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Sample records for bony heterogeneity effects

  1. The Effects of Latarjet Reconstruction on Glenohumeral Instability in the Presence of Combined Bony Defects

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ronak Maneklal; Walia, Piyush; Gottschalk, Lionel; Jones, Morgan H.; Fening, Stephen D.; Miniaci, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Recurrent glenohumeral instability is often as a result of underlying bony defects in the glenoid and/or humeral head. Anterior glenoid augmentation with a bone block (i.e. Latarjet) has been recommended for glenoid bone loss in the face of recurrent instability. However, no study has investigated the effect of Latarjet augmentation in the setting of both glenoid and humeral head defects (Hill-Sachs Defects (HSD)). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the stability achieved through a Latarjet procedure in the presence of combined bony defects. Methods: Eighteen fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens were tested at all combinations of glenohumeral abduction (ABD) angles of 20°, 40°, and 60° and three external rotation (ER) levels (0°, 40°, and 80°). Each experiment comprised of anterior dislocation by translating the glenoid under a 50N medial load applied on the humerus, simulating the static load of soft tissues. Translational distance and medial-lateral displacement of the humeral head, along with horizontal reaction forces were recorded for every trial. Specimens were tested in an intact condition (no defect), different combinations of defects, and with Latarjet augmentation. The Latarjet was performed for 20% and 30% glenoid defects by transferring the specimen's coracoid process anterior to the glenoid flush with the articulating surface. Four different humeral head defects were created of sizes 6%, 19%, 31%, and 44% of humeral diameter. Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed with statistical significance set at p <0.05. Results: Results are summarized in Fig. 1. The vertical axis represents the normalized distance to dislocation with respect to the values of the intact joint. The horizontal axis represents the varying sizes and combinations of bony defects. At 20° ABD and 0°ER, increasing HSD size did not affect percentage of intact translation with a constant glenoid defect of 20% before and after Latarjet

  2. The Effects of Latarjet Reconstruction on Glenohumeral Instability in the Presence of Combined Bony Defects

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ronak M.; Walia, Piyush; Gottschalk, Lionel; Jones, Morgan H.; Fening, Stephen D.; Miniaci, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Recurrent glenohumeral instability is often a result of underlying bony defects in the glenoid and/or humeral head. Anterior glenoid augmentation with a bone block (i.e. Latarjet) has been recommended for glenoid bone loss in the face of recurrent instability. However, no study has investigated the effect of Latarjet augmentation in the setting of both glenoid and humeral head defects (Hill-Sachs Defects (HSD)). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the stability achieved through a Latarjet procedure in the presence of combined bony defects. Our hypothesis was that Latarjet augmentation would increase shoulder stability for glenoid defects with small HSD, but have limited success in cases with large concomitant HSD. Methods: Eighteen fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens were tested at combinations of glenohumeral abduction (ABD) angles of 20°, 40°, and 60° and external rotation (ER) angles of 0°, 40°, and 80°. Each experiment applied a 50N medial load on the humerus to replicate the static load of soft tissues, and then simulated anterior dislocation by translating the glenoid in an anterior direction. Translational distance and medial-lateral displacement of the humeral head, along with horizontal reaction forces, were recorded for every trial. Specimens were tested in an intact condition (no defect), different combinations of defects, and with Latarjet augmentation. The Latarjet was performed for 20% and 30% glenoid defects by transferring the specimen’s coracoid process anterior to the glenoid flush with the articulating surface. Results: Results are summarized in Fig. 1. The vertical axis represents the normalized distance to dislocation with respect to the values of the intact joint. The horizontal axis represents the varying sizes and combinations of bony defects. Latarjet augmentation improved stability for every combination of bony defects. At 20° ABD, 0°ER, and 20% glenoid defect size, the percentage of intact translation did not

  3. The effect of violin playing on the bony facial structures in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kovero, O; Könönen, M; Pirinen, S

    1997-08-01

    Holding a violin between shoulder and chin needs a special kind of muscle function. The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether this kind of muscular activity is a modifying factor for facial growth in adolescence. The bony facial dimensions of 24 adolescent violin students attending colleges of music with a playing history of 5-11 years were measured from lateral and posteroanterior cephalograms and panoramic tomograms of the jaws. The dimensions were compared with those of sex- and age-matched controls. Significant differences were found between violin players and controls. The players had higher faces, especially on the right side of the lower face and in the right mandibular ramus. The players also had more proclined upper and lower incisors than the controls. It is concluded that the overall greater facial height in violinists reflects the increased face muscle activity and the higher bony dimensions of the right side of the face are due to the muscular activity produced on that side to balance the load caused by the violin on the left. The greater proclination of the incisors is the result of an altered balance of muscular activity between tongue and lip, and the pressure of the violin to the chin. PMID:9308257

  4. The effect of violin playing on the bony facial structures in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kovero, O; Könönen, M; Pirinen, S

    1997-08-01

    Holding a violin between shoulder and chin needs a special kind of muscle function. The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether this kind of muscular activity is a modifying factor for facial growth in adolescence. The bony facial dimensions of 24 adolescent violin students attending colleges of music with a playing history of 5-11 years were measured from lateral and posteroanterior cephalograms and panoramic tomograms of the jaws. The dimensions were compared with those of sex- and age-matched controls. Significant differences were found between violin players and controls. The players had higher faces, especially on the right side of the lower face and in the right mandibular ramus. The players also had more proclined upper and lower incisors than the controls. It is concluded that the overall greater facial height in violinists reflects the increased face muscle activity and the higher bony dimensions of the right side of the face are due to the muscular activity produced on that side to balance the load caused by the violin on the left. The greater proclination of the incisors is the result of an altered balance of muscular activity between tongue and lip, and the pressure of the violin to the chin.

  5. The effect of professional violin and viola playing on the bony facial structures.

    PubMed

    Kovero, O; Könönen, M; Pirinen, S

    1997-02-01

    Professional violin and viola playing involves a particular kind of asymmetric face, neck and shoulder muscle activity. The aim of this study was to find out whether players' facial morphology is influenced by this occupational orofacial muscle activity. Lateral and posteroanterior cephalograms and panoramic tomograms of 26 adult professional violin and viola players were evaluated and compared with those of age, sex and dentition matched controls. Significant differences were found between the players and the controls. The players had smaller facial heights, more proclined maxillary incisors and greater mandibular lengths. Thus, intense long-term violin/viola playing has the effect of modifying facial morphology. PMID:9071044

  6. The effect of professional violin and viola playing on the bony facial structures.

    PubMed

    Kovero, O; Könönen, M; Pirinen, S

    1997-02-01

    Professional violin and viola playing involves a particular kind of asymmetric face, neck and shoulder muscle activity. The aim of this study was to find out whether players' facial morphology is influenced by this occupational orofacial muscle activity. Lateral and posteroanterior cephalograms and panoramic tomograms of 26 adult professional violin and viola players were evaluated and compared with those of age, sex and dentition matched controls. Significant differences were found between the players and the controls. The players had smaller facial heights, more proclined maxillary incisors and greater mandibular lengths. Thus, intense long-term violin/viola playing has the effect of modifying facial morphology.

  7. Seismoelectric effects due to mesoscopic heterogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jougnot, Damien; Rubino, J. GermáN.; Carbajal, Marina Rosas; Linde, Niklas; Holliger, Klaus

    2013-05-01

    While the seismic effects of wave-induced fluid flow due to mesoscopic heterogeneities have been studied for several decades, the role played by these types of heterogeneities on seismoelectric phenomena is largely unexplored. To address this issue, we have developed a novel methodological framework which allows for the coupling of wave-induced fluid flow, as inferred through numerical oscillatory compressibility tests, with the pertinent seismoelectric conversion mechanisms. Simulating the corresponding response of a water-saturated sandstone sample containing mesoscopic fractures, we demonstrate for the first time that these kinds of heterogeneities can produce measurable seismoelectric signals under typical laboratory conditions. Given that this phenomenon is sensitive to key hydraulic and mechanical properties, we expect that the results of this pilot study will stimulate further exploration on this topic in several domains of the Earth, environmental, and engineering sciences.

  8. Biochemical effect of a histidine phosphatase acid (phytase) of Aspergillus japonicus var. Saito on performance and bony characteristics of broiler.

    PubMed

    Maller, Alexandre; de Quadros, Thays Cristina Oliveira; Junqueira, Otto M; Graña, Alfredo Lora; de Lima Montaldi, Ana Paula; Alarcon, Ricardo Fernandes; Jorge, João Atílio; de Lourdes T M Polizeli, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Phytases are enzymes that hydrolyze the ester linkage of phytic acid, releasing inositol and inorganic phosphate. The phytic acid (phytate) is a major form of phosphorus in plant foods. Knowing that diet for animal of production has the cereal base (corn and soybean), primarily, broilers need for an alternative to use of the phosphate present in these ingredients, since it does not naturally produce the enzyme phytase, which makes it available. The aims of this work was studding the safe supplementation of Aspergillus japonicus var. Saito crude phytase in feeding broilers and check the biochemical effect on performance and bones of these animals. The enzymatic extract did not have aflatoxins B1, B2, G2 and G1 and zearalenone and ochratoxin, and low concentrations of this extract did not have cytotoxic effects on cells derived from lung tissue. The in vivo experiments showed that the phytase supplied the available phosphate reduction in the broiler feed formulation, with a live weight, weight gain, feed intake, feed conversion, viability, productive efficiency index and carcass yield similar to the control test. Furthermore, the phytase supplementation favored the formation of bone structure and performance of the broilers. The results show the high biotechnological potential of A. japonicus phytase on broiler food supplementation to reduce phosphorus addition in the food formulation. So, this enzyme could be used as a commercial alternative to animal diet supplementation.

  9. Biochemical effect of a histidine phosphatase acid (phytase) of Aspergillus japonicus var. Saito on performance and bony characteristics of broiler.

    PubMed

    Maller, Alexandre; de Quadros, Thays Cristina Oliveira; Junqueira, Otto M; Graña, Alfredo Lora; de Lima Montaldi, Ana Paula; Alarcon, Ricardo Fernandes; Jorge, João Atílio; de Lourdes T M Polizeli, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Phytases are enzymes that hydrolyze the ester linkage of phytic acid, releasing inositol and inorganic phosphate. The phytic acid (phytate) is a major form of phosphorus in plant foods. Knowing that diet for animal of production has the cereal base (corn and soybean), primarily, broilers need for an alternative to use of the phosphate present in these ingredients, since it does not naturally produce the enzyme phytase, which makes it available. The aims of this work was studding the safe supplementation of Aspergillus japonicus var. Saito crude phytase in feeding broilers and check the biochemical effect on performance and bones of these animals. The enzymatic extract did not have aflatoxins B1, B2, G2 and G1 and zearalenone and ochratoxin, and low concentrations of this extract did not have cytotoxic effects on cells derived from lung tissue. The in vivo experiments showed that the phytase supplied the available phosphate reduction in the broiler feed formulation, with a live weight, weight gain, feed intake, feed conversion, viability, productive efficiency index and carcass yield similar to the control test. Furthermore, the phytase supplementation favored the formation of bone structure and performance of the broilers. The results show the high biotechnological potential of A. japonicus phytase on broiler food supplementation to reduce phosphorus addition in the food formulation. So, this enzyme could be used as a commercial alternative to animal diet supplementation. PMID:27625972

  10. Role of effective canal diameter in assessing the pre-operative and the post-operative status of patients with bony cranio-vertebral anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Mehrotra, Anant; Srivastava, Arun; Sahu, Rabi N.; Kumar, Raj

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The effective canal diameter (ECD) for the cranio-vertebral junction is measured from the posterior surface of the dens to the nearest posterior bony structure (foramen magnum or the posterior arch of the atlas). The ECD is the space which is occupied by the buffer space (which can be compromised without producing any signs or symptoms) and the cord itself. We intend to study the role of the ECD (especially in patients with markedly reduced ECD) in producing the symptoms and also the outcome of surgery in patients with bony cranio-vertebral junction (CVJ) anomalies. Materials and Methods: A total of 67 consecutive patients from the period of January 2009 through June 2010 were prospectively included in the study. These patients were operated by a single experienced surgeon (the senior author) at the Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow. The ECD and the pre-operative Kumar and Kalra score (K and K score) (4) was calculated for all patients. The K and K score was also calculated at the time of discharge, at three months and six months follow-up. The patients were divided into three groups based on the ECD into 5 mm to 10 mm group, 10 mm to 15 mm group, and >15 mm group. Results: There were 53 male (79.1%) patients and 14 female patients (20.9%) with mean age of presentation 27.10 years (±15.01 years) with range of 4-59 years. The duration of symptoms in our series varied from 1-120 months with mean of 23.79 months. The mean effective canal diameter was 9.027 mm (±2.23 mm) with range of 5-16 mm. The mean pre-operative K and K score was 19.27 (±4.19). There were 39 patients who had an ECD between 5 mm to 10 mm, 24 patients with ECD between 10 mm to 15 mm, and 4 patients with ECD more than 15 mm. The correlation coefficients between the effective canal diameter and the pre-operative and the post-operative Kumar and Kalra score at the time of discharge, 3 months and 6 months were 0.404 (P < 0.001), 0.320 (P < 0.008), 0

  11. Role of effective canal diameter in assessing the pre-operative and the post-operative status of patients with bony cranio-vertebral anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Mehrotra, Anant; Srivastava, Arun; Sahu, Rabi N.; Kumar, Raj

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The effective canal diameter (ECD) for the cranio-vertebral junction is measured from the posterior surface of the dens to the nearest posterior bony structure (foramen magnum or the posterior arch of the atlas). The ECD is the space which is occupied by the buffer space (which can be compromised without producing any signs or symptoms) and the cord itself. We intend to study the role of the ECD (especially in patients with markedly reduced ECD) in producing the symptoms and also the outcome of surgery in patients with bony cranio-vertebral junction (CVJ) anomalies. Materials and Methods: A total of 67 consecutive patients from the period of January 2009 through June 2010 were prospectively included in the study. These patients were operated by a single experienced surgeon (the senior author) at the Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow. The ECD and the pre-operative Kumar and Kalra score (K and K score) (4) was calculated for all patients. The K and K score was also calculated at the time of discharge, at three months and six months follow-up. The patients were divided into three groups based on the ECD into 5 mm to 10 mm group, 10 mm to 15 mm group, and >15 mm group. Results: There were 53 male (79.1%) patients and 14 female patients (20.9%) with mean age of presentation 27.10 years (±15.01 years) with range of 4-59 years. The duration of symptoms in our series varied from 1-120 months with mean of 23.79 months. The mean effective canal diameter was 9.027 mm (±2.23 mm) with range of 5-16 mm. The mean pre-operative K and K score was 19.27 (±4.19). There were 39 patients who had an ECD between 5 mm to 10 mm, 24 patients with ECD between 10 mm to 15 mm, and 4 patients with ECD more than 15 mm. The correlation coefficients between the effective canal diameter and the pre-operative and the post-operative Kumar and Kalra score at the time of discharge, 3 months and 6 months were 0.404 (P < 0.001), 0.320 (P < 0.008), 0

  12. Recursive partitioning for heterogeneous causal effects

    PubMed Central

    Athey, Susan; Imbens, Guido

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we propose methods for estimating heterogeneity in causal effects in experimental and observational studies and for conducting hypothesis tests about the magnitude of differences in treatment effects across subsets of the population. We provide a data-driven approach to partition the data into subpopulations that differ in the magnitude of their treatment effects. The approach enables the construction of valid confidence intervals for treatment effects, even with many covariates relative to the sample size, and without “sparsity” assumptions. We propose an “honest” approach to estimation, whereby one sample is used to construct the partition and another to estimate treatment effects for each subpopulation. Our approach builds on regression tree methods, modified to optimize for goodness of fit in treatment effects and to account for honest estimation. Our model selection criterion anticipates that bias will be eliminated by honest estimation and also accounts for the effect of making additional splits on the variance of treatment effect estimates within each subpopulation. We address the challenge that the “ground truth” for a causal effect is not observed for any individual unit, so that standard approaches to cross-validation must be modified. Through a simulation study, we show that for our preferred method honest estimation results in nominal coverage for 90% confidence intervals, whereas coverage ranges between 74% and 84% for nonhonest approaches. Honest estimation requires estimating the model with a smaller sample size; the cost in terms of mean squared error of treatment effects for our preferred method ranges between 7–22%. PMID:27382149

  13. Functional Heterogeneity and Senior Management Team Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benoliel, Pascale; Somech, Anit

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: There has been an increasing trend toward the creation of senior management teams (SMTs) which are characterized by a high degree of functional heterogeneity. Although such teams may create better linkages to information, along with the benefits of functional heterogeneity comes the potential for conflicts that stem from the value…

  14. Biology of Bony Fish Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkinson, Jordan W.; Grayfer, Leon; Belosevic, Miodrag

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are found across all vertebrate species, reside in virtually all animal tissues, and play critical roles in host protection and homeostasis. Various mechanisms determine and regulate the highly plastic functional phenotypes of macrophages, including antimicrobial host defenses (pro-inflammatory, M1-type), and resolution and repair functions (anti-inflammatory/regulatory, M2-type). The study of inflammatory macrophages in immune defense of teleosts has garnered much attention, and antimicrobial mechanisms of these cells have been extensively studied in various fish models. Intriguingly, both similarities and differences have been documented for the regulation of lower vertebrate macrophage antimicrobial defenses, as compared to what has been described in mammals. Advances in our understanding of the teleost macrophage M2 phenotypes likewise suggest functional conservation through similar and distinct regulatory strategies, compared to their mammalian counterparts. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing teleost macrophage functional heterogeneity, including monopoetic development, classical macrophage inflammatory and antimicrobial responses as well as alternative macrophage polarization towards tissues repair and resolution of inflammation. PMID:26633534

  15. Landscape heterogeneity-biodiversity relationship: effect of range size.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Naoki; Amano, Tatsuya; Naoe, Shoji; Yamakita, Takehisa; Komatsu, Isamu; Takagawa, Shin-ichi; Sato, Naoto; Ueta, Mutsuyuki; Miyashita, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    The importance of landscape heterogeneity to biodiversity may depend on the size of the geographic range of species, which in turn can reflect species traits (such as habitat generalization) and the effects of historical and contemporary land covers. We used nationwide bird survey data from Japan, where heterogeneous landscapes predominate, to test the hypothesis that wide-ranging species are positively associated with landscape heterogeneity in terms of species richness and abundance, whereas narrow-ranging species are positively associated with landscape homogeneity in the form of either open or forest habitats. We used simultaneous autoregressive models to explore the effects of climate, evapotranspiration, and landscape heterogeneity on the richness and abundance of breeding land-bird species. The richness of wide-ranging species and the total species richness were highest in heterogeneous landscapes, where many wide-ranging species showed the highest abundance. In contrast, the richness of narrow-ranging species was not highest in heterogeneous landscapes; most of those species were abundant in either open or forest landscapes. Moreover, in open landscapes, narrow-ranging species increased their species richness with decreasing temperature. These results indicate that heterogeneous landscapes are associated with rich bird diversity but that most narrow-ranging species prefer homogeneous landscapes--particularly open habitats in colder regions, where grasslands have historically predominated. There is a need to reassess the generality of the heterogeneity-biodiversity relationship, with attention to the characteristics of species assemblages determined by environments at large spatiotemporal scales. PMID:24675969

  16. [Latest pain management for painful bony metastases].

    PubMed

    Ikenaga, Masayuki

    2006-04-01

    Pain management for painful bony metastases is the most important problem for symptom relief of terminally-ill cancer patients. Pathological fractures often decrease the activity of daily life (ADL) of patients, and cause deterioration of the quality of life (QOL) and prognosis. Basically pharmacological therapies of the World Health Organization (WHO) method are essential for symptom relief from cancer pain. This article provides the latest pain managements (palliative irradiation, bisphosphonate, orthopedic surgery, percutaneous vertebroplasty and radiopharmaceutical therapy) of bony metastases, and mentions the indications and the problems of these interventions. In consideration to prognosis, the QOL and patient's needs, medical staffs have to perform multidisciplinary approach for providing suitable palliative care. PMID:16582515

  17. [Ethmoidal mucocele after transpalpebral bony orbital decompression].

    PubMed

    Gire, J; Facon, F; Guigou, S; Fauquier, S; Malet, T

    2012-10-01

    We report a case of a late ethmoidal mucocele occurring after transpalpebral bony orbital decompression. A 39-year-old man presented with a recurrence of a right-sided proptosis without signs of orbital inflammation. The patient had undergone bilateral transpalpebral bony orbital decompression for dysthyroid orbitopathy 2 years prior. Orbital CT scan showed a large mucocele in the supero-lateral right ethmoidal sinus with lateral extension to the medial rectus. The patient was therefore referred to an ear, nose and throat (ENT) surgeon, who performed an anterior ethmoidectomy with marsupialization and drainage of the mucocele via an endoscopic approach. A complete postoperative resolution of proptosis was observed without recurrence of the mucocele to date, approximately 6 months postoperative. Sinus complications occurring after orbital decompression may include sinusitis, hematoma, imploding antrum syndrome and mucoceles. Recurrent proptosis secondary to an ethmoidal mucocele is a rare event after bony orbital decompression surgery, with only two cases reported in the international literature. Management requires ophthalmologic diagnosis and collaboration between the ophthalmologist and otorhinolaryngologist.

  18. Time Transient Effects in Heterogeneous Permselective Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Yoav; Park, Sinwook; Yossifon, Gilad

    2015-03-01

    The passage of an electric current through a permselective medium (membranes/nanochannels) under an applied electric field is characterized by the formation of ionic concentration gradients which result in regions of depleted and enriched ionic concentration at opposite ends of the medium, i.e. concentration polarization (CP). In this work, we study the time-transient behavior of the concentration and electric potential distributions in a realistic two dimensional and three layered system (i.e. microchannel-permselective medium-microchannel device). We provide an analytical solution for the concentration under the simplifying assumptions of local-electroneutrality, ideal permselectivity and negligible convection while the electric potential is solved numerically. It is shown that time transient effects occur over the diffusive time scale until steady-state is achieved. The numerical steady state solution is compared with previous analytical results and good quantitative behavior is observed.

  19. Primary bony Hodgkin’s lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Binesh, Fariba; Mirjalili, Mohammad Reza; Akhavan, Ali; Navabii, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Hodgkin’s lymphoma most commonly presents with progressive painless enlargement of peripheral lymph nodes, especially around the cervical region. At the time of diagnosis osseous involvement is uncommon and even in the late stages only 9–35% of cases have any bony involvement. Rarely Hodgkin’s lymphoma presents as an osseous lesion without involvement of lymph nodes, therefore the histological diagnosis of osseous Hodgkin’s lymphoma can be problematic. Here, the authors present a rare case of primary osseous Hodgkin’s lymphoma and a review of the literature. PMID:22787180

  20. Advances in genomics of bony fish

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Hans J.; Dirks, Ron P.

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we present an overview of the recent advances of genomic technologies applied to studies of fish species belonging to the superclass of Osteichthyes (bony fish) with a major emphasis on the infraclass of Teleostei, also called teleosts. This superclass that represents more than 50% of all known vertebrate species has gained considerable attention from genome researchers in the last decade. We discuss many examples that demonstrate that this highly deserved attention is currently leading to new opportunities for answering important biological questions on gene function and evolutionary processes. In addition to giving an overview of the technologies that have been applied for studying various fish species we put the recent advances in genome research on the model species zebrafish and medaka in the context of its impact for studies of all fish of the superclass of Osteichthyes. We thereby want to illustrate how the combined value of research on model species together with a broad angle perspective on all bony fish species will have a huge impact on research in all fields of fundamental science and will speed up applications in many societally important areas such as the development of new medicines, toxicology test systems, environmental sensing systems and sustainable aquaculture strategies. PMID:24291769

  1. Effective Hydraulic Conductivity of Unsaturated Isotropic Soils with Multidimensional Heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. F.

    2010-05-01

    Accurate simulation and prediction of flow and transport of solutes in a heterogeneous vadose zone requires the appropriate hydraulic properties corresponding to the spatial scale of interest. Upscaling techniques provide effective properties to describe the vadose zone system’s behavior with information collected at a much smaller scale. Realizing that a saturated system can be considered as a special state of the unsaturated system, the methodologies for upscaling the saturated hydraulic conductivity of heterogeneous isotropic porous media under steady-state flow conditions can be extended for upscaling the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. An advantage of this approach is that the extended upscaling methods are independent of the choice of hydraulic function models. The Matheron, small-perturbation, and self-consistent upscaling methods were used to demonstrate the approach. The extended upscaling methods were tested using multi-step numerical experiments of gravity-induced flow into Miller-similar synthetic soils with different levels of heterogeneity. Results show that, under 3-D flow conditions in isotropic soils, the self-consistent method applies to all the soil heterogeneity conditions considered while the Matheron and small-perturbation methods are acceptable for soil of relatively low variability.

  2. Computing effective properties of random heterogeneous materials on heterogeneous parallel processors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leidi, Tiziano; Scocchi, Giulio; Grossi, Loris; Pusterla, Simone; D'Angelo, Claudio; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Ortona, Alberto

    2012-11-01

    In recent decades, finite element (FE) techniques have been extensively used for predicting effective properties of random heterogeneous materials. In the case of very complex microstructures, the choice of numerical methods for the solution of this problem can offer some advantages over classical analytical approaches, and it allows the use of digital images obtained from real material samples (e.g., using computed tomography). On the other hand, having a large number of elements is often necessary for properly describing complex microstructures, ultimately leading to extremely time-consuming computations and high memory requirements. With the final objective of reducing these limitations, we improved an existing freely available FE code for the computation of effective conductivity (electrical and thermal) of microstructure digital models. To allow execution on hardware combining multi-core CPUs and a GPU, we first translated the original algorithm from Fortran to C, and we subdivided it into software components. Then, we enhanced the C version of the algorithm for parallel processing with heterogeneous processors. With the goal of maximizing the obtained performances and limiting resource consumption, we utilized a software architecture based on stream processing, event-driven scheduling, and dynamic load balancing. The parallel processing version of the algorithm has been validated using a simple microstructure consisting of a single sphere located at the centre of a cubic box, yielding consistent results. Finally, the code was used for the calculation of the effective thermal conductivity of a digital model of a real sample (a ceramic foam obtained using X-ray computed tomography). On a computer equipped with dual hexa-core Intel Xeon X5670 processors and an NVIDIA Tesla C2050, the parallel application version features near to linear speed-up progression when using only the CPU cores. It executes more than 20 times faster when additionally using the GPU.

  3. Aggregation effects of surface heterogeneity in land surface processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Z.; Pelgrum, H.; Menenti, M.

    In order to investigate the aggregation effects of surface heterogeneity in land surface processes we have adapted a theory of aggregation. Two strategies have been adopted: 1) Aggregation of radiative fluxes. The aggregated radiative fluxes are used to derive input parameters that are then used to calculate the aerodynamic fluxes at different aggregation levels. This is equivalent to observing the same area at different resolutions using a certain remote sensor, and then calculating the aerodynamic fluxes correspondingly. 2) Aggregation of aerodynamic fluxes calculated at the original observation scale to different aggregation levels. A case study has been conducted to identify the effects of aggregation on areal estimates of sensible and latent heat fluxes. The length scales of surface variables in heterogeneous landscapes are estimated by means of wavelet analysis.

  4. [Chronic bony instability of the elbow joint].

    PubMed

    Geßmann, J; Königshausen, M; Schildhauer, T A; Seybold, D

    2016-10-01

    The high stability of the elbow joint is provided by the congruent articular surfaces in combination with soft tissue stabilizers. The main osseous contributor of elbow stability is the coronoid, which is therefore referred to as a primary stabilizer. The radial head as a secondary stabilizer together with the medial collateral ligament assures valgus stability and together with the coronoid it assures posterolateral stability. Insufficiency of the osseous stabilizers may lead to difficulties in the treatment of chronic dislocation and complex instability. Thereby reconstruction of the osseous constraints of the elbow joint is not performed in isolation from addressing insufficient soft-tissue stabilizers. Bony stabilizers and reconstructional procedures are discussed in this review.

  5. The Value of Heterogeneity for Cost-Effectiveness Subgroup Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Manca, Andrea; Claxton, Karl; Sculpher, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    This article develops a general framework to guide the use of subgroup cost-effectiveness analysis for decision making in a collectively funded health system. In doing so, it addresses 2 key policy questions, namely, the identification and selection of subgroups, while distinguishing 2 sources of potential value associated with heterogeneity. These are 1) the value of revealing the factors associated with heterogeneity in costs and outcomes using existing evidence (static value) and 2) the value of acquiring further subgroup-related evidence to resolve the uncertainty given the current understanding of heterogeneity (dynamic value). Consideration of these 2 sources of value can guide subgroup-specific treatment decisions and inform whether further research should be conducted to resolve uncertainty to explain variability in costs and outcomes. We apply the proposed methods to a cost-effectiveness analysis for the management of patients with acute coronary syndrome. This study presents the expected net benefits under current and perfect information when subgroups are defined based on the use and combination of 6 binary covariates. The results of the case study confirm the theoretical expectations. As more subgroups are considered, the marginal net benefit gains obtained under the current information show diminishing marginal returns, and the expected value of perfect information shows a decreasing trend. We present a suggested algorithm that synthesizes the results to guide policy. PMID:24944196

  6. TRAPEZE: a randomised controlled trial of the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of chemotherapy with zoledronic acid, strontium-89, or both, in men with bony metastatic castration-refractory prostate cancer.

    PubMed Central

    James, Nicholas; Pirrie, Sarah; Pope, Ann; Barton, Darren; Andronis, Lazaros; Goranitis, Ilias; Collins, Stuart; McLaren, Duncan; O'Sullivan, Joe; Parker, Chris; Porfiri, Emilio; Staffurth, John; Stanley, Andrew; Wylie, James; Beesley, Sharon; Birtle, Alison; Brown, Janet; Chakraborti, Prabir; Russell, Martin; Billingham, Lucinda

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bony metastatic castration-refractory prostate cancer is associated with a poor prognosis and high morbidity. TRAPEZE was a two-by-two factorial randomised controlled trial of zoledronic acid (ZA) and strontium-89 (Sr-89), each combined with docetaxel. All have palliative benefits, are used to control bone symptoms and are used with docetaxel to prolong survival. ZA, approved on the basis of reducing skeletal-related events (SREs), is commonly combined with docetaxel in practice, although evidence of efficacy and cost-effectiveness is lacking. Sr-89, approved for controlling metastatic pain and reducing need for subsequent bone treatments, is generally palliatively used in patients unfit for chemotherapy. Phase II analysis confirmed the safety and feasibility of combining these agents. TRAPEZE aimed to determine the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of each agent. METHODS: Patients were randomised to receive six cycles of docetaxel plus prednisolone: alone, with ZA, with a single Sr-89 dose after cycle 6, or with both. Primary outcomes were clinical progression-free survival (CPFS: time to pain progression, SRE or death) and cost-effectiveness. Secondary outcomes were SRE-free interval (SREFI), total SREs, overall survival (OS) and quality of life (QoL). Log-rank test and Cox regression modelling were used to determine clinical effectiveness. Cost-effectiveness was assessed from the NHS perspective and expressed as cost per additional quality-adjusted life-year (QALY). An additional analysis was carried out for ZA to reflect the availability of generic ZA. RESULTS: PATIENTS: 757 randomised (median age 68.7 years; Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group scale score 0, 40%; 1, 52%; 2, 8%; prior radiotherapy, 45%); median prostate-specific antigen 143.78 ng/ml (interquartile range 50.8-353.9 ng/ml). Stratified log-rank analysis of CPFS was statistically non-significant for either agent (Sr-89, p = 0.11; ZA, p = 0.45). Cox regression

  7. TRAPEZE: a randomised controlled trial of the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of chemotherapy with zoledronic acid, strontium-89, or both, in men with bony metastatic castration-refractory prostate cancer.

    PubMed Central

    James, Nicholas; Pirrie, Sarah; Pope, Ann; Barton, Darren; Andronis, Lazaros; Goranitis, Ilias; Collins, Stuart; McLaren, Duncan; O'Sullivan, Joe; Parker, Chris; Porfiri, Emilio; Staffurth, John; Stanley, Andrew; Wylie, James; Beesley, Sharon; Birtle, Alison; Brown, Janet; Chakraborti, Prabir; Russell, Martin; Billingham, Lucinda

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bony metastatic castration-refractory prostate cancer is associated with a poor prognosis and high morbidity. TRAPEZE was a two-by-two factorial randomised controlled trial of zoledronic acid (ZA) and strontium-89 (Sr-89), each combined with docetaxel. All have palliative benefits, are used to control bone symptoms and are used with docetaxel to prolong survival. ZA, approved on the basis of reducing skeletal-related events (SREs), is commonly combined with docetaxel in practice, although evidence of efficacy and cost-effectiveness is lacking. Sr-89, approved for controlling metastatic pain and reducing need for subsequent bone treatments, is generally palliatively used in patients unfit for chemotherapy. Phase II analysis confirmed the safety and feasibility of combining these agents. TRAPEZE aimed to determine the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of each agent. METHODS: Patients were randomised to receive six cycles of docetaxel plus prednisolone: alone, with ZA, with a single Sr-89 dose after cycle 6, or with both. Primary outcomes were clinical progression-free survival (CPFS: time to pain progression, SRE or death) and cost-effectiveness. Secondary outcomes were SRE-free interval (SREFI), total SREs, overall survival (OS) and quality of life (QoL). Log-rank test and Cox regression modelling were used to determine clinical effectiveness. Cost-effectiveness was assessed from the NHS perspective and expressed as cost per additional quality-adjusted life-year (QALY). An additional analysis was carried out for ZA to reflect the availability of generic ZA. RESULTS: PATIENTS: 757 randomised (median age 68.7 years; Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group scale score 0, 40%; 1, 52%; 2, 8%; prior radiotherapy, 45%); median prostate-specific antigen 143.78 ng/ml (interquartile range 50.8-353.9 ng/ml). Stratified log-rank analysis of CPFS was statistically non-significant for either agent (Sr-89, p = 0.11; ZA, p = 0.45). Cox regression

  8. Understanding the effect of retirement on health: Mechanisms and heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Eibich, Peter

    2015-09-01

    This paper investigates the mechanisms behind the health effects of retirement. Using a Regression Discontinuity Design to exploit financial incentives in the German pension system for identification, I find that retirement improves subjective health status and mental health, while also reducing outpatient care utilization. I explore a wide range of health behaviors, time use, and effect heterogeneity as potential mechanisms. Relief from work-related stress and strain, increased sleep duration as well as more frequent physical exercise seem to be key mechanisms through which retirement affects health. PMID:26079117

  9. Transient dynamics and the destabilizing effects of prey heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Christopher F; Klausmeier, Christopher A; Litchman, Elena

    2012-03-01

    The presence of prey heterogeneity and weakly interacting prey species is frequently viewed as a stabilizer of predator-prey dynamics, countering the destabilizing effects of enrichment and reducing the amplitude of population cycles. However, prior model explorations have largely focused on long-term, dynamic attractors rather than transient dynamics. Recent theoretical work shows that the presence of prey that are defended from predation can have strongly divergent effects on dynamics depending on time scale: prey heterogeneity can counteract the destabilizing effects of enrichment on predator-prey dynamics at long time scales but strongly destabilize systems during transient phases by creating long periods of low predator/prey abundance and increasing extinction probability (an effect that is amplified with increasing enrichment). We tested these general predictions using a planktonic system composed of a zooplankton predator and multiple algal prey. We first parameterized a model of our system to generate predictions and tested these experimentally. Our results qualitatively supported several model predictions. During transient phases, presence of defended algal prey increased predator extinctions at low and high enrichment levels compared to systems with only a single edible prey. This destabilizing effect was moderated at higher dilution rates, as predicted by our model. When examining dynamics beyond initial oscillations, presence of the defended prey increased predator-prey temporal variability at high nutrient enrichment but had no effect at low nutrient levels. Our results highlight the importance of considering transient dynamics when assessing the role of stabilizing factors on the dynamics of food webs.

  10. Frequency-dependent effective hydraulic conductivity of strongly heterogeneous media.

    PubMed

    Caspari, E; Gurevich, B; Müller, T M

    2013-10-01

    The determination of the transport properties of heterogeneous porous rocks, such as an effective hydraulic conductivity, arises in a range of geoscience problems, from groundwater flow analysis to hydrocarbon reservoir modeling. In the presence of formation-scale heterogeneities, nonstationary flows, induced by pumping tests or propagating elastic waves, entail localized pressure diffusion processes with a characteristic frequency depending on the pressure diffusivity and size of the heterogeneity. Then, on a macroscale, a homogeneous equivalent medium exists, which has a frequency-dependent effective conductivity. The frequency dependence of the conductivity can be analyzed with Biot's equations of poroelasticity. In the quasistatic frequency regime of this framework, the slow compressional wave is a proxy for pressure diffusion processes. This slow compressional wave is associated with the out-of-phase motion of the fluid and solid phase, thereby creating a relative fluid-solid displacement vector field. Decoupling of the poroelasticity equations gives a diffusion equation for the fluid-solid displacement field valid in a poroelastic medium with spatial fluctuations in hydraulic conductivity. Then, an effective conductivity is found by a Green's function approach followed by a strong-contrast perturbation theory suggested earlier in the context of random dielectrics. This theory leads to closed-form expressions for the frequency-dependent effective conductivity as a function of the one- and two-point probability functions of the conductivity fluctuations. In one dimension, these expressions are consistent with exact solutions in both low- and high-frequency limits for arbitrary conductivity contrast. In 3D, the low-frequency limit depends on the details of the microstructure. However, the derived approximation for the effective conductivity is consistent with the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds.

  11. Dosimetric effect of tissue heterogeneity for 125I prostate implants

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Susana Maria; Teixeira, Nuno José; Fernandes, Lisete; Teles, Pedro; Vaz, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Aim To use Monte Carlo (MC) together with voxel phantoms to analyze the tissue heterogeneity effect in the dose distributions and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for 125I prostate implants. Background Dose distribution calculations in low dose-rate brachytherapy are based on the dose deposition around a single source in a water phantom. This formalism does not take into account tissue heterogeneities, interseed attenuation, or finite patient dimensions effects. Tissue composition is especially important due to the photoelectric effect. Materials and methods The computed tomographies (CT) of two patients with prostate cancer were used to create voxel phantoms for the MC simulations. An elemental composition and density were assigned to each structure. Densities of the prostate, vesicles, rectum and bladder were determined through the CT electronic densities of 100 patients. The same simulations were performed considering the same phantom as pure water. Results were compared via dose–volume histograms and EUD for the prostate and rectum. Results The mean absorbed doses presented deviations of 3.3–4.0% for the prostate and of 2.3–4.9% for the rectum, when comparing calculations in water with calculations in the heterogeneous phantom. In the calculations in water, the prostate D90 was overestimated by 2.8–3.9% and the rectum D0.1cc resulted in dose differences of 6–8%. The EUD resulted in an overestimation of 3.5–3.7% for the prostate and of 7.7–8.3% for the rectum. Conclusions The deposited dose was consistently overestimated for the simulation in water. In order to increase the accuracy in the determination of dose distributions, especially around the rectum, the introduction of the model-based algorithms is recommended. PMID:25337412

  12. Tailgut cyst accompanied with bony defect

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jae-Sang; Lee, Kyeong-Seok; Doh, Jae-Won

    2016-01-01

    Retro-rectal cystic hamartoma (tailgut cyst), is an uncommon congenital developmental lesion, generally located in the retro-rectal space. Its diagnosis and approach is challenging because the retropelvic space is not familiar. We report a 51-year-old woman who presented with paresthesia and pain in perianal area. The magnetic resonance image showed high signal intensity on the T1-weighted image and iso to high signal intensity on the T2-weighted image of the retropelvic space and CT showed sacral bony defect. We chose the posterior approach for removal of the tailgut cyst. Histopathology exam of the retropelvic cyst revealed a multiloculated cyst containing abundant mucoid material lined by both squamous and glandular mucinous epithelium. The patient has recovered nicely with no recurrence. Tailgut cyst needs complete surgical excision for good prognosis. So, a preoperative high-resolution image and co-operation between neurosurgen and general surgeon would help to make safe and feasible diagnosis and surgical access. PMID:27073796

  13. Effective hydraulic properties on a highly heterogeneous soil horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samouëlian, A.; Cousin, I.; Frison, A.; Richard, G.

    2009-04-01

    Knowing the soil hydraulic functioning for agricultural practices is more and more important in the context of global change. In that context, soil horizons represent the reference soil volume in term of soil functioning. Nevertheless they can be heterogeneous as for example, stony horizons, cultivated horizons, or also specific weathering horizons like those in Albeluvisol. The determination of effective hydraulic properties in these heterogeneous horizons can not be done by classical laboratory experiments like Multi-Step-Outflow or evaporative Wind experiment. So it remains a real challenge to get the effective hydraulic properties. The aim of this paper is to propose a methodology for the determination of effective hydraulic properties of heterogeneous soil horizons based on the knowledge of the: on one hand the 3D soil structure and on the other hand the local hydraulic properties. The studied soil is an Albeluvisol that exhibits some horizons composed by the juxtaposition of two Elementary Pedological Volumes (EPVs); they can be visually distinguished by their colours (ochre and white) and they have differential hydraulic functioning: the clayey ochre ones conduct less water than the loamy white ones. Local hydraulic properties were determined on each type of volumes. The 3D structure of the heterogeneous horizon was obtained by electrical resistivity measurements. Several two-dimensional cuts with different structures were extracted from this 3D block so that we can simulate on them the hydraulic functioning of the horizon by the Hydrus2D software. The equivalent water retention curve was obtained thanks to the additive properties of the water retention curves at the local scale. The equivalent unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of the horizon was determined on each 2D cut, which requires the knowledge of the structure. The calculations were done by two methods, a numerical one that simulated the water flow for a constant hydraulic potential, a analytical

  14. Civic Returns to Higher Education: A Note on Heterogeneous Effects.

    PubMed

    Brand, Jennie E

    2010-12-01

    American educational leaders and philosophers have long valued schooling for its role in preparing the nation's youth to be civically engaged citizens. Numerous studies have found a positive relationship between education and subsequent civic participation. However, little is known about possible variation in effects by selection into higher education, a critical omission considering education's expressed role as a key mechanism for integrating disadvantaged individuals into civic life. I disaggregate effects and examine whether civic returns to higher education are largest for disadvantaged low likelihood or advantaged high likelihood college goers. I find evidence for significant effect heterogeneity: civic returns to college are greatest among individuals who have a low likelihood for college completion. Returns decrease as the propensity for college increases.

  15. Hydrological effects of within-catchment heterogeneity of drainage density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Lazzaro, Michele; Zarlenga, Antonio; Volpi, Elena

    2015-02-01

    Local drainage density (dd) has been traditionally defined as the inverse of twice the distance one has to walk before encountering a channel. This formalization easily allows to derive raster-based maps of dd extracted straight off from digital elevation model data. Maps of local dd, which are continuous in space, are able to reveal the appearance of strong heterogeneities in the geological and geomorphological properties of natural landscapes across different scales. In this work we employ the information provided by these spatial maps to study the potential effects of the within-catchment variability of dd on the hydrologic response. A simple power law relationship between runoff yield at the local scale and the value of dd has been adopted; the hypothesis is supported by a large number of past empirical observations and modeling. The novel framework proposed (ddRWF) embeds this spatially variable runoff weight in the well-known Rescaled Width Function (RWF) framework, based on the more general geomorphological theory of the hydrologic response. The model is applied to four sub-basins in the Cascade Range Region (Oregon, USA) where strong contrasts in dissection patterns due the underlain geology have been broadly addressed in previous literature. The ddRWF approach is compared with the classic RWF in terms of shape, moments and peak of the simulated hydrograph response. Results hint that the variability of runoff yield due to the heterogeneity of dd (i.e. of hillslope lengths) determines a more rapid concentration of runoff, which implies shorter lag times, larger skewness and higher peak floods, especially in the case hillslope velocity is much smaller than channel velocity. The potential of the proposed framework relies on accounting for spatially variable losses related to geomorphologic heterogeneity in lumped rainfall-runoff models, still keeping the simple and robust structure of the IUH approach.

  16. Effects of incomplete mixing on chemical reactions under flow heterogeneities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Lazaro; Hidalgo, Juan J.; Dentz, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Evaluation of the mixing process in aquifers is of primary importance when assessing attenuation of pollutants. In aquifers different hydraulic and chemical properties can increase mixing and spreading of the transported species. Mixing processes control biogeochemical transformations such as precipitation/dissolution reactions or degradation reactions that are fast compared to mass transfer processes. Reactions are local phenomena that fluctuate at the pore scale, but predictions are often made at much larger scales. However, aquifer heterogeities are found at all scales and generates flow heterogeneities which creates complex concentration distributions that enhances mixing. In order to assess the impact of spatial flow heterogeneities at pore scale we study concentration profiles, gradients and reaction rates using a random walk particle tracking (RWPT) method and kernel density estimators to reconstruct concentrations and gradients in two setups. First, we focus on a irreversible bimolecular reaction A+B → C under homogeneous flow to distinguish phenomena of incomplete mixing of reactants from finite-size sampling effects. Second, we analise a fast reversible bimolecular chemical reaction A+B rightleftharpoons C in a laminar Poiseuille flow reactor to determine the difference between local and global reaction rates caused by the incomplete mixing under flow heterogeneities. Simulation results for the first setup differ from the analytical solution of the continuum scale advection-dispersion-reaction equation studied by Gramling et al. (2002), which results in an overstimation quantity of reaction product (C). In the second setup, results show that actual reaction rates are bigger than the obtained from artificially mixing the system by averaging the concentration vertically. - LITERATURE Gramling, C. M.,Harvey, C. F., Meigs, and L. C., (2002). Reactive transport in porous media: A comparison of model prediction with laboratory visualization, Environ. Sci

  17. Investigating the effects of target heterogeneity on the cratering process.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnouin, O. S.

    2012-12-01

    momentum using a second order multi-material Eulerian methodology. This code possesses an adaptive mesh refinement that allows investigating the effects of fine-scale target heterogeneity on the cratering process, through the use of a simple microscopic model with complex but resolvable heterogeneous geometries, rather than a complex macroscopic model. Both approaches provide insights on how the thickness of the shock front relative to the average dimension of any pre-exiting structure could be a controlling factor during impact cratering.

  18. Analysis of Surface Heterogeneity Effects with Mesoscale Terrestrial Modeling Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmer, C.

    2015-12-01

    An improved understanding of the full variability in the weather and climate system is crucial for reducing the uncertainty in weather forecasting and climate prediction, and to aid policy makers to develop adaptation and mitigation strategies. A yet unknown part of uncertainty in the predictions from the numerical models is caused by the negligence of non-resolved land surface heterogeneity and the sub-surface dynamics and their potential impact on the state of the atmosphere. At the same time, mesoscale numerical models using finer horizontal grid resolution [O(1)km] can suffer from inconsistencies and neglected scale-dependencies in ABL parameterizations and non-resolved effects of integrated surface-subsurface lateral flow at this scale. Our present knowledge suggests large-eddy-simulation (LES) as an eventual solution to overcome the inadequacy of the physical parameterizations in the atmosphere in this transition scale, yet we are constrained by the computational resources, memory management, big-data, when using LES for regional domains. For the present, there is a need for scale-aware parameterizations not only in the atmosphere but also in the land surface and subsurface model components. In this study, we use the recently developed Terrestrial Systems Modeling Platform (TerrSysMP) as a numerical tool to analyze the uncertainty in the simulation of surface exchange fluxes and boundary layer circulations at grid resolutions of the order of 1km, and explore the sensitivity of the atmospheric boundary layer evolution and convective rainfall processes on land surface heterogeneity.

  19. Effective heterogeneity controlling premonitory slip on laboratory faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvadurai, P. A.; Glaser, S.; Parker, J.

    2015-12-01

    Using a direct shear friction apparatus, we characterize factors controlling rheological differences along a PMMA-PMMA fault in the laboratory. Rheological differences on natural faults are believed to be a controlling factor to aseismic transients (slow slip) in nature. Asperity sizes and locations were measured using a pressure sensitive film at high (σn = 0.8 MPa) and low (σn = 0.4 MPa) nominal normal stress levels. Faults confined to low and high normal stress experienced lower and higher 'effective heterogeneity,' quantified using a characteristic elastic correlation length λc [Braun and Peyrard, 2012]. The fault was sheared at a constant far-field velocity VLP under constant normal stress σn. Non-uniform premonitory slip accumulated along the fault prior to rapid sliding. Slow events (SE), which were characterized as local increases in slip rate, were observed when the effective heterogeneity was increased. These events nucleated from the weaker central section of the fault propagating outwards at speeds between 0.84 mm/s to 26.5 mm/s over times 406 s and 11 s. The rupture growth rates were dependent on the load-point velocity VLP driving the system to failure. Slip rates, which increased within the SE, were also dependent on the load-point velocity. The evolution of slip rates versus time was similar to the 2013-2014 Boso slow slip event [Fukuda et al., 2014]. The slow event culminated with rapid slip rate deceleration sufficient to generate seismicity measured by an array of acoustic emission sensors. Deceleration of the SE (left panel of figure) shows a lower-frequency event (~ 60 - 350 Hz). In Detail A, we show the smaller, high-frequency events (~ 300 - 500 kHz) were superimposed on the larger, low-frequency signal. These events only occurred at higher levels of effective heterogeneity and demonstrate interactions between larger/slow and localized/fast slip. References: Braun, O. M. & M. Peyrard (2012), 'Crack in the frictional interface as a

  20. DIAGNOSTIC CRITERIA FOR PROLIFERATIVE THYROID LESIONS IN BONY FISHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Criteria for distinguishing hyperplastic thyroid lesions from thyroid neoplasia in bony fishes have long been debated by scientists. Confusion exists because the thyroid tissue in most teleosts is unencapsulated, is occasionally found in ectopic sites, and is frequently predispos...

  1. DIAGNOSTIC CRITERIA FOR PROLIFERATIVE THYROID LESIONS IN BONY FISHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid proliferative lesions are rather common in bony fishes but disagreement exists in the fish pathology community concerning diagnostic criteria for hyperplastic versus neoplastic lesions. To simplify the diagnosis of proliferative thyroid lesions and to reduce confusion reg...

  2. Multiple bony overgrowths in the mouth - report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Sathya; Muthusamy, Senthilkumar; Muthu, Kavitha; Sidhu, Preena

    2015-01-01

    Summary Tori and exostoses are benign bony protuberances that arise from bone surfaces in the oral cavity. The etiology of these growths has been implicated as multifactorial, but no consensus has been reached so far. These painless overgrowths seldom present as a complaint in the dental office unless functional or esthetic complications set in, and there is a fear for cancer. Here we discuss two rare cases where bony overgrowths present in the mouth were extensive and multiple. PMID:26811708

  3. Effective IPTV channel management method over heterogeneous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Hyunchul; Lee, Dai-boong; Song, Hwangjun

    2007-09-01

    This paper presents an effective IPTV channel management method using SVC (scalable video coding) that considers concurrently both channel zapping time and network utilization. A broadcasting channel is encoded in two-layered bitstream (base-layer channel and enhancement-layer channel) to supply for heterogeneous environments. The proposed algorithm locates only a limited numbers of base-layer channels close to users to reduce the network delay part of channel zapping time and adjusts the length of GOP (group of picture) into each base-layer channel to decrease the video decoding delay part of channel zapping time, which are performed based on user's channel preference information. Finally, the experimental results are provided to show the performance of the proposed schemes.

  4. The effects of physical and geochemical heterogeneities on hydro-geochemical transport and effective reaction rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atchley, Adam L.; Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis K.; Maxwell, Reed M.

    2014-09-01

    The role of coupled physical and geochemical heterogeneities in hydro-geochemical transport is investigated by simulating three-dimensional transport in a heterogeneous system with kinetic mineral reactions. Ensembles of 100 physically heterogeneous realizations were simulated for three geochemical conditions: 1) spatially homogeneous reactive mineral surface area, 2) reactive surface area positively correlated to hydraulic heterogeneity, and 3) reactive surface area negatively correlated to hydraulic heterogeneity. Groundwater chemistry and the corresponding effective reaction rates were calculated at three transverse planes to quantify differences in plume evolution due to heterogeneity in mineral reaction rates and solute residence time (τ). The model is based on a hypothetical CO2 intrusion into groundwater from a carbon capture utilization and storage (CCUS) operation where CO2 dissolution and formation of carbonic acid created geochemical dis-equilibrium between fluids and the mineral galena that resulted in increased aqueous lead (Pb2 +) concentrations. Calcite dissolution buffered the pH change and created conditions of galena oversaturation, which then reduced lead concentrations along the flow path. Near the leak kinetic geochemical reactions control the release of solutes into the fluid, but further along the flow path mineral solubility controls solute concentrations. Simulation results demonstrate the impact of heterogeneous distribution of geochemical reactive surface area in coordination with physical heterogeneity on the effective reaction rate (Krxn,eff) and Pb2 + concentrations within the plume. Dissimilarities between ensemble Pb2 + concentration and Krxn,eff are attributed to how geochemical heterogeneity affects the time (τeq) and therefore advection distance (Leq) required for the system to re-establish geochemical equilibrium. Only after geochemical equilibrium is re-established, Krxn,eff and Pb2 + concentrations are the same for all three

  5. The effects of physical and geochemical heterogeneities on hydro-geochemical transport and effective reaction rates.

    PubMed

    Atchley, Adam L; Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis K; Maxwell, Reed M

    2014-09-01

    The role of coupled physical and geochemical heterogeneities in hydro-geochemical transport is investigated by simulating three-dimensional transport in a heterogeneous system with kinetic mineral reactions. Ensembles of 100 physically heterogeneous realizations were simulated for three geochemical conditions: 1) spatially homogeneous reactive mineral surface area, 2) reactive surface area positively correlated to hydraulic heterogeneity, and 3) reactive surface area negatively correlated to hydraulic heterogeneity. Groundwater chemistry and the corresponding effective reaction rates were calculated at three transverse planes to quantify differences in plume evolution due to heterogeneity in mineral reaction rates and solute residence time (τ). The model is based on a hypothetical CO2 intrusion into groundwater from a carbon capture utilization and storage (CCUS) operation where CO2 dissolution and formation of carbonic acid created geochemical dis-equilibrium between fluids and the mineral galena that resulted in increased aqueous lead (Pb(2+)) concentrations. Calcite dissolution buffered the pH change and created conditions of galena oversaturation, which then reduced lead concentrations along the flow path. Near the leak kinetic geochemical reactions control the release of solutes into the fluid, but further along the flow path mineral solubility controls solute concentrations. Simulation results demonstrate the impact of heterogeneous distribution of geochemical reactive surface area in coordination with physical heterogeneity on the effective reaction rate (Krxn,eff) and Pb(2+) concentrations within the plume. Dissimilarities between ensemble Pb(2+) concentration and Krxn,eff are attributed to how geochemical heterogeneity affects the time (τeq) and therefore advection distance (Leq) required for the system to re-establish geochemical equilibrium. Only after geochemical equilibrium is re-established, Krxn,eff and Pb(2+) concentrations are the same for all

  6. Heterogeneous Effects of Direct Hypoxia Pathway Activation in Kidney Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Rafik; Masson, Norma; Simpson, Peter; Sciesielski, Lina Katrin; Sun, Min; Tian, Ya-Min; Ratcliffe, Peter John; Mole, David Robert

    2015-01-01

    General activation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathways is classically associated with adverse prognosis in cancer and has been proposed to contribute to oncogenic drive. In clear cell renal carcinoma (CCRC) HIF pathways are upregulated by inactivation of the von-Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor. However HIF-1α and HIF-2α have contrasting effects on experimental tumor progression. To better understand this paradox we examined pan-genomic patterns of HIF DNA binding and associated gene expression in response to manipulation of HIF-1α and HIF-2α and related the findings to CCRC prognosis. Our findings reveal distinct pan-genomic organization of canonical and non-canonical HIF isoform-specific DNA binding at thousands of sites. Overall associations were observed between HIF-1α-specific binding, and genes associated with favorable prognosis and between HIF-2α-specific binding and adverse prognosis. However within each isoform-specific set, individual gene associations were heterogeneous in sign and magnitude, suggesting that activation of each HIF-α isoform contributes a highly complex mix of pro- and anti-tumorigenic effects. PMID:26262842

  7. Effects of reservoir heterogeneity on scaling of effective mass transfer coefficient for solute transport.

    PubMed

    Leung, Juliana Y; Srinivasan, Sanjay

    2016-09-01

    Modeling transport process at large scale requires proper scale-up of subsurface heterogeneity and an understanding of its interaction with the underlying transport mechanisms. A technique based on volume averaging is applied to quantitatively assess the scaling characteristics of effective mass transfer coefficient in heterogeneous reservoir models. The effective mass transfer coefficient represents the combined contribution from diffusion and dispersion to the transport of non-reactive solute particles within a fluid phase. Although treatment of transport problems with the volume averaging technique has been published in the past, application to geological systems exhibiting realistic spatial variability remains a challenge. Previously, the authors developed a new procedure where results from a fine-scale numerical flow simulation reflecting the full physics of the transport process albeit over a sub-volume of the reservoir are integrated with the volume averaging technique to provide effective description of transport properties. The procedure is extended such that spatial averaging is performed at the local-heterogeneity scale. In this paper, the transport of a passive (non-reactive) solute is simulated on multiple reservoir models exhibiting different patterns of heterogeneities, and the scaling behavior of effective mass transfer coefficient (Keff) is examined and compared. One such set of models exhibit power-law (fractal) characteristics, and the variability of dispersion and Keff with scale is in good agreement with analytical expressions described in the literature. This work offers an insight into the impacts of heterogeneity on the scaling of effective transport parameters. A key finding is that spatial heterogeneity models with similar univariate and bivariate statistics may exhibit different scaling characteristics because of the influence of higher order statistics. More mixing is observed in the channelized models with higher-order continuity. It

  8. Effects of reservoir heterogeneity on scaling of effective mass transfer coefficient for solute transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Juliana Y.; Srinivasan, Sanjay

    2016-09-01

    Modeling transport process at large scale requires proper scale-up of subsurface heterogeneity and an understanding of its interaction with the underlying transport mechanisms. A technique based on volume averaging is applied to quantitatively assess the scaling characteristics of effective mass transfer coefficient in heterogeneous reservoir models. The effective mass transfer coefficient represents the combined contribution from diffusion and dispersion to the transport of non-reactive solute particles within a fluid phase. Although treatment of transport problems with the volume averaging technique has been published in the past, application to geological systems exhibiting realistic spatial variability remains a challenge. Previously, the authors developed a new procedure where results from a fine-scale numerical flow simulation reflecting the full physics of the transport process albeit over a sub-volume of the reservoir are integrated with the volume averaging technique to provide effective description of transport properties. The procedure is extended such that spatial averaging is performed at the local-heterogeneity scale. In this paper, the transport of a passive (non-reactive) solute is simulated on multiple reservoir models exhibiting different patterns of heterogeneities, and the scaling behavior of effective mass transfer coefficient (Keff) is examined and compared. One such set of models exhibit power-law (fractal) characteristics, and the variability of dispersion and Keff with scale is in good agreement with analytical expressions described in the literature. This work offers an insight into the impacts of heterogeneity on the scaling of effective transport parameters. A key finding is that spatial heterogeneity models with similar univariate and bivariate statistics may exhibit different scaling characteristics because of the influence of higher order statistics. More mixing is observed in the channelized models with higher-order continuity. It

  9. Effects of reservoir heterogeneity on scaling of effective mass transfer coefficient for solute transport.

    PubMed

    Leung, Juliana Y; Srinivasan, Sanjay

    2016-09-01

    Modeling transport process at large scale requires proper scale-up of subsurface heterogeneity and an understanding of its interaction with the underlying transport mechanisms. A technique based on volume averaging is applied to quantitatively assess the scaling characteristics of effective mass transfer coefficient in heterogeneous reservoir models. The effective mass transfer coefficient represents the combined contribution from diffusion and dispersion to the transport of non-reactive solute particles within a fluid phase. Although treatment of transport problems with the volume averaging technique has been published in the past, application to geological systems exhibiting realistic spatial variability remains a challenge. Previously, the authors developed a new procedure where results from a fine-scale numerical flow simulation reflecting the full physics of the transport process albeit over a sub-volume of the reservoir are integrated with the volume averaging technique to provide effective description of transport properties. The procedure is extended such that spatial averaging is performed at the local-heterogeneity scale. In this paper, the transport of a passive (non-reactive) solute is simulated on multiple reservoir models exhibiting different patterns of heterogeneities, and the scaling behavior of effective mass transfer coefficient (Keff) is examined and compared. One such set of models exhibit power-law (fractal) characteristics, and the variability of dispersion and Keff with scale is in good agreement with analytical expressions described in the literature. This work offers an insight into the impacts of heterogeneity on the scaling of effective transport parameters. A key finding is that spatial heterogeneity models with similar univariate and bivariate statistics may exhibit different scaling characteristics because of the influence of higher order statistics. More mixing is observed in the channelized models with higher-order continuity. It

  10. Heterogenization of Homogeneous Catalysts: the Effect of the Support

    SciTech Connect

    Earl, W.L.; Ott, K.C.; Hall, K.A.; de Rege, F.M.; Morita, D.K.; Tumas, W.; Brown, G.H.; Broene, R.D.

    1999-06-29

    We have studied the influence of placing a soluble, homogeneous catalyst onto a solid support. We determined that such a 'heterogenized' homogeneous catalyst can have improved activity and selectivity for the asymmetric hydrogenation of enamides to amino acid derivatives. The route of heterogenization of RhDuPhos(COD){sup +} cations occurs via electrostatic interactions with anions that are capable of strong hydrogen bonding to silica surfaces. This is a novel approach to supported catalysis. Supported RhDuPhos(COD){sup +} is a recyclable, non-leaching catalyst in non-polar media. This is one of the few heterogenized catalysts that exhibits improved catalytic performance as compared to its homogeneous analog.

  11. Effect of heterogeneous catalyst during combustion of diesel fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arefeen, Quamrul

    1999-11-01

    With the increase in number of vehicles using diesel engines, the contributions to environmental pollution made by diesel engines is also on the rise. Carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen and sulfur, hydrocarbons, and particulates are currently regulated as harmful emissions from diesel engines. Recent technologies to control harmful engine emissions have been almost exclusively directed towards gasoline engines. It is generally held that fuel quality will have to play an important role with all IC engines to meet future stringent regulations. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of heterogeneous catalyst on combustion. Micron sized solid catalyst, suspended in a specific organic peroxide, has been found to promote better combustion by modifying kinetics and changing the thermodynamics of the reactions. The catalyst reduces emissions without dramatically changing the properties of the fuel. The characteristic parameters of a baseline fuel, and the same fuel with the additive, were analyzed. The dosage of additive used was found to be compatible with commercial diesel. Diesel vehicles were driven unloaded at normal road conditions during the experiments. Exhaust emissions were measured when the trucks were at static conditions and the engine running on idle and at 2000 rpm. The gaseous components in the exhaust, O2, CO2, CO, NO, NO2, NOx, SO2, and CxH y were monitored. Particulates were trapped on a pre-weighed glass filter. Some of the filters were sent to an independent laboratory for microscopic and elemental analysis of the collected debris. Zinc oxide/peroxide suspended in tert-butyl hydro peroxide were used as the heterogeneous fuel catalyst. This combination increased the cetane rating of a commercial diesel fuel from 45 to a level of 70 depending on treatment ratio. A treatment ratio of one ounce additive per 5 gallons of diesel increased cetane number by an average of 5 points. Road mileage with the additive increased by an average

  12. Charge heterogeneity of surfaces: mapping and effects on surface forces.

    PubMed

    Drelich, Jaroslaw; Wang, Yu U

    2011-07-11

    The DLVO theory treats the total interaction force between two surfaces in a liquid medium as an arithmetic sum of two components: Lifshitz-van der Waals and electric double layer forces. Despite the success of the DLVO model developed for homogeneous surfaces, a vast majority of surfaces of particles and materials in technological systems are of a heterogeneous nature with a mosaic structure composed of microscopic and sub-microscopic domains of different surface characteristics. In such systems, the heterogeneity of the surface can be more important than the average surface character. Attractions can be stronger, by orders of magnitude, than would be expected from the classical mean-field DLVO model when area-averaged surface charge or potential is employed. Heterogeneity also introduces anisotropy of interactions into colloidal systems, vastly ignored in the past. To detect surface heterogeneities, analytical tools which provide accurate and spatially resolved information about material surface chemistry and potential - particularly at microscopic and sub-microscopic resolutions - are needed. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) offers the opportunity to locally probe not only changes in material surface characteristic but also charges of heterogeneous surfaces through measurements of force-distance curves in electrolyte solutions. Both diffuse-layer charge densities and potentials can be calculated by fitting the experimental data with a DLVO theoretical model. The surface charge characteristics of the heterogeneous substrate as recorded by AFM allow the charge variation to be mapped. Based on the obtained information, computer modeling and simulation can be performed to study the interactions among an ensemble of heterogeneous particles and their collective motions. In this paper, the diffuse-layer charge mapping by the AFM technique is briefly reviewed, and a new Diffuse Interface Field Approach to colloid modeling and simulation is briefly discussed.

  13. Canadian Teachers' and Principals' Beliefs about Inclusive Education as Predictors of Effective Teaching in Heterogeneous Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanovich, Paula J.; Jordan, Anne

    1998-01-01

    Used teacher beliefs and attitudes, principal beliefs and school norms, and teacher efficacy to predict effective teaching in heterogeneous classrooms. Found that the strongest predictors of effective teaching were: (1) the subjective school norm operationalized by the principal's attitudes and beliefs about heterogeneous classroom and report of…

  14. [Bony avulsions of the rotator cuff : Arthroscopic concepts].

    PubMed

    Greiner, S; Scheibel, M

    2011-01-01

    Bony avulsions of the rotator cuff and isolated greater or lesser tuberosity fractures are rare injuries and a clear consensus regarding classification and therapy does not yet exist. Conservative therapy is limited, especially in injuries with displaced fragments and in these cases surgical treatment is frequently indicated. The ongoing development of arthroscopic techniques has led to quite a number of reports about arthroscopically assisted or total arthroscopic techniques in the treatment of these injuries. The advantages and disadvantages of arthroscopic concepts for the treatment of bony avulsions of the rotator cuff are presented with reference to the current literature. PMID:21153534

  15. Effects of Tidal Modulation in Heterogeneous Models of Slow Slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarbek, R. M.; Rempel, A. W.; Thomas, A.

    2014-12-01

    Since their discovery, numerous models have been put forward to explain the occurance of slow slip and associated tremor. These models invoke a wide array of causal mechanisms and are all successful in reproducing the first-order behavior of slow-slip events. Discriminating amongst the various proposed models requires looking at second-order effects of slow slip and tremor. Here, we consider the effects of tidal modulation on slow slip in subduction zones. A great deal of observational evidence has established that slow-slip and associated tremor are modulated by the small stress perturbations associated with tides and teleseismic events. Recent modeling studies that have examined the influence of tidal stresses (<10 kPa) have focused either on the effects of tidally induced changes in shear stress, or on changes in shear and normal stress that coincide. However, along the Cascadia margin, the relative phase of the tidally induced fault-normal and shear stresses depends on position along the plate boundary fault, and can vary from being in phase, to completely out of phase. We report on the predictions of models designed to examine the sensitivity of slow-slip in subduction zones to the phase shift γ between tidally induced normal and shear stress perturbations. We consider both simple spring-slider and 1-D elastodynamic models that are designed to mimic the effects of geologic heterogeneity by allowing for variations in the rate-and-state frictional parameters. For a given slow-slip event, spring-slider results indicate that the phase lag γv between the peak slip rate and the tidally induced shear stress perturbation depends on both the phase shift γ, and the perturbation amplitude. Models parameterized for Cascadia are capable of producing phase lags γv within the range (15◦ to 30◦) of those reported by Royer et al. (JGR, 2014). Additionally, our models predict that the correlation between tidally induced shear stress perturbations and resultant slip also

  16. [Effects of spatial heterogeneity on spatial extrapolation of sampling plot data].

    PubMed

    Liang, Yu; He, Hong-Shi; Hu, Yuan-Man; Bu, Ren-Cang

    2012-01-01

    By using model combination method, this paper simulated the changes of response variable (tree species distribution area at landscape level under climate change) under three scenarios of environmental spatial heterogeneous level, analyzed the differentiation of simulated results under different scenarios, and discussed the effects of environmental spatial heterogeneity on the larger spatial extrapolation of the tree species responses to climate change observed in sampling plots. For most tree species, spatial heterogeneity had little effects on the extrapolation from plot scale to class scale; for the tree species insensitive to climate warming and the azonal species, spatial heterogeneity also had little effects on the extrapolation from plot-scale to zonal scale. By contrast, for the tree species sensitive to climate warming, spatial heterogeneity had effects on the extrapolation from plot scale to zonal scale, and the effects could be varied under different scenarios.

  17. Heterogeneity in Sedimentary Aquifers: Effects on Chlorinated Solvent Mass Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinovich, I. K.; Allen-King, R.; Carlone, D.; Clarke, D.; George, S. S.; Weissmann, G. S.; McNamara, K. C.; Frechette, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    Dynamic mass storage of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOC) is affected by physical and geochemical aquifer heterogeneities, creating a need for targeted remediation. In glacially-derived aquifers (such as the well-known Borden study site), sedimentary lithocomponents contain varying types and quantities of highly-sorbing carbonaceous matter. These lithocomponents are distributed throughout the aquifer through transport and depositional processes. Compared to fine-grained lithofacies, lithofacies with greater texture have increased magnitudes and variability of Kd (equilibrium sorption coefficient) due to lithocomponent variety and deposition. Sedimentological features with greater physical and geochemical heterogeneity (such as scours and troughs) are potential areas for mass storage of HOCs, requiring targeted remediation efforts. In this study, a spatial data set collected from the Borden study site is combined with a nearby outcrop analogue to investigate how geochemical and physical heterogeneity influences the mass storage of HOCs. Outcrop analogue-derived lithofacies from a nearby sand quarry allow us to quantify geochemical heterogeneity in the sedimentary architectural context. Each scour feature consists of several sediment facies layered on top of one another in identifiable and predictable patterns. These patterns extend beyond the massive packages of medium grained facies; they include fine grained facies toward the top of the scour. Outcrop investigations of spatial deposition of lithocomponents and Kd analysis shows that areas of increased lateral heterogeneity and overall Kd magnitude are associated with the sharp contact at the bottom of these scours with fine-grained facies. Both lateral heterogeneity and Kd are associated with the abundance of dark and light carbonaceous lithocomponents. Particle size, lithocomponent analysis and distinct cumulative density functions for Kd (of chlorinated volatile organic compounds) were derived for

  18. The Effect of Heterogeneity on Numerical Ordering in Rhesus Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantlon, Jessica F.; Brannon, Elizabeth M.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated how within-stimulus heterogeneity affects the ability of rhesus monkeys to order pairs of the numerosities 1 through 9. Two rhesus monkeys were tested in a touch screen task where the variability of elements within each visual array was systematically varied by allowing elements to vary in color, size, shape, or any combination of…

  19. The Heterogeneous Effects of Income Changes on Happiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becchetti, Leonardo; Corrado, Luisa; Rossetti, Fiammetta

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between money and happiness across the waves of the British Household Panel Study by using a latent class approach which accounts for slope heterogeneity. Our findings reveal the presence of a vast majority of "Easterlin-type" individuals with positive but very weak relationship between changes in income and changes…

  20. PROPOSED DIAGNOSTIC CRITERIA FOR PROLIFERATIVE THYROID LESIONS IN BONY FISHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Distinguishing hyperplastic lesions from neoplasia in the thyroid of bony fishes has been debated by scientists for about one hundred years. As early as the first decade of the last century, the histological interpretation of some of the striking proliferative lesions observed in...

  1. DIAGNOSTIC CRITERIA FOR PROLIFERATIVE THYROID LESIONS IN BONY FISHES II

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid proliferative lesions are rather common in bony fishes but diagnostic terminology and criteria for these lesions are inconsistent in the literature. The diagnosis of proliferative thyroid lesions is especially challenging in fish due to the fact that the thyroid is not a ...

  2. 1. GENERAL VIEW FROM BONY PILE LOOKING SOUTH. WASH HOUSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW FROM BONY PILE LOOKING SOUTH. WASH HOUSE IN LEFT BACKGROUND. TIPPLE AND CLEANING PLANT TO RIGHT. IN CENTER IS A TANK USED FOR TREATING MINE REFUSE AND ACID RUNOFF. - Eureka No. 40, Tipple & Cleaning Plant, East of State Route 56, north of Little Paint Creek, Scalp Level, Cambria County, PA

  3. Effect of edema, relative biological effectiveness, and dose heterogeneity on prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian Z.; Mayr, Nina A.; Nag, Subir; Montebello, Joseph; Gupta, Nilendu; Samsami, Nina; Kanellitsas, Christos

    2006-04-15

    Many factors influence response in low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy of prostate cancer. Among them, edema, relative biological effectiveness (RBE), and dose heterogeneity have not been fully modeled previously. In this work, the generalized linear-quadratic (LQ) model, extended to account for the effects of edema, RBE, and dose heterogeneity, was used to assess these factors and their combination effect. Published clinical data have shown that prostate edema after seed implant has a magnitude (ratio of post- to preimplant volume) of 1.3-2.0 and resolves exponentially with a half-life of 4-25 days over the duration of the implant dose delivery. Based on these parameters and a representative dose-volume histogram (DVH), we investigated the influence of edema on the implant dose distribution. The LQ parameters ({alpha}=0.15 Gy{sup -1} and {alpha}/{beta}=3.1 Gy) determined in earlier studies were used to calculate the equivalent uniform dose in 2 Gy fractions (EUD{sub 2}) with respect to three effects: edema, RBE, and dose heterogeneity for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd implants. The EUD{sub 2} analysis shows a negative effect of edema and dose heterogeneity on tumor cell killing because the prostate edema degrades the dose coverage to tumor target. For the representative DVH, the V{sub 100} (volume covered by 100% of prescription dose) decreases from 93% to 91% and 86%, and the D{sub 90} (dose covering 90% of target volume) decrease from 107% to 102% and 94% of prescription dose for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd implants, respectively. Conversely, the RBE effect of LDR brachytherapy [versus external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy] enhances dose effect on tumor cell kill. In order to balance the negative effects of edema and dose heterogeneity, the RBE of prostate brachytherapy was determined to be approximately 1.2-1.4 for {sup 125}I and 1.3-1.6 for {sup 103}Pd implants. These RBE values are consistent with the RBE data published in the

  4. Effect of spatial heterogeneity on remotely sensed GPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kljun, Natascha; Gelybó, Györgyi; Barcza, Zoltán; Kern, Anikó

    2013-04-01

    Satellite based remote sensing provides an efficient way to estimate carbon balance components over large spatial domains with acceptable temporal and spatial resolution. However, for heterogeneous landscapes these remotely sensed data may be biased towards one dominant land-cover type. In the present study, remote-sensing based gross primary production estimates (GPP MOD17, 1 km x 1 km spatial resolution) were evaluated using data from a tall eddy-covariance flux tower located over a heterogeneous agricultural landscape in Hungary. We present a novel approach for GPP model validation, exploiting the advantage of footprint-size similarity between remote sensing and the hourly eddy covariance signal measured at the tall tower. Further, we present a new methodology for improved remote-sensing based GPP estimates. This methodology addresses land-use heterogeneity by incorporating a footprint climatology and by downscaling MOD17 GPP using the 250-m resolution MODIS-NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) dataset. The results show that GPP was underestimated by MOD17 especially in years with average precipitation during the growing season, while model performance was better during dry years. Our downscaling technique significantly improved agreement between the MOD17 model results and the eddy-covariance measurements (modelling efficiency (ME) increased from 0.783 to 0.884, root mean square error (RMSE) decreased from 1.095 g C m-2 day-1 to 0.815 g C m-2 day-1), although GPP remained underestimated (bias decreased from -0.680 g C m-2 day-1 to -0.426 g C m-2 day-1). The presented methods are applicable to any eddy-covariance tower with limitations depending on the complexity of landscape around the flux tower. As incorporation of footprint information clearly impacts validation results, future model validation and/or calibration should also involve source area estimation which can be easily implemented following the presented approach.

  5. Homogeneous-heterogeneous reaction effects in peristalsis through curved geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, Tasawar; Tanveer, Anum; Alsaadi, Fuad; Alotaibi, Naif D.

    2015-06-01

    This paper looks at the influence of homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions on the peristaltic transport of non-Newtonian fluid in a curved channel with wall properties. Constitutive relations for thermodynamic third grade material are utilized in the problem development. An electrically conducting fluid in the presence of radial applied magnetic field is considered. The governing flow equations are developed in the presence of viscous heating. Mathematical computations are simplified employing long wavelength and low Reynolds number considerations. The solutions for velocity, temperature, concentration and heat transfer coefficient are obtained and examined. The features of sundry parameters are analyzed by plotting graphs.

  6. Homogeneous-heterogeneous reaction effects in peristalsis through curved geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hayat, Tasawar; Tanveer, Anum Alsaadi, Fuad; Alotaibi, Naif D.

    2015-06-15

    This paper looks at the influence of homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions on the peristaltic transport of non-Newtonian fluid in a curved channel with wall properties. Constitutive relations for thermodynamic third grade material are utilized in the problem development. An electrically conducting fluid in the presence of radial applied magnetic field is considered. The governing flow equations are developed in the presence of viscous heating. Mathematical computations are simplified employing long wavelength and low Reynolds number considerations. The solutions for velocity, temperature, concentration and heat transfer coefficient are obtained and examined. The features of sundry parameters are analyzed by plotting graphs.

  7. Effect of heterogeneous investments on the evolution of cooperation in spatial public goods game.

    PubMed

    Huang, Keke; Wang, Tao; Cheng, Yuan; Zheng, Xiaoping

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the emergence of cooperation in spatial public goods game remains a grand challenge across disciplines. In most previous studies, it is assumed that the investments of all the cooperators are identical, and often equal to 1. However, it is worth mentioning that players are diverse and heterogeneous when choosing actions in the rapidly developing modern society and researchers have shown more interest to the heterogeneity of players recently. For modeling the heterogeneous players without loss of generality, it is assumed in this work that the investment of a cooperator is a random variable with uniform distribution, the mean value of which is equal to 1. The results of extensive numerical simulations convincingly indicate that heterogeneous investments can promote cooperation. Specifically, a large value of the variance of the random variable can decrease the two critical values for the result of behavioral evolution effectively. Moreover, the larger the variance is, the better the promotion effect will be. In addition, this article has discussed the impact of heterogeneous investments when the coevolution of both strategy and investment is taken into account. Comparing the promotion effect of coevolution of strategy and investment with that of strategy imitation only, we can conclude that the coevolution of strategy and investment decreases the asymptotic fraction of cooperators by weakening the heterogeneity of investments, which further demonstrates that heterogeneous investments can promote cooperation in spatial public goods game.

  8. Effect of salt concentration on the stability of heterogeneous DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Amar; Singh, Navin

    2015-02-01

    We study the role of cations on the stability of double stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules. It is known that the two strands of double stranded DNA (dsDNA) have negative charge due to phosphate group. Cations in the form of salt in the solution, act as shielding agents thereby reducing the repulsion between these strands. We study several heterogeneous DNA molecules. We calculate the phase diagrams for DNA molecules in thermal as well as in force ensembles using Peyrard-Bishop-Dauxois (PBD) model. The dissociation and the stacking energies are the two most important factors that play an important role in the DNA stability. With suitable modifications in the model parameters we investigate the role of cation concentration on the stability of different heterogeneous DNA molecules. The objective of this work is to understand how these cations modify the strength of different pairs or bases along the strand. The phase diagram for the force ensemble case (a dsDNA is pulled from an end) is compared with the experimental results.

  9. Numerical Simulations of Floodplain Heterogeneity Effects on Meanders Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogoni, M.; Lanzoni, S.; Putti, M.

    2014-12-01

    Floodplains and sinuous rivers have a close relationship with each other, mutually influencing their evolutions in time and space. The heterogeneity in erosional resistance has a crucial role on meander planform evolution. It depends on external factors, like land use and cover, but also on the composition of the floodplain, which is due to the ancient geological composition and to the processes associated to long-term river migration. In particular, banks erosion and deposition cause a variation of the superficial composition of the soil, therefore the river patterns are influenced by the previous trends. Based on some recent works, the aim of this contribution is to collect numerical information on the relations between meander migration and the heterogeneity of floodplains caused by oxbow lakes. Numerical simulations have been performed to analyze the temporal and spatial behavior of meanders with a range of values of the erosional resistance of the plain. These values are set as a function of some factors: the characteristic grain size of sediment transported by the flow, the deposition age of the sediments, the eventual presence of vegetation on the banks. The statistical analysis of characteristic geometrical quantities of meanders are able to show the dependence of the simulation results on the meander history. In particular we try to answer to the following questions: how do the rivers affect themselves during their spatial and temporal evolution, modifying the distribution of the floodplain erodibility? Do the migration history plays a main role on the meanders migration modeling?

  10. Charge Transfer and Support Effects in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hervier, Antoine

    2011-12-21

    the band bending at the interface, gives rise to a steady-state flow of hot holes to the surface. This leads to a decrease in turnover on the surface, an effect which is enhanced when a reverse bias is applied to the diode. Similar experiments were carried out for CO oxidation. On Pt/Si diodes, the reaction rate was found to increase when a forward bias was applied. When the diode was exposed to visible light and a reverse bias was applied, the rate was instead decreased. This implies that a flow of negative charges to the surface increases turnover, while positive charges decrease it. Charge flow in an oxide supported metal catalyst can be modified even without designing the catalyst as a solid state electronic device. This was done by doping stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric TiO2 films with F, and using the resulting oxides as supports for Pt films. In the case of stoichiometric TiO2, F was found to act as an n-type dopant, creating a population of filled electronic states just below the conduction band, and dramatically increasing the conductivity of the oxide film. The electrons in those states can transfer to surface O, activating it for reaction with CO, and leading to increased turnover for CO oxidation. This reinforces the hypothesis that CO oxidation is activated by a flow of negative charges to the surface. The same set of catalysts was used for methanol oxidation. The electronic properties of the TiO2 films again correlated with the turnover rates, but also with selectivity. With stoichiometric TiO2 as the support, F-doping caused an increase in selectivity toward the formation of partial oxidation products, formaldehyde and methyl formate, versus the total oxidation product, CO2. With non-stoichiometric TiO2, F-doping had the reverse effect. Ambient Pressure X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy was used to investigate this F-doping effect in reaction conditions. In O2 alone, and in

  11. Composite catalyst surfaces: Effect of inert and active heterogeneities on pattern formation

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, M.; Bangia, A.K.; Kevrekidis, I.G.; Haas, G.; Rotermund, H.H.; Ertl, G.

    1996-12-05

    Spatiotemporal dynamics in reaction-diffusion systems can be altered through the properties (reactivity, diffusivity) of the medium in which they occur. We construct active heterogeneous media (composite catalytic surfaces with inert as well as active illusions) using microelectronics fabrication techniques and study the spatiotemporal dynamics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions on these catalysts. In parallel, we perform simulations as well as numerical stability and bifurcation analysis of these patterns using mechanistic models. At the limit of large heterogeneity `grain size` (compared to the wavelength of spontaneously arising structures) the interaction patterns with inert or active boundaries dominates (e.g., pinning, transmission, and boundary breakup of spirals, interaction of pulses with corners, `pacemaker` effects). At the opposite limit of very small or very finely distributed heterogeneity, effective behavior is observed (slight modulation of pulses, nearly uniform oscillations, effective spirals). Some representative studies of transitions between the two limits are presented. 48 refs., 11 figs.

  12. PBNR: Percutaneous Blunt Needle Reduction of Bony Mallet Injuries.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Benjamin H; Murugesan, Logendra; Grobbelaar, Adriaan O; Jemec, Barbara

    2015-06-01

    Mallet finger injuries are common; treatment goals include achieving joint stability, preventing extensor lag, and subsequent swan-neck deformity. We describe a simple technique for improving intraoperative bony mallet reduction, which may avoid the requirement for closed Ishiguro extension blocking wires or open fixation, and present a prospective case series (n=12). Intraoperative percutaneous blunt needle reduction (PBNR) is achieved under image intensifier guidance. Using artery forceps, a blunt fill needle tip is manipulated onto the proximal avulsed fragment; this is then guided into a reduced position and maintained using a well-formed Zimmer splint across the distal interphalangeal joint in 15- to 30-degree extension. There were 5 injuries involving >1/3 of the articular surface (Doyle's classification IVb) and 7 injuries involving >1/2 of the articular surface (Doyle's classification IVc). Mean hand therapy follow-up was 10.6±1.0 weeks, extensor lag was 4.6±1.7 degrees, and all patients achieved full functional recovery with return to normal daily activity. No complications were reported. Closed techniques, for example, Ishiguro extension blocking wires, may reduce the risks associated with open reduction, but do not avoid further articular surface damage. PBNR offers the surgeon a useful adjunct to the treatment options for bony mallet injuries, without excluding progression to surgical fixation if required. PBNR represents a less-invasive management option for bony mallet injures where surgical fixation may also be indicated. PMID:25989396

  13. The effect and correction of reference heterogeneity in diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavadi, Hamed; Xu, Chen; Zhu, Quing

    2015-03-01

    Near infrared (NIR) diffuse optical tomography has demonstrated great potential in the initial diagnosis of tumor and in the assessment of tumor vasculature response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. To reconstruct the absorption map of a breast lesion, perturbation is needed which is the normalized difference between the measurements of lesion-side breast and contralateral reference breast. However, the heterogeneity in the reference breast can produce unwanted perturbation which will result in distortion of the reconstructed target absorption map. This report introduces a filtering method to overcome the reference heterogeneity. This method corrects affected source-detector measurements obtained from the reference side by using averages of unaffected measurements. As a result, the filtered perturbation has decreased the effect of heterogeneity on the reconstructed absorption maps. To evaluate the performance of this filtering method, we have compared the reconstructed results with and without the filtering algorithm using simulated heterogeneous reference with heterogeneous absorbers ranging from 0.05 to 0.20 cm-1 and heterogeneous scatters ranging from 10 to 20cm-1. The results show that the algorithm can improve the maximum reconstructed target value up to 99% of the value with homogeneous reference. In the worst case of high absorption heterogeneity in reference breast, the maximum reconstructed value was around 30.85% of the true absorption without filtering correction and was improved to 60.4% of the true absorption value, which is 95% of the reconstructed value when using the homogeneous reference.

  14. Effect of Population Heterogenization on the Reproducibility of Mouse Behavior: A Multi-Laboratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Richter, S. Helene; Garner, Joseph P.; Zipser, Benjamin; Lewejohann, Lars; Sachser, Norbert; Touma, Chadi; Schindler, Britta; Chourbaji, Sabine; Brandwein, Christiane; Gass, Peter; van Stipdonk, Niek; van der Harst, Johanneke; Spruijt, Berry; Võikar, Vootele; Wolfer, David P.; Würbel, Hanno

    2011-01-01

    In animal experiments, animals, husbandry and test procedures are traditionally standardized to maximize test sensitivity and minimize animal use, assuming that this will also guarantee reproducibility. However, by reducing within-experiment variation, standardization may limit inference to the specific experimental conditions. Indeed, we have recently shown in mice that standardization may generate spurious results in behavioral tests, accounting for poor reproducibility, and that this can be avoided by population heterogenization through systematic variation of experimental conditions. Here, we examined whether a simple form of heterogenization effectively improves reproducibility of test results in a multi-laboratory situation. Each of six laboratories independently ordered 64 female mice of two inbred strains (C57BL/6NCrl, DBA/2NCrl) and examined them for strain differences in five commonly used behavioral tests under two different experimental designs. In the standardized design, experimental conditions were standardized as much as possible in each laboratory, while they were systematically varied with respect to the animals' test age and cage enrichment in the heterogenized design. Although heterogenization tended to improve reproducibility by increasing within-experiment variation relative to between-experiment variation, the effect was too weak to account for the large variation between laboratories. However, our findings confirm the potential of systematic heterogenization for improving reproducibility of animal experiments and highlight the need for effective and practicable heterogenization strategies. PMID:21305027

  15. Treatment Effect Heterogeneity in a Science Professional Development Initiative: The Case for School Capacity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruch, Sarah; Grigg, Jeffrey; Hanselman, Paul

    2010-01-01

    This study focuses on how the treatment effects of a teacher professional development initiative in science differed by school capacity. In other words, the authors are primarily concerned with treatment effect heterogeneity. As such, this paper complements ongoing evaluation of the average treatment effects of the initiative over time. The…

  16. Effect of Formaldehyde on the Heterogeneous Reaction of Nitrogen Dioxide on γ-Alumina.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhenyu; Kong, Lingdong; Zhao, Xi; Ding, Xiaoxiao; Fu, Hongbo; Cheng, Tiantao; Yang, Xin; Chen, Jianmin

    2015-09-01

    Heterogeneous reactions of NO2 on various mineral aerosol particles have been investigated in many previous studies, but a fundamental understanding of how the adsorption of formaldehyde influences the heterogeneous reactions of NO2 remains unclear. In this work, the effect of formaldehyde preadsorption on heterogeneous reaction of NO2 on the surface of γ-Al2O3 at 298 K and ambient pressure was investigated by using diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectrometry (DRIFTS). It was found that the preadsorption of HCHO on γ-Al2O3 could suppress the formation of nitrate, and the rate of nitrate formation decreased with increasing amount of preadsorbed HCHO, whereas the following heterogeneous uptake of NO2 could suppress the hydration reaction of HCHO and promote the production of HCOO(-) during the reaction. Surface nitrite was formed and identified to be an intermediate product and gradually disappeared as the reaction proceeded. The amount of the formed nitrite decreased when the amount of HCHO increased. Uptake coefficients of heterogeneous reactions were calculated and found to be sensitive to the adsorption of HCHO. A possible mechanism for the influence of HCHO adsorption on the heterogeneous conversion of NO2 on γ-Al2O3 was proposed, and atmospheric implications based on these results were discussed.

  17. Effect of the heterogeneous neuron and information transmission delay on stochastic resonance of neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingyun; Zhang, Honghui; Chen, Guanrong

    2012-12-01

    We study the effect of heterogeneous neuron and information transmission delay on stochastic resonance of scale-free neuronal networks. For this purpose, we introduce the heterogeneity to the specified neuron with the highest degree. It is shown that in the absence of delay, an intermediate noise level can optimally assist spike firings of collective neurons so as to achieve stochastic resonance on scale-free neuronal networks for small and intermediate α(h), which plays a heterogeneous role. Maxima of stochastic resonance measure are enhanced as α(h) increases, which implies that the heterogeneity can improve stochastic resonance. However, as α(h) is beyond a certain large value, no obvious stochastic resonance can be observed. If the information transmission delay is introduced to neuronal networks, stochastic resonance is dramatically affected. In particular, the tuned information transmission delay can induce multiple stochastic resonance, which can be manifested as well-expressed maximum in the measure for stochastic resonance, appearing every multiple of one half of the subthreshold stimulus period. Furthermore, we can observe that stochastic resonance at odd multiple of one half of the subthreshold stimulus period is subharmonic, as opposed to the case of even multiple of one half of the subthreshold stimulus period. More interestingly, multiple stochastic resonance can also be improved by the suitable heterogeneous neuron. Presented results can provide good insights into the understanding of the heterogeneous neuron and information transmission delay on realistic neuronal networks.

  18. Development of numerical framework to study microstructural effects on shock initiation in heterogeneous energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Martin; Rai, Nirmal; Udaykumar, H. S.

    2015-06-01

    Heterogeneous energetic materials like plastic bonded explosives (PBX) have very detailed and non-uniform microstructure. The heterogeneity is mainly because of presence of HMX crystals embedded in a polymer binder matrix. Also, manufacturing defects often creates pores and cracks in the material. Shock interaction with these heterogeneities leads to local heated regions known as hot spots. It is widely accepted that these hot spots are predominantly the cause of triggering reaction and eventually ignition in these energetic materials. There are various physical phenomenon through which hot spot can be created such as pore collapse, inter-granular friction in HMX crystals, shock heating of HMX crystals and binder etc. Hence, microstructural heterogeneity can play a vital role for shock initiation in PBX. In the current work, a general framework has been established for performing mesoscale simulations on heterogeneous energetic material. In order to get an accurate representation of the microstructure, image processing algorithms have been employed on XCMT images of PBX microstructure. The image processing framework has been built up with massively parallel Eulerian code, SCIMITAR3D. Shock simulation on PBX microstructures has been performed and the effect of microstructure geometry has been studied for different shock strengths case. The simulation results have been shown to resolve hot spots created due to various heterogeneities present in the microstructure.

  19. Effects of capillary heterogeneity on vapor-liquid counterflow in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Stubos, A.K.; Satik, C.; Yortsos, Y.C.

    1992-06-01

    Based on a continuum description, the effect of capillary heterogeneity, induced by variation in permeability, on the steady state, countercurrent, vapor-liquid flow in porous media is analyzed. It is shown that the heterogeneity acts as a body force, that may enhance or diminish gravity effects on heat pipes. Selection rules that determine the steady states reached in homogeneous, gravity-driven heat pipes are also formulated. It is shown that the ``infinite`` two-phase zone may terminate by a substantial change in the permeability somewhere in the medium. The two possible sequences, liquid - liquid dominated - dry, or liquid - vapor dominated - dry find applications in geothermal systems. Finally, it is shown that although weak heterogeneity affects only gravity controlled flows, stronger variations in permeability can give rise to significant capillary effects.

  20. Characteristics of Supplemental Educational Services Providers That Explain Heterogeneity of Effects on Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Curtis J.

    2015-01-01

    This study used a mixed-methods approach to explore the heterogeneity of effectiveness between supplemental educational services (SES) providers in the Chicago Public Schools (CPS). Using surveys of schools and SES providers, and statistical modeling, providers using college graduates and teachers as tutors were found to be more effective than…

  1. Evaluating Heterogeneous Conservation Effects of Forest Protection in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Payal; Baylis, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    Establishing legal protection for forest areas is the most common policy used to limit forest loss. This article evaluates the effectiveness of seven Indonesian forest protected areas introduced between 1999 and 2012. Specifically, we explore how the effectiveness of these parks varies over space. Protected areas have mixed success in preserving forest, and it is important for conservationists to understand where they work and where they do not. Observed differences in the estimated treatment effect of protection may be driven by several factors. Indonesia is particularly diverse, with the landscape, forest and forest threats varying greatly from region to region, and this diversity may drive differences in the effectiveness of protected areas in conserving forest. However, the observed variation may also be spurious and arise from differing degrees of bias in the estimated treatment effect over space. In this paper, we use a difference-in-differences approach comparing treated observations and matched controls to estimate the effect of each protected area. We then distinguish the true variation in protected area effectiveness from spurious variation driven by several sources of estimation bias. Based on our most flexible method that allows the data generating process to vary across space, we find that the national average effect of protection preserves an additional 1.1% of forest cover; however the effect of individual parks range from a decrease of 3.4% to an increase of 5.3% and the effect of most parks differ from the national average. Potential biases may affect estimates in two parks, but results consistently show Sebangau National Park is more effective while two parks are substantially less able to protect forest cover than the national average. PMID:26039754

  2. Evaluating heterogeneous conservation effects of forest protection in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Shah, Payal; Baylis, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    Establishing legal protection for forest areas is the most common policy used to limit forest loss. This article evaluates the effectiveness of seven Indonesian forest protected areas introduced between 1999 and 2012. Specifically, we explore how the effectiveness of these parks varies over space. Protected areas have mixed success in preserving forest, and it is important for conservationists to understand where they work and where they do not. Observed differences in the estimated treatment effect of protection may be driven by several factors. Indonesia is particularly diverse, with the landscape, forest and forest threats varying greatly from region to region, and this diversity may drive differences in the effectiveness of protected areas in conserving forest. However, the observed variation may also be spurious and arise from differing degrees of bias in the estimated treatment effect over space. In this paper, we use a difference-in-differences approach comparing treated observations and matched controls to estimate the effect of each protected area. We then distinguish the true variation in protected area effectiveness from spurious variation driven by several sources of estimation bias. Based on our most flexible method that allows the data generating process to vary across space, we find that the national average effect of protection preserves an additional 1.1% of forest cover; however the effect of individual parks range from a decrease of 3.4% to an increase of 5.3% and the effect of most parks differ from the national average. Potential biases may affect estimates in two parks, but results consistently show Sebangau National Park is more effective while two parks are substantially less able to protect forest cover than the national average.

  3. Comparative testicular structure and spermatogenesis in bony fishes

    PubMed Central

    Uribe, Mari Carmen; Grier, Harry J; Mejía-Roa, Víctor

    2014-01-01

    In most bony fishes, testes are paired elongated organs that are attached to the dorsal wall of the body by a mesorchium. Histological examination of teleost testes, and also in all vertebrates, shows that the testes are formed of germ cells and somatic cells, comprising the germinal and interstitial compartments. Both compartments are separated by a basement membrane. The germ cells may be spermatogonia, meiotic spermatocytes and haploid spermatids that differentiate into spermatozoa. The process of spermatogenesis includes a sequence of morphological and physiological changes of germ cells that begin with the differentiation of spermatogonia that become meiotic spermatocytes. After the second meiotic division, through a process of spermiogenesis, these differentiate into spermatozoa. Spermatogonia associate with Sertoli cells to form spermatocysts or cysts. The cyst is the unit of spermatogenic function, composed of a cohort of isogenic germ cells surrounded by encompassing Sertoli cells. The teleost testis is organized morphologically into 3 types of testis: 1) tubular testis type, present in lower bony fishes as salmonids, cyprinids and lepisosteids; 2) unrestricted spermatogonial testis type, found in neoteleosts except Atherinomorpha; and 3) restricted spermatogonial testis type, characteristic of all Atherinomorpha. The morphology of the testicular germinal epithelium changes during the annual reproductive cycle, reflecting reproductive seasonality. PMID:26413405

  4. Giant Atretic Occipital Lipoencephalocele in an Adult with Bony Outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Nimkar, Kshama; Sood, Dinesh; Soni, Pawan; Chauhan, Narvir; Surya, Mukesh

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background We present unique case of a giant extracranial atretic occipital lipoencephalocele in an adult patient with new bone formation within it which was not associated with any developmental malformation of brain. Resection of the lipoencephalocele was performed for esthetic reasons. Case Report 18 year old female patient presented to the surgery OPD with complains of a large mass in the occipital region present since birth. It was of size of a betel nut at the time of birth and gradually increased in size over a long period of time. It was painless and not associated with any other constitutional symptoms. On examination the rounded fluctuant mass was present in the midline in occipital region covered with alopecic skin with dimpling in the overlying skin. On MRI there was mass showing both T1 and T2 hyperintense signal area suggestive of fat component. Herniation of meninges and atretic brain parenchyma was also seen through a defect in the occipital bone in the midline. There was a Y shaped bony outgrowth seen arising from occipital bone into the mass which was quite unusual in association with an atretic lipoencephalocele. Conclusions A large lipoencephalocele with bony outgrowth in an adult patient is a rare presentation of atreic occipital encephalocele.

  5. Giant Atretic Occipital Lipoencephalocele in an Adult with Bony Outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Nimkar, Kshama; Sood, Dinesh; Soni, Pawan; Chauhan, Narvir; Surya, Mukesh

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background We present unique case of a giant extracranial atretic occipital lipoencephalocele in an adult patient with new bone formation within it which was not associated with any developmental malformation of brain. Resection of the lipoencephalocele was performed for esthetic reasons. Case Report 18 year old female patient presented to the surgery OPD with complains of a large mass in the occipital region present since birth. It was of size of a betel nut at the time of birth and gradually increased in size over a long period of time. It was painless and not associated with any other constitutional symptoms. On examination the rounded fluctuant mass was present in the midline in occipital region covered with alopecic skin with dimpling in the overlying skin. On MRI there was mass showing both T1 and T2 hyperintense signal area suggestive of fat component. Herniation of meninges and atretic brain parenchyma was also seen through a defect in the occipital bone in the midline. There was a Y shaped bony outgrowth seen arising from occipital bone into the mass which was quite unusual in association with an atretic lipoencephalocele. Conclusions A large lipoencephalocele with bony outgrowth in an adult patient is a rare presentation of atreic occipital encephalocele. PMID:27617049

  6. Bony injuries about the elbow in the throwing athlete.

    PubMed

    Andrews, J R

    1985-01-01

    Tremendous valgus stress during the acceleration phase of pitching is the primary cause of elbow injury in the pitcher. Lateral compression injuries are usually found in pitchers in their early teens, and osteochondritis dissecans is the primary underlying cause. Severe flexion contractures and even partial ankylosis of the elbow may occur. Prognosis after surgery is generally poor. Medial tension injuries with either soft-tissue damage or bony damage usually require surgery. The medial collateral ligament should be considered the primary stabilizer against the valgus-vector overload. The medial collateral ligament or bony avulsion form the medial compartment of the elbow should be primarily corrected. Results of early surgical correction to these lesions should produce excellent results. Pitchers with extension block injuries are generally older, more experienced athletes than those without such injuries. These pitchers have had symptoms for some time with progressive loss of full extension of the elbow and increasing pain. Valgus extension overload can be surgically corrected by an open surgical approach or an operative arthroscopic approach. Basically these approaches are palliative, and progression of symptoms at a later date may be expected. Finally, the postoperative rehabilitation of any elbow problem is extremely important and should be preplanned for the specific lesion treated.

  7. Effect of Material Property Heterogeneity on Biomechanical Modeling of Prostate under Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Samavati, Navid; McGrath, Deirdre M.; Jewett, Michael A.S.; van der Kwast, Theo; Ménard, Cynthia; Brock, Kristy K.

    2015-01-01

    Biomechanical model based deformable image registration has been widely used to account for prostate deformation in various medical imaging procedures. Biomechanical material properties are important components of a biomechanical model. In this study, the effect of incorporating tumor-specific material properties in the prostate biomechanical model was investigated to provide insight into the potential impact of material heterogeneity on the prostate deformation calculations First, a simple spherical prostate and tumor model was used to analytically describe the deformations and demonstrate the fundamental effect of changes in the tumor volume and stiffness in the modeled deformation. Next, using clinical prostate model, a parametric approach was used to describe the variations in the heterogeneous prostate model by changing tumor volume, stiffness, and location, to show the differences in the modeled deformation between heterogeneous and homogeneous prostate models. Finally, five clinical prostatectomy examples were used in separately performed homogeneous and heterogeneous biomechanical model based registrations to describe the deformations between 3D reconstructed histopathology images and ex vivo Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), and examine the potential clinical impact of modeling biomechanical heterogeneity of the prostate. The analytical formulation showed that increasing the tumor volume and stiffness could significantly increase the impact of heterogeneous prostate model in the calculated displacement differences compared to homogeneous model. The parametric approach using a single prostate model indicated up to 4.8 mm of displacement difference at the tumor boundary compared to a homogeneous model. . Such differences in the deformation of prostate could bepotentially clinically significant given the voxel size of the ex vivo MR images (0.3×0.3×0.3 mm). However, no significant changes in the registration accuracy were observed using heterogeneous models

  8. Scaling Effects of Cr(VI) Reduction Kinetics. The Role of Geochemical Heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Li; Li, Li

    2015-10-22

    The natural subsurface is highly heterogeneous with minerals distributed in different spatial patterns. Fundamental understanding of how mineral spatial distribution patterns regulate sorption process is important for predicting the transport and fate of chemicals. Existing studies about the sorption was carried out in well-mixed batch reactors or uniformly packed columns, with few data available on the effects of spatial heterogeneities. As a result, there is a lack of data and understanding on how spatial heterogeneities control sorption processes. In this project, we aim to understand and develop modeling capabilities to predict the sorption of Cr(VI), an omnipresent contaminant in natural systems due to its natural occurrence and industrial utilization. We systematically examine the role of spatial patterns of illite, a common clay, in determining the extent of transport limitation and scaling effects associated with Cr(VI) sorption capacity and kinetics using column experiments and reactive transport modeling. Our results showed that the sorbed mass and rates can differ by an order of magnitude due to of the illite spatial heterogeneities and transport limitation. With constraints from data, we also developed the capabilities of modeling Cr(VI) in heterogeneous media. The developed model is then utilized to understand the general principles that govern the relationship between sorption and connectivity, a key measure of the spatial pattern characteristics. This correlation can be used to estimate Cr(VI) sorption characteristics in heterogeneous porous media. Insights gained here bridge gaps between laboratory and field application in hydrogeology and geochemical field, and advance predictive understanding of reactive transport processes in the natural heterogeneous subsurface. We believe that these findings will be of interest to a large number of environmental geochemists and engineers, hydrogeologists, and those interested in contaminant fate and transport

  9. Effect of material property heterogeneity on biomechanical modeling of prostate under deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samavati, Navid; McGrath, Deirdre M.; Jewett, Michael A. S.; van der Kwast, Theo; Ménard, Cynthia; Brock, Kristy K.

    2015-01-01

    Biomechanical model based deformable image registration has been widely used to account for prostate deformation in various medical imaging procedures. Biomechanical material properties are important components of a biomechanical model. In this study, the effect of incorporating tumor-specific material properties in the prostate biomechanical model was investigated to provide insight into the potential impact of material heterogeneity on the prostate deformation calculations. First, a simple spherical prostate and tumor model was used to analytically describe the deformations and demonstrate the fundamental effect of changes in the tumor volume and stiffness in the modeled deformation. Next, using a clinical prostate model, a parametric approach was used to describe the variations in the heterogeneous prostate model by changing tumor volume, stiffness, and location, to show the differences in the modeled deformation between heterogeneous and homogeneous prostate models. Finally, five clinical prostatectomy examples were used in separately performed homogeneous and heterogeneous biomechanical model based registrations to describe the deformations between 3D reconstructed histopathology images and ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging, and examine the potential clinical impact of modeling biomechanical heterogeneity of the prostate. The analytical formulation showed that increasing the tumor volume and stiffness could significantly increase the impact of the heterogeneous prostate model in the calculated displacement differences compared to the homogeneous model. The parametric approach using a single prostate model indicated up to 4.8 mm of displacement difference at the tumor boundary compared to a homogeneous model. Such differences in the deformation of the prostate could be potentially clinically significant given the voxel size of the ex vivo MR images (0.3  ×  0.3  ×  0.3 mm). However, no significant changes in the registration accuracy were

  10. Nonlinear effects of locally heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity fields on regional stream-aquifer exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J.; Winter, C. L.; Wang, Z.

    2015-11-01

    Computational experiments are performed to evaluate the effects of locally heterogeneous conductivity fields on regional exchanges of water between stream and aquifer systems in the Middle Heihe River basin (MHRB) of northwestern China. The effects are found to be nonlinear in the sense that simulated discharges from aquifers to streams are systematically lower than discharges produced by a base model parameterized with relatively coarse effective conductivity. A similar, but weaker, effect is observed for stream leakage. The study is organized around three hypotheses: (H1) small-scale spatial variations of conductivity significantly affect regional exchanges of water between streams and aquifers in river basins, (H2) aggregating small-scale heterogeneities into regional effective parameters systematically biases estimates of stream-aquifer exchanges, and (H3) the biases result from slow paths in groundwater flow that emerge due to small-scale heterogeneities. The hypotheses are evaluated by comparing stream-aquifer fluxes produced by the base model to fluxes simulated using realizations of the MHRB characterized by local (grid-scale) heterogeneity. Levels of local heterogeneity are manipulated as control variables by adjusting coefficients of variation. All models are implemented using the MODFLOW (Modular Three-dimensional Finite-difference Groundwater Flow Model) simulation environment, and the PEST (parameter estimation) tool is used to calibrate effective conductivities defined over 16 zones within the MHRB. The effective parameters are also used as expected values to develop lognormally distributed conductivity (K) fields on local grid scales. Stream-aquifer exchanges are simulated with K fields at both scales and then compared. Results show that the effects of small-scale heterogeneities significantly influence exchanges with simulations based on local-scale heterogeneities always producing discharges that are less than those produced by the base model

  11. Effect of Heterogeneity on Decorrelation Mechanisms in Spiking Neural Networks: A Neuromorphic-Hardware Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeil, Thomas; Jordan, Jakob; Tetzlaff, Tom; Grübl, Andreas; Schemmel, Johannes; Diesmann, Markus; Meier, Karlheinz

    2016-04-01

    High-level brain function, such as memory, classification, or reasoning, can be realized by means of recurrent networks of simplified model neurons. Analog neuromorphic hardware constitutes a fast and energy-efficient substrate for the implementation of such neural computing architectures in technical applications and neuroscientific research. The functional performance of neural networks is often critically dependent on the level of correlations in the neural activity. In finite networks, correlations are typically inevitable due to shared presynaptic input. Recent theoretical studies have shown that inhibitory feedback, abundant in biological neural networks, can actively suppress these shared-input correlations and thereby enable neurons to fire nearly independently. For networks of spiking neurons, the decorrelating effect of inhibitory feedback has so far been explicitly demonstrated only for homogeneous networks of neurons with linear subthreshold dynamics. Theory, however, suggests that the effect is a general phenomenon, present in any system with sufficient inhibitory feedback, irrespective of the details of the network structure or the neuronal and synaptic properties. Here, we investigate the effect of network heterogeneity on correlations in sparse, random networks of inhibitory neurons with nonlinear, conductance-based synapses. Emulations of these networks on the analog neuromorphic-hardware system Spikey allow us to test the efficiency of decorrelation by inhibitory feedback in the presence of hardware-specific heterogeneities. The configurability of the hardware substrate enables us to modulate the extent of heterogeneity in a systematic manner. We selectively study the effects of shared input and recurrent connections on correlations in membrane potentials and spike trains. Our results confirm that shared-input correlations are actively suppressed by inhibitory feedback also in highly heterogeneous networks exhibiting broad, heavy-tailed firing

  12. The effect of material heterogeneity in curved composite beams for use in aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoole, Brendan J.; Santare, Michael H.

    1992-01-01

    A design tool is presented for predicting the effect of material heterogeneity on the performance of curved composite beams for use in aircraft fuselage structures. Material heterogeneity can be induced during processes such as sheet forming and stretch forming of thermoplastic composites. This heterogeneity can be introduced in the form of fiber realignment and spreading during the manufacturing process causing a gradient in material properties in both the radial and tangential directions. The analysis procedure uses a separate two-dimensional elasticity solution for the stresses in the flanges and web sections of the beam. The separate solutions are coupled by requiring the forces and displacements match at the section boundaries. Analysis is performed for curved beams loaded in pure bending and uniform pressure. The beams can be of any general cross-section such as a hat, T-, I-, or J-beam. Preliminary results show that geometry of the beam dictates the effect of heterogeneity on performance. Heterogeneity plays a much larger role in beams with a small average radius to depth ratio, R/t, where R is the average radius of the beam and t is the difference between the inside and outside radius. Results of the analysis are in the form of stresses and displacements, and they are compared to both mechanics of materials and numerical solutions obtained using finite element analysis.

  13. A novel surface treatment for porous metallic implants that improves the rate of bony ongrowth.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Fintan J; Cottrell, Jocelyn M; Deng, Xiang-Hua; Crowder, Katherine N; Doty, Stephen B; Avaltroni, Michael J; Warren, Russell F; Wright, Timothy M; Schwartz, Jeffrey

    2008-09-15

    Rapid implant fixation could prove beneficial in a host of clinical applications from total joint arthroplasty to trauma. We hypothesized that a novel self-assembled monolayer of phosphonate molecules (SAMP) covalently bonded to the oxide surface of titanium alloy would enhance bony integration. Beaded metallic rods were treated with one of three coatings: SAMP, SAMP + RGD peptide, or hydroxyapatite. Rods were inserted retrogradely into both distal femurs of 60 rabbits. Fifteen rabbits were sacrificed at 2, 4, 8, and 16 weeks. At each time, seven specimens for mechanical pull-out testing and three for histomorphometric analysis were available for each coating. At four weeks, both SAMP groups had significantly higher failure loads when compared to hydroxyapatite (p < 0.01). No significant differences were found among groups at other times, though the SAMP-alone group remained stronger at 16 weeks. Histology showed abundant new bone formation around all the three groups, though more enhanced formation was apparent in the two SAMP groups. With this novel treatment, with or without RGD, the failure load of implants doubled in half the time as compared with hydroxyapatite. Where early implant fixation is important, the SAMP treatment provides a simple, cost-effective enhancement to bony integration of orthopaedic implants.

  14. Modeling the effect of p53 on tumor heterogeneity and the mutator phenotype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Melissa; Berryman, Matthew J.; Abbott, Derek

    2005-02-01

    p53 is an important gene, involved in apoptosis (programmed cell death), DNA repair, and cell cycle progression. We explore the selective advantages and disadvantages of mutations in the p53 gene on tumor cells, and the heterogeneity of tumor cell populations. Based on an evolutionary computational approach, our model considers changes in mutation rate caused by lack of DNA repair processes, and the lack of apoptosis caused by mutations in p53. We find that the degree of robustness of p53 to mutations has a significant effect on the tumor heterogeneity and "fitness", with clinical consequences for people who inherit p53 mutations.

  15. Exploring the Effects of Microscale Structural Heterogeneity of Forest Canopies Using Large-Eddy Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohrer, Gil; Katul, Gabriel G.; Walko, Robert L.; Avissar, Roni

    2009-09-01

    The Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS)-based Forest Large-Eddy Simulation (RAFLES), developed and evaluated here, is used to explore the effects of three-dimensional canopy heterogeneity, at the individual tree scale, on the statistical properties of turbulence most pertinent to mass and momentum transfer. In RAFLES, the canopy interacts with air by exerting a drag force, by restricting the open volume and apertures available for flow (i.e. finite porosity), and by acting as a heterogeneous source of heat and moisture. The first and second statistical moments of the velocity and flux profiles computed by RAFLES are compared with turbulent velocity and scalar flux measurements collected during spring and winter days. The observations were made at a meteorological tower situated within a southern hardwood canopy at the Duke Forest site, near Durham, North Carolina, U.S.A. Each of the days analyzed is characterized by distinct regimes of atmospheric stability and canopy foliage distribution conditions. RAFLES results agreed with the 30-min averaged flow statistics profiles measured at this single tower. Following this intercomparison, two case studies are numerically considered representing end-members of foliage and midday atmospheric stability conditions: one representing the winter season with strong winds above a sparse canopy and a slightly unstable boundary layer; the other representing the spring season with a dense canopy, calm conditions, and a strongly convective boundary layer. In each case, results from the control canopy, simulating the observed heterogeneous canopy structure at the Duke Forest hardwood stand, are compared with a test case that also includes heterogeneity commensurate in scale to tree-fall gaps. The effects of such tree-scale canopy heterogeneity on the flow are explored at three levels pertinent to biosphere-atmosphere exchange. The first level (zero-dimensional) considers the effects of such heterogeneity on the common

  16. Deconfounding the effects of local element spatial heterogeneity and sparsity on processing dominance.

    PubMed

    Montoro, Pedro R; Luna, Dolores

    2009-10-01

    Previous studies on the processing of hierarchical patterns (Luna & Montoro, 2008) have shown that altering the spatial relationships between the local elements affected processing dominance by decreasing global advantage. In the present article, the authors examine whether heterogeneity or a sparse distribution of the local elements was the responsible factor for this effect. In Experiments 1 and 2, the distance between the local elements was increased in a similar way, but between-element distance was homogeneous in Experiment 1 and heterogeneous in Experiment 2. In Experiment 3, local elements' size was varied by presenting global patterns composed of similar large or small local elements and of different large and small sizes. The results of the present research showed that, instead of element sparsity, spatial heterogeneity that could change the appearance of the global form as well as the salience of the local elements was the main determiner of impairing global processing.

  17. Late Marriage and Marital Instability: The Effects of Heterogeneity and Inflexibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitter, Robert G.

    1986-01-01

    Investigates the effects of late marriage on marital instability. Persons married later in life were found to be more heterogeneous in their choice of mate. No support was found for the hypothesis that late marriage may be associated with marital instability because such spouses are "too set in their ways." (Author/ABB)

  18. Cooperative effects of parameter heterogeneity and coupling on coherence resonance in unidirectional coupled brusselator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qian-Shu; Shi, Jian-Cheng

    2007-01-01

    Two unidirectional coupled brusselator systems, subject to common and uncorrelated multiplicative noise, are investigated, respectively. It can be found that, the parameter heterogeneity effect may be destroyed above critical coupling strength. Synchronization occurs between subsystems subjected to common noise, but cannot achieve by means of uncorrelated noise.

  19. Pore-Scale Process Coupling and Effective Surface Reaction Rates in Heterogeneous Subsurface Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chongxuan; Liu, Yuanyuan; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Zachara, John M.

    2015-09-01

    This manuscript provides a review of pore-scale researches in literature including experimental and numerical approaches, and scale-dependent behavior of geochemical and biogeochemical reaction rates in heterogeneous porous media. A mathematical equation that can be used to predict the scale-dependent behavior of geochemical reaction rates in heterogeneous porous media has been derived. The derived effective rate expression explicitly links the effective reaction rate constant to the intrinsic rate constant, and to the pore-scale variations in reactant concentrations in porous media. Molecular simulations to calculate the intrinsic rate constants were provided. A few examples of pore-scale simulations were used to demonstrate the application of the equation to calculate effective rate constants in heterogeneous materials. The results indicate that the deviation of effective rate constant from the intrinsic rate in heterogeneous porous media is caused by the pore-scale distributions of reactants and their correlation, which are affected by the pore-scale coupling of reactions and transport.

  20. Effects of Constructivist and Computer-Facilitated Strategies on Achievement in Heterogeneous Secondary Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Maryellen; Barowy, William

    This paper describes the effects of the implementation of constructivist techniques with interactive computer simulations on conceptual understanding of plant nutrition and critical thinking skills in heterogeneously grouped secondary biology classrooms. The study focused on three strategies for teaching plant nutrition: (1) traditional; (2)…

  1. Gifted Students' Perceptions of the Academic and Social/Emotional Effects of Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Grouping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams-Byers, Jan; Whitsell, Sara Squiller; Moon, Sidney M.

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated student perceptions of differences in academic and social effects that occur when gifted and talented youth are grouped homogeneously (i.e., in special classes for gifted students) as contrasted with heterogeneously (i.e., in classes with many ability levels represented). Forty-four students in grades 5-11 completed…

  2. Effect of heterogeneous microvasculature distribution on drug delivery to solid tumour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Wenbo; Gedroyc, Wladyslaw; Xu, Xiao Yun

    2014-11-01

    Most of the computational models of drug transport in vascular tumours assume a uniform distribution of blood vessels through which anti-cancer drugs are delivered. However, it is well known that solid tumours are characterized by dilated microvasculature with non-uniform diameters and irregular branching patterns. In this study, the effect of heterogeneous vasculature on drug transport and uptake is investigated by means of mathematical modelling of the key physical and biochemical processes in drug delivery. An anatomically realistic tumour model accounting for heterogeneous distribution of blood vessels is reconstructed based on magnetic resonance images of a liver tumour. Numerical simulations are performed for different drug delivery modes, including direct continuous infusion and thermosensitive liposome-mediated delivery, and the anti-cancer effectiveness is evaluated through changes in tumour cell density based on predicted intracellular concentrations. Comparisons are made between regions of different vascular density, and between the two drug delivery modes. Our numerical results show that both extra- and intra-cellular concentrations in the liver tumour are non-uniform owing to the heterogeneous distribution of tumour vasculature. Drugs accumulate faster in well-vascularized regions, where they are also cleared out more quickly, resulting in less effective tumour cell killing in these regions. Compared with direct continuous infusion, the influence of heterogeneous vasculature on anti-cancer effectiveness is more pronounced for thermosensitive liposome-mediated delivery.

  3. The Effect of Population Heterogeneity on Statistical Power in the Design and Evaluation of Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiang, Depeng; Pepler, Debra; Yao, Hongxing

    2010-01-01

    Do interventions work and for whom? For this article, we examined the influence of population heterogeneity on power in designing and evaluating interventions. On the basis of Monte Carlo simulations in Study 1, we demonstrated that the power to detect the overall intervention effect is lower for a mixture of two subpopulations than for a…

  4. Effect of secretin on release of heterogeneous forms of gastrin.

    PubMed Central

    Straus, E; Greenstein, A J; Yalow, R S

    1975-01-01

    The effect of an intravenous injection of secretin on plasma gastrin concentration is shown to be dependent upon the relative concentration of the major forms of immunoreactive gastrin present in the plasma at the time of injection. Secretin suppressed gastrin secretion in the fasting state in patients in whose plasma heptadecapeptide and big gastrins predominated and did not suppress when big big gastrin comprised more than 90% of plasma gastrin immunoreactivity. The post-secretin decrease in plasma gastrin was due entirely to the disappearance of the smaller, more rapidly degraded forms. Food-stimulated gastrin response was suppressed by secretin for the initial 40 minutes after a test meal but was greater than usual from 40 to 120 minutes. PMID:1218824

  5. Heterogeneous photocatalytic degradation of rose bengal: Effect of operational parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Japinder; Singhal, Sonal

    2014-10-01

    The photocatalytic degradation of rose bengal dye has been investigated using ZnO nanoparticles as photocatalyst. ZnO nanoparticles were found to be efficient catalyst for the degradation of dye and 98% degradation was observed in 90 min. Effect of various operational parameters such as amount of catalyst (0.25-2.00 g/L), concentration of dye (0.01-0.05 mM) and pH (3-11) of dye solution on the rate of dye degradation was studied. The most favorable results for the degradation of rose bengal were observed at pH 5 at a catalyst loading of 1 g/L. Moreover, hydroxyl radicals have been detected in the photocatalytic reaction mixture by using terephthalic acid photoluminescence probing technique. The reusability of the catalyst has also been studied and catalyst was found to be active even after being used for 5 times.

  6. [Regional heterogeneity of lake eutrophication effects in China].

    PubMed

    Cao, Jin-Ling; Xu, Qi-Gong; Xi, Bei-Dou; Li, Xiao-Ping; Yang, Liu-Yan; Jiang, Li-Wen; Wei, Zi-Min; Wu, Xian-Hua

    2012-06-01

    Although biomass of algae (Chl-a) were in variant levels between different lake regions in China under the same nutrients conditions, it demonstrated that efficiencies of TN/TP used by algae had regional differences. In order to clarify the differences, curve estimation in SPSS was used to analyze the linear relationship between Ig Chl-a and Ig TN/lg TP. The slopes of these linear equations were identified as the efficiencies of TN/TP used by algae. The slopes of linear equations from Mengxin Plateau, Yungui Plateau, Northeast Mountain-Plain, lower reach of Yangtze River Plain and North Plain were 1.002, 0.817, 0.761, 0.545, 0.250, orderly. The efficiencies of TN used by algae ranged from the highest to the lowest were lower reach of Yangtze River Plain, Yungui Plateau, North Plain, Northeast Mountain-Plain, Mengxin Plateau, and the slopes of linear equations were 1.401, 1.058, 0.447, 0.239, 0. 099, respectively. Consequently, in Northeast Mountain-Plain, Mengxin Plateau the efficiencies of TP used by algae were higher than those of TN, and in Yangtze River Plain, Yungui Plateau, North Plain, the efficiencies of TN used by algae were higher than those of TP. On the other hand, in order to describe the effects of algae on transparency in different lakes, the relationships between Chl-a and SD were analyzed. The results showed that in Yungui Plateau the effect of algae on transparency was the most obvious as the variation of SD explained by Chl-a was the highest, and Northeast Mountain-Plain, Mengxin Plateau and North Plain followed. However, in lower reach of Yangtze River Plain, the relationship between Chl-a and SD was not significant.

  7. NOx AND HETEROGENEITY EFFECTS IN HIGH LEVEL WASTE (HLW)

    SciTech Connect

    Meisel, Dan; Camaioni, Donald M.; Orlando, Thom

    2000-06-01

    We summarize contributions from our EMSP supported research to several field operations of the Office of Environmental Management (EM). In particular we emphasize its impact on safety programs at the Hanford and other EM sites where storage, maintenance and handling of HLW is a major mission. In recent years we were engaged in coordinated efforts to understand the chemistry initiated by radiation in HLW. Three projects of the EMSP (''The NOx System in Nuclear Waste,'' ''Mechanisms and Kinetics of Organic Aging in High Level Nuclear Wastes, D. Camaioni--PI'' and ''Interfacial Radiolysis Effects in Tanks Waste, T. Orlando--PI'') were involved in that effort, which included a team at Argonne, later moved to the University of Notre Dame, and two teams at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Much effort was invested in integrating the results of the scientific studies into the engineering operations via coordination meetings and participation in various stages of the resolution of some of the outstanding safety issues at the sites. However, in this Abstract we summarize the effort at Notre Dame.

  8. Effects of heterogeneity on earthquake location at ISC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, R. D.

    1992-12-01

    Earthquake location at the International Seismological Centre is carried out by routine least-squares analysis using Jeffreys-Bullen travel times. It is impossible to examine every earthquake in detail, but when obvious discrepancies in location become apparent, adjustments can be made by analysts, usually in phase identification or the restraint of depth. Such discrepancies often result from inappropriateness of the Jeffreys-Bullen model. The effect is most apparent in subduction zones, where it is often difficult to reconcile local and teleseismic observations, and differences from the standard model can result in substantial mislocations. Large events, located by steeply descending teleseismic phases, may be only slightly misplaced, with large residuals at close stations giving a true indication of velocity anomalies. Small events, however, are often significantly misplaced, although giving small residuals at a few close stations. These apparently well located events give compensating misinformation about velocities and location. In other areas, especially mid-oceanic ridges, difficulties in depth determination are likely to be related to deviations from a laterally homogeneous velocity model.

  9. [Buccal bony exostoses induced by free gingival grafts].

    PubMed

    Tal, H; Slutzkey, S

    2011-01-01

    Buccal Bony Exostoses (BBE) is a local benign osseous overgrowth continuous with the facial aspect of the jaw. Post operative BBE may be the result of dermal grafts used to restore the buccal vestibulum, of connective tissue graft placement, and of Free Gingival Grafts (FGG) procedures. In 46 patients in whom 72 FGG procedures were performed by the senior author (HT) over the past 12 years, BBE was clinically and radiographically diagnosed. In one case the tumor was surgically removed. The etiology, pathogenesis and frequency of BBE following FGG procedures was reviewed and discussed. We suggest that the BBE may develop owing to periosteal surgical trauma during FGG procedures, and suggest that this phenomenon receives further attention.

  10. The effect of small intestine heterogeneity on irreversible electroporation treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Mary

    2014-09-01

    Nonthermal irreversible electroporation (NTIRE) is an ablation modality that utilizes microsecond electric fields to produce nanoscale defects in the cell membrane. This results in selective cell death while preserving all other molecules, including the extracellular matrix. Here, finite element analysis and experimental results are utilized to examine the effect of NTIRE on the small intestine due to concern over collateral damage to this organ during NTIRE treatment of abdominal cancers. During previous studies, the electrical treatment parameters were chosen based on a simplified homogeneous tissue model. The small intestine, however, has very distinct layers, and a more realistic model is needed to further develop this technology for precise clinical applications. This study uses a two-dimensional finite element solution of the Laplace and heat conduction equations to investigate how small intestine heterogeneities affect the electric field and temperature distribution. Experimental results obtained by applying NTIRE to the rat small intestine in vivo support the heterogeneous effect of NTIRE on the tissue. The numerical modeling indicates that the electroporation parameters chosen for this study avoid thermal damage to the tissue. This is supported by histology obtained from the in vivo study, which showed preservation of extracellular structures. The finite element model also indicates that the heterogeneous structure of the small intestine has a significant effect on the electric field and volume of cell ablation during electroporation and could have a large impact on the extent of treatment. The heterogeneous nature of the tissue should be accounted for in clinical treatment planning.

  11. Effects of three-dimensional geometric field focusing on concentration polarization in a heterogeneous permselective system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Yoav; Yossifon, Gilad

    2014-01-01

    The current study extends previous two-dimensional (2D) analysis of concentration polarization to account for three-dimensional effects in realistic heterogeneous ion-permselective systems, e.g., microchamber-nanoslot devices. An analytical solution of the electrodiffusive problem, decoupled from electroconvection along with the local electroneutrality approximation, was obtained using the separation of variables technique. It is able to account for the previously neglected effects of microchamber and nanoslot heights on concentration polarization in terms of concentration profiles, limiting current, and current-voltage curves. The resultant heterogeneity in the third dimension adds to that already existing in the 2D in plane problem to further increase geometric field-focusing effects. As a result the currents no longer scale linearly with the nanoslot area, but rather depend on its shape and relative size compared to that of the nonconducting region (i.e., level of heterogeneity). This is turn leads to pronounced current density intensification with increased system heterogeneity found to be in qualitative agreement with previously reported experiments in which both microchamber and nanoslot geometries were varied.

  12. The short-term outcome of the modified Sauvé-Kapandji procedure regarding range of motion, carpal bone translation and bony shelf size.

    PubMed

    Toyama, Shogo; Tamai, Kazuo; Sakamoto, Atsuto; Hirashima, Toshiko

    2011-02-01

    The Sauvé-Kapandji (S-K) procedure is a common treatment for rheumatoid wrists, but in some cases severe bone destruction makes this operative modality difficult to perform, while also resulting in a poor outcome. A modified S-K procedure for these wrists has been reported, but the clinical outcomes of the modified procedure are unclear. This study evaluated 24 wrists in 20 patients who underwent the modified S-K procedure. The mean follow-up period was 34.5 months. The clinical assessments were range of motion, carpal bone translation and bony shelf size. The range of motion and carpal bone translation were similar to those produced by the S-K procedure. In regard to bony shelf size, wrists with an excessively large bony shelf tended to have a progression of carpal bone translation toward the palmar direction due to the residual malposition of the ECU tendon. The modified S-K procedure appears to be a safe and effective surgical alternative for the treatment of severely destroyed rheumatoid wrists. Although the modified procedure allows for the adjustment of the bony shelf size, it should not be used with wrists that have an excessively large bony shelf.

  13. Effects of heterogeneity on active spreading strategies to remediate contaminated groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasprzyk, J. R.; Piscopo, A. N.; Neupauer, R.

    2015-12-01

    The effectiveness of in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) to remediate contaminated aquifers is constrained by the amount of contact between the groundwater contaminant and the injected oxidant. Contaminant degradation during ISCO can be enhanced using innovative active spreading strategies, which involve injecting and extracting water at wells in the vicinity of the plume to generate flow fields that spread the contaminant and oxidant plumes in a manner that increases their contact. Because aquifer heterogeneity affects the transport of the contaminant and oxidant during injection and extraction, aquifer heterogeneity also affects the amount of contact and the degree of contaminant degradation achieved using active spreading strategies during ISCO. Consequently, we can improve the effectiveness of active spreading strategies by generating sequences of injection and extraction that take the aquifer heterogeneity into account. In this study, we optimize sequences of injections and extractions to maximize contaminant degradation in aquifers with zonal and spatially-correlated heterogeneity for three contaminant-oxidant pairings with different reaction kinetics. Analysis of the transport and degradation corresponding to the optimal sequences of injection and extraction demonstrates that the underlying aquifer and contaminant properties are reflected by the optimal sequences.

  14. On the validity of effective formulations for transport through heterogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Dreuzy, Jean-Raynald; Carrera, Jesus

    2016-04-01

    Geological heterogeneity enhances spreading of solutes and causes transport to be anomalous (i.e., non-Fickian), with much less mixing than suggested by dispersion. This implies that modeling transport requires adopting either stochastic approaches that model heterogeneity explicitly or effective transport formulations that acknowledge the effects of heterogeneity. A number of such formulations have been developed and tested as upscaled representations of enhanced spreading. However, their ability to represent mixing has not been formally tested, which is required for proper reproduction of chemical reactions and which motivates our work. We propose that, for an effective transport formulation to be considered a valid representation of transport through heterogeneous porous media (HPM), it should honor mean advection, mixing and spreading. It should also be flexible enough to be applicable to real problems. We test the capacity of the multi-rate mass transfer (MRMT) model to reproduce mixing observed in HPM, as represented by the classical multi-Gaussian log-permeability field with a Gaussian correlation pattern. Non-dispersive mixing comes from heterogeneity structures in the concentration fields that are not captured by macrodispersion. These fine structures limit mixing initially, but eventually enhance it. Numerical results show that, relative to HPM, MRMT models display a much stronger memory of initial conditions on mixing than on dispersion because of the sensitivity of the mixing state to the actual values of concentration. Because MRMT does not restitute the local concentration structures, it induces smaller non-dispersive mixing than HPM. However long-lived trapping in the immobile zones may sustain the deviation from dispersive mixing over much longer times. While spreading can be well captured by MRMT models, in general non-dispersive mixing cannot.

  15. Spatial Heterogeneity in the Effects of Immigration and Diversity on Neighborhood Homicide Rates

    PubMed Central

    Graif, Corina; Sampson, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the connection of immigration and diversity to homicide by advancing a recently developed approach to modeling spatial dynamics—geographically weighted regression. In contrast to traditional global averaging, we argue on substantive grounds that neighborhood characteristics vary in their effects across neighborhood space, a process of “spatial heterogeneity.” Much like treatment-effect heterogeneity and distinct from spatial spillover, our analysis finds considerable evidence that neighborhood characteristics in Chicago vary significantly in predicting homicide, in some cases showing countervailing effects depending on spatial location. In general, however, immigrant concentration is either unrelated or inversely related to homicide, whereas language diversity is consistently linked to lower homicide. The results shed new light on the immigration-homicide nexus and suggest the pitfalls of global averaging models that hide the reality of a highly diversified and spatially stratified metropolis. PMID:20671811

  16. Experimental study on effects of geologic heterogeneity in enhancing dissolution trapping of supercritical CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agartan, Elif; Trevisan, Luca; Cihan, Abdullah; Birkholzer, Jens; Zhou, Quanlin; Illangasekare, Tissa H.

    2015-03-01

    Dissolution trapping is one of the primary mechanisms that enhance the storage security of supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) in saline geologic formations. When scCO2 dissolves in formation brine produces an aqueous solution that is denser than formation brine, which leads to convective mixing driven by gravitational instabilities. Convective mixing can enhance the dissolution of CO2 and thus it can contribute to stable trapping of dissolved CO2. However, in the presence of geologic heterogeneities, diffusive mixing may also contribute to dissolution trapping. The effects of heterogeneity on mixing and its contribution to stable trapping are not well understood. The goal of this experimental study is to investigate the effects of geologic heterogeneity on mixing and stable trapping of dissolved CO2. Homogeneous and heterogeneous media experiments were conducted in a two-dimensional test tank with various packing configurations using surrogates for scCO2 (water) and brine (propylene glycol) under ambient pressure and temperature conditions. The results show that the density-driven flow in heterogeneous formations may not always cause significant convective mixing especially in layered systems containing low-permeability zones. In homogeneous formations, density-driven fingering enhances both storage in the deeper parts of the formation and contact between the host rock and dissolved CO2 for the potential mineralization. On the other hand, for layered systems, dissolved CO2 becomes immobilized in low-permeability zones with low-diffusion rates, which reduces the risk of leakage through any fault or fracture. Both cases contribute to the permanence of the dissolved plume in the formation.

  17. Effects of 2 nm size added heterogeneity on non-exponential dielectric response, and the dynamic heterogeneity view of molecular liquids.

    PubMed

    Johari, G P; Khouri, J

    2012-09-14

    To investigate how non-exponential response could vary under different conditions, we studied the effects of adding 2 nm size polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) to diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A, whose molecules have the same terminal (epoxide) dipoles as the tentacle-like side chains attached to the silsesquioxane core of the POSS molecule. Dielectric relaxation spectra show that, on initial addition, the POSS nano-heterogeneity decreases the non-exponential response parameter β, which is consistent with the dynamic heterogeneity view, but it also decreases the relaxation time τ(m), which is inconsistent with that view. The variations in β and τ(m) with the composition have a thermal equivalence. Despite the lack of translational diffusion required for dynamic heterogeneity, plastic crystals show non-exponential response and non-Arrhenius dynamics. Measurements of β and τ(m) seem more appropriate than using probe molecules or modeling nonlinear response data as a sum of linear responses for testing the dynamic heterogeneity view. Data on molecular liquid mixtures is not generally consistent with this view, and adding a solute does not always decrease β. Studies of mixtures of different size rigid molecules with identical dipolar groups, including polymers, may be useful for comparing the relative effects of temperature and molecular size on β and τ(m).

  18. Effects of 2 nm size added heterogeneity on non-exponential dielectric response, and the dynamic heterogeneity view of molecular liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johari, G. P.; Khouri, J.

    2012-09-01

    To investigate how non-exponential response could vary under different conditions, we studied the effects of adding 2 nm size polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) to diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A, whose molecules have the same terminal (epoxide) dipoles as the tentacle-like side chains attached to the silsesquioxane core of the POSS molecule. Dielectric relaxation spectra show that, on initial addition, the POSS nano-heterogeneity decreases the non-exponential response parameter β, which is consistent with the dynamic heterogeneity view, but it also decreases the relaxation time τm, which is inconsistent with that view. The variations in β and τm with the composition have a thermal equivalence. Despite the lack of translational diffusion required for dynamic heterogeneity, plastic crystals show non-exponential response and non-Arrhenius dynamics. Measurements of β and τm seem more appropriate than using probe molecules or modeling nonlinear response data as a sum of linear responses for testing the dynamic heterogeneity view. Data on molecular liquid mixtures is not generally consistent with this view, and adding a solute does not always decrease β. Studies of mixtures of different size rigid molecules with identical dipolar groups, including polymers, may be useful for comparing the relative effects of temperature and molecular size on β and τm.

  19. The effect of environmental heterogeneity on species richness depends on community position along the environmental gradient.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiyong; Liu, Xueqi; Zhou, Mohua; Ai, Dexiecuo; Wang, Gang; Wang, Youshi; Chu, Chengjin; Lundholm, Jeremy T

    2015-01-01

    Environmental heterogeneity is among the most important factors governing community structure. Besides the widespread evidence supporting positive relationships between richness and environmental heterogeneity, negative and unimodal relationships have also been reported. However, few studies have attempted to test the role of the heterogeneity on species richness after removing the confounding effect of resource availability or environmental severity. Here we constructed an individual-based spatially explicit model incorporating a long-recognized tradeoff between competitive ability and stress-tolerance ability of species. We explored the impact of the level of resource availability (i.e. the position of the community along a gradient of environmental severity) on the heterogeneity-diversity relationship (HDR). The results indicate that the shape of HDR depends on the community position along the environmental gradient: at either end of the gradient of environmental severity, a positive HDR occurred, whereas at the intermediate levels of the gradient, a unimodal HDR emerged. Our exploration demonstrates that resource availability/environmental severity should be considered as a potential factor influencing the shape of the HDR. Our theoretical predictions represent hypotheses in need of further empirical study. PMID:26508413

  20. The effects of racial heterogeneity on mental health: A study of detained youth across multiple counties.

    PubMed

    Lau, Katherine S L; Aalsma, Matthew C; Holloway, Evan D; Wiehe, Sarah E; Vachon, David D

    2015-09-01

    A majority of detained adolescents experience mental health and substance use problems. Limited research has examined the interaction between the race/ethnicity of an individual youth and county-level racial heterogeneity on adolescent mental health outcomes. Participants were identified through a statewide mental health screening project that took place in detention centers across 11 different counties in a Midwestern state during January 1, 2008, to May 10, 2010. A total of 23,831 detained youth (ages 11-18 years), identified as non-Hispanic White (46.6%), Black (43.5%), or Hispanic (9.8%), completed a mental health screener that assessed problems in alcohol/drug use, depression-anxiety, anger-irritability, trauma, somatic complaints, and suicide ideation. Census data were gathered to determine the racial heterogeneity of each county and other county-level variables. Hierarchical linear regression analyses were used to test the independent and interactive effects of youth race/ethnicity and county-level variables (including racial heterogeneity of the county) on adolescent mental health. Independent of other community characteristics, as county-level racial heterogeneity increased, mental health problems among detained youth decreased. In future research on the development and persistence of mental health problems in detained youth, both community and individual-level factors should be considered. PMID:26460702

  1. The effects of racial heterogeneity on mental health: A study of detained youth across multiple counties.

    PubMed

    Lau, Katherine S L; Aalsma, Matthew C; Holloway, Evan D; Wiehe, Sarah E; Vachon, David D

    2015-09-01

    A majority of detained adolescents experience mental health and substance use problems. Limited research has examined the interaction between the race/ethnicity of an individual youth and county-level racial heterogeneity on adolescent mental health outcomes. Participants were identified through a statewide mental health screening project that took place in detention centers across 11 different counties in a Midwestern state during January 1, 2008, to May 10, 2010. A total of 23,831 detained youth (ages 11-18 years), identified as non-Hispanic White (46.6%), Black (43.5%), or Hispanic (9.8%), completed a mental health screener that assessed problems in alcohol/drug use, depression-anxiety, anger-irritability, trauma, somatic complaints, and suicide ideation. Census data were gathered to determine the racial heterogeneity of each county and other county-level variables. Hierarchical linear regression analyses were used to test the independent and interactive effects of youth race/ethnicity and county-level variables (including racial heterogeneity of the county) on adolescent mental health. Independent of other community characteristics, as county-level racial heterogeneity increased, mental health problems among detained youth decreased. In future research on the development and persistence of mental health problems in detained youth, both community and individual-level factors should be considered.

  2. Estimation of the advection effects induced by surface heterogeneities in the surface energy budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuxart, Joan; Wrenger, Burkhard; Martínez-Villagrasa, Daniel; Reuder, Joachim; Jonassen, Marius O.; Jiménez, Maria A.; Lothon, Marie; Lohou, Fabienne; Hartogensis, Oscar; Dünnermann, Jens; Conangla, Laura; Garai, Anirban

    2016-07-01

    The effect of terrain heterogeneities in one-point measurements is a continuous subject of discussion. Here we focus on the order of magnitude of the advection term in the equation of the evolution of temperature as generated by documented terrain heterogeneities and we estimate its importance as a term in the surface energy budget (SEB), for which the turbulent fluxes are computed using the eddy-correlation method. The heterogeneities are estimated from satellite and model fields for scales near 1 km or broader, while the smaller scales are estimated through direct measurements with remotely piloted aircraft and thermal cameras and also by high-resolution modelling. The variability of the surface temperature fields is not found to decrease clearly with increasing resolution, and consequently the advection term becomes more important as the scales become finer. The advection term provides non-significant values to the SEB at scales larger than a few kilometres. In contrast, surface heterogeneities at the metre scale yield large values of the advection, which are probably only significant in the first centimetres above the ground. The motions that seem to contribute significantly to the advection term in the SEB equation in our case are roughly those around the hectometre scales.

  3. Bony fish and their contribution to marine inorganic carbon cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salter, Michael; Perry, Chris; Wilson, Rod; Harborne, Alistair

    2016-04-01

    Conventional understanding of the marine inorganic carbon cycle holds that CaCO3 (mostly as low Mg-calcite and aragonite) precipitates in the upper reaches of the ocean and sinks to a point where it either dissolves or is deposited as sediment. Thus, it plays a key role controlling the distribution of DIC in the oceans and in regulating their capacity to absorb atmospheric CO2. However, several aspects of this cycle remain poorly understood and have long perplexed oceanographers, such as the positive alkalinity anomaly observed in the upper water column of many of the world's oceans, above the aragonite and calcite saturation horizons. This anomaly would be explained by extensive dissolution of a carbonate phase more soluble than low Mg-calcite or aragonite, but major sources for such phases remain elusive. Here we highlight marine bony fish as a potentially important primary source of this 'missing' high-solubility CaCO3. Precipitation of CaCO3 takes place within the intestines of all marine bony fish as part of their normal physiological functioning, and global production models suggest it could account for up to 45 % of total new marine CaCO3 production. Moreover, high Mg-calcite containing >25 % mol% MgCO3 - a more soluble phase than aragonite - is a major component of these precipitates. Thus, fish CaCO3 may at least partially explain the alkalinity anomaly in the upper water column. However, the issue is complicated by the fact that carbonate mineralogy actually varies among fish species, with high Mg-calcite (HMC), low Mg-calcite (LMC), aragonite, and amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) all being common products. Using data from 22 Caribbean fish species, we have generated a novel production model that resolves phase proportions. We evaluate the preservation/dissolution potential of these phases and consider potential implications for marine inorganic carbon cycling. In addition, we consider the dramatic changes in fish biomass structure that have resulted

  4. Revisiting the Effect of Capture Heterogeneity on Survival Estimates in Capture-Mark-Recapture Studies: Does It Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Abadi, Fitsum; Botha, Andre; Altwegg, Res

    2013-01-01

    Recently developed capture-mark-recapture methods allow us to account for capture heterogeneity among individuals in the form of discrete mixtures and continuous individual random effects. In this article, we used simulations and two case studies to evaluate the effectiveness of continuously distributed individual random effects at removing potential bias due to capture heterogeneity, and to evaluate in what situation the added complexity of these models is justified. Simulations and case studies showed that ignoring individual capture heterogeneity generally led to a small negative bias in survival estimates and that individual random effects effectively removed this bias. As expected, accounting for capture heterogeneity also led to slightly less precise survival estimates. Our case studies also showed that accounting for capture heterogeneity increased in importance towards the end of study. Though ignoring capture heterogeneity led to a small bias in survival estimates, such bias may greatly impact management decisions. We advocate reducing potential heterogeneity at the sampling design stage. Where this is insufficient, we recommend modelling individual capture heterogeneity in situations such as when a large proportion of the individuals has a low detection probability (e.g. in the presence of floaters) and situations where the most recent survival estimates are of great interest (e.g. in applied conservation). PMID:23646131

  5. Effects of heterogeneity in aquifer permeability and biomass on biodegradation rate calculations - Results from numerical simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholl, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    Numerical simulations were used to examine the effects of heterogeneity in hydraulic conductivity (K) and intrinsic biodegradation rate on the accuracy of contaminant plume-scale biodegradation rates obtained from field data. The simulations were based on a steady-state BTEX contaminant plume-scale biodegradation under sulfate-reducing conditions, with the electron acceptor in excess. Biomass was either uniform or correlated with K to model spatially variable intrinsic biodegradation rates. A hydraulic conductivity data set from an alluvial aquifer was used to generate three sets of 10 realizations with different degrees of heterogeneity, and contaminant transport with biodegradation was simulated with BIOMOC. Biodegradation rates were calculated from the steady-state contaminant plumes using decreases in concentration with distance downgradient and a single flow velocity estimate, as is commonly done in site characterization to support the interpretation of natural attenuation. The observed rates were found to underestimate the actual rate specified in the heterogeneous model in all cases. The discrepancy between the observed rate and the 'true' rate depended on the ground water flow velocity estimate, and increased with increasing heterogeneity in the aquifer. For a lognormal K distribution with variance of 0.46, the estimate was no more than a factor of 1.4 slower than the true rate. For aquifer with 20% silt/clay lenses, the rate estimate was as much as nine times slower than the true rate. Homogeneous-permeability, uniform-degradation rate simulations were used to generate predictions of remediation time with the rates estimated from heterogeneous models. The homogeneous models were generally overestimated the extent of remediation or underestimated remediation time, due to delayed degradation of contaminants in the low-K areas. Results suggest that aquifer characterization for natural attenuation at contaminated sites should include assessment of the presence

  6. Heterogeneity and the Effect of Mental Health Parity Mandates on the Labor Market*

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Health insurance benefit mandates are believed to have adverse effects on the labor market, but efforts to document such effects for mental health parity mandates have had limited success. I show that one reason for this failure is that the association between parity mandates and labor market outcomes vary with mental distress. Accounting for this heterogeneity, I find adverse labor market effects for non-distressed individuals, but favorable effects for moderately distressed individuals and individuals with a moderately distressed family member. On net, I conclude that the mandates are welfare increasing for moderately distressed workers and their families, but may be welfare decreasing for non-distressed individuals. PMID:26210944

  7. Heterogeneity and the effect of mental health parity mandates on the labor market.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Martin

    2015-09-01

    Health insurance benefit mandates are believed to have adverse effects on the labor market, but efforts to document such effects for mental health parity mandates have had limited success. I show that one reason for this failure is that the association between parity mandates and labor market outcomes vary with mental distress. Accounting for this heterogeneity, I find adverse labor market effects for non-distressed individuals, but favorable effects for moderately distressed individuals and individuals with a moderately distressed family member. On net, I conclude that the mandates are welfare increasing for moderately distressed workers and their families, but may be welfare decreasing for non-distressed individuals.

  8. The effect of heterogeneous dynamics of online users on information filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bo-Lun; Zeng, An; Chen, Ling

    2015-11-01

    The rapid expansion of the Internet requires effective information filtering techniques to extract the most essential and relevant information for online users. Many recommendation algorithms have been proposed to predict the future items that a given user might be interested in. However, there is an important issue that has always been ignored so far in related works, namely the heterogeneous dynamics of online users. The interest of active users changes more often than that of less active users, which asks for different update frequency of their recommendation lists. In this paper, we develop a framework to study the effect of heterogeneous dynamics of users on the recommendation performance. We find that the personalized application of recommendation algorithms results in remarkable improvement in the recommendation accuracy and diversity. Our findings may help online retailers make better use of the existing recommendation methods.

  9. Effect of heterogeneity on the quantitative determination of trace elements in concrete.

    PubMed

    Weritz, Friederike; Schaurich, Dieter; Taffe, Alexander; Wilsch, Gerd

    2006-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy has been used for quantitative measurement of trace elements, e.g. sulfur and chlorine, in concrete. Chloride and sulfate ions have a large effect on the durability of concrete structures, and quantitative measurement is important for condition assessment and quality assurance. Concrete is a highly heterogeneous material in composition and grain-size distribution, i.e. the spatial distribution of elements. Calibration plots were determined by use of laboratory-made reference samples consisting of pressings of cement powder, hydrated cement, cement mortar, and concrete, in which the heterogeneity of the material is increasing because of the aggregates. Coarse aggregate and cement paste are distinguishable by the intensity of the Ca spectral lines. More advanced evaluation is necessary to account for the effect of the fine aggregate. The three series of reference samples enable systematic study of the effects of heterogeneity on spectral intensity, signal fluctuation, uncertainty, and limits of detection. Spatially resolved measurements and many spectra enable statistical evaluation of the data. The heterogeneity has an effect on measurement of the sulfur and chlorine content, because both occur mainly in the cement matrix. Critical chloride concentrations are approximately 0.04% (m/m). The chlorine spectral line at 837.6 nm is evaluated. The natural sulfur content of concrete is approximately 0.1% (m/m). The spectral line at 921.3 nm is evaluated. One future application may be simultaneous determination of the amount of damaging trace elements and the cement content of the concrete. PMID:16520935

  10. Effect of heterogeneity on the quantitative determination of trace elements in concrete.

    PubMed

    Weritz, Friederike; Schaurich, Dieter; Taffe, Alexander; Wilsch, Gerd

    2006-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy has been used for quantitative measurement of trace elements, e.g. sulfur and chlorine, in concrete. Chloride and sulfate ions have a large effect on the durability of concrete structures, and quantitative measurement is important for condition assessment and quality assurance. Concrete is a highly heterogeneous material in composition and grain-size distribution, i.e. the spatial distribution of elements. Calibration plots were determined by use of laboratory-made reference samples consisting of pressings of cement powder, hydrated cement, cement mortar, and concrete, in which the heterogeneity of the material is increasing because of the aggregates. Coarse aggregate and cement paste are distinguishable by the intensity of the Ca spectral lines. More advanced evaluation is necessary to account for the effect of the fine aggregate. The three series of reference samples enable systematic study of the effects of heterogeneity on spectral intensity, signal fluctuation, uncertainty, and limits of detection. Spatially resolved measurements and many spectra enable statistical evaluation of the data. The heterogeneity has an effect on measurement of the sulfur and chlorine content, because both occur mainly in the cement matrix. Critical chloride concentrations are approximately 0.04% (m/m). The chlorine spectral line at 837.6 nm is evaluated. The natural sulfur content of concrete is approximately 0.1% (m/m). The spectral line at 921.3 nm is evaluated. One future application may be simultaneous determination of the amount of damaging trace elements and the cement content of the concrete.

  11. Application of Effective Medium Theory to the Three-Dimensional Heterogeneity of Mantle Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, X.; Jordan, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    A self-consistent theory for the effective elastic parameters of stochastic media with small-scale 3D heterogeneities has been developed using a 2nd-order Born approximation to the scattered wavefield (T. H. Jordan, GJI, in press). Here we apply the theory to assess how small-scale variations in the local anisotropy of the upper mantle affect seismic wave propagation. We formulate a anisotropic model in which the local elastic properties are specified by a constant stiffness tensor with hexagonal symmetry of arbitrary orientation. This orientation is guided by a Gaussian random vector field with transversely isotropic (TI) statistics. If the outer scale of the statistical variability is small compared to a wavelength, then the effective seismic velocities are TI and depend on two parameters, a horizontal-to-vertical orientation ratio ξ and a horizontal-to-vertical aspect ratio, η. If ξ = 1, the symmetry axis is isotropically distributed; if ξ < 1, it is vertical biased (bipolar distribution), and if ξ > 1, it is horizontally biased (girdle distribution). If η = 1, the heterogeneity is geometrically isotropic; as η à∞, the medium becomes a horizontal stochastic laminate; as η à0, the medium becomes a vertical stochastic bundle. Using stiffness tensors constrained by laboratory measurements of mantle xenoliths, we explore the dependence of the effective P and S velocities on ξ and η. The effective velocities are strongly controlled by the orientation ratio ξ; e.g., if the hexagonal symmetry axis of the local anisotropy is the fast direction of propagation, then vPH > vPV and vSH > vSV for ξ > 1. A more surprising result is the 2nd-order insensitivity of the velocities to the heterogeneity aspect ratio η. Consequently, the geometrical anisotropy of upper-mantle heterogeneity significantly enhances seismic-wave anisotropy only through local variations in the Voigt-averaged velocities, which depend primarily on rock composition and not deformation

  12. Effect of Transmurally Heterogeneous Myocyte Excitation-Contraction Coupling on Left Ventricular Electromechanics

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Stuart G.; Howard, Elliot; Aguado-Sierra, Jazmin; Coppola, Benjamin A.; Omens, Jeffrey H.; Mulligan, Lawrence J.; McCulloch, Andrew D.; Kerckhoffs, Roy CP

    2009-01-01

    The excitation-contraction coupling properties of cardiac myocytes isolated from different regions of the mammalian left ventricular wall have been shown to vary considerably, with uncertain effects on ventricular function. We embedded a cell-level excitation-contraction coupling model with region-dependent parameters within a simple finite element model of left ventricular geometry to study effects of electromechanical heterogeneity on local myocardial mechanics and global hemodynamics. This model was compared with one in which heterogeneous myocyte parameters were assigned randomly throughout the mesh while preserving the total amount of each cell subtype. The two models displayed nearly identical transmural patterns of fibre and cross-fibre strains at end systole, but showed clear differences in fibre strains at earlier points during systole. Hemodynamic function, including peak left ventricular pressure, maximum rate of left ventricular pressure development, and stroke volume were essentially identical in the two models. These results suggest that in the intact ventricle heterogeneously distributed myocyte subtypes primarily impact local deformation of the myocardium, and that these effects are greatest during early systole. PMID:19251984

  13. Jaws and teeth of the earliest bony fishes.

    PubMed

    Botella, Hector; Blom, Henning; Dorka, Markus; Ahlberg, Per Erik; Janvier, Philippe

    2007-08-01

    Extant jawed vertebrates, or gnathostomes, fall into two major monophyletic groups, namely chondrichthyans (cartilaginous fishes) and osteichthyans (bony fishes and tetrapods). Fossil representatives of the osteichthyan crown group are known from the latest Silurian period, 418 million years (Myr) ago, to the present. By contrast, stem chondrichthyans and stem osteichthyans are still largely unknown. Two extinct Palaeozoic groups, the acanthodians and placoderms, may fall into these stem groups or the common stem group of gnathostomes, but their relationships and monophyletic status are both debated. Here we report unambiguous evidence for osteichthyan characters in jaw bones referred to the late Silurian (423-416-Myr-old) fishes Andreolepis hedei and Lophosteus superbus, long known from isolated bone fragments, scales and teeth, and whose affinities to, or within, osteichthyans have been debated. The bones are a characteristic osteichthyan maxillary and dentary, but the organization of the tooth-like denticles they bear differs from the large, conical teeth of crown-group osteichthyans, indicating that they can be assigned to the stem group. Andreolepis and Lophosteus are thus not only the oldest but also the most phylogenetically basal securely identified osteichthyans known so far.

  14. Ancient origin of lubricated joints in bony vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Askary, Amjad; Smeeton, Joanna; Paul, Sandeep; Schindler, Simone; Braasch, Ingo; Ellis, Nicholas A; Postlethwait, John; Miller, Craig T; Crump, J Gage

    2016-01-01

    Synovial joints are the lubricated connections between the bones of our body that are commonly affected in arthritis. It is assumed that synovial joints first evolved as vertebrates came to land, with ray-finned fishes lacking lubricated joints. Here, we examine the expression and function of a critical lubricating protein of mammalian synovial joints, Prg4/Lubricin, in diverse ray-finned fishes. We find that Prg4 homologs are specifically enriched at the jaw and pectoral fin joints of zebrafish, stickleback, and gar, with genetic deletion of the zebrafish prg4b gene resulting in the same age-related degeneration of joints as seen in lubricin-deficient mice and humans. Our data support lubricated synovial joints evolving much earlier than currently accepted, at least in the common ancestor of all bony vertebrates. Establishment of the first arthritis model in the highly regenerative zebrafish will offer unique opportunities to understand the aetiology and possible treatment of synovial joint disease. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16415.001 PMID:27434666

  15. Effect of heterogeneity on radionuclide retardation in the alluvial aquifer near Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

    PubMed

    Painter, S; Cvetkovic, V; Turner, D R

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is currently studying Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a potential site for a geological high-level waste repository. In the current conceptual models of radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain, part of the transport path to pumping locations would be through an alluvial aquifer. Interactions with minerals in the alluvium are expected to retard the downstream migration of radionuclides, thereby delaying arrival times and reducing ground water concentrations. We evaluate the effectiveness of the alluvial aquifer as a transport barrier using the stochastic Lagrangian framework. A transport model is developed to account for physical and chemical heterogeneities and rate-limited mass transfer between mobile and immobile zones. The latter process is caused by small-scale heterogeneity and is thought to control the macroscopic-scale retardation in some field experiments. A geostatistical model for the spatially varying sorption parameters is developed from a site-specific database created from hydrochemical measurements and a calibrated modeling approach (Turner and Pabalan 1999). Transport of neptunium is considered as an example. The results are sensitive to the rate of transfer between mobile and immobile zones, and to spatial variability in the hydraulic conductivity. Chemical heterogeneity has only a small effect, as does correlation between hydraulic conductivity and the neptunium distribution coefficient. These results illustrate how general sensitivities can be explored with modest effort within the Lagrangian framework. Such studies complement and guide the application of more detailed numerical simulations.

  16. The value of heterogeneity for cost-effectiveness subgroup analysis: conceptual framework and application.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Manuel A; Manca, Andrea; Claxton, Karl; Sculpher, Mark J

    2014-11-01

    This article develops a general framework to guide the use of subgroup cost-effectiveness analysis for decision making in a collectively funded health system. In doing so, it addresses 2 key policy questions, namely, the identification and selection of subgroups, while distinguishing 2 sources of potential value associated with heterogeneity. These are 1) the value of revealing the factors associated with heterogeneity in costs and outcomes using existing evidence (static value) and 2) the value of acquiring further subgroup-related evidence to resolve the uncertainty given the current understanding of heterogeneity (dynamic value). Consideration of these 2 sources of value can guide subgroup-specific treatment decisions and inform whether further research should be conducted to resolve uncertainty to explain variability in costs and outcomes. We apply the proposed methods to a cost-effectiveness analysis for the management of patients with acute coronary syndrome. This study presents the expected net benefits under current and perfect information when subgroups are defined based on the use and combination of 6 binary covariates. The results of the case study confirm the theoretical expectations. As more subgroups are considered, the marginal net benefit gains obtained under the current information show diminishing marginal returns, and the expected value of perfect information shows a decreasing trend. We present a suggested algorithm that synthesizes the results to guide policy.

  17. Reduced negativity effect in older adults' memory for emotional pictures: the heterogeneity-homogeneity list paradigm.

    PubMed

    Grühn, Daniel; Scheibe, Susanne; Baltes, Paul B

    2007-09-01

    Using the heterogeneity-homogeneity list paradigm, the authors investigated 48 young adults' (20-30 years) and 48 older adults' (65-75 years) recognition memory for emotional pictures. The authors obtained no evidence for a positivity bias in older adults' memory: Age differences were primarily driven by older adults' diminished ability to remember negative pictures. The authors further found a strong effect of list types: Pictures, particularly neutral ones, were better recognized in homogeneous (blocked) lists than in heterogeneous (mixed) ones. Results confirm those of a previous study by D. Grühn, J. Smith, and P. B. Baltes (2005) that used a different type of to-be-remembered material, that is, pictures instead of words.

  18. Effects of heterogeneity and friction on the deformation and strength of rock

    SciTech Connect

    Nihei, K.T.; Myer, L.R.; Liu, Z.; Cook, N.G.W.; Kemeny, J.M.

    1994-03-01

    Experimental observations of the evolution of damage in rocks during compressive loading indicate that macroscopic failure occurs predominantly by extensile crack growth parallel or subparallel to the maximum principal stress. Extensile microcracks initiate at grain boundaries and open pores by a variety of micromechanical processes which may include grain bending, Brazilian type fracture and grain boundary sliding. Microstructural heterogeneity in grain size, strength and shape determines the magnitude of the local tensile stresses which produce extensile microcracking and the stability with which these microcracks coalesce to form macrocracks. Friction at grain boundaries and between the surfaces of microcracks reduces the strain energy available for extensile crack growth and increases the stability of microcrack growth. In clastic rocks, frictional forces may improve the conditions for extensile microcrack growth by constraining the amount of sliding and rotation of individual grains. Micromechanical models are used to investigate the effects of heterogeneity and friction on the deformation and strength of crystalline and clastic rocks.

  19. New heterogeneous test statistics for the unbalanced fixed-effect nested design.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jiin-Huarng; Billard, L; Luh, Wei-Ming

    2011-05-01

    When the underlying variances are unknown or/and unequal, using the conventional F test is problematic in the two-factor hierarchical data structure. Prompted by the approximate test statistics (Welch and Alexander-Govern methods), the authors develop four new heterogeneous test statistics to test factor A and factor B nested within A for the unbalanced fixed-effect two-stage nested design under variance heterogeneity. The actual significance levels and statistical power of the test statistics were compared in a simulation study. The results show that the proposed procedures maintain better Type I error rate control and have greater statistical power than those obtained by the conventional F test in various conditions. Therefore, the proposed test statistics are recommended in terms of robustness and easy implementation.

  20. Perceived Disagreement and Heterogeneity in Social Networks: Distinct Effects on Political Participation.

    PubMed

    Guidetti, Margherita; Cavazza, Nicoletta; Graziani, Anna Rita

    2016-01-01

    Although the coexistence of conflicting opinions in society is the very core of democracy, people's tendency to avoid conflict could keep them away from political discussion and participation. On the other hand, being exposed to diverse political views could motivate citizens to participate. We conducted secondary analyses on two 2013 ITANES (Italian National Election Studies) probability samples in order to test the hypotheses that perceived network disagreement (between an individual and her/his discussion partners) and heterogeneity (among discussants holding different political opinions) exert independent and opposite effects on political participation through motivation and knowledge. Results converged in showing that disagreement dampened, while heterogeneity encouraged, political participation (voting, propensity to abstain in future, offline and online activism, and timing of vote decision) by decreasing or increasing, respectively, political interest and, in turn, knowledge.

  1. Protein-nanoparticle interactions: the effects of surface compositional and structural heterogeneity are scale dependent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Rixiang; Carney, Randy P.; Stellacci, Francesco; Lau, Boris L. T.

    2013-07-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) in the biological environment are exposed to a large variety and concentration of proteins. Proteins are known to adsorb in a `corona' like structure on the surface of NPs. In this study, we focus on the effects of surface compositional and structural heterogeneity on protein adsorption by examining the interaction of self-assembled monolayer coated gold NPs (AuNPs) with two types of proteins: ubiquitin and fibrinogen. This work was designed to systematically investigate the role of surface heterogeneity in nanoparticle-protein interaction. We have chosen the particles as well as the proteins to provide different types (in distribution and length-scale) of heterogeneity. The goal was to unveil the role of heterogeneity and of its length-scale in the particle-protein interaction. Dynamic light scattering and circular dichroism spectroscopy were used to reveal different interactions at pH above and below the isoelectric points of the proteins, which is related to the charge heterogeneity on the protein surface. At pH 7.4, there was only a monolayer of proteins adsorbed onto the NPs and the secondary structure of proteins remained intact. At pH 4.0, large aggregates of nanoparticle-protein complexes were formed and the secondary structures of the proteins were significantly disrupted. In terms of interaction thermodynamics, results from isothermal titration calorimetry showed that ubiquitin adsorbed differently onto (1) AuNPs with charged and nonpolar terminals organized into nano-scale structure (66-34 OT), (2) AuNPs with randomly distributed terminals (66-34 brOT), and (3) AuNPs with homogeneously charged terminals (MUS). This difference in adsorption behavior was not observed when AuNPs interacted with fibrinogen. The results suggested that the interaction between the proteins and AuNPs was influenced by the surface heterogeneity on the AuNPs, and this influence depends on the scale of surface heterogeneity and the size of the proteins

  2. Continuum heterogeneous biofilm model--a simple and accurate method for effectiveness factor determination.

    PubMed

    Gonzo, Elio Emilio; Wuertz, Stefan; Rajal, Veronica B

    2012-07-01

    We present a novel analytical approach to describe biofilm processes considering continuum variation of both biofilm density and substrate effective diffusivity. A simple perturbation and matching technique was used to quantify biofilm activity using the steady-state diffusion-reaction equation with continuum variable substrate effective diffusivity and biofilm density, along the coordinate normal to the biofilm surface. The procedure allows prediction of an effectiveness factor, η, defined as the ratio between the observed rate of substrate utilization (reaction rate with diffusion resistance) and the rate of substrate utilization without diffusion limitation. Main assumptions are that (i) the biofilm is a continuum, (ii) substrate is transferred by diffusion only and is consumed only by microorganisms at a rate according to Monod kinetics, (iii) biofilm density and substrate effective diffusivity change in the x direction, (iv) the substrate concentration above the biofilm surface is known, and (v) the substratum is impermeable. With this approach one can evaluate, in a fast and efficient way, the effect of different parameters that characterize a heterogeneous biofilm and the kinetics of the rate of substrate consumption on the behavior of the biological system. Based on a comparison of η profiles the activity of a homogeneous biofilm could be as much as 47.8% higher than that of a heterogeneous biofilm, under the given conditions. A comparison of η values estimated for first order kinetics and η values obtained by numerical techniques showed a maximum deviation of 1.75% in a narrow range of modified Thiele modulus values. When external mass transfer resistance, is also considered, a global effectiveness factor, η(0) , can be calculated. The main advantage of the approach lies in the analytical expression for the calculation of the intrinsic effectiveness factor η and its implementation in a computer program. For the test cases studied convergence was

  3. Continuum heterogeneous biofilm model--a simple and accurate method for effectiveness factor determination.

    PubMed

    Gonzo, Elio Emilio; Wuertz, Stefan; Rajal, Veronica B

    2012-07-01

    We present a novel analytical approach to describe biofilm processes considering continuum variation of both biofilm density and substrate effective diffusivity. A simple perturbation and matching technique was used to quantify biofilm activity using the steady-state diffusion-reaction equation with continuum variable substrate effective diffusivity and biofilm density, along the coordinate normal to the biofilm surface. The procedure allows prediction of an effectiveness factor, η, defined as the ratio between the observed rate of substrate utilization (reaction rate with diffusion resistance) and the rate of substrate utilization without diffusion limitation. Main assumptions are that (i) the biofilm is a continuum, (ii) substrate is transferred by diffusion only and is consumed only by microorganisms at a rate according to Monod kinetics, (iii) biofilm density and substrate effective diffusivity change in the x direction, (iv) the substrate concentration above the biofilm surface is known, and (v) the substratum is impermeable. With this approach one can evaluate, in a fast and efficient way, the effect of different parameters that characterize a heterogeneous biofilm and the kinetics of the rate of substrate consumption on the behavior of the biological system. Based on a comparison of η profiles the activity of a homogeneous biofilm could be as much as 47.8% higher than that of a heterogeneous biofilm, under the given conditions. A comparison of η values estimated for first order kinetics and η values obtained by numerical techniques showed a maximum deviation of 1.75% in a narrow range of modified Thiele modulus values. When external mass transfer resistance, is also considered, a global effectiveness factor, η(0) , can be calculated. The main advantage of the approach lies in the analytical expression for the calculation of the intrinsic effectiveness factor η and its implementation in a computer program. For the test cases studied convergence was

  4. A Self-Consistent Approach for Calculating the Effective Hydraulic Conductivity of a Bimodal, Heterogeneous Medium

    SciTech Connect

    Pozdniakov, Sergey; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2004-01-02

    In this paper, we consider an approach for estimating the effective hydraulic conductivity of a 3D medium with a binary distribution of local hydraulic conductivities. The medium heterogeneity is represented by a combination of matrix medium conductivity with spatially distributed sets of inclusions. Estimation of effective conductivity is based on a self-consistent approach introduced by Shvidler (1985). The tensor of effective hydraulic conductivity is calculated numerically by using a simple system of equations for the main diagonal elements. Verification of the method is done by comparison with theoretical results for special cases and numerical results of Desbarats (1987) and our own numerical modeling. The method was applied to estimating the effective hydraulic conductivity of a 2D and 3D fractured porous medium. The medium heterogeneity is represented by a combination of matrix conductivity and a spatially distributed set of highly conductive fractures. The tensor of effective hydraulic conductivity is calculated for parallel- and random-oriented sets of fractures. The obtained effective conductivity values coincide with Romm's (1966) and Snow's (1969) theories for infinite fracture length. These values are also physically acceptable for the sparsely-fractured-medium case with low fracture spatial density and finite fracture length. Verification of the effective hydraulic conductivity obtained for a fractured porous medium is done by comparison with our own numerical modeling for a 3D case and with Malkovsky and Pek's (1995) results for a 2D case.

  5. Heterogeneous Suppression of Sequential Effects in Random Sequence Generation, but Not in Operant Learning.

    PubMed

    Shteingart, Hanan; Loewenstein, Yonatan

    2016-01-01

    There is a long history of experiments in which participants are instructed to generate a long sequence of binary random numbers. The scope of this line of research has shifted over the years from identifying the basic psychological principles and/or the heuristics that lead to deviations from randomness, to one of predicting future choices. In this paper, we used generalized linear regression and the framework of Reinforcement Learning in order to address both points. In particular, we used logistic regression analysis in order to characterize the temporal sequence of participants' choices. Surprisingly, a population analysis indicated that the contribution of the most recent trial has only a weak effect on behavior, compared to more preceding trials, a result that seems irreconcilable with standard sequential effects that decay monotonously with the delay. However, when considering each participant separately, we found that the magnitudes of the sequential effect are a monotonous decreasing function of the delay, yet these individual sequential effects are largely averaged out in a population analysis because of heterogeneity. The substantial behavioral heterogeneity in this task is further demonstrated quantitatively by considering the predictive power of the model. We show that a heterogeneous model of sequential dependencies captures the structure available in random sequence generation. Finally, we show that the results of the logistic regression analysis can be interpreted in the framework of reinforcement learning, allowing us to compare the sequential effects in the random sequence generation task to those in an operant learning task. We show that in contrast to the random sequence generation task, sequential effects in operant learning are far more homogenous across the population. These results suggest that in the random sequence generation task, different participants adopt different cognitive strategies to suppress sequential dependencies when

  6. Heterogeneous Suppression of Sequential Effects in Random Sequence Generation, but Not in Operant Learning

    PubMed Central

    Shteingart, Hanan; Loewenstein, Yonatan

    2016-01-01

    There is a long history of experiments in which participants are instructed to generate a long sequence of binary random numbers. The scope of this line of research has shifted over the years from identifying the basic psychological principles and/or the heuristics that lead to deviations from randomness, to one of predicting future choices. In this paper, we used generalized linear regression and the framework of Reinforcement Learning in order to address both points. In particular, we used logistic regression analysis in order to characterize the temporal sequence of participants’ choices. Surprisingly, a population analysis indicated that the contribution of the most recent trial has only a weak effect on behavior, compared to more preceding trials, a result that seems irreconcilable with standard sequential effects that decay monotonously with the delay. However, when considering each participant separately, we found that the magnitudes of the sequential effect are a monotonous decreasing function of the delay, yet these individual sequential effects are largely averaged out in a population analysis because of heterogeneity. The substantial behavioral heterogeneity in this task is further demonstrated quantitatively by considering the predictive power of the model. We show that a heterogeneous model of sequential dependencies captures the structure available in random sequence generation. Finally, we show that the results of the logistic regression analysis can be interpreted in the framework of reinforcement learning, allowing us to compare the sequential effects in the random sequence generation task to those in an operant learning task. We show that in contrast to the random sequence generation task, sequential effects in operant learning are far more homogenous across the population. These results suggest that in the random sequence generation task, different participants adopt different cognitive strategies to suppress sequential dependencies when

  7. Effect of crustal heterogeneities and effective rock strength on the formation of HP and UHP rocks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuber, Georg; Kaus, Boris; Schmalholz, Stefan; White, Richard

    2015-04-01

    next step, we performed several hundred numerical simulations to understand the effects of km-scale heterogeneities and material parameters on pressure magnitudes, using a model setup that is otherwise very similar to the one of Li et al. (2010). Results show that significant non-lithostatic pressures occur if (lower) crustal rocks are dry or if km-scale (nappe-sized) heterogeneities with dryer rocks are present within the crust. Overpressure magnitudes can be up to 1 GPa or 100% and in some cases rock assemblages are temporarily in the coesite stability field at a depth of only 40 km, followed by rapid exhumation to the surface. Tectonic overpressures can vary strongly in magnitude versus time, but peak pressures are present sufficiently long for metamorphic reactions to occur. The presence of heterogeneities can affect the crustal-scaled deformation pattern, and the effective friction angle of crustal-scale rocks (or the dryness of these rocks) is a key parameter that determines the magnitude of non-lithostatic pressures. Our results thus reconcile previous findings and highlight the importance of having an accurate knowledge of the fluid-pressure, initial crustal structure and rock composition during continental collision. If rocks are dry by the time they enter a subduction zone, or are stronger/dryer than surrounding rocks, they are likely to develop significantly higher pressures than nearby rocks. This might explain the puzzling observation that some nappes have very high peak pressures, while juxtaposed nappes have much lower values, without clear structural evidence for deep burial and exhumation along a subduction channel of the high-pressure nappe. Our models might also give a partial explanation of why the reported timescales for high and ultra-high pressure stages of peak metamorphism are often very short. References: Burov, E., Francois, T., Agard, P., Le Pourhiet, L., Meyer, B., Tirel, C., Lebedev, S., Yamato, P., Brun, J.-P., 2014. Tectonophysics

  8. Diffusion-weighted Imaging Using Readout-segmented EPI Reveals Bony Metastases from Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Laura L; Alazraki, Adina; Wasilewski-Masker, Karen; Jones, Richard A; Porter, David A; Palasis, Susan

    2016-10-01

    Identifying neuroblastoma (NBL) metastases is crucial to treatment and prognosis. Metaiodobenzylguanidine and Tc99M bone scans are standard for identifying bony metastases but can underestimate disease. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of the spine has shown promise in evaluating bony metastases but has been limited by artifacts. Readout-segmented echo planar imaging is a technique for DWI that minimizes artifacts allowing for improved identification of spinal disease. This report illustrates the utility of DWI of the spine using readout-segmented echo planar imaging in the detection of bony NBL metastases in a child, lending support that DWI should be included in magnetic resonance imaging scans for NBL.

  9. Diffusion-weighted Imaging Using Readout-segmented EPI Reveals Bony Metastases from Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Laura L; Alazraki, Adina; Wasilewski-Masker, Karen; Jones, Richard A; Porter, David A; Palasis, Susan

    2016-10-01

    Identifying neuroblastoma (NBL) metastases is crucial to treatment and prognosis. Metaiodobenzylguanidine and Tc99M bone scans are standard for identifying bony metastases but can underestimate disease. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of the spine has shown promise in evaluating bony metastases but has been limited by artifacts. Readout-segmented echo planar imaging is a technique for DWI that minimizes artifacts allowing for improved identification of spinal disease. This report illustrates the utility of DWI of the spine using readout-segmented echo planar imaging in the detection of bony NBL metastases in a child, lending support that DWI should be included in magnetic resonance imaging scans for NBL. PMID:27571120

  10. A heterogeneous chemistry model for acid rain`s effect on ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Tao

    1995-11-01

    A computer model for simulating heterogeneous reactions in cloud is developed to determine the S(IV) species` effect on ozone. Crutzen claims that NO{sub x}, HO{sub x} families and H{sub 2}CO in the troposphere can decrease ozone by 5 to 10%. However, is this claim valid for a SO{sub x} polluted atmosphere? The SO{sub x} family reacts with the ozone destroyers. These reactions seem to be significant enough to reduce the H{sub 2}CO`s destructive effect on ozone.

  11. Control rod heterogeneity effects in liquid-metal fast breeder reactors: Method developments and experimental validation

    SciTech Connect

    Carta, M.; Granget, G.; Palmiotti, G.; Salvatores, M.; Soule, R.

    1988-11-01

    The control rod worth assessment in a large liquid-metal fast breeder reactor is strongly dependent on the actual arrangement of the absorber pins inside the control rod subassemblies. The so-called heterogeneity effects (i.e., the effects on the rod reactivity of the actual rod internal geometry versus homogenization of the absorber atoms over all the subassembly volume) have been evaluated, using explicit and variational methods to derive appropriate cross sections. An experimental program performed at the MASURCA facility has been used to validate these methods.

  12. CHIMERA: Clustering of Heterogeneous Disease Effects via Distribution Matching of Imaging Patterns.

    PubMed

    Dong, Aoyan; Honnorat, Nicolas; Gaonkar, Bilwaj; Davatzikos, Christos

    2016-02-01

    Many brain disorders and diseases exhibit heterogeneous symptoms and imaging characteristics. This heterogeneity is typically not captured by commonly adopted neuroimaging analyses that seek only a main imaging pattern when two groups need to be differentiated (e.g., patients and controls, or clinical progressors and non-progressors). We propose a novel probabilistic clustering approach, CHIMERA, modeling the pathological process by a combination of multiple regularized transformations from normal/control population to the patient population, thereby seeking to identify multiple imaging patterns that relate to disease effects and to better characterize disease heterogeneity. In our framework, normal and patient populations are considered as point distributions that are matched by a variant of the coherent point drift algorithm. We explain how the posterior probabilities produced during the MAP optimization of CHIMERA can be used for clustering the patients into groups and identifying disease subtypes. CHIMERA was first validated on a synthetic dataset and then on a clinical dataset mixing 317 control subjects and patients suffering from Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and Parkison's Disease (PD). CHIMERA produced better clustering results compared to two standard clustering approaches. We further analyzed 390 T1 MRI scans from Alzheimer's patients. We discovered two main and reproducible AD subtypes displaying significant differences in cognitive performance.

  13. Effects of the heterogeneous landscape on a predator-prey system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Hee

    2010-01-01

    In order to understand how a heterogeneous landscape affects a predator-prey system, a spatially explicit lattice model consisting of predators, prey, grass, and landscape was constructed. The predators and preys randomly move on the lattice space and the grass grows in its neighboring site according to its growth probability. When predators and preys meet at the same site at the same time, a number of prey, equal to the number of predators are eaten. This rule was also applied to the relationship between the prey and grass. The predator (prey) could give birth to an offspring when it ate prey (grass), with a birth probability. When a predator or prey animal was initially introduced, or newly born, its health state was set at a given high value. This health state decreased by one with every time step. When the state of an animal decreased to less than zero, the animal died and was removed from the system. The heterogeneous landscape was characterized by parameter H, which controlled the heterogeneity according to the neutral model. The simulation results showed that H positively or negatively affected a predator’s survival, while its effect on prey and grass was less pronounced. The results can be understood by the disturbance of the balance between the prey and predator densities in the areas where the animals aggregated.

  14. Disease Spread and Its Effect on Population Dynamics in Heterogeneous Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Ranjit Kumar; Roy, Parimita

    In this paper, an eco-epidemiological model in which both species diffuse along a spatial gradient has been shown to exhibit temporal chaos at a fixed point in space. The proposed model is a modification of the model recently presented by Upadhyay and Roy [2014]. The spatial interactions among the species have been represented in the form of reaction-diffusion equations. The model incorporates the intrinsic growth rate of fish population which varies linearly with the depth of water. Numerical results show that diffusion can drive otherwise stable system into aperiodic behavior with sensitivity to initial conditions. We show that spatially induced chaos plays an important role in spatial pattern formation in heterogeneous environment. Spatiotemporal distributions of species have been simulated using the diffusivity assumptions realistic for natural eco-epidemic systems. We found that in heterogeneous environment, the temporal dynamics of both the species are drastically different and show chaotic behavior. It was also found that the instability observed in the model is due to spatial heterogeneity and diffusion-driven. Cumulative death rate of predator has an appreciable effect on model dynamics as the spatial distribution of all constituent populations exhibit significant changes when this model parameter is changed and it acts as a regularizing factor.

  15. Assessing the heterogeneity of treatment effects via potential outcomes of individual patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiwei; Wang, Chenguang; Nie, Lei; Soon, Guoxing

    2014-01-01

    Summary There is growing interest in understanding the heterogeneity of treatment effects (HTE), which has important implications in treatment evaluation and selection. The standard approach to assessing HTE (i.e. subgroup analyses based on known effect modifiers) is informative about the heterogeneity between subpopulations but not within. It is arguably more informative to assess HTE in terms of individual treatment effects, which can be defined by using potential outcomes. However, estimation of HTE based on potential outcomes is challenged by the lack of complete identifiability. The paper proposes methods to deal with the identifiability problem by using relevant information in baseline covariates and repeated measurements. If a set of covariates is sufficient for explaining the dependence between potential outcomes, the joint distribution of potential outcomes and hence all measures of HTE will then be identified under a conditional independence assumption. Possible violations of this assumption can be addressed by including a random effect to account for residual dependence or by specifying the conditional dependence structure directly. The methods proposed are shown to reduce effectively the uncertainty about HTE in a trial of human immunodeficiency virus. PMID:25506088

  16. Heterogeneous Effects of Fructose on Blood Lipids in Individuals With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sievenpiper, John L.; Carleton, Amanda J.; Chatha, Sheena; Jiang, Henry Y.; de Souza, Russell J.; Beyene, Joseph; Kendall, Cyril W.C.; Jenkins, David J.A.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Because of blood lipid concerns, diabetes associations discourage fructose at high intakes. To quantify the effect of fructose on blood lipids in diabetes, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of experimental clinical trials investigating the effect of isocaloric fructose exchange for carbohydrate on triglycerides, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol in type 1 and 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library for relevant trials of ≥7 days. Data were pooled by the generic inverse variance method and expressed as standardized mean differences with 95% CI. Heterogeneity was assessed by χ2 tests and quantified by I2. Meta-regression models identified dose threshold and independent predictors of effects. RESULTS Sixteen trials (236 subjects) met the eligibility criteria. Isocaloric fructose exchange for carbohydrate raised triglycerides and lowered total cholesterol under specific conditions without affecting LDL cholesterol or HDL cholesterol. A triglyceride-raising effect without heterogeneity was seen only in type 2 diabetes when the reference carbohydrate was starch (mean difference 0.24 [95% CI 0.05–0.44]), dose was >60 g/day (0.18 [0.00–0.37]), or follow-up was ≤4 weeks (0.18 [0.00–0.35]). Piecewise meta-regression confirmed a dose threshold of 60 g/day (R2 = 0.13)/10% energy (R2 = 0.36). A total cholesterol–lowering effect without heterogeneity was seen only in type 2 diabetes under the following conditions: no randomization and poor study quality (−0.19 [−0.34 to −0.05]), dietary fat >30% energy (−0.33 [−0.52 to −0.15]), or crystalline fructose (−0.28 [−0.47 to −0.09]). Multivariate meta-regression analyses were largely in agreement. CONCLUSIONS Pooled analyses demonstrated conditional triglyceride-raising and total cholesterol–lowering effects of isocaloric fructose exchange for carbohydrate in type 2 diabetes. Recommendations

  17. Accounting for Heterogeneity in Relative Treatment Effects for Use in Cost-Effectiveness Models and Value-of-Information Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Marta O.; Palmer, Stephen; Ades, Anthony E.; Harrison, David; Shankar-Hari, Manu; Rowan, Kathy M.

    2015-01-01

    Cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) models are routinely used to inform health care policy. Key model inputs include relative effectiveness of competing treatments, typically informed by meta-analysis. Heterogeneity is ubiquitous in meta-analysis, and random effects models are usually used when there is variability in effects across studies. In the absence of observed treatment effect modifiers, various summaries from the random effects distribution (random effects mean, predictive distribution, random effects distribution, or study-specific estimate [shrunken or independent of other studies]) can be used depending on the relationship between the setting for the decision (population characteristics, treatment definitions, and other contextual factors) and the included studies. If covariates have been measured that could potentially explain the heterogeneity, then these can be included in a meta-regression model. We describe how covariates can be included in a network meta-analysis model and how the output from such an analysis can be used in a CEA model. We outline a model selection procedure to help choose between competing models and stress the importance of clinical input. We illustrate the approach with a health technology assessment of intravenous immunoglobulin for the management of adult patients with severe sepsis in an intensive care setting, which exemplifies how risk of bias information can be incorporated into CEA models. We show that the results of the CEA and value-of-information analyses are sensitive to the model and highlight the importance of sensitivity analyses when conducting CEA in the presence of heterogeneity. The methods presented extend naturally to heterogeneity in other model inputs, such as baseline risk. PMID:25712447

  18. Effect of a magnetic water treatment on homogeneous and heterogeneous precipitation of calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Fathi, Alimi; Mohamed, Tlili; Claude, Gabrielli; Maurin, Georges; Mohamed, Ben Amor

    2006-06-01

    In this paper are reported experimental results on the effect of a magnetic field on the precipitation process of calcium carbonate scale from a hard water. Carbonically pure water was circulated at a constant flow rate in a magnetic field. After this treatment, calcium carbonate precipitation was induced by degassing dissolved carbonic gas. The nucleation time was identified from the variations of the pH and the Ca(2+) concentration. The ratio between homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation was determined from the measurement of the mass of precipitated calcium carbonate. It is shown that the magnetic treatment increases the total amount of precipitate. This effect depends on the solution pH, the flow rate and the duration of the treatment. In addition, the magnetic treatment modifies the ratio between homogeneous/heterogeneous nucleation. Homogeneous nucleation is promoted by an increasing the pH of water, the flow rate as well as the residence time. The magnetic treatment enhances these effects with a maximum for a 15 min treatment time. It is shown that the presence of calcium carbonate colloid particles is not necessary. It is advanced that the main magnetic effects concern the associations of ionic species which are present in the solution and which are involved in the nucleation process of calcium carbonate precipitation.

  19. Assessment of the effect of reduced compositional heterogeneity on fracture resistance of human cortical bone using finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Demirtas, Ahmet; Curran, Erin; Ural, Ani

    2016-10-01

    The recent reports of atypical femoral fracture (AFF) and its possible association with prolonged bisphosphonate (BP) use highlighted the importance of a thorough understanding of mechanical modifications in bone due to bisphosphonate treatment. The reduced compositional heterogeneity is one of the modifications in bone due to extensive suppression of bone turnover. Although experimental evaluations suggested that compositional changes lead to a reduction in the heterogeneity of elastic properties, there is limited information on the extent of influence of reduced heterogeneity on fracture resistance of cortical bone. As a result, the goal of the current study is to evaluate the influence of varying the number of unique elastic and fracture properties for osteons, interstitial bone, and cement lines on fracture resistance across seven different human cortical bone specimens using finite element modeling. Fracture resistance of seven human cortical bone samples under homogeneous and three different heterogeneous material levels was evaluated using a compact tension test setup. The simulation results predicted that the crack volume was the highest for the models with homogeneous material properties. Increasing heterogeneity resulted in a lower amount of crack volume indicating an increase in fracture resistance of cortical bone. This reduction was observed up to a certain level of heterogeneity after which further beneficial effects of heterogeneity diminished suggesting a possible optimum level of heterogeneity for the bone tissue. The homogeneous models demonstrated limited areas of damage with extensive crack formation. On the other hand, the heterogeneity in the material properties led to increased damage volume and a more variable distribution of damage compared to the homogeneous models. This resulted in uncracked regions which tended to have less damage accumulation preventing extensive crack propagation. The results also showed that the percent osteonal area

  20. Assessment of the effect of reduced compositional heterogeneity on fracture resistance of human cortical bone using finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Demirtas, Ahmet; Curran, Erin; Ural, Ani

    2016-10-01

    The recent reports of atypical femoral fracture (AFF) and its possible association with prolonged bisphosphonate (BP) use highlighted the importance of a thorough understanding of mechanical modifications in bone due to bisphosphonate treatment. The reduced compositional heterogeneity is one of the modifications in bone due to extensive suppression of bone turnover. Although experimental evaluations suggested that compositional changes lead to a reduction in the heterogeneity of elastic properties, there is limited information on the extent of influence of reduced heterogeneity on fracture resistance of cortical bone. As a result, the goal of the current study is to evaluate the influence of varying the number of unique elastic and fracture properties for osteons, interstitial bone, and cement lines on fracture resistance across seven different human cortical bone specimens using finite element modeling. Fracture resistance of seven human cortical bone samples under homogeneous and three different heterogeneous material levels was evaluated using a compact tension test setup. The simulation results predicted that the crack volume was the highest for the models with homogeneous material properties. Increasing heterogeneity resulted in a lower amount of crack volume indicating an increase in fracture resistance of cortical bone. This reduction was observed up to a certain level of heterogeneity after which further beneficial effects of heterogeneity diminished suggesting a possible optimum level of heterogeneity for the bone tissue. The homogeneous models demonstrated limited areas of damage with extensive crack formation. On the other hand, the heterogeneity in the material properties led to increased damage volume and a more variable distribution of damage compared to the homogeneous models. This resulted in uncracked regions which tended to have less damage accumulation preventing extensive crack propagation. The results also showed that the percent osteonal area

  1. How the heterogeneous infection rate effect on the epidemic spreading in activity-driven network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Dun; Li, Dandan; Chen, Chao; Sun, Mei

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we research the impact of the heterogeneous infection rate on the epidemic spread in the activity-driven networks. By using the mean field approximation, the epidemic threshold is theoretically obtained. Several immunization strategies that could curb the epidemic spread are presented. Based on the theoretical analysis and simulation results, we obtain that the epidemic would be prevented effectively if the infection rate strongly correlates with the individual activity. However, if infection rate has a little correlation with the individual activity, most of the individuals may be infected. In addition, the epidemic can be suppressed soon if the individuals with high activity are immunized preferentially.

  2. The effect of surface heterogeneity on the mechanical properties of single wall carbon nanotube carpets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, E. C.; Roth, M. W.

    2010-03-01

    The results presented and discussed involve Material Point Method (MPM) simulations of single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) carpets with varying surface heterogeneity. Specifically, we use deterministic MPM simulations to explore the effect of the degree of randomness of the SWNT array on peeling and adhesive properties as well as the degree clumping of the carpets acting under the constraint of guided motion of the carpet substrate. The bulk elastic properties of the tubes and substrate are taken into account and the system's behavior is characterized through calculations involving dynamics and energetics.

  3. Cementless Titanium Mesh Fixation of Osteoporotic Burst Fractures of the Lumbar Spine Leads to Bony Healing: Results of an Experimental Sheep Model

    PubMed Central

    Roepenack, Paula; Roesner, Jan; Herlyn, Philipp Karl Ewald; Martin, Heiner; Reichel, Martin; Rotter, Robert; Vollmar, Brigitte; Mittlmeier, Thomas; Gradl, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Current treatment strategies for osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) focus on cement-associated solutions. Complications associated with cement application are leakage, embolism, adjacent fractures, and compromise in bony healing. This study comprises a validated VCF model in osteoporotic sheep in order to (1) evaluate a new cementless fracture fixation technique using titanium mesh implants (TMIs) and (2) demonstrate the healing capabilities in osteoporotic VCFs. Methods. Twelve 5-year-old Merino sheep received ovariectomy, corticosteroid injections, and a calcium/phosphorus/vitamin D-deficient diet for osteoporosis induction. Standardized VCFs (type AO A3.1) were created, reduced, and fixed using intravertebral TMIs. Randomly additional autologous spongiosa grafting (G1) or no augmentation was performed (G2, n = 6 each). Two months postoperatively, macroscopic, micro-CT and biomechanical evaluation assessed bony consolidation. Results. Fracture reduction succeeded in all cases without intraoperative complications. Bony consolidation was proven for all cases with increased amounts of callus development for G2 (58.3%). Micro-CT revealed cage integration. Neither group showed improved results with biomechanical testing. Conclusions. Fracture reduction/fixation using TMIs without cement in osteoporotic sheep lumbar VCF resulted in bony fracture healing. Intravertebral application of autologous spongiosa showed no beneficial effects. The technique is now available for clinical use; thus, it offers an opportunity to abandon cement-associated complications. PMID:27019848

  4. Investigating the Effect of Hydraulic Data and Heterogeneity on Stochastic Inversion of a Physically Based Groundwater Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.; Zhang, Y.

    2014-12-01

    This research explores the interactions between data quantity, data quality and heterogeneity resolution on stochastic inversion of a physically based model. To further investigate aquifer heterogeneity, simulations are used to examine the impact of geostatistical models on inversion quality, as well as the spatial sensitivity to heterogeneity using local and global methods. The model domain is a two-dimensional steady-state confined aquifer with lateral flows through two hydrofacies with alternating patterns.To examine general effects, the control variable method was adopted to reveal the impact of three factors on estimated hydraulic conductivity (K) and hydraulic head boundary conditions (BCs): (1) data availability, (2) data error, and (3) characterization of heterogeneity. Results show that fewer data increase model sensitivity to measurement error and heterogeneity. Extremely large data errors can cause severe model deterioration, regardless of sufficient data availability or high resolution representation of heterogeneity. Smaller data errors can alleviate the bias caused by the limited observations. For heterogeneity resolution, once general patterns of geological structures are captured, its influence is minimal compared to the other factors.Next, two geostatistical models (spherical and exponential variograms), were used to explore the representation of heterogeneity under the same nugget effects. The results show that stochastic inversion based on the exponential variogram improves both the precision and accuracy of the inverse model, as compared to the spherical variogram. This difference is particularly important for determining accurate BCs through stochastic inversion.Last, sensitivity analysis was conducted to further investigate the effect of varying the K of each hydrofacies on model inversion. Results from the partial local method show that the inversion is more sensitive to perturbations of K in regions with high heterogeneity. Using the

  5. Homogenization and effective parameters for the Henry problem in heterogeneous formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Held, R.; Attinger, S.; Kinzelbach, W.

    2005-11-01

    General upscaling of density-dependent flow is investigated for the classical two-dimensional Henry problem of saltwater intrusion in coastal aquifers. Combined theoretical and numerical results are here presented. Effective flow and transport parameters for saline intrusions could be derived for statistically isotropic and anisotropic heterogeneous permeability fields by use of homogenization theory, applying also to the preasymptotic regime. Our numerical results indicate that heterogeneities in permeability affect foremost the transient evolution of saltwater intrusion, whereas the steady state saltwater distribution is less sensitive to spatially varying permeabilities and longitudinal dispersion. For the isotropic media the effective permeability is found to correspond to the geometric mean, as under conditions without fluid density contrast. The extension of results to anisotropic media requires nontrivial corrections for the effective permeability, which include the variance of log(k) and the directional correlation lengths. The appropriate dispersion coefficients for the problem correspond to the local dispersion coefficients, rather than macrodispersion coefficients. These results are discussed in light of the specific flow configuration posed in the Henry problem.

  6. Bony wall damage in the region of the middle and posterior cranial fossa observed during otosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Wiatr, Maciej; Składzień, Jacek; Tomik, Jerzy; Stręk, Paweł; Przeklasa-Muszyńska, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Bony wall damages in the region of the middle and posterior cranial fossa are usually observed in cases of chronic otitis media. These defects can also be congenital, post-traumatic, iatrogenic or due to tumors. They can potentially lead to the development of intracranial complications. Material/Methods We analyzed patients who were diagnosed as having bony wall damage in the region of the middle and/or posterior cranial fossa. We also discuss methods of reconstruction during otosurgery. The analysis involves patients who underwent middle ear operations in the Department of Otolaryngology at the Jagiellonian University of Krakow between 2004 and 2008; 495 otosurgeries were performed during this period of time. Results In 70% of patients the reason for otosurgery was chronic otitis media. In 20%, bone defects occurred simultaneously with otosclerosis. Less than 10% underwent otosurgery for other reasons. Bony wall damage in the region of the middle and posterior cranial fossa were diagnosed in 46 patients who underwent surgery. In patients with bony wall damage, otogenic intracranial complications were described in 14 cases. Conclusions The performed reconstruction methods for bony wall damage, which used the fascia, strengthened with the pedicle muscle flap for larger defects and with either bone lamella or cartilage in specific cases, proved successful. Nearly 80% of bony wall damages in the region of the middle and posterior cranial fossa remain asymptomatic and are discovered incidentally during middle ear surgery. The above observations emphasize the significant role of pre-operative imaging diagnostics. PMID:22648242

  7. Effects of Chemical Aging on the Heterogeneous Freezing of Organic Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, K.; Brooks, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    Organic aerosols are emitted into the atmosphere from a variety of sources and display a wide range of effectiveness in promoting the nucleation of ice in clouds. Soot and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS) arise from incomplete combustion and other pollutant sources. Hydrocarbon compounds in diesel motor oil and other fuel blends include compounds such as octacosane (a straight saturated alkane), squalane (a branched saturated alkane) and squalene (an unsaturated branched alkene). At temperatures above -36°C, the formation of ice crystals in the atmosphere is facilitated by heterogeneous freezing processes in which atmospheric aerosols act as ice nuclei (IN). The variability in ability of organic particles to facilitate heterogeneous ice nucleation causes major uncertainties in predictions of aerosol effects on climate. Further, atmospheric aerosol composition and ice nucleation ability can be altered via chemical aging and reactions with atmospheric oxidants such as ozone. In this study, we take a closer look at the role of chemical oxidation on the efficiency of specific IN during contact freezing laboratory experiments. The freezing temperatures of droplets in contact with representative organic aerosols are determined through the use of an optical microscope apparatus equipped with a cooling stage and a digital camera. Chemical changes at the surface of aerosols due to ozone exposure are characterized using Raman Microspectroscopy and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy with Horizontal Attenuated Total Reflectance. Our results indicate that oxidation of certain atmospheric organics (soot and PAHS) enhances their ice nucleation ability. In this presentation, results of heterogeneous nucleation on various types of organic aerosols will be presented, and the role of structure in promoting freezing will be discussed.

  8. Bayesian hierarchical modeling and the integration of heterogeneous information on the effectiveness of cardiovascular therapies.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Heemun; Lewis, Roger J

    2011-11-01

    When making therapeutic decisions for an individual patient or formulating treatment guidelines on a population level, it is often necessary to utilize information arising from different study designs, settings, or treatments. In clinical practice, heterogeneous information is frequently synthesized qualitatively, whereas in comparative effectiveness research and guideline development, it is imperative that heterogeneous data are integrated quantitatively and in a manner that accurately captures the true uncertainty in the results. Bayesian hierarchical modeling is a technique that utilizes all available information from multiple sources and naturally yields a revised estimate of the treatment effect associated with each source. A hierarchical model consists of multiple levels (ie, a hierarchy) of probability distributions that represent relationships between information arising within single populations or trials, as well as relationships between information arising from different populations or trials. We describe the structure of Bayesian hierarchical models and discuss their advantages over simpler models when multiple information sources are relevant. Two examples are presented that illustrate this technique: a meta-analysis of immunosuppressive therapy in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and a subgroup analysis of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Intravenous Tissue Plasminogen Activator Stroke Trial. PMID:22085987

  9. Modeling electrostatic and heterogeneity effects on proton dissociation from humic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tipping, E.; Reddy, M.M.; Hurley, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    The apparent acid dissociation constant of humic substances increases by 2-4 pK units as ionization of the humic carboxylate groups proceeds. This change in apparent acid strength is due in part to the increase in electrical charge on the humic molecules as protons are shed. In addition, proton dissociation reactions are complicated because humic substances are heterogeneous with respect to proton dissociating groups and molecular size. In this paper, we use the Debye-Hu??ckel theory to describe the effects of electrostatic interactions on proton dissociation of humic substances. Simulations show that, for a size-heterogeneous system of molecules, the weight-average molecular weight is preferable to the number-average value for averaging the effects of electrostatic interactions. Analysis of published data on the proton dissociation of fulvic acid from the Suwannee River shows that the electrostatic interactions can be satisfactorily described by a hypothetical homogeneous compound having a molecular weight of 1000 (similar to the experimentally determined weight-average value). Titration data at three ionic strengths, for several fulvic acid concentrations, and in the pH range from 2.9 to 6.4 can be fitted with three adjustable parameters (pK??int values), given information on molecular size and carboxylate group content. ?? 1990 American Chemical Society.

  10. Effects of heterogeneous traffic with speed limit zone on the car accidents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzoug, R.; Lakouari, N.; Bentaleb, K.; Ez-Zahraouy, H.; Benyoussef, A.

    2016-06-01

    Using the extended Nagel-Schreckenberg (NS) model, we numerically study the impact of the heterogeneity of traffic with speed limit zone (SLZ) on the probability of occurrence of car accidents (Pac). SLZ in the heterogeneous traffic has an important effect, typically in the mixture velocities case. In the deterministic case, SLZ leads to the appearance of car accidents even in the low densities, in this region Pac increases with increasing of fraction of fast vehicles (Ff). In the nondeterministic case, SLZ decreases the effect of braking probability Pb in the low densities. Furthermore, the impact of multi-SLZ on the probability Pac is also studied. In contrast with the homogeneous case [X. Li, H. Kuang, Y. Fan and G. Zhang, Int. J. Mod. Phys. C 25 (2014) 1450036], it is found that in the low densities the probability Pac without SLZ (n = 0) is low than Pac with multi-SLZ (n > 0). However, the existence of multi-SLZ in the road decreases the risk of collision in the congestion phase.

  11. Effects of vegetative heterogeneity and patch-scale harvest on energy balance closure and flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, X. F.; Cai, X. H.; Kang, L.; Zhu, T.; Zhang, H. S.

    2009-05-01

    Based on the micrometeorological measurements at a heterogeneous farmland in South China, this work detects the effects of vegetative heterogeneity and patch-scale harvest on the energy balance closure and turbulent fluxes. As a quality control, the integral turbulent characteristics are analyzed in the framework of Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. Spatial representativeness of the measurements is studied in terms of footprint and source area. Firstly, in two wind sectors, the nondimensional standard deviations of turbulent quantities generally agree with some foregoing studies. Discrepancies exist in the other sectors due to the instrument-induced flow distortion. Secondly, energy balance closure is examined with two types of linear regression, which confirms that mismatching source areas between the available energy and turbulent fluxes have no preference to either energy “deficit” or “surplus”. Thirdly, turbulent fluxes exhibit greater variability when they represent smaller source areas. The patch-scale harvest adjacent to the flux mast causes notable increase and decrease in the sensible heat and latent heat fluxes, respectively, while the CO2 exchange almost vanishes after the harvest. Interestingly, energy balance closure is less influenced despite the notable effects on the turbulent fluxes and Bowen ratio, implying that the energy balance closure check may mask some variability in the turbulent fluxes. Thus, to adjust the heat fluxes with a single “closure factor” for a perfect closure is dangerous at a patchy site.

  12. Effects of heterogeneous traffic with speed limit zone on the car accidents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzoug, R.; Lakouari, N.; Bentaleb, K.; Ez-Zahraouy, H.; Benyoussef, A.

    2016-06-01

    Using the extended Nagel-Schreckenberg (NS) model, we numerically study the impact of the heterogeneity of traffic with speed limit zone (SLZ) on the probability of occurrence of car accidents (Pac). SLZ in the heterogeneous traffic has an important effect, typically in the mixture velocities case. In the deterministic case, SLZ leads to the appearance of car accidents even in the low densities, in this region Pac increases with increasing of fraction of fast vehicles (Ff). In the nondeterministic case, SLZ decreases the effect of braking probability Pb in the low densities. Furthermore, the impact of multi-SLZ on the probability Pac is also studied. In contrast with the homogeneous case [X. Li, H. Kuang, Y. Fan and G. Zhang, Int. J. Mod. Phys. C 25 (2014) 1450036], it is found that in the low densities the probability Pac without SLZ (n = 0) is low than Pac with multi-SLZ (n > 0). However, the existence of multi-SLZ in the road decreases the risk of collision in the congestion phase.

  13. Advances in the meta-analysis of heterogeneous clinical trials II: The quality effects model.

    PubMed

    Doi, Suhail A R; Barendregt, Jan J; Khan, Shahjahan; Thalib, Lukman; Williams, Gail M

    2015-11-01

    This article examines the performance of the updated quality effects (QE) estimator for meta-analysis of heterogeneous studies. It is shown that this approach leads to a decreased mean squared error (MSE) of the estimator while maintaining the nominal level of coverage probability of the confidence interval. Extensive simulation studies confirm that this approach leads to the maintenance of the correct coverage probability of the confidence interval, regardless of the level of heterogeneity, as well as a lower observed variance compared to the random effects (RE) model. The QE model is robust to subjectivity in quality assessment down to completely random entry, in which case its MSE equals that of the RE estimator. When the proposed QE method is applied to a meta-analysis of magnesium for myocardial infarction data, the pooled mortality odds ratio (OR) becomes 0.81 (95% CI 0.61-1.08) which favors the larger studies but also reflects the increased uncertainty around the pooled estimate. In comparison, under the RE model, the pooled mortality OR is 0.71 (95% CI 0.57-0.89) which is less conservative than that of the QE results. The new estimation method has been implemented into the free meta-analysis software MetaXL which allows comparison of alternative estimators and can be downloaded from www.epigear.com.

  14. Effects of small-scale heterogeneities on the bulk mechanical properties of sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic ice cover is riddled with cracks, ridges, and melt ponds leading to spatial heterogeneities that manifest as sharp transitions in thickness, porosity, salinity, etc., that in turn affect the bulk mechanical behavior of the ice pack. In regions within and near the marginal ice zone, where ice survives the summer melt and break-up as discrete floes with length scales on the order of hundreds of meters to a kilometer, the freeze up subsequent to the melt season forms a patchwork of thick perennial ice bound together by thinner and smoother first-year ice with a coherence of varying length scales. Remote sensing has shown that the fracture patterns in these patchy ice regions, which may be more representative of marginal ice zone and coastal areas, tend to form in preferential pathways in the thinner ice, therefore modifying the rhomboidal pattern that is characteristic of more homogeneous ice. Using a sea ice model based on the discrete element method (DEM) and remotely sensed images, we examine the effect that heterogeneities in the ice cover have on the derivation of constitutive behavior at scales relevant to climate models by representing the observed heterogeneities explicitly. This model allows us to not only measure the mechanical response of a sample domain, but to also look at the break-up behavior for regions of varying melt pond coverage, thickness, etc. Our hope is that our results can be used to extend existing sea ice rheologies that already incorporate the spatial discontinuities of the ice cover due to lead formation [Moritz & Ukita, 2000; Schreyer et al., 2006; Wilchinsky & Feltham, 2004; Sedlacek et al., 2007].

  15. Effects of heterogeneous wealth distribution on public cooperation with collective risk.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Fu, Feng; Wang, Long

    2010-07-01

    The distribution of wealth among individuals in real society can be well described by the Pareto principle or "80-20 rule." How does such heterogeneity in initial wealth distribution affect the emergence of public cooperation, when individuals, the rich and the poor, engage in a collective-risk enterprise, not to gain a profit but to avoid a potential loss? Here we address this issue by studying a simple but effective model based on threshold public goods games. We analyze the evolutionary dynamics for two distinct scenarios, respectively: one with fair sharers versus defectors and the other with altruists versus defectors. For both scenarios, particularly, we in detail study the dynamics of the population with dichotomic initial wealth-the rich versus the poor. Moreover, we demonstrate the possible steady compositions of the population and provide the conditions for stability of these steady states. We prove that in a population with heterogeneous wealth distribution, richer individuals are more likely to cooperate than poorer ones. Participants with lower initial wealth may choose to cooperate only if all players richer than them are cooperators. The emergence of pubic cooperation largely relies on rich individuals. Furthermore, whenever the wealth gap between the rich and the poor is sufficiently large, cooperation of a few rich individuals can substantially elevate the overall level of social cooperation, which is in line with the well-known Pareto principle. Our work may offer an insight into the emergence of cooperative behavior in real social situations where heterogeneous distribution of wealth among individual is omnipresent.

  16. Effects of heterogeneous wealth distribution on public cooperation with collective risk.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Fu, Feng; Wang, Long

    2010-07-01

    The distribution of wealth among individuals in real society can be well described by the Pareto principle or "80-20 rule." How does such heterogeneity in initial wealth distribution affect the emergence of public cooperation, when individuals, the rich and the poor, engage in a collective-risk enterprise, not to gain a profit but to avoid a potential loss? Here we address this issue by studying a simple but effective model based on threshold public goods games. We analyze the evolutionary dynamics for two distinct scenarios, respectively: one with fair sharers versus defectors and the other with altruists versus defectors. For both scenarios, particularly, we in detail study the dynamics of the population with dichotomic initial wealth-the rich versus the poor. Moreover, we demonstrate the possible steady compositions of the population and provide the conditions for stability of these steady states. We prove that in a population with heterogeneous wealth distribution, richer individuals are more likely to cooperate than poorer ones. Participants with lower initial wealth may choose to cooperate only if all players richer than them are cooperators. The emergence of pubic cooperation largely relies on rich individuals. Furthermore, whenever the wealth gap between the rich and the poor is sufficiently large, cooperation of a few rich individuals can substantially elevate the overall level of social cooperation, which is in line with the well-known Pareto principle. Our work may offer an insight into the emergence of cooperative behavior in real social situations where heterogeneous distribution of wealth among individual is omnipresent. PMID:20866684

  17. Effect of distance-related heterogeneity on population size estimates from point counts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Efford, Murray G.; Dawson, Deanna K.

    2009-01-01

    Point counts are used widely to index bird populations. Variation in the proportion of birds counted is a known source of error, and for robust inference it has been advocated that counts be converted to estimates of absolute population size. We used simulation to assess nine methods for the conduct and analysis of point counts when the data included distance-related heterogeneity of individual detection probability. Distance from the observer is a ubiquitous source of heterogeneity, because nearby birds are more easily detected than distant ones. Several recent methods (dependent double-observer, time of first detection, time of detection, independent multiple-observer, and repeated counts) do not account for distance-related heterogeneity, at least in their simpler forms. We assessed bias in estimates of population size by simulating counts with fixed radius w over four time intervals (occasions). Detection probability per occasion was modeled as a half-normal function of distance with scale parameter sigma and intercept g(0) = 1.0. Bias varied with sigma/w; values of sigma inferred from published studies were often 50% for a 100-m fixed-radius count. More critically, the bias of adjusted counts sometimes varied more than that of unadjusted counts, and inference from adjusted counts would be less robust. The problem was not solved by using mixture models or including distance as a covariate. Conventional distance sampling performed well in simulations, but its assumptions are difficult to meet in the field. We conclude that no existing method allows effective estimation of population size from point counts.

  18. Effect of aquifer heterogeneity on non-pumped, reactive well networks for removing pollutants in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Hudak, Paul F

    2012-06-01

    This purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of heterogeneity in aquifer hydraulic conductivity on configurations of non-pumped wells filled with reactive media for removing contaminant plumes in groundwater. Among one homogeneous and three heterogeneous simulated aquifers, 2-16 wells were necessary to contain a plume, with no clear relationship between degree of heterogeneity and number of wells. Generally, heterogeneous aquifers with initial plumes having broad rather than narrow downgradient margins required more wells and showed greater tendency for plumes to move around wells. Cleanup time increased up to 181 % with degree of heterogeneity in hydraulic conductivity.

  19. Effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Jiannong; Liu, Quan; Li, Xia; Gao, Yang; Jia, Xingcan; Sheng, Jiujiang; Liu, Yangang

    2015-12-01

    The effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events was investigated by analysis of comprehensive measurements of aerosol composition and concentrations [e.g., particular matters (PM2.5), nitrate (NO3), sulfate (SO4), ammonium (NH4)], gas-phase precursors [e.g., nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and ozone (O3)], and relevant meteorological parameters [e.g., visibility and relative humidity (RH)]. The measurements were conducted in Beijing, China from Sep. 07, 2012 to Jan. 16, 2013. The results show that the conversion ratios of N from NOx to nitrate (Nratio) and S from SO2 to sulfate (Sratio) both significantly increased in haze events, suggesting enhanced conversions from NOx and SO2 to their corresponding particle phases in the late haze period. Further analysis shows that Nratio and Sratio increased with increasing RH, with Nratio and Sratio being only 0.04 and 0.03, respectively, when RH < 40%, and increasing up to 0.16 and 0.12 when RH reached 60-80%, respectively. The enhanced conversion ratios of N and S in the late haze period is likely due to heterogeneous aqueous reactions, because solar radiation and thus the photochemical capacity are reduced by the increases in aerosols and RH. This point was further affirmed by the relationships of Nratio and Sratio to O3: the conversion ratios increase with decreasing O3 concentration when O3 concentration is lower than <15 ppb but increased with increasing O3 when O3 concentration is higher than 15 ppb. The results suggest that heterogeneous aqueous reactions likely changed aerosols and their precursors during the haze events: in the beginning of haze events, the precursor gases accumulated quickly due to high emission and low reaction rate; the occurrence of heterogeneous aqueous reactions in the late haze period, together with the accumulated high concentrations of precursor gases such as SO2 and NOx, accelerated the formation of secondary

  20. Effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events

    DOE PAGES

    Quan, Jiannong; Liu, Yangang; Liu, Quan; Li, Xia; Gao, Yang; Jia, Xingcan; Sheng, Jiujiang

    2015-09-30

    In this study, the effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events was investigated by analysis of comprehensive measurements of aerosol composition and concentrations [e.g., particular matters (PM2.5), nitrate (NO3), sulfate (SO4), ammonium (NH4)], gas-phase precursors [e.g., nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and ozone (O3)], and relevant meteorological parameters [e.g., visibility and relative humidity (RH)]. The measurements were conducted in Beijing, China from Sep. 07, 2012 to Jan. 16, 2013. The results show that the conversion ratios of N from NOx to nitrate (Nratio) and S from SO2 to sulfate (Sratio) bothmore » significantly increased in haze events, suggesting enhanced conversions from NOx and SO2 to their corresponding particle phases in the late haze period. Further analysis shows that Nratio and Sratio increased with increasing RH, with Nratio and Sratio being only 0.04 and 0.03, respectively, when RH < 40%, and increasing up to 0.16 and 0.12 when RH reached 60–80%, respectively. The enhanced conversion ratios of N and S in the late haze period is likely due to heterogeneous aqueous reactions, because solar radiation and thus the photochemical capacity are reduced by the increases in aerosols and RH. This point was further affirmed by the relationships of Nratio and Sratio to O3: the conversion ratios increase with decreasing O3 concentration when O3 concentration is lower than <15 ppb but increased with increasing O3 when O3 concentration is higher than 15 ppb. The results suggest that heterogeneous aqueous reactions likely changed aerosols and their precursors during the haze events: in the beginning of haze events, the precursor gases accumulated quickly due to high emission and low reaction rate; the occurrence of heterogeneous aqueous reactions in the late haze period, together with the accumulated high concentrations of precursor gases such as SO2 and NOx, accelerated the

  1. Effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events

    SciTech Connect

    Quan, Jiannong; Liu, Yangang; Liu, Quan; Li, Xia; Gao, Yang; Jia, Xingcan; Sheng, Jiujiang

    2015-09-30

    In this study, the effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events was investigated by analysis of comprehensive measurements of aerosol composition and concentrations [e.g., particular matters (PM2.5), nitrate (NO3), sulfate (SO4), ammonium (NH4)], gas-phase precursors [e.g., nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and ozone (O3)], and relevant meteorological parameters [e.g., visibility and relative humidity (RH)]. The measurements were conducted in Beijing, China from Sep. 07, 2012 to Jan. 16, 2013. The results show that the conversion ratios of N from NOx to nitrate (Nratio) and S from SO2 to sulfate (Sratio) both significantly increased in haze events, suggesting enhanced conversions from NOx and SO2 to their corresponding particle phases in the late haze period. Further analysis shows that Nratio and Sratio increased with increasing RH, with Nratio and Sratio being only 0.04 and 0.03, respectively, when RH < 40%, and increasing up to 0.16 and 0.12 when RH reached 60–80%, respectively. The enhanced conversion ratios of N and S in the late haze period is likely due to heterogeneous aqueous reactions, because solar radiation and thus the photochemical capacity are reduced by the increases in aerosols and RH. This point was further affirmed by the relationships of Nratio and Sratio to O3: the conversion ratios increase with decreasing O3 concentration when O3 concentration is lower than <15 ppb but increased with increasing O3 when O3 concentration is higher than 15 ppb. The results suggest that heterogeneous aqueous reactions likely changed aerosols and their precursors during the haze events: in the beginning of haze events, the precursor gases accumulated quickly

  2. Evidence-Based Medicine, Heterogeneity of Treatment Effects, and the Trouble with Averages

    PubMed Central

    Kravitz, Richard L; Duan, Naihua; Braslow, Joel

    2004-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine is the application of scientific evidence to clinical practice. This article discusses the difficulties of applying global evidence (“average effects” measured as population means) to local problems (individual patients or groups who might depart from the population average). It argues that the benefit or harm of most treatments in clinical trials can be misleading and fail to reveal the potentially complex mixture of substantial benefits for some, little benefit for many, and harm for a few. Heterogeneity of treatment effects reflects patient diversity in risk of disease, responsiveness to treatment, vulnerability to adverse effects, and utility for different outcomes. Recognizing these factors, researchers can design studies that better characterize who will benefit from medical treatments, and clinicians and policymakers can make better use of the results. PMID:15595946

  3. Understanding heterogeneity in the effects of birth weight on adult cognition and wages.

    PubMed

    Justin Cook, C; Fletcher, Jason M

    2015-05-01

    A large economics literature has shown long term impacts of birth weight on adult outcomes, including IQ and earnings that are often robust to sibling or twin fixed effects. We examine potential mechanisms underlying these effects by incorporating findings from the genetics and neuroscience literatures. We use a sample of siblings combined with an "orchids and dandelions hypothesis", where the IQ of genetic dandelions is not affected by in utero nutrition variation but genetic orchids thrive under advantageous conditions and wilt in poor conditions. Indeed, using variation in three candidate genes related to neuroplasticity (APOE, BDNF, and COMT), we find substantial heterogeneity in the associations between birth weight and adult outcomes, where part of the population (i.e., "dandelions") is not affected by birth weight variation. Our results help uncover why birth weight affects adult outcomes. PMID:25770970

  4. Heterogeneous effects of oil shocks on exchange rates: evidence from a quantile regression approach.

    PubMed

    Su, Xianfang; Zhu, Huiming; You, Wanhai; Ren, Yinghua

    2016-01-01

    The determinants of exchange rates have attracted considerable attention among researchers over the past several decades. Most studies, however, ignore the possibility that the impact of oil shocks on exchange rates could vary across the exchange rate returns distribution. We employ a quantile regression approach to address this issue. Our results indicate that the effect of oil shocks on exchange rates is heterogeneous across quantiles. A large US depreciation or appreciation tends to heighten the effects of oil shocks on exchange rate returns. Positive oil demand shocks lead to appreciation pressures in oil-exporting countries and this result is robust across lower and upper return distributions. These results offer rich and useful information for investors and decision-makers. PMID:27516925

  5. Understanding Heterogeneity in the Effects of Birth Weight on Adult Cognition and Wages

    PubMed Central

    Cook, C. Justin; Fletcher, Jason M.

    2015-01-01

    A large economics literature has shown long term impacts of birth weight on adult outcomes, including IQ and earnings that are often robust to sibling or twin fixed effects. We examine potential mechanisms underlying these effects by incorporating findings from the genetics and neuroscience literatures. We use a sample of siblings combined with an “orchids and dandelions hypothesis”, where the IQ of genetic dandelions is not affected by in utero nutrition variation but genetic orchids thrive under advantageous conditions and wilt in poor conditions. Indeed, using variation in three candidate genes related to neuroplasticity (APOE, BDNF, and COMT), we find substantial heterogeneity in the associations between birth weight and adult outcomes, where part of the population (i.e., “dandelions”) is not affected by birth weight variation. Our results help uncover why birth weight affects adult outcomes. PMID:25770970

  6. Heterogeneous effects of oil shocks on exchange rates: evidence from a quantile regression approach.

    PubMed

    Su, Xianfang; Zhu, Huiming; You, Wanhai; Ren, Yinghua

    2016-01-01

    The determinants of exchange rates have attracted considerable attention among researchers over the past several decades. Most studies, however, ignore the possibility that the impact of oil shocks on exchange rates could vary across the exchange rate returns distribution. We employ a quantile regression approach to address this issue. Our results indicate that the effect of oil shocks on exchange rates is heterogeneous across quantiles. A large US depreciation or appreciation tends to heighten the effects of oil shocks on exchange rate returns. Positive oil demand shocks lead to appreciation pressures in oil-exporting countries and this result is robust across lower and upper return distributions. These results offer rich and useful information for investors and decision-makers.

  7. Accounting for strong localized heterogeneities and local transport effect in core calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggieri, J.M.; Doriath, J.Y.; Finck, P.J.; Boyer, R.

    1996-09-01

    Two methods based on the variational nodal transport method have been developed to account for localized heterogeneities and local transport effects in full core calculations. A local mesh refinement technique relies on using the projected partial ingoing surface currents produced during coarse-mesh iterations as boundary conditions for fine-mesh calculations embedded within the coarse-mesh calculations. The outgoing fine-mesh partial currents are averaged to serve in the coarse-mesh iterations. Then, a mixed transport-diffusion method using two levels of angular approximations for the surface partial currents depending on the node considered has been implemented to account for local transport effects in full core diffusion calculations. These methods have been tested for a model of the Superphenix complementary shutdown rods.

  8. Pore and Continuum Scale Study of the Effect of Subgrid Transport Heterogeneity on Redox Reaction Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Liu, Chongxuan; Zhang, Changyong; Yang, Xiaofan; Zachara, John M.

    2015-08-01

    A micromodel system with a pore structure for heterogeneous flow and transport was used to investigate the effect of subgrid transport heterogeneity on redox reaction rates. Hematite reductive dissolution by injecting a reduced form of flavin mononucleotide (FMNH2) at variable flow rates was used as an example to probe the variations of redox reaction rates in different subgrid transport domains. Experiments, pore-scale simulations, and macroscopic modeling were performed to measure and simulate in-situ hematite reduction and to evaluate the scaling behavior of the redox reaction rates from the pore to macroscopic scales. The results indicated that the measured pore-scale rates of hematite reduction were consistent with the predictions from a pore scale reactive transport model. A general trend is that hematite reduction followed reductant transport pathways, starting from the advection-dominated pores toward the interior of diffusion-dominated domains. Two types of diffusion domains were considered in the micromodel: a micropore diffusion domain, which locates inside solid grains or aggregates where reactant transport is limited by diffusion; and a macropore diffusion domain, which locates at wedged, dead-end pore spaces created by the grain-grain contacts. The rate of hematite reduction in the advection-dominated domain was faster than those in the diffusion-controlled domains, and the rate in the macropore diffusion domain was faster than that in the micropore domain. The reduction rates in the advection and macropore diffusion domains increased with increasing flow rate, but were affected by different mechanisms. The rate increase in the advection domain was controlled by the mass action effect as a faster flow supplied more reactants, and the rate increase in the macropore domain was more affected by the rate of mass exchange with the advection domain, which increased with increasing flow rate. The hematite reduction rate in the micropore domain was, however

  9. Effects of geographical heterogeneity in species interactions on the evolution of venom genes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Dan; Olenzek, Amy M; Duda, Thomas F

    2015-04-22

    Geographical heterogeneity in the composition of biotic interactions can create a mosaic of selection regimes that may drive the differentiation of phenotypes that operate at the interface of these interactions. Nonetheless, little is known about effects of these geographical mosaics on the evolution of genes encoding traits associated with species interactions. Predatory marine snails of the family Conidae use venom, a cocktail of conotoxins, to capture prey. We characterized patterns of geographical variation at five conotoxin genes of a vermivorous species, Conus ebraeus, at Hawaii, Guam and American Samoa, and evaluated how these patterns of variation are associated with geographical heterogeneity in prey utilization. All populations show distinct patterns of prey utilization. Three 'highly polymorphic' conotoxin genes showed significant geographical differences in allelic frequency, and appear to be affected by different modes of selection among populations. Two genes exhibited low levels of diversity and a general lack of differentiation among populations. Levels of diversity of 'highly polymorphic' genes exhibit a positive relationship with dietary breadth. The different patterns of evolution exhibited by conotoxin genes suggest that these genes play different roles in prey capture, and that some genes are more greatly affected by differences in predator-prey interactions than others. Moreover, differences in dietary breadth appear to have a greater influence on the differentiation of venoms than differences in the species of prey. PMID:25788600

  10. Effect of Relative Humidity on the OH-Initiated Heterogeneous Oxidation of Monosaccharide Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hanyu; Tinsley, Mark R; Goulay, Fabien

    2015-11-12

    The OH-initiated heterogeneous oxidation of solid methyl β-d-glucopyranoside nanoparticles (a cellulose oligomer surrogate) is studied in an atmospheric pressure gas flow reactor coupled to an aerosol mass spectrometer. The decay of the solid reactant relative concentration is measured as a function of OH exposure over a wide range of ambient relative humidities (RHs). The kinetic traces display an initial fast exponential decay followed by a slower decay. For long OH exposure, the fraction of a particle that reacts decreases from 90% at RH = 30% to 60% at RH = 20% and to 40% at RH = 10%. A computational model based on the diffusion and reaction of the radical, monosaccharide, and water is developed in order to further examine the experimental data. The model parameters and validity are discussed on the basis of previous literature data. The experimental data are consistent with a diffusion-controlled heterogeneous oxidation. These findings are discussed toward a better understanding of mass transport in semisolid organic material and their effect on chemical change, in particular during the thermal transformation of cellulosic materials to useful chemicals. PMID:26473757

  11. Effects of geographical heterogeneity in species interactions on the evolution of venom genes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Dan; Olenzek, Amy M; Duda, Thomas F

    2015-04-22

    Geographical heterogeneity in the composition of biotic interactions can create a mosaic of selection regimes that may drive the differentiation of phenotypes that operate at the interface of these interactions. Nonetheless, little is known about effects of these geographical mosaics on the evolution of genes encoding traits associated with species interactions. Predatory marine snails of the family Conidae use venom, a cocktail of conotoxins, to capture prey. We characterized patterns of geographical variation at five conotoxin genes of a vermivorous species, Conus ebraeus, at Hawaii, Guam and American Samoa, and evaluated how these patterns of variation are associated with geographical heterogeneity in prey utilization. All populations show distinct patterns of prey utilization. Three 'highly polymorphic' conotoxin genes showed significant geographical differences in allelic frequency, and appear to be affected by different modes of selection among populations. Two genes exhibited low levels of diversity and a general lack of differentiation among populations. Levels of diversity of 'highly polymorphic' genes exhibit a positive relationship with dietary breadth. The different patterns of evolution exhibited by conotoxin genes suggest that these genes play different roles in prey capture, and that some genes are more greatly affected by differences in predator-prey interactions than others. Moreover, differences in dietary breadth appear to have a greater influence on the differentiation of venoms than differences in the species of prey.

  12. Nanoparticle-enhanced spectral photoacoustic tomography: effect of oxygen saturation and tissue heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, William C.; Jia, Congxian; Wear, Keith A.; Garra, Brian S.; Pfefer, T. Joshua

    2016-03-01

    Molecular imaging for breast cancer detection, infectious disease diagnostics and preclinical animal research may be achievable through combined use of targeted exogenous agents - such as nanoparticles - and spectral Photoacoustic Tomography (PAT). However, tissue heterogeneity can alter fluence distributions and acoustic propagation, corrupting measured PAT absorption spectra and complicating in vivo nanoparticle detection and quantitation. Highly absorptive vascular structures represent a common confounding factor, and variations in vessel hemoglobin saturation (SO2) may alter spectral content of signals from adjacent/deeper regions. To evaluate the impact of this effect on PAT nanoparticle detectability, we constructed heterogeneous phantoms with well-characterized channel-inclusion geometries and biologically relevant optical and acoustic properties. Phantoms contained an array of tubes at several depths filled with hemoglobin solutions doped with varying concentrations of gold nanorods with an absorption peak at 780 nm. Both overlying and target network SO2 was tuned using sodium dithionite. Phantoms were imaged from 700 to 900 nm using a custom PAT system comprised of a tunable pulsed laser and a research-grade ultrasound system. Recovered nanoparticle spectra were analyzed and compared with results from both spectrophotometry and PAT data from waterimmersed tubes containing blood and nanoparticle solutions. Results suggested that nanoparticle selection for a given PAT application should take into account expected oxygenation states of both target blood vessel and background tissue oxygenation to achieve optimal performance.

  13. Effects of ionization chamber construction on dose measurements in a heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Mauceri, T.; Kase, K.

    1987-07-01

    Traditionally, measurements have been made in heterogeneous phantoms to determine the factors which should be applied to dose calculations, when calculating a dose to a heterogeneous medium. Almost all measurements have relied on relatively thin-walled ion chambers, with no attempt to match ion chamber wall material to the measuring medium. The recent AAPM dosimetry protocol has established that a mismatch between ion chamber wall and phantom material can have an effect on dose measurement. To investigate the affect of this mismatch of ion chamber wall material to phantom material, two parallel-plate ion chambers were constructed. One ion chamber from solid water, for measurements in a solid water phantom and the other from plastic lung material, for measurements in a plastic lung material phantom. Correction factors measured by matching ion chamber to media were compared to correction factors measured by using a thin-walled cavity ion chamber with no regard for matching wall and media for cobalt-60, 6-, 10- and 20-MV photon beams. The results demonstrated that the matching of ion chamber to measuring media can be ignored, provided that a small, approximately tissue-equivalent, thin-walled ion chamber is used for measuring the correction factors.

  14. Effects of heterogeneity and experimental scale on the biodegradation of diesel.

    PubMed

    Davis, Cynthia; Cort, Todd; Dai, Dongping; Illangasekare, Tissa H; Munakata-Marr, Junko

    2003-12-01

    Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbon contamination is a common method for remediating soils and groundwater. Due to complexities with field-scale studies, biodegradation rates are typically evaluated at the bench-scale in laboratory studies. However, important field conditions can be difficult to mimic in the laboratory. This study investigates three scaling factors that can impact laboratory biodegradation rates and that are frequently unaccounted for in typical laboratory experimental procedures. These factors are soil heterogeneity, morphology of petroleum hydrocarbon non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) and soil moisture distribution. The effects of these factors on the biodegradation rate of diesel NAPL is tested under a variety of experimental procedures from well-mixed batch studies to four-foot static soil columns. The results indicate that a high degree of variability results from even small-scale heterogeneities. In addition, it appears that as the experimental scale increases, the measured biodegradation rates slow. The results indicate that diesel biodegradation rates derived from small-scale experiments are not necessarily representative of field-scale biodegradation rates.

  15. Effects of Porous Medium Heterogeneity on Vadose Zone Desiccation: Intermediate-scale Laboratory Experiments and Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Oostrom, Martinus; Freedman, Vicky L.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Dane, Jacob H.; Truex, Michael J.

    2012-11-01

    Soil desiccation (drying), involving water evaporation induced by dry gas injection, is a potentially robust vadose zone remediation process to limit contaminant transport through the vadose zone. A series of four intermediate-scale flow cell experiments was conducted in homogeneous and simple layered heterogeneous porous medium systems to investigate the effects of heterogeneity on desiccation of unsaturated porous media. The permeability ratios of porous medium layers ranged from about five to almost two orders of magnitude. The insulated flow cell was equipped with twenty humidity and temperature sensors and a dual-energy gamma system was used to determine water saturations at various times. The multiphase code STOMP was used to simulate the desiccation process. Results show that injected dry gas flowed predominantly in the higher permeability layer and delayed water removal from the lower permeability material. For the configurations tested, water vapor diffusion from the lower to the higher permeability zone was considerable over the duration of the experiments, resulting in much larger relative humidity values of the outgoing air than based on permeability ratios alone. Acceptable numerical matches with the experimental data were obtained when an extension of the saturation-capillary pressure relation below the residual water saturation was used. The agreements between numerical and experimental results suggest that the correct physics are implemented in the simulator and that the thermal and hydraulic properties of the porous media, flow cell wall and insulation materials were properly represented.

  16. The effect of environmental heterogeneity on RPW8-mediated resistance to powdery mildews in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Jorgensen, Tove H.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims The biotic and abiotic environment of interacting hosts and parasites may vary considerably over small spatial and temporal scales. It is essential to understand how different environments affect host disease resistance because this determines frequency of disease and, importantly, heterogeneous environments can retard direct selection and potentially maintain genetic variation for resistance in natural populations. Methods The effect of different temperatures and soil nutrient conditions on the outcome of infection by a pathogen was quantified in Arabidopsis thaliana. Expression levels of a gene conferring resistance to powdery mildews, RPW8, were compared with levels of disease to test a possible mechanism behind variation in resistance. Key Results Most host genotypes changed from susceptible to resistant across environments with the ranking of genotypes differing between treatments. Transcription levels of RPW8 increased after infection and varied between environments, but there was no tight association between transcription and resistance levels. Conclusions There is a strong potential for a heterogeneous environment to change the resistance capacity of A. thaliana genotypes and hence the direction and magnitude of selection in the presence of the pathogen. Possible causative links between resistance gene expression and disease resistance are discussed in light of the present results on RPW8. PMID:22234559

  17. Response function theories that account for size distribution effects - A review. [mathematical models concerning composite propellant heterogeneity effects on combustion instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, N. S.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents theoretical models developed to account for the heterogeneity of composite propellants in expressing the pressure-coupled combustion response function. It is noted that the model of Lengelle and Williams (1968) furnishes a viable basis to explain the effects of heterogeneity.

  18. Mixing effects on apparent reaction rates and isotope fractionation during denitrification in a heterogeneous aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, C.T.; Böhlke, J.K.; Bekins, B.A.; Phillips, S.P.

    2010-01-01

    Gradients in contaminant concentrations and isotopic compositions commonly are used to derive reaction parameters for natural attenuation in aquifers. Differences between field-scale (apparent) estimated reaction rates and isotopic fractionations and local-scale (intrinsic) effects are poorly understood for complex natural systems. For a heterogeneous alluvial fan aquifer, numerical models and field observations were used to study the effects of physical heterogeneity on reaction parameter estimates. Field measurements included major ions, age tracers, stable isotopes, and dissolved gases. Parameters were estimated for the O2 reduction rate, denitrification rate, O 2 threshold for denitrification, and stable N isotope fractionation during denitrification. For multiple geostatistical realizations of the aquifer, inverse modeling was used to establish reactive transport simulations that were consistent with field observations and served as a basis for numerical experiments to compare sample-based estimates of "apparent" parameters with "true" (intrinsic) values. For this aquifer, non-Gaussian dispersion reduced the magnitudes of apparent reaction rates and isotope fractionations to a greater extent than Gaussian mixing alone. Apparent and true rate constants and fractionation parameters can differ by an order of magnitude or more, especially for samples subject to slow transport, long travel times, or rapid reactions. The effect of mixing on apparent N isotope fractionation potentially explains differences between previous laboratory and field estimates. Similarly, predicted effects on apparent O2 threshold values for denitrification are consistent with previous reports of higher values in aquifers than in the laboratory. These results show that hydrogeological complexity substantially influences the interpretation and prediction of reactive transport. ?? 2010 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. Person Heterogeneity of the BDI-II-C and Its Effects on Dimensionality and Construct Validity: Using Mixture Item Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Pei-Chen; Huang, Tsai-Wei

    2010-01-01

    This study was to apply the mixed Rasch model to investigate person heterogeneity of Beck Depression Inventory-II-Chinese version (BDI-II-C) and its effects on dimensionality and construct validity. Person heterogeneity was reflected by two latent classes that differ qualitatively. Additionally, person heterogeneity adversely affected the…

  20. Effects of lung ventilation–perfusion and muscle metabolism–perfusion heterogeneities on maximal O2 transport and utilization

    PubMed Central

    Cano, I; Roca, J; Wagner, P D

    2015-01-01

    Previous models of O2 transport and utilization in health considered diffusive exchange of O2 in lung and muscle, but, reasonably, neglected functional heterogeneities in these tissues. However, in disease, disregarding such heterogeneities would not be justified. Here, pulmonary ventilation–perfusion and skeletal muscle metabolism–perfusion mismatching were added to a prior model of only diffusive exchange. Previously ignored O2 exchange in non-exercising tissues was also included. We simulated maximal exercise in (a) healthy subjects at sea level and altitude, and (b) COPD patients at sea level, to assess the separate and combined effects of pulmonary and peripheral functional heterogeneities on overall muscle O2 uptake ( and on mitochondrial (). In healthy subjects at maximal exercise, the combined effects of pulmonary and peripheral heterogeneities reduced arterial () at sea level by 32 mmHg, but muscle by only 122 ml min−1 (–3.5%). At the altitude of Mt Everest, lung and tissue heterogeneity together reduced by less than 1 mmHg and by 32 ml min−1 (–2.4%). Skeletal muscle heterogeneity led to a wide range of potential among muscle regions, a range that becomes narrower as increases, and in regions with a low ratio of metabolic capacity to blood flow, can exceed that of mixed muscle venous blood. For patients with severe COPD, peak was insensitive to substantial changes in the mitochondrial characteristics for O2 consumption or the extent of muscle heterogeneity. This integrative computational model of O2 transport and utilization offers the potential for estimating profiles of both in health and in diseases such as COPD if the extent for both lung ventilation–perfusion and tissue metabolism–perfusion heterogeneity is known. PMID:25640017

  1. Distance-to-Agreement Investigation of Tomotherapy's Bony Anatomy-Based Autoregistration and Planning Target Volume Contour-Based Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Steve; Schultheiss, Timothy E.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To compare Tomotherapy's megavoltage computed tomography bony anatomy autoregistration with the best achievable registration, assuming no deformation and perfect knowledge of planning target volume (PTV) location. Methods and Materials: Distance-to-agreement (DTA) of the PTV was determined by applying a rigid-body shift to the PTV region of interest of the prostate from its reference position, assuming no deformations. Planning target volume region of interest of the prostate was extracted from the patient archives. The reference position was set by the 6 degrees of freedom (dof)—x, y, z, roll, pitch, and yaw—optimization results from the previous study at this institution. The DTA and the compensating parameters were calculated by the shift of the PTV from the reference 6-dof to the 4-dof—x, y, z, and roll—optimization. In this study, the effectiveness of Tomotherapy's 4-dof bony anatomy–based autoregistration was compared with the idealized 4-dof PTV contour-based optimization. Results: The maximum DTA (maxDTA) of the bony anatomy-based autoregistration was 3.2 ± 1.9 mm, with the maximum value of 8.0 mm. The maxDTA of the contour-based optimization was 1.8 ± 1.3 mm, with the maximum value of 5.7 mm. Comparison of Pearson correlation of the compensating parameters between the 2 4-dof optimization algorithms shows that there is a small but statistically significant correlation in y and z (0.236 and 0.300, respectively), whereas there is very weak correlation in x and roll (0.062 and 0.025, respectively). Conclusions: We find that there is an average improvement of approximately 1 mm in terms of maxDTA on the PTV going from 4-dof bony anatomy-based autoregistration to the 4-dof contour-based optimization. Pearson correlation analysis of the 2 4-dof optimizations suggests that uncertainties due to deformation and inadequate resolution account for much of the compensating parameters, but pitch variation also makes a statistically significant

  2. Modelling the effect of chemical heterogeneity on acidification and solute leaching in overburden mine spoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerke, Horst H.; Molson, John W.; Frind, Emil O.

    1998-08-01

    The generation of acid mine drainage from overburden spoil piles at open-pit lignite mines is impacting the quality of groundwater and surface water bodies in large parts of the Lusatian mining area in Germany. Values of pH as low as 1 have been observed in the groundwater. After decommissioning, mine pits are generally converted to lakes which may also be acidic owing to the acidic groundwater discharge. The acidic effluent is generated by sulphide oxidation in the unsaturated zone of the spoil pile which generally extends to large depths as a result of dewatering. The long-term evolution of the acidification is still largely unknown. Our research focuses on the effects of physical and chemical heterogeneity caused by mixing of soil materials that may have already been oxidized to different degrees during the deposition of the spoil pile. Processes considered include variably saturated groundwater flow, oxygen diffusion in the soil gas, kinetic pyrite oxidation and acidic effluent generation, advective-dispersive transport of the aqueous components, equilibrium geochemical reactions between the chemical components and the soil minerals, and possible buffering and acid neutralization. Several existing numerical codes were coupled to represent the complete set of processes. Simulations were carried out in one- and two dimensions using representative characteristics of mine spoil piles, with the two-dimensional representation being based on spatially heterogeneous random fields of hydraulic conductivity and sulphide mineral fractions. Results show the long-term evolution of the oxidation front, the mass flux of oxidation products and the effects of system heterogeneity. Under conditions of constant flow, the system is found to return to neutral conditions over a time period on the order of several decades. Further work, including sensitivity analyses with respect to the controlling parameters and model calibration using site-specific field data, will be necessary to

  3. Bony labyrinth shape variation in extant Carnivora: a case study of Musteloidea.

    PubMed

    Grohé, Camille; Tseng, Z Jack; Lebrun, Renaud; Boistel, Renaud; Flynn, John J

    2016-03-01

    The bony labyrinth provides a proxy for the morphology of the inner ear, a primary cognitive organ involved in hearing, body perception in space, and balance in vertebrates. Bony labyrinth shape variations often are attributed to phylogenetic and ecological factors. Here we use three-dimensional (3D) geometric morphometrics to examine the phylogenetic and ecological patterns of variation in the bony labyrinth morphology of the most species-rich and ecologically diversified traditionally recognized superfamily of Carnivora, the Musteloidea (e.g. weasels, otters, badgers, red panda, skunks, raccoons, coatis). We scanned the basicrania of specimens belonging to 31 species using high-resolution X-ray computed micro-tomography (μCT) to virtually reconstruct 3D models of the bony labyrinths. Labyrinth morphology is captured by a set of six fixed landmarks on the vestibular and cochlear systems, and 120 sliding semilandmarks, slid at the center of the semicircular canals and the cochlea. We found that the morphology of this sensory structure is not significantly influenced by bony labyrinth size, in comparisons across all musteloids or in any of the individual traditionally recognized families (Mephitidae, Procyonidae, Mustelidae). PCA (principal components analysis) of shape data revealed that bony labyrinth morphology is clearly distinguishable between musteloid families, and permutation tests of the Kmult statistic confirmed that the bony labyrinth shows a phylogenetic signal in musteloids and in most mustelids. Both the vestibular and cochlear regions display morphological differences among the musteloids sampled, associated with the size and curvature of the semicircular canals, angles between canals, presence or absence of a secondary common crus, degree of lateral compression of the vestibule, orientation of the cochlea relative to the semicircular canals, proportions of the cochlea, and degree of curvature of its turns. We detected a significant ecological signal

  4. Bony labyrinth shape variation in extant Carnivora: a case study of Musteloidea.

    PubMed

    Grohé, Camille; Tseng, Z Jack; Lebrun, Renaud; Boistel, Renaud; Flynn, John J

    2016-03-01

    The bony labyrinth provides a proxy for the morphology of the inner ear, a primary cognitive organ involved in hearing, body perception in space, and balance in vertebrates. Bony labyrinth shape variations often are attributed to phylogenetic and ecological factors. Here we use three-dimensional (3D) geometric morphometrics to examine the phylogenetic and ecological patterns of variation in the bony labyrinth morphology of the most species-rich and ecologically diversified traditionally recognized superfamily of Carnivora, the Musteloidea (e.g. weasels, otters, badgers, red panda, skunks, raccoons, coatis). We scanned the basicrania of specimens belonging to 31 species using high-resolution X-ray computed micro-tomography (μCT) to virtually reconstruct 3D models of the bony labyrinths. Labyrinth morphology is captured by a set of six fixed landmarks on the vestibular and cochlear systems, and 120 sliding semilandmarks, slid at the center of the semicircular canals and the cochlea. We found that the morphology of this sensory structure is not significantly influenced by bony labyrinth size, in comparisons across all musteloids or in any of the individual traditionally recognized families (Mephitidae, Procyonidae, Mustelidae). PCA (principal components analysis) of shape data revealed that bony labyrinth morphology is clearly distinguishable between musteloid families, and permutation tests of the Kmult statistic confirmed that the bony labyrinth shows a phylogenetic signal in musteloids and in most mustelids. Both the vestibular and cochlear regions display morphological differences among the musteloids sampled, associated with the size and curvature of the semicircular canals, angles between canals, presence or absence of a secondary common crus, degree of lateral compression of the vestibule, orientation of the cochlea relative to the semicircular canals, proportions of the cochlea, and degree of curvature of its turns. We detected a significant ecological signal

  5. Cortical tibial osteoperiosteal flap technique to achieve bony bridge in transtibial amputation: experience in nine adult patients.

    PubMed

    Mongon, Mauricio Leal; Piva, Felipe Alberto; Mistro Neto, Sylvio; Carvalho, Jose Andre; Belangero, William Dias; Livani, Bruno

    2013-04-01

    Amputation, especially of the lower limbs, is a surgical procedure that gives excellent results when conducted under the appropriate conditions. In 1949 Ertl developed a technique for transtibial osteomyoplastic amputation which restored the intraosseous pressure through canal obliteration and expanded the area of terminal support through a bony bridge between the fibula and distal tibia. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a modification of the original Ertl's technique in which a cortical osteoperiosteal flap created from the tibia is used to form a bony bridge during transtibial amputation in adults. Nine patients underwent leg amputations with the cortical tibial osteoperiosteal flap technique for reconstruction of the stump. The average duration of follow-up was 30.8 (range, 18-41) months. The post-surgery examination included a clinical examination and radiography. A 6-min walk test (Enright in Respir Care 48(8):783-785, 2003) was performed in the 32nd week after amputation. At 24th week post-surgery, all patients had stumps that were painless and able to bear full weight through the end. The creation of a cortical osteoperiosteal flap from the tibia to the fibula during transtibial amputation is a safe and effective technique that provides a strong and painless terminal weight-bearing stump. This constitutes a useful option for young patients, athletes, and patients with high physical demands. PMID:23371841

  6. Geometric effects of global lateral heterogeneity on long-period surface wave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lay, T.; Kanamori, H.

    1985-01-01

    The present investigation has the objective to document examples of anomalous long-period surface wave amplitude behavior and to provide a preliminary appraisal of the effects of global lateral heterogeneity on surface wave propagation from a ray theory perspective. Attention is given to remarkable long-period surface wave anomalies described in literature, an equidistance azimuthal plot centered on the Iranian source region, Rayleigh wave and Love wave spectra for the 256-s period arrivals for the Tabas earthquake, constrained moment tensor and fault model inversion solutions ofr Iranian earthquakes, aspects of surface wave ray tracing, and a table of Rayleigh wave amplitude anomalies for Iranian earthquakes. Surface wave ray-tracing calculations for models of global phase velocity variations proposed by Nakanishi and Anderson (1984) are found to show that large-amplitude anomalies will be observed for Love and Rayleigh waves with periods of 100-250 s.

  7. Heterogeneous reactivity effects in medium- and high-enriched uranium metal-water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenwalter, J.J.

    1997-07-01

    The effect of heterogeneity on reactivity of low-, medium-, and high-enriched, water-moderated uranium metal systems has been examined for various hydrogen-to-fissile (H/X) ratios using the CSAS1X sequence in SCALE and MCNP. For the calculations, an infinite array of close-packed unit cells was modeled which consisted of centered uranium metal spheres surrounded by water. The enrichments used correspond to the average enrichments of fragmented fuel plates in three proposed waste shipments from Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The analysis performed to obtain peak reactivity for each enrichment as a function of particle size and H/X ratio led to the development of the topic discussed in this paper.

  8. Effects of tissue heterogeneity on the optical estimate of breast density

    PubMed Central

    Taroni, Paola; Pifferi, Antonio; Quarto, Giovanna; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Torricelli, Alessandro; Abbate, Francesca; Balestreri, Nicola; Ganino, Serena; Menna, Simona; Cassano, Enrico; Cubeddu, Rinaldo

    2012-01-01

    Breast density is a recognized strong and independent risk factor for developing breast cancer. At present, breast density is assessed based on the radiological appearance of breast tissue, thus relying on the use of ionizing radiation. We have previously obtained encouraging preliminary results with our portable instrument for time domain optical mammography performed at 7 wavelengths (635–1060 nm). In that case, information was averaged over four images (cranio-caudal and oblique views of both breasts) available for each subject. In the present work, we tested the effectiveness of just one or few point measurements, to investigate if tissue heterogeneity significantly affects the correlation between optically derived parameters and mammographic density. Data show that parameters estimated through a single optical measurement correlate strongly with mammographic density estimated by using BIRADS categories. A central position is optimal for the measurement, but its exact location is not critical. PMID:23082283

  9. Large scale effects of localized physical heterogeneity on environmental processes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomann, E.; Appuhamillage, T.; Bokil, V. A.; Waymire, E. C.; Wood, B. D.

    2010-12-01

    Fragmented or network like environments serve as examples of spatial domains in which sharp discontinuities in some of the physical/biological characteristics are naturally encountered. Modeling dispersion in such environments require a careful understanding of the relevant physical/biological processes to capture the appropriate interface conditions and can lead to surprising consequences in the structure of basic quantities of interest to environmental scientists. In this talk, a survey of examples will be presented. A feature common to these examples is that the mathematical modeling leads to partial differential equations with discontinuous coefficients. The conditions on the interface depend on the particular application affecting the behavior of physically relevant quantities. Examples from hydrology, ecology and physical oceanography will be presented to illustrate these concepts and present recent related results on effects of sharp heterogeneity. This talk is based on joint work with Thilanka Appuhamilage, Vrushali Bokil, Ed Waymire and Brian Wood.

  10. The Effects of Subsurface Heterogeneity on Detectability of CO2 Leakage to Shallow Groundwater Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolaver, B. D.; Sun, A. Y.; Nicot, J.; Hovorka, S. D.; Nuñez-Lopez, V.; Young, M.

    2011-12-01

    Numerical simulations of CO2 storage reservoir leakage can be used to assess risks of shallow groundwater aquifer contamination during monitoring network design. Improperly plugged and abandoned wells are well known to represent one of the greatest risks to successful containment at geologic carbon sequestration sites. Casing and cement seal failure of wells penetrating the confining layer may create fast-flow pathways for CO2 and brine migration from the storage reservoir into the shallow subsurface. To protect drinking water aquifers from possible leaks, injection permits require identification of artificial penetrations and evaluation that wells are adequately plugged and abandoned. However, assumptions made during well evaluation may overlook the likelihood of well failure leading to a leak into an aquifer. We present a monitoring approach that provides quick and accurate detection in the event of a leak to an aquifer. Sand and shale facies are classified to simulate aquifer heterogeneity using representative borehole geophysical data from Texas, U.S.A. Gulf Coast Aquifer System wells. Numerical models simulate pressure perturbations in response to a leak to an aquifer overlying a storage reservoir. Candidate monitoring well locations for a possible leak of randomly selected location are chosen from a suite of possible wells based on the detectability of CO2 leakage from the groundwater model. We first show that the locations and magnitudes of leakage can be identified for homogeneous aquifers by using an inversion procedure and pressure observations. We then consider the effects of conceptual model uncertainty, pressure measurement error, and background noise on detectability of leaky wells. While substantial previous work quantified pressure perturbations caused by leaky wells using analytical solutions or simple numerical model configurations, the effects of formation heterogeneity on pressure perturbation and other uncertain factors are not well examined

  11. Heterogeneous reactions of surface-adsorbed catechol with nitrogen dioxide: substrate effects for tropospheric aerosol surrogates.

    PubMed

    Woodill, Laurie A; Hinrichs, Ryan Z

    2010-09-28

    Surface-adsorbed organics can alter the chemistry of tropospheric aerosols thereby impacting photochemical cycles and altering aerosol properties. The nature of the surface can also influence the chemistry of the surface-adsorbed organic. We employed diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) to monitor the adsorption of gaseous catechol on several tropospheric aerosol surrogates and to investigate the subsequent reactivity of adsorbed catechol with nitrogen dioxide. The dark heterogeneous reaction of NO(2) with NaCl-adsorbed catechol produced 4-nitrocatechol, 1,2-benzoquinone, and the ring-cleaved product muconic acid, with product yields of 88%, 8%, and 4% at relative humidity (RH) < 2%, respectively. The reaction was first-order with respect to both catechol and NO(2). The reactive uptake coefficient for NO(2) + NaCl-adsorbed catechol increased from 3 x 10(-6) at <2% RH to 7 x 10(-6) at 30% RH. These reactions were more than two orders of magnitude more reactive than NaCl without adsorbed catechol. The 4-nitrocatechol product yield was enhanced on NaF, while NaBr-adsorbed catechol produced considerably more 1,2-benzoquinone and muconic acid. This substrate effect is discussed in terms of each substrate's ability to polarize the phenol group and hinder hydrogen atom abstraction from intermediate o-semiquinone radicals. These dark heterogeneous reactions may alter the UV-visible absorbing properties of tropospheric aerosols and may also contribute as a dark source of NO(2)(-)/HONO. These results contrast prior observations which found pure catechol thin films unreactive with NO(2), highlighting the need to specifically consider substrate and matrix effects in laboratory systems.

  12. Low effect of young afforestations on bird communities inhabiting heterogeneous Mediterranean cropland

    PubMed Central

    Rey Benayas, José M.; Carrascal, Luis M.

    2015-01-01

    Afforestation programs such as the one promoted by the EU Common Agricultural Policy have spread tree plantations on former cropland. These afforestations attract generalist forest and ubiquitous species but may cause severe damage to open habitat species, especially birds of high conservation value. We investigated the effects of young (<20 yr) tree plantations dominated by pine P. halepensis on bird communities inhabiting the adjacent open farmland habitat in central Spain. We hypothesize that pine plantations located at shorter distances from open fields and with larger surface would affect species richness and conservation value of bird communities. Regression models controlling for the influence of land use types around plantations revealed positive effects of higher distance to pine plantation edge on community species richness in winter, and negative effects on an index of conservation concern (SPEC) during the breeding season. However, plantation area did not have any effect on species richness or community conservation value. Our results indicate that the effects of pine afforestation on bird communities inhabiting Mediterranean cropland are diluted by heterogeneous agricultural landscapes. PMID:26664801

  13. Low effect of young afforestations on bird communities inhabiting heterogeneous Mediterranean cropland.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Oliver, Juan S; Rey Benayas, José M; Carrascal, Luis M

    2015-01-01

    Afforestation programs such as the one promoted by the EU Common Agricultural Policy have spread tree plantations on former cropland. These afforestations attract generalist forest and ubiquitous species but may cause severe damage to open habitat species, especially birds of high conservation value. We investigated the effects of young (<20 yr) tree plantations dominated by pine P. halepensis on bird communities inhabiting the adjacent open farmland habitat in central Spain. We hypothesize that pine plantations located at shorter distances from open fields and with larger surface would affect species richness and conservation value of bird communities. Regression models controlling for the influence of land use types around plantations revealed positive effects of higher distance to pine plantation edge on community species richness in winter, and negative effects on an index of conservation concern (SPEC) during the breeding season. However, plantation area did not have any effect on species richness or community conservation value. Our results indicate that the effects of pine afforestation on bird communities inhabiting Mediterranean cropland are diluted by heterogeneous agricultural landscapes.

  14. Low effect of young afforestations on bird communities inhabiting heterogeneous Mediterranean cropland.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Oliver, Juan S; Rey Benayas, José M; Carrascal, Luis M

    2015-01-01

    Afforestation programs such as the one promoted by the EU Common Agricultural Policy have spread tree plantations on former cropland. These afforestations attract generalist forest and ubiquitous species but may cause severe damage to open habitat species, especially birds of high conservation value. We investigated the effects of young (<20 yr) tree plantations dominated by pine P. halepensis on bird communities inhabiting the adjacent open farmland habitat in central Spain. We hypothesize that pine plantations located at shorter distances from open fields and with larger surface would affect species richness and conservation value of bird communities. Regression models controlling for the influence of land use types around plantations revealed positive effects of higher distance to pine plantation edge on community species richness in winter, and negative effects on an index of conservation concern (SPEC) during the breeding season. However, plantation area did not have any effect on species richness or community conservation value. Our results indicate that the effects of pine afforestation on bird communities inhabiting Mediterranean cropland are diluted by heterogeneous agricultural landscapes. PMID:26664801

  15. Antral bony wall erosion, trigeminal nerve injury, and enophthalmos after root canal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Eduardo; Antunes, Luís; Dinis, Paulo Borges

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The frequently used irrigant in dental surgery, sodium hypochlorite, is occasionally the cause of minor, usually circumscribed, adverse effects. Severe, extensive complications, with lasting sequelae, however, also can occur, as in the case we report herein. Case Report: A 55-year-old woman underwent an endodontic procedure on a maxillary molar, whose roots, unknown to the surgeon, were protruding into the maxillary sinus. After sodium hypochlorite root canal irrigation, the patient immediately developed intense facial pain, facial edema, and periorbital cellulitis. An emergency department evaluation diagnosed an intense inflammatory disease of the maxillary sinus, with significant destruction of its bony walls, accompanied by midface paraesthesia due to infraorbital nerve injury. In the following weeks, the patient slowly developed enophthalmos due to bone erosion of the orbit floor. Treatment, besides prolonged oral steroids, required the endoscopic endonasal opening of the maxillary sinus for profuse irrigation. Two years later, the patient maintained a complete loss of function of the maxillary sinus, anesthesia-paraesthesia of the midface, and inferior dystonia of the eye with an enophthalmos. Conclusion: Dentists, maxillofacial surgeons, and otorhinolaryngologists should all be aware of the whole spectrum of complications of even the simplest dental work. Sodium hypochlorite irrigations should be used cautiously in root canal surgery, with the full awareness of its potential for causing soft-tissue damage. PMID:27465790

  16. Allocating Sample Sizes to Reduce Budget for Fixed-Effect 2×2 Heterogeneous Analysis of Variance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luh, Wei-Ming; Guo, Jiin-Huarng

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the sample size requirements for the interaction, row, and column effects, respectively, by forming a linear contrast for a 2×2 factorial design for fixed-effects heterogeneous analysis of variance. The proposed method uses the Welch t test and its corresponding degrees of freedom to calculate the final sample size in a…

  17. Effects of hardware heterogeneity on the performance of SVM Alzheimer's disease classifier.

    PubMed

    Abdulkadir, Ahmed; Mortamet, Bénédicte; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Jack, Clifford R; Krueger, Gunnar; Klöppel, Stefan

    2011-10-01

    Fully automated machine learning methods based on structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data can assist radiologists in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). These algorithms require large data sets to learn the separation of subjects with and without AD. Training and test data may come from heterogeneous hardware settings, which can potentially affect the performance of disease classification. A total of 518 MRI sessions from 226 healthy controls and 191 individuals with probable AD from the multicenter Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) were used to investigate whether grouping data by acquisition hardware (i.e. vendor, field strength, coil system) is beneficial for the performance of a support vector machine (SVM) classifier, compared to the case where data from different hardware is mixed. We compared the change of the SVM decision value resulting from (a) changes in hardware against the effect of disease and (b) changes resulting simply from rescanning the same subject on the same machine. Maximum accuracy of 87% was obtained with a training set of all 417 subjects. Classifiers trained with 95 subjects in each diagnostic group and acquired with heterogeneous scanner settings had an empirical detection accuracy of 84.2±2.4% when tested on an independent set of the same size. These results mirror the accuracy reported in recent studies. Encouragingly, classifiers trained on images acquired with homogenous and heterogeneous hardware settings had equivalent cross-validation performances. Two scans of the same subject acquired on the same machine had very similar decision values and were generally classified into the same group. Higher variation was introduced when two acquisitions of the same subject were performed on two scanners with different field strengths. The variation was unbiased and similar for both diagnostic groups. The findings of the study encourage the pooling of data from different sites to increase the number of

  18. Effect of meter-scale heterogeneities inside 67P nucleus on CONSERT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarletti, Valérie; Lasue, Jérémie; Lemonnier, Florentin; Kofman, Wlodek; Levasseur-Regourd, Anny-Chantal; Herique, Alain; Guiffaut, Christophe

    2016-10-01

    Since their arrival at comet 67P in August 2014, a number of instruments onboard Rosetta's main spacecraft and Philae lander have been observing the surface of the nucleus and revealed details of amazing surficial structures (hundreds of meters deep pits and cliffs, surface roughness of the order of a couple of meters in size, non-continuous apparent layers on both lobes of the comet). After two years of observations, the activity of the comet has also been better constrained, while the origin of sporadic jet activities remains debated. This surficial information is complemented by relevant measurements assessing the nucleus internal structure that have been collected by the CONSERT (Comet Nucleus Sounding Experiment by Radiowave Transmission) experiment in order to constrain the nucleus formation and evolution.The CONSERT experiment is a bistatic radar with receivers and transmitters on-board both Rosetta's main spacecraft and the Philae lander. The instrument transmits electromagnetic waves at 90 MHz (10 MHz bandwidth) between Philae and Rosetta. The signal propagated through the small lobe of 67P over distances ranging from approximately 200 to 800 meters depending on the spacecraft location and probed a maximum depth of about one hundred meters in the vicinity of the final landing site Abydos. The CONSERT data have been used to obtain an estimate of the permittivity mean value. Thanks to the 10 MHz frequency bandwidth of the signal used by the instrument, a spatial resolution around 10m is obtained inside the sounded volume of the nucleus.In this work, we analyze the effect of internal heterogeneities of 67P on the CONSERT data by simulating the propagation of the signal through a fractal model of the comet interior. We considered for the simulations a range of realistic permittivity values and characteristic sizes of the material heterogeneities. The different parameters values used have an impact on the width of the signal propagating through the modeled

  19. Severe bony ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint on one side and contralateral adhesion: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong-Gon; Choi, Hang-Moon; Kim, Hyun Jung

    2015-01-01

    Bony fusion between the mandibular condyle and skull base involves temporomandibular joint (TMJ) bony ankylosis. This condition might originate from trauma, infection, or systemic disease. TMJ adhesion can develop after synovial damage. Both TMJ ankylosis and adhesion lead to functional impairment and pain. Here, we present a case of a 50-year-old female who had bony ankylosis of the right TMJ and adhesion of the left TMJ. She had otitis media in the right ear. A large mass in the right TMJ was observed on computed tomograph. Magnetic resonance image showed a large fused bone mass with normal bone marrow in the right TMJ and flattening of the condyle with a thin disk in the left TMJ. Gap arthroplasty with temporal fascia was performed on the right TMJ, and discectomy, high condylectomy, and coronoidectomy were performed on the left TMJ. During a 2-year follow-up after surgery, the patient had no recurrence. PMID:26125005

  20. [Bony regrowth after major erosion of the maxillary following silastic malar augmentation. Case report].

    PubMed

    Salmin, J-P; Wilk, A; Barrière, P

    2012-06-01

    Alloplastic malar augmentation has become a routine procedure associated with few complications. Among them, authors have described bony erosion and resorption. The case presented here illustrates an unusual case of maxillary bone erosion after silastic malar augmentation. Implants were surgically removed and no more surgical intervention was performed. After 15 months, contrast-enhanced CT scan has showed nearly complete bony regrowth to an almost normal state. Considering resorption phenomenons following silastic chin implants, Peled et al. reported no long-term sequellae after implant removal and bony regrowth to the presurgical state after 9 months. Accordingly, we conclude that these phenomenons, even spectacular, are always reversible after implants removal and that treatment should just consist in ablation of the offending prosthetic material.

  1. Effects of heterogeneities on capillary pressure-saturation-relative permeability relationships.

    PubMed

    Ataie-Ashtiani, Behzad; Hassanizadeh, S Majid; Celia, Michael A

    2002-06-01

    In theories of multiphase flow through porous media, capillary pressure-saturation and relative permeability-saturation curves are assumed to be intrinsic properties of the medium. Moreover, relative permeability is assumed to be a scalar property. However, numerous theoretical and experimental works have shown that these basic assumptions may not be valid. For example, relative permeability is known to be affected by the flow velocity (or pressure gradient) at which the measurements are carried out. In this article, it is suggested that the nonuniqueness of capillary pressure-relative permeability-saturation relationships is due to the presence of microheterogeneities within a laboratory sample. In order to investigate this hypothesis, a large number of "numerical experiments" are carried out. A numerical multiphase flow model is used to simulate the procedures that are commonly used in the laboratory for the measurement of capillary pressure and relative permeability curves. The dimensions of the simulation domain are similar to those of a typical laboratory sample (a few centimeters in each direction). Various combinations of boundary conditions and soil heterogeneity are simulated and average capillary pressure, saturation, and relative permeability for the "soil sample" are obtained. It is found that the irreducible water saturation is a function of the capillary number; the smaller the capillary number, the larger the irreducible water saturation. Both drainage and imbibition capillary pressure curves are found to be strongly affected by heterogeneities and boundary conditions. Relative permeability is also found to be affected by the boundary conditions; this is especially true about the nonaqueous phase permeability. Our results reveal that there is much need for laboratory experiments aimed at investigating the interplay of boundary conditions and microheterogeneities and their effect on capillary pressure and relative permeability.

  2. Effect of heterogeneity on enhanced reductive dechlorination: Analysis of remediation efficiency and groundwater acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovelli, A.; Lacroix, E.; Robinson, C. E.; Gerhard, J.; Holliger, C.; Barry, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    Enhanced reductive dehalogenation is an attractive in situ treatment technology for chlorinated contaminants. The process includes two acid-forming microbial reactions: fermentation of an organic substrate resulting in short-chain fatty acids, and dehalogenation resulting in hydrochloric acid. The accumulation of acids and the resulting drop of groundwater pH are controlled by the mass and distribution of chlorinated solvents in the source zone, type of electron donor, alternative terminal electron acceptors available and presence of soil mineral phases able to buffer the pH (such as carbonates). Groundwater acidification may reduce or halt microbial activity, and thus dehalogenation, significantly increasing the time and costs required to remediate the aquifer. In previous work a detailed geochemical and groundwater flow simulator able to model the fermentation-dechlorination reactions and associated pH change was developed. The model accounts for the main processes influencing microbial activity and groundwater pH, including the groundwater composition, the electron donor used and soil mineral phase interactions. In this study, the model was applied to investigate how spatial variability occurring at the field scale affects dechlorination rates, groundwater pH and ultimately the remediation efficiency. Numerical simulations were conducted to examine the influence of heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity on the distribution of the injected, fermentable substrate and on the accumulation/dilution of the acidic products of reductive dehalogenation. The influence of the geometry of the DNAPL source zone was studied, as well as the spatial distribution of soil minerals. The results of this study showed that the heterogeneous distribution of the soil properties have a potentially large effect on the remediation efficiency. For examples, zones of high hydraulic conductivity can prevent the accumulation of acids and alleviate the problem of groundwater acidification. The

  3. Peripheral Dose Heterogeneity Due to the Thread Effect in Total Marrow Irradiation With Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yutaka; Verneris, Michael R.; Dusenbery, Kathryn E.; Wilke, Christopher T.; Storme, Guy; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Hui, Susanta K.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To report potential dose heterogeneity leading to underdosing at different skeletal sites in total marrow irradiation (TMI) with helical tomotherapy due to the thread effect and provide possible solutions to reduce this effect. Methods and Materials: Nine cases were divided into 2 groups based on patient size, defined as maximum left-to-right arm distance (mLRD): small mLRD (≤47 cm) and large mLRD (>47 cm). TMI treatment planning was conducted by varying the pitch and modulation factor while a jaw size (5 cm) was kept fixed. Ripple amplitude, defined as the peak-to-trough dose relative to the average dose due to the thread effect, and the dose–volume histogram (DVH) parameters for 9 cases with various mLRD was analyzed in different skeletal regions at off-axis (eg, bones of the arm or femur), at the central axis (eg, vertebrae), and planning target volume (PTV), defined as the entire skeleton plus 1-cm margin. Results: Average ripple amplitude for a pitch of 0.430, known as one of the magic pitches that reduce thread effect, was 9.2% at 20 cm off-axis. No significant differences in DVH parameters of PTV, vertebrae, or femur were observed between small and large mLRD groups for a pitch of ≤0.287. Conversely, in the bones of the arm, average differences in the volume receiving 95% and 107% dose (V95 and V107, respectively) between large and small mLRD groups were 4.2% (P=.016) and 16% (P=.016), respectively. Strong correlations were found between mLRD and ripple amplitude (rs=.965), mLRD and V95 (rs=−.742), and mLRD and V107 (rs=.870) of bones of the arm. Conclusions: Thread effect significantly influences DVH parameters in the bones of the arm for large mLRD patients. By implementing a favorable pitch value and adjusting arm position, peripheral dose heterogeneity could be reduced.

  4. Peripheral dose heterogeneity due to the thread effect in total marrow irradiation with helical tomotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Yutaka; Verneris, Michael R.; Dusenbery, Kathryn; Wilke, Christopher; Storme, Guy; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Hui, Susanta K

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To report potential dose heterogeneity leading to underdosing at different skeletal sites in total marrow irradiation (TMI) with helical tomotherapy due to the thread effect, and provide possible solutions to reduce this effect. Methods and Materials Nine cases were divided into two groups based on patientsize, defined as maximum left-to-right arm distance (mLRD): small mLRD (≤47 cm) and large mLRD (> 47 cm). TMI treatment planning was conducted by varying the pitch and modulation factor while a jaw size (5 cm) was kept fixed. Ripple amplitude, defined as the peak-to-trough dose relative to the average dose due to the thread effect, and the DVH parameters for 9 cases with various mLRD was analyzed in different skeletal regions at off-axis (e.g. bones of the arm, or femur), at the central axis (e.g. vertebrae), and PTV, defined as the entire skeleton plus 1 cm margin. Results Average ripple amplitude for a pitch of 0.430, known as one of the magic pitches that reduce thread effect, was 9.2% at 20 cm off-axis. No significant differences in DVH parameters of PTV, vertebrae, or femur were observed between small and large mLRD groups for a pitch of ≤0.287. Conversely, in the bones of the arm, average differences in the volume receiving 95% and 107% dose (V95, and V107, respectively) between large and small mLRD groups were 4.2% (p=0.016), and 16% (p=0.016), respectively. Strong correlations were found between mLRD and ripple amplitude (rs=0.965), mLRD and V95 (rs=−0.742), and mLRD and V107 (rs=0.870) of bones of the arm. Conclusions Thread effect significantly influences DVH parameters in the bones of the arm for large mLRD patients. By implementing a favorable pitch value and adjusting arm position, peripheral dose heterogeneity could be reduced. PMID:24011657

  5. Effects of Heterogeneities, Sampling Frequencies, Tools and Methods on Uncertainties in Subsurface Contaminant Concentration Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezzedine, S. M.; McNab, W. W.

    2007-12-01

    Long-term monitoring (LTM) is particularly important for contaminants which are mitigated by natural processes of dilution, dispersion, and degradation. At many sites, LTM can require decades of expensive sampling at tens or even hundreds of existing monitoring wells, resulting in hundreds of thousands, or millions of dollars per year for sampling and data management. Therefore, contaminant sampling tools, methods and frequencies are chosen to minimize waste and data management costs while ensuring a reliable and informative time-history of contaminant measurement for regulatory compliance. The interplay play between cause (i.e. subsurface heterogeneities, sampling techniques, measurement frequencies) and effect (unreliable data and measurements gap) has been overlooked in many field applications which can lead to inconsistencies in time- histories of contaminant samples. In this study we address the relationship between cause and effect for different hydrogeological sampling settings: porous and fractured media. A numerical model has been developed using AMR-FEM to solve the physicochemical processes that take place in the aquifer and the monitoring well. In the latter, the flow is governed by the Navier-Stokes equations while in the former the flow is governed by the diffusivity equation; both are fully coupled to mimic stressed conditions and to assess the effect of dynamic sampling tool on the formation surrounding the monitoring well. First of all, different sampling tools (i.e., Easy Pump, Snapper Grab Sampler) were simulated in a monitoring well screened in different homogeneous layered aquifers to assess their effect on the sampling measurements. Secondly, in order to make the computer runs more CPU efficient the flow in the monitoring well was replaced by its counterpart flow in porous media with infinite permeability and the new model was used to simulate the effect of heterogeneities, sampling depth, sampling tool and sampling frequencies on the

  6. Effects of the Heterogeneity in the Electron Beam Welded Joint on Mechanical Properties of Ti6Al4V Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Gao, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Lin-Jie; Zhang, Jian-Xun

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the effect of microstructure heterogeneity on the tensile and low cycle fatigue properties of electron beam welded (EBW) Ti6Al4V sheets. To achieve this goal, the tensile and low cycle fatigue property in the EBW joints and base metal (BM) specimens is compared. During the tensile testing, digital image correlation technology was used to measure the plastic strain field evolution within the specimens. The experimental results showed that the tensile ductility and low cycle fatigue strength of EBW joints are lower than that of BM specimens, mainly because of the effect of microstructure heterogeneity of the welded joint. Moreover, the EBW joints exhibit the cyclic hardening behavior during low fatigue process, while BM specimens exhibit the cyclic softening behavior. Compared with the BM specimens with uniform microstructure, the heterogeneity of microstructure in the EBW joint is found to decrease the mechanical properties of welded joint.

  7. Congenital complex corneal choristoma associated with unilateral bony calvarial defects, subcutaneous nodules, and alopecia.

    PubMed

    Owen, Leah A; Ford, Joshua; Mamalis, Nick; Hoffman, Robert; Mifflin, Mark

    2015-04-01

    Complex corneal choristoma is a rare finding and its relationship with systemic disease is poorly understood. We present a 3-day-old boy with the constellation of left-sided congenital complex corneal choristoma, limbal dermoid, ipsilateral bony skull defects, and bilateral subcutaneous vascularized nodules with overlying alopecia and scalp nevi. To our knowledge this is the first case of complex choristoma involving the presence of associated bony calvarial defects. This presentation may contribute to a greater understanding of the systemic findings associated with the condition. Furthermore, it may shed light on the possible syndromic spectrum associated with complex choristoma and its underlying pathophysiology.

  8. Bony expansion in skeletal metastases from carcinoma of the prostate as seen by bone scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Resnik, C.S.; Garver, P.; Resnick, D.

    1984-10-01

    Carcinoma of the prostate often metastasizes to the skeletal system, the usual radiologic pattern being widespread patchy areas of increased density without change in the contour of the involved bones. Radionuclide correlation generally shows multiple foci of increased tracer activity. Less commonly, there is bony sclerosis with expansion of the diameter of the involved bone. Several cases of expansile skeletal metastases from carcinoma of the prostate have appeared in the literature but we know of no published descriptions of the radionuclide findings. We present three patients with carcinoma of the prostate who had skeletal metastases with evidence of bony expansion on both roentgenographic and radionuclide examination. 15 references, 8 figures.

  9. Surgical repair of a mandibular bony defect following the removal of an amelobalstoma.

    PubMed

    Ejiofor, Kandi

    2013-01-01

    This case report describes a 35-year-old Caucasian radiographer who presented with a significant mandibular bony defect following multiple excisions of an ameloblastoma. As a result, there was an absence of teeth on the lower-right mandible and a clear defect in the mandible. The treatment objectives were to rebuild the mandibular defect, with a long-term view of inserting dental implants. In a novel approach outlined in this presentation, tissue expansion of the submucosa, a titanium construct and an iliac bone graft were used to rebuild the patient's jaw. This surgical technique is recommended for the reconstruction of bony defects. PMID:24963929

  10. Understanding the effects of permeability heterogeneity and connectivity on surface water-groundwater exchange using multiscale models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryshlak, T. T.; Sawyer, A. H.; Stonedahl, S. H.; Soltanian, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    Permeability heterogeneity and channel morphology both control surface water-groundwater exchange (hyporheic exchange) and therefore influence stream ecosystem processes and biogeochemical cycles. However, the effects of permeability heterogeneity are less understood than channel morphology due to the challenge of measuring permeability at relevant scales in the field. Permeability fields in streambeds often have sharp, discontinuous contrasts ranging by orders of magnitudes (e.g. sand-clay contacts). To better understand the effects of permeability heterogeneity we modeled hyporheic exchange in bimodal permeability fields consisting of sand and clay in a representative low-gradient stream. Heterogeneity was developed using a Markov Chain approach for representing sand and clay stratasets using commonly observed characteristics of sediments including volumetric proportions and mean lengths. The channel topography was generated and characterized using Fourier series. Hydraulic head was assigned along the streambed as a function of topography and stream velocity. Initial results show that sedimentary structure, specifically the positioning of sand strata, controls hyporheic exchange depth and fluxes. Particle tracing simulations test the hypothesis that uncertainty in solute residence times increases as the connectivity of permeable sand strata increases due to the partitioning of solutes between connected and stagnant flow paths. These results will lead to a better understanding of how heterogeneity and the structure of highly permeable strata influences hyporheic residence times and biogeochemical processes.

  11. Effect of methacholine on peripheral lung mechanics and ventilation heterogeneity in asthma.

    PubMed

    Downie, Sue R; Salome, Cheryl M; Verbanck, Sylvia; Thompson, Bruce R; Berend, Norbert; King, Gregory G

    2013-03-15

    The forced oscillation technique (FOT) and multiple-breath nitrogen washout (MBNW) are noninvasive tests that are potentially sensitive to peripheral airways, with MBNW indexes being especially sensitive to heterogeneous changes in ventilation. The objective was to study methacholine-induced changes in the lung periphery of asthmatic patients and determine how changes in FOT variables of respiratory system reactance (Xrs) and resistance (Rrs) and frequency dependence of resistance (Rrs5-Rrs19) can be linked to changes in ventilation heterogeneity. The contributions of air trapping and airway closure, as extreme forms of heterogeneity, were also investigated. Xrs5, Rrs5, Rrs19, Rrs5-Rrs19, and inspiratory capacity (IC) were calculated from the FOT. Ventilation heterogeneity in acinar and conducting airways, and trapped gas (percent volume of trapped gas at functional residual capacity/vital capacity), were calculated from the MBNW. Measurements were repeated following methacholine. Methacholine-induced airway closure (percent change in forced vital capacity) and hyperinflation (change in IC) were also recorded. In 40 mild to moderate asthmatic patients, increase in Xrs5 after methacholine was predicted by increases in ventilation heterogeneity in acinar airways and forced vital capacity (r(2) = 0.37, P < 0.001), but had no correlation with ventilation heterogeneity in conducting airway increase or IC decrease. Increases in Rrs5 and Rrs5-Rrs19 after methacholine were not correlated with increases in ventilation heterogeneity, trapped gas, hyperinflation, or airway closure. Increased reactance in asthmatic patients after methacholine was indicative of heterogeneous changes in the lung periphery and airway closure. By contrast, increases in resistance and frequency dependence of resistance were not related to ventilation heterogeneity or airway closure and were more indicative of changes in central airway caliber than of heterogeneity. PMID:23372144

  12. Applicability of the effective-medium approximation to heterogeneous aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Dlugach, Janna M.; Liu, Li

    2016-07-01

    The effective-medium approximation (EMA) is based on the assumption that a heterogeneous particle can have a homogeneous counterpart possessing similar scattering and absorption properties. We analyze the numerical accuracy of the EMA by comparing superposition T-matrix computations for spherical aerosol particles filled with numerous randomly distributed small inclusions and Lorenz-Mie computations based on the Maxwell-Garnett mixing rule. We verify numerically that the EMA can indeed be realized for inclusion size parameters smaller than a threshold value. The threshold size parameter depends on the refractive-index contrast between the host and inclusion materials and quite often does not exceed several tenths, especially in calculations of the scattering matrix and the absorption cross section. As the inclusion size parameter approaches the threshold value, the scattering-matrix errors of the EMA start to grow with increasing the host size parameter and/or the number of inclusions. We confirm, in particular, the existence of the effective-medium regime in the important case of dust aerosols with hematite or air-bubble inclusions, but then the large refractive-index contrast necessitates inclusion size parameters of the order of a few tenths. Irrespective of the highly restricted conditions of applicability of the EMA, our results provide further evidence that the effective-medium regime must be a direct corollary of the macroscopic Maxwell equations under specific assumptions.

  13. Assessing and reporting heterogeneity in treatment effects in clinical trials: a proposal.

    PubMed

    Kent, David M; Rothwell, Peter M; Ioannidis, John P A; Altman, Doug G; Hayward, Rodney A

    2010-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that there is frequently considerable variation in the risk of the outcome of interest in clinical trial populations. These differences in risk will often cause clinically important heterogeneity in treatment effects (HTE) across the trial population, such that the balance between treatment risks and benefits may differ substantially between large identifiable patient subgroups; the "average" benefit observed in the summary result may even be non-representative of the treatment effect for a typical patient in the trial. Conventional subgroup analyses, which examine whether specific patient characteristics modify the effects of treatment, are usually unable to detect even large variations in treatment benefit (and harm) across risk groups because they do not account for the fact that patients have multiple characteristics simultaneously that affect the likelihood of treatment benefit. Based upon recent evidence on optimal statistical approaches to assessing HTE, we propose a framework that prioritizes the analysis and reporting of multivariate risk-based HTE and suggests that other subgroup analyses should be explicitly labeled either as primary subgroup analyses (well-motivated by prior evidence and intended to produce clinically actionable results) or secondary (exploratory) subgroup analyses (performed to inform future research). A standardized and transparent approach to HTE assessment and reporting could substantially improve clinical trial utility and interpretability. PMID:20704705

  14. Heterogeneity in the Effect of Common Shocks on Healthcare Expenditure Growth.

    PubMed

    Hauck, Katharina; Zhang, Xiaohui

    2016-09-01

    Healthcare expenditure growth is affected by important unobserved common shocks such as technological innovation, changes in sociological factors, shifts in preferences, and the epidemiology of diseases. While common factors impact in principle all countries, their effect is likely to differ across countries. To allow for unobserved heterogeneity in the effects of common shocks, we estimate a panel data model of healthcare expenditure growth in 34 OECD countries over the years 1980 to 2012, where the usual fixed or random effects are replaced by a multifactor error structure. We address model uncertainty with Bayesian model averaging, to identify a small set of robust expenditure drivers from 43 potential candidates. We establish 16 significant drivers of healthcare expenditure growth, including growth in GDP per capita and in insurance premiums, changes in financing arrangements and some institutional characteristics, expenditures on pharmaceuticals, population ageing, costs of health administration, and inpatient care. Our approach allows us to provide robust evidence to policy makers on the drivers that were most strongly associated with the growth in healthcare expenditures over the past 32 years. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26940606

  15. Justification of an effective field method in elasto-statics of heterogeneous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markov, Konstantin Z.

    2001-11-01

    A heuristic scheme for predicting the overall properties of composite media has been proposed, explored and widely used in the last 25 years by Kanaun and Levin. The numerous results and technical details are collected in the impressive volume Kanaun and Levin (Petrozavodsk: Izdatel'stvo Petrozavodskogo Universiteta, 1993 (in Russian)). The method is based on a certain old, natural and appealing physical reasoning, which well explains its name effective field method (EFM). The predictions of the methods agree very well with many experimental data. However, no attempt has been made to justify the method, putting it into the frame of a more rigorous theory of heterogeneous media. The present study represents such an attempt. The main conclusion is that the EFM approach, at least in elasto-statics when the effective moduli of the composite are looked for, is in essence a variational procedure of Hashin-Shtrikman type. Hence Kanaun-Levin's results provide, for the microstructures treated by the authors, rigorous variational prescriptions. The latter represent bounds on the effective moduli of the composites, if the matrix is weaker or stiffer than the inclusions. Moreover, it is shown that in the special, though quite general case of a matrix containing several kinds of ellipsoidal inclusions, distributed with "ellipsoidal" symmetry, an obvious generalization of the EFM method yields results that coincide with the variational estimates, recently obtained by Ponte Castañeda and Willis (J. Mech. Phys. Solids 43 (1995) 1919).

  16. Effect of small-scale heterogeneities on interpretation of crustal compositions exemplified by a layered anorthosite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semprich, J.; Vrijmoed, J. C.

    2015-02-01

    The composition of the lower crust has a significant effect on geodynamic processes because it influences physical rock properties such as densities and seismic velocities. Compositional differences in lower crustal rocks are potentially large and exist on the scales of centimeters up to kilometers resulting in non-unique seismic and gravity data. While larger heterogeneities can be detected as reflections on seismic profiles, irregular small-scale compositional variations are not likely to be discovered, but will influence the averaged seismic velocities and densities of an area. The extent and effects of such small-scale heterogeneities are explored on an exposed high-grade layered anorthositic body by providing a detailed field map, petrological descriptions, pycnometry measurements as well as whole rock and mineral analyses combined with thermodynamic phase equilibria calculations. To evaluate the results of our thermodynamic calculations, densities and mineral modes obtained from the modeled phase equilibria are compared to measured densities and estimated mineral modes from rock samples. The proportion of mafic to ultramafic (plagioclase-poor) rocks in the mapped field area amounts to 10-15% but higher proportions of these rock types in the lower crust are feasible. To further study the effects of compositional variations, we have generated mixtures of mafic to ultramafic and anorthositic/intermediate rocks until the average properties of these mixtures are comparable to those of mafic granulites (3000-3100 kg/m3; 7.1-7.3 km/s). Mixtures of anorthosite with 40-45% and of tonalite with 50-60% high-grade mafic to ultramafic rocks yield average densities and seismic velocities similar to mafic granulites although they still contain 50-60 vol.% plagioclase. Hence small-scale mixing of certain rock types may result in the overestimation of the proportion of mafic (garnet) granulites in the lithologic interpretation of crustal compositions from seismic data. Since

  17. Necessity of using heterogeneous ellipsoidal Earth model with terrain to calculate co-seismic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Huihong; Zhang, Bei; Zhang, Huai; Huang, Luyuan; Qu, Wulin; Shi, Yaolin

    2016-04-01

    Co-seismic deformation and stress changes, which reflect the elasticity of the earth, are very important in the earthquake dynamics, and also to other issues, such as the evaluation of the seismic risk, fracture process and triggering of earthquake. Lots of scholars have researched the dislocation theory and co-seismic deformation and obtained the half-space homogeneous model, half-space stratified model, spherical stratified model, and so on. Especially, models of Okada (1992) and Wang (2003, 2006) are widely applied in the research of calculating co-seismic and post-seismic effects. However, since both semi-infinite space model and layered model do not take the role of the earth curvature or heterogeneity or topography into consideration, there are large errors in calculating the co-seismic displacement of a great earthquake in its impacted area. Meanwhile, the computational methods of calculating the co-seismic strain and stress are different between spherical model and plane model. Here, we adopted the finite element method which could well deal with the complex characteristics (such as anisotropy, discontinuities) of rock and different conditions. We use the mash adaptive technique to automatically encrypt the mesh at the fault and adopt the equivalent volume force replace the dislocation source, which can avoid the difficulty in handling discontinuity surface with conventional (Zhang et al., 2015). We constructed an earth model that included earth's layered structure and curvature, the upper boundary was set as a free surface and the core-mantle boundary was set under buoyancy forces. Firstly, based on the precision requirement, we take a testing model - - a strike-slip fault (the length of fault is 500km and the width is 50km, and the slippage is 10m) for example. Because of the curvature of the Earth, some errors certainly occur in plane coordinates just as previous studies (Dong et al., 2014; Sun et al., 2012). However, we also found that: 1) the co

  18. Effect of heterogenous and homogenous air gaps on dry heat loss through the garment.

    PubMed

    Mert, Emel; Psikuta, Agnes; Bueno, Marie-Ange; Rossi, René M

    2015-11-01

    In real life conditions, the trapped air between the human body and the garment has uneven shape and vary over the body parts as a consequence of the complex geometry of the human body. However, the existing clothing models assume uniform air layer between the human body and the garment or its full contact, which may cause large error in the output of simulations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a heterogeneous vertical air gap with different configuration of folds (size and frequency) on dry heat loss using a heated cylinder (Torso). It was found that the presence of folds in the garment led to an increased heat loss from the body in comparison to a homogeneous air gap of comparable size. Interestingly, the size of folds did not have an influence on the dry heat loss. Additionally, the effect of the contact area on dry heat loss became important when exceeding a threshold of about 42%. The results from this study are useful for modelling of a realistic dry heat loss through the clothing and contribute to the improvement of design of protective and active sport garments.

  19. Effect of heterogenous and homogenous air gaps on dry heat loss through the garment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mert, Emel; Psikuta, Agnes; Bueno, Marie-Ange; Rossi, René M.

    2015-11-01

    In real life conditions, the trapped air between the human body and the garment has uneven shape and vary over the body parts as a consequence of the complex geometry of the human body. However, the existing clothing models assume uniform air layer between the human body and the garment or its full contact, which may cause large error in the output of simulations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a heterogeneous vertical air gap with different configuration of folds (size and frequency) on dry heat loss using a heated cylinder (Torso). It was found that the presence of folds in the garment led to an increased heat loss from the body in comparison to a homogeneous air gap of comparable size. Interestingly, the size of folds did not have an influence on the dry heat loss. Additionally, the effect of the contact area on dry heat loss became important when exceeding a threshold of about 42 %. The results from this study are useful for modelling of a realistic dry heat loss through the clothing and contribute to the improvement of design of protective and active sport garments.

  20. Zonal heterogeneity of the effects of chronic ethanol feeding on hepatic fatty acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Guzman, M; Castro, J

    1990-11-01

    Periportal and perivenous hepatocytes were isolated from rats fed a high-fat, ethanol-containing diet to investigate the acinar heterogeneity of the effects of prolonged ethanol administration on lipid metabolism. Chronic feeding of ethanol caused a rather selective accumulation of triacylglycerols in the perivenous zone of the liver. In control animals the rate of lipogenesis and the activity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase were higher in perivenous than in periportal hepatocytes, whereas the rate of fatty acid oxidation and the activity of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I were higher in periportal than in perivenous cells; however, no zonation was evident for very-low-density-lipoprotein-lipid secretion. Prolonged ethanol administration abolished the zonal asymmetry of the lipogenic process and inverted the acinar distribution of the fatty acid-oxidative process (i.e., in ethanol-fed animals the rate of fatty acid oxidation and the activity of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I were higher in perivenous than in periportal hepatocytes). Moreover, chronic feeding of ethanol led to a marked and selective inhibition of very-low-density-lipoprotein-triacylglycerol secretion by the perivenous zone of the liver. Nevertheless, no zonal differences were observed between control and ethanol-fed animals with respect to the effects of acute doses of ethanol and acetaldehyde on lipid metabolism. In conclusion, our results show that chronic ethanol intake produces important alterations in the acinar distribution of the different fatty acid-metabolizing pathways.

  1. The Community College Effect Revisited: The Importance of Attending to Heterogeneity and Complex Counterfactuals*

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Jennie E.; Pfeffer, Fabian T.; Goldrick-Rab, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Community colleges are controversial educational institutions, often said to simultaneously expand college opportunities and diminish baccalaureate attainment. We assess the seemingly contradictory functions of community colleges by attending to effect heterogeneity and to alternative counterfactual conditions. Using data on postsecondary outcomes of high school graduates of Chicago Public Schools, we find that enrolling at a community college penalizes more advantaged students who otherwise would have attended four-year colleges, particularly highly selective schools; however, these students represent a relatively small portion of the community college population, and these estimates are almost certainly biased. On the other hand, enrolling at a community college has a modest positive effect on bachelor's degree completion for disadvantaged students who otherwise would not have attended college; these students represent the majority of community college goers. We conclude that discussions among scholars, policymakers, and practitioners should move beyond considering the pros and cons of community college attendance for students in general to attending to the implications of community college attendance for targeted groups of students. PMID:25825705

  2. Effects of Spatially Heterogeneous Porosity on Matrix-Diffusion as Investigated by X ray Absorption Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Boney, C.; Christian-Frear, T.; Meigs, L.C.; Tidwell, V.C.

    1998-10-20

    Laboratory experiments were performed to investigate the effects of spatial variation in porosity on matrix-diffusion processes. Four centimeter-scale slabs of Culebra dolomite taken from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site were used in the tests. Experiments involved the simple diffusion of iodine into a single edge of each rock slab while X ray absorption imaging was used to measure the resulting two-dmensional solute concentration field as a function of time. X ray imaging was also used to quantify the two-dimensional porosity field of each rock slab. Image analysis provided a unique opportunity to both visuake and quantifj the effects of the spatially variable porosi~ on matrixdMusion. Four key results were obtained. First, significant variation in rates of diffusion were realized over the relatively small length (centimeter) and time scales (months) investigated. Second, clear evidence of diffusion preferentially following zones of relatively higher porosity was noted. Third, rate of difhion was found to vary as tracer diffused into the rock slabs encountering changing porosity conditions. Fourth, strong correlation between porosi~ and the calculated diffusion coefficients was found. In fact, the nature of the correlation can be related to the geometry, position, and orientation of the heterogeneous porosity features populating each rock slab.

  3. The effects of laser welding on heterogeneous immunoassay performance in a microfluidic cartridge

    PubMed Central

    Mäntymaa, Anne; Halme, Jussi; Välimaa, Lasse; Kallio, Pasi

    2011-01-01

    Sealing of a microfluidic cartridge is a challenge, because the cartridge commonly contains heat-sensitive biomolecules that must also be protected from contamination. In addition, the objective is usually to obtain a sealing method suitable for mass production. Laser welding is a rapid technique that can be accomplished with low unit costs. Even though the technique has been widely adopted in industry, the literature on its use in microfluidic applications is not large. This paper is the first to report the effects of laser welding on the performance of the heterogeneous immunoassay in a polystyrene microfluidic cartridge in which biomolecules are immobilized into the reaction surface of the cartridge before sealing. The paper compares the immunoassay performance of microfluidic cartridges that are sealed either with an adhesive tape or by use of laser transmission welding. The model analyte used is thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). The results show that the concentration curves in the laser-welded cartridges are very close to the curves in the taped cartridges. This indicates, first, that laser welding does not cause any significant reduction in immunoassay performance, and second, that the polystyrene cover does not have significant effect on the signal levels. Interestingly, the coefficients of variance between parallel samples were lower in the laser-welded cartridges than in the taped cartridges. PMID:22685505

  4. The effect of coolant orificing on the core performance of a heterogeneous liquid-metal fast breeder reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Mamoru, K.; Shigehiro, A.; Yoshiaki, O.

    1983-04-01

    The effect of orificing on the core performance of a commercial-size heterogeneous liquid-metal fast breeder reactor was studied analytically. The thermal power output was flattened at beginning of life, and the coolant flow rate was chosen such that the maximum inner cladding temperature of a driver fuel and a blanket fuel was less than or equal to 620/sup 0/C at both beginning of equilibrium life (BOEL) and end of equilibrium life (EOEL). The difference between reactor outlet temperatures at BOEL and EOEL was then calculated for six core configurations: one homogeneous core configuration and five heterogeneous ones. The results showed that the core outlet temperature variation due to the change of the power profile of the radial heterogeneous core configurations is similar to that of the homogeneous one, even when a single type of orificing is used in each core zone, and it will not be necessary to use the more detailed orificing in each zone of a heterogeneous core configuration. The study concludes that for the present design, especially the thermal design, of some heterogeneous core configurations, it is feasible to control the change of the reactor outlet temperature with burnup, even when a single type of orificing is used in each core zone.

  5. The Effect of Point-spread Function Interaction with Radiance from Heterogeneous Scenes on Multitemporal Signature Analysis. [soybean stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duggin, M. J.; Schoch, L. B.

    1984-01-01

    The point-spread function is an important factor in determining the nature of feature types on the basis of multispectral recorded radiance, particularly from heterogeneous scenes and particularly from scenes which are imaged repetitively, in order to provide thematic characterization by means of multitemporal signature. To demonstrate the effect of the interaction of scene heterogeneity with the point spread function (PSF)1, a template was constructed from the line spread function (LSF) data for the thematic mapper photoflight model. The template was in 0.25 (nominal) pixel increments in the scan line direction across three scenes of different heterogeneity. The sensor output was calculated by considering the calculated scene radiance from each scene element occurring between the contours of the PSF template, plotted on a movable mylar sheet while it was located at a given position.

  6. Development of kink bands in granodiorite: Effect of mechanical heterogeneities, fault geometry, and friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chheda, T. D.; Nevitt, J. M.; Pollard, D. D.

    2014-12-01

    The formation of monoclinal right-lateral kink bands in Lake Edison granodiorite (central Sierra Nevada, CA) is investigated through field observations and mechanics based numerical modeling. Vertical faults act as weak surfaces within the granodiorite, and vertical granodiorite slabs bounded by closely-spaced faults curve into a kink. Leucocratic dikes are observed in association with kinking. Measurements were made on maps of Hilgard, Waterfall, Trail Fork, Kip Camp (Pollard and Segall, 1983b) and Bear Creek kink bands (Martel, 1998). Outcrop scale geometric parameters such as fault length andspacing, kink angle, and dike width are used to construct a representative geometry to be used in a finite element model. Three orders of fault were classified, length = 1.8, 7.2 and 28.8 m, and spacing = 0.3, 1.2 and 3.6 m, respectively. The model faults are oriented at 25° to the direction of shortening (horizontal most compressive stress), consistent with measurements of wing crack orientations in the field area. The model also includes a vertical leucocratic dike, oriented perpendicular to the faults and with material properties consistent with aplite. Curvature of the deformed faults across the kink band was used to compare the effects of material properties, strain, and fault and dike geometry. Model results indicate that the presence of the dike, which provides a mechanical heterogeneity, is critical to kinking in these rocks. Keeping properties of the model granodiorite constant, curvature increased with decrease in yield strength and Young's modulus of the dike. Curvature increased significantly as yield strength decreased from 95 to 90 MPa, and below this threshold value, limb rotation for the kink band was restricted to the dike. Changing Poisson's ratio had no significant effect. The addition of small faults between bounding faults, decreasing fault spacing or increasing dike width increases the curvature. Increasing friction along the faults decreases slip, so

  7. The Effect of Incorporation of HNO(sub 3) Into Liquid Sulfuric Acid on Heterogeneous Reaction Probabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, R.; Leu, M-T.; Keyser, L.

    1994-01-01

    Using a fast-flow reactor coupled to a quadrupole mass spectrometer, the heterogeneous reactions of C1ONO2 + HCl and HOCl + HCl as well as hydrolysis of N2O5 and C1ONO2 were investigated on liquid sulfuric acid, with particular emphasis on the effect of incorporation of HNO3 on the reaction probabilities.

  8. Expanding the Scope of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy: Evidence for Effectiveness in a Heterogeneous Psychiatric Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Sheryl M.; Bieling, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Mindfulness-based interventions (e.g., MBSR; Kabat-Zinn, 1990; MBCT; Segal, Williams, & Teasdale, 2002) have demonstrated effectiveness in a number of distinct clinical populations. However, few studies have evaluated MBCT within a heterogeneous group of psychiatric adult outpatients. This study examined whether a wider variety of patients…

  9. Systematic Analysis of the Effect of Small Scale Permeability Heterogeneity on Hyporheic Exchange Flux and Residence Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laube, G.; Schmidt, C.; Fleckenstein, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    The hyporheic zone (HZ) contributes significantly to whole stream biogeochemical cycling. Biogeochemical reactions within the HZ are often transport limited, thus, understanding these reactions requires knowledge about the magnitude of hyporheic fluxes (HF) and the residence time (RT) of these fluxes within the HZ. While the hydraulics of HF are relatively well understood, studies addressing the influence of permeability heterogeneity lack systematic analysis and have even produced contradictory results (e.g. [1] vs. [2]). In order to close this gap, this study uses a statistical numerical approach to elucidate the influence of permeability heterogeneity on HF and RT. We simulated and evaluated 3750 2D-scenarios of sediment heterogeneity by means of Gaussian random fields with focus on total HF and RT distribution. The scenarios were based on ten realizations of each of all possible combinations of 15 different correlation lengths, 5 dipping angles and 5 permeability variances. Roughly 500 hyporheic stream traces were analyzed per simulation, for a total of almost two million stream traces analyzed for correlations between permeability heterogeneity, HF, and RT. Total HF and the RT variance positively correlated with permeability variance while the mean RT negatively correlated with permeability variance. In contrast, changes in correlation lengths and dipping angles had little effect on the examined properties RT and HF. These results provide a possible explanation of the seemingly contradictory conclusions of recent studies, given that the permeability variances in these studies differ by several orders of magnitude. [1] Bardini, L., Boano, F., Cardenas, M.B, Sawyer, A.H, Revelli, R. and Ridolfi, L. "Small-Scale Permeability Heterogeneity Has Negligible Effects on Nutrient Cycling in Streambeds." Geophysical Research Letters, 2013. doi:10.1002/grl.50224. [2] Zhou, Y., Ritzi, R. W., Soltanian, M. R. and Dominic, D. F. "The Influence of Streambed Heterogeneity on

  10. Effects of physical and geochemical heterogeneities on mineral transformation and biomass accumulation during biostimulation experiments at Rifle, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Steefel, Carl I; Kowalsky, Michael B; Englert, Andreas; Hubbard, Susan S

    2010-03-01

    Electron donor amendment for bioremediation often results in precipitation of secondary minerals and the growth of biomass, both of which can potentially change flow paths and the efficacy of bioremediation. Quantitative estimation of precipitate and biomass distribution has remained challenging, partly due to the intrinsic heterogeneities of natural porous media and the scarcity of field data. In this work, we examine the effects of physical and geochemical heterogeneities on the spatial distributions of mineral precipitates and biomass accumulated during a biostimulation field experiment near Rifle, Colorado. Field bromide breakthrough data were used to infer a heterogeneous distribution of hydraulic conductivity through inverse transport modeling, while the solid phase Fe(III) content was determined by assuming a negative correlation with hydraulic conductivity. Validated by field aqueous geochemical data, reactive transport modeling was used to explicitly keep track of the growth of the biomass and to estimate the spatial distribution of precipitates and biomass. The results show that the maximum mineral precipitation and biomass accumulation occurs in the vicinity of the injection wells, occupying up to 5.4vol.% of the pore space, and is dominated by reaction products of sulfate reduction. Accumulation near the injection wells is not strongly affected by heterogeneities present in the system due to the ubiquitous presence of sulfate in the groundwater. However, accumulation in the down-gradient regions is dominated by the iron-reducing reaction products, whose spatial patterns are strongly controlled by both physical and geochemical heterogeneities. Heterogeneities can lead to localized large accumulation of mineral precipitates and biomass, increasing the possibility of pore clogging. Although ignoring the heterogeneities of the system can lead to adequate prediction of the average behavior of sulfate-reducing related products, it can also lead to an

  11. Effects of physical and geochemical heterogeneities on mineral transformation and biomass accumulation during biostimulation experiments at Rifle, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Steefel, Carl I; Kowalsky, Michael B; Englert, Andreas; Hubbard, Susan S

    2010-03-01

    Electron donor amendment for bioremediation often results in precipitation of secondary minerals and the growth of biomass, both of which can potentially change flow paths and the efficacy of bioremediation. Quantitative estimation of precipitate and biomass distribution has remained challenging, partly due to the intrinsic heterogeneities of natural porous media and the scarcity of field data. In this work, we examine the effects of physical and geochemical heterogeneities on the spatial distributions of mineral precipitates and biomass accumulated during a biostimulation field experiment near Rifle, Colorado. Field bromide breakthrough data were used to infer a heterogeneous distribution of hydraulic conductivity through inverse transport modeling, while the solid phase Fe(III) content was determined by assuming a negative correlation with hydraulic conductivity. Validated by field aqueous geochemical data, reactive transport modeling was used to explicitly keep track of the growth of the biomass and to estimate the spatial distribution of precipitates and biomass. The results show that the maximum mineral precipitation and biomass accumulation occurs in the vicinity of the injection wells, occupying up to 5.4vol.% of the pore space, and is dominated by reaction products of sulfate reduction. Accumulation near the injection wells is not strongly affected by heterogeneities present in the system due to the ubiquitous presence of sulfate in the groundwater. However, accumulation in the down-gradient regions is dominated by the iron-reducing reaction products, whose spatial patterns are strongly controlled by both physical and geochemical heterogeneities. Heterogeneities can lead to localized large accumulation of mineral precipitates and biomass, increasing the possibility of pore clogging. Although ignoring the heterogeneities of the system can lead to adequate prediction of the average behavior of sulfate-reducing related products, it can also lead to an

  12. Effects of physical and geochemical heterogeneities on mineral transformation and biomass accumulation during biostimulation experiments at Rifle, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Steefel, Carl I.; Kowalsky, Michael B.; Englert, Andreas; Hubbard, Susan S.

    2010-03-01

    Electron donor amendment for bioremediation often results in precipitation of secondary minerals and the growth of biomass, both of which can potentially change flow paths and the efficacy of bioremediation. Quantitative estimation of precipitate and biomass distribution has remained challenging, partly due to the intrinsic heterogeneities of natural porous media and the scarcity of field data. In this work, we examine the effects of physical and geochemical heterogeneities on the spatial distributions of mineral precipitates and biomass accumulated during a biostimulation field experiment near Rifle, Colorado. Field bromide breakthrough data were used to infer a heterogeneous distribution of hydraulic conductivity through inverse transport modeling, while the solid phase Fe(III) content was determined by assuming a negative correlation with hydraulic conductivity. Validated by field aqueous geochemical data, reactive transport modeling was used to explicitly keep track of the growth of the biomass and to estimate the spatial distribution of precipitates and biomass. The results show that the maximum mineral precipitation and biomass accumulation occurs in the vicinity of the injection wells, occupying up to 5.4 vol.% of the pore space, and is dominated by reaction products of sulfate reduction. Accumulation near the injection wells is not strongly affected by heterogeneities present in the system due to the ubiquitous presence of sulfate in the groundwater. However, accumulation in the down-gradient regions is dominated by the iron-reducing reaction products, whose spatial patterns are strongly controlled by both physical and geochemical heterogeneities. Heterogeneities can lead to localized large accumulation of mineral precipitates and biomass, increasing the possibility of pore clogging. Although ignoring the heterogeneities of the system can lead to adequate prediction of the average behavior of sulfate-reducing related products, it can also lead to an

  13. Bony defect of palate and vomer in submucous cleft palate patients.

    PubMed

    Ren, S; Ma, L; Zhou, X; Sun, Z

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to visualize bony defects of the palate and vomer in submucous cleft palate patients (SMCP) by three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) reconstruction and to classify the range of bony defects. Forty-eight consecutive non-operated SMCP patients were included. Diagnosis was based on the presence of at least one of three classical signs of SMCP: bifid uvula, a translucent zone in the midline of the soft palate, and a palpable 'V' notch on the posterior border of the bony palate. Patients were imaged using spiral CT. 3D reconstruction models were created of the palate and vomer. The sagittal extent of the bony cleft in SMCP was classified into four types: type I, no V-shaped hard palate cleft (8.3%); type II, cleft involving the partial palate (43.8%); type III, cleft involving the complete palate and extending to the incisive foramen (43.8%); type IV, cleft involving the complete palate and the alveolar bone (4.2%). The extent of the vomer defect was classified into three types: type A, vomer completely fused with the palate (8.3%); type B, vomer partially fused with the palate (43.8%); type C, vomer not fused with the palate up to the incisive foramen (47.9%). Significant variability in hard palate defects in SMCP is the rule rather than the exception. The association of velopharyngeal insufficiency with anatomical malformations may be complex.

  14. Relationship between levator ani and bony pelvis morphology and clinical grade of prolapse in women.

    PubMed

    Li, Ran; Song, Yanfeng; Ma, Ming

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the morphological features of the levator ani and bony pelvis in women with different grades of prolapse. Ninety Chinese women with different grades of uterine prolapse were studied, 18 in each stage of prolapse from I to IV, and 18 asymptomatic nulliparous volunteers as normal controls. Three-dimensional (3D) models that included the pelvic bones, levator ani, pubic symphysis, sacrum, and coccyx were generated from magnetic resonance (MR) images. The width and length of the levator hiatus and levator symphysis gap, the width of the iliococcygeus, and the iliococcygeal angle were measured to quantify levator ani morphology; the intertuberous diameter, interspinous diameter, subpubic angle, and pubococcygeal line were measured to characterize the morphology of the bony pelvis. Four patterns of levator ani morphology among women with and without prolapse were distinguished. Among the bony pelvis parameters, no measurement differed significantly between the subjects with prolapse and normal controls, or among subjects with different grades of prolapse. There were significant differences in the width and length of the levator hiatus and levator symphysis gap between women with prolapse and normal controls. Our pilot data help to elucidate bony pelvis and levator ani morphology in women with and without pelvic organ prolapse. In contrast to the iliococcygeus muscle, changes in the morphological features of the pubovisceral muscle are more likely to accompany prolapse.

  15. Shape variation and ontogeny of the ruminant bony labyrinth, an example in Tragulidae.

    PubMed

    Mennecart, Bastien; Costeur, Loïc

    2016-09-01

    Despite its growing use in anatomical and ecological studies, the morphological variability and ontogenetic development of the bony labyrinth have very rarely been investigated in ruminants. Here we study its morphology in 15 adult and 10 juvenile specimens in the three extant tragulid ruminant genera. Intraspecific and interspecific variability is quantified using morphometric and 3D geometric morphometrics analyses. The bony labyrinth of Tragulus, Hyemoschus, and Moschiola is strikingly different, clustering in clearly different morphospaces despite similar ecological adaptations. Although the bony labyrinths within two species of the same genus cannot be distinguished from each other based on the chosen semi-landmarks, discrete interspecific differences exist. We were able to show for the first time that an artiodactyl mammal in a late fetal stage possesses an almost fully formed bony labyrinth similar to that of adults. No significant change either occurs in size or morphology after ossification of the petrosal bone. Some intraspecific variation is observed on the shape of the lateral semi-circular canal, the size and shape of the common crus, the coil of the cochlea or the stapedial ratio. Variable structures are expected to be highly informative characters for a large cladistic analysis. They can be used for phylogenetic studies in ruminants. Incorporating juvenile specimens in studies is not problematic, as they fall within the morphological range of adults. PMID:27245372

  16. "Sub Specie Boni": The Comfort Zone of Self-Belief--A Dimension in Counseling Offenders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Church, James Lee

    1996-01-01

    Claims that self-defeating behavior is a rational attempt to satisfy early, introjected messages about the type of person one is, arising from a desire for things perceived as good--sub specie boni. Examines the notion of the comfort zone, toxic shame, and therapists' responsibility to nourish acceptable joy. (RJM)

  17. Treatment effect heterogeneity for univariate subgroups in clinical trials: Shrinkage, standardization, or else.

    PubMed

    Varadhan, Ravi; Wang, Sue-Jane

    2016-01-01

    Treatment effect heterogeneity is a well-recognized phenomenon in randomized controlled clinical trials. In this paper, we discuss subgroup analyses with prespecified subgroups of clinical or biological importance. We explore various alternatives to the naive (the traditional univariate) subgroup analyses to address the issues of multiplicity and confounding. Specifically, we consider a model-based Bayesian shrinkage (Bayes-DS) and a nonparametric, empirical Bayes shrinkage approach (Emp-Bayes) to temper the optimism of traditional univariate subgroup analyses; a standardization approach (standardization) that accounts for correlation between baseline covariates; and a model-based maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) approach. The Bayes-DS and Emp-Bayes methods model the variation in subgroup-specific treatment effect rather than testing the null hypothesis of no difference between subgroups. The standardization approach addresses the issue of confounding in subgroup analyses. The MLE approach is considered only for comparison in simulation studies as the "truth" since the data were generated from the same model. Using the characteristics of a hypothetical large outcome trial, we perform simulation studies and articulate the utilities and potential limitations of these estimators. Simulation results indicate that Bayes-DS and Emp-Bayes can protect against optimism present in the naïve approach. Due to its simplicity, the naïve approach should be the reference for reporting univariate subgroup-specific treatment effect estimates from exploratory subgroup analyses. Standardization, although it tends to have a larger variance, is suggested when it is important to address the confounding of univariate subgroup effects due to correlation between baseline covariates. The Bayes-DS approach is available as an R package (DSBayes). PMID:26485117

  18. Heterogenous effects of bryostatin on human myeloid leukemia clonogenicity: dose and time scheduling dependency.

    PubMed

    van der Hem, K G; Schuurhuis, G J; Dräger, A M; Odding, J H; Huijgens, P C

    1996-09-01

    The potent anti-neoplastic actions displayed in vitro by bryostatins have led to the introduction of short-term bryostatin-1 infusions in phase I clinical trials. Because bryostatin (bryo) undergoes a rapid clearance in vivo, we were interested in its scheduling effects on acute myeloid leukemia (AML) clonogenicity. Therefore, we assessed the primary plating efficiency (PE1) of AML samples in response to several bryo concentrations after various preincubation periods in a semi-solid colony forming assay. Whereas continuous exposure to 10 nM bryo during the assay period reduced the PE1 in nearly all samples tested, preincubation of eight AML patients' specimens for 1, 2, 3 or 4 days with bryo in a dose range of 0.1-10 nM showed a heterogenous PE1 response. Stimulatory as well as inhibitory effects on leukemic clonogenic growth were seen within individual specimens depending on dose and preincubation time with no single incubation time or concentration that caused unequivocal common overall inhibition of clonogenic growth in most or all of the samples. Higher doses of bryo also failed to result in specific inhibition of leukemic cells: 4/8 samples showed an increased clonogenic response to 250 nM bryo whereas normal bone marrow progenitor cells were consistently inhibited in their clonogenicity at this dose. A marked similarity, i.e. undulatory effects with increasing bryo concentrations, was found for HL60 leukemic cells. In conclusion, the effects of bryo on clonogenic leukemia cell growth are strongly dependent on scheduling and dose varying between and within individual AML samples. These results caution against in vivo bryo pulse therapy, as currently applied, for treatment of AML. PMID:8947584

  19. Effects of Heterogeneity on Transport of Graphene Oxide in Saturated and Unsaturated Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, S.; Sun, Y.; Shi, X.; Wu, J.; Gao, B.

    2015-12-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) has received increasing attention in many fields with its wide applications and rapid growth in production. Therefore, it is expected that GO nanoparticles will inevitably be released into the subsurface and cause the environmental risk subsequently. In view of this, knowledge of the fate for GO in the vadose zone and groundwater systems is indispensable. So far most research has focused on the deposition and transport of GO nanoparticles in one-dimensional homogenous porous media; nonetheless, the complex heterogeneous system is extensively distributed in natural subsurface environment and may not be well represented by the homogeneous packed columns. However, little investigations have been directed toward understanding the transport of GO in heterogeneous porous media. The overarching objective of this study is to advance current understanding of GO transport in structured heterogeneous porous media. The saturated and unsaturated columns packed with different sand combinations and solution ionic strength, were used to examine the breakthrough behavior of GO in heterogeneous porous media. A two-domain model considering GO exchange between zones was developed to describe GO transport in structured, heterogeneous porous media. The experimental data indicate that volumetric moisture content and water flow are the critical factors that control GO transport in heterogeneous porous media. And higher ionic strength decrease the mobility of GO particles in both saturated and unsaturated heterogeneous pore media. Simulations of this two-domain nanoparticle transport model matched experimental breakthrough data well for all the experimental conditions. Experimental and model results show that under saturated conditions, both fast-flow and slow-flow domains affect colloid transport in heterogeneous media. Under unsaturated conditions, however, our results indicate that flows in the fast flow domain dominate the colloid transport and retention processes.

  20. The Effect of Methyl, Hydroxyl, and Ketone Functional Groups on the Heterogeneous Oxidation of Succinic Acid Aerosol by OH Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, M.; Zhang, H.; Wilson, K. R.

    2013-12-01

    The heterogeneous oxidation of atmospheric organic aerosols can influence their effects on climate, human health, and visibility. During oxidation, functionalization occurs when an oxygenated functional group is added to a molecule, leaving the carbon skeleton intact. Fragmentation involves carbon-carbon bond cleavage and produces two products with smaller carbon numbers than the parent compound. To gain better insights into how the molecular structure of more oxygenated organic compounds affects heterogeneous reactivity, succinic acid aerosols are photo-oxidized in an aerosol flow tube reactor, and the reaction products are analyzed using Direct Analysis in Real Time Mass Spectrometry for online chemical analysis. The effect of various functional groups (CH3, OH, C=O) along the carbon backbone on the heterogeneous reaction mechanisms are also investigated using model compounds. For this series of compounds, the formation of more oxygenated products through functionalization can be explained by well-known condensation-phase reactions such as Russell and Bennett and Summers. The number of fragmentation products is found to increase with the presence of OH and CH3 groups. This can be attributed to the increased number of tertiary carbons, enhancing the fragmentation after multiple oxidation steps. Smaller dicaids (oxalic acid and malonic acid) can be formed through the fragmentation processes in the heterogeneous oxidation of succinic acid. The effect of molecular structure on reaction kinetics, volatilization, and the relative importance of functionalization and fragmentation pathways will be discussed.

  1. Pyrite cinder as a cost-effective heterogeneous catalyst in heterogeneous Fenton reaction: decomposition of H(2)O(2) and degradation of Acid Red B.

    PubMed

    Wu, Deli; Liu, Yanxia; Duan, Dong; Ma, Luming

    2014-01-01

    Pyrite cinder (PyC) was employed as a heterogeneous Fenton-like catalyst, and its catalytic activity was evaluated in view of the effects of catalyst dosage, pH and leaching metal ions. PyC showed significant reactivity, and the pseudo-first-order kinetic rate constant for decomposition of H(2)O(2) and degradation of Acid Red B (ARB) were 3.4 and 14.89 (10⁻³ min⁻¹) respectively when pH = 5. When 20 g/L PyC was added into 10 mM H(2)O(2) solution in neutral pH, H(2)O(2) could be completely degraded within 4 h, and more than 90% ARB was removed. Leaching metal ions from PyC were found to have little effect on decomposition of H(2)O(2) or on degradation of ARB. PyC still had high catalytic activity after five successive runs. The decomposition mechanism of H(2)O(2) was analyzed and the Haber-Weiss mechanism was employed in this paper. The electron spin resonance image showed •OH was produced and increased between 3 and 5 min in the PyC catalyzing H(2)O(2) reaction, which demonstrated that PyC had a durable ability to produce •OH.

  2. The effect of spatial heterogenity on the aggregation of ticks on white-footed mice

    PubMed Central

    Devevey, G.; Brisson, D.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Parasites are often aggregated on a minority of the individuals in their host populations. Although host characteristics are commonly presumed to explain parasite aggregation on hosts, spatio-temporal aggregation of parasites during their host-seeking stages may have a dominant effect on the aggregation on hosts. We aimed to quantify, using mixed models, repeatability and autocorrelation analyses, the degree to which the aggregation of blacklegged ticks (Ixodes scapularis) on white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) is influenced by spatio-temporal distributions of the host-seeking ticks and by heterogeneity among mice. Host-seeking ticks were spatially aggregated at both the larval and nymphal life-stages. However, this spatial aggregation accounted for little of the variation in larval and nymphal burdens observed on mice (3% and 0%, respectively). Conversely, mouse identity accounted for a substantial proportion of the variance in tick burdens. Mouse identity was a significant explanatory factor as the majority of ticks parasitized a consistent set of mice throughout the activity seasons. Of the characteristics associated with mouse identity investigated, only gender affected larval burdens, and body mass and home range sizes in males were correlated with nymphal burdens. These analyses suggest that aggregation of ticks on a minority of mice does not result from the distribution of host-seeking ticks but from characteristics of the hosts. PMID:22409977

  3. The effect of spatial heterogenity on the aggregation of ticks on white-footed mice.

    PubMed

    Devevey, G; Brisson, D

    2012-06-01

    Parasites are often aggregated on a minority of the individuals in their host populations. Although host characteristics are commonly presumed to explain parasite aggregation on hosts, spatio-temporal aggregation of parasites during their host-seeking stages may have a dominant effect on the aggregation on hosts. We aimed to quantify, using mixed models, repeatability and autocorrelation analyses, the degree to which the aggregation of blacklegged ticks (Ixodes scapularis) on white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) is influenced by spatio-temporal distributions of the host-seeking ticks and by heterogeneity among mice. Host-seeking ticks were spatially aggregated at both the larval and nymphal life-stages. However, this spatial aggregation accounted for little of the variation in larval and nymphal burdens observed on mice (3% and 0%, respectively). Conversely, mouse identity accounted for a substantial proportion of the variance in tick burdens. Mouse identity was a significant explanatory factor as the majority of ticks parasitized a consistent set of mice throughout the activity seasons. Of the characteristics associated with mouse identity investigated, only gender affected larval burdens, and body mass and home range sizes in males were correlated with nymphal burdens. These analyses suggest that aggregation of ticks on a minority of mice does not result from the distribution of host-seeking ticks but from characteristics of the hosts. PMID:22409977

  4. Specificity and Heterogeneity of Terahertz Radiation Effect on Gene Expression in Mouse Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    DOE PAGES

    Alexandrov, Boian S.; Phipps, M. Lisa; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Booshehri, Layla G.; Erat, Anna; Zabolotny, Janice; Mielke, Charles H.; Chen, Hou-Tong; Rodriguez, George; Rasmussen, Kim O.; et al

    2013-01-31

    In this paper, we report that terahertz (THz) irradiation of mouse mesenchymal stem cells (mMSCs) with a single-frequency (SF) 2.52 THz laser or pulsed broadband (centered at 10 THz) source results in irradiation specific heterogenic changes in gene expression. The THz effect depends on irradiation parameters such as the duration and type of THz source, and on the degree of stem cell differentiation. Our microarray survey and RT-PCR experiments demonstrate that prolonged broadband THz irradiation drives mMSCs toward differentiation, while 2-hour irradiation (regardless of THz sources) affects genes transcriptionally active in pluripotent stem cells. The strictly controlled experimental environment indicatesmore » minimal temperature changes and the absence of any discernable response to heat shock and cellular stress genes imply a non-thermal response. Computer simulations of the core promoters of two pluripotency markers reveal association between gene upregulation and propensity for DNA breathing. Finally, we propose that THz radiation has potential for non-contact control of cellular gene expression.« less

  5. Specificity and Heterogeneity of Terahertz Radiation Effect on Gene Expression in Mouse Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, Boian S.; Phipps, M. Lisa; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Booshehri, Layla G.; Erat, Anna; Zabolotny, Janice; Mielke, Charles H.; Chen, Hou-Tong; Rodriguez, George; Rasmussen, Kim O.; Martinez, Jennifer S.; Bishop, Alan R.; Usheva, Anny

    2013-01-31

    In this paper, we report that terahertz (THz) irradiation of mouse mesenchymal stem cells (mMSCs) with a single-frequency (SF) 2.52 THz laser or pulsed broadband (centered at 10 THz) source results in irradiation specific heterogenic changes in gene expression. The THz effect depends on irradiation parameters such as the duration and type of THz source, and on the degree of stem cell differentiation. Our microarray survey and RT-PCR experiments demonstrate that prolonged broadband THz irradiation drives mMSCs toward differentiation, while 2-hour irradiation (regardless of THz sources) affects genes transcriptionally active in pluripotent stem cells. The strictly controlled experimental environment indicates minimal temperature changes and the absence of any discernable response to heat shock and cellular stress genes imply a non-thermal response. Computer simulations of the core promoters of two pluripotency markers reveal association between gene upregulation and propensity for DNA breathing. Finally, we propose that THz radiation has potential for non-contact control of cellular gene expression.

  6. Scheduling in Heterogeneous Grid Environments: The Effects of DataMigration

    SciTech Connect

    Oliker, Leonid; Biswas, Rupak; Shan, Hongzhang; Smith, Warren

    2004-01-01

    Computational grids have the potential for solving large-scale scientific problems using heterogeneous and geographically distributed resources. However, a number of major technical hurdles must be overcome before this goal can be fully realized. One problem critical to the effective utilization of computational grids is efficient job scheduling. Our prior work addressed this challenge by defining a grid scheduling architecture and several job migration strategies. The focus of this study is to explore the impact of data migration under a variety of demanding grid conditions. We evaluate our grid scheduling algorithms by simulating compute servers, various groupings of servers into sites, and inter-server networks, using real workloads obtained from leading supercomputing centers. Several key performance metrics are used to compare the behavior of our algorithms against reference local and centralized scheduling schemes. Results show the tremendous benefits of grid scheduling, even in the presence of input/output data migration - while highlighting the importance of utilizing communication-aware scheduling schemes.

  7. Specificity and Heterogeneity of Terahertz Radiation Effect on Gene Expression in Mouse Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, Boian S.; Phipps, M. Lisa; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Booshehri, Layla G.; Erat, Anna; Zabolotny, Janice; Mielke, Charles H.; Chen, Hou-Tong; Rodriguez, George; Rasmussen, Kim Ø.; Martinez, Jennifer S.; Bishop, Alan R.; Usheva, Anny

    2013-01-01

    We report that terahertz (THz) irradiation of mouse mesenchymal stem cells (mMSCs) with a single-frequency (SF) 2.52 THz laser or pulsed broadband (centered at 10 THz) source results in irradiation specific heterogenic changes in gene expression. The THz effect depends on irradiation parameters such as the duration and type of THz source, and on the degree of stem cell differentiation. Our microarray survey and RT-PCR experiments demonstrate that prolonged broadband THz irradiation drives mMSCs toward differentiation, while 2-hour irradiation (regardless of THz sources) affects genes transcriptionally active in pluripotent stem cells. The strictly controlled experimental environment indicates minimal temperature changes and the absence of any discernable response to heat shock and cellular stress genes imply a non-thermal response. Computer simulations of the core promoters of two pluripotency markers reveal association between gene upregulation and propensity for DNA breathing. We propose that THz radiation has potential for non-contact control of cellular gene expression.

  8. Effects of surface compositional and structural heterogeneity on nanoparticle-protein interactions: different protein configurations.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rixiang; Carney, Randy P; Ikuma, Kaoru; Stellacci, Francesco; Lau, Boris L T

    2014-06-24

    As nanoparticles (NPs) enter into biological systems, they are immediately exposed to a variety and concentration of proteins. The physicochemical interactions between proteins and NPs are influenced by the surface properties of the NPs. To identify the effects of NP surface heterogeneity, the interactions between bovine serum albumin (BSA) and gold NPs (AuNPs) with similar chemical composition but different surface structures were investigated. Different interaction modes and BSA conformations were studied by dynamic light scattering, circular dichroism spectroscopy, fluorescence quenching and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Depending on the surface structure of AuNPs, BSA seems to adopt either a "side-on" or an "end-on" conformation on AuNPs. ITC demonstrated that the adsorption of BSA onto AuNPs with randomly distributed polar and nonpolar groups was primarily driven by electrostatic interaction, and all BSA were adsorbed in the same process. The adsorption of BSA onto AuNPs covered with alternating domains of polar and nonpolar groups was a combination of different interactions. Overall, the results of this study point to the potential for utilizing nanoscale manipulation of NP surfaces to control the resulting NP-protein interactions. PMID:24882660

  9. Effect of chemical heterogeneity on photoluminescence of graphite oxide treated with S-/N-containing modifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahim, Amani M.; Rodríguez-Castellón, Enrique; Montenegro, José María; Bandosz, Teresa J.

    2015-03-01

    Graphite oxide (GO) obtained using Hummers method was modified by hydrothermal treatment either with sulfanilic acid or polystyrene (3-ammonium) sulfonate at 100 °C or 85 °C, respectively. Both modifiers contain sulfur in the oxidized forms and nitrogen in the reduced forms. The materials were characterized using FTIR, XPS, thermal analysis, potentiometric titration and SEM. Their photoluminescent properties and their alteration with an addition of Ag+ were also measured. As a result of these modifications nitrogen was introduced to the graphene layers as amines, imides, amides, and sulfur as sulfones and sulfonic acids. Moreover, the presence of polyaniline was detected. This significantly affected the polarity, acid-base character, and conductivity of the materials. Apparently carboxylic groups of GO were involved in the surface reactions. The modified GOs lost their layered structure and the modifications resulted in the high degree of structural and chemical heterogeneity. Photoluminescence in visible light was recorded and linked to the presence of heteroatoms. For the polystyrene (3-ammonium) sulfonate modified sample addition of Ag+ quenched the photoluminescence at low wavelength showing sensitivity as a possible optical detector. No apparent effect was found for the sulfanilic acid modified sample.

  10. The Effect Of Hysteresis And Heterogeneity On Specific Yield And Fillable Porosity: Theoretical Considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patros, T.

    2011-12-01

    Specific yield, or drainable porosity, is an important component in estimating groundwater recharge (GWR) using the water table fluctuation (WTF) method. The use of soil fillable porosity instead of specific yield has been proposed due to the effect of hysteresis on the soil moisture characteristic curve (SMCC), which shows that the specific yield may be larger than the fillable porosity, resulting in larger estimation of GWR. Here, an attempt is made to compare the specific yield and the fillable porosity mathematically, using an equation(s) for the SMCC (including hysteresis) from the literature. The implication of using either the specific yield or the fillable porosity on GWR estimation in homogeneous and layered heterogeneous profiles for a variety of soil textural classes is presented. In addition, replacing soil residual volumetric water content with soil field capacity, or specific retention, as a lower limit of the SMCC, and the influence of that change on GWR estimation, is critically examined for both the specific yield and the fillable porosity.

  11. Effects of surface heterogeneity on the adsorption of CO₂ in microporous carbons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yangyang; Wilcox, Jennifer

    2012-02-01

    Carbon capture combined with utilization and storage has the potential to serve as a near-term option for CO(2) emissions reduction. CO(2) capture by carbon-based sorbents and CO(2) storage in geologic formations such as coal and shale both require a thorough understanding of the CO(2) adsorption properties in microporous carbon-based materials. Complex pore structures for natural organic materials, such as coal and gas shale, in addition to general carbon-based porous materials are modeled as a collection of independent, noninterconnected, functionalized graphitic slit pores with surface heterogeneities. Electronic structure calculations coupled with van der Waals-inclusive corrections have been performed to investigate the electronic properties of functionalized graphitic surfaces. With Bader charge analysis, electronic structure calculations can provide the initial framework comprising both the geometry and corresponding charge information required to carry out statistical modeling. Grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations were carried out to determine the adsorption isotherms for a given adsorbent-adsorbate interaction at temperature/pressure conditions relevant to carbon capture applications to focus on the effect of the surface functionalities. On the basis of the current work, oxygen-containing functional groups were predicted to enhance CO(2) adsorption in microporous carbon materials in the absence of water vapor, and the hydrated graphite was found to hinder CO(2) adsorption. PMID:22216997

  12. First Record of Eocene Bony Fishes and Crocodyliforms from Canada’s Western Arctic

    PubMed Central

    Eberle, Jaelyn J.; Gottfried, Michael D.; Hutchison, J. Howard; Brochu, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Discovery of Eocene non-marine vertebrates, including crocodylians, turtles, bony fishes, and mammals in Canada’s High Arctic was a critical paleontological contribution of the last century because it indicated that this region of the Arctic had been mild, temperate, and ice-free during the early – middle Eocene (∼53–50 Ma), despite being well above the Arctic Circle. To date, these discoveries have been restricted to Canada’s easternmost Arctic – Ellesmere and Axel Heiberg Islands (Nunavut). Although temporally correlative strata crop out over 1,000 km west, on Canada’s westernmost Arctic Island – Banks Island, Northwest Territories – they have been interpreted as predominantly marine. We document the first Eocene bony fish and crocodyliform fossils from Banks Island. Principal Findings We describe fossils of bony fishes, including lepisosteid (Atractosteus), esocid (pike), and amiid, and a crocodyliform, from lower – middle Eocene strata of the Cyclic Member, Eureka Sound Formation within Aulavik National Park (∼76°N. paleolat.). Palynology suggests the sediments are late early to middle Eocene in age, and likely spanned the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO). Conclusions/Significance These fossils extend the geographic range of Eocene Arctic lepisosteids, esocids, amiids, and crocodyliforms west by approximately 40° of longitude or ∼1100 km. The low diversity bony fish fauna, at least at the family level, is essentially identical on Ellesmere and Banks Islands, suggesting a pan-High Arctic bony fish fauna of relatively basal groups around the margin of the Eocene Arctic Ocean. From a paleoclimatic perspective, presence of a crocodyliform, gar and amiid fishes on northern Banks provides further evidence that mild, year-round temperatures extended across the Canadian Arctic during early – middle Eocene time. Additionally, the Banks Island crocodyliform is consistent with the phylogenetic hypothesis of a Paleogene divergence

  13. Variable bucket representation of TOPMODEL and investigation of the effects of rainfall heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivapalan, Murugesu; Woods, Ross A.; Kalma, Jetse D.

    1997-07-01

    In this paper we present a variable bucket capacity (VBC) representation of TOPMODEL (Beven and Kirkby, 1979), generalizing the Manabe simple bucket scheme widely used in climate models. In doing this, we have been motivated by the variable infiltration capacity (VIC) model presented by Wood et al. (1992). For catchments, or for parts of the land surface, whose hydrology fits the TOPMODEL assumptions, this lumped version offers an alternative representation that can be used as the building block for land surface hydrology models at large spatial scales. The model is first applied, with satisfactory results, to a small catchment near Canberra in Australia. Next, using the same model, the effects of random spatial variability of rainfall are studied, but in the context of land surface hydrological parameterizations for global climate models. Sub-grid rainfall variability, especially the partial coverage that characterizes rainfall events at such large scales, is found to cause significant biases in the estimation of land surface fluxes. Other manifestations of the effects of the spatial variability of rainfall are also investigated, also by means of model simulations, but with a view to gaining insights for developing simple parameterizations of land surface fluxes at large scales. This includes the investigation of the dynamics, i.e. spatial and temporal variability, of the soil moisture state variable during and after a rainfall event. In addition, empirical relationships linking the variable contributing area, subsurface runoff and evaporation, to a soil moisture state variable (e.g. soil moisture storage), are derived based on model simulations, and the effects of the sub-grid rainfall variability on these relationships are examined. Because of the strong non-linearity inherent in the process descriptions within the model, the above constitutive relationships are strongly affected by rainfall heterogeneity.

  14. Effects of topography and crustal heterogeneities on the source estimation of LP event at Kilauea volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cesca, S.; Battaglia, J.; Dahm, T.; Tessmer, E.; Heimann, S.; Okubo, P.

    2008-01-01

    The main goal of this study is to improve the modelling of the source mechanism associated with the generation of long period (LP) signals in volcanic areas. Our intent is to evaluate the effects that detailed structural features of the volcanic models play in the generation of LP signal and the consequent retrieval of LP source characteristics. In particular, effects associated with the presence of topography and crustal heterogeneities are here studied in detail. We focus our study on a LP event observed at Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, in 2001 May. A detailed analysis of this event and its source modelling is accompanied by a set of synthetic tests, which aim to evaluate the effects of topography and the presence of low velocity shallow layers in the source region. The forward problem of Green's function generation is solved numerically following a pseudo-spectral approach, assuming different 3-D models. The inversion is done in the frequency domain and the resulting source mechanism is represented by the sum of two time-dependent terms: a full moment tensor and a single force. Synthetic tests show how characteristic velocity structures, associated with shallow sources, may be partially responsible for the generation of the observed long-lasting ringing waveforms. When applying the inversion technique to Kilauea LP data set, inversions carried out for different crustal models led to very similar source geometries, indicating a subhorizontal cracks. On the other hand, the source time function and its duration are significantly different for different models. These results support the indication of a strong influence of crustal layering on the generation of the LP signal, while the assumption of homogeneous velocity model may bring to misleading results. ?? 2008 The Authors Journal compilation ?? 2008 RAS.

  15. Clinical and Microcomputed Topography Evaluation of the Concentrated Growth Factors as a Sole Material in a Cystic Bony Defect in Alveolar Bone Followed by Dental Implantation: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Shyu, Shih-Shiun; Fu, Earl; Shen, E-Chin

    2016-10-01

    Concentrated growth factors (CGFs) can be used to enhance wound healing. This case report describes a short-term effect of CGF grafting followed by implant placement in a cystic bony defect within the mandible. Healing conditions were monitored by 2 implant-related surgeries, radiographs, and a microcomputed topography examination. Continuous increase of radiopacity in radiographs was noticed till 6 months after grafting. Bone core specimen was taken at 3.5 months after grafting, and percent bone volume reached 32.7% analyzed by microcomputed topography. In conclusion, the present case showed bone regeneration in the cystic bony defect grafted by CGFs alone.

  16. Reducing the effects of acoustic heterogeneity with an iterative reconstruction method from experimental data in microwave induced thermoacoustic tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jinguo; Zhao, Zhiqin Song, Jian; Chen, Guoping; Nie, Zaiping; Liu, Qing-Huo

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: An iterative reconstruction method has been previously reported by the authors of this paper. However, the iterative reconstruction method was demonstrated by solely using the numerical simulations. It is essential to apply the iterative reconstruction method to practice conditions. The objective of this work is to validate the capability of the iterative reconstruction method for reducing the effects of acoustic heterogeneity with the experimental data in microwave induced thermoacoustic tomography. Methods: Most existing reconstruction methods need to combine the ultrasonic measurement technology to quantitatively measure the velocity distribution of heterogeneity, which increases the system complexity. Different to existing reconstruction methods, the iterative reconstruction method combines time reversal mirror technique, fast marching method, and simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique to iteratively estimate the velocity distribution of heterogeneous tissue by solely using the measured data. Then, the estimated velocity distribution is used subsequently to reconstruct the highly accurate image of microwave absorption distribution. Experiments that a target placed in an acoustic heterogeneous environment are performed to validate the iterative reconstruction method. Results: By using the estimated velocity distribution, the target in an acoustic heterogeneous environment can be reconstructed with better shape and higher image contrast than targets that are reconstructed with a homogeneous velocity distribution. Conclusions: The distortions caused by the acoustic heterogeneity can be efficiently corrected by utilizing the velocity distribution estimated by the iterative reconstruction method. The advantage of the iterative reconstruction method over the existing correction methods is that it is successful in improving the quality of the image of microwave absorption distribution without increasing the system complexity.

  17. The effect of a spatially heterogeneous transmural water flux on concentration polarization of low density lipoprotein in arteries.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Peter E; Sherwin, Spencer J; Weinberg, Peter D

    2009-04-22

    Uptake of low density lipoprotein (LDL) by the arterial wall is likely to play a key role in atherogenesis. A particular process that may cause vascular scale heterogeneity in the rate of transendothelial LDL transport is the formation of a flow-dependent LDL concentration polarization layer on the luminal surface of the arterial endothelium. In this study, the effect of a spatially heterogeneous transmural water flux (that traverses the endothelium only via interendothelial cell clefts) on such concentration polarization is investigated numerically. Unlike in previous investigations, realistic intercellular cleft dimensions are used here and several values of LDL diffusivity are considered. Particular attention is paid to the spatially averaged LDL concentration adjacent to different regions of the endothelial surface, as such measures may be relevant to the rate of transendothelial LDL transport. It is demonstrated in principle that a heterogeneous transmural water flux can act to enhance such measures, and cause them to develop a shear dependence (in addition to that caused by vascular scale flow features, affecting the overall degree of LDL concentration polarization). However, it is shown that this enhancement and additional shear dependence are likely to be negligible for a physiologically realistic transmural flux velocity of 0.0439 mum s(-1) and an LDL diffusivity (in blood plasma) of 28.67 mum(2) s(-1). Hence, the results imply that vascular scale studies of LDL concentration polarization are justified in ignoring the effect of a spatially heterogeneous transmural water flux.

  18. Effect of Subgrid Heterogeneity on Scaling Geochemical and Biogeochemical Reactions: A Case of U(VI) Desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chongxuan; Shang, Jianying; Shan, Huimei; Zachara, John M.

    2014-02-04

    The effect of subgrid heterogeneity in sediment properties on the rate of uranyl[U(VI)] desorption was investigated using a sediment collected from the US Department of Energy Hanford site. The sediment was sieved into 7 grain size fractions that each exhibited different U(VI) desorption properties. Six columns were assembled using the sediment with its grain size fractions arranged in different spatial configurations to mimic subgrid heterogeneity in reactive transport properties. The apparent rate of U(VI) desorption varied significantly in the columns. Those columns with sediment structures leading to preferential transport had much lower rates of U(VI) desorption than those with relatively homogeneous transport. Modeling analysis indicated that the U(VI) desorption model and parameters characterized from well-mixed reactors significantly over-predicted the measured U(VI) desorption in the columns with preferential transport. A dual domain model, which operationally separates reactive transport properties into two subgrid domains improved the predictions significantly. A similar effect of subgrid heterogeneity, albeit at a less degree, was observed for denitrification, which also occurred in the columns. The results imply that subgrid heterogeneity is an important consideration in extrapolating reaction rates from the laboratory to field.

  19. Endocrine and Local IGF-I in the Bony Fish Immune System.

    PubMed

    Franz, Anne-Constance; Faass, Oliver; Köllner, Bernd; Shved, Natallia; Link, Karl; Casanova, Ayako; Wenger, Michael; D'Cotta, Helena; Baroiller, Jean-François; Ullrich, Oliver; Reinecke, Manfred; Eppler, Elisabeth

    2016-01-26

    A role for GH and IGF-I in the modulation of the immune system has been under discussion for decades. Generally, GH is considered a stimulator of innate immune parameters in mammals and teleost fish. The stimulatory effects in humans as well as in bony fish often appear to be correlated with elevated endocrine IGF-I (liver-derived), which has also been shown to be suppressed during infection in some studies. Nevertheless, data are still fragmentary. Some studies point to an important role of GH and IGF-I particularly during immune organ development and constitution. Even less is known about the potential relevance of local (autocrine/paracrine) IGF-I within adult and developing immune organs, and the distinct localization of IGF-I in immune cells and tissues of mammals and fish has not been systematically defined. Thus far, IGF-I has been localized in different mammalian immune cell types, particularly macrophages and granulocytes, and in supporting cells, but not in T-lymphocytes. In the present study, we detected IGF-I in phagocytic cells isolated from rainbow trout head kidney and, in contrast to some findings in mammals, in T-cells of a channel catfish cell line. Thus, although numerous analogies among mammals and teleosts exist not only for the GH/IGF-system, but also for the immune system, there are differences that should be further investigated. For instance, it is unclear whether the primarily reported role of GH/IGF-I in the innate immune response is due to the lack of studies focusing on the adaptive immune system, or whether it truly preferentially concerns innate immune parameters. Infectious challenges in combination with GH/IGF-I manipulations are another important topic that has not been sufficiently addressed to date, particularly with respect to developmental and environmental influences on fish growth and health.

  20. Endocrine and Local IGF-I in the Bony Fish Immune System.

    PubMed

    Franz, Anne-Constance; Faass, Oliver; Köllner, Bernd; Shved, Natallia; Link, Karl; Casanova, Ayako; Wenger, Michael; D'Cotta, Helena; Baroiller, Jean-François; Ullrich, Oliver; Reinecke, Manfred; Eppler, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    A role for GH and IGF-I in the modulation of the immune system has been under discussion for decades. Generally, GH is considered a stimulator of innate immune parameters in mammals and teleost fish. The stimulatory effects in humans as well as in bony fish often appear to be correlated with elevated endocrine IGF-I (liver-derived), which has also been shown to be suppressed during infection in some studies. Nevertheless, data are still fragmentary. Some studies point to an important role of GH and IGF-I particularly during immune organ development and constitution. Even less is known about the potential relevance of local (autocrine/paracrine) IGF-I within adult and developing immune organs, and the distinct localization of IGF-I in immune cells and tissues of mammals and fish has not been systematically defined. Thus far, IGF-I has been localized in different mammalian immune cell types, particularly macrophages and granulocytes, and in supporting cells, but not in T-lymphocytes. In the present study, we detected IGF-I in phagocytic cells isolated from rainbow trout head kidney and, in contrast to some findings in mammals, in T-cells of a channel catfish cell line. Thus, although numerous analogies among mammals and teleosts exist not only for the GH/IGF-system, but also for the immune system, there are differences that should be further investigated. For instance, it is unclear whether the primarily reported role of GH/IGF-I in the innate immune response is due to the lack of studies focusing on the adaptive immune system, or whether it truly preferentially concerns innate immune parameters. Infectious challenges in combination with GH/IGF-I manipulations are another important topic that has not been sufficiently addressed to date, particularly with respect to developmental and environmental influences on fish growth and health. PMID:26821056

  1. Targeting P38 Pathway Regulates Bony Formation via MSC Recruitment during Mandibular Distraction Osteogenesis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zi-hui; Wu, Bao-lei; Ye, Chen; Jia, Sen; Yang, Xin-jie; Hou, Rui; Lei, De-lin; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Distraction osteogenesis (DO) is a widely used self-tissue engineering. However, complications and discomfort due to the long treatment period are still the bottleneck of DO. Novel strategies to accelerate bone formation in DO are still needed. P38 is capable of regulating the osteogenic differentiation of both mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and osteoblasts, which are crucial to bone regeneration. However, it is not clear whether targeting p38 could regulate bony formation in DO. The purpose of the current work was to investigate the effects of local application of either p38 agonist anisomycin or p38 inhibitor SB203580 in a rat model of DO. 30 adult rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: (A) rats injected with DMSO served as the control group; (B) rats injected with p38 agonist anisomycin; (C) rats injected with p38 inhibitor SB203580. All the rats were subjected to mandibular distraction and the injection was performed daily during this period. The distracted mandibles were harvested on days 15 and 30 after surgery and subjected to the following analysis. Micro-computed tomography and histological evaluation results showed that local application of p38 agonist anisomycin increased new bone formation in DO, whereas p38 inhibitor SB203580 decreased it. Immunohistochemical analysis suggested that anisomycin promoted MSC recruitment in the distraction gap. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that local application of p38 agonist anisomycin can increase new bone formation during DO. This study may lead to a novel cell-based strategy for the improvement of bone regeneration. PMID:27766028

  2. Endocrine and Local IGF-I in the Bony Fish Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Franz, Anne-Constance; Faass, Oliver; Köllner, Bernd; Shved, Natallia; Link, Karl; Casanova, Ayako; Wenger, Michael; D’Cotta, Helena; Baroiller, Jean-François; Ullrich, Oliver; Reinecke, Manfred; Eppler, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    A role for GH and IGF-I in the modulation of the immune system has been under discussion for decades. Generally, GH is considered a stimulator of innate immune parameters in mammals and teleost fish. The stimulatory effects in humans as well as in bony fish often appear to be correlated with elevated endocrine IGF-I (liver-derived), which has also been shown to be suppressed during infection in some studies. Nevertheless, data are still fragmentary. Some studies point to an important role of GH and IGF-I particularly during immune organ development and constitution. Even less is known about the potential relevance of local (autocrine/paracrine) IGF-I within adult and developing immune organs, and the distinct localization of IGF-I in immune cells and tissues of mammals and fish has not been systematically defined. Thus far, IGF-I has been localized in different mammalian immune cell types, particularly macrophages and granulocytes, and in supporting cells, but not in T-lymphocytes. In the present study, we detected IGF-I in phagocytic cells isolated from rainbow trout head kidney and, in contrast to some findings in mammals, in T-cells of a channel catfish cell line. Thus, although numerous analogies among mammals and teleosts exist not only for the GH/IGF-system, but also for the immune system, there are differences that should be further investigated. For instance, it is unclear whether the primarily reported role of GH/IGF-I in the innate immune response is due to the lack of studies focusing on the adaptive immune system, or whether it truly preferentially concerns innate immune parameters. Infectious challenges in combination with GH/IGF-I manipulations are another important topic that has not been sufficiently addressed to date, particularly with respect to developmental and environmental influences on fish growth and health. PMID:26821056

  3. The effect of reservoir heterogeneity on gas production from hydrate accumulations in the permafrost

    SciTech Connect

    Reagan, M. T.; Kowalsky, M B.; Moridis, G. J.; Silpngarmlert, S.

    2010-05-01

    The quantity of hydrocarbon gases trapped in natural hydrate accumulations is enormous, leading to significant interest in the evaluation of their potential as an energy source. Large volumes of gas can be readily produced at high rates for long times from methane hydrate accumulations in the permafrost by means of depressurization-induced dissociation combined with conventional technologies and horizontal or vertical well configurations. Initial studies on the possibility of natural gas production from permafrost hydrates assumed homogeneity in intrinsic reservoir properties and in the initial condition of the hydrate-bearing layers (either due to the coarseness of the model or due to simplifications in the definition of the system). These results showed great promise for gas recovery from Class 1, 2, and 3 systems in the permafrost. This work examines the consequences of inevitable heterogeneity in intrinsic properties, such as in the porosity of the hydrate-bearing formation, or heterogeneity in the initial state of hydrate saturation. Heterogeneous configurations are generated through multiple methods: (1) through defining heterogeneous layers via existing well-log data, (2) through randomized initialization of reservoir properties and initial conditions, and (3) through the use of geostatistical methods to create heterogeneous fields that extrapolate from the limited data available from cores and well-log data. These extrapolations use available information and established geophysical methods to capture a range of deposit properties and hydrate configurations. The results show that some forms of heterogeneity, such as horizontal stratification, can assist in production of hydrate-derived gas. However, more heterogeneous structures can lead to complex physical behavior within the deposit and near the wellbore that may obstruct the flow of fluids to the well, necessitating revised production strategies. The need for fine discretization is crucial in all cases to

  4. Magnetic pyrite cinder as an efficient heterogeneous ozonation catalyst and synergetic effect of deposited Ce.

    PubMed

    Wu, Deli; Liu, Ying; He, Hongping; Zhang, Yalei

    2016-07-01

    Heterogeneous catalytic ozonation was emerged to be a promising alternative in the mineralization of various persistent organic pollutants in recent decades. Magnetic pyrite cinder (PyC), which was employed as the catalyst in our investigation, was further deposited by Ce (Ce-PyC) to enhance its catalytic activity in the degradation of aqueous reactive black 5 (RB5). The results showed that additional 17.39%, 42.12% mineralization efficiency was obtained by O3/PyC, O3/Ce-PyC, respectively, in the degradation of RB5 compared to that of O3 alone under identical experimental condition. The reaction mechanism involved the enhanced mineralization of aqueous RB5 at the catalyst-solution interface via hydroxyl radicals produced by the reaction between O3 and catalyst surface. Besides surface hydroxyl, surface Ce(Ⅲ) was crucial for Ce-PyC in the enhanced generation of hydroxyl radicals. More surprisingly, it was found that both PyC and Ce-PyC could exert quite stable catalytic activity in a wide pH range from 3 to 10, which was supposed to be combined with inherently comprised various metal oxide, such as Fe2O3, Fe3O4, MnO2 and CuO. Ozone utilization evaluation demonstrated that PyC and Ce-PyC facilitated effective ozone decomposition, as ozone utilization efficiency (mgTOC/mgO3) of O3/PyC and O3/Ce-PyC increased 64.0%, 155.0%, respectively, compared to that of O3 alone. This investigation provided an effective alternative in the resource utilization of PyC, which was traditionally characterized as a waste material. PMID:27108370

  5. Magnetic pyrite cinder as an efficient heterogeneous ozonation catalyst and synergetic effect of deposited Ce.

    PubMed

    Wu, Deli; Liu, Ying; He, Hongping; Zhang, Yalei

    2016-07-01

    Heterogeneous catalytic ozonation was emerged to be a promising alternative in the mineralization of various persistent organic pollutants in recent decades. Magnetic pyrite cinder (PyC), which was employed as the catalyst in our investigation, was further deposited by Ce (Ce-PyC) to enhance its catalytic activity in the degradation of aqueous reactive black 5 (RB5). The results showed that additional 17.39%, 42.12% mineralization efficiency was obtained by O3/PyC, O3/Ce-PyC, respectively, in the degradation of RB5 compared to that of O3 alone under identical experimental condition. The reaction mechanism involved the enhanced mineralization of aqueous RB5 at the catalyst-solution interface via hydroxyl radicals produced by the reaction between O3 and catalyst surface. Besides surface hydroxyl, surface Ce(Ⅲ) was crucial for Ce-PyC in the enhanced generation of hydroxyl radicals. More surprisingly, it was found that both PyC and Ce-PyC could exert quite stable catalytic activity in a wide pH range from 3 to 10, which was supposed to be combined with inherently comprised various metal oxide, such as Fe2O3, Fe3O4, MnO2 and CuO. Ozone utilization evaluation demonstrated that PyC and Ce-PyC facilitated effective ozone decomposition, as ozone utilization efficiency (mgTOC/mgO3) of O3/PyC and O3/Ce-PyC increased 64.0%, 155.0%, respectively, compared to that of O3 alone. This investigation provided an effective alternative in the resource utilization of PyC, which was traditionally characterized as a waste material.

  6. Effect of heterogeneity correction on dosimetric parameters of radiotherapy planning for thoracic esophageal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Masao; Yoshida, Kenji; Nishimura, Hideki; Miyawaki, Daisuke; Uehara, Kazuyuki; Okamoto, Yoshiaki; Okayama, Takanobu; Sasaki, Ryohei

    2014-04-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of heterogeneity correction (HC) on dosimetric parameters in 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy planning for patients with thoracic esophageal cancer. We retrospectively analyzed 20 patients. Two treatment plans were generated for each patient using a superposition algorithm on the Xio radiotherapy planning system. The first plan was calculated without HC. The second was a new plan calculated with HC, using identical beam geometries and maintaining the same number of monitor units as the first. With regard to the planning target volume (PTV), the overall mean differences in the prescription dose, maximum dose, mean dose, and dose that covers 95% of the PTV between the first and second plans were 1.10 Gy (1.8%), 1.35 Gy (2.2%), 1.10 Gy (1.9%), and 0.56 Gy (1.0%), respectively. With regard to parameters related to the organs at risk (OARs), the mean differences in the absolute percentages of lung volume receiving greater than 5, 10, 20, and 30 Gy (lung V{sub 5}, V{sub 10}, V{sub 20}, and V{sub 30}) between the first and second plans were 7.1%, 2.7%, 0.4%, and 0.5%, respectively. These results suggest that HC might have a more pronounced effect on the percentages of lung volume receiving lower doses (e.g., V{sub 5} and V{sub 10}) than on the dosimetric parameters related to the PTV and other OARs.

  7. Combined effects of climatic gradient and domestic livestock grazing on reptile community structure in a heterogeneous agroecosystem.

    PubMed

    Rotem, Guy; Gavish, Yoni; Shacham, Boaz; Giladi, Itamar; Bouskila, Amos; Ziv, Yaron

    2016-01-01

    Grazing plays an important role in shaping ecological communities in human-related ecosystems. Although myriad studies have explored the joint effect of grazing and climate on plant communities, this interactive effect has rarely been studied in animals. We hypothesized that the effect of grazing on the reptile community varies along a climatic gradient in relation to the effect of grazing on habitat characteristics, and that grazing differentially affects reptiles of different biogeographic regions. We tested our hypotheses by collecting data on environmental characteristics and by trapping reptiles in four heterogeneous landscapes experiencing differing grazing intensities and distributed along a sharp climatic gradient. We found that while reptile diversity increased with grazing intensity at the mesic end of the gradient, it decreased with grazing intensity at the arid end. Moreover, the proportion of reptile species of differing biogeographic origins varied with the interactive effect of climate and grazing. The representation of species originating in arid biogeographic zones was highest at the arid end of the climatic gradient, and representation increased with grazing intensity within this area. Regardless of the climatic context, increased grazing pressure results in a reduction in vegetation cover and thus in changes in habitat characteristics. By reducing vegetation cover, grazing increased habitat heterogeneity in the dense mesic sites and decreased habitat heterogeneity in the arid sites. Thus, our results suggest that the same direction of habitat alteration caused by grazing may have opposite effects on biodiversity and community composition in different climatic contexts.

  8. Transuranic Transmutation and Criticality Calculation Sensitivity to Heterogeneous Lattice Effects - 12391

    SciTech Connect

    Barbaras, Sean A.; Knight, Travis W.

    2012-07-01

    composition whereas U-238, Pu-242, and Pu-238 composition was not changed by taking into account the non-homogenous lattice effects. Heterogeneous lattice effects do change the calculated eigenvalue and transmutation rate in a non-uniform lattice of MOX fuel rods and UO{sub 2} fuel. However, the uncertainty in the ENDF data used by SCALE in these calculations is large enough that the infinite lattice assumption remains valid. (authors)

  9. Effects of source zone heterogeneity on surfactant-enhanced NAPL dissolution and resulting remediation end-points.

    PubMed

    Saenton, S; Illangasekare, T H; Soga, K; Saba, T A

    2002-11-01

    The effectiveness of removal of nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) from the entrapment source zone of the subsurface has been limited by soil heterogeneity and the inability to locate all entrapped sources. The goal of this study was to demonstrate the uncertainty of degree of source removal associated with aquifer heterogeneity. In this demonstration, source zone NAPL removal using surfactant-enhanced dissolution was considered. Model components that simulate the processes of natural dissolution in aqueous phase and surfactant-enhanced dissolution were incorporated into an existing code of contaminant transport. The dissolution modules of the simulator used previously developed Gilland-Sherwood type phenomenological models of NAPL dissolution to estimate mass transfer coefficients that are upscaleable to multidimensional flow conditions found at field sites. The model was used to simulate the mass removal from 10 NAPL entrapment zone configurations based on previously conducted two-dimensional tank experiments. These entrapment zones represent the NAPL distribution in spatially correlated random fields of aquifer hydraulic conductivity. The numerical simulations representing two-dimensional conditions show that effectiveness of mass removal depends on the aquifer heterogeneity that controls the NAPL entrapment and delivery of the surfactant to the locations of entrapped NAPLs. Flow bypassing resulting from heterogeneity and the reduction of relative permeability due to NAPL entrapment reduces the delivery efficiency of the surfactant, thus prolonging the remediation time to achieve desired end-point NAPL saturations and downstream dissolved concentrations. In some extreme cases, the injected surfactant completely bypassed the NAPL source zones. It was also found that mass depletion rates for different NAPL source configurations vary significantly. The study shows that heterogeneity result in uncertainties in the mass removal and achievable end-points that are

  10. Effect of partitioning equilibria on the activity of beta-galactosidase in heterogeneous media.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Julieta M; Ciklic, Iván; Perillo, María A

    2005-12-01

    We had demonstrated that membrane adsorption or penetration differentially modulated beta-Galactosidase (beta-Gal) activity against soluble substrates (Coll. and Surf., 24, 21, 2002). In a heterogeneous media, not only the enzyme but also the rest of the chemical species taking part in a chemical reaction would eventually interact with the available surfaces. The aim of the present work was to investigate if, in addition to changes in the intrinsic mechanism of the reaction at the lipid-water interface, the kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed reactions could be significantly affected by the partitioning of the substrate (ortho-nitro-phenyl galactopyranoside (ONPG)), the product (ortho-nitro-phenol (ONP)) and the enzyme (E. coli beta-Gal) towards the membrane. Multilamellar vesicles of sPC were used as model membranes. Membrane-water partition coefficients (Pm/w) were determined according to the theory and methodology developed previously (J. Neurosci. Meth. 36, 203, 1991). The values of Pm/w obtained (PONPG =0, PONP =50 and P beta-Gal = 118) were applied to a two-compartment model, which assumed a free access of the substrate to the enzyme and a nucleophile-like activatory effect exerted, within the membrane compartment, by the lipid-water interface. This model: (i) reproduced the lipid concentration-dependence we had observed previously in Vmax, (ii) predicted the values of k4 = 3.54 x 10(7) s-1 and the extinction coefficient of the aglycone in the membrane phase, 4012 M(-1) cm-1, with p < 0.0001 and p < 0.02, respectively, as well as for P beta-Gal =117 (which was poor (p=0.6716) but gave a numerical value within the same order of magnitude that the experimental value) and (iii) emphasized the importance of the more efficient reaction mechanism in the membrane phase compared with that in the aqueous phase (k4>k3).

  11. Spatial and Temporal Analysis of Drought Effects in a Heterogeneous Semi-Arid Forest Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assal, T.; Anderson, P. J.; Sibold, J.

    2015-12-01

    Drought-induced forest mortality has been documented across genera in recent years in western North America. Understanding patterns of mortality and plant response to severe drought is important to resource managers, given the frequency of these events are expected to increase in the future. Remote sensing studies have documented changes in forest properties due to direct and indirect effects of drought; however, few have addressed this at local scales needed to characterize highly heterogeneous ecosystems in the forest-shrubland ecotone. We analyzed a 22-year Landsat time series (1985-2012) to determine changes in forest that experienced a relatively dry decade punctuated by two years of extreme drought. We assessed the relationship between vegetation indices and field measures, applied the index to trend analysis to uncover the location, direction and timing of change, and assessed the interaction of climate on topography. The Normalized Difference Moisture Index (NDMI) had the strongest correlation with plant area index (R2 = 0.64) and canopy gap fraction (R2 = 0.65). During the study period, 25% of the forested area experienced a significant (p < 0.05) negative trend in NDMI, compared to less than 10% in a positive trend. Trends were not consistent across forest type as a larger amount of coniferous forest was impacted by negative trends than deciduous forest. Southern aspects were least likely to exhibit a negative trend and north aspects were most prevalent. Field plots with a negative trend had a lower live density, and higher amounts of standing dead and down trees compared to plots with no trend. Our analysis identifies spatially explicit patterns of long-term trends anchored with ground based evidence to highlight areas of forest that are resistant, persistent and vulnerable to severe drought. The results provide a long-term perspective for the resource management of this area and can be applied to similar ecosystems throughout western North America.

  12. Cavernous hemangioma of the posterior mediastinum with bony invasion.

    PubMed

    Yun, Takamasa; Suzuki, Hidemi; Tagawa, Tetsuzo; Iwata, Takekazu; Mizobuchi, Teruaki; Yoshida, Shigetoshi; Yamazaki, Masashi; Yoshino, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a case of a cavernous hemangioma of the posterior mediastinum treated with surgical resection. Mediastinal hemangiomas are rare and diagnosis is difficult prior to operation. A 58-year-old female was referred to our hospital for back pain and a tumor in the left posterior mediastinum that was detected by chest computed tomography (CT). CT showed a tumor adjacent to the left side of the fifth thoracic vertebrae measuring 60 × 50 mm with invasion into and destruction of the 5th rib. The tumor was resected successfully via hemilaminectomy with costotransversectomy, and was revealed to be a cavernous hemangioma histologically. 1 year and 5 months after surgery, the patient was asymptomatic and without a recurrence. Hemangiomas are usually considered benign but sometimes behave aggressively with destruction of the neighboring structures. We consider en bloc resection to be safe and effective for aggressive cavernous hemangiomas of the posterior mediastinum.

  13. Probing the effects of heterogeneity on delocalized pi...pi interaction energies.

    PubMed

    Bates, Desiree M; Anderson, Julie A; Oloyede, Ponmile; Tschumper, Gregory S

    2008-05-21

    Dimers composed of benzene (Bz), 1,3,5-triazine (Tz), cyanogen (Cy) and diacetylene (Di) are used to examine the effects of heterogeneity at the molecular level and at the cluster level on pi...pi stacking energies. The MP2 complete basis set (CBS) limits for the interaction energies (E(int)) of these model systems were determined with extrapolation techniques designed for correlation consistent basis sets. CCSD(T) calculations were used to correct for higher-order correlation effects (deltaE(CCSD)(T)(MP2)) which were as large as +2.81 kcal mol(-1). The introduction of nitrogen atoms into the parallel-slipped dimers of the aforementioned molecules causes significant changes to E(int). The CCSD(T)/CBS E(int) for Di-Cy is -2.47 kcal mol(-1) which is substantially larger than either Cy-Cy (-1.69 kcal mol(-1)) or Di-Di (-1.42 kcal mol(-1)). Similarly, the heteroaromatic Bz-Tz dimer has an E(int) of -3.75 kcal mol(-1) which is much larger than either Tz-Tz (-3.03 kcal mol(-1)) or Bz-Bz (-2.78 kcal mol(-1)). Symmetry-adapted perturbation theory calculations reveal a correlation between the electrostatic component of E(int) and the large increase in the interaction energy for the mixed dimers. However, all components (exchange, induction, dispersion) must be considered to rationalize the observed trend. Another significant conclusion of this work is that basis-set superposition error has a negligible impact on the popular deltaE(CCSD)(T)(MP2) correction, which indicates that counterpoise corrections are not necessary when computing higher-order correlation effects on E(int). Spin-component-scaled MP2 (SCS-MP2 and SCSN-MP2) calculations with a correlation-consistent triple-zeta basis set reproduce the trends in the interaction energies despite overestimating the CCSD(T)/CBS E(int) of Bz-Tz by 20-30%.

  14. Who does the hat fit? Teenager heterogeneity and the effectiveness of information policies in preventing cannabis use and heavy drinking.

    PubMed

    Etilé, Fabrice

    2006-07-01

    This paper models heterogeneity in the relationship between exposure to information at school or in the media and cannabis use and heavy drinking, using latent class techniques applied to data on French teenagers collected in 1993. Teenagers cluster in five classes which differ in their tastes for drunkenness and cannabis, and in the correlations between information exposure and cannabis use or heavy drinking. Teenager heterogeneity and habit-formation or precociousness effects limit the effectiveness of general information policies. Improving the impact of prevention requires that interventions be better targeted and personalised. We show how economic theory, latent class techniques and existing psychometric questionnaires can be used to build simple statistical tools for targeting prevention policies.

  15. Bony Versus Soft Tissue Reconstruction for Anterior Shoulder Instability

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Richard James; Miniaci, Anthony; Jones, Morgan H.

    2015-01-01

    effect on the model. When the rate of no complication after open surgery is 97.6%, open surgery becomes the patient’s preferred treatment. Conclusion: Arthroscopic surgery is an acceptable treatment if recurrent instability occurs consistently at ≤23.8%. This has important implications given the technical difficulty of successfully performing arthroscopic fixation to resolve recurrent anteroinferior glenohumeral dislocations associated with critical osseous defects. However, due to a lack of clinical outcomes studies, more research is needed to better predict the optimal operative treatment. PMID:26779552

  16. Homogenized moment tensor and the effect of near-field heterogeneities on nonisotropic radiation in nuclear explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgos, Gaël.; Capdeville, Yann; Guillot, Laurent

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the effect of small-scale heterogeneities close to a seismic explosive source, at intermediate periods (20-50 s), with an emphasis on the resulting nonisotropic far-field radiation. First, using a direct numerical approach, we show that small-scale elastic heterogeneities located in the near-field of an explosive source, generate unexpected phases (i.e., long period S waves). We then demonstrate that the nonperiodic homogenization theory applied to 2-D and 3-D elastic models, with various pattern of small-scale heterogeneities near the source, leads to accurate waveforms at a reduced computational cost compared to direct modeling. Further, it gives an interpretation of how nearby small-scale features interact with the source at low frequencies, through an explicit correction to the seismic moment tensor. In 2-D simulations, we find a deviatoric contribution to the moment tensor, as high as 21% for near-source heterogeneities showing a 25% contrast of elastic values (relative to a homogeneous background medium). In 3-D this nonisotropic contribution reaches 27%. Second, we analyze intermediate-periods regional seismic waveforms associated with some underground nuclear explosions conducted at the Nevada National Security Site and invert for the full moment tensor, in order to quantify the relative contribution of the isotropic and deviatoric components of the tensor. The average value of the deviatoric part is about 35%. We conclude that the interactions between an explosive source and small-scale local heterogeneities of moderate amplitude may lead to a deviatoric contribution to the seismic moment, close to what is observed using regional data from nuclear test explosions.

  17. Effects of Current Velocity, Particle Size, and Substrate Heterogeneity on Crayfish (Orconectes propinquus) Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, J. M.; Kershner, M. W.

    2005-05-01

    The use of flow refugia (e.g., substrate) by lotic invertebrates often increases their likelihood of survival during flood events. Movement to potential refugia becomes risky as velocities increase, and the range of velocities that benthic invertebrates can withstand is variable. In this study, activity time and slip velocities of small [carapace length (CL)=10-20 mm] and large (CL=20-30 mm) Orconectes propinquus were measured in an artificial flume across ranges of current velocity and substrate heterogeneity. Particle sizes included small pebbles (16-32 mm), large pebbles (32-64 mm), and small cobble (64-128 mm). Water velocity was increased by 0.1 m/s increments from 0.1-1.5 m/s at 5-minute intervals or until the crayfish was dislodged from the substrate. As current velocity increased, the probability of slipping increased for all crayfish. Regardless of the degree of substrate heterogeneity, small crayfish held their position at higher velocities than large crayfish and were also less active. Slip rates were generally lower for both sizes as substrate heterogeneity increased. Essentially, the availability and probability of finding refugia increased with increased habitat heterogeneity and allowed crayfish to avoid being swept into the drift.

  18. Cooperative CBI: The Effects of Heterogeneous versus Homogeneous Grouping on the Learning of Progressively Complex Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooper, Simon; Hannafin, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    Describes study that compared the achievement of high and low ability eighth-grade students working cooperatively during computer-based instruction. Homogeneous and heterogeneous grouping based on ability are explained, posttest results are analyzed, and implications for instructional design are discussed. (23 references) (Author/LRW)

  19. Restructuring for Caring and Effective Education: An Administrative Guide to Creating Heterogeneous Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villa, Richard A.; And Others

    This collection of papers offers advice on restructuring education to create heterogeneous schools, with the goal of creating happy, comfortable, and successful learning environments for all the children and adults who learn and teach in them. Section I, titled "A Rationale for Restructuring and the Change Process," contains the following papers:…

  20. The effect of land cover heterogeneity of MODIS pixel on canopy LAI estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manninen, T.; Puttonen, N.

    2012-04-01

    The boreal zone land cover has a very significant influence on the northern hemisphere albedo and is an important component of the northern hemisphere carbon budget. Both albedo and the leaf area index (LAI) are one of the most important biophysical vegetation parameters and belong to the Essential Climate Variables (ECV) . In addition, in winter time the boreal forest albedo is a complicated combination of snow and canopy radiative properties, so that the albedo is a function of the canopy LAI. One possibility to estimate LAI using optical satellite data is by determination of spectral vegetation indices (SVIs), such as the reduced simple ratio (RSR). It uses the visible near infrared and short wave infrared channels. In large areas moderate resolution instruments, like MODIS, are suitable for LAI mapping. Yet, the heterogeneity of land cover in many boreal areas, for example in Finland, causes a challenge for LAI estimation. This effect was studied using several Landsat and MODIS images and the high resolution CORINE land cover map covering the same area in various parts of Finland. The atmospheric correction of the Landsat images was adjusted so that each MODIS pixel reflectance matched the average of the Landsat pixel reflectances within the MODIS pixel. The LAI values for Landsat and MODIS images were then determined using the RSR index. The LAI average of forested Landsat pixels was compared to the corresponding MODIS pixel LAI as a function of open water area fraction in the MODIS pixel. A regression function was determined to derive a method to correct the MODIS based LAI values with the open water area fraction. It turned out that the existence of open water in the MODIS pixels reduces the determined canopy LAI value on the average 30%. Also other land cover classes affect the LAI value, but the effect of water is largest, because the reflectance of water deviates so much from that of the canopy. The canopy LAI map of whole Finland was then calculated

  1. Pore Fluid Effects on Shear Modulus in a Model of Heterogeneous Rocks, Reservoirs, and Granular Media

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J G

    2005-03-23

    To provide quantitative measures of the importance of fluid effects on shear waves in heterogeneous reservoirs, a model material called a ''random polycrystal of porous laminates'' is introduced. This model poroelastic material has constituent grains that are layered (or laminated), and each layer is an isotropic, microhomogeneous porous medium. All grains are composed of exactly the same porous constituents, and have the same relative volume fractions. The order of lamination is not important because the up-scaling method used to determine the transversely isotropic (hexagonal) properties of the grains is Backus averaging, which--for quasi-static or long-wavelength behavior--depends only on the volume fractions and layer properties. Grains are then jumbled together totally at random, filling all space, and producing an overall isotropic poroelastic medium. The poroelastic behavior of this medium is then analyzed using the Peselnick-Meister-Watt bounds (of Hashin-Shtrikman type). We study the dependence of the shear modulus on pore fluid properties and determine the range of behavior to be expected. In particular we compare and contrast these results to those anticipated from Gassmann's fluid substitution formulas, and to the predictions of Mavko and Jizba for very low porosity rocks with flat cracks. This approach also permits the study of arbitrary numbers of constituents, but for simplicity the numerical examples are restricted here to just two constituents. This restriction also permits the use of some special exact results available for computing the overall effective stress coefficient in any two-component porous medium. The bounds making use of polycrystalline microstructure are very tight. Results for the shear modulus demonstrate that the ratio of compliance differences R (i.e., shear compliance changes over bulk compliance changes when going from drained to undrained behavior, or vice versa) is usually nonzero and can take a wide range of values, both

  2. Heterogeneity in cost-effectiveness of lifestyle counseling for metabolic syndrome risk groups -primary care patients in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical trials have indicated that lifestyle interventions for patients with lifestyle-related cardiovascular and diabetes risk factors (the metabolic syndrome) are cost-effective. However, patient characteristics in primary care practice vary considerably, i.e. they exhibit heterogeneity in risk factors. The cost-effectiveness of lifestyle interventions is likely to differ over heterogeneous patient groups. Methods Patients (62 men, 80 women) in the Kalmar Metabolic Syndrome Program (KMSP) in primary care (Kalmar regional healthcare area, Sweden) were divided into three groups reflecting different profiles of metabolic risk factors (low, middle and high risk) and gender. A Markov model was used to predict future cardiovascular disease and diabetes, including complications (until age 85 years or death), with health effects measured as QALYs and costs from a societal perspective in Euro (EUR) 2012, discounted 3%. Simulations with risk factor levels at start and at 12 months follow-up were performed for each group, with an assumed 4-year sustainability of intervention effects. Results The program was estimated cost-saving for middle and high risk men, while the incremental cost vs. do-nothing varied between EUR 3,500 – 18,000 per QALY for other groups. There is heterogeneity in the cost-effectiveness over the risk groups but this does not affect the overall conclusion on the cost-effectiveness of the KMSP. Even the highest ICER (for high risk women) is considered moderately cost-effective in Sweden. The base case result was not sensitive to alternative data and methodology but considerably affected by sustainability assumptions. Alternative risk stratifications did not change the overall conclusion that KMSP is cost-effective. However, simple grouping with average risk factor levels over gender groups overestimate the cost-effectiveness. Conclusions Lifestyle counseling to prevent metabolic diseases is cost-effective in Swedish standard primary care

  3. Reliability of the Bony Anatomy in Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Guckenberger, Matthias Baier, Kurt; Guenther, Iris; Richter, Anne; Wilbert, Juergen; Sauer, Otto; Vordermark, Dirk; Flentje, Michael

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether the position of brain metastases remains stable between planning and treatment in cranial stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients with 20 brain metastases were treated with single-fraction (17 lesions) or hypofractionated (3 lesions) image-guided SRT. Median time interval between planning and treatment was 8 days. Before treatment a cone-beam CT (CBCT) and a conventional CT after application of i.v. contrast were acquired. Setup errors using automatic bone registration (CBCT) and manual soft-tissue registration of the brain metastases (conventional CT) were compared. Results: Tumor size was not significantly different between planning and treatment. The three-dimensional setup error (mean {+-} SD) was 4.0 {+-} 2.1 mm and 3.5 {+-} 2.2 mm according to the bony anatomy and the lesion itself, respectively. A highly significant correlation between automatic bone match and soft-tissue registration was seen in all three directions (r {>=} 0.88). The three-dimensional distance between the isocenter according to bone match and soft-tissue registration was 1.7 {+-} 0.7 mm, maximum 2.8 mm. Treatment of intracranial pressure with steroids did not influence the position of the lesion relative to the bony anatomy. Conclusion: With a time interval of approximately 1 week between planning and treatment, the bony anatomy of the skull proved to be an excellent surrogate for the target position in image-guided SRT.

  4. Heterogeneous Catalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miranda, R.

    1989-01-01

    Described is a heterogeneous catalysis course which has elements of materials processing embedded in the classical format of catalytic mechanisms and surface chemistry. A course outline and list of examples of recent review papers written by students are provided. (MVL)

  5. Spatial and temporal trends of drought effects in a heterogeneous semi-arid forest ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Assal, Timothy J.; Anderson, Patrick J.; Sibold, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Drought has long been recognized as a driving mechanism in the forests of western North America and drought-induced mortality has been documented across genera in recent years. Given the frequency of these events are expected to increase in the future, understanding patterns of mortality and plant response to severe drought is important to resource managers. Drought can affect the functional, physiological, structural, and demographic properties of forest ecosystems. Remote sensing studies have documented changes in forest properties due to direct and indirect effects of drought; however, few studies have addressed this at local scales needed to characterize highly heterogeneous ecosystems in the forest-shrubland ecotone. We analyzed a 22-year Landsat time series (1985–2012) to determine changes in forest in an area that experienced a relatively dry decade punctuated by two years of extreme drought. We assessed the relationship between several vegetation indices and field measured characteristics (e.g. plant area index and canopy gap fraction) and applied these indices to trend analysis to uncover the location, direction and timing of change. Finally, we assessed the interaction of climate and topography by forest functional type. The Normalized Difference Moisture Index (NDMI), a measure of canopy water content, had the strongest correlation with short-term field measures of plant area index (R2 = 0.64) and canopy gap fraction (R2 = 0.65). Over the entire time period, 25% of the forested area experienced a significant (p-value < 0.05) negative trend in NDMI, compared to less than 10% in a positive trend. Coniferous forests were more likely to be associated with a negative NDMI trend than deciduous forest. Forests on southern aspects were least likely to exhibit a negative trend while north aspects were most prevalent. Field plots with a negative trend had a lower live density, and higher amounts of standing dead and down trees compared to plots with no

  6. The effects of selective history and environmental heterogeneity on inbreeding depression in experimental populations of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Long, Tristan A F; Rowe, Locke; Agrawal, Aneil F

    2013-04-01

    Inbreeding depression varies considerably among populations, but only some aspects of this variation have been thoroughly studied. Because inbreeding depression requires genetic variation, factors that influence the amount of standing variation can affect the magnitude of inbreeding depression. Environmental heterogeneity has long been considered an important contributor to the maintenance of genetic variation, but its effects on inbreeding depression have been largely ignored by empiricists. Here we compare inbreeding depression, measured in two environments, for 20 experimental populations of Drosophila melanogaster that have been maintained under four different selection regimes, including two types of environmentally homogeneous selection and two types environmentally heterogeneous selection. In line with theory, we find considerably higher inbreeding depression in populations from heterogeneous selection regimes. We also use our data set to test whether inbreeding depression is correlated with either stress or the phenotypic coefficient of variation (CV), as suggested by some recent studies. Though both of these factors are significant predictors of inbreeding depression in our study, there is an effect of assay environment on inbreeding depression that cannot be explained by either stress or CV.

  7. Combination effects of tissue heterogeneity and geometric targeting error in stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancer using CyberKnife.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ki Mun; Jeong, Bae Kwon; Choi, Hoon-Sik; Yoo, Seung Hoon; Hwang, Ui-Jung; Lim, Young Kyung; Jeong, Hojin

    2015-09-08

    We have investigated the combined effect of tissue heterogeneity and its variation associated with geometric error in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung cancer. The treatment plans for eight lung cancer patients were calculated using effective path length (EPL) correction and Monte Carlo (MC) algorithms, with both having the same beam configuration for each patient. These two kinds of plans for individual patients were then subsequently recalculated with adding systematic and random geometric errors. In the ordinary treatment plans calculated with no geometric offset, the EPL calculations, compared with the MC calculations, largely overestimated the doses to PTV by ~ 21%, whereas the overestimation were markedly lower in GTV by ~ 12% due to relatively higher density of GTV than of PTV. When recalculating the plans for individual patients with assigning the systematic and random geometric errors, no significant changes in the relative dose distribution, except for overall shift, were observed in the EPL calculations, whereas largely altered in the MC calculations with a consistent increase in dose to GTV. Considering the better accuracy of MC than EPL algorithms, the present results demonstrated the strong coupling of tissue heterogeneity and geometric error, thereby emphasizing the essential need for simultaneous correction for tissue heterogeneity and geometric targeting error in SBRT of lung cancer.

  8. Simulation of barrier heterogeneity and preferential flow effects on the performance of shallow land burial facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Luxmoore, R.J.; Tharp, M.L.

    1993-03-01

    Compacted soil barriers constructed at landfill sites have some degree of heterogeneity in hydraulic properties that may lead to a decline in barrier integrity and performance. A computer modeling study of the water dynamics of compacted soil barriers for a mesic site in eastem Tennessee was undertaken to identify possible situations that could lead to barrier failure. A water dynamics model for soil-plant systems (UTM) was applied to three landful construction scenarios, and varying degrees of heterogeneity of hydraulic properties for the cap and liner were introduced with a scaling procedure. Simulations were conducted for three annual contrasting rainfall conditions, and sensitivity analysis and Monte Carlo methods were used in the investigation.

  9. Scale-dependent effects of a heterogeneous landscape on genetic differentiation in the Central American squirrel monkey (Saimiri oerstedii).

    PubMed

    Blair, Mary E; Melnick, Don J

    2012-01-01

    Landscape genetic studies offer a fine-scale understanding of how habitat heterogeneity influences population genetic structure. We examined population genetic structure and conducted a landscape genetic analysis for the endangered Central American Squirrel Monkey (Saimiri oerstedii) that lives in the fragmented, human-modified habitats of the Central Pacific region of Costa Rica. We analyzed non-invasively collected fecal samples from 244 individuals from 14 groups for 16 microsatellite markers. We found two geographically separate genetic clusters in the Central Pacific region with evidence of recent gene flow among them. We also found significant differentiation among groups of S. o. citrinellus using pairwise F(ST) comparisons. These groups are in fragments of secondary forest separated by unsuitable "matrix" habitats such as cattle pasture, commercial African oil palm plantations, and human residential areas. We used an individual-based landscape genetic approach to measure spatial patterns of genetic variance while taking into account landscape heterogeneity. We found that large, commercial oil palm plantations represent moderate barriers to gene flow between populations, but cattle pastures, rivers, and residential areas do not. However, the influence of oil palm plantations on genetic variance was diminished when we restricted analyses to within population pairs, suggesting that their effect is scale-dependent and manifests during longer dispersal events among populations. We show that when landscape genetic methods are applied rigorously and at the right scale, they are sensitive enough to track population processes even in species with long, overlapping generations such as primates. Thus landscape genetic approaches are extremely valuable for the conservation management of a diverse array of endangered species in heterogeneous, human-modified habitats. Our results also stress the importance of explicitly considering the heterogeneity of matrix habitats in

  10. The effect of correlated neuronal firing and neuronal heterogeneity on population coding accuracy in guinea pig inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Zohar, Oran; Shackleton, Trevor M; Palmer, Alan R; Shamir, Maoz

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that the considerable noise in single-cell responses to a stimulus can be overcome by pooling information from a large population. Theoretical studies indicated that correlations in trial-to-trial fluctuations in the responses of different neurons may limit the improvement due to pooling. Subsequent theoretical studies have suggested that inherent neuronal diversity, i.e., the heterogeneity of tuning curves and other response properties of neurons preferentially tuned to the same stimulus, can provide a means to overcome this limit. Here we study the effect of spike-count correlations and the inherent neuronal heterogeneity on the ability to extract information from large neural populations. We use electrophysiological data from the guinea pig Inferior-Colliculus to capture inherent neuronal heterogeneity and single cell statistics, and introduce response correlations artificially. To this end, we generate pseudo-population responses, based on single-cell recording of neurons responding to auditory stimuli with varying binaural correlations. Typically, when pseudo-populations are generated from single cell data, the responses within the population are statistically independent. As a result, the information content of the population will increase indefinitely with its size. In contrast, here we apply a simple algorithm that enables us to generate pseudo-population responses with variable spike-count correlations. This enables us to study the effect of neuronal correlations on the accuracy of conventional rate codes. We show that in a homogenous population, in the presence of even low-level correlations, information content is bounded. In contrast, utilizing a simple linear readout, that takes into account the natural heterogeneity, even of neurons preferentially tuned to the same stimulus, within the neural population, one can overcome the correlated noise and obtain a readout whose accuracy grows linearly with the size of the population. PMID

  11. Impact of Heterogeneity in Sexual Behavior on Effectiveness in Reducing HIV Transmission with Test-and-Treat Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Rozhnova, Ganna; van der Loeff, Maarten F. Schim; Heijne, Janneke C. M.; Kretzschmar, Mirjam E.

    2016-01-01

    The WHO’s early-release guideline for antiretroviral treatment (ART) of HIV infection based on a recent trial conducted in 34 countries recommends starting treatment immediately upon an HIV diagnosis. Therefore, the test-and-treat strategy may become more widely used in an effort to scale up HIV treatment and curb further transmission. Here we examine behavioural determinants of HIV transmission and how heterogeneity in sexual behaviour influences the outcomes of this strategy. Using a deterministic model, we perform a systematic investigation into the effects of various mixing patterns in a population of men who have sex with men (MSM), stratified by partner change rates, on the elimination threshold and endemic HIV prevalence. We find that both the level of overdispersion in the distribution of the number of sexual partners and mixing between population subgroups have a large influence on endemic prevalence before introduction of ART and on possible long term effectiveness of ART. Increasing heterogeneity in risk behavior may lead to lower endemic prevalence levels, but requires higher coverage levels of ART for elimination. Elimination is only feasible for populations with a rather low degree of assortativeness of mixing and requires treatment coverage of almost 80% if rates of testing and treatment uptake by all population subgroups are equal. In this case, for fully assortative mixing and 80% coverage endemic prevalence is reduced by 57%. In the presence of heterogeneity in ART uptake, elimination is easier to achieve when the subpopulation with highest risk behavior is tested and treated more often than the rest of the population, and vice versa when it is less. The developed framework can be used to extract information on behavioral heterogeneity from existing data which is otherwise hard to determine from population surveys. PMID:27479074

  12. Impact of Heterogeneity in Sexual Behavior on Effectiveness in Reducing HIV Transmission with Test-and-Treat Strategy.

    PubMed

    Rozhnova, Ganna; van der Loeff, Maarten F Schim; Heijne, Janneke C M; Kretzschmar, Mirjam E

    2016-08-01

    The WHO's early-release guideline for antiretroviral treatment (ART) of HIV infection based on a recent trial conducted in 34 countries recommends starting treatment immediately upon an HIV diagnosis. Therefore, the test-and-treat strategy may become more widely used in an effort to scale up HIV treatment and curb further transmission. Here we examine behavioural determinants of HIV transmission and how heterogeneity in sexual behaviour influences the outcomes of this strategy. Using a deterministic model, we perform a systematic investigation into the effects of various mixing patterns in a population of men who have sex with men (MSM), stratified by partner change rates, on the elimination threshold and endemic HIV prevalence. We find that both the level of overdispersion in the distribution of the number of sexual partners and mixing between population subgroups have a large influence on endemic prevalence before introduction of ART and on possible long term effectiveness of ART. Increasing heterogeneity in risk behavior may lead to lower endemic prevalence levels, but requires higher coverage levels of ART for elimination. Elimination is only feasible for populations with a rather low degree of assortativeness of mixing and requires treatment coverage of almost 80% if rates of testing and treatment uptake by all population subgroups are equal. In this case, for fully assortative mixing and 80% coverage endemic prevalence is reduced by 57%. In the presence of heterogeneity in ART uptake, elimination is easier to achieve when the subpopulation with highest risk behavior is tested and treated more often than the rest of the population, and vice versa when it is less. The developed framework can be used to extract information on behavioral heterogeneity from existing data which is otherwise hard to determine from population surveys. PMID:27479074

  13. Effect of the spatial heterogeneity of soil properties on the growth and productivity of soybeans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutuzova, N. D.; Kust, G. S.; Rozov, S. Yu.; Stoma, G. V.

    2015-01-01

    The joint study of the spatial heterogeneity and dynamics of the biometric parameters of soybean growth and productivity and the soil properties has shown that the thickness and bulk density of the subsurface horizon, which determine the accumulation of water in the root-inhabited layer and its dynamics at the critical stages of soybean growing during the vegetation period, mainly affect the growth dynamics of soybean plants on chernozems in Krasnodar region.

  14. Monte Carlo Investigation on the Effect of Heterogeneities on Strut Adjusted Volume Implant (SAVI) Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koontz, Craig

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer for women with more than 225,000 new cases diagnosed in the United States in 2012 (ACS, 2012). With the high prevalence, comes an increased emphasis on researching new techniques to treat this disease. Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) has been used as an alternative to whole breast irradiation (WBI) in order to treat occult disease after lumpectomy. Similar recurrence rates have been found using ABPI after lumpectomy as with mastectomy alone, but with the added benefit of improved cosmetic and psychological results. Intracavitary brachytherapy devices have been used to deliver the APBI prescription. However, inability to produce asymmetric dose distributions in order to avoid overdosing skin and chest wall has been an issue with these devices. Multi-lumen devices were introduced to overcome this problem. Of these, the Strut-Adjusted Volume Implant (SAVI) has demonstrated the greatest ability to produce an asymmetric dose distribution, which would have greater ability to avoid skin and chest wall dose, and thus allow more women to receive this type of treatment. However, SAVI treatments come with inherent heterogeneities including variable backscatter due to the proximity to the tissue-air and tissue-lung interfaces and variable contents within the cavity created by the SAVI. The dose calculation protocol based on TG-43 does not account for heterogeneities and thus will not produce accurate dosimetry; however Acuros, a model-based dose calculation algorithm manufactured by Varian Medical Systems, claims to accurately account for heterogeneities. Monte Carlo simulation can calculate the dosimetry with high accuracy. In this thesis, a model of the SAVI will be created for Monte Carlo, specifically using MCNP code, in order to explore the affects of heterogeneities on the dose distribution. This data will be compared to TG-43 and Acuros calculated dosimetry to explore their accuracy.

  15. Macroscopic geometric heterogeneity effects in radiation dose distribution analysis for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, J.M.; Nigg, D.W.; Wheeler, F.J.; Bauer, W.F. )

    1992-05-01

    Calculations of radiation flux and dose distributions for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of brain tumors are typically performed using sophisticated three-dimensional analytical models based on either a homogeneous approximation or a simplified few-region approximation to the actual highly heterogeneous geometry of the irradiation volume. Such models should be validated by comparison with calculations using detailed models in which all significant macroscopic tissue heterogeneities and geometric structures are explicitly represented as faithfully as possible. This paper describes such a validation exercise for BNCT of canine brain tumors. Geometric measurements of the canine anatomical structures of interest for this work were performed by dissecting and examining two essentially identical Labrador retriever heads. Chemical analyses of various tissue samples taken during the dissections were conducted to obtain measurements of elemental compositions for the tissues of interest. The resulting geometry and tissue composition data were then used to construct a detailed heterogeneous calculational model of the Labrador head. Calculations of three-dimensional radiation flux distributions pertinent to BNCT were performed for this model using the TORT discrete-ordinates radiation transport code. The calculations were repeated for a corresponding volume-weighted homogeneous-tissue model. Comparison of the results showed that peak neutron and photon flux magnitudes were quite similar for the two models (within 5%), but that the spatial flux profiles were shifted in the heterogeneous model such that the fluxes in some locations away from the peak differed from the corresponding fluxes in the homogeneous model by as much as 10%--20%. Differences of this magnitude can be therapeutically significant, emphasizing the need for proper validation of simplified treatment planning models.

  16. The dual effect of ephaptic coupling on cardiac conduction with heterogeneous expression of connexin 43.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ning; Mori, Yoichiro; Tolkacheva, Elena G

    2016-05-21

    Decreased and heterogeneous expression of connexin 43 (Cx43) are common features in animal heart failure models. Ephpatic coupling, which relies on the presence of junctional cleft space between the ends of adjacent cells, has been suggested to play a more active role in mediating intercellular electrical communication when gap junctions are reduced. To better understand the interplay of Cx43 expression and ephaptic coupling on cardiac conduction during heart failure, we performed numerical simulations on our model when Cx43 expression is reduced and heterogeneous. Under severely reduced Cx43 expression, we identified three new phenomena in the presence of ephaptic coupling: alternating conduction, in which ephaptic and gap junction-mediated mechanisms alternate; instability of planar fronts; and small amplitude action potential (SAP), which has a smaller potential amplitude than the normal action potential. In the presence of heterogeneous Cx43 expression, ephaptic coupling can either prevent or promote conduction block (CB) depending on the Cx43 knockout (Cx43KO) content. When Cx43KO content is relatively high, ephaptic coupling reduces the probabilities of CB. However, ephaptic coupling promotes CB when Cx43KO and wild type cells are mixed in roughly equal proportion, which can be attributed to an increase in current-to-load mismatch.

  17. A Network Approach to Fracture: The Effect of Heterogeneity and Loading Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuschlé, T.

    Fracture in a heterogeneous solid is simulated on a triangular network of bonds which figure the potential cracks of the medium. Heterogeneity is introduced by assuming a statistical strength distribution for the bonds. External stresses are applied to the network and the evolution of the bond population is analyzed when the stresses are increased. Bond-breaking is controlled by the crack-exten sion force which takes into account crack interactions by using an iterative procedure. Crack propaga tion leads to the coalescence of broken bonds crack clusters are formed. By using this kind of approach which combines fracture mechanics and network modelling, we are able to simulate the rupture of a rock specimen under various loading conditions without heavy computation. We discuss physical properties of the rupture process by examining the rupture stress and the geometric properties of the macroscopic fracture and their dependence on loading conditions and heterogeneity. Analysis of the geometric characteristics shows that the number of broken bonds can be fitted by a power law of the lattice size, the exponent depending on the loading conditions. Furthermore, an approximate computation of the mechanical response of the network demonstrates that the threshold secant modulus may be a more legitimate choice for a damage parameter in terms of system size independence.

  18. Modeling the Heterogeneous Effects of GHG Mitigation Policies on Global Agriculture and Forestry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golub, A.; Henderson, B.; Hertel, T. W.; Rose, S. K.; Sohngen, B.

    2010-12-01

    Agriculture and forestry are envisioned as potentially key sectors for climate change mitigation policy, yet the depth of analysis of mitigation options and their economic consequences remains remarkably shallow in comparison to that for industrial mitigation. Farming and land use change - much of it induced by agriculture -account for one-third of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Any serious attempt to curtail these emissions will involve changes in the way farming is conducted, as well as placing limits on agricultural expansion into areas currently under more carbon-intensive land cover. However, agriculture and forestry are extremely heterogeneous, both in the technology and intensity of production, as well as in the GHG emissions intensity of these activities. And these differences, in turn, give rise to significant changes in the distribution of agricultural production, trade and consumption in the wake of mitigation policies. This paper assesses such distributional impacts via a global economic analysis undertaken with a modified version of the GTAP model. The paper builds on a global general equilibrium GTAP-AEZ-GHG model (Golub et al., 2009). This is a unified modeling framework that links the agricultural, forestry, food processing and other sectors through land, and other factor markets and international trade, and incorporates different land-types, land uses and related CO2 and non-CO2 GHG emissions and sequestration. The economic data underlying this work is the global GTAP data base aggregated up to 19 regions and 29 sectors. The model incorporates mitigation cost curves for different regions and sectors based on information from the US-EPA. The forestry component of the model is calibrated to the results of the state of the art partial equilibrium global forestry model of Sohngen and Mendelson (2007). Forest carbon sequestration at both the extensive and intensive margins are modeled separately to better isolate land competition between

  19. Evaluation of combining bony anatomy and soft tissue position correction strategies for IMRT prostate cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Adamczyk, Marta; Piotrowski, Tomasz; Adamiak, Ewa

    2012-01-01

    Background Radiotherapy treatment requires delivering high homogenous dose to target volume while sparing organs at risk. That is why accurate patient positioning is one of the most important steps during the treatment process. It reduces set-up errors which have a strong influence on the doses given to the target and surrounding tissues. Aim The aim of this study was to investigate the efficiency of combining bony anatomy and soft tissue imaging position correction strategies for patients with prostate cancer. Materials and methods The study based on pre-treatment position verification results determined for 10 patients using kV images and CBCT match. At the same patients’ position, two orthogonal kV images and set of CT scans were acquired. Both verification methods gave the information about patients’ position changes in vertical, longitudinal and lateral directions. Results For 93 verifications, the mean values of kV shifts in vertical, longitudinal and lateral directions equaled: −0.11 ± 0.54 cm, 0.26 ± 0.38 cm and −0.06 ± 0.47 cm, respectively. The same values achieved for CBCT matching equaled: 0.07 ± 0.62 cm, 0.22 ± 0.36 cm and −0.02 ± 0.45 cm. Statistically significant changes between the values of shifts received during the first week of treatment and the rest time of the irradiation process were found for 2 patients in the lateral direction and 2 patients in vertical direction among kV results and for 3 patients in the longitudinal direction among CBCT results. A significant difference between kV and CBCT match results was found in the vertical direction. Conclusions In clinical practice, CBCT combined with kV or even portal imaging improves precision and effectiveness of prostate cancer treatment accuracy. PMID:24377008

  20. The Effects of Heterogeneities on Seismic Wave Propagation in the Climax Stock

    SciTech Connect

    Hagan Webb, C., Snelson, C. M., White, R., Emmitt, R., Barker, D., Abbott, R., Bonal, N.

    2011-12-01

    The Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty requires the ability to detect low-yield (less than 150kton) nuclear events. This kind of monitoring can only be done seismically on a regional scale (within 2000km). At this level, it is difficult to distinguish between low-yield nuclear events and non-nuclear events of similar magnitude. In order to confidently identify a nuclear event, a more detailed understanding of nuclear seismic sources is needed. In particular, it is important to know the effects of local geology on the seismic signal. This study focuses on P-wave velocity in heterogeneous granitoid. The Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is currently performing low-yield tests with chemical explosives at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The exact test site was chosen to be in the Climax Stock, a cretaceous granodiorite and quartz-monzonite pluton located in Area 15 of the NNSS. It has been used in the past for the Hard Hat and Pile Driver nuclear tests, which provided legacy data that can be used to simulate wave propagation. The Climax Stock was originally chosen as the site of the SPE partly because of its assumed homogeneity. It has since been discovered that the area of the stock where the SPE tests are being performed contains a perched water table. In addition, the stock is known to contain an extensive network of faults, joints, and fractures, but the exact effect of these structural features on seismic wave velocity is not fully understood. The SPE tests are designed to seismically capture the explosion phenomena from the near- to the far-field transition of the seismic waveform. In the first SPE experiment, 100kg of chemical explosives were set off at a depth of 55m. The blast was recorded with an array of sensors and diagnostics, including accelerometers, geophones, rotational sensors, short-period and broadband seismic sensors, Continuous Reflectometry for Radius vs. Time Experiment, Time of Arrival, Velocity of Detonation, and infrasound sensors

  1. Effect of pattern formation on C and N turnover heterogeneity in initial soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaf, Wolfgang; Zimmermann, Claudia

    2013-04-01

    The formation of vegetation patterns and hydrological processes, among others, result in soil heterogeneity in newly exposed land surfaces. We studied the effect of these developling structures on carbon and nitrogen trunover in soils of the artificial catchment Chicken Creek (Schaaf et al. 2011, 2012). Substrates with different physical and geochemical properties in combination with different labelled plant litter materials were studied in a microcosm experiment over a period of 80 weeks. Main objectives of the microcosm experiment were to determine the transformation processes of C and N from litter decomposition within the gaseous, liquid and solid phase, the interaction with mineral surfaces and its role for the establishment of biogeochemical cycles. The microcosm experiments were established in a climate chamber at constant 10 °C. In total, 48 soil columns (diameter: 14.4 cm; height: 30 cm) were filled with two different quaternary substrates (sand and loamy sand) representing the textural variation within the catchment at a bulk density of 1.4-1.5 g cm-3. The columns were automatically irrigated with artificial rainwater four times a day with 6.6 ml each (corresponding to 600 mm yr-1). The gaseous phase in the headspace of the microcosms was analyzed continuously for CO2 and N2O concentrations. C and N transformation processes were studied using 13C and 15N labelled litter of two different plant species occurring at the catchment (Lotus corniculatus, Calamagrostis epigejos) that was incorporated into the microcosm surface. By including litter from species with wide distribution within the catchment and soil substrates representing the main variation types of the sediments used for catchment construction we were able to characterize the general function of these sub-patches within the catchment with respect to litter decomposition, soil solution composition, DOC and nutrient leaching, and impact on the mineral soil phase. The results suggest that initial

  2. Heterogeneous reaction of NO2 on Al2O3: the effect of temperature on the nitrite and nitrate formation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lingyan; Tong, Shengrui; Ge, Maofa

    2013-06-13

    Although recent evidence suggests that the heterogeneous reaction of NO2 on the surface of mineral aerosol plays an important role in the atmospheric chemistry, a fundamental understanding of how temperature influences the rate and extent of nitrate formation processes remains unclear. This work presents the first laboratory study of the effect of temperature on heterogeneous reaction of NO2 on the surface of γ-Al2O3 in the temperature range of 250-318 K at ambient pressure. From the analysis of IR spectra, nitrite was found to be an intermediate product at temperatures between 250 and 318 K. It is proved by our experiments that nitrite would convert to the bidentate nitrate as the reaction proceeded. In addition, it is interesting to find that the rate of conversion increased with decreasing temperature. Along with nitrite decrease, the initial rate of nitrate formation increased while the rate of nitrate formation in the steady region decreased with decreasing temperature. The uptake coefficients at seasonal temperatures were determined for the first time and were found to be sensitive to temperature. Finally, atmospheric implications of the role of temperature on the heterogeneous reaction of NO2 with mineral aerosol are discussed.

  3. Coupling Between Flow and Precipitation In Heterogeneous Subsurface Environments and Effects on Contaminant Fate and Transport (Project no. 99272)

    SciTech Connect

    Redden, G.D.; Fujita, Y.; Scheibe, T.D.; Tartakovsky, A.M.; Smith, R.W.; Reddy, M.M.; Kelly, S.D.

    2006-04-05

    This project is aimed at understanding how contaminant transport in heterogeneous porous media is impacted by precipitation and dissolution events through chemical interactions with precipitates and as a consequence of coupling between precipitation and flow. We hypothesize that precipitation/coprecipitation, encapsulation, isolation from flow and alteration of reactive surfaces will contribute to altering contaminant mobility during precipitation events, and that predicting the release of contaminants during precipitate dissolution requires an understanding of how precipitates are distributed and how contaminants are released from the different compartments over time. Using calcium carbonate as a model system, physical experiments and modeling at the pore-scale and continuum-scale will be used to improve the conceptual approach to predicting the impact of flow-precipitation coupling on solute migration. Column and 2-dimensional intermediate-scale experiments with constructed physical and chemical heterogeneities will be used to investigate the movement of fluids and reactive solutes during different types of mixing events that lead to calcium carbonate supersaturation and precipitation. Smoothed particle hydrodynamic modeling will be used to simulate pore-scale mixing and precipitation in heterogeneous porous media and estimate continuum-scale parameters. Continuum-scale modeling will be used to test conceptual models and associated effective parameters that simulate the macroscopic behavior of the experimental domains.

  4. Heterogeneity in a room-temperature ionic liquid: persistent local environments and the red-edge effect.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhonghan; Margulis, Claudio J

    2006-01-24

    In this work, we investigate the slow dynamics of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate, a very popular room-temperature ionic solvent. Our study predicts the existence of heterogeneity in the liquid and shows that this heterogeneity is the underlying microscopic cause for the recently reported "red-edge effect" (REE) observed in the study of fluorescence of the organic probe 2-amino-7-nitrofluorene. This theoretical work explains in microscopic terms the relation between REE and dynamic heterogeneity in a room-temperature ionic liquid (IL). The REE is typical of micellar or colloidal systems, which are characterized by microscopic environments that are structurally very different. In contrast, in the case of this room-temperature IL, the REE occurs because of the long period during which molecules are trapped in quasistatic local solvent cages. This trapping time, which is longer than the lifetime of the excited-state probe, together with the inability of the surroundings to adiabatically relax, induces a set of site-specific spectroscopic responses. Subensembles of fluorescent molecules associated with particular local environments absorb and emit at different frequencies. We describe in detail the absorption wavelength-dependent emission spectra of 2-amino-7-nitrofluorene and show that this dependence on lambda(ex) is characteristic of the IL and, as is to be expected, is absent in the case of a normal solvent such as methanol.

  5. Heterogeneity in a room-temperature ionic liquid: persistent local environments and the red-edge effect.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhonghan; Margulis, Claudio J

    2006-01-24

    In this work, we investigate the slow dynamics of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate, a very popular room-temperature ionic solvent. Our study predicts the existence of heterogeneity in the liquid and shows that this heterogeneity is the underlying microscopic cause for the recently reported "red-edge effect" (REE) observed in the study of fluorescence of the organic probe 2-amino-7-nitrofluorene. This theoretical work explains in microscopic terms the relation between REE and dynamic heterogeneity in a room-temperature ionic liquid (IL). The REE is typical of micellar or colloidal systems, which are characterized by microscopic environments that are structurally very different. In contrast, in the case of this room-temperature IL, the REE occurs because of the long period during which molecules are trapped in quasistatic local solvent cages. This trapping time, which is longer than the lifetime of the excited-state probe, together with the inability of the surroundings to adiabatically relax, induces a set of site-specific spectroscopic responses. Subensembles of fluorescent molecules associated with particular local environments absorb and emit at different frequencies. We describe in detail the absorption wavelength-dependent emission spectra of 2-amino-7-nitrofluorene and show that this dependence on lambda(ex) is characteristic of the IL and, as is to be expected, is absent in the case of a normal solvent such as methanol. PMID:16418271

  6. SU-E-J-63: Estimating the Effects of Respiratory Motion On Dose Heterogeneity for ITV-Based Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C; Lewis, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the relationship between the amount of dose heterogeneity in a treatment plan that uses an internal target volume (ITV) to account for respiratory motion and the true amount of heterogeneity in the dose delivered to the tumor contained within that ITV. Methods: We develop a convolution-based framework for calculating dose delivered to a tumor moving inside an ITV according to a common sinusoid-based breathing model including asymmetry. We model the planned ITV dose distribution as a centrally peaked analytic function approximating the profile of clinical stereotactic body radiotherapy treatments. Expressions for the minimum and maximum dose received by the tumor are derived and evaluated for a range of clinically relevant parameters. Results of the model are validated with phantom measurements using an ion chamber array. Results: An analytic expression is presented for the maximum and minimum doses received by the tumor relative to the planned ITV dose. The tumor dose heterogeneity depends solely on the ratio of tumor size to ITV size, the peak dose in the planned ITV dose distribution, and the respiratory asymmetry parameter. Under the assumptions of this model, using a typical breathing asymmetry parameter and a dose distribution with a fixed size ITV covered by the 100% line and with a 130% hotspot, the maximum dose to the tumor varies between 113%–130%, and the minimum dose varies between 100%–116% depending on the amount of tumor motion. Conclusion: This modeling exercise demonstrates the interplay between motion and dose heterogeneity. Tumors that exhibit large amounts of respiratory motion relative to their size will receive a more homogeneous dose and a larger minimum dose than would be inferred from the ITV dose distribution. This effect is not captured in current clinical treatment planning methods unless 4D dose calculation techniques are used. This work was partially supported by a Varian Medical Systems research grant.

  7. The effects of spatial and temporal heterogeneity on the population dynamics of four animal species in a Danish landscape

    PubMed Central

    Sibly, Richard M; Nabe-Nielsen, Jacob; Forchhammer, Mads C; Forbes, Valery E; Topping, Christopher J

    2009-01-01

    Background Variation in carrying capacity and population return rates is generally ignored in traditional studies of population dynamics. Variation is hard to study in the field because of difficulties controlling the environment in order to obtain statistical replicates, and because of the scale and expense of experimenting on populations. There may also be ethical issues. To circumvent these problems we used detailed simulations of the simultaneous behaviours of interacting animals in an accurate facsimile of a real Danish landscape. The models incorporate as much as possible of the behaviour and ecology of skylarks Alauda arvensis, voles Microtus agrestis, a ground beetle Bembidion lampros and a linyphiid spider Erigone atra. This allows us to quantify and evaluate the importance of spatial and temporal heterogeneity on the population dynamics of the four species. Results Both spatial and temporal heterogeneity affected the relationship between population growth rate and population density in all four species. Spatial heterogeneity accounted for 23–30% of the variance in population growth rate after accounting for the effects of density, reflecting big differences in local carrying capacity associated with the landscape features important to individual species. Temporal heterogeneity accounted for 3–13% of the variance in vole, skylark and spider, but 43% in beetles. The associated temporal variation in carrying capacity would be problematic in traditional analyses of density dependence. Return rates were less than one in all species and essentially invariant in skylarks, spiders and beetles. Return rates varied over the landscape in voles, being slower where there were larger fluctuations in local population sizes. Conclusion Our analyses estimated the traditional parameters of carrying capacities and return rates, but these are now seen as varying continuously over the landscape depending on habitat quality and the mechanisms of density dependence. The

  8. Shear zone nucleation and deformation transient: effect of heterogeneities and loading conditions in experimentally deformed calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, L. F. G.; Rybacki, E.; Dresen, G. H.; Kilian, R.

    2015-12-01

    In the Earth's middle to lower crust, strain is frequently localized along ductile shear zones, which commonly nucleate at structural and material heterogeneities. To investigate shear zone nucleation and development due to heterogeneities, we performed constant strain-rate (CSR) and constant stress (CS) simple shear (torsion) deformation experiments on Carrara marble samples containing weak (limestone) inclusions. The experiments were conducted in a Paterson-type gas deformation apparatus at 900 °C temperature and 400 MPa confining pressure and maximum bulk shear strains of 3. Peak shear stress was about 20 MPa for all the samples, followed by smooth weakening and steady state behavior. The strain is predominantly localized in the host marble within the process zone in front of the inclusion, defined by a zone of intense grain size reduction due to dynamic recrystallization. In CS tests a narrow shear zone developed in front of the inclusion, whereas in CSR experiments the deformation is more heterogeneously distributed, up to g=3.. In the later, secondary foliations oblique to the process zone and alternating thin, high-strain layers are common. In samples deformed at the same shear strain (g=1), the average recrystallized grain size in the process zone is similar for CS and CSR conditions. Crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) measurements shows that different grain sizes have slightly different CPO patterns. CPO strength varies for different grain sizes, with a CPO strength peak between 40-50 μm, decreasing progressively within smaller grain size, but with secondary peaks for different coarse-grained sizes. Our observations suggest that the initial formation and transient deformation of shear zones is strongly affected by loading conditions.

  9. Effects of spatial heterogeneity on butterfly species richness in Rocky Mountain National Park, CO, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kumar, S.; Simonson, S.E.; Stohlgren, T.J.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated butterfly responses to plot-level characteristics (plant species richness, vegetation height, and range in NDVI [normalized difference vegetation index]) and spatial heterogeneity in topography and landscape patterns (composition and configuration) at multiple spatial scales. Stratified random sampling was used to collect data on butterfly species richness from seventy-six 20 ?? 50 m plots. The plant species richness and average vegetation height data were collected from 76 modified-Whittaker plots overlaid on 76 butterfly plots. Spatial heterogeneity around sample plots was quantified by measuring topographic variables and landscape metrics at eight spatial extents (radii of 300, 600 to 2,400 m). The number of butterfly species recorded was strongly positively correlated with plant species richness, proportion of shrubland and mean patch size of shrubland. Patterns in butterfly species richness were negatively correlated with other variables including mean patch size, average vegetation height, elevation, and range in NDVI. The best predictive model selected using Akaike's Information Criterion corrected for small sample size (AICc), explained 62% of the variation in butterfly species richness at the 2,100 m spatial extent. Average vegetation height and mean patch size were among the best predictors of butterfly species richness. The models that included plot-level information and topographic variables explained relatively less variation in butterfly species richness, and were improved significantly after including landscape metrics. Our results suggest that spatial heterogeneity greatly influences patterns in butterfly species richness, and that it should be explicitly considered in conservation and management actions. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  10. Joint effects of habitat heterogeneity and species' life-history traits on population dynamics in spatially structured landscapes.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xinping; Skidmore, Andrew K; Wang, Tiejun

    2014-01-01

    Both habitat heterogeneity and species' life-history traits play important roles in driving population dynamics, yet there is little scientific consensus around the combined effect of these two factors on populations in complex landscapes. Using a spatially explicit agent-based model, we explored how interactions between habitat spatial structure (defined here as the scale of spatial autocorrelation in habitat quality) and species life-history strategies (defined here by species environmental tolerance and movement capacity) affect population dynamics in spatially heterogeneous landscapes. We compared the responses of four hypothetical species with different life-history traits to four landscape scenarios differing in the scale of spatial autocorrelation in habitat quality. The results showed that the population size of all hypothetical species exhibited a substantial increase as the scale of spatial autocorrelation in habitat quality increased, yet the pattern of population increase was shaped by species' movement capacity. The increasing scale of spatial autocorrelation in habitat quality promoted the resource share of individuals, but had little effect on the mean mortality rate of individuals. Species' movement capacity also determined the proportion of individuals in high-quality cells as well as the proportion of individuals experiencing competition in response to increased spatial autocorrelation in habitat quality. Positive correlations between the resource share of individuals and the proportion of individuals experiencing competition indicate that large-scale spatial autocorrelation in habitat quality may mask the density-dependent effect on populations through increasing the resource share of individuals, especially for species with low mobility. These findings suggest that low-mobility species may be more sensitive to habitat spatial heterogeneity in spatially structured landscapes. In addition, localized movement in combination with spatial

  11. Computational investigation of stoichiometric effects, binding site heterogeneities, and selectivities of molecularly imprinted polymers.

    PubMed

    Terracina, Jacob J; Bergkvist, Magnus; Sharfstein, Susan T

    2016-06-01

    A series of quantum mechanical (QM) computational optimizations of molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) systems were used to determine optimal monomer-to-target ratios. Imidazole- and xanthine-derived target molecules were studied. The investigation included both small-scale models (3-7 molecules) and larger-scale models (15-35 molecules). The optimal ratios differed between the small and larger scales. For the larger models containing multiple targets, binding-site surface area analysis was used to quantify the heterogeneity of these sites. The more fully surrounded sites had greater binding energies. No discretization of binding modes was seen, furthering arguments for continuous affinity distribution models. Molecular mechanical (MM) docking was then used to measure the selectivities of the QM-optimized binding sites. Selectivity was also shown to improve as binding sites become more fully encased by the monomers. For internal sites, docking consistently showed selectivity favoring the molecules that had been imprinted via QM geometry optimizations. The computationally imprinted sites were shown to exhibit size-, shape-, and polarity-based selectivity. Here we present a novel approach to investigate the selectivity and heterogeneity of imprinted polymer binding sites, by applying the rapid orientation screening of MM docking to the highly accurate QM-optimized geometries. Modeling schemes were designed such that no computing clusters or other specialized modeling equipment would be required. Improving the in silico analysis of MIP system properties will ultimately allow for the production of more sensitive and selective polymers. PMID:27207254

  12. Mechanical measurements of heterogeneity and length scale effects in PEG-based hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Brian G.; Shapiro, Jenna M.; DelRio, Frank W.; Cook, Robert F.; Oyen, Michelle L.

    2015-01-01

    Colloidal-probe spherical indentation load-relaxation experiments with a probe radius of 3 μm are conducted on poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel materials to quantify their steady-state mechanical properties and time-dependent transport properties via a single experiment. PEG-based hydrogels are shown to be heterogeneous in both morphology and mechanical stiffness at this scale; a linear-harmonic interpolation of hyperelastic Mooney-Rivlin and Boussinesq flat-punch indentation models was used to describe the steady-state response of the hydrogels and determine upper and lower bounds for indentation moduli. Analysis of the transient load-relaxation response during displacement-controlled hold periods provides a means of extracting two time constants τ1 and τ2, where τ1 and τ2 are assigned to the viscoelastic and poroelastic properties, respectively. Large τ2 values at small indentation depths provide evidence of a non-equilibrium state characterized by a phenomenon that restricts poroelastic fluid flow through the material; for larger indentations, the variability in τ2 values decreases and pore sizes estimated from τ2 via indentation approach those measured via macroscopic swelling experiments. The contact probe methodology developed here provides a means of assessing hydrogel heterogeneity, including time-dependent mechanical and transport properties, and has potential implications in hydrogel biomedical and engineering applications. PMID:26255839

  13. Effects of diffusion on total biomass in heterogeneous continuous and discrete-patch systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeAngelis, Don; Ming Ni, Wei; Zhang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical models of populations on a system of two connected patches previously have shown that when the two patches differ in maximum growth rate and carrying capacity, and in the limit of high diffusion, conditions exist for which the total population size at equilibrium exceeds that of the ideal free distribution, which predicts that the total population would equal the total carrying capacity of the two patches. However, this result has only been shown for the Pearl-Verhulst growth function on two patches and for a single-parameter growth function in continuous space. Here, we provide a general criterion for total population size to exceed total carrying capacity for three commonly used population growth rates for both heterogeneous continuous and multi-patch heterogeneous landscapes with high population diffusion. We show that a sufficient condition for this situation is that there is a convex positive relationship between the maximum growth rate and the parameter that, by itself or together with the maximum growth rate, determines the carrying capacity, as both vary across a spatial region. This relationship occurs in some biological populations, though not in others, so the result has ecological implications.

  14. Effect of pond shape and vegetation heterogeneity on flow and treatment performance of constructed wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wörman, Anders; Kronnäs, Veronika

    2005-01-01

    A model framework is developed for nitrogen transformations in a constructed wetland by combining both hydraulics and chemical transformation of nitrogen species. The nitrogen concentration of the effluent water is represented in terms of a convolution between the probability density function of the hydraulic residence times and a chemical transformation function describing the rate of mass-removal of total nitrogen with time in the water as a first-order reaction. Closed-form solutions to the treatment efficiency is derived and related to the nitrogen reduction in wetland Alhagen in Nynäshamn, Sweden. Further, the model coefficients are explored by numerical simulations and expressed in terms of heterogeneity of the flow resistance, i.e. in vegetation, and the aspect ratio of the wetland. Heterogeneity in vegetation contributes to increasing the variance of the water residence time and this increases the effluent concentration of nitrogen. Based on the theory and the data from Alhagen, the residence time probability density function for water can have a significant influence on the treatment, and particularly the aspect ratio markedly affects the active water volume and the treatment efficiency.

  15. Comparative study of notoungulate (Placentalia, Mammalia) bony labyrinths and new phylogenetically informative inner ear characters

    PubMed Central

    Macrini, Thomas E; Flynn, John J; Ni, Xijun; Croft, Darin A; Wyss, André R

    2013-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of notoungulates, an extinct group of predominantly South American herbivores, remain poorly resolved with respect to both other placental mammals and among one another. Most previous phylogenetic analyses of notoungulates have not included characters of the internal cranium, not least because few such features, including the bony labyrinth, have been described for members of the group. Here we describe the inner ears of the notoungulates Altitypotherium chucalensis (Mesotheriidae), Pachyrukhos moyani (Hegetotheriidae) and Cochilius sp. (Interatheriidae) based on reconstructions of bony labyrinths obtained from computed tomography imagery. Comparisons of the bony labyrinths of these taxa with the basally diverging notoungulate Notostylops murinus (Notostylopidae), an isolated petrosal from Itaboraí, Brazil, referred to Notoungulata, and six therian outgroups, yielded an inner ear character matrix of 25 potentially phylogenetically informative characters, 14 of them novel to this study. Two equivocally optimized character states potentially support a pairing of Mesotheriidae and Hegetotheriidae, whereas four others may be diagnostic of Notoungulata. Three additional characters are potentially informative for diagnosing more inclusive clades: one for crown Placentalia; another for a clade containing Kulbeckia, Zalambdalestes, and Placentalia; and a third for Eutheria (crown Placentalia plus stem taxa). Several other characters are apomorphic for at least one notoungulate in our study and are of potential interest for broader taxonomic sampling within Notoungulata to clarify currently enigmatic interrelationships. Measures of the semicircular canals were used to infer agility (e.g. capable of quick movements vs. lethargic movements) of these taxa. Agility scores calculated from these data generally corroborate interpretations based on postcranial remains of these or closely related species. We provide estimates of the low

  16. Comparative Anatomy of the Bony Labyrinth (Inner Ear) of Placental Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Ekdale, Eric G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Variation is a naturally occurring phenomenon that is observable at all levels of morphology, from anatomical variations of DNA molecules to gross variations between whole organisms. The structure of the otic region is no exception. The present paper documents the broad morphological diversity exhibited by the inner ear region of placental mammals using digital endocasts constructed from high-resolution X-ray computed tomography (CT). Descriptions cover the major placental clades, and linear, angular, and volumetric dimensions are reported. Principal Findings The size of the labyrinth is correlated to the overall body mass of individuals, such that large bodied mammals have absolutely larger labyrinths. The ratio between the average arc radius of curvature of the three semicircular canals and body mass of aquatic species is substantially lower than the ratios of related terrestrial taxa, and the volume percentage of the vestibular apparatus of aquatic mammals tends to be less than that calculated for terrestrial species. Aspects of the bony labyrinth are phylogenetically informative, including vestibular reduction in Cetacea, a tall cochlear spiral in caviomorph rodents, a low position of the plane of the lateral semicircular canal compared to the posterior canal in Cetacea and Carnivora, and a low cochlear aspect ratio in Primatomorpha. Significance The morphological descriptions that are presented add a broad baseline of anatomy of the inner ear across many placental mammal clades, for many of which the structure of the bony labyrinth is largely unknown. The data included here complement the growing body of literature on the physiological and phylogenetic significance of bony labyrinth structures in mammals, and they serve as a source of data for future studies on the evolution and function of the vertebrate ear. PMID:23805251

  17. The Tree of Life and a New Classification of Bony Fishes

    PubMed Central

    Betancur-R., Ricardo; Broughton, Richard E.; Wiley, Edward O.; Carpenter, Kent; López, J. Andrés; Li, Chenhong; Holcroft, Nancy I.; Arcila, Dahiana; Sanciangco, Millicent; Cureton II, James C; Zhang, Feifei; Buser, Thaddaeus; Campbell, Matthew A.; Ballesteros, Jesus A; Roa-Varon, Adela; Willis, Stuart; Borden, W. Calvin; Rowley, Thaine; Reneau, Paulette C.; Hough, Daniel J.; Lu, Guoqing; Grande, Terry; Arratia, Gloria; Ortí, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    The tree of life of fishes is in a state of flux because we still lack a comprehensive phylogeny that includes all major groups. The situation is most critical for a large clade of spiny-finned fishes, traditionally referred to as percomorphs, whose uncertain relationships have plagued ichthyologists for over a century. Most of what we know about the higher-level relationships among fish lineages has been based on morphology, but rapid influx of molecular studies is changing many established systematic concepts. We report a comprehensive molecular phylogeny for bony fishes that includes representatives of all major lineages. DNA sequence data for 21 molecular markers (one mitochondrial and 20 nuclear genes) were collected for 1410 bony fish taxa, plus four tetrapod species and two chondrichthyan outgroups (total 1416 terminals). Bony fish diversity is represented by 1093 genera, 369 families, and all traditionally recognized orders. The maximum likelihood tree provides unprecedented resolution and high bootstrap support for most backbone nodes, defining for the first time a global phylogeny of fishes. The general structure of the tree is in agreement with expectations from previous morphological and molecular studies, but significant new clades arise. Most interestingly, the high degree of uncertainty among percomorphs is now resolved into nine well-supported supraordinal groups. The order Perciformes, considered by many a polyphyletic taxonomic waste basket, is defined for the first time as a monophyletic group in the global phylogeny. A new classification that reflects our phylogenetic hypothesis is proposed to facilitate communication about the newly found structure of the tree of life of fishes. Finally, the molecular phylogeny is calibrated using 60 fossil constraints to produce a comprehensive time tree. The new time-calibrated phylogeny will provide the basis for and stimulate new comparative studies to better understand the evolution of the amazing

  18. Comparative study of notoungulate (Placentalia, Mammalia) bony labyrinths and new phylogenetically informative inner ear characters.

    PubMed

    Macrini, Thomas E; Flynn, John J; Ni, Xijun; Croft, Darin A; Wyss, André R

    2013-11-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of notoungulates, an extinct group of predominantly South American herbivores, remain poorly resolved with respect to both other placental mammals and among one another. Most previous phylogenetic analyses of notoungulates have not included characters of the internal cranium, not least because few such features, including the bony labyrinth, have been described for members of the group. Here we describe the inner ears of the notoungulates Altitypotherium chucalensis (Mesotheriidae), Pachyrukhos moyani (Hegetotheriidae) and Cochilius sp. (Interatheriidae) based on reconstructions of bony labyrinths obtained from computed tomography imagery. Comparisons of the bony labyrinths of these taxa with the basally diverging notoungulate Notostylops murinus (Notostylopidae), an isolated petrosal from Itaboraí, Brazil, referred to Notoungulata, and six therian outgroups, yielded an inner ear character matrix of 25 potentially phylogenetically informative characters, 14 of them novel to this study. Two equivocally optimized character states potentially support a pairing of Mesotheriidae and Hegetotheriidae, whereas four others may be diagnostic of Notoungulata. Three additional characters are potentially informative for diagnosing more inclusive clades: one for crown Placentalia; another for a clade containing Kulbeckia, Zalambdalestes, and Placentalia; and a third for Eutheria (crown Placentalia plus stem taxa). Several other characters are apomorphic for at least one notoungulate in our study and are of potential interest for broader taxonomic sampling within Notoungulata to clarify currently enigmatic interrelationships. Measures of the semicircular canals were used to infer agility (e.g. capable of quick movements vs. lethargic movements) of these taxa. Agility scores calculated from these data generally corroborate interpretations based on postcranial remains of these or closely related species. We provide estimates of the low

  19. Anatomical study of suboccipital vertebral arteries and surrounding bony structures using virtual reality technology

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Wenbo; Yang, DeLin; Gu, Shixin; Xu, Qi-Wu; Che, Xiaoming; Wu, Jin-Song; Li, Wensheng

    2014-01-01

    Background This work aimed to evaluate the efficacy of virtual reality (VR) technology in neurosurgical anatomy through a comparison of the virtual 3D microanatomy of the suboccipital vertebral arteries and their bony structures as part of the resection of tumors in the craniovertebral junction (CVJ) of 20 patients compared to the actual microanatomy of the vertebral arteries of 15 cadaveric headsets. Material/Methods The study was conducted with 2 groups of data: a VR group composed of 20 clinical cases and a physical body group (PB group) composed of 15 cadaveric headsets. In the VR group, the dissection and measurements of the vertebral arteries were simulated on a Dextroscope. In the PB group, the vertebral arteries in the cadaver heads were examined under a microscope and anatomical measurements of VA and bony structures were performed. The length and course of the vertebral arteries and its surrounding bony structures in each group were compared. Results The distances from the inferior part of the transverse process foramen (TPF) of C1 to the inferior part of TPF of C2 were 17.68±2.86 mm and 18.4±1.82 mm in the PB and VR groups, respectively. The distances between the middle point of the posterior arch of the atlas and the medial intersection of VA on the groove were 17.35±2.23 mm in the PB group and 18.13±2.58 mm in the VR group. The distances between the middle line and the entrance of VA to the lower rim of TPF of Atlas were 28.64±2.67 mm in PB group and 29.23±2.89 mm in VR group. The diameters of the vertebral artery (VA) at the end of the groove and foramen of C2 transverse process were 4.02±046 mm and 4.25±0.51 mm, respectively, in the PB group and 3.54±0.44 mm and 4.47±0.62 mm, respectively, in VR group. The distances between the VA lumen center and midline of the foramen magnum at the level of dural penetration was 10.4±1.13 mm in the PB group and 11.5±1.34 mm in the VR group (P>0.05). Conclusions VR technology can accurately simulate the

  20. Bony fusion of the maxilla and mandible as a sequelae of noma: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Awasthi, Ujjwala Rastogi; Mody, Bharat M.; Suma, Gundareddy N.; Garg, Shruti

    2015-01-01

    Noma is a gangrenous disease of the orofacial region that leads to severe facial tissue destruction and is a significant cause of death among children. With the advent of modern antibiotics and improved nutrition, children with noma may survive into adulthood, but must face the challenge of undergoing repair of the sequelae of noma. This report describes a case of bony fusion of the maxilla and mandible in a 28-year-old female patient, which was a sequelae of a childhood case of noma. PMID:26389063

  1. Bony fusion of the maxilla and mandible as a sequelae of noma: A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Bagewadi, Shivanand B; Awasthi, Ujjwala Rastogi; Mody, Bharat M; Suma, Gundareddy N; Garg, Shruti

    2015-09-01

    Noma is a gangrenous disease of the orofacial region that leads to severe facial tissue destruction and is a significant cause of death among children. With the advent of modern antibiotics and improved nutrition, children with noma may survive into adulthood, but must face the challenge of undergoing repair of the sequelae of noma. This report describes a case of bony fusion of the maxilla and mandible in a 28-year-old female patient, which was a sequelae of a childhood case of noma.

  2. Combined effects between temporal heterogeneity of water supply, nutrient level, and population density on biomass of four broadly distributed herbaceous species.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Yousuke; Kachi, Naoki; Suzuki, Jun-Ichirou

    2012-01-01

    Temporal heterogeneity of water supply affects grassland community productivity and it can interact with nutrient level and intraspecific competition. To understand community responses, the responses of individual species to water heterogeneity must be evaluated while considering the interactions of this heterogeneity with nutrient levels and population density. We compared responses of four herbaceous species grown in monocultures to various combinations of water heterogeneity, nutrient level, and population density: two grasses (Cynodon dactylon and Lolium perenne), a forb (Artemisia princeps), and a legume (Trifolium repens). Treatment effects on shoot and root biomass were analyzed. In all four species, shoot biomass was larger under homogeneous than under heterogeneous water supply. Shoot responses of L. perenne tended to be greater at high nutrient levels. Although root biomass was also larger under homogeneous water supply, effects of water heterogeneity on root biomass were not significant in the grasses. Trifolium repens showed marked root responses, particularly at high population density. Although greater shoot and root growth under homogeneous water supply appears to be a general trend among herbaceous species, our results suggested differences among species could be found in the degree of response to water heterogeneity and its interactions with nutrient level and intraspecific competition.

  3. Kinetics of Heterogeneous Reaction of Sulfur Dioxide on Authentic Mineral Dust: Effects of Relative Humidity and Hydrogen Peroxide.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liubin; Zhao, Yue; Li, Huan; Chen, Zhongming

    2015-09-15

    Heterogeneous reaction of SO2 on mineral dust seems to be an important sink for SO2. However, kinetic data about this reaction on authentic mineral dust are scarce and are mainly limited to low relative humidity (RH) conditions. In addition, little is known about the role of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in this reaction. Here, we investigated the uptake kinetics of SO2 on three authentic mineral dusts (i.e., Asian mineral dust (AMD), Tengger desert dust (TDD), and Arizona test dust (ATD)) in the absence and presence of H2O2 at different RHs using a filter-based flow reactor, and applied a parameter (effectiveness factor) to the estimation of the effective surface area of particles for the calculation of the corrected uptake coefficient (γc). We found that with increasing RH, the γc decreases on AMD particles, but increases on ATD and TDD particles. This discrepancy is probably due to the different mineralogy compositions and aging extents of these dust samples. Furthermore, the presence of H2O2 can promote the uptake of SO2 on mineral dust at different RHs. The probable explanations are that H2O2 rapidly reacts with SO2 on mineral dust in the presence of adsorbed water, and OH radicals, which can be produced from the heterogeneous decomposition of H2O2 on the mineral dust, immediately react with adsorbed SO2 as well. Our results suggest that the removal of SO2 via the heterogeneous reaction on mineral dust is an important sink for SO2 and has the potential to alter the physicochemical properties (e.g., ice nucleation ability) of mineral dust particles in the atmosphere. PMID:26281003

  4. Kinetics of Heterogeneous Reaction of Sulfur Dioxide on Authentic Mineral Dust: Effects of Relative Humidity and Hydrogen Peroxide.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liubin; Zhao, Yue; Li, Huan; Chen, Zhongming

    2015-09-15

    Heterogeneous reaction of SO2 on mineral dust seems to be an important sink for SO2. However, kinetic data about this reaction on authentic mineral dust are scarce and are mainly limited to low relative humidity (RH) conditions. In addition, little is known about the role of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in this reaction. Here, we investigated the uptake kinetics of SO2 on three authentic mineral dusts (i.e., Asian mineral dust (AMD), Tengger desert dust (TDD), and Arizona test dust (ATD)) in the absence and presence of H2O2 at different RHs using a filter-based flow reactor, and applied a parameter (effectiveness factor) to the estimation of the effective surface area of particles for the calculation of the corrected uptake coefficient (γc). We found that with increasing RH, the γc decreases on AMD particles, but increases on ATD and TDD particles. This discrepancy is probably due to the different mineralogy compositions and aging extents of these dust samples. Furthermore, the presence of H2O2 can promote the uptake of SO2 on mineral dust at different RHs. The probable explanations are that H2O2 rapidly reacts with SO2 on mineral dust in the presence of adsorbed water, and OH radicals, which can be produced from the heterogeneous decomposition of H2O2 on the mineral dust, immediately react with adsorbed SO2 as well. Our results suggest that the removal of SO2 via the heterogeneous reaction on mineral dust is an important sink for SO2 and has the potential to alter the physicochemical properties (e.g., ice nucleation ability) of mineral dust particles in the atmosphere.

  5. The effect of material heterogeneity and random loading on the mechanics of fatigue crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivatsan, T. S.; Sambandham, M.; Bharucha-Reid, A. T.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews experimental work on the influence of variable amplitude or random loads on the mechanics and micromechanisms of fatigue crack growth. Implications are discussed in terms of the crack driving force, local plasticity, crack closure, crack blunting, and microstructure. Due to heterogeneity in the material's microstructure, the crack growth rate varies with crack tip position. Using the weakest link theory, an expression for crack growth rate is obtained as the expectation of a random variable. This expression is used to predict the crack growth rates for aluminum alloys, a titanium alloy, and a nickel steel in the mid-range region. It is observed, using the present theory, that the crack growth rate obeys the power law for small stress intensity factor range, and that the power is a function of a material constant.

  6. Effect of method of heterogenization of ephedrine and reaction conditions on the enantioselectivity of Michael additions

    SciTech Connect

    Krotov, V.V.; Staroverov, S.M.; Nesterenko, P.N.; Lisichkin. G.V.

    1987-11-10

    A series of heterogeneous catalysts for asymmetric Michael additions was synthesized based on ephedrine chemically bound to the surface of silica. The length of the hydrocarbon chain binding the active center to the support surface affects the sign of rotation of the reaction product from the asymmetric addition of thiophenol to benzylideneacetophenone. Grafting ephedrine to the silica surface via a short hydrocarbon chain results in a change in the configuration of the reaction product. Silanol groups on the silica surface are involved in the transition state, as evidenced by data obtained using silica which has been exhaustively treated with trimethylchlorosilane. The absolute specific rotation of 1,3-diphenyl-3-thiophenylpropan-1-one has been established.

  7. The effects of heterogeneities and loading conditions in the development of shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Luiz F. G.; Rybacki, Erik; Dresen, Georg

    2016-04-01

    Shear zones are regions of localized deformation and are frequently nucleated by material and/or structural heterogeneities and may develop under transient boundary conditions of strain rate and stress. Here we investigate shear zone nucleation and development due to mechanical heterogeneities. Experiments were performed in constant twist rate (CTR) and constant torque (CT) torsion tests to simulate the end member conditions of constant strain rate and constant stress. We have used hollow cylinders of Carrara marble samples containing weak inclusions of Solnhofen limestone. The experiments were conducted in a Paterson-type gas deformation apparatus at 900 °C temperature and 400 MPa confining pressure to maximum bulk shear strains of 3. Peak shear stress was about 20 MPa for all the samples, followed by smooth weakening and steady state behavior. The strain is predominantly localized in the host marble within the process zone in front of the inclusion, defined by a zone of intense grain size reduction due to dynamic recrystallization. Local shear strain values in the process zone are between 5 to 10 times higher than the bulk applied strain. In CT experiments, a narrow shear zone marked by intense grain size reduction is developed in front of the inclusion and the surrounding material remains relatively intact, whereas in CTR experiments the deformation is more widely distributed. The volume of recrystallized grains is nevertheless similar in the samples deformed at same bulk strains in both CT and CTR. At similar bulk strain, the crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) in the process zone of CT experiments is stronger than in CTR experiments and CPO strength varies with grain size. Our observations suggest that the initial formation and transient deformation of shear zones is strongly affected by loading conditions.

  8. Effects of heterogeneous wind fields and vegetation composition on modeled estimates of pollen source area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, K. D.; Goring, S. J.; Williams, J. W.; Holloway, T.

    2015-12-01

    Fossil pollen records from lakes, bogs, and small hollows offer the main source of information about vegetation responses to climate change and land use over timescales of decades to millennia. Millions of pollen grains are released from individual trees each year, and are transported by wind before settling out of the atmosphere. Reconstructing past vegetation from sedimentary pollen records, however, requires careful modeling of pollen production, transport, and deposition. The atmosphere is turbulent, and regional wind patterns shift from day to day. In accordance with this, it is necessary for pollen transport models to adequately account for variable, non-uniform wind patterns and vegetation heterogeneity. Using a simulation approach, with both simulated vegetation patterns and vegetation gradients, as well as simulated wind fields, we show the inconsistency in pollen loading proportions and local vegetation proportions when non-uniform wind patterns are incorporated. Vegetation upwind from the lake is over-represented due to the increased prevalence of winds transporting pollen from that area. The inclusion of North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) wind records affirms this finding. Of the lake sites explored in this study, none had uniform wind patterns. The use of a settlement-era gridded vegetation dataset, compiled by the PalEON project and based on Public Land Survey System (PLSS) records allows us to model pollen source area with realistic vegetation heterogeneity. Due to differences in productivity, pollen fall speeds, and neighboring vegetation, there exist patterns of vegetation that may be poorly characterized due to over/under representation of different taxa. Better understanding these differences in representation allows for more accurate reconstruction of historical vegetation, and pollen-vegetation relationships.

  9. Effect of tissue heterogeneity on an in vivo range verification technique for proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Bentefour, El Hassane; Shikui, Tang; Prieels, Damien; Lu, Hsiao-Ming

    2012-09-01

    It was proposed recently that time-resolved dose measurements during proton therapy treatment by passively scattered beams may be used for in vivo range verification. The method was shown to work accurately in a water tank. In this paper, we further evaluated the potential of the method for more clinically relevant situations where proton beams must pass through regions with significant tissue heterogeneities. Specifically, we considered prostate treatment where the use of anterior or anterior- oblique fields was recently proposed in order to reduce rectal dose by taking advantage of the sharp distal fall-off of the Bragg peak. These beam portals pass through various parts of pubic bone and potential air cavities in the bladder and bowels. Using blocks of materials with densities equivalent to bone, air, etc, arranged in the water tank in relevant configurations, we tested the robustness of the method against range shifting and range mixing. In the former, the beam range is changed uniformly by changes in tissue density in the beam path, while in the latter, variations in tissue heterogeneities across the beam cross section causes the mixing of beam energies downstream, as often occurs when the beam travels along the interface of materials with significantly different densities. We demonstrated that in the region of interest, the method can measure water-equivalent path length with accuracy better than ±0.5 mm for pure range shifting and still reasonable accuracy for range mixing between close beam energies. In situations with range mixing between significantly different beam energies, the dose rate profiles may be simulated for verifying the beam range. We also found that the above performances can be obtained with very small amount of dose (<0.5 cGy), if silicon diodes are used as detectors. This makes the method suitable for in vivo range verification prior to each treatment delivery. PMID:22864304

  10. Effect of Substrate Character on Heterogeneous Ozone Reaction Rate with Individual PAHs and Their Reaction Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmen, B. A.; Stevens, T.

    2009-12-01

    Vehicle exhaust contains many unregulated chemical compounds that are harmful to human health and the natural environment, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), a class of organic compounds derived from fuel combustion that can be carcinogenic and mutagenic. PAHs have been quantified in vehicle-derived ultrafine particles (Dp<100nm), which are more toxic than larger particles and are linked to adverse health problems, including respiratory and cardiac disease. Once emitted into the atmosphere, particle-bound PAHs can undergo “aging” reactions with oxidants, such as ozone, to form more polar species. These polar reaction products include species such as quinones that can be more toxic than the parent PAH compounds. Here, 0.4ppm ozone was reacted over a 24-hour period with the 16 EPA priority PAHs plus coronene adsorbed to (i) a quartz fiber filter and (ii) NIST diesel PM. The difference in the PAH/O3 heterogeneous reaction rate resulting from the two substrates will be discussed. The experiments were completed by spiking a known PAH mixture to the solid, reacting the samples with gas-phase ozone, and determining both PAH loss over time and products formed, using thermal-desorption gas chromatography / mass spectrometry (TD-GC/MS). The individual PAHs anthracene, phenanthrene, and fluorene, adsorbed to a QFF were also separately reacted with 0.4 ppm ozone. A volatilization control and the collection of volatilized PAHs using a Tenax-packed thermal desorption vial completed the mass balance and aided determination parent-product relationships. Heterogeneous reaction products analyzed directly without derivatization indicate the formation of 9,10-anthracenedione, 9H-fluoren-9-one, and (1,1’-biphenyl)-2,2’-dicarboxaldehyde from the reaction of ozone with the PAH mix on a QFF, but only 9,10-anthracenedione was detected for the diesel PM reaction. The implications of these results for aging of diesel particulate in urban environments will be discussed.

  11. Intratumor Heterogeneity in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Beca, Francisco; Polyak, Kornelia

    2016-01-01

    Intratumor heterogeneity is the main obstacle to effective cancer treatment and personalized medicine. Both genetic and epigenetic sources of intratumor heterogeneity are well recognized and several technologies have been developed for their characterization. With the technological advances in recent years, investigators are now elucidating intratumor heterogeneity at the single cell level and in situ. However, translating the accumulated knowledge about intratumor heterogeneity to clinical practice has been slow. We are certain that better understanding of the composition and evolution of tumors during disease progression and treatment will improve cancer diagnosis and the design of therapies. Here we review some of the most important considerations related to intratumor heterogeneity. We discuss both genetic and epigenetic sources of intratumor heterogeneity and review experimental approaches that are commonly used to quantify it. We also discuss the impact of intratumor heterogeneity on cancer diagnosis and treatment and share our perspectives on the future of this field. PMID:26987535

  12. Subsurface Transport and Mobilization of Pathogenic Microbes and Microspheres: Effect of Microbe Size, Soil Physical Heterogeneity, and Intermittent Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulicek, M. C.; Metge, D. W.; Mohanty, S. K.; Harvey, R. W.; Ryan, J. N.

    2013-12-01

    Intermittent flows of rainwater frequently mobilize pathogenic microbes attached to subsurface soils, thereby causing groundwater contamination. The potential of intermittent rainfall to mobilize diverse pathogens (e.g., size, shape, taxa) remains understudied for heterogeneous soil systems. This study investigates the combined effects of microbe size and shape, intermittent flow, and soil physical heterogeneity on the transport, retention and mobilization of microbes through an intact, fractured shale saprolite core. Microbes, including MS-2 bacteriophage (~26 nm), Pseudomonas stutzeri bacteria (~1 μm), and Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts (3.6 μm), and 0.5 μm fluorescent microspheres (FMS), preceded by a bromide tracer, were applied to the core to obtain breakthrough. After breakthrough, the core was subjected to intermittent rainfalls to mobilize the attached microbes and FMS. Water samples were collected using 19 spatially-arranged outlet ports at the core base to resolve the effect of soil physical heterogeneity. Water infiltrated through only eight of 19 total sampling ports, which indicated water partially bypassed soil matrices and infiltrated through macropores. Bromide recovery was less than 100%, which indicated diffusion of bromide into the soil matrix. Macropores and the soil matrix dominated flow were characterized based on the cumulative bromide recovery within individual sampling ports. Thus, lower recovery was attributed to increased matrix diffusion and higher recovery indicated the presence of macropores. Intermittent flow mobilized previously sequestered microbes and FMS; however, mobilization varied with the size of microbes/FMS and sampling ports. Greater mobilization occurred through macropores compared to soil matrices. Mobilization of larger, spherical C. parvum oocysts was greater than that of the smaller, spherical MS-2 bacteriophage and the rod-shaped P. stutzeri bacteria during intermittent flow. This suggested shear forces mobilize

  13. Clinical and Radiologic Evaluation of Regenerative Potential of NHA Paste and DBM in the Treatment of Periodontal Intra-bony Defects -A Randomized Control Trial

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepti; Gupta, Bharat; Sharma, Saurabh; Juneja, Saurabh; Juneja, Manjushree; Sharma, Shruti; Patil, Neha

    2016-01-01

    .64% (p<0.05). Conclusion Overall, both therapies led to significant improvements of the investigated parameters. The NHA paste was as effective in terms of improving clinical and radiographic parameters as DBM-Xenograft, which is an already established bone graft. There is a need for further long term controlled studies evaluating the adjunctive benefits of usage of NHA paste in the treatment of periodontal intra-bony defects. PMID:27790585

  14. Underestimating the effects of spatial heterogeneity due to individual movement and spatial scale: infectious disease as an example

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cross, Paul C.; Caillaud, Damien; Heisey, Dennis M.

    2013-01-01

    Many ecological and epidemiological studies occur in systems with mobile individuals and heterogeneous landscapes. Using a simulation model, we show that the accuracy of inferring an underlying biological process from observational data depends on movement and spatial scale of the analysis. As an example, we focused on estimating the relationship between host density and pathogen transmission. Observational data can result in highly biased inference about the underlying process when individuals move among sampling areas. Even without sampling error, the effect of host density on disease transmission is underestimated by approximately 50 % when one in ten hosts move among sampling areas per lifetime. Aggregating data across larger regions causes minimal bias when host movement is low, and results in less biased inference when movement rates are high. However, increasing data aggregation reduces the observed spatial variation, which would lead to the misperception that a spatially targeted control effort may not be very effective. In addition, averaging over the local heterogeneity will result in underestimating the importance of spatial covariates. Minimizing the bias due to movement is not just about choosing the best spatial scale for analysis, but also about reducing the error associated with using the sampling location as a proxy for an individual’s spatial history. This error associated with the exposure covariate can be reduced by choosing sampling regions with less movement, including longitudinal information of individuals’ movements, or reducing the window of exposure by using repeated sampling or younger individuals.

  15. Bony labyrinth morphometry indicates locomotor adaptations in the squirrel-related clade (Rodentia, Mammalia).

    PubMed

    Pfaff, Cathrin; Martin, Thomas; Ruf, Irina

    2015-06-22

    The semicircular canals (SCs) of the inner ear detect angular acceleration and are located in the bony labyrinth of the petrosal bone. Based on high-resolution computed tomography, we created a size-independent database of the bony labyrinth of 50 mammalian species especially rodents of the squirrel-related clade comprising taxa with fossorial, arboreal and gliding adaptations. Our sampling also includes gliding marsupials, actively flying bats, the arboreal tree shrew and subterranean species. The morphometric anatomy of the SCs was correlated to the locomotion mode. Even if the phylogenetic signal cannot entirely be excluded, the main significance for functional morphological studies has been found in the diameter of the SCs, whereas the radius of curvature is of minor interest. Additionally, we found clear differences in the bias angle of the canals between subterranean and gliding taxa, but also between sciurids and glirids. The sensitivity of the inner ear correlates with the locomotion mode, with a higher sensitivity of the SCs in fossorial species than in flying taxa. We conclude that the inner ear of flying and gliding mammals is less sensitive due to the large information flow into this sense organ during locomotion.

  16. Bony labyrinth morphometry indicates locomotor adaptations in the squirrel-related clade (Rodentia, Mammalia).

    PubMed

    Pfaff, Cathrin; Martin, Thomas; Ruf, Irina

    2015-06-22

    The semicircular canals (SCs) of the inner ear detect angular acceleration and are located in the bony labyrinth of the petrosal bone. Based on high-resolution computed tomography, we created a size-independent database of the bony labyrinth of 50 mammalian species especially rodents of the squirrel-related clade comprising taxa with fossorial, arboreal and gliding adaptations. Our sampling also includes gliding marsupials, actively flying bats, the arboreal tree shrew and subterranean species. The morphometric anatomy of the SCs was correlated to the locomotion mode. Even if the phylogenetic signal cannot entirely be excluded, the main significance for functional morphological studies has been found in the diameter of the SCs, whereas the radius of curvature is of minor interest. Additionally, we found clear differences in the bias angle of the canals between subterranean and gliding taxa, but also between sciurids and glirids. The sensitivity of the inner ear correlates with the locomotion mode, with a higher sensitivity of the SCs in fossorial species than in flying taxa. We conclude that the inner ear of flying and gliding mammals is less sensitive due to the large information flow into this sense organ during locomotion. PMID:26019162

  17. Multi-locus phylogenetic analysis reveals the pattern and tempo of bony fish evolution

    PubMed Central

    Broughton, Richard E.; Betancur-R., Ricardo; Li, Chenhong; Arratia, Gloria; Ortí, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    Over half of all vertebrates are “fishes”, which exhibit enormous diversity in morphology, physiology, behavior, reproductive biology, and ecology. Investigation of fundamental areas of vertebrate biology depend critically on a robust phylogeny of fishes, yet evolutionary relationships among the major actinopterygian and sarcopterygian lineages have not been conclusively resolved. Although a consensus phylogeny of teleosts has been emerging recently, it has been based on analyses of various subsets of actinopterygian taxa, but not on a full sample of all bony fishes. Here we conducted a comprehensive phylogenetic study on a broad taxonomic sample of 61 actinopterygian and sarcopterygian lineages (with a chondrichthyan outgroup) using a molecular data set of 21 independent loci. These data yielded a resolved phylogenetic hypothesis for extant Osteichthyes, including 1) reciprocally monophyletic Sarcopterygii and Actinopterygii, as currently understood, with polypteriforms as the first diverging lineage within Actinopterygii; 2) a monophyletic group containing gars and bowfin (= Holostei) as sister group to teleosts; and 3) the earliest diverging lineage among teleosts being Elopomorpha, rather than Osteoglossomorpha. Relaxed-clock dating analysis employing a set of 24 newly applied fossil calibrations reveals divergence times that are more consistent with paleontological estimates than previous studies. Establishing a new phylogenetic pattern with accurate divergence dates for bony fishes illustrates several areas where the fossil record is incomplete and provides critical new insights on diversification of this important vertebrate group. PMID:23788273

  18. Split cord malformation with dorsally located bony spur: Report of four cases and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Prasad, G L; Borkar, Sachin A; Satyarthee, G D; Mahapatra, A K

    2012-09-01

    Split cord malformations (SCM) with a dorsally located bony spur are a very rare entity. The authors report a series of four such cases. The literature is reviewed regarding the pathogenesis and management of this uncommon variant of SCM. The presenting features include - scoliosis with motor and autonomic dysfunction (n = 1), scoliosis with cutaneous patch (n = 1), hypertrichotic area (n = 1), and motor deficits alone (n = 1). The location of spur was thoracic and lumbar in two patients (50%) each. Low-lying conus was present in three patients. Long segment syrinx was present in one patient. With respect to the bony anomalies, two patients had a hypertrophied posterior arch (HPA) and one patient had a dysraphic spine. All patients underwent surgical excision of the spur with detethering, if a low-lying conus was present. Two patients developed transient worsening of the neurological status after surgery which recovered at the time of the last follow-up; in both these patients, there was a HPA and a low-lying conus. Surgical excision of the spur with detethering of filum, in cases of low-lying conus, is the treatment of choice. Risk of post-operative worsening of the neurological status is increased in cases in which there is concomitant presence of HPA.

  19. Bony labyrinth morphometry indicates locomotor adaptations in the squirrel-related clade (Rodentia, Mammalia)

    PubMed Central

    Pfaff, Cathrin; Martin, Thomas; Ruf, Irina

    2015-01-01

    The semicircular canals (SCs) of the inner ear detect angular acceleration and are located in the bony labyrinth of the petrosal bone. Based on high-resolution computed tomography, we created a size-independent database of the bony labyrinth of 50 mammalian species especially rodents of the squirrel-related clade comprising taxa with fossorial, arboreal and gliding adaptations. Our sampling also includes gliding marsupials, actively flying bats, the arboreal tree shrew and subterranean species. The morphometric anatomy of the SCs was correlated to the locomotion mode. Even if the phylogenetic signal cannot entirely be excluded, the main significance for functional morphological studies has been found in the diameter of the SCs, whereas the radius of curvature is of minor interest. Additionally, we found clear differences in the bias angle of the canals between subterranean and gliding taxa, but also between sciurids and glirids. The sensitivity of the inner ear correlates with the locomotion mode, with a higher sensitivity of the SCs in fossorial species than in flying taxa. We conclude that the inner ear of flying and gliding mammals is less sensitive due to the large information flow into this sense organ during locomotion. PMID:26019162

  20. An alternative treatment option for a bony defect from large odontoma using recycled demineralization at chairside.

    PubMed

    Lee, JuHyon; Lee, Eun-Young; Park, Eun-Jin; Kim, Eun-Suk

    2015-04-01

    Odontoma is the most common odontogenic benign tumor, and the treatment of choice is generally surgical removal. After excision, bone grafts may be necessary depending on the need for further treatment, or the size and location of the odontoma. Although the osteogenic capacity of a demineralized tooth was verified as early as 1967 by Urist and many other investigators, the cumbersome procedure, including a long demineralization time, may be less than comfortable for clinicians. A modified ultrasonic technology, with periodic negative pressure and temperature control, facilitated rapid and aseptic preparation of demineralized teeth for bone grafts. This approach reduces the demineralization time dramatically (≤80 minutes), so that the graft material can be prepared chairside on the same day as the extraction. The purpose of this article is to describe two cases of large compound odonotomas used as graft material prepared chairside for enucleation-induced bony defects. These two clinical cases showed favorable wound healing without complications, and good bony support for future dental implants or orthodontic treatment. Finally, this report will suggest the possibility of recycling the benign pathologic hard tissue as an alternative treatment option for conventional bone grafts in clinics.

  1. An alternative treatment option for a bony defect from large odontoma using recycled demineralization at chairside

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Odontoma is the most common odontogenic benign tumor, and the treatment of choice is generally surgical removal. After excision, bone grafts may be necessary depending on the need for further treatment, or the size and location of the odontoma. Although the osteogenic capacity of a demineralized tooth was verified as early as 1967 by Urist and many other investigators, the cumbersome procedure, including a long demineralization time, may be less than comfortable for clinicians. A modified ultrasonic technology, with periodic negative pressure and temperature control, facilitated rapid and aseptic preparation of demineralized teeth for bone grafts. This approach reduces the demineralization time dramatically (≤80 minutes), so that the graft material can be prepared chairside on the same day as the extraction. The purpose of this article is to describe two cases of large compound odonotomas used as graft material prepared chairside for enucleation-induced bony defects. These two clinical cases showed favorable wound healing without complications, and good bony support for future dental implants or orthodontic treatment. Finally, this report will suggest the possibility of recycling the benign pathologic hard tissue as an alternative treatment option for conventional bone grafts in clinics. PMID:25922824

  2. Electrosensory ampullary organs are lateral line placode-derived in bony fishes

    PubMed Central

    Modrell, Melinda S.; Bemis, William E.; Northcutt, R. Glenn; Davis, Marcus C.; Baker, Clare V. H.

    2014-01-01

    Electroreception is an ancient subdivision of the lateral line sensory system, found in all major vertebrate groups (though lost in frogs, amniotes, and most ray-finned fishes). Electroreception is mediated by “hair cells” in ampullary organs, distributed in fields flanking lines of mechanosensory hair cell-containing neuromasts that detect local water movement. Neuromasts, and afferent neurons for both neuromasts and ampullary organs, develop from lateral line placodes. Although ampullary organs in the axolotl (a representative of the lobe-finned clade of bony fishes) are lateral line placode-derived, non-placodal origins have been proposed for electroreceptors in other taxa. Here we show morphological and molecular data describing lateral line system development in the basal ray-finned fish Polyodon spathula, and present fate-mapping data that conclusively demonstrate a lateral line placode origin for ampullary organs and neuromasts. Together with the axolotl data, this confirms that ampullary organs are ancestrally lateral line placode-derived in bony fishes. PMID:21988912

  3. Aluminosilicates and biphasic HA-TCP composites: studies of properties for bony filling.

    PubMed

    Oudadesse, H; Derrien, A C; Mami, M; Martin, S; Cathelineau, G; Yahia, L

    2007-03-01

    Aluminosilicate materials synthesized at room temperature present good mechanical properties. Hydroxyapatite, tricalcium phosphate or both offer a high biocompatibility in the biomedical field. In this work, we focused on the composites resulting from associations of these materials. The best compromise between porosity and biomechanical properties versus different parameters was determined. The in vitro behaviour of compounds in contact with the simulated body fluid (SBF) was studied and in vivo experiments in a rabbit's thighbones were carried out. The inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) method permitted us to study the eventual release of Al from composites to SBF and to evaluate the chemical stability of composites characterized by the succession of SiO(4) and AlO(4) tetrahedra. The kinetic biomineralization, the bioconsolidation and biological studies were made. The results obtained show the chemical stability of composites. In the bone-implant interface, the intimate links reveal the high quality of the biointegration and the bioconsolidation between composites and bony matrix. Histological studies confirm good bony bonding and highlight the total absence of inflammation or fibrous tissues.

  4. Results of Bony Chest Wall Reconstruction with Expanded Polytetrafluoroethylene Soft Tissue Patch

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Haibo; Kitano, Kentaro; Nagayama, Kazuhiro; Nitadori, Jun-ichi; Anraku, Masaki; Murakawa, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The early and long-term outcomes of bony chest wall reconstruction with expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (Gore-Tex) soft tissue patch remain a concern. No clinical study has reported the shrinkage of Gore-Tex following reconstruction to date. Methods: Thirty-seven patients who underwent bony chest wall reconstruction from 1994 to 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Postoperative chest computed tomography images of 17 patients were examined, and shrinkage of reconstruction materials was measured and compared. Results: Gore-Tex was used for reconstruction in 18 patients, autologous materials were used in 14, Marlex mesh was used in four, and Medifit felt was used in one. No surgery-related deaths were observed. Twenty patients experienced early postoperative complications. Four patients experienced local infection. One patient with Marlex-mesh experienced empyema 33 days postoperatively. Chest drainage time in the Gore-Tex patients was significantly lower than in patients with other types of prosthetic reconstruction. No dislocation or dehiscence was found. Shrinkage of Gore-Tex was absent in 4 patients and acceptable in seven patients. No granulation formation was evident around the Gore-Tex, No significant difference in shrinkage was seen between the different materials used. Conclusion: Chest wall reconstruction with Gore-Tex was feasible with favorable early and long-term results. PMID:25641033

  5. Characterization of Paper Heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Considine, John M.

    Paper and paperboard are the most widely-used green materials in the world because they are renewable, recyclable, reusable, and compostable. Continued and expanded use of these materials and their potential use in new products requires a comprehensive understanding of the variability of their mechanical properties. This work develops new methods to characterize the mechanical properties of heterogeneous materials through a combination of techniques in experimental mechanics, materials science and numerical analysis. Current methods to analyze heterogeneous materials focus on crystalline materials or polymer-crystalline composites, where material boundaries are usually distinct. This work creates a methodology to analyze small, continuously-varying stiffness gradients in 100% polymer systems and is especially relevant to paper materials where factors influencing heterogeneity include local mass, fiber orientation, individual pulp fiber properties, local density, and drying restraint. A unique approach was used to understand the effect of heterogeneity on paper tensile strength. Additional variation was intentionally introduced, in the form of different size holes, and their effect on strength was measured. By modifying two strength criteria, an estimate of strength in the absence of heterogeneity was determined. In order to characterize stiffness heterogeneity, a novel load fixture was developed to excite full-field normal and shear strains for anisotropic stiffness determination. Surface strains were measured with digital image correlation and were analyzed with the VFM (Virtual Fields Method). This approach led to VFM-identified stiffnesses that were similar to values determined by conventional tests. The load fixture and VFM analyses were used to measure local stiffness and local stiffness variation on heterogeneous anisotropic materials. The approach was validated on simulated heterogeneous materials and was applied experimentally to three different paperboards

  6. Inclusion of line tension effect in classical nucleation theory for heterogeneous nucleation: A rigorous thermodynamic formulation and some unique conclusions.

    PubMed

    Singha, Sanat K; Das, Prasanta K; Maiti, Biswajit

    2015-03-14

    A rigorous thermodynamic formulation of the geometric model for heterogeneous nucleation including line tension effect is missing till date due to the associated mathematical hurdles. In this work, we develop a novel thermodynamic formulation based on Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT), which is supposed to illustrate a systematic and a more plausible analysis for the heterogeneous nucleation on a planar surface including the line tension effect. The appreciable range of the critical microscopic contact angle (θc), obtained from the generalized Young's equation and the stability analysis, is θ∞ < θc < θ' for positive line tension and is θM < θc < θ∞ for negative line tension. θ∞ is the macroscopic contact angle, θ' is the contact angle for which the Helmholtz free energy has the minimum value for the positive line tension, and θM is the local minima of the nondimensional line tension effect for the negative line tension. The shape factor f, which is basically the dimensionless critical free energy barrier, becomes higher for lower values of θ∞ and higher values of θc for positive line tension. The combined effect due to the presence of the triple line and the interfacial areas (f(L) + f(S)) in shape factor is always within (0, 3.2), resulting f in the range of (0, 1.7) for positive line tension. A formerly presumed appreciable range for θc(0 < θc < θ∞) is found not to be true when the effect of negative line tension is considered for CNT. Estimation based on the property values of some real fluids confirms the relevance of the present analysis.

  7. Inclusion of line tension effect in classical nucleation theory for heterogeneous nucleation: A rigorous thermodynamic formulation and some unique conclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Singha, Sanat K.; Das, Prasanta K. Maiti, Biswajit

    2015-03-14

    A rigorous thermodynamic formulation of the geometric model for heterogeneous nucleation including line tension effect is missing till date due to the associated mathematical hurdles. In this work, we develop a novel thermodynamic formulation based on Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT), which is supposed to illustrate a systematic and a more plausible analysis for the heterogeneous nucleation on a planar surface including the line tension effect. The appreciable range of the critical microscopic contact angle (θ{sub c}), obtained from the generalized Young’s equation and the stability analysis, is θ{sub ∞} < θ{sub c} < θ′ for positive line tension and is θ{sub M} < θ{sub c} < θ{sub ∞} for negative line tension. θ{sub ∞} is the macroscopic contact angle, θ′ is the contact angle for which the Helmholtz free energy has the minimum value for the positive line tension, and θ{sub M} is the local minima of the nondimensional line tension effect for the negative line tension. The shape factor f, which is basically the dimensionless critical free energy barrier, becomes higher for lower values of θ{sub ∞} and higher values of θ{sub c} for positive line tension. The combined effect due to the presence of the triple line and the interfacial areas (f{sup L} + f{sup S}) in shape factor is always within (0, 3.2), resulting f in the range of (0, 1.7) for positive line tension. A formerly presumed appreciable range for θ{sub c}(0 < θ{sub c} < θ{sub ∞}) is found not to be true when the effect of negative line tension is considered for CNT. Estimation based on the property values of some real fluids confirms the relevance of the present analysis.

  8. Heterogeneous Reaction of SO2 on Authentic Mineral Dusts: Effects of Relative Humidity and H2O2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, L.; Li, H.; Zhao, Y.; Chen, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) is a significant precursor of sulfuric acid and sulfate aerosols in the atmosphere. Field and model studies have revealed that heterogeneous reaction on mineral dusts seem to be an important sink for SO2. However, available kinetic data about heterogeneous reaction of SO2 on authentic mineral dusts are scarce and are mainly limited at low humidity relative (RH). In addition, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), which is the predominant oxidant of SO2 in the aqueous phase, may be able to promote the heterogeneous oxidation of SO2 on mineral dusts, but little is known about this role that H2O2 may play. In this study, we investigated the uptake kinetics of SO2 on authentic mineral dusts in the absence and presence of H2O2 at different RHs using a filter-based reactor. Three different authentic mineral dusts, i.e., Asian dust storm particles (ADS), Arizona test dust (ATD) and Tengger Desert sand (TDS), were used. The initial gas phase concentration of SO2 and H2O2 is about 5 ppbv and 0.8 ppbv, respectively, the typical concentration in the atmosphere. The values of uptake coefficients, γBET, on these particles are on the order of 10-5 under dry condition. Interestingly, with increasing RH, the γBET decreases on ADS particles, but increases on ATD and TDS particles. The difference in the mineralogy composition of these dust samples seems to rationalize the discrepancy in SO2 uptake. Furthermore, it is found that the presence of H2O2 increases the γBET by 45-90% on ADS, 45-150% on ATD and 40%-105% on TDS as RH increases 0 to 90%. One possible explanation for the observed behavior are that H2O2 can immediately react with SO2 on the surface of mineral dusts. Our results suggest that the role of heterogeneous reaction on mineral dusts as a sink of SO2 or a source of sulfate in the atmosphere may be underestimated due to the excluding of the enhancement effect of H2O2 in current atmospheric models.

  9. Effect of surface free energies on the heterogeneous nucleation of water droplet: a molecular dynamics simulation approach.

    PubMed

    Xu, W; Lan, Z; Peng, B L; Wen, R F; Ma, X H

    2015-02-01

    Heterogeneous nucleation of water droplet on surfaces with different solid-liquid interaction intensities is investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. The interaction potentials between surface atoms and vapor molecules are adjusted to obtain various surface free energies, and the nucleation process and wetting state of nuclei on surfaces are investigated. The results indicate that near-constant contact angles are already established for nano-scale nuclei on various surfaces, with the contact angle decreasing with solid-liquid interaction intensities linearly. Meanwhile, noticeable fluctuation of vapor-liquid interfaces can be observed for the nuclei that deposited on surfaces, which is caused by the asymmetric forces from vapor molecules. The formation and growth rate of nuclei are increasing with the solid-liquid interaction intensities. For low energy surface, the attraction of surface atoms to water molecules is comparably weak, and the pre-existing clusters can depart from the surface and enter into the bulk vapor phase. The distribution of clusters within the bulk vapor phase becomes competitive as compared with that absorbed on surface. For moderate energy surfaces, heterogeneous nucleation predominates and the formation of clusters within bulk vapor phase is suppressed. The effect of high energy particles that embedded in low energy surface is also discussed under the same simulation system. The nucleation preferably initiates on the high energy particles, and the clusters that formed on the heterogeneous particles are trapped around their original positions instead of migrating around as that observed on smooth surfaces. This feature makes it possible for the heterogeneous particles to act as fixed nucleation sites, and simulation results also suggest that the number of nuclei increases monotonously with the number of high energy particles. The growth of nuclei on high energy particles can be divided into three sub-stages, beginning with the formation

  10. Effect of surface free energies on the heterogeneous nucleation of water droplet: A molecular dynamics simulation approach

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, W.; Lan, Z.; Peng, B. L.; Wen, R. F.; Ma, X. H.

    2015-02-07

    Heterogeneous nucleation of water droplet on surfaces with different solid-liquid interaction intensities is investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. The interaction potentials between surface atoms and vapor molecules are adjusted to obtain various surface free energies, and the nucleation process and wetting state of nuclei on surfaces are investigated. The results indicate that near-constant contact angles are already established for nano-scale nuclei on various surfaces, with the contact angle decreasing with solid-liquid interaction intensities linearly. Meanwhile, noticeable fluctuation of vapor-liquid interfaces can be observed for the nuclei that deposited on surfaces, which is caused by the asymmetric forces from vapor molecules. The formation and growth rate of nuclei are increasing with the solid-liquid interaction intensities. For low energy surface, the attraction of surface atoms to water molecules is comparably weak, and the pre-existing clusters can depart from the surface and enter into the bulk vapor phase. The distribution of clusters within the bulk vapor phase becomes competitive as compared with that absorbed on surface. For moderate energy surfaces, heterogeneous nucleation predominates and the formation of clusters within bulk vapor phase is suppressed. The effect of high energy particles that embedded in low energy surface is also discussed under the same simulation system. The nucleation preferably initiates on the high energy particles, and the clusters that formed on the heterogeneous particles are trapped around their original positions instead of migrating around as that observed on smooth surfaces. This feature makes it possible for the heterogeneous particles to act as fixed nucleation sites, and simulation results also suggest that the number of nuclei increases monotonously with the number of high energy particles. The growth of nuclei on high energy particles can be divided into three sub-stages, beginning with the formation

  11. Sensing Home: A Cost-Effective Design for Smart Home via Heterogeneous Wireless Networks.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaohu; Huang, Hao; Qi, Shipeng; Luo, Xincheng; Zeng, Jing; Xie, Qubo; Xie, Changsheng

    2015-12-03

    The aging population has inspired the marketing of advanced real time devices for home health care, more and more wearable devices and mobile applications, which have emerged in this field. However, to properly collect behavior information, accurately recognize human activities, and deploy the whole system in a real living environment is a challenging task. In this paper, we propose a feasible wireless-based solution to deploy a data collection scheme, activity recognition model, feedback control and mobile integration via heterogeneous networks. We compared and found a suitable algorithm that can be run on cost-efficient embedded devices. Specifically, we use the Super Set Transformation method to map the raw data into a sparse binary matrix. Furthermore, designed front-end devices of low power consumption gather the living data of the habitant via ZigBee to reduce the burden of wiring work. Finally, we evaluated our approach and show it can achieve a theoretical time-slice accuracy of 98%. The mapping solution we propose is compatible with more wearable devices and mobile apps.

  12. Sensing Home: A Cost-Effective Design for Smart Home via Heterogeneous Wireless Networks.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaohu; Huang, Hao; Qi, Shipeng; Luo, Xincheng; Zeng, Jing; Xie, Qubo; Xie, Changsheng

    2015-01-01

    The aging population has inspired the marketing of advanced real time devices for home health care, more and more wearable devices and mobile applications, which have emerged in this field. However, to properly collect behavior information, accurately recognize human activities, and deploy the whole system in a real living environment is a challenging task. In this paper, we propose a feasible wireless-based solution to deploy a data collection scheme, activity recognition model, feedback control and mobile integration via heterogeneous networks. We compared and found a suitable algorithm that can be run on cost-efficient embedded devices. Specifically, we use the Super Set Transformation method to map the raw data into a sparse binary matrix. Furthermore, designed front-end devices of low power consumption gather the living data of the habitant via ZigBee to reduce the burden of wiring work. Finally, we evaluated our approach and show it can achieve a theoretical time-slice accuracy of 98%. The mapping solution we propose is compatible with more wearable devices and mobile apps. PMID:26633424

  13. Heterogeneous Reactions of Acetic Acid with Oxide Surfaces: Effects of Mineralogy and Relative Humidity.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mingjin; Larish, Whitney A; Fang, Yuan; Gankanda, Aruni; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-07-21

    We have investigated the heterogeneous uptake of gaseous acetic acid on different oxides including γ-Al2O3, SiO2, and CaO under a range of relative humidity conditions. Under dry conditions, the uptake of acetic acid leads to the formation of both acetate and molecularly adsorbed acetic acid on γ-Al2O3 and CaO and only molecularly adsorbed acetic acid on SiO2. More importantly, under the conditions of this study, dimers are the major form for molecularly adsorbed acetic acid on all three particle surfaces investigated, even at low acetic acid pressures under which monomers are the dominant species in the gas phase. We have also determined saturation surface coverages for acetic acid adsorption on these three oxides under dry conditions as well as Langmuir adsorption constants in some cases. Kinetic analysis shows that the reaction rate of acetic acid increases by a factor of 3-5 for γ-Al2O3 when relative humidity increases from 0% to 15%, whereas for SiO2 particles, acetic acid and water are found to compete for surface adsorption sites. PMID:27322707

  14. Effective Suppression of Pathological Synchronization in Cortical Networks by Highly Heterogeneous Distribution of Inhibitory Connections

    PubMed Central

    Kada, Hisashi; Teramae, Jun-Nosuke; Tokuda, Isao T.

    2016-01-01

    Even without external random input, cortical networks in vivo sustain asynchronous irregular firing with low firing rate. In addition to detailed balance between excitatory and inhibitory activities, recent theoretical studies have revealed that another feature commonly observed in cortical networks, i.e., long-tailed distribution of excitatory synapses implying coexistence of many weak and a few extremely strong excitatory synapses, plays an essential role in realizing the self-sustained activity in recurrent networks of biologically plausible spiking neurons. The previous studies, however, have not considered highly non-random features of the synaptic connectivity, namely, bidirectional connections between cortical neurons are more common than expected by chance and strengths of synapses are positively correlated between pre- and postsynaptic neurons. The positive correlation of synaptic connections may destabilize asynchronous activity of networks with the long-tailed synaptic distribution and induce pathological synchronized firing among neurons. It remains unclear how the cortical network avoids such pathological synchronization. Here, we demonstrate that introduction of the correlated connections indeed gives rise to synchronized firings in a cortical network model with the long-tailed distribution. By using a simplified feed-forward network model of spiking neurons, we clarify the underlying mechanism of the synchronization. We then show that the synchronization can be efficiently suppressed by highly heterogeneous distribution, typically a lognormal distribution, of inhibitory-to-excitatory connection strengths in a recurrent network model of cortical neurons. PMID:27803659

  15. Effect of geometry on concentration polarization in realistic heterogeneous permselective systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Yoav; Shloush, Shahar; Yossifon, Gilad

    2014-04-01

    This study extends previous analytical solutions of concentration polarization occurring solely in the depleted region, to the more realistic geometry consisting of a three-dimensional (3D) heterogeneous ion-permselective medium connecting two opposite microchambers (i.e., a three-layer system). Under the local electroneutrality approximation, the separation of variable methods is used to derive an analytical solution of the electrodiffusive problem for the two opposing asymmetric microchambers. The assumption of an ideal permselective medium allows for the analytic calculation of the 3D concentration and electric potential distributions as well as a current-voltage relation. It is shown that any asymmetry in the microchamber geometries will result in current rectification. Moreover, it is demonstrated that for non-negligible microchamber resistances, the conductance does not exhibit the expected saturation at low concentrations but instead shows a continuous decrease. The results are intended to facilitate a more direct comparison between theory and experiments, as now the voltage drop is across a realistic 3D and three-layer system.

  16. Heterogeneous Reactions of Acetic Acid with Oxide Surfaces: Effects of Mineralogy and Relative Humidity.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mingjin; Larish, Whitney A; Fang, Yuan; Gankanda, Aruni; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-07-21

    We have investigated the heterogeneous uptake of gaseous acetic acid on different oxides including γ-Al2O3, SiO2, and CaO under a range of relative humidity conditions. Under dry conditions, the uptake of acetic acid leads to the formation of both acetate and molecularly adsorbed acetic acid on γ-Al2O3 and CaO and only molecularly adsorbed acetic acid on SiO2. More importantly, under the conditions of this study, dimers are the major form for molecularly adsorbed acetic acid on all three particle surfaces investigated, even at low acetic acid pressures under which monomers are the dominant species in the gas phase. We have also determined saturation surface coverages for acetic acid adsorption on these three oxides under dry conditions as well as Langmuir adsorption constants in some cases. Kinetic analysis shows that the reaction rate of acetic acid increases by a factor of 3-5 for γ-Al2O3 when relative humidity increases from 0% to 15%, whereas for SiO2 particles, acetic acid and water are found to compete for surface adsorption sites.

  17. Effects of dispersal on total biomass in a patchy, heterogeneous system: Analysis and experiment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Liu, Xin; DeAngelis, D L; Ni, Wei-Ming; Wang, G Geoff

    2015-06-01

    An intriguing recent result from mathematics is that a population diffusing at an intermediate rate in an environment in which resources vary spatially will reach a higher total equilibrium biomass than the population in an environment in which the same total resources are distributed homogeneously. We extended the current mathematical theory to apply to logistic growth and also showed that the result applies to patchy systems with dispersal among patches, both for continuous and discrete time. This allowed us to make specific predictions, through simulations, concerning the biomass dynamics, which were verified by a laboratory experiment. The experiment was a study of biomass growth of duckweed (Lemna minor Linn.), where the resources (nutrients added to water) were distributed homogeneously among a discrete series of water-filled containers in one treatment, and distributed heterogeneously in another treatment. The experimental results showed that total biomass peaked at an intermediate, relatively low, diffusion rate, higher than the total carrying capacity of the system and agreeing with the simulation model. The implications of the experiment to dynamics of source, sink, and pseudo-sink dynamics are discussed. PMID:25817196

  18. Sensing Home: A Cost-Effective Design for Smart Home via Heterogeneous Wireless Networks

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiaohu; Huang, Hao; Qi, Shipeng; Luo, Xincheng; Zeng, Jing; Xie, Qubo; Xie, Changsheng

    2015-01-01

    The aging population has inspired the marketing of advanced real time devices for home health care, more and more wearable devices and mobile applications, which have emerged in this field. However, to properly collect behavior information, accurately recognize human activities, and deploy the whole system in a real living environment is a challenging task. In this paper, we propose a feasible wireless-based solution to deploy a data collection scheme, activity recognition model, feedback control and mobile integration via heterogeneous networks. We compared and found a suitable algorithm that can be run on cost-efficient embedded devices. Specifically, we use the Super Set Transformation method to map the raw data into a sparse binary matrix. Furthermore, designed front-end devices of low power consumption gather the living data of the habitant via ZigBee to reduce the burden of wiring work. Finally, we evaluated our approach and show it can achieve a theoretical time-slice accuracy of 98%. The mapping solution we propose is compatible with more wearable devices and mobile apps. PMID:26633424

  19. Effects of dispersal on total biomass in a patchy, heterogeneous system: analysis and experiment.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, Bo; Liu, Xin; DeAngelis, Donald L.; Ni, Wei-Ming; Wang, G Geoff

    2015-01-01

    An intriguing recent result from mathematics is that a population diffusing at an intermediate rate in an environment in which resources vary spatially will reach a higher total equilibrium biomass than the population in an environment in which the same total resources are distributed homogeneously. We extended the current mathematical theory to apply to logistic growth and also showed that the result applies to patchy systems with dispersal among patches, both for continuous and discrete time. This allowed us to make specific predictions, through simulations, concerning the biomass dynamics, which were verified by a laboratory experiment. The experiment was a study of biomass growth of duckweed (Lemna minor Linn.), where the resources (nutrients added to water) were distributed homogeneously among a discrete series of water-filled containers in one treatment, and distributed heterogeneously in another treatment. The experimental results showed that total biomass peaked at an intermediate, relatively low, diffusion rate, higher than the total carrying capacity of the system and agreeing with the simulation model. The implications of the experiment to dynamics of source, sink, and pseudo-sink dynamics are discussed.

  20. Sorbing tracer experiments in a crystalline rock fracture at Äspö (Sweden): 3. Effect of microscale heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovic, V.; Cheng, H.

    2008-12-01

    We study the impact of microscale (10-3-10-2 m) heterogeneity in material and structural properties on sorbing tracer transport in a single crystalline fracture of the TRUE-1 tests (mesoscale, 5 m) at Äspö (Sweden). The analysis is based on the microscale characterization results as presented in part 1 of this series. Our main objective in this last part of the series is to provide an independent interpretation (or "prediction") of the effective parameters as estimated from calibration in part 2 by combining the data presented in part 1 with analytical and numerical transport modeling. We show here that the independent information from microscopic characterization can be used for "predicting" the effective diffusion time td reasonably well; a discrepancy is to be expected given the uncertainties of microscale retention properties, in particular of the sorption coefficient.

  1. Using Simulation to Examine the Effect of Physician Heterogeneity on the Operational Efficiency of an Overcrowded Hospital Emergency Department

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Y.-H.; Leung, J. M. Y.; Graham, C. A.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we present a case study of modelling and analyzing the patient flow of a hospital emergency department in Hong Kong. The emergency department is facing the challenge of overcrowding and the patients there usually experience a long waiting time. Our project team was requested by a senior consultant of the emergency department to analyze the patient flow and provide a decision support tool to help improve their operations. We adopt a simulation approach to mimic their daily operations. With the simulation model, we conduct a computational study to examine the effect of physician heterogeneity on the emergency department performance. We found that physician heterogeneity has a great impact on the operational efficiency and thus should be considered when developing simulation models. Our computational results show that, with the same average of service rates among the physicians, variation in the rates can improve overcrowding situation. This suggests that emergency departments may consider having some efficient physicians to speed up the overall service rate in return for more time for patients who need extra medical care.

  2. Enhancement of Bacterial Transport in Aerobic and Anaerobic Environments: Assessing the Effect of Metal Oxide Chemical Heterogeneities

    SciTech Connect

    T.C. Onstott

    2005-09-30

    The goal of our research was to understand the fundamental processes that control microbial transport in physically and chemically heterogeneous aquifers and from this enhanced understanding determine the requirements for successful, field-scale delivery of microorganisms to metal contaminated subsurface sites. Our specific research goals were to determine; (1) the circumstances under which the preferential adsorption of bacteria to Fe, Mn, and Al oxyhydroxides influences field-scale bacterial transport, (2) the extent to which the adhesion properties of bacterial cells affect field-scale bacterial transport, (3) whether microbial Fe(III) reduction can enhance field-scale transport of Fe reducing bacteria (IRB) and other microorganisms and (4) the effect of field-scale physical and chemical heterogeneity on all three processes. Some of the spin-offs from this basic research that can improve biostimulation and bioaugmentation remediation efforts at contaminated DOE sites have included; (1) new bacterial tracking tools for viable bacteria; (2) an integrated protocol which combines subsurface characterization, laboratory-scale experimentation, and scale-up techniques to accurately predict field-scale bacterial transport; and (3) innovative and inexpensive field equipment and methods that can be employed to enhance Fe(III) reduction and microbial transport and to target microbial deposition under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

  3. Transport and deposition of polymer-modified Fe0 nanoparticles in 2-D heterogeneous porous media: effects of particle concentration, Fe0 content, and coatings.

    PubMed

    Phenrat, Tanapon; Cihan, Abdullah; Kim, Hye-Jin; Mital, Menka; Illangasekare, Tissa; Lowry, Gregory V

    2010-12-01

    Concentrated suspensions of polymer-modified Fe(0) nanoparticles (NZVI) are injected into heterogeneous porous media for groundwater remediation. This study evaluated the effect of porous media heterogeneity and the dispersion properties including particle concentration, Fe(0) content, and adsorbed polymer mass and layer thickness which are expected to affect the delivery and emplacement of NZVI in heterogeneous porous media in a two-dimensional (2-D) cell. Heterogeneity in hydraulic conductivity had a significant impact on the deposition of NZVI. Polymer modified NZVI followed preferential flow paths and deposited in the regions where fluid shear is insufficient to prevent NZVI agglomeration and deposition. NZVI transported in heterogeneous porous media better at low particle concentration (0.3 g/L) than at high particle concentrations (3 and 6 g/L) due to greater particle agglomeration at high concentration. High Fe(0) content decreased transport during injection due to agglomeration promoted by magnetic attraction. NZVI with a flat adsorbed polymeric layer (thickness ∼30 nm) could not be transported effectively due to pore clogging and deposition near the inlet, while NZVI with a more extended adsorbed layer thickness (i.e., ∼70 nm) were mobile in porous media. This study indicates the importance of characterizing porous media heterogeneity and NZVI dispersion properties as part of the design of a robust delivery strategy for NZVI in the subsurface. PMID:21058703

  4. Transport and deposition of polymer-modified Fe0 nanoparticles in 2-D heterogeneous porous media: effects of particle concentration, Fe0 content, and coatings.

    PubMed

    Phenrat, Tanapon; Cihan, Abdullah; Kim, Hye-Jin; Mital, Menka; Illangasekare, Tissa; Lowry, Gregory V

    2010-12-01

    Concentrated suspensions of polymer-modified Fe(0) nanoparticles (NZVI) are injected into heterogeneous porous media for groundwater remediation. This study evaluated the effect of porous media heterogeneity and the dispersion properties including particle concentration, Fe(0) content, and adsorbed polymer mass and layer thickness which are expected to affect the delivery and emplacement of NZVI in heterogeneous porous media in a two-dimensional (2-D) cell. Heterogeneity in hydraulic conductivity had a significant impact on the deposition of NZVI. Polymer modified NZVI followed preferential flow paths and deposited in the regions where fluid shear is insufficient to prevent NZVI agglomeration and deposition. NZVI transported in heterogeneous porous media better at low particle concentration (0.3 g/L) than at high particle concentrations (3 and 6 g/L) due to greater particle agglomeration at high concentration. High Fe(0) content decreased transport during injection due to agglomeration promoted by magnetic attraction. NZVI with a flat adsorbed polymeric layer (thickness ∼30 nm) could not be transported effectively due to pore clogging and deposition near the inlet, while NZVI with a more extended adsorbed layer thickness (i.e., ∼70 nm) were mobile in porous media. This study indicates the importance of characterizing porous media heterogeneity and NZVI dispersion properties as part of the design of a robust delivery strategy for NZVI in the subsurface.

  5. Vascularized proximal fibular autograft for treatment of post-traumatic segmental bony defects in the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takamasa; Yajima, Hiroshi; Kobata, Yasunori; Shigematsu, Koji; Kawamura, Kenji; Takakura, Yoshinori

    2008-11-01

    Vascularized proximal fibular autograft is reported as one of the reconstructive procedures for the wrists following tumor resection in the distal end of the radius. However, it is rarely performed for the treatment of segmental bony defects in the distal radius after trauma. A 19-year-old man who had traumatic bony defects in the distal radius involving the articular surface underwent vascularized proximal fibular grafting for reconstruction of the wrist. After surgery, he regained wrist functions, with 40 degrees of flexion, 45 degrees of extension, 90 degrees of pronation, and 45 degrees of supination. No evidence of instability or degenerative changes was noted in the reconstructed wrist at 3 years after surgery. Vascularized proximal fibular autograft appears a useful procedure both for reconstruction of the wrist in cases with segmental bony defects in the distal radius after trauma, as well as for after tumor resection. PMID:18925543

  6. Numerical analysis of wave-induced fluid flow effects related to mesoscopic heterogeneities for realistic models of porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubino, J. G.; Holliger, K.

    2010-12-01

    suitable upscaling procedure. This computational procedure emulates a corresponding pertinent laboratory experiment, in which a representative, mesoscopic-scale rock sample is subjected to a time-harmonic compressibility test. The thus observed complex volume change of the probed sample then allows for estimating the equivalent complex plane-wave modulus, which in turn yields the corresponding effective phase velocity and quality factor as functions of frequency. We apply this approach to a range of canonical models of porous media characterized by realistic, highly heterogeneous distributions of the hydraulic and/or elastic properties as well as varying levels of saturation. In particular, we also compare the results of spatially continuous variations of the medium and fluid properties with equivalent binary parameter distributions. Interestingly, preliminary results provide evidence to suggest that for most heterogeneous porous media characterized by spatially continuous variations of the hydraulic and/or elastic properties, the contribution of wave-induced mesoscopic fluid flow effects to the velocity dispersion and attenuation of seismic waves is likely to be of subordinate importance.

  7. Heterogeneity in mammography use across the nation: separating evidence of disparities from the disproportionate effects of geography

    PubMed Central

    Mobley, Lee R; Kuo, Tzy-Mey (May); Driscoll, David; Clayton, Laurel; Anselin, Luc

    2008-01-01

    Background Mammography is essential for early detection of breast cancer and both reduced morbidity and increased survival among breast cancer victims. Utilization is lower than national guidelines, and evidence of a recent decline in mammography use has sparked concern. We demonstrate that regression models estimated over pooled samples of heterogeneous states may provide misleading information regarding predictors of health care utilization and that comprehensive cancer control efforts should focus on understanding these differences and underlying causal factors. Our study population includes all women over age 64 with breast cancer in the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) cancer registries, linked to a nationally representative 5% reference sample of Medicare-eligible women located in 11 states that span all census regions and are heterogeneous in racial and ethnic mix. Combining women with and without cancer in the sample allows assessment of previous cancer diagnosis on propensity to use mammography. Our conceptual model recognizes the interplay between individual, social, cultural, and physical environments along the pathways to health care utilization, while delineating local and more distant levels of influence among contextual variables. In regression modeling, we assess individual-level effects, direct effects of contextual factors, and interaction effects between individual and contextual factors. Results Pooling all women across states leads to quite different conclusions than state-specific models. Commuter intensity, community acculturation, and community elderly impoverishment have significant direct impacts on mammography use which vary across states. Minorities living in isolated enclaves with others of the same race/ethnicity may be either advantaged or disadvantaged, depending upon the place studied. Conclusion Careful analysis of place-specific context is essential for understanding differences across communities stemming from

  8. Geometric effects in microfluidics on heterogeneous cell stress using an Eulerian-Lagrangian approach.

    PubMed

    Warren, K M; Mpagazehe, J N; LeDuc, P R; Higgs, C F

    2016-02-01

    The response of individual cells at the micro-scale in cell mechanics is important in understanding how they are affected by changing environments. To control cell stresses, microfluidics can be implemented since there is tremendous control over the geometry of the devices. Designing microfluidic devices to induce and manipulate stress levels on biological cells can be aided by computational modeling approaches. Such approaches serve as an efficient precursor to fabricating various microfluidic geometries that induce predictable levels of stress on biological cells, based on their mechanical properties. Here, a three-dimensional, multiphase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling approach was implemented for soft biological materials. The computational model incorporates the physics of the particle dynamics, fluid dynamics and solid mechanics, which allows us to study how stresses affect the cells. By using an Eulerian-Lagrangian approach to treat the fluid domain as a continuum in the microfluidics, we are conducting studies of the cells' movement and the stresses applied to the cell. As a result of our studies, we were able to determine that a channel with periodically alternating columns of obstacles was capable of stressing cells at the highest rate, and that microfluidic systems can be engineered to impose heterogenous cell stresses through geometric configuring. We found that when using controlled geometries of the microfluidics channels with staggered obstructions, we could increase the maximum cell stress by nearly 200 times over cells flowing through microfluidic channels with no obstructions. Incorporating computational modeling in the design of microfluidic configurations for controllable cell stressing could help in the design of microfludic devices for stressing cells such as cell homogenizers. PMID:26753780

  9. Effects of Tumor Microenvironment Heterogeneity on Nanoparticle Disposition and Efficacy in Breast Cancer Tumor Models

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gina; Darr, David B.; Santos, Charlene M.; Ross, Mark; Valdivia, Alain; Jordan, Jamie L.; Midkiff, Bentley R.; Cohen, Stephanie; Feinberg, Nana Nikolaishvili; Miller, C. Ryan; Tarrant, Teresa K.; Rogers, Arlin B.; Dudley, Andrew C.; Perou, Charles M.; Zamboni, William C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Tumor cells are surrounded by a complex microenvironment. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the role of heterogeneity of the tumor microenvironment in the variability of nanoparticle (NP) delivery and efficacy. Experimental designs C3(1)-T-Antigen genetically engineered mouse model (C3-TAg) and T11/TP53Null orthotopic syngeneic murine transplant model (T11) representing human breast tumor subtypes basal-like and claudin-low, respectively, were evaluated. For the pharmacokinetic studies, non-liposomal doxorubicin (NL-doxo) or polyethylene glycol tagged (PEGylated) liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) was administered at 6 mg/kg intravenously (IV) x1. Area-under-the concentration versus time curve (AUC) of doxorubicin was calculated. Macrophages, collagen, and the amount of vasculature were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Chemokines and cytokines were measured by multiplex immunochemistry. NL-doxo or PLD was administered at 6 mg/kg IV weekly x6 in efficacy studies. Analyses of intermediary tumor response and overall survival were performed. Results Plasma AUC of NL-doxo and PLD encapsulated and released doxorubicin were similar between two models. However, tumor sum total AUC of PLD was 2-fold greater in C3-TAg compared with T11 (P<0.05). T11 tumors showed significantly higher expression of CC chemokine ligand (CCL) 2 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-a, greater vascular quantity, and decreased expression of VEGF-c compared to C3-TAg (P<0.05). PLD was more efficacious compared to NL-doxo in both models. Conclusion The tumor microenvironment and/or tumor cell features of breast cancer affected NP tumor delivery and efficacy, but not the small molecule drug. Our findings reveal the role of the tumor microenvironment in variability of NP delivery and therapeutic outcomes. PMID:25231403

  10. Effects of evapotranspiration heterogeneity on catchment water balance in the Southern Sierra Nevada of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerkez, B.; Kelly, A. E.; Lucas, R. G.; Son, K.; Glaser, S. D.; Bales, R. C.

    2011-12-01

    Heterogeneity of Evapotranspiration (ET) is the result of poorly understood interactions between climate, topography, vegetation and soil. Accurate predictions of ET, and thus improved water balance estimates, hinge directly upon an improved understanding of the processes that drive ET across a wide spatio-temporal range. Recent warming trends in the Western US are shifting precipitation toward more rain-dominated patterns, significantly increasing vegetation water stress in historically snow-dominated regimes due to reduced soil moisture and increased vapor deficit during warm summer months. We investigate dominant controls that govern ET variability in a highly instrumented 1km2 mountain catchment at the Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory, co-located in the Kings River Experimental Watershed. Various ET estimates are derived from a number of measurement approaches: an eddy flux covariance tower, ET chambers, stream flumes, groundwater monitoring wells, matric potential sensors, as well as data from a distributed wireless sensor network with over 300 sensors. Combined with precipitation data, and high-density distributed soil moisture and snowdepth readings, the ET estimates are utilized to reconstruct the overall catchment water balance. We also apply the Regional Hydro-Ecologic Simulation System (RHESSys), a physically based, spatially distributed hydrologic model, to estimate water balance components. The model predictions are compared with the water budget calculated from field data, and used to identify the key variables controlling spatial and temporal patterns of ET at multiple scales. Initial results show that ET estimates are scale-, and vegetation-dependent, with significant ET variability between vegetation types and physiographic parameters such as elevation, slope, and aspect. In mixed conifer forests terrain, ET is more dependent on soil moisture, while in the meadows, where the soil is generally saturated for the duration of the growing

  11. Geometric effects in microfluidics on heterogeneous cell stress using an Eulerian-Lagrangian approach.

    PubMed

    Warren, K M; Mpagazehe, J N; LeDuc, P R; Higgs, C F

    2016-02-01

    The response of individual cells at the micro-scale in cell mechanics is important in understanding how they are affected by changing environments. To control cell stresses, microfluidics can be implemented since there is tremendous control over the geometry of the devices. Designing microfluidic devices to induce and manipulate stress levels on biological cells can be aided by computational modeling approaches. Such approaches serve as an efficient precursor to fabricating various microfluidic geometries that induce predictable levels of stress on biological cells, based on their mechanical properties. Here, a three-dimensional, multiphase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling approach was implemented for soft biological materials. The computational model incorporates the physics of the particle dynamics, fluid dynamics and solid mechanics, which allows us to study how stresses affect the cells. By using an Eulerian-Lagrangian approach to treat the fluid domain as a continuum in the microfluidics, we are conducting studies of the cells' movement and the stresses applied to the cell. As a result of our studies, we were able to determine that a channel with periodically alternating columns of obstacles was capable of stressing cells at the highest rate, and that microfluidic systems can be engineered to impose heterogenous cell stresses through geometric configuring. We found that when using controlled geometries of the microfluidics channels with staggered obstructions, we could increase the maximum cell stress by nearly 200 times over cells flowing through microfluidic channels with no obstructions. Incorporating computational modeling in the design of microfluidic configurations for controllable cell stressing could help in the design of microfludic devices for stressing cells such as cell homogenizers.

  12. Insights Into the Effects of Internal Variability, External Variability, and Active Sites on Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beydoun, H.; Sullivan, R. C.; Polen, M.

    2015-12-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation (HIN) remains one of the outstanding problems in cloud physics and atmospheric science. Experimental challenges in properly simulating HIN processes with relevant atmospheric conditions have largely contributed to the absence of a consistent and comprehensive parameterization. Here we formulate a new ice active surface site-based stochastic model of HIN with the unique feature of invoking a continuum assumption on the ice nucleation activity (contact angle) of an aerosol particle's surface. The result is a particle specific property g that defines a distribution of local surface ice nucleation rates. Upon integration this yields a full freezing probability function for an ice nucleating particle. Current cold plate droplet freezing measurements provide a great resource for studying the freezing ability of many atmospheric aerosol systems. A method based on statistical significance and critical area analysis is presented that can resolve the two-dimensional nature of the ice nucleation ability of aerosol particles: variability in active sites and freezing rates along an individual particle's surface, as well as variability between two particles of the same type in an aerosol population. When applied to published experimental data, the method demonstrates its ability to comprehensively interpret droplet freezing spectra of variable particle mass and surface area concentrations. By fitting the high concentration freezing curves to a statistically significant active site density function, the lower concentration freezing curves are successfully fitted via a process of random sampling from the statistically significant distribution. Using the new scheme, comprehensive parameterizations that can track the frozen fraction of cloud droplets in larger atmospheric models are derived.

  13. Heterogeneous Heat Flow and Groundwater Effects on East Antarctic Ice Sheet Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gooch, B. T.; Soderlund, K. M.; Young, D. A.; Blankenship, D. D.

    2015-12-01

    We present the results numerical models describing the potential contributions groundwater and heterogeneous heat sources might have on ice dynamics. A two-phase, 1D hydrothermal model demonstrates the importance of groundwater flow in heat flux advection near the ice-bed interface. Typical, conservative vertical groundwater volume fluxes on the order of +/- 1-10 mm/yr can alter vertical heat flux by +/- 50-500 mW/m2 that could produce considerable volumes of meltwater depending on basin geometry and geothermal heat production. A 1D hydromechanical model demonstrates that during ice advance groundwater is mainly recharged into saturated sedimentary aquifers and during retreat groundwater discharges into the ice-bed interface, potentially contributing to subglacial water budgets on the order of 0.1-1 mm/yr during ice retreat. A map of most-likely elevated heat production provinces, estimated sedimentary basin depths, and radar-derived bed roughness are compared together to delineate areas of greatest potential to ice sheet instability in East Antarctica. Finally, a 2D numerical model of crustal fluid and heat flow typical to recently estimated sedimentary basins under the East Antarctic Ice Sheet is coupled to a 2.5D Full Stokes ice sheet model (with simple basal hydrology) to test for the sensitivity of hydrodynamic processes on ice sheet dynamics. Preliminary results show that the enhanced fluid flow can dramatically alter the basal heating of the ice and its temperature profile, as well as, the sliding rate, which heavily alter ice dynamics.

  14. The Heterogeneous Effects of Cigarette Prices on Brand Choice in China: Implications for Tobacco Control Policy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; White, Justin S.; Hu, Teh-wei; Fong, Geoffrey T.; Jiang, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Background China has long kept its tobacco taxes below international standards. The Chinese government has cited as two rationales against raising tobacco tax, namely the unfair burden it places on low-income smokers and the ability of consumers to switch to cheaper brands. Objective This study examines how different socioeconomic subgroups of Chinese smokers switch brands in response to cigarette price changes. Methods We model smokers’ choice of cigarette tier as a function of tier-specific prices. We examine heterogeneous responses to prices by estimating mixed logit models for different income and education subgroups that allow for random variation in smokers’ preferences. We use data from three waves of the longitudinal ITC China Survey, collected in six large Chinese cities between 2006 and 2009. Findings Low-income and less educated smokers are considerably more likely to switch tiers (including both up-trading and down-trading) than are their high-socioeconomic status (SES) counterparts. For those in the second-to-lowest tier, a ¥1 ($0.16, or roughly 25%) rise in prices increases the likelihood of switching tiers by 5.6% points for low-income smokers and 7.2% points for less educated smokers, compared to 1.6% and 3.0% points for the corresponding high-SES groups. Low-income and less educated groups are also more likely to trade down compared to their high-SES counterparts. Conclusion Only a small percentage of low-income and less educated Chinese smokers switched to cheaper brands in response to price increases. Hence, the concern of the Chinese government that a cigarette tax increase will lead to large-scale brand switching is not supported by this study. PMID:25855642

  15. Bony cranial ornamentation linked to rapid evolution of gigantic theropod dinosaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, Terry A.; Organ, Chris; Zanno, Lindsay E.

    2016-09-01

    Exaggerated cranial structures such as crests and horns, hereafter referred to collectively as ornaments, are pervasive across animal species. These structures perform vital roles in visual communication and physical interactions within and between species. Yet the origin and influence of ornamentation on speciation and ecology across macroevolutionary time scales remains poorly understood for virtually all animals. Here, we explore correlative evolution of osseous cranial ornaments with large body size in theropod dinosaurs using a phylogenetic comparative framework. We find that body size evolved directionally toward phyletic giantism an order of magnitude faster in theropod species possessing ornaments compared with unadorned lineages. In addition, we find a body mass threshold below which bony cranial ornaments do not originate. Maniraptoriform dinosaurs generally lack osseous cranial ornaments despite repeatedly crossing this body size threshold. Our study provides novel, quantitative support for a shift in selective pressures on socio-sexual display mechanisms in theropods coincident with the evolution of pennaceous feathers.

  16. A Forgotten Technique for Replacement of Maxillary Anteriors and an associated Bony Defect: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Manoaharan, P S; Ali, S A Mohamed; Selvarangam, Suganya; Balaji, J; Ibthigar, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Fixed replacement of maxillary anterior teeth with an associated bony defect has challenged the restoring dentist with problems like weight of the prosthesis thereby leading to weakening of abutment teeth, difficulty in establishing smile line and mechanical stability. This article describes the management of a patient with such defect with a forgotten prosthesis – the Andrew bridge system, which has a fixed and a removable prosthetic component with retentive clips, which anchors on to a bar spanning the edentulous space. Andrew’s bridge system has definite indications and offers immense advantages over the other prosthesis for rehabilitation of cases of such scenario. It addresses the problems aforementioned and provides the optimal retention, mechanical stability, esthetics and comfort to the patient. PMID:26028906

  17. Crouzon syndrome with bony upper airway obstruction: case report and review literature.

    PubMed

    Gothwal, Sunil; Nayan, Swati; Kumar, Jagdish

    2014-08-01

    Crouzon syndrome is a rare genetic disorder. It is inherited as an autosomal dominant pattern. Mutations in the FGFR2 gene are known to cause Crouzon syndrome. Craniofacial abnormalities are common at birth and may progress with time. The severity of these signs and symptoms varies among affected children. A full term, large for date, male baby was delivered to a gravida 2 mother by cesarean section having facial dimorphism suggestive of Crouzon syndrome. Genetic team confirmed the diagnosis. Baby had severe respiratory distress. On work up, upper bony airway narrowing was found (diameter 3 mm). Later on, baby was operated for the same. Baby is asymptomatic now and doing well up to 2 months of follow-up. Management of Crouzon disease is multidisciplinary and early diagnosis has prime importance. Follow-up must ensure late features like hearing problems, vision problems, dental problems, intelligence, cranial synostosis, and upper airway problems. PMID:24828762

  18. Use of urea as a chemosensory cloaking molecule by a bony fish.

    PubMed

    Barimo, John F; Walsh, Patrick J

    2006-11-01

    Because urea is bioenergetically expensive to synthesize, few aquatic teleostean (bony) fish make or excrete much urea beyond early development and excrete the majority of nitrogenous waste as the readily diffusible ammonia. The gulf toadfish is one of a few adult teleostean fish that excretes predominantly urea. Most studies of chemosensing by fish predators have focused on amino acids as odorants, but we tested the chemo-attractiveness of both urea and ammonia. We report that characteristic "prey-attack" behaviors by a key toadfish predator, gray snapper, were elicited by low ammonia concentrations (<100 nmol N l(-1)) and similar urea concentrations blunted the ammonia-induced component of attacks. Thus, urea functions as a cloaking molecule, explaining why toadfish co-excrete urea with ammonia. Furthermore, ammonia waste is an important chemical attractant for piscine predators.

  19. Bony cranial ornamentation linked to rapid evolution of gigantic theropod dinosaurs

    PubMed Central

    Gates, Terry A.; Organ, Chris; Zanno, Lindsay E.

    2016-01-01

    Exaggerated cranial structures such as crests and horns, hereafter referred to collectively as ornaments, are pervasive across animal species. These structures perform vital roles in visual communication and physical interactions within and between species. Yet the origin and influence of ornamentation on speciation and ecology across macroevolutionary time scales remains poorly understood for virtually all animals. Here, we explore correlative evolution of osseous cranial ornaments with large body size in theropod dinosaurs using a phylogenetic comparative framework. We find that body size evolved directionally toward phyletic giantism an order of magnitude faster in theropod species possessing ornaments compared with unadorned lineages. In addition, we find a body mass threshold below which bony cranial ornaments do not originate. Maniraptoriform dinosaurs generally lack osseous cranial ornaments despite repeatedly crossing this body size threshold. Our study provides novel, quantitative support for a shift in selective pressures on socio-sexual display mechanisms in theropods coincident with the evolution of pennaceous feathers. PMID:27676310

  20. Effect of adding nanometre-sized heterogeneities on the structural dynamics and the excess wing of a molecular glass former

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, S.; Fischer, J. K. H.; Lunkenheimer, P.; Loidl, A.; Novak, E.; Jalarvo, N.; Ohl, M.

    2016-01-01

    We present the relaxation dynamics of glass-forming glycerol mixed with 1.1 nm sized polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) molecules using dielectric spectroscopy (DS) and two different neutron scattering (NS) techniques. Both, the reorientational dynamics as measured by DS and the density fluctuations detected by NS reveal a broadening of the α relaxation when POSS molecules are added. Moreover, we find a significant slowing down of the α-relaxation time. These effects are in accord with the heterogeneity scenario considered for the dynamics of glasses and supercooled liquids. The addition of POSS also affects the excess wing in glycerol arising from a secondary relaxation process, which seems to exhibit a dramatic increase in relative strength compared to the α relaxation. PMID:27725747

  1. The effects of permeability heterogeneity on miscible viscous fingering: A three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Erik J.; Grotegut, Chad A.; Braun, George W.; Kirschner, Kenneth J.; Staudaher, John R.; Dickson, Matthew L.; Fernandez, Veronica L.

    1995-03-01

    The three-dimensional evolution of the viscous fingering instability has been visualized directly with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Miscible displacement of thin solute bands by aqueous solvent was investigated in packed beds of 30 μm chromatographic particles. Fingering behavior into samples of glycerol and a protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA), with viscosity ratios ranging from 1 to approximately 4, were compared. The three-dimensional morphology and dynamics of fingers were monitored to approximately millimeter spatial resolution using MRI. Linear and nonlinear fingering behavior were observed. Permeability heterogeneities with length scales on the order of the finger wavelength induced complex three-dimensional fingering patterns. Sample and column boundary effects on fingering dynamics were also noted. The differences in fingering behavior observed between albumin and glycerol samples are consistent with the wavelength predictions of linear stability analysis and the large differences in molecular diffusivity.

  2. The effect of heterogeneous variance on efficiency and power of cluster randomized trials with a balanced 2 × 2 factorial design.

    PubMed

    Lemme, Francesca; van Breukelen, Gerard J P; Candel, Math J J M; Berger, Martijn P F

    2015-10-01

    Sample size calculation for cluster randomized trials (CRTs) with a [Formula: see text] factorial design is complicated due to the combination of nesting (of individuals within clusters) with crossing (of two treatments). Typically, clusters and individuals are allocated across treatment conditions in a balanced fashion, which is optimal under homogeneity of variance. However, the variance is likely to be heterogeneous if there is a treatment effect. An unbalanced allocation is then more efficient, but impractical because the optimal allocation depends on the unknown variances. Focusing on CRTs with a [Formula: see text] design, this paper addresses two questions: How much efficiency is lost by having a balanced design when the outcome variance is heterogeneous? How large must the sample size be for a balanced allocation to have sufficient power under heterogeneity of variance? We consider different scenarios of heterogeneous variance. Within each scenario, we determine the relative efficiency of a balanced design, as a function of the level (cluster, individual, both) and amount of heterogeneity of the variance. We then provide a simple correction of the sample size for the loss of power due to heterogeneity of variance when a balanced allocation is used. The theory is illustrated with an example of a published 2 x2 CRT.

  3. The effect of heterogeneous variance on efficiency and power of cluster randomized trials with a balanced 2 × 2 factorial design.

    PubMed

    Lemme, Francesca; van Breukelen, Gerard J P; Candel, Math J J M; Berger, Martijn P F

    2015-10-01

    Sample size calculation for cluster randomized trials (CRTs) with a [Formula: see text] factorial design is complicated due to the combination of nesting (of individuals within clusters) with crossing (of two treatments). Typically, clusters and individuals are allocated across treatment conditions in a balanced fashion, which is optimal under homogeneity of variance. However, the variance is likely to be heterogeneous if there is a treatment effect. An unbalanced allocation is then more efficient, but impractical because the optimal allocation depends on the unknown variances. Focusing on CRTs with a [Formula: see text] design, this paper addresses two questions: How much efficiency is lost by having a balanced design when the outcome variance is heterogeneous? How large must the sample size be for a balanced allocation to have sufficient power under heterogeneity of variance? We consider different scenarios of heterogeneous variance. Within each scenario, we determine the relative efficiency of a balanced design, as a function of the level (cluster, individual, both) and amount of heterogeneity of the variance. We then provide a simple correction of the sample size for the loss of power due to heterogeneity of variance when a balanced allocation is used. The theory is illustrated with an example of a published 2 x2 CRT. PMID:25911332

  4. The Evolution of Bony Vertebrate Enhancers at Odds with Their Coding Sequence Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Yousaf, Aisha; Sohail Raza, Muhammad; Ali Abbasi, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Enhancers lie at the heart of transcriptional and developmental gene regulation. Therefore, changes in enhancer sequences usually disrupt the target gene expression and result in disease phenotypes. Despite the well-established role of enhancers in development and disease, evolutionary sequence studies are lacking. The current study attempts to unravel the puzzle of bony vertebrates’ conserved noncoding elements (CNE) enhancer evolution. Bayesian phylogenetics of enhancer sequences spotlights promising interordinal relationships among placental mammals, proposing a closer relationship between humans and laurasiatherians while placing rodents at the basal position. Clock-based estimates of enhancer evolution provided a dynamic picture of interspecific rate changes across the bony vertebrate lineage. Moreover, coelacanth in the study augmented our appreciation of the vertebrate cis-regulatory evolution during water–land transition. Intriguingly, we observed a pronounced upsurge in enhancer evolution in land-dwelling vertebrates. These novel findings triggered us to further investigate the evolutionary trend of coding as well as CNE nonenhancer repertoires, to highlight the relative evolutionary dynamics of diverse genomic landscapes. Surprisingly, the evolutionary rates of enhancer sequences were clearly at odds with those of the coding and the CNE nonenhancer sequences during vertebrate adaptation to land, with land vertebrates exhibiting significantly reduced rates of coding sequence evolution in comparison to their fast evolving regulatory landscape. The observed variation in tetrapod cis-regulatory elements caused the fine-tuning of associated gene regulatory networks. Therefore, the increased evolutionary rate of tetrapods’ enhancer sequences might be responsible for the variation in developmental regulatory circuits during the process of vertebrate adaptation to land. PMID:26253316

  5. The Evolution of Bony Vertebrate Enhancers at Odds with Their Coding Sequence Landscape.

    PubMed

    Yousaf, Aisha; Sohail Raza, Muhammad; Ali Abbasi, Amir

    2015-08-06

    Enhancers lie at the heart of transcriptional and developmental gene regulation. Therefore, changes in enhancer sequences usually disrupt the target gene expression and result in disease phenotypes. Despite the well-established role of enhancers in development and disease, evolutionary sequence studies are lacking. The current study attempts to unravel the puzzle of bony vertebrates' conserved noncoding elements (CNE) enhancer evolution. Bayesian phylogenetics of enhancer sequences spotlights promising interordinal relationships among placental mammals, proposing a closer relationship between humans and laurasiatherians while placing rodents at the basal position. Clock-based estimates of enhancer evolution provided a dynamic picture of interspecific rate changes across the bony vertebrate lineage. Moreover, coelacanth in the study augmented our appreciation of the vertebrate cis-regulatory evolution during water-land transition. Intriguingly, we observed a pronounced upsurge in enhancer evolution in land-dwelling vertebrates. These novel findings triggered us to further investigate the evolutionary trend of coding as well as CNE nonenhancer repertoires, to highlight the relative evolutionary dynamics of diverse genomic landscapes. Surprisingly, the evolutionary rates of enhancer sequences were clearly at odds with those of the coding and the CNE nonenhancer sequences during vertebrate adaptation to land, with land vertebrates exhibiting significantly reduced rates of coding sequence evolution in comparison to their fast evolving regulatory landscape. The observed variation in tetrapod cis-regulatory elements caused the fine-tuning of associated gene regulatory networks. Therefore, the increased evolutionary rate of tetrapods' enhancer sequences might be responsible for the variation in developmental regulatory circuits during the process of vertebrate adaptation to land.

  6. Effect of heterogeneity and anisotropy related to the construction method on transfer processes in waste rock piles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahmira, Belkacem; Lefebvre, René; Aubertin, Michel; Bussière, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Waste rock piles producing acid mine drainage (AMD) are partially saturated systems involving multiphase (gas and liquid) flow and coupled transfer processes. Their internal structure and heterogeneous properties are inherited from their wide-ranging material grain sizes, their modes of deposition, and the underlying topography. This paper aims at assessing the effect of physical heterogeneity and anisotropy of waste rock piles on the physical processes involved in the generation of AMD. Generic waste rock pile conditions were represented with the numerical simulator TOUGH AMD based on those found at the Doyon mine waste rock pile (Canada). Models included four randomly distributed material types (coarse, intermediate, fine and very fine-grained). The term "randomly" as used in this study means that the vertical profile and spatial distribution of materials in waste rock piles (internal structure) defy stratigraphy principles applicable to natural sediments (superposition and continuity). The materials have different permeability and capillary properties, covering the typical range of materials found in waste rock piles. Anisotropy with a larger horizontal than vertical permeability was used to represent the effect of pile construction by benches, while the construction by end-dumping was presumed to induce a higher vertical than horizontal permeability. Results show that infiltrated precipitation preferentially flows in fine-grained materials, which remain almost saturated, whereas gas flows preferentially through the most permeable coarse materials, which have higher volumetric gas saturation. Anisotropy, which depends on pile construction methods, often controls global gas flow paths. Construction by benches favours lateral air entry close to the pile slope, whereas end-dumping leads to air entry from the surface to the interior of the pile by secondary gas convection cells. These results can be useful to construct and rehabilitate waste rock piles to minimize

  7. Effect of heterogeneity and anisotropy related to the construction method on transfer processes in waste rock piles.

    PubMed

    Lahmira, Belkacem; Lefebvre, René; Aubertin, Michel; Bussière, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Waste rock piles producing acid mine drainage (AMD) are partially saturated systems involving multiphase (gas and liquid) flow and coupled transfer processes. Their internal structure and heterogeneous properties are inherited from their wide-ranging material grain sizes, their modes of deposition, and the underlying topography. This paper aims at assessing the effect of physical heterogeneity and anisotropy of waste rock piles on the physical processes involved in the generation of AMD. Generic waste rock pile conditions were represented with the numerical simulator TOUGH AMD based on those found at the Doyon mine waste rock pile (Canada). Models included four randomly distributed material types (coarse, intermediate, fine and very fine-grained). The term "randomly" as used in this study means that the vertical profile and spatial distribution of materials in waste rock piles (internal structure) defy stratigraphy principles applicable to natural sediments (superposition and continuity). The materials have different permeability and capillary properties, covering the typical range of materials found in waste rock piles. Anisotropy with a larger horizontal than vertical permeability was used to represent the effect of pile construction by benches, while the construction by end-dumping was presumed to induce a higher vertical than horizontal permeability. Results show that infiltrated precipitation preferentially flows in fine-grained materials, which remain almost saturated, whereas gas flows preferentially through the most permeable coarse materials, which have higher volumetric gas saturation. Anisotropy, which depends on pile construction methods, often controls global gas flow paths. Construction by benches favours lateral air entry close to the pile slope, whereas end-dumping leads to air entry from the surface to the interior of the pile by secondary gas convection cells. These results can be useful to construct and rehabilitate waste rock piles to minimize

  8. Effect of heterogeneity and anisotropy related to the construction method on transfer processes in waste rock piles.

    PubMed

    Lahmira, Belkacem; Lefebvre, René; Aubertin, Michel; Bussière, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Waste rock piles producing acid mine drainage (AMD) are partially saturated systems involving multiphase (gas and liquid) flow and coupled transfer processes. Their internal structure and heterogeneous properties are inherited from their wide-ranging material grain sizes, their modes of deposition, and the underlying topography. This paper aims at assessing the effect of physical heterogeneity and anisotropy of waste rock piles on the physical processes involved in the generation of AMD. Generic waste rock pile conditions were represented with the numerical simulator TOUGH AMD based on those found at the Doyon mine waste rock pile (Canada). Models included four randomly distributed material types (coarse, intermediate, fine and very fine-grained). The term "randomly" as used in this study means that the vertical profile and spatial distribution of materials in waste rock piles (internal structure) defy stratigraphy principles applicable to natural sediments (superposition and continuity). The materials have different permeability and capillary properties, covering the typical range of materials found in waste rock piles. Anisotropy with a larger horizontal than vertical permeability was used to represent the effect of pile construction by benches, while the construction by end-dumping was presumed to induce a higher vertical than horizontal permeability. Results show that infiltrated precipitation preferentially flows in fine-grained materials, which remain almost saturated, whereas gas flows preferentially through the most permeable coarse materials, which have higher volumetric gas saturation. Anisotropy, which depends on pile construction methods, often controls global gas flow paths. Construction by benches favours lateral air entry close to the pile slope, whereas end-dumping leads to air entry from the surface to the interior of the pile by secondary gas convection cells. These results can be useful to construct and rehabilitate waste rock piles to minimize

  9. Effective coarse-grained solid-fluid potentials and their application to model adsorption of fluids on heterogeneous surfaces.

    PubMed

    Forte, Esther; Haslam, Andrew J; Jackson, George; Müller, Erich A

    2014-09-28

    The use of effective fluid-surface potentials, in which the full positional dependence is replaced by a dependence only on the distance from the surface of the solid, is common practice as a route to reduce the complexity of evaluating adsorption of fluids on substrates. Conceptually this is equivalent to replacing the detailed description of the discrete molecular nature by a coarse-grained description in which the solid is represented by a continuous (structureless) surface. These effective fluid-surface potentials are essential in the development of theories for surface adsorption, and they provide a means to reduce the computational cost associated with the molecular simulation of the system. The main purpose of the present contribution is to emphasise the necessity of using an adequate averaging procedure to obtain effective fluid-surface potentials. A simple unweighted average of the configurational energy is commonly employed, resulting in effective potentials that are temperature independent. We describe here a procedure to develop free-energy-averaged effective fluid-surface potentials retaining the important temperature dependence of the coarse-grained interaction between the particle and the surface. Although the approach is general in nature, we assess the merits of free-energy-averaged potentials for the adsorption of methane on graphene and graphite, making appropriate comparisons with the description obtained with the more traditional temperature-independent potentials. Additionally, we develop effective fluid-surface potentials for crystalline faces of monolayer and multilayer homogeneous and heterogeneous fcc lattices based on the Lennard-Jones (12-6) pair potential, and compute the corresponding adsorption isotherms of Lennard-Jones fluids on these surfaces using Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations. The adequacy of the two different options to obtain effective fluid-surface potentials (a free-energy-based versus a simple unweighted

  10. Achondrogenesis II-hypochondrogenesis: variability versus heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Borochowitz, Z; Ornoy, A; Lachman, R; Rimoin, D L

    1986-06-01

    Recently hypochondrogenesis was described as a form of neonatally lethal dwarfism said to resemble spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita radiographically and achondrogenesis II morphologically. Because of the difficulty in distinguishing radiographically between mild achondrogenesis II and severe hypochondrogenesis, we performed a clinical, radiographic, and morphologic study of 24 cases originally classified as either achondrogenesis II or hypochondrogenesis, in an attempt to distinguish between heterogeneity and clinical variability. Review of the radiographic findings in these cases show a fairly continuous spectrum of bony defects, rather than two distinct radiographic syndromes. Chondro-osseous histology and ultrastructure was similar in all cases regardless of severity and was characterized by hypervascularity and hypercellularity of the cartilage with multiple small, round dilated cysternae of rough endoplasmic reticulum. These findings suggest that hypochondrogenesis and achondrogenesis type II represent a spectrum with marked phenotypic variability. PMID:3717210

  11. Mitochondrial phylogenomics of early land plants: mitigating the effects of saturation, compositional heterogeneity, and codon-usage bias.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Cox, Cymon J; Wang, Wei; Goffinet, Bernard

    2014-11-01

    Phylogenetic analyses using concatenation of genomic-scale data have been seen as the panacea for resolving the incongruences among inferences from few or single genes. However, phylogenomics may also suffer from systematic errors, due to the, perhaps cumulative, effects of saturation, among-taxa compositional (GC content) heterogeneity, or codon-usage bias plaguing the individual nucleotide loci that are concatenated. Here, we provide an example of how these factors affect the inferences of the phylogeny of early land plants based on mitochondrial genomic data. Mitochondrial sequences evolve slowly in plants and hence are thought to be suitable for resolving deep relationships. We newly assembled mitochondrial genomes from 20 bryophytes, complemented these with 40 other streptophytes (land plants plus algal outgroups), compiling a data matrix of 60 taxa and 41 mitochondrial genes. Homogeneous analyses of the concatenated nucleotide data resolve mosses as sister-group to the remaining land plants. However, the corresponding translated amino acid data support the liverwort lineage in this position. Both results receive weak to moderate support in maximum-likelihood analyses, but strong support in Bayesian inferences. Tests of alternative hypotheses using either nucleotide or amino acid data provide implicit support for their respective optimal topologies, and clearly reject the hypotheses that bryophytes are monophyletic, liverworts and mosses share a unique common ancestor, or hornworts are sister to the remaining land plants. We determined that land plant lineages differ in their nucleotide composition, and in their usage of synonymous codon variants. Composition heterogeneous Bayesian analyses employing a nonstationary model that accounts for variation in among-lineage composition, and inferences from degenerated nucleotide data that avoid the effects of synonymous substitutions that underlie codon-usage bias, again recovered liverworts being sister to the

  12. Effect of spatial vegetation and relief heterogeneity on vertical CO2 fluxes between land surface and the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olchev, Alexander; Mukhartova, Yulia; Levashova, Natalia; Volkova, Elena

    2015-04-01

    The main goal of the study is to describe the influence of spatial vegetation and relief heterogeneity on turbulent CO2 fluxes between land surface and the atmosphere using a process-based two-dimensional turbulent exchange models. As a key area for this modeling study the hilly territory situated at the southern boundary of broadleaf forest community in European part of Russia (Tula region) was selected. The vegetation cover in the study region is mainly represented by mosaic of agricultural areas, grasslands, mires and groves that makes very difficult an adequate determining the local and regional CO2 fluxes using experimental methods only. Applied two two-dimensional models based on solution of the Navier-Stokes and continuity equations using the first-order and one-and-a-half order (TKE) closure schemes. Numerical scheme of the first-order closure model is based on the theory of contrast structures (Levashova et al 2005). For description of the plant canopy photosynthesis and respiration rates an aggregated approach based on the model of Ball et al (1987) in Leuning modification (1990, 1995), the Beer-Lambert equation for the description of solar radiation penetration within a plant canopy (Monsi, Saeki 1953), and also an algorithm describing the response of stomatal conductance of the leaves to incoming photosynthetically active radiation is used. All necessary input parameters describing the photosynthesis and respiration properties of different plants and soil types in the study region were obtained from the field measurements or taken from the literature. To quantify the possible effects of relief and vegetation heterogeneity on CO2 fluxes the three transects crossing the study area were chosen. For each transect the 2D patterns of wind speed components, turbulent exchange coefficients, CO2 concentrations and fluxes were calculated both for actual vegetation structure and for additional scenario assuming the total area deforestation. All modeling

  13. Fine Mapping Seronegative and Seropositive Rheumatoid Arthritis to Shared and Distinct HLA Alleles by Adjusting for the Effects of Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Han, Buhm; Diogo, Dorothée; Eyre, Steve; Kallberg, Henrik; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Bowes, John; Padyukov, Leonid; Okada, Yukinori; González-Gay, Miguel A.; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Martin, Javier; Huizinga, Tom W.J.; Plenge, Robert M.; Worthington, Jane; Gregersen, Peter K.; Klareskog, Lars; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    2014-01-01

    Despite progress in defining human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles for anti-citrullinated-protein-autoantibody-positive (ACPA+) rheumatoid arthritis (RA), identifying HLA alleles for ACPA-negative (ACPA−) RA has been challenging because of clinical heterogeneity within clinical cohorts. We imputed 8,961 classical HLA alleles, amino acids, and SNPs from Immunochip data in a discovery set of 2,406 ACPA− RA case and 13,930 control individuals. We developed a statistical approach to identify and adjust for clinical heterogeneity within ACPA− RA and observed independent associations for serine and leucine at position 11 in HLA-DRβ1 (p = 1.4 × 10−13, odds ratio [OR] = 1.30) and for aspartate at position 9 in HLA-B (p = 2.7 × 10−12, OR = 1.39) within the peptide binding grooves. These amino acid positions induced associations at HLA-DRB1∗03 (encoding serine at 11) and HLA-B∗08 (encoding aspartate at 9). We validated these findings in an independent set of 427 ACPA− case subjects, carefully phenotyped with a highly sensitive ACPA assay, and 1,691 control subjects (HLA-DRβ1 Ser11+Leu11: p = 5.8 × 10−4, OR = 1.28; HLA-B Asp9: p = 2.6 × 10−3, OR = 1.34). Although both amino acid sites drove risk of ACPA+ and ACPA− disease, the effects of individual residues at HLA-DRβ1 position 11 were distinct (p < 2.9 × 10−107). We also identified an association with ACPA+ RA at HLA-A position 77 (p = 2.7 × 10−8, OR = 0.85) in 7,279 ACPA+ RA case and 15,870 control subjects. These results contribute to mounting evidence that ACPA+ and ACPA− RA are genetically distinct and potentially have separate autoantigens contributing to pathogenesis. We expect that our approach might have broad applications in analyzing clinical conditions with heterogeneity at both major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and non-MHC regions. PMID:24656864

  14. Class Size Effects on Student Achievement: Heterogeneity across Abilities and Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Paola, Maria; Ponzo, Michela; Scoppa, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze class size effects on college students exploiting data from a project offering special remedial courses in mathematics and language skills to freshmen enrolled at an Italian medium-sized public university. To estimate the effects of class size, we exploit the fact that students and teachers are virtually randomly assigned…

  15. Examining Heterogeneity in the Effect of Taking Algebra in Eighth Grade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickles, Jordan H.

    2013-01-01

    Increased access to algebra was a focal point of the National Mathematics Advisory Panel's 2008 report on improving mathematics learning in the United States. Past research found positive effects for early access to algebra, but the focus on average effects may mask important variation across student subgroups. The author addresses whether…

  16. Interface coupling-induced enhancement of magnetoimpedance effect in heterogeneous nanobrush by adjusting textures of Co nanowires

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Interface coupling-induced and interface coupling-enhanced magnetoimpedance (MI) effect in heterogeneous nanobrush has been investigated. The nanobrush is composed of Fe25Ni75 nanofilm and textured hexagonal close-packed cobalt nanowire array, respectively fabricated by RF magnetron sputtering and electrochemical deposition. The design of this structure is based on the vortex distribution of magnetic moments in thin film, which can be induced by the exchange coupling effect at the interfaces of the nanobrush. The texture of nanowires plays an important role in the MI effect of the nanobrush, which is regulated by controlling the pH values and temperatures of the deposition process. The ‘parallel’ and ‘perpendicular’ coupling models were used to explain the different MI results of the nanobrush with cobalt nanowires, which have (100) and (002) textures, respectively. The optimized MI effect of the nanobrush brought by (100) nanowires can be magnified by 300% with more than 80%/Oe magnetic sensitivity at a low frequency, which has great application potentials in low-frequency MI sensors. PMID:24207011

  17. Study the effect of reservoir spatial heterogeneity on CO2 sequestration under an uncertainty quantification (UQ) software framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Y.; Hou, J.; Engel, D.; Lin, G.; Yin, J.; Han, B.; Fang, Z.; Fountoulakis, V.

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we introduce an uncertainty quantification (UQ) software framework for carbon sequestration, with the focus of studying being the effect of spatial heterogeneity of reservoir properties on CO2 migration. We use a sequential Gaussian method (SGSIM) to generate realizations of permeability fields with various spatial statistical attributes. To deal with the computational difficulties, we integrate the following ideas/approaches: 1) firstly, we use three different sampling approaches (probabilistic collocation, quasi-Monte Carlo, and adaptive sampling approaches) to reduce the required forward calculations while trying to explore the parameter space and quantify the input uncertainty; 2) secondly, we use eSTOMP as the forward modeling simulator. eSTOMP is implemented using the Global Arrays toolkit (GA) that is based on one-sided inter-processor communication and supports a shared memory programming style on distributed memory platforms. It provides highly-scalable performance. It uses a data model to partition most of the large scale data structures into a relatively small number of distinct classes. The lower level simulator infrastructure (e.g. meshing support, associated data structures, and data mapping to processors) is separated from the higher level physics and chemistry algorithmic routines using a grid component interface; and 3) besides the faster model and more efficient algorithms to speed up the forward calculation, we built an adaptive system infrastructure to select the best possible data transfer mechanisms, to optimally allocate system resources to improve performance, and to integrate software packages and data for composing carbon sequestration simulation, computation, analysis, estimation and visualization. We will demonstrate the framework with a given CO2 injection scenario in a heterogeneous sandstone reservoir.

  18. Heterogeneous road networks have no apparent effect on the genetic structure of small mammal populations.

    PubMed

    Grilo, Clara; Del Cerro, Irene; Centeno-Cuadros, Alejandro; Ramiro, Victor; Román, Jacinto; Molina-Vacas, Guillem; Fernández-Aguilar, Xavier; Rodríguez, Juan; Porto-Peter, Flávia; Fonseca, Carlos; Revilla, Eloy; Godoy, José A

    2016-09-15

    Roads are widely recognized to represent a barrier to individual movements and, conversely, verges can act as potential corridors for the dispersal of many small mammals. Both barrier and corridor effects should generate a clear spatial pattern in genetic structure. Nevertheless, the effect of roads on the genetic structure of small mammal populations still remains unclear. In this study, we examine the barrier effect that different road types (4-lane highway, 2-lane roads and single-lane unpaved roads) may have on the population genetic structure of three species differing in relevant life history traits: southern water vole Arvicola sapidus, the Mediterranean pine vole Microtus duodecimcostatus and the Algerian mouse Mus spretus. We also examine the corridor effect of highway verges on the Mediterranean pine vole and the Algerian mouse. We analysed the population structure through pairwise estimates of FST among subpopulations bisected by roads, identified genetic clusters through Bayesian assignment approaches, and used simple and partial Mantel tests to evaluate the relative barrier or corridor effect of roads. No strong evidences were found for an effect of roads on population structure of these three species. The barrier effect of roads seems to be site-specific and no corridor effect of verges was found for the pine vole and Algerian mouse populations. The lack of consistent results among species and for each road type lead us to believe that the ability of individual dispersers to use those crossing structures or the habitat quality in the highway verges may have a relatively higher influence on gene flow among populations than the presence of crossing structures per se. Further research should include microhabitat analysis and the estimates of species abundance to understand the mechanisms that underlie the genetic structure observed at some sites. PMID:27219505

  19. Heterogeneous road networks have no apparent effect on the genetic structure of small mammal populations.

    PubMed

    Grilo, Clara; Del Cerro, Irene; Centeno-Cuadros, Alejandro; Ramiro, Victor; Román, Jacinto; Molina-Vacas, Guillem; Fernández-Aguilar, Xavier; Rodríguez, Juan; Porto-Peter, Flávia; Fonseca, Carlos; Revilla, Eloy; Godoy, José A

    2016-09-15

    Roads are widely recognized to represent a barrier to individual movements and, conversely, verges can act as potential corridors for the dispersal of many small mammals. Both barrier and corridor effects should generate a clear spatial pattern in genetic structure. Nevertheless, the effect of roads on the genetic structure of small mammal populations still remains unclear. In this study, we examine the barrier effect that different road types (4-lane highway, 2-lane roads and single-lane unpaved roads) may have on the population genetic structure of three species differing in relevant life history traits: southern water vole Arvicola sapidus, the Mediterranean pine vole Microtus duodecimcostatus and the Algerian mouse Mus spretus. We also examine the corridor effect of highway verges on the Mediterranean pine vole and the Algerian mouse. We analysed the population structure through pairwise estimates of FST among subpopulations bisected by roads, identified genetic clusters through Bayesian assignment approaches, and used simple and partial Mantel tests to evaluate the relative barrier or corridor effect of roads. No strong evidences were found for an effect of roads on population structure of these three species. The barrier effect of roads seems to be site-specific and no corridor effect of verges was found for the pine vole and Algerian mouse populations. The lack of consistent results among species and for each road type lead us to believe that the ability of individual dispersers to use those crossing structures or the habitat quality in the highway verges may have a relatively higher influence on gene flow among populations than the presence of crossing structures per se. Further research should include microhabitat analysis and the estimates of species abundance to understand the mechanisms that underlie the genetic structure observed at some sites.

  20. Anatomic variation--a bony canal for the median nerve at the distal humerus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kazuki, Kenichi; Egi, Takeshi; Okada, Mitsuhiro; Takaoka, Kunio

    2004-09-01

    We report a rare anatomic variation in which the median nerve travels in a bony canal of the distal humerus, separating from the brachial artery. We encountered this during neurolysis for posttraumatic median nerve palsy in a 10-year-old boy. We suggest that this anatomic variation was related strongly to this patient's median nerve palsy.

  1. Free flap transfer for closure and interposition-arthroplasty in noma defects of the lateral face associated with bony ankylosis.

    PubMed

    Giessler, Goetz A; Schmidt, Andreas B; Deubel, Ute; Cornelius, C-Peter

    2004-09-01

    Noma defects of the anterolateral face are often associated with fibrous or bony ankylosis fusing the mandibula to the skull base. According to the extent of the ankylosis, the temporomandibular joint mobility can be restricted or even completely frozen. In third world conditions the surgical approach to severe forms of bony ankylosis consists of a single linear opening osteotomy (trismus release) and the closure of the noma defect with locoregional flaps. Relapse of jaw immobility is common and may be caused by minor bone resection, the lack of adequate postoperative physiotherapy, or even the scarring of the defect coverage. In 4 years the authors have gained increasing experience with folded free flaps for simultaneous closure of outer and inner lining of large noma defects and the maintenance and training of re-established jaw function by the use of a dynamic external distractor fixed between the zygoma and the mandibular body. The authors report the bony reankylosis can be reduced by extended wedge osteotomies of the bony bridge and tip-like shaping of the ascending mandibular ramus. To preclude the reossification of the osteotomy site and fibrous scar formation, a dermofatty or muscular tail of the free flap is interposed into the bone gap. Two cases were treated according to this concept with a free parascapular and a latissimus dorsi flap in combination with simultaneous arthroplasty. During a 6-month follow-up period, no signs of a recurrent reduction of mandibular movement were noted in either case.

  2. Effectiveness of cognitive behavior therapy for diagnostically heterogeneous groups: a benchmarking study.

    PubMed

    McEvoy, Peter M; Nathan, Paula

    2007-04-01

    Researchers have recently suggested that the commonalities across the emotional disorders outweigh the differences, and thus similar treatment principles could be applied in unified interventions. In this study, the authors used a benchmarking strategy to investigate the transportability of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety and depression to mixed-diagnosis groups. Patients (N = 143) attended 10 2-hour sessions of group CBT plus a 1-month follow-up. Changes in anxiety and depression were indexed by effect sizes, reliable change, and clinically significant change and then benchmarked to previous efficacy and effectiveness studies. Symptoms of depression and anxiety significantly improved, and mixed-diagnosis groups compared favorably with diagnosis-specific CBT, suggesting that unified treatments are an effective, efficient, and practical method of treatment delivery.

  3. Fractionation in normal tissues: the (α/β)eff concept can account for dose heterogeneity and volume effects.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Aswin L; Nahum, Alan E

    2013-10-01

    The simple Linear-Quadratic (LQ)-based Withers iso-effect formula (WIF) is widely used in external-beam radiotherapy to derive a new tumour dose prescription such that there is normal-tissue (NT) iso-effect when changing the fraction size and/or number. However, as conventionally applied, the WIF is invalid unless the normal-tissue response is solely determined by the tumour dose. We propose a generalized WIF (gWIF) which retains the tumour prescription dose, but replaces the intrinsic fractionation sensitivity measure (α/β) by a new concept, the normal-tissue effective fractionation sensitivity, [Formula: see text], which takes into account both the dose heterogeneity in, and the volume effect of, the late-responding normal-tissue in question. Closed-form analytical expressions for [Formula: see text] ensuring exact normal-tissue iso-effect are derived for: (i) uniform dose, and (ii) arbitrary dose distributions with volume-effect parameter n = 1 from the normal-tissue dose-volume histogram. For arbitrary dose distributions and arbitrary n, a numerical solution for [Formula: see text] exhibits a weak dependence on the number of fractions. As n is increased, [Formula: see text] increases from its intrinsic value at n = 0 (100% serial normal-tissue) to values close to or even exceeding the tumour (α/β) at n = 1 (100% parallel normal-tissue), with the highest values of [Formula: see text] corresponding to the most conformal dose distributions. Applications of this new concept to inverse planning and to highly conformal modalities are discussed, as is the effect of possible deviations from LQ behaviour at large fraction sizes. PMID:24029492

  4. Heterogenous Effects of Sports Participation on Education and Labor Market Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorry, Devon

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyzes the distribution of education and labor market benefits from sports participation. Results show that effects are similar across gender, but differ on other dimensions. In particular, participants in team sports show greater gains than those in individual sports. Quantile regressions show that educational gains are larger for…

  5. Combining Heterogeneous Correlation Matrices: Simulation Analysis of Fixed-Effects Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hafdahl, Adam R.

    2008-01-01

    Monte Carlo studies of several fixed-effects methods for combining and comparing correlation matrices have shown that two refinements improve estimation and inference substantially. With rare exception, however, these simulations have involved homogeneous data analyzed using conditional meta-analytic procedures. The present study builds on…

  6. Examining the Foundations of Methods That Assess Treatment Effect Heterogeneity across Intermediate Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feller, Avi; Miratrix, Luke

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study is to better understand how methods for estimating treatment effects of latent groups operate. In particular, the authors identify where violations of assumptions can lead to biased estimates, and explore how covariates can be critical in the estimation process. For each set of approaches, the authors first review the…

  7. Bias and Bias Correction in Multisite Instrumental Variables Analysis of Heterogeneous Mediator Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reardon, Sean F.; Unlu, Fatih; Zhu, Pei; Bloom, Howard S.

    2014-01-01

    We explore the use of instrumental variables (IV) analysis with a multisite randomized trial to estimate the effect of a mediating variable on an outcome in cases where it can be assumed that the observed mediator is the only mechanism linking treatment assignment to outcomes, an assumption known in the IV literature as the exclusion restriction.…

  8. Bias and Bias Correction in Multi-Site Instrumental Variables Analysis of Heterogeneous Mediator Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reardon, Sean F.; Unlu, Faith; Zhu, Pei; Bloom, Howard

    2013-01-01

    We explore the use of instrumental variables (IV) analysis with a multi-site randomized trial to estimate the effect of a mediating variable on an outcome in cases where it can be assumed that the observed mediator is the only mechanism linking treatment assignment to outcomes, as assumption known in the instrumental variables literature as the…

  9. The Effects of Homogeneous versus Heterogeneous Stimuli on the Confrontation-Naming Performance of Aphasics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Sarah E.; Wright, Judith M.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of semantic grouping on confrontation-naming performances of 16 fluent and 10 nonfluent aphasic adults was examined. Performances were not uniformly facilitated in one naming condition over the other. Some patients, however, did appear to display performance discrepancies between the two conditions. (Author/CL)

  10. Influence of heterogeneous sulfur atoms on the negative differential resistance effect in polythiophene

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiao Jing; Dong, Kang Liang; An, Zhong

    2014-09-07

    In this work, we have carried out theoretical investigations aiming to clarify the effects of sulfur heteroatoms on the transport characteristics in polythiophene. Sulfur atoms in polythiophene are demonstrated to influence the structure and transport process by two aspects: the electron hopping between carbon atoms on both sides of the sulfur atom as well as the effective confinement of π electrons from the sulfur atom. Based on the static Su-Schrieffer-Heeger model and the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism, we simulate the electron transportation in a metal/polythiophene/metal structure. The simulation results show that the electron hopping via sulfur atoms is responsible for the observed negative differential resistance (NDR) behavior in the I-V curves. The NDR disappears if the electron transport channels from carbon to carbon via sulfur atoms are forbidden. The weaker the effective confinement of π electrons and the electron hopping between carbon atoms on both sides of the sulfur atom are, the higher is the peak-to-valley ratio of the NDR and the wider the voltage range where the current remains at low levels. These results can help in understanding the NDR effect in polythiophene.

  11. Sacro-Iliac Joint Sensory Block and Radiofrequency Ablation: Assessment of Bony Landmarks Relevant for Image-Guided Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Shannon L.; Burnham, Robert S.; Loh, Eldon; Agur, Anne M.

    2016-01-01

    Image-guided sensory block and radiofrequency ablation of the nerves innervating the sacro-iliac joint require readily identifiable bony landmarks for accurate needle/electrode placement. Understanding the relative locations of the transverse sacral tubercles along the lateral sacral crest is important for ultrasound guidance, as they demarcate the position of the posterior sacral network (S1–S3 ± L5/S4) innervating the posterior sacro-iliac joint. No studies were found that investigated the spatial relationships of these bony landmarks. The purpose of this study was to visualize and quantify the interrelationships of the transverse sacral tubercles and posterior sacral foramina to inform image-guided block and radiofrequency ablation of the sacro-iliac joint. The posterior and lateral surfaces of 30 dry sacra (15 M/15 F) were digitized and modeled in 3D and the distances between bony landmarks quantified. The relationships of bony landmarks (S1–S4) were not uniform. The mean intertubercular and interforaminal distances decreased from S1 to S4, whereas the distance from the lateral margin of the posterior sacral foramina to the transverse sacral tubercles increased from S1 to S3. The mean intertubercular distance from S1 to S3 was significantly (p < 0.05) larger in males. The interrelationships of the sacral bony landmarks should be taken into consideration when estimating the site and length of an image-guided strip lesion targeting the posterior sacral network. PMID:27747222

  12. The relationship between the lizard eye and associated bony features: a cautionary note for interpreting fossil activity patterns.

    PubMed

    Hall, Margaret I

    2009-06-01

    Activity pattern, the time of day when an animal is active, is associated with ecology. There are two major activity patterns: diurnal (awake during the day in a photopic environment) and nocturnal (awake at night in a scotopic environment). Lizards exhibit characteristic eye shapes associated with activity pattern, with scotopic-adapted lizard eyes optimized for visual sensitivity with large corneal diameters relative to their eye axial lengths, and photopic-adapted lizards optimized for visual acuity, with larger axial lengths of the eye relative to their corneal diameters. This study: (1) quantifies the relationship between the lizard eye and its associated bony anatomy (the orbit, sclerotic ring, and associated skull widths); (2) investigates how activity pattern is reflected in that bony anatomy; and (3) determines if it is possible to reliably interpret activity pattern for a lizard that does not have the soft tissue available for study, specifically, for a fossil. Knowledge of extinct lizards' activity patterns would be useful in making paleoecological interpretations. Here, 96 scotopic- and photopic-adapted lizard species are analyzed in a phylogenetic context. Although there is a close relationship between the lepidosaur eye and associated bony anatomy, based on these data activity pattern cannot be reliably interpreted for bony-only specimens, such as a fossil, possibly because of the limited ossification of the lepidosaur skull. Caution should be exercised when utilizing lizard bony anatomy to interpret light-level adaptation, either for a fossil lizard or as part of an extant phylogenetic bracket to interpret other extinct animals with sclerotic rings, such as dinosaurs. PMID:19462447

  13. Effect of surface binding on heterogeneous DNA melting equilibria: a Monte Carlo simulation study.

    PubMed

    Allen, John H; Schoch, Emily T; Stubbs, John M

    2011-02-24

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) microarrays are constructed with a surface-immobilized single-stranded probe sequence that hydrogen bonds with its complementary target strand from solution and is subsequently detected, making their hybridization equilibrium of central importance. Unexpectedly, the effect of surface immobilization is that if the sequences of probe and target are exchanged, the hybridization equilibrium shifts. Here, configurational-bias Monte Carlo simulations using a coarse-grained model for DNA were carried out for an undecamer double helix both in solution and bound to a surface to determine dissociation equilibria. Four possible surface binding orientations were independently investigated. Analysis shows that the effect of surface binding is to destabilize hydrogen-bonding interactions of bases proximal to the binding site and enhance those of distal bases due to the double helix lying flat on the surface. Results have implications for predicting surface-bound DNA hybridization equilibria.

  14. Heterogeneity across brain regions and neurotransmitter interactions with nicotinic effects on memory function.

    PubMed

    Levin, Edward D; Hall, Brandon J; Rezvani, Amir H

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors have been shown in many studies to be critically involved in memory function. The precise roles these receptors play depend on the receptor subtype, their anatomic localization, their interactions with other parts of the neural systems underlying cognition and the particular domain of cognitive function. Nicotinic agonists can significantly improve learning, memory, and attention. Nicotinic receptors in the hippocampus are innervated by cholinergic projections from the medial septum and diagonal band. Local infusions of either α7 or α4β2 nicotinic antagonists into either the dorsal or ventral hippocampus produce amnestic effects in rats navigating about a radial arm maze. There is cholinergic innervation of nicotinic receptors in other components of the limbic system as well. In the basolateral amygdala and the anterior thalamus, similar amnestic effects of nicotinic α7 and α4β2 antagonists are seen. Interestingly, there are no additive amnestic effects observed in these limbic areas when α7 and α4β2 receptor antagonists are combined. The particular expression patterns of α7 and α4β2 nicotinic receptors in these limbic and cortical areas may explain this nonadditivity, but further research is needed to determine the specific cause of this phenomenon. Nicotinic receptor mechanisms in the limbic system play an important role in cognitive impairment for a variety of neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. Alzheimer's disease results in a dramatic decrease in hippocampal nicotinic receptor density, affecting α4β2 receptor expression most prominently. In schizophrenia, there are anomalies in α7 nicotinic receptor expression, which seem to be crucial for the cognitive impairment of the disorder. Chronic nicotine exposure, such as seen with tobacco use, results in an increase in nicotinic receptor density in the limbic system. This effect appears to be related to the desensitization of

  15. Heterogeneous photocatalysis of methylene blue over titanate nanotubes: effect of adsorption.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Lin; Sun, Weiling; Yang, Ye; Chen, Cheng; Ni, Jinren

    2011-04-01

    Titanate nanotubes were synthesized with hydrothermal reaction using TiO(2) and NaOH as the precursors and subsequent calcination at 400°C for 2h. The products were characterized with SEM and XRD. Adsorption and photocatalysis of methylene blue over titanate nanotubes and TiO(2) were investigated. The results indicated that titanate nanotubes exhibited a better photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue in a simultaneous adsorption and photodegradation system than that in equilibrium adsorption followed by a photodegradation system, whereas TiO(2) showed no significant differences in photocatalytic activity in the two systems. The methylene blue overall removal efficiency over TNTs in the first system even exceeded that over TiO(2). The different catalytic performances of titanate nanotubes in the two systems were tentatively attributed to different effects of adsorption of methylene blue, i.e., the promoting effect in the former and the inhibition effect in the latter. Decantation experiments showed that the titanate nanotube photocatalyst could be easily separated from the reaction medium by sedimentation. Thus titanate nanotubes with high sedimentation rates and concurrent adsorption represent a new catalyst system with a strong potential for commercial applications.

  16. The bony labyrinth of the middle Pleistocene Sima de los Huesos hominins (Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain).

    PubMed

    Quam, Rolf; Lorenzo, Carlos; Martínez, Ignacio; Gracia-Téllez, Ana; Arsuaga, Juan Luis

    2016-01-01

    We performed 3D virtual reconstructions based on CT scans to study the bony labyrinth morphology in 14 individuals from the large middle Pleistocene hominin sample from the site of the Sima de los Huesos (SH) in the Sierra de Atapuerca in northern Spain. The Atapuerca (SH) hominins represent early members of the Neandertal clade and provide an opportunity to compare the data with the later in time Neandertals, as well as Pleistocene and recent humans more broadly. The Atapuerca (SH) hominins do not differ from the Neandertals in any of the variables related to the absolute and relative sizes and shape of the semicircular canals. Indeed, the entire Neandertal clade seems to be characterized by a derived pattern of canal proportions, including a relatively small posterior canal and a relatively large lateral canal. In contrast, one of the most distinctive features observed in Neandertals, the low placement of the posterior canal (i.e., high sagittal labyrinthine index), is generally not present in the Atapuerca (SH) hominins. This low placement is considered a derived feature in Neandertals and is correlated with a more vertical orientation of the ampullar line (LSCm < APA), posterior surface of the petrous pyramid (LSCm > PPp), and third part of the facial canal (LSCm < FC3). Some variation is present within the Atapuerca (SH) sample, however, with a few individuals approaching the Neandertal condition more closely. In addition, the cochlear shape index in the Atapuerca (SH) hominins is low, indicating a reduction in the height of the cochlea. Although the phylogenetic polarity of this feature is less clear, the low shape index in the Atapuerca (SH) hominins may be a derived feature. Regardless, cochlear height subsequently increased in Neandertals. In contrast to previous suggestions, the expanded data in the present study indicate no difference across the genus Homo in the angle of inclination of the cochlear basal turn (COs < LSCm). Principal components

  17. The bony labyrinth of the middle Pleistocene Sima de los Huesos hominins (Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain).

    PubMed

    Quam, Rolf; Lorenzo, Carlos; Martínez, Ignacio; Gracia-Téllez, Ana; Arsuaga, Juan Luis

    2016-01-01

    We performed 3D virtual reconstructions based on CT scans to study the bony labyrinth morphology in 14 individuals from the large middle Pleistocene hominin sample from the site of the Sima de los Huesos (SH) in the Sierra de Atapuerca in northern Spain. The Atapuerca (SH) hominins represent early members of the Neandertal clade and provide an opportunity to compare the data with the later in time Neandertals, as well as Pleistocene and recent humans more broadly. The Atapuerca (SH) hominins do not differ from the Neandertals in any of the variables related to the absolute and relative sizes and shape of the semicircular canals. Indeed, the entire Neandertal clade seems to be characterized by a derived pattern of canal proportions, including a relatively small posterior canal and a relatively large lateral canal. In contrast, one of the most distinctive features observed in Neandertals, the low placement of the posterior canal (i.e., high sagittal labyrinthine index), is generally not present in the Atapuerca (SH) hominins. This low placement is considered a derived feature in Neandertals and is correlated with a more vertical orientation of the ampullar line (LSCm < APA), posterior surface of the petrous pyramid (LSCm > PPp), and third part of the facial canal (LSCm < FC3). Some variation is present within the Atapuerca (SH) sample, however, with a few individuals approaching the Neandertal condition more closely. In addition, the cochlear shape index in the Atapuerca (SH) hominins is low, indicating a reduction in the height of the cochlea. Although the phylogenetic polarity of this feature is less clear, the low shape index in the Atapuerca (SH) hominins may be a derived feature. Regardless, cochlear height subsequently increased in Neandertals. In contrast to previous suggestions, the expanded data in the present study indicate no difference across the genus Homo in the angle of inclination of the cochlear basal turn (COs < LSCm). Principal components

  18. Effects of tissue heterogeneity on single-coil, scanning MIT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldkamp, J. R.; Quirk, S.

    2016-03-01

    We recently reported on the use of a single induction coil to accomplish imaging of the electrical conductivity in human tissues via magnetic induction tomography (MIT). A key to the method was the development of a mapping equation that quantitatively relates an arbitrary electrical conductivity distribution to ohmic loss in a coil consisting of concentric circular loops in a plane. By making multiple coil loss measurements at a number of locations in the vicinity of the target (scan), this mapping equation can be used to build an algorithm for 3D image construction of electrical conductivity. Important assumptions behind the mathematical formula included uniform relative permittivity throughout all space and continuous variation in conductivity. In this paper, these two assumptions were tested in a series of experiments involving the use of human tissue phantoms created from agarose, doped with sufficient sodium chloride to yield physiological conductivities. Inclusions of doped agarose were scanned both while isolated and also while embedded in a matrix of agarose gel having lowered conductivity - to help evaluate the effects of abrupt permittivity change. The effects of discontinuous conductivity change were simulated by filling 5 cm diameter petri dishes with 1.4% aqueous KCl and placing them in a much larger, 14 cm diameter petri dish - gap distance varied from about 3 mm to 30 mm. In either case, we will show that these effects are minimal on resultant images, helping to further validate the mapping equation used to construct MIT images. Because of their simplicity, scans reported here did not include coil rotation. To acknowledge the importance of rotation, however, we have devoted a section of this work to illustrate the profound benefits of coil rotation during a scan - though virtual data are used, where coil rotation is more easily specified.

  19. Effects of spatial habitat heterogeneity on habitat selection and annual fecundity for a migratory forest songbird

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cornell, K.L.; Donovan, T.M.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding how spatial habitat patterns influence abundance and dynamics of animal populations is a primary goal in landscape ecology. We used an information-theoretic approach to investigate the association between habitat patterns at multiple spatial scales and demographic patterns for black-throated blue warblers (Dendroica caerulescens) at 20 study sites in west-central Vermont, USA from 2002 to 2005. Sites were characterized by: (1) territory-scale shrub density, (2) patch-scale shrub density occurring within 25 ha of territories, and (3) landscape-scale habitat patterns occurring within 5 km radius extents of territories. We considered multiple population parameters including abundance, age ratios, and annual fecundity. Territory-scale shrub density was most important for determining abundance and age ratios, but landscape-scale habitat structure strongly influenced reproductive output. Sites with higher territory-scale shrub density had higher abundance, and were more likely to be occupied by older, more experienced individuals compared to sites with lower shrub density. However, annual fecundity was higher on sites located in contiguously forested landscapes where shrub density was lower than the fragmented sites. Further, effects of habitat pattern at one spatial scale depended on habitat conditions at different scales. For example, abundance increased with increasing territory-scale shrub density, but this effect was much stronger in fragmented landscapes than in contiguously forested landscapes. These results suggest that habitat pattern at different spatial scales affect demographic parameters in different ways, and that effects of habitat patterns at one spatial scale depends on habitat conditions at other scales. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009.

  20. Target Promiscuity and Heterogeneous Effects of Tarantula Venom Peptides Affecting Na+ and K+ Ion Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Redaelli, Elisa; Cassulini, Rita Restano; Silva, Deyanira Fuentes; Clement, Herlinda; Schiavon, Emanuele; Zamudio, Fernando Z.; Odell, George; Arcangeli, Annarosa; Clare, Jeffrey J.; Alagón, Alejandro; de la Vega, Ricardo C. Rodríguez; Possani, Lourival D.; Wanke, Enzo

    2010-01-01

    Venom-derived peptide modulators of ion channel gating are regarded as essential tools for understanding the molecular motions that occur during the opening and closing of ion channels. In this study, we present the characterization of five spider toxins on 12 human voltage-gated ion channels, following observations about the target promiscuity of some spider toxins and the ongoing revision of their “canonical” gating-modifying mode of action. The peptides were purified de novo from the venom of Grammostola rosea tarantulas, and their sequences were confirmed by Edman degradation and mass spectrometry analysis. Their effects on seven tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na+ channels, the three human ether-à-go-go (hERG)-related K+ channels, and two human Shaker-related K+ channels were extensively characterized by electrophysiological techniques. All the peptides inhibited ion conduction through all the Na+ channels tested, although with distinctive patterns. The peptides also affected the three pharmaceutically relevant hERG isoforms differently. At higher concentrations, all peptides also modified the gating of the Na+ channels by shifting the activation to more positive potentials, whereas more complex effects were recorded on hERG channels. No effects were evident on the two Shaker-related K+ channels at concentrations well above the IC50 value for the affected channels. Given the sequence diversity of the tested peptides, we propose that tarantula toxins should be considered both as multimode and target-promiscuous ion channel modulators; both features should not be ignored when extracting mechanistic interpretations about ion channel gating. Our observations could also aid in future structure-function studies and might help the development of novel ion channel-specific drugs. PMID:19955179

  1. On the Effect of Connectivity on Solute Transport in Spatially Heterogeneous Combined Unsaturated-Saturated Flow Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, David

    2016-04-01

    Detailed numerical analyses of flow and transport were used to investigate the effect of spatially connected features on the transport in three-dimensional (3-D), spatially heterogeneous, combined vadose zone-groundwater flow systems. Formations with spatially connected fine- and coarse-textured features (SCFT- and SCCT-formations, respectively), representing the10th and the 90th percentiles of the distributions of the formation's hydraulic parameters, respectively, were considered here. Results of the analyses suggest that in steady-state flow, when the unsaturated zone of the combined flow domains is relatively wet, as compared with a Multivariate-Gaussian (MG) formation, spatially connected features may reduce the solute first arrival time, particularly in the SCCT-formation, and may enhance the spreading of the solute breakthrough, particularly in the SCFT-formation. The effect of the spatially connected features on the hydrological response, however, decreases as the unsaturated zone becomes drier. The latter result stems from the decrease in the fraction of the water-filled, pore-space occupied by the connected structures, with decreasing water content. The latter finding also explains the result that the response of more realistic, combined flow systems, whose unsaturated zone is associated with transient flow and relatively low, intermittent water contents, is essentially independent of the spatially connected features of the formations, regardless of their soil texture.

  2. Final technical report: The effect of physical and chemical heterogeneities in a porous medium on the transport of bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Hornberger, George M.; Mills, Aaron L.; Herman, Janet S.

    2001-04-01

    Among the demonstrated processes influencing the transport of bacteria through aquifers, the deposition of cells on mineral surfaces is one of the most important. Heterogeneous distribution of aquifer properties such as mineral-grain oxide coatings and preferred flow paths can control the numbers of microbes arriving a point down gradient from their injection, and these properties can also affect the distribution of the organisms remaining in the sedimentary matrix. The distribution of metal oxide coatings affects the final location of retained cells within the matrix but had no effect on total breakthrough of applied bacteria. We were able to demonstrate transverse mixing of both conservative tracers and bacteria between regions of differing hydraulic conductivity; the conservative tracer could be used to model the transverse mixing of the bacteria. We were able to show that the presence of metal oxide coatings on aquifer surfaces retarded a reactive tracer (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) that simulated bacterial retardation in the laboratory. When metal oxide coatings were absent (due to bacterial establishment of a reducing environment) the tracer and bacteria were not retarded. The effect was reproduced in a tracer experiment done in the field. The results suggest that bacterial transport in the subsurface is controlled by a number of interrelated and confounding factors that prevent accurate prediction of transport given the present state of knowledge.

  3. Determination of the relative power density distribution in a heterogeneous reactor from the results of measurements of the reactivity effects and the neutron importance function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrov, A. A.; Glushkov, E. S.; Zimin, A. A.; Kapitonova, A. V.; Kompaniets, G. V.; Nosov, V. I.; Petrushenko, R. P.; Smirnov, O. N.

    2012-12-01

    A method for experimental determination of the relative power density distribution in a heterogeneous reactor based on measurements of fuel reactivity effects and importance of neutrons from a californium source is proposed. The method was perfected on two critical assembly configurations at the NARCISS facility of the Kurchatov Institute, which simulated a small-size heterogeneous nuclear reactor. The neutron importance measurements were performed on subcritical and critical assemblies. It is shown that, along with traditionally used activation methods, the developed method can be applied to experimental studies of special features of the power density distribution in critical assemblies and reactors.

  4. Determination of the relative power density distribution in a heterogeneous reactor from the results of measurements of the reactivity effects and the neutron importance function

    SciTech Connect

    Bobrov, A. A.; Glushkov, E. S.; Zimin, A. A.; Kapitonova, A. V.; Kompaniets, G. V.; Nosov, V. I. Petrushenko, R. P.; Smirnov, O. N.

    2012-12-15

    A method for experimental determination of the relative power density distribution in a heterogeneous reactor based on measurements of fuel reactivity effects and importance of neutrons from a californium source is proposed. The method was perfected on two critical assembly configurations at the NARCISS facility of the Kurchatov Institute, which simulated a small-size heterogeneous nuclear reactor. The neutron importance measurements were performed on subcritical and critical assemblies. It is shown that, along with traditionally used activation methods, the developed method can be applied to experimental studies of special features of the power density distribution in critical assemblies and reactors.

  5. Effect of Heterogeneous Mixing and Vaccination on the Dynamics of Anthelmintic Resistance: A Nested Model

    PubMed Central

    Sabatelli, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    Anthelmintic resistance is a major threat to current measures for helminth control in humans and animals. The introduction of anthelmintic vaccines, as a complement to or replacement for drug treatments, has been advocated as a preventive measure. Here, a computer-based simulation, tracking the dynamics of hosts, parasites and parasite-genes, shows that, depending on the degree of host-population mixing, the frequency of totally recessive autosomes associated with anthelmintic resistance can follow either a fast dynamical regime with a low equilibrium point or a slow dynamical regime with a high equilibrium point. For fully dominant autosomes, only one regime is predicted. The effectiveness of anthelminthic vaccines against resistance is shown to be strongly influenced by the underlying dynamics of resistant autosomes. Vaccines targeting adult parasites, by decreasing helminth fecundity or lifespan, are predicted to be more effective than vaccines targeting parasite larvae, by decreasing host susceptibility to infection, in reducing the spread of resistance. These results may inform new strategies to prevent, monitor and control the spread of anthelmintic resistance, including the development of viable anthelmintic vaccines. PMID:20502690

  6. Attention and memory evaluation across the life span: heterogeneous effects of age and education.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Pérez, Esther; Ostrosky-Solís, Feggy

    2006-05-01

    The developmental sequences of attention and memory were studied by utilizing normative data derived from the neuropsychological battery named NEUROPSI ATTENTION AND MEMORY. A sample of 521 Spanish-speaking individuals, aged 6 to 85 years, participated in this study. In the adult sample, educational level ranged from 0 to 22 years of education. Data from subtests measuring orientation, attention and concentration, executive functions, working memory, immediate and delayed verbal memory, and immediate and delayed visual memory were included. The factor structure of the analyzed battery is presented. The effects of age and education on this structure were analyzed. Results suggested that although attention and memory are related, their developmental sequences are separated from one another. During childhood, the development of selective and sustained attention, attentional-working memory, and executive functions showed a fast improvement in performance. Development of verbal memory and place and person orientation showed a slower increment in scores. In the adult sample it was found that factors related to memory are sensitive to age, whereas those related to attention and executive functions are sensitive to education. The consideration of both the developmental sequence, as well as differential effects of education, can improve the sensitivity and specificity of neuropsychological measures, allowing early diagnosis of cognitive dysfunction and implementation of adequate rehabilitation programs. PMID:16624779

  7. Attention and memory evaluation across the life span: heterogeneous effects of age and education.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Pérez, Esther; Ostrosky-Solís, Feggy

    2006-05-01

    The developmental sequences of attention and memory were studied by utilizing normative data derived from the neuropsychological battery named NEUROPSI ATTENTION AND MEMORY. A sample of 521 Spanish-speaking individuals, aged 6 to 85 years, participated in this study. In the adult sample, educational level ranged from 0 to 22 years of education. Data from subtests measuring orientation, attention and concentration, executive functions, working memory, immediate and delayed verbal memory, and immediate and delayed visual memory were included. The factor structure of the analyzed battery is presented. The effects of age and education on this structure were analyzed. Results suggested that although attention and memory are related, their developmental sequences are separated from one another. During childhood, the development of selective and sustained attention, attentional-working memory, and executive functions showed a fast improvement in performance. Development of verbal memory and place and person orientation showed a slower increment in scores. In the adult sample it was found that factors related to memory are sensitive to age, whereas those related to attention and executive functions are sensitive to education. The consideration of both the developmental sequence, as well as differential effects of education, can improve the sensitivity and specificity of neuropsychological measures, allowing early diagnosis of cognitive dysfunction and implementation of adequate rehabilitation programs.

  8. Shape-dependent effects of dielectrically nonlinear inclusions in heterogeneous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, Stefano; Rocchia, Walter

    2005-11-01

    In this work the electrical response of a mixture composed of dielectrically nonlinear ellipsoids dispersed in a linear matrix is modeled. The inclusions may be randomly oriented. The aim is both to set up a methodology apt to deal with this kind of system and to use it to study the effect of marked nonsphericity of inclusions on the global behavior of a mixture. The results are quite interesting from both these points of view. The method here developed extends the Maxwell-Garnett theory [A Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism (Clarendon, Oxford, 1881)], which deals with dielectrically linear inclusions, and it allows, inter alia, to obtain a closed-form expression for the hypersusceptibility ratio of the mixture to the dispersed inclusions. These latter can range from cylinders to spheres, already present in the literature, to "penny-shaped" particles. The theoretical framework is based on the assumption that the dispersion is very dilute. We were able to show that in a specific case, when oblate particles such as elliptic lamellae are dispersed in a matrix having dielectric constant lower than the linear term of inclusion permittivity, a remarkable nonlinear effect occurs. This theory finds application in fields such as nonlinear optics and, more broadly, in many branches of material science.

  9. Effect of temperature on the structure and phase behavior of water confined by hydrophobic, hydrophilic, and heterogeneous surfaces.

    PubMed

    Giovambattista, Nicolas; Rossky, Peter J; Debenedetti, Pablo G

    2009-10-22

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations of water confined between atomically detailed hydrophobic, hydrophilic, and heterogeneous (patchy) nanoscale plates. We study the effects of temperature 220 effective hydrophobicity of the plate decreases as T decreases, consistent with the suppression of the vapor phase upon cooling. However, both the orientation of water's molecules at the interface and the water contact angle on the hydrophobic surface show practically no temperature dependence. Simulations of water confined by heterogeneous plates decorated with hydrophobic and hydrophilic patches reveal that cooling leads to appreciable blurring of the differences between water densities at hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. This observation, together with remarkable similarities in confined water's response to isobaric cooling and to isothermal

  10. Effect of compositional heterogeneity on dissolution of non-ideal LNAPL mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, M.; Johnston, C. D.; Bastow, T. P.; Lekmine, G.; Rayner, J. L.; Nambi, I. M.; Suresh Kumar, G.; Ravi Krishna, R.; Davis, G. B.

    2016-11-01

    The extent of dissolution of petroleum hydrocarbon fuels into groundwater depends greatly on fuel composition. Petroleum fuels can consist of thousands of compounds creating different interactions within the non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL), thereby affecting the relative dissolution of the components and hence a groundwater plume's composition over long periods. Laboratory experiments were conducted to study the variability in the effective solubilities and activity coefficients for common constituents of gasoline fuels (benzene, toluene, p-xylene and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene) (BTX) in matrices with an extreme range of molar volumes and chemical affinities. Four synthetic mixtures were investigated comprising BTX with the bulk of the NAPL mixtures made up of either, ethylbenzene (an aromatic like BTX with similar molar volume); 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene (an aromatic with a greater molar volume); n-hexane (an aliphatic with a low molar volume); and n-decane (an aliphatic with a high molar volume). Equilibrium solubility values for the constituents were under-predicted by Raoult's law by up to 30% (higher experimental concentrations) for the mixture with n-hexane as a filler and over-predicted by up to 12% (lower experimental concentrations) for the aromatic mixtures with ethylbenzene and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene as fillers. Application of PP-LFER (poly-parameter linear free energy relationship) model for non-ideal mixtures also resulted in poor correlation between experimentally measured and predicted concentrations, indicating that differences in chemical affinities can be the major cause of deviation from ideal behavior. Synthetic mixtures were compared with the dissolution behavior of fresh and naturally weathered unleaded gasoline. The presence of lighter aliphatic components in the gasoline had a profound effect on estimating effective solubility due to chemical affinity differences (estimated at 0.0055 per percentage increase in the molar proportion of aliphatic) as

  11. Effects of frugivore preferences and habitat heterogeneity on seed rain: a multi-scale analysis.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Javier; Larrinaga, Asier R; Santamaría, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Seed rain mediated by frugivores is influenced by (1) the seed-deposition distances following fruit ingestion, (2) the disperser activity, as determined by its behaviour and habitat preferences, and (3) the structure of the habitat within the landscape. Here, we evaluated such components using the fleshy-fruited shrub Ephedra fragilis and the frugivorous Balearic lizard Podarcis lilfordi. We estimated seed-deposition patterns based on the displacements and habitat preferences of lizards, derived from visual surveys and telemetry data. The influence of variables potentially determining lizard habitat preference (i.e., height, slope, four measures of habitat abundance and four measures of habitat fragmentation) was evaluated at three spatial scales: 'home-range' (c. 2.5-10*10(3) m(2); telemetry data), 'within home-range' (c. 100 m(2); telemetry data) and 'microhabitat' (<100 m(2); visual survey). Cumulative lizard displacement (from each telemetric location to the initial capture point) saturated before the peak of seed defecation (seed-retention time), indicating that lizard home-range size and habitat preferences were the main determinants of the spread and shape of seed shadows. Shrub cover was positively correlated with habitat preference at the three scales of analysis, whereas slope was negatively correlated at the home-range scale. Model scenarios indicated that spatially-aggregated seed rain emerged when we incorporated the joint effect of habitat preference at the two largest (home-range and within home-range) scales. We conclude that, in order to predict seed rain in animal dispersed plants, it is important to consider the multi-scale effects of habitat preference by frugivores.

  12. Effects of Frugivore Preferences and Habitat Heterogeneity on Seed Rain: A Multi-Scale Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Javier; Larrinaga, Asier R.; Santamaría, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Seed rain mediated by frugivores is influenced by (1) the seed-deposition distances following fruit ingestion, (2) the disperser activity, as determined by its behaviour and habitat preferences, and (3) the structure of the habitat within the landscape. Here, we evaluated such components using the fleshy-fruited shrub Ephedra fragilis and the frugivorous Balearic lizard Podarcis lilfordi. We estimated seed-deposition patterns based on the displacements and habitat preferences of lizards, derived from visual surveys and telemetry data. The influence of variables potentially determining lizard habitat preference (i.e., height, slope, four measures of habitat abundance and four measures of habitat fragmentation) was evaluated at three spatial scales: ‘home-range’ (c. 2.5–10*103 m2; telemetry data), ‘within home-range’ (c. 100 m2; telemetry data) and ‘microhabitat’ (<100 m2; visual survey). Cumulative lizard displacement (from each telemetric location to the initial capture point) saturated before the peak of seed defecation (seed-retention time), indicating that lizard home-range size and habitat preferences were the main determinants of the spread and shape of seed shadows. Shrub cover was positively correlated with habitat preference at the three scales of analysis, whereas slope was negatively correlated at the home-range scale. Model scenarios indicated that spatially-aggregated seed rain emerged when we incorporated the joint effect of habitat preference at the two largest (home-range and within home-range) scales. We conclude that, in order to predict seed rain in animal dispersed plants, it is important to consider the multi-scale effects of habitat preference by frugivores. PMID:22438902

  13. Effects of heterogeneous structure and diffusion permeability of body tissues on decompression gas bubble dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, V P

    2000-07-01

    To gain insight into the special nature of gas bubbles that may form in astronauts, aviators and divers, we developed a mathematical model which describes the following: 1) the dynamics of extravascular bubbles formed in intercellular cavities of a hypothetical tissue undergoing decompression; and 2) the dynamics of nitrogen tension in a thin layer of intercellular fluid and in a thick layer of cells surrounding the bubbles. This model is based on the assumption that, due to limited cellular membrane permeability for gas, a value of effective nitrogen diffusivity in the massive layer of cells in the radial direction is essentially lower compared to conventionally accepted values of nitrogen diffusivity in water and body tissues. Due to rather high nitrogen diffusivity in intercellular fluid, a bubble formed just at completion of fast one-stage reduction of ambient pressure almost instantly grows to the size determined by the initial volume of the intercellular cavity, surface tension of the fluid, the initial nitrogen tension in the tissue, and the level of final pressure. The rate of further bubble growth and maximum bubble size depend on comparatively low effective nitrogen diffusivity in the cell layer, the tissue perfusion rate, the initial nitrogen tension in the tissue, and the final ambient pressure. The tissue deformation pressure performs its conservative action on bubble dynamics only in a limited volume of tissue (at a high density of formed bubbles). Our model is completely consistent with the available data concerning the random latency times to the onset of decompression sickness (DCS) symptoms associated with hypobaric decompressions simulating extravehicular activity. We believe that this model could be used as a theoretical basis for development of more adequate methods for the DCS risk prediction.

  14. Studies of the factors effecting the preparation of heterogeneous platinum-based catalyst on silica supports

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chang Young; Jung, Chi-Young; Jung, Jae-Woong; Jeong, Sung Hoon; Yi, Sung-Chul; Kim, Wha Jung

    2010-10-15

    Pt nanoparticles with an average size of {approx}3 nm were successfully immobilized on the surface of SiO{sub 2} functionalized with -NH{sub 2} and -SH groups through chemical reduction process using polyvinylpyrrolidone as a stabilizer and different reducing agents. The effects of molecular weight of polyvinylpyrrolidone, molar ratio of reducing agent to Pt salt, type of reducing agent on the size and degree of agglomeration of Pt nanoparticles on the SiO{sub 2} surface were investigated. The X-ray diffraction and transmission electron micrograph analyses were performed to identify the product phase, size and morphology of immobilized Pt onto SiO{sub 2}. UV-vis analysis was also conducted to identify the degree of reduction of Pt ions. The Pt-SiO{sub 2} nanocomposite prepared from both NH{sub 2}- and SH-functionalized SiO{sub 2} exhibited similar behavior. The number of immobilized Pt nanoparticles and their average size was increased with polyvinylpyrrolidone concentration while the number of immobilized Pt was decreased with its molecular weight.

  15. Effect of Particle-Scale Heterogeneity on Uranium(VI) Transport in Unsaturated Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Gamerdinger, Amy P.; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2008-01-23

    Uranium (VI) sorption and transport was evaluated in mixtures of silt loam and coarse sand sediments using traditional static batch sorption, saturated column, and unsaturated centrifugation experiments to evaluate the association of mobile and immobile water domains with particles of different size and surface reactivity. Exclusion of conservative tracers and a decrease in uranium sorption compared to what was predicted by the Kd-mass-avg value observed in sediment mixtures where the mass fraction of silt loam was 10%. This is consistent with behavior that was previously reported for coarse and fine sand separates. No exclusion of the conservative tracer, as predicted for the moderate water content range, was measured during unsaturated transport in sediment mixtures that contained 30% or more silt loam by mass. However, sorption was greater than predicted based on the Kd-mass-avg value, which suggests the fine-textured silt was in contact with the mobile water domain. This is the first evidence linking sorption to transport in a particular water domain. Results of this investigation demonstrate the interaction between the geochemical and hydrodynamic processes has a profound effect on transport in unsaturated sediments. In particular, analyses of the data from the experiments on sediment mixtures illustrate how the hydrodynamic conditions have a significant impact on the breakthrough of sorptive solutes. Definition of the fraction of mobile water was especially important for defining the front of the BTC, which is integral to predicting the arrival time of solutes at a particular depth/location in the sediment.

  16. Atrial natriuretic peptide receptor heterogeneity and effects on cyclic GMP accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Leitman, D.C.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (AVP) on guanylate cyclase activity and cyclic GMP accumulation were examined, since these hormones appear to be intimately associated with blood pressure and intravascular volume homeostasis. ANP was found to increase cyclic GMP accumulation in ten cell culture systems, which were derived from blood vessels, adrenal cortex, kidney, lung, testes and mammary gland. ANP receptors were characterized in intact cultured cells using {sup 125}I-ANP{sub 8-33}. Specific {sup 125}I-ANP binding was saturable and of high affinity. Scratchard analysis of the binding data for all cell types exhibited a straight line, indicating that these cells possessed a single class of binding sites. Despite the presence of linear Scatchard plots, these studies demonstrated that cultured cells possess two functionally and physically distinct ANP-binding sites. Most of the ANP-binding sites in cultured cells have a molecular size of 66,000 daltons under reducing conditions. The identification of cultured cell types in which hormones (ANP and oxytocin) regulate guanylate cyclase activity and increase cyclic GMP synthesis will provide valuable systems to determine the mechanisms of hormone-receptor coupling to guanylate cyclase and the cellular processes regulated by cyclic GMP.

  17. A unified treatment of nonclassical nonlinear effects in the propagation of ultrasound in heterogeneous media.

    PubMed

    Paolo Delsanto, Pier; Hirsekorn, Sigrun

    2004-04-01

    Recent experiments on rocks and other materials, such as soil, cement, concrete and damaged elastic materials, have led to the discovery of nonlinear (NL) hysteretic effects in their elastic behaviour. These observations suggest the existence of a NL mesoscopic elasticity universality class, to which all the aforementioned materials belong. The purpose of the present contribution is to search for the basic mathematical roots for nonclassical nonlinearity, in order to explain its universality, classify it and correlate it with the underlying meso- or microscopic interaction mechanisms. In our discussions we explicitly consider two quite different kinds of specimens: a two-bonded-elements structure and a thin multigrained bar. It is remarkable that, although the former includes only one interface and the latter very many interstices, the same "interaction box" formalism can be applied to both. Another important result of the proposed formalism is that the spectral contents of an arbitrary system for any input amplitude may be predicted, under certain assumptions, from the result of a single experiment at a higher amplitude.

  18. Effect of regional lung inflation on ventilation heterogeneity at different length scales during mechanical ventilation of normal sheep lungs.

    PubMed

    Wellman, Tyler J; Winkler, Tilo; Costa, Eduardo L V; Musch, Guido; Harris, R Scott; Venegas, Jose G; Vidal Melo, Marcos F

    2012-09-01

    Heterogeneous, small-airway diameters and alveolar derecruitment in poorly aerated regions of normal lungs could produce ventilation heterogeneity at those anatomic levels. We modeled the washout kinetics of (13)NN with positron emission tomography to examine how specific ventilation (sV) heterogeneity at different length scales is influenced by lung aeration. Three groups of anesthetized, supine sheep were studied: high tidal volume (Vt; 18.4 ± 4.2 ml/kg) and zero end-expiratory pressure (ZEEP) (n = 6); low Vt (9.2 ± 1.0 ml/kg) and ZEEP (n = 6); and low Vt (8.2 ± 0.2 ml/kg) and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP; 19 ± 1 cmH(2)O) (n = 4). We quantified fractional gas content with transmission scans, and sV with emission scans of infused (13)NN-saline. Voxel (13)NN-washout curves were fit with one- or two-compartment models to estimate sV. Total heterogeneity, measured as SD[log(10)(sV)], was divided into length-scale ranges by measuring changes in variance of log(10)(sV), resulting from progressive filtering of sV images. High-Vt ZEEP showed higher sV heterogeneity at <12- (P < 0.01), 12- to 36- (P < 0.01), and 36- to 60-mm (P < 0.05) length scales compared with low-Vt PEEP, with low-Vt ZEEP in between. Increased heterogeneity was associated with the emergence of low sV units in poorly aerated regions, with a high correlation (r = 0.95, P < 0.001) between total heterogeneity and the fraction of lung with slow washout. Regional mean fractional gas content was inversely correlated with regional sV heterogeneity at <12- (r = -0.67), 12- to 36- (r = -0.74), and >36-mm (r = -0.72) length scales (P < 0.001). We conclude that sV heterogeneity at length scales <60 mm increases in poorly aerated regions of mechanically ventilated normal lungs, likely due to heterogeneous small-airway narrowing and alveolar derecruitment. PEEP reduces sV heterogeneity by maintaining lung expansion and airway patency at those small length scales.

  19. Biomechanical Evaluation of All-Polyethylene Pegged Bony Ingrowth Glenoid Fixation Techniques on Implant Micromotion.

    PubMed

    Wiater, Brett P; Moravek, James E; Kurdziel, Michael D; Baker, Kevin C; Wiater, J Michael

    2016-01-01

    Newer glenoid components that allow for hybrid cement fixation via traditional cementation of peripheral pegs and bony ingrowth into an interference-fit central peg introduce the possibility of long-term biological fixation. However, little biomechanical work has been done on the initial stability of these components and the various fixation options. We conducted a study in which all-polyethylene glenoid components with a centrally fluted peg were implanted in polyurethane blocks with interference-fit, hybrid cement, and fully cemented fixation (5 per fixation group). Biomechanical evaluation of glenoid loosening, according to ASTM Standard F-2028-12, subjected the glenoids to 50,000 cycles of rim loading, and glenoid component motion was recorded with 2 differential variable reluctance transducers fixed to each glenoid prosthesis. Fully cemented fixation exhibited significantly less mean distraction in comparison with interference-fit fixation (P < .001) and hybrid cement fixation (P < .001). Hybrid cement fixation exhibited significantly less distraction (P < .001), more compression (P < .001), and no significant difference in glenoid translation (P = .793) in comparison with interference-fit fixation. Fully cemented fixation exhibited the most resistance to glenoid motion in comparison with hybrid cement fixation and interference-fit fixation. However, hybrid cement fixation and interference-fit fixation exhibited equivocal motion. Given these results, cementation of peripheral pegs may confer no additional initial stability over that provided by uncemented interference-fit fixation. PMID:27327928

  20. Proglucagons in vertebrates: Expression and processing of multiple genes in a bony fish.

    PubMed

    Busby, Ellen R; Mommsen, Thomas P

    2016-09-01

    In contrast to mammals, where a single proglucagon (PG) gene encodes three peptides: glucagon, glucagon-like peptide 1 and glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-1; GLP-2), many non-mammalian vertebrates carry multiple PG genes. Here, we investigate proglucagon mRNA sequences, their tissue expression and processing in a diploid bony fish. Copper rockfish (Sebastes caurinus) express two independent genes coding for distinct proglucagon sequences (PG I, PG II), with PG II lacking the GLP-2 sequence. These genes are differentially transcribed in the endocrine pancreas, the brain, and the gastrointestinal tract. Alternative splicing identified in rockfish is only one part of this complex regulation of the PG transcripts: the system has the potential to produce two glucagons, four GLP-1s and a single GLP-2, or any combination of these peptides. Mass spectrometric analysis of partially purified PG-derived peptides in endocrine pancreas confirms translation of both PG transcripts and differential processing of the resulting peptides. The complex differential regulation of the two PG genes and their continued presence in this extant teleostean fish strongly suggests unique and, as yet largely unidentified, roles for the peptide products encoded in each gene. PMID:26927880

  1. Effects of Field-Scale Heterogeneity on Plume Behavior and Remediation in Alluvial Aquifer Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Labolle, E. M.; Fogg, G. E.

    2002-12-01

    This study examines the effects of various field-scale geologic attributes on plume behavior and efficacy of remediation. Using transition probability geostatistical simulation and core descriptions available from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory site, we generate a spectrum of unconditional realizations representing alluvial aquifer systems with different degrees of interconnectedness (connectivity) and volumetric abundance of different facies. Both statistical and spatial measures are used to characterize degree of connectivity of high-K bodies (channel facies) in simulated K fields. The random-walk particle method is used to simulate conservative mass transport under steady-state flow conditions. Spatial and temporal analyses of simulated contaminant plumes explore the relative sensitivity of plume behavior to style of geologic complexity. Two geologic settings (one with high-K embedded in low-K materials and the other with low-K embedded in high-K) are used to evaluate a set of remedial methods for different proportions and corresponding degrees of connectivity. The remedial scenarios include ambient transport (no remediation), pump-and-treat remediation with three different rates of extraction, and two methods of enhanced remediation. Results show a percolation threshold for high-K channel bodies between channel fractions of 0.08 and 0.18. Further, as the volume fraction of high-K channel facies increases (from 0.08 to 0.68), simulated plumes show decreasingly anomalous behavior (e.g., mass holdback resulting in tailing). Results show that the architecture of high permeability units and preferential flow paths are important in controlling groundwater flow in fine-grain dominant systems, and relatively less important in coarse-grain dominant systems. Remedial experiments show total mass remaining in low-K materials after the application of remediation is always greater than the total mass in high-K channel facies at the channel facies volume fraction

  2. The effect of ozone on nicotine desorption from model surfaces:evidence for heterogeneous chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Destaillats, Hugo; Singer, Brett C.; Lee, Sharon K.; Gundel, LaraA.

    2005-05-01

    Assessment of secondhand tobacco smoke exposure using nicotine as a tracer or biomarker is affected by sorption of the alkaloid to indoor surfaces and by its long-term re-emission into the gas phase. However, surface chemical interactions of nicotine have not been sufficiently characterized. Here, the reaction of ozone with nicotine sorbed to Teflon and cotton surfaces was investigated in an environmental chamber by monitoring nicotine desorption over a week following equilibration in dry or humid air (65-70 % RH). The Teflon and cotton surfaces had N{sub 2}-BET surface areas of 0.19 and 1.17 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}, and water mass uptakes (at 70 % RH) of 0 and 7.1 % respectively. Compared with dry air baseline levels in the absence of O{sub 3}, gas phase nicotine concentrations decrease, by 2 orders of magnitude for Teflon after 50 h at 20-45 ppb O{sub 3}, and by a factor of 10 for cotton after 100 h with 13-15 ppb O{sub 3}. The ratios of pseudo first-order rate constants for surface reaction (r) to long-term desorption (k) were r/k = 3.5 and 2.0 for Teflon and cotton surfaces, respectively. These results show that surface oxidation was competitive with desorption. Hence, oxidative losses could significantly reduce long-term re-emissions of nicotine from indoor surfaces. Formaldehyde, N-methylformamide, nicotinaldehyde and cotinine were identified as oxidation products, indicating that the pyrrolidinic N was the site of electrophilic attack by O{sub 3}. The presence of water vapor had no effect on the nicotine-O{sub 3} reaction on Teflon surfaces. By contrast, nicotine desorption from cotton in humid air was unaffected by the presence of ozone. These observations are consistent with complete inhibition of ozone-nicotine surface reactions in an aqueous surface film present in cotton but not in Teflon surfaces.

  3. A safe, efficient and cost effective process for removing petroleum hydrocarbons from a highly heterogeneous and relatively inaccessible shoreline.

    PubMed

    Guerin, Turlough F

    2015-10-01

    A rocky, intractable and highly heterogeneous, intertidal zone, was contaminated from a diesel fuel spill that occurred during refuelling of a grader used in road construction, on an operational mine's shiploading facility. A practical, cost-effective, and safer (to personnel by avoiding drilling and earthworks), and non-invasive sampling and remediation strategy was designed and implemented since the location and nature of the impacted geology (rock fill) and sediment, precluded conventional ex-situ and any in-situ treatment where drilling would be required. Enhanced biostimulation with surfactant, available N & P (which were highly constrained), and increased aeration, increased the degradation rate from no discernable change for 2 years post-spill, to 170 mg/kg/day; the maximum degradation rate after intervention. While natural attenuation was ineffective in this application, the low-cost, biostimulation intervention proved successful, allowing the site owner to meet their regulatory obligations. Petroleum hydrocarbons (aliphatic fraction) decreased from ∼20,000 mg/kg to <200 mg/kg at the completion of 180 weeks of treatment.

  4. Coalescent Times and Patterns of Genetic Diversity in Species with Facultative Sex: Effects of Gene Conversion, Population Structure, and Heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Hartfield, Matthew; Wright, Stephen I; Agrawal, Aneil F

    2016-01-01

    Many diploid organisms undergo facultative sexual reproduction. However, little is currently known concerning the distribution of neutral genetic variation among facultative sexual organisms except in very simple cases. Understanding this distribution is important when making inferences about rates of sexual reproduction, effective population size, and demographic history. Here we extend coalescent theory in diploids with facultative sex to consider gene conversion, selfing, population subdivision, and temporal and spatial heterogeneity in rates of sex. In addition to analytical results for two-sample coalescent times, we outline a coalescent algorithm that accommodates the complexities arising from partial sex; this algorithm can be used to generate multisample coalescent distributions. A key result is that when sex is rare, gene conversion becomes a significant force in reducing diversity within individuals. This can reduce genomic signatures of infrequent sex (i.e., elevated within-individual allelic sequence divergence) or entirely reverse the predicted patterns. These models offer improved methods for assessing null patterns of molecular variation in facultative sexual organisms.

  5. Effect of chemical heterogeneity of biodegradable polymers on surface energy: A static contact angle analysis of polyester model films.

    PubMed

    Belibel, R; Avramoglou, T; Garcia, A; Barbaud, C; Mora, L

    2016-02-01

    Biodegradable and bioassimilable poly((R,S)-3,3 dimethylmalic acid) (PDMMLA) derivatives were synthesized and characterized in order to develop a new coating for coronary endoprosthesis enabling the reduction of restenosis. The PDMMLA was chemically modified to form different custom groups in its side chain. Three side groups were chosen: the hexyl group for its hydrophobic nature, the carboxylic acid and alcohol groups for their acid and neutral hydrophilic character, respectively. The sessile drop method was applied to characterize the wettability of biodegradable polymer film coatings. Surface energy and components were calculated. The van Oss approach helped reach not only the dispersive and polar acid-base components of surface energy but also acid and basic components. Surface topography was quantified by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and subnanometer average values of roughness (Ra) were obtained for all the analyzed surfaces. Thus, roughness was considered to have a negligible effect on wettability measurements. In contrast, heterogeneous surfaces had to be corrected by the Cassie-Baxter equation for copolymers (10/90, 20/80 and 30/70). The impact of this correction was quantified for all the wettability parameters. Very high relative corrections (%) were found, reaching 100% for energies and 30% for contact angles. PMID:26652458

  6. Spatial heterogeneity in the effects of climate and density-dependence on dispersal in a house sparrow metapopulation

    PubMed Central

    Pärn, Henrik; Ringsby, Thor Harald; Jensen, Henrik; Sæther, Bernt-Erik

    2012-01-01

    Dispersal plays a key role in the response of populations to climate change and habitat fragmentation. Here, we use data from a long-term metapopulation study of a non-migratory bird, the house sparrow (Passer domesticus), to examine the influence of increasing spring temperature and density-dependence on natal dispersal rates and how these relationships depend on spatial variation in habitat quality. The effects of spring temperature and population size on dispersal rate depended on the habitat quality. Dispersal rate increased with temperature and population size on poor-quality islands without farms, where house sparrows were more exposed to temporal fluctuations in weather conditions and food availability. By contrast, dispersal rate was independent of spring temperature and population size on high-quality islands with farms, where house sparrows had access to food and shelter all the year around. This illustrates large spatial heterogeneity within the metapopulation in how population density and environmental fluctuations affect the dispersal process. PMID:21613299

  7. The interactions of squalene, alkanes and other mineral oils with model membranes; effects on membrane heterogeneity and function.

    PubMed

    Richens, Joanna L; Lane, Jordan S; Mather, Melissa L; O'Shea, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Droplet interface bilayers (DIBs) offer many favourable facets as an artificial membrane system but the influence of any residual oil that remains in the bilayer following preparation is ill-defined. In this study the fluorescent membrane probes di-8-butyl-amino-naphthyl-ethylene-pyridinium-propyl-sulfonate (Di-8-ANEPPS) and Fluoresceinphosphatidylethanolamine (FPE) were used to help understand the nature of the phospholipid-oil interaction and to examine any structural and functional consequences of such interactions on membrane bilayer properties. Concentration-dependent modifications of the membrane dipole potential were found to occur in phospholipid vesicles exposed to a variety of different oils. Incorporation of oil into the lipid bilayer was shown to have no significant effect on the movement of fatty acids across the lipid bilayer. Changes in membrane heterogeneity were, however, demonstrated with increased microdomain formation being visible in the bilayer following exposure to mineral oil, pentadecane and squalene. As it is important that artificial systems provide an accurate representation of the membrane environment, careful consideration should be taken prior to the application of DIBs in studies of membrane structure and organisation.

  8. Finite size and geometrical non-linear effects during crack pinning by heterogeneities: An analytical and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasoya, Manish; Unni, Aparna Beena; Leblond, Jean-Baptiste; Lazarus, Veronique; Ponson, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    Crack pinning by heterogeneities is a central toughening mechanism in the failure of brittle materials. So far, most analytical explorations of the crack front deformation arising from spatial variations of fracture properties have been restricted to weak toughness contrasts using first order approximation and to defects of small dimensions with respect to the sample size. In this work, we investigate the non