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Sample records for botulinum c2 toxin

  1. BOTULINUM TOXIN

    PubMed Central

    Nigam, P K; Nigam, Anjana

    2010-01-01

    Botulinum toxin, one of the most poisonous biological substances known, is a neurotoxin produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. C. botulinum elaborates eight antigenically distinguishable exotoxins (A, B, C1, C2, D, E, F and G). All serotypes interfere with neural transmission by blocking the release of acetylcholine, the principal neurotransmitter at the neuromuscular junction, causing muscle paralysis. The weakness induced by injection with botulinum toxin A usually lasts about three months. Botulinum toxins now play a very significant role in the management of a wide variety of medical conditions, especially strabismus and focal dystonias, hemifacial spasm, and various spastic movement disorders, headaches, hypersalivation, hyperhidrosis, and some chronic conditions that respond only partially to medical treatment. The list of possible new indications is rapidly expanding. The cosmetological applications include correction of lines, creases and wrinkling all over the face, chin, neck, and chest to dermatological applications such as hyperhidrosis. Injections with botulinum toxin are generally well tolerated and side effects are few. A precise knowledge and understanding of the functional anatomy of the mimetic muscles is absolutely necessary to correctly use botulinum toxins in clinical practice. PMID:20418969

  2. Retargeting the Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin to the neuronal cytosol

    PubMed Central

    Pavlik, Benjamin J.; Hruska, Elizabeth J.; Van Cott, Kevin E.; Blum, Paul H.

    2016-01-01

    Many biological toxins are known to attack specific cell types, delivering their enzymatic payloads to the cytosol. This process can be manipulated by molecular engineering of chimeric toxins. Using toxins with naturally unlinked components as a starting point is advantageous because it allows for the development of payloads separately from the binding/translocation components. Here the Clostridium botulinum C2 binding/translocation domain was retargeted to neural cell populations by deleting its non-specific binding domain and replacing it with a C. botulinum neurotoxin binding domain. This fusion protein was used to deliver fluorescently labeled payloads to Neuro-2a cells. Intracellular delivery was quantified by flow cytometry and found to be dependent on artificial enrichment of cells with the polysialoganglioside receptor GT1b. Visualization by confocal microscopy showed a dissociation of payloads from the early endosome indicating translocation of the chimeric toxin. The natural Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin was then delivered to human glioblastoma A172 and synchronized HeLa cells. In the presence of the fusion protein, native cytosolic enzymatic activity of the enzyme was observed and found to be GT1b-dependent. This retargeted toxin may enable delivery of therapeutics to peripheral neurons and be of use in addressing experimental questions about neural physiology. PMID:27025362

  3. EGA Protects Mammalian Cells from Clostridium difficile CDT, Clostridium perfringens Iota Toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 Toxin.

    PubMed

    Schnell, Leonie; Mittler, Ann-Katrin; Sadi, Mirko; Popoff, Michel R; Schwan, Carsten; Aktories, Klaus; Mattarei, Andrea; Tehran, Domenico Azarnia; Montecucco, Cesare; Barth, Holger

    2016-04-01

    The pathogenic bacteria Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum produce the binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins CDT, iota and C2, respectively. These toxins are composed of a transport component (B) and a separate enzyme component (A). When both components assemble on the surface of mammalian target cells, the B components mediate the entry of the A components via endosomes into the cytosol. Here, the A components ADP-ribosylate G-actin, resulting in depolymerization of F-actin, cell-rounding and eventually death. In the present study, we demonstrate that 4-bromobenzaldehyde N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)semicarbazone (EGA), a compound that protects cells from multiple toxins and viruses, also protects different mammalian epithelial cells from all three binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. In contrast, EGA did not inhibit the intoxication of cells with Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, indicating a possible different entry route for this toxin. EGA does not affect either the binding of the C2 toxin to the cells surface or the enzyme activity of the A components of CDT, iota and C2, suggesting that this compound interferes with cellular uptake of the toxins. Moreover, for C2 toxin, we demonstrated that EGA inhibits the pH-dependent transport of the A component across cell membranes. EGA is not cytotoxic, and therefore, we propose it as a lead compound for the development of novel pharmacological inhibitors against clostridial binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins.

  4. EGA Protects Mammalian Cells from Clostridium difficile CDT, Clostridium perfringens Iota Toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Leonie; Mittler, Ann-Katrin; Sadi, Mirko; Popoff, Michel R.; Schwan, Carsten; Aktories, Klaus; Mattarei, Andrea; Tehran, Domenico Azarnia; Montecucco, Cesare; Barth, Holger

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic bacteria Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum produce the binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins CDT, iota and C2, respectively. These toxins are composed of a transport component (B) and a separate enzyme component (A). When both components assemble on the surface of mammalian target cells, the B components mediate the entry of the A components via endosomes into the cytosol. Here, the A components ADP-ribosylate G-actin, resulting in depolymerization of F-actin, cell-rounding and eventually death. In the present study, we demonstrate that 4-bromobenzaldehyde N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)semicarbazone (EGA), a compound that protects cells from multiple toxins and viruses, also protects different mammalian epithelial cells from all three binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. In contrast, EGA did not inhibit the intoxication of cells with Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, indicating a possible different entry route for this toxin. EGA does not affect either the binding of the C2 toxin to the cells surface or the enzyme activity of the A components of CDT, iota and C2, suggesting that this compound interferes with cellular uptake of the toxins. Moreover, for C2 toxin, we demonstrated that EGA inhibits the pH-dependent transport of the A component across cell membranes. EGA is not cytotoxic, and therefore, we propose it as a lead compound for the development of novel pharmacological inhibitors against clostridial binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. PMID:27043629

  5. EGA Protects Mammalian Cells from Clostridium difficile CDT, Clostridium perfringens Iota Toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 Toxin.

    PubMed

    Schnell, Leonie; Mittler, Ann-Katrin; Sadi, Mirko; Popoff, Michel R; Schwan, Carsten; Aktories, Klaus; Mattarei, Andrea; Tehran, Domenico Azarnia; Montecucco, Cesare; Barth, Holger

    2016-04-01

    The pathogenic bacteria Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum produce the binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins CDT, iota and C2, respectively. These toxins are composed of a transport component (B) and a separate enzyme component (A). When both components assemble on the surface of mammalian target cells, the B components mediate the entry of the A components via endosomes into the cytosol. Here, the A components ADP-ribosylate G-actin, resulting in depolymerization of F-actin, cell-rounding and eventually death. In the present study, we demonstrate that 4-bromobenzaldehyde N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)semicarbazone (EGA), a compound that protects cells from multiple toxins and viruses, also protects different mammalian epithelial cells from all three binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. In contrast, EGA did not inhibit the intoxication of cells with Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, indicating a possible different entry route for this toxin. EGA does not affect either the binding of the C2 toxin to the cells surface or the enzyme activity of the A components of CDT, iota and C2, suggesting that this compound interferes with cellular uptake of the toxins. Moreover, for C2 toxin, we demonstrated that EGA inhibits the pH-dependent transport of the A component across cell membranes. EGA is not cytotoxic, and therefore, we propose it as a lead compound for the development of novel pharmacological inhibitors against clostridial binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. PMID:27043629

  6. The susceptibility of the mallard duck (Anas platyrhynchos) to Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jensen, W.I.; Duncan, R.M.

    1980-01-01

    Most strains of Clostridium botulinum type C, after having lost their capacity to produce their dominant toxin (C1) as a result of being "cured" of their prophages, continue to produce C2, a trypsin-activable toxin reported by other investigators. While of relatively low toxicity when administered perorally to the adult mallard duck (Anas platyrhynchos), it was highly toxic when given parenterally. By the intravenous route, for example, it was more than 1,000 times as toxic as C1 toxin by the same route, when compared on the basis of mouse intraperitoneal toxicity. The cause of death in every instance was massive pulmonary edema and hemorrhage rather than the respiratory paralysis that occurs in C1 intoxication.

  7. Botox (Botulinum Toxin)

    MedlinePlus

    ... people when there are many effective and safe cosmetic procedures that can temporarily reduce a very prominent ... form of botulinum toxin is Type A (Botox® Cosmetic, Allergan, Inc). Botulinum toxin, what we will now ...

  8. Structural constraints-based evaluation of immunogenic avirulent toxins from Clostridium botulinum C2 and C3 toxins as subunit vaccines.

    PubMed

    Prisilla, A; Prathiviraj, R; Sasikala, R; Chellapandi, P

    2016-10-01

    Clostridium botulinum (group-III) is an anaerobic bacterium producing C2 and C3 toxins in addition to botulinum neurotoxins in avian and mammalian cells. C2 and C3 toxins are members of bacterial ADP-ribosyltransferase superfamily, which modify the eukaryotic cell surface proteins by ADP-ribosylation reaction. Herein, the mutant proteins with lack of catalytic and pore forming function derived from C2 (C2I and C2II) and C3 toxins were computationally evaluated to understand their structure-function integrity. We have chosen many structural constraints including local structural environment, folding process, backbone conformation, conformational dynamic sub-space, NAD-binding specificity and antigenic determinants for screening of suitable avirulent toxins. A total of 20 avirulent mutants were identified out of 23 mutants, which were experimentally produced by site-directed mutagenesis. No changes in secondary structural elements in particular to α-helices and β-sheets and also in fold rate of all-β classes. Structural stability was maintained by reordered hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding patterns. Molecular dynamic studies suggested that coupled mutations may restrain the binding affinity to NAD(+) or protein substrate upon structural destabilization. Avirulent toxins of this study have stable energetic backbone conformation with a common blue print of folding process. Molecular docking studies revealed that avirulent mutants formed more favorable hydrogen bonding with the side-chain of amino acids near to conserved NAD-binding core, despite of restraining NAD-binding specificity. Thus, structural constraints in the avirulent toxins would determine their immunogenic nature for the prioritization of protein-based subunit vaccine/immunogens to avian and veterinary animals infected with C. botulinum.

  9. [Intoxication of botulinum toxin].

    PubMed

    Chudzicka, Aleksandra

    2015-09-01

    Botulinum toxin is an egzotoxin produced by Gram positive bacteria Clostridium botulinum. It is among the most potent toxins known. The 3 main clinical presentations of botulism are as follows: foodborne botulism, infant botulism and wound botulism. The main symptom of intoxication is flat muscles paralysis. The treatment is supportive care and administration of antitoxin. In prevention the correct preparing of canned food is most important. Botulinum toxin is accepted as a biological weapon.

  10. [Intoxication of botulinum toxin].

    PubMed

    Chudzicka, Aleksandra

    2015-09-01

    Botulinum toxin is an egzotoxin produced by Gram positive bacteria Clostridium botulinum. It is among the most potent toxins known. The 3 main clinical presentations of botulism are as follows: foodborne botulism, infant botulism and wound botulism. The main symptom of intoxication is flat muscles paralysis. The treatment is supportive care and administration of antitoxin. In prevention the correct preparing of canned food is most important. Botulinum toxin is accepted as a biological weapon. PMID:26449577

  11. Botulinum toxin injection - larynx

    MedlinePlus

    Injection laryngoplasty; Botox-larynx: spasmodic dysphonia-BTX; Essential voice tremor (EVT)-btx; Glottic insufficiency; Percutaneous electromyography-guided botulinum toxin treatment; Percutaneous indirect laryngoscopy- ...

  12. Functional Characterization of an Extended Binding Component of the Actin-ADP-Ribosylating C2 Toxin Detected in Clostridium botulinum Strain (C) 2300 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Sterthoff, Charlott; Lang, Alexander E.; Schwan, Carsten; Tauch, Andreas; Aktories, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin consists of the binding component C2II and the enzyme component C2I, which ADP-ribosylates G-actin of eukaryotic cells. Trypsin-activated C2II (C2IIa) forms heptamers that mediate cell binding and translocation of C2I from acidic endosomes into the cytosol of target cells. By genome sequencing of C. botulinum strain (C) 2300, we found that C2II from this strain carries a C-terminal extension of 129 amino acids, unlike its homologous counterparts from strains (C) 203U28, (C) 468, and (D) 1873. This extension shows a high similarity to the C-terminal receptor-binding domain of C2II and is presumably the result of a duplication of this domain. The C2II extension facilitates the binding to cell surface receptors, which leads to an increased intoxication efficiency compared to that of C2II proteins from other C. botulinum strains. PMID:20145093

  13. Effect of disruption of actin filaments by Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin on insulin secretion in HIT-T15 cells and pancreatic islets.

    PubMed Central

    Li, G; Rungger-Brändle, E; Just, I; Jonas, J C; Aktories, K; Wollheim, C B

    1994-01-01

    To examine their role in insulin secretion, actin filaments (AFs) were disrupted by Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin that ADP-ribosylates G-actin. Ribosylation also prevents polymerization of G-actin to F-actin and inhibits AF assembly by capping the fast-growing end of F-actin. Pretreatment of HIT-T15 cells with the toxin inhibited stimulated insulin secretion in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The toxin did not affect cellular insulin content or nonstimulated secretion. In static incubation, toxin treatment caused 45-50% inhibition of secretion induced by nutrients alone (10 mM glucose + 5 mM glutamine + 5 mM leucine) or combined with bombesin (phospholipase C-activator) and 20% reduction of that potentiated by forskolin (stimulator of adenylyl cyclase). In perifusion, the stimulated secretion during the first phase was marginally diminished, whereas the second phase was inhibited by approximately 80%. Pretreatment of HIT cells with wartmannin, a myosin light chain kinase inhibitor, caused a similar pattern of inhibition of the biphasic insulin release as C2 toxin. Nutrient metabolism and bombesin-evoked rise in cytosolic free Ca2+ were not affected by C2 toxin, indicating that nutrient recognition and the coupling between receptor activation and second messenger generation was not changed. In the toxin-treated cells, the AF web beneath the plasma membrane and the diffuse cytoplasmic F-actin fibers disappeared, as shown both by staining with an antibody against G- and F-actin and by staining F-actin with fluorescent phallacidin. C2 toxin dose-dependently reduced cellular F-actin content. Stimulation of insulin secretion was not associated with changes in F-actin content and organization. Treatment of cells with cytochalasin E and B, which shorten AFs, inhibited the stimulated insulin release by 30-50% although differing in their effects on F-actin content. In contrast to HIT-T15 cells, insulin secretion was potentiated in isolated rat islets after disruption of

  14. Botulinum toxin in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Jankovic, J

    2004-01-01

    Botulinum toxin, the most potent biological toxin, has become a powerful therapeutic tool for a growing number of clinical applications. This review draws attention to new findings about the mechanism of action of botulinum toxin and briefly reviews some of its most frequent uses, focusing on evidence based data. Double blind, placebo controlled studies, as well as open label clinical trials, provide evidence that, when appropriate targets and doses are selected, botulinum toxin temporarily ameliorates disorders associated with excessive muscle contraction or autonomic dysfunction. When injected not more often than every three months, the risk of blocking antibodies is slight. Long term experience with this agent suggests that it is an effective and safe treatment not only for approved indications but also for an increasing number of off-label indications. PMID:15201348

  15. Botulinum toxin for pain.

    PubMed

    Casale, Roberto; Tugnoli, Valeria

    2008-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (BTX) injection is being increasingly used 'off label' in the management of chronic pain. Data support the hypothesis of a direct analgesic effect of BTX, different to that exerted on muscle. Although the pain-reducing effect of BTX is mainly due to its ability to block acetylcholine release at the synapse, other effects on the nervous system are also thought to be involved. BTX affects cholinergic transmission in both the somatic and the autonomic nervous systems. Proposed mechanisms of action of BTX for pain relief of trigger points, muscular spasms, fibromyalgia and myofascial pain include direct action on muscle and indirect effects via action at the neuromuscular junction. Invitro and invivo data have shown that BTX has specific antinociceptive activity relating to its effects on inflammation, axonal transport, ganglion inhibition, and spinal and suprasegmental level inhibition. Our review of the mechanisms of action, efficacy, administration techniques and therapeutic dosage of BTX for the management of chronic pain in a variety of conditions shows that although muscular tone and movement disorders remain the most important therapeutic applications for BTX, research suggests that BTX can also provide benefits related to effects on cholinergic control of the vascular system, autonomic function, and cholinergic control of nociceptive and antinociceptive systems. Furthermore, it appears that BTX may influence the peripheral and central nervous systems. The therapeutic potential of BTX depends mainly on the ability to deliver the toxin to the target structures, cholinergic or otherwise. Evidence suggests that BTX can be administered at standard dosages in pain disorders, where the objective is alteration of muscle tone. For conditions requiring an analgesic effect, the optimal therapeutic dosage of BTX remains to be defined. PMID:18095750

  16. Botulinum Toxin in Pediatric Neurology

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Enas Abdallah Ali

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins are natural molecules produced by anaerobic spore-forming bacteria called Clostradium boltulinum. The toxin has a peculiar mechanism of action by preventing the release of acetylcholine from the presynaptic membrane. Consequently, it has been used in the treatment of various neurological conditions related to muscle hyperactivity and/or spasticity. Also, it has an impact on the autonomic nervous system by acting on smooth muscle, leading to its use in the management of pain syndromes. The use of botulinum toxin in children separate from adults has received very little attention in the literature. This review presents the current data on the use of botulinum neurotoxin to treat various neurological disorders in children. PMID:27335961

  17. Application of botulinum toxin in pain management.

    PubMed

    Sim, Woo Seog

    2011-03-01

    Botulinum toxin has been used for the treatment of many clinical disorders by producing temporary skeletal muscle relaxation. In pain management, botulinum toxin has demonstrated an analgesic effect by reducing muscular hyperactivity, but recent studies suggest this neurotoxin could have direct analgesic mechanisms different from its neuromuscular actions. At the moment, botulinum toxin is widely investigated and used in many painful diseases such as myofascial syndrome, headaches, arthritis, and neuropathic pain. Further studies are needed to understand the exact analgesic mechanisms, efficacy and complications of botulinum toxin in chronic pain disorders.

  18. Botulinum Toxin and Gastrointestinal Tract Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Weiser, Kirsten; Kennedy, Abigail

    2008-01-01

    The history of botulinum toxin is fascinating. First recognized as the cause of botulism nearly 200 years ago, it was originally feared as a deadly poison. Over the last 30 years, however, botulinum toxin has been transformed into a readily available medication used to treat a variety of medical disorders. Interest in the use of botulinum toxin has been particularly strong for patients with spastic smooth muscle disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. Patients with achalasia, diffuse esophageal spasm, gastroparesis, sphincter of Oddi dysfunction, and anal fissures have all been treated with botulinum toxin injections, often with impressive results. However, not all patients respond to botulinum toxin therapy, and large randomized controlled trials are lacking for many conditions commonly treated with botulinum toxin. This paper reviews the history, microbiology, and pharmacology of botulinum toxin, discusses its mechanism of action, and then presents recent evidence from the literature regarding the use of botulinum toxin for the treatment of a variety of gastrointestinal tract disorders. PMID:21960915

  19. [Treatment of wrinkles with botulinum toxin].

    PubMed

    Lanzl, I; Merté, R-L

    2007-09-01

    The use of botulinum toxin A for the treatment of wrinkles is increasing. Botulinum toxin A inhibits exocytosis of acetylcholine from 3 to 12 months, depending on the target tissue. Low-dose botulinum toxin A is used to smooth hyperkinetic facial lines. This is especially successful in the upper facial parts, since the target muscles (procerus, corrugator supracilii, frontalis, orbicularis oculi) all directly overlie the osseous structures of the face. This is not the case for the lower facial parts, and more side effects are encountered when treating, for example, wrinkles around the mouth. Contraindications to the use of botulinum toxin A are diseases affecting neuromuscular signal transduction, allergic reactions to components of the solution, therapy with aminoglycosides or acetylsalicylic acid prior to treatment, infections in the planned treatment area, and pregnancy and lactation. Alternative and complementary treatments include erbium-YAG or CO2 laser, as well as augmentation and surgical plastic procedures. PMID:17823803

  20. [Botulinum toxin in disabling dermatological diseases].

    PubMed

    Messikh, R; Atallah, L; Aubin, F; Humbert, P

    2009-05-01

    Botulinum toxin could represent nowadays a new treatment modality especially for cutaneous conditions in course of which conventional treatments remain unsuccessful. Besides palmar and plantar hyperhidrosis, botulinum toxin has demonstrated efficacy in different conditions associated with hyperhidrosis, such as dyshidrosis, multiple eccrine hidrocystomas, hidradenitis suppurativa, Frey syndrome, but also in different conditions worsened by hyperhidrosis such as Hailey-Hailey disease, Darier disease, inversed psoriasis, aquagenic palmoplantar keratoderma, pachyonychia congenital. Moreover, different cutaneous conditions associated with sensitive disorders and/or neurological involvements could benefit from botulinum toxin, for example anal fissures, leg ulcers, lichen simplex, notalgia paresthetica, vestibulitis. Endly, a case of cutis laxa was described where the patient was improved by cutaneous injections of botulinum toxin. PMID:19576479

  1. Botulinum toxin in poststroke spasticity.

    PubMed

    Ozcakir, Suheda; Sivrioglu, Koncuy

    2007-06-01

    Poststroke hemiparesis, together with abnormal muscle tone, is a major cause of morbidity and disability. Although most hemiparetic patients are able to reach different ambulatory levels with rehabilitation efforts, upper and lower limb spasticity can impede activities of daily living, personal hygiene, ambulation and, in some cases, functional improvement. The goals of spasticity management include increasing mobility and range of motion, attaining better hygiene, improving splint wear and other functional activities. Conservative measures, such as positioning, stretching and exercise are essential in spasticity management, but alone often are inadequate to effectively control it. Oral antispastic medications often provide limited effects with short duration and frequent unwanted systemic side effects, such as weakness, sedation and dry mouth. Therefore, neuromuscular blockade by local injections have become the first choice for the treatment of focal spasticity, particularly in stroke patients. Botulinum toxin (BTX), being one of the most potent biological toxins, acts by blocking neuromuscular transmission via inhibiting acetylcholine release. Currently, focal spasticity is being treated successfully with BTX via injecting in the spastic muscles. Two antigenically distinct serotypes of BTX are available on the market as type A and B. Clinical studies of BTX used for spastic hemiplegic patients are reviewed in this article in two major categories, upper and lower limb applications. This review addresses efficacy in terms of outcome measures, such as muscle tone reduction and functional outcome, as well as safety issues. Application modifications of dose, dilutions, site of injections and combination therapies with BTX injections are also discussed. PMID:17607049

  2. Botulinum Toxin in Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Rúiter Silva; Rassi, Mauricio Carneiro

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effects of botulinum toxin on urodynamic parameters and quality of life in patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity. Methods Thirty four adult patients with spinal cord injury and detrusor overactivity were selected. The patients received 300 units of botulinum toxin type A. The endpoints evaluated with the episodes of urinary incontinence and measured the maximum cystometric capacity, maximum amplitude of detrusor pressure and bladder compliance at the beginning and end of the study (24 weeks) and evaluated the quality of life by applying the Qualiveen questionnaire. Results A significant decrease in the episodes of urinary incontinence was observed. All urodynamic parameters presented a significant improvement. The same was observed in the quality of life index and the specific impact of urinary problems scores from the Qualiveen questionnaire. Six patients did not complete the study, two due to incomplete follow-up, and four violated protocol and were excluded from the analyses. No systemic adverse events of botulinum toxin type A were reported. Conclusions A botulinum toxin type A showed a significantly improved response in urodynamics parameters and specific and general quality of life. PMID:23094220

  3. Botulinum toxin (botox) chemodenervation for facial rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Carruthers, J; Carruthers, A

    2001-05-01

    A positive attitude toward life at any age is now seen to be consistent with inclusion in all societal activities. A mere increase in years is no longer enough reason for "ageism." Botulinum Toxin (Botox) aesthetic treatments, because of their outstanding effectiveness and safety, can continue to play a positive role in the rebuttal of "ageism." PMID:11457686

  4. Treatment of hyperhidrosis with botulinum toxin.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Joel L; Solish, Nowell

    2003-11-01

    Focal hyperhidrosis is a common problem that affects up to 2.8% of the population with significant psychosocial implications. Traditional therapies have not proven effective for most of these patients, which further adds to patient anxiety. Botulinum toxin is emerging as a novel treatment for focal hyperhidrosis and is proving to be safe and effective. A therapeutic protocol for focal hyperhidrosis includes an individualized treatment plan for each site of involvement. For those who are affected in the palms and soles, the most common treatments include topical treatment with aluminum chloride, iontophoresis, botulinum toxin,systemic medications, and sympathectomy. For those who have axillary focal hyperhidrosis, iontophoresis is often difficult and botulinum toxin becomes the second line therapy. As of June 2003, BTX A has been approved for the treatment of hyperhidrosis in 13 countries: England, Canada, New Zealand, Australia, Taiwan, Netherlands, Switzerland, Brazil, Argentina, Columbia, El Salvador, Guatemala, and Mexico. With the currently available literature and ongoing studies, it should only be a short time before the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approves botulinum toxin therapy for focal hyperhidrosis in the United States.

  5. Botulinum toxin for treatment of Harlequin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Manhães, Roberta K J V; Spitz, Mariana; Vasconcellos, Luiz Felipe

    2016-02-01

    We described a patient with Harlequin syndrome, a rare neurological condition, characterized by unilateral facial sweating and flushing, who had a good response to botulinum toxin application. She had been submitted to sympathectomy a few years, however she still complained of excessive sweating in the regions mentioned and intense flushing. PMID:26750113

  6. Detection of antibodies against botulinum toxins.

    PubMed

    Sesardic, Dorothea; Jones, Russell G A; Leung, Tong; Alsop, Toni; Tierney, Robert

    2004-03-01

    After immunisation with botulinum vaccine, antibodies to multiple epitopes are produced. Only some of these will have the capacity to neutralise the toxin activity. In fact, the ability of toxoid vaccine to induce toxin neutralising antibodies has provided the basis for the use of therapeutic antitoxins and immunoglobulins for the prophylaxis and treatment of diseases caused by bacterial toxins. Increasing indications for the chronic use of botulinum toxin for therapy have inevitably resulted in concern for patients becoming unresponsive because of the presence of circulating toxin-specific antibodies. Highly sensitive and relevant assays to detect only clinically relevant toxin neutralising antibodies are essential. Although immunoassays often provide the sensitivity, their relevance and specificity is often questioned. The mouse protection LD(50) bioassay is considered most relevant but can often only detect 10 mIU/ml of antitoxin. This sensitivity, although sufficient for confirming protective immunity, is inadequate for patients undergoing toxin therapy. An intramuscular paralysis assay improves the sensitivity to ca. 1 mIU/ml, and a mouse ex vivo diaphragm assay, with sensitivity of < 0.5 mIU/ml, is the most sensitive functional assay to date for this purpose. Alternative approaches for the detection of antibodies to botulinum toxin have included in vitro endopeptidase activity neutralisation. Unlike any other functional assay, this approach is not reliant on serotype-specific antibodies for specificity. Most recent promising developments are focused on cellular assays utilising primary rat embryonic cord cells or more conveniently in vitro differentiated established cell lines such as human neuroblastoma cells.

  7. Autopsy findings in botulinum toxin poisoning.

    PubMed

    Devers, Kelly G; Nine, Jeffrey S

    2010-11-01

    In the United States, foodborne botulism is most commonly associated with home-canned food products. Between 1950 and 2005, 405 separate outbreaks of botulism were reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Approximately 8% of these outbreaks were attributed to commercially produced canned food products. Overall, 5-10% of persons ingesting botulinum toxin die. Few reports exist pertaining to autopsy findings in cases of foodborne botulism. Here, we report the autopsy findings of a man who died after a prolonged illness caused by botulinum toxin exposure likely attributable to a commercially prepared food source. Despite extensive testing, our histopathologic findings were nonspecific. We therefore conclude that the forensic pathologist must become familiar with the neurotoxicity syndrome associated with this illness. Maintaining vigilance for botulism by carefully reviewing the decedent's clinical history will aid in the early identification and control of outbreaks, either foodborne or terrorism-related.

  8. Use of botulinum toxin in musculoskeletal pain.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jasvinder A

    2013-01-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain is a common cause of chronic pain, which is associated with a total cost of $635 billion per year in the U.S. Emerging evidence suggests an anti-nociceptive action of botulinum toxin, independent of its muscle paralyzing action. This review provides a summary of data from both non-randomized and randomized clinical studies of botulinum toxin in back pain and various osteoarticular conditions, including osteoarthritis, tennis elbow, low back pain and hand pain. Three randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of small sizes provide evidence of short-term efficacy of a single intra-articular injection of 100 units of botulinum toxin A (BoNT/A) for the relief of pain and the improvement of both function and quality of life in patients with chronic joint pain due to arthritis. Three RCTs studied intramuscular BoNT/A for tennis elbow with one showing a significant improvement in pain relief compared with placebo, another one showing no difference from placebo, and the third finding that pain and function improvement with BoNT/A injection were similar to those obtained with surgical release. One RCT of intramuscular BoNT/A for low back pain found improvement in pain and function compared to placebo. Single RCTs using local injections of BoNT in patients with either temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain or plantar fasciitis found superior efficacy compared to placebo. One RCT of intramuscular BoNT/B in patients with hand pain and carpal tunnel syndrome found improvement in pain in both BoNT/B and placebo groups, but no significant difference between groups. Most evidence is based on small studies, but the use of BoNT is supported by a single, and sometimes up to three, RCTs for several chronic musculoskeletal pain conditions. This indicates that botulinum toxin may be a promising potential new treatment for chronic refractory musculoskeletal pain. Well-designed large clinical trials are needed. PMID:24715952

  9. Use of botulinum toxin in musculoskeletal pain

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jasvinder A

    2013-01-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain is a common cause of chronic pain, which is associated with a total cost of $635 billion per year in the U.S. Emerging evidence suggests an anti-nociceptive action of botulinum toxin, independent of its muscle paralyzing action. This review provides a summary of data from both non-randomized and randomized clinical studies of botulinum toxin in back pain and various osteoarticular conditions, including osteoarthritis, tennis elbow, low back pain and hand pain. Three randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of small sizes provide evidence of short-term efficacy of a single intra-articular injection of 100 units of botulinum toxin A (BoNT/A) for the relief of pain and the improvement of both function and quality of life in patients with chronic joint pain due to arthritis. Three RCTs studied intramuscular BoNT/A for tennis elbow with one showing a significant improvement in pain relief compared with placebo, another one showing no difference from placebo, and the third finding that pain and function improvement with BoNT/A injection were similar to those obtained with surgical release. One RCT of intramuscular BoNT/A for low back pain found improvement in pain and function compared to placebo. Single RCTs using local injections of BoNT in patients with either temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain or plantar fasciitis found superior efficacy compared to placebo. One RCT of intramuscular BoNT/B in patients with hand pain and carpal tunnel syndrome found improvement in pain in both BoNT/B and placebo groups, but no significant difference between groups. Most evidence is based on small studies, but the use of BoNT is supported by a single, and sometimes up to three, RCTs for several chronic musculoskeletal pain conditions. This indicates that botulinum toxin may be a promising potential new treatment for chronic refractory musculoskeletal pain. Well-designed large clinical trials are needed. PMID:24715952

  10. [Botulinum toxin in the treatment of focal dystonias: own experience with botulinum toxin].

    PubMed

    Stefanoff, P; Kiliszek, M; Friedman, A

    2000-01-01

    During the last 5 years, 75 patients with focal dystonias were longitudinally treated with injections of botulinum toxin A. Each patient received 2-6 injections. The improvement was assessed after each injection and estimated as significant after 68.47% of injections, as mediocre after 23.42% of injections and none after 8.11% of the injections. The most significant improvement was obtained in patients with blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm, the worst effect was obtained in spasmodic torticollis. Varying responses were observed following repeated injections of botulinum toxin, the clinically assessed improvement did not decrease after successively applied doses. Side-effects occurred after 18% of the injections and were mostly mild and disappeared after short time. This study confirms the usefulness of botulinum toxin, which is an effective and safe treatment of focal dystonias. PMID:10849905

  11. Botulinum Toxin in the Treatment of Facial Paralysis.

    PubMed

    Mehdizadeh, Omid B; Diels, Jacqueline; White, William Matthew

    2016-02-01

    This article reviews the current literature supporting the use of botulinum toxin in producing symmetric facial features and reducing unwanted, involuntary movements. Methods, protocols, and adverse events are discussed. Additionally, the authors suggest that using botulinum toxin A therapy in postparalytic facial synkinesis can provide long-term results when used in conjunction with other treatment modalities.

  12. Clostridial Binary Toxins: Iota and C2 Family Portraits

    PubMed Central

    Stiles, Bradley G.; Wigelsworth, Darran J.; Popoff, Michel R.; Barth, Holger

    2011-01-01

    There are many pathogenic Clostridium species with diverse virulence factors that include protein toxins. Some of these bacteria, such as C. botulinum, C. difficile, C. perfringens, and C. spiroforme, cause enteric problems in animals as well as humans. These often fatal diseases can partly be attributed to binary protein toxins that follow a classic AB paradigm. Within a targeted cell, all clostridial binary toxins destroy filamentous actin via mono-ADP-ribosylation of globular actin by the A component. However, much less is known about B component binding to cell-surface receptors. These toxins share sequence homology amongst themselves and with those produced by another Gram-positive, spore-forming bacterium also commonly associated with soil and disease: Bacillus anthracis. This review focuses upon the iota and C2 families of clostridial binary toxins and includes: (1) basics of the bacterial source; (2) toxin biochemistry; (3) sophisticated cellular uptake machinery; and (4) host–cell responses following toxin-mediated disruption of the cytoskeleton. In summary, these protein toxins aid diverse enteric species within the genus Clostridium. PMID:22919577

  13. Botulinum toxin for the lower urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yao-Chi; Kuo, Hann-Chorng; Chancellor, Michael B

    2010-04-01

    Botulinum toxins (BoNTs) are known for their ability to potently and selectively modulate neurotransmission for successful long-term treatment of muscle hypercontractility. Recent studies suggest that BoNT has effects on modulation of sensory processing, inflammation and glandular function. Urologists and urogynaecologists have become interested in the potential application of BoNTs in patients with lower urinary tract symptoms, including detrusor and sphincter overactivity, bladder hypersensitivity, interstitial cystitis/painful bladder symptoms and benign prostatic hyperplasia. We review the biological action of BoNT in bladder and prostate, and present the techniques and results of the clinical studies with BoNT in the lower urinary tract.

  14. Acrylamide inhibits nerve sprouting induced by botulinum toxin type A

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hong; Xiang, Yi; Hu, Xingyue; Cai, Huaying

    2014-01-01

    Botulinum toxin type A is a potent muscle relaxant that blocks the transmission and release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction. Intramuscular injection of botulinum toxin type A has served as an effective and safe therapy for strabismus and focal dystonia. However, muscular weakness is temporary and after 3–4 months, muscle strength usually recovers because functional recovery is mediated by nerve sprouting and reconstruction of the neuromuscular junction. Acrylamide may produce neurotoxic substances that cause retrograde necrotizing neuropathy and inhibit nerve sprouting caused by botulinum toxin type A. This study investigated whether acrylamide inhibits nerve sprouting after intramuscular injection of botulinum toxin type A. A tibial nerve sprouting model was established through local injection of botulinum toxin type A into the right gastrocnemius muscle of Sprague-Dawley rats. Following intramuscular injection, rats were given intraperitoneal injection of 3% acrylamide every 3 days for 21 days. Nerve sprouting appeared 2 weeks after intramuscular injection of botulinum toxin type A and single-fiber electromyography revealed abnormal conduction at the neuromuscular junction 1 week after intramuscular injection of botulinum toxin type A. Following intraperitoneal injection of acrylamide, the peak muscle fiber density decreased. Electromyography jitter value were restored to normal levels 6 weeks after injection. This indicates that the maximal decrease in fiber density and the time at which functional conduction of neuromuscular junction was restored were delayed. Additionally, the increase in tibial nerve fibers was reduced. Acrylamide inhibits nerve sprouting caused by botulinum toxin type A and may be used to prolong the clinical dosage of botulinum toxin type A. PMID:25317170

  15. Treatment of Gastrointestinal Sphincters Spasms with Botulinum Toxin A

    PubMed Central

    Brisinda, Giuseppe; Sivestrini, Nicola; Bianco, Giuseppe; Maria, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum toxin A inhibits neuromuscular transmission. It has become a drug with many indications. The range of clinical applications has grown to encompass several neurological and non-neurological conditions. One of the most recent achievements in the field is the observation that botulinum toxin A provides benefit in diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. Although toxin blocks cholinergic nerve endings in the autonomic nervous system, it has also been shown that it does not block non-adrenergic non-cholinergic responses mediated by nitric oxide. This has promoted further interest in using botulinum toxin A as a treatment for overactive smooth muscles and sphincters. The introduction of this therapy has made the treatment of several clinical conditions easier, in the outpatient setting, at a lower cost and without permanent complications. This review presents current data on the use of botulinum toxin A in the treatment of pathological conditions of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:26035487

  16. Ten Mistakes To Avoid When Injecting Botulinum Toxin.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Rodriguez, R; Martin-Gorgojo, A

    2015-01-01

    Injection of botulinum toxin is currently the most common cosmetic procedure in the United States, and in recent years it has become-together with dermal fillers-the mainstay of therapy for the prevention and treatment of facial aging. However, in some cases the treatment may lead to a somewhat unnatural appearance, usually caused by loss of facial expression or other telltale signs. In the present article, we review the 10 mistakes that should be avoided when injecting botulinum toxin. We also reflect on how treatment with botulinum toxin influences us through our facial expressions, both in terms of how we feel and what others perceive. PMID:25956528

  17. Ten Mistakes To Avoid When Injecting Botulinum Toxin.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Rodriguez, R; Martin-Gorgojo, A

    2015-01-01

    Injection of botulinum toxin is currently the most common cosmetic procedure in the United States, and in recent years it has become-together with dermal fillers-the mainstay of therapy for the prevention and treatment of facial aging. However, in some cases the treatment may lead to a somewhat unnatural appearance, usually caused by loss of facial expression or other telltale signs. In the present article, we review the 10 mistakes that should be avoided when injecting botulinum toxin. We also reflect on how treatment with botulinum toxin influences us through our facial expressions, both in terms of how we feel and what others perceive.

  18. Botulinum toxin physiology in focal hand and cranial dystonia.

    PubMed

    Karp, Barbara Illowsky

    2012-11-20

    The safety and efficacy of botulinum toxin for the treatment of focal hand and cranial dystonias are well-established. Studies of these adult-onset focal dystonias reveal both shared features, such as the dystonic phenotype of muscle hyperactivity and overflow muscle contraction and divergent features, such as task specificity in focal hand dystonia which is not a common feature of cranial dystonia. The physiologic effects of botulinum toxin in these 2 disorders also show both similarities and differences. This paper compares and contrasts the physiology of focal hand and cranial dystonias and of botulinum toxin in the management of these disorders.

  19. Botulinum Toxin Injection for Spastic Scapular Dyskinesia After Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Saiyun; Ivanhoe, Cindy; Li, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Spastic scapular dyskinesia after stroke is rare, which causes impaired shoulder active range of motion (ROM). To date, there has been no report about botulinum toxin injection to spastic periscapular muscles. This study presents botulinum toxin A injection for management of spastic periscapular muscles after stroke in 2 cases. This is a retrospective study of 2 cases of spastic scapular dyskinesia after stroke. Spasticity of periscapular muscles including rhomboid and lower trapezius was diagnosed by physical examination and needle electromyographic study. Botulinum toxin was injected into the spastic periscapular muscles under ultrasound imaging guidance. During the 3-week follow-up visit after injection, both patients showed increased shoulder active ROM, without any sign of scapular destabilization. The results suggest that botulinum toxin injection to spastic periscapular muscles can increase shoulder active ROM without causing scapular destabilization in patients with poststroke spastic scapular dyskinesia. PMID:26266368

  20. Botulinum toxin drugs: brief history and outlook.

    PubMed

    Dressler, D

    2016-03-01

    The global botulinum toxin (BT) market is currently undergoing rapid changes: this may be the time to review the history and the future of BT drug development. Since the early 1990s Botox(®) and Dysport(®) dominated the international BT market. Later, Myobloc(®)/NeuroBloc(®), a liquid BT type B drug, came out, but failed. Xeomin(®) is the latest major BT drug. It features removal of complexing proteins and improved neurotoxin purity. Several new BT drugs are coming out of Korea, China and Russia. Scientific challenges for BT drug development include modification of BT's duration of action, its transdermal transport and the design of BT hybrid drugs for specific target tissues. The increased competition will change the global BT market fundamentally and a re-organisation according to large indication groups, such as therapeutic and cosmetic applications, might occur.

  1. Botulinum Toxin to Treat Neurogenic Bladder.

    PubMed

    Smith, Christopher P; Chancellor, Michael B

    2016-02-01

    Alteration in neural control from suprapontine areas to the nerves innervating the bladder can lead to bladder dysfunction and the development of a neurogenic bladder (NGB). Patients with NGB often suffer from urinary incontinence, which can lead to adverse events such as urinary tract infections and decubiti, in addition to creating a large care burden for family members or healthcare providers and significantly impairing patient quality of life. The common failure of anticholinergic medications has spurned the development of second-line treatments, including the use of botulinum toxin. OnabotulinumtoxinA (onaBoNT-A; BOTOX, Allergan, Inc.) was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2011 to treat neurogenic detrusor overactivity in patients with urinary incontinence resulting from a NGB. In this review the authors summarize pertinent results from key trials leading to FDA approval of onaBoNT-A as well as more recent long-term data.

  2. [Use of botulinum toxin for pain therapy].

    PubMed

    Nodera, Hiroyuki

    2008-05-01

    Preventive measures are necessary against contraction of botulism through food intake or due to other factors because the botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is one of the strongest toxins. Despite this, given its therapeutic utility in the controll of neuromuscular transmission, BoNT has been utilized to treat diseases related to muscular hyperactivity, such as dystonia and spasticity. Furthermore, it has been recognized that BoNT is also useful in controlling the neurotransmitter release of sensory and autonomic nerve terminals as well. This paper reviews the recent progress in the therapeutic use of BoNT in pain management, for example, in condition such as migraine, myofascial pain syndrome, pelvic pain, and interstitial cystitis. PMID:18516972

  3. Botulinum toxin A for the Treatment of Overactive Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Po-Fan; Chiu, Hung-Chieh; Chen, Kuan-Chieh; Chang, Chao-Hsiang; Chou, Eric Chieh-Lung

    2016-01-01

    The standard treatment for overactive bladder starts with patient education and behavior therapies, followed by antimuscarinic agents. For patients with urgency urinary incontinence refractory to antimuscarinic therapy, currently both American Urological Association (AUA) and European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines suggested that intravesical injection of botulinum toxin A should be offered. The mechanism of botulinum toxin A includes inhibition of vesicular release of neurotransmitters and the axonal expression of capsaicin and purinergic receptors in the suburothelium, as well as attenuation of central sensitization. Multiple randomized, placebo-controlled trials demonstrated that botulinum toxin A to be an effective treatment for patients with refractory idiopathic or neurogenic detrusor overactivity. The urinary incontinence episodes, maximum cystometric capacity, and maximum detrusor pressure were improved greater by botulinum toxin A compared to placebo. The adverse effects of botulinum toxin A, such as urinary retention and urinary tract infection, were primarily localized to the lower urinary tract. Therefore, botulinum toxin A offers an effective treatment option for patients with refractory overactive bladder. PMID:26938559

  4. Toxin yet not toxic: Botulinum toxin in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Archana, M S

    2016-04-01

    Paracelsus contrasted poisons from nonpoisons, stating that "All things are poisons, and there is nothing that is harmless; the dose alone decides that something is a poison". Living organisms, such as plants, animals, and microorganisms, constitute a huge source of pharmaceutically useful medicines and toxins. Depending on their source, toxins can be categorized as phytotoxins, mycotoxins, or zootoxins, which include venoms and bacterial toxins. Any toxin can be harmful or beneficial. Within the last 100 years, the perception of botulinum neurotoxin (BTX) has evolved from that of a poison to a versatile clinical agent with various uses. BTX plays a key role in the management of many orofacial and dental disorders. Its indications are rapidly expanding, with ongoing trials for further applications. However, despite its clinical use, what BTX specifically does in each condition is still not clear. The main aim of this review is to describe some of the unclear aspects of this potentially useful agent, with a focus on the current research in dentistry. PMID:27486290

  5. Botulinum Toxin A for Controlling Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Pero, Raffaela; Coretti, Lorena; Lembo, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Rapid growth of the overweight population and the number of obese individuals in recent decades suggests that current strategies based on diet, exercise, and pharmacological knowledge are not sufficient to address this epidemic. Obesity is the result of a high caloric intake and energy storage, not counterbalanced by an equally important energy expense. Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) use is rapidly expanding to include treatment of a variety of ophthalmological, gastrointestinal, urological, orthopedic, dermatological, secretory, painful, and cosmetic disorders. Many studies evaluating the effect of BoNT-A in gastric antrum e/o fundus for the treatment of obesity have been published. This treatment modality was based on the observation that gastric injection of BoNT-A in laparatomized rats induced a significant reduction of food intake and body weight. These studies have been published yielding debated results. Differences in the selection of patients, the doses of BoNT-A, the method of administration of the toxin, and the instruments of evaluation of some parameters among these studies may be the cause. In this review, it will study the state-of-the-art use of BoNT-A in obesity basic science models and review the clinical evidence on the therapeutic applications of BoNT-A for obesity. PMID:27681739

  6. An aptamer beacon responsive to botulinum toxins.

    PubMed

    Bruno, John G; Richarte, Alicia M; Carrillo, Maria P; Edge, Allison

    2012-01-15

    Sixty candidate DNA aptamers were developed against botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) type A light chain (LC) from ten rounds of selection, resulting in several identical sequences. Secondary structures of the identical aptamers were compared to structures of previously reported BoNT A DNA aptamers. A series of ten candidate loop structures were selected from this comparison as potential binding pockets and aptamer beacons. These candidate beacons were synthesized with 5'-TYE 665 and 3'-Iowa Black quencher labels for comparison of fluorescence levels as a function of BoNT A LC concentration. Only three of the ten candidates exhibited any fluorescence response to increasing levels of BoNT A LC. However, of the two most responsive candidates, one represented a subset loop of the larger more intensely fluorescent double-looped structure, designated Beacon 10. This beacon yielded a lower limit of detection of 1 ng/mL in buffer using a spectrofluorometer and a portable handheld fluorometer, but also responded substantially to BoNT A, B, E holotoxins and heavy or light chain components even in a dilute soil suspension, but not in 50% human serum. Beacon 10 did not respond strongly to a variety of other divergent peptides, suggesting that it is relatively specific to the level of botulinum toxins and is only useful for environmental testing. Beacon 10 also shared short sequence segments with other published BoNT aptamer DNA sequences, suggesting that these may be points of physical contact between the aptamers and BoNTs.

  7. FDA Approves First Botulism Antitoxin for Use in Neutralizing All Seven Known Botulinum Nerve Toxin Serotypes

    MedlinePlus

    ... approves first Botulism Antitoxin for use in neutralizing all seven known botulinum nerve toxin serotypes Product to ... contains a mixture of antibody fragments that neutralize all of the seven botulinum nerve toxin serotypes known ...

  8. Development of a quail embryo model for the detection of botulinum toxin type A activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium botulinum is a ubiquitous microorganism which under certain anaerobic conditions can produce botulinum toxins. Due to concerns in regards to both food-borne illness and the potential use of botulinum toxin as a biological weapon, the capability to assess the amount of toxin in a food or...

  9. Botulinum toxin for hyperhidrosis: a review.

    PubMed

    Grunfeld, Alexander; Murray, Christian A; Solish, Nowell

    2009-01-01

    Primary focal hyperhidrosis is a disorder of idiopathic excessive sweating that typically affects the axillae, palms, soles, and face. The disorder, which affects up to 2.8% of the US population, is associated with considerable physical, psychosocial, and occupational impairments. Current therapeutic strategies include topical aluminum salts, tap-water iontophoresis, oral anticholinergic agents, local surgical approaches, and sympathectomies. These treatments, however, have been limited by a relatively high incidence of adverse effects and complications. Non-surgical treatment complications are typically transient, whereas those of surgical therapies may be permanent and significant. Recently, considerable evidence suggests that botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) injections into hyperhidrotic areas can considerably reduce focal sweating in multiple areas without major adverse effects. BTX-A has therefore shown promise as a potential replacement for more invasive treatments after topical aluminum salts have failed. This article reviews the epidemiology, diagnosis, and management of primary focal hyperhidrosis, with an emphasis on recent research evidence supporting the use of BTX-A injections for this indication.

  10. Therapeutic Use of Botulinum Toxin in Neurorehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Intiso, Domenico

    2012-01-01

    The botulinum toxins (BTX), type A and type B by blocking vesicle acetylcholine release at neuro-muscular and neuro-secretory junctions can result efficacious therapeutic agents for the treatment of numerous disorders in patients requiring neuro-rehabilitative intervention. Its use for the reduction of focal spasticity following stroke, brain injury, and cerebral palsy is provided. Although the reduction of spasticity is widely demonstrated with BTX type A injection, its impact on the improvement of dexterity and functional outcome remains controversial. The use of BTX for the rehabilitation of children with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy and in treating sialorrhea which can complicate the course of some severe neurological diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson's disease is also addressed. Adverse events and neutralizing antibodies formation after repeated BTX injections can occur. Since impaired neurological persons can have complex disabling feature, BTX treatment should be viewed as adjunct measure to other rehabilitative strategies that are based on the individual's residual ability and competence and targeted to achieve the best functional recovery. BTX therapy has high cost and transient effect, but its benefits outweigh these disadvantages. Future studies must clarify if this agent alone or adjunctive to other rehabilitative procedures works best on functional outcome. PMID:21941544

  11. Botulinum toxin: application, safety, and limitations.

    PubMed

    Bigalke, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A), despite its high toxicity, is approved for therapy of many neurological (e.g., dystonia, spasticity) and non-neurological (e.g., achalasia, hyperhidrosis) disorders. Its mode of action is well understood. This has led to more and more indications (e.g., pain, gastrointestinal and urologic disorders), in which the toxin can reduce disturbing symptoms. In general the application is safe (pharmacological index 20-100, depending on indication). Few unwanted reactions may occur. In worst cases BoNT treated patients may develop neutralizing antibodies. These patients are excluded from further treatment. A more recently approved second serotype (BoNT/B) could be effective in those secondary non-responders, however, due to less potency in humans higher doses have to be applied leading to an only transient successful treatment. Other serotypes as BoNT/A and B, e.g., BoNT/C should be approved as medicines. PMID:23239359

  12. Synaptic transmission: inhibition of neurotransmitter release by botulinum toxins.

    PubMed

    Dolly, Oliver

    2003-01-01

    Botulinum toxin type A, a protein long used in the successful treatment of various dystonias, has a complex mechanism of action that results in muscle relaxation. At the neuromuscular junction, the presynaptic nerve ending is packed with synaptic vesicles filled with acetylcholine, and clustered at the tip of the folds of the postsynaptic muscle membrane are the acetylcholine receptors. Synaptic vesicles fuse with the membrane in response to an elevation of intraneuronal calcium concentration and undergo release of their transmitter by exocytosis. Intracellular proteins that contribute to the fusion of the vesicles with the plasma membrane during exocytosis include synaptosomal protein with a molecular weight of 25 kDa (SNAP-25); vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP), also known as synaptobrevin; and syntaxin. Through their proteolytic action on these proteins, botulinum toxins prevent exocytosis, thereby inhibiting the release of acetylcholine. There are 7 serotypes of this toxin-A, B, C1, D, E, F, and G-and each cleaves a different intracellular protein or the same target at distinct bonds. The separate cleavage sites in SNAP-25 for botulinum toxin types A and E contribute to their dissimilar durations of muscle relaxation. This report describes the molecular basis for the inhibition by botulinum toxins of neuroexocytosis and subsequent functional recovery at the neuromuscular junction.

  13. Botulinum toxin for the treatment of genital pain syndromes.

    PubMed

    Romito, Silvia; Bottanelli, Mara; Pellegrini, Maria; Vicentini, Silvana; Rizzuto, Niccolò; Bertolasi, Laura

    2004-01-01

    Our purpose was to test the effect of botulinum toxin injections on hypertonic pelvic floor muscles of patients suffering from genital pain syndromes. We report two cases of women complaining of a genital pain syndrome resistant to pharmacological therapies and rehabilitation exercises associated with a documented involuntary tonic contraction of the levator ani muscle as a defense reaction triggered by vulvar pain. We performed botulinum toxin injections into the levator ani with the intent to relieve pelvic muscular spasms. Within a few days after the injections both the patients reported a complete resolution of the painful symptomatology, lasting for several months. Our experience suggests that botulinum injections are indicated in patients with genital pain syndrome with documented pelvic muscle hyperactivity, whose symptoms arise not only from genital inflammation and lesions, but also, and sometimes chiefly, from levator ani myalgia.

  14. Updates on the antinociceptive mechanism hypothesis of botulinum toxin A.

    PubMed

    Aoki, K Roger; Francis, Joseph

    2011-11-01

    Botulinum toxin A has been traditionally viewed as a motor nerve specific treatment. However, clinical uses for botulinum toxin A have continued to expand, with increased use in conditions implicating sensory pain nerve dysfunction. Chronic pain is associated with excess pain fiber activity. When the site of this excess activity resides in the peripheral portion of the pain pathway, a condition of peripheral sensitization can establish. During this state, excess pain signaling reaches the central nervous system, which can then lead to a condition of central sensitization, manifesting as the symptoms associated with chronic pain (i.e. burning, electric pain, lowered pain threshold to normal stimuli, etc). Experimentally, botulinum toxin type A has been shown to reduce neuropeptides and neurotransmitter release from treated cells or nerve endings and to attenuate nociception in both neuropathic and non-neuropathic pain models. This review summarizes the literature to update the hypothesis for the mechanism by which botulinum toxin type A can modulate chronic pain. PMID:21999893

  15. Centrifugal microfluidic platform for ultrasensitive detection of Botulinum Toxin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botulinum neurotoxin – a global public health threat and category A bioterrorism agent - is the most toxic substance known and one of the most challenging toxins to detect due to its lethality at extremely low concentrations. Hence the live-mouse bioassay because of its superior sensitivity, remains...

  16. Longitudinal Phonatory Characteristics after Botulinum Toxin Type A Injection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Kimberly V.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A study investigated the long-term effects of a Botulinum Toxin Type A injection on the glottal competency of a man with adductor spasmodic dysphonia. Results suggest that change in degree of glottal adduction over time can be observed even when vocal instability is present within each recording session. (CR)

  17. Botulinum Toxin for the Treatment of Tremor and Tics.

    PubMed

    Lotia, Mitesh; Jankovic, Joseph

    2016-02-01

    The therapeutic applications of botulinum toxin (BoNT) have grown manifold since its initial approval in 1989 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of strabismus, blepharospasm, and other facial spasms. Although it is the most potent biologic toxin known to man, long-term studies have established its safety in the treatment of a variety of neurologic and nonneurologic disorders. Despite a paucity of randomized controlled trials, BoNT has been found to be beneficial in treating a variety of tremors and tics when used by clinicians skilled in the administration of the drug for these hyperkinetic movement disorders. Botulinum toxin injections can provide meaningful improvement in patients with localized tremors and tics; in some cases, they may be an alternative to other treatments with more undesirable adverse effects.

  18. Inactivation of botulinum and tetanus toxins by chelators.

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, S D; Sugiyama, H

    1989-01-01

    Purified type A botulinum toxin of about 10(6) mouse 50% lethal doses per ml was greater than 99.9% inactivated when incubated at pH 7.4 for 30 min at 37 degrees C in 20 mM 1,10-phenanthroline (PTL) or 2,2'-dipyridyl (DPD) and was 96% inactivated when incubated in 70 mM 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonic acid (HQL), but was not affected when incubated in 200 mM EDTA. When used as a representative of the chelating agents, PTL inactivated greater than or equal to 99.9% of toxicity in the culture filtrate of C. botulinum type A, B, and E strains. Highly purified tetanus toxin at 2.5 x 10(5) 50% lethal doses per ml lost all toxicity in 40 mM PTL or 150 mM DPD but was not detectably affected by 100 mM HQL (the highest concentration possible). Toxin inactivation by 20 mM PTL was completely blocked when the PTL was prereacted with an equimolar amount of Zn2+ and significantly reduced when it was preincubated with one-third its molar amount of Fe2+. DPD at 20 mM had little toxin-inactivating potency when preincubated with an equimolar amount of Zn2+ and only some of this potency when preincubated with an equimolar amount of Fe2+. Toxicity was not recovered by adding Zn2+ or Fe2+ to PTL-treated toxin. Neutron activation analysis of type A toxin showed that for each toxin molecule present, there was 1 atom of Fe, 0.4 atom of Zn, and 22 to 55 atoms each of Ca and Mg. The biological activity of botulinum toxin seems to depend on a metal component, which is likely to be Fe. PMID:2506129

  19. Inactivation of botulinum and tetanus toxins by chelators.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, S D; Sugiyama, H

    1989-10-01

    Purified type A botulinum toxin of about 10(6) mouse 50% lethal doses per ml was greater than 99.9% inactivated when incubated at pH 7.4 for 30 min at 37 degrees C in 20 mM 1,10-phenanthroline (PTL) or 2,2'-dipyridyl (DPD) and was 96% inactivated when incubated in 70 mM 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonic acid (HQL), but was not affected when incubated in 200 mM EDTA. When used as a representative of the chelating agents, PTL inactivated greater than or equal to 99.9% of toxicity in the culture filtrate of C. botulinum type A, B, and E strains. Highly purified tetanus toxin at 2.5 x 10(5) 50% lethal doses per ml lost all toxicity in 40 mM PTL or 150 mM DPD but was not detectably affected by 100 mM HQL (the highest concentration possible). Toxin inactivation by 20 mM PTL was completely blocked when the PTL was prereacted with an equimolar amount of Zn2+ and significantly reduced when it was preincubated with one-third its molar amount of Fe2+. DPD at 20 mM had little toxin-inactivating potency when preincubated with an equimolar amount of Zn2+ and only some of this potency when preincubated with an equimolar amount of Fe2+. Toxicity was not recovered by adding Zn2+ or Fe2+ to PTL-treated toxin. Neutron activation analysis of type A toxin showed that for each toxin molecule present, there was 1 atom of Fe, 0.4 atom of Zn, and 22 to 55 atoms each of Ca and Mg. The biological activity of botulinum toxin seems to depend on a metal component, which is likely to be Fe.

  20. Perioperative use of botulinum toxin for movement disorder-induced cervical spine disease.

    PubMed

    Adler, C H; Zimmerman, R S; Lyons, M K; Simeone, F; Brin, M F

    1996-01-01

    Patients with cervical dystonia or tics of the nuchal muscles can develop serious cervical spine disease. We report a series of four patients who received botulinum toxin injections to control their movement disorders prior to their required surgery. One patient with cervical tic-induced radiculomyelopathy required botulinum toxin injection postoperatively to facilitate stabilization of the cervical fusion. Two patients with torticollis-induced cervical radiculomyelopathy, and one patient with dystonia-induced C5 fracture, had botulinum toxin injected preoperatively to facilitate postoperative recovery. Botulinum toxin appears to be a useful adjunct in the treatment of cervical movement disorders prior to or following surgery for associated cervical spine disease.

  1. Brain Metabolic Changes of Cervical Dystonia with Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 1 after Botulinum Toxin Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Akio; Takeda, Atsushi; Sugeno, Naoto; Miura, Emiko; Kato, Kazuhiro; Hasegawa, Takafumi; Baba, Toru; Konno, Masatoshi; Oshima, Ryuji; Watanuki, Shoichi; Hiraoka, Kotaro; Tashiro, Manabu; Aoki, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    We occasionally observe long-term remission of cervical dystonia after several botulinum toxin treatments. However, botulinum toxin transiently acts on neuromuscular junctions. We herein report that a cervical dystonia patient with spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 could have long-term remission as a result of the depression of hypermetabolism in the bilateral putamen and primary sensorimotor cortex after botulinum toxin therapy. We suggest that botulinum toxin impacts the central nervous system, causing prolonged improvement through the normalization of basal ganglia circuits in addition to its effects at neuromuscular junctions. PMID:27432104

  2. Brain Metabolic Changes of Cervical Dystonia with Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 1 after Botulinum Toxin Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Akio; Takeda, Atsushi; Sugeno, Naoto; Miura, Emiko; Kato, Kazuhiro; Hasegawa, Takafumi; Baba, Toru; Konno, Masatoshi; Oshima, Ryuji; Watanuki, Shoichi; Hiraoka, Kotaro; Tashiro, Manabu; Aoki, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    We occasionally observe long-term remission of cervical dystonia after several botulinum toxin treatments. However, botulinum toxin transiently acts on neuromuscular junctions. We herein report that a cervical dystonia patient with spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 could have long-term remission as a result of the depression of hypermetabolism in the bilateral putamen and primary sensorimotor cortex after botulinum toxin therapy. We suggest that botulinum toxin impacts the central nervous system, causing prolonged improvement through the normalization of basal ganglia circuits in addition to its effects at neuromuscular junctions.

  3. Reduction of cat eye movements using retrobulbar botulinum toxin.

    PubMed

    Zimm, J; Yanik, G M; Evans, L; Marchese, A

    1991-01-01

    We studied the effects of a single retrobulbar injection of Botulinum toxin on the motility of cat eyes. Four cats were sedated and the opposite eye served as a control. Eye movements were plotted by reflecting a laser beam from a mirror fixed to the cornea. We found the mean degrees of deviation per eye per day and summarized these results as mean degrees of deviation per eye per week +/- standard deviation. Statistical analysis was accomplished using Student's t test for independent measures, since measurement of the treated eye pairs was done in a randomized manner on different test days. (table; see text) These results indicate that a single retrobulbar dose of Botulinum toxin can produce a paralysis of the ocular musculature lasting in excess of four weeks in a specific and reproducible manner. In addition, this methodology should prove useful in future experiments in which ocular motility might prove to be a technical concern. PMID:1919273

  4. Topical botulinum toxin to treat hyperhidrosis? No sweat!

    PubMed

    Lim, Erle C H; Seet, Raymond C S; Chow, Adeline; Oh, Vernon M S; Ong, Benjamin K C; Wilder-Smith, Einar P V

    2006-01-01

    Palmar, plantar and axillary hyperhidrosis, though benign, may be burdensome and occupationally restrictive, even hazardous. Treatment modalities range from topical antiperspirants, iontophoresis, systemic medications such as anticholinergics and benzodiazepines and injections of botulinum toxin, to thoracic sympathectomy. Intradermal injections of botulinum toxin (BTX), though effective, are painful especially when multiple injections are required. Iontophoretic administration of BTX has been described, the BTX entering the eccrine sweat glands via the sweat pores and through the sweat ducts. We postulate that BTX can be administered topically, either unassisted or assisted by application of an electrical gradient, low-frequency ultrasound or excipients such as dimethylsulfoxide. We examine the rationale and feasibility for such a treatment modality and route of administration.

  5. Botulinum toxin as a treatment for refractory overactive bladder.

    PubMed

    Harris, Shatril; Rizzolo, Denise

    2016-02-01

    Detrusor overactivity is the most common cause of overactive bladder (OAB) and refers to demonstrable involuntary detrusor contractions during urodynamic studies. The number of adults age 40 years or older suffering from idiopathic urge incontinence ranges from 13% in men to 30% in women. For patients whose symptoms are refractory to conventional therapy, intradetrusor botulinum toxin injection offers a safe and effective outpatient treatment with high rates of improvement of OAB symptoms.

  6. Botulinum toxin injections in the treatment of musician's dystonia.

    PubMed

    Schuele, Stephan; Jabusch, Hans-Christian; Lederman, Richard J; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2005-01-25

    The authors present the results of 84 musicians with focal task-specific dystonia treated with EMG-guided botulinum toxin injections. Treatment outcome was assessed by subjective estimation of playing before and after treatment and self-rating of treatment response. Fifty-eight (69%) of the musicians experienced improvement from the injections and 30 of 84 musicians (36%) reported long-term benefit in their performance ability.

  7. Temporomandibular Myofacial Pain Treated with Botulinum Toxin Injection

    PubMed Central

    Mor, Niv; Tang, Christropher; Blitzer, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the diagnoses and treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and outlines of the role of botulinum toxin (BoNT) in the treatment of myofacial TMD. This manuscript includes a brief history of the use of BoNT in the treatment of pain, the mechanism of action of BoNT, and the techniques for injections, adverse effects and contraindications when using BoNT to treat mayofacial pain caused by TMD. PMID:26213970

  8. A Beautician's Dystonia: Long-Lasting Effect of Botulinum Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Di Martino, Siria; Dalise, Stefania; Lamola, Giuseppe; Venturi, Martina; Rossi, Bruno; Chisari, Carmelo

    2014-01-01

    Treatment options for dystonia are not curative but symptomatic; the treatment of choice for focal dystonias is repeated botulinum toxin injections. Here, we present the case of a 46-year-old beautician with focal dystonia in her left hand that affected her ability to work. Pharmacological treatment with clonazepam and gabapentin failed to resolve her symptoms and was discontinued due to side effects (sleepiness, gastrointestinal disorders). Intramuscular injection of botulinum toxin (incobotulinumtoxinA, Xeomin) into the extensor digitorum communis (35 U), flexor carpi radialis (35 U), and flexor digitorum superficialis (30 U) muscles resulted in complete resolution of symptoms at clinical assessments at 1, 3, 6, and 10 months after the injections, confirmed by the results of surface electromyography 10 months after treatment. The patient was able to work again 1 month after treatment. No reinjection has been necessary at the last evaluation (12 months after treatment). In conclusion, botulinum toxin is an effective treatment for focal dystonia that can have long-lasting effects and can improve patients' ability to work and quality of life. PMID:25143844

  9. Centrifugal Microfluidic Platform for Ultrasensitive Detection of Botulinum Toxin

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present an innovative centrifugal microfluidic immunoassay platform (SpinDx) to address the urgent biodefense and public health need for ultrasensitive point-of-care/incident detection of botulinum toxin. The simple, sample-to-answer centrifugal microfluidic immunoassay approach is based on binding of toxins to antibody-laden capture particles followed by sedimentation of the particles through a density-media in a microfluidic disk and quantification by laser-induced fluorescence. A blind, head-to-head comparison study of SpinDx versus the gold-standard mouse bioassay demonstrates 100-fold improvement in sensitivity (limit of detection = 0.09 pg/mL), while achieving total sample-to-answer time of <30 min with 2-μL required volume of the unprocessed sample. We further demonstrate quantification of botulinum toxin in both exogeneous (human blood and serum spiked with toxins) and endogeneous (serum from mice intoxicated via oral, intranasal, and intravenous routes) samples. SpinDx can analyze, without any sample preparation, multiple sample types including whole blood, serum, and food. It is readily expandable to additional analytes as the assay reagents (i.e., the capture beads and detection antibodies) are disconnected from the disk architecture and the reader, facilitating rapid development of new assays. SpinDx can also serve as a general-purpose immunoassay platform applicable to diagnosis of other conditions and diseases. PMID:25521812

  10. Centrifugal microfluidic platform for ultrasensitive detection of botulinum toxin

    DOE PAGES

    Koh, Chung -Yan; Schaff, Ulrich Y.; Sandstone Diagnostics, Livermore, CA; Piccini, Matthew E.; Cepheid, Sunnyvale, CA; Stanker, Larry H.; Cheng, Luisa W.; Ravichandran, Easwaran; Singh, Bal -Ram; Sommer, Greg J.; et al

    2014-12-18

    In this study, we present an innovative centrifugal microfluidic immunoassay platform (SpinDx) to address the urgent biodefense and public health need for ultrasensitive point-of-care/incident detection of botulinum toxin. The simple, sample-to-answer centrifugal microfluidic immunoassay approach is based on binding of toxins to antibody-laden capture particles followed by sedimentation of the particles through a density-media in a microfluidic disk and quantification by laser-induced fluorescence. A blind, head-to-head comparison study of SpinDx versus the gold-standard mouse bioassay demonstrates 100-fold improvement in sensitivity (limit of detection = 0.09 pg/mL), while achieving total sample-to-answer time of <30 min with 2-μL required volume of themore » unprocessed sample. We further demonstrate quantification of botulinum toxin in both exogeneous (human blood and serum spiked with toxins) and endogeneous (serum from mice intoxicated via oral, intranasal, and intravenous routes) samples. SpinDx can analyze, without any sample preparation, multiple sample types including whole blood, serum, and food. It is readily expandable to additional analytes as the assay reagents (i.e., the capture beads and detection antibodies) are disconnected from the disk architecture and the reader, facilitating rapid development of new assays. SpinDx can also serve as a general-purpose immunoassay platform applicable to diagnosis of other conditions and diseases.« less

  11. Centrifugal microfluidic platform for ultrasensitive detection of botulinum toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Koh, Chung -Yan; Schaff, Ulrich Y.; Piccini, Matthew E.; Stanker, Larry H.; Cheng, Luisa W.; Ravichandran, Easwaran; Singh, Bal -Ram; Sommer, Greg J.; Singh, Anup K.

    2014-12-18

    In this study, we present an innovative centrifugal microfluidic immunoassay platform (SpinDx) to address the urgent biodefense and public health need for ultrasensitive point-of-care/incident detection of botulinum toxin. The simple, sample-to-answer centrifugal microfluidic immunoassay approach is based on binding of toxins to antibody-laden capture particles followed by sedimentation of the particles through a density-media in a microfluidic disk and quantification by laser-induced fluorescence. A blind, head-to-head comparison study of SpinDx versus the gold-standard mouse bioassay demonstrates 100-fold improvement in sensitivity (limit of detection = 0.09 pg/mL), while achieving total sample-to-answer time of <30 min with 2-μL required volume of the unprocessed sample. We further demonstrate quantification of botulinum toxin in both exogeneous (human blood and serum spiked with toxins) and endogeneous (serum from mice intoxicated via oral, intranasal, and intravenous routes) samples. SpinDx can analyze, without any sample preparation, multiple sample types including whole blood, serum, and food. It is readily expandable to additional analytes as the assay reagents (i.e., the capture beads and detection antibodies) are disconnected from the disk architecture and the reader, facilitating rapid development of new assays. SpinDx can also serve as a general-purpose immunoassay platform applicable to diagnosis of other conditions and diseases.

  12. Nonspecific toxicites in the mouse assay test for botulinum toxin.

    PubMed

    Segner, W P; Schmidt, C F

    1968-08-01

    In inoculated pack experiments on Clostridium botulinum type E, unirradiated and 0.1-Mrad irradiated haddock fillets often gave nonspecific toxicities by the mouse assay test for botulinum toxin. Samples given 0.2-Mrad radiation failed to produce nonspecific reactions. Nonspecific deaths sometimes occurred within 24 hr after injection, although deaths between 24 and 48 hr were more common. The symptoms and the pattern of these deaths suggested a septicemia. Heart-blood cultured from mice showing nonspecific symptoms indicated an infectious process. Among 23 isolates from the blood, eight were identified as Proteus vulgaris, two P. morganii, one P. rettgeri, one Providence subgroup B, two Aerobacter aerogenes, one Actinobacillus, three enterococci, one Alcaligenes marshalli, and four Erysipelothrix insidiosa. The E. insidiosa, Aerobacter, Providence group, and most of the Proteus isolates were infectious for mice when injected by the intraperitoneal route. But the enterococci, Alcaligenes, and Actinobacillus isolates were not infectious and probably represent secondary invaders. The cultural characteristics of the E. insidiosa isolates conform to those described in the literature, with the exception that the four strains grew in the temperature range 50 F (10 C) to 40 F (4.4 C). Nonspecific toxicities were avoided in assays for botulinum toxin by the protection of mice with chloramphenicol and oxytetracycline.

  13. The medicinal chemistry of botulinum, ricin and anthrax toxins.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Rickey P; Hartell, Mark G; Nichols, Daniel A; Bhattacharjee, Apurba K; van Hamont, John E; Skillman, Donald R

    2005-01-01

    The potential use of weapons of mass destruction (nuclear, biological or chemical) by terrorist organizations represents a major threat to world peace and safety. Only a limited number of vaccines are available to protect the general population from the medical consequences of these weapons. In addition there are major health concerns associated with a pre-exposure mass vaccination of the general population. To reduce or eliminate the impact of these terrible threats, new drugs must be developed to safely treat individuals exposed to these agents. A review of all therapeutic agents under development for the treatment of the illnesses and injuries that result from exposure to nuclear, biological or chemical warfare agents is beyond the scope of any single article. The intent here is to provide a focused review for medicinal and organic chemists of three widely discussed and easily deployed biological warfare agents, botulinum neurotoxin and ricin toxins and the bacteria Bacillus anthracis. Anthrax will be addressed because of its similarity in both structure and mechanism of catalytic activity with botulinum toxin. The common feature of these three agents is that they exhibit their biological activity via toxin enzymatic hydrolysis of a specific bond in their respective substrate molecules. A brief introduction to the history of each of the biological warfare agents is presented followed by a discussion on the mechanisms of action of each at the molecular level, and a review of current potential inhibitors under investigation.

  14. Restoring balance in focal limb dystonia with botulinum toxin.

    PubMed

    Sheean, Geoffrey

    2007-12-15

    Focal task-specific dystonia of the hand is rare in the general population, where it usually manifests as writer's cramp, but seems relatively common among musicians. The disability may be so severe as to prevent writing altogether or to end a professional musician's career. The cause is usually unknown but it is thought to be primarily a basal ganglia disorder with dysfunction of cortical-striatothalamic-cortical circuits. Abnormalities have been found in cortical movement preparation, intracortical inhibition, sensory and motor maps, and patterns of cortical activation during movement. Much evidence supports disordered processing of sensory information with disturbed sensorimotor integration. Underlying this may be maladaptive neural plasticity mechanisms. Treatment is difficult. Oral medications are generally ineffective and have troublesome side-effects. Intensive rehabilitation techniques based on neural plasticity theory show promise but are rarely available and are time-intensive. Botulinum toxin injections appear to be effective in writer's cramp and musician's dystonia, at least initially; long-term benefit is less common. Despite definite improvement, some patients abandon treatment because the gain is insufficient for meaningful function: this is particularly so for musicians. Much of the benefit from botulinum toxin injection comes from simply reducing muscle overactivity through muscle paralysis, restoring balance to motor control. However, some evidence suggests that botulinum toxin injections can produce transient improvement in some of the various cortical abnormalities described, probably through alteration of sensory input from the periphery, by direct and indirect means. These changes in cortical function might be usefully combined with those brought about by sensorimotor retraining programs, but such studies are awaited.

  15. Facing depression with botulinum toxin: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wollmer, M Axel; de Boer, Claas; Kalak, Nadeem; Beck, Johannes; Götz, Thomas; Schmidt, Tina; Hodzic, Muris; Bayer, Ursula; Kollmann, Thilo; Kollewe, Katja; Sönmez, Daniela; Duntsch, Katja; Haug, Martin D; Schedlowski, Manfred; Hatzinger, Martin; Dressler, Dirk; Brand, Serge; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Kruger, Tillmann H C

    2012-05-01

    Positive effects on mood have been observed in subjects who underwent treatment of glabellar frown lines with botulinum toxin and, in an open case series, depression remitted or improved after such treatment. Using a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial design we assessed botulinum toxin injection to the glabellar region as an adjunctive treatment of major depression. Thirty patients were randomly assigned to a verum (onabotulinumtoxinA, n = 15) or placebo (saline, n = 15) group. The primary end point was change in the 17-item version of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale six weeks after treatment compared to baseline. The verum and the placebo groups did not differ significantly in any of the collected baseline characteristics. Throughout the sixteen-week follow-up period there was a significant improvement in depressive symptoms in the verum group compared to the placebo group as measured by the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (F((6,168)) = 5.76, p < 0.001, η(2) = 0.17). Six weeks after a single treatment scores of onabotulinumtoxinA recipients were reduced on average by 47.1% and by 9.2% in placebo-treated participants (F((1,28)) = 12.30, p = 0.002, η(2) = 0.31, d = 1.28). The effect size was even larger at the end of the study (d = 1.80). Treatment-dependent clinical improvement was also reflected in the Beck Depression Inventory, and in the Clinical Global Impressions Scale. This study shows that a single treatment of the glabellar region with botulinum toxin may shortly accomplish a strong and sustained alleviation of depression in patients, who did not improve sufficiently on previous medication. It supports the concept, that the facial musculature not only expresses, but also regulates mood states. PMID:22364892

  16. Detection of botulinum toxins: micromechanical and fluorescence-based sensors.

    PubMed

    Parpura, Vladimir; Chapman, Edwin R

    2005-08-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most lethal of known human toxins, exerting their actions by cleaving the soluble N-ethyl maleimide-sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) required for neurotransmitter release. Early detection of these toxins is important for appropriate medical treatment. To detect BoNT activity, traditional assays monitor the effects of the toxins on a mammalian organism (observing signs of botulism in mice), or identify cleaved substrate molecules (electrophoresis and immunoblot). Similarly, enzyme-linked assays were used for screening potential toxin inhibitors in vitro in attempt to select antitoxins that could be used for therapeutic purposes. Here we review two recently developed sensor systems for detection of toxin activity in vitro and in living cells. In vitro detection was carried out using a micromechanosensor that relies on the attachment of a bead to the micromachined cantilever through the interactions between SNARE proteins, with synaptobrevin 2 deposited onto beads and syntaxin 1A deposited onto cantilevers. The presence of toxin is indicated by the detachment of the bead, resulting from cleavage of synaptobrevin 2. Additional in vitro detection is possible using fluorescent sensors constructed by inserting linkers, containing fragments of SNARE proteins acting as toxin substrates, between cyan and yellow fluorescent proteins (CFP and YFP). Toxins cause the cleavage of these linkers and thereby abolish fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between CFP and YFP. This approach, combined with an additional sensor based on subcellular redistribution of YFP fluorescence in cells, was used for cell-based screening of toxin activity.

  17. Mycobacterial Infection after Cosmetic Procedure with Botulinum Toxin A

    PubMed Central

    Saeb-Lima, Marcela; Solis-Arreola, Gerardo-Victor

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of mycobacterial infection at the sites of previous injections of botulinum toxin A in a 45-year-old woman. She presented with erythematous, swollen, warm, and tender plaques and nodules at the points of injection from which a biopsy was taken, demonstrating a deep dermal and hypodermal abscessified epithelioid granulomatous inflammatory infiltrate in which some acid-fast bacilli were identified with Ziehl-Neelsen and Fite-Faraco stains. The lesion was first treated with clarithromycin plus azithromycin, to which rifampicin was later added. A good therapeutic response was obtained. PMID:26023629

  18. Advances in Assays and Analytical Approaches for Botulinum Toxin Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Grate, Jay W.; Ozanich, Richard M.; Warner, Marvin G.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Marks, James D.

    2010-08-04

    Methods to detect botulinum toxin, the most poisonous substance known, are reviewed. Current assays are being developed with two main objectives in mind: 1) to obtain sufficiently low detection limits to replace the mouse bioassay with an in vitro assay, and 2) to develop rapid assays for screening purposes that are as sensitive as possible while requiring an hour or less to process the sample an obtain the result. This review emphasizes the diverse analytical approaches and devices that have been developed over the last decade, while also briefly reviewing representative older immunoassays to provide background and context.

  19. In Silico Analysis for the Study of Botulinum Toxin Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Tomonori; Miyazaki, Satoru

    2010-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions play many important roles in biological function. Knowledge of protein-protein complex structure is required for understanding the function. The determination of protein-protein complex structure by experimental studies remains difficult, therefore computational prediction of protein structures by structure modeling and docking studies is valuable method. In addition, MD simulation is also one of the most popular methods for protein structure modeling and characteristics. Here, we attempt to predict protein-protein complex structure and property using some of bioinformatic methods, and we focus botulinum toxin complex as target structure.

  20. Botulinum toxin: examining duration of effect in facial aesthetic applications.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Timothy Corcoran

    2010-01-01

    Patient satisfaction with botulinum toxin treatment is a key success factor in aesthetic procedures and is governed by the interaction of numerous variables. Duration of effect is important because it influences retreatment intervals as well as affecting cost and convenience to the patient. In order to review the evidence on the duration of benefit associated with various commercial formulations of botulinum toxin, MEDLINE was searched using the following terms: 'botulinum' and 'duration'/'retreatment' (limits: 'clinical trials,' 'meta-analyses,' 'English'). I also searched my existing reference files, reference lists of identified articles, and meeting/conference abstracts to ensure completeness. The focus was on clinical medicine and aesthetic trials. To be eligible for the analysis, studies had to include efficacy assessments at multiple timepoints. To estimate duration of benefit, the following outcomes were examined and summarized: responder rates, mean wrinkle severity scores at various timepoints (with or without changes from baseline), and relapse rates. Duration at both repose and maximum attempted muscle contraction was considered when provided. Where possible, duration was assessed by formulation and dose. The initial search yielded 164 articles. Of these, 35 included an adequate measure of duration in aesthetic indications. The majority of these (22) were on the glabellar area. Study designs and endpoints were highly heterogeneous, and duration of effect varied between studies. Several studies with the BOTOX Cosmetic (onabotulinumtoxinA; Allergan, Inc., Irvine, CA, USA) formulation of botulinum toxin type A (BoNTA) included relapse rates, defined conservatively as return to baseline levels of line severity for two consecutive visits approximately 30 days apart (at repose and maximum contraction). In these studies, duration of effect ranged from 3 to 5 months in female patients and from 4 to 6 months in male patients. Individual patients had longer

  1. Chloroquine Analog Interaction with C2- and Iota-Toxin in Vitro and in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Kronhardt, Angelika; Beitzinger, Christoph; Barth, Holger; Benz, Roland

    2016-01-01

    C2-toxin from Clostridium botulinum and Iota-toxin from Clostridium perfringens belong both to the binary A-B-type of toxins consisting of two separately secreted components, an enzymatic subunit A and a binding component B that facilitates the entry of the corresponding enzymatic subunit into the target cells. The enzymatic subunits are in both cases actin ADP-ribosyltransferases that modify R177 of globular actin finally leading to cell death. Following their binding to host cells' receptors and internalization, the two binding components form heptameric channels in endosomal membranes which mediate the translocation of the enzymatic components Iota a and C2I from endosomes into the cytosol of the target cells. The binding components form ion-permeable channels in artificial and biological membranes. Chloroquine and related 4-aminoquinolines were able to block channel formation in vitro and intoxication of living cells. In this study, we extended our previous work to the use of different chloroquine analogs and demonstrate that positively charged aminoquinolinium salts are able to block channels formed in lipid bilayer membranes by the binding components of C2- and Iota-toxin. Similarly, these molecules protect cultured mammalian cells from intoxication with C2- and Iota-toxin. The aminoquinolinium salts did presumably not interfere with actin ADP-ribosylation or receptor binding but blocked the pores formed by C2IIa and Iota b in living cells and in vitro. The blocking efficiency of pores formed by Iota b and C2IIa by the chloroquine analogs showed interesting differences indicating structural variations between the types of protein-conducting nanochannels formed by Iota b and C2IIa. PMID:27517960

  2. Chloroquine Analog Interaction with C2- and Iota-Toxin in Vitro and in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kronhardt, Angelika; Beitzinger, Christoph; Barth, Holger; Benz, Roland

    2016-01-01

    C2-toxin from Clostridium botulinum and Iota-toxin from Clostridium perfringens belong both to the binary A-B-type of toxins consisting of two separately secreted components, an enzymatic subunit A and a binding component B that facilitates the entry of the corresponding enzymatic subunit into the target cells. The enzymatic subunits are in both cases actin ADP-ribosyltransferases that modify R177 of globular actin finally leading to cell death. Following their binding to host cells’ receptors and internalization, the two binding components form heptameric channels in endosomal membranes which mediate the translocation of the enzymatic components Iota a and C2I from endosomes into the cytosol of the target cells. The binding components form ion-permeable channels in artificial and biological membranes. Chloroquine and related 4-aminoquinolines were able to block channel formation in vitro and intoxication of living cells. In this study, we extended our previous work to the use of different chloroquine analogs and demonstrate that positively charged aminoquinolinium salts are able to block channels formed in lipid bilayer membranes by the binding components of C2- and Iota-toxin. Similarly, these molecules protect cultured mammalian cells from intoxication with C2- and Iota-toxin. The aminoquinolinium salts did presumably not interfere with actin ADP-ribosylation or receptor binding but blocked the pores formed by C2IIa and Iota b in living cells and in vitro. The blocking efficiency of pores formed by Iota b and C2IIa by the chloroquine analogs showed interesting differences indicating structural variations between the types of protein-conducting nanochannels formed by Iota b and C2IIa. PMID:27517960

  3. A monoclonal antibody based capture ELISA for botulinum neurotoxin serotype B: toxin detection in food

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botulism is a serious foodborne neuroparalyic disease caused by botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) produced by the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium botulinum. Seven toxin serotypes (A-H) have been described. The majority of human cases of botulism are caused by serotypes A and B followed by E and F. We repo...

  4. Presence of Clostridium botulinum and botulinum toxin in milk and udder tissue of dairy cows with suspected botulism.

    PubMed

    Böhnel, H; Gessler, F

    2013-04-13

    Clostridium botulinum is an anaerobic spore-forming bacterium prevalent in the environment, and causes botulism in man and animals via toxins. Dairy cattle may be contaminated or infected by feed, water or other environmental factors. Milk may also carry the pathogen. Hence, milk and udder samples need to be tested. The number of clinical cases of bovine botulism in Germany has been increasing since the mid-1990s. Besides routine samples, additional 99 milk samples from 37 farms, and 51 udder samples from 51 farms from sick animals presumably affected by botulism were tested microbiologically by the mouse bioassay. Milk from three farms (8.1 per cent) contained botulinum toxin, and from two (5.4 per cent) bacterial states of C botulinum. Ten udder samples (19.6 per cent) contained toxin, and 7 (13.7 per cent) bacterial forms, including one case where both toxin and bacteria were found. The findings are discussed. Positive milk samples containing botulinum toxin or bacteria raise concern of food safety for the human consumer. Pathological udder samples may show either infection prior to, or contamination after death.

  5. Botulinum Toxin Injection for Spastic Scapular Dyskinesia After Stroke: Case Series.

    PubMed

    Hou, Saiyun; Ivanhoe, Cindy; Li, Sheng

    2015-08-01

    Spastic scapular dyskinesia after stroke is rare, which causes impaired shoulder active range of motion (ROM). To date, there has been no report about botulinum toxin injection to spastic periscapular muscles. This study presents botulinum toxin A injection for management of spastic periscapular muscles after stroke in 2 cases.This is a retrospective study of 2 cases of spastic scapular dyskinesia after stroke. Spasticity of periscapular muscles including rhomboid and lower trapezius was diagnosed by physical examination and needle electromyographic study. Botulinum toxin was injected into the spastic periscapular muscles under ultrasound imaging guidance.During the 3-week follow-up visit after injection, both patients showed increased shoulder active ROM, without any sign of scapular destabilization.The results suggest that botulinum toxin injection to spastic periscapular muscles can increase shoulder active ROM without causing scapular destabilization in patients with poststroke spastic scapular dyskinesia. PMID:26266368

  6. [Botulinum toxin type A in headache treatment : Established and experimental indications].

    PubMed

    Gaul, C; Holle-Lee, D; Straube, A

    2016-08-01

    In recent years botulinum toxin type A has been used increasingly more in the treatment of specific headache disorders. Especially regarding chronic migraine with and without combined medication overuse, convincing randomized studies have proven the efficacy of this treatment option and have led to approval for this indication. Regarding other headache entities, such as episodic migraine, tension-type headache, trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia (TAC), neuralgic, neuropathic and myofascial pain, currently available scientific data on the efficacy of botulinum toxin type A are scarce and often ambiguous. The exact underlying mechanisms of the influence of botulinum toxin type A on the pathophysiology of headache are not completely clear but an influence on the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) seems to play a crucial role. This article summarizes the most important studies as well as experiences of treatment with botulinum toxin type A regarding different headache entities. PMID:27300190

  7. Use of botulinum toxin in cheiloplasty: A new method to decrease tension

    PubMed Central

    Galárraga, Iván Marcelo Cueva

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine if the use of botulinum toxin during cheiloplasty could help in the management of tension at the surgical wound level. INTERVENTIONS: Five children younger than six months of age, who were born with complete cleft lip and palate, were treated with a dose of 10 units of botulinum toxin injected into the upper lip during surgery. Before the surgery, an electromyographic study was carried out on the patients’ upper lips. A Millard-type cheiloplasty was performed and 10 days later, a second electromyographic study was performed on the upper lips of all the patients. RESULTS: There was a significant change (P<0.039) in the electromyographic tracing obtained after the application of botulinum toxin, especially during rest. CONCLUSION: As confirmed by electromyography, botulinum toxin effectively inhibits the action of the orbicularis oris muscle, especially when at rest; consequently, the tension is decreased at the level of the surgical wound. PMID:20808741

  8. Botulinum toxin for treatment of Frey's syndrome: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Teive, Hélio A G; Troiano, André R; Robert, Fábio; Iwamoto, Fábio M; Maniglia, João J; Mocellin, Marcos; Werneck, Lineu César

    2003-06-01

    Frey's syndrome is a phenomenon of hemifacial flushing and sweating after gustatory stimulus, usually secondary to surgical trauma over the parotid gland, although other injury mechanisms may be seen. It is accepted as a result of aberrant regeneration of facial autonomic nerve fibers. Treatment evolved from ineffective medical and surgical approaches to botulinum toxin. We evaluate the effectiveness and safety of botulinum toxin in the treatment of this complication in two patients. PMID:12806506

  9. Botulinum toxin in the treatment of chronic urinary retention in women.

    PubMed

    Fowler, C J; Betts, C D; Christmas, T J; Swash, M; Fowler, C G

    1992-10-01

    Six women were identified as having difficulty in voiding or complete urinary retention due to abnormal myotonic-like electromyographic (EMG) activity in the striated muscle of the urethral sphincter. An attempt was made to improve voiding by injection of botulinum toxin into the striated sphincter muscle. Although 3 patients then developed transient stress incontinence, demonstrating that sufficient botulinum toxin had been given to cause sphincter weakness, no patient had significant symptomatic benefit.

  10. Botulinum Toxin in Secondarily Nonresponsive Patients with Spasmodic Dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Mor, Niv; Tang, Christopher; Blitzer, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    Chemodenervation with botulinum toxin (BoNT) has been effective and well tolerated for all types of dystonia for >30 years. We reviewed outcomes of our patients treated with BoNT serotype A (BoNT-A) for spasmodic dysphonia (SD) who became secondarily nonresponsive. We found that 8 of 1400 patients became nonresponsive to BoNT-A (0.57%), which is lower than the secondary nonresponse rate in other dystonias. After a cessation period, 4 of our patients resumed BoNT-A injections, and recurrence of immunoresistance was not seen in any of them. When compared with patients with other dystonias, patients with SD receive extremely low doses of BoNT. Small antigen challenge may explain the lower rate of immunoresistance and long-lasting efficacy after BoNT-A is restarted among secondary nonresponsive patients with SD. PMID:27143711

  11. Applications of botulinum toxin in dentistry: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Sanjeev; Kharbanda, Smriti; Pal, U. S.; Shah, Vinit

    2015-01-01

    The horizons of treatment options in dentistry are broadening rapidly. In this scenario, applications of unconventional treatment options like use of botulinum toxin (BT) are gaining momentum. The use of BT has been popularly accepted in esthetic procedures like management of facial wrinkles; however, it has been documented to be successful in a variety of conditions. Of particular interest to this paper are applications of BT in the maxillofacial region, concerned to dentistry. BT offers a transient, reversible, relatively safe treatment option to many conditions of interest to a dental practitioner. Dental surgeons by their virtue of being extensively aware of the anatomy of faciomaxillary region are a potential pool of operators who can use BT in their armamentarium with minor skill enhancement and thus widen the perspective of alternative, minimally invasive options to refractory conditions or invasive protocols. PMID:27390488

  12. Applications of botulinum toxin in dentistry: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Sanjeev; Kharbanda, Smriti; Pal, U S; Shah, Vinit

    2015-01-01

    The horizons of treatment options in dentistry are broadening rapidly. In this scenario, applications of unconventional treatment options like use of botulinum toxin (BT) are gaining momentum. The use of BT has been popularly accepted in esthetic procedures like management of facial wrinkles; however, it has been documented to be successful in a variety of conditions. Of particular interest to this paper are applications of BT in the maxillofacial region, concerned to dentistry. BT offers a transient, reversible, relatively safe treatment option to many conditions of interest to a dental practitioner. Dental surgeons by their virtue of being extensively aware of the anatomy of faciomaxillary region are a potential pool of operators who can use BT in their armamentarium with minor skill enhancement and thus widen the perspective of alternative, minimally invasive options to refractory conditions or invasive protocols. PMID:27390488

  13. Botulinum Toxin Treatment for Limb Spasticity in Childhood Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Pavone, Vito; Testa, Gianluca; Restivo, Domenico A.; Cannavò, Luca; Condorelli, Giuseppe; Portinaro, Nicola M.; Sessa, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    CP is the most common cause of chronic disability in childhood occurring in 2–2.5/1000 births. It is a severe disorder and a significant number of patients present cognitive delay and difficulty in walking. The use of botulinum toxin (BTX) has become a popular treatment for CP especially for spastic and dystonic muscles while avoiding deformity and pain. Moreover, the combination of physiotherapy, casting, orthotics and injection of BTX may delay or decrease the need for surgical intervention while reserving single-event, multi-level surgery for fixed musculotendinous contractures and bony deformities in older children. This report highlights the utility of BTX in the treatment of cerebral palsy in children. We include techniques for administration, side effects, and possible resistance as well as specific use in the upper and lower limbs muscles. PMID:26924985

  14. [The route of botulinum toxin from cause of food poisoning to medical remedy].

    PubMed

    Sätilä, Heli

    2014-01-01

    Botulinum toxins are amongst the most poisonous substances known in nature. The discovery and development of this toxin into a medical remedy is one of the most fascinating stories in the history of medicine. German physician Justinus Kerner founded the theory of treating hyperactive disorders with botulinum toxin and Alan Scott was the one to make this happen successfully. Nowadays the toxin is widely used in different indications, and the research is still going on for discovering novel tools for treating e.g. pain.

  15. [First use of botulinum toxin type B in ENT patients with secondary therapy failure of botulinum toxin type A].

    PubMed

    Guntinas-Lichius, O

    2004-01-01

    The first botulinum toxin type B (BT-B) formulation, NeuroBloc, has been licensed in Germany for the treatment of cervical dystonia since March 2001. This allows the treatment of patients with secondary failure of botulinum type A (BT-A) injections for the first time. Three patients with such a secondary failure were successfully treated with BT-B. A total of 1,000 mouse units (MU) NeuroBloc per eye were injected in a patient with blepharospasm. The treatment was effective for 4 months. In a patient with spasmodic dysphonia, 250 MU were injected into each vocal cord. This was effective for 3.5 months. The third patient suffered from bilateral Frey's syndrome. A total of 7,500 MU were used on the right side and 6,000 MU on the left side to stop the gustatory sweating for 9 months. Overall, BT-B showed similar intervals of effectiveness as BT-A. Side effects were not seen using the above dosage regimes. PMID:14740116

  16. Patient considerations in the treatment of cervical dystonia: focus on botulinum toxin type A

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Reversa R; Pagan, Fernando L

    2015-01-01

    Cervical dystonia is the most common form of focal dystonia characterized by involuntary muscle contractions causing abnormal movements and posturing of the head and neck and is associated with significant pain. Botulinum toxin is considered first-line therapy in the treatment of pain and abnormal head posturing associated with cervical dystonia. There are currently three botulinum toxin type A neurotoxins and one botulinum type B neurotoxin commercially available and US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) labeled for the treatment of cervical dystonia. This review will focus on the efficacy, safety, and therapeutic use of botulinum type A neurotoxins in the treatment of cervical dystonia. We conclude with a discussion of factors influencing toxin selection including therapeutic effect, duration of effect, side effect profile, cost, and physician preference. PMID:26082621

  17. The role of botulinum toxin A in treating neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Weckx, Filip; Tutolo, Manuela; De Ridder, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) can result in lower and upper urinary tract complications and eventually even in end-stage kidney failure. Since the driving force of this clinical cascade is high bladder pressure, controlling intravesical pressure in NDO patients improves both quality of life and life-expectancy in these patients. Botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) has proven its efficacy in reducing intravesical pressure and in reducing incontinence episodes. BTX-A also improves quality of life in patients with NDO. Both onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox®, Allergan, Irvine, USA) and abobotulinumtoxinA (Dysport®, Ipsen, Paris, France) have a level A recommendation for NDO-treatment. The recommended dose for intradetrusor injections in NDO patients is 200 U of onabotulinumtoxinA or 500 U of abobotulinumtoxinA. The drug is generally administered extratrigonal in the detrusor muscle, via cystoscopic guided injection at 20 sites in 1 mL injections. Intradetrusor BTX-A injections are safe, with mostly local complications such as urinary tract infection and high post-void residual or retention. The effect of the toxin lasts for approximately 9 months. Repeat injections can be performed without loss of efficacy. Different injection techniques, novel ways of BTX-A administration, eliminating the need for injection or new BTX-A types with better/longer response rates could change the field in the future. PMID:26904413

  18. Botulinum toxin treatment of urethral and bladder dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yao-Chi; Smith, Christopher P; Somogyi, George T; Chancellor, Michael B

    2003-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (BTX) is the most lethal naturally occurring toxin known to mankind. Injection of BTX into the urethral sphincter or bladder is an effective treatment for lower urinary tract dysfunction. We reviewed the literature on the mechanisms of action and clinical efficacy of BTX treatment in urologic diseases, with a focus on lower urinary tract dysfunction. Injection of BTX is safe and effective in the treatment of detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia, non-neurogenic pelvic floor spasticity, and refractory overactive bladder. Urodynamic assessment after sphincter injection with BTX reveals a decrease of bladder voiding pressure, urethral pressure profile, and post-void residual urine. An increase of the functional bladder capacity and a decrease of the bladder voiding pressure can be seen after bladder injection with BTX. Clinical improvement was found in a moderate percentage of treated patients in most reported series and lasted for 3 to 14 months without significant adverse effects. In addition, BTX-A treatment inhibits afferent-nerve-mediated bladder contraction. This analgesic effect may expand the application of BTX in the localized genitourinary tract pain syndrome, such as interstitial cystitis and prostatodynia. In conclusion, application of BTX is a promising treatment for lower urinary tract dysfunction with profound basic and clinical implications.

  19. Reconstituting botulinum toxin drugs: shaking, stirring or what?

    PubMed

    Dressler, Dirk; Bigalke, Hans

    2016-05-01

    Most botulinum toxin (BT) drugs are stored as powders which need to be reconstituted with normal saline before clinical use. As botulinum neurotoxin (BNT), the therapeutically active ingredient, is a large double-stranded protein the process of reconstitution should be performed with special attention to mechanical stress applied. We wanted to test the mechanical stability of BNT during the reconstitution process. For this, 100 MU onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox(®), Irvine, CA, USA) was reconstituted with 2.0 ml of NaCl/H2O. Gentle reconstitution (GR) was performed with a 5 ml syringe, a 0.90 × 70 mm injection needle, one cycle of injection-aspiration-injection and two gentle shakes of the vial. Aggressive reconstitution (AR) was performed with a 5 ml syringe, a 0.40 × 40 mm injection needle, ten injection-aspiration-injection cycles and 30 s of continuous shaking of the vial. AR increased the time to paralysis in the mouse hemidiaphragm assay (HDA) from 72.0 ± 4.6 to 106.0 ± 16.0 min (*p = 0.002, two-tailed t test after Kolmogorov-Smirnova test with Lilliefors correction for normal distribution). Construction of a calibration curve revealed that the increase in the time to paralysis was correlated with a loss of potency of from 100 to 58 MU (-42 %). BT users should use large diameter injection needles for reconstitution, apply two or three injection-aspiration-injection cycles and, maybe, shake the vials a few times to rinse the entire glass wall. Aggressive reconstitution with small diameter needles, prolonged injection-aspiration-injection and violent shaking should be avoided.

  20. [Botulinum toxin: from poison to drug. A historical review].

    PubMed

    Kreyden, O P; Geiges, M L; Böni, R; Burg, G

    2000-10-01

    Botulinumtoxin (BTX) is a neurotoxin produced from Clostridium botulinum under anaerobic conditions and is responsible for botulism, a notifiable, bacterial form of food poisoning. The first case of botulism is believed to have occurred in 1735. An epidemic in Southern Germany in 1793 claimed the death of over the half of those patients who had become ill through eating uncooked blood sausages. The term "pharmakon" is Greek and implicates that a drug originates from poison (potion, remedy). Theophrastus Bombast von Hohenheim known as Paracelsus (1493/94-1541) first described this duality with his dictum "alle ding sind gift und nichts on gift; alein die dosis macht das ein ding kein gift ist" (only the dose makes a remedy poisonous). In Baden-Württemberg in 1817, the poet and physician Dr. Justinus Christian Kerner described the symptoms of botulism, so that at this time botulism was also called Kerner disease. Until the turn of the century the reason for poisoning was not known. Van Ermengem succeeded in isolating the anaerobic bacterium causing botulism, but the specific mechanism of BTX was only established after the second World War. In the late seventies the ophthalmologist Dr. Alan Scott used BTX the first time in the treatment of strabismus. The drug was then used in the treatment of several muscle spasticities such as, for example, torticollis or hemifacial spasm. Only recently BTX has been successfully used for focal hyperhidrosis. We review the history of botulinum toxin from its discovery in the nineteenth century and the research into its effect in the middle of the 20th century up to its clinical use at the present time.

  1. Effects of botulinum toxin type D on secretion of tumor necrosis factor from human monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Imamura, K.; Spriggs, D.; Ohno, T.; Kufe, D.

    1989-05-01

    Botulinum toxins are potent neurotoxins which block the release of neurotransmitters. The effects of these toxins on hematopoietic cells, however, are unknown. Monocytes secrete a variety of polypeptide growth factors, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF). In the study reported here, the effects of botulinum toxin type D on the secretion of TNF from human monocytes were examined. The results demonstrate that biotulinum toxin type D inhibits the release of TNF from monocytes activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) but not by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. Botulinum toxin type D had no detectable effect on intracellular TNF levels in LPS-treated monocytes, indicating that the effects of this toxin involve the secretory process. This inhibitory effect of botulinum toxin type D on TNF secretion from LPS-treated monocytes was partially reversed by treatment with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate or introduction of guanosine 5'-(/gamma/-thio)t-riphosphate into these cells. The results demonstrate that TNF secretion is regulated by at least two distinct guanine nucleotide-binding proteins, one responsible for the activation of phospholiphase C and another which acts as a substrate for botulinum toxin type D. ADP-ribosylation of monocyte membranes by botulinum toxin type D demonstrated the presence of three substrates with M/sub r/s of 45,000, 21,000, and 17,000. While the role of these substrates in exocytosis is unknown, the results suggest that the M/sub r/ 21,000 substrate is involved in a process other than TNF secretion.

  2. Clinical use of non-A botulinum toxins: botulinum toxin type B.

    PubMed

    Dressler, D; Eleopra, R

    2006-04-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin type B (BT, BT-B) has been used as NeuroBloc/MyoBloc since 1999 for treatment of cervical dystonia, hyperhidrosis, spastic conditions, cerebral palsy, hemifacial spasm, bladder dysfunction, spasmodic dysphonia, sialorrhoea, anal fissures, piriformis syndrome, various pain conditions and cosmetic applications. Generally, its therapeutic effects are comparable to BT type A (BT-A). The adverse effect profiles of BT-B and BT-A, however, differ considerably. BT-B has been found to produce more regional as well as systemic anticholinergic adverse effects, such as dryness of mouth, accommodation difficulties, conjunctival irritation, reduced sweating, dysphagia, heartburn, constipation, bladder voiding difficulties and dryness of nasal mucosa. In BT-B the relationship between autonomic and motor effects known from BT-A is substantially shifted towards autonomic effects. BT-B, therefore, should be used carefully in patients with autonomic disorders and in patients with concomitant anticholinergic therapy. If NeuroBloc/MyoBloc is used to treat cervical dystonia patients with antibody-induced failure of BT-A therapy, 86% of those will develop complete secondary therapy failure after five applications. If NeuroBloc/MyoBloc used to treat cervical dystonia patients without prior exposure to BT, 44% of those will develop complete secondary therapy failure after nine applications. NeuroBloc/MyoBloc, therefore, is associated with substantial antigenicity problems originating from a particular low specific biological potency. Systemic anticholinergic adverse effects and high antigenicity limits the clinical use of NeuroBloc/MyoBloc considerably. PMID:16785108

  3. Effects of botulinum toxin A on the sphincter of Oddi: an in vivo and in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Sand, J; Nordback, I; Arvola, P; Porsti, I; Kalloo, A; Pasricha, P

    1998-01-01

    Background—Botulinum toxin A is a potent inhibitor of the release of acetylcholine from nerve endings. Local injection of botulinum toxin has recently been suggested to be helpful in sphincter of Oddi dyskinesia by decreasing sphincter of Oddi pressure. 
Aims—To explore the mechanism of action of botulinum toxin A on sphincter of Oddi (SO) muscle. 
Methods—Four piglets underwent duodenoscopy and SO manometry was performed. After obtaining a baseline pressure, the SO was injected with normal saline and the experiment repeated after one week. The SO was then injected endoscopically with botulinum toxin (40 U) with follow up manometry one week later. The sphincter of Oddi was removed from 10 pigs, cut into three rings, and placed in an organ bath. The force of contraction was measured and registered on a polygraph. Rings were stimulated by 70 V (10 Hz, 0.5 ms) electrical field stimulation for 20 seconds, exogenous acetylcholine (100 µM), and KCl (125 mM). Botulinum toxin (0.1 U/ml) or atropine (1 µM) was added to the incubation medium and the stimulation was repeated. 
Results—Mean basal SO pressure in the pigs remained unchanged after saline injection but decreased to about 50% of baseline value following botulinum toxin injection (p=0.04). The contractions induced by direct stimulation of SO smooth muscle with KCl were not significantly affected by either atropine or botulinum toxin. In all rings exogenous acetylcholine induced contractions, which were totally blocked by atropine, but not by botulinum toxin. Electrical field stimulation induced contractions that were inhibited by both atropine and botulinum toxin. 
Conclusion—Botulinum toxin inhibits pig sphincter of Oddi smooth muscle contractions by a presynaptic cholinergic mechanism, similar to that described in skeletal muscle. 

 Keywords: sphincter of Oddi; botulinum toxin; pig; ex vivo PMID:9616312

  4. Safety and efficacy of botulinum toxin injection therapy for esophageal achalasia in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Daisuke; Tsuruoka, Nanae; Sakata, Yasuhisa; Shimoda, Ryo; Fujimoto, Kazuma; Iwakiri, Ryuichi

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum toxin injection is an accepted treatment modality for esophageal achalasia in western countries. This pilot study aimed to clarify the effectiveness of botulinum toxin injection for esophageal achalasia in Japanese patients. We enrolled 10 patients diagnosed with esophageal achalasia between 2008 and 2014. A total of 100 U botulinum toxin A was divided into eight aliquots and injected around the esophagogastric junction. We compared the lower esophageal sphincter pressure before and 1 week after treatment. Scores of subjective symptoms for esophageal achalasia were assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS) before and after 1 week of follow-up of treatment. Barium passage was improved in barium esophagography and passage of contrast agent was also improved. Mean Eckardt score was reduced from 5.5 to 1.6 after treatment (p<0.001). By esophageal manometric study, mean lower esophageal sphincter pressure was reduced from 46.9 to 29.1 mmHg after treatment (p = 0.002). One week after treatment, mean VAS score was reduced from 10 to 3.9 (p<0.001). There were no side effects in any cases. Botulinum toxin injection for esophageal achalasia was safe and effective with few complications. Therefore, botulinum toxin could be used as minimally invasive therapy for esophageal achalasia in Japan. PMID:26566311

  5. [Treated patients in survey: High satisfaction with botulinum toxin in palmar hyperhidrosis].

    PubMed

    Deebaj, Richard; Emtestam, Lennart; Lundeberg, Lena; Brandin Samuelsson, Karin; Girnita, Ada

    2015-01-01

    When debilitating, hyperhidrosis can be seen as a disease and not just as a symptom. It is most often a primary condition but can be secondary to other diseases. Aluminum chloride products are the initial treatment modality for palmar hyperhidrosis followed by anticholinergics, iontophoresis and botulinum toxin. The Dermatology Department of the Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm, Sweden treated 151 patients at 289 visits with botulinum toxin for palmar hyperhidrosis during a two year period (2012-2013). It was found that botulinum toxin had good effect, which lasted between two and five months in 72% of cases. Muscle weakness (pincer grip) was reported at 41% of return visits and was present for less than one to four weeks in 62% of cases. At 56% of return visits, no side effects of botulinum toxin were reported. 90% of patients surveyed thought that botulinum toxin worked well or very well for their condition and 99% valued the treatment they received at the clinic as good to excellent. PMID:25625725

  6. [Treated patients in survey: High satisfaction with botulinum toxin in palmar hyperhidrosis].

    PubMed

    Deebaj, Richard; Emtestam, Lennart; Lundeberg, Lena; Brandin Samuelsson, Karin; Girnita, Ada

    2015-01-27

    When debilitating, hyperhidrosis can be seen as a disease and not just as a symptom. It is most often a primary condition but can be secondary to other diseases. Aluminum chloride products are the initial treatment modality for palmar hyperhidrosis followed by anticholinergics, iontophoresis and botulinum toxin. The Dermatology Department of the Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm, Sweden treated 151 patients at 289 visits with botulinum toxin for palmar hyperhidrosis during a two year period (2012-2013). It was found that botulinum toxin had good effect, which lasted between two and five months in 72% of cases. Muscle weakness (pincer grip) was reported at 41% of return visits and was present for less than one to four weeks in 62% of cases. At 56% of return visits, no side effects of botulinum toxin were reported. 90% of patients surveyed thought that botulinum toxin worked well or very well for their condition and 99% valued the treatment they received at the clinic as good to excellent.

  7. Pain Relief in Cervical Dystonia with Botulinum Toxin Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, Carlos Henrique Ferreira; Cattai, Lígia; Teive, Hélio Afonso Ghizoni

    2015-01-01

    Dystonia is a neurological disorder characterized by intermittent or sustained muscle contractions that cause abnormal, usually repetitive, movements and postures. Dystonic movements can be tremulous and twisting and often follow a pattern. They are frequently associated with overflow muscle activation and may be triggered or worsened by voluntary action. Most voluntary muscles can be affected and, in the case of the neck muscles, the condition is referred to as cervical dystonia (CD), the most common form of dystonia. The high incidence of pain distinguishes CD from other focal dystonias and contributes significantly to patient disability and low quality of life. Different degrees of pain in the cervical region are reported by more than 60% of patients, and pain intensity is directly related to disease severity. Botulinum toxin (BoNT) is currently considered the treatment of choice for CD and can lead to an improvement in pain and dystonic symptoms in up to 90% of patients. The results for BoNT/A and BoNT/B are similar. The complex relationship between pain and dystonia has resulted in a large number of studies and more comprehensive assessments of dystonic patients. When planning the application of BoNT, pain should be a key factor in the choice of muscles and doses. In conclusion, BoNT is highly effective in controlling pain, and its analgesic effect is sustained for a long time in most CD patients. PMID:26110508

  8. Treatment of Raynaud's phenomenon with botulinum toxin type A.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaolong; Hu, Yong; Nie, Zhiyu; Song, Ye; Pan, Yougui; Liu, Ying; Jin, Lingjing

    2015-07-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon (RP), an episodic vasospasm of the peripheral arteries, is quite common in general population. The current therapies of RP are limited by efficacy, side effects, and polypharmacy concerns. Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) local injections have been reported for the treatment of RP, but the injection sites, concentration and dose of BTX-A were different from each other in previous trials. In addition, so far, there have been no reports concerning local injection of BTX-A in Asian RP patients. Ten patients with RP in China were included in this retrospective study. All the patients had intractable pain and were non-responsive to conservative and/or medical therapy. A patterned BTX-A injection was performed in RP patients, guided by ultrasonography. BTX-A was injected as 20 u/ml devoid of preservatives. Outcomes were measured by ultrasonography, surface temperature, visual analog scale (VAS) for clinical symptoms (pain, numbness, stiffness and swelling), and changes in ulcers or gangrene. Overall, a great improvement in artery flow velocity (P < 0.01), surface temperature (P < 0.01), ulcer and VAS for clinical symptoms, was observed after BTX-A local injection. Complications were very rarely found, and no patients complained of hand weakness and bruise. BTX-A patterned injection guided by ultrasonography might be a useful therapeutic tool in the management of intractable RP.

  9. In situ detection of the Clostridium botulinum type C1 toxin gene in wetland sediments with a nested PCR assay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williamson, J.L.; Rocke, T.E.; Aiken, Judd M.

    1999-01-01

    A nested PCR was developed for detection of the Clostridium botulinum type C1 toxin gene in sediments collected from wetlands where avian botulism outbreaks had or had not occurred. The C1 toxin gene was detected in 16 of 18 sites, demonstrating both the ubiquitous distribution of C. botulinum type C in wetland sediments and the sensitivity of the detection assay.

  10. Improvement of chronic facial pain and facial dyskinesia with the help of botulinum toxin application

    PubMed Central

    Junghans, Katharina; Rohrbach, Saskia; Ellies, Maik; Laskawi, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Background Facial pain syndromes can be very heterogeneous and need individual diagnosis and treatment. This report describes an interesting case of facial pain associated with eczema and an isolated dyskinesia of the lower facial muscles following dental surgery. Different aspects of the pain, spasms and the eczema will be discussed. Case presentation In this patient, persistent intense pain arose in the lower part of her face following a dental operation. The patient also exhibited dyskinesia of her caudal mimic musculature that was triggered by specific movements. Several attempts at therapy had been unsuccessful. We performed local injections of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) into the affected region of the patient's face. Pain relief was immediate following each set of botulinum toxin injections. The follow up time amounts 62 weeks. Conclusion Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) can be a safe and effective therapy for certain forms of facial pain syndromes. PMID:17714591

  11. The use of botulinum toxin for the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Orasanu, Bogdan; Mahajan, Sangeeta T.

    2013-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, botulinum toxin has been transformed from a cause of life-threatening disease to an effective medical therapy. It has been used in a variety of specialties for different indications, significantly improving patient quality of life. A recent growing body of evidence suggests that intra-detrusor injection of botulinum toxin may have beneficial effects in patients with medication refractory detrusor overactivity and may offer a new minimally invasive alternative to patients with severe overactive bladder symptoms. To review current data regarding the effects of botulinum toxin in patients with overactive bladder, a MEDLINE®/PubMed® literature search was carried out. The mechanism of action, clinical usage, adverse effects, and treatment efficacy were reviewed and the results are presented in this paper. PMID:23671356

  12. Botulinum toxin type A in children and adolescents with severe cerebral palsy: a retrospective chart review.

    PubMed

    Mesterman, Ronit; Gorter, Jan Willem; Harvey, Adrienne; Lockhart, Julia; McEwen-Hill, Jenny; Margallo, Karen; Goldie, Nancy

    2014-02-01

    This retrospective cohort study reviewed set goals and their outcomes of children and adolescents with severe cerebral palsy who received botulinum toxin A in 2008 and 2009. Sixty children (36 male, mean age 9 years) were included. They received on average 4 (range 1-7) treatments, with the dosage varying between 20 and 400 units per treatment (3-21 U/kg/body weight). Mild transient side effects were reported in 12 of 242 treatments with botulinum toxin A. Treatment goals were related to lower limb function (82%), range of motion (68%), positioning (33%), upper limb function (33%), and facilitating ease of care in dressing (30%), toileting, and diapering (22%). The treatment goals were reached in 60% to 85% by report of the parent and child dyad. Our findings suggest that botulinum toxin A should be considered as a treatment option in patients with cerebral palsy within Gross Motor Function Classification System levels IV and V. PMID:23965398

  13. Clostridium botulinum growth and toxin production in tomato juice containing Aspergillus gracilis.

    PubMed Central

    Odlaug, T E; Pflug, I J

    1979-01-01

    The ability of spores of one type A and one type B strain of Clostridium botulinum to grow and produce toxin in tomato juice was investigated. The type A strain grew at pH 4.9, but not at pH 4.8; the type B strain grew at pH 5.1, but not at pH 5.0. Aspergillus gracilis was inoculated along with C. botulinum spores into pH 4.2 tomato juice; in a nonhermetic unit, a pH gradient developed under the mycelial mat, resulting in C. botulinum growth and toxin production. In a hermetic unit, mold growth was reduced, and no pH gradient was detected; however, C. botulinum growth and low levels of toxin production (less than 10 50% lethal doses per ml) still occurred and were associated with the mycelial mat. The results of tests to find filterable or dialyzable growth factors were negative. It was demonstrated that for toxin production C. botulinum and the mold had to occupy the same environment. PMID:36843

  14. Arrangement of the Clostridium baratii F7 Toxin Gene Cluster with Identification of a σ Factor That Recognizes the Botulinum Toxin Gene Cluster Promoters

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, Nir; Barash, Jason R.; Burke, Julianne N.; Hill, Karen K.; Detter, John C.; Arnon, Stephen S.

    2014-05-22

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is the most poisonous substances known and its eight toxin types (A to H) are distinguished by the inability of polyclonal antibodies that neutralize one toxin type to neutralize any of the other seven toxin types. Infant botulism, an intestinal toxemia orphan disease, is the most common form of human botulism in the United States. It results from swallowed spores of Clostridium botulinum (or rarely, neurotoxigenic Clostridium butyricum or Clostridium baratii) that germinate and temporarily colonize the lumen of the large intestine, where, as vegetative cells, they produce botulinum toxin. Botulinum neurotoxin is encoded by the bont gene that is part of a toxin gene cluster that includes several accessory genes. In this paper, we sequenced for the first time the complete botulinum neurotoxin gene cluster of nonproteolytic C. baratii type F7. Like the type E and the nonproteolytic type F6 botulinum toxin gene clusters, the C. baratii type F7 had an orfX toxin gene cluster that lacked the regulatory botR gene which is found in proteolytic C. botulinum strains and codes for an alternative σ factor. In the absence of botR, we identified a putative alternative regulatory gene located upstream of the C. baratii type F7 toxin gene cluster. This putative regulatory gene codes for a predicted σ factor that contains DNA-binding-domain homologues to the DNA-binding domains both of BotR and of other members of the TcdR-related group 5 of the σ70 family that are involved in the regulation of toxin gene expression in clostridia. We showed that this TcdR-related protein in association with RNA polymerase core enzyme specifically binds to the C. baratii type F7 botulinum toxin gene cluster promoters. Finally, this TcdR-related protein may therefore be involved in regulating the expression of the genes of the botulinum toxin gene cluster in neurotoxigenic C. baratii.

  15. Arrangement of the Clostridium baratii F7 toxin gene cluster with identification of a σ factor that recognizes the botulinum toxin gene cluster promoters.

    PubMed

    Dover, Nir; Barash, Jason R; Burke, Julianne N; Hill, Karen K; Detter, John C; Arnon, Stephen S

    2014-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is the most poisonous substances known and its eight toxin types (A to H) are distinguished by the inability of polyclonal antibodies that neutralize one toxin type to neutralize any of the other seven toxin types. Infant botulism, an intestinal toxemia orphan disease, is the most common form of human botulism in the United States. It results from swallowed spores of Clostridium botulinum (or rarely, neurotoxigenic Clostridium butyricum or Clostridium baratii) that germinate and temporarily colonize the lumen of the large intestine, where, as vegetative cells, they produce botulinum toxin. Botulinum neurotoxin is encoded by the bont gene that is part of a toxin gene cluster that includes several accessory genes. We sequenced for the first time the complete botulinum neurotoxin gene cluster of nonproteolytic C. baratii type F7. Like the type E and the nonproteolytic type F6 botulinum toxin gene clusters, the C. baratii type F7 had an orfX toxin gene cluster that lacked the regulatory botR gene which is found in proteolytic C. botulinum strains and codes for an alternative σ factor. In the absence of botR, we identified a putative alternative regulatory gene located upstream of the C. baratii type F7 toxin gene cluster. This putative regulatory gene codes for a predicted σ factor that contains DNA-binding-domain homologues to the DNA-binding domains both of BotR and of other members of the TcdR-related group 5 of the σ70 family that are involved in the regulation of toxin gene expression in clostridia. We showed that this TcdR-related protein in association with RNA polymerase core enzyme specifically binds to the C. baratii type F7 botulinum toxin gene cluster promoters. This TcdR-related protein may therefore be involved in regulating the expression of the genes of the botulinum toxin gene cluster in neurotoxigenic C. baratii.

  16. Diagnosis, impact, and management of focal hyperhidrosis: treatment review including botulinum toxin therapy.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Joel L; Cohen, Goldie; Solish, Nowell; Murray, Christian A

    2007-02-01

    Idiopathic localized hyperhidrosis, called for hyperhidrosis, affects almost 3% of the US population. The most frequent anatomic sites of involvement include the axillae, palms, soles, and face. For those affected, this condition can be extremely socially debilitating and interfere with work activities. Until recently, frequently ineffective topical regimens or problematic surgical procedures have been the treatments of choice. Since 1996, intracutaneous injections of botulinum toxin have been used as a minimally invasive treatment for this condition with numerous studies documenting safety, efficacy, and extremely high levels of patient satisfaction. Botulinum toxin type A (Botox) was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2004 for the treatment of axillary hyperhidrosis.

  17. Long-Term Blood Pressure Control Effect of Celiac Plexus Block with Botulinum Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Hyun; Lim, Dae Hwan; Lee, Ju Ho; Chang, Kiyuk; Koo, Jung Min; Park, Hue Jung

    2016-01-01

    Celiac plexus block (CPB) is one of the main treatment options for patients resistant to conventional antihypertensive drugs. We present a case of resistant hypertension (RHTN) that was treated with CPB using botulinum toxin. An 18-year-old male patient with RHTN, who suffered from persistent hypertension even after combination therapy and a renal denervation procedure, was referred to our pain center for CPB. CPB using botulinum toxin following the use of only local anesthetics resulted in control of systolic blood pressure (BP) at ~150 mmHg for at least three months. PMID:26907344

  18. How botulinum toxin in neurogenic detrusor overactivity can reduce upper urinary tract damage?

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Maximilien; Grise, Philippe; Cornu, Jean-Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Intradetrusor injections of botulinum toxin are the cornerstone of medical treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity. The primary aim of this treatment is to ensure a low pressure regimen in the urinary bladder, but the mechanisms leading to long-term protection of the urinary tract remain poorly understood. In this paper, we highlight the potential benefits of intradetrusor injections of botulinum toxin regarding local effects on the bladder structures, urinary tract infections, stone disease, vesico ureteral reflux, hydronephrosis, renal function based on a comprehensive literature review. PMID:26981445

  19. Long-term botulinum toxin efficacy, safety, and immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Mejia, Nicte I; Vuong, Kevin Dat; Jankovic, Joseph

    2005-05-01

    To determine the long-term efficacy of botulinum toxin (BTX) treatments, we analyzed longitudinal follow-up data on 45 patients (32 women; mean age, 68.8 years) currently followed in the Baylor College of Medicine Movement Disorders Clinic, who have received BTX treatments continuously for at least 12 years (mean 15.8 +/- 1.5 years). Their mean response rating after the last injection, based one a previously described scale 0-to-4 scale (0 = no effect; 4 = marked improvement) was 3.7 +/- 0.6 and the mean total duration of response was 15.4 +/- 3.4 weeks. Although the latency and total duration of the response to treatment have not changed over time, the peak duration of response (P < 0.005) and dose per visit (P < 0.0001) have increased since the initial visit. Furthermore, global rating (P < 0.02) and peak effect (P < 0.05) have improved. In total, 20 adverse events occurred in 16 of 45 (35.6%) patients after their initial visit and 11 adverse events in 10 of 45 (22.2%) patients at their most recent injection visit. Antibody (Ab) testing was carried out in 22 patients due to nonresponsiveness; blocking Abs were confirmed by the mouse protection assay in 4 of 22 (18%) patients. Of the Ab-negative patients, 16 resumed responsiveness after dose adjustments and 2 persisted as nonrespondents. Except for 1 patient, the 4 Ab-positive and the 2 clinical nonresponders are being treated with BTX-B. This longest reported follow-up of BTX injections confirms the long-term efficacy and safety of this treatment.

  20. [Botulinum toxin for the treatment of pain syndromes].

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Joaquim J; Couto, Marina; Costa, João; Coelho, Miguel; Rosa, Mário M; Sampaio, Cristina

    2006-01-01

    Although botulinum toxin (BoNT) is being used for therapeutic purposes for more than 20 years, the list of potential new indications continues to increase and includes various pain syndromes. The pain relief experienced by patients with dystonia and spasticity from intramuscular BoNT injections suggested that other chronic skeletal-muscles pain conditions may also benefit. BoNT inhibits the release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction thereby reducing striatal muscle contractions and the proposed analgesic property was initially attributed to muscular relaxation. A specific analgesic BoNT effect is difficult to conclude from studies where pain is conditioned by other associated symptoms like dystonia, muscle contraction or spasticity. One alternative is to critically appraise clinical trials where BoNT was studied as the active intervention and pain evaluated as an outcome. From this analysis there is convincing evidence for the effectiveness of BoNT in the treatment of pain associated with cervical dystonia. For all other pain syndromes there have been relatively few, small sized, placebo-controlled studies (myofascial pain syndrome, chronic neck and low back pain, piriformis syndrome and fibromyalgia) and the results of these studies have been contradictory or non conclusive. To establish the analgesic properties of BoNT there is a need for appropriately designed, exploratory randomized controlled studies in well accepted human models of nociceptive or neuropathic pain. This does not exclude the subsequent need to conduct pragmatic trials to evaluate the effectiveness of BoNT in conditions where the improvement of pain or any associated clinical sign or symptom may be of clinical relevance. PMID:17058384

  1. Therapeutic use of botulinum toxin in migraine: mechanisms of action

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Roshni; Yaksh, Tony L

    2014-01-01

    Migraine pain represents sensations arising from the activation of trigeminal afferents, which innervate the meningeal vasculature and project to the trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC). Pain secondary to meningeal input is referred to extracranial regions innervated by somatic afferents that project to homologous regions in the TNC. Such viscerosomatic convergence accounts for referral of migraine pain arising from meningeal afferents to particular extracranial dermatomes. Botulinum toxins (BoNTs) delivered into extracranial dermatomes are effective in and approved for treating chronic migraine pain. Aside from their well-described effect upon motor endplates, BoNTs are also taken up in local afferent nerve terminals where they cleave soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins, and prevent local terminal release. However, a local extracranial effect of BoNT cannot account for allthe effects of BoNT upon migraine. We now know that peripherally delivered BoNTs are taken up in sensory afferents and transported to cleave SNARE proteins in the ganglion and TNC, prevent evoked afferent release and downstream activation. Such effects upon somatic input (as from the face) likewise would not alone account for block of input from converging meningeal afferents. This current work suggests that BoNTs may undergo transcytosis to cleave SNAREs in second-order neurons or in adjacent afferent terminals. Finally, while SNAREs mediate exocytotic release, they are also involved in transport of channels and receptors involved in facilitated pain states. The role of such post-synaptic effects of BoNT action in migraine remains to be determined. PMID:24819339

  2. Botulinum Toxin Type A (BOTOX) for Refractory Myofascial Pelvic Pain

    PubMed Central

    ADELOWO, Amos; HACKER, Michele R.; SHAPIRO, Alex; Modest, Anna Merport; ELKADRY, Eman

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess intralevator Botulinum toxin type A (Botox) injections for refractory myofascial pelvic pain with short tight pelvic floor. Methods Retrospective cohort study of all women with intralevator Botox injection (100-300 Units) from 2005 through 2010 for refractory myofascial pelvic pain. Primary outcomes were self-reported pain on palpation and symptom improvement. Secondary outcomes included post-injection complications and repeat injection. Pain was assessed during digital palpation of the pelvic floor muscles using a scale of 0-10, with 10 being the worst possible pain. Follow-up occurred at <6 weeks post-injection and again at ≥ 6 weeks. Data are presented as median (interquartile range) or proportion. Results Thirty-one patients met eligibility criteria; 2 were lost to follow up and excluded. Median age was 55.0 years (38.0-62.0). Before Botox injection, median pain score was 9.5 (8.0-10.0). Twenty-nine patients (93.5%) returned for the first follow-up visit; 79.3% reported improvement in pain, while 20.7% reported no improvement. Median pain with levator palpation was significantly lower than before injection (P<0.0001). Eighteen women (58.0%) had a second follow-up visit with a median pain score that remained lower than before injection (P<0.0001). Fifteen (51.7%) women elected to have repeat Botox injection; the median time to repeat injection was 4.0 (3.0-7.0) months. Three (10.3%) women developed de-novo urinary retention, 2 (6.9%) reported fecal incontinence and 3 (10.3%) reported constipation and/or rectal pain; all side effects resolved spontaneously. Conclusions Intralevator injection of Botox demonstrates effectiveness in women with refractory myofascial pelvic pain with few, self-limiting adverse effects. PMID:23982578

  3. Lectins from Triticum vulgaris and Limax flavus are universal antagonists of botulinum neurotoxin and tetanus toxin.

    PubMed

    Bakry, N; Kamata, Y; Simpson, L L

    1991-09-01

    Lectins from Anguilla anguilla, Artocarpus integrifolia, Canavalia ensiformis, Datora stramonium, Glycine max, Limax flavus, Ricinus communis and Triticum vulgaris were tested for their abilities to antagonize the binding of botulinum neurotoxin and tetanus toxin to rat brain membranes and to antagonize the ability of these toxins to block neuromuscular transmission in mouse phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragm preparations. Lectins from Limax flavus and Triticum vulgaris, both of which have affinity for sialic acid, were antagonists of the various serotypes of botulinum neurotoxin and tetanus toxin. When tested against the high affinity binding site for botulinum neurotoxin type B, the lectin from Limax flavus had a Ki of 3.1 x 10(-7) M and the lectin from Triticum vulgaris had a Ki of 3.75 x 10(-7) M. When tested against the high affinity binding site for tetanus toxin, the lectins from Limax flavus and Triticum vulgaris had Ki values of 1.5 x 10(-7) and 1 x 10(-6) M, respectively. In all cases the lectins behaved as competitive antagonists. In reverse experiments, neither botulinum toxin nor tetanus toxin was a very effective antagonist of lectin binding to brain membranes. Studies on isolated neuromuscular preparations showed that the lectin from Triticum vulgaris did not affect transmission at concentrations of 10(-6) to 10(-3) M, but at a concentration of 3 x 10(-5) M the lectin produced highly statistically significant antagonism of the neuromuscular blocking properties of botulinum neurotoxin types A, B, C, D, E and F as well as tetanus toxin. The lectin did not antagonize beta-bungarotoxin.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Attempts to identify Clostridium botulinum toxin in milk from three experimentally intoxicated Holstein cows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moeller, R.B.; Puschner, B.; Walker, R.L.; Rocke, T.E.; Smith, S.R.; Cullor, J.S.; Ardans, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    Three adult lactating Holstein cows were injected in the subcutaneous abdominal vein with 175 ng/kg of body weight of Clostridium botulinum type C toxin (451 cow median toxic doses) to determine if this botulinum toxin crosses the blood-milk barrier. Whole blood (in sodium heparin) and clotted blood serum samples were taken at 0 min, 10 min, and 3, 6, 9, and 12 h postinoculation. Milk samples were taken at 0 min and at 3, 6, 9 and 12 h postinoculation. All samples were tested for the presence of the toxin using the mouse bioassay and immunostick ELISA test. The immunostick ELISA identified the toxin in whole blood and the mouse bioassay identified the toxin in serum at all times examined in all 3 animals. Toxin was not identified by either detection method in milk samples collected from the 3 animals. From these results, it appears that Clostridium botulinum type C toxin does not cross from the blood to the milk in detectable concentrations. ?? American Dairy Science Association, 2009.

  5. Tetanus: Pathophysiology, Treatment, and the Possibility of Using Botulinum Toxin against Tetanus-Induced Rigidity and Spasms

    PubMed Central

    Hassel, Bjørnar

    2013-01-01

    Tetanus toxin, the product of Clostridium tetani, is the cause of tetanus symptoms. Tetanus toxin is taken up into terminals of lower motor neurons and transported axonally to the spinal cord and/or brainstem. Here the toxin moves trans-synaptically into inhibitory nerve terminals, where vesicular release of inhibitory neurotransmitters becomes blocked, leading to disinhibition of lower motor neurons. Muscle rigidity and spasms ensue, often manifesting as trismus/lockjaw, dysphagia, opistotonus, or rigidity and spasms of respiratory, laryngeal, and abdominal muscles, which may cause respiratory failure. Botulinum toxin, in contrast, largely remains in lower motor neuron terminals, inhibiting acetylcholine release and muscle activity. Therefore, botulinum toxin may reduce tetanus symptoms. Trismus may be treated with botulinum toxin injections into the masseter and temporalis muscles. This should probably be done early in the course of tetanus to reduce the risk of pulmonary aspiration, involuntary tongue biting, anorexia and dental caries. Other muscle groups are also amenable to botulinum toxin treatment. Six tetanus patients have been successfully treated with botulinum toxin A. This review discusses the use of botulinum toxin for tetanus in the context of the pathophysiology, symptomatology, and medical treatment of Clostridium tetani infection. PMID:23299659

  6. Vocal aging and adductor spasmodic dysphonia: Response to botulinum toxin injection

    PubMed Central

    Cannito, Michael P; Kahane, Joel C; Chorna, Lesya

    2008-01-01

    Aging of the larynx is characterized by involutional changes which alter its biomechanical and neural properties and create a biological environment that is different from younger counterparts. Illustrative anatomical examples are presented. This natural, non-disease process appears to set conditions which may influence the effectiveness of botulinum toxin injection and our expectations for its success. Adductor spasmodic dysphonia, a type of laryngeal dystonia, is typically treated using botulinum toxin injections of the vocal folds in order to suppress adductory muscle spasms which are disruptive to production of speech and voice. A few studies have suggested diminished response to treatment in older patients with adductor spasmodic dysphonia. This retrospective study provides a reanalysis of existing pre-to-post treatment data as function of age. Perceptual judgments of speech produced by 42 patients with ADSD were made by two panels of professional listeners with expertise in voice or fluency of speech. Results demonstrate a markedly reduced positive response to botulinum toxin treatment in the older patients. Perceptual findings are further elucidated by means of acoustic spectrography. Literature on vocal aging is reviewed to provide a specific set of biological mechanisms that best account for the observed interaction of botulinum toxin treatment with advancing age. PMID:18488884

  7. Thickened Saliva after Effective Management of Drooling with Botulinum Toxin A

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erasmus, Corrie E.; van Hulst, Karen; van den Hoogen, Frank J. A.; van Limbeek, Jacques; Roeleveld, Nel; Veerman, Enno C. I.; Rotteveel, Jan J.; Jongerius, Peter H.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the rheological properties of saliva after submandibular botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) injections. Method: We enrolled 15 children (11 males and six females; age range 3-17y, mean age 9y 10mo) diagnosed with spastic (n=9) or dyskinetic (n=6) quadriplegic cerebral palsy (CP); Gross Motor Function…

  8. Botulinum Toxin A Injection into the Subscapularis Muscle to Treat Intractable Hemiplegic Shoulder Pain

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the beneficial effect of botulinum toxin A (Botox) injection into the subscapularis muscle on intractable hemiplegic shoulder pain. Methods Six stroke patients with intractable hemiplegic shoulder pain were included. Botulinum toxin A was injected into the subscapularis muscle. Intractable hemiplegic shoulder pain was evaluated using an 11-point numerical rating scale. Pain-free range of motion was assessed for shoulder abduction and external rotation. The spasticity of the shoulder internal rotator was measured using the modified Ashworth scale. Assessments were carried out at baseline and at 1, 2, 4, and, if possible, 8 weeks. Results Intractable hemiplegic shoulder pain was improved (p=0.004) after botulinum toxin injection into the subscapularis muscle. Restricted shoulder abduction (p=0.003), external rotation (p=0.005), and spasticity of the shoulder internal rotator (p=0.005) were also improved. Improved hemiplegic shoulder pain was correlated with improved shoulder abduction (r=–1.0, p<0.001), external rotation (r=–1.0, p<0.001), and spasticity of the internal rotator (r=1.0, p<0.001). Conclusion Botulinum toxin A injection into the subscapularis muscle appears to be valuable in the management of intractable hemiplegic shoulder pain.

  9. Elevation of the Corner of the Mouth Using Botulinum Toxin Type A

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Alberto; Wollina, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    Indications for botulinum toxin type A have been constantly evolving, and it can currently be used in virtually any area of the face and neck. The authors present their experience with this neurotoxin in treating the platysmal bands and depressor anguli oris muscle with the purpose of cosmetically improving the anterior neck and lifting the oral commissure. PMID:21430826

  10. Botulinum Toxin A Injection in the Bladder Neck: A Promising Treatment for Urinary Retention

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Marianne; Zgheib, Joseph; El Khoury, Fouad

    2016-01-01

    Secondary to failure of optimal medical therapy and the high morbidity that accompanies surgical techniques in high risk patients, the use of de novo treatments including botulinum toxin A is emerging in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). However, the treatment of urinary retention secondary to BPH via injecting botulinum toxin into the bladder neck is not well established in the literature. This case report describes the case of a 75-year-old male patient with a chronic history of obstructive lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and multiple comorbidities who was admitted to the hospital for management of recurrent urinary retention. The patient was not a surgical candidate for transurethral incision of the prostate (TUIP) or transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). Botulinum toxin injection into the bladder neck was performed with very satisfying results. Botulinum toxin injection in the bladder neck presents a promising minimally invasive, tolerated, and cost-effective approach for the treatment of urinary retention in patients with benign prostatic obstruction who are not candidates for surgery or in whom medical treatment has failed. More research is needed to identify the efficacy of this novel approach. PMID:27088032

  11. Botulinum Toxin A Injection into the Subscapularis Muscle to Treat Intractable Hemiplegic Shoulder Pain

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the beneficial effect of botulinum toxin A (Botox) injection into the subscapularis muscle on intractable hemiplegic shoulder pain. Methods Six stroke patients with intractable hemiplegic shoulder pain were included. Botulinum toxin A was injected into the subscapularis muscle. Intractable hemiplegic shoulder pain was evaluated using an 11-point numerical rating scale. Pain-free range of motion was assessed for shoulder abduction and external rotation. The spasticity of the shoulder internal rotator was measured using the modified Ashworth scale. Assessments were carried out at baseline and at 1, 2, 4, and, if possible, 8 weeks. Results Intractable hemiplegic shoulder pain was improved (p=0.004) after botulinum toxin injection into the subscapularis muscle. Restricted shoulder abduction (p=0.003), external rotation (p=0.005), and spasticity of the shoulder internal rotator (p=0.005) were also improved. Improved hemiplegic shoulder pain was correlated with improved shoulder abduction (r=–1.0, p<0.001), external rotation (r=–1.0, p<0.001), and spasticity of the internal rotator (r=1.0, p<0.001). Conclusion Botulinum toxin A injection into the subscapularis muscle appears to be valuable in the management of intractable hemiplegic shoulder pain. PMID:27606265

  12. Botulinum toxin A in the treatment of Raynaud's phenomenon: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Puszczewicz, Mariusz J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The management of Raynaud's phenomenon in its most severe form is challenging, and current medical and surgical treatment methods frequently do not lead to optimal symptom control and prevention of ischemic complications. The aim of the study was to critically evaluate all existing evidence on the use of botulinum toxin A in the management of Raynaud's phenomenon. Material and methods We adopted the PRISMA methodology and searched Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, SCOPUS, EULAR and ACR congresses abstract archives for Raynaud* AND botulinum toxin OR onabotulinum. All studies that contained reports of botulinum toxin A use and its outcome in Raynaud's phenomenon were included in the review. Results Eleven studies met our inclusion criteria and involved a total of 125 patients. Two reviewers extracted data from the studies under review and achieved a consensus in their selection. The main outcomes measured were pain reduction and healing of digital ulcers. The level of evidence across studies was very low to moderate. Conclusions There is insufficient evidence to assess the efficacy of botulinum toxin A in Raynaud's phenomenon. Despite many promising reports, further research in the form of randomized controlled trials is warranted in order to investigate this new treatment method for Raynaud's phenomenon. PMID:27478469

  13. Botulinum toxin A as a treatment for delayed gastric emptying in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Max L.; Fransson, Boel A.; Barry, Sabrina L.

    2014-01-01

    A toy Australian shepherd dog was referred for bile peritonitis following excision of a biliary mucocele. Subsequent delayed gastric emptying was refractory to prokinetic therapy but responded to injection of botulinum toxin A into the muscularis layer of the pylorus; a novel therapy for delayed gastric emptying in dogs. PMID:24982520

  14. Comparison of Effects of Botulinum Toxin Injection Between Subacute and Chronic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Young-Ho; Choi, Eun-Hi; Lim, Jong Youb

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to compare the effects of botulinum toxin injection between subacute and chronic stroke patients. Eighteen stroke patients (9 subacute and 9 chronic) with spasticity of 1+ or higher in the hemiplegic elbow or wrist joint, based on the modified Ashworth scale were recruited. Modified Ashworth scale, modified Tardieu scale, manual muscle testing, passive range of motion, Brunnstrom stage, modified Barthel index, and Fugl-Meyer scale evaluations of the hemiplegic upper extremity were performed just before the injection and 4 weeks later. A total dose of 200 U of botulinum toxin type A was injected into each patient. One or more of the elbow flexor muscles and one or more of the wrist flexor or finger flexor muscles were included. Modified Ashworth scale, manual muscle testing, passive range of motion, and modified Barthel index results were improved in subacute patients only. However, modified Tardieu scale for the elbow and Fugl-Meyer scale results were improved in both groups, and the improvement was comparable. In conclusion, botulinum toxin injection in subacute patients was more helpful for spasticity, contracture, and function than in chronic patients. However, beneficial effects of botulinum toxin injection on spasticity and function in chronic patients were found in the assessments of the modified Tardieu scale and Fugl-Meyer scale. PMID:26886649

  15. Properties and use of botulinum toxin and other microbial neurotoxins in medicine.

    PubMed Central

    Schantz, E J; Johnson, E A

    1992-01-01

    Crystalline botulinum toxin type A was licensed in December 1989 by the Food and Drug Administration for treatment of certain spasmodic muscle disorders following 10 or more years of experimental treatment on human volunteers. Botulinum toxin exerts its action on a muscle indirectly by blocking the release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine at the nerve ending, resulting in reduced muscle activity or paralysis. The injection of only nanogram quantities (1 ng = 30 mouse 50% lethal doses [U]) of the toxin into a spastic muscle is required to bring about the desired muscle control. The type A toxin produced in anaerobic culture and purified in crystalline form has a specific toxicity in mice of 3 x 10(7) U/mg. The crystalline toxin is a high-molecular-weight protein of 900,000 Mr and is composed of two molecules of neurotoxin (ca. 150,000 Mr) noncovalently bound to nontoxic proteins that play an important role in the stability of the toxic unit and its effective toxicity. Because the toxin is administered by injection directly into neuromuscular tissue, the methods of culturing and purification are vital. Its chemical, physical, and biological properties as applied to its use in medicine are described. Dilution and drying of the toxin for dispensing causes some detoxification, and the mouse assay is the only means of evaluation for human treatment. Other microbial neurotoxins may have uses in medicine; these include serotypes of botulinum toxins and tetanus toxin. Certain neurotoxins produced by dinoflagellates, including saxitoxin and tetrodotoxin, cause muscle paralysis through their effect on the action potential at the voltage-gated sodium channel. Saxitoxin used with anaesthetics lengthens the effect of the anaesthetic and may enhance the effectiveness of other medical drugs. Combining toxins with drugs could increase their effectiveness in treatment of human disease. PMID:1579114

  16. Primary hyperhidrosis: Implications on symptoms, daily life, health and alcohol consumption when treated with botulinum toxin.

    PubMed

    Shayesteh, Alexander; Boman, Jens; Janlert, Urban; Brulin, Christine; Nylander, Elisabet

    2016-08-01

    Primary hyperhidrosis affects approximately 3% of the population and reduces quality of life in affected persons. Few studies have investigated the symptoms of anxiety, depression and hazardous alcohol consumption among those with hyperhidrosis and the effect of treatment with botulinum toxin. The first aim of this study was to investigate the effect of primary hyperhidrosis on mental and physical health, and alcohol consumption. Our second aim was to study whether and how treatment with botulinum toxin changed these effects. One hundred and fourteen patients answered questionnaires regarding hyperhidrosis and symptoms, including hyperhidrosis disease severity scale (HDSS), visual analog scale (VAS) 10-point scale for hyperhidrosis symptoms, hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS), alcohol use disorder identification test (AUDIT) and short-form health survey (SF-36) before treatment with botulinum toxin and 2 weeks after. The age of onset of hyperhidrosis was on average 13.4 years and 48% described heredity for hyperhidrosis. Significant improvements were noted in patients with axillary and palmar hyperhidrosis regarding mean HDSS, VAS 10-point scale, HADS, SF-36 and sweat-related health problems 2 weeks after treatment with botulinum toxin. Changes in mean AUDIT for all participants were not significant. Primary hyperhidrosis mainly impairs mental rather than physical aspects of life and also interferes with specific daily activities of the affected individuals. Despite this, our patients did not show signs of anxiety, depression or hazardous alcohol consumption. Treatment with botulinum toxin reduced sweat-related problems and led to significant improvements in HDSS, VAS, HADS and SF-36 in our patients. PMID:26875781

  17. Sustained improvement of reading symptoms following botulinum toxin A injection for convergence insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Saunte, Jon Peiter; Holmes, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We evaluated the use of botulinum toxin A in adults with convergence insufficiency in whom prior treatment had failed. Methods We studied 8 patients (median age 36 years, range 17 to 77 years) with reading symptoms due to convergence insufficiency defined as an exodeviation greater at near, not exceeding 10 PD in the distance measured by prism and alternate cover test, and either convergence near point >6 cm or reduced fusional amplitudes. All patients were still symptomatic after prior treatment by convergence exercises (n = 8), base-in prism glasses (n = 5) or strabismus surgery (n = 2). Five patients received injection of 5 IU botulinum toxin in 0.1 ml saline to one lateral rectus muscle, two received 2.5 IU, and one received 2.5 IU to both lateral rectus muscles. Results At 1 month post injection, all patients had an initial reduction of exodeviation from baseline (median 9 PD, p = 0.008) at near, although 2 patients had a temporary intermittent esotropia in the distance with diplopia associated with difficulty driving. At 6 months, when the pharmacological effect of botulinum toxin had completely worn off, patients still maintained a small reduction of exodeviation (median 4 PD, p = 0.3) at near. Reading symptoms improved in 7 of 8 patients at 1-month post injection, and in all patients at 6 months. Two patients had health-related quality of life assessed with the Adult Strabismus 20 Questionnaire, showing improved Reading Function scores at 6 months. Interestingly, 3 patients reported improved reading despite returning to the baseline angle at 6 months, and 2 of 4 with 12-month follow-up still reported improvement. Conclusions In adult convergence insufficiency, botulinum toxin injection to a lateral rectus muscle improves reading symptoms beyond the duration of the pure pharmacological effect. Botulinum toxin injection may be useful in management of adult convergence insufficiency, although repeat injections may be needed. PMID:24786379

  18. Channels Formed by Botulinum, Tetanus, and Diphtheria Toxins in Planar Lipid Bilayers: Relevance to Translocation of Proteins across Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoch, David H.; Romero-Mira, Miryam; Ehrlich, Barbara E.; Finkelstein, Alan; Dasgupta, Bibhuti R.; Simpson, Lance L.

    1985-03-01

    The heavy chains of both botulinum neurotoxin type B and tetanus toxin form channels in planar bilayer membranes. These channels have pH-dependent and voltage-dependent properties that are remarkably similar to those previously described for diphtheria toxin. Selectivity experiments with anions and cations show that the channels formed by the heavy chains of all three toxins are large; thus, these channels could serve as ``tunnel proteins'' for translocation of active peptide fragments. These findings support the hypothesis that the active fragments of botulinum neurotoxin and tetanus toxin, like that of diphtheria toxin, are translocated across the membranes of acidic vesicles.

  19. “Non-Toxic” Proteins of the Botulinum Toxin Complex Exert In-vivo Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Miyashita, Shin-Ichiro; Sagane, Yoshimasa; Suzuki, Tomonori; Matsumoto, Takashi; Niwa, Koichi; Watanabe, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    The botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) causes muscle paralysis and is the most potent toxin in nature. BoNT is associated with a complex of auxiliary “Non-Toxic” proteins, which constitute a large-sized toxin complex (L-TC). However, here we report that the “Non-Toxic” complex of serotype D botulinum L-TC, when administered to rats, exerts in-vivo toxicity on small-intestinal villi. Moreover, Serotype C and D of the “Non-Toxic” complex, but not BoNT, induced vacuole-formation in a rat intestinal epithelial cell line (IEC-6), resulting in cell death. Our results suggest that the vacuole was formed in a manner distinct from the mechanism by which Helicobacter pylori vacuolating toxin (VacA) and Vibrio cholerae haemolysin induce vacuolation. We therefore hypothesise that the serotype C and D botulinum toxin complex is a functional hybrid of the neurotoxin and vacuolating toxin (VT) which arose from horizontal gene transfer from an ancestral BoNT-producing bacterium to a hypothetical VT-producing bacterium. PMID:27507612

  20. Improving botulinum toxin therapy for palmar hyperhidrosis: wrist block and technical considerations.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, A R; Kadunc, B V; de Oliveira, E M

    2001-01-01

    Botulinum A exotoxin has become an excellent therapeutic option to treat focal hyperhidrosis, but when the problem affects the palmar region the technique has some drawbacks. Pain with injection is difficult to tolerate and the large dose needed to treat both hands are two concerns, as well as muscle weakness secondary to botulinum toxin diffusion and the possibility of antibody production. All these problems limit the number of patients treated. The author's suggestion is to treat only the dominant hand, after performing a wrist block. The use of a device adapted from a cartridge rubber may help to control the injection depth and the risk of muscular weakness. PMID:11231239

  1. Study on Potential Clostridium Botulinum Growth and Toxin Production in Parma Ham

    PubMed Central

    Ramini, Mattia; Parolari, Giovanni; Barbuti, Silvana; Frustoli, Maria Angela; Taddei, Roberta; Pongolini, Stefano; Ardigò, Paolo; Cozzolino, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate Clostridium botulinum growth and toxin production in the industrially manufactured Italian Parma ham. The study focuses on the Parma ham production phase identified as maximum risk to C. botulinum proliferation, i.e. the transition from cold phase (salting and resting) to a phase carried out at temperature between 15 and 23°C (drying). A preliminary in vitro test was carried out in order to verify the capability of 6 C. botulinum strains (1 type A, 4 type B, and 1 type E strains) to grow in conditions of temperature, pH and NaCl concentration comparable to those of the beginning stage of ham drying. Five C. botulinum strains grew at 20°C and pH 6, four strains produced toxin when inoculated at a concentration equal to 103 cfu/mL at NaCl concentration of 4%, while when the inoculum concentration was 10 cfu/mL, NaCl concentration of 3% resulted the toxin-genesis limiting factor. An experimental contamination with a mixture of the 5 C. botulinum strains selected by the preliminary in vitro test was performed on 9 thighs inoculated at the end of the resting phase. The study was designed to evaluate the potential growth and toxin production in extremely favourable conditions for the bacterium. Type B proteolytic C. botulinum toxin was produced after 14 days of incubation at 20°C in 2 thighs characterised by high weight, low number of days of resting and anomalous physiochemical characteristics [one for very low NaCl concentration (1.59%), the other for elevated pH (6.27) and both for high water activity values (>0.970)]. The results of this research confirm that the cold resting step is a critical phase in the production process of Parma ham for the investigated hazard. Based on the present study, the long resting phase adopted in the manufacturing of Parma ham is proven effective to prevent the growth of C. botulinum, an event which could not otherwise be excluded if the hams were processed under less stringent

  2. Treatment Efficacy of Electromyography versus Fiberscopy-Guided Botulinum Toxin Injection in Adductor Spasmodic Dysphonia Patients: A Prospective Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Wook; Park, Jae Hong; Park, Ki Nam; Lee, Seung Won

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. This study prospectively evaluates and compares the treatment efficacy of botulinum toxin injection under electromyography guidance (EMG group) and percutaneous botulinum toxin injection under flexible fiberscopic guidance (fiberscopy group). Methods. Thirty patients with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD), who had never received treatment, were randomly allocated into EMG- or fiberscopy-guided botulinum toxin injections between March 2008 and February 2010. We assessed acoustic and aerodynamic voice parameters, and the voice handicap index (VHI) before injection and at 1, 3, and 6 months after injection. Results. The mean total dosage of botulinum toxin was similar for both groups: 1.7 ± 0.5 U for the EMG group and 1.8 ± 0.4 U for the fiberscopy group (P > 0.05). There were no significant differences in outcomes between the two groups in either the duration of effectiveness or complications such as breathy voice and aspiration. Conclusion. Botulinum toxin injection under fiberscopic guidance is a viable alternative to EMG-guided botulinum toxin injection for the treatment of adductor spasmodic dysphonia when EMG equipment is unavailable. PMID:25383369

  3. No clinical or neurophysiological evidence of botulinum toxin diffusion to non-injected muscles in patients with hemifacial spasm.

    PubMed

    Lorenzano, C; Bagnato, S; Gilio, F; Fabbrini, G; Berardelli, A

    2006-04-01

    Botulinum toxin injected into a muscle may diffuse to nearby muscles thus producing unwanted effects. In patients with hemifacial spasm, we evaluated clinically and neurophysiologically, whether botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) diffuses from the injection site (orbicularis oculi) to untreated muscles (orbicularis oris from the affected side and orbicularis oculi and oris from the unaffected side). We studied 38 patients with idiopathic hemifacial spasm. Botulinum toxin was injected into the affected orbicularis oculi muscle alone (at 3 standardized sites) at a clinically effective dose. Patients were studied before (T0) and 3-4 weeks after treatment (T1). We evaluated the clinical effects of botulinum toxin and muscle strength in the affected and unaffected muscles. We also assessed the peak-to-peak amplitude compound muscle action potential (CMAP) recorded from the orbicularis oculi and orbicularis oris muscles on both sides after supramaximal electrical stimulation of the facial nerve at the stylomastoid foramen. In all patients, botulinum toxin treatment reduced muscle spasms in the injected orbicularis oculi muscle and induced no muscle weakness in the other facial muscles. The CMAP amplitude significantly decreased in the injected orbicularis oculi muscle, but remained unchanged in the other facial muscles (orbicularis oris muscle on the affected side and contra-lateral unaffected muscles). In conclusion, in patients with hemifacial spasm, botulinum toxin, at a clinically effective dose, induces no clinical signs of diffusion and does not reduce the CMAP size in the nearby untreated orbicularis oris or contralateral facial muscles.

  4. Multipoint and multilevel injection technique of botulinum toxin A in facial aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Iozzo, Ivano; Tengattini, Vera; Antonucci, Valentina A

    2014-06-01

    Botulinum toxin represents one of the most frequently requested cosmetic procedures. We treated 223 patients with facial wrinkles using a new technique of injection of botulinum toxin A (BTA) called multipoint and multilevel injection technique (MMIT). The aim of MMIT was to relax the muscle and not paralyze it. Patient satisfaction was evaluated by Facial Line Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire (FTSQ). Treatment with botulinum toxin determined a good response in all patients. Facial rhytids were completely resolved in case of young skin and well reduced in case of aged skin, leaving a natural aspect both in static and dynamic wrinkles. Patient mean overall satisfaction evaluated with FTSQ was 6.4 ± 1.1. In our experience, the use of botulin toxin by MMIT consents a better calibration of action with a soft and natural result. This can be achieved by distributing the BTA dose through various injection points for each area ("multipoint injections"). Furthermore, injections can be performed at different levels ("multilevel injections"). The level of injections regulates the potency of effect on the muscle: if the level is deep (intramuscular), the effect will be strong while if it is medium or superficial (subcutaneous and intradermal), the effect will be soft. This consents a fine calibration of action on muscle activity with a personal aesthetic result.

  5. Analyzing a bioterror attack on the food supply: The case of botulinum toxin in milk

    PubMed Central

    Wein, Lawrence M.; Liu, Yifan

    2005-01-01

    We developed a mathematical model of a cows-to-consumers supply chain associated with a single milk-processing facility that is the victim of a deliberate release of botulinum toxin. Because centralized storage and processing lead to substantial dilution of the toxin, a minimum amount of toxin is required for the release to do damage. Irreducible uncertainties regarding the dose–response curve prevent us from quantifying the minimum effective release. However, if terrorists can obtain enough toxin, and this may well be possible, then rapid distribution and consumption result in several hundred thousand poisoned individuals if detection from early symptomatics is not timely. Timely and specific in-process testing has the potential to eliminate the threat of this scenario at a cost of <1 cent per gallon and should be pursued aggressively. Investigation of improving the toxin inactivation rate of heat pasteurization without sacrificing taste or nutrition is warranted. PMID:15985558

  6. A Monoclonal Antibody Based Capture ELISA for Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype B: Toxin Detection in Food

    PubMed Central

    Stanker, Larry H.; Scotcher, Miles C.; Cheng, Luisa; Ching, Kathryn; McGarvey, Jeffery; Hodge, David; Hnasko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Botulism is a serious foodborne neuroparalytic disease, caused by botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), produced by the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium botulinum. Seven toxin serotypes (A – H) have been described. The majority of human cases of botulism are caused by serotypes A and B followed by E and F. We report here a group of serotype B specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) capable of binding toxin under physiological conditions. Thus, they serve as capture antibodies for a sandwich (capture) ELISA. The antibodies were generated using recombinant peptide fragments corresponding to the receptor-binding domain of the toxin heavy chain as immunogen. Their binding properties suggest that they bind a complex epitope with dissociation constants (KD’s) for individual antibodies ranging from 10 to 48 × 10−11 M. Assay performance for all possible combinations of capture-detector antibody pairs was evaluated and the antibody pair resulting in the lowest level of detection (L.O.D.), ~20 pg/mL was determined. Toxin was detected in spiked dairy samples with good recoveries at concentrations as low as 0.5 pg/mL and in ground beef samples at levels as low as 2 ng/g. Thus, the sandwich ELISA described here uses mAb for both the capture and detector antibodies (binding different epitopes on the toxin molecule) and readily detects toxin in those food samples tested. PMID:24253240

  7. Use of botulinum toxin type A in the management of patients with neurological disorders: a national survey

    PubMed Central

    Smania, Nicola; Colosimo, Carlo; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita; Sandrini, Giorgio; Picelli, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Summary The aim of this survey was to provide an overview of important issues relating to therapeutic strategies based on botulinum toxin type A injection for the treatment of patients with neurological disorders. Two hundred and ten physicians from neurology and neurorehabilitation units in Italian hospitals answered a questionnaire exploring some clinical aspects of the use of botulinum toxin type A in patients with spasticity/dystonia. 66% of the physicians treated patients with dystonia, 80% treated adults with spasticity, and 35% treated children with cerebral palsy. Palpation with no instrumental guidance was the injection technique most commonly used for treating patients with dystonia, spasticity and cerebral palsy; 57% of the physicians evaluated patients instrumentally before toxin injection, while 45% assessed post-injection improvements by instrumental means; 78% of the physicians prescribed (when appropriate) rehabilitation procedures after toxin injection. Our results seem to show that the routine use of botulinum toxin in clinics is far from standardized. PMID:24598392

  8. Botulinum Toxin Treatment of Autonomic Disorders: Focal Hyperhidrosis and Sialorrhea.

    PubMed

    Hosp, Christine; Naumann, Markus K; Hamm, Henning

    2016-02-01

    Primary focal hyperhidrosis is a common autonomic disorder that significantly impacts quality of life. It is characterized by excessive sweating confined to circumscribed areas, such as the axillae, palms, soles, and face. Less frequent types of focal hyperhidrosis secondary to underlying causes include gustatory sweating in Frey's syndrome and compensatory sweating in Ross' syndrome and after sympathectomy. Approval of onabotulinumtoxinA for severe primary axillary hyperhidrosis in 2004 has revolutionized the treatment of this indication. Meanwhile further type A botulinum neurotoxins like abobotulinumtoxinA and incobotulinumtoxinA, as well as the type B botulinum neurotoxin rimabotulinumtoxinB are successfully used off-label for axillary and various other types of focal hyperhidrosis. For unexplained reasons, the duration of effect differs considerably at different sites. Beside hyperhidrosis, botulinum neurotoxin is also highly valued for the treatment of sialorrhea affecting patients with Parkinson's disease, cerebral palsy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, motor neuron disease, and other neurologic conditions. With correct dosing and application, side effects are manageable and transient. PMID:26866492

  9. Botulinum Toxin Treatment of Autonomic Disorders: Focal Hyperhidrosis and Sialorrhea.

    PubMed

    Hosp, Christine; Naumann, Markus K; Hamm, Henning

    2016-02-01

    Primary focal hyperhidrosis is a common autonomic disorder that significantly impacts quality of life. It is characterized by excessive sweating confined to circumscribed areas, such as the axillae, palms, soles, and face. Less frequent types of focal hyperhidrosis secondary to underlying causes include gustatory sweating in Frey's syndrome and compensatory sweating in Ross' syndrome and after sympathectomy. Approval of onabotulinumtoxinA for severe primary axillary hyperhidrosis in 2004 has revolutionized the treatment of this indication. Meanwhile further type A botulinum neurotoxins like abobotulinumtoxinA and incobotulinumtoxinA, as well as the type B botulinum neurotoxin rimabotulinumtoxinB are successfully used off-label for axillary and various other types of focal hyperhidrosis. For unexplained reasons, the duration of effect differs considerably at different sites. Beside hyperhidrosis, botulinum neurotoxin is also highly valued for the treatment of sialorrhea affecting patients with Parkinson's disease, cerebral palsy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, motor neuron disease, and other neurologic conditions. With correct dosing and application, side effects are manageable and transient.

  10. Combined Treatment with Botulinum Toxin and 595-nm Pulsed Dye Laser for Traumatic Scarring.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Ju; Jeong, Se Yeong; No, Yeon A; Park, Kui Young; Kim, Beom Joo

    2015-12-01

    Traumatic scars on skin covering areas of high movement, especially areas on the face, can be stressful for patients. We report two cases of traumatic scars that occurred on the chin, and that were successfully treated with a combined therapy of 595-nm pulsed dye laser (PDL) and intramuscular injection of botulinum toxin. After the treatment, good cosmetic results were achieved in both patients. The only adverse effect during and after the treatments was mild pain, which resolved within several days without any additional treatment. In conclusion, the combination of 595-nm PDL and intramuscular botulinum toxin injection was shown to be a safe and effective treatment for traumatic scars on the mobile chin area in Korean patients. PMID:26719648

  11. Type A botulinum toxin: a new treatment for axillary and palmar hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Rusciani, Luigi; Severino, Enzo; Rusciani, Antonio

    2002-09-01

    Hyperhidrosis is an invalidating condition, and one that is difficult to treat. It is characterized by an excessive and uncontrolled production of sweat by the sweat glands, often causing psychological, social, and occupational problems for the patient. Hyperhidrosis can be distinguished in two forms: idiopathic (of unknown etiology), or secondary, due to an alteration of the endocrine system (ex: hyperthyroidism, neuropathy, neoplasia etc.) It is found in about 0.3-0.5% of the population and can be localized (axillary, palmar, plantar, facial) or diffused. The subcutaneous injection of type A botulinum toxin, until now used only for the treatment of blepharospasm or hemifacial spasm, has shown to be a useful treatment for localized hyperhidrosis. The objective of the authors is to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy, safety, and management of botulinum toxin treatment in patients affected with axillary or palmar hyperhidrosis resistant to conventional therapies. PMID:12847738

  12. Variable ptosis after botulinum toxin type a injection with positive ice test mimicking ocular myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Alaraj, Ahmad M; Oystreck, Darren T; Bosley, Thomas M

    2013-06-01

    We describe a patient who received cosmetic botulinum toxin type A injections to the brow and subsequently developed unilateral ptosis that was variable during examination and was transiently improved after the ice pack test. Ptosis gradually resolved spontaneously over approximately 3 months. This is the third patient to have variable ptosis documented after botulinum toxin type A injection to the brow and the second to have a positive ice test. The ice test is not completely specific for myasthenia gravis but may, at times, improve ptosis resulting from other defects at the neuromuscular junction. Wound botulism now is much more common because of illicit drug use, and the ice test also might be positive in this setting.

  13. Treatment of recalcitrant idiopathic muscular torticollis in infants with botulinum toxin type a.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Michelle B; de Chalain, Tristan M B

    2005-03-01

    Congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) is the most common form of torticollis in children, significantly outnumbering orthopedic, neurologic, and ocular causes. CMT may present as a palpable sternomastoid tumor (SMT) or a simple tightness of the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM), designated as idiopathic muscular torticollis (IMT). Muscular torticollis has been associated with positional plagiocephaly in neonates who slept in the supine position. We have had difficulty in treating some of these combined cases by traditional methods such as physiotherapy, stretching exercises, and molding helmets. In November 2000, we began injecting botulinum toxin type A in cases in which there was persistent IMT, despite significant physical therapy input. The 15 patients included in this retrospective study all presented with IMT and positional plagiocephaly; all had responded poorly to conservative treatment, including physiotherapy, stretching exercises, or use of a helmet. In the attempt to avoid progression to surgical release, these patients were treated with botulinum toxin injected into the affected SCM and subsequent additional physiotherapy. All appeared to respond well, and a retrospective analysis of this treatment strategy was undertaken. Information gathered included a questionnaire, skull-shape tracings, and photographs. Independent outcome assessment data were then obtained from the regional child development teams and community physiotherapists. These results show that 14 of 15 children with recalcitrant IMT and positional plagiocephaly treated with botulinum toxin obtained sufficient improvement in neck range of motion and head position as to make surgical release of the muscle unnecessary. Our conclusion is that the use of botulinum toxin is a safe and effective adjunct to physical therapy in treating recalcitrant IMT; in selected cases, it may obviate the need for surgical release of a tight but nonfibrotic SCM.

  14. Botulinum Toxin Treatment of Blepharospasm, Orofacial/Oromandibular Dystonia, and Hemifacial Spasm.

    PubMed

    Karp, Barbara Illowsky; Alter, Katharine

    2016-02-01

    Blepharospasm is a focal dystonia characterized by involuntary, repetitive eye closure. Orofacial and oromandibular dystonia describe involuntary dystonic movements of orofacial and oromandibular musculature. Hemifacial spasm is characterized by repetitive synchronous contraction of facial nerve innervated muscles on one side of the face. In this article, the clinical presentation, epidemiology, and approaches to treatment are reviewed. Technical aspects of using botulinum toxin for treatment and reported outcomes are discussed.

  15. Clinical and image improvement of Raynaud's phenomenon after botulinum toxin type A treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, HongMei; Lian, YaJun

    2015-08-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon is often accompanied by pain, digital ulceration and compromised daily activities. Pharmacological therapy or sympathectomies have been administered to diminish these symptoms but existing treatments are not invariably efficacious. A recent case series has described the use of botulinum toxin type A in the treatment of Raynaud's phenomenon. We report two patients with severe or mild Raynaud's phenomenon who were injected with BTX-A; both of whom experienced clinical and image improvement after treatment.

  16. Analysis of the mechanisms that underlie absorption of botulinum toxin by the inhalation route.

    PubMed

    Al-Saleem, Fetweh H; Ancharski, Denise M; Joshi, Suresh G; Elias, M; Singh, Ajay; Nasser, Zidoon; Simpson, Lance L

    2012-12-01

    Botulinum toxin is a highly potent oral and inhalation poison, which means that the toxin must have an efficient mechanism for penetration of epithelial barriers. To date, three models for toxin passage across epithelial barriers have been proposed: (i) the toxin itself undergoes binding and transcytosis; (ii) an auxiliary protein, HA35, transports toxin from the apical to the basal side of epithelial cells; and (iii) an auxiliary protein, HA35, acts on the basal side of epithelial cells to disrupt tight junctions, and this permits paracellular flux of toxin. These models were evaluated by studying toxin absorption following inhalation exposure in mice. Three types of experiments were conducted. In the first, the potency of pure neurotoxin was compared with that of progenitor toxin complex, which contains HA35. The results showed that the rate and extent of toxin absorption, as well as the potency of absorbed toxin, did not depend upon, nor were they enhanced by, the presence of HA35. In the second type of experiment, the potencies of pure neurotoxin and progenitor toxin complex were compared in the absence or presence of antibodies on the apical side of epithelial cells. Antibodies directed against the neurotoxin protected against challenge, but antibodies against HA35 did not. In the final type of experiment, the potency of pure neurotoxin and toxin complex was compared in animals pretreated to deliver antibodies to the basal side of epithelial cells. Once again, antibodies directed against the neurotoxin provided resistance to challenge, but antibodies directed against HA35 did not. Taken collectively, the data indicate that the toxin by itself is capable of crossing epithelial barriers. The data do not support any hypothesis in which HA35 is essential for toxin penetration of epithelial barriers.

  17. Association of toxin-producing Clostridium botulinum with the macroalga Cladophora in the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chun, Chan Lan; Ochsner, Urs; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.; Whitman, Richard L.; Tepp, William H.; Lin, Guangyun; Johnson, Eric A.; Peller, Julie; Sadowsky, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Avian botulism, a paralytic disease of birds, often occurs on a yearly cycle and is increasingly becoming more common in the Great Lakes. Outbreaks are caused by bird ingestion of neurotoxins produced by Clostridium botulinum, a spore-forming, gram-positive, anaerobe. The nuisance, macrophytic, green alga Cladophora (Chlorophyta; mostly Cladophora glomerata L.) is a potential habitat for the growth of C. botulinum. A high incidence of botulism in shoreline birds at Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore (SLBE) in Lake Michigan coincides with increasingly massive accumulations of Cladophora in nearshore waters. In this study, free-floating algal mats were collected from SLBE and other shorelines of the Great Lakes between June and October 2011. The abundance of C. botulinum in algal mats was quantified and the type of botulism neurotoxin (bont) genes associated with this organism were determined by using most-probable-number PCR (MPN-PCR) and five distinct bont gene-specific primers (A, B, C, E, and F). The MPN-PCR results showed that 16 of 22 (73%) algal mats from the SLBE and 23 of 31(74%) algal mats from other shorelines of the Great Lakes contained the bont type E (bont/E) gene. C. botulinum was present up to 15 000 MPN per gram dried algae based on gene copies of bont/E. In addition, genes for bont/A and bont/B, which are commonly associated with human diseases, were detected in a few algal samples. Moreover, C. botulinum was present as vegetative cells rather than as dormant spores in Cladophora mats. Mouse toxin assays done using supernatants from enrichment of Cladophora containing high densities of C. botulinum (>1000 MPN/g dried algae) showed that Cladophora-borne C. botulinum were toxin-producing species (BoNT/E). Our results indicate that Cladophora provides a habitat for C. botulinum, warranting additional studies to better understand the relationship between this bacterium and the alga, and how this interaction potentially contributes to botulism

  18. Association of toxin-producing Clostridium botulinum with the macroalga Cladophora in the Great Lakes.

    PubMed

    Chun, Chan Lan; Ochsner, Urs; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N; Whitman, Richard L; Tepp, William H; Lin, Guangyun; Johnson, Eric A; Peller, Julie; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2013-03-19

    Avian botulism, a paralytic disease of birds, often occurs on a yearly cycle and is increasingly becoming more common in the Great Lakes. Outbreaks are caused by bird ingestion of neurotoxins produced by Clostridium botulinum, a spore-forming, gram-positive, anaerobe. The nuisance, macrophytic, green alga Cladophora (Chlorophyta; mostly Cladophora glomerata L.) is a potential habitat for the growth of C. botulinum. A high incidence of botulism in shoreline birds at Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore (SLBE) in Lake Michigan coincides with increasingly massive accumulations of Cladophora in nearshore waters. In this study, free-floating algal mats were collected from SLBE and other shorelines of the Great Lakes between June and October 2011. The abundance of C. botulinum in algal mats was quantified and the type of botulism neurotoxin (bont) genes associated with this organism were determined by using most-probable-number PCR (MPN-PCR) and five distinct bont gene-specific primers (A, B, C, E, and F). The MPN-PCR results showed that 16 of 22 (73%) algal mats from the SLBE and 23 of 31(74%) algal mats from other shorelines of the Great Lakes contained the bont type E (bont/E) gene. C. botulinum was present up to 15000 MPN per gram dried algae based on gene copies of bont/E. In addition, genes for bont/A and bont/B, which are commonly associated with human diseases, were detected in a few algal samples. Moreover, C. botulinum was present as vegetative cells rather than as dormant spores in Cladophora mats. Mouse toxin assays done using supernatants from enrichment of Cladophora containing high densities of C. botulinum (>1000 MPN/g dried algae) showed that Cladophora-borne C. botulinum were toxin-producing species (BoNT/E). Our results indicate that Cladophora provides a habitat for C. botulinum, warranting additional studies to better understand the relationship between this bacterium and the alga, and how this interaction potentially contributes to botulism

  19. Arrangement of the Clostridium baratii F7 Toxin Gene Cluster with Identification of a σ Factor That Recognizes the Botulinum Toxin Gene Cluster Promoters

    DOE PAGES

    Dover, Nir; Barash, Jason R.; Burke, Julianne N.; Hill, Karen K.; Detter, John C.; Arnon, Stephen S.

    2014-05-22

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is the most poisonous substances known and its eight toxin types (A to H) are distinguished by the inability of polyclonal antibodies that neutralize one toxin type to neutralize any of the other seven toxin types. Infant botulism, an intestinal toxemia orphan disease, is the most common form of human botulism in the United States. It results from swallowed spores of Clostridium botulinum (or rarely, neurotoxigenic Clostridium butyricum or Clostridium baratii) that germinate and temporarily colonize the lumen of the large intestine, where, as vegetative cells, they produce botulinum toxin. Botulinum neurotoxin is encoded by the bontmore » gene that is part of a toxin gene cluster that includes several accessory genes. In this paper, we sequenced for the first time the complete botulinum neurotoxin gene cluster of nonproteolytic C. baratii type F7. Like the type E and the nonproteolytic type F6 botulinum toxin gene clusters, the C. baratii type F7 had an orfX toxin gene cluster that lacked the regulatory botR gene which is found in proteolytic C. botulinum strains and codes for an alternative σ factor. In the absence of botR, we identified a putative alternative regulatory gene located upstream of the C. baratii type F7 toxin gene cluster. This putative regulatory gene codes for a predicted σ factor that contains DNA-binding-domain homologues to the DNA-binding domains both of BotR and of other members of the TcdR-related group 5 of the σ70 family that are involved in the regulation of toxin gene expression in clostridia. We showed that this TcdR-related protein in association with RNA polymerase core enzyme specifically binds to the C. baratii type F7 botulinum toxin gene cluster promoters. Finally, this TcdR-related protein may therefore be involved in regulating the expression of the genes of the botulinum toxin gene cluster in neurotoxigenic C. baratii.« less

  20. The Role of Botulinum Toxin Type A in the Clinical Management of Refractory Anterior Knee Pain.

    PubMed

    Singer, Barbara J; Silbert, Benjamin I; Silbert, Peter L; Singer, Kevin P

    2015-09-01

    Anterior knee pain is a highly prevalent condition affecting largely young to middle aged adults. Symptoms can recur in more than two thirds of cases, often resulting in activity limitation and reduced participation in employment and recreational pursuits. Persistent anterior knee pain is difficult to treat and many individuals eventually consider a surgical intervention. Evidence for long term benefit of most conservative treatments or surgical approaches is currently lacking. Injection of Botulinum toxin type A to the distal region of vastus lateralis muscle causes a short term functional "denervation" which moderates the influence of vastus lateralis muscle on the knee extensor mechanism and increases the relative contribution of the vastus medialis muscle. Initial data suggest that, compared with other interventions for anterior knee pain, Botulinum toxin type A injection, in combination with an active exercise programme, can lead to sustained relief of symptoms, reduced health care utilisation and increased activity participation. The procedure is less invasive than surgical intervention, relatively easy to perform, and is time- and cost-effective. Further studies, including larger randomized placebo-controlled trials, are required to confirm the effectiveness of Botulinum toxin type A injection for anterior knee pain and to elaborate the possible mechanisms underpinning pain and symptom relief. PMID:26308056

  1. Botulinum toxin injection to facilitate rehabilitation of muscle imbalance syndromes in sports medicine.

    PubMed

    Cullen, D M; Boyle, J J W; Silbert, P L; Singer, B J; Singer, K P

    2007-12-15

    Intramuscular injection of Botulinum toxin to produce reduction of focal muscle overactivity, and localized muscle spasm, has been utilized therapeutically for almost two decades. Muscle overactivity in neurologically normal muscle, where an imbalance exists between a relatively overactive muscle and its less active synergist or antagonist, can inhibit control of the antagonist producing a functional muscle imbalance. This brief review provides an overview of the role of muscle imbalance in sports-related pain and dysfunction, and outlines the potential for intramuscular injection of Botulinum toxin to be used as an adjunct to specific muscle re-education and functional rehabilitation in this patient group. A comprehensive understanding of normal movement and the requirements of the sporting activity are essential to allow accurate diagnosis of abnormal motor patterns and to re-educate more appropriate movement strategies. Therapeutic management of co-impairments may include stretching of tight soft tissues, specific re-education aimed at isolation of the non-dominant weak muscles and improvement in their activation, 'unlearning' of faulty motor patterns, and eventual progression onto functional exercises to anticipate gradual return to sporting activity. Intramuscular injection of Botulinum toxin, in carefully selected cases, provides short term reduction of focal muscle overactivity, and may facilitate activation of relatively 'inhibited' muscles and assist the restoration of more appropriate motor patterns.

  2. Ultrasound-guided botulinum toxin A injection: an alternative treatment for dribbling.

    PubMed

    Marina, M B; Sani, A; Hamzaini, A H; Hamidon, B B

    2008-06-01

    Dribbling (sialorrhoea) affects about 10 per cent of patients with chronic neurological disease. The variety of treatments currently available is unsatisfactory. This study was a clinical trial of the efficacy of ultrasound-guided, intraglandular injection of botulinum toxin A for dribbling, performed within the otorhinolaryngology department of the National University of Malaysia. Both pairs of parotid and submandibular glands received 25 U each of botulinum toxin A. Twenty patients were enrolled in the study. The median age was 15 years. All 20 patients (or their carers) reported a distinct improvement in symptoms after injection. Using the Wilcoxon signed rank test, there were significant reductions in dribbling rating score, dribbling frequency score, dribbling severity score, dribbling visual analogue score and towel changes score, comparing pre- and post-injection states (p<0.001). There were no complications or adverse effects during or after the injection procedure. Intraglandular, major salivary gland injection of botulinum toxin A is an effective treatment to reduce dribbling. Ultrasound guidance enhances the accuracy of this procedure and minimises the risk of complication.

  3. The Role of Botulinum Toxin Type A in the Clinical Management of Refractory Anterior Knee Pain

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Barbara J.; Silbert, Benjamin I.; Silbert, Peter L.; Singer, Kevin P.

    2015-01-01

    Anterior knee pain is a highly prevalent condition affecting largely young to middle aged adults. Symptoms can recur in more than two thirds of cases, often resulting in activity limitation and reduced participation in employment and recreational pursuits. Persistent anterior knee pain is difficult to treat and many individuals eventually consider a surgical intervention. Evidence for long term benefit of most conservative treatments or surgical approaches is currently lacking. Injection of Botulinum toxin type A to the distal region of vastus lateralis muscle causes a short term functional “denervation” which moderates the influence of vastus lateralis muscle on the knee extensor mechanism and increases the relative contribution of the vastus medialis muscle. Initial data suggest that, compared with other interventions for anterior knee pain, Botulinum toxin type A injection, in combination with an active exercise programme, can lead to sustained relief of symptoms, reduced health care utilisation and increased activity participation. The procedure is less invasive than surgical intervention, relatively easy to perform, and is time- and cost-effective. Further studies, including larger randomized placebo-controlled trials, are required to confirm the effectiveness of Botulinum toxin type A injection for anterior knee pain and to elaborate the possible mechanisms underpinning pain and symptom relief. PMID:26308056

  4. Sensing the Deadliest Toxin: Technologies for Botulinum Neurotoxin Detection

    PubMed Central

    Čapek, Petr; Dickerson, Tobin J.

    2010-01-01

    Sensitive and rapid detection of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), the most poisonous substances known to date, is essential for studies of medical applications of BoNTs and detection of poisoned food, as well as for response to potential bioterrorist threats. Currently, the most common method of BoNT detection is the mouse bioassay. While this assay is sensitive, it is slow, quite expensive, has limited throughput and requires sacrificing animals. Herein, we discuss and compare recently developed alternative in vitro detection methods and assess their ability to supplement or replace the mouse bioassay in the analysis of complex matrix samples. PMID:22069545

  5. Survey of Botulinum Toxin Injections in Anticoagulated Patients: Korean Physiatrists' Preference in Controlling Anticoagulation Profile Prior to Intramuscular Injection

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Yongjun; Park, Geun-Young; Park, Jihye; Choi, Asayeon; Kim, Soo Yeon; Boulias, Chris; Phadke, Chetan P.; Ismail, Farooq

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate Korean physiatrists' practice of performing intramuscular botulinum toxin injection in anticoagulated patients and to assess their preference in controlling the bleeding risk before injection. Methods As part of an international collaboration survey study, a questionnaire survey was administered to 100 Korean physiatrists. Physiatrists were asked about their level of experience with botulinum toxin injection, the safe international normalized ratio range in anticoagulated patients undergoing injection, their tendency for injecting into deep muscles, and their experience of bleeding complications. Results International normalized ratio <2.0 was perceived as an ideal range for performing Botulinum toxin injection by 41% of the respondents. Thirty-six respondents replied that the international normalized ratio should be lowered to sub-therapeutic levels before injection, and 18% of the respondents reported that anticoagulants should be intentionally withheld and discontinued prior to injection. In addition, 20%–30% of the respondents answered that they were uncertain whether they should perform the injection regardless of the international normalized ratio values. About 69% of the respondents replied that they did have any standardized protocols for performing botulinum toxin injection in patients using anticoagulants. Only 1 physiatrist replied that he had encountered a case of compartment syndrome. Conclusion In accordance with the lack of consensus in performing intramuscular botulinum toxin injection in anticoagulated patients, our survey shows a wide range of practices among many Korean physiatrists; they tend to avoid botulinum toxin injection in anticoagulated patients and are uncertain about how to approach these patients. The results of this study emphasize the need for formulating a proper international consensus on botulinum toxin injection management in anticoagulated patients. PMID:27152278

  6. Botulinum Toxin for Neuropathic Pain: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Hyun-Mi; Chung, Myung Eun

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), derived from Clostridium botulinum, has been used therapeutically for focal dystonia, spasticity, and chronic migraine. Its spectrum as a potential treatment for neuropathic pain has grown. Recent opinions on the mechanism behind the antinociceptive effects of BoNT suggest that it inhibits the release of peripheral neurotransmitters and inflammatory mediators from sensory nerves. There is some evidence showing the axonal transport of BoNT, but it remains controversial. The aim of this review is to summarize the experimental and clinical evidence of the antinociceptive effects, mechanisms, and therapeutic applications of BoNT for neuropathic pain conditions, including postherpetic neuralgia, complex regional pain syndrome, and trigeminal neuralgia. The PubMed and OvidSP databases were searched from 1966 to May 2015. We assessed levels of evidence according to the American Academy of Neurology guidelines. Recent studies have suggested that BoNT injection is an effective treatment for postherpetic neuralgia and is likely efficient for trigeminal neuralgia and post-traumatic neuralgia. BoNT could also be effective as a treatment for diabetic neuropathy. It has not been proven to be an effective treatment for occipital neuralgia or complex regional pain syndrome. PMID:26287242

  7. Botulinum Toxin A for Bladder Pain Syndrome/Interstitial Cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Bin; Tai, Huai-Ching; Chung, Shiu-Dong; Birder, Lori A.

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT-A), derived from Clostridium botulinum, has been used clinically for several diseases or syndrome including chronic migraine, spasticity, focal dystonia and other neuropathic pain. Chronic pelvic or bladder pain is the one of the core symptoms of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC). However, in the field of urology, chronic bladder or pelvic pain is often difficult to eradicate by oral medications or bladder instillation therapy. We are looking for new treatment modality to improve bladder pain or associated urinary symptoms such as frequency and urgency for patients with BPS/IC. Recent studies investigating the mechanism of the antinociceptive effects of BoNT A suggest that it can inhibit the release of peripheral neurotransmitters and inflammatory mediators from sensory nerves. In this review, we will examine the evidence supporting the use of BoNTs in bladder pain from basic science models and review the clinical studies on therapeutic applications of BoNT for BPS/IC. PMID:27376330

  8. Use of botulinum toxin in individuals with neurogenic detrusor overactivity: State of the art review

    PubMed Central

    Linsenmeyer, Todd A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) injection into the bladder wall has been shown to be an effective alternative to anticholinergic (antimuscarinic) medications and more invasive surgery in those with multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) and urinary incontinence who are not tolerating anticholinergic medications. In August 2011, Botox® (onabotulinumtoxinA) received Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for this use. Clinically, intradetrusor injection of BoNT has been found to decrease urinary incontinence and improve quality of life. Its impact on urodynamic parameters is an increase in the maximum cystometric (bladder) capacity and decrease in the maximum detrusor pressures. The most common side effects are urinary tract infections and urinary retention. There have been rare reports and a black box warning of distant spread of BoNT. BoNT has gained popularity because of its effectiveness and long duration of action, relative ease of administration, easy learning curve, reproducibility of results on repeated administration, and low incidence of complications. Objective To discuss the structure and function, mechanisms of action, clinical and urodynamic studies, injection technique, potential beneficial and adverse effects, and potential areas of research of BoNT. Methods Literature search focused on botulinum toxin in MEDLINE/PubMed. Search terms included botulinum toxin, neurogenic bladder, NDO, botox bladder, botox spinal cord injury, botox, FDA, botox side effects. All papers identified were English language, full-text papers. In addition, English abstracts of non-English papers were noted. The reference list of identified articles was also searched for further papers. Conclusion Botulinum toxin is an alternative treatment for individuals with NDO who fail to tolerate anticholinergic medications. Its popularity has increased because of the literature, which has supported its effectiveness, safety, easy

  9. Botulinum toxin for the treatment of myofascial pain syndromes involving the neck and back: a review from a clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Climent, José M; Kuan, Ta-Shen; Fenollosa, Pedro; Martin-Del-Rosario, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Botulinum toxin inhibits acetylcholine (ACh) release and probably blocks some nociceptive neurotransmitters. It has been suggested that the development of myofascial trigger points (MTrP) is related to an excess release of ACh to increase the number of sensitized nociceptors. Although the use of botulinum toxin to treat myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) has been investigated in many clinical trials, the results are contradictory. The objective of this paper is to identify sources of variability that could explain these differences in the results. Material and Methods. We performed a content analysis of the clinical trials and systematic reviews of MPS. Results and Discussion. Sources of differences in studies were found in the diagnostic and selection criteria, the muscles injected, the injection technique, the number of trigger points injected, the dosage of botulinum toxin used, treatments for control group, outcome measures, and duration of followup. The contradictory results regarding the efficacy of botulinum toxin A in MPS associated with neck and back pain do not allow this treatment to be recommended or rejected. There is evidence that botulinum toxin could be useful in specific myofascial regions such as piriformis syndrome. It could also be useful in patients with refractory MPS that has not responded to other myofascial injection therapies.

  10. Botulinum toxin for the treatment of myofascial pain syndromes involving the neck and back: a review from a clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Climent, José M; Kuan, Ta-Shen; Fenollosa, Pedro; Martin-Del-Rosario, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Botulinum toxin inhibits acetylcholine (ACh) release and probably blocks some nociceptive neurotransmitters. It has been suggested that the development of myofascial trigger points (MTrP) is related to an excess release of ACh to increase the number of sensitized nociceptors. Although the use of botulinum toxin to treat myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) has been investigated in many clinical trials, the results are contradictory. The objective of this paper is to identify sources of variability that could explain these differences in the results. Material and Methods. We performed a content analysis of the clinical trials and systematic reviews of MPS. Results and Discussion. Sources of differences in studies were found in the diagnostic and selection criteria, the muscles injected, the injection technique, the number of trigger points injected, the dosage of botulinum toxin used, treatments for control group, outcome measures, and duration of followup. The contradictory results regarding the efficacy of botulinum toxin A in MPS associated with neck and back pain do not allow this treatment to be recommended or rejected. There is evidence that botulinum toxin could be useful in specific myofascial regions such as piriformis syndrome. It could also be useful in patients with refractory MPS that has not responded to other myofascial injection therapies. PMID:23533477

  11. Botulinum toxin injection techniques for the management of adult spasticity.

    PubMed

    Walker, Heather W; Lee, Michael Y; Bahroo, Laxman B; Hedera, Peter; Charles, David

    2015-04-01

    Spasticity is often experienced by individuals with injury or illness of the central nervous system from etiologies such as stroke, spinal cord injury, brain injury, multiple sclerosis, or other neurologic conditions. Although spasticity may provide benefits in some patients, it more often leads to complications negatively impacting the patient. Nonpharmacologic treatment options often do not provide long-term reduction of spasticity, and systemic interventions, such as oral medications, can have intolerable side effects. The use of botulinum neurotoxin injections is one option for management of focal spasticity. Several localization techniques are available to physicians that allow for identification of the selected target muscles. These methods include anatomic localization in isolation or in conjunction with electromyography guidance, electrical stimulation guidance, or ultrasound guidance. This article will focus on further description of each of these techniques in relation to the treatment of adult spasticity and will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each technique, as well as review the literature comparing the techniques.

  12. Comparative evaluation of botulinum toxin versus iontophoresis with topical aluminium chloride hexahydrate in treatment of palmar hyperhidrosis

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopal, R.; Mallya, Nikhitha B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Hyperhidrosis is generalised or focal excessive sweating and carries a substantial psychological and social burden. This study compares botulinum toxin versus iontophoresis with topical aluminium chloride hexahydrate in palmar hyperhidrosis. Methods The study included 60 cases of palmar hyperhidrosis randomly allocated to 2 groups. One group was given botulinum toxin type A 100 units per palm and the other group subjected to digital iontophoresis with topical application of aluminium chloride hexahydrate lotion for 4 weeks. They were assessed 4 weeks later and those without improvement were crossed over to the other arm for another 4 weeks. Those with improvement were followed up in the same arm for 6 months. Results Botulinum therapy showed significant improvement in the initial (80%) as well as cross over cases (75%) as compared to iontophoresis and aluminium chloride (47%) for initial cases and (17%) for cross over cases. Conclusion Better improvements were seen with botulinum therapy than with iontophoresis and topical therapy. Residual effects of relief lasted on an average for 4 months for botulinum toxin whereas it was one month with iontophoresis and topical therapy. Advantage with iontophoresis and topical therapy was that it was non invasive and did not require regional anaesthesia as with botulinum therapy. PMID:25378778

  13. The effect of Clostridium botulinum toxin type A injections on motor unit activity of the deep digital flexor muscle in healthy sound Royal Dutch sport horses.

    PubMed

    Wijnberg, Inge D; Hardeman, Lotte C; van der Meij, Bram R; Veraa, Stefanie; Back, Willem; van der Kolk, Johannes H

    2013-12-01

    Therapeutic reduction of the activity of the deep digital flexor (DDF) muscle may play a role in treatment of laminitic horses. Clostridium botulinum toxin type A induces reduced muscle activity and has a spasmolytic effect in horses. In this study, the effectiveness of 200 IU C. botulinum toxin type A on reduction of DDF muscle activity was measured in seven healthy, sound, adult Royal Dutch sport horses. C. botulinum toxin type A was injected using ultrasound and electromyographic (EMG) guidance. The effectiveness was assessed by interference pattern analysis (IPA) and motor unit action potential (MUAP) analysis. All needle EMG MUAP variables, along with IPA amplitude/turn and turns/s, were significantly reduced after C. botulinum toxin type A injections. The strongest effect occurred within the first 3 days after injection. The reduced muscle induced by C. botulinum toxin type A may have benefits in the treatment of horses with laminitis. PMID:24360760

  14. Drug Insight: biological effects of botulinum toxin A in the lower urinary tract

    PubMed Central

    Chancellor, Michael B; Fowler, Clare J; Apostolidis, Apostolos; de Groat, William C; Smith, Christopher P; Somogyi, George T; Aoki, K Roger

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Botulinum toxins can effectively and selectively disrupt and modulate neurotransmission in striated muscle. Recently, urologists have become interested in the use of these toxins in patients with detrusor overactivity and other urological disorders. In both striated and smooth muscle, botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) is internalized by presynaptic neurons after binding to an extracellular receptor (ganglioside and presumably synaptic vesicle protein 2C). In the neuronal cytosol, BTX-A disrupts fusion of the acetylcholine-containing vesicle with the neuronal wall by cleaving the SNAP-25 protein in the synaptic fusion complex. The net effect is selective paralysis of the low-grade contractions of the unstable detrusor, while still allowing high-grade contraction that initiates micturition. Additionally, BTX-A seems to have effects on afferent nerve activity by modulating the release of ATP in the urothelium, blocking the release of substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide and glutamate from afferent nerves, and reducing levels of nerve growth factor. These effects on sensory feedback loops might not only help to explain the mechanism of BTX-A in relieving symptoms of overactive bladder, but also suggest a potential role for BTX-A in the relief of hyperalgesia associated with lower urinary tract disorders. PMID:18461049

  15. Effect of botulinum toxin type A on gait of children who are idiopathic toe-walkers.

    PubMed

    Brunt, Denis; Woo, Raymund; Kim, Hyeong Dong; Ko, Man Soo; Senesac, Claudia; Li, Shuman

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of botulinum toxin type A treatment on ankle muscle activity during gait of children who are idiopathic toe-walkers. Five children who were idiopathic toe-walkers with a mean age was 4.34 years participated. Gait of the subjects was evaluated prior to, 20 days following, and 12 months following bilateral botulinum toxin type A injection of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles. Subjects received physical therapy following the 20-day evaluation. Dependent variables were type of foot contact pattern and duration of swing-phase tibialis anterior activity and onset of stance-phase gastrocnemius relative to ground contact. Prior to treatment 51% of foot contacts were with the toe (heel just off the ground) or were digitigrade, while the remaining contacts were flat foot or heel strike. At approximately 20 days following treatment, only 8% of foot contacts were toe contact or digitigrade. Prior to treatment, mean gastrocnemius onset was 30 ms prior to foot contact and the duration of swing-phase tibialis anterior was only 345 ms. Following treatment (and a more normal foot contact pattern), mean gastrocnemius onset followed ground contact by 36 ms and tibialis anterior duration increased through terminal swing and into the loading response. The posttreatment improvement was maintained at 12-month follow-up. It appears that botulinum toxin type A treatment normalizes the ankle EMG pattern during gait and a more normal foot-strike pattern is obtained. These data are discussed in terms of a neuromotor rationale for the rehabilitation of children who are idiopathic toe-walkers to maintain posttreatment improvements.

  16. The use of botulinum toxin in the treatment of sialorrhea in parkinsonian disorders.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Caravaca, María T; Cáceres-Redondo, María T; Huertas-Fernández, Ismael; Vargas-González, Laura; Carrillo, Fátima; Carballo, Manuel; Mir, Pablo

    2015-02-01

    Drooling is a common symptom in parkinsonian disorders. Our aim was to assess the safety and effect of botulinum toxin when applied to parotid glands without ultrasound guidance for sialorrhea in parkinsonian disorders in a retrospective study with a long-term follow-up. We evaluated 53 patients (64.2% male and 35.8% female) with a mean age of 70.18 ± 9.25 years who were treated in our centre between 2007 and 2013. We analysed the mean dose, latency, effect duration, response and adverse effects of treating sialorrhea by injecting botulinum toxin type A (Botox) into the parotid glands without ultrasound guidance. A total of 41 patients with Parkinson's disease, 6 with progressive supranuclear palsy, 4 with multiple system atrophy and 2 with corticobasal degeneration were included. The mean duration of the disease at onset was 10.51 ± 6.81 years and the mean sialorrhea duration was 1.99 ± 1.55 years. The initial dose used for each parotid gland was 14.53 ± 3.95 units of Botox, with a mean dose of 22.17 ± 8.76 units. There was an improvement after treatment in 65.22% of patients with an average score of 6.85 ± 1.58 points on a scale from 0 to 10. The duration of the treatment effect was 4.38 ± 2.11 months, with a latency period of 10.06 ± 9.63 days. Adverse effects were mild and infrequent. Botulinum toxin is a safe and effective therapy for the treatment of sialorrhea in parkinsonian disorders and there is no requirement for ultrasound guidance. It has a rapid onset and lasting effect without requiring a high dosage. PMID:25238916

  17. The use of botulinum toxin in the treatment of sialorrhea in parkinsonian disorders.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Caravaca, María T; Cáceres-Redondo, María T; Huertas-Fernández, Ismael; Vargas-González, Laura; Carrillo, Fátima; Carballo, Manuel; Mir, Pablo

    2015-02-01

    Drooling is a common symptom in parkinsonian disorders. Our aim was to assess the safety and effect of botulinum toxin when applied to parotid glands without ultrasound guidance for sialorrhea in parkinsonian disorders in a retrospective study with a long-term follow-up. We evaluated 53 patients (64.2% male and 35.8% female) with a mean age of 70.18 ± 9.25 years who were treated in our centre between 2007 and 2013. We analysed the mean dose, latency, effect duration, response and adverse effects of treating sialorrhea by injecting botulinum toxin type A (Botox) into the parotid glands without ultrasound guidance. A total of 41 patients with Parkinson's disease, 6 with progressive supranuclear palsy, 4 with multiple system atrophy and 2 with corticobasal degeneration were included. The mean duration of the disease at onset was 10.51 ± 6.81 years and the mean sialorrhea duration was 1.99 ± 1.55 years. The initial dose used for each parotid gland was 14.53 ± 3.95 units of Botox, with a mean dose of 22.17 ± 8.76 units. There was an improvement after treatment in 65.22% of patients with an average score of 6.85 ± 1.58 points on a scale from 0 to 10. The duration of the treatment effect was 4.38 ± 2.11 months, with a latency period of 10.06 ± 9.63 days. Adverse effects were mild and infrequent. Botulinum toxin is a safe and effective therapy for the treatment of sialorrhea in parkinsonian disorders and there is no requirement for ultrasound guidance. It has a rapid onset and lasting effect without requiring a high dosage.

  18. Neurophysiological changes induced by the botulinum toxin type A injection in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Frascarelli, Flaminia; Di Rosa, Giuseppe; Bisozzi, Eleonora; Castelli, Enrico; Santilli, Valter

    2011-01-01

    In the last few years botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) has been widely used in the management of spasticity in children with cerebral palsy in order to reduce hypertonicity and improve functional outcomes enhancing motor skill development. The botulinum toxin injection seems to interact with intrafusal and extrafusal fibers producing a reduction of hypertone both through synaptic blockade and inhibition of stretch reflex loop and these changes may influence not only the spinal cord but also the central nervous system (CNS). The purpose of our study was to determine the neurophysiological changes induced by the BTX-A through an evaluation of cortical somatosensory Evoked Potential (SEP) and Soleus H wave, that is the index of excitability of stretch reflex loop. Eighteen children with Cerebral Palsy (CP), aged between 5 and 12, were recruited at Children's Hospital "Bambino Gesù" of Rome. All children were evaluated with appropriate clinical scales before and 1 month after the BTX-A injection. Neurophysiological measurements were performed before, and 1 month after botulinum toxin injection through lower limb SEPs, M-wave and Soleus H wave recording. After the injection the results showed a statistically significant improvement both of clinical scales and the neurophysiological variables. These findings suggest that spasticity itself can be considered as a factor affecting the cortical SEPs. And even though it seems that BTX-A does not have any direct central effect on sensory pathways we suppose an indirect mechanism on modulation of afferent fibers Ia due to the modification induced by BTX-A to central loop reflex.

  19. Off label use of botulinum toxin in children under two years of age: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Druschel, Claudia; Althuizes, Henriette C; Funk, Julia F; Placzek, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of children with cerebral palsy with Botulinum Toxin is considered safe and effective, but is only approved for children older than two years of age. The effect of BoNT-A injection on juvenile skeletal muscle especially on neuromuscular junction density, distribution and morphology is poorly delineated and concerns of irreversible damage to the motor endplates especially in young children exist. In contrast, earlier treatment could be appropriate to improve the attainment of motor milestones and general motor development. This review systematically analyzes the evidence regarding this hypothesis. A database search, including PubMed and Medline databases, was performed and all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the efficacy of Botulinum Toxin in children younger than two years were identified. Two authors independently extracted the data and the methods of all identified trials were assessed. Three RCTs met the inclusion criteria. The results of the analysis revealed an improvement in spasticity of the upper and lower extremities as well as in the range of motion in the joints of the lower limbs. However, evidence of an improvement of general motor development could not be found, as the assessment of this area was not completely specified for this patient group. Based on available evidence it can not be concluded that Botulinum Toxin treatment in children younger than two years improves the achievement of motor milestones. However, there is evidence for the reduction of spasticity, avoiding contractures and delaying surgery. Due to some limitations, the results of this review should be cautiously interpreted. More studies, long-term follow up independent high-quality RCTs with effectiveness analyses are needed. PMID:23296386

  20. Oromandibular Dystonia: A Case Report of the Lateral Pterygoid Muscle Involvement and Treatment with Botulinum Toxin A

    PubMed Central

    Alexoudi, Athanasia; Dalivigka, Zoi; Siatouni, Anna; Verentzioti, Anastasia; Gatzonis, Stylianos

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present case report is to punctuate the importance of individualized therapy procedures and the accurate diagnosis of the muscles involved in oromandibular dystonia and underline the role of electromyography (EMG). We report a woman who presented sustained jaw movement towards the left, severe difficulty in jaw opening and jaw protrusion. The patient was treated with injections of botulinum A toxin in lateral pterygoid, masseter, platysma, sternoclidomastoid, temporalis muscles with EMG guidance. She experienced an 80% reduction of her symptoms after the first injection. In jaw deviation dystonia symptoms impressively respond to botulinum toxin treatment of the pterygoid muscle. Individualized therapy procedures are necessitated. PMID:27777710

  1. Botulinum toxin type A in treatment of bilateral primary axillary hyperhidrosis: randomised, parallel group, double blind, placebo controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Naumann, M; Lowe, N J

    2001-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the safety and efficacy of botulinum toxin type A in the treatment of bilateral primary axillary hyperhidrosis. Design Multicentre, randomised, parallel group, placebo controlled trial. Setting 17 dermatology and neurology clinics in Belgium, Germany, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. Participants Patients aged 18-75 years with bilateral primary axillary hyperhidrosis sufficient to interfere with daily living. 465 were screened, 320 randomised, and 307 completed the study. Interventions Patients received either botulinum toxin type A (Botox) 50 U per axilla or placebo by 10-15 intradermal injections evenly distributed within the hyperhidrotic area of each axilla, defined by Minor's iodine starch test. Main outcome measures Percentage of responders (patients with ⩾50% reduction from baseline of spontaneous axillary sweat production) at four weeks, patients' global assessment of treatment satisfaction score, and adverse events. Results At four weeks, 94% (227) of the botulinum toxin type A group had responded compared with 36% (28) of the placebo group. By week 16, response rates were 82% (198) and 21% (16), respectively. The results for all other measures of efficacy were significantly better in the botulinum toxin group than the placebo group. Significantly higher patient satisfaction was reported in the botulinum toxin type A group than the placebo group (3.3 v 0.8, P<0.001 at 4 weeks). Adverse events were reported by only 27 patients (11%) in the botulinum toxin group and four (5%) in the placebo group (P>0.05). Conclusion Botulinum toxin type A is a safe and effective treatment for primary axillary hyperhidrosis and produces high levels of patient satisfaction. What is already known on this topicPrimary hyperhidrosis is a chronic disorder that can affect any part of the body, especially the axillas, palms, feet, and faceCurrent treatments are often ineffective, short acting, or poorly toleratedWhat this study addsBotulinum toxin type

  2. Spotlight on botulinum toxin and its potential in the treatment of stroke-related spasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kaku, Michelle; Simpson, David M

    2016-01-01

    Poststroke spasticity affects up to one-half of stroke patients and has debilitating effects, contributing to diminished activities of daily living, quality of life, pain, and functional impairments. Botulinum toxin (BoNT) is proven to be safe and effective in the treatment of focal poststroke spasticity. The aim of this review is to highlight BoNT and its potential in the treatment of upper and lower limb poststroke spasticity. We review evidence for the efficacy of BoNT type A and B formulations and address considerations of optimal injection technique, patient and caregiver satisfaction, and potential adverse effects of BoNT. PMID:27022247

  3. Role of Botulinum Toxin Type-A (BTX-A) in the Management of Trigeminal Neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is a clinical condition characterized by paroxysmal attacks of severe and electric shock-like pain along the distribution of one or more branches of the trigeminal nerve. Various medicinal or surgical modalities have been employed in the past with variable success. Newer methods were tried in search of permanent cure or long-lasting pain relief. The purpose of this paper is to present the review of the literature regarding the use of botulinum toxin type-A (BTX-A) in the management of trigeminal neuralgia. PMID:24194982

  4. Psychological functioning before and after treatment of torticollis with botulinum toxin.

    PubMed Central

    Jahanshahi, M; Marsden, C D

    1992-01-01

    The impact of botulinum toxin injection on psychological function was assessed in 26 patients with idiopathic torticollis. Eighty five per cent of the patients and 88% of the relatives considered torticollis to be better following the injections. Symptomatic improvement with the injections was associated with significant reduction of depression and disability, but non-significant improvement in body concept, and self-esteem. This concordant pattern of change in symptoms and psychological function with the injections supports the proposal that in torticollis depression and disability are consequences of the postural abnormality of the head. PMID:1564490

  5. Combined treatment with botulinum toxin and hyaluronic acid to correct unsightly lateral-chin depression*

    PubMed Central

    Braz, André Vieira; Louvain, Dailana; Mukamal, Luana Vieira

    2013-01-01

    With aging, anatomical changes are observed in the face. In the lower third, these changes are expressed as ptosis of the angle of the mouth, lip enhancement groove mentalis; decrease in concavity between the jaw and neck and very noticeable platysmal banding. The repeated contraction of muscles of the lateral-chin together with the band platysmal side form what are called a marionette groove. Treating the whole lateral-chin area can result in a more harmonious aspect of the face when compared with treatment of a marionette groove in isolation. In this paper we describe combined treatment of the lateral chin area using botulinum toxin and fillers. PMID:23539022

  6. Adult cases of congenital muscular torticollis successfully treated with botulinum toxin.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Manon; Chouinard, Sylvain; Suchowersky, Oksana

    2010-10-30

    Congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) is the most common cause of torticollis in childhood. This condition is usually recognized and successfully treated in infancy, but may persist in adulthood, particularly if not treated. In adult patients, CMT can be differentiated from idiopathic cervical dystonia by the frequent association with facial asymmetry, presence of a cord-like sternocleiodmastoid muscle (SCM), absence of head tremor, lack of sensory trick, and head tilt since infancy. We describe 3 patients with persistent CMT, who were successfully treated with botulinum toxin injections with long lasting benefit.

  7. Focal hyperhidrosis secondary to eccrine naevus successfully treated with botulinum toxin type A.

    PubMed

    Lera, M; España, A; Idoate, M Á

    2015-08-01

    Eccrine naevus (EN) is a rare skin hamartoma included in the organoid group of epidermal naevi, histologically defined as focal hyperplasia and/or hypertrophy of eccrine glands. Clinically, EN usually presents as hyperhidrotic patches with no visible skin changes, frequently located on the forearms. The decision to treat EN or not usually depends on the grade of hyperhidrosis, but there is no therapeutic consensus because of the rarity of this condition. We present a case diagnosed as EN in an adult patient with severe localized hyperhidrosis, which was successfully treated with botulinum toxin. PMID:25816711

  8. Botulinum toxin: new option for refractory lower urinary tract symptoms in women.

    PubMed

    Rickey, Leslie M; Kenton, Kimberly

    2008-03-01

    Lower urinary tract symptoms refractory to standard therapies create significant distress and quality of life impact for women with these disorders. Likewise, they are challenging for clinicians caring for these women. Once conservative measures are exhausted, the few remaining treatment options are often invasive and associated with significant morbidity. Botulinum toxin is an emerging medical therapy with increasing applications in the lower urinary tract and pelvic floor, which has proven to be an effective and safe alternative for the treatment of some refractory pelvic floor disorders.

  9. The Prediction of Botulinum Toxin Structure Based on in Silico and in Vitro Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Tomonori; Miyazaki, Satoru

    2011-01-01

    Many of biological system mediated through protein-protein interactions. Knowledge of protein-protein complex structure is required for understanding the function. The determination of huge size and flexible protein-protein complex structure by experimental studies remains difficult, costly and five-consuming, therefore computational prediction of protein structures by homolog modeling and docking studies is valuable method. In addition, MD simulation is also one of the most powerful methods allowing to see the real dynamics of proteins. Here, we predict protein-protein complex structure of botulinum toxin to analyze its property. These bioinformatics methods are useful to report the relation between the flexibility of backbone structure and the activity.

  10. Clostridium botulinum Toxin Production in Relation to Spoilage of Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar) Packaged in Films of Varying Oxygen Permeabilities and with Different Atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Marilyn C; Ma, Li M; Doyle, Michael P

    2015-11-01

    Shelf life of fish packaged under modified atmosphere (MA) is extended, but within the United States, commercial application of MA with impermeable packaging films is restricted due to concerns that botulinum toxin production would precede spoilage when contaminated fish are held at abusive storage temperatures. Use of semipermeable packaging films has been advocated; however, previous studies are inconclusive in determining the oxygen transmission rate (OTR) of a film that is needed to achieve an acceptable margin of safety (i.e., toxin production occurs only after spoilage). This study was conducted to determine the influence of OTR (target OTRs of 3 to 15,000) on the development of spoilage volatiles and toxin in salmon inoculated with type E Clostridium botulinum and subjected to air, vacuum, or 75:25 CO2:N2 MA and storage temperatures of 4, 8, 12, or 16°C. The most dominant headspace volatile peak that was produced during spoilage of samples at 4, 8 or 12°C was a peak, having a Kovats retention index (KI) of 753, and at which external standards of 2- or 3-methyl 1-butanol also eluted. Under anaerobic conditions, both the aerobic microbial populations and the size of the KI 753 spoilage peak were less in inoculated samples compared with uninoculated samples. C. botulinum-inoculated samples that were stored at 12 or 16°C under conditions favorable for anaerobic growth were also characterized by a KI 688 peak. Using a previously developed model that related the percentage of elderly consumers who would prepare a sample having the KI 753 spoilage peak of a specific size, it was determined that for salmon packaged with 3 or 3,000 OTR films under any atmosphere and stored at 12 or 16°C, 2 to 61% of the consumers could potentially prepare toxin-contaminated samples. Hence, when abusive storage conditions are suspected, the fish should not be consumed.

  11. Clostridium botulinum Toxin Production in Relation to Spoilage of Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar) Packaged in Films of Varying Oxygen Permeabilities and with Different Atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Marilyn C; Ma, Li M; Doyle, Michael P

    2015-11-01

    Shelf life of fish packaged under modified atmosphere (MA) is extended, but within the United States, commercial application of MA with impermeable packaging films is restricted due to concerns that botulinum toxin production would precede spoilage when contaminated fish are held at abusive storage temperatures. Use of semipermeable packaging films has been advocated; however, previous studies are inconclusive in determining the oxygen transmission rate (OTR) of a film that is needed to achieve an acceptable margin of safety (i.e., toxin production occurs only after spoilage). This study was conducted to determine the influence of OTR (target OTRs of 3 to 15,000) on the development of spoilage volatiles and toxin in salmon inoculated with type E Clostridium botulinum and subjected to air, vacuum, or 75:25 CO2:N2 MA and storage temperatures of 4, 8, 12, or 16°C. The most dominant headspace volatile peak that was produced during spoilage of samples at 4, 8 or 12°C was a peak, having a Kovats retention index (KI) of 753, and at which external standards of 2- or 3-methyl 1-butanol also eluted. Under anaerobic conditions, both the aerobic microbial populations and the size of the KI 753 spoilage peak were less in inoculated samples compared with uninoculated samples. C. botulinum-inoculated samples that were stored at 12 or 16°C under conditions favorable for anaerobic growth were also characterized by a KI 688 peak. Using a previously developed model that related the percentage of elderly consumers who would prepare a sample having the KI 753 spoilage peak of a specific size, it was determined that for salmon packaged with 3 or 3,000 OTR films under any atmosphere and stored at 12 or 16°C, 2 to 61% of the consumers could potentially prepare toxin-contaminated samples. Hence, when abusive storage conditions are suspected, the fish should not be consumed. PMID:26555524

  12. Prevalence of toxin-producing Clostridium botulinum associated with the macroalga Cladophora in three Great Lakes: growth and management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chun, Chan Lan; Kahn, Chase I.; Borchert, Andrew J.; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.; Whitman, Richard L.; Peller, Julie R.; Pier, Christina; Lin, Guangyun; Johnson, Eric A.; Sadowsky, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The reemergence of avian botulism caused by Clostridium botulinum type E has been observed across the Great Lakes in recent years. Evidence suggests an association between the nuisance algae, Cladophoraspp., and C. botulinum in nearshore areas of the Great Lakes. However, the nature of the association between Cladophora and C. botulinum is not fully understood due, in part, to the complex food web interactions in this disease etiology. In this study, we extensively evaluated their association by quantitatively examining population size and serotypes of C. botulinum in algal mats collected from wide geographic areas in lakes Michigan, Ontario, and Erie in 2011–2012 and comparing them with frequencies in other matrices such as sand and water. A high prevalence (96%) of C. botulinum type E was observed inCladophora mats collected from shorelines of the Great Lakes in 2012. Among the algae samples containing detectable C. botulinum, the population size of C. Botulinum type E was 100–104 MPN/g dried algae, which was much greater (up to 103 fold) than that found in sand or the water column, indicating thatCladophora mats are sources of this pathogen. Mouse toxinantitoxin bioassays confirmed that the putativeC. botulinum belonged to the type E serotype. Steam treatment was effective in reducing or eliminating C. botulinum type E viable cells in Cladophora mats, thereby breaking the potential transmission route of toxin up to the food chain. Consequently, our data suggest that steam treatment incorporated with a beach cleaning machine may be an effective treatment of Cladophora-borne C. botulinum and may reduce bird mortality and human health risks.

  13. Prevalence of toxin-producing Clostridium botulinum associated with the macroalga Cladophora in three Great Lakes: growth and management.

    PubMed

    Lan Chun, Chan; Kahn, Chase I; Borchert, Andrew J; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N; Whitman, Richard L; Peller, Julie; Pier, Christina; Lin, Guangyun; Johnson, Eric A; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2015-04-01

    The reemergence of avian botulism caused by Clostridium botulinum type E has been observed across the Great Lakes in recent years. Evidence suggests an association between the nuisance algae, Cladophora spp., and C. botulinum in nearshore areas of the Great Lakes. However, the nature of the association between Cladophora and C. botulinum is not fully understood due, in part, to the complex food web interactions in this disease etiology. In this study, we extensively evaluated their association by quantitatively examining population size and serotypes of C. botulinum in algal mats collected from wide geographic areas in lakes Michigan, Ontario, and Erie in 2011-2012 and comparing them with frequencies in other matrices such as sand and water. A high prevalence (96%) of C. botulinum type E was observed in Cladophora mats collected from shorelines of the Great Lakes in 2012. Among the algae samples containing detectable C. botulinum, the population size of C. Botulinum type E was 10(0)-10(4) MPN/g dried algae, which was much greater (up to 10(3) fold) than that found in sand or the water column, indicating that Cladophora mats are sources of this pathogen. Mouse toxinantitoxin bioassays confirmed that the putative C. botulinum belonged to the type E serotype. Steam treatment was effective in reducing or eliminating C. botulinum type E viable cells in Cladophora mats, thereby breaking the potential transmission route of toxin up to the food chain. Consequently, our data suggest that steam treatment incorporated with a beach cleaning machine may be an effective treatment of Cladophora-borne C. botulinum and may reduce bird mortality and human health risks.

  14. An Alternative In Vivo Method to Refine the Mouse Bioassay for Botulinum Toxin Detection

    PubMed Central

    Wilder-Kofie, Temeri D; Lúquez, Carolina; Adler, Michael; Dykes, Janet K; Coleman, JoAnn D; Maslanka, Susan E

    2011-01-01

    Botulism is a rare, life-threatening paralytic disease of both humans and animals that is caused by botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT). Botulism is confirmed in the laboratory by the detection of BoNT in clinical specimens, contaminated foods, and cultures. Despite efforts to develop an in vitro method for botulinum toxin detection, the mouse bioassay remains the standard test for laboratory confirmation of this disease. In this study, we evaluated the use of a nonlethal mouse toe-spread reflex model to detect BoNT spiked into buffer, serum, and milk samples. Samples spiked with toxin serotype A and nontoxin control samples were injected into the left and right extensor digitorum longus muscles, respectively. Digital photographs at 0, 8, and 24 h were used to obtain objective measurements through effective paralysis scores, which were determined by comparing the width-to-length ratio between right and left feet. Both objective measurements and clinical observation could accurately identify over 80% of animals injected with 1 LD50 (4.3 pg) BoNT type A within 24 h. Half of animals injected with 0.5 LD50 BoNT type A and none injected with 0.25 LD50 demonstrated localized paralysis. Preincubating the toxin with antitoxin prevented the development of positive effective paralysis scores, demonstrating that (1) the effect was specific for BoNT and (2) identification of toxin serotype could be achieved by using this method. These results suggest that the mouse toe-spread reflex model may be a more humane alternative to the current mouse bioassay for laboratory investigations of botulism. PMID:21819693

  15. Botulinum Toxin A: Dose-dependent Effect on Reepithelialization and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kober, Johanna; Schmid, Melanie; Buchberger, Elisabeth; Kamolz, Lars-Peter; Keck, Maike

    2016-01-01

    Background: Botulinum (neuro)toxin A (BoNT) is widely used in the field of plastic and reconstructive surgery. Among treatment of pain, hyperhidrosis, or aesthetic purposes, it is also used to enhance wound healing and prevent excessive scar formation. Some clinical data already exist, but only little is known on a cellular level. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of BoNT on cells essential for wound healing in vitro. Therefore, primary human keratinocytes and endothelial cells were treated with different concentrations of BoNT and tested on proliferation, migration, and angiogenic behavior. Methods: BoNT was exposed to human keratinocytes and endothelial cells in a low (1 IU/mL), medium (10 IU/mL), and high (20 IU/mL) concentrations in cell culture. Proliferation and migration of the 2 cell types were observed and also the angiogenic potential of endothelial cells in vitro. Results: BoNT 20 IU/mL negatively influenced proliferation and migration of keratinocytes but not those of endothelial cells. Angiogenesis in vitro was less effective with the highest BoNT concentrations tested. Low concentrations of BoNT supported sprouting of endothelial cells. Conclusions: High concentrations of botulinum toxin interfered with wound closure as keratinocytes’ proliferation and migration were deteriorated. Furthermore, BoNT concentrations of 20 IU/mL constrain in vitro vessel formation but do not influence proliferation or migration of endothelial cells.

  16. Rapid, Sensitive Detection of Botulinum Toxin on a Flexible Microfluidics Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, Marvin G.; Dockendorff, Brian P.; Feldhaus, Michael J.; Anheier, Norman C.; Marks, James D.; Grate, Jay W.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2004-10-30

    In this paper we will describe how high affinity reagents and a sensor configuration enabling rapid mass transport can be combined for rapid, sensitive biodetection. The system that we have developed includes a renewable surface immunoassay, which involves on-column detection of a fluorescently labeled secondary antibody in a sandwich immunoassay. Yeast display and directed molecular evolution were used to create high affinity antibodies to the botulinum toxin heavy chain receptor binding domain, AR1 and 3D12. A rotating rod renewable surface microcolumn was used to form a microliter-sized column containing beads functionalized with the capture antibody (AR1). The column was perfused with sample, wash solutions, and a fluorescently labeled secondary antibody (3D12) while the on-column fluorescence was monitored. Detection was accomplished in less than 5 minutes, with a total processing time of about 10 minutes. On-column detection of botulinum toxin was more sensitive and much faster than flow cytometry analysis on microbeads using the same reagents.

  17. Botulinum Toxin A for the Treatment of a Child with SUNCT Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Haifeng; Lian, Ya-Jun; Ma, Yun-Qing; Xie, Nan-Chang; Cheng, Xuan; Zhang, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Background. Short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache with conjunctival injection and tearing (SUNCT) syndrome is an unusual cause of headache, mainly described in older adults, and is rare in children. Pain attacks may be severe, frequent, and prolonged. The therapeutic benefits of many drugs are disappointing. Patient and Methods. A 12-year-old boy suffered severe headache and toothache for 20 days. As treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, anticonvulsants, and steroids proved ineffective, he was treated with ipsilateral multisite subcutaneous injections of botulinum toxin A 70 U around the orbit, the temporal area, and the upper gum. Results. The pain had reduced in frequency and severity by the fourth day after treatment and had completely disappeared after 7 days. There were no side effects or recurrence during a subsequent 17-month follow-up period. Conclusion. Botulinum toxin A can be used to treat the first episode of SUNCT in children over the age of 12 years. PMID:27445629

  18. Botulinum Toxin A: Dose-dependent Effect on Reepithelialization and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kober, Johanna; Schmid, Melanie; Buchberger, Elisabeth; Kamolz, Lars-Peter; Keck, Maike

    2016-01-01

    Background: Botulinum (neuro)toxin A (BoNT) is widely used in the field of plastic and reconstructive surgery. Among treatment of pain, hyperhidrosis, or aesthetic purposes, it is also used to enhance wound healing and prevent excessive scar formation. Some clinical data already exist, but only little is known on a cellular level. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of BoNT on cells essential for wound healing in vitro. Therefore, primary human keratinocytes and endothelial cells were treated with different concentrations of BoNT and tested on proliferation, migration, and angiogenic behavior. Methods: BoNT was exposed to human keratinocytes and endothelial cells in a low (1 IU/mL), medium (10 IU/mL), and high (20 IU/mL) concentrations in cell culture. Proliferation and migration of the 2 cell types were observed and also the angiogenic potential of endothelial cells in vitro. Results: BoNT 20 IU/mL negatively influenced proliferation and migration of keratinocytes but not those of endothelial cells. Angiogenesis in vitro was less effective with the highest BoNT concentrations tested. Low concentrations of BoNT supported sprouting of endothelial cells. Conclusions: High concentrations of botulinum toxin interfered with wound closure as keratinocytes’ proliferation and migration were deteriorated. Furthermore, BoNT concentrations of 20 IU/mL constrain in vitro vessel formation but do not influence proliferation or migration of endothelial cells. PMID:27622105

  19. Identification of the interaction region between hemagglutinin components of the botulinum toxin complex.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tomonori; Miyashita, Shin-Ichiro; Hayashi, Shintaro; Miyata, Keita; Inui, Ken; Kondo, Yosuke; Miyazaki, Satoru; Ohyama, Tohru; Niwa, Koichi; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Sagane, Yoshimasa

    2014-04-01

    The large toxin complex (L-TC) produced by Clostridium botulinum is formed from the M-TC (BoNT/NTNHA complex) by conjugation of M-TC with HA-33/HA-17 trimer consists of two HA-33 proteins and a single HA-17 protein. This association is mediated by HA-70, which interacts with HA-17. The current study aims to identify the regions of the HA-70 molecule that adhere to the HA-33/HA-17 complex. Products from limited proteolysis of HA-70 were resolved by SDS-PAGE and transferred onto PVDF membranes, where they were probed with HA-33/HA-17 in a far-western blot. Among the HA-70 fragments, HA-33/HA-17 bound to those containing at least the C-terminal half of the HA-70 molecule, but not those carrying the N-terminal half. Additional docking simulation analysis indicated that the HA-70 region Gln420-Tyr575 is responsible for binding to HA-17, which is consistent with the far-western blot data. The findings here reveal additional details concerning the three-dimensional structure of the functional HA sub-complex in the botulinum toxin complex. PMID:24472509

  20. Attomolar Detection of Botulinum Toxin Type A in Complex Biological Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Bagramyan, Karine; Barash, Jason R.; Arnon, Stephen S.; Kalkum, Markus

    2008-01-01

    Background A highly sensitive, rapid and cost efficient method that can detect active botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) in complex biological samples such as foods or serum is desired in order to 1) counter the potential bioterrorist threat 2) enhance food safety 3) enable future pharmacokinetic studies in medical applications that utilize BoNTs. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we describe a botulinum neurotoxin serotype A assay with a large immuno-sorbent surface area (BoNT/A ALISSA) that captures a low number of toxin molecules and measures their intrinsic metalloprotease activity with a fluorogenic substrate. In direct comparison with the “gold standard” mouse bioassay, the ALISSA is four to five orders of magnitudes more sensitive and considerably faster. Our method reaches attomolar sensitivities in serum, milk, carrot juice, and in the diluent fluid used in the mouse assay. ALISSA has high specificity for the targeted type A toxin when tested against alternative proteases including other BoNT serotypes and trypsin, and it detects the holotoxin as well as the multi-protein complex form of BoNT/A. The assay was optimized for temperature, substrate concentration, size and volume proportions of the immuno-sorbent matrix, enrichment and reaction times. Finally, a kinetic model is presented that is consistent with the observed improvement in sensitivity. Conclusions/Significance The sensitivity, specificity, speed and simplicity of the BoNT ALISSA should make this method attractive for diagnostic, biodefense and pharmacological applications. PMID:18446228

  1. Botulinum toxin for chronic anal fissure after biliopancreatic diversion for morbid obesity

    PubMed Central

    Vanella, Serafino; Brisinda, Giuseppe; Marniga, Gaia; Crocco, Anna; Bianco, Giuseppe; Maria, Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of botulinum toxin in patients with chronic anal fissure after biliopancreatic diversion (BPD) for severe obesity. METHODS: Fifty-nine symptomatic adults with chronic anal fissure developed after BPD were enrolled in an open label study. The outcome was evaluated clinically and by comparing the pressure of the anal sphincters before and after treatment. All data were analyzed in univariate and multivariate analysis. RESULTS: Two months after treatment, 65.4% of the patients had a healing scar. Only one patient had mild incontinence to flatus that lasted 3 wk after treatment, but this disappeared spontaneously. In the multivariate analysis of the data, two registered months after the treatment, sex (P = 0.01), baseline resting anal pressure (P = 0.02) and resting anal pressure 2 mo after treatment (P < 0.0001) were significantly related to healing rate. CONCLUSION: Botulinum toxin, despite worse results than in non-obese individuals, appears the best alternative to surgery for this group of patients with a high risk of incontinence. PMID:22416176

  2. Botulinum Toxin A for the Treatment of a Child with SUNCT Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Haifeng; Lian, Ya-Jun; Ma, Yun-Qing; Xie, Nan-Chang; Cheng, Xuan; Zhang, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Background. Short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache with conjunctival injection and tearing (SUNCT) syndrome is an unusual cause of headache, mainly described in older adults, and is rare in children. Pain attacks may be severe, frequent, and prolonged. The therapeutic benefits of many drugs are disappointing. Patient and Methods. A 12-year-old boy suffered severe headache and toothache for 20 days. As treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, anticonvulsants, and steroids proved ineffective, he was treated with ipsilateral multisite subcutaneous injections of botulinum toxin A 70 U around the orbit, the temporal area, and the upper gum. Results. The pain had reduced in frequency and severity by the fourth day after treatment and had completely disappeared after 7 days. There were no side effects or recurrence during a subsequent 17-month follow-up period. Conclusion. Botulinum toxin A can be used to treat the first episode of SUNCT in children over the age of 12 years. PMID:27445629

  3. Growth of and toxin production by nonproteolytic Clostridium botulinum in cooked puréed vegetables at refrigeration temperatures.

    PubMed Central

    Carlin, F; Peck, M W

    1996-01-01

    Seven strains of nonproteolytic Clostridium botulinum (types B, E, and F) were each inoculated into a range of anaerobic cooked puréed vegetables. After incubation at 10 degrees C for 15 to 60 days, all seven strains formed toxin in mushrooms, five did so in broccoli, four did so in cauliflower, three did so in asparagus, and one did so in kale. Growth kinetics of nonproteolytic C. botulinum type B in cooked mushrooms, cauliflower, and potatoes were determined at 16, 10, 8, and 5 degrees C. Growth and toxin production occurred in cooked cauliflower and mushrooms at all temperatures and in potatoes at 16 and 8 degrees C. The C. botulinum neurotoxin was detected within 3 to 5 days at 16 degrees C, 11 to 13 days at 10 degrees C, 10 to 34 days at 8 degrees C, and 17 to 20 days at 5 degrees C. PMID:8702303

  4. Purification and characterization of neurotoxin complex from a dual toxin gene containing Clostridium botulinum strain PS-5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are produced as a toxin complex (TC) which consists of neurotoxin (NT) and neurotoxin associated proteins (NAPs). The characterization of NT in its native state is an essential step for developing diagnostics and therapeutic countermeasures against botulism. The presenc...

  5. The Use of Botulinum Toxin for the Treatment of Muscle Spasticity in the First 2 Years of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakheit, Abdel Magid

    2010-01-01

    Although there are sound theoretical reasons for the use of botulinum toxin (Btx) as early as possible in the management of severe childhood muscle spasticity, the experience with its safety in children younger than 2 years of age is limited and information about its possible effects on the development and maturation of the human motor system…

  6. Repeated bilateral retrobulbar injection of botulinum toxin in a blind patient with retinitis pigmentosa and incapacitating nystagmus.

    PubMed

    Devogelaere, Th; Gobin, C; Casaer, P; Spileers, W

    2006-01-01

    Pronounced visual loss can lead to nystagmus, provoking oscillopsia and distressing ocular sensations. The treatment of acquired nystagmus remains difficult and various therapeutic options are attempted with limited results. We report the case of a man with acquired nystagmus and excessive ocular discomfort, successfully treated with repeated retrobulbar injections with botulinum toxin.

  7. Food safety objective approach for controlling Clostridium botulinum growth and toxin production in commercially sterile foods.

    PubMed

    Anderson, N M; Larkin, J W; Cole, M B; Skinner, G E; Whiting, R C; Gorris, L G M; Rodriguez, A; Buchanan, R; Stewart, C M; Hanlin, J H; Keener, L; Hall, P A

    2011-11-01

    As existing technologies are refined and novel microbial inactivation technologies are developed, there is a growing need for a metric that can be used to judge equivalent levels of hazard control stringency to ensure food safety of commercially sterile foods. A food safety objective (FSO) is an output-oriented metric that designates the maximum level of a hazard (e.g., the pathogenic microorganism or toxin) tolerated in a food at the end of the food supply chain at the moment of consumption without specifying by which measures the hazard level is controlled. Using a risk-based approach, when the total outcome of controlling initial levels (H(0)), reducing levels (ΣR), and preventing an increase in levels (ΣI) is less than or equal to the target FSO, the product is considered safe. A cross-disciplinary international consortium of specialists from industry, academia, and government was organized with the objective of developing a document to illustrate the FSO approach for controlling Clostridium botulinum toxin in commercially sterile foods. This article outlines the general principles of an FSO risk management framework for controlling C. botulinum growth and toxin production in commercially sterile foods. Topics include historical approaches to establishing commercial sterility; a perspective on the establishment of an appropriate target FSO; a discussion of control of initial levels, reduction of levels, and prevention of an increase in levels of the hazard; and deterministic and stochastic examples that illustrate the impact that various control measure combinations have on the safety of well-established commercially sterile products and the ways in which variability all levels of control can heavily influence estimates in the FSO risk management framework. This risk-based framework should encourage development of innovative technologies that result in microbial safety levels equivalent to those achieved with traditional processing methods.

  8. Botulinum toxin type A on oral health in treating sialorrhea in children with cerebral palsy: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Katie Pei-Hsuan; Ke, Jyh-Yuh; Chen, Chung-Yao; Chen, Chia-Ling; Chou, Ming-Yen; Pei, Yu-Cheng

    2011-07-01

    Intrasalivary gland injection of botulinum toxin type A is known to treat sialorrhea effectively in children with cerebral palsy. However, oral health may be compromised with escalating dose. In this randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled pilot trial, the authors aim to determine the therapeutic effect of low-dose, ultrasonography-controlled botulinum toxin type A injection to bilateral parotid and submandibular glands on oral health in the management of sialorrhea. Twenty children diagnosed with cerebral palsy were randomly assigned to 2 groups. The treatment group received botulinum toxin type A injections, whereas the control received normal saline in the same locations. The authors evaluated subjective drooling scales, salivary flow rate, and oral health (salivary compositions and cariogenic bacterial counts). A significant decrease was found in salivary flow rate at the 1- and 3-month follow-up in the botulinum toxin-treated group. The authors suggest that current protocol can effectively manage sialorrhea while maintaining oral health.

  9. Longitudinal examination of health outcomes associated with botulinum toxin use in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Balkrishnan, Rajesh; Manuel, Janeen C; Smith, Beth P; Camacho, Fabian T; Koman, L Andrew

    2004-01-01

    A prospective cohort study with annual follow-up was conducted on 172 children with spastic type cerebral palsy receiving botulinum toxin type A (BTX) injections for spasticity management. A mixed modeling procedure was used to identify changes in both physical functioning outcomes for the child (using the WeeFIM measure) as well as quality of life of the parent caregiver (using the Stein and Reissman Impact on the Family Scale) with increasing utilization of BTX injections. The study found that each additional BTX injection administration was associated with a 2.3% improvement in the WeeFIM compared to the average baseline score (p < .01). Similarly, the study found an improvement of 2.5% compared to baseline in the parent's overall perception of the severity of the child's condition with each additional BTX injection administration (p < .001). These findings suggest that BTX injections may be associated with beneficial outcomes in childhood spasticity.

  10. Successful treatment of tardive lingual dystonia with botulinum toxin: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hennings, Johannes M H; Krause, Eike; Bötzel, Kai; Wetter, Thomas C

    2008-07-01

    Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is a dreaded side effect of antipsychotic medication. Recommended treatments for TD may provide reliable improvement but can be, in turn, associated with additional adverse reactions. Recently, several reports have suggested that botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) injection in affected muscles may significantly improve TD. Here, we report a case of severe tongue protrusion dystonia secondary to an antipsychotic medication in a young man. Several approaches including clozapine, amisulpride, aripiprazole, ziprasidone, tiapride and clonazepam failed to improve the symptoms. Injection of 50 U of BTX-A (Dysport, Ipsen, Ettlingen, Germany) into each genioglossal muscle dramatically improved tongue protrusion within few days with a sustained effect. If reasonable precautions are taken, the application seems to be well tolerated with only minor side effects. A review of the literature that is part of this article adverts BTX-A injection as a potential beneficial approach of various kinds of TD. PMID:17936461

  11. Botulinum toxin B ultrasound-guided injections for sialorrhea in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Contarino, Maria Fiorella; Pompili, Maurizio; Tittoto, Paola; Vanacore, Nicola; Sabatelli, Mario; Cedrone, Augusto; Rapaccini, Gian Ludovico; Gasbarrini, Giovanni; Tonali, Pietro Attilio; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita

    2007-07-01

    Sialorrhea is frequent and invalidating in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or Parkinson's disease (PD). Botulinum toxin (BTX) emerged as an alternative to traditional treatments. We evaluated efficacy and tolerability of ultrasound-guided BTX-B injections in parotids and submandibular glands in 18 patients with ALS or PD. At 1 week, both objective (cotton rolls weight) and subjective evaluations (dedicated clinical scales) documented sialorrhea reduction (p<0.01). ALS patients reported shorter benefit duration (p<0.001) and higher prevalence of viscous saliva (seven vs one patients), possibly due to different pattern of autonomic involvement. BTX-B seems efficacious in reducing sialorrhea in ALS and PD but the risk-benefit ratio might differ between these two conditions. This might have implications for clinical practice.

  12. Botulinum toxin improves sialorrhea and quality of living in bulbar amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Verma, Ashok; Steele, Julie

    2006-08-01

    Sialorrhea is frequently a socially disabling symptom in patients with bulbar amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In this open-label prospective study, we report the effect of botulinum toxin A (Botox) injection into the parotid glands in 10 patients with bulbar ALS and socially disabling sialorrhea. We applied three different outcome measures to determine the effect of Botox therapy on sialorrhea. Botox significantly improved the degree of sialorrhea and a drooling impact score and, by inference, the quality of living, in over half of the patients with bulbar ALS and severe sialorrhea. The beneficial effect of Botox lasted for at least 2 months in those who responded. No major adverse effects were noted. Local injection of a small dose of Botox into the parotid glands can control sialorrhea and potentially improve living quality in some patients with bulbar ALS.

  13. Randomized double-blind study of botulinum toxin type B for sialorrhea in ALS patients.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Carlayne E; Gronseth, Gary; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey; Barohn, Richard J; Dubinsky, Richard; Simpson, C Blake; McVey, April; Kittrell, Pamela P; King, Ruth; Herbelin, Laura

    2009-02-01

    Twenty ALS patients with sialorrhea refractory to medical therapy were enrolled in this double-blind, randomized study to receive either 2,500 U of botulinum toxin type B (BTxb) or placebo into the bilateral parotid and submandibular glands using electromyographic guidance. Patients who received BTxb reported a global impression of improvement of 82% at 2 weeks compared to 38% of those who received placebo (P < 0.05). This significant effect was sustained at 4 weeks. At 12 weeks, 50% of patients who received BTxb continued to report improvement compared to 14% of those who received placebo. There were no significant adverse events, including dysphagia, in the BTxb group, and there was no significant increase in the rate of decline of vital capacity.

  14. Botulinum toxin: An effective treatment for prosthesis-related hyperhidrosis in patients with traumatic amputations.

    PubMed

    Lezanski-Gujda, Amanda; Bingham, Jonathan L; Logemann, Nicholas F

    2015-01-01

    Hyperhidrosis-related to prosthesis use in patients who have suffered a traumatic limb amputation presents itself as a barrier to comfort, prosthesis use and overall quality of life. This review intends to encourage dermatologists to consider the use of botulinum toxin A or B for the treatment of hyperhidrosis in the residual limb and may serve as a stimulus for a modern, in-depth, and more comprehensive study. A review of the literature was conducted using the PubMed database, focusing on hyperhidrosis treatment after traumatic limb amputation. Articles discussing hyperhidrosis treatment for amputations secondary to chronic medical conditions were excluded. Seven case studies published over the last 12 years have demonstrated positive outcomes of this treatment strategy. Overall, there is little data examining this topic and current publications focus primarily on small case series. A larger, double-blind, placebo-controlled study would likely benefit veterans, service members, and civilians. PMID:25657907

  15. Botulinum Toxin Therapy for Osteoarticular Pain: An Evidence-Based Review

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jasvinder A.

    2010-01-01

    Botulinum (BoNT) toxin has been used for its muscle-paralyzing action in conditions such as treatment of wrinkles, cervical dystonia and blephrospasm. There is preclinical and emerging clinical evidence of another mechanism of action of BoNT, namely, an antinociceptive action. In this review, we provide an evidence-based review of clinical studies of BoNT in osteoarticular conditions, such as osteoarthritis, tennis elbow, low back pain, and hand pain. Many randomized controlled trials (RCTs) found evidence of short-term efficacy of an injection of BoNT in relief of pain, and in some cases, improvement of function and quality of life. However, more clinical trials are needed to better define the clinical use of BoNT for treatment of refractory osteoarticular pain. PMID:21304830

  16. Ultrasensitive detection of protease activity of anthrax and botulinum toxins by a new PCR-based assay.

    PubMed

    Kolesnikov, Alexander V; Kozyr, Arina V; Ryabko, Alyona K; Shemyakin, Igor G

    2016-02-01

    Anthrax and botulism are dangerous infectious diseases that can be fatal unless detected and treated quickly. Fatalities from these diseases are primarily due to endopeptidase toxins secreted by the pathogens. Rapid and sensitive detection of the presence of active toxins is the key element for protection from natural outbreaks of anthrax and botulism, as well as from the threat of bioterrorism. We describe an ultrasensitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assay for detecting proteolytic activity of anthrax and botulinum toxins using composite probes consisting of covalent peptide-DNA conjugate for the detection of anthrax, and noncovalent protein-aptamer assembly to assay botulinum toxin activity. Probes immobilized on the solid-phase support are cleaved by toxins to release DNA, which is detected by real-time PCR. Both assays can detect subpicogram quantities of active toxins isolated from composite matrices. Special procedures were developed to isolate intact toxins from the matrices under mild conditions. The assay is rapid, uses proven technologies, and can be modified to detect other proteolytic and biopolymer-degrading enzymes. PMID:26620058

  17. Botulinum toxin type A in the treatment of painful adductor muscle contracture after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Santamato, Andrea; Ranieri, Maurizio; Panza, Francesco; Solfrizzi, Vincenzo; Frisardi, Vincenza; Lapenna, Luisa Maria; Moretti, Biagio; Fiore, Pietro

    2009-10-01

    Painful adductor muscle contracture is an important cause of failure during rehabilitation following total hip arthroplasty (THA). Adductor muscle contracture may be caused by postoperative muscle retractions, adhesive capsulitis, postoperative leg-length inequalities caused by implant failure, or preexisting hip pathologies. A 34-year-old woman experienced a persistent painful contracture into the left adductor magnus muscle after THA. She had no leg-length inequalities and, according to the Medical Research Council scale (grades 0-5), muscle strength of the quadriceps was 5/5 for the right side and 3/5 for the left. The degree of functionality according to the Harris hip score (HHS) was 16/100 in the left hip. The pain level, measured with the visual analog scale (VAS), was 7/10. The patient was unable to fully adhere to the rehabilitation program and walked with a limp during the stance phase of gait. After 7 days of treatment with injections of botulinum toxin type A into the left adductor magnus muscle (dose, 150 UM) and subsequent rehabilitation, a great reduction of painful contracture was observed (VAS score, 2/10). The procedure was well tolerated and no adverse effects were noted. After 20 days, hip articular range of motion and gait had improved (HHS score, 75/100). The clinical effects of botulinum toxin type A were present at 2-month follow-up. This treatment may be a viable alternative for the management of painful adductor muscle contracture after THA, without significant side effects. PMID:19824593

  18. Botulinum Toxin Type A as a Therapeutic Agent against Headache and Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Luvisetto, Siro; Gazerani, Parisa; Cianchetti, Carlo; Pavone, Flaminia

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) is a toxin produced by the naturally-occurring Clostridium botulinum that causes botulism. The potential of BoNT/A as a useful medical intervention was discovered by scientists developing a vaccine to protect against botulism. They found that, when injected into a muscle, BoNT/A causes a flaccid paralysis. Following this discovery, BoNT/A has been used for many years in the treatment of conditions of pathological muscle hyperactivity, like dystonias and spasticities. In parallel, the toxin has become a “glamour” drug due to its power to ward off facial wrinkles, particularly frontal, due to the activity of the mimic muscles. After the discovery that the drug also appeared to have a preventive effect on headache, scientists spent many efforts to study the potentially-therapeutic action of BoNT/A against pain. BoNT/A is effective at reducing pain in a number of disease states, including cervical dystonia, neuropathic pain, lower back pain, spasticity, myofascial pain and bladder pain. In 2010, regulatory approval for the treatment of chronic migraine with BoNT/A was given, notwithstanding the fact that the mechanism of action is still not completely elucidated. In the present review, we summarize experimental evidence that may help to clarify the mechanisms of action of BoNT/A in relation to the alleviation of headache pain, with particular emphasis on preclinical studies, both in animals and humans. Moreover, we summarize the latest clinical trials that show evidence on headache conditions that may obtain benefits from therapy with BoNT/A. PMID:26404377

  19. Botulinum Toxin Type a as a Therapeutic Agent against Headache and Related Disorders.

    PubMed

    Luvisetto, Siro; Gazerani, Parisa; Cianchetti, Carlo; Pavone, Flaminia

    2015-09-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) is a toxin produced by the naturally-occurring Clostridium botulinum that causes botulism. The potential of BoNT/A as a useful medical intervention was discovered by scientists developing a vaccine to protect against botulism. They found that, when injected into a muscle, BoNT/A causes a flaccid paralysis. Following this discovery, BoNT/A has been used for many years in the treatment of conditions of pathological muscle hyperactivity, like dystonias and spasticities. In parallel, the toxin has become a "glamour" drug due to its power to ward off facial wrinkles, particularly frontal, due to the activity of the mimic muscles. After the discovery that the drug also appeared to have a preventive effect on headache, scientists spent many efforts to study the potentially-therapeutic action of BoNT/A against pain. BoNT/A is effective at reducing pain in a number of disease states, including cervical dystonia, neuropathic pain, lower back pain, spasticity, myofascial pain and bladder pain. In 2010, regulatory approval for the treatment of chronic migraine with BoNT/A was given, notwithstanding the fact that the mechanism of action is still not completely elucidated. In the present review, we summarize experimental evidence that may help to clarify the mechanisms of action of BoNT/A in relation to the alleviation of headache pain, with particular emphasis on preclinical studies, both in animals and humans. Moreover, we summarize the latest clinical trials that show evidence on headache conditions that may obtain benefits from therapy with BoNT/A.

  20. Osteopenic consequences of botulinum toxin injections in the masticatory muscles: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Raphael, K G; Tadinada, A; Bradshaw, J M; Janal, M N; Sirois, D A; Chan, K C; Lurie, A G

    2014-08-01

    Patients with temporomandibular muscle and joint disorder (TMJD) increasingly seek and receive treatment for their pain with botulinum toxin (BoNTA; botulinum toxin A). Used intramuscularly in therapeutic doses, it produces localised paresis. Such paresis creates risk of reduced bone mineral density, or 'disuse osteopenia'. Animal studies have frequently used BoNTA as a model of paralysis to induce bone changes within short periods. Osteopenic effects can be enduring in animals but have yet to be studied in humans. This is the first study in humans to examine bone-related consequences of BoNTA injections in the masticatory muscles, comparing oral and maxillofacial radiologists' ratings of trabecular bone patterns in the condyles of patients with TMJD exposed to multiple masticatory muscle injection sessions with BoNTA to a sample of patients with TMJD unexposed to masticatory muscle injections with BoNTA. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-derived images of bilateral condyles were evaluated in seven patients with TMJD receiving 2+ recent BoNTA treatment sessions for facial pain and nine demographically matched patients with TMJD not receiving BoNTA treatment. Two oral and maxillofacial radiologists evaluated CBCT images for evidence of trabecular changes consistent with osteopenia. Both evaluators noted decreased density in all participants exposed to BoNTA and in none of the unexposed participants (P < 0.001). No other abnormalities associated with reduced loading were detected. These findings need replication in a larger sample and over a longer time period, to ensure safety of patients with TMJD receiving multiple BoNTA injections for their pain.

  1. Botulinum Toxin Type a as a Therapeutic Agent against Headache and Related Disorders.

    PubMed

    Luvisetto, Siro; Gazerani, Parisa; Cianchetti, Carlo; Pavone, Flaminia

    2015-09-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) is a toxin produced by the naturally-occurring Clostridium botulinum that causes botulism. The potential of BoNT/A as a useful medical intervention was discovered by scientists developing a vaccine to protect against botulism. They found that, when injected into a muscle, BoNT/A causes a flaccid paralysis. Following this discovery, BoNT/A has been used for many years in the treatment of conditions of pathological muscle hyperactivity, like dystonias and spasticities. In parallel, the toxin has become a "glamour" drug due to its power to ward off facial wrinkles, particularly frontal, due to the activity of the mimic muscles. After the discovery that the drug also appeared to have a preventive effect on headache, scientists spent many efforts to study the potentially-therapeutic action of BoNT/A against pain. BoNT/A is effective at reducing pain in a number of disease states, including cervical dystonia, neuropathic pain, lower back pain, spasticity, myofascial pain and bladder pain. In 2010, regulatory approval for the treatment of chronic migraine with BoNT/A was given, notwithstanding the fact that the mechanism of action is still not completely elucidated. In the present review, we summarize experimental evidence that may help to clarify the mechanisms of action of BoNT/A in relation to the alleviation of headache pain, with particular emphasis on preclinical studies, both in animals and humans. Moreover, we summarize the latest clinical trials that show evidence on headache conditions that may obtain benefits from therapy with BoNT/A. PMID:26404377

  2. Functional end-plate recovery in long-term botulinum toxin therapy of hemifacial spasm: a nerve conduction study.

    PubMed

    Butera, C; Guerriero, R; Amadio, S; Ungaro, D; Tesfaghebriel, H; Bianchi, F; Comi, G; Del Carro, U

    2013-02-01

    Botulinum toxin type-A is currently thought to be effective and safe for hemifacial spasm (HFS). The pre-synaptic block of acetylcholine release at the neuromuscular junction induces depression of orbicularis oculi muscle compound motor action potential (CMAP). The aim of our study was to evaluate at what extent end-plate functional recovery is possible even in botulinum toxin treatments lasting up to 15 years. We examined 81 outpatients with primary HFS (mean treatment duration = 7.2 ± 4.2 years) who underwent neurophysiologic study, once clinical effect of the previous treatment had vanished. The mean CMAP amplitude, mean rectified amplitude of response 1 (R1) of the blink reflex and area of response 2 (R2) of treated orbicularis oculi muscle were measured in comparison to the controlateral side. Mean amplitude of the above mentioned parameters was slightly lower (about 20%; p < 0.001) in the treated side at the end of the follow-up period (4.7 ± 1.7 months). The CMAP amplitude reduction weakly correlated with the interval from last treatment, while other neurophysiologic parameters did not change due to treatment duration or total toxin amount. Our study demonstrates that botulinum toxin affects compound motor action potential and blink-reflex responses for at least 4-5 months in HFS patients. The residual block is slight and does not increase with repeated injections after several years of treatment. Our study, beside confirming the long-term efficacy of botulinum toxin treatment for HFS, provides neurophysiologic evidence that therapeutic effect may be obtained without hindering the regenerative potential of the nerve-muscle complex.

  3. Interneuronal Transfer and Distal Action of Tetanus Toxin and Botulinum Neurotoxins A and D in Central Neurons.

    PubMed

    Bomba-Warczak, Ewa; Vevea, Jason D; Brittain, Joel M; Figueroa-Bernier, Annette; Tepp, William H; Johnson, Eric A; Yeh, Felix L; Chapman, Edwin R

    2016-08-16

    Recent reports suggest that botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) A, which is widely used clinically to inhibit neurotransmission, can spread within networks of neurons to have distal effects, but this remains controversial. Moreover, it is not known whether other members of this toxin family are transferred between neurons. Here, we investigate the potential distal effects of BoNT/A, BoNT/D, and tetanus toxin (TeNT), using central neurons grown in microfluidic devices. Toxins acted upon the neurons that mediated initial entry, but all three toxins were also taken up, via an alternative pathway, into non-acidified organelles that mediated retrograde transport to the somato-dendritic compartment. Toxins were then released into the media, where they entered and exerted their effects upon upstream neurons. These findings directly demonstrate that these agents undergo transcytosis and interneuronal transfer in an active form, resulting in long-distance effects. PMID:27498860

  4. Toxin production by Clostridium botulinum in pasteurized milk treated with carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Glass, K A; Kaufman, K M; Smith, A L; Johnson, E A; Chen, J H; Hotchkiss, J

    1999-08-01

    The addition of carbon dioxide to milk at levels of <20 mM inhibits the growth of selected spoilage organisms and extends refrigerated shelf life. Our objective was to determine if the addition of CO2 influenced the risk of botulism from milk. Carbon dioxide was added to pasteurized 2% fat milk at approximately 0, 9.1, or 18.2 mM using a commercial gas-injection system. The milk was inoculated with a 10-strain mixture of proteolytic and nonproteolytic Clostridium botulinum spore strains to yield 10(1) to 10(2) spores/ml. Milk was stored at 6.1 or 21 degrees C for 60 or 6 days, respectively, in sealed glass jars or high-density polyethylene plastic bottles. Milk stored at 21 degrees C curdled and exhibited a yogurt-like odor at 2 days and was putrid at 4 days. Botulinal toxin was detected in 9.1 mM CO2 milk at 4 days and in all treatments after 6 days of storage at 21 degrees C. All toxic samples were grossly spoiled based on sensory evaluation at the time toxin was detected. Although botulinal toxin appeared earlier in milk treated with 9.1 mM CO2 compared to both the 18.2 mM and untreated milk, gross spoilage would act as a deterrent to consumption of toxic milk. No botulinal toxin was detected in any treatment stored at 6.1 degrees C for 60 days. At 6.1 degrees C, the standard plate counts (SPCs) were generally lower in the CO2-treated samples than in controls, with 18.2 mM CO2 milk having the lowest SPC. These data indicate that the low-level addition of CO2 retards spoilage of pasteurized milk at refrigeration temperatures and does not increase the risk of botulism from treated milk stored at refrigeration or abuse temperatures.

  5. Botulinum toxin type A blocks the morphological changes induced by chemical stimulation on the presynaptic membrane of Torpedo synaptosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Marsal, J; Egea, G; Solsona, C; Rabasseda, X; Blasi, J

    1989-01-01

    The action of botulinum neurotoxin on acetylcholine release, and on the structural changes at the presynaptic membrane associated with the transmitter release, was studied by using a subcellular fraction of cholinergic nerve terminals (synaptosomes) isolated from the Torpedo electric organ. Acetylcholine and ATP release were continuously monitored by chemiluminescent methods. To catch the membrane morphological changes, the quick-freezing method was applied. Our results show that botulinum neurotoxin inhibits the release of acetylcholine from these isolated nerve terminals in a dose-dependent manner, whereas ATP release is not affected. The maximal inhibition (70%) is achieved at neurotoxin concentrations as low as 125 pM with an incubation time of 6 min. This effect is not linked to an alteration of the integrity of the synaptosomes since, after poisoning by botulinum neurotoxin type A, they show a nonmodified occluded lactate dehydrogenase activity. Moreover, membrane potential is not altered by the toxin with respect to the control, either in resting condition or after potassium depolarization. In addition to acetylcholine release inhibition, botulinum neurotoxin blocks the rearrangement of the presynaptic intramembrane particles induced by potassium stimulation. The action of botulinum neurotoxin suggests that the intramembrane particle rearrangement is related to the acetylcholine secretion induced by potassium stimulation in synaptosomes isolated from the electric organ of Torpedo marmorata. Images PMID:2463625

  6. Establishment of alternative potency test for botulinum toxin type A using compound muscle action potential (CMAP) in rats.

    PubMed

    Torii, Yasushi; Goto, Yoshitaka; Nakahira, Shinji; Ginnaga, Akihiro

    2014-11-01

    The biological activity of botulinum toxin type A has been evaluated using the mouse intraperitoneal (ip) LD50 test. This method requires a large number of mice to precisely determine toxin activity, and, as such, poses problems with regard to animal welfare. We previously developed a compound muscle action potential (CMAP) assay using rats as an alternative method to the mouse ip LD50 test. In this study, to evaluate this quantitative method of measuring toxin activity using CMAP, we assessed the parameters necessary for quantitative tests according to ICH Q2 (R1). This assay could be used to evaluate the activity of the toxin, even when inactive toxin was mixed with the sample. To reduce the number of animals needed, this assay was set to measure two samples per animal. Linearity was detected over a range of 0.1-12.8 U/mL, and the measurement range was set at 0.4-6.4 U/mL. The results for accuracy and precision showed low variability. The body weight was selected as a variable factor, but it showed no effect on the CMAP amplitude. In this study, potency tests using the rat CMAP assay of botulinum toxin type A demonstrated that it met the criteria for a quantitative analysis method.

  7. Combined effect of botulinum toxin and splinting on motor components and function of people suffering a stroke

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Malek; Shamili, Aryan; Frough, Bijan; Pashmdarfard, Marzieh; Fallahzadeh Abarghouei, AbolGhasem

    2016-01-01

    Background: Spasticity is one of the problems after a stroke. Due to this increase in muscle tone, patients are confronted with problems in motor control and difficulties in activities of daily living and complications such as shortness and contracture. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of the simultaneous use of both splint and botulinum toxin-A (BTX-A) injection on spasticity, range of motion and upper extremity function in a 3-month period. Methods: In this study a comparison was done between three groups of interventions, conducted in rehabilitation clinics in Tehran. Sixty people with chronic stroke were recruited. Based on the inclusion criteria, a total of 39 stroke patients after completing the consent forms were entered to intervention groups; splint or botulinum toxin injection or combined splint/botulinum toxin injection. They were followed up about three months and the evaluations were done monthly. Goniometry was the method to measure the range of motion, and Modified Ashworth Scale was used to examine the spasticity and the upper extremity function was scored based on Fugl- Meyer Assessment. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS 17. And ANOVAs was used for comparison between groups and times. Significance was set at 0.05. Results: All outcome measures were improved within each group but the differences between splint group and BTX-A group and the BTX-A-splint group was not significant in most outcomes during the 3 periods (first evaluation until end of the first month, the end of first month until the end of second month, the end of second month until the end of the third month) (p>0.05). The results also showed that the changes in elbow`s spasticity (p=0.05) and wrist`s spasticity (p=0.007) and upper extremity function (p=0.04) were obvious between the three groups over the 3-months and the difference in the group of combined use of botulinum toxin, and the splint was more than other groups. Conclusion: In this study, the effects of

  8. Botulinum toxin type-A injection to treat patients with intractable anismus unresponsive to simple biofeedback training

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Wang, Zhen-Ning; He, Lei; Gao, Ge; Zhai, Qing; Yin, Zhi-Tao; Zeng, Xian-Dong

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of botulinum toxin type A injection to the puborectalis and external sphincter muscle in the treatment of patients with anismus unresponsive to simple biofeedback training. METHODS: This retrospective study included 31 patients suffering from anismus who were unresponsive to simple biofeedback training. Diagnosis was made by anorectal manometry, balloon expulsion test, surface electromyography of the pelvic floor muscle, and defecography. Patients were given botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) injection and pelvic floor biofeedback training. Follow-up was conducted before the paper was written. Improvement was evaluated using the chronic constipation scoring system. RESULTS: BTX-A injection combined with pelvic floor biofeedback training achieved success in 24 patients, with 23 maintaining persistent satisfaction during a mean period of 8.4 mo. CONCLUSION: BTX-A injection combined with pelvic floor biofeedback training seems to be successful for intractable anismus. PMID:25253964

  9. Acetylcholine receptors and sodium channels in denervated and botulinum-toxin-treated adult rat muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Bambrick, L; Gordon, T

    1987-01-01

    1. The number of acetylcholine (ACh) receptors and Na channels was measured in adult rat hind-limb muscles after denervation or injection of botulinum toxin type A (BoTX), using specific binding of radiolabelled neurotoxins. 2. Denervation by sciatic nerve section increased the number of [125I]iodo-alpha-bungarotoxin ([125I]BTX) binding sites from low, unmeasurable levels to 39 +/- 3 fmol of toxin bound per milligram muscle protein at 21 days. 3. Subcutaneous injection of BoTX produced complete neuromuscular blockade for 11-14 days over which time the number of [125I]BTX binding sites increased with the same time course and to the same extent as following denervation. 4. Neither denervation nor BoTX treatment significantly altered the number of tritiated saxitoxin ([3H]STX) binding sites from normal values of 7.8 fmol/mg muscle weight or 57 +/- 3 fmol/mg homogenate protein. This may, however, correspond to a lower density of [3H]STX sites in the muscle membrane. 5. It was concluded that neuromuscular blockade with BoTX is equivalent to denervation in its effects on synthesis of ACh receptors. Numbers of Na channels are more stable than ACh receptors but may also be modulated by neuromuscular activity. PMID:2442368

  10. Sialorrhea: anatomy, pathophysiology and treatment with emphasis on the role of botulinum toxins.

    PubMed

    Lakraj, Amanda Amrita; Moghimi, Narges; Jabbari, Bahman

    2013-05-21

    Sialorrhea or excessive drooling is a major issue in children with cerebral palsy and adults with neurodegenerative disorders. In this review, we describe the clinical features, anatomy and physiology of sialorrhea, as well as a review of the world literature on medical treatment using Yale University's search engine; including but not limited to Medline and Erasmus. Level of drug efficacy is defined according to the guidelines of American Academy of Neurology. Current medical management is unsatisfactory. Topical agents (scopolamine and tropicamide) and oral agents (glyccopyrolate) combined render a level B evidence (probably effective); however, this treatment is associated with troublesome side effects. Double-blind and placebo-controlled studies of botulinum toxin (BoNT) provide a level A evidence for type B (two class I studies; effective and established) and both overall and individual B level of evidence for OnabotulinumtoxinA (A/Ona) and AbobotulinumtoxinA (A/Abo); these are probably effective. For IncobotulinumtoxinA (A/Inco), the level of evidence is U (insufficient) due to lack of blinded studies. Side effects are uncommon; transient and comparable between the two types of toxin. A clinical note at the end of this review comments on fine clinical points. Administration of BoNTs into salivary glands is currently the most effective way of treating sialorrhea.

  11. Salivary gland application of botulinum toxin for the treatment of sialorrhea.

    PubMed

    Fuster Torres, María Angeles; Berini Aytés, Leonardo; Gay Escoda, Cosme

    2007-11-01

    Sialorrhea or excessive salivation, and drooling, are common and disabling manifestations in different neurological disorders. A review is made of the literature, based on a PubMed search, selecting those articles describing clinical trials involving the injection of botulinum toxin A in the salivary glands of patients with different diseases characterized by sialorrhea. The most frequently treated diseases were infant cerebral palsy (30%), Parkinson's disease (20%) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (15%). Over half of the authors injected the product into the parotid glands, 9.5% into the submaxillary glands, and 38% into both. The total doses of toxin injected varied from 10-100 units of Botox or 30-450 units of Dysport according to the different authors. A reduction was observed in the production of saliva following these injections, and the duration of the therapeutic effect was 1.5-6 months. Six articles (30%) described the presence of adverse effects such as dysphagia, xerostomia and chewing difficulties. Most of the clinical studies involved small patient samples, with no blinding or randomization, and no control group. Moreover, no data are available on the efficacy and adverse effects of treatment in the context of long-term prospective studies. The effective therapeutic dose and ideal form of application remain to be established, and require the conduction of further controlled clinical trials involving large sample sizes.

  12. Intragastric injection of botulinum toxin for the treatment of obesity. Where are we?

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Compean, Diego; Garza, Hector Maldonado

    2008-01-01

    Obesity has reached epidemic proportions particularly in western countries. Most non-surgical treatments of this condition are disappointing. Since 2005, several studies evaluating the effect of Botulinum Toxin type A (BT-A) in gastric antrum by means of endoscopy for the treatment of obesity have been published. This treatment modality was based on the observation that gastric injection of BT-A in laparatomized rats induced a significant reduction of food intake and body weight. Nowadays, 6 studies have been published yielding conflicting results. Differences in selection of patients, doses of BT-A, method of administration of the toxin and instruments of evaluation of some parameters among these studies may be the cause of divergent results. We discuss herein some important features of these studies pointing out on differences among them. At the same time, based on the knowledge of physiological characteristics of normal and abnormal gastric function related with feeding, we discuss the probable causes of failure observed in these trials. Finally, we give some guidelines concerning the way that future research in this field may follow, not without calling attention to disadvantages of this treatment. PMID:18350615

  13. Anticholinergic versus botulinum toxin A comparison trial for the treatment of bothersome urge urinary incontinence: ABC trial.

    PubMed

    Visco, Anthony G; Brubaker, Linda; Richter, Holly E; Nygaard, Ingrid; Paraiso, Marie Fidela; Menefee, Shawn A; Schaffer, Joseph; Wei, John; Chai, Toby; Janz, Nancy; Spino, Cathie; Meikle, Susan

    2012-01-01

    This trial compares the change in urgency urinary incontinence episodes over 6 months, tolerability and cost effectiveness between women receiving daily anticholinergic therapy plus a single intra-detrusor injection of saline versus a single intra-detrusor injection of 100 U of botulinum toxin A plus daily oral placebo tablets. We present the rationale and design of a randomized-controlled trial, Anticholinergic versus Botulinum Toxin, Comparison Trial for the Treatment of Bothersome Urge Urinary Incontinence: ABC trial, conducted by the NICHD-funded Pelvic Floor Disorders Network. We discuss the innovative nature of this trial and the challenges related to choice of patient population, maintaining masking, cost effectiveness, ethical considerations, measuring adherence, and placebo development and testing. Enrollment began in April, 2010. 242 participants will be randomized and primary outcome data analysis is anticipated to begin in mid 2012. Several challenges in the trial design are discussed. Randomization to placebo intra-detrusor injections may limit recruitment, potentially impacting generalizability. Other challenges included the heavy marketing of drugs for overactive bladder which could impact recruitment of drug-naïve women. In addition, anticholinergic medications often cause dry mouth, making masking difficult. Finally, adverse reporting of transient urinary retention is challenging as there is no standardized definition; yet this is the most common adverse event following intra-detrusor botulinum toxin injection. The ABC trial will help women with urgency urinary incontinence balance efficacy, side effects and cost of anticholinergic medication versus botulinum toxin intra-detrusor injection. The results have the potential to fundamentally change the therapeutic approach to this condition.

  14. A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Botulinum Toxin A Dosage in the Upper Extremity of Children with Spasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kawamura, Anne; Campbell, Kent; Lam-Damji, Sophie; Fehlings, Darcy

    2007-01-01

    This study compared the effects of low and high doses of botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) to improve upper extremity function. Thirty-nine children (22 males, 17 females) with a mean age of 6 years 2 months (SD 2y 9mo) diagnosed with spastic hemiplegia or triplegia were enrolled into this double-blind, randomized controlled trial. The high-dose group…

  15. Botulinum Toxin Type a Injection, Followed by Home-Based Functional Training for Upper Limb Hemiparesis after Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takekawa, Toru; Kakuda, Wataru; Taguchi, Kensuke; Ishikawa, Atsushi; Sase, Yousuke; Abo, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) has been reported to be an effective treatment for limb spasticity after stroke. However, the reduction in the spasticity after BoNT-A injection alone does not ensure an improvement in the active motor function of the affected limb. The aim of this study was to clarify the clinical effects of a BoNT-A injection,…

  16. Anticholinergic Versus Botulinum Toxin A Comparison Trial for the Treatment of Bothersome Urge Urinary Incontinence: ABC Trial

    PubMed Central

    Visco, Anthony G.; Brubaker, Linda; Richter, Holly E.; Nygaard, Ingrid; Paraiso, Marie Fidela; Menefee, Shawn A.; Schaffer, Joseph; Wei, John; Chai, Toby; Janz, Nancy; Spino, Cathie; Meikle, Susan

    2011-01-01

    This trial compares the change in urgency urinary incontinence episodes over 6 months, tolerability and cost effectiveness between women receiving daily anticholinergic therapy plus a single intra-detrusor injection of saline versus a single intra-detrusor injection of 100 unit of botulinum toxin A plus daily oral placebo tablets. We present the rationale and design of a randomized controlled trial, Anticholinergic versus Botulinum Toxin, Comparison Trial for the Treatment of Bothersome Urge Urinary Incontinence: ABC Trial, conducted by the NICHD-funded Pelvic Floor Disorders Network. We discuss the innovative nature of this trial and the challenges related to choice of patient population, maintaining masking, cost-effectiveness, ethical considerations, measuring adherence, and placebo development and testing. Enrollment began in April, 2010. 242 participants will be randomized and primary outcome data analysis is anticipated to begin in mid 2012. Several challenges in the trial design are discussed. Randomization to placebo intradetrusor injections may limit recruitment, potentially impacting generalizability. Other challenges included the heavy marketing of drugs for overactive bladder which could impact recruitment of drug naïve women. In addition, anticholinergic medications often cause dry mouth, making masking difficult. Finally, adverse reporting of transient urinary retention is challenging as there is no standardized definition; yet this is the most common adverse event following intradetrusor botulinum toxin injection. The ABC trial will help women with urgency urinary incontinence balance efficacy, side effects and cost of anticholinergic medication versus botulinum toxin intradetrusor injection. The results have the potential to fundamentally change the therapeutic approach to this condition. PMID:22008247

  17. Treacher Collins syndrome: an undescribed characteristic of the condition and its management with botulinum toxin and surgery.

    PubMed

    Warner, Robert M; Fagan, John M; Das-Gupta, Rana

    2008-11-01

    Mandibulofacial dysostosis (Treacher Collins syndrome) is associated with clinical abnormalities of structures derived from the first and second branchial arches, including antimongoloid slant of palpebral fissures, colobomas of the lower eyelid, eyelash malformations, and malar and mandibular defects. We describe an unusual clinical feature associated with colobomas of the lower eyelids, in a patient with mandibulofacial dysostosis, successfully treated with botulinum toxin and subsequent surgery.

  18. Botulinum toxin type A injections for the management of muscle tightness following total hip arthroplasty: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Bhave, Anil; Zywiel, Michael G; Ulrich, Slif D; McGrath, Mike S; Seyler, Thorsten M; Marker, David R; Delanois, Ronald E; Mont, Michael A

    2009-01-01

    Background Development of hip adductor, tensor fascia lata, and rectus femoris muscle contractures following total hip arthroplasties are quite common, with some patients failing to improve despite treatment with a variety of non-operative modalities. The purpose of the present study was to describe the use of and patient outcomes of botulinum toxin injections as an adjunctive treatment for muscle tightness following total hip arthroplasty. Methods Ten patients (14 hips) who had hip adductor, abductor, and/or flexor muscle contractures following total arthroplasty and had been refractory to physical therapeutic efforts were treated with injection of botulinum toxin A. Eight limbs received injections into the adductor muscle, 8 limbs received injections into the tensor fascia lata muscle, and 2 limbs received injection into the rectus femoris muscle, followed by intensive physical therapy for 6 weeks. Results At a mean final follow-up of 20 months, all 14 hips had increased range in the affected arc of motion, with a mean improvement of 23 degrees (range, 10 to 45 degrees). Additionally all hips had an improvement in hip scores, with a significant increase in mean score from 74 points (range, 57 to 91 points) prior to injection to a mean of 96 points (range, 93 to 98) at final follow-up. There were no serious treatment-related adverse events. Conclusion Botulinum toxin A injections combined with intensive physical therapy may be considered as a potential treatment modality, especially in difficult cases of muscle tightness that are refractory to standard therapy. PMID:19709429

  19. Botulinum toxin type A and B improve quality of life in patients with axillary and palmar hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Rosell, Karolina; Hymnelius, Kristina; Swartling, Carl

    2013-05-01

    Hyperhidrosis is a common disorder that may have a severe impact on quality of life. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical effect of two novel botulinum toxins, Xeomin®, a type A botulinum toxin, and Neuro-bloc®, a type B botulinum toxin, in the treatment of axillary and palmar hyperhidrosis. A total of 84 patients, 58 with axillary and 26 with palmar hyperhidrosis, were included in this open study. Axillae were injected with 107 ± 22 U Xeomin® and palms were injected with 213 ± 19 U Xeomin® and 264 ± 60 U Neurobloc® over the thenar eminences to avoid muscle weakness. At follow-up 3 weeks post-treatment, all patients treated for axillary hyperhidrosis reported satisfaction in self-ranking, evaporation decreased > 40%, and Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) score improved from 12.0 to 1.7 (p < 0.05). In the palmar group 95% were satisfied, evaporation decreased > 50% and DLQI score improved from 10.3 to 1.2 (p < 0.05). Only one patient in the palmar group experienced muscle weakness. In conclusion, Xeomin® has an excellent effect on axillary hyperhidrosis and in combination with Neurobloc® on palmar hyperhidrosis. Neurobloc® may be an option for use in the treatment of palmar hyperhidrosis in order to minimize muscular side-effects.

  20. Systematic review of the effectiveness of botulinum toxin or radiotherapy for sialorrhea in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Stone, Carol A; O'Leary, Norma

    2009-02-01

    Fifty percent of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) experience problems handling serous saliva and 20% fail to achieve adequate control of sialorrhea with anticholinergic medications, or experience intolerable adverse effects from these drugs. Both botulinum and radiotherapy have been suggested in the literature as treatments for intractable sialorrhea. In this review, we assess the evidence for the effectiveness and toxicity of botulinum toxin and radiotherapy for sialorrhea in patients with ALS. Relevant studies were retrieved from Medline, Embase and Cochrane Databases. Handsearching of Neurology, Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, and Palliative Medicine and of reference lists, was carried out. Five studies (28 patients) were included in the analysis of botulinum. Of the four studies using an intraglandular method of injection, no adverse effects occurred. Two of these had positive findings of the effect of botulinum in salivary secretion rate and quality of life. In contrast, significant adverse effects were experienced by two patients in a study of retrograde injections into the salivary ducts. Two studies were included in the analysis of radiotherapy (27 patients). Both demonstrated a positive effect of radiotherapy on salivary secretion rate. Some patients experienced mild acute side effects. Because of the small numbers of studies, small sample sizes, and poor quality of reporting, it is not possible to draw firm conclusions. There is some evidence indicating that both botulinum and radiotherapy are well tolerated, effective treatments for persistent sialorrhea in patients with ALS and that the duration of action is up to three months with botulinum and six months with radiotherapy.

  1. An update on botulinum toxin A injections of trigger points for myofascial pain.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jon Y; Wang, Dajie

    2014-01-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is a common chronic pain condition that is characterized by distinct "trigger points." Despite current treatments with physical therapy, analgesics, anti-depressants and trigger-point injections, myofascial pain remains a challenging chronic pain condition in clinical practice. Botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) can cause prolonged muscle relaxation through inhibition of acetylcholine release. It may offer some advantages over the current treatments for MPS by providing a longer sustained period of pain relief. Despite numerous clinical trials, the efficacy of BTX-A in alleviating MPS is not well-established due to mixed results from recent clinical trials. Active trigger points are associated with referred pain and greatly impact many aspects of activities of daily living, mood, and health status. This review is designed to analyze the clinical trials regarding the efficacy of BTX-A injection of active trigger points as a treatment for MPS. The literature referenced was obtained via a computer search with Google Scholar, Pubmed, Medline and EMbase. Our search terms included "Botulinum toxin," "myofascial pain," "trigger points," "myofascial trigger points," "chronic pain." Additional references were retrieved from the reference list of the reports found via this search. Studies were considered eligible for inclusion if they were double-blinded, randomized, controlled trials evaluating the efficacy of BTX-A injections into trigger points for pain reduction, and if the trigger point selection in the trial included referred pain and/or local twitch response. Open-label studies, case reports, and other non-randomized studies were excluded. Eight trials were found according to the above criteria and are summarized in Table 1. There are well-designed clinical trials to support the efficacy of trigger-point injections with BTX-A for MPS. However, further clinical trials with considerations of minimizing placebo effect, repeated dosing, adequate

  2. An update on botulinum toxin A injections of trigger points for myofascial pain.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jon Y; Wang, Dajie

    2014-01-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is a common chronic pain condition that is characterized by distinct "trigger points." Despite current treatments with physical therapy, analgesics, anti-depressants and trigger-point injections, myofascial pain remains a challenging chronic pain condition in clinical practice. Botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) can cause prolonged muscle relaxation through inhibition of acetylcholine release. It may offer some advantages over the current treatments for MPS by providing a longer sustained period of pain relief. Despite numerous clinical trials, the efficacy of BTX-A in alleviating MPS is not well-established due to mixed results from recent clinical trials. Active trigger points are associated with referred pain and greatly impact many aspects of activities of daily living, mood, and health status. This review is designed to analyze the clinical trials regarding the efficacy of BTX-A injection of active trigger points as a treatment for MPS. The literature referenced was obtained via a computer search with Google Scholar, Pubmed, Medline and EMbase. Our search terms included "Botulinum toxin," "myofascial pain," "trigger points," "myofascial trigger points," "chronic pain." Additional references were retrieved from the reference list of the reports found via this search. Studies were considered eligible for inclusion if they were double-blinded, randomized, controlled trials evaluating the efficacy of BTX-A injections into trigger points for pain reduction, and if the trigger point selection in the trial included referred pain and/or local twitch response. Open-label studies, case reports, and other non-randomized studies were excluded. Eight trials were found according to the above criteria and are summarized in Table 1. There are well-designed clinical trials to support the efficacy of trigger-point injections with BTX-A for MPS. However, further clinical trials with considerations of minimizing placebo effect, repeated dosing, adequate

  3. Factors affecting growth and toxin production by Clostridium botulinum type E on irradiated (0. 3 Mrad) chicken skins

    SciTech Connect

    Firstenberg-Eden, R.; Rowley, D.B.; Shattuck, G.E.

    1982-05-01

    A model system (chicken skins with chicken exudate) was used to determine if Clostridium botulinum type E (Beluga) spores, stressed by low dose irradiation, would develop and produce toxin at abuse temperatures of 10 and 30/sup 0/C in the absence of characteristic spoilage. Unstressed spores germinated, multiplied, and produced toxin on vacuum-packed chicken skins, stored at either 30 or 10/sup 0/C. Cell numbers increased faster and toxin was evident sooner at 30/sup 0/C than at 10/sup 0/C. At 30/sup 0/C, growth occurred and toxin was produced more slowly when samples were incubated aerobically than anaerobically. When samples were incubated aerobically at 10/sup 0/C, no toxin was detected within a test period of 14 days. An irradiation dose of 0.3 Mrad at 5/sup 0/C reduced a spore population on vacuum-sealed chicken skins by about 90%. The surviving population produced toxin at 30/sup 0/C under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions, at 10/sup 0/C no toxin was detected even on skins incubated anaerobically. Under the worst conditions (30/sup 0/C, vacuum packed) toxin was not detected prior to characteristic spoilage caused by the natural flora surviving 0.3 Mrad.

  4. The effect of laser and botulinum toxin in the treatment of myofascial pain and mouth opening: A randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    De Carli, Bethânia Molin Giaretta; Magro, Alessandra Kuhn Dall; Souza-Silva, Bianca Núbia; Matos, Felipe de Souza; De Carli, João Paulo; Paranhos, Luiz Renato; Magro, Eduardo Dall

    2016-06-01

    This study conducted a randomized clinical trial in 15 patients, who sought care at the Dental Clinic of the University of Passo Fundo, in order to compare the use of low-level laser and botulinum toxin in the treatment of myofascial pain and whether they alter the mouth opening of patients with temporomandibular disorder. The patients were divided into two groups: the Laser group received low-level GaAlAs laser, 100mW of power at a wavelength of 830nm in continuous light emission; and the Toxin group received 30U of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) in the first session, and 15U after fifteen days. The assessments were performed by measuring pain with Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), and mouth opening with a digital caliper. Data were submitted to Student's t test at 5% significance level. Regarding pain symptoms, the results indicate that groups treated with laser and toxin registered 7U in VAS, at day 5 the scores were 4.75 and 4.86U, respectively. The laser worked faster (day 12) at 2.75U, and the group treated with BTX-A registered 2.86U at day 30. Both therapies investigated were effective in reducing pain, but the effect of low-level laser was faster than the use of BTX-A. Both treatments showed no statistically significant improvement in mouth opening. PMID:27045280

  5. The effect of laser and botulinum toxin in the treatment of myofascial pain and mouth opening: A randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    De Carli, Bethânia Molin Giaretta; Magro, Alessandra Kuhn Dall; Souza-Silva, Bianca Núbia; Matos, Felipe de Souza; De Carli, João Paulo; Paranhos, Luiz Renato; Magro, Eduardo Dall

    2016-06-01

    This study conducted a randomized clinical trial in 15 patients, who sought care at the Dental Clinic of the University of Passo Fundo, in order to compare the use of low-level laser and botulinum toxin in the treatment of myofascial pain and whether they alter the mouth opening of patients with temporomandibular disorder. The patients were divided into two groups: the Laser group received low-level GaAlAs laser, 100mW of power at a wavelength of 830nm in continuous light emission; and the Toxin group received 30U of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) in the first session, and 15U after fifteen days. The assessments were performed by measuring pain with Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), and mouth opening with a digital caliper. Data were submitted to Student's t test at 5% significance level. Regarding pain symptoms, the results indicate that groups treated with laser and toxin registered 7U in VAS, at day 5 the scores were 4.75 and 4.86U, respectively. The laser worked faster (day 12) at 2.75U, and the group treated with BTX-A registered 2.86U at day 30. Both therapies investigated were effective in reducing pain, but the effect of low-level laser was faster than the use of BTX-A. Both treatments showed no statistically significant improvement in mouth opening.

  6. Hyperhidrosis: Anatomy, Pathophysiology and Treatment with Emphasis on the Role of Botulinum Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Lakraj, Amanda-Amrita D.; Moghimi, Narges; Jabbari, Bahman

    2013-01-01

    Clinical features, anatomy and physiology of hyperhidrosis are presented with a review of the world literature on treatment. Level of drug efficacy is defined according to the guidelines of the American Academy of Neurology. Topical agents (glycopyrrolate and methylsulfate) are evidence level B (probably effective). Oral agents (oxybutynin and methantheline bromide) are also level B. In a total of 831 patients, 1 class I and 2 class II blinded studies showed level B efficacy of OnabotulinumtoxinA (A/Ona), while 1 class I and 1 class II study also demonstrated level B efficacy of AbobotulinumtoxinA (A/Abo) in axillary hyperhidrosis (AH), collectively depicting Level A evidence (established) for botulinumtoxinA (BoNT-A). In a comparator study, A/Ona and A/Inco toxins demonstrated comparable efficacy in AH. For IncobotulinumtoxinA (A/Inco) no placebo controlled studies exist; thus, efficacy is Level C (possibly effective) based solely on the aforementioned class II comparator study. For RimabotulinumtoxinB (B/Rima), one class III study has suggested Level U efficacy (insufficient data). In palmar hyperhidrosis (PH), there are 3 class II studies for A/Ona and 2 for A/Abo (individually and collectively level B for BoNT-A) and no blinded study for A/Inco (level U). For B/Rima the level of evidence is C (possibly effective) based on 1 class II study. Botulinum toxins (BoNT) provide a long lasting effect of 3–9 months after one injection session. Studies on BoNT-A iontophoresis are emerging (2 class II studies; level B); however, data on duration and frequency of application is inconsistent. PMID:23612753

  7. Spatial, Temporal, and Matrix Variability of Clostridium botulinum Type E Toxin Gene Distribution at Great Lakes Beaches

    PubMed Central

    Oster, Ryan J.; Haack, Sheridan K.; Fogarty, Lisa R.; Tucker, Taaja R.; Riley, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum type E toxin is responsible for extensive mortality of birds and fish in the Great Lakes. The C. botulinum bontE gene that produces the type E toxin was amplified with quantitative PCR from 150 sloughed algal samples (primarily Cladophora species) collected during summer 2012 from 10 Great Lakes beaches in five states; concurrently, 74 sediment and 37 water samples from four sites were also analyzed. The bontE gene concentration in algae was significantly higher than in water and sediment (P < 0.05), suggesting that algal mats provide a better microenvironment for C. botulinum. The bontE gene was detected most frequently in algae at Jeorse Park and Portage Lake Front beaches (Lake Michigan) and Bay City State Recreation Area beach on Saginaw Bay (Lake Huron), where 77, 100, and 83% of these algal samples contained the bontE gene, respectively. The highest concentration of bontE was detected at Bay City (1.98 × 105 gene copies/ml of algae or 5.21 × 106 g [dry weight]). This study revealed that the bontE gene is abundant in the Great Lakes but that it has spatial, temporal, and matrix variability. Further, embayed beaches, low wave height, low wind velocity, and greater average water temperature enhance the bontE occurrence. PMID:25888178

  8. Spatial, Temporal, and Matrix Variability of Clostridium botulinum Type E Toxin Gene Distribution at Great Lakes Beaches.

    PubMed

    Wijesinghe, Rasanthi U; Oster, Ryan J; Haack, Sheridan K; Fogarty, Lisa R; Tucker, Taaja R; Riley, Stephen C

    2015-07-01

    Clostridium botulinum type E toxin is responsible for extensive mortality of birds and fish in the Great Lakes. The C. botulinum bontE gene that produces the type E toxin was amplified with quantitative PCR from 150 sloughed algal samples (primarily Cladophora species) collected during summer 2012 from 10 Great Lakes beaches in five states; concurrently, 74 sediment and 37 water samples from four sites were also analyzed. The bontE gene concentration in algae was significantly higher than in water and sediment (P < 0.05), suggesting that algal mats provide a better microenvironment for C. botulinum. The bontE gene was detected most frequently in algae at Jeorse Park and Portage Lake Front beaches (Lake Michigan) and Bay City State Recreation Area beach on Saginaw Bay (Lake Huron), where 77, 100, and 83% of these algal samples contained the bontE gene, respectively. The highest concentration of bontE was detected at Bay City (1.98 × 10(5) gene copies/ml of algae or 5.21 × 10(6) g [dry weight]). This study revealed that the bontE gene is abundant in the Great Lakes but that it has spatial, temporal, and matrix variability. Further, embayed beaches, low wave height, low wind velocity, and greater average water temperature enhance the bontE occurrence.

  9. Efficacy and Safety of a New Botulinum Toxin Type A Free of Complexing Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Hyun-Mi; Park, Joo Hyun; Song, Dae Heon; Chung, Myung Eun

    2015-01-01

    MT10107 is botulinum neurotoxin type A derived drug which utilizes the 150 kDa portion without complexing proteins and human serum albumin contents. To evaluate the efficacy and the safety of MT10107, it was compared with onabotulinumtoxinA in this double-blind, randomized controlled trial. Twenty-five healthy males received a randomly selected dose of MT10107 into the extensor digitorum brevis (EDB) muscle of one foot, and an equivalent dose of onabotulinumtoxinA (BOTOX) was injected into the contralateral EDB muscle. While efficacy of the administered substance was determined by measuring paretic effects on the EDB, the local spread of toxin effects was evaluated by the paretic effects on the nearby abductor hallucis (AH) and abductor digiti quinti (ADQ) muscles. Paretic effects were defined as the percentage of reduction of the compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitudes, measured at 14, 30, 90 days after the injection, compared to the baseline value. Intergroup (MT10107 and onabotulinumtoxinA) differences were not significant in the percentage reduction of the amplitudes in the EDB muscles. In this study, there was no significant difference in efficacy and safety between the two test drugs. MT10107 may be effective and safe as much as onabotulinumtoxinA to produce the desired paretic effect. PMID:26712786

  10. The first non Clostridial botulinum-like toxin cleaves VAMP within the juxtamembrane domain

    PubMed Central

    Zornetta, Irene; Azarnia Tehran, Domenico; Arrigoni, Giorgio; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Bano, Luca; Leka, Oneda; Zanotti, Giuseppe; Binz, Thomas; Montecucco, Cesare

    2016-01-01

    The genome of Weissella oryzae SG25T was recently sequenced and a botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) like gene was identified by bioinformatics methods. The typical three-domains organization of BoNTs with a N-terminal metalloprotease domain, a translocation and a cell binding domains could be identified. The BoNT family of neurotoxins is rapidly growing, but this was the first indication of the possible expression of a BoNT toxin outside the Clostridium genus. We performed molecular modeling and dynamics simulations showing that the 50 kDa N-terminal domain folds very similarly to the metalloprotease domain of BoNT/B, whilst the binding part is different. However, neither the recombinant metalloprotease nor the binding domains showed cross-reactivity with the standard antisera that define the seven serotypes of BoNTs. We found that the purified Weissella metalloprotease cleaves VAMP at a single site untouched by the other VAMP-specific BoNTs. This site is a unique Trp-Trp peptide bond located within the juxtamembrane segment of VAMP which is essential for neurotransmitter release. Therefore, the present study identifies the first non-Clostridial BoNT-like metalloprotease that cleaves VAMP at a novel and relevant site and we propose to label it BoNT/Wo. PMID:27443638

  11. Lumbar Sympathetic Block with Botulinum Toxin Type B for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eunjoo; Cho, Chan Woo; Kim, Hye Young; Lee, Pyung Bok; Nahm, Francis Sahngun

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar sympathetic block (LSB) is an effective method for relief of sympathetically mediated pain in the lower extremities. To prolong the sympathetic blockade, sympathetic destruction with alcohol or radiofrequency has been used. The pre-ganglionic sympathetic nerves are cholinergic, and botulinum toxin (BTX) has been found to inhibit the release of acetylcholine at the cholinergic nerve terminals. Moreover, BTX type B (BTX-B) is more convenient to use than BTX type A. Based on these findings, we performed LSB on the 2 patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) in the lower extremity. Levobupivacaine 0.25% 5 mL mixed with BTX-B 5,000 IU was given under fluoroscopic guidance. Two months after LSB with BTX-B, pain intensity and the Leeds assessment of neuropathic symptoms and signs (LANSS) score were significantly reduced. Allodynia and coldness disappeared and skin color came back to normal. In conclusion, BTX-B can produce an efficacious and durable sympathetic blocking effect on patients with CRPS.

  12. Cosmetic use of botulinum toxin-a affects processing of emotional language.

    PubMed

    Havas, David A; Glenberg, Arthur M; Gutowski, Karol A; Lucarelli, Mark J; Davidson, Richard J

    2010-07-01

    How does language reliably evoke emotion, as it does when people read a favorite novel or listen to a skilled orator? Recent evidence suggests that comprehension involves a mental simulation of sentence content that calls on the same neural systems used in literal action, perception, and emotion. In this study, we demonstrated that involuntary facial expression plays a causal role in the processing of emotional language. Subcutaneous injections of botulinum toxin-A (BTX) were used to temporarily paralyze the facial muscle used in frowning. We found that BTX selectively slowed the reading of sentences that described situations that normally require the paralyzed muscle for expressing the emotions evoked by the sentences. This finding demonstrates that peripheral feedback plays a role in language processing, supports facial-feedback theories of emotional cognition, and raises questions about the effects of BTX on cognition and emotional reactivity. We account for the role of facial feedback in language processing by considering neurophysiological mechanisms and reinforcement-learning theory.

  13. Growth effects of botulinum toxin type A injected unilaterally into the masseter muscle of developing rats*

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chanyoung; Park, Kitae; Kim, Jiyeon

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) on mandible skeletal development by inducing muscle hypofunction. Methods: Four-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats (n=60) were divided into three groups: Group 1 animals served as controls and were injected with saline; Group 2 animals were injected unilaterally with BTX-A (the contralateral side was injected with saline); and Group 3 animals were injected bilaterally with BTX-A. In Group 2, the saline-injected side was designated the control side (Group 2-1), whereas the BTX-A-injected side was designated the experimental side (Group 2-2). After four weeks, the animals were sacrificed, dry skulls were prepared, and mandibles were measured. Results: In the unilateral group, the experimental side (Group 2-2) had reduced dimensions for all mandible measurements compared with the control side (Group 2-1), suggesting a local effect of BTX-A on mandible growth, likely due to muscle reduction. Conclusions: Localized BTX-A injection induced a change in craniofacial growth, and the skeletal effect was unilateral despite both sides of the mandible functioning as one unit. PMID:25559955

  14. Efficacy and Safety of a New Botulinum Toxin Type A Free of Complexing Proteins.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyun-Mi; Park, Joo Hyun; Song, Dae Heon; Chung, Myung Eun

    2016-01-01

    MT10107 is botulinum neurotoxin type A derived drug which utilizes the 150 kDa portion without complexing proteins and human serum albumin contents. To evaluate the efficacy and the safety of MT10107, it was compared with onabotulinumtoxinA in this double-blind, randomized controlled trial. Twenty-five healthy males received a randomly selected dose of MT10107 into the extensor digitorum brevis (EDB) muscle of one foot, and an equivalent dose of onabotulinumtoxinA (BOTOX) was injected into the contralateral EDB muscle. While efficacy of the administered substance was determined by measuring paretic effects on the EDB, the local spread of toxin effects was evaluated by the paretic effects on the nearby abductor hallucis (AH) and abductor digiti quinti (ADQ) muscles. Paretic effects were defined as the percentage of reduction of the compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitudes, measured at 14, 30, 90 days after the injection, compared to the baseline value. Intergroup (MT10107 and onabotulinumtoxinA) differences were not significant in the percentage reduction of the amplitudes in the EDB muscles. In this study, there was no significant difference in efficacy and safety between the two test drugs. MT10107 may be effective and safe as much as onabotulinumtoxinA to produce the desired paretic effect. PMID:26712786

  15. Unique use of botulinum toxin to decrease adductor tone and allow surgical excision of vulvar carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Guo, Y; Shin, K

    2004-01-01

    Here, we present the case of an 86-year-old woman with vulvar carcinoma requiring surgical resection and with Parkinson's disease with severe spasticity and contractures of the lower extremities. Because of the patient's severe contractures and spasticity (her knees could only be separated by 2 cm with sustained abducting force), surgical positioning and access to the vulva were impossible. The patient was admitted, intending to undergo surgery after injection with botulinum toxin (BTX) to hip adductors and intensive physical therapy. After confirmed healed hip arthroplasty, the patient underwent BTX injection (400 U) to her bilateral adductor brevis, adductor longus, adductor magnus, and semimembranosus and semitendinosus muscles on day 2 of her hospital stay. On day 3, a physical therapist began a twice-a-day stretching program. An adjustable abduction brace was custom-made to provide sustained stretching. On day 9, the patient underwent wide local excision of vulvar carcinoma with the abductor brace in place. The patient tolerated the surgery well and was discharged home on day 11 with continuous physical therapy. Upon discharge, the distance between the patient's knees was 14 cm. This unique case demonstrated a new indication for BTX treatment in the preoperative setting to allow surgical positioning and access.

  16. SYSTEMS ANALYSIS OF TRANSCRIPTIONAL DATA PROVIDES INSIGHTS INTO MUSCLE’S BIOLOGICAL RESPONSE TO BOTULINUM TOXIN

    PubMed Central

    MUKUND, KAVITHA; MATHEWSON, MARGIE; MINAMOTO, VIVIANE; WARD, SAMUEL R.; SUBRAMANIAM, SHANKAR; LIEBER, RICHARD L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In this study we provide global transcriptomic profiling and analysis of botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A)–treated muscle over a 1-year period. Methods Microarray analysis was performed on rat tibialis anterior muscles from 4 groups (n =4/group) at 1, 4, 12, and 52 weeks after BoNT-A injection compared with saline-injected rats at 12 weeks. Results Dramatic transcriptional adaptation occurred at 1 week with a paradoxical increase in expression of slow and immature isoforms, activation of genes in competing pathways of repair and atrophy, impaired mitochondrial biogenesis, and increased metal ion imbalance. Adaptations of the basal lamina and fibrillar extracellular matrix (ECM) occurred by 4 weeks. The muscle transcriptome returned to its unperturbed state 12 weeks after injection. Conclusion Acute transcriptional adaptations resemble denervated muscle with some subtle differences, but resolved more quickly compared with denervation. Overall, gene expression, across time, correlates with the generally accepted BoNT-A time course and suggests that the direct action of BoNT-A in skeletal muscle is relatively rapid. PMID:24536034

  17. Combined effects of botulinum toxin injection and hindlimb unloading on bone and muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ellman, Rachel; Grasso, Daniel J.; van Vliet, Miranda; Brooks, Daniel J.; Spatz, Jordan M.; Conlon, Christine; Bouxsein, Mary L.

    2014-01-01

    Bone receives mechanical stimulation from two primary sources, muscle contractions and external gravitational loading, but the relative contribution of each source to skeletal health is not fully understood. Understanding the most effective loading for maintaining bone health has important clinical implications for prescribing physical activity for the treatment or prevention of osteoporosis. Therefore, we investigated the relative effects of muscle paralysis and reduced gravitational loading on changes in muscle mass, bone mineral density and microarchitecture. Adult female C57Bl/6J mice (n=10/group) underwent one of the following: unilateral botulinum toxin (BTX) injection of the hindlimb, hindlimb unloading (HLU), both unilateral BTX injection and HLU, or no intervention. BTX and HLU each led to significant muscle and bone loss. The effect of BTX was diminished when combined with HLU, though generally the leg that received the combined intervention (HLU + BTX) had the most detrimental changes in bone and muscle. We found an indirect effect of BTX affecting the uninjected (contralateral) leg that led to significant decreases in bone mineral density and deficits in muscle mass and bone architecture relative to the untreated controls; the magnitude of this indirect BTX effect was comparable to the direct effect of BTX treatment and HLU. Thus, while it was difficult to definitively conclude whether muscle forces or external gravitational loading contribute more to bone maintenance, it appears that BTX-induced muscle paralysis is more detrimental to muscle and bone than hindlimb unloading. PMID:24240478

  18. The first non Clostridial botulinum-like toxin cleaves VAMP within the juxtamembrane domain.

    PubMed

    Zornetta, Irene; Azarnia Tehran, Domenico; Arrigoni, Giorgio; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Bano, Luca; Leka, Oneda; Zanotti, Giuseppe; Binz, Thomas; Montecucco, Cesare

    2016-07-22

    The genome of Weissella oryzae SG25T was recently sequenced and a botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) like gene was identified by bioinformatics methods. The typical three-domains organization of BoNTs with a N-terminal metalloprotease domain, a translocation and a cell binding domains could be identified. The BoNT family of neurotoxins is rapidly growing, but this was the first indication of the possible expression of a BoNT toxin outside the Clostridium genus. We performed molecular modeling and dynamics simulations showing that the 50 kDa N-terminal domain folds very similarly to the metalloprotease domain of BoNT/B, whilst the binding part is different. However, neither the recombinant metalloprotease nor the binding domains showed cross-reactivity with the standard antisera that define the seven serotypes of BoNTs. We found that the purified Weissella metalloprotease cleaves VAMP at a single site untouched by the other VAMP-specific BoNTs. This site is a unique Trp-Trp peptide bond located within the juxtamembrane segment of VAMP which is essential for neurotransmitter release. Therefore, the present study identifies the first non-Clostridial BoNT-like metalloprotease that cleaves VAMP at a novel and relevant site and we propose to label it BoNT/Wo.

  19. Lumbar Sympathetic Block with Botulinum Toxin Type B for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eunjoo; Cho, Chan Woo; Kim, Hye Young; Lee, Pyung Bok; Nahm, Francis Sahngun

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar sympathetic block (LSB) is an effective method for relief of sympathetically mediated pain in the lower extremities. To prolong the sympathetic blockade, sympathetic destruction with alcohol or radiofrequency has been used. The pre-ganglionic sympathetic nerves are cholinergic, and botulinum toxin (BTX) has been found to inhibit the release of acetylcholine at the cholinergic nerve terminals. Moreover, BTX type B (BTX-B) is more convenient to use than BTX type A. Based on these findings, we performed LSB on the 2 patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) in the lower extremity. Levobupivacaine 0.25% 5 mL mixed with BTX-B 5,000 IU was given under fluoroscopic guidance. Two months after LSB with BTX-B, pain intensity and the Leeds assessment of neuropathic symptoms and signs (LANSS) score were significantly reduced. Allodynia and coldness disappeared and skin color came back to normal. In conclusion, BTX-B can produce an efficacious and durable sympathetic blocking effect on patients with CRPS. PMID:26431145

  20. None detectable retrograde transport of Chinese botulinum toxin type A in mice by single intramuscular injection

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Bin; Yao, Lin-Lin; Hu, Xing-Yue

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT/A) can specifically cleave synaptosomal associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25) into cleaved SNAP-25 (cl.SNAP-25), thus blocking the synaptic transmission in motor end plate and resulting in paralysis. It has been widely applied in clinical for treatment of various conditions characterized by muscle hyperactivity, such as dystonia and spasticity. BoNT/A is used locally, with little diffusion. Its paralyzing role is considered to be restricted to the nerve muscle junction, or close to the injection site. Recently, more and more studies, however, have suggested that BoNT/A also has central effects. In addition, some investigators have demonstrated that BoNT/A enters into central nervous system via retrograde transport after local intramuscular administration. The retrograde axonal transport of Chinese BoNT/A (CBoNT/A) was studied in this paper, which was rare in report. And the results showed that cl.SNAP-25 appeared not only at the injection site but also in contralateral muscle. Retrograde transport, however, was non-existent or too little to be detected in our study. PMID:26629081

  1. Inhibitory Effects of Botulinum Toxin Type A on Pyloric Cholinergic Muscle Contractility of Rat.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Peng; Sun, Hong-Xu; Chu, Min; Hou, Yi-Ping

    2016-08-31

    Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) selectively cleaves synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25) and results in inhibition of the fusion of synaptic vesicles containing neurotransmitters with the presynaptic membrane to undergo exocytosis and release. The aim of this study was to investigate whether BTX-A inhibited the pyloric smooth muscle contractility induced by acetylcholine (ACh) after BTX-A-mediated cleavage of SNAP-25 antagonized by toosendanin (TSN). Three groups of rat pyloric muscle strips were studied in vitro. All strips were allowed to equilibrate for 52 min under a basal loading tension of 1 g in Krebs solution and spontaneous contractile waves were recorded as their own controls before adding each drug. According to experimental protocols, 100 μM ACh, 1 μM atropine, 29.6 μM TSN and 10 U/ml BTX-A was added, respectively. BTX-A directly inhibited pyloric spontaneous contraction and ACh-induced contractile response. Addition of 10 U/ml BTX-A still inhibited pyloric smooth muscle contractility following incubation of TSN, while subsequent administration of 100 μM ACh had no effect. BTX-A inhibits pyloric smooth muscle contractility in our study suggesting BTX-A inhibits not only ACh release from cholinergic nerves but also muscarinic cholinergic muscular transmission. PMID:27426259

  2. The first non Clostridial botulinum-like toxin cleaves VAMP within the juxtamembrane domain.

    PubMed

    Zornetta, Irene; Azarnia Tehran, Domenico; Arrigoni, Giorgio; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Bano, Luca; Leka, Oneda; Zanotti, Giuseppe; Binz, Thomas; Montecucco, Cesare

    2016-01-01

    The genome of Weissella oryzae SG25T was recently sequenced and a botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) like gene was identified by bioinformatics methods. The typical three-domains organization of BoNTs with a N-terminal metalloprotease domain, a translocation and a cell binding domains could be identified. The BoNT family of neurotoxins is rapidly growing, but this was the first indication of the possible expression of a BoNT toxin outside the Clostridium genus. We performed molecular modeling and dynamics simulations showing that the 50 kDa N-terminal domain folds very similarly to the metalloprotease domain of BoNT/B, whilst the binding part is different. However, neither the recombinant metalloprotease nor the binding domains showed cross-reactivity with the standard antisera that define the seven serotypes of BoNTs. We found that the purified Weissella metalloprotease cleaves VAMP at a single site untouched by the other VAMP-specific BoNTs. This site is a unique Trp-Trp peptide bond located within the juxtamembrane segment of VAMP which is essential for neurotransmitter release. Therefore, the present study identifies the first non-Clostridial BoNT-like metalloprotease that cleaves VAMP at a novel and relevant site and we propose to label it BoNT/Wo. PMID:27443638

  3. Molecular mechanisms of treadmill therapy on neuromuscular atrophy induced via botulinum toxin A.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Sen-Wei; Chen, Hsiao-Ling; Chang, Yi-Chun; Chen, Chuan-Mu

    2013-01-01

    Botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) is a bacterial zinc-dependent endopeptidase that acts specifically on neuromuscular junctions. BoNT-A blocks the release of acetylcholine, thereby decreasing the ability of a spastic muscle to generate forceful contraction, which results in a temporal local weakness and the atrophy of targeted muscles. BoNT-A-induced temporal muscle weakness has been used to manage skeletal muscle spasticity, such as poststroke spasticity, cerebral palsy, and cervical dystonia. However, the combined effect of treadmill exercise and BoNT-A treatment is not well understood. We previously demonstrated that for rats, following BoNT-A injection in the gastrocnemius muscle, treadmill running improved the recovery of the sciatic functional index (SFI), muscle contraction strength, and compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitude and area. Treadmill training had no influence on gastrocnemius mass that received BoNT-A injection, but it improved the maximal contraction force of the gastrocnemius, and upregulation of GAP-43, IGF-1, Myo-D, Myf-5, myogenin, and acetylcholine receptor (AChR) subunits α and β was found following treadmill training. Taken together, these results suggest that the upregulation of genes associated with neurite and AChR regeneration following treadmill training may contribute to enhanced gastrocnemius strength recovery following BoNT-A injection.

  4. Use of botulinum toxin-A for musculoskeletal pain in patients with whiplash associated disorders [ISRCTN68653575

    PubMed Central

    Juan, Francisco J

    2004-01-01

    Background Whiplash associated disorder is commonly linked to motor vehicle accidents and sports injuries. Cervical injury is attributed to rapid extension followed by neck flexion. The exact pathophysiology of whiplash is uncertain but probably involves some degree of aberrant muscle spasms and may produce a wide range of symptoms. The most commonly prescribed pharmacological agents for initial treatment of whiplash-associated pain are oral muscle relaxants and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. However, potential systemic adverse effects limit these agents. Physical interventions such as mobilization, manipulation, and exercises have proved beneficial for pain and dysfunction but only on a time-limited basis. Little evidence suggests that physical therapy specifically aimed at the musculature (e.g., transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, ultrasonography, heat, ice, and acupuncture) improves prognosis in acute whiplash associated disorder. A new approach to treatment is the use of botulinum toxin, which acts to reduce muscle spasms. Methods/design This is a prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trial and botulinum toxin-A (Botox®) injections will be compared with placebo injections. The primary objective is to determine the efficacy of Botox® in the management of musculoskeletal pain in whiplash associated disorders. Discussion Botulinum toxin type-A toxin has been studied in small trials on whiplash associated disorder patients and has generally been found to relieve pain and improve range of motion. Specifically, we seek to assess the efficacy of Botox® in reducing pain and to improve the cervical spine range of movement, during the 6-month trial period. PMID:15018625

  5. Growth and toxin production by Clostridium botulinum on sliced raw potatoes in a modified atmosphere with and without sulfite.

    PubMed

    Solomon, H M; Rhodehamel, E J; Kautter, D A

    1998-01-01

    The ability of Clostridium botulinum type A or B spores to grow and produce toxin on fresh raw potatoes in a modified atmosphere with or without sulfite was investigated at 22 degrees C. Fresh, peeled, sliced potatoes, untreated or dipped for 2 min into 0.7% sulfite solution and drained, were surface-inoculated at several concentration levels with a mixture of C. botulinum spores, either type A or B. They were placed in a modified atmosphere (30% N/70% CO2) within oxygen-impermeable bags (200 g/bag) and incubated at room temperature (22 degrees C). Toxicity was tested on days 0, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7. After incubation, the potatoes were blended and centrifuged, and the Millipore-filtered supernatant fluid was injected intraperitoneally into mice. Sensory evaluation, except taste, was also performed. Potatoes inoculated with C. botulinum type A spores but untreated with NaHSO3 became toxic in 4 to 5 days, which coincided with the sensory evaluation "unfit for human consumption". Potatoes treated with NaHSO3 regardless of inoculum size or residual SO2 levels appeared acceptable for human consumption through day 7, even though they were toxic after 4 days of incubation. Although toxicity from type B spores occurred later and in fewer test samples than toxicity from type A, some potatoes again appeared acceptable but were toxic. Thus, although NaHSO3 markedly extended the consumer acceptability of peeled, sliced, raw potatoes at the abuse temperature, it did not inhibit outgrowth and toxin production by C. botulinum under these conditions.

  6. Development of human-like scFv-Fc antibodies neutralizing Botulinum toxin serotype B.

    PubMed

    Rasetti-Escargueil, Christine; Avril, Arnaud; Chahboun, Siham; Tierney, Rob; Bak, Nicola; Miethe, Sebastian; Mazuet, Christelle; Popoff, Michel R; Thullier, Philippe; Hust, Michael; Pelat, Thibaut; Sesardic, Dorothea

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are responsible for human botulism, a life-threatening disease characterized by flaccid muscle paralysis that occurs naturally by food poisoning or colonization of the gastrointestinal tract by BoNT-producing clostridia. BoNTs have been classified as category A agents by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. To date, 7 subtypes of BoNT/B were identified showing that subtypes B1 (16 strains) and B2 (32 strains) constitute the vast majority of BoNT/B strains. Neutralizing antibodies are required for the development of anti-botulism drugs to deal with the potential risk. In this study, macaques (Macaca fascicularis) were immunized with recombinant light chain (LC) or heavy chain (HC) of BoNT/B2, followed by the construction of 2 hyper-immune phage display libraries. The best single-chain variable fragments (scFvs) isolated from each library were selected according to their affinities and cross reactivity with BoNT/B1 toxin subtype. These scFvs against LC and HC were further analyzed by assessing the inhibition of in vitro endopeptidase activity of BoNT/B1 and B2 and neutralization of BoNT/B1 and B2 toxin-induced paralysis in the mouse ex vivo phrenic nerve assay. The antibodies B2-7 (against HC) and BLC3 (against LC) were produced as scFv-Fc, and, when tested individually, neutralized BoNT/B1 and BoNT/B2 in a mouse ex vivo phrenic nerve assay. Whereas only scFv-Fc BLC3 alone protected mice against BoNT/B2-induced paralysis in vivo, when B2-7 and BLC3 were combined they exhibited potent synergistic protection. The present study provided an opportunity to assess the extent of antibody-mediated neutralization of BoNT/B1 and BoNT/B2 subtypes in ex vivo and in vitro assays, and to confirm the benefit of the synergistic effect of antibodies targeting the 2 distinct functional domains of the toxin in vivo. Notably, the framework regions of the most promising antibodies (B2-7 and BLC3) are close to the human germline sequences, which

  7. Development of human-like scFv-Fc antibodies neutralizing Botulinum toxin serotype B

    PubMed Central

    Rasetti-Escargueil, Christine; Avril, Arnaud; Chahboun, Siham; Tierney, Rob; Bak, Nicola; Miethe, Sebastian; Mazuet, Christelle; Popoff, Michel R; Thullier, Philippe; Hust, Michael; Pelat, Thibaut; Sesardic, Dorothea

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are responsible for human botulism, a life-threatening disease characterized by flaccid muscle paralysis that occurs naturally by food poisoning or colonization of the gastrointestinal tract by BoNT-producing clostridia. BoNTs have been classified as category A agents by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. To date, 7 subtypes of BoNT/B were identified showing that subtypes B1 (16 strains) and B2 (32 strains) constitute the vast majority of BoNT/B strains. Neutralizing antibodies are required for the development of anti-botulism drugs to deal with the potential risk. In this study, macaques (Macaca fascicularis) were immunized with recombinant light chain (LC) or heavy chain (HC) of BoNT/B2, followed by the construction of 2 hyper-immune phage display libraries. The best single-chain variable fragments (scFvs) isolated from each library were selected according to their affinities and cross reactivity with BoNT/B1 toxin subtype. These scFvs against LC and HC were further analyzed by assessing the inhibition of in vitro endopeptidase activity of BoNT/B1 and B2 and neutralization of BoNT/B1 and B2 toxin-induced paralysis in the mouse ex vivo phrenic nerve assay. The antibodies B2–7 (against HC) and BLC3 (against LC) were produced as scFv-Fc, and, when tested individually, neutralized BoNT/B1 and BoNT/B2 in a mouse ex vivo phrenic nerve assay. Whereas only scFv-Fc BLC3 alone protected mice against BoNT/B2-induced paralysis in vivo, when B2–7 and BLC3 were combined they exhibited potent synergistic protection. The present study provided an opportunity to assess the extent of antibody-mediated neutralization of BoNT/B1 and BoNT/B2 subtypes in ex vivo and in vitro assays, and to confirm the benefit of the synergistic effect of antibodies targeting the 2 distinct functional domains of the toxin in vivo. Notably, the framework regions of the most promising antibodies (B2–7 and BLC3) are close to the human germline sequences

  8. Development of human-like scFv-Fc antibodies neutralizing Botulinum toxin serotype B.

    PubMed

    Rasetti-Escargueil, Christine; Avril, Arnaud; Chahboun, Siham; Tierney, Rob; Bak, Nicola; Miethe, Sebastian; Mazuet, Christelle; Popoff, Michel R; Thullier, Philippe; Hust, Michael; Pelat, Thibaut; Sesardic, Dorothea

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are responsible for human botulism, a life-threatening disease characterized by flaccid muscle paralysis that occurs naturally by food poisoning or colonization of the gastrointestinal tract by BoNT-producing clostridia. BoNTs have been classified as category A agents by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. To date, 7 subtypes of BoNT/B were identified showing that subtypes B1 (16 strains) and B2 (32 strains) constitute the vast majority of BoNT/B strains. Neutralizing antibodies are required for the development of anti-botulism drugs to deal with the potential risk. In this study, macaques (Macaca fascicularis) were immunized with recombinant light chain (LC) or heavy chain (HC) of BoNT/B2, followed by the construction of 2 hyper-immune phage display libraries. The best single-chain variable fragments (scFvs) isolated from each library were selected according to their affinities and cross reactivity with BoNT/B1 toxin subtype. These scFvs against LC and HC were further analyzed by assessing the inhibition of in vitro endopeptidase activity of BoNT/B1 and B2 and neutralization of BoNT/B1 and B2 toxin-induced paralysis in the mouse ex vivo phrenic nerve assay. The antibodies B2-7 (against HC) and BLC3 (against LC) were produced as scFv-Fc, and, when tested individually, neutralized BoNT/B1 and BoNT/B2 in a mouse ex vivo phrenic nerve assay. Whereas only scFv-Fc BLC3 alone protected mice against BoNT/B2-induced paralysis in vivo, when B2-7 and BLC3 were combined they exhibited potent synergistic protection. The present study provided an opportunity to assess the extent of antibody-mediated neutralization of BoNT/B1 and BoNT/B2 subtypes in ex vivo and in vitro assays, and to confirm the benefit of the synergistic effect of antibodies targeting the 2 distinct functional domains of the toxin in vivo. Notably, the framework regions of the most promising antibodies (B2-7 and BLC3) are close to the human germline sequences, which

  9. A functional dual-coated (FDC) microtiter plate method to replace the botulinum toxin LD50 test.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yvonne Y B; Rigsby, Peter; Sesardic, Dorothea; Marks, James D; Jones, Russell G A

    2012-06-01

    Conventional capture ("Sandwich") ELISAs equally detect denatured inactive and native active botulinum type A toxin. Light chain endoprotease activity assays also fail to distinguish between various inactive molecules including partially denatured and fragmented material still retaining this protease activity. By co-coating microtiter plates with SNAP25 substrate and a monoclonal antibody specific for a conformational epitope of the toxin's Hc domain, it was possible to develop a highly sensitive (130 aM LoD), precise (1.4% GCV) new assay specific for the biologically active toxin molecule. Capture was performed in phosphate buffer with a fixed optimal concentration of chaotropic agent (e.g., 1.2 M urea) to differentially isolate functional toxin molecules. Addition of enzymatically favorable buffer containing zinc and DTT reduced the interchain disulfide bond releasing and activating the captured L-chain with subsequent specific cleavage of the SNAP25(1-206) substrate. A neoepitope antibody specific for the newly exposed Q(197) epitope was used to quantify the cleaved SNAP25(1-197). The assay's requirement for the intact toxin molecule was demonstrated with pre-reduced toxin (heavy and light chains), recombinant LHn fragments, and stressed samples containing partially or fully denatured material. This is the first known immunobiochemical assay that correlates with in vivo potency and provides a realistic alternative. PMID:22406430

  10. Treatment of Primary Axillary Hyperhidrosis with Botulinum Toxin Type A: Our Experience in 50 Patients from 2007 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    Scamoni, Stefano; Valdatta, Luigi; Frigo, Claudia; Maggiulli, Francesca; Cherubino, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Background. Local injections of Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) are an effective and safe solution for primary bilateral axillary hyperhidrosis. Traditional treatments are often ineffective and difficult to tolerate. This study was performed to assess the efficacy and safety of Botulinum toxin type A in the treatment of these diseases and to evaluate the reliability of patient's subjective rating in the timing of repeat injections. Methods. From 2007 to 2008, we included in the study and treated a total of 50 patients, and we used the Minor's iodine test and the hyperhidrosis diseases severity scale as initial inclusion criteria and also for evaluating the followup, comparing to patient's subjective rating. We used also a specific questionnaire to evaluate the level of pain, the onset of the effect, any eventual adverse effect of the treatment, the onset of compensatory hyperhidrosis, and the global grade of satisfaction. The data were analyzed using standard statistical methods. Results. 88% of patients were totally satisfied and all patients repeated the treatment during all the study. The symptom-free interval was in median 6 months with an average improving of HDSS of 1.5 points. In 86%, there was a complete accordance between the subjective patient's demand of the repetition of the treatment and the positivity to Minor test and HDSS. No major side effects happened. Conclusion. Local injections of Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) result in an effective and safe solution for bilateral axillary primary hyperhidrosis for the absence of significant morbidity, side effects, and lack of efficacy or duration. The only defects are the need of repetition of the treatment and relative costs. PMID:23119179

  11. Prevention of unfavourable effects of cigarette smoke on flap viability using botulinum toxin in random pattern flaps: An experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Karayel, Hikmet; Kaya, Burak; Caydere, Muzaffer; Terzioğlu, Ahmet; Aslan, Gürcan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There are numerous clinical and experimental studies reporting unfavourable effects of cigarette smoke on skin flaps. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether unfavourable effects of cigarette smoke on flap survival could be reduced by botulinum toxin type A. METHODS: Twenty-eight male Wistar albino rats (15 months of age, mean weight 210 g [range 180 g to 230 g]) were included. They were divided into four groups of seven animals each. The control group underwent the surgical procedure alone. Surgical procedure was performed after administration of botulinum toxin type A in the botulinum toxin (BTX) group, after exposure to cigarette smoke in the cigarette smoke (CS) group, and after BTX type A administration and exposure to CS in the CS+BTX (CS+BTX) group. Random pattern cutaneous flaps (3 cm × 9 cm) were elevated from the dorsum of all rats. Necrosis area was calculated in percentages (%) using Image J computer software. Tissue samples were examined histopathologically. RESULTS: The mean necrotic area in the control group (26%) and in the BTX group (21%) were similar (P=0.497), whereas administration of BTX type A significantly decreased flap necrosis area in the rats exposed to CS (the mean necrosis areas were 41.5% in the CS group, and 26% in the CS+BTX group; P<0.001). Histopathological examination findings corroborated the unfavourable effects of CS and preventive effects of BTX type A. CONCLUSION: Preoperative administration of BTX significantly enhanced flap viability in the rats exposed to CS. Further human studies are warranted to verify whether BTX type A could be used as an agent to reduce the risk of flap necrosis in patients who smoke. PMID:26361625

  12. Effect of a clown’s presence at botulinum toxin injections in children: a randomized, prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Lars Kjaersgaard; Kibaek, Maria; Martinussen, Torben; Kragh, Lene; Hejl, Mogens

    2011-01-01

    Background The effect of the presence of a hospital clown during pediatric procedures has rarely been evaluated. In a pediatric ward, botulinum toxin injection is a painful procedure and a stressful experience for the child. We undertook a study of the effect of the presence of a hospital clown on children treated with botulinum toxin in an outpatient setting. Methods In total, 60 children, the majority of whom had spastic cerebral palsy, were subjected to a total of 121 botulinum toxin treatment sessions. Thirty-two children were being treated for the first time. During a 2-year period, we enrolled 121 treatment sessions prospectively, and the children were randomized to either the presence of a female clown during treatment or to no presence of a clown. The duration of the child’s crying during the procedure was used as an indicator of the effect of the presence of a clown. Results The effect of the clown was significantly related to patient gender. Girls were found to have a significantly shorter period of crying when the clown was present. For children younger than 8 years, the effect on boys was negative. Children treated for the first time did not appear to benefit from the presence of the clown, and showed no difference in effect between genders. Conclusion No effect of the clown was documented for children being treated for the first time. At repeat treatments, we saw a positive effect of the female clown in relation to girls, and a negative effect on boys younger than 8 years of age. PMID:22003302

  13. Successful Treatment of Essential Palatal Tremor Lasting Over a Long Term with a Rare Application of Botulinum Toxin in a Child.

    PubMed

    Eryılmaz, Aylin; Başal, Yeşim; Günel, Ceren; Ozkul, Ayca; Tosun, Ayşe

    2015-01-01

    Objective Essential Palatal Tremor (PT) is a disorder in which radiological brain images appear normal but the clicking noise caused by peritubal, palatal muscle contractions remains the main complaint of patients. The condition occurs rarely in childhood. This paper demonstrates such a rare case with bilateral presentation of essential PT in a 12-yr-old girl could successfully be treated with botulinum toxin therapy at Otorhinolaryngology Department in 2013, as she was still asymptomatic after 16 months. Besides, being minimally invasive with negligible side effects, this choice of treatment with botulinum toxin A (BTA) leads to a long-term symptom free outcome from essential PT. PMID:26664446

  14. Potential Effect of Liposomes and Liposome-Encapsulated Botulinum Toxin and Tacrolimus in the Treatment of Bladder Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Janicki, Joseph J; Chancellor, Michael B; Kaufman, Jonathan; Gruber, Michele A; Chancellor, David D

    2016-03-18

    Bladder drug delivery via catheter instillation is a widely used treatment for recurrence of superficial bladder cancer. Intravesical instillation of liposomal botulinum toxin has recently shown promise in the treatment of overactive bladder and interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome, and studies of liposomal tacrolimus instillations show promise in the treatment of hemorrhagic cystitis. Liposomes are lipid vesicles composed of phospholipid bilayers surrounding an aqueous core that can encapsulate hydrophilic and hydrophobic drug molecules to be delivered to cells via endocytosis. This review will present new developments on instillations of liposomes and liposome-encapsulated drugs into the urinary bladder for treating lower urinary tract dysfunction.

  15. Potential Effect of Liposomes and Liposome-Encapsulated Botulinum Toxin and Tacrolimus in the Treatment of Bladder Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Janicki, Joseph J.; Chancellor, Michael B.; Kaufman, Jonathan; Gruber, Michele A.; Chancellor, David D.

    2016-01-01

    Bladder drug delivery via catheter instillation is a widely used treatment for recurrence of superficial bladder cancer. Intravesical instillation of liposomal botulinum toxin has recently shown promise in the treatment of overactive bladder and interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome, and studies of liposomal tacrolimus instillations show promise in the treatment of hemorrhagic cystitis. Liposomes are lipid vesicles composed of phospholipid bilayers surrounding an aqueous core that can encapsulate hydrophilic and hydrophobic drug molecules to be delivered to cells via endocytosis. This review will present new developments on instillations of liposomes and liposome-encapsulated drugs into the urinary bladder for treating lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:26999210

  16. Botulinum toxin therapy for hyperhidrosis: reduction of injection site pain by nitrous oxide/oxygen mixtures.

    PubMed

    Paracka, Lejla; Kollewe, Katja; Dengler, Reinhard; Dressler, Dirk

    2015-09-01

    Injection site pain (ISP) reduces compliance of botulinum toxin (BT) therapy considerably. We wanted to study whether nitrous oxide/oxygen (NOO, Livopan(®), Linde Gas Therapeutics, Unterschleißheim, Germany) can reduce ISP in patients receiving intracutaneous BT injections for axillary or palmar hyperhidrosis (HH). The study followed an open-label design comparing intraindividually ISP in both axillae and/or both palms when NOO was applied or not during BT injections. BT efficacy was measured by the Hyperhidrosis Disease Severity Scale (HDSS) and by a 4-point Self-Assessment Scale. ISP was documented by a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and the Verbal Scale of Pain Intensity (VSPI), adverse effects by a Structuralised Interview (SI). Altogether 13 patients (age 34.1 ± 12.4 years, 9 females, 4 males) were studied. 11 BT treatments were for biaxillary and 3 for bipalmar HH. BT reduced biaxillary HH from HDSS 3.7 ± 0.5 to 1.0 ± 0 and bipalmar HH from 3.6 ± 0.6 to 1.0 ± 0. All patients reported ISP reduction by NOO. In axillary HH, NOO reduced ISP from 55.7 ± 12.7 to 12.8 ± 7.5 on the VAS (p < 0.05) and from 4.1 ± 0.3 to 0.7 ± 0.5 on the VSPI (p < 0.05), in bipalmar HH from 60.0 ± 10.0 to 13.3 ± 5.8 on the VAS (p < 0.05) and from 5.0 ± 0 to 1.3 ± 0.5 on the VSPI (p < 0.05). Adverse effects were not identified. NOO is a potent, non-sedative, quickly reversible and safe inhalative analgesic which reduces ISP considerably in patients receiving BT therapy for axillary and palmar HH thus substantially improving compliance of BT therapy.

  17. Considerations on patient-related outcomes with the use of botulinum toxins: is switching products safe?

    PubMed Central

    Fraint, Avram; Vittal, Padmaja; Comella, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Botulinum toxin (BoNT) is the treatment of choice for many neurologic movement disorders, including blepharospasm, hemifacial spasm, and cervical dystonia. There are two serotypes approved for use by the US Food and Drug Administration: three brands of serotype A and one of serotype B. Many attempts have been made at establishing dose conversion ratios between brands and serotypes. This review focuses on the existing data comparing different formulations of the same BoNT serotypes as well as that comparing different serotypes with one another. We focus on existing data regarding switching from one formulation or serotype to another and will also discuss the issue of immunogenicity of BoNT. With this information as a foundation, recommendations on safety of switching agents are addressed. Method Literature review searching PubMed and Google Scholar using the search terms “switching botox”, “dosing equivalency in botox”, and “comparing botox”. Results/conclusion Overall, there are many studies that demonstrate the efficacy and safety of each of the brands of BoNTs used in clinical practice. However, determination of dosing equivalencies among these brands and serotypes is complex with inconsistencies among the studies. When switching from one brand to another, the clinician should be aware of these issues, and not make the assumption that such ratios exist. Tailoring the dosage of each brand of BoNT to the clinical situation is the most prudent treatment strategy rather than focusing closely on conversion factors and concerns for immunogenicity. PMID:26917963

  18. Dynamic cortical gray matter volume changes after botulinum toxin in cervical dystonia.

    PubMed

    Delnooz, Cathérine C S; Pasman, Jaco W; van de Warrenburg, Bart P C

    2015-01-01

    Previous electrophysiological and functional imaging studies in focal dystonia have reported on cerebral reorganization after botulinum toxin (BoNT) injections. With the exception of microstructural changes, alterations in gray matter volume after BoNT have not been explored. In this study, we sought to determine whether BoNT influences gray matter volume in a group of cervical dystonia (CD) patients. We analyzed whole brain gray matter volume in a sample of CD patients with VBM analysis. In patients, scans were repeated immediately before and some weeks after BoNT injections; controls were only scanned once. We analyzed 1) BoNT-related gray matter volume changes within patients; 2) gray matter volume differences between patients and controls; and 3) correlations between gray matter volume and disease duration and disease severity. The pre- and post-BoNT treatment analysis revealed an increase of gray matter volume within the right precentral sulcus, at the lateral border of the premotor cortex. In comparison to healthy controls, CD patients had reduced gray matter volume in area 45 functionally corresponding to the left ventral premotor cortex. No gray matter volume increase was found for CD patients in comparison to controls. Gray matter volume of the left supramarginal gyrus and left premotor cortex correlated positively with disease duration, and that of the right inferior parietal lobule correlated negatively with disease severity. We have identified structural, yet dynamic gray matter volume changes in CD. There were specific gray matter volume changes related to BoNT injections, illustrating indirect central consequences of modified peripheral sensory input. As differences were exclusively seen in higher order motor areas relevant to motor planning and spatial cognition, these observations support the hypothesis that deficits in these cognitive processes are crucial in the pathophysiology of CD.

  19. Antinociceptive Effects of Botulinum Toxin Type A on Trigeminal Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Yang, K Y; Kim, M J; Ju, J S; Park, S K; Lee, C G; Kim, S T; Bae, Y C; Ahn, D K

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) attenuates orofacial nociception. However, there has been no evidence of the participation of the voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs) in the antinociceptive mechanisms of BoNT-A. This study investigated the cellular mechanisms underlying the antinociceptive effects of BoNT-A in a male Sprague-Dawley rat model of trigeminal neuropathic pain produced by malpositioned dental implants. The left mandibular second molar was extracted under anesthesia, followed by a miniature dental implant placement to induce injury to the inferior alveolar nerve. Mechanical allodynia was monitored after subcutaneous injection of BoNT-A at 3, 7, or 12 d after malpositioned dental implant surgery. Subcutaneous injections of 1 or 3 U/kg of BoNT-A on postoperative day 3 significantly attenuated mechanical allodynia, although 0.3 U/kg of BoNT-A did not affect the air-puff threshold. A single injection of 3 U/kg of BoNT-A produced prolonged antiallodynic effects over the entire experimental period. Treatment with BoNT-A on postoperative days 7 and 12, when pain had already been established, also produced prolonged antiallodynic effects. Double treatments with 1 U/kg of BoNT-A produced prolonged, more antiallodynic effects as compared with single treatments. Subcutaneous administration of 3 U/kg of BoNT-A significantly inhibited the upregulation of Nav isoform 1.7 (Nav1.7) expression in the trigeminal ganglion in the nerve-injured animals. These results suggest that antinociceptive effects of BoNT-A are mediated by an inhibition of upregulated Nav1.7 expression in the trigeminal ganglion. BoNT-A is therefore a potential new therapeutic agent for chronic pain control, including neuropathic pain. PMID:27418174

  20. Botulinum toxin in Migraine: Role of transport in trigemino-somatic and trigemino-vascular afferents

    PubMed Central

    Roshni, Ramachandran; Carmen, Lam; Yaksh Tony, L

    2015-01-01

    Migraine secondary to meningeal input is referred to extracranial regions innervated by somatic afferents that project to homologous regions in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC). Reported efficacy of extracranial botulinum toxin (BoNT) in treating migraine is surprising since a local extracranial effect of BoNT cannot account for its effect upon meningeal input. We hypothesize that intradermal BoNT acts through central transport in somatic afferents. Anesthetized C57Bl/6 mice (male) received unilateral supraorbital (SO) injections of BoNT-B (1.5 U/40 μl) or saline. 3 days later, mice received ipsilateral (ipsi) -SO capsaicin (2.5 μg/30 μl) or meningeal capsaicin (4 μl of 1mg/ml). Pre-treatment with ipsi-SO BONT-B i) decreased nocicsponsive ipsilateral wiping behavior following ipsi-SO capsaicin; ii) produced cleavage of VAMP in the V1 region of ipsi-TG and in TG neurons showing WGA after SO injection; iii) reduced expression of c-fos in ipsi-TNC following ipsi-SO capsaicin; iv) reduced c-fos activation and NK-1 internalization in ipsi-TNC secondary to ipsi-meningeal capsaicin; vi) SO WGA did not label dural afferents. We conclude that BoNT-B is taken up by peripheral afferents and transported to central terminals where it inhibits transmitter release resulting in decreased activation of second order neurons. Further, this study supports the hypothesis that SO BoNT exerts a trans-synaptic action on either the second order neuron (which receives convergent input from the meningeal afferent) or the terminal/TG of the converging meningeal afferent. PMID:25958249

  1. Botulinum toxin type A for neuropathic pain in patients with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Han, Zee‐A; Song, Dae Heon; Oh, Hyun‐Mi

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the analgesic effect of botulinum toxin type A (BTX‐A) on patients with spinal cord injury‐associated neuropathic pain. Methods The effect of BTX‐A on 40 patients with spinal cord injury‐associated neuropathic pain was investigated using a randomized, double‐blind, placebo‐controlled design. A 1‐time subcutaneous BTX‐A (200U) injection was administered to the painful area. Visual analogue scale (VAS) scores (0–100mm), the Korean version of the short‐form McGill Pain Questionnaire, and the World Health Organization WHOQOL‐BREF quality of life assessment were evaluated prior to treatment and at 4 and 8 weeks after the injection. Results At 4 and 8 weeks after injection, the VAS score for pain was significantly reduced by 18.6 ± 16.8 and 21.3 ± 26.8, respectively, in the BTX‐A group, whereas it was reduced by 2.6 ± 14.6 and 0.3 ± 19.5, respectively, in the placebo group. The pain relief was associated with preservation of motor or sensory function below the neurological level of injury. Among the responders in the BTX‐A group, 55% and 45% reported pain relief of 20% or greater at 4 and 8 weeks, respectively, after the injection, whereas only 15% and 10% of the responders in the placebo group reported a similar level of pain relief. Improvements in the score for the physical health domain of the WHOQOL‐BREF in the BTX‐A group showed a marginal trend toward significance (p = 0.0521) at 4 weeks after the injection. Interpretation These results indicate that BTX‐A may reduce intractable chronic neuropathic pain in patients with spinal cord injury. Ann Neurol 2016;79:569–578 PMID:26814620

  2. Botulinum toxin type A: an effective treatment to restore phonation in laryngectomized patients unable to voice.

    PubMed

    Bartolomei, Luigi; Zambito Marsala, Sandro; Pighi, Gian Paolo; Cristofori, Valentina; Pagano, Giuseppe; Pontarin, Massimo; Gioulis, Manuela; Marchini, Corrado

    2011-06-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of Botulinum toxin type A (BTXA) as an alternative to surgical intervention to facilitate phonation in 34 laryngectomized patients (31 males and 3 women) who were unable to produce tracheoesophageal voice because of spasm of the middle and inferior pharyngeal constrictor muscles (PCM). EMG was recorded to confirm activity in these muscles during attempted vocalization. Parapharyngeal nerve block (Carbocaine 2%, 5 cc) was used to demonstrate short-term fluent voice after relaxation of the pharyngeal constrictor muscle. At a later occasion, 100 U of Botox (Allergan) in ten patients and 50 U in two patients were injected unilaterally at one location in the PCM percutaneously under EMG guidance. All patients then underwent a voice therapy program. In 11 out of 12 patients an improvement of phonation was evident after 24-48 h and it was long lasting. This result was also seen in a patient previously myotomized without improvement. Only one patient needed to be reinjected every 3 months. At a follow-up after 3 months the EMG recorded in four patients showed a low-amplitude or complete absence of activity in the treated muscle. No side effects developed. BTX therapy, especially when associated with the speech therapy, is efficacious in restoring voice to laryngectomees who are unable to voice because of spasm of the PCMs. Our results confirm previous reports. This method is our approach of choice in managing PCM spasm because it is non-invasive, not painful, has few or no side effects, and is frequently long-lasting.

  3. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation versus botulinum toxin injection in chronic migraine prophylaxis: a pilot randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Shehata, Hatem S; Esmail, Eman H; Abdelalim, Ahmad; El-Jaafary, Shaimaa; Elmazny, Alaa; Sabbah, Asmaa; Shalaby, Nevin M

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic migraine is a prevalent disabling disease, with major health-related burden and poor quality of life. Long-term use of preventive medications carries risk of side effects. Objectives The aim of this study was to compare repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to botulinum toxin-A (BTX-A) injection as preventive therapies for chronic migraine. Methods A pilot, randomized study was conducted on a small-scale sample of 29 Egyptian patients with chronic migraine, recruited from Kasr Al-Aini teaching hospital outpatient clinic and diagnosed according to ICHD-III (beta version). Patients were randomly assigned into two groups; 15 patients received BTX-A injection following the Phase III Research Evaluating Migraine Prophylaxis Therapy injection paradigm and 14 patients were subjected to 12 rTMS sessions delivered at high frequency (10 Hz) over the left motor cortex (MC, M1). All the patients were requested to have their 1-month headache calendar, and they were subjected to a baseline 25-item (beta version) Henry Ford Hospital Headache Disability Inventory (HDI), Headache Impact Test (HIT-6), and visual analogue scale assessment of headache intensity. The primary efficacy measures were headache frequency and severity; secondary measures were 25-item HDI, HIT-6, and number of acute medications. Follow-up visits were scheduled at weeks 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 after baseline visit. Results A reduction in all outcome measures was achieved in both the groups. However, this improvement was more sustained in the BTX-A group, and both the therapies were well tolerated. Conclusion BTX-A injection and rTMS have favorable efficacy and safety profiles in chronic migraineurs. rTMS is of comparable efficacy to BTX-A injection in chronic migraine therapy, but with less sustained effect. PMID:27785091

  4. Cellular and Matrix Response of the Mandibular Condylar Cartilage to Botulinum Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Dutra, Eliane H.; O’ Brien, Mara H.; Lima, Alexandro; Kalajzic, Zana; Tadinada, Aditya; Nanda, Ravindra; Yadav, Sumit

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the cellular and matrix effects of botulinum toxin type A (Botox) on mandibular condylar cartilage (MCC) and subchondral bone. Materials and Methods Botox (0.3 unit) was injected into the right masseter of 5-week-old transgenic mice (Col10a1-RFPcherry) at day 1. Left side masseter was used as intra-animal control. The following bone labels were intraperitoneally injected: calcein at day 7, alizarin red at day 14 and calcein at day 21. In addition, EdU was injected 48 and 24 hours before sacrifice. Mice were sacrificed 30 days after Botox injection. Experimental and control side mandibles were dissected and examined by x-ray imaging and micro-CT. Subsequently, MCC along with the subchondral bone was sectioned and stained with tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), EdU, TUNEL, alkaline phosphatase, toluidine blue and safranin O. In addition, we performed immunohistochemistry for pSMAD and VEGF. Results Bone volume fraction, tissue density and trabecular thickness were significantly decreased on the right side of the subchondral bone and mineralized cartilage (Botox was injected) when compared to the left side. There was no significant difference in the mandibular length and condylar head length; however, the condylar width was significantly decreased after Botox injection. Our histology showed decreased numbers of Col10a1 expressing cells, decreased cell proliferation and increased cell apoptosis in the subchondral bone and mandibular condylar cartilage, decreased TRAP activity and mineralization of Botox injected side cartilage and subchondral bone. Furthermore, we observed reduced proteoglycan and glycosaminoglycan distribution and decreased expression of pSMAD 1/5/8 and VEGF in the MCC of the Botox injected side in comparison to control side. Conclusion Injection of Botox in masseter muscle leads to decreased mineralization and matrix deposition, reduced chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation and increased cell apoptosis in the

  5. IGF-1 Antibody Prolongs the Effective Duration Time of Botulinum Toxin in Decreasing Muscle Strength

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Lingjing; Pan, Lizhen; Liu, Wuchao; Guo, Yan; Zheng, Yuguo; Guan, Qiang; Nie, Zhiyu

    2013-01-01

    Botulinum toxin type-A (Btx-A), a powerful therapeutic tool in various medical specialties, requires repeated injections to maintain its effect. Therefore, novel methods to prolong the effective duration time of Btx-A are highly needed. Rats were assigned to three major groups: control group (n = 30), Btx-A group (n = 30), and IGF-1 Ab groups. IGF-1 Ab groups were composed by sub-groups A1–A5 (each has 25 rats) for the subsequent IGF-1Ab dose-effect study. Muscle strength was determined by a survey system for rat lower limbs nerve and muscle function. Muscle-specific receptor tyrosine kinase (MuSK), Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-5 (IGFBP5), and growth-associated protein, 43-kDa (GAP43) were determined by real-time polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) and Western blot. We found that Btx-A decreased the muscle strength, with a paralysis maintained for 70 days. IGF-1Ab prolonged the effective duration time of Btx-A. Real-time PCRs and Western blot showed that IGF-1Ab delayed the increase of MuSK and IGFBP5 after Btx-A injection, without affecting GAP43. These results indicate that IGF-1Ab might prolong the effective duration time of Btx-A on muscle strength through delaying the increase of MuSK. It would be interesting to determine whether IGF-1Ab can be used as an auxiliary measure to the Btx-A treatment in the future. PMID:23698763

  6. Gynecological indications for the use of botulinum toxin in women with chronic pelvic pain.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Jason

    2009-10-01

    Chronic pelvic pain in women is a common symptom with a wide variety of etiologies that demand accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment if pain reduction is to be effected. Superficial conditions such as provoked vestibulodynia and problems affecting deeper structures such as pelvic floor muscle spasm are difficult to treat and can have significant impacts on quality of life for the sufferer. Apart from daily pain, symptoms such as painful intercourse (dyspareunia), painful bowel motions (dyschesia) and exacerbation of period pain (dysmenorrhea) are commonly reported by patients. For inflammatory conditions, and in areas where muscle spasm is thought to contribute to pain, botulinum toxins (BoNT) are used with considerable success. For gynecological indications, there are limited data, in the form of case reports and small series, to indicate that BoNT used in the vulva may have a benefit for 3-6 months after injection of 20-40U of BOTOX; for women with provoked vestibulodynia. Re-treatment is reported to be successful and side effects are limited. Controlled studies are essential to further explore this indication. For pelvic floor muscle spasm, a greater number of women have been studied and a double blind, randomized controlled study has reported a significant reduction in pelvic floor pressures with significant pain reduction for some types of pelvic pain compared to baseline. There were no differences in pain compared to the control group who had physical therapy as an intervention. Physical therapy could be used as a non-invasive first line treatment, with BoNT injections reserved for those who are refractory to treatment. In summary, BoNT treatment for a variety of gynecological indications seems successful with limited side effects, although there are minimal data, particularly in superficial vulval conditions. To allow recommendation for wider utilization of this treatment, it is essential that more research is performed to add further evidence to our

  7. Neuro-exocytosis: botulinum toxins as inhibitory probes and versatile therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Dolly, J Oliver; Lawrence, Gary W; Meng, Jianghui; Wang, Jiafu; Ovsepian, Saak V

    2009-06-01

    For the fundamental process of quantal neurotransmitter release, a consensus is being reached on the recycling pathways for transmitter-containing, small synaptic vesicles (SSVs), and major inroads have been made into deciphering the multiple steps of regulated exocytosis. These advances arose from the identification of approximately 80 proteins in SSVs, elucidation of the structures of pertinent macromolecular complexes, utilisation of different serotypes (A-G) of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) together with transgenic mice lacking key genes. Hence, converging evidence continues to emerge for the sequential formation of complexes between the three SNAREs (SNAP-25, syntaxin and VAMP) and their regulatory proteins (complexins, Munc18), as well as for the Ca2+ triggering of membrane fusion/exocytosis via its sensor, synaptotagmin. Moreover, molecular data gained on BoNTs have been translated into Clinical Medicine with type A now being applied worldwide for effectively treating >100 human conditions due to overactivity of nerves supplying various muscles or glands. A recent advance is the successful engineering of a chimera from two BoNTs to acquire the capability of re-targeting a more active moiety to sensory neurons, with resultant inhibition of the release of a pain mediator. Encouragingly, this novel recombinant protein blocks the exocytotic response triggered by a stimulant (capsaicin) of nociceptive C fibres that activates their vanilloid receptors, a feat not possible for either parental toxin. Reaching this landmark has generated optimism for designing further variants of such a versatile therapeutic for normalising the hyper-activity of particular cell types, especially those underlying the many cases of chronic pain that do not respond to existing drugs.

  8. Detection of Botulinum Toxins A, B, E, and F in Foods by Endopep-MS

    PubMed Central

    Kalb, Suzanne R.; Krilich, Joan C.; Dykes, Janet K.; Lúquez, Carolina; Maslanka, Susan E.; Barr, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Botulism is caused by exposure to botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs). BoNTs are proteins secreted by some species of clostridia; these neurotoxins are known to interfere with nerve impulse transmission, thus causing paralysis. Botulism may be contracted through consumption of food either naturally or intentionally contaminated with BoNT. The human lethal dose of BoNT is not known but is estimated to be between 0.1 μg to 70 μg so, it is important to be able to detect small amounts of this toxin in foods to ensure food safety and to identify the source of an outbreak. Our laboratory previously reported on the development of Endopep-MS, a mass-spectrometric-based endopeptidase method for the detection and differentiation of BoNT. This method can detect BoNT at levels below the historic standard mouse bioassay in clinical samples such as serum, stool, and culture supernatants. We have now expanded this assay to detect BoNT in over 50 foods including representative products that were involved in actual botulism investigations. The foods tested by the Endopep-MS included those with various acidities, viscosities, and fat levels. Dairy and culturally diverse products were also included. This work demonstrates that the Endopep-MS method can be used to detect BoNT/A, /B, /E, and /F in foods at levels spiked below that of the limit of detection of the mouse bioassay. Furthermore, we successfully applied this method to investigate several foods associated with botulism outbreaks. PMID:25578960

  9. The use of botulinum toxin in the treatment of the consequences of bruxism on cervical spine musculature.

    PubMed

    Finiels, P J; Batifol, D

    2014-03-01

    Hypertonia and hyperactivity of masticatory muscles are involved in pain and contractions of the cervical spine musculature, but their pathophysiology remains nonetheless unknown and its treatment far to be codified. In this study, 8 patients, showing disabling posterior neck muscle contractures linked with bruxism were prospectively treated and followed for an average 15 months period, after having received Injections of botulinum toxin A essentially in masticatory muscles. Injections were made every 3 months, varying from 10 to 100 U Botox* by muscles, without administrating more than 300 U Botox* in the same patient. The angle of cervical lordosis were calculated on lateral sitting radiographs in neutral position, good results being considered to be achieved in the case of a 2 point diminution of VAS score as well as at least a 5° positive gain in the curve. 7 patients out of 8 showed a real improvement in their symptoms after an average of 3 injections, showing a decrease of 4.5 points on the VAS score and an average increment of 15° in cervical lordosis. Although the follow-up period of patients was relatively short and the sample quite small, the general impression, confirmed by the patients' experience, seems to suggest a potential place for the use of botulinum toxin amongst the array of treatments which can be offered in certain selected cases which associate bruxism and posterior cervical contractions.

  10. Eradication of keloids: Surgical excision followed by a single injection of intralesional 5-fluorouracil and botulinum toxin

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Adel Michel

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Keloids may complicate wound healing secondary to trauma, inflammation or surgical incision. Although various treatment modalities have been used with variable degrees of success, overall recurrence rates have remained unacceptably high. METHODS: The present study involved 80 patients with keloids of at least one-years’ duration. Following total surgical excision of the keloid, a single dose of 5-fluorouracil was injected into the edges of the healing wound on postoperative day 9 together with botulinum toxin. The concentration of 5-fluorouracil used was 50 mg/mL and approximately 0.4 mL was infiltrated per cm of wound tissue, with the total dose <500 mg. The concentration of botulinum toxin was 50 IU/mL with the total dose <140 IU. RESULTS: Patients were followed-up for 17 to 24 months and a recurrence rate of 3.75% was found, which was significantly lower than in previously reported studies using other therapeutic modalities. CONCLUSION: The author recommends that this treatment be routinely applied to all keloids because it is significantly more effective than those described by other authors. PMID:24431948

  11. Cytotoxicity of the Vibrio vulnificus MARTX toxin Effector DUF5 is linked to the C2A Subdomain

    PubMed Central

    Antic, Irena; Biancucci, Marco; Satchell, Karla J. F.

    2014-01-01

    The multifunctional-autoprocessing repeats-in-toxin (MARTX) toxins bacterial protein toxins that serve as delivery platforms for cytotoxic effector domains. The domain of unknown function in position 5 (DUF5) effector domain is present in at least six different species’ MARTX toxins and as a hypothetical protein in Photorhabdus spp. Its presence increases the potency of the Vibrio vulnificus MARTX toxin in mouse virulence studies, indicating DUF5 directly contributes to pathogenesis. In this work, DUF5 is shown to be cytotoxic when transiently expressed in HeLa cells. DUF5 localized to the plasma membrane dependent upon its C1 domain and the cells become rounded dependent upon its C2 domain. Both full-length DUF5 and the C2 domain caused growth inhibition when expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A structural model of DUF5 was generated based on the structure of Pasteurella multocida toxin facilitating localization of the cytotoxic activity to a 186 amino acid subdomain termed C2A. Within this subdomain, an alanine scanning mutagenesis revealed aspartate-3721 and arginine-3841 as residues critical for cytotoxicity. These residues were also essential for HeLa cell intoxication when purified DUF5 fused to anthrax toxin lethal factor was delivered cytosolically. Thermal shift experiments indicated that these conserved residues are important to maintain protein structure, rather than for catalysis. The Aeromonas hydrophila MARTX toxin DUF5Ah domain was also cytotoxic, while the weakly conserved C1-C2 domains from P. multocida toxin were not. Overall, this study is the first demonstration that DUF5 as found in MARTX toxins has cytotoxic activity that depends on conserved residues in the C2A subdomain. PMID:24935440

  12. Feasibility of a Day-Camp Model of Modified Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy with and without Botulinum Toxin A Injection for Children with Hemiplegia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eliasson, Ann-Christin; Shaw, Karin; Ponten, Eva; Boyd, Roslyn; Krumlinde-Sundholm, Lena

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the feasibility of modified constraint-induced (CI) therapy provided in a 2-week day-camp model with and without intramuscular botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) injections for children with congenital cerebral palsy. Sixteen children with congenital hemiplegia, Manual Ability Classification System (MACS)…

  13. Alterations in CNS Activity Induced by Botulinum Toxin Treatment in Spasmodic Dysphonia: An H[subscript 2][superscript 15]O PET Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, S. Omar; Thomassen, Michael; Schulz, Geralyn M.; Hosey, Lara A.; Varga, Mary; Ludlow, Christy L.; Braun, Allen R.

    2006-01-01

    Speech-related changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were measured using H[subscript 2][superscript 15]O positron-emission tomography in 9 adults with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD) before and after botulinum toxin (BTX) injection and 10 age- and gender-matched volunteers without neurological disorders. Scans were acquired at rest…

  14. The Profile of Patients and Current Practice of Treatment of Upper Limb Muscle Spasticity with Botulinum Toxin Type A: An International Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakheit, Abdel Magid

    2010-01-01

    To document the current practice in relation with the treatment of patients with upper limb spasticity with botulinum toxin type A to inform future research in this area. We designed an international, cross-sectional, noninterventional survey of current practice. Nine hundred and seventy-four patients from 122 investigational centres in 31…

  15. Detection of neutral sugars in purified type G botulinum progenitor toxin and the effects of some glycolytic enzymes on its molecular dissociation and oral toxicity.

    PubMed

    Nukina, M; Miyata, T; Sakaguchi, S; Sakaguchi, G

    1991-04-15

    Arabinose and galactose were detected in purified type G botulinum toxin (Mr about 500,000) of Clostridium argentinense. The i.p. LD50/mg N of type G progenitor toxin was one-tenth, but the oral LD50/mg N twice that of type A-L toxin. The lysozyme-, endo-beta-galactosidase-, and N-glucanase-treated toxins each had a molecular mass of about 300,000. The oral toxicity of the endo-beta-galactosidase or N-glucanase-treated toxin was one-fifth that of untreated progenitor toxin. On DEAE-Sephadex chromatography, the N-glucanase-treated toxin dissociated into two fractions, nontoxic and toxic. SDS-PAGE of the toxic fraction showed a single band with a Mr of about 150,000, and after dithiothreitol treatment, two bands with Mr of 100,000 and 50,000.

  16. Effects of nitrate and phosphate on growth and C2 toxin productivity of Alexandrium tamarense CI01 in culture.

    PubMed

    Wang, Da-Zhi; Hsieh, Dennis

    2002-01-01

    Growth and C2 toxin productivity of a marine dinoflagellate, Alexandrium tamarense CI01 (ATCI01) which predominantly produces C2 toxin, were studied in unialgal batch cultures to optimize the concentrations of nitrate and phosphate for a maximal toxin yield. A range of start concentrations of the two major nutrients was determined in which algal growth was proportional to the nutrient concentrations used. The highest concentrations of nitrate and phosphate in this growth-enhancing range were 264 and 20 microM, respectively. In this concentration range, the C2 toxin yield (microg/l) and cellular toxin content (Qt, fmole per cell) reached a maximum at the lowest end of phosphate (5 microM) and the highest end of nitrate (264 microM). Further increase in the supply of nitrate continued to enhance the toxin yield. Our results indicated that the growth and toxin productivity of this algal strain in batch cultures had distinctly different optimal ranges of nitrate and phosphate concentrations. For a maximum toxin yield, a judicious use of phosphate under a nitrate-replete condition is called for. PMID:12398397

  17. Anatomy of the sweat glands, pharmacology of botulinum toxin, and distinctive syndromes associated with hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Kreyden, Oliver P; Scheidegger, E Paul

    2004-01-01

    For a long period the therapeutic modalities to treat focal hyperhidrosis (HH) were very limited. Due to this the problem of focal HH was delt with stepmotherly. Nowadays we can consider BTX as the therapy of choice for axillary HH after topical treatment with aluminium salts have failed. The amount of successful reports on botulinum toxin (BTX) in the treatment of focal HH brought a change and the interest for this specific disorder grew. This article gives details on anatomy and physiology of sweating and mechanism of BTX. Further distinctive syndromes associated with HH, which all can be treated with BTX like localized unilateral hyperhidrosis (LUH), Ross' Syndrome and Frey' Syndrome are presented. A diagnosis of primary HH is usually based on the patients's history, typical younger age and visible signs of excessive sweating. Before treatment it is important to objectify focal HH with performing sweat tests such like Minor starch test and/or gravimetry. The total number of sweat glands is somewhere between 2 and 4 million and only about 5% are active at the same time, indicating the enormous potential for sweat production. The eccrine sweat gland is a long-branched tubular structure with highly coiled secretory portion and a straight ductular portion. Sweat is produced by clear and dark cells and is a clear hypotonic, odorless fluid. In response to nerve impulses, Acetylcholine (ACh) is released from the presynaptic nerve endings and then binds to postsynaptic cholinergic receptors presumably present in the basolateral membrane of the clear cells. This activates a complex in- and efflux of electrolytes creating the hypotonic sweat. Injection of BTX leads to temporary chemodenervation with the loss or reduction of activity of the target organ. BTX is consisted of a heavy and a light chain. The structural architecture of BTX comprises three domains-L, H(N) and H(C)-each with a specific function in the mechanism of cell intoxication. The heavy chain is responsible

  18. Botulinum Toxin Type A for the Treatment of Neuropathic Pain in Neuro-Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Intiso, Domenico; Basciani, Mario; Santamato, Andrea; Intiso, Marta; Di Rienzo, Filomena

    2015-01-01

    Pain is a natural protective mechanism and has a warning function signaling imminent or actual tissue damage. Neuropathic pain (NP) results from a dysfunction and derangement in the transmission and signal processing along the nervous system and it is a recognized disease in itself. The prevalence of NP is estimated to be between 6.9% and 10% in the general population. This condition can complicate the recovery from stroke, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord lesions, and several neuropathies promoting persistent disability and poor quality of life. Subjects suffering from NP describe it as burning, itching, lancing, and numbness, but hyperalgesia and allodynia represent the most bothersome symptoms. The management of NP is a clinical challenge and several non-pharmacological and pharmacological interventions have been proposed with variable benefits. Botulinum toxin (BTX) as an adjunct to other interventions can be a useful therapeutic tool for the treatment of disabled people. Although BTX-A is predominantly used to reduce spasticity in a neuro-rehabilitation setting, it has been used in several painful conditions including disorders characterized by NP. The underlying pharmacological mechanisms that operate in reducing pain are still unclear and include blocking nociceptor transduction, the reduction of neurogenic inflammation by inhibiting neural substances and neurotransmitters, and the prevention of peripheral and central sensitization. Some neurological disorders requiring rehabilitative intervention can show neuropathic pain resistant to common analgesic treatment. This paper addresses the effect of BTX-A in treating NP that complicates frequent disorders of the central and peripheral nervous system such as spinal cord injury, post-stroke shoulder pain, and painful diabetic neuropathy, which are commonly managed in a rehabilitation setting. Furthermore, BTX-A has an effect in relief pain that may characterize less common neurological disorders including post

  19. Neutralizing Antibody and Botulinum Toxin Therapy: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Margherita; Leodori, Giorgio; Fernandes, Ricardo M; Bhidayasiri, Roongroj; Marti, Maria Jose; Colosimo, Carlo; Ferreira, Joaquim J

    2016-01-01

    The formation of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) directed specifically against the active neurotoxin part of the botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) complex is often cited as a major cause of secondary non-responsiveness (SnR) to treatment. This systematic and meta-analytic review evaluates the frequency of NAbs among patients treated with BoNT therapy for any clinical indication. A comprehensive database search strategy was designed to retrieve relevant clinical data from the published literature up to April 2013. All English-language publications that analyzed NAbs prevalence in more than ten patients were included, regardless of BoNT formulation, assay method, and study design. For the meta-analysis, patients were divided into three categories: secondary nonresponse (SnR) patients, clinically responding patients and all patients, independently of BoNT responsiveness. The meta-analysis included 61 studies reporting data for 8525 patients; 4972 dystonic patients, 1170 patients with spasticity, 294 patients with urologic indications, 396 patient with hyperhidrosis, 1659 patients with glabellar line, and 34 patients with hypersalivation. Among the ‘‘all patients’’ group NAbs frequency was 20%for dystonia, 5.9%for spasticity, and 2.7% for urologic patients and 1.1% for other conditions. The prevalence of NAbs was lower (3.5%) among clinically responding patients and higher in 53.5%SnR patients. About a half of patients with SnR do not have NAbs. NAbs was high among patients treated with RIMA but it was not associated with clinical non-responsiveness. Meta-analysis of the frequency of NAbs and SnR are limited by the heterogeneity of study design and reported outcomes. Indeed the analysis of several factors that can influence the development of NAbs, i.e.,MHCof patients, frequency and site of injection, injection technique, cumulative dose, and toxin denaturation, was not specifically evaluated due to the paucity and heterogeneity of data. The identification of all

  20. Efficacy and safety of botulinum toxin in treatment of anismus: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Emile, Sameh Hany; Elfeki, Hossam Ayman; Elbanna, Hosam Ghazy; Youssef, Mohamed; Thabet, Waleed; Abd El-Hamed, Tito M; Said, Basem; Lotfy, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) in the management of patients with anismus. METHODS: An organized search of published literature was conducted using electronic databases including: PubMed/MEDLINE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, also an internet-based search using “Google Scholar” service was conducted. Both comparative and observational studies were included. We excluded irrelevant articles, editorials, case reports, reviews, and meta-analyses. The studies that followed the patients less than 6 mo were excluded. Variables collected were demographic data of the patients, technique of BTX-A injection and number of sessions, short-term and long-term clinical improvement, post-injection changes in electromyography (EMG), defecography, manometry, and balloon expulsion test, and complications recorded after BTX-A injection. RESULTS: Seven studies comprising 189 patients were included in the review. The median age of the patients was 41.2 years and female-to-male ratio was 1.3:1. The median dose of BTX-A injected per procedure was 100 IU (range, 20-100 IU). Lateral injection was done in five trails and combined lateral and posterior injections in two trials. Three studies used endorectal ultrasonography-guided technique, one study used EMG-guided technique, whereas the remaining three studies used manual palpation with the index finger. The median percentage of patients who reported initial improvement of symptoms was 77.4% (range 37.5%-86.7%), this percentage declined to a median of 46% (range 25%-100%) at 4 mo after injection of BTX-A. Rates of improvement evaluated by balloon expulsion test, EMG, and defecography ranged between (37.5%-80%), (54%-86.7%), and (25%-86.6%), respectively. Fourteen (7.4%) patients developed complications after injection of BTX-A. Complication rates across the studies ranged from 0% to 22.6%. CONCLUSION: Initial satisfactory improvement of symptoms after BTX-A injection

  1. Efficacy and safety of botulinum toxin in treatment of anismus: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Emile, Sameh Hany; Elfeki, Hossam Ayman; Elbanna, Hosam Ghazy; Youssef, Mohamed; Thabet, Waleed; Abd El-Hamed, Tito M; Said, Basem; Lotfy, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) in the management of patients with anismus. METHODS: An organized search of published literature was conducted using electronic databases including: PubMed/MEDLINE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, also an internet-based search using “Google Scholar” service was conducted. Both comparative and observational studies were included. We excluded irrelevant articles, editorials, case reports, reviews, and meta-analyses. The studies that followed the patients less than 6 mo were excluded. Variables collected were demographic data of the patients, technique of BTX-A injection and number of sessions, short-term and long-term clinical improvement, post-injection changes in electromyography (EMG), defecography, manometry, and balloon expulsion test, and complications recorded after BTX-A injection. RESULTS: Seven studies comprising 189 patients were included in the review. The median age of the patients was 41.2 years and female-to-male ratio was 1.3:1. The median dose of BTX-A injected per procedure was 100 IU (range, 20-100 IU). Lateral injection was done in five trails and combined lateral and posterior injections in two trials. Three studies used endorectal ultrasonography-guided technique, one study used EMG-guided technique, whereas the remaining three studies used manual palpation with the index finger. The median percentage of patients who reported initial improvement of symptoms was 77.4% (range 37.5%-86.7%), this percentage declined to a median of 46% (range 25%-100%) at 4 mo after injection of BTX-A. Rates of improvement evaluated by balloon expulsion test, EMG, and defecography ranged between (37.5%-80%), (54%-86.7%), and (25%-86.6%), respectively. Fourteen (7.4%) patients developed complications after injection of BTX-A. Complication rates across the studies ranged from 0% to 22.6%. CONCLUSION: Initial satisfactory improvement of symptoms after BTX-A injection

  2. A case report of the beneficial effects of botulinum toxin type A on Raynaud phenomenon in a patient with lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu; Lei, Qi-song; Liu, Yu-ying; Song, Guan-jie; Song, Chun-ling

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Raynaud phenomenon is a vasospastic disorder affecting the hands and feet, and the efficacies of traditional treatments, such as pharmacological therapies and sympathectomy, are not uniform. Patients with paraneoplastic Raynaud phenomenon do not benefit from the traditional treatments. The use of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) for Raynaud phenomenon has been reported for several years; however, there are few reports regarding botulinum toxin type A in the treatment of paraneoplastic Raynaud phenomenon. We describe a case report of the beneficial effects of botulinum toxin type A on Raynaud phenomenon in a patient with lung cancer. Methods: A 63-year-old male complained of pain and discoloration of his fingers and indicated that oral nifedipine and low-dose aspirin were not effective. After approximately 8 months, he was diagnosed with lung cancer. Chemotherapy partially reduced the pain and discoloration of his fingers; however, no significant changes occurred in his fingers after the fourth cycle. We used BTX-A to treat this patient with paraneoplastic RP. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to assess the clinical response. Results: After approximately 2 months, the patient reported relief from pain, stiffness, numbness, and cold sensation. Furthermore, no local or general adverse effects were exhibited by the patient. Conclusion: This study used botulinum toxin type A for a patient with paraneoplastic Raynaud phenomenon. Botulinum toxin type A significantly improved the patient's clinical symptoms without significant complications. These findings suggest that BTX-A may represent a good option for the treatment of paraneoplastic RP. PMID:27749585

  3. Effect of Fill Temperature on Clostridium botulinum Type A Toxin Activity during the Hot Filling of Juice Bottles.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Guy E; Fleischman, Gregory J; Balster, Fran; Reineke, Karl; Reddy, N Rukma; Larkin, John W

    2015-08-01

    The potential threat of terrorist attacks against the United States food supply using neurotoxin produced by Clostridium botulinum (BoNT) has resulted in the need for studying the effect of various food process operations on the bioavailability of this toxin. The objective of this study was to evaluate C. botulinum type A neurotoxin bioavailability after a simulated hot fill juice bottling operation. C. botulinum type A acid mud toxin (∼10(6) mouse lethal dose [MLD50]/ml) was deposited into juice bottles at an experimentally determined fastest cooling spot. Bottles (12 or 20 oz [355 and 592 ml]) were filled with either apple juice or an orange drink, at 80 or 85°C, in either upright or inverted orientations. Toxicity of the juice was evaluated as a function of holding time (1 to 2 min) by the mouse bioassay. The fastest cooling point in the upright orientation was determined to be at a bottle's bottom rim. In the inverted orientation, the fastest cooling point was in the bottle cap region. With respect to these two points, the upright bottle cooled faster than the inverted bottle, which was reflected in a higher inactivation of BoNT in the latter. For the orange drink (pH 2.9) toxicity was reduced by 0.5 × 10(6) MLD50/ml to a nondetectable level after 1 min in all bottle sizes, orientations, and temperatures as measured by the mouse bioassay. This indicates that there was at least a 0.5 × 10(6) MLD50/ml reduction in activity. Inactivation in apple juice (pH 4.0), to the same degree as in the orange drink, was found only for the inverted orientation at 85°C. Complete inactivation in apple juice for all conditions was found at a lower added toxin level of 0.25 × 10(5) MLD50/ml. In general, bottle inversion and filling at 85°C provided complete inactivation of BoNT to the 0.5 × 10(6) MLD50/ml level. All experiments resulted in the inactivation of 2.5 × 10(4) MLD50/ml of BoNT regardless of juice type, fill temperature, or bottle orientation and size.

  4. Effect of Fill Temperature on Clostridium botulinum Type A Toxin Activity during the Hot Filling of Juice Bottles.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Guy E; Fleischman, Gregory J; Balster, Fran; Reineke, Karl; Reddy, N Rukma; Larkin, John W

    2015-08-01

    The potential threat of terrorist attacks against the United States food supply using neurotoxin produced by Clostridium botulinum (BoNT) has resulted in the need for studying the effect of various food process operations on the bioavailability of this toxin. The objective of this study was to evaluate C. botulinum type A neurotoxin bioavailability after a simulated hot fill juice bottling operation. C. botulinum type A acid mud toxin (∼10(6) mouse lethal dose [MLD50]/ml) was deposited into juice bottles at an experimentally determined fastest cooling spot. Bottles (12 or 20 oz [355 and 592 ml]) were filled with either apple juice or an orange drink, at 80 or 85°C, in either upright or inverted orientations. Toxicity of the juice was evaluated as a function of holding time (1 to 2 min) by the mouse bioassay. The fastest cooling point in the upright orientation was determined to be at a bottle's bottom rim. In the inverted orientation, the fastest cooling point was in the bottle cap region. With respect to these two points, the upright bottle cooled faster than the inverted bottle, which was reflected in a higher inactivation of BoNT in the latter. For the orange drink (pH 2.9) toxicity was reduced by 0.5 × 10(6) MLD50/ml to a nondetectable level after 1 min in all bottle sizes, orientations, and temperatures as measured by the mouse bioassay. This indicates that there was at least a 0.5 × 10(6) MLD50/ml reduction in activity. Inactivation in apple juice (pH 4.0), to the same degree as in the orange drink, was found only for the inverted orientation at 85°C. Complete inactivation in apple juice for all conditions was found at a lower added toxin level of 0.25 × 10(5) MLD50/ml. In general, bottle inversion and filling at 85°C provided complete inactivation of BoNT to the 0.5 × 10(6) MLD50/ml level. All experiments resulted in the inactivation of 2.5 × 10(4) MLD50/ml of BoNT regardless of juice type, fill temperature, or bottle orientation and size. PMID

  5. Renewable Surface Fluorescence Sandwich Immunoassay Biosensor for Rapid Sensitive Botulinum Toxin Detection in an Automated Fluidic Format

    SciTech Connect

    Grate, Jay W.; Warner, Marvin G.; Ozanich, Richard M.; Miller, Keith D.; Colburn, Heather A.; Dockendorff, Brian P.; Antolick, Kathryn C.; Anheier, Norman C.; Lind, Michael A.; Lou, Jianlong; Marks, James D.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2009-03-05

    A renewable surface biosensor for rapid detection of botulinum toxin is described based on fluidic automation of a fluorescence sandwich immunoassay, using a recombinant fragment of the toxin heavy chain as a structurally valid simulant. Monoclonal antibodies AR4 and RAZ1 bind to separate epitopes of both this fragment and the holotoxin. The AR4 antibody was covalently bound to Sepharose beads and used as the capture antibody. A rotating rod flow cell was used to capture these beads delivered as a suspension by the sequential injection flow system, creating a 3.6 microliter column. After perfusing the bead column with sample and washing away the matrix, the column was perfused with Alexa 647 dye-labeled RAZ1 antibody as the reporter. Optical fibers coupled to the rotating rod flow cell at a 90 degree angle to one another delivered excitation light from a HeNe laser and collected fluorescent emission light for detection. After each measurement, the used sepharose beads are released and replaced with fresh beads. In a rapid screening approach to sample analysis, the toxin simulant was detected to concentrations of 10 pM in less than 20 minutes.

  6. [Toxin treatment of sweat pearls. A review of the treatment of hyperhidrosis with a special view of a new therapy option using botulinum toxin A].

    PubMed

    Kreyden, O P; Burg, G

    2000-07-25

    Hyperhidrosis is defined as an excess of sweating beyond the amount needed to cool down elevated body temperature. We distinguish a primary and a secondary form, where an underlying endocrinological or neurological disease is found. The innervation of eccrine sweat glands is sympathetic but the transmitter is cholinergic (ACh). There are variable modalities in the treatment of focal hyperhidrosis, such as topical aluminium chloride application, tapwater iontophoresis, anticholinergic drugs or surgery (axillary sweat gland extraction, liposuction or thoracoscopic sympathectomy). Only recently botulinum toxin (BTX) has been introduced as a therapeutic tool for hyperhidrosis. As BTX inhibits the release of ACh at the cholinergic synapse, perspiration is arrested completely after intradermal injection. BTX is a very potent alternative to the surgical approach in the treatment of hyperhidrosis, though the treatment must be repeated regularly to maintain the effect. PMID:10971942

  7. An in vivo analysis of facial muscle change treated with botulinum toxin type A using digital image speckle correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yan; Palmaccio, Samantha Palmaccio; Bui, Duc; Dagum, Alexander; Rafailovich, Miriam

    Been famous for clinical use from early 1980s, the neuromuscular blocking agent Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A), has been used to reduce wrinkles for a long time. Only little research has been done to quantify the change of muscle contraction before and after injection and most research paper depend on subjective evaluation from both patients and surgeons. In our research, Digital Image Speckle Correlation (DISC) was employed to study the mechanical properties of skin, contraction mode of muscles (injected) and reaction of neighbor muscle group (un-injected).At the same time, displacement patterns (vector maps)generated by DISC can predict injection locus for surgeons who normally handle it depending only on visual observation.

  8. British Neurotoxin Network recommendations for managing cervical dystonia in patients with a poor response to botulinum toxin

    PubMed Central

    Marion, Marie-Helene; Humberstone, Miles; Grunewald, Richard; Wimalaratna, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (BoNT) injections are an effective treatment for cervical dystonia. Approximately 20% of patients eventually stop BoNT treatment, mostly because of treatment failure. These recommendations review the different therapeutic interventions for optimising the treatment in secondary poor responder patients. Immunoresistance has become less common over the years, but the diagnosis has to be addressed with a frontalis test or an Extensor Digitorum Brevis test. In case of immunoresistance to BoNT-A, we discuss the place the different therapeutic options (BoNT-A holidays, BoNT-B injections, alternative BoNT-A injections, deep brain stimulation). When poor responders are not immunoresistant, they benefit from reviewing (1) injections technique with electromyography or ultrasound guidance, (2) muscles selection and (3) dose of BoNT. In addition, in both scenarios, a holistic approach including drug treatment, retraining and psychological support is valuable in the management of these complex and severe cervical dystonia. PMID:26976927

  9. [The efficacy of botulinum toxin therapy in patients with upper limb spasticity due to traumatic brain injury].

    PubMed

    Akulov, M A; Khat'kova, S E; Mokienko, O A; Orlova, O R; Usachev, D Yu; Zakharov, V O; Orlova, A S; Tomsky, A A

    2016-01-01

    Spasticity is a type of muscle hyperactivity that occurs in patients after focal lesions of the Central nervous system due to various diseases: stroke, traumatic brain injury or spinal cord injury, neurosurgical intervention, as well as multiple sclerosis and other diseases of the Central nervous system and is the most disability manifestation of the syndrome of upper motor neuron (UMNS). Focal spasticity of the upper limb requires a complex treatment. Botulinum toxin therapy is an effective treatment for focal/multifocal spasticity in reducing muscle tone and improving function with the highest level of evidence according to the latest American and European guidelines for treatment of spasticity. There are many publications devoted to BTA use in post-stroke patients. This article provides a review of the BTA use in patients with the upper limb spasticity due to severe traumatic brain injury. Some local data on the BTA efficacy in the cohort of patients with traumatic brain injury are also presented. PMID:27635608

  10. Botulinum toxin use in neuro-rehabilitation to treat obstetrical plexus palsy and sialorrhea following neurological diseases: a review.

    PubMed

    Intiso, Domenico; Basciani, M

    2012-01-01

    In neuro-rehabilitation, botulinum toxin (BTX) as adjunct to other interventions can result in a useful therapeutic tool treating disabled people. Other than spasticity, numerous motor and non motor disorders can complicate clinical course and hamper rehabilitative process of neurological impaired patients. A review of BTX use in treating muscular imbalance of children with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy and in reducing sialorrhea following neurological diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ASL), Parkinson disease and cerebral palsy (CP) is provided. Clinicians have to face unique and difficult to treat clinical conditions such as ulcers, sores and abnormal posture and movement disorders due to neurological affections. BTX effectiveness in treating some of these conditions is also provided. Since, neurologically disabled subjects can show complex dysfunction, prior to initiating BTX therapy, specific functional limitations, goals and expected outcomes of treatment should be evaluated and discussed with family and caregivers.

  11. Botulinum toxin assessment, intervention and after-care for upper limb hypertonicity in adults: international consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Sheean, G; Lannin, N A; Turner-Stokes, L; Rawicki, B; Snow, B J

    2010-08-01

    Upper limb spasticity affecting elbow, wrist, and finger flexors can be safely and effectively reduced with injections of botulinum toxin type-A (BoNT-A). It has been best studied in adults in the context of post-stroke spasticity. The clinical benefits include reduction in pain and deformity, improvement in washing and dressing the upper limb, and a reduction in caregiver burden (Class I evidence, recommendation level A). Some patients show improvement in function performed by active movement of the affected upper limb (Class III evidence, recommendation C), but predicting and measuring this is difficult, and further research is needed. An individually based approach to treatment and outcome measurement is preferred (Class IV, recommendation U). More research is needed to resolve many unknown issues of assessment and treatment, using research methods appropriate to the question. PMID:20633180

  12. [The efficacy of botulinum toxin therapy in patients with upper limb spasticity due to traumatic brain injury].

    PubMed

    Akulov, M A; Khat'kova, S E; Mokienko, O A; Orlova, O R; Usachev, D Yu; Zakharov, V O; Orlova, A S; Tomsky, A A

    2016-01-01

    Spasticity is a type of muscle hyperactivity that occurs in patients after focal lesions of the Central nervous system due to various diseases: stroke, traumatic brain injury or spinal cord injury, neurosurgical intervention, as well as multiple sclerosis and other diseases of the Central nervous system and is the most disability manifestation of the syndrome of upper motor neuron (UMNS). Focal spasticity of the upper limb requires a complex treatment. Botulinum toxin therapy is an effective treatment for focal/multifocal spasticity in reducing muscle tone and improving function with the highest level of evidence according to the latest American and European guidelines for treatment of spasticity. There are many publications devoted to BTA use in post-stroke patients. This article provides a review of the BTA use in patients with the upper limb spasticity due to severe traumatic brain injury. Some local data on the BTA efficacy in the cohort of patients with traumatic brain injury are also presented.

  13. Botulinum Toxin Type A Injections for Cervical and Shoulder Girdle Myofascial Pain Using an Enriched Protocol Design

    PubMed Central

    Nicol, Andrea L.; Wu, Irene I.; Ferrante, F. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background Myofascial pain syndrome is a regional condition of muscle pain and stiffness and is classically characterized by the presence of trigger points in affected musculature. Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) has been shown to have antinociceptive properties and elicit sustained muscle relaxation, thereby possibly affording even greater relief than traditional strategies. Our goal in this study was to determine whether direct injection of BoNT-A into painful muscle groups is effective for cervical and shoulder girdle myofascial pain. Methods An enriched protocol design was used wherein 114 patients with cervical and shoulder girdle myofascial pain underwent injection of BoNT-A to determine their response to the drug. Fifty-four responders were then enrolled in a twelve-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Pain scales and quality of life measures were assessed at baseline and at routine follow-up visits until completion of the study after 26 weeks. Results Injection of BoNT-A into painful muscle groups improved average visual numerical pain scores in subjects who received a second dose of BoNT-A compared to placebo (p = 0.019 (0.26, 2.78)). Subjects who received a second dose of BoNT-A had a reduced number of headaches per week (p = 0.04 (0.07, 4.55)). Brief Pain Inventory interference scores for general activity and sleep were improved (p = 0.046 (0.038, 3.7) and 0.02 (0.37, 4.33), respectively) in those who received a second dose of BoNT-A. Conclusion Botulinum toxin type A injected directly into painful muscle groups improves average pain scores and certain aspects of quality of life in patients suffering from severe cervical and shoulder girdle myofascial pain. PMID:24842179

  14. Evaluating the effects of ice application on the pain felt during botulinum toxin type-a injections: a prospective, randomized, single-blind controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Sarifakioglu, Nedim; Sarifakioglu, Evren

    2004-12-01

    The pain felt during botulinum toxin type-A injections and the troubled and distressed treatment it induces is common and well known for the patient and the doctor applying the treatment. This problem is further intensified on the patients who have needle phobia. The effect of ice application on the treatment zone before botulinum toxin type-A treatment on the pain felt during injections is investigated. Totally, 24 patients who underwent botulinum toxin type-A treatment in upper face region for esthetic purposes are included in the study. Ice was applied 5 minutes before the injections on the right lateral orbital zones (crow's feet area) of the patients, whereas on their left sides, toxin was injected without applying any ice. All the drugs were diluted by normal saline; 5 U of active botulinum toxin type-A was used in each diziem (0.1 mL). Total injection number was determined both in right and left areas as 8. Visual analog scale (VAS) was used for pain intensity and evaluation. On the side where ice was applied, the treatment was completed in 1 session and lasted shorter when compared with that of the control side. However, the average VAS values defining the pain that the patients felt in their right and left sides were found as 1.1 and 5.9, respectively. The clinical findings obtained indicated that pain is significantly reduced on the side where ice is applied. The statistical significance of the test results were evaluated by Student's t test, and the difference between VAS values was found statistically significant (P = 0.000).

  15. Crystal Structure of Botulinum Neurotoxin Type a in Complex With the Cell Surface Co-Receptor GT1b-Insight Into the Toxin-Neuron Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Stenmark, P.; Dupuy, J.; Inamura, A.; Kiso, M.; Stevens, R.C.

    2009-05-26

    Botulinum neurotoxins have a very high affinity and specificity for their target cells requiring two different co-receptors located on the neuronal cell surface. Different toxin serotypes have different protein receptors; yet, most share a common ganglioside co-receptor, GT1b. We determined the crystal structure of the botulinum neurotoxin serotype A binding domain (residues 873-1297) alone and in complex with a GT1b analog at 1.7 A and 1.6 A, respectively. The ganglioside GT1b forms several key hydrogen bonds to conserved residues and binds in a shallow groove lined by Tryptophan 1266. GT1b binding does not induce any large structural changes in the toxin; therefore, it is unlikely that allosteric effects play a major role in the dual receptor recognition. Together with the previously published structures of botulinum neurotoxin serotype B in complex with its protein co-receptor, we can now generate a detailed model of botulinum neurotoxin's interaction with the neuronal cell surface. The two branches of the GT1b polysaccharide, together with the protein receptor site, impose strict geometric constraints on the mode of interaction with the membrane surface and strongly support a model where one end of the 100 A long translocation domain helix bundle swing into contact with the membrane, initiating the membrane anchoring event.

  16. Botulinum toxin treatment of pes cavovarus in a child suffering from autosomal recessive axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy (AR-CMT2).

    PubMed

    Tiffreau, V; Allart, E; Dangleterre, C; Boutry, N; Petit, F; Cuisset, J M; Thevenon, A

    2015-06-01

    In a 12-year old girl suffering from autosomal recessive axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) neuropathy, pes cavovarus was treated with botulinum toxin injection in the tibialis posterior. The patient underwent a clinical evaluation, video analysis of spatiotemporal gait parameters and dynamic foot plantar pressure assessment before treatment and then two weeks, three months and six months thereafter. The video gait analysis revealed a decrease in varus during the swing phase of gait. The dynamic foot plantar pressure decreased by 50% in the excessive pressure at the side of the foot six months after the injection (maximal pressure=42.6N/cm2 before treatment and 18.9 N/cm2 after 6 month). Botulinum toxin injection appears to be an efficacious means of correcting pes cavovarus in CMT disease. A larger-scale clinical trial is now required to evaluate the putative longer-term preventive effect of this treatment on the pes cavus deformity. PMID:24980632

  17. Gangliosides in human, cow and goat milk, and their abilities as to neutralization of cholera toxin and botulinum type A neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Iwamori, Masao; Takamizawa, Kotarou; Momoeda, Mikio; Iwamori, Yuriko; Taketani, Yuji

    2008-10-01

    To elucidate the potential of mammalian milk as to protection of infants from infections, we determined the ganglioside compositions of human, cow and goat milk in relation with cholera toxin and botulinum type A neurotoxin-receptors. Gangliosides accounted for 1 to 2 micromol of lipid-bound sialic acid (LSA) in 100 ml of milk, and GD3 comprised about 69% of LSA in all milk samples. Among the milk samples examined, goat milk was found to contain an amount of gangliosides belonging to the b-pathway representing 15.8% of the total LSA. Accordingly, botulinum neurotoxin bound to GT1b and GQ1b in goat milk, but not to any gangliosides in human or cow milk. On the other hand, GM1, the cholera toxin receptor, was found to be present in all milk samples at concentrations of 0.02% to 0.77% of the total LSA and to be maintained at a relatively constant level in human milk during the postpartum period. Gangliosides from 1 ml of pooled human milk exhibited the ability to attenuate the binding of cholera toxin (30 ng) to GM1 by 93%, and those from 500 microl of goat milk completely inhibited the binding of botulinum type A neurotoxin 1.5 microg to GT1b.

  18. GaAs laser treatment of bilateral eyelid ptosis due to complication of botulinum toxin type A injection.

    PubMed

    Majlesi, Gholamreza

    2008-10-01

    The widespread use of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) for aesthetic procedures in recent years has brought about some unwanted side effects that, though they are self-limited, cause inconvenience for patients. Injection of this paralytic toxin inactivates target muscle(s) for many months and unwanted facial movements will thus be prevented. Spreading of the toxin beyond the target muscles sometimes involves muscles necessary for other facial movements, such as the levator palpebrae, inactivation of which causes upper eyelid ptosis. Mild cases resolve after 2-3 wk, but in severe cases the complication may last as long as the cosmetic results persist (3-4 mo), and until now there has been no medical intervention to accelerate healing. In an effort to achieve more rapid recovery from eyelid ptosis due to overdose of BTX-A in the glabella, laser therapy was used in a 46-year-old woman with bilateral eyelid ptosis (partial on the right side and complete on the left) 12 d after injection. A GaAs laser was used and the protocol consisted of irradiation of three points on the upper lid just above the levator, and one point on the corrugator muscle on each side in contact mode, with three sessions per week (wavelength 890 nm, peak power 94 W, output power 28 mW, pulse duration 200 ns, spot size 3 mm, pulse repetition rate 3000 Hz, duration of irradiation 40 sec per point, energy per point 1.1 J, total energy per session 8.8 J, dose 16 J/cm2). The result was complete recovery from ptosis after 10 sessions, but the cosmetic results persisted for several months. It appears that if this procedure has similar results in other case series, it will be an effective therapeutic option to treat this complication.

  19. Botulinum Neurotoxin Injections

    MedlinePlus

    ... years without side effects from long-term use. Immunity Because botulinum neurotoxin is a biological product, it ... for the body to create antibodies and develop immunity to the effects of the toxin. Measures are ...

  20. Botulinum toxin in the management of blepharospasm: current evidence and recent developments

    PubMed Central

    Hellman, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Blepharospasm is a focal (although usually bilateral) dystonia of the orbicularis oculi muscles, producing excessive eye closure. This produces significant disability through functional blindness. Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) have become the treatment of choice for blepharospasm; the impressive response rate and the tolerable safety profile have been proven through multiple clinical studies. There are currently four BoNT approved in the United States for different indications - we review the data on blepharospasm for each of these drugs. Currently, incobotulinumtoxinA and onabotulinumtoxinA have the most evidence of benefit for patients with blepharospasm. Current evidence, recent development and future directions are discussed. PMID:25922620

  1. Effect of Clostridium botulinum toxin type A injections into the deep digital flexor muscle on the range of motion of the metacarpus and carpus, and the force distribution underneath the hooves, of sound horses at the walk.

    PubMed

    Hardeman, Lotte C; van der Meij, Bram R; Oosterlinck, Maarten; Veraa, Stefanie; van der Kolk, Johannes H; Wijnberg, Inge D; Back, Willem

    2013-12-01

    In the treatment of laminitis, reducing deep digital flexor muscle (DDFM) activity might diminish its pull on the distal phalanx, thereby preventing displacement and providing pain relief. Injection of Clostridium botulinum toxin type A into the DDFM of horses is potentially therapeutic. However, the effects of C. botulinum toxin type A on the gait characteristics of sound horses at the walk are not known. The aim of this study was to test if a reduced DDFM activity would lead to (1) alterations of the sagittal range of motion of the metacarpus (SROM) and range of motion of the carpal joint (CROM); (2) changes in the force distribution underneath the hoof (toe vs. heel region: balance index); and (3) changes in the force distribution between the treated and untreated limb (symmetry index). The DDFMs of the left forelimbs of seven sound Royal Dutch Sport Horses were injected with 200 IU C. botulinum toxin type A using electromyography and ultrasound guidance. Measurements using an inertial sensor system and dynamically calibrated pressure plate were performed before and after injections. The SROM and CROM of the treated limb were significantly increased after C. botulinum toxin type A injections. No significant changes were detected in the balance index or in the symmetry index, indicating that no lameness was induced. C. botulinum toxin type A injections into the DDFM of sound horses do not appear to result in substantial gait alterations at the walk. PMID:24360731

  2. The Role of Botulinum Toxin A in the Treatment of Raynaud Phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Segreto, Francesco; Marangi, Giovanni Francesco; Cerbone, Vincenzo; Persichetti, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    Raynaud phenomenon (RP) is a transient digital ischemia that occurs after exposure to cold temperature or emotional distress. It presents with a triphasic course: the initial white phase is followed by cyanotic discoloration and, subsequently, erythema. The attacks may be associated with pain, paresthesia, and complicate with nonhealing ulceration often leading to amputation. To date, there are no clear-cut therapeutic guidelines and many medications are used off-label. Encouraging results were reported with the use of botulinum neurotoxin-A (BoNT-A). However, there is still ongoing debate regarding indications, contraindications, best injection technique, and mechanism of action. The aim of this study was to address these issues by providing an up-to-date and detailed overview of the use of BoNT-A in RP.A PubMed database search was conducted. The available studies and techniques were evaluated and compared.The search yielded a total of 29 studies. Ten papers, published between 2004 and 2014, were considered relevant. A total of 128 patients underwent BoNT-A injections. Seventy-five percent to 100 % of the patients reported pain reduction after treatment. Healing of ulcers was reported in 75% to 100% of the affected patients. The most common complication was temporary hand weakness, with an average incidence of 14.1%. Injections targeting the neurovascular bundle at or slightly proximal to the A1 pulley were the most commonly performed.Botulinum neurotoxin-A injection proved to be a valid approach in both primary and secondary RP. The available evidence shows the achievement of both symptomatic and functional improvements in this debilitating condition. However, the patient should be adequately informed about the risk of transient hand weakness.

  3. Sleep bruxism possibly triggered by multiple sclerosis attacks and treated successfully with botulinum toxin: Report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Sevim, Serhan; Kaleağası, Hakan; Fidancı, Halit

    2015-09-01

    Sleep bruxism refers to a nocturnal parafunctional activity including the clenching, grinding or gnashing of teeth. While most of the nocturnal bruxism cases seen in the general population are apparently idiopathic, it has been reported to be associated with a range of neurological diseases such as Huntington's disease, cranio-cervical dystonia and post-anoxic brain damage, but not multiple sclerosis (MS). We describe three cases of MS patients who have had moderate to severe complaints of bruxism in the two weeks following their relevant MS attacks. None of the three patients had a diagnosis of bruxism prior to her attack. The diagnosis was confirmed in one out of three by a polysomnography. One patient did not have any complaints related to bruxism previous to her attack, whereas two had mild and infrequent complaints. The symptoms of the relevant attacks were left hemihypesthesia in all and hemiparesis in two. None of the patients had spasticity that could result in severe teeth clenching. All three patients presented with morning headaches and jaw pain or tightness and were treated successfully with botulinum toxin (Btx) injections applied to their masseter and temporalis muscles. The cause of bruxism is controversial but lesions of the cortico-basalganglia-thalamo-cotrical loops are thought to be most likely. However, acute or chronic lesions in those pathways were not demonstrated in the 3 patients. It is feasible that they had normal appearing white matter interruptions in their cortico-basalganglia-thalamocortical loops along with their relevant attack.

  4. Efficacy and safety of botulinum toxin type A for treatment of Frey's syndrome: evidence from 22 published articles.

    PubMed

    Xie, Shang; Wang, Kan; Xu, Tao; Guo, Xue-Sheng; Shan, Xiao-Feng; Cai, Zhi-Gang

    2015-11-01

    Frey's syndrome (FS) is an unavoidable sequela following the surgery of the parotid gland. Although several treatment methods are available, their efficacy is short term or accompanied by unacceptable complications. In the past two decades, botulinum toxin type A (BTXA) has been widely used to treat FS. Although several systematic reviews have been reported recently, they were conflicting and with obvious deficiencies. Thus, we performed an objectively systematic review to determine whether BTXA is an effective and safe treatment for FS. A literature retrieval covering PubMed, Web of Science, Ovid, Embase and Cochrane library was performed on 16 January, 2015. Proportion meta-analysis and corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) were performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of BXTA in treatment of FS. A total of 499 records were retrieved and 22 articles with 23 studies were included after scrutiny by two independent authors. Statistical analyses regarding the effective rate, incidence of complications were used to estimate the efficacy and safety of BTXA. Our results suggested that the effective rate of BTXA for treatment of FS is 98.5% (95% CI = 0.971-0.994) and the incidence of complication is 3.6% (95% CI = 0.017-0.061). In conclusion, our study supports that BTXA produces meaningful benefits on the treatment of patients with FS. However, owing to lack of strong evidence, future studies with well-designed inclusion criteria and multicenter randomized controlled trials are needed to give more credible evidence, if possible. PMID:26310612

  5. Polyclonal neural cell adhesion molecule antibody prolongs the effective duration time of botulinum toxin in decreasing muscle strength.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yan; Pan, Lizhen; Liu, Wuchao; Pan, Yougui; Nie, Zhiyu; Jin, Lingjing

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to investigate if the effective duration time of botulinum toxin A (Btx-A) could be prolonged by polyclonal neural cell adhesion molecule antibody (P-NCAM-Ab). 175 male SD rats were randomly divided into three major groups: control group (n = 25), Btx-A group (n = 25), and P-NCAM-Ab groups. P-NCAM-Ab groups were composed of five sub-groups, with 25 rats each in the dose-response study. Muscle strength of rat lower limbs was determined using a survey system. The expressions of muscle-specific receptor tyrosine kinase (MuSK) and neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) were determined by real-time polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR) and western blotting (WB). The muscle strength was significantly decreased by Btx-A in Btx-A/P-NCAM-Ab groups compared with normal control group. Besides, the muscle strength of P-NCAM-Ab group was significantly decreased compared with the Btx-A group. The recovery time of muscle strength in P-NCAM-Ab group was significantly longer compared with Btx-A group. RT-PCR and WB assay showed that PNCAM-Ab delayed the increase of MuSK and NCAM after Btx-A injection. P-NCAM-Ab prolongs the effective duration time of Btx-A in decreasing muscle strength, which could provide a novel enhancement in clinical application.

  6. Botulinum toxin type A in simple motor tics: short-term and long-term treatment-effects.

    PubMed

    Rath, Judith J G; Tavy, Dénes L J; Wertenbroek, Agnes A A C M; van Woerkom, Theodoor C A M; de Bruijn, Sebastiaan F T M

    2010-08-01

    To determine the short-term and long-term treatment-effects of botulinum toxin type A in simple motor tics, we analyzed 15 consecutive patients (18 tics) with simple motor tics that were treated every 3 months with injections of BTX-A. Efficacy (rated on a 4-level scale) and duration of effect of the first 2 and last 2 (if treated 5 times or more) treatments were recorded, as well as latency of response, changes of premonitory urges (PMUs) and possible side effects. Total number of treatments for each tic varied from 2 to 50 (mean 11, median 6). In 16 of 18 tics (89%) short-term efficacy was reported successful (good or moderate). Long-term efficacy was reported in 12 tics of which 11 showed similar or even increased beneficial effects. Premonitory urge (PMU) was reported in 8 patients (53%). PMU, if present, lessened or disappeared after treatment with BTX-A. A permanent remission of the treated tic was seen in 3 patients with a maximum follow-up of 10 years. BTX-A appears a safe and effective treatment for simple motor tics and retains its efficacy after long-term treatment. BTX may also induce permanent remission of the treated tics and effects of BTX are not restricted to merely motor behaviour.

  7. A randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trial of botulinum toxin in the treatment of spastic foot in hemiparetic patients.

    PubMed Central

    Burbaud, P; Wiart, L; Dubos, J L; Gaujard, E; Debelleix, X; Joseph, P A; Mazaux, J M; Bioulac, B; Barat, M; Lagueny, A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To confirm the apparent effectiveness of botulinum toxin (BTX) in hemiparetic patients with ankle plantar flexors and foot invertor spasticity. METHODS: Twenty three hemiparetic patients with spasticity of the ankle plantar flexors and foot invertors were included in a randomised double blind, placebo controlled study with BTX. Patients were examined on days 0, 30, 90, and 120 and received one injection of BTX and one of placebo in a random order at day 0 and day 90. RESULTS: Patients reported a clear subjective improvement in foot spasticity after BTX (P = 0.0014) but not after placebo. Significant changes were noted in Ashworth scale values for ankle extensors (P < 0.0001) and invertors (P = 0.0002), and for active ankle dorsiflexion (P = 0.0001). Gait velocity was slightly but not significantly (P = 0.0731) improved after BTX injections. The severity of spasticity did not modify treatment efficacy, but BTX was less effective in patients with longer duration of spasticity (P = 0.0081). CONCLUSION: The efficacy of BTX injections in the treatment of spastic foot suggests that BTX may be particularly useful during the first year after a stroke. PMID:8795597

  8. Early postoperative treatment of thyroidectomy scars using botulinum toxin: a split-scar, double-blind randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youn Sung; Lee, Hyun Joo; Cho, Sang Hyun; Lee, Jeong Deuk; Kim, Hei Sung

    2014-01-01

    Operational scars, especially those located on the exposed parts of the body, can be distressing. Despite high demand for an early intervention to minimize surgical scars, there is yet no universal consensus on optimal treatment. A split-scar, double-blind randomized controlled trial was held to assess the safety and efficacy of early postoperative botulinum toxin type A (BTA) injection in surgical scars. A single session of treatment was performed where BTA was allocated to one half of the scar and 0.9% saline to the control half. Scars were assessed using the modified Stony Brook Scar Evaluation Scale (SBSES) with standardized photographs. Fifteen patients completed the study, and their data were analyzed. At 6 months' follow-up, a significant improvement in SBSES score was noted for the BTA-treated halves of the scars (p < 0.001), with minimal change on the saline-treated side (p = 0.785). The mean calculated difference in SBSES scores (final/initial) between the BTA-treated side and the saline-treated side was also significant (p < 0.001). Early postoperative BTA injection was safe and effective in modulating thyroidectomy scars and may be a promising option for scar prevention.

  9. A Review of Thoracic Outlet Syndrome and the Possible Role of Botulinum Toxin in the Treatment of This Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Jacqueline Mary; Finlayson, Heather; Travlos, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to discuss the classification, diagnosis, pathophysiology and management of Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS). Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a complex entity that is characterized by different neurovascular signs and symptoms involving the upper limb. TOS is defined as upper extremity symptoms due to compression of the neurovascular bundle in the area of the neck just above the first rib. Compression is thought to occur at one or more of the three anatomical compartments: the interscalene triangle, the costoclavicular space and the retropectoralis minor spaces. The clinical presentation can include both neurogenic and vascular symptoms. TOS can be difficult to diagnose because there is no standardized objective test that can be used and the clinician must rely on history and several positive findings on physical exam. The medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve conduction may be a sensitive way to detect pathology in the lower trunks of the brachial plexus which is promising for future research. Treatment options continue to be conservative and surgical. However, for those who have failed physical therapy there is research to suggest that botulinum toxin may help with symptom relief. However, given that there has been conflicting evidence, further research is required using randomized controlled trials. PMID:23202313

  10. A proposal to prevent the "Mephisto sign" side effect of botulinum toxin type A injection in chronic migraine.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eunae S; Hwang, Jae Young; Kim, Seong Taek

    2013-11-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) has been reported as an effective treatment for chronic migraine. When BoNT-A is injected on the frontalis muscle for chronic migraine, an unexpected clinical side effect called the "Mephisto sign" may occur. The aim of this article is to propose a method to eliminate or prevent the Mephisto sign side effect. A 25-year-old female patient visited the hospital and was diagnosed with chronic migraine. A total of 155 U of BoNT-A was injected into 31 sites. 2-weeks later, and the patient developed the Mephisto sign. An additional 2-U dose was administered bilaterally to the lateral-most point of the frontalis muscles, and the eyebrow morphology returned to normal within 2-3 weeks. We propose that the development of the Mephisto sign may be prevented with an additional BoNT-A injection of 2-4 U bilaterally to the lateral most point of the frontalis muscles during the primary injection process.

  11. A Proposal to Prevent the "Mephisto Sign" Side Effect of Botulinum Toxin Type A Injection in Chronic Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eunae S.; Hwang, Jae Young

    2013-01-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) has been reported as an effective treatment for chronic migraine. When BoNT-A is injected on the frontalis muscle for chronic migraine, an unexpected clinical side effect called the "Mephisto sign" may occur. The aim of this article is to propose a method to eliminate or prevent the Mephisto sign side effect. A 25-year-old female patient visited the hospital and was diagnosed with chronic migraine. A total of 155 U of BoNT-A was injected into 31 sites. 2-weeks later, and the patient developed the Mephisto sign. An additional 2-U dose was administered bilaterally to the lateral-most point of the frontalis muscles, and the eyebrow morphology returned to normal within 2-3 weeks. We propose that the development of the Mephisto sign may be prevented with an additional BoNT-A injection of 2-4 U bilaterally to the lateral most point of the frontalis muscles during the primary injection process. PMID:24142664

  12. Antigenic sites on the HN domain of botulinum neurotoxin A stimulate protective antibody responses against active toxin

    PubMed Central

    Vijayalakshmi Ayyar, B.; Tajhya, Rajeev B.; Beeton, Christine; Zouhair Atassi, M.

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most toxic substances known. BoNT intoxicates cells in a highly programmed fashion initiated by binding to the cell surface, internalization and enzymatic cleavage of substrate, thus, inhibiting synaptic exocytosis. Over the past two decades, immunological significance of BoNT/A C-terminal heavy chain (HC) and light chain (LC) domains were investigated extensively leading to important findings. In the current work, we explored the significance of BoNT/A heavy chain N-terminal (HN) region as a vaccine candidate. Mice were immunized with recombinant HN519–845 generating antibodies (Abs) that were found to be protective against lethal dose of BoNT/A. Immuno-dominant regions of HN519–845 were identified and individually investigated for antibody response along with synthetic peptides within those regions, using in vivo protection assays against BoNT/A. Results were confirmed by patch-clamp analysis where anti-HN antibodies were studied for the ability to block toxin-induced channel formation. This data strongly indicated that HN519–593 is an important region in generating protective antibodies and should be valuable in a vaccine design. These results are the first to describe and dissect the protective activity of the BoNT/A HN domain. PMID:26508475

  13. Effectiveness of botulinum toxin type A treatment of neck pain related to nocturnal bruxism: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Santamato, Andrea; Panza, Francesco; Di Venere, Daniela; Solfrizzi, Vincenzo; Frisardi, Vincenza; Ranieri, Maurizio; Fiore, Pietro

    2010-01-01

    Objective This case report describes a patient with nocturnal bruxism and related neck pain treated with botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A). Clinical Features The patient was a 27-year-old man with nocturnal bruxism and difficulty in active mouth opening and chewing and neck pain at rest. His numeric pain score was 7 of 10. Surface electromyography of the temporalis and masseter muscles showed typical signs of hyperactivity, characterized by compound muscle action potential amplitude alterations. Intervention and Outcome After clinical evaluation, he was treated with BTX-A to reduce masseter and temporalis muscle hyperactivity. After 3 days of treatment with BTX-A, with each masseter muscle injected with a dose of about 40 mouse units with a dilution of 1 mL and with temporal muscle bilaterally injected with 25 mouse units with the same dilution, a decrease in bruxism symptoms was reported. Neck pain also decreased after the first treatment (visual analog scale of 2/10) and then resolved completely. After 4 weeks, electromyography showed the reduction of muscle hyperactivity with a decrease in the amplitude of the motor action potential. The same reduction in signs and symptoms was still present at assessment 3 months posttreatment. Conclusion These findings suggest that BTX-A may be a therapeutic option for the treatment of bruxism and related disorders. PMID:22027036

  14. Distant effects of locally injected botulinum toxin: a double-blind study of single fiber EMG changes.

    PubMed

    Lange, D J; Rubin, M; Greene, P E; Kang, U J; Moskowitz, C B; Brin, M F; Lovelace, R E; Fahn, S

    1991-07-01

    We used single fiber electromyography (SFEMG) to study 42 patients who had enrolled in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial undertaken to assess the efficacy of botulinum toxin (BTX) injection of neck muscles to treat torticollis. SFEMG in a limb muscle was performed before treatment, 2, and 12 weeks after injection of placebo or BTX. Before treatment, the mean jitter was 26.8 microsec in patients who were to receive BTX, and 25.7 microsec in the placebo group. Two weeks after injection, mean jitter in the group receiving BTX was 43.6 microsec. In the placebo group, it was 26.5 microsec (P = less than .05). Twelve weeks after injection, mean jitter in the BTX group was 35.5; for the placebo group it was 24.5. Fiber density did not change in any patient during the study. There were no remote clinical effects of BTX. Injection of BTX into muscles affected with focal dystonia is a promising and safe treatment, but there are subclinical effects on uninjected muscles.

  15. Questionnaire about the Adverse Events and Side Effects Following Botulinum Toxin A Treatment in Patients with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Blaszczyk, Izabela; Foumani, Nazli Poorsafar; Ljungberg, Christina; Wiberg, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) injections for treatment of spasticity in patients with cerebral palsy (CP) have been used for about two decades. The treatment is considered safe but a low frequency of adverse events (AE) has been reported. A good method to report AEs is necessary to verify the safety of the treatment. We decided to use an active surveillance of treatment-induced harm using a questionnaire we created. We studied the incidence of reported AEs and side effects in patients with CP treated with BoNT-A. We investigated the relationship between the incidence of AEs or side effects and gender, age, weight, total dose, dose per body weight, Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) and number of treated body parts. Seventy-four patients with CP participated in our study. In 54 (51%) of 105 BoNT-A treatments performed in 45 (61%) patients, there were 95 AEs and side effects reported, out of which 50 were generalized and/or focal distant. Severe AEs occurred in three patients (4%), and their BoNT-A treatment was discontinued. Consecutive collection of the AE and side-effect incidence using our questionnaire can increase the safety of BoNT-A treatment in patients with CP. PMID:26561833

  16. Physical Therapy for an Adult with Chronic Stroke after Botulinum Toxin Injection for Spasticity: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Phadke, Chetan P.; Ismail, Farooq; Boulias, Chris

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: In this case report, we describe the type and duration of a physical therapy and botulinum toxin type A (BoNTA) intervention directed at lower limb spasticity and the gait and balance improvement in a patient post-stroke. Treatment of focal spasticity with BoNTA intramuscular injections combined with physical therapy is recommended by rehabilitation experts. However, the optimal type and duration of physical therapy intervention to optimize any functional gains that follow chemodenervation induced by BoNTA has not been established. Method: One individual with chronic stroke who received BoNTA injections for upper and lower extremity spasticity was included. Physical therapy intervention consisted of 45- to 60-min sessions twice weekly for 12 weeks, based on the Bobath–neurodevelopmental therapy approach, and an activity-based home program. Results: After BoNTA injections and physical therapy, the patient made clinically significant improvements in balance and gait speed and became more independent with his ambulation. Conclusions: This case report demonstrates that physical therapy after BoNTA injections can result in significant functional improvements for individuals with spasticity after chronic stroke that may not be possible with BoNTA injections alone. PMID:25931655

  17. Comparing the Effect of Botulinum Toxin Type B Injection at Different Dosages for Patient with Drooling due to Brain Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hee Dong; Park, Sang Jun; Choi, Yong Min

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate Botulinum toxin type B (BNT-B) injection's effect and duration depending on dose for patients with brain lesion. Method Twenty one patients with brain lesion and severe drooling were included and divided into three groups. All patients received conventional dysphagia therapy. Group A patients (n=7) received an injection of 1,500 units and group B patients (n=7) received an injection of 2,500 units of BNT-B in submandibular gland under ultrasound guidance. Group C patients (n=7) received conventional dysphagia therapy. Saliva secretion was assessed quantitatively at baseline and at weeks 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12. The severity and frequency of drooling was assessed using the Drooling Quotient (DQ) by patients and/or caregivers. Results Group A and B reported a distinct improvement of the symptoms within 2 weeks after BNT-B injection. Compared to the baseline, the mean amount of saliva decreased significantly throughout the study. However, there was no meaningful difference between the two groups. The greatest reductions were achieved at 2 weeks and lasted up to 8 weeks after BNT-B injection. Group C did not show any differences. Conclusion Local injection of 1,500 units of BNT-B into salivary glands under ultrasonic guidance proved to be a safe and effective dose for drooling in patient with brain lesion, as did 2,500 units. PMID:23342318

  18. Intraprostatic injection of botulinum toxin type- A relieves bladder outlet obstruction in human and induces prostate apoptosis in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Yao-Chi; Tu, Chieh-Hsien; Huang, Chao-Cheng; Lin, Hsin-Ju; Chiang, Po-Hui; Yoshimura, Naoki; Chancellor, Michael B

    2006-01-01

    Background With the increasing interest with botulinum toxin – A (BTX-A) application in the lower urinary tract, we investigated the BTX-A effects on the canine prostate and also in men with bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Methods Transperineal injection into the prostate using transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) was performed throughout the study. Saline with or without 100 U of BTX-A was injected into mongrel dogs prostate. One or 3 months later, the prostate was harvested for morphologic and apoptotic study. In addition, eight BPH patients refractory to α-blockers were treated with ultrasound guided intraprostatic injection of 200 U of BTX-A. Results In the BTX-A treated dogs, atrophy and diffuse apoptosis was observed with H&E stain and TUNEL stain at 1 and 3 months. Clinically, the mean prostate volume, symptom score, and quality of life index were significantly reduced by 18.8%, 73.1%, and 61.5% respectively. Maximal flow rate significantly increased by 72.0%. Conclusion Intraprostatic BTX-A injection induces prostate apotosis in dogs and relieves BOO in humans. It is therefore a promising alternative treatment for refractory BOO due to BPH. PMID:16620393

  19. Persistence of Clostridium botulinum type C toxin in blow fly (Calliphoridae) larvae as a possible cause of avian botulism in spring.

    PubMed

    Hubálek, Z; Halouzka, J

    1991-01-01

    Diverse samples were examined at a site of water-bird mortality, caused by Clostridium botulinum type C toxin in southern Moravia (Czechoslovakia). The toxin was detected in high concentrations in mute swan (Cygnus olor) carcasses (less than or equal to 1 x 10(6) LD50/g) as well as in necrophagous larvae and pupae of the blow flies Lucilia sericata and Calliphora vomitoria (less than or equal to 1 x 10(5) LD50/g) collected from them. It was detected in lower concentrations (less than or equal to 1 x 10(3) LD50/g) in other invertebrates (ptychopterid fly larvae, leeches, sow-bugs) associated with these carcasses, and occasionally in water samples (8 LD50/ml) close to the carrion. The toxin was not detected in the samples of water, mud or invertebrates collected at a distance greater than or equal to 5 m from the carcasses. The toxin-bearing larvae of L. sericata and C. vomitoria, containing 80,000 LD50/g of type C toxin, were exposed in the mud at the study site for 131 days from November to March. Although the toxin activity decreased 25-fold and 40-fold in the two samples of maggots exposed during this period, it remained very high (less than or equal to 3,200 LD50/g). Birds ingesting a relatively low number of these toxic larvae (or pupae) in the spring could receive a lethal dose of the toxin. PMID:2023331

  20. Growth and formation of toxin by Clostridium botulinum in peeled, inoculated, vacuum-packed potatoes after a double pasteurization and storage at 25 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Lund, B M; Graham, A F; George, S M

    1988-03-01

    A process that claims to use a double pasteurization to produce vacuum-packed potatoes for storage at ambient temperature has been evaluated. After the first pasteurization, potatoes are vacuum-packed and stored at 25 degrees-35 degrees C for up to 24 h, which is intended to allow germination of bacterial spores, and are then pasteurized again. When potatoes were inoculated with spores of Clostridium botulinum and subjected to this double-pasteurization process a high proportion of spores remained viable and resulted in growth and formation of toxin within 5-9 d at 25 degrees C. To provide an appropriate reduction in the risk o survival and growth of Cl. botulinum, peeled, vacuum-packed potatoes for storage at ambient temperature should be given a heat treatment equivalent to an F(0)3 process. If they are not given such a heat treatment they should be stored at a temperature below 4 degrees C.

  1. Experience with botulinum toxin type A in the treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Juenemann, Klaus-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Control of the lower urinary tract is a complex, multilevel process that involves both the peripheral and central nervous system. Neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD) is a widespread chronic illness that impairs millions of people worldwide. Neurogenic LUTD has a major impact on quality of life, affecting emotional, social, sexual, occupational and physical aspects of daily life, and in addition to the debilitating manifestations for patients, it also imposes a substantial economic burden on every healthcare system. First-line treatment for neurogenic LUTD includes antimuscarinics and some form of catheterization, preferably intermittent self-catheterization. However, the treatment effect is often unsatisfactory, so that other options have to be considered. Moreover, neurogenic LUTD is a challenge because all available treatment modalities (i.e. conservative, minimally invasive and invasive therapies) may fail. In recent years, botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A) treatment has been shown to be an effective pharmacological therapy option in patients refractory to antimuscarinic and neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO). Several studies have shown that BoNT/A injection significantly reduces detrusor muscle overactivity. Also BoNT/A treatment of NDO has revealed a significant improvement of lower urinary tract function with regard to reduced urinary incontinence, reduced detrusor pressure, increased bladder capacity and improved quality of life in NDO. PMID:24489607

  2. Snake and Spider Toxins Induce a Rapid Recovery of Function of Botulinum Neurotoxin Paralysed Neuromuscular Junction

    PubMed Central

    Duregotti, Elisa; Zanetti, Giulia; Scorzeto, Michele; Megighian, Aram; Montecucco, Cesare; Pirazzini, Marco; Rigoni, Michela

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) and some animal neurotoxins (β-Bungarotoxin, β-Btx, from elapid snakes and α-Latrotoxin, α-Ltx, from black widow spiders) are pre-synaptic neurotoxins that paralyse motor axon terminals with similar clinical outcomes in patients. However, their mechanism of action is different, leading to a largely-different duration of neuromuscular junction (NMJ) blockade. BoNTs induce a long-lasting paralysis without nerve terminal degeneration acting via proteolytic cleavage of SNARE proteins, whereas animal neurotoxins cause an acute and complete degeneration of motor axon terminals, followed by a rapid recovery. In this study, the injection of animal neurotoxins in mice muscles previously paralyzed by BoNT/A or /B accelerates the recovery of neurotransmission, as assessed by electrophysiology and morphological analysis. This result provides a proof of principle that, by causing the complete degeneration, reabsorption, and regeneration of a paralysed nerve terminal, one could favour the recovery of function of a biochemically- or genetically-altered motor axon terminal. These observations might be relevant to dying-back neuropathies, where pathological changes first occur at the neuromuscular junction and then progress proximally toward the cell body. PMID:26670253

  3. Practical guidance for CD management involving treatment of botulinum toxin: a consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Albanese, Alberto; Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Dressler, Dirk; Duzynski, Wojciech; Khatkova, Svetlana; Marti, Maria Jose; Mir, Pablo; Montecucco, Cesare; Moro, Elena; Pinter, Michaela; Relja, Maja; Roze, Emmanuel; Skogseid, Inger Marie; Timerbaeva, Sofiya; Tzoulis, Charalampos

    2015-10-01

    Cervical dystonia is a neurological movement disorder causing abnormal posture of the head. It may be accompanied by involuntary movements which are sometimes tremulous. The condition has marked effects on patients' self-image, and adversely affects quality of life, social relationships and employment. Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is the treatment of choice for CD and its efficacy and safety have been extensively studied in clinical trials. However, current guidelines do not provide enough practical information for physicians who wish to use this valuable treatment in a real-life setting. In addition, patients and physicians may have different perceptions of what successful treatment outcomes should be. Consequently, an international group of expert neurologists, experienced in BoNT treatment, met to review the literature and pool their extensive clinical experience to give practical guidance about treatment of CD with BoNT. Eight topic headings were considered: the place of BoNT within CD treatment options; patient perspectives and desires for treatment; assessment and goal setting; starting treatment with BoNT-A; follow-up sessions; management of side effects; management of non-response; switching between different BoNT products. One rapporteur took responsibility for summarising the current literature for each topic, while the consensus statements were developed by the entire expert group. These statements are presented here along with a discussion of the background information. PMID:25877834

  4. Practical guidance for CD management involving treatment of botulinum toxin: a consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Albanese, Alberto; Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Dressler, Dirk; Duzynski, Wojciech; Khatkova, Svetlana; Marti, Maria Jose; Mir, Pablo; Montecucco, Cesare; Moro, Elena; Pinter, Michaela; Relja, Maja; Roze, Emmanuel; Skogseid, Inger Marie; Timerbaeva, Sofiya; Tzoulis, Charalampos

    2015-10-01

    Cervical dystonia is a neurological movement disorder causing abnormal posture of the head. It may be accompanied by involuntary movements which are sometimes tremulous. The condition has marked effects on patients' self-image, and adversely affects quality of life, social relationships and employment. Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is the treatment of choice for CD and its efficacy and safety have been extensively studied in clinical trials. However, current guidelines do not provide enough practical information for physicians who wish to use this valuable treatment in a real-life setting. In addition, patients and physicians may have different perceptions of what successful treatment outcomes should be. Consequently, an international group of expert neurologists, experienced in BoNT treatment, met to review the literature and pool their extensive clinical experience to give practical guidance about treatment of CD with BoNT. Eight topic headings were considered: the place of BoNT within CD treatment options; patient perspectives and desires for treatment; assessment and goal setting; starting treatment with BoNT-A; follow-up sessions; management of side effects; management of non-response; switching between different BoNT products. One rapporteur took responsibility for summarising the current literature for each topic, while the consensus statements were developed by the entire expert group. These statements are presented here along with a discussion of the background information.

  5. Botulinum toxin assessment, intervention and follow-up for paediatric upper limb hypertonicity: international consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Fehlings, D; Novak, I; Berweck, S; Hoare, B; Stott, N S; Russo, R N

    2010-08-01

    The primary objective of this paper was to evaluate the published evidence of efficacy and safety of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) injections in paediatric upper limb hypertonia (PULH). Secondary objectives included the provision of clinical context, based on evidence and expert opinion, in the areas of assessment, child and muscle selection, dosing, and adjunctive treatment. A multidisciplinary panel of authors systematically reviewed, abstracted, and classified relevant literature. Recommendations were based on the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) evidence classification. Following a literature search, 186 potential articles were screened for inclusion, and 15 of these met the criteria and were reviewed. Grade A evidence was found to support the use of BoNT to reach individualized therapeutic goals for PULH. There is grade B evidence (probably effective) for tone reduction following BoNT injections and grade U evidence (inconclusive) for improvement in upper limb (UL) activity and function. BoNT injections were generally found to be safe and well tolerated with the most common side effect identified as a transient decrease in grip strength. PMID:20633178

  6. [Treatment of hemifacial spasm with type A botulinum toxin (AGN 191622): a dose finding study and the evaluation of clinical effect with electromyography].

    PubMed

    Mezaki, T; Kaji, R; Kimura, J; Ogawa, N

    1999-05-01

    Forty-one patients with hemifacial spasm had an injection of type A botulinum toxin (AGN 191622; Allergan Co. Ltd., Irvine, CA). Patients were randomly divided into 3 groups by the injection dose: group L (1 unit; 14 patients), group M (5 units; 14 patients), and group H (10 units; 13 patients). Half of the dose was injected into the orbicularis oculi and the rest into the zygomaticus major muscles on the affected side. The clinical effect and electromyogram were evaluated at 2 weeks after the injection. The clinical benefit was dependent on the injection dose, and group H showed the highest rate of improvement (84.6%). No adverse effect related to the toxin was demonstrated except one patient in group H who showed mild and transient lagophthalmos. For 81.8% of group H patients, the final judgement was "useful" or "very useful", which was 9.1% for group L and 50.0% for group M. On the other hand, electromyography disclosed no consistent dose-finding relationship. We conclude that at least 10 (preferably more) units of botulinum toxin are necessary for effectively treating hemifacial spasm. Electromyography has only limited value for the evaluation of clinical effect.

  7. Safety and efficacy of botulinum toxin type B for treatment of sialorrhea in Parkinson's disease: a prospective double-blind trial.

    PubMed

    Chinnapongse, Robert; Gullo, Kristen; Nemeth, Paul; Zhang, Yuxin; Griggs, Lynn

    2012-02-01

    Sialorrhea (drooling) is a common symptom of Parkinson's disease (PD) that can significantly impair a patient's health and quality of life. Fifty-four PD subjects with troublesome sialorrhea were enrolled using a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, sequential-dose escalation design in which subjects received a single intraglandular treatment with botulinum toxin type B (doses of 1,500 Units [0.3 mL]; 2,500 Units [0.5 ml]; or 3,500 Units [0.7 ml]) or placebo. Postinjection, subjects were followed acutely for 4 weeks and long-term for up to 20 weeks. Safety/tolerability, as assessed by adverse events, was the primary outcome measure. Efficacy, as assessed by the Drooling Frequency and Severity Scale and unstimulated salivary flow rate, was secondary. Gastrointestinal-related adverse events occurred more frequently in the active groups versus placebo group (31% vs 7%), with dry mouth being most common (15%). There were no serious adverse events attributed to botulinum toxin type B or discontinuations due to adverse events from treatment. At 4 weeks postinjection, Drooling Frequency and Severity Scale scores significantly improved versus placebo (-1.3 ± 1.3) in a dose-related manner (-2.1 ± 1.2, P = 0.0191; -3.3 ± 1.4, P < 0.0001; -3.5 ± 1.1, P < 0.0001, respectively) and unstimulated salivary flow rates significantly decreased in all active groups versus placebo (P ≤ 0.0009). Furthermore, treated subjects appeared to have more sustained improvement in sialorrhea than placebo subjects. We conclude that intraglandular injection of botulinum toxin type B was safe, tolerable, and efficacious in treating sialorrhea in PD patients. Additional studies are warranted to further confirm the drug's robust efficacy, as well as evaluate its effect with repeated dosing.

  8. Patient-Identified Factors That Influence Spasticity in People with Stroke and Multiple Sclerosis Receiving Botulinum Toxin Injection Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Janice; Rancourt, Amanda; Di Poce, Stephanie; Levine, Amy; Hoang, Jessica; Ismail, Farooq; Boulias, Chris

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To describe the nature, extent, and impact of spasticity; determine factors that are perceived to influence its severity; and examine the relationship between time since diagnosis and impact of spasticity on daily activities in people with stroke and multiple sclerosis (MS) who are receiving botulinum toxin injection treatments. Methods: After a cross-sectional telephone survey, descriptive statistics and correlations were analyzed separately for the stroke and MS groups. Results: A total of 29 people with stroke and 10 with MS were surveyed. Both groups perceived increased spasticity with outdoor cold (69% stroke, 60% MS), muscle fatigue (59% stroke, 80% MS), and mental stress (59% stroke, 90% MS). No statistically significant correlations were found between time since diagnosis and perceived impact of spasticity on function in the stroke (r=0.07, p=0.37) or MS (r=0.16, p=0.33) groups. The MS group experienced bilateral and more severe perception of spasticity in the legs than the stroke group and identified more factors as worsening their spasticity (p<0.05). Severity of leg (but not arm) spasticity was significantly correlated with severity of impact of the following factors in the MS group only: lying on the back (r=0.70, p<0.05), outdoor heat (r=0.61, p<0.05), and morning (r=0.59, p<0.05). Conclusion: Intrinsic and extrinsic triggers can influence the perception of spasticity differently depending on individual factors, severity, location (arm vs. leg), and distribution of spasticity (unilateral vs. bilateral). Clinicians can use the findings to better understand, educate, and treat people with stroke and MS. PMID:25931667

  9. The Inhibitory Effect of Botulinum Toxin Type A on Rat Pyloric Smooth Muscle Contractile Response to Substance P In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yu-Feng; Xie, Jun-Fan; Ren, Yin-Xiang; Wang, Can; Kong, Xiang-Pan; Zong, Xiao-Jian; Fan, Lin-Lan; Hou, Yi-Ping

    2015-01-01

    A decrease in pyloric myoelectrical activity and pyloric substance P (SP) content following intrasphincteric injection of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) in free move rats have been demonstrated in our previous studies. The aim of the present study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of BTX-A on rat pyloric muscle contractile response to SP in vitro and the distributions of SP and neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) immunoreactive (IR) cells and fibers within pylorus. After treatment with atropine, BTX-A (10 U/mL), similar to [D-Arg1, D-Phe5, D-Trp7,9, Leu11]-SP (APTL-SP, 1 μmol/L) which is an NK1R antagonist, decreased electric field stimulation (EFS)-induced contractile tension and frequency, whereas, subsequent administration of APTL-SP did not act on contractility. Incubation with BTX-A at 4 and 10 U/mL for 4 h respectively decreased SP (1 μmol/L)-induced contractions by 26.64% ± 5.12% and 74.92% ± 3.62%. SP-IR fibers and NK1R-IR cells both located within pylorus including mucosa and circular muscle layer. However, fewer SP-fibers were observed in pylorus treated with BTX-A (10 U/mL). In conclusion, BTX-A inhibits SP release from enteric terminals in pylorus and EFS-induced contractile responses when muscarinic cholinergic receptors are blocked by atropine. In addition, BTX-A concentration- and time-dependently directly inhibits SP-induced pyloric smooth muscle contractility. PMID:26501321

  10. Long-term follow-up of ultrasound-guided botulinum toxin-A injections for sialorrhea in neurological dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Barbero, Pierangelo; Busso, Marco; Tinivella, Marco; Artusi, Carlo Alberto; De Mercanti, Stefania; Cucci, Angele; Veltri, Andrea; Avagnina, Paolo; Calvo, Andrea; Chio', Adriano; Durelli, Luca; Clerico, Marinella

    2015-12-01

    Literature provides reports only of a limited follow-up single injection of botulinum toxin-A (BoNT-A) in patients with sialorrhea. The aim of our study is to evaluate the long-lasting efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided BoNT-A injections for severe sialorrhea secondary to neurological dysphagia. We enrolled 38 severe adult sialorrhea patients referred consecutively to the neurology unit and performed bilateral parotid and submandibular gland BoNT-A injections under ultrasound guidance. The outcomes of the study were reduction of sialorrhea, duration of therapeutic effect, and subjective patient- and caregiver-reported satisfaction. A total of 113 BoNT-A administrations were given during the study period with a mean duration of follow-up of 20.2 ± 4.4 months. We observed a significant decrease from baseline in mean number of daily aspirations and a significant improvement in patient- and caregiver-reported outcomes following ultrasound-guided BoNT-A injections (p < 0.001 vs baseline for all comparisons) and the mean duration of the efficacy was 5.6 ± 1 months. No major treatment-related adverse events occurred and a low incidence of minor adverse events was reported. This study confirms the long-lasting efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided BoNT-A injections for sialorrhea, regardless of the causative neurological disorder. These results should encourage the use of BoNT-A in the treatment of severe sialorrhea and highlight the role of ultrasound guidance to obtain optimal results in terms of safety and reproducible outcomes.

  11. Botulinum toxin in masticatory muscles: Short- and long-term effects on muscle, bone, and craniofacial function in adult rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Rafferty, Katherine L.; Liu, Zi Jun; Ye, Wenmin; Navarrete, Alfonso L.; Nguyen, Thao Tuong; Salamati, Atriya; Herring, Susan W.

    2012-01-01

    Paralysis of the masticatory muscles using botulinum toxin (BTX) is a common treatment for cosmetic reduction of the masseters as well as for conditions involving muscle spasm and pain. The effects of this treatment on mastication have not been evaluated, and claims that the treatment unloads the jaw joint and mandible have not been validated. If BTX treatment does decrease mandibular loading, osteopenia might ensue as an adverse result. Rabbits received a single dose of BTX or saline into one randomly chosen masseter muscle and were followed for 4 or 12 weeks. Masticatory muscle activity was assessed weekly, and incisor bite force elicited by stimulation of each masseter was measured periodically. At the endpoint, strain gages were installed on the neck of the mandibular condyle and on the molar area of the mandible for in vivo bone strain recording during mastication and muscle stimulation. After termination, muscles were weighed and mandibular segments were scanned with micro CT. BTX paralysis of one masseter did not alter chewing side or rate, in part because of compensation by the medial pterygoid muscle. Masseter-induced bite force was dramatically decreased. Analysis of bone strain data suggested that at 4 weeks, the mandibular condyle of the BTX-injected side was underloaded, as were both sides of the molar area. Bone quantity and quality were severely decreased specifically at these underloaded locations, especially the injection-side condylar head. At 12 weeks, most functional parameters were near their pre-injection levels, but the injected masseter still exhibited atrophy and percent bone area was still low in the condylar head. In conclusion, although the performance of mastication was only minimally harmed by BTX paralysis of the masseter, the resulting underloading was sufficient to cause notable and persistent bone loss, particularly at the temporomandibular joint. PMID:22155510

  12. Factors influencing response to Botulinum toxin type A in patients with idiopathic cervical dystonia: results from an international observational study

    PubMed Central

    Ehler, Edvard; Zakine, Benjamin; Maisonobe, Pascal; Simonetta-Moreau, Marion

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Real-life data on response to Botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) in cervical dystonia (CD) are sparse. An expert group of neurologists was convened with the overall aim of developing a definition of treatment response, which could be applied in a non-interventional study of BoNT-A-treated subjects with CD. Design International, multicentre, prospective, observational study of a single injection cycle of BoNT-A as part of normal clinical practice. Setting 38 centres across Australia, Belgium, Czech Republic, France, Germany, The Netherlands, Portugal, Russia and the UK. Participants 404 adult subjects with idiopathic CD. Most subjects were women, aged 41–60 years and had previously received BoNT-A. Outcome measures Patients were classified as responders if they met all the following four criteria: magnitude of effect (≥25% improvement Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale), duration of effect (≥12-week interval between the BoNT-A injection day and subject-reported waning of treatment effect), tolerability (absence of severe related adverse event) and subject's positive Clinical Global Improvement (CGI). Results High rates of response were observed for magnitude of effect (73.6%), tolerability (97.5%) and subject's clinical global improvement (69.8%). The subjective duration of effect criterion was achieved by 49.3% of subjects; 28.6% of subjects achieved the responder definition. Factors most strongly associated with response were age (<40 years; OR 3.9, p<0.05) and absence of baseline head tremor (OR 1.5; not significant). Conclusions Three of four criteria were met by most patients. The proposed multidimensional definition of response appears to be practical for routine practice. Unrealistically high patient expectation and subjectivity may influence the perception of a quick waning of effect, but highlights that this aspect may be a hurdle to response in some patients. Clinical registration number (NCT00833196; ClinicalTrials.gov). PMID

  13. Beneficial effect of botulinum toxin A on Raynaud's phenomenon in Japanese patients with systemic sclerosis: A prospective, case series study.

    PubMed

    Motegi, Sei-ichiro; Yamada, Kazuya; Toki, Sayaka; Uchiyama, Akihiko; Kubota, Yuka; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there is no satisfactory treatment for Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) in systemic sclerosis (SSc). Recently, it has been reported that botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) injection was effective for the treatment of RP in SSc patients. The objective was to assess the efficacy and safety of BTX-A on RP in Japanese SSc patients. In the prospective, case series study, 10 Japanese SSc patients with RP received 10 U of BTX-A injections into the hand. The change in severity of RP, including the frequency of attacks/pain, color changes, duration time of RP and the severity of pain, was assessed by Raynaud's score and pain visual analog scale (VAS) at each visit during 16 weeks. The recovery of skin temperature 20 min after cold water stimulation was examined by thermography at baseline and 4 weeks after injection. The number of digital ulcers (DU) and adverse effects were assessed at each visit. BTX-A injection decreased Raynaud's score and pain VAS from 2 weeks after injection, and the suppressive effect was continued until 16 weeks after injection. Skin temperature recovery after cold water stimulation at 4 weeks after injection was significantly enhanced compared with that before injection. All DU in five patients were healed within 12 weeks after injection. Neither systemic nor local adverse effects were observed in all cases. We conclude that BTX-A injection significantly improved the activity of RP in SSc patients without any adverse events, suggesting that BTX-A may have possible long-term preventive and therapeutic potentials for RP in Japanese SSc patients.

  14. Striving for more good days: patient perspectives on botulinum toxin for the treatment of cervical dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Poliziani, Michele; Koch, Marco; Liu, Xierong

    2016-01-01

    Background The recommended reinjection interval for botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) formulations in the treatment of cervical dystonia (CD) is generally ≥12 weeks, though intervals ≥10 weeks are approved for incobotulinumtoxinA in Europe. However, recurring symptoms can occur before the end of this period. Using qualitative research, we sought a greater understanding of disease burden, unmet patient needs, and barriers to treatment. Methods We conducted online semistructured, focus-group discussions, and online forum follow-up discussions among patients with CD, focusing on disease burden, patient needs, injection cycle preferences, and relationships with health care professionals. A subset of patients was also questioned in telephone interviews about individual experiences of CD and BoNT treatment. All participants were UK residents who had received onabotulinumtoxinA or abobotulinumtoxinA for CD for ≥1 year. Results Thirty-one patients (81% female; mean duration of CD 16.4 [range 4–31] years; mean BoNT injection cycle length 12.8 weeks) participated in the online focus-group and forum follow-up discussions. Of these, seven patients participated in telephone interviews. All had recurring symptoms between treatments, which substantially impacted on their work, family, and social life. Symptom severity fluctuated throughout an injection cycle and differed between patients and across injection cycles. Participants’ relationships with health care professionals and treatment satisfaction varied greatly. Many participants wanted longer-lasting and/or more stable symptom relief with shorter and/or more flexible injection intervals, according to individual needs. Lack of health care resources, long journeys to treatment centers, and immunogenicity/side-effect concerns were perceived as the main barriers to more flexible treatment. Conclusion The high burden of recurring primary and secondary symptoms of CD considerably affects patients’ quality of life. Patient

  15. Identification of the factors that govern the ability of therapeutic antibodies to provide postchallenge protection against botulinum toxin: a model for assessing postchallenge efficacy of medical countermeasures against agents of bioterrorism and biological warfare.

    PubMed

    Al-Saleem, Fetweh H; Nasser, Zidoon; Olson, Rebecca M; Cao, Linsen; Simpson, Lance L

    2011-08-01

    Therapeutic antibodies are one of the major classes of medical countermeasures that can provide protection against potential bioweapons such as botulinum toxin. Although a broad array of antibodies are being evaluated for their ability to neutralize the toxin, there is little information that defines the circumstances under which these antibodies can be used. In the present study, an effort was made to quantify the temporal factors that govern therapeutic antibody use in a postchallenge scenario. Experiments were done involving inhalation administration of toxin to mice, intravenous administration to mice, and direct application to murine phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragm preparations. As part of this study, several pharmacokinetic characteristics of botulinum toxin and neutralizing antibodies were measured. The core observation that emerged from the work was that the window of opportunity within which postchallenge administration of antibodies exerted a beneficial effect increased as the challenge dose of toxin decreased. The critical factor in establishing the window of opportunity was the amount of time needed for fractional redistribution of a neuroparalytic quantum of toxin from the extraneuronal space to the intraneuronal space. This redistribution event was a dose-dependent phenomenon. It is likely that the approach used to identify the factors that govern postchallenge efficacy of antibodies against botulinum toxin can be used to assess the factors that govern postchallenge efficacy of medical countermeasures against any agent of bioterrorism or biological warfare.

  16. Long-Term Effects of Botulinum Toxin Complex Type A Injection on Mechano- and Metabo-Sensitive Afferent Fibers Originating from Gastrocnemius Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Guillaume; Marqueste, Tanguy; Decherchi, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate long term effects of motor denervation by botulinum toxin complex type A (BoNT/A) from Clostridium Botulinum, on the afferent fibers originating from the gastrocnemius muscle of rats. Animals were divided in 2 experimental groups: 1) untreated animals acting as control and 2) treated animals in which the toxin was injected in the left muscle, the latter being itself divided into 3 subgroups according to their locomotor recovery with the help of a test based on footprint measurements of walking rats: i) no recovery (B0), ii) 50% recovery (B50) and iii) full recovery (B100). Then, muscle properties, metabosensitive afferent fiber responses to potassium chloride (KCl) and lactic acid injections and Electrically-Induced Fatigue (EIF), and mechanosensitive responses to tendon vibrations were measured. At the end of the experiment, rats were killed and the toxin injected muscles were weighted. After toxin injection, we observed a complete paralysis associated to a loss of force to muscle stimulation and a significant muscle atrophy, and a return to baseline when the animals recover. The response to fatigue was only decreased in the B0 group. The responses to KCl injections were only altered in the B100 groups while responses to lactic acid were altered in the 3 injected groups. Finally, our results indicated that neurotoxin altered the biphasic pattern of response of the mechanosensitive fiber to tendon vibrations in the B0 and B50 groups. These results indicated that neurotoxin injection induces muscle afferent activity alterations that persist and even worsen when the muscle has recovered his motor activity. PMID:26485650

  17. An Accelerated Multi-Modality Rehabilitation Protocol Combined with Botulinum Toxin-A Injection in Adult Idiopathic Toe Walking: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kibar, Sibel; Yavuz, Ferdi; Balaban, Birol

    2016-06-01

    Diagnosis of Adult Idiopathic Toe Walking (AITW) is very rare in clinical practice. High quality studies regarding AITW and its treatment options have not been conducted previously. A 28-year-old male patient complaining of lower leg pain was referred to outpatient rehabilitation clinic. Physical examination revealed a gait abnormality of insufficient heel strike at initial contact. The aetiology was investigated and the patient's walking parameters were assessed using a computerized gait analysis system. The AITW was diagnosed. Botulinum toxin-A (Dysport(®)) was injected to the bilateral gastrocnemius muscles. A combined 10-days rehabilitation program was designed, including a daily one-hour physiotherapist supervised exercise program, ankle dorsiflexion exercises using an EMG-biofeedback unit assisted virtual rehabilitation system (Biometrics) and virtual gait training (Rehawalk) every other day. After treatment, the patient was able to heel strike at the initiation of the stance phase of the gait. Ankle dorsiflexion range of motions increased. The most prominent improvement was seen in maximum pressure and heel force. In addition center of pressure evaluations were also improved. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case, of AITW treated with combined botulinum toxin, exercise and virtual rehabilitation systems. This short report demonstrates the rapid effect of this 10-days combined therapy. PMID:27504395

  18. [Botulinum toxin injection techniques in the lower third and middle of the face, the neck and the décolleté: the "Nefertiti lift"].

    PubMed

    Gassia, V; Beylot, C; Béchaux, S; Michaud, T

    2009-05-01

    Although correction of the dynamic wrinkles of the upper part of the face is the major indication for botulinum toxin, there are also many possibilities for the middle and lower thirds of the face and neck. However, these injections are more delicate and require an experienced operator who has excellent knowledge of the muscles of these regions, their functions, the antagonist actions exercised on other muscles, particularly in terms of the complex equilibrium of the mouth. An excessive dose, an inappropriate injection point, or a centering mistake can all easily be responsible for undesirable side effects. However, the results obtained, often with lower doses than in the superior part of the face, can be highly satisfactory, notably in erasing bunny lines, improvement of marionette lines, peau d'orange chin, attenuation of peribuccal lines, melomental folds, correction of a gummy smile, and facial asymmetries. In the neck it is possible to reduce platysmal bands, horizontal lines, and diagonal lines of the neck and décolleté. The face contours can also be improved by the Nefertiti lift. In the mid and lower regions of the face, botulinum toxin is often a complement to other esthetic techniques, particularly filling procedures.

  19. A critical appraisal of the evidence for botulinum toxin type A in the treatment for cervico-thoracic myofascial pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Desai, Mehul J; Shkolnikova, Tatyana; Nava, Andrew; Inwald, Danielle

    2014-02-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is a musculoskeletal condition characterized by regional pain and muscle tenderness associated with the presence of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs). The last decade has seen an exponential increase in the use of botulinum toxin (BTX) to treat MPS. To understand the medical evidence substantiating the role of therapeutic BTX injections and to provide useful information for the medical practitioner, we applied the principles of evidence-based medicine to the treatment for cervico-thoracic MPS. A search was conducted through MEDLINE (PubMed, OVID, MDConsult), EMBASE, SCOPUS and the Cochrane database for the period 1966 to 2012 using the following keywords: myofascial pain, muscle pain, botulinum toxin, trigger points, and injections. A total of 7 trials satisfied our inclusion criteria and were evaluated in this review. Although the majority of studies found negative results, our analysis identified Gobel et al.'s as the highest quality study among these prospectively randomized investigations. This was due to appropriate identification of diagnostic criteria, excellent study design and objective endpoints. The 6 other identified studies had significant failings due to deficiencies in 1 or more major criteria. We conclude that higher quality, rigorously standardized studies are needed to more appropriately investigate this promising treatment modality.

  20. An Accelerated Multi-Modality Rehabilitation Protocol Combined with Botulinum Toxin-A Injection in Adult Idiopathic Toe Walking: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yavuz, Ferdi; Balaban, Birol

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of Adult Idiopathic Toe Walking (AITW) is very rare in clinical practice. High quality studies regarding AITW and its treatment options have not been conducted previously. A 28-year-old male patient complaining of lower leg pain was referred to outpatient rehabilitation clinic. Physical examination revealed a gait abnormality of insufficient heel strike at initial contact. The aetiology was investigated and the patient’s walking parameters were assessed using a computerized gait analysis system. The AITW was diagnosed. Botulinum toxin-A (Dysport®) was injected to the bilateral gastrocnemius muscles. A combined 10-days rehabilitation program was designed, including a daily one-hour physiotherapist supervised exercise program, ankle dorsiflexion exercises using an EMG-biofeedback unit assisted virtual rehabilitation system (Biometrics) and virtual gait training (Rehawalk) every other day. After treatment, the patient was able to heel strike at the initiation of the stance phase of the gait. Ankle dorsiflexion range of motions increased. The most prominent improvement was seen in maximum pressure and heel force. In addition center of pressure evaluations were also improved. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case, of AITW treated with combined botulinum toxin, exercise and virtual rehabilitation systems. This short report demonstrates the rapid effect of this 10-days combined therapy. PMID:27504395

  1. Ca2+-induced changes in SNAREs and synaptotagmin I correlate with triggered exocytosis from chromaffin cells: insights gleaned into the signal transduction using trypsin and botulinum toxins.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Gary W; Dolly, J Oliver

    2002-07-01

    Ca2+-triggered catecholamine exocytosis from chromaffin cells involves SNAP-25, synaptobrevin and syntaxin (known as SNAREs). Synaptotagmin I has been implicated as the Ca2+-sensor because it binds Ca2+, and this enhances its binding to syntaxin, SNAP-25 and phospholipids in vitro. However, most of these interactions are only mediated by [Ca2+]i two orders of magnitude higher than that needed to elicit secretion. Thus, the Ca2+ sensitivities of synaptotagmin I and the other SNAREs were quantified in situ. Secretion elicited from permeabilised cells by microM Ca2+ was accompanied, with almost identical Ca2+ dependencies, by changes in synaptotagmin I, SNAP-25, syntaxin and synaptobrevin that rendered them less susceptible to trypsin. The majority of the trypsin-resistant SNAREs were not associated with SDS-resistant complexes. None of these proteins acquired trypsin resistance in cells rendered incompetent for exocytosis by run-down. Removal of nine C-terminal residues from SNAP-25 by botulinum toxin A reduced both exocytosis and the SNAREs' acquisition of trypsin resistance but did not alter the Ca2+ sensitivity, except for synaptotagmin I. Even after synaptobrevin had been cleaved by botulinum toxin B, all the other proteins still responded to Ca2+. These data support a model whereby Ca2+ is sensed, probably by synaptotagmin I, and the signal passed to syntaxin and SNAP-25 before they interact with synaptobrevin.

  2. The Effect of Total Cumulative Dose, Number of Treatment Cycles, Interval between Injections, and Length of Treatment on the Frequency of Occurrence of Antibodies to Botulinum Toxin Type A in the Treatment of Muscle Spasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakheit, Abdel Magid O.; Liptrot, Anthea; Newton, Rachel; Pickett, Andrew M.

    2012-01-01

    A large cumulative dose of botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A), frequent injections, a short interval between treatment cycles, and a long duration of treatment have all been suggested, but not confirmed, to be associated with a high incidence of neutralizing antibodies to the neurotoxin. The aim of this study was to investigate whether these…

  3. On Botulinum Neurotoxin Variability

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT  The rapidly growing number of botulinum neurotoxin sequences poses the problem of the possible evolutionary significance of the variability of these superpotent neurotoxins for toxin-producing Clostridium species. To progress in the understanding of this remarkable phenomenon, we suggest that researchers should (i) abandon an anthropocentric view of these neurotoxins as human botulism-causing agents or as human therapeutics, (ii) begin to investigate in depth the role of botulinum neurotoxins in animal botulism in the wilderness, and (iii) devote large efforts to next-generation sequencing of soil samples to identify novel botulinum neurotoxins. In order to compare the fitness of the different toxins, we suggest that assays of all the steps from toxin production to animal death should be performed. PMID:25564463

  4. A Randomized, Placebo Controlled Pilot Trial of Botulinum Toxin for Paratonic Rigidity in People with Advanced Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Kleiner-Fisman, Galit; Khoo, Edwin; Moncrieffe, Nikohl; Forbell, Triina; Gryfe, Pearl; Fisman, David

    2014-01-01

    Objective Evaluate safety and efficacy of Incobotulinumtoxin A in elderly patients with dementia and paratonia. Setting University-affiliated hospital, spasticity management Clinic. Participants Ten subjects were enrolled. Inclusion criteria: 1) severe cognitive impairment 2) diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease, vascular dementia, or frontotemporal dementia, and 3) score >3 on the paratonic assessment instrument, with posture in an arm(s) interfering with provision of care. Exclusion criteria: 1) alternate etiologies for increased tone and 2) injection with botulinum toxin within the 6 months preceding the study. Design Single center, randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial with two treatment cycles of 16 weeks. Assessments occurred at 2, 6, 12 and16 weeks following injections. Subjects received up to 300 U of Incobotulinumtoxin A in arm(s). Primary and Secondary Outcome Measures Primary outcome measure was the modified caregiver burden scale (mCBS); exploratory secondary outcome measures were also performed. Analysis of variance and mixed modeling techniques were used to evaluate treatment effects. Results Incobotulinumtoxin A treatment produced significant improvement in mCBS total score −1.11 (–2.04 to −0.18) (Treatment effect and 95% CI), dressing sub-score −0.36 (–0.59 to 0.12), and cleaning under the left and right armpits sub-score −0.5 (–0.96 to −0.04), −0.41 (–0.79 to −0.04) respectively. PROM in the left and right elbow increased by 27.67 degrees (13.32–42.02) and 22.07 degrees (9.76–34.39) respectively. PROM in the left and right shoulder increased by 11.92 degrees (5.46–18.38) and 8.58 degrees (3.73–13.43) respectively. No significant treatment effect was found for GAS, VAS and PAINAD scales or change in time to perform care. No adverse drug reactions occurred. Conclusions Administration of Incobotulinumtoxin A in elderly people with advanced dementia and paratonia may be an efficacious and safe

  5. [Dose-response relationship in the treatment of cervical dystonia with botulinum toxin type A (AGN 191622)--a phase II study].

    PubMed

    Mezaki, T; Kaji, R; Kimura, J; Mannen, T

    1995-09-01

    Injection of botulinum toxin type A has been the treatment of choice for spasmodic torticollis for several years. Although previous reports demonstrate its effectiveness and safety, the treatment strategy has been empirical. The present study, using the freeze-dried crystalline botulinum toxin type A (AGN 191622; Allergan Inc., Irvine, CA), aimed to compare the efficacy among three treatment groups divided into low, medium and high dosage levels. Fifty-one patients who entered the study were grouped into low-dose (60 units/session), medium-dose (120 units/session) and high-dose (240 units/session) groups. Two patients (one in low-dose group and the other in high-dose group) were excluded from the assessment of efficacy because they dropped out in the early phase of the study. One experienced worsening of an existing psychosis and the other developed an acute respiratory infection. Injection sites were decided individually by palpation. If the clinical response was not satisfactory four weeks after an injection, the patient was re-injected with the same dose of toxin. The follow-up period was 14 weeks from the initial injection. The results showed that the high-dose group improved more than the other groups in the parameters of severity of symptoms and subjective benefit (p = 0.000). Also, fewer injections were required in the high-dose group to achieve substantial clinical benefit. Although the mean reduction in Tsui's score was not statistically significant among the groups, the "marked improvement" was seen more frequently in the high-dose group (p = 0.033). Unfavorable adverse effects including excessive weakness and dysphasia were always mild and transient.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Treatment of focal dystonias with botulinum neurotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Benecke, Reiner; Blitzer, Andrew; Comella, Cynthia L.

    2016-01-01

    This is a review on the use of injections of botulinum toxin for the treatment of focal dystonias. Disorders covered include cranial dystonia, cervical dystonia, spasmodic dysphonia, and focal hand dystonia. Considered are clinical aspects, alternative treatment strategies and principles of use of botulinum toxin injections. PMID:19103214

  7. Usefulness of Magnetic Resonance Neurography for Diagnosis of Piriformis Muscle Syndrome and Verification of the Effect After Botulinum Toxin Type A Injection

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hea Eun; Park, Jung Hyun; Kim, Sungjun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Piriformis muscle syndrome (PMS) is a controversial neuromuscular disorder that is presumed to involve compression neuropathy of the sciatic nerve at the level of the piriformis muscle. Botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) injection into the piriformis muscle is widely used as a treatment aimed at relieving sciatic nerve compression. In 2 patients with PMS, magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) was taken before and after BTX-A injection. The first MRN was performed as a diagnostic tool, and the second to identify the effect of the treatment. Signal change of the sciatic nerve under the hypertrophied piriformis muscle was confirmed by MRN. In follow-up MRN performed after BTX-A injection into the piriformis muscle, changes of the sciatic nerve and piriformis muscle were noticed as well as improvement of clinical symptoms. MRN is a useful tool to add certainty of diagnosis and verify the effect of treatment in PMS. PMID:26402805

  8. Botulinum Toxin Type A Injection Combined With Cast Immobilization for Treating Recurrent Peroneal Spastic Flatfoot Without Bone Coalitions: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Muhammad, Hassan; Wang, Xu; Ma, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Peroneal spastic flatfoot is an uncommon condition. It often presents as a rigid and usually painful valgus deformity in the hindfoot with peroneal muscles spasms. Although tarsal coalition is an important cause, a few patients have not undergone bone coalitions. We describe a 27-year-old female who experienced recurrent peroneal spastic flatfoot after an injury. She was treated successfully with a combination of botulinum toxin type A and immobilization of the foot in a neutral position with a cast. After 3 years, the condition had not recurred, and she was pain free and walked normally, with no increase in muscle tone. This unique treatment could be of potential use to treat many patients with such conditions.

  9. Therapeutic synergism in the treatment of post-stroke arm paresis utilizing botulinum toxin, robotic therapy, and constraint-induced movement therapy.

    PubMed

    Takebayashi, Takashi; Amano, Satoru; Hanada, Keisuke; Umeji, Atsushi; Takahashi, Kayoko; Koyama, Tetsuo; Domen, Kazuhisa

    2014-11-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BtxA) injection, constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT), and robotic therapy (RT) each represent promising approaches to enhance arm motor recovery after stroke. To provide more effective treatment for a 50-year-old man with severe left spastic hemiparesis, we attempted to facilitate CIMT with adaptive approaches to extend the wrist and fingers using RT for 10 consecutive weeks after BtxA injection. This combined treatment resulted in substantial improvements in arm function and the amount of arm use in activities of daily living, and may be effective for stroke patients with severe arm paresis. However, we were unable to sufficiently prove the efficacy of combined treatment based only on a single case. To fully elucidate the efficacy of the combined approach for patients with severe hemiparesis after stroke, future studies of a larger number of patients are needed.

  10. A preliminary study of painless and effective transdermal botulinum toxin A delivery by jet nebulization for treatment of primary hyperhidrosis

    PubMed Central

    Iannitti, Tommaso; Palmieri, Beniamino; Aspiro, Anna; Di Cerbo, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Background Hyperhidrosis is a chronic disease characterized by increased sweat production. Local injections of botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) have been extensively used for treatment of primary hyperhidrosis (idiopathic). The current treatment for this condition involves several intradermal injections, resulting in poor patient compliance due to injection-related pain. Therefore, new protocols, including an improved anesthetic regimen, are required. Aim We designed the present study to determine whether JetPeel™-3, a medical device used for transdermal delivery of drugs by jet nebulization, could be used to deliver lidocaine prior to the standard multiple BTX-A injections or deliver lidocaine together with BTX-A in order to determine the protocol giving better results in terms of procedure-related pain, sweating, and patient satisfaction in subjects affected by primary axillary, palmar or plantar hyperhidrosis. Materials and methods Twenty patients with a visual analog scale (VAS) sweating score ≥ 8 cm were randomized to receive lidocaine 2% (5 mL) delivered by JetPeel™-3 followed by multiple injections of BTX-A (100 units) or lidocaine 2% (5 mL) and BTX-A (50 units) delivered together by JetPeel™-3. Effect of treatment on sweating was measured by VAS (0= minimum sweating; 10= maximum sweating) at 3-month follow-up. Pain induced by the procedure was assessed by VAS (0= minimum pain; 10= maximum pain) immediately after the procedure. Patient satisfaction was assessed at 3-month follow-up using a 5-point scale (1= not at all satisfied; 2= not satisfied; 3= partially satisfied; 4= satisfied; 5= highly satisfied). Results Both treatment modalities reduced sweating at 3-month follow-up, if compared with baseline (all P<0.001). Delivery of lidocaine and BTX-A by JetPeel™-3 resulted in lower procedure-related pain and reduced sweating, if compared with lidocaine delivered by JetPeel™-3 followed by multiple BTX-A injections (all P<0.001). Patient satisfaction with

  11. Effectiveness of botulinum toxin A for upper and lower limb spasticity in children with cerebral palsy: a summary of evidence.

    PubMed

    Lukban, Marissa Barlaan; Rosales, Raymond L; Dressler, Dirk

    2009-03-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) therapy has gained wide acceptance in the management of spasticity in cerebral palsy (CP). Clinical experience from numerous case reports and series, retrospective and prospective open label cohort studies, and randomized controlled trials (RCT) has grown over the past 10 years. Several independent systematic reviews on the role of BoNT-A for upper and lower limb spasticity have been written by various authors. The objective of this paper is to summarize past systematic reviews and recent RCT not yet included in the systematic reviews that assess the effectiveness of BoNT-A in upper and lower limb spasticity in children with CP. We reviewed four Class II RCT discussed in five independent systematic reviews and two new Class II trials on the use of BoNT-A alone or with occupational therapy compared to placebo or occupational therapy alone in children with upper limb spasticity. There were 229 children recruited in these six trials and of those, 115 children received BoNT-A in the upper limbs. Five of six RCT showed a time limited decrease in muscle tone most especially at the wrist. Four of six trials showed improvement of hand function on a few specific functional tests. Four systematic reviews concluded that there is insufficient and inconsistent evidence to support or refute the effectiveness of BoNT-A in upper limb spasticity but one recent review recommended that BoNT-A should be considered as a treatment option in upper limb spasticity. For lower limb spasticity, we reviewed 13 RCT discussed in six systematic reviews and two new trials comparing BoNT-A with placebo or other rehabilitation modalities such as physiotherapy, occupational therapy, casting or electrical stimulation. In these studies, 617 children were recruited and of those, 360 children received BoNT-A in the lower limbs. There were six Class I and nine Class II trials. Three Class I trials documented significant improvement in gait pattern in children with

  12. Botulinum Toxin Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... lecture Full lecture Part 1: Structure Part 2: Origin Part 3: Function Textbook Study notes Image library ... in-depth medical knowledge of how the body works. The AAD recommends the following to everyone interested ...

  13. Persistence of the synaptosomal-associated protein-25 cleavage product after intradetrusor botulinum toxin A injections in patients with myelomeningocele showing an inadequate response to treatment.

    PubMed

    Schulte-Baukloh, Heinrich; Zurawski, Tomas H; Knispel, Helmut H; Miller, Kurt; Haferkamp, Axel; Dolly, J Oliver

    2007-11-01

    OBJECTIVE To monitor the presence and cleavage of synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25) by botulinum toxin type A (botox-A), in human detrusor muscle, as the effects of botox-A in the urinary bladder last significantly longer than when applied for disorders of striated muscles. PATIENTS AND METHODS Tissue samples were obtained from eight patients with end-stage neurogenic bladder at different times after injection with botox-A. The resected bladder domes were examined using biochemical and immunohistological techniques. RESULTS The presence of intact SNAP-25 in human bladder was detected, for the first time, in all samples by both Western blotting and immunofluorescence. By contrast, detection of a band potentially representing toxin-cleaved SNAP-25(A) required its enrichment by precipitation with a specific antibody. This putative product was present in four of six patients treated with botox-A 5 weeks to 11 months previously, but could not be detected in one patient 30 months after botox injection, and in an untreated control. Fluorescence microscopy showed no obvious effects of the toxin treatment on the presence and pattern of SNAP-25-positive neurones. CONCLUSIONS A limited amount of SNAP-25 appears to be cleaved in nerves that innervate the smooth detrusor muscle in most patients who had been injected with botox-A; its absolute identification was precluded by the sensitivity of the detection. This protein was detectable much longer after toxin treatment than published for rodent striated muscle, and thus could contribute to the clinically reported longer duration of the effectiveness of botox-A.

  14. DNA vaccines targeting heavy chain C-terminal fragments of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin serotypes A, B, and E induce potent humoral and cellular immunity and provide protection from lethal toxin challenge.

    PubMed

    Scott, Veronica L; Villarreal, Daniel O; Hutnick, Natalie A; Walters, Jewell N; Ragwan, Edwin; Bdeir, Khalil; Yan, Jian; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Finnefrock, Adam C; Casimiro, Danilo R; Weiner, David B

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are deadly, toxic proteins produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum that can cause significant diseases in humans. The use of the toxic substances as potential bioweapons has raised concerns by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the United States Military. Currently, there is no licensed vaccine to prevent botulinum intoxication. Here we present an immunogenicity study to evaluate the efficacy of novel monovalent vaccines and a trivalent cocktail DNA vaccine targeting the heavy chain C-terminal fragments of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin serotypes A, B, and E. These synthetic DNA vaccines induced robust humoral and polyfunctional CD4(+) T-cell responses which fully protected animals against lethal challenge after just 2 immunizations. In addition, naïve animals administered immunized sera mixed with the lethal neurotoxin were 100% protected against intoxication. The data demonstrate the protective efficacy induced by a combinative synthetic DNA vaccine approach. This study has importance for the development of vaccines that provide protective immunity against C. botulinum neurotoxins and other toxins.

  15. DNA vaccines targeting heavy chain C-terminal fragments of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin serotypes A, B, and E induce potent humoral and cellular immunity and provide protection from lethal toxin challenge

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Veronica L; Villarreal, Daniel O; Hutnick, Natalie A; Walters, Jewell N; Ragwan, Edwin; Bdeir, Khalil; Yan, Jian; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Finnefrock, Adam C; Casimiro, Danilo R; Weiner, David B

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are deadly, toxic proteins produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum that can cause significant diseases in humans. The use of the toxic substances as potential bioweapons has raised concerns by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the United States Military. Currently, there is no licensed vaccine to prevent botulinum intoxication. Here we present an immunogenicity study to evaluate the efficacy of novel monovalent vaccines and a trivalent cocktail DNA vaccine targeting the heavy chain C-terminal fragments of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin serotypes A, B, and E. These synthetic DNA vaccines induced robust humoral and polyfunctional CD4+ T-cell responses which fully protected animals against lethal challenge after just 2 immunizations. In addition, naïve animals administered immunized sera mixed with the lethal neurotoxin were 100% protected against intoxication. The data demonstrate the protective efficacy induced by a combinative synthetic DNA vaccine approach. This study has importance for the development of vaccines that provide protective immunity against C. botulinum neurotoxins and other toxins. PMID:26158319

  16. Use of botulinum toxin in the treatment of ankle plantar flexor spasticity in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Mirska, Anna; Cybula, Katarzyna; Okurowska-Zawada, Bożena; Kułak, Wojciech; Dmitruk, Elżbieta; Okulczyk, Kamila; Kalinowska, Anna K

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of botulinum on spasticity of gastrocnemius and soleus muscles. Forty-one children with spastic cerebral palsy were assessed (muscle tone, range of motion of ankle joint extension with straightened and bent knee, and gait pattern using the Physician Rating Scale) before administration and 2, 6, and 13 weeks after. Changes on Physician Rating Scale and dorsiflexion with extended knee were significant after 2, 6, and 13 weeks. Differences in the remaining parameters were significant after the first two check-ups. Over 90% of the changes were positive. This research confirms the effectiveness of botulinum in reducing spasticity, increasing the range of motion, and improving the gait pattern.

  17. Regional diffusion of botulinum toxin in facial muscles: a randomised double-blind study and a consideration for clinical studies with split-face design.

    PubMed

    Punga, Anna Rostedt; Eriksson, Annika; Alimohammadi, Mohammad

    2015-11-01

    Despite the extensive use of botulinum toxin A (BoNTA) in medical and cosmetic treatments, the potential spreading of BoNTA to surrounding tissues remains unknown. A patient with hemifacial paralysis upon blepharospasm treatment with low dose of BoNTA, prompted us to investigate the spreading effect. A randomised, double-blind study was conducted in which 5 healthy women (33-52 years) were treated with different doses of onabotulinum toxin unilaterally in the corrugator muscle. Parameters of efficacy and diffusion (CMAP; EMG and jitter analysis) in both glabellar and frontalis muscles were assessed at baseline, 2 and 4 weeks following BoNTA injection. CMAP of the treated glabellar muscles was reduced to approximately 40% in all dose groups. Additionally, contralateral CMAP reduction was observed in 3 of 5 subjects. These data confirm regional diffusion of BoNTA in facial muscle application, which raises question on the reliability of split-face models in BoNTA studies. PMID:25766591

  18. Toxins

    MedlinePlus

    Toxins are substances created by plants and animals that are poisonous to humans. Toxins also include some medicines that are helpful in small doses, but poisonous in large amounts. Most toxins that cause problems ...

  19. A dileucine in the protease of botulinum toxin A underlies its long-lived neuroparalysis: transfer of longevity to a novel potential therapeutic.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiafu; Zurawski, Tomas H; Meng, Jianghui; Lawrence, Gary; Olango, Weredeselam M; Finn, David P; Wheeler, Larry; Dolly, J Oliver

    2011-02-25

    Blockade of neurotransmitter release by botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT(A)) underlies the severe neuroparalytic symptoms of human botulism, which can last a few years. The structural basis for this remarkable persistence remains unclear. Herein, recombinant BoNT(A) was found to match the neurotoxicity of that from Clostridium botulinum, producing persistent cleavage of synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25) and neuromuscular paralysis. When two leucines near the C terminus of the protease light chain of A (LC(A)) were mutated, its inhibition of exocytosis was followed by fast recovery of intact SNAP-25 in cerebellar neurons and neuromuscular transmission in vivo. Deletion of 6-7 N terminus residues diminished BoNT(A) activity but did not alter the longevity of its SNAP-25 cleavage and neuromuscular paralysis. Furthermore, genetically fusing LC(E) to a BoNT(A) enzymically inactive mutant (BoTIM(A)) yielded a novel LC(E)-BoTIM(A) protein that targets neurons, and the BoTIM(A) moiety also delivers and stabilizes the inhibitory LC(E), giving a potent and persistent cleavage of SNAP-25 with associated neuromuscular paralysis. Moreover, its neurotropism was extended to sensory neurons normally insensitive to BoNT(E). LC(E-)BoTIM(A)(AA) with the above-identified dileucine mutated gave transient neuromuscular paralysis similar to BoNT(E), reaffirming that these residues are critical for the persistent action of LC(E)-BoTIM(A) as well as BoNT(A). LC(E)-BoTIM(A) inhibited release of calcitonin gene-related peptide from sensory neurons mediated by transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 and attenuated capsaicin-evoked nociceptive behavior in rats, following intraplantar injection. Thus, a long acting, versatile composite toxin has been developed with therapeutic potential for pain and conditions caused by overactive cholinergic nerves.

  20. Study design and methods of the BoTULS trial: a randomised controlled trial to evaluate the clinical effect and cost effectiveness of treating upper limb spasticity due to stroke with botulinum toxin type A

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, Helen; Shaw, Lisa; Price, Christopher; van Wijck, Frederike; Barnes, Michael; Graham, Laura; Ford, Gary; Shackley, Phil; Steen, Nick

    2008-01-01

    Background Following a stroke, 55–75% of patients experience upper limb problems in the longer term. Upper limb spasticity may cause pain, deformity and reduced function, affecting mood and independence. Botulinum toxin is used increasingly to treat focal spasticity, but its impact on upper limb function after stroke is unclear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical and cost effectiveness of botulinum toxin type A plus an upper limb therapy programme in the treatment of post stroke upper limb spasticity. Methods Trial design : A multi-centre open label parallel group randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation. Participants : Adults with upper limb spasticity at the shoulder, elbow, wrist or hand and reduced upper limb function due to stroke more than 1 month previously. Interventions : Botulinum toxin type A plus upper limb therapy (intervention group) or upper limb therapy alone (control group). Outcomes : Outcome assessments are undertaken at 1, 3 and 12 months. The primary outcome is upper limb function one month after study entry measured by the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT). Secondary outcomes include: spasticity (Modified Ashworth Scale); grip strength; dexterity (Nine Hole Peg Test); disability (Barthel Activities of Daily Living Index); quality of life (Stroke Impact Scale, Euroqol EQ-5D) and attainment of patient-selected goals (Canadian Occupational Performance Measure). Health and social services resource use, adverse events, use of other antispasticity treatments and patient views on the treatment will be compared. Participants are clinically reassessed at 3, 6 and 9 months to determine the need for repeat botulinum toxin type A and/or therapy. Randomisation : A web based central independent randomisation service. Blinding : Outcome assessments are undertaken by an assessor who is blinded to the randomisation group. Sample size : 332 participants provide 80% power to detect a 15% difference in treatment successes between

  1. Efficacy of botulinum toxin type B for the treatment of primary palmar hyperhidrosis: a prospective, open, single-blind, multi-centre study.

    PubMed

    Basciani, Mario; Di Rienzo, Filomena; Bizzarrini, Massimo; Zanchi, Malvina; Copetti, Massimiliano; Intiso, Domenico

    2014-07-01

    Primary palmar hyperhidrosis is a distressing and disabling condition that can produce social, psychological and occupational problems. Although the use of botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) has been reported as an efficacious and safe intervention to improve palmar hyperhidrosis, only one study concerned botulinum toxin type B (BoNT-B) in this disorder. The aim of study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of BoNT-B in treating primary palmar hyperhidrosis. Participants were injected with 5,000 IU of BoNT-B in each palm. Visual analogue test (VAS) to evaluate the intensity of decrease in sweat production, Minor's iodine starch test and measurement of paper towels' weight were used to ascertain palmar sweating at baseline, 4, 12 and 24 weeks after BoNT-B injections by a blind examiner. Thirty-two subjects (12 males, 20 females, mean age 31 ± 11) were enrolled. Significant reduction of palmar sweating was detected after BoNT-B injection: 2.9 ± 1.4, 0.3 ± 0.4, 0.9 ± 0.8, and 2.1 ± 1.5 g (p < 0.001) of paper towels' weight for the right palm at baseline, 4, 12 and 24 weeks; and 2.8 ± 1.7, 0.5 ± 0.6, 0.8 ± 0.7, and 1.8 ± 1.25 g (p < 0.001) at same time, respectively for the left palm. Significant reduction of mean VAS values were also detected after BoNT-B injections: 8.6 ± 1.1, 0.6 ± 0.8, 3.5 ± 2.5, and 7.1 ± 2.4 (p < 0.0001) at baseline, 4, 12 and 24 weeks, respectively. Mild side effects consisting in local pain and hand weakness were observed in 4 (12.5%) subjects. The findings indicated that the use of 5,000 IU BoNT-B injection in each palm was safe and significantly improved the severity of palmar hyperhidrosis. PMID:24522897

  2. Efficacy of botulinum toxin type B for the treatment of primary palmar hyperhidrosis: a prospective, open, single-blind, multi-centre study.

    PubMed

    Basciani, Mario; Di Rienzo, Filomena; Bizzarrini, Massimo; Zanchi, Malvina; Copetti, Massimiliano; Intiso, Domenico

    2014-07-01

    Primary palmar hyperhidrosis is a distressing and disabling condition that can produce social, psychological and occupational problems. Although the use of botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) has been reported as an efficacious and safe intervention to improve palmar hyperhidrosis, only one study concerned botulinum toxin type B (BoNT-B) in this disorder. The aim of study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of BoNT-B in treating primary palmar hyperhidrosis. Participants were injected with 5,000 IU of BoNT-B in each palm. Visual analogue test (VAS) to evaluate the intensity of decrease in sweat production, Minor's iodine starch test and measurement of paper towels' weight were used to ascertain palmar sweating at baseline, 4, 12 and 24 weeks after BoNT-B injections by a blind examiner. Thirty-two subjects (12 males, 20 females, mean age 31 ± 11) were enrolled. Significant reduction of palmar sweating was detected after BoNT-B injection: 2.9 ± 1.4, 0.3 ± 0.4, 0.9 ± 0.8, and 2.1 ± 1.5 g (p < 0.001) of paper towels' weight for the right palm at baseline, 4, 12 and 24 weeks; and 2.8 ± 1.7, 0.5 ± 0.6, 0.8 ± 0.7, and 1.8 ± 1.25 g (p < 0.001) at same time, respectively for the left palm. Significant reduction of mean VAS values were also detected after BoNT-B injections: 8.6 ± 1.1, 0.6 ± 0.8, 3.5 ± 2.5, and 7.1 ± 2.4 (p < 0.0001) at baseline, 4, 12 and 24 weeks, respectively. Mild side effects consisting in local pain and hand weakness were observed in 4 (12.5%) subjects. The findings indicated that the use of 5,000 IU BoNT-B injection in each palm was safe and significantly improved the severity of palmar hyperhidrosis.

  3. Use of Botulinum Toxin A in the Treatment of Lower Urinary Tract Disorders: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Moore, David C.; Cohn, Joshua A.; Dmochowski, Roger R.

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is used to treat a variety of ailments, and its therapeutic application in lower urinary tract disorders (LUTDs) is well studied. Robust evidence supporting the efficacy and tolerability of BoNT in the treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) and non-neurogenic overactive bladder (OAB) has led to regulatory approval for these conditions. Use of BoNT in the treatment of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome, chronic pelvic pain, and detrusor sphincter dyssynergia has demonstrated some promise, but is still evolving and off-label for these indications. Trials to date do not support the use of BoNT for benign prostatic hyperplasia. This comprehensive review outlines the mechanisms of BoNT in the treatment of LUTDs in adults and presents background and updated data examining the efficacy and adverse events associated with the use of BoNT in common urologic applications. PMID:27023601

  4. Development of a quail embryo model for the detection of botulinum neurotoxin activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium botulinum is a ubiquitous microorganism that under anaerobic conditions produces botulinum neurotoxins. In regards to both food-borne illness and the potential use of botulinum toxin as a biological weapon, the capability to assess the amount of toxin in a food or environmental sample e...

  5. Botulinum Toxin Type A Injection for Spastic Equinovarus Foot in Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy: Effects on Gait and Foot Pressure Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ja Young; Jung, Soojin; Rha, Dong-wook

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effect of intramuscular Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) injection on gait and dynamic foot pressure distribution in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) with dynamic equinovarus foot. Materials and Methods Twenty-five legs of 25 children with CP were investigated in this study. BoNT-A was injected into the gastrocnemius (GCM) and tibialis posterior (TP) muscles under the guidance of ultrasonography. The effects of the toxin were clinically assessed using the modified Ashworth scale (MAS) and modified Tardieu scale (MTS), and a computerized gait analysis and dynamic foot pressure measurements using the F-scan system were also performed before injection and at 1 and 4 months after injection. Results Spasticity of the ankle plantar-flexor in both the MAS and MTS was significantly reduced at both 1 and 4 months after injection. On dynamic foot pressure measurements, the center of pressure index and coronal index, which represent the asymmetrical weight-bearing of the medial and lateral columns of the foot, significantly improved at both 1 and 4 months after injection. The dynamic foot pressure index, total contact area, contact length and hind foot contact width all increased at 1 month after injection, suggesting better heel contact. Ankle kinematic data were significantly improved at both 1 and 4 months after injection, and ankle power generation was significantly increased at 4 months after injection compared to baseline data. Conclusion Using a computerized gait analysis and foot scan, this study revealed significant benefits of BoNT-A injection into the GCM and TP muscles for dynamic equinovarus foot in children with spastic CP. PMID:26847306

  6. Adeno-associated virus transfer of a gene encoding SNAP-25 resistant to botulinum toxin A attenuates neuromuscular paralysis associated with botulism.

    PubMed

    Raghunath, Arvind; Perez-Branguli, Francesc; Smith, Leonard; Dolly, J Oliver

    2008-04-01

    Advances in viral gene therapy have opened new possibilities for treating a range of motor neuron diseases, but these have not yet been translated into clinically applicable therapies because of difficulties in delivery to susceptible/damaged neurons, ambiguities in the identity of gene(s) implicated, and a paucity of means to quantify any physiological improvement. Most of these hurdles can be overcome by using the neuromuscular paralysis induced by botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A) as a prototype disease. Furthermore, because human botulism, occasionally fatal, causes prolonged muscle disablement as a result of the intraneuronal persistence of the toxin's SNAP-25 (S25)-cleaving protease, development of a genetic approach could lead to a potential treatment for this debilitating disease. Adeno-associated viral delivery of a cleavage-resistant S25 gene (S25-R198T) to chromaffin cells in vitro yielded exocytotically active S25-R198T that diminished subsequent blockade by BoNT/A of evoked catecholamine release. Evaluation in vivo, by administering this virus into rat spinal cord before injecting BoNT/A, showed a decreased inhibition of acetylcholine release as reflected in elevated retention of neuromuscular transmission. A similar, although smaller, protection of synaptic transmission from the toxin was seen after peripherally injecting the therapeutic virus. Such therapy also curtailed nerve sprouting normally induced by BoNT/A. This first demonstration of the utility of a DNA-based therapy for botulism paves the way for further advances in its treatment and for application to genetic disorders of motor neurons.

  7. Clinical Assessment of the Safety and Effectiveness of Nonablative Fractional Laser Combined with Transdermal Delivery of Botulinum Toxin A in Treating Periocular Wrinkles

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yue; Wang, Shiping; Li, Tong; Xue, Ping; Yang, Qing; Ma, Qiaoxin

    2016-01-01

    Summary: The upper and lower eyelids are traditionally contraindicated for subcutaneous botulinum toxin A (BTX) injection because of possible complications. We assessed the clinical safety and effectiveness of nonablative fractional laser (NAFL) combined with transdermal delivery of BTX in the treatment of periocular wrinkles. Thirty patients who had periocular wrinkles were treated with 1,565-nm NAFL in combination in the left periocular area and normal saline in the corresponding area of the right eye. VISIA skin detector was used to photograph and compare the changes induced by treatment. We also recorded the comfort level of the patients. All 28 patients could tolerate the pain caused by the laser treatment and showed no apparent discomfort during percutaneous drug delivery. No chromatosis or ptosis of upper eyelids occurred after the treatment. We used VISIA to detect changes at 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months, respectively, after the treatment. The periocular wrinkles decreased, and the flabbiness of eyelids was significantly reduced. The upper and lower eyelids are traditionally contraindicated for subcutaneous BTX injection, as it may cause complications. The treatment combining 1,565-nm NAFL and transdermal delivery of BTX can decrease periocular wrinkles and flabbiness while avoiding complications to the greatest extent. None of the 28 patients who had completed the treatment suffered from complications or adverse effects; all were satisfied with the treatment outcome. PMID:27622085

  8. Ultrasound-Guided Injection of Botulinum Toxin Type A for Piriformis Muscle Syndrome: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Santamato, Andrea; Micello, Maria Francesca; Valeno, Giovanni; Beatrice, Raffaele; Cinone, Nicoletta; Baricich, Alessio; Picelli, Alessandro; Panza, Francesco; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Fiore, Pietro; Ranieri, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Piriformis muscle syndrome (PMS) is caused by prolonged or excessive contraction of the piriformis muscle associated with pain in the buttocks, hips, and lower limbs because of the close proximity to the sciatic nerve. Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) reduces muscle hypertonia as well as muscle contracture and pain inhibiting substance P release and other inflammatory factors. BoNT-A injection technique is important considering the difficult access of the needle for deep location, the small size of the muscle, and the proximity to neurovascular structures. Ultrasound guidance is easy to use and painless and several studies describe its use during BoNT-A administration in PMS. In the present review article, we briefly updated current knowledge regarding the BoNT therapy of PMS, describing also a case report in which this syndrome was treated with an ultrasound-guided injection of incobotulinumtoxin A. Pain reduction with an increase of hip articular range of motion in this patient with PMS confirmed the effectiveness of BoNT-A injection for the management of this syndrome. PMID:26266421

  9. The Efficacy and Safety of Fractional CO2 Laser Combined with Topical Type A Botulinum Toxin for Facial Rejuvenation: A Randomized Controlled Split-Face Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jie; Ji, Xi; Li, Min; Chen, Xiao-e; Liu, Juan; Zhang, Jia-an; Luo, Dan; Zhou, Bing-rong

    2016-01-01

    Objective. We evaluated synergistic efficacy and safety of combined topical application of Botulinum Toxin Type A (BTX-A) with fractional CO2 laser for facial rejuvenation. Methods. Twenty female subjects were included for this split-face comparative study. One side of each subject's cheek was treated with fractional CO2 plus saline solution, and the other side was treated with fractional CO2 laser plus topical application of BTX-A. Patients received one session of treatment and evaluations were done at baseline, one, four, and twelve weeks after treatment. The outcome assessments included subjective satisfaction scale; blinded clinical assessment; and the biophysical parameters of roughness, elasticity, skin hydration, transepidermal water loss (TEWL), and the erythema and melanin index. Results. BTX-A combined with fractional CO2 laser sides showed higher physician's global assessment score, subject satisfaction score, roughness, skin hydration, and skin elasticity compared to that of fractional CO2 plus saline solution side at 12 weeks after treatment. TEWL and erythema and melanin index showed no significant differences between two sides at baseline, one, four, and twelve weeks after treatment. Conclusion. Topical application of BTX-A could enhance the rejuvenation effect of fractional CO2 laser. PMID:26998485

  10. Change of Distribution and Timing of Bite Force after Botulinum Toxin Type A Injection Evaluated by a Computerized Occlusion Analysis System

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ji Hee; Cho, Eunae S.; Kim, Seong Taek

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to determine the force distribution and pattern of mastication after injection of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) into both masseter muscles. The hypothesis to be tested was that the difference between right and left balance of occlusal force diminishes over time following BTX-A injection. Materials and Methods Fifteen patients were submitted to BTX-A injection therapy for subjective masseter hypertrophy. A total of 25 U of BTX-A (50 U in total) was injected into two points located 1 cm apart at the center of the lower one-third of both masseter muscles. All patients were examined using the T-Scan occlusion analysis system before and 4, 8, 12, and 24 weeks after BTX-A injection. Results A significant change in force balance was found between the right and left sides over time and the difference between the two sides decreased with the time post-injection, reaching a minimum at 12 weeks. Comparison of the force balance between the anterior and posterior occlusions revealed no significant difference at any of the time points. The occlusion and disclusion times (right and left sides) did not differ significantly with time since BTX-A injection. Conclusion A decline in the difference in the clenching force between the left and right sides was found with increasing time up to 12 weeks following BTX-A injection. PMID:24954346

  11. Altered cell metabolism in tissues of the knee joint in a rabbit model of Botulinum toxin A-induced quadriceps muscle weakness.

    PubMed

    Leumann, A; Longino, D; Fortuna, R; Leonard, T; Vaz, M A; Hart, D A; Herzog, W

    2012-12-01

    Quadriceps muscle weakness is frequently associated with knee injuries in sports. The influence of quadriceps weakness on knee joint homeostasis remains undefined. We hypothesized that quadriceps weakness will lead to tissue-specific alterations in the cell metabolism of tissues of the knee. Quadriceps weakness was induced with repetitive injections of Botulinum toxin A in six 1-year-old New Zealand White rabbits for 6 months. Five additional animals served as controls with injections of saline/dextrose. Muscle weakness was assessed by muscle wet mass, isometric knee extensor torque, and histological morphology analysis. Cell metabolism was assessed for patellar tendon, medial and lateral collateral ligament, and medial and lateral meniscus by measuring the total RNA levels and specific mRNA levels for collagen I, collagen III, MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-13, TGF-β, biglycan, IL-1, and bFGF by reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction. While the total RNA levels did not change, tissue-specific mRNA levels were lower for relevant anabolic and catabolic molecules, indicating potential changes in tissue mechanical set points. Quadriceps weakness may lead to adaptations in knee joint tissue cell metabolism by altering a subset of anabolic and catabolic mRNA levels corresponding to a new functional and metabolic set point for the knee that may contribute to the high injury rate of athletes with muscle weakness.

  12. Treatment of painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis with botulinum toxin A: why isn’t it effective in all patients?

    PubMed Central

    Bjorling, Dale E.

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum toxin A (BTA) is currently used to treat a variety of painful disorders, including painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis (PBS/IC). However, BTA is not consistently effective in all patients. This may be due to the disparity of causes of pain, but this may also relate to the processes by which BTA exerts anti-nociceptive effects. This review discusses mechanisms by which BTA may inhibit pain and studies of the use of BTA in PSB/IC patients. It is doubtful that any single treatment will effectively control pain in PBS/IC patients, and it is highly probable that multiple strategies will be required, both within individual patients and across the population of PBS/IC patients. The purpose of this review is to discuss those mechanisms by which BTA acts, with the intent that alternative strategies exploiting these mechanism, or work through alternative pathways, can be identified to more effectively treat pain in PBS/IC patients in the future. PMID:26816853

  13. Occlusal force characteristics of masseteric muscles after intramuscular injection of botulinum toxin A(BTX - A)for treatment of temporomandibular disorder.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Long-Dan; Liu, Qi; Zou, De-Rong; Yu, Lv-Feng

    2016-09-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the occlusal force and therapeutic efficacy of the masseteric muscles after intramuscular injection of botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) for the treatment of patients with concurrent temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and bruxism. Thirty patients with TMD associated with bruxism were randomised into three groups (n=10 in each group), and treated by bilateral intramuscular injection of BTX-A into the masseter, placebo, or control. We used an occlusal force analysis system to collect several measures of occlusal force such as duration of biting and closing, the maximum occlusal force, and the distribution of occlusal force. The occlusal force in the intercuspid position was reduced in all three groups. There was a significant difference between the BTX-A and placebo groups (F(df=1)=8.08, p=0.01) but not between the control group and the other two(F(df=1)=4.34, p=0.047). The duration of occlusion was significantly increased in the BTX-A group after 3 months' treatment (t=4.07, p=0.003). The asymmetrical distribution of occlusal force was reduced in all three groups, but not significantly so (Levene's test F(df=2)=0.25, p=0.78,ANOVA F(df=2)=0.50, p=0.61). Treatment of TMD with BTX-A is effective in reducing the occlusal force, but psychological intervention plays an important part in treatment.

  14. The link between facial feedback and neural activity within central circuitries of emotion--new insights from botulinum toxin-induced denervation of frown muscles.

    PubMed

    Hennenlotter, Andreas; Dresel, Christian; Castrop, Florian; Ceballos-Baumann, Andres O; Baumann, Andres O Ceballos; Wohlschläger, Afra M; Haslinger, Bernhard

    2009-03-01

    Afferent feedback from muscles and skin has been suggested to influence our emotions during the control of facial expressions. Recent imaging studies have shown that imitation of facial expressions is associated with activation in limbic regions such as the amygdala. Yet, the physiological interaction between this limbic activation and facial feedback remains unclear. To study if facial feedback effects on limbic brain responses during intentional imitation of facial expressions, we applied botulinum toxin (BTX)-induced denervation of frown muscles in combination with functional magnetic resonance imaging as a reversible lesion model to minimize the occurrence of afferent muscular and cutaneous input. We show that, during imitation of angry facial expressions, reduced feedback due to BTX treatment attenuates activation of the left amygdala and its functional coupling with brain stem regions implicated in autonomic manifestations of emotional states. These findings demonstrate that facial feedback modulates neural activity within central circuitries of emotion during intentional imitation of facial expressions. Given that people tend to mimic the emotional expressions of others, this could provide a potential physiological basis for the social transfer of emotion.

  15. Single treatments that have lasting effects: some thoughts on the antidepressant effects of ketamine and botulinum toxin and the anxiolytic effect of psilocybin.

    PubMed

    Young, Simon N

    2013-03-01

    Recent clinical trials suggest that 3 single biological treatments have effects that persist. Based on research showing that the muscles involved in facial expressions can feed back to influence mood, a single trial diminishing glabella frown lines with botulinum toxin demonstrated a significant antidepressant effect for 16 weeks. Based primarily on research with animal models of depression suggesting that glutamate may be involved in depression, the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist ketamine has been tested in several trials. A single dose decreased depression for up to a week. The reported effects of the use of mushrooms containing psilocybin by a number of cultures around the world has stimulated several trials showing beneficial effects of a single dose of psilocybin for over a year in healthy people, and for up to 3 months in patients with anxiety disorders who have advanced cancer. This article discusses these studies, their rationale, their possible mechanisms of action, the future clinical research required to establish these therapies and the basic research required to optimize single treatments that have lasting effects.

  16. Safety and efficacy of botulinum toxin A for the treatment of spasticity in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: results of a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Costa, Juan F; Máñez, Inmaculada; Alabajos, Ana; Guevara Salazar, Maricruz; Roda, Cristina; Sevilla, Teresa

    2016-10-01

    Spasticity can be a very disabling problem in some amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) phenotypes, such as upper motor neuron-dominant ALS (UMN-D ALS) and primary lateral sclerosis (PLS). Our aim is to describe the safety and efficacy of botulinum toxin A (BoTox-A) for improving gait in those ALS phenotypes. UMN-D ALS and PLS outpatients experiencing gait disturbances, secondary to moderate-to-severe spasticity despite optimized oral medication, were offered BoTox-A treatment. Stretching exercises were indicated to complement BoTox-A effect, and ankle-foot orthotics were prescribed when appropriate. Tolerance (muscle strength, disease progression rate) and efficacy (10-m walk test) were measured at baseline and after treatment. Eight out of 122 ALS outpatients were offered BoTox-A treatment. One declined and the other seven were administered BoTox-A in the lower limbs, every 5-8 months. All of them experienced improvement in the clinical outcome and all but one referred subjective improvement. Moreover, after a median follow-up of 16 months and three injections, BoTox-A effect was maintained with no adverse events. This study provides class IV evidence that BoTox-A is safe , and could be beneficial in the short term and long term in a subset of ALS patients with moderate-to-severe spasticity.

  17. Clinical Assessment of the Safety and Effectiveness of Nonablative Fractional Laser Combined with Transdermal Delivery of Botulinum Toxin A in Treating Periocular Wrinkles

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yue; Wang, Shiping; Li, Tong; Xue, Ping; Yang, Qing; Ma, Qiaoxin

    2016-01-01

    Summary: The upper and lower eyelids are traditionally contraindicated for subcutaneous botulinum toxin A (BTX) injection because of possible complications. We assessed the clinical safety and effectiveness of nonablative fractional laser (NAFL) combined with transdermal delivery of BTX in the treatment of periocular wrinkles. Thirty patients who had periocular wrinkles were treated with 1,565-nm NAFL in combination in the left periocular area and normal saline in the corresponding area of the right eye. VISIA skin detector was used to photograph and compare the changes induced by treatment. We also recorded the comfort level of the patients. All 28 patients could tolerate the pain caused by the laser treatment and showed no apparent discomfort during percutaneous drug delivery. No chromatosis or ptosis of upper eyelids occurred after the treatment. We used VISIA to detect changes at 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months, respectively, after the treatment. The periocular wrinkles decreased, and the flabbiness of eyelids was significantly reduced. The upper and lower eyelids are traditionally contraindicated for subcutaneous BTX injection, as it may cause complications. The treatment combining 1,565-nm NAFL and transdermal delivery of BTX can decrease periocular wrinkles and flabbiness while avoiding complications to the greatest extent. None of the 28 patients who had completed the treatment suffered from complications or adverse effects; all were satisfied with the treatment outcome.

  18. Quality of life and social isolation in Greek adolescents with primary focal hyperhidrosis treated with botulinum toxin type A: a case series.

    PubMed

    Kouris, Anargyros; Armyra, Kalliopi; Stefanaki, Christina; Christodoulou, Christos; Karimali, Polixeni; Kontochristopoulos, George

    2015-01-01

    Primary hyperhidrosis, although extensively documented in adults, typically has onset that dates back to early childhood. It is an unpleasant and socially disabling problem for the affected child, but little attention has been paid to the disease in adolescents. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effectiveness of botulinum toxin type A (BTXA) in adolescents with primary palmar and axillary hyperhidrosis and to determine its effect on quality of life and social isolation. Thirty-five individuals (17 girls, 18 boys) with moderate to severe palmar and axillary hyperhidrosis were treated with BTXA (onabotulinum). Patients were examined at baseline and 6 months after treatment. The Hyperhidrosis Disease Severity Scale (HDSS) was used to evaluate disease severity and the Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI) was used to assess quality of life. The University of California at Los Angeles loneliness scale (UCLA version 3) was used to assess personal perception of loneliness and social isolation. The median age of the participants was 14 years, and 48.6% were female. Twenty-one had palmar hyperhidrosis, and 14 had axillary hyperhidrosis. Total CDLQI and social isolation scores decreased significantly after treatment with BTXA (both p < 0.001). There was a significant difference between pre- and post-treatment levels of severity of hyperhidrosis. No statistically significant difference was documented for CDLQI and UCLA scores between boys and girls. Treatment of hyperhidrosis with BTXA resulted in improvement in quality of life, social skills, and activities.

  19. Clinical Assessment of the Safety and Effectiveness of Nonablative Fractional Laser Combined with Transdermal Delivery of Botulinum Toxin A in Treating Periocular Wrinkles.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xing; Yin, Yue; Wang, Shiping; Li, Tong; Xue, Ping; Yang, Qing; Ma, Qiaoxin

    2016-08-01

    The upper and lower eyelids are traditionally contraindicated for subcutaneous botulinum toxin A (BTX) injection because of possible complications. We assessed the clinical safety and effectiveness of nonablative fractional laser (NAFL) combined with transdermal delivery of BTX in the treatment of periocular wrinkles. Thirty patients who had periocular wrinkles were treated with 1,565-nm NAFL in combination in the left periocular area and normal saline in the corresponding area of the right eye. VISIA skin detector was used to photograph and compare the changes induced by treatment. We also recorded the comfort level of the patients. All 28 patients could tolerate the pain caused by the laser treatment and showed no apparent discomfort during percutaneous drug delivery. No chromatosis or ptosis of upper eyelids occurred after the treatment. We used VISIA to detect changes at 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months, respectively, after the treatment. The periocular wrinkles decreased, and the flabbiness of eyelids was significantly reduced. The upper and lower eyelids are traditionally contraindicated for subcutaneous BTX injection, as it may cause complications. The treatment combining 1,565-nm NAFL and transdermal delivery of BTX can decrease periocular wrinkles and flabbiness while avoiding complications to the greatest extent. None of the 28 patients who had completed the treatment suffered from complications or adverse effects; all were satisfied with the treatment outcome. PMID:27622085

  20. Botulinum toxin paralysis of the orbicularis oculi muscle. Types and time course of alterations in muscle structure, physiology and lid kinematics.

    PubMed

    Horn, A K; Porter, J D; Evinger, C

    1993-01-01

    In chronically prepared guinea pigs, we investigated the time course of botulinum toxin A's (Bot A) effect on the blink reflex by monitoring lid movements and EMG activity prior to and after Bot A injection into the orbicularis oculi muscle (OOemg), or after nerve crush of the zygomatic nerve. We correlated these alterations with the morphological changes of the orbicularis oculi (lid-closing) muscles of the same animals. After Bot A treatment there was a profound reduction of OOemg activity and blink amplitudes as well as a slowing of maximum blink down-phase velocity. Blink up-phases, however, remained unchanged. Gradual recovery of OOemg magnitude and blink amplitude started around day 6; a functioning blink reflex appeared on day 21, and full recovery of blink amplitude occurred by day 42. Crushing the zygomatic branch of the facial nerve produced similar changes in blink parameters, but recovery was much more rapid (15 days) than for Bot A-treated guinea pigs. The morphological analysis demonstrated that Bot A produced a denervation-like atrophy in the orbicularis oculi. No fiber type-specific alterations were noted, and all muscle fiber types ultimately recovered, with no longstanding consequences of the transient denervation. Our findings support the notion that functional recovery was the result of preterminal and terminal axonal sprouting that subsequently re-established functional innervation. Moreover, differences between the present findings and those seen after injection of Bot A into the extraocular muscles strongly support the hypothesis that the composition in terms of muscle fiber type and the properties of the motor control system of a given muscle greatly influence both how the particular muscle responds to toxin injection, and how effective the toxin is in resolution of neuromuscular disorders that affect a particular muscle. The present findings were consistent with clinical observations that Bot A produces only temporary relief in patients

  1. Botulinum toxin assessment, intervention and aftercare for paediatric and adult niche indications including pain: international consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Rawicki, B; Sheean, G; Fung, V S C; Goldsmith, S; Morgan, C; Novak, I

    2010-08-01

    Evidence is emerging for the use of botulinum neurotoxin type-A (BoNT-A) for niche indications including pain independent of spasticity. Pain indications such as chronic nociceptive back pain, piriformis syndrome, chronic myofascial pain, pelvic pain, complex regional pain syndrome, facial pain and neuropathic pain are outlined in this paper. Of these, class I evidence is available for the treatment of chronic nociceptive low back pain, piriformis syndrome, myofascial pain, facial pain, neuropathic pain and plantar fasciitis. Peri-operative use of BoNT-A is emerging, with indications including planning for surgery and facilitating surgery, as well as healing and improving analgesia post-operatively. Evidence is limited, although there are some reports that clinicians are successfully using BoNT-A peri-operatively. There is class I evidence showing pre-operative use of BoNT-A has a beneficial effect on outcomes following adductor-release surgery. The use of BoNT for treatment of tremor, other than neck tremor in the setting of cervical dystonia, including evidence for upper limb tremor, cranial tremor and non-dystonic neck tremor is reviewed. The evidence is variable at this stage, and further study is required to develop definitive recommendations for the clinical utility of BoNT-A for these indications.

  2. Rating scales for cervical dystonia: a critical evaluation of tools for outcome assessment of botulinum toxin therapy.

    PubMed

    Jost, Wolfgang H; Hefter, Harald; Stenner, Andrea; Reichel, Gerhard

    2013-03-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin is the therapy of choice for all forms of cervical dystonia (CD), but treatment regimens still vary considerably. The interpretation of treatment outcome is mainly based on the clinical experience and on the scientific value of the rating scales applied. The aim of this review is to describe the historical development of rating scales for the assessment of CD and to provide an appraisal of their advantages and drawbacks. The Tsui score and the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS) have been widely employed in numerous clinical studies as specific instruments for CD. The obvious advantage of the Tsui score is its simplicity so that it can be easily implemented in clinical routine. The TWSTRS allows a more sophisticated assessment of functional features of CD, but only the Tsui score includes a rating for tremor. Other benefits of the TWSTRS are the disability and pain subscales, but despite its value in clinical trials, it might be too complex for routine clinical practice. None of the rating scales used at present has been rigorously tested for responsiveness to detect significant changes in clinical status after therapeutic interventions. Moreover, clinical data support a new classification of CD leading to a differentiation between head and neck subtypes. As the current rating scales are not able to cover all these aspects of the disorder, further research is needed to develop a valid and reliable instrument which considers the most current classification of CD.

  3. Botulinum toxin assessment, intervention and aftercare for paediatric and adult niche indications including pain: international consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Rawicki, B; Sheean, G; Fung, V S C; Goldsmith, S; Morgan, C; Novak, I

    2010-08-01

    Evidence is emerging for the use of botulinum neurotoxin type-A (BoNT-A) for niche indications including pain independent of spasticity. Pain indications such as chronic nociceptive back pain, piriformis syndrome, chronic myofascial pain, pelvic pain, complex regional pain syndrome, facial pain and neuropathic pain are outlined in this paper. Of these, class I evidence is available for the treatment of chronic nociceptive low back pain, piriformis syndrome, myofascial pain, facial pain, neuropathic pain and plantar fasciitis. Peri-operative use of BoNT-A is emerging, with indications including planning for surgery and facilitating surgery, as well as healing and improving analgesia post-operatively. Evidence is limited, although there are some reports that clinicians are successfully using BoNT-A peri-operatively. There is class I evidence showing pre-operative use of BoNT-A has a beneficial effect on outcomes following adductor-release surgery. The use of BoNT for treatment of tremor, other than neck tremor in the setting of cervical dystonia, including evidence for upper limb tremor, cranial tremor and non-dystonic neck tremor is reviewed. The evidence is variable at this stage, and further study is required to develop definitive recommendations for the clinical utility of BoNT-A for these indications. PMID:20633183

  4. Development and Partial Characterization of High-affinity Monoclonal Antibodies for Botulinum Toxin Type A and their use in Analysis of Milk by Sandwich ELISA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT), produced by the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium botulinum, cause severe neuroparalytic disease and are considered the most toxic biological agents known. While botulism is rare in the US, it often is fatal if not treated quickly, and recovery is long, requiring intensiv...

  5. Synaptobrevin I mediates exocytosis of CGRP from sensory neurons and inhibition by botulinum toxins reflects their anti-nociceptive potential.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jianghui; Wang, Jiafu; Lawrence, Gary; Dolly, J Oliver

    2007-08-15

    Calcitonin-gene-related peptide (CGRP), a potent vasodilator that mediates inflammatory pain, is elevated in migraine; nevertheless, little is known about its release from sensory neurons. In this study, CGRP was found to occur in the majority of neurons from rat trigeminal ganglia, together with the three exocytotic SNAREs [SNAP25, syntaxin 1 and the synaptobrevin (Sbr, also known as VAMP) isoforms] and synaptotagmin. Ca(2+)-dependent CGRP release was evoked with K(+)-depolarisation and, to lower levels, by capsaicin or bradykinin from neurons that contain the vanilloid receptor 1 and/or bradykinin receptor 2. Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) type A cleaved SNAP25 and inhibited release triggered by K(+) > bradykinin > capsaicin. Unlike BoNT type D, BoNT type B did not affect exocytosis, even though the neurons possess its receptor and Sbr II and Sbr III got proteolysed (I is resistant in rat) but, in mouse neurons, it additionally cleaved Sbr I and blocked transmitter release. Sbr I and II were found in CGRP-containing vesicles, and each was shown to separately form a SNARE complex. These new findings, together with punctate staining of Sbr I and CGRP in neurites, implicate isoform Sbr I in exocytosis from large dense-core vesicles together with SNAP25 (also, probably, syntaxin 1 because BoNT type C1 caused partial cleavage and inhibition); this differs from Sbr-II-dependent release of transmitters from small synaptic vesicles. Such use of particular Sbr isoform(s) by different neurons raises the functional implications for other cells previously unrecognised.

  6. Consensus panel's assessment and recommendations on the use of 3 botulinum toxin type A products in facial aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Lorenc, Z Paul; Kenkel, Jeffrey M; Fagien, Steven; Hirmand, Haideh; Nestor, Mark S; Sclafani, Anthony P; Sykes, Jonathan M; Waldorf, Heidi A

    2013-03-01

    In this summary article, the authors discuss the characteristics of abobotulinumtoxinA, incobotulinumtoxinA, and onabotulinumtoxinA. With 3 neuromodulators available in the US market, comparisons between and among products will invariably be made, so arguments for the most effective facial aesthetic uses of each neuromodulator are presented. Topics addressed in this article include patient expectations, toxin reconstitution and preparation, patient positioning, differences among products, the role of complexing proteins, and dosing and injection strategies. Recommendations are also provided by treatment area.

  7. Consensus panel's assessment and recommendations on the use of 3 botulinum toxin type A products in facial aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Lorenc, Z Paul; Kenkel, Jeffrey M; Fagien, Steven; Hirmand, Haideh; Nestor, Mark S; Sclafani, Anthony P; Sykes, Jonathan M; Waldorf, Heidi A

    2013-03-01

    In this summary article, the authors discuss the characteristics of abobotulinumtoxinA, incobotulinumtoxinA, and onabotulinumtoxinA. With 3 neuromodulators available in the US market, comparisons between and among products will invariably be made, so arguments for the most effective facial aesthetic uses of each neuromodulator are presented. Topics addressed in this article include patient expectations, toxin reconstitution and preparation, patient positioning, differences among products, the role of complexing proteins, and dosing and injection strategies. Recommendations are also provided by treatment area. PMID:23515197

  8. High-frequency, low-magnitude vibration does not prevent bone loss resulting from muscle disuse in mice following botulinum toxin injection.

    PubMed

    Manske, Sarah L; Good, Craig A; Zernicke, Ronald F; Boyd, Steven K

    2012-01-01

    High-frequency, low-magnitude vibration enhances bone formation ostensibly by mimicking normal postural muscle activity. We tested this hypothesis by examining whether daily exposure to low-magnitude vibration (VIB) would maintain bone in a muscle disuse model with botulinum toxin type A (BTX). Female 16-18 wk old BALB/c mice (N = 36) were assigned to BTX-VIB, BTX-SHAM, VIB, or SHAM. BTX mice were injected with BTX (20 µL; 1 U/100 g body mass) into the left hindlimb posterior musculature. All mice were anaesthetized for 20 min/d, 5 d/wk, for 3 wk, and the left leg mounted to a holder. Through the holder, VIB mice received 45 Hz, ± 0.6 g sinusoidal acceleration without weight bearing. SHAM mice received no vibration. At baseline and 3 wk, muscle cross-sectional area (MCSA) and tibial bone properties (epiphysis, metaphysis and diaphysis) were assessed by in vivo micro-CT. Bone volume fraction in the metaphysis decreased 12 ± 9% and 7 ± 6% in BTX-VIB and BTX-SHAM, but increased in the VIB and SHAM. There were no differences in dynamic histomorphometry outcomes between BTX-VIB and BTX nor between VIB and SHAM. Thus, vibration did not prevent bone loss induced by a rapid decline in muscle activity nor produce an anabolic effect in normal mice. The daily loading duration was shorter than would be expected from postural muscle activity, and may have been insufficient to prevent bone loss. Based on the approach used in this study, vibration does not prevent bone loss in the absence of muscle activity induced by BTX. PMID:22590551

  9. Intralesional botulinum toxin type A equally effective and better tolerated than intralesional steroid in the treatment of keloids: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Shaarawy, Eman; Hegazy, Rehab A; Abdel Hay, Rania M

    2015-06-01

    Intralesional (IL) corticosteroid therapy is a treatment for keloids. IL botulinum toxin type A (BTA) has been postulated in such an indication with controversial reports. To compare efficacy and safety of IL BTA to the IL corticosteroid therapy in treatment of keloids. Twenty-four patients with keloids were randomly divided into two equal groups: receiving IL steroid repeated every 4 weeks for six sessions (group A) and IL BTA 5 IU/cm(3) repeated every 8 weeks for three sessions (group B). Objective parameters (hardness, elevation, and redness), subjective complaints (itching, pain, and tenderness), patient satisfaction, and side effects were evaluated. There was a significant decrease in the volume of the lesions after treatment (P < 0.01), with a volume reduction of 82.7% and 79.2%, respectively, in both groups. A significant softening of lesions vs. baseline was observed (P < 0.01), with statistically significant improvement in softening in group A (P < 0.01). There was a significant decrease in height of lesions and in redness score compared with baseline (P < 0.01) with no significant difference in between both groups. All patients mentioned a significant reduction of their subjective complaints (P < 0.01) that were more significant in group B. Skin atrophy and telangiectasia were evident in three patients of group A. The efficacy and safety of the IL BTA were clearly evident in the current work from the rapid significant amelioration of the subjective complaints and the comparable significant improvement of the objective parameters as well as the volume of the keloids in comparison with the IL corticosteroids.

  10. The use of botulinum toxin in the pelvic floor for women with chronic pelvic pain-a new answer to old problems?

    PubMed

    Abbott, Jason

    2009-01-01

    Chronic pelvic pain occurs in about 15% of women and has a variety of causes requiring accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment if pain reduction is to be effected. Superficial conditions such as provoked vestibulodynia and deeper pelvic issues such as pelvic floor myalgia were traditionally difficult to diagnose and adequately treat. For provoked vestibulodynia, there are limited data, in the form of case reports and small series, to indicate that botulinum toxin (BoNT) injections may provide short-term (3-6 months) benefit. Retreatment is reported to be successful and side effects are few. Class-I studies are essential to adequately assess this form of treatment. For pelvic floor myalgia, 1 class-I study and 3 class-II to -III studies indicate efficacy of BoNT. In the only double-blind, randomized, controlled study, significant reduction in pelvic floor pressures with significant pain reduction for some types of pelvic pain are reported compared with baseline. No differences in pain occurred compared with the control group who had physical therapy as an intervention. Physical therapy should be used as a noninvasive first-line treatment, with BoNT injections reserved for those who are refractory to treatment. Pelvic floor disorders should be considered as a cause for chronic pelvic pain in women and an attempt made to diagnose and treat such problems as a routine practice. The use of BoNT as a therapeutic option for pelvic floor muscle spasm and pain is still in its infancy. Initial reports suggest that there may be a significant role for women with chronic pain that is refractory to currently available medical and surgical treatments, however, there are very few high-quality studies and research is essential before this novel treatment can be accepted into widespread use for pelvic pain attributable to the pelvic floor.

  11. Anti-photoaging potential of Botulinum Toxin Type A in UVB-induced premature senescence of human dermal fibroblasts in vitro through decreasing senescence-related proteins.

    PubMed

    Permatasari, Felicia; Hu, Yan-yan; Zhang, Jia-an; Zhou, Bing-rong; Luo, Dan

    2014-04-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the anti-photoaging effects of Botulinum Toxin Type A (BoNTA) in Ultraviolet B-induced premature senescence (UVB-SIPS) of human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) in vitro and the underlying mechanism. We established a stress-induced premature senescence model by repeated subcytotoxic exposures to Ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation. The aging condition was determined by cytochemical staining of senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal). The tumor suppressor and senescence-associated protein levels of p16(INK-4a), p21(WAF-1), and p53 were estimated by Western blotting. The G1 phase cell growth arrest was analyzed by flow cytometry. The mRNA expressions of p16, p21, p53, COL1a1, COL3a1, MMP1, and MMP3 were determined by real-time PCR. The level of Col-1, Col-3, MMP-1, and MMP-3 were determined by ELISA. Compared with the UVB-irradiated group, we found that the irradiated fibroblasts additionally treated with BoNTA demonstrated a decrease in the expression of SA-β-gal, a decrease in the level of tumor suppressor and senescence-associated proteins, a decrease in the G1 phase cell proportion, an increase in the production of Col-1 and Col-3, and a decrease in the secretion of MMP-1 and MMP-3, in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, these results indicate that BoNTA significantly antagonizes premature senescence induced by UVB in HDFs in vitro, therefore potential of intradermal BoNTA injection as anti-photoaging treatment still remains a question. PMID:24727404

  12. Botulinum toxin type A combined with cervical spine manual therapy for masseteric hypertrophy in a patient with Alzheimer-type dementia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Villafañe, Jorge H.; Fernandez-de-las-Peñas, Cesar; Pillastrini, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case study is to present the findings of combining botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) and cervical spine manual therapy to address masseter muscle spasticity in a patient with Alzheimer-type dementia. Case Report A 78-year-old woman with bilateral spasticity of the masseteric regions for 2 years was referred for physiotherapy. She had trismus and bruxism, and could neither close nor open her mouth normally; thus, she was unable to be fed orally in a normal manner. Intervention and Outcome The patient underwent combined treatment with BoNT-A and cervical spine manual therapy. A medical physician (neurologist) performed the BoNT-A injections into 2 points at the center of the lower third of the masseter muscle. A physical therapist performed manual therapy interventions targeted at the cervical spine. Manual therapy started the day after the BoNT-A injection and continued for 5 sessions per week for a total period of 2 weeks. Clinical outcomes were measured including spasticity (Modified Ashworth Scale), functionality (Barthel Index), and jaw opening. Outcomes were conducted at baseline, 2 weeks after treatment, and at 2-month follow-up session after finishing the treatment. The patient improved in all of the outcomes at the end of treatment, and these results were maintained during the follow-up. After treatment, the patient was able to feed with minimal caregiver dependency because oral feeding was possible. Conclusion The patient in this study responded positively to a combination of BoNT-A and manual therapy, resulting in decreased masseter muscles spasticity and improved trismus and bruxism. PMID:23843761

  13. Intravesical Botulinum Toxin A Injections for Bladder Pain Syndrome/Interstitial Cystitis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Controlled Studies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junpeng; Wang, Qiang; Wu, Qinghui; Chen, Yang; Wu, Peng

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The role of intravesical botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) injections in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) has not been clearly defined. The aim of this study was to evaluate high-level evidence regarding the efficacy and safety of BTX-A injections for BPS/IC. MATERIAL AND METHODS We conducted a comprehensive search of PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science, and conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of all available randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled studies assessing BTX-A injections for BPS/IC. RESULTS Seven RCTs and 1 retrospective study were identified based on the selection criteria. Pooled analyses showed that although BTX-A was associated with a slightly larger volume of post-void residual urine (PVR) (weighted mean difference [WMD] 10.94 mL; 95% confidence intervals [CI] 3.32 to 18.56; p=0.005), patients in this group might benefit from greater reduction in pelvic pain (WMD -1.73; 95% CI -3.16 to -0.29; p=0.02), Interstitial Cystitis Problem Index (ICPI) scores (WMD -1.25; 95% CI -2.20 to -0.30; p=0.01), and Interstitial Cystitis Symptom Index (ICSI) scores (WMD -1.16; 95% CI -2.22 to -0.11; p=0.03), and significant improvement in daytime frequency of urination (WMD -2.36; 95% CI -4.23 to -0.49; p=0.01) and maximum cystometric capacity (MCC) (WMD 50.49 mL; 95% CI 25.27 to 75.71; p<0.00001). Nocturia, maximal urinary flow rate, dysuria, and urinary tract infection did not differ significantly between the 2 groups. CONCLUSIONS Intravesical BTX-A injections might offer significant improvement in bladder pain symptoms, daytime urination frequency, and MCC for patients with refractory BPS/IC, with a slightly larger PVR. Further well-designed, large-scale RCTs are required to confirm the findings of this analysis. PMID:27624897

  14. Literature Review and Comparison of Two Statistical Methods to Evaluate the Effect of Botulinum Toxin Treatment on Gait in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Nieuwenhuys, Angela; Papageorgiou, Eirini; Pataky, Todd; De Laet, Tinne; Molenaers, Guy; Desloovere, Kaat

    2016-01-01

    Aim This study aimed at comparing two statistical approaches to analyze the effect of Botulinum Toxin A (BTX-A) treatment on gait in children with a diagnosis of spastic cerebral palsy (CP), based on three-dimensional gait analysis (3DGA) data. Through a literature review, the available expert knowledge on gait changes after BTX-A treatment in children with CP is summarized. Methods Part 1—Intervention studies on BTX-A treatment in children with CP between 4–18 years that used 3DGA data as an outcome measure and were written in English, were identified through a broad systematic literature search. Reported kinematic and kinetic gait features were extracted from the identified studies. Part 2—A retrospective sample of 53 children with CP (6.1 ± 2.3years, GMFCS I-III) received 3DGA before and after multilevel BTX-A injections. The effect of BTX-A on gait was interpreted by comparing the results of paired samples t-tests on the kinematic gait features that were identified from literature to the results of statistical parametric mapping analysis on the kinematic waveforms of the lower limb joints. Results Part 1–53 kinematic and 33 kinetic features were described in literature. Overall, there is no consensus on which features should be evaluated after BTX-A treatment as 49 features were reported only once or twice. Part 2—Post-BTX-A, both statistical approaches found increased ankle dorsiflexion throughout the gait cycle. Statistical parametric mapping analyses additionally found increased knee extension during terminal stance. In turn, feature analyses found increased outtoeing during stance after BTX-A. Conclusion This study confirms that BTX-A injections are a valuable treatment option to improve gait function in children with CP. However, different statistical approaches may lead to different interpretations of treatment outcome. We suggest that a clear, definite hypothesis should be stated a priori and a commensurate statistical approach should

  15. Intravesical Botulinum Toxin A Injections for Bladder Pain Syndrome/Interstitial Cystitis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Controlled Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junpeng; Wang, Qiang; Wu, Qinghui; Chen, Yang; Wu, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Background The role of intravesical botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) injections in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) has not been clearly defined. The aim of this study was to evaluate high-level evidence regarding the efficacy and safety of BTX-A injections for BPS/IC. Material/Methods We conducted a comprehensive search of PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science, and conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of all available randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled studies assessing BTX-A injections for BPS/IC. Results Seven RCTs and 1 retrospective study were identified based on the selection criteria. Pooled analyses showed that although BTX-A was associated with a slightly larger volume of post-void residual urine (PVR) (weighted mean difference [WMD] 10.94 mL; 95% confidence intervals [CI] 3.32 to 18.56; p=0.005), patients in this group might benefit from greater reduction in pelvic pain (WMD −1.73; 95% CI −3.16 to −0.29; p=0.02), Interstitial Cystitis Problem Index (ICPI) scores (WMD −1.25; 95% CI −2.20 to −0.30; p=0.01), and Interstitial Cystitis Symptom Index (ICSI) scores (WMD −1.16; 95% CI −2.22 to −0.11; p=0.03), and significant improvement in daytime frequency of urination (WMD −2.36; 95% CI −4.23 to −0.49; p=0.01) and maximum cystometric capacity (MCC) (WMD 50.49 mL; 95% CI 25.27 to 75.71; p<0.00001). Nocturia, maximal urinary flow rate, dysuria, and urinary tract infection did not differ significantly between the 2 groups. Conclusions Intravesical BTX-A injections might offer significant improvement in bladder pain symptoms, daytime urination frequency, and MCC for patients with refractory BPS/IC, with a slightly larger PVR. Further well-designed, large-scale RCTs are required to confirm the findings of this analysis. PMID:27624897

  16. First report of an infant botulism case due to Clostridium botulinum type Af.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Laura I T; Fernández, Rafael A; Pareja, Virtudes; Giaroli, Gabriel; Guidarelli, Sergio R; Dykes, Janet K; Lúquez, Carolina

    2015-02-01

    Most infant botulism cases worldwide are due to botulinum toxin types A and B. Rarely, Clostridium botulinum strains that produce two serotypes (Ab, Ba, and Bf) have also been isolated from infant botulism cases. This is the first reported case of infant botulism due to C. botulinum type Af worldwide.

  17. Botulinum neurotoxin: a deadly protease with applications to human medicine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are some of the most potent biological toxins to humans. They are synthesized by the gram-positive, spore-forming bacterium Clostridium botulinum. BoNT is secreted from the bacterium as a ~150 kDa polypeptide which is cleaved by bacterial or host proteases into a ~50 kD...

  18. [Axillary hyperhidrosis, botulinium A toxin treatment: Review].

    PubMed

    Clerico, C; Fernandez, J; Camuzard, O; Chignon-Sicard, B; Ihrai, T

    2016-02-01

    Injection of type A botulinum toxin in the armpits is a temporary treatment for axillary hyperhidrosis. This technique described in 1996 by Bushara et al., is known to be efficient and safe. The purpose of this article was to review the data concerning the treatment of axillary hyperhidrosis with botulinum toxin type A, and discuss the other treatment modalities for this socially disabling entity.

  19. Bioterrorism: toxins as weapons.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Peter D

    2012-04-01

    The potential for biological weapons to be used in terrorism is a real possibility. Biological weapons include infectious agents and toxins. Toxins are poisons produced by living organisms. Toxins relevant to bioterrorism include ricin, botulinum, Clostridium perfrigens epsilson toxin, conotoxins, shigatoxins, saxitoxins, tetrodotoxins, mycotoxins, and nicotine. Toxins have properties of biological and chemical weapons. Unlike pathogens, toxins do not produce an infection. Ricin causes multiorgan toxicity by blocking protein synthesis. Botulinum blocks acetylcholine in the peripheral nervous system leading to muscle paralysis. Epsilon toxin damages cell membranes. Conotoxins block potassium and sodium channels in neurons. Shigatoxins inhibit protein synthesis and induce apoptosis. Saxitoxin and tetrodotoxin inhibit sodium channels in neurons. Mycotoxins include aflatoxins and trichothecenes. Aflatoxins are carcinogens. Trichothecenes inhibit protein and nucleic acid synthesis. Nicotine produces numerous nicotinic effects in the nervous system.

  20. Botulinum neurotoxin: the ugly duckling.

    PubMed

    Koussoulakos, Stauros

    2009-01-01

    This review presents a brief account of the most significant biological effects and clinical applications of botulinum neurotoxins, in a way comprehensive even for casual readers who are not familiar with the subject. The most toxic known substances in botulinum neurotoxins are polypeptides naturally synthesized by bacteria of the genus Clostridium. These polypeptides inhibit acetylcholine release at neuromuscular junctions, thus causing muscle paralysis involving both somatic and autonomic innervation. There is substantial evidence that this muscle-paralyzing feature of botulinum neurotoxins is useful for their beneficial influence on more than 50 pathological conditions such as spastic paralysis, cerebral palsy, focal dystonia, essential tremor, headache, incontinence and a variety of cosmetic interventions. Injection of adequate quantities of botulinum toxins in spastic muscles is considered as a highly hopeful procedure for the treatment of people who suffer from dystonia, cerebral palsy or have experienced a stroke. So far, numerous and reliable studies have established the safety and efficacy of botulinum neurotoxins and advocate wider clinical therapeutic and cosmetic applications. PMID:19365125

  1. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of an HA17–HA70 (HA2–HA3) complex from Clostridium botulinum type C progenitor toxin

    PubMed Central

    Iwasa, Chikako; Tonozuka, Takashi; Shinoda, Masaya; Sagane, Yoshimasa; Niwa, Koichi; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Yoshida, Hiromi; Kamitori, Shigehiro; Takao, Toshifumi; Oguma, Keiji; Nishikawa, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    The haemagglutinin (HA) complex of Clostridium botulinum type C toxin is composed of three types of subcomponents: HA33, HA17 and HA70 (also known as HA1, HA2 and HA3, respectively). Here, a 260 kDa HA17–HA70 complex was crystallized. His-tagged HA17 and maltose-binding-protein-tagged HA70 were expressed in Escherichia coli and their complex was affinity-purified using a combination of amylose resin chromatography and nickel–nitrilotri­acetic acid agarose chromatography. Diffraction data were collected to 8.0 Å resolution and the crystal belonged to the tetragonal space group P41212. The molecular-replacement solution indicated that one molecule of HA17 was bound to each HA70 monomer. PMID:24419620

  2. [Cervical dystonia treatment with botulin toxin].

    PubMed

    Cervical Dystonia Treatment With Botulin Toxin, Kazimierz

    2016-08-01

    Cervical dystonia is the most common form of dystonia in adult age. It is characterized by involuntary muscle contractions that cause abnormal movements and positioning of the head and neck. Symptoms of it are often associated with pain. This distinguishes this form from other dystonia. The drug of choice is botulinum toxin. It effectively reduces both pain and abnormal excessive muscle activity. In some cases, particularly where there is not obtained the full recovery after treatment botulinum toxin we used drugs for systemic effect. To increase the effectiveness and reduce the side effects of botulinum toxin more commonly we used administration of toxin under the EMG and ultrasound control. PMID:27591450

  3. [Cervical dystonia treatment with botulin toxin].

    PubMed

    Cervical Dystonia Treatment With Botulin Toxin, Kazimierz

    2016-07-01

    Cervical dystonia is the most common form of dystonia in adult age. It is characterized by involuntary muscle contractions that cause abnormal movements and positioning of the head and neck. Symptoms of it are often associated with pain. This distinguishes this form from other dystonia. The drug of choice is botulinum toxin. It effectively reduces both pain and abnormal excessive muscle activity. In some cases, particularly where there is not obtained the full recovery after treatment botulinum toxin we used drugs for systemic effect. To increase the effectiveness and reduce the side effects of botulinum toxin more commonly we used administration of toxin under the EMG and ultrasound control. PMID:27590655

  4. Multiple forms of SNARE complexes in exocytosis from chromaffin cells: effects of Ca(2+), MgATP and botulinum toxin type A.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Gary W; Dolly, J Oliver

    2002-02-01

    The changes that SNAREs undergo during exocytosis were studied in permeabilised chromaffin cells treated with Ca(2+), MgATP or botulinum neurotoxin A. High-resolution 2D SDS-PAGE revealed multiple SDS-resistant SNARE complexes having a wide range of sizes and in which SNAP-25 and syntaxin predominate over synaptobrevin. Their formation increased upon Ca(2+)-stimulated exocytosis; notably, the 2D protocol proved much superior to 1D SDS-PAGE for the detection of large complexes and revealed that for forms with relative molecular mass greater than 100,000 stimulated induction was more significant than for smaller species. MgATP enhanced Ca(2+)-triggered catecholamine release but reduced the content of complexes. By contrast, botulinum neurotoxin type A inhibited exocytosis and altered the stoichiometry of the SNAP-25:syntaxin binary association, without lowering its abundance. The individual SNAREs were protected against trypsin proteolysis to varying extents in binary and ternary complexes of different sizes, suggestive of distinct folding intermediates. Our data suggest that Ca(2+) triggers an early stage of SNARE complex formation causing an accumulation of partially folded intermediates, especially of binary forms, as well as their maturation into smaller, more protease resistant states. In addition, botulinum neurotoxin A inhibits exocytosis by perturbing the syntaxin:SNAP-25 ratio in binary intermediates.

  5. Botulinum Neurotoxin Research at the Western Regional Research Center

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are some of the most potent toxins to humans. The most common route of intoxication is through ingestion of contaminated food or drink. In addition, these toxins are likely targets for use in intentional adulteration of food or animal feeds and are thus classified as Se...

  6. Effects of irradiation on growth and toxigenicity of Clostridium botulinum types A and B inoculated onto chicken skins

    SciTech Connect

    Dezfulian, M.; Bartlett, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the effects of 0.3-Mrad irradiation on growth and toxigenicity of Clostridum botulinum types A and B on chicken skins. Irradiation followed by aerobic or anaerobic incubation at 30/sup 0/C extended the shelf life of skin samples and delayed growth and toxin production by C. botulinum. During 2 weeks of incubation at 10/sup 0/C, the irradiated and nonirradiated C. botulinum spores failed to grow or produce toxin.

  7. Dynamics of motor nerve terminal remodeling unveiled using SNARE-cleaving botulinum toxins: the extent and duration are dictated by the sites of SNAP-25 truncation.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Frédéric A; Lisk, Godfrey; Sesardic, Dorothea; Dolly, J Oliver

    2003-04-01

    Nerve sprouts emerge from motor nerve terminals following blockade of exo-endocytosis for more than 3 days by botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), and form functional synapses, albeit temporary. Upon restoration of synaptic activity to the parent terminal 7 and 90 days after exposure to BoNT/F or A respectively, a concomitant retraction of the outgrowths was observed. BoNT/E caused short-term neuroparalysis, and dramatically accelerated the recovery of BoNT/A-paralyzed muscle by further truncation of SNAP-25 and its replenishment with functional full-length SNARE. The removal of 9 C-terminal residues from SNAP-25 by BoNT/A leads to persistence of the inhibitory product due to the formation of a nonproductive SNARE complex(es) at release sites, whereas deletion of a further 17 amino acids permits replenishment and a speedy recovery.

  8. Evaluating Functional Outcomes of Botulinum Toxin Type A Injection Combined with Occupational Therapy in the Upper Limbs of Children with Cerebral Palsy: A 9-Month Follow-Up from the Perspectives of Both Child and Caregiver

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Ching; Huang, Chien-Yu; Lin, I-Ling; Shieh, Jeng-Yi; Chung, Yu-Ting; Chen, Kuan-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the effectiveness of combining botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) with functional occupational therapy (OT) at 9-month follow-up in children with cerebral palsy (CP) with bilateral upper limb impairments from the perspectives of both child and caregiver. Methods Twelve children with CP and their caregivers were assessed across 5 time points over 9 months based on the ICF after BoNT-A injection and functional OT in this open-label study. Results Significant differences were found across the 5 time points (p < .05) for both grasp and visual-motor integration with small effects (effect sizes = 0.12–0.24) and the self-care capability and performance of social function (p < .05). However, based on the effect sizes (0.02–0.14), no significant effects were found at the 4 post-test time points. Small effects were found on the psychological domain (effect sizes = 0.25–0.37) and environmental domains (effect size = 0.27) at follow-ups. Conclusion Combining a BoNT-A injection with OT not only reduced the muscle tone and increased ROM but also improved the upper limb function and self-care capability in children with CP. More importantly, these effects persisted for up to 9 months. Functional OT extends the effectiveness of a BoNT-A injection. PMID:26599003

  9. Occurrence of human pathogenic Clostridium botulinum among healthy dairy animals: an emerging public health hazard.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Moein, Khaled A; Hamza, Dalia A

    2016-01-01

    The current study was conducted to investigate the occurrence of human pathogenic Clostridium botulinum in the feces of dairy animals. Fecal samples were collected from 203 apparently healthy dairy animals (50 cattle, 50 buffaloes, 52 sheep, 51 goats). Samples were cultured to recover C. botulinum while human pathogenic C. botulinum strains were identified after screening of all C. botulinum isolates for the presence of genes that encode toxins type A, B, E, F. The overall prevalence of C. botulinum was 18.7% whereas human pathogenic C. botulinum strains (only type A) were isolated from six animals at the rates of 2, 2, 5.8, and 2% for cattle, buffaloes, sheep, and goats, respectively. High fecal carriage rates of C. botulinum among apparently healthy dairy animals especially type A alarm both veterinary and public health communities for a potential role which may be played by dairy animals in the epidemiology of such pathogen. PMID:27077311

  10. Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A in Neurology: Update

    PubMed Central

    Orsini, Marco; Leite, Marco Antonio Araujo; Chung, Tae Mo; Bocca, Wladimir; de Souza, Jano Alves; de Souza, Olivia Gameiro; Moreira, Rayele Priscila; Bastos, Victor Hugo; Teixeira, Silmar; Oliveira, Acary Bulle; Moraes, Bruno da Silva; Matta, André Palma; Jacinto, Luis Jorge

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews the current and most neurological (central nervous system, CNS) uses of the botulinum neurotoxin type A. The effect of these toxins at neuromuscular junction lends themselves to neurological diseases of muscle overactivity, particularly abnormalities of muscle control. There are seven serotypes of the toxin, each with a specific activity at the molecular level. Currently, serotypes A (in two preparations) and B are available for clinical purpose, and they have proved to be safe and effective for the treatment of dystonia, spasticity, headache, and other CNS disorders in which muscle hyperactivity gives rise to symptoms. Although initially thought to inhibit acetylcholine release only at the neuromuscular junction, botulinum toxins are now recognized to inhibit acetylcholine release at autonomic cholinergic nerve terminals, as well as peripheral release of neuro-transmitters involved in pain regulation. Its effects are transient and nondestructive, and largely limited to the area in which it is administered. These effects are also graded according to the dose, allowing individualized treatment of patients and disorders. It may also prove to be useful in the control of autonomic dysfunction and sialorrhea. In over 20 years of use in humans, botulinum toxin has accumulated a considerable safety record, and in many cases represents relief for thousands of patients unaided by other therapy. PMID:26487928

  11. Topographic Relationship between the Supratrochlear Nerve and Corrugator Supercilii Muscle—Can This Anatomical Knowledge Improve the Response to Botulinum Toxin Injections in Chronic Migraine?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyung-Jin; Choi, Kwang-Seok; Won, Sung-Yoon; Apinuntrum, Prawit; Hu, Kyung-Seok; Kim, Seong-Taek; Tansatit, Tanvaa; Kim, Hee-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Chronic migraine has been related to the entrapment of the supratrochlear nerve within the corrugator supercilii muscle. Recently, research has shown that people who have undergone botulinum neurotoxin A injection in frontal regions reported disappearance or alleviation of their migraines. There have been numerous anatomical studies conducted on Caucasians revealing possible anatomical problems leading to migraine; on the other hand, relatively few anatomical studies have been conducted on Asians. Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine the topographic relationship between the supratrochlear nerve and corrugator supercilii muscle in the forehead that may be the cause of migraine. Fifty-eight hemifaces from Korean and Thai cadavers were used for this study. The supratrochlear nerve entered the corrugator supercilii muscle in every case. Type I, in which the supratrochlear nerve emerged separately from the supraorbital nerve at the medial one-third portion of the orbit, was observed in 69% (40/58) of cases. Type II, in which the supratrochlear nerve emerged from the orbit at the same location as the supraorbital nerve, was observed in 31% (18/58) of cases. PMID:26193317

  12. A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial Investigating the Most Efficacious Dose of Botulinum Toxin-A for Sialorrhea Treatment in Asian Adults with Neurological Diseases.

    PubMed

    Mazlan, Mazlina; Rajasegaran, Shivani; Engkasan, Julia Patrick; Nawawi, Ouzreiah; Goh, Khean-Jin; Freddy, Saini Jeffery

    2015-09-22

    This study aims to determine the most efficacious dose of Botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT-A) in reducing sialorrhea in Asian adults with neurological diseases. A prospective, double-blind randomized controlled trial was conducted over 24 weeks. Thirty patients with significant sialorrhea were randomly assigned to receive a BoNT-A (Dysport(®)) injection into the submandibular and the parotid glands bilaterally via an ultrasound guidance. The total dose given per patient was either BoNT-A injection of (i) 50 U; (ii) 100 U; or (iii) 200 U. The primary outcome was the amount of saliva reduction, measured by the differential weight (wet versus dry) of intraoral dental gauze at baseline and at 2, 6, 12, and 24 weeks after injection. The secondary outcome was the subjective report of drooling using the Drooling Frequency and Severity Scale (DFS). Saliva reduction was observed in response to all BoNT-A doses in 17 patients who completed the assessments. Although no statistically significant difference among the doses was found, the measured reduction was greater in groups that received higher doses (100 U and 200 U). The group receiving 200 U of Dysport(®) showed the greatest reduction of saliva until 24 weeks and reported the most significant improvement in the DFS score.

  13. Current methods for detecting the presence of botulinum neurotoxins in food and other biological samples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current methods for detecting the presence of botulinum neurotoxins in food and other biological samples Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), the causative agents of botulism, are among the most lethal human bacterial toxins and the causative agent of botulism. BoNTs are also classified as Select Agents ...

  14. Translocation of botulinum neurotoxins and associated proteins across intestinal epithelial cells(Abstract)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botulinum neurotoxins(BoNTs)secreted by Clostridium botulinum are some of the most poisonous toxins in nature and considered to be major bioterrorism threats. To date, seven BoNT subtypes (A to G) have been identified. When secreted from bacteria, some BoNTs associate with a non-toxic, non hemagglu...

  15. Structure of a bimodular botulinum neurotoxin complex provides insights into its oral toxicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are highly potent oral poisons produced by Clostridium botulinum. BoNTs are secreted along with several auxiliary proteins forming progenitor toxin complexes (PTC). Here, we report the structure of a ~760 kDa 14-subunit PTC using a combination of X-ray crystallography a...

  16. CD44 Promotes Intoxication by the Clostridial Iota-Family Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Wigelsworth, Darran J.; Ruthel, Gordon; Schnell, Leonie; Herrlich, Peter; Blonder, Josip; Veenstra, Timothy D.; Carman, Robert J.; Wilkins, Tracy D.; Van Nhieu, Guy Tran; Pauillac, Serge; Gibert, Maryse; Sauvonnet, Nathalie; Stiles, Bradley G.; Popoff, Michel R.; Barth, Holger

    2012-01-01

    Various pathogenic clostridia produce binary protein toxins associated with enteric diseases of humans and animals. Separate binding/translocation (B) components bind to a protein receptor on the cell surface, assemble with enzymatic (A) component(s), and mediate endocytosis of the toxin complex. Ultimately there is translocation of A component(s) from acidified endosomes into the cytosol, leading to destruction of the actin cytoskeleton. Our results revealed that CD44, a multifunctional surface protein of mammalian cells, facilitates intoxication by the iota family of clostridial binary toxins. Specific antibody against CD44 inhibited cytotoxicity of the prototypical Clostridium perfringens iota toxin. Versus CD44+ melanoma cells, those lacking CD44 bound less toxin and were dose-dependently resistant to C. perfringens iota, as well as Clostridium difficile and Clostridium spiroforme iota-like, toxins. Purified CD44 specifically interacted in vitro with iota and iota-like, but not related Clostridium botulinum C2, toxins. Furthermore, CD44 knockout mice were resistant to iota toxin lethality. Collective data reveal an important role for CD44 during intoxication by a family of clostridial binary toxins. PMID:23236484

  17. Low pH-Induced Pore Formation by the T Domain of Botulinum Toxin Type A is Dependent upon NaCl Concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, B.; Swaminathan, S.; Agarwal, R.; Nelson, L. D.; London, E.

    2010-07-19

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) undergo low pH-triggered membrane insertion, resulting in the translocation of their light (catalytic) chains into the cytoplasm. The T (translocation) domain of the BoNT heavy chain is believed to carry out translocation. Here, the behavior of isolated T domain from BoNT type A has been characterized, both in solution and when associated with model membranes. When BoNT T domain prepared in the detergent dodecylmaltoside was diluted into aqueous solution, it exhibited a low pH-dependent conformational change below pH 6. At low pH the T domain associated with, and formed pores within, model membrane vesicles composed of 30 mol% dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol/70 mol% dioleoylphosphatidylcholine. Although T domain interacted with vesicles at low (50 mM) and high (400 mM) NaCl concentrations, the interaction required much less lipid at low salt. However, even at high lipid concentrations pore formation was much more pronounced at low NaCl concentrations than at high NaCl concentration. Increasing salt concentration after insertion in the presence of 50 mM NaCl did not decrease pore formation. A similar effect of NaCl concentration upon pore formation was observed in vesicles composed solely of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine, showing that the effect of NaCl did not solely involve modulation of electrostatic interactions between protein and anionic lipids. These results indicate that some feature of membrane-bound T domain tertiary structure critical for pore formation is highly dependent upon salt concentration.

  18. A Prospective Randomized Double-blinded Pilot Study to Examine the Effect of Botulinum Toxin Type A Injection Versus Lidocaine/Depomedrol Injection on Residual and Phantom Limb Pain

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hong; Sultana, Rizwana; Taylor, Kerrey Barton; Szabo, Aniko

    2013-01-01

    Objective Botulinum toxin type A (Botox) injection has been used to manage pain. However, it remains to be proved whether Botox injection is effective to relieve residual limb pain (RLP) and phantom limb pain (PLP). Design Randomized, double-blinded pilot study. Setting Medical College and an outpatient clinic in Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Participants Amputees (n=14) with intractable RLP and/or PLP who failed in the conventional treatments. Interventions Study amputees were randomized to receive 1 Botox injection versus the combination of Lidocaine and Depomedrol injection. Each patient was evaluated at baseline and every month after the injection for 6 months. Main Outcome Measure The changes of RLP and PLP as recorded by VAS, and the changes of the pressure pain tolerance as determined by a pressure algometer. Results All patients completed the protocol treatment without acute side effects, and monthly assessments of RLP, PLP, and pain tolerance after the treatment. The time trend in the outcomes was modeled as an immediate change owing to the treatment followed by a linear tread afterward. Repeated measures were incorporated using mixed effects modeling. We found that both Botox and Lidocaine/Depomedrol injections resulted in immediate improvements of RLP (Botox: P=0.002; Lidocaine/Depomedrol: P=0.06) and pain tolerance (Botox: P=0.01; Lidocaine/Depomedrol: P=0.07). The treatment effect lasted for 6 months in both groups. The patients who received Botox injection had higher starting pain than those who received Lidocaine/Depomedrol injection (P=0.07). However, there were no statistical differences in RLP and pain tolerance between these 2 groups. In addition, no improvement of PLP was observed after Botox or Lidocaine/Depomedrol injection. Conclusions Both Botox and Lidocaine/Depomedrol injections resulted in immediate improvement of RLP (not PLP) and pain tolerance, which lasted for 6 months in amputees who failed in conventional

  19. Botulinum toxin in masticatory muscles of the adult rat induces bone loss at the condyle and alveolar regions of the mandible associated with a bone proliferation at a muscle enthesis.

    PubMed

    Kün-Darbois, Jean-Daniel; Libouban, Hélène; Chappard, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    In man, botulinum toxin type A (BTX) is injected in masticatory muscles for several indications such as trismus, bruxism, or masseter hypertrophy. Bone changes in the mandible following BTX injections in adult animal have therefore became a subject of interest. The aim of this study was to analyze condylar and alveolar bone changes following BTX unilateral injections in masseter and temporal muscles in adult rats. Mature male rats (n = 15) were randomized into 2 groups: control (CTRL; n = 6) and BTX group (n= 9). Rats of the BTX group received a single injection of BTX into right masseter and temporal muscles. Rats of the CTRL group were similarly injected with saline solution. Rats were sacrificed 4 weeks after injections. Masticatory muscles examination and microcomputed tomography (microCT) were performed. A significant difference of weight was found between the 2 groups at weeks 2, 3 and 4 (p < 0.05). Atrophy of the right masseter and temporal muscles was observed in all BTX rats. MicroCT analysis showed significant bone loss in the right alveolar and condylar areas in BTX rats. Decrease in bone volume reached -20% for right alveolar bone and -35% for right condylar bone. A hypertrophic bone metaplasia at the digastric muscle enthesis was found on every right hemimandible in the BTX group and none in the CTRL group. BTX injection in masticatory muscles leads to a significant and major mandible bone loss. These alterations can represent a risk factor for fractures in human. The occurrence of a hypertrophic bone metaplasia at the Mus Digastricus enthesis may constitute an etiological factor for tori.

  20. Safety and Efficacy of Botulinum Toxin to Preserve Gland Function after Radiotherapy in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer: A Prospective, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blinded Phase I Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Teymoortash, Afshin; Pfestroff, Andreas; Wittig, Andrea; Franke, Nora; Hoch, Stephan; Harnisch, Susanne; Schade-Brittinger, Carmen; Hoeffken, Helmut; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Brugger, Markus; Strauch, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    This prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded phase I clinical trial investigates safety and efficacy of botulinum toxin (BoNT) to preserve gland function after radiotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer. Twelve patients with advanced head and neck cancer were injected with BoNT into the submandibular glands prior to primary radiochemotherapy. Six patients received BoNT/A and 6 patients BoNT/A and B, half of each subgroup into their left and the other half into their right gland. As an internal control, sodium chloride was injected into the respective contralateral gland (placebo). For the evaluation of the salivary gland function, technetium pertechnetate salivary gland scintigraphy was performed before and after the end of radiotherapy. BoNT/A and B were well tolerated. Analysis of the scintigraphic data revealed no statistically significant difference between BoNT and placebo regarding the scintigraphic uptake difference (pBoNT/A = 0.84 and pBoNT/A-B = 0.56 for BoNT/A vs. placebo and BoNT/A-B vs. placebo, respectively). We also found no significant difference in treatment between BoNT and placebo in terms of salivary excretion fraction (pBoNT/A = 0.44; pBoNT/A-B = 0.44). This study demonstrates that BoNT can be safely combined with radiochemotherapy. Dosing and timing of BoNT injection should be further investigated for efficacy analysis. Trial Registration German Registry for Clinical Trails DRKS00004595.

  1. Safety and Efficacy of Botulinum Toxin to Preserve Gland Function after Radiotherapy in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer: A Prospective, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blinded Phase I Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Teymoortash, Afshin; Pfestroff, Andreas; Wittig, Andrea; Franke, Nora; Hoch, Stephan; Harnisch, Susanne; Schade-Brittinger, Carmen; Hoeffken, Helmut; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Brugger, Markus; Strauch, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    This prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded phase I clinical trial investigates safety and efficacy of botulinum toxin (BoNT) to preserve gland function after radiotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer. Twelve patients with advanced head and neck cancer were injected with BoNT into the submandibular glands prior to primary radiochemotherapy. Six patients received BoNT/A and 6 patients BoNT/A and B, half of each subgroup into their left and the other half into their right gland. As an internal control, sodium chloride was injected into the respective contralateral gland (placebo). For the evaluation of the salivary gland function, technetium pertechnetate salivary gland scintigraphy was performed before and after the end of radiotherapy. BoNT/A and B were well tolerated. Analysis of the scintigraphic data revealed no statistically significant difference between BoNT and placebo regarding the scintigraphic uptake difference (pBoNT/A = 0.84 and pBoNT/A-B = 0.56 for BoNT/A vs. placebo and BoNT/A-B vs. placebo, respectively). We also found no significant difference in treatment between BoNT and placebo in terms of salivary excretion fraction (pBoNT/A = 0.44; pBoNT/A-B = 0.44). This study demonstrates that BoNT can be safely combined with radiochemotherapy. Dosing and timing of BoNT injection should be further investigated for efficacy analysis. Trial Registration German Registry for Clinical Trails DRKS00004595 PMID:26991494

  2. Efficacy and safety of a single botulinum type A toxin complex treatment (Dysport) for the relief of upper back myofascial pain syndrome: results from a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Göbel, Hartmut; Heinze, Axel; Reichel, Gerhard; Hefter, Harald; Benecke, Reiner

    2006-11-01

    Botulinum type A toxin (BoNT-A) has antinociceptive and muscle-relaxant properties and may help relieve the symptoms of myofascial pain syndrome. In this study we evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of BoNT-A (Dysport) in patients with myofascial pain syndrome of the upper back. We conducted a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 12-week, multicentre study. Patients with moderate-to-severe myofascial pain syndrome affecting cervical and/or shoulder muscles (10 trigger points, disease duration 6-24 months) were randomized to Dysport or saline. Injections were made into the 10 most tender trigger points (40 units per site). The primary outcome was the proportion of patients with mild or no pain at week 5. Secondary outcomes included changes in pain intensity and the number of pain-free days per week. Tolerability and safety were also assessed. At week 5, significantly more patients in the Dysport group reported mild or no pain (51%), compared with the patients in the placebo group (26%; p=0.002). Compared with placebo, Dysport resulted in a significantly greater change from baseline in pain intensity during weeks 5-8 (p<0.05), and significantly fewer days per week without pain between weeks 5 and 12 (p=0.036). Treatment was well tolerated, with most side effects resolving within 8 weeks. In conclusion, in patients with upper back myofascial pain syndrome, injections of 400 Ipsen units of Dysport at 10 individualised trigger points significantly improved pain levels 4-6 weeks after treatment. Injections were well tolerated.

  3. Treatment of Chronic Migraine with Focus on Botulinum Neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Sara M; Gottschalk, Christopher H; Jabbari, Bahman

    2015-07-14

    Migraine is the most common neurological disorder, and contributes to disability and large healthcare costs in the United States and the world. The treatment of migraine until recently has focused on medications, both abortive and prophylactic, but treatment of chronic migraine has been revolutionized with the introduction of botulinum toxin injection therapy. In this review, we explore the current understanding of migraine pathophysiology, and the evolution of the use of botulinum toxin therapy including proposed pathophysiological mechanisms through animal data. We also discuss the similarities and differences between three injection techniques.

  4. [Severe Frey syndrome after parotidectomy: treatment with botulinum neurotoxin type A].

    PubMed

    Laccourreye, O; Muscatello, L; Gutierrez-Fonseca, R; Seckin, S; Brasnu, D; Bonan, B

    1999-06-01

    Based upon an inception cohort of 30 patients with severe Frey's syndrome, after conservative parotidectomy, the technique and the results of intracutaneous injection of botulinum toxin type A are presented. The skin surface involved with Frey's syndrome was managed with intracutaneous injection of 2.5 international units of botulinum toxin type A per square centimeter. A minimum follow-up of 16 months was achieved. The only adverse side effect encountered was a temporary paresis of the upper lid noted in 2 patients. Frey's syndrome vanished within 2-5 days from the intracutaneous injection of botulinum toxin type A. Frey's syndrome was controlled in 53.2% of cases (17/30) after the initial injection of botulinum toxin type A. Five of the 13 patients with recurrence of Frey's syndrome elicited to undergo a watch and wait policy due to the lack of discomfort induced by the recurrence. The remaining eight patients with recurrence of Frey's syndrome were successfully managed with a secondary intracutaneous injection of botulinum toxin type A. Such preliminary data, together with the review of the literature suggests, that the intracutaneous injection of botulinum toxin type A should now be the first line treatment option in patients with severe Frey syndrome. PMID:10399528

  5. Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotypes Detected by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Alison C.; Buckley, Nicholas; Halliwell, Jennifer; Gwenin, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin is one of the deadliest biological toxins known to mankind and is able to cause the debilitating disease botulism. The rapid detection of the different serotypes of botulinum neurotoxin is essential for both diagnosis of botulism and identifying the presence of toxin in potential cases of terrorism and food contamination. The modes of action of botulinum neurotoxins are well-established in literature and differ for each serotype. The toxins are known to specifically cleave portions of the SNARE proteins SNAP-25 or VAMP; an interaction that can be monitored by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. This study presents a SNAP-25 and a VAMP biosensors for detecting the activity of five botulinum neurotoxin serotypes (A–E) using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The biosensors are able to detect concentrations of toxins as low as 25 fg/mL, in a short time-frame compared with the current standard methods of detection. Both biosensors show greater specificity for their compatible serotypes compared with incompatible serotypes and denatured toxins. PMID:25954998

  6. Impact of integrated upper limb spasticity management including botulinum toxin A on patient-centred goal attainment: rationale and protocol for an international prospective, longitudinal cohort study (ULIS-III)

    PubMed Central

    Turner-Stokes, Lynne; Ashford, Stephen; Jacinto, Jorge; Maisonobe, Pascal; Balcaitiene, Jovita; Fheodoroff, Klemens

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Describe the rationale and protocol for the Upper Limb International Spasticity (ULIS)-III study, which aims to evaluate the impact of integrated spasticity management, involving multiple botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) injection cycles and concomitant therapies, on patient-centred goal attainment. Outline novel outcome assessment methods for ULIS-III and report initial evaluation data from goal setting in early stages of the study. Design Large international longitudinal cohort study of integrated upper limb spasticity management, including BoNT-A. Participants and setting ULIS-III is a 2-year study expected to enrol >1000 participants at 58 study centres across 14 countries. Interventions The study design is non-interventional and intended to reflect real-life clinical practice. It will describe injection practices and additional treatment strategies, and record clinical decision-making in a serial approach to long-term spasticity management. Outcome measures ULIS-III will use a goal-directed approach to selection of targeted standardised measures to capture the diversity of presentation, goals and outcomes. ULIS-III will implement the Upper Limb Spasticity Index, a battery of assessments including a structured approach to goal attainment scaling (Goal Attainment Scaling—Evaluation of Outcomes for Upper Limb Spasticity tool), alongside a limited set of standardised measures, chosen according to patients' selected goal areas. Concomitant therapy inputs, patient satisfaction with engagement in goal setting, health economic end points and health-related quality of life data will also be captured. Results of initial evaluation of goal quality Recruitment started in January 2015. By June 2015, 58 sites had been identified and initial data collected for 79 patients across 13 sites in 3 countries. Goal setting data were quality-checked and centres rated on the basis of function-related and Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic, Timed (SMART

  7. Evaluation of the effects of botulinum toxin A injections when used to improve ease of care and comfort in children with cerebral palsy whom are non-ambulant: a double blind randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Children with cerebral palsy (CP) whom are non-ambulant are at risk of reduced quality of life and poor health status. Severe spasticity leads to discomfort and pain. Carer burden for families is significant. This study aims to determine whether intramuscular injections of botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) combined with a regime of standard therapy has a positive effect on care and comfort for children with CP whom are non-ambulant (GMFCS IV/V), compared with standard therapy alone (cycle I), and whether repeated injections with the same regime of adjunctive therapy results in greater benefits compared with a single injecting episode (cycle II). The regime of therapy will include serial casting, splinting and/or provision of orthoses, as indicated, combined with four sessions of goal directed occupational therapy or physiotherapy. Method/design This study is a double blind randomized controlled trial. Forty participants will be recruited. In cycle I, participants will be randomized to either a treatment group who will receive BoNT-A injections into selected upper and/or lower limb muscles, or a control group who will undergo sham injections. Both groups will receive occupational therapy and /or physiotherapy following injections. Groups will be assessed at baseline then compared at 4 and 16 weeks following injections or sham control. Parents, treating clinicians and assessors will be masked to group allocation. In cycle II, all participants will undergo intramuscular BoNT-A injections to selected upper and/or lower limb muscles, followed by therapy. The primary outcome measure will be change in parent ratings in identified areas of concern for their child’s care and comfort, using the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM). Secondary measures will include the Care and Comfort Hypertonicity Scale (ease of care), the Cerebral Palsy Quality of Life Questionnaire (CP QoL–Child) (quality of life), the Caregiver Priorities and Child Health Index of Life

  8. Modified constraint-induced movement therapy or bimanual occupational therapy following injection of Botulinum toxin-A to improve bimanual performance in young children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy: a randomised controlled trial methods paper

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Use of Botulinum toxin-A (BoNT-A) for treatment of upper limb spasticity in children with cerebral palsy has become routine clinical practice in many paediatric treatment centres worldwide. There is now high-level evidence that upper limb BoNT-A injection, in combination with occupational therapy, improves outcomes in children with cerebral palsy at both the body function/structure and activity level domains of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Investigation is now required to establish what amount and specific type of occupational therapy will further enhance functional outcomes and prolong the beneficial effects of BoNT-A. Methods/Design A randomised, controlled, evaluator blinded, prospective parallel-group trial. Eligible participants were children aged 18 months to 6 years, diagnosed with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy and who were able to demonstrate selective motor control of the affected upper limb. Both groups received upper limb injections of BoNT-A. Children were randomised to either the modified constraint-induced movement therapy group (experimental) or bimanual occupational therapy group (control). Outcome assessments were undertaken at pre-injection and 1, 3 and 6 months following injection of BoNT-A. The primary outcome measure was the Assisting Hand Assessment. Secondary outcomes included: the Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test; Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory; Canadian Occupational Performance Measure; Goal Attainment Scaling; Pediatric Motor Activity Log; modified Ashworth Scale and; the modified Tardieu Scale. Discussion The aim of this paper is to describe the methodology of a randomised controlled trial comparing the effects of modified constraint-induced movement therapy (a uni-manual therapy) versus bimanual occupational therapy (a bimanual therapy) on improving bimanual upper limb performance of children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy following upper limb injection of Bo

  9. An open-label cohort study of the improvement of quality of life and pain in de novo cervical dystonia patients after injections with 500 U botulinum toxin A (Dysport)

    PubMed Central

    Hefter, H; Benecke, R; Erbguth, F; Jost, W; Reichel, G; Wissel, J

    2013-01-01

    Objectives It remains to be determined whether the benefits of botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) on cervical dystonia (CD) motor symptoms extend to improvements in patient's quality of life (QoL). This analysis of a large, multicentre study was conducted with the aim of investigating changes in QoL and functioning among de novo patients receiving 500 U BoNT-A (abobotulinumtoxinA; Dysport) for the treatment of the two most frequent forms of CD, predominantly torticollis and laterocollis. Design A prospective, open-label study of Dysport (500 U; Ipsen Biopharm Ltd) administered according to a defined intramuscular injection algorithm. Setting German and Austrian outpatient clinics. Participants 516 male and female patients (aged ≥18 years) with de novo CD. The majority of patients had torticollis (78.1%). 35 patients had concomitant depression (MedDRA-defined). Main outcome measures Change from baseline to weeks 4 and 12 in Craniocervical Dystonia Questionnaire (CDQ-24) total and subscale scores, patient diary items (‘day-to-day capacities and activities’, ‘pain’ and ‘duration of pain’) and global assessment of pain. Results Significant improvements were observed in CDQ-24 total and subscale scores at week 4 and were sustained up to week 12 (p<0.001). Changes in CDQ-24 scores did not significantly differ between the torticollis and laterocollis groups or between patients with or without depression. There were also significant reductions in patient diary item scores for activities of daily living, pain and pain duration at weeks 4 and 12 (p<0.001). Pain relief (less or no pain) was reported by 66% and 74.1% of patients at weeks 4 and 12, respectively. Changes in pain parameters demonstrated a positive relationship with change in Tsui score. Conclusions After standardised open-label treatment with Dysport 500 U, improvements in QoL and pain intensity up to 12 weeks in patients with CD were observed. PMID:23604344

  10. Comparison of oral toxicological properties of botulinum neurotoxin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are among the most potent biological toxins for humans. Of the seven known serotypes (A-G) of BoNT, serotypes A, B and E cause most of the foodborne intoxications in humans. BoNTs in nature are associated with non-toxic accessory proteins known as neurotoxin-associated ...

  11. Rapid and selective detection of botulinum neurotoxin serotypes-A and –B with a single immunochromatographic test strip

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seven, antigenically distinct botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum and classified into serotypes designated A-G. In animals these potent toxin acts to inhibit acetylcholine release, resulting in paralysis and death. BoNT/A and /B, together represent >80% o...

  12. Update on the botulinum neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Carruthers, A; Carruthers, J

    2001-12-01

    The botulinum neurotoxins (BTX) are an exciting group of therapeutic agents with dramatically expanding clinical indications. The US FDA has approved BOTOX (BTX-A, Allergan) and Myobloc (BTX-B, Elan Pharmaceuticals) for the treatment of cervical dystonia. TPP Canada has also approved BOTOX for the treatment of glabellar frown lines. The US FDA is expected to approve this new indication before the end of 2002. These changes will dramatically expand the marketing of BTXs. Concerns about risks and side-effects diminish as clinical experience increases with this "most poisonous of poisons". In particular, the incidence of secondary resistance to the toxin's effect has been dramatically diminished with the reduction of the non-toxic protein in current batches of BOTOX. PMID:11813096

  13. Clostridium difficile toxin CDT induces formation of microtubule-based protrusions and increases adherence of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Schwan, Carsten; Stecher, Bärbel; Tzivelekidis, Tina; van Ham, Marco; Rohde, Manfred; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich; Wehland, Jürgen; Aktories, Klaus

    2009-10-01

    Clostridium difficile causes antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis by production of the Rho GTPase-glucosylating toxins A and B. Recently emerging hypervirulent Clostridium difficile strains additionally produce the binary ADP-ribosyltransferase toxin CDT (Clostridium difficile transferase), which ADP-ribosylates actin and inhibits actin polymerization. Thus far, the role of CDT as a virulence factor is not understood. Here we report by using time-lapse- and immunofluorescence microscopy that CDT and other binary actin-ADP-ribosylating toxins, including Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin and Clostridium perfringens iota toxin, induce redistribution of microtubules and formation of long (up to >150 microm) microtubule-based protrusions at the surface of intestinal epithelial cells. The toxins increase the length of decoration of microtubule plus-ends by EB1/3, CLIP-170 and CLIP-115 proteins and cause redistribution of the capture proteins CLASP2 and ACF7 from microtubules at the cell cortex into the cell interior. The CDT-induced microtubule protrusions form a dense meshwork at the cell surface, which wrap and embed bacterial cells, thereby largely increasing the adherence of Clostridia. The study describes a novel type of microtubule structure caused by less efficient microtubule capture and offers a new perspective for the pathogenetic role of CDT and other binary actin-ADP-ribosylating toxins in host-pathogen interactions.

  14. Learning from the past: historical aspects of bacterial toxins as pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Pellett, Sabine

    2012-06-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins are the most poisonous substances known to humankind, but also are the bacterial toxins most frequently used as pharmaceuticals to benefit humans. The discovery of botulinum toxins and development into a useful drug is unique and fascinating, dating back to the early 19th century, when Justinus Kerner first recognized that botulism was caused by a biological toxin and suggested its use for medicinal purposes. This was translated into reality in 1980, when Alan Scott for the first time used the toxins to successfully treat strabismus. Now a subset of botulinum toxins are widely used for cosmetic applications, treatment of various movement disorders, pain and many other syndromes, and further developments using other botulinum toxins or recombinant molecules engineered from subdomains are promising.

  15. The zinc-dependent protease activity of the botulinum neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Lebeda, Frank J; Cer, Regina Z; Mudunuri, Uma; Stephens, Robert; Singh, Bal Ram; Adler, Michael

    2010-05-01

    The botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT, serotypes A-G) are some of the most toxic proteins known and are the causative agents of botulism. Following exposure, the neurotoxin binds and enters peripheral cholinergic nerve endings and specifically and selectively cleaves one or more SNARE proteins to produce flaccid paralysis. This review centers on the kinetics of the Zn-dependent proteolytic activities of these neurotoxins, and briefly describes inhibitors, activators and factors underlying persistence of toxin action. Some of the structural, enzymatic and inhibitor data that are discussed here are available at the botulinum neurotoxin resource, BotDB (http://botdb.abcc.ncifcrf.gov).

  16. Use of Botulinum Toxin in Urologic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Chermansky, Christopher J; Chancellor, Michael B

    2016-05-01

    OnabotulinumtoxinA (onaBoNTA) is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of urinary incontinence due to neurogenic detrusor overactivity and for the treatment of refractory overactive bladder. As a treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia, onaBoNTA showed no difference over placebo in recently published studies. In contrast, treating interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome with onaBoNTA has shown efficacy, and the current American Urological Association guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome lists onaBoNTA as fourth-line treatment. This comprehensive review will present all studied applications of onaBoNTA within the lower urinary tract.

  17. Toxins from Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Henkel, James S.; Baldwin, Michael R.; Barbieri, Joseph T.

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial toxins damage the host at the site of bacterial infection or distanced from the site of infections. Bacterial toxins can be single proteins or organized as oligomeric protein complexes and are organized with distinct AB structure-function properties. The A domain encodes a catalytic activity; ADP-ribosylation of host proteins is the earliest post-translational modification determine to be performed by bacterial toxin, and now include glucosylation and proteolysis among other s. Bacterial toxins also catalyze the non-covalent modification of host protein function or can modify host cell properties through direct protein-protein interactions. The B domain includes two functional domains: a receptor-binding domain, which defines the tropism of a toxin for a cell and a translocation domain that delivers A domain across a lipid bilayer, either on the plasma membrane or the endosome. Bacterial toxins are often characterized based upon the section mechanism that delivers the toxin out of the bacterium, termed type I–VII. This review will overview the major families of bacterial toxins and will also describe the specific structure-function properties of the botulinum neurotoxins. PMID:20358680

  18. Antibody-based biological toxin detection

    SciTech Connect

    Menking, D.E.; Goode, M.T.

    1995-12-01

    Fiber optic evanescent fluorosensors are under investigation in our laboratory for the study of drug-receptor interactions for detection of threat agents and antibody-antigen interactions for detection of biological toxins. In a direct competition assay, antibodies against Cholera toxin, Staphylococcus Enterotoxin B or ricin were noncovalently immobilized on quartz fibers and probed with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) - labeled toxins. In the indirect competition assay, Cholera toxin or Botulinum toxoid A was immobilized onto the fiber, followed by incubation in an antiserum or partially purified anti-toxin IgG. These were then probed with FITC-anti-IgG antibodies. Unlabeled toxins competed with labeled toxins or anti-toxin IgG in a dose dependent manner and the detection of the toxins was in the nanomolar range.

  19. The C-Terminal Heavy-Chain Domain of Botulinum Neurotoxin A Is Not the Only Site That Binds Neurons, as the N-Terminal Heavy-Chain Domain Also Plays a Very Active Role in Toxin-Cell Binding and Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, K. Roger

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) possess unique specificity for nerve terminals. They bind to the presynaptic membrane and then translocate intracellularly, where the light-chain endopeptidase cleaves the SNARE complex proteins, subverting the synaptic exocytosis responsible for acetylcholine release to the synaptic cleft. This inhibits acetylcholine binding to its receptor, causing paralysis. Binding, an obligate event for cell intoxication, is believed to occur through the heavy-chain C-terminal (HC) domain. It is followed by toxin translocation and entry into the cell cytoplasm, which is thought to be mediated by the heavy-chain N-terminal (HN) domain. Submolecular mapping analysis by using synthetic peptides spanning BoNT serotype A (BoNT/A) and mouse brain synaptosomes (SNPs) and protective antibodies against toxin from mice and cervical dystonia patients undergoing BoNT/A treatment revealed that not only regions of the HC domain but also regions of the HN domain are involved in the toxin binding process. Based on these findings, we expressed a peptide corresponding to the BoNT/A region comprising HN domain residues 729 to 845 (HN729–845). HN729–845 bound directly to mouse brain SNPs and substantially inhibited BoNT/A binding to SNPs. The binding involved gangliosides GT1b and GD1a and a few membrane lipids. The peptide bound to human or mouse neuroblastoma cells within 1 min. Peptide HN729–845 protected mice completely against a lethal BoNT/A dose (1.05 times the 100% lethal dose). This protective activity was obtained at a dose comparable to that of the peptide from positions 967 to 1296 in the HC domain. These findings strongly indicate that HN729–845 and, by extension, the HN domain are fully programmed and equipped to bind to neuronal cells and in the free state can even inhibit the binding of the toxin. PMID:25624352

  20. Development and characterization of six monoclonal antibodies to hemagglutinin-70 (HA70) of Clostridium botulinum and their application in a sandwich ELISA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT),produced by Clostridium botulinum, cause severe neuroparalytic disease that if not treated quickly is often fatal. The toxin is synthesized as a 150 kDa precursor protein (holotoxin), which is then enzymatically cleaved to form two subunit chains linked by a single disul...

  1. Rapid, Quantitative PCR Monitoring of Growth of Clostridium botulinum Type E in Modified-Atmosphere-Packaged Fish

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, B.; Kawasaki, S.; Nakano, H.; Fujii, T.

    2001-01-01

    A rapid, quantitative PCR assay (TaqMan assay) which quantifies Clostridium botulinum type E by amplifying a 280-bp sequence from the botulinum neurotoxin type E (BoNT/E) gene is described. With this method, which uses the hydrolysis of an internal fluoregenic probe and monitors in real time the increase in the intensity of fluorescence during PCR by using the ABI Prism 7700 sequence detection system, it was possible to perform accurate and reproducible quantification of the C. botulinum type E toxin gene. The sensitivity and specificity of the assay were verified by using 6 strains of C. botulinum type E and 18 genera of 42 non-C. botulinum type E strains, including strains of C. botulinum types A, B, C, D, F, and G. In both pure cultures and modified-atmosphere-packaged fish samples (jack mackerel), the increase in amounts of C. botulinum DNA could be monitored (the quantifiable range was 102 to 108 CFU/ml or g) much earlier than toxin could be detected by mouse assay. The method was applied to a variety of seafood samples with a DNA extraction protocol using guanidine isothiocyanate. Overall, an efficient recovery of C. botulinum cells was obtained from all of the samples tested. These results suggested that quantification of BoNT/E DNA by the rapid, quantitative PCR method was a good method for the sensitive assessment of botulinal risk in the seafood samples tested. PMID:11133447

  2. Detection of botulinum neurotoxin serotypes A and B using a chemiluminescent versus electrochemiluminescent immunoassay in food and serum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are some of the most potent biological toxins. High-affinity monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been developed for the detection of BoNT serotypes A and B using a chemiluminescent capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In an effort to improve toxin detection ...

  3. Zebrafish Sensitivity to Botulinum Neurotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Chatla, Kamalakar; Gaunt, Patricia S.; Petrie-Hanson, Lora; Ford, Lorelei; Hanson, Larry A.

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are the most potent known toxins. The mouse LD50 assay is the gold standard for testing BoNT potency, but is not sensitive enough to detect the extremely low levels of neurotoxin that may be present in the serum of sensitive animal species that are showing the effects of BoNT toxicity, such as channel catfish affected by visceral toxicosis of catfish. Since zebrafish are an important animal model for diverse biomedical and basic research, they are readily available and have defined genetic lines that facilitate reproducibility. This makes them attractive for use as an alternative bioassay organism. The utility of zebrafish as a bioassay model organism for BoNT was investigated. The 96 h median immobilizing doses of BoNT/A, BoNT/C, BoNT/E, and BoNT/F for adult male Tübingen strain zebrafish (0.32 g mean weight) at 25 °C were 16.31, 124.6, 4.7, and 0.61 picograms (pg)/fish, respectively. These findings support the use of the zebrafish-based bioassays for evaluating the presence of BoNT/A, BoNT/E, and BoNT/F. Evaluating the basis of the relatively high resistance of zebrafish to BoNT/C and the extreme sensitivity to BoNT/F may reveal unique functional patterns to the action of these neurotoxins. PMID:27153088

  4. Zebrafish Sensitivity to Botulinum Neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Chatla, Kamalakar; Gaunt, Patricia S; Petrie-Hanson, Lora; Ford, Lorelei; Hanson, Larry A

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are the most potent known toxins. The mouse LD50 assay is the gold standard for testing BoNT potency, but is not sensitive enough to detect the extremely low levels of neurotoxin that may be present in the serum of sensitive animal species that are showing the effects of BoNT toxicity, such as channel catfish affected by visceral toxicosis of catfish. Since zebrafish are an important animal model for diverse biomedical and basic research, they are readily available and have defined genetic lines that facilitate reproducibility. This makes them attractive for use as an alternative bioassay organism. The utility of zebrafish as a bioassay model organism for BoNT was investigated. The 96 h median immobilizing doses of BoNT/A, BoNT/C, BoNT/E, and BoNT/F for adult male Tübingen strain zebrafish (0.32 g mean weight) at 25 °C were 16.31, 124.6, 4.7, and 0.61 picograms (pg)/fish, respectively. These findings support the use of the zebrafish-based bioassays for evaluating the presence of BoNT/A, BoNT/E, and BoNT/F. Evaluating the basis of the relatively high resistance of zebrafish to BoNT/C and the extreme sensitivity to BoNT/F may reveal unique functional patterns to the action of these neurotoxins. PMID:27153088

  5. Complete nucleotide sequence of a plasmid containing the botulinum neurotoxin gene in Clostridium botulinum type B strain 111 isolated from an infant patient in Japan.

    PubMed

    Hosomi, Koji; Sakaguchi, Yoshihiko; Kohda, Tomoko; Gotoh, Kazuyoshi; Motooka, Daisuke; Nakamura, Shota; Umeda, Kaoru; Iida, Tetsuya; Kozaki, Shunji; Mukamoto, Masafumi

    2014-12-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are highly potent toxins that are produced by Clostridium botulinum. We determined the complete nucleotide sequence of a plasmid containing the botulinum neurotoxin gene in C. botulinum type B strain 111 in order to obtain an insight into the toxigenicity and evolution of the bont gene in C. botulinum. Group I C. botulinum type B strain 111 was isolated from the first case of infant botulism in Japan in 1995. In previous studies, botulinum neurotoxin subtype B2 (BoNT/B2) produced by strain 111 exhibited different antigenic properties from those of authentic BoNT/B1 produced by strain Okra. We have recently shown that the isolates of strain 111 that lost toxigenicity were cured of the plasmid containing the bont/B2 gene. In the present study, the plasmid (named pCB111) was circular 265,575 bp double-stranded DNA and contained 332 predicted open reading frames (ORFs). 85 gene products of these ORFs could be functionally assigned on the basis of sequence homology to known proteins. The bont/B2 complex genes were located on pCB111 and some gene products may be involved in the conjugative plasmid transfer and horizontal transfer of bont genes. pCB111 was similar to previously identified plasmids containing bont/B1, /B5, or/A3 complex genes in other group I C. botulinum strains. It was suggested that these plasmids had been derived from a common ancestor and had played important roles for the bont gene transfer between C. botulinum. PMID:25149145

  6. Toxins as Weapons: A Historical Review.

    PubMed

    Pita, R; Romero, A

    2014-07-01

    This review article summarizes the use of toxins as weapons dating from the First World War until today, when there is a high concern of possible terrorist attacks with weapons of mass destruction. All through modern history, military programs and terrorist groups have favored toxins because of their high toxicity. However, difficulties of extraction or synthesis, as well as effective dissemination to cause a large number of casualties, have been the most important drawbacks. Special emphasis is focused on ricin and botulinum toxin, the most important toxins that have attracted the attention of military programs and terrorist groups. Other toxins like trichothecenes, saxitoxin, and Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) are also discussed. A short section about anthrax is also included: Although Bacillus anthracis is considered a biological weapon rather than a toxin weapon, it produces a toxin that is finally responsible for the anthrax disease. PMID:26227025

  7. Toxins as Weapons: A Historical Review.

    PubMed

    Pita, R; Romero, A

    2014-07-01

    This review article summarizes the use of toxins as weapons dating from the First World War until today, when there is a high concern of possible terrorist attacks with weapons of mass destruction. All through modern history, military programs and terrorist groups have favored toxins because of their high toxicity. However, difficulties of extraction or synthesis, as well as effective dissemination to cause a large number of casualties, have been the most important drawbacks. Special emphasis is focused on ricin and botulinum toxin, the most important toxins that have attracted the attention of military programs and terrorist groups. Other toxins like trichothecenes, saxitoxin, and Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) are also discussed. A short section about anthrax is also included: Although Bacillus anthracis is considered a biological weapon rather than a toxin weapon, it produces a toxin that is finally responsible for the anthrax disease.

  8. Block of transmitter release by botulinum C1 action on syntaxin at the squid giant synapse.

    PubMed

    Marsal, J; Ruiz-Montasell, B; Blasi, J; Moreira, J E; Contreras, D; Sugimori, M; Llinás, R

    1997-12-23

    Electrophysiological, morphological, and biochemical approaches were combined to study the effect of the presynaptic injection of the light chain of botulinum toxin C1 into the squid giant synapse. Presynaptic injection was accompanied by synaptic block that occurred progressively as the toxin filled the presynaptic terminal. Neither the presynaptic action potential nor the Ca2+ currents in the presynaptic terminal were affected by the toxin. Biochemical analysis of syntaxin moiety in squid indicates that the light chain of botulinum toxin C1 lyses syntaxin in vitro, suggesting that this was the mechanism responsible for synaptic block. Ultrastructure of the injected synapses demonstrates an enormous increase in the number of presynaptic vesicles, suggesting that the release rather than the docking of vesicles is affected by biochemical lysing of the syntaxin molecule.

  9. Systemic colonization of clover (Trifolium repens) by Clostridium botulinum strain 2301

    PubMed Central

    Zeiller, Matthias; Rothballer, Michael; Iwobi, Azuka N.; Böhnel, Helge; Gessler, Frank; Hartmann, Anton; Schmid, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, cases of botulism in cattle and other farm animals and also in farmers increased dramatically. It was proposed, that these cases could be affiliated with the spreading of compost or other organic manures contaminated with Clostridium botulinum spores on farm land. Thus, soils and fodder plants and finally farm animals could be contaminated. Therefore, the colonization behavior and interaction of the botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT D) producing C. botulinum strain 2301 and the non-toxin producing Clostridium sporogenes strain 1739 were investigated on clover (Trifolium repens) in a field experiment as well as in phytochamber experiments applying axenic and additionally soil based systems under controlled conditions. Plants were harvested and divided into root and shoot parts for further DNA isolation and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays; subsamples were fixed for fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis in combination with confocal laser scanning microscopy. In addition, we observed significant differences in the growth behavior of clover plants when inoculated with clostridial spores, indicating a plant growth promoting effect. Inoculated plants showed an increased growth index (shoot size, wet and dry weight) and an enlarged root system induced by the systemic colonization of clover by C. botulinum strain 2301. To target C. botulinum and C. sporogenes, 16S rDNA directed primers were used and to specifically detect C. botulinum, BoNT D toxin genes targeted primers, using a multiplex PCR approach, were applied. Our results demonstrate an effective colonization of roots and shoots of clover by C. botulinum strain 2301 and C. sporogenes strain 1739. Detailed analysis of colonization behavior showed that C. botulinum can occur as individual cells, in cell clusters and in microcolonies within the rhizosphere, lateral roots and within the roots tissue of clover. PMID:26583010

  10. Systemic colonization of clover (Trifolium repens) by Clostridium botulinum strain 2301.

    PubMed

    Zeiller, Matthias; Rothballer, Michael; Iwobi, Azuka N; Böhnel, Helge; Gessler, Frank; Hartmann, Anton; Schmid, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, cases of botulism in cattle and other farm animals and also in farmers increased dramatically. It was proposed, that these cases could be affiliated with the spreading of compost or other organic manures contaminated with Clostridium botulinum spores on farm land. Thus, soils and fodder plants and finally farm animals could be contaminated. Therefore, the colonization behavior and interaction of the botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT D) producing C. botulinum strain 2301 and the non-toxin producing Clostridium sporogenes strain 1739 were investigated on clover (Trifolium repens) in a field experiment as well as in phytochamber experiments applying axenic and additionally soil based systems under controlled conditions. Plants were harvested and divided into root and shoot parts for further DNA isolation and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays; subsamples were fixed for fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis in combination with confocal laser scanning microscopy. In addition, we observed significant differences in the growth behavior of clover plants when inoculated with clostridial spores, indicating a plant growth promoting effect. Inoculated plants showed an increased growth index (shoot size, wet and dry weight) and an enlarged root system induced by the systemic colonization of clover by C. botulinum strain 2301. To target C. botulinum and C. sporogenes, 16S rDNA directed primers were used and to specifically detect C. botulinum, BoNT D toxin genes targeted primers, using a multiplex PCR approach, were applied. Our results demonstrate an effective colonization of roots and shoots of clover by C. botulinum strain 2301 and C. sporogenes strain 1739. Detailed analysis of colonization behavior showed that C. botulinum can occur as individual cells, in cell clusters and in microcolonies within the rhizosphere, lateral roots and within the roots tissue of clover. PMID:26583010

  11. Inhibiting oral intoxication of botulinum neurotoxin A by carbohydrate receptor mimics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) cause the disease botulism manifested by flaccid paralysis that could be fatal to humans and animals. Oral ingestion of the toxin with contaminated food is one of the most common routes of BoNT intoxication, where BoNT assembles with several auxiliary proteins to surviv...

  12. Use of monoclonal antibodies in the sensitive detection and neutralization of botulinum neurotoxin serotype B

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are some of nature’s most potent toxins. Due to potential food contamination and bioterrorism concerns, the development of detection reagents, therapeutics and countermeasures are of urgent interest. Recently, we have developed sensitive electrochemiluminescent (ECL) i...

  13. Translocation of botulinum neurotoxin serotype a and associated proteins across the intestinal epithelia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are some of the most poisonous natural toxins and considered to be a major venue of bioterrorist threat. BoNTs associate with neurotoxin associated proteins (NAPs), forming large complexes. NAPs have been shown to shield the BoNT holotoxin from the harsh environment of ...

  14. Detection of botulinum neurotoxin-A activity in food by peptide cleavage assay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The World Health Organization (WHO) and U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have labeled botulinum toxins as a high priority biological agent that may be used in terrorist attacks against food supplies. Due to this threat there is an increased need to develop fast and effective met...

  15. Comparison of Toxicological Properties of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotypes A and B in Mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are among the most toxic biological toxins for humans. Of the seven known serotypes (A-G) of BoNT, serotypes A, B and E cause most of the human foodborne intoxications. In this study, we compared the toxicological properties of BoNT serotype A and B holotoxins and compl...

  16. CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF CLOSTRIDIUM BOTULINUM NEUROTOXIN SEROTYPE B.

    SciTech Connect

    SWAMINATHAN,S.; ESWARAMOORTHY,S.

    2001-11-19

    The toxigenic strains of Clostridium botulinum produce seven serologically distinct types of neurotoxins labeled A - G (EC 3.4.24.69), while Clostridium tetani produces tetanus neurotoxin (EC 3.4.24.68). Botulinum and tetanus neurotoxins (BoNTs and TeNT) are produced as single inactive chains of molecular mass of approximately 150 kDa. Most of these neurotoxins are released after being cleaved into two chains, a heavy chain (HI) of 100 kDa and a light chain (L) of 50 kDa held together by an interchain disulfide bond, by tissue proteinases. BoNT/E is released as a single chain but cleaved by host proteinases [1]. Clostvidium botulinum neurotoxins are extremely poisonous proteins with their LD{sub 50} for humans in the range of 0.1 - 1 ng kg{sup -1} [2]. Botulinum neurotoxins are responsible for neuroparalytic syndromes of botulism characterized by serious neurological disorders and flaccid paralysis. BoNTs block the release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction causing flaccid paralysis while TeNT blocks the release of neurotransmitters like glycine and {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the inhibitory interneurons of the spinal cord resulting in spastic paralysis. In spite of different clinical symptoms, their aetiological agents intoxicate neuronal cells in the same way and these toxins have similar structural organization [3].

  17. Clostridium botulinum in cattle and dairy products.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Miia; Myllykoski, Jan; Sivelä, Seppo; Korkeala, Hannu

    2010-04-01

    The use of plastic-wrapped and nonacidified silage as cattle feed has led to an increasing number of botulism outbreaks due to Clostridium botulinum Groups I-III in dairy cattle. The involvement of Groups I and II organisms in cattle botulism has raised concern of human botulism risk associated with the consumption of dairy products. Multiplication of C. botulinum in silage and in the gastrointestinal tract of cattle with botulism has been reported, thus contamination of the farm environment and raw milk, and further transmission through the dairy chain, are possible. The standard milk pasteurization treatment does not eliminate spores, and the intrinsic factors of many dairy products allow botulinal growth and toxin production. Although rare, several large botulism outbreaks due to both commercial and home-prepared dairy products have been reported. Factors explaining these outbreaks include most importantly temperature abuse, but also unsafe formulation, inadequate fermentation, insufficient thermal processing, post-process contamination, and lack of adequate quality control for adjunct ingredients were involved. The small number of outbreaks is probably explained by a low incidence of spores in milk, the presence of competitive bacteria in pasteurized milk and other dairy products, and growth-inhibitory combinations of intrinsic and extrinsic factors in cultured and processed dairy products.

  18. Emerging Opportunities for Serotypes of Botulinum Neurotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Peng Chen, Zhongxing; Morris, J. Glenn; Rodriguez, Ramon L.; Shukla, Aparna Wagle; Tapia-Núñez, John; Okun, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Two decades ago, botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) type A was introduced to the commercial market. Subsequently, the toxin was approved by the FDA to address several neurological syndromes, involving muscle, nerve, and gland hyperactivity. These syndromes have typically been associated with abnormalities in cholinergic transmission. Despite the multiplicity of botulinal serotypes (designated as types A through G), therapeutic preparations are currently only available for BoNT types A and B. However, other BoNT serotypes are under study for possible clinical use and new clinical indications; Objective: To review the current research on botulinum neurotoxin serotypes A-G, and to analyze potential applications within basic science and clinical settings; Conclusions: The increasing understanding of botulinal neurotoxin pathophysiology, including the neurotoxin’s effects on specific neuronal populations, will help us in tailoring treatments for specific diagnoses, symptoms and patients. Scientists and clinicians should be aware of the full range of available data involving neurotoxin subtypes A-G. PMID:23202312

  19. Clostridium botulinum in cattle and dairy products.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Miia; Myllykoski, Jan; Sivelä, Seppo; Korkeala, Hannu

    2010-04-01

    The use of plastic-wrapped and nonacidified silage as cattle feed has led to an increasing number of botulism outbreaks due to Clostridium botulinum Groups I-III in dairy cattle. The involvement of Groups I and II organisms in cattle botulism has raised concern of human botulism risk associated with the consumption of dairy products. Multiplication of C. botulinum in silage and in the gastrointestinal tract of cattle with botulism has been reported, thus contamination of the farm environment and raw milk, and further transmission through the dairy chain, are possible. The standard milk pasteurization treatment does not eliminate spores, and the intrinsic factors of many dairy products allow botulinal growth and toxin production. Although rare, several large botulism outbreaks due to both commercial and home-prepared dairy products have been reported. Factors explaining these outbreaks include most importantly temperature abuse, but also unsafe formulation, inadequate fermentation, insufficient thermal processing, post-process contamination, and lack of adequate quality control for adjunct ingredients were involved. The small number of outbreaks is probably explained by a low incidence of spores in milk, the presence of competitive bacteria in pasteurized milk and other dairy products, and growth-inhibitory combinations of intrinsic and extrinsic factors in cultured and processed dairy products. PMID:20301016

  20. Temporal characteristics of botulinum neurotoxin therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lebeda, Frank J; Cer, Regina Z; Stephens, Robert M; Mudunuri, Uma

    2010-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin is a pharmaceutical treatment used for an increasing number of neurological and non-neurological indications, symptoms and diseases. Despite the wealth of clinical reports that involve the timing of the therapeutic effects of this toxin, few studies have attempted to integrate these data into unified models. Secondary reactions have also been examined including the development of adverse events, resistance to repeated applications, and nerve terminal sprouting. Our primary intent for conducting this review was to gather relevant pharmacodynamic data from suitable biomedical literature regarding botulinum neurotoxins via the use of automated data-mining techniques. We envision that mathematical models will ultimately be of value to those who are healthcare decision makers and providers, as well as clinical and basic researchers. Furthermore, we hypothesize that the combination of this computer-intensive approach with mathematical modeling will predict the percentage of patients who will favorably or adversely respond to this treatment and thus will eventually assist in developing the increasingly important area of personalized medicine. PMID:20021324

  1. Genomic and physiological variability within Group II (non-proteolytic) Clostridium botulinum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Clostridium botulinum is a group of four physiologically and phylogenetically distinct bacteria that produce botulinum neurotoxin. While studies have characterised variability between strains of Group I (proteolytic) C. botulinum, the genetic and physiological variability and relationships between strains within Group II (non-proteolytic) C. botulinum are not well understood. In this study the genome of Group II strain C. botulinum Eklund 17B (NRP) was sequenced and used to construct a whole genome DNA microarray. This was used in a comparative genomic indexing study to compare the relatedness of 43 strains of Group II C. botulinum (14 type B, 24 type E and 5 type F). These results were compared with characteristics determined from physiological tests. Results Whole genome indexing showed that strains of Group II C. botulinum isolated from a wide variety of environments over more than 75 years clustered together indicating the genetic background of Group II C. botulinum is stable. Further analysis showed that strains forming type B or type F toxin are closely related with only toxin cluster genes targets being unique to either type. Strains producing type E toxin formed a separate subset. Carbohydrate fermentation tests supported the observation that type B and F strains form a separate subset to type E strains. All the type F strains and most of type B strains produced acid from amylopectin, amylose and glycogen whereas type E strains did not. However, these two subsets did not differ strongly in minimum growth temperature or maximum NaCl concentration for growth. No relationship was found between tellurite resistance and toxin type despite all the tested type B and type F strains carrying tehB, while the sequence was absent or diverged in all type E strains. Conclusions Although Group II C. botulinum form a tight genetic group, genomic and physiological analysis indicates there are two distinct subsets within this group. All type B strains and type F

  2. Purification and Characterization of Botulinum Neurotoxin FA from a Genetically Modified Clostridium botulinum Strain.

    PubMed

    Pellett, Sabine; Tepp, William H; Bradshaw, Marite; Kalb, Suzanne R; Dykes, Janet K; Lin, Guangyun; Nawrocki, Erin M; Pier, Christina L; Barr, John R; Maslanka, Susan E; Johnson, Eric A

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), produced by neurotoxigenic clostridial species, are the cause of the severe disease botulism in humans and animals. Early research on BoNTs has led to their classification into seven serotypes (serotypes A to G) based upon the selective neutralization of their toxicity in mice by homologous antibodies. Recently, a report of a potential eighth serotype of BoNT, designated "type H," has been controversial. This novel BoNT was produced together with BoNT/B2 in a dual-toxin-producing Clostridium botulinum strain. The data used to designate this novel toxin as a new serotype were derived from culture supernatant containing both BoNT/B2 and novel toxin and from sequence information, although data from two independent laboratories indicated neutralization by antibodies raised against BoNT/A1, and classification as BoNT/FA was proposed. The sequence data indicate a chimeric structure consisting of a BoNT/A1 receptor binding domain, a BoNT/F5 light-chain domain, and a novel translocation domain most closely related to BoNT/F1. Here, we describe characterization of this toxin purified from the native strain in which expression of the second BoNT (BoNT/B) has been eliminated. Mass spectrometry analysis indicated that the toxin preparation contained only BoNT/FA and confirmed catalytic activity analogous to that of BoNT/F5. The in vivo mouse bioassay indicated a specific activity of this toxin of 3.8 × 10(7) mouse 50% lethal dose (mLD50) units/mg, whereas activity in cultured human neurons was very high (50% effective concentration [EC50] = 0.02 mLD50/well). Neutralization assays in cells and mice both indicated full neutralization by various antibodies raised against BoNT/A1, although at 16- to 20-fold-lower efficiency than for BoNT/A1. IMPORTANCE Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), produced by anaerobic bacteria, are the cause of the potentially deadly, neuroparalytic disease botulism. BoNTs have been classified into seven serotypes, serotypes A

  3. Clostridium botulinum: a bug with beauty and weapon.

    PubMed

    Shukla, H D; Sharma, S K

    2005-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum, a Gram-positive, anaerobic spore-forming bacteria, is distinguished by its significant clinical applications as well as its potential to be used as bioterror agent. Growing cells secrete botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), the most poisonous of all known poisons. While BoNT is the causative agent of deadly neuroparalytic botulism, it also serves as a remarkably effective treatment for involuntary muscle disorders such as blepharospasm, strabismus, hemifacial spasm, certain types of spasticity in children, and other ailments. BoNT is also used in cosmetology for the treatment of glabellar lines, and is well-known as the active component of the anti-aging medications Botox and Dysport. In addition, recent reports show that botulinum neurotoxin can be used as a tool for pharmaceutical drug delivery. However, BoNT remains the deadliest of all toxins, and is viewed by biodefense researchers as a possible agent of bioterrorism (BT). Among seven serotypes, C. botulinum type A is responsible for the highest mortality rate in botulism, and thus has the greatest potential to act as biological weapon. Genome sequencing of C. botulinum type A Hall strain (ATCC 3502) is now complete, and has shown the genome size to be 3.89 Mb with a G+C content of approximately 28.2%. The bacterium harbors a 16.3 kb plasmid with a 26.8% G+C content--slightly lower than that of the chromosome. Most of the virulence factors in C. botulinum are chromosomally encoded; bioinformatic analysis of the genome sequence has shown that the plasmid does not harbor toxin genes or genes for related virulence factors. Interestingly, the plasmid does harbor genes essential to replication, including dnaE, which encodes the alpha subunit of DNA polymerase III which has close similarity with its counterpart in C. perfringens strain 13. The plasmid also contains similar genes to those that encode the ABC-type multidrug transport ATPase, and permease. The presence of ABC-type multidrug transport

  4. Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin type B is heat-stable in milk and not inactivated by pasteurization.

    PubMed

    Rasooly, Reuven; Do, Paula M

    2010-12-01

    Foodborne botulism is caused by the ingestion of foods containing botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs). To study the heat stability of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins, we needed to measure and compare the activity of botulinum neurotoxins, serotypes A and B, under various pasteurization conditions. Currently, the only accepted assay to detect active C. botulinum neurotoxin is an in vivo mouse bioassay, which raises ethical concerns with regard to the use of experimental animals. In this study, noninvasive methods were used to simultaneously detect and distinguish between active BoNT serotypes A and B in one reaction and sample. We developed an enzymatic activity assay employing internally quenched fluorogenic peptides corresponding to SNAP-25, for BoNT-A, and VAMP2, for BoNT-B, as an alternative method to the mouse bioassay. Because each peptide is labeled with different fluorophores, we were able to distinguish between these two toxins. We used this method to analyze the heat stability of BoNT-A and BoNT-B. This study reports that conventional milk pasteurization (63 °C, 30 min) inactivated BoNT serotype A; however, serotype B is heat-stable in milk and not inactivated by pasteurization. Using this activity assay, we also showed that the commonly used food processes such as acidity and pasteurization, which are known to inhibit C. botulinum growth and toxin production, are more effective in inactivating BoNT serotype A than serotype B when conventional pasteurization (63 °C, 30 min) is used.

  5. Purification and Characterization of Botulinum Neurotoxin FA from a Genetically Modified Clostridium botulinum Strain

    PubMed Central

    Pellett, Sabine; Tepp, William H.; Bradshaw, Marite; Kalb, Suzanne R.; Dykes, Janet K.; Lin, Guangyun; Nawrocki, Erin M.; Pier, Christina L.; Barr, John R.; Maslanka, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), produced by neurotoxigenic clostridial species, are the cause of the severe disease botulism in humans and animals. Early research on BoNTs has led to their classification into seven serotypes (serotypes A to G) based upon the selective neutralization of their toxicity in mice by homologous antibodies. Recently, a report of a potential eighth serotype of BoNT, designated “type H,” has been controversial. This novel BoNT was produced together with BoNT/B2 in a dual-toxin-producing Clostridium botulinum strain. The data used to designate this novel toxin as a new serotype were derived from culture supernatant containing both BoNT/B2 and novel toxin and from sequence information, although data from two independent laboratories indicated neutralization by antibodies raised against BoNT/A1, and classification as BoNT/FA was proposed. The sequence data indicate a chimeric structure consisting of a BoNT/A1 receptor binding domain, a BoNT/F5 light-chain domain, and a novel translocation domain most closely related to BoNT/F1. Here, we describe characterization of this toxin purified from the native strain in which expression of the second BoNT (BoNT/B) has been eliminated. Mass spectrometry analysis indicated that the toxin preparation contained only BoNT/FA and confirmed catalytic activity analogous to that of BoNT/F5. The in vivo mouse bioassay indicated a specific activity of this toxin of 3.8 × 107 mouse 50% lethal dose (mLD50) units/mg, whereas activity in cultured human neurons was very high (50% effective concentration [EC50] = 0.02 mLD50/well). Neutralization assays in cells and mice both indicated full neutralization by various antibodies raised against BoNT/A1, although at 16- to 20-fold-lower efficiency than for BoNT/A1. IMPORTANCE Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), produced by anaerobic bacteria, are the cause of the potentially deadly, neuroparalytic disease botulism. BoNTs have been classified into seven serotypes

  6. Multiplex Real-Time PCR for Detecting and Typing Clostridium botulinum Group III Organisms and Their Mosaic Variants

    PubMed Central

    Auricchio, Bruna; Woudstra, Cédric; Fach, Patrick; Fiore, Alfonsina; Skarin, Hanna; Bano, Luca; Segerman, Bo; Knutsson, Rickard; De Medici, Dario

    2013-01-01

    Botulism is a neuroparalytic disease that can occur in all warm-blooded animals, birds, and fishes. The disease in animals is mainly caused by toxins produced by Clostridium botulinum strains belonging to group III, although outbreaks due to toxins produced by group I and II organisms have been recognized. Group III strains are capable of producing botulinum toxins of type C, D, and C/D and D/C mosaic variants. Definitive diagnosis of animal botulism is made by combining clinical findings with laboratory investigations. Detection of toxins in clinical specimens and feed is the gold standard for laboratory diagnosis. Since toxins may be degraded by organisms contained in the gastrointestinal tract or may be present at levels below the detection limit, the recovery of C. botulinum from sick animal specimens is consistent for laboratory confirmation. In this article we report the development and in-house validation of a new multiplex real-time PCR for detecting and typing the neurotoxin genes found in C. botulinum group III organisms. Validation procedures have been carried out according to ISO 16140, using strains and samples recovered from cases of animal botulism in Italy and France. PMID:23971808

  7. Genetic characteristics of toxigenic Clostridia and toxin gene evolution.

    PubMed

    Popoff, Michel R; Bouvet, Philippe

    2013-12-01

    Clostridia comprise a heterogenous group of environmental bacteria containing 15 pathogenic species, which produce the most potent toxins. The origin of toxins is still enigmatic. It is hypothesized that toxins exhibiting an enzymatic activity have derived from hydrolytic enzymes, which are abundantly secreted by these bacteria, and that pore-forming toxins have evolved from an ancestor transmembrane protein. The presence of related toxin genes in distinct Clostridium species and the variability of some toxin genes support horizontal toxin gene transfer and subsequent independent evolution from strain to strain. Clostridium perfringens toxin genes involved in myonecrosis, mainly alpha toxin and perfringolysin genes, are chromosomally located, whereas toxin genes responsible for intestinal and food borne diseases are localized on plasmids except the enterotoxin gene which can be located either on the chromosome or plasmids. The distribution of these plasmids containing one or several toxin genes accounts for the diverse C. perfringens toxinotypes. Clostridium difficile strains show a high genetic variability. But in contrast to C. perfringens, toxin genes are clustered in pathogenicity locus located on chromosome. The presence of related toxin genes in distinct clostridial species like Clostridium sordellii, Clostridium novyi, and C. perfringens supports interspecies mobilization of this locus. The multiple C. difficile toxinotypes based on toxin gene variants possibly reflect strain adaptation to the intestinal environment. Botulinum toxin genes also show a high level of genetic variation. They have a diverse genetic localization including chromosome, plasmid or phage, and are spread in various Clostridium species (Clostridium botulinum groups, Clostridium argentinense, Clostridium butyricum, Clostridium baratii). Exchange of toxin genes not only include transfers between Clostridium species but also between Clostridium and other bacterial species as well as

  8. Activation of TRPV1 mediates calcitonin gene-related peptide release, which excites trigeminal sensory neurons and is attenuated by a retargeted botulinum toxin with anti-nociceptive potential.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jianghui; Ovsepian, Saak V; Wang, Jiafu; Pickering, Mark; Sasse, Astrid; Aoki, K Roger; Lawrence, Gary W; Dolly, J Oliver

    2009-04-15

    Excessive release of inflammatory/pain mediators from peripheral sensory afferents renders nerve endings hyper-responsive, causing central sensitization and chronic pain. Herein, the basal release of proinflammatory calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) was shown to increase the excitability of trigeminal sensory neurons in brainstem slices via CGRP1 receptors because the effect was negated by an antagonist, CGRP8-37. This excitatory action could be prevented by cleaving synaptosomal-associated protein of M(r) 25,000 (SNAP-25) with botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) type A, a potent inhibitor of exocytosis. Strikingly, BoNT/A proved unable to abolish the CGRP1 receptor-mediated effect of capsaicin, a nociceptive TRPV1 stimulant, or its elevation of CGRP release from trigeminal ganglionic neurons (TGNs) in culture. Although the latter was also not susceptible to BoNT/E, apparently attributable to a paucity of its acceptors (glycosylated synaptic vesicle protein 2 A/B), this was overcome by using a recombinant chimera (EA) of BoNT/A and BoNT/E. It bound effectively to the C isoform of SV2 abundantly expressed in TGNs and cleaved SNAP-25, indicating that its /A binding domain (H(C)) mediated uptake of the active /E protease. The efficacy of /EA is attributable to removal of 26 C-terminal residues from SNAP-25, precluding formation of SDS-resistant SNARE complexes. In contrast, exocytosis could be evoked after deleting nine of the SNAP-25 residues with /A but only on prolonged elevation of [Ca(2+)](i) with capsaicin. This successful targeting of /EA to nociceptive neurons and inhibition of CGRP release in vitro and in situ highlight its potential as a new therapy for sensory dysmodulation and chronic pain.

  9. C2-streptavidin mediates the delivery of biotin-conjugated tumor suppressor protein p53 into tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Fahrer, Jörg; Schweitzer, Brigitte; Fiedler, Katja; Langer, Torben; Gierschik, Peter; Barth, Holger

    2013-04-17

    We have previously generated a recombinant C2-streptavidin fusion protein for the delivery of biotin-labeled molecules of low molecular weight into the cytosol of mammalian cells. A nontoxic moiety of Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin mediates the cellular uptake, whereas the streptavidin unit serves as a binding platform for biotin-labeled cargo molecules. In the present study, we used the C2-streptavidin transporter to introduce biotin-conjugated p53 protein into various mammalian cell lines. The p53 tumor suppressor protein is inactivated in many human cancers by multiple mechanisms and therefore the restoration of its activity in tumor cells is of great therapeutic interest. Recombinant p53 was expressed in insect cells and biotin-labeled. Biotin-p53 retained its specific high-affinity DNA-binding as revealed by gel-shift analysis. Successful conjugation of biotin-p53 to the C2-streptavidin transporter was monitored by an overlay blot technique and confirmed by real-time surface plasmon resonance, providing a KD-value in the low nM range. C2-streptavidin significantly enhanced the uptake of biotin-p53 into African Green Monkey (Vero) epithelial cells as shown by flow cytometry. Using cell fractionation, the cytosolic translocation of biotin-p53 was detected in Vero cells as well as in HeLa cervix carcinoma cells. In line with this finding, confocal microscopy displayed cytoplasmic staining of biotin-p53 in HeLa and HL60 leukemia cells. Internalized biotin-p53 partially colocalized with early endosomes, as confirmed by confocal microscopy. In conclusion, our results demonstrate the successful conjugation of biotin-p53 to C2-streptavidin and its subsequent receptor-mediated endocytosis into different human tumor cell lines.

  10. A tetanus toxin sensitive protein other than VAMP 2 is required for exocytosis in the pancreatic acinar cell.

    PubMed

    Padfield, P J

    2000-11-01

    The neurotoxin sensitivity of regulated exocytosis in the pancreatic acinar cell was investigated using streptolysin-O permeabilized pancreatic acini. Treatment of permeabilized acini with botulinum toxin B (BoNT/B) or botulinum toxin D (BoNT/D) had no detectable effect on Ca(2+)-dependent amylase secretion but did result in the complete cleavage of VAMP 2. In comparison, tetanus toxin (TeTx) treatment both significantly inhibited Ca(2+)-dependent amylase secretion and cleaved VAMP 2. These results indicate that regulated exocytosis in the pancreatic acinar cell requires a tetanus toxin sensitive protein(s) other than VAMP 2.

  11. A penicillin- and metronidazole-resistant Clostridium botulinum strain responsible for an infant botulism case.

    PubMed

    Mazuet, C; Yoon, E-J; Boyer, S; Pignier, S; Blanc, T; Doehring, I; Meziane-Cherif, D; Dumant-Forest, C; Sautereau, J; Legeay, C; Bouvet, P; Bouchier, C; Quijano-Roy, S; Pestel-Caron, M; Courvalin, P; Popoff, M R

    2016-07-01

    The clinical course of a case of infant botulism was characterized by several relapses despite therapy with amoxicillin and metronidazole. Botulism was confirmed by identification of botulinum toxin and Clostridium botulinum in stools. A C. botulinum A2 strain resistant to penicillins and with heterogeneous resistance to metronidazole was isolated from stool samples up to 110 days after onset. Antibiotic susceptibility was tested by disc agar diffusion and MICs were determined by Etest. Whole genome sequencing allowed detection of a gene cluster composed of blaCBP for a novel penicillinase, blaI for a regulator, and blaR1 for a membrane-bound penicillin receptor in the chromosome of the C. botulinum isolate. The purified recombinant penicillinase was assayed. Resistance to β-lactams was in agreement with the kinetic parameters of the enzyme. In addition, the β-lactamase gene cluster was found in three C. botulinum genomes in databanks and in two of 62 genomes of our collection, all the strains belonging to group I C. botulinum. This is the first report of a C. botulinum isolate resistant to penicillins. This stresses the importance of antibiotic susceptibility testing for adequate therapy of botulism. PMID:27108966

  12. Evaluation of a quali embryo model for the detection of botulism toxin type A activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Japanese quail embryo (Coturnix japonica) was evaluated for use as a bioassay to detect biologically active botulinum toxin serotype A (BoNT/A). Day 15 of incubation embryos were injected with decreasing dosages of BoNT/A from 250 to 0.5 ng of toxin. At 1 day post-injection, embryos receiving ...

  13. Electrochemical aptamer scaffold biosensors for detection of botulism and ricin toxins.

    PubMed

    Fetter, Lisa; Richards, Jonathan; Daniel, Jessica; Roon, Laura; Rowland, Teisha J; Bonham, Andrew J

    2015-10-21

    Protein toxins present considerable health risks, but detection often requires laborious analysis. Here, we developed electrochemical aptamer biosensors for ricin and botulinum neurotoxins, which display robust and specific signal at nanomolar concentrations and function in dilute serum. These biosensors may aid future efforts for the rapid diagnosis of toxins. PMID:26323568

  14. Block of transmitter release by botulinum C1 action on syntaxin at the squid giant synapse

    PubMed Central

    Marsal, Jordi; Ruiz-Montasell, Bonaventura; Blasi, Joan; Moreira, Jorge E.; Contreras, Diego; Sugimori, Mutsuyuki; Llinás, Rodolfo

    1997-01-01

    Electrophysiological, morphological, and biochemical approaches were combined to study the effect of the presynaptic injection of the light chain of botulinum toxin C1 into the squid giant synapse. Presynaptic injection was accompanied by synaptic block that occurred progressively as the toxin filled the presynaptic terminal. Neither the presynaptic action potential nor the Ca2+ currents in the presynaptic terminal were affected by the toxin. Biochemical analysis of syntaxin moiety in squid indicates that the light chain of botulinum toxin C1 lyses syntaxin in vitro, suggesting that this was the mechanism responsible for synaptic block. Ultrastructure of the injected synapses demonstrates an enormous increase in the number of presynaptic vesicles, suggesting that the release rather than the docking of vesicles is affected by biochemical lysing of the syntaxin molecule. PMID:9405706

  15. Effect of Nutrients on Physiological Properties of Clostridium botulinum Type E

    PubMed Central

    Gullmar, B.; Molin, N.

    1967-01-01

    Eight strains of Clostridium botulinum type E out of twelve tested showed good growth and normal cell morphology in a synthetic medium containing choline. Growth and toxin production by a representative strain was not influenced by repeated subculturing. In the chemically defined medium, acetylcholine, N,N-dimethylethanolamine, and lecithin could replace choline to get normal cell division and cell morphology of C. botulinum type E. Choline could not be replaced by ethanolamine, N-methylethanolamine, or betaine. A toxigenic strain of C. botulinum type E showed proteolytic, lipolytic, and lecithinase activity in complex media but not in a synthetic medium. On prolonged incubation in the high temperature range of growth, the toxicity of the culture filtrate decreased in a complex, but not in a synthetic medium. The implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:4864406

  16. PROCEDURE FOR CLEANING OF CLOSTRIDIUM BOTULINUM SPORES1

    PubMed Central

    Grecz, N.; Anellis, A.; Schneider, M. D.

    1962-01-01

    Grecz, N. (Quartermaster Food and Container Institute, Chicago, Ill.), A. Anellis, and M. D. Schneider. Procedure for cleaning of Clostridium botulinum spores. J. Bacteriol. 84:552–558. 1962.—Liberation of clean spores from vegetative sporangia of Clostridium botulinum strains was accomplished by the use of lytic enzymes and sonic oscillation. Suspensions of crude spores in phosphate buffer (pH 7) were digested with lysozyme (200 μg/ml) and trypsin (100 μg/ml). Rapid lysis of sporangia was induced by ultrasonic oscillation of the reacting mixture at 10 kc for 5 min at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, and 6 hr of incubation at 45 C. Intermittent washing of the reacting spore suspension with a solution of lysozyme and trypsin hastened purification of the spore crop. The cleaning procedure was completed by repeated washing of the spores with distilled water. The spores produced by this procedure were clean, as judged by their microscopic appearance, refractility to staining, loss of heat-sensitive toxin, and partition behavior in a two-phase system composed of polyethylene glycol and 3 m potassium phosphate buffer (pH 7.1). The cleaning procedure appeared not to affect the viability, resistance to heat and gamma radiation, or the toxic nature of C. botulinum spores. Images PMID:13950051

  17. Detection of botulinum neurotoxin serotypes A and B using chemiluminescence and electrochemiluninescene immunoassays in food and serum matrices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are some of the most potent biological toxins with serotypes A and B being most prevalent in foodborne contaminations. BoNTs are also likely targets for use in intentional adulteration of food or animal feeds and are thus classified as Select Agents. In our laboratories,...

  18. Mass Spectrometric Detection of Botulinum Neurotoxin by Measuring its Activity in Serum and Milk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalb, Suzanne R.; Pirkle, James L.; Barr, John R.

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are bacterial protein toxins which are considered likely agents for bioterrorism due to their extreme toxicity and high availability. A new mass spectrometry based assay called Endopep MS detects and defines the toxin serotype in clinical and food matrices via toxin activity upon a peptide substrate which mimics the toxin's natural target. Furthermore, the subtype of the toxin is differentiated by employing mass spectrometry based proteomic techniques on the same sample. The Endopep-MS assay selectively detects active BoNT and defines the serotype faster and with sensitivity greater than the mouse bioassay. One 96-well plate can be analyzed in under 7 h. On higher level or "hot" samples, the subtype can then be differentiated in less than 2 h with no need for DNA.

  19. Recombinant Botulinum Toxoids: A Practical Guide for Production.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Gustavo Marçal S G; Moreira, Clóvis; da Cunha, Carlos Eduardo P; Mendonça, Marcelo; Conceição, Fabricio R

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a Gram-positive,