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Sample records for border control measure

  1. A quantitative risk assessment model to evaluate effective border control measures for rabies prevention

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Hsin-Yi; Wu, Pei-I; Yang, Ping-Cheng; Tsai, Yi-Lun; Chang, Chao-Chin

    2009-01-01

    Border control is the primary method to prevent rabies emergence. This study developed a quantitative risk model incorporating stochastic processes to evaluate whether border control measures could efficiently prevent rabies introduction through importation of cats and dogs using Taiwan as an example. Both legal importation and illegal smuggling were investigated. The impacts of reduced quarantine and/or waiting period on the risk of rabies introduction were also evaluated. The results showed that Taiwan’s current animal importation policy could effectively prevent rabies introduction through legal importation of cats and dogs. The median risk of a rabid animal to penetrate current border control measures and enter Taiwan was 5.33 × 10−8 (95th percentile: 3.20 × 10−7). However, illegal smuggling may pose Taiwan to the great risk of rabies emergence. Reduction of quarantine and/or waiting period would affect the risk differently, depending on the applied assumptions, such as increased vaccination coverage, enforced custom checking, and/or change in number of legal importations. Although the changes in the estimated risk under the assumed alternatives were not substantial except for completely abolishing quarantine, the consequences of rabies introduction may yet be considered to be significant in a rabies-free area. Therefore, a comprehensive benefit-cost analysis needs to be conducted before recommending these alternative measures. PMID:19822125

  2. Control of Japanese honeysuckle in wildlife borders

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warbach, O.

    1953-01-01

    1. Japanese honeysuckle, an exotic that can be either a pest or an asset in different localities, makes maintenance of wildlife plantings in the Southeast a difficult problem. 2. A herbicide applied during the winter and strong enough to kill dormant woody plants will stop the spread of honeysuckle from a woods edge for at least two years. 3. A low-percentage 2,4-D water spray applied to honeysuckle growing in bicolor lespedeza borders at a time when honeysuckle is starting growth and bicolor is still dormant will selectively destroy the vine without injuring the border. 4. Studies on control of honeysuckle in multiflora rose, shrub borders, and contour hedges by herbicides are planned for the future.

  3. Taiwan's Travel and Border Health Measures in Response to Zika

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Li-Li; Tsai, Yu-Hui; Lee, Wang-Ping; Liao, Szu-Tsai; Wu, Li-Gin

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus has recently emerged as a worldwide public health concern. Travel and border health measures stand as one of the main strategies and frontline defenses in responding to international epidemics. As of October 31, 2016, Taiwan has reported 13 imported cases, 5 of which were detected through routine entry screening and active monitoring at international airports. This article shares Taiwan's disease surveillance activities at designated points of entry and travel and border health measures in response to Zika. The Taiwan government collaborates with its tourism industry to disseminate information about precautionary measures and encourages tour guides to report suspected individuals or events to activate early response measures. Taiwan also engages in vector control activities at points of entry, including targeting aircraft from countries where vector-borne diseases are endemic, implementing mosquito sweep measures, and collecting vector surveillance data. In future emerging and reemerging disease events, entry surveillance at designated points of entry may enable early detection of diseases of international origin and more rapid activation of public health preparedness activities and international collaboration. Taiwan will continue to maximize border and travel health measures in compliance with IHR (2005) requirements, which rely on continued risk assessment, practical implementation activities, and engagement with all stakeholders. PMID:28418744

  4. Taiwan's Travel and Border Health Measures in Response to Zika.

    PubMed

    Ho, Li-Li; Tsai, Yu-Hui; Lee, Wang-Ping; Liao, Szu-Tsai; Wu, Li-Gin; Wu, Yi-Chun

    Zika virus has recently emerged as a worldwide public health concern. Travel and border health measures stand as one of the main strategies and frontline defenses in responding to international epidemics. As of October 31, 2016, Taiwan has reported 13 imported cases, 5 of which were detected through routine entry screening and active monitoring at international airports. This article shares Taiwan's disease surveillance activities at designated points of entry and travel and border health measures in response to Zika. The Taiwan government collaborates with its tourism industry to disseminate information about precautionary measures and encourages tour guides to report suspected individuals or events to activate early response measures. Taiwan also engages in vector control activities at points of entry, including targeting aircraft from countries where vector-borne diseases are endemic, implementing mosquito sweep measures, and collecting vector surveillance data. In future emerging and reemerging disease events, entry surveillance at designated points of entry may enable early detection of diseases of international origin and more rapid activation of public health preparedness activities and international collaboration. Taiwan will continue to maximize border and travel health measures in compliance with IHR (2005) requirements, which rely on continued risk assessment, practical implementation activities, and engagement with all stakeholders.

  5. Prospects for cost reductions from relaxing additional cross-border measures related to livestock trade.

    PubMed

    Hop, G E; Mourits, M C M; Slager, R; Oude Lansink, A G J M; Saatkamp, H W

    2013-05-01

    Compared with the domestic trade in livestock, intra-communal trade across the European Union (EU) is subject to costly, additional veterinary measures. Short-distance transportation just across a border requires more measures than long-distance domestic transportation, while the need for such additional cross-border measures can be questioned. This study examined the prospects for cost reductions from relaxing additional cross-border measures related to trade within the cross-border region of the Netherlands (NL) and Germany (GER); that is, North Rhine Westphalia and Lower Saxony. The study constructed a deterministic spread-sheet cost model to calculate the costs of both routine veterinary measures (standard measures that apply to both domestic and cross-border transport) and additional cross-border measures (extra measures that only apply to cross-border transport) as applied in 2010. This model determined costs by stakeholder, region and livestock sector, and studied the prospects for cost reduction by calculating the costs after the relaxation of additional cross-border measures. The selection criteria for relaxing these measures were (1) a low expected added value on preventing contagious livestock diseases, (2) no expected additional veterinary risks in case of relaxation of measures and (3) reasonable cost-saving possibilities. The total cost of routine veterinary measures and additional cross-border measures for the cross-border region was €22.1 million, 58% (€12.7 million) of which came from additional cross-border measures. Two-thirds of this €12.7 million resulted from the trade in slaughter animals. The main cost items were veterinary checks on animals (twice in the case of slaughter animals), export certification and control of export documentation. Four additional cross-border measures met the selection criteria for relaxation. The relaxation of these measures could save €8.2 million (€5.0 million for NL and €3.2 million for GER) annually

  6. Effects of internal border control on spread of pandemic influenza.

    PubMed

    Wood, James G; Zamani, Nasim; MacIntyre, C Raina; Beckert, Niels G

    2007-07-01

    We investigated the capacity of internal border control to limit influenza spread in an emergent pandemic in the context of Australia, a country with a low-population density and geopolitical boundaries that may facilitate restrictions. Mathematical models were used to study the time delay between epidemics in 2 population centers when travel restrictions were imposed. The models demonstrated that population size, travel rates, and places where travelers reside can strongly influence delay. The model simulations suggested that moderate delays in geographic spread may be possible with stringent restrictions and a low reproduction number, but results will be sensitive to the reproduction number and timing of restrictions. Model limitations include the absence of further importations and additional control measures. Internal border control may have a role in protecting domestic centers early in a pandemic, when importations are sparse. Our results may be useful for policymakers.

  7. Usability in Public Services and Border Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirelli, Giuliano

    The paper starts with a brief overview of the scale of disability and associated challenges and puts them in the context of the public policy on disability. It then analyses the usability challenges in public services and border control, including the issues of accessibility, safety and communication. These need to be addressed in future policy proposals, to provide the best assistance by new technologies to elderly people and people with disabilities, avoiding creating new barriers due to incorrect or incomplete initial conception. With increasing flux of novel security technology in mass transportation systems, and particularly the use of biometric identification in airports, the challenge of usability is recognized. This paper analyses these issues in the context of users with disability in an idealized process of Simplifying Passenger Travel (SPT).

  8. Superresolution border segmentation and measurement in remote sensing images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipolletti, Marina P.; Delrieux, Claudio A.; Perillo, Gerardo M. E.; Cintia Piccolo, M.

    2012-03-01

    Segmentation and measurement of linear characteristics in remote sensing imagery are among the first stages in several geomorphologic studies, including the length estimation of geographic features such as perimeters, coastal lines, and borders. However, unlike area measurement algorithms, widely used methods for perimeter estimation in digital images have high systematic errors. No precision improvement can be achieved with finer spatial resolution images because of the inherent geometrical inaccuracies they commit. In this work, a superresolution border segmentation and measurement algorithm is presented. The method is based on minimum distance segmentation over the initial image, followed by contour tracking using a superresolution enhancement of the marching squares algorithm. Thorough testing with synthetic and validated field images shows that this algorithm outperforms traditional border measuring methods, regardless of the image resolution or the orientation, size, and shape of the object to be analyzed.

  9. Inconsistency in precipitation measurements across the Alaska-Yukon border

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaff, L.; Yang, D.; Li, Y.; Mekis, E.

    2015-12-01

    This study quantifies the inconsistency in gauge precipitation observations across the border of Alaska and Yukon. It analyses the precipitation measurements by the national standard gauges (National Weather Service (NWS) 8 in. gauge and Nipher gauge) and the bias-corrected data to account for wind effect on the gauge catch, wetting loss and trace events. The bias corrections show a significant amount of errors in the gauge records due to the windy and cold environment in the northern areas of Alaska and Yukon. Monthly corrections increase solid precipitation by 136 % in January and 20 % for July at the Barter Island in Alaska, and about 31 % for January and 4 % for July at the Yukon stations. Regression analyses of the monthly precipitation data show a stronger correlation for the warm months (mainly rainfall) than for cold month (mainly snowfall) between the station pairs, and small changes in the precipitation relationship due to the bias corrections. Double mass curves also indicate changes in the cumulative precipitation over the study periods. This change leads to a smaller and inverted precipitation gradient across the border, representing a significant modification in the precipitation pattern over the northern region. Overall, this study discovers significant inconsistency in the precipitation measurements across the USA-Canada border. This discontinuity is greater for snowfall than for rainfall, as gauge snowfall observations have large errors in windy and cold conditions. This result will certainly impact regional, particularly cross-border, climate and hydrology investigations.

  10. Layered mode selection logic control for border security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Born, T.; Ferrer, G.; Wright, A. M.; Wright, A. B.

    2007-04-01

    Challenges in border security may be resolved through a team of autonomous mobile robots configured as a flexible sensor array. The robots will have a prearranged formation along a section of a border, and each robot will attempt to maintain a uniform distance with its nearest neighbors. The robots will carry sensor packages which can detect a signature that is representative of a human (for instance, a thermal signature). When a robot detects an intruder, it will move away such that it attempts to maintain a constant distance from the intruder and move away from the border (i.e. into its home territory). As the robot moves away from the border, its neighbors will move away from the border to maintain a uniform distance with the moving robot and with their fixed neighbors. The pattern of motion in the team of robots can be identified, either algorithmically by a computer or by a human monitor of a display. Unique patterns are indicative of animal movement, human movement, and mass human movement. To realize such a scheme, a new control architecture must be developed. This architecture must be fault tolerant to sensor and manipulator failures, scalable in number of agents, and adaptable to different robotic base platforms (for instance, a UGV may be appropriate at the southern border and a UAV may be appropriate at the northern border). The Central Arkansas Robotics Consortium has developed an architecture, called Layered Mode Selection Logic (LMSL), which addresses all of these concerns. The overall LMSL scheme as applied to a multi-agent flexible sensor array is described in this paper.

  11. Gaps in Border Controls Are Related to Quarantine Alien Insect Invasions in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Bacon, Steven James; Bacher, Sven; Aebi, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    Alien insects are increasingly being dispersed around the world through international trade, causing a multitude of negative environmental impacts and billions of dollars in economic losses annually. Border controls form the last line of defense against invasions, whereby inspectors aim to intercept and stop consignments that are contaminated with harmful alien insects. In Europe, member states depend on one another to prevent insect introductions by operating a first point of entry rule – controlling goods only when they initially enter the continent. However, ensuring consistency between border control points is difficult because there exists no optimal inspection strategy. For the first time, we developed a method to quantify the volume of agricultural trade that should be inspected for quarantine insects at border control points in Europe, based on global agricultural trade of over 100 million distinct origin-commodity-species-destination pathways. This metric was then used to evaluate the performance of existing border controls, as measured by border interception results in Europe between 2003 and 2007. Alarmingly, we found significant gaps between the trade pathways that should be inspected and actual number of interceptions. Moreover, many of the most likely introduction pathways yielded none or very few insect interceptions, because regular interceptions are only made on only a narrow range of pathways. European countries with gaps in border controls have been invaded by higher numbers of quarantine alien insect species, indicating the importance of proper inspections to prevent insect invasions. Equipped with an optimal inspection strategy based on the underlying risks of trade, authorities globally will be able to implement more effective and consistent border controls. PMID:23112835

  12. Radiation Control on Uzbekistan Borders - Results and Perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Petrenko, Vitaliy; Yuldashev, Bekhzod; Ismailov, Ulughbek; Shipilov, Nikolay; Chipizubov, Sergey; Avezov, Anvar

    2009-12-02

    The measures and actions on prevention, detection and response to criminal or unauthorized acts involving radioactive materials in Uzbekistan are presented. In frames of program of radiation monitoring to prevent illicit trafficking of nuclear and radioactive materials main customs border checkpoints were equipped with commercial radiation portal monitors. Special radiation monitors elaborated and manufactured in INP AS RU are installed in INP(main gates, research reactor and laboratory building) to provide nuclear security of Institute facilities. The experience of Uzbekistan in establishing radiation monitoring systems on its borders, their operation and maintenance would be useful for realization of proposed plan of strengthening measures to prevent illicit trafficking in Republics of Central Asia region.

  13. 40 CFR 81.99 - New Mexico Southern Border Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false New Mexico Southern Border Intrastate... Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.99 New Mexico Southern Border Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Arizona-New Mexico Southern Border Interstate Air Quality Control Region has been renamed the...

  14. 40 CFR 81.99 - New Mexico Southern Border Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false New Mexico Southern Border Intrastate... Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.99 New Mexico Southern Border Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Arizona-New Mexico Southern Border Interstate Air Quality Control Region has been renamed the...

  15. 40 CFR 81.99 - New Mexico Southern Border Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false New Mexico Southern Border Intrastate... Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.99 New Mexico Southern Border Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Arizona-New Mexico Southern Border Interstate Air Quality Control Region has been renamed the...

  16. 40 CFR 81.99 - New Mexico Southern Border Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false New Mexico Southern Border Intrastate... Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.99 New Mexico Southern Border Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Arizona-New Mexico Southern Border Interstate Air Quality Control Region has been renamed the...

  17. Regional Joint Border Commands: A Pathway to Improving Collaboration and Effectiveness for Border Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    with Canada (eastern slope of Rocky Mountains to Pacific Ocean); 8. West Coast (Washington, Oregon , and California coasts ); 9. Alaska maritime and... Coast (Washington, Oregon , and California coasts ); 9. Alaska maritime and land border with Canada; and 10. Hawaii (maritime) The map on Figure 13...Border Patrol (USBP).....................................................25 b. U.S. Coast Guard (USCG

  18. A historical overview of the United States-Mexico Border Diabetes Prevention and Control Project.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Kenney, Rita V; Ruiz-Holguín, Rosalba; de Cosío, Federico G; Ramos, Rebeca; Rodríguez, Betsy; Beckles, Gloria L; Valdez, Rodolfo; Thompson-Reid, Patricia E

    2010-09-01

    Diabetes is a serious public health problem in the border region between the United States of America and Mexico, reflecting and by some measures surpassing the extent of national diabetes burden of each country. The U.S.-Mexico Border Diabetes Prevention and Control Project, a two-phase prevalence study on type 2 diabetes and its risk factors, was conceived and developed by culturally diverse groups of people representing more than 100 government agencies and nongovernmental organizations; health care providers; and residents of 10 U.S. and Mexican border states, using a participatory approach, to address this disproportionate incidence of diabetes. This report describes the project's history, conceptualization, participatory approach, implementation, accomplishments, and challenges, and recommends a series of steps for carrying out other binational participatory projects based on lessons learned.

  19. Border screening vs. community level disease control for infectious diseases: Timing and effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sehjeong; Chang, Dong Eui

    2017-06-01

    There have been many studies of the border screening using a simple math model or a statistical analysis to investigate the ineffectiveness of border screening during 2003 and 2009 pandemics. However, the use of border screening is still a controversial issue. It is due to focusing only on the functionality of border screening without considering the timing to use. In this paper, we attempt to qualitatively answer whether the use of border screening is a desirable action during a disease pandemic. Thus, a novel mathematical model with a transition probability of status change during flight and border screening is developed. A condition to check a timing of the border screening is established in terms of a lower bound of the basic reproduction number. If the lower bound is greater than one, which indicates a pandemic, then the border screening may not be effective and the disease persists. In this case, a community level control strategy should be conducted.

  20. Travel and Border Health Measures to Prevent the International Spread of Ebola.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Nicole J; Brown, Clive M; Alvarado-Ramy, Francisco; Bair-Brake, Heather; Benenson, Gabrielle A; Chen, Tai-Ho; Demma, Andrew J; Holton, N Kelly; Kohl, Katrin S; Lee, Amanda W; McAdam, David; Pesik, Nicki; Roohi, Shahrokh; Smith, C Lee; Waterman, Stephen H; Cetron, Martin S

    2016-07-08

    During the 2014-2016 Ebola virus disease (Ebola) epidemic in West Africa, CDC implemented travel and border health measures to prevent international spread of the disease, educate and protect travelers and communities, and minimize disruption of international travel and trade. CDC staff provided in-country technical assistance for exit screening in countries in West Africa with Ebola outbreaks, implemented an enhanced entry risk assessment and management program for travelers at U.S. ports of entry, and disseminated information and guidance for specific groups of travelers and relevant organizations. New and existing partnerships were crucial to the success of this response, including partnerships with international organizations, such as the World Health Organization, the International Organization for Migration, and nongovernment organizations, as well as domestic partnerships with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and state and local health departments. Although difficult to assess, travel and border health measures might have helped control the epidemic's spread in West Africa by deterring or preventing travel by symptomatic or exposed persons and by educating travelers about protecting themselves. Enhanced entry risk assessment at U.S. airports facilitated management of travelers after arrival, including the recommended active monitoring. These measures also reassured airlines, shipping companies, port partners, and travelers that travel was safe and might have helped maintain continued flow of passenger traffic and resources needed for the response to the affected region. Travel and border health measures implemented in the countries with Ebola outbreaks laid the foundation for future reconstruction efforts related to borders and travel, including development of regional surveillance systems, cross-border coordination, and implementation of core capacities at designated official points of entry in accordance with the International Health Regulations

  1. Border Lookout: Enhancing Tuberculosis Control on the United States-Mexico Border.

    PubMed

    DeSisto, Carla; Broussard, Kelly; Escobedo, Miguel; Borntrager, Denise; Alvarado-Ramy, Francisco; Waterman, Stephen

    2015-10-01

    We evaluated the use of federal public health intervention tools known as the Do Not Board and Border Lookout (BL) for detecting and referring infectious or potentially infectious land border travelers with tuberculosis (TB) back to treatment. We used data about the issuance of BL from April 2007 to September 2013 to examine demographics and TB laboratory results for persons on the list (N = 66) and time on the list before being located and achieving noninfectious status. The majority of case-patients were Hispanic and male, with a median age of 39 years. Most were citizens of the United States or Mexico, and 30.3% were undocumented migrants. One-fifth had multidrug-resistant TB. Nearly two-thirds of case-patients were located and treated as a result of being placed on the list. However, 25.8% of case-patients, primarily undocumented migrants, remain lost to follow-up and remain on the list. For this highly mobile patient population, the use of this novel federal travel intervention tool facilitated the detection and treatment of infectious TB cases that were lost to follow-up. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  2. Border Lookout: Enhancing Tuberculosis Control on the United States–Mexico Border

    PubMed Central

    DeSisto, Carla; Broussard, Kelly; Escobedo, Miguel; Borntrager, Denise; Alvarado-Ramy, Francisco; Waterman, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the use of federal public health intervention tools known as the Do Not Board and Border Lookout (BL) for detecting and referring infectious or potentially infectious land border travelers with tuberculosis (TB) back to treatment. We used data about the issuance of BL from April 2007 to September 2013 to examine demographics and TB laboratory results for persons on the list (N = 66) and time on the list before being located and achieving noninfectious status. The majority of case-patients were Hispanic and male, with a median age of 39 years. Most were citizens of the United States or Mexico, and 30.3% were undocumented migrants. One-fifth had multidrug-resistant TB. Nearly two-thirds of case-patients were located and treated as a result of being placed on the list. However, 25.8% of case-patients, primarily undocumented migrants, remain lost to follow-up and remain on the list. For this highly mobile patient population, the use of this novel federal travel intervention tool facilitated the detection and treatment of infectious TB cases that were lost to follow-up. PMID:26304917

  3. JNK signaling controls border cell cluster integrity and collective cell migration.

    PubMed

    Llense, Flora; Martín-Blanco, Enrique

    2008-04-08

    Collective cell movement is a mechanism for invasion identified in many developmental events. Examples include the movement of lateral-line neurons in Zebrafish, cells in the inner blastocyst, and metastasis of epithelial tumors [1]. One key model to study collective migration is the movement of border cell clusters in Drosophila. Drosophila egg chambers contain 15 nurse cells and a single oocyte surrounded by somatic follicle cells. At their anterior end, polar cells recruit several neighboring follicle cells to form the border cell cluster [2]. By stage 9, and over 6 hr, border cells migrate as a cohort between nurse cells toward the oocyte. The specification and directionality of border cell movement are regulated by hormonal and signaling mechanisms [3]. However, how border cells are held together while they migrate is not known. Here, we show that a negative-feedback loop controlling JNK activity regulates border cell cluster integrity. JNK signaling modulates contacts between border cells and between border cells and substratum to sustain collective migration by regulating several effectors including the polarity factor Bazooka and the cytoskeletal adaptor D-Paxillin. We anticipate a role for the JNK pathway in controlling collective cell movements in other morphogenetic and clinical models.

  4. Treating the invisible: Gaps and opportunities for enhanced TB control along the Thailand-Myanmar border.

    PubMed

    Tschirhart, Naomi; Thi, Sein Sein; Swe, Lei Lei; Nosten, Francois; Foster, Angel M

    2017-01-13

    In Thailand's northwestern Tak province, contextual conditions along the border with Myanmar pose difficulties for TB control among migrant populations. Incomplete surveillance data, migrant patient mobility, and loss to follow-up make it difficult to estimate the TB burden and implement effective TB control measures. This multi-methods study examined tuberculosis, tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus co-infection, and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis treatment accessibility for migrants and refugees in Tak province, health system response, and public health surveillance. In this study we conducted 13 interviews with key informants working in public health or TB treatment provision to elicit information on TB treatment availability and TB surveillance practices. In addition we organized 15 focus group discussions with refugee and migrant TB, TB/HIV, and MDR-TB patients and non-patients to discuss treatment access. We analyzed the data using thematic analysis and created treatment availability maps with Google maps. The study identified surveillance, treatment, and funding gaps. Migrant TB cases are underreported in the provincial statistics due to jurisdictional interpretations and resource barriers. Our results suggest that TB/HIV and MDR-TB treatment options are limited for migrants and a heavy reliance on donor funding may lead to potential funding gaps for migrant TB services. We identified several opportunities that positively contribute to TB control in Tak province: improved diagnostics, comprehensive care, and collaboration through data sharing, planning, and patient referrals. The various organizations providing TB treatment to migrant and refugee populations along the border and the Tak Provincial Public Health Office are highly collaborative which offers a strong foundation for future TB control initiatives. Our findings suggest the need to enhance the surveillance system to include all migrant TB patients who seek treatment in Tak province and

  5. Actions to control high blood pressure among hypertensive adults in Texas counties along the Mexico border: Texas BRFSS, 2007.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Carma; Fang, Jing; Escobedo, Luis; Pan, Stephen; Balcazar, Hector G; Wang, Guijing; Merritt, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We examined the prevalence of actions taken to control blood pressure as measured by taking antihypertensive medication or making lifestyle modifications among hypertensive adults residing along the Texas/Mexico border. We used self-reported data from the 2007 Texas Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, with oversampling of border counties. We calculated the age-standardized prevalence of actions taken to control hypertension by selected characteristics. In analyses that combined ethnicity with predominant language spoken, those least likely to take any action to control their blood pressure--either by taking an antihypertensive medication or by making any of four lifestyle modifications--were Spanish-speaking Hispanic people (83.2% ± 2.7% standard error [SE]), with English-speaking non-Hispanic people (88.9% ± 0.8% SE) having the highest prevalence of taking action to control blood pressure. When analyzed by type of medical category, uninsured Hispanic people (63.8% ± 4.8% SE) had the lowest prevalence of taking action to control their blood pressure compared with uninsured non-Hispanic people (75.4% ± 4.7% SE). Nonborder Texas residents with hypertension were more likely to take antihypertensive medications (78.4% ± 1.0% SE) than border county residents with hypertension (70.7% ± 2.0% SE). Public health efforts must be undertaken to improve the control of hypertension among residents of Texas counties along the Mexico border, particularly for uninsured Hispanic people.

  6. Optical benchmarking of security document readers for automated border control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentín, Kristián.; Wild, Peter; Å tolc, Svorad; Daubner, Franz; Clabian, Markus

    2016-10-01

    Authentication and optical verification of travel documents upon crossing borders is of utmost importance for national security. Understanding the workflow and different approaches to ICAO 9303 travel document scanning in passport readers, as well as highlighting normalization issues and designing new methods to achieve better harmonization across inspection devices are key steps for the development of more effective and efficient next- generation passport inspection. This paper presents a survey of state-of-the-art document inspection systems, showcasing results of a document reader challenge investigating 9 devices with regards to optical characteristics.

  7. 40 CFR 81.99 - New Mexico Southern Border Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Air Quality Control Region. 81.99 Section 81.99 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.99 New Mexico Southern Border Intrastate Air Quality Control...

  8. X-ray control of borders and of internal security.

    PubMed

    Vogel, H

    2010-01-01

    Security control with X-rays means exposure to ionising radiation and creates the possibility of access to personal privacy. Internal security concerns the police and secret services. The used technologies and their possibilities are described. Observations and additional information have been collected. The exposure dose has been measured. Several technical set ups are in use: Transmission imaging (fluoroscopy), backscatter imaging, computed tomography and several combinations. The search of persons concerns the interior of the human body, its surface and the clothing together with the luggage. One looks for weapons, explosives and drugs. The exposure dose is low compared to the exposure dose by a flight or due to a holiday in a country with higher environmental radiation by external sources like Finland. In the future, the security control will increase. Using X-rays creates the possibility to inspect privacy.

  9. Force-displacement measurements of earlywood bordered pits using a mesomechanical tester

    Treesearch

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Keith J. Bourne; John C. Hermanson; Samuel V. Glass; Adriana Costa; Alex C. Wiedenhoeft

    2015-01-01

    The elastic properties of pit membranes are reported to have important implications in understanding air-seeding phenomena in gymnosperms, and pit aspiration plays a large role in wood technological applications such as wood drying and preservative treatment. Here we present force–displacement measurements for pit membranes of circular bordered pits, collected on a...

  10. On precise phase difference measurement approach using border stability of detection resolution.

    PubMed

    Bai, Lina; Su, Xin; Zhou, Wei; Ou, Xiaojuan

    2015-01-01

    For the precise phase difference measurement, this paper develops an improved dual phase coincidence detection method. The measurement resolution of the digital phase coincidence detection circuits is always limited, for example, only at the nanosecond level. This paper reveals a new way to improve the phase difference measurement precision by using the border stability of the circuit detection fuzzy areas. When a common oscillator signal is used to detect the phase coincidence with the two comparison signals, there will be two detection fuzzy areas for the reason of finite detection resolution surrounding the strict phase coincidence. Border stability of fuzzy areas and the fluctuation difference of the two fuzzy areas can be even finer than the picoseconds level. It is shown that the system resolution obtained only depends on the stability of the circuit measurement resolution which is much better than the measurement device resolution itself.

  11. Reformulation of controlled-release oxycodone and pharmacy dispensing patterns near the US–Canada border

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Tara; Paterson, J Michael; Juurlink, David N; Dhalla, Irfan A; Mamdani, Muhammad M

    2012-01-01

    Background In August 2010, a tamper-resistant formulation of controlled-release oxycodone (OxyContin-OP) was introduced in the United States but not in Canada. Our objective was to determine whether introduction of OxyContin-OP in the United States influenced prescription volumes for the original controlled-release oxycodone formulation (OxyContin) at Canadian pharmacies near the international border. Methods We conducted a population-based, serial, cross-sectional study of prescriptions dispensed from pharmacies in the 3 cities with the highest volume of US–Canada border crossings in Ontario: Niagara Falls, Windsor and Sarnia. We analyzed data on all outpatient prescriptions for OxyContin dispensed by Canadian pharmacies near each border crossing between 2010 Apr. 1 and 2012 Feb. 29. We calculated and compared monthly prescription rates, adjusted per 1000 population and stratified by tablet strength. Results The number of tablets dispensed near 4 border crossings in the 3 Canadian cities remained stable over the study period. However, the rate of dispensing at pharmacies near the Detroit–Windsor Tunnel increased roughly 4-fold between August 2010 and February 2011, from 505 to 1969 tablets per 1000 population. By April 2011, following warnings to prescribers and pharmacies regarding drug-seeking behaviour, the dispensing rate declined to 1683 tablets per 1000 population in this area. By November 2011, the rate had returned to levels observed in early 2010. Our analyses suggest that 242 075 excess OxyContin tablets were dispensed near the Detroit–Windsor Tunnel between August 2010 and October 2011. Conclusions Prescribing of the original formulation of controlled-release oxycodone rose substantially near a major international border crossing following the introduction of a tamper-resistant formulation in the United States. It is possible that the restriction of this finding to the area surrounding the Detroit–Windsor Tunnel reflects specific

  12. Border safety: quality control at the nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Brant M.; Lusk, C. Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The unique biochemical identity of the nuclear envelope confers its capacity to establish a barrier that protects the nuclear compartment and directly contributes to nuclear function. Recent work uncovered quality control mechanisms employing the ESCRT machinery and a new arm of ERAD to counteract the unfolding, damage or misassembly of nuclear envelope proteins and ensure the integrity of the nuclear envelope membranes. Moreover, cells have the capacity to recognize and triage defective nuclear pore complexes in order to prevent their inheritance and preserve the longevity of progeny. These mechanisms serve to highlight the diverse strategies used by cells to maintain nuclear compartmentalization; we suggest they mitigate the progression and severity of diseases associated with nuclear envelope malfunction like the laminopathies. PMID:26437591

  13. Border control--a membrane-linked interactome of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Jones, Alexander M; Xuan, Yuanhu; Xu, Meng; Wang, Rui-Sheng; Ho, Cheng-Hsun; Lalonde, Sylvie; You, Chang Hun; Sardi, Maria I; Parsa, Saman A; Smith-Valle, Erika; Su, Tianying; Frazer, Keith A; Pilot, Guillaume; Pratelli, Réjane; Grossmann, Guido; Acharya, Biswa R; Hu, Heng-Cheng; Engineer, Cawas; Villiers, Florent; Ju, Chuanli; Takeda, Kouji; Su, Zhao; Dong, Qunfeng; Assmann, Sarah M; Chen, Jin; Kwak, June M; Schroeder, Julian I; Albert, Reka; Rhee, Seung Y; Frommer, Wolf B

    2014-05-16

    Cellular membranes act as signaling platforms and control solute transport. Membrane receptors, transporters, and enzymes communicate with intracellular processes through protein-protein interactions. Using a split-ubiquitin yeast two-hybrid screen that covers a test-space of 6.4 × 10(6) pairs, we identified 12,102 membrane/signaling protein interactions from Arabidopsis. Besides confirmation of expected interactions such as heterotrimeric G protein subunit interactions and aquaporin oligomerization, >99% of the interactions were previously unknown. Interactions were confirmed at a rate of 32% in orthogonal in planta split-green flourescent protein interaction assays, which was statistically indistinguishable from the confirmation rate for known interactions collected from literature (38%). Regulatory associations in membrane protein trafficking, turnover, and phosphorylation include regulation of potassium channel activity through abscisic acid signaling, transporter activity by a WNK kinase, and a brassinolide receptor kinase by trafficking-related proteins. These examples underscore the utility of the membrane/signaling protein interaction network for gene discovery and hypothesis generation in plants and other organisms. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  14. Deterring Cybertrespass and Securing Cyberspace: Lessons from United States Border Control Strategies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-01

    literature about border controls. Drawing on a rich literature, including case studies of successful and un- successful attempts at securing the Southern...fluence—and so few cases of nuclear launches—there are a much wider variety of cases of both successful and failed deterrence efforts for analysts...numerous studies of illegal immi- gration based on survey data and interviews collected from both failed and successful illegal immigrants. This data

  15. Measuring Illegal Border Crossing Between Ports of Entry: An Assessment of Four Promising Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    sobre Migración en la Frontera Norte de México GAO U.S. Government Accountability Office ONDCP Office of National Drug Control Policy 1 CHAPTER ONE...returned to Mexico or another country, and are now on a return trip to the United States). Whereas many migrants do continue to try to cross until they...migrants in northern Mexican border communities called Encuesta sobre Migración en la Frontera Norte de México (EMIF), which is collected at

  16. Cosmic-Ray-Induced Ship-Effect Neutron Measurements and Implications for Cargo Scanning at Borders

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Seifert, Allen; Siciliano, Edward R.; Weier, Dennis R.; Windsor, Lindsay K.; Woodring, Mitchell L.; Borgardt, James D.; Buckley, Elise D.; Flumerfelt, Eric L.; Oliveri, Anna F.; Salvitti, Matthew

    2008-03-11

    Neutron measurements are used as part of the interdiction process for illicit nuclear materials at border crossings. Even though the natural neutron background is small, its variation can impact the sensitivity of detection systems. The natural background of neutrons that is observed in monitoring instruments arises almost entirely from cosmic ray induced cascades in the atmosphere and the surrounding environment. One significant source of variation in the observed neutron background is produced by the “ship effect” in large quantities of cargo that transit past detection instruments. This paper reports on results from measurements with typical monitoring equipment of ship effect neutrons in various materials. One new result is the “neutron shadow shielding” effect seen with some low neutron density materials.

  17. The Border Community & Immigration Stress Scale: A Preliminary Examination of a Community Responsive Measure in Two Southwest Samples

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal, Scott C.; Rosales, Cecilia; Rubio-Goldsmith, Raquel; Sabo, Samantha; Ingram, Maia; McClelland, Debra Jean; Redondo, Floribella; Torres, Emma; Romero, Andrea J.; Oleary, Anna Ochoa; Sanchez, Zoila; de Zapien, Jill Guernsey

    2015-01-01

    Background Understanding contemporary socio-cultural stressors may assist educational, clinical and policy-level health promotion efforts. This study presents descriptive findings on a new measure, the Border Community & Immigration Stress Scale (BCISS). Methods The data were from two community surveys as part of community based participatory projects conducted in the Southwestern US border region. This scale includes stressful experiences reflected in extant measures, with new items reflecting heightened local migration pressures and health care barriers. Results Stressors representing each main domain, including novel ones, were reported with frequency and at high intensity in the predominantly Mexican-descent samples. Total stress was also significantly associated with mental and physical health indicators. Discussion The study suggests particularly high health burdens tied to the experience of stressors in the US border region. Further, many of the stressors are also likely relevant for other communities within developed nations also experiencing high levels of migration. PMID:22430894

  18. Risk Factors for Border Malaria in a Malaria Elimination Setting: A Retrospective Case-Control Study in Yunnan, China

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jian-Wei; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Yu; Guo, Xiang-Rui; Wang, Jia-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    A retrospective case-control study was conducted to identify risk factors for border malaria in a malaria elimination setting of Yunnan Province, China. The study comprised 214 cases and 428 controls. The controls were individually matched to the cases on the basis of residence, age, and gender. In addition, statistical associations are based on matched analyses. The frequencies of imported, male, adult, and vivax malaria cases were respectively 201 (93.9%), 194 (90.7%), 210 (98.1%), and 176 (82.2%). Overnight stay in Myanmar within the prior month was independently associated with malaria infection (odds ratio [OR] 159.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 75.1–338.9). In particular, stays in lowland and foothill (OR 5.5, 95% CI 2.5–11.8) or mid-hill (OR 42.8, 95% CI 5.1–319.8) areas, or near streamlets (OR 15.3, 95% CI 4.3–55.2) or paddy field or pools (OR10.1, 95% CI 4.4–55.8) were found to be independently associated with malaria. Neither forest exposure nor use of vector control measures was associated with malaria. In conclusion, travel to lowland and foothill or mid-hill hyperendemic areas, especially along the waterside in Myanmar, was found to be the highest risk factor for malaria. In considering the limitations of the study, further investigations are needed to identify the major determinants of malaria risk and develop new strategies for malaria elimination on China-Myanmar border. PMID:25601994

  19. Crossing Borders: The Impact of the California Tobacco Control Program on Both Sides of the US–Mexico Border

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Donate, Ana P.; Hovell, Melbourne F.; Hofstetter, C. Richard; González-Pérez, Guillermo J.; Kotay, Anu; Adams, Marc A.

    2008-01-01

    We examined the association between exposure to the California Tobacco Control Program and tobacco-related behaviors and perceptions among adults of Mexican descent. Three cross-sectional population-based surveys were conducted among adults in cities that represent full, partial, and no exposure to the program: San Diego, Calif, Tijuana, Mexico, and Guadalajara, Mexico, respectively. After we controlled for socioeconomic differences, we found significantly different rates of smoking, exposure to environmental tobacco smoke, and smoking bans in the 3 cities. We also observed a parallel gradient of cross-city differences in theoretical mediators of tobacco control. This suggests a significant association among the California Tobacco Control Program, tobacco-control outcomes, and theoretical mediators of these outcomes. Similar programs should be implemented in other regions; they have widespread effects on social norms and behaviors related to smoking and environmental tobacco smoke and can help achieve tobacco control across nations. PMID:18172154

  20. Force-displacement measurements of earlywood bordered pits using a mesomechanical tester.

    PubMed

    Zelinka, Samuel L; Bourne, Keith J; Hermanson, John C; Glass, Samuel V; Costa, Adriana; Wiedenhoeft, Alex C

    2015-10-01

    The elastic properties of pit membranes are reported to have important implications in understanding air-seeding phenomena in gymnosperms, and pit aspiration plays a large role in wood technological applications such as wood drying and preservative treatment. Here we present force-displacement measurements for pit membranes of circular bordered pits, collected on a mesomechanical testing system. The system consists of a quartz microprobe attached to a microforce sensor that is positioned and advanced with a micromanipulator mounted on an inverted microscope. Membrane displacement is measured from digital image analysis. Unaspirated pits from earlywood of never-dried wood of Larix and Pinus and aspirated pits from earlywood of dried wood of Larix were tested to generate force-displacement curves up to the point of membrane failure. Two failure modes were observed: rupture or tearing of the pit membrane by the microprobe tip, and the stretching of the pit membrane until the torus was forced out of the pit chamber through the pit aperture without rupture, a condition we refer to as torus prolapse.

  1. C-BORD project: "Effective container inspection at BORDer control points"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etilé, Asénath; Roig, Olivier; Bauge, Eric; Gaudefroy, Laurent; Méot, Vincent

    2017-09-01

    In the framework of the C-BORD project of the H2020 programme to provide a safety chain for container inspection at border control points, CEA-DAM is involved to develop an identification method of Special Nuclear Material. Using active interrogation the main purpose is to specifically discriminate fissile actinides from fertile ones through the detection of γ-rays emitted by very short-lived isomers. We present here the interdependance of such a project with nuclear data. We first introduce the SNM identification method. Then, will be detailed the needs in nuclear data and first yields of specific short-lived isomers of 252Cf spontaneous fission. Perspectives and conclusions will end the article.

  2. Border control for stowaway alien species should be prioritised based on variations in establishment debt.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, Katelyn T; Robertson, Mark P; Rouget, Mathieu; Wilson, John R U

    2016-09-15

    Border control is one of the major approaches used by countries to limit the number of organisms introduced as stowaways. However, it is not feasible to inspect all passengers, cargo and vehicles entering a country, and so efforts need to be prioritised. Here we use South Africa as a case study to assess, based on tourism and trade data and climate matching techniques, the number of stowaway species that might be introduced ('colonisation pressure') and the likelihood that once introduced, these organisms will establish ('likelihood of establishment'). These results were used to explore how the number of species that are likely to establish ('establishment debt') varies across donor regions and seasons. A simple theoretical model was then used to compare four strategies for prioritising border control inspections: no prioritisation; based on colonisation pressure; based on likelihood of establishment; and based on both colonisation pressure and likelihood of establishment. Establishment debt was greatest in southern hemisphere spring and autumn when South Africa is climatically similar to northern hemisphere countries with which there are strong, consistent trade and tourism links (i.e. colonisation pressure varied little seasonally, but likelihood of establishment did vary across the seasons). Prioritising inspections based on both colonisation pressure and the likelihood of establishment was clearly the most effective strategy, with this strategy detecting at least 6% more potential invaders than the other strategies. While there are many practical limitations to the implementation of such prioritised inspection strategies, the results highlight the importance of national and regional studies of establishment debt. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Health control at International Borders: the role of foreign health during the containment phases of the pandemic (H1N1) 2009].

    PubMed

    Dávila Cornejo, Miguel; Aramburu Celigueta, Carmen; Morte Esteban, Susana; Vera Gil, Inmaculada; Iglesias García, Maria José; González Gutiérrez-Solana, Oscar

    2010-01-01

    As a public health strategy in responding to epidemics, sanitary checks at borders to delay the entry of the pandemic virus into Spain are part of the containment phases activities. Their implementation is the responsibility of the Foreign Health Department and requires a coordinated action with other agencies involved in the response. This paper describes the actions undertaken at international airports during these phases and evaluates its efficacy in the execution of their objective. We establish a hypothesis to explain how the measures undertaken by Foreign Health and the collaboration with the National Surveillance System may have contributed to delay the spread of the virus into our country. We want to emphasize the need for consolidating the border control surveillance system and improving collaboration, as well as the importance of designing a clear communication strategy for the population in these settings. Together these measures, along with others, will prevent situations of uncertainty.

  4. The Transcription Factor NIN-LIKE PROTEIN7 Controls Border-Like Cell Release1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Karve, Rucha

    2016-01-01

    The root cap covers the tip of the root and functions to protect the root from environmental stress. Cells in the last layer of the root cap are known as border cells, or border-like cells (BLCs) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). These cells separate from the rest of the root cap and are released from its edge as a layer of living cells. BLC release is developmentally regulated, but the mechanism is largely unknown. Here, we show that the transcription factor NIN-LIKE PROTEIN7 (NLP7) is required for the proper release of BLCs in Arabidopsis. Mutations in NLP7 lead to BLCs that are released as single cells instead of an entire layer. NLP7 is highly expressed in BLCs and is activated by exposure to low pH, a condition that causes BLCs to be released as single cells. Mutations in NLP7 lead to decreased levels of cellulose and pectin. Cell wall-loosening enzymes such as CELLULASE5 (CEL5) and a pectin lyase-like gene, as well as the root cap regulators SOMBRERO and BEARSKIN1/2, are activated in nlp7-1 seedlings. Double mutant analysis revealed that the nlp7-1 phenotype depends on the expression level of CEL5. Mutations in NLP7 lead to an increase in susceptibility to a root-infecting fungal pathogen. Together, these data suggest that NLP7 controls the release of BLCs by acting through the cell wall-loosening enzyme CEL5. PMID:27221617

  5. 75 FR 19420 - Proposed Information Collection; OMB Control Number 1018-0144; Wildlife Without Borders...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-14

    ... Without Borders--Amphibians in Decline Grant Program AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION... Species Act (16 U.S.C. 1531-43) authorizes the establishment of the Wildlife Without Borders-Amphibians in Decline grant program to fund projects that conserve the world's rapidly declining amphibian species....

  6. Blood pressure control, hypertension, awareness, and treatment in adults with diabetes in the United States-Mexico border region.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, Maya; He, Guozhong; Stoddard, Pamela; Schillinger, Dean

    2010-09-01

    To determine prevalence of blood pressure control, hypertension, hypertension awareness, and antihypertensive treatment among adults (> 18 years old) with diabetes living in the border region between the United States of America and Mexico, and to explore variation in those variables between all adults on the Mexican side of the border ("Mexicans") and three groups on the U.S. side of the border ("all U.S. adults," "U.S.-born Hispanics," and "Mexican immigrants"). Using data from Phase I (February 2001-October 2002) of the U.S.-Mexico Border Diabetes Prevention and Control Project, a prevalence study of type 2 diabetes and its risk factors, age-adjusted prevalence of hypertension-related variables was calculated for the sample (n = 682) and differences between the border groups were examined through logistic regression. Less than one-third of the sample had controlled blood pressure (< 130/80 mm Hg), almost half had hypertension (≥140/90 mm Hg), and hypertension awareness and treatment were inadequate. After adjusting for demographics, body mass index, and access to health care, there were no differences in blood pressure control, hypertension, hypertension awareness, or treatment between Mexicans and both U.S. adults and Mexican immigrants. However, compared to Mexicans and Mexican immigrants, U.S.-born Hispanics, particularly younger individuals, had the lowest rates of blood pressure control (17.3%) and the highest rates of coexisting hypertension (54.8%). Compared to Mexicans, U.S.-born Hispanics had lower odds of controlled blood pressure (odds ratio [OR] 0.30, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.09-0.95) and greater odds of hypertension (OR 3.75, 95% CI 1.51-9.29) and hypertension awareness (OR 6.19, 95% CI 1.46-26.15). Co-occurrence of diabetes and hypertension is a major public health problem among U.S.-Mexico border residents. The low rate of blood pressure control among various border groups, especially younger U.S.-born Hispanics, suggests that initiatives

  7. Minimum package for cross-border TB control and care in the WHO European region: a Wolfheze consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Dara, Masoud; de Colombani, Pierpaolo; Petrova-Benedict, Roumyana; Centis, Rosella; Zellweger, Jean-Pierre; Sandgren, Andreas; Heldal, Einar; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Jansen, Niesje; Bahtijarevic, Rankica; Migliori, Giovanni Battista

    2012-11-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) European region estimates that more than 400,000 tuberculosis (TB) cases occur in Europe, a large proportion of them among migrants. A coordinated public health mechanism to guarantee TB prevention, diagnosis, treatment and care across borders is not in place. A consensus paper describing the minimum package of cross-border TB control and care was prepared by a task force following a literature review, and with input from the national TB control programme managers of the WHO European region and the Wolfheze 2011 conference. A literature review focused on the subject of TB in migrants was carried out, selecting documents published during the 11-yr period 2001-2011. Several issues were identified in cross-border TB control and care, varying from the limited access to early TB diagnosis, to the lack of continuity of care and information during migration, and the availability of, and access to, health services in the new country. The recommended minimum package addresses the current shortcomings and intends to improve the situation by covering several areas: political commitment (including the implementation of a legal framework for TB cross-border collaboration), financial mechanisms and adequate health service delivery (prevention, infection control, contact management, diagnosis and treatment, and psychosocial support).

  8. Minimum package for cross-border TB control and care in the WHO European region: a Wolfheze consensus statement

    PubMed Central

    Dara, Masoud; de Colombani, Pierpaolo; Petrova-Benedict, Roumyana; Centis, Rosella; Zellweger, Jean-Pierre; Sandgren, Andreas; Heldal, Einar; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Jansen, Niesje; Bahtijarevic, Rankica; Migliori, Giovanni Battista

    2012-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) European region estimates that more than 400,000 tuberculosis (TB) cases occur in Europe, a large proportion of them among migrants. A coordinated public health mechanism to guarantee TB prevention, diagnosis, treatment and care across borders is not in place. A consensus paper describing the minimum package of cross-border TB control and care was prepared by a task force following a literature review, and with input from the national TB control programme managers of the WHO European region and the Wolfheze 2011 conference. A literature review focused on the subject of TB in migrants was carried out, selecting documents published during the 11-yr period 2001–2011. Several issues were identified in cross-border TB control and care, varying from the limited access to early TB diagnosis, to the lack of continuity of care and information during migration, and the availability of, and access to, health services in the new country. The recommended minimum package addresses the current shortcomings and intends to improve the situation by covering several areas: political commitment (including the implementation of a legal framework for TB cross-border collaboration), financial mechanisms and adequate health service delivery (prevention, infection control, contact management, diagnosis and treatment, and psychosocial support). PMID:22653772

  9. RhoB controls endothelial barrier recovery by inhibiting Rac1 trafficking to the cell border

    PubMed Central

    Marcos-Ramiro, Beatriz; García-Weber, Diego; Barroso, Susana; Feito, Jorge; Ortega, María C.; Cernuda-Morollón, Eva; Reglero-Real, Natalia; Fernández-Martín, Laura; Durán, Maria C.; Alonso, Miguel A.; Correas, Isabel; Cox, Susan; Ridley, Anne J.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial barrier dysfunction underlies chronic inflammatory diseases. In searching for new proteins essential to the human endothelial inflammatory response, we have found that the endosomal GTPase RhoB is up-regulated in response to inflammatory cytokines and expressed in the endothelium of some chronically inflamed tissues. We show that although RhoB and the related RhoA and RhoC play additive and redundant roles in various aspects of endothelial barrier function, RhoB specifically inhibits barrier restoration after acute cell contraction by preventing plasma membrane extension. During barrier restoration, RhoB trafficking is induced between vesicles containing RhoB nanoclusters and plasma membrane protrusions. The Rho GTPase Rac1 controls membrane spreading and stabilizes endothelial barriers. We show that RhoB colocalizes with Rac1 in endosomes and inhibits Rac1 activity and trafficking to the cell border during barrier recovery. Inhibition of endosomal trafficking impairs barrier reformation, whereas induction of Rac1 translocation to the plasma membrane accelerates it. Therefore, RhoB-specific regulation of Rac1 trafficking controls endothelial barrier integrity during inflammation. PMID:27138256

  10. Solving the Border Control Problem: Evidence of Enhanced Face Matching in Individuals with Extraordinary Face Recognition Skills.

    PubMed

    Bobak, Anna Katarzyna; Dowsett, Andrew James; Bate, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Photographic identity documents (IDs) are commonly used despite clear evidence that unfamiliar face matching is a difficult and error-prone task. The current study set out to examine the performance of seven individuals with extraordinary face recognition memory, so called "super recognisers" (SRs), on two face matching tasks resembling border control identity checks. In Experiment 1, the SRs as a group outperformed control participants on the "Glasgow Face Matching Test", and some case-by-case comparisons also reached significance. In Experiment 2, a perceptually difficult face matching task was used: the "Models Face Matching Test". Once again, SRs outperformed controls both on group and mostly in case-by-case analyses. These findings suggest that SRs are considerably better at face matching than typical perceivers, and would make proficient personnel for border control agencies.

  11. Solving the Border Control Problem: Evidence of Enhanced Face Matching in Individuals with Extraordinary Face Recognition Skills

    PubMed Central

    Bobak, Anna Katarzyna; Dowsett, Andrew James; Bate, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Photographic identity documents (IDs) are commonly used despite clear evidence that unfamiliar face matching is a difficult and error-prone task. The current study set out to examine the performance of seven individuals with extraordinary face recognition memory, so called “super recognisers” (SRs), on two face matching tasks resembling border control identity checks. In Experiment 1, the SRs as a group outperformed control participants on the “Glasgow Face Matching Test”, and some case-by-case comparisons also reached significance. In Experiment 2, a perceptually difficult face matching task was used: the “Models Face Matching Test”. Once again, SRs outperformed controls both on group and mostly in case-by-case analyses. These findings suggest that SRs are considerably better at face matching than typical perceivers, and would make proficient personnel for border control agencies. PMID:26829321

  12. Internal Structure Analysis of a Tobacco Control Network on the U.S.-México Border.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Theodore V; Cabriales, José Alonso; Taylor, Thom; Hernandez, Nora; Law, Jon; Kelly, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Tobacco control (TC) networks (in which multiple agencies collaborate) are essential components within comprehensive TC efforts. The aim of this study was to assess the internal coalition outcomes hierarchy model (via the Internal Coalition Effectiveness [ICE] scale) in the present sample. Participants (members of a TC Network on the U.S.-México border; independent Waves 1 [N = 30] and 2 [N = 33; at a 1-year subsequent assessment]) completed a background questionnaire and an adapted version of the ICE scale. Mean values for ICE subscales suggested a strong enthusiasm of Network members and recognition of the importance of a cohesive social vision, employment of efficient practices, a need for improved and maintained knowledge/training, and stable social relationships among members. However, no significant differences were observed between data waves in the ICE subscales, multivariate analysis of variance: λ = .97, F(4, 43) = 0.31, p > .86. Considering a multifaceted assessment may enhance the understanding of the dynamics and strengths of the Network. Finally, including an assessment of the leadership's perspective regarding internal coalition outcome hierarchy model constructs to compare them with members' perspective is warranted.

  13. Quantifying cross-border movements and migrations for guiding the strategic planning of malaria control and elimination.

    PubMed

    Pindolia, Deepa K; Garcia, Andres J; Huang, Zhuojie; Fik, Timothy; Smith, David L; Tatem, Andrew J

    2014-05-03

    Identifying human and malaria parasite movements is important for control planning across all transmission intensities. Imported infections can reintroduce infections into areas previously free of infection, maintain 'hotspots' of transmission and import drug resistant strains, challenging national control programmes at a variety of temporal and spatial scales. Recent analyses based on mobile phone usage data have provided valuable insights into population and likely parasite movements within countries, but these data are restricted to sub-national analyses, leaving important cross-border movements neglected. National census data were used to analyse and model cross-border migration and movement, using East Africa as an example. 'Hotspots' of origin-specific immigrants from neighbouring countries were identified for Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda. Populations of origin-specific migrants were compared to distance from origin country borders and population size at destination, and regression models were developed to quantify and compare differences in migration patterns. Migration data were then combined with existing spatially-referenced malaria data to compare the relative propensity for cross-border malaria movement in the region. The spatial patterns and processes for immigration were different between each origin and destination country pair. Hotspots of immigration, for example, were concentrated close to origin country borders for most immigrants to Tanzania, but for Kenya, a similar pattern was only seen for Tanzanian and Ugandan immigrants. Regression model fits also differed between specific migrant groups, with some migration patterns more dependent on population size at destination and distance travelled than others. With these differences between immigration patterns and processes, and heterogeneous transmission risk in East Africa and the surrounding region, propensities to import malaria infections also likely show substantial variations. This was a first

  14. Effectiveness and impact of the cross-border healthcare model as implemented by non-governmental organizations: case study of the malaria control programs by health poverty action on the China-Myanmar border.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Dong, Jia-Qiang; Li, Jia-Ying; Zhang, Yue; Tian, Yang-Hui; Sun, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Guang-Yun; Li, Qing-Pu; Xu, Xiao-Yu; Cai, Tao

    2016-09-01

    In the Yunnan province of China, 18 counties in six prefectures border Myanmar. Due to its particular combination of geographic features, climate conditions, and cultural landscape, the area provides a suitable environment for the spread of insect-borne diseases such as malaria. In five identified Myanmar Special Regions along the China-Myanmar border, economic development is lagging, people live in extreme poverty, and the healthcare system is fragile. Coupled with political and other reasons, this precludes malaria control work to be effectively carried out in Myanmar, resulting in a heavy burden of the disease. Frequent population movements and favorable conditions for malaria transmission on the border fuel difficulties in controlling and eliminating the spread of the disease in the area. To reduce the prevalence of malaria in the China-Myanmar border area and improve healthcare services for local residents in this particular environment, Health Poverty Action (HPA) has provided malaria aid in the area since the beginning of 2006, as a sub-recipient of the China Global Fund Malaria Programs. In this case study, we examined HPA's activities as part of its malaria control programs in the area, analyzed and summarized the effectiveness and impact of the cross-border healthcare model as implemented by non-governmental organizations, and put forward suggestions for cross-border health aid models and for the prevention of malaria transmission in the Greater Mekong Subregion. HPA had carried out a great quantity of successful malaria control activities in border areas between China and Myanmar, strengthened the partnership and established the collaboration, coordination and cooperation channels among stakeholders. HPA has laid good groundwork and developed its valuable model that could be highlighted and referenced.

  15. Crop border and mineral oil sprays used in combination as physical control methods of the aphid-transmitted potato virus Y in potato.

    PubMed

    Boiteau, Gilles; Singh, Mathuresh; Lavoie, Jacques

    2009-03-01

    The objectives of this work were to determine if the control of potato virus Y (PVY, genus Potyvirus, family Potyviridae) in seed potato could be improved by combining border crops and mineral oil sprays, and if the border crop acts as a barrier or a virus sink. Field tests over 3 years confirmed that mineral oils alone are an effective barrier to PVY, and showed that borders alone act as a PVY sink. Combining the familiar mineral oil and the more recent crop border methods was almost twice as effective in reducing PVY incidence as either one used alone. The combination provided consistently high PVY control compared with the variable and often lower level of control by either method alone. The contribution of the oil to PVY reduction was similar whether it was applied to the border, the center seed plot, or both. Oil application to the border alone should not affect efficacy and would help keep control costs down. Combining border and oil provided the best reduction in PVY incidence 3 years out of 3, providing producers with a tool to reduce year-to-year variation in the effectiveness of crop borders or oil sprays used separately. John Wiley and Sons, Ltd

  16. On the efficacy of current biosecurity measures at EU borders to prevent the transfer of zoonotic and livestock diseases by travellers.

    PubMed

    Noordhuizen, Jos; Surborg, Helmut; Smulders, Frans J M

    2013-01-01

    Although many animal diseases have been eradicated from the European Union (EU), the animal production sectors in the EU are still under a major threat of disease pathogens introduced by travellers into a country through illegal importation of wildlife or production animals, and/or food products of animal origin. These may carry (exotic) pathogens or toxic metabolites that are hazardous for public health and have a zoonotic potential. According to experts, newly emerging diseases will most probably be zoonotic in nature. The control systems and inspection measures at the borders are, in general, sufficient to control the import of disease pathogens through commercial consignments, as regularly reported by the Food and Veterinary Office (FVO). The Schengen Agreement in the EU has pushed such inspections to the outer borders of the EU in the context of freedom of movement of 'goods' - including live animals and foods of animal origin - people and services within the EU (Treaty of Rome). However, it is questionable whether this policy and the inspection measures taken are effective in reducing public and animal health risks in the EU to an acceptable level. Risk assessment studies point to the potential dangers of illegal imports by travellers. This review article discusses the current status quo and more, in particular, the weaknesses of the current inspection procedures related to biosecurity and suggestions for improvement are made.

  17. Why Border Enforcement Backfired

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Douglas S.; Durand, Jorge; Pren, Karen A.

    2016-01-01

    In this article we undertake a systematic analysis of why border enforcement backfired as a strategy of immigration control in the United States. We argue theoretically that border enforcement emerged as a policy response to a moral panic about the perceived threat of Latino immigration to the United States propounded by self-interested bureaucrats, politicians, and pundits who sought to mobilize political and material resources for their own benefit. The end result was a self-perpetuating cycle of rising enforcement and increased apprehensions that resulted in the militarization of the border in a way that was disconnected from the actual size of the undocumented flow. Using an instrumental variable approach, we show how border militarization affected the behavior of unauthorized migrants and border outcomes to transform undocumented Mexican migration from a circular flow of male workers going to three states into an eleven-million person population of settled families living in 50 states. PMID:27721512

  18. Tijuana alcohol control policies: a response to cross-border high-risk drinking by young Americans.

    PubMed

    Romano, Eduardo; Cano, Saúl; Lauer, Elizabeth; Jiménez, Avelino; Voas, Robert B; Lange, James E

    2004-06-01

    Several thousand young Americans visit the bars in Tijuana, Mexico, each weekend night, raising concerns on both sides of the border. Measures implemented in San Diego, California, and Tijuana have successfully reduced the number of American visitors to Mexican bars. Although San Diego policies have been well-documented, this is the first article on investigation of measures enacted south of the border. Information on Tijuana alcohol policies was obtained from a survey of 29-36 bars from 1997 to 1999. The Tijuana police provided data on Americans arrested in Tijuana from 1998 to 1999. Our study found alcohol regulations are poorly enforced in Tijuana, suggesting that regulatory agencies are captured by bar owners. However, such a capture may be weakening. The importance of identifying and supporting Mexican interest groups, as opposed to the bar owners, as a mechanism to impede the capture of Tijuana's regulatory agencies is discussed. The number of Americans involved in alcohol-related crimes in Tijuana sharply decreased over time. However, such a success is largely related to the success of the San Diego efforts in reducing the number of American visitors to Tijuana. Also, by demonstrating the racial/ethnic heterogeneity of American visitors to Tijuana bars, our study points out the need for prevention policies designed north of the border to take such heterogeneity into account.

  19. Tectonically controlled facies changes in the Jurassic of the northern border of the central High Atlas east of midelt (Morocco)

    SciTech Connect

    Hauptmann, M.K.; Heinetz, W.

    1988-08-01

    Jurassic carbonate sedimentation and facies changes at the northern border of the Central High Atlas mountain range east of Midelt are mainly controlled by synsedimentary tectonics which took place during the development of the Central High Atlas rift. There is no evidence of the influence of global eustatic sea level changes. During early Liassic time the carbonate facies documents an extended platform with numerous isolated mud mounds surrounded by biodetritic limestone fans. From middle Liassic to early Dogger (Aalenian) time, different kinds of mass-flow deposits coincide with the maximum extension of the Central High Atlas trough. Large-scale slide blocks, conglomerates, mud-flow and debris-flow sediments, etc, show the existence of a platform-basin border formed by a preexisting fault system acting as downthrusts during Jurassic time. A sudden diminution of the subsidence at the Aalenian-Bajocian border is indicated by nearshore carbonates (tidal flats, tidal channels). Already at middle Bajocian time red beds were deposited. From the Oligocene onward during a compressive phase most likely due to the Rif orogenesis, these faults were reactivated. As a result, the east-northeast-striking faults which oriented at right angles toward the direction of compression were transformed to inverse faults and the north-northeast-striking faults became sinistral strike-slip faults. At the fault junction, areas of higher compression were created, inducing a cleavage of the Mesozoic sediments. Whereas upfolds predominantly occur over preexisting fault zones, wide flat downfolds developed above the basement blocks.

  20. Metrics for border management systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Duggan, Ruth Ann

    2009-07-01

    There are as many unique and disparate manifestations of border systems as there are borders to protect. Border Security is a highly complex system analysis problem with global, regional, national, sector, and border element dimensions for land, water, and air domains. The complexity increases with the multiple, and sometimes conflicting, missions for regulating the flow of people and goods across borders, while securing them for national security. These systems include frontier border surveillance, immigration management and customs functions that must operate in a variety of weather, terrain, operational conditions, cultural constraints, and geopolitical contexts. As part of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development Project 08-684 (Year 1), the team developed a reference framework to decompose this complex system into international/regional, national, and border elements levels covering customs, immigration, and border policing functions. This generalized architecture is relevant to both domestic and international borders. As part of year two of this project (09-1204), the team determined relevant relative measures to better understand border management performance. This paper describes those relative metrics and how they can be used to improve border management systems.

  1. Measurement control workshop instructional materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Philip; Harvel, Charles; Clark, John

    2011-12-01

    An essential element in an effective nuclear materials control and accountability (MC&A) program is the measurement of the nuclear material as it is received, moved, processed and shipped. Quality measurement systems and methodologies determine the accuracy of the accountability values. Implementation of a measurement control program is essential to ensure that the measurement systems and methodologies perform as expected. A measurement control program also allows for a determination of the level of confidence in the ac counting values.

  2. Measurement control workshop instructional materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Philip; Harvel, Charles; Clark, John

    2012-09-01

    An essential element in an effective nuclear materials control and accountability (MC&A) program is the measurement of the nuclear material as it is received, moved, processed and shipped. Quality measurement systems and methodologies determine the accuracy of the accountability values. Implementation of a measurement control program is essential to ensure that the measurement systems and methodologies perform as expected. A measurement control program also allows for a determination of the level of confidence in the accounting values.

  3. Advance Control Measures & Programs

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    As areas develop their path forward or action plan, they should consider a variety of voluntary and mandatory measures and programs. The resources on this page can help, and participants are also encouraged to talk with their EPA Advance contact

  4. Pollution control enhanced spruce growth in the "Black Triangle" near the Czech-Polish border.

    PubMed

    Kolář, Tomáš; Čermák, Petr; Oulehle, Filip; Trnka, Miroslav; Štěpánek, Petr; Cudlín, Pavel; Hruška, Jakub; Büntgen, Ulf; Rybníček, Michal

    2015-12-15

    Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) stands in certain areas of Central Europe have experienced substantial dieback since the 1970s. Understanding the reasons for this decline and reexamining the response of forests to acid deposition reduction remains challenging because of a lack of long and well-replicated tree-ring width chronologies. Here, spruce from a subalpine area heavily affected by acid deposition (from both sulfur and nitrogen compounds) is evaluated. Tree-ring width measurements from 98 trees between 1000 and 1350m above sea level (a.s.l.) reflected significant May-July temperature signals. Since the 1970s, acid deposition has reduced the growth-climate relationship. Efficient pollution control together with a warmer but not drier climate most likely caused the increased growth of spruce stands in this region, the so-called "Black Triangle," in the 1990s.

  5. Walking on the Borders: A Measure of Epistemic Cognition in History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maggioni, Liliana; VanSledright, Bruce; Alexander, Patricia A.

    2009-01-01

    The authors build on literature related to the development of epistemic cognition, research on historical thinking, and studies of individuals' epistemic beliefs. They designed this study to explore, develop, and test a measure of epistemic cognition in history. They administered the Beliefs about Learning and Teaching History Questionnaire to…

  6. The Hox gene Dfd controls organogenesis by shaping territorial border through regulation of basal DE-Cadherin distribution.

    PubMed

    Anais Tiberghien, Marie; Lebreton, Gaelle; Cribbs, David; Benassayag, Corinne; Suzanne, Magali

    2015-09-15

    Hox genes are highly conserved selector genes controlling tissue identity and organogenesis. Recent work indicates that Hox genes also controls cell segregation and segmental boundary in various species, however the underlying cellular mechanisms involved in this function are poorly understood. In Drosophila melanogaster, the Hox gene Deformed (Dfd) is required for specification and organogenesis of the adult Maxillary (Mx) palp. Here, we demonstrate that differential Dfd expression control Mx morphogenesis through the formation of a physical boundary separating the Mx field and the Peripodial Epithelium (PE). We show that this boundary relies on DE-cadherin (DE-cad) basal accumulation in Mx cells controlled by differential Dfd expression. Indeed, Dfd controls boundary formation through cell autonomous basal redistribution of DE-cad which leads to subsequent fold at the Dfd expression border. Finally, the loss of Mx DE-cad basal accumulation and hence of Mx-PE folding is sufficient to prevent Mx organogenesis thus revealing the crucial role of boundaries in organ differentiation. Altogether, these results reveal that Hox coordination of tissue morphogenesis relies on boundary fold formation through the modulation of DE-cad positioning.

  7. Health Impact Assessment of Asian Dust/Cross-border Air Pollutant and Necessary Preventive Measure.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Kazunari

    2017-01-01

    The health effects of Asian dust (mineral dust) originating from dry lands such as the Gobi Desert and Taklamakan Desert have recently been a concern. In addition to Asian dust, transboundary airborne microparticles that reach Japan include various types of aerosol, such as artificial air pollutants and smoke from combustion. They originate from densely populated areas and are transported along the same route as Asian dust. We analyzed environmental factors and subjective symptoms involving the respiratory organ, nose, eyes, and skin using a conventional equation for estimation, and found that symptoms with a significant risk of worsening varied according to the type of pollutants reaching Japan. We also analyzed the synergistic effects of Asian dust and pollens on nasal symptoms using a two-pollutant model. The odds ratio for symptoms at the time of arrival of a high concentration of Asian dust was 1.37 (95% confidence interval: 1.19-1.58), but the odds ratio adjusted for pollens was 1.18 (95% confidence interval: 1.04-1.34). Although the influence on nasal symptoms overlapped somewhat between Asian dust and pollens, that of Asian dust remained significant. Regarding preventive measures against symptoms, we examined the rate of particle leakage into masks. We found that it is important to wear a mask that fits an individual's facial features and has no gap between the face and the mask. In addition, we report our attempt to construct models for predicting aerosol arrival and forecasting health to establish preventive measures against aerosols.

  8. Investigation and control of a Plasmodium falciparum malaria outbreak in Shan Special Region II of Myanmar along the China-Myanmar Border from June to December 2014.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Xu, Jian-Wei; Yang, Heng-Lin; Li, Mei; Sun, Cheng-De; Yin, Yi-Jie; Zheng, Zhi-Liang; Zhang, Guang-Yun; Yu, Ai-Shui; Yang, Yong-Hui; Li, Chun-Hui; Ai, Shui

    2016-04-25

    From 2007 to 2013, intensive control measures reduced malaria burden by 90 % along the China-Myanmar border. However, despite these measures a P. falciparum malaria outbreak was reported in the Shan Special Region II of Myanmar in June of 2014. Epidemiological, parasitological and entomological investigations were performed. Dihydroartemisinin piperaquine (DAPQ) was immediately administered to treat parasite positive individuals. Long lasting insecticidal nets (LLIN), indoor residual spraying (IRS) with insecticides and behavior change communication (BCC) were also provided for outbreak control. An embedded efficacy study was conducted evaluating DP. Molecular genotyping via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed on the Kelch gene on chromosome 13. All infections were identified as Plasmodium falciparum by RDT and microscopy. Two fatalities resulted from the outbreak. The attack rate was 72.8 % (67/92) and the incidence density rate was 14.2 per 100 person-weeks. The positive rate of rapid diagnostic test (RDT) was 72.2 % (65/90) and microscopically-determine parasite rate 42.2 % (38/90). Adjusted odds ratio (OR) of multivariate logistic regression analysis for aged <15 years, 15-45 years, inappropriate treatment from a private healer and lack of bed nets were 13.51 (95 % confidence interval, 2.21-105.89), 7.75 (1.48-44.97), 3.78 (1.30-46.18) and 3.21(1.21-15.19) respectively. In the six surrounding communities of the outbreak site, positive RDT rate was 1.2 % (4/328) and microscopically-determine parasite rate 0.6 % (2/328). Two light traps collected a total of 110 anopheline mosquitoes including local vectors, An. minimus, An. sinensis and An. maculates. After intensive control, the detection of malaria attacks, parasites and antigen were reduced to zero between July 1 and December 1, 2014. The cure rate of P. falciparum patients at day 42 was 94.3 % (95 % CI, 80.8-99.3 %). The PCR did not detect K13-propeller mutations. Imported P. falciparum caused the

  9. Temperature field and heat flow of the Danish-German border region - borehole measurements and numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Sven; Balling, Niels

    2016-04-01

    We present a regional 3D numerical crustal temperature model and analyze the present-day conductive thermal field of the Danish-German border region located in the North German Basin. A comprehensive analysis of borehole and well-log data on a regional scale is conducted to derive both the model parameterization with a spatial distribution of rock thermal conductivity and new heat-flow values. The latter one are used to setup the numerical lower boundary condition. Measured heat flow and borehole temperature observations (59 values from 24 wells) are used to constrain the modelling results (calibration and validation). The prediction uncertainties between observed and modelled temperatures at deep borehole sites are small (rms = 3.5°C). For eight deep boreholes, new values of terrestrial surface heat flow are derived, ranging between 72 and 84 mW/m² (mean of 80 ± 5 mW/m²). Those values are up to 20 mW/m² higher than low values reported in some previous studies for this region. Heat flow from the mantle is estimated to be between 33 and 40 mW/m² (q1-q3; mean of 37 ± 7 mW/m²). Pronounced lateral temperature variations are caused mainly by complex geological structures, including a large amount of salt structures and marked lateral variations in the thickness of basin sediments. The associated variations in rock thermal conductivity generate significant variations in model heat flow and large variations in temperature gradients. Major geothermal sandstone reservoirs (e.g. Rhaetian and Middle Buntsandstein) are mainly found with temperatures within the range of 40-80°C, which is suitable for low enthalpy heating purposes in most of the area. Higher temperatures of up to 120-160°C, of interest for the production of electricity, are observed only in the very south-eastern part of the study area (Glückstadt-Graben area). In combination with the structural geological model and information on reservoir hydraulic properties, the presented temperature model will

  10. Effectiveness of the Pasos Adelante chronic disease prevention and control program in a US-Mexico border community, 2005-2008.

    PubMed

    Staten, Lisa K; Cutshaw, Christina A; Davidson, Christopher; Reinschmidt, Kerstin; Stewart, Rosie; Roe, Denise J

    2012-01-01

    Pasos Adelante is a lifestyle intervention program facilitated by community health workers (promotores) targeting chronic disease prevention and control in Mexican Americans. Initial studies of Pasos Adelante indicated significant improvements in self-reported nutrition and physical activity. This study examined whether Pasos Adelante participants living in a US border community showed improvements in selected physiological measures after participating in the program and whether changes were maintained at 3-month follow-up. The program took place in 12-week sessions from January 2005 to May 2008 and included walking groups and education targeting nutrition and physical activity. Questionnaires, anthropometric measures, and laboratory tests were conducted at baseline (n = 305), conclusion of program (n = 254), and 3-month follow-up (n = 221). Participants demonstrated decreases in body mass index (P = .04), waist and hip circumference (P < .001), diastolic and systolic blood pressure (P < .001), and total cholesterol (P = .008) from baseline to program conclusion. No values worsened significantly between program conclusion and follow-up, except systolic blood pressure. Glucose levels improved between conclusion and follow-up (P = .01). These results support the initial findings of improvements in participants' self-reported physical activity and nutrition patterns through changes in objective measures. This evidence-based program demonstrates the potential for a promotores-facilitated chronic disease prevention and control program to improve physical health and targets both primary and secondary prevention in Hispanic communities and organizations.

  11. Multi-temporal InSAR measurement of interseimic motion on the eastern Tibet border

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doin, M. P.; Lasserre, C.; He, P.; de Sigoyer, J.

    2014-12-01

    We use here SAR interferometry using archived Envisat data to map the interseismic deformation of eastern Tibet. The area under study starts just South of the Haiyuan fault, crosses the eastern termination of the Kunlun fault and the bend on the XianShuiHe fault to the South. It includes the Longriba fault system, an active structure located 150 km west of the Longmen Shan front (Xu et al., 2008, Ren et al., 2013). GPS data suggest that it may accommodate a large part of the present-day relative movement (6-8 mm/yr) between the Aba block and the south China block (Thatcher, 2007, Shen et al 2005). The Longriba and the Longmen Shan faults might be linked at depth by a decollement zone or by ductile shear in the crust (Shu et al., 2008). We process three adjacent Envisat 1000 km long swaths crossing this mountainous and vegetated terrain using a small baseline strategy. The interferograms show numerous phase perturbations that mask the interseismic motion due to : (1) coherence loss, (2) stratified atmospheric delays, (3) DEM error contribution, (4) the 2008 Sichuan earthquake. We will show how we tackle these limitations and display the effect of successive corrections. Focus will first be brought to the corrections applied before filtering and unwrapping, that increase phase spatial continuity. We estimate empirically stratified atmospheric delay polynomial relationship, depending on azimuth and elevation, on wrapped interferograms. We then estimate the local DEM error for each pixel. Multi-looking and filtering are based on various measures of pixel reliability in order to increase the signal to noise ratio of filtered interferograms. Finally, unwrapping is obtained by a region growing algorithm, from the most reliable areas to the least, avoiding to cross layover areas. Time series of phase delay maps in the Longriba area are dominated by a side lobe of the May 2008 Sichuan earthquake. After its extraction and correction, principal component analysis clearly

  12. Iraq Border

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In an area north of the city of Al-Basrah, Iraq, which borders Iran, a former wetland has been drained and walled off. Now littered with minefields and gun emplacments, it is a staging area for military exercises. This image was acquired by Landsat 7's Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) sensor on January 24, 2001. This is a false-color composite image made using near-infrared, red, and green wavelengths. The image has also been sharpened using the sensor's panchromatic band. Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch

  13. Quantification of biventricular myocardial function using cardiac magnetic resonance feature tracking, endocardial border delineation and echocardiographic speckle tracking in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Kempny, Aleksander; Fernández-Jiménez, Rodrigo; Orwat, Stefan; Schuler, Pia; Bunck, Alexander C; Maintz, David; Baumgartner, Helmut; Diller, Gerhard-Paul

    2012-05-31

    Parameters of myocardial deformation have been suggested to be superior to conventional measures of ventricular function in patients with tetralogy of Fallot (ToF), but have required non-routine, tagged cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) techniques. We assessed biventricular myocardial function using CMR cine-based feature tracking (FT) and compared it to speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) and to simple endocardial border delineation (EBD). In addition, the relation between parameters of myocardial deformation and clinical parameters was assessed. Overall, 28 consecutive adult patients with repaired ToF (age 40.4 ± 13.3 years) underwent standard steady-state-free precession sequence CMR, echocardiography, and cardiopulmonary exercise testing. In addition, 25 healthy subjects served as controls. Myocardial deformation was assessed by CMR based FT (TomTec Diogenes software), CMR based EBD (using custom written software) and STE (TomTec Cardiac Performance Analysis software). Feature tracking was feasible in all subjects. A close agreement was found between measures of global left (LV) and right ventricular (RV) global strain. Interobserver agreement for FT and STE was similar for longitudinal LV global strain, but FT showed better inter-observer reproducibility than STE for circumferential or radial LV and longitudinal RV global strain. Reproducibility of regional strain on FT was, however, poor. The relative systolic length change of the endocardial border measured by EBD yielded similar results to FT global strain. Clinically, biventricular longitudinal strain on FT was reduced compared to controls (P < 0.0001) and was related to the number of previous cardiac operations. In addition, FT derived RV strain was related to exercise capacity and VE/VCO2-slope. Although neither the inter-study reproducibility nor accuracy of FT software were investigated, and its inter-observer reproducibility for regional strain calculation was poor, its

  14. Quantification of biventricular myocardial function using cardiac magnetic resonance feature tracking, endocardial border delineation and echocardiographic speckle tracking in patients with repaired tetralogy of fallot and healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Parameters of myocardial deformation have been suggested to be superior to conventional measures of ventricular function in patients with tetralogy of Fallot (ToF), but have required non-routine, tagged cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) techniques. We assessed biventricular myocardial function using CMR cine-based feature tracking (FT) and compared it to speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) and to simple endocardial border delineation (EBD). In addition, the relation between parameters of myocardial deformation and clinical parameters was assessed. Methods Overall, 28 consecutive adult patients with repaired ToF (age 40.4 ± 13.3 years) underwent standard steady-state-free precession sequence CMR, echocardiography, and cardiopulmonary exercise testing. In addition, 25 healthy subjects served as controls. Myocardial deformation was assessed by CMR based FT (TomTec Diogenes software), CMR based EBD (using custom written software) and STE (TomTec Cardiac Performance Analysis software). Results Feature tracking was feasible in all subjects. A close agreement was found between measures of global left (LV) and right ventricular (RV) global strain. Interobserver agreement for FT and STE was similar for longitudinal LV global strain, but FT showed better inter-observer reproducibility than STE for circumferential or radial LV and longitudinal RV global strain. Reproducibility of regional strain on FT was, however, poor. The relative systolic length change of the endocardial border measured by EBD yielded similar results to FT global strain. Clinically, biventricular longitudinal strain on FT was reduced compared to controls (P < 0.0001) and was related to the number of previous cardiac operations. In addition, FT derived RV strain was related to exercise capacity and VE/VCO2-slope. Conclusions Although neither the inter-study reproducibility nor accuracy of FT software were investigated, and its inter-observer reproducibility for regional

  15. Cross-border collaboration for neglected tropical disease efforts-Lessons learned from onchocerciasis control and elimination in the Mano River Union (West Africa).

    PubMed

    Gustavsen, Kenneth; Sodahlon, Yao; Bush, Simon

    2016-08-22

    Diseases don't respect borders, so efforts to control and eliminate diseases must also be flexible and adaptable enough to effectively reach the populations that live in the areas around national frontiers. Onchocerciasis, commonly known as river blindness is a tropical disease that has historically affected millions of people in 35 countries in Africa and Latin America. In Africa, programs and partnerships to address river blindness through mass drug administration have been active for more than 25 years. While in many cases the disease is found in isolated foci that fall entirely within national boundaries, the geographic scope of many affected areas crosses country borders. National river blindness programs are the responsibility of each nation's Ministry of Health, so in cross-border situations there is a need for effective country-country collaboration. Cross-border collaboration for onchocerciasis control efforts in the countries of the Mano River Basin illustrates the positive impact of a creative model, and offers lessons for expanded application for onchocerciasis elimination as well as other neglected tropical disease (NTD) control and elimination programs.

  16. Transmission Risk from Imported Plasmodium vivax Malaria in the China-Myanmar Border Region.

    PubMed

    Wang, Duoquan; Li, Shengguo; Cheng, Zhibin; Xiao, Ning; Cotter, Chris; Hwang, Jimee; Li, Xishang; Yin, Shouqin; Wang, Jiazhi; Bai, Liang; Zheng, Zhi; Wang, Sibao

    2015-10-01

    Malaria importation and local vector susceptibility to imported Plasmodium vivax infection are a continuing risk along the China-Myanmar border. Malaria transmission has been prevented in 3 border villages in Tengchong County, Yunnan Province, China, by use of active fever surveillance, integrated vector control measures, and intensified surveillance and response.

  17. Network structure and attitudes toward collaboration in a community partnership for diabetes control on the US-Mexican border.

    PubMed

    Provan, Keith G; Harvey, Jennel; de Zapien, Jill Guernsey

    2005-01-01

    This study seeks to provide an examination of a health policy network operating in a single, small community along the US-Mexican border. The purpose of the paper is to discuss why and how this network evolved, and then to present findings on how the network was structured. Analysis will focus especially on agency involvement, or "embeddedness" in the network, and its relationship to attitudes held by network members regarding trust, reputation, and perceived benefit. Data were collected from 15 public and nonprofit agencies trying to work collaboratively to influence local policy and services regarding the prevention of obesity-related chronic disease, especially diabetes. Embeddedness was measured in three different ways and both confirmed and unconfirmed networks were assessed. Network analysis methods were utilized as well as nonparametric correlation statistics. The network was found to be densely connected through unconfirmed linkages, but much less so when these links were confirmed. Strongest findings were found for shared information. Measures of agency embeddedness in the network were strong predictors of agency reputation, but findings for trust and perceived benefit were generally weak. From a practice perspective, the study points to the problems in building and sustaining community-based chronic disease health networks, especially in a small community with substantial health needs. The research also contributes to theory on embeddedness and to methodology for collecting and analyzing data on community health networks.

  18. Latinos and political advocacy for cancer control in a United States-Mexico border community.

    PubMed

    Murray, Kate E; Barbour, Lynda; Morlett, Alejandra; Garcini, Luz

    2014-01-01

    Health policy interventions provide powerful tools for addressing health disparities. The Latino community is one of the fastest growing communities in the United States yet is largely underrepresented in government and advocacy efforts. This study includes 42 Latino adults (M age = 45 years) who participated in focus group discussions and completed a brief questionnaire assessing their experiences with political health advocacy. Qualitative analyses revealed participants considered cancer a concern for the Latino community, but there was a lack of familiarity with political advocacy and its role in cancer control. Participants identified structural, practical, cultural, and contextual barriers to engaging in political health advocacy. This article presents a summary of the findings that suggest alternative ways to engage Latinos in cancer control advocacy.

  19. Cost-effectiveness of Community Health Workers in controlling diabetes epidemic on the U.S.-Mexico border.

    PubMed

    Ryabov, I

    2014-07-01

    This study attempted to evaluate clinical outcomes and long-term cost-effectiveness of an intervention involving Community Health Workers (CHW's, a.k.a. promotoras de salud in Spanish) in assisting Mexican-American diabetes type-2 patients with controlling their condition. The intervention has been carried out in Hidalgo County, TX which is situated on the U.S.-Mexico border. The design of the study is experimental. The sample (n = 30) was recruited from Mexican-American diabetes patients aged 30 or above. The intervention group received monthly visits from CHW's, while the control group did not. Incremental lifetime health outcomes and related expenditures were calculated using the CDC Diabetes Cost-Effectiveness Model (DCEM) which is a probabilistic computer simulation model of disease progression and cost-effectiveness for type 2 diabetes patients. The DCEM allows projection of lifetime healthcare costs and Quality-Adjusted Life-Years (QALYs). The intervention group showed a significant improvement in glycemic control and cholesterol management after two years of intervention. The intervention is expected to reduce long-term complications, resulting in an increase in residual life-years and quality-adjusted life-years. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio has been estimated to be $13,810, which is below the level of comparable studies. Intervention has a substantial impact on the medical costs of type 2 diabetes treatment. The estimates presented in this model may be used to analyse the cost-effectiveness of interventions involving CHW's for type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2014 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A case control study investigating factors associated with high infant death in Saiha district of Mizoram, India bordering Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Deb, Alok K; Dutta, Shanta; Hnichho, Chhaihlo; Vanlalpeki, Mary; Phosa, Hli Thapi; Rakhu, Khaila; Fanai, Samuel Lalfakawma; Chakrabarti, Manoj; Panda, Samiran

    2017-01-17

    Infant mortality has dropped considerably in India over the last 5 years. A sharp contrast to this decline in national average of infant mortality is the rate recorded during 2014-2015 from the southernmost district of Saiha, Mizoram having a common international border with Myanmar. As this district specific rate (113 per 1000 live births) is 3 times higher compared to the national and state average, the present investigation was carried out to identify associated factors. We examined secondary data made available by the national health mission, consulted with local community members and generated primary data through interviews. A case-control study design was followed. Mothers, who delivered a child during 2013-2015 and subsequently lost them due to infant death, formed the case group and controls were selected from same neighborhood as with case-mothers. The mother and child tracking system maintained by the district specific national health mission office was used for recruiting cases and controls. A total of 195 mothers were interviewed; 66 of them belonged to 'cases' and 129 were 'controls'. The mean age of the respondents was 27 years (median 27; SD ± 5; minimum 17 & maximum 44). In uni-variate analyses 'child delivery at home', 'low birth weight', 'non-attendance of school by mothers', 'completed standard of school education by mothers', 'both parents working', 'mothers receiving blood transfusion during last pregnancy', and 'fourth or more birth order during last pregnancy' were associated with infant deaths. Intriguingly, the number of daily kuhva (raw areca nut) intake during last pregnancy was significantly higher among case-mothers compared to controls. In conditional logistic regression, 'low birth weight' (adjusted OR (AOR) 14.7; 95% CI 2.1-101.8; p = 0.006), and 'consumption of 4 or more kuhva per day' (AOR 8; 95% CI 1.9-34.3; p = 0.005) were independently associated with infant-death-experiences. The present investigation merits due

  1. Measurements of submicron aerosols at the California-Mexico border during the Cal-Mex 2010 field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Misti E.; Zhang, Renyi; Zheng, Jun; Tan, Haobo; Wang, Yuan; Molina, Luisa T.; Takahama, S.; Russell, L. M.; Li, Guohui

    2014-05-01

    We present measurements of submicron aerosols in Tijuana, Mexico during the Cal-Mex 2010 field campaign. A suite of aerosol instrumentations were deployed, including a hygroscopic-volatility tandem differential mobility analyzer (HV-TDMA), aerosol particle mass analyzer (APM), condensation particle counter (CPC), cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS), and nephelometer to measure the aerosol size distributions, effective density, hygroscopic growth factors (HGF), volatility growth factors (VGF), and optical properties. The average mass concentration of PM0.6 is 10.39 ± 7.61 μg m-3, and the derived average black carbon (BC) mass concentration is 2.87 ± 2.65 μg m-3. There is little new particle formation or particle growth during the day, and the mass loading is dominated by organic aerosols and BC, which on average are 37% and 27% of PM1.0, respectively. For four particle sizes of 46, 81, 151, and 240 nm, the measured particle effective density, HGFs, and VGFs exhibit distinct diurnal trends and size-dependence. For smaller particles (46 and 81 nm), the effective density distribution is unimodal during the day and night, signifying an internally mixed aerosol composition. In contrast, larger particles (151 and 240 nm) exhibit a bi-modal effective density distribution during the daytime, indicating an external mixture of fresh BC and organic aerosols, but a unimodal distribution during the night, corresponding to an internal mixture of BC and organic aerosols. The smaller particles show a noticeable diurnal trend in the effective density distribution, with the highest effective density (1.70 g cm-3) occurring shortly after midnight and the lowest value (0.90 g cm-3) occurring during the afternoon, corresponding most likely to primary organic aerosols and BC, respectively. Both HGFs and VGFs measured are strongly size-dependent. HGFs increase with increasing particle size, indicating that the largest particles are more hygroscopic. VGFs decrease with increasing

  2. Stress controlled magma-earthquake interaction during unrest at Chiles-Cerro Negro Volcanoes (Ecuador-Colombian border)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebmeier, S. K.; Elliott, J. R.; Nocquet, J. M.; Biggs, J.; Mothes, P. A.; Lundgren, P.; Samsonov, S. V.; Jarrin, P.; Yepez, M.; Aguaiza, S.

    2015-12-01

    The movement of fluids beneath a volcano can cause deformation, and therefore changes to the subsurface stress field that manifest in swarms of low magnitude (measurements of deformation during the height of an episode of unrest in October 2014 at Chiles-Cerro Negro volcanoes on the Ecuador-Colombian border. These volcanoes were previously considered to be historically inactive, but between 2013 and early 2015 there were three episodes of unrest characterised by VT swarms of increasing energy and duration. GPS measurements at two stations near Volcán Chiles show inflation over a time period of approximately twenty days prior to the 20th October, consistent with the intrusion of magma at half space depths >13 km. This inflation took place during a swarm of VT seismicity with thousands of low magnitude events per day and culminated in a M 5.6 earthquake on the 20th October, when inflation abruptly ceased. We measure coseismic displacements from the M 5.6 earthquake with data from three independent InSAR platforms and find that they are consistent with shallow slip of 1.2 m on an oblique reverse fault. This fault plane would have experienced positive Coulomb stress changes from some of the range of potential sources consistent with the inflation. Magmatic intrusion could therefore have contributed to the loading on the fault directly through stress changes caused by pressurisation, and indirectly through the decrease in effective friction coefficient due to elevated pore fluid pressure. The cessation of inflation immediately after the moderate earthquake suggests a link between the two events. We expect slip on the fault plane identified from the InSAR data to have resulted in compression in the shallow crust

  3. BOOK REVIEW Quantum Measurement and Control Quantum Measurement and Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, Claus

    2010-12-01

    In the last two decades there has been an enormous progress in the experimental investigation of single quantum systems. This progress covers fields such as quantum optics, quantum computation, quantum cryptography, and quantum metrology, which are sometimes summarized as `quantum technologies'. A key issue there is entanglement, which can be considered as the characteristic feature of quantum theory. As disparate as these various fields maybe, they all have to deal with a quantum mechanical treatment of the measurement process and, in particular, the control process. Quantum control is, according to the authors, `control for which the design requires knowledge of quantum mechanics'. Quantum control situations in which measurements occur at important steps are called feedback (or feedforward) control of quantum systems and play a central role here. This book presents a comprehensive and accessible treatment of the theoretical tools that are needed to cope with these situations. It also provides the reader with the necessary background information about the experimental developments. The authors are both experts in this field to which they have made significant contributions. After an introduction to quantum measurement theory and a chapter on quantum parameter estimation, the central topic of open quantum systems is treated at some length. This chapter includes a derivation of master equations, the discussion of the Lindblad form, and decoherence - the irreversible emergence of classical properties through interaction with the environment. A separate chapter is devoted to the description of open systems by the method of quantum trajectories. Two chapters then deal with the central topic of quantum feedback control, while the last chapter gives a concise introduction to one of the central applications - quantum information. All sections contain a bunch of exercises which serve as a useful tool in learning the material. Especially helpful are also various separate

  4. The Most Appropriate National Level Organization Structure and Command and Control System for U.S. Customs and Border Protection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-08

    Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 2011), ix. 37DuBrin, 256. 38Anthony Scott Good, “U.S. Border Patrol OCONUS: Possible Contributions to...manager.”49 Bowditch and Buono call this concept spatial differentiation; where work is divided according to geographical location.50 This differs from the...50James L. Bowditch , and Anthony F. Buono, A Primer on Organizational Behavior, 5th ed. (Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley and Sons Inc

  5. Quantitative measurements of inventory control.

    PubMed

    Noel, M W

    1984-11-01

    The use of quantitative measurements for improving inventory management efficiency in hospital pharmacy is reviewed. Proper management of the pharmacy inventory affects the financial operation of the entire hospital. Problems associated with maintaining inadequate or excessive inventory investment are discussed, and the use of inventory valuation and turnover rate for assessing inventory control efficiency is described. Frequency of order placement has an important effect on inventory turnover, carrying costs, and ordering costs. Use of the ABC system of inventory classification for identifying products constituting the majority of inventory dollar investment is outlined, and the economic order value concept is explained. With increasing regulations aimed at controlling hospital costs, pharmacy managers must seek every possible means to improve efficiency. Reducing the amount of money obligated to inventory can substantially improve the financial position of the hospital without requiring a reduction in personnel or quality of service.

  6. Transportation control measure information documents

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The document, sponsored by the United States Environmental Protection Agency, is intended to provide information on Transportation Control Measures (TCMs) to transportation planning and air quality planning management and staff at all government levels. The document provides descriptions and examples of the TCMs listed in Section 108(f) of the Clean Air Act. Each TCM is described in terms of its objectives, variation in the ways it may be applied, expected transportation and emissions impacts, and other important implementation and policy considerations that State, regional, and local decision-making agencies will face.

  7. Assessing a cross-border logistics policy using a performance measurement system framework: the case of Hong Kong and the Pearl River Delta region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, David W. C.; Choy, K. L.; Chow, Harry K. H.; Lin, Canhong

    2014-06-01

    For the most rapidly growing economic entity in the world, China, a new logistics operation called the indirect cross-border supply chain model has recently emerged. The primary idea of this model is to reduce logistics costs by storing goods at a bonded warehouse with low storage cost in certain Chinese regions, such as the Pearl River Delta (PRD). This research proposes a performance measurement system (PMS) framework to assess the direct and indirect cross-border supply chain models. The PMS covers four categories including cost, time, quality and flexibility in the assessment of the performance of direct and indirect models. Furthermore, a survey was conducted to investigate the logistics performance of third party logistics (3PLs) at the PRD regions, including Guangzhou, Shenzhen and Hong Kong. The significance of the proposed PMS framework allows 3PLs accurately pinpoint the weakness and strengths of it current operations policy at four major performance measurement categories. Hence, this helps 3PLs further enhance the competitiveness and operations efficiency through better resources allocation at the area of warehousing and transportation.

  8. A model for international border management systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Duggan, Ruth Ann

    2008-09-01

    To effectively manage the security or control of its borders, a country must understand its border management activities as a system. Using its systems engineering and security foundations as a Department of Energy National Security Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories has developed such an approach to modeling and analyzing border management systems. This paper describes the basic model and its elements developed under Laboratory Directed Research and Development project 08-684.

  9. The association of depression and anxiety with glycemic control among Mexican Americans with diabetes living near the U.S.-Mexico border.

    PubMed

    Kendzor, Darla E; Chen, Minxing; Reininger, Belinda M; Businelle, Michael S; Stewart, Diana W; Fisher-Hoch, Susan P; Rentfro, Anne R; Wetter, David W; McCormick, Joseph B

    2014-02-18

    The prevalence of diabetes is alarmingly high among Mexican American adults residing near the U.S.-Mexico border. Depression is also common among Mexican Americans with diabetes, and may have a negative influence on diabetes management. Thus, the purpose of the current study was to evaluate the associations of depression and anxiety with the behavioral management of diabetes and glycemic control among Mexican American adults living near the border. The characteristics of Mexican Americans with diabetes living in Brownsville, TX (N = 492) were compared by depression/anxiety status. Linear regression models were conducted to evaluate the associations of depression and anxiety with BMI, waist circumference, physical activity, fasting glucose, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Participants with clinically significant depression and/or anxiety were of greater age, predominantly female, less educated, more likely to have been diagnosed with diabetes, and more likely to be taking diabetes medications than those without depression or anxiety. In addition, anxious participants were more likely than those without anxiety to have been born in Mexico and to prefer study assessments in Spanish rather than English. Greater depression and anxiety were associated with poorer behavioral management of diabetes (i.e., greater BMI and waist circumference; engaging in less physical activity) and poorer glycemic control (i.e., higher fasting glucose, HbA1c). Overall, depression and anxiety appear to be linked with poorer behavioral management of diabetes and glycemic control. Findings highlight the need for comprehensive interventions along the border which target depression and anxiety in conjunction with diabetes management.

  10. The association of depression and anxiety with glycemic control among Mexican Americans with diabetes living near the U.S.-Mexico border

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence of diabetes is alarmingly high among Mexican American adults residing near the U.S.-Mexico border. Depression is also common among Mexican Americans with diabetes, and may have a negative influence on diabetes management. Thus, the purpose of the current study was to evaluate the associations of depression and anxiety with the behavioral management of diabetes and glycemic control among Mexican American adults living near the border. Methods The characteristics of Mexican Americans with diabetes living in Brownsville, TX (N = 492) were compared by depression/anxiety status. Linear regression models were conducted to evaluate the associations of depression and anxiety with BMI, waist circumference, physical activity, fasting glucose, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Results Participants with clinically significant depression and/or anxiety were of greater age, predominantly female, less educated, more likely to have been diagnosed with diabetes, and more likely to be taking diabetes medications than those without depression or anxiety. In addition, anxious participants were more likely than those without anxiety to have been born in Mexico and to prefer study assessments in Spanish rather than English. Greater depression and anxiety were associated with poorer behavioral management of diabetes (i.e., greater BMI and waist circumference; engaging in less physical activity) and poorer glycemic control (i.e., higher fasting glucose, HbA1c). Conclusions Overall, depression and anxiety appear to be linked with poorer behavioral management of diabetes and glycemic control. Findings highlight the need for comprehensive interventions along the border which target depression and anxiety in conjunction with diabetes management. PMID:24548487

  11. Correlates of measured prehypertension and hypertension in Latina women living along the US-Mexico border, 2007-2009.

    PubMed

    Madanat, Hala; Molina, Marisa; Din, Hena; Mintle, Rachel; Arredondo, Elva M; Elder, John P; Patrick, Kevin; Lemus, Hector; Medina, Veronica; Ayala, Guadalupe X

    2014-10-23

    Although Latinos have lower hypertension rates than non-Latino whites and African Americans, they have a higher prevalence of undiagnosed and uncontrolled hypertension. Research on predictors of hypertension has mostly focused on intrapersonal factors with no studies assessing the combined influence of intrapersonal, interpersonal, and environmental factors. The purpose of this study was to assess a broad range of correlates including intrapersonal, interpersonal, and environmental factors on measured blood pressure category (nonhypertensive, prehypertensive, and hypertensive) in a sample of Latina women residing in San Diego, California. This cross-sectional study used baseline data from the San Diego Prevention Research Center's Familias Sanas y Activas program, a promotora-led physical activity intervention. The sample was 331 Latinas who self-selected into this program. Backward conditional logistic regression analysis was conducted to determine the strongest correlates of measured blood pressure category. Logistic regression analysis suggested that the strongest correlates of prehypertension were soda consumption (odds ratio [OR] = 1.34, [1.00-1.80], P ≤ .05) and age (OR = 1.03, [1.00-1.05], P ≤ .05). The strongest correlates of hypertension were soda consumption (OR = 1.92, [1.20-3.07], P ≤ .01), age (OR = 1.09, [1.05-1.13], P ≤ .001), and measured body mass index (OR = 1.13, [1.05-1.22], P ≤ .001). All analyses controlled for age and education. No interpersonal or environmental correlates were significantly associated with blood pressure category. Future research should aim to further understand the role of soda consumption on risk for hypertension in this population. Furthermore, interventions aimed at preventing hypertension may want to focus on intrapersonal level factors.

  12. Rural-urban differences in health services utilization in the US-Mexico border region.

    PubMed

    Su, Dejun; Pratt, William; Salinas, Jennifer; Wong, Rebeca; Pagán, José A

    2013-01-01

    Evaluate the association between driving distance to the US-Mexico border and rural-urban differences in the use of health services in Mexico by US border residents from Texas. Data for this study come from the Cross-Border Utilization of Health Care Survey, a population-based telephone survey conducted in the Texas border region in spring 2008. Driving distances to the border were estimated from the nearest border crossing station using Google Maps. Outcome measures included medication purchases, physician visits, dentist visits, and inpatient care in Mexico during the 12 months prior to the survey. A series of adjusted logit models were estimated after controlling for relevant confounding factors. The average driving distance to the nearest border crossing station among rural respondents was 4 times that of urban respondents (42.0 miles vs 10.3 miles [P < .001]). Rural respondents were more likely to be dissatisfied than urban respondents with the health care provided on the US side of the border, yet they were less likely to use health services in Mexico. Driving distance to the border largely explained the observed rural-urban differences in medication purchases from Mexico. In the case of inpatient care, however, rural respondents reported a higher utilization rate than urban respondents and this rural-urban difference became more pronounced after adjusting for the effect of driving distance to the border. Dissatisfaction with US health care services in rural communities in the US-Mexico border region seems to be compounded by the lack of access to health care services in Mexico due to travel distance constraints. No claim to original US government works.

  13. Atmospheric Science Without Borders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panday, Arnico; Praveen, Ps; Adhikary, Bhupesh; Bhave, Prakash; Surapipith, Vanisa; Pradhan, Bidya; Karki, Anita; Ghimire, Shreta; Thapa, Alpha; Shrestha, Sujan

    2016-04-01

    The Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP) in northern South Asia are among the most polluted and most densely populated places in the world, and they are upwind of vulnerable ecosystems in the Himalaya mountains. They are also fragmented across 5 countries between which movement of people, data, instruments and scientific understanding have been very limited. ICIMOD's Atmosphere Initiative has for the past three years been working on filling data gaps in the region, while facilitating collaborations across borders. It has established several atmospheric observatories at low and mid elevations in Bhutan and Nepal that provide new data on the inflow of pollutants from the IGP towards the mountains, as well as quantify the effects of local emissions on air quality in mountain cities. EGU will be the first international conference where these data will be presented. ICIMOD is in the process of setting up data servers through which data from the region will be shared with scientists and the general public across borders. Meanwhile, to promote cross-border collaboration among scientists in the region, while addressing an atmospheric phenomenon that affects the lives of the several hundred million people, ICIMOD' Atmosphere Initiative has been coordinating an interdisciplinary multi-year study of persistent winter fog over the Indo-Gangetic Plains, with participation by researchers from Pakistan, India, China, Nepal, Bhutan and Bangladesh. Using a combination of in-situ measurements and sample collection, remote sensing, modeling and community based research, the researchers are studying how changing moisture availability and air pollution have led to increases in fog frequency and duration, as well as the fog's impacts on local communities and energy demand that may affect air pollution emissions. Preliminary results of the Winter 2015-2016 field campaign will be shown.

  14. 40 CFR 57.503 - Control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control measures. 57.503 Section 57.503... NONFERROUS SMELTER ORDERS Fugitive Emission Evaluation and Control § 57.503 Control measures. The NSO of any... requirement of § 57.501. Measures required to be implemented may include: (a) Additional supplementary control...

  15. 40 CFR 57.503 - Control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control measures. 57.503 Section 57.503... NONFERROUS SMELTER ORDERS Fugitive Emission Evaluation and Control § 57.503 Control measures. The NSO of any... requirement of § 57.501. Measures required to be implemented may include: (a) Additional supplementary control...

  16. 40 CFR 57.503 - Control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control measures. 57.503 Section 57.503... NONFERROUS SMELTER ORDERS Fugitive Emission Evaluation and Control § 57.503 Control measures. The NSO of any... requirement of § 57.501. Measures required to be implemented may include: (a) Additional supplementary control...

  17. 40 CFR 57.503 - Control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control measures. 57.503 Section 57.503... NONFERROUS SMELTER ORDERS Fugitive Emission Evaluation and Control § 57.503 Control measures. The NSO of any... requirement of § 57.501. Measures required to be implemented may include: (a) Additional supplementary control...

  18. Surveillance and Control of Aedes albopictus in the Swiss-Italian Border Region: Differences in Egg Densities between Intervention and Non-intervention Areas

    PubMed Central

    Suter, Tobias T.; Flacio, Eleonora; Feijoó Fariña, Begoña; Engeler, Lukas; Tonolla, Mauro; Regis, Lêda N.; de Melo Santos, Maria A. V.; Müller, Pie

    2016-01-01

    Background Aedes albopictus, the Asian tiger mosquito, originates from the tropical and subtropical regions of Southeast Asia. Over the recent decades it has been passively spread across the globe, primarily through the used tyre trade and passive transportation along major traffic routes. A. albopictus is a proven vector for many arboviruses, most notably chikungunya and dengue, with recent outbreaks also in continental Europe. In southern Switzerland, in the Canton of Ticino A. albopictus was spotted for the first time in 2003. Since then the local authorities have implemented a control programme based on larval source reduction. Despite these efforts, mosquito densities have increased over the last decade, casting doubts on the effectiveness of such larval control programmes. Methodology/Principal Findings The Italian communities just across the Swiss-Italian border lack a control programme. This motivated us to compare the intervention and the non-intervention areas side by side in an attempt to find evidence for, or against, the effectiveness of larval A. albopictus control. Using ovitraps and a randomised sampling scheme, we examined the seasonal and spatial abundance of A. albopictus in sylvatic and urban environments across the Swiss-Italian border in 2012 and 2013. In the urban environments of the non-intervention area, egg densities were 2.26 times higher as compared to the intervention area. In the sylvatic environments, as compared to the urban environments, egg densities were 36% in the intervention area and 18% in the non-intervention area. Conclusions/Significance Though alternative explanations are also valid, the results support the hypothesis that the Ticino intervention programme does have an impact. At the same time the data also suggest that current larval interventions fall short in gaining full control over the mosquito, calling for the evaluation of additional, or alternative, approaches. Ideally, these should also consider inclusion of the

  19. Environmental Control Measures (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... exposed to live Christmas trees. previous continue Controlling animal dander If a child is allergic to a ... advisability of finding a new home for the animal — especially if your child has symptoms not controlled ...

  20. Unsafe abortion as a birth control method: maternal mortality risks among unmarried cambodian migrant women on the Thai-Cambodia border.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Shalika; Hoban, Elizabeth; Nevill, Annemarie

    2012-11-01

    Reproductive health research and policies in Cambodia focus on safe motherhood programs particularly for married women, ignoring comprehensive fertility regulation programs for unmarried migrant women of reproductive age. Maternal mortality risks arising due to unsafe abortion methods practiced by unmarried Cambodian women, across the Thai-Cambodia border, can be considered as a public health emergency. Since Thailand has restrictive abortion laws, Cambodian migrant women who have irregular migration status in Thailand experimented with unsafe abortion methods that allowed them to terminate their pregnancies surreptitiously. Unmarried migrant women choose abortion as a preferred birth control method seeking repeat "unsafe" abortions instead of preventing conception. Drawing on the data collected through surveys, in-depth interviews, and document analysis in Chup Commune (pseudonym), Phnom Penh, and Bangkok, the authors describe the public health dimensions of maternal mortality risks faced by unmarried Cambodian migrant women due to various unsafe abortion methods employed as birth control methods.

  1. 40 CFR 57.503 - Control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control measures. 57.503 Section 57.503... NONFERROUS SMELTER ORDERS Fugitive Emission Evaluation and Control § 57.503 Control measures. The NSO of any... requirement of § 57.501. Measures required to be implemented may include: (a) Additional supplementary...

  2. FIXED-SITE AIR AND BIOMARKER MEASUREMENTS OF VOCS IN A NON-OCCUPATIONALLY EXPOSED POPULATION ALONG THE ARIZONA-MEXICO BORDER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goals of the NHEXAS-Border Study are to obtain environmental exposure and biomarker data for a representative population residing along the Arizona-Mexico border, and compare the distributions to similar distributions previously obtained for the state of Arizona (NHEXAS-Ari...

  3. FIXED-SITE AIR AND BIOMARKER MEASUREMENTS OF VOCS IN A NON-OCCUPATIONALLY EXPOSED POPULATION ALONG THE ARIZONA-MEXICO BORDER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goals of the NHEXAS-Border Study are to obtain environmental exposure and biomarker data for a representative population residing along the Arizona-Mexico border, and compare the distributions to similar distributions previously obtained for the state of Arizona (NHEXAS-Ari...

  4. 10 CFR 74.45 - Measurements and measurement control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Measurements and measurement control. 74.45 Section 74.45 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) MATERIAL CONTROL AND ACCOUNTING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL Special Nuclear Material of Moderate Strategic Significance § 74.45 Measurements and...

  5. Environmental Control Measures (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and home improvement stores. continue Controlling pollens and molds Another reason to avoid humidifiers is that high levels of humidity promote mold growth. If you must use a humidifier, change ...

  6. Measurement control workshop instructional materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Philip; Crawford, Cary; McGinnis, Brent

    2014-04-01

    A workshop to teach the essential elements of an effective nuclear materials control and accountability (MC&A) programs are outlined, along with the modes of Instruction, and the roles and responsibilities of participants in the workshop.

  7. The discrimination of blur in peripheral coloured borders.

    PubMed

    Blatherwick, P; Hallett, P E

    1992-09-01

    Our interest is in measuring the threshold for blur, for long borders at well-defined retinal eccentricities between large fields of colour. Our method is to precisely match a centrally fixated sharp-edged disk of one colour against a surround of another, using the minimum distinct border criterion. We then measure the amount of added Gaussian blur that makes the sharp step-edged border just noticeably different. The selected colours are small fixed chromatic deviations of 500 msec duration from an adaptive low photopic or mesopic white. The effects of retinal eccentricity are striking. Blur thresholds are large for yellow-blue borders centrally (at 1.25 degrees eccentricity) and extremely large for red-green borders peripherally (at 20 degrees). Blur thresholds are generally larger for isoluminous chromatic borders than for a low contrast achromatic border. Accurate Rovamo-Virsu M-scaling is limited to photopic achromatic borders.

  8. Theileriosis in Zambia: etiology, epidemiology and control measures.

    PubMed

    Nambota, A; Samui, K; Sugimoto, C; Kakuta, T; Onuma, M

    1994-06-01

    In Zambia, theileriosis manifests itself in the form of Corridor disease (CD), caused by Theileria parva lawrencei, and East Coast fever (ECF), caused by T. parva parva. Of the approximately 3 million cattle in Zambia, 1.4 million are at risk to theileriosis. ECF is found in the Northern and Eastern provinces of the country, while CD appears in Southern, Central, Lusaka and Copperbelt provinces. Theileriosis is a major constraint to the development of the livestock industry in Zambia, with losses of about 10,000 cattle per annum. The disease is spreading at a very fast rate, over-flowing its original borders. The epidemiology is complicated by, among other factors, the wide distribution of the tick vector, Rhipicephalus appendiculatus, which is found all over the country. The current strategy of relying on tick control and therapeutic drugs as a way of controlling the disease is becoming increasingly difficult for Zambia. This is because both curative drugs and acaricides are very costly. Immunization against theileriosis using the infection and treatment method as a way of controlling the disease is becoming increasingly accepted, provided local Theileria stocks are used. This paper reviews the incidence of theileriosis in the last 2 years, 1991 and 1992. It also gives a historical perspective of the disease, epidemiology and control measures presently in use.

  9. The U.S.-Mexico Border Infectious Disease Surveillance Project: Establishing Binational Border Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Waterman, Stephen; Lucas, Carlos Alvarez; Falcon, Veronica Carrion; Morales, Pablo Kuri; Lopez, Luis Anaya; Peter, Chris; Gutiérrez, Alejandro Escobar; Gonzalez, Ernesto Ramirez; Flisser, Ana; Bryan, Ralph; Valle, Enrique Navarro; Rodriguez, Alfonso; Hernandez, Gerardo Alvarez; Rosales, Cecilia; Ortiz, Javier Arias; Landen, Michael; Vilchis, Hugo; Rawlings, Julie; Leal, Francisco Lopez; Ortega, Luis; Flagg, Elaine; Conyer, Roberto Tapia; Cetron, Martin

    2003-01-01

    In 1997, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Mexican Secretariat of Health, and border health officials began the development of the Border Infectious Disease Surveillance (BIDS) project, a surveillance system for infectious diseases along the U.S.-Mexico border. During a 3-year period, a binational team implemented an active, sentinel surveillance system for hepatitis and febrile exanthems at 13 clinical sites. The network developed surveillance protocols, trained nine surveillance coordinators, established serologic testing at four Mexican border laboratories, and created agreements for data sharing and notification of selected diseases and outbreaks. BIDS facilitated investigations of dengue fever in Texas-Tamaulipas and measles in California–Baja California. BIDS demonstrates that a binational effort with local, state, and federal participation can create a regional surveillance system that crosses an international border. Reducing administrative, infrastructure, and political barriers to cross-border public health collaboration will enhance the effectiveness of disease prevention projects such as BIDS. PMID:12533288

  10. Army Support to the United States Border Patrol in the 21st Century

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-19

    the AC can leverage military capabilities to mitigate border security challenges. 5 He did this as precautionary measure after Mexican President...the 21ST century. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Border Security, Mexico , Canada, United States Border Patrol (USBP), Customs and Border Protection (CBP...border security. USBP works in a complex operating environment where the agency remains undermanned securing the border of the United States and Mexico

  11. Enhancing knowledge and awareness of biosecurity practices for control of African swine fever among smallholder pig farmers in four districts along the Kenya-Uganda border.

    PubMed

    Nantima, Noelina; Davies, Jocelyn; Dione, Michel; Ocaido, Michael; Okoth, Edward; Mugisha, Anthony; Bishop, Richard

    2016-04-01

    A study was undertaken along the Kenya-Uganda border in four districts of Tororo and Busia (Uganda) and Busia and Teso (Kenya) to understand smallholder farmers' knowledge, practices and awareness of biosecurity measures. Information was collected by administering questionnaires to 645 randomly selected pig households in the study area. In addition, focus group discussions were carried out in 12 villages involving 248 people using a standardized list of questions. The outcome suggested that there was a very low level of awareness of biosecurity practices amongst smallholder farmers. We conclude that adoption of specific biosecurity practices by smallholder farmers is feasible but requires institutional support. There is a clear requirement for government authorities to sensitize farmers using approaches that allow active participation of farmers in the design, planning and implementation of biosecurity practices to enable enhanced adoption.

  12. The Border Pedagogy Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazanjian, Christopher John

    2011-01-01

    Border pedagogy is a multicultural educational approach utilized in multicultural settings to help students understand their histories and experiences and how it affects their identities and cultures. The approach seeks to produce intellectuals that transcend physical and metaphysical boundaries. The goal of border pedagogy is to remove cultural…

  13. The Border Pedagogy Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazanjian, Christopher John

    2011-01-01

    Border pedagogy is a multicultural educational approach utilized in multicultural settings to help students understand their histories and experiences and how it affects their identities and cultures. The approach seeks to produce intellectuals that transcend physical and metaphysical boundaries. The goal of border pedagogy is to remove cultural…

  14. Lack of patient risk counselling and a broader provider training affect malaria control in remote Somalia Kenya border: Qualitative assessment.

    PubMed

    Asgary, Ramin; Grigoryan, Zoya; Naderi, Ramesh; Allan, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Effectiveness of providing health education solely via mass media and the providers' targeted training in malaria control needs further exploration. During pre-epidemic season, we conducted a qualitative study of 40 providers and community leaders using focus groups, comprehensive semi-structured interviews and consultation observations. Interviews were transcribed, coded and analysed for major themes. Community leaders believe that they can acquire malaria from contaminated water, animal products, air or garbage. Consequently, they under-utilise bed nets and other protective measures due to perceived continued exposure to other potential malaria sources. Practitioners do not provide individualised health counselling and risk assessment to patients during sick visits, leading to a range of misconceptions about malaria based on limited knowledge from rumours and mass media, and a strong belief in the curative power of traditional medicine. Providers overdiagnose malaria clinically and underutilise available tests due to time constraints, and the lack of training and resources to correctly diagnose other illnesses. Subsequently, misdiagnoses lead them to question the efficacy of recommended treatments. Promoting counselling during clinical encounters to address patient misconception and change risky behaviour is warranted. Wider-ranging ongoing training could enable providers to properly diagnose and manage differential diagnoses to manage malaria better.

  15. Measurement and control for mechanical compressive stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qing; Ye, Guang; Pan, Lan; Wu, Xiushan

    2001-12-01

    At present, the indirect method is applied to measuring and controlling mechanical compressive stress, which is the measurement and control of rotating torque of screw with torque transducer during screw revolving. Because the friction coefficient between every screw-cap and washer, of screw-thread is different, the compressive stress of every screw may is different when the machinery is equipped. Therefore, the accurate measurement and control of mechanical compressive stress is realized by the direct measurement of mechanical compressive stress. The author introduces the research of contrast between compressive stress and rotating torque in the paper. The structure and work principle of a special washer type transducer is discussed emphatically. The special instrument cooperates with the washer type transducer for measuring and controlling mechanical compressive stress. The control tactics based on the rate of compressive stress is put to realize accurate control of mechanical compressive stress.

  16. Draft load measurement and control

    SciTech Connect

    Rutkowski, D.J.; McLean, D.H.

    1989-02-21

    An apparatus is described for providing a measurement of draft force exerted by a draft implement coupled to a tractor through at least one link arm of a hydraulic lift assembly having at least one lift rod coupled between each link arm and a hydraulic cylinder for lifting or lowering the draft implement, comprising: a force transducer coupled to the link arm for providing a total force signal related to the total force applied against the link arm; a pressure sensor coupled to the cylinder for providing a pressure signal related to cylinder pressure; position means coupled to the lift rod for providing a lift position signal related to the position of the lift rod; processing means responsive to both the pressure signal and the lift position signal for providing a component lift force signal related to the component of lift force transmitted to the link arm through the lift rod; and means for adding the component lift force signal to the total force signal to provide a corrected draft force signal proportional to the draft force exerted by the implement.

  17. Rapid and accurate measurement of left ventricular function with a new second-harmonic fast-rotating transducer and semi-automated border detection.

    PubMed

    Krenning, Boudewijn J; Voormolen, Marco M; van Geuns, Robert-Jan; Vletter, W B; Lancée, Charles T; de Jong, Nico; Ten Cate, Folkert J; van der Steen, Anton F W; Roelandt, Jos R T C

    2006-07-01

    Measurement of left ventricular (LV) volume and function are the most common clinical referral questions to the echocardiography laboratory. A fast, practical, and accurate method would offer important advantages to obtain this important information. To validate a new practical method for rapid measurement of LV volume and function. We developed a continuous fast-rotating transducer, with second-harmonic capabilities, for three-dimensional echocardiography (3DE). Fifteen cardiac patients underwent both 3DE and magnetic resonance imaging (reference method) on the same day. 3DE image acquisition was performed during a 10-second breath-hold with a frame rate of 100 frames/sec and a rotational speed of 6 rotations/sec. The individual images were postprocessed with Matlab software using multibeat data fusion. Subsequently, with these images, 12 datasets per cardiac cycle were reconstructed, each comprising seven equidistant cross-sectional images for analysis in the new TomTec 4DLV analysis software, which uses a semi-automated border detection (ABD) algorithm. The ABD requires an average analysis time of 15 minutes per patient. A strong correlation was found between LV end-diastolic volume (r = 0.99; y = 0.95x - 1.14 ml; SEE = 6.5 ml), LV end-systolic volume (r = 0.96; y = 0.89x + 7.91 ml; SEE = 7.0 ml), and LV ejection fraction (r = 0.93; y = 0.69x + 13.36; SEE = 2.4%). Inter- and intraobserver agreement for all measurements was good. The fast-rotating transducer with new ABD software is a dedicated tool for rapid and accurate analysis of LV volume and function.

  18. Designing Digital Control Systems With Averaged Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polites, Michael E.; Beale, Guy O.

    1990-01-01

    Rational criteria represent improvement over "cut-and-try" approach. Recent development in theory of control systems yields improvements in mathematical modeling and design of digital feedback controllers using time-averaged measurements. By using one of new formulations for systems with time-averaged measurements, designer takes averaging effect into account when modeling plant, eliminating need to iterate design and simulation phases.

  19. Cross-border collaboration in the field of highly contagious livestock diseases: a general framework for policy support.

    PubMed

    Hop, G E; Mourits, M C M; Oude Lansink, A G J M; Saatkamp, H W

    2014-08-01

    This paper analyses the potential gains and the main challenges for increased cross-border collaboration in the control of highly contagious livestock diseases in regions with cross-border reliance on production and consumption of livestock commodities. The aim of this intensification of cross-border collaboration is to retain the economic advantages of cross-border trade in livestock and livestock commodities while maintaining a low risk of highly contagious livestock diseases. From these two foci, possibilities for future policy making with respect to highly contagious livestock diseases are discussed: peacetime cross-border cooperation to improve the cost-effectiveness of routine veterinary measures and crisis time cross-border harmonization of current disease control strategies. A general disease management framework was used to describe the way in which these two fields are related to and affect the epidemiological system and, consequently, how they impact the stakeholders. In addition to this framework, the importance of a good understanding of influencing factors, that is, the production structure of livestock, was stressed because these factors are important determinants of the frequency and magnitude of highly contagious livestock diseases and their economic impact. The use of the suggested integrated approach was illustrated for the extended cross-border region of the Netherlands and Germany, that is, North Rhine Westphalia and Lower Saxony. For this region, current difficulties in cross-border trade in livestock and livestock commodities and possibilities for future cross-border collaboration were examined. The concepts and ideas presented in this paper should foster future development of cross-border collaboration in animal health control. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. Measurement process error determination and control

    SciTech Connect

    Everhart, J.

    1992-01-01

    Traditional production processes have required repeated inspection activities to assure product quality. A typical production process follows this pattern: production makes product; production inspects product; Quality Control (QC) inspects product to ensure production inspected properly QC then inspects the product on a different gage to ensure the production gage performance; and QC often inspects on a different day to determine environmental effect. All of these costly inspection activities are due to the lack of confidence in the initial production measurement. The Process Measurement Assurance Program (PMAP) is a method of determining and controlling measurement error in design, development, and production. It is a preventive rather than an appraisal method that determines, improves, and controls the error in the measurement process, including measurement equipment, environment, procedure, and personnel. PMAP expands the concept of the Measurement Assurance Program developed in the 1960's by the National Bureau of Standards (NBS), today known as the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). PMAP acts as a bridge in the gap between the Metrology Laboratory and the production environment by introducing standards (or certified parts) into the production process. These certified control standards are then measured as part of the production process. A control system is present to examine the measurement results of the control standards before, during, and after the manufacturing and measuring of the product. The results of the PMAP control charts determine random uncertainty and systematic (bias from the standard) error of the measurement process. The combinations of these uncertainties determine the margin of error of the measurement process. The total measurement process error is determined by combining the margin of error and the uncertainty in the control standard.

  1. Measurement process error determination and control

    SciTech Connect

    Everhart, J.

    1992-11-01

    Traditional production processes have required repeated inspection activities to assure product quality. A typical production process follows this pattern: production makes product; production inspects product; Quality Control (QC) inspects product to ensure production inspected properly QC then inspects the product on a different gage to ensure the production gage performance; and QC often inspects on a different day to determine environmental effect. All of these costly inspection activities are due to the lack of confidence in the initial production measurement. The Process Measurement Assurance Program (PMAP) is a method of determining and controlling measurement error in design, development, and production. It is a preventive rather than an appraisal method that determines, improves, and controls the error in the measurement process, including measurement equipment, environment, procedure, and personnel. PMAP expands the concept of the Measurement Assurance Program developed in the 1960`s by the National Bureau of Standards (NBS), today known as the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). PMAP acts as a bridge in the gap between the Metrology Laboratory and the production environment by introducing standards (or certified parts) into the production process. These certified control standards are then measured as part of the production process. A control system is present to examine the measurement results of the control standards before, during, and after the manufacturing and measuring of the product. The results of the PMAP control charts determine random uncertainty and systematic (bias from the standard) error of the measurement process. The combinations of these uncertainties determine the margin of error of the measurement process. The total measurement process error is determined by combining the margin of error and the uncertainty in the control standard.

  2. Bordering on environmental disaster.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, C W

    2000-01-01

    Millions of people live on the U.S.-Mexico border, drawn by employment opportunities from industry and agriculture, and booming growth is expected to continue in the coming decades. But the influx of people has long outstripped the capacity of border towns and cities to provide for their citizens, and a large percentage of the population lives in sprawling, underserviced shantytowns. Although investment in environmental infrastructure on both sides has led to improvements, shortages among necessities such as drinking water, wastewater treatment, and solid waste disposal are at crisis levels. In addition, a host of diseases including gastrointestinal infections, asthma, tuberculosis, multiple myeloma, systemic lupus erythematosus, hepatitis A, neural tube defects, and lead poisoning have been linked to environmental conditions on the border. Ongoing binational studies are attempting to define the breadth of the public and environmental health crisis and find ways to help make the border a healthier place. PMID:10903625

  3. Brazil-Bolivia Border

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-04-16

    This image of the river-delineated border between western Brazil Acre province, and northwestern Bolivia Pando Department, demarcates a remarkable difference in land use and development practices as seen by NASA Terra spacecraft.

  4. Bordering on environmental disaster.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, C W

    2000-07-01

    Millions of people live on the U.S.-Mexico border, drawn by employment opportunities from industry and agriculture, and booming growth is expected to continue in the coming decades. But the influx of people has long outstripped the capacity of border towns and cities to provide for their citizens, and a large percentage of the population lives in sprawling, underserviced shantytowns. Although investment in environmental infrastructure on both sides has led to improvements, shortages among necessities such as drinking water, wastewater treatment, and solid waste disposal are at crisis levels. In addition, a host of diseases including gastrointestinal infections, asthma, tuberculosis, multiple myeloma, systemic lupus erythematosus, hepatitis A, neural tube defects, and lead poisoning have been linked to environmental conditions on the border. Ongoing binational studies are attempting to define the breadth of the public and environmental health crisis and find ways to help make the border a healthier place.

  5. Borders and Borderlands in the Americas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    both licit and illicit networks. Traditional territorial security concerns declined in the Americas following the end of the Cold War, and NAFTA in...deepen economic ties and liberalize regimes, privileging development over security.12 Similarly, trade, fostered through NAFTA , has shaped and affected...Perhaps most critically, taking the local border reality seriously alerts us to situations in which border control agencies do not have the capacity to

  6. Frequency Control Performance Measurement and Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Illian, Howard F.

    2010-12-20

    Frequency control is an essential requirement of reliable electric power system operations. Determination of frequency control depends on frequency measurement and the practices based on these measurements that dictate acceptable frequency management. This report chronicles the evolution of these measurements and practices. As technology progresses from analog to digital for calculation, communication, and control, the technical basis for frequency control measurement and practices to determine acceptable performance continues to improve. Before the introduction of digital computing, practices were determined largely by prior experience. In anticipation of mandatory reliability rules, practices evolved from a focus primarily on commercial and equity issues to an increased focus on reliability. This evolution is expected to continue and place increased requirements for more precise measurements and a stronger scientific basis for future frequency management practices in support of reliability.

  7. Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/8: Cooperative Border Security for Jordan: Assessment and Options

    SciTech Connect

    Qojas, M.

    1999-03-01

    This document is an analysis of options for unilateral and cooperative action to improve the security of Jordan's borders. Sections describe the current political, economic, and social interactions along Jordan's borders. Next, the document discusses border security strategy for cooperation among neighboring countries and the adoption of confidence-building measures. A practical cooperative monitoring system would consist of hardware for early warning, command and control, communications, and transportation. Technical solutions can expand opportunities for the detection and identification of intruders. Sensors (such as seismic, break-wire, pressure-sensing, etc.) can warn border security forces of intrusion and contribute to the identification of the intrusion and help formulate the response. This document describes conceptual options for cooperation, offering three scenarios that relate to three hypothetical levels (low, medium, and high) of cooperation. Potential cooperative efforts under a low cooperation scenario could include information exchanges on military equipment and schedules to prevent misunderstandings and the establishment of protocols for handling emergency situations or unusual circumstances. Measures under a medium cooperation scenario could include establishing joint monitoring groups for better communications, with hot lines and scheduled meetings. The high cooperation scenario describes coordinated responses, joint border patrols, and sharing border intrusion information. Finally, the document lists recommendations for organizational, technical, and operational initiatives that could be applicable to the current situation.

  8. Quantum control by von Neumann measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechen, Alexander; Il'in, Nikolai; Shuang, Feng; Rabitz, Herschel

    2006-11-01

    A general scheme is presented for controlling quantum systems using evolution driven by nonselective von Neumann measurements, with or without an additional tailored electromagnetic field. As an example, a two-level quantum system controlled by nonselective quantum measurements is considered. The control goal is to find optimal system observables such that consecutive nonselective measurement of these observables transforms the system from a given initial state into a state which maximizes the expected value of a target operator (the objective). A complete analytical solution is found including explicit expressions for the optimal measured observables and for the maximal objective value given any target operator, any initial system density matrix, and any number of measurements. As an illustration, upper bounds on measurement-induced population transfer between the ground and the excited states for any number of measurements are found. The anti-Zeno effect is recovered in the limit of an infinite number of measurements. In this limit the system becomes completely controllable. The results establish the degree of control attainable by a finite number of measurements.

  9. Measurement and control of electrostatic patch potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Joseph L.; Munday, Jeremy N.

    Electrostatic patch potentials hinder many precision measurements, particularly measurements of the Casimir force. Despite the improved force sensitivity achieved over the last decade, only recently have attempts been made to measure and quantify the effects of patch potentials. Here we present an analysis of patch potentials measured by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and discuss methods to control these potentials (e.g. humidity, material choice, etc).

  10. U.S. border patrol potential applications of internetted unattended ground sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, Wilbur W., Jr.; Schatzmann, Larry A.

    1997-07-01

    The U.S. Border Patrol monitors the traffic on the Mexican/U.S. Border, the Canadian/U.S. Border and along some coastal areas. Measures have been taken to reduce or eliminate illegal immigration and smuggling. An automated border surveillance sub-system based on the DARPA Internetted Unattended Ground Sensors Program is discussed.

  11. PARTICULATE EMISSION MEASUREMENTS FROM CONTROLLED CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarized the results of field testing of the effectiveness of control measures for sources of fugitive particulate emissions found at construction sites. The effectiveness of watering temporary, unpaved travel surfaces on emissions of particulate matter with aerodyna...

  12. PARTICULATE EMISSION MEASUREMENTS FROM CONTROLLED CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarized the results of field testing of the effectiveness of control measures for sources of fugitive particulate emissions found at construction sites. The effectiveness of watering temporary, unpaved travel surfaces on emissions of particulate matter with aerodyna...

  13. Ras-dva1 small GTPase regulates telencephalon development in Xenopus laevis embryos by controlling Fgf8 and Agr signaling at the anterior border of the neural plate.

    PubMed

    Tereshina, Maria B; Ermakova, Galina V; Ivanova, Anastasiya S; Zaraisky, Andrey G

    2014-03-15

    We previously found that the small GTPase Ras-dva1 is essential for the telencephalic development in Xenopus laevis because Ras-dva1 controls the Fgf8-mediated induction of FoxG1 expression, a key telencephalic regulator. In this report, we show, however, that Ras-dva1 and FoxG1 are expressed in different groups of cells; whereas Ras-dva1 is expressed in the outer layer of the anterior neural fold, FoxG1 and Fgf8 are activated in the inner layer from which the telencephalon is derived. We resolve this paradox by demonstrating that Ras-dva1 is involved in the transduction of Fgf8 signal received by cells in the outer layer, which in turn send a feedback signal that stimulates FoxG1 expression in the inner layer. We show that this feedback signal is transmitted by secreted Agr proteins, the expression of which is activated in the outer layer by mediation of Ras-dva1 and the homeodomain transcription factor Otx2. In turn, Agrs are essential for maintaining Fgf8 and FoxG1 expression in cells at the anterior neural plate border. Our finding reveals a novel feedback loop mechanism based on the exchange of Fgf8 and Agr signaling between neural and non-neural compartments at the anterior margin of the neural plate and demonstrates a key role of Ras-dva1 in this mechanism.

  14. 23 CFR 751.13 - Control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321), recycling of junk and scrap is to be encouraged to the greatest extent practicable in the implementation of the junkyard control program. Recycling should be considered in conjunction with other control measures. To facilitate recycling, junk or scrap should be moved to an...

  15. 23 CFR 751.13 - Control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321), recycling of junk and scrap is to be encouraged to the greatest extent practicable in the implementation of the junkyard control program. Recycling should be considered in conjunction with other control measures. To facilitate recycling, junk or scrap should be moved to an...

  16. 23 CFR 751.13 - Control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321), recycling of junk and scrap is to be encouraged to the greatest extent practicable in the implementation of the junkyard control program. Recycling should be considered in conjunction with other control measures. To facilitate recycling, junk or scrap should be moved to an...

  17. 23 CFR 751.13 - Control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321), recycling of junk and scrap is to be encouraged to the greatest extent practicable in the implementation of the junkyard control program. Recycling should be considered in conjunction with other control measures. To facilitate recycling, junk or scrap should be moved to an...

  18. 23 CFR 751.13 - Control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321), recycling of junk and scrap is to be encouraged to the greatest extent practicable in the implementation of the junkyard control program. Recycling should be considered in conjunction with other control measures. To facilitate recycling, junk or scrap should be moved to an...

  19. Border Malaria Associated with Multidrug Resistance on Thailand-Myanmar and Thailand-Cambodia Borders: Transmission Dynamic, Vulnerability, and Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Bhumiratana, Adisak; Intarapuk, Apiradee; Sorosjinda-Nunthawarasilp, Prapa; Maneekan, Pannamas; Koyadun, Surachart

    2013-01-01

    This systematic review elaborates the concepts and impacts of border malaria, particularly on the emergence and spread of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax multidrug resistance (MDR) malaria on Thailand-Myanmar and Thailand-Cambodia borders. Border malaria encompasses any complex epidemiological settings of forest-related and forest fringe-related malaria, both regularly occurring in certain transmission areas and manifesting a trend of increased incidence in transmission prone areas along these borders, as the result of interconnections of human settlements and movement activities, cross-border population migrations, ecological changes, vector population dynamics, and multidrug resistance. For regional and global perspectives, this review analyzes and synthesizes the rationales pertaining to transmission dynamics and the vulnerabilities of border malaria that constrain surveillance and control of the world's most MDR falciparum and vivax malaria on these chaotic borders. PMID:23865048

  20. Reactivity measurement using a programmable logic controller

    SciTech Connect

    Bobek, L.M.; Miraglia, P.Q.

    1995-12-31

    The application of digital systems for measuring reactor dynamics has been used at experimental and research reactors for almost 30 yr. At the Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) nuclear reactor facility (NRF), a recent modernization effort included the installation of a programmable logic controller (PLC) and an operator interface terminal (OIT). The PLC systems are increasingly being used to replace relay-based monitoring and control systems at nuclear power plants. At WPI, the PLC and OIT provide a digital reactor monitoring system that is remote from the reactor`s analog control instrumentation. The NRF staff has programmed the monitoring system for several reactor-related applications, including reactivity measurement.

  1. The Advanced Noise Control Fan Baseline Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAllister, Joseph; Loew, Raymond A.; Lauer, Joel T.; Stuliff, Daniel L.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center s (NASA Glenn) Advanced Noise Control Fan (ANCF) was developed in the early 1990s to provide a convenient test bed to measure and understand fan-generated acoustics, duct propagation, and radiation to the farfield. As part of a complete upgrade, current baseline and acoustic measurements were documented. Extensive in-duct, farfield acoustic, and flow field measurements are reported. This is a follow-on paper to documenting the operating description of the ANCF.

  2. CLINICAL FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH SPONTANEOUS PASSAGE OF URETER STONES IN CONSERVATIVE MANAGEMENT: 6 mm IN MAXIMAL STONE SIZE MEASURED BY ULTRASONOGRAPHY CAN BE A PREDICTIVE BORDER.

    PubMed

    Okada, Takashi; Kubota, Masashi; Nishiyama, Ryuichi; Kanno, Toru; Higashi, Yoshihito; Yamada, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    (Purpose) To date there was no consensus regarding expectant size of stone and time to expulsion in the conservative treatment of ureter stones. The aim of this study was to find the clinical factors associated with stone passage by evaluating the outcome of ureter stones with expectant management in Japanese. (Materials and methods) A total of 679 ureter stone cases who visited our hospital with acute real colic and/or hematuria between 2009 and 2013, and who had decided to be treated by expectant management with or without medical expulsive therapy were enrolled in this study. All cases were examined size, location and presence of stone, and degree of hydronephrosis with ultrasonography. The examined data plus clinical data such as gender, age, side and body mass index were analyzed to find the factors related to spontaneous passage of ureter stones. Statistical analysis was performed to predict whether the factors were associated with the ureteral stone expulsion or not. (Results) Accumulated residual stone curve using Kaplan-Meier method showed time to 50%-expulsion as 15.7 days in cases with stone size no more than 6.0 mm and that as 21.8 days in those with greater than 6.0 mm, and time to 50%-expulsion as 28.8 days in cases with upper ureter stone whereas 15.6 days in those with middle or distal ureter stone. Analysis in groups with 1 mm-interval in stone size showed statistical significance only when compared 5-6 mm group with 6-7 mm group in size. Multivariate analysis showed stone size and location as statistically significant and independent factors to predict time to expulsion within 30 days. (Conclusion) Stone size and location was statistically reconfirmed to be associated with spontaneous passage in expectant management of ureter stones. This study statistically demonstrated the possibility that 6 mm in maximal stone size measured by ultrasonography can be a predictive border. 75% of ureter stones within 6 mm in maximal size measured by

  3. Border control! Capillary pressure / saturation relationships in a diphasic flow in a random medium: Influence of the boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorentino, Eve-Agnès; Toussaint, Renaud; Moura, Marcel; Jankov, Mihailo; Schäfer, Gerhard; Jørgen Måløy, Knut

    2013-04-01

    Solving problems involving biphasic flows in porous media, at a scale larger than the pore one, normally requires the use of relationships between pressure and saturation. These allow the closure of generalized Darcy flow models for two phases, commonly used in hydrology or large scale problems of diphasic flow in porous media. There are mathematical models which approximate experimental records with curve-fitting equations. The two most common models are the Brooks-Corey and van Genüchten ones, they are used to complete a system of generalized Darcy equations. The purpose of the current study is the influence of the boundary conditions on the relationship between pressure and saturation. We perform numerical simulations of drainage experiments. Water is the wetting fluid and air is the non wetting fluid. The results highlight the fact that a filter which allows only water to flow at the exit face of the system modifies both the shape of the curve and the value of the residual saturation. The pressure of the models that are commonly used does not match with the pressure of real flows since there is no filter to cross, to flow from an elementary volume to another. Experiments performed in transparent Hele-Shaw cells exhibit the same features, showing the influence of the semi permeable boundary conditions on the pressure-saturation measures obtained. This effect corresponding to the formation of localized plugging clusters at the boundaries, is obtained in slow flow conditions, and is independent of any dynamic fingering, also known to affect such relations (1,2,3). Modeling flows in open media thus would require to use the central part of the curves pressure saturation where the effect of the boundaries is the least important, or to modify properly these relationships to extract the behavior unaffected by boundaries. References: (1) Two-phase flow: structure, upscaling, and consequences for macroscopic transport properties Renaud Toussaint ; Knut Jørgen M

  4. Optimal control of a quantum measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egger, D. J.; Wilhelm, F. K.

    2014-11-01

    Pulses to steer the time evolution of quantum systems can be designed with optimal control theory. In most cases it is the coherent processes that can be controlled and one optimizes the time evolution toward a target unitary process, sometimes also in the presence of noncontrollable incoherent processes. Here we show how to extend the gradient ascent pulse engineering (GRAPE) algorithm in the case where the incoherent processes are controllable and the target time evolution is a nonunitary quantum channel. We perform a gradient search on a fidelity measure based on Choi matrices. We illustrate our algorithm by optimizing a phase qubit measurement pulse. We show how this technique can lead to a large measurement contrast close to 99 % . We also show, within the validity of our model, that this algorithm can produce short 1.4 -ns pulses with 98.2 % contrast.

  5. Driven to drink: Sin taxes near a border.

    PubMed

    Beatty, Timothy K M; Larsen, Erling Røed; Sommervoll, Dag Einar

    2009-12-01

    This paper investigates household purchasing behavior in response to differing alcohol and tobacco taxes near an international border. Our study suggests that large tax differentials near borders induce economically important tax avoidance behavior, which may limit a government's ability to raise revenue and potentially undermine important health and social policy goals. We match novel supermarket scanner and consumer expenditure data to measure the size and scope of the effect for households and stores. We find that stores near/far from the international border have statistically significantly lower/higher sales of beer and tobacco than comparable stores far/near the border. Moreover, we find that households near the border report higher consumption of these same goods. This is consistent with households facing lower prices. Finally, we find measures of externalities associated with these goods are higher near the border.

  6. Adaptive measurement control for calorimetric assay

    SciTech Connect

    Glosup, J.G.; Axelrod, M.C.

    1994-10-01

    The performance of a calorimeter is usually evaluated by constructing a Shewhart control chart of its measurement errors for a collection of reference standards. However, Shewhart control charts were developed in a manufacturing setting where observations occur in batches. Additionally, the Shewhart control chart expects the variance of the charted variable to be known or at least well estimated from previous experimentation. For calorimetric assay, observations are collected singly in a time sequence with a (possibly) changing mean, and extensive experimentation to calculate the variance of the measurement errors is seldom feasible. These facts pose problems in constructing a control chart. In this paper, the authors propose using the mean squared successive difference to estimate the variance of measurement errors based solely on prior observations. This procedure reduces or eliminates estimation bias due to a changing mean. However, the use of this estimator requires an adjustment to the definition of the alarm and warning limits for the Shewhart control chart. The authors propose adjusted limits based on an approximate Student`s t-distribution for the measurement errors and discuss the limitations of this approximation. Suggestions for the practical implementation of this method are provided also.

  7. Performance measurement: A tool for program control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abell, Nancy

    1994-01-01

    Performance measurement is a management tool for planning, monitoring, and controlling as aspects of program and project management--cost, schedule, and technical requirements. It is a means (concept and approach) to a desired end (effective program planning and control). To reach the desired end, however, performance measurement must be applied and used appropriately, with full knowledge and recognition of its power and of its limitations--what it can and cannot do for the project manager. What is the potential of this management tool? What does performance measurement do that a traditional plan vs. actual technique cannot do? Performance measurement provides an improvement over the customary comparison of how much money was spent (actual cost) vs. how much was planned to be spent based on a schedule of activities (work planned). This commonly used plan vs. actual comparison does not allow one to know from the numerical data if the actual cost incurred was for work intended to be done.

  8. Hands across the Border.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langston, Diane

    1990-01-01

    Describes the Hands across the Border Cultural Exchange Program between the communities of Palominas, Arizona, and Arizpe, Sonora, Mexico. An Arizona fifth/sixth grader studies Mexico prior to hosting a visitor from Mexico and enjoying a reciprocal visit to the Arizpe student's home. Highlights the program's unique features and benefits. (DMM)

  9. Virtual sea border

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferriere, D.; Rucinski, A.; Jankowski, T.

    2007-04-01

    Establishing a Virtual Sea Border by performing a real-time, satellite-accessible Internet-based bio-metric supported threat assessment of arriving foreign-flagged cargo ships, their management and ownership, their arrival terminal operator and owner, and rewarding proven legitimate operators with an economic incentive for their transparency will simultaneously improve port security and maritime transportation efficiencies.

  10. "Border Sexualities, Border Families in Schools": Queering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, John

    2012-01-01

    This essay reviews Maria Pallotta-Chiarolli's (2010) Lambda Award-winning monograph "Border Sexualities, Border Families in Schools", in which queer and mestizage pedagogies frame a groundbreaking and highly accessible exploration of the issues that sexual border dwellers experience. Her particular focus areas are bisexual "sexually fluid"…

  11. "Border Sexualities, Border Families in Schools": Queering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, John

    2012-01-01

    This essay reviews Maria Pallotta-Chiarolli's (2010) Lambda Award-winning monograph "Border Sexualities, Border Families in Schools", in which queer and mestizage pedagogies frame a groundbreaking and highly accessible exploration of the issues that sexual border dwellers experience. Her particular focus areas are bisexual "sexually fluid"…

  12. Copper TESLA structure: measurements and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Główka, Jakub; Maciaś, Mateusz

    2008-01-01

    Phase and amplitude stabilization of accelerating field is a challenging task, which usually requires dedicated hardware and software. In this contribution, we introduce briefly parameters of an accelerating structure and basic measurements on the test stand with copper structure, helping to improve control systems required for stable operation of accelerating structures.

  13. A Permo-Triassic border rift structure within the south-western Bay of Biscay controlling the shape of the Alpine crustal root beneath the Cantabrian Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadenas, Patricia; Fernández-Viejo, Gabriela; Álvarez-Pulgar, Javier

    2017-04-01

    The Bay of Biscay-Pyrenean geological system is an inverted hyperextended rift that illustrates in its deep structure the transition between an oceanic underthrusting in the west to a continent-continent collision in the east. We developed a structural analysis of the south-western reactivated rift system, which represents at present-day the western branch of the Cantabrian-Pyrenean collisional chain, including the Cantabrian Mountains onshore and the central and western segments of the North Iberian margin in the southern Bay of Biscay. This passive margin was structured during polyphase Triassic to Lower Cretaceous rifting events and subsequently inverted in the Cenozoic during the Alpine orogeny, when the Cantabrian-Pyrenean realm formed in the Iberian-European plate boundary. The reactivated rift system shows a significant structural variability resulting from the strong segmentation and strain partitioning during the subsequent tectonic events. Thus, it is a natural laboratory to study the constraints imposed by tectonic inheritance in the successive stages of an almost complete orogenic cycle. From the interpretation of offshore geological and geophysical data and the integration of onshore wide-angle results, where Mesozoic fossil remnants are very scarce, we analyzed the crustal structure of the reactivated rift system and mapped the now inverted rift domains. Our results show that the inherited rift architecture controlled the subsequent compressional reactivation of the hyperextended rift system. Of particular interest are the structural variations observed in proximal areas. Offshore, the proximal domain includes classical shallow grabens and half-grabens with low degrees of extension developed during an early Permo-Triassic rift event governed by stretching processes. Its NW-SE distal limit runs parallel to the Cantabrian Fault. Following this trend, a major structure, called Ventaniella fault, has been traditionally mapped onshore, interpreted as a

  14. Healthy Border 2020 Embassy Launch

    Cancer.gov

    The U.S.-Mexico Border Health Commission launched the Healthy Border 2020 at the Mexican Embassy in the United States on June 24, 2015. This new initiative aims to strengthening what was accomplished on the previous plan of action entitled Healthy Border 2010.

  15. Hybrid scatterometry measurement for BEOL process control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timoney, Padraig; Vaid, Alok; Kang, Byeong Cheol; Liu, Haibo; Isbester, Paul; Cheng, Marjorie; Ng-Emans, Susan; Yellai, Naren; Sendelbach, Matt; Koret, Roy; Gedalia, Oram

    2017-03-01

    Scaling of interconnect design rules in advanced nodes has been accompanied by a reducing metrology budget for BEOL process control. Traditional inline optical metrology measurements of BEOL processes rely on 1-dimensional (1D) film pads to characterize film thickness. Such pads are designed on the assumption that solid copper blocks from previous metallization layers prevent any light from penetrating through the copper, thus simplifying the effective film stack for the 1D optical model. However, the reduction of the copper thickness in each metallization layer and CMP dishing effects within the pad, have introduced undesired noise in the measurement. To resolve this challenge and to measure structures that are more representative of product, scatterometry has been proposed as an alternative measurement. Scatterometry is a diffraction based optical measurement technique using Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA), where light diffracted from a periodic structure is used to characterize the profile. Scatterometry measurements on 3D structures have been shown to demonstrate strong correlation to electrical resistance parameters for BEOL Etch and CMP processes. However, there is significant modeling complexity in such 3D scatterometry models, in particlar due to complexity of front-end-of-line (FEOL) and middle-of-line (MOL) structures. The accompanying measurement noise associated with such structures can contribute significant measurement error. To address the measurement noise of the 3D structures and the impact of incoming process variation, a hybrid scatterometry technique is proposed that utilizes key information from the structure to significantly reduce the measurement uncertainty of the scatterometry measurement. Hybrid metrology combines measurements from two or more metrology techniques to enable or improve the measurement of a critical parameter. In this work, the hybrid scatterometry technique is evaluated for 7nm and 14nm node BEOL measurements of

  16. Border Security Fencing and Wildlife: The End of the Transboundary Paradigm in Eurasia?

    PubMed

    Linnell, John D C; Trouwborst, Arie; Boitani, Luigi; Kaczensky, Petra; Huber, Djuro; Reljic, Slaven; Kusak, Josip; Majic, Aleksandra; Skrbinsek, Tomaz; Potocnik, Hubert; Hayward, Matt W; Milner-Gulland, E J; Buuveibaatar, Bayarbaatar; Olson, Kirk A; Badamjav, Lkhagvasuren; Bischof, Richard; Zuther, Steffen; Breitenmoser, Urs

    2016-06-01

    The ongoing refugee crisis in Europe has seen many countries rush to construct border security fencing to divert or control the flow of people. This follows a trend of border fence construction across Eurasia during the post-9/11 era. This development has gone largely unnoticed by conservation biologists during an era in which, ironically, transboundary cooperation has emerged as a conservation paradigm. These fences represent a major threat to wildlife because they can cause mortality, obstruct access to seasonally important resources, and reduce effective population size. We summarise the extent of the issue and propose concrete mitigation measures.

  17. Border Security Fencing and Wildlife: The End of the Transboundary Paradigm in Eurasia?

    PubMed Central

    Linnell, John D. C.; Trouwborst, Arie; Boitani, Luigi; Kaczensky, Petra; Kusak, Josip; Skrbinsek, Tomaz; Buuveibaatar, Bayarbaatar; Bischof, Richard; Breitenmoser, Urs

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing refugee crisis in Europe has seen many countries rush to construct border security fencing to divert or control the flow of people. This follows a trend of border fence construction across Eurasia during the post-9/11 era. This development has gone largely unnoticed by conservation biologists during an era in which, ironically, transboundary cooperation has emerged as a conservation paradigm. These fences represent a major threat to wildlife because they can cause mortality, obstruct access to seasonally important resources, and reduce effective population size. We summarise the extent of the issue and propose concrete mitigation measures. PMID:27331878

  18. Limited Access to Healthcare among Hispanics in the US-Mexico Border Region.

    PubMed

    Shen, Minghui; Gai, Yunwei; Feng, Li

    2016-09-01

    Using large national databases, we investigated how living in the US-Mexico border region further limited access to healthcare among the non-elderly Hispanic adult population after controlling individual and county-level characteristics. The 2008-2012 individual-level data of non-elderly Hispanic adults from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) were merged with county-level data from Area Health Resources File (AHRF). Multivariate logistic analyses were performed to predict insurance status and access to doctors using residency in the US-Mexico border region as the key predictor, adjusting individual and county-level factors. Controlling only individual characteristic, Hispanics living in the US-Mexico border region had significantly lower odds of having health insurance (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.51; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.49-0.54) and access to doctors (AOR = 0.69; 95% CI, 0.66-0.72). After including county-level measurements of healthcare system capacity and other local characteristics, the border region continued to be associated with lower likelihood of healthcare access. Hispanic residents in the U.S.-Mexico border had less access to healthcare than their inland counterparts. The findings highlight unique features in this region and support policies and initiatives to improve minority healthcare access, particularly among disadvantaged populations in this region.

  19. Belize-Guatemala Border

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-29

    The border between Belize and Guatemala illustrates striking differences in land use practices. In a study of deforestation published in 2016, Chicas and co-authors found that in their study area between 1991 and 2014, on the Guatemalan side of the border forested land declined 32%; in Belize, forested area declined 11%. In part of their study area shown in this image, the difference is more dramatic: near-pristine forest in Belize on the right, and agricultural fields in Guatemala on the left. The image was acquired May 10, 2016, covers an area of 27 by 41 km, and is located at 16.7 degrees north, 89.2 degrees west. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21826

  20. Astronomers without borders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Mike

    2011-06-01

    ``Astronomers Without Borders'' is a new global organisational dedicated to furthering understanding and goodwill across national and cultural boundaries using the universal appeal of astronomy and space science. A growing network of affiliate organisations brings together clubs, magazines and other organizations involved in astronomy and space science. Forums, galleries, video conferences and other interactive technologies are used to connect participants around the world. Sharing of resources and direct connections through travel programs are also planned. One project, ``The World at Night'' (TWAN), has become an Special Project of IYA2009. TWAN creates wide-angle images of the night sky in important natural and historic settings around the world, dramatically demonstrating the universal nature and appeal of the night sky. ``Astronomers Without Borders'' is also a leader of the 100 Hours of Astronomy IYA2009 Global Cornerstone Project.

  1. Measurements for low level RF control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simrock, S. N.

    2007-08-01

    The low level RF control system for the European x-ray free electron laser, which is based on TESLA technology, requires information on a large number of signals and parameters which are either directly measurable as physical signals or must be derived from the physical signals. In most cases, calibrations are required to obtain the desired quantities. The measured signals are used in the real time feedback loops for field and resonance control, and for diagnostic purposes to support automation and exception handling. Good system models and powerful signal processors (including field programmable gate arrays and digital signal processors) combined with fast communication links allow for processing a large number of complex algorithms in real time. Several of these algorithms have been implemented at the free electron laser at Hamburg (FLASH) for evaluation and have increased the availability of the facility for user operation.

  2. Turbine gas temperature measurement and control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, W. L.

    1973-01-01

    A fluidic Turbine Inlet Gas Temperature (TIGIT) Measurement and Control System was developed for use on a Pratt and Whitney Aircraft J58 engine. Based on engine operating requirements, criteria for high temperature materials selection, system design, and system performance were established. To minimize development and operational risk, the TIGT control system was designed to interface with an existing Exhaust Gas Temperature (EGT) Trim System and thereby modulate steady-state fuel flow to maintain a desired TIGT level. Extensive component and system testing was conducted including heated (2300F) vibration tests for the fluidic sensor and gas sampling probe, temperature and vibration tests on the system electronics, burner rig testing of the TIGT measurement system, and in excess of 100 hours of system testing on a J58 engine. (Modified author abstract)

  3. Assessment of Pneumatic Controller Emission Measurements ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Oil and Natural Gas (ONG) production facilities have the potential to emit greenhouse gases such as methane (CH4) and other hydrocarbons (HCs) to the atmosphere. ONG production sites have multiple emission sources including storage tank venting, enclosed combustion devices, engine exhaust, pneumatic controllers and uncontrolled leaks. Accounting for up to 37.8 percent of CH4 emissions, pneumatic controllers are one of the most significant sources of CH4 in ONG production field operations. Recent measurement studies used the only commercially-available high volume sampling (HVS) technology (Bacharach Hi Flow Sampler, Bacharach, Inc., New Kensington, PA) to quantify CH4 emission rates of pneumatic devices on ONG production pads and compare to inventory estimates. Other studies indicate that this HVS may malfunction, causing underestimates of emissions in certain scenarios encountered in ONG production and should not be used for some sources such as heavy emissions from condensate storage tanks. The HVS malfunction can occur on relatively large emissions, where the measured leak concentrations exceed 5%, and is ascribed to a sensor transition failure in the instrument. The HVS malfunction is believed to be exacerbated by several factors (large emission rates, amount of non-CH4 HCs in the emission stream, non-optimal HVS calibration frequency, firmware, and emission measurement coupling geometries). The degree to which HVS measurements of emissions from pneumatic co

  4. Assessment of Pneumatic Controller Emission Measurements ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Oil and Natural Gas (ONG) production facilities have the potential to emit greenhouse gases such as methane (CH4) and other hydrocarbons (HCs) to the atmosphere. ONG production sites have multiple emission sources including storage tank venting, enclosed combustion devices, engine exhaust, pneumatic controllers and uncontrolled leaks. Accounting for up to 37.8 percent of CH4 emissions, pneumatic controllers are one of the most significant sources of CH4 in ONG production field operations. Recent measurement studies used the only commercially-available high volume sampling (HVS) technology (Bacharach Hi Flow Sampler, Bacharach, Inc., New Kensington, PA) to quantify CH4 emission rates of pneumatic devices on ONG production pads and compare to inventory estimates. Other studies indicate that this HVS may malfunction, causing underestimates of emissions in certain scenarios encountered in ONG production and should not be used for some sources such as heavy emissions from condensate storage tanks. The HVS malfunction can occur on relatively large emissions, where the measured leak concentrations exceed 5%, and is ascribed to a sensor transition failure in the instrument. The HVS malfunction is believed to be exacerbated by several factors (large emission rates, amount of non-CH4 HCs in the emission stream, non-optimal HVS calibration frequency, firmware, and emission measurement coupling geometries). The degree to which HVS measurements of emissions from pneumatic co

  5. BTFS: The Border Trade Facilitation System

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, L.R.

    1999-03-18

    The author demonstrates the Border Trade Facilitation System (BTFS), an agent-based bilingual e-commerce system built to expedite the regulation, control, and execution of commercial trans-border shipments during the delivery phase. The system was built to serve maquila industries at the US/Mexican border. The BTFS uses foundation technology developed here at Sandia Laboratories' Advanced Information Systems Lab (AISL), including a distributed object substrate, a general-purpose agent development framework, dynamically generated agent-human interaction via the World-Wide Web, and a collaborative agent architecture. This technology is also the substrate for the Multi-Agent Simulation Management System (MASMAS) proposed for demonstration at this conference. The BTFS executes authenticated transactions among agents performing open trading over the Internet. With the BTFS in place, one could conduct secure international transactions from any site with an Internet connection and a web browser. The BTFS is currently being evaluated for commercialization.

  6. [Comprehensive assessment on control measures of Ambrosia artemisiifolia L].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhong-Shi; Guo, Jian-Ying; Wan, Fang-Hao; Peng, Zhao-Pu; Luo, Yuan-Hua; Liu, Yong

    2008-09-01

    Three control measures of Ambrosia artemisiifolia, including biological control, chemical control, and CK without any treatment, were evaluated by analytic hierarchy process (AHP). Corresponding contributions of the three control measures to comprehensive profit (CP) and comprehensive cost (CC) were calculated and ranked, which were regarded as the assessment criteria of the control measures. The results showed that among the three control measures, biological control had the highest CP and the lowest CC, CK was in adverse; and chemical control was in intervenient. Biological control had the highest ratio of profit to cost, and suggesting that this control measure is an optimal and recommendable measure in controlling A. artemisiifolia.

  7. Comparative evaluation of reproducibility of peripheral tissues produced by different border molding materials in edentulous patients: An in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Aman Kumar; Goyal, Itanshu; Sehgal, Monilka

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study is to analyze the effect of different materials and techniques in current use on peripheral shaping of complete denture impression. Methods: The present study was conducted to compare and evaluate the maxillary border morphology produced using tissue conditioner as control and low fusing impression compound, Polyether, Pattern resin and periphery wax as border molding materials. The study was carried out on 15 denture wearer patients with well formed, rounded edentulous maxillary arch with adequate width and height. On each patient, border moldings were done, with tissue conditioner which was loaded on the borders of previous maxillary denture of the patient (control group), low fusing impression compound (Group 1), polyether (Group 2), Pattern resin (Group 3) and Peripheral wax (Group 4), respectively on special tray made for the patient. Sulcus width height and area was then measured for each group using stereomicroscope. Results and Conclusions: Based on the study it is concluded that the polyether was the best material for border molding which will give most accurate borders to a denture. PMID:26929495

  8. Measurement and Controls Data Acquisition System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Rick; Daniel, Alice; Batts, Frank E., Sr.

    2006-01-01

    Measurement and Controls Data Acquisition System (MCDAS) is an application program that integrates the functions of two stand-alone programs: one for acquisition of data, the other for controls. MCDAS facilitates and improves testing of complex engineering systems by helping to perform calibration and setup of test systems and acquisition, dissemination, and processing of data. Features of MCDAS include an intuitive, user-friendly graphical user interface, a capability for acquiring data at rates greater than previously possible, cooperation between the data-acquisition software subsystem and alarm-checking and analytical components of the control software subsystem, and a capability for dissemination of data through fiber optics and virtual and wide-area networks, including networks that contain hand-held display units. The integration of the data acquisition and control software offers a safety advantage by making alarm information available to the control software in a more timely manner. By enabling the use of hand-held devices, MCDAS reduces the time spent by technicians asking for screen updates to determine effects of setup actions. Previously recorded data can be processed without interruption to current acquisition of data. Analysts can continue to view test parameters while test-data files are being generated.

  9. Who Is Guarding Serbia’s Borders? An Assessment of Serbia’s Progress in Border Security Development and Reform

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    Product HVO Croatian Defense Force IBM Integrated Border Management ICG International Crisis Group ICTY International Criminal Tribunal...supply. Serbian state controlled enterprises offered to pay premiums for needed petroleum products and other raw materials. As Serbian industry had...exchange for allowing safe passage of petroleum products and other sanctioned goods across borders into Serbia.84 Sanctions busting was organized in

  10. Novel EUV mask black border and its impact on wafer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodera, Yutaka; Fukugami, Norihito; Komizo, Toru; Watanabe, Genta; Ito, Shin; Yoshida, Itaru; Maruyama, Shingo; Kotani, Jun; Konishi, Toshio; Haraguchi, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    EUV lithography is the most promising technology for semiconductor device manufacturing of the 10nm node and beyond. The EUV mask is a key element in the lithographic scanner optical path. The image border is a pattern free dark area around the die on the photomask serving as transition area between the parts of the mask that is shielded from the exposure light by the Reticle Masking (REMA) blades and the die. When printing a die at dense spacing on an EUV scanner, the EUV light reflection from the image border overlaps edges of neighboring dies, affecting CD and contrast in this area. To reduce this effect an etched multilayer type black border was developed, and it was demonstrated that CD impact at the edge of a die is strongly reduced with this type of the black border (BB). However, wafer printing result still showed some CD change influenced by the black border reflection. It was proven that the CD shift was caused by DUV Out of Band (OOB) light which is emitted from EUV light source. New types of a multilayer etched BB were evaluated and showed a good potential for DUV light suppression. In this study, a novel black border called Hybrid Black Border has been developed which allows to eliminate EUV and DUV OOB light reflection. Direct measurements of OOB light from HBB and Normal BB are performed on NXE:3300B ASML EUV scanner; it is shown that HBB OOB reflection is 3x lower than that of Normal BB. Finally, we state that HBB is a promising technology allowing for CD control at die edges.

  11. Simulation of Cross-border Impacts Resulting from Classical Swine Fever Epidemics within the Netherlands and Germany.

    PubMed

    Hop, G E; Mourits, M C M; Oude Lansink, A G J M; Saatkamp, H W

    2016-02-01

    The cross-border region of the Netherlands (NL) and the two German states of North Rhine Westphalia (NRW) and Lower Saxony (LS) is a large and highly integrated livestock production area. This region increasingly develops towards a single epidemiological area in which disease introduction is a shared veterinary and, consequently, economic risk. The objectives of this study were to examine classical swine fever (CSF) control strategies' veterinary and direct economic impacts for NL, NRW and LS given the current production structure and to analyse CSF's cross-border causes and impacts within the NL-NRW-LS region. The course of the epidemic was simulated by the use of InterSpread Plus, whereas economic analysis was restricted to calculating disease control costs and costs directly resulting from the control measures applied. Three veterinary control strategies were considered: a strategy based on the minimum EU requirements, a vaccination and a depopulation strategy based on NL and GER's contingency plans. Regardless of the veterinary control strategy, simulated outbreak sizes and durations for 2010 were much smaller than those simulated previously, using data from over 10 years ago. For example, worst-case outbreaks (50th percentile) in NL resulted in 30-40 infected farms and lasted for two to four and a half months; associated direct costs and direct consequential costs ranged from €24.7 to 28.6 million and €11.7 to 26.7 million, respectively. Both vaccination and depopulation strategies were efficient in controlling outbreaks, especially large outbreaks, whereas the EU minimum strategy was especially deficient in controlling worst-case outbreaks. Both vaccination and depopulation strategies resulted in low direct costs and direct consequential costs. The probability of cross-border disease spread was relatively low, and cross-border spread resulted in small, short outbreaks in neighbouring countries. Few opportunities for further cross-border harmonization and

  12. Beneficial Insect Borders Provide Northern Bobwhite Brood Habitat

    PubMed Central

    Moorman, Christopher E.; Plush, Charles J.; Orr, David B.; Reberg-Horton, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Strips of fallow vegetation along cropland borders are an effective strategy for providing brood habitat for declining populations of upland game birds (Order: Galliformes), including northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus), but fallow borders lack nectar-producing vegetation needed to sustain many beneficial insect populations (e.g., crop pest predators, parasitoids, and pollinator species). Planted borders that contain mixes of prairie flowers and grasses are designed to harbor more diverse arthropod communities, but the relative value of these borders as brood habitat is unknown. We used groups of six human-imprinted northern bobwhite chicks as a bioassay for comparing four different border treatments (planted native grass and prairie flowers, planted prairie flowers only, fallow vegetation, or mowed vegetation) as northern bobwhite brood habitat from June-August 2009 and 2010. All field border treatments were established around nine organic crop fields. Groups of chicks were led through borders for 30-min foraging trials and immediately euthanized, and eaten arthropods in crops and gizzards were measured to calculate a foraging rate for each border treatment. We estimated arthropod prey availability within each border treatment using a modified blower-vac to sample arthropods at the vegetation strata where chicks foraged. Foraging rate did not differ among border treatments in 2009 or 2010. Total arthropod prey densities calculated from blower-vac samples did not differ among border treatments in 2009 or 2010. Our results showed plant communities established to attract beneficial insects should maximize the biodiversity potential of field border establishment by providing habitat for beneficial insects and young upland game birds. PMID:24376759

  13. Dose-dependent modulation of HIF-1alpha/sima controls the rate of cell migration and invasion in Drosophila ovary border cells.

    PubMed

    Doronkin, S; Djagaeva, I; Nagle, M E; Reiter, L T; Seagroves, T N

    2010-02-25

    The role of the hypoxic response during metastasis was analysed in migrating border cells of the Drosophila ovary. Acute exposure to 1% O(2) delayed or blocked border cell migration (BCM), whereas prolonged exposure resulted in the first documented accelerated BCM phenotype. Similarly, manipulating the expression levels of sima, the Drosophila hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1alpha ortholog, revealed that Sima can either block or restore BCM in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, over-expression of Vhl (Drosophila von Hippel-Lindau) generated a range of phenotypes, including blocked, delayed and accelerated BCM, whereas over-expression of hph (Drosophila HIF prolyl hydroxylase) only accelerated BCM. Mosaic clone analysis of sima or tango (HIF-1beta ortholog) mutants revealed that cells lacking Hif-1 transcriptional activity were preferentially detected in the leading cell position of the cluster, resulting in either a delay or acceleration of BCM. Moreover, in sima mutant cell clones, there was reduced expression of nuclear slow border cells (Slbo) and basolateral DE-cadherin, proteins essential for proper BCM. These results show that Sima levels define the rate of BCM in part through regulation of Slbo and DE-cadherin, and suggest that dynamic regulation of Hif-1 activity is necessary to maintain invasive potential of migrating epithelial cells.

  14. Measurement and Control of Glass Feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    Arel Weisberg

    2007-04-26

    ERCo has developed a laser-based technology for rapid compositional measurements of batch, real-time sorting of cullet, and in-situ measurements of molten glass. This technology, termed LIBS (Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) can determine whether or not the batch was formulated accurately in order to control glass quality. It can also be used to determine if individual batch ingredients are within specifications. In the case of cullet feedstocks, the sensor can serve as part of a system to sort cullet by color and ensure that it is free of contaminants. In-situ compositional measurements of molten glass are achieved through immersing a LIBS probe directly into the melt in a glass furnace. This technology has been successfully demonstrated in ERCo’s LIBS laboratory for batch analysis, cullet sorting, and glass melt measurements. A commercial batch analyzer has been operating in a PPG fiberglass plant since August 2004. LIBS utilizes a highly concentrated laser pulse to rapidly vaporize and ionize nanograms of the material being studied. As this vapor cools, it radiates light at specific wavelengths corresponding to the elemental constituents (e.g. silicon, aluminum, iron) of the material. The strengths of the emissions correlate to the concentrations of each of the elemental constituents. By collecting the radiated light with a spectrometer capable of resolving and measuring these wavelengths, the elemental composition of the sample is found.

  15. TECHNIQUES TO ASSESS CROSS-BORDER AIR POLLUTION AND APPLICATION TO A U.S.-MEXICO BORDER REGION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A year-long assessment of cross-border air pollution was conducted in the eastmost section of the US-Mexico border region, known as the Lower Rio Grande Valley, in South Texas. Measurements were conducted on the US side and included fine particle mass (PM2.5) and elemental com...

  16. TECHNIQUES TO ASSESS CROSS-BORDER AIR POLLUTION AND APPLICATION TO A U.S.-MEXICO BORDER REGION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A year-long assessment of cross-border air pollution was conducted in the eastmost section of the US-Mexico border region, known as the Lower Rio Grande Valley, in South Texas. Measurements were conducted on the US side and included fine particle mass (PM2.5) and elemental com...

  17. Social and cultural influences among Mexican border entrepreneurs.

    PubMed

    Díaz Bretones, Francisco; Cappello, Héctor M; Garcia, Pedro A

    2009-06-01

    Social and cultural conditions (including U.S. border and inland influence, role models within the family, and educational background) which affect locus of control and achievement motivation among Mexican entrepreneurs were explored among 64 selected entrepreneurs in two Mexican towns, one on the Mexico-U.S. border, the other located inland. Analyses showed that the border subsample scored higher on External locus of control; however, in both subsamples the father was an important element in the locus of control variable and the entrepreneur status. No statistically significant mean difference was noted for achievement motivation. Practical applications and limitations are discussed.

  18. Collaborating Across Borders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flatten, Amy

    Physicists transcend national boundaries, ethnic differences, and scientific disciplines to address globally shared problems and questions. This talk will highlight how scientists have collaborated across borders - both geographic and scientific - to achieve ground-breaking discoveries through international scientific cooperation. The speaker also will address how international collaborations will be even more crucial for addressing future challenges faced by the physics community, such as building large-scale research facilities, strengthening scientific capacity in developing countries, fostering ''science for diplomacy'' in times of political tensions and other critical issues.

  19. 10 CFR 74.45 - Measurements and measurement control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) MATERIAL CONTROL AND ACCOUNTING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR... received, produced, transferred between internal control areas, on inventory, or shipped, discarded, or..., transferred between internal control areas, or on inventory that have been determined by other means...

  20. EUV mask black border evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turley, Christina; Bonam, Ravi; Gallagher, Emily; Grohs, Jonathan; Kagawa, Masayuki; Kindt, Louis; Narita, Eisuke; Nash, Steven; Sakamoto, Yoshifumi

    2014-10-01

    The black border is a frame created by removing all the multilayers on the EUV mask in the region around the chip. It is created to prevent exposure of adjacent fields when printing an EUV mask on a wafer. Papers have documented its effectiveness. As the technology transitions into manufacturing, the black border must be optimized from the initial mask making process through its life. In this work, the black border is evaluated in three stages: the black border during fabrication, the final sidewall profile, and extended lifetime studies. This work evaluates the black border through simulations and physical experiments. The simulations address concerns for defects and sidewall profiles. The physical experiments test the current black border process. Three masks are used: one mask to test how black border affects the image placement of features on mask and two masks to test how the multilayers change through extended cleans. Data incorporated in this study includes: registration, reflectivity, multilayer structure images and simulated wafer effects. By evaluating the black border from both a mask making perspective and a lifetime perspective, we are able to characterize how the structure evolves. The mask data and simulations together predict the performance of the black border and its ability to maintain critical dimensions on wafer. In this paper we explore what mask changes occur and how they will affect mask use.

  1. Small islands and pandemic influenza: Potential benefits and limitations of travel volume reduction as a border control measure

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Some island nations have explicit components of their influenza pandemic plans for providing travel warnings and restricting incoming travellers. But the potential value of such restrictions has not been quantified. Methods We developed a probabilistic model and used parameters from a published model (i.e., InfluSim) and travel data from Pacific Island Countries and Territories (PICTs). Results The results indicate that of the 17 PICTs with travel data, only six would be likely to escape a major pandemic with a viral strain of relatively low contagiousness (i.e., for R0 = 1.5) even when imposing very tight travel volume reductions of 99% throughout the course of the pandemic. For a more contagious viral strain (R0 = 2.25) only five PICTs would have a probability of over 50% to escape. The total number of travellers during the pandemic must not exceed 115 (for R0 = 3.0) or 380 (for R0 = 1.5) if a PICT aims to keep the probability of pandemic arrival below 50%. Conclusion These results suggest that relatively few island nations could successfully rely on intensive travel volume restrictions alone to avoid the arrival of pandemic influenza (or subsequent waves). Therefore most island nations may need to plan for multiple additional interventions (e.g., screening and quarantine) to raise the probability of remaining pandemic free or achieving substantial delay in pandemic arrival. PMID:19788751

  2. Tuning quantum measurements to control chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastman, Jessica K.; Hope, Joseph J.; Carvalho, André R. R.

    2017-03-01

    Environment-induced decoherence has long been recognised as being of crucial importance in the study of chaos in quantum systems. In particular, the exact form and strength of the system-environment interaction play a major role in the quantum-to-classical transition of chaotic systems. In this work we focus on the effect of varying monitoring strategies, i.e. for a given decoherence model and a fixed environmental coupling, there is still freedom on how to monitor a quantum system. We show here that there is a region between the deep quantum regime and the classical limit where the choice of the monitoring parameter allows one to control the complex behaviour of the system, leading to either the emergence or suppression of chaos. Our work shows that this is a result from the interplay between quantum interference effects induced by the nonlinear dynamics and the effectiveness of the decoherence for different measurement schemes.

  3. Tuning quantum measurements to control chaos

    PubMed Central

    Eastman, Jessica K.; Hope, Joseph J.; Carvalho, André R. R.

    2017-01-01

    Environment-induced decoherence has long been recognised as being of crucial importance in the study of chaos in quantum systems. In particular, the exact form and strength of the system-environment interaction play a major role in the quantum-to-classical transition of chaotic systems. In this work we focus on the effect of varying monitoring strategies, i.e. for a given decoherence model and a fixed environmental coupling, there is still freedom on how to monitor a quantum system. We show here that there is a region between the deep quantum regime and the classical limit where the choice of the monitoring parameter allows one to control the complex behaviour of the system, leading to either the emergence or suppression of chaos. Our work shows that this is a result from the interplay between quantum interference effects induced by the nonlinear dynamics and the effectiveness of the decoherence for different measurement schemes. PMID:28317933

  4. Anesthesia education across borders.

    PubMed

    Dohlman, Lena E

    2013-12-01

    Changing attitudes toward global health are affecting medical education programs at all levels in the USA and abroad. This review describes some of these changes, and how these affect the educational aspects of US global health programs and anesthesia training in developing countries. Interest in global health has surged in the past decade, and support for programs has increased in medical schools, university hospitals and from the US government. Recognition of the surgical burden of disease as a global public health problem has been slow but is also increasing. Anesthesia involvement in building healthcare education infrastructure and workforce in low-resource countries is needed and important, and benefits can be had on both sides of the border. The past 5 years have brought a new global focus on workforce development and education in anesthesia. Programs need to be supported by all stakeholders and monitored for safety, quality and outcomes.

  5. Life on the Hardened Border

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Bruce Granville

    2012-01-01

    The many Coast Salish groups distributed on both sides of the United States-Canada border on the Pacific coast today face significant obstacles to cross the international border, and in some cases are denied passage or intimidated into not attempting to cross. The current situation regarding travel by Aboriginal people reflects the…

  6. Life on the Hardened Border

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Bruce Granville

    2012-01-01

    The many Coast Salish groups distributed on both sides of the United States-Canada border on the Pacific coast today face significant obstacles to cross the international border, and in some cases are denied passage or intimidated into not attempting to cross. The current situation regarding travel by Aboriginal people reflects the…

  7. Microsensors for border patrol applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falkofske, Dwight; Krantz, Brian; Shimazu, Ron; Berglund, Victor

    2005-05-01

    A top concern in homeland security efforts is the lack of ability to monitor the thousands of miles of open border with our neighbors. It is not currently feasible to continually monitor the borders for illegal intrusions. The MicroSensor System (MSS) seeks to achieve a low-cost monitoring solution that can be efficiently deployed for border patrol applications. The modifications and issues regarding the unique requirements of this application will be discussed and presented. The MicroSensor System was developed by the Defense Microelectronics Activity (DMEA) for military applications, but border patrol applications, with their unique sensor requirements, demand careful adaptation and modification from the military application. Adaptation of the existing sensor design for border applications has been initiated. Coverage issues, communications needs, and other requirements need to be explored for the border patrol application. Currently, border patrol has a number of deficiencies that can be addressed with a microsensor network. First, a distributed networked sensor field could mitigate the porous border intruder detection problem. Second, a unified database needs to be available to identify aliens attempting to cross into the United States. This database needs to take unique characteristics (e.g. biometrics, fingerprints) recovered from a specialized field unit to reliably identify intruders. Finally, this sensor network needs to provide a communication ability to allow border patrol officers to have quick access to intrusion information as well as equipment tracking and voice communication. MSS already addresses the sensing portion of the solution, including detection of acoustic, infrared, magnetic, and seismic events. MSS also includes a low-power networking protocol to lengthen the battery life. In addition to current military requirements, MSS needs a solar panel solution to extend its battery life to 5 years, and an additional backbone communication link

  8. 40 CFR 51.111 - Description of control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Description of control measures. 51.111... Description of control measures. Each plan must set forth a control strategy which includes the following: (a... compliance with each of the selected control measures, (2) Procedures for handling violations, and (3) A...

  9. 40 CFR 51.111 - Description of control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Description of control measures. 51.111... Description of control measures. Each plan must set forth a control strategy which includes the following: (a... compliance with each of the selected control measures, (2) Procedures for handling violations, and (3) A...

  10. 40 CFR 51.111 - Description of control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Description of control measures. 51.111... Description of control measures. Each plan must set forth a control strategy which includes the following: (a... compliance with each of the selected control measures, (2) Procedures for handling violations, and (3) A...

  11. 40 CFR 51.111 - Description of control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Description of control measures. 51.111... Description of control measures. Each plan must set forth a control strategy which includes the following: (a... compliance with each of the selected control measures, (2) Procedures for handling violations, and (3) A...

  12. Laser safety: Risks, hazards, and control measures

    PubMed Central

    Smalley, Penny J.

    2011-01-01

    Now that laser technology has emerged from hospital operating rooms, and has become available to office practices, clinics, and private enterprises, the burden of responsibility for safety has shifted from hospital staff to the individual user, often without benefit of appropriate or adequate resources. What remains, regardless of the practice site, application, or system in use, is the constant goal of establishing and maintaining a laser safe environment for the patient, the staff, and the user, at all times. This should be the goal of all who are involved with the sale, purchase, application, and management of all medical laser systems–under all circumstances. Laser safety is EVERYONE'S concern! A laser is as safe or as hazardous as the user–and that user's knowledge and skill, defines how well laser safety is managed. Of all hazards, complacency is the most dangerous, and it is imperative to develop a risk management perspective on laser safety. Proper safety management requires a fourfold approach including: knowledge of standards, identification of hazards and risks, implementation of appropriate control measures, and consistent program audit to demonstrate quality assurance. PMID:24155518

  13. A Measurement Control Program for Nuclear Material Accounting

    SciTech Connect

    Brouns, R. J.; Roberts, F. P.; Merrill, J. A.; Brown, W. B.

    1980-06-01

    A measurement control program for nuclear material accounting monitors and controls the quality of the measurements of special nuclear material that are involved in material balances. The quality is monitored by collecting data from which the current precision and accuracy of measurements can be evaluated. The quality is controlled by evaluations, reviews, and other administrative measures for control of selection or design of facilities. equipment and measurement methods and the training and qualification of personnel who perform SNM measurements. This report describes the most important elements of a program by which management can monitor and control measurement quality.

  14. Border Security: Barriers Along the U.S. International Border

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-16

    Border Fence Construction Process and Funding................................................................. 18 Types of Fences and Barriers...33 Figures Figure 1. Imperial Beach Station Apprehensions...13 Figure 3. Apprehensions at San Diego Sector Stations, Excluding Imperial Beach and Chula Vista

  15. Advancements in bait technology to control Glossina swynnertoni Austen, the species of limited distribution in Kenya and Tanzania border: A review.

    PubMed

    Nagagi, Yakob P; Silayo, Richard S; Kweka, Eliningaya J

    2017-01-01

    Glossina swynnertoni is a savannah tsetse that is largely confined to the Serengeti-Mara [a very small part of East Africa covering northern Tanzania (Arusha and Manyara regions and parts of Shinyanga and Mara regions) extending Maasai Mara ecosystem in southwestern Kenya]. Nevertheless, it is of great concern to human and animal health and is one of the top target tsetse species for eradication. To achieve this eradication objective, it is important to know about its behaviour so that the appropriate tools/measures especially the right traps can be applied against it. In this paper G. swynnertoni is reviewed in terms of its behaviour, and development of traps for its survey and control. Glossina swynnertoni control is of paramount importance in Tanzania tourism industry and country's income. Since, G. swynnertoni is also distributed in national parks, control is vital as it might reduce tourists excursion/movement, by transmitting the African trypanosomiasis among travelers. Different literature search engines such as Google Scholar and PubMed were deployed for literature search. It was found that the behaviour of G. swynnertoni is relatively similar but unique from other tsetse flies. Its feeding cycle is 2½-3 days as opposed to 3-4 days observed in other tsetse species. The flight activity pattern varied between sex, with male having their peak at 1100-1200 hrs and females 1400-1600 hrs. The activity in both sexes decline rapidly towards the dusk (1700-1800 hrs). It was further that host odours, relatively smaller and vertically oriented devices, as well as host movement are the main attractive factors to this tsetse species, which can be exploited to design efficient artificial devices for control of G. swynnertoni . Therefore, due to its restricted distribution and threat it poses on tourism industry, deliberate efforts need to be made against G. swynnertoni as a next candidate to be eradicated using artificial bait technology.

  16. Presidential Edict No. 2145 "On Measures to Introduce Immigration Control" [16 December 1993].

    PubMed

    1993-12-27

    This Edict introduces immigration controls at the borders of the Russian Federation. The controls are under the Russian Federal Migration Service and have the following tasks: "a) control over the entry onto the country's territory of foreign citizens or stateless persons seeking asylum or in transit, their identification, registration, and recording; b) the implementation of measures to prevent uncontrolled migration and the organization of the deportation of foreigners in cases and within the procedure stipulated by acts of legislation; c) the examination of appeals for asylum from foreign citizens and stateless persons who have come to Russian territory." Further provisions of the Edict deal with determination of immigration control points and their opening hours, allocation of premises and equipment for the implementation of immigration control activities, financing, information communication systems, procedures for the temporary accommodation and residence of persons seeking asylum, immigration personnel, and the training of such personnel, among other things. In December 1993, the Council of Ministers of the Russian Federation issued a Decree to create a statewide automated system of registering the official identity documents of the population and calling for proposals on this system. See Foreign Broadcast Information Service, Document No. FBIS-SOV-93-246, 27 December 1993, p. 42.

  17. 40 CFR 51.213 - Transportation control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Transportation control measures. 51.213... Transportation control measures. (a) The plan must contain procedures for obtaining and maintaining data on actual emissions reductions achieved as a result of implementing transportation control measures. (b) In...

  18. 33 CFR 101.410 - Control and Compliance Measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control and Compliance Measures... MARITIME SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY: GENERAL Control Measures for Security § 101.410 Control and Compliance Measures. (a) The COTP may exercise authority pursuant to 33 CFR parts 6, 160 and 165, as appropriate, to...

  19. 33 CFR 101.410 - Control and Compliance Measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control and Compliance Measures... MARITIME SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY: GENERAL Control Measures for Security § 101.410 Control and Compliance Measures. (a) The COTP may exercise authority pursuant to 33 CFR parts 6, 160 and 165, as appropriate, to...

  20. Toward Definition and Measurement of Pupil Control Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helsel, A. Ray; Willower, Donald J.

    1974-01-01

    Pupil control is regarded as an integrative theme to explain the collection of extensive observations made in schools. This report attempts to define and measure pupil control behavior, a companion concept to pupil control ideology. (Author/WM)

  1. Border Sovereignty and Protection Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Hunter, Duncan D. [R-CA-52

    2009-04-23

    05/26/2009 Referred to the Subcommittee on Immigration, Citizenship, Refugees, Border Security, and International Law. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  2. Border Sovereignty and Protection Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Hunter, Duncan D. [R-CA-52

    2009-04-23

    House - 05/26/2009 Referred to the Subcommittee on Immigration, Citizenship, Refugees, Border Security, and International Law. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  3. Border Hunter Research Technical Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-31

    southwest border of the United States. Border Hunter is a systematic approach designed to improve cognitive skills, training personnel to read the...experts Greg Williams and David Scott-Donelan. Lastly, I also want to thank the research team, who designed , executed, and completed this ambitious...of Central Florida’s Institute for Simulation and Training), who organized the research effort, constructed the high-level research design

  4. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN TUBERCULOSIS AND DIABETES IN THE MEXICAN BORDER AND NON-BORDER REGIONS OF TEXAS

    PubMed Central

    PÉREZ, ADRIANA; BROWN, H. SHELTON; RESTREPO, BLANCA I.

    2006-01-01

    The association between tuberculosis and underlying risk factors was evaluated in Texas patients hospitalized in the 15 counties along the Mexico border within the remaining non-border counties. A case control analysis of the hospital discharge dataset from the Texas Health Care Information Council was performed for the years 1999–2001. A discharge diagnosis of tuberculosis identified cases (N = 4,915). Deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and acute appendicitis conditions identified controls (N = 70,808). Risk factors associated with tuberculosis were identified by logistic regression. Diabetes patients were almost twice as likely to have tuberculosis after adjusting by sex, age, and race/ethnicity. The association was strong for the population in the Texas border region, where there are higher incidence rates of tuberculosis (odds ratio [OR]adj = 1.82; 95% CI = 1.57–2.12) compared with non-border counties (ORadj = 1.51; 95% CI = 1.36–1.67). PMID:16606993

  5. A Microcomputer-Controlled Measurement of Acceleration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crandall, A. Jared; Stoner, Ronald

    1982-01-01

    Describes apparatus and method used to allow rapid and repeated measurement of acceleration of a ball rolling down an inclined plane. Acceleration measurements can be performed in an hour with the apparatus interfaced to a Commodore PET microcomputer. A copy of the BASIC program is available from the authors. (Author/JN)

  6. A Microcomputer-Controlled Measurement of Acceleration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crandall, A. Jared; Stoner, Ronald

    1982-01-01

    Describes apparatus and method used to allow rapid and repeated measurement of acceleration of a ball rolling down an inclined plane. Acceleration measurements can be performed in an hour with the apparatus interfaced to a Commodore PET microcomputer. A copy of the BASIC program is available from the authors. (Author/JN)

  7. Thermoelectric property measurements with computer controlled systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chmielewski, A. B.; Wood, C.

    1984-01-01

    A joint JPL-NASA program to develop an automated system to measure the thermoelectric properties of newly developed materials is described. Consideration is given to the difficulties created by signal drift in measurements of Hall voltage and the Large Delta T Seebeck coefficient. The benefits of a computerized system were examined with respect to error reduction and time savings for human operators. It is shown that the time required to measure Hall voltage can be reduced by a factor of 10 when a computer is used to fit a curve to the ratio of the measured signal and its standard deviation. The accuracy of measurements of the Large Delta T Seebeck coefficient and thermal diffusivity was also enhanced by the use of computers.

  8. Thermoelectric property measurements with computer controlled systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chmielewski, A. B.; Wood, C.

    1984-01-01

    A joint JPL-NASA program to develop an automated system to measure the thermoelectric properties of newly developed materials is described. Consideration is given to the difficulties created by signal drift in measurements of Hall voltage and the Large Delta T Seebeck coefficient. The benefits of a computerized system were examined with respect to error reduction and time savings for human operators. It is shown that the time required to measure Hall voltage can be reduced by a factor of 10 when a computer is used to fit a curve to the ratio of the measured signal and its standard deviation. The accuracy of measurements of the Large Delta T Seebeck coefficient and thermal diffusivity was also enhanced by the use of computers.

  9. Measurement and Control of Glass Feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    2005-08-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) promises a new way for glass manufacturers to significantly increase productivity. By measuring the chemical makeup in raw materials and recycled glass cullet, LIBS can quickly detect contaminants and batch non...

  10. Changes in the Transnational Family Structures of Mexican Farm Workers in the Era of Border Militarization.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Erin R; Hale, Jo Mhairi

    2016-10-01

    Historically, undocumented Mexican farm workers migrated circularly, leaving family behind in Mexico on short trips to the United States. Scholars have argued that border militarization has disrupted circular migration as the costs of crossing the border lead to longer stays, increased settlement, and changing transnational family practices. Yet, no study has explored changes in the transnational family structures of Mexico-U.S. migrants that span the era of border militarization. Using data from the National Agricultural Workers Survey, we document a dramatic shift away from transnational family life (as measured by location of residence of dependent children) among undocumented Mexican farm workers and a less dramatic shift among documented Mexican farm workers in the United States between 1993 and 2012. These trends are not explained by changes in the sociodemographic characteristics of farm workers or by changing demographic conditions or rising violence in Mexico. One-half of the trend can be accounted for by lengthened duration of stay and increased connections to the United States among the undocumented, but none of the trend is explained by these measures of settlement among the documented, suggesting that some Mexican farm workers adopt new family migration strategies at first migration. Increases in border control are associated with lower likelihood that children reside in Mexico-a finding that holds up to instrumental variable techniques. Our findings confirm the argument that U.S. border militarization-a policy designed to deter undocumented migration-is instead disrupting transnational family life between Mexico and the United States and, in doing so, is creating a permanent population of undocumented migrants and their children in the United States.

  11. Brief Intervention in the Emergency Department Among Mexican-Origin Young Adults at the US–Mexico Border: Outcomes of a Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial Using Promotores†

    PubMed Central

    Cherpitel, Cheryl J.; Ye, Yu; Bond, Jason; Woolard, Robert; Villalobos, Susana; Bernstein, Judith; Bernstein, Edward; Ramos, Rebeca

    2016-01-01

    Aims A randomized controlled trial of brief intervention (BI), for drinking and related problems, using peer health promotion advocates (promotores), was conducted among at-risk and alcohol-dependent Mexican-origin young adult emergency department (ED) patients, aged 18–30. Methods Six hundred and ninety-eight patients were randomized to: screened only (n = 78), assessed (n = 310) and intervention (n = 310). Primary outcomes were at-risk drinking and Rapid Alcohol Problems Screen (RAPS4) scores. Secondary outcomes were drinking days per week, drinks per drinking day, maximum drinks in a day and negative consequences of drinking. Results At 3- and 12-month follow-up the intervention condition showed significantly lower values or trends on all outcome variables compared to the assessed condition, with the exception of the RAPS4 score; e.g. at-risk drinking days dropped from 2.9 to 1.7 at 3 months for the assessed condition and from 3.2 to 1.2 for the intervention condition. Using random effects modeling controlling for demographics and baseline values, the intervention condition showed significantly greater improvement in all consumption measures at 12 months, but not in the RAPS4 or negative consequences of drinking. Improvements in outcomes were significantly more evident for non-injured patients, those reporting drinking prior to the event, and those lower on risk taking disposition. Conclusions At 12-month follow-up this study demonstrated significantly improved drinking outcomes for Mexican-origin young adults in the ED who received a BI delivered by promotores compared to those who did not. Trial Register ClinicalTrials.gov. Clinical Trial Registration Number NCT02056535. PMID:26243733

  12. Brief Intervention in the Emergency Department Among Mexican-Origin Young Adults at the US-Mexico Border: Outcomes of a Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial Using Promotores.

    PubMed

    Cherpitel, Cheryl J; Ye, Yu; Bond, Jason; Woolard, Robert; Villalobos, Susana; Bernstein, Judith; Bernstein, Edward; Ramos, Rebeca

    2016-03-01

    A randomized controlled trial of brief intervention (BI), for drinking and related problems, using peer health promotion advocates (promotores), was conducted among at-risk and alcohol-dependent Mexican-origin young adult emergency department (ED) patients, aged 18-30. Six hundred and ninety-eight patients were randomized to: screened only (n = 78), assessed (n = 310) and intervention (n = 310). Primary outcomes were at-risk drinking and Rapid Alcohol Problems Screen (RAPS4) scores. Secondary outcomes were drinking days per week, drinks per drinking day, maximum drinks in a day and negative consequences of drinking. At 3- and 12-month follow-up the intervention condition showed significantly lower values or trends on all outcome variables compared to the assessed condition, with the exception of the RAPS4 score; e.g. at-risk drinking days dropped from 2.9 to 1.7 at 3 months for the assessed condition and from 3.2 to 1.2 for the intervention condition. Using random effects modeling controlling for demographics and baseline values, the intervention condition showed significantly greater improvement in all consumption measures at 12 months, but not in the RAPS4 or negative consequences of drinking. Improvements in outcomes were significantly more evident for non-injured patients, those reporting drinking prior to the event, and those lower on risk taking disposition. At 12-month follow-up this study demonstrated significantly improved drinking outcomes for Mexican-origin young adults in the ED who received a BI delivered by promotores compared to those who did not. ClinicalTrials.gov. NCT02056535. © The Author 2015. Medical Council on Alcohol and Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  13. Cross-Border Cholera Outbreaks in Sub-Saharan Africa, the Mystery behind the Silent Illness: What Needs to Be Done?

    PubMed

    Bwire, Godfrey; Mwesawina, Maurice; Baluku, Yosia; Kanyanda, Setiala S E; Orach, Christopher Garimoi

    2016-01-01

    Cross-border cholera outbreaks are a major public health problem in Sub-Saharan Africa contributing to the high annual reported cholera cases and deaths. These outbreaks affect all categories of people and are challenging to prevent and control. This article describes lessons learnt during the cross-border cholera outbreak control in Eastern and Southern Africa sub-regions using the case of Uganda-DRC and Malawi-Mozambique borders and makes recommendations for future outbreak prevention and control. We reviewed weekly surveillance data, outbreak response reports and documented experiences on the management of the most recent cross-border cholera outbreaks in Eastern and Southern Africa sub-regions, namely in Uganda and Malawi respectively. Uganda-Democratic Republic of Congo and Malawi-Mozambique borders were selected because the countries sharing these borders reported high cholera disease burden to WHO. A total of 603 cross-border cholera cases with 5 deaths were recorded in Malawi and Uganda in 2015. Uganda recorded 118 cases with 2 deaths and CFR of 1.7%. The under-fives and school going children were the most affected age groups contributing 24.2% and 36.4% of all patients seen along Malawi-Mozambique and Uganda-DRC borders, respectively. These outbreaks lasted for over 3 months and spread to new areas leading to 60 cases with 3 deaths, CRF of 5%, and 102 cases 0 deaths in Malawi and Uganda, respectively. Factors contributing to these outbreaks were: poor sanitation and hygiene, use of contaminated water, floods and rampant cross-border movements. The outbreak control efforts mainly involved unilateral measures implemented by only one of the affected countries. Cross-border cholera outbreaks contribute to the high annual reported cholera burden in Sub-Saharan Africa yet they remain silent, marginalized and poorly identified by cholera actors (governments and international agencies). The under-fives and the school going children were the most affected age

  14. Cross-Border Cholera Outbreaks in Sub-Saharan Africa, the Mystery behind the Silent Illness: What Needs to Be Done?

    PubMed Central

    Mwesawina, Maurice; Baluku, Yosia; Kanyanda, Setiala S. E.; Orach, Christopher Garimoi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cross-border cholera outbreaks are a major public health problem in Sub-Saharan Africa contributing to the high annual reported cholera cases and deaths. These outbreaks affect all categories of people and are challenging to prevent and control. This article describes lessons learnt during the cross-border cholera outbreak control in Eastern and Southern Africa sub-regions using the case of Uganda-DRC and Malawi-Mozambique borders and makes recommendations for future outbreak prevention and control. Materials and Methods We reviewed weekly surveillance data, outbreak response reports and documented experiences on the management of the most recent cross-border cholera outbreaks in Eastern and Southern Africa sub-regions, namely in Uganda and Malawi respectively. Uganda-Democratic Republic of Congo and Malawi-Mozambique borders were selected because the countries sharing these borders reported high cholera disease burden to WHO. Results A total of 603 cross-border cholera cases with 5 deaths were recorded in Malawi and Uganda in 2015. Uganda recorded 118 cases with 2 deaths and CFR of 1.7%. The under-fives and school going children were the most affected age groups contributing 24.2% and 36.4% of all patients seen along Malawi-Mozambique and Uganda-DRC borders, respectively. These outbreaks lasted for over 3 months and spread to new areas leading to 60 cases with 3 deaths, CRF of 5%, and 102 cases 0 deaths in Malawi and Uganda, respectively. Factors contributing to these outbreaks were: poor sanitation and hygiene, use of contaminated water, floods and rampant cross-border movements. The outbreak control efforts mainly involved unilateral measures implemented by only one of the affected countries. Conclusions Cross-border cholera outbreaks contribute to the high annual reported cholera burden in Sub-Saharan Africa yet they remain silent, marginalized and poorly identified by cholera actors (governments and international agencies). The under-fives and the

  15. Borders in Education and Living- a Case of Trench Warfare.

    PubMed

    Hviid, Pernille

    2016-03-01

    In this paper the notion of border will be examined in a cultural life course perspective. I will investigate borders as psycho-cultural constructions created to enable and control meaning-making in the intersection between subjects engagements and concerns and collectively constructed and guiding meanings. An empirical analysis of one boy's life course in and between home, school and a Leisure Time Activity Center in the years 1st to 3rd grade demonstrates a systemic construction of borders involving him, his teachers and his parents and renders the boy to choose between becoming an engaged pupil or a dedicated son. As such, the analysis can illuminate processes of school - home interactions that work opposite of what is intended and become detrimental to children's life. In a cultural life course perspective borders show how life is maintained as meaningful and not only guide the present living but also serve as directional guides into the future.

  16. Effects of Vegetated Field Borders on Arthropods in Cotton Fields in Eastern North Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Outward, Randy; Sorenson, Clyde E.; Bradley, J. R.

    2008-01-01

    The influence, if any, of 5m wide, feral, herbaceous field borders on pest and beneficial arthropods in commercial cotton, Gossypium hirsutum (L.) (Malvales: Malvaceae), fields was measured through a variety of sampling techniques over three years. In each year, 5 fields with managed, feral vegetation borders and five fields without such borders were examined. Sampling was stratified from the field border or edge in each field in an attempt to elucidate any edge effects that might have occurred. Early season thrips populations appeared to be unaffected by the presence of a border. Pitfall sampling disclosed no differences in ground-dwelling predaceous arthropods but did detect increased populations of crickets around fields with borders. Cotton aphid (Aphis gossypii Glover) (Hemiptera: Aphididae) populations were too low during the study to adequately assess border effects. Heliothines, Heliothis virescens (F.) and Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), egg numbers and damage rates were largely unaffected by the presence or absence of a border, although in one instance egg numbers were significantly lower in fields with borders. Overall, foliage-dwelling predaceous arthropods were somewhat more abundant in fields with borders than in fields without borders. Tarnished plant bugs, Lygus lineolaris (Palisot de Beauvois) (Heteroptera: Miridae) were significantly more abundant in fields with borders, but stink bugs, Acrosternum hilare (Say), and Euschistus servus (Say) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) numbers appeared to be largely unaffected by border treatment. Few taxa clearly exhibited distributional edge effects relative to the presence or absence of border vegetation. Field borders like those examined in this study likely will have little impact on insect pest management in cotton under current insect management regimens. PMID:20345293

  17. Crossing borders: HIV / AIDS and migrant communities.

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    The annual National Council for International Health Private Volunteer Organization (PVO)/AIDS workshop took place June 30, 1994, in Arlington, Virginia. About 90 representatives of PVOs, domestic and international nongovernmental organizations (NGO), universities, and research organizations were in attendance. Speakers presented both domestic and international perspectives upon the relationship between migration trends and HIV transmission. The keynote address spelled out the UN High Commission on Refugees' policy on HIV/AIDS: refugees are not a risk group per se, and they should benefit from the same control measures as the general host population; there will be no mandatory HIV screening in any population; and the rights of HIV-positive refugees against being deported and for asylum and eventual repatriation need to be protected. The following issues were presented at the workshop: an overview of HIV/AIDS and migration issues; STD/HIV control and prevention; HIV/AIDS among highly mobile populations along the Thailand/Myanmar border; migration trends in Phnom Penh, Cambodia; migrant farmworkers working in the US; changes in sexual practices among Mexican migrants to the US and their impact on the risk of HIV transmission; the importance of understanding the epidemiology, health-care seeking behaviors, and health beliefs of immigrants; the ability of PVOs and NGOs to provide effective HIV/AIDS prevention for refugees and migrants; the impact of political instability and civil strife on population movements and the prevalence of high-risk behaviors; and the important considerations needed for work with special target populations such as adolescents, women, mobile seasonal migrants, and urban residents.

  18. Border Detection of Common Carotid Artery Using Hough Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koya, Yoshiharu; Nagahara, Yoshihiro

    The arteriosclerosis is on the increase with an aging or change of our living environment. For that reason, diagnosis of the common carotid artery using echocardiogram is doing to take precautions carebropathy. The arteriosclerosis of the common carotid artery is diagnosed using Intima-Media Thickness (IMT) which is obtained from echocardiogram. In order to measure IMT from echocardiogram, it is required to detect a border which is a boundary between vessel tissue layers. The method of border detection requires reproducibility and high accuracy. The conventional methods to detect the border curve depend on differential value of brightness on the common carotid artery. Therefore, we can't extract a good candidate point by influence of a noise. In this paper, we propose the high-accuracy detection method by Hough Transform. About high-accuracy, it realized by attaching importance to high reliable candidate point of border.

  19. Toward Definition and Measurement of Pupil Control Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helsel, A. Ray; Willower, Donald J.

    An attempt is made to define and measure pupil control "behavior." In order to measure pupil control behavior, an instrument called the Pupil Control Behavior (PCB) Form was developed and tested. The 31 custodial and 34 humanistic items were randomized, and the initial version of the PCB Form was administered in 20 schools in Illinois…

  20. 33 CFR 101.410 - Control and Compliance Measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control and Compliance Measures. 101.410 Section 101.410 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY: GENERAL Control Measures for Security § 101.410 Control and Compliance...

  1. 33 CFR 101.410 - Control and Compliance Measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control and Compliance Measures. 101.410 Section 101.410 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY: GENERAL Control Measures for Security § 101.410 Control and Compliance...

  2. 33 CFR 101.410 - Control and Compliance Measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control and Compliance Measures. 101.410 Section 101.410 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY: GENERAL Control Measures for Security § 101.410 Control and Compliance...

  3. Over the border--the problems of uncontrolled radioactive materials crossing national borders.

    PubMed

    Duftschmid, K E

    2002-03-01

    Cross-border movement of radioactive materials and contaminated items, in particular metallurgical scrap, has become a problem of increasing importance. Radioactive sources out of regulatory control, now often called 'orphan sources', have frequently caused serious, even deadly, radiation exposures and widespread contamination. The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission reported over 2,300 incidents of radioactive materials found in recycled metal scrap and more than 50 accidental smeltings of radioactive sources. A further potentially serious problem is illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials. In 1995 the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) started a programme to combat illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials, which includes an international database on incidents of illicit trafficking, receiving reports from some 80 member states. For the period 1993-2000 the IAEA database includes 345 confirmed incidents. While from 1994-1996 the frequency declined significantly, this trend has been reversed since 1997, largely due to radioactive sources rather than nuclear material. This paper compares monitoring techniques for radioactive materials in scrap applied at steel plants and scrap yards with monitoring at borders, a completely different situation. It discusses the results of the 'Illicit Trafficking Radiation Detection Assessment Program', a large international pilot study, conducted in cooperation between the IAEA, the Austrian Government and the Austrian Research Centre Seibersdorf. The aim of this exercise was to derive realistic and internationally agreed requirements for border monitoring instrumentation. Finally the present extent of border monitoring installations is discussed.

  4. 40 CFR 52.1890 - Removed control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Removed control measures. 52.1890 Section 52.1890 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... measures. On the dates listed below, Ohio requested that the indicated control measures be removed from the...

  5. 40 CFR 52.1890 - Removed control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Removed control measures. 52.1890 Section 52.1890 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... measures. On the dates listed below, Ohio requested that the indicated control measures be removed from the...

  6. 40 CFR 52.1890 - Removed control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Removed control measures. 52.1890 Section 52.1890 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... measures. On the dates listed below, Ohio requested that the indicated control measures be removed from the...

  7. Measuring interactivity on tobacco control websites.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Becky; Chapman, Simon

    2012-08-01

    With the increased reach of Web 2.0, Internet users expect webpages to be interactive. No studies have been conducted to assess whether tobacco control-relevant sites have implemented these features. The authors conducted an analysis of an international sample of tobacco control-relevant websites to determine their level of interactivity. The sample included 68 unique websites selected from Google searches in 5 countries, on each country's Google site, using the term smoking. The 68 sites were analyzed for 10 categories of interactive tools. The most common type of interactive content found on 46 (68%) of sites was for multimedia featuring content that was not primarily text based, such as photo galleries, videos, or podcasts. Only 11 (16%) websites-outside of media sites-allowed people to interact and engage with the site owners and other users by allowing posting comments on content and/or hosting forums/discussions. Linkages to social networking sites were low: 17 pages (25%) linked to Twitter, 15 (22%) to Facebook, and 11 (16%) to YouTube. Interactivity and connectedness to online social media appears to still be in its infancy among tobacco control-relevant sites.

  8. Permeability measurement and control for epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tsun-Hsu; Tsai, Cheng-Hung; Wong, Wei-Syuan; Chen, Yen-Ren; Chao, Hsien-Wen

    2017-08-01

    The coupling of the electric and magnetic fields leads to a strong interplay in materials' permittivity and permeability. Here, we proposed a specially designed cavity, called the mu cavity. The mu cavity, consisting of a mushroom structure inside a cylindrical resonator, is exclusively sensitive to permeability, but not to permittivity. It decouples materials' electromagnetic properties and allows an accurate measurement of the permeability. With the help of an epsilon cavity, these two cavities jointly determine the complex permeability and permittivity of the materials at microwave frequencies. Homemade epoxy-based composite materials were prepared and tested. Measurement and manipulation of the permeability and permittivity of the epoxy composites will be shown. The results will be compared with the effective medium theories.

  9. RF Control and Measurement of Superconducting Qubits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-14

    Manucharyan, J. Koch, L. I. Glazman, M. H. Devoret. Fluxonium: Single Cooper-Pair Circuit Free of Charge Offsets, Science, (10 2009): 0. doi...10.1126/science.1175552 S M Girvin, M H Devoret, R J Schoelkopf. Circuit QED and engineering charge-based superconducting qubits, Physica Scripta, (12...Coherence in Josephson Junction Qubits Measured in a Three-Dimensional Circuit QED Architecture, Physical Review Letters, (12 2011): 0. doi: 10.1103

  10. Solar energy control system. [temperature measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, J. R. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A solar energy control system for a hot air type solar energy heating system wherein thermocouples are arranged to sense the temperature of a solar collector, a space to be heated, and a top and bottom of a heat storage unit is disclosed. Pertinent thermocouples are differentially connected together, and these are employed to effect the operation of dampers, a fan, and an auxiliary heat source. In accomplishing this, the differential outputs from the thermocouples are amplified by a single amplifier by multiplexing techniques. Additionally, the amplifier is corrected as to offset by including as one multiplex channel a common reference signal.

  11. TOWARDS MEASURES OF INTELLIGENCE BASED ON SEMIOTIC CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    C. JOSLYN

    2000-08-01

    We address the question of how to identify and measure the degree of intelligence in systems. We define the presence of intelligence as equivalent to the presence of a control relation. We contrast the distinct atomic semioic definitions of models and controls, and discuss hierarchical and anticipatory control. We conclude with a suggestion about moving towards quantitative measures of the degree of such control in systems.

  12. 33 CFR 106.260 - Security measures for access control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARINE SECURITY: OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF (OCS) FACILITIES Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Facility Security Requirements § 106.260 Security measures for access control. (a)...

  13. 33 CFR 106.260 - Security measures for access control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARINE SECURITY: OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF (OCS) FACILITIES Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Facility Security Requirements § 106.260 Security measures for access control. (a)...

  14. 33 CFR 106.260 - Security measures for access control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARINE SECURITY: OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF (OCS) FACILITIES Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Facility Security Requirements § 106.260 Security measures for access control. (a)...

  15. Influenza A (H1N1-2009) pandemic in Singapore--public health control measures implemented and lessons learnt.

    PubMed

    Tay, Joanne; Ng, Yeuk Fan; Cutter, Jeffery L; James, Lyn

    2010-04-01

    We describe the public health control measures implemented in Singapore to limit the spread of influenza A (H1N1-2009) and mitigate its social effects. We also discuss the key learning points from this experience. Singapore's public health control measures were broadly divided into 2 phases: containment and mitigation. Containment strategies included the triage of febrile patients at frontline healthcare settings, admission and isolation of confirmed cases, mandatory Quarantine Orders (QO) for close contacts, and temperature screening at border entry points. After sustained community transmission became established, containment shifted to mitigation. Hospitals only admitted H1N1-2009 cases based on clinical indications, not for isolation. Mild cases were managed in the community. Contact tracing and QOs tapered off, and border temperature screening ended. The 5 key lessons learnt were: (1) Be prepared, but retain flexibility in implementing control measures; (2) Surveillance, good scientific information and operational research can increase a system's ability to manage risk during a public health crisis; (3) Integrated systems-level responses are essential for a coherent public health response; (4) Effective handling of manpower surges requires creative strategies; and (5) Communication must be strategic, timely, concise and clear. Singapore's effective response to the H1N1-2009 pandemic, founded on experience in managing the 2003 SARS epidemic, was a whole-of-government approach towards pandemic preparedness planning. Documenting the measures taken and lessons learnt provides a learning opportunity for both doctors and policy makers, and can help fortify Singapore's ability to respond to future major disease outbreaks.

  16. Jejunal Brush Border Microvillous Alterations in Giardia muris-Infected Mice: Role of T Lymphocytes and Interleukin-6

    PubMed Central

    Scott, K. G.-E.; Logan, M. R.; Klammer, G. M.; Teoh, D. A.; Buret, A. G.

    2000-01-01

    Intestinal colonization with the protozoan Giardia causes diffuse brush border microvillous alterations and disaccharidase deficiencies, which in turn are responsible for intestinal malabsorption and maldigestion. The role of T cells and/or cytokines in the pathogenesis of Giardia-induced microvillous injury remains unclear. The aim of this study was to assess the role of T cells and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the brush border pathophysiology of acute murine giardiasis in vivo. Athymic nude (nu−/nu−) CD-1 mice and isogenic immunocompetent (nu+/nu+) CD-1 mice (4 weeks old) received an axenic Giardia muris trophozoite inoculum or vehicle (control) via orogastric gavage. Weight gain and food intake were assessed daily. On day 6, segments of jejunum were assessed for parasite load, brush border ultrastructure, IL-6 content, maltase and sucrase activities, villus-crypt architecture, and intraepithelial lymphocyte (IEL) infiltration. Despite similar parasitic loads on day 6, infected immunocompetent animals, but not infected nude mice, showed a diffuse loss of brush border microvillous surface area, which was correlated with a significant reduction in maltase and sucrase activities and a decrease in jejunal IL-6 concentration. In both athymic control and infected mice, jejunal brush border surface area and disaccharidases were high, but levels of tissue IL-6 were low and comparable to the concentration measured in immunocompetent infected animals. In both immunocompetent and nude mice, infection caused a small but significant increase in the numbers of IELs. These findings suggest that the enterocyte brush border injury and malfunction seen in giardiasis is, at least in part, mediated by thymus-derived T lymphocytes and that suppressed jejunal IL-6 does not necessarily accompany microvillous shortening. PMID:10816492

  17. Geochemical Controls on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Rosemary; Prasad, Manika; Keating, Kristina

    2003-11-11

    OAK-B135 Our research objectives are to determine, through an extensive set of laboratory experiments, the effect of the specific mineralogic form of iron and the effect of the distribution of iron on proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation mechanisms. In the first nine months of this project, we have refined the experimental procedures to be used in the acquisition of the laboratory NMR data; have ordered, and conducted preliminary measurements on, the sand samples to be used in the experimental work; and have revised and completed the theoretical model to use in this project. Over the next year, our focus will be on completing the first phase of the experimental work where the form and distribution of the iron in the sands in varied.

  18. Tour of bordered Floer theory

    PubMed Central

    Lipshitz, Robert; Ozsváth, Peter S.; Thurston, Dylan P.

    2011-01-01

    Heegaard Floer theory is a kind of topological quantum field theory (TQFT), assigning graded groups to closed, connected, oriented 3-manifolds and group homomorphisms to smooth, oriented four-dimensional cobordisms. Bordered Heegaard Floer homology is an extension of Heegaard Floer homology to 3-manifolds with boundary, with extended-TQFT-type gluing properties. In this survey, we explain the formal structure and construction of bordered Floer homology and sketch how it can be used to compute some aspects of Heegaard Floer theory. PMID:21521788

  19. Cross-border ties and Arab American mental health.

    PubMed

    Samari, Goleen

    2016-04-01

    Due to increasing discrimination and marginalization, Arab Americans are at a greater risk for mental health disorders. Social networks that include ties to the country of origin could help promote mental well-being in the face of discrimination. The role of countries of origin in immigrant mental health receives little attention compared to adjustment in destination contexts. This study addresses this gap by analyzing the relationship between nativity, cross-border ties, and psychological distress and happiness for Arab Americans living in the greater Detroit Metropolitan Area (N = 896). I expect that first generation Arab Americans will have more psychological distress compared to one and half, second, and third generations, and Arab Americans with more cross-border ties will have less psychological distress and more happiness. Data come from the 2003 Detroit Arab American Study, which includes measures of nativity, cross-border ties--attitudes, social ties, media consumption, and community organizations, and the Kessler-10 scale of psychological distress and self-reported happiness. Ordered logistic regression analyses suggest that psychological distress and happiness do not vary much by nativity alone. However, cross-border ties have both adverse and protective effects on psychological distress and happiness. For all generations of Arab Americans, cross-border attitudes and social ties are associated with greater odds of psychological distress and for first generation Arab Americans, media consumption is associated with greater odds of unhappiness. In contrast, for all generations, involvement in cross-border community organizations is associated with less psychological distress and for the third generation, positive cross-border attitudes are associated with higher odds of happiness. These findings show the complex relationship between cross-border ties and psychological distress and happiness for different generations of Arab Americans.

  20. Cross-border Ties and Arab American Mental Health

    PubMed Central

    Samari, Goleen

    2016-01-01

    Due to increasing discrimination and marginalization, Arab Americans are at a greater risk for mental health disorders. Social networks that include ties to the country of origin could help promote mental well-being in the face of discrimination. The role of countries of origin in immigrant mental health receives little attention compared to adjustment in destination contexts. This study addresses this gap by analyzing the relationship between nativity, cross-border ties, and psychological distress and happiness for Arab Americans living in the greater Detroit Metropolitan Area (N=896). I expect that first generation Arab Americans will have more psychological distress compared to one and half, second, and third generations, and Arab Americans with more cross-border ties will have less psychological distress and more happiness. Data come from the 2003 Detroit Arab American Study, which includes measures of nativity, cross-border ties – attitudes, social ties, media consumption, and community organizations, and the Kessler-10 scale of psychological distress and self-reported happiness. Ordered logistic regression analyses suggest that psychological distress and happiness do not vary much by nativity alone. However, cross-border ties have both adverse and protective effects on psychological distress and happiness. For all generations of Arab Americans, cross-border attitudes and social ties are associated with greater odds of psychological distress and for first generation Arab Americans, media consumption is associated with greater odds of unhappiness. In contrast, for all generations, involvement in cross-border community organizations is associated with less psychological distress and for the third generation, positive cross-border attitudes are associated with higher odds of happiness. These findings show the complex relationship between cross-border ties and psychological distress and happiness for different generations of Arab Americans. PMID:26999416

  1. A computer simulation approach to measurement of human control strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J.; Davenport, E. L.; Engler, H. F.; Sears, W. E., III

    1982-01-01

    Human control strategy is measured through use of a psychologically-based computer simulation which reflects a broader theory of control behavior. The simulation is called the human operator performance emulator, or HOPE. HOPE was designed to emulate control learning in a one-dimensional preview tracking task and to measure control strategy in that setting. When given a numerical representation of a track and information about current position in relation to that track, HOPE generates positions for a stick controlling the cursor to be moved along the track. In other words, HOPE generates control stick behavior corresponding to that which might be used by a person learning preview tracking.

  2. A computer simulation approach to measurement of human control strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J.; Davenport, E. L.; Engler, H. F.; Sears, W. E., III

    1982-01-01

    Human control strategy is measured through use of a psychologically-based computer simulation which reflects a broader theory of control behavior. The simulation is called the human operator performance emulator, or HOPE. HOPE was designed to emulate control learning in a one-dimensional preview tracking task and to measure control strategy in that setting. When given a numerical representation of a track and information about current position in relation to that track, HOPE generates positions for a stick controlling the cursor to be moved along the track. In other words, HOPE generates control stick behavior corresponding to that which might be used by a person learning preview tracking.

  3. A randomised controlled trial of the effectiveness of soft silicone multi-layered foam dressings in the prevention of sacral and heel pressure ulcers in trauma and critically ill patients: the border trial.

    PubMed

    Santamaria, Nick; Gerdtz, Marie; Sage, Sarah; McCann, Jane; Freeman, Amy; Vassiliou, Theresa; De Vincentis, Stephanie; Ng, Ai Wei; Manias, Elizabeth; Liu, Wei; Knott, Jonathan

    2015-06-01

    The prevention of hospital acquired pressure ulcers in critically ill patients remains a significant clinical challenge. The aim of this trial was to investigate the effectiveness of multi-layered soft silicone foam dressings in preventing intensive care unit (ICU) pressure ulcers when applied in the emergency department to 440 trauma and critically ill patients. Intervention group patients (n = 219) had Mepilex(®) Border Sacrum and Mepilex(®) Heel dressings applied in the emergency department and maintained throughout their ICU stay. Results revealed that there were significantly fewer patients with pressure ulcers in the intervention group compared to the control group (5 versus 20, P = 0·001). This represented a 10% difference in incidence between the groups (3·1% versus 13·1%) and a number needed to treat of ten patients to prevent one pressure ulcer. Overall there were fewer sacral (2 versus 8, P = 0·05) and heel pressure ulcers (5 versus 19, P = 0·002) and pressure injuries overall (7 versus 27, P = 0·002) in interventions than in controls. The time to injury survival analysis indicated that intervention group patients had a hazard ratio of 0·19 (P = 0·002) compared to control group patients. We conclude that multi-layered soft silicone foam dressings are effective in preventing pressure ulcers in critically ill patients when applied in the emergency department prior to ICU transfer.

  4. [Preventive measures against plague and the control of Chinese coolies in colonial Korea].

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsoo

    2014-12-01

    This paper aims to examine the preventive measures taken against the plague in colonial Korea, particularly as applied to the control of Chinese coolies in 1911, soon after the annexation. The Government General of Korea began preventive measures with a train quarantine in Shin'uiju and Incheon in response to the spread of the plague to the Southern Manchuria. Shin' uiju had become urbanized due the development of the transportation network, and the seaport of Incheon was the major hub for traffic with China. Examining the transportation routes for the entry and exit of Chinese to and from Korea makes clear the reason why the Korea Government General initiated preventive measures in mid-January, 1911. The Government General of Korea tried to block the entry of Chinese through the land border crossing with China and through ports of entry, primarily Incheon. During the implementation of the preventive measures, quarantine facilities were built, including a quarantine station and isolation facility in Incheon. It was also needed to investigate the population and residential locations of Chinese in Korea to prevent the spread of plague. A certificate of residence was issued to all Chinese in Korea, which they needed to carry when they travelled. The preventive measures against plague which broke out in Manchuria were removed gradually. However, there was no specific measures against Chinese coolies, those who had migrated from China to work in the spring in Korea. Still the Government General of Korea had doubt about an infection of the respiratory system. As a result, the labor market in colonial Korea underwent changes in this period. The Government General recruited Korean laborers, instead of Chinese coolies whose employment had been planned. This move explains the Government General's strong preventive measures against plague and uncertainty in the route of plague infection, which influenced subsequent regulations on the prohibition of Chinese coolies working on

  5. Factors That Affect Patient Attitudes toward Infection Control Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Daniel J.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A study investigated patient attitudes toward different disease control measures taken in dental school clinics (n=272 patients) and private practices (n=107 patients). Variables examined included sex, age, educational background, and knowledge of infectious diseases. Patients tended to accept the control measures being used in each context. (MSE)

  6. 33 CFR 104.265 - Security measures for access control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... each Maritime Security (MARSEC) Level, including those points where TWIC access control provisions will... control, particularly if these security measures are applied on a random or occasional basis. (f) MARSEC... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Security measures for access...

  7. 33 CFR 104.265 - Security measures for access control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... each Maritime Security (MARSEC) Level, including those points where TWIC access control provisions will... control, particularly if these security measures are applied on a random or occasional basis. (f) MARSEC... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Security measures for access...

  8. 30 CFR 817.45 - Hydrologic balance: Sediment control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrologic balance: Sediment control measures. 817.45 Section 817.45 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT...-UNDERGROUND MINING ACTIVITIES § 817.45 Hydrologic balance: Sediment control measures. (a) Appropriate sediment...

  9. 30 CFR 816.45 - Hydrologic balance: Sediment control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrologic balance: Sediment control measures. 816.45 Section 816.45 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT...-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.45 Hydrologic balance: Sediment control measures. (a) Appropriate sediment...

  10. 30 CFR 817.45 - Hydrologic balance: Sediment control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrologic balance: Sediment control measures. 817.45 Section 817.45 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT...-UNDERGROUND MINING ACTIVITIES § 817.45 Hydrologic balance: Sediment control measures. (a) Appropriate sediment...

  11. 30 CFR 816.45 - Hydrologic balance: Sediment control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrologic balance: Sediment control measures. 816.45 Section 816.45 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT...-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.45 Hydrologic balance: Sediment control measures. (a) Appropriate sediment...

  12. 30 CFR 816.45 - Hydrologic balance: Sediment control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrologic balance: Sediment control measures. 816.45 Section 816.45 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT...-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.45 Hydrologic balance: Sediment control measures. (a) Appropriate sediment...

  13. 30 CFR 816.45 - Hydrologic balance: Sediment control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrologic balance: Sediment control measures. 816.45 Section 816.45 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT...-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.45 Hydrologic balance: Sediment control measures. (a) Appropriate sediment...

  14. 30 CFR 816.45 - Hydrologic balance: Sediment control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrologic balance: Sediment control measures. 816.45 Section 816.45 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT...-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.45 Hydrologic balance: Sediment control measures. (a) Appropriate sediment...

  15. 30 CFR 817.45 - Hydrologic balance: Sediment control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrologic balance: Sediment control measures. 817.45 Section 817.45 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT...-UNDERGROUND MINING ACTIVITIES § 817.45 Hydrologic balance: Sediment control measures. (a) Appropriate sediment...

  16. 30 CFR 817.45 - Hydrologic balance: Sediment control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrologic balance: Sediment control measures. 817.45 Section 817.45 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT...-UNDERGROUND MINING ACTIVITIES § 817.45 Hydrologic balance: Sediment control measures. (a) Appropriate sediment...

  17. 30 CFR 817.45 - Hydrologic balance: Sediment control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrologic balance: Sediment control measures. 817.45 Section 817.45 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT...-UNDERGROUND MINING ACTIVITIES § 817.45 Hydrologic balance: Sediment control measures. (a) Appropriate sediment...

  18. Choosing Border Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haig-Brown, Celia

    1992-01-01

    A non-Native researcher describes undertaking an ethnography of perceptions about Native control of education among staff and students at a Native adult educational institution in British Columbia and discusses concerns about her role in the power struggle and the legitimacy and adequacy of such research. Contains 40 references. (SV)

  19. Self-Control and Impulsivity in Children: Multiple Behavioral Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forzano, L. B.; Michels, Jennifer L.; Carapella, R. K.; Conway, Patrick; Chelonis, J. J.

    2011-01-01

    The present experiment investigated the relationship between laboratory measures of self-control and delay of gratification in children and explored several other factors that may influence self-control. In the self-control paradigm, 30 four-year-old children repeatedly chose between three reinforcers received after a delay and one reinforcer…

  20. Self-Control and Impulsivity in Children: Multiple Behavioral Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forzano, L. B.; Michels, Jennifer L.; Carapella, R. K.; Conway, Patrick; Chelonis, J. J.

    2011-01-01

    The present experiment investigated the relationship between laboratory measures of self-control and delay of gratification in children and explored several other factors that may influence self-control. In the self-control paradigm, 30 four-year-old children repeatedly chose between three reinforcers received after a delay and one reinforcer…

  1. Northern Border Pipeline Company NPDES Permit

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Under NPDES permit MT-0030791, the Northern Border Pipeline Company is authorized to discharge from locations along the Northern Border Gas Transmission Pipeline located within the exterior boundaries of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation, Montana.

  2. Authoritarianism among border police officers, career soldiers, and airport security guards at the Israeli border.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, Gidi

    2006-12-01

    Several personality theories focusing on specific personality variables involved in career choice and job satisfaction are based on the assumption that individuals choose certain career choices because they believe that they may be able to meet their emotional needs (J. L. Holland, 1977). The author of this study investigated the personality traits of border police officers, career soldiers, and airport security guards in Israel. The participants were 160 men--40 border policemen, 40 career soldiers, 40 airport security guards, and 40 control participants--who filled out a demographic questionnaire and a Hebrew version of the right-wing authoritarianism (RWA) shortened scale (B. Altemeyer, personal communication, February 2000). The present hypothesis predicted that the RWA scores of border police officers would be the highest, followed by those of career soldiers, airport security guards, and control participants, in that order. Statistically significant differences in RWA scores occurred between these groups in the predicted order, with the exception of the career soldiers' RWA scores, which did not significantly differ from those of the airport security guards.

  3. Development and validation of the RAND Asthma Control Measure.

    PubMed

    Lara, Marielena; Edelen, Maria Orlando; Eberhart, Nicole K; Stucky, Brian D; Sherbourne, Cathy D

    2014-11-01

    Patient-based measures for asthma control are important in assessing the worldwide impact of this highly prevalent chronic illness. We sought to refine an asthma symptom scale that RAND had previously developed to shorten it and validate it further, as well as reflect updated international expert definitions of asthma control. We conducted rigorous psychometric testing of new and adapted self-administered survey items in a sample of 2032 adults with asthma. The reliability and preliminary validity of the resulting measure, henceforth referred to as the RAND Asthma Control Measure (RAND-ACM), matched or exceeded that of the original RAND measure and others in the literature. RAND-ACM scores for worse asthma control were significantly associated with worse asthma-related quality of life, increased asthma-related healthcare use, Hispanic ethnicity and lower educational level. Evidence for internal consistency was strong with a Cronbach's α of 0.84. We also found adequate concordance between the RAND-ACM and the Global Initiative for Asthma categories of "uncontrolled", "partly controlled" and "controlled" asthma. The RAND-ACM, a five-item self-reported asthma control survey measure, performs well in a large ethnically-diverse sample of US adults with asthma and provides a cost-free alternative to other asthma control measures currently available. ©ERS 2014.

  4. The impact of Border policy effect on cross-border ethnic areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bie, Q. L.; Zhou, S. Y.; Li, C. S.

    2013-11-01

    Boundary effect analysis is related to border policy making in the cross-border ethnic area. The border effect literatures show that geographic boundaries have obvious impacts on economic, social and cultural relations in both sides of a nation border. Particularly in cross-border ethnic areas, each ethnic group has strong internal spatial structure relevance, and the boundary effect is more obvious. However, most of China's border areas are cross-border ethnic areas, each of border issues is unique. Under this perspective, we analyze the border effects of various boundaries can provide basis for formulating border management policies. For small scale of cross-border ethnic minority areas, how to formulate the boundary management policy is a good question to explore. This paper is demonstrated by a study of the impact of border management policies in Dehong Dai and Jingpo Autonomous Prefecture in Yunnan Province at the border area to Burma. The comparative method is used to analysis the border management policies in past 50 decades for the border area of Yunnan Province .This research aims to define trends within border policy and its influences to national security. This paper also examines Wendy Brown's liberal theory of border management policy. We found that it is not suitable for Sino-Burma border area. The conclusion is that the changes or instability of international economic and political situation has more influence to this cross-border ethnic area, and only innovative policy will be effective in cross-border ethnic area. So the border management policies should reflect the change of international context.

  5. Border Security: Barriers Along the U.S. International Border

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-21

    of necessary easements, required certain safety features be incorporated into the design of the fence, and authorized a total appropriation not to...Construction Account( total ) Tactical Infrastructure Construction 2007 (request) 256 106 2006 298 93 2005 92 15 2004 89 14 2003 235 23 2002 128 6 2001...spokesman reportedly noted that the total 123 mile length of the project “will form the largest continuous physical barrier along the border in the

  6. Computerized interactive measurement control system at the Rocky Flats Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Hyman, P.A.; Hunt, V.M.

    1985-01-01

    Traditionally measurement control for the Rocky Flats Plant Analytical Laboratories has been administered by the Chemistry Standards Laboratory (CSL); both groups are under the jurisdiction of the Quality Engineering and Control Department. In the past, control samples were prepared by CSL, submitted to an Analytical Laboratory, and results were compiled by hand and submitted to the plant's central computing center which then generated a statistical report. The old paper-driven system has been replaced by the IMECS, an acronym for ''Interactive Measurement Evaluation and Control System''. The IMECS is a computerized, interactive measurement control system developed in-house with the cooperation of computer programmers., statisticians, analytical chemists, and standards engineers. The software is structured in three parts: (1) a data base section; (2) a statistical analysis section; and (3) supporting routines used for file maintenance, updating, scheduling, and control. This paper will describe how the system was conceived and designed. The paper will also detail the implementation of the system (scheduled for January 1985), and how it compares to the previous measurement control system. Examples will be given on how individual measurement control programs are designed and how control data is entered into the system. Also discussed will be the types of statistical reporting performed by the system.

  7. Applications of radiation measurements in arms control and nonproliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leich, D.; Reinitz, K.; Barnette, S.; O'Connell, M.; Sheely, K.

    1994-12-01

    Radiation measurements play a vital role in the development and implementation of U.S. arms control and nonproliferation policy. The President's Nonproliferation and Export Control Policy reflects the changing realities of a post-Cold-War world and makes nonproliferation one of our nation's highest priorities. Key elements of the Policy concern international controls on plutonium and highly-enriched uranium. Current DOE work contributing to arms control and nonproliferation policy implementation is described with an emphasis on the role of radiation measurements.

  8. Measurement of control system response using an analog operational circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lalli, V. R.

    1978-01-01

    Ten basic steps are established for an analog method that measures control system response parameters. An example shows how these steps were used on a speed control portion of an auxiliary power unit. The equations and calculations necessary to describe this subsystem are given. The mechanization schematic and simulation diagram for obtaining the measured response parameters of the control system using an analog circuit are explained. Methods for investigating the various effects of the control parameters are described. It is concluded that the optimum system should be underdamped enough to be slightly oscillatory during transients.

  9. Assessing Locus of Control of Reinforcement in Elderly People: Evaluation of the Desired Control Measure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Lynn E.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Reid and Zeigler's Desired Control Measure (DCM); Levenson's Internal, Powerful Other, and Chance Locus of Control scales, Life Satisfaction Index; and Affect Balance Scale were completed by 363 older adults. The DCM apparently does not primarily tap locus of control and would be more appropriately used as a measure of individuals' perceptions of…

  10. Malaria Risk Areas in Thailand Border.

    PubMed

    Kaewpitoon, Natthawut; Loyd, Ryan A; Kaewpitoon, Soraya J; Rujirakul, Ratana

    2015-05-01

    Malaria is a serious public health problem of the world especially in Africa and Asia where the areas are located in the tropical and subtropical regions. Malaria is a mosquito-borne infectious disease ofhumans caused by parasitic protozoans of the genus Plasmodium. The present study aims to analyze the risk areas by using Potential Surface Analysis (PSA) with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in Thai-Cambodia border including Buriram and Surin provinces. The study divided the factors into six factors including population density, land used (agriculture, houses, water reservoirs, forest), anopheles adult density in villages with reported cases, average annual rainfall, average annual temperature, average annual relative humidity and analyzing risk areas by analysis of PSA. 846 malaria cases were reported between 2008 and 2012, 80.50% and 19.50% from to the Surin and Buriram provinces, respectively. The most cases were found in females, in the 31-40-year age group and agricultural people. The predominant cases were Plasmodium vivax with 45.36%. The high-risk areas of malaria cases was on the 3,014.79 kilometer Thai-Cambodian border consisting offour districts: Nangrong and Nondaeng districts of Buriram province and Sangka and Buached districts of Surin province. The relationship between malaria morbidity with environmental factors found that malaria morbidity rates were associated with land use (forest areas), population density, anopheles adult density of statistical significance and influenced morbidity rates by 12.3% (Adjusted R2 = 0.261), 17.0 (Adjusted R2 = 0.170), and 11.1 (Adjusted R2 = 0.111). The climate factor associated to malaria morbidity with average annual relative humidity by percentage of 5.7 (Adjusted R2 = 0.057). This study showed that malaria is still a problem in Thailand-Cambodia border and the analysis of PSA with GIS can be used to assess the risk of malarial morbidity, and lead to planning, control, and prevention of the morbidity.

  11. Breakdown of gliadin peptides by intestinal brush borders from coeliac patients.

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, G; Woodley, J F; Swan, C H

    1984-01-01

    The 'missing peptidase' hypothesis to explain the aetiology of coeliac disease has never been satisfactorily resolved and recent reports suggest that coeliac brush borders may have depressed levels of specific peptidase enzymes. It has been inferred from these studies that the subsequent brush border digestion of gliadin peptides may therefore be defective. In this present study a sensitive fluorometric assay was used to measure the hydrolysis of a peptic-tryptic digest of gliadin by both normal and coeliac brush borders. The coeliac brush borders were as efficient as the normals in hydrolysing gliadin peptides and showed no depression of any specific peptidase activity. PMID:6381246

  12. Measuring asthma control. Clinic questionnaire or daily diary?

    PubMed

    Juniper, E F; O'Byrne, P M; Ferrie, P J; King, D R; Roberts, J N

    2000-10-01

    Daily symptom, peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), and medication diaries are often used in clinical trials of treatments for asthma on the assumption that they provide a better estimate of clinical status than does a questionnaire completed in the clinic. We conducted a study with the aim of comparing the measurement properties of the clinic-completed Asthma Control Questionnaire with those of the Asthma Control Diary. The diary is composed of questions and response options almost identical to those of the questionnaire, but uses PEFR instead of FEV(1) as the measure of airway caliber. In an observational study, 50 adults with symptomatic asthma attended a McMaster University asthma clinic at 0, 1, 5, and 9 wk to complete the Asthma Control Questionnaire and other measures of asthma status. For 1 wk before each follow-up visit, patients completed the Asthma Control Diary every morning and evening. Concordance between the questionnaire and diary was high (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] = 0.87). Both reliability (ICC: questionnaire = 0.90; diary = 0.86) and responsiveness (responsiveness index: questionnaire = 1.06; diary = 0.90; p = 0.005) were better with the questionnaire than with the diary. Correlations between the two instruments and other measures of clinical asthma status were similar and close to a priori predictions. Both the Asthma Control Questionnaire and the Asthma Control Diary are valid instruments for measuring asthma control, but the questionnaire has slightly better discriminative and evaluative measurement properties than does the diary.

  13. Survey report: Potential options for the control of border agents` exposure to vehicle emissions at United States port of entry, San Ysidro, California

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, K.; Mead, K.R.; Heitbrink, W.A.

    1999-05-14

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted a site visit in response to a Health Hazard Evaluation (HHE) request received from the United State Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS). Personal air samples were collected for carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons, and lead particulate matter. Personal and area air samples for lead, carbon dioxide and hydrocarbons were all within acceptable occupational health criteria for full shift exposures, however, peak exposures exceeded the NIOSH recommended ceiling concentration of 200 parts per million. Based on these results, the NIOSH HHE team made several recommendations that included modifying the local exhaust ventilation systems, incorporating administrative controls, and elimination of some tasks.

  14. A Promotora-administered group education intervention to promote breast and cervical cancer screening in a rural community along the U.S.-Mexico border: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Nuño, Tomas; Martinez, Maria Elena; Harris, Robin; García, Francisco

    2011-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most common neoplasm among Hispanic women. Cervical cancer has a higher incidence and mortality among Hispanic women compared with non-Hispanic White women. To assess the effectiveness of a promotora-administered educational intervention to promote breast and cervical cancer screening among post-reproductive age, medically underserved Hispanic women residing along the U.S.-Mexico border. Women age 50 or older were eligible to participate in this intervention study. A total of 381 subjects agreed to participate. Women were randomly assigned into one of two groups, educational intervention or usual care. The primary outcomes were self-reported mammogram and Pap smear screening. Logistic regression analysis was used to compute odds ratios for comparisons between intervention and control groups. Women in the intervention group were 2.0 times more likely to report having had a mammogram within the last year when compared with the usual care group (95% CI = 1.3-3.1). Likewise, women in the intervention group were 1.5 times more likely to report having a Pap smear within the last year when compared with the usual care group, although this was not statistically significant (95% CI = 0.9-2.6). In a secondary analysis, the intervention suggests a stronger effect on those that had not had a mammogram or Pap smear within the past year at baseline. A promotora-based educational intervention can be used to increase breast and cervical cancer screening utilization among Hispanic women.

  15. Dynamics of immigration control.

    PubMed

    Djajic, S

    1999-01-01

    This paper examines the dynamic implications of US border control policies and internal enforcement measures for the pattern of illegal immigration and the sectoral allocation of clandestine foreign workers. Efforts to counteract illegal immigration into the US have been increasing steadily following the passage of the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986. The purpose of the Act is to reduce illegal immigration with the aid of three instruments: 1) employer sanctions; 2) increased controls along the border; and 3) a legalization program designed to meet the existing demand for agricultural labor in geographic locations that are in proximity of Mexico, the principal source of clandestine foreign labor. The effect of tougher border control measures increases the cost of illegal entry, discouraging clandestine inflows. On the other hand, these measures induce migrants to increase their own anti-detection efforts, reducing the probability of detection and the deportation rate. If the latter effect should dominate, the steady-state stock of clandestine foreign labor will actually increase in response to more vigorous border control measures. Explicit consideration of the role of networks in the clandestine labor market suggests the need for a drastic policy change. This policy change should target illegal migration in areas with high concentrations of clandestine foreign workers. Complementary measures should accompany this policy change to prevent unbalanced enforcement measures.

  16. Acculturation and healthy lifestyle habits among Hispanics in United States-Mexico border communities.

    PubMed

    Ghaddar, Suad; Brown, Cynthia J; Pagán, José A; Díaz, Violeta

    2010-09-01

    To explore the relationship between acculturation and healthy lifestyle habits in the largely Hispanic populations living in underserved communities in the United States of America along the U.S.-Mexico border. A cross-sectional study was conducted from April 2006 to June 2008 using survey data from the Alliance for a Healthy Border, a program designed to reduce health disparities in the U.S.-Mexico border region by funding nutrition and physical activity education programs at 12 federally qualified community health centers in Arizona, California, New Mexico, and Texas. The survey included questions on acculturation, diet, exercise, and demographic factors and was completed by 2,381 Alliance program participants, of whom 95.3% were Hispanic and 45.4% were under the U.S. poverty level for 2007. Chi-square (χ2) and Student's t tests were used for bivariate comparisons between acculturation and dietary and physical activity measures. Linear regression and binary logistic regression were used to control for factors associated with nutrition and exercise. Based on univariate tests and confirmed by regression analysis controlling for sociodemographic and health variables, less acculturated survey respondents reported a significantly higher frequency of fruit and vegetable consumption and healthier dietary habits than those who were more acculturated. Adjusted binary logistic regression confirmed that individuals with low language acculturation were less likely to engage in physical activity than those with moderate to high acculturation (odds ratio 0.75, 95% confidence interval 0.59-0.95). Findings confirmed an association between acculturation and healthy lifestyle habits and supported the hypothesis that acculturation in border community populations tends to decrease the practice of some healthy dietary habits while increasing exposure to and awareness of the importance of other healthy behaviors.

  17. Border-ownership-dependent tilt aftereffect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von der Heydt, Rüdiger; Macuda, Todd; Qiu, Fangtu T.

    2005-10-01

    Single-cell recordings from macaque visual cortex have shown orientation-selective neurons in area in V2 code for border ownership [J. Neurosci. 20, 6594 (2000)]: Each piece of contrast border is represented by two pools of neurons whose relative firing rate indicates the side of border ownership. Here we show that the human visual cortex uses a similar coding scheme by demonstrating a border-ownership-contingent tilt aftereffect. The aftereffect was specific for the adapted location, indicating that the adapted neurons have small receptive fields. We conclude that figure-ground organization is represented by border-ownership-selective neurons at early stages in the human visual cortex.

  18. Adaptive control of a vibratory angle measuring gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Park, Sungsu

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an adaptive control algorithm for realizing a vibratory angle measuring gyroscope so that rotation angle can be directly measured without integration of angular rate, thus eliminating the accumulation of numerical integration errors. The proposed control algorithm uses a trajectory following approach and the reference trajectory is generated by an ideal angle measuring gyroscope driven by the estimate of angular rate and the auxiliary sinusoidal input so that the persistent excitation condition is satisfied. The developed control algorithm can compensate for all types of fabrication imperfections such as coupled damping and stiffness, and mismatched stiffness and un-equal damping term in an on-line fashion. The simulation results show the feasibility and effectiveness of the developed control algorithm that is capable of directly measuring rotation angle without the integration of angular rate.

  19. Border malaria in China: knowledge and use of personal protection by minority populations and implications for malaria control: a questionnaire-based survey.

    PubMed

    Moore, Sarah J; Min, Xia; Hill, Nigel; Jones, Caroline; Zaixing, Zhang; Cameron, Mary M

    2008-10-01

    Malaria control in remote, forested areas of the Mekong region relies on personal protection from mosquito bites. Uptake of these methods may be limited by knowledge of the link between mosquitoes and malaria as well as social and economic aspects. Understanding barriers to uptake will inform malaria control programmes on targets for improvement of delivery. A total 748 key respondents: health providers and village heads, from 187 villages and 25 different ethnic groups, were interviewed using structured questionnaires. Differences in use of personal protection, and knowledge of malaria between groups were analysed using chi-square; and binary logistic regression used for multivariate analysis. Malaria knowledge was poor with 19.4% of women and 37.5% of men linking mosquitoes with malaria, although 95.6% knew one or more methods of mosquito control. Virtually all respondents used personal protection at some time during the year; and understanding of malaria transmission was strongly associated with bednet use. Those working in forest agriculture were significantly more likely to know that mosquitoes transmit malaria but this did not translate into a significantly greater likelihood of using bednets. Furthermore, use of personal protection while woing outdoors was rare, and less than 3% of respondents knew about the insecticide impregnation of bednets. The use of bednets, synthetic repellents and mosquito coils varied between ethnic groups, but was significantly more frequent among those with higher income, more years of education and permanent housing. The reported use of repellents and coils was also more common among women despite their low knowledge of malaria transmission, and low likelihood of having heard information on malaria within the last year. The use of personal protection must be increased, particularly among outdoor workers that have higher malaria risk. However, personal protection is widely used and widely accepted to prevent nuisance biting

  20. Cross-border reprogenetic services.

    PubMed

    Couture, V; Drouin, R; Tan, S-L; Moutquin, J-M; Bouffard, C

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to synthesize the current knowledge on the international movement of patients and biopsied embryo cells for pre-implantation genetic diagnosis and its different applications. Thus far, few attempts have been made to identify the specific nature of this phenomenon called 'cross-border reprogenetic services'. There is scattered evidence, both empirical and speculative, suggesting that these services raise major issues in terms of service provision, risks for patients and the children-to-come, the legal liabilities of physicians, as well as social justice. To compile this evidence, this review uses the narrative overview protocol combined with thematic analysis. Five major themes have emerged from the literature at the conjunction of cross-border treatments and reprogenetics: 'scope', 'scale', 'motivations', 'concerns', and 'governance'. Similar themes have already been observed in the case of other medical tourism activities, but this review highlights their singularity with reprogenetic services. It emphasizes the diagnostic and autologous feature of reprogenetics, the constant risk of misdiagnosis, the restriction on certain tests for medically controversial conditions, and the uncertain accessibility of genetic counseling in cross-border settings. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Border preserving skin lesion segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamali, Mostafa; Samei, Golnoosh

    2008-03-01

    Melanoma is a fatal cancer with a growing incident rate. However it could be cured if diagnosed in early stages. The first step in detecting melanoma is the separation of skin lesion from healthy skin. There are particular features associated with a malignant lesion whose successful detection relies upon accurately extracted borders. We propose a two step approach. First, we apply K-means clustering method (to 3D RGB space) that extracts relatively accurate borders. In the second step we perform an extra refining step for detecting the fading area around some lesions as accurately as possible. Our method has a number of novelties. Firstly as the clustering method is directly applied to the 3D color space, we do not overlook the dependencies between different color channels. In addition, it is capable of extracting fine lesion borders up to pixel level in spite of the difficulties associated with fading areas around the lesion. Performing clustering in different color spaces reveals that 3D RGB color space is preferred. The application of the proposed algorithm to an extensive data-base of skin lesions shows that its performance is superior to that of existing methods both in terms of accuracy and computational complexity.

  2. Modelling and designing digital control systems with averaged measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polites, Michael E.; Beale, Guy O.

    1988-01-01

    An account is given of the control systems engineering methods applicable to the design of digital feedback controllers for aerospace deterministic systems in which the output, rather than being an instantaneous measure of the system at the sampling instants, instead represents an average measure of the system over the time interval between samples. The averaging effect can be included during the modeling of the plant, thereby obviating the iteration of design/simulation phases.

  3. Exploration of the Use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles along with Other Assets to Enhance Border Protection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    Initiative AoR Area of Responsibility ASB Arizona- Sonora Border BP Border Patrol C3I Command, Control, Communications, and Intelligence COP Common...illustrates the outcome apprehension probability of migrants given the implementation of various operational strategies by presenting the Arizona- Sonora

  4. 33 CFR 105.255 - Security measures for access control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... restricted area and maintain security control during transfers between the facility and a vessel. (g) MARSEC... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Security measures for access control. 105.255 Section 105.255 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND...

  5. 33 CFR 105.255 - Security measures for access control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... restricted area and maintain security control during transfers between the facility and a vessel. (g) MARSEC... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Security measures for access control. 105.255 Section 105.255 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND...

  6. Discrete-time infinity control problem with measurement feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoorvogel, A. A.; Saberi, A.; Chen, B. M.

    1992-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the discrete-time H(sub infinity) control problem with measurement feedback. The authors extend previous results by having weaker assumptions on the system parameters. The authors also show explicitly the structure of H(sub infinity) controllers. Finally, they show that it is in certain cases possible, without loss of performance, to reduce the dynamical order of the controllers.

  7. 15 CFR 30.17 - Customs and Border Protection regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Customs and Border Protection regulations. 30.17 Section 30.17 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade BUREAU OF THE CENSUS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FOREIGN TRADE REGULATIONS Export Control and Licensing...

  8. 15 CFR 30.17 - Customs and Border Protection regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Customs and Border Protection regulations. 30.17 Section 30.17 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade BUREAU OF THE CENSUS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FOREIGN TRADE REGULATIONS Export Control and...

  9. Taeniasis among Refugees Living on Thailand-Myanmar Border, 2012.

    PubMed

    McCleery, Ellen J; Patchanee, Prapas; Pongsopawijit, Pornsawan; Chailangkarn, Sasisophin; Tiwananthagorn, Saruda; Jongchansittoe, Papaspong; Dantrakool, Anchalee; Morakote, Nimit; Phyu, Hnin; Wilkins, Patricia P; Noh, John C; Phares, Christina; O'Neal, Seth

    2015-10-01

    We tested refugee camp residents on the Thailand-Myanmar border for Taenia solium infection. Taeniasis prevalence was consistent with that for other disease-endemic regions, but seropositivity indicating T. solium taeniasis was rare. Seropositivity indicating cysticercosis was 5.5% in humans, and 3.2% in pigs. Corralling pigs and providing latrines may control transmission of these tapeworms within this camp.

  10. 15 CFR 30.17 - Customs and Border Protection regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Customs and Border Protection regulations. 30.17 Section 30.17 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade BUREAU OF THE CENSUS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FOREIGN TRADE REGULATIONS Export Control and...

  11. 15 CFR 30.17 - Customs and Border Protection regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Customs and Border Protection regulations. 30.17 Section 30.17 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade BUREAU OF THE CENSUS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FOREIGN TRADE REGULATIONS Export Control and...

  12. Statistical process control (SPC) for coordinate measurement machines

    SciTech Connect

    Escher, R.N.

    2000-01-04

    The application of process capability analysis, using designed experiments, and gage capability studies as they apply to coordinate measurement machine (CMM) uncertainty analysis and control will be demonstrated. The use of control standards in designed experiments, and the use of range charts and moving range charts to separate measurement error into it's discrete components will be discussed. The method used to monitor and analyze the components of repeatability and reproducibility will be presented with specific emphasis on how to use control charts to determine and monitor CMM performance and capability, and stay within your uncertainty assumptions.

  13. Measurements of control rod worth by modified inverse kinetic method

    SciTech Connect

    Bobrov, A. A.; Lebedev, G. V. Nechaev, Yu. A.

    2011-12-15

    Results of control rod worth measurements on the Astra critical assembly at the Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute are presented. The measurements were carried out by the modified inverse kinetics method, which is based on the use of experimental information about the variation of neutron detector readings only after introducing a reactivity perturbation. Calculated corrections are not required. The results of measurements do not depend on the neutron detector position.

  14. Control System Upgrade for a Mass Property Measurement Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, William; Hinkle, R. Kenneth (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Mass Property Measurement Facility (MPMF) at the Goddard Space Flight Center has undergone modifications to ensure the safety of Flight Payloads and the measurement facility. The MPMF has been technically updated to improve reliability and increase the accuracy of the measurements. Modifications include the replacement of outdated electronics with a computer based software control system, the addition of a secondary gas supply in case of a catastrophic failure to the gas supply and a motor controlled emergency stopping feature instead of a hard stop.

  15. The power of a control qubit in weak measurements.

    PubMed

    Coto, Raul; Montenegro, Víctor; Eremeev, Vitalie; Mundarain, Douglas; Orszag, Miguel

    2017-07-25

    In the late 80 s, a curious effect suggested by Aharanov et al. was found to lead to an anomalous amplification based on quantum measurements of weakly coupled systems. In this paper, we investigate the quantum control of the weak value amplification of a qubit system coupled to a meter. For the qubit system, the coupling occurs via a second non-interacting qubit, initially quantum correlated with the first one. We show that for weak measurements, the control can be remotely realized via the post-selected state of the second qubit or the degree of squeezing of the meter. In our study of the quantum control of the amplification, we can easily manipulate the degree of quantum correlations between the initially correlated qubits. We find that the degree of entanglement has no effect on the quantum control of the amplification. However, we also found a clear connection between the amplification and quantum discord like measurements as well as classical correlations between the qubits. Finally, we suggest an application of the amplification control on the enhancement of the quantum measurement accuracy, e.g. measuring the relative phase of the post-selected control qubit in a more precise way, as opposed to the non-amplified case.

  16. Web interface for control of spent fuel measurements at FCF.

    SciTech Connect

    Soltys, I. E.; Yacout, A. M.; McKnight, R. D.

    1999-10-11

    The material control and accountancy system for the Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) initially uses calculated values for the mass flows of irradiated EBR-11 driver fuel to be processed in the electrorefiner. These calculated values are continually verified by measurements performed by the Analytical Laboratory (AL) on samples from the fuel element chopper retained for each chopper batch. Measured values include U and Pu masses, U and Pu isotopic fractions, and burnup (via La and Tc). When the measured data become available, it is necessary to determine if the measured and calculated data are consistent. This verification involves accessing two databases and performing standard statistical analyses to produce control charts for these measurements. These procedures can now be invoked via a Web interface providing: a timely and efficient control of these measurements, a user-friendly interface, off-site remote access to the data, and a convenient means of studying correlations among the data. This paper will present the architecture of the interface and a description of the control procedures, as well as examples of the control charts and correlations.

  17. Personal customizing exercise with a wearable measurement and control unit

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhihui; Kiryu, Tohru; Tamura, Naoki

    2005-01-01

    Background Recently, wearable technology has been used in various health-related fields to develop advanced monitoring solutions. However, the monitoring function alone cannot meet all the requirements of customizing machine-based exercise on an individual basis by relying on biosignal-based controls. We propose a new wearable unit design equipped with measurement and control functions to support the customization process. Methods The wearable unit can measure the heart rate and electromyogram signals during exercise performance and output workload control commands to the exercise machines. The workload is continuously tracked with exercise programs set according to personally customized workload patterns and estimation results from the measured biosignals by a fuzzy control method. Exercise programs are adapted by relying on a computer workstation, which communicates with the wearable unit via wireless connections. A prototype of the wearable unit was tested together with an Internet-based cycle ergometer system to demonstrate that it is possible to customize exercise on an individual basis. Results We tested the wearable unit in nine people to assess its suitability to control cycle ergometer exercise. The results confirmed that the unit could successfully control the ergometer workload and continuously support gradual changes in physical activities. Conclusion The design of wearable units equipped with measurement and control functions is an important step towards establishing a convenient and continuously supported wellness environment. PMID:15982425

  18. An Alternative Approach to Control Measurements of Crane Rails

    PubMed Central

    Marjetič, Aleš; Kregar, Klemen; Ambrožič, Tomaž; Kogoj, Dušan

    2012-01-01

    Horizontal and vertical positions of points for the control assessment of crane rails are classically determined separately. The procedure is time consuming and causes non-homogenous accuracy of the horizontal and vertical position of control points. The proposed alternative approach is based on polar measurements using a high accuracy total station instrument and a special platform with two precise surveying prisms fixed on it. Measurements are carried out from a single station thus ensuring a common coordinate system and homogenous accuracy. The position of the characteristic point of a rail is derived from the measured positions of both prisms with known geometry of the platform. The influence of platform non-horizontality is defined, along with its elimination procedure. Accuracy assessment is ensured with redundant measurements. Result of the proposed procedure is a numerical and graphical presentation of characteristic points. The control parameters required in international Eurocode standards are easily determined from them. PMID:22778621

  19. Measurement and control of 2-supplier delivery station

    SciTech Connect

    Shumate, G.

    1997-04-01

    An industrial plant that uses natural gas for its furnaces obtains contracts with two local gas suppliers. A system is needed to measure and control the delivery of gas from these two suppliers. A system is proposed that will combine electronic instrumentation and control hardware with traditional mechanical techniques. An RTU with multi-communication ports and dial-up telephone modem is to be the main link between the field equipment and the host computer in the plant`s control room. Electronic flow correctors (EFC`s) shall be used to perform the flow calculations required to pressure- and temperature-correct the flow through the two supplier`s turbine meters. Finally, a dedicated control processor is to perform the control functions of the system. An efficient, chargeable battery arrangement provides power to the system, even during loss of utility company power. Turbine meters are used to measure the gas flow. Each supply is to have a single-run turbine meter from which electrical pulses are obtained for volume calculations. Pilot-operated control valves are used to control the gas flow. Each supplier will have two control valves--one for the automated control, and a second to monitor high pressure in the event of failure in the primary control valve or its operating system. There are also many mechanical and pneumatic components that go into a system like this. However, these details will not be discussed here.

  20. Volume-controlled hydrologic property measurements in triaxial systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, Harold W.; Willden, Arthur T.; Kiusalaas, Nicholas J.; Nelson, Karl R.; Poeter, Eileen P.

    1994-01-01

    New capabilities for hydrologic property measurements in triaxial systems include: (1) volume-controlled and simultaneous measurements of hydraulic conductivity and one-dimensional consolidation (or specific storage) of a saturated test specimen; and (2) volume-controlled measurements of hydraulic conductivity, matric potential, and the variation of these properties with the moisture content of an unsaturated test specimen. Data on saturated kaolinite demonstrate simultaneous hydraulic-conductivity and one-dimensional consolidation tests with continuous monitoring of both vertical and horizontal effective stresses. Data on well-graded silty sand demonstrate the feasibility of concurrent constant-flow hydraulic conductivity and mattic potential measurements, and the variation of these properties with moisture content, for undisturbed and unsaturated specimens mounted in triaxial cells. Refinements needed to realize the full potential of these capabilities include a more rigid triaxial cell to minimize compliance, and an improved technique for measuring hydraulic-head differences within an unsaturated test specimen.

  1. Automatic control and detector for three-terminal resistance measurement

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.

    1976-10-26

    A device is provided for automatic control and detection in a three-terminal resistance measuring instrument. The invention is useful for the rapid measurement of the resistivity of various bulk material with a three-terminal electrode system. The device maintains the current through the sample at a fixed level while measuring the voltage across the sample to detect the sample resistance. The three-electrode system contacts the bulk material and the current through the sample is held constant by means of a control circuit connected to a first of the three electrodes and works in conjunction with a feedback controlled amplifier to null the voltage between the first electrode and a second electrode connected to the controlled amplifier output. An A.C. oscillator provides a source of sinusoidal reference voltage of the frequency at which the measurement is to be executed. Synchronous reference pulses for synchronous detectors in the control circuit and an output detector circuit are provided by a synchronous pulse generator. The output of the controlled amplifier circuit is sampled by an output detector circuit to develop at an output terminal thereof a D.C. voltage which is proportional to the sample resistance R. The sample resistance is that segment of the sample between the area of the first electrode and the third electrode, which is connected to ground potential.

  2. Effect of the US-Mexico border region in cardiovascular mortality: ecological time trend analysis of Mexican border and non-border municipalities from 1998 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Anaya, Gabriel; Al-Delaimy, Wael K

    2017-05-06

    An array of risk factors has been associated with cardiovascular diseases, and developing nations are becoming disproportionately affected by such diseases. Cardiovascular diseases have been reported to be highly prevalent in the Mexican population, but local mortality data is poor. The Mexican side of the US-Mexico border has a culture that is closely related to a developed nation and therefore may share the same risk factors of cardiovascular diseases. We wanted to explore if there was higher cardiovascular mortality in the border region of Mexico compared to the rest of the nation. We conducted a population based cross-sectional time series analysis to estimate the effects of education, insurance and municipal size in Mexican border (n = 38) and non-border municipalities (n = 2360) and its association with cardiovascular age-adjusted mortality rates between the years 1998-2012. We used a mixed effect linear model with random effect estimation and repeated measurements to compare the main outcome variable (mortality rate), the covariates (education, insurance and population size) and the geographic delimiter (border/non-border). Mortality due to cardiovascular disease was consistently higher in the municipalities along the US-Mexico border, showing a difference of 78 · 5 (95% CI 58 · 7-98 · 3, p < 0 · 001) more cardiovascular deaths after adjusting for covariates. Larger municipal size and higher education levels showed a reduction in cardiovascular mortality of 12 · 6 (95% CI 11 · 4-13 · 8, p < 0 · 001) deaths and 8 · 6 (95% CI 5 · 5-11 · 8, p < 0 · 001) deaths respectively. Insurance coverage showed an increase in cardiovascular mortality of 3 · 6 (95% CI 3 · 1-4 · 0, p < 0 · 001) deaths per decile point increase. There was an increase in cardiovascular mortality of 0 · 3 (95% CI -0 · 001-0 · 6, p = 0 · 050) deaths per year increase in

  3. Integrated measure and control system for textile machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuantao; Zhao, Jinzhi; Zhao, Zexiang

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, textile mechanical drive control is researched. Textile machinery integrated measure and control system is established. The system is composed of micro-computer, PLC, transducer, implement device, all kinds of detective components and industrial Ethernet etc. Technology of industrial field bus control and Internet technique are applied. The system is on a background of textile production technique, such as spring, woven, chemical fiber, non-woven, dyeing and finishing. A network based open integrated control system is developed. Various characteristics of production technique flow and textile machinery movement discipline are presented. Configuration software is introduced according to user's control tasks. Final remote automatic controls are finished. This may make development cost reduced, and development periods shortened. Some problems in textile machinery development process are solved, which may make transparency factory and remote development realized.

  4. Integrated phase shift measurements for advanced mask etch process control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, Turgut; Collard, Corey; Anderson, Scott A.; Mak, Alfred W.; Brooks, Cynthia B.; Buie, Melisa J.; Walsh, Philip; Li, George

    2003-12-01

    The phase shift effect in Alternating Phase Shift Masks (AAPSMs) and chrome-less phase shift masks is created by etching trenches directly into the quartz substrate. Since the phase shift is critically dependent on the etch depth, the quartz etch process must be tightly controlled. In the absence of an etch stop for the process, an integrated metrology solution is desirable on the mask tech tool. Traditional methods for measuring etch depth or phase shift, such as interferometry, profilometry, AFM, and SEM, are expensive, slow, and/or destructive. In addition, traditional methods cannot measure quartz etch depth without removing the resist and in some cases the chrome mask, making them unsuitable for integration into the etch process. This paper will present measurements of trench depth and phase shift on quartz phase shift mask using the n&k Analyzer 1512-RT. The n&k Analyzer measures reflectance (R) and transmittance (T) from 190-1000nm, which is analyzed according to the Forouhi-Bloomer dispersion relations to simultaneously determine n, k, film thicknesses, trench depth, and phase shift. The measurement is non-destructive and fast, typically taking 2-3 seconds per measurement point. No special test structures are required for the measurement. In addition, the n&k Analyzer can measure quartz etch depth with the chrome mask, ARC layers, and resist still intact. The n&k Analyzer measurements show good correlation with 193nm interferometer measurements, and good repeatability. The small footprint, ease of use, measurement speed, and the ability to measure quartz depth in the presence of chrome and resist make the n&k Analyzer an ideal candidate for integrated metrology applications on mask etch tools for advanced proces control (APC). The Applied Materials' Tetra II phootmask etch system has the unique capability to accommodate integrated metrology modules through the factory interface. Applications of APC with integrated phase shift measurements will be discussed.

  5. System for controllable magnetic measurement with direct field determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stupakov, O.

    2012-02-01

    This work describes a specially designed setup for magnetic hysteresis and Barkhausen noise measurements. The setup combines two main elements: an improved fast algorithm to control the waveform of magnetic induction and simultaneous direct determination of the magnetic field. The digital feedback algorithm uses only the previous measurement cycle to correct the magnetization voltage without any additional correlation parameter; it usually converges after several tens of cycles. The magnetic field is measured at the sample surface using a vertically mounted array of sensitive Hall sensors. Linear extrapolation of the tangential field profile to the sample surface determines the true waveform of the magnetic field. This unique combination of physically based control for both parameters of the magnetization process provides stable and reliable results, which are independent of a specified experimental configuration. This is illustrated for the industrially attractive measurements of non-oriented electrical steels with a 50 Hz sinusoidal induction waveform.

  6. Improving Nigerian Border Security -- A Comprehensive Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-02

    U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, Homeland Defense, Joint Publication (JP) 3- 27 (Washington, D.C.: CJCS, 12 July 2007), viii. 2. Rafiu A. Akindele and Bola ...http://www.voiceofnigeria.org/Bordersecub.htm 6. Bola A. Akinterinwa and Bassey E. Ate, eds., Cross Border Armed Banditry in the Northeast: Issues in...Border Security, Cooperation and Integration, 69. 22. Adeola and Fayomi, Implications of Cross Border Migration, 6-7. 23. Ibid., 7. 24. Aluko Ola

  7. An effective technique for denture border evaluation.

    PubMed

    Phoenix, R D; DeFreest, C F

    1997-09-01

    Proper extension and adjustment of denture borders is a critical component in successful removable prosthodontic treatment. Unfortunately, commonly marketed disclosing media may not provide appropriate viscosities for the accurate assessment of denture border extensions. This article provides a technique for the mixing, unit-dose packaging, and utilization of a disclosing medium that is extremely well-suited for denture border applications. The technique employs commonly available materials and compiles with current "unit-dose" guidelines.

  8. Microstrip filters for measurement and control of superconducting qubits.

    PubMed

    Longobardi, Luigi; Bennett, Douglas A; Patel, Vijay; Chen, Wei; Lukens, James E

    2013-01-01

    Careful filtering is necessary for observations of quantum phenomena in superconducting circuits at low temperatures. Measurements of coherence between quantum states require extensive filtering to protect against noise coupled from room temperature electronics. We demonstrate distributed transmission line filters which cut off exponentially at GHz frequencies and can be anchored at the base temperature of a dilution refrigerator. The compact design makes them suitable to filter many different bias lines in the same setup, necessary for the control and measurement of superconducting qubits.

  9. Measurement of Temporal Awareness in Air Traffic Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rantanen, E.M.

    2009-01-01

    Temporal awareness, or level 3 situation awareness, is critical to successful control of air traffic, yet the construct remains ill-defined and difficult to measure. This research sought evidence for air traffic controllers awareness of temporal characteristics of their tasks in data from a high-fidelity system evaluation simulation. Five teams of controllers worked on four scenarios with different traffic load. Several temporal parameters were defined for each task controllers performed during a simulation run and their actions on the tasks were timed relative to them. Controllers showed a strong tendency to prioritize tasks according to a first come, first served principle. This trend persisted as task load increased. Also evident was awareness of the urgency of tasks, as tasks with impending closing of a window of opportunity were performed before tasks that had longer time available before closing of the window.

  10. Measurement of Temporal Awareness in Air Traffic Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rantanen, E.M.

    2009-01-01

    Temporal awareness, or level 3 situation awareness, is critical to successful control of air traffic, yet the construct remains ill-defined and difficult to measure. This research sought evidence for air traffic controllers awareness of temporal characteristics of their tasks in data from a high-fidelity system evaluation simulation. Five teams of controllers worked on four scenarios with different traffic load. Several temporal parameters were defined for each task controllers performed during a simulation run and their actions on the tasks were timed relative to them. Controllers showed a strong tendency to prioritize tasks according to a first come, first served principle. This trend persisted as task load increased. Also evident was awareness of the urgency of tasks, as tasks with impending closing of a window of opportunity were performed before tasks that had longer time available before closing of the window.

  11. Asthma control measurement using five different questionnaires: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, Francois; de Meulder, Isabelle; Paesmans, Marianne; Muylle, Inge; Bruyneel, Marie; Ninane, Vincent

    2013-09-01

    Questionnaires play a key place in the assessment of asthma control. Different questionnaires have been developed. However, it remains largely unknown whether they can be used interchangeably. We wondered whether the panel of frequently used scores would give similar measurement of asthma control. The present study aimed to assess the agreement between five specific questionnaires. In this prospective study, ninety-nine patients completed five commonly used asthma control scores: the GINA, the Asthma Control Test™, the Royal College of Physician score, the Asthma Therapy Assessment Questionnaire (ATAQ), and the Asthma Control Questionnaire(©) (ACQ). The kappa coefficient was used to assess the agreement between questionnaires. The agreement between the GINA and other scores was only moderate (kappa coefficients amounted from 0.41 to 0.60). With respect to the "controlled" level, all the other scores gave higher results than GINA. All other scores also tended to underestimate GINA "uncontrolled level". For the "partly controlled level" defined by 3 of the 5 questionnaires, ACQ identified the same percentage of patients than GINA while ATAQ overestimated this percentage. This study shows only moderate agreement between five commonly used asthma control scores. The GINA score showed the lowest percentage of controlled and the highest percentage of uncontrolled asthma. As a consequence, all these scores do not seem to evaluate the same symptoms. NCT01350661. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Microprocessor controlled optical measuring system for large mirror modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehne, R.; Rach, E.; Reich, F.

    1985-10-01

    A microprocessor controlled contactless measuring system was developed in order to determine how the beam quality of mirrors influences the performance of solar plants with focusing collectors. The system was installed to investigate large flat and curved mirror surfaces ( or = 10 sq m). An algorithm to evaluate the measured data was derived. The very accurate method is based on laser ray tracing to determine the ripple and the deviations from the ideal contour which can be expressed as a root mean square value. Measurements on parabolic trough mirrors and heliostat segments yield rms values of 10 and 3.7 mrad, respectively.

  13. Radio-controlled boat for measuring water velocities and bathymetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidmar, Andrej; Bezak, Nejc; Sečnik, Matej

    2016-04-01

    Radio-controlled boat named "Hi3" was designed and developed in order to facilitate water velocity and bathymetry measurements. The boat is equipped with the SonTek RiverSurveyor M9 instrument that is designed for measuring open channel hydraulics (discharge and bathymetry). Usually channel cross sections measurements are performed either from a bridge or from a vessel. However, these approaches have some limitations such as performing bathymetry measurements close to the hydropower plant turbine or downstream from a hydropower plant gate where bathymetry changes are often the most extreme. Therefore, the radio-controlled boat was designed, built and tested in order overcome these limitations. The boat is made from a surf board and two additional small balance support floats. Additional floats are used to improve stability in fast flowing and turbulent parts of rivers. The boat is powered by two electric motors, steering is achieved with changing the power applied to left and right motor. Furthermore, remotely controlled boat "Hi3" can be powered in two ways, either by a gasoline electric generator or by lithium batteries. Lithium batteries are lighter, quieter, but they operation time is shorter compared to an electrical generator. With the radio-controlled boat "Hi3" we can perform measurements in potentially dangerous areas such as under the lock gates at hydroelectric power plant or near the turbine outflow. Until today, the boat "Hi3" has driven more than 200 km in lakes and rivers, performing various water speed and bathymetry measurements. Moreover, in future development the boat "Hi3" will be upgraded in order to be able to perform measurements automatically. The future plans are to develop and implement the autopilot. With this approach the user will define the route that has to be driven by the boat and the boat will drive the pre-defined route automatically. This will be possible because of the very accurate differential GPS from the Sontek River

  14. Chemical measurements with optical fibers for process control.

    PubMed

    Boisde, G; Blanc, F; Perez, J J

    1988-02-01

    Several aspects of remote in situ spectrophotometric measurement by means of optical fibers are considered in the context of chemical process control. The technique makes it possible to measure a species in a particular oxidation state, such as plutonium(VI), sequentially, under the stringent conditions of automated analysis. For the control of several species in solution, measurements at discrete wavelengths on the sides of the absorption peaks serve to increase the dynamic range. Examples are given concerning the isotopic separation of uranium in the Chemex process. The chemical control of complex solutions containing numerous mutually interfering species requires a more elaborate spectral scan and real-time processing to determine the chemical kinetics. Photodiode array spectrophotometers are therefore ideal for analysing the uranium and plutonium solutions of the Purex process. Remote on-line control by ultraviolet monitoring exhibits limitations chiefly due to Rayleigh scattering in the optical fibers. The measurement of pH in acidic (0.8-3.2) and basic media (10-13) has also been attempted. Prior calibration, signal processing and optical spectra modeling are also discussed.

  15. Quality Assurance and Control Considerations in Environmental Measurements and Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlet, Jacob

    1982-06-01

    Quality assurance and quality control have become accepted as essential parts of all environmental surveillance, measurements, and monitoring programs, both nuclear and non-nuclear. The same principles and details apply to each. It is primarily the final measurement technique that differs. As the desire and need to measure smaller amounts of pollutants with greater accuracy has increased, it has been recognized that quality assurance and control programs are cost-effective in achieving the expected results. Quality assurance (QA) consists of all the actions necessary to provide confidence in the results. Quality control (QC) is a part of QA, and consists of those actions and activities that permit the control of the individual steps in the environmental program. The distinction between the two terms is not always clearly defined, but a sharp division is not necessary. The essential principle of QA and QC is a commitment to high quality results. The essential components of a QA and QC program are a complete, written procedures manual for all parts of the environmental program, the use of standard or validated procedures, participation in applicable interlaboratory comparison or QA programs, replicate analysis and measurement, training of personnel, and a means of auditing or checking that the QA and QC programs are properly conducted. These components are discussed below in some detail.

  16. Methods of measurement for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullis, W. M. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    This progress report describes NBS activities directed toward the development of methods of measurement for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices. Significant accomplishments during this reporting period include design of a plan to provide standard silicon wafers for four-probe resistivity measurements for the industry, publication of a summary report on the photoconductive decay method for measuring carrier lifetime, publication of a comprehensive review of the field of wire bond fabrication and testing, and successful completion of organizational activity leading to the establishment of a new group on quality and hardness assurance in ASTM Committee F-1 on Electronics. Work is continuing on measurement of resistivity of semiconductor crystals; characterization of generation-recombination-trapping centers in silicon; study of gold-doped silicon; development of the infrared response technique; evaluation of wire bonds and die attachment; and measurement of thermal properties of semiconductor devices, delay time and related carrier transport properties in junction devices, and noise properties of microwave diodes.

  17. The Armchair at the Borders: The "Messy" Ideas of Borders and Border Epistemologies within Multicultural Science Education Scholarship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Lyn

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims to further articulate multicultural science education scholarship. In particular, it explores the notions of borders and border epistemologies as intellectual resources to think again about the challenges of science education in the global world that demand more sophisticated concepts to unravel some of its complexities. It…

  18. The Armchair at the Borders: The "Messy" Ideas of Borders and Border Epistemologies within Multicultural Science Education Scholarship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Lyn

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims to further articulate multicultural science education scholarship. In particular, it explores the notions of borders and border epistemologies as intellectual resources to think again about the challenges of science education in the global world that demand more sophisticated concepts to unravel some of its complexities. It…

  19. Closed-loop snowplow applicator control using road condition measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdogan, Gurkan; Alexander, Lee; Rajamani, Rajesh

    2011-04-01

    Closed-loop control of a snowplow applicator, based on direct measurement of the road surface condition, is a valuable technology for the optimisation of winter road maintenance costs and for the protection of the environment from the negative impacts of excessive usage of de-icing chemicals. To this end, a novel friction measurement wheel is designed to provide a continuous measurement of road friction coefficient, which is, in turn, utilised to control the applicator automatically on a snowplow. It is desired that the automated snowplow applicator deploy de-icing materials right from the beginning of any slippery surface detected by the friction wheel, meaning that no portion of the slippery road surface should be left untreated behind, as the snowplow travels over it at a reasonably high speed. This paper describes the developed wheel-based measurement system, the friction estimation algorithm and the expected performance of the closed-loop applicator system. Conventional and zero velocity applicators are introduced and their hardware time delays are measured in addition to the time delay of the friction estimation algorithm. The overall performance of the closed-loop applicator control system is shown to be reliable at typical snowplowing speeds if the zero velocity applicator is used.

  20. Optimal Load Control via Frequency Measurement and Neighborhood Area Communication

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, CH; Topcu, U; Low, SH

    2013-11-01

    We propose a decentralized optimal load control scheme that provides contingency reserve in the presence of sudden generation drop. The scheme takes advantage of flexibility of frequency responsive loads and neighborhood area communication to solve an optimal load control problem that balances load and generation while minimizing end-use disutility of participating in load control. Local frequency measurements enable individual loads to estimate the total mismatch between load and generation. Neighborhood area communication helps mitigate effects of inconsistencies in the local estimates due to frequency measurement noise. Case studies show that the proposed scheme can balance load with generation and restore the frequency within seconds of time after a generation drop, even when the loads use a highly simplified power system model in their algorithms. We also investigate tradeoffs between the amount of communication and the performance of the proposed scheme through simulation-based experiments.

  1. International Issues, High-Stakes Testing, and Border Pedagogy: Social Studies at Border High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cashman, Timothy G.; McDermott, Benjamin R.

    2013-01-01

    A recently constructed border wall stands within walking distance of Border High School (BHS) and was created to impede the flow of people, goods, fauna, and contraband from Mexico into the United States (U.S.). The reality, however, is that this geopolitical border is fluid, allowing connections between sociopolitical zones. The researchers…

  2. International Issues, High-Stakes Testing, and Border Pedagogy: Social Studies at Border High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cashman, Timothy G.; McDermott, Benjamin R.

    2013-01-01

    A recently constructed border wall stands within walking distance of Border High School (BHS) and was created to impede the flow of people, goods, fauna, and contraband from Mexico into the United States (U.S.). The reality, however, is that this geopolitical border is fluid, allowing connections between sociopolitical zones. The researchers…

  3. The Intersectionality of Border Pedagogy and Latino/a Youth: Enacting Border Pedagogy in Multiple Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramirez, Pablo C.; Ross, Lydia; Jimenez-Silva, Margarita

    2016-01-01

    In this one-year qualitative study, the authors examined how border pedagogy is enacted by two Latino/a high school teachers in a border community in Southern California. Through classroom observations, the authors documented powerful student discussions that named complex borders (Giroux, 1992) that existed in their daily lives. We drew from…

  4. 22 CFR 41.32 - Nonresident alien Mexican border crossing identification cards; combined border crossing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nonresident alien Mexican border crossing... IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Temporary Visitors § 41.32 Nonresident alien Mexican border... Mexico on Form I-186, Nonresident Alien Mexican Border Crossing Card, or Form I-586, Nonresident...

  5. 22 CFR 41.32 - Nonresident alien Mexican border crossing identification cards; combined border crossing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nonresident alien Mexican border crossing... IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Temporary Visitors § 41.32 Nonresident alien Mexican border... Mexico on Form I-186, Nonresident Alien Mexican Border Crossing Card, or Form I-586, Nonresident...

  6. 22 CFR 41.32 - Nonresident alien Mexican border crossing identification cards; combined border crossing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nonresident alien Mexican border crossing... IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Temporary Visitors § 41.32 Nonresident alien Mexican border... Mexico on Form I-186, Nonresident Alien Mexican Border Crossing Card, or Form I-586, Nonresident...

  7. The Intersectionality of Border Pedagogy and Latino/a Youth: Enacting Border Pedagogy in Multiple Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramirez, Pablo C.; Ross, Lydia; Jimenez-Silva, Margarita

    2016-01-01

    In this one-year qualitative study, the authors examined how border pedagogy is enacted by two Latino/a high school teachers in a border community in Southern California. Through classroom observations, the authors documented powerful student discussions that named complex borders (Giroux, 1992) that existed in their daily lives. We drew from…

  8. Methods of Measurement for Semiconductor Materials, Process Control, and Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullis, W. M. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    The development of methods of measurement for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices is reported. Significant accomplishments include: (1) Completion of an initial identification of the more important problems in process control for integrated circuit fabrication and assembly; (2) preparations for making silicon bulk resistivity wafer standards available to the industry; and (3) establishment of the relationship between carrier mobility and impurity density in silicon. Work is continuing on measurement of resistivity of semiconductor crystals; characterization of generation-recombination-trapping centers, including gold, in silicon; evaluation of wire bonds and die attachment; study of scanning electron microscopy for wafer inspection and test; measurement of thermal properties of semiconductor devices; determination of S-parameters and delay time in junction devices; and characterization of noise and conversion loss of microwave detector diodes.

  9. Is tuberculosis crossing borders at the Eastern boundary of the European Union?

    PubMed Central

    van der Werf, Marieke J.; Hollo, Vahur; Noori, Teymur

    2013-01-01

    Background: The Eastern border of the European Union (EU) consists of 10 countries after the expansion of the EU in 2004 and 2007. These 10 countries border to the East to countries with high tuberculosis (TB) notification rates. We analyzed the notification data of Europe to quantify the impact of cross-border TB at the Eastern border of the EU. Methods: We used TB surveillance data of 2010 submitted by 53 European Region countries to the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control and the World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe. Notified TB cases were stratified by origin of the case (national/foreign). We calculated the contribution of foreign to overall TB notification. Results: In the 10 EU countries located at the EU Eastern border, 618 notified TB cases (1.7% of all notified TB cases) were of foreign origin. Of those 618 TB cases, 173 (28.0%) were from countries bordering the EU to the East. More specifically, 90 (52.0%) were from Russia, 33 (19.1%) from Belarus, 33 (19.1%) from Ukraine, 13 (7.5%) from Moldova and 4 (2.3%) from Turkey. Conclusions: Currently, migrants contribute little to TB notifications in the 10 EU countries at the Eastern border of the EU, but changes in migration patterns may result in an increasing contribution. Therefore, EU countries at the Eastern border of the EU should strive to provide prompt diagnostic services and adequate treatment of migrants. PMID:23813718

  10. Socioeconomic Context and the Food Landscape in Texas: Results from Hotspot Analysis and Border/Non-Border Comparison of Unhealthy Food Environments

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Jennifer J.; Abdelbary, Bassent; Klaas, Kelly; Tapia, Beatriz; Sexton, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the food landscape of Texas using the CDC’s Modified Retail Food Environment (mRFEI) and to make comparisons by border/non-border. Methods: The Modified Retail Food Environment index (mRFEI (2008)) is an index developed by the CDC that measures what percent of the total food vendors in a census track sell healthy food. The range of values is 0 (unhealthy areas with limited access to fruits and vegetables) to (100—Healthy). These data were linked to 2010 US Census socioeconomic and ethnic concentration data. Spatial analysis and GIS techniques were applied to assess the differences between border and non-border regions. Variables of interest were mRFEI score, median income, total population, percent total population less than five years, median age, % receiving food stamps, % Hispanic, and % with a bachelor degree. Results: Findings from this study reveal that food environment in Texas tends to be characteristic of a “food desert”. Analysis also demonstrates differences by border/non-border location and percent of the population that is foreign born and by percent of families who receive food stamps. Conclusions: Identifying the relationship between socioeconomic disparity, ethnic concentration and mRFEI score could be a fundamental step in improving health in disadvantage communities, particularly those on the Texas-Mexico border. PMID:24865399

  11. Key performance measures to control maintenance-associated HAIs.

    PubMed

    Njuangang, Stanley; Liyanage, Champika; Akintoye, Akintola

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to improve overall healthcare maintenance (HM) service performance in NHS infection control (IC). Hence, the authors identify critical success factors (CSFs) and key performance measures in maintenance-associated infections. These infections occur because of the poor performance of HM service in IC. In the first Delphi exercise, complete CSFs and performance measures were presented to the Delphi participants for refinement and modification. Delphi round 1 data were analysed manually and used to refine the rounds 2 and 3 Delphi instruments. In subsequent Delphi rounds, the results were analysed through descriptive statistics. In total, eight CSFs and 53 key performance measures were identified for reducing maintenance-associated infections in hospitals. For example, establishing clear communication between the infection control team (ICT) and HM unit is important for preventing maintenance-associated HAIs. Dust prevention is also identified by the healthcare experts as an important measure to prevent maintenance-associated HAIs in high-risk patient areas. The findings provide CSFs and key performance measures for measuring performance in HM in IC. Reducing the rate of maintenance-associated infections will have important socio-economic and health ramifications for hospitals. It will reduce cost and free up additional resources for alternative projects. It will also raise confidence among healthcare users about the quality of services provided by hospitals.

  12. Measurement and Control of the Variability of Scanning Pressure Transducer Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhl, David D.; Everhart, Joel L.; Hallissy, James B.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the new wall pressure measurement system and data-quality monitoring software installed at 14x22 Ft subsonic tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center. The monitoring software was developed to enable measurement and control of the variability of the reference pressures and approximately 400 tunnel wall pressure measurements. Variability of the system, based upon data acquired over a year of wind tunnel tests and calibrations, is presented. The level of variation of the wall pressure measurements is shown to be predictable.

  13. Control systems improvements in a precision coordinate measuring machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, S. S.; Babelay, E. F., Jr.; Igou, R. E.; Woodard, L. M.; Green, W. L.

    1981-09-01

    A conventional, manually driven Moore No. 3 coordinate measuring machine at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant is being upgraded to provide a continuous-path numerical control capability and simultaneously serve as a vehicle for testing new machine slide-control concepts. Besides new lead screw drive motors, an NC machine control unit, and a closed-loop servo system, the machine has also been equipped with vibration isolation, air-bearing slideways, and laser interferometric position feedback. The present conventional slide servo system will be replaced with a digital servo system wherein various feedback and compensation techniques can be realized through the use of a high speed, dedicated digital processor. The improvements to data are described with emphasis on identification and compensation of the slide control systems.

  14. Assisted Control Point Measurement for Close Range Photogrammetry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mata, E.; Hernandez, M. A.; Cardenal, J.; Perez, J. L.

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes the automation and optimization in control points measurement and elaboration of sketches in Close Range Photogrammetry. The system can be controlled by an operator alone and it integrates a robotized and reflectorless total station, two digital cameras, a laptop computer and the control software. The measured data with the station are registered and the control point will get associated to their marks in the images. So, it is possible to eliminate the handmade sketches since the marking of control points in the image is instantaneously made. The sketch includes object images with enlargements so the point is clearly identified and marked with the support of a virtual reticle. Also the sketch includes object coordinates, image coordinates, identification code (ID) and some additional information about the point. The use of the system by only one operator allows the reduction of costs, organization and time in control point surveying. Different tests have been made in order to check the system. TDC: this test has been made in close range conditions with targets and artificial illumination. EDIF: in this case the test includes long range conditions and control points targeted at natural points in building façade. The tests have allowed several analyses to study the feasibility and the improvement of the system. So we have made in situ tests by comparing direct observations with and without the camera telescope, with targets and natural points, close and long distances and different conditions of illumination. Moreover in one of these tests we include the observation and sketch realization with a manual method. With respect to the use of the aiming eyepiece camera, the tests (TDC) realized in laboratory (close distance -4 m- and good light conditions) show very small spatial differences (below the nominal precision of the total station) comparing the direct aim through the telescope without camera. Other test (EDIF) made over longer distance (130

  15. Optimal Control of Quantum Measurement for Superconducting Phase Qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Frank; Egger, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Pulses to steer the time evolution of quantum systems can be designed with optimal control theory. In most cases it is the coherent processes that can be controlled and one optimizes the time evolution towards a target unitary process, sometimes also in the presence of non-controllable incoherent processes. Here we show how to extend the GRAPE algorithm in the case where the incoherent processes are controllable and the target time evolution is a non-unitary quantum channel. We perform a gradient search on a fidelity measure based on Choi matrices. We illustrate our algorithm by optimizing a phase qubit measurement pulse. We show how this technique can lead to large measurement contrast close to 99%. We also show, within the validity of our model, that this algorithm can produce short 1.4 ns pulses with 98.2% contrast. Work posted at arXiv:1408.6086, in press at Physical Review A Supported by the EU through SCALEQIT.

  16. A Clinical Tool to Measure Trunk Control in Children with Cerebral Palsy: The Trunk Control Measurement Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyrman, Lieve; Molenaers, Guy; Desloovere, Kaat; Verheyden, Geert; De Cat, Jos; Monbaliu, Elegast; Feys, Hilde

    2011-01-01

    In this study the psychometric properties of the Trunk Control Measurement Scale (TCMS) in children with cerebral palsy (CP) were examined. Twenty-six children with spastic CP (mean age 11 years 3 months, range 8-15 years; Gross Motor Function Classification System level I n = 11, level II n = 5, level III n = 10) were included in this study. To…

  17. A Clinical Tool to Measure Trunk Control in Children with Cerebral Palsy: The Trunk Control Measurement Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyrman, Lieve; Molenaers, Guy; Desloovere, Kaat; Verheyden, Geert; De Cat, Jos; Monbaliu, Elegast; Feys, Hilde

    2011-01-01

    In this study the psychometric properties of the Trunk Control Measurement Scale (TCMS) in children with cerebral palsy (CP) were examined. Twenty-six children with spastic CP (mean age 11 years 3 months, range 8-15 years; Gross Motor Function Classification System level I n = 11, level II n = 5, level III n = 10) were included in this study. To…

  18. Green Belt Europe - borders separate, nature unites

    Treesearch

    Uwe Friedel

    2015-01-01

    During the period of the Cold War between 1945 and 1989, a "Green Belt" of valuable pristine landscapes developed along the border line between Eastern and Western Europe, the intensively fortified and guarded so called Iron Curtain. Due to the remoteness of the border areas, a high number of national parks and other large conservation areas can be found...

  19. Border Pedagogy in the Age of Postmodernism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giroux, Henry A.

    1988-01-01

    Advances a theory incorporating the most useful and transformative aspects of critical pedagogy. Border pedagogy acknowledges the shifting borders that undermine and reterritorialize power and knowledge, and links the educational enterprise with the struggle for a democratic society. Attempts to combine an emancipatory modernism with a…

  20. Border Pedagogy Cafes: Grassroots Conversations that Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Necochea, Juan; Cline, Zulmara

    2008-01-01

    This exploratory study uses qualitative methods to analyze the impact of conversations in the Border Pedagogy "Cafes" on more than 500 binational educators from the Tijuana/San Diego area on the U.S.-Mexico border. Four important themes emerged from the analysis that describe the impact of the cafes and offer a strong foundation on which…

  1. Researching Transfronterizo Literacies in Texas Border Colonias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Patrick H.; Murillo, Luz A.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines literacies practiced in bilingual households located in emerging communities along the Texas-Mexico border known as border colonias. Drawing on theoretical notions of space as geographic and temporal, the simultaneity of global and local forces at work in colonias, and expressions of agency that are "in between"…

  2. Teaching Orthodox Religious Education on the Border

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berglund, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    In geographical areas bordering those of other states, the function of educational systems, as the means for states to foster their citizens, is challenged by ambiguities and tensions connected to intercultural experiences. In this article, I illustrate some of the findings from a project that studies religious education in four border areas…

  3. Researching Transfronterizo Literacies in Texas Border Colonias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Patrick H.; Murillo, Luz A.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines literacies practiced in bilingual households located in emerging communities along the Texas-Mexico border known as border colonias. Drawing on theoretical notions of space as geographic and temporal, the simultaneity of global and local forces at work in colonias, and expressions of agency that are "in between"…

  4. Binational Border Collaboration in Teacher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampton, Elaine; Liguori, Olga; Rippberger, Susan

    2003-01-01

    Describes an educational collaboration at the University of Texas El Paso designed to increase the U.S. border community's understanding of their Mexican school counterparts. This small teacher border exchange program grew into a laboratory for learning and teaching multicultural education through binational community-based experience. Research…

  5. Sprouting of dormant buds on border trees

    Treesearch

    G.R., Jr. Trimble; H. Clay Smith; H. Clay Smith

    1970-01-01

    As part of an evaluation of silvicultura1 systems used in managing Appalachian hardwoods, we are studying degrade of border trees surrounding harvest-cut openings made in the patch cutting and group selection systems. One facet of this research dealt with determining what portion of visually evident dormant buds on border tree boles sprouted when the openings were cut...

  6. Border Pedagogy Cafes: Grassroots Conversations that Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Necochea, Juan; Cline, Zulmara

    2008-01-01

    This exploratory study uses qualitative methods to analyze the impact of conversations in the Border Pedagogy "Cafes" on more than 500 binational educators from the Tijuana/San Diego area on the U.S.-Mexico border. Four important themes emerged from the analysis that describe the impact of the cafes and offer a strong foundation on which…

  7. Computing border bases using mutant strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, E.; Abbas Khan, S.

    2014-01-01

    Border bases, a generalization of Gröbner bases, have actively been addressed during recent years due to their applicability to industrial problems. In cryptography and coding theory a useful application of border based is to solve zero-dimensional systems of polynomial equations over finite fields, which motivates us for developing optimizations of the algorithms that compute border bases. In 2006, Kehrein and Kreuzer formulated the Border Basis Algorithm (BBA), an algorithm which allows the computation of border bases that relate to a degree compatible term ordering. In 2007, J. Ding et al. introduced mutant strategies bases on finding special lower degree polynomials in the ideal. The mutant strategies aim to distinguish special lower degree polynomials (mutants) from the other polynomials and give them priority in the process of generating new polynomials in the ideal. In this paper we develop hybrid algorithms that use the ideas of J. Ding et al. involving the concept of mutants to optimize the Border Basis Algorithm for solving systems of polynomial equations over finite fields. In particular, we recall a version of the Border Basis Algorithm which is actually called the Improved Border Basis Algorithm and propose two hybrid algorithms, called MBBA and IMBBA. The new mutants variants provide us space efficiency as well as time efficiency. The efficiency of these newly developed hybrid algorithms is discussed using standard cryptographic examples.

  8. Teaching Orthodox Religious Education on the Border

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berglund, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    In geographical areas bordering those of other states, the function of educational systems, as the means for states to foster their citizens, is challenged by ambiguities and tensions connected to intercultural experiences. In this article, I illustrate some of the findings from a project that studies religious education in four border areas…

  9. Microcomputer control soft tube measuring-testing instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yanzhou; Jiang, Xiu-Zhen; Wang, Wen-Yi

    1993-09-01

    Soft tube are key and easily spoiled parts used by the vehicles in the transportation with large numbers. Measuring and testing of the tubes were made by hands for a long time. Cooperating with Harbin Railway Bureau recently we have developed a new kind of automatical measuring and testing instrument In the paper the instrument structure property and measuring principle are presented in details. Centre of the system is a singlechip processor INTEL 80C31 . It can collect deal with data and display the results on LED. Furthermore it brings electromagnetic valves and motors under control. Five soft tubes are measured and tested in the same time all the process is finished automatically. On the hardware and software counter-electromagnetic disturbance methods is adopted efficiently so the performance of the instrument is improved significantly. In the long run the instrument is reliable and practical It solves a quite difficult problem in the railway transportation.

  10. Methods of measurement for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullis, W. M. (Editor)

    1972-01-01

    Activities directed toward the development of methods of measurement for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices are described. Accomplishments include the determination of the reasons for differences in measurements of transistor delay time, identification of an energy level model for gold-doped silicon, and the finding of evidence that it does not appear to be necessary for an ultrasonic bonding tool to grip the wire and move it across the substrate metallization to make the bond. Work is continuing on measurement of resistivity of semiconductor crystals; study of gold-doped silicon; development of the infrared response technique; evaluation of wire bonds and die attachment; measurement of thermal properties of semiconductor devices, delay time, and related carrier transport properties in junction devices, and noise properties of microwave diodes; and characterization of silicon nuclear radiation detectors.

  11. Novel Cross-Border Approaches to Optimise Identification of Asymptomatic and Artemisinin-Resistant Plasmodium Infection in Mobile Populations Crossing Cambodian Borders.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Hannah M; Canavati, Sara E; Rang, Chandary; Ly, Po; Sovannaroth, Siv; Canier, Lydie; Khim, Nimol; Menard, Didier; Ashton, Ruth A; Meek, Sylvia R; Roca-Feltrer, Arantxa

    2015-01-01

    Human population movement across country borders presents a real challenge for malaria control and elimination efforts in Cambodia and its neighbouring countries. To quantify Plasmodium infection among the border-crossing population, including asymptomatic and artemisinin resistant (AR) parasites, three official border crossing points, one from each of Cambodia's borders with Thailand, Laos and Vietnam, were selected for sampling. A total of 3206 participants (of 4110 approached) were recruited as they crossed the border, tested for malaria and interviewed. By real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), 5.4% of all screened individuals were found to harbour Plasmodium parasites. The proportion was highest at the Laos border (11.5%). Overall there were 97 P. vivax (55.7%), 55 P. falciparum (31.6%), two P. malariae (1.1%) and 20 mixed infections (11.5%). Of identified infections, only 20% were febrile at the time of screening. Of the 24 P. falciparum samples where a further PCR was possible to assess AR, 15 (62.5%) had mutations in the K13 propeller domain gene, all from participants at the Laos border point. Malaria rapid diagnostic test (RDT) pLDH/HRP-2 identified a positivity rate of 3.2% overall and sensitivity compared to RT-PCR was very low (43.1%). Main individual risk factors for infection included sex, fever, being a forest-goer, poor knowledge of malaria prevention methods and previous malaria infection. Occupation, day of the week and time of crossing (morning vs. afternoon) also appeared to play an important role in predicting positive cases. This study offers a novel approach to identify asymptomatic infections and monitor AR parasite flow among mobile and migrant populations crossing the borders. Similar screening activities are recommended to identify other hot borders and characterise potential hot spots of AR. Targeted "customised" interventions and surveillance activities should be implemented in these sites to accelerate elimination efforts in

  12. A measurement of a control rod drop using an LVDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Myoung-Hwan; Kim, Ji-Ho; Huh, Hyung; Yu, Je-Yong; Sohn, Dong-Seong

    2010-03-01

    A control element drive mechanism is a reactor regulating system, which is to insert, withdraw, or maintain a control rod containing neutron-absorbing material within a reactor core to control the reactivity of the reactor. The ball-screw type CEDM for the small and medium research reactor has a spring-hydraulic damper to reduce the impact force due to the free drop of the CEDM. This paper describes the experimental results to obtain the drop characteristics of the CEDM. The tests are performed by using a full-scale structure except the control element assembly, and a drop time and displacement after an impact are measured by using an LVDT. The influences of the rod weight and the drop height on the drop behavior are also estimated on the basis of test results. In case of the longest stroke, the drop time of the control rod is within 4.5 seconds to meet the design requirement. The behavior after the impact shows a general damping motion of the spring-damper system, and the maximum displacement is measured as 15.6 mm.

  13. A measurement of a control rod drop using an LVDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Myoung-Hwan; Kim, Ji-Ho; Huh, Hyung; Yu, Je-Yong; Sohn, Dong-Seong

    2009-12-01

    A control element drive mechanism is a reactor regulating system, which is to insert, withdraw, or maintain a control rod containing neutron-absorbing material within a reactor core to control the reactivity of the reactor. The ball-screw type CEDM for the small and medium research reactor has a spring-hydraulic damper to reduce the impact force due to the free drop of the CEDM. This paper describes the experimental results to obtain the drop characteristics of the CEDM. The tests are performed by using a full-scale structure except the control element assembly, and a drop time and displacement after an impact are measured by using an LVDT. The influences of the rod weight and the drop height on the drop behavior are also estimated on the basis of test results. In case of the longest stroke, the drop time of the control rod is within 4.5 seconds to meet the design requirement. The behavior after the impact shows a general damping motion of the spring-damper system, and the maximum displacement is measured as 15.6 mm.

  14. Automatic quadrature control and measuring system. [using optical coupling circuitry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamlet, J. F. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A quadrature component cancellation and measuring system comprising a detection system for detecting the quadrature component from a primary signal, including reference circuitry to define the phase of the quadrature component for detection is described. A Raysistor optical coupling control device connects an output from the detection system to a circuit driven by a signal based upon the primary signal. Combining circuitry connects the primary signal and the circuit controlled by the Raysistor device to subtract quadrature components. A known current through the optically sensitive element produces a signal defining the magnitude of the quadrature component.

  15. ADVANCES TOWARDS THE MEASUREMENT AND CONTROL LHC TUNE AND CHROMATICITY

    SciTech Connect

    CAMERON, P.; CUPOLO, J.; DEGEN, C.; DELLAPENNA, A.; HOFF, L.; MEAD, J.; SIKORA, R.

    2005-06-06

    Requirements for tune and chromaticity control in most superconducting hadron machines, and in particular the LHC, are stringent. In order to reach nominal operation, the LHC will almost certainly require feedback on both tune and chromaticity. Experience at RHIC has also shown that coupling control is crucial to successful tune feedback. A prototype baseband phase-locked loop (PLL) tune measurement system has recently been brought into operation at RHIC as part of the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP). We report on the performance of that system and compare it with the extensive accumulation of data from the RHIC 245MHz PLL.

  16. Controlling quantum flux through measurement: An idealised example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilloy, A.; Bauer, M.; Bernard, D.

    2014-07-01

    Classically, no transfer occurs between two equally filled reservoirs, no matter how one looks at them, but the situation can be different quantum-mechanically. This paradoxically surprising phenomenon rests on the distinctive property of the quantum world that one cannot stare at a system without disturbing it. It was recently discovered that this seemingly annoying feature could be harnessed to control small quantum systems using weak measurements. Here we present one of the simplest models —an idealised double quantum dot—where by toying with the dot measurement strength, i.e. the intensity of the look, it is possible to create a particle flux in an otherwise completely symmetric system. The basic property underlying this phenomena is that measurement disturbances are very different on a system evolving unitarily and a system evolving dissipatively. This effect shows that adaptive measurements can have dramatic effects enabling transport control but possibly inducing biases in the measurement of macroscopic quantities if not handled with care.

  17. Methods of measurement for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullis, W. M. (Editor)

    1972-01-01

    Activities directed toward the development of methods of measurement for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices are described. Topics investigated include: measurements of transistor delay time; application of the infrared response technique to the study of radiation-damaged, lithium-drifted silicon detectors; and identification of a condition that minimizes wire flexure and reduces the failure rate of wire bonds in transistors and integrated circuits under slow thermal cycling conditions. Supplementary data concerning staff, standards committee activities, technical services, and publications are included as appendixes.

  18. Measurement and control practices in Finnish wastewater networks.

    PubMed

    Poutiainen, H; Heinonen-Tanski, H

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, we describe measurement and control practices in Finnish wastewater networks. We have surveyed the 14 largest wastewater treatment plants in the country, which account for approximately 40% of total Finnish treatment capacity. It was found that these plants still only rely on a few, traditional measurement techniques. The treatment processes could be improved, and the treatment could be made more energy-efficient by installing modern instrumentation. We review some recent developments in wastewater plant instrumentation technology and suggest improvements to Finnish plants.

  19. Sampling and Control Circuit Board for an Inertial Measurement Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chelmins, David T (Inventor); Powis, Richard T., Jr. (Inventor); Sands, Obed (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A circuit board that serves as a control and sampling interface to an inertial measurement unit ("IMU") is provided. The circuit board is also configured to interface with a local oscillator and an external trigger pulse. The circuit board is further configured to receive the external trigger pulse from an external source that time aligns the local oscillator and initiates sampling of the inertial measurement device for data at precise time intervals based on pulses from the local oscillator. The sampled data may be synchronized by the circuit board with other sensors of a navigation system via the trigger pulse.

  20. Health status of southern Arizona border counties: a Healthy Border 2010 midterm review.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Keisha L; Ernst, Kacey C; Johnson, Babs L; Rosales, Cecilia

    2010-11-01

    The region on the United States (US) side of the US-Mexico border consists of 44 counties in four states; populations on both sides of the border have similar health problems. Healthy Border 2010: An Agenda for Improving Health on the US-Mexico Border (HB 2010) is a binational agenda of health promotion and disease prevention for individuals in the region. This study reports on the health status of the four southern Arizona border counties. Data on health indicators for Cochise, Pima, Santa Cruz, and Yuma Counties were collected from the Arizona Department of Health Services Vital Records and Statistics. Progress was calculated as a percentage made toward or away from the 2010 target. Comparisons were made between the border counties and Arizona. Progress toward the HB 2010 targets varied among the border counties. All border counties made progress toward the targets with the cervical cancer, hepatitis A, and teenage birthrate objectives. Most border counties moved toward the goals for breast cancer, diabetes mortality, tuberculosis, motor vehicle crashes, infant mortality from congenital abnormalities, and prenatal care. Border counties moved away from the target with the human immunodeficiency virus and infant mortality objectives. Assessment of the HB 2010 objectives provided a comprehensive description of the health status of the population. Although the southern Arizona border counties have shown improvement in some areas, monitoring is still needed to identify the disparities that remain.

  1. Measuring the cost of poor asthma control and exacerbations.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Patrick W; Ghushchyan, Vahram H; Campbell, Jonathan D; Globe, Gary; Bender, Bruce; Magid, David J

    2017-01-02

    Previous studies have shown an association between cost and poor asthma control. However, longitudinal studies of general populations are lacking. To examine the cost of poor asthma control and exacerbations across a broad spectrum of asthma patients. The Observational Study of Asthma Control and Outcomes (OSACO) was a prospective survey of persistent asthma patients in Kaiser Colorado in 2011-2012. Patients received a survey 3 times in one year, which included the Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) and questions on exacerbations. Self-reported exacerbations were compared to actual oral corticosteroid (OCS) use. Regression analyses examined the association of control (ACQ-5 scores) and exacerbations with healthcare expenditures, controlling for sociodemographics and smoking. Analyses of expenditures used Generalized Linear Models (GLM) with log-link. 2681 individuals completed at least one survey; 1799 completed all three. ACQ-5 scores were associated with higher all-cause and asthma-specific expenditures across all categories of costs (medical, outpatient, ER, pharmacy) except for inpatient expenditures. Each 1-point increase in the ACQ-5 score (i.e., worse control) was associated with a corresponding increase in all-cause annual healthcare and asthma-specific expenditures of $1443 and $927 ($US 2013). Asthma exacerbations with documented OCS use were associated with an increase of $3014 and $1626 over 4 months, while self-reported exacerbations were $713 and $506. Results demonstrate that poor asthma control and exacerbations are strongly associated with higher healthcare expenditures. Results also confirm that collection of validated measures of control such as the ACQ-5 may provide valuable information toward improving clinical and economic outcomes.

  2. Beta* and beta-waist measurement and control at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Ptitsyn,V.; Della Penna, A.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Malitsky, N.; Satogata, T.

    2009-05-04

    During the course of last RHIC runs the beta-functions at the collision points ({beta}*) have been reduced gradually to 0.7m. In order to maximize the collision luminosity and ensure the agreement of the actual machine optics with the design one, more precise measurements and control of {beta}* value and {beta}-waist location became necessary. The paper presents the results of the implementation of the technique applied in last two RHIC runs. The technique is based on well-known relation between the tune shift and the beta function and involves precise betatron tune measurements using BBQ system as well as specially developed knobs for {beta}-waist location control.

  3. Device for self-verifying temperature measurement and control

    DOEpatents

    Watkins, Arthur D.; Cannon, Collins P.; Tolle, Charles R.

    2004-08-03

    A measuring instrument includes a first temperature sensor, a second temperature sensor and circuitry. The first and second temperature sensors each generate a signal indicative of the temperature of a medium being detected. The circuitry is configured to activate verification of temperature being sensed with the first sensor. According to one construction, the first temperature sensor comprises at least one thermocouple temperature sensor and the second temperature sensor comprises an optical temperature sensor, each sensor measuring temperature over the same range of temperature, but using a different physical phenomena. Also according to one construction, the circuitry comprises a computer configured to detect failure of one of the thermocouples by comparing temperature of the optical temperature sensor with each of the thermocouple temperature sensors. Even further, an output control signal is generated via a fuzzy inference machine and control apparatus.

  4. Mandibular border positions and their relationships with peripheral joint mobility.

    PubMed

    McCarroll, R S; Hesse, J R; Naeije, M; Yoon, C K; Hansson, T L

    1987-03-01

    Peripheral joint mobility was assessed in a group of fifty-one dental students using a modification of the Carter and Wilkinson Index. Mandibular border positions were measured both actively and passively with the aid of a millimetre ruler. The purpose of the investigation was to study possible relationships between generalized joint (hyper-)mobility and (hyper-)mobility of the temporomandibular joints. Only a few weak correlations were found between the mandibular border position measurements (active and passive mouth opening, active and passive, left and right, laterotrusions and active protrusion) and the peripheral joint mobility measurements. Differences between the sexes were illustrated in peripheral joint mobility with females showing a greater joint mobility than males, especially when only the passively measured joints were considered. The mandibular border positions were significantly correlated with each other (P less than 0.05-P less than 0.001) for the males, but few and then only weak relationships between these measurements could be found for the females in this group. The concept of temporomandibular joint 'end-feel' in relation to joint mobility is discussed.

  5. Alcohol abuse and dependence among U.S.-Mexico border and non-border Mexican Americans

    PubMed Central

    Caetano, Raul; Caetano Vaeth, Patrice A.; Mills, Britain A.; Rodriguez, Lori A.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND This paper examines the prevalence, the symptom profile, and the drinking and sociodemographic predictors of current (past 12 month) DSM-IV alcohol abuse and dependence among Mexican Americans living along the U.S.-Mexico border and those living in metropolitan areas away from the border. METHODS Respondents in the non-border areas (primarily Houston and Los Angeles) constitute a multistage probability sample (N=1,288) of these areas, interviewed as part of the 2006 Hispanic Americans Baseline Alcohol Survey (HABLAS). Respondents in the border area (N=1,307) constitute a household probability sample of Mexican Americans living on the border. In both surveys, data were collected during computer assisted interviews conducted in respondents’ homes. The HABLAS and the border sample response rates were 76% and 67%, respectively. RESULTS Although bivariate analyses revealed no overall differences between border and non-border locations, (negative) age trends were more pronounced on the border for male abuse and for dependence among both genders. Among females aged 18–29, border residence was linked to significantly higher rates of dependence. In multivariable analyses, the prevalence of male abuse declined more rapidly with age on the border than off the border. Other unique predictors of male abuse were Jewish/other religion and weekly volume of alcohol consumption. Being married or out of the workforce, attaining a higher education, no religious preference, and weekly volume uniquely predicted female dependence. Age and weekly volume uniquely predicted male dependence. CONCLUSIONS The prevalence of alcohol use disorders among Mexican Americans on and off the U.S.-Mexico border largely mirrors previously documented patterns of alcohol consumption in these areas. For young Mexican-American women in particular, border residence is linked to heightened vulnerability to alcohol dependence. PMID:23278433

  6. Measurement of a weak transition moment using Coherent Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antypas, Dionysios

    We have developed a two-pathway Coherent Control technique for measurements of weak optical transition moments. We demonstrate this technique through a measurement of the transition moment of the highly-forbidden magnetic dipole transition between the 6s2S 1/21/2 and 7s2S 1/21/2 states in atomic Cesium. The experimental principle is based on a two-pathway excitation, using two phase-coherent laser fields, a fundamental field at 1079 nm and its second harmonic at 539.5 nm. The IR field induces a strong two-photon transition, while the 539.5 nm field drives a pair of weak one-photon transitions: a Stark-induced transition of controllable strength as well as the magnetic dipole transition. Observations of the interference between these transitions for different Stark-induced transition amplitudes, allow a measurement of the ratio of the magnetic dipole to the Stark-induced moment. The interference between the transitions is controlled by modulation of the phase-delay between the two optical fields. Our determination of the magnetic dipole moment is at the 0.4% level and in good agreement with previous measurements, and serves as a benchmark for our technique and apparatus. We anticipate that with further improvement of the apparatus detection sensitivity, the demonstrated scheme can be used for measurements of the very weak Parity Violation transition moment on the Cesium 6s2 S1/2→7s2 S1/2 transition.

  7. Techniques to assess cross-border air pollution and application to a US-Mexico border region.

    PubMed

    Mukerjee, S; Shadwick, D S; Smith, L A; Somerville, M C; Dean, K E; Bowser, J J

    2001-08-10

    A year-long assessment of cross-border air pollution was conducted in the eastmost section of the US-Mexico border region, known as the Lower Rio Grande Valley, in South Texas. Measurements were conducted on the US side and included fine particle mass (PM2.5) and elemental composition, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and meteorology. Wind sector analyses of chemical tracers and diagnostic ratios, in addition to principal component analysis (PCA), were initially applied to assess cross-border and overall air shed influences. Linear-angular correlation statistics [Biometrika, 63, (1976), 403-405] and nonparametric multiple comparisons between wind sectors were computed with the particle element data using principal component scores from PCA to determine the direction of source classes. Findings suggest crustal particles and salts carried or stirred by sea breeze winds from a southerly and southeasterly direction from the Gulf of Mexico heavily influenced the elemental composition of the particulate samples. Pair-wise comparisons of wind directions for the principal component scores suggest possible oil combustion influences from utilities or boilers coming from the south and possible coal combustion influences from the north and northwest. The techniques discussed can provide a methodology to assess future ambient levels and cross-border influences in the Valley as conditions change.

  8. The spacecraft control laboratory experiment optical attitude measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Sharon S.; Montgomery, Raymond C.; Barsky, Michael F.

    1991-01-01

    A stereo camera tracking system was developed to provide a near real-time measure of the position and attitude of the Spacecraft COntrol Laboratory Experiment (SCOLE). The SCOLE is a mockup of the shuttle-like vehicle with an attached flexible mast and (simulated) antenna, and was designed to provide a laboratory environment for the verification and testing of control laws for large flexible spacecraft. Actuators and sensors located on the shuttle and antenna sense the states of the spacecraft and allow the position and attitude to be controlled. The stereo camera tracking system which was developed consists of two position sensitive detector cameras which sense the locations of small infrared LEDs attached to the surface of the shuttle. Information on shuttle position and attitude is provided in six degrees-of-freedom. The design of this optical system, calibration, and tracking algorithm are described. The performance of the system is evaluated for yaw only.

  9. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices among Border Crossers during Temporary Enforcement of a Formal Entry Requirement for Mexican-Style Soft Cheeses, 2009†

    PubMed Central

    NGUYEN, AN V.; COHEN, NICOLE J.; GAO, HONGJIANG; FISHBEIN, DANIEL B.; KEIR, JANE; OCANA, J. MIGUEL; SENINI, LORI; FLORES, ALETA; WATERMAN, STEPHEN H.

    2015-01-01

    Mexican-style soft cheese known as queso fresco (QF), which is often unpasteurized, has been implicated in outbreaks of foodborne illness in the United States. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) exercises discretion in enforcement of noncommercial importation of cheese. To test control measures aimed at decreasing unlawful QF importation, in 2009 the FDA temporarily enforced a requirement for formal commercial entry for all cheeses over 5 lb (2.3 kg) at the San Diego–Tijuana border. Enforcement was combined with educational outreach. Border crossers importing cheese and those not importing cheese were surveyed at the beginning and end of the temporary enforcement period. Data collected included participant demographic information, knowledge of QF-associated health risks, and attitudes and practices regarding QF consumption and importation. We surveyed 306 importers and 381 nonimporters. Compared with nonimporters, importers had a lower level of knowledge regarding QF-associated health risks (P < 0.0001). Border crossers carrying cheese were more likely to have less education, be U.S. or dual residents, consume QF more frequently, and cross the border less often. Importation and consumption of unpasteurized QF remained prevalent among border crossers during the temporary enforcement period, and the level of knowledge regarding QF-associated risks remained low among these crossers. More vigorous, sustained messaging targeted at high-risk groups is needed to change behaviors. Definition and consistent enforcement of limits will likely be needed to reduce QF importation and the risk of QF-associated diseases along the U.S.–Mexico border; however, public health benefits will need to be balanced against the cost of enforcement. PMID:25198849

  10. Knowledge, attitudes, and practices among border crossers during temporary enforcement of a formal entry requirement for Mexican-style soft cheeses, 2009.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, An V; Cohen, Nicole J; Gao, Hongjiang; Fishbein, Daniel B; Keir, Jane; Ocana, J Miguel; Senini, Lori; Flores, Aleta; Waterman, Stephen H

    2014-09-01

    Mexican-style soft cheese known as queso fresco (QF), which is often unpasteurized, has been implicated in outbreaks of foodborne illness in the United States. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) exercises discretion in enforcement of noncommercial importation of cheese. To test control measures aimed at decreasing unlawful QF importation, in 2009 the FDA temporarily enforced a requirement for formal commercial entry for all cheeses over 5 lb (2.3 kg) at the San Diego-Tijuana border. Enforcement was combined with educational outreach. Border crossers importing cheese and those not importing cheese were surveyed at the beginning and end of the temporary enforcement period. Data collected included participant demographic information, knowledge of QF-associated health risks, and attitudes and practices regarding QF consumption and importation. We surveyed 306 importers and 381 nonimporters. Compared with nonimporters, importers had a lower level of knowledge regarding QF-associated health risks (P < 0.0001). Border crossers carrying cheese were more likely to have less education, be U.S. or dual residents, consume QF more frequently, and cross the border less often. Importation and consumption of unpasteurized QF remained prevalent among border crossers during the temporary enforcement period, and the level of knowledge regarding QF-associated risks remained low among these crossers. More vigorous, sustained messaging targeted at high-risk groups is needed to change behaviors. Definition and consistent enforcement of limits will likely be needed to reduce QF importation and the risk of QF-associated diseases along the U.S.-Mexico border; however, public health benefits will need to be balanced against the cost of enforcement.

  11. Parasitism of the wheat stem sawfly (Hymenoptera: Cephidae) by Bracon cephi and B. lissogaster (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) in wheat fields bordering tilled and untilled fallow in Montana.

    PubMed

    Runyon, J B; Morrill, W L; Weaver, D K; Miller, P R

    2002-12-01

    We evaluated wheat stem sawfly, Cephus cinctus Norton, parasitism, infestation, and sawfly-cut stems in wheat fields bordering intensely tilled (no visible stubble residue), minimally tilled (>75% stubble residue visible), and untilled (chemical fallow, herbicide fallow management) summer fallow fields in north-central and south-central Montana. No difference in sawfly parasitism or sawfly-cut stems was found between fields bordering minimally tilled and fields bordering untilled summer fallow. Sawfly parasitism in fields bordering untilled summer fallow was greater than in fields bordering intensely tilled summer fallow at six of the eight sites examined. Sawfly-cut stems were greater in the field bordering intensely tilled fallow at four sites, with no difference in sawfly-cut stems between the intensely tilled and untilled field at the other four sites. Although it has never been reported, we have observed that many sawfly stubs are completely buried. Therefore, we measured the depth of sawfly stubs in four untilled fields in Broadwater County, MT. Two-thirds of the stubs were completely buried (206 of 300) with an average depth of 6 mm. Intensive tillage, which results in soil-covered stubble, is not an effective sawfly control practice, because sawflies typically overwinter below ground and upon emergence must dig to reach the soil surface. However, Bracon cephi (Gahan) and Bracon lissogaster Muesebeck overwinter above ground in stems and might be unable to dig to the soil surface if buried. The elimination of intensive tillage in favor of chemical fallow should result in greater sawfly parasitism over time. Producers replacing minimal tillage with chemical fallow should see no effect on sawfly parasitism.

  12. [U.S.-Mexico cross-border cooperation in research on diabetes mellitus type 2].

    PubMed

    Canela-Soler, Jaume; Frontini, María; Cerqueira, Maria Teresa; Ruiz-Holguín, Rosalba; Díaz-Apodaca, Beatriz A

    2010-09-01

    To describe and analyze, utilizing a case study approach, the U.S.- Mexico Border Diabetes Prevention and Control Project, a health research cooperation initiative incorporating the participation of federal, state, and local institutions of both countries. A model of equal representation, participation, consensus, and shared leadership was used, with the participation of more than 130 institutions. A sample of 4 020 people over 18 years of age was obtained by a random, multistage, stratified, clustered design. A questionnaire about diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2) and health was applied. The statistical analysis took into account the design effect. The prevalence of diagnosed DM2 was 14.9% (95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 12.5-17.6) and the prevalence of diagnosed DM2 adjusted by age was 19.5% (95% CI: 16.8-22.6) on the Mexican side of the border and 16.1% (IC95%: 13.5-19.2) on the U.S. border side. There were differences between the DM2 prevalence and risk factors along the border. The U.S.-Mexico Border Diabetes Prevention and Control Project allowed the border zone between the two countries to be considered, for the first time ever, as a unit for epidemiological research. A shared understanding among all participating institutions and entities of sociopolitical structures and procedures is required for effective border health cooperation initiatives.

  13. Measurement and control systems for an imaging electromagnetic flow metre.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y Y; Lucas, G; Leeungculsatien, T

    2014-03-01

    Electromagnetic flow metres based on the principles of Faraday's laws of induction have been used successfully in many industries. The conventional electromagnetic flow metre can measure the mean liquid velocity in axisymmetric single phase flows. However, in order to achieve velocity profile measurements in single phase flows with non-uniform velocity profiles, a novel imaging electromagnetic flow metre (IEF) has been developed which is described in this paper. The novel electromagnetic flow metre which is based on the 'weight value' theory to reconstruct velocity profiles is interfaced with a 'Microrobotics VM1' microcontroller as a stand-alone unit. The work undertaken in the paper demonstrates that an imaging electromagnetic flow metre for liquid velocity profile measurement is an instrument that is highly suited for control via a microcontroller.

  14. The Intestinal Brush Border Membrane in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Ward A.; Korsmo, Helen

    1977-01-01

    Diabetes stimulates the functional activity of the intestinal brush border membrane with enhancement of both hydrolytic enzyme activity and membrane transport systems. To determine the mechanism of this effect, we studied the effects of streptozotocin diabetes on the metabolism of one membrane protein, sucrase-isomaltase, which increases its activity in diabetes. The protein was purified and an antiserum prepared. Sucrase-isomaltase from control and diabetic rats was immunologically identical as shown by Ouchterlony double-diffusion analysis of papain-solubilized mucosal proteins. The increase in sucrase enzyme activity in diabetic animals (31.0±1.4 U SEM 5 days after streptozotocin vs. 13.1±1.0 in controls) was the consequence of increased enzyme protein and not an alteration in catalytic efficiency as demonstrated by quantitative immunoprecipitin reactions. To account for increased sucrase-isomaltase protein in diabetes we studied papain-solubilized mucosal proteins labeled by injection of [14C]carbonate and [14C]leucine and analyzed incorporation into sucrase-isomaltase protein (anti-serum precipitable) and total protein (trichloroacetic acid precipitable). We found that diabetes did not affect the decay of labeled total protein, but prolonged the decay of labeled sucrase-isomaltase. t½ of sucrase-isomaltase was 4.4 h in control animals after [14C]carbonate injection and 8.8 and 10.2 h, respectively, 2 and 5 days after induction of streptozotocin diabetes. We obtained similar results in experiments with [14C]leucine with diabetes increasing t½ from 6 to 13.6 h. Diabetes did not appear to increase the rate of addition of sucrase-isomaltase to the brush border membrane, since it did not affect the 10- and 60-min incorporations of isotope into sucrase-isomaltase protein relative to incorporation into total protein and did not alter rate constants for synthesis calculated from the t½ and the change in enzyme mass over time. Thus, enhanced sucrase activity in

  15. Implications of the EU patients' rights directive in cross-border healthcare on the German sickness fund system.

    PubMed

    Kifmann, Mathias; Wagner, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    We examine the implications of the EU directive on the application of patients' rights in cross-border healthcare on the German sickness fund system. Since Germany implemented most requirements of the directive already in 2004, we first review Germany's experience with EU cross-border healthcare. We then focus on the possible effects of increased EU cross-border healthcare. While this gives patients more choice, the German sickness fund system faces a number of challenges. EU cross-border care may undermine efforts to keep healthcare expenditure under control. Cross-border care can also increase inequality of access. Furthermore, promoting cross-border care can be a means for sickness funds to attract good risks. We discuss these challenges and point out possible policy responses.

  16. Human factors measurement for future air traffic control systems.

    PubMed

    Langan-Fox, Janice; Sankey, Michael J; Canty, James M

    2009-10-01

    This article provides a critical review of research pertaining to the measurement of human factors (HF) issues in current and future air traffic control (ATC). Growing worldwide air traffic demands call for a radical departure from current ATC systems. Future systems will have a fundamental impact on the roles and responsibilities of ATC officers (ATCOs). Valid and reliable methods of assessing HF issues associated with these changes, such as a potential increase (or decrease) in workload, are of utmost importance for advancing theory and for designing systems, procedures, and training. We outline major aviation changes and how these relate to five key HF issues in ATC. Measures are outlined, compared, and evaluated and are followed by guidelines for assessing these issues in the ATC domain. Recommendations for future research are presented. A review of the literature suggests that situational awareness and workload have been widely researched and assessed using a variety of measures, but researchers have neglected the areas of trust, stress, and boredom. We make recommendations for use of particular measures and the construction of new measures. It is predicted that, given the changing role of ATCOs and profound future airspace requirements and configurations, issues of stress, trust, and boredom will become more significant. Researchers should develop and/or refine existing measures of all five key HF issues to assess their impact on ATCO performance. Furthermore, these issues should be considered in a holistic manner. The current article provides an evaluation of research and measures used in HF research on ATC that will aid research and ATC measurement.

  17. Taeniasis among Refugees Living on Thailand–Myanmar Border, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Patchanee, Prapas; Pongsopawijit, Pornsawan; Chailangkarn, Sasisophin; Tiwananthagorn, Saruda; Jongchansittoe, Papaspong; Dantrakool, Anchalee; Morakote, Nimit; Phyu, Hnin; Wilkins, Patricia P.; Noh, John C.; Phares, Christina; O’Neal, Seth

    2015-01-01

    We tested refugee camp residents on the Thailand–Myanmar border for Taenia solium infection. Taeniasis prevalence was consistent with that for other disease-endemic regions, but seropositivity indicating T. solium taeniasis was rare. Seropositivity indicating cysticercosis was 5.5% in humans, and 3.2% in pigs. Corralling pigs and providing latrines may control transmission of these tapeworms within this camp. PMID:26401787

  18. National Security Threats at the U.S.-Mexico Border

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-24

    terrorists and WMDs to enter the U.S. across the U.S.- Mexico border. As stated earlier, DTO’s have secured control over the human smuggling trade in the...last decade. Nested within human smuggling, is smuggling of persons from Countries of Interest or countries known to harbor or directly support...eliminate domestic threats to or attacks upon the national order and social structure; to prevent crime and any related dangers to domestic human security

  19. [Countermeasure against viral hemorrhagic fever at the border in Japan].

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Emiko

    2005-12-01

    Human have struggled against many infectious diseases such as cholera, plague, dysentery and yellow fever for a long time. And we have spent a lot of energy to control these infectious diseases and developed various tool for them. One of these efforts was Quarantine system that was established in 14th century in Europe. But during recent days, we are suffering from newly emerged diseases. These new infectious diseases are zoonosis and most of them are serious and highly infectious. Viral hemorrhagic fever such as Ebola hemorrhagic fever, Marburg hemorrhagic fever and Lassa fever are typical these emerging serious diseases, and these outbreak always have occurred in Africa and neighboring countries. Fortunately we have never experienced any case, but as these diseases are so serious, we are so nervous diseases entering in Japan. Against these serious diseases, in Japan, Quarantine Station are doing screening examination at airport and port by questionnaire and measuring body temperature, because these viral hemorrhagic fever patients show high fever. If people were suspected viral hemorrhagic fever at Quarantine Station at the border, they will be leaded to hospital for further examination and treatment as soon as possible.

  20. Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/13: Cooperative monitoring for confidence building: A case study of the Sino-Indian border areas

    SciTech Connect

    SIDHU,WAHEGURU PAL SINGH; YUAN,JING-DONG; BIRINGER,KENT L.

    1999-08-01

    This occasional paper identifies applicable cooperative monitoring techniques and develops models for possible application in the context of the border between China and India. The 1993 and 1996 Sino-Indian agreements on maintaining peace and tranquility along the Line of Actual Control (LAC) and establishing certain confidence building measures (CBMs), including force reductions and limitation on military exercises along their common border, are used to examine the application of technically based cooperative monitoring in both strengthening the existing terms of the agreements and also enhancing trust. The paper also aims to further the understanding of how and under what conditions technology-based tools can assist in implementing existing agreements on arms control and confidence building. The authors explore how cooperative monitoring techniques can facilitate effective implementation of arms control agreements and CBMS between states and contribute to greater security and stability in bilateral, regional, and global contexts.

  1. Air-Sea Interaction Measurements from the Controlled Towed Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khelif, D.; Bluth, R. T.; Jonsson, H.; Barge, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Controlled Towed Vehicle (CTV) uses improved towed drone technology to actively maintain via a radar altimeter and controllable wing a user-set height that can be as low as the canonical reference height of 10 m above the sea surface. After take-off, the drone is released from the tow aircraft on a ~700-m stainless steel cable. We have instrumented the 0.23 m diameter and 2.13 m long drone with high fidelity instruments to measure the means and turbulent fluctuations of 3-D wind vector, temperature, humidity, pressure, CO2 and IR sea surface temperature. Data are recorded internally at 40 Hz and simultaneously transmitted to the tow aircraft via dedicated wireless Ethernet link. The CTV accommodates 40 kg of instrument payload and provides it with 250 W of continuous power through a ram air propeller-driven generator. Therefore its endurance is only limited by that of the tow aircraft.We will discuss the CTV development, the engineering challenges and solutions that have been successfully implemented to overcome them. We present results from recent flights as low as 9 m over the coastal ocean and comparisons of profiles and turbulent fluxes from the CTV and the tow aircraft. Manned aircraft operation at low-level boundary-layer flights is very limited. Dropsondes and UAS (Unmanned Aerial Systems) and UAS are alternates for measurements near the ocean surface. However, dropsondes have limited sensor capability and do not measure fluxes, and most present UAS vehicles do not have the payload and power capacity nor the low-flying ability in high winds over the oceans. The CTV therefore, fills a needed gap between the dropsondes, in situ aircraft, and UAS. The payload, capacity and power of the CTV makes it suitable for a variety of atmospheric research measurements. Other sensors to measure aerosol, chemistry, radiation, etc., could be readily accommodated in the CTV.

  2. Measures to Control Forming of Oil in a Refrigerant Compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, Tadashi; Shimizu, Takashi; Fukuta, Mitsuhiro; Mizuno, Yoshihito

    Foaming of lubricating oil in a rotary compressor induces flowing out of the oil from the compressor, which deteriorates reliability of the compressor. This study investigates foaming characteristics of oil-refrigerant mixture by using an experimental apparatus which models foaming in the compressor. The experiments reveal that the foaming caused by blade rotation can be controlled by a plate which prevents a vortex from swallowing up the vapor and that the foaming caused by vapor blow can be depressed by a blow pipe extending above the mixture. Based on these results, measures to control foaming in a practical rotary compressor are investigated by using an experimental refrigerating cycle. From measurement of the foaming, it is proved that a simple cover which separates discharge blow from the mixture under a motor has a great effect of defoaming. Collection of oil which is pumped up through a shaft is also effective in decreasing the foaming. In addition, improvement of transient performance of the cycle is obtained by controlling the foaming.

  3. Semantic Borders and Incomplete Understanding.

    PubMed

    Silva-Filho, Waldomiro J; Dazzani, Maria Virgínia

    2016-03-01

    In this article, we explore a fundamental issue of Cultural Psychology, that is our "capacity to make meaning", by investigating a thesis from contemporary philosophical semantics, namely, that there is a decisive relationship between language and rationality. Many philosophers think that for a person to be described as a rational agent he must understand the semantic content and meaning of the words he uses to express his intentional mental states, e.g., his beliefs and thoughts. Our argument seeks to investigate the thesis developed by Tyler Burge, according to which our mastery or understanding of the semantic content of the terms which form our beliefs and thoughts is an "incomplete understanding". To do this, we discuss, on the one hand, the general lines of anti-individualism or semantic externalism and, on the other, criticisms of the Burgean notion of incomplete understanding - one radical and the other moderate. We defend our understanding that the content of our beliefs must be described in the light of the limits and natural contingencies of our cognitive capacities and the normative nature of our rationality. At heart, anti-individualism leads us to think about the fact that we are social creatures, living in contingent situations, with important, but limited, cognitive capacities, and that we receive the main, and most important, portion of our knowledge simply from what others tell us. Finally, we conclude that this discussion may contribute to the current debate about the notion of borders.

  4. Finger temperature controller for non-invasive blood glucose measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiqin; Ting, Choon Meng; Yeo, Joon Hock

    2010-11-01

    Blood glucose level is an important parameter for doctors to diagnose and treat diabetes. The Near-Infra-Red (NIR) spectroscopy method is the most promising approach and this involves measurement on the body skin. However it is noted that the skin temperature does fluctuate with the environmental and physiological conditions and we found that temperature has important influences on the glucose measurement. In-vitro and in-vivo investigations on the temperature influence on blood glucose measurement have been carried out. The in-vitro results show that water temperature has significant influence on water absorption. Since 90% of blood components are water, skin temperature of measurement site has significant influence on blood glucose measurement. Also the skin temperature is related to the blood volume, blood volume inside capillary vessels changes with skin temperature. In this paper the relationship of skin temperature and signal from the skin and inside tissue was studied at different finger temperatures. Our OGTT (oral glucose tolerance test) trials results show the laser signals follow the skin temperature trend and the correlation of signal and skin temperature is much stronger than the correlation of signal and glucose concentration. A finger heater device is designed to heat and maintain the skin temperature of measurement site. The heater is controlled by an electronic circuit according to the skin temperature sensed by a thermocouple that is put close to the measurement site. In vivo trials were carried out and the results show that the skin temperature significantly influences the signal fluctuations caused by pulsate blood and the average signal value.

  5. Enhancing Surveillance for Arboviral Infections in the Arizona Border Region

    PubMed Central

    McCotter, Orion; Vanskike, Frank; Ernst, Kacey; Komatsu, Ken; Margolis, Harold; Waterman, Stephen; Tippit, Laura; Tomashek, Kay; Wertheimer, Anne; Montiel, Sonia; Golenko, Catherine; Hunsperger, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    that present to medical services for WNV testing and reported to public health officials are the most severe nueroinvasive cases. Much less is understood about the non-neuroinvasive cases with often present with non-descript symptoms. Results Vector mapping: Comparative densities of Ae. aegypti with academic partners of the Entomology and Public Health conducting a study capturing Ae. aegypti may help to enhance environmental programs. Laboratory Capacity: The laboratory training will cover conventional serological methods as well as recently FDA cleared molecular RT-PCR. Participants will include public health laboratory personnel working in molecular and serology diagnostics and other binational partners. Surveillance: A convenient seroprevalence study at sentinel-hospital site of symptomatic patients presenting in Arizona border hospital sites will be performed to better understand circulating levels of arboviral infections. Conclusions Appropriate and timely response to surveillance data is the key to identification human and animal disease associated with WNV, DENV, and other arboviruses. The mosquito vector Ae. aegypti is well established widespread and thriving in Arizona yet there is no autochthonous transmission of DENV identified to date. The results from this study will identify gaps and potential prevention and control measures for emerging infectious diseases including WNV and DENV in Arizona.

  6. Systematic Analysis of the Transcriptional Switch Inducing Migration of Border Cells

    PubMed Central

    Borghese, Lodovica; Fletcher, Georgina; Mathieu, Juliette; Atzberger, Ann; Eades, William C.; Cagan, Ross L.; Rørth, Pernille

    2010-01-01

    Summary Cell migration within a natural context is tightly controlled, often by specific transcription factors. However, the switch from stationary to migratory behavior is poorly understood. Border cells perform a spatially and temporally controlled invasive migration during Drosophila oogenesis. Slbo, a C/EBP family transcriptional activator, is required for them to become migratory. We purified wild-type and slbo mutant border cells as well as nonmigratory follicle cells and performed comparative whole-genome expression profiling, followed by functional tests of the contributions of identified targets to migration. About 300 genes were significantly upregulated in border cells, many dependent on Slbo. Among these, the microtubule regulator Stathmin was strongly upregulated and was required for normal migration. Actin cytoskeleton regulators were also induced, including, surprisingly, a large cluster of “muscle-specific” genes. We conclude that Slbo induces multiple cytoskeletal effectors, and that each contributes to the behavioral changes in border cells. PMID:16580994

  7. Measures to Control Phlebotomus argentipes and Visceral Leishmaniasis in India

    PubMed Central

    Bublitz, DeAnna C.; Poché, Richard M.; Garlapati, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis is a deadly parasitic disease that is transmitted via the bite of a female sand fly, Phlebotomus argentipes. The highest burden of this disease is in northern India. In 2005, India embarked on an initiative with Nepal, Bangladesh, and the World Health Organization to eliminate visceral leishmaniasis by 2015. With the goal of 1 case in 10,000 people still unmet, it is prudent to evaluate the tools that have been used thus far to reduce vector numbers and cases of the disease. Herein, we present a review of studies conducted on vector-control strategies in India to combat visceral leishmaniasis including indoor residual spraying, insecticide-treated bed nets, environmental modification, and feed-through insecticides. This review suggests that the quality of indoor residual spraying may enhance control measures while a combination of spraying, nets, and feed-through insecticides would best confront the diverse habitats of P. argentipes. PMID:27308270

  8. Handedness correlates with actigraphically measured sleep in a controlled environment.

    PubMed

    Killgore, William D S; Lipizzi, Erica L; Grugle, Nancy L; Killgore, Desiree B; Balkin, Thomas J

    2009-10-01

    The relationship between hand preference and duration of sleep was assessed in 40 healthy subjects using self-report estimates, sleep diaries, and wrist activity monitors during an uncontrolled 7-day at-home phase and during a controlled overnight stay in a sleep laboratory. Handedness was unrelated to any index of sleep duration when assessed in the unregulated home environment. In the controlled environment of the laboratory, however, greater right-hand dominance was positively correlated with more minutes of obtained sleep and greater sleep efficiency. Findings were consistent with previous reports which suggest measures of brain lateralization may be related to sleep and health but further suggest that these relationships may be easily obscured by extraneous environmental factors when assessed in an uncontrolled setting.

  9. Measure Up Pressure Down: Provider Toolkit to Improve Hypertension Control.

    PubMed

    Torres, Jennifer

    2016-05-01

    Hypertension is one of the most important risk factors for heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, and diabetes complications. Nearly one in three Americans adults has high blood pressure, and the cost associated with treating this condition is staggering. The Measure Up Pressure Down: Provider Toolkit to Improve Hypertension Control is a resource developed by the American Medical Group Foundation in partnership with the American Medical Group Association. The goal of this toolkit is to mobilize health care practitioners to work together through team-based approaches to achieve an 80% control rate of high blood pressure among their patient population. The toolkit can be used by health educators, clinic administrators, physicians, students, and other clinic staff as a step-by-step resource for developing the infrastructure needed to better identify and treat individuals with high blood pressure or other chronic conditions.

  10. Development of an integrated control and measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Manges, W.W.

    1984-03-01

    This thesis presents a tutorial on the issues involved in the development of a minicomputer-based, distributed intelligence data acquisition and process control system to support complex experimental facilities. The particular system discussed in this thesis is under development for the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) Program at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP). In the AVLIS program, we were careful to integrate the computer sections of the implementation into the instrumentation system rather than adding them as an appendage. We then addressed the reliability and availability of the system as a separate concern. Thus, our concept of an integrated control and measurement (ICAM) system forms the basis for this thesis. This thesis details the logic and philosophy that went into the development of this system and explains why the commercially available turn-key systems generally are not suitable. Also, the issues involved in the specification of the components for such an integrated system are emphasized.

  11. Lymphatic filariasis in India: epidemiology and control measures.

    PubMed

    Raju, Khk; Jambulingam, P; Sabesan, S; Vanamail, P

    2010-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis caused by Wuchereria bancrofti and Brugia malayi is an important public health problem in India. Both parasites produce essentially similar clinical presentations in man, related mainly to the pathology of the lymphatic system. Filariasis is endemic in 17 States and six Union Territories, with about 553 million people at risk of infection. The Government of India has accorded a high priority for elimination of this infection through mass chemotherapy programme (annual, single dose of Diethylcarbamazine citrate, i.e. DEC - 6 mg/kg of bodyweight, plus Albendazole repeated four to six times). This campaign has become a part of the National Vector-Borne Disease Control Programme in 2003 under the National Health Policy 2002 and aims to eliminate filariasis by 2015. We discuss here the epidemiology and current control strategy for filariasis; highlighting key issues, challenges and options in the implementation of the programme, and suggesting measures for mid-course corrections in the elimination strategy.

  12. The impact of the EU Directive on patients' rights and cross border health care in Malta.

    PubMed

    Azzopardi-Muscat, Natasha; Aluttis, Christoph; Sorensen, Kristine; Pace, Roderick; Brand, Helmut

    2015-10-01

    The patients' rights and cross-border health care directive was implemented in Malta in 2013. Malta's transposition of the directive used the discretionary elements allowable to retain national control on cross-border care to the fullest extent. This paper seeks to analyse the underlying dynamics of this directive on the Maltese health care system through the lens of key health system stakeholders. Thirty-three interviews were conducted. Qualitative content analysis of the interviews reveals six key themes: fear from the potential impact of increased patient mobility, strategies employed for damage control, opportunities exploited for health system reform, moderate enhancement of patients' rights, negligible additional patient mobility and unforeseen health system reforms. The findings indicate that local stakeholders expected the directive to have significant negative effects and adopted measures to minimise these effects. In practice the directive has not affected patient mobility in Malta in the first months following its implementation. Government appears to have instrumentalised the implementation of the directive to implement certain reforms including legislation on patients' rights, a health benefits package and compulsory indemnity insurance. Whilst the Maltese geo-demographic situation precludes automatic generalisation of the conclusions from this case study to other Member States, the findings serve to advance our understanding of the mechanisms through which European legislation on health services is influencing health systems, particularly in small EU Member States.

  13. General Aviation Interior Noise. Part 3; Noise Control Measure Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unruh, James F.; Till, Paul D.; Palumbo, Daniel L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The work reported herein is an extension to the work accomplished under NASA Grant NAG1-2091 on the development of noise/source/path identification techniques for single engine propeller driven General Aviation aircraft. The previous work developed a Conditioned Response Analysis (CRA) technique to identify potential noise sources that contributed to the dominating tonal responses within the aircraft cabin. The objective of the present effort was to improve and verify the findings of the CRA and develop and demonstrate noise control measures for single engine propeller driven General Aviation aircraft.

  14. Methods of measurement for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullis, W. M. (Editor)

    1971-01-01

    The development of methods of measurement for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices is discussed. The following subjects are also presented: (1) demonstration of the high sensitivity of the infrared response technique by the identification of gold in a germanium diode, (2) verification that transient thermal response is significantly more sensitive to the presence of voids in die attachment than steady-state thermal resistance, and (3) development of equipment for determining susceptibility of transistors to hot spot formation by the current-gain technique.

  15. [Control measures for a VRE outbreak in a haemodialysis unit].

    PubMed

    Diguio, N; Chanet, P; Hautemanière, A; Cao-Huu, T; Hartemann, P; Kessler, M

    2009-06-01

    We report an outbreak of colonization with Vancomycin Resistant Enterococci (VRE) in the Haemodialysis unit of our hospital. From October 2004 to September 2008, 19 patients were found positive. The risk of acquiring this multi-resistant bacterium is extremely important in patients undergoing haemodialysis, heightened measures have gradually been set to control cross transmissions: first isolation, then geographic clustering of carriers and finally creating cohorting sectors with different staff for carriers, contacts and VRE free patients. This re-organization was supplemented by strengthening procedures for hand hygiene, active screening of patients and enhanced cleaning. Monitoring of the epidemic curve has allowed us to demonstrate the effectiveness of measures introduced. However, deleterious effects were observed in patients whose habits were changed; we could also highlight significant impact on the activity of the unit.

  16. Simultaneous Authentication and Certification of Arms-Control Measurement Systems

    SciTech Connect

    MacArthur, Duncan W.; Hauck, Danielle K.; Thron, Jonathan L.

    2012-07-09

    Most arms-control-treaty-monitoring scenarios involve a host party that makes a declaration regarding its nuclear material or items and a monitoring party that verifies that declaration. A verification system developed for such a use needs to be trusted by both parties. The first concern, primarily from the host party's point of view, is that any sensitive information that is collected must be protected without interfering in the efficient operation of the facility being monitored. This concern is addressed in what can be termed a 'certification' process. The second concern, of particular interest to the monitoring party, is that it must be possible to confirm the veracity of both the measurement system and the data produced by this measurement system. The monitoring party addresses these issues during an 'authentication' process. Addressing either one of these concerns independently is relatively straightforward. However, it is more difficult to simultaneously satisfy host party certification concerns and monitoring party authentication concerns. Typically, both parties will want the final access to the measurement system. We will describe an alternative approach that allows both parties to gain confidence simultaneously. This approach starts with (1) joint development of the measurement system followed by (2) host certification of several copies of the system and (3) random selection by the inspecting party of one copy to be use during the monitoring visit and one (or more) copy(s) to be returned to the inspecting party's facilities for (4) further hardware authentication; any remaining copies are stored under joint seal for use as spares. Following this process, the parties will jointly (5) perform functional testing on the selected measurement system and then (6) use this system during the monitoring visit. Steps (1) and (2) assure the host party as to the certification of whichever system is eventually used in the monitoring visit. Steps (1), (3), (4), and (5

  17. Border Security Search Accountability Act of 2011

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Sanchez, Loretta [D-CA-47

    2011-01-07

    House - 01/31/2011 Referred to the Subcommittee on Border, Maritime, and Global Counterterrorism. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  18. Secure the Border Act of 2010

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Tiahrt, Todd [R-KS-4

    2010-04-28

    House - 05/05/2010 Referred to the Subcommittee on Border, Maritime, and Global Counterterrorism. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  19. Border Fence Trust Fund Act of 2009

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Capito, Shelley Moore [R-WV-2

    2009-04-02

    House - 04/17/2009 Referred to the Subcommittee on Border, Maritime, and Global Counterterrorism. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  20. 10k Run for the Border Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Myrick, Sue Wilkins [R-NC-9

    2009-01-15

    03/16/2009 Referred to the Subcommittee on Immigration, Citizenship, Refugees, Border Security, and International Law. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  1. Border Violence Prevention Act of 2009

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Kirkpatrick, Ann [D-AZ-1

    2009-04-02

    House - 04/17/2009 Referred to the Subcommittee on Border, Maritime, and Global Counterterrorism. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  2. 10k Run for the Border Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Myrick, Sue Wilkins [R-NC-9

    2009-01-15

    03/16/2009 Referred to the Subcommittee on Immigration, Citizenship, Refugees, Border Security, and International Law. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  3. Unlawful Border Entry Prevention Act of 2009

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Hunter, Duncan D. [R-CA-52

    2009-07-22

    House - 07/31/2009 Referred to the Subcommittee on Border, Maritime, and Global Counterterrorism. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  4. 10k Run for the Border Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Myrick, Sue Wilkins [R-NC-9

    2009-01-15

    House - 03/16/2009 Referred to the Subcommittee on Immigration, Citizenship, Refugees, Border Security, and International Law. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  5. Faulty measurement substitution and control reconfiguration by using a multivariate flow control loop.

    PubMed

    Perillo, Sergio R P; Upadhyaya, Belle R; Hines, J Wesley

    2014-03-01

    A two-tank multivariate loop was designed and built to support research related to instrumentation and control, equipment and sensor monitoring. This test bed provides the framework necessary to investigate and test control strategies and fault detection methods applicable to sensors, equipment, and actuators, and was used to experimentally develop and demonstrate a fault-tolerant control strategy using six correlated variables in a single-tank configuration. This work shows the feasibility of using data-based empirical models to perform fault detection and substitute faulty measurements with predictions and to perform control reconfiguration in the presence of actuator failure in a real system. These experiments were particularly important because they offered the opportunity to prove that a system, such as the multivariate control loop, could survive degraded conditions, provided the empirical models used were accurate and representative of the process dynamics.

  6. Measurements and simulation of controlled beamfront motion in the Laser Controlled Collective Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, R.L.; Destler, W.W.; Striffler, C.D.; Rodgers, J.; Scgalov, Z.

    1989-01-01

    In the Laser Controlled Collective Accelerator, an intense electron beam is injected at a current above the vacuum space charge limit into an initially evacuated drift tube. A plasma channel, produced by time-sequenced, multiple laser beam ionization of a solid target on the drift tube wall, provides the necessary neutralization to allow for effective beam propagation. By controlling the rate of production of the plasma channel as a function of time down the drift tube, control of the electron beamfront can be achieved. Recent experimental measurements of controlled beamfront motion in this configuration are presented, along with results of ion acceleration experiments conducted using two different accelerating gradients. These results are compared with numerical simulations of the system in which both controlled beamfront motion and ion acceleration is observed consistent with both design expectations and experimental results. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  7. Border Jumping: Strategic and Operational Considerations in Planning Cross-Border Raids Against Insurgent Sanctuaries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    Army SWAPO South West Africa People’s Organization UDN Nicaraguan Democratic Union UN United Nations UNITA União Nacional para a Independência Total...1958 1959 Cuba 1953 1959 Tibet 1959 1974 Eritrea 1960 1993 Congo/Katanga 1960 1965 South Africa 1960 1994 Guatemala 1960 1996 Angolan...Tunisian border.92 The Tunisian border fence ran 450 kilometers, while a second fence along the Moroccan border totaled 750 kilometers in length.93

  8. Post harvest spoilage of sweetpotato in tropics and control measures.

    PubMed

    Ray, R C; Ravi, V

    2005-01-01

    Sweetpotato storage roots are subjected to several forms of post harvest spoilage in the tropical climate during transportation from farmers' field to market and in storage. These are due to mechanical injury, weight loss, sprouting, and pests and diseases. Sweetpotato weevil is the single most important storage pest in tropical regions for which no control measures or resistant variety are yet available. Several microorganisms (mostly fungi) have been found to induce spoilage in stored sweetpotatoes. The most important among them are Botryodiplodia theobromae, Ceratocystis fimbriata, Fusarium spp., and Rhizopus oryzae. The other less frequently occurring spoilage microorganisms include Cochliobolus lunatus (Curvularia lunata), Macrophomina phaseolina, Sclerotium rolfsii, Rhizoctonia solani, Plenodomus destruens. Microbial spoilage of sweetpotato is found associated with decrease in starch, total sugar, organic acid (ascorbic acid and oxalic acid) contents with concomitant increase in polyphenols, ethylene, and in some instances phytoalexins. Several methods are used to control microbial spoilage. Curing to promote wound healing is found as the most suitable method to control microbial spoilage. Curing naturally occurs in tropical climates where mean day temperature during sweetpotato harvesting season (February-April) invariably remains at 32-35 degrees C and relative humidity at 80-95%. Sweetpotato varieties varied in their root dry matter content, and low root dry matter content attributed for their high curing efficiency. Curing efficiency of varieties also differed in response to curing periods. Fungicide treatment, bio-control, gamma irradiation, hydro warming, and storage in sand and saw dust were found to have intermediate impacts in controlling spoilage and enhancing shelf life of sweetpotato roots. Breeding program has to be chalked out to develop new varieties suitable to curing under tropical conditions in addition to developing varieties having multi

  9. Collaborative Point Paper on Border Surveillance Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    technologies. Section 2 identifies 22 US and Canadian companies, a brief description of their border surveillance systems/ products and the applicable...surveillance company data including: company name hyperlinked to its About Us/Profile page, a brief description of its systems/ products , and the...This section identifies foreign border surveillance companies a brief description of their systems/ products and the applicable environment(s) for each

  10. Collaborative Point Paper on Border Surveillance Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    Canadian companies, a brief description of their border surveillance systems/ products and the applicable environment(s) for each system/ product and/or...page, a brief description of its systems/ products , and the applicable nvironment(s) for each. The environments are labeled and color coe is green...SYSTEM/ PRODUCT MANUFACTURERS This section identifies foreign border surveillance companies a brief description of their systems/ products and the

  11. Cumulative sum quality control for calibrated breast density measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Heine, John J.; Cao Ke; Beam, Craig

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: Breast density is a significant breast cancer risk factor. Although various methods are used to estimate breast density, there is no standard measurement for this important factor. The authors are developing a breast density standardization method for use in full field digital mammography (FFDM). The approach calibrates for interpatient acquisition technique differences. The calibration produces a normalized breast density pixel value scale. The method relies on first generating a baseline (BL) calibration dataset, which required extensive phantom imaging. Standardizing prospective mammograms with calibration data generated in the past could introduce unanticipated error in the standardized output if the calibration dataset is no longer valid. Methods: Sample points from the BL calibration dataset were imaged approximately biweekly over an extended timeframe. These serial samples were used to evaluate the BL dataset reproducibility and quantify the serial calibration accuracy. The cumulative sum (Cusum) quality control method was used to evaluate the serial sampling. Results: There is considerable drift in the serial sample points from the BL calibration dataset that is x-ray beam dependent. Systematic deviation from the BL dataset caused significant calibration errors. This system drift was not captured with routine system quality control measures. Cusum analysis indicated that the drift is a sign of system wear and eventual x-ray tube failure. Conclusions: The BL calibration dataset must be monitored and periodically updated, when necessary, to account for sustained system variations to maintain the calibration accuracy.

  12. Economic value of norovirus outbreak control measures in healthcare settings.

    PubMed

    Lee, B Y; Wettstein, Z S; McGlone, S M; Bailey, R R; Umscheid, C A; Smith, K J; Muder, R R

    2011-04-01

    Although norovirus is a significant cause of nosocomial viral gastroenteritis, the economic value of hospital outbreak containment measures following identification of a norovirus case is currently unknown. We developed computer simulation models to determine the potential cost-savings from the hospital perspective of implementing the following norovirus outbreak control interventions: (i) increased hand hygiene measures, (ii) enhanced disinfection practices, (iii) patient isolation, (iv) use of protective apparel, (v) staff exclusion policies, and (vi) ward closure. Sensitivity analyses explored the impact of varying intervention efficacy, number of initial norovirus cases, the norovirus reproductive rate (R(0)), and room, ward size, and occupancy. Implementing increased hand hygiene, using protective apparel, staff exclusion policies or increased disinfection separately or in bundles provided net cost-savings, even when the intervention was only 10% effective in preventing further norovirus transmission. Patient isolation or ward closure was cost-saving only when transmission prevention efficacy was very high (≥ 90%), and their economic value decreased as the number of beds per room and the number of empty beds per ward increased. Increased hand hygiene, using protective apparel or increased disinfection practices separately or in bundles are the most cost-saving interventions for the control and containment of a norovirus outbreak.

  13. A brief review of control measures for indoor formaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, T.G.

    1988-01-01

    Indoor environments contain a variety of consumer and construction products that emit formaldehyde (CH/sub 2/O) vapor. The strongest CH/sub 2/O emitters are typically particleboard underlayment and industrial particleboard, hardwood plywood paneling, urea-formaldehyde foam insulation, and medium density fiberboard, all of which contain urea-formaldehyde (UF) resins. The contribution of individual products to indoor CH/sub 2/O levels depends on several parameters, including the quantity and age of the product, building ventilation rate, presence of permeation barriers, temperature (T), relative humidity (RH), and CH/sub 2/O vapor concentration resulting from all of the CH/sub 2/O emitters (1,3-8). Combustion sources (e.g., kerosene heaters, gas stoves and cigarettes), carpet and carpet padding, resilient flooring (e.g., linoleum), gypsum board, non-apparel and apparel textiles, ceiling tiles, fibrous glass insulation and softwood plywood subflooring are generally weak emitters that do not contribute significantly to steady-state, indoor CH/sub 2/O levels. Control measures exist to reduce CH/sub 2/O emissions from consumer and construction products during their manufacturer and in post-installation applications. This note summarized the effectiveness of the following subset of post-installation control measures: product aging, installations of permeation barriers (i.e., flooring) and increased building ventilation. 14 refs.

  14. Construction of a temperature-controlled diffusion phantom for quality control of diffusion measurements.

    PubMed

    Reischauer, Carolin; Staempfli, Philipp; Jaermann, Thomas; Boesiger, Peter

    2009-03-01

    To construct a temperature-controlled diffusion phantom with known diffusion properties and geometry in order to facilitate the comparison and optimization of diffusion sequences with the objective of increasing the precision of experimentally derived diffusion parameters. A temperature-stabilized diffusion phantom made up of two crossing strands of hydrophobic polyethylene fibers was constructed. Reproducibility and temperature dependence of several diffusion parameters was investigated and compared with computer simulations. Furthermore, in order to stimulate actual use, the precision of measurement of different diffusion-encoding schemes was compared using bootstrap analysis. The measured values of the diffusion parameters are highly reproducible and feature strong temperature dependence which is reproduced in simulations, underlining the necessity of a temperature-stabilized environment for quality control. The exemplary application presented here demonstrates that the phantom allows comparing and optimizing different diffusion sequences with regard to their measurement precision. The present work demonstrates that the diffusion phantom facilitates and improves the comparison and quality control of diffusion sequences and the ensuing parameters. The results show that an accurate temperature control is a vital prerequisite for highly reproducible calibration measurements. As such, the phantom might provide a valuable calibration tool for clinical studies. Copyright (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Evaluation of Intersection Traffic Control Measures through Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaithambi, Gowri; Sivanandan, R.

    2015-12-01

    Modeling traffic flow is stochastic in nature due to randomness in variables such as vehicle arrivals and speeds. Due to this and due to complex vehicular interactions and their manoeuvres, it is extremely difficult to model the traffic flow through analytical methods. To study this type of complex traffic system and vehicle interactions, simulation is considered as an effective tool. Application of homogeneous traffic models to heterogeneous traffic may not be able to capture the complex manoeuvres and interactions in such flows. Hence, a microscopic simulation model for heterogeneous traffic is developed using object oriented concepts. This simulation model acts as a tool for evaluating various control measures at signalized intersections. The present study focuses on the evaluation of Right Turn Lane (RTL) and Channelised Left Turn Lane (CLTL). A sensitivity analysis was performed to evaluate RTL and CLTL by varying the approach volumes, turn proportions and turn lane lengths. RTL is found to be advantageous only up to certain approach volumes and right-turn proportions, beyond which it is counter-productive. CLTL is found to be advantageous for lower approach volumes for all turn proportions, signifying the benefits of CLTL. It is counter-productive for higher approach volume and lower turn proportions. This study pinpoints the break-even points for various scenarios. The developed simulation model can be used as an appropriate intersection lane control tool for enhancing the efficiency of flow at intersections. This model can also be employed for scenario analysis and can be valuable to field traffic engineers in implementing vehicle-type based and lane-based traffic control measures.

  16. Speech intelligibility measure for vocal control of an automaton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naranjo, Michel; Tsirigotis, Georgios

    1998-07-01

    The acceleration of investigations in Speech Recognition allows to augur, in the next future, a wide establishment of Vocal Control Systems in the production units. The communication between a human and a machine necessitates technical devices that emit, or are submitted to important noise perturbations. The vocal interface introduces a new control problem of a deterministic automaton using uncertain information. The purpose is to place exactly the automaton in a final state, ordered by voice, from an unknown initial state. The whole Speech Processing procedure, presented in this paper, has for input the temporal speech signal of a word and for output a recognised word labelled with an intelligibility index given by the recognition quality. In the first part, we present the essential psychoacoustic concepts for the automatic calculation of the loudness of a speech signal. The architecture of a Time Delay Neural Network is presented in second part where we also give the results of the recognition. The theory of the fuzzy subset, in third part, allows to extract at the same time a recognised word and its intelligibility index. In the fourth part, an Anticipatory System models the control of a Sequential Machine. A prediction phase and an updating one appear which involve data coming from the information system. A Bayesian decision strategy is used and the criterion is a weighted sum of criteria defined from information, minimum path functions and speech intelligibility measure.

  17. Autonomous Quality Control of Joint Orientation Measured with Inertial Sensors.

    PubMed

    Lebel, Karina; Boissy, Patrick; Nguyen, Hung; Duval, Christian

    2016-07-05

    Clinical mobility assessment is traditionally performed in laboratories using complex and expensive equipment. The low accessibility to such equipment, combined with the emerging trend to assess mobility in a free-living environment, creates a need for body-worn sensors (e.g., inertial measurement units-IMUs) that are capable of measuring the complexity in motor performance using meaningful measurements, such as joint orientation. However, accuracy of joint orientation estimates using IMUs may be affected by environment, the joint tracked, type of motion performed and velocity. This study investigates a quality control (QC) process to assess the quality of orientation data based on features extracted from the raw inertial sensors' signals. Joint orientation (trunk, hip, knee, ankle) of twenty participants was acquired by an optical motion capture system and IMUs during a variety of tasks (sit, sit-to-stand transition, walking, turning) performed under varying conditions (speed, environment). An artificial neural network was used to classify good and bad sequences of joint orientation with a sensitivity and a specificity above 83%. This study confirms the possibility to perform QC on IMU joint orientation data based on raw signal features. This innovative QC approach may be of particular interest in a big data context, such as for remote-monitoring of patients' mobility.

  18. Autonomous Quality Control of Joint Orientation Measured with Inertial Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Lebel, Karina; Boissy, Patrick; Nguyen, Hung; Duval, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Clinical mobility assessment is traditionally performed in laboratories using complex and expensive equipment. The low accessibility to such equipment, combined with the emerging trend to assess mobility in a free-living environment, creates a need for body-worn sensors (e.g., inertial measurement units—IMUs) that are capable of measuring the complexity in motor performance using meaningful measurements, such as joint orientation. However, accuracy of joint orientation estimates using IMUs may be affected by environment, the joint tracked, type of motion performed and velocity. This study investigates a quality control (QC) process to assess the quality of orientation data based on features extracted from the raw inertial sensors’ signals. Joint orientation (trunk, hip, knee, ankle) of twenty participants was acquired by an optical motion capture system and IMUs during a variety of tasks (sit, sit-to-stand transition, walking, turning) performed under varying conditions (speed, environment). An artificial neural network was used to classify good and bad sequences of joint orientation with a sensitivity and a specificity above 83%. This study confirms the possibility to perform QC on IMU joint orientation data based on raw signal features. This innovative QC approach may be of particular interest in a big data context, such as for remote-monitoring of patients’ mobility. PMID:27399701

  19. Case studies on design, simulation and visualization of control and measurement applications using REX control system

    SciTech Connect

    Ozana, Stepan Pies, Martin Docekal, Tomas

    2016-06-08

    REX Control System is a professional advanced tool for design and implementation of complex control systems that belongs to softPLC category. It covers the entire process starting from simulation of functionality of the application before deployment, through implementation on real-time target, towards analysis, diagnostics and visualization. Basically it consists of two parts: the development tools and the runtime system. It is also compatible with Simulink environment, and the way of implementation of control algorithm is very similar. The control scheme is finally compiled (using RexDraw utility) and uploaded into a chosen real-time target (using RexView utility). There is a wide variety of hardware platforms and real-time operating systems supported by REX Control System such as for example Windows Embedded, Linux, Linux/Xenomai deployed on SBC, IPC, PAC, Raspberry Pi and others with many I/O interfaces. It is modern system designed both for measurement and control applications, offering a lot of additional functions concerning data archiving, visualization based on HTML5, and communication standards. The paper will sum up possibilities of its use in educational process, focused on control of case studies of physical models with classical and advanced control algorithms.

  20. Case studies on design, simulation and visualization of control and measurement applications using REX control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozana, Stepan; Pies, Martin; Docekal, Tomas

    2016-06-01

    REX Control System is a professional advanced tool for design and implementation of complex control systems that belongs to softPLC category. It covers the entire process starting from simulation of functionality of the application before deployment, through implementation on real-time target, towards analysis, diagnostics and visualization. Basically it consists of two parts: the development tools and the runtime system. It is also compatible with Simulink environment, and the way of implementation of control algorithm is very similar. The control scheme is finally compiled (using RexDraw utility) and uploaded into a chosen real-time target (using RexView utility). There is a wide variety of hardware platforms and real-time operating systems supported by REX Control System such as for example Windows Embedded, Linux, Linux/Xenomai deployed on SBC, IPC, PAC, Raspberry Pi and others with many I/O interfaces. It is modern system designed both for measurement and control applications, offering a lot of additional functions concerning data archiving, visualization based on HTML5, and communication standards. The paper will sum up possibilities of its use in educational process, focused on control of case studies of physical models with classical and advanced control algorithms.

  1. Measurable Control System Security through Ideal Driven Technical Metrics

    SciTech Connect

    Miles McQueen; Wayne Boyer; Sean McBride; Marie Farrar; Zachary Tudor

    2008-01-01

    The Department of Homeland Security National Cyber Security Division supported development of a small set of security ideals as a framework to establish measurable control systems security. Based on these ideals, a draft set of proposed technical metrics was developed to allow control systems owner-operators to track improvements or degradations in their individual control systems security posture. The technical metrics development effort included review and evaluation of over thirty metrics-related documents. On the bases of complexity, ambiguity, or misleading and distorting effects the metrics identified during the reviews were determined to be weaker than necessary to aid defense against the myriad threats posed by cyber-terrorism to human safety, as well as to economic prosperity. Using the results of our metrics review and the set of security ideals as a starting point for metrics development, we identified thirteen potential technical metrics - with at least one metric supporting each ideal. Two case study applications of the ideals and thirteen metrics to control systems were then performed to establish potential difficulties in applying both the ideals and the metrics. The case studies resulted in no changes to the ideals, and only a few deletions and refinements to the thirteen potential metrics. This led to a final proposed set of ten core technical metrics. To further validate the security ideals, the modifications made to the original thirteen potential metrics, and the final proposed set of ten core metrics, seven separate control systems security assessments performed over the past three years were reviewed for findings and recommended mitigations. These findings and mitigations were then mapped to the security ideals and metrics to assess gaps in their coverage. The mappings indicated that there are no gaps in the security ideals and that the ten core technical metrics provide significant coverage of standard security issues with 87% coverage. Based

  2. Border traps in Al2O3/In0.53Ga0.47As (100) gate stacks and their passivation by hydrogen anneals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eun Ji; Wang, Lingquan; Asbeck, Peter M.; Saraswat, Krishna C.; McIntyre, Paul C.

    2010-01-01

    Charge-trapping defects in Pt/Al2O3/In0.53Ga0.47As metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors and their passivation by hydrogen are investigated in samples with abrupt oxide/III-V interfaces. Tunneling of electrons into defect states (border traps) in the atomic layer deposited Al2O3 near the oxide/semiconductor interface is found to control the frequency dispersion of the capacitance in accumulation. Hydrogen anneals effectively passivate border traps in the oxide, in addition to some of the midgap states that control carrier generation in the channel. This is evident in the reduced frequency dispersion in accumulation, reduced capacitance-voltage stretch-out through depletion, and suppression of the inversion carrier response in capacitance-voltage measurements.

  3. [Malaria in the triple border region between Brazil, Colombia and Peru].

    PubMed

    Peiter, Paulo César; Franco, Vivian da Cruz; Gracie, Renata; Xavier, Diego Ricardo; Suárez-Mutis, Martha Cecilia

    2013-12-01

    This article aims to analyze the malaria surveillance situation on the triple border between Brazil, Colombia, and Peru. This was a qualitative study using questionnaires in the border towns in 2011. The results were analyzed with the SWOT matrix methodology, pointing to significant differences between the malaria surveillance systems along the border. Weaknesses included lack of linkage between actors, lack of trained personnel, high turnover in teams, and lack of malaria specialists in the local hospitals. The study also showed lack of knowledge on malaria and its prevention in the local population. The strengths are the inclusion of new institutional actors, improvement of professional training, distribution of insecticide-treated bed nets, and possibilities for complementary action between surveillance systems through cooperation between health teams on the border. Malaria control can only be successful if the region is dealt with as a whole.

  4. Ultrasonic Velocity Measurement of Grease as a Quality Control Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utrata, D.

    2007-03-01

    Grease is used in a variety of industries where it is desirable to hold in place a lubricating film without having this lubricant leak or run. Various thickeners and additives are used to hold the base oil in place, extend the operating temperature range of the grease, and enhance corrosion and wear resistance. The characteristic of grease that perhaps most dictates its usefulness for a given application is its consistency: too thin and the grease may not adhere to the surfaces needing lubrication; too thick and it may not flow properly. Grease consistency is rated by the National Lubricating Grease Institute (NLGI) using performance in cone penetration tests. This work correlates the ultrasonic velocity of various greases to their consistency grade. Results indicate that some greases exhibit a clear relationship between ultrasonic velocity and grade. This promises that the use of velocity measurement could be a viable quality control tool. Not all grease formulations respond well to such predictive attempts, however.

  5. Control and Measurement of an Exchange-Only Spin Qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medford, James

    2015-03-01

    Gate-defined semiconductor quantum dots have proven to be a versatile testbed for exploring quantum systems and quantum information. We demonstrate the fast all-electrical control of a spin qubit using the two coherent exchange interactions in a triple quantum dot. Our measurements identify the role of nuclear spins from the host GaAs in this system as a mechanism for both dephasing and leakage out of the qubit subspace. We also show that by increasing both exchange interactions in a balanced fashion, we enter a second regime of operation. In this regime, leakage from the subspace has been suppressed, resulting in a spin qubit with a tunable electric dipole moment, which we refer to as the resonant exchange qubit.

  6. Infectious diseases following natural disasters: prevention and control measures.

    PubMed

    Kouadio, Isidore K; Aljunid, Syed; Kamigaki, Taro; Hammad, Karen; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2012-01-01

    Natural disasters may lead to infectious disease outbreaks when they result in substantial population displacement and exacerbate synergic risk factors (change in the environment, in human conditions and in the vulnerability to existing pathogens) for disease transmission. We reviewed risk factors and potential infectious diseases resulting from prolonged secondary effects of major natural disasters that occurred from 2000 to 2011. Natural disasters including floods, tsunamis, earthquakes, tropical cyclones (e.g., hurricanes and typhoons) and tornadoes have been secondarily described with the following infectious diseases including diarrheal diseases, acute respiratory infections, malaria, leptospirosis, measles, dengue fever, viral hepatitis, typhoid fever, meningitis, as well as tetanus and cutaneous mucormycosis. Risk assessment is essential in post-disaster situations and the rapid implementation of control measures through re-establishment and improvement of primary healthcare delivery should be given high priority, especially in the absence of pre-disaster surveillance data.

  7. Transportation control measure: State Implementation Plan guidance (revised final report)

    SciTech Connect

    Eisinger, D.S.; Deakin, E.A.; Mahoney, L.A.; Morris, R.E.; Ireson, R.G.

    1990-09-01

    The document has been developed for the United States Environmental Protection Agency to summarize current knowledge about transportation control measures (TCMs). The target audience includes transportation and air quality management staff at all government levels. The guidance development effort is motivated by the need to provide post-1987 guidance to attain National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). The document provides descriptions and examples of the most frequently implemented TCMs; institutional guidance such as assessing feasibility, agency responsibilities, and funding; and techniques for monitoring and enforcing TCMs. In addition, the document describes the tools available for evaluating TCM impacts on hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide emissions. Appendices present approaches to estimate TCM effects on PM-10 emissions; important sources of additional information; implementation experiences in various cities; and rules of thumb to quantitatively evaluate TCM transportation system effects. The information presented demonstrates that there have been significant advances in TCM development over the past decade, and that TCMs are appropriate control options for state implementation plans.

  8. Temperature Measurement and Control System for Transtibial Prostheses: Functional Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ghoseiri, Kamiar; Zheng, Yong Ping; Leung, Aaron K L; Rahgozar, Mehdi; Aminian, Gholamreza; Lee, Tat Hing; Safari, Mohammad Reza

    2016-10-03

    The accumulation of heat inside the prosthetic socket increases skin temperature and fosters perspiration, which consequently leads to high tissue stress, friction blister, discomfort, unpleasant odor, and decreased prosthesis suspension and use. In the present study, the prototype of a temperature measurement and control (TM&C) system was designed, fabricated, and functionally evaluated in a phantom model of the transtibial prosthetic socket. The TM&C system was comprised of 12 thermistors divided equally into two groups that arranged internal and external to a prosthetic silicone liner. Its control system was programmed to select the required heating or cooling function of a thermal pump to provide thermal equilibrium based on the amount of temperature difference from a defined set temperature, or the amount of difference between the mean temperature recorded by inside and outside thermistors. A thin layer of aluminum was used for thermal conduction between the thermal pump and different sites around the silicone liner. The results showed functionality of the TM&C system for thermoregulation inside the prosthetic socket. However, enhancing the structure of this TM&C system, increasing its thermal power, and decreasing its weight and cost are main priorities before further development.

  9. Fluidic Control of Nozzle Flow: Some Performance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Federspiel, John; Bangert, Linda; Wing, David; Hawkes, Tim

    1995-01-01

    Results are presented of an experimental program that investigated the use of a secondary air stream to control the amount of flow through a convergent-divergent nozzle. These static tests utilized high pressure, ambient temperature air that was injected at the throat of the nozzle through an annular slot. Multiple injection slot sizes and injection angles were tested. The introduction of secondary flow was made in an opposing direction to the primary flow and the resulting flow field caused the primary stream to react as though the physical throat size had been reduced. The percentage reduction in primary flow rate was generally about twice the injected flow rate. The most effective throttling was achieved by injecting through the smallest slot in an orientation most nearly opposed to the approaching primary flow. Thrust edliciency, as measured by changes in nozzle thrust coefficient, was highest at high nozzle pressure ratios, NPR. The static test results agreed with predictions obtained prior from PABSD, a fully viscous computational fluid dynamics program. Since use of such an injection system on gas turbine engine exhaust nozzles would be primarily at high NPRs, it was concluded that fluidic control holds promise for reducing nozzle weight and complexity on future systems.

  10. Interception of spray drift by border structures. Part 1: wind tunnel experiments.

    PubMed

    De Schampheleire, M; Nuyttens, D; Dekeyser, D; Verboven, P; Cornelis, W; Gabriels, D; Spanoghe, P

    2008-01-01

    This research investigated the drift-intercepting potential of structures surrounding the field borders, like artificial screens and crops, which are not yet a part of the drift mitigation measures for field crop sprayers in Belgium. Drift-interception experiments were performed in the wind tunnel of the International Centre for Eremology (Ghent University, Belgium) with various interception structures: Artificial screens with heights of 0.5, 0.75 and 1 m and screen open areas of 16, 36 and 63%; a row of plastic Christmas trees with heights of 0.5 and 0.75 m; and a potato canopy. The interception structure was positioned at 1 m from the field border. From the results it was found that type of border structure has a pronounced effect on the drift interception, while the height of the border structure had no significant effect.

  11. Hydrologic response to stormwater control measures in urban watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Colin D.; McMillan, Sara K.; Clinton, Sandra M.; Jefferson, Anne J.

    2016-10-01

    Stormwater control measures (SCMs) are designed to mitigate deleterious effects of urbanization on river networks, but our ability to predict the cumulative effect of multiple SCMs at watershed scales is limited. The most widely used metric to quantify impacts of urban development, total imperviousness (TI), does not contain information about the extent of stormwater control. We analyzed the discharge records of 16 urban watersheds in Charlotte, NC spanning a range of TI (4.1-54%) and area mitigated with SCMs (1.3-89%). We then tested multiple watershed metrics that quantify the degree of urban impact and SCM mitigation to determine which best predicted hydrologic response across sites. At the event time scale, linear models showed TI to be the best predictor of both peak unit discharge and rainfall-runoff ratios across a range of storm sizes. TI was also a strong driver of both a watershed's capacity to buffer small (e.g., 1-10 mm) rain events, and the relationship between peak discharge and precipitation once that buffering capacity is exceeded. Metrics containing information about SCMs did not appear as primary predictors of event hydrologic response, suggesting that the level of SCM mitigation in many urban watersheds is insufficient to influence hydrologic response. Over annual timescales, impervious surfaces unmitigated by SCMs and tree coverage were best correlated with streamflow flashiness and water yield, respectively. The shift in controls from the event scale to the annual scale has important implications for water resource management, suggesting that overall limitation of watershed imperviousness rather than partial mitigation by SCMs may be necessary to alleviate the hydrologic impacts of urbanization.

  12. Border collision route to quasiperiodicity: Numerical investigation and experimental confirmation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhusubaliyev, Zhanybai T.; Mosekilde, Erik; Maity, Somnath; Mohanan, Srijith; Banerjee, Soumitro

    2006-06-01

    Numerical studies of higher-dimensional piecewise-smooth systems have recently shown how a torus can arise from a periodic cycle through a special type of border-collision bifurcation. The present article investigates this new route to quasiperiodicity in the two-dimensional piecewise-linear normal form map. We have obtained the chart of the dynamical modes for this map and showed that border-collision bifurcations can lead to the birth of a stable closed invariant curve associated with quasiperiodic or periodic dynamics. In the parameter regions leading to the existence of an invariant closed curve, there may be transitions between an ergodic torus and a resonance torus, but the mechanism of creation for the resonance tongues is distinctly different from that observed in smooth maps. The transition from a stable focus point to a resonance torus may lead directly to a new focus of higher periodicity, e.g., a period-5 focus. This article also contains a discussion of torus destruction via a homoclinic bifurcation in the piecewise-linear normal map. Using a dc-dc converter with two-level control as an example, we report the first experimental verification of the direct transition to quasiperiodicity through a border-collision bifurcation.

  13. Measurements of optical underwater turbulence under controlled conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanaev, A. V.; Gladysz, S.; Almeida de Sá Barros, R.; Matt, S.; Nootz, G. A.; Josset, D. B.; Hou, W.

    2016-05-01

    Laser beam propagation underwater is becoming an important research topic because of high demand for its potential applications. Namely, ability to image underwater at long distances is highly desired for scientific and military purposes, including submarine awareness, diver visibility, and mine detection. Optical communication in the ocean can provide covert data transmission with much higher rates than that available with acoustic techniques, and it is now desired for certain military and scientific applications that involve sending large quantities of data. Unfortunately underwater environment presents serious challenges for propagation of laser beams. Even in clean ocean water, the extinction due to absorption and scattering theoretically limit the useful range to few attenuation lengths. However, extending the laser light propagation range to the theoretical limit leads to significant beam distortions due to optical underwater turbulence. Experiments show that the magnitude of the distortions that are caused by water temperature and salinity fluctuations can significantly exceed the magnitude of the beam distortions due to atmospheric turbulence even for relatively short propagation distances. We are presenting direct measurements of optical underwater turbulence in controlled conditions of laboratory water tank using two separate techniques involving wavefront sensor and LED array. These independent approaches will enable development of underwater turbulence power spectrum model based directly on the spatial domain measurements and will lead to accurate predictions of underwater beam propagation.

  14. Measurement approaches to support future warhead arms control transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Olinger, C.T.; Frankle, C.M.; Johnson, M.W.; Poths, J.

    1998-12-31

    Transparency on warhead stockpiles, warhead dismantlement, and fissile material stockpiles in nuclear weapons states will become increasingly important in the move beyond START II toward lower quantities of warheads. Congressional support for further warhead reductions will likely depend on the degree of irreversibility, or in other words, the rapidity with which warhead inventories could be reconstituted. Whether irreversibility considerations can be satisfied will depend on monitoring dismantlement as well as constraining the available stockpile of fissile materials for possible refabrication into warheads. Measurement techniques designed to address the above problems will need to consider NPT Article 1 obligations as well as Russian and US classification regulations, which prohibit or restrict the transfer of nuclear warhead design information to other states. Classification considerations currently limit the potential completeness of future inspections of weapons materials. Many conventional international safeguards approaches are not currently viable for arms control applications because they would reveal weapons design information. The authors discuss a variety of technical measures that may help to improve transparence of warhead and fissile material stockpiles and may enable limited warhead dismantlement transparency.

  15. "Quality's "Others"?" The Politics of Bordering and Re-Bordering Our Educational Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soudien, Crain

    2011-01-01

    The 14th World Congress of the World Council of Comparative Education Societies (WCCES), held in Istanbul in June 2010, was entitled "Bordering, re-bordering and new possibilities for change in education and society". It opened with this address, in which the author explores how the idea of a norm works for education using key…

  16. On the Borders of Pedagogy: Implementing a Critical Pedagogy for Students on the Thai Burma Border

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Couch, Jen

    2017-01-01

    This article uses an auto-ethnographic approach to explore the reflections and insights that occurred during my teaching of a subject in adolescent development on the Thai Burma border. This paper adopts a relatively descriptive style to a personal reflection of teaching on the border and how it transformed the way I teach and made me look at the…

  17. Cross-border mobility and social networks: Laotians seeking medical treatment along the Thai border.

    PubMed

    Bochaton, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    Drawing upon research conducted on cross-border patients living in Laos and seeking care in Thailand, this paper examines the important role played by social networks in patients' decision-making and on the itineraries they choose to seek treatment on the Thai side of the border. Due to the vastly contrasting situations between the two countries in terms of healthcare supply, and considering Laotians' increasing demand for high quality healthcare, a number of them have managed to satisfy their needs by combining cross-border treatment with the use of the healthcare facilities provided by their own country. This study consisted first of household surveys conducted in five border areas (2006-2007) in Laos in order to quantify and map out cross-border healthcare-related travel patterns. Afterwards, interviews were conducted with cross-border patients (55), Laotian and Thai medical doctors (6), Thai social workers (5), and officials working in public institutions (12). While socioeconomic and spatial factors partly explain cross-border mobility, patients' social networks significantly influence treatment itineraries throughout the decision-making process, including logistical and financial considerations. The social networks existing at different geographical levels (neighbourhood, regional and global) are therefore a powerful analytical tool not only for understanding the emergence of these cross-border movements but also for justifying them in an authoritarian political environment such as Lao PDR's.

  18. Knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding influenza prevention and control measures among Hispanics in San Diego County--2006.

    PubMed

    Bethel, Jeffrey W; Waterman, Stephen H

    2009-01-01

    Influenza vaccination is the most effective method to avoid influenza virus infection and its potential serious complications; however, influenza vaccine is underutilized especially among minority groups. We assessed the knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) regarding influenza prevention and control measures among Hispanics in San Diego County. We used a multistage cluster sampling scheme to administer an in-person, door-to-door KAP survey to 226 Hispanics aged > or = 18 years in three regions of San Diego County during July-August 2006. Hispanics in the three regions sampled for this survey varied widely by age, country of birth, years living in the United States, number of border crossings in previous month, and number of people in household. Awareness of the influenza vaccine was nearly 90% among survey respondents. The percentage of Hispanic males and females aged 50-64 years who received an influenza vaccination in the previous 12 months was 7.7% and 23.5%, respectively, and the percentage of Hispanic males and females aged > or = 65 years who received an influenza vaccination in the previous 12 months was 33.3% and 59.1%, respectively. This survey showed high awareness of the influenza vaccine among Hispanics in San Diego County but relatively low vaccination rates among respondents aged > or = 50 years, a group targeted for influenza vaccination. Differences in awareness and vaccination rates between Hispanic males and females across all age groups indicate that educational outreach efforts should specifically target Hispanic men.

  19. Wilderness rescue and border enforcement along the Arizona Mexico border--the Border Patrol Search, Trauma and Rescue Unit.

    PubMed

    Keim, Samuel M; Reiser, Frank; Shetty, Sheetal; Ranger-Moore, James

    2009-01-01

    To introduce and describe the US Border Patrol (USBP) Tucson Sector Border Patrol Search, Trauma and Rescue Unit (BORSTAR) and to analyze whether the frequency of its activities were associated with the amount of total border patrol law enforcement activities in the area. Descriptive and nonparametric analysis was conducted on data that were obtained on total USBP apprehensions of undocumented immigrants and BORSTAR activities for a consecutive 3-year period. From October 2004 to September 2007 over 1 million apprehensions occurred within the Tucson Sector. During this time, a large number of search, rescue, and medical intervention events occurred. However, only a weak association was found between the frequency of apprehensions and BORSTAR activities. The BORSTAR unit of the Tucson Sector commonly encounters harsh conditions and provides search, rescue, and medical interventions to undocumented immigrants. The frequency of BORSTAR activities is not strongly associated with the volume of USBP law enforcement activities.

  20. Border-tracing algorithm implementation for the femoral geometry reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Testi, D; Zannoni, C; Cappello, A; Viceconti, M

    2001-06-01

    In some orthopaedic applications such as the design of custom-made hip prostheses, reconstruction of the bone morphology is a fundamental step. Different methods are available to extract the geometry of the femoral medullary canal from computed tomography (CT) images. In this research, an automatic procedure (border-tracing method) for the extraction of bone contours was implemented and validated. A composite replica of the human femur was scanned and the CT images processed using three different methods, a manual procedure; the border-tracing algorithm; and a threshold-based method. The resulting contours were used to estimate the accuracy of the implemented procedure. The two software techniques were more accurate than the manual procedure. Then, these two procedures were applied to an in vivo CT data set in order to determine to most critical region for repeatability. Only for the images located in this region, the repeatability measurement was carried out for six in vivo CT data sets to evaluate the inter-femur repeatability. The border-tracing method was found to achieve the highest repeatability.

  1. Network communities within and across borders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerina, Federica; Chessa, Alessandro; Pammolli, Fabio; Riccaboni, Massimo

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the impact of borders on the topology of spatially embedded networks. Indeed territorial subdivisions and geographical borders significantly hamper the geographical span of networks thus playing a key role in the formation of network communities. This is especially important in scientific and technological policy-making, highlighting the interplay between pressure for the internationalization to lead towards a global innovation system and the administrative borders imposed by the national and regional institutions. In this study we introduce an outreach index to quantify the impact of borders on the community structure and apply it to the case of the European and US patent co-inventors networks. We find that (a) the US connectivity decays as a power of distance, whereas we observe a faster exponential decay for Europe; (b) European network communities essentially correspond to nations and contiguous regions while US communities span multiple states across the whole country without any characteristic geographic scale. We confirm our findings by means of a set of simulations aimed at exploring the relationship between different patterns of cross-border community structures and the outreach index.

  2. Getting ready to use control: Advances in the measurement of young children's use of proactive control.

    PubMed

    Doebel, Sabine; Barker, Jane E; Chevalier, Nicolas; Michaelson, Laura E; Fisher, Anna V; Munakata, Yuko

    2017-01-01

    A key developmental transition in executive function is in the temporal dynamics of its engagement: children shift from reactively calling to mind task-relevant information as needed, to being able to proactively maintain information across time in anticipation of upcoming demands. This transition is important for understanding individual differences and developmental changes in executive function; however, methods targeting its assessment are limited. We tested the possibility that Track-It, a paradigm developed to measure selective sustained attention, also indexes proactive control. In this task children must track a target shape as it moves unpredictably among moving distractors, and identify where it disappears, which may require proactively maintaining information about the target or goal. In two experiments (5-6 year-olds, Ns = 33, 64), children's performance on Track-It predicted proactive control across two established paradigms. These findings suggest Track-It measures proactive control in children. Theoretical possibilities regarding how proactive control and selective sustained attention may be related are also discussed.

  3. Lesion border detection in dermoscopy images.

    PubMed

    Celebi, M Emre; Iyatomi, Hitoshi; Schaefer, Gerald; Stoecker, William V

    2009-03-01

    Dermoscopy is one of the major imaging modalities used in the diagnosis of melanoma and other pigmented skin lesions. Due to the difficulty and subjectivity of human interpretation, computerized analysis of dermoscopy images has become an important research area. One of the most important steps in dermoscopy image analysis is the automated detection of lesion borders. In this article, we present a systematic overview of the recent border detection methods in the literature paying particular attention to computational issues and evaluation aspects. Common problems with the existing approaches include the acquisition, size, and diagnostic distribution of the test image set, the evaluation of the results, and the inadequate description of the employed methods. Border determination by dermatologists appears to depend upon higher-level knowledge, therefore it is likely that the incorporation of domain knowledge in automated methods will enable them to perform better, especially in sets of images with a variety of diagnoses.

  4. Lesion Border Detection in Dermoscopy Images

    PubMed Central

    Celebi, M. Emre; Schaefer, Gerald; Iyatomi, Hitoshi; Stoecker, William V.

    2009-01-01

    Background Dermoscopy is one of the major imaging modalities used in the diagnosis of melanoma and other pigmented skin lesions. Due to the difficulty and subjectivity of human interpretation, computerized analysis of dermoscopy images has become an important research area. One of the most important steps in dermoscopy image analysis is the automated detection of lesion borders. Methods In this article, we present a systematic overview of the recent border detection methods in the literature paying particular attention to computational issues and evaluation aspects. Conclusion Common problems with the existing approaches include the acquisition, size, and diagnostic distribution of the test image set, the evaluation of the results, and the inadequate description of the employed methods. Border determination by dermatologists appears to depend upon higher-level knowledge, therefore it is likely that the incorporation of domain knowledge in automated methods will enable them to perform better, especially in sets of images with a variety of diagnoses. PMID:19121917

  5. [AIDS along Brazil's borders, 1990-2003].

    PubMed

    Rodrigues-Júnior, Antonio Luiz; de Castilho, Euclides Ayres

    2009-01-01

    To study the AIDS epidemic in Brazil's border areas, from the spatial and temporal perspective. This was an ecological study in which the cases of AIDS reported to the Ministry of Health of Brazil from 1990-2003 were grouped according to "hunger areas" as defined by Josué de Castro in the 1940s and according to 19 cultural subregions. Spatial assessment was based on incidence rates for border municipalities; temporal assessment considered the absolute number of cases occurring quarterly from 1990-2003 in each of the hunger areas studied (Extreme South, Midwest, and Amazon). During the study period, 7,973 cases of AIDS were reported from the Brazilian border areas: 648 in the Amazon area, 1,579 in the Midwest, and 5,746 in the Extreme South (populations of 668,098, 895,489, and 2,769,361, respectively). The subregions with the highest AIDS incidence rates in each of the three border areas were those near triple-borders, between more than two Latin American countries. Sexual transmission was predominant, with heterosexual transmission being the most frequent, followed by transmission by male homosexuality. These two categories accounted for 87.2% of the cases reported. The estimates of the trend parameter in the temporal analysis were 0.53 (P < 0.0001), 0.83 (P < 0.0001), and 3.47 (P < 0.0001), respectively, for the Amazon, Midwest, and Extreme South areas. The improvement of health care services along Brazil's borders may be a strategy for territorial integration and for dealing with the AIDS epidemic, as long as social, economic, and cultural differences are taken into account.

  6. Migrant deaths along the California-Mexico border: an anthropological perspective.

    PubMed

    Hinkes, Madeleine J

    2008-01-01

    California shares a 150-mile international border with Mexico. Traditionally, this border has seen non-stop illegal migration. In the 1990s, the Border Patrol began a concerted effort to establish and maintain control of the border, beginning in urban San Diego. This heightened law enforcement presence, known as Operation Gatekeeper, changed the westernmost segment of the border from the most permeable to the least permeable. This enforcement pushed migrants into more dangerous crossing areas in eastern San Diego and Imperial Counties, making their trip longer and more physically challenging as they made their way through treacherous mountains, deserts, and irrigation canals. Death rates soared. Political decisions impacted human lives and the caseloads of forensic anthropologists in jurisdictions along the border. Bodies decompose rapidly here, and there are minimal sources of antemortem data. Many of these migrants are never identified. This paper, and this symposium, is an attempt to bring this situation to the notice of other anthropologists and to discuss cooperative means of addressing the issue of identification.

  7. Crimmigration checks in the internal border areas of the EU: Finding the discretion that matters

    PubMed Central

    van der Woude, Maartje; van der Leun, Joanne

    2017-01-01

    Internal borders are a major but understudied site of crimmigration as most scholarship has focused on external borders (Van der Woude and Van Berlo, 2015). Internal borders were supposed to disappear under the principle of free movement within the European Union. But today we see EU member states policing the borders inside Schengen, checking identification, verifying passage, and regulating mobility in so-called ‘gray zones’. This article investigates this type of policing within the EU, focusing on the case of the Netherlands. It argues that the policing of internal borders is highly dependent upon discretionary power, a significant factor in the crimmigration process that we do not know enough about. Following Hawkins (1992, 2003), Schneider (1992), and Bushway and Forst (2013) on discretion and discretionary decision-making, we examine the interaction between decisions by law-makers and policy-makers that create discretionary space for law enforcement officials on the ground, and the way in which these street-level bureaucrats perceive the discretionary space attributed to them. By zeroing in on the interaction between these two actors, we aim to find the discretionary decision that matters the most in terms of explaining the crimmigration practices, offering a more holistic and interdisciplinary approach to border control. We discuss the implications of this power and the consequences for the European Project as such. PMID:28596710

  8. Quantitation of the Adherence of an Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli to Isolated Rabbit Intestinal Brush Borders

    PubMed Central

    Cheney, Christopher P.; Boedeker, Edgar C.; Formal, Samuel B.

    1979-01-01

    Two assays were developed to quantitate the adherence of an Escherichia coli strain (RDEC-1) known to colonize the mucosal surface of the small intestine of rabbits to brush borders isolated from rabbit intestinal epithelial cells. In the first assay, the mean adherence per rabbit brush border was determined by counting the number of organisms adhering to each of 40 brush borders under phase microscopy. The mean adherence of RDEC-1 (11.5 ± 0.7 per rabbit brush border) was significantly greater than adherence of two nonpathogenic strains: HS (2.7 ± 0.4 per rabbit brush border) and 640 (0.8 ± 0.1 per rabbit brush border). A similar distinction between the adherence of RDEC-1 and the control (nonadherent) organisms could be made more rapidly by determining the percentage of the total number of brush borders which had 10 or more adherent organisms; this second assay was used to define the optimum conditions for adherence. Maximum adherence was seen within 15 min. Adherence was temperature dependent, with adherence after 1 min at 37°C being fourfold greater than that at 4°C. The pH optimum for adherence was between 6.5 and 7.0, and adherence was abolished below pH 5.0. With the first, more sensitive assay, the effect of electrolytes and a number of hexoses and hexosamines on adherence was analyzed. RDEC-1 adherence was inhibited at high ionic strengths; however, adherence was not influenced at moderately high concentrations (20 mg/ml) by either d-mannose or l-fucose, in contrast to the case for other reported enteric pathogens. These two quantitative in vitro assays for adherence produce consistent results and have been used to partially characterize the adherence of RDEC-1 to rabbit brush borders. Images PMID:44705

  9. Meteors Without Borders: a global campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heenatigala, T.

    2012-01-01

    "Meteors Without Borders" is a global project, organized by Astronomers Without Borders and launched during the Global Astronomy Month in 2010 for the Lyrid meteor shower. The project focused on encouraging amateur astronomy groups to hold public outreach events for major meteor showers, conduct meteor-related classroom activities, photography, poetry and art work. It also uses social-media platforms to connect groups around the world to share their observations and photography, live during the events. At the International Meteor Conference 2011, the progress of the project was presented along with an extended invitation for collaborations for further improvements of the project.

  10. Plateau borders of smectic liquid crystalline films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trittel, Torsten; Aldred, Ruth; Stannarius, Ralf

    2011-06-01

    We investigate the geometrical properties of Plateau borders in an arrangement of connected smectic A free standing films. The geometry is chosen such that a circular Plateau border surrounds a planar smectic film and connects it with two smectic catenoids. It is demonstrated that, similar to soap films, the smectic film geometry can be described by a negative line tension of the circular contact region. Thus, the equilibrium angle between the films depends upon the liquid content in this region, and with increasing liquid content, deviations from Plateau's rule are observed. The experimental results are qualitatively comparable to soap films. A possible origin of slight quantitative differences is discussed.

  11. The California Border Health Collaborative: A Strategy for Leading the Border to Better Health

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Charles Edwards; Wooten, Wilma; Gomez, María Gudelia Rangel; Kozo, Justine; Fernandez, April; Ojeda, Victoria D.

    2015-01-01

    There are hundreds of people and organizations working on border health issues in the California–Baja California border region trying to protect and improve health. These efforts are being conducted without a collaborative structure that integrates jurisdictions and organizations. Thus, there is a need to coordinate these organizations to work together and benefit from their collective effort and each other’s best practices. The outcome of such an effort could effectively improve the health in the border region. The newly developed “California Border Health Collaborative” unites organizations and provides the leadership and collaborative culture to positively improve the health of the border region; it is referred to as the “Collaborative.” This article describes the developmental process of this Collaborative, including partner engagement, governance, strategic planning, key elements for success, the roles of multi-level jurisdictions, and policy implications. This paper focuses on describing the preparation and processes that created the U.S./California side of this binational collaborative effort and is a strong reflection of the theory of border collaboration as described by Denman and De Sonora (1) in “Working beyond Borders: A Handbook for Transborder Projects in Health.” PMID:26075195

  12. The California Border Health Collaborative: A Strategy for Leading the Border to Better Health.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Charles Edwards; Wooten, Wilma; Gomez, María Gudelia Rangel; Kozo, Justine; Fernandez, April; Ojeda, Victoria D

    2015-01-01

    There are hundreds of people and organizations working on border health issues in the California-Baja California border region trying to protect and improve health. These efforts are being conducted without a collaborative structure that integrates jurisdictions and organizations. Thus, there is a need to coordinate these organizations to work together and benefit from their collective effort and each other's best practices. The outcome of such an effort could effectively improve the health in the border region. The newly developed "California Border Health Collaborative" unites organizations and provides the leadership and collaborative culture to positively improve the health of the border region; it is referred to as the "Collaborative." This article describes the developmental process of this Collaborative, including partner engagement, governance, strategic planning, key elements for success, the roles of multi-level jurisdictions, and policy implications. This paper focuses on describing the preparation and processes that created the U.S./California side of this binational collaborative effort and is a strong reflection of the theory of border collaboration as described by Denman and De Sonora (1) in "Working beyond Borders: A Handbook for Transborder Projects in Health."

  13. Risk behaviours for HIV infection among travelling Mexican migrants: The Mexico-US border as a contextual risk factor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao; Martinez-Donate, Ana P; Simon, Norma-Jean E; Hovell, Melbourne F; Rangel, Maria Gudelia; Magis-Rodriguez, Carlos; Sipan, Carol L

    2017-01-01

    The Mexico-US border region is a transit point in the trajectory of Mexican migrants travelling to and from the USA and a final destination for domestic migrants from other regions in Mexico. This region also represents a high-risk environment that may increase risk for HIV among migrants and the communities they connect. We conducted a cross-sectional, population-based survey, in Tijuana, Mexico, and compared Mexican migrants with a recent stay on the Mexico-US border region (Border, n = 553) with migrants arriving at the border from Mexican sending communities (Northbound, n = 1077). After controlling for demographics and migration history, border migrants were more likely to perceive their risk for HIV infection as high in this region and regard this area as a liberal place for sexual behaviours compared to Northbound migrants reporting on their perceptions of the sending communities (p < .05). Male border migrants were more likely to engage in sex, and have unprotected sex, with female sex workers during their recent stay on the border compared to other contexts (rate ratio = 3.0 and 6.6, respectively, p < .05). Binational and intensified interventions targeting Mexican migrants should be deployed in the Mexican border region to address migration related HIV transmission in Mexico and the USA.

  14. Alcohol-related social problems among Mexican Americans living in U.S.-Mexico border and non-border areas.

    PubMed

    Vaeth, Patrice A C; Caetano, Raul; Mills, Britain A; Rodriguez, Lori A

    2012-08-01

    This paper examines alcohol-related social problems among Mexican Americans living along the U.S.-Mexico border and in non-border areas. Interviews were conducted among Mexican Americans in the border regions of California, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas (N=1307). Non-border respondents were interviewed primarily in Houston and Los Angeles (N=1288) as part of the Hispanic Americans Baseline Alcohol Survey (HABLAS). Both the border and HABLAS surveys employed multistage cluster sample designs (response rates were 67% and 76%, respectively). In the bivariate analysis, there were no significant differences between border and non-border areas in the proportion of those with one or more social problem. In non-border areas, the prevalence of alcohol problems did not differ significantly by age. However, along the border the prevalence of alcohol problems was significantly different across age groups, with 18 to 29year old men and women having the highest prevalence. The final models showed no residence effect on problem likelihood. Drinking was strongly associated with problems. Although young border residents had higher problem prevalence rates than older residents, the logistic regression models showed no effect of border residence on the likelihood of problems, indicating that problems are due to alcohol consumption, not the border environment. The border, however, did appear to influence more drinking among young people. Regardless of residence, alcohol treatment and preventive interventions tailored to Mexican Americans are essential and special attention should be focused on younger individuals near the border.

  15. Comparative analysis of the retention of maxillary denture base with and without border molding using zinc oxide eugenol impression paste.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Simrat; Datta, Kusum; Gupta, S K; Suman, Neelam

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of border molding on the retention of the maxillary denture base. Two special trays, one with full extensions to the periphery and one 2 mm short from the borders were made on the cast obtained from the preliminary impression. Border molding was done on the tray which was short from borders. On both trays, the final impression was made with zinc oxide eugenol impression paste. Heat cure denture bases were fabricated on the prepared casts and retention was measured using specially designed instrument. Mean force with border molding (2765.0 g) was larger than mean force without border molding (1805.0 g) at P < 0.01 level. In terms of percentage, too, the mean improvement (59.4%) in force of dislodgement was statistically highly significant (i.e. P < 0.01). The results of the present study suggest that the dentures made with border molding will provide better retentive force than the dentures made without border molding.

  16. Comparative analysis of the retention of maxillary denture base with and without border molding using zinc oxide eugenol impression paste

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Simrat; Datta, Kusum; Gupta, S. K.; Suman, Neelam

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of border molding on the retention of the maxillary denture base. Materials and Methods: Two special trays, one with full extensions to the periphery and one 2 mm short from the borders were made on the cast obtained from the preliminary impression. Border molding was done on the tray which was short from borders. On both trays, the final impression was made with zinc oxide eugenol impression paste. Heat cure denture bases were fabricated on the prepared casts and retention was measured using specially designed instrument. Observations and Results: Mean force with border molding (2765.0 g) was larger than mean force without border molding (1805.0 g) at P < 0.01 level. In terms of percentage, too, the mean improvement (59.4%) in force of dislodgement was statistically highly significant (i.e. P < 0.01). Clinical Significance: The results of the present study suggest that the dentures made with border molding will provide better retentive force than the dentures made without border molding. PMID:27134447

  17. RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT OF PREVENTION AND CONTROL MEASURES FOR MOLD CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Air Pollution Prevention and Control Division, Indoor Environment Management Branch has, since 1995, conducted research into controlling biological contamination in the indoor environment. In this paper four areas of research are discusse...

  18. RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT OF PREVENTION AND CONTROL MEASURES FOR MOLD CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Air Pollution Prevention and Control Division, Indoor Environment Management Branch has, since 1995, conducted research into controlling biological contamination in the indoor environment. In this paper four areas of research are discusse...

  19. Smart border: ad-hoc wireless sensor networks for border surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jun; Fallahi, Mahmoud; Norwood, Robert A.; Peyghambarian, Nasser

    2011-06-01

    Wireless sensor networks have been proposed as promising candidates to provide automated monitoring, target tracking, and intrusion detection for border surveillance. In this paper, we demonstrate an ad-hoc wireless sensor network system for border surveillance. The network consists of heterogeneously autonomous sensor nodes that distributively cooperate with each other to enable a smart border in remote areas. This paper also presents energy-aware and sleeping algorithms designed to maximize the operating lifetime of the deployed sensor network. Lessons learned in building the network and important findings from field experiments are shared in the paper.

  20. Measurement and control of electron-phonon interactions in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remi, Sebastian

    Despite the weak interaction between electrons and atomic vibrations (phonons) in the one-atom thick crystal of carbon called graphene, the scattering of electrons off phonons limits coherent electron transport in pristine devices over mesoscopic length scales. The future of graphene as a replacement to silicon and other materials in advanced electronic devices will depend on the success of controlling and optimizing electronic transport. In this dissertation, we explore the electron-phonon interaction via Raman scattering, elucidating the effects of filling and emptying charge states on the phonons in both the metallic state and when levels are quantized by an applied perpendicular magnetic field. In zero magnetic field, the phonon energy shifts due to electronic screening by charge carriers. Previously, a logarithmic divergence of the phonon energy was predicted as a function of the charge carrier density. For the first time, we observe signatures of this logarithmic divergence at liquid He temperatures after vacuum annealing on single layers. We also measure the electron-phonon coupling strength, Fermi velocity, and broadening of electronic quantum levels from Raman scattering and correlate these parameters to electronic transport. In a strong perpendicular magnetic field, the energy bands split into discrete Landau levels. Here, we observe kinks and splitting of the optical phonon energy, even when the Landau level transitions are far from resonant with the phonons. We discover that the kinks are attributed to charge filling of Landau levels, as understood from a linearized model based on electron-phonon interactions. Moreover, we show that material parameters determined without magnetic fields also describe phonon behavior in high magnetic fields.

  1. 40 CFR 721.30 - EPA approval of alternative control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the substance. (3) The citation for the specific section in subpart E of this part which pertains to... release control measures. (6) An analysis justifying why such alternative control measures...

  2. Novel Cross-Border Approaches to Optimise Identification of Asymptomatic and Artemisinin-Resistant Plasmodium Infection in Mobile Populations Crossing Cambodian Borders

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Hannah M.; Canavati, Sara E.; Rang, Chandary; Ly, Po; Sovannaroth, Siv; Canier, Lydie; Khim, Nimol; Menard, Didier; Ashton, Ruth A.; Meek, Sylvia R.; Roca-Feltrer, Arantxa

    2015-01-01

    Background Human population movement across country borders presents a real challenge for malaria control and elimination efforts in Cambodia and its neighbouring countries. To quantify Plasmodium infection among the border-crossing population, including asymptomatic and artemisinin resistant (AR) parasites, three official border crossing points, one from each of Cambodia's borders with Thailand, Laos and Vietnam, were selected for sampling. Methods and Findings A total of 3206 participants (of 4110 approached) were recruited as they crossed the border, tested for malaria and interviewed. By real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), 5.4% of all screened individuals were found to harbour Plasmodium parasites. The proportion was highest at the Laos border (11.5%). Overall there were 97 P. vivax (55.7%), 55 P. falciparum (31.6%), two P. malariae (1.1%) and 20 mixed infections (11.5%). Of identified infections, only 20% were febrile at the time of screening. Of the 24 P. falciparum samples where a further PCR was possible to assess AR, 15 (62.5%) had mutations in the K13 propeller domain gene, all from participants at the Laos border point. Malaria rapid diagnostic test (RDT) pLDH/HRP-2 identified a positivity rate of 3.2% overall and sensitivity compared to RT-PCR was very low (43.1%). Main individual risk factors for infection included sex, fever, being a forest-goer, poor knowledge of malaria prevention methods and previous malaria infection. Occupation, day of the week and time of crossing (morning vs. afternoon) also appeared to play an important role in predicting positive cases. Conclusions This study offers a novel approach to identify asymptomatic infections and monitor AR parasite flow among mobile and migrant populations crossing the borders. Similar screening activities are recommended to identify other hot borders and characterise potential hot spots of AR. Targeted “customised” interventions and surveillance activities should be implemented in

  3. Migration in action: profiling border cells.

    PubMed

    Jasper, Heinrich

    2006-04-01

    Acquiring the ability to migrate is essential for cells taking part in many developmental and disease processes. Two studies in this issue of Developmental Cell use gene expression profiling of purified border cells from the Drosophila ovary to characterize the molecular changes required in cells to initiate migration in vivo. Their results offer interesting new insights into a moving cell's physiology.

  4. Acculturation Tendencies in a Border Latino Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guinn, Robert; Vincent, Vern; Wang, Lin; Villas, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify variables distinguishing more acculturated versus less acculturated Latinos residing near the United States-Mexico border. The study sample consisted of 438 participants ranging in age from 20 to 68 years. Data were gathered through a self-report survey instrument composed of items assessing acculturation,…

  5. 50 CFR 14.16 - Border ports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Border ports. 14.16 Section 14.16 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TAKING, POSSESSION, TRANSPORTATION, SALE, PURCHASE, BARTER, EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS...

  6. 50 CFR 14.16 - Border ports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Border ports. 14.16 Section 14.16 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TAKING, POSSESSION, TRANSPORTATION, SALE, PURCHASE, BARTER, EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS...

  7. 50 CFR 14.16 - Border ports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Border ports. 14.16 Section 14.16 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TAKING, POSSESSION, TRANSPORTATION, SALE, PURCHASE, BARTER, EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS...

  8. 50 CFR 14.16 - Border ports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Border ports. 14.16 Section 14.16 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TAKING, POSSESSION, TRANSPORTATION, SALE, PURCHASE, BARTER, EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS...

  9. 50 CFR 14.16 - Border ports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Border ports. 14.16 Section 14.16 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TAKING, POSSESSION, TRANSPORTATION, SALE, PURCHASE, BARTER, EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS...

  10. Comparative U.S.-Mexico Border Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoddard, Ellwyn R., Ed.

    Four United States universities, one from each American state having a common boundary with Mexico, organized the Border-State University Consortium for Latin America. The organization emerged as an attempt to focus collectively on problems and situations immediately accessible for study in a series of publications entitled "Occasional…

  11. Beyond Borders: Profiles in International Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Joseph S., Jr.; Edelstein, Richard J.

    This publication profiles 15 college and university interdisciplinary collaboration programs for international education. Chapter 1, "Beyond Borders" by Joseph S. Johnston, Jr., outlines the importance of such programs and of international education in particular. It also addresses rationales for internationalization, challenges to its…

  12. Anti-Border Corruption Act of 2010

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Shuler, Heath [D-NC-11

    2010-12-01

    House - 12/02/2010 Referred to the Subcommittee on Border, Maritime, and Global Counterterrorism. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see S.3243, which became Public Law 111-376 on 1/4/2011. Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  13. Anti-Border Corruption Act of 2010

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Shuler, Heath [D-NC-11

    2010-12-01

    12/02/2010 Referred to the Subcommittee on Border, Maritime, and Global Counterterrorism. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see S.3243, which became Public Law 111-376 on 1/4/2011. Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  14. Comparative U.S.-Mexico Border Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoddard, Ellwyn R., Ed.

    Four United States universities, one from each American state having a common boundary with Mexico, organized the Border-State University Consortium for Latin America. The organization emerged as an attempt to focus collectively on problems and situations immediately accessible for study in a series of publications entitled "Occasional…

  15. Anti-Border Corruption Act of 2010

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Shuler, Heath [D-NC-11

    2010-12-01

    12/02/2010 Referred to the Subcommittee on Border, Maritime, and Global Counterterrorism. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see S.3243, which became Public Law 111-376 on 1/4/2011. Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  16. Stress Resilience among Border Mexican American Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guinn, Bobby; Vincent, Vern; Dugas, Donna

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors distinguishing Mexican American women living near the U.S.-Mexican border who are resilient to the experience of stress from those who are not. The study sample consisted of 418 participants ranging in age from 20 to 61 years. Data were gathered through a self-report survey instrument composed of…

  17. Stress Resilience among Border Mexican American Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guinn, Bobby; Vincent, Vern; Dugas, Donna

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors distinguishing Mexican American women living near the U.S.-Mexican border who are resilient to the experience of stress from those who are not. The study sample consisted of 418 participants ranging in age from 20 to 61 years. Data were gathered through a self-report survey instrument composed of…

  18. Crossing Pedagogical Borders in the Yucatan Peninsula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willhauck, Susan

    2009-01-01

    A challenging intercultural teaching experience provided an opportunity for engaging embodied pedagogies that facilitated border crossings of language, age, gender, and experience. Influenced by the work of Augusto Boal, the author describes how improvisation, role-play, music, and drawing led seminary students in Mexico into sacred time and space…

  19. Border Lakes land-cover classification

    Treesearch

    Marvin Bauer; Brian Loeffelholz; Doug. Shinneman

    2009-01-01

    This document contains metadata and description of land-cover classification of approximately 5.1 million acres of land bordering Minnesota, U.S.A. and Ontario, Canada. The classification focused on the separation and identification of specific forest-cover types. Some separation of the nonforest classes also was performed. The classification was derived from multi-...

  20. Radiation Detection at Borders for Homeland Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouzes, Richard

    2004-05-01

    Countries around the world are deploying radiation detection instrumentation to interdict the illegal shipment of radioactive material crossing international borders at land, rail, air, and sea ports of entry. These efforts include deployments in the US and a number of European and Asian countries by governments and international agencies. Items of concern include radiation dispersal devices (RDD), nuclear warheads, and special nuclear material (SNM). Radiation portal monitors (RPMs) are used as the main screening tool for vehicles and cargo at borders, supplemented by handheld detectors, personal radiation detectors, and x-ray imaging systems. Some cargo contains naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) that triggers "nuisance" alarms in RPMs at these border crossings. Individuals treated with medical radiopharmaceuticals also produce nuisance alarms and can produce cross-talk between adjacent lanes of a multi-lane deployment. The operational impact of nuisance alarms can be significant at border crossings. Methods have been developed for reducing this impact without negatively affecting the requirements for interdiction of radioactive materials of interest. Plastic scintillator material is commonly used in RPMs for the detection of gamma rays from radioactive material, primarily due to the efficiency per unit cost compared to other detection materials. The resolution and lack of full-energy peaks in the plastic scintillator material prohibits detailed spectroscopy. However, the limited spectroscopic information from plastic scintillator can be exploited to provide some discrimination. Energy-based algorithms used in RPMs can effectively exploit the crude energy information available from a plastic scintillator to distinguish some NORM. Whenever NORM cargo limits the level of the alarm threshold, energy-based algorithms produce significantly better detection probabilities for small SNM sources than gross-count algorithms. This presentation discusses

  1. Measurement of performance using acceleration control and pulse control in simulated spacecraft docking operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brody, Adam R.; Ellis, Stephen R.

    1992-01-01

    Nine commercial airline pilots served as test subjects in a study to compare acceleration control with pulse control in simulated spacecraft maneuvers. Simulated remote dockings of an orbital maneuvering vehicle (OMV) to a space station were initiated from 50, 100, and 150 meters along the station's -V-bar (minus velocity vector). All unsuccessful missions were reflown. Five way mixed analysis of variance (ANOVA) with one between factor, first mode, and four within factors (mode, bloch, range, and trial) were performed on the data. Recorded performance measures included mission duration and fuel consumption along each of the three coordinate axes. Mission duration was lower with pulse mode, while delta V (fuel consumption) was lower with acceleration mode. Subjects used more fuel to travel faster with pulse mode than with acceleration mode. Mission duration, delta V, X delta V, Y delta V., and Z delta V all increased with range. Subjects commanded the OMV to 'fly' at faster rates from further distances. These higher average velocities were paid for with increased fuel consumption. Asymmetrical transfer was found in that the mode transitions could not be predicted solely from the mission duration main effect. More testing is advised to understand the manual control aspects of spaceflight maneuvers better.

  2. Analysis of mechanical-hydraulic bedload deposition control measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwindt, S.; Franca, M. J.; De Cesare, G.; Schleiss, A. J.

    2017-10-01

    During floods, the bedload transport of steep headwaters can exceed the hydraulic transport capacity of milder downstream reaches where settlements are often situated. Therefore, sediment retention barriers are typically installed upstream of such sensible areas. These barriers trigger bedload trapping via two control mechanisms, either hydraulic or mechanical. Both deposition controls, pertaining to instream sediment trapping structures, are analyzed experimentally in this study. Bedload trapping by hydraulically controlled barriers is prone to sediment flushing, i.e., the remobilization of formerly deposited sediment, in particular when the barrier is simultaneously under- and overflown. In this case, the remobilization rate is close to the bedload transport capacity of the nonconstricted channel. Mechanical deposition control by screens is in turn sensible to the grain size. Thus, both deposition control concepts may fail, and bedload may be transported downstream at a rate corresponding to the transport capacity of headwaters, thereby endangering urban areas. This study shows that the combination of both deposition control concepts is suitable for improving the control of bedload retention. With this combination, undesired sediment flushing of upstream deposits in the channel caused by insufficient hydraulic control is prevented. Furthermore, the uncertainty related to the estimation of the representative grain size in the design of mechanical control barriers is reduced.

  3. Interpretation of the source-specific substantive control measures of the Minamata Convention on Mercury.

    PubMed

    You, Mingqing

    2015-02-01

    Being persistent, toxic, and bio-accumulative, Mercury (Hg) seriously affects the environment and human health. Due to Hg's attribute of long-range environmental transport across national borders, especially through atmospheric transport, no country can fully protect its environment and human health with its own efforts, without global cooperation. The Minamata Convention on Mercury, which was formally adopted and opened for signature in October 2013, is the only global environmental regime on the control of Hg pollution. Its main substantive control measures are source-specific: its phasing-out, phasing-down, and other main substantive requirements all direct to specific categories of pollution sources through the regulation of specific sectors of the economy and social life. This Convention does not take a national quota approach to quantify the Parties' nationwide total allowable consumption or discharge of Hg or Hg compounds, nor does it quantify their nationwide total reduction requirements. This paper attempts to find the underlying reasons for this source-specific approach and offers two interpretations. One possible interpretation is that Hg might be a non-threshold pollutant, i.e., a pollutant without a risk-free value of concentration. The existence of a reference dose (RfD), reference concentration (RfC), provisional tolerable weekly intake (PTWI), minimal risk level (MRL) or other similar reference values of Hg does not necessarily mean that Hg cannot be regarded as non-threshold because such reference values have scientific uncertainties and may also involve policy considerations. Another interpretation is that Hg lacks a feasibly determinable total allowable quantity. There is evidence that negotiators might have treated Hg as non-threshold, or at least accepted that Hg lacks a feasibly determinable total allowable quantity: (1) The negotiators were informed about the serious situations of the current emissions, releases, and legacy deposition; (2

  4. Quality control measurements for digital x-ray detectors.

    PubMed

    Marshall, N W; Mackenzie, A; Honey, I D

    2011-02-21

    This paper describes a digital radiography (DR) quality control protocol for DR detectors from the forthcoming report from the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM). The protocol was applied to a group of six identical caesium iodide (CsI) digital x-ray detectors to assess reproducibility of methods, while four further detectors were assessed to examine the wider applicability. Twelve images with minimal spatial frequency processing are required, from which the detector response, lag, modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS) and threshold contrast-detail (c-d) detectability are calculated. The x-ray spectrum used was 70 kV and 1 mm added copper filtration, with a target detector air kerma of 2.5 µGy for the NNPS and c-d results. In order to compare detector performance with previous imaging technology, c-d data from four screen/film systems were also acquired, at a target optical density of 1.5 and an average detector air kerma of 2.56 µGy. The DR detector images were typically acquired in 20 min, with a further 45 min required for image transfer and analysis. The average spatial frequency for the 50% point of the MTF for six identical detectors was 1.29 mm(-1) ± 0.05 (3.9% coefficient of variation (cov)). The air kerma set for the six systems was 2.57 µGy ± 0.13 (5.0% cov) and the NNPS at this air kerma was 1.42 × 10(-5) mm(2) (6.5% cov). The detective quantum efficiency (DQE) measured for the six identical detectors was 0.60 at 0.5 mm(-1), with a maximum cov of 10% at 2.9 mm(-1), while the average DQE was 0.56 at 0.5 mm(-1) for three CsI detectors from three different manufacturers. Comparable c-d performance was found for these detectors (5.9% cov) with an average threshold contrast of 0.46% for 11 mm circular discs. The average threshold contrast for the S/F systems was 0.70% at 11 mm, indicating superior imaging performance for the digital systems. The protocol was found to be quick, reproducible and

  5. Quality control measurements for digital x-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, N. W.; Mackenzie, A.; Honey, I. D.

    2011-02-01

    This paper describes a digital radiography (DR) quality control protocol for DR detectors from the forthcoming report from the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM). The protocol was applied to a group of six identical caesium iodide (CsI) digital x-ray detectors to assess reproducibility of methods, while four further detectors were assessed to examine the wider applicability. Twelve images with minimal spatial frequency processing are required, from which the detector response, lag, modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS) and threshold contrast-detail (c-d) detectability are calculated. The x-ray spectrum used was 70 kV and 1 mm added copper filtration, with a target detector air kerma of 2.5 µGy for the NNPS and c-d results. In order to compare detector performance with previous imaging technology, c-d data from four screen/film systems were also acquired, at a target optical density of 1.5 and an average detector air kerma of 2.56 µGy. The DR detector images were typically acquired in 20 min, with a further 45 min required for image transfer and analysis. The average spatial frequency for the 50% point of the MTF for six identical detectors was 1.29 mm-1 ± 0.05 (3.9% coefficient of variation (cov)). The air kerma set for the six systems was 2.57 µGy ± 0.13 (5.0% cov) and the NNPS at this air kerma was 1.42 × 10-5 mm2 (6.5% cov). The detective quantum efficiency (DQE) measured for the six identical detectors was 0.60 at 0.5 mm-1, with a maximum cov of 10% at 2.9 mm-1, while the average DQE was 0.56 at 0.5 mm-1 for three CsI detectors from three different manufacturers. Comparable c-d performance was found for these detectors (5.9% cov) with an average threshold contrast of 0.46% for 11 mm circular discs. The average threshold contrast for the S/F systems was 0.70% at 11 mm, indicating superior imaging performance for the digital systems. The protocol was found to be quick, reproducible and gave an in

  6. Quality of Work Life and Organizational Climate of Schools Located along the Thai-Cambodian Borders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitratporn, Poonsook; Puncreobutr, Vichian

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to measure the Quality of Work Life and Organizational Climate of Schools located along the Thai-Cambodian borders. The study intended to measure the relationship between the two underlying variables quality of work life and organizational climate. Simple random sample of 384 respondents were administrators and teachers…

  7. Border extrapolation using fractal attributes in remote sensing images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipolletti, M. P.; Delrieux, C. A.; Perillo, G. M. E.; Piccolo, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    In management, monitoring and rational use of natural resources the knowledge of precise and updated information is essential. Satellite images have become an attractive option for quantitative data extraction and morphologic studies, assuring a wide coverage without exerting negative environmental influence over the study area. However, the precision of such practice is limited by the spatial resolution of the sensors and the additional processing algorithms. The use of high resolution imagery (i.e., Ikonos) is very expensive for studies involving large geographic areas or requiring long term monitoring, while the use of less expensive or freely available imagery poses a limit in the geographic accuracy and physical precision that may be obtained. We developed a methodology for accurate border estimation that can be used for establishing high quality measurements with low resolution imagery. The method is based on the original theory by Richardson, taking advantage of the fractal nature of geographic features. The area of interest is downsampled at different scales and, at each scale, the border is segmented and measured. Finally, a regression of the dependence of the measured length with respect to scale is computed, which then allows for a precise extrapolation of the expected length at scales much finer than the originally available. The method is tested with both synthetic and satellite imagery, producing accurate results in both cases.

  8. Active Flow Control Strategies Using Surface Pressure Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Vikas; Alvi, Farrukh S.

    2010-01-01

    Evaluate the efficacy of Microjets Can we eliminate/minimize flow separation? Is the flow unsteadiness reduced? Guidelines for an active control Search for an appropriate sensor. Examine for means to develop a flow model for identifying the state of flow over the surface Guidelines toward future development of a Simple and Robust control methodology

  9. Measuring Joint Stimulus Control by Complex Graph/Description Correspondences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Lanny; Spear, Jack

    2012-01-01

    Joint stimulus control occurs when responding is determined by the correspondence of elements of a complex sample and a complex comparison stimulus. In academic settings, joint stimulus control of behavior would be evidenced by the selection of an accurate description of a complex graph in which each element of a graph corresponded to particular…

  10. Measuring Joint Stimulus Control by Complex Graph/Description Correspondences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Lanny; Spear, Jack

    2012-01-01

    Joint stimulus control occurs when responding is determined by the correspondence of elements of a complex sample and a complex comparison stimulus. In academic settings, joint stimulus control of behavior would be evidenced by the selection of an accurate description of a complex graph in which each element of a graph corresponded to particular…

  11. A Comparison of Four Measures of Self-Control Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mezo, Peter G.; Heiby, Elaine M.

    2004-01-01

    This study compares the psychometric characteristics of four questionnaires designed to assess self-control skills: the Self-Control Questionnaire, the Frequency of Self-Reinforcement Questionnaire, the Cognitive Self-Management Test, and the Lifestyle Approaches Inventory. Content validity was judged to be fairly comparable by three raters in…

  12. 33 CFR 105.255 - Security measures for access control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... each MARSEC Level, including those points where TWIC access control provisions will be applied. Each... escorting them; (4) Procedures for identifying authorized and unauthorized persons at any MARSEC level; and... access controls, particularly if they are to be applied on a random or occasional basis. (f) MARSEC...

  13. International Border Management Systems (IBMS) Program : visions and strategies.

    SciTech Connect

    McDaniel, Michael; Mohagheghi, Amir Hossein

    2011-02-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), International Border Management Systems (IBMS) Program is working to establish a long-term border security strategy with United States Central Command (CENTCOM). Efforts are being made to synthesize border security capabilities and technologies maintained at the Laboratories, and coordinate with subject matter expertise from both the New Mexico and California offices. The vision for SNL is to provide science and technology support for international projects and engagements on border security.

  14. Process control measurements in the SRP fuel separations plants

    SciTech Connect

    McKibben, J.M.; Pickett, C.E.; Dickert, H.D.

    1982-02-01

    Programs were started to develop new in-line and at-line analytical techniques. Among the more promising techniques being investigated are: (1) an in-line instrument to analyze for percent tributyl phosphate in process solvent, (2) remote laser optrode techniques (using lazer light transmitted to and from the sample cell via light pipes) for a variety of possible analyses, and (3) sonic techniques for concentration analyses in two component systems. A subcommittee was also formed to investigate state-of-the-technology for process control. The final recommendation was to use a distributed control approach to upgrade the process control sytem. The system selected should be modular, easy to expand, and simple to change control strategies. A distributed system using microprocessorbased controllers would allow installation of the control intelligence near the process, thereby simplifying field wiring. Process information collected and stored in the controllers will be transmitted to operating consoles, via a data highway, for process management and display. The overall program has a number of distinct benefits. There are a number of cost savings that will be realized. Excellent annual return on investment - up to 110% - has been predicted for several of the projects in this program that are already funded. In addition, many of the instrument modifications will improve safety performance and production throughput in the specific ways shown.

  15. 77 FR 1497 - U.S. Customs and Border Protection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-10

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Application for Withdrawal of Bonded Stores for Fishing Vessels and Certificate of Use AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border... comments to U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Attn: Tracey Denning, Regulations and Rulings, Office...

  16. 78 FR 35044 - U.S. Customs and Border Protection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-11

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Visa Waiver Program Carrier Agreement (CBP Form I-775) AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland...: 1651-0110. SUMMARY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) of the Department of Homeland...

  17. Imagining and Imaging Borders: Understanding Borderlands for Global Sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad, V.

    2013-11-01

    Borders are increasingly complex human responses and social constructions in a world where globalizing forces confront basic human concerns for security and certainty. In an effort to provide a background to assess research directions for imaging borders, this paper explores what we know about borders, and what we do not know well about borders. Borders in globalization are the meeting points of globalizing forces of security, trade and migration flows with emerging technologies, self determination and regionalization around the world. We need to know more about how: self determination fuels secessions and new borders; borders result from complex rather than simple policy and governance issues; borders depend on the political clout of borderland communities; market and migration flows impact borders; and borders are always in motion. The paper shows how these organizing principles underlie the basic themes of border governance, flows, culture, history, security and sustainability. Finally, the paper offers two brief illustrations of border imaging to link this presentation to the following discussion of the workshop.

  18. DEMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS OF THE NHEXAS-ARIZONA BORDER STUDY POPULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The NHEXAS-Arizona Border Study employed a population based probability design to recruit a representative cohort residing within 40 Km of the US-Mexico Border in Arizona. As an extension of the NHEXAS Arizona statewide survey, the border study was designed to determine the dis...

  19. DEMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS OF THE NHEXAS-ARIZONA BORDER STUDY POPULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The NHEXAS-Arizona Border Study employed a population based probability design to recruit a representative cohort residing within 40 Km of the US-Mexico Border in Arizona. As an extension of the NHEXAS Arizona statewide survey, the border study was designed to determine the dis...

  20. A Snapshot of Children on the California Border

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children Now, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This snapshot of children on the California border examines the well-being of children along the U.S.-Mexico border, comparing California, Texas, New Mexico and Arizona. It indicates more than one-quarter of all California residents are foreign born (26%), compared to 8% of residents in non-border states. In Texas, the percentage of the population…