; Fang, Bing

    2016-01-01

    It is a big challenge for bone healing under osteoporotic pathological condition with impaired angiogenesis, osteogenesis and remodeling. In the present study, the effect of Ca, Mg, Si containing akermanite bioceramics (Ca2MgSi2O7) extract on cell proliferation, osteogenic differentiation and angiogenic factor expression of BMSCs derived from ovariectomized rats (BMSCs-OVX) as well as the expression of osteoclastogenic factors was evaluated. The results showed that akermanite could enhance cell proliferation, ALP activity, expression of Runx2, BMP-2, BSP, OPN, OCN, OPG and angiogenic factors including VEGF and ANG-1. Meanwhile, akermanite could repress expression of osteoclastogenic factors including RANKL and TNF-α. Moreover, akermanite could activate ERK, P38, AKT and STAT3 signaling pathways, while crosstalk among these signaling pathways was evident. More importantly, the effect of akermanite extract on RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis was evaluated by TRAP staining and real-time PCR assay. The results showed that akermanite could suppress osteoclast formation and expression of TRAP, cathepsin K and NFATc1. The in vivo experiments revealed that akermanite bioceramics dramatically stimulated osteogenesis and angiogenesis in an OVX rat critical-sized calvarial defect model. All these results suggest that akermanite bioceramics with the effects of Mg and Si ions on osteogenesis, angiogenesis and osteoclastogenesis are promising biomaterials for osteoporotic bone regeneration. PMID:26911441

  19. Electrospinning biomedical nanocomposite fibers of hydroxyapatite/poly(lactic acid) for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hae-Won; Lee, Hae-Hyoung; Knowles, J C

    2006-12-01

    Development of fibrous matrices of bioceramic-biopolymer nanocomposite offers great potential in the field of bone regeneration and tissue engineering. However, in order to produce electrospun fibers with homogeneous structure, it is essential for the ceramic powder to be fine and to remain stable in suspension. Herein, we developed a novel method whereby the bioceramic hydroxyapatite (HA) was kept in suspension in biopolymer poly(lactic acid) (PLA). The strategy was to introduce a surfactant hydroxysteric acid (HSA) between the hydrophilic HA powder and the hydrophobic chloroform-dissolved PLA. The HA nanopowder was dispersed effectively in HSA and mixed homogeneously with PLA. Continuous and uniform fibers were generated successfully with diameters of approximately 1-2 microm, and featured a well-developed nanocomposite structure of HA nanopowder-dispersed PLA. Initial cellular assays showed excellent cell attachment and proliferation and also enhanced expression of alkaline phosphatase at 7 days of culturing. The HA-PLA nanocomposite fibers may be potentially useful in tissue engineering applications, particularly as three-dimensional substrates for bone growth.

  20. Akermanite bioceramics promote osteogenesis, angiogenesis and suppress osteoclastogenesis for osteoporotic bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Lunguo; Yin, Zhilan; Mao, Lixia; Wang, Xiuhui; Liu, Jiaqiang; Jiang, Xinquan; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Lin, Kaili; Chang, Jiang; Fang, Bing

    2016-01-01

    It is a big challenge for bone healing under osteoporotic pathological condition with impaired angiogenesis, osteogenesis and remodeling. In the present study, the effect of Ca, Mg, Si containing akermanite bioceramics (Ca2MgSi2O7) extract on cell proliferation, osteogenic differentiation and angiogenic factor expression of BMSCs derived from ovariectomized rats (BMSCs-OVX) as well as the expression of osteoclastogenic factors was evaluated. The results showed that akermanite could enhance cell proliferation, ALP activity, expression of Runx2, BMP-2, BSP, OPN, OCN, OPG and angiogenic factors including VEGF and ANG-1. Meanwhile, akermanite could repress expression of osteoclastogenic factors including RANKL and TNF-α. Moreover, akermanite could activate ERK, P38, AKT and STAT3 signaling pathways, while crosstalk among these signaling pathways was evident. More importantly, the effect of akermanite extract on RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis was evaluated by TRAP staining and real-time PCR assay. The results showed that akermanite could suppress osteoclast formation and expression of TRAP, cathepsin K and NFATc1. The in vivo experiments revealed that akermanite bioceramics dramatically stimulated osteogenesis and angiogenesis in an OVX rat critical-sized calvarial defect model. All these results suggest that akermanite bioceramics with the effects of Mg and Si ions on osteogenesis, angiogenesis and osteoclastogenesis are promising biomaterials for osteoporotic bone regeneration. PMID:26911441

  1. Three-dimensional printing of strontium-containing mesoporous bioactive glass scaffolds for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianhua; Zhao, Shichang; Zhu, Yufang; Huang, Yinjun; Zhu, Min; Tao, Cuilian; Zhang, Changqing

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we fabricated strontium-containing mesoporous bioactive glass (Sr-MBG) scaffolds with controlled architecture and enhanced mechanical strength using a three-dimensional (3-D) printing technique. The study showed that Sr-MBG scaffolds had uniform interconnected macropores and high porosity, and their compressive strength was ∼170 times that of polyurethane foam templated MBG scaffolds. The physicochemical and biological properties of Sr-MBG scaffolds were evaluated by ion dissolution, apatite-forming ability and proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, osteogenic expression and extracelluar matrix mineralization of osteoblast-like cells MC3T3-E1. The results showed that Sr-MBG scaffolds exhibited a slower ion dissolution rate and more significant potential to stabilize the pH environment with increasing Sr substitution. Importantly, Sr-MBG scaffolds possessed good apatite-forming ability, and stimulated osteoblast cells' proliferation and differentiation. Using dexamethasone as a model drug, Sr-MBG scaffolds also showed a sustained drug delivery property for use in local drug delivery therapy, due to their mesoporous structure. Therefore, the 3-D printed Sr-MBG scaffolds combined the advantages of Sr-MBG such as good bone-forming bioactivity, controlled ion release and drug delivery and enhanced mechanical strength, and had potential application in bone regeneration. PMID:24412143

  2. Adequate hypoxia inducible factor 1α signaling is indispensable for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Stegen, Steve; Deprez, Sanne; Eelen, Guy; Torrekens, Sophie; Van Looveren, Riet; Goveia, Jermaine; Ghesquière, Bart; Carmeliet, Peter; Carmeliet, Geert

    2016-06-01

    Engineered cell-based constructs are an appealing strategy to treat large skeletal defects. However, transplanted cells are often confronted with an environment that is deprived of oxygen and nutrients. Upon hypoxia, most cell types activate hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) signaling, but its importance for implanted osteoprogenitor cells during bone regeneration is not elucidated. To this end, we specifically deleted the HIF--1α isoform in periosteal progenitor cells and show that activation of HIF-1α signaling in these cells is critical for bone repair by modulating angiogenic and metabolic processes. Activation of HIF-1α is not only crucial for blood vessel invasion, by enhancing angiogenic growth factor production, but also for periosteal cell survival early after implantation, when blood vessels have not yet invaded the construct. HIF-1α signaling limits oxygen consumption to avoid accumulation of harmful ROS and preserve redox balance, and additionally induces a switch to glycolysis to prevent energetic distress. Altogether, our results indicate that the proangiogenic capacity of implanted periosteal cells is HIF-1α regulated and that metabolic adaptations mediate post-implantation cell survival. PMID:27058876

  3. Tantalum coating of porous carbon scaffold supplemented with autologous bone marrow stromal stem cells for bone regeneration in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaowei; Zhao, Dewei; Wang, Benjie; Wang, Wei; Kang, Kai; Xie, Hui; Liu, Baoyi; Zhang, Xiuzhi; Zhang, Jinsong; Yang, Zhenming

    2016-03-01

    Porous tantalum metal with low elastic modulus is similar to cancellous bone. Reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) can provide three-dimensional pore structure and serves as the ideal scaffold of tantalum coating. In this study, the biocompatibility of domestic porous tantalum was first successfully tested with bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs) in vitro and for bone tissue repair in vivo. We evaluated cytotoxicity of RVC scaffold and tantalum coating using BMSCs. The morphology, adhesion, and proliferation of BMSCs were observed via laser scanning confocal microscope and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, porous tantalum rods with or without autologous BMSCs were implanted on hind legs in dogs, respectively. The osteogenic potential was observed by hard tissue slice examination. At three weeks and six weeks following implantation, new osteoblasts and new bone were observed at the tantalum-host bone interface and pores. At 12 weeks postporous tantalum with autologous BMSCs implantation, regenerated trabecular equivalent to mature bone was found in the pore of tantalum rods. Our results suggested that domestic porous tantalum had excellent biocompatibility and could promote new bone formation in vivo. Meanwhile, the osteogenesis of porous tantalum associated with autologous BMSCs was more excellent than only tantalum implantation. Future clinical studies are warranted to verify the clinical efficacy of combined implantation of this domestic porous tantalum associated with autologous BMSCs implantation and compare their efficacy with conventional autologous bone grafting carrying blood vessel in patients needing bone repairing.

  4. Tantalum coating of porous carbon scaffold supplemented with autologous bone marrow stromal stem cells for bone regeneration in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaowei; Wang, Benjie; Wang, Wei; Kang, Kai; Xie, Hui; Liu, Baoyi; Zhang, Xiuzhi; Zhang, Jinsong; Yang, Zhenming

    2016-01-01

    Porous tantalum metal with low elastic modulus is similar to cancellous bone. Reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) can provide three-dimensional pore structure and serves as the ideal scaffold of tantalum coating. In this study, the biocompatibility of domestic porous tantalum was first successfully tested with bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs) in vitro and for bone tissue repair in vivo. We evaluated cytotoxicity of RVC scaffold and tantalum coating using BMSCs. The morphology, adhesion, and proliferation of BMSCs were observed via laser scanning confocal microscope and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, porous tantalum rods with or without autologous BMSCs were implanted on hind legs in dogs, respectively. The osteogenic potential was observed by hard tissue slice examination. At three weeks and six weeks following implantation, new osteoblasts and new bone were observed at the tantalum–host bone interface and pores. At 12 weeks postporous tantalum with autologous BMSCs implantation, regenerated trabecular equivalent to mature bone was found in the pore of tantalum rods. Our results suggested that domestic porous tantalum had excellent biocompatibility and could promote new bone formation in vivo. Meanwhile, the osteogenesis of porous tantalum associated with autologous BMSCs was more excellent than only tantalum implantation. Future clinical studies are warranted to verify the clinical efficacy of combined implantation of this domestic porous tantalum associated with autologous BMSCs implantation and compare their efficacy with conventional autologous bone grafting carrying blood vessel in patients needing bone repairing. PMID:26843518

  5. Tantalum coating of porous carbon scaffold supplemented with autologous bone marrow stromal stem cells for bone regeneration in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaowei; Zhao, Dewei; Wang, Benjie; Wang, Wei; Kang, Kai; Xie, Hui; Liu, Baoyi; Zhang, Xiuzhi; Zhang, Jinsong; Yang, Zhenming

    2016-03-01

    Porous tantalum metal with low elastic modulus is similar to cancellous bone. Reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) can provide three-dimensional pore structure and serves as the ideal scaffold of tantalum coating. In this study, the biocompatibility of domestic porous tantalum was first successfully tested with bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs) in vitro and for bone tissue repair in vivo. We evaluated cytotoxicity of RVC scaffold and tantalum coating using BMSCs. The morphology, adhesion, and proliferation of BMSCs were observed via laser scanning confocal microscope and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, porous tantalum rods with or without autologous BMSCs were implanted on hind legs in dogs, respectively. The osteogenic potential was observed by hard tissue slice examination. At three weeks and six weeks following implantation, new osteoblasts and new bone were observed at the tantalum-host bone interface and pores. At 12 weeks postporous tantalum with autologous BMSCs implantation, regenerated trabecular equivalent to mature bone was found in the pore of tantalum rods. Our results suggested that domestic porous tantalum had excellent biocompatibility and could promote new bone formation in vivo. Meanwhile, the osteogenesis of porous tantalum associated with autologous BMSCs was more excellent than only tantalum implantation. Future clinical studies are warranted to verify the clinical efficacy of combined implantation of this domestic porous tantalum associated with autologous BMSCs implantation and compare their efficacy with conventional autologous bone grafting carrying blood vessel in patients needing bone repairing. PMID:26843518

  6. Association of vitamin D3 with alveolar bone regeneration in dogs.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hsiang-Hsi; Yen, Tzung-Hai; Hong, Adrienne; Chou, Ting-An

    2015-06-01

    Designed sockets prepared on the mandibles of nine Beagle dogs were divided into three groups: Calcitriol +Alloplast, Alloplast and Empty. Five of the nine dogs received Vit.D3 and calcium supplement (Vit.D/Ca group), while the other four dogs without supplements were assigned to Non-Vit.D/Ca group. After 4 weeks, the extent of vertical ridge resorption (VRR), bone density (density), new bone formation (NBF) and implant stability quotient (ISQ) were measured. Following systemic Vit.D/Ca administration, the Empty subgroup showed significant differences from the Calcitriol + Alloplast subgroup on variants NBF/Density/VRR and the Alloplast subgroup on items NBF/Density/ISQ/VRR. Alternatively, the Calcitriol + Alloplast subgroup revealed higher values of NBF/Density/ISQ (P < 0.001) and a lower VRR value (P = 0.001) than the Alloplast subgroup. Although there were no significant differences in NBF (P = 0.349), density (P = 0.796), ISQ (P = 0.577) and VRR (0.979) comparisons on alloplast treatment between the Vit.D/Ca and Non-Vit.D/Ca groups, local application with Calcitriol + Alloplast demonstrated better NBF/Density/ISQ (P = 0.02 to <0.001) effects than which of Alloplast subgroups. Consequently, the results showed that both systemic and local vitamin D3 treatment might accelerate bone regeneration in dogs. Within the using dose, systemic vitamin D3 treatment displayed a superior stimulating effect than local vitamin D3 application did.

  7. Wollastonite nanofiber–doped self-setting calcium phosphate bioactive cement for bone tissue regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Han; Wei, Jie; Song, Wenhua; Zhang, Shan; Yan, Yonggang; Liu, Changsheng; Xiao, Tiqiao

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to synthesize a self-setting bioactive cement by incorporation of wollastonite nanofibers (WNFs) into calcium phosphate cement (CPC). The composition, morphology, setting time, compressive strength, hydrophilicity, and degradation of WNF-doped CPC (wnf-CPC) were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy were utilized. Additionally, methyl-thiazolyl-tetrazolium bromide assay, scanning electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, and histological evaluation were used to study the cell and tissue responses to wnf-CPC, both in vitro and in vivo. The results confirmed that the addition of WNFs into CPC had no obvious effect on the setting time or the compressive strength of wnf-CPC, provided the WNF amount was not more than 10 wt%. However, the hydrophilicity and degradability of wnf-CPC were significantly improved by the addition of WNFs – this was because of the change of microstructure caused by the WNFs. The preferred dissolution of WNFs caused the formation of microporosity in wnf-CPC when soaked in tris hydrochloride solution. The microporosity enlarged the surface area of the wnf-CPC and so promoted degradation of the wnf-CPC when in contact with liquid. In addition, MG-63 cell attachment and proliferation on the wnf-CPC were superior to that on the CPC, indicating that incorporation of WNFs into CPC improved the biological properties for wnf-CPC. Following the implantation of wnf-CPC into bone defects of rabbits, histological evaluation showed that wnf-CPC enhanced the efficiency of new bone formation in comparison with CPC, indicating excellent biocompatibility and osteogenesis of wnf-CPC. In conclusion, wnf-CPC exhibited promising prospects in bone regeneration. PMID:22848181

  8. Biomimetic tubular nanofiber mesh and platelet rich plasma-mediated delivery of BMP-7 for large bone defect regeneration.

    PubMed

    Berner, A; Boerckel, J D; Saifzadeh, S; Steck, R; Ren, J; Vaquette, C; Zhang, J Qiyi; Nerlich, M; Guldberg, R E; Hutmacher, D W; Woodruff, M A

    2012-03-01

    There is a growing need for successful bone tissue engineering strategies and advanced biomaterials that mimic the structure and function of native tissues carry great promise. Successful bone repair approaches may include an osteoconductive scaffold, osteoinductive growth factors, cells with an osteogenic potential and capacity for graft vascularisation. To increase osteoinductivity of biomaterials, the local combination and delivery of growth factors has been developed. In the present study we investigated the osteogenic effects of calcium phosphate (CaP)-coated nanofiber mesh tube-mediated delivery of BMP-7 from a PRP matrix for the regeneration of critical sized segmental bone defects in a small animal model. Bilateral full-thickness diaphyseal segmental defects were created in twelve male Lewis rats and nanofiber mesh tubes were placed around the defect. Defects received either treatment with a CaP-coated nanofiber mesh tube (n = 6), an un-coated nanofiber mesh tube (n=6) a CaP-coated nanofiber mesh tube with PRP (n=6) or a CaP-coated nanofiber mesh tube in combination with 5 μg BMP-7 and PRP (n = 6). After 12 weeks, bone volume and biomechanical properties were evaluated using radiography, microCT, biomechanical testing and histology. The results demonstrated significantly higher biomechanical properties and bone volume for the BMP group compared to the control groups. These results were supported by the histological evaluations, where BMP group showed the highest rate of bone regeneration within the defect. In conclusion, BMP-7 delivery via PRP enhanced functional bone defect regeneration, and together these data support the use of BMP-7 in the treatment of critical sized defects.

  9. Peripheral serotonin-mediated system suppresses bone development and regeneration via serotonin 6 G-protein-coupled receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Hyung-Mun; Park, Kyung-Ran; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin is important in brain functions and involved in neurological diseases. It is also drawn considerable attention in bone disease since it mainly produced by the gut. Serotonin 6 G-protein-coupled receptor (5-HT6R) is clinical targets for the treatment of neurological diseases. However, 5-HT6R as a therapeutic target in bone has not been reported. Herein, we found that 5-HT6R showed higher expression in bone, and its expression was increased during bone remodeling and osteoblast differentiation. The activation of 5-HT6R by ST1936 caused the inhibition of ALP activity and mineralization in primary osteoblast cultures, which was antagonized by SB258585, an antagonist and by the knockdown of 5-HT6R. Further investigation indicated that 5-HT6R inhibited osteoblast differentiation via Jab1 in BMP2 signaling but not PKA and ERK1/2. In vivo studies showed that the activation of 5-HT6R inhibited bone regeneration in the calvarial defect mice and also delayed bone development in newborn mice; this response was antagonized by SB258585. Therefore, our findings indicate a key role of 5-HT6R in bone formation through serotonin originating in the peripheral system, and suggest that it is a novel therapeutic target for drug development in the bone repair and bone diseases. PMID:27581523

  10. Peripheral serotonin-mediated system suppresses bone development and regeneration via serotonin 6 G-protein-coupled receptor.

    PubMed

    Yun, Hyung-Mun; Park, Kyung-Ran; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin is important in brain functions and involved in neurological diseases. It is also drawn considerable attention in bone disease since it mainly produced by the gut. Serotonin 6 G-protein-coupled receptor (5-HT6R) is clinical targets for the treatment of neurological diseases. However, 5-HT6R as a therapeutic target in bone has not been reported. Herein, we found that 5-HT6R showed higher expression in bone, and its expression was increased during bone remodeling and osteoblast differentiation. The activation of 5-HT6R by ST1936 caused the inhibition of ALP activity and mineralization in primary osteoblast cultures, which was antagonized by SB258585, an antagonist and by the knockdown of 5-HT6R. Further investigation indicated that 5-HT6R inhibited osteoblast differentiation via Jab1 in BMP2 signaling but not PKA and ERK1/2. In vivo studies showed that the activation of 5-HT6R inhibited bone regeneration in the calvarial defect mice and also delayed bone development in newborn mice; this response was antagonized by SB258585. Therefore, our findings indicate a key role of 5-HT6R in bone formation through serotonin originating in the peripheral system, and suggest that it is a novel therapeutic target for drug development in the bone repair and bone diseases. PMID:27581523

  11. Bone marrow-derived fibroblast growth factor-2 induces glial cell proliferation in the regenerating peripheral nervous system

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Among the essential biological roles of bone marrow-derived cells, secretion of many soluble factors is included and these small molecules can act upon specific receptors present in many tissues including the nervous system. Some of the released molecules can induce proliferation of Schwann cells (SC), satellite cells and lumbar spinal cord astrocytes during early steps of regeneration in a rat model of sciatic nerve transection. These are the major glial cell types that support neuronal survival and axonal growth following peripheral nerve injury. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) is the main mitogenic factor for SCs and is released in large amounts by bone marrow-derived cells, as well as by growing axons and endoneurial fibroblasts during development and regeneration of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Results Here we show that bone marrow-derived cell treatment induce an increase in the expression of FGF-2 in the sciatic nerve, dorsal root ganglia and the dorsolateral (DL) region of the lumbar spinal cord (LSC) in a model of sciatic nerve transection and connection into a hollow tube. SCs in culture in the presence of bone marrow derived conditioned media (CM) resulted in increased proliferation and migration. This effect was reduced when FGF-2 was neutralized by pretreating BMMC or CM with a specific antibody. The increased expression of FGF-2 was validated by RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry in co-cultures of bone marrow derived cells with sciatic nerve explants and regenerating nerve tissue respectivelly. Conclusion We conclude that FGF-2 secreted by BMMC strongly increases early glial proliferation, which can potentially improve PNS regeneration. PMID:22793996

  12. New Bio-Ceramization Processes Applied to Vegetable Hierarchical Structures for Bone Regeneration: An Experimental Model in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Filardo, Giuseppe; Tampieri, Anna; Cabezas-Rodríguez, Rafael; Di Martino, Alessandro; Fini, Milena; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Lelli, Marco; Martínez-Fernández, Julian; Martini, Lucia; Ramírez-Rico, Joaquin; Salamanna, Francesca; Sandri, Monica; Sprio, Simone; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2014-01-01

    Bone loss is still a major problem in orthopedics. The purpose of this experimental study is to evaluate the safety and regenerative potential of a new scaffold based on a bio-ceramization process for bone regeneration in long diaphyseal defects in a sheep model. The scaffold was obtained by transformation of wood pieces into porous biomorphic silicon carbide (BioSiC®). The process enabled the maintenance of the original wood microstructure, thus exhibiting hierarchically organized porosity and high mechanical strength. To improve cell adhesion and osseointegration, the external surface of the hollow cylinder was made more bioactive by electrodeposition of a uniform layer of collagen fibers that were mineralized with biomimetic hydroxyapatite, whereas the internal part was filled with a bio-hybrid HA/collagen composite. The final scaffold was then implanted in the metatarsus of 15 crossbred (Merinos-Sarda) adult sheep, divided into 3 groups: scaffold alone, scaffold with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) augmentation, and scaffold with bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) added during implantation. Radiological analysis was performed at 4, 8, 12 weeks, and 4 months, when animals were sacrificed for the final radiological, histological, and histomorphometric evaluation. In all tested treatments, these analyses highlighted the presence of newly formed bone at the bone scaffolds' interface. Although a lack of substantial effect of PRP was demonstrated, the scaffold+BMSC augmentation showed the highest value of bone-to-implant contact and new bone growth inside the scaffold. The findings of this study suggest the potential of bio-ceramization processes applied to vegetable hierarchical structures for the production of wood-derived bone scaffolds, and document a suitable augmentation procedure in enhancing bone regeneration, particularly when combined with BMSCs. PMID:24099033

  13. Differential effect of amelogenin peptides on osteogenic differentiation in vitro: identification of possible new drugs for bone repair and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Amin, Harsh D; Olsen, Irwin; Knowles, Jonathan C; Donos, Nikolaos

    2012-06-01

    Enamel matrix proteins (EMP) have been shown to promote regeneration of periodontal ligament and root cementum, and sometimes to enhance the differentiation of bone-forming cells in vitro and new bone growth in vivo. However, the inconsistent and unpredictable effects of EMP that have been reported for bone regeneration may be due to the highly variable composition of this heterogeneous material, which is comprised mainly of amelogenin and amelogenin-derived peptides. The present study has therefore examined the effects of naturally occurring low-molecular-weight (LMW) and high-molecular-weight (HMW) fractions of Emdogain(®) (EMD; Institut Straumann, Basel, Switzerland), a commercially available form of EMP, on osteogenic differentiation of bone precursor cells in vitro. In addition, the effects of chemically synthesized specific components of LMW and HMW-namely, the tyrosine-rich amelogenin peptide (TRAP), a specific amelogenin isoform derived by proteolytic clipping, and a leucine-rich amelogenin peptide (LRAP), an isoform derived by alternative splicing-on bone-forming cell activity were also investigated. Our findings demonstrate that while TRAP suppressed the formation of bone-like mineralized nodules, LRAP upregulated osteogenic differentiation. Furthermore, synthetically produced TRAP and its unique C-terminal 12 amino acid sequence (TCT) also suppressed bone-forming cells, whereas LRAP and its unique C-terminal 23 amino acid sequence (LCT) markedly enhanced terminal differentiation of bone-forming cells. These findings suggest that the differential effects of amelogenin-derived peptide sequences present in EMP could be of potential clinical value, with the novel bioactive TCT peptide as a useful tool for limiting pathological bone cell growth and the unique LCT sequence having therapeutic benefits in the treatment of periodontal and orthopedic diseases. PMID:22320389

  14. New bio-ceramization processes applied to vegetable hierarchical structures for bone regeneration: an experimental model in sheep.

    PubMed

    Filardo, Giuseppe; Kon, Elizaveta; Tampieri, Anna; Cabezas-Rodríguez, Rafael; Di Martino, Alessandro; Fini, Milena; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Lelli, Marco; Martínez-Fernández, Julian; Martini, Lucia; Ramírez-Rico, Joaquin; Salamanna, Francesca; Sandri, Monica; Sprio, Simone; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2014-02-01

    Bone loss is still a major problem in orthopedics. The purpose of this experimental study is to evaluate the safety and regenerative potential of a new scaffold based on a bio-ceramization process for bone regeneration in long diaphyseal defects in a sheep model. The scaffold was obtained by transformation of wood pieces into porous biomorphic silicon carbide (BioSiC®). The process enabled the maintenance of the original wood microstructure, thus exhibiting hierarchically organized porosity and high mechanical strength. To improve cell adhesion and osseointegration, the external surface of the hollow cylinder was made more bioactive by electrodeposition of a uniform layer of collagen fibers that were mineralized with biomimetic hydroxyapatite, whereas the internal part was filled with a bio-hybrid HA/collagen composite. The final scaffold was then implanted in the metatarsus of 15 crossbred (Merinos-Sarda) adult sheep, divided into 3 groups: scaffold alone, scaffold with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) augmentation, and scaffold with bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) added during implantation. Radiological analysis was performed at 4, 8, 12 weeks, and 4 months, when animals were sacrificed for the final radiological, histological, and histomorphometric evaluation. In all tested treatments, these analyses highlighted the presence of newly formed bone at the bone scaffolds' interface. Although a lack of substantial effect of PRP was demonstrated, the scaffold+BMSC augmentation showed the highest value of bone-to-implant contact and new bone growth inside the scaffold. The findings of this study suggest the potential of bio-ceramization processes applied to vegetable hierarchical structures for the production of wood-derived bone scaffolds, and document a suitable augmentation procedure in enhancing bone regeneration, particularly when combined with BMSCs.

  15. Modern bone regeneration instead of bone transplantation: a combination of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 and platelet-rich plasma for the vertical augmentation of the maxillary bone-a single case report.

    PubMed

    Schuckert, Karl-Heinz; Jopp, Stefan; Osadnik, Magdalena

    2010-12-01

    This publication describes the clinical case of a 75-year-old woman. She suffered from total alveolar ridge atrophy due to 20 years of wearing dentures. Bone transplantation, including harvesting of the iliac crest, was rejected by another clinic due to various existing diseases and risk of blood loss on donor side. Moreover, the minimal residual alveolar ridge did not allow bone fixation using screws nor did it allow osteodistraction. Before deciding which bone tissue engineering techniques should best be employed in this surgical treatment, cardiological and internistic consultations and treatments were carried out. In addition, anesthetic preparations were made. The surgical treatment was performed implementing special bridge flap techniques to preserve the periosteum. Tricalcium phosphate blocks soaked with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 and platelet-rich plasma were implanted on the narrow alveolar ridge. They were attached by tightening the soft tissue, including the periosteum. Four months later, after complication-free wound healing and bone regeneration, six dental implants were inserted into the new alveolar ridge. The histology of all bone samples showed vital lamellar bone. Three months after implantation, a new dental structure was fixed on the implants. The patient's quality of life improved significantly with this new situation. PMID:20302447

  16. Bone regeneration in rat calvarial defects implanted with fibrous scaffolds composed of a mixture of silicate and borate bioactive glasses.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yifei; Huang, Wenhai; Rahaman, Mohamed N; Day, Delbert E

    2013-11-01

    Previous studies have evaluated the capacity of porous scaffolds composed of a single bioactive glass to regenerate bone. In the present study, scaffolds composed of a mixture of two different bioactive glasses (silicate 13-93 and borate 13-93B3) were created and evaluated for their response to osteogenic MLO-A5 cells in vitro and their capacity to regenerate bone in rat calvarial defects in vivo. The scaffolds, which have similar microstructures (porosity=58-67%) and contain 0, 25, 50 and 100 wt.% 13-93B3 glass, were fabricated by thermally bonding randomly oriented short fibers. The silicate 13-93 scaffolds showed a better capacity to support cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity than the scaffolds containing borate 13-93B3 fibers. The amount of new bone formed in the defects implanted with the 13-93 scaffolds at 12 weeks was 31%, compared to values of 25, 17 and 20%, respectively, for the scaffolds containing 25, 50 and 100% 13-93B3 glass. The amount of new bone formed in the 13-93 scaffolds was significantly higher than in the scaffolds containing 50 and 100% 13-93B3 glass. While the 13-93 fibers were only partially converted to hydroxyapatite at 12 weeks, the 13-93B3 fibers were fully converted and formed a tubular morphology. Scaffolds composed of an optimized mixture of silicate and borate bioactive glasses could provide the requisite architecture to guide bone regeneration combined with a controllable degradation rate that could be beneficial for bone and tissue healing.

  17. Platelet-rich plasma, plasma rich in growth factors and simvastatin in the regeneration and repair of alveolar bone

    PubMed Central

    RIVERA, CÉSAR; MONSALVE, FRANCISCO; SALAS, JUAN; MORÁN, ANDREA; SUAZO, IVÁN

    2013-01-01

    Platelet preparations promote bone regeneration by inducing cell migration, proliferation and differentiation in the area of the injury, which are essential processes for regeneration. In addition, several studies have indicated that simvastatin (SIMV), widely used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia, stimulates osteogenesis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of treatment with either platelet-rich plasma (PRP) or plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) in combination with SIMV in the regeneration and repair of alveolar bone. The jaws of Sprague Dawley rats (n=18) were subjected to rotary instrument-induced bone damage (BD). Animals were divided into six groups: BD/H2O (n=3), distilled water without the drug and alveolar bone damage; BD/H2O/PRP (n=3), BD and PRP; BD/H2O/PRGF (n=3), BD and PRGF; BD/SIMV (n=3), BD and water with SIMV; BD/SIMV/PRP (n=3), BD, PRP and SIMV; and BD/SIMV/PRGF (n=3), BD, PRGF and SIMV. Conventional histological analysis (hematoxylin and eosin staining) revealed that the BD/SIMV group showed indicators for mature bone tissue, while the BD/SIMV/PRP and BD/SIMV/PRGF groups showed the coexistence of indicators for mature and immature bone tissue, with no statistical differences between the platelet preparations. Simvastatin did not improve the effect of platelet-rich plasma and plasma rich in growth factors. It was not possible to determine which platelet preparation produced superior effects. PMID:24250728

  18. A computer-designed scaffold for bone regeneration within cranial defect using human dental pulp stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Yeon Kwon, Doo; Seon Kwon, Jin; Hun Park, Seung; Hun Park, Ji; Hee Jang, So; Yun Yin, Xiang; Yun, Jeong-Ho; Ho Kim, Jae; Hyun Min, Byoung; Hee Lee, Jun; Kim, Wan-Doo; Suk Kim, Moon

    2015-01-01

    A computer-designed, solvent-free scaffold offer several potential advantages such as ease of customized manufacture and in vivo safety. In this work, we firstly used a computer-designed, solvent-free scaffold and human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) to regenerate neo-bone within cranial bone defects. The hDPSCs expressed mesenchymal stem cell markers and served as an abundant source of stem cells with a high proliferation rate. In addition, hDPSCs showed a phenotype of differentiated osteoblasts in the presence of osteogenic factors (OF). We used solid freeform fabrication (SFF) with biodegradable polyesters (MPEG-(PLLA-co-PGA-co-PCL) (PLGC)) to fabricate a computer-designed scaffold. The SFF technology gave quick and reproducible results. To assess bone tissue engineering in vivo, the computer-designed, circular PLGC scaffold was implanted into a full-thickness cranial bone defect and monitored by micro-computed tomography (CT) and histology of the in vivo tissue-engineered bone. Neo-bone formation of more than 50% in both micro-CT and histology tests was observed at only PLGC scaffold with hDPSCs/OF. Furthermore, the PLGC scaffold gradually degraded, as evidenced by the fluorescent-labeled PLGC scaffold, which provides information to tract biodegradation of implanted PLGC scaffold. In conclusion, we confirmed neo-bone formation within a cranial bone defect using hDPSCs and a computer-designed PLGC scaffold. PMID:26234712

  19. The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay for the study of human bone regeneration: a refinement animal model for tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Jiménez, Inés; Hulsart-Billstrom, Gry; Lanham, Stuart A.; Janeczek, Agnieszka A.; Kontouli, Nasia; Kanczler, Janos M.; Evans, Nicholas D.; Oreffo, Richard Oc

    2016-08-01

    Biomaterial development for tissue engineering applications is rapidly increasing but necessitates efficacy and safety testing prior to clinical application. Current in vitro and in vivo models hold a number of limitations, including expense, lack of correlation between animal models and human outcomes and the need to perform invasive procedures on animals; hence requiring new predictive screening methods. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) can be used as a bioreactor to culture and study the regeneration of human living bone. We extracted bone cylinders from human femoral heads, simulated an injury using a drill-hole defect, and implanted the bone on CAM or in vitro control-culture. Micro-computed tomography (μCT) was used to quantify the magnitude and location of bone volume changes followed by histological analyses to assess bone repair. CAM blood vessels were observed to infiltrate the human bone cylinder and maintain human cell viability. Histological evaluation revealed extensive extracellular matrix deposition in proximity to endochondral condensations (Sox9+) on the CAM-implanted bone cylinders, correlating with a significant increase in bone volume by μCT analysis (p < 0.01). This human-avian system offers a simple refinement model for animal research and a step towards a humanized in vivo model for tissue engineering.

  20. The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay for the study of human bone regeneration: a refinement animal model for tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Jiménez, Inés; Hulsart-Billstrom, Gry; Lanham, Stuart A.; Janeczek, Agnieszka A.; Kontouli, Nasia; Kanczler, Janos M.; Evans, Nicholas D.; Oreffo, Richard OC

    2016-01-01

    Biomaterial development for tissue engineering applications is rapidly increasing but necessitates efficacy and safety testing prior to clinical application. Current in vitro and in vivo models hold a number of limitations, including expense, lack of correlation between animal models and human outcomes and the need to perform invasive procedures on animals; hence requiring new predictive screening methods. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) can be used as a bioreactor to culture and study the regeneration of human living bone. We extracted bone cylinders from human femoral heads, simulated an injury using a drill-hole defect, and implanted the bone on CAM or in vitro control-culture. Micro-computed tomography (μCT) was used to quantify the magnitude and location of bone volume changes followed by histological analyses to assess bone repair. CAM blood vessels were observed to infiltrate the human bone cylinder and maintain human cell viability. Histological evaluation revealed extensive extracellular matrix deposition in proximity to endochondral condensations (Sox9+) on the CAM-implanted bone cylinders, correlating with a significant increase in bone volume by μCT analysis (p < 0.01). This human-avian system offers a simple refinement model for animal research and a step towards a humanized in vivo model for tissue engineering. PMID:27577960

  1. A computer-designed scaffold for bone regeneration within cranial defect using human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Doo Yeon; Kwon, Jin Seon; Park, Seung Hun; Park, Ji Hun; Jang, So Hee; Yin, Xiang Yun; Yun, Jeong-Ho; Kim, Jae Ho; Min, Byoung Hyun; Lee, Jun Hee; Kim, Wan-Doo; Kim, Moon Suk

    2015-08-03

    A computer-designed, solvent-free scaffold offer several potential advantages such as ease of customized manufacture and in vivo safety. In this work, we firstly used a computer-designed, solvent-free scaffold and human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) to regenerate neo-bone within cranial bone defects. The hDPSCs expressed mesenchymal stem cell markers and served as an abundant source of stem cells with a high proliferation rate. In addition, hDPSCs showed a phenotype of differentiated osteoblasts in the presence of osteogenic factors (OF). We used solid freeform fabrication (SFF) with biodegradable polyesters (MPEG-(PLLA-co-PGA-co-PCL) (PLGC)) to fabricate a computer-designed scaffold. The SFF technology gave quick and reproducible results. To assess bone tissue engineering in vivo, the computer-designed, circular PLGC scaffold was implanted into a full-thickness cranial bone defect and monitored by micro-computed tomography (CT) and histology of the in vivo tissue-engineered bone. Neo-bone formation of more than 50% in both micro-CT and histology tests was observed at only PLGC scaffold with hDPSCs/OF. Furthermore, the PLGC scaffold gradually degraded, as evidenced by the fluorescent-labeled PLGC scaffold, which provides information to tract biodegradation of implanted PLGC scaffold. In conclusion, we confirmed neo-bone formation within a cranial bone defect using hDPSCs and a computer-designed PLGC scaffold.

  2. The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay for the study of human bone regeneration: a refinement animal model for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Jiménez, Inés; Hulsart-Billstrom, Gry; Lanham, Stuart A; Janeczek, Agnieszka A; Kontouli, Nasia; Kanczler, Janos M; Evans, Nicholas D; Oreffo, Richard Oc

    2016-01-01

    Biomaterial development for tissue engineering applications is rapidly increasing but necessitates efficacy and safety testing prior to clinical application. Current in vitro and in vivo models hold a number of limitations, including expense, lack of correlation between animal models and human outcomes and the need to perform invasive procedures on animals; hence requiring new predictive screening methods. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) can be used as a bioreactor to culture and study the regeneration of human living bone. We extracted bone cylinders from human femoral heads, simulated an injury using a drill-hole defect, and implanted the bone on CAM or in vitro control-culture. Micro-computed tomography (μCT) was used to quantify the magnitude and location of bone volume changes followed by histological analyses to assess bone repair. CAM blood vessels were observed to infiltrate the human bone cylinder and maintain human cell viability. Histological evaluation revealed extensive extracellular matrix deposition in proximity to endochondral condensations (Sox9+) on the CAM-implanted bone cylinders, correlating with a significant increase in bone volume by μCT analysis (p < 0.01). This human-avian system offers a simple refinement model for animal research and a step towards a humanized in vivo model for tissue engineering. PMID:27577960

  3. Hydroxyapatite/regenerated silk fibroin scaffold-enhanced osteoinductivity and osteoconductivity of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jia; Hao, Wei; Li, Yuzhuo; Yao, Jinrong; Shao, Zhengzhong; Li, Hong; Yang, Jianjun; Chen, Shiyi

    2013-04-01

    A novel hydroxyapatite/regenerated silk fibroin scaffold was prepared and investigated for its potential to enhance both osteoinductivity and osteoconductivity of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells in vitro. Approx. 12.4 ± 0.06 % (w/w) hydroxyapatite was deposited onto the scaffold, and cell viability and DNA content were significantly increased (18.5 ± 0.6 and 33 ± 1.2 %, respectively) compared with the hydroxyapatite scaffold after 14 days. Furthermore, alkaline phosphatase activity in the novel scaffold increased 41 ± 2.5 % after 14 days compared with the hydroxyapatite scaffold. The data indicate that this novel hydroxyapatite/regenerated silk fibroin scaffold has a positive effect on osteoinductivity and osteoconductivity, and may be useful for bone tissue engineering.

  4. Regeneration of red bone marrow in rat lower jaw after transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells into the site of injury.

    PubMed

    Maiborodin, I V; Matveeva, V A; Kolesnikov, I S; Drovosekov, M N; Toder, M S; Shevela, A I

    2012-02-01

    Regeneration processes in rat mandibular bone after transplantation of a suspension of autologous BM MSC in culture medium were studied by methods of light microscopy and X-ray densitometry. It was found that the structures of red BM in the callus after transplantation of autologous BM MSC formed earlier than in natural reparation. The formation of cavities containing BM determines lower tissue density at the site of injury after transplantation of autologous BM MSC on weeks 4 and 5 of observation than during spontaneous healing. These changes progressed throughout the observation period and attested to accelerated bone tissue reparation.

  5. Characterizing the hierarchical structures of bioactive sol-gel silicate glass and hybrid scaffolds for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Martin, R A; Yue, S; Hanna, J V; Lee, P D; Newport, R J; Smith, M E; Jones, J R

    2012-03-28

    Bone is the second most widely transplanted tissue after blood. Synthetic alternatives are needed that can reduce the need for transplants and regenerate bone by acting as active temporary templates for bone growth. Bioactive glasses are one of the most promising bone replacement/regeneration materials because they bond to existing bone, are degradable and stimulate new bone growth by the action of their dissolution products on cells. Sol-gel-derived bioactive glasses can be foamed to produce interconnected macropores suitable for tissue ingrowth, particularly cell migration and vascularization and cell penetration. The scaffolds fulfil many of the criteria of an ideal synthetic bone graft, but are not suitable for all bone defect sites because they are brittle. One strategy for improving toughness of the scaffolds without losing their other beneficial properties is to synthesize inorganic/organic hybrids. These hybrids have polymers introduced into the sol-gel process so that the organic and inorganic components interact at the molecular level, providing control over mechanical properties and degradation rates. However, a full understanding of how each feature or property of the glass and hybrid scaffolds affects cellular response is needed to optimize the materials and ensure long-term success and clinical products. This review focuses on the techniques that have been developed for characterizing the hierarchical structures of sol-gel glasses and hybrids, from atomic-scale amorphous networks, through the covalent bonding between components in hybrids and nanoporosity, to quantifying open macroporous networks of the scaffolds. Methods for non-destructive in situ monitoring of degradation and bioactivity mechanisms of the materials are also included.

  6. Noncanonical Wnt-4 signaling enhances bone regeneration of mesenchymal stem cells in craniofacial defects through activation of p38 MAPK.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jia; Sonoyama, Wataru; Wang, Zhuo; Jin, Qiming; Zhang, Chengfei; Krebsbach, Paul H; Giannobile, William; Shi, Songtao; Wang, Cun-Yu

    2007-10-19

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells that can be differentiated into osteoblasts and provide an excellent cell source for bone regeneration and repair. Recently, the canonical Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway has been found to play a critical role in skeletal development and osteogenesis, implying that Wnts can be utilized to improve de novo bone formation mediated by MSCs. However, it is unknown whether noncanonical Wnt signaling regulates osteogenic differentiation. Here, we find that Wnt-4 enhanced in vitro osteogenic differentiation of MSCs isolated from human adult craniofacial tissues and promoted bone formation in vivo. Whereas Wnt-4 did not stabilize beta-catenin, it activated p38 MAPK in a novel noncanonical signaling pathway. The activation of p38 was dependent on Axin and was required for the enhancement of MSC differentiation by Wnt-4. Moreover, using two different models of craniofacial bone injury, we found that MSCs genetically engineered to express Wnt-4 enhanced osteogenesis and improved the repair of craniofacial defects in vivo. Taken together, our results reveal that noncanonical Wnt signaling could also play a role in osteogenic differentiation. Wnt-4 may have a potential use in improving bone regeneration and repair of craniofacial defects.

  7. Capillary action: enrichment of retention and habitation of cells via micro-channeled scaffolds for massive bone defect regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hong, Min-Ho; Kim, Yoon Hyuk; Ganbat, Danaa; Kim, Do-Gyoon; Bae, Chun-Sik; Oh, Daniel S

    2014-08-01

    The development of a biomaterial substitute that can promote bone regeneration in massive defects has remained as a significant clinical challenge even using bone marrow cells or growth factors. Without an active, thriving cell population present throughout and stable anchored to the construct, exceptional bone regeneration does not occur. An engineered micro-channel structures scaffold within each trabecular has been designed to overcome some current limitations involving the cultivation and habitation of cells in large, volumetric scaffolds to repair massive skeletal defect. We created a scaffold with a superior fluid retention capacity that also may absorb bone marrow cells and provide growth factor-containing body fluids such as blood clots and/or serum under physiological conditions. The scaffold is composed of 3 basic structures (1) porous trabecular network (300-400 μm) similar to that of human trabecular bones, (2) micro-size channels (25-70 μm) within each trabecular septum which mimic intra-osseous channels such as Haversian canals and Volkmann's canals with body fluid access, diffusion, nutritional supply and gas exchange, and (3) nano-size pores (100-400 nm) on the surface of each septum that allow immobilized cells to anchor. Combinatorial effects of these internal structures result in a host-adapting construct that enhances cell retention and habitation throughout the 3 cm-height and 4 cm-length bridge-shaped scaffold.

  8. Poly(ester amide)s from Soybean Oil for Modulated Release and Bone Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Janeni; Dasgupta, Queeny; Shetty, Shreya N; Sarkar, Kishor; Madras, Giridhar; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2016-09-28

    Designing biomaterials for bone tissue regeneration that are also capable of eluting drugs is challenging. Poly(ester amide)s are known for their commendable mechanical properties, degradation, and cellular response. In this regard, development of new poly(ester amide)s becomes imperative to improve the quality of lives of people affected by bone disorders. In this framework, a family of novel soybean oil based biodegradable poly(ester amide)s was synthesized based on facile catalyst-free melt-condensation reaction. The structure of the polymers was confirmed by FTIR and (1)H -NMR, which indicated the formation of the ester and amide bonds along the polymer backbone. Thermal analysis revealed the amorphous nature of the polymers. Contact angle and swelling studies proved that the hydrophobic nature increased with increase in chain length of the diacids and decreased with increase in molar ratio of sebacic acid. Mechanical studies proved that Young's modulus decreased with decrease in chain lengths of the diacids and increase in molar ratio of sebacic acid. The in vitro hydrolytic degradation and dye release demonstrated that the degradation and release decreased with increase in chain lengths of the diacids and increased with increase in molar ratio of sebacic acid. The degradation followed first order kinetics and dye release followed Higuchi kinetics. In vitro cell studies showed no toxic effects of the polymers. Osteogenesis studies revealed that the polymers can be remarkably efficient because more than twice the amount of minerals were deposited on the polymer surfaces than on the tissue culture polystyrene surfaces. Thus, a family of novel poly(ester amide)s has been synthesized, characterized for controlled release and tissue engineering applications wherein the physical, degradation, and release kinetics can be tuned by varying the monomers and their molar ratios. PMID:27599306

  9. Development of Magnesium and Siloxane-Containing Vaterite and Its Composite Materials for Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Shinya; Obata, Akiko; Maeda, Hirotaka; Ota, Yoshio; Kasuga, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Development of novel biomaterials with Mg2+, Ca2+, and silicate ions releasability for bone regeneration is now in progress. Several inorganic ions have been reported to stimulate bone-forming cells. We featured Ca2+, silicate, and especially, Mg2+ ions as growth factors for osteoblasts. Various biomaterials, such as ceramic powders and organic–inorganic composites, that release the ions, have been developed and investigated for their cytocompatibilities in our previous work. Through the investigation, providing the three ions was found to be effective to activate osteogenic cells. Magnesium and siloxane-­containing vaterite was prepared by a carbonation process as an inorganic particle that can has the ability to simultaneously release Ca2+, silicate, and Mg2+ ions to biodegradable polymers. Poly (l-lactic acid) (PLLA)- and bioactive PLLA-based composites containing vaterite coatings were discussed regarding their degradability and cytocompatibility using a metallic Mg substrate as Mg2+ ion source. PLLA/SiV composite film, which has a releasability of silicate ions besides Ca2+ ion, was coated on a pure Mg substrate to be compared with the PLLA/V coating. The degradability and releasability of inorganic ions were morphologically and quantitatively monitored in a cell culture medium. The bonding strength between the coatings and Mg substrates was one of the key factors to control Mg2+ ion release from the substrates. The cell culture tests were conducted using mouse osteoblast-like cells (MC3T3-E1 cells); cellular morphology, proliferation, and differentiation on the materials were evaluated. The PLLA/V and PLLA/SiV coatings on Mg substrates were found to enhance the proliferation, especially the PLLA/SiV coating possessed a higher ability to induce the osteogenic differentiation of the cells. PMID:26697421

  10. Guided bone regeneration for immediate non-submerged implant placement using bioabsorbable materials in Beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Brunel, G; Benqué, E; Elharar, F; Sansac, C; Duffort, J F; Barthet, P; Baysse, E; Miller, N

    1998-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the combined application of different bioabsorbable materials for healing of residual peri-implant defects after placement of non-submerged implants into fresh extraction sockets. Second and third mandibular premolars were extracted from 10 Beagle dogs, the coronal part of the distal sockets were surgically enlarged and this was followed by immediate placement of specially designed hollow-screw non-submerged dental implants. For each animal, the coronal peri-implant defects were further treated with one of the 4 following procedures: 1) no treatment, control site; 2) grafting with porous hydroxyapatite (HA); 3) collagen membrane tightly secured around the implant and over the defect and 4) grafting with HA covered with a collagen membrane. After 16 weeks of healing, specimens were removed from the mandibule and prepared for a histomorphometric evaluation. The bone-to-implant contact length (BIC) was measured and compared amongst the different treatment modalities. In the defect area, the irregular bone regeneration was similar between all the treatment procedures (P > 0.10). In the sites covered with a collagen membrane alone, the total BIC (47%) was greater than in control sites (28.7%, P < 0.05) or sites grafted with HA (22.2%, P < 0.02). Total BIC in sites treated with the HA-membrane combination (43%) was only significantly different from sites treated with HA (P < 0.05). It is concluded that the use of bioabsorbable materials results in a limited increase of osseointegration when used in conjunction with immediate placement of non-submerged implants, although the principle of the one stage surgical approach can be maintained.

  11. Human embryonic stem cells and macroporous calcium phosphate construct for bone regeneration in cranial defects in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xian; Wang, Ping; Chen, Wenchuan; Weir, Michael D; Bao, Chongyun; Xu, Hockin H K

    2014-10-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are an exciting cell source as they offer an unlimited supply of cells that can differentiate into all cell types for regenerative medicine applications. To date, there has been no report on hESCs with calcium phosphate cement (CPC) scaffolds for bone regeneration in vivo. The objectives of this study were to: (i) investigate hESCs for bone regeneration in vivo in critical-sized cranial defects in rats; and (ii) determine the effects of cell seeding and platelets in macroporous CPC on new bone and blood vessel formation. hESCs were cultured to yield mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which underwent osteogenic differentiation. Four groups were tested in rats: (i) CPC control without cells; (ii) CPC with hESC-derived MSCs (CPC+hESC-MSC); (iii) CPC with hESC-MSCs and 30% human platelet concentrate (hPC) (CPC+hESC-MSC+30% hPC); and (iv) CPC+hESC-MSC+50% hPC. In vitro, MSCs were derived from embryoid bodies of hESCs. Cells on CPC were differentiated into the osteogenic lineage, with highly elevated alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin expressions, as well as mineralization. At 12weeks in vivo, the groups with hESC-MSCs and hPC had three times as much new bone as, and twice the blood vessel density of, the CPC control. The new bone in the defects contained osteocytes and blood vessels, and the new bone front was lined with osteoblasts. The group with 30% hPC and hESC-MSCs had a blood vessel density that was 49% greater than the hESC-MSC group without hPC, likely due to the various growth factors in the platelets enhancing both new bone and blood vessel formation. In conclusion, hESCs are promising for bone tissue engineering, and hPC can enhance new bone and blood vessel formation. Macroporous CPC with hESC-MSCs and hPC may be useful for bone regeneration in craniofacial and orthopedic applications.

  12. Layer-by-layer paper-stacking nanofibrous membranes to deliver adipose-derived stem cells for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wan, Wenbing; Zhang, Shiwen; Ge, Liangpeng; Li, Qingtao; Fang, Xingxing; Yuan, Quan; Zhong, Wen; Ouyang, Jun; Xing, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering through seeding of stem cells in three-dimensional scaffolds has greatly improved bone regeneration technology, which historically has been a constant challenge. In this study, we researched the use of adipose-derived stem cell (ADSC)-laden layer-by-layer paper-stacking polycaprolactone/gelatin electrospinning nanofibrous membranes for bone regeneration. Using this novel paper-stacking method makes oxygen distribution, nutrition, and waste transportation work more efficiently. ADSCs can also secrete multiple growth factors required for osteogenesis. After the characterization of ADSC surface markers CD29, CD90, and CD49d using flow cytometry, we seeded ADSCs on the membranes and found cells differentiated, with significant expression of the osteogenic-related proteins osteopontin, osteocalcin, and osteoprotegerin. During 4 weeks in vitro, the ADSCs cultured on the paper-stacking membranes in the osteogenic medium exhibited the highest osteogenic-related gene expressions. In vivo, the paper-stacking scaffolds were implanted into the rat calvarial defects (5 mm diameter, one defect per parietal bone) for 12 weeks. Investigating with microcomputer tomography, the ADSC-laden paper-stacking membranes showed the most significant bone reconstruction, and from a morphological perspective, this group occupied 90% of the surface area of the defect, produced the highest bone regeneration volume, and showed the highest bone mineral density of 823.06 mg/cm(3). From hematoxylin and eosin and Masson staining, the new bone tissue was most evident in the ADSC-laden scaffold group. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis from collected tissues, we found that the ADSC-laden paper-stacking membrane group presented the highest osteogenic-related gene expressions of osteocalcin, osteopontin, osteoprotegerin, bone sialoprotein, runt-related transcription factor 2, and osterix (two to three times higher than the control group, and 1.5 times higher

  13. Layer-by-layer paper-stacking nanofibrous membranes to deliver adipose-derived stem cells for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wan, Wenbing; Zhang, Shiwen; Ge, Liangpeng; Li, Qingtao; Fang, Xingxing; Yuan, Quan; Zhong, Wen; Ouyang, Jun; Xing, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering through seeding of stem cells in three-dimensional scaffolds has greatly improved bone regeneration technology, which historically has been a constant challenge. In this study, we researched the use of adipose-derived stem cell (ADSC)-laden layer-by-layer paper-stacking polycaprolactone/gelatin electrospinning nanofibrous membranes for bone regeneration. Using this novel paper-stacking method makes oxygen distribution, nutrition, and waste transportation work more efficiently. ADSCs can also secrete multiple growth factors required for osteogenesis. After the characterization of ADSC surface markers CD29, CD90, and CD49d using flow cytometry, we seeded ADSCs on the membranes and found cells differentiated, with significant expression of the osteogenic-related proteins osteopontin, osteocalcin, and osteoprotegerin. During 4 weeks in vitro, the ADSCs cultured on the paper-stacking membranes in the osteogenic medium exhibited the highest osteogenic-related gene expressions. In vivo, the paper-stacking scaffolds were implanted into the rat calvarial defects (5 mm diameter, one defect per parietal bone) for 12 weeks. Investigating with microcomputer tomography, the ADSC-laden paper-stacking membranes showed the most significant bone reconstruction, and from a morphological perspective, this group occupied 90% of the surface area of the defect, produced the highest bone regeneration volume, and showed the highest bone mineral density of 823.06 mg/cm(3). From hematoxylin and eosin and Masson staining, the new bone tissue was most evident in the ADSC-laden scaffold group. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis from collected tissues, we found that the ADSC-laden paper-stacking membrane group presented the highest osteogenic-related gene expressions of osteocalcin, osteopontin, osteoprotegerin, bone sialoprotein, runt-related transcription factor 2, and osterix (two to three times higher than the control group, and 1.5 times higher

  14. Bone marrow cells for cardiac regeneration and repair: current status and issues.

    PubMed

    Haider, Husnain Kh

    2006-07-01

    Extensive studies in experimental animal heart models and patients have shown the promise of bone marrow cell (BMC) transplantation as an alternative strategy to the conventional treatment modalities for cardiac repair. 'Stemness' of BMC to adopt cardiac phenotype, their potential as carriers of exogenous therapeutic genes and an inherent ability to express growth factors and cytokines to exert paracrine effects have been especially focused until recently. These findings suggest that locally delivered BMCs are capable of regenerating de novo myocardium. Others have shown that extensive neovascularization due to paracrine effects of the engrafted cells resulted in improved regional blood flow and reduced infarct size. Despite initial success, there are multiple fundamental issues that remain contentious. Indeed, resolving these issues will optimize future heart cell therapy protocols to achieve better prognosis in the clinical settings. This review is a concise, in-depth and critical appreciation of the role of BMCs in heart cell therapy and builds a conceptual framework to elaborate their significance as a possible source of donor cells. Moreover, it discusses the current status of BMC transplantation as a clinical modality and the relevant issues confronting this approach in light of the published data with clinical relevance.

  15. MAPLE deposition of polypyrrole-based composite layers for bone regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paun, Irina Alexandra; Acasandrei, Adriana Maria; Luculescu, Catalin Romeo; Mustaciosu, Cosmin Catalin; Ion, Valentin; Mihailescu, Mona; Vasile, Eugenia; Dinescu, Maria

    2015-12-01

    We report on biocompatible, electrically conductive layers of polypyrrole (PPy)-based composites obtained by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) for envisioned bone regeneration. In order to preserve the conductivity of the PPy while overcoming its lack of biodegradability and low mechanical resilience, conductive PPy nanograins were embedded in two biocompatible, insulating polymeric matrices, i.e. poly(lactic-co-glycolic)acid (PLGA) and polyurethane (PU). PLGA offers the advantage of full biodegradability into non-toxic products, while PU provides toughness and elasticity. The PPy nanograins formed micro-domains and networks within the PLGA and PU matrices, in a compact spatial arrangement favorable for electrical percolation. The proposed approach allowed us to obtain PPy-based composite layers with biologically meaningful conductivities up to 10-2 S/cm for PPy loadings as low as 1:10 weight ratios. Fluorescent staining and viability assays showed that the MG63 osteoblast-like cells cultured on the PPy-based layers deposited by MAPLE were viable and retained their capacity to proliferate. The performance of the proposed method was demonstrated by quantitative evaluation of the calcium phosphate deposits from the cultured cells, as indicative for cell mineralization. Electrical stimulation using 200 μA currents passing through the PPy-based layers, during a time interval of 4 h, enhanced the osteogenesis in the cultured cells. Despite their lowest conductivity, the PPy/PU layers showed the best biocompatibility and the highest osteogenic potential.

  16. Functionally graded PCL/ β-TCP biocomposites in a multilayered structure for bone tissue regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong Bok; Kim, GeunHyung

    2012-09-01

    Functionally graded (FG) composites consisting of polycaprolactone (PCL) and beta-tricalcium phosphate ( β-TCP) particles were fabricated with a multilayered structure using a melt plotter with a two-heating-barrel system. Using this process, the concentration of β-TCP particles varied in each layered strut. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy mapping of calcium on the fabricated scaffolds indicated that the β-TCP particles were well distributed in each PCL strut, according to conceptual design. By incorporating β-TCP, the FG-PCL/ β-TCP scaffolds had meaningful increases in water absorption (30 % increase) and showed good mechanical properties, although the mechanical properties are slightly low compared to pure PCL/ β-TCP composite. We performed biological assessments to evaluate the capability of these FG scaffolds to act as a biomaterial for bone tissue regeneration with osteoblast-like cells (MG63). SEM images of cell-seeded FG scaffolds showed that the concentrated β-TCP struts were affected as good cell attachment/proliferation sites. Additionally, calcium deposition on the FG scaffolds was higher than that of normal scaffolds after 14 days. In particular, we observed high levels of mineralization in the highly concentrated β-TCP struts in the FG scaffolds. Based on these results, we believe that the FG scaffolds having various spatially designed structures with graded properties will be widely applicable for hard tissue engineering applications.

  17. Novel biocompatible polymeric blends for bone regeneration: Material and matrix design and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Meng

    characterized for miscibility, mechanical properties, degradation kinetics, and in vitro osteocompatibility. Primary rat osteoblasts (PRO) isolated from rat calvaria were used to evaluate their in vitro osteocompatibility. The blends were also characterized for in vivo biodegradability and biocompatibility using a rat subcutaneous implantation model. Successful in vivo scaffold-based tissue regeneration greatly depends on the scaffold material biocompatibility, mechanical stability, and scaffold architecture to promote tissue in-growth. The other part of the work in the dissertation is focused on the development of mechanically competent bioresorbable nano-structured three-dimensional (3D) hiomimetic scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications. Scaffold material selection was based on achieving improved mechanical stability, in vitro osteoblast performance, and in vivo biocompatibility. A miscible PNGEGPhPh-PLAGA blend system developed and characterized in the first part of the thesis work was chosen to fabricate a nanofiber-based mechanically competent biomimetic scaffold via electrospinning. Due to its versatility, controllability and reproducibility, the technique of electrospinning was adopted to produce blend nanofibers. The polymer solution concentration and electrospinning parameters were optimized to produce blend fibers in the range of 50-500 nm to mimic dimensions of collagen fibrils present in the natural extracellular matrix of native bone. These blend nanofiber matrices supported PRO adhesion, proliferation and showed an elevated phenotype expression compared to PLAGA nanofibers. Orienting electrospun nanofibers in a concentric manner with an open central cavity created a mechanically competent 3D scaffold mimicking the bone marrow cavity, as well as, the lamellar structure of bone. The 3D biomimetic scaffold exhibited a similar characteristic mechanical behavior to that of native bone. Compressive modulus of the scaffold was found to be within the range of

  18. Attachment and growth of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells on regenerated antheraea pernyi silk fibroin films.

    PubMed

    Luan, Xi-Ying; Wang, Yong; Duan, Xiang; Duan, Qiao-Yan; Li, Ming-Zhong; Lu, Shen-Zhou; Zhang, Huan-Xiang; Zhang, Xue-Guang

    2006-12-01

    Silk fibroin of the silkworm Bombyx mori has been studied extensively, while the research on Antheraea pernyi silk fibroin (A. pernyi SF) in biomaterials is only at an early stage. In this study, the attachment, morphology, growth and phenotype of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) cultured on the regenerated A. pernyi SF films were studied in vitro. The results indicated that the attachment of hBMSCs on the regenerated A. pernyi SF films was almost the same as that on the collagen films. MTT and cell counting analyses demonstrated that the growth of hBMSCs on the regenerated A. pernyi SF films was better than that on controls. Moreover, electron scanning microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorting assays showed that the regenerated A. pernyi SF supported hBMSCs growth and functional maintenance compared with the controls. These data suggest that the regenerated A. pernyi SF, like Bombyx mori silk fibroin (B. mori SF) and collagen, can support hBMSCs attachment, growth and phenotypic maintenance, and has better biocompatibilities for hBMSCs in vitro culture. PMID:18458403

  19. A review of material properties of biodegradable and bioresorbable polymers and devices for GTR and GBR applications.

    PubMed

    Hutmacher, D; Hürzeler, M B; Schliephake, H

    1996-01-01

    Use of bioresorbable and biodegradable materials for guided tissue and guided bone regeneration is under intense investigation and is being tested in clinical trials. This study presents a basic overview of material properties of bioresorbable and biodegradable polymers and devices for guided tissue and guided bone regeneration treatment. Collagens and aliphatic polyesters, such as poly(glycolic acid), poly(lactic acid), and poly(epsilon-caprolactone), are discussed, as well as biocompatibility, mechanical properties, and sterilization. PMID:8908867

  20. Porous tantalum coatings prepared by vacuum plasma spraying enhance bmscs osteogenic differentiation and bone regeneration in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ze; Xie, Youtao; Yang, Fei; Huang, Yan; Wang, Chuandong; Dai, Kerong; Zheng, Xuebin; Zhang, Xiaoling

    2013-01-01

    Tantalum, as a potential metallic implant biomaterial, is attracting more and more attention because of its excellent anticorrosion and biocompatibility. However, its significantly high elastic modulus and large mechanical incompatibility with bone tissue make it unsuitable for load-bearing implants. In this study, porous tantalum coatings were first successfully fabricated on titanium substrates by vacuum plasma spraying (VPS), which would exert the excellent biocompatibility of tantalum and alleviate the elastic modulus of tantalum for bone tissue. We evaluated cytocompatibility and osteogenesis activity of the porous tantalum coatings using human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) and its ability to repair rabbit femur bone defects. The morphology and actin cytoskeletons of hBMSCs were observed via electron microscopy and confocal, and the cell viability, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation potential of hBMSCs were examined quantitatively by PrestoBlue assay, Ki67 immunofluorescence assay, real-time PCR technology and ALP staining. For in vivo detection, the repaired femur were evaluated by histomorphology and double fluorescence labeling 3 months postoperation. Porous tantalum coating surfaces promoted hBMSCs adhesion, proliferation, osteogenesis activity and had better osseointegration and faster new bone formation rate than titanium coating control. Our observation suggested that the porous tantalum coatings had good biocompatibility and could enhance osseoinductivity in vitro and promote new bone formation in vivo. The porous tantalum coatings prepared by VPS is a promising strategy for bone regeneration.

  1. Porous Tantalum Coatings Prepared by Vacuum Plasma Spraying Enhance BMSCs Osteogenic Differentiation and Bone Regeneration In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ze; Xie, Youtao; Yang, Fei; Huang, Yan; Wang, Chuandong; Dai, Kerong; Zheng, Xuebin; Zhang, Xiaoling

    2013-01-01

    Tantalum, as a potential metallic implant biomaterial, is attracting more and more attention because of its excellent anticorrosion and biocompatibility. However, its significantly high elastic modulus and large mechanical incompatibility with bone tissue make it unsuitable for load-bearing implants. In this study, porous tantalum coatings were first successfully fabricated on titanium substrates by vacuum plasma spraying (VPS), which would exert the excellent biocompatibility of tantalum and alleviate the elastic modulus of tantalum for bone tissue. We evaluated cytocompatibility and osteogenesis activity of the porous tantalum coatings using human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) and its ability to repair rabbit femur bone defects. The morphology and actin cytoskeletons of hBMSCs were observed via electron microscopy and confocal, and the cell viability, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation potential of hBMSCs were examined quantitatively by PrestoBlue assay, Ki67 immunofluorescence assay, real-time PCR technology and ALP staining. For in vivo detection, the repaired femur were evaluated by histomorphology and double fluorescence labeling 3 months postoperation. Porous tantalum coating surfaces promoted hBMSCs adhesion, proliferation, osteogenesis activity and had better osseointegration and faster new bone formation rate than titanium coating control. Our observation suggested that the porous tantalum coatings had good biocompatibility and could enhance osseoinductivity in vitro and promote new bone formation in vivo. The porous tantalum coatings prepared by VPS is a promising strategy for bone regeneration. PMID:23776648

  2. Histological and molecular-biological analyses of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) patches for enhancement of bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Gredes, Tomasz; Gedrange, Tomasz; Hinüber, Claudia; Gelinsky, Michael; Kunert-Keil, Christiane

    2015-05-01

    Tissue engineered cell-seeded constructs with poly(3)hydroxybutyrate (PHB) induced ectopic bone formation after implantation into the back muscle of rats. The objective of our in vivo study was to evaluate the osteogenic potential of pure PHB patches in surgically created cranial defects. For this, PHB patches were analyzed after implantation in surgically created defects on the cranium of adult male rats. After healing periods of 4, 8 and 12 weeks, the bone tissue specimens containing PHB patches were processed and analyzed histologically as well as molecular-biologically. After 4 weeks, the PHB patches were completely embedded in connective tissue. Eight weeks after PHB insertion, bone regeneration proceeding from bearing bone was found in 50% of all treated animals, whereas all PHB treated cavities showed both bone formation and embedding of the patches in bone 12 weeks after surgery. Furthermore, all slices showed pronounced development of blood vessels. Histomorphometric analysis presented a regenerated bone mean value between 46.4 ± 16.1% and 54.2 ± 19.3% after 4-12 weeks of healing. Caveolin-1 staining in capillary-like structures showed a 1.16-1.38 fold increased expression in PHB treated defects compared to controls. Real-time RT-PCR analyses showed significantly lower expressions of Alpl, Col1a1 and VEGFA in cranium defects after treatment with PHB patches compared to untreated bony defects of the same cranium. Within the limits of the presented animal investigation, it could conclude that the tested PHB patches featured a good biocompatibility and an osteoconductive character.

  3. Importance of Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) in Scaffolds for Guided Bone Regeneration: A Focused Review.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Dalí, Gabriel; Velázquez-Cayón, Rocío; Serrera-Figallo, M Angeles; Rodríguez-González-Elipe, Agustín; Gutierrez-Pérez, José-Luis; Torres-Lagares, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    Total or partial tissue damage and loss of function in an organ are two of the most serious and costly issues in human health. Initially, these problems were approached through organ and allogenic tissue transplantation, but this option is limited by the scarce availability of donors. In this manner, new bone for restoring or replacing lost and damaged bone tissue is an important health and socioeconomic necessity. Tissue engineering has been used as a strategy during the 21st century for mitigating this need through the development of guided bone regeneration scaffold and composites. In this manner, compared with other traditional methods, bone tissue engineering offers a new and interesting approach to bone repair. The poly-α-hydroxy acids, which include the copolymers of lactic acid and glycolic acid, have been used commonly in the fabrication of these scaffolds. The objective of our article was to review the characteristics and functions of scaffold with biomedical applications, with special interest in scaffold construction using poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) polymers, in order to update the current methods used for fabrication and to improve the quality of these scaffolds, integrating this information into the context of advancements made in tissue engineering based on these structures. In the future, research into bone regeneration should be oriented toward a fruitful exchange between disciplines involved in tissue engineering, which is coming very close to filling the gaps in our ability to provide implants and restoration of functionality in bone tissue. Overcoming this challenge will provide benefits to a major portion of the population and facilitate substantial improvements to quality of life.

  4. In silico Mechano-Chemical Model of Bone Healing for the Regeneration of Critical Defects: The Effect of BMP-2.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Frederico O; Gómez-Benito, María José; Folgado, João; Fernandes, Paulo R; García-Aznar, José Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The healing of bone defects is a challenge for both tissue engineering and modern orthopaedics. This problem has been addressed through the study of scaffold constructs combined with mechanoregulatory theories, disregarding the influence of chemical factors and their respective delivery devices. Of the chemical factors involved in the bone healing process, bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) has been identified as one of the most powerful osteoinductive proteins. The aim of this work is to develop and validate a mechano-chemical regulatory model to study the effect of BMP-2 on the healing of large bone defects in silico. We first collected a range of quantitative experimental data from the literature concerning the effects of BMP-2 on cellular activity, specifically proliferation, migration, differentiation, maturation and extracellular matrix production. These data were then used to define a model governed by mechano-chemical stimuli to simulate the healing of large bone defects under the following conditions: natural healing, an empty hydrogel implanted in the defect and a hydrogel soaked with BMP-2 implanted in the defect. For the latter condition, successful defect healing was predicted, in agreement with previous in vivo experiments. Further in vivo comparisons showed the potential of the model, which accurately predicted bone tissue formation during healing, bone tissue distribution across the defect and the quantity of bone inside the defect. The proposed mechano-chemical model also estimated the effect of BMP-2 on cells and the evolution of healing in large bone defects. This novel in silico tool provides valuable insight for bone tissue regeneration strategies.

  5. In silico Mechano-Chemical Model of Bone Healing for the Regeneration of Critical Defects: The Effect of BMP-2

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The healing of bone defects is a challenge for both tissue engineering and modern orthopaedics. This problem has been addressed through the study of scaffold constructs combined with mechanoregulatory theories, disregarding the influence of chemical factors and their respective delivery devices. Of the chemical factors involved in the bone healing process, bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) has been identified as one of the most powerful osteoinductive proteins. The aim of this work is to develop and validate a mechano-chemical regulatory model to study the effect of BMP-2 on the healing of large bone defects in silico. We first collected a range of quantitative experimental data from the literature concerning the effects of BMP-2 on cellular activity, specifically proliferation, migration, differentiation, maturation and extracellular matrix production. These data were then used to define a model governed by mechano-chemical stimuli to simulate the healing of large bone defects under the following conditions: natural healing, an empty hydrogel implanted in the defect and a hydrogel soaked with BMP-2 implanted in the defect. For the latter condition, successful defect healing was predicted, in agreement with previous in vivo experiments. Further in vivo comparisons showed the potential of the model, which accurately predicted bone tissue formation during healing, bone tissue distribution across the defect and the quantity of bone inside the defect. The proposed mechano-chemical model also estimated the effect of BMP-2 on cells and the evolution of healing in large bone defects. This novel in silico tool provides valuable insight for bone tissue regeneration strategies. PMID:26043112

  6. Microstructure, physical properties, and bone regeneration effect of the nano-sized β-tricalcium phosphate granules.

    PubMed

    Lee, David S H; Pai, Y; Chang, Steve; Kim, D H

    2016-01-01

    The nano-sized β-tricalcium phosphate granules for the practical application of bone graft substitutes could be prepared from the wet chemically precipitated β-TCP powders by the liquid-solid mixture route and by controlling the pH of mixture solution to 7.5 within a shorter processing time. The phase purity of prepared β-TCP granules was higher above 99% and their particle sizes ranged from 200 to 650 nm. Also, their average compressive strength was higher at 2.22 MPa. It is considered that the phase purity, particle refinement, and mechanical compressive strength of β-TCP granules could be significantly improved through the β-TCP powders synthesized through the liquid-solid mixture precipitation at pH of 7.5. Meanwhile both the porosity and the specific surface area positively associated with the osteoconductivity for bone regeneration were higher at 75% and 2.50 m(2)/g respectively due to the nano-sized particles of porous β-TCP granules. Furthermore, the histological analysis in beagle mandibular defect showed that β-TCP granules demonstrated remarkable bone regeneration effect compared with that of the non-treatment group, indicating the increased new formation of bone (except for callus) (48.42 ± 6.57%) and rapid resorption (69.49 ± 2.40%) without toxicologically significant changes at 12 weeks after implantation. PMID:26478393

  7. The role of angiogenesis in implant dentistry part II: The effect of bone-grafting and barrier membrane materials on angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Asatourian, Armen; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Sheibani, Nader

    2016-01-01

    Background In implant dentistry, bone substitute materials and barrier membranes are used in different treatments including guided bone regeneration (GBR), socket preservation, alveolar ridge augmentation, maxillary sinus elevation, and filling bony defects around the inserted dental implant. One of the most important factors in prognosis of treatments using these materials is the growth of new blood vessels in applied areas. Present review was performed to evaluate the effect of the bone-grafting and barrier membrane materials on angiogenesis events. Material and Methods An electronic search was performed in PubMed, MEDLINE, and EMBASE databases via OVID using the keywords mentioned in the PubMed and MeSH headings regarding the role of angiogenesis in implant dentistry from January 2000-April 2014. Results Of the 5,622 articles identified in our initial search results, only 33 met the inclusion criteria set for this review. Among bone substitute materials the autogenous bone-grafts, and among the barrier membranes the collagenous membranes, had the highest angiogenic potentials. Other bone-grafting materials or membranes were mostly used with pro-angiogenic factors to enhance their angiogenic properties. Conclusions Angiogenesis is one of the key factors, which plays a critical role in success rate of GBR technique and is seriously considered in manufacturing bone-grafting and barrier membrane materials. However, there is still lack of clinical and in-vivo studies addressing the effect of angiogenesis in treatments using bone-grafting and barrier membrane materials. Key words:Angiogenesis, bone-grafting materials, GBR, ridge augmentation, sinus elevation, socket preservation. PMID:27031074

  8. Vertical bone regeneration with deproteinised bovine bone mineral or biphasic calcium phosphate in the rabbit calvarium: effect of autologous platelet lysate.

    PubMed

    Chakar, C; Soffer, E; Cohen, N; Petite, H; Naaman, N; Anagnostou, F

    2015-01-01

    Although bone substitutes associated with platelet concentrates are widely used to vertically reconstruct alveolar ridges, their respective and specific contribution remain controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the benefit of using either biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) or demineralised bovine bone mineral (DBBM) alone or with autologous platelet lysate (APL) in vertical bone regeneration. The study involved fourteen New Zealand rabbits. Autologous APL was prepared by freeze-thawing from a platelet suspension (10(9) platelets/ml). Four CP titanium (cpTi) cylinders were fixed to each calvarium; one cylinder was empty, one was filled with APL alone and the others were filled either with BCP or BCP + APL or DBBM or DBBM + APL. New bone formation and biomaterial resorption were evaluated using non-demineralised histology and histomorphometry. After 6 weeks, new bone formation was observed in all cylinders. The newly formed bone in the cylinders filled with APL alone, DBBM and BCP was significantly increased by (0.6-, 2.5- and 3.3-fold, respectively) (P < 0.0001) compared to results obtained with the empty cylinders. Vertical bone height in the cylinders filled with BCP was greater to that observed with DBBM. The residual material in the cylinders filled with BCP was significantly (P < 0.0001) lower (0.35-fold) than that with DBBM. Both newly formed bone and residual material in the cylinders filled with BCP + APL or DBBM + APL were similar to those filled with either BCP or DBBM, respectively. This study provided evidence that APL alone, as well as DBBM and BCP, have a beneficial effect on vertical bone formation and remodelling. APL associated with either DBBM or BCP did not provide additional benefits. PMID:25578693

  9. In vivo experimental study on bone regeneration in critical bone defects using PIB nanogels/boron-containing mesoporous bioactive glass composite scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaohui; Zhao, Yanbing; Geng, Shinan; Miron, Richard J; Zhang, Qiao; Wu, Chengtie; Zhang, Yufeng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In the present study, the fabrication of novel p(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-butyl methylacrylate) (PIB) nanogels was combined with boron-containing mesoporous bioactive glass (B-MBG) scaffolds in order to improve the mechanical properties of PIB nanogels alone. Scaffolds were tested for mechanical strength and the ability to promote new bone formation in vivo. Patients and methods To evaluate the potential of each scaffold in bone regeneration, ovariectomized rats were chosen as a study model to determine the ability of PIB nanogels to stimulate bone formation in a complicated anatomical bone defect. PIB nanogels and PIB nanogels/B-MBG composites were respectively implanted into ovariectomized rats with critical-sized femur defects following treatment periods of 2, 4, and 8 weeks post-implantation. Results Results from the present study demonstrate that PIB nanogels/B-MBG composites showed greater improvement in mechanical strength when compared to PIB nanogels alone. In vivo, hematoxylin and eosin staining revealed significantly more newly formed bone in defects containing PIB nanogels/B-MBG composite scaffolds when compared to PIB nanogels alone. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive staining demonstrated that both scaffolds were degraded over time and bone remodeling occurred in the surrounding bone defect as early as 4 weeks post-implantation. Conclusion The results from the present study indicate that PIB nanogels are a potential bone tissue engineering biomaterial able to treat defects of irregular shapes and deformities as an injectable, thermoresponsive, biocompatible hydrogel which undergoes rapid thermal gelation once body temperature is reached. Furthermore, its combination with B-MBG scaffolds improves the mechanical properties and ability to promote new bone formation when compared to PIB nanogels alone. PMID:25653525

  10. Simultaneous implant placement and bone regeneration around dental implants using tissue-engineered bone with fibrin glue, mesenchymal stem cells and platelet-rich plasma.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kenji; Yamada, Yoichi; Naiki, Takahito; Ueda, Minoru

    2006-10-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the use of tissue-engineered bone as grafting material for alveolar augmentation with simultaneous implant placement. Twelve adult hybrid dogs were used in this study. One month after the extraction of teeth in the mandible region, bone defects on both sides of the mandible were induced using a trephine bar with a diameter of 10 mm. Dog mesenchymal stem cells (dMSCs) were obtained via iliac bone biopsy and cultured for 4 weeks before implantation. After installing the dental implants, the defects were simultaneously implanted with the following graft materials: (i) fibrin, (ii) dMSCs and fibrin (dMSCs/fibrin), (iii) dMSCs, platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and fibrin (dMSCs/PRP/fibrin) and (iv) control (defect only). The implants were assessed by histological and histomorphometric analysis, 2, 4 and 8 weeks after implantation. The implants exhibited varying degrees of bone-implant contact (BIC). The BIC was 17%, 19% and 29% (control), 20%, 22% and 25% (fibrin), 22%, 32% and 42% (dMSCs/fibrin) and 25%, 49% and 53% (dMSCs/PRP/fibrin) after 2, 4 and 8 weeks, respectively. This study suggests that tissue-engineered bone may be of sufficient quality for predictable enhancement of bone regeneration around