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Sample records for book review editor

  1. Book Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pecora, Peter J.; Cline, Stephanie

    1994-01-01

    Reviews two books: (1) "Advancing Family Preservation Practice" (E. Susan Morton and R. Kevin Brigsby, editors) which summarizes Intensive Family Preservation Services in the United States over the past decade; and (2) "Marketing Strategies for Nonprofit Organizations" (Siri Espy) which discusses marketing and its application…

  2. Book Review: Book review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegener, Daan

    Writing a biography of a complex personality and mastermind like Albert Einstein is a daunting task for any historian of science. Yet the sheer temptation of writing his biography has apparently helped to overcome scholarly scruples, as biographies of Einstein have appeared quite regularly on the market. One of them is Einstein: his Life and Universe by journalist Walter Isaacson. It is a best-seller, which is one of the reasons the book deserves a critical evaluation. Isaacson is a man of considerable repute: he has been the chairman of CNN and managing editor of Time magazine. Isaacson's Einstein is written in a style that is accessible to a wide audience. Scholars who are already familiar with Einstein's physics may still enjoy the parts of the book that deal with the relation between Einstein and the press. Indeed, the breadth of its scope is the book's major merit, as it connects the personal, scientific, public and political dimensions of Einstein's life. In this review, I discuss Isaacson's treatment of these dimensions one-by-one.

  3. Book Review: Book review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freire, Olival

    2014-05-01

    This book concerns the many lives of Hugh Everett's seminal work on the interpretation of quantum mechanics. As these many lives were spread over time, like layers, the reading of this book is like an archeological tour as well as an adventure in physics, its philosophy and history. In short, the story traces the lives of his work. The first life was around 1956-1957 when Everett, a doctoral student under John Archibald Wheeler, wrote his dissertation at Princeton University and published it in the journal Review of Modern Physics. He presented an interpretation which dispensed with the need to collapse quantum states during measurements, thus dissolving the quantum measurement problem, and consistently reproduced results from quantum mechanics using Schrödinger's equation alone. Despite the face value of such a proposal it drew little attention until the end of the 1960s. This was when the second life of Everett's work began. In 1967 Bryce DeWitt appealed to Everett's work while working on the quantization of general relativity creating what is now called the Wheeler-DeWitt equation. Furthermore, DeWitt wanted give to Everett's work a wider audience than experts in quantum gravity. Supported by the editors of Physics Today a paper by himself presenting this interpretation as one of the possible ones for quantum mechanics triggered a heated debate on the subject in the periodical. Together with this new life a layer beneath the original publication of the dissertation appeared. In contact with Everett, DeWitt discovered that the 1957 dissertation and paper had been an abridged version of a more consistently developed interpretation. The full version of the work was then published in 1973 with the enticing title, suggested by DeWitt, of "The Many-Worlds Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics." This second life was larger than the first one, indeed it is alive until today, sparking a huge amount of technical work by physicists and philosophers attempting to solve what

  4. Book Reviews

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    James J. Gross (Editor) Handbook of emotion regulation (second edition), reviewed by Gyöngyi Kökönyei Michael S. Ascher (Author, Editor) and Petros Levounis (Editor) The behavioral addictions, reviewed by Renáta Cserjési

  5. [Book review] Ecological Scale - Theory and Applications by D.L. Peterson and V. Thomas Parker, editors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Connell, A.F.

    2000-01-01

    Covering the complexity of the scale topic, this volume represents an important compilation of information on a topic that is often misunderstood, and one for which little attention is paid (although, thankfully, this seems to be on the decline). Although technical, this book provides full exposure to the scale issue in ecology and is an important reference for researchers and resource managers who are working to understand and preserve ecological function in parks. The authors and editors have combined to provide a needed examination of a very important topic. In summary, why purchase all those books on scale when just one will do? The mountain of information alone stuffed into this one book should prompt all parks to get a copy and have it on hand as a quick and ready reference.

  6. Book Review: Book review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manohar, C. S.

    2015-02-01

    The subject of the theory of vibrations has carried an aesthetic appeal to generations of engineering students for its richness of ideas, and for the intellectual challenges it offers. Also, the diverse range of its applications (covering civil, mechanical, automotive, and aerospace structures) has provided obvious motivations for its study. For most students, the subject provides, perhaps, the first encounter in substantial application of mathematical tools (differential equations, calculus of variations, Fourier/Laplace transforms, and matrix algebra) to engineering problems. The intimate relationship that the subject of mechanics has with mathematics strikes home probably for the first time. While teaching this subject, the instructor is spoilt for choice in selecting a text book and so are the students who wish to pursue a self-study of the subject. Many luminaries in the field have offered their own exposition of the subject: starting from the classics of Rayleigh, Timoshenko, Den Hartog, Bishop and Johnson, and the works of more recent vintage (e.g., the books by Meirovich, Clough, and Penzien, and works with computational flavour, such as, those by Bathe and Petyt), several works easily come to one's mind. Given this milieu, it requires a distinctive conviction to write a new book on this subject. And, here we have a book, written by a practitioner, which aims to deal with fundamental aspects of vibrations of engineering systems. The scepticism that this reviewer had on the need for having one more such book vanished as he browsed through the book and read selectively a few sections. The author's gift for elegant explanations is immediately noticeable even in such a preliminary reading. After a more careful reading, the reviewer has found this book to be insightful and he considers the book to be a welcome addition to the family of books on vibration engineering. The author has struck a fine balance between physical explanations, mathematical niceties

  7. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimondo, Ennio

    2004-07-01

    For many years the Institute of Physics has published books on hot topics based on a collection of reprints from different journals, including some remarks by the editors of each volume. The book on Optical Angular Momentum, edited by L Allen, S M Barnett and M J Padgett, is a recent addition to the series. It reproduces forty four papers originally published in different journals and in a few cases it provides direct access to works not easily accessible to a web navigator. The collection covers nearly a hundred years of progress in physics, starting from an historic 1909 paper by Poynting, and ending with a 2002 paper by Padgett, Barnett and coworkers on the measurement of the orbital angular momentum of a single photon. The field of optical angular momentum has expanded greatly, creating an interdisciplinary attraction for researchers operating in quantum optics, atomic physics, solid state physics, biophysics and quantum information theory. The development of laser optics, especially the control of single mode sources, has made possible the specific design of optical radiation modes with a high degree of control on the light angular momentum. The editors of this book are important figures in the field of angular momentum, having contributed to key progress in the area. L Allen published an historical paper in 1999, he and M J Padgett (together with M Babiker) produced few years ago a long review article which is today still the most complete basic introduction to the angular momentum of light, while S M Barnett has contributed several high quality papers to the progress of this area of physics. The editors' choice provides an excellent overview to all readers, with papers classified into eight different topics, covering the basic principles of the light and spin and orbital angular momentum, the laboratory tools for creating laser beams carrying orbital angular momentum, the optical forces and torques created by laser beams carrying angular momentum on

  8. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Steve

    2008-11-01

    The Polish physicist Józio (Joseph, Josh, Jo) Rotblat was catapulted into the public eye when he (and the 'Pugwash Conferences' organization) received the 1995 Nobel Peace Prize. His life prior to that had been most distinguished but conducted well out of the public eye. Born and raised as a Jewish physicist in pre-World War II Poland, and thus potentially educationally disadvantaged, he battled away for education and scientific achievement. He came to Liverpool University just before the outbreak of World War II, worked in James Chadwick's laboratory on the early beginnings of neutron fission physics, moved to Los Alamos to take part in the US-UK collaborative Manhattan Project to build a nuclear bomb and was motivated by a desire to rid Poland of Nazi 'racial cleansing'. On realizing the US-UK goal was somewhat wider, he resigned this work and dedicated his life to the peaceful uses of radiation and the campaigns to rid the world of the potential world-eliminating possibility of nuclear war. For this purpose he interacted with Albert Einstein and Bertrand Russell, and in July 1957 founded the 'Pugwash Conferences', named for a small fishing village in Nova Scotia, Canada where the first was held. Along the way his personal life was no less dramatic. Cruel events conspired, and his wife Tola remained in Poland and was killed in the Nazi extermination camp at Majdanek. He grieved for his beloved Poland and those left behind or unaccounted for. He was suspected by some Americans of being a spy and had his personal papers and family artefacts impounded. After the war he was Professor of Medical Physics at St Bartholomew's Hospital, London for 30 years up to retirement. After John Roberts, he was the second editor of this journal Physics in Medicine and Biology from 1961-72 (see e.g. Bob Burns' paper in our 50th birthday issue, 2006. Kit Hill's little book which chronicles the life and times of Rotblat weaves together the key events in his personal and professional

  9. Book Review: Book review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clevers, Jan G. P. W.

    2016-09-01

    For many years a good introductory book for undergraduate and postgraduate students on remote sensing of the Earth's land surface, which was not starting with an emphasis on traditional photographic techniques, was missing. In 2010 the first edition of the book Fundamentals of Satellite Remote Sensing by Emilio Chuvieco and Alfredo Huete was published by CRC Press and it was filling this gap. Now the second edition by Emilio Chuvieco was published by CRC Press. This second edition is made more attractive by the use of colour and including colour illustrations instead of the black-and-white ones in the first edition.

  10. Book Review: Book review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2017-07-01

    This fundamental (and in many respects encyclopedic) 755-page monograph was published as part of the ;Mario Boella Series on Electromagnetism in Information and Communication; edited by P. L. E. Uslenghi. The main purpose of the book is systematic exposition of several important aspects of the electromagnetic scattering theory along with the presentation of the requisite mathematical apparatus and illustrative numerical results. What distinguishes this volume from the vast majority of related books is the extensive treatment of the time-domain scattering theory.

  11. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Journal of Early Childhood, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Reviews "La Educacion Preescolar: Desafio y Aventura" (Lavanchy Bobsien); "Working towards Better Childcare" (Peeters and Vandenbroeck, editors); "Children's Savings: A Study in the Development of Economic Behavior" (Sonuga-Barke and Webley); "Curvas de Crecimiento Estaturo-ponderal en Escolares" (Saez Crespo and others); and "Helping Bereaved…

  12. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Journal of Early Childhood, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Reviews "La Educacion Preescolar: Desafio y Aventura" (Lavanchy Bobsien); "Working towards Better Childcare" (Peeters and Vandenbroeck, editors); "Children's Savings: A Study in the Development of Economic Behavior" (Sonuga-Barke and Webley); "Curvas de Crecimiento Estaturo-ponderal en Escolares" (Saez Crespo and others); and "Helping Bereaved…

  13. Book Review: Book review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonte, Cidália C.

    2016-02-01

    The use of geospatial data for a wide variety of applications has increased continuously over the last decades and a great variety of packages of open source GIS software are now available, with diverse characteristics. R was created as free software mainly for statistical computation and graphics, but offers now a large diversity of packages to process and visualize spatial data. Many books dedicated to R are available (e.g., Zuur et al., 2009; Chambers, 2008), but not many about spatial analysis in R (Bivand et al., 2008). The book under analysis is aimed for beginners both in R and in spatial analysis, and therefore can be used as a starting point for students and professionals which may want to enter the area of spatial analysis with R.

  14. Book Review: Book review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groover, Holly

    "Most of us want to be realists about the physical world" (p. 11): Only three paragraphs into his brief book, Hebor hits a nerve. Could it be-despite our philosophical sophistication-that we continue to have a deep-seated, common sense, Einsteinian yearning to have a world out there, existing independently of us? This candid admission motivates Hebor's project, which aims to show how quantum mechanics can and should be interpreted as a realistic theory.

  15. Book Review: Book review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Christina Yan

    2017-02-01

    The world class Ni-Cu-PGE sulfide deposits associated with the Sudbury Igneous Complex (SIC) are quite unique on earth in the sense that the energy source and origin were triggered by a large meteorite impact event. The ore deposits in the SIC make up one of the largest Ni-Cu-PGE sulfide deposit camps in the world and have now been mined for over 100 years. This is the first complete reference book that focuses entirely on the SIC and covers the fields of economic geology, petrology, geochemistry and geophysics. The purpose of this book is to explore the linkage between sulfide and silicate magmas generated by the 1.85 Ga Sudbury impact event and to unite an understanding of the process of crustal melt sheet evolution with the formation of the magmatic sulfide mineralization. The author, Peter Lightfoot, has been based in Sudbury for 25 years. As a top scientist on magmatic Ni-Cu-PGE sulfide deposits and a Chief Geologist with the Brownfield Exploration group at Vale Base Metals, Peter has been positioned to develop and assemble the ideas presented in this book, which are perfectly balanced between industry and academia.

  16. Book Review: Book review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, Alberto A.

    The title Einstein's Generation immediately suggests names such as Ehrenfest, Ritz, Kaufmann, Born, Laue, and Laub. Staley's book discusses these individuals, but it actually has a broader scope. Both the title and the subtitle are not quite appropriate. A much more fitting title would be Michelson, Electrons, and the Rise of "Modern" Physics. The emphasis on Albert Michelson is evident in the Index: almost four columns on him, compared to just one and a half on Einstein. Likewise, "Einstein's generation" includes, for Staley, many other physicists who were quite older than Einstein, such as Lorentz, Planck, Poincaré, and Minkowski. The book exhibits a composite character because it includes and expands upon four articles that Staley had published earlier on Michelson, relativity, and the co-creation of modern and classical physics. Hence the book is partly a bridging work; it ambitiously connects areas in the history of physics, from the 1880s until 1911. Staley identifies how diverse interests produced crossfertilization, and how various disciplinary boundaries were crossed. He wants to discuss material culture, experiment, and theory, all on the same footing. Every page of the introduction seems to quadruple the scope; he writes about individuals and communities, consolidation and diversification, power and weakness, memory and neglect, the cultural and the material, the classical and the modern, and the absolute and the relative.

  17. Book Review: Book review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Linden, Sebastian

    2016-05-01

    Compiling a good book on urban remote sensing is probably as hard as the research in this disciplinary field itself. Urban areas comprise various environments and show high heterogeneity in many respects, they are highly dynamic in time and space and at the same time of greatest influence on connected and even tele-connected regions due to their great economic importance. Urban remote sensing is therefore of great importance, yet as manifold as its study area: mapping urban areas (or sub-categories thereof) plays an important (and challenging) role in land use and land cover (change) monitoring; the analysis of urban green and forests is by itself a specialization of ecological remote sensing; urban climatology asks for spatially and temporally highly resolved remote sensing products; the detection of artificial objects is not only a common and important remote sensing application but also a typical benchmark for image analysis techniques, etc. Urban analyses are performed with all available spaceborne sensor types and at the same time they are one of the most relevant fields for airborne remote sensing. Several books on urban remote sensing have been published during the past 10 years, each taking a different perspective. The book Global Urban Monitoring and Assessment through Earth Observation is motivated by the objectives of the Global Urban Observation and Information Task (SB-04) in the GEOSS (Global Earth Observation System of Systems) 2012-2015 workplan (compare Chapter 2) and wants to highlight the global aspects of state-of-the-art urban remote sensing.

  18. Book Review: Book review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, Newton C. A.; Krause, Décio

    This book contains a representative selection of Erhard Scheibe's writings on the philosophy of physics. It encompasses eight sections, with 38 papers, distributed as follows: (I) Between Rationalism and Empiricism (five papers from 1969 to 1994); (II) The Philosophy of the Physicists (five papers from 1988 to 1995); (III) Reconstruction (four papers, from 1979 to 1988); (IV) Laws of Nature (five papers, from 1989 to 1998); (V) Reduction (five papers from 1973 to 1995); (VI) Foundations of Quantum Mechanics (six papers from 1985 to 1993); (VII) Spacetime, Invariance, Covariance (four papers from 1982 to 1994), and (VIII) Mathematics and Physics (four papers from 1977 to 1997).

  19. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Convergence, 1996

    1996-01-01

    This special book review section contains reviews of 18 books in adult and continuing education and development. Subjects include rural development, feminist discourse, group facilitation, Paulo Freire, professional development, social change, participatory action research, and the ecology of written language. (SK)

  20. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powicke, J. C.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Reviews of 10 recent books and one new journal ("Catalyst: A Journal of Policy Debate") are provided. Topics of the books reviewed include: economics in modern Britain, world economics, the mixed economy, Milton Friedman's thought, British industry, economic issues, and London as a financial center. (JDH)

  1. Book Review: Book review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2017-01-01

    The second - revised and enlarged - edition of this popular monograph is co-authored by Michael Kahnert and is published as Volume 145 of the Springer Series in Optical Sciences. As in the first edition, the main emphasis is on the mathematics of electromagnetic scattering and on numerically exact computer solutions of the frequency-domain macroscopic Maxwell equations for particles with complex shapes. The book is largely centered on Green-function solution of relevant boundary value problems and the T-matrix methodology, although other techniques (the method of lines, integral equation methods, and Lippmann-Schwinger equations) are also covered. The first four chapters serve as a thorough overview of key theoretical aspects of electromagnetic scattering intelligible to readers with undergraduate training in mathematics. A separate chapter provides an instructive analysis of the Rayleigh hypothesis which is still viewed by many as a highly controversial aspect of electromagnetic scattering by nonspherical objects. Another dedicated chapter introduces basic quantities serving as optical observables in practical applications. A welcome extension of the first edition is the new chapter on group theoretical aspects of electromagnetic scattering by particles with discrete symmetries. An essential part of the book is the penultimate chapter describing in detail popular public-domain computer programs mieschka and Tsym which can be applied to a wide range of particle shapes. The final chapter provides a general overview of available literature on electromagnetic scattering by particles and gives useful reading advice.

  2. An Idea Book for the Education Editor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodinsky, Ben, Ed.

    To be used as a reference and guide for education editors, this booklet contains advice and information on writing, editing, production, publishing, the magazine, and the newsletter. The final section discusses the role and duties of the education editor. This edition contains material from the 1963 brochure of the same name, new material selected…

  3. Book Review: Book review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, John T.

    Mauro Dorato's new book is subtitled "An Introduction to the History and Philosophy of Laws of Nature". This is a bit misleading: a reader previously unacquainted with any of the literature on the topic of laws of nature and related problems in the philosophy of science will find much of the book prohibitively challenging. But the book does aim for the kind of breadth and generality that one would expect from an introduction to the subject, and it serves well as a compact overview of the issues, views, arguments, and counter-arguments that have shaped the contemporary philosophical debate on laws of nature. Almost no important facet of the debate goes untouched. There are chapters or sections on: recent scholarship on the history of the notion of a law and its role in the study of nature; the characteristics of the things called "laws" in a wide range of sciences; the relations among laws, algorithmic compressibility of information, and the theory of measurement; the puzzling question of why so many laws of nature should be mathematical in form; regularity theories of laws; the universals approach to laws; the necessitarian approach to laws; skeptical eliminativism about laws; non-reductive realism about laws; the question of the supervenience of laws on non-nomic facts; the relations of laws to counterfactuals, causality, dispositions, explanation, chance, symmetry, and necessity; ceteris paribus clauses; the evolutionary contingency thesis and the question of biological laws; Wilhelm Dilthey and the alleged distinction between "nomothetic" sciences and "historical" ones; the question of psychophysical laws and the relation between this question and the problems of mental causation and free will; even the connection between the issue of psychophysical laws and Gibson's ecological theory of perception. This is an impressive range of topics, especially considering that they are all treated in only 174 pages. One result is that not all of them are treated with as

  4. Book Review: Book review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Wenjiao

    2016-06-01

    This monograph book represents an important volume summarizing the present geological knowledge and understanding of the geodynamic evolution of large parts of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) or Altaids, which is one of the largest orogenic collages on Earth. The CAOB, like other major accretionary orogens, is a complex assembly of ancient microcontinents, arc terranes, accretionary wedges, fragments of oceanic volcanic islands (sea-mounts), oceanic plateaus, ophiolites, and shelf sediments from passive continental margins. The CAOB has caused much international attention due to its complicated architecture and considerably continental growth. However, after many years of investigations, some fundamental problems still remain controversial, such as the rate and volume of crustal growth, the origin of continental fragments, the detailed mechanism of accretion and collision, the role of terrane rotations during the orogeny, and the age and composition of the lower crust in Central Asia.

  5. Book Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Linda

    1994-01-01

    Reviews "Attention Deficit Disorder: ADHD and ADD Syndromes" (D. R. Jordan), a short book about the characteristics and differences between attention deficit disorder (ADD) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and the effect they have on children and adults in their classrooms, home, and workplace. The book includes techniques for…

  6. Book Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargrave, Mary C.

    1993-01-01

    Reviews "Children and Youth in Limbo: A Search for Connections," a book by Nadia Ehrlich Finkelstein. The book develops a categorical scheme for providing care to children and adolescents in families with varying degrees of commitment and permanency, and stresses the need for youths to have and maintain "roots." (MDM)

  7. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beveridge, Sally; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Reviews three books: (1) "Special Educational Needs in Schools" (Sally Beveridge), concerning the education of special needs children in Britain; (2) "Class Management" (E.C. Wragg), one of a series of practical resource books for primary school teachers; and (3) "Teaching Music in the Primary School" (Joanna Glover…

  8. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour, J. B.

    2007-02-01

    These colloquium proceedings will be valuable, the blurb says, for graduate students and researchers in cosmology and theoretical astrophysics. Specifically, the book 'looks at both the strengths and weaknesses of the current big bang model in explaining certain puzzling data' and gives a 'comprehensive coverage of the expanding field of cosmology'. The reality is rather different. Conference proceedings rarely compare in value with a solid monograph or good review articles, and Current Issues in Cosmology is no exception. The colloquium was convened by the two editors, who have both long harboured doubts about the big bang, and was held in Paris in June 2004. The proceedings contain 19 presented papers and relatively brief summary comments by four panel speakers. The questions and answers at the end of each talk and a general discussion at the end were recorded and transcribed but contain little of interest. The nature of the colloquium is indicated by panellist Francesco Bertola's comment: 'While in the 1950s it was possible to speak of rival theories in cosmology, now the big-bang picture has no strong rivals. This is confirmed by the fact that out of 1500 members of the IAU Division VIII (Galaxies and the Universe) only a dozen, although bright people, devote their time to the heterodox views.' This was largely a platform for them to give their views. At least half of the dozen, all the 'usual suspects', were present: Geoffery and Margaret Burbidge, Jayant Narlikar, Halton Arp, Chandra Wickramasinghe and, in spirit only but playing a role somewhat like the ghost of Hamlet's father, the late Fred Hoyle. Doubters presented 12 of the 19 papers. Orthodoxy should certainly be challenged and the sociology of science questioned, but I found two main problems with this book. The papers putting the orthodox view are too short, even perfunctory. The most that a serious graduate student would get out of them is a reference to a far better review article or book on modern

  9. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodd, John M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Reviews two books on issues of Native American education: (1) "Light of the Feather: Pathways through Contemporary Indian America" (M. Fedullo); and (2) "Teaching American Indian Students" (J. Rehner). (ME)

  10. Reviews: Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Bretta; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Reviews three books: "The Schoolhome: Rethinking Schools for Changing Families," by Jane Martin; "Godly Play," by Jerome Berryman; and "Five Kingdoms: An Illustrated Guide to the Phyla of Life on Earth," by Margulis and Schwartz. (TJQ)

  11. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodd, John M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Reviews two books on issues of Native American education: (1) "Light of the Feather: Pathways through Contemporary Indian America" (M. Fedullo); and (2) "Teaching American Indian Students" (J. Rehner). (ME)

  12. Children's Books. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moulton, Kate

    1994-01-01

    Reviews 10 children's books, published or reissued 1988-93, about daily life, traditional culture, and schooling among Taos Pueblo, Zuni Pueblo, Navajo, Inuit, Guatemalan, and other Native peoples, as well as tales from Native American oral tradition, the life of a buffalo, and Cherokee and Athapascan historical fiction. Includes grade range and…

  13. Children's Books. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moulton, Kate

    1994-01-01

    Reviews 10 children's books, published or reissued 1988-93, about daily life, traditional culture, and schooling among Taos Pueblo, Zuni Pueblo, Navajo, Inuit, Guatemalan, and other Native peoples, as well as tales from Native American oral tradition, the life of a buffalo, and Cherokee and Athapascan historical fiction. Includes grade range and…

  14. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truscott, J. G.

    2004-05-01

    A book of this nature is long overdue; as could be expected from the pedigree of the editors, the coverage is comprehensive and, thanks to the authors selected, is of high quality. The book is divided into five sections, the central three of which are concerned with the measurement techniques themselves. The invasive techniques of mechanical testing and bone histology are dealt with in great detail at a level suitable for postgraduate students looking for an introduction to these techniques at a practical level. In the section dealing with the measurement techniques which use ionizing radiation, the chapters on DXA, neutron activation and radiogrammetry are well detailed and again at the appropriate level for postgraduate students. However, the chapters dealing with quantitative CT techniques are missing the sort of information that would have given them more authority. There is no mention of reconstruction algorithms or some of the typical shortcomings (e.g. partial volume artefacts) of these techniques and, given the excellent quality of the rest of the book, this was disappointing. The third of these technique sections deals with methods that do not use ionizing radiation. As one might expect with these two editors, the chapter on ultrasound is excellent and the coverage thorough and deep. The chapter on MRI and bone is particularly useful and timely as little has been published in this area and the debate about how best to measure bone quality in vivo has recently been rejoined. The chapters on finite element modelling and vibration analysis give a useful overview of the topics and have comprehensive reference lists for anyone who wishes to deepen their studies. The book has a useful introductory section. Bone biology is discussed in some detail, providing sufficient knowledge for the reader to be able to understand the basis and significance of the measurement techniques that follow. Exhaustive coverage is given to biological and radiation safety issues which

  15. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershfield, Bruce; DeWoody, Madelyn

    1993-01-01

    Reviews two booklets edited by Kay Albrecht and by Albrecht and Margaret Plantz that outline principles of developmentally appropriate practices and criteria for quality in child care programs. Also reviews a book by John Meyers that guides helping professionals through the language, themes, rules, and roles of the legal system as the system…

  16. Book Reviews

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumeister, Phillip; Baumeister, Phillip

    1986-12-01

    This book hardly needs an introduction, since its first edition appeared 17 years ago. In the mid-1970s I was teaching a course on optical coatings to a group of optical coating engineers from various industrial coating shops. I chatted with engineers from Texas Instruments who had learned about optical coatings essentially on their own, with little tutoring from experienced workers. They referred to Prof. Macleod's book as their "bible." While this reviewer does not mean to imply any irreverent comparison, it still serves to remind us that Macleod's book has remained the standard textbook on optical coatings for nearly two decades. Other books have appeared during this period, for example, Z. Knittl's Optics of Thin Films and more recently H. Pulker's Coatings on Glass. Although they cover some topics that Macleod does not, Thin-Film Optical Filters has remained the standard reference and text in this field.

  17. Research Review: Magazine Editors and Editing Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jolliffe, Lee

    1994-01-01

    Reviews and critiques literature in the subfield of magazine editing research, chiefly biographical studies of individual editors and various types of studies of editorial practices, including surveys, magazine content analyses, and close qualitative examinations of editors' relationships with others. (SR)

  18. Research Review: Magazine Editors and Editing Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jolliffe, Lee

    1994-01-01

    Reviews and critiques literature in the subfield of magazine editing research, chiefly biographical studies of individual editors and various types of studies of editorial practices, including surveys, magazine content analyses, and close qualitative examinations of editors' relationships with others. (SR)

  19. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannetto, E.

    2005-08-01

    This book is a sort of tribute to Rob Clifton (1964 2002), Associate Professor of Philosophy and Associate Director of the Center for Philosophy of Science at the University of Pittsburgh, philosopher of physics and editor of the journal Studies in the History and Philosophy of Modern Physics, who tragically died of cancer. It contains fourteen papers by Clifton, for the most part written in collaboration with other authors (Jeffrey Bub (2), Sheldon Goldstein, Michael Dickson, Hans Halvorson (6), Adrian Kent (2)), published between 1995 and 2002. The choice of papers made by the editors is very impressive. They concern the foundations of quantum mechanics and quantum field theory. Among the issues discussed are the modal interpretations of quantum mechanics, the problems of hidden variables theories, non-locality, Bell's inequality, the Einstein Podolsky Rosen paradox, Lorentz invariance, de-coherence, non-contextuality, complementarity, entanglement and quantum information. A consequence of such investigations is that non-separability is a more complex issue than violation of Bell's inequality. Apart from the perspective one can follow—whether one agrees or not with Clifton—these papers are effective contributions to an understanding of the problems involved in the foundations of quantum mechanics. The most interesting parts, in my opinion, are related to the extension of the discussion of foundational problems to quantum field theory: on the algebraic approach, and on the twin concepts of particle and vacuum. Non-locality appears to be `worse' in relativistic quantum field theory than in non-relativistic quantum mechanics. All the papers deal with relevant epistemological and even historical aspects of quantum mechanics interpretations, but all the issues are discussed from a technical, logical and mathematical approach. A complete bibliography of Clifton's papers is given at the end of the volume.

  20. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, James J.; Sullivan, Ann

    1994-01-01

    Reviews two books: (1) "LEAD!" (Richard Lynch), which outlines leadership principles for nonprofit and public agency managers; and (2) "Troubled Transplants: Unconventional Strategies for Helping Disturbed Foster and Adopted Children" (Richard J. Delaney and Frank R. Kunstal), which offers practical suggestions for intervention by parents and…

  1. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, James J.; Sullivan, Ann

    1994-01-01

    Reviews two books: (1) "LEAD!" (Richard Lynch), which outlines leadership principles for nonprofit and public agency managers; and (2) "Troubled Transplants: Unconventional Strategies for Helping Disturbed Foster and Adopted Children" (Richard J. Delaney and Frank R. Kunstal), which offers practical suggestions for intervention by parents and…

  2. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fein, Greta G.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Reviews the following books: "Child Care in Context" (Lamb et al., Eds.); "Making Friends in School: Promoting Relationships in Early Childhood" (Ramsay); "The Epigenesis of Mind: Essays on Biology and Cognition" (Carey and Gelman, Eds.); "Moral Maturity: Measuring the Development of Sociomoral Reflection"…

  3. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinnott, Jan D.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Reviews four books: (1) "A Dynamic Systems Approach to Development: Applications" (Linda B. Smith and Esther Thelen, Eds.); (2) "The Psychology of Gender" (Anne E. Beall and Robert J. Sternberg, Eds.); (3) "Children's Understanding: The Development of Mental Models" (Graeme S. Halford); and (4) "Adolescent Storm…

  4. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eron, Leonard D.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Reviews six books on developmental psychology: (1) "Children and Violence" (David Reiss and others); (2) "Television and the American Child" (George Comstock); (3) "Intellectual Development" (Robert Sternberg and Cynthia Berg); (4) "Context and Development" (Robert Cohen and Alexander Siegel); (5) "Adolescent Identity Formation" (Gerald Adams and…

  5. Book Reviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holeinger, Philip R.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Presents and review six books. Topics include earth science topics (Philip R. Holzinger, 1985), the wild horse controversy (Richard Symanski, 1985), historical Dutch geography (Audrey M. Lambert, 1985), urban geography (Susan L. Cutter, 1985), a geopolitical atlas (Gerard Chaliand and Jean-Pierre Rageau, 1985), and remote sensing (Robert K. Holz,…

  6. Book Reviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holeinger, Philip R.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Presents and review six books. Topics include earth science topics (Philip R. Holzinger, 1985), the wild horse controversy (Richard Symanski, 1985), historical Dutch geography (Audrey M. Lambert, 1985), urban geography (Susan L. Cutter, 1985), a geopolitical atlas (Gerard Chaliand and Jean-Pierre Rageau, 1985), and remote sensing (Robert K. Holz,…

  7. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pencek, Bruce; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Reviews of five books are presented. Topics are public property and private power (Hartog, 1983), essays on Julius Caesar (Blits, 1982), changes in the American political system (Shafer, 1983), the spiritual crisis in western civilizations (Harrington, 1983), and justice, pluralism and equality (Walzer, 1983). (JDH)

  8. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pencek, Bruce; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Reviews of five books are presented. Topics are public property and private power (Hartog, 1983), essays on Julius Caesar (Blits, 1982), changes in the American political system (Shafer, 1983), the spiritual crisis in western civilizations (Harrington, 1983), and justice, pluralism and equality (Walzer, 1983). (JDH)

  9. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joyner, Christopher C.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Scholarly reviews of nine books are presented. Topics include nuclear deterrence, urban planning in France, human rights in the Republic of China, the United States' support of Israel, U. S. military policy, an analysis of Rousseau's social contract, political influences on the U. S. presidency, the state and political theory, and the loss of…

  10. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eron, Leonard D.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Reviews six books on developmental psychology: (1) "Children and Violence" (David Reiss and others); (2) "Television and the American Child" (George Comstock); (3) "Intellectual Development" (Robert Sternberg and Cynthia Berg); (4) "Context and Development" (Robert Cohen and Alexander Siegel); (5) "Adolescent Identity Formation" (Gerald Adams and…

  11. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Ashok

    2007-01-01

    looking for and developed fully what is known today as the path integral approach to quantum theories. Although his main motivation was in the study of theories involving the concept of action-at-a-distance, as he emphasizes in his thesis, his formulation of quantum theories applies to any theory in general. The thesis develops quite systematically and in detail all the concepts of functionals necessary for this formulation. The motivation and the physical insights are described in the brilliant 'Feynman' style. It is incredible that even at that young age, the signs of his legendary teaching style were evident in his presentation of the material in the thesis. The path integral approach is now something that every graduate student in theoretical physics is supposed to know. There are several books on the subject, even one by Feynman himself (and Hibbs). Nonetheless, the thesis provides a very good background for the way these ideas came about. The two companion articles, although available in print, also gives a complete picture of the development of this line of thinking. The helpful introductory remarks by the editor also puts things in the proper historical perspective. This book would be very helpful to anyone interested in the development of modern ideas in physics.

  12. Book Selection Criteria of Children's Book Editors and Elementary Classroom Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKeon, Helen M.

    This paper describes a study of the criteria children's book editors and elementary classroom teachers use to select fiction books for children in grades four, five, and six. A questionnaire was sent to all members of the Children's Book Council and to elementary classroom teachers of grades four, five, and six in each elementary school in…

  13. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallone, B. G.

    2004-01-01

    This book represents the proceedings of the five day programme on IMRT techniques presented at the 2003 American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Summer School held in Colorado Springs, Colorado. The book is essentially an overview of IMRT techniques, discussing the history, the mathematical processes involved in the planning stages, the biological indices for evaluations, the off-line and on-line medical imaging that is required, the various IMRT delivery techniques available, positioning and motion verification, shielding and QA issues, and some clinical applications. There is some additional discussion on modulated electron and proton therapy, views on the clinical and financial impact of IMRT, as well as some speculation on the future uses of IMRT. The fact that the book is an `overview' must be emphasized. Medical physicists who are well-read in IMRT, or have implemented IMRT, even partially, may be a little disappointed with the book. Although specific details were purposely omitted, the well-read physicist would have preferred to go right to the `heart of the matter', something this book fails to do. As is typical of many proceedings-type books, there is a certain level of inconsistency of writing styles, as well as some redundancy between the different chapters. It is unfortunate that such a large volume does not have an index to allow a reader to explore a particular subject pertaining to IMRT. The reader would have to guide himself/herself by the table of contents before each chapter which could be a problem if the reader requires some information quickly. It is interesting to note that the book lends itself to a variety of professionals interested in IMRT, including administrators. It may be a source of help for medical physicists who wish to discuss IMRT issues with higher level administration, for example. Some clinical applications are also reviewed. The lack of details concerning the advantages of IMRT with respect to clinical outcome is

  14. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folacci, Antoine; Jensen, Bruce

    2003-12-01

    Thanks to its impressive success in the second half of the 20th century, both in high-energy physics and in critical phenomena, quantum field theory has enjoyed an abundant literature. We therefore greet yet another book on this subject with caution: what can a monograph on quantum field theory bring now that is new, either conceptually or pedagogically? But when it is written by a physicist such as Bryce DeWitt, who has made his own contribution to the collection of field theory books with The Global Approach to Quantum Field Theory, all suspicion is naturally abandoned. One knows in advance that this book can only lead to a genuine enrichment of the literature. DeWitt has made a formidable contribution to various areas of physics: general relativity, the interpretation of quantum mechanics, and most of all the quantization of non-Abelian gauge theories and quantum gravity. In addition, his pedagogical publications, especially the Les Houches schools of 1963 and 1983 [1, 2], have had a great impact on quantum field theory. All this makes the reader keen to pick up his new work and a deeper reading confirms the reviewer's initial enthusiasm. We must begin by alerting the potential readers of this book that it cannot be compared to any other book in the field (unless of course we are talking about references [1] and [2], of which the book under review is an extension and reworking). This uniqueness applies to both the scientific content and the way the ideas are presented. A quick description of this book and a brief explanation of its title should convince the reader of the book's unique quality. For DeWitt, a central concept of field theory is that of `space of histories'. For a field varphii defined on a given spacetime M, the set of all varphii(x) for all x in all charts of M defines its history. It is the space Phi of all possible histories (dynamically allowed or not) of the fields defined on M which is called the `space of histories' by DeWitt. If only

  15. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrusciel, P. T.

    2006-06-01

    Most of us sometimes have to face a student asking: 'What do I need to get started on this'. (In my case 'this' would typically be a topic in general relativity.) After thinking about it for quite a while, and consulting candidate texts again and again, a few days later I usually end up saying: read this chapter in book I (but without going too much detail), then that chapter in book II (but ignore all those comments), then the first few sections of this review paper (but do not try to work out equations NN to NNN), and then come back to see me. In the unlikely event that the student comes back without changing the topic, there follows quite a bit of explaining on a blackboard over the following weeks. From now on I will say: get acquainted with the material covered by this book. As far as Isham's book is concerned, 'this' in the student's question above can stand for any topic in theoretical physics which touches upon differential geometry (and I can only think of very few which do not). Said plainly: this book contains most of the introductory material necessary to get started in general relativity, or those branches of mathematical physics which require differential geometry. A student who has mastered the notions presented in the book will have a solid basis to continue into specialized topics. I am not aware of any other book which would be as useful as this one in terms of the spectrum of topics covered, stopping at the right place to get sufficient introductory insight. According to the publisher, these lecture notes are the content of an introductory course on differential geometry which is taken by first-year theoretical physics PhD students, or by students attending the one-year MSc course 'Quantum Fields and Fundamental Forces' at Imperial College, London. The volume is divided into six chapters: An Introduction to Topology Differential Manifolds Vector Fields and n-Forms Lie Groups Fibre Bundles Connections in a Bundle. It is a sad reflection on current

  16. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louko, Jorma

    2007-04-01

    Bastianelli and van Nieuwenhuizen's monograph `Path Integrals and Anomalies in Curved Space' collects in one volume the results of the authors' 15-year research programme on anomalies that arise in Feynman diagrams of quantum field theories on curved manifolds. The programme was spurred by the path-integral techniques introduced in Alvarez-Gaumé and Witten's renowned 1983 paper on gravitational anomalies which, together with the anomaly cancellation paper by Green and Schwarz, led to the string theory explosion of the 1980s. The authors have produced a tour de force, giving a comprehensive and pedagogical exposition of material that is central to current research. The first part of the book develops from scratch a formalism for defining and evaluating quantum mechanical path integrals in nonlinear sigma models, using time slicing regularization, mode regularization and dimensional regularization. The second part applies this formalism to quantum fields of spin 0, 1/2, 1 and 3/2 and to self-dual antisymmetric tensor fields. The book concludes with a discussion of gravitational anomalies in 10-dimensional supergravities, for both classical and exceptional gauge groups. The target audience is researchers and graduate students in curved spacetime quantum field theory and string theory, and the aims, style and pedagogical level have been chosen with this audience in mind. Path integrals are treated as calculational tools, and the notation and terminology are throughout tailored to calculational convenience, rather than to mathematical rigour. The style is closer to that of an exceedingly thorough and self-contained review article than to that of a textbook. As the authors mention, the first part of the book can be used as an introduction to path integrals in quantum mechanics, although in a classroom setting perhaps more likely as supplementary reading than a primary class text. Readers outside the core audience, including this reviewer, will gain from the book a

  17. BOOK REVIEW: ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING, 5TH EDITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Book Review of Environmental Engineering, 5th Edition (Joseph A. Salvato, Nelson L. Nemerow, Franklin J. Agardy (Editors), John Wiley and Sons, Inc. Hoboken, New Jersey. 2003.). Author wrote review per the request of the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Environmental Quality.

  18. Book Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kragh, Helge

    2015-11-01

    Ever since the days of William Blake there has been an underground resistance against the soulless yet triumphant science and its unholy alliance with money, technology and political power. With the nearly undisputed hegemony that science and technological innovation has attained in the post-World War II era, this kind of resistance has resulted in numerous books and articles that in different ways warn against the dark sides of science and the socio-economic system that nourishes a science in degeneration. Classical examples include Herbert Marcuse's One-Dimensional Man (1964), Jacques Ellul's The Technological Society (1965), Theodore Roszak's The Making of a Counter Culture (1968), and Paul Feyerabend's Science in a Free Society (1978). A fair part of the literature written by sociologists and philosophers is not only critical to trends in modern science, but tends to or is overtly anti-science. The book under review belongs in some respects to this heterogeneous literary tradition, but Twilight of the Scientific Age is primarily directed against the institutional system of science and its associated ideology and not against science itself. Indeed, the author is himself a practicing scientist, an astrophysicist, and he emphasizes several times that he firmly believes in science, even that he loves it. He is not a "stupid cultural relativist," he asserts (p. 11), but a critical freethinker independent of dogmatic beliefs.

  19. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louko, J.

    2005-06-01

    Jean Zinn-Justin's textbook Path Integrals in Quantum Mechanics aims to familiarize the reader with the path integral as a calculational tool in quantum mechanics and field theory. The emphasis is on quantum statistical mechanics, starting with the partition function Tr exp(-β H) and proceeding through the diffusion equation to barrier penetration problems and their semiclassical limit. The 'real time' path integral is defined via analytic continuation and used for the path-integral representation of the nonrelativistic S-matrix and its perturbative expansion. Holomorphic and Grassmannian path integrals are introduced and applied to nonrelativistic quantum field theory. There is also a brief discussion of path integrals in phase space. The introduction includes a brief historical review of path integrals, supported by a bibliography with some 40 entries. As emphasized in the introduction, mathematical rigour is not a central issue in the book. This allows the text to present the calculational techniques in a very readable manner: much of the text consists of worked-out examples, such as the quartic anharmonic oscillator in the barrier penetration chapter. At the end of each chapter there are exercises, some of which are of elementary coursework type, but the majority are more in the style of extended examples. Most of the exercises indeed include the solution or a sketch thereof. The book assumes minimal previous knowledge of quantum mechanics, and some basic quantum mechanical notation is collected in an appendix. The material has a large overlap with selected chapters in the author's thousand-page textbook Quantum Field Theory and Critical Phenomena (2002 Oxford: Clarendon). The stand-alone scope of the present work has, however, allowed a more focussed organization of this material, especially in the chapters on, respectively, holomorphic and Grassmannian path integrals. In my view the book accomplishes its aim admirably and is eminently usable as a textbook

  20. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broderick, A.

    2006-10-01

    'The Black Hole at the Center of the Milky Way' collects and presents recent advances in galactic centre research in a unified form by some of the researches at the forefront of the field. This book presents an opportunity to review the observational evidence for the best constrained black hole candidate currently known. In my opinion, the authors succeed in producing a good topical reference, appropriate for advanced students and working researchers, providing and excellent summary of the state of near-infrared results in particular. While the title refers exclusively to the supermassive black hole associated with the compact radio source Sagittarius A*, the text has a broader focus, discussing the nuclear region of the galaxy. Indeed, this is necessary given that most of the restrictions upon the characteristics of the central supermassive black hole have been obtained indirectly via stellar observations in it's vicinity. This also has the virtue of introducing a number of interesting additional astrophysical mysteries associated with the galactic centre (e.g. the so-called 'paradox of youth', referring to the presence of excessively young stars). The first section of the book contains a primer on the astronomical techniques applied to the galactic Centre. As with the rest of the text, the discussion of near-infrared techniques dominates, providing only a short summary of radio interferometry, and optical through gamma-ray techniques. While this primer is a useful introduction for the working researcher, or advanced student, it is not exhaustive and thus presumes at least a passing familiarity with the methods discussed. The second and third sections are devoted to a summary of observations and their astrophysical interpretation, respectively. Necessarily there is considerable overlap between these and they may have benefited from being combined. Nevertheless, each subsection is relatively self-contained which, when combined with the numerous data and graphs

  1. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabris, Júlio C.

    2004-04-01

    very skilful way. We can say that he has found an efficient way to solve the usual dilemma in teaching this subject: physics first, mathematics later, but without sacrificing the full consistency of the theory. The book is divided into three parts. In the first, covering five chapters of the 24 in the whole book, Newtonian physics and special relativity are reviewed. This review is done in a manner that prepares the reader for the subsequent discussion of general relativity itself. The principle of relativity, the variational principle, the geometrical content of Newtonian theory and the main ideas behind special relativity are all presented. In general, this first part is quite standard, except for the emphasis on geometrical aspects, such as the employment of different coordinates in a physical problem, the consequences of specific geometries, such as that of a sphere, and the notion of a spacetime manifold. This allows the author to introduce the reader to the idea of non-Euclidean geometries and their intrinsic properties. The heart of the book is, in some sense, in the second part, containing 14 chapters and covering almost two thirds of the book. Here, the principle of equivalence is fully discussed as well as the idea that gravity can be represented by the geometry of spacetime. Gravity is no longer conceived as a force but instead as the curvature of spacetime. First, the author shows how Newtonian gravity can be obtained as the limit of a specific spacetime geometry, which is after all the weak field limit of a general pseudo-Riemannian spacetime. From this, he is able to introduce geometries that represent gravity outside this weak field limit. The general approach followed by the author could be summarized as follows. The equivalence principle is encoded in curved spacetime. When gravitation effects are weak and the velocity small compared with the velocity of light, we can recover Newtonian theory from this spacetime structure. Now, let us assume a specific

  2. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poisson, E.

    2006-09-01

    The motion of a charged particle interacting with its own electromagnetic field is an area of research that has a long history; this problem has never ceased to fascinate its investigators. On the one hand the theory ought to be straightforward to formulate: one has Maxwell's equations that tell the field how to behave (given the motion of the particle), and one has the Lorentz-force law that tells the particle how to move (given the field). On the other hand the theory is fundamentally ambiguous because of the field singularities that necessarily come with a point particle. While each separate sub-problem can easily be solved, to couple the field to the particle in a self-consistent treatment turns out to be tricky. I believe it is this dilemma (the theory is straightforward but tricky) that has been the main source of the endless fascination. For readers of Classical and Quantum Gravity, the fascination does not end there. For them it is also rooted in the fact that the electromagnetic self-force problem is deeply analogous to the gravitational self-force problem, which is of direct relevance to future gravitational wave observations. The motion of point particles in curved spacetime has been the topic of a recent Topical Review [1], and it was the focus of a recent Special Issue [2]. It is surprising to me that radiation reaction is a subject that continues to be poorly covered in the standard textbooks, including Jackson's bible [3]. Exceptions are Rohrlich's excellent text [4], which makes a very useful introduction to radiation reaction, and the Landau and Lifshitz classic [5], which contains what is probably the most perfect summary of the foundational ideas (presented in characteristic terseness). It is therefore with some trepidation that I received Herbert Spohn's book, which covers both the classical and quantum theories of a charged particle coupled to its own field (the presentation is limited to flat spacetime). Is this the text that graduate students

  3. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, J. M.

    2006-02-01

    In 1952, Mme Yvonne Choquet-Bruhat published a major paper, Théorème d'existence pour certains systèmes d'équations aux dérivées partielles non linéaires (Acta Math. 88 141-225), which laid the foundation for modern studies of the Cauchy problem in general relativity. The fiftieth anniversary of this event was celebrated with an eponymous Cargèse Summer School in 2002. The proceedings of that summer school are summarized electronically (as audio, video, transparencies and lecture notes, where available) on a DVD archive included with this volume, and are also available on the internet. However the organizers decided that a separate volume describing the 'state of the art in mathematical general relativity' would be useful, and this book is the result. It includes some material not covered in the school and excludes some school material which has been covered adequately elsewhere. Unfortunately, I was unable to find, electronically, a table of contents, which every prospective purchaser would wish to see, and so this review does in fact list all the articles, ordered, roughly, by length. About one fifth of the book is devoted to a survey of Smoothness at Null Infinity and the Structure of Initial Data by Helmut Friedrich. This is a modern study of gravitational radiation, and the analysis of Einstein's equations. It is extremely helpful to survey all of this material, including some of the latest developments, using a consistent notation. This article is strongly recommended to anyone hoping to gain a foothold in this area. Note also that 47 pages of transparencies have become 84 book pages. Lars Andersson has surveyed, in The Global Existence Problem in General Relativity, some results and conjectures about the global properties of 3+1-dimensional spacetimes with a compact Cauchy surface. Again it is very useful to have essentially all of the known results presented in a consistent notation. This material is not on the DVD. Yvonne Choquet-Bruhat has

  4. Reforming Welfare in America. Book Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Edward T., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Reviews three books on welfare reform: "The Poverty of Welfare Reform" (Joel F. Handler); "The Politics of Welfare Reform" (Donald F. Norris, Lyke Thompson, editors); and "Living on the Edge: The Realities of Welfare in America" (Mark Robert Rank). (JOW)

  5. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walcher, J.

    2006-10-01

    This book is a find. Mariño meets the challenge of filling in less than 200 pages the need for an accessible review of topological gauge / gravity duality. He is one of the pioneers of the subject and a clear expositor. It is no surprise that reading this book is a great pleasure. The existence of dualities between gauge theories and theories of gravity remains one of the most surprising recent discoveries in mathematical physics. While it is probably fair to say that we do not yet understand the full reach of such a relation, the impressive amount of evidence that has accumulated over the past years can be regarded as a substitute for a proof, and will certainly help to delineate the question of what is the most fundamental quantum mechanical theory. As has been the case in the past, it is in the context of Witten's 'topological' quantum theories that the mathematical framework is well enough established to firmly ground, and fully benefit from, the development of the physical theories. This book makes an important contribution to this new chapter in the math / physics interaction. There are two main instances of topological gauge/gravity duality. In the A-model, Chern Simons gauge theory on the 3-sphere is related to the closed topological string theory on the local Calabi Yau 3-fold {\\mathcal O}_{{\\mathbb P}^1}(-1) \\oplus{\\mathcal O}_{{\\mathbb P}^1} (-1), also known as the resolved conifold (Gopakumar-Vafa duality). In the B-model, certain types of matrix models are related on the gravity side to topological strings on certain cousins of the deformed conifold (Dijkgraaf-Vafa duality). In both cases, and similarly to the more physical AdS/CFT correspondence, the duality can be discovered by realizing the gauge theory as the target space theory of open strings ending on particular D-branes in a geometry closely related to the closed string background of the gravity theory. The A-branes supporting Chern Simons theory are wrapped on the Lagrangian three

  6. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlip, S.

    2006-10-01

    The early 1980s, when I first learned theory, were desperate times for graduate students. We searched frantically for coherent introductions, passing tattered copies of review articles around like samizdat, struggling over obscure references to ancient models of strong interactions, and flocking to lectures—not least those by Joe Polchinski—that promised to really explain what was going on. If only this book had been around, it would have saved much grief. Volume I, The Bosonic String, offers a clear and well organized introduction to bosonic string theory. Topics range from the 'classical' (spectra, vertex operators, consistency conditions, etc.) to the 'modern' (D-branes first appear in an exercise at the end of chapter 1, noncommutative geometry shows up in chapter 8). Polchinski does not hesitate to discuss sophisticated matters—path integral measures, BRST symmetries, etc.—but his approach is pedagogical, and his writing is lucid, if sometimes a bit terse. Chapters end with problems that are sometimes difficult but never impossible. A very useful annotated bibliography directs readers to resources for further study, and a nearly 30-page glossary provides short but clear definitions of key terms. There is much here that will appeal to relativists. Polchinski uses the covariant Polyakov path integral approach to quantization from early on; he clearly distinguishes Weyl invariance from conformal invariance; he is appropriately careful about using complex coordinates on topologically nontrivial manifolds; he keeps the string world sheet metric explicit at the start instead of immediately hiding it by a gauge choice. Volume II includes an elegant introduction to anticommuting coordinates and superconformal transformations. A few conventions may cause confusion—%, Polchinski's stress energy tensor, for instance, differs from the standard general relativistic definition by a factor of -2π, and while this is briefly mentioned in the text, it could easily be

  7. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borcherds, P.

    2005-03-01

    superb quotations to include all of them in this review, but one of Bragg's Golden Rules for newcomers to his laboratory should be on the door of every experimental laboratory: 'Never be afraid to carry on an experiment which is declared stupid by the theorists [sic] of the laboratory'. This book is, as its subtitle implies, about Bragg and about his science. Hunter has skilfully and seamlessly interwoven the two strands. At one minute you are reading about the man and at the next you realize you are reading about the science. In writing about the science, Hunter writes knowledgeably and expects the reader to make an effort to understand. In this he is following the precept of Bragg who, when advised to avoid technical terms when lecturing to a lay audience, ridiculed this attitude with a telling metaphor: 'What could be more technical than a description of a football match? To picture the scientist's plight, one must imagine the sports expert being told to describe the match using as little as possible such terms as "ball'' or "goal'', and of course avoiding the very complex ideas involved in "try'' or "offside'' '. Bragg made several major contributions to crystallography and these are described, as already mentioned. One has to concentrate quite hard to follow but the effort is worthwhile and Hunter manages not only to convey the excitement felt by Bragg and his colleagues but also to let the reader feel it too. Bragg interacted strongly with other crystallographers, not least with his father, but also with Pauling. At times there was a close race between Bragg and Pauling, which is fully discussed. Bragg succeeded Rutherford at Cambridge. The appointment was controversial. Under Rutherford the Cavendish Laboratory concentrated on nuclear physics, while Bragg was a crystallographer, with little interest in nuclear physics. However the crystallographic work Bragg encouraged on haemoglobin and DNA led to several Nobel prizes. Bragg's activities in canvassing for Nobel

  8. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, C.

    2005-10-01

    The most difficult unsolved problem in fundamental theoretical physics is the consistent implementation of the gravitational interaction into a quantum framework, which would lead to a theory of quantum gravity. Although a final answer is still pending, several promising attempts do exist. Despite the general title, this book is about one of them - loop quantum gravity. This approach proceeds from the idea that a direct quantization of Einstein's theory of general relativity is possible. In contrast to string theory, it presupposes that the unification of all interactions is not needed as a prerequisite for quantum gravity. Usually one divides theories of quantum general relativity into covariant and canonical approaches. Covariant theories employ four-dimensional concepts in its formulation, one example being the path integral approach. Canonical theories start from a classical Hamiltonian version of the theory in which spacetime is foliated into spacelike hypersurfaces. Loop quantum gravity is a variant of the canonical approach, the oldest being quantum geometrodynamics where the fundamental configuration variable is the three-metric. Loop quantum gravity has developed from a new choice of canonical variables introduced by Abhay Ashtekar in 1986, the new configuration variable being a connection defined on a three-manifold. Instead of the connection itself, the loop approach employs a non-local version in which the connection is integrated over closed loops. This is similar to the Wilson loops used in gauge theories. Carlo Rovelli is one of the pioneers of loop quantum gravity which he started to develop with Lee Smolin in two papers written in 1988 and 1990. In his book, he presents a comprehensive and competent overview of this approach and provides at the same time the necessary technical background in order to make the treatment self-contained. In fact, half of the book is devoted to 'preparations' giving a detailed account of Hamiltonian mechanics, quantum

  9. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metherell, A. J. F.

    1985-01-01

    as many and as varied as the topics themselves. They include, to mention but three, the utilization of the Josephson junction, the quantized Hall resistance, and that instrument known to all schoolboy physicists, the torsion pendulum. In particular, the application of the quantum Hall effect to the determination of the fine-structure constant and to electrical resistance standards is one of the most remarkable developments in metrology in recent years. Although the effect was discovered only a short while before PMFC II, these Proceedings include eight papers devoted to it and its applications and, of course, many more have appeared since. The impact of the quantum Hall effect will certainly be considerable, not only in metrology, but also in solid state physics. It is to be expected that the proceedings of PMFC III will, in due course, reflect this. Noteworthy also for their impact on precision spectroscopy during the decade between PMFC I and II are the techniques of Doppler-free two-photon transitions and the methodology for trapping a single ion. Not all the papers, however, are devoted to reports of hard measurement. Many consist of progress reports of experiments in hand at the time of the Conference. It would be interesting to know just how many of these have been completed in the four years since the Conference took place. And of these, it would be more interesting still to learn which of them achieved the accuracies that their authors had, optimistically perhaps, hoped for. A few of the papers are purely speculative, an example being the suggestion by Faller and Bender for a space-borne gravitational-wave detector. Their suggestions involve a laser device with baseline lengths of the order of 106 km. If the authors are to launch this experiment they will need powerful friends in high places to find the necessary funding. But to return to earth and to the comments made at the beginning of this article: may this reviewer make two pleas on behalf of all those

  10. Book Review

    PubMed Central

    Donev, Doncho

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: This book provides step-by-step guidance on developing a sound publication strategy for how to prepare and get research papers published. The book is a user-friendly guide, a route map for publishing that covers many topics, ranging from abstracts and blogs, tables and trial registration to ethical principles and conventions for writing scientific papers. Publishing the results of scientific research in the form of a scientific paper is the ultimate goal and the final stage of the research of each scientist. To write and publish papers is never going to be an easy task. With this book as their guide, researchers will be better informed and therefore should have an easier and altogether more pleasant path to publication with clear direction on how to choose the right journal, avoid publication delays, and resolve authorship disputes and many other problems associated with scientific publishing. CONTENTS: The 188 pages of the book are distributed in 5 chapters in Part I and 249 entries ordered by the letters of Alphabet in Part II creating an A to Z of publication strategy. In the Appendices there are four sections covering further reading, organizations, guidelines and principles of good publication practice for company-sponsored medical research. The book also contains key references and useful websites within many entries where it seemed helpful. The last ten pages of the book present an index to help users to find the information of interest in the book. CONCLUSION: The book is intended to help all authors, young and old, novice and experienced, to plan their research and publications effectively and prepare manuscripts for journals and other publications, increasing the likelihood that their work will be published. Providing essential information on publishing strategy and process, the book should be extremely useful to everyone who wants to publish research results.

  11. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borcherds, P. H.

    2004-09-01

    There is a new tradition in England called Apple Day which is held on some day in October. The actual day varies from place to place. For instance, in 2003, 23 October was Apple Day at Woolsthorpe Manor, the house where Isaac Newton was born and where, during the Plague, he is said to have developed the theory of gravity. (For information on future Apple Days see, for example, http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/main/thingstodo.) Last year in our garden we picked an apple which weighed one pound, thirteen and a half ounces (1 lb 13 1/2 oz or 29 1/2 oz). The following day we went to an Apple Day event where there were many exotic apples on display, varieties which are not sold in shops. One of the varieties there was called 'Twenty Ounce'. By now you may be wondering what all this has to do with the book being reviewed. We shall return to this later. This entertaining book is ostensibly about units, in particular about Imperial and metric units, but there are numerous informative digressions. The author reminds us that almost every country 'with the exception of the United States, North and South Yemen, Burma and Brunei' has gone metric. He points out that the United States (US) became officially metric in 1893. However, as early as 1866, the US legal definition of the metre was 39.370000 inches. He tells us that after World War II the (US) inch was rounded down (from 25.400051) to 25.4 mm. There is no mention that the Imperial (British) inch was simultaneously rounded up from 25.399956 mm to 25.4 mm. The author frequently digresses, covering such matters as the trisection of angles and Eratosthenes' graphic solution for duplicating the cube. There is an informative discussion on the length of the day: appropriately 25 December, which lasts for 24 h and 30 s, is the longest day. He shows how with cycles and epicycles one can construct an ellipse. Ptolemy did not realize the importance of the focus of the ellipse. The author discusses various topics in the development of

  12. Book Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokulich, Alisa

    In recent years, there has been a growing resurgence of interest in the philosophical views of the founders of quantum mechanics. Kristian Camilleri's book on Werner Heisenberg's philosophy of quantum mechanics is a welcome addition to this literature. It takes Heisenberg seriously as a philosopher of science, traces the various philosophical influences on his view, and carefully distinguishes his interpretation of quantum mechanics from that of his contemporaries. It is a fine example of the new insights that can emerge when one takes an integrated approach to the history and philosophy of science. After summarizing some of the main themes of the book, I will turn to two moderate criticisms of the book-one stylistic, and the other, regarding its content.

  13. Book Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2016-08-01

    The main purpose of this exemplary book is to provide a systematic exposition of the entire field of optical tweezers and their applications. The book is divided into three (approximately equal) parts summarizing the electromagnetic theory of optical tweezers (Part I), the practice of designing and building optical tweezers (Part II), and extensive applications of optical tweezers in various branches of science (Part III). The exposition is highly methodical and addresses the needs of anyone dealing with optical tweezers, be it a theoretician, an engineer/experimentalist, a routine practitioner, or an interested scientist.

  14. Book Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Steffen

    2017-07-01

    The book titled European Landscape Dynamics is a comprehensive compendium on the European CORINE land cover (CLC) and some other aspects such as fragmentation and ecosystem services in Europe. The authors constitute a wide selection of researchers and practitioners from across Europe active in this field. It contains 29 chapters of very different sizes ranging between 2 pages (Chapter 8) to 43 pages (Chapter 20). The book is structured in 5 different sections: 1. Introduction; 2. Methodology; 3. European CORINE data layers; 4. Case studies; and 5. CORINE Land Cover Perspective.

  15. Book Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clevers, J. G. P. W.

    2015-02-01

    About thirty years after the previous advanced textbook on Microwave Remote Sensing by Ulaby, Moore and Fung has been published as three separate volumes, now an up-to-date new textbook has been published. The 1000-page book covers theoretical models, system design and operation, and geoscientific applications of active and passive microwave remote sensing systems. It is designed as a textbook at the postgraduate level, as well as a reference for the practicing professional. The book is caught by a thorough introduction into the physics and mathematics of electrical engineering applied to microwave radiation. Here on overview of its chapters with a short description of its focus will be given.

  16. Book Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausman, Daniel M.

    2008-01-01

    This collection of first-rate essays by distinguished authors focuses on issues relevant to what the editors call "causal republicanism." Causal republicanism contrasts with views that regard causation as a fundamental concept of science-a position that, as Bertrand Russell put it, "is a relic of a bygone age, surviving, like the monarchy, only because it is erroneously supposed to do no harm" (Russell, 1918). With the overthrow of the monarchy, Price and Corry describe causal republicanism as "the view that although the notion of causation is useful, perhaps indispensable, in our dealings with the world, it is a category provided neither by God nor by physics, but rather constructed by us" (p. 2). Exactly what the contrast is between categories "provided by" God or physics and categories constructed by us is not obvious, and among the contributions in this volume that support or articulate something that might be called "causal republicanism," there are diverging interpretations.

  17. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botet, R.

    2004-09-01

    The second edition of Mathematical Methods for Physics and Engineering by Riley et al is a great scientific textbook. The reader should not be intimidated by its size - over 1200 pages - and skimming through it, one is confronted with a vast amount of information (which could be daunting for students). However, when reading it in detail one realizes that the number of pages is justified and the result is a self-contained reference on mathematical methods for physics. The book is well organized: it starts at basic university undergraduate level and progresses to the highest graduate level. It is a tour de force to write mathematical sections that are both complete and at a appropriate academic level; the sequence of sections (and their content) has been chosen with great care in order that each section may introduce the following ones. The authors have clearly succeeded with this challenge, making this a remarkable pedagogical book. No precise knowledge is needed at the beginning, and all the material is presented in a logical progression. The student can confidently follow the material as it is presented. Even though this book is devoted to physics and engineering, it can be used by students in other scientific fields. The material covered in the book concentrates on applied theorems and formulae. But as the title of the book indicates, it is primarily written 'for physics and engineering' so this is to be expected and it greatly simplifies the text of the course. Consequently, derivations of the main results are essentially 'for physicists'. Frequently proofs are briefly outlined and are not as detailed as many mathematicians would like. Nevertheless, the final results are always clearly stated together with the technical conditions under which they should be used, thus providing a very comprehensive and practical textbook. The only criticism is that the sections on probability and statistics do not fit comfortably between their previous and following sections

  18. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, R. P.

    1981-04-01

    In July 1976, some thirty young scientists and their lecturers were privileged to participate in a conference on "Metrology and the Fundamental Constants" at Varenna, this being the 68th course in the "Enrico Fermi International School of Physics". Now, at last, we are all privileged to share in that experience—to a large degree—with the appearance of the Proceedings, published last summer under the auspices of the Italian Physical Society. This rather massive volume (800 pages) places in one's hands a summary of the "state of the art" in the greater part of physical metrology. It is not, however, a metrology handbook, designed to assist the unskilled in making trustworthy measurements. It summarizes, via the lectures of internationally-recognized experts, the most recent attempts to realize with enhanced accuracy the basic units of measurement and, in so doing, it presents the subject of measurement science as the central (or all-pervasive) topic in physics itself. Clearly demonstrated is the progress from discovery to "understanding" of physical phenomena which is made possible through the historical alternation of observation and measurement. The volume includes informative reviews of the fundamentals of this fundamental science, namely, the concepts of quantities and units (Allisy); systems of units and the Système International, SI. (Terrien); international aspects of metrology and standards (Terrien); practical considerations in a hierarchy of standards (Terrien); materials problems affecting metrology (Ferro Milone and Sourdo) and statistical methods (Allisy). These discussions alone, being brought together in one place, are of particular usefulness. The remaining, and major, part of the book is taken up by authoritative and generally very readable discussions of measurement topics, for the most part separately focused on one of the base units. For these one cannot help noticing nor refrain from recording a measure of imbalance: some quantities (for

  19. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulling, S. A.

    2006-05-01

    classes of systems: quantum mechanics, linear (free) fields, and interacting fields. DeWitt's characteristic tools of effective actions, heat kernels, and ghost fields are developed. Chapters 26 and 31 outline new approaches developed in collaboration with DeWitt's recent students C Molina-Paris and C Y Wang, respectively. The first of these is a ghost-free formulation of gauge theory built on ideas of G A Vilkovisky. The second is a systematic attempt (following J Schwinger, L V Keldysh, and others) to replace the in-out matrix elements by expectation values in a single (initial) state. Most of parts VI and VII consist of special topics, such as anomalies, particle creation by external fields, Unruh acceleration temperature, black holes, and Euclideanization. Chapter 30, on black holes and Hawking radiation, will be very familiar to readers of DeWitt's influential review article [4]. Chapter 28, on anomalies, makes a careful distinction (missing from many treatments) between 'critical' anomalies, which render equations of motion inconsistent in the (would-be) quantum theory, and harmless anomalies that merely invalidate predictions that would classically follow from certain symmetries. The trace anomalies in the stress tensor of matter and the axial-current anomaly in quantum electrodynamics are harmless. Examples of critical anomalies are the chiral anomaly of a spinor field coupled to a non-Abelian gauge field and the anomaly in the conservation law of the stress tensor of certain pathological theories [5]. DeWitt's chapter calculates the trace and chiral anomalies in detail. The axial anomaly is mentioned only in a one-line summary (and not defined or indexed—generally speaking, I found the book's long index surprisingly unhelpful), and the Alvarez Witten anomaly is not mentioned at all. The last two chapters of part VII treat the most important particular quantum field theories. Chapter 34 develops many of the textbook predictions of quantum eletrodynamics from De

  20. Book Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanona, Scott

    There is more to this book than readers of this journal might expect from an author who has associated Bohr and Heisenberg with Derrida and Lacan (Plotnitsky, 1994, 2002). Plotnitsky has written in the past on trying to bridge the "two cultures" of the "science wars" by defending Derrida and others against what he perceives to have been too-quickly dismissive critiques (Plotnitsky, 1997), but he has not provided an extended philosophical analysis of Bohr to support the connections he has made. This book seems to be an attempt to engage in a careful analysis of Bohr in a way meant to satisfy critical readers and also support what he here calls "nonclassical epistemology".

  1. Book Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giere, Ronald

    The original motivation for this book was to understand why the role of models in science was mostly ignored by philosophers of science for the first half of the twentieth century only to become the focus of much attention later in the second half of the century. The scope of the book, however, is much broader than that question. After a brief introductory chapter, there are chapters, respectively, on the use of mechanical models by scientists in the nineteenth century, the nature of analogy, the distinction between models and theories, paradigms and metaphors, the semantic view of theories, the distinctions among phenomena, data and data models, and, finally, representation using models. Overall, the volume is best described as an analytical history of the topic of models in the philosophy of science, a genre invoked by the author herself. (ix)

  2. Book Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardonio, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The content of this book is aptly depicted by its engaging cover design, which exemplifies the vast range of circumstances where sound and vibration characterise the life of human beings and animals, the environment, the quality of buildings and halls, the operation and comfort of land, water and air transportation vehicles, the functioning of machines, etc. Also, the short and comprehensive title effectively defines the breath (sound and vibration) and depth (fundamentals) of the covered topics.

  3. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combescure, M.

    2005-06-01

    This book provides an introduction and discussion of the main issues in the current understanding of classical Hamiltonian chaos, and of its fractional space-time structure. It also develops the most complex and open problems in this context, and provides a set of possible applications of these notions to some fundamental questions of dynamics: complexity and entropy of systems, foundation of classical statistical physics on the basis of chaos theory, and so on. Starting with an introduction of the basic principles of the Hamiltonian theory of chaos, the book covers many topics that can be found elsewhere in the literature, but which are collected here for the readers' convenience. In the last three parts, the author develops topics which are not typically included in the standard textbooks; among them are: the failure of the traditional description of chaotic dynamics in terms of diffusion equations; he fractional kinematics, its foundation and renormalization group analysis; `pseudo-chaos', i.e. kinetics of systems with weak mixing and zero Lyapunov exponents; directional complexity and entropy. The purpose of this book is to provide reearchers and students in physics, mathematics and engeenering with an overview of many aspects of chaos and fractality in Hamiltonian dynamical systems. In my opinion it achieves this aim, at least provided researchers and students (mainly those involved in mathematical physics) can complement this reading with comprehensive material from more specialized sources which are provided as references and `further reading'. Each section contains introductory pedagogical material, often illustrated by figures coming from several numerical simulations which give the feeling of what's going on, and thus is very useful to the reader who is not very familiar with the topics presented. Some problems are included at the end of most sections to help the reader to go deeper into the subject. My one regret is that the book does not mention the

  4. Book Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belot, Gordon; Jansson, Lina

    What is the relation between classical and quantum mechanics? Bokulich's fascinating Reexamining the Quantum-Classical Relation: Beyond Reductionism and Pluralism is devoted to this question. It is a remarkable book, deeply thoughtful, written with admirable clarity, and full of interesting ideas. It should be read by anyone with an interest in the history or philosophy of quantum theory or in relations between scientific theories.

  5. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    The NATO Advanced Study Institute held at Erice, Sicily, in November 1981 brought together specialists in precise measurement to present a tutorial introduction to quantum metrology and the measurement of the fundamental physical constants. Ever since the evolution of experimental physics as a scientific pursuit the measurement of the values of quantities accepted to be constants of nature has commanded the attention of some of the world's most accomplished workers in this field. Their efforts to seek out the sources of systematic error and to reduce the random errors have produced significant advances in techniques and a continual interest in their results from users and critics: as Raymond T Birge, who pioneered the evaluation of the 'best' values of the constants from the available measurements, observed (perhaps with tongue-in-cheek) "it is the continual variation in the values of these quantities that furnishes most of the interest in the subject". Long before the recognition of the fundamental constants the measurement of mass, length and time grew as a matter of necessity in organized communities, especially in agriculture, commerce and navigation. The adoption of standards, first local, then national, and now international, was a natural consequence. It is particularly relevant that the published proceedings of the NATO school opens with a historical survey by Pierre Giacomo of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures, which places the subsequent papers in perspective. Measurements which realize the standards of length and time, and those from which values of the fundamental constants are derived, are of such a nature that a considerable background knowledge of physics is needed for their understanding. (The principle of the caesium frequency standard and the physics of the Josephson junction are a long haul from Michelson's measurement of the speed of light and the Millikan oil drop experiment familiar in the school books.) With this in mind, George

  6. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dray, T.

    2005-10-01

    I have had a love/hate relationship with this book ever since it first came out. On the one hand, this is an excellent introduction for mathematicians to the differential geometry underlying general relativity. On the other hand, this is definitely a book for mathematicians. The book's greatest strength is its clear, precise presentation of the basic ideas in differential geometry, combined with equally clear and precise applications to theoretical physics, notably general relativity. But the book's precision is also its greatest weakness; this is not an easy book to read for non-mathematicians, who may not appreciate the notational complexity, some of which is nonstandard. The present edition is very similar to the original, published in 1992. In addition to minor revisions and clarifications of the material, there is now a brief introduction to fibre bundles, and a (very) brief discussion of the gauge theory description of fundamental particles. The index to the symbols used is also a more complete than in the past, but without the descriptive material present in the previous edition. The bulk of the book consists of a careful introduction to tensors and their properties. Tensors are introduced first as linear maps on vector spaces, and only later generalized to tensor fields on manifolds. The differentiation and integration of differential forms is discussed in detail, including Stokes' theorem, Lie differentiation and Hodge duality, and connections, curvature and torsion. To this point, Wasserman's text can be viewed as an expanded version of Bishop and Goldberg's classic text [1], one major difference being Wasserman's inclusion of the pseudo-Riemannian case from the beginning (in particular, when discussing Hodge duality). Whether one prefers Wasserman's approach to Bishop and Goldberg's is largely a matter of taste: Wasserman's treatment is both more complete and more precise, making it easier to check calculations in detail, but occasionally more difficult

  7. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKane, Alan

    2003-12-01

    This is a book about the modelling of complex systems and, unlike many books on this subject, concentrates on the discussion of specific systems and gives practical methods for modelling and simulating them. This is not to say that the author does not devote space to the general philosophy and definition of complex systems and agent-based modelling, but the emphasis is definitely on the development of concrete methods for analysing them. This is, in my view, to be welcomed and I thoroughly recommend the book, especially to those with a theoretical physics background who will be very much at home with the language and techniques which are used. The author has developed a formalism for understanding complex systems which is based on the Langevin approach to the study of Brownian motion. This is a mesoscopic description; details of the interactions between the Brownian particle and the molecules of the surrounding fluid are replaced by a randomly fluctuating force. Thus all microscopic detail is replaced by a coarse-grained description which encapsulates the essence of the interactions at the finer level of description. In a similar way, the influences on Brownian agents in a multi-agent system are replaced by stochastic influences which sum up the effects of these interactions on a finer scale. Unlike Brownian particles, Brownian agents are not structureless particles, but instead have some internal states so that, for instance, they may react to changes in the environment or to the presence of other agents. Most of the book is concerned with developing the idea of Brownian agents using the techniques of statistical physics. This development parallels that for Brownian particles in physics, but the author then goes on to apply the technique to problems in biology, economics and the social sciences. This is a clear and well-written book which is a useful addition to the literature on complex systems. It will be interesting to see if the use of Brownian agents becomes

  8. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beenakker, C. W. J.

    2005-08-01

    Quantum Noise is advertised as a handbook, and this is indeed how it functions for me these days: it is a book that I keep within hand's reach, ready to be consulted on the proper use of quantum stochastic methods in the course of my research on quantum dots. I should point out that quantum optics, the target field for this book, is not my field by training. So I have much to learn, and find this handbook to be a reliable and helpful guide. Crispin Gardiner previously wrote the Handbook of Stochastic Methods (also published by Springer), which provides an overview of methods in classical statistical physics. Quantum Noise, written jointly with Peter Zoller, is the counterpart for quantum statistical physics, and indeed the two books rely on each other by frequent cross referencing. The fundamental problem addressed by Quantum Noise is how the quantum dynamics of an open system can be described statistically by treating the environment as a source of noise. This is a general problem in condensed matter physics (in particular in the context of Josephson junctions) and in quantum optics. The emphasis in this book in on the optical applications (for condensed matter applications one could consult Quantum Dissipative Systems by Ulrich Weiss, published by World Scientific). The optical applications centre around the interaction of light with atoms, where the atoms represent the open system and the light is the noisy environment. A complete description of the production and detection of non-classical states of radiation (such as squeezed states) can be obtained using one of the equivalent quantum stochastic formulations: the quantum Langevin equation for the field operators (in either the Ito or the Stratonovich form), the Master equation for the density matrix, or the stochastic Schrödinger equation for the wave functions. Each formulation is fully developed here (as one would expect from a handbook), with detailed instructions on how to go from one to the other. The

  9. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vespignani, A.

    2004-09-01

    Networks have been recently recognized as playing a central role in understanding a wide range of systems spanning diverse scientific domains such as physics and biology, economics, computer science and information technology. Specific examples run from the structure of the Internet and the World Wide Web to the interconnections of finance agents and ecological food webs. These networked systems are generally made by many components whose microscopic interactions give rise to global structures characterized by emergent collective behaviour and complex topological properties. In this context the statistical physics approach finds a natural application since it attempts to explain the various large-scale statistical properties of networks in terms of local interactions governing the dynamical evolution of the constituent elements of the system. It is not by chance then that many of the seminal papers in the field have been published in the physics literature, and have nevertheless made a considerable impact on other disciplines. Indeed, a truly interdisciplinary approach is required in order to understand each specific system of interest, leading to a very interesting cross-fertilization between different scientific areas defining the emergence of a new research field sometimes called network science. The book of Dorogovtsev and Mendes is the first comprehensive monograph on this new scientific field. It provides a thorough presentation of the forefront research activities in the area of complex networks, with an extensive sampling of the disciplines involved and the kinds of problems that form the subject of inquiry. The book starts with a short introduction to graphs and network theory that introduces the tools and mathematical background needed for the rest of the book. The following part is devoted to an extensive presentation of the empirical analysis of real-world networks. While for obvious reasons of space the authors cannot analyse in every detail all the

  10. Book Reviews

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Brian C. Leutholtz and Ignacio Ripoll, Exercise and Disease Management, reviewed by Laura Desveaux Barbara L. Kornblau, Ann Burkhardt, Ethics in Rehabilitation: A Clinical Perspective, reviewed by Maude Laliberté

  11. Book Reviews

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Clare Delany, Elizabeth Molloy, eds., Clinical Education in the Health Professions, reviewed by Brenda Mori Janet Carr, Roberta Shepherd, Neurological Rehabilitation: Optimizing Motor Performance, 2nd ed., reviewed by Meredith Smith

  12. Book Reviews

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Laurita M. Hack, Jan Gwyer, Evidence into Practice: Integrating Judgment, Values, and Research, reviewed by Evelyne Durocher Peter Brukner, Karim Khan, Brukner & Khan's Clinical Sports Medicine, reviewed by Mireille Landry

  13. Book Reviews

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Richard P. Di Fabio, Essentials of Rehabilitation Research: A Statistical Guide to Clinical Practice, reviewed by Laura Desveaux Jason Brumitt, Physical Therapy Case Files: Orthopaedics, reviewed by Maria Lung

  14. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straumann, N.

    2005-06-01

    This new book on quantum field theory by Michele Maggiore fits well into the Oxford Master Series in Physics, which is designed for final year undergraduate and beginning graduate students in physics. It is based on the teaching experience of the author with students in the fourth year at the University of Geneva. In this sense it is a two-semester course book for students exposed to quantum field theory for the first time. Maggiore gives, on slightly less than 300 pages, a balanced introduction to a vast field of twentieth century physics that will help students going on to study more advanced and specialized courses. Beside applications to many processes in particle physics that can also be found in many other textbooks, the author emphasizes conceptual, structural and methodological aspects of quantum field theory. After an introductory chapter, the group theoretical tools required to implement Lorentz invariance in quantum field theory are developed on 30 pages. Chapter 3 is devoted to classical field theory, emphasizing symmetries and conservation laws. The quantization of free fields in the next chapter follows traditional lines. Here one may miss a section describing the mathematical structure of the Fock space. It is also not said that in infinite dimensions von Neumann's uniqueness theorem for the representations of the canonical commutation relations no longer holds. The operations C, P, T are carefully discussed. In the relatively long chapter 5, perturbation theory and renormalization are developed. In this context the author discusses the modern view on renormalizability, and also emphasizes in a separate section the seriousness of the cosmological constant problem in quantum field theory. The next three chapters provide applications of the theory, especially to quantum electrodynamics and the low-energy limit of the electroweak theory. Chapters 9, 10, and 11 are meant as a bridge to more advanced courses. In these, path integral quantization, non

  15. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    maintained a very active interest in the affairs of the CCT. The above outline of the author's background is given here to emphasize his qualifications for presuming to undertake the writing of such an extensive and comprehensive monograph, and for doing it so well, since no similar information is given in "Temperature" nor in any of the advertising. He successfully conveys the viewpoints of both the basic scientist, whose interests are in standards thermometry and forefront research, and the person whose goals are the selection and use of the most appropriate thermometer. After an historical introduction, each of the various chapters (Thermodynamic and practical temperature scales, The measurement of thermodynamic temperatures, Fixed points and comparison baths, Resistance thermometry, Thermocouples, Radiation thermometry, Mercury-in-glass thermometry) and subsections has a similar format. This includes a capsule theoretical introduction and analysis of the subject to orient the reader and to establish limitations and approximations, a description of the current state of the art, and, finally, a nuts-and-bolts presentation which, where appropriate, includes industrial applications. Numerous tables, both in the text and in the appendices, document these discussions, along with an extensive listing of citations (close to 500) to original papers, review articles and other monographs. The coverage of topics is thorough and well-balanced, and suffers only moderately (but not deleteriously) from the biases of the author. My interests in low temperature thermometry extend upwards to 0 °C, and the author's treatment of this area is comprehensive and is done with understanding. He appears to have done equally well done equally well in the sections on higher temperature and more applied thermometry. The theoretical discussions are to educate the reader about the basic physics and consequent limitations and problems in each area. This is a difficult task which is done well on the

  16. Book Reviews

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, Anthony

    1986-10-01

    Amorphous Silicon Solar Cells by K. Takahashi and M. Konagai is one of the first books dealing exclusively with the subject of amorphous silicon solar cells. The book was first published in Japanese in 1983 and was translated and published in English in 1986. Part 1, covering 94 pages, is a general introduction to solar energy, including the basic concepts, the prospects for cost reduction of the various competing photovoltaic technologies, and a discussion of several types of solar power systems, while Part 2 deals exclusively with the technical issues surrounding the application of amorphous silicon to solar cells. Throughout, reference is made to the impact of photovoltaics on the Japanese economy, both as a business activity and as a domestic supply of electrical energy. As the authors point out, photovoltaics is a national priority for the Japanese, with increasing business as well as government support. Although this was also once the case in the U.S., as memories of the recent energy crises fade, the bulk of this activity is shifting toward the Far East.

  17. Writing a book review.

    PubMed

    Bryson, David; Hudson, Robert

    2017-04-01

    Book reviews are a good way to get started with writing for a journal and this Learning and CPD activity takes you through the process of understanding the aims of book review, undertaking practice pieces through to reviewing a book and advice on the dos and don'ts of book reviewing.

  18. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poisson, E.

    2005-10-01

    The ever growing relevance of general relativity to astrophysics and cosmology continues to motivate the publication of new textbooks which put the theory in a fresh perspective informed by recent developments. In the last few years we have witnessed the appearance of two new books which reflect this trend, and which stand proud among the classic relativity texts. While the 1970s were the decade of Weinberg [1] and Misner et al [2], and the 80s the decade of Schutz [3] and Wald [4], this is clearly the decade of Hartle [5] and Carroll. Hartle has introduced a novel pedagogical approach to teaching general relativity, which he convincingly argues [6] should be done in the standard undergraduate physics curriculum. His 'physics-first approach' emphasizes physical phenomena and minimizes mathematical formalism. Hartle achieves a lot by introducing only the spacetime metric and the geodesic equation, which are the main tools needed to explore curved spacetime and extract physical consequences. To be sure, to explain how the metric is obtained in the first place does require a background of differential geometry and the formulation of the Einstein field equations. But in Hartle's book this material is wisely presented at a later stage, after an ample sampling of the physics of curved spacetime has motivated the need for the advanced mathematics. Carroll follows instead the traditional route, what Hartle calls the 'math-first approach', in which one introduces first the required mathematical formalism and only then derives the physical consequences. He is, of course, in good company, as this is the method followed in all existing textbooks (with Hartle's being the sole exception). Carroll's approach may not be original, but it is tried and true, and the result of Carroll's efforts is an excellent introduction to general relativity. The book covers the standard topics that would be found in virtually all textbooks (differential geometry, the field equations, linearized

  19. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botet, R.

    2005-01-01

    This second edition of the popular book written by Quang Ho-Kim, Narenda Kumar and Chi Sing Lam, provides a comprehensive and interesting view of ten important topics in modern physics. All the sections have been updated: symmetry, lasers, superconductivity, chaos and fractals, stellar evolution, elementary particles and cosmology, while three new sections have been added to this edition: Bose-Einstein condensates, nanostructures and quantum computation. It is an impressive feat by the authors to cover such a wide panorama of physics from particles to cosmos and at a consistently high scientific level of information and explanation. This level is excellent and is at the frontier of current research but it does mean that some parts may be quite difficult for the undergraduate student. The ideal reader is probably the mature physicist revisiting familiar lines of thought, and following amazing bridges between distant topics. And if you are an active specialist in one particular topic, this book would give a clear insight on subjects outside your own field, allowing you to at last understand what your university colleague is really doing in a branch of physics with which you are totally unfamiliar. At the beginning, the style of writing can be disconcerting at this scientific level; equations are almost systematically avoided and illustrations are sparse, which can occasionally make the discussions rather ponderous, but the remarkable level of pedagogy and imaginative conception more than compensates for this. The fundamental ideas of exciting natural phenomena are elegantly discussed, while the authors never forget that physics is an experimental science, and address up-to-date applications in this manner. A brief bibliography is added at the end of each chapter, and a few simple exercises are given with answers. But the great strength of this book, and the main reason why it is worth reading by anyone interested in modern science, lies in the text itself which

  20. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, G. F. R.

    2005-12-01

    Wolfgang Rindler is known as a writer of exceptional clarity. This quality is evident in this book as it explores in depth first special relativity, then general relativity, and finally relativistic cosmology. He bases his writing in the fundamental underlying ideas and principles that so successfully guided Einstein in his work, clarifying their nature and implications in an illuminating way with many examples. The usual suspects are there: the relativity principle and equivalence principle, the abolishing of absolute space, invariance of the speed of light, analytic and geometric representations of the Lorentz transformation, its kinematic and dynamic consequences, relativistic optics, Minkowski spacetime, energy and momentum conservation, and the Compton effect. Particularly useful is the emphasis on the unity of the whole: for example (p 63) that the kinematic effect of length shortening must imply a corresponding detailed mechanical explanation of that shortening. The tensor formulation of Maxwell's equations leads to the transformation properties of the electromagnetic field and consequent elegant derivation of the field of an infinite straight current; in this case, relativity is important even for slowly moving charges because an ordinary current moves a very big charge (p 151). General relativity is systematically introduced in stages, starting with curved spaces and moving on through static and stationary spacetimes, geodesics, and tensor calculus to the field equations. A considerable strength of the book is the careful detailed examination of the local and global geometry of the major significant solutions of the equations: the Schwarzschild spacetime and its Kruskal extension, plane gravitational waves, de sitter and anti-de Sitter spacetimes, and Robertson-Walker cosmologies. The latter includes a clear presentation of the dust and radiation model dynamics for the variety of possible cases, a detailed examination of observational relations, and

  1. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israel, W.

    2006-07-01

    The evaporation of a black hole formed by the collapse of matter is a nonunitary process involving loss of information. At least, this is how it appears in Hawking's semiclassical description, in which gravity is not quantized and the emergent radiation appears thermal. Since unitarity is one of the pillars of quantum mechanics there has been an understandable reluctance to accept this as an ironclad conclusion. Conformal field theories in flat space are manifestly unitary, and the AdS/CFT correspondence therefore suggests that the information trapped in the depths of the hole must find some way to escape—a conclusion almost universally accepted today, at least among particle theorists. Just how it could escape remains a mystery, however, since nothing can escape without violating causality until the black hole has shrunk too far to hold much information. Gerard 't Hooft and the senior author of this book, Leonard Susskind, have been vocal advocates of the view that the information paradox poses a real crisis for physics requiring significant paradigm shifts. They suggest that locality must be given up as an objective property of physical phenomena (even on large scales) and replaced by a new principle of 'black hole complementarity'. Specifically, there are two very different ways to view the process of collapse and evaporation. To a free-falling observer, nothing unusual happens at the horizon and matter and information fall deep into the hole. To a stationary observer hovering just outside the hole it appears instead that the matter and information are deposited on the horizon (which he experiences as very hot because of his large acceleration), to be eventually re-emitted from there as Hawking radiation. According to 't Hooft and Susskind, these must be viewed as equally valid, 'complementary' descriptions of the same process. Black hole complementarity is essentially the statement (supported by operational arguments) that their simultaneous validity cannot

  2. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, P.

    2006-02-01

    Cosmology is a discipline that encompasses many diverse aspects of physics and astronomy. This is part of its attraction, but also a reason why it is difficult for new researchers to acquire sufficient grounding to enable them to make significant contributions early in their careers. For this reason there are many cosmology textbooks aimed at the advanced undergraduate/beginning postgraduate level. Physical Foundations of Cosmology by Viatcheslav Mukhanov is a worthy new addition to this genre. Like most of its competitors it does not attempt to cover every single aspect of the subject but chooses a particular angle and tries to unify its treatment around that direction. Mukhanov has chosen to focus on the fundamental principles underlying modern cosmological research at the expense of some detail at the frontiers. The book places great emphasis on the particle-astrophysics interface and issues connected with the thermal history of the big-bang model. The treatment of big-bang nucleosynthesis is done in much more detail than in most texts at a similar level, for example. It also contains a very extended and insightful discussion of inflationary models. Mukhanov makes great use of approximate analytical arguments to develop physical intuition rather than concentrating on numerical approaches. The book is quite mathematical, but not in a pedantically formalistic way. There is much use of 'order-of-magnitude' dimensional arguments which undergraduate students often find difficult to get the hang of, but which they would do well to assimilate as early as possible in their research careers. The text is peppered with problems for the reader to solve, some straightforward and some exceedingly difficult. Solutions are not provided. The price to be paid for this foundational approach is that there is not much about observational cosmology in this book, and neither is there much about galaxy formation or large-scale structure. It also neglects some of the trendier recent

  3. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Reviews two textbooks: "Principles of Biochemistry" by Albert L. Lehninger and "Inorganic Chemistry, A Modern Introduction" by Therald Moeller. Also reviews text, study guide, and laboratory manual for Morris Hein's "Foundations of College Chemistry, Fifth Edition" and text/study guide for David A. Ucko's "Basics for Chemistry." (JN)

  4. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Reviews two textbooks: "Principles of Biochemistry" by Albert L. Lehninger and "Inorganic Chemistry, A Modern Introduction" by Therald Moeller. Also reviews text, study guide, and laboratory manual for Morris Hein's "Foundations of College Chemistry, Fifth Edition" and text/study guide for David A. Ucko's "Basics for Chemistry." (JN)

  5. Book Reviews

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, Edina; Szabo, Attila

    2015-01-01

    Kent A. Kiehl and Walter P. Sinnott-Armstrong, Eds. Handbook on psychopathy and law, reviewed by Edina Szabó Katherine Schreiber and Heather A. Hausenblas The truth about exercise addiction – Understanding the dark side of thinspiration, reviewed by Attila Szabo

  6. Writing a book review.

    PubMed

    Peh, W C; Ng, K H

    2010-09-01

    A book review is a form of academic writing that provides a succinct yet critical analysis evaluating the content, style, merit and significance of a book. The reader should gain insight into the strengths and weaknesses of the book, aided by input from the reviewer. The four stages of writing a book review are: introducing the book, outlining its contents, highlighting parts of the book by selecting particular chapters or themes, and giving a detailed evaluation.

  7. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unruh, W. G.

    2006-02-01

    Quantum mechanics is one of the most successful theoretical structures in all of science. Developed between 1925-26 to explain the optical spectrum of atoms, the theory over the succeeding 80 years has been extended, first to quantum field theories, gauge field theories, and now even string theory. It is used every day by thousands of physicists to calculate physical phenomena to exquisite precision, with no ambiguity in the results. To claim that this is a theory which is not understood by those physicists is absurd. And yet, as eminent a physicist as Richard Feynman, who did as much as anyone else to extend quantum theory to field theories and was a master at producing those exquisite calculations, could say that anyone who claimed they understood quantum theory clearly did not understand quantum theory. One hundred years ago Einstein postulated one of the most unsettling features of the theory, the wave-particle duality, with his particulate explanation for light of the photoelectric effect, and an explanation which was in direct conflict with Maxwell's brilliant development of a wave, or field, theory of light. Einstein believed that the particulate nature would ultimately be explainable by some sort of non-linear theory of electromagnetism, and was outraged by the acceptance of the community of the probabilistic quantum theory. His programme was of course dealt a (near?) fatal blow by Bell's discovery that the three desiderata - a theory which agrees with experiment, a theory which is local in its effects, and a theory in which nature, at its heart, is not probabilistic - are incompatible. That discomfort felt by Einstein and by Feynman is felt by numerous other people as well. This discomfort is heightened by the fact that the theory of gravity, another of Einstein's great achievements, has resisted all efforts at reconciliation with quantum mechanics. This book explores that discomfort, and tries to pin down what the locus of that discomfort is. For many

  8. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimble, Virginia

    2007-05-01

    Here are two textbooks, both published by Springer and each roughly half devoted to cosmology—the large scale structure and evolution of the Universe. I can imagine a context (not the same context) in which each would be useful. And there the similarities largely end. Bergstrom and Goobar's (hereafter B&G) other topic is particle astrophysics, and they are addressing students who already have some knowledge of advanced quantum mechanics and classical field theory (or who can master some relativistic dynamics and the Dirac equation on the basis of a couple of very information-dense appendices). The book is meant for use at the graduate level, probably the second year by US standards (the authors are from Stockholm). Schneider (hereafter PS), on the other hand, begins with galaxies, and then alternates between cosmological topics of gradually increasing sophistication (expanding universe to CMB fluctuations) and additional galactic topics—clusters, quasars and all. The book is meant as the second half of an introductory astronomy/astrophysics course for physics majors, and in the US would fit into an upper division `capstone' course. Each is meant for a single semester class at the target level, and might be squeezed into a 10-week term with elimination of some topics. B&G is a paperback of a second edition, with colour confined to a central block of plates, relatively few graphs and drawings, but lots of complex equations. PS is a hard cover translation from a German original, with colour used freely in astronomical images and graphs throughout, with fewer and less complex equations. Though the nominal difference in copyright date is only two years (2006 for PS, 2004 for B&G), the former is considerably more up to date, mentioning, for instance, that the third year WMAP results are not different enough from the first year to justify redoing drawings and such (I agree). What can you expect to get if you buy one or both of these? B&G have a homepage of error

  9. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colman, Andrew M.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Reviews "Cooperation and Prosocial Behaviour" (Hinde and Groebel); "Psychological Development of High Risk Multiple Birth Children" (Krall and Feinstein); "Early Prediction and Prevention of Child Abuse" (Browne and others); "Strategies des joueurs d'Awale" (Reitschitzki); "Children's Understanding of…

  10. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, John

    2007-04-01

    ), but the latter is surprising in the context of a subject whose whole purpose is to observe the properties of primordial perturbations that may have arisen from inflation. Instead, the text concentrates on the technical heartland of the transport theory for CMB photons, and the Newtonian and relativistic theory for the development of CMB anisotropies, including polarization. It closes with more observationally-based chapters on general statistical aspects of the CMB sky, a digest of the recent results from WMAP, and an outlook. These are welcome, but the book really stands or falls on its treatment of the core physics of anisotropies. Without going too much into specifics, it can be fairly stated that the treatment given of the main material on CMB fluctuations is geared more to working professionals than to students. There is a good deal of useful technical detail, but it is not always derived systematically, and sometimes arises by reference to the research literature. There are no problem sets or worked examples, and not much attempt at intuitive illumination. As an example, one might point to the large-angle anisotropies of the CMB, which were first analysed in the classic Sachs Wolfe paper of 1967. The relativistic transport equation is there, but one looks in vain for the separation into the Sachs Wolfe effect proper (potential perturbations at last scattering) and the integrated effect of evolution since then. This latter ISW effect is in fact of huge interest in current research, since it is one of the methods for probing whether the vacuum energy differs from a cosmological constant. In general, the text seems strangely patchy on issues of contemporary interest, certainly in terms of its emphasis. It is as if the three authors contributed material separately without achieving a full integration. On the more positive side, the book has the advantage that it presents a Russian view of the subject. So much of the initial work on the `Relic Radiation' (a much

  11. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogister, A. L.

    2004-03-01

    John Wesson’s well known book, now re-edited for the third time, provides an excellent introduction to fusion oriented plasma physics in tokamaks. The author’s task was a very challenging one, for a confined plasma is a complex system characterised by a variety of dimensionless parameters and its properties change qualitatively when certain threshold values are reached in this multi-parameter space. As a consequence, theoretical description is required at different levels, which are complementary: particle orbits, kinetic and fluid descriptions, but also intuitive and empirical approaches. Theory must be carried out on many fronts: equilibrium, instabilities, heating, transport etc. Since the properties of the confined plasma depend on the boundary conditions, the physics of plasmas along open magnetic field lines and plasma surface interaction processes must also be accounted for. Those subjects (and others) are discussed in depth in chapters 2 9. Chapter 1 mostly deals with ignition requirements and the tokamak concept, while chapter 14 provides a list of useful relations: differential operators, collision times, characteristic lengths and frequencies, expressions for the neoclassical resistivity and heat conduction, the bootstrap current etc. The presentation is sufficiently broad and thorough that specialists within tokamak research can either pick useful and up-to-date information or find an authoritative introduction into other areas of the subject. It is also clear and concise so that it should provide an attractive and accurate initiation for those wishing to enter the field and for outsiders who would like to understand the concepts and be informed about the goals and challenges on the horizon. Validation of theoretical models requires adequately resolved experimental data for the various equilibrium profiles (clearly a challenge in the vicinity of transport barriers) and the fluctuations to which instabilities give rise. Chapter 10 is therefore

  12. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainwright, John

    2007-04-01

    The present volume is an introduction to general relativity and cosmology, at a level suitable for beginning graduate students or advanced undergraduates. The book consists of two main parts, the first entitled `Elements of differential geometry', and the second `The theory of gravitation'. Chapters 2-7, part I, introduce the basic ideas of differential geometry in a general setting, and are based on previously unpublished notes by one of the authors. On the one hand, the treatment is modern in that it uses a `top-down' approach, i.e. starting with general differentiable manifolds, and deferring the introduction of a metric tensor until after the notions of affine connection and curvature have been introduced. On the other hand, the treatment is classical in that it relies heavily, though not exclusively, on index notation. The general material, chapters 1-7, is then followed by four more specialized chapters dealing with matters of specific interest for general relativity. Topics include symmetry groups acting on Riemannian manifolds, with spherically symmetric spacetimes and spatially homogeneous spacetimes as examples, the efficient calculation of curvature, and the Petrov classification of the Weyl curvature tensor using spinors. Part II deals with general relativity and cosmology. The basic assumptions of the theory and its application to spherically symmetric gravitational fields are discussed in two chapters, and there is some historical material and motivation for the basic assumptions at the beginning of the book. The final chapter contains a detailed discussion of the Kerr solution. But the main emphasis in part II is on relativistic cosmology, in particular the analysis of cosmological models more general than the familiar Friedmann-Lemaitre (FL) models. The material on cosmology begins with a discussion of relativistic hydrodynamics and thermodynamics. The kinematical quantities (rate of expansion, shear, etc, of a timelike congruence) are introduced

  13. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altschul, Brett D.

    2007-06-01

    All the physics we observe in our world is underlain by special relativity, a theory that has survived for more than a hundred years, in many respects completely intact. Yet despite its status as the most stringently tested theory in all of physics, special relativity is still frequently questioned. In the last decade and a half, many scientists have come to believe that special relativity, as Einstein formulated it, will need to be modified to accommodate a quantum theory of gravity. {\\it Special Relativity: Will it Survive the Next 101 Years?} is a volume intended to introduce the reader to this new and still slightly controversial area of research. The book is divided into four parts. The first part is essentially historical. It consists of an essay discussing Einstein's work in the context of contemporary technological developments and a amusing note by R W P Drever on a precision Lorentz test that he performed literally in his backyard. These set the stage for the more modern material that follows. Part II discusses the theory of relativity and its mathematical foundations, from completely modern perspectives. There is much here that may be new even for experts on special relativity, and a significant level of mathematical sophistication on the part of the reader is assumed. A number of the lectures delve into the crucial question of how special relativity and its generalizations can be combined with quantum mechanics. The third part discusses theoretical models of Lorentz violation, and all the important paradigms that appear in the current literature are considered. These include the standard model extension (an effective field theory), modified dispersion relations and 'double special relativity', and noncommutative geometry. These lectures generally delve into less detail than those in part II; the focus is on helping the reader digest the new principles that must arise in theories without Lorentz symmetry. The final part of the volume covers current

  14. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, R.

    2005-06-01

    This book gives a clear exposition of quantum field theory at the graduate level and the contents could be covered in a two semester course or, with some effort, in a one semester course. The book is well organized, and subtle issues are clearly explained. The margin notes are very useful, and the problems given at the end of each chapter are relevant and help the student gain an insight into the subject. The solutions to these problems are given in chapter 12. Care is taken to keep the numerical factors and notation very clear. Chapter 1 gives a clear overview and typical scales in high energy physics. Chapter 2 presents an excellent account of the Lorentz group and its representation. The decomposition of Lorentz tensors under SO(3) and the subsequent spinorial representations are introduced with clarity. After giving the field representation for scalar, Weyl, Dirac, Majorana and vector fields, the Poincaré group is introduced. Representations of 1-particle states using m2 and the Pauli Lubanski vector, although standard, are treated lucidly. Classical field theory is introduced in chapter 3 and a careful treatment of the Noether theorem and the energy momentum tensor are given. After covering real and complex scalar fields, the author impressively introduces the Dirac spinor via the Weyl spinor; Abelian gauge theory is also introduced. Chapter 4 contains the essentials of free field quantization of real and complex scalar fields, Dirac fields and massless Weyl fields. After a brief discussion of the CPT theorem, the quantization of electromagnetic field is carried out both in radiation gauge and Lorentz gauge. The presentation of the Gupta Bleuler method is particularly impressive; the margin notes on pages 85, 100 and 101 invaluable. Chapter 5 considers the essentials of perturbation theory. The derivation of the LSZ reduction formula for scalar field theory is clearly expressed. Feynman rules are obtained for the λphi4 theory in detail and those of QED

  15. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, L. D.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Reviews "Nonprofits for Hire" (Steven R. Smith and Michael Lipsky), on the advantages and disadvantages of pursuing or accepting government purchase-of-service contracts; "Birthmothers" (Merry B. Jones); "Understanding Child Abuse and Neglect" (National Research Council); and "Young, Poor, and Pregnant"…

  16. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campion, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    "Microdosimetry" is the latest title to be issued by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements in their well known and well respected Report series. The subject is concerned with the study of the spatial distribution of energy deposition along the tracks of ionizing radiations. On a microscopic scale such energy deposition is far from uniform and, while a full description of the interaction of ionizing radiations with matter together with the consequences of such interactions is probably unmanageable in interpreting the microscopic effects of radiation, nevertheless a study of energy deposition in volumes comparable to the elemental structures being affected is an obvious starting point. The Report is a comprehensive review of microdosimetric concepts and techniques, both experimental and theoretical and forms a very useful state-of-the-art review. The first major chapter describes the quantities needed for microdosimetry and their interrelation. The next chapter very briefly reviews the primary interactions between ionizing radiations and matter, whilst in the following one the physical processes involved in the interaction of charged particles (mainly electrons and fast ions) are described in more detail together with the processes by which such particles lose energy, and the spatial distribution of energy deposits. Then come two chapters on, respectively, the experimental determination and theoretical calculation of various microdosimetric quantities. The principal detector for microdosimetric measurements is, of course, the gas proportional counter, usually operated at low pressure. The various techniques used to simulate small volume cavities are discussed, with their limitations, while an appendix describes in detail some of the designs of proportional counters that have been used. A fairly reliable indication that any new frontier of science has emerged from the "gee whizz" stage to more mature respectability is given when its

  17. Book Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-07-01

    The International Cryogenic Engineering Conferences (ICEC) are held biennially and are medium-scale events (a few hundred participants) involving a wide range of cryogenic specialists. The Proceedings of the 17th Conference reflects this range clearly, comprising four sections. The first, and shortest, presents the texts of (some of) the plenary invited papers and covers topics ranging from `The first collection of liquid hydrogen' to `The application of bulk high-temperature superconductors'. Then follow three sections of approximately equal length (250--300 pages each) covering, respectively, refrigeration, superconductivity and cryogenics. The rapid recent development of closed cycle refrigerators is reflected in the content of the first section and is a firm indicator that the topic of cryogenic engineering is spreading out from its current twin, but limited, areas of the research laboratory and the large-scale particle or energy research facility. Expansion into both industry, commerce and medicine is apparent, as is the provision of facilities for other technologies (for example, high-field magnets for NMR, extending to 1 GHz). Later in this volume some of these future applications are described. The Kleemenko cycle, as lucidly explained by Bill Little, consists of a development of the Joule--Thomson expansion technique for cooling in which the expansion and cooling of a single component gas is replaced by the expansion and cooling of a mixture of gas and liquid phase. Pulse tube coolers now come in a variety of forms and sizes, in single stage and double stage forms, providing a lowest temperature so far of around 2 K with 2 stages or 20 K with a single stage. The ability of this design is to reduce mechanical vibration levels well below those achievable with conventional Gifford--McMahon or Stirling cycle coolers and this volume includes a review of developments of these types, as well as a number of research papers setting out the leading edge of

  18. Special Book Review Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grauer, Barbara Ellman, Ed.; And Others

    1998-01-01

    Provides reviews of books dealing with all aspects of careers, including 8 books on dealing with change, 13 on career management, 4 on entrepreneurship, 3 guides and workbooks, 2 on assessment, 4 on resumes, and 1 biography. Includes 12 short reviews of books on career development issues and information such as publishers' addresses. (JOW)

  19. Book Review: Constraining Constraints.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kessen, William; Reznick, J. Steven

    1993-01-01

    Reviews "The Epigenesis of Mind: Essays on Biology and Cognition" (S. Carey and R. Gelman, editors), a collection of essays that present a hard-scientific vision of cognitive development. Examines the arguments this work articulates and then determines the place it occupies in the analysis of the state of developmental psychology as presented in…

  20. Why Write Book Reviews?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obeng-Odoom, Franklin

    2014-01-01

    The pressure to publish or perish or, more recently, to be visible or vanish, marginalises a culture of critical reading and reflection that has historically been the province of book reviews. Today, book reviews are roundly rejected by academic bureaucrats as unimportant, easy to write and hence, easy to get published, mere summaries, uncritical…

  1. Special Book Review Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grauer, Barbara Ellman, Ed.; And Others

    1999-01-01

    Offers reviews of 40 new and classic books for career counselors and career centers. Includes reviews of books on the following topics: assessment, career management, distance learning, entrepreneurship, the spirit-work connection, job-search methods, lifelong career development, as well as guides and workbooks. (JOW)

  2. Special Book Review Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grauer, Barbara Ellman, Ed.; And Others

    1999-01-01

    Offers reviews of 40 new and classic books for career counselors and career centers. Includes reviews of books on the following topics: assessment, career management, distance learning, entrepreneurship, the spirit-work connection, job-search methods, lifelong career development, as well as guides and workbooks. (JOW)

  3. Why Review Books? Editorial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ree, Malcolm J.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the book review as both science and art, the result of critical evaluation mixed with the expertise and predilections of the reviewer. Notes that there is no accounting for taste, but there is identifying and acknowledging it. (SLD)

  4. Special Issue: Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohs, Perla, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    Reviews of 42 books in the following categories are provided: career counseling theory and skills, organizational development, career and life planning, adult career development, retirement, career fields, job search, job success, entrepreneurship, college and women, college and the military, life management, creativity, and reference books. (SK)

  5. Peer reviews and the role of a journal editor

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Obtaining peer reviews for manuscripts submitted to scientific journals is becoming increasingly difficult. Changes to the system are necessary, and editors must cultivate and maintain a solid base of reviewers to help evaluate journal submissions. This article outlines some steps editors can and sh...

  6. Book Review: New Perspectives on Technical Editing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, A. J. (Ed.); Sterken, Christiaan

    2012-08-01

    New Perspectives on Technical Editing by Avon J. Murphy (ed.) ISBN : 978-0895033949 (2010) Baywood Publishing Company Inc, Hardcover, 210 pages, 35.5 GBP This book presents a collection of 10 chapters dealing with diverse aspects of technical editing (ie, editorial planning, and analysis and structural changes made to other people's technological documents): research in technical editing, trends and teaching of technical editing, copyediting, and technical journal editing. The role and function of the modern journal and book editor is also dealt with in detail. Each chapter is written by an expert in the field: senior editors, university professors in technical communication, technical writers and linguists. The ever-evolving role of the editor is clearly elucidated in several historical reviews, and in the descriptions of the expectations for the future. A very striking aspect of this book is its extensive collection of bibliographic resources: every chapter lists dozens of very useful references, and the closing chapter, and annotated bibliography, contain many not so well known references, and are most useful. All in all, the book is a treasure trove listing more than 400 references, in addition to numerous webpage URLs embedded in the texts. The book is designed to help the reader to understand current practices and norms in technical editing, and to help to take action in editing as well as in teaching and educating would-be editors. The audience for this book thus includes editors and teachers, but also writers, researchers and students. A deep reading of this book will result in a better understanding of the difference between full technical editing and its much narrower component so well known as copyediting, and will convince any prospective editor that editing should not be undertaken if the people involved do not master the art of precision and accuracy in technical (as well as in human) communication, do not possess the technical know how and computer

  7. Book Review: The People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Gordon

    1992-01-01

    Reviews "The Micmac: How Their Ancestors Lived Five Hundred Years Ago" (Ruth Holmes and Harold McGee), an illustrated book that shows how Micmac Indians adapted so well to the world. Describes the Micmacs' knowledge of herbs for treating sicknesses and injuries. Explains that the demise of the Micmacs came with new diseases brought to…

  8. Book Review: The People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Gordon

    1992-01-01

    Reviews "The Micmac: How Their Ancestors Lived Five Hundred Years Ago" (Ruth Holmes and Harold McGee), an illustrated book that shows how Micmac Indians adapted so well to the world. Describes the Micmacs' knowledge of herbs for treating sicknesses and injuries. Explains that the demise of the Micmacs came with new diseases brought to…

  9. What Authors Want From Journal Reviewers and Editors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickerson, Raymond S.

    2005-01-01

    Peer review is the primary means of ensuring the maintenance of standards that are deemed appropriate for scientific publications. There are many similarities, but also some differences, in the way the review process is conducted by different editors, and there are differences among reviewers in how they deal with the same manuscript--the…

  10. BOOK REVIEW: Supergravity Supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Ruth

    2013-02-01

    Supergravity is an essential ingredient in so many areas of ultra high energy physics, yet it is rarely taught systematically, even at the graduate level. Students most often have to learn along with applying, and must use the now classic older texts. For such core material, it is surprising that there are so few good texts on the subject. It is not necessarily that supergravity is so much more conceptually complex, rather that it is technical and therefore easy for a text to become dry, dense and rather indigestible. This book, written by two experts in the field, is therefore a breath of fresh air. It not only represents a comprehensive modern overview of the subject, but achieves this with clarity, accessibility, and even humour! To paraphrase the authors, if you are not impressed by this book, you should put it down and watch television instead. It starts by reviewing, or overviewing, aspects of field theory, basic supersymmetry and gravity that will be needed for the rest of the book. This first third or so of the book is very condensed, and will not be easy to follow for those who have not encountered the material before. However, the authors acknowledge this and give plenty of suggestions for more pedagogical texts in the relevant areas, thus it does not feel overly brief. The middle section deals with the construction of supergravity, starting with basic N = 1 supergravity in 4 and 11 dimensions and gradually extending the discussion to include matter multiplets. This part of the book systematically builds up understanding and construction of models, before moving on to superconformal methods. The purpose is not to cover all supergravity theories, but to focus on a few examples in detail, and to give sufficient expertise and information for the reader to be able to deal with any other models they might need. The final part of the book deals with applications, and includes two chapters on applications in adS/CFT, which will be of most interest to new

  11. Native American Children's Books. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moulton, Kathryn Elizabeth; Cornelius, Carol

    1993-01-01

    Reviews 11 children's books, published 1990-93, suitable for elementary and middle school students, covering Native riddles; Hiawatha as founder of the Iroquois confederacy; Chief Seattle's famous speech; stories about Inuit life and Mexican village life during the 1500s; Sequoyah and the Cherokee alphabet; the Iroquois creation myth; Wampanoag…

  12. Native American Children's Books. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moulton, Kathryn Elizabeth; Cornelius, Carol

    1993-01-01

    Reviews 11 children's books, published 1990-93, suitable for elementary and middle school students, covering Native riddles; Hiawatha as founder of the Iroquois confederacy; Chief Seattle's famous speech; stories about Inuit life and Mexican village life during the 1500s; Sequoyah and the Cherokee alphabet; the Iroquois creation myth; Wampanoag…

  13. A Review of Two Distance Learning Books [book review].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koszalka, Tiffany A.; Spector, J. Michael

    2003-01-01

    Reviews two books that are representative of the substantive books aimed at those who wish to design effective distance learning. Together these books provide a reasonably complete perspective on how to design effective distance learning. They have many strengths, and few weaknesses. (SLD)

  14. A Review of Two Distance Learning Books [book review].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koszalka, Tiffany A.; Spector, J. Michael

    2003-01-01

    Reviews two books that are representative of the substantive books aimed at those who wish to design effective distance learning. Together these books provide a reasonably complete perspective on how to design effective distance learning. They have many strengths, and few weaknesses. (SLD)

  15. BOOK REVIEW: Quantum Squeezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubairy, Suhail

    2005-05-01

    Quantum squeezed states are a consequence of uncertainty relations; a state is squeezed when the noise in one variable is reduced below the symmetric limit at the expense of the increased noise in the conjugate variable such that the Heisenberg uncertainty relation is not violated. Such states have been known since the earliest days of quantum mechanics. The realization in the early 80's that quantum squeezed states of the radiation field can have important applications in high precision Michelson interferometry for detecting gravitational waves led to a tremendous amount of activity, both in theoretical and experimental quantum optics. The present volume, edited by two eminent scientists, is a collection of papers by leading experts in the field of squeezed states on different aspects of the field as it stands today. The book is divided into three parts. In the first part, there are three articles that review the fundamentals. The first paper by Knight and Buzek presents an introductory account of squeezed states and their properties. The chapter, which opens with the quantization of the radiation field, goes on to discuss the quantum optical properties of single mode and multimode squeezed states. The second article by Hillery provides a detailed description of field quantization in the presence of a nonlinear dielectric medium, thus providing a rigorous treatment of squeezing in nonlinear media. The third article by Yurke presents a comprehensive discussion of the input-output theory of the squeezed radiation at the dielectric boundaries. The second part of the book, comprising of three articles, deals with the generation of squeezed states. In the first article, Drummond reviews the squeezing properties of light in nonlinear systems such as parametric oscillators. He also discusses squeezed light propagation through waveguides and optical fibers. In the second article, Ralph concentrates on active laser sources of squeezing and presents an analysis based on the

  16. Book reviews in medical journals.

    PubMed

    Kroenke, K

    1986-01-01

    In a study of book reviews published in four general medical journals over a six-month period, 480 reviews were analyzed. Twenty-five features that reviewers address when evaluating a text were identified, and the frequency of commentary for each feature was determined. The mean number of features addressed per review was 9.0. Reviews averaged 389 words, but review length did not correlate with the length or scope of the book, with the number of features addressed, nor with the reviewer's assessment of the text. Extraneous commentary by the reviewer occurred in 16% of the reviews. This editorializing appeared in lengthier reviews that addressed fewer features. Favorable reviews were far more common than unfavorable ones (88.5% vs. 11.5%). Consequently, for the fifty-five books reviewed in more than one journal, agreement regarding rating of the text was high (86%). Results of this study may provide useful guidelines for reviewers of medical texts.

  17. Book reviews in medical journals.

    PubMed Central

    Kroenke, K

    1986-01-01

    In a study of book reviews published in four general medical journals over a six-month period, 480 reviews were analyzed. Twenty-five features that reviewers address when evaluating a text were identified, and the frequency of commentary for each feature was determined. The mean number of features addressed per review was 9.0. Reviews averaged 389 words, but review length did not correlate with the length or scope of the book, with the number of features addressed, nor with the reviewer's assessment of the text. Extraneous commentary by the reviewer occurred in 16% of the reviews. This editorializing appeared in lengthier reviews that addressed fewer features. Favorable reviews were far more common than unfavorable ones (88.5% vs. 11.5%). Consequently, for the fifty-five books reviewed in more than one journal, agreement regarding rating of the text was high (86%). Results of this study may provide useful guidelines for reviewers of medical texts. PMID:3947772

  18. Elementary Students as Book Reviewers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geier, Denise B.

    2008-01-01

    There is always a new supply of books coming into the school library, and students make great reviewers for these new titles. This article shows how library media specialists can create a student book review group as part of a program to develop school-wide incentive for reading.

  19. Book Reviews 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grauer, Barbara Ellman, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    Contains reviews of 41 books on career management, job search strategies, entrepreneurship, the Internet job search, self-improvement; specific careers, women and careers, and career development e-business. Eight guides and workbooks are also reviewed. (JOW)

  20. Book Reviews 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grauer, Barbara Ellman, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    Contains reviews of 41 books on career management, job search strategies, entrepreneurship, the Internet job search, self-improvement; specific careers, women and careers, and career development e-business. Eight guides and workbooks are also reviewed. (JOW)

  1. Editors' Spring Picks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2011

    2011-01-01

    While they do not represent the rainbow of reading tastes American public libraries accommodate, Book Review editors are a wildly eclectic bunch. One look at their bedside tables and ereaders would reveal very little crossover. This article highlights an eclectic array of spring offerings ranging from print books to an audiobook to ebook apps. It…

  2. Editors' Spring Picks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2011

    2011-01-01

    While they do not represent the rainbow of reading tastes American public libraries accommodate, Book Review editors are a wildly eclectic bunch. One look at their bedside tables and ereaders would reveal very little crossover. This article highlights an eclectic array of spring offerings ranging from print books to an audiobook to ebook apps. It…

  3. Paradigm Lost. Book Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, James M.

    1996-01-01

    Claiming to have developed a new conceptualization of creative phenomena, Howard Gardner has rounded up the usual biographical suspects in his new book "Creating Minds: An Anatomy of Creativity Seen Through the Lives of Freud, Einstein, Picasso, Stravinsky, Eliot, Graham, and Gandhi" (Basic Books, 1993). Gardner doesn't successfully…

  4. Test Scoring [book review].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meijer, Rob R.

    2003-01-01

    This book discusses how to obtain test scores and, in particular, how to obtain test scores from tests that consist of a combination of multiple choice and open-ended questions. The strength of the book is that scoring solutions are presented for a diversity of real world scoring problems. (SLD)

  5. Test Scoring [book review].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meijer, Rob R.

    2003-01-01

    This book discusses how to obtain test scores and, in particular, how to obtain test scores from tests that consist of a combination of multiple choice and open-ended questions. The strength of the book is that scoring solutions are presented for a diversity of real world scoring problems. (SLD)

  6. BOOK REVIEW: Minority Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzler, R.

    2005-02-01

    when different kinds of agents are added. It is this chapter that really justifies the MG as a toy model, and the authors succeed in stating, but not overstating, the case for the MG. The final chapter is devoted to extensions and alternative interpretations of the MG that take the `minority wins' mechanism as a starting point, but consider different approaches to inductive learning. Topics include evolutionary learning schemes, neural networks, and experiments with human players. The diversity of contributions demonstrates that the minority mechanism has a wider applicability and may inspire many more papers. Part II, as mentioned, contains reprints of 27 articles on the MG and econophysics in general that are organized along the same lines as the chapters in Part I. The selection is good; the authors resisted the temptation to place too much emphasis on their own prolific output and represent a well-rounded picture of the literature. The book thus serves several purposes, and it serves them well: it is a well-organized, concise and comprehensive introduction to the MG and the questions econophysics is concerned with, and thus of interest to researchers and graduate students who want to get involved in the field; it is a thorough summary and literature review of the MG and therefore mandatory for those who are already active on the topic; and it serves as a case study for how a toy model can be interpreted and modified to yield insight into complex phenomena, and what answers one can and cannot expect from such models. Whether the MG will serve as a foundation for econophysics in years to come (and investment firms will indeed use the MG score of applicants as a hiring criterion, as the authors jokingly speculate) or as a stepping stone to other models, only time can tell. But in the meantime, there is much to learn from it, and this book is a good place to start.

  7. Academic Dishonesty [Book Review].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazana, P. Gordon

    2002-01-01

    This book is a practical text that provides concrete solutions to problems related to academic dishonesty with an overview of research and theory and strategies for preventing, confronting, and managing the problem. (SLD)

  8. Reference Accuracy: Authors', Reviewers', Editors', and Publishers' Contributions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Scientific authors are responsible for the accuracy of their writings and references to others' works. However, relying on authors is not enough when it comes to processing their manuscripts. Joint efforts of authors, peer reviewers, editors, and publishers throughout the publishing process may prevent most reference errors. This article analyzes essential aspects of bibliographic management and focuses on the importance of validating references by all stakeholders of scholarly publishing. PMID:25469055

  9. The Common Vision. Reviews: Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chattin-McNichols, John

    1998-01-01

    Reviews Marshak's book describing the work of educators Maria Montessori, Rudolf Steiner, Aurobindo Ghose, and Inayat Khan. Maintains that the book gives clear, concise information on each educator and presents a common vision for children and their education; also maintains that it gives theoretical and practical information and discusses…

  10. BOOK REVIEW: Nonlinear Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafranov, V.

    1998-08-01

    's theory, to satisfy the above mentioned alignment of the vectors j and B. The details of this remarkable process are described. The final chapter is devoted to solar flares, which are as the author says `probably, the most spectacular eruptive events in cosmic plasmas'. This chapter describes in detail the structure of the solar convection zone and the solar atmosphere, considers the formation of the rope-like structure of the magnetic field and the thick flux tubes displayed as sunspots, as well as the buoyancy of the flux tubes and different models of the MHD processes leading to solar flares. In summary, the reviewed book is rich in content, reflecting the important issues of striking phenomena such as solar flares, the, quite dangerous for plasma confinement, major disruptions in tokamaks and the, conversely quite favourable for plasma confinement, non-linear process of L-H transition in tokamaks and continuous turbulent generation and maintenance of stabilizing toroidal magnetic fields in reversed field pinches, as well as other interesting MHD processes. The analysis of these very complicated phenomena is based on non-elementary mathematics. This could make it difficult for non-theoreticians to read some parts of the book. However, as for an explanation of the physics of the phenomena, the author achieves this in a rather simple manner: briefly, and with the minimal number of necessary formulas. This is done strictly without oversimplifications. This makes the book useful to both theoreticians and experimenters who wish to learn about non-linear processes such as disruptions and plasma self-organization.

  11. Generalizability Theory [Book Review].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Michael

    2003-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive overview of univariate and multivariate generalizability theory, a psychometric model that provides a powerful approach to the analysis of errors of measurement through the use of random-effects and mixed-model analysis of variance. (SLD)

  12. Book and Software Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wissick, Cheryl

    2000-01-01

    This introductory column on books and software concerned with special education technology presents an article by JuHye Yook on the software design process. It discusses the rationale for developing new software for students with reading disabilities, the design and development process, and analysis of the software design. Software use by two…

  13. The Ethics of Academic Book Reviewing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashley, Leonard R. N.

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of ethical quandaries in academe focuses on the ethics of book reviewing. Topics include difficulties in getting published; exploitation of examination copies; reviewing books to get free copies; using book reviews as personal pulpits; inadequate rewards for reviewing books; and qualifications for reviewers. (LRW)

  14. BOOK REVIEW: Complete Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Simon

    2000-03-01

    This book contains all the essential concepts for GCSE (or equivalent) physics courses or for general science courses at Key Stage 4. It claims to be ideal for use as a bridging resource for those intending to take physics beyond GCSE: it is no surprise, then, that the book is written at a level above that of the average Key Stage 4 student. It includes material not included in many GCSE syllabuses; this is clearly identified in the contents pages. It would be a useful resource for more able students at GCSE or for beginning A-level students. The layout of the book is attractive. It is well illustrated and colourful. Some of the illustrations are striking: each of the 12 main sections of the book begins with a title page that includes some unusual photographs illustrating physical ideas. Section 2, Forces and Motion, has a photograph of a bungee jumper leaping from the Sky Tower in New Zealand, taken at night looking along the length of the tower from its foot. Section 9, Magnets and Currents, has a computer-generated picture of the magnetic field in a fusion generator. These pictures, as well as contributing to the attractiveness of the book, could be used to initiate discussions of some of the physics. However, there are pictures that serve little useful purpose: a photograph of a recording station for seismic waves looks like any other building lit up at night. A photograph of a rock band in the middle of a section on sound carries no explanatory caption at all and is purely decorative. Other illustrations - in a variety of styles - do illustrate some physical ideas very well: the diagrams of motors and generators, for instance, are far clearer than my efforts on the blackboard! The book is divided into 14 sections with titles reflecting the traditional divisions of physics syllabuses, together with a beginning section on measurement and units and two final sections, `History of Key Ideas' and `Experimental Physics'. The first section, `Measurement and Units

  15. Problems faced by editors of peer reviewed medical journals.

    PubMed

    Jawaid, Shaukat A

    2004-01-01

    Forty-six medical and dental journals are published from Pakistan of which only 29 are currently recognized by the Pakistan Medical and Dental Council. Only a few are peer reviewed. Six are indexed in Medline while EMBASE Excerpta Medica and World Health Organization Index Medicus for Eastern Mediterranean Region cover others. Editors of the peer reviewed medical journals are faced with numerous problems, which relate to the authors. Some of these are: shortage of quality of manuscripts, poor quality of reviewers, problems with indexation in international indexing services particularly Medline, duplicate submission and authorship and lastly, financial problems. Patronage from the Pharma industry is the major source of revenue which itself has serious implications. Editing a medical journal is a very stressful job and the editors have to work under too many pressures. A lot of useful data is presented at medical conferences, but a vast majority of it remains unpublished for various reasons, which adversely affects the citation rate from scientists from the developing third world countries in the world of medical literature. A few lectures on medical writing and research methodology to final year medical students will expose them to the art of medical writing. Specialty organizations can be persuaded to have a session on medical writing at their conferences, which will be extremely helpful not only to the potential new authors but also others, thereby improving the quality of their manuscripts. In addition to regular seminars, workshops for authors, reviewers and training courses for editors, subscribing to local medical journals by healthcare professionals and libraries are some of the measures that will help improve the situation to a great extent.

  16. Book Review: Wissenschaftliches Publizieren erlernen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedemair, Christof; Sterken, Christiaan

    2012-10-01

    Book Review: Wissenschaftliches Publizieren erlernen: Wissenschaft ist wie Haute Cuisine - man muss seine Ergebnisse dem Leser stilvoll servieren. Science is like Haute Cuisine - results should be served in style to the reader. Review of "Scientific Writing for Young Astronomers", see 2011EAS....50.....S

  17. BOOK REVIEW: Synergetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckhardt, B.

    2005-01-01

    The reductionist approach asks us to split the world into its constituents and to develop a detailed understanding of the properties of each fragment. This programme has met with considerable success in many instances, but it fails to account for properties that emerge from the interrelation between constituents and can be seen in the system as a whole only. The reductionist approach explains the spectra and intensities of the light emitted by a single atom, but it does not account for the appearance of coherent lasing action of atoms coupled by their light field. It describes the motion of individual molecules in a liquid but cannot explain how they arrange to form the majestic roll of waves on a beach. Similarly, a brain consists of millions of neurons whose biochemistry is reasonably well understood, but how they interact to give rise to memory and association and the myriad of other tasks a brain is capable off, remains unclear. These and many other examples in the anorganic and living world around us have in common that they typically operate far from thermodynamic equilibrium, that they involve the interaction of many ingredients, and that nonlinear interactions and feedback loops tend to be important. Over the past few decades many aspects of the dynamics of such systems have been explored, and fields like nonlinear dynamics, bifurcation theory, and pattern formation have prospered enourmously. Yet, the connection between the different areas and their contribution to the larger goal of explaining and exploring much of the order out of chaos around us has been in danger of being lost. Hermann Hakens book overcomes this reductionist separation of approaches and disciplines and provides a coherent collection of concepts, methods and tools with which all the previous examples and many more can be addressed. It lays the foundation for a quantitative analysis and should been seen as an invitation to the reader to apply its ideas to his or her favourite phenomenon

  18. On Book Reviews in Rhetoric and Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North, Stephen M.

    1992-01-01

    Describes book reviews and their publication. Explores where limits are drawn in which books get reviewed at all. Discusses the exclusivity of the review process and the impact on readers and reviewers. Offers suggestions for reform. (PRA)

  19. Book review: Extreme ocean waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, Eric L.

    2017-01-01

    “Extreme Ocean Waves”, edited by E. Pelinovsky and C. Kharif, second edition, Springer International Publishing, 2016; ISBN: 978-3-319-21574-7, ISBN (eBook): 978-3-319-21575-4The second edition of “Extreme Ocean Waves” published by Springer is an update of a collection of 12 papers edited by Efim Pelinovsky and Christian Kharif following the April 2007 meeting of the General Assembly of the European Geosciences Union. In this edition, three new papers have been added and three more have been substantially revised. Color figures are now included, which greatly aids in reading several of the papers, and is especially helpful in visualizing graphs as in the paper on symbolic computation of nonlinear wave resonance (Tobisch et al.). A note on terminology: extreme waves in this volume broadly encompass different types of waves, including deep-water and shallow-water rogue waves (which are alternatively termed freak waves), and internal waves. One new paper on tsunamis (Viroulet et al.) is now included in the second edition of this volume. Throughout the book, the reader will find a combination of laboratory, theoretical, and statistical/empirical treatment necessary for the complete examination of this subject. In the Introduction, the editors underscore the importance of studying extreme waves, documenting a dramatic instance of damaging extreme waves that recently occurred in 2014.

  20. [Book Review] Biology of marine birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jodice, Patrick G.; Roby, Daniel D.; Antolos, Michelle; Lyons, Donald E.; Rizzolo, Daniel; Wright, Sadie K.; Anderson, Cynthia D.; Anderson, Scott K.; Nelson, S. Kim; Gall, Adrian E.; Wennerberg, Liv

    2003-01-01

    A text devoted to the biology and ecology of marine birds has not been published in the last 15 years. Although a number of more taxa-specific texts have been produced during that period, there has not been a single publication that attempted to review our knowledge of all the major seabird orders since the works of Nelson (1979), Croxall (1987), and Furness and Monaghan (1987). Following the publication of those works, a large and impressive body of literature has been produced. Given the rapid expansion of the field in the last two decades, the time was ripe for production of an extensive compendium on the biology, ecology, and conservation of the world's seabirds.E. A. Schreiber and J. Burger are editors of this CRC publication, Biology of Marine Birds. The book consists of 19 chapters that vary in length from 15 to 51 pages. There are also two extensive appendices: (1) a list of seabird species (restricted to the orders Sphenisciformes, Procellariiformes, Pelecaniformes, and Charadriiformes, the latter limited to Stercorariidae, Laridae, Rhynchopidae, and Alcidae) and their IUCN status, and (2) a very useful table of species-specific life-history traits. The 19 chapters were prepared by 26 authors, among them some of the most respected and published seabird scientists in the world. A brief preface introduces the book, its objective (to provide an examination and summary of the research on seabirds), its audience (researchers, conservationists, managers, and policy-makers), and the taxa covered. The editors coauthored the introductory chapter, Seabirds in the Marine Environment. The authors describe distinctive characteristics of seabird life-histories in comparison to other taxa, hypotheses for why those lifestyles evolved and the potential role of energy limitation in the evolution of seabird life-histories. Along with a discussion of other common seabird traits, such as a propensity for colonial breeding, the authors also suggest directions for future

  1. BOOK REVIEW: Modern Supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulish, Petr P.

    2006-12-01

    S/CFT correspondence. The author explains clearly most of the arguments in discussions and refers for further details to original papers (with corresponding arXiv numbers), selected lists of which appear at the end of each chapter (there are more than 300 references in the book). Considered as a whole the book covers primers on quantum fields, Feynman diagrams, renormalization procedure and renormalization groups, as well as the representation theory of classical linear Lie algebras. Some necessary information on irreducible representations of su(N), so(N) and sp(2N) is given in an appendix. There are in the text short historical and biographical notes concerning those scientists who made important contributions to the subject of the monograph: S Coleman, Yu Golfand, E Witten and others. Most of the seventeen chapters contain a few exercises to check the reader's understanding of the corresponding material. This monograph will be useful for graduate students and researchers in the field of elementary particles.

  2. BOOK REVIEW: Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silk, Joseph

    2008-11-01

    recent, and comprehensive, is Cosmology, in which the University of Texas physicist and Nobel Laureate, Steven Weinberg provides a concise introduction to modern cosmology. The book is aimed at the level of a final year physics undergraduate, or a first year graduate student. The discussion is self-contained, with numerous derivations. It begins with an overview of the standard cosmological model, and presents a detailed treatment of fluctuation growth. There are sections on gravitational lensing and inflationary cosmology, on microwave background fluctuations and structure growth. There are aspects however where a supplementary book is essential for the physicist being introduced to cosmology. The text is lacking in physical cosmology. The baryon physics of galaxy formation is barely mentioned, apart from a discussion of the Jeans mass. And it ignores one of the greatest contributions to the field by Russian cosmologist Yaakov Zel'dovich, who discovered the only nonspherical solution to the nonlinear evolution of density fluctuations, one that has since dominated our understanding of the large-scale structure of the universe via the cosmic web. But these are minor quibbles about what provides an outstanding introduction to modern cosmology, and one that takes us from the physics fundamentals up to the cosmic frontier. I recommend Cosmology for anyone wishing to enter the field and with a good physics background. It is ideal for the astronomer who may only have a sketchy knowledge of general relativity or particle physics. She will learn about vielbeins and scalar fields, gauge-invariant fluctuation theory and inflation. Steven Weinberg is a leading physicist who has also made important contributions to cosmology. The text provides a rigorous treatment of the standard model of cosmology, and of structure formation. Numerous exercises are provided. It provides an excellent core for a course on cosmology.

  3. BOOK REVIEW: Symmetry Breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, L. H.

    2005-11-01

    have to be rather clever to recognize that the particle interactions were rotationally invariant. Nambu and Goldstone showed that the spontaneous breakdown of a (continuous) symmetry implied the existence of massless scalar particles, referred to as Nambu Goldstone bosons, or simply Goldstone bosons. Meanwhile Anderson, in his study of (non-relativistic) superconductivity, showed that the exclusion of magnetic flux (Meissner effect) corresponds to a finite range for the electromagnetic field and hence to a `massive photon'. In a relativistic context Englert, Brout, Guralnik and more particularly Higgs showed that a spontaneous breaking of a gauge symmetry resulted in a massive, instead of a massless, gauge particle and no Goldstone particle; in the jargon of the day, the massless gauge particle had `eaten' the massless Goldstone boson and become massive; exactly Anderson's observation. It is this phenomenon which has been invoked so successfully to explain the masses of the W and Z bosons of weak interactions. Spontaneous symmetry breaking, therefore, has played a major role in the development of the Standard Model of particle physics, and it has also proved an important tool in condensed matter physics, for example in the understanding of phase transitions. At the same time, however, in the understanding of most (or all) particle physicists, and perhaps also condensed matter physicists, the notion of spontaneous symmetry breaking has been inexorably linked to that of a degenerate vacuum. This is the background and the starting point for Strocchi's book. Recognizing the power and importance of the concept of spontaneous symmetry breaking in theoretical physics, he defines it in a more refined and general way than usual. `Despite the many popular accounts', he writes, `the phenomenon of spontaneous symmetry breaking is deep and subtle and it is not without [reason] that it has been fully understood only in recent times.' Strocchi's main emphasis is on the fact that the

  4. Book and Video Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Karen

    1994-01-01

    Reviews two videos. "Caregivers Guide for Drug Exposed Infants" addresses the effects of fetal drug exposure on children's physical, emotional, and social development and illustrates caregiving techniques. "Foundations for Being a Successful Director" offers professionals advice on stress in the workplace, taking care of…

  5. Best Books of 1977

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerhardt, Lillian N.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    School Library Journal book review editors have selected and annotated their choices for the best children's and young adults' books from those books that were submitted for review during 1977 by general book trade book publishers. Included in the annotations are: author, title, publisher, price, and recommended reading and interest levels. (JPF)

  6. International Book Review and Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dieker, Lisa; McTigue, Anna

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews the book "Helping Individuals with Disabilities and Their Families: Mexican and U.S. Perspectives," edited by Todd V. Fletcher and Candace S. Bos (1999). An interview with Todd V. Fletcher is presented in which he discusses the importance of U.S. understanding and collaboration with Mexico. (CR)

  7. Book Review: Human Radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, William F.

    2013-11-01

    This well written report reviews the evidence for variation in human sensitivity to ionizing radiation from epidemiological, clinical, animal, and experimental studies. The report also considers the mechanism(s) of radiation sensitivity and the ethical implications of current and potential knowledge that might be gained in the future. The report is concisely written, considers a large number of historical as well as recent studies, and features a ‘ bullet like ’ summary at the end of each chapter that captures the salient points.

  8. Book Reviewing Media for Technical Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadow, Arnold

    1970-01-01

    Publications which publish reviews of new technical books are compared and evaluated. The ideal reviewing journal provides critical reviews of all books--good, bad and indifferent--written by subject specialists, and publishes these reviews at the same time as the books are published. A proposal for producing such a journal is presented for…

  9. Book Reviewing Media for Technical Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadow, Arnold

    1970-01-01

    Publications which publish reviews of new technical books are compared and evaluated. The ideal reviewing journal provides critical reviews of all books--good, bad and indifferent--written by subject specialists, and publishes these reviews at the same time as the books are published. A proposal for producing such a journal is presented for…

  10. BOOK REVIEW: The Wandering Astronomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinbank, Elizabeth

    2000-09-01

    Fans of Patrick Moore will like this book. I enjoyed it more than I expected, having anticipated a collection of personal anecdotes of the type favoured by certain tedious after-dinner speakers. Some of the 41 short items it contains do tend towards that category, but there are also some nuggets which might enliven your physics teaching. For example, did you know that, in a murder trial in 1787, the defendant's belief that the Sun was inhabited was cited as evidence of his insanity? This was despite his views being shared by many astronomers of the day including William Herschel. Or that Clyde Tombaugh had a cat called Pluto after the planet he discovered, which was itself named by an eleven-year-old girl? Another gem concerns a brief flurry, in the early 1990s, over a suspected planet orbiting a pulsar; variations in the arrival time of its radio pulses indicated the presence of an orbiting body. These shifts were later found to arise from an error in a computer program that corrected for the Earth's motion. The programmer had assumed a circular orbit for the Earth whereas it is actually elliptical. The book is clearly intended for amateur astronomers and followers of Patrick Moore's TV programmes. There is plenty of astronomy, with an emphasis on the solar system, but very little astrophysics. The author's metricophobia means that quantities are given in imperial units throughout, with metric equivalents added in brackets (by an editor, I suspect) which can get irritating, particularly as powers-of-ten notation is avoided. It is quite a novelty to see the temperature for hydrogen fusion quoted as 18 000 000 °F (10 000 000 °C). By way of contrast, astronomical terms are used freely - ecliptic, first-magnitude star, and so on. Such terms are defined in a glossary at the end, but attention is not drawn to this and I only stumbled across it by chance. Patrick Moore obviously knows his public, and this book will serve them well. For physics teachers and students

  11. Writing a narrative biomedical review: considerations for authors, peer reviewers, and editors.

    PubMed

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Ayvazyan, Lilit; Blackmore, Heather; Kitas, George D

    2011-11-01

    Review articles comprehensively covering a specific topic are crucial for successful research and academic projects. Most editors consider review articles for special and regular issues of journals. Writing a review requires deep knowledge and understanding of a field. The aim of this review is to analyze the main steps in writing a narrative biomedical review and to consider points that may increase the chances of success. We performed a comprehensive search through MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus, and Web of Science using the following keywords: review of the literature, narrative review, title, abstract, authorship, ethics, peer review, research methods, medical writing, scientific writing, and writing standards. Opinions expressed in the review are also based on personal experience as authors, peer reviewers, and editors.

  12. Review Citations for Best-Selling Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Joseph W.

    1979-01-01

    Compares "Book Review Digest,""Book Review Index," and "Current Book Review Citations" for their coverage of titles appearing on the best-seller lists of "Publishers Weekly." Methodology is described and results are provided for both 1976 and 1978 titles. (Author/JD)

  13. Review Citations for Best-Selling Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Joseph W.

    1979-01-01

    Compares "Book Review Digest,""Book Review Index," and "Current Book Review Citations" for their coverage of titles appearing on the best-seller lists of "Publishers Weekly." Methodology is described and results are provided for both 1976 and 1978 titles. (Author/JD)

  14. The RAE and Publications: A Review of Journal Editors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talib, Ameen Ali

    2000-01-01

    Surveyed editors of academic journals about publication issues related to Britain's Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), a process of grading and funding universities based on published research output. Editors were asked about research quality and output, publication practices, academics' willingness to referee manuscripts, and proliferation of…

  15. The RAE and Publications: A Review of Journal Editors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talib, Ameen Ali

    2000-01-01

    Surveyed editors of academic journals about publication issues related to Britain's Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), a process of grading and funding universities based on published research output. Editors were asked about research quality and output, publication practices, academics' willingness to referee manuscripts, and proliferation of…

  16. Children's Books in Review: Books on Strengthening Family Ties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winfield, Evelyn T.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews children's books that emphasize the strengthening of family ties. Characters in the books realize the importance and influence of family relationships as they struggle with sibling rivalry, self-discovery, peer relationships, a search for heritage, adoption, and death. (SM)

  17. Children's Books in Review: Books on Strengthening Family Ties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winfield, Evelyn T.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews children's books that emphasize the strengthening of family ties. Characters in the books realize the importance and influence of family relationships as they struggle with sibling rivalry, self-discovery, peer relationships, a search for heritage, adoption, and death. (SM)

  18. Self-Interest and Scholarly Publication: The Dilemma of Researchers, Reviewers, and Editors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calabrese, Raymond L.; Roberts, Brian

    2004-01-01

    Academic misconduct in research is of growing concern to funding agencies, scholars, and academic journal editors. Scholarly publication has ethical implications researchers, reviewers, and journal editors. The theoretical background of the ethics of scholarly publication is explored as well as the use of a case study of an untenured researcher…

  19. Book Review: Scientific Writing for Young Astronomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uyttenhove, Jos

    2011-12-01

    EDP Sciences, Les Ulis, France. Part 1 : 162 pp. € 35 ISBN 978-2-7598-0506-8 Part 2 : 298 pp. € 60 ISBN 978-2-7598-0639-3 The journal Astronomy & Astrophysics (A&A) and EDP Sciences decided in 2007 to organize a School on the various aspects of scientific writing and publishing. In 2008 and 2009 Scientific Writing for Young Astronomers (SWYA) Schools were held in Blankenberge (B) under the direction of Christiaan Sterken (FWO-VUB). These two books (EAS publication series, Vol. 49 and 50) reflect the outcome of these Schools. Part 1 contains a set of contributions that discuss various aspects of scientific publication; it includes A&A Editors' view of the peer review and publishing process. A very interesting short paper by S.R. Pottasch (Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, Groningen, and one of the two first Editors-in Chief of A&A) deals with the history of the creation of the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics. Two papers by J. Adams et al. (Observatoire de Paris) discuss language editing, including a detailed guide for any non-native user of the English language. In 2002 the Board of Directors decided that all articles in A&A must be written in clear and correct English. Part 2 consists of three very extensive and elaborated papers by Christiaan Sterken, supplying guidelines to PhD students and postdoctoral fellows to help them compose scientific papers for different forums (journals, proceedings, thesis, etc.). This part is of interest not only for young astronomers but it is very useful for scholars of all ages and disciplines. Paper I "The writing process" (60 pp.) copes with the preparation of manuscripts, with communicating with editors and referees and with avoiding common errors. Delicate problems on authorship, refereeing, revising multi-authored papers etc. are treated in 26 FAQ's. Paper II "Communication by graphics" (120 pp.) is entirely dedicated to the important topic of communication with images, graphs, diagrams, tables etc. Design types of graphs

  20. Book Review: Regional Hydrological Response to Climate Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koster, Randal

    1998-01-01

    The book being reviewed, Regional Hydrological Response to Climate Change, addresses the effects of global climate change, particularly global warming induced by greenhouse gas emissions, on hydrological budgets at the regional scale. As noted in its preface, the book consists of peer-reviewed papers delivered at scientific meetings held by the International Geographical Union Working Group on Regional Hydrological Response to Climate Change and Global Warming, supplemented with some additional chapters that round out coverage of the topic. The editors hope that this book will serve as "not only a record of current achievements, but also a stimulus to further hydrological research as the detail and spatial resolution of Global Climate Models improves". The reviewer found the background material on regional climatology to be valuable and the methodologies presented to be of interest. The value of the book is significantly diminished, however by the dated nature of some of the material and by large uncertainties in the predictions of regional precipitation change. The book would have been improved by a much more extensive documentation of the uncertainty associated with each step of the prediction process.

  1. Follow Your Heart [Book Review].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czerwinskyj, Don

    1999-01-01

    Maintains that Pieper and Pieper's book shares Montessori's ideals and approach, and that it achieves a balance between strict behaviorist approaches and permissiveness. Notes the book's strengths, including the authors' research and clinical experience and numerous examples. (KB)

  2. Medical journals' conflicts of interest in the publication of book reviews.

    PubMed

    Davis, Ronald M; Neale, Anne Victoria; Monsur, Joseph C

    2003-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess medical journals' conflicts of interest in the publication of book reviews. We examined book reviews published in 1999, 2000, and 2001 (N = 1,876) in five leading medical journals: Annals of Internal Medicine, British Medical Journal (BMJ), Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), Lancet, and New England Journal of Medicine. The main outcome measure was journal publication of reviews of books that had been published by the journal's own publisher, that had been edited or authored by a lead editor of the journal, or that posed another conflict of interest. We also surveyed the editors-in-chief of the five journals about their policies on these conflicts of interests. During the study period, four of the five journals published 30 book reviews presenting a conflict of interest: nineteen by the BMJ, five by the Annals, four by JAMA, and two by the Lancet. These reviews represent 5.8%, 2.7%, 0.7%, and 0.7%, respectively, of all book reviews published by the journals. These four journals, respectively, published reviews of 11.9%, 25.0%, 0.9%, and 1.0% of all medical books published by the journals' publishers. Only one of the 30 book reviews included a disclosure statement addressing the conflict of interest. None of the journals had a written policy pertaining to the conflicts of interest assessed in this study, although four reported having unwritten policies. We recommend that scientific journals and associations representing journal editors develop policies on conflicts of interest pertaining to book reviews.

  3. Redefining Book Reviews for the Digital Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Deirdre; Leahy, Margaret; McCormack, Ciaran

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a pilot study conducted in Ireland to examine the effectiveness of an online book review project. The project focused on the production of book reviews by primary school children in the form of digital video. The videos created were uploaded to a password protected website, which was available to the schools…

  4. Redefining Book Reviews for the Digital Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Deirdre; Leahy, Margaret; McCormack, Ciaran

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a pilot study conducted in Ireland to examine the effectiveness of an online book review project. The project focused on the production of book reviews by primary school children in the form of digital video. The videos created were uploaded to a password protected website, which was available to the schools…

  5. Current Books on Composition: Some Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawlor, Joseph; And Others

    Ten current books covering a variety of topics relating to composition are reviewed in this paper. The first three reviews are of books describing actual writing abilities of students: "Language Development: Kindergarten through Grade 12" by Walter Loban; "The Development of Writing Abilities (11-18)" by James Britton and his colleagues; and "The…

  6. Editorial, Forum and Book Reviews

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulfield, H. J.

    1982-04-01

    I address myself to one of the greatest joys that befalls an editor and also to one of the greatest sadnesses. One of my great joys is the privilege of sharing my concerns as editor with my colleagues who edit other journals (John Howard of Applied Optics, Joe Goodman of the Journal of the Optical Society of America, etc.). Unfortunately, one of the concerns we have to share is a source of my greatest sadness as editor. For lack of a suitably comprehensive term, I use the term "journal gamesmanship." Journal gamesmanship is the fine and well-developed art of seeking inappropriate credit for oneself via publication in a technical or scientific journal. This can mean anything from overt plagiarism to deliberately inaccurate citations. If you are shocked that such things occur, III am pleased with your innocence. Even if you are not shocked, I hope to make you, aware of the many forms in which this unfortunate and ugly game can be and is played.

  7. BOOK REVIEWS: Quantum Mechanics: Fundamentals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, A.

    2004-02-01

    This review is of three books, all published by Springer, all on quantum theory at a level above introductory, but very different in content, style and intended audience. That of Gottfried and Yan is of exceptional interest, historical and otherwise. It is a second edition of Gottfried’s well-known book published by Benjamin in 1966. This was written as a text for a graduate quantum mechanics course, and has become one of the most used and respected accounts of quantum theory, at a level mathematically respectable but not rigorous. Quantum mechanics was already solidly established by 1966, but this second edition gives an indication of progress made and changes in perspective over the last thirty-five years, and also recognises the very substantial increase in knowledge of quantum theory obtained at the undergraduate level. Topics absent from the first edition but included in the second include the Feynman path integral, seen in 1966 as an imaginative but not very useful formulation of quantum theory. Feynman methods were given only a cursory mention by Gottfried. Their practical importance has now been fully recognised, and a substantial account of them is provided in the new book. Other new topics include semiclassical quantum mechanics, motion in a magnetic field, the S matrix and inelastic collisions, radiation and scattering of light, identical particle systems and the Dirac equation. A topic that was all but totally neglected in 1966, but which has flourished increasingly since, is that of the foundations of quantum theory. John Bell’s work of the mid-1960s has led to genuine theoretical and experimental achievement, which has facilitated the development of quantum optics and quantum information theory. Gottfried’s 1966 book played a modest part in this development. When Bell became increasingly irritated with the standard theoretical approach to quantum measurement, Viki Weisskopf repeatedly directed him to Gottfried’s book. Gottfried had devoted a

  8. BOOK REVIEW: Universe or Multiverse?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimble, Virginia

    2008-11-01

    More than 2000 years ago, Epicurus taught that there are an infinite number of other worlds, both like and unlike ours, and Aristotle taught that there are none. Neither hypothesis can currently be falsified, and this issue of potential for falsification (that is testability) goes to the heart of many of the chapters in Carr's book. All but one of the 27 chapters, provided by 27 pundits (almost but not quite a one-to-one mapping) are written versions of talks given at one of three meetings, held between 2001 and 2005 at Stanford and Cambridge Universities and partly sponsored by the Templeton Foundation. Every reader will surely find some chapters interesting and informative, some provocative, and some rather vacuous. These will not be the same chapters for all readers. Two 'conflict of interest' statements: first, I spoke at one of these meetings, but was not one of those asked to provide a chapter. And, second, the first time I suggested in a lecture for scientists that 'many universes, either in temporal succession or embedded in higher dimensional space' was a possible explanation of the habitability of ours was fall 1974, shortly after Brandon Carter's first paper on anthropic principles and explanations, but before Bernard Carr and Martin Rees's 1979 Nature paper, which presented all the anthropic arguments then known and divided them into numbers that required no additional physics beyond the four standard forces (like the number of particles in a star) and those that seemed essential for life but not calculable (like the ratio of the electromagnetic to nuclear force constant). My other three possibilities were 'G.d has been very careful' (now called intelligent design), additional physics to be learned, and shear complexity. The core multiverse concept is that our universe (the 4-dimensional spacetime with which we are or could be connected and all its contents) is one of many, perhaps infinitely many, probably with different values of the constants of

  9. Guidelines for Reviewers and the Editor at the Nuclear Safety Information Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whetsel, H. B.

    The main purpose of this report is to help novice reviewers accelerate their apprenticeship at the Nuclear Safety Information Center, a computerized information service sponsored by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. Guidelines for reviewers are presented in Part 1; Part 2 contains guidelines for the novice editor. The goal of the reviewers and…

  10. A scoping review of competencies for scientific editors of biomedical journals.

    PubMed

    Galipeau, James; Barbour, Virginia; Baskin, Patricia; Bell-Syer, Sally; Cobey, Kelly; Cumpston, Miranda; Deeks, Jon; Garner, Paul; MacLehose, Harriet; Shamseer, Larissa; Straus, Sharon; Tugwell, Peter; Wager, Elizabeth; Winker, Margaret; Moher, David

    2016-02-02

    Biomedical journals are the main route for disseminating the results of health-related research. Despite this, their editors operate largely without formal training or certification. To our knowledge, no body of literature systematically identifying core competencies for scientific editors of biomedical journals exists. Therefore, we aimed to conduct a scoping review to determine what is known on the competency requirements for scientific editors of biomedical journals. We searched the MEDLINE®, Cochrane Library, Embase®, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and ERIC databases (from inception to November 2014) and conducted a grey literature search for research and non-research articles with competency-related statements (i.e. competencies, knowledge, skills, behaviors, and tasks) pertaining to the role of scientific editors of peer-reviewed health-related journals. We also conducted an environmental scan, searched the results of a previous environmental scan, and searched the websites of existing networks, major biomedical journal publishers, and organizations that offer resources for editors. A total of 225 full-text publications were included, 25 of which were research articles. We extracted a total of 1,566 statements possibly related to core competencies for scientific editors of biomedical journals from these publications. We then collated overlapping or duplicate statements which produced a list of 203 unique statements. Finally, we grouped these statements into seven emergent themes: (1) dealing with authors, (2) dealing with peer reviewers, (3) journal publishing, (4) journal promotion, (5) editing, (6) ethics and integrity, and (7) qualities and characteristics of editors. To our knowledge, this scoping review is the first attempt to systematically identify possible competencies of editors. Limitations are that (1) we may not have captured all aspects of a biomedical editor's work in our searches, (2) removing redundant and overlapping items may have led to the

  11. Special Issue: Book Reviews 2002-2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grauer, Barbara Ellman, Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This special issue reviews 71 books on the following topics: career management; career opportunities for people with disabilities; federal government career information; college career development/counseling; job search strategies, tools, methods; coaching; retirement issues; strategies for managers; women and careers; general career books; and…

  12. Special Issue: Book Reviews 2002-2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grauer, Barbara Ellman, Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This special issue reviews 71 books on the following topics: career management; career opportunities for people with disabilities; federal government career information; college career development/counseling; job search strategies, tools, methods; coaching; retirement issues; strategies for managers; women and careers; general career books; and…

  13. Book Review: Making Thinking Visible

    PubMed Central

    Royal, Kenneth; Hardie, Lizette

    2015-01-01

    Recent trends in medical education emphasize the importance of producing well-rounded graduates who not only possess a sufficient fund of medical knowledge but who can think clearly and deeply. Unfortunately, many medical educators struggle with what exactly it means to “think” and do not know where to begin when asked to teach “thinking.” We believe the book Making Thinking Visible, though written for K-12, will be of great interest to medical educators. The book describes different types of thinking and presents more than 20 teaching routines that can help engage learners and improve learning to think.

  14. Current Status of Biomedical Book Reviewing: Part III. Duplication Patterns in Biomedical Book Reviewing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ching-chih

    1974-01-01

    This is the third part of a comprehensive, quantitative study of biomedical book reviewing. The data base of the total project was built from statistics of 3,347 reviews of 2,067 biomedical books appearing in all 1970 issues of fifty-four reviewing journals. This part of the study explores the duplication patterns in book reviewing among these media. It is found that 35.17% (727 books) of the 2,067 titles were reviewed more than once in 1970, these titles accounting for 2,007 of the total of 3,347 reviews. For the most part, reviews of the most frequently reviewed titles appeared in such journals as British Medical Journal, Annals of Internal Medicine, Lancet, Journal of the American Medical Association, and New England Journal of Medicine. These five journals covered 93.53% of the 727 books reviewed more than once in 1970. PMID:4471577

  15. Best Books of 1971

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerhardt, Lillian N.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    The forty-two titles selected by the editors of School Library Journal" are the best among over 2,100 new children's books reviewed since last January. Also included are 25 top notch Young Adult titles. (67 references) (MM)

  16. Best Books of 1971

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerhardt, Lillian N.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    The forty-two titles selected by the editors of School Library Journal" are the best among over 2,100 new children's books reviewed since last January. Also included are 25 top notch Young Adult titles. (67 references) (MM)

  17. Ensuring the Quality, Fairness, and Integrity of Journal Peer Review: A Possible Role of Editors.

    PubMed

    Resnik, David B; Elmore, Susan A

    2016-02-01

    A growing body of literature has identified potential problems that can compromise the quality, fairness, and integrity of journal peer review, including inadequate review, inconsistent reviewer reports, reviewer biases, and ethical transgressions by reviewers. We examine the evidence concerning these problems and discuss proposed reforms, including double-blind and open review. Regardless of the outcome of additional research or attempts at reforming the system, it is clear that editors are the linchpin of peer review, since they make decisions that have a significant impact on the process and its outcome. We consider some of the steps editors should take to promote quality, fairness and integrity in different stages of the peer review process and make some recommendations for editorial conduct and decision-making.

  18. Reviewing Children's Books: A Content Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Kay; Van Orden, Phyllis

    1998-01-01

    An analysis of 599 reviews of children's books from six reviewing journals for 1995-96 was compared to earlier studies, revealing great variation in adequacy of reviews. School Library Journal provided the most complete bibliographic and ordering information but no single journal supplied all the information librarians need for purchasing juvenile…

  19. Book Reviewers: An Empirical Portrait.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craver, Kathleen W.

    1984-01-01

    Reports results of survey questioning "School Library Journal's" reviewers of children's literature in four main areas: review aspects (relating plot, commenting on literary quality); reviewer roles (reviewer, critic); review practices; and personal and professional background (demographic questions). The survey questionnaire and 38…

  20. Book review: Physics of tsunamis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, Eric L.

    2017-01-01

    “Physics of Tsunamis”, second edition, provides a comprehensive analytical treatment of the hydrodynamics associated with the tsunami generation process. The book consists of seven chapters covering 388 pages. Because the subject matter within each chapter is distinct, an abstract appears at the beginning and references appear at the end of each chapter, rather than at the end of the book. Various topics of tsunami physics are examined largely from a theoretical perspective, although there is little information on how the physical descriptions are applied in numerical models.“Physics of Tsunamis”, by B. W. Levin and M. A. Nosov, Second Edition, Springer, 2016; ISBN-10: 33-1933106X, ISBN-13: 978-331933-1065

  1. BOOK REVIEW: The Wraparound Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakrzewski, Wojtek J.

    2008-11-01

    I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book. It is written in clear language supplemented with many very helpful photographs and drawings. I like the structure of the book, which is a collection of 45 rather short chapters that make it easier for the reader to read it at his/her own speed. The main aim of the author is to interest the reader in cosmology and to convey to him/her the amazing progress that has been made in recent years in our understanding of the universe, its shape and its future. However, even to formulate this problem and to describe some recent work in this field, the author has to explain to the reader many concepts from mathematics and physics. Jean-Pierre Luminet, in addition to being a well known astrophysicist, is also a very gifted writer and so he manages to do this very successfully. In fact the book contains very few formulae and most of the explanations are given in terms of a written narrative supplemented by drawings. The author is also extremely skillful in finding and then using appropriate analogies. The required ideas from mathematics, and topology in particular, present a further aim of the book—to explain to the interested reader the beautiful world of topology and its relevance to the description of the real world. Here, again, he succeeds very impressively. The central claim of the book is as follows: instead of a simple topology, the Universe may have a multiply-connected topology—hence 'wrapped around'; in consequence, it may be much smaller than is usually assumed. If this is so some of the galaxies we see are not real galaxies, but only images of a smaller number of genuine galaxies. The author then discusses possible topologies, and finally chooses the 'dodecahedral' one. A large part of the book is dedicated to showing how this hypothesis can be tested, and what the most recent data on the cosmic background radiation from the WMAP satellite say about this issue (they are inconclusive). Jean-Pierre Luminet's suggestions

  2. BOOK REVIEW: Modeling Complex Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreckenberg, M.

    2004-10-01

    This book by Nino Boccara presents a compilation of model systems commonly termed as `complex'. It starts with a definition of the systems under consideration and how to build up a model to describe the complex dynamics. The subsequent chapters are devoted to various categories of mean-field type models (differential and recurrence equations, chaos) and of agent-based models (cellular automata, networks and power-law distributions). Each chapter is supplemented by a number of exercises and their solutions. The table of contents looks a little arbitrary but the author took the most prominent model systems investigated over the years (and up until now there has been no unified theory covering the various aspects of complex dynamics). The model systems are explained by looking at a number of applications in various fields. The book is written as a textbook for interested students as well as serving as a compehensive reference for experts. It is an ideal source for topics to be presented in a lecture on dynamics of complex systems. This is the first book on this `wide' topic and I have long awaited such a book (in fact I planned to write it myself but this is much better than I could ever have written it!). Only section 6 on cellular automata is a little too limited to the author's point of view and one would have expected more about the famous Domany--Kinzel model (and more accurate citation!). In my opinion this is one of the best textbooks published during the last decade and even experts can learn a lot from it. Hopefully there will be an actualization after, say, five years since this field is growing so quickly. The price is too high for students but this, unfortunately, is the normal case today. Nevertheless I think it will be a great success!

  3. BOOK REVIEW: The Odd Quantum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Helen

    2000-03-01

    The Odd Quantum is aiming to be odd. Falling between being a quantum mechanics textbook and a `popular' science book, it aims to convey something of the substance of quantum mechanics without being overly technical or professional. It does not shy away from the mathematics of the subject or resort solely to analogy and metaphor, as so often is the case. Books aimed at the lay reader tend to take on a particular aspect of quantum mechanics, for example, wave-particle duality, and can do little more than hint at the complexity of the subject. This book is more than a textbook on quantum mechanics; it gives the reader a comprehensive account of history and an appreciation of the nature of quantum mechanics. The introductory chapters deal with the earlier part of the century and the thinking of that time. The approach is familiar, as are the stories that Treiman tells, but he also manages to convey the speed with which ideas changed and the excitement this brought to the physics community. Classical ideas of force and energy are dealt with succinctly but with sufficient depth to set up the reader for what is to come; Maxwell's equations and a brief glimpse at relativity are included. This is followed by a brief description of what the author terms the `old' quantum mechanics, in effect a highly readable tour around black body radiation and spectroscopy and the models of the atom that emerged from them. The `new' quantum mechanics begins about a third of the way through the book, and in a chapter entitled `Foundations' starts gently but rapidly moves into a detailed mathematical treatment. This section, of necessity, relapses into the style of a textbook and covers a lot of ground quickly. It is at this point that the non-specialist popular science readers for whom Treiman has written this book may become a little bemused. Concepts such as non-degeneracy and operators come thick and fast. It is difficult to imagine an educated non-physicist with little mathematical

  4. Use of Book Reviews by Scholars: Implications for Electronic Publishing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spink, Amanda; Robins, David

    1996-01-01

    Investigates the importance of book reviews to science and technology scholars and humanities and social science scholars. Focuses on the sources, importance, and utility of book reviews for information seeking; research by scholars and scholars' criteria for useful book reviews; and whether scholars use electronic book reviews. (Author/AEF)

  5. BOOK REVIEW: The Current Comparator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersons, Oskars

    1989-01-01

    This 120-page book is a concise, yet comprehensive, clearly-written and well-illustrated monograph that covers the subject matter from basic principles through design, construction and calibration details to the principal applications. The book will be useful, as a primer, to the uninitiated and, as a reference book to the practitioner involved with transformer-type ratio devices. The length of the book and the style of presentation will not overburden any informed reader. The described techniques and the cited references are primarily from the work at the National Research Council, Canada (NRC). Any omissions, however, are not serious with respect to coverage of the subject matter, since most of the development work has been done at NRC. The role of transformers and transformer-like devices for establishing accurate voltage and current ratios has been recognized for over half a century. Transformer techniques were much explored and developed in the fifties and sixties for accuracy levels suitable for standards laboratories. Three-winding voltage transformers were developed for scaling of impedances in connection with the calculable Thompson Lampard capacitor; three-winding current transformers or current comparators were initially explored for the calibration of current transformers and later for specialized impedance measurements. Extensive development of the current comparator and its applications has been and is still being conducted at the NRC by a team that was started and, until his retirement, led by N L Kusters. The team is now led by W J M Moore. He and P N Miljanic, the authors of this book, have had the principal roles in the development of the current comparator. It is fortunate for the field of metrology that considerabe resources and a talented group of researchers were available to do this development along with mechanisms that were available to transfer this technology to a private sector instrument manufacturer and, thus, disseminate it world wide

  6. The effects of an editor serving as one of the reviewers during the peer-review process.

    PubMed

    Giordan, Marco; Csikasz-Nagy, Attila; Collings, Andrew M; Vaggi, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Background Publishing in scientific journals is one of the most important ways in which scientists disseminate research to their peers and to the wider public. Pre-publication peer review underpins this process, but peer review is subject to various criticisms and is under pressure from growth in the number of scientific publications. Methods Here we examine an element of the editorial process at eLife, in which the Reviewing Editor usually serves as one of the referees, to see what effect this has on decision times, decision type, and the number of citations. We analysed a dataset of 8,905 research submissions to eLife since June 2012, of which 2,747 were sent for peer review. This subset of 2747 papers was then analysed in detail.   Results The Reviewing Editor serving as one of the peer reviewers results in faster decision times on average, with the time to final decision ten days faster for accepted submissions (n=1,405) and five days faster for papers that were rejected after peer review (n=1,099). Moreover, editors acting as reviewers had no effect on whether submissions were accepted or rejected, and a very small (but significant) effect on citation rates. Conclusions An important aspect of eLife's peer-review process is shown to be effective, given that decision times are faster when the Reviewing Editor serves as a reviewer. Other journals hoping to improve decision times could consider adopting a similar approach.

  7. The effects of an editor serving as one of the reviewers during the peer-review process

    PubMed Central

    Giordan, Marco; Csikasz-Nagy, Attila; Collings, Andrew M.; Vaggi, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Background Publishing in scientific journals is one of the most important ways in which scientists disseminate research to their peers and to the wider public. Pre-publication peer review underpins this process, but peer review is subject to various criticisms and is under pressure from growth in the number of scientific publications. Methods Here we examine an element of the editorial process at eLife, in which the Reviewing Editor usually serves as one of the referees, to see what effect this has on decision times, decision type, and the number of citations. We analysed a dataset of 8,905 research submissions to eLife since June 2012, of which 2,747 were sent for peer review. This subset of 2747 papers was then analysed in detail.   Results The Reviewing Editor serving as one of the peer reviewers results in faster decision times on average, with the time to final decision ten days faster for accepted submissions (n=1,405) and five days faster for papers that were rejected after peer review (n=1,099). Moreover, editors acting as reviewers had no effect on whether submissions were accepted or rejected, and a very small (but significant) effect on citation rates. Conclusions An important aspect of eLife’s peer-review process is shown to be effective, given that decision times are faster when the Reviewing Editor serves as a reviewer. Other journals hoping to improve decision times could consider adopting a similar approach. PMID:27508056

  8. Book Review: Sapphire. (1996). Push.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Elisabeth; Cuban, Sondra

    1998-01-01

    This review of "Push," a novel about a young single mother in a literacy education program, incorporates theoretical elements from Allan Quigley's "Rethinking Literacy Education." The review addresses issues of stereotypes, humanistic education, and advocacy and includes reflections on teaching philosophy in adult basic…

  9. Book Review: "The Road to Sustainability, GDP and Future Generations" Pulselli et al, WIT Press, Southhampton, UK 197p 2008

    EPA Science Inventory

    “The Road to Sustainability, GDP and future generations” by Pulselli, F.M., Bastianoni, S., Marchettini, N. Tiezzi, E. was reviewed upon request by the journal’s editor. Briefly, this book presents the authors’ perspective on the complex and important topic of sustainability. Su...

  10. Book Review: "The Road to Sustainability, GDP and Future Generations" Pulselli et al, WIT Press, Southhampton, UK 197p 2008

    EPA Science Inventory

    “The Road to Sustainability, GDP and future generations” by Pulselli, F.M., Bastianoni, S., Marchettini, N. Tiezzi, E. was reviewed upon request by the journal’s editor. Briefly, this book presents the authors’ perspective on the complex and important topic of sustainability. Su...

  11. BOOK REVIEW: Once Upon Einstein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannetto, E.

    2007-07-01

    Thibault Damour is a theoretical physicist, and a member of the French Academy of Sciences. This book is the translation, by Eric Novak, of the original French Si Einstein m'etait conté (Le Cherche Midi, 2005). It is neither a book of theoretical physics nor a biography of Einstein. It is not a book of history nor philosophy of science. In Damour's words it was written to encourage the reader to share with Einstein `those times when he understood some part of the hidden order of the universe'. It is a relatively short book, written in a very fluent style, but it deals with all the major problems and achievements of Einstein's works. Starting from special relativity, it continues with general relativity, quantum theories, unified field theory and a brief overview of the actual research related to Einstein's legacy. It is essentially a popular science book with some related exploration in history and philosophy to interpret physical theories. The most important problem discussed by Damour is the nature of time. On this subject, there is a very interesting short paragraph (pp 33--35) dedicated to the reception of the relativity idea by the great writer Marcel Proust and its counterpart within À la Recherche du Temps Perdu. A correct discussion of the implications of a relativistic time should imply the distinction of the different possible interpretations of this concept. Damour seems to conclude that only one interpretation is possible: `time does not exist', flowing of time is an illusion. One has to know that Einstein's ideas on time were related to Spinoza's perspective of a knowledge sub specie aeternitatis. However, other interpretations are possible and are related to the idea of time as an actuality. Damour speaks about the controversy between Einstein and Bergson, but Bergson is considered as a philosopher who did not understand relativity. This philosophical problem of relativistic time is indeed related to a historical problem briefly discussed by Damour

  12. The Reviewing of Controversial Juvenile Books: A Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow, Sherry R.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a study which examined reviewers' treatment of controversial juvenile books in Booklist, Bulletin of Center for Children's Books, Horn Book, and School Library Journal. The total number of controversial books reviewed by each journal, promptness of reviews, and extent of discussion of controversial features are discussed. (MBR)

  13. Scientific value of systematic reviews: survey of editors of core clinical journals.

    PubMed

    Meerpohl, Joerg J; Herrle, Florian; Reinders, Stefan; Antes, Gerd; von Elm, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Synthesizing research evidence using systematic and rigorous methods has become a key feature of evidence-based medicine and knowledge translation. Systematic reviews (SRs) may or may not include a meta-analysis depending on the suitability of available data. They are often being criticised as 'secondary research' and denied the status of original research. Scientific journals play an important role in the publication process. How they appraise a given type of research influences the status of that research in the scientific community. We investigated the attitudes of editors of core clinical journals towards SRs and their value for publication. We identified the 118 journals labelled as "core clinical journals" by the National Library of Medicine, USA in April 2009. The journals' editors were surveyed by email in 2009 and asked whether they considered SRs as original research projects; whether they published SRs; and for which section of the journal they would consider a SR manuscript. The editors of 65 journals (55%) responded. Most respondents considered SRs to be original research (71%) and almost all journals (93%) published SRs. Several editors regarded the use of Cochrane methodology or a meta-analysis as quality criteria; for some respondents these criteria were premises for the consideration of SRs as original research. Journals placed SRs in various sections such as "Review" or "Feature article". Characterization of non-responding journals showed that about two thirds do publish systematic reviews. Currently, the editors of most core clinical journals consider SRs original research. Our findings are limited by a non-responder rate of 45%. Individual comments suggest that this is a grey area and attitudes differ widely. A debate about the definition of 'original research' in the context of SRs is warranted.

  14. Letter to the editor : Impartial review is key.

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, G. W.; Materials Science Division

    2002-08-22

    The News Feature, 'Misconduct in physics: Time to wise up? [Nature 418, 120-121; 2002], raises important issues that the physical-science community must face. Argonne National Laboratory's code of ethics calls for a response very similar to that of Bell Labs, namely: 'The Laboratory director may appoint an ad-hoc scientific review committee to investigate internal or external charges of scientific misconduct, fraud, falsification of data, misinterpretation of data, or other activities involving scientific or technical matters.'

  15. Book review of "Encyclopedia of soil science"

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This book review describes "Encyclopedia of soil science" edited by Chesworth et al. (2008), an update of the 1979 version of "The encyclopedia of soil science" edited by Fairbridge and Finkl. It is compared with Hillel et al. (2004) second edition of "Encyclopedia of soils in the environment" and w...

  16. BOOK REVIEW: String Theory in a Nutshell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skenderis, Kostas

    2007-11-01

    The book 'String Theory in a Nutshell' by Elias Kiritsis provides a comprehensive introduction to modern string theory. String theory is the leading candidate for a theory that successfully unifies all fundamental forces of nature, including gravity. The subject has been continuously developing since the early 1970s, with classic textbooks on the subject being those of Green, Schwarz and Witten (1987) and Polchinski (1998). Since the latter was published there have been substantial developments, in particular in understanding black holes and gravity/gauge theory dualities. A textbook treatment of this important material is clearly needed, both by students and researchers in string theory and by mathematicians and physicists working in related fields. This book has a good selection of material, starting from basics and moving into classic and modern topics. In particular, Kiritsis' presentation of the basic material is complementary to that of the earlier textbooks and he includes a number of topics which are not easily found or covered adequately elsewhere, for example, loop corrections to string effective couplings. Overall the book nicely covers the major advances of the last ten years, including (non-perturbative) string dualities, black hole physics, AdS/CFT and matrix models. It provides a concise but fairly complete introduction to these subjects which can be used both by students and by researchers. Moreover the emphasis is on results that are reasonably established, as is appropriate for a textbook; concise summaries are given for subjects which are still in flux, with references to relevant reviews and papers. A positive feature of the book is that the bibliography sections at the end of each chapter provide a comprehensive guide to the literature. The bibliographies point to reviews and pedagogical papers on subjects covered in this book as well as those that were omitted. It is rare for a textbook to contain such a self-contained and detailed guide to

  17. BOOK REVIEW: Image-Guided IMRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayles, P.

    2006-12-01

    This book provides comprehensive coverage of the subject of intensity modulated radiotherapy and the associated imaging. Most of the names associated with advanced radiotherapy can be found among the 80 authors and the book is therefore an authoritative reference text. The early chapters deal with the basic principles and include an interesting comparison between views of quality assurance for IMRT from Europe and North America. It is refreshing to see that the advice given has moved on from the concept of individual patient based quality control to more generic testing of the delivery system. However, the point is made that the whole process including the data transfer needs to be quality assured and the need for thorough commissioning of the process is emphasised. The `tricks' needed to achieve a dose based IMRT plan are well covered by the group at Ghent and there is an interesting summary of biological aspects of treatment planning for IMRT by Andrzej Niemierko. The middle section of the book deals with advanced imaging aspects of both treatment planning and delivery. The contributions of PET and MR imaging are well covered and there is a rather rambling section on molecular imaging. Image guidance in radiotherapy treatment is addressed including the concept of adaptive radiotherapy. The treatment aspects could perhaps have merited some more coverage, but there is a very thorough discussion of 4D techniques. The final section of the book considers each site of the body in turn. This will be found useful by those wishing to embark on IMRT in a new area, although some of the sections are more comprehensive than others. The book contains a wealth of interesting and thought provoking articles giving details as well as broad principles, and would be a useful addition to every departmental library. The editors have done a good job of ensuring that the different chapters are complementary, and of encouraging a systematic approach to the descriptions of IMRT in

  18. BOOK REVIEW: Generation and Application of High Power Microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirshfield, J. L.

    1998-08-01

    A question often posed upon publication of a summer school proceedings is whether the contents are of lasting value, or are only an archive or diary of the gathering. This issue is exacerbated by the year's delay (or more) that is all too customary between the school itself and publication; and of course the attendees have had the contents in note form all along. Only occasionally, in this reviewer's experience, are the contents worth the purchase price of the book; and even less often is the book a useful reference for course work in a teaching context. It is thus gratifying to report that the present volume should be of lasting value, and should be a useful reference for students in high power microwave physics and related fields to have and to hold during their formative years. The editors, Professor Alan Cairns of the University of St Andrews, and Professor Alan Phelps of the University of Strathclyde, have assembled some 14 essays in the book on a range of topics on microwave source physics and the uses of high power microwaves for fusion plasma heating. Amongst the essays are several tutorials, including Alan Phelps' own 8 page introduction; Michael Petelin's elegant overview of a range of classical spontaneous and stimulated radiation processes for free electrons; Rodolfo Bonifacio's exposition on free electron waveguide lasers; James Eastwood's overview of computer modelling methods; Georges Faillon's review of klystrons; Alan Cairns's and Nat Fisch's lucid descriptions of the physical basis of plasma heating with intense microwaves; and Manfred Thumm's two thorough contributions on microwave mode converters and on applications. The other essays are less tutorial, but more topical, with expositions on new results on gyro-amplifiers by Monica Blank; on vacuum microelectronics issues for microwave power amplifiers by Morag Garven and Robert Parker; John Vomvoridis's theory of cyclotron resonance interactions for generation of high power microwaves using a

  19. Quality and peer review of research: an adjudicating role for editors.

    PubMed

    Newton, Douglas P

    2010-05-01

    Peer review gives research a stamp of approval, but the reviews themselves can be flawed. This is potentially serious for the writer, the journal, and journal user. This study describes shortcomings of the peer review process and condenses them into an explanatory framework involving situational, personal, social, and ethical factors. Some proposals to improve matters are impractical and may make them worse. Some data is offered which illustrates the problem and suggests a potential solution. Informed editors who avoid mechanical approaches engage cautiously and critically with reviews and guard against bias, even in themselves, could make a significant difference.

  20. Book review: Birds of Delaware

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterjohn, Bruce G.

    2001-01-01

    Located along Delaware Bay and the Atlantic coast, the state of Delaware’s significance for bird conservation has been well established for decades. The extensive tidal habitats and marshes bordering Delaware Bay host shorebird and waterbird populations of hemispheric importance, and protecting these populations has become an urgent conservation priority in recent years. Other habitats found in the state vary from barrier beaches to dry coniferous woods on the coastal plain and mesophytic communities along the Piedmont in the north, allowing a diverse avifauna to prosper within a small geographic area. Ornithologists and birders have actively studied birds within the state for more than a century, but surprisingly, no single reference has provided a complete summary of the status and distribution of the state’s birds until publication of the Birds of Delaware.Review info: Birds of Delaware. By Gene K. Hess, Richard L. West, Maurice V. Barnhill III, and Lorraine M. Fleming, 2000. ISBN: 0-8229-4069-8, 635 pp.

  1. Book review: Reptiles and amphibians: Self-assessment color review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, David E.

    2017-01-01

    No abstract available.Book information: Reptiles and Amphibians: Self-Assessment Color Review. 2nd Edition. By Fredric L. Frye. CRC Press, Taylor and Francis Group, Boca Raton, Florida USA. 2015. 252 pp. ISBN 9781482257601.

  2. The Book Review Genre: A Structural Move Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmani Nodoushan, Mohammad Ali; Montazeran, Hamed

    2012-01-01

    The current study aimed at showing whether native, ESL and EFL book review authors differed in terms of types of rhetorical moves the employ in the reviews they write. 60 book reviews (N = 60) from applied linguistics journals were randomly selected from a pool of 87 book reviews published in "Asian EFL Journal," "ESP,"…

  3. Best Books for Spring 1972

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerhardt, Lillian N.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    Titles of what are considered to be outstanding in terms of content, design or illustration as selected by the editors of School Library Journal Book Review" are presented. (47 references) (Author/NH)

  4. Conflicts of interest in biomedical publications: considerations for authors, peer reviewers, and editors

    PubMed Central

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Ayvazyan, Lilit; Akazhanov, Nurbek A.; Kitas, George D.

    2013-01-01

    This article overviews evidence on common instances of conflict of interest (COI) in research publications from general and specialized fields of biomedicine. Financial COIs are viewed as the most powerful source of bias, which may even distort citation outcomes of sponsored publications. The urge to boost journal citation indicators by stakeholders of science communication is viewed as a new secondary interest, which may compromize the interaction between authors, peer reviewers, and editors. Comprehensive policies on disclosure of financial and non-financial COIs in scholarly journals are presented as proxies of their indexing in evidence-based databases, and examples of successful medical journals are discussed in detail. Reports on clinical trials, systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and clinical practice guidelines may be unduly influenced by author-pharmaceutical industry relations, but these publications do not always contain explicit disclosures to allow the readers to judge the reliability of the published conclusions and practice-changing recommendations. The article emphasizes the importance of adhering to the guidance on COI from learned associations such as the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE). It also considers joint efforts of authors, peer reviewers, and editors as a foundation for appropriately defining and disclosing potential COIs. PMID:24382859

  5. Conflicts of interest in biomedical publications: considerations for authors, peer reviewers, and editors.

    PubMed

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Ayvazyan, Lilit; Akazhanov, Nurbek A; Kitas, George D

    2013-12-01

    This article overviews evidence on common instances of conflict of interest (COI) in research publications from general and specialized fields of biomedicine. Financial COIs are viewed as the most powerful source of bias, which may even distort citation outcomes of sponsored publications. The urge to boost journal citation indicators by stakeholders of science communication is viewed as a new secondary interest, which may compromize the interaction between authors, peer reviewers and editors. Comprehensive policies on disclosure of financial and non-financial COIs in scholarly journals are presented as proxies of their indexing in evidence-based databases, and examples of successful medical journals are discussed in detail. Reports on clinical trials, systematic reviews, meta-analyses and clinical practice guidelines may be unduly influenced by author-pharmaceutical industry relations, but these publications do not always contain explicit disclosures to allow the readers to judge the reliability of the published conclusions and practice-changing recommendations. The article emphasizes the importance of adhering to the guidance on COI from learned associations such as the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE). It also considers joint efforts of authors, peer reviewers and editors as a foundation for appropriately defining and disclosing potential COIs.

  6. [Book review] The wildfowl of Britain and Europe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krapu, G.L.

    1984-01-01

    Of about 140 extant species of waterfowl in the world, 54 occur in the western Pale- arctic. In this, his most recent book, Ogilvie introduces the reader to the waterfowl of Europe including occasional visitors and introduced species. Although written primarily for laymen, ornithologists will find the book informative but should not expect a major treatise on European waterfowl. The text is drawn primarily from Volume I of "The hand-book of the birds of Europe, North Africa, and the Middle East: the birds of the Western Palearctic," of which the author was an editor.

  7. Boerhaave: Author and Editor *

    PubMed Central

    Lindeboom, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    The many facets of Herman Boerhaave's life are presented. He was a renowned teacher, physician, author, and editor. Discussed here are his activities as cataloger of the Vossius Collection, author of books on chemistry, botany, and medicine, and as editor of works by Vesalius and early Greek medical writers. Printing and bookselling in Leiden during Boerhaave's era are described. Images PMID:4596962

  8. Book review: The Wilderness Debate Rages On: Continuing the Great New Wilderness Debate

    Treesearch

    Peter Landres

    2009-01-01

    The Wilderness Debate Rages On is a collection of mostly previously published papers about the meaning, value, and role of wilderness and continues the discussion that was propelled by the editors' previous book The Great New Wilderness Debate (also a collection of papers) published in 1998. The editors state that this sequel to their previous book is mandated...

  9. Editors' Fall Picks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffert, Barbara; Heilbrun, Margaret; Kuzyk, Raya; Kim, Ann; McCormack, Heather; Katterjohn, Anna; Burns, Ann; Williams, Wilda

    2008-01-01

    From the fall's cascade of great new books, "Library Journal's" editors select their favorites--a dark rendition of Afghan life, a look at the "self-esteem trap," a celebration of Brooklyn activism, and much more.

  10. Children's Books in Review. Books That Give Cultural Insights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winfield, Evelyn T.

    1992-01-01

    Presents a selection of children's books that feature a variety of topics and literary representations with insight into other cultures. The books focus on foods, historical events, reliance on the environment, folktales, family experiences, community heritage, words and phrases, and linguistic eccentricities. (SM)

  11. Children's Books in Review. Books That Give Cultural Insights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winfield, Evelyn T.

    1992-01-01

    Presents a selection of children's books that feature a variety of topics and literary representations with insight into other cultures. The books focus on foods, historical events, reliance on the environment, folktales, family experiences, community heritage, words and phrases, and linguistic eccentricities. (SM)

  12. BOOK REVIEW: European Perceptions of Terra Australis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, Christiaan

    2012-12-01

    transposition errors and thus creating pidgin or even fake geographical appellations. The evidence presented in this work brings out many issues of cartographic authorship credit, exploratory competition and plagiarism, and even ghostwriting. The book is of interest, among others, to cultural historians, historians of science, historians of cartography, the visual arts, and to scholars in the history of slavery and post-colonial studies. The Editors of this Volume have done a fine job by arranging all references into one single bibliography list at the end of the book: as such, the reader has access to one alphabetical list of about 30 pages of sources and references. The book contains more than 50 figures, mostly zonal maps and charts, world maps, and also reproductions of painted landscapes and portraits. Regretfully, none of these illustrations is in colour, and the low-contrast greytone reproductions lack the necessary luster to fully appreciate the scientific and artistic content. Worse even, some graphics are extremely poor in terms of image resolution: for example, a full-page reproduction from a 15th-century morality play has been copied from the given website at a graphical resolution of 85 dpi only. This is in complete contradiction with the hardcover-with-sleeve product of that price level.

  13. Research Review: Children and Poverty [Book Review].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holman, Bob

    1994-01-01

    This study is a careful review and analysis of recent official statistics and academic studies about children and poverty in the United Kingdom. Kumar fully and succinctly identifies the link between increasing child poverty and economic, demographic, and policy changes and the greater risks of children from ethnic minorities. (SLD)

  14. Research Review: Children and Poverty [Book Review].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holman, Bob

    1994-01-01

    This study is a careful review and analysis of recent official statistics and academic studies about children and poverty in the United Kingdom. Kumar fully and succinctly identifies the link between increasing child poverty and economic, demographic, and policy changes and the greater risks of children from ethnic minorities. (SLD)

  15. BOOK REVIEW: Quantum Gravity (2nd edn)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, Viqar

    2008-06-01

    There has been a flurry of books on quantum gravity in the past few years. The first edition of Kiefer's book appeared in 2004, about the same time as Carlo Rovelli's book with the same title. This was soon followed by Thomas Thiemann's 'Modern Canonical Quantum General Relativity'. Although the main focus of each of these books is non-perturbative and non-string approaches to the quantization of general relativity, they are quite orthogonal in temperament, style, subject matter and mathematical detail. Rovelli and Thiemann focus primarily on loop quantum gravity (LQG), whereas Kiefer attempts a broader introduction and review of the subject that includes chapters on string theory and decoherence. Kiefer's second edition attempts an even wider and somewhat ambitious sweep with 'new sections on asymptotic safety, dynamical triangulation, primordial black holes, the information-loss problem, loop quantum cosmology, and other topics'. The presentation of these current topics is necessarily brief given the size of the book, but effective in encapsulating the main ideas in some cases. For instance the few pages devoted to loop quantum cosmology describe how the mini-superspace reduction of the quantum Hamiltonian constraint of LQG becomes a difference equation, whereas the discussion of 'dynamical triangulations', an approach to defining a discretized Lorentzian path integral for quantum gravity, is less detailed. The first few chapters of the book provide, in a roughly historical sequence, the covariant and canonical metric variable approach to the subject developed in the 1960s and 70s. The problem(s) of time in quantum gravity are nicely summarized in the chapter on quantum geometrodynamics, followed by a detailed and effective introduction of the WKB approach and the semi-classical approximation. These topics form the traditional core of the subject. The next three chapters cover LQG, quantization of black holes, and quantum cosmology. Of these the chapter on LQG is

  16. Book Reviews as a Tool for Assessing Publisher Reputation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordy, Matthew L.; McGrath, Eileen L.; Rutledge, John B.

    1999-01-01

    Reports on the use of book reviews as selection tools to establish the reputations of publishers. Examines the quality of books of several presses, and compares each publisher against a control sample, finding discernible variations in how reviewers express themselves about books. Discusses the relationship between price and qualit,y and…

  17. Do Author-Suggested Reviewers Rate Submissions More Favorably than Editor-Suggested Reviewers? A Study on Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics

    PubMed Central

    Bornmann, Lutz; Daniel, Hans-Dieter

    2010-01-01

    Background Ratings in journal peer review can be affected by sources of bias. The bias variable investigated here was the information on whether authors had suggested a possible reviewer for their manuscript, and whether the editor had taken up that suggestion or had chosen a reviewer that had not been suggested by the authors. Studies have shown that author-suggested reviewers rate manuscripts more favorably than editor-suggested reviewers do. Methodology/Principal Findings Reviewers' ratings on three evaluation criteria and the reviewers' final publication recommendations were available for 552 manuscripts (in total 1145 reviews) that were submitted to Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, an interactive open access journal using public peer review (authors' and reviewers' comments are publicly exchanged). Public peer review is supposed to bring a new openness to the reviewing process that will enhance its objectivity. In the statistical analysis the quality of a manuscript was controlled for to prevent favorable reviewers' ratings from being attributable to quality instead of to the bias variable. Conclusions/Significance Our results agree with those from other studies that editor-suggested reviewers rated manuscripts between 30% and 42% less favorably than author-suggested reviewers. Against this backdrop journal editors should consider either doing without the use of author-suggested reviewers or, if they are used, bringing in more than one editor-suggested reviewer for the review process (so that the review by author-suggested reviewers can be put in perspective). PMID:20976226

  18. Do author-suggested reviewers rate submissions more favorably than editor-suggested reviewers? A study on atmospheric chemistry and physics.

    PubMed

    Bornmann, Lutz; Daniel, Hans-Dieter

    2010-10-14

    Ratings in journal peer review can be affected by sources of bias. The bias variable investigated here was the information on whether authors had suggested a possible reviewer for their manuscript, and whether the editor had taken up that suggestion or had chosen a reviewer that had not been suggested by the authors. Studies have shown that author-suggested reviewers rate manuscripts more favorably than editor-suggested reviewers do. Reviewers' ratings on three evaluation criteria and the reviewers' final publication recommendations were available for 552 manuscripts (in total 1145 reviews) that were submitted to Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, an interactive open access journal using public peer review (authors' and reviewers' comments are publicly exchanged). Public peer review is supposed to bring a new openness to the reviewing process that will enhance its objectivity. In the statistical analysis the quality of a manuscript was controlled for to prevent favorable reviewers' ratings from being attributable to quality instead of to the bias variable. Our results agree with those from other studies that editor-suggested reviewers rated manuscripts between 30% and 42% less favorably than author-suggested reviewers. Against this backdrop journal editors should consider either doing without the use of author-suggested reviewers or, if they are used, bringing in more than one editor-suggested reviewer for the review process (so that the review by author-suggested reviewers can be put in perspective).

  19. Book review: Oklahoma Breeding Bird Atlas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterjohn, Bruce G.

    2004-01-01

    The first North American breeding bird atlases were initiated during the 1970s. With atlases completed or ongoing in more than 40 U.S. states and most Canadian provinces, these projects are now familiar to professional ornithologists and amateur birders. This book provides the results of the Oklahoma Breeding Bird Atlas, the data for which were collected during 1997–2001. Its appearance less than 3 years after completing fieldwork is remarkable and everyone associated with its timely publication should be congratulated for their efforts.Review info: Oklahoma Breeding Bird Atlas. By Dan L. Reinking, 2004. ISBN: 0806136146, 528 pp.

  20. Current Status of Biomedical Book Reviewing: Part II. Time Lag in Biomedical Book Reviewing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ching-Chih

    1974-01-01

    This part of the study explores the effectiveness of the review media in terms of speed of reviewing, comprehensiveness of review treatment, and authority. The time lags for the fifty-four journals varied widely, the mean ranging from 5.8 months to forty-two months. The time lags for all 3,347 reviews varied even more widely, ranging from less than a month to 108 months after a book was off the press. The 3,347 reviews had a mean time lag of 10.43 months and a standard deviation of 6.63 months. PMID:4826480

  1. Children's Books in Review: Expand Kids' Knowledge with Nonfiction Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winfield, Evelyn T.

    1991-01-01

    Examines several current nonfiction books that can expand a child's knowledge of a wide variety of subjects, noting that the breadth of a child's knowledge base affects his or her reading development. Subjects discussed include dinosaurs, animal preservation, insects, ecology, history, and drugs and alcohol. (SM)

  2. Current Status of Biomedical Book Reviewing: Part IV. Major American and British Biomedical Book Publishers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ching-chih

    1974-01-01

    This is the fourth part of a comprehensive, quantitative study of biomedical book reviews. The data base of the total project was built from statistics of 3,347 reviews of 2,067 biomedical books taken from all 1970 issues of fifty-four reviewing journals. This part of the study identifies the major American and British biomedical book publishers in terms of their quantitative production of book titles reviewed, and determines the relationships among these publishers. It is found that Williams & Wilkins, Charles C Thomas, Academic Press, and Springer Verlag are the most productive biomedical book publishers in terms of books reviewed in 1970. These four publishers accounted for 32% of the 1,674 books available in the United States and reviewed in the reviewing media in 1970. Williams & Wilkins is especially significant by virtue of reprint activity. The present study also explores the price trend of biomedical books. It is found that the mean price for 1,077 books studied was $16.20 per volume, with a standard deviation of $9.42. PMID:4466508

  3. Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newland, Robert J.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Reviews four organic chemistry computer programs and three books. Software includes: (1) NMR Simulator 7--for IBM or Macintosh, (2) Nucleic Acid Structure and Synthesis--for IBM, (3) Molecular Design Editor--for Apple II, and (4) Synthetic Adventure--for Apple II and IBM. Book topics include physical chemistry, polymer pioneers, and the basics of…

  4. Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newland, Robert J.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Reviews four organic chemistry computer programs and three books. Software includes: (1) NMR Simulator 7--for IBM or Macintosh, (2) Nucleic Acid Structure and Synthesis--for IBM, (3) Molecular Design Editor--for Apple II, and (4) Synthetic Adventure--for Apple II and IBM. Book topics include physical chemistry, polymer pioneers, and the basics of…

  5. BOOK REVIEW: Time, Quantum and Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Leaf

    2004-04-01

    Time, Quantum and Information, a paean to Professor Carl Friedrich von Weizsäcker, commemorates his 90th birthday. The range of Professor Weizsäcker’s endeavours is an exhilarating example of what can be accomplished by one freely-soaring human spirit, who is at the same time a physicist, a philosopher, and a humanitarian. The editors, Lutz Castell and Otfried Ischebeck, have assembled an admirable collection of essays and articles written by Weizsäcker’s past students, collaborators, colleagues and acquaintances. Time, Quantum and Information offers the reader a panoply of unique insights into twentieth century science and history. Entangled with the stories about Weizsäcker’s influence on the lives of some of the contributors are discussions of the activities of German scientists during and following World War II, emphasizing their reluctance to work on atomic weapons following the war. By outlining Weizsäcker’s role in the early development of numerous tributaries of physical science, the book gives us a new glimpse into the origins of some of its disparate domains, such as nuclear physics, the physics of stellar nucleosynthesis, cosmic ray physics, fluid turbulence, and the formation of the solar system. We physicists have all studied Weizsäcker’s semi-empirical mass formula describing the binding energy of nuclei. We are aware too that both he and Hans Bethe independently discovered the nuclear cycles that provide stars with their enduring energy output. We have studied the Weizsäcker--Williams technique of calculating the bremsstrahlung of relativistic electrons. But how many of us know of Weizsäcker’s work in fluid turbulence that he, like Werner Heisenberg under whom he had earned his doctorate, pursued while holed up in Farm Hall? And how many of us are aware of his introduction of turbulent viscosity to account for the origin of planetary orbits, involving the migration of mass inwards and angular momentum outwards? Moreover, before

  6. Science Books, A Quarterly Review, Volume 7 Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Books A Quarterly Review, 1971

    1971-01-01

    Science Books is published quarterly to review trade books, textbooks, and reference works in the pure and applied sciences for students in the elementary school, secondary school, and first two years of college. It includes selected advanced and professional books useful for reference by students and faculty members. The approximately 234 titles…

  7. Science Books, A Quarterly Review, Volume 7 Number 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association for the Advancement of Science, Washington, DC.

    "Science Books" is published quarterly to review trade books, textbooks, and reference works in the pure and applied sciences for students in the elementary school, secondary school, and first two years of college. It includes selected advanced and professional books useful for reference by students and faculty members. The approximately 200…

  8. Science Books, A Quarterly Review, Volume 7 Number 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association for the Advancement of Science, Washington, DC.

    "Science Books" is published quarterly to review trade books, textbooks, and reference works in the pure and applied sciences for students in the elementary school, secondary school, and first two years of college. It includes selected advanced and professional books useful for reference by students and faculty members. The approximately 240…

  9. The Young Adult Book Review Media: An Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locker, Linda S.

    This study examines eight reviewing tools which include reviews for young adult (YA) books. The following journals are examined to determine scope, coverage, analysis of content, and reviewing policies: "Booklist,""School Library Journal,""Horn Book Magazine,""Wilson Library Bulletin,""Voice of Youth…

  10. BOOK REVIEW: Solid State Physics: An Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakoby, Bernhard

    2009-07-01

    There's a wealth of excellent textbooks on solid state physics. The author of the present book is well aware of this fact and does not attempt to write just another one. Rather, he has provided a very compact introduction to solid state physics for third-year students. As we are faced with the continuous appearance interdisciplinary fields and associated study curricula in natural and engineering sciences (biophysics, mechatronics, etc), a compact text in solid state physics would be appreciated by students of these disciplines as well. The book features 11 chapters where each is provided with supplementary discussion questions and problems. The first chapters deal with a review of chemical bonding mechanisms, crystal structures and mechanical properties of solids, which are brief but by no means superficial. The following, somewhat more detailed chapter on thermal properties of lattices includes a nice introduction to phonons. The foundations of solid state electronics are treated in the next three chapters. Here the author first discusses the classical treatment of electronic behaviour in metals (Drude model) and continues with a quantum-theoretical approach starting with the free-electron model and leading to the band structures in conductive solids. The next chapter is devoted to semiconductors and ends with a brief but, with respect to the topical scope, adequate discussion of semiconductor devices. The classical topics of magnetic and dielectric behaviour are treated in the sequel. The book closes with a chapter on superconductivity and a brief chapter covering the modern topics of quantum confinement and aspects of nanoscale physics. In my opinion, the author has succeeded in creating a very concise yet not superficial textbook. The account presented often probes subjects deep enough to lay the basis for a thorough understanding, preparing the reader for more specialized textbooks. For instance, I think that this book may serve as an excellent first

  11. BOOK REVIEW: Rotation and Accretion Powered Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspi, V. M.

    2008-03-01

    Pulsar astrophysics has come a long way in the 40 years since the discovery of the first pulsar by Bell and Hewish. From humble beginnings as bits of 'scruff' on the Cambridge University group's chart recorder paper, the field of pulsars has blossomed into a major area of mainstream astrophysics, with an unparalleled diversity of astrophysical applications. These range from Nobel-celebrated testing of general relativity in the strong-field regime to constraining the equation-of-state of ultradense matter; from probing the winds of massive stars to globular cluster evolution. Previous notable books on the subject of pulsars have tended to focus on some particular topic in the field. The classic text Pulsars by Manchester and Taylor (1977 San Francisco, CA: Freeman) targeted almost exclusively rotation-powered radio pulsars, while the Mészáros book High-Energy Radiation from Magnetized Neutron Stars (1992 Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press) considered both rotation- and accretion-powered neutron stars, but focused on their radiation at x-ray energies and above. The recent book Neutron Stars 1 by Haensel et al (2007 Berlin: Springer) considers only the equation of state and neutron-star structure. Into this context appears Rotation and Accretion Powered Pulsars, by Pranab Ghosh. In contrast to other books, here the author takes an encyclopedic approach and attempts to synthesize practically all of the major aspects of the two main types of neutron star. This is ambitious. The only comparable undertaking is the useful but more elementary Lyne and Graham-Smith text Pulsar Astronomy (1998 Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), or Compact Stellar X-ray Sources (eds Lewin and van der Klis, 2006 Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), an anthology of technical review articles that also includes black hole topics. Rotation and Accretion Powered Pulsars thus fills a clear void in the field, providing a readable, graduate-level book that covers nearly everything you

  12. Electronic Books: A Review and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rao, Siriginidi Subba

    2003-01-01

    Discusses electronic books and derives a comprehensive definition. Lists various types of e-books, their characteristics, pros and cons, and compares e-books reader hardware and software with their specifications and characteristics. Considers the publishing industry, impact on libraries, and digital rights management. (Author/LRW)

  13. Electronic Books: A Review and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rao, Siriginidi Subba

    2003-01-01

    Discusses electronic books and derives a comprehensive definition. Lists various types of e-books, their characteristics, pros and cons, and compares e-books reader hardware and software with their specifications and characteristics. Considers the publishing industry, impact on libraries, and digital rights management. (Author/LRW)

  14. [Message from editors to authors: review articles. How can the scientific and educational results be improved?].

    PubMed

    Reyes, H; Goic, A; Kauffmann, R

    1993-06-01

    Most biomedical journals include review articles that pretend to provide the readers with an updated, synthetic and critical appraisal of some important topic. These articles are usually written by experts in the topics reviewed. There are no conventional or universally accepted requisites for the formal organization of contents in a review article. This is in contrast with other kinds of original articles. Therefore, to guide the authors on how to improve the review articles to be submitted to Revista Medica de Chile, some recommendations are proposed. These recommendations were based in the editors' experience and in other pertinent publications: 1) The scope and purpose of the review article should be established in the introductory paragraphs; 2) The methodology used in the selection of the literature reviewed and the time span covered by the search, should also be specified; 3) The author of the review article should systematically appraise the validity of the methods employed in the papers reviewed. A similar attitude should be observed with regards to the results, discussions and conclusions. The limitations and inconsistencies found should be pointed out; 4) The author of the review article should state his (her) own conclusions, identifying the solid as well as the weakly established facts; 5) Whenever feasible, a proposal of future lines of research envisioned after reviewing the literature, is commendable; 6) The literary style of the article should be kept as interesting as possible, to motivate the prospective readers; 7) The scope of the specific journal where the author intends to submit the review article, should always be kept in mind.

  15. BOOK REVIEW: Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelmann, F.

    2007-07-01

    This new book by Kenro Miyamoto provides an up-to-date overview of the status of fusion research and the important parts of the underlying plasma physics at a moment where, due to the start of ITER construction, an important step in fusion research has been made and many new research workers will enter the field. For them, and also for interested graduate students and physicists in other fields, the book provides a good introduction into fusion physics as, on the whole, the presentation of the material is quite appropriate for getting acquainted with the field on the basis of just general knowledge in physics. There is overlap with Miyamoto's earlier book Plasma Physics for Nuclear Fusion (MIT Press, Cambridge, USA, 1989) but only in a few sections on subjects which have not evolved since. The presentation is subdivided into two parts of about equal length. The first part, following a concise survey of the physics basis of thermonuclear fusion and of plasmas in general, covers the various magnetic configurations studied for plasma confinement (tokamak; reversed field pinch; stellarator; mirror-type geometries) and introduces the specific properties of plasmas in these devices. Plasma confinement in tokamaks is treated in particular detail, in compliance with the importance of this field in fusion research. This includes a review of the ITER concept and of the rationale for the choice of ITER's parameters. In the second part, selected topics in fusion plasma physics (macroscopic instabilities; propagation of waves; kinetic effects such as energy transfer between waves and particles including microscopic instabilities as well as plasma heating and current drive; transport phenomena induced by turbulence) are presented systematically. While the emphasis is on displaying the essential physics, deeper theoretical analysis is also provided here. Every chapter is complemented by a few related problems, but only partial hints for their solution are given. A selection of

  16. BOOK REVIEW: The Oxford Companion to Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, Peter

    2008-10-01

    compare the two books as I am clearly biased, but looking at mine again in the course of writing this review it struck me how much the landscape of cosmology has changed in the relatively short time that has elapsed between their publication dates. The past decade has seen the discovery of cosmic acceleration, detailed all-sky maps of the microwave background, the completion of huge galaxy surveys, and the synthesis of these observations into a standard 'concordance' cosmological model. If someone has the time and energy to undertake a project like this in ten years' time, I wonder if the current consensus will have survived.

  17. An Estimation of Difficulty for Academic Books using Reviews

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Yuki; Nambo, Hidetaka; Kimura, Haruhiko

    A collaborate filtering has been generally used as a method which recommends items to customers. However, recommending academic books, it need to consider difficulty of them and individual amount of knowledge as well as user's preference. If the recommendation method considers only user's preference, they might regret after buying or reading recommended book because it won't match user's appropriate level. In this paper, we focus on academic books and propose a method which estimates the difficulty of academic books using user's reviews. Estimating difficulty of books will support users to search and recommend academic books that match user's skill. Moreover, we evaluated applying our method to academic text books about C programming Language. We verified that our method is more effective than traditional methods for academic books.

  18. Kids Review Kids' Books: 375 Reviews of Favorite Books That Get Children To Read and Read and Read! Grades 2-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scholastic Inc., New York, NY.

    This resource book contains reviews, written by children, of 375 "can't put down" children's books. Reviews were selected from over 10,000 submissions, the results of a national survey in which children reviewed their favorite books. The book makes it easy to locate books by listing: (1) title; (2) author; (3) number of pages; (4) genre…

  19. Science Books, A Quarterly Review, Volume 8 Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association for the Advancement of Science, Washington, DC.

    This quarterly journal reviews books in different science fields which could be used by teachers in elementary school, secondary school, and in the first two years of college. Not only are the textbooks reviewed, but trade books and reference works in pure and applied sciences are included. Annotations are listed in order of Dewey Decimal…

  20. 12 CFR 995.10 - Review of books and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Review of books and records. 995.10 Section 995.10 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD NON-BANK SYSTEM ENTITIES FINANCING CORPORATION OPERATIONS § 995.10 Review of books and records. The Finance Board shall examine the Financing Corporation...

  1. Science Books, A Quarterly Review, Volume 8 Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association for the Advancement of Science, Washington, DC.

    This quarterly journal reviews books in different science fields which could be used by teachers in elementary school, secondary school, and in the first two years of college. Not only are the textbooks reviewed, but trade books and reference works in pure and applied sciences are included. Annotations are listed in order of Dewey Decimal…

  2. 12 CFR 995.10 - Review of books and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Review of books and records. 995.10 Section 995.10 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD NON-BANK SYSTEM ENTITIES FINANCING CORPORATION OPERATIONS § 995.10 Review of books and records. The Finance Board shall examine the Financing Corporation at...

  3. 12 CFR 995.10 - Review of books and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Review of books and records. 995.10 Section 995.10 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD NON-BANK SYSTEM ENTITIES FINANCING CORPORATION OPERATIONS § 995.10 Review of books and records. The Finance Board shall examine the Financing Corporation at...

  4. 12 CFR 1271.39 - Review of books and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Review of books and records. 1271.39 Section 1271.39 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS MISCELLANEOUS FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK OPERATIONS AND AUTHORITIES Financing Corporation Operations § 1271.39 Review of books...

  5. 12 CFR 995.10 - Review of books and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Review of books and records. 995.10 Section 995.10 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD NON-BANK SYSTEM ENTITIES FINANCING CORPORATION OPERATIONS § 995.10 Review of books and records. The Finance Board shall examine the Financing Corporation at...

  6. Book review: Current perspectives on zinc deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelley, Karen D.

    2016-01-01

    This book, published in 2015 by the Irish Association for Economic Geology (IAEG), is a compilation of papers and abstracts written by selected authors who attended the ZINC 2010 Conference in Cork, Ireland. Unlike most books produced each decade by the IAEG, which are focused primarily on achievements of the Irish and European mineral sectors, this book has a global perspective of a single commodity—zinc. As stated in the Preface, the theme of the conference and book was quite relevant for the IAEG because Ireland has the highest concentration of zinc per square kilometer on the planet. The book contains 7 full papers and 5 extended abstracts by keynote speakers, followed by 17 extended abstracts by other presenters, plus an Appendix (reprint) of a previously published paper.

  7. BOOK REVIEW: Principles of Plasma Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterheld, A. L.

    1998-08-01

    This book gives a comprehensive treatment of plasma spectroscopy, the quantitative study of line and continuous radiation from high temperature plasmas. This highly interdisciplinary field combines elements of atomic, plasma and statistical physics, and has wide application to simulations and diagnostics of laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. Plasma spectroscopy is naturally intertwined with magnetic and inertial fusion energy science. Radiative processes in plasmas are important in the design of fusion facilities, and can be used to diagnose and control conditions in fusion plasmas. In turn, fusion scientists and facilities have played a central role in developing plasma spectroscopy theory and applications. The book covers radiation from plasmas, spectral line broadening, atomic processes in plasmas and level kinetic models, radiative transfer and applications to spectroscopic plasma diagnostics. It is successful both as an introductory text and as a source book of theoretical and experimental research. The book presents a broad development of the theoretical foundations of these topics, and discusses the seminal papers and critical experiments. There is a strong emphasis on applications of plasma spectroscopy, primarily to plasma diagnostics and calculations of radiative cooling rates. Extensive references (current through the end of 1995) point readers to original material and detailed discussions of advanced topics. Of course, a single text cannot treat all aspects of plasma spectroscopy in depth. The strongest and most detailed section of the book is a long chapter on spectral line broadening. For me, the most significant omission is lack of a discussion of laser assisted transitions which can occur in plasmas produced by high intensity lasers. The book was intentionally written to be accessible to young researchers and graduate students. The level is roughly that of a graduate text. It assumes some familiarity with quantum mechanics and statistical

  8. BOOK REVIEW: Fusion: The Energy of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, J.

    2006-05-01

    trails', since it is so tempting to produce a `backroom' solution to mankind's hunger for energy. Unfortunately, Chapter 8 can only regret that none of them has passed closer peer review. Chapters 9 and 10 concentrate on the `tokamak' concept for magnetic confinement, the basis for the JET and ITER projects, as well as for a wealth of smaller, national projects. The hopes and the disappointments are well and very frankly illustrated. The motivation for building a project of the size of ITER is made very clear. Present fusion research cannot forget that its mission is to develop an industrial reactor, not just a powerful research tool. Chapter 11 presents the major challenges between ITER and a reactor. Finally, Chapter 12 reminds us of why we need energy, why we do not have a credible solution at the mid-term (20 years) and why we have no solution in the longer term. The public awareness of this is growing, at last, even though the arguments were all on the table in the 1970's. This chapter therefore closes the book by bringing the reader back to earth rather suitably with the hard reality of energy needs and the absence of credible policies. This book has already received impressive approval among a wide range of people, since it so evidently succeeds in its goal to explain Fusion to many levels of reader. Gary McCracken and Peter Stott (one time editor of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion) both dedicated their careers to magnetic confinement fusion, mostly at Culham working on UKAEA projects and later on the JET project. They were both deeply involved with international collaborations and both were working abroad when they retired. The mixture between ideas, developments and people is most successfully developed. They clearly underline the importance of strong international collaboration on which this field depends. This open background is tangible in their recently published work, in which they have tried to communicate their love and understanding of this exciting

  9. BOOK REVIEW: THE STRUCTURE AND PERFORMANCE OF THE AEROSPACE INDUSTRY,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Review of book by Herman O. Stekler: The book should find its major readership among those sectors of aerospace management concerned primarily with...affected the structure of the aerospace industry. The historical development , mainly in economic terms, of the industry is traced from the World War I...The book lacks analyses of the effectiveness of government procurement policies and the void in relating the growth and difficulties of the industry to changes in strategic outlook.

  10. REVIEW OF TWO BOOKS ON ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    These are the second and third books in the Allen and Unwin series which publishes work being carried on by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology...Center for International Studies in India. These books arise more or less directly out of the economic research conducted by the Center, in...A major theme underlying both these volumes in the clarification of the contribution that the economist, as economist, can make to the problems of development in a particular country.

  11. The politics of forestry [book review

    Treesearch

    Brian. Sturtevant

    2010-01-01

    This book is a call to action--nearly a call to arms--designed to put a face on the plight of ancient forests both within the United States (US) and world-wide. In the author's words, "The purpose of this book is to explain how forests work, to discuss the fate of forests, and to suggest principles to their proper management." It accomplishes this with...

  12. Book review of "Biophysical Chemistry of Fractal Structures and Processes in Environmental Systems"

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The editors are N. Senesi and K.J. Wilkinson, and the book is published in 2008 by John Wiley and Sons, with 323 pages. This book is part of the IUPAC series on “Analytical and physical chemistry of environmental systems.” Nineteen generally well-known fractal scientists have contributed to this vol...

  13. Science Books, A Quarterly Review, Volume 8 Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association for the Advancement of Science, Washington, DC.

    This quarterly journal reviews trade books, textbooks, and reference works in the pure and applied sciences for students in the elementary schools, in secondary school and in the first two years of college. Included are selected advanced and professional books useful for reference by students and faculty members. Annotations are listed in order of…

  14. A BOOK REVIEW OF "ECOLOGICAL INDICATORS FOR THE NATION"

    EPA Science Inventory

    Review of the the book "Ecological Indicators for the Nation". This book is the report of the Committee to Evaluate Indicators for Monitoring Aquatic and Terrestrial Environments, which was established at the behest of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The boo...

  15. Legibility in Children's Books: A Review of Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Lynne; Nisbet, John

    This book reviews the research in the field of typography as it affects children's books and sets it in the context of research on reading. The contents include five chapters: "Problems of Definition and Measurement" discusses the various measures of legibility used in research studies. "The Reading Process" examines three…

  16. Science Books, A Quarterly Review, Volume 8 Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association for the Advancement of Science, Washington, DC.

    This quarterly journal reviews trade books, textbooks, and reference works in the pure and applied sciences for students in the elementary schools, in secondary school and in the first two years of college. Included are selected advanced and professional books useful for reference by students and faculty members. Annotations are listed in order of…

  17. Science Books, A Quarterly Review, Volume 7 Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deason, Hilary J., Ed.

    Approximately 200 trade books, and reference works in the pure and applied sciences for students in the elementary school, in secondary school and in the first two years of college, including selected advanced and professional books useful for reference by students and faculty members, are reviewed in this issue of the quarterly publication. The…

  18. Science Books: A Quarterly Review, Volume 8, Number 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association for the Advancement of Science, Washington, DC.

    This quarterly journal reviews trade books, textbooks, and reference works in the pure and applied sciences for students in kindergartens, elementary schools, secondary schools, and in the first two years of college. Also included are selected advanced and professional books useful for reference by students and faculty members. Annotations are…

  19. Who Will Teach? And How Will They Teach? [Book Review].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sykes, Gary

    1993-01-01

    Reviews "Who Will Teach? Policies That Matter" (Richard J. Murnane, Judith D. Singer, John Willett, James J. Kemple, and Randall J. Olsen), a book on teacher workforce policy issues. The book uses labor market analyses and economic tools to effectively address some issues but overlooks others of equal importance. (JB)

  20. Using a Review Book to Improve Knowledge Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmas, Ridvan; Aydogdu, Bülent; Saban, Yakup

    2017-01-01

    This study has two primary objectives. The first one is preparation of an efficient review book including a series of activities, which will help fourth grade students exercise what they learned in the elementary science course in a year. The second objective is examination of the prepared book in the framework of student and teacher opinions. In…

  1. "Changing Education for Diversity" by David Corson. Book Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berhard, Judith K.

    1999-01-01

    Reviews Corson's book on changes in educational strategies intended for immigrant girls, aboriginal peoples, urban poor, and language minority groups, and the way educators value student groups differently. Considers classroom suggestions for dealing with bias against nonstandard language use and the book's examination on differences in the…

  2. Legibility in Children's Books: A Review of Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Lynne; Nisbet, John

    This book reviews the research in the field of typography as it affects children's books and sets it in the context of research on reading. The contents include five chapters: "Problems of Definition and Measurement" discusses the various measures of legibility used in research studies. "The Reading Process" examines three…

  3. Books as Culture/Books as Commerce: An Analysis of the Text and Format of the "New York Times Book Review."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haugland, Ann

    The oldest of the mass communication technologies, books, needs to be examined in mass communication research. Accordingly a study analyzed the structure and format of the "New York Times Book Review" to identify its dual roles: evaluating books and providing information crucial to book marketing. Also explored was how the text of the…

  4. Getting published well requires fulfilling editors' and reviewers' needs and desires.

    PubMed

    Schoenwolf, Gary C

    2013-12-01

    Publication in international scientific journals provides an unparalleled opportunity for authors to showcase their work. Where authors publish affects how the community values the work. This value directly determines the impact of the work on the field-papers must be read and cited to advance the field, and because the scientific literature is vast, only a subset of the literature is widely read and cited. Moreover, the value placed on the work also affects the authors' scientific reputation and career advancement. Consequently, it is essential that manuscripts receive the recognition they deserve by being published in one of the "best" journals that the scientific findings allow. Several factors determine where a paper is published: how well the topic of the paper fits the scope of the journal, the quality of the study and the manuscript describing it, the advance the paper makes in its field, the importance of the advance, and the extent to which the paper impacts the broader community of science. As scientists, we assume that our papers will be assessed objectively using only well defined scientific standards, but editors and reviewers also view papers subjectively, having biases of what defines a high-quality publication based on Western standards. Therefore, scientists trained in other parts of the world can be significantly disadvantaged in getting their papers published in the best journals. Here, I present concrete suggestions for improving the perception of a paper in the reader's minds, increasing the likelihood that it will get published well.

  5. BOOK REVIEW: Feynman Lectures on Gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feynman, Richard P.; Morinigo, Fernando B.; Wagner, William G.

    2003-05-01

    In the early 1960s Feynman lectured to physics undergraduates and, with the assistance of his colleagues Leighton and Sands, produced the three-volume classic Feynman Lectures in Physics. These lectures were delivered in the mornings. In the afternoons Feynman was giving postgraduate lectures on gravitation. This book is based on notes compiled by two students on that course: Morinigo and Wagner. Their notes were checked and approved by Feynman and were available at Caltech. They have now been edited by Brian Hatfield and made more widely available. The book has a substantial preface by John Preskill and Kip Thorne, and an introduction entitled 'Quantum Gravity' by Brian Hatfield. You should read these before going on to the lectures themselves. Preskill and Thorne identify three categories of potential readers of this book. 1. Those with a postgraduate training in theoretical physics. 2. 'Readers with a solid undergraduate training in physics'. 3. 'Admirers of Feynman who do not have a strong physics background'. The title of the book is perhaps misleading: readers in category 2 who think that this book is an extension of the Feynman Lectures in Physics may be disappointed. It is not: it is a book aimed mainly at those in category 1. If you want to get to grips with gravitation (and general relativity) then you need to read an introductory text first e.g. General Relativity by I R Kenyon (Oxford: Oxford University Press) or A Unified Grand Tour of Theoretical Physics by Ian D Lawrie (Bristol: IoP). But there is no Royal Road. As pointed out in the preface and in the introduction, the book represents Feynman's thinking about gravitation some 40 years ago: the lecture course was part of his attempts to understand the subject himself, and for readers in all three categories it is this that makes the book one of interest: the opportunity to observe how a great physicist attempts to tackle some of the hardest challenges of physics. However, the book was written 40

  6. BOOK REVIEW: NMR Imaging of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blümich, Bernhard

    2003-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of materials is a field of increasing importance. Applications extend from fundamental science like the characterization of fluid transport in porous rock, catalyst pellets and hemodialysers into various fields of engineering for process optimization and product quality control. While the results of MRI imaging are being appreciated by a growing community, the methods of imaging are far more diverse for materials applications than for medical imaging of human beings. Blümich has delivered the first book in this field. It was published in hardback three years ago and is now offered as a paperback for nearly half the price. The text provides an introduction to MRI imaging of materials covering solid-state NMR spectroscopy, imaging methods for liquid and solid samples, and unusual MRI in terms of specialized approaches to spatial resolution such as an MRI surface scanner. The book represents an excellent and thorough treatment which will help to grow research in materials MRI. Blümich developed the treatise over many years for his research students, graduates in chemistry, physics and engineering. But it may also be useful for medical students looking for a less formal discussion of solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The structure of this book is easy to perceive. The first three chapters cover an introduction, the fundamentals and methods of solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The book starts at the ground level where no previous knowledge about NMR is assumed. Chapter 4 discusses a wide variety of transformations beyond the Fourier transformation. In particular, the Hadamard transformation and the 'wavelet' transformation are missing from most related books. This chapter also includes a description of noise-correlation spectroscopy, which promises the imaging of large objects without the need for extremely powerful radio-frequency transmitters. Chapters 5 and 6 cover basic imaging methods. The following chapter about the use of relaxation and

  7. Book review: Bird census techniques, Second edition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sauer, John R.

    2002-01-01

    Conservation concerns, federal mandates to monitor birds, and citizen science programs have spawned a variety of surveys that collect information on bird populations. Unfortunately, all too frequently these surveys are poorly designed and use inappropriate counting methods. Some of the flawed approaches reflect a lack of understanding of statistical design; many ornithologists simply are not aware that many of our most entrenched counting methods (such as point counts) cannot appropriately be used in studies that compare densities of birds over space and time. It is likely that most of the readers of The Condor have participated in a bird population survey that has been criticized for poor sampling methods. For example, North American readers may be surprised to read in Bird Census Techniques that the North American Breeding Bird Survey 'is seriously flawed in its design,' and that 'Analysis of trends is impossible from points that are positioned along roads' (p. 109). Our conservation efforts are at risk if we do not acknowledge these concerns and improve our survey designs. Other surveys suffer from a lack of focus. In Bird Census Techniques, the authors emphasize that all surveys require clear statements of objectives and an understanding of appropriate survey designs to meet their objectives. Too often, we view survey design as the realm of ornithologists who know the life histories and logistical issues relevant to counting birds. This view reflects pure hubris: survey design is a collaboration between ornithologists, statisticians, and managers, in which goals based on management needs are met by applying statistical principles for design to the biological context of the species of interest. Poor survey design is often due to exclusion of some of these partners from survey development. Because ornithologists are too frequently unaware of these issues, books such as Bird Census Techniques take on added importance as manuals for educating ornithologists about

  8. BOOK REVIEW: Stellarator and Heliotron Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, John L.

    1999-02-01

    Pfirsch-Schlüter current driven magnetic islands and the interpretation of sawtooth instabilities in Heliotron E. The treatment of particle orbits in Chapter 6 includes a derivation of drift equations, a discussion of the characteristics of trapped particle confinement in a heliotron and one of the Monte Carlo method for studying transport phenomena. A good treatment of neoclassical transport in a stellarator, with emphasis on the relation between parallel viscosity driven fluxes and bootstrap current, is given in Chapter 7. This is the best treatment I have found, outside of the original references, but it is still demanding. In addition, a radial electric field is introduced into the energy transport equations. The treatment of heating and confinement of heliotron plasmas in Chapter 8 is a good combination of providing results from experiments on the Heliotron E and DR heliotrons and the ATF and CHS stellarators and showing how theoretical interpretation is formulated. The discussions of ray tracing and energy absorption for both ECRH and ICRF heating techniques, as well as a treatment of neutral beam injection, are very clear. Measurements of bootstrap current and plasma rotation, as well as the density limits associated with pellet injection, are discussed. The chapter ends with a discussion of what may be the author's favourite topic, pressure gradient driven turbulence, in which he describes mixing length and scale invariance techniques. Finally, a discussion of the characteristics of a steady state fusion reactor, including a treatment of the containment, slowing down and energy transfer of the alpha particles, one of the toroidal Alfvén modes driven by these particles and some physics of divertors are given in Chapter 9. A reviewer is usually expected to find some faults. I had no problem in finding one as soon as I received the book: indeed, I did not like its title. I have always maintained that Lyman Spitzer defined a stellarator as any toroidal device in

  9. Children's Books in Review. Saving and Appreciating Our Planet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winfield, Evelyn T.

    1992-01-01

    Reviews books for preschool through elementary school students, focusing on environmental issues in urban and rural areas. The literature examines such topics as saving the tropical rainforests, conserving energy and resources, decreasing pollution, and saving endangered species. (SM)

  10. Book Review: Venus Rising: Cultural Astronomy in Southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snedegar, K.

    2014-10-01

    Book review: Dr Peter G. Alcock's important new publication, Venus Rising: South African Astronomical Beliefs, Customs and Observations. See also articles by Alcock, P.G. and Labuscagne, L. in the next issue.

  11. How to Write a Book Review: A Guide for Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammett, Hugh B.

    1974-01-01

    The author provides seven guidelines for writing a book review. Included in the guidelines are publication information, author background, purpose, scope, major themes, thesis, basic flaws, source material, and stylistic suggestions. (DE)

  12. Children's Books in Review. Saving and Appreciating Our Planet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winfield, Evelyn T.

    1992-01-01

    Reviews books for preschool through elementary school students, focusing on environmental issues in urban and rural areas. The literature examines such topics as saving the tropical rainforests, conserving energy and resources, decreasing pollution, and saving endangered species. (SM)

  13. Sampling for natural resource monitoring: Book review

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sampling for Natural Resource Monitoring provides a comprehensive introduction to natural resource sampling design for students, scientists and managers. The emphasis on cost analysis and optimization throughout the book is perhaps one of its greatest strengths. The explanations of two-phase and seq...

  14. Book Reviews, Annotation, and Web Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulze, Patricia

    From reading texts to annotating web pages, grade 6-8 students rely on group cooperation and individual reading and writing skills in this research project that spans six 50-minute lessons. Student objectives for this project are that they will: read, discuss, and keep a journal on a book in literature circles; understand the elements of and…

  15. Thinking about Parent and Child [Book Review].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, James Q.

    1999-01-01

    The controversy about the relative importance of heredity and environment and the role of parents in children's behavior explored by Harris is not new. Although her book offers no new policy guidance, it does offer some useful academic suggestions by clarifying the plentiful scientific evidence of the importance of genetics in behavior. (SLD)

  16. Book review: Methods for catching beetles

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Beetles are the most speciose animal group and found in virtually all habitats on Earth. Methods for Catching Beetles is a comprehensive general sourcebook about where and how to collect members of this diverse group. The book makes a compelling case in its Introduction about the value of scientif...

  17. BOOK REVIEW: Experimental Stochatics (2nd edition)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiberg, P.

    2004-05-01

    Otto Moeschlin and his co-authors have written a book about simulation of stochastic systems. The book comes with a CD-ROM that contains the experiments discussed in the book, and the text from the book is repeated on the CD-ROM. According to the authors, the aim of the book is to give a quick introduction to stochastic simulation for `all persons interested in experimental stochastics'. To please this diverse audience, the authors offer a book that has four parts. Part 1, called `Artificial Randomness', is the longest of the four parts. It gives an overview of the generation, testing and basic usage of pseudo random numbers in simulation. Although algorithms for generating sequences of random numbers are fundamental to simulation, it is a slightly unusual choice to give it such weight in comparison to other algorithmic topics. The remaining three parts consist of simulation case studies. Part 2, `Stochastic Models', treats four problems---Buffon's needle, a queuing system, and two problems related to the kinetic theory of gases. Part 3 is called `Stochastic Processes' and discusses the simulation of discrete time Markov chains, birth--death processes, Brownian motion and diffusions. The last section of Part 3 is about simulation as a tool to understand the traffic flow in a system controlled by stoplights, an area of research for the authors. Part4 is called `Evaluation of Statistical Procedures'. This section contains examples where simulation is used to test the performance of statistical methods. It covers four examples: the Neymann--Pearson lemma, the Wald sequential test, Bayesian point estimation and Hartigan procedures. The CD-ROM contains an easy-to-install software package that runs under Microsoft Windows. The software contains the text and simulations from the book. What I found most enjoyable about this book is the number of topics covered in the case studies. The highly individual selection of applications, which may serve as a source of inspiration

  18. BOOK REVIEW: Inverse Problems. Activities for Undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2003-06-01

    This book is a valuable introduction to inverse problems. In particular, from the educational point of view, the author addresses the questions of what constitutes an inverse problem and how and why we should study them. Such an approach has been eagerly awaited for a long time. Professor Groetsch, of the University of Cincinnati, is a world-renowned specialist in inverse problems, in particular the theory of regularization. Moreover, he has made a remarkable contribution to educational activities in the field of inverse problems, which was the subject of his previous book (Groetsch C W 1993 Inverse Problems in the Mathematical Sciences (Braunschweig: Vieweg)). For this reason, he is one of the most qualified to write an introductory book on inverse problems. Without question, inverse problems are important, necessary and appear in various aspects. So it is crucial to introduce students to exercises in inverse problems. However, there are not many introductory books which are directly accessible by students in the first two undergraduate years. As a consequence, students often encounter diverse concrete inverse problems before becoming aware of their general principles. The main purpose of this book is to present activities to allow first-year undergraduates to learn inverse theory. To my knowledge, this book is a rare attempt to do this and, in my opinion, a great success. The author emphasizes that it is very important to teach inverse theory in the early years. He writes; `If students consider only the direct problem, they are not looking at the problem from all sides .... The habit of always looking at problems from the direct point of view is intellectually limiting ...' (page 21). The book is very carefully organized so that teachers will be able to use it as a textbook. After an introduction in chapter 1, sucessive chapters deal with inverse problems in precalculus, calculus, differential equations and linear algebra. In order to let one gain some insight

  19. BOOK REVIEW: Chaos: A Very Short Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klages, R.

    2007-07-01

    This book is a new volume of a series designed to introduce the curious reader to anything from ancient Egypt and Indian philosophy to conceptual art and cosmology. Very handy in pocket size, Chaos promises an introduction to fundamental concepts of nonlinear science by using mathematics that is `no more complicated than X=2. Anyone who ever tried to give a popular science account of research knows that this is a more challenging task than writing an ordinary research article. Lenny Smith brilliantly succeeds to explain in words, in pictures and by using intuitive models the essence of mathematical dynamical systems theory and time series analysis as it applies to the modern world. In a more technical part he introduces the basic terms of nonlinear theory by means of simple mappings. He masterly embeds this analysis into the social, historical and cultural context by using numerous examples, from poems and paintings over chess and rabbits to Olbers' paradox, card games and `phynance'. Fundamental problems of the modelling of nonlinear systems like the weather, sun spots or golf balls falling through an array of nails are discussed from the point of view of mathematics, physics and statistics by touching upon philosophical issues. At variance with Laplace's demon, Smith's 21st century demon makes `real world' observations only with limited precision. This poses a severe problem to predictions derived from complex chaotic models, where small variations of initial conditions typically yield totally different outcomes. As Smith argues, this difficulty has direct implications on decision-making in everyday modern life. However, it also asks for an inherently probabilistic theory, which somewhat reminds us of what we are used to in the microworld. There is little to criticise in this nice little book except that some figures are of poor quality thus not really reflecting the beauty of fractals and other wonderful objects in this field. I feel that occasionally the book

  20. BOOK REVIEW: Practical Density Measurement and Hydrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S. V.

    2003-01-01

    Density determinations are very important not only for science and production but also in everyday life, since very often a product is sold by mass but the content of the package is measured by volume (or vice versa) so that the density is needed to convert the values. In production processes the density serves as a measure of mixing ratios and other properties. In science, the determination of Avogadro's constant using silicon single crystals and the potential replacement of the kilogram prototype boost density determination to an extremely low relative uncertainty of 10-7 or less. The book by S V Gupta explains in detail the foundations of any density measurement, namely the volume determination of solid artefacts in terms of the SI base unit of length and the density of water and mercury. Both the history and the actual state of science are reported. For practical density measurements, these chapters contain very useful formulae and tables. Water is treated in detail since it is most widely used as a standard not only for density determination but also to gravimetrically calibrate the capacity of volumetric glassware. Two thirds of the book are devoted to the practical density measurement of solids and liquids, mainly using classical instruments like pycnometers and hydrometers. Methods using free flotation of samples in a liquid without suspension are especially useful for small samples. Also, density determinations of powders and granular or porous samples are explained. Unfortunately, modern density meters of the oscillation type are dealt with in only a few pages. The book is clearly written and easy to understand. It contains a lot of evaluations of formulae that for practical measurements are represented in detailed tables. Methods and measurement procedures are described in detail, including also the calculation of uncertainty. Listings of the advantages and disadvantages of the different methods are very helpful. S V Gupta has written a book that will be

  1. How to Write a Scholarly Book Review for Publication in a Peer-Reviewed Journal

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Alexander D.; Green, Bart N.; Johnson, Claire D.; Nyquist, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To describe and discuss the processes used to write scholarly book reviews for publication in peer-reviewed journals and to provide a recommended strategy and book appraisal worksheet to use when conducting book reviews. Methods: A literature search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and the Index to Chiropractic Literature was conducted in June 2009 using a combination of controlled vocabulary and truncated text words to capture articles relevant to writing scholarly book reviews for publication in peer-reviewed journals. Results: The initial search identified 839 citations. Following the removal of duplicates and the application of selection criteria, a total of 78 articles were included in this review including narrative commentaries (n = 26), editorials or journal announcements (n = 25), original research (n = 18), and journal correspondence pieces (n = 9). Discussion: Recommendations for planning and writing an objective and quality book review are presented based on the evidence gleaned from the articles reviewed and from the authors' experiences. A worksheet for conducting a book review is provided. Conclusions: The scholarly book review serves many purposes and has the potential to be an influential literary form. The process of publishing a successful scholarly book review requires the reviewer to appreciate the book review publication process and to be aware of the skills and strategies involved in writing a successful review. PMID:20480015

  2. Book Review: Dangerous Neighbors: Volcanoes and Cities

    DOE PAGES

    Caporuscio, Florie Andre

    2013-01-01

    Here, Grant Heiken, a world-renowned volcanologist, has written a book based on his long history investigating volcanic hazards that is absolutely riveting. Eight of the ten chapters focus on the interplay between major metropolises and destructive volcanoes. The introductory chapter sets the stage for the remainder of the book. This chapter touches on various types of volcanic events; from Nyiragongo lava flows that disrupted the city of Goma, DRC, to debris flows from Nevado del Ruiz that killed 23,000 residents in Armero, Columbia, to the Eyjafjallajokull volcano in Iceland which spewed an ash column into the jet stream and disruptedmore » air travel to 32 European countries for 6 days. Other issues weaved into the introduction are the social and political fallout when a predicted eruption does not occur (Soufriere de Guadeloupe), how hazard evaluation processes change, and why do major populations reside near high risk volcanoes.« less

  3. Book Review: Dangerous Neighbors: Volcanoes and Cities

    SciTech Connect

    Caporuscio, Florie Andre

    2013-01-01

    Here, Grant Heiken, a world-renowned volcanologist, has written a book based on his long history investigating volcanic hazards that is absolutely riveting. Eight of the ten chapters focus on the interplay between major metropolises and destructive volcanoes. The introductory chapter sets the stage for the remainder of the book. This chapter touches on various types of volcanic events; from Nyiragongo lava flows that disrupted the city of Goma, DRC, to debris flows from Nevado del Ruiz that killed 23,000 residents in Armero, Columbia, to the Eyjafjallajokull volcano in Iceland which spewed an ash column into the jet stream and disrupted air travel to 32 European countries for 6 days. Other issues weaved into the introduction are the social and political fallout when a predicted eruption does not occur (Soufriere de Guadeloupe), how hazard evaluation processes change, and why do major populations reside near high risk volcanoes.

  4. BOOK REVIEW: Carl Sagan: A Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakeways, Robin

    2000-01-01

    This is a quite remarkable book. If you want a quick and sketchy evening's read about your favourite popular scientist then this is not for you! On the other hand, if you want a detailed, fascinating and exhaustively researched story about a very special person, then read it. The author has produced a painstaking picture of Sagan. The main text consists of 430 pages of stories, anecdotes, quotations etc, which lead us through the complex life of a very complex man. This is backed up with a further 70 pages of detailed references followed by a 19 page bibliography. We learn about Sagan from his early days, when he was a somewhat precocious schoolboy, right up to his final days when he was in poor health yet still turning out books at a great rate. Like many people, I knew of him but not very much about him before I read this book. He was a man of giant energy who attempted to combine the life of a working research scientist with that of a great popularizer as well as extending his tentacles into various aspects of (scientific) government policy. Even in his early days his one aim in life seemed to be that of furthering his own career by getting to know as many well-known scientists as possible. He had fingers in many pies - academic, something mysterious and military related, book writing, popular science on TV etc, etc. He was particularly concerned with the space programme, especially the planetary probes and the Voyager vehicles which took messages from Earth to outer space. We get the impression from the book that he was especially obsessed with extraterrestrial life and was desperate to confirm its existence. He was instrumental in keeping the SETI programme going even though it eventually had to go private. We learn that he was not a good family man and work usually took precedence over domestic issues. As a result his private life seems to have been as complicated as his professional life. He was a man whose mind went in several directions at once and he was

  5. BOOK REVIEW: Relativistic Figures of Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mars, M.

    2009-08-01

    Compact fluid bodies in equilibrium under its own gravitational field are abundant in the Universe and a proper treatment of them can only be carried out using the full theory of General Relativity. The problem is of enormous complexity as it involves two very different regimes, namely the interior and the exterior of the fluid, coupled through the surface of the body. This problem is very challenging both from a purely theoretical point of view, as well as regarding the obtaining of realistic models and the description of their physical properties. It is therefore an excellent piece of news that the book 'Relativistic Figures of Equilibrium' by R Meinel, M Ansorg, A Kleinwächter, G Neugebauer and D Petroff has been recently published. This book approaches the topic in depth and its contents will be of interest to a wide range of scientists working on gravitation, including theoreticians in general relativity, mathematical physicists, astrophysicists and numerical relativists. This is an advanced book that intends to present some of the present-day results on this topic. The most basic results are presented rather succinctly, and without going into the details, of their derivations. Although primarily not intended to serve as a textbook, the presentation is nevertheless self-contained and can therefore be of interest both for experts on the field as well as for anybody wishing to learn more about rotating self-gravitating compact bodies in equilibrium. It should be remarked, however, that this book makes a rather strong selection of topics and concentrates fundamentally on presenting the main results obtained by the authors during their research in this field. The book starts with a chapter where the fundamental aspects of rotating fluids in equilibrium, including its thermodynamic properties, are summarized. Of particular interest are the so-called mass-shedding limit, which is the limit where the body is rotating so fast that it is on the verge of starting

  6. Book Review Geostatistical Analysis of Compositional Data

    SciTech Connect

    Carle, S F

    2007-03-26

    Compositional data are represented as vector variables with individual vector components ranging between zero and a positive maximum value representing a constant sum constraint, usually unity (or 100 percent). The earth sciences are flooded with spatial distributions of compositional data, such as concentrations of major ion constituents in natural waters (e.g. mole, mass, or volume fractions), mineral percentages, ore grades, or proportions of mutually exclusive categories (e.g. a water-oil-rock system). While geostatistical techniques have become popular in earth science applications since the 1970s, very little attention has been paid to the unique mathematical properties of geostatistical formulations involving compositional variables. The book 'Geostatistical Analysis of Compositional Data' by Vera Pawlowsky-Glahn and Ricardo Olea (Oxford University Press, 2004), unlike any previous book on geostatistics, directly confronts the mathematical difficulties inherent to applying geostatistics to compositional variables. The book righteously justifies itself with prodigious referencing to previous work addressing nonsensical ranges of estimated values and error, spurious correlation, and singular cross-covariance matrices.

  7. BOOK REVIEW: Black Holes, Wormholes & Time Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellema, Steven H.

    2000-05-01

    Black Holes Wormholes & Time Machines is a welcome addition to the collection of books written with the purpose of explaining interesting aspects of 20th century physics to a general audience. Throughout the book it is clear that the author, Jim Al-Khalili, must be a wonderful public lecturer. His style, informal yet precise, is just what is needed to convey these difficult concepts to an audience of non-specialists. As the title might suggest, the author has chosen to specifically address certain topics that have been introduced into the public imagination through the mass media (primarily movies and television). He does an admirable job, both of connecting to these media-generated perceptions (with frequent references, for example, to Star Trek) and of correcting them (or at least placing them in the proper context) insofar as the current knowledge of physics is concerned. What emerges is a well thought-out journey through the theories of special and general relativity as well as appropriate aspects of cosmology. The book eschews the standard, historical approach, which would introduce special relativity, followed by general relativity, and finally some cosmology. Rather, it begins with the promise and the paradoxes of time travel (exemplified in the movie The Terminator) and then winds its way carefully through all of the physics relevant to the possible existence of a time machine. Along the way, the reader is introduced to aspects of special and general relativity, including higher dimensional space-times and geometries. The astrophysical and cosmological journey visits the Big Bang, open and closed universes, and black holes. By meticulously piecing together the puzzle of time (and along the way meeting such oddities as parallel universes and wormholes) the author comes to the climactic chapter entitled `How to Build a Time Machine'. There may be readers who are disappointed that this ultimate question is unraveled, not so much like an instruction manual (as

  8. Book Review: A Thin Cosmic Rain by Michael W. Friedlander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Frank C.; White, Nicholas (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In reviewing this book I am going to say some harsh things about it. From this one might think that I did not like the book. In fact, one would be wrong to think so. For this reason I wish to state up front that I did like the book. It was an ambitious undertaking and I think that the author has, for the most part, pulled it off. This extremely broad and rich book will allow those non-specialists with a sufficiently long attention span to obtain a good understanding of what cosmic rays are and what cosmic ray research is all about. I have pointed out things that bothered me because I believe that the book is good enough for a second edition and I hope that these matters can be addressed at that time.

  9. BOOK REVIEW: Statistical Mechanics of Turbulent Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambon, C.

    2004-10-01

    This is a handbook for a computational approach to reacting flows, including background material on statistical mechanics. In this sense, the title is somewhat misleading with respect to other books dedicated to the statistical theory of turbulence (e.g. Monin and Yaglom). In the present book, emphasis is placed on modelling (engineering closures) for computational fluid dynamics. The probabilistic (pdf) approach is applied to the local scalar field, motivated first by the nonlinearity of chemical source terms which appear in the transport equations of reacting species. The probabilistic and stochastic approaches are also used for the velocity field and particle position; nevertheless they are essentially limited to Lagrangian models for a local vector, with only single-point statistics, as for the scalar. Accordingly, conventional techniques, such as single-point closures for RANS (Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes) and subgrid-scale models for LES (large-eddy simulations), are described and in some cases reformulated using underlying Langevin models and filtered pdfs. Even if the theoretical approach to turbulence is not discussed in general, the essentials of probabilistic and stochastic-processes methods are described, with a useful reminder concerning statistics at the molecular level. The book comprises 7 chapters. Chapter 1 briefly states the goals and contents, with a very clear synoptic scheme on page 2. Chapter 2 presents definitions and examples of pdfs and related statistical moments. Chapter 3 deals with stochastic processes, pdf transport equations, from Kramer-Moyal to Fokker-Planck (for Markov processes), and moments equations. Stochastic differential equations are introduced and their relationship to pdfs described. This chapter ends with a discussion of stochastic modelling. The equations of fluid mechanics and thermodynamics are addressed in chapter 4. Classical conservation equations (mass, velocity, internal energy) are derived from their

  10. BOOK REVIEW: Observational Cosmology Observational Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Dale Andrew

    2013-04-01

    Observational Cosmology by Stephen Serjeant fills a niche that was underserved in the textbook market: an up-to-date, thorough cosmology textbook focused on observations, aimed at advanced undergraduates. Not everything about the book is perfect - some subjects get short shrift, in some cases jargon dominates, and there are too few exercises. Still, on the whole, the book is a welcome addition. For decades, the classic textbooks of cosmology have focused on theory. But for every Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect there is a Butcher-Oemler effect; there are as many cosmological phenomena established by observations, and only explained later by theory, as there were predicted by theory and confirmed by observations. In fact, in the last decade, there has been an explosion of new cosmological findings driven by observations. Some are so new that you won't find them mentioned in books just a few years old. So it is not just refreshing to see a book that reflects the new realities of cosmology, it is vital, if students are to truly stay up on a field that has widened in scope considerably. Observational Cosmology is filled with full-color images, and graphs from the latest experiments. How exciting it is that we live in an era where satellites and large experiments have gathered so much data to reveal astounding details about the origin of the universe and its evolution. To have all the latest data gathered together and explained in one book will be a revelation to students. In fact, at times it was to me. I've picked up modern cosmological knowledge through a patchwork of reading papers, going to colloquia, and serving on grant and telescope allocation panels. To go back and see them explained from square one, and summarized succinctly, filled in quite a few gaps in my own knowledge and corrected a few misconceptions I'd acquired along the way. To make room for all these graphs and observational details, a few things had to be left out. For one, there are few derivations

  11. BOOK REVIEW: Modern Physics, 3rd edn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovett, David

    1999-09-01

    The number of broadly based physics texts written at a level corresponding to second year and above of UK physics degrees is limited. This is such a book thoroughly updated in a third edition, the first edition having been published 20 years ago. The book is unusual in that the reader is referred to the Freeman website www.whfreeman.com/physics for some additional sections. It will be interesting to see whether this proves to be an attractive feature. The coverage reflects the US emphasis on topics and contains both theoretical and experimental details. It should not be regarded as an introductory text although it is clearly written. Thus the first two chapters take the reader straight into relativity, concentrating mainly on special relativity but going on to general relativity. From here the reader is led to ideas of quantization of charge, light and energy, followed by an exploration of the nuclear atom, wavelike properties of particles and Schrödinger's equation. Solution of this equation for the hydrogen atom introduces a section on spectroscopy. The next chapter on statistical physics includes Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein statistics and brings to a close Part 1, which concentrates on the theoretical groundwork. Consistent with its title, the book does not cover traditional aspects of thermodynamics and electromagnetic theory. Part 2 is entitled `Applications' and begins with a chapter on molecular structure and spectra. Lasers and masers are included here but geometrical, physical and nonlinear optics get limited or no coverage. Solid state physics follows but, despite the title of the book, there is little on modern devices, although the section on superconductivity mentions high temperature materials. The chapters on nuclear physics, fission, fusion reactors and medical applications and a chapter on particle physics are comprehensive. Finally a chapter on astrophysics and cosmology is referred to, but the reader must find this at the website. As this is

  12. BOOK REVIEW: The Artful Universe Expanded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassett, B. A.

    2005-07-01

    The cosmos is an awfully big place and there is no better guide to its vast expanse and fascinating nooks and crannies than John Barrow. A professor of mathematical sciences at Cambridge University, Barrow embodies that rare combination of highly polished writer and expert scientist. His deft touch brings together the disparate threads of human knowledge and weaves them into a tapestry as rich and interesting for the expert as it is for the layperson. The Artful Universe Expanded is an updated edition of this popular book first published in 1995. It explores the deeply profound manner in which natural law and the nature of the cosmos have moulded and shaped us, our cultures and the very form of our arts and music—a new type of `cosmic' anthropology. The main themes Barrow chooses for revealing this new anthropology are the subjects of evolution, the size of things, the heavens and the nature of music. The book is a large, eclectic repository of knowledge often unavailable to the layperson,\\endcolumn hidden in esoteric libraries around the world. It rivals The Da Vinci Code for entertainment value and insights, but this time it is Nature’s code that is revealed. It is rare indeed to find common threads drawn through topics as diverse as The Beetles, Bach and Beethoven or between Jackson Pollock, the Aztecs, Kant, Picasso, Byzantine mosaics, uranium-235 and the helix nebula. Barrow unerringly binds them together, presenting them in a stimulating, conversational style that belies the amount of time that must have gone into researching this book. Dip into it at random, or read it from cover to cover, but do read it. The Artful Universe Expanded is an entertaining antidote to the oft-lamented pressures to know more and more about less and less and the apparently inexorable march of specialization. On reading this book one can, for a short time at least, hold in one’s mind a vision that unifies science, art and culture and glimpse a universal tapestry of great

  13. Language games: Advanced R & R packages: Book Review

    DOE PAGES

    Hraber, Peter Thomas

    2016-03-23

    Readers who wrangle answers from data by extended refinement of available computational tools have many options and resources available. Inevitably, they will develop their own methods tailored to the problem at hand.Two new books have recently been published, each of which is useful addition to the library for a scientist who programs with data. The two books reviewed are both written by H. Wickham. The titles are ''Advanced R'' and ''R Packages'', both published in 2015.

  14. BOOK REVIEW: Assessing Sc1 for GCSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, H.

    2000-01-01

    It is well known that investigations that `fit' the National Curriculum or examination board criteria are few in number. The fair testing emphasis means that pupils all over the country are finding out what affects the rate of a chemical reaction, the rate of photosynthesis or, in the case of Physics, the resistance of a wire. This book focuses on nine of the most common Sc1 investigations and how to prepare for them, manage and assess them. The author, a GCSE examiner, has turned his expertise into a handbook for improving Sc1 performance in the classroom. He has produced a book that would be extremely useful to both newly qualified teachers and experienced teachers. The first aim of the book, however, is to explain the requirements of Sc1. This is done comprehensively with examples of what the jargon means in practice. By breaking down the elements of planning, obtaining evidence, analysing evidence and evaluating, it is easy to see the subtleties of the mark descriptors. At first glance there seems to be little difference between the type of scientific knowledge needed for planning at level 6 and level 8. However, the level 8 statement specifies `detailed' scientific knowledge and understanding, which would mean a student should use equations from physics or symbolic chemical equations to support their arguments. One of the most useful sections in the book details the marking problems that can arise with some investigations. For example, in an investigation into electromagnets it is difficult for students to provide sufficient relevant scientific theory to satisfy the requirements of planning at level 6. One of the problems with Sc1 is that certain requirements, such as graph plotting, are difficult for many students. This book provides exercises that can be given to students to improve those skills. Each of the nine investigations is covered in great detail. Each investigation begins with an introduction detailing the rationale for choosing it, whether students

  15. BOOK REVIEW: Kinetic Theory of Granular Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trizac, Emmanuel

    2005-11-01

    Granular gases are composed of macroscopic bodies kept in motion by an external energy source such as a violent shaking. The behaviour of such systems is quantitatively different from that of ordinary molecular gases: due to the size of the constituents, external fields have a stronger effect on the dynamics and, more importantly, the kinetic energy of the gas is no longer a conserved quantity. The key role of the inelasticity of collisions has been correctly appreciated for about fifteen years, and the ensuing consequences in terms of phase behaviour or transport properties studied in an increasing and now vast body of literature. The purpose of this book is to help the newcomer to the field in acquiring the essential theoretical tools together with some numerical techniques. As emphasized by the authors—who were among the pioneers in the domain— the content could be covered in a one semester course for advanced undergraduates, or it could be incorporated in a more general course dealing with the statistical mechanics of dissipative systems. The book is self-contained, clear, and avoids mathematical complications. In order to elucidate the main physical ideas, heuristic points of views are sometimes preferred to a more rigorous route that would lead to a longer discussion. The 28 chapters are short; they offer exercises and worked examples, solved at the end of the book. Each part is supplemented with a relevant foreword and a useful summary including take-home messages. The editorial work is of good quality, with very few typographical errors. In spite of the title, kinetic theory stricto sensu is not the crux of the matter covered. The authors discuss the consequences of the molecular chaos assumption both at the individual particle level and in terms of collective behaviour. The first part of the book addresses the mechanics of grain collisions. It is emphasized that considering the coefficient of restitution ɛ —a central quantity governing the

  16. Every Reader a Reviewer: The Online Book Conversation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffert, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, the book review landscape has changed seismically. Reviewing is no longer centralized, with a few big voices leading the way, but fractured among numerous multifarious voices found mostly on the web. In turn, readers aren't playing the captive audience any more. Undone by economics, many traditional print sources have been…

  17. Book Review: Bioassays with Arthropods: 2nd Edition

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The technical book "Bioassays with Arthropods: 2nd Edition" (2007. Jacqueline L. Robertson, Robert M. Russell, Haiganoush K, Preisler and N. E. Nevin, Eds. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, 224 pp.) was reviewed for the scientific readership of the peer-reviewed publication Journal of Economic Entomology. ...

  18. Every Reader a Reviewer: The Online Book Conversation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffert, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, the book review landscape has changed seismically. Reviewing is no longer centralized, with a few big voices leading the way, but fractured among numerous multifarious voices found mostly on the web. In turn, readers aren't playing the captive audience any more. Undone by economics, many traditional print sources have been…

  19. BOOK REVIEW: Introduction to Computational Plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartley, P.

    2006-04-01

    The use of computational modelling in all areas of science and engineering has in recent years escalated to the point where it underpins much of current research. However, the distinction must be made between computer systems in which no knowledge of the underlying computer technology or computational theory is required and those areas of research where the mastery of computational techniques is of great value, almost essential, for final year undergraduates or masters students planning to pursue a career in research. Such a field of research in the latter category is continuum mechanics, and in particular non-linear material behaviour, which is the core topic of this book. The focus of the book on computational plasticity embodies techniques of relevance not only to academic researchers, but also of interest to industrialists engaged in the production of components using bulk or sheet forming processes. Of particular interest is the guidance on how to create modules for use with the commercial system Abaqus for specific types of material behaviour. The book is in two parts, the first of which contains six chapters, starting with microplasticity, but predominantly on continuum plasticity. The first chapter on microplasticty gives a brief description of the grain structure of metals and the existence of slip systems within the grains. This provides an introduction to the concept of incompressibility during plastic deformation, the nature of plastic yield and the importance of the critically resolved shear stress on the slip planes (Schmid's law). Some knowledge of the notation commonly used to describe slip systems is assumed, which will be familiar to students of metallurgy, but anyone with a more general engineering background may need to undertake additional reading to understand the various descriptions. Any lack of knowledge in this area however, is of no disadvantage as it serves only as an introduction and the book moves on quickly to continuum plasticity

  20. BOOK REVIEW: Astrophysics (Advanced Physics Readers)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibble, Bob

    2000-07-01

    Here is a handy and attractive reader to support students on post-16 courses. It covers the astrophysics, astronomy and cosmology that are demanded at A-level and offers anyone interested in these fields an interesting and engaging reference book. The author and the production team deserve credit for producing such an attractive book. The content, in ten chapters, covers what one would expect at this level but it is how it is presented that struck me as the book's most powerful asset. Each chapter ends with a summary of key ideas. Line drawings are clear and convey enough information to make them more than illustrations - they are as valuable as the text in conveying information. Full colour is used throughout to enhance illustrations and tables and to lift key sections of the text. A number of colour photographs complement the material and serve to maintain interest and remind readers that astrophysics is about real observable phenomena. Included towards the end is a set of tables offering information on physical and astronomical data, mathematical techniques and constellation names and abbreviations. This last table puzzled me as to its value. There is a helpful bibliography which includes society contacts and a website related to the text. Perhaps my one regret is that there is no section where students are encouraged to actually do some real astronomy. Astrophysics is in danger of becoming an armchair and calculator interest. There are practical projects that students could undertake either for school assessment or for personal interest. Simple astrophotography to capture star trails, observe star colours and estimate apparent magnitudes is an example, as is a simple double-star search. There are dozens more. However, the author's style is friendly and collaborative. He befriends the reader as they journey together through the ideas. There are progress questions at the end of each chapter. Their style tends to be rather closed and they emphasize factual recall

  1. BOOK REVIEW: Science Fair Projects: Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Helen

    2000-11-01

    I have often thought that the notion of a Science Fair is intrinsically a good one but have never set one up. With this book such an undertaking is possible, with 47 projects from which you can choose. Each project has a clearly stated purpose with an overview that contains the physics you need to get started. A hypothesis, or sometimes two, and a procedure detailing what the student should do follow this. The materials to be used are those you should be able to find at home, and safety guidelines as well as places the student needs adult help are clearly marked. Every project asks the student to write down the results of their experiment and decide whether or not their hypothesis was correct. There are also suggestions for taking each project further. Some of these projects are standard experiments that you may already do with students in class, for example, making plasticine boats, string telephones and levers. Most are interesting twists on standard experiments such as using a wedge as a simple machine, home-made spinning toys and the experiments with light bulbs. The latter are the only real cause for concern if students were to do these things at home as adult supervision would be essential. This is obviously an American book, though. Teachers in British classrooms would need to work out how to deal with the references to temperature in Fahrenheit and mass in ounces. Length is usually given in centimetres as well as inches. Translations of soda bottles and bobby pins would also be needed. This book is designed to be full of ideas and to give structure to projects students can do at home, not to provide ideas that you can transport into the classroom. It does this very well and I would recommend it to anyone thinking of starting up a Science Fair. Alternatively, this is an excellent resource for more interesting homework assignments that would put more responsibility on the student and give them something fun to do.

  2. Book Review: The Origins of Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, Christopher P.

    1992-01-01

    In The Origins of Comets, Bailey, Clube, and Napier propose that the answer to whether the ancient heavens were more interesting is a resounding "yes." The sky, in fact, has changed and is still changing. The authors trace the study of comets back to ancient Babylonian times with a focus on theories of the origins of these enigmatic visitors. The book is really of three distinct parts: the first six chapters provide an excellent and delightfully readable historical account of comet studies up to this century. The next few chapters give a rather detailed treatment of current models for comet origins. The last section treats the authors' own theories about the relationship between giant comets and extinctions on Earth.

  3. Book Review: The Origins of Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, Christopher P.

    1992-01-01

    In The Origins of Comets, Bailey, Clube, and Napier propose that the answer to whether the ancient heavens were more interesting is a resounding "yes." The sky, in fact, has changed and is still changing. The authors trace the study of comets back to ancient Babylonian times with a focus on theories of the origins of these enigmatic visitors. The book is really of three distinct parts: the first six chapters provide an excellent and delightfully readable historical account of comet studies up to this century. The next few chapters give a rather detailed treatment of current models for comet origins. The last section treats the authors' own theories about the relationship between giant comets and extinctions on Earth.

  4. BOOK REVIEW: An Analog Electronics Companion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Scott

    2003-09-01

    The expression 'Analog electronics' here means the sum of a vast quantity of scientific and technical knowledge and topics. By the same token, the electronic analogue and circuit designer should also have a vast cultural and scientific know-how. The aim of this book is to be a guide for neophytes as well as a useful 'travelling companion' for the mature designer confronted with such a vast world. In my opinion it successfully meets these intentions. The subjects are treated in a concise, clear and self-contained fashion, always helped by a broad exhaustive bibliography, and cover all the necessary aspects for electronic design, such as: the essential elements of mathematical analysis, trigonometry and logarithms to reach Fourier and Laplace transforms and differential equations; physics phenomena and laws from electrostatics and electrodynamics up to Maxwell equations and electronic noise; the fundamental elements of electronic circuit theory and their methods of analysis up to the theory of feedback and control systems; an analysis of the electrical characteristics of the main passive and active electronic components. The above mentioned points take up about half of the text. The remaining topics deal with circuit applications often faced by the electronic designer. In the second part, circuit analysis is treated analytically as well as by the use of CAD, and Pspice software is provided on a CD which illustrates examples. The list of topics treated is long and ranges from operational amplifier circuits to rectifier circuits as well as current feedback amplifiers and high frequency transformers. The book closes by mentioning chaos theory. Daniele Marioli

  5. BOOK REVIEW: Quantum Physics in One Dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, David

    2004-05-01

    To a casual ostrich the world of quantum physics in one dimension may sound a little one-dimensional, suitable perhaps for those with an unhealthy obsession for the esoteric. Nothing of course could be further from the truth. The field is remarkably rich and broad, and for more than fifty years has thrown up innumerable challenges. Theorists, realising that the role of interactions in 1D is special and that well known paradigms of higher dimensions (Fermi liquid theory for example) no longer apply, took up the challenge of developing new concepts and techniques to understand the undoubted pecularities of one-dimensional systems. And experimentalists have succeeded in turning pipe dreams into reality, producing an impressive and ever increasing array of experimental realizations of 1D systems, from the molecular to the mesoscopic---spin and ladder compounds, organic superconductors, carbon nanotubes, quantum wires, Josephson junction arrays and so on. Many books on the theory of one-dimensional systems are however written by experts for experts, and tend as such to leave the non-specialist a touch bewildered. This is understandable on both fronts, for the underlying theoretical techniques are unquestionably sophisticated and not usually part of standard courses in many-body theory. A brave author it is then who aims to produce a well rounded, if necessarily partial, overview of quantum physics in one dimension, accessible to a beginner yet taking them to the edge of current research, and providing en route a thorough grounding in the fundamental ideas, basic methods and essential phenomenology of the field. It is of course the brave who succeed in this world, and Thierry Giamarchi does just that with this excellent book, written by an expert for the uninitiated. Aimed in particular at graduate students in theoretical condensed matter physics, and assumimg little theoretical background on the part of the reader (well just a little), Giamarchi writes in a refreshingly

  6. BOOK REVIEW: Supersymmetry: Theory, Experiment and Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Tim

    2008-06-01

    developed mainly in terms of four-component Majorana spinors, while use of two-component spinors is relegated to the appendices, where the author valiantly presents results in a manner facilitating translation between different conventions, which is very useful. In the main text, however, the reader might even be led to feel that the Wess Zumino model actions for a Majorana fermion on the one hand and a chiral fermion on the other are different theories, whereas in fact one can of course be rewritten as the other. I feel that the two-component formalism could have been profitably introduced at an earlier stage and used more consistently. The book concludes with discussions of two 'challenges' to supersymmetry, as presented by the flavour problem and the cosmological constant. These are full of interesting and (indeed) challenging material, at the frontier of present-day research. This is an excellent and up-to-date book, and very timely vis-à-vis the Large Hadron Collider. It would make an excellent graduate text for graduate students in particle theory. 'Road-maps' for high energy experimentalists and cosmologists are also provided; however for experimentalists a text with more in the way of, for example, explicit calculations of cross-sections would probably be more useful. To summarise: minor quibbles aside, a fine book with a wealth of exciting material, and to be thoroughly recommended to any theoretically-inclined graduate student who has done a field theory course and wants to really get to grips with any aspect of supersymmetry.

  7. BOOK REVIEW: Physics in the Real World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardine, Jim

    2000-05-01

    Listeners to science programmes on Canadian radio were invited to submit questions which were then answered, on air, by the author of this wee book. Its purpose, he says, is `to indicate that there are many questions in the real world to which there are no perfect answers' but most of the answers given `contain the essence, if not the whole truth, of the solution to the problem.' The questions, many of which are old chestnuts, range from the mythical - Why might Rudolph be red-nosed? Are high-flying larks harbingers of a hot summer? - through the mundane - Why does the glass handle of a cup of hot coffee stay cool? Is it easier to pull or push a wheelbarrow? - to the mystifying - How is it possible to walk barefoot on red-hot coals? - Is it true that when you take a shower large electric fields can be set up or chloroform released? As the answers were originally given on radio programmes and intended for `educated laypeople' they contain few references to mathematics and no equations! Nevertheless many of the problems are discussed in detail and most readers will find at least some of them fascinating and informative. Many of the answers will be of interest and value to science teachers. In this short book the questions and answers fill only 60 pages but there is a lengthy contents section at the beginning and, at the end, a glossary of many of the terms used throughout. At £8.99 for the UK edition it is pricy - so `feel the quality' of these sections! Outdoors contains questions such as: How is artificial snow created? Can fish really give an electric shock? Why do skates glide along ice? How can blowing on your hands sometimes cool them and sometimes warm them? Theoretical. Here questions on exponential growth, global warming, magnetic poles and energy consumption are answered. Home & Kitchen. Can clothes be whiter than white? How can you tell if an egg is boiled or not? How can a ketchup bottle explode? Why do leaves in a cup of tea collect in the centre

  8. BOOK REVIEW: Modern Canonical Quantum General Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, Claus

    2008-06-01

    The open problem of constructing a consistent and experimentally tested quantum theory of the gravitational field has its place at the heart of fundamental physics. The main approaches can be roughly divided into two classes: either one seeks a unified quantum framework of all interactions or one starts with a direct quantization of general relativity. In the first class, string theory (M-theory) is the only known example. In the second class, one can make an additional methodological distinction: while covariant approaches such as path-integral quantization use the four-dimensional metric as an essential ingredient of their formalism, canonical approaches start with a foliation of spacetime into spacelike hypersurfaces in order to arrive at a Hamiltonian formulation. The present book is devoted to one of the canonical approaches—loop quantum gravity. It is named modern canonical quantum general relativity by the author because it uses connections and holonomies as central variables, which are analogous to the variables used in Yang Mills theories. In fact, the canonically conjugate variables are a holonomy of a connection and the flux of a non-Abelian electric field. This has to be contrasted with the older geometrodynamical approach in which the metric of three-dimensional space and the second fundamental form are the fundamental entities, an approach which is still actively being pursued. It is the author's ambition to present loop quantum gravity in a way in which every step is formulated in a mathematically rigorous form. In his own words: 'loop quantum gravity is an attempt to construct a mathematically rigorous, background-independent, non-perturbative quantum field theory of Lorentzian general relativity and all known matter in four spacetime dimensions, not more and not less'. The formal Leitmotiv of loop quantum gravity is background independence. Non-gravitational theories are usually quantized on a given non-dynamical background. In contrast, due to

  9. Book review: Rogue waves in the ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, Eric L.

    2011-01-01

    Review info: Rogue Waves in the Ocean. Advances in Geophysical and Environmental Mechanics and Mathematics. By Christian Kharif, Efim Pelinovsky and Alexey Slunyaev, 2009. ISBN: 978-3540884187, xiii, 216 pp.

  10. BOOK REVIEW: OPENING SCIENCE, THE EVOLVING GUIDE ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The way we get our funding, collaborate, do our research, and get the word out has evolved over hundreds of years but we can imagine a more open science world, largely facilitated by the internet. The movement towards this more open way of doing and presenting science is coming, and it is not taking hundreds of years. If you are interested in these trends, and would like to find out more about where this is all headed and what it means to you, consider downloding Opening Science, edited by Sönke Bartling and Sascha Friesike, subtitled The Evolving Guide on How the Internet is Changing Research, Collaboration, and Scholarly Publishing. In 26 chapters by various authors from a range of disciplines the book explores the developing world of open science, starting from the first scientific revolution and bringing us to the next scientific revolution, sometimes referred to as “Science 2.0”. Some of the articles deal with the impact of the changing landscape of how science is done, looking at the impact of open science on Academia, or journal publishing, or medical research. Many of the articles look at the uses, pitfalls, and impact of specific tools, like microblogging (think Twitter), social networking, and reference management. There is lots of discussion and definition of terms you might use or misuse like “altmetrics” and “impact factor”. Science will probably never be completely open, and Twitter will probably never replace the journal article,

  11. BOOK REVIEW: OPENING SCIENCE, THE EVOLVING GUIDE ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The way we get our funding, collaborate, do our research, and get the word out has evolved over hundreds of years but we can imagine a more open science world, largely facilitated by the internet. The movement towards this more open way of doing and presenting science is coming, and it is not taking hundreds of years. If you are interested in these trends, and would like to find out more about where this is all headed and what it means to you, consider downloding Opening Science, edited by Sönke Bartling and Sascha Friesike, subtitled The Evolving Guide on How the Internet is Changing Research, Collaboration, and Scholarly Publishing. In 26 chapters by various authors from a range of disciplines the book explores the developing world of open science, starting from the first scientific revolution and bringing us to the next scientific revolution, sometimes referred to as “Science 2.0”. Some of the articles deal with the impact of the changing landscape of how science is done, looking at the impact of open science on Academia, or journal publishing, or medical research. Many of the articles look at the uses, pitfalls, and impact of specific tools, like microblogging (think Twitter), social networking, and reference management. There is lots of discussion and definition of terms you might use or misuse like “altmetrics” and “impact factor”. Science will probably never be completely open, and Twitter will probably never replace the journal article,

  12. STE - The Software Tools Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Software tools is an excellent book written by B. W. Kernighan and P. J. Plauger, published by Addison-Wesley. In it the authors discuss how to write programs that make good tools, and how to program well in the process. One of the tools they develop is a fairly powerful editor, written in Ratfor (a structured form of FORTRAN IV). This program has been implemented on the UCL Starlink VAX (with a few modifications and extensions) and is recommended as the editor to use on the VAX. This note gives a brief introduction to, and description of, the editor which has been abstracted from the book (which you are recommended to buy). There are some short command summary sections at the end of this note. After reading this note you may like to print these short files and use them for reference when using the editor.

  13. BOOK REVIEW: Particle Astrophysics (Second Edition)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Nicole

    2009-07-01

    Particle astrophysics, the interface of elementary particle physics with astrophysics and cosmology, is a rapidly evolving field. Perkins' book provides a nice introduction to this field, at a level appropriate for senior undergraduate students. Perkins develops the foundations underlying both the particle and astrophysics areas, and also covers some of the most recent developments in this field. The latter is an appealing feature, as students rarely encounter topics of current research in their undergraduate textbooks. Part 1 of the text introduces the elementary particle content, and interactions, of the standard model of particle physics. Relativity is addressed at the level of special relativistic kinematics, the equivalence principle and the Robertson-Walker metric. Part 2 covers cosmology, starting with the expansion of the Universe and basic thermodynamics. It then moves on to primordial nucleosynthesis, baryogenesis, dark matter, dark energy, structure formation and the cosmic microwave background. Part 3 covers cosmic rays, stellar evolution, and related topics. Cutting edge topics include the use of the cosmological large scale structure power spectrum to constrain neutrino mass, the creation of the baryon asymmetry via leptogenesis, and the equation of state for dark energy. While the treatment of many topics is quite brief, the level of depth is about right for undergraduates who are being exposed to these topics for the first time. The breadth of topics spanned is excellent. Perkins does a good job connecting theory with the experimental underpinnings, and of simplifying the theoretical presentation of complex subjects to a level that senior undergraduate students should find accessible. Each chapter includes a number of exercises. Brief solutions are provided for all the exercises, while fully worked solutions are provided for a smaller subset.

  14. BOOK REVIEW: "...eine ausnehmende Zierde und Vortheil"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerbeck, H. W.; Luehning, F.

    This book comprises the habilitation thesis submitted by F. Lühning to the Faculty of Mathematics of Hamburg University in 2004. Due to financial support from various organizations, it was issued in a very attractive form as a special publication of the Society for the history of the city of Kiel. The nice layout, the graphical sketches of buildings, instruments, and astronomical connexions, often designed by the author, and the scientifically precise text, written with a sense of humor, make a pleasant reading, in spite of sometimes quite extensive descriptions of architectural details or 'operating instructions' for meridan circles etc. I have rarely read such an appealing text on astronomical history. The single chapters deal with the beginnings of astronomy in Kiel (1770-1820), Schrader's giant telescope from the late 18th century, Altona Observatory (1823-1850), the first years of the Astronomische Nachrichten, the last years of Altona Observatory (1850-1872), Bothkamp Observatory (1870-1914), the genesis of Kiel Observatory (1874-1880), the era of Krueger (1880-1896), the Kiel Chronometer Observatory (1893-1913), the era of Harzer (1897-1925), the era of Rosenberg (1927-1934), the decline of Kiel Observatory (1935-1950), and the Astronomische Nachrichten under Kobold (1907-1938). The book is concluded with a glossary of technical terms, biographical sketches of known and unknown dramatis personae, as well as a list of references. The author outlines lively sketches of people that were astronomically active in Altona, Kiel and its surroundings over a time interval of 200 years. To achieve this task, he has studied many files from the Secret State Archive Preussischer Kulturbesitz (Berlin), the Schleswig-Holsteinisches State Archive (Schleswig) and the Hamburg State Archive, from which he quotes extensively. He also has evaluated private documents and has interviewed surviving witnesses of the 1930s and 1940s. He has located remote sources: for example, the

  15. BOOK REVIEW: Physics of Strongly Coupled Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraeft, Wolf-Dietrich

    2007-07-01

    properties are the topics of chapters 6 to 8, followed by problems of metallization (chapter 9), non-neutral and dusty plasmas (chapter 10, chapter 11). References follow after each chapter. The book is of interest for obtaining an overview of the field, and is recommended reading. However, for more detailed information on special (theoretical) topics, one should go into the literature. Little is said with respect to kinetic theory, to the theory of ionization kinetics, to stopping power, effective potentials, and to spectral lines in dense plasmas. The interaction between laser or particle beams and plasmas and the evaluation of the results discussing Hugoniots is only touched on briefly. Astrophysics is not dealt with at all. Some misprints concerning names and years in the references may cause difficulties.

  16. BOOK REVIEW: ESTUARINE SCIENCE: A SYNTHETIC APPROACH TO RESEARCH AND PRACTICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This book is the product of fifty leading estuarine scientists most of whom attended a workshop convened for the purpose of "put[ting] together the case for synthesis of estuarine data and to show the capabilities of synthetic methods of research" (p. 2). The editor, John E. Hob...

  17. BOOK REVIEW: ESTUARINE SCIENCE: A SYNTHETIC APPROACH TO RESEARCH AND PRACTICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This book is the product of fifty leading estuarine scientists most of whom attended a workshop convened for the purpose of "put[ting] together the case for synthesis of estuarine data and to show the capabilities of synthetic methods of research" (p. 2). The editor, John E. Hob...

  18. New Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-03-01

    It is an honour and a challenge to take up the editorship of the Messenger at this time of ESO's expanding role in European and worldwide astronomy. In order to mark the change, we have made a few adjustments to the appearance without departing from the overall style that Peter Shaver had evolved during his term as editor. I would like to thank Peter for gen-tly coaching me into the position and Jutta Boxheimer, the technical editor, for the high quality of the layout.

  19. Book review of "Harvestmen: The Biology of the Opiliones"

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This is a review of the book Harvestmen by Pinto-da-Rocha et al (eds.), which is a wonderfully balanced and staggeringly complete treatment that covers the gauntlet of taxonomy and systematics, internal physiology, ecology, and behavior of Opiliones. In addition to the breadth of material presented ...

  20. Book Review: ADHD with Comorbid Disorders: Clinical Assessment and Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkpatrick, Michael A.

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews "ADHD with Comorbid Disorders: Clinical Assessment and Management" by Steven R. Pliszka, Caryn L. Carlson, and James M. Swanson, a book that provides information on children displaying both attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and other comorbid psychiatric conditions, complex psychopharmacological interventions that may…

  1. "The Sociology of Childhood" by William A. Corsaro. Book Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qvortrup, Jens

    1998-01-01

    Reviews Corsaro's work on the shift toward sociological approaches to research on children. Notes that the book fills a need for textbook on the sociology of childhood; documents the need for concern about children's well-being; presents a new analytical framework for the sociological study of children and of childhood; and challenges traditional…

  2. Looking to the Future Darkly: A Book Review from 2033.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Gene L.; Tesolowski, Dennis G.

    1991-01-01

    This fictional review of a book on vocational education, 1980-2033, suggests that (1) vocational educators failed to track signs of change; (2) deregulation transferred educational responsibility from the public sector to corporations with an underlying need to affect learning and work productivity. The "author's" response questions…

  3. An index to medical book reviews: a computer experiment.

    PubMed

    Atwood, R

    1967-01-01

    The experimental production of an index to book reviews of medical publications is described. Details of compilation and preparation of data for processing by an IBM 1440 computer are outlined. Results of a survey testing the response to the index in its present form by medical libraries are presented.

  4. The Critical Book Review: How, Why, and When?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevin, Ann I.; Brown, Stephanie; Erratt, John; Esquer, Jocelyn; Kamae, Melanie; Neria, Christy; Ocampo, Alaine; Shubin, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Disability Studies in Education (DSE) offers a framework that (a) grounds policy/practice in the experiences [and] perspectives of people with disabilities, (b) challenges practices/policy that isolate, de-humanize individuals, and (c) leads to new questions to pose. In this session, pedagogy for critical book reviews from a DSE perspective is…

  5. Emerging Communities: Integrating Networked Information into Library Services (Book Review).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afifi, Marianne

    1995-01-01

    Reviews this collection of papers, edited by Ann P. Bishop, which present the current state of networking as it relates to libraries and the community. Recommends the book as a compendium of lessons, learned and to be learned, as networked information becomes an integral and necessary part of the library world. (JMV)

  6. An Index to Medical Book Reviews: A Computer Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Atwood, Ruth

    1967-01-01

    The experimental production of an index to book reviews of medical publications is described. Details of compilation and preparation of data for processing by an IBM 1440 computer are outlined. Results of a survey testing the response to the index in its present form by medical libraries are presented. PMID:6016372

  7. How to write a scholarly book review for publication in a peer-reviewed journal: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lee, Alexander D; Green, Bart N; Johnson, Claire D; Nyquist, Julie

    2010-01-01

    To describe and discuss the processes used to write scholarly book reviews for publication in peer-reviewed journals and to provide a recommended strategy and book appraisal worksheet to use when conducting book reviews. A literature search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and the Index to Chiropractic Literature was conducted in June 2009 using a combination of controlled vocabulary and truncated text words to capture articles relevant to writing scholarly book reviews for publication in peer-reviewed journals. The initial search identified 839 citations. Following the removal of duplicates and the application of selection criteria, a total of 78 articles were included in this review including narrative commentaries (n = 26), editorials or journal announcements (n = 25), original research (n = 18), and journal correspondence pieces (n = 9). Recommendations for planning and writing an objective and quality book review are presented based on the evidence gleaned from the articles reviewed and from the authors' experiences. A worksheet for conducting a book review is provided. The scholarly book review serves many purposes and has the potential to be an influential literary form. The process of publishing a successful scholarly book review requires the reviewer to appreciate the book review publication process and to be aware of the skills and strategies involved in writing a successful review.

  8. Book Trade Research and Statistics. Prices of U.S. and Foreign Published Materials; Book Title Output and Average Prices: 2001 Final and 2002 Preliminary Figures; Book Sales Statistics, 2002: AAP Preliminary Estimates; U.S. Book Exports and Imports:2002; Number of Book Outlets in the United States and Canada; Review Media Statistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Sharon G.; Grabois, Andrew; Greco, Albert N.

    2003-01-01

    Includes six reports related to book trade statistics, including prices of U.S. and foreign materials; book title output and average prices; book sales statistics; book exports and imports; book outlets in the U.S. and Canada; and numbers of books and other media reviewed by major reviewing publications. (LRW)

  9. Robert Wartenberg: stormy petrel of neurology; rebel of book reviewers.

    PubMed

    Boshes, L D

    1996-12-01

    This "Sherlock Holmes" in the discipline of neurology, always searching for truth accuracy and dependability of researcher, clinician or writer, advanced his endowment into book reviewing. His acrid criticism was accurate, for the succeeding edition always embodied all recommendations, but at all times everyone benefited from the Wartenberg warmth, for he never made enemies with his microscopic scrutiny of facts in his unique but complete review of a tome.

  10. The most important tasks for peer reviewers evaluating a randomized controlled trial are not congruent with the tasks most often requested by journal editors.

    PubMed

    Chauvin, Anthony; Ravaud, Philippe; Baron, Gabriel; Barnes, Caroline; Boutron, Isabelle

    2015-07-03

    The peer review process is a cornerstone of biomedical research publications. However, it may fail to allow the publication of high-quality articles. We aimed to identify and sort, according to their importance, all tasks that are expected from peer reviewers when evaluating a manuscript reporting the results of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) and to determine which of these tasks are clearly requested by editors in their recommendations to peer reviewers. We identified the tasks expected of peer reviewers from 1) a systematic review of the published literature and 2) recommendations to peer reviewers for 171 journals (i.e., 10 journals with the highest impact factor for 14 different medical areas and all journals indexed in PubMed that published more than 15 RCTs over 3 months regardless of the medical area). Participants who had peer-reviewed at least one report of an RCT had to classify the importance of each task relative to other tasks using a Q-sort technique. Finally, we evaluated editors' recommendations to authors to determine which tasks were clearly requested by editors in their recommendations to peer reviewers. The Q-sort survey was completed by 203 participants, 93 (46 %) with clinical expertise, 72 (36 %) with methodological/statistical expertise, 17 (8 %) with expertise in both areas, and 21 (10 %) with other expertise. The task rated most important by participants (evaluating the risk of bias) was clearly requested by only 5 % of editors. In contrast, the task most frequently requested by editors (provide recommendations for publication), was rated in the first tertile only by 21 % of all participants. The most important tasks for peer reviewers were not congruent with the tasks most often requested by journal editors in their guidelines to reviewers.

  11. Book review: Advances in reintroduction biology of Australian and New Zealand fauna

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muths, Erin L.

    2016-01-01

    Review info: Advances in Reintroduction Biology of Australian and New Zealand Fauna. Doug P. Armstrong, Matthew W. Hayward, Dorian Moro, and Philip J. Seddon, editors. 2015. ISBN 978-1486303014. 320 pp.

  12. Book review: Ecology of North American freshwater fishes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonar, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    This book will be important in courses for upper undergraduates studying fish ecology or for graduate students. However, it will also be an excellent reference for the fishery manager who asks ‘Why does this fish do that?’. With the wealth of great information contained in Ross’ book, chances are an answer will be found. Review info: Ecology of North American freshwater fishes. Edited by Stephen T. Ross, 2013. ISBN: 978-0520249455, 408 pp.

  13. Editor's note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umapathy, Siva

    2017-01-01

    This is an editor's note related to the publication 'Biologically active and thermally stable polymeric Schiff base and its metal polychelates: Their synthesis and spectral aspects' by Raza Rasool and Sumaiya Hasnain, which appeared in Spectrochimica Acta Part A: Molecular and Biomolecular Spectroscopy 148 (2015) 435-443.

  14. Recent Trends in the Presentation of Neuroanatomy in Contemporary Neuroanatomy Books as Revealed in Their 'Preface's: A Review.

    PubMed

    Yasmin, Q S; Banu, L A; Rahman, M F; Paul, S

    2015-04-01

    Many changes have been made in the field of Neuroanatomy teaching and assessment. One important way to know the changes in other country is by analyzing the Neuroanatomy text books and we can compare their reflections in our curriculum by analyzing the assessment system. To analyze the 'Preface's of contemporary Neuroanatomy text books, qualitatively, for noting the approaches taken and means applied in dealing with Neuroanatomy in the text books. This review was done in Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU), Dhaka from July 2008 and June 2009. The 'Preface's of ten contemporary text books dealing with Neuroanatomy, published since 1993, was analyzed. Among them, the two that are most commonly recommended to the medical postgraduates in Bangladesh were selected for analyzing their presentation of text and illustrations. The 'Preface's of ten books were analyzed qualitatively to identify the information and explanations provided and comments made by their author(s)/editor(s) on the approaches taken and the means applied in the books in selecting and presenting topics, text and illustrations. The observations were organized into specific 'theme's. Twelve 'theme's were identified from the analyses of the 'Preface's of ten contemporary Neuroanatomy text books. These include special emphasis in the books on incorporation of new information, on practical application of Neuroanatomical facts. Addition and improvement regarding illustrations are also highlighted. By incorporating the findings of the present study with the present-day ideas and trends in Neuroanatomy in the developed world as evident from the available literature, suggestions could be formulated on improving the methods of teaching and assessment of Neuroanatomy in Bangladesh.

  15. Common statistical and research design problems in manuscripts submitted to high-impact psychiatry journals: what editors and reviewers want authors to know.

    PubMed

    Harris, Alex H S; Reeder, Rachelle; Hyun, Jenny K

    2009-10-01

    Journal editors and statistical reviewers are often in the difficult position of catching serious problems in submitted manuscripts after the research is conducted and data have been analyzed. We sought to learn from editors and reviewers of major psychiatry journals what common statistical and design problems they most often find in submitted manuscripts and what they wished to communicate to authors regarding these issues. Our primary goal was to facilitate communication between journal editors/reviewers and researchers/authors and thereby improve the scientific and statistical quality of research and submitted manuscripts. Editors and statistical reviewers of 54 high-impact psychiatry journals were surveyed to learn what statistical or design problems they encounter most often in submitted manuscripts. Respondents completed the survey online. The authors analyzed survey text responses using content analysis procedures to identify major themes related to commonly encountered statistical or research design problems. Editors and reviewers (n=15) who handle manuscripts from 39 different high-impact psychiatry journals responded to the survey. The most commonly cited problems regarded failure to map statistical models onto research questions, improper handling of missing data, not controlling for multiple comparisons, not understanding the difference between equivalence and difference trials, and poor controls in quasi-experimental designs. The scientific quality of psychiatry research and submitted reports could be greatly improved if researchers became sensitive to, or sought consultation on frequently encountered methodological and analytic issues.

  16. Reviews, Holdings, and Presses and Publishers in Academic Library Book Acquisitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, John C.

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of academic library book acquisition reviews pertinent literature on book reviews, book selection, and evaluation and proposes a model for academic library book acquisition using a two-year relational database file of approval plan records. Defines a core collection for the California State University system, and characterizes…

  17. Reviews, Holdings, and Presses and Publishers in Academic Library Book Acquisitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, John C.

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of academic library book acquisition reviews pertinent literature on book reviews, book selection, and evaluation and proposes a model for academic library book acquisition using a two-year relational database file of approval plan records. Defines a core collection for the California State University system, and characterizes…

  18. [Book review] Endangered Birds: Management techniques for preserving threatened species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erickson, R.C.

    1980-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of a symposium held at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, during 17-20 August 1977. In the words of the book's editor, Stanley Temple, the symposium "offered a unique opportunity for leading scientists from around the world to meet and share their experiences with endangered birds." That this objective was achieved is indicated by a list of contributors standing as a "Who's Who" in endangered species research and management. This symposium was jointly sponsored by the International Council for Bird Preservation, World Wildlife Fund, National Audubon Society, New York Zoological Society, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Fifty-one papers by 53 contributors are listed under 10 topics: endangered bird problems and the concept of managing threatened species; increasing reproductive effort and success by reducing nest-site limitations; alleviating problems of competition, predation, parasitism, and disease; supplemental feeding and manipulation of feeding ecology; manipulating aspects of nesting biology; captive breeding of endangered birds; genetic aspects of managing dwindling populations; reintroducing endangered birds to the wild; integrated approaches to management of endangered birds; and summary. A 14-page index provides convenient reference to subjects in the text.

  19. An Analysis of the Relationship between Book Reviews and Fiction Holdings in OCLC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Debora

    1991-01-01

    Study of library holdings on OCLC compared with book reviews listed in "Book Review Index" showed a positive correlation between the number of reviews a book received and the number of libraries holding it. Positive and negative reviews were not differentiated, and the correlation was strongest with general and science fiction, weakest…

  20. Editors' Fall Picks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heilbrun, Margaret; McCormack, Heather; Katterjohn, Anna; Kuzyk, Raya; Roncevic, Mirela; Fox, Bette-Lee; Hoffert, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal's" review editors select fall titles readers won't want to miss--"Waiting on a Train: The Embattled Future of Passenger Rail Service" (James McCommons); "Happy" (Alex Lemon); "Free for All: Joe Papp, the Public, and the Greatest Theater Story Ever Told" (Kenneth Turan & Joseph Papp); "In My Father's Shadow: A Daughter Remembers…

  1. Editors' Fall Picks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heilbrun, Margaret; McCormack, Heather; Katterjohn, Anna; Kuzyk, Raya; Roncevic, Mirela; Fox, Bette-Lee; Hoffert, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal's" review editors select fall titles readers won't want to miss--"Waiting on a Train: The Embattled Future of Passenger Rail Service" (James McCommons); "Happy" (Alex Lemon); "Free for All: Joe Papp, the Public, and the Greatest Theater Story Ever Told" (Kenneth Turan & Joseph Papp); "In My Father's Shadow: A Daughter Remembers…

  2. TOAD Editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bingle, Bradford D.; Shea, Anne L.; Hofler, Alicia S.

    1993-01-01

    Transferable Output ASCII Data (TOAD) computer program (LAR-13755), implements format designed to facilitate transfer of data across communication networks and dissimilar host computer systems. Any data file conforming to TOAD format standard called TOAD file. TOAD Editor is interactive software tool for manipulating contents of TOAD files. Commonly used to extract filtered subsets of data for visualization of results of computation. Also offers such user-oriented features as on-line help, clear English error messages, startup file, macroinstructions defined by user, command history, user variables, UNDO features, and full complement of mathematical statistical, and conversion functions. Companion program, TOAD Gateway (LAR-14484), converts data files from variety of other file formats to that of TOAD. TOAD Editor written in FORTRAN 77.

  3. WRR editors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    New editors of AGU's Water Resources Research journal will be Soroosh Sorooshian and Roger E. Smith.Soroosh Sorooshian was born in Kerman, Iran. He received his B.S. degree in mechanical engineering from California State Polytechnic University, San Luis Obispo, in 1971. He received his M.S. degree in operations research in 1973 and his Ph.D. degree in water resources systems engineering in 1978, both from the University of California, Los Angeles.

  4. MPS Editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathews, William S.; Liu, Ning; Francis, Laurie K.; OReilly, Taifun L.; Schrock, Mitchell; Page, Dennis N.; Morris, John R.; Joswig, Joseph C.; Crockett, Thomas M.; Shams, Khawaja S.

    2011-01-01

    Previously, it was time-consuming to hand-edit data and then set up simulation runs to find the effect and impact of the input data on a spacecraft. MPS Editor provides the user the capability to create/edit/update models and sequences, and immediately try them out using what appears to the user as one piece of software. MPS Editor provides an integrated sequencing environment for users. It provides them with software that can be utilized during development as well as actual operations. In addition, it provides them with a single, consistent, user friendly interface. MPS Editor uses the Eclipse Rich Client Platform to provide an environment that can be tailored to specific missions. It provides the capability to create and edit, and includes an Activity Dictionary to build the simulation spacecraft models, build and edit sequences of commands, and model the effects of those commands on the spacecraft. MPS Editor is written in Java using the Eclipse Rich Client Platform. It is currently built with four perspectives: the Activity Dictionary Perspective, the Project Adaptation Perspective, the Sequence Building Perspective, and the Sequence Modeling Perspective. Each perspective performs a given task. If a mission doesn't require that task, the unneeded perspective is not added to that project's delivery. In the Activity Dictionary Perspective, the user builds the project-specific activities, observations, calibrations, etc. Typically, this is used during the development phases of the mission, although it can be used later to make changes and updates to the Project Activity Dictionary. In the Adaptation Perspective, the user creates the spacecraft models such as power, data store, etc. Again, this is typically used during development, but will be used to update or add models of the spacecraft. The Sequence Building Perspective allows the user to create a sequence of activities or commands that go to the spacecraft. It provides a simulation of the activities and

  5. Book Review: ALIENS: WHY THEY ARE HERE / Scribner, 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Wendy M.

    Wendy M. Grossman of The Skeptic review of "Aliens: Why They Are Here" by Bryan Appleyard. "Appleyard says he moved from scepticism to belief to acceptance in the course of writing his book. Yet he dislikes science throughout, saying it aims to 'imagine a world of emotionless self-awareness'. I'd still rather be a sceptic. At least for us science is still a source of wonder."

  6. Book Review - Panofsky on Physics, Politics, and Peace: Pief Remembers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loew, Gregory

    The following sections are included: * Introduction: Genesis of the Book * Nature and Nurture: Pief's Early Life * This Review * High School in Hamburg; University at Princeton and Caltech * Pief and the Bomb * Accelerators and Physics at UCRL * Events Leading up to the Loyalty Oath * Stanford, the Microwave Lab and HEPL * The Rise of SLAC * Building SLAC * Physics Research at SLAC in the First Ten Years * Other Accelerator Activities under Pief * Science Advising and International Science * Arms Control (1981-2007): The Unfinished Business

  7. Comparing Open-Book and Closed-Book Examinations: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Durning, Steven J; Dong, Ting; Ratcliffe, Temple; Schuwirth, Lambert; Artino, Anthony R; Boulet, John R; Eva, Kevin

    2016-04-01

    To compare the relative utility of open-book examinations (OBEs) and closed-book examinations (CBEs) given the rapid expansion and accessibility of knowledge. A systematic review of peer-reviewed articles retrieved from MEDLINE, ERIC, Embase, and PsycINFO (through June 2013). In 2013-2014, articles that met inclusion criteria were reviewed by at least two investigators and coded for six outcome categories: (1) examination preparation, (2) test anxiety, (3) exam performance, (4) psychometrics and logistics, (5) testing effects, and (6) public perception. From 4,192 identified studies, 37 were included. The level of learner and subject studied varied. The frequency of each outcome category was as follows: (1) exam preparation (n = 20; 54%); (2) test anxiety (n = 14; 38%); (3) exam performance (n = 30; 81%); (4) psychometrics and logistics (n = 5; 14%); (5) testing effects (n = 24; 65%); and (6) public perception (n = 5; 14%). Preexamination outcome findings were equivocal, but students may prepare more extensively for CBEs. For during-examination outcomes, examinees appear to take longer to complete OBEs. Studies addressing examination performance favored CBE, particularly when preparation for CBE was greater than for OBE. Postexamination outcomes suggest little difference in testing effects or public perception. Given the data available, there does not appear to be sufficient evidence for exclusively using CBE or OBE. As such, a combined approach could become a more significant part of testing protocols as licensing bodies seek ways to assess competencies other than the maintenance of medical knowledge.

  8. Role of Gender in Reviewers' Appraisals of Quality in Political Science Books: A Content Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinty, Stephen; Moore, Anne C.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the changing roles for women in academia from 1991 to 2001 through a content analysis of quality characteristics in 626 "American Political Science Review" book reviews. Results revealed increases for women over men in quantity of books and reviews published, as well as quality appraisals of books written. (Contains 2 tables…

  9. A review of Catherine Milne's book, The Invention of Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmer, Penny J.

    2011-12-01

    Catherine Milne's book, The Invention of Science, recounts the history of science (mainly Eurocentric) from cross-cultural, historical and philosophical worldviews. Scientists, science educators, and teachers would find this an interesting book, not only for themselves but also for those with whom they interact. Most accounts are of the great men in science with some to women in science, including reference to the exclusion of women from science. Milne provides thought-provoking activities to use in the classroom, like asking students to write the processes that occur when sugar dissolves in hot tea, with students including the three components of causal explanation. She also encourages teachers to use narratives to help students learn the context of discovery in science. In a comparison of analogical, deductive, inductive and abductive reasoning, she encourages teachers to pay attention to dialogical arguments. Book review author predicts that Milne's book will fit well with the nation's next generation science standards, still in development form. Milne succeeded in her goal "to combine aspects of the philosophy and history; not just to focus on specific scientific ideas but to provide a hint of the complex relationship between place and history, space and time, in the development of Eurocentric science."

  10. Survey of editors and reviewers of high-impact psychology journals: statistical and research design problems in submitted manuscripts.

    PubMed

    Harris, Alex; Reeder, Rachelle; Hyun, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    The authors surveyed 21 editors and reviewers from major psychology journals to identify and describe the statistical and design errors they encounter most often and to get their advice regarding prevention of these problems. Content analysis of the text responses revealed themes in 3 major areas: (a) problems with research design and reporting (e.g., lack of an a priori power analysis, lack of congruence between research questions and study design/analysis, failure to adequately describe statistical procedures); (b) inappropriate data analysis (e.g., improper use of analysis of variance, too many statistical tests without adjustments, inadequate strategy for addressing missing data); and (c) misinterpretation of results. If researchers attended to these common methodological and analytic issues, the scientific quality of manuscripts submitted to high-impact psychology journals might be significantly improved.

  11. Book review: Birds of Prey: Health & Disease, Third Edition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, Glenn H.

    2009-01-01

    Even though this book is billed as the third edition it is, in the words of Patrick T. Redig, author of its Foreword, ‘‘a seriously reinvented book.’’ Originally published in 1978 under the title of Veterinary Aspects of Captive Birds of Prey, this new edition, with its new title, could stand alone and not have been tagged with the ‘‘third edition.’’ Much has changed in the world of avian medicine in the 30 yr since the publishing of the original tome, and this new volume brings the latest information on raptor medicine to the reader.Review info: Birds of Prey: Health & Disease, Third Edition. Edited by John E. Cooper. Blackwell Sciences, Ltd., Oxford, UK. 2002. 345 pp. ISBN 978-0-63205-115-1.

  12. Book review: Shorebirds of North America: the photographic guide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterjohn, Bruce G.

    2005-01-01

    As stated in the preface of this new guide, shorebirds are among our most engaging birds. Their ecology and behavior are the subjects of numerous ornithological studies, their identification can challenge the skills of the most serious birdwatchers, and people with a casual interest in birds are captivated by the antics of Sanderlings (Calidris alba) chasing waves along a beach. While some books provide a worldwide perspective on shorebird identification, this book is the first guide devoted solely to identifying every species occurring in North America. Its coverage is truly continental, extending from Alaska to Panama and including the West Indies.Review info: Shorebirds of North America: the photographic guide. By Dennis R. Paulson, 2005. ISBN: 0691102740, 384 pp.

  13. Book review: Nonlinear ocean waves and the inverse scattering transform

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, Eric L.

    2011-01-01

    Nonlinear Ocean Waves and the Inverse Scattering Transform is a comprehensive examination of ocean waves built upon the theory of nonlinear Fourier analysis. The renowned author, Alfred R. Osborne, is perhaps best known for the discovery of internal solitons in the Andaman Sea during the 1970s. In this book, he provides an extensive treatment of nonlinear water waves based on a nonlinear spectral theory known as the inverse scattering transform. The writing is exceptional throughout the book, which is particularly useful in explaining some of the more difficult mathematical concepts.  Review info: Nonlinear Ocean Waves and the Inverse Scattering Transform. By Alfred R. Osborne, 2010. ISBN: 978-125286299, 917 pp.

  14. BOOK REVIEW: Light, Visible and Invisible and its Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newing, Angela

    2000-09-01

    This book is based on various lectures given by Professor Newing over the last few years covering the centenaries of the discovery of x-rays, radioactivity, the electron and radium. It is a splendid follow-up read after studying the more formal presentations in A-level textbooks. The theory of each technique is touched on and the reader is provided with a full list of references for deeper analysis. Intermittently within the text are paragraphs of historical and developmental details, illustrated by contemporary drawings and photographs. These passages, which appear in a different typeface, add greatly to the enjoyment of the book, but could be skipped by an impatient reader seeking to gain an appropriate review knowledge of the subject of medical radiation physics. The areas of physiological measurement and medical engineering are not covered, neither is medical computing. Chapters discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic applications of x-rays. Different methods of scanning are outlined and the appropriateness of techniques brought up-to-date. Treatment with ionizing radiations is expanded to touch on electron radiotherapy, neutron therapy and brachytherapy. Phototherapy and photochemotherapy are considered in the section on treatments using non-ionizing radiations. The story starts with evidence from the ancient worlds of Egypt and Greece, accelerating through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries to the many treatments around today. The laser is shown to be a versatile and exact tool, available in a complete range of wavelengths for different surgical uses. The scientific principles and current applications of nuclear medicine, ultrasound and MRI are described. For each type of procedure, the author includes comments on advantages, disadvantages and operational safety. Dosimetry and quality assurance are touched upon. The book reflects Professor Newing's enthusiasm for her role as a medical physicist both as practitioner and teacher. To any students studying

  15. BOOK REVIEW: Nonlinear Dynamics: Integrability, Chaos and Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grammaticos, B.

    2004-02-01

    When the editorial office of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and General of the Institute of Physics Publishing asked me to review a book on nonlinear dynamics I experienced an undeniable apprehension. Indeed, the domain is a rapidly expanding one and writing a book aiming at a certain degree of completeness looks like an almost impossible task. My uneasiness abated somewhat when I saw the names of the authors, two well-known specialists of the nonlinear domain, but it was only when I held the book in my hands that I felt really reassured. The book is not just a review of the recent (and less so) findings on nonlinear systems. It is also a textbook. The authors set out to provide a detailed, step by step, introduction to the domain of nonlinearity and its various subdomains: chaos, integrability and pattern formation (although this last topic is treated with far less detail than the other two). The public they have in mind is obviously that of university students, graduate or undergraduate, who are interested in nonlinear phenomena. I suspect that a non-negligible portion of readers will be people who have to teach topics which figure among those included in the book: they will find this monograph an excellent companion to their course. The book is written in a pedagogical way, with a profusion of examples, detailed explanations and clear diagrams. The point of view is that of a physicist, which to my eyes is a major advantage. The mathematical formulation remains simple and perfectly intelligible. Thus the reader is not bogged down by fancy mathematical formalism, which would have discouraged the less experienced ones. A host of exercises accompanies every chapter. This will give the novice the occasion to develop his/her problem-solving skills and acquire competence in the use of nonlinear techniques. Some exercises are quite straightforward, like `verify the relation 14.81'. Others are less so, such as `prepare a write-up on a) frequency-locking and b) devil

  16. BOOK REVIEW: Geheimnisvolles Universum - Europas Astronomen entschleiern das Weltall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerbeck, H. W.; Lorenzen, D. H.

    2002-12-01

    The 25th birthday of ESO, in 1987, was celebrated by the publication of an illustrated popular book, "Exploring the Southern Sky" (Springer-Verlag 1987), which also saw editions in Danish, English, French, German, and Spanish. Written and illustrated by the ESO staff members Svend Laustsen, Claus Madsen and Richard M. West, its many pictures were mainly taken with the ESO 3.6m and Schmidt telescopes. The structure of the book - perhaps at that time somewhat unusual - started with things far away (Universe and galaxies), zoomed in to the Milky Way, and finally reached the Solar System (with a concluding chapter dealing with the La Silla observatory). Now, with the 4 units of the Very Large Telescope in full operation, and on the occasion of ESO's 40th birthday, another jubilee book has appeared: "Geheimnisvolles Universum: Europas Astronomen entschleiern das Weltall", written by the science journalist Dirk H. Lorenzen, of Hamburg, Germany, and prefaced by Catherine Cesarsky, Director General of ESO. Presumably, this book will also soon become available in more languages spoken in ESO member countries. Thus it may be worthwhile to review the first edition, although some readers may like to wait for more easily accessible editions. Before going into details, let me first mention that I find this a very impressing book, great to look at and refreshing to read. With ESO seen through the eyes of a visitor, things gain a perspective that is quite different from that of the previous book, and at least as attractive. It comes as no surprise that the book starts with a visit of ESO's showcase, the Paranal Observatory, and the writer not only notes down his own impressions, but also cites statements of some of the many people that keep Paranal going - technicians and staff astronomers. This mixture of texts provides a good impression of the operations at a large observatory for the general reader. The two more 'astronomical' parts that follow deal with star and planet

  17. BOOK REVIEW: Quantum Gravity: third edition Quantum Gravity: third edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovelli, Carlo

    2012-09-01

    The request by Classical and Quantum Gravity to review the third edition of Claus Kiefer's 'Quantum Gravity' puts me in a slightly awkward position. This is a remarkably good book, which every person working in quantum gravity should have on the shelf. But in my opinion quantum gravity has undergone some dramatic advances in the last few years, of which the book makes no mention. Perhaps the omission only attests to the current vitality of the field, where progress is happening fast, but it is strange for me to review a thoughtful, knowledgeable and comprehensive book on my own field of research, which ignores what I myself consider the most interesting results to date. Kiefer's book is unique as a broad introduction and a reliable overview of quantum gravity. There are numerous books in the field which (often notwithstanding titles) focus on a single approach. There are also countless conference proceedings and article collections aiming to be encyclopaedic, but offering disorganized patchworks. Kiefer's book is a careful and thoughtful presentation of all aspects of the immense problem of quantum gravity. Kiefer is very learned, and brings together three rare qualities: he is pedagogical, he is capable of simplifying matter to the bones and capturing the essential, and he offers a serious and balanced evaluation of views and ideas. In a fractured field based on a major problem that does not yet have a solution, these qualities are precious. I recommend Kiefer's book to my students entering the field: to work in quantum gravity one needs a vast amount of technical knowledge as well as a grasp of different ideas, and Kiefer's book offers this with remarkable clarity. This novel third edition simplifies and improves the presentation of several topics, but also adds very valuable new material on quantum gravity phenomenology, loop quantum cosmology, asymptotic safety, Horava-Lifshitz gravity, analogue gravity, the holographic principle, and more. This is a testament

  18. BOOK REVIEW: Supersymmetry and String Theory: Beyond the Standard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocek, Martin

    2007-11-01

    When I was asked to review Michael Dine's new book, 'Supersymmetry and String Theory', I was pleased to have a chance to read a book by such an established authority on how string theory might become testable. The book is most useful as a list of current topics of interest in modern theoretical physics. It gives a succinct summary of a huge variety of subjects, including the standard model, symmetry, Yang Mills theory, quantization of gauge theories, the phenomenology of the standard model, the renormalization group, lattice gauge theory, effective field theories, anomalies, instantons, solitons, monopoles, dualities, technicolor, supersymmetry, the minimal supersymmetric standard model, dynamical supersymmetry breaking, extended supersymmetry, Seiberg Witten theory, general relativity, cosmology, inflation, bosonic string theory, the superstring, the heterotic string, string compactifications, the quintic, string dualities, large extra dimensions, and, in the appendices, Goldstone's theorem, path integrals, and exact beta-functions in supersymmetric gauge theories. Its breadth is both its strength and its weakness: it is not (and could not possibly be) either a definitive reference for experts, where the details of thorny technical issues are carefully explored, or a textbook for graduate students, with detailed pedagogical expositions. As such, it complements rather than replaces the much narrower and more focussed String Theory I and II volumes by Polchinski, with their deep insights, as well the two older volumes by Green, Schwarz, and Witten, which develop string theory pedagogically.

  19. BOOK REVIEW: Physics for Scientists and Engineers Third Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giancoli, Douglas C.

    2000-09-01

    There are a large number of textbooks for the college and university student produced in the USA and here is one that I had not seen before even though it is now in the third edition. But it is so similar to many others. The standard version as reviewed here covers the usual topics of classical physics, namely kinematics, energy, waves and oscillations, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism and light. Also, as is usual with the American coverage, it includes fluids, special relativity and a short chapter on quantum theory and the atom. An extended version is available covering modern physics, astrophysics and cosmology. There is also available back-up material such as instructor's manual, CD-ROM, video and other extra teaching material Full colour is used and the book is lavishly illustrated with diagrams and photographs. Calculus is used throughout the book, although this is limited to basic differentiation and integration. There is an extensive range of worked examples plus end-of-chapter questions and problems, with numerical answers given to the odd-numbered problems. The physics is illustrated with many everyday examples. The styles of course presentation and hence the styles of book used in the USA and the UK seem to be diverging. It is unlikely such a book as this would be used at A-level. This is not only because of the calculus, albeit simple, but because of the detailed coverage of classical topics. Increasingly there has been a trend in this country to be more selective in content, and yet at the same time to incorporate more modern topics such as solids, environmental and atmospheric physics, particle physics and cosmology, but described in a fairly elementary way. The book would be suitable for preliminary year and first-year university physics courses but its size and weight are daunting. I am not sure why physics described in such an encyclopaedic way is popular in the US but less so here. However, of its type this book is both attractive and

  20. BOOK REVIEW An Introduction to Relativity An Introduction to Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dray, Tevian

    2011-02-01

    As is clearly stated in the preface, this book is a fresh rewrite of Narlikar's published lecture notes [1] from 1978, resulting in a unique historical perspective with a modernized presentation. For workers in the field, this book provides a fascinating glimpse of the state of the art 30 years ago, but there are some inevitable idiosyncracies which might make it less useful to the beginner, especially those attempting to read this book on their own. The author is well-known for his informal, readable style, and this book is no exception. Although the treatment is overly algebraic from this reviewer's modern perspective, that is not necessarily a drawback, and does accurately reflect contemporary usage. This text is a `math first' approach to relativity, presenting the tensor calculus first, and the physics second. Not surprisingly given the author's interests, there is an emphasis on cosmological applications. After a quick review of special relativity, the book jumps right in with a fairly standard introduction to tensor calculus, followed almost immediately by chapters on Einstein's equations, the Schwarzschild solution, experimental tests, relativistic astrophysics, and black holes, followed in turn by several chapters on cosmology. This new text is a faithful adaptation of the earlier text, with essentially identical tables of contents. In fact, the only notable differences are the opening chapter summarizing special relativity, a brief new chapter on gravitational radiation, and the exclusion of a lecture on the Steady State Theory — and that material appears separately in the author's cosmology text [2]. Some of the material, such as the excellent chapter on symmetries, is largely identical to the original, but most of the material has been extensively rewritten, with most of the changes being to presentation, rather than content. There are some seldom seen gems in this book, such as the aforementioned discussion of symmetries, the extensive discussion of

  1. BOOK REVIEW: New Visions on Form and Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, M.

    2005-03-01

    presentation is quite advanced, at the level of a graduate text, and newcomers to the field may in places have difficulty following the arguments. For example, the subtle topic of the renormalization group is rather abruptly introduced in the discussion of interface structures. Furthermore, the presentation is not helped by some typographical errors in the equations. Curiously for a book on pattern formation, there is rather little discussion of reaction diffusion systems, or of Turing-type instabilities. I also found the discussion of biological systems in the final chapter to be too brief and speculative to be really useful. This subject is vast and it would have been worthwhile to attempt a more comprehensive review of pattern formation in biology to link it more concretely with the simpler and better understood pattern-forming systems in physics. Nevertheless, Pelcé's book is worthwhile and forms a useful addition to the literature on pattern formation in physics and biology.

  2. BOOK REVIEW: Microscopic Dynamics of Plasmas and Chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elskens, Y.; Escande, D.

    2003-04-01

    beautiful derivations of the self-consistent Lagrangian for wave-particle interactions, followed by an equivalent Hamiltonian formulation in terms of action-angle variables. In the following two chapters, these and related techniques are used to explore the deepest topics of plasma dynamics and wave theory, often from a beam-plasma perspective. The book begins afresh at chapter 5, which is an ambitious attempt to summarise modern classical dynamics. This chapter begins well, with a nice introduction to action-angle variables (these have already been extensively exploited in the preceding chapters, however!), but the account eventually became too compressed for the present reviewer. There follow two further chapters on both diffusion and the single-wave-particle system. Perhaps this book is best considered as a companion to the research literature (indeed there is a useful and extensive bibliography), rather than as a conventionally structured textbook. Certainly it is a book that should be read backwards and sideways, as well as forwards. Most readers, for example, will be more familiar with the Vlasov-Poisson system than with the N-body approach to particles and fields that is developed here: their natural starting point will perhaps be appendix G.4 of the present volume. Nor does the book provide a free-standing account of plasma dynamics from the chosen perspective. For example, prior familiarity with van Kampen modes in the Vlasov--Poisson description would greatly assist understanding of chapter 3. Challenging exercises are embedded in the text throughout (even in the otherwise excellent appendices), with answers not necessarily provided. Altogether, this book provides a wealth of theoretical information that is not easily accessible from any other source. It is a book with character, written from a definite viewpoint, but it also facilitates the development of the reader's own perspective by offering a clear path to the original research literature. R O Dendy

  3. Vicarious Collecting: A Review of Some Notable Books about Books - and where to acquire them!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koester, Jack

    Reviews on Milestones of Science, Ruth A. Sparrow, Buffalo Museum of Science, 1972, The Face of the Moon, from the Linda Hall Library, Out of this World - The Golden Age of the Celestial Atlas, Linda Hall Library, including Bayer's Uranometria, Schiller's Coelum Christianum, Hevelius' Firmamentum, Flamsteed's Atlas Coelestis, and Bode's Uranographia, as well as Argelander, Bode, Cellarius, Coronelli, Doppelmaier, Kepler, La Caille, Messier, Piccolomini, and Wollaston, Heavenly Library, Angus MacDonald and A.D. Morrison-Low from Royal Observatory Edinburgh, Library, 1994, Catalogue of the Rare Astronomical Books in the San Diego State University Library, Louis A. Kenney, 1988, and Vanity Fair, from 1869 to 1914, including caricatures of famous astronomers and scientists, such as Airy, Ball, Huggins, and Proctor.

  4. BOOK REVIEW: Treasure-Hunting in Astronomical Plate Archives.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, Peter; La Dous, Constanze; Brauer, Hans-Juergen; Sterken, C.

    This book consists of the proceedings of a conference on the exploration of the invaluable scientific treasure present in astronomical plate archives worldwide. The book incorporates fifty scientific papers covering almost 250 pages. There are several most useful papers, such as, for example, an introduction to the world's large plate archives that serves the purpose of a guide for the beginning user of plate archives. It includes a very useful list of twelve mayor archives with many details on their advantages (completeness, number of plates, classification system and homogeneity of time coverage) and their limitations (plate quality, access, electronic catalogues, photographic services, limiting magnitudes, search software and cost to the user). Other topics cover available contemporary digitization machines, the applications of commercial flatbed scanners, technical aspects of plate consulting, astrophysical applications and astrometric uses, data reduction, data archiving and retrieval, and strategies to find astrophysically useful information on plates. The astrophysical coverage is very broad: from solar-system bodies to variable stars, sky surveys and sky patrols covering the galactic and extragalactic domain and even gravitational lensing. The book concludes by an illuminating paper on ALADIN, the reference tool for identification of astronomical sources. This work can be considered as a kind of field guide, and is recommended reading for anyone who wishes to undertake small- or large-scale consulting of photographic plate material. A shortcoming of the proceedings is the fact that very few papers have abstracts. BOOK REVIEW: Treasure-Hunting in Astronomical Plate Archives. Proceedings of the international workshop held at Sonneberg Observatory, March 4-6, 1999. Peter Kroll, Constanze la Dous and Hans-Juergen Brauer (Eds.)

  5. Book Review: Fluxes as functions of ecosystem and drivers of atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Lianhong

    2015-06-01

    The review is of the book Terrestrial biosphere-atmospheric fluxes, by Russell Monson and Dennis Baldochi. The book was published by Cambridge University Press, NY, 487 p. in 2014. ISBN 978-1-107-04065-6

  6. The Perfect Tens: The Top Twenty Books Reviewed in "Voice of Youth Advocates" 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voice of Youth Advocates, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Explains the review procedures and rating system for teen books in "Voice of Youth Advocates" and provides annotated bibliographies for the twenty best books in 2001-2202, including fiction, nonfiction, and science fiction and fantasy. (LRW)

  7. Teaching and Learning and the Challenge of Educational Reform. [Book Review].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Alma; Hopkins, David

    1999-01-01

    Reviews five books on instructional improvement: "The Effective Classroom" (Bert Creemers); "Universal Teaching Strategies" (H.J. Freiberg); "Changing Teachers, Changing Times" (A. Hargreaves); "Horace's Hope" (Theodore Sizer); and "Education for All" (Robert Slavin). Each book stresses the…

  8. Editors' foreword

    Treesearch

    D.C. Hayes; S.L. Stout; R.H. Crawford; A.P. Hoover

    2014-01-01

    Research programs may move in new directions in response to changes in society's needs and values. Each chapter of this book reflects the relationship between the ecological results that emerge from a long-term research project and the social forces that influence questions asked and resources invested in ecological research.

  9. Understanding abortion via different scholarly methodologies: book review essay.

    PubMed

    Erde, Edmund L

    1986-01-01

    Erde review three works that in his opinion have made important contributions to the abortion debate: Abortion Policy: An Evaluation of the Consequences For Maternal and Infant Health, by Jerome S. Legge, Jr. (Albany: State University of New York Press; 1985); Abortion and the Politics of Motherhood, by Kristen Luker (Berkeley: University of California Press; 1984); and Abortion: Moral and Legal Perspective, edited by J.L. Garfield and P. Hennessey (Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press; 1984). A later issue of the Journal of Medical Humanities and Bioethics will carry Erde's review of two additional scholarly books on abortion: Abortion: Understanding the Differences, edited by Sidney Callahan and Daniel Callahan (New York: Plenum Press; 1984), and Abortion and the Status of the Fetus, edited by William B. Bondeson, H.T. Engelhardt, Jr., S.F. Spicker, and D.H. Winship (Boston: D. Reidel; 1983).

  10. BOOK REVIEW Planck Scale Effects in Astrophysics and Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, Thanu

    2007-08-01

    through the articles in this book and it must have been an exciting conference. (The book under review is based on the lectures given at the 40th Karpacz Winter School.) This is a valuable addition to any library and will serve as a useful source of information for any graduate student or researcher who wants to enter or appreciate this field.

  11. A systematic review comparing open-book and closed-book examinations: Evaluating effects on development of critical thinking skills.

    PubMed

    Johanns, Beth; Dinkens, Amber; Moore, Jill

    2017-08-19

    The advantages of using traditional closed-book examinations are closely compared to the advantages of using open-book examinations for the development of critical thinking skills in nursing students. The use of critical thinking skills is vital among nurses to assess patient needs and modify standard approaches to individualize care for better patient outcomes. The following areas are compared and contrasted for both closed-book and open-book examinations: examination preparation, rote memorization versus active learning, intellectual engagement, simulation of working environment, higher order thinking skills, anxiety reduction and student satisfaction. During investigation of closed-book examinations and open-book examinations, the use of collaborative testing was unveiled. Collaborative testing combines areas from both closed-book and open-book examinations. Based on the systematic review of literature, the recommendation is to use a mixed method of examination types throughout the course of the nursing program. Each type of examination helps develop different skill sets in the nursing student. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. BOOK REVIEW Analytical and Numerical Approaches to Mathematical Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, John M.

    2007-08-01

    . This reviewer found the exposition much clearer than much of the phenomenological literature. Finally László Szabados gives a very systematic spacetime discussion of the group theoretical analysis of general relativity by Beig and Ó Murchadha, addressing the Poincaré structure and the centre-of-mass of asymptotically flat spacetimes. The third and final group is entitled 'numerical methods'. Beverly Berger summarizes her 'Living Review' on numerical approaches to spacetime singularities and includes more recent analytical results emphasizing the synergy between mathematical and numerical approaches. For numerical evolutions on a domain of compact spatial support boundary conditions will be needed and, as pointed out by this reviewer, for unconstrained evolutions it is essential that the boundary conditions ensure constraint conservation. This aspect is discussed in a clear elementary way by Simonetta Frittelli and Roberto Gómez. Dave Neilsen, Luis Lehner, Olivier Sarbach and Manuel Tiglio review algorithms adopted recently by the Louisiana group, particularly summation by parts and constraint monitoring with applications to bubble and black hole spacetimes. Finally Maria Babiuc, Béla Szilágyi and Jeffrey Winicour discuss the Pittsburgh group's approach with particular reference to harmonic gauge conditions. It is perhaps unfortunate for the editors of this work that published proceedings of more recent numerical relativity meetings exist already. However, as this reviewer has tried to indicate, this slim (but not inexpensive) volume contains a wealth of diverse, fascinating material which needs to be perused by research students and others new to this field. Many will wish to buy it, but even if you do not, make sure your institution's library purchases a copy!

  13. Journal Editors Celebrated at Editors' Evening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panning, Jeanette

    2014-02-01

    At the Fall Meeting, the premiere social event for AGU's many journal editors is the annual Editors' Evening, an opportunity for members to celebrate and to recognize the efforts of retiring editors. At the event, AGU president Carol Finn welcomed all those in attendance and thanked them for volunteering their time for the benefit of AGU and the wider research community.

  14. Changes in Author, Editor, and Reviewer Genders over 42 Years in "Teaching of Psychology"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCann, Lee I.; Ebert, Alexandria R.; Timmins, Rebecca R.; Thompson, Ashley E.

    2017-01-01

    The present study examined changes in the genders of authors, first authors, reviewers, and editorial staff over 42 years (1974-2015) in "Teaching of Psychology." Over the first 6 years of the journal's publication, 17.67% of authors and 16.5% of first authors were women, increasing to 57.83% and 44% in the most recent 6 years. From the…

  15. Remarks from a retiring Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansur, Louis K.

    2015-10-01

    At the end of 2015 I plan to step down as Chairman of Editors for the Journal of Nuclear Materials. I use the opportunity to express thoughts that have recurred to me but were muted in comparison with the day to day priorities of editorial work. The most important is that I hold the deepest gratitude for your enduring support- authors, reviewers, readers, the Advisory Editorial Board, and my fellow Editors.

  16. Preparing raw clinical data for publication: guidance for journal editors, authors, and peer reviewers.

    PubMed

    Hrynaszkiewicz, Iain; Norton, Melissa L; Vickers, Andrew J; Altman, Douglas G

    2010-01-29

    In recognition of the benefits of transparent reporting, many peer-reviewed journals require that their authors be prepared to share their raw, unprocessed data with other scientists and/or state the availability of raw data in published articles. But little information on how data should be prepared for publication - or sharing - has emerged. In clinical research patient privacy and consent for use of personal health information are key considerations, but agreed-upon definitions of what constitutes anonymised patient information do not appear to have been established. We aim to address this issue by providing practical guidance for those involved in the publication process, by proposing a minimum standard for de-identifying datasets for the purposes of publication in a peer-reviewed biomedical journal, or sharing with other researchers. Basic advice on file preparation is provided along with procedural guidance on prospective and retrospective publication of raw data, with an emphasis on randomised controlled trials.

  17. BOOK REVIEW: The Physics of the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Douglas

    2007-11-01

    The physics of the very small and the very large were successfully brought together in the 1980s through the idea of 'the universe as a particle accelerator'. The manifesto of this new campaign was laid out in the book 'The Early Universe' by Kolb and Turner in 1990. For at least the next decade that book was to be found on the shelves of every theorist (and many experimentalists) who professed an interest in this topic. But science marches on, and the last 10 15 years has seen an explosion in our understanding of the physics of the very earliest times and the very largest scales. Experimentally our world-view has changed utterly, through exquisitely precise measurements of the cosmic microwave background, galaxy clustering and supernova distances, with a refinement of the basic inflationary big bang paradigm into the new 'standard cosmological model'. And in tandem with these changes has been the development of new theoretical ideas, particularly involving dark energy and connections between string/brane theory and cosmology. So what is the new book for the shelves of today's cohort of young Rockys and Mikes? Despite a recent number of promising-sounding cosmology books, there is nothing at the advanced level which is broad enough to be a general introduction to the 'early universe' topic. Perhaps the best of the bunch is 'The Physics of the Early Universe', edited by E Papantonopoulos as part of Springer's series 'Lecture notes in physics'. This is a set of 9 review articles given as part of a 2003 summer school on Syros Island, Greece. Although far from perfect, the core of this book provides a solid introduction to current research in early universe physics, which should be useful for PhD students or postdoctoral researchers who want the real thing. The book starts with a competent introduction by Kyriakos Tamvakis, serving essentially as a summary of where we were in Kolb and Turner's text. We have learned since then, however, that inflation is really all

  18. Having an impact, making a difference: the Editor's review of the first 30 years.

    PubMed

    Wade, Derick T

    2016-09-01

    To review publications in Clinical Rehabilitation over the last 30 years, discerning the original goals and whether they were met, and describing major trends over the 30 years. Personal review, backed up by data from 'most read' articles and 'most cited' articles, from yearly lists of all controlled trials published in the journal and other sources. The original goals included making rehabilitation better understood both within and outside the speciality, and more scientific. The first goal is probably not achieved, but the scientific standard of publication is much higher and it routinely recommends the use of guidelines appropriate to the publication. The journal has established a pre-eminent position in publishing randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews and articles on goal-setting. It has developed a series describing rehabilitation interventions. It aims to increase consideration of the theoretical basis of rehabilitation practices. We would like to think its impact has increased - but we cannot prove that! The journal has established some credentials as being a source of clinically relevant evidence and guidance across the whole field of rehabilitation and across most disabling conditions. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. [Book review] American sportsmen and the origins of conservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banks, Richard C.

    1976-01-01

    The relationship of this book to ornithology is so indirect that the work barely merits a review on these pages. In a rather subtle way, however, the book may have a considerable effect on at least one aspect of ornithology, that involving scientific collecting. In essence, the volume is an entry in the hunting versus antihunting controversy, by a historian who is a sportsman. A challenge to antihunting preservationists, the premise is that sportsmen (those who hunt and fish for pleasure rather than for food or profit), and not preservationists, were the founders of conservation concepts in the United States. The implied conclusion is that modern hunting and fishing are valid, conservation- oriented activities. The proof of the thesis depends on demonstrating that those persons who led the conservation movement were in fact sportsmen, as defined, rather than fitting any other categorization, and that only those who fit the definition were effective. The method is to detail both the sporting proclivities and conservation efforts of leaders in the movement and to ignore or belittle other activities of those persons and other persons not considered sportsmen. Although effective in making a point, the technique suffers from the difficulties inherent in any one-character classification.

  20. BOOK REVIEW: Kinetic theory of plasma waves, homogeneous plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porkolab, Miklos

    1998-11-01

    The linear theory of plasma waves in homogeneous plasma is arguably the most mature and best understood branch of plasma physics. Given the recently revised version of Stix's excellent Waves in Plasmas (1992), one might ask whether another book on this subject is necessary only a few years later. The answer lies in the scope of this volume; it is somewhat more detailed in certain topics than, and complementary in many fusion research relevant areas to, Stix's book. (I am restricting these comments to the homogeneous plasma theory only, since the author promises a second volume on wave propagation in inhomogeneous plasmas.) This book is also much more of a theorist's approach to waves in plasmas, with the aim of developing the subject within the logical framework of kinetic theory. This may indeed be pleasing to the expert and to the specialist, but may be too difficult to the graduate student as an `introduction' to the subject (which the author explicitly states in the Preface). On the other hand, it may be entirely appropriate for a second course on plasma waves, after the student has mastered fluid theory and an introductory kinetic treatment of waves in a hot magnetized `Vlasov' plasma. For teaching purposes, my personal preference is to review the cold plasma wave treatment using the unified Stix formalism and notation (which the author wisely adopts in the present book, but only in Chapter 5). Such an approach allows one to deal with CMA diagrams early on, as well as to provide a framework to discuss electromagnetic wave propagation and accessibility in inhomogeneous plasmas (for which the cold plasma wave treatment is perfectly adequate). Such an approach does lack some of the rigour, however, that the author achieves with the present approach. As the author correctly shows, the fluid theory treatment of waves follows logically from kinetic theory in the cold plasma limit. I only question the pedagogical value of this approach. Otherwise, I welcome this

  1. Editor's Choice - Minimizing Radiation Exposure During Endovascular Procedures: Basic Knowledge, Literature Review, and Reporting Standards.

    PubMed

    Hertault, A; Maurel, B; Midulla, M; Bordier, C; Desponds, L; Saeed Kilani, M; Sobocinski, J; Haulon, S

    2015-07-01

    Endovascular procedures, requiring X-ray guidance, are commonly performed in vascular surgery. X-ray exposure is associated with biological risks for both patients and physicians. Medical X-ray use must follow "as low as reasonably achievable" (ALARA) principles, which aim at using the lowest radiation exposure to achieve a procedure safely. This is underlined by European and international recommendations that also suggest that adequate theoretical and practical training is mandatory during the initial education of physicians. However, the content of this education and professional practices vary widely from one country to another. This review aims to summarize the basic knowledge required for vascular surgeons on X-ray physics and image production. A panel of endovascular therapists (vascular surgeons and radiologists) and physicists dedicated to X-rays was gathered. International recommendations were summarized. A literature review was performed via MEDLINE to identify studies reporting dosages of common endovascular procedures. The different mechanisms inducing biological risks, and the associated potential effects on health, are described. Details on dose metrics are provided and a common nomenclature to measure, estimate, and report dose is proposed in order to perform accurate comparisons between publications and practices. Key points of the European and international legislation regarding medical X-ray use are summarized, and radiation protection basics for patients and staff, are detailed. Finally, a literature review is proposed for physicians to evaluate their practice. Today's trainees will be highly exposed to radiation throughout their practice. It is thus compulsory that they undergo dedicated radiation education during their initial training, and regular refresher sessions later. In daily practice, focus on dose reduction and monitoring of patient and staff exposure are mandatory. Copyright © 2015 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by

  2. Book Review of 'Modelling for Field Biologists and Other Interesting People' by Kokko, H

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The article provides a review of the book, Modelling for Field Biologists and Other Interesting People, written by Hanna Kokko. The review is structured from the perspective of general interest in the topic rather than an assessment of the deep technical merits of the book. The review will be publ...

  3. BOOK REVIEW: Introduction to 3+1 Numerical Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundlach, Carsten

    2008-11-01

    This is the first major textbook on the methods of numerical relativity. The selection of material is based on what is known to work reliably in astrophysical applications and would therefore be considered by many as the 'mainstream' of the field. This means spacelike slices, the BSSNOK or harmonic formulation of the Einstein equations, finite differencing for the spacetime variables, and high-resolution shock capturing methods for perfect fluid matter. (Arguably, pseudo-spectral methods also belong in this category, at least for elliptic equations, but are not covered in this book.) The account is self-contained, and comprehensive within its chosen scope. It could serve as a primer for the growing number of review papers on aspects of numerical relativity published in Living Reviews in Relativity (LRR). I will now discuss the contents by chapter. Chapter 1, an introduction to general relativity, is clearly written, but may be a little too concise to be used as a first text on this subject at postgraduate level, compared to the textbook by Schutz or the first half of Wald's book. Chapter 2 contains a good introduction to the 3+1 split of the field equations in the form mainly given by York. York's pedagogical presentation (in a 1979 conference volume) is still up to date, but Alcubierre makes a clearer distinction between the geometric split and its form in adapted coordinates, as well as filling in some derivations. Chapter 3 on initial data is close to Cook's 2001 LRR, but is beautifully unified by an emphasis on how different choices of conformal weights suit different purposes. Chapter 4 on gauge conditions covers a topic on which no review paper exists, and which is spread thinly over many papers. The presentation is both detailed and unified, making this an excellent resource also for experts. The chapter reflects the author's research interests while remaining canonical. Chapter 5 covers hyperbolic reductions of the field equations. Alcubierre's excellent

  4. Preparing raw clinical data for publication: guidance for journal editors, authors, and peer reviewers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In recognition of the benefits of transparent reporting, many peer-reviewed journals require that their authors be prepared to share their raw, unprocessed data with other scientists and/or state the availability of raw data in published articles. But little information on how data should be prepared for publication - or sharing - has emerged. In clinical research patient privacy and consent for use of personal health information are key considerations, but agreed-upon definitions of what constitutes anonymised patient information do not appear to have been established. We aim to address this issue by providing practical guidance for those involved in the publication process, by proposing a minimum standard for de-identifying datasets for the purposes of publication in a peer-reviewed biomedical journal, or sharing with other researchers. Basic advice on file preparation is provided along with procedural guidance on prospective and retrospective publication of raw data, with an emphasis on randomised controlled trials. In order to encourage its wide dissemination this article is freely accessible on the BMJ and Trials journal web sites. PMID:20113465

  5. Site-specific recombination for precise and clean transgene integration in plant genome. In: Touraev, A., Citovsky, V., Tzfira, T., Editors of book. Plant Transformation Technologies.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plant Transformation Technologies is a comprehensive, authoritative book focusing on cutting-edge plant biotechnologies, offering in-depth, forward-looking information on methods for controlled and accurate genetic engineering. In response to ever-increasing pressure for precise and efficient integr...

  6. Letter to the Editor: Recent advances in research on cognition and emotion in OCD: a review.

    PubMed

    Anholt, Gideon E; Kalanthroff, Eyal

    2013-12-01

    Cognitive theories of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) ascertain that catastrophic (mis)interpretations of normally occurring intrusive thoughts are causal to the onset and maintenance of OCD. Recently, Calkins, Berman and Wilhelm have highlighted research validating the cognitive model. However, the current comment article stresses various findings that challenge basic premises of the cognitive theory. Moreover, a review of clinical studies investigating cognitive and behavioral therapies for OCD questions the added value of cognitive interventions over and above behavior therapy consisting of exposure and response prevention for this disorder. We suggest an alternative, potentially more useful route of investigation, stressing executive (dis)functions as the cause of OCD patients to (automatically) act on internal and external stimuli. We further suggest that dysfunctional beliefs proposed as paramount in the pathogenesis of OCD according to the cognitive model may be less important and specific than formerly believed.

  7. Book Review: Book review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, F. A.

    About half a century ago, Patrick Suppes and collaborators published an axiomatisation of classical particle mechanics Newtonian-style (Scientific Structures, p. 316). Until then, in philosophy, an axiomatisation of a scientific theory was generally understood in exactly the same sense as it was understood in logic: first erect a 1st-order formal language, notably including predicates for the primitive concepts of the scientific theory and a formal-deductive apparatus in order to be able to reason rigorously (prove theorems); next select a number of sentences of the language as the axioms; the theory is then by definition the deductive closure of these axioms. How to connect a formalised scientific theory to the world? A distinction was introduced in the primitive predicates of the language: theoretical and observational ones. Every formalised scientific theory contains a number of axioms that connect the two. Sentences consisting of entirely observational predicates are in principle open to verification or falsification. That is to say, whether an observational sentence is true or false can, in principle, be determined just by opening your eyes. Thus our sensory experience constitutes the connexion between a theory and the world. This nexus codifies the empirical essence of science. Without it, there is no science. Let us call this answer to the question what a scientific theory is and how it relates to the world the formal-linguistic view.

  8. Book Review: Book review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wüthrich, Christian

    Symmetry considerations stand at the core of classical and quantum physics. No modern-and few older-physical theories forgo the immense services that these considerations offer. It is therefore only natural that philosophers of physics have increasingly started to study the motivations for, as well as the technical implementations and the interpretative implications of, symmetries in fundamental physics. Apart from the extraordinary foundational interest of symmetries, they provide a vehicle to study more general philosophical issues such as the relation between the physical world and its representations and between physics and mathematics. Moreover, traditional problems in metaphysics and philosophy of science such as the nature and status of laws of nature, scientific realism, and determinism naturally arise in, and enjoy substantial fertilisation from, the context of symmetries in physics.

  9. Book Review: Book review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Barry

    2012-05-01

    In Laws and Lawmakers Marc Lange climbs off the fence regarding the metaphysics of laws, landing squarely on the non-Humean side. However, his position is interestingly distinct from the standard options: facts about the laws are not metaphysically prior to facts about subjunctives, nor are they analyzed in terms of causal powers or dispositions. Instead, the law facts are analyzed in terms of subjunctive facts. In The Law-Governed Universe John Roberts reconciles the governing intuition with Humean supervenience, a feat so remarkable it suggests we are dealing not with metaphysics, but metaphysical poetry, characterized by Dr. Johnson as that in which "the most heterogeneous ideas are yoked by violence together." These are two highly original works that stake out sophisticated and genuinely novel positions in the debate. They provide essential reading for anyone interested in laws.

  10. Book Review: Book review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wüthrich, Adrian

    In 1948 Richard Feynman came up with a diagrammatic method to address tenacious problems in the mathematical formulation of quantum field theory. The diagrams, named after Feynman, quickly became a standard tool in theoretical physics. Even today, research papers, particularly those on particle physics, as well as popular publications, textbooks, lecture notes and informal talks on the subject, abound with these "stick figures" (p. 365). As a part of daily research practice since the 1950s, Feynman diagrams thus make a good case for studying the development of visual means of representation in physics.

  11. Book Review: Book review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, Josefa Ros

    2015-11-01

    Alberto Fragio is currently one of the major experts on Hans Blumenberg's work and thought. In recent years he has become a great interpreter of Blumenberg's posthumous publications and his Nachlaβ at the Deutsche Literatur-Archiv Marbach (DLA Marbach). Since he acquired his doctoral degree in 2007, Fragio has devoted much of his efforts to clarifying Blumenberg's convoluted philosophical corpus, whose understanding - as is known - is really demanding for anyone who ventures into its disclosure, and it requires a monumental exercise of patience. Fragio has published far more than a dozen academic articles and three monographs, all of them generally pointing to the existence of a holistic nature in the philosophical work to which Blumenberg devoted a lifetime. Although his research project was on Blumenberg's History and Philosophy of Science, his joint publication with Giordano Bruno, Hans Blumenberg, Nuovi paradigmi d'analisi(2010), and the publication of what is the first enquiry into Blumenberg's History of Astronomy, Destrucción, cosmos, metáfora. Ensayos sobre HansBlumenberg (2010),

  12. Book Review: Book review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wald, Robert M.

    There is no question that the formulation of general relativity was one of the most remarkable episodes in the history of science. As a physicist and researcher in general relativity, the story of the formulation of general relativity that I have heard (and repeated) many times goes basically as follows: In 1907, Einstein obtained his fundamental insight-the "equivalence principle"-that gravitation and inertia are intimately connected; a freely falling observer does not "feel" gravitational force. It then took the genius of Einstein many years of "struggle"-during which he mastered the elements of differential geometry-to formulate a theory that properly incorporated this idea. In November, 1915, he finally succeeded in formulating general relativity.

  13. Book Review: Book review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, David

    2015-11-01

    As the demand for transport continues to increase, the control of noise from roads and railways has become a universal imperative. The development of control measures at the source, while generally held to be most effective, is not always practical. On the other hand, mitigation in the transmission path, most notably using noise barriers, introduces other problems such as visual intrusion. So there is a clear attractiveness to the idea of using 'green' methods to control transport noise - methods that involve improvements to the environment such as planting trees, shrubs, green walls, etc. But how effective are such approaches at reducing noise?

  14. Book Review: Book review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Lunteren, Frans

    Andy Warwick's long awaited Masters of theory more than fulfils its promise. It is an extremely rich work. It deftly combines a cultural history of Cambridge undergraduate education with a view of mathematical theorizing as a 'form of life' that is fundamentally shaped by local pedagogical regimes. It also provides some valuable insights into the transmission and appropriation of mathematical skills and theories and the rise of modern theoretical physics as a discipline.

  15. Book Review: Book review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2017-03-01

    The overall objective of this fundamental monograph is to summarize the state-of-the-art of the entire discipline of light scattering by cirrus cloud particles in the terrestrial atmosphere. The six chapters accomplish this ambitious objective by describing in detail

  16. Book Review: Book review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Helden, A.

    Controversy has followed Galileo in death, as it did in life. In life, his ideas were suspect and often willfully misunderstood, he was admired as fervently by his friends and disciples as he was despised by his enemies and opponents. And if in death the host of admirers only grew while his detractors faded away in science, his condemnation has continued to be the subject of heated discussion: recriminations are still heaped on the Church, and apologists still try to minimize the Church's blame by assigning a share of it to Galileo (Finocchiaro, 1989, 2005). The latest upheaval concerns the 1992 report of the commission formed by Pope John Paul II to investigate the Galileo Affair. This report was recently severely criticized by George V. Coyne S.J., director of the Vatican Observatory and a member of the commission. The issue was Galileo's philosophy of science: in the report, Galileo had to share part of the blame for his condemnation because he did not fully understand the role of hypothesis in science, whereas Cardinal Bellarmine did. Coyne demonstrates the anachronism of this charge (Coyne, 2005).

  17. Book Review: Book review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tweed, Fiona S.

    2017-08-01

    This special edition of Zeitschrift für Geomorphologie (ZfG) is based on presentations given at a conference entitled 'Hydrological Extreme Events in Historic and Prehistoric Times' which took place in Bonn in June 2014. The volume consists of an editorial introduction and nine research papers reflecting a range of approaches to understanding past events, including modelling, analysis of historical data and studies that focus on a consistent approach to collection and analysis of data from different areas. The HEX project, which generated the conference in Bonn, adopted a multidisciplinary approach and this is reflected in the collection of papers, which emphasise the importance of combining a range of approaches and analyses as tools for decoding both landscapes and processes.

  18. Book Review: Book review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Laurie M.

    This volume is based on a centennial conference held in 2004 at Berkeley, where J. Robert Oppenheimer had been a professor and done his most important scientific work. As the Preface states, it complements the many "old biographies and new ones, treatments in film, literature, and television, even an opera." The articles are grouped under the following headings: Oppenheimer as Physicist, The Communist Question, The Soviet Comparison: New Insights, Postwar Politics: The Oppenheimer Case in Context, Cultural Resonances, The Public Oppenheimer.

  19. Book Review: Book review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Margaret

    Modeling: Gateway to the unknown presents us with a broad ranging account not only of the kinds of models used in scientific inquiry but the different ways in which they are put to work in different contexts of investigation, specifically physics and psychology. It does this in 16 chapters divided over six sections that deal with practical issues regarding knowledge acquisition and with modeling as it relates to traditional debates in philosophy of science such as realism, the nature of explanation and the role of experiment. The work brings together many ideas published in essays that appeared in other places. As a collection it covers a lot of ground and in doing so presents not just an account of modeling but a broader philosophy of science in the bargain, one that addresses many of the questions that plague not only the role of models but also the status of entities, theories, causes and inductive inference.

  20. Book Trade Research and Statistics. Prices of U.S. and Foreign Published Materials; Book Title Output and Average Prices: 2000 Final and 2001 Preliminary Figures; Book Sales Statistics, 2001: AAP Preliminary Estimates; U.S. Book Exports and Imports: 2001; Number of Book Outlets in the United States and Canada; Review Media Statistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Sharon G.; Barr, Catherine; Grabois, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Includes six articles that report on prices of U.S. and foreign published materials; book title output and average prices; book sales statistics; book exports and imports; book outlets in the U.S. and Canada; and review media statistics. (LRW)

  1. Effect of book reviewing workshop on awareness of, aptitude for and attitude toward book reviews in faculty members of faculty of management and medical information.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Nayere Sadat Soleimanzade; Ashrafi-Rizi, Hasan; Yarmohammadian, Mohammad Hossein; Shahrzadi, Leila; Hasanzade, Akbar

    2014-01-01

    Works evaluation and critique is one of the most important phases in scientific production cycle. Reviewers need some aptitude about rules and principles of writing good review. Considering the important role of books for storage and transferring the scientific findings, book reviewing is vital to scientific progress. Despite this fact, investigation of Isfahan University of Medical Science's journal, demonstrated the number of published book reviews to be very small. This study aims to investigate the influence of reviewing training courses on participants' book reviewing awareness, attitude, and aptitude. The study method is experimental with two group design (with pre-test and post-test) and applied. Statistical population is of all faculty members of the faculty of management and medical information of Isfahan University of Medical Science, including both hired and contracted employees, which, according to faculty's department of Education, consists of 86 people. The sampling method used in this study is random. Number of samples in case and control groups was calculated using the following equation of n= (z1 + z2) 2 (2s2)/d2 and is 15 people. One checklist and two questionnaires were the means of data collection. Data were analyzed using SPSS 18.0 software and two level of descriptive (mean and SD) and inferential statistics (t-test and t-paired). Findings showed that the mean score of awareness of book reviews in case group increased meaningfully after the training course (55.7) compared to the score prior to the intervention (33.1), P < 0.001. On the other hand, the mean score of awareness of book reviews in control group remained mostly the same before (31.6) and after intervention (35.1), P = 0.35. The mean score of attitude toward book reviews showed no significant difference before and after intervention in both case group (71.4 before intervention and 74.4 after intervention, P = 0.11) and control group (70.9 before intervention and 74.4 after

  2. Current Status of Biomedical Book Reviewing: Part I. Key Biomedical Reviewing Journals with Quantitative Significance

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ching-Chih; Wright, Arthuree M.

    1974-01-01

    This is the first part of a comprehensive, quantitative study of biomedical book reviewing. The data base of the total project was built from statistics taken from all 1970 issues of biomedical journals held in the Science Library of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Of 285 so-called “life sciences” journals held by that library, fifty-four English journals (excluding Science and Nature) were found to contain bona fide book reviews (as contrasted with mere author-title lists) and were therefore selected for close study. The statistical results reveal that there were 3,347 reviews of 2,067 biomedical books in these fifty-four selected journals in 1970. Part I of the study identifies key biomedical reviewing journals of quantitative significance. The top ten journals, British Medical Journal, Lancet, Annals of Internal Medicine, Journal of the American Medical Association, Archives of Internal Medicine, New England Journal of Medicine, Quarterly Review of Biology, Bioscience, Canadian Medical Association Journal,* and American Journal of the Medical Sciences, accounted for 63.03% of the total number of reviews in 1970. PMID:4826479

  3. How to write a medical book chapter?

    PubMed

    Kendirci, Muammer

    2013-09-01

    Invited medical book chapters are usually requested by editors from experienced authors who have made significant contributions to the literature in certain fields requested by an editor from an experienced. Before the start of the writing process a consensus should be established between the editor and the author with regard to the title, deadline, specific instructions and content of the manuscript. Certain issues concerning a chapter can be negotiated by the parties beforehand, but some issues cannot. As writing a medical book chapter is seen as an honor in its own right, the assignment needs to be treated with sincerity by elucidating the topic in detail, and maximal effort should be made to keep in mind that the chapter will reach a large target audience. The purpose of this review article is to provide guidance to residents and junior specialists in the field of urology to improve their writing skills.

  4. How to write a medical book chapter?

    PubMed Central

    Kendirci, Muammer

    2013-01-01

    Invited medical book chapters are usually requested by editors from experienced authors who have made significant contributions to the literature in certain fields requested by an editor from an experienced. Before the start of the writing process a consensus should be established between the editor and the author with regard to the title, deadline, specific instructions and content of the manuscript. Certain issues concerning a chapter can be negotiated by the parties beforehand, but some issues cannot. As writing a medical book chapter is seen as an honor in its own right, the assignment needs to be treated with sincerity by elucidating the topic in detail, and maximal effort should be made to keep in mind that the chapter will reach a large target audience. The purpose of this review article is to provide guidance to residents and junior specialists in the field of urology to improve their writing skills. PMID:26328134

  5. Book Review: Chemistry in Theatre. Insufficiency, Phallacy or Both

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, Christiaan; Djerassi, Carl

    2012-11-01

    dialogues in this play also point to the problem of untenured lecturers that are tough graders in a culture of student grade inflation and anonymous student evaluations. The discussion also reflects on the system of peer reviewers and referees on evaluation committees. Phallacy deals with the similarities and differences between science and art, and connects both. The play poses the question that comes up after the discovery that a bronze statue that was considered since long to be a Roman original, suddenly is demonstrated to be a Renaissance cast: does that discovery change the value of the artwork? The play furthermore illustrates how scientists fall in love with their own pet theories, and defend their favourite hypotheses against new evidence. The essay has very good and sharp dialogues about citing and not citing each other, and about the problem of the perception of discussion and counterarguments as personal affronts. The play vividly touches on the concept of scientific "truth" and illustrates this in a playful way, along with concepts as the scientist's life-work, fraud, proof, and credit, and even the question for priority and credit via the unwritten rules about the order of author names on a paper. The science plays in this book are intended for reading rather than for performance on the stage. The booklet is very enjoyable reading, and offers pleasant plots that lead to unexpected outcomes - although not of the "happy end" type. The book deals with how scientists work, with the excitement and drama of scientific discovery, with the tribal nature of scientist's behaviour in the typical atmosphere of a run-of-the-mill laboratory or university department, and even includes aspects of scientific writing. The underlying morale is that first-class science and crookedness by some of its practitioners are not necessary incompatible. The short digressions about quality of a scientific work (i.e., something inherent to the work itself), the value of a scientific work

  6. [Book review] Designing and Interpreting Radio Telemetry Studies, edited by J. J. Millspaugh and J. M. Marzluff

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sargeant, G.A.

    2002-01-01

    Review of: Millspaugh, Joshua J., and John M. Marzluff, editors. 2001. Radio tracking and animal populations. Academic Press, San Diego, California. xvii 1 474 p. $69.95 (alk. paper), ISBN: 0-12-497781-2.

  7. A Study of Critical Attitude across English and Spanish Academic Book Reviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreno, Ana I.; Suarez, Lorena

    2008-01-01

    Since the 1990s cross-cultural studies of academic genres are becoming increasingly relevant. One genre that has recently attracted cross-cultural attention is the academic book review. The aim of the present paper is to provide insight into what is expected in terms of overall critical attitude towards the books under review when writing in this…

  8. Re-Valuing the Role of Images in Reviewing Picture Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unsworth, Len; Wheeler, Janet

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the narrative role of images in three prize-winning children's books. Argues that the contribution of images to interpretive possibilities of the narrative are typically not sufficiently addressed in reviewing picture books. Suggests reviewers and teachers should take an approach described as "reading images." (PM)

  9. The Perfect Tens: The Top Forty Books Reviewed in "Voice of Youth Advocates" 1996-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    Presents an annotated list of the 40 books reviewed in this journal from 1996-2000 that were judged to be the best in quality and popularity, including fiction, nonfiction, and science fiction/fantasy/horror. Discusses the review process for books that appeal to young adults. (LRW)

  10. BOOK REVIEW: Path Integrals in Field Theory: An Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, Lewis

    2004-06-01

    In the 1960s Feynman was known to particle physicists as one of the people who solved the major problems of quantum electrodynamics, his contribution famously introducing what are now called Feynman diagrams. To other physicists he gained a reputation as the author of the Feynman Lectures on Physics; in addition some people were aware of his work on the path integral formulation of quantum theory, and a very few knew about his work on gravitation and Yang--Mills theories, which made use of path integral methods. Forty years later the scene is rather different. Many of the problems of high energy physics are solved; and the standard model incorporates Feynman's path integral method as a way of proving the renormalisability of the gauge (Yang--Mills) theories involved. Gravitation is proving a much harder nut to crack, but here also questions of renormalisability are couched in path-integral language. What is more, theoretical studies of condensed matter physics now also appeal to this technique for quantisation, so the path integral method is becoming part of the standard apparatus of theoretical physics. Chapters on it appear in a number of recent books, and a few books have appeared devoted to this topic alone; the book under review is a very recent one. Path integral techniques have the advantage of enormous conceptual appeal and the great disadvantage of mathematical complexity, this being partly the result of messy integrals but more fundamentally due to the notions of functional differentiation and integration which are involved in the method. All in all this subject is not such an easy ride. Mosel's book, described as an introduction, is aimed at graduate students and research workers in particle physics. It assumes a background knowledge of quantum mechanics, both non-relativistic and relativistic. After three chapters on the path integral formulation of non-relativistic quantum mechanics there are eight chapters on scalar and spinor field theory, followed

  11. 2012 Editors' Citations for Excellence in Refereeing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-09-01

    One of the most important services performed for AGU is the conscientious reviewing of submitted papers. Because of the nature of the reviewing process, this service is also one of the least recognized. Every year editors are asked to select the outstanding reviewers from the previous year. The reviewers listed below have been cited by editors of AGU journals and Eos for excellence in refereeing. These individuals are to be commended for consistently providing constructive and thoughtful reviews.

  12. 2013 Editors' Citations for Excellence in Refereeing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-06-01

    One of the most important services performed for AGU is the conscientious reviewing of submitted papers. Because of the nature of the reviewing process, this service is also one of the least recognized. Every year editors are asked to select the outstanding reviewers from the previous year. The reviewers listed below have been cited by editors of AGU journals and Eos for excellence in refereeing. These individuals are to be commended for consistently providing constructive and thoughtful reviews.

  13. BOOK REVIEW: Advanced Diagnostics for Magnetic and Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stott, PE; Wootton, A.; Gorini, G.; Sindoni, E.; Batani, D.

    2003-02-01

    This book is a collection of papers, written by specialists in the field, on advanced topics of nuclear fusion diagnostics. The 78 contributions were originally presented at the International Conference on Advanced Diagnostics for Magnetic and Inertial Fusion held at Villa Monastero, Italy in September 2001. Both magnetically confined and inertial fusion programmes are quite extensively covered, with more emphasis given to the former scheme. In the case of magnetic confinement, since the present international programme is strongly focused on next-step devices, particular attention is devoted to techniques and technologies viable in an environment with strong neutron fluxes. Indeed, in the first section, the various methods are considered in the perspective of performing the measurements of the relevant parameters in conditions approaching a burning plasma, mainly in the Tokamak configuration. The most demanding requirements, like the implications of the use of tritium and radiation resistance, are reviewed and the most challenging open issues, which require further research and development, are also clearly mentioned. The following three sections are devoted to some of the most recent developments in plasma diagnostics, which are grouped according to the following classification: `Neutron and particle diagnostics', `Optical and x-ray diagnostics' and `Interferometry, Polarimetry and Thomson Scattering'. In these chapters, several of the most recent results are given, covering measurements taken on the most advanced experiments around the world. Here the developments described deal more with the requirements imposed by the physical issues to be studied. They are therefore more focused on the approaches adopted to increase the spatial and time resolution of the diagnostics, on some methods to improve the characterisation of the turbulence and on fast particles. Good coverage is given to neutron diagnostics, which are assuming increasing relevance as the plasma

  14. 77 FR 74175 - Solicitation of Review Editors for the Draft Report of the National Climate Assessment and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... Report of the National Climate Assessment and Development Advisory Committee (NCADAC). AGENCY: Office of... editors of the National Climate Assessment and Development Advisory Committee (NCADAC) National Climate... Research Program at email@usgcrp.gov . More information on the National Climate Assessment can be found at...

  15. Book Review: Beitraege zur Astronomiegeschichte, Band 5 (Acta Historica Astronomiae Vol. 15)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerbeck, H. W.; Dick, W. R.; Hamel, J.

    2002-12-01

    The 15th volume of the Acta Historica Astronomiae is at the same time the fifth collection of essays on the history of astronomy (Beitraege zur Astronomiegeschichte, Band 5), edited by the historians of astronomy W.R. Dick (Potsdam) and J. Hamel (Berlin). Besides a few short notices and book reviews, the book contains 11 major articles, which deal with astronomical topics covering the time from the 16th to the 20th centuries. The first article, on the analysis and interpretation of historical horoscopes as a source of the history of science, is based on the inaugural lecture of its author, Guenther Oestmann. After a general introduction, which deals with the principles of horoscope making, the author discusses the horoscope of Count Heinrich Ranzau (1526-1598), the Danish governor of Schleswig-Holstein, who was a friend of Tycho Brahe. Oestmann shows that the astronomical-mathematical basis of such a horoscope can be reconstructed and interpreted. However, it is hardly possible to gain an insight in the process how the interpretation of a horoscope was done in detail. The second and third articles, by Franz Daxecker, deal with Athanasius Kircher and Christoph Scheiner, two catholic astronomers of the 17th century. Kircher's Organum Mathematicum is a calculating device that can be used in the fields of arithmetic, geometry, chronology, astronomy, astrology and others. The author provides extracts of the description of the Organum taken from a book by Caspar Schott, which deal with chronology and astronomy. A photograph of the Organum indicates that this tool consists of a set of tables glued on wooden or cardboard, but details of its contents and applications remain pretty obscure for the reader - a few elaborated examples would have been helpful. The second paper deals with the life of Christoph Scheiner SJ, the co-discoverer of sunspots (next to Galileo), after leaving Rome in 1633 - the year of the Galileo trial. Scheiner spent his later years in the Austrian and

  16. Book review: The requisite reference for the study of Sirenia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beck, Cathy A.

    2013-01-01

    Sirenians often are given little or no notice in texts on marine mammals; whales, dolphins, and seals are what come to mind for most when a marine mammal is imagined. An order of only four extant species, the Sirenia is indeed the “other” frequently overlooked group of marine mammals. Dugongs and manatees remain unknown by much of the world, but to those that study these species, the members are extraordinarily unique and fascinating. The three highly respected authors of this newly published volume are all distinguished researchers, with more than a century of combined expertise in the study of this mammalian order. Their collective experience and insight make this book a captivating and valuable read for students, professionals, and anyone interested in having an all-inclusive reference for learning about the Order Sirenia.Review info: Ecology and conservation of the Sirenia-dugongs and manatees. By H. Marsh, T. J. O'Shea, and J. E. Reynolds, III, 2012. ISBN: 978-0521888288, 521 pp.

  17. The Future of Childhood Is The Present. Book Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    Suggests that Corsaro's well-written book has a number of especially useful sections, specifically those on the history of childhood, social problems, and children's cultures. Notes that segments from Corsaro's and other researchers' work and numerous photographs and figures contribute to the book's accessibility. Problems noted include the…

  18. Editor's Note.

    PubMed

    Alberts, Bruce

    2011-05-27

    The Research Article "A bacterium that can grow by using arsenic instead of phosphorus" by F. Wolfe-Simon et al., published online 2 December 2010, was the subject of extensive discussion and criticism following its online publication. Science received a wide range of correspondence that raised specific concerns about the Research Article's methods and interpretations. Eight Technical Comments that represent the main concerns, as well as a Technical Response by Wolfe-Simon et al., are published online in Science Express at the addresses listed in this note. They have been peer-reviewed and revised according to Science's standard procedure.

  19. Book review: Advances in 40Ar/39Ar dating: From archaeology to planetary sciences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cosca, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    The recently published book Advances in 40Ar/39Ar Dating: From Archaeology to Planetary Sciences is a collection of 24 chapters authored by international scientists on topics ranging from decay constants to 40Ar/39Ar dating of extraterrestrial objects. As stated by the editors in their introduction, these chapters were assembled with the goal of providing technique-specific examples highlighting recent advances in the field of 40Ar/39Ar dating. As this is the first book truly dedicated to 40Ar/39Ar dating since the second edition printing of the argon geochronologist’s handbook Geochronology and Thermochronology by the 40Ar/39Ar Method (McDougall and Harrison 1999), a new collection of chapters highlighting recent advances in 40Ar/39Ar geochronology offers much to the interested reader.

  20. Editor comments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouker, Pascale; Ferlet-Cavrois, Véronique; Pellish, Jonathan

    2013-06-01

    This June 2013 Special Issue of the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE commemorates the 50th Anniversary of the IEEE International Nuclear and Space Radiation Effects Conference (NSREC). At the NSREC, held annually in July, scientists and engineers from industry, academia, and government institutions present their latest research on radiation effects in materials, electronic devices, circuits, and systems. The conference is the primary forum for technical presentations in the area of radiation effects, with attendance from over 20 countries around the world. It is also an important venue for companies to present their latest products and where students, young graduates, and experienced professionals meet, share ideas, and plan new experiments. Indeed, NSREC has been at the heart of the radiation effects community for 50 years. This special issue consists of review articles summarizing the research that has been published over the past ten years on subjects of interest to this community. The range of topics covered attests to our diversified and rich background.

  1. Editors' note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-12-01

    The widespread eutrophication of coastal waters has been the subject to much scientific and management effort, yet we have too few examples where there is a substantive scientific record, and sustained tracking of management actions. In this issue Greening and colleagues review the time courses of ambient conditions, describe what was done to remediate severely eutrophic water quality, and demonstrate the recovery trajectory of a number of variables useful to track ecosystem responses. In addition, a compelling aspect of the paper is that it also describes the social side of the recovery, i.e., what was needed to bring the community and political action to perceive and act upon the issues, and develop a plan to address the problems. The improvement in water quality and environmental conditions currently taking place in Tampa Bay is an excellent example of what can be achieved with the combination of basic understanding of the scientific issues, application of reasonable technological advances, and the marshaling of popular support for action.

  2. EDITORIAL: Editor's Farewell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, R. P.

    1989-01-01

    The completion of Volume 26, 1989, marked the end of my tenure as Editor of Metrologia. My association with the journal, its parent body the Comité International des Poids et Mesures, its host organization the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures, the publishers Springer-Verlag and last (but by no means least) the Editorial Board, has been a pleasant one and I trust that the subscribers will have found the product to be generally satisfactory. There have been, it is true, some disappointments along the way and I shall mention two of these while expressing the hope that the new Editor will enjoy a greater success in their regard. First is the question of circulation, which has stayed dangerously low, although the shrinkage has tapered off in the most recent years. Because of the narrow public support, the costs of production are relatively high and this, through a consequently high subscription rate, tends to enshrine the unsatisfactory state of affairs. Modest schemes to broaden the journal's appeal and bring in a wider readership have foundered upon the first step, namely, that of procuring from staff members of the national standards laboratories the hoped-for articles which would discuss the state of the art in delivering the highest-quality measurement services to the public. However, some very interesting and bolder schemes are presently under discussion. I had also hoped to leaven the journal's content a little by regularly appearing articles on the latest developments within the great national laboratories. But, as with technical review articles, it has proven very difficult to find the right authors who can also spare the time, and only a few laboratories have found it possible to collaborate. In taking my leave, it remains for me to thank all the contributors, referees and readers for their support, to express the hope of an ever brighter future for Metrologia and to wish to the new Editor, Dr D A Blackburn, a happy and successful tenure.

  3. BOOK REVIEW: Solitons, Instantons, and Twistors Solitons, Instantons, and Twistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witt, Donald M.

    2011-04-01

    Solitons and instantons play important roles both in pure and applied mathematics as well as in theoretical physics where they are related to the topological structure of the vacuum. Twistors are a useful tool for solving nonlinear differential equations and are useful for the study of the antiself-dual Yang-Mills equations and the Einstein equations. Many books and more advanced monographs have been written on these topics. However, this new book by Maciej Dunajski is a complete first introduction to all of the topics in the title. Moreover, it covers them in a very unique way, through integrable systems. The approach taken in this book is that of mathematical physics à la field theory. The book starts by giving an introduction to integrable systems of ordinary and partial differential equations and proceeds from there. Gauge theories are not covered until chapter 6 which means the reader learning the material for the first time can build up confidence with simpler models of solitons and instantons before encountering them in gauge theories. The book also has an extremely clear introduction to twistor theory useful to both mathematicians and physicists. In particular, the twistor theory presentation may be of interest to string theorists wanting understand twistors. There are many useful connections to research into general relativity. Chapter 9 on gravitational instantons is great treatment useful to anyone doing research in classical or quantum gravity. There is also a nice discussion of Kaluza-Klein monopoles. The three appendices A-C cover the necessary background material of basic differential geometry, complex manifolds, and partial differential equations needed to fully understand the subject. The reader who has some level of expertise in any of the topics covered can jump right into that material without necessarily reading all of the earlier chapters because of the extremely clear writing style of the author. This makes the book an excellent reference on

  4. Book Review: The history of the Quaternary Research Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, D. Q.

    2016-06-01

    This is a book that should be in the library of every member of the QRA as well as their institutions. This volume is a celebration of 50 years of the Quaternary Studies Field Group (1964), which was renamed the Quaternary Research Association (QRA) in 1969. What follows is a combination of a review with some further information based on the recollection of someone who was there. In examining the origins of the QSFG due credit is paid to Richard Hey and Richard West, but an inexplicable omission is the earlier discussion between Hey, Allan Straw and others during the field meeting of the Yorkshire Geological Society in September 1962 (Worsley, 2014). It is said that history is always written by the victors, or in modern parlance by those who write the minutes! But, in the writing of history there are only degrees of unsuccess. In Chapter 2 John Catt comments on the less than perfect early archival records of the QRA. So it is to his credit that 50 years of archival material has been diligently sifted and edited. In this he was assisted by memories of some named QRA members who are thanked. Wider consultation may have filled some of the gaps. At earlier meetings it was always a pleasure to greet long retired colleagues, such as Archie Lamont at the Carlops glacial drainage system when being demonstrated by Brian Sissons in 1966, or Tony Farringdon at Ballycotton Bay in 1968, or Hallam Movius in 1971 at a London discussion meeting. Similarly, who can forget the field meeting at Canterbury in 1967 when Alec Skempton demonstrated the Sevenoaks by-pass late-glacial slope failures, and John Hutchinson's use of Pomatias elegans for dating the Folkestone Warren landslips? Jan Mangerud's first QRA meeting on the Isle of Man (1971) was notable for his prescient recognition of glaciomarine deposits.

  5. Peer Reviewers and Publishers of Scholarly Book Get Subpoenas in Lawsuit against Chemical Companies.

    PubMed

    Guterman, Lila

    2005-04-01

    Lawyers representing more than 20 chemical companies took the unusual step of issuing subpoenas to five peer reviewers of a scholarly book as part of litigation over the alleged health risks of a widely used chemical compound. The peer reviewers, who are historians and health experts, were summoned to be questioned in the case, which pits a former chemical worker who now suffers from cancer against the companies, including the Dow Chemical Company, the Goodrich Corporation, the Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company, the Monsanto Company, and Uniroyal Inc. The book's publishers also received subpoenas, several months earlier, to provide information about early drafts of the book and its peer review.

  6. Practical polyphenolics: from structure to molecular recognition and physiological action, by Edwin Haslam.[Book review

    Treesearch

    Richard W. Hemingway

    1998-01-01

    Hemingway’s book review brings into focus Edwin Haslam's career, devoted to defining the significance of plant polyphenols. That historical perspective focuses on the progress made in this science over the last 30 years. Most important, this book demonstrates the myriad ways that plant polyphe­nols influence our lives. Professor Haslam makes a strong argument for...

  7. "Constructing the Child: A History of Canadian Day Care," by Donna Varga. Book Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prochner, Larry

    1998-01-01

    Reviews Varga's book on Canadian day care. Suggests that the work's linkage of ideas concerning scientific child study and ideologies about the child to changes in structure and practice of child care highlights the concerns of children, mothers, teachers, and administrators. Notes that the limitations of the book are its brevity and the nature of…

  8. BOOK REVIEW OF "CHESAPEAKE BAY BLUES: SCIENCE, POLITICS, AND THE STRUGGLE TO SAVE THE BAY"

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a book review of "Chesapeake Bay Blues: Science, Politics, and the Struggle to Save the Bay". This book is very well written and provides an easily understandable description of the political challenges faced by those proposing new or more stringent environmental regulat...

  9. BOOK REVIEW OF "CHESAPEAKE BAY BLUES: SCIENCE, POLITICS, AND THE STRUGGLE TO SAVE THE BAY"

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a book review of "Chesapeake Bay Blues: Science, Politics, and the Struggle to Save the Bay". This book is very well written and provides an easily understandable description of the political challenges faced by those proposing new or more stringent environmental regulat...

  10. BOOK REVIEW: Nonlinear Continuum Mechanics for Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialek, James M.

    1998-05-01

    -Green tensors, the Eulerian or Almansi strain tensor, distortional components, strain rate tensors, rate of deformation tensors, spin tensors and objectivity. The standard Cauchy stress tensor is mentioned in passing, and then virtual work and work conjugacy lead to alternative stress representations such as the Piola-Kirchoff representation. Chapter 5 concentrates on hyperelasticity (where stresses are derived from a stored energy function) and its subvarieties. Chapter 6 proceeds by linearizing the virtual work statement prior to discretization and Chapter 7 deals with approaches to solving the formulation. In Chapter 8 the FORTRAN finite element code written by Bonet (available via the world wide web) is described. In summary this book is written by experts, for future experts, and provides a very fast review of the field for people who already know the topic. The authors assume the reader is familiar with `elementary stress analysis' and has had some exposure to `the principle of the finite element method'. Their goals are summarized by the statement, `If the reader is prepared not to get too hung up on details, it is possible to use the book to obtain a reasonable overview of the subject'. This is a very nice summary of what is going on in the field but as a stand-alone text it is much too terse. The total bibliography is a page and a half. It would be an improvement if there were that much reference material for each chapter.

  11. BOOK REVIEW: Theory of Neural Information Processing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galla, Tobias

    2006-04-01

    It is difficult not to be amazed by the ability of the human brain to process, to structure and to memorize information. Even by the toughest standards the behaviour of this network of about 1011 neurons qualifies as complex, and both the scientific community and the public take great interest in the growing field of neuroscience. The scientific endeavour to learn more about the function of the brain as an information processing system is here a truly interdisciplinary one, with important contributions from biology, computer science, physics, engineering and mathematics as the authors quite rightly point out in the introduction of their book. The role of the theoretical disciplines here is to provide mathematical models of information processing systems and the tools to study them. These models and tools are at the centre of the material covered in the book by Coolen, Kühn and Sollich. The book is divided into five parts, providing basic introductory material on neural network models as well as the details of advanced techniques to study them. A mathematical appendix complements the main text. The range of topics is extremely broad, still the presentation is concise and the book well arranged. To stress the breadth of the book let me just mention a few keywords here: the material ranges from the basics of perceptrons and recurrent network architectures to more advanced aspects such as Bayesian learning and support vector machines; Shannon's theory of information and the definition of entropy are discussed, and a chapter on Amari's information geometry is not missing either. Finally the statistical mechanics chapters cover Gardner theory and the replica analysis of the Hopfield model, not without being preceded by a brief introduction of the basic concepts of equilibrium statistical physics. The book also contains a part on effective theories of the macroscopic dynamics of neural networks. Many dynamical aspects of neural networks are usually hard to find in the

  12. BOOK REVIEW: Transport and Structural Formation in Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thyagaraja, A.

    1999-06-01

    The book under review is one of a series of monographs on plasma physics published by the Institute of Physics under the editorship of Peter Stott and Hans Wilhelmsson. It is nicely produced and is aimed at research workers and advanced students of both laboratory (i.e. tokamak plasmas) and astrophysical plasma physics. The authors are prolific contributors to the subject of plasma turbulence and transport with a well-defined message: ``The authors' view is that the plasma structure, fluctuations and turbulent transport are continually regulating each other and, in addition, that the structural formation and structural transition of plasmas are typical of the physics of far from equilibrium systems. The book presents and explains why the plasma inhomogeneity is the ordering parameter governing transport and how self-sustained fluctuations can be driven through subcritical excitation even beyond linear instability''. This point of view is expounded in 24 chapters, including topics such as transport phenomena in toroidal plasmas (Chapters 2-4), low frequency modes and instabilities of confined systems (Chapters 5-7), renormalization (Chapter 8), self-sustained turbulence due to the current diffusive mode and resistive effects (Chapters 9-11), subcritical turbulence and numerical simulations (Chapters 12-14), scale invariance arguments (Chapter 15), electric field effects (Chapters 17-21) and self-organized dynamics (Chapter 22). The material is essentially drawn from the authors' many and varied original contributions to the plasma turbulence and transport literature. Whatever view one might have about the merits of this work, there is little doubt in this reviewer's mind that it is indeed thought-provoking and presents a worthy intellectual challenge to plasma theorists and experimentalists alike. The authors take a consistent stance and discuss the issues from their own standpoint. They observe that the plasmas one encounters in practice (for definiteness, the

  13. EDITORIAL: Editor's Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackburn, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    Since its first issue in 1965 Metrologia has had just three editors, a history of tenure which suggests that those who hold the post find in it sufficient to interest, occupy, challenge and amuse them. I see no reason to doubt that this happy circumstance will continue and look forward to my own period as editor with the intention of retaining, insofar as I am able to interpret them, the best traditions the journal has established so far. As I take up my editorial duties I have become aware that surrounding Metrologia there is a small community of authors, reviewers and readers on whose support the success of the journal entirely depends. It is a community in which the roles change daily with some of its members engaged, even simultaneously, as reader, reviewer and author. I am well aware that the goodwill extended to me as I enter this community is in no small part due the efforts of the outgoing editor, Dr Ralph Hudson, whose easy, engaging and courteous, yet firm, relationship with authors and reviewers emerges clearly from editorial correspondence. I thank him for that he has done and wish him an active and happy retirement. A short foray into the records of Metrologia shows - in the first editorial - that four main kinds of article were originally envisaged: research articles likely to contribute to progress in fundamental scientific measurements, reports of experiments or techniques of particular importance or originality in the area of secondary measurement, articles concerning the decisions of the Comité International des Poids et Mesures, and review articles. No balance was specified but a priority was assigned to articles dealing with fundamental metrology. Of the four categories, the first two represent the core of Metrologia's activity and largely determine its reputation as a publication. For this reason, editorial implementation of the policy set by the CIPM is mainly exercised through the operation of a reviewing system which is intentionally strict

  14. Books: From Writer to Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenfeld, Howard

    This book describes the various stages of book publishing and the people responsible for those stages. Its seventeen chapters discuss the following topics: the writer, the literary agent, the publishing house, the decision to publish, the editor, the illustrator, the copy editor, the designer, the jacket designer, the production supervisor, the…

  15. Books: From Writer to Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenfeld, Howard

    This book describes the various stages of book publishing and the people responsible for those stages. Its seventeen chapters discuss the following topics: the writer, the literary agent, the publishing house, the decision to publish, the editor, the illustrator, the copy editor, the designer, the jacket designer, the production supervisor, the…

  16. [Book review] Seabirds of Hawaii: Natural history and conservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clapp, Roger B.

    1991-01-01

    This volume is a rather odd contribution, a hybrid between an academic work and a popular book, and both suffers and benefits from these attributes. The 18 chapters are divided into four parts that deal with the environment and humans (3 chapters and ca. 12% of the text), comparative biology of Hawaiian seabirds (5 chapters, 26%), treatments of Hawaiian seabird groups by family (7 chapters, 34%), and conservation (3 chapters, 16%). At the end of the book are an appendix of common and scientific names for plants, birds, mammals, fish, and a few invertebrates; a 6-page "selected" bibliography with pertinent references for each chapter; and an index.

  17. BOOK REVIEW: From Stars To Stalagmites. How Everything Connects.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braterman, Paul S.; Sterken, Christiaan

    2014-02-01

    This fine book offers a wide range of significant scientific subjects, viz., the age of the Earth, atoms and molecules, the discovery of the noble gases, the problem of the ozone hole, the greenhouse effect, nucleosynthesis, stellar evolution, and so on. The book also contains an interesting presentation of facts related to global warming, a very detailed chapter on metals, and a very useful chapter on uncertainty. The last chapter describes the events from the Big Bang to the present day. The subjects treated in each chapter of the book are of prime scientific interest, and some topics illustrate important interactions between scientific developments and society. Each theme is presented within its historical and intellectual context, and is discussed in clear and well-written non-technical language. As such, the combination of history and science writing is extremely fruitful as seen from the educational perspective. Paul Braterman clearly explains simple concepts that are often misunderstood - for example, the difference between mass and weight. He also explains units, and provides etymological background information on Greek and Latin words and terms that are used in science. The author pays ample attention to models - crude as well as more sophisticated - with due attention for the simplifying assumptions of the underlying scientific theories. In addition, he also focuses on physical mechanisms. The book continuously explains how science works, and explicates what makes science so difficult to manage. The author also touches on the impact of science on society, and he poses many - apparently rhetorical - questions, and gives fitting answers. Reference is made to stubbornness and conservatism in science, as well as to the ever changing attitudes vis-a-vis shared authorship. The finishing paragraph of the book simply lists some misconceptions of great thinkers from Epicurus to Bohr. This book is very well typeset, with very few typographical errors. Regrettably

  18. [Book review] The youngest science: notes of a medicine-watcher, by Lewis Thomas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, D.H.

    1984-01-01

    Review of: The youngest science: notes of a medicine-watcher. Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Series. Lewis Thomas. Penguin Books, 1995. Pennsylvania State University. 270 pp. ISBN: 0140243275, 9780140243277.

  19. Software Reviews: "Pow! Zap! Ker-plunk! The Comic Book Maker" (Pelican Software).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Bernajean

    1990-01-01

    Reviews the newest addition to Pelican's Creative Writing Series of instructional software, which uses the comic book format to provide a unique writing environment for satire, symbolism, sequencing, and combining text and graphics to communicate ideas. (SR)

  20. Building Relationships (Children's Books).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galda, Lee

    1991-01-01

    Reviews 44 trade books that focus on the relationships between families and friends. Offers an annotated bibliography on dinosaurs including 15 primary level books, 14 intermediate level books, 7 intermediate to advanced level books, and 2 advanced level books. (MG)

  1. Effect of book reviewing workshop on awareness of, aptitude for and attitude toward book reviews in faculty members of faculty of management and medical information

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Nayere Sadat Soleimanzade; Ashrafi-rizi, Hasan; Yarmohammadian, Mohammad Hossein; Shahrzadi, Leila; Hasanzade, Akbar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Works evaluation and critique is one of the most important phases in scientific production cycle. Reviewers need some aptitude about rules and principles of writing good review. Considering the important role of books for storage and transferring the scientific findings, book reviewing is vital to scientific progress. Despite this fact, investigation of Isfahan University of Medical Science's journal, demonstrated the number of published book reviews to be very small. This study aims to investigate the influence of reviewing training courses on participants’ book reviewing awareness, attitude, and aptitude. Materials and Methods: The study method is experimental with two group design (with pre-test and post-test) and applied. Statistical population is of all faculty members of the faculty of management and medical information of Isfahan University of Medical Science, including both hired and contracted employees, which, according to faculty's department of Education, consists of 86 people. The sampling method used in this study is random. Number of samples in case and control groups was calculated using the following equation of n= (z1 + z2) 2 (2s2)/d2 and is 15 people. One checklist and two questionnaires were the means of data collection. Data were analyzed using SPSS 18.0 software and two level of descriptive (mean and SD) and inferential statistics (t-test and t-paired). Results: Findings showed that the mean score of awareness of book reviews in case group increased meaningfully after the training course (55.7) compared to the score prior to the intervention (33.1), P < 0.001. On the other hand, the mean score of awareness of book reviews in control group remained mostly the same before (31.6) and after intervention (35.1), P = 0.35. The mean score of attitude toward book reviews showed no significant difference before and after intervention in both case group (71.4 before intervention and 74.4 after intervention, P = 0.11) and control group

  2. Science Books, A Quarterly Review, Volume 8 Number 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association for the Advancement of Science, Washington, DC.

    This quarterly publication is intended to acquaint students and teachers with new trade books, textbooks, and reference works in the pure and applied sciences. A listing of detailed subject fields is provided including psychology, sociology, economics, education, physical sciences, natural sciences, engineering, agriculture, geography and…

  3. Baboquivari Mountain plants: Identification, ecology, and ethnobotany [Book Review

    Treesearch

    Rosemary L. Pendleton

    2011-01-01

    The Sky Islands of southern Arizona and northwestern Mexico make up a region that is rich, both biologically and culturally. These isolated mountain ranges, separated by desert "seas," contain a unique and diverse flora and have long been home to indigenous peoples of the southwestern US. This book, Baboquivari Mountain Plants: Identification, Ecology, and...

  4. Landscape ecologists have a role in poverty relief. Book review.

    Treesearch

    Louis R. Iverson

    2007-01-01

    The causes, consequences, and solutions to human poverty throughout the world lie squarely in the realm of landscape ecology. I believe the book "The End of Poverty: Economic Possibilities for our Time" by Jeffrey Sachs should motivate additional research and implementation of principles within landscape ecology into this critical arena.

  5. BOOK REVIEW OF "DRINKING WATER REGULATION AND HEALTH"

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since the enactment of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) in 1974, several amendments and other new regulations have been developed for drinking water. The book, "Drinking Water Regulation and Health", explains these regulations and provides background on why they were developed ...

  6. An Evaluative Review of a Course in English, Book #4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shahheidaripour, Gholamabbass

    1998-01-01

    Course books are said to be the core of language teaching and learning processes on which the EFL teachers and English language institutes obviously base their activities. EFL students often consult teachers for a suitable textbook or even a good institute to be recommended to them for self-study or regular classroom attendance. Frankly speaking,…

  7. Book Review, Waste: Uncovering the Global Food Scandal

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Could curbing food waste significantly reduce world hunger and environmental pressures? Tristram Stuart argues cogently that it could in his book Waste, which details the global food-waste scandal and delves into questions such as how much food is available globally? How much is needed and used, a...

  8. Computerized Adaptive Testing: From Inquiry to Operation [Book Review].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gierl, Mark J.

    1998-01-01

    This book documents the research, development, and implementation efforts that allowed the U.S. Department of Defense to initiate the Computerized Adaptive Testing Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery Program for enlistment testing. Traces the history of this program over 30 years. (SLD)

  9. "The Philosophy of Childhood," by Gareth B. Matthews. Book Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palermo, James

    1998-01-01

    Asserts that this text by Matthews is a remedy to the scant attention paid to philosophical questioning by children. Describes the book's attempt to set children's philosophical questions against a re-examination of children's art and literature, legal issues regarding children's autonomy, and psychological models of the child's cognitive and…

  10. [Book review] Ospreys: A natural and unnatural history

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henny, Charles J.

    1990-01-01

    The Osprey (Pandion haliaetus) is now arguably the world's best known bird of prey. The DDT-related Osprey population crash in the northeastern United States resulted in an unparalleled amount of research during the last 20 years. In 1969, when I published my first paper on Ospreys in The Auk, there were only three or four osprey papers of consequence in the United States, plus an important paper on Swedish Ospreys, which hardly compares to the nearly 300 papers (the great majority dealing with Ospreys) cited by Poole in his book. Based on his detailed investigations in eastern North America and the literature from throughout the world, Poole wrote a book with perfect timing. A synthesis of the massive literature on this species was needed, and judging from the bio- logical soundness, completeness, and clear writing style, Poole was the proper person to write the book. Of course it is one aim to prepare a synthesis but, in addition, Poole carefully points out potential biases in data, gaps in information, and needs for further research. The book is both informative, and points out research problems for the next generation of Osprey investigators.

  11. Remember John Holt and "How Children Fail?" A Book Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costley, Kevin C.

    2006-01-01

    In the book, "How Children Fail", John Holt simply but honestly records classroom interactions in a refreshing, realistic and humorous style of delivery. Many of Holt's real stories have to do with teachers often falling into the trap of asking students questions and looking only for "right answers." Holt's main thrust is child failure in a…

  12. Science Books, A Quarterly Review, Volume 8 Number 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association for the Advancement of Science, Washington, DC.

    This quarterly publication is intended to acquaint students and teachers with new trade books, textbooks, and reference works in the pure and applied sciences. A listing of detailed subject fields is provided including psychology, sociology, economics, education, physical sciences, natural sciences, engineering, agriculture, geography and…

  13. BOOK REVIEW: Conversations on the Dark Secrets of Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teller, Edward

    2003-07-01

    Over many years Edward Teller delivered a course of Physical Science Appreciation Lectures. This book is based on those lectures, which must have been very stimulating. In the preparation of the book, Edward Teller was assisted by his daughter, Wendy Teller, and also by Wilson Talley. On many pages there are footnotes in the form of conversations between 'ET', who explains, and 'WT', who asks intelligent questions. (It is never clear which 'WT' is which.) I mention these footnotes as they contribute enormously to the charm and humour of the book. The book contains numerous anecdotes, many of which were new to me. The verse in the New Yorker, by Harold Furth, recording the famous meeting between Dr Teller and Dr Anti-Teller, is included. Dr Teller's comment is `The remarkable fact is that Harold got paid for the poem'. Dr Anti-Teller's comment is anti-recorded. The topics in the book include simple mechanics, statistical mechanics, electromagnetism, quantum mechanics and 'uses of new knowledge'. Despite its origins, the book does not avoid mathematics ('I will use mathematics because physics without mathematics is meaningless' (p1)), but Teller does attempt to explain the mathematics he uses. In much of the book the mathematics is at school level, but in his treatment of quantum mechanics he uses differential equations. If one skips past the equations then his final chapters are less mathematically demanding. I have enjoyed reading this book. Teller's approach is refreshing, and his coverage comprehensive and generally authoritative. My only disquiet is over his coverage of electrons in solids, where it would be clearer to consider the one-dimensional case first, before treating the three-dimensional case. There is a substantial discussion on the correspondence principle, wave-particle duality and on the uncertainty principle. His disposal of Schrödinger's notorious cat is masterly. There are questions at the end of each chapter. One question is based on a possible

  14. BOOK REVIEW: Renormalization Methods---A Guide For Beginners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardy, J.

    2004-05-01

    The stated goal of this book is to fill a perceived gap between undergraduate texts on critical phenomena and advanced texts on quantum field theory, in the general area of renormalization methods. It is debatable whether this gap really exists nowadays, as a number of books have appeared in which it is made clear that field-theoretic renormalization group methods are not the preserve of particle theory, and indeed are far more easily appreciated in the contexts of statistical and condensed matter physics. Nevertheless, this volume does have a fresh aspect to it, perhaps because of the author's background in fluid dynamics and turbulence theory, rather than through the more traditional migration from particle physics. The book begins at a very elementary level, in an effort to motivate the use of renormalization methods. This is a worthy effort, but it is likely that most of this section will be thought too elementary by readers wanting to get their teeth into the subject, while those for whom this section is apparently written are likely to find the later chapters rather challenging. The author's particular approach then leads him to emphasise the role of renormalized perturbation theory (rather than the renormalization group) in a number of problems, including non-linear systems and turbulence. Some of these ideas will be novel and perhaps even surprising to traditionally trained field theorists. Most of the rest of the book is on far more familiar territory: the momentum-space renormalization group, epsilon-expansion, and so on. This is standard stuff, and, like many other textbooks, it takes a considerable chunk of the book to explain all the formalism. As a result, there is only space to discuss the standard phi4 field theory as applied to the Ising model (even the N-vector model is not covered) so that no impression is conveyed of the power and extent of all the applications and generalizations of the techniques. It is regrettable that so much space is spent

  15. Book It!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Diane; Vesper, Virginia

    On the Internet, one can not only buy books but also obtain information about publishers and vendors, book reviews, authors, and other book-related information. Even electronic texts are available for downloading or browsing online. The paper discusses World Wide Web sites for many book-related information needs, whether a person is searching for…

  16. BOOK REVIEW: Galileo's Muse: Renaissance Mathematics and the Arts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Mark; Sterken, Christiaan

    2013-12-01

    Galileo's Muse is a book that focuses on the life and thought of Galileo Galilei. The Prologue consists of a first chapter on Galileo the humanist and deals with Galileo's influence on his student Vincenzo Viviani (who wrote a biography of Galileo). This introductory chapter is followed by a very nice chapter that describes the classical legacy: Pythagoreanism and Platonism, Euclid and Archimedes, and Plutarch and Ptolemy. The author explicates the distinction between Greek and Roman contributions to the classical legacy, an explanation that is crucial for understanding Galileo and Renaissance mathematics. The following eleven chapters of this book arranged in a kind of quadrivium, viz., Poetry, Painting, Music, Architecture present arguments to support the author's thesis that the driver for Galileo's genius was not Renaissance science as is generally accepted but Renaissance arts brought forth by poets, painters, musicians, and architects. These four sets of chapters describe the underlying mathematics in poetry, visual arts, music and architecture. Likewise, Peterson stresses the impact of the philosophical overtones present in geometry, but absent in algebra and its equations. Basically, the author writes about Galileo, while trying to ignore the Copernican controversy, which he sees as distracting attention from Galileo's scientific legacy. As such, his story deviates from the standard myth on Galileo. But the book also looks at other eminent characters, such as Galileo's father Vincenzo (who cultivated music and music theory), the painter Piero della Francesca (who featured elaborate perspectives in his work), Dante Alighieri (author of the Divina Commedia), Filippo Brunelleschi (who engineered the dome of the Basilica di Santa Maria del Fiore in Florence, Johannes Kepler (a strong supporter of Galileo's Copernicanism), etc. This book is very well documented: it offers, for each chapter, a wide selection of excellent biographical notes, and includes a fine

  17. DNAAlignEditor: DNA alignment editor tool

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Villeda, Hector; Schroeder, Steven; Flint-Garcia, Sherry; Guill, Katherine E; Yamasaki, Masanori; McMullen, Michael D

    2008-01-01

    Background With advances in DNA re-sequencing methods and Next-Generation parallel sequencing approaches, there has been a large increase in genomic efforts to define and analyze the sequence variability present among individuals within a species. For very polymorphic species such as maize, this has lead to a need for intuitive, user-friendly software that aids the biologist, often with naïve programming capability, in tracking, editing, displaying, and exporting multiple individual sequence alignments. To fill this need we have developed a novel DNA alignment editor. Results We have generated a nucleotide sequence alignment editor (DNAAlignEditor) that provides an intuitive, user-friendly interface for manual editing of multiple sequence alignments with functions for input, editing, and output of sequence alignments. The color-coding of nucleotide identity and the display of associated quality score aids in the manual alignment editing process. DNAAlignEditor works as a client/server tool having two main components: a relational database that collects the processed alignments and a user interface connected to database through universal data access connectivity drivers. DNAAlignEditor can be used either as a stand-alone application or as a network application with multiple users concurrently connected. Conclusion We anticipate that this software will be of general interest to biologists and population genetics in editing DNA sequence alignments and analyzing natural sequence variation regardless of species, and will be particularly useful for manual alignment editing of sequences in species with high levels of polymorphism. PMID:18366684

  18. Book Review: Rediscovering the Immune System as an Integrated Organ.

    PubMed

    Corthay, A

    2016-07-01

    The immune system may seem incredibly complex. Researchers in immunology are amassing enormous amounts of detailed information without gaining proportional insights. Why might this be? So asks Peter Bretscher near the start of his book Rediscovering the Immune System as an Integrated Organ. He argues that contemporary immunology fails to provide understanding at the level of the system because it is dominated by molecular and cellular considerations. He reminds us of a famous quotation: Not everything that counts can be counted and not everything that can be counted counts, before stating the ambitious aim of his book: to make plausible an integrated and readily accessible view of how the immune system functions. By Peter Bretscher. FriesenPress, 2016. 288 pp. ISBN: 978-1-4602-7406-4.

  19. BOOK REVIEW: Heterogeneous Materials I and Heterogeneous Materials II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, K. M.

    2004-02-01

    In these two volumes the author provides a comprehensive survey of the various mathematically-based models used in the research literature to predict the mechanical, thermal and electrical properties of hetereogeneous materials, i.e., materials containing two or more phases such as fibre-reinforced polymers, cast iron and porous ceramic kiln furniture. Volume I covers linear properties such as linear dielectric constant, effective electrical conductivity and elastic moduli, while Volume II covers nonlinear properties, fracture and atomistic and multiscale modelling. Where appropriate, particular attention is paid to the use of fractal geometry and percolation theory in describing the structure and properties of these materials. The books are advanced level texts reflecting the research interests of the author which will be of significant interest to research scientists working at the forefront of the areas covered by the books. Others working more generally in the field\

  20. How the eastern US National Forests were formed [Book review

    Treesearch

    Louis R. Iverson

    2014-01-01

    As a landscape ecologist conducting research on eastern forests for the US Forest Service (e.g., www.nrs.fs.fed.us/atlas), I was eager to learn about how the eastern National Forests came to be, as these forests now play such an important part of the natural world and provide a large carbon sink. The book did not disappoint and I'm confident that it will be...

  1. Hope is the thing with feathers [book review

    Treesearch

    John C Kilgo

    2000-01-01

    Hope Is the Thing with Feathers, written by Christopher Cokinos, presents accounts of the lives and deaths of six extinct species (or races) of North American birds: Carolina parakeet, ivory-billed woodpecker, heath hen, passenger pigeon, Labrador duck, and the great auk. The message of Cokinos’ book is that we must do more than hope; we must act to prevent...

  2. BOOK REVIEW: Partial Differential Equations in General Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choquet-Bruhat, Yvonne

    2008-09-01

    General relativity is a physical theory basic in the modeling of the universe at the large and small scales. Its mathematical formulation, the Einstein partial differential equations, are geometrically simple, but intricate for the analyst, involving both hyperbolic and elliptic PDE, with local and global problems. Many problems remain open though remarkable progress has been made recently towards their solutions. Alan Rendall's book states, in a down-to-earth form, fundamental results used to solve different types of equations. In each case he gives applications to special models as well as to general properties of Einsteinian spacetimes. A chapter on ODE contains, in particular, a detailed discussion of Bianchi spacetimes. A chapter entitled 'Elliptic systems' treats the Einstein constraints. A chapter entitled 'Hyperbolic systems' is followed by a chapter on the Cauchy problem and a chapter 'Global results' which contains recently proved theorems. A chapter is dedicated to the Einstein Vlasov system, of which the author is a specialist. On the whole, the book surveys, in a concise though precise way, many essential results of recent interest in mathematical general relativity, and it is very clearly written. Each chapter is followed by an up to date bibliography. In conclusion, this book will be a valuable asset to relativists who wish to learn clearly-stated mathematical results and to mathematicians who want to penetrate into the subtleties of general relativity, as a mathematical and physical theory.

  3. The Children's Book Showcase 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Book Council, New York, NY.

    The 1975 Children's Book Showcase committee selected 27 children's books for their excellent quality and design. Each of these books is given a two-page spread in the Showcase catalog. Information about the books, which are arranged alphabetically by title, includes author, title, publisher, artist, editor, art director, designer, production…

  4. The Children's Book Showcase 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Book Council, New York, NY.

    The 1975 Children's Book Showcase committee selected 27 children's books for their excellent quality and design. Each of these books is given a two-page spread in the Showcase catalog. Information about the books, which are arranged alphabetically by title, includes author, title, publisher, artist, editor, art director, designer, production…

  5. Best Books 1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Library Journal, 1982

    1982-01-01

    This annotated bibliography lists 45 children's books and 29 young adult books selected by School Library Journal's Book Review staff and Young Adult Review committee, respectively. Arrangement is alphabetical by author with the grade level indicated for children's books. (EJS)

  6. Book Review: Distant wanderers / Copernicus Books/Springer , 2001/2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, H. C.

    2002-06-01

    Are we alone in the Universe? The Earth, teeming with life, as we know it, is only one amongst the nine planets (wanderers) that wander around the Sun in more or less circular orbits. Do distant stars also have planets circling them? Are some of them similar to Earth and support life? These questions have long occupied the human mind. However, until the closing years of the twentieth century, the idea that there are stars, other than the Sun, that have planets orbiting them, remained a subject of speculation and controversy because the astronomical observing techniques used for the detection of planetary companions of stars did not have the necessary precision. During the past several years, advances in technology and dedicated efforts of planet-hunting astronomers have made it possible to detect Jupiter-like or more massive planets around nearby stars. So far about 70 such extra-solar planets have been discovered indicating that our solar system is not unique and distant wanderers are not uncommon. Distant Wanderers narrates the story of the search for extra-solar planets, even as the search is becoming more vigorous with newer instruments pushing the limits of sensitivity that has often resulted in the detection of planetary systems with totally unexpected characteristics. The book is primarily aimed at non specialists, but practicing scientists, including astronomers, will find the narrative very interesting and sometimes offering a perspective that is unfamiliar to professionals. The book begins with an introduction to some basic astronomical facts about the Universe, evolution of stars, supernovae and formation of pulsars. The first extra-solar planets were discovered in 1992 around a radio pulsar (PSR 1257+12) by measuring the oscillatory perturbations in the pulse arrival times from the pulsar caused by the presence of orbiting earth-sized planets as their gravity forces the pulsar also to move in orbit around the system barycenter. Such planetary systems

  7. BOOK REVIEW: The Cosmic Microwave Background The Cosmic Microwave Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, Peter

    2009-08-01

    With the successful launch of the European Space Agency's Planck satellite earlier this year the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is once again the centre of attention for cosmologists around the globe. Since its accidental discovery in 1964 by Arno Penzias and Robert Wilson, this relic of the Big Bang has been subjected to intense scrutiny by generation after generation of experiments and has gradually yielded up answers to the deepest questions about the origin of our Universe. Most recently, the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) has made a full-sky analysis of the pattern of temperature and polarization variations that helped establish a new standard cosmological model, confirmed the existence of dark matter and dark energy, and provided strong evidence that there was an epoch of primordial inflation. Ruth Durrer's book reflects the importance of the CMB for future developments in this field. Aimed at graduate students and established researchers, it consists of a basic introduction to cosmology and the theory of primordial perturbations followed by a detailed explanation of how these manifest themselves as measurable variations in the present-day radiation field. It then focuses on the statistical methods needed to obtain accurate estimates of the parameters of the standard cosmological model, and finishes with a discussion of the effect of gravitational lensing on the CMB and on the evolution of its spectrum. The book apparently grew out of various lecture notes on CMB anisotropies for graduate courses given by the author. Its level and scope are well matched to the needs of such an audience and the presentation is clear and well-organized. I am sure that this book will be a useful reference for more senior scientists too. If I have a criticism, it is not about what is in the book but what is omitted. In my view, one of the most exciting possibilities for future CMB missions, including Planck, is the possibility that they might discover physics

  8. BOOK REVIEW: Evaluating the Measurement Uncertainty: Fundamentals and practical guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lira, Ignacio

    2003-08-01

    Evaluating the Measurement Uncertainty is a book written for anyone who makes and reports measurements. It attempts to fill the gaps in the ISO Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement, or the GUM, and does a pretty thorough job. The GUM was written with the intent of being applicable by all metrologists, from the shop floor to the National Metrology Institute laboratory; however, the GUM has often been criticized for its lack of user-friendliness because it is primarily filled with statements, but with little explanation. Evaluating the Measurement Uncertainty gives lots of explanations. It is well written and makes use of many good figures and numerical examples. Also important, this book is written by a metrologist from a National Metrology Institute, and therefore up-to-date ISO rules, style conventions and definitions are correctly used and supported throughout. The author sticks very closely to the GUM in topical theme and with frequent reference, so readers who have not read GUM cover-to-cover may feel as if they are missing something. The first chapter consists of a reprinted lecture by T J Quinn, Director of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM), on the role of metrology in today's world. It is an interesting and informative essay that clearly outlines the importance of metrology in our modern society, and why accurate measurement capability, and by definition uncertainty evaluation, should be so important. Particularly interesting is the section on the need for accuracy rather than simply reproducibility. Evaluating the Measurement Uncertainty then begins at the beginning, with basic concepts and definitions. The third chapter carefully introduces the concept of standard uncertainty and includes many derivations and discussion of probability density functions. The author also touches on Monte Carlo methods, calibration correction quantities, acceptance intervals or guardbanding, and many other interesting cases. The book goes

  9. BOOK REVIEW: June 8, 2004: Venus in Transit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maor, Eli

    2000-09-01

    A transit of Venus is a relatively rare astronomical event in which the silhouette of Venus is seen to move across the face of the Sun. The phenomenon typically lasts several hours, during which Venus is seen as a small dot against the half-degree angular diameter of the solar disc. The last transit of Venus occurred in 1882; the next will be 8 June 2004. Such transits were once of great importance in astronomy. By observing a transit simultaneously from well separated points on the Earth's surface, astronomers were able to measure, with some degree of accuracy, the crucially important separation of the Earth and the Sun. Knowing this enabled them to convert the relative spacings of the planets indicated by Kepler's laws into absolute interplanetary distances expressed in miles or kilometres. Eli Maor's book presents the general reader with a full account of Venusian transits that covers the history of their observation as well as their significance and the reasons for their rarity. The book is a light and enjoyable read that opens well with an imaginative description of observing the 2004 transit from the hills outside Jerusalem. Following an account of Kepler's prediction of a transit of Mercury in 1631 and its observation by Gassendi, the book moves on to describe the transit of Venus in 1639, giving particular emphasis to the prescient work of Jeremiah Horrocks, the extraordinary young English curate and astronomer who died just two years later at the age of 21. The story, however, really takes off with Edmond Halley's realization, in 1677, that transits of Venus might provide the key to determining distances within the solar system. The details of Halley's method are confined to an appendix, but the central chapters of the book detail the increasingly elaborate efforts that astronomers made to observe transits of Venus up to the time of the 1882 transit, when, due to the impact of new photographic methods, interest in transit observations was waning. By that

  10. Scratching the surface of tomorrow's diagnostics: the Editor-in-Chief's opinion at the 15th year of Expert Review of Molecular Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Lorincz, Attila; Raison, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Interview with Attila Lorincz by Claire Raison (Commissioning Editor) To mark the beginning of the 15th year of Expert Review of Molecular Diagnostics, the journal's Editor-in-Chief shares his expert knowledge on translational diagnostics, his opinion on recent controversies and his predictions for molecular diagnostics in 2015 and beyond. Attila Lorincz received his doctorate from Trinity College, Dublin, Republic of Ireland, and went on to become a research fellow at the University of California, Santa Barbara, CA, USA. During Professor Lorincz's research on human papillomavirus (HPV), he found several important and novel carcinogenic HPV types and pioneered the use of HPV DNA testing for clinical diagnostics. In 1988, Professor Lorincz's team produced the first HPV test to be FDA-approved for patients and in 2003, for general population cervical precancer screening. Now Professor of Molecular Epidemiology at the Centre for Cancer Prevention, Queen Mary University of London, UK, he and his team are furthering translational research into DNA methylation assays for cancer risk prediction.

  11. BOOK REVIEW: Electricity, Relativity and Magnetism: a unified text

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambourne, Robert

    1999-09-01

    It is well known that magnetism is a relativistic effect. The combination of Coulomb's law of electrostatics and Einstein's special theory of relativity demands the existence of magnetic forces and hence magnetic fields. However, although many books have drawn attention to this fact very few have attempted to use it as the basis of a unified treatment of electricity, relativity and magnetism, and none, as far as I am aware, have extended that treatment to include the quantum theory of magnetism. Derek Craik's new book does all of the things, and does them with considerable thoroughness and a good degree of clarity. For these reasons it will be a valuable addition to many college and university libraries and will be of interest to all those involved in the teaching of electricity and magnetism at tertiary level. Electricity, Relativity and Magnetism: a unified text is divided into four substantial chapters. The first, and shortest, is devoted to special relativity. In just 35 pages it covers the essentials of the subject, including length contraction, time dilation and the transformation laws of velocity, acceleration and force. The other three chapters deal respectively with electromagnetism, magnetic behaviour and design (including practical field calculations and the energetics of domain structure) and the quantum theory of magnetism. Each of these latter chapters is about a hundred pages long, and therefore in some danger of becoming indigestible, but all of the chapters are subdivided into manageable sections and subsections that are usually just a few pages in length. The sections are well focused, but unusually wordy for such a mathematical text. Indeed, wordiness is one of the hallmarks of this text. The author is seriously concerned to present a specific approach to his subject, not merely a catalogue of results. This is refreshing and worthwhile, but it does mean that even in the second chapter, which deals with such familiar topics as dipoles

  12. Concentrating Solar Power Program Review 2013 (Book) (Revised)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-06-01

    This U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Concentrating Solar Power Program Review Meeting booklet will be provided to attendees at the Concentrating Solar Power Review Meeting in Phoenix, Arizona on April 23-25, 2013.

  13. [Book review] The geochronology and evolution of Africa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Frederic H.

    1987-01-01

    This book was written 'to provide an up-to-date data bank from which those wishing to construct models concerned with the evolution of Africa .... can draw.' As such, it attempts a survey of 'integrated geology and geochronology' of the African continent throughout the Precambrian and into the Phanerozoic. Political and language divisions often hinder the synthesis of continent-wide data, therefore, this well-indexed inventory of selected data and synthesis of present geochronological knowledge for Africa as a whole provides an important reference for researchers and explorationists, many of whom have limited access to complete collections of the geological literature of Africa.

  14. [Book review] The history of ornithology in Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, C.S.

    2005-01-01

    Virginia is arguably the birthplace of ornithology in North America. Captain John Smith and naturalist Mark Catesby were among the early describers of Virginia's common birds. David Johnston's book, however, begins by taking the reader back to the Tertiary period, some 65 million years ago, with Storrs Olson's description of fossils from tidewater Virginia. John Guilday, studying bone deposits in mountain caves, identified 80 species of birds, including Rock Ptarmigan and Spruce Grouse, from a time when Virginia's climate differed greatly from that of today. Archaeological studies and accounts of aboriginals in the 17th century complete Chapter 1.

  15. [Book review] Skua and penguin: Predator and prey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pietz, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    The skua and penguin with title billing in this book are specifically the South Polar Skua (Catharacta maccormicki) and the Adélie Penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae), More specifically, they are the populations of those two species that breed at Cape Bird on Ross Island, Antarctica (77°14'S, 16628'E), where the author and his students and colleagues conducted research during 1965-1970, Young presents the results of that research (with apologies for the long delay), using later research conducted by others on these species to help evaluate and interpret the findings from his program,

  16. BOOK REVIEW: New Understanding Physics for Advanced Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breithaupt, Jim

    2000-09-01

    Breithaupt's new book is big: at 727 pages, it will be a hefty addition to any student's bag. According to the preface, the book is designed to help students achieve the transition from GCSE to A-level and to succeed well at this level. It also aims to cover the requirements of the compulsory parts of all new syllabuses and to cover most of the optional material, too. The book is organized into seven themes along traditional lines: mechanics, materials, fields, waves, electricity, inside the atom, and physics in medicine. Each theme begins with a colourful title page that outlines what the theme is about, lists the applications that students will meet in their reading, identifies prior learning from GCSE and gives a checklist of what students should be able to do once they have finished their reading of the theme. This is all very useful. The text of the book is illustrated with many colourful photographs, pictures and cartoons, but despite this it looks very dense. There are a lot of words on every page in a small font that makes them seem very unfriendly, and although the book claims to be readable I rather doubt that the layout will encourage voluntary reading of the text. Each chapter ends with a useful summary and a selection of short questions that allow students to test their understanding. Each theme has a set of multiple choice and long questions. Some of the questions have an icon referring the student to the accompanying CD (more of this later). There is much up-to-date material in the book. For example, the section on cosmology gives a brief description of the inflationary scenario within the Big Bang model of the origin of the universe, although no mechanism for the inflation is given, which might prove unsatisfying to some students. I do have some reservations about the presentation of some topics within the book: the discussion of relativistic mass, for example, states that `Einstein showed that the mass ... is given by the formula ...' and quotes

  17. BOOK REVIEW: A Journey with Fred Hoyle (Second Edition)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramasinghe, Chandra; Sterken, Christiaan

    2013-12-01

    I read A Journey with Fred Hoyle: The Search for Cosmic Life shortly after the first edition appeared in 2005. The second expanded edition of this remarkable autobiographical account brings the scientific story up to date. The added Epilogue offers reflections in 2012, and shows that some of Hoyle's and Wickramasinghe's heretical theories have become accepted science today: these scientists were among the forerunners of today's astrobiology. The book is the story - presented as a blend of personal anecdotes, travel stories, references to political and social events, and science writing - of the remarkable 40-year friendship and scientific collaboration between the British astrophysicist Fred Hoyle and the Sri Lankan mathematician and astronomer Chandra Wickramasinghe. The author illuminates the story of his collaboration with Hoyle with interesting aspects of his personal life, such as the description of his educational background in Sri Lanka, and the story of how he, as a PhD student, made his first contact with his supervisor in 1960. The book also offers insights into Hoyle's and Wickramasinghe's family lives. The narrative also contains plenty of interstellar astrophysics along with the stories. Sir Fred Hoyle (1915-2001) was famous for his contribution to the theory of stellar nucleosynthesis, renowned for his coining (on BBC radio) of the term Big Bang and for his later rejection of that theory (coupled to his advocacy of the steady state cosmology), and famed as writer of more than a dozen science-fiction stories. He was the founding director of the Cambridge Institute of Theoretical Astronomy (that later became the Institute of Astronomy). Hoyle was a scientific whistleblower, a radical troublemaker, an unorthodox scientific mind, but also a victim of the system. Hoyle-Wickramasinghe thought was a long-term assault on conventional thinking: especially their notable concept of panspermia (that ever-present life pervades our universe) and their opposition to

  18. BOOK REVIEW: Robert Hooke and the Royal Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Neil

    2000-01-01

    Many physics students only come across Hooke when they learn his law of stretching springs, which is a pity because it is just one of his contributions to progress in science, and a minor one at that. His, Micrographia, the first great book of microscopical observations, arouses admiration to this day. He was also active in horology, astronomy, geology and surveying, and he took part in biological experiments, transfusing blood between animals. Much of his work was done while he was curator of experiments for the Royal Society, in which he was involved almost from its foundation. This was by no means a full-time occupation, however. After the Great Fire of London, Hooke was appointed one of the three surveyors for the rebuilding of the city. One of the others was Christopher Wren, a lifelong friend. In this role Hooke was responsible for the design of several buildings, including the Monument. Nichols writes about all these activities, as well as Hooke's childhood, his education at Westminster School, the University of Oxford when Hooke was an undergraduate, and the founding of the Royal Society. The book draws on research for a master's degree. Turning a dissertation into a popular book is risky. The author has avoided the pitfall of making it too academic, but the result is not satisfying. Nichols seems overawed by Hooke and his work, frequently seeming to credit Hooke with a far-reaching influence that he did not necessarily have. There may be a case for lauding Hooke as the father of English microscopy, the father of English meteorology, and the founder of English geology and earth sciences, but it needs to be made much more critically, even in a popular work. Hooke was full of good ideas, but he rarely continued long enough to put them into practice. There is no doubt that Hooke proposed using a balance wheel and spring to improve the timekeeping of a watch, for example, but he did not have a watch made to his design until after Christiaan Huygens had

  19. BOOK REVIEW: Seeking Ultimates. An Intuitive Guide to Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Neil

    2000-05-01

    Physics has the reputation of being a difficult and dry subject. Many books have been written in attempts to show that the difficulties are not insurmountable, even for the layman, and to convey some of the fascination it provides for those within it. In Seeking Ultimates Peter Landsberg avoids mathematics, the source of so many difficulties, entirely, and seeks to make physics comprehensible by what he terms intuition. He also emphasizes that there is almost no part of science that is completely understood; there are always areas of incompleteness and uncertainty, capable of providing exciting new results, and examples of this are highlighted throughout the book. After an introduction Landsberg starts with macroscopic phenomena for ease of understanding, though one might question whether the chosen topic of thermodynamics is ever going to be easy. Next he looks at microscopic effects, from atomic structure to the fundamental particles of the standard model and their interactions. There follow chapters on time and entropy, on chaos theory, on quantum mechanics and then cosmology. The final chapters look at physical constants (including the anthropic principle), whether physics has room for a creator God (the conclusion is that this is not the province of science), and some thoughts on science as a human activity. The chosen topics are those which have been important in the late twentieth century and remain important. Each chapter cites an eminent scientist as a `hero', though little is made of this. There are occasional historical notes, set in boxes, and a few short poems to leaven the text. What the book achieves is difficult to assess. Removing mathematics and adding a glossary of technical terms do not necessarily allow non-scientists to enjoy the text, as the publisher's note on the back cover suggests. The concepts can baffle the layman even more than the mathematics, and one of the most difficult of all physical concepts permeates so much of this book

  20. BOOK REVIEW: Plasma and Fluid Turbulence: Theory and Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshizawa, A.; Itoh, S. I.; Itoh, K.

    2003-03-01

    The area of turbulence has been covered by many books over the years. This has, of course, mainly been fluid turbulence, while the area of plasma turbulence has been treated much less. This book by Yoshizawa et al covers both plasma and fluid turbulence, in a way that does justice to both areas at the same time as cross-disciplinary aspects are illuminated. The book should be useful to physicists working in both areas partly because it examines fundamental aspects in a pedagogical way, partly because it is up to date and partly because of the cross-disciplinary aspects which enrich both areas. It is written as an advanced textbook. The reader should have previous knowledge of at least one of the areas and also some background in statistical physics. The book starts with the very important and highly up to date area of structure formation which is relevant both to fluids and plasmas. Here, pipe flow of fluids is treated as an introduction to the area, then follows discussion of the generation of magnetic fields by turbulent motion in stellar objects and stucture formation in plasmas confined by a magnetic field. Also the concept of bifurcation is introduced. This part builds up knowledge from the simple fluid case to the problems of magnetic confinement of plasmas in a very pedagogical way. It continues by introducing the fundamentals of fluid turbulence. This is done very systematically and concepts useful for industrial applications like the K-e method and several ways of heuristic modelling are introduced. Also the two dimensional vortex equation, which is also relevant to magnetized plasmas is introduced. In chapter 5 the statistical theory of turbulence is treated. It starts with a very nice and easy to understand example of renormalization of a simple nonlinear equation where the exact solution is known. It introduces the method of partial renormalization, Greens functions and the direct interaction approximation (DIA). The book then continues with an