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Sample records for boundary character distributions

  1. Grain Boundary Character Distributions In Isostructural Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratanaphan, Sutatch

    Anisotropic grain boundary character distributions (GBCDs), which influence macroscopic materials properties, are thought to be controlled by the grain boundary energy anisotropy. Structurally, grain boundary could be viewed as two free surfaces joined together. Grain boundary energy could be simply defined by the total excess energy for creating two free surfaces minus the energy gained when new bonds are formed between these surfaces. This implies that different crystal structure should have different GBEDs and GBCDs. It was recently discovered that grain boundary energy distributions (GBED) in isostructural materials, a class of materials that share the same crystal structure, are directly related to one another. This suggests that GBCDs in isostructural materials might also be related in a similar way. To test this hypothesis, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was used to map grain orientations in Ag, Au, Cu, Fe, and Mo. The GBCDs were determined from the stereological interpretation of EBSD maps containing on the order of 100,000 grains. It was found that the GBCDs of face-centered cubic (FCC) metals are statistically correlated, while the GBCDs of body-centered cubic (BCC) Fe and Mo are not correlated to the GBCD of FCC metals. The degree of the correlations among the FCC metals is weaker if there are significant differences in grain shape or texture. For example, Ag has the weakest correlation to the other FCC materials and also has quantitatively different grain shapes and texture. The relationship between the populations and energies of grain boundaries was also studied. By comparing the GBCDs of Al, Au, Cu, and Ni to the energies of 388 grain boundaries previously calculated by the Embedded Atom Method (EAM), we observed a moderately inverse correlation between the relative areas of grain boundaries and their energies. Interestingly, there are strong inverse correlations between the energies and populations of the most common grain boundaries (Sigma

  2. Grain Boundary Character Distribution of TLM Titanium Alloy During Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, X. F.; Zhao, Y. Q.; Jia, Z. Q.; Zhang, Y. S.; Li, B.

    2016-06-01

    The grain boundary character distribution of TLM titanium alloy (with a nominal chemical composition of Ti-3Zr-2Sn-3Mo-25Nb) was studied under the deformation condition with different strain rates and compression reductions. The experimental results showed that the evolution and character distribution of grain boundaries structure during deformation were both related to grain boundary coupling, sliding, migration, and the grain rotating in nature. In TLM titanium alloy, the type of grain boundaries under different deformation condition included high-angle boundaries, low-angle boundaries, and the CSL boundaries of Σ3, Σ13, Σ29, and Σ39. Under the strain rate of 1 s-1, the numbers of grain boundaries with misorientation angle of 3°, 30°, and 60° all decreased obviously with the increasing compression reduction to 4.5%, comparing to those obtained under the strain rate of 0.001 s-1. Under the strain rate of 1 s-1, the numbers of Σ29 boundaries greatly increased with the compression reductions of 3 to 4.5% comparing to those obtained under the strain rate of 0.001 s-1, and the numbers of Σ3 boundaries increased firstly and then stabilized with the compression reduction increasing from 0 to 4%, while the numbers of Σ39 boundaries decreased with the compression reduction increasing to 4.5%.

  3. Grain boundary character distribution in nanocrystalline metals produced by different processing routes

    DOE PAGES

    Bober, David B.; Kumar, Mukal; Rupert, Timothy J.; ...

    2015-12-28

    Nanocrystalline materials are defined by their fine grain size, but details of the grain boundary character distribution should also be important. Grain boundary character distributions are reported for ball-milled, sputter-deposited, and electrodeposited Ni and Ni-based alloys, all with average grain sizes of ~20 nm, to study the influence of processing route. The two deposited materials had nearly identical grain boundary character distributions, both marked by a Σ3 length percentage of 23 to 25 pct. In contrast, the ball-milled material had only 3 pct Σ3-type grain boundaries and a large fraction of low-angle boundaries (16 pct), with the remainder being predominantlymore » random high angle (73 pct). Furthermore, these grain boundary character measurements are connected to the physical events that control their respective processing routes. Consequences for material properties are also discussed with a focus on nanocrystalline corrosion. As a whole, the results presented here show that grain boundary character distribution, which has often been overlooked in nanocrystalline metals, can vary significantly and influence material properties in profound ways.« less

  4. Grain boundary character distribution in nanocrystalline metals produced by different processing routes

    SciTech Connect

    Bober, David B.; Kumar, Mukal; Rupert, Timothy J.; Khalajhedayati, Amirhossein

    2015-12-28

    Nanocrystalline materials are defined by their fine grain size, but details of the grain boundary character distribution should also be important. Grain boundary character distributions are reported for ball-milled, sputter-deposited, and electrodeposited Ni and Ni-based alloys, all with average grain sizes of ~20 nm, to study the influence of processing route. The two deposited materials had nearly identical grain boundary character distributions, both marked by a Σ3 length percentage of 23 to 25 pct. In contrast, the ball-milled material had only 3 pct Σ3-type grain boundaries and a large fraction of low-angle boundaries (16 pct), with the remainder being predominantly random high angle (73 pct). Furthermore, these grain boundary character measurements are connected to the physical events that control their respective processing routes. Consequences for material properties are also discussed with a focus on nanocrystalline corrosion. As a whole, the results presented here show that grain boundary character distribution, which has often been overlooked in nanocrystalline metals, can vary significantly and influence material properties in profound ways.

  5. Evolution of microstructure and grain boundary character distribution of a tin bronze annealed at different temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Weijiu; Chai, Linjiang; Li, Zhijun; Yang, Xusheng; Guo, Ning; Song, Bo

    2016-04-15

    Specimens cut from a rolled tin bronze sheet were annealed at 400–800 °C for 1 h and evolution of their microstructures was then characterized in details by electron channeling contrast imaging and electron backscatter diffraction techniques. Particularly, statistics on special boundaries (SBs) with Σ ≤ 29 and network connectivity of random high angle boundaries (HABs) in the annealed specimens were examined to probe optimization potentials of grain boundary character distribution (GBCD) for this material. Results show that the deformed microstructure in the as-received material begins to be recrystallized when the annealing temperature increase to 500 °C and average grain sizes surge with further increasing temperatures. As a result of the recrystallization, a large number of annealing twins (with Σ3 misorientation) are produced, leading to remarkably increased fractions of SBs (f{sub SBs}). Thanks to preexisting dense low angle boundaries, the majority of SBs in the 500 °C specimen with only partial recrystallization are Σ3{sub ic} (incoherent) boundaries, which effectively disrupt connectivity of random HABs network. Although the f{sub SBs} can be further increased (up to 72.5%) in specimens with full recrystallization (at higher temperatures), the Σ3{sub ic} boundaries would be replaced to some extent by Σ3{sub c} (coherent) boundaries which do not contribute directly to optimizing the GBCD. This work should be able to provide clear suggestions on applying the concept of grain boundary engineering to tin bronze alloys. - Highlights: • The rolled tin bronze begins to be recrystallized as temperature increases to 500 °C. • A lot of SBs are produced after recrystallization and the highest f{sub SBs} is 72.5%. • Partially recrystallized specimen has the optimum GBCD due to more Σ3{sub ic} boundaries. • The Σ3{sub ic} boundaries are replaced by Σ3{sub c} boundaries after full recrystallization.

  6. Effect of Grain Boundary Character Distribution on the Adiabatic Shear Susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Jiang, Lihong; Luo, Shuhong; Hu, Haibo; Tang, Tiegang; Zhang, Qingming

    2016-11-01

    The adiabatic shear susceptibility of AISI321 stainless steels with different grain boundary character distributions (GBCDs) was investigated by means of split-Hopkinson pressure bar. The results indicate that the width of the adiabatic shear band of the specimen after thermomechanical processing (TMP) treatment is narrower. The comparison of the stress collapse time, the critical stress, and the adiabatic shear forming energy suggests that the TMP specimens have lower adiabatic shear susceptibility than that of the solution-treated samples under the same loading condition. GBCD and grain size affected the adiabatic shear susceptibility. The high-angle boundary network of the TMP specimens was interrupted or replaced by the special grain boundary, and smaller grain size hindered the adiabatic shearing.

  7. Modifications in the grain boundary character distribution in FCC materials through thermomechanical processing

    SciTech Connect

    King, W E; Kumar, M; Schwartz, A J

    1999-03-01

    Recently, a body of work has emerged that indicates the potential to improve certain materials' properties through thermomechanical processing (TMP) solely by controlling grain misorientations. The grain boundary character distribution (GBCD) is defined as a microstructural property that describes the proportions of ''special'' and ''random'' boundaries with reference to the coincident site lattice model. Most of the ''optimization'' treatments reported in the literature have been performed on f.c.c. metals and alloys with medium to low stacking fault energies and have resulted in microstructures with high fractions of {Sigma}3, {Sigma}9, and {Sigma}27 boundaries, or {Sigma}3{sup n} type boundaries. It could be interpreted that only an increased incidence of annealing twinning is required to improve the GBCD. However, it also appears imperative that the formation of annealing twins disrupt the connectivity of the random boundary network, thus implying that {Sigma}3{sup n} reactions and resultant triple junctions are critical. Experiments to modify the GBCD in model materials like oxygen-free electronic Cu and Inconel 600 are presented and the efficacy of the processing routes is assessed in terms of the random boundary network and evolution of texture in the processed microstructures.

  8. Role of twinning in the optimization of the grain boundary character distribution

    SciTech Connect

    King, W E; Kumar, M; Schwartz, A J

    1999-01-08

    The grain boundary character distribution (GBCD) is a microstructural property that describes the proportions of "special" and "random" boundaries as defined by the coincident site lattice model. Recently, there has been increased attention on determination of the GBCD and manipulation of the relative fractions in the microstructure through thermomechanical processing in order to improve material's properties like corrosion and creep resistance. Most of the "optimization" treatments reported in the literature have been performed on fee materials with relatively low stacking fault energies and have resulted in microstructures with high fractions of Σ3, Σ9, and Σ27 boundaries. It could be interpreted that annealing twins are solely required to improve the GBCD. However, in order to optimize the properties, it appears imperative that the formation of annealing twins disrupt the connectivity of the random boundary network, thus implying that Σ3n reactions and resultant triple lines are critical. Experiments to modify the GBCD of oxygen-free electronic Cu and Inconel 600 through thermomechanical processing are presented and discussed in light of observations of the deformed and recrystallized microstructures.

  9. Grain boundary character distribution of CuNiSi and FeNi alloys processed by severe plastic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzeddine, H.; Baudin, T.; Helbert, A. L.; Brisset, F.; Larbi, F. Hadj; Tirsatine, K.; Kawasaki, M.; Bradai, D.; Langdon, T. G.

    2015-04-01

    In this work the Grain Boundary Character Distribution (GBCD) in general and the relative proportion of low-Σ CSL (Coincidence Site Lattice) grain boundaries are determined through EBSD in Cu-2.5Ni-0.6Si (wt.%) and Fe-36Ni (wt.%) alloys after processing by high-pressure torsion, equal- channel angular pressing and accumulative roll bonding.

  10. Influence of Processing Method on the Grain Boundary Character Distribution and Network Connectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, M; King, W.E.

    1999-12-20

    There exists a growing body of literature that correlates the fraction of ''special'' boundaries in a microstructure, as described by the Coincident Site Lattice Model, to properties such as corrosion resistance, intergranular stress corrosion cracking, creep, etc. Several studies suggest that the grain boundary character distribution (GBCD), which is defined in terms of the relative fractions of ''special'' and ''random'' grain boundaries, can be manipulated through thermomechanical processing. This investigation evaluates the influence of specific thermomechanical processing methods on the resulting GBCD in FCC materials such as oxygen-free electronic (ofe) copper and Inconel 600. We also demonstrate that the primary effect of thermomechanical processing is to reduce or break the connectivity of the random grain boundary network. Samples of ofe Cu were subjected to a minimum of three different deformation paths to evaluate the influence of deformation path on the resulting GBCD. These include: rolling to 82% reduction in thickness, compression to 82% strain, repeated compression to 20% strain followed by annealing. In addition, the influence of annealing temperature was probed by applying, for each of the processes, three different annealing temperatures of 400, 560, and 800 C. The observations obtained from automated electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) characterization of the microstructure are discussed in terms of deformation path, annealing temperature, and processing method. Results are compared to previous reports on strain-annealed ofe Cu and sequential processed Inconel 600. These results demonstrate that among the processes considered, sequential processing is the most effective method to disrupt the random grain boundary network and improve the GBCD.

  11. Measuring grain boundary character distributions in Ni-base alloy 725 using high-energy diffraction microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Bagri, Akbar; Hanson, John P.; Lind, J. P.; ...

    2016-10-25

    We use high-energy X-ray diffraction microscopy (HEDM) to characterize the microstructure of Ni-base alloy 725. HEDM is a non-destructive technique capable of providing three-dimensional reconstructions of grain shapes and orientations in polycrystals. The present analysis yields the grain size distribution in alloy 725 as well as the grain boundary character distribution (GBCD) as a function of lattice misorientation and boundary plane normal orientation. We find that the GBCD of Ni-base alloy 725 is similar to that previously determined in pure Ni and other fcc-base metals. We find an elevated density of Σ9 and Σ3 grain boundaries. We also observe amore » preponderance of grain boundaries along low-index planes, with those along (1 1 1) planes being the most common, even after Σ3 twins have been excluded from the analysis.« less

  12. Measuring Grain Boundary Character Distributions in Ni-Base Alloy 725 Using High-Energy Diffraction Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagri, Akbar; Hanson, John P.; Lind, Jonathan; Kenesei, Peter; Suter, Robert M.; Gradečak, Silvija; Demkowicz, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    We use high-energy X-ray diffraction microscopy (HEDM) to characterize the microstructure of Ni-base alloy 725. HEDM is a non-destructive technique capable of providing three-dimensional reconstructions of grain shapes and orientations in polycrystals. The present analysis yields the grain size distribution in alloy 725 as well as the grain boundary character distribution (GBCD) as a function of lattice misorientation and boundary plane normal orientation. We find that the GBCD of Ni-base alloy 725 is similar to that previously determined in pure Ni and other fcc-base metals. We find an elevated density of Σ9 and Σ3 grain boundaries. We also observe a preponderance of grain boundaries along low-index planes, with those along (1 1 1) planes being the most common, even after Σ3 twins have been excluded from the analysis.

  13. Measuring grain boundary character distributions in Ni-base alloy 725 using high-energy diffraction microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bagri, Akbar; Hanson, John P.; Lind, J. P.; Kenesei, Peter; Suter, Robert; Gradecak, Silvija; Demkowicz, Michael J.

    2016-10-25

    We use high-energy X-ray diffraction microscopy (HEDM) to characterize the microstructure of Ni-base alloy 725. HEDM is a non-destructive technique capable of providing three-dimensional reconstructions of grain shapes and orientations in polycrystals. The present analysis yields the grain size distribution in alloy 725 as well as the grain boundary character distribution (GBCD) as a function of lattice misorientation and boundary plane normal orientation. We find that the GBCD of Ni-base alloy 725 is similar to that previously determined in pure Ni and other fcc-base metals. We find an elevated density of Σ9 and Σ3 grain boundaries. We also observe a preponderance of grain boundaries along low-index planes, with those along (1 1 1) planes being the most common, even after Σ3 twins have been excluded from the analysis.

  14. On the grain boundary character distribution of Incoloy 800H during dynamic recrystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yu; Di, Hongshuang; Huang, Guangjie

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we investigated the influence of hot deformation parameters on the distribution and proliferation of twin boundaries during dynamic recrystallization (DRX). The results showed that microstructure evolution is characterized by a process of ;dynamic recovery (DRV)→necklace/multiple necklace→fully DRX; with increasing temperature and decreasing strain rate. The predominant proliferation mechanism of Σ3n (1 ≤ n ≤ 3) boundaries is transformed from Σ3 regeneration to new twinning during the growth of DRX grains.

  15. Influence of anisotropic grain boundary properties on the evolution of grain boundary character distribution during grain growth—a 2D level set study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallberg, Håkan

    2014-12-01

    The present study elaborates on a 2D level set model of polycrystal microstructures that was recently established by adding the influence of anisotropic grain boundary energy and mobility on microstructure evolution. The new model is used to trace the evolution of grain boundary character distribution during grain growth. The employed level set formulation conveniently allows the grain boundary characteristics to be quantified in terms of coincidence site lattice (CSL) type per unit of grain boundary length, providing a measure of the distribution of such boundaries. In the model, both the mobility and energy of the grain boundaries are allowed to vary with misorientation. In addition, the influence of initial polycrystal texture is studied by comparing results obtained from a polycrystal with random initial texture against results from a polycrystal that initially has a cube texture. It is shown that the proposed level set formulation can readily incorporate anisotropic grain boundary properties and the simulation results further show that anisotropic grain boundary properties only have a minor influence on the evolution of CSL boundary distribution during grain growth. As anisotropic boundary properties are considered, the most prominent changes in the CSL distributions are an increase of general low-angle Σ1 boundaries as well as a more stable presence of Σ3 boundaries. The observations also hold for the case of an initially cube-textured polycrystal. The presence of this kind of texture has little influence over the evolution of the CSL distribution. Taking into consideration the anisotropy of grain boundary properties, grain growth alone does not seem to be sufficient to promote any significantly increased overall presence of CSL boundaries.

  16. Determination of the five parameter grain boundary character distribution of nanocrystalline alpha-zirconium thin films using transmission electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Ghamarian, I.; Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO; Samani, P.; ...

    2017-03-24

    Grain boundary engineering and other fundamental materials science problems (e.g., phase transformations and physical properties) require an improvement in the understanding of the type and population of grain boundaries in a given system – yet, databases are limited in number and spare in detail, including for hcp crystals such as zirconium. One way to rapidly obtain databases to analyze is to use small-grained materials and high spatial resolution orientation microscopy techniques, such as ASTAR™/precession electron diffraction. To demonstrate this, a study of grain boundary character distributions was conducted for α-zirconium deposited at room temperature on fused silica substrates using physicalmore » vapor deposition. The orientation maps of the nanocrystalline thin films were acquired by the ASTARα/precession electron diffraction technique, a new transmission electron microscope based orientation microscopy method. The reconstructed grain boundaries were classified as pure tilt, pure twist, 180°-twist and 180°-tilt grain boundaries based on the distribution of grain boundary planes with respect to the angle/axis of misorientation associated with grain boundaries. The results of the current study were compared to the results of a similar study on α-titanium and the molecular dynamics results of grain boundary energy for α-titanium.« less

  17. Deriving the Grain Boundary Character Distribution and relative Energies from Three Dimensional EBSD Data (PREPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    Dimensional Grain Boundary Plane Analysis,” Ultramicroscopy 90 [2‐3] 153‐162  (2001).  [2] D.M.  Saylor , A. Morawiec, and G.S. Rohrer, "Distribution of...Grain boundaries in  Magnesia as a Function of Five Macroscopic Parameters," Acta Mater., 51 (2003)  3663‐74.  [3] D.M.  Saylor , B.S. El‐Dasher, T. Sano...Combining EBSD and serial sectioning.  Scripta mater. 55:11‐6  [6] D.M.  Saylor , B.S. El‐Dasher, B.L. Adams, and G.S. Rohrer, "Measuring the Five

  18. Secondary recrystallization in non-sag W filament wires -- On the possible role of relative grain boundary character distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Samajdar, I.; Verlinden, B.; Watte, P.; Mertens, F.

    1999-05-07

    Non-Sag tungsten (W) wire is indispensable for the lighting industry. For the necessary creep resistance, large elongated grains are considered as the desired microstructure. These large grains are obtained by primary and secondary recrystallization. In the present study an effort has been made to characterize and to understand the origin of such large elongated grains. In secondary recrystallization, often called abnormal grain growth, a few of the grains grow massive. The mechanisms of normal and abnormal grain growth are essentially the same, involving high angle boundary migration and driven by the reduction of surface energy. The abnormal grain growth can be visualized as a growth advantage for a few of the grains or growth disadvantage for the majority. Such an advantage/disadvantage may be caused by (1) differences in grain size and/or (2) differences in grain boundary character distribution (GBCD). In other words, a grain may grow massive if it has large size and/or possibilities of more favorable (i.e., of higher mobility) grain boundaries with the matrix grains.

  19. Mapping wilderness character in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness

    Treesearch

    James Tricker; Ann Schwaller; Teresa Hanson; Elizabeth Mejicano; Peter Landres

    2017-01-01

    A GIS-based approach was used to depict how threats to wilderness character vary in extent and magnitude across the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness. Based on the interagency strategy to monitor wilderness character, Keeping It Wild: An Interagency Strategy for Monitoring Wilderness Character Across the National Wilderness Preservation System (Landres et al. 2008a...

  20. STUDY OF GRAIN BOUNDARY CHARACTER ALONG INTERGRANULAR STRESS CORROSION CRACK PATHS IN AUSTENITIC ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect

    Guertsman, Valery Y.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2001-05-25

    Samples of austenitic stainless alloys were examined by means of scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Misorientations were measured by electron backscattered diffraction. Grain boundary distributions were analyzed with special emphasis on the grain boundary character along intergranular stress-corrosion cracks and at crack arrest points. It was established that only coherent twin S3 boundaries could be considered as "special" ones with regard to crack resistance. However, it is possible that twin interactions with random grain boundaries may inhibit crack propagation. The results suggest that other factors besides geometrical ones play an important role in the intergranular stress-corrosion cracking of commercial alloys.

  1. Grain boundary character modification employing thermo-mechanical processing in type 304L stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, S. K.; Mandal, S.

    2016-02-01

    Grain boundary engineering (GBE) approach has been employed to modify the boundaries character of a type 304L stainless steel through thermo-mechanical processing (TMP) route, which combined a low level of cold deformation (5, 10 and 15%) followed by annealing at 1173K and 1273K for 1hour. Employing Electron Back Scatter Diffraction based Orientation Imaging Microscopy, the fraction and distribution of low ∑ CSL boundaries (∑≤ 29) and its effect on random high-angle grain boundaries connectivity and triple junction distribution of as-received (AR) and GBE specimens were evaluated. It was possible to increase the fraction of low ∑ CSL boundaries up to 75% following GBE treatment (as compared to 50% in AR specimen). The GBE specimens also contained maximum number of percolation resistant triple junctions which could render better resistance against percolation related phenomena.

  2. Grain Boundary Character Dependence on Nucleation of Discontinuous Precipitates in Cu-Ti Alloys.

    PubMed

    Semboshi, Satoshi; Sato, Mitsutaka; Kaneno, Yasuyuki; Iwase, Akihiro; Takasugi, Takayuki

    2017-04-15

    The dependence of the grain boundary character distribution for a Cu-4 at. % Ti polycrystal alloy (average grain size: 100 µm) on the nucleation of cellular discontinuous precipitates was systematically investigated. In an alloy over-aged at 723 K, cellular discontinuous precipitates consisted of a terminal Cu solid solution and a stable β-Cu₄Ti lamellae nucleated at grain boundaries. Electron backscatter diffraction analysis revealed that the discontinuous precipitation reaction preferentially occurred at random grain boundaries with a Σ value of more than 21 according to the coincidence site lattice theory. On the other hand, few cellular discontinuous precipitates nucleated at low-angle and low-Σ boundaries, particularly twin (Σ 3) boundaries. These findings suggest that the nucleation of discontinuous precipitates is closely correlated with grain boundary character and structure, and hence energy and/or diffusibility. It should therefore be possible to suppress the discontinuous precipitation reaction through control of the alloy's grain boundary energy, by means of texture control and third elemental addition.

  3. Online writer identification using character prototypes distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Siew Keng; Viard-Gaudin, Christian; Tay, Yong Haur

    2008-01-01

    Writer identification is a process which aims to identify the writer of a given handwritten document. Its implementation is needed in applications such as forensic document analysis and document retrieval which involved the use of offline handwritten documents. With the recent advances of technology, the invention of digital pen and paper has extended the field of writer identification to cover online handwritten documents. In this communication, a methodology is proposed to solve the problem of text-independent writer identification using online handwritten documents. The proposed methodology would strive to identify the writer of a given handwritten document regardless of its text contents by comparing his or her handwritings with those stored in a reference database. The output of this process would be a ranked list of the writers whose handwritings are stored in the reference database. The main idea is to use the distance measurement between the distributions of reference patterns defined at the character level. Very few, if any, attempts have been done at this character level. Two sets of handwritten document databases each with 82 online documents contributed by 82 subjects were used in the experiments. The reported result was 95% of Top 1 rate accuracy. Only four writers were identified wrongly, ranked as 2, 4, 5 and 12 choice returned.

  4. Understanding the Effect of Grain Boundary Character on Dynamic Recrystallization in Stainless Steel 316L

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Megan; Morse, Michael; Corolewski, Caleb; Fritchman, Koyuki; Stifter, Chris; Poole, Callum; Hurley, Michael; Frary, Megan

    2017-08-01

    Dynamic recrystallization (DRX) occurs during high-temperature deformation in metals and alloys with low to medium stacking fault energies. Previous simulations and experimental research have shown the effect of temperature and grain size on DRX behavior, but not the effect of the grain boundary character distribution. To investigate the effects of the distribution of grain boundary types, experimental testing was performed on stainless steel 316L specimens with different initial special boundary fractions (SBF). This work was completed in conjunction with computer simulations that used a modified Monte Carlo method which allowed for the addition of anisotropic grain boundary energies using orientation data from electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The correlation of the experimental and simulation work allows for a better understanding of how the input parameters in the simulations correspond to what occurs experimentally. Results from both simulations and experiments showed that a higher fraction of so-called "special" boundaries ( e.g., Σ3 twin boundaries) delayed the onset of recrystallization to larger strains and that it is energetically favorable for nuclei to form on triple junctions without these so-called "special" boundaries.

  5. Influence of grain boundary character on point defect formation energies in BCC Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Tschopp, Mark A.; Horstemeyer, Mark; Gao, Fei; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this research is to understand how grain boundary character influences formation of vacancies and interstitials to grain boundaries in BCC Fe. In this study, molecular statics simulations were used to obtain a large number of minimum energy grain boundary structures in the <100> and <110> symmetric tilt grain boundary system. Then, simulations were used to calculate the formation energies associated with vacancies and self-interstitial atoms at atomic positions within 20 Angstroms of the boundary. As a first analysis, the vacancy formation energies are examined here. The simulation results show how the vacancy formation energies are influenced by grain boundary structure. Low angle boundaries are found to be an effective sink for vacancies along planes adjacent to grain boundary dislocations, while high angle low sigma grain boundaries are less effective sinks for vacancies. The grain boundary sink strength is postulated to depend upon the minimum vacancy formation energy and the influence of grain boundary character on this is shown. Interestingly, low sigma boundaries in the <100> symmetric tilt grain boundary system have higher minimum vacancy formation energies, while this quantity does not seem to be influenced by misorientation angle or grain boundary energy. The significance of this research is that atomistic simulations of this kind may ultimately help inform damage evolution via grain boundaries in multiscale models for irradiated materials as well as its implications for grain boundary engineering.

  6. Influence of SiC grain boundary character on fission product transport in irradiated TRISO fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Lillo, T. M.; Rooyen, I. J.

    2016-02-26

    The relationship between grain boundary character and fission product migration is identified as an important knowledge gap in order to advance the understanding of fission product release from TRISO fuel particles. Precession electron diffraction (PED), a TEM-based technique, was used in this study to quickly and efficiently provide the crystallographic information needed to identify grain boundary misorientation, grain boundary type (low or high angle) and whether the boundary is coincident site lattice (CSL) – related, in irradiated SiC. Analysis of PED data showed the grain structure of the SiC layer in an irradiated TRISO fuel particle from the AGR-1 experiment to be composed mainly of twin boundaries with a small fraction of low angle grain boundaries (<10%). In general, fission products favor precipitation on random, high angle grain boundaries but can precipitate out on low angle and CSL-related grain boundaries to a limited degree. Pd is capable of precipitating out on all types of grain boundaries but most prominently on random, high angle grain boundaries. Pd-U and Pd-Ag precipitates were found on CSL-related as well as random high angle grain boundaries but not on low angle grain boundaries. In contrast, precipitates containing only Ag were found only on random, high angle grain boundaries but not on either low angle or CSL-related grain boundaries.

  7. Influence of SiC grain boundary character on fission product transport in irradiated TRISO fuel

    DOE PAGES

    Lillo, T. M.; Rooyen, I. J.

    2016-02-26

    The relationship between grain boundary character and fission product migration is identified as an important knowledge gap in order to advance the understanding of fission product release from TRISO fuel particles. Precession electron diffraction (PED), a TEM-based technique, was used in this study to quickly and efficiently provide the crystallographic information needed to identify grain boundary misorientation, grain boundary type (low or high angle) and whether the boundary is coincident site lattice (CSL) – related, in irradiated SiC. Analysis of PED data showed the grain structure of the SiC layer in an irradiated TRISO fuel particle from the AGR-1 experimentmore » to be composed mainly of twin boundaries with a small fraction of low angle grain boundaries (<10%). In general, fission products favor precipitation on random, high angle grain boundaries but can precipitate out on low angle and CSL-related grain boundaries to a limited degree. Pd is capable of precipitating out on all types of grain boundaries but most prominently on random, high angle grain boundaries. Pd-U and Pd-Ag precipitates were found on CSL-related as well as random high angle grain boundaries but not on low angle grain boundaries. In contrast, precipitates containing only Ag were found only on random, high angle grain boundaries but not on either low angle or CSL-related grain boundaries.« less

  8. Lognormal Behavior of the Size Distributions of Animation Characters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Ken

    This study investigates the statistical property of the character sizes of animation, superhero series, and video game. By using online databases of Pokémon (video game) and Power Rangers (superhero series), the height and weight distributions are constructed, and we find that the weight distributions of Pokémon and Zords (robots in Power Rangers) follow the lognormal distribution in common. For the theoretical mechanism of this lognormal behavior, the combination of the normal distribution and the Weber-Fechner law is proposed.

  9. Computer simulation study of grain boundary and triple junction distributions in microstructures formed by multiple twinning

    SciTech Connect

    Gertsman, V.Y. |; Tangri, K.

    1995-06-01

    Microstructures formed as a result of multiple twinning have been simulated by means of computer modeling. Grain boundary misorientation (character) and triple junction distributions have been studied with the emphasis on the effect of initial texture and multiple twinning process. Although grain boundary distributions are similar in all the microstructures modeled, sharp initial texture leads to a somewhat enhanced amount of {Sigma}3 boundaries and to a considerable increase in the number of triple junctions containing two {Sigma}3 boundaries. The impact of these parameters on the material susceptibility to intergranular crack propagation has been analyzed and implications for grain boundary engineering has been discussed.

  10. Interdependence of character of grain boundaries, intergranular segregation of boron and grain boundary liquation in simulated weld heat-affected zone in Inconel 718

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, H.; Chaturvedi, M.C.; Richards, N.L.; McMahon, G.S.

    1999-01-08

    Intergranular microfissuring is frequently observed in the weld heat-affected zones (HAZ) in Inconel 718. Extensive studies of this phenomenon have established that the HAZ microfissuring in Inconel 718 is associated with the constitutional liquation of grain boundary (GB) precipitates of carbides, Laves and {delta} phases. In addition, HAZ microfissuring has been also attributed to the GB segregation of B and S. To differentiate between the influence of B from other factors, studies were initiated on Inconel 718 that was almost free of C, P, and S, and contained different concentrations of B. These studies have shown that B in Inconel 718 can segregate to the grain boundaries by a non-equilibrium mechanism during cooling from the pre-weld solution heat treatment temperature, which would lower the melting temperature of the GB material. If the segregation of B is sufficiently high, the GBs are likely to liquate in the HAZ during the heating component of the welding thermal cycle. The inability of the liquated GBs to support tensile stresses that develop during cooling of the welds would result in microfissuring in the HAZs. It was also observed that the GB liquation in the HAZs was heterogeneously distributed. That is, while a GB liquated others connected to it did not. Therefore, an investigation was initiated to determine the interdependence of segregation of B on GBs, their crystallographic character and liquation. The results are presented in this communication.

  11. Thermal momentum distribution from shifted boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giusti, L.

    At finite temperature the distribution of the total momentum is an observable characterizing the thermal state of a field theory, and its cumulants are related to thermodynamic potentials. In a relativistic system at zero chemical potential, for instance, the thermal variance of the total momentum is a direct measure of the entropy. We relate the generating function of the cumulants to the ratio of a path integral with properly shifted boundary conditions in the compact direction over the ordinary partition function. In this form it is well suited for Monte-Carlo evaluation, and the cumulants can be extracted straightforwardly. We test the method in the SU(3) Yang--Mills theory, and obtain the entropy density at three different temperatures.

  12. Defect character at grain boundary facet junctions: Analysis of an asymmetric Σ = 5 grain boundary in Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Medlin, D. L.; Hattar, K.; Zimmerman, J. A.; Abdeljawad, F.; Foiles, S. M.

    2016-11-16

    Grain boundaries often develop faceted morphologies in systems for which the interfacial free energy depends on the boundary inclination. Although the mesoscale thermodynamic basis for such morphological evolution has been extensively studied, the influence of line defects, such as secondary grain boundary dislocations, on the facet configurations has not been thoroughly explored. In this paper, through a combination of atomistic simulations and electron microscopic observations, we examine in detail the structure of an asymmetric Σ = 5 [001] grain boundary in well-annealed, body-centered cubic (BCC) Fe. The observed boundary forms with a hill-and-valley morphology composed of nanoscale {310} and {210} facets. Our analysis clarifies the atomic structure of the {310}/{210} facet junctions and identifies the presence of an array of secondary grain boundary dislocations that are localized to these junctions. Analysis of the Burgers vectors of the grain boundary dislocations, which are of type (1/5)<310> and (1/5)<120>, shows that the defect density is consistent with that required to accommodate a small observed angular deviation from the exact Σ = 5 orientation relationship. As a result, these observations and analysis suggest a crucial role for secondary grain boundary dislocations in dictating the length-scale of grain boundary facets, a consideration which has not been included in prior analyses of facet evolution and equilibrium facet length.

  13. Defect character at grain boundary facet junctions: Analysis of an asymmetric Σ = 5 grain boundary in Fe

    DOE PAGES

    Medlin, D. L.; Hattar, K.; Zimmerman, J. A.; ...

    2016-11-16

    Grain boundaries often develop faceted morphologies in systems for which the interfacial free energy depends on the boundary inclination. Although the mesoscale thermodynamic basis for such morphological evolution has been extensively studied, the influence of line defects, such as secondary grain boundary dislocations, on the facet configurations has not been thoroughly explored. In this paper, through a combination of atomistic simulations and electron microscopic observations, we examine in detail the structure of an asymmetric Σ = 5 [001] grain boundary in well-annealed, body-centered cubic (BCC) Fe. The observed boundary forms with a hill-and-valley morphology composed of nanoscale {310} and {210}more » facets. Our analysis clarifies the atomic structure of the {310}/{210} facet junctions and identifies the presence of an array of secondary grain boundary dislocations that are localized to these junctions. Analysis of the Burgers vectors of the grain boundary dislocations, which are of type (1/5)<310> and (1/5)<120>, shows that the defect density is consistent with that required to accommodate a small observed angular deviation from the exact Σ = 5 orientation relationship. As a result, these observations and analysis suggest a crucial role for secondary grain boundary dislocations in dictating the length-scale of grain boundary facets, a consideration which has not been included in prior analyses of facet evolution and equilibrium facet length.« less

  14. Influence of SiC grain boundary character on fission product transport in irradiated TRISO fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillo, T. M.; van Rooyen, I. J.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the fission product precipitates at silicon carbide grain boundaries from an irradiated TRISO particle were identified and correlated with the associated grain boundary characteristics. Precession electron diffraction in the transmission electron microscope provided the crystallographic information needed to identify grain boundary misorientation and boundary type (i.e., low angle, random high angle or coincident site lattice (CSL)-related). The silicon carbide layer was found to be composed mainly of twin boundaries and small fractions of random high angle and low angle grain boundaries. Most fission products were found at random, high-angle grain boundaries, with small fractions at low-angle and CSL-related grain boundaries. Palladium (Pd) was found at all types of grain boundaries while Pd-uranium and Pd-silver precipitates were only associated with CSL-related and random, high-angle grain boundaries. Precipitates containing only Ag were found only at random, high-angle grain boundaries, but not at low angle or CSL-related grain boundaries.

  15. Distribution and character of naleds in northeastern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harden, Deborah; Barnes, Peter W.; Reimnitz, Erk

    1977-01-01

    An examination of the distribution of river naleds seen in Landsat satellite imagery and high- and low-altitude aerial photography of Alaska's North Slope indicates that these features are widespread east of the Colville River and less abundant to the west. Where naleds occur, stream channels are wide and often form braided channels. Their distribution can be related to changes in stream gradient and to the occurrence of springs. Large naleds, such as on the Kongakut River, often remain through the summer melt season to form the nucleus of icing in the succeeding winter. Major naleds also are likely to significantly influence the nature of permafrost in their immediate vicinity. The map of naleds may serve as a guide to the occurrence of year-round flowing water, a sparse commodity in northern Alaska.

  16. [Dynamic distribution characters of herbaceous vegetation root systems in abandoned grasslands of Loess Plateau].

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Li, Zhanbin; Tantai, Zhan

    2005-05-01

    The investigation on the vertical distribution characters of herbaceous vegetation root systems in abandoned and natural grasslands of Loess Plateau by the method of soil auger showed that there were no significant differences in root system distribution patterns between different sampling points, and the related root indexes could be used to indicate the vertical distribution characters of vegetation roots. The main root indexes including root biomass and root length were decreased with increasing soil depth, but increased with increasing abandoned years. After abandoned for more than 20 years, the root distribution characters of abandoned grassland were approached to that of natural grassland. The root extinction coefficient decreased with increasing abandoned years, indicating that more and more roots were concentrated in surface soil layer with the increase of abandoned time, which was helpful to the improvement of soil physical and chemical properties, and beneficial to the new species intrusion and vegetation succession.

  17. The character for the boundary layer and mechanism of acid rain formation in the Tsingdao area

    SciTech Connect

    Baozhang Liu; Jinlong Li

    1996-12-31

    The vertical distribution of the wind field and temperature field of the boundary layer was very peculiar in Tsingdao area, China. Under the height of 1500m, the wind field appeared as one-front-two-valleys type: the wind speed was relatively low near surface, got bigger between 300m to 400m, decreased over 500m, and increased again gradually over 1000m. The temperature stratification was stable in the morning and evening, and it became unstable below 200m after noon. As far as mixed layer was concerned, it was not very high, generally about 400m, sometimes it reached 700m high. Multiple-layer inversion often appeared in low altitude. Northern wind was prevailing in winter, so southern in summer. The wind field were often influenced by Jianghuai cyclone and Huanghuai cyclone. Convergence air current between lower level and higher level emerged when the cyclones passed Tsingdao area. Introducing straight and shear air current, pollutants emitted from point sources were modeled by advection-diffusion equation. The result indicated that pollutants were transported far away under one straight air current. In rainy days, pollutants were accumulated in local area and the concentrations were high. When wind direction appeared shear between higher level and lower level, the transportation of pollutants was more limited. In rain days, acid rain was form by chemical process at a near distance.

  18. Grain boundary distribution and texture in ultrafine-grained copper produced by severe plastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Mishin, O.V. |; Gertsman, V.Y. |; Valiev, R.Z.; Gottstein, G.

    1996-10-01

    Ultrafine-grained (UFG), i.e., nano- and submicrocrystalline materials have attracted great attention in recent years. This interest is caused by the unusual mechanical and physical properties of these materials. The extremely high volume fraction of grain boundaries (GBs) and triple junctions in UFG materials contribute to their unusual properties. However, other important parameters describing polycrystalline aggregate, namely, grain boundary misorientation and character distributions have not yet been studied in UFG materials, though they are conceived to influence mechanical and physical properties as well. Some studies indicated that mainly high-angle GBs were formed during severe plastic deformation; however, no direct proof of this suggestion has been obtained so far. The current paper deals with a statistical study of GB distributions and texture in UFG-materials. Pure copper was chosen for this study, since many results on microstructure and properties of the ultrafine-grained state produced in this material are available.

  19. An Equation for the Mean Velocity Distribution of Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandborn, V. A.

    1959-01-01

    A general relation, empirical in origin, for the mean velocity distribution of both laminar and turbulent boundary layers is proposed. The equation, in general, accurately describes the profiles in both laminar and turbulent flows. The calculation of profiles is based on a prior knowledge of momentum, displacement, and boundary-layer thickness together with free-stream conditions. The form for turbulent layers agrees with the present concepts of similarity of the outer layer. For the inner region or turbulent boundary layers the present relation agrees very closely with experimental measurements even in cases where the logarithmic law of the wall is inadequate. A unique relation between profile form factors and the ratio of displacement thickness to boundary-layer thickness is obtained for turbulent separation. A similar criterion is also obtained for laminar separation. These relations are demonstrated to serve as an accurate criterion for identifying separation in known profiles.

  20. Correlated grain-boundary distributions in two-dimensional networks.

    PubMed

    Mason, Jeremy K; Schuh, Christopher A

    2007-07-01

    In polycrystals, there are spatial correlations in grain-boundary species, even in the absence of correlations in the grain orientations, due to the need for crystallographic consistency among misorientations. Although this consistency requirement substantially influences the connectivity of grain-boundary networks, the nature of the resulting correlations are generally only appreciated in an empirical sense. Here a rigorous treatment of this problem is presented for a model two-dimensional polycrystal with uncorrelated grain orientations or, equivalently, a cross section through a three-dimensional polycrystal in which each grain shares a common crystallographic direction normal to the plane of the network. The distribution of misorientations theta, boundary inclinations phi and the joint distribution of misorientations about a triple junction are derived for arbitrary crystal symmetry and orientation distribution functions of the grains. From these, general analytical solutions for the fraction of low-angle boundaries and the triple-junction distributions within the same subset of systems are found. The results agree with existing analysis of a few specific cases in the literature but present a significant generalization.

  1. Comparing EAM Potentials to Model Slip Transfer of Sequential Mixed Character Dislocations Across Two Symmetric Tilt Grain Boundaries in Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shuozhi; Xiong, Liming; Chen, Youping; McDowell, David L.

    2017-05-01

    Slip transfer via sequential pile-up dislocations across grain boundaries (GBs) plays an important role in plastic deformation in polycrystalline face-centered cubic (FCC) metals. In this work, large scale concurrent atomistic-continuum (CAC) method simulations are performed to address the slip transfer of mixed character dislocations across GBs in FCC Ni. Two symmetric tilt GBs, a Σ3{111} coherent twin boundary (CTB) and a Σ11{113} symmetric tilt GB (STGB), are investigated using five different fits to the embedded-atom method (EAM) interatomic potential to assess the variability of predicted dislocation-interface reaction. It is shown that for the Σ3 CTB, two of these potentials predict dislocation transmission while the other three predict dislocation absorption. In contrast, all five fits to the EAM potential predict that dislocations are absorbed by the Σ11 STGB. Simulation results are examined in terms of several slip transfer criteria in the literature, highlighting the complexity of dislocation/GB interactions and the significance of multiscale modeling of the slip transfer process.

  2. Comparing EAM Potentials to Model Slip Transfer of Sequential Mixed Character Dislocations Across Two Symmetric Tilt Grain Boundaries in Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shuozhi; Xiong, Liming; Chen, Youping; McDowell, David L.

    2017-03-01

    Slip transfer via sequential pile-up dislocations across grain boundaries (GBs) plays an important role in plastic deformation in polycrystalline face-centered cubic (FCC) metals. In this work, large scale concurrent atomistic-continuum (CAC) method simulations are performed to address the slip transfer of mixed character dislocations across GBs in FCC Ni. Two symmetric tilt GBs, a Σ3{111} coherent twin boundary (CTB) and a Σ11{113} symmetric tilt GB (STGB), are investigated using five different fits to the embedded-atom method (EAM) interatomic potential to assess the variability of predicted dislocation-interface reaction. It is shown that for the Σ3 CTB, two of these potentials predict dislocation transmission while the other three predict dislocation absorption. In contrast, all five fits to the EAM potential predict that dislocations are absorbed by the Σ11 STGB. Simulation results are examined in terms of several slip transfer criteria in the literature, highlighting the complexity of dislocation/GB interactions and the significance of multiscale modeling of the slip transfer process.

  3. Variable Mixed Orbital Character in the Photoelectron Angular Distribution of NO_{2}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laws, Benjamin A.; Cavanagh, Steven J.; Lewis, Brenton R.; Gibson, Stephen T.

    2017-06-01

    NO_{2} a key component of photochemical smog and an important species in the Earth's atmosphere, is an example of a molecule which exhibits significant mixed orbital character in the HOMO. In photoelectron experiments the geometric properties of the parent anion orbital are reflected in the photoelectron angular distribution (PAD), an area of research that has benefited largely from the ability of velocity-map imaging (VMI) to simultaneously record both the energetic and angular information, with 100% collection efficiency. Photoelectron spectra of NO_{2}^{-}, taken over a range of wavelengths (355nm-520nm) with the ANU's VMI spectrometer, reveal an anomalous jump in the anisotropy parameter near threshold. Consequently, the orbital behavior of NO_{2}^{-} appears to be quite different near threshold compared to detachment at higher photon energies. This surprising effect is due to the Wigner Threshold law, which causes p orbital character to dominate the photodetachment cross-section near threshold, before the mixed s/d orbital character becomes significant at higher electron kinetic energies. By extending recent work on binary character models to form a more general expression, the variable mixed orbital character of NO_{2}^{-} is able to be described. This study provides the first multi-wavelength NO_{2} anisotropy data, which is shown to be in decent agreement with much earlier zero-core model predictions of the anisotropy parameter. K. J. Reed, A. H. Zimmerman, H. C. Andersen, and J. I. Brauman, J. Chem. Phys. 64, 1368, (1976). doi:10.1063/1.432404 D. Khuseynov, C. C. Blackstone, L. M. Culberson, and A. Sanov, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 124312, (2014). doi:10.1063/1.4896241 W. B. Clodius, R. M. Stehman, and S. B. Woo, Phys. Rev. A. 28, 760, (1983). doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.28.760 Research supported by the Australian Research Council Discovery Project Grant DP160102585

  4. Combining Different Tools for EEG Analysis to Study the Distributed Character of Language Processing

    PubMed Central

    da Rocha, Armando Freitas; Foz, Flávia Benevides; Pereira, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies on language processing indicate that language cognition is better understood if assumed to be supported by a distributed intelligent processing system enrolling neurons located all over the cortex, in contrast to reductionism that proposes to localize cognitive functions to specific cortical structures. Here, brain activity was recorded using electroencephalogram while volunteers were listening or reading small texts and had to select pictures that translate meaning of these texts. Several techniques for EEG analysis were used to show this distributed character of neuronal enrollment associated with the comprehension of oral and written descriptive texts. Low Resolution Tomography identified the many different sets (si) of neurons activated in several distinct cortical areas by text understanding. Linear correlation was used to calculate the information H(ei) provided by each electrode of the 10/20 system about the identified si. H(ei) Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to study the temporal and spatial activation of these sources si. This analysis evidenced 4 different patterns of H(ei) covariation that are generated by neurons located at different cortical locations. These results clearly show that the distributed character of language processing is clearly evidenced by combining available EEG technologies. PMID:26713089

  5. Thermal Momentum Distribution from Path Integrals with Shifted Boundary Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giusti, Leonardo; Meyer, Harvey B.

    2011-04-01

    For a thermal field theory formulated in the grand canonical ensemble, the distribution of the total momentum is an observable characterizing the thermal state. We show that its cumulants are related to thermodynamic potentials. In a relativistic system, for instance, the thermal variance of the total momentum is a direct measure of the enthalpy. We relate the generating function of the cumulants to the ratio of (a) a partition function expressed as a Matsubara path integral with shifted boundary conditions in the compact direction and (b) the ordinary partition function. In this form the generating function is well suited for Monte Carlo evaluation, and the cumulants can be extracted straightforwardly. We test the method in the SU(3) Yang-Mills theory and obtain the entropy density at three different temperatures.

  6. [Speciation and distribution characters of rare earth elements in the Baotou Section of the Yellow River].

    PubMed

    He, Jiang; Mi, Na; Kuang, Yun-chen; Fan, Qing-yun; Wang, Xia; Guan, Wei; Li, Gui-hai; Li, Chao-sheng; Wang, Xi-wei

    2004-03-01

    As a whole of water column, suspended matter and surface sediment in the mainstream and the branch taking up industry wastewater, speciation and distribution characters of rare earth elements (REEs) were investigated systemically in the Baotou section of the Yellow River. This study shows that rare earth elements in the mainstream of the Baotou section of the Yellow River mainly exist in suspended particles, and the dissolved contents are in extremely minute quantities. REEs mainly exist in dissolved particles in the branch taking up industry wastewater, and suspended sigma REE and dissolved sigma REE are obviously higher than those in the mainstream. The change of sigma REE of dissolved particles in water phase along the Baotou section of the Yellow River is very similar to that of sigma REE of suspended particles, and consistent along the main river, it is that sigma REE increase appreciably from the control profile to the keystone discharged section, come to a head in the D site and reduce in the E site. This distribution pattern indicates pile industry wastewater of Baotou to rare earth elements in the mainstream of the Yellow River, particularly LREE. The REE distribution in the mainstream of the Baotou section of the Yellow River is the same, with LREE enrichment and Eu depletion. But LREE origin of D site is different from the other sites by excursion of LREE distribution curve and other geochemical parameters, they are origin of industry wastewater piled, otherwise the other four sites are origin of loess altiplano. And HREE are origin of loess altiplano in all the sites. The speciation characteristics of REE in the sediments and suspended matter are quite similar with the amount in as follows: residual > bound to carbonates, bound to Fe-Mn oxides > bound to organic matter > exchangeable. REEs exchangeable in surface sediment and suspended matter in the branch taking up industry wastewater are higher than those in the mainstream, it confirms that REEs in

  7. Global Distribution of Planetary Boundary Layer Height Derived from CALIPSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.

    2015-12-01

    The global distribution of planetary boundary layer (PBL) height, which was estimated from the attenuated back-scatter observations of Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO), is presented. In general, the PBL is capped by a temperature inversion that tends to trap moisture and aerosols. The gradient of back-scatter observed by lidar is almost always associated with this temperature inversion and the simultaneous decrease of moisture content. Thus, the PBL top is defined as the location of the maximum aerosol scattering gradient, which is analogous to the more conventional thermodynamic definition. The maximum standard deviation method, developed by Jordan et al. (2010), is modified and used to derive the global PBL heights. The derived PBL heights are not only consistent with the results of McGrath-Spangler and Denning (2012) but also agree well with the ground-based lidar measurements. It is found that the correlation between CALIPSO and the ground-based lidar was 0.73. The seasonal mean patterns from 4-year mid-day PBL heights over global are demonstrated. Also it is found that the largest PBL heights occur over the Tibetan Plateau and the coastal areas. The smallest PBL heights appear in the Tarim Basin and the northeast of China during the local winter. The comparison of PBL heights from CALIPSO and ECMWF under different land-cover conditions showed that, over ocean and forest surface, the PBL height estimated from the CALIPSO back-scatter climatology is larger than the ones estimated from ECMWF data. However, the PBL heights from ECMWF, over grass land and bare land surface in spring and summer are larger than the ones from CALIPSO.

  8. World Map Showing Surface and Subsurface Distribution, and Lithologic Character of Middle and Late Neoproterozoic Rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, John H.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The map was prepared to outline the basic information on where Neoproterozoic rocks are present in the World, and of the lithologic character of these rocks. The information provides a better understanding of major Neoproterozoic tectonic subdivisions useful in paleogeographic and plate tectonic reconstructions. The time frame of the map is within the middle and late Neoproterozoic from approximately 870 to 540 Ma and is after widespread Mesoproterozoic Grenville-age collisional events that are considered to have formed the hypothetical supercontinent of Rodinia. Much of the time represented by the map is interpreted to be during the fragmentation of Rodinia. The recognition of Neoproterozoic rocks is commonly difficult because of limited isotopic or paloeontological dating. Thus, some rocks shown on the map could be older or younger than the age indicated. However, at the scale of the map the the problem may be minor. Enough information seems to be available to indicate the general age of the rocks. Many of the successions contain diamictite deposits considered to be glaciogenic and dated as middle or late Neoproterozoic. These deposits thus show a rough correlation of middle and late Neoproterozoic rocks of the world. The map is a Richardson map projection, except for Antarctica which is a polar projection. The map was prepared from about 650 references, shown in the text linked below under 'Sources of Information', used to outline distribution patterns, determine rock types, and provide information on the regional and local geologic framework of the rocks. The focus of the references is on the geologic information needed to prepare the map. Other information, such as plate tectonic reconstructions or paleomagnetic studies is generally not included. The 'Sources of Information' lists references alphabetically for each of 14 regions. In brackets is a code for each area. These codes provide help in locating the specific regions in the references.

  9. Vertical distribution of HOx concentrations driven by boundary layer dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomm, Sebastian; Broch, Sebastian; Fuchs, Hendrik; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Holland, Frank; Bohn, Birger; Häseler, Rolf; Jäger, Julia; Kaiser, Jennifer; Keutsch, Frank; Li, Xin; Lu, Keding; Lohse, Insa; Rohrer, Franz; Tillmann, Ralf; Wegener, Robert; Wolfe, Glenn; Mentel, Thomas F.; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Wahner, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    The hydroxyl (OH) and hydroperoxy (HO2) radicals are key compounds for the degradation of pollutants in the atmosphere. Therefore, accurate and precise measurements of HOx radicals (= OH + HO2) at different altitudes and in different regions are necessary to test our understanding of atmospheric chemical processes. The planetary boundary layer (PBL) is of special interest as it is chemically the most active part of the atmosphere. Until today, there is a general lack of measurements investigating the distribution of radicals, trace gases, and aerosols in the PBL with high spatial resolution. Here, we present results of measurements performed in June/July 2012 in the Po valley region in Italy as part of the Pan-European Gas-AeroSOls-climate interaction Study (PEGASOS). A Zeppelin NT was used as an airborne platform for measurements of HOx radical concentrations and total OH reactivity (kOH) applying a remotely controlled Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) instrument. In addition a comprehensive set of other trace gases (O3, CO, NO, NO2, HCHO, HONO, VOCs), photolysis frequencies, particle number concentration, and meteorological parameters were measured. During the morning hours, a layered atmospheric structure with vertical gradients in trace gas concentrations was observed. In altitudes larger than 600 m above ground, air masses with low trace gas concentrations (NOx < 500 ppt, kOH < 3 s-1) were probed, whereas air masses in altitudes below 100 m above ground were influenced by ground emissions resulting in higher trace gas concentrations (NOx > 6 ppb, kOH > 6 s-1). The airship Zeppelin NT was used to perform localized height profiles between 75 and 900 m above ground in order to investigate the influence of these trace gas gradients on HOx radical concentrations. Due to changing chemical conditions, the measured OH concentration shows a variability with height up to a factor of 2.5 and for the measured HO2 concentration up to a factor of 5. Additionally, we present

  10. Grain and grain boundary characters in surface layer of untreated and plasma nitrocarburized 18Ni maraging steel with nanocrystalline structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, M. F.; Wu, Y. Q.; Liu, R. L.

    2013-05-01

    The nanocrystallized 18Ni maraging steel was plasma nitrocarburized at 460 °C for 4 h in a mixture gas of N2, H2 and C2H5OH. The surface phase compositions of the specimens were analyzed using X-ray diffractometer. The grain shape and size, and grain boundaries in the subsurface layers of the samples were characterized by electron backscattering diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that the nitrocarburized layers are composed of α-Fe, γ‧-Fe4N and FeN0.049 phases. Most α-Fe and γ‧-Fe4N grains show in columnar shape. The major and minor axes of some α-Fe grains are elongated and shortened after nitrocarburizing, respectively. In the subsurface layers of the untreated and nitrocarburized specimens, the average areas of γ‧-Fe4N and α-Fe grains both with a dimension of nanometer are 0.395 μm2 and 0.397 μm2, respectively. The γ‧-Fe4N grain boundaries are mainly high angle boundaries with a very small fraction of low angle boundaries. Coincidence site lattice boundaries in the subsurface layer of the untreated specimen are composed mainly of Σ3, Σ11 and Σ13b, and their fraction decreases after nitrocarburizing.

  11. Infinite-horizon boundary control of distributed systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimov, V. I.; Osipov, Yu. S.

    2016-01-01

    For a boundary controlled dynamic system, algorithms for solving the problem of tracking reference motion and the problem of tracking reference control are described. The algorithms are robust to information noise and computational errors. The solution method is based on the extremal shift method from the theory of positional differential games.

  12. Zero-derivative boundary condition for pulsed distributed systems. [column chromatography example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lashmet, P. K.; Woodrow, P. T.

    1975-01-01

    To permit use of experimentally determined Peclet numbers in numerical simulations of pulsed distributed flow systems such as chromatograph columns, substitution of the zero-derivative boundary condition for the infinite boundary condition used in treating data is examined. Moment analysis shows that application of the zero-derivative condition external to the column will yield equivalent numerical results for the two boundary conditions. Criteria for locating this position are provided as a function of the Peclet number.

  13. Analysis of spatial distribution and transmission characters for highly pathogenic avian influenza in Chinese mainland in 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y. L.; Wei, C. J.; Yan, L.; Chi, T. H.; Wu, X. B.; Xiao, C. S.

    2006-03-01

    After the outbreak of highly pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) in South Korea in the end of year 2003, estimates of the impact of HPAI in affected countries vary greatly, the total direct losses are about 3 billion US dollars, and it caused 15 million birds and poultry flocks death. It is significant to understand the spatial distribution and transmission characters of HPAI for its prevention and control. According to 50 outbreak cases for HPAI in Chinese mainland during 2004, this paper introduces the approach of spatial distribution and transmission characters for HPAI and its results. Its approach is based on remote sensing and GIS techniques. Its supporting data set involves normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and land surface temperature (Ts) derived from a time-series of remote sensing data of 1 kilometer-resolution NOAA/AVHRR, birds' migration routes, topology geographic map, lake and wetland maps, and meteorological observation data. In order to analyze synthetically using these data, a supporting platform for analysis Avian Influenza epidemic situation (SPAS/AI) was developed. Supporting by SPAS/AI, the integrated information from multi-sources can be easily used to the analysis of the spatial distribution and transmission character of HPAI. The results show that the range of spatial distribution and transmission of HPAI in China during 2004 connected to environment factors NDVI, Ts and the distributions of lake and wetland, and especially to bird migration routes. To some extent, the results provide some suggestions for the macro-decision making for the prevention and control of HPAI in the areas of potential risk and reoccurrence.

  14. Sequential slip transfer of mixed-character dislocations across Σ3 coherent twin boundary in FCC metals: a concurrent atomistic-continuum study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shuozhi; Xiong, Liming; Chen, Youping; McDowell, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Sequential slip transfer across grain boundaries (GB) has an important role in size-dependent propagation of plastic deformation in polycrystalline metals. For example, the Hall-Petch effect, which states that a smaller average grain size results in a higher yield stress, can be rationalised in terms of dislocation pile-ups against GBs. In spite of extensive studies in modelling individual phases and grains using atomistic simulations, well-accepted criteria of slip transfer across GBs are still lacking, as well as models of predicting irreversible GB structure evolution. Slip transfer is inherently multiscale since both the atomic structure of the boundary and the long-range fields of the dislocation pile-up come into play. In this work, concurrent atomistic-continuum simulations are performed to study sequential slip transfer of a series of curved dislocations from a given pile-up on Σ3 coherent twin boundary (CTB) in Cu and Al, with dominant leading screw character at the site of interaction. A Frank-Read source is employed to nucleate dislocations continuously. It is found that subject to a shear stress of 1.2 GPa, screw dislocations transfer into the twinned grain in Cu, but glide on the twin boundary plane in Al. Moreover, four dislocation/CTB interaction modes are identified in Al, which are affected by (1) applied shear stress, (2) dislocation line length, and (3) dislocation line curvature. Our results elucidate the discrepancies between atomistic simulations and experimental observations of dislocation-GB reactions and highlight the importance of directly modeling sequential dislocation slip transfer reactions using fully 3D models.

  15. 26 CFR 1.661(b)-1 - Character of amounts distributed; in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... into the computation of distributable net income as the total of each class bears to the total distributable net income. For example, if a trust has distributable net income of $20,000, consisting of $10,000... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Estates and Trusts Which May Accumulate Income Or...

  16. 26 CFR 1.661(b)-2 - Character of amounts distributed when charitable contributions are made.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... enter into the computation of distributable net income are allocated among the items of income which enter into the computation of distributable net income in accordance with the rules set forth in § 1.652... items of income entering into the computation of the distributable net income of the estate or trust, in...

  17. 26 CFR 1.661(b)-1 - Character of amounts distributed; in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of distributable net income as the total of each class bears to the total distributable net income. For example, if a trust has distributable net income of $20,000, consisting of $10,000 each of taxable... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Estates and Trusts Which May Accumulate Income Or Which...

  18. 26 CFR 1.661(b)-2 - Character of amounts distributed when charitable contributions are made.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... enter into the computation of distributable net income are allocated among the items of income which enter into the computation of distributable net income in accordance with the rules set forth in § 1.652... items of income entering into the computation of the distributable net income of the estate or trust, in...

  19. A pseudo-3D approach based on electron backscatter diffraction and backscatter electron imaging to study the character of phase boundaries between Mg and long period stacking ordered phase in a Mg–2Y–Zn alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Afshar, Mehran Zaefferer, Stefan

    2015-03-15

    In Mg–2 at.% Y–1 at.% Zn alloys, the LPSO (Long Period Stacking Ordered) phase is important to improve mechanical properties of the material. The aim of this paper is to present a study on the phase boundary character in these two-phase alloys. Using EBSD pattern analysis it was found that the 24R structure is the dominant LPSO phase structure in the current alloy. The phase boundary character between the Mg matrix and the LPSO phase was investigated using an improved pseudo-3D EBSD (electron backscatter diffraction) technique in combination with BSE or SE (backscatter or secondary electron) imaging. A large amount of very low-angle phase boundaries was detected. The (0 0 0 2) plane in the Mg matrix which is parallel to the (0 0 0 24) plane in the LPSO phase was found to be the most frequent plane for these phase boundaries. This plane is supposed to be the habit plane of the eutectic co-solidification of the Mg matrix and the LPSO phase. - Highlights: • It is shown that for the investigated alloy the LPSO phase has mainly 24R crystal structure. • A new method is presented which allows accurate determination of the 5-parameter grain or phase boundary character. • It is found that the low-angle phase boundaries appearing in the alloy all have basal phase boundary planes.

  20. Microstructure of TRISO Coated Particles from the AGR-1 Experiment I: SiC Grain Size and Grain Boundary Character

    SciTech Connect

    Rita Kirchhofer; John D, Hunn; Paul A. Demkowicz; James I. Cole; Brian P. Gorman

    2013-01-01

    Pre-irradiation SiC microstructures in TRISO coated fuel particles from the AGR-1 experiment were quantitatively characterized using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). From EBSD it was determined that only the cubic polymorph of as-deposited SiC was present and the SiC had a high fraction of CSL S3 grain boundaries. Additionally, the local area misorientation (LAM), which is a qualitative measurement of strain in the SiC lattice, was mapped for each fuel variant. The morphology of the SiC / IPyC interfaces were characterized by TEM following site-specific focused ion beam (FIB) specimen preparation. It was determined that the SiC layer had a heavily faulted microstructure typical of CVD deposited SiC and that the average grain diameter increased from the SiC/IPyC interface for all the fuel variants, except V3 that showed a constant grain size across the layer.

  1. Weibull-distributed dyke thickness reflects probabilistic character of host-rock strength

    PubMed Central

    Krumbholz, Michael; Hieronymus, Christoph F.; Burchardt, Steffi; Troll, Valentin R.; Tanner, David C.; Friese, Nadine

    2014-01-01

    Magmatic sheet intrusions (dykes) constitute the main form of magma transport in the Earth’s crust. The size distribution of dykes is a crucial parameter that controls volcanic surface deformation and eruption rates and is required to realistically model volcano deformation for eruption forecasting. Here we present statistical analyses of 3,676 dyke thickness measurements from different tectonic settings and show that dyke thickness consistently follows the Weibull distribution. Known from materials science, power law-distributed flaws in brittle materials lead to Weibull-distributed failure stress. We therefore propose a dynamic model in which dyke thickness is determined by variable magma pressure that exploits differently sized host-rock weaknesses. The observed dyke thickness distributions are thus site-specific because rock strength, rather than magma viscosity and composition, exerts the dominant control on dyke emplacement. Fundamentally, the strength of geomaterials is scale-dependent and should be approximated by a probability distribution. PMID:24513695

  2. Weibull-distributed dyke thickness reflects probabilistic character of host-rock strength.

    PubMed

    Krumbholz, Michael; Hieronymus, Christoph F; Burchardt, Steffi; Troll, Valentin R; Tanner, David C; Friese, Nadine

    2014-01-01

    Magmatic sheet intrusions (dykes) constitute the main form of magma transport in the Earth's crust. The size distribution of dykes is a crucial parameter that controls volcanic surface deformation and eruption rates and is required to realistically model volcano deformation for eruption forecasting. Here we present statistical analyses of 3,676 dyke thickness measurements from different tectonic settings and show that dyke thickness consistently follows the Weibull distribution. Known from materials science, power law-distributed flaws in brittle materials lead to Weibull-distributed failure stress. We therefore propose a dynamic model in which dyke thickness is determined by variable magma pressure that exploits differently sized host-rock weaknesses. The observed dyke thickness distributions are thus site-specific because rock strength, rather than magma viscosity and composition, exerts the dominant control on dyke emplacement. Fundamentally, the strength of geomaterials is scale-dependent and should be approximated by a probability distribution.

  3. Character of the correlation between the geographic distribution of auroras and the anomalous geomagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degtiarev, V. I.; Nadubovich, Iu. A.; Platonov, O. I.; Shumilova, N. A.; Mishurinskii, B. E.

    1987-06-01

    Photographic measurements obtained on Taimyr and in the Iakutsk region are used in a statistical correlation of the distributions of the relative occurrence probability of auroras along the auroral zone and the magnitude of the anomalous geomagnetic field (AGF). A negative correlation between the AGF and the geographic distribution of auroras is established. Using topside sounding data, the characteristic dimensions of ionospheric irregularities in the auroral zone are determined which coincide with the regional scale of aurora distribution.

  4. Estuarine sedimentation, sediment character, and foraminiferal distribution in central San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chin, John L.; Woodrow, Donald L.; McGann, Mary; Wong, Florence L.; Fregoso, Theresa; Jaffe, Bruce E.

    2010-01-01

    dominantly by sand- to coarse sand-sized sediment. Sandy areas also include Raccoon Strait, off Point Tiburon, and on the subtidal Alcatraz, Point Knox, and Presidio Shoals. Drab-colored silty clays are the dominant sediment observed in gravity cores from central bay. Their dominance along the length of the core suggests that silty clays have been deposited consistently over much of this subembayment for the time period covered by the recovered sediments (Woodrow and others, this report). Stratification types include weakly-defined laminae, 1-3 mm thick. Few examples of horizontal lamination in very fine sand or silt were observed. Cross lamination, including ripples, was observed in seven cores. Erosional surfaces were evident in almost every core where x-radiographs were available (they are very difficult to observe visually). Minor cut-and-fill structures also were noted in three cores and inclined strata were observed in three cores. Textural patterns in central bay indicate that silts and clays dominate the shallow water areas and margins of the bay. Sand dominates the tidal channel just east of Angel and Alcatraz Islands and to the west of the islands to the Golden Gate. The pattern of sand-sized sediment, as determined by particle-size analysis, suggests that sand movement is easterly from the west-central part of the bay. A second pattern of sand movement is to the south from the southwestern extremity of San Pablo Bay (boundary approximated by the location of the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge). Age dates for central bay sediment samples were obtained by carbon-14 radiometric age dating. Age dates were determined from shell material that was interpreted to be largely in-place (not transported). Age dates subsequently were reservoir corrected and then converted to calendar years. Sediments sampled from central bay cores range in age from 330 to 4,155 years before present. Foraminiferal distribution in the San Francisco Bay estuary is fairly well

  5. 26 CFR 1.735-1 - Character of gain or loss on disposition of distributed property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... distributed property—(1) Unrealized receivables. Any gain realized or loss sustained by a partner on a sale or... by a partner on a sale or exchange of inventory items (as defined in section 751(d)(2)) received in a... partner of such inventory items after 5 years from the date of distribution shall be determined as of...

  6. Photoelectron angular distributions for states of any mixed character: an experiment-friendly model for atomic, molecular, and cluster anions.

    PubMed

    Khuseynov, Dmitry; Blackstone, Christopher C; Culberson, Lori M; Sanov, Andrei

    2014-09-28

    We present a model for laboratory-frame photoelectron angular distributions in direct photodetachment from (in principle) any molecular orbital using linearly polarized light. A transparent mathematical approach is used to generalize the Cooper-Zare central-potential model to anionic states of any mixed character. In the limit of atomic-anion photodetachment, the model reproduces the Cooper-Zare formula. In the case of an initial orbital described as a superposition of s and p-type functions, the model yields the previously obtained s-p mixing formula. The formalism is further advanced using the Hanstorp approximation, whereas the relative scaling of the partial-wave cross-sections is assumed to follow the Wigner threshold law. The resulting model describes the energy dependence of photoelectron anisotropy for any atomic, molecular, or cluster anions, usually without requiring a direct calculation of the transition dipole matrix elements. As a benchmark case, we apply the p-d variant of the model to the experimental results for NO(-) photodetachment and show that the observed anisotropy trend is described well using physically meaningful values of the model parameters. Overall, the presented formalism delivers insight into the photodetachment process and affords a new quantitative strategy for analyzing the photoelectron angular distributions and characterizing mixed-character molecular orbitals using photoelectron imaging spectroscopy of negative ions.

  7. Photoelectron angular distributions for states of any mixed character: An experiment-friendly model for atomic, molecular, and cluster anions

    SciTech Connect

    Khuseynov, Dmitry; Blackstone, Christopher C.; Culberson, Lori M.; Sanov, Andrei

    2014-09-28

    We present a model for laboratory-frame photoelectron angular distributions in direct photodetachment from (in principle) any molecular orbital using linearly polarized light. A transparent mathematical approach is used to generalize the Cooper-Zare central-potential model to anionic states of any mixed character. In the limit of atomic-anion photodetachment, the model reproduces the Cooper-Zare formula. In the case of an initial orbital described as a superposition of s and p-type functions, the model yields the previously obtained s-p mixing formula. The formalism is further advanced using the Hanstorp approximation, whereas the relative scaling of the partial-wave cross-sections is assumed to follow the Wigner threshold law. The resulting model describes the energy dependence of photoelectron anisotropy for any atomic, molecular, or cluster anions, usually without requiring a direct calculation of the transition dipole matrix elements. As a benchmark case, we apply the p-d variant of the model to the experimental results for NO{sup −} photodetachment and show that the observed anisotropy trend is described well using physically meaningful values of the model parameters. Overall, the presented formalism delivers insight into the photodetachment process and affords a new quantitative strategy for analyzing the photoelectron angular distributions and characterizing mixed-character molecular orbitals using photoelectron imaging spectroscopy of negative ions.

  8. Velocity Distribution in the Boundary Layer of a Submerged Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, M

    1930-01-01

    This report deals with the measurement of the velocity distribution of the air in the velocity of a plate placed parallel to the air flow. The measurements took place in a small wind tunnel where the diameter of the entrance cone is 30 cm and the length of the free jet between the entrance and exit cones is about 2.5 m. The measurements were made in the free jet where the static pressure was constant, which was essential for the method of measurement used.

  9. Character feature integration of Chinese calligraphy and font

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Cao; Xiao, Jianguo; Jia, Wenhua; Xu, Canhui

    2013-01-01

    A framework is proposed in this paper to effectively generate a new hybrid character type by means of integrating local contour feature of Chinese calligraphy with structural feature of font in computer system. To explore traditional art manifestation of calligraphy, multi-directional spatial filter is applied for local contour feature extraction. Then the contour of character image is divided into sub-images. The sub-images in the identical position from various characters are estimated by Gaussian distribution. According to its probability distribution, the dilation operator and erosion operator are designed to adjust the boundary of font image. And then new Chinese character images are generated which possess both contour feature of artistical calligraphy and elaborate structural feature of font. Experimental results demonstrate the new characters are visually acceptable, and the proposed framework is an effective and efficient strategy to automatically generate the new hybrid character of calligraphy and font.

  10. Influence of grain boundary structure distribution and processing history on intergranular creep cavitation: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, B.L.

    1988-01-01

    A new measure of grain boundary structure in polycrystalline materials has been introduced which overcomes two difficult obstacles in modeling properties. Previous microstructural measures described intercrystalline misorientation and boundary physical orientation separately. The new measure, called the Intercrystalline Structure Distribution Function, successfully combines both of these elements into a single cohesive measure application to a wide class of property models. A method for determining the function from microdiffraction measurements in section planes was developed. 17 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Reassessment of morphological diagnostic characters and species boundaries requires taxonomical changes for the genus orthopyxis L. Agassiz, 1862 (campanulariidae, hydrozoa) and some related campanulariids.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Amanda F; Genzano, Gabriel N; Marques, Antonio C

    2015-01-01

    The genus Orthopyxis is widely known for its morphological variability, making species identification particularly difficult. A number of nominal species have been recorded in the southwestern Atlantic, although most of these records are doubtful. The goal of this study was to infer species boundaries in the genus Orthopyxis from the southwestern Atlantic using an integrative approach. Intergeneric limits were also tested using comparisons with specimens of the genus Campanularia. We performed DNA analyses using the mitochondrial genes 16S and COI and the nuclear ITS1 and ITS2 regions. Orthopyxis was monophyletic in maximum likelihood analyses using the combined dataset and in analyses with 16S alone. Four lineages of Orthopyxis were retrieved for all analyses, corresponding morphologically to the species Orthopyxis sargassicola (previously known in the area), Orthopyxis crenata (first recorded for the southwestern Atlantic), Orthopyxis caliculata (= Orthopyxis minuta Vannucci, 1949 and considered a synonym of O. integra by some authors), and Orthopyxis mianzani sp. nov. A re-evaluation of the traditional morphological diagnostic characters, guided by our molecular analyses, revealed that O. integra does not occur in the study area, and O. caliculata is the correct identification of one of the lineages occurring in this region, corroborating the validity of that species. Orthopyxis mianzani sp. nov. resembles O. caliculata with respect to gonothecae morphology and a smooth hydrothecae rim, although it shows significant differences for other characters, such as perisarc thickness, which has traditionally been thought to have wide intraspecific variation. The species O. sargassicola is morphologically similar to O. crenata, although they differ in gonothecae morphology, and these species can only be reliably identified when this structure is present.

  12. Reassessment of Morphological Diagnostic Characters and Species Boundaries Requires Taxonomical Changes for the Genus Orthopyxis L. Agassiz, 1862 (Campanulariidae, Hydrozoa) and Some Related Campanulariids

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Amanda F.; Genzano, Gabriel N.; Marques, Antonio C.

    2015-01-01

    The genus Orthopyxis is widely known for its morphological variability, making species identification particularly difficult. A number of nominal species have been recorded in the southwestern Atlantic, although most of these records are doubtful. The goal of this study was to infer species boundaries in the genus Orthopyxis from the southwestern Atlantic using an integrative approach. Intergeneric limits were also tested using comparisons with specimens of the genus Campanularia. We performed DNA analyses using the mitochondrial genes 16S and COI and the nuclear ITS1 and ITS2 regions. Orthopyxis was monophyletic in maximum likelihood analyses using the combined dataset and in analyses with 16S alone. Four lineages of Orthopyxis were retrieved for all analyses, corresponding morphologically to the species Orthopyxis sargassicola (previously known in the area), Orthopyxis crenata (first recorded for the southwestern Atlantic), Orthopyxis caliculata (= Orthopyxis minuta Vannucci, 1949 and considered a synonym of O. integra by some authors), and Orthopyxis mianzani sp. nov. A re-evaluation of the traditional morphological diagnostic characters, guided by our molecular analyses, revealed that O. integra does not occur in the study area, and O. caliculata is the correct identification of one of the lineages occurring in this region, corroborating the validity of that species. Orthopyxis mianzani sp. nov. resembles O. caliculata with respect to gonothecae morphology and a smooth hydrothecae rim, although it shows significant differences for other characters, such as perisarc thickness, which has traditionally been thought to have wide intraspecific variation. The species O. sargassicola is morphologically similar to O. crenata, although they differ in gonothecae morphology, and these species can only be reliably identified when this structure is present. PMID:25723572

  13. On the CSL grain boundary distributions in polycrystals. [Coincidence site lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Yu . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Adams, B.L. . Dept. of Manufacturing Engineering)

    1994-04-15

    CSL (Coincidence Site Lattice) grain boundaries are considered to be special for polycrystals. Compared to non-special, random grain boundaries, they are believed to be low-energy, and they are observed to be resistant to intergranular fracture, creep cavitation, etc. Thus the frequencies of CSL distribution are important in Grain Boundary Characteristics Design (GBCD). In a previous paper, the influence of crystallographic texture on the frequencies of CSL grain boundary distributions in polycrystals was discussed. The authors draw the conclusion that the frequency of CSL-boundaries depends upon texture, but that this frequency is weak for textures which are not sharp. However, the potential for spatial correlations between neighboring grain orientations was not considered in this earlier work, and some recent experimental measurements in real polycrystals are in contradiction with this conclusion. Recent experimental advances make it possible to determine the crystallographic characteristics of a large number of grain boundaries in a short time. This paper illustrates two examples for fcc cubic materials: Inconel 600 alloy with a weak rolling texture, and a highly fiber-textured aluminum thin film. It is demonstrated that the occurrence of CSL boundaries is very strong in the weakly textured Inconel 600 alloy, in disagreement with theoretical estimates. For the aluminum thin film, it is shown that experimental measurements and theoretical predictions are in reasonable agreement. In the next section the numerical results of theoretical and computer simulated CSL grain boundary distributions are described. Section 3 details the OIM experimental measurements. Section 4 provides a more complete discussion of the comparison between theoretical predictions and experimental measurements.

  14. Density and energy distribution of interface states in the grain boundaries of polysilicon nanowire.

    PubMed

    Amit, Iddo; Englander, Danny; Horvitz, Dror; Sasson, Yaniv; Rosenwaks, Yossi

    2014-11-12

    Wafer-scale fabrication of semiconductor nanowire devices is readily facilitated by lithography-based top-down fabrication of polysilicon nanowire (P-SiNW) arrays. However, free carrier trapping at the grain boundaries of polycrystalline materials drastically changes their properties. We present here transport measurements of P-SiNW array devices coupled with Kelvin probe force microscopy at different applied biases. By fitting the measured P-SiNW surface potential using electrostatic simulations, we extract the longitudinal dopant distribution along the nanowires as well as the density of grain boundaries interface states and their energy distribution within the band gap.

  15. 26 CFR 1.735-1 - Character of gain or loss on disposition of distributed property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...—(1) Unrealized receivables. Any gain realized or loss sustained by a partner on a sale or exchange or... property other than a capital asset. (2) Inventory items. Any gain realized or loss sustained by a partner... partner of such inventory items after 5 years from the date of distribution shall be determined as of...

  16. [137Cs profile distribution character and its implication for soil erosion on Karst slopes of northwest Guangxi].

    PubMed

    Feng, Teng; Chen, Hong-song; Zhang, Wei; Nie, Yun-peng; Wang, Ke-lin

    2011-03-01

    This paper studied the profile distribution characters of 137Cs and soil organic carbon (SOC) on the Karst slopes and in the fissures in typical peak-cluster depression in Northwest Guangxi, aimed to approach the applicability of 137Cs method on Karst slopes and the implication of 37Cs for the characteristics of slope soil erosion. In all test profiles, there was a significant correlation between 137Cs and SOC, indicating that both of them might have the same loss pathway. On the slopes under secondary forests, 137Cs mainly existed within the depth 0-24 cm. On the upper middle and middle slope sites, 137Cs had an exponential decrease with depth, indicating no or slight surface erosion; while on the foot slope site, the distribution pattern of 137Cs indicated severer erosion. On the slopes with cultivated lands, 137Cs distributed uniformly within the plough layer. In the upper middle and middle slopes profiles, 137Cs mainly existed in the depth around 15 cm and far less than the background value, indicating severe soil erosion; while in foot slope profiles, 137Cs was aggraded to the depth 45 cm. A discontinuous distribution of 137Cs in the profiles was detected on the foot slopes under secondary forests, on the upper middle and foot slopes of cultivated lands, and in the fissures, indicating that the soil particles on Karst slopes had a trend of losing with rainwater to the underground, but the loss quantity was negligible, compared with surface erosion.

  17. Atomic Scale Verification of Oxide-Ion Vacancy Distribution near a Single Grain Boundary in YSZ

    PubMed Central

    An, Jihwan; Park, Joong Sun; Koh, Ai Leen; Lee, Hark B.; Jung, Hee Joon; Schoonman, Joop; Sinclair, Robert; Gür, Turgut M.; Prinz, Fritz B.

    2013-01-01

    This study presents atomic scale characterization of grain boundary defect structure in a functional oxide with implications for a wide range of electrochemical and electronic behavior. Indeed, grain boundary engineering can alter transport and kinetic properties by several orders of magnitude. Here we report experimental observation and determination of oxide-ion vacancy concentration near the Σ13 (510)/[001] symmetric tilt grain-boundary of YSZ bicrystal using aberration-corrected TEM operated under negative spherical aberration coefficient imaging condition. We show significant oxygen deficiency due to segregation of oxide-ion vacancies near the grain-boundary core with half-width < 0.6 nm. Electron energy loss spectroscopy measurements with scanning TEM indicated increased oxide-ion vacancy concentration at the grain boundary core. Oxide-ion density distribution near a grain boundary simulated by molecular dynamics corroborated well with experimental results. Such column-by-column quantification of defect concentration in functional materials can provide new insights that may lead to engineered grain boundaries designed for specific functionalities. PMID:24042150

  18. Measurement of argon neutral velocity distribution functions near an absorbing boundary in a plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, Zachary; Thompson, Derek; Good, Timothy; Scime, Earl

    2016-10-01

    Neutral particle distributions are critical to the study of plasma boundary interactions, where ion-neutral collisions, e.g. via charge exchange, may modify energetic particle populations impacting the boundary surface. Neutral particle behavior at absorbing boundaries thus underlies a number of important plasma physics issues, such as wall loading in fusion devices and anomalous erosion in Hall thruster channels. Neutral velocity distribution functions (NVDFs) are measured using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). Our LIF scheme excites the 1s4 non-metastable state of neutral argon with 667.913 nm photons. The subsequent decay emission at 750.590 nm is recorded synchronously with injection laser frequency. Measurements are performed near a grounded boundary immersed in a cylindrical helicon plasma, with the boundary plate oriented at an oblique angle to the magnetic field. NVDFs are recorded in multiple velocity dimensions and in a three-dimensional volume, enabling point-to-point comparisons with NVDF predictions from particle-in-cell models as well as comparisons with ion velocity distribution function measurements obtained in the same regions through Ar-II LIF. This work is supported by US National Science Foundation Grant Number PHYS-1360278.

  19. Grain boundary distributions, texture and orientation correlations in austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Gertsman, V.Y. |; Tangri, K.

    1995-10-01

    Among various distribution functions describing microstructure of polycrystals, two relate to the crystallite orientations, namely, crystallographic texture and misorientation distribution. Complications arise due to the orientation correlations which may exist between various crystallites of the polycrystalline aggregate. These two factors, viz. texture and orientation correlations, determine the grain boundary distribution in a sample. Contributions of these factors to the misorientation distribution as a whole and to the fractions of specific grain boundary types are yet to be fully understood. Studies have shown that in some materials grain boundary distribution is primarily determined by texture, whereas the orientation correlations may play a dominant role in the others. Another point that requires clarification is as follows: Crystallographic texture may be described either by macrotexture determined by the X-ray analysis, orientation distribution function (ODF) being its most general representation, or by microtexture represented as a set of individual crystallite orientations in some area of the material. It is not a priori clear whether misorientation distributions derived from microtexture and macrotexture would be the same. These are the questions addressed in the present paper. This work is an extension of the authors` previous publications.

  20. SILICON CARBIDE GRAIN BOUNDARY DISTRIBUTIONS, IRRADIATION CONDITIONS, AND SILVER RETENTION IN IRRADIATED AGR-1 TRISO FUEL PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Lillo, T. M.; Rooyen, I. J.; Aguiar, J. A.

    2016-11-01

    Precession electron diffraction in the transmission electron microscope was used to map grain orientation and ultimately determine grain boundary misorientation angle distributions, relative fractions of grain boundary types (random high angle, low angle or coincident site lattice (CSL)-related boundaries) and the distributions of CSL-related grain boundaries in the SiC layer of irradiated TRISO-coated fuel particles. Two particles from the AGR-1 experiment exhibiting high Ag-110m retention (>80%) were compared to a particle exhibiting low Ag-110m retention (<19%). Irradiated particles with high Ag-110m retention exhibited a lower fraction of random, high angle grain boundaries compared to the low Ag-110m retention particle. An inverse relationship between the random, high angle grain boundary fraction and Ag-110m retention is found and is consistent with grain boundary percolation theory. Also, comparison of the grain boundary distributions with previously reported unirradiated grain boundary distributions, based on SEM-based EBSD for similarly fabricated particles, showed only small differences, i.e. a greater low angle grain boundary fraction in unirradiated SiC. It was, thus, concluded that SiC layers with grain boundary distributions susceptible to Ag-110m release were present prior to irradiation. Finally, irradiation parameters were found to have little effect on the association of fission product precipitates with specific grain boundary types.

  1. Concerning initial and secondary character of radionuclide distribution in elementary landscape geochemical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobova, Elena; Romanov, Sergey

    2017-04-01

    Specificity of radionuclide distribution in elementary landscape geochemical systems (ELGS) treated as local system of geochemically linked elementary terrestrial units (in toposequence: watershed-slope-closing depression), belongs to one of the less investigated but practically significant problems of current geochemistry. First measurements after the Chernobyl accident showed a considerable variation of Cs-137 distribution in all examined ELGS (Shcheglov et al, 2001; Romanov, 1989; Korobova, Korovaykov, 1990; Linnik, 2008). The results may be interpreted in frames of two alternative hypotheses: 1) irregularity of the initial contamination; 2) secondary redistribution of the initially regular level of fallout. But herewith only a disproof of the first hypothesis automatically justifies the second one. Factors responsible for initial irregularity of surface contamination included: 1) the presence of the so-called "hot" particles in the initial fallout; 2) interception of radionuclides by forest canopy; 3) irregular aerial particles deposition; 4) uneven initial precipitation. Basing on monitoring Cs-137 spatial distribution that has been performed since 2005, we demonstrate that the observed spatial irregularity in distribution of Cs-137 in ELGS reflects a purely secondary distribution of initial reserves of radionuclides in fallout matter due to its migration with water in local geochemical systems. This statement has some significant consequences. 1. Mechanism of migration of matter in ELGS is complicated and could not be reduced solely to a primitive moving from watershed to closing depression. 2. The control of migration of "labeled atoms" (Cs-137) permits to understand common mechanism of migration of water in all systems on the level of ELGS. 3. Understanding formation of the structure of contamination zones in ELGS permits to use mathematical model to solve the inverse problem of restoration of the initially equable level of their contamination. Performed

  2. [Water color parameter spatial distribution character and influence on hygrophyte photosynthesis in Taihu Lake].

    PubMed

    Le, Cheng-feng; Li, Yun-mei; Zhang, Yun-lin; Sun, De-yong; Wu, Lan

    2007-11-01

    Using 64 stations water quality data collected in Taihu Lake, the spatial distribution of water color parameters and euphotic depth was analyzed, and the potential effect on hygrophyte photosynthesis was discussed. The result showed that the most variation was found for Chl a concentration, the value varies from 1.67 microg x L(-1) to 159.94 microg x L(-1), with the standard deviation of 41.03 mg x L(-1). The high Chl a concentration was recorded in Meiliang Bay, Zhushan Lake, Jiapu port and Xiaomei port with obviously spatial variation and compressive isoclines. The spatial variation of total suspended matter (TSM) concentration was lower than that of Chl a with a standard deviation of 31.63 mg x L(-1), and the concentration varies from 6.47 mg x L(-1) to 143.47 mg x L(-1). The high value was found in the area near Dapu port and Xiaomei port, with obviously spatial variation and compressive isoclines. No markedly spatial variation was found for colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in the whole lake. Euphotic depth was influenced by TSM and Chl a concentrations, while the influence by TSM was greater than that by Chl a. Therefore, the characteristics of spatial distribution for euphotic depth are reverse with TSM.

  3. Understanding the distinctively skewed and heavy tailed character of atmospheric and oceanic probability distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Sardeshmukh, Prashant D.

    2015-03-15

    The probability distributions of large-scale atmospheric and oceanic variables are generally skewed and heavy-tailed. We argue that their distinctive departures from Gaussianity arise fundamentally from the fact that in a quadratically nonlinear system with a quadratic invariant, the coupling coefficients between system components are not constant but depend linearly on the system state in a distinctive way. In particular, the skewness arises from a tendency of the system trajectory to linger near states of weak coupling. We show that the salient features of the observed non-Gaussianity can be captured in the simplest such nonlinear 2-component system. If the system is stochastically forced and linearly damped, with one component damped much more strongly than the other, then the strongly damped fast component becomes effectively decoupled from the weakly damped slow component, and its impact on the slow component can be approximated as a stochastic noise forcing plus an augmented nonlinear damping. In the limit of large time-scale separation, the nonlinear augmentation of the damping becomes small, and the noise forcing can be approximated as an additive noise plus a correlated additive and multiplicative noise (CAM noise) forcing. Much of the diversity of observed large-scale atmospheric and oceanic probability distributions can be interpreted in this minimal framework.

  4. Character and distribution of borehole breakouts and their relationship to in situ stresses in Deep Columbia River Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paillet, Frederick L.; Kim, Kunsoo

    1987-06-01

    The character and distribution of borehole breakouts in deeply buried basalts at the Hanford Site in south central Washington State are examined in light of stress indicator data and hydraulic-fracturing stress data by means of acoustic televiewer and acoustic waveform logging systems. A series of boreholes penetrating the Grande Ronde Basalt of the Columbia River Basalt Group were logged to examine the extent of breakouts at depths near 1000 m. Breakouts occur discontinuously throughout the interiors of most flows. In some boreholes the distribution of borehole wall breakouts closely correlates with the incidence of core disking. Differences in the distribution of breakouts and disking are attributed to differences in failure mechanisms. A thin interval of breakout-free basalt occurs near the upper and lower limits of flow interiors, with many intervals of breakouts terminating at the intersection of oblique fractures with the borehole. Hydraulic-fracturing stress measurement results obtained from four deep boreholes indicate anisotropic horizontal principal stresses, with maximum principal stress along an approximate north trending axis, consistent with the east trending orientation of breakouts. Acoustic waveform logs indicate that there is no measurable difference between the seismic properties of breakout-free flow tops and flow interiors. The highly coherent waveforms obtained in almost all flow interiors indicate that damage to the borehole wall associated with breakout formation remains confined to the thin annulus of stress concentration.

  5. The Richness of Distributional Cues to Word Boundaries in Speech to Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarosz, Gaja; Johnson, J. Alex

    2013-01-01

    This study is a systematic analysis of the information content of a wide range of distributional cues to word boundaries, individually and in combination, in naturally occurring child-directed speech across three languages (English, Polish, and Turkish). The paper presents a series of statistical analyses examining the relative predictive strength…

  6. The Richness of Distributional Cues to Word Boundaries in Speech to Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarosz, Gaja; Johnson, J. Alex

    2013-01-01

    This study is a systematic analysis of the information content of a wide range of distributional cues to word boundaries, individually and in combination, in naturally occurring child-directed speech across three languages (English, Polish, and Turkish). The paper presents a series of statistical analyses examining the relative predictive strength…

  7. Receptivity of Hypersonic Boundary Layers to Distributed Roughness and Acoustic Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, Ponnampalam

    2012-01-01

    Boundary-layer receptivity and stability of Mach 6 flow over smooth and rough 7 half-angle sharp-tipped cones are numerically investigated. The receptivity of the boundary layer to slow acoustic disturbances, fast acoustic disturbances, and vortical disturbances are considered. The effects of two-dimensional isolated and distributed roughness on the receptivity and stability are also simulated. The results show that the instability waves are generated in the leading edge region and that the boundary layer is much more receptive to slow acoustic waves than to the fast waves. Vortical disturbances also generate unstable second modes, however the receptivity coefficients are smaller than that of the slow acoustic wave. An isolated two-dimensional roughness element of height h/delta =1/4 did not produce any difference in the receptivity or in the stability of the boundary layer. Distributed roughness elements produced a small decrease in the receptivity coefficient and also stabilized the boundary layer by small amounts.

  8. [Species composition, distribution and phenological characters of pollen-allergenic plants in Beijing urban area].

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Zhi-Yun; Xin, Jia-Nan; Zheng, Hua; Meng, Xue-Song; Wang, Xiao-Ke

    2007-09-01

    In order to know the species composition, distribution pattern, and phenological characteristics of pollen-allergenic plants in Beijing urban area, an investigation was made, combined with literature survey and experts interviews. The results showed that within the fifth ring of Beijing, there were 99 pollen-allergenic plant species belonging to 32 genera and 19 families, among which, 52 species were native plants, accounting for 52.5% of the total, 26 species were introduced from other regions of China, occupying 26.3% of the total, and 21 species were introduced from foreign countries, being 21.2% of the total. The 32 genera of pollen-allergenic plants in Beijing urban area were mainly North Temperate elements, occupying 40.6% , followed by Cosmopolitan and Pantropic elements. In all functional sections of Beijing urban area, the pollen-allergenic plants were most diversified in urban parks, and had the highest proportion in street tree species. The coverage of herbs with strong pollen allergy was in the order of waste lands > gym centers and institution yards > greenbelts > parks > residential areas > squares. The blooming period of pollen-allergenic arbors in Beijing urban area was concentrated in March and April, while that of pollen-allergenic herbs was from July to September.

  9. Immunological studies of human placentae: the distribution and character of immunoglobulins in chorionic villi.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, P M; Natvig, J B; Ystehede, U A; Faulk, W P

    1977-01-01

    All four human IgG subclasses, and both kappa and lambda light chains, were detected by immunofluorescence in similar distributions in chorionic villi of human placentae. IgG1 and IgG3 were the predominant subclasses. No evidence was obtained for local enzymatic digestion of IgG during placental transfer. Most of the IgG on the trophoblastic basement membrane (TBM) was loosely bound and could be removed by prolonged washing, although some appeared to be more tightly bound to small segments of the TBM. IgM, but not IgA, was present in small amounts in placental villous structures. Immunoglobulin was never observed within the syncytiotrophoblast. Antisera to IgG genetic (Gm) markers were used to locate IgG thought to be of foetal or maternal origin. The presence of paternal Gm markers not carried by the mother was taken as evidence for foetal IgG. Foetal (paternal) Gm markers were observed in placentae, although maternal IgG was the major immunoglobulin present in placental villi. Both maternal and foetal IgG were demonstrated in fibrinoid deposits, vessel walls and the cytoplasm of some stromal cells. Only foetal IgG was definitively observed in the immunoglobulin that is tightly bound to the TBM. PMID:342151

  10. Heavy Metal Contaminated Soils in Riverside Park, Milwaukee, WI: Character, Bioavailability, and Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dansand, J. J.; Knudsen, A. C.

    2007-12-01

    Prior to being breached in 1990, the North Avenue Dam on the Milwaukee River had created a 2.5-mile impoundment for over 150 years. Upstream urban runoff and industrial pollution resulted in the deposition of heavy metal rich sediments in the slow moving waters of the impoundment. After the dam removal, the river returned to a more natural flowpath and as the river narrowed, newly exposed riverbed was annexed as part of Riverside Park, enabling ecological recovery efforts on the river and riparian zones. However, these newly exposed soils are enriched with heavy metal contaminants, most notably, Pb, Zn, Cd, Cu, and Ni, concentrated by the impoundment. The current study has analyzed the location and concentrations of these trace metals, as well as their mobility and availability. This study is being conducted in conjunction with the Urban Ecology Center, a nonprofit environmental organization located in Riverside Park that is dedicated to serving the local community and urban youth while restoring and protecting the natural areas along the Milwaukee River. Analyses have included determination of general soil parameters such as particle size, organic content, and point of zero charge analyses. Beyond bulk chemical analysis, we have conducted selective sequential extractions to estimate the chemical speciation of these elements, which showed that approximately 30 percent of contaminants are highly available. Additionally, the soils have been analyzed with an Electron Microprobe to directly observe phase relationships of metals in the soils. Microprobe and other analyses have shown that heavy metals are associated with a variety of phases, including Mn and Fe oxy-hydroxides, and vary in concentration and phase relationships with depth and distance from the river. Finally, a field-portable x-ray fluorescence spectrometer (pXRF), coupled with GPS data, is being used to create a geochemical map of heavy metal distributions throughout the park.

  11. Stability of grain boundary texture during isothermal grain growth in UO2 considering anisotropic grain boundary properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallberg, Håkan; Zhu, Yaochan

    2015-10-01

    In the present study, mesoscale simulations of grain growth in UO2 are performed using a 2D level set representation of the polycrystal grain boundary network, employed in a finite element setting. Anisotropic grain boundary properties are considered by evaluating how grain boundary energy and mobility varies with local grain boundary character. This is achieved by considering different formulations of the anisotropy of grain boundary properties, for example in terms of coincidence site lattice (CSL) correspondence. Such modeling approaches allow tracing of the stability of a number of characteristic low-Σ boundaries in the material during grain growth. The present simulations indicate that anisotropic grain boundary properties have negligible influence on the grain growth rate. However, considering the evolution of grain boundary character distribution and the grain size distribution, it is found that neglecting anisotropic boundary properties will strongly bias predictions obtained from numerical simulations.

  12. The Role of Grain Boundary Energy on Grain Boundary Complexion Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Bojarski, Stephanie A.; Rohrer, Gregory S.

    2014-09-01

    Grain boundary complexions are distinct equilibrium structures and compositions of a grain boundary and complexion transformations are transition from a metastable to an equilibrium complexion at a specific thermodynamic and geometric conditions. Previous work indicates that, in the case of doped alumina, a complexion transition that increased the mobility of transformed boundaries and resulted in abnormal grain growth also caused a decrease in the mean relative grain boundary energy as well as an increase in the anisotropy of the grain boundary character distribution (GBCD). The current work will investigate the hypothesis that the rates of complexion transitions that result in abnormal grain growth (AGG) depend on grain boundary character and energy. Furthermore, the current work expands upon this understanding and tests the hypothesis that it is possible to control when and where a complexion transition occurs by controlling the local grain boundary energy distribution.

  13. Rheology of dense granular mixtures: particle-size distributions, boundary conditions, and collisional time scales.

    PubMed

    Yohannes, Bereket; Hill, K M

    2010-12-01

    We computationally investigate the dependence of the rheology of dense sheared granular mixtures on their particle size distribution. We consider the simplest case of a binary mixture of two different sized particles where the fraction of large particles is varied from one simulation to the next while the total solid mass is kept constant. We find that the variation of the rheology with the particle size distribution depends on the boundary conditions. For example, under constant pressure conditions the effective friction coefficient μ(∗) (the ratio between shear and pressure stresses at the boundary) increases mildly with the average particle size. On the other hand, under constant volume conditions, μ(∗) has a nonmonotonic dependence on the average particle size that is related to the proximity of the system solid fraction to the maximum packing fraction. Somewhat surprisingly, then, μ(∗) scales with a dimensionless shear rate (a generalized inertial number) in the same way for either boundary condition. We show that, for our system of relatively hard spheres, these relationships are governed largely by the ratio between average collision times and mean-free-path times, also independent of boundary conditions.

  14. Global distribution of energetic proton precipitations equatorward of the boundary of isotropic fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenova, N. V.; Yahnina, T. A.; Yahnin, A. G.; Demekhov, A. G.

    2017-07-01

    Based on data of the NOAA POES satellite, the global distribution of the occurrence rate of precipitations of energetic protons ( E > 30 keV) equatorward of the boundary of isotropic fluxes has been constructed for the first time. It has been shown that the occurrence rate of proton precipitations inside the zone of anisotropic fluxes is maximum in daytime hours (1100-1600 MLT) at latitudes L = 6-9 and decreases in evening and morning hours. Comparison of the obtained results about proton precipitations with the spatial distribution of the occurrence rate of electromagnetic ion-cyclotron (EMIC) waves in the equatorial magnetosphere according to results of satellite observations demonstrates a close relationship between them. This corroborates that precipitations of energetic protons equatorward of the boundary of isotropic fluxes are a consequence of the development of the ion-cyclotron instability in the equatorial magnetosphere.

  15. Some methods of encoding simple visual images for use with a sparse distributed memory, with applications to character recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaeckel, Louis A.

    1989-01-01

    To study the problems of encoding visual images for use with a Sparse Distributed Memory (SDM), I consider a specific class of images- those that consist of several pieces, each of which is a line segment or an arc of a circle. This class includes line drawings of characters such as letters of the alphabet. I give a method of representing a segment of an arc by five numbers in a continuous way; that is, similar arcs have similar representations. I also give methods for encoding these numbers as bit strings in an approximately continuous way. The set of possible segments and arcs may be viewed as a five-dimensional manifold M, whose structure is like a Mobious strip. An image, considered to be an unordered set of segments and arcs, is therefore represented by a set of points in M - one for each piece. I then discuss the problem of constructing a preprocessor to find the segments and arcs in these images, although a preprocessor has not been developed. I also describe a possible extension of the representation.

  16. Character Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Changing Schools, 2000

    2000-01-01

    This issue of "Changing Schools" focuses on character education. The lead article, "Character Education: Finding Ways To Foster Ethical Behavior in Youth" by Diane McIntyre Wilber discusses the character education programs that have spread to nearly every type of school, whether public, private, charter, or faith-based. Since…

  17. Delineating generalized species boundaries from species distribution data and a species distribution model

    Treesearch

    Matthew P. Peters; Stephen N. Matthews; Louis R. Iverson; Anantha M. Prasad

    2013-01-01

    Species distribution models (SDM) are commonly used to provide information about species ranges or extents, and often are intended to represent the entire area of potential occupancy or suitable habitat in which individuals occur. While SDMs can provide results over various geographic extents, they normally operate within a grid and cannot delimit distinct, smooth...

  18. Correspondence between the ULF wave power spatial distribution and auroral oval boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyreva, Olga; Pilipenko, Vyacheslav; Engebretson, Mark; Klimushkin, Dmitriy; Mager, Pavel

    2016-06-01

    The world-wide spatial distribution of the wave power in the Pc5 band during magnetic storms has been compared with auroral oval boundaries. The poleward and equatorward auroral oval boundaries are estimated using either the British Antarctic Survey database containing IMAGE satellite UV observations of the aurora or the OVATION model based on the DMSP particle data. The "epicenter" of the spectral power of broadband Pc5 fluctuations during the storm growth phase is mapped inside the auroral oval. During the storm recovery phase, the spectral power of narrowband Pc5 waves, both in the dawn and dusk sectors, is mapped inside the auroral oval or around its equatorward boundary. This observational result confirms previously reported effects: the spatial/temporal variations of the Pc5 wave power in the morning/pre-noon sector are closely related to the dynamics of the auroral electrojet and magnetospheric field-aligned currents. At the same time, narrowband Pc5 waves demonstrate typical resonant features in the amplitude-phase latitudinal structure. Thus, the location of the auroral oval or its equatorward boundary is the preferred latitude for magnetospheric field-line Alfven resonator excitation. This effect is not taken into account by modern theories of ULF Pc5 waves, but it could be significant for the development of more adequate models.

  19. Boundary-layer receptivity due to distributed surface imperfections of a deterministic or random nature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan

    1992-01-01

    Acoustic receptivity of a Blasius boundary layer in the presence of distributed surface irregularities is investigated analytically. It is shown that, out of the entire spatial spectrum of the surface irregularities, only a small band of Fourier components can lead to an efficient conversion of the acoustic input at any given frequency to an unstable eigenmode of the boundary layer flow. The location, and width, of this most receptive band of wavenumbers corresponds to a relative detuning of O(R sub l.b.(exp -3/8)) with respect to the lower-neutral instability wavenumber at the frequency under consideration, R sub l.b. being the Reynolds number based on a typical boundary-layer thickness at the lower branch of the neutral stability curve. Surface imperfections in the form of discrete mode waviness in this range of wavenumbers lead to initial instability amplitudes which are O(R sub l.b.(exp 3/8)) larger than those caused by a single, isolated roughness element. In contrast, irregularities with a continuous spatial spectrum produce much smaller instability amplitudes, even compared to the isolated case, since the increase due to the resonant nature of the response is more than that compensated for by the asymptotically small band-width of the receptivity process. Analytical expressions for the maximum possible instability amplitudes, as well as their expectation for an ensemble of statistically irregular surfaces with random phase distributions, are also presented.

  20. Particle concentrations and number size distributions in the planetary boundary layer derived from airship based measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, Ralf; Zhao, Defeng; Ehn, Mikael; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Holland, Frank; Rohrer, Franz; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Wahner, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric particles play a key role for regional and global climate due to their direct and indirect radiative forcing effects. The concentration and size of the particles are important variables to these effects. Within the continental planetary boundary layer (PBL) the particle number size distribution is influenced by meteorological parameters, local sinks and sources resulting in variable spatial distributions. However, measurements of particle number size distributions over a broad vertical range of the PBL are rare. The airship ZEPPELIN NT is an ideal platform to measure atmospheric aerosols on a regional scale within an altitude range up to 1000 m. For campaigns in the Netherlands, Northern Italy and South Finland in 2012 and 2013 the airship was deployed with a wide range of instruments, including measurements of different trace gases, short lived radicals, solar radiation, aerosols and meteorological parameters. Flights were carried out at different times of the day to investigate the influence of the diurnal evolution of the PBL on atmospheric trace gases and aerosols. During night and early morning hours the concentration and size distribution of atmospheric particles were found to be strongly influenced by the layered structure of the PBL, i.e. the nocturnal boundary layer and the residual layer. Within the residual layer particle concentrations stay relatively constant as this layer is decoupled from ground sources. The particles persist in the accumulation mode as expected for an aged aerosol. In the nocturnal boundary layer particle concentrations and size are more dynamic with higher concentrations than in the residual layer. A few hours after sunrise, the layered structure of the PBL intermixes. During daytime the PBL is well mixed and a negative concentration gradient with increasing height is observed. Several height profiles at different times of the day and at different locations in Europe were measured. The aerosol measurements will be

  1. Approximation of discrete-time LQG compensators for distributed systems with boundary input and unbounded measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, J. S.; Rosen, I. G.

    1987-01-01

    The approximation of optimal discrete-time linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) compensators for distributed parameter control systems with boundary input and unbounded measurement is considered. The approach applies to a wide range of problems that can be formulated in a state space on which both the discrete-time input and output operators are continuous. Approximating compensators are obtained via application of the LQG theory and associated approximation results for infinite dimensional discrete-time control systems with bounded input and output. Numerical results for spline and modal based approximation schemes used to compute optimal compensators for a one dimensional heat equation with either Neumann or Dirichlet boundary control and pointwise measurement of temperature are presented and discussed.

  2. Approximation of discrete-time LQG compensators for distributed systems with boundary input and unbounded measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, J. S.; Rosen, I. G.

    1988-01-01

    The approximation of optimal discrete-time linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) compensators for distributed parameter control systems with boundary input and unbounded measurement is considered. The approach applies to a wide range of problems that can be formulated in a state space on which both the discrete-time input and output operators are continuous. Approximating compensators are obtained via application of the LQG theory and associated approximation results for infinite dimensional discrete-time control systems with bounded input and output. Numerical results for spline and modal based approximation schemes used to compute optimal compensators for a one-dimensional heat equation with either Neumann or Dirichlet boundary control and pointwise measurement of temperature are presented and discussed.

  3. Transition boundary model of magnetization distribution in high density perpendicular recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. J.; Chen, B. J.; Wang, H. T.

    2011-04-01

    A model is introduced in this paper to describe the transition boundaries in perpendicular magnetic recording at extremely high density. In contrary to the previous signal generation models, effects of magnetization transition curvature and the track edge fluctuations are adequately included in the new model that is designed to capture the actual transition boundaries, i.e., the variations of magnetization distribution in both down-track and across-track directions. The model is used to predict the readback waveforms based on the detailed information obtained from micromagnetic simulations taking into account the head and media parameters. The model is therefore suitable for magnetic recording at extremely high densities when the impact of the transition curvature and the track edge effect on the recording performance becomes more significant.

  4. SEPARATION OF THE INTERSTELLAR BOUNDARY EXPLORER RIBBON FROM GLOBALLY DISTRIBUTED ENERGETIC NEUTRAL ATOM FLUX

    SciTech Connect

    Schwadron, N. A.; Kucharek, H.; Moebius, E. E-mail: harald.kucharek@unh.edu

    2011-04-10

    The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) observes a remarkable feature, the IBEX ribbon, which has energetic neutral atom (ENA) flux over a narrow region {approx}20{sup 0} wide, a factor of 2-3 higher than the more globally distributed ENA flux. Here, we separate ENA emissions in the ribbon from the distributed flux by applying a transparency mask over the ribbon and regions of high emissions, and then solve for the distributed flux using an interpolation scheme. Our analysis shows that the energy spectrum and spatial distribution of the ribbon are distinct from the surrounding globally distributed flux. The ribbon energy spectrum shows a knee between {approx}1 and 4 keV, and the angular distribution is approximately independent of energy. In contrast, the distributed flux does not show a clear knee and more closely conforms to a power law over much of the sky. Consistent with previous analyses, the slope of the power law steepens from the nose to tail, suggesting a weaker termination shock toward the tail as compared to the nose. The knee in the energy spectrum of the ribbon suggests that its source plasma population is generated via a distinct physical process. Both the slope in the energy distribution of the distributed flux and the knee in the energy distribution of the ribbon are ordered by latitude. The heliotail may be identified in maps of globally distributed flux as a broad region of low flux centered {approx}44{sup 0}W of the interstellar downwind direction, suggesting heliotail deflection by the interstellar magnetic field.

  5. The distribution of word matches between Markovian sequences with periodic boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Burden, Conrad J; Leopardi, Paul; Forêt, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    Word match counts have traditionally been proposed as an alignment-free measure of similarity for biological sequences. The D(2) statistic, which simply counts the number of exact word matches between two sequences, is a useful test bed for developing rigorous mathematical results, which can then be extended to more biologically useful measures. The distributional properties of the D(2) statistic under the null hypothesis of identically and independently distributed letters have been studied extensively, but no comprehensive study of the D(2) distribution for biologically more realistic higher-order Markovian sequences exists. Here we derive exact formulas for the mean and variance of the D(2) statistic for Markovian sequences of any order, and demonstrate through Monte Carlo simulations that the entire distribution is accurately characterized by a Pólya-Aeppli distribution for sequence lengths of biological interest. The approach is novel in that Markovian dependency is defined for sequences with periodic boundary conditions, and this enables exact analytic formulas for the mean and variance to be derived. We also carry out a preliminary comparison between the approximate D(2) distribution computed with the theoretical mean and variance under a Markovian hypothesis and an empirical D(2) distribution from the human genome.

  6. The Distribution of Word Matches Between Markovian Sequences with Periodic Boundary Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Leopardi, Paul; Forêt, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Word match counts have traditionally been proposed as an alignment-free measure of similarity for biological sequences. The D2 statistic, which simply counts the number of exact word matches between two sequences, is a useful test bed for developing rigorous mathematical results, which can then be extended to more biologically useful measures. The distributional properties of the D2 statistic under the null hypothesis of identically and independently distributed letters have been studied extensively, but no comprehensive study of the D2 distribution for biologically more realistic higher-order Markovian sequences exists. Here we derive exact formulas for the mean and variance of the D2 statistic for Markovian sequences of any order, and demonstrate through Monte Carlo simulations that the entire distribution is accurately characterized by a Pólya-Aeppli distribution for sequence lengths of biological interest. The approach is novel in that Markovian dependency is defined for sequences with periodic boundary conditions, and this enables exact analytic formulas for the mean and variance to be derived. We also carry out a preliminary comparison between the approximate D2 distribution computed with the theoretical mean and variance under a Markovian hypothesis and an empirical D2 distribution from the human genome. PMID:24160839

  7. In-situ quantification of the effect of solute on the mobility, character and driving pressure of grain boundaries during recrystallization in aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taheri, Mitra L.

    Aluminum alloys exhibit recrystallization kinetics that vary strongly with composition. The conventional understanding is that certain alloying elements, e.g. chromium, retard grain boundary motion due to the formation of tine dispersions of second phase particles, giving rise to particle drag of boundaries. There is countervailing evidence, however, that suggests that solute drag provides the stronger influence on the mobility of grain boundaries. This thesis presents new evidence of this pronounced effect of solute drag based on in-situ annealing (both SEM and TEM) and EBSD experiments involving recrystallization in aluminum alloys with varying composition in which individual boundaries move under the driving pressure of stored energy from prior plastic strain. This driving pressure is calculated both macroscopically (via Calorimetry, Microhardness) and microscopically (via Orientation Imaging Microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy). In all alloy compositions studied, a compensation effect is noted with respect to grain boundary mobility maxima for certain boundary types. A shift occurs in the misorientation associated with maximum mobility at 38--39°<111> observed at low temperatures, to misorientation axes towards <001>, <110> and <111> is seen in alloys when annealed at higher temperatures. A faceting/defaceting transition is also observed which is consistent with the changes in maximum mobility boundary type with increased temperature. These observations are supported by analysis of activation energy for boundary migration for each alloy. Evidence for irregular motion of boundaries from in-situ observations is discussed in reference to new theoretical results that suggest that boundaries migrating in the presence of solutes should move sporadically, provided that the length scale at which observations are made is small enough. Z-Contrast Imaging using a Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope coupled with TEM EDX analysis suggested variable Zr

  8. Receptivity of Hypersonic Boundary Layers to Distributed Roughness and Acoustic Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, P.

    2013-01-01

    Boundary-layer receptivity and stability of Mach 6 flows over smooth and rough seven-degree half-angle sharp-tipped cones are numerically investigated. The receptivity of the boundary layer to slow acoustic disturbances, fast acoustic disturbances, and vortical disturbances is considered. The effects of three-dimensional isolated roughness on the receptivity and stability are also simulated. The results for the smooth cone show that the instability waves are generated in the leading edge region and that the boundary layer is much more receptive to slow acoustic waves than to the fast acoustic waves. Vortical disturbances also generate unstable second modes, however the receptivity coefficients are smaller than that of the slow acoustic wave. Distributed roughness elements located near the nose region decreased the receptivity of the second mode generated by the slow acoustic wave by a small amount. Roughness elements distributed across the continuous spectrum increased the receptivity of the second mode generated by the slow and fast acoustic waves and the vorticity wave. The largest increase occurred for the vorticity wave. Roughness elements distributed across the synchronization point did not change the receptivity of the second modes generated by the acoustic waves. The receptivity of the second mode generated by the vorticity wave increased in this case, but the increase is lower than that occurred with the roughness elements located across the continuous spectrum. The simulations with an isolated roughness element showed that the second mode waves generated by the acoustic disturbances are not influenced by the small roughness element. Due to the interaction, a three-dimensional wave is generated. However, the amplitude is orders of magnitude smaller than the two-dimensional wave.

  9. Life on the boundary: Environmental factors as drivers of habitat distribution in the littoral zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cefalì, Maria Elena; Cebrian, Emma; Chappuis, Eglantine; Pinedo, Susana; Terradas, Marc; Mariani, Simone; Ballesteros, Enric

    2016-04-01

    The boundary between land and sea, i.e. the littoral zone, is home to a large number of habitats whose distribution is primarily driven by the distance to the sea level but also by other environmental factors such as littoral's geomorphological features, wave exposure, water temperature or orientation. Here we explore the relative importance of those major environmental factors that drive the presence of littoral rocky habitats along 1100 Km of Catalonia's shoreline (Spain, NW Mediterranean) by using Geographic Information Systems and Generalized Linear Models. The distribution of mediolittoral and upper infralittoral habitats responded to different environmental factors. Mediolittoral habitats showed regional differences drawn by sea-water temperature and substrate type. Wave exposure (hydrodynamism), slope and geological features were only relevant to those mediolittoral habitats with specific environmental needs. We did not find any regional pattern of distribution in upper infralittoral habitats, and selected factors only played a moderate role in habitat distribution at the local scale. This study shows for the first time that environmental factors determining habitat distribution differ within the mediolittoral and the upper infralittoral zones and provides the basis for further development of models oriented at predicting the distribution of littoral marine habitats.

  10. Palomar-Leiden minor planets - Proper elements, frequency distributions, belt boundaries, and family memberships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Hierath, J. E.

    1987-01-01

    Tabulations are presented for the proper elements of 1227 higher accuracy orbits of faint minor planets encompassing earth and deep Mars crossers, Trojans, and Hildas. The distribution of the closest approach distance to Mars drops off sharply near zero, while that for Jupiter vanishes near 1.1 AU; it is suggested that Mars and Jupiter have caused these boundaries, so that the asteroid belt must have been larger early in the solar system's history. Some 3.5 percent of the sample, primarily shallow crossers, can impact Mars; the fortuitous alignments required for impact occur with near-simultaneity for these objects, so that they will episodically bombard Mars.

  11. Palomar-Leiden minor planets - Proper elements, frequency distributions, belt boundaries, and family memberships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Hierath, J. E.

    1987-01-01

    Tabulations are presented for the proper elements of 1227 higher accuracy orbits of faint minor planets encompassing earth and deep Mars crossers, Trojans, and Hildas. The distribution of the closest approach distance to Mars drops off sharply near zero, while that for Jupiter vanishes near 1.1 AU; it is suggested that Mars and Jupiter have caused these boundaries, so that the asteroid belt must have been larger early in the solar system's history. Some 3.5 percent of the sample, primarily shallow crossers, can impact Mars; the fortuitous alignments required for impact occur with near-simultaneity for these objects, so that they will episodically bombard Mars.

  12. On Boundary Misorientation Distribution Functions and How to Incorporate them into 3D Models of Microstructural Evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, A.W.; Holm, E.A.; Hughes, D.A.; Miodownik, M.

    1998-12-23

    The fundamental difficulties incorporating experimentally obtained-boundary disorientation distributions (BMD) into 3D microstructural models are discussed. An algorithm is described which overcomes these difficulties. The boundary misorientations are treated as a statistical ensemble which is evolved toward the desired BMD using a Monte Carlo method. The application of this algorithm to a number complex arbitrary BMDs shows that the approach is effective for both conserved and non-conserved textures. The algorithm is successfully used to create the BMDs observed in deformation microstructure containing both incidental dislocation boundaries (IDBs) and geometrically necessary boundaries (GNBs).

  13. Dwarf novae white dwarf surface brightness distributions: dispelling boundary layer assumptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spark, Mellony K.; O'Donoghue, Darragh

    2015-05-01

    Estimates of white dwarf radii from photometric observations of eclipsing cataclysmic variables critically depend on the shape of the emitting region which has traditionally been assumed to be spherical and unchanging. Derivative analysis of light curves can reveal the shape of the emitting boundary layer but requires high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), fast photometry of the central, compact object. With this objective, 18 light curves were obtained from high time resolution observations of OY Car using the Southern African Large Telescopes (SALT) Imaging Camera (SALTICAM). The technique of total variation regularization, adapted and applied here for the first time to astronomical time series data, combined with the high SNR provided by SALTICAM, allowed analysis of the light curves on an individual basis. This showed that the shape of the emitting region does indeed vary significantly; the boundary layer emission changes on an orbital cycle-to-cycle basis. This implies that previous analyses have led to overestimates of the white dwarf's radius. Nearly all of the light curves presented here did not match previously proposed models for the boundary layer's surface brightness distribution.

  14. Non-linear boundary-layer receptivity due to distributed surface roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amer, Tahani Reffet; Selby, Gregory V.

    1995-01-01

    The process by which a laminar boundary layer internalizes the external disturbances in the form of instability waves is known as boundary-layer receptivity. The objective of the present research was to determine the effect of acoustic excitation on boundary-layer receptivity for a flat plate with distributed variable-amplitude surface roughness through measurements with a hot-wire probe. Tollmien-Schlichting (T-S) mode shapes due to surface-roughness receptivity have also been determined, analyzed, and shown to be in agreement with theory and other experimental work. It has been shown that there is a linear relationship between the surface roughness and receptivity for certain roughness configurations with constant roughness wavelength. In addition, strong nonlinear receptivity effects exist for certain surface roughness configurations over a band where the surface roughness and T-S wavelength are matched. The results from the present experiment follow the trends predicted by theory and other experimental work for linear receptivity. In addition, the results show the existence of nonlinear receptivity effects for certain combinations of surface roughness elements.

  15. Non-linear boundary-layer receptivity due to distributed surface roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amer, Tahani Reffet

    1995-01-01

    The process by which a laminar boundary layer internalizes the external disturbances in the form of instability waves is known as boundary-layer receptivity. The objective of the present research was to determine the effect of acoustic excitation on boundary-layer receptivity for a flat plate with distributed variable-amplitude surface roughness through measurements with a hot-wire probe. Tollmien-Schlichting mode shapes due to surface roughness receptivity have also been determined, analyzed, and shown to be in agreement with theory and other experimental work. It has been shown that there is a linear relationship between the surface roughness and receptivity for certain roughness configurations with constant roughness wavelength. In addition, strong non-linear receptivity effects exist for certain surface roughness configurations over a band where the surface roughness and T-S wavelength are matched. The results from the present experiment follow the trends predicted by theory and other experimental work for linear receptivity. In addition, the results show the existence of non-linear receptivity effects for certain combinations of surface roughness elements.

  16. Australian Sphingidae – DNA Barcodes Challenge Current Species Boundaries and Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Rougerie, Rodolphe; Kitching, Ian J.; Haxaire, Jean; Miller, Scott E.; Hausmann, Axel; Hebert, Paul D. N.

    2014-01-01

    Main Objective We examine the extent of taxonomic and biogeographical uncertainty in a well-studied group of Australian Lepidoptera, the hawkmoths (Sphingidae). Methods We analysed the diversity of Australian sphingids through the comparative analysis of their DNA barcodes, supplemented by morphological re-examinations and sequence information from a nuclear marker in selected cases. The results from the analysis of Australian sphingids were placed in a broader context by including conspecifics and closely related taxa from outside Australia to test taxonomic boundaries. Results Our results led to the discovery of six new species in Australia, one case of erroneously synonymized species, and three cases of synonymy. As a result, we establish the occurrence of 75 species of hawkmoths on the continent. The analysis of records from outside Australia also challenges the validity of current taxonomic boundaries in as many as 18 species, including Agrius convolvuli (Linnaeus, 1758), a common species that has gained adoption as a model system. Our work has revealed a higher level of endemism than previously recognized. Most (90%) Australian sphingids are endemic to the continent (45%) or to Australia, the Pacific Islands and the Papuan and Wallacean regions (45%). Only seven species (10%) have ranges that extend beyond this major biogeographical boundary toward SE Asia and other regions of the Old World. Main Conclusions This study has established that overlooked cryptic diversity and inaccurate species delineation produced significant misconceptions concerning diversity and distribution patterns in a group of insects that is considered well known taxonomically. Because DNA barcoding represents a straightforward way to test taxonomic boundaries, its implementation can improve the accuracy of primary diversity data in biogeography and conservation studies. PMID:24987846

  17. Noise-induced rupture process: phase boundary and scaling of waiting time distribution.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Srutarshi; Chandra, Anjan Kumar; Chakrabarti, Bikas K

    2013-07-01

    A bundle of fibers has been considered here as a model for composite materials, where breaking of the fibers occur due to a combined influence of applied load (stress) and external noise. Through numerical simulation and a mean-field calculation we show that there exists a robust phase boundary between continuous (no waiting time) and intermittent fracturing regimes. In the intermittent regime, throughout the entire rupture process avalanches of different sizes are produced and there is a waiting time between two consecutive avalanches. The statistics of waiting times follows a Γ distribution and the avalanche distribution shows power-law scaling, similar to what has been observed in the case of earthquake events and bursts in fracture experiments. We propose a prediction scheme that can tell when the system is expected to reach the continuous fracturing point from the intermittent phase.

  18. Effects of orientation angles on film cooling over a flat plate: Boundary layer temperature distributions and adiabatic film cooling effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, I.S.; Lee, J.S.

    2000-01-01

    Presented are experimental results describing the effects of orientation angle of film cooling holes on boundary layer temperature distributions and film cooling effectiveness. Film flow data were obtained from a row of five film cooling holes on a flat test plate. The inclination angle of the hole was fixed at 35 deg and four orientation angles of 0, 30, 60, and 90 deg were investigated. The velocity ratios surveyed were 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0. The boundary layer temperature distributions were measured at three downstream locations using 1 {micro}m platinum wire. Detailed adiabatic film cooling effectiveness distributions were measured using thermochromic liquid crystal. Results show that the increased lateral momentum in the case of large orientation angle injection strongly affects boundary layer temperature distributions. Temperature distribution characteristics are, in general, explained in the context of the interactions between injectant and free-stream fluid and between injectants issuing from adjacent holes. The adiabatic film cooling effectiveness distributions are discussed in connection with the boundary layer temperature distributions. Spanwise-averaged effectiveness distributions and space-averaged effectiveness distributions are also presented with respect to the velocity ratios and the orientation angles.

  19. Effects of temperature distribution on boundary layer stability for a circular cone at Mach 10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigney, Jeffrey M.

    A CFD analysis was conducted on a circular cone at 3 degrees angle of attack at Mach 10 using US3D and STABL 3D to determine the effect of wall temperature on the stability characteristics that lead to laminar-to-turbulent transition. Wall temperature distributions were manipulated while all other flow inputs and geometric qualities were held constant. Laminar-to-turbulent transition was analyzed for isothermal and adiabatic wall conditions, a simulated short-duration wind tunnel case, and several hot-nose temperature distributions. For this study, stability characteristics include maximum N-factor growth and the corresponding frequency range, disturbance spatial amplification rate and the corresponding modal frequency, and stability neutral point location. STABL 3D analysis indicates that temperature distributions typical of those in short-duration hypersonic wind tunnels do not result in any significant difference on the stability characteristics, as compared to an isothermal wall boundary condition. Hypothetical distributions of much greater temperatures at and past the nose tip do show a trend of dampening of second-mode disturbances, most notably on the leeward ray. The most pronounced differences existed between the isothermal and adiabatic cases.

  20. Character of the Caribbean-Gônave-North America plate boundaries in the upper mantle based on shear-wave splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benford, B.; Tikoff, B.; DeMets, C.

    2012-12-01

    We present new shear-wave splitting measurements of SKS, SKKS, PKS, and sSKS phases from eight stations in the northern Caribbean. Prior to this work, shear-wave splitting analysis of the northern Caribbean boundary was only evaluated at a station in Puerto Rico. Stations that lie within several tens of kilometers of microplate boundaries have mean fast polarization directions parallel to the boundary and have delay times greater than 1 s. Stations more than several tens of kilometers away from microplate boundaries show no evidence for an anisotropic upper mantle. Stations in Cuba and Jamaica have fast axes oriented ˜100° with delay times of ˜1.5 s, indicating that the east-striking left-lateral strike-slip faults that define the north and south boundaries of the Gônave microplate continue into the upper mantle. A station located in Antigua, where the North America plate subducts beneath the Caribbean plate, has a high degree of splitting with the fast axis parallel to the trench. Based on our results, the deformation related to the presence of microplates in the northern Caribbean extends into the upper mantle.

  1. Pressure and heating-rate distributions on a corrugated surface in a supersonic turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Drag and heating rates on wavy surfaces typical of current corrugated plate designs for thermal protection systems were determined experimentally. Pressure-distribution, heating-rate, and oil-flow tests were conducted in the Langley Unitary Plan wind tunnel at Mach numbers of 2.4 and 4.5 with the corrugated surface exposed to both thick and thin turbulent boundary layers. Tests were conducted with the corrugations at cross-flow angles from 0 deg to 90 deg to the flow. Results show that for cross-flow angles of 30 deg or less, the pressure drag coefficients are less than the local flat-plate skin-friction coefficients and are not significantly affected by Mach number, Reynolds number, or boundary-layer thickness over the ranges investigated. For cross-flow angles greater than 30 deg, the drag coefficients increase significantly with cross-flow angle and moderately with Reynolds number. Increasing the Mach number causes a significant reduction in the pressure drag. The average and peak heating penalties due to the corrugated surface are small for cross-flow angles of 10 deg or less but are significantly higher for the larger cross-flow angles.

  2. Online platform for simulations of ion energy distribution functions behind a plasma boundary sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollny, Alexander; Shihab, Mohammed; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter

    2012-10-01

    Plasma processes, particularly plasma etching and plasma deposition are crucial for a large variety of industrial manufacturing purposes. For these processes the knowledge of the ion energy distribution function plays a key role. Measurements of the ion energy and ion angular distribution functions (IEDF, IADF) are at least challenging and often impossible in industrial processes. An alternative to measurements of the IEDF are simulations. With this contribution we present a self-consistent model available online for everyone. The simulation of ion energy and ion angular distribution functions involves the well known plasma boundary sheath model by Brinkmann [1-4], which is controlled via a web interface (http://sheath.tet.rub.de). After a successful simulation run all results are evaluable within the browser and ready for download for further analysis.[4pt] [1] R.P. Brinkmann, J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 44, 042002 (2011)[0pt] [2] R.P. Brinkmann, J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 42, 194009 (2009)[0pt] [3] R.P. Brinkmann, J. App. Phys. 102, 093303 (2007)[0pt] [4] M. Kratzer et al., J. Appl. Phys. 90, 2169 (2001)

  3. Localized and distributed boundary-layer receptivity to convected unsteady wake in free stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan

    1994-01-01

    Receptivity to a model convected disturbance in the presence of localized and distributed variations in wall geometry and wall-suction velocity is examined. The model free-stream disturbance corresponds to the time-harmonic wake of a vibrating ribbon that is placed at a suitable distance above the surface of a thin airfoil. The advantages of using this disturbance for experiments on receptivity to convected disturbances are outlined. A brief parametric study is presented for a flat-plate boundary layer. The study quantifies the effect of wake position as well as wake width; in addition, it should be helpful in the choice of an optimal setting for a controlled experiment of the above type, which the above parametric study shows as feasible.

  4. Sea turtle distribution along the boundary of the Gulf Stream current off eastern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, W.; Fritts, T.H.

    1982-01-01

    Aerial surveys, out to 222 km off the east coast of central Florida during August 1980, revealed that marine turtles were distributed in a narrow zone west of the Gulf Stream. Of 255 loggerhead turtles, Caretta caretta, only three were observed east of the western boundary of the Gulf Stream. Radiometric thermometry revealed that the waters occupied by most Caretta were markedly cooler than the nearby waters of the Gulf Stream. Of 18 leatherback turtles, Dermochelys coriacea, all were seen west of the Gulf Stream in waters less than 70 m in depth. Marine turtles off eastern Florida are confined seasonally to nearshore waters west of the Gulf Stream. The records of Dermochelys in nearshore waters are in contrast with a deep water oceanic ecology often hypothesized for this species.

  5. An Examination of the Effect of Boundary Layer Ingestion on Turboelectric Distributed Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felder, James L.; Kim, Huyn Dae; Brown, Gerald V.; Chu, Julio

    2011-01-01

    A Turboelectric Distributed Propulsion (TeDP) system differs from other propulsion systems by the use of electrical power to transmit power from the turbine to the fan. Electrical power can be efficiently transmitted over longer distances and with complex topologies. Also the use of power inverters allows the generator and motors speeds to be independent of one another. This decoupling allows the aircraft designer to place the core engines and the fans in locations most advantageous for each. The result can be very different installation environments for the different devices. Thus the installation effects on this system can be quite different than conventional turbofans where the fan and core both see the same installed environments. This paper examines a propulsion system consisting of two superconducting generators, each driven by a turboshaft engine located so that their inlets ingest freestream air, superconducting electrical transmission lines, and an array of superconducting motor driven fan positioned across the upper/rear fuselage area of a hybrid wing body aircraft in a continuous nacelle that ingests all of the upper fuselage boundary layer. The effect of ingesting the boundary layer on the design of the system with a range of design pressure ratios is examined. Also the impact of ingesting the boundary layer on off-design performance is examined. The results show that when examining different design fan pressure ratios it is important to recalculate of the boundary layer mass-average Pt and MN up the height for each inlet height during convergence of the design point for each fan design pressure ratio examined. Correct estimation of off-design performance is dependent on the height of the column of air measured from the aircraft surface immediately prior to any external diffusion that will flow through the fan propulsors. The mass-averaged Pt and MN calculated for this column of air determine the Pt and MN seen by the propulsor inlet. Since the height

  6. Roles of boundary conditions in DNA simulations: analysis of ion distributions with the finite-difference Poisson-Boltzmann method.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xiang; Cai, Qin; Yang, Wei; Luo, Ray

    2009-07-22

    The wide use of lattice-sum strategies in biomolecular simulations has raised many questions on potential artifacts in these strategies. One interesting question is the artifacts in the counterion distributions of highly charged systems. As one would anticipate, Coulombic interactions under the periodic boundary condition may deviate noticeably from those under the free boundary condition in the highly charged systems, significantly influencing their counterion distributions. On the other hand, the electrostatic screening due to water molecules and mobile ions may effectively damp the possible periodic distortions in Coulombic interactions. Therefore, the magnitude of periodicity-induced artifacts in counterion distributions is not straightforward to dissect without detailed analyses. In this study, we have developed a hybrid explicit counterion/implicit salt representation of mobile ions to address this question. We have chosen a well-studied DNA for easy validation of the minimal hybrid ion representation. Our detailed analysis of continuum ion distributions, explicit ion distributions, radial counterion distribution functions, and sequence-dependent counterion distributions, however, indicates that periodicity artifacts are not apparent at the surface of the tested DNA. Nevertheless, influence of boundary conditions does show up starting at the second solvation shell and becomes apparent at the cell boundary.

  7. Interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer at high transonic speeds. I - Pressure distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messiter, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    Asymptotic solutions are derived for the pressure distribution in the interaction of a weak normal shock wave with a turbulent boundary layer. The undisturbed boundary layer is characterized by the law of the wall and the law of the wake for compressible flow. In the limiting case considered, for 'high' transonic speeds, the sonic line is very close to the wall. Comparisons with experiment are shown, with corrections included for the effect of longitudinal wall curvature and for the boundary-layer displacement effect in a circular pipe.

  8. In-flight surface oil-flow photographs with comparisons to pressure distribution and boundary-layer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Robert R., Jr.; Jennett, Lisa A.

    1985-01-01

    Upper surface oil-flow photographs were obtained at transonic speeds on an F-111 transonic aircraft technology (TACT) aircraft, which had been fitted with a natural laminar-flow airfoil section. The oil-flow photographs were interpreted with regard to shock and boundary-layer characteristics and compared to results obtained from pressure distributions and boundary-layer measurements. Results indicated that flow phenomena (such as shock location and strength) and chord location of boundary-layer characteristics (such as transition location) could be correctly identified from the oil-flow photographs.

  9. On angularly perturbed Laplace equations in the unit ball of IR{sup n+2} and their distributional boundary values

    SciTech Connect

    Massopust, P.R.

    1997-08-01

    All solutions of an in its angular coordinates continuously perturbed Laplace-Beltrami equation in the open unit ball IB{sup n+2} {contained_in} IR{sup n+2}, n {ge} 1, are characterized. Moreover, it is shown that such pertubations yield distributional boundary values which are different from, but algebraically and topologically equivalent to, the hyperfunctions of Lions & Magenes. This is different from the case of radially perturbed Laplace-Beltrami operators (cf. [7]) where one has stability of distributional boundary values under such perturbations.

  10. Believable Characters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Nasr, Magy Seif; Bishko, Leslie; Zammitto, Veronica; Nixon, Michael; Vasiliakos, Athanasios V.; Wei, Huaxin

    The interactive entertainment industry is one of the fastest growing industries in the world. In 1996, the U.S. entertainment software industry reported 2.6 billion in sales revenue, this figure has more than tripled in 2007 yielding 9.5 billion in revenues [1]. In addition, gamers, the target market for interactive entertainment products, are now reaching beyond the traditional 8-34 year old male to include women, Hispanics, and African Americans [2]. This trend has been observed in several markets, including Japan, China, Korea, and India, who has just published their first international AAA title (defined as high quality games with high budget), a 3D third person action game: Ghajini - The Game [3]. The topic of believable characters is becoming a central issue when designing and developing games for today's game industry. While narrative and character were considered secondary to game mechanics, games are currently evolving to integrate characters, narrative, and drama as part of their design. One can see this pattern through the emergence of games like Assassin's Creed (published by Ubisoft 2008), Hotel Dusk (published by Nintendo 2007), and Prince of Persia series (published by Ubisoft), which emphasized character and narrative as part of their design.

  11. Character & Cane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sartorius, Tara Cady

    2009-01-01

    They say first impressions can be deceiving. The difficulty of getting to know someone increases when that person is mostly fictional. Whatever the author writes is all readers can know. Whatever they read about the character is all they have to go on. Now take it another step back, and imagine a portrait drawing, painting or print of that…

  12. Character & Cane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sartorius, Tara Cady

    2009-01-01

    They say first impressions can be deceiving. The difficulty of getting to know someone increases when that person is mostly fictional. Whatever the author writes is all readers can know. Whatever they read about the character is all they have to go on. Now take it another step back, and imagine a portrait drawing, painting or print of that…

  13. Influence of Natural Organic Matter (NOM) Character on the Distribution of Chlorinated and Chloraminated Disinfection By-Products (DBPs) at Rand Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marais, Savia S.; Ncube, Esper J.; Haarhoff, Johannes; Msagati, Titus AM; Mamba, Bhekie B.; Nkambule, Thabo I.

    2016-04-01

    Certain disinfection by-products (DBPs) are likely human carcinogens or present mutagenic effects while many DBPs are unidentified. Considering the possibility of DBPs being harmful to human health and the fact that trihalomethanes (THMs) are the only regulated DBP in the South African National Standard (SANS:241) for drinking water, special interest in the precursors to these DBPs' formation is created. It is essential to understand the reactivity and character of the precursors responsible for the formation of DBPs in order to enhance precursor removal strategies during the treatment of drinking water. In this study the character of NOM within surface water and the subsequent distribution of THMs formed in the drinking water from Rand Waters' full scale treatment plant were investigated. Molecular size distribution (MSD) of NOM within the surface water was determined by high performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC). Specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA) and UV254 measurements formed part of the NOM character study as they provide an indication of the aromaticity of organic matter. The four THMs; bromoform, chloroform, dibromochloromethane (DBCM) and bromodichloromethane (BDCM)were measured by gas chromatography. The sum of these four THMs was expressed as total trihalomethane (TTHM). On average the chloroform constituted 76.2% of the total TTHM, BDCM 22.5% while DBCM and bromoform measured below the detection limit. THM speciation after chlorination and chloramination concentrations increased in the sequence bromoform < DBCM < BDCM < chloroform. Results of the MSD showed a significant correlation between NOM of high molecular size (peak I) and TTHM formation specifically during the summer months (R2= 0.971, p < 0.05). High molecular weight (HMW) NOM also related well to chloroform formation (R2 = 0.963, p < 0.05) however, the formation of BDCM was not due to HWM fraction as indicated by weak regression coefficient. A positive correlation existed between

  14. Regions of the development of a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and the electrical potential distribution at the magnetosphere boundary.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezentsev, A. V.

    1991-10-01

    The configurations of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability regions at the magnetosphere boundary are obtained in the incompressible case as a function of the angle θ between the interplanetary magnetic field and the geomagnetic field for different density ratios at the boundary based on a numerical solution to the problem of streamline flow around the magnetosphere near the magnetic barrier. For θ = O, the instability region lies near the equatorial plane. This region shrinks and shifts towards higher latitudes with increasing angle θ. Growth of the shock front at the discontinuity serves to reduce the size of the instability regions. Using these results it was possible to estimate the thickness of the viscous boundary layer and the distribution of the electrical potential at the magnetosphere boundary near the equatorial plane.

  15. Vertical distribution of CO2 in the atmospheric boundary layer: Characteristics and impact of meteorological variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanli; Deng, Junjun; Mu, Chao; Xing, Zhenyu; Du, Ke

    2014-07-01

    Knowledge of vertical CO2 distribution is important for development of CO2 transport models and calibration/validation of satellite-borne measurements. In this study, vertical profiles of CO2 concentration within 0-1000 m were measured using a tethered balloon at a suburban site in Xiamen, which is undergoing fast urbanization. The characteristics of CO2 vertical distribution were investigated under both stable and convective boundary-layer conditions. The correlation of ground level CO2 concentrations and those at high altitudes decreased with altitude and show significant correlation in the first 300 m with R = 0.78 at 100 m, R = 0.52 at 200 m, R = 0.40 at 300 m (P < 0.01). The correlation keeps almost constant for 300-800 m, and there is no obvious correlation at 800 m, indicating that the impact of ground level CO2 was restricted within the 300 m above the ground. When comparing the vertical profiles obtained at different times during a 24 h period, it was found that CO2 concentration exhibited more obvious diurnal pattern at surface level than at high altitude because of the variation of sources and sinks of CO2 at ground level. Most profiles demonstrated declining trends of CO2 concentration with increasing altitude. The vertical profiles of CO2 were fitted to obtain an empirical equation for estimating CO2 vertical concentration in the lower atmosphere (0-1000 m): y = -75.04 + 1.17 × 109e-x/28.01, R2 = 0.59 (P < 0.05). However, for some cases opposite patterns were observed that the CO2 concentration profiles showed a turning point at a certain altitude or little variation with altitude under certain meteorological conditions. The atmospheric boundary layer depth and atmospheric stability are two major factors controlling the vertical structure of CO2 profile. The results would improve our understanding of the spatial and temporal variation of CO2 in urban environment, which would facilitate using 3-D transport model to study the impacts of CO2 on urban

  16. Σ3 CSL boundary distributions in an austenitic stainless steel subjected to multidirectional forging followed by annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhonova, Marina; Kuzminova, Yuliya; Fang, Xiaoying; Wang, Weiguo; Kaibyshev, Rustam; Belyakov, Andrey

    2014-12-01

    The effect of processing and annealing temperatures on the grain boundary characters in the ultrafine-grained structure of a 304-type austenitic stainless steel was studied. An S304H steel was subjected to multidirectional forging (MDF) at 500-800°C to total strains of ~4, followed by annealing at 800-1,000°C for 30 min. The MDF resulted in the formation of ultrafine-grained microstructures with mean grain sizes of 0.28-0.85 μm depending on the processing temperature. The annealing behaviour of the ultrafine-grained steel was characterized by the development of continuous post-dynamic recrystallization including a rapid recovery followed by a gradual grain growth. The post-dynamically recrystallized grain size depended on both the deformation temperature and the annealing temperature. The recrystallization kinetics was reduced with an increase in the temperature of the preceding deformation. The grain growth during post-dynamic recrystallization was accompanied by an increase in the fraction of Σ3n CSL boundaries, which was defined by a relative change in the grain size, i.e. a ratio of the annealed grain size to that evolved by preceding warm working (D/D0). The fraction of Σ3n CSL boundaries sharply rose to approximately 0.5 in the range of D/D0 from 1 to 5, which can be considered as early stage of continuous post-dynamic recrystallization. Then, the rate of increase in the fraction of Σ3n CSL boundaries slowed down significantly in the range of D/D0 > 5. A fivefold increase in the grain size by annealing is a necessary condition to obtain approximately 50% Σ3n CSL boundaries in the recrystallized microstructure.

  17. Grain Boundary Specific Segregation in Nanocrystalline Fe(Cr).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuyang; Yu, Xiao-Xiang; Kaub, Tyler; Martens, Richard L; Thompson, Gregory B

    2016-10-06

    A cross-correlative precession electron diffraction - atom probe tomography investigation of Cr segregation in a Fe(Cr) nanocrystalline alloy was undertaken. Solute segregation was found to be dependent on grain boundary type. The results of which were compared to a hybrid Molecular Dynamics and Monte Carlo simulation that predicted the segregation for special character, low angle, and high angle grain boundaries, as well as the angle of inclination of the grain boundary. It was found that the highest segregation concentration was for the high angle grain boundaries and is explained in terms of clustering driven by the onset of phase separation. For special character boundaries, the highest Gibbsain interfacial excess was predicted at the incoherent ∑3 followed by ∑9 and ∑11 boundaries with negligible segregation to the twin and ∑5 boundaries. In addition, the low angle grain boundaries predicted negligible segregation. All of these trends matched well with the experiment. This solute-boundary segregation dependency for the special character grain boundaries is explained in terms of excess volume and the energetic distribution of the solute in the boundary.

  18. Grain Boundary Specific Segregation in Nanocrystalline Fe(Cr)

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xuyang; Yu, Xiao-xiang; Kaub, Tyler; Martens, Richard L.; Thompson, Gregory B.

    2016-01-01

    A cross-correlative precession electron diffraction – atom probe tomography investigation of Cr segregation in a Fe(Cr) nanocrystalline alloy was undertaken. Solute segregation was found to be dependent on grain boundary type. The results of which were compared to a hybrid Molecular Dynamics and Monte Carlo simulation that predicted the segregation for special character, low angle, and high angle grain boundaries, as well as the angle of inclination of the grain boundary. It was found that the highest segregation concentration was for the high angle grain boundaries and is explained in terms of clustering driven by the onset of phase separation. For special character boundaries, the highest Gibbsain interfacial excess was predicted at the incoherent ∑3 followed by ∑9 and ∑11 boundaries with negligible segregation to the twin and ∑5 boundaries. In addition, the low angle grain boundaries predicted negligible segregation. All of these trends matched well with the experiment. This solute-boundary segregation dependency for the special character grain boundaries is explained in terms of excess volume and the energetic distribution of the solute in the boundary. PMID:27708360

  19. Studying the active deformation of distributed plate boundaries by integration of GNSS networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agostino, Nicola; Avallone, Antonio; Cecere, Gianpaolo; D'Anastasio, Elisabetta

    2013-04-01

    In the last decade GNSS networks installed for different purposes have proliferated in Italy and now provide a large amount of data available to geophysical studies. In addition to the existing regional and nation-wide scientific GNSS networks developed by ASI (http://geodaf.mt.asi.it), INGV (http://ring.gm.ingv.it) and OGS (http://crs.inogs.it/frednet), a large number (> 400) of continuously-operating GPS stations have been installed in the framework of regional and national networks, both publicly-operated and commercial, developed to provide real-time positioning capability to surveyors. Although the quality of the data and metadata associated to these stations is generally lower with respect to the "scientific" CGPS stations, the increased density and redundancy in crustal motion information, resulting in more than 500 stations with more than 2.5 years of observations, significantly increase the knowledge of the active deformation of the Italian territory and provides a unique image of the crustal deformation field. The obtained GPS velocity field is analysed and various features ranging from the definition of strain distribution and microplate kinematics within the plate boundary, to the evaluation of tectonic strain accumulation on active faults are presented in this work. Undeforming, aseismic regions (Sardinia, Southern Apulia) provide test sites to evaluate the lower bound on the accuracy achievable to measure tectonic deformation. Integration of GNSS networks significantly improves the resolution of the strain rate field in Central Italy showing that active deformation is concentrated in a narrow belt along the crest of the Apennines, consistently with the distribution of the largest historical and recent earthquakes. Products derived from dense GPS velocity and strain rate fields include map of earthquake potential developed under the assumption that the rate of seismic moment accumulation measured from geodesy distributes into earthquake sizes that

  20. Variable Sweep Transition Flight Experiment (VSTFE)-Parametric Pressure Distribution Boundary Layer Stability Study and Wing Glove Design Task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozendaal, Rodger A.

    1986-01-01

    The Variable Sweep Transition Flight Experiment (VSTFE) was initiated to establish a boundary-layer transition data base for laminar flow wing design. For this experiment, full-span upper-surface gloves will be fitted to a variable sweep F-14 aircraft. The results of two initial tasks are documented: a parametric pressure distribution/boundary-layer stability study and the design of an upper-surface glove for Mach 0.8. The first task was conducted to provide a data base from which wing-glove pressure distributions could be selected for glove designs. Boundary-layer stability analyses were conducted on a set of pressure distributions for various wing sweep angles, Mach numbers, and Reynolds number in the range of those anticipated for the flight-test program. The design procedure for the Mach 0.8 glove is described, and boundary-layer stability calculations and pressure distributions are presented both at design and off-design conditions. Also included is the analysis of the clean-up glove (smoothed basic wing) that will be flight-tested initially and the analysis of a Mach 0.7 glove designed at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  1. Defining boundaries for the distribution of microbial communities beneath the sediment-buried, hydrothermally active seafloor.

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, Katsunori; Ijiri, Akira; Breuker, Anja; Sakai, Sanae; Miyoshi, Youko; Kawagucci, Shinsuke; Noguchi, Takuroh; Hirai, Miho; Schippers, Axel; Ishibashi, Jun-Ichiro; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Sunamura, Michinari; Urabe, Tetsuro; Nunoura, Takuro; Takai, Ken

    2017-02-01

    Subseafloor microbes beneath active hydrothermal vents are thought to live near the upper temperature limit for life on Earth. We drilled and cored the Iheya North hydrothermal field in the Mid-Okinawa Trough, and examined the phylogenetic compositions and the products of metabolic functions of sub-vent microbial communities. We detected microbial cells, metabolic activities and molecular signatures only in the shallow sediments down to 15.8 m below the seafloor at a moderately distant drilling site from the active hydrothermal vents (450 m). At the drilling site, the profiles of methane and sulfate concentrations and the δ(13)C and δD isotopic compositions of methane suggested the laterally flowing hydrothermal fluids and the in situ microbial anaerobic methane oxidation. In situ measurements during the drilling constrain the current bottom temperature of the microbially habitable zone to ~45 °C. However, in the past, higher temperatures of 106-198 °C were possible at the depth, as estimated from geochemical thermometry on hydrothermally altered clay minerals. The 16S rRNA gene phylotypes found in the deepest habitable zone are related to those of thermophiles, although sequences typical of known hyperthermophilic microbes were absent from the entire core. Overall our results shed new light on the distribution and composition of the boundary microbial community close to the high-temperature limit for habitability in the subseafloor environment of a hydrothermal field.

  2. Distributed-Roughness Effects on Stability and Transition In Swept-Wing Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrillo, Ruben B., Jr.; Reibert, Mark S.; Saric, William S.

    1997-01-01

    Boundary-layer stability experiments are conducted in the Arizona State University Unsteady Wind Tunnel on a 45 deg swept airfoil. The pressure distribution and test conditions are designed to suppress Tollmien-Schlichting disturbances and provide crossflow-dominated transition. The surface of the airfoil is finely polished to a near mirror finish. Under these conditions, submicron surface irregularities cause the naturally occurring stationary crossflow waves to grow to nonuniform amplitudes. Spanwise-uniform stationary crossflow disturbances are generated through careful control of the initial conditions with full-span arrays of micron-high roughness elements near the attachment line. Detailed hot-wire measurements are taken to document the stationary crossflow structure and determine growth rates for the total and individual-mode disturbances. Naphthalene flow visualization provides transition location information. Roughness spacing and roughness height are varied to examine the effects on transition location and all amplified wavelengths. The measurements show that roughness spacings that do not contain harmonics equal to the most unstable wavelength as computed by linear stability theory effectively suppress the most unstable mode. Under certain conditions, subcritical roughness spacing delays transition past that of the corresponding smooth surface.

  3. Spatially Distributed Forcing for Boundary Layer Separation Control on a Wall Mounted Hump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgmann, David; Little, Jesse; Woszidlo, Rene

    2016-11-01

    Numerous successful efforts on controlling flow separation have been demonstrated using spatially distributed actuators. These include both steady and unsteady forcing from discrete locations in the vicinity of separation. Despite this, there are many open questions on the actual flow control mechanism. A canonical hump model is used to investigate these physics in a subsonic wind tunnel. Reynolds number independence is achieved above 0.72 ×106 and testing is performed up to 2.2 ×106. The efficacy of discrete steady jets is studied as a function of spacing, momentum coefficient, velocity ratio and mass flux. Highly-resolved surface pressure data for the controlled flow are compared to an inviscid solution establishing a figure of merit. Results indicate the inviscid limit is reached for a momentum coefficient of 1% with actuator spacing of 0.5% span. A comparison of steady discrete jets with sweeping jets actuators of equivalent cross-sectional area is undertaken. Surface flow visualization and PIV are employed to extract detailed information on the baseline and controlled flow field. This importance of establishing critical baseline features is also discussed with respect to establishing proper boundary conditions for accompanying numerical simulations. Supported by The Boeing Company.

  4. Prediction of acoustic radiation from axisymmetric surfaces with arbitrary boundary conditions using the boundary element method on a distributed computing system.

    PubMed

    Wright, Louise; Robinson, Stephen P; Humphrey, Victor F

    2009-03-01

    This paper presents a computational technique using the boundary element method for prediction of radiated acoustic waves from axisymmetric surfaces with nonaxisymmetric boundary conditions. The aim is to predict the far-field behavior of underwater acoustic transducers based on their measured behavior in the near-field. The technique is valid for all wavenumbers and uses a volume integral method to calculate the singular integrals required by the boundary element formulation. The technique has been implemented on a distributed computing system to take advantage of its parallel nature, which has led to significant reductions in the time required to generate results. Measurement data generated by a pair of free-flooding underwater acoustic transducers encapsulated in a polyurethane polymer have been used to validate the technique against experiment. The dimensions of the outer surface of the transducers (including the polymer coating) were an outer diameter of 98 mm with an 18 mm wall thickness and a length of 92 mm. The transducers were mounted coaxially, giving an overall length of 185 mm. The cylinders had resonance frequencies at 13.9 and 27.5 kHz, and the data were gathered at these frequencies.

  5. On the grain boundary statistics in metals and alloys susceptible to annealing twinning

    SciTech Connect

    Gertsman, V.Y. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering Russian Academy of Sciences, Ufa . Inst. for Metals Superplasticity Problems); Tangri, K. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Valiev, R.Z. . Inst. for Metals Superplasticity Problems)

    1994-06-01

    Grain boundary distribution which includes grain boundary character distribution (i.e. distribution of boundaries by the reciprocal density of coincidence sites [Sigma]) as well as distribution of boundaries by misorientation angles and axes is an important parameter describing polycrystalline microstructure. Numerous experimental data on grain boundary distribution in low stacking fault energy f.c.c. materials that are susceptible to annealing twinning have been analyzed and it has been established that there is a certain stable grain boundary distribution characterized by the dominance of [Sigma]3[double prime] boundaries in all statically recrystallized materials of this class. Computer modeling based on the assumption that multiple twinning is the main process controlling structure formation has confirmed this conclusion. It has been also found that distribution of lengths of different types of grain boundaries is more sensitive to the stacking fault energy and treatment of the material. Relation between grain boundary distributions and grain orientation distributions has been studied both experimentally and by computer modeling. It has been established that the grain boundary distribution is not completely determined by texture but is only influenced by it, because the grain boundary spectrum is primarily dependent on the orientation correlations which may exist between various crystallites of a polycrystal. Control of grain boundary distributions by means of various treatments has been demonstrated and possibilities of grain boundary design for improving the bulk properties of polycrystalline materials are discussed.

  6. Displaced logarithmic profile of the velocity distribution in the boundary layer of a turbulent flow over an unbounded flat surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talpos, Simona; Apostol, Marian

    2015-12-01

    It is shown that the Reynolds equations for a turbulent flow over an unbounded flat surface in the presence of a constant pressure-gradient lead to a displaced logarithmic profile of the velocity distribution; the displaced logarithmic profile is obtained by assuming a constant production rate of turbulence energy. The displacement height measured on the (vertical) axis perpendicular to the surface is either positive or negative. For a positive displacement height the boundary layer exhibits an inversion, while for a negative displacement height the boundary layer is a direct one. In an inversion boundary layer the logarithmic velocity profile is disrupted into two distinct branches separated by a logarithmic singularity. The viscosity transforms this logarithmic singularity into a sharp edge, governed by a generalized Reynolds number. The associated temperature distribution is calculated, and the results are discussed in relation to meteorological boundary-layer jets and stratified layers. The effects of gravitation and atmospheric thermal or fluid-mixture concentration gradients (;external forcings;) are also considered; it is shown that such circumstances may lead to various modifications of the boundary layers. A brief presentation of a similar situation is described for a circular pipe.

  7. Tessera terrain on Venus: Implications of tessera flooding models and boundary characteristics for global distribution and mode of formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Head, James W.; Ivanov, Mikhail

    1993-01-01

    Mapping of tessera terrain using Magellan global high-resolution data has shown that it comprises about 10 percent of the surface area of Venus, is not randomly distributed, is extremely highly deformed relative to intervening plains, lies at a wide range of elevations, is embayed by and largely predates adjacent volcanic plains, is generally negatively correlated with broad lowlands and volcanic rises, may underlie a considerable percentage of the superposed volcanic plains, and has linear/tectonic margins for about 27 percent of its boundaries. In this paper, we investigate further the distribution and origin of tessera through analysis of the changing nature of tessera occurrences during sequential flooding, and assessment of the nature and distribution of Type 2 (linear/tectonic) tessera boundaries.

  8. EBSD characterization of carbide-carbide boundaries in WC-Co composites.

    PubMed

    Farooq, M U; Klement, U

    2004-03-01

    A sample of WC-6wt%Co was investigated for grain boundary character distribution and occurrence of coincidence site lattice (CSL) boundaries on a statistical basis. For this purpose orientation measurements of the grains were carried out using electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD). The dominant misorientation relationships were determined by complementary EBSD data representation tools such as orientation maps, misorientation angle distribution histograms and the sectioned three-dimensional misorientation space. It was found that the grain boundary character distribution of the material is nearly random and the CSL boundaries are not present in statistically significant amounts. It was also found that the amount of binder phase does not play a role in the formation of special boundaries. The paper focuses on the methodology of characterizing grain boundaries in a hexagonal material using EBSD.

  9. The effects of grain size distribution on cavity nucleation and creep deformation in ceramics containing viscous grain boundary phase

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, N.; Hsia, K.J.; Socie, D.F.

    1997-10-01

    The grain size distribution in a polycrystalline ceramic material is not uniform. Such microstructural inhomogeneity may give rise to nonuniform local stress distributions. Here the authors investigate the effect of grain size distribution on the generation of local stress concentration in ceramic materials creeping by localized flow of a viscous grain boundary phase. A simple bimodal grain size distribution is first considered. The critical stress for cavity nucleation, calculated using classical Becker-Doring nucleation theory, is compared with the local stress concentration. The results show that, because of the inhomogeneity, the local stress in the grain boundary viscous phase at the locations of large grains can exceed the critical stress for cavity nucleation. The creep rate due to localized viscous flow of the grain boundary phase and cavity growth is evaluated. Although the creep behavior owing solely to viscous flow is linear with respect to applied stress, it can be highly nonlinear when cavitation occurs. Moreover, as an example, the model has been used to study creep behavior of a whisker-reinforced Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} matrix composite in which long whiskers are surrounded by small equiaxed ceramic grains.

  10. Distribution of MdACS3 null alleles in apple (Malus × domestica Borkh.) and its relevance to the fruit ripening characters

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Songling; Wang, Aide; Igarashi, Megumi; Kon, Tomoyuki; Fukasawa-Akada, Tomoko; Li, Tianzhong; Harada, Takeo; Hatsuyama, Yoshimichi

    2012-01-01

    Expression of MdACS3a, one of the ripening-related ACC synthase genes, plays a pivotal role in initiating the burst of ethylene production by MdACS1 in apple fruit. Although previous studies have demonstrated the presence of MdACS3a-null alleles through deficiency of transcription activity or loss of enzyme activity due to amino acid substitution, which may affect the storage properties of certain fruit cultivars, an overall picture of these null alleles in cultivars is still lacking. The present study investigated the distribution of null allelic genes in 103 cultivars and 172 breeding selections by using a simple sequence repeat (SSR) marker linked to them. The results indicated that both allelic genes were widely distributed throughout the examined cultivars and selections, some occurring as the null genotype, either homozygously or heterozygously, with each null allele. The implications of MdACS3a distribution results and the influence of its null allelotypes in fruit characters are discussed. PMID:23136513

  11. Video Capture and Editing as a Tool for the Storage, Distribution, and Illustration of Morphological Characters of Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    De Ley, Paul; Bert, Wim

    2002-01-01

    Morphological identification and detailed observation of nematodes usually requires permanent slides, but these are never truly permanent and often prevent the same specimens to be used for other purposes. To efficiently record the morphology of nematodes in a format that allows easy archiving, editing, and distribution, we have assembled two micrographic video capture and editing (VCE) configurations. These assemblies allow production of short video clips that mimic multifocal observation of nematode specimens through a light microscope. Images so obtained can be used for training, management, and online access of "virtual voucher specimens" in taxonomic collections, routine screening of fixed or unfixed specimens, recording of ephemeral staining patterns, or recording of freshly dissected internal organs prior to their decomposition. We provide an overview of the components and operation of both of our systems and evaluate their efficiency and image quality. We conclude that VCE is a highly versatile approach that is likely to become widely used in nematology research and teaching. PMID:19265947

  12. Video capture and editing as a tool for the storage, distribution, and illustration of morphological characters of nematodes.

    PubMed

    De Ley, Paul; Bert, Wim

    2002-12-01

    Morphological identification and detailed observation of nematodes usually requires permanent slides, but these are never truly permanent and often prevent the same specimens to be used for other purposes. To efficiently record the morphology of nematodes in a format that allows easy archiving, editing, and distribution, we have assembled two micrographic video capture and editing (VCE) configurations. These assemblies allow production of short video clips that mimic multifocal observation of nematode specimens through a light microscope. Images so obtained can be used for training, management, and online access of "virtual voucher specimens" in taxonomic collections, routine screening of fixed or unfixed specimens, recording of ephemeral staining patterns, or recording of freshly dissected internal organs prior to their decomposition. We provide an overview of the components and operation of both of our systems and evaluate their efficiency and image quality. We conclude that VCE is a highly versatile approach that is likely to become widely used in nematology research and teaching.

  13. Distribution of magnetofossils in deep-sea surface sediments with Fe-redox boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Kawamura, N.; Seike, K.; Sakuramoto, Y.; Okutsu, N.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are considered to be microaerophilic and most commonly live near or below the Fe-redox boundary. However, common occurrence of magnetofossils in Pacific red clay (Yamazaki and Shimono, 2013), which contains abundant dissolved oxygen and does not have a Fe-redox boundary, suggest that some species of magnetotactic bacteria live in an environment without a strong chemical gradient. To contribute to better understanding of the ecology of magnetotactic bacteria in deep-sea sediments, we have studied magnetofossils within surface sediments of the Japan Sea, where the Fe-redox boundary is known to occur several to tens of centimeters below the seafloor, with rock-magnetic techniques and TEM observations. Undisturbed surface sediments were taken with a multiple corer. From dissolved oxygen and Fe (II) contents of interstitial water and color reflectance of the sediments, the Fe-redox boundary was clearly detected at 7 to 25 cm below the seafloor at three sites. In the component analyses of IRM acquisition curves, a magnetic component that has a mean coercivity of ~65 mT and a small dispersion parameter occurs, which corresponds to the biogenic hard (BH) component of Egli (2004). At all three sites, the proportion of this component increases just below the Fe-redox boundary, which is associated with an increase in the ratio of ARM to SIRM. These results suggest increased abundance of magnetofossils with elongated morphologies like hexagonal prism and tear drop. On the other hand, FORC diagrams show sharp central ridges indicative of magnetofossils throughout the sediment columns regardless of the distance from the Fe-redox boundary, even at the sediment-water interface. The occurrence of magnetofossils was confirmed by TEM observations. These results suggest that although some species of magnetotactic bacteria living in marine sediments prefer a chemical condition near the Fe-redox boundary, others may be aerotolerant and live in oxic environments.

  14. Methane distributions and transports in the nocturnal boundary layer at a rural station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Klaus; Zeeman, Matthias; Brosy, Caroline; Münkel, Christoph; Fersch, Benjamin; Mauder, Matthias; Emeis, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the methane distributions and transports, the role of related atmospheric processes by determination of vertical profiles of wind, turbulence, temperature and humidity as well as nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) height and the quantification of methane emissions at local and plot scale the so-called ScaleX-campaign was performed in a pre-alpine observatory in Southern Germany from 01 June until 31 July 2015. The following measurements from the ground up to the free troposphere were performed: layering of the atmosphere by a ceilometer (Vaisala CL51); temperature, wind, turbulence profiles from 50 m up to 500 m by a Radio-Acoustic Sounding System (RASS, Metek GmbH); temperature, humidity profiles in situ by a hexacopter; methane farm emissions by two open-path laser spectrometers (Boreal GasFinder2); methane concentrations in situ (Los Gatos DLT-100) with tubes in 0.3 m agl and 5 sampling heads; and methane soil emissions by a big chamber (10 m length, 2.60 m width, up to 0.61 m height) with a plastic cover. The methane concentrations near the surface show a daily variation with a maximum and a frequent double-peak structure during night-time. Analysis of the variation of the nocturnal methane concentration together with the hexacopter and RASS data indicates that the first peak in the nocturnal methane concentration is probably due to local cooling and stabilization which keeps the methane emissions from the soil near the ground. The second peak seems to be due to advection of methane-enriched air which had formed in the environment of the nearby farm yards. These dairy farm emissions were determined by up-wind and down-wind open-path concentration measurements, turbulence data from an EC station nearby and Backward Lagrangian Simulation (WindTrax software). The methane fluxes at plot scale (big chamber) are characterized by emissions at water saturated grassland patches, by an exponential decrease of these emissions during grassland drying, and by an

  15. On the latitudinal and seasonal distribution of reactive halogens in the Eastern Pacific marine boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez Martin, J. C.; Hay, T. D.; Mahajan, A. S.; Prados-Roman, C.; Ordoñez, C.; Royer, S.-J.; Yvon-Lewis, S.; Agama Reyes, M. V.; Paredes Mora, J. F.; Sorribas Panero, M.; Gil, M.; MacDonald, S.; Plane, J. M. C.; Saiz-Lopez, A.

    2012-04-01

    Spatially and time-resolved observations of reactive iodine and bromine species were made during two field campaigns in the Eastern Pacific marine boundary layer (MBL) in order to improve our understanding of their sources and their impacts on ozone and aerosols. The first campaign, HaloCarbon Air Sea Transect-Pacific (HaloCAST-P), was a one-month ship-based study on a scientific cruise from Chile to Seattle during March-April 2010. The second campaign, Climate and HAlogen Reactivity tropicaL EXperiment (CHARLEX) in the Galapagos Islands, running from September 2010, is the first long-term ground-based study of atmospheric trace gases in this region (1). Both ship-based MAX-DOAS measurements and ground-based MAX-DOAS, LP-DOAS and ROFLEX observations indicate a constant and ubiquitous presence of reactive iodine (IOx = I + IO), with enhanced mixing ratios over the oligotrophic parts of the ocean and slightly increased IOx mixing ratios in the warm season (although IO itself does not show a seasonal trend). On the other hand, BrO was not observed above the LP-DOAS 0.5 pptv (2σ) detection limit, indicating BrOx levels on the low side of the range predicted by models (2,3). The mixing ratios observed in the eastern Pacific show similar variability and magnitude, although they are generally lower than in other remote tropical locations (1). A recently reported time series of satellite observations of IO around Galapagos (4,5) is inconsistent with the spatial distribution and low surface mixing ratios measured in our study. In situ measurements of meteorological and physical ocean variables, Chlorophyll-a and halocarbons, along with satellite ocean colour imagery were used to gain insights into the possible sources and the impacts of iodine in this environment. Regarding the current halogen impacts on the regional MBL chemistry, the low mixing ratios observed indicate that they will neither affect significantly surface ozone nor trigger significant new particle

  16. Timing, distribution, and character of tephra fall from the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska - a progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, K. L.; Schaefer, J. R.

    2009-12-01

    The 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano included one minor and 19 major tephra-producing explosions between March 15, 2009 and April 4, 2009 (UTC). NEXRAD radar data show that plumes reached heights between 6.7 km (22,000 ft) and 19 km (62,000 ft) asl and were distributed downwind along nearly all azimuths of the volcano. Explosions lasted between <1 and 31 minutes based on the signal duration at a distal seismic station (86 km). From MODIS imagery and field data, we estimate that over 80,000 km2 received at least minor ash fall (>0.8 mm), including communities along the Kenai Peninsula (80-100 km) and the city of Anchorage (170 km). Trace ash (< 0.8 mm) was reported as far as Fairbanks, 550 km NNE of the volcano. A preliminary total tephra-fall volume (dense-rock equivalent) for magmatic explosions is between 23 Mm3 and 40 Mm3 with a single event maximum of 6.3 Mm3. On March 15, a small (4.6 km, 15,000 ft asl) phreatic explosion containing minor, non-juvenile ash, erupted through the summit ice cap. The first five magmatic explosions (Events 1-5) occurred within a 6-hour period on March 23 (06:34-12:30 UTC). Plumes rose to heights between 5.5 km (18,000 ft) and 14.9 km (49,000 ft) asl during 2- to 20-min-duration explosions, and were dispersed mainly along a NNE trajectory. Trace ash fall was reported as far as Fairbanks. Owing to a shift in wind direction and heavy snowfall during these events, field discrimination among many of these layers was possible. All deposits include a significant percentage of accretionary lapilli, yet only Event 5 deposits contain coarse clasts including ice. The most voluminous tephra fall was deposited on March 24 (Event 6; 03:40 UTC) from a 15 minute explosion that sent a plume to 18 km (60,000) asl, and dispersed tephra to the WNW. Within 10 km of the vent, this deposit contains 1-10 cm pumice clasts in a matrix of 1-2 mm accretionary lapilli. An anomalous mass-per-unit-area contour extending to the NNW, defined by dense lapilli, may

  17. Coarsening kinetics of topologically highly correlated grain boundary networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ming; Reed, Bryan W.; Kumar, Mukul

    2012-08-01

    We apply phase-field simulations in two dimensions to study the thermal coarsening of grain boundary (GB) networks with high fractions of twin and twin-variant boundaries, which for example are seen in grain-boundary-engineered FCC materials. Two types of grain boundary networks with similar starting special boundary fractions but different topological features were considered as initial conditions for the grain growth simulations. A lattice Monte Carlo method creates polycrystalline microstructures (Reed and Kumar (RK)), which exhibit hierarchical organization of random and special coincidence site lattice boundaries. The other type of microstructures (randomly distributed (RD)) contains random distributions of special boundaries subject only to crystallographic constraints. Under the assumption that random boundaries have larger energy and much higher mobility than special boundaries, simulations show that increasing the initial special boundary fraction in both microstructures slows down grain growth. However, the two starting microstructures exhibit very different behavior in the evolution of GB character and triple junction (TJ) distributions. The RD networks coarsened more slowly than the RK networks with comparable initial fractions of special boundaries. The observed trend in the evolution of the RK microstructures is explained by an extended von Neumann-Mullins analysis. This study demonstrates that the special boundary fraction is not a sufficient indicator of the coarsening behavior of twinned GB networks; the network topology must also be considered to correctly predict the grain growth kinetics.

  18. Effect of Grain Orientation and Boundary Distributions on Hydrogen-Induced Cracking in Low-Carbon-Content Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoumi, Mohammad; Coelho, Hana Livia Frota; Tavares, Sérgio Souto Maior; Silva, Cleiton Carvalho; de Abreu, Hamilton Ferreira Gomes

    2017-03-01

    Hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC) causes considerable economic losses in a wide range of steels exposed to corrosive environments. The effect of crystallographic texture and grain boundary distributions tailored by rolling at 850 °C in three different steels with a body-centered cube structure was investigated on HIC resistance. The x-ray and electron backscattered diffraction techniques were used to characterize texture evolutions during the rolling process. The findings revealed a significant improvement against HIC based on texture engineering. In addition, increasing the number of {111} and {110} grains, associated with minimizing the number of {001} grains in warm-rolled samples, reduced HIC susceptibility. Moreover, the results showed that boundaries associated with low {hkl} indexing and denser packing planes had more resistance against crack propagation.

  19. Remote sensing of seasonal distribution of precipitable water vapor over the oceans and inference of boundary layer structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakara, C.

    1979-01-01

    Over the ocean satellite infrared spectral measurements in the 18 micrometer water vapor band and the 11 micrometer window region were used to derive precipitable water vapor, w, in the atmosphere and the sea surface temperature, SST. Seasonal maps of w on the oceans derived from these data reveal the dynamical influence of the large scale atmospheric circulation. With the help of a model for the vertical distribution of water vapor, the configuration of the atmospheric boundary layer over the oceans can be inferred from w when the information of SST is combined. The gross seasonal mean structure of the boundary layer inferred in this fashion reveals the broad areas of the trade wind inversion and the convectively active areas such as the intertropical convergence zones.

  20. A boundary element model for investigating the effects of eye tumor on the temperature distribution inside the human eye.

    PubMed

    Ooi, E H; Ang, W T; Ng, E Y K

    2009-08-01

    A three-dimensional boundary element model of the human eye is developed to investigate the thermal effects of eye tumor on the ocular temperature distribution. The human eye is modeled as comprising several regions which have different thermal properties. The tumor is one of these regions. The thermal effects of the tumor are simulated by taking it to have a very high metabolic heat generation and blood perfusion rate. Inside the tumor, the steady state temperature is governed by the Pennes bioheat equation. Elsewhere, in normal tissues of the eye, the temperature satisfies the Laplace's equation. To compute the temperature on the corneal surface, the surface boundary of each region is divided into triangular elements.

  1. Effect of Grain Orientation and Boundary Distributions on Hydrogen-Induced Cracking in Low-Carbon-Content Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoumi, Mohammad; Coelho, Hana Livia Frota; Tavares, Sérgio Souto Maior; Silva, Cleiton Carvalho; de Abreu, Hamilton Ferreira Gomes

    2017-08-01

    Hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC) causes considerable economic losses in a wide range of steels exposed to corrosive environments. The effect of crystallographic texture and grain boundary distributions tailored by rolling at 850 °C in three different steels with a body-centered cube structure was investigated on HIC resistance. The x-ray and electron backscattered diffraction techniques were used to characterize texture evolutions during the rolling process. The findings revealed a significant improvement against HIC based on texture engineering. In addition, increasing the number of {111} and {110} grains, associated with minimizing the number of {001} grains in warm-rolled samples, reduced HIC susceptibility. Moreover, the results showed that boundaries associated with low {hkl} indexing and denser packing planes had more resistance against crack propagation.

  2. Development of a Grain Boundary Pinning Model that Considers Particle Size Distribution Using the Phase Field Method

    SciTech Connect

    Michael R Tonks; Yongfeng Zhang; Xian-Ming Bai

    2015-04-01

    Grain boundary (GB) migration significantly impacts material behavior. However, GB migration is slowed or even halted by resistive pressure applied by pores or particles. Zener’s original investigation of particle pinning, and subsequent modifications by other researchers, describe the resistive pressure for various spatial distributions of particles with respect to GBs. In this work, we develop a pinning model that considers the impact of the particle size distribution and we verify it by comparing to mesoscale phase field and Monte Carlo simulations. Resistive pressure expressions are developed that are functions of the percentage of GB area covered by particles and of the particle volume fraction for any spatial distribution of particles. In both expressions, the mean value of the resistive pressure decreases with increasing standard deviation of the particle radius.

  3. Energy Decay and Boundary Control for Distributed Parameter Systems with Viscoelastic Damping

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-24

    involved Hannsgen and Wheeler, together with Yuriko Renardy and Volfgang Desch. Aspects of this work are reported in [1, 6, 7, 20] and have been presented...Kim and Yuriko Renardy [2] analyzed flexural oscillations of the elastic Timoshenko beam in the context of boundary control. The Timoshenko model, which...While partially supported by funds from this grant, Yuriko Renardy used physical modeling, analytical and computational techniques to study the

  4. Effects of oxide distributed in grain boundaries on microstructure stability of nanocrystalline metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Kai; Li, Hui; Biao Pang, Jin; Wang, Zhu

    2013-06-01

    Nanocrystalline copper and zinc prepared by high-pressure compaction method have been studied by positron lifetime spectroscopy associated with X-ray diffraction. For nanocrystalline Cu, mean grain sizes of the samples decrease after being annealed at 900 °C and increase during aging at 180 °C, revealing that the atoms exchange between the two regions. The positron lifetime results indicate that the vacancy clusters formed in the annealing process are unstable and decomposed at the aging time below 6 hours. In addition, the partially oxidized surfaces of the nanoparticles hinder the grain growth during the ageing at 180 °C, and the vacancy clusters inside the disorder regions which are related to Cu2O need longer aging time to decompose. In the case of nanocrystalline Zn, the open volume defect (not larger than divacancy) is dominant according to the high relative intensity for the short positron lifetime (τ1). The oxide (ZnO) inside the grain boundaries has been found having an effect to hinder the decrease of average positron lifetime (τav) during the annealing, which probably indicates that the oxide stabilizes the microstructure of the grain boundaries. For both nanocrystalline copper and zinc, the oxides in grain boundaries enhance the thermal stability of the microstucture, in spite of their different crystal structures. This effect is very important for the nanocrystalline materials using as radiation resistant materials.

  5. Effect of the Earth's magnetic field spatial distribution on the electromagnetic coupling at the fluid core boundaries for nutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koot, L.; Dumberry, M.

    2011-12-01

    Nutations are periodic variations in the orientation of the Earth's rotation axis in space. This motion is generated by the gravitational torque applied on the Earth's equatorial bulge by the Moon, the Sun, and the other planets. Because the mantle, the fluid outer core and the solid inner core react differently to the applied torque, the nutation motion is characterized by differential rotations between these three regions. Since the boundaries of the fluid outer core are permeated by a background magnetic field (the geodynamo field), the differential rotation at the fluid core boundaries induces a secondary magnetic field by shear and advection of the background field. The associated electric currents produce Lorentz forces and torques between the outer core, inner core, and mantle, that tend to oppose the differential rotation. A previous study has shown that the magnitude of the electromagnetic (EM) torque is mainly determined by the electrical conductivities on both sides of the outer core boundaries and by the mean RMS strength of the background magnetic field, with the spatial distribution of this magnetic field being unimportant to first order. The goal of the present work is to reassess the role of the magnetic field spatial distribution on the strength of the EM torque using a new model of the EM coupling for nutations that we have recently developed. Our model differs from previous ones in that we use a global approach to describe the induced magnetic field. Moreover, we also include in the torque the contribution from the poloidal component of the induced field, an effect neglected in previous models. In addition, we do not assume a priori that the non-dipolar components of the background magnetic field can be represented by a uniform field with the same power but instead we calculate the torque on the basis of the full geometry of the field. This is particularly important for the poloidal torque as it depends directly on the surface gradient of the

  6. Character Education in America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vardin, Patricia A.

    2003-01-01

    Notes the resurgence of interest in character education in American schools, and summarizes the history of character education in American culture. Explores Montessori's views on character education, and character education as presented in the Montessori classroom. Lists 11 criteria teachers can use to enhance character education in the 21st…

  7. Character in fiction and fiction in character.

    PubMed

    Baudry, F

    1990-07-01

    This paper examines the concept of fictional character from a psychoanalytic point of view, including its synthesis and the role of reader response. A second section takes up the role of fiction in the development of character.

  8. Exponential Stability of the Energy of the Wave Equation with Variable Coefficients and a Boundary Distributed Delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenjun

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we consider a wave equation with space variable coefficients. Due to physical considerations, a distributed delay damping is acted on the part of the boundary. Under suitable assumptions, we prove the exponential stability of the energy based on the use of Riemannian geometry method, the perturbed energy argument, and some observability inequalities. From the applications point of view, our results may provide some qualitative analysis and intuition for the researchers in fields such as engineering, biophysics, and mechanics. And the method is rather general and can be adapted to other evolution systems with variable coefficients (e. g. elasticity plates) as well.

  9. Structure of two-dimensional and three-dimensional turbulent boundary layers with sparsely distributed roughness elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Jacob

    The present study deals with the effects of sparsely distributed three-dimensional elements on two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) turbulent boundary layers (TBL) such as those that occur on submarines, ship hulls, etc. This study was achieved in three parts: Part 1 dealt with the cylinders when placed individually in the turbulent boundary layers, thereby considering the effect of a single perturbation on the TBL; Part 2 considered the effects when the same individual elements were placed in a sparse and regular distribution, thus studying the response of the flow to a sequence of perturbations; and in Part 3, the distributions were subjected to 3-D turbulent boundary layers, thus examining the effects of streamwise and spanwise pressure gradients on the same perturbed flows as considered in Part 2. The 3-D turbulent boundary layers were generated by an idealized wing-body junction flow. Detailed 3-velocity-component Laser-Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) and other measurements were carried out to understand and describe the rough-wall flow structure. The measurements include mean velocities, turbulence quantities (Reynolds stresses and triple products), skin friction, surface pressure and oil flow visualizations in 2-D and 3-D rough-wall flows for Reynolds numbers, based on momentum thickness, greater than 7000. Very uniform circular cylindrical roughness elements of 0.38mm, 0.76mm and 1.52mm height (k) were used in square and diagonal patterns, yielding six different roughness geometries of rough-wall surface. For the 2-D rough-wall flows, the roughness Reynolds numbers, k +, based on the element height (k) and the friction velocity (Utau), range from 26 to 131. Results for the 2-D rough-wall flows reveal that the velocity-defect law is similar for both smooth and rough surfaces, and the semi-logarithmic velocity-distribution curve is shifted by an amount DeltaU/U, depending on the height of the roughness element, showing that Delta U/Utau is a function

  10. Strains distribution in biaxial Ge/CdSe nanowire analyzed by a new finite element method based on boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Wang, Chunrui; Zhang, Yao; Zhang, Shasha; Xu, Xiaofeng; Yang, Qinyu

    2013-12-01

    A new finite element method based on boundary conditions is proposed here to obtain the complete strains distribution in Ge/CdSe biaxial nanowires. The results show that the strains in nanowire is essentially uniform along the nanowire axis, whereas turn to be complex in cross-section. Additionally, Raman spectrum of Ge subnanowire was calculated on base of those strain data. Raman frequency shifts in Ge subnanowire in Ge/CdSe biaxial nanowires is a good agreement with that of Raman spectrum, which confirms the validity of this model.

  11. Distributions of orientations and misorientations in hot-rolled copper

    SciTech Connect

    Mishin, O.V. |; Gertsman, V.Y. |; Gottstein, G.

    1997-01-01

    Local orientations were measured by means of the electron backscatter diffraction technique in hot-rolled pure copper after postdynamic recrystallization. Orientation and misorientation distribution functions, grain boundary misorientation and character distributions, and triple junction distributions were calculated from the local orientation data. The superposition of microstructural features characteristic of both dynamic recrystallization and static recrystallization was observed. The evolution of grain boundary and triple junction distributions are discussed in terms of the recrystallization process.

  12. Creatures of Character: Winning with Character Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cali, Charlene C.

    1997-01-01

    Describes the development of a curriculum for students in K-5 that teaches character development and involves all members of the school faculty. Uses animal associations to reinforce the importance of certain character traits, outlines lesson planning, and discusses program development, character traits, program evaluation, and the need for…

  13. Periodic seepage face formation and water pressure distribution along a vertical boundary of an aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jazayeri Shoushtari, Seyed Mohammad Hossein; Nielsen, Peter; Cartwright, Nick; Perrochet, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Detailed measurements of the piezometric head from sand flume experiments of an idealised coastal aquifer forced by a simple harmonic boundary condition across a vertical boundary are presented. The measurements focus on the pore pressures very close to the interface (x = 0.01m) and throw light on the details of the boundary condition, particularly with respect to meniscus suction and seepage face formation during the falling tide. Between the low and the mean water level, the response is consistent with meniscus suction free models in terms of both the vertical mean head and oscillation amplitude profiles and is consistent with the observation that this area of the interface was generally within the seepage face. Above the mean water level, the influence of meniscus formation is significant with the mean pressure head being less than that predicted by capillary free theory and oscillation amplitudes decaying faster than predicted by suction free models. The reduced hydraulic conductivity in this area due to partial drainage of pores on the falling tide also causes a delay in the response to the rising tide. The combined influence of seepage face formation, meniscus suction and reduced hydraulic conductivity generate higher harmonics with amplitudes of up to 26% of the local main harmonic. To model the influence of seepage face formation and meniscus suction a numerical solution of the Richards' equation was developed and evaluated against the data. The model-data comparison shows a good agreement with the behaviour high above the water table sensitive to the choice of moisture retention parameters.

  14. Massive-scale aircraft observations of giant sea-salt aerosol particle size distributions in atmospheric marine boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    iant sea-salt aerosol particles (dry radius, rd > 0.5 μm) occur nearly everywhere in the marine boundary layer and frequently above. This study presents observations of atmospheric sea-salt size distributions in the range 0.7 < rd < 14 μm based on external impaction of sea-spray aerosol particles onto microscope polycarbonate microscope slides. The slides have very large sample volumes, typically about 250 L over a 10-second sampling period. This provides unprecedented sampling of giant sea-salt particles for flights in marine boundary layer air. The slides were subsequently analyzed in a humidified chamber using dual optical digital microscopy. At a relative humidity of 90% the sea-salt aerosol particles form spherical cap drops. Based on measurement the volume of the spherical cap drop and assuming NaCl composition, the Kohler equation is used to derive the dry salt mass of tens of thousands of individual aerosol particles on each slide. Size distributions are given with a 0.2 μm resolution. The slides were exposed from the NSF/NCAR C-130 research aircraft during the 2008 VOCALS project off the coast of northern Chile and the 2011 ICE-T in the Caribbean. In each deployment, size distributions using hundreds of slides are used to relate fitted log-normal size distributions parameters to wind speed, altitude and other atmospheric conditions. The size distributions provide a unique observational set for initializing cloud models with coarse-mode aerosol particle observations for marine atmospheres.

  15. Development of low angle grain boundaries in lightly deformed superconducting niobium and their influence on hydride distribution and flux perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Z.-H.; Wang, M.; Polyanskii, A. A.; Santosh, C.; Balachandran, S.; Compton, C.; Larbalestier, D. C.; Bieler, T. R.; Lee, P. J.

    2017-05-01

    This study shows that low angle grain boundaries (LAGBs) can be created by small 5% strains in high purity (residual resistivity ratio ≥ 200) superconducting radio frequency (SRF)-grade single crystalline niobium (Nb) and that these boundaries act as hydrogen traps as indicated by the distribution of niobium hydrides (Nb1-xHx). Nb1-xHx is detrimental to SRF Nb cavities due to its normal conducting properties at cavity operating temperatures. By designing a single crystal tensile sample extracted from a large grain (>5 cm) Nb ingot slice for preferred slip on one slip plane, LAGBs and dense dislocation boundaries developed. With chemical surface treatments following standard SRF cavity fabrication practice, Nb1-xHx phases were densely precipitated at the LAGBs upon cryogenic cooling (8-10 K/min). Micro-crystallographic analysis confirmed heterogeneous hydride precipitation, which included significant hydrogen atom accumulation in LAGBs. Magneto-optical imaging analysis showed that these sites can then act as sites for both premature flux penetration and eventually flux trapping. However, this hydrogen related degradation at LAGBs did not completely disappear even after an 800 °C/2 h anneal typically used for hydrogen removal in SRF Nb cavities. These findings suggest that hydride precipitation at an LAGB is facilitated by a non-equilibrium concentration of vacancy-hydrogen (H) complexes aided by mechanical deformation and the hydride phase interferes with the recovery process under 800 °C annealing.

  16. Development of low angle grain boundaries in lightly deformed superconducting niobium and their influence on hydride distribution and flux perturbation

    DOE PAGES

    Sung, Z. -H.; Wang, M.; Polyanskii, A. A.; ...

    2017-05-19

    This study shows that low angle grain boundaries (LAGBs) can be created by small 5% strains in high purity (RRR ≥ 200) SRF-grade single crystalline niobium (Nb) and that these boundaries act as hydrogen traps as indicated by the distribution of niobium hydrides (Nb1-xHx). Nb1-xHx is detrimental to superconducting radio frequency (SRF) Nb cavities due to its normal conducting properties at cavity operating temperatures. By designing a single crystal tensile sample extracted from a large grain (>5 cm) Nb ingot slice for preferred slip on one slip plane, LAGBs and dense dislocation boundaries developed. With chemical surface treatments following standardmore » SRF cavity fabrication practice, Nb1-xHx phases were densely precipitated at the LAGBs upon cryogenic cooling (8-10 K/min). Micro-crystallographic analysis confirmed heterogeneous hydride precipitation, which included significant hydrogen atom accumulation in LAGBs. Magneto-optical imaging (MOI) analysis showed that these sites can then act as sites for both premature flux penetration and eventually flux trapping. However, this hydrogen related degradation at LAGBs did not completely disappear even after a 800 °C/2hrs anneal typically used for hydrogen removal in SRF Nb cavities. These findings suggest that hydride precipitation at a LAGB is facilitated by a non-equilibrium concentration of vacancy-hydrogen (H) complexes aided by mechanical deformation and the hydride phase interferes with the recovery process under 800°C annealing.« less

  17. Airship measurements of aerosol size distributions, cloud droplet spectra, and trace gas concentrations in the marine boundary layers

    SciTech Connect

    Frick, G.M.; Hoppel, W.A. )

    1993-11-01

    The use of an airship as a platform to conduct atmospheric chemistry, aerosol, and cloud microphysical research is described, and results from demonstration flights made off the Oregon coast are presented. The slow speed of the airship makes it an ideal platform to do high-spatial resolution profiling both vertically and horizontally, and to measure large aerosol and cloud droplet distributions without the difficulties caused by high-speed aircraft sampling. A unique set of data obtained during the demonstration flights show the effect that processing marine boundary layer aerosol through stratus clouds has on the aerosol size distribution. Evidence of new particle formation (nucleation of particles) was also observed on about half the days on which flights were made. 11 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Nonuniform Moving Boundary Method for Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Intrathecal Cerebrospinal Flow Distribution in a Cynomolgus Monkey.

    PubMed

    Khani, Mohammadreza; Xing, Tao; Gibbs, Christina; Oshinski, John N; Stewart, Gregory R; Zeller, Jillynne R; Martin, Bryn A

    2017-08-01

    A detailed quantification and understanding of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics may improve detection and treatment of central nervous system (CNS) diseases and help optimize CSF system-based delivery of CNS therapeutics. This study presents a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model that utilizes a nonuniform moving boundary approach to accurately reproduce the nonuniform distribution of CSF flow along the spinal subarachnoid space (SAS) of a single cynomolgus monkey. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol was developed and applied to quantify subject-specific CSF space geometry and flow and define the CFD domain and boundary conditions. An algorithm was implemented to reproduce the axial distribution of unsteady CSF flow by nonuniform deformation of the dura surface. Results showed that maximum difference between the MRI measurements and CFD simulation of CSF flow rates was <3.6%. CSF flow along the entire spine was laminar with a peak Reynolds number of ∼150 and average Womersley number of ∼5.4. Maximum CSF flow rate was present at the C4-C5 vertebral level. Deformation of the dura ranged up to a maximum of 134 μm. Geometric analysis indicated that total spinal CSF space volume was ∼8.7 ml. Average hydraulic diameter, wetted perimeter, and SAS area were 2.9 mm, 37.3 mm and 27.24 mm2, respectively. CSF pulse wave velocity (PWV) along the spine was quantified to be 1.2 m/s.

  19. First passage time distribution in stochastic processes with moving and static absorbing boundaries with application to biological rupture experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhonghan; Cheng, Liwen; Berne, B. J.

    2010-07-01

    We develop and investigate an integral equation connecting the first passage time distribution of a stochastic process in the presence of an absorbing boundary condition and the corresponding Green's function in the absence of the absorbing boundary. Analytical solutions to the integral equations are obtained for three diffusion processes in time-independent potentials which have been previously investigated by other methods. The integral equation provides an alternative way to analytically solve the three diffusion-controlled reactive processes. In order to help analyze biological rupture experiments, we further investigate the numerical solutions of the integral equation for a diffusion process in a time-dependent potential. Our numerical procedure, based on the exact integral equation, avoids the adiabatic approximation used in previous analytical theories and is useful for fitting the rupture force distribution data from single-molecule pulling experiments or molecular dynamics simulation data, especially at larger pulling speeds, larger cantilever spring constants, and smaller reaction rates. Stochastic simulation results confirm the validity of our numerical procedure. We suggest combining a previous analytical theory with our integral equation approach to analyze the kinetics of force induced rupture of biomacromolecules.

  20. First passage time distribution in stochastic processes with moving and static absorbing boundaries with application to biological rupture experiments.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhonghan; Cheng, Liwen; Berne, B J

    2010-07-21

    We develop and investigate an integral equation connecting the first passage time distribution of a stochastic process in the presence of an absorbing boundary condition and the corresponding Green's function in the absence of the absorbing boundary. Analytical solutions to the integral equations are obtained for three diffusion processes in time-independent potentials which have been previously investigated by other methods. The integral equation provides an alternative way to analytically solve the three diffusion-controlled reactive processes. In order to help analyze biological rupture experiments, we further investigate the numerical solutions of the integral equation for a diffusion process in a time-dependent potential. Our numerical procedure, based on the exact integral equation, avoids the adiabatic approximation used in previous analytical theories and is useful for fitting the rupture force distribution data from single-molecule pulling experiments or molecular dynamics simulation data, especially at larger pulling speeds, larger cantilever spring constants, and smaller reaction rates. Stochastic simulation results confirm the validity of our numerical procedure. We suggest combining a previous analytical theory with our integral equation approach to analyze the kinetics of force induced rupture of biomacromolecules.

  1. Text vectorization based on character recognition and character stroke modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhigang; Zhou, Bingfeng; Tse, Francis; Mu, Yadong; He, Tao

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, a text vectorization method is proposed using OCR (Optical Character Recognition) and character stroke modeling. This is based on the observation that for a particular character, its font glyphs may have different shapes, but often share same stroke structures. Like many other methods, the proposed algorithm contains two procedures, dominant point determination and data fitting. The first one partitions the outlines into segments and second one fits a curve to each segment. In the proposed method, the dominant points are classified as "major" (specifying stroke structures) and "minor" (specifying serif shapes). A set of rules (parameters) are determined offline specifying for each character the number of major and minor dominant points and for each dominant point the detection and fitting parameters (projection directions, boundary conditions and smoothness). For minor points, multiple sets of parameters could be used for different fonts. During operation, OCR is performed and the parameters associated with the recognized character are selected. Both major and minor dominant points are detected as a maximization process as specified by the parameter set. For minor points, an additional step could be performed to test the competing hypothesis and detect degenerated cases.

  2. Electron distributions observed with Langmuir waves in the plasma sheet boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Junga; Rha, Kicheol; Seough, Jungjoon; Yoon, Peter H.

    2014-09-15

    The present paper investigates the Langmuir turbulence driven by counter-streaming electron beams and its plausible association with observed features in the Earth's plasma sheet boundary layer region. A one-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell simulation code is employed in order to simulate broadband electrostatic waves with characteristic frequency in the vicinity of the electron plasma frequency ω/ω{sub pe}≃1.0. The present simulation confirms that the broadband electrostatic waves may indeed be generated by the counter-streaming electron beams. It is also found that the observed feature associated with low energy electrons, namely quasi-symmetric velocity space plateaus, are replicated according to the present simulation. However, the present investigation only partially succeeds in generating the suprathermal tails such that the origin of observed quasi power-law energetic population formation remains outstanding.

  3. Ergodicity and Energy Distributions for Some Boundary Driven Integrable Hamiltonian Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balint, Peter; Lin, Kevin K.; Young, Lai-Sang

    2010-02-01

    We consider systems of moving particles in 1-dimensional space interacting through energy storage sites. The ends of the systems are coupled to heat baths, and resulting steady states are studied. When the two heat baths are equal, an explicit formula for the (unique) equilibrium distribution is given. The bulk of the paper concerns nonequilibrium steady states, i.e., when the chain is coupled to two unequal heat baths. Rigorous results including ergodicity are proved. Numerical studies are carried out for two types of bath distributions. For chains driven by exponential baths, our main finding is that the system does not approach local thermodynamic equilibrium as system size tends to infinity. For bath distributions that are sharply peaked Gaussians, in spite of the near-integrable dynamics, transport properties are found to be more normal than expected.

  4. System and method for character recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, J. P. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A character recognition system is disclosed in which each character in a retina, defining a scanning raster, is scanned with random lines uniformly distributed over the retina. For each type of character to be recognized the system stores a probability density function (PDF) of the random line intersection lengths and/or a PDF of the random line number of intersections. As an unknown character is scanned, the random line intersection lengths and/or the random line number of intersections are accumulated and based on a comparison with the prestored PDFs a classification of the unknown character is performed.

  5. Connectivity in Random Grain Boundary Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, M; Schuh, C A; King, W E

    2002-10-22

    Mechanical properties of FCC metals and alloys can be improved by exercising control over the population of grain boundary types in the microstructure. The existing studies also suggest that such properties tend to have percolative mechanisms that depend on the topology of the grain boundary network. With the emergence of SEM-based automated electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), statistically significant datasets of interface crystallography can be analyzed in a routine manner, giving new insight into the topology and percolative properties of grain boundary networks. In this work, we review advanced analysis techniques for EBSD datasets to quantify microstructures in terms of grain boundary character and triple junction distributions, as well as detailed percolation-theory based cluster analysis.

  6. Ion-induced reorientation and distribution of pentanone in the air-water boundary layer.

    PubMed

    Plath, Kathryn L; Valley, Nicholas A; Richmond, Geraldine L

    2013-11-14

    Organic material at the surface of atmospheric aerosols is ubiquitous and plays an important role in Earth's atmosphere. Small ketones, such as 3-pentanone, are found in aerosols and as surface-active species on aerosols. This study uses 3-pentanone as a model ketone to understand how such molecules adsorb at the vapor-water interface on aqueous solutions containing sulfate, carbonate, or chloride ions. By combining surface spectroscopic experiments with computational methods, very detailed information about the molecular bonding, geometries, and surface orientation of 3-pentanone as a function of depth has been obtained. The results show that, for pure water, 3-pentanone resides at the topmost surface of water with the carbonyl pointing into the aqueous phase where it is weakly solvated. For Na2SO4-containing solutions, we found that sulfate ions in the boundary layer provoke changes in the geometry and interfacial position of 3-pentanone that are not seen in solutions containing sodium chloride or sodium carbonate. The results provide important insight into the behavior of ketones in the presence of salts at the surface of aerosols in the atmosphere.

  7. Transient temperature distributions in simple conducting bodies steadily heated through a laminar boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Hermon M

    1953-01-01

    An analysis is made of the transient heat-conduction effects in three simple semi-infinite bodies: the flat insulated plate, the conical shell, and the slender solid cone. The bodies are assumed to have constant initial temperatures and, at zero time, to begin to move at a constant speed and zero angle of attack through a homogeneous atmosphere. The heat input is taken as that through a laminar boundary layer. Radiation heat transfer and transverse temperature gradients are assumed to be zero. The appropriate heat-conduction equations are solved by an iteration method, the zeroeth-order terms describing the situation in the limit of small time. The method is presented and the solutions are calculated to three orders which are sufficient to give reasonably accurate results when the forward edge has attained one-half the total temperature rise (nose half-rise time). Flight Mach number and air properties occur as parameters in the result. Approximate expressions for the extent of the conduction region and nose half-rise times as functions of the parameters of the problem are presented. (author)

  8. "Invitations" to Character

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milliren, Al; Messer, Mitchell H.

    2009-01-01

    If we are to help children develop character, we have to go beyond offering a character education class once or twice each month. We actually have to validate character when we see it or hear about it happening. Through the use of a new strategy called "focused invitations," counselors and teachers can focus on the 36 core components of character.…

  9. Ozone and aerosol distributions measured by airborne lidar during the 1988 Arctic Boundary Layer Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, Edward V.; Butler, Carolyn F.; Kooi, Susan A.

    1991-01-01

    Consideration is given to O3 and aerosol distributions measured from an aircraft using a DIAL system in order to study the sources and sinks of gases and aerosols over the tundra regions of Alaska during summer 1988. The tropospheric O3 budget over the Arctic was found to be strongly influenced by stratospheric intrusions. Regions of low aerosol scattering and enhanced O3 mixing ratios were usually correlated with descending air from the upper troposphere or lower stratosphere.

  10. Extending SCAT: Additional techniques for identifying domain boundaries and determining how azimuth frequency distribution varies with depth

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, J.D. ); Goldberg, D.A. )

    1990-05-01

    For accurate structural interpretation of dipmeter data, it is important to project well bores onto sections correctly. Current methods include the DVA and tangent plots of Bengtson's statistical curvature analysis techniques (SCAT). However, if the well bore crosses domain boundaries, i.e., surfaces across which the projection type (cylindrical or conical) or structural axis changes, all current methods fail: the plots show composite patterns that are difficult to interpret, if not misleading. Thus, methods for detecting domain boundaries, so that data from different domains can be analyzed separately, become important. The authors have developed and extensively tested a rapid, graphical method based on a series of AD plots - plots of apparent dip in arbitrary directions vs. measured depth. (SCAT's T and L plots thus become AD plots in the T and L directions.) In addition, the authors have developed an algorithm for calculating the most likely L direction of a given data set. They apply this calculation to equally spaced intervals and show the results on a separate plot, thereby providing interpreters with another aid for detecting domain boundaries. Another important requirement is to determine how azimuth-frequency distribution (AFD) varies with depth. The traditional method - displaying rose diagrams at equally-spaced intervals - has two drawbacks: first, interpreters must study this display carefully to understand how AFD varies with depth; second, rose diagrams themselves are often misleading. In contrast, only a quick glance at a stack of rectangular historgrams is necessary for determining how AFD varies with depth; moreover, historgrams always depict AFD faithfully.

  11. Latitudinal distributions of methane in the upper troposphere and marine boundary air over the Pacific in 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Matsueda, Hidekazu; Inoue, Hisayuki; Ishii, Masao

    1993-02-01

    Measurements of atmospheric methane at 11-13 km were made over the Pacific from 65[degree]N to 65[degree]S by two research flights (INSTAC II, February--March, 1990, and III, October, 1990). Relatively low concentrations were observed in the high latitudes, indicating intrusion of stratospheric methane at 11--13 km. Methane distributions in the tropical and subtropical regions showed north to south gradients and longitudinal gradients from west to central Pacific. During almost the same period of the INSTAC III flight, atmospheric methane in the marine boundary air was measured on boad a research vessel in the Pacific from 35[degree]N to 20[degree]S. In the Northern Hemisphere, methane concentrations in the marine boundary air showed relatively higher values compared with those at 11--13 km. However, the relative methane levels between lower and upper air were reversed between 10[degree]N and the equator, where the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) was located. Such positive vertical gradient appearing around the ITCZ was maintained to the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. These results strongly suggests that methane-rich air in the Northern Hemisphere was actively transported upward at the ITCZ and then meridionally transported through the upper troposphere into the Southern Hemisphere. 23 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Remote sensing of seasonal distribution of precipitable water vapor over the oceans and the inference of boundary-layer structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakara, C.; Lo, R. C.; Nath, N. R.; Dalu, G.

    1979-01-01

    From the depth of the water vapor spectral lines in the 8-9 micron window region, measured by the Nimbus 4 Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer (IRIS) with a resolution of about 3/cm, the precipitable water vapor over the oceans is remotely sensed. In addition the IRIS spectral data in the 11-13 micron window region have been used to derive the sea surface temperature (SST). Seasonal maps of w on the oceans deduced from the spectral data reveal the dynamical influence of the large-scale atmospheric circulation. With the help of a model for the vertical distribution of water vapor, the configuration of the atmospheric boundary layer over the oceans can be inferred from these remotely sensed w and SST. The gross seasonal mean structure of the boundary layer inferred in this fashion reveals the broad areas of trade wind inversion and the convectively active areas such as the ITCZ. The derived information is in reasonable agreement with some observed climatological patterns over the oceans.

  13. Remote sensing of seasonal distribution of precipitable water vapor over the oceans and the inference of boundary-layer structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakara, C.; Lo, R. C.; Nath, N. R.; Dalu, G.

    1979-01-01

    From the depth of the water vapor spectral lines in the 8-9 micron window region, measured by the Nimbus 4 Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer (IRIS) with a resolution of about 3/cm, the precipitable water vapor over the oceans is remotely sensed. In addition the IRIS spectral data in the 11-13 micron window region have been used to derive the sea surface temperature (SST). Seasonal maps of w on the oceans deduced from the spectral data reveal the dynamical influence of the large-scale atmospheric circulation. With the help of a model for the vertical distribution of water vapor, the configuration of the atmospheric boundary layer over the oceans can be inferred from these remotely sensed w and SST. The gross seasonal mean structure of the boundary layer inferred in this fashion reveals the broad areas of trade wind inversion and the convectively active areas such as the ITCZ. The derived information is in reasonable agreement with some observed climatological patterns over the oceans.

  14. Analytical Solutions for an Escape Problem in a Disc with an Arbitrary Distribution of Exit Holes Along Its Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. S.

    2016-12-01

    We analytically construct solutions for the mean first-passage time and splitting probabilities for the escape problem of a particle moving with continuous Brownian motion in a confining planar disc with an arbitrary distribution (i.e., of any number, size and spacing) of exit holes/absorbing sections along its boundary. The governing equations for these quantities are Poisson's equation with a (non-zero) constant forcing term and Laplace's equation, respectively, and both are subject to a mixture of homogeneous Neumann and Dirichlet boundary conditions. Our solutions are expressed as explicit closed formulae written in terms of a parameterising variable via a conformal map, using special transcendental functions that are defined in terms of an associated Schottky group. They are derived by exploiting recent results for a related problem of fluid mechanics that describes a unidirectional flow over "no-slip/no-shear" surfaces, as well as results from potential theory, all of which were themselves derived using the same theory of Schottky groups. They are exact up to the determination of a finite set of mapping parameters, which is performed numerically. Their evaluation also requires the numerical inversion of the parameterising conformal map. Computations for a series of illustrative examples are also presented.

  15. Environmental boundaries of marine cladoceran distributions in the NW Mediterranean: Implications for their expansion under global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atienza, Dacha; Sabatés, Ana; Isari, Stamatina; Saiz, Enric; Calbet, Albert

    2016-12-01

    We studied the horizontal and vertical distributions of marine cladocerans across the Catalan Sea shelf (NW Mediterranean) in July and September 2003, and in June and July 2004. At the seasonal scale, Penilia avirostris appears first in June in the southern region, where temperatures are warmer, and its populations develop northward during the summer. Evadne-Pseudevadne did not show a clear pattern, likely because several species were pooled. In 2003 successive heat waves affecting southwestern Europe resulted in surface seawater temperatures about 2 °C higher than usual across the whole study region. These high temperatures were associated with much lower abundance of P. avirostris. Overall, the mesoscale distributions of cladocerans were associated with the presence of low salinity, productive and stratified waters of continental origin, and negatively linked to the intrusion of offshore waters. On the vertical scale P. avirostris was located within or above the thermocline, whereas Evadne-Pseudevadne was much shallower; no evidence of diel migration was detected in either group. Our study provides new insights regarding the environmental limits for marine cladocerans in the NW Mediterranean; in the particular case of P. avirostris that knowledge can define the likely boundaries of its new distributions as it expands poleward under climate change.

  16. Spatial, seasonal and vertical distributions of currently-used pesticides in the marine boundary layer of the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai, Carolin; Theobald, Norbert; Lammel, Gerhard; Hühnerfuss, Heinrich

    2013-08-01

    Pesticides are transported beyond source regions and reach coastal waters and shelf seas. 23 representatives of six chemical classes of currently-used pesticides (CUPs) were simultaneously quantified in the marine boundary layer and the surface seawater of the German Bight and the central North Sea in 2009 and 2010.Terbuthylazine, metolachlor, metazachlor, pendimethalin and trifluralin exhibited the highest concentrations, seasonally highly variable. Advection of contaminated air from land and subsequent atmospheric deposition was shown to contribute to surface seawater contamination significantly, in particular in regions beyond riverine input and during the main seasons of application in agriculture. Deposition was most significant for the seasonal and spatial distributions of pendimethalin and trifluralin. Atrazine and simazine levels in the air are lower than 1-2 decades ago.

  17. Kinetic Alfven wave in the presence of kappa distribution function in plasma sheet boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Shrivastava, G. Ahirwar, G.; Shrivastava, J.

    2015-07-31

    The particle aspect approach is adopted to investigate the trajectories of charged particles in the electromagnetic field of kinetic Alfven wave. Expressions are found for the dispersion relation, damping/growth rate and associated currents in the presence of kappa distribution function. Kinetic effect of electrons and ions are included to study kinetic Alfven wave because both are important in the transition region. It is found that the ratio β of electron thermal energy density to magnetic field energy density and the ratio of ion to electron thermal temperature (T{sub i}/T{sub e}), and kappa distribution function affect the dispersion relation, damping/growth rate and associated currents in both cases(warm and cold electron limit).The treatment of kinetic Alfven wave instability is based on assumption that the plasma consist of resonant and non resonant particles. The resonant particles participate in an energy exchange process, whereas the non resonant particles support the oscillatory motion of the wave.

  18. Setting boundaries: environmental and spatial effects on Odonata larvae distribution (Insecta).

    PubMed

    Mendes, Thiago P; Cabette, Helena S R; Juen, Leandro

    2015-03-01

    Environmental characteristics and spatial distances between sites have been used to explain species distribution in the environment, through Neutral (space) and Niche theory (environment) predictions. We evaluated the effects of spatial and environmental factors on Odonata larvae distribution along the Suiá-Missú River Basin, state of Mato Grosso. We tested the hypotheses that (1) the environment is the main factor structuring the community due to its ecophysiological requirements; and (2) the pattern, if present, is clearer for Zygoptera. Samples were made in 12 sites on the Suiá-Missú River Basin in three seasons (2007/2008), with a total of 1.382 Odonata larvae, comprising 10 families, 51 genera and 100 morphospecies. The Anisoptera were more abundant than Zygoptera, comprising 81% of all specimens. The environment affected Zygoptera (R=0.291; p=0.007) and was the main factor structuring the assembly. Thus, Niche theory was confirmed. The absence of this effect on Anisoptera may be due to the ecophysiological adaptations that enable it to occupy different habitats. Zygoptera larvae are indicators of changes in habitat structure. The effects of environmental variables on larvae ecology emphasize the strong relationship between these organisms and environmental integrity.

  19. Aerosol Distribution in The Planetary Boundary Layer Aloft a Residential Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovorka, Jan; Leoni, Cecilia; Dočekalová, Veronika; Ondráček, Jakub; Zíková, Naděžda

    2016-10-01

    Atmospheric aerosol is an omnipresent component of the Earth atmosphere. Aerosol particle of diameters < 100 nm or > 1 μm defines ultrafine or coarse aerosol particles, respectively. Aerosol particle concentrations within the planetary boundary layer - PBL are measured at the ground level while their vertical profiles in the PBL are usually estimated by modelling. The aim of this study was to construct vertical concentration profiles of ultrafine and coarse aerosol particles from airborne and ground measurements conducted in an urban airshed. Airborne measurements were done by an unmanned airship, remotely controlled with GPS 10 Hz position tracking, and electrically powered with propulsion vectoring, which allows average cruising speed of 6 m.s-1. The airship carried three aerosol monitors and a temperature sensor. The monitors acquired 1 Hz data on mass concentration of coarse and number concentration of ultrafine particles. Four flight sequences were conducted on the 2nd of March 2014 above Plesna village, up-wind suburb of Ostrava in the Moravian-Silesian region of the Czech Republic. The region is a European air pollution hot-spot. Repeated flights were carried out in several height levels up to 570 m above ground level - a.g.l. Early morning flight revealed a temperature inversion in the PBL up to 70 m a.g.l. This lead to coarse particle concentrations of 50 μgm-3 below the inversion layer and 10 μgm-3 above it. Concurrently, air masses at 90-120 m a.g.l. were enriched with ultrafine particles up to 2.5x104 cm-3, which may indicate a fanning plume from a distant emission source with high emission height. During the course of the day, concentrations of ultrafine and coarse particle gradually decreased. Nevertheless, a sudden increase of ultrafine particle concentrations up to 3.7x104 cm-3 was registered at 400 m a.g.l. at noon and also after a lag of 20 min at the ground. This may indicate formation of new aerosol particles at higher altitudes, which are

  20. Spatial distribution of child pedestrian injuries along census tract boundaries: Implications for identifying area-based correlates.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Jacqueline W

    2017-01-01

    Census tracts are often used to investigate area-based correlates of a variety of health outcomes. This approach has been shown to be valuable in understanding the ways that health is shaped by place and to design appropriate interventions that account for community-level processes. Following this line of inquiry, it is common in the study of pedestrian injuries to aggregate the point level locations of these injuries to the census tracts in which they occur. Such aggregation enables investigation of the relationships between a range of socioeconomic variables and areas of notably high or low incidence. This study reports on the spatial distribution of child pedestrian injuries in a mid-sized U.S. city over a three-year period. Utilizing a combination of geospatial approaches, Near Analysis, Kernel Density Estimation, and Local Moran's I, enables identification, visualization, and quantification of close proximity between incidents and tract boundaries. Specifically, results reveal that nearly half of the 100 incidents occur within roads that are also census tract boundaries. Results also uncover incidents that occur on tract boundaries, not merely near them. This geographic pattern raises the question of the utility of associating area-based census data from any one tract to the injuries occurring in these border zones. Furthermore, using a standard spatial join technique in a Geographic Information System (GIS), these points located on the border are counted as falling into census tracts on both sides of the boundary, which introduces uncertainty in any subsequent analysis. Therefore, two additional approaches of aggregating points to polygons were tested in this study. Results differ with each approach, but without any alert of such differences to the GIS user. This finding raises a fundamental concern about techniques through which points are aggregated to polygons in any study using point level incidents and their surrounding census tract socioeconomic data to

  1. The influence of boundary conditions on wall shear stress distribution in patients specific coronary trees.

    PubMed

    van der Giessen, Alina G; Groen, Harald C; Doriot, Pierre-André; de Feyter, Pim J; van der Steen, Antonius F W; van de Vosse, Frans N; Wentzel, Jolanda J; Gijsen, Frank J H

    2011-04-07

    Patient specific geometrical data on human coronary arteries can be reliably obtained multislice computer tomography (MSCT) imaging. MSCT cannot provide hemodynamic variables, and the outflow through the side branches must be estimated. The impact of two different models to determine flow through the side branches on the wall shear stress (WSS) distribution in patient specific geometries is evaluated. Murray's law predicts that the flow ratio through the side branches scales with the ratio of the diameter of the side branches to the third power. The empirical model is based on flow measurements performed by Doriot et al. (2000) in angiographically normal coronary arteries. The fit based on these measurements showed that the flow ratio through the side branches can best be described with a power of 2.27. The experimental data imply that Murray's law underestimates the flow through the side branches. We applied the two models to study the WSS distribution in 6 coronary artery trees. Under steady flow conditions, the average WSS between the side branches differed significantly for the two models: the average WSS was 8% higher for Murray's law and the relative difference ranged from -5% to +27%. These differences scale with the difference in flow rate. Near the bifurcations, the differences in WSS were more pronounced: the size of the low WSS regions was significantly larger when applying the empirical model (13%), ranging from -12% to +68%. Predicting outflow based on Murray's law underestimates the flow through the side branches. Especially near side branches, the regions where atherosclerotic plaques preferentially develop, the differences are significant and application of Murray's law underestimates the size of the low WSS region.

  2. Meso-scale anisotropic hydrogen segregation near grain-boundaries in polycrystalline nickel characterized by EBSD/SIMS

    SciTech Connect

    Oudriss, A.; Le Guernic, Solenne; Wang, Zhaoying; Osman Hock, B.; Bouhattate, Jamaa; Conforto, E.; Zhu, Zihua; Li, Dongsheng; Feaugas, Xavier

    2016-02-15

    To study anisotropic hydrogen segregation and diffusion in nickel polycrystalline, Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) and Electron Back Scattered Diffraction (EBSD) are integrated to investigate hydrogen distribution around grain boundaries. Hydrogen distribution in pre-charged samples were correlated with grain boundary character by integrating high-resolution grain microstructure from EBSD inverse pole figure map and low-resolution hydrogen concentration profile map from SIMS. This multimodal imaging instrumentation shows that grain boundaries in nickel can be categorized into two families based on behavior of hydrogen distribution crossing grain boundary: the first one includes random grain boundaries with fast hydrogen diffusivity, showing a sharp gap for hydrogen concentration profile cross the grain boundaries. The second family are special Σ3n grain boundaries with low hydrogen diffusivity, showing a smooth gradient of hydrogen concentration cross the grain boundary. Heterogeneous hydrogen distributions due to grain boundary family revealed by SIMS/EBSD on mesoscale further validate the recent hydrogen permeation data and anisotropic ab-initio calculations in nanoscale. The results highlight the fact that grain boundaries character impacts hydrogen distribution significantly.

  3. ALADINA - an unmanned research aircraft for observing vertical and horizontal distributions of ultrafine particles within the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altstädter, B.; Platis, A.; Wehner, B.; Scholtz, A.; Wildmann, N.; Hermann, M.; Käthner, R.; Baars, H.; Bange, J.; Lampert, A.

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents the unmanned research aircraft Carolo P360 "ALADINA" (Application of Light-weight Aircraft for Detecting IN situ Aerosol) for investigating the horizontal and vertical distribution of ultrafine particles in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). It has a wingspan of 3.6 m, a maximum take-off weight of 25 kg and is equipped with aerosol instrumentation and meteorological sensors. A first application of the system, together with the unmanned research aircraft MASC (Multi-Purpose Airborne Carrier) of the Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen (EKUT), is described. As small payload for ALADINA, two condensation particle counters (CPC) and one optical particle counter (OPC) were miniaturised by re-arranging the vital parts and composing them in a space-saving way in the front compartment of the airframe. The CPCs are improved concerning the lower detection threshold and the response time to less than 1.3 s. Each system was characterised in the laboratory and calibrated with test aerosols. The CPCs are operated in this study with two different lower detection threshold diameters of 11 and 18 nm. The amount of ultrafine particles, which is an indicator for new particle formation, is derived from the difference in number concentrations of the two CPCs (ΔN). Turbulence and thermodynamic structure of the boundary layer are described by measurements of fast meteorological sensors that are mounted at the aircraft nose. A first demonstration of ALADINA and a feasibility study were conducted in Melpitz near Leipzig, Germany, at the Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) station of the Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research (TROPOS) on 2 days in October 2013. There, various ground-based instruments are installed for long-term atmospheric monitoring. The ground-based infrastructure provides valuable additional background information to embed the flights in the continuous atmospheric context and is used for validation of the airborne results. The development of the

  4. I-BIEM, an iterative boundary integral equation method for computer solutions of current distribution problems with complex boundaries: A new algorithm. I - Theoretical

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahan, B. D.; Scherson, Daniel; Reid, Margaret A.

    1988-01-01

    A new algorithm for an iterative computation of solutions of Laplace's or Poisson's equations in two dimensions, using Green's second identity, is presented. This algorithm converges strongly and geometrically and can be applied to curved, irregular, or moving boundaries with nonlinear and/or discontinuous boundary conditions. It has been implemented in Pascal on a number of micro- and minicomputers and applied to several geometries. Cases with known analytic solutions have been tested. Convergence to within 0.1 percent to 0.01 percent of the theoretical values are obtained in a few minutes on a microcomputer.

  5. I-BIEM, an iterative boundary integral equation method for computer solutions of current distribution problems with complex boundaries: A new algorithm. I - Theoretical

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahan, B. D.; Scherson, Daniel; Reid, Margaret A.

    1988-01-01

    A new algorithm for an iterative computation of solutions of Laplace's or Poisson's equations in two dimensions, using Green's second identity, is presented. This algorithm converges strongly and geometrically and can be applied to curved, irregular, or moving boundaries with nonlinear and/or discontinuous boundary conditions. It has been implemented in Pascal on a number of micro- and minicomputers and applied to several geometries. Cases with known analytic solutions have been tested. Convergence to within 0.1 percent to 0.01 percent of the theoretical values are obtained in a few minutes on a microcomputer.

  6. Large character sums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granville, Andrew; Soundararajan, K.

    2007-04-01

    In 1918 Polya and Vinogradov gave an upper bound for the maximal size of character sums, which still remains the best known general estimate. One of the main results of this paper provides a substantial improvement of the Polya-Vinogradov bound for characters of odd, bounded order. In 1977 Montgomery and Vaughan showed how the Polya-Vinogradov inequality may be sharpened assuming the Generalized Riemann Hypothesis. We give a simple proof of their estimate and provide an improvement for characters of odd, bounded order. The paper also gives characterizations of the characters for which the maximal character sum is large, and it finds a hidden structure among these characters.

  7. Advancing the boundaries of high-connectivity network simulation with distributed computing.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Abigail; Mehring, Carsten; Geisel, Theo; Aertsen, A D; Diesmann, Markus

    2005-08-01

    The availability of efficient and reliable simulation tools is one of the mission-critical technologies in the fast-moving field of computational neuroscience. Research indicates that higher brain functions emerge from large and complex cortical networks and their interactions. The large number of elements (neurons) combined with the high connectivity (synapses) of the biological network and the specific type of interactions impose severe constraints on the explorable system size that previously have been hard to overcome. Here we present a collection of new techniques combined to a coherent simulation tool removing the fundamental obstacle in the computational study of biological neural networks: the enormous number of synaptic contacts per neuron. Distributing an individual simulation over multiple computers enables the investigation of networks orders of magnitude larger than previously possible. The software scales excellently on a wide range of tested hardware, so it can be used in an interactive and iterative fashion for the development of ideas, and results can be produced quickly even for very large networks. In contrast to earlier approaches, a wide class of neuron models and synaptic dynamics can be represented.

  8. Intermittently Closed/Open Lakes and Lagoons: Their global distribution and boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McSweeney, S. L.; Kennedy, D. M.; Rutherfurd, I. D.; Stout, J. C.

    2017-09-01

    Intermittently Closed/Open Lakes and Lagoons (ICOLLs) are a particularly dynamic form of estuary characterised by periodic entrance closure to the ocean. Closure occurs when a subaerial sand berm stabilises across the entrance channel during times of low fluvial discharge. ICOLLs are of global importance as they provide valuable ecological habitats for many species and are associated with a wide range of management issues due to their cycle of entrance closure and opening. ICOLLs are found to be more widespread globally than previously described with 1477 of these estuaries being identified in this study. This constitutes an estimated 3% of the world's estuaries and 15% of all estuaries along microtidal coastlines. ICOLLs are concentrated along microtidal to low mesotidal coastlines in the mid-latitudes and predominantly on coasts with temperate climates. This distribution is related to greater wave heights as driven by high intensity winds and a longer fetch distance. The highest proportion of ICOLLs are present in Australia (21% all global ICOLLs), South Africa (16%) and Mexico (16%). In Australia, a comparison with fluvial input found that it is less important than marine processes in determining ICOLL formation and that ICOLLs are associated with a relative tidal range of < 3.22. Additionally the majority of ICOLLS are small systems with catchments < 2000 km2 and tidal prisms < 30 × 106 m3, forming at the mouths of rivers with generally low mean annual and specific discharges.

  9. The spatial distribution of deposited seeding material in the Earth boundary layer during weather modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ćurić, M.; Janc, D.

    2012-10-01

    Cloud seeding projects may have the time scale of half a century and cover the planetary-scale surface. Such activities among the positive also have negative consequences that include environmental pollution. Year after year cloud seeding over certain areas could produce large amounts of seeding agents washed out in precipitation. The sampling of these deposits is therefore important, but not applied in large space and time scales due to a high cost. As an alternative, the cloud seeding project measurements may be used for finding the deposit spatial pattern and locations of its maximum. In this study, we established the method for finding the spatial distribution of deposited silver iodide over a selected area after hail suppression using the observed characteristics of seeded hailstorms. The estimation of the silver iodide deposit maximum is 155 μg m-2 during a 6-year period. Our findings agree well with those obtained from sampling silver content in precipitation during the other convective cloud seeding experiments. On the other hand, our method gives an answer of where to place the samplers, and hence more detailed chemical analysis and monitoring can be done in the future. The proposed methodology may be applied for any other target area and cloud seeding scenario.

  10. Frequency-size distributions of Wadati-Benioff zone and near-boundary, intraplate earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todes, J.; Okal, E.; Kirby, S. H.

    2016-12-01

    We conduct a systematic analysis of the frequency-moment distribution for a number of earthquake populations, motivated by the more than three-fold increase in the available CMT database since our previous study (Okal and Kirby, 1995; hereafter OK95), where some datasets may have been undersampled. We characterize our results in terms of variations in the parameter β, the absolute value of the slope of the logarithmic regression of population vs. seismic moment. We first examine global datasets boxed into 100-km depth slices. For most, we uphold the results of OK95: namely, β-values (before saturation) close to the theoretical 2/3 predicted under seismic similitude with a fractal dimension of 2 for the seismogenic zone. In the 500-to-600 km depth range, we obtain slightly lower β-values (0.57 vs. 0.66), and confirm the distinct behavior between the Tonga subduction zone, where β-values decrease (from 0.80 to 0.47) beyond the saturation elbow, and other provinces of deep seismicity, where they show an increase (from 0.38 to 0.82). In addition, we report on a dataset of more than 600 normal faulting events in the outer rise region of subduction trenches. This population features a β-value close to 2/3; the similarity of β between intermediate- depth slab earthquakes (in the 100-200 km range) and this class of events would suggest that the former occur on reactivated faults already present in the lithosphere subducting at the trench. However, characteristics of the saturation elbow and post-saturation behavior are found to differ in the two populations. A smaller dataset of outer rise thrust earthquakes, expected to occur at greater depths in the subducting plate, also feature a typical β (0.59), with a steeper slope beyond saturation. By contrast, intraplate normal faulting events occurring in the vicinity of mid-ocean ridges are typified by a higher β-value (0.99), with a significant, inverse dependence on spreading rate.

  11. A Few Funny Characters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zingher, Gary

    2002-01-01

    Describes funny characters in children's books and films, including humorous children, adults, and animal characters. Considers younger children and middle grade and older children and suggests library media center activities for various age groups. (LRW)

  12. Handprinted Forms and Characters

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Handprinted Forms and Characters (PC database for purchase)   NIST Special Database 19 contains NIST's entire corpus of training materials for handprinted document and character recognition. It supersedes NIST Special Databases 3 and 7.

  13. Making Character Education Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colgan, Craig

    2003-01-01

    Describes charter education program at the Moraine Elementary School in Northville, Michigan, named a National School of Character in 2002 by the Washington, D.C.-based Character Education Partnership. (PKP)

  14. End-boundary sheath potential, electron and ion energy distribution in the low-pressure non-ambipolar electron plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lee; Chen, Zhiying; Funk, Merritt

    2013-12-01

    The end-boundary floating-surface sheath potential, electron and ion energy distribution functions (EEDf, IEDf) in the low-pressure non-ambipolar electron plasma (NEP) are investigated. The NEP is heated by an electron beam extracted from an inductively coupled electron-source plasma (ICP) through a dielectric injector by an accelerator located inside the NEP. This plasma's EEDf has a Maxwellian bulk followed by a broad energy continuum connecting to the most energetic group with energies around the beam energy. The NEP pressure is 1-3 mTorr of N2 and the ICP pressure is 5-15 mTorr of Ar. The accelerator is biased positively from 80 to 600 V and the ICP power range is 200-300 W. The NEP EEDf and IEDf are determined using a retarding field energy analyser. The EEDf and IEDf are measured at various NEP pressures, ICP pressures and powers as a function of accelerator voltage. The accelerator current and sheath potential are also measured. The IEDf reveals mono-energetic ions with adjustable energy and it is proportionally controlled by the sheath potential. The NEP end-boundary floating surface is bombarded by a mono-energetic, space-charge-neutral plasma beam. When the injected energetic electron beam is adequately damped by the NEP, the sheath potential is linearly controlled at almost a 1 : 1 ratio by the accelerator voltage. If the NEP parameters cannot damp the electron beam sufficiently, leaving an excess amount of electron-beam power deposited on the floating surface, the sheath potential will collapse and become unresponsive to the accelerator voltage.

  15. Supporting Character Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janas, Monica; Nabors, Martha C.

    2002-01-01

    Identifies strategies early childhood educators can use to create an environment that encourages character development in young children. Provides reflective checklists for specific areas of character development and character education addressed: (1) content; (2) communication; (3) clarification; (4) community; (5) critical thinking; (6) context;…

  16. Bringing Character into Focus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Donna; Clarke, Veronica Bohac

    2006-01-01

    School-wide character education is difficult and ongoing work, even without the added complication of having diverse programs and students. Despite these obstacles, King George School in Calgary, Alberta, Canada chose to engage in character education. Initially, the reasons were pragmatic. Character education seemed the only hope for any sort of…

  17. ALADINA - an unmanned research aircraft for observing vertical and horizontal distributions of ultrafine particles within the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altstädter, B.; Platis, A.; Wehner, B.; Scholtz, A.; Lampert, A.; Wildmann, N.; Hermann, M.; Käthner, R.; Bange, J.; Baars, H.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents the unmanned research aircraft Carolo P360 "ALADINA" (Application of Light-weight Aircraft for Detecting IN-situ Aerosol) for investigating the horizontal and vertical distribution of ultrafine particles in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). It has a wingspan of 3.6 m, a maximum take-off weight of 25 kg and is equipped with aerosol instrumentation and meteorological sensors. A first application of the system, together with the unmanned research aircraft MASC (Multi-Purpose Airborne Carrier) of the Eberhard-Karls University of Tübingen (EKUT), is described. As small payload for ALADINA, two condensation particle counters (CPC) and one optical particle counter (OPC) were miniaturized by re-arranging the vital parts and composing them in a space saving way in the front compartment of the airframe. The CPCs are improved concerning the lower detection threshold and the response time. Each system was characterized in the laboratory and calibrated with test aerosols. The CPCs are operated with two different lower detection threshold diameters of 6 and 18 nm. The amount of ultrafine particles, which is an indicator for new particle formation, is derived from the difference in number concentrations of the two CPCs. Turbulence and thermodynamic structure of the boundary layer are described by measurements of fast meteorological sensors that are mounted at the aircraft nose. A first demonstration of ALADINA and a feasibility study were conducted in Melpitz near Leipzig, Germany, at the Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) station of the Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research (TROPOS) on two days in October 2013. There, various ground-based instruments are installed for long-term atmospheric monitoring. The ground-based infrastructure provides valuable additional background information to embed the flights in the continuous atmospheric context and is used for validation of the airborne results. The development of the boundary layer, derived from

  18. Toward more accurate basal boundary conditions: a new 2-D model of distributed and channelised subglacial drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werder, M. A.; Hewitt, I. J.; Schoof, C.; Flowers, G. E.

    2012-04-01

    Basal boundary conditions are one of the least constrained components of today's ice sheet models. To get at these one needs to know the distributed basal water pressure. We present a new glacier drainage system model to contribute to this missing piece of the puzzle. This two dimensional mathematical/numerical model combines distributed and channelised drainage at the ice-bed interface coupled to a water storage component. Notably the model determines the location of the channels as part of the solution. This is achieved by allowing channels (modelled as R-channels) to form on any of the edges of the unstructured triangular grid used to discretise the model. The distributed system is represented by a water sheet which is a continuum description of a linked-cavity system and exchanges water with the channels along their length. Water storage is parameterised as a function of the subglacial water pressure, which can be interpreted as storage in an englacial aquifer or due to elastic processes. The parabolic equation that determines the water pressure is solved using finite elements, the time evolution of the water sheet thickness and channel diameter are governed by local differential equations that are integrated using explicit methods. To explore the model's properties, we apply it to synthetic ice sheet catchments with areas up to 3000km2. We present steady state drainage system configurations and evaluate their channel-network properties (fractal dimensions, channel spacing). We find that an arborescent channel network forms whose density depends on the water sheet conductivity relative to water input. As a further experiment, we force the model with a seasonally and diurnally varying melt water input to investigate how the modelled drainage system evolves on these time scales: a channelised system grows up glacier as meltwater is delivered to the bed in spring and collapses in autumn. Water pressure is highest just before the formation of channels and then

  19. Evaporation, Heat Transfer, and Velocity Distribution in Two-Dimensional and Rotationally Symmetrical Laminar Boundary-Layer Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froessling, Nils

    1958-01-01

    The fundamental boundary layer equations for the flow, temperature and concentration fields are presented. Two dimensional symmetrical and unsymmetrical and rotationally symmetrical steady boundary layer flows are treated as well as the transfer boundary layer. Approximation methods for the calculation of the transfer layer are discussed and a brief survey of an investigation into the validity of the law that the Nusselt number is proportional to the cube root of the Prandtl number is presented.

  20. Aerosol Number-size Distributions and Hygroscopic Growth in the Marine Boundary Layer during ACE-Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covert, D. S.; Coffman, D. J.; Bates, T. S.

    2001-12-01

    As part of the Aerosol Chemistry Experiment-Asia (ACE-Asia), measurements of the physical and hygroscopic properties of aerosol particles were made on the NOAA Research Vessel Ron Brown in the experiment's study area around southern Japan, the Sea of Japan and the Yellow Sea from 30 March through 19 April, 2001 (Day of Year 90 through 109). The number-size distribution from 3 nm to 10 um diameter was measured with a combination of differential mobility analyzers and aerodynamic particle sizers. The system was operated at 55% relative humidity (RH) for consistency with optical measurements and size dependent chemical sampling on the ship. A separate system consisting of three differential mobility analyzers and humidity conditioners measured the change in hydration of the accumulation mode particles from an initial condition of 55% RH to humidities of 20% and 90% RH. The result is a distribution of hygroscopic growth factors at the end RH relative to the initial humidity. The size distributions varied widely depending on the location of the ship, the source of the air mass and the local meteorological conditions. The dominant features included ultrafine particles (less than 20 nm), soil dust particulate mass (greater than 2 um) and Aitken, accumulation mode number and mass (40 to 600 nm). The results are limited to case studies rather than any statistical or time-space average due to the limited data base and the few sources and air mass types encountered in the 21 day period. The results have been analyzed and categorized according to specific air mass trajectories and chemical analysis and are considered representative of those air masses at the marine boundary layer level. Soil dust dominated distributions were observed on days 101 through 103 with volume concentrations of 50 to 100 um3/cm3 and a volume mean diameter of 3 um. High concentrations of ultrafine particles were observed on the later two of these days from early morning through mid-afternoon in spite

  1. Analytical model for temperature distribution of an end diode-pumped laser slab with Robin boundary conditions by Green’s function method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghtader Dindarlu, M. H.; Kavosh Tehrani, M.; Saghafifar, H.; Maleki, A.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, an analytical model is introduced for temperature distribution of an end diode-pumped laser slab by Green’s function method. To solve the heat equation, Robin boundary conditions are considered because four lateral faces of the slab are cooled by water. An analytical model is extracted for single and dual end-pumping configuration. For an example, the 2D and 3D temperature distributions are plotted and our analytical model is validated by numerical solution based on the finite element method (FEM). The results show that our model has very good agreement with numerical solution. Furthermore, dependence of the temperature distribution on absorbed pump power is shown.

  2. Stress distribution in cylindrical and conical implants under rotational micromovement with different boundary conditions and bone properties: 3-D FEA.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Mateus Bertolini Fernandes; Meloto, Gabriel de Oliveira; Bacchi, Ataís; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço

    2017-03-28

    Factors related to micromovements at bone-implant interface have been studied because they are considered adverse to osseointegration. Simplifications are commonly observed in these FEA evaluations. The aim of this study was to clarify the influence of FEA parameters (boundary conditions and bone properties) on the stress distribution in peri-implant bone tissue when micromovements are simulated in implants with different geometries. Three-dimensional models of an anterior section of the jaw with cylindrical or conical titanium implants (4.1 mm in width and 11 mm in length) were created. Micromovement (50, 150, or 250 μm) was applied to the implant. The FEA parameters studied were linear vs. non-linear analyses, isotropic vs. orthogonal anisotropic bone, friction coefficient (0.3) vs. frictionless bone-implant contact. Data from von Mises, shear, maximum, and minimum principal stresses in the peri-implant bone tissue were compared. Linear analyses presented a relevant increase of the stress values, regardless of the bone properties. Frictionless contact reduced the stress values in non-linear analysis. Isotropic bone presented lower stress than orthogonal anisotropic. Conical implants behave better, in regard to compressive stresses (minimum principal), than cylindrical ones, except for nonlinear analyses when micromovement of 150 and 250 μm were simulated. The stress values raised as the micromovement amplitude increased. Non-linear analysis, presence of frictional contact and orthogonal anisotropic bone, evaluated through maximum and minimum principal stress should be used as FEA parameters for implant-micromovement studies.

  3. Distributions of ice supersaturation and ice crystals from airborne observations in relation to upper tropospheric dynamical boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, Minghui; Jensen, Jorgen B.; Pan, Laura L.; Homeyer, Cameron R.; Honomichl, Shawn; Bresch, James F.; Bansemer, Aaron

    2015-05-01

    Ice supersaturation (ISS) is the prerequisite condition for cirrus cloud formation. To examine multiscale dynamics' influences on ISS formation, we analyze in situ aircraft observations (~200 m scale) over North America in coordinates relative to dynamical boundaries in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Two case studies demonstrate that ISS formation is likely influenced by mesoscale uplifting, small-scale waves, and turbulence. A collective analysis of 15 flights in April-June 2008 shows that the top layers of ISS and ice crystal distributions are strongly associated with thermal tropopause height. In addition, the average occurrence frequencies of ISS and ice crystals on the anticyclonic side of the jet stream are ~1.5-2 times of those on the cyclonic side. By defining five cirrus evolution phases based on the spatial relationships between ice-supersaturated and in-cloud regions, we find that their peak occurrence frequencies are located at decreasing altitudes with respect to the thermal tropopause: (phase 1) clear-sky ISS around the tropopause, (phase 2) nucleation phase around 2 km below the tropopause, (phases 3 and 4) early and later growth phases around 6 km below the tropopause, and (phase 5) sedimentation/sublimation around 2-6 km below the tropopause. Consistent with this result, chemical tracer correlation analysis shows that the majority (~80%) of the earlier cirrus phases (clear-sky ISS and nucleation) occurs inside the chemical tropopause transition layer, while the later phases happen mostly below that layer. These results shed light on the role of dynamical environment in facilitating cirrus cloud formation and evolution.

  4. Passive buoyant tracers in the ocean surface boundary layer: 1. Influence of equilibrium wind-waves on vertical distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukulka, T.; Brunner, K.

    2015-05-01

    This paper is the first of a two part series that investigates passive buoyant tracers in the ocean surface boundary layer. The first part examines the influence of equilibrium wind-waves on vertical tracer distributions, based on large eddy simulations (LES) of the wave-averaged Navier-Stokes equation. The second part applies the model to investigate observations of buoyant microplastic marine debris, which has emerged as a major ocean pollutant. The LES model captures both Langmuir turbulence (LT) and enhanced turbulent kinetic energy input due to breaking waves (BW) by imposing equilibrium wind-wave statistics for a range of wind and wave conditions. Concentration profiles of LES agree well with analytic solutions obtained for an eddy diffusivity profile that is constant near the surface and transitions into the K-Profile Parameterization (KPP) profile shape at greater depth. For a range of wind and wave conditions, the eddy diffusivity normalized by the product of water-side friction velocity and mixed layer depth, h, mainly depends on a single nondimensional parameter, the peak wavelength (which is related to Stokes drift decay depth) normalized by h. For smaller wave ages, BW critically enhances near-surface mixing, while LT effects are relatively small. For greater wave ages, both BW and LT contribute to elevated near-surface mixing, and LT significantly increases turbulent transport at greater depth. We identify a range of realistic wind and wave conditions for which only Langmuir (and not BW or shear driven) turbulence is capable of deeply submerging buoyant tracers.

  5. Alteration of the size distributions and mixing states of black carbon through transport in the boundary layer in east Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyakawa, Takuma; Oshima, Naga; Taketani, Fumikazu; Komazaki, Yuichi; Yoshino, Ayako; Takami, Akinori; Kondo, Yutaka; Kanaya, Yugo

    2017-05-01

    Ground-based measurements of black carbon (BC) were performed near an industrial source region in the early summer of 2014 and at a remote island in Japan in the spring of 2015. Here, we report the temporal variations in the transport, size distributions, and mixing states of the BC-containing particles. These particles were characterized using a continuous soot monitoring system, a single particle soot photometer, and an aerosol chemical speciation monitor. The effects of aging on the growth of BC-containing particles were examined by comparing the ground-based observations between the near-source and remote island sites. Secondary formation of sulfate and organic aerosols strongly affected the increases in BC coating (i.e., enhancement of cloud condensation nuclei activity) with air mass aging from the source to the outflow regions. The effects of wet removal on BC microphysics were elucidated by classifying the continental outflow air masses depending on the enhancement ratios of BC to CO (ΔBC / ΔCO), which were used as an indicator of the transport efficiency of BC. It was found that ΔBC / ΔCO ratios were controlled mainly by the wet removal during transport in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) on the timescale of 1-2 days. The meteorological conditions and backward trajectory analyses suggested that air masses strongly affected by wet removal originated mainly from a region in southern China (20-35° N) in the spring of 2015. Removal of large and thickly coated BC-containing particles was detected in the air masses that were substantially affected by the wet removal in the PBL, as predicted by Köhler theory. The size and water solubility of BC-containing particles in the PBL can be altered by the wet removal as well as the condensation of non-BC materials.

  6. Distributed sounding of the boundary layer using multiple unmanned aerial systems during the ScaleX campaign 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipp, Andreas; Petersen, Erik; Groos, Alexander; Ferenci, Pia; Engerer, Stefan; Fiedler, Benedikt; Emeis, Stefan; Schäfer, Klaus; Brosy, Caroline; Zeeman, Matthias; Jacobeit, Jucundus

    2017-04-01

    In order to observe and better understand micro scale processes of interaction between the surface and the atmosphere and to relate them to meso and macro scale processes, an intensive measurement campaign at the TERENO (Terrestrial Environmental Observatories) site Fendt in southern Germany was organized in summer 2016 by IMK-IFU (Institute of Meteorology and Climate Research - Atmospheric Environmental Research) / KIT (Karlsruher Institute for Technology) under participation of a large number of cooperation partners. While several ground based remote sensing systems were implemented beside already installed long-term observing instruments for turbulence, soil moisture, trace gas emission etc., several flight campaigns with unmanned aerial systems took place. IGUA (Institute for Geography at the Universiy of Augsburg) contributed with spiral profile flights up to 1000 meters above ground level simultaneously at five locations, covering an 1 km x 1 km large area, corresponding to a WRF (Weather and Research Forecast model) grid box. Starting in the afternoon of 6th of July and ending in the morning of 7th of July each full hour an ascent was launched. While there were several technical problems leading to missing values, an all together useful dataset was produced covering the distribution of temperature, humidity and wind for the diurnal cycle. The contribution presents the interpretation of the profiles in respect to stratification of the planetary boundary layer and comparison to the cooperated instruments. An interesting aspect of the observation data is the modification of the wind field by an nearby terrain step which also influences cold air flow near the ground. These observations are compared to mesoscale model data (METRAS and later WRF) in order to check whether the principle mechanisms can be simulated.

  7. Experimental demonstration of ecological character displacement

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background The evolutionary consequences of competition are of great interest to researchers studying sympatric speciation, adaptive radiation, species coexistence and ecological assembly. Competition's role in driving evolutionary change in phenotypic distributions, and thus causing ecological character displacement, has been inferred from biogeographical data and measurements of divergent selection on a focal species in the presence of competitors. However, direct experimental demonstrations of character displacement due to competition are rare. Results We demonstrate a causal role for competition in ecological character displacement. Using populations of the bacterium Escherichia coli that have adaptively diversified into ecotypes exploiting different carbon resources, we show that when interspecific competition is relaxed, phenotypic distributions converge. When we reinstate competition, phenotypic distributions diverge. Conclusion This accordion-like dynamic provides direct experimental evidence that competition for resources can cause evolutionary shifts in resource-related characters. PMID:18234105

  8. Computation of boundary shear stress distributions throughout river cross-sections: a comparison among four geometrical methods and aDcp measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kadi Abderrezzak, K.; Le Coz, J.; Moore, S.

    2010-12-01

    Despite the fundamental importance of assessing boundary shear stress distributions for hydraulic engineering purposes, comparison of calculated distributions with field measurements is rarely undertaken. Herein, we explore the ability of four geometrical methods to reproduce boundary shear stress distribution in rivers with arbitrary geometrical sections. Geometrical predictions are compared with numerical predictions obtained by the two-dimensional (2-D) depth averaged numerical model TELEMAC and field data derived from acoustic Doppler current profiler (aDcp) measurements conducted in the Saône river and in two trapezoidal open channels located in the Rhone river valley (France). Two approaches are used to derive the boundary shear stress distributions from the measured aDcp velocity profiles: a) mapping of the channel cross-section into sub-areas using velocity isovels and orthogonal lines, and b) fitting a logarithmic-law to the velocity profiles. Comparisons between the predicted and measured shear stresses indicate that Merged Perpendicular Method (MPM) and Wobus, Tucker, and Anderson (WTA) model behave similarly and yield better results compared to the Vertical Depth Method (VDM) and Normal Area Method (NAM), but some deviations remain. Potential sources of these discrepancies are discussed, showing that they are related to the assumptions of negligible secondary currents and of uniform flow conditions which are used for the four tested geometrical methods.

  9. Grain boundary engineering for structure materials of nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lizhen; Allen, Todd R.; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2013-03-29

    Grain boundary engineering (GBE), primarily implemented by thermomechanical processing, is an effective and economical method of enhancing the properties of polycrystalline materials. Among the factors affecting grain boundary character distribution, literature data showed definitive effect of grain size and texture. GBE is more effective for austenitic stainless steels and Ni-base alloys compared to other structural materials of nuclear reactors, such as refractory metals, ferritic and ferritic–martensitic steels, and Zr alloys. Furthermore, GBE has shown beneficial effects on improving the strength, creep strength, and resistance to stress corrosion cracking and oxidation of austenitic stainless steels and Ni-base alloys.

  10. Characteristics of turbulence in boundary layer with zero pressure gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klebanoff, P S

    1955-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation of a turbulent boundary layer with zero pressure gradient are presented. Measurements with the hot-wire anemometer were made of turbulent energy and turbulent shear stress, probability density and flattening factor of u-fluctuation (fluctuation in x-direction), spectra of turbulent energy and shear stress, and turbulent dissipation. The importance of the region near the wall and the inadequacy of the concept of local isotropy are demonstrated. Attention is given to the energy balance and the intermittent character of the outer region of the boundary layer. Also several interesting features of the spectral distribution of the turbulent motions are discussed.

  11. Metacognition and Character.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodrich, Heidi

    This paper proposes a definition of intellectual character in which metacognition plays a key enabling role. Two necessary, if not sufficient, conditions for being said to have intellectual character are having high intellectual standards and habitually checking one's thinking against those standards, or being metacognitive. Four questions…

  12. Character in Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, David

    2007-01-01

    Qualities of personal character would appear to play a significant role in the professional conduct of teachers. It is often said that we remember teachers as much for the kinds of people they were than for anything they may have taught us, and some kinds of professional expertise may best be understood as qualities of character. After (roughly)…

  13. Essays on Character & Opportunity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Children and Families at Brookings, 2014

    2014-01-01

    These essays provide richer set of writings on the philosophical, empirical and practical issues raised by a focus on character, and in particular its relationship to questions of opportunity. Each one is an intellectual pemmican: sharp and to the point. Two scholars draw attention to the gendered nature of character formation (Segal and Lexmond);…

  14. Essays on Character & Opportunity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Children and Families at Brookings, 2014

    2014-01-01

    These essays provide richer set of writings on the philosophical, empirical and practical issues raised by a focus on character, and in particular its relationship to questions of opportunity. Each one is an intellectual pemmican: sharp and to the point. Two scholars draw attention to the gendered nature of character formation (Segal and Lexmond);…

  15. Character Education Manifesto.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boston Univ., MA. Center for the Advancement of Ethics and Character.

    This paper describes guiding principles of educational reform founded upon character education. The signatories of the declaration recognize the following precepts for character education: (1) Education in its fullest sense is inescapably a moral enterprise; (2) We strongly affirm parents as the primary moral educators of their children and…

  16. Complex Characters Made Simple

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kettle, Sidney F. A.

    2009-01-01

    The physical significance of complex characters is explored with particular reference to the C[subscript 4] point group. While a diagrammatic representation of these characters in this group is possible, the extension to higher groups C[subscript n], n greater than 4 is left as a problem for discussion. (Contains 3 tables, 8 figures, and 1 note.)

  17. Social character of materialism.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, A; Hunt, J M; Kernan, J B

    2000-06-01

    Scores for 170 undergraduates on Richins and Dawson's Materialism scale were correlated with scores on Kassarjian's Social Preference Scale, designed to measure individuals' character structure. A correlation of .26 between materialism and other-directed social character suggested that an externally oriented reference system guides materialists' perceptions, judgments, acquisitions, and possessions.

  18. Experimental and numerical investigation of the effect of distributed suction on oblique shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benhachmi, Driss; Greber, Isaac; Hingst, Warren R.

    1988-01-01

    A combined experimental and numerical study of the interaction of an incident oblique shock wave with a turbulent boundary layer on a rough plate and on a porous plate with suction is presented. The experimental phase involved the acquisition of mean data upstream of, within, and downstream of the interaction region at Mach numbers 2.5 and 3.0. Data were taken at unit Reynolds numbers of 1.66 E7 and 1.85 E7 m respectively, and for flow deflection angles of 0, 4, 6 and 8 degs. Measured data include wall static pressure, pitot pressure profiles, and local bleed distributions on the porous plate. On the rough plate, with no suction, the boundary layer profiles were modified near the wall, but not separated for the 4 deg flow deflection angle. For the higher deflection angles of 6 and 8 degs, the boundary layer was separated. Suction increases the strength of the incident shock required to separate the turbulent boundary layer; for all shock strengths tested, separation is completely eliminated. The pitot pressure profiles are affected throughout the whole boundary layer; they are fuller than the ones obtained on the rough plate. It is also found that the combination of suction and roughness introduces spatial perturbations.

  19. Knowing Chinese character grammar.

    PubMed

    Myers, James

    2016-02-01

    Chinese character structure has often been described as representing a kind of grammar, but the notion of character grammar has hardly been explored. Patterns in character element reduplication are particularly grammar-like, displaying discrete combinatoriality, binarity, phonology-like final prominence, and potentially the need for symbolic rules (X→XX). To test knowledge of these patterns, Chinese readers were asked to judge the acceptability of fake characters varying both in grammaticality (obeying or violating reduplication constraints) and in lexicality (of the reduplicative configurations). While lexical knowledge was important (lexicality improved acceptability and grammatical configurations were accepted more quickly when also lexical), grammatical knowledge was important as well, with grammaticality improving acceptability equally for lexical and nonlexical configurations. Acceptability was also higher for more frequent reduplicative elements, suggesting that the reduplicative configurations were decomposed. Chinese characters present an as-yet untapped resource for exploring fundamental questions about the nature of the human capacity for grammar.

  20. Accelerating Progress: A New Era of Research on Character Development.

    PubMed

    Clement, Sarah; Bollinger, Richard

    2017-06-01

    Adolescent character development is a high priority for educators, policymakers, and front-line youth workers. To meet this growing demand, and as exemplified in the five articles in this special section, character development scholars are drawing from a range of academic disciplines to push beyond the traditional boundaries of the science of character development. These articles highlight important trends in character research, including the co-development of a subset of character strengths, the articulation of developmental trajectories of character, the use of advanced methodological approaches, and the implications for education. Studies such as these are critically important for establishing the research base that will be used to design the character development programs of tomorrow.

  1. A new approach to grain boundary engineering for nanocrystalline materials

    PubMed Central

    Tsurekawa, Sadahiro; Watanabe, Tadao

    2016-01-01

    A new approach to grain boundary engineering (GBE) for high performance nanocrystalline materials, especially those produced by electrodeposition and sputtering, is discussed on the basis of some important findings from recently available results on GBE for nanocrystalline materials. In order to optimize their utility, the beneficial effects of grain boundary microstructures have been seriously considered according to the almost established approach to GBE. This approach has been increasingly recognized for the development of high performance nanocrystalline materials with an extremely high density of grain boundaries and triple junctions. The effectiveness of precisely controlled grain boundary microstructures (quantitatively characterized by the grain boundary character distribution (GBCD) and grain boundary connectivity associated with triple junctions) has been revealed for recent achievements in the enhancement of grain boundary strengthening, hardness, and the control of segregation-induced intergranular brittleness and intergranular fatigue fracture in electrodeposited nickel and nickel alloys with initial submicrometer-grained structure. A new approach to GBE based on fractal analysis of grain boundary connectivity is proposed to produce high performance nanocrystalline or submicrometer-grained materials with desirable mechanical properties such as enhanced fracture resistance. Finally, the potential power of GBE is demonstrated for high performance functional materials like gold thin films through precise control of electrical resistance based on the fractal analysis of the grain boundary microstructure. PMID:28144533

  2. A new approach to grain boundary engineering for nanocrystalline materials.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shigeaki; Tsurekawa, Sadahiro; Watanabe, Tadao

    2016-01-01

    A new approach to grain boundary engineering (GBE) for high performance nanocrystalline materials, especially those produced by electrodeposition and sputtering, is discussed on the basis of some important findings from recently available results on GBE for nanocrystalline materials. In order to optimize their utility, the beneficial effects of grain boundary microstructures have been seriously considered according to the almost established approach to GBE. This approach has been increasingly recognized for the development of high performance nanocrystalline materials with an extremely high density of grain boundaries and triple junctions. The effectiveness of precisely controlled grain boundary microstructures (quantitatively characterized by the grain boundary character distribution (GBCD) and grain boundary connectivity associated with triple junctions) has been revealed for recent achievements in the enhancement of grain boundary strengthening, hardness, and the control of segregation-induced intergranular brittleness and intergranular fatigue fracture in electrodeposited nickel and nickel alloys with initial submicrometer-grained structure. A new approach to GBE based on fractal analysis of grain boundary connectivity is proposed to produce high performance nanocrystalline or submicrometer-grained materials with desirable mechanical properties such as enhanced fracture resistance. Finally, the potential power of GBE is demonstrated for high performance functional materials like gold thin films through precise control of electrical resistance based on the fractal analysis of the grain boundary microstructure.

  3. CHR -- Character Handling Routines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, A. C.; Rees, P. C. T.; Chipperfield, A. J.; Jenness, T.

    This document describes the Character Handling Routine library, CHR, and its use. The CHR library augments the limited character handling facilities provided by the Fortran 77 standard. It offers a range of character handling facilities: from formatting Fortran data types into text strings and the reverse, to higher level functions such as wild card matching, string sorting, paragraph reformatting and justification. The library may be used simply for building text strings for interactive applications or as a basis for more complex text processing applications.

  4. The Use of Source-Sink and Doublet Distributions Extended to the Solution of Boundary-Value Problems in Supersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaslet, Max A; Lomax, Harvard

    1948-01-01

    A direct analogy is established between the use of source-sink and doublet distributions in the solution of specific boundary-value problems in subsonic wing theory and the corresponding problems in supersonic theory. The correct concept of the "finite part" of an integral is introduced and used in the calculation of the improper integrals associated with supersonic doublet distributions. The general equations developed are shown to include several previously published results and particular examples are given for the loading on rolling and pitching triangular wings with supersonic leading edges.

  5. Character, mass, distribution, and origin of tephra-fall deposits of the 1989-1990 eruption of redoubt volcano, south-central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, W.E.; McGimsey, R.G.

    1994-01-01

    The 1989-1990 eruption of Redoubt Volcano spawned about 20 areally significant tephra-fall deposits between December 14, 1989 and April 26, 1990. Tephra plumes rose to altitudes of 7 to more than 10 km and were carried mainly northward and eastward by prevailing winds, where they substantially impacted air travel, commerce, and other activities. In comparison to notable eruptions of the recent past, the Redoubt events produced a modest amount of tephra-fall deposits - 6 ?? 107 to 5 ?? 1010 kg for individual events and a total volume (dense-rock equivalent) of about 3-5 ?? 107 m3 of andesite and dacite. Two contrasting tephra types were generated by these events. Pumiceous tephra-fall deposits of December 14 and 15 were followed on December 16 and all later events by fine-grained lithic-crystal tephra deposits, much of which fell as particle aggregates. The change in the character of the tephra-fall deposits reflects their fundamentally different modes of origin. The pumiceous deposits were produced by magmatically driven explosions. The finegrained lithic-crystal deposits were generated by two processes. Hydrovolcanic vent explosions generated tephrafall deposits of December 16 and 19. Such explosions continued as a tephra source, but apparently with diminishing importance, during events of January and February. Ash clouds of lithic pyroclastic flows generated by collapse of actively growing lava domes probably contributed to tephra-fall deposits of all events from January 2 to April 26, and were the sole source of tephra fall for at least the last 4 deposits. ?? 1994.

  6. Unipolar distributions of junctional Myosin II identify cell stripe boundaries that drive cell intercalation throughout Drosophila axis extension

    PubMed Central

    Tetley, Robert J; Blanchard, Guy B; Fletcher, Alexander G; Adams, Richard J; Sanson, Bénédicte

    2016-01-01

    Convergence and extension movements elongate tissues during development. Drosophila germ-band extension (GBE) is one example, which requires active cell rearrangements driven by Myosin II planar polarisation. Here, we develop novel computational methods to analyse the spatiotemporal dynamics of Myosin II during GBE, at the scale of the tissue. We show that initial Myosin II bipolar cell polarization gives way to unipolar enrichment at parasegmental boundaries and two further boundaries within each parasegment, concomitant with a doubling of cell number as the tissue elongates. These boundaries are the primary sites of cell intercalation, behaving as mechanical barriers and providing a mechanism for how cells remain ordered during GBE. Enrichment at parasegment boundaries during GBE is independent of Wingless signaling, suggesting pair-rule gene control. Our results are consistent with recent work showing that a combinatorial code of Toll-like receptors downstream of pair-rule genes contributes to Myosin II polarization via local cell-cell interactions. We propose an updated cell-cell interaction model for Myosin II polarization that we tested in a vertex-based simulation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12094.001 PMID:27183005

  7. Character Education: Parents as Partners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkowitz, Marvin W.; Bier, Melinda C.

    2005-01-01

    The study of effective character education programs shows that full parent involvement is a must, as it has a profound impact on the students' character development. The complexity of character educations and the benefits of parental involvement are discussed.

  8. Paranoid character and the intolerance of indifference.

    PubMed

    Auchincloss, E L; Weiss, R W

    1992-01-01

    This paper suggests that aspects of paranoid character are structured around fantasies of magical and concrete connectedness to objects; these fantasies serve to avoid the terrors of object inconstancy. The authors describe how these fantasies are expressed in the psychoanalytic situation and explore their relation to common paranoid phenomena. The paranoid person must maintain these fantasies of connectedness at all cost or risk experiencing unbearable indifference between self and object. Paradoxically, the sacrifice of self and object boundaries inherent in these fantasies makes object constancy even more difficult to achieve because of the secondary defensive use of anger mobilized to protect the boundaries of the self.

  9. Introduction to selected references on fossil fuels of the central and southern Appalachian basin: Chapter H.1 in Coal and petroleum resources in the Appalachian basin: distribution, geologic framework, and geochemical character

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppert, Leslie F.; Lentz, Erika E.; Tewalt, Susan J.; Román Colón, Yomayra A.; Ruppert, Leslie F.; Ryder, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    The Appalachian basin contains abundant coal and petroleum resources that have been studied and extracted for at least 150 years. In this volume, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists describe the geologic framework and geochemical character of the fossil-fuel resources of the central and southern Appalachian basin. Separate subchapters (some previously published) contain geologic cross sections; seismic profiles; burial history models; assessments of Carboniferous coalbed methane and Devonian shale gas; distribution information for oil, gas, and coal fields; data on the geochemistry of natural gas and oil; and the fossil-fuel production history of the basin. Although each chapter and subchapter includes references cited, many historical or other important references on Appalachian basin and global fossil-fuel science were omitted because they were not directly applicable to the chapters.

  10. The Varieties of Character and Some Implications for Character Education.

    PubMed

    Baehr, Jason

    2017-06-01

    The moral and civic dimensions of personal character have been widely recognized and explored. Recent work by philosophers, psychologists, and education theorists has drawn attention to two additional dimensions of character: intellectual character and "performance" character. This article sketches a "four-dimensional" conceptual model of personal character and some of the character strengths or "virtues" proper to each dimension. In addition to exploring how the dimensions of character are related to each other, the article also examines the implications of this account for character education undertaken in a youth or adolescent context. It is argued that "intellectual character education," which emphasizes the development of intellectual virtues like curiosity, open-mindedness, and intellectual courage, is an underexplored but especially promising approach in this context. The relationship between intellectual character education and traditional character education, which emphasizes the development of moral and civic virtues like kindness, generosity, and tolerance, is also explored.

  11. Boundary crossings and violations in clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Aravind, V K; Krishnaram, V D; Thasneem, Z

    2012-01-01

    Principles of beneficence, autonomy, and nonmaleficence, compassion along with fiduciary partnership are the core concepts in the doctor-patient relationship in therapeutic settings. There are varieties of reasons for boundary problems. Physicians ignorance, exploitative character, emotional vulnerability moral weakness and similar factors may pave the way for boundary issues resulting in nonsexual or sexual boundary crossings and violations.

  12. Boundary Crossings and Violations in Clinical Settings

    PubMed Central

    Aravind, V. K.; Krishnaram, V. D.; Thasneem, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Principles of beneficence, autonomy, and nonmaleficence, compassion along with fiduciary partnership are the core concepts in the doctor-patient relationship in therapeutic settings. There are varieties of reasons for boundary problems. Physicians ignorance, exploitative character, emotional vulnerability moral weakness and similar factors may pave the way for boundary issues resulting in nonsexual or sexual boundary crossings and violations. PMID:22661802

  13. The influence factors and novel character of the concentration distribution of atmospheric C{sub 2}-C{sub 10} nonmethane hydrocarbons monitored at Lanyu, Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng-Ju Liaw; Tai-Ly Tso

    1996-12-31

    Continuous measurements of atmospheric C{sub 2}-C{sub 10} nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) were made at the Climate and Air Quality Taiwan Station (CATS), located in Lanyu (22{degrees}02{prime}N, 120{degrees}33{prime}E) an off-island of the southeastern Taiwan, on the Pacific Rim. Fifty-two NMHC`s components categorized in alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, aromatics and cyclic hydrocarbons are speciated and separated by Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/KCl PLOT GC column with FID detector. Each NMHC`s component can be identified specifically by the rention index and quantified by the FID molar response which is the effective carbon number response well calibrated by the gas standards. The frequency-vs-concentration plots of the 14 months sampling data were made for each NMHC`s component. Three modes of concentration distribution was discovered for each NMHC`s component. The approximate ratio of the averaged concentration of each mode was 1:2.5:5. This constant ratio was realized by observing the relative concentration (normalized on pentane concentration) of 52 NMHC`s components uniquely constant. This unique relative concentration distribution of 52 NMHC`s components was used to be compared with the available published data monitored elsewhere. Fifty-two NMHC`s components were analyzed for each possible anthropogenic source, e.g., vehicle`s exhaust emission, gasoline vapor emission and utility natural gas. A multivariate chemometric analysis technique was applied to calculate the influence contribution factor from these emission sources. The motor vehicles emission was the dominant contribution. The atmospheric transport of the pollution air mass was also analyzed for transporting such polluted air plume to such remote site of Lanyu. The emission flux of the pollution air plume was estimated at such Pacific Rim region. The possible photochemical influence of the concentration distribution was not very obvious. This indicates the photochemical activity about the same in the whole year.

  14. Shaping species with ephemeral boundaries: The distribution and genetic structure of desert tortoise (Gopherus morafkai) in the Sonoran Desert region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, Taylor; Vaughn, Mercy; Rosen, Philip C.; Torres, Ma. Cristina Melendez; Karl, Alice E.; Culver, Melanie; Murphy, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    The historically shifting ecotone between tropical deciduous forest and Sonoran desertscrub appears to be a boundary that fostered divergence between parapatric lineages of tortoises. The sharp genetic cline between the two lineages suggests that periods of isolation in temporary refugia due to Pleistocene climatic cycling influenced divergence. Despite incomplete reproductive isolation, the Sonoran and Sinaloan lineages of G. morafkai are on separate evolutionary trajectories.

  15. Increasing the number of discrete character states for continuous characters generates well-resolved trees that do not reflect phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Bardin, Jérémie; Rouget, Isabelle; Yacobucci, Margaret Mary; Cecca, Fabrizio

    2014-08-01

    Since the introduction of the cladistic method in systematics, continuous characters have been integrated into analyses but no methods for their treatment have received unanimous support. Some methods require a large number of character states to discretise continuous characters in order to keep the maximum level of information about taxa differences within the coding scheme. Our objective was to assess the impact of increasing the character state number on the outcomes of phylogenetic analyses. Analysis of a variety of simulated datasets shows that these methods for coding continuous characters can lead to the generation of well-resolved trees that do not reflect a phylogenetic signal. We call this phenomenon the flattening of the tree-length distribution; it is influenced by both the relative quantity of continuous characters in relation to discrete characters, and the number of characters in relation to the number of taxa. Bootstrap tests provide a method to avoid this potential bias.

  16. Character and spatial distribution of OH/H2O on the surface of the Moon seen by M3 on Chandrayaan-1.

    PubMed

    Pieters, C M; Goswami, J N; Clark, R N; Annadurai, M; Boardman, J; Buratti, B; Combe, J-P; Dyar, M D; Green, R; Head, J W; Hibbitts, C; Hicks, M; Isaacson, P; Klima, R; Kramer, G; Kumar, S; Livo, E; Lundeen, S; Malaret, E; McCord, T; Mustard, J; Nettles, J; Petro, N; Runyon, C; Staid, M; Sunshine, J; Taylor, L A; Tompkins, S; Varanasi, P

    2009-10-23

    The search for water on the surface of the anhydrous Moon had remained an unfulfilled quest for 40 years. However, the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) on Chandrayaan-1 has recently detected absorption features near 2.8 to 3.0 micrometers on the surface of the Moon. For silicate bodies, such features are typically attributed to hydroxyl- and/or water-bearing materials. On the Moon, the feature is seen as a widely distributed absorption that appears strongest at cooler high latitudes and at several fresh feldspathic craters. The general lack of correlation of this feature in sunlit M3 data with neutron spectrometer hydrogen abundance data suggests that the formation and retention of hydroxyl and water are ongoing surficial processes. Hydroxyl/water production processes may feed polar cold traps and make the lunar regolith a candidate source of volatiles for human exploration.

  17. Character and spatial distribution of OH/H2O on the surface of the moon seen by M3 on chandrayaan-1

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pieters, C.M.; Goswami, J.N.; Clark, R.N.; Annadurai, M.; Boardman, J.; Buratti, B.; Combe, J.-P.; Dyar, M.D.; Green, R.; Head, J.W.; Hibbitts, C.; Hicks, M.; Isaacson, P.; Klima, R.; Kramer, G.; Kumar, S.; Livo, E.; Lundeen, S.; Malaret, E.; McCord, T.; Mustard, J.; Nettles, J.; Petro, N.; Runyon, C.; Staid, M.; Sunshine, J.; Taylor, L.A.; Tompkins, S.; Varanasi, P.

    2009-01-01

    The search for water on the surface of the anhydrous Moon had remained an unfulfilled quest for 40 years. However, the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M 3) on Chandrayaan-1 has recently detected absorption features near 2.8 to 3.0 micrometers on the surface of the Moon. For silicate bodies, such features are typically attributed to hydroxyl- and/or water-bearing materials. On the Moon, the feature is seen as a widely distributed absorption that appears strongest at cooler high latitudes and at several fresh feldspathic craters. The general lack of correlation of this feature in sunlit M3 data with neutron spectrometer hydrogen abundance data suggests that the formation and retention of hydroxyl and water are ongoing surficial processes. Hydroxyl/water production processes may feed polar cold traps and make the lunar regolith a candidate source of volatiles for human exploration.

  18. A character string scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enison, R. L.

    1971-01-01

    A computer program called Character String Scanner (CSS), is presented. It is designed to search a data set for any specified group of characters and then to flag this group. The output of the CSS program is a listing of the data set being searched with the specified group of characters being flagged by asterisks. Therefore, one may readily identify specific keywords, groups of keywords or specified lines of code internal to a computer program, in a program output, or in any other specific data set. Possible applications of this program include the automatic scan of an output data set for pertinent keyword data, the editing of a program to change the appearance of a certain word or group of words, and the conversion of a set of code to a different set of code.

  19. Fluid distribution in grain boundaries of natural fine-grained rock salt deformed at low shear stress: implications for rheology and transport properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desbois, G.; Urai, J. L.; De Bresser, J. H. P.

    2012-04-01

    We used a combination of broad ion beam (BIB) cross-sectioning and high resolution (cryogenic) SEM to image polished surfaces and corresponding pairs of fractured grain boundaries in an investigation of grain boundary (GB) microstructures and fluid distribution in naturally deformed halite from a salt glacier (Kum Quh, central Iran). At the scale of observations, four types of fluid or gas filled grain boundaries can be distinguished: (1) straight boundaries with thick (up to 10 µm) GB tubes (2) straight boundaries with narrow (about 50 nm) GB tubes (3) wavy (tens of µm wavelength) GB with isolated inclusions of a few µm, and (4) wavy (µm wavelength) GB with small (µm) isolated inclusions. Grain boundary fluid inclusions can have three types of morphologies: the inclusion of Type 1 is intruded completely in one grain, inclusion of Type 2 has its major part included in one grain with a minor part in the second grain and the inclusion of Type 3 is located in both grains. Solid second phases in GB are mainly euhedral anhydrite crystals. The mobility of the brine is shown after cutting the inclusions by BIB in vacuum and fine-grained halite forms efflorescence and precipitates on internal walls of inclusions. At cryogenic temperature, in-situ brine is seen as continuous film in GB of type (1) and (2), and in isolated inclusions in GB of type (3) and (4). The structure of halite-halite contact between isolated fluid inclusions in GB of type (3) and (4) is below the resolution of SEM. GB of type (3) and (4) are interpreted to have formed by healing of mobile fluid films. First results of deformation experiments on the same samples under shear stress corresponding to conditions of natural salt glacier, show very low strain rates (7.43x10-10 s-1 and 1x10-9 s-1), up to one order of magnitude below of expected strain rates by solution precipitation creep. Both microstructures and deformation experiments suggest interfacial energy-driven GB healing, in agreement with the

  20. Arctic low-level boundary layer clouds: in-situ measurements and simulations of mono- and bimodal supercooled droplet size distributions at the cloud top layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingebiel, M.; de Lozar, A.; Molleker, S.; Weigel, R.; Roth, A.; Schmidt, L.; Meyer, J.; Ehrlich, A.; Neuber, R.; Wendisch, M.; Borrmann, S.

    2014-06-01

    Aircraft borne optical in-situ size distribution measurements were performed within Arctic boundary layer clouds, with a special emphasis on the cloud top layer, during the VERtical Distribution of Ice in Arctic Clouds (VERDI) campaign. The observations were carried out within a joint research activity of seven German institutes to investigate Arctic boundary layer-, mixed-phase clouds in April and May 2012. An instrumented Basler BT-67 research aircraft operated out of Inuvik over the Mackenzie River delta and the Beaufort Sea in the Northwest Territories of Canada. Besides the cloud particle and hydrometeor size spectrometers the aircraft was equipped with instrumentation for aerosol, radiation and other parameters. Inside the cloud, droplet size distributions with monomodal shapes were observed for predominantly liquid-phase Arctic stratocumulus. With increasing altitude inside the cloud the droplet mean diameters grew from 10 μm to 20 μm. In the upper transition zone (i.e. adjacent to the cloud-free air aloft) changes from monomodal to bimodal droplet size distributions were observed. It is shown that droplets of both modes co-exist in the same (small) air volume and the bimodal shape of the measured size distributions cannot be explained as an observational artifact caused by accumulating two droplet populations from different air volumes. The formation of a second size mode can be explained by (a) entrainment and activation/condensation of fresh aerosol particles, or (b) by differential evaporation processes occurring with cloud droplets engulfed in different eddies. Activation of entrained particles seemed a viable possibility as a layer of dry Arctic enhanced background aerosol was detected directly above the stratus cloud might form a second mode of small cloud droplets. However, theoretical considerations and a model simulation revealed that, instead, turbulent mixing and evaporation of larger droplets most likely are the main reasons for the formation

  1. Investigations into Character Enhancement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartoonian, H. Michael

    2001-01-01

    Presents six different investigations of character enhancement that attempts to answer three questions: (1) who are you; (2) what is your destination; and (3) who is your captain? Intends to build relationships among ideas such as perspective taking, seeing and making connections with the other, and understanding more about ethical development.…

  2. Optical Character Recognition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Converso, L.; Hocek, S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes computer-based optical character recognition (OCR) systems, focusing on their components (the computer, the scanner, the OCR, and the output device); how the systems work; and features to consider in selecting a system. A list of 26 questions to ask to evaluate systems for potential purchase is included. (JDD)

  3. Investigations into Character Enhancement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartoonian, H. Michael

    2001-01-01

    Presents six different investigations of character enhancement that attempts to answer three questions: (1) who are you; (2) what is your destination; and (3) who is your captain? Intends to build relationships among ideas such as perspective taking, seeing and making connections with the other, and understanding more about ethical development.…

  4. Optical Character Recognition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Converso, L.; Hocek, S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes computer-based optical character recognition (OCR) systems, focusing on their components (the computer, the scanner, the OCR, and the output device); how the systems work; and features to consider in selecting a system. A list of 26 questions to ask to evaluate systems for potential purchase is included. (JDD)

  5. Character, mass, distribution, and origin of tephra-fall deposits from the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska—Highlighting the significance of particle aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Kristi L.; Schaefer, Janet R.; Coombs, Michelle L.

    2013-06-01

    The 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano included 20 tephra-producing explosions between March 15, 2009 and April 4, 2009 (UTC). Next-Generation radar (NEXRAD) data show that plumes reached heights between 4.6 km and 19 km asl and were distributed downwind along nearly all azimuths of the volcano. Explosions lasted between < 1 and 31 min based on the signal duration at a distal seismic station (86 km). From Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) imagery and field data, we estimate that over 80,000 km2 received at least minor ash fall (> 0.8 mm thick), including communities along the Kenai Peninsula (80-100 km) and the city of Anchorage (170 km). Trace ash (< 0.8 mm) was reported as far as Fairbanks, 550 km NNE of the volcano. We estimate the total mass of tephra-fall deposits at 54.6 × 109 kg with a total DRE volume of 20.6 × 106 m3. On March 15, a small (4.6 km asl) phreatic explosion containing minor, non-juvenile ash, erupted through the summit ice cap. The first five magmatic explosions (events 1-5) occurred within a 6-hour period on March 23. Plumes rose to heights between 5.5 km and 14.9 km asl during 2- to 20-minute-duration explosions, and were dispersed mainly along a NNE trajectory. Trace ash fall was reported as far as Fairbanks. Owing to a shift in wind direction and heavy snowfall during these events, field discrimination among many of these layers was possible. All deposits comprise a volumetrically significant amount of particle aggregates, yet only event 5 deposits contain coarse clasts including glacier ice. The most voluminous tephra fall was deposited on March 24 (event 6) from a 15 minute explosion that sent a plume to 18.3 km asl, and dispersed tephra to the WNW. Within 10 km of the vent, this deposit contains 1-11 cm pumice clasts in a matrix of 1-2 mm aggregate lapilli. A small dome was presumably emplaced between March 23 and March 26 and was subsequently destroyed during 1-14 minute magmatic explosions of events 7-8 (March 26

  6. Mosquito-Producing Containers, Spatial Distribution, and Relationship between Aedes aegypti Population Indices on the Southern Boundary of its Distribution in South America (Salto, Uruguay)

    PubMed Central

    Basso, César; Caffera, Ruben M.; García da Rosa, Elsa; Lairihoy, Rosario; González, Cristina; Norbis, Walter; Roche, Ingrid

    2012-01-01

    A study was conducted in the city of Salto, Uruguay, to identify mosquito-producing containers, the spatial distribution of mosquitoes and the relationship between the different population indices of Aedes aegypti. On each of 312 premises visited, water-filled containers and immature Ae. aegypti mosquitoes were identified. The containers were counted and classified into six categories. Pupae per person and Stegomyia indices were calculated. Pupae per person were represented spatially. The number of each type of container and number of mosquitoes in each were analyzed and compared, and their spatial distribution was analyzed. No significant differences in the number of the different types of containers with mosquitoes or in the number of mosquitoes in each were found. The distribution of the containers with mosquito was random and the distribution of mosquitoes by type of container was aggregated or highly aggregated. PMID:23128295

  7. Mosquito-producing containers, spatial distribution, and relationship between Aedes aegypti population indices on the southern boundary of its distribution in South America (Salto, Uruguay).

    PubMed

    Basso, César; Caffera, Ruben M; García da Rosa, Elsa; Lairihoy, Rosario; González, Cristina; Norbis, Walter; Roche, Ingrid

    2012-12-01

    A study was conducted in the city of Salto, Uruguay, to identify mosquito-producing containers, the spatial distribution of mosquitoes and the relationship between the different population indices of Aedes aegypti. On each of 312 premises visited, water-filled containers and immature Ae. aegypti mosquitoes were identified. The containers were counted and classified into six categories. Pupae per person and Stegomyia indices were calculated. Pupae per person were represented spatially. The number of each type of container and number of mosquitoes in each were analyzed and compared, and their spatial distribution was analyzed. No significant differences in the number of the different types of containers with mosquitoes or in the number of mosquitoes in each were found. The distribution of the containers with mosquito was random and the distribution of mosquitoes by type of container was aggregated or highly aggregated.

  8. Impact of Ship Emissions on Marine Boundary Layer NO(x) and SO2 Distributions over the Pacific Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, D. D.; Grodzinsky, G.; Kasibhatla, P.; Crawford, J.; Chen, G.; Liu, S.; Bandy, A.; Thornton, D.; Guan, H.; Sandholm, S.

    2001-01-01

    The impact of ship emissions on marine boundary layer (MBL) NO(x) and SO2 levels over the Pacific Ocean has been explored by comparing predictions (with and without ships) from a global chemical transport model (GCTM) against compiled airborne observations of MBL NO(x) and SO2. For latitudes above 15 N, which define that part of the Pacific having the heaviest shipping, this analysis revealed significant model over prediction for NOx and a modest under prediction for SO2 when ship emissions were considered. Possible reasons for the difference in NO(x) and SO2 were explored using a full-chemistry box model. These results revealed that for an actual plume setting the NO(x) lifetime could be greatly shortened by chemical processes promoted by ship plume emissions themselves. Similar chemical behavior was not found for SO2.

  9. Public domain optical character recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garris, Michael D.; Blue, James L.; Candela, Gerald T.; Dimmick, Darrin L.; Geist, Jon C.; Grother, Patrick J.; Janet, Stanley A.; Wilson, Charles L.

    1995-03-01

    A public domain document processing system has been developed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The system is a standard reference form-based handprint recognition system for evaluating optical character recognition (OCR), and it is intended to provide a baseline of performance on an open application. The system's source code, training data, performance assessment tools, and type of forms processed are all publicly available. The system recognizes the handprint entered on handwriting sample forms like the ones distributed with NIST Special Database 1. From these forms, the system reads hand-printed numeric fields, upper and lowercase alphabetic fields, and unconstrained text paragraphs comprised of words from a limited-size dictionary. The modular design of the system makes it useful for component evaluation and comparison, training and testing set validation, and multiple system voting schemes. The system contains a number of significant contributions to OCR technology, including an optimized probabilistic neural network (PNN) classifier that operates a factor of 20 times faster than traditional software implementations of the algorithm. The source code for the recognition system is written in C and is organized into 11 libraries. In all, there are approximately 19,000 lines of code supporting more than 550 subroutines. Source code is provided for form registration, form removal, field isolation, field segmentation, character normalization, feature extraction, character classification, and dictionary-based postprocessing. The recognition system has been successfully compiled and tested on a host of UNIX workstations. This paper gives an overview of the recognition system's software architecture, including descriptions of the various system components along with timing and accuracy statistics.

  10. Nano-XRF Analysis of Metal Impurities Distribution at PL Active Grain Boundaries During mc-Silicon Solar Cell Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardini, Simone; Johnston, Steve; West, Bradley; Naerland, Tine U.; Stuckelberger, Michael; Lai, Barry; Bertoni, Mariana I.

    2017-01-01

    Metal impurities are known to hinder the performance of commercial Si-based solar cells by inducing bulk recombination, increasing leakage current, and causing direct shunting. Recently, a set of photoluminescence (PL) images of neighboring multicrystalline silicon wafers taken from a cell production line at different processing stages has been acquired. Both band-to-band PL and sub-bandgap PL (subPL) images showed various regions with different PL signal intensity. Interestingly, in several of these regions a reversal of the subPL intensity was observed right after the deposition of the antireflective coating. In this paper, we present the results of the synchrotron-based nano-X-ray fluorescence imaging performed in areas characterized by the subPL reversal to evaluate the possible role of metal decoration in this uncommon behavior. Furthermore, the acquisition of a statistically meaningful set of data for samples taken at different stages of the solar cell manufacturing allows us to shine a light on the precipitation and rediffusion mechanisms of metal impurities at these grain boundaries.

  11. Nano-XRF Analysis of Metal Impurities Distribution at PL Active Grain Boundaries During mc-Silicon Solar Cell Processing

    DOE PAGES

    Bernardini, Simone; Johnston, Steve; West, Bradley; ...

    2017-01-01

    Metal impurities are known to hinder the performance of commercial Si-based solar cells by inducing bulk recombination, increasing leakage current, and causing direct shunting. Recently, a set of photoluminescence (PL) images of neighboring multicrystalline silicon wafers taken from a cell production line at different processing stages has been acquired. Both band-to-band PL and sub-bandgap PL (subPL) images showed various regions with different PL signal intensity. Interestingly, in several of these regions a reversal of the subPL intensity was observed right after the deposition of the antireflective coating. In this paper, we present the results of the synchrotron-based nano-X-ray fluorescence imagingmore » performed in areas characterized by the subPL reversal to evaluate the possible role of metal decoration in this uncommon behavior. Furthermore, the acquisition of a statistically meaningful set of data for samples taken at different stages of the solar cell manufacturing allows us to shine a light on the precipitation and rediffusion mechanisms of metal impurities at these grain boundaries.« less

  12. The distribution of Elongation Factor-1 Alpha (EF-1alpha), Elongation Factor-Like (EFL), and a non-canonical genetic code in the ulvophyceae: discrete genetic characters support a consistent phylogenetic framework.

    PubMed

    Gile, Gillian H; Novis, Philip M; Cragg, David S; Zuccarello, Giuseppe C; Keeling, Patrick J

    2009-01-01

    The systematics of the green algal class Ulvophyceae have been difficult to resolve with ultrastructural and molecular phylogenetic analyses. Therefore, we investigated relationships among ulvophycean orders by determining the distribution of two discrete genetic characters previously identified only in the order Dasycladales. First, Acetabularia acetabulum uses the core translation GTPase Elongation Factor 1alpha (EF-1alpha) while most Chlorophyta instead possess the related GTPase Elongation Factor-Like (EFL). Second, the nuclear genomes of dasycladaleans A. acetabulum and Batophora oerstedii use a rare non-canonical genetic code in which the canonical termination codons TAA and TAG instead encode glutamine. Representatives of Ulvales and Ulotrichales were found to encode EFL, while Caulerpales, Dasycladales, Siphonocladales, and Ignatius tetrasporus were found to encode EF-1alpha, in congruence with the two major lineages previously proposed for the Ulvophyceae. The EF-1alpha of I. tetrasporus supports its relationship with Caulerpales/Dasycladales/Siphonocladales, in agreement with ultrastructural evidence, but contrary to certain small subunit rRNA analyses that place it with Ulvales/Ulotrichales. The same non-canonical genetic code previously described in A. acetabulum was observed in EF-1alpha sequences from Parvocaulis pusillus (Dasycladales), Chaetomorpha coliformis, and Cladophora cf. crinalis (Siphonocladales), whereas Caulerpales use the universal code. This supports a sister relationship between Siphonocladales and Dasycladales and further refines our understanding of ulvophycean phylogeny.

  13. Distributed Blowing and Suction for the Purpose of Streak Control in a Boundary Layer Subjected to a Favorable Pressure Gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forgoston, Eric; Tumin, Anatoli; Ashpis, David E.

    2005-01-01

    An analysis of the optimal control by blowing and suction in order to generate stream- wise velocity streaks is presented. The problem is examined using an iterative process that employs the Parabolized Stability Equations for an incompressible uid along with its adjoint equations. In particular, distributions of blowing and suction are computed for both the normal and tangential velocity perturbations for various choices of parameters.

  14. On the neural implausibility of the modular mind: Evidence for distributed construction dissolves boundaries between perception, cognition, and emotion.

    PubMed

    Hackel, Leor M; Larson, Grace M; Bowen, Jeffrey D; Ehrlich, Gaven A; Mann, Thomas C; Middlewood, Brianna; Roberts, Ian D; Eyink, Julie; Fetterolf, Janell C; Gonzalez, Fausto; Garrido, Carlos O; Kim, Jinhyung; O'Brien, Thomas C; O'Malley, Ellen E; Mesquita, Batja; Barrett, Lisa Feldman

    2016-01-01

    Firestone & Scholl (F&S) rely on three problematic assumptions about the mind (modularity, reflexiveness, and context-insensitivity) to argue cognition does not fundamentally influence perception. We highlight evidence indicating that perception, cognition, and emotion are constructed through overlapping, distributed brain networks characterized by top-down activity and context-sensitivity. This evidence undermines F&S's ability to generalize from case studies to the nature of perception.

  15. Holocene distribution of woody taxa at the westernmost limit of the Circumboreal/Mediterranean boundary: Evidence from wood remains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubiales, Juan M.; Ezquerra, Javier; Muñoz Sobrino, Castor; Génova, María M.; Gil, Luis; Ramil-Rego, Pablo; Gómez Manzaneque, Fernando

    2012-02-01

    Macrofossils and megafossils of different genera, which were found in twelve localities in the mountains of northwest Iberia, provide spatially precise evidence of their distribution in the region during the Holocene. Macrofossils were recovered from mires, eroded peat bogs and lakes, identified by their wood anatomy and dated using radiocarbon methods. Conifers (Pinus), deciduous trees (Betula, Salix, Quercus) and shrubs (Erica, Fabaceae) were identified. The findings of Pinus gr. sylvestris/nigra have special biogeographical significance. The available palaeoecological data from the Cantabrian Range and nearby mountains (Ancares and Courel) indicate that pines have grown during the Holocene over the highlands of the western part of the Cantabrian Range area as a natural vegetation element. Nevertheless, Pinus sylvestris is the only pine species that is currently present in the Cantabrian Mountains, and its natural distribution area is now limited to a few enclaves. In this study, we provide a number of conclusive findings demonstrating that the past distribution of Pinus gr. sylvestris/nigra in this region suffered an important range contraction during the last two millennia. Historical data also support this idea, as they strongly suggest that this species survived well into the historical period.

  16. Distribution of the Pacific/North America motion in the Queen Charlotte Islands-S. Alaska plate boundary zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzotti, Stéphane; Hyndman, Roy D.; Flück, Paul; Smith, Alex J.; Schmidt, Michael

    2003-07-01

    We present GPS data that constrain the distribution of the relative Pacific/North America motion across the Queen Charlotte Islands-Alaska Panhandle margin (NW North America). Velocities from a network of 22 campaign and permanent sites indicate that the Pacific/North America transpressive motion is mostly accommodated along the locked Queen Charlotte-Fairweather Fault. A significant portion (6-7 mm/yr) of the relative plate motion is taken up by distributed dextral shear across a ~200 km wide region of the margin. Two models have been proposed to describe how the Pacific/North America convergence is accommodated off the Queen Charlotte Islands: Internal shortening vs. underthrusting of the Pacific plate. Although the GPS data cannot discriminate between the models, they provide strong constraints on the convergence distribution. The significant non-transient motion of GPS sites along the central British Columbia-southern Alaska margin has implications for seismic hazard and tectonic evolution models of the Canadian Cordillera.

  17. Distribution and mechanism of Neogene to present-day vertical axis rotations, Pacific-Australian Plate Boundary Zone, South Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Timothy A.; Roberts, Andrew P.

    1997-01-01

    Remarkably little knowledge exists about mechanisms of vertical axis rotation in continental crust. Steeply dipping basement rocks in South Island, New Zealand, provide an opportunity to map the distribution of rotations across the Pacific-Australian plate boundary zone, and to delineate boundaries of rotated blocks in unusual detail. We synthesize new structural data with new and existing paleomagnetic data, with geodetic data, and with patterns of Neogene-Quaternary faulting in the strike-slip Marlborough fault system. For the past 20 m.y., vertical axis rotations have been hinged about two crustal-scale boundaries near the east coast. The NE hinge accommodated ˜50° of early-middle Miocene clockwise rotation, which caused deformation of the eastern ends of the Alpine-Wairau and Clarence strike-slip faults. The SW hinge has accommodated a further 30°-50° of finite clockwise rotation since ˜4 Ma and deflects active fault traces. The locus of rotation has shifted southwestward astride a subduction margin that is lengthening in that direction. Rotating rocks are pinned to the south against a locked collision zone where the continental Chatham Rise impinges against the margin. Slip on inland strike-slip faults is transformed seaward across a zone of fault termination into rigid body rotation of a large continental block that has been thrust eastward over the downgoing subducted slab of the Pacific plate. The rotation mechanism is a "migrating hinge," which resembles a flexed telephone book. Strike-slip faults are translated through a brecciated hinge region that does not coincide with a fixed material line in the rock.

  18. [The Durkheim Test. Remarks on Susan Leigh Star's Boundary Objects].

    PubMed

    Gießmann, Sebastian

    2015-09-01

    The article reconstructs Susan Leigh Star's conceptual work on the notion of 'boundary objects'. It traces the emergence of the concept, beginning with her PhD thesis and its publication as Regions of the Mind in 1989. 'Boundary objects' attempt to represent the distributed, multifold nature of scientific work and its mediations between different 'social worlds'. Being addressed to several 'communities of practice', the term responded to questions from Distributed Artificial Intelligence in Computer Science, Workplace Studies and Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW), and microhistorical approaches inside the growing Science and Technology Studies. Yet the interdisciplinary character and interpretive flexibility of Star’s invention has rarely been noticed as a conceptual tool for media theory. I therefore propose to reconsider Star's 'Durkheim test' for sociotechnical media practices.

  19. Research on Russian National Character

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Na, Zhuo

    2008-01-01

    The special geographical location Russia lies in creates the unique character of the Russian nation. Based on the dual nature of the Russian national character, the Russian geographical environment and the analysis of its social structure, this text tries to explore the reasons of the dual nature of Russian national character.

  20. Classroom Characters (in the Classroom).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Tom

    1991-01-01

    Describes a classroom technique used to creatively involve first grade students in reading and writing through the use of classroom characters who talk to the class via a paper cartoon-type balloon attached to the characters picture. Provides examples of classroom characters and how they help children develop their writing skills. (MG)

  1. Character Education: A Critical Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmonson, Stacey; Tatman, Robert; Slate, John R.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we examined the history behind character education because we believe that character education an integral component of the educational enterprise. Major contributors to the importance of character education in the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries were discussed. Then we focused on the highlights of the last five decades of the 20th…

  2. How Iconic Are Chinese Characters?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luk, Gigi; Bialystok, Ellen

    2005-01-01

    The study explores the notion that some Chinese characters contain pictorial indications of meanings that can be used to help retrieve the referent. Thirty adults with no prior knowledge of Chinese guessed the meanings of twenty Chinese characters by choosing between one of two photographs. Half of the characters were considered to be iconic and…

  3. Genetics of Sesame Street Characters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raye, Susan

    2001-01-01

    Teaches genetics and inheritance using the characters from Sesame Street. Asks students to create a gene map of their favorite character and determine those genes passing to the next generation. Includes a genetics activity sheet and genetic information on the characters. (YDS)

  4. Genetics of Sesame Street Characters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raye, Susan

    2001-01-01

    Teaches genetics and inheritance using the characters from Sesame Street. Asks students to create a gene map of their favorite character and determine those genes passing to the next generation. Includes a genetics activity sheet and genetic information on the characters. (YDS)

  5. Characters as Guides to Meaning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roser, Nancy; Martinez, Miriam; Fuhrken, Charles; McDonnold, Kathleen

    2007-01-01

    Characters in children's books can help to guide readers through stories, contributing to deepened understandings of plot and themes. The authors discuss why characters become vivid and lasting in readers' minds, the ways in which students are often asked to think about characters in classroom literature study, and how students' understanding of…

  6. The Choice of Traditional vs. Simplified Characters in US Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deng, Shi-zhong

    2009-01-01

    Which form of Chinese characters should be taught in Chinese language classes: traditional or simplified? The results of a questionnaire distributed to sections at the University of Florida show the reasons for students' preferences for one or the other form. In view of the students' awareness that traditional characters are more beneficial to…

  7. Atmospheric Aerosol Size Distributions and Optical Properties Found in the Marine Boundary Layer Over the Atlantic Ocean

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-30

    nephelometers. 60ON Glasgow ,Scotland 50ON -1 L40ON I.Charleston, S.C. __ 14 10 Las Palmas " 18 March 2623 Canary Is. 200. 12 80 0W 60OW 40OW 20OW 00...the ship moved upwind of Grand Canary, and just prior to arrival at Las Palmas , the distribution was similar to that shown by Curve 1. 3.5 Air...Chichon volcano in late March and early April 1982, and since our primary interest is in the tropospheric component of the optical thickness, it was

  8. Interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer at high transonic speeds. Part 1: Pressure distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messiter, A. F.

    1979-01-01

    Analytical solutions are derived which incorporate additional physical effects as higher order terms for the case when the sonic line is very close to the wall. The functional form used for the undisturbed velocity profile is described to indicate how various parameters will be calculated for later comparison with experiment. The basic solutions for the pressure distribution are derived. Corrections are added for flow along a wall having longitudinal curvature and for flow in a circular pipe, and comparisons with available experimental data are shown.

  9. Evidence of sealing and brine distribution at grain boundaries in natural fine-grained Halite (Qum Kuh salt fountain, Central Iran): implications for rheology of salt extrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desbois, Guillaume; Urai, Janos L.; de Bresser, J. H. P.

    2010-05-01

    When grain boundary movement is stopped, surface energy related forces reassert themselves driving the system to its equilibrium conditions ([2], [6], [7], [8]). This could result in growth of islands and shrinking of channels and hence in healing the boundary by internal redistribution of fluid and solid in the contact region. Such islands are proposed to grow preferentially close to the contact rim and promote the healing of the grain-grain contact, which in turn prevents transport in or out the boundary region and thus traps the fluids in isolated inclusions. This contribution is focused on observation of grain boundary microstructures in natural mylonitic rocksalt collected from the distal part of Kum-Quh salt fountain (central Iran) in order to give unprecedented insight of grain boundary microstructures using argon-beam cross-sectioning to prepare high quality polished surfaces suitable for high-resolution SEM imaging. The possibility to use our SEM under cryogenic conditions allows also imaging the in-situ distribution of fluids. Results show that brine at grain boundaries occurs as thick layers (> µm in scale) corresponding to cross-sectioned wetted triple junction tubes, as filling at triple junction and as array of isolated fluids inclusions at grain-grain contacts. Close observations at islands contacts suggest the presence of a very thin fluid film (<100 nm). The most remarkable is evidence for sealing of pore space appearing as subhedral crystals filling the void space and decoupled from surrounding crystals by a thin brine layer. In parallel to this microstructural study, we deformed the same samples in order to simulate the simple shear flow at very low mean stress as in the salt fountain. First results suggest a complicated rheology. Samples loaded at σ < 0.7 MPa show no measurable deformation in a month, indicating strain rates less than 10-12 s-1 though, in fully activated pressure-solution (PS) creep, strain rates of several orders of magnitude

  10. Modeled Temperatures and Fluid Source Distributions for the Mexico Subduction Zone: Effects of Hydrothermal Cooling and Implications for Plate Boundary Seismic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, M. R.; Spinelli, G. A.; Wada, I.

    2014-12-01

    In subduction zones, spatial variations in pore fluid pressure are hypothesized to control the distribution and nature of slip behavior (e.g., "normal" earthquakes, slow slip events, non-volcanic tremor, very low frequency earthquakes) on the plate boundary fault. A primary control on the pore fluid pressure distribution in subduction zones is the distribution of fluid release from hydrous minerals in the subducting sediment and rock. The distributions of these diagenetic and metamorphic fluid sources are controlled by the pressure-temperature paths that the subducting material follows. Thus, constraining subduction zone thermal structure is required to inform conceptual models of seismic behavior. Here, we present results of thermal models for the Mexico subduction zone, a system that has received recent attention due to observations of slow-slip events and non-volcanic tremor. We model temperatures in five margin-perpendicular transects from 96 ˚W to 104 ˚W. In each transect, we examine the potential thermal effects of vigorous fluid circulation in a high permeability aquifer within the basaltic basement of the oceanic crust. In the transect at 100˚W, hydrothermal circulation cools the subducting material by up to 140 ˚C, shifting peak slab dehydration landward by ~100 km relative to previous estimates from models that do not include the effects of fluid circulation. The age of the subducting plate in the trench increases from ~3 Ma at 104 ˚W to ~18 Ma at 96 ˚W; hydrothermal circulation redistributes the most heat (and cools the system the most) where the subducting plate is youngest. For systems with <20 Ma subducting lithosphere, hydrothermal circulation in oceanic crust should be considered in estimating subduction zone temperatures and fluid source distributions.

  11. Arctic low-level boundary layer clouds: in situ measurements and simulations of mono- and bimodal supercooled droplet size distributions at the top layer of liquid phase clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingebiel, M.; de Lozar, A.; Molleker, S.; Weigel, R.; Roth, A.; Schmidt, L.; Meyer, J.; Ehrlich, A.; Neuber, R.; Wendisch, M.; Borrmann, S.

    2015-01-01

    Aircraft borne optical in situ size distribution measurements were performed within Arctic boundary layer clouds with a special emphasis on the cloud top layer during the VERtical Distribution of Ice in Arctic clouds (VERDI) campaign in April and May 2012. An instrumented Basler BT-67 research aircraft operated out of Inuvik over the Mackenzie River delta and the Beaufort Sea in the Northwest Territories of Canada. Besides the cloud particle and hydrometeor size spectrometers the aircraft was equipped with instrumentation for aerosol, radiation and other parameters. Inside the cloud, droplet size distributions with monomodal shapes were observed for predominantly liquid-phase Arctic stratocumulus. With increasing altitude inside the cloud the droplet mean diameters grew from 10 to 20 μm. In the upper transition zone (i.e., adjacent to the cloud-free air aloft) changes from monomodal to bimodal droplet size distributions (Mode 1 with 20 μm and Mode 2 with 10 μm diameter) were observed. It is shown that droplets of both modes co-exist in the same (small) air volume and the bimodal shape of the measured size distributions cannot be explained as an observational artifact caused by accumulating data point populations from different air volumes. The formation of the second size mode can be explained by (a) entrainment and activation/condensation of fresh aerosol particles, or (b) by differential evaporation processes occurring with cloud droplets engulfed in different eddies. Activation of entrained particles seemed a viable possibility as a layer of dry Arctic enhanced background aerosol (which was detected directly above the stratus cloud) might form a second mode of small cloud droplets. However, theoretical considerations and model calculations (adopting direct numerical simulation, DNS) revealed that, instead, turbulent mixing and evaporation of larger droplets are the most likely reasons for the formation of the second droplet size mode in the uppermost region

  12. Flow quality of NAL two-dimensional transonic wind tunnel. Part 1: Mach number distributions, flow angularities and preliminary study of side wall boundary layer suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakakibara, Seizo; Takashima, Kazuaki; Miwa, Hitoshi; Oguni, Yasuo; Sato, Mamoru; Kanda, Hiroshi

    1988-01-01

    Experimental data on the flow quality of the National Aerospace Laboratory two-dimensional transonic wind tunnel are presented. Mach number distributions on the test section axis show good uniformity which is characterized by the two sigma (standard deviation) values of 0.0003 to 0.001 for a range of Mach numbers from 0.4 to 1.0. Flow angularities, which were measured by using a wing model with a symmetrical cross section, remained within 0.04 deg for Mach numbers from 0.2 to 0.8. Side wall boundary layer suction was applied through a pair of porous plates. The variation of aerodynamic properties of the model due to the suction mass flow rate change is presented with a brief discussion. Two dimensionality of the flow over the wing span is expected to be improved by applying the appropriate suction rate, which depends on the Mach number, Reynolds number, and lift coefficient.

  13. Enigma of earthquakes at ridge-transform-fault plate boundaries - Distribution of non-double couple parameter of Harvard CMT solutions. [Centroid Moment Tensors

    SciTech Connect

    Kawakatsu, Hitoshi )

    1991-06-01

    The distribution of the non-double couple parameter of shallow earthquakes reported in the Harvard CMT catalogue shows systematic characteristics depending on the epicentral locations and types of fault mechanisms. The authors suggest that they can be explained by the presence of subevents with different double couple mechanisms in a single rupture sequence. The earthquakes at the ridge-transform-fault plate boundaries show a particularly interesting pattern. It is suggested that two types of faulting expected in the area (i.e., normal faults at ridges and strike slip faults at transform-faults) tend to occur almost simultaneously, although this hypothesis needs to be delineated by careful analyses using bodywave waveforms.

  14. Ecological thresholds at the savanna-forest boundary: how plant traits, resources and fire govern the distribution of tropical biomes.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, William A; Geiger, Erika L; Gotsch, Sybil G; Rossatto, Davi R; Silva, Lucas C R; Lau, On Lee; Haridasan, M; Franco, Augusto C

    2012-07-01

    Fire shapes the distribution of savanna and forest through complex interactions involving climate, resources and species traits. Based on data from central Brazil, we propose that these interactions are governed by two critical thresholds. The fire-resistance threshold is reached when individual trees have accumulated sufficient bark to avoid stem death, whereas the fire-suppression threshold is reached when an ecosystem has sufficient canopy cover to suppress fire by excluding grasses. Surpassing either threshold is dependent upon long fire-free intervals, which are rare in mesic savanna. On high-resource sites, the thresholds are reached quickly, increasing the probability that savanna switches to forest, whereas low-resource sites are likely to remain as savanna even if fire is infrequent. Species traits influence both thresholds; saplings of savanna trees accumulate bark thickness more quickly than forest trees, and are more likely to become fire resistant during fire-free intervals. Forest trees accumulate leaf area more rapidly than savanna trees, thereby accelerating the transition to forest. Thus, multiple factors interact with fire to determine the distribution of savanna and forest by influencing the time needed to reach these thresholds. Future work should decipher multiple environmental controls over the rates of tree growth and canopy closure in savanna. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  15. Turbulent boundary layer heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finson, M. L.; Clarke, A. S.; Wu, P. K. S.

    1981-01-01

    A Reynolds stress model for turbulent boundary layers is used to study surface roughness effects on skin friction and heat transfer. The issues of primary interest are the influence of roughness character (element shape and spacing) and the nature of roughness effects at high Mach numbers. Computations based on the model compare satisfactorily with measurements from experiments involving variations in roughness character, in low speed and modestly supersonic conditions. The more limited data base at hypersonic Mach numbers is also examined with reasonable success, although no quantitative explanation is offered for the reduction of heat transfer with increasing roughness observed by Holden at Me -9.4. The present calculations indicate that the mean velocity is approximately uniform over much of the height range below the tops of the elements, y less than or equal to k. With this constant (roughness velocity,) it is simple to estimate the form drag on the elements. This roughness velocity has been investigated by systematically exercising the present model over ranges of potential parameters. The roughness velocity is found to be primarily a function of the projected element frontal area per unit surface area, thus providing a new and simple method for predicting roughness character effects. The model further suggests that increased boundary layer temperatures should be generated by roughness at high edge Mach numbers, which would tend to reduce skin friction and heat transfer, perhaps below smooth wall levels.

  16. Nature and distribution of geological domains at the Africa-Eurasia plate boundary off SW Iberia and regional geodynamic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Loriente, Sara; Sallarès, Valentí; Gràcia, Eulàlia; Bartolome, Rafael

    2014-05-01

    We present a new classification of geological domains at the Africa-Eurasia plate boundary off SW Iberia, together with a regional geodynamic reconstruction spanning from the Mesozoic extension to the Neogene-to-present-day convergence. It is based on seismic velocity and density models along two regional wide-angle seismic transects, one running NW-SE from the Horseshoe to the Seine abyssal plains, and the other running N-S from S Portugal to the Seine Abyssal Plain, combined with previously available information. The seismic velocity and density structure at the Seine Abyssal Plain and the internal Gulf of Cadiz indicates the presence of a highly heterogeneous oceanic crust, similar to that described in ultra-slow spreading centers, whereas in the Horseshoe and Tagus abyssal plains, the basement structure resembles that of exhumed mantle sections identified in the Northern Atlantic margin. The integration of all this new information allows defining the presence of three oceanic domains offshore SW Iberia: (1) the Seine Abyssal Plain domain, generated during the first stages of slow seafloor spreading in the NE Central Atlantic (Early Jurassic); (2) the Gulf of Cadiz domain, made of oceanic crust generated in the Alpine-Tethys spreading system between Iberia and Africa, which was coeval with the formation of the Seine Abyssal Plain domain and lasted up to the North Atlantic continental break-up (Late Jurassic); and (3) the Gorringe Bank domain, mainly made of rocks exhumed from the mantle with little synchronous magmatism, which formed during the first stages of North Atlantic opening. Our models suggest that the Seine Abyssal Plain and Gulf of Cadiz domains are separated by the Lineament South strike-slip fault, whereas the Gulf of Cadiz and Gorringe Bank domains appear to be limited by a deep thrust fault located at the center of the Horseshoe Abyssal Plain. The formation and evolution of these three domains during the Mesozoic is key to understand the sequence

  17. Word knowledge influences character perception.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingshan; Pollatsek, Alexander

    2011-10-01

    In two experiments, we examined whether context information can affect the activity of the nodes at the character level. Chinese readers viewed two Chinese characters; one was intact, but the other (the target) was embedded in a rectangle of visual noise and increased in visibility over time. The two characters constituted a word in one condition but did not in the other condition. The task was to press a button to indicate whether the character in the noise was at the top or bottom of the rectangle. (They did not have to identify the character.) Response times were faster in the word condition than in the nonword condition. Because the "wordness" of the stimulus was logically irrelevant to judging the location of the target character, the data indicate that processing at the word level can feed back to fairly low-level judgments, such as where a character is.

  18. A novel poisson distribution-based approach for testing boundaries of real-time PCR assays for food pathogen quantification.

    PubMed

    Rossmanith, Peter; Wagner, Martin

    2011-09-01

    The validation of quantitative real-time PCR systems and above all, proof of the detection limit of this method, is a frequently and intensively discussed topic in food pathogen detection. Among proper sample collection, assay design, careful experimental design, execution of real-time PCR, and data analysis, the validation of the method per se ensuring reliable quantification data is of prime importance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a novel validation tool for real-time PCR assays, based on the theoretical possibility of the amplification of a single DNA target. The underlying mathematical basis for the work is Poisson distribution, which describes patterns of low particle numbers in a volume. In this context, we focused on the quantitative aspect of real-time PCR for the first time. This allowed for demonstration of the reliable amplification of a lone target DNA molecule and the demonstration of the distinct discrimination between integer molecular numbers when using low initial copy numbers. A real-time PCR assay amplifying a 274-bp fragment of the positive regulatory protein A locus of Listeria monocytogenes was used for this work. Evidence for a linear range of quantification from a single target copy to 10 ng of target DNA was experimentally demonstrated, and evidence for the significance of this novel validation approach is presented here.

  19. Influence of trans-boundary biomass burning impacted air masses on submicron particle number concentrations and size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betha, Raghu; Zhang, Zhe; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar

    2014-08-01

    Submicron particle number concentration (PNC) and particle size distribution (PSD) in the size range of 5.6-560 nm were investigated in Singapore from 27 June 2009 through 6 September 2009. Slightly hazy conditions lasted in Singapore from 6 to 10 August. Backward air trajectories indicated that the haze was due to the transport of biomass burning impacted air masses originating from wild forest and peat fires in Sumatra, Indonesia. Three distinct peaks in the morning (08:00-10:00), afternoon (13:00-15:00) and evening (16:00-20:00) were observed on a typical normal day. However, during the haze period no distinct morning and afternoon peaks were observed and the PNC (39,775 ± 3741 cm-3) increased by 1.5 times when compared to that during non-haze periods (26,462 ± 6017). The morning and afternoon peaks on the normal day were associated with the local rush hour traffic while the afternoon peak was induced by new particle formation (NPF). Diurnal profiles of PNCs and PSDs showed that primary particle peak diameters were large during the haze (60 nm) period when compared to that during the non-haze period (45.3 nm). NPF events observed in the afternoon period on normal days were suppressed during the haze periods due to heavy particle loading in atmosphere caused by biomass burning impacted air masses.

  20. Boundary issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Alan R.; Porder, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    the one for oceans. Encouragingly, while they argue that we've already crossed one key boundary in the P cycle, they also suggest it's not a Rubicon moment. The inefficiencies in P use that motivate these boundary debates are also clear targets for improvement, and some world regions may be on a trajectory towards greater P use efficiency (Vitousek et al 2009). This is a critical step for society, because even absent concerns over freshwater eutrophication or marine anoxic events, accelerating rates of P mining and inefficiencies in agricultural P use would still pose very real threats. There is legitimate debate over when readily accessible P reserves may run out (Cordell et al 2009, Van Kauenbergh 2010), but nobody argues with their finite nature. Sooner or later, we will be forced to keep P out of our waterways, if only because we will have to keep it on our farms. Without such a shift, we may face severe P constraints to food security within just a few human generations. As current P reserves decline, rising economic values of low concentration P stores may catalyze their harvest, but without considerable policy interventions, that price hike would exacerbate already strong global inequities in the distribution and use of chemical fertilizers (Sanchez and Swaminathan 2005). The harvest of low concentration P reserves would also create substantial collateral damage to the surrounding environment. Furthermore, even without exhaustion of high-concentration P reserves, their location in only a few countries creates geopolitical risks from the demand for an increasingly valuable resource (Cordell et al 2009). Policies aimed at lowering P inputs to aquatic environments will not only reduce the eutrophication risks explored by Carpenter and Bennett, they will increase P retention in agricultural landscapes and slow the decline of finite P reserves. Shifts in human diets can also make a profound difference in the amount of P (and N) required to meet caloric needs. Society

  1. The distribution of atmospheric black carbon in the marine boundary layer over the North Atlantic and the Russian Arctic Seas in July - October 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, Vladimir P.; Kopeikin, Vladimir M.; Evangeliou, Nikolaos; Novigatsky, Alexander N.; Pankratova, Natalia V.; Starodymova, Dina P.; Stohl, Andreas; Thompson, Rona

    2016-04-01

    Black carbon (BC) particles are highly efficient at absorbing visible light, which has a large potential impact on Arctic climate. However, measurement data on the distribution of BC in the atmosphere over the North Atlantic and the Russian Arctic Seas are scarce. We present measurement data on the distribution of atmospheric BC in the marine boundary layer of the North Atlantic and Baltic, North, Norwegian, Barents, White, Kara and Laptev Seas from research cruises during July 23 to October 6, 2015. During the 62nd and 63rd cruises of the RV "Akademik Mstislav Keldysh" air was filtered through Hahnemuhle fineart quarz-microfibre filters. The mass of BC on the filter was determined by measurement of the attenuation of a beam of light transmitted through the filter. Source areas were estimated by backwards trajectories of air masses calculated using NOAA's HYSPLIT model (http://www.arl.noaa.gov/ready.html) and FLEXPART model (http://www.flexpart.eu). During some parts of the cruises, air masses arrived from background areas of high latitudes, and the measured BC concentrations were low. During other parts of the cruise, air masses arrived from industrially developed areas with strong BC sources, and this led to substantially enhanced measured BC concentrations. Model-supported analyses are currently performed to use the measurement data for constraining the emission strength in these areas.

  2. The Energy of Olivine Grain Boundaries Deduced from Grain Boundary Frequency Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquardt, K.; Rohrer, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    The properties of grain boundaries strongly differ from those of the crystal lattice, and there is growing evidence that the presence of grain boundaries influence detected geophysical signals such as electrical conductivity and seismic velocities especially in aggregates with a LPO that favours the alignment of specific grain boundaries. However, neither the anisotropic frequency or energy distribution of grain boundary networks are understood in olivine dominated aggregates, neither with nor without LPO. We used electron backscatter diffraction, EBSD to detect the orientations of over 1.4x104 grains corresponding to roughly 5000mm length of grain boundary separating them. Subsequently we used a stereological approach to determine the grain boundary character distribution, GBCD, defined as the relative areas of grain boundaries of different types, distinguished by their five degrees of freedom (Rohrer, 2007). The grain boundary planes showed a preference for low index planes, which is in agreement with recent findings on other materials (e.g. MgO, TiO2, SrTiO3, MgAl2O4). However, our inferred surface energies are controversial with respect to previously simulated surface energies (Watson et al., 1997; de Leeuw et al., 2000; Gurmani et al., 2011). We find that the principal crystallographic planes have the lowest energies and that at 60° misorientation specific grain boundaries with common [100] axis of misorientation are favored compared to 60° misorientations about random axis of rotation. This seems to support the results of (Faul and Fitz Gerald, 1999), even though our data imply that 90°/[001] (100)(010) should be even less favorable for the propagation of melt films. These differences and similarities will be discussed with respect to the different methods and their limitations. References: Faul U. H. and Fitz Gerald J. D. (1999) Phys. Chem. Miner. 26, 187-197. Gurmani S. F. et al. (2011). J. Geophys. Res. 116, B12209. De Leeuw N. H. et al. (2000) Phys

  3. Simulations of a dynamic solar cycle and its effects on the interstellar boundary explorer ribbon and globally distributed energetic neutral atom flux

    DOE PAGES

    Zirnstein, E. J.; Heerikhuisen, J.; Pogorelov, N. V.; ...

    2015-04-23

    Observations by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) have vastly improved our understanding of the interaction between the solar wind (SW) and local interstellar medium through direct measurements of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs); this informs us about the heliospheric conditions that produced them. An enhanced feature of flux in the sky, the so-called IBEX ribbon, was not predicted by any global models before the first IBEX observations. A dominating theory of the origin of the ribbon, although still under debate, is a secondary charge-exchange process involving secondary ENAs originating from outside the heliopause. According to this mechanism, the evolution of themore » solar cycle should be visible in the ribbon flux. Therefore, in this paper we simulate a fully time-dependent ribbon flux, as well as globally distributed flux from the inner heliosheath (IHS), using time-dependent SW parameters from Sokol et al. as boundary conditions for our time-dependent heliosphere simulation. After post-processing the results to compute H ENA fluxes, these results show that the secondary ENA ribbon indeed should be time dependent, evolving with a period of approximately 11 yr, with differences depending on the energy and direction. Our results for the IHS flux show little periodic change with the 11 yr solar cycle, but rather with short-term fluctuations in the background plasma. And, while the secondary ENA mechanism appears to emulate several key characteristics of the observed IBEX ribbon, it appears that our simulation does not yet include all of the relevant physics that produces the observed ribbon.« less

  4. SIMULATIONS OF A DYNAMIC SOLAR CYCLE AND ITS EFFECTS ON THE INTERSTELLAR BOUNDARY EXPLORER RIBBON AND GLOBALLY DISTRIBUTED ENERGETIC NEUTRAL ATOM FLUX

    SciTech Connect

    Zirnstein, E. J.; Heerikhuisen, J.; Pogorelov, N. V.; McComas, D. J.; Dayeh, M. A.

    2015-05-01

    Since 2009, observations by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) have vastly improved our understanding of the interaction between the solar wind (SW) and local interstellar medium through direct measurements of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs), which inform us about the heliospheric conditions that produced them. An enhanced feature of flux in the sky, the so-called IBEX ribbon, was not predicted by any global models before the first IBEX observations. A dominating theory of the origin of the ribbon, although still under debate, is a secondary charge-exchange process involving secondary ENAs originating from outside the heliopause. According to this mechanism, the evolution of the solar cycle should be visible in the ribbon flux. Therefore, in this paper we simulate a fully time-dependent ribbon flux, as well as globally distributed flux from the inner heliosheath (IHS), using time-dependent SW parameters from Sokół et al. as boundary conditions for our time-dependent heliosphere simulation. After post-processing the results to compute H ENA fluxes, our results show that the secondary ENA ribbon indeed should be time dependent, evolving with a period of approximately 11 yr, with differences depending on the energy and direction. Our results for the IHS flux show little periodic change with the 11 yr solar cycle, but rather with short-term fluctuations in the background plasma. While the secondary ENA mechanism appears to emulate several key characteristics of the observed IBEX ribbon, it appears that our simulation does not yet include all of the relevant physics that produces the observed ribbon.

  5. Simulations of a dynamic solar cycle and its effects on the interstellar boundary explorer ribbon and globally distributed energetic neutral atom flux

    SciTech Connect

    Zirnstein, E. J.; Heerikhuisen, J.; Pogorelov, N. V.; McComas, D. J.; Dayeh, M. A.

    2015-04-23

    Observations by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) have vastly improved our understanding of the interaction between the solar wind (SW) and local interstellar medium through direct measurements of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs); this informs us about the heliospheric conditions that produced them. An enhanced feature of flux in the sky, the so-called IBEX ribbon, was not predicted by any global models before the first IBEX observations. A dominating theory of the origin of the ribbon, although still under debate, is a secondary charge-exchange process involving secondary ENAs originating from outside the heliopause. According to this mechanism, the evolution of the solar cycle should be visible in the ribbon flux. Therefore, in this paper we simulate a fully time-dependent ribbon flux, as well as globally distributed flux from the inner heliosheath (IHS), using time-dependent SW parameters from Sokol et al. as boundary conditions for our time-dependent heliosphere simulation. After post-processing the results to compute H ENA fluxes, these results show that the secondary ENA ribbon indeed should be time dependent, evolving with a period of approximately 11 yr, with differences depending on the energy and direction. Our results for the IHS flux show little periodic change with the 11 yr solar cycle, but rather with short-term fluctuations in the background plasma. And, while the secondary ENA mechanism appears to emulate several key characteristics of the observed IBEX ribbon, it appears that our simulation does not yet include all of the relevant physics that produces the observed ribbon.

  6. Pressure distribution on the roof of a model low-rise building tested in a boundary layer wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goliber, Matthew Robert

    validate the tube length, tube diameter, port diameter, and pressure transducer used in the field. Also, Model 2 was used to study the effects of surface roughness on pressure readings. A partial roof and wall of the low-rise building in the field was used as the third model. Similar to the second model, Model 3 was tested in the AABL Wind Tunnel. Initially, the objectives of the third model were to validate the pressure port protection device (PPPD) being used in the field and test the possibility of interpolating between pressure ports. But in the end, Model 3 was best used to validate the inconsistencies of the full-scale PPPD, validate the transducers used in the field, and prove the importance of scaling either all or none of the model. Fourthly, Model 4 was a 1:16 model of the low-rise building itself. Based on the three previous model tests, Model 4 was instrumented with 202 pressure transducers to better understand: (1) the pressure distribution on the roof of the structure, (2) the affects of the fundamental test variables such as tube length, tube diameter, port diameter, transducer type, and surface roughness, (3) the affects of a scaled PPPD, (4) the importance of wind angle of attack, and (5) the possibility of measuring pressure data and load data simultaneously. In the end, the combination of all four model tests proved to be helpful in understanding the pressure data gathered on the roof of the low-rise building in the field. The two main recommendations for the field structure are for reevaluation of the PPPD design and slight redistribution of the pressure ports. The wind tunnel model tests show a need for these two modifications in order to gather more accurate field pressure data. Other than these two adjustments, the model tests show that the remaining data gathering system is currently accurate.

  7. Spatial and temporal constancy of seismic strain release along the Death Valley-Fish Lake Valley fault and Pacific-North America plate boundary strain distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankel, K. L.; Dolan, J. F.; Ganev, P.; Finkel, R. C.

    2008-12-01

    The Death Valley-Fish Lake Valley fault (DV-FLVF) is the most active fault system along the Pacific-North America plate boundary east of the San Andreas fault. Recent work in the region suggests the late Pleistocene slip rate decreases from approximately 4.5 mm/yr along the central part of the DV-FLVF in northern Death Valley to approximately 2.5 mm/yr at the northern end of the DV-FLVF in Fish Lake Valley. This decrease in slip rate is at odds with observations at the latitude of northern Death Valley, which show late Pleistocene rates of deformation across the eastern California shear zone are coincident with short- terms rates of dextral shear determined from GPS data. Here, we report on alluvial fan offsets from three additional sites along the DV-FLVF to help determine the distribution of strain and the temporal and spatial constancy of deformation in the northern eastern California shear zone. From south to north these sites are: Cucomongo Canyon, Leidy Creek, and Indian Creek. We generated digital elevation models with 1 m horizontal resolution and decimeter vertical accuracy of the offsets from an airborne laser swath mapping (ALSM) survey along the fault zone. Right lateral displacements in offset late Pleistocene alluvial fans at Cucomongo Canyon and Leidy Creek are approximately 190 m and 50 m, respectively. A Holocene fan deposit at Indian Creek displays a dextral offset of approximately 15 m. Sixteen surface boulder samples were collected from the Leidy Creek and Indian Creek alluvial fans and five samples were collected from a depth profile at the Cucomongo Canyon fan for cosmogenic Beryllium-10 geochronology. These samples will help establish the age of the alluvial fans and when combined with the measured offsets from the ALSM data will provide slip rates over a variety of temporal and spatial scales. Ultimately, these rates will add to a growing number of such data, which are helping to elucidate how strain is distributed along this important

  8. Internalization of Character Traits by Those Who Teach Character Counts!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harms, Kristyn; Fritz, Susan

    2001-01-01

    Cooperative extension personnel (n=53) completed a Web-based survey analyzing the impact of the Character Counts! program on extension, their personal lives, and society. Results demonstrated that extension educators and assistants were more likely to make ethical decisions as a result of teaching Character Counts! The need for increased…

  9. Constraints on the Nature and Distribution of Iridium Host Phases at the Cretaceous-Tertiary Boundary: Implications for Projectile Identity and dispersal on impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuraytz, B. C.; Lindstrom, D. J.; Sharpton, V. L.

    1997-01-01

    Among Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary sites worldwide, variations in the concentrations and ratios of elements commonly enriched in meteorites complicate traditional geochemical attempts at impactor identification. Yet they may provide constraints on the physical and chemical processes associated with large-body disruption and dispersal, as well as with diagenesis of projectile components. To this end, we continue our efforts to identify the mineral host-phases of projectile-derived elements, particularly for Ir, and to document their partitioning between crater deposits and ejecta resulting from the Chicxulub basin-forming impact. Building on earlier work, we used INAA to measure Ir concentrations in successively smaller splits of finely powdered impact melt breccia from the Chicxulub Crater in Mexico (sample Y6Nl9-R(b)), and K/T boundary fish clay from Stevns Klint, Denmark (sample FC-1, split from 40 kg of homogenized material intended as an analytical standard). Results for the Chicxulub sample show a heterogeneous Ir distribution and document that at least five discrete Ir-bearing host phases were isolated in subsequent splits, having Ir masses equivalent to pure Ir spheres from about 0.8 to about 3.5 mm in diameter. Three of these are within a sufficiently reduced mass of powder to warrant searching for them using backscattered electron microscopy. In contrast, successively smaller splits of the Stevns Klint fish clay show no statistically significant deviation from the reported value of 32 +/- 2 ng/g Ir, suggesting a uniform Ir host-phase distribution. For the smallest split obtained thus far (100 +/- 40 ng/g Ir), a pure Ir sphere of equivalent Ir mass would be <0.05 min in diameter. (n.b. Although homogenizing and sieving of FC-1 to <75 min obviously obscured variations in stratigraphic distribution, it is unlikely to have affected the size-frequency distribution of Ir host phases.) We previously identified micrometer-scale Ir host phases by electron

  10. Constraints on the Nature and Distribution of Iridium Host Phases at the Cretaceous-Tertiary Boundary: Implications for Projectile Identity and dispersal on impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuraytz, B. C.; Lindstrom, D. J.; Sharpton, V. L.

    1997-01-01

    Among Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary sites worldwide, variations in the concentrations and ratios of elements commonly enriched in meteorites complicate traditional geochemical attempts at impactor identification. Yet they may provide constraints on the physical and chemical processes associated with large-body disruption and dispersal, as well as with diagenesis of projectile components. To this end, we continue our efforts to identify the mineral host-phases of projectile-derived elements, particularly for Ir, and to document their partitioning between crater deposits and ejecta resulting from the Chicxulub basin-forming impact. Building on earlier work, we used INAA to measure Ir concentrations in successively smaller splits of finely powdered impact melt breccia from the Chicxulub Crater in Mexico (sample Y6Nl9-R(b)), and K/T boundary fish clay from Stevns Klint, Denmark (sample FC-1, split from 40 kg of homogenized material intended as an analytical standard). Results for the Chicxulub sample show a heterogeneous Ir distribution and document that at least five discrete Ir-bearing host phases were isolated in subsequent splits, having Ir masses equivalent to pure Ir spheres from about 0.8 to about 3.5 mm in diameter. Three of these are within a sufficiently reduced mass of powder to warrant searching for them using backscattered electron microscopy. In contrast, successively smaller splits of the Stevns Klint fish clay show no statistically significant deviation from the reported value of 32 +/- 2 ng/g Ir, suggesting a uniform Ir host-phase distribution. For the smallest split obtained thus far (100 +/- 40 ng/g Ir), a pure Ir sphere of equivalent Ir mass would be <0.05 min in diameter. (n.b. Although homogenizing and sieving of FC-1 to <75 min obviously obscured variations in stratigraphic distribution, it is unlikely to have affected the size-frequency distribution of Ir host phases.) We previously identified micrometer-scale Ir host phases by electron

  11. Levels and vertical distributions of PCBs, PBDEs, and OCPs in the atmospheric boundary layer: observation from the Beijing 325-m meteorological tower.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingming; Zhang, Qinghua; Ji, Dongsheng; Wang, Thanh; Wang, Yawei; Wang, Pu; Ding, Lei; Jiang, Guibin

    2009-02-15

    Polyurethane foam disk passive air sampling was carried out to investigate the levels, vertical distributions, and potential sources of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in the atmospheric boundary layer of an urban site in Asia. Sampling was performed at nine heights (15, 47, 80, 120, 160, 200, 240, 280, 320 m) of the 325-m meteorological tower in Beijing, China over three 2-month periods between December 2006 and August 2007. This is the first study to report vertical variations of PBDEs in the ABL and one of only a few studies to investigate vertical distributions of persistent organic pollutants. The levels of sigma19PCBs and sigma8PBDEs were relatively low, ranging from 22 to 65 and from 2.3 to 18 pg m(-3), respectively. Air concentrations of gamma-HCH were high, with values in the range of 39-103 pg m(-3) in winter, 100-180 pg m(-3) in spring, and 115-242 pg m(-3) in summer, respectively. alpha-HCH concentrations ranged from 20 to 86 pg m(-3), p,p'-DDT between 7.3 and 78 pg m(-3), and HCB between 15 and 160 pg m(-3). The seasonal variations of PCBs, PBDEs, and OCPs may reflect different sources for these chemicals, such as those related with regional use (gamma-HCH), volatilization/re-emission (PBDEs, PCBs, alpha-HCH), and pesticide impurities (HCB). Although the performance reference compounds (PRCs) were spiked before deployment, the sampling rates showed strong dependency on wind speeds, resulting in large variations in uptake rates in the ABL, ranging from approximately 7.0 m3 day(-1) at ground level to 11 m3 day(-1) at 320 m. Levels of PCBs, PBDEs, and OCPs decreased with increasing ABL height indicating the potential of Beijing as the local sources.

  12. A Distributed Air Index Based on Maximum Boundary Rectangle over Grid-Cells for Wireless Non-Flat Spatial Data Broadcast

    PubMed Central

    Im, Seokjin; Choi, JinTak

    2014-01-01

    In the pervasive computing environment using smart devices equipped with various sensors, a wireless data broadcasting system for spatial data items is a natural way to efficiently provide a location dependent information service, regardless of the number of clients. A non-flat wireless broadcast system can support the clients in accessing quickly their preferred data items by disseminating the preferred data items more frequently than regular data on the wireless channel. To efficiently support the processing of spatial window queries in a non-flat wireless data broadcasting system, we propose a distributed air index based on a maximum boundary rectangle (MaxBR) over grid-cells (abbreviated DAIM), which uses MaxBRs for filtering out hot data items on the wireless channel. Unlike the existing index that repeats regular data items in close proximity to hot items at same frequency as hot data items in a broadcast cycle, DAIM makes it possible to repeat only hot data items in a cycle and reduces the length of the broadcast cycle. Consequently, DAIM helps the clients access the desired items quickly, improves the access time, and reduces energy consumption. In addition, a MaxBR helps the clients decide whether they have to access regular data items or not. Simulation studies show the proposed DAIM outperforms existing schemes with respect to the access time and energy consumption. PMID:24940864

  13. A distributed air index based on maximum boundary rectangle over grid-cells for wireless non-flat spatial data broadcast.

    PubMed

    Im, Seokjin; Choi, JinTak

    2014-06-17

    In the pervasive computing environment using smart devices equipped with various sensors, a wireless data broadcasting system for spatial data items is a natural way to efficiently provide a location dependent information service, regardless of the number of clients. A non-flat wireless broadcast system can support the clients in accessing quickly their preferred data items by disseminating the preferred data items more frequently than regular data on the wireless channel. To efficiently support the processing of spatial window queries in a non-flat wireless data broadcasting system, we propose a distributed air index based on a maximum boundary rectangle (MaxBR) over grid-cells (abbreviated DAIM), which uses MaxBRs for filtering out hot data items on the wireless channel. Unlike the existing index that repeats regular data items in close proximity to hot items at same frequency as hot data items in a broadcast cycle, DAIM makes it possible to repeat only hot data items in a cycle and reduces the length of the broadcast cycle. Consequently, DAIM helps the clients access the desired items quickly, improves the access time, and reduces energy consumption. In addition, a MaxBR helps the clients decide whether they have to access regular data items or not. Simulation studies show the proposed DAIM outperforms existing schemes with respect to the access time and energy consumption.

  14. Character Education: Christian Education Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Gretchen M.; Firmin, Michael W.

    2008-01-01

    Character is defined broadly by leading authorities, including concepts such as practicing apt behavior and teaching right from wrong. Virtue and moral undertones tend to pervade most experts' use of character, although in secular settings, the notion of ethics is more prominent. Overall, developing in students a desire for the good is how most…

  15. Unique, Universal & Uniform Character Encoding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leggott, Mark

    1991-01-01

    Explains Unicode, a standard for the representation of multilingual character sets that extends the traditional ASCII (American Standard Code Information Interchange) character set. The consortium that created Unicode is described, integration of Unicode with existing hardware and software is discussed, and the role of librarians in defining…

  16. First Steps in Character Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Patty Smith

    2017-01-01

    For many centuries, there has been theoretical statements asserting faith in character as the main objective in education, but it is only comparatively recently enough has been known about character and the scientific conditions for its development to make an honored place for it in the curricula. Today, it is creeping into curricula under new…

  17. Character Education: Christian Education Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Gretchen M.; Firmin, Michael W.

    2008-01-01

    Character is defined broadly by leading authorities, including concepts such as practicing apt behavior and teaching right from wrong. Virtue and moral undertones tend to pervade most experts' use of character, although in secular settings, the notion of ethics is more prominent. Overall, developing in students a desire for the good is how most…

  18. Character Education and Gifted Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkowitz, Marvin W.; Hoppe, Mary Anne

    2009-01-01

    Character education is both an age-old and growing discipline, which attempts to restructure schools to optimally foster the development of the ethical and pro-social motivations and competencies of students. The key components of evidence-based quality character education are presented. Then the relevant characteristics of gifted students are…

  19. Character Education: Frill or Foundation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Merle J.; Beatty, Alexandra; Dachnowicz, Eileen

    2006-01-01

    Proof of academic performance often serves as the litmus test for maintaining instructional practices and programs. Just as the national focus on academic improvement has gained momentum, so too has another movement calling for character education. Educators find themselves caught in the middle, questioning whether character education is just…

  20. Determination of grain boundary mobility during recrystallization by statistical evaluation of electron backscatter diffraction measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, I. Chen, M.; Loeck, M.; Al-Samman, T.; Molodov, D.A.

    2016-07-15

    One of the key aspects influencing microstructural design pathways in metallic systems is grain boundary motion. The present work introduces a method by means of which direct measurement of grain boundary mobility vs. misorientation dependence is made possible. The technique utilizes datasets acquired by means of serial electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements. The experimental EBSD measurements are collectively analyzed, whereby datasets were used to obtain grain boundary mobility and grain aspect ratio with respect to grain boundary misorientation. The proposed method is further validated using cellular automata (CA) simulations. Single crystal aluminium was cold rolled and scratched in order to nucleate random orientations. Subsequent annealing at 300 °C resulted in grains growing, in the direction normal to the scratch, into a single deformed orientation. Growth selection was observed, wherein the boundaries with misorientations close to Σ7 CSL orientation relationship (38° 〈111〉) migrated considerably faster. The obtained boundary mobility distribution exhibited a non-monotonic behavior with a maximum corresponding to misorientation of 38° ± 2° about 〈111〉 axes ± 4°, which was 10–100 times higher than the mobility values of random high angle boundaries. Correlation with the grain aspect ratio values indicated a strong growth anisotropy displayed by the fast growing grains. The observations have been discussed in terms of the influence of grain boundary character on grain boundary motion during recrystallization. - Highlights: • Statistical microstructure method to measure grain boundary mobility during recrystallization • Method implementation independent of material or crystal structure • Mobility of the Σ7 boundaries in 5N Al was calculated as 4.7 × 10{sup –8} m{sup 4}/J ⋅ s. • Pronounced growth selection in the recrystallizing nuclei in Al • Boundary mobility values during recrystallization 2–3 orders of

  1. Analysis of grain-boundary structure in Al-Cu interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, David P.; Sanchez, John E., Jr.; Besser, Paul R.; Dingley, David J.

    1997-09-01

    The role of crystallographic texture in electromigration resistance of interconnect lines is well documented. The presence of a strong (111) fiber texture results in a more reliable interconnect structure. It is also generally accepted that grain-boundary diffusion is the primary mechanism by which electromigration failures occur. It has been difficult to this point, however, to obtain statistically reliable information of grain-boundary structure in these materials as transmission electron microscopy investigations are limited by tedious specimen preparation and small, nonrepresentative, imaging regions. The present work focuses upon characterization of texture and grain-boundary structure of interconnect lines using orientation imaging microscopy, and particularly, upon the linewidth dependence of these measures. Conventionally processed Al-1%Cu lines were investigated to determine the affects of a postpatterning anneal on boundary structure as a function of linewidth. It was observed that texture tended to strengthen slightly with decreasing linewidth subsequent to the anneal procedure. Grain morphology changed substantially as the narrow lines became near bamboo in character and the crystallographic character of the boundary plane changed as a function of linewidth. These results are contrasted with those obtained from Al-1%Cu lines, which were fabricated using the damascene process. The damascene lines show a marked weakening in texture as the linewidth decreases, accompanied by a more random misorientation distribution. A description of the competing energetics, which result in the observed microstructures, is included.

  2. Size distribution, composition and origin of the submicron aerosol in the marine boundary layer during the eastern Mediterranean "SUB-AERO" experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eleftheriadis, K.; Colbeck, I.; Housiadas, C.; Lazaridis, M.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Mitsakou, C.; Smolík, J.; Ždímal, V.

    A period of intensive physical and chemical aerosol characterisation measurements was held over 5 days during July 2000 as part of the European SUB-AERO experiment.. Concurrent measurements were performed at the Finokalia remote coastal site on the island of Crete (Greece) and onboard the R/V " Aegaeon" which cruised in south part of the Aegean Sea northwards of Crete. The objective of the study was to investigate the spatial and temporal variability of microphysical parameters of the submicron aerosol and their dependence on airmass origin and chemical composition. The results reflect the submicron aerosol properties during airmass transport from the north including Europe and the Balkans and are in line with other studies on the aerosol properties of polluted continental air entering the marine boundary layer (MBL). Concentrations of submicron particulate matter (PM) mass were relatively higher at sea (20 μg m -3) compared to the coastal site (16 μg m -3). Concentrations of both organic carbon and sulphate, being the major water soluble component, were also higher at sea than at land. The high concentrations of ammonium and those of the water soluble organics, such as oxalate, can be attributed to emissions from mainland forest fires. The submicron aerosol number size distribution was unimodal with mobility mean diameters ( dg) ranging from 98 to 144 μm and standard deviations ( σg) from 1.56 to 1.9. Aerosol number concentrations at Finokalia were at least 50% lower especially when R/V Aegaeon sampled polluted air, but the modal parameters of the size distribution were very similar ( dg: 111-120, σg: 1.55-1.91). The surface MBL, under these conditions, was an aerosol rich environment where aerosol particles were transported both by the surface wind, advected from higher layers, chemically processed by interactions with gaseous precursors and physically altered by water vapour. The number to volume ratio for the submicrometer aerosol fraction reflected the

  3. Easily seen characters to identify the pupa of Aedes albopictus in the United States.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Bruce A

    2005-12-01

    Pupal paddle characters of Aedes albopictus that will quickly differentiate this species from other container-inhabiting species in the United States are described, illustrated, and compared with 2 other container species that have somewhat similar paddles, but with very different characters. Additional noncontainer species that possess slightly similar characters are also discussed. Citations for other published illustrations of the characters, pupal sexing methods, and published keys to pupae are provided, as are laboratory methods and the distributions for the species.

  4. Recognizing characters of ancient manuscripts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diem, Markus; Sablatnig, Robert

    2010-02-01

    Considering printed Latin text, the main issues of Optical Character Recognition (OCR) systems are solved. However, for degraded handwritten document images, basic preprocessing steps such as binarization, gain poor results with state-of-the-art methods. In this paper ancient Slavonic manuscripts from the 11th century are investigated. In order to minimize the consequences of false character segmentation, a binarization-free approach based on local descriptors is proposed. Additionally local information allows the recognition of partially visible or washed out characters. The proposed algorithm consists of two steps: character classification and character localization. Initially Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) features are extracted which are subsequently classified using Support Vector Machines (SVM). Afterwards, the interest points are clustered according to their spatial information. Thereby, characters are localized and finally recognized based on a weighted voting scheme of pre-classified local descriptors. Preliminary results show that the proposed system can handle highly degraded manuscript images with background clutter (e.g. stains, tears) and faded out characters.

  5. Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loitsianskii. L. G.

    1956-01-01

    The fundamental, practically the most important branch of the modern mechanics of a viscous fluid or a gas, is that branch which concerns itself with the study of the boundary layer. The presence of a boundary layer accounts for the origin of the resistance and lift force, the breakdown of the smooth flow about bodies, and other phenomena that are associated with the motion of a body in a real fluid. The concept of boundary layer was clearly formulated by the founder of aerodynamics, N. E. Joukowsky, in his well-known work "On the Form of Ships" published as early as 1890. In his book "Theoretical Foundations of Air Navigation," Joukowsky gave an account of the most important properties of the boundary layer and pointed out the part played by it in the production of the resistance of bodies to motion. The fundamental differential equations of the motion of a fluid in a laminar boundary layer were given by Prandtl in 1904; the first solutions of these equations date from 1907 to 1910. As regards the turbulent boundary layer, there does not exist even to this day any rigorous formulation of this problem because there is no closed system of equations for the turbulent motion of a fluid. Soviet scientists have done much toward developing a general theory of the boundary layer, and in that branch of the theory which is of greatest practical importance at the present time, namely the study of the boundary layer at large velocities of the body in a compressed gas, the efforts of the scientists of our country have borne fruit in the creation of a new theory which leaves far behind all that has been done previously in this direction. We shall herein enumerate the most important results by Soviet scientists in the development of the theory of the boundary layer.

  6. Role of Grain Boundaries and Microstructure on the Environment Assisted Cracking of Pipeline Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arafin, Muhammad

    2011-12-01

    In this research, two common types of environment assisted cracking (EAC) of pipeline steels, namely the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) and the hydrogen induced cracking (HIC), have been studied, and computer models have been developed to simulate the intergranular stress corrosion crack propagation behaviour in pipeline steel as well as to predict the intergranular fracture susceptibility, due to mechanical loading in non-corrosive environment, of polycrystalline materials. First, a new understanding of the IGSCC resistance of pipeline steel has been obtained by studying the grain boundary character and crystallographic orientation in both cracked and non-cracked pipeline steel samples using electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and X-ray texture measurements. It has been found that the low-angle and certain types of special boundaries, known as the coincident site lattice (CSL) boundaries (S5, S11, and S13b types), are crack-resistant while the random high angle boundaries are prone to cracking. However, it has been also observed that the grain boundaries associated with {110} and {111} neighbour grain orientations having <110> and <111> rotation axis, respectively, are crack-resistant, while the cracked boundaries are mainly linked to the {100} orientation with <100> rotation axis. Subsequently, a novel integrated modeling approach, combining Voronoi Algorithm, Markov Chain theory, and Monte Carlo simulations, has been developed in order to predict the IGSCC behaviour of pipeline steels. The model takes both the physical microstructural features, such as the grain shape and grain size distribution, as well as the grain boundary characters and their orientations with respect to the external stress axis into account. The predicted crack propagation behaviour has been found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental crack-propagation and arrest data in API X65 pipeline steel. In addition, a texture based grain boundary character

  7. A Toolbox for Geometric Grain Boundary Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glowinski, Krzysztof; Morawiec, Adam

    Properties of polycrystalline materials are affected by grain boundary networks. The most basic aspect of boundary analysis is boundary geometry. This paper describes a package of computer programs for geometric boundary characterization based on macroscopic boundary parameters. The program allows for determination whether a boundary can be classified as near-tilt, -twist, -symmetric et cetera. Since calculations on experimental, i.e., error affected data are assumed, the program also provides distances to the nearest geometrically characteristic boundaries. The software has a number of other functions helpful in grain boundary analysis. One of them is the determination of planes of all characteristic boundaries for a given misorientation. The resulting diagrams of geometrically characteristic boundaries can be linked to experimentally determined grain boundary distributions. In computations, all symmetrically equivalent representations of boundaries are taken into account. Cubic and hexagonal holohedral crystal symmetries are allowed.

  8. Character as the Aim of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, David Light

    2011-01-01

    The aim of education should be developing intellectual character, moral character, civic character, and performance character. That does not mean that schools should ignore teaching content, but that the dispositions and habits of mind that come from developing these four forms of character will remain with students throughout their lives.…

  9. Character as the Aim of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, David Light

    2011-01-01

    The aim of education should be developing intellectual character, moral character, civic character, and performance character. That does not mean that schools should ignore teaching content, but that the dispositions and habits of mind that come from developing these four forms of character will remain with students throughout their lives.…

  10. Flash Cards: Common Chinese-Cantonese Characters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Monterey, CA.

    This set of flash cards is designed to accompany the Defense Language Institute's instructional programs in Cantonese Chinese. Each card displays six Chinese characters, for a total of 1500 characters. Each character is printed two inches tall. Above each character are transcriptions of the Chinese words represented by the character (marked for…

  11. Airborne determination of the temporo-spatial distribution of benzene, toluene, nitrogen oxides and ozone in the boundary layer across Greater London, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, M. D.; Lee, J. D.; Davison, B.; Vaughan, A.; Purvis, R. M.; Lewis, A. C.; Hewitt, C. N.

    2014-10-01

    Highly spatially resolved mixing ratios of benzene and toluene, nitrogen oxides (NOx) and ozone (O3) were measured in the atmospheric boundary layer above Greater London during the period 24 June to 9 July 2013 using a Dornier 228 aircraft. Toluene and benzene were determined in-situ using a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS), NOx by dual channel NOx chemiluminescence and O3 mixing ratios by UV absorption. Average mixing ratios observed over inner London at 360 ± 10 m a.g.l. were 0.20 ± 0.05, 0.28 ± 0.07, 13.2 ± 8.6, 21.0 ± 7.3 and 34.3 ± 15.2 ppbv for benzene, toluene, NO, NO2 and NOx respectively. Linear regression analysis between NO2, benzene and toluene mixing ratios yielded a trimodal distribution indicating that these compounds predominantly share the same or co-located sources within the city and that a significant fraction of NOx is directly emitted as NO2. Average mixing ratios measured at 360 ± 10 m a.g.l. over outer London were always lower than over inner London. Where traffic densities were highest, the toluene / benzene (T / B) concentration ratios were highest (average of 1.8 ± 0.3 ppbv ppbv-1) indicative of strong local sources. Daytime maxima in NOx, benzene and toluene mixing ratios were observed in the morning (~40 ppbv NOx, ~350 pptv toluene and ~200 pptv benzene) and for ozone in the mid-afternoon (~40 ppbv O3) all at 360 ± 10 m a.g.l.

  12. Species boundaries in tintinnid ciliates: a case study--morphometric variability, molecular characterization, and temporal distribution of Helicostomella species (Ciliophora, Tintinnina).

    PubMed

    Xu, Dapeng; Sun, Ping; Shin, Mann Kyoon; Kim, Young Ok

    2012-01-01

    Tintinnids are a large group of planktonic ciliates with diverse morphologies. The range of variability in lorica shapes and sizes can be very high even within a single species depending on life stages and environmental conditions, which makes the delimitation of different species based on morphological criteria alone very difficult. Accordingly, comparisons of morphological and molecular variability in tintinnids are necessary to provide a pragmatic approach for establishing species boundaries within this diverse and poorly understood group. We investigated the temporal distribution of species of the hyaline tintinnid Helicostomella (Ciliophora, Tintinnina), which were collected daily from September 2008 to August 2009 in Jangmok Bay of Geoje Island on the south coast of Korea. Two forms - a long form and a short form, were discovered. The long form was found in cold waters in February and March whereas the short form occurred in warm waters from June to October. Thus, these two forms were seasonally isolated. However, all the morphological characteristics for these two forms overlap to some degree. A comparison of the small subunit (SSU) rDNA, ITS1-5.8S-ITS2, and ITS2 sequences from two forms revealed 0.5%, 3.8%, and 5.6% divergences, respectively. Morever, one compensatory base change (CBC) and three hemi-CBCs were identified from ITS2 secondary structures of these two forms. All these data suggest that these two forms represent two distinct species despite their highly similar lorica morphology. The phylogenetic position of the genus Helicostomella was also examined using SSU rDNA sequences.

  13. Ground-state energy, density profiles, and momentum distribution of attractively interacting 1D Fermi gases with hard-wall boundaries: a Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenney, J. R.; Shill, C. R.; Porter, W. J.; Drut, J. E.

    2016-11-01

    Motivated by the realization of hard-wall boundary conditions in experiments with ultracold atoms, we investigate the ground-state properties of spin-1/2 fermions with attractive interactions in a one-dimensional box. We use lattice Monte Carlo methods to determine essential quantities like the energy, which we compute as a function of coupling strength and particle number in the regime from few to many particles. Many-fermion systems bound by hard walls display non-trivial density profiles characterized by so-called Friedel oscillations (which are similar to those observed in harmonic traps). In non-interacting systems, the characteristic length scale of the oscillations is set by {(2{k}{{F}})}-1, where {k}{{F}} is the Fermi momentum, while repulsive interactions tend to generate Wigner-crystal oscillations of period {(4{k}{{F}})}-1. Based on the non-interacting result, we find a remarkably simple parametrization of the density profiles of the attractively interacting case, which we generalize to the one-body density matrix. While the total momentum is not a conserved quantity in the presence of hard walls, the magnitude of the momentum does provide a good quantum number. We are therefore able to provide a detailed characterization of the (quasi-)momentum distribution, which displays rather robust discontinuity at the Fermi surface. In addition, we determine the spatially varying on-site density-density correlation, which in turn yields Tan’s contact density and, upon integration, Tan’s contact. As is well known, the latter fully determines the short-range correlations and plays a crucial role in a multitude of equilibrium and non-equilibrium sum rules.

  14. Printed Arabic optical character segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, Khader; Ayyesh, Muna; Qaroush, Aziz; Tumar, Iyad

    2015-03-01

    A considerable progress in recognition techniques for many non-Arabic characters has been achieved. In contrary, few efforts have been put on the research of Arabic characters. In any Optical Character Recognition (OCR) system the segmentation step is usually the essential stage in which an extensive portion of processing is devoted and a considerable share of recognition errors is attributed. In this research, a novel segmentation approach for machine Arabic printed text with diacritics is proposed. The proposed method reduces computation, errors, gives a clear description for the sub-word and has advantages over using the skeleton approach in which the data and information of the character can be lost. Both of initial evaluation and testing of the proposed method have been developed using MATLAB and shows 98.7% promising results.

  15. Character profiles and life satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Park, Hwanjin; Suh, Byung Seong; Kim, Won Sool; Lee, Hye-Kyung; Park, Seon-Cheol; Lee, Kounseok

    2015-04-01

    There is a surge of interest in subjective well-being (SWB), which concerns how individuals feel about their happiness. Life satisfaction tends to be influenced by individual psychological traits and external social factors. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between individual character and SWB. Data from 3522 university students were analyzed in this study. Character profiles were evaluated using the Temperament and Character Inventory-Revised Short version (TCI-RS). Life satisfaction was assessed using the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS). All statistical tests regarding the correlations between each character profile and life satisfaction were conducted using ANOVAs, t-tests, multiple linear regression models and correlation analyses. The creative (SCT) profile was associated with the highest levels of life satisfaction, whereas the depressive (sct) profile was associated with the lowest levels of life satisfaction. Additionally, high self-directedness, self-transcendence and cooperation were associated with high life satisfaction. The results of gender-adjusted multiple regression analysis showed that the effects of self-directedness were the strongest in the assessment of one's quality of life, followed by self-transcendence and cooperativeness, in that order. All of the three-character profiles were significantly correlated with one's quality of life, and the character profiles of TCI-RS explained 27.6% of life satisfaction in total. Among the three-character profiles, the self-directedness profile was most associated with life satisfaction. Our study was cross-sectional, and self-reported data from students at a single university were analyzed. The results of this study showed that, among the character profiles, the effects of self-directedness were the strongest for predicting life satisfaction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Machine Segmentation of Unformatted Characters.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    open the disk file if necessary. C ACCEPT" Do you want a disk file created (YES/NO)? " 1 READ(11,19)N ;Read one ASCII character IF(N.EQ. 19968 )GO TO 2...ACCEPT" Do you want a complete picture (YES/NO)? ŕ 4 READ(11,19)N ;Read one ASCII character IFCN.EQ. 19968 )GO TO 22 ;Response was "NO" IF(N.NE.22784)GO TO

  17. Calculation of grain boundary normals directly from 3D microstructure images

    DOE PAGES

    Lieberman, E. J.; Rollett, A. D.; Lebensohn, R. A.; ...

    2015-03-11

    The determination of grain boundary normals is an integral part of the characterization of grain boundaries in polycrystalline materials. These normal vectors are difficult to quantify due to the discretized nature of available microstructure characterization techniques. The most common method to determine grain boundary normals is by generating a surface mesh from an image of the microstructure, but this process can be slow, and is subject to smoothing issues. A new technique is proposed, utilizing first order Cartesian moments of binary indicator functions, to determine grain boundary normals directly from a voxelized microstructure image. In order to validate the accuracymore » of this technique, the surface normals obtained by the proposed method are compared to those generated by a surface meshing algorithm. Specifically, the local divergence between the surface normals obtained by different variants of the proposed technique and those generated from a surface mesh of a synthetic microstructure constructed using a marching cubes algorithm followed by Laplacian smoothing is quantified. Next, surface normals obtained with the proposed method from a measured 3D microstructure image of a Ni polycrystal are used to generate grain boundary character distributions (GBCD) for Σ3 and Σ9 boundaries, and compared to the GBCD generated using a surface mesh obtained from the same image. Finally, the results show that the proposed technique is an efficient and accurate method to determine voxelized fields of grain boundary normals.« less

  18. Calculation of grain boundary normals directly from 3D microstructure images

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, E. J.; Rollett, A. D.; Lebensohn, R. A.; Kober, E. M.

    2015-03-11

    The determination of grain boundary normals is an integral part of the characterization of grain boundaries in polycrystalline materials. These normal vectors are difficult to quantify due to the discretized nature of available microstructure characterization techniques. The most common method to determine grain boundary normals is by generating a surface mesh from an image of the microstructure, but this process can be slow, and is subject to smoothing issues. A new technique is proposed, utilizing first order Cartesian moments of binary indicator functions, to determine grain boundary normals directly from a voxelized microstructure image. In order to validate the accuracy of this technique, the surface normals obtained by the proposed method are compared to those generated by a surface meshing algorithm. Specifically, the local divergence between the surface normals obtained by different variants of the proposed technique and those generated from a surface mesh of a synthetic microstructure constructed using a marching cubes algorithm followed by Laplacian smoothing is quantified. Next, surface normals obtained with the proposed method from a measured 3D microstructure image of a Ni polycrystal are used to generate grain boundary character distributions (GBCD) for Σ3 and Σ9 boundaries, and compared to the GBCD generated using a surface mesh obtained from the same image. Finally, the results show that the proposed technique is an efficient and accurate method to determine voxelized fields of grain boundary normals.

  19. Grain boundary engineering in a thermo-mechanically processed Nb-stabilized austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunquera, A.; Jorge-Badiola, D.; Gutiérrez, I.; Iza-Mendia, A.

    2015-04-01

    Three different thermo-mechanical strategies—annealing, strain recrystallization and strain annealing—were applied to a Nb-stabilized 304H austenitic stainless steel in order to study their effects on grain boundary character distribution (GBCD). An Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) analysis revealed specific combinations of cold reduction-temperature-time that favor annealing twinning. A uniform increase in microstructural size and special boundaries (particularly for Σ3, Σ9 and Σ27 boundaries) was achieved under strain annealing conditions (low cold reductions) and long times at high temperatures (≥ 990°C). These conditions provide a high fraction of special boundaries (about 80%), which replace the random grain boundary network and thus optimize the GBCD. The profuse presence of Σ3n boundaries is attributed to the geometric interaction of twin-related variants during grain boundary migration. In addition to all this, precipitation takes place at the temperature range where optimum GBCD is achieved. The significance of precipitation in the different strategies was also tackled.

  20. Effects of heavy-ion irradiation on the grain boundary chemistry of an oxide-dispersion strengthened Fe-12 wt.% Cr alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquis, Emmanuelle A.; Lozano-Perez, Sergio; Castro, Vanessa de

    2011-10-01

    Understanding the behaviour of oxide-dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic martensitic steels under irradiation is of prime importance in the design of future fusion reactors. Although changes in grain boundary chemistry during irradiation can significantly affect fracture strength, little is known on the behaviour of grain boundaries in ODS steels. Here, the effect of heavy-ion implantation at 500 °C on grain boundary chemistry in a model ODS Fe-12 wt.% Cr alloy was investigated using atom-probe tomography (APT) and analytical scanning-transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM) techniques. While chromium and carbon segregation at grain boundaries is found in annealed alloys before irradiation, the three-dimensional APT reconstructions and TEM observations after irradiation reveal a complex distribution of Cr segregation and depletion at grain boundaries of varying character.

  1. Nanoscale potential distribution of grain boundary dependence on humidity of high performance Perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3) solar cell(Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Nirmal; Nazmul, Md. Hasan; Dubey, Ashish; Qiao, Qiquan

    2016-09-01

    We report effects of controlled humidity in ambient condition on grain boundary potential and charge transport within the grains of Pervoskite films prepared by sequential deposited technique. Grain boundary exhibited variation of their electronic properties with change in humidity level from sample kept inside glove box to 75% RH. X-ray diffraction (XRD) indicates the formation of PbI2 phase with increasing humidity level. The degradation of Pervoskite solar cell is mainly associated with the increase of PbI2 phase with increase in humidity level and hydration of the grain boundaries with the formation of hydrated phases. Spatial mapping of surface potential in the Perovskite film exhibits higher positive potential at grain boundaries compared to the surface of the grains. Grain boundary potential barrier were found to increase from 35 meV to 80 meV for perovskite film exposed to 75% RH level compared to perovskite film kept inside glove box. Nanoscale current sensing measurement (Cs-AFM) shows that charge transport in perovskit solar cell strongly depends in humidity level. Performances of the solar cell was maximum for 25% humidity with 14.01 %. Transient measurement shows decrease in charge carrier life time and charge transport time with increase in humidity level. Our results show strong correlation between humidity level, electronic grain boundary properties and device performance.

  2. Moral character in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Taya R; Panter, A T; Turan, Nazli; Morse, Lily; Kim, Yeonjeong

    2014-11-01

    Using two 3-month diary studies and a large cross-sectional survey, we identified distinguishing features of adults with low versus high levels of moral character. Adults with high levels of moral character tend to: consider the needs and interests of others and how their actions affect other people (e.g., they have high levels of Honesty-Humility, empathic concern, guilt proneness); regulate their behavior effectively, specifically with reference to behaviors that have positive short-term consequences but negative long-term consequences (e.g., they have high levels of Conscientiousness, self-control, consideration of future consequences); and value being moral (e.g., they have high levels of moral identity-internalization). Cognitive moral development, Emotionality, and social value orientation were found to be relatively undiagnostic of moral character. Studies 1 and 2 revealed that employees with low moral character committed harmful work behaviors more frequently and helpful work behaviors less frequently than did employees with high moral character, according to their own admissions and coworkers' observations. Study 3 revealed that adults with low moral character committed more delinquent behavior and had more lenient attitudes toward unethical negotiation tactics than did adults with high moral character. By showing that individual differences have consistent, meaningful effects on employees' behaviors, after controlling for demographic variables (e.g., gender, age, income) and basic attributes of the work setting (e.g., enforcement of an ethics code), our results contest situationist perspectives that deemphasize the importance of personality. Moral people can be identified by self-reports in surveys, and these self-reports predict consequential behaviors months after the initial assessment.

  3. The plasma sheet boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastman, T. E.; Frank, L. A.; Peterson, W. K.; Lennartsson, W.

    1984-01-01

    A spatially distinct, temporally variable, transition region between the magnetotail lobes and the central plasma sheet designated the plasma sheet boundary layer has been identified from a survey of particle spectra and three-dimensional distributions as sampled by the ISEE 1 LEPEDEA. The instrumentation and data presentation are described, and the signatures of the magnetotail plasma regimes are presented and discussed for the central plasma sheet and lobe and the plasma sheet boundary layer. Comparisons of plasma parameters and distribution fucntions are made and the evolution of ion velocity distributions within the plasma sheet boundary layer is discussed. The spatial distribution of the plasma sheet boundary layer is considered and ion composition measurements are presented.

  4. Making Characters Come Alive: Using Characters for Identification and Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chadwick, Jocelyn A.

    2012-01-01

    How do English teachers, with their amazing gift, empower students to see and experience literature not as a burden that must be endured and memorized for the test and then mercifully forgotten, but as a vehicle for self-discovery and reflection? One effective way to help students experience and discover literature is through the characters. For…

  5. Making Characters Come Alive: Using Characters for Identification and Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chadwick, Jocelyn A.

    2012-01-01

    How do English teachers, with their amazing gift, empower students to see and experience literature not as a burden that must be endured and memorized for the test and then mercifully forgotten, but as a vehicle for self-discovery and reflection? One effective way to help students experience and discover literature is through the characters. For…

  6. Distribution

    Treesearch

    John R. Jones

    1985-01-01

    Quaking aspen is the most widely distributed native North American tree species (Little 1971, Sargent 1890). It grows in a great diversity of regions, environments, and communities (Harshberger 1911). Only one deciduous tree species in the world, the closely related Eurasian aspen (Populus tremula), has a wider range (Weigle and Frothingham 1911)....

  7. Distributions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowers, Wayne A.

    This monograph was written for the Conference of the New Instructional Materials in Physics, held at the University of Washington in summer, 1965. It is intended for students who have had an introductory college physics course. It seeks to provide an introduction to the idea of distributions in general, and to some aspects of the subject in…

  8. Chinese readers can perceive a word even when it's composed of noncontiguous characters.

    PubMed

    Ma, Guojie; Pollatsek, Alexander; Li, Yugang; Li, Xingshan

    2017-01-01

    This study explored whether readers could recognize a word composed of noncontiguous characters (a cross-character word) in Chinese reading. All 3 experiments employed Chinese 4-character strings ABCD, where both AB and CD were 2-character words. In the cross-character word condition, AC was a word but in the control condition, AC was not a word. A character identification task was employed in Experiment 1 and sentence reading tasks were employed in Experiments 2 and 3. In all 3 experiments, an AC word produced inhibition effects. In Experiment 1, an AC word decreased the accuracy of character B identification, but increased the accuracy of character C identification. In Experiments 2 and 3, an AC word slowed reading on CD, indicating that the cross-character words were activated. These results imply that Chinese character encoding leading to word recognition does not proceed in a strictly serial way from left to right, or is strictly constrained by invisible word boundaries. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Font effects of Chinese characters and pseudo-characters on the N400: evidence for an orthographic processing view.

    PubMed

    Lv, Caixia; Wang, Quanhong

    2012-10-01

    Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were recorded during a Chinese character decision task to examine whether N400 amplitude is modulated by stimulus font. Results revealed large negative-going ERPs in an N400 time window of 300-500ms to stimuli presented in degraded Xing Kai Ti (XKT) font compared with more intact Song Ti (ST) font regardless of whether the stimuli were real or pseudo-characters. ERPs for the pseudo-characters were more negative than for the real characters with similar timing and scalp distribution. The N400-like font effect on amplitude is interpreted as analogous to an N400 stimulus degradation effect, an extension to Holcomb (1993); the degraded perceptual cues provided by XKT supposedly account for this degradation effect. This effect is further interpreted to reflect relative difficulty, which results from orthographic processing difficulty, in retrieving the meaning of XKT stimuli compared with ST stimuli. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Character Interviews Help Bring Literature to Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swindall, Vickie; Cantrell, R. Jeffrey

    1999-01-01

    Describes "Character Interviews," a class activity that guides children, especially reluctant readers, to the meaning of a story through a thoughtful understanding of character as they consider a character's emotions and motives, to respond to a question as that character would. Describes the interview process. Offers sample interviews…

  11. Building Character through Literacy with Children's Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almerico, Gina M.

    2014-01-01

    Character education is described as curriculum specifically developed to teach children about the quality and traits of good character. One means in which children can learn about good character is through the pages of high quality children's literature. In this study, the author defines the characteristics of an effective character development…

  12. Constructing Stylish Characters on Computer Graphics Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Gary S.

    1980-01-01

    Computer graphics systems typically produce a single, machine-like character font. At most, these systems enable the user to (1) alter the aspect ratio (height-to-width ratio) of the characters, (2) specify a transformation matrix to slant the characters, and (3) define a virtual pen table to change the lineweight of the plotted characters.…

  13. The Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary and some events on this boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, A. S.; Badiukov, D. D.; Nazarov, M. A.

    Present ideas on the position and radiological age of the C-P boundary are examined along with data on biotic events, changes of the ocean level, sedimentation conditions at the end of the Crataceous, the inversion of the geomagnetic field, volcanism, and tectonic movements on this boundary. Different lithological and geochemical peculiarities of the boundary horizon are discussed. It is suggested that the data on the character of events on the C-P boundary can only be explained on the basis of the impact model.

  14. The characters of Palaeozoic jawed vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Brazeau, Martin D; Friedman, Matt

    2014-01-01

    Newly discovered fossils from the Silurian and Devonian periods are beginning to challenge embedded perceptions about the origin and early diversification of jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes). Nevertheless, an explicit cladistic framework for the relationships of these fossils relative to the principal crown lineages of the jawed vertebrates (osteichthyans: bony fishes and tetrapods; chondrichthyans: sharks, batoids, and chimaeras) remains elusive. We critically review the systematics and character distributions of early gnathostomes and provide a clearly stated hierarchy of synapomorphies covering the jaw-bearing stem gnathostomes and osteichthyan and chondrichthyan stem groups. We show that character lists, designed to support the monophyly of putative groups, tend to overstate their strength and lack cladistic corroboration. By contrast, synapomorphic hierarchies are more open to refutation and must explicitly confront conflicting evidence. Our proposed synapomorphy scheme is used to evaluate the status of the problematic fossil groups Acanthodii and Placodermi, and suggest profitable avenues for future research. We interpret placoderms as a paraphyletic array of stem-group gnathostomes, and suggest what we regard as two equally plausible placements of acanthodians: exclusively on the chondrichthyan stem, or distributed on both the chondrichthyan and osteichthyan stems. PMID:25750460

  15. Character and the Composing Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivers, Thomas M.

    As communication is a moral action involving personal choice, composition instructors must help promote their students' character development. Whether during audience analysis, invention, or disposition, composition always involves the development and testing of four virtues: honesty, courage, love, and a combination of hope and humility. Teachers…

  16. Character Toys as Psychological Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smirnova, Elena O.

    2011-01-01

    The main characteristic of children's play is its mental aspect--the fact that it is based on thoughts and feelings and not on objective reality. During imaginary play, children go beyond the limits of reality, and toys are tools that help them to do this. Children need character toys--toys that play the role of companion or partner--in the early…

  17. Building Character through Shadow Puppetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Susannah

    2004-01-01

    Puppetry captures the imagination and interest of young students. Stories are told and retold to children through pictures, puppets, stuffed animals, toys, dolls, gestures, dramatic voices, and theatrical effects. Many of the stories involve some moral decision or event, such as fairy tales in which the characters "live happily ever after" after…

  18. Educators' Perceptions of Character Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Lelon; Stokes, Laura C.

    In 1995, Alabama joined many other states in passing mandatory character education as a response to violence in schools. Although the "Virtue of the Week" program had been implemented in Alabama schools for several years, little evaluation has been done to measure its effectiveness. In spring 2001, a study was carried out to analyze the…

  19. Understanding Agency and Educating Character

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Klas

    2011-01-01

    How can we understand human agency, and what does it mean to educate character? In this essay Klas Roth develops a Kantian notion, one that suggests we render ourselves efficacious and autonomous in education and elsewhere. This requires, among other things, that we are successful in bringing about the intended result through our actions and the…

  20. Moral Character and Student Aid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flint, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    Thirty years after the creation of federal student financial aid programs through the Higher Education Act of 1965, the link between moral character and student financial aid programs is once again influencing the public policy debate. A careful look at the debate, though, shows that the nature of concerns has shifted. In the past, the question…

  1. Character Toys as Psychological Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smirnova, Elena O.

    2011-01-01

    The main characteristic of children's play is its mental aspect--the fact that it is based on thoughts and feelings and not on objective reality. During imaginary play, children go beyond the limits of reality, and toys are tools that help them to do this. Children need character toys--toys that play the role of companion or partner--in the early…

  2. Shakespeare Live! and Character Counts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookshire, Cathy A.

    This paper discusses a live production of Shakespeare's "Macbeth" (in full costume but with no sets) for all public middle school and high school students in Harrisonburg and Rockingham, Virginia. The paper states that the "Character Counts" issues that are covered in the play are: decision making, responsibility and…

  3. Lessons in Leadership and Character.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilding, James A.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how an organization can demonstrate leadership and character through its operating principles and practices based on experiences at the Metro West Airports Authority (MWAA). Explains how the MWAA made the transition from a department within the federal government to an independent, not-for-profit organization. (Author/LRW)

  4. Lessons in Leadership and Character.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilding, James A.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how an organization can demonstrate leadership and character through its operating principles and practices based on experiences at the Metro West Airports Authority (MWAA). Explains how the MWAA made the transition from a department within the federal government to an independent, not-for-profit organization. (Author/LRW)

  5. Understanding Agency and Educating Character

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Klas

    2011-01-01

    How can we understand human agency, and what does it mean to educate character? In this essay Klas Roth develops a Kantian notion, one that suggests we render ourselves efficacious and autonomous in education and elsewhere. This requires, among other things, that we are successful in bringing about the intended result through our actions and the…

  6. Character Education and the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    Educators bring up the importance of character education periodically in articles written and speeches given at teacher education conventions. They believe that pupils need to develop well in the moral as well as academic dimensions. There are major problems in society today such as drug abuse, gang membership, intoxication, teenage pregnancy,…

  7. Twining characters and orbit Lie algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, Jurgen; Ray, Urmie; Schellekens, Bert; Schweigert, Christoph

    1996-12-05

    We associate to outer automorphisms of generalized Kac-Moody algebras generalized character-valued indices, the twining characters. A character formula for twining characters is derived which shows that they coincide with the ordinary characters of some other generalized Kac-Moody algebra, the so-called orbit Lie algebra. Some applications to problems in conformal field theory, algebraic geometry and the theory of sporadic simple groups are sketched.

  8. Evaluation of Interface Boundaries in 9Cr-1Mo Steel After Thermal and Thermomechanical Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthikeyan, T.; Dash, Manmath Kumar; Saroja, S.; Vijayalakshmi, M.

    2013-04-01

    The grain boundary character distribution (GBCD) and microstructure in 9Cr-1Mo ferritic/martensitic steel subjected to different heat treatments and thermomechanical treatments (TMTs) have been evaluated using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique. Microstructures obtained through displacive transformation of high-temperature austenite yielded higher amounts of Σ1-29 coincidence site lattice (CSL) boundaries (from 29 to 38 pct) compared with the ferrite grains obtained by diffusional transformation (~16 pct) or by recrystallization process (~14 pct). Specifically, the low-angle (Σ1), Σ3, Σ11, and Σ25b boundaries were enhanced in the tempered martensite substructure, whereas the prior austenite grain boundaries were largely of random type. Misorientation between the product ferrite variants for ideal orientation relationships during austenite transformation was calculated and compared with CSL misorientation to find its proximity based on Brandon's criteria. The observed enhancements in Σ1, Σ3, and Σ11 could be interpreted based on Kurdjumov-Sachs (K-S) relation, but Nishiyama-Wassermann (N-W) relation was needed to understand Σ25b formation. The amounts of CSL boundaries in the tempered martensite structure were not significantly influenced by austenite grain size or the kinetics of martensitic transformation. In mixed microstructures of "polygonal ferrite + tempered martensite", the frequencies of CSL boundaries were found to systematically decrease with increasing amounts of diffusional/recrystallized ferrite.

  9. Spectrum of an electromagnetic light wave on scattering from an anisotropic semisoft boundary medium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Jiang, Zhenfei; Ji, Xiaoling; Zhao, Daomu

    2016-04-01

    Spectral shifts and spectral switches of a polychromatic electromagnetic light wave on scattering from an anisotropic semisoft boundary medium are discussed. It is shown that both the property of the incident field and the character of the scattering medium play roles in the change of the spectrum of the far-zone scattered field. It is also shown that the distribution of the far-zone scattered spectrum, including the magnitude of the spectral shift and the direction at which the spectral switch occurs, is rotationally nonsymmetric.

  10. Perceiving the writing sequence of Chinese characters: an ERP investigation.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yinchen; Zhou, Xiaolin

    2010-04-01

    The neural dynamics in perceiving well-learned sequences and its modulation by task demand were investigated in this study in which participants were asked to observe stroke-by-stroke display of Chinese characters composed of two radicals while their brain activity was monitored with the event-related potential (ERP) technique. Experiment 1 used an accuracy judgment task that would draw participants' attention to the violation of the writing sequence whereas Experiment 2 required participants to judge the completion of the display and thus the more automatic aspects of sequence processing could be revealed. In Experiment 1, the within-radical boundary reversal produced bilateral posterior N2 enhancement and the cross-boundary reversal elicited a left N2 effect and right posterior N2 reduction on the critical stroke. Both types of reversal elicited P3 effects on the critical stroke and sustained negativity effects on the following stroke, with the size being larger for the cross-boundary reversal. In Experiment 2, in addition to the P3 effects, the within-boundary reversal elicited a left posterior N2 effect and the cross-boundary reversal elicited right posterior N2 reduction on the critical stroke. Moreover, on the following stroke, the cross-boundary reversal elicited a right N2 effect and both types of reversal elicited sustained positivity effects. These findings demonstrate that native Chinese readers use their sequential knowledge to predict upcoming strokes in perceiving the writing of characters and to construct appropriate representations for the action sequence regardless of whether such predictions and constructions are required by the task.

  11. Quantifying grain boundary damage tolerance with atomistic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Daniel; Tucker, Garritt J.

    2016-10-01

    Grain boundaries play a pivotal role in defect evolution and accommodation within materials. Irradiated metals have been observed to form defect denuded zones in the vicinity of grain boundaries. This is especially apparent in nanocrystalline metals, which have an increased grain boundary concentration, as compared to their polycrystalline counterparts. Importantly, the effect of individual grain boundaries on microstructural damage tolerance is related to the character or structural state of the grain boundary. In this work, the damage accommodation behavior of a variety of copper grain boundaries is studied using atomistic simulations. Damage accumulation behavior is found to reach a saturation point where both the free volume and energy of a grain boundary fluctuate within an elliptical manifold, which varies in size for different boundary characters. Analysis of the grain boundaries shows that extrinsic damage accommodation occurs due to localized atomic shuffling accompanied by free volume rearrangement within the boundary. Continuous damage accumulation leads to altered atomic structural states that oscillate around a mean non-equilibrium state, that is energetically metastable. Our results suggest that variation of grain boundary behavior, both from equilibrium and under saturation, is directly related to grain boundary equilibrium energy and some boundaries have a greater propensity to continually accommodate damage, as compared to others.

  12. Efficient learning strategy of Chinese characters based on network approach.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaoyong; Fan, Ying; Di, Zengru; Havlin, Shlomo; Wu, Jinshan

    2013-01-01

    We develop an efficient learning strategy of Chinese characters based on the network of the hierarchical structural relations between Chinese characters. A more efficient strategy is that of learning the same number of useful Chinese characters in less effort or time. We construct a node-weighted network of Chinese characters, where character usage frequencies are used as node weights. Using this hierarchical node-weighted network, we propose a new learning method, the distributed node weight (DNW) strategy, which is based on a new measure of nodes' importance that considers both the weight of the nodes and its location in the network hierarchical structure. Chinese character learning strategies, particularly their learning order, are analyzed as dynamical processes over the network. We compare the efficiency of three theoretical learning methods and two commonly used methods from mainstream Chinese textbooks, one for Chinese elementary school students and the other for students learning Chinese as a second language. We find that the DNW method significantly outperforms the others, implying that the efficiency of current learning methods of major textbooks can be greatly improved.

  13. Maximum entropy, word-frequency, Chinese characters, and multiple meanings.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaoyong; Minnhagen, Petter

    2015-01-01

    The word-frequency distribution of a text written by an author is well accounted for by a maximum entropy distribution, the RGF (random group formation)-prediction. The RGF-distribution is completely determined by the a priori values of the total number of words in the text (M), the number of distinct words (N) and the number of repetitions of the most common word (k(max)). It is here shown that this maximum entropy prediction also describes a text written in Chinese characters. In particular it is shown that although the same Chinese text written in words and Chinese characters have quite differently shaped distributions, they are nevertheless both well predicted by their respective three a priori characteristic values. It is pointed out that this is analogous to the change in the shape of the distribution when translating a given text to another language. Another consequence of the RGF-prediction is that taking a part of a long text will change the input parameters (M, N, k(max)) and consequently also the shape of the frequency distribution. This is explicitly confirmed for texts written in Chinese characters. Since the RGF-prediction has no system-specific information beyond the three a priori values (M, N, k(max)), any specific language characteristic has to be sought in systematic deviations from the RGF-prediction and the measured frequencies. One such systematic deviation is identified and, through a statistical information theoretical argument and an extended RGF-model, it is proposed that this deviation is caused by multiple meanings of Chinese characters. The effect is stronger for Chinese characters than for Chinese words. The relation between Zipf's law, the Simon-model for texts and the present results are discussed.

  14. Maximum Entropy, Word-Frequency, Chinese Characters, and Multiple Meanings

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xiaoyong; Minnhagen, Petter

    2015-01-01

    The word-frequency distribution of a text written by an author is well accounted for by a maximum entropy distribution, the RGF (random group formation)-prediction. The RGF-distribution is completely determined by the a priori values of the total number of words in the text (M), the number of distinct words (N) and the number of repetitions of the most common word (kmax). It is here shown that this maximum entropy prediction also describes a text written in Chinese characters. In particular it is shown that although the same Chinese text written in words and Chinese characters have quite differently shaped distributions, they are nevertheless both well predicted by their respective three a priori characteristic values. It is pointed out that this is analogous to the change in the shape of the distribution when translating a given text to another language. Another consequence of the RGF-prediction is that taking a part of a long text will change the input parameters (M, N, kmax) and consequently also the shape of the frequency distribution. This is explicitly confirmed for texts written in Chinese characters. Since the RGF-prediction has no system-specific information beyond the three a priori values (M, N, kmax), any specific language characteristic has to be sought in systematic deviations from the RGF-prediction and the measured frequencies. One such systematic deviation is identified and, through a statistical information theoretical argument and an extended RGF-model, it is proposed that this deviation is caused by multiple meanings of Chinese characters. The effect is stronger for Chinese characters than for Chinese words. The relation between Zipf’s law, the Simon-model for texts and the present results are discussed. PMID:25955175

  15. Non-Markovian character in human mobility: Online and offline.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Cai, Shi-Min; Lu, Yang

    2015-06-01

    The dynamics of human mobility characterizes the trajectories that humans follow during their daily activities and is the foundation of processes from epidemic spreading to traffic prediction and information recommendation. In this paper, we investigate a massive data set of human activity, including both online behavior of browsing websites and offline one of visiting towers based mobile terminations. The non-Markovian character observed from both online and offline cases is suggested by the scaling law in the distribution of dwelling time at individual and collective levels, respectively. Furthermore, we argue that the lower entropy and higher predictability in human mobility for both online and offline cases may originate from this non-Markovian character. However, the distributions of individual entropy and predictability show the different degrees of non-Markovian character between online and offline cases. To account for non-Markovian character in human mobility, we apply a protype model with three basic ingredients, namely, preferential return, inertial effect, and exploration to reproduce the dynamic process of online and offline human mobilities. The simulations show that the model has an ability to obtain characters much closer to empirical observations.

  16. Non-Markovian character in human mobility: Online and offline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Cai, Shi-Min; Lu, Yang

    2015-06-01

    The dynamics of human mobility characterizes the trajectories that humans follow during their daily activities and is the foundation of processes from epidemic spreading to traffic prediction and information recommendation. In this paper, we investigate a massive data set of human activity, including both online behavior of browsing websites and offline one of visiting towers based mobile terminations. The non-Markovian character observed from both online and offline cases is suggested by the scaling law in the distribution of dwelling time at individual and collective levels, respectively. Furthermore, we argue that the lower entropy and higher predictability in human mobility for both online and offline cases may originate from this non-Markovian character. However, the distributions of individual entropy and predictability show the different degrees of non-Markovian character between online and offline cases. To account for non-Markovian character in human mobility, we apply a protype model with three basic ingredients, namely, preferential return, inertial effect, and exploration to reproduce the dynamic process of online and offline human mobilities. The simulations show that the model has an ability to obtain characters much closer to empirical observations.

  17. Character virtues in psychiatric practice.

    PubMed

    Radden, Jennifer; Sadler, John Z

    2008-01-01

    The character-focused approach known as virtue ethics is especially well suited to understanding and promoting ethical psychiatric practice. Virtues are stable dispositions and responses attributed to character, and a virtue-based ethics is one in which people's selves or characters are at the center of moral assessment. In this discussion by a clinician and a philosopher, clinical scenarios using exchanges and inner monologue illustrate key aspects of virtues. Virtues are acquired through habituation; they are habits of mind as much as behavior; they are as a group heterogeneous, and individually composite; they involve affective responses; they are not impartial; they are compatible with the "role morality" required of professionals; they are responses to particular temptations and weaknesses; and they include, in the capacity for practical judgment known as phronesis, a way of resolving many of the conflicts and dilemmas that arise in practice. The virtue approach to ethics will likely be most useful in the educational setting where practitioners are learning clinical skills and socialized into the broad ethos of professional practice. Aspects of this educational effort are briefly reviewed, including whether it ought to be undertaken at all, whether the effort to teach virtues is possible, and, if so, how it can be achieved.

  18. Foundations of Eigenvalue Distribution Theory for General & Nonnegative Matrices, Stability Criteria for Hyperbolic Initial-Boundary Value Problems, Exact Eigenvalue Computations on the ILLIAC IV.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-29

    FOUNDATIONS OF EIGENVALUE DISTRIBUTION THEORY FOR GENERAL A NON--ETC(U) SEP 80 M MARCUS, M GOLDBERG, M NEWMAN AFOSR-79-0127 UNCLASSIFIED AFOSR-TR-80...September 1980 Title of Research: Foundations of Eigenvalue Distribution Theory for General & Nonnegative Matrices, Stability Criteria for Hyperbolic

  19. 7 CFR 52.781 - Character.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Cherries 1 Factors of Quality § 52.781 Character. (a) General. The factor of character refers to the..., regardless of the total score for the product (this is a limiting rule). Allowances for Quality Factors ...

  20. 7 CFR 52.781 - Character.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Cherries 1 Factors of Quality § 52.781 Character. (a) General. The factor of character refers to the..., regardless of the total score for the product (this is a limiting rule). Allowances for Quality Factors ...

  1. 7 CFR 52.809 - Character.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... United States Standards for Grades of Frozen Red Tart Pitted Cherries Factors of Quality § 52.809 Character. (a) General. The factor of character refers to the physical characteristics of the flesh of the...). Allowances for Quality Factors ...

  2. 7 CFR 52.809 - Character.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... United States Standards for Grades of Frozen Red Tart Pitted Cherries Factors of Quality § 52.809 Character. (a) General. The factor of character refers to the physical characteristics of the flesh of the...). Allowances for Quality Factors ...

  3. Character Analysis: Up Close and Personal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonough, Carla J.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a class activity which gives students practice in character analysis based on characters' dialog in plays. Offers a version of this activity as applied to Caryl Churchill's play "Top Girls." (SR)

  4. Character Analysis: Up Close and Personal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonough, Carla J.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a class activity which gives students practice in character analysis based on characters' dialog in plays. Offers a version of this activity as applied to Caryl Churchill's play "Top Girls." (SR)

  5. Accurate positioning of characters on CRT displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damian, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Two systems, one digital and one analog, improve positioning of characters in cathode-ray tube (CRT) display systems. Circuits minimize effects of amplifier settling times--effects that can displace and distort characters in high-speed multiplexed systems.

  6. Accurate positioning of characters on CRT displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damian, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Two systems, one digital and one analog, improve positioning of characters in cathode-ray tube (CRT) display systems. Circuits minimize effects of amplifier settling times--effects that can displace and distort characters in high-speed multiplexed systems.

  7. Chinese license plate character segmentation using multiscale template matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jiangmin; Wang, Guoyou; Liu, Jianguo; Xia, Yuanchun

    2016-09-01

    Character segmentation (CS) plays an important role in automatic license plate recognition and has been studied for decades. A method using multiscale template matching is proposed to settle the problem of CS for Chinese license plates. It is carried out on a binary image integrated from maximally stable extremal region detection and Otsu thresholding. Afterward, a uniform harrow-shaped template with variable length is designed, by virtue of which a three-dimensional matching space is constructed for searching of candidate segmentations. These segmentations are detected at matches with local minimum responses. Finally, the vertical boundaries of each single character are located for subsequent recognition. Experiments on a data set including 2349 license plate images of different quality levels show that the proposed method can achieve a higher accuracy at comparable time cost and is robust to images in poor conditions.

  8. The case for character displacement in plants

    PubMed Central

    Beans, Carolyn M

    2014-01-01

    The evidence for character displacement as a widespread response to competition is now building. This progress is largely the result of the establishment of rigorous criteria for demonstrating character displacement in the animal literature. There are, however, relatively few well-supported examples of character displacement in plants. This review explores the potential for character displacement in plants by addressing the following questions: (1) Why aren't examples of character displacement in plants more common? (2) What are the requirements for character displacement to occur and how do plant populations meet those requirements? (3) What are the criteria for testing the pattern and process of character displacement and what methods can and have been used to address these criteria in the plant literature? (4) What are some additional approaches for studying character displacement in plants? While more research is needed, the few plant systems in which character displacement hypotheses have been rigorously tested suggest that character displacement may play a role in shaping plant communities. Plants are especially amenable to character displacement studies because of the experimental ease with which they can be used in common gardens, selection analyses, and breeding designs. A deeper investigation of character displacement in plants is critical for a more complete understanding of the ecological and evolutionary processes that permit the coexistence of plant species. PMID:24683467

  9. The case for character displacement in plants.

    PubMed

    Beans, Carolyn M

    2014-03-01

    The evidence for character displacement as a widespread response to competition is now building. This progress is largely the result of the establishment of rigorous criteria for demonstrating character displacement in the animal literature. There are, however, relatively few well-supported examples of character displacement in plants. This review explores the potential for character displacement in plants by addressing the following questions: (1) Why aren't examples of character displacement in plants more common? (2) What are the requirements for character displacement to occur and how do plant populations meet those requirements? (3) What are the criteria for testing the pattern and process of character displacement and what methods can and have been used to address these criteria in the plant literature? (4) What are some additional approaches for studying character displacement in plants? While more research is needed, the few plant systems in which character displacement hypotheses have been rigorously tested suggest that character displacement may play a role in shaping plant communities. Plants are especially amenable to character displacement studies because of the experimental ease with which they can be used in common gardens, selection analyses, and breeding designs. A deeper investigation of character displacement in plants is critical for a more complete understanding of the ecological and evolutionary processes that permit the coexistence of plant species.

  10. Extending Word Processing for Foreign Characters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melby, Alan K.

    1984-01-01

    Presents short text in French and discusses possible methods of extending word processing to allow text entry, text editing, and hard copy output of foreign characters. Highlights include discussions of using ASCII for English and problems with French, one-character and two-character approaches, and examples in terms of specific microcomputer…

  11. Strengths of character and posttraumatic growth.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Christopher; Park, Nansook; Pole, Nnamdi; D'Andrea, Wendy; Seligman, Martin E P

    2008-04-01

    How are strengths of character related to growth following trauma? A retrospective Web-based study of 1,739 adults found small, but positive associations among the number of potentially traumatic events experienced and a number of cognitive and interpersonal character strengths. It was concluded that growth following trauma may entail the strengthening of character.

  12. Promoting Character Development through Coach Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, F. Clark; Seroczynski, A. D.

    2015-01-01

    Can youth sports build character? Research suggests that the answer to this question leads to 2 further questions: (1) can youth sport coaches be effectively prepared to become character educators, and (2) can character education take place in today's competitive youth sport environment? (Bredemeier & Shields, 2006; Power, 2015; Power &…

  13. Understanding the Properties of Interactive Televised Characters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claxton, Laura J.; Ponto, Katelyn C.

    2013-01-01

    Children's television programming frequently uses interactive characters that appear to directly engage the viewers. These characters encourage children to answer questions and perform actions to help the characters solve problems in the televised world. Children readily engage in these interactions; however, it is unclear why they do so. To…

  14. Exploring Good Character and Citizenship in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arthur, James; Harrison, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Citizenship, character and the virtues that constitute both are increasingly concerns of public policy in the UK. This article understands character to encompass the morally valuable, reason-response and education part of personality, and understands virtues as states of character concerned with praiseworthy feelings and conduct in specific…

  15. A Review of Virtual Character's Emotion Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhen

    2008-11-01

    Emotional virtual characters are essential to digital entertainment, an emotion is related to virtual environment and a virtual character's inner variables, emotion model of virtual character is a hot topic in many fields, domain knowledge is very important for modeling emotion, and the current research of emotion expression in the world was also summarized, and some new research directions of emotion model are presented.

  16. Is There a Place for Character Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creasy, Kim L.

    2008-01-01

    Recent trends in school curricula place a heavy focus on the improvement of basic skills test scores. As a result, the role of character education has been diminished. This article provides a rationale for the incorporation of a character education program within the school curricula, a working definition of character education, and the role of…

  17. Understanding the Properties of Interactive Televised Characters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claxton, Laura J.; Ponto, Katelyn C.

    2013-01-01

    Children's television programming frequently uses interactive characters that appear to directly engage the viewers. These characters encourage children to answer questions and perform actions to help the characters solve problems in the televised world. Children readily engage in these interactions; however, it is unclear why they do so. To…

  18. Rapid Naming Speed and Chinese Character Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liao, Chen-Huei; Georgiou, George K.; Parrila, Rauno

    2008-01-01

    We examined the relationship between rapid naming speed (RAN) and Chinese character recognition accuracy and fluency. Sixty-three grade 2 and 54 grade 4 Taiwanese children were administered four RAN tasks (colors, digits, Zhu-Yin-Fu-Hao, characters), and two character recognition tasks. RAN tasks accounted for more reading variance in grade 4 than…

  19. Interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer at high transonic speeds. Part 1: Pressure distribution. Part 2: Wall shear stress. Part 3: Simplified formulas for the prediction of surface pressures and skin friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, T. C., Jr.; Liou, M. S.; Messiter, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    An asymptotic description is derived for the interaction between a shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer in transonic flow, for a particular limiting case. The dimensionless difference between the external flow velocity and critical sound speed is taken to be much smaller than one, but large in comparison with the dimensionless friction velocity. The basic results are derived for a flat plate, and corrections for longitudinal wall curvature and for flow in a circular pipe are also shown. Solutions are given for the wall pressure distribution and the shape of the shock wave. Solutions for the wall shear stress are obtained, and a criterion for incipient separation is derived. Simplified solutions for both the wall pressure and skin friction distributions in the interaction region are given. These results are presented in a form suitable for use in computer programs.

  20. The Distribution of Superficial Zone Protein (SZP)/Lubricin/PRG4 and Boundary Mode Frictional Properties of the Bovine Diarthrodial Joint

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Gordon; McNary, Sean M.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.; Reddi, A. Hari

    2015-01-01

    The diarthrodial, knee joint is a remarkably efficient bearing system; articulating cartilage surfaces provide nearly frictionless performance with minimal wear. The low friction properties of the cartilage surfaces are due in part to the boundary lubricant, superficial zone protein (SZP); also known as lubricin or proteoglycan 4 (PRG4). In previous work, SZP localization and cartilage friction were examined across the femoral condyles. Studies in the literature have also individually investigated the other tissues that comprise the human knee and four-legged animal stifle joint, such as the meniscus or patella. However, comparisons between individual studies are limited due to the variable testing conditions employed. Friction is a system property that is dependent on the opposing articulating surface, entraining speed, and loading. A cross-comparison of the frictional properties and SZP localization across the knee/stifle joint tissues utilizing a common testing configuration is therefore needed. The objective of this investigation was to determine the friction coefficient and SZP localization of the tissues comprising the three compartments of the bovine stifle joint: patella, patellofemoral groove, femoral condyles, meniscus, tibial plateau, and anterior cruciate ligament. The boundary mode coefficient of friction was greater in tissues of the patellofemoral compartment than the lateral and medial tibiofemoral compartments. SZP immunolocalization followed this trend with reduced depth of staining and intensity in the patella and patellofemoral groove compared to the femoral condyles and tibial plateau. These results illustrate the important role of SZP in reducing friction in the tissues and compartments of the knee/stifle joint. PMID:26117076

  1. Postural Instability Detection: Aging and the Complexity of Spatial-Temporal Distributional Patterns for Virtually Contacting the Stability Boundary in Human Stance

    PubMed Central

    Kilby, Melissa C.; Slobounov, Semyon M.; Newell, Karl M.

    2014-01-01

    Falls among the older population can severely restrict their functional mobility and even cause death. Therefore, it is crucial to understand the mechanisms and conditions that cause falls, for which it is important to develop a predictive model of falls. One critical quantity for postural instability detection and prediction is the instantaneous stability of quiet upright stance based on motion data. However, well-established measures in the field of motor control that quantify overall postural stability using center-of-pressure (COP) or center-of-mass (COM) fluctuations are inadequate predictors of instantaneous stability. For this reason, 2D COP/COM virtual-time-to-contact (VTC) is investigated to detect the postural stability deficits of healthy older people compared to young adults. VTC predicts the temporal safety margin to the functional stability boundary ( =  limits of the region of feasible COP or COM displacement) and, therefore, provides an index of the risk of losing postural stability. The spatial directions with increased instability were also determined using quantities of VTC that have not previously been considered. Further, Lempel-Ziv-Complexity (LZC), a measure suitable for on-line monitoring of stability/instability, was applied to explore the temporal structure or complexity of VTC and the predictability of future postural instability based on previous behavior. These features were examined as a function of age, vision and different load weighting on the legs. The primary findings showed that for old adults the stability boundary was contracted and VTC reduced. Furthermore, the complexity decreased with aging and the direction with highest postural instability also changed in aging compared to the young adults. The findings reveal the sensitivity of the time dependent properties of 2D VTC to the detection of postural instability in aging, availability of visual information and postural stance and potential applicability as a predictive

  2. Deformed Neogene basins, active faulting and topography in Westland: Distributed crustal mobility west of the Alpine Fault transpressive plate boundary (South Island, New Zealand)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisetti, Francesca; Sibson, Richard H.; Hamling, Ian

    2016-12-01

    Tectonic activity in the South Island of New Zealand is dominated by the Alpine Fault component of the Australia-Pacific plate boundary. West of the Alpine Fault deformation is recorded by Paleogene-Neogene basins coeval with the evolution of the right-lateral/transpressive plate margin. Initial tectonic setting was controlled by N-S normal faults developed during Late Cretaceous and Eocene-early Miocene rifting. Following inception of the Alpine Fault (c. 25 Ma) reverse reactivation of the normal faults controlled tectonic segmentation that became apparent in the cover sequences at c. 22 Ma. Based on restored transects tied to stratigraphic sections, seismic lines and wells, we reconstruct the vertical mobility of the Top Basement Unconformity west of Alpine Fault. From c. 37-35 Ma to 22 Ma subsidence was controlled by extensional faulting. After 22 Ma the region was affected by differential subsidence, resulting from eastward crustal flexure towards the Alpine Fault boundary and/or components of transtension. Transition from subsidence to uplift started at c. 17 Ma within a belt of basement pop-ups, separated by subsiding basins localised in the common footwall of oppositely-dipping reverse faults. From 17 to 7-3 Ma reverse fault reactivation and uplift migrated to the WSW. Persistent reverse reactivation of the inherited faults in the present stress field is reflected by the close match between tectonic block segmentation and topography filtered at a wavelength of 25 km, i.e. at a scale comparable to crustal thickness in the region. However, topography filtered at wavelength of 75 km shows marked contrasts between the elevated Tasman Ranges region relative to regions to the south. Variations in thickness and rigidity of the Australian lithosphere possibly control N-S longitudinal changes, consistent with our estimates of increase in linear shortening from the Tasman Ranges to the regions located west of the Alpine Fault bend.

  3. Character recognition of Japanese newspaper headlines with graphical designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawaki, Minako; Hagita, Norihiro

    1996-03-01

    Graphical designs are often used in Japanese newspaper headlines to indicate hot articles. However, conventional OCR software seldom recognizes characters in such headlines because of the difficulty of removing the designs. This paper proposes a method that recognizes these characters without needing removal of the graphical designs. First, the number of text-line regions and the averaged character heights are roughly extracted from the local distribution of the black and white runs observed in a rectangular window while the window is shifted pixel- by-pixel along the direction of the text-line. Next, normalized text-line regions are yielded by normalizing their heights to the height of binary reference patterns in a dictionary. Next, displacement matching is applied to the normalized text-line region for character recognition. A square window at each position is matched against binary reference patterns while being shifted pixel-by-pixel along the direction of the text-line. The complementary similarity measure, which is robust against graphical designs, is used as a discriminant function. When the maximum similarity value at each position exceeds the threshold, which is automatically determined from the degree of degradation in the square window, the character category of this similarity value is specified as a recognized category. Experimental results for fifty Japanese newspaper headlines show that the method achieves recognition rates of over 90%, much higher than a conventional method (17%).

  4. The cascade character of the growth of turbulent vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surkov, S. V.

    1985-04-01

    The structure of discrete large-scale vortices in a turbulent boundary flow is modeled using a mininal number of assumptions. It is shown that if the waves generated by the vortex propagate transversely in relation to the flow then the vortex growth is of a cascade character, which is related to the stepwise decrease in the rotation frequency. The model also accounts for the maxima in the spectra of turbulent pulsations and for the increase in the number of maxima with an increase in the Reynolds number. Finally, characteristic pulsation frequencies are approximately defined for a flow in a hydraulically smooth pipe, exhibiting good agreement with available experimental results.

  5. Group discriminatory power of handwritten characters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomai, Catalin I.; Kshirsagar, Devika M.; Srihari, Sargur N.

    2003-12-01

    Using handwritten characters we address two questions (i) what is the group identification performance of different alphabets (upper and lower case) and (ii) what are the best characters for the verification task (same writer/different writer discrimination) knowing demographic information about the writer such as ethnicity, age or sex. The Bhattacharya distance is used to rank different characters by their group discriminatory power and the k-nn classifier to measure the individual performance of characters for group identification. Given the tasks of identifying the correct gender/age/ethnicity or handedness, the accumulated performance of characters varies between 65% and 85%.

  6. Data set for Tifinagh handwriting character recognition

    PubMed Central

    Bencharef, Omar; Chihab, Younes; Mousaid, Nouredine; Oujaoura, Mustapha

    2015-01-01

    The Tifinagh alphabet-IRCAM is the official alphabet of the Amazigh language widely used in North Africa [1]. It includes thirty-one basic letter and two letters each composed of a base letter followed by the sign of labialization. Normalized only in 2003 (Unicode) [2], ICRAM-Tifinagh is a young character repertoire. Which needs more work on all levels. In this context we propose a data set for handwritten Tifinagh characters composed of 1376 image; 43 Image For Each character. The dataset can be used to train a Tifinagh character recognition system, or to extract the meaning characteristics of each character. PMID:26217753

  7. Document Form and Character Recognition using SVM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang-Sung; Shin, Young-Geun; Jung, Won-Kyo; Ahn, Dong-Kyu; Jang, Dong-Sik

    2009-08-01

    Because of development of computer and information communication, EDI (Electronic Data Interchange) has been developing. There is OCR (Optical Character Recognition) of Pattern recognition technology for EDI. OCR contributed to changing many manual in the past into automation. But for the more perfect database of document, much manual is needed for excluding unnecessary recognition. To resolve this problem, we propose document form based character recognition method in this study. Proposed method is divided into document form recognition part and character recognition part. Especially, in character recognition, change character into binarization by using SVM algorithm and extract more correct feature value.

  8. Data set for Tifinagh handwriting character recognition.

    PubMed

    Bencharef, Omar; Chihab, Younes; Mousaid, Nouredine; Oujaoura, Mustapha

    2015-09-01

    The Tifinagh alphabet-IRCAM is the official alphabet of the Amazigh language widely used in North Africa [1]. It includes thirty-one basic letter and two letters each composed of a base letter followed by the sign of labialization. Normalized only in 2003 (Unicode) [2], ICRAM-Tifinagh is a young character repertoire. Which needs more work on all levels. In this context we propose a data set for handwritten Tifinagh characters composed of 1376 image; 43 Image For Each character. The dataset can be used to train a Tifinagh character recognition system, or to extract the meaning characteristics of each character.

  9. Professional Development for Character Education: An Evaluation of Teachers' Sense of Efficacy for Character Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledford, Alice T.

    2011-01-01

    Today's teachers and administrators must educate students for character. But, teachers are inconsistently prepared for this challenge. This descriptive study examined teachers' sense of efficacy for character education among pre-K-12 teachers based on their type of character education training. The Character Education Efficacy Belief Instrument…

  10. Actual use scene of Han-Character for proper name and coded character set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Tatsuo

    This article discusses the following two issues. One is overview of standardization of Han-Character in coded character set including Universal coded character set (ISO/IEC 10646), with the relation to Japanese language policy of the government. The other is the difference and particularity of Han-Character usage for proper name and difficulty to implement in ICT systems.

  11. The habit of crystals in aggregates: five parameter grain boundary characterization of olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquardt, K.; Rohrer, G. S.; Morales, L. F. G.; De Graef, M.; Farla, R. J.

    2016-12-01

    There is growing evidence that the presence of interfaces in rocks, including phase and grain boundaries influence macroscopic properties. To model resulting bulk rock properties and ultimately interpret geophysical signals, such as electrical conductivity, knowledge about the relative abundance of specific grain boundaries is needed. To date, neither the anisotropic frequency of appearance of specific grain boundaries nor its dependence on chemical composition is known for rock forming minerals. Here, we report detailed interface characterizations in olivine, the most abundant phase in the upper mantle. To obtain the area distribution of the geometrically varying interfaces, which is among the most fundamental information, we used electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) to detect the orientations of over 3x104grains corresponding to more than 6000 mm length of grain boundary separating them. Subsequently we used a stereological approach to determine the grain boundary character distribution (GBCD), defined as the relative areas of grain boundaries of different types, distinguished by their five degrees of freedom (Rohrer et al. 2004). We discuss data collected from different olivine aggregates with chemical compositions ranging from Mg2SiO4 forsterite to Mg1.8Fe0.2SiO4 derived from different synthesis methods. We show that standard EBSD indexing as commonly used is sufficient for many applications, but when characterizing grain boundaries higher accuracy and precision is fundamental and provided by the new dictionary indexing approach, where clean up procedures, that can cause artifacts, are superfluous. The grain boundary planes show a preference for low index planes, which is in agreement with observations on other materials (e.g. MgO, TiO2, SrTiO3, MgAl2O4). We find that the principal crystallographic planes have the lowest energies resulting in crystal habits dominated by (001) planes, followed by (010) and (001) planes and that 90°/[001] (100)(010) are the

  12. Natal plumage characters in rails

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wetherbee, D.K.; Meanley, B.

    1965-01-01

    The downy young of the Clapper Rail (Rallus longirostris), King Rail (Rallus elegans), and Virginia Rail (Rallus limicola) are described as totally black in all literature examined by us. Wetherbee (Bird-Banding, 32: 141-159, 1961) noted that some neonates of Virginia Rail from Storrs, Connecticut, had patches of white down below the wings. "Neonatal" pertains to the developmental condition or characters at hatching distinct from the much abused term "natal" which in ornithology pertains to the condition or characters from hatching to acquisition of teleoptile plumage. The presence of similar patches of white down was observed by us in the Clapper Rails at Chincoteague, Virginia (Figure 1). An examination of many hundreds of specimens from the ranges of most of the subspecies of Clapper Rails, including the strongly contrasting R. longirostris saturatus from Louisiana, revealed the almost invariable presence of at least 1 and sometimes as many as 30 white neossoptiles in the anterior abdominal regions of the ventral pterylae. Conversely, no King Rail neonate examined by us has shown a white neossoptile.

  13. Precession electron diffraction for SiC grain boundary characterization in unirradiated TRISO fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Lillo, T. M.; van Rooyen, I. J.; Wu, Y. Q.

    2016-06-16

    Precession electron diffraction (PED), a transmission electron microscopy-based technique, has been evaluated for the suitability for evaluating grain boundary character in the SiC layer of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel. Although the ultimate goal is to determine the grain boundary characteristics of fission product containing grain boundaries of neutron irradiated SiC, our work reports the effect of transmission electron microscope (TEM) lamella thickness on quality of data and establishes a baseline comparison on grain boundary characteristics determined previously using a conventional EBSD scanning electron microscope (SEM) based technique. In general, it was determined that the lamella thickness produced using the standard FIB fabrication process, is sufficient to provide reliable PED measurements with thicker lamellae (~120 nm) produce higher quality orientation data. Analysis of grain boundary character from the TEM-based PED data showed a much lower fraction of low angle grain boundaries compared to SEM-based EBSD data from the SiC layer of the same TRISO-coated particle as well as a SiC layer deposited at a slightly lower temperature. The fractions of high angle and CSL-related grain boundaries determined by PED are similar to those found using SEM-based EBSD. Since the grain size of the SiC layer of TRSIO fuel can be as small as 250 nm [12], depending on the fabrication parameters, and grain boundary fission product precipitates can be nano-sized, the TEM-based PED orientation data collection method is preferred to determine an accurate representation of the relative fractions of low angle, high angle and CSL-related grain boundaries. It was concluded that although the resolution of the PED data is better by more than an order of magnitude, data acquisition times may be significantly longer or the number of areas analyzed significantly larger than the SEM-based method to obtain a statistically relevant distribution. Also, grain size could be

  14. Precession electron diffraction for SiC grain boundary characterization in unirradiated TRISO fuel

    DOE PAGES

    Lillo, T. M.; van Rooyen, I. J.; Wu, Y. Q.

    2016-06-16

    Precession electron diffraction (PED), a transmission electron microscopy-based technique, has been evaluated for the suitability for evaluating grain boundary character in the SiC layer of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel. Although the ultimate goal is to determine the grain boundary characteristics of fission product containing grain boundaries of neutron irradiated SiC, our work reports the effect of transmission electron microscope (TEM) lamella thickness on quality of data and establishes a baseline comparison on grain boundary characteristics determined previously using a conventional EBSD scanning electron microscope (SEM) based technique. In general, it was determined that the lamella thickness produced using the standardmore » FIB fabrication process, is sufficient to provide reliable PED measurements with thicker lamellae (~120 nm) produce higher quality orientation data. Analysis of grain boundary character from the TEM-based PED data showed a much lower fraction of low angle grain boundaries compared to SEM-based EBSD data from the SiC layer of the same TRISO-coated particle as well as a SiC layer deposited at a slightly lower temperature. The fractions of high angle and CSL-related grain boundaries determined by PED are similar to those found using SEM-based EBSD. Since the grain size of the SiC layer of TRSIO fuel can be as small as 250 nm [12], depending on the fabrication parameters, and grain boundary fission product precipitates can be nano-sized, the TEM-based PED orientation data collection method is preferred to determine an accurate representation of the relative fractions of low angle, high angle and CSL-related grain boundaries. It was concluded that although the resolution of the PED data is better by more than an order of magnitude, data acquisition times may be significantly longer or the number of areas analyzed significantly larger than the SEM-based method to obtain a statistically relevant distribution. Also, grain size could be

  15. Documentation for the machine-readable character coded version of the SKYMAP catalogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, W. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The SKYMAP catalogue is a compilation of astronomical data prepared primarily for purposes of attitude guidance for satellites. In addition to the SKYMAP Master Catalogue data base, a software package of data base management and utility programs is available. The tape version of the SKYMAP Catalogue, as received by the Astronomical Data Center (ADC), contains logical records consisting of a combination of binary and EBCDIC data. Certain character coded data in each record are redundant in that the same data are present in binary form. In order to facilitate wider use of all SKYMAP data by the astronomical community, a formatted (character) version was prepared by eliminating all redundant character data and converting all binary data to character form. The character version of the catalogue is described. The document is intended to fully describe the formatted tape so that users can process the data problems and guess work; it should be distributed with any character version of the catalogue.

  16. Kannada character recognition system using neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Suresh D. S.; Kamalapuram, Srinivasa K.; Kumar, Ajay B. R.

    2013-03-01

    Handwriting recognition has been one of the active and challenging research areas in the field of pattern recognition. It has numerous applications which include, reading aid for blind, bank cheques and conversion of any hand written document into structural text form. As there is no sufficient number of works on Indian language character recognition especially Kannada script among 15 major scripts in India. In this paper an attempt is made to recognize handwritten Kannada characters using Feed Forward neural networks. A handwritten Kannada character is resized into 20x30 Pixel. The resized character is used for training the neural network. Once the training process is completed the same character is given as input to the neural network with different set of neurons in hidden layer and their recognition accuracy rate for different Kannada characters has been calculated and compared. The results show that the proposed system yields good recognition accuracy rates comparable to that of other handwritten character recognition systems.

  17. Character evolution in Hydrozoa (phylum Cnidaria).

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Paulyn; Nawrocki, Annalise M

    2010-09-01

    The diversity of hydrozoan life cycles, as manifested in the wide range of polyp, colony, and medusa morphologies, has been appreciated for centuries. Unraveling the complex history of characters involved in this diversity is critical for understanding the processes driving hydrozoan evolution. In this study, we use a phylogenetic approach to investigate the evolution of morphological characters in Hydrozoa. A molecular phylogeny is reconstructed using ribosomal DNA sequence data. Several characters involving polyp, colony, and medusa morphology are coded in the terminal taxa. These characters are mapped onto the phylogeny and then the ancestral character states are reconstructed. This study confirms the complex evolutionary history of hydrozoan morphological characters. Many of the characters involving polyp, colony, and medusa morphology appear as synapomorphies for major hydrozoan clades, yet homoplasy is commonplace. © The Author 2010. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved.

  18. Changing the Structure Boundary Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Karasev, Viktor; Dzlieva, Elena; Ivanov, Artyom

    2008-09-07

    Analysis of previously obtained results shows that hexagonal crystal lattice is the dominant type of ordering, in particular, in striated glow discharges. We explore the possibility for changing the dust distribution in horizontal cross sections of relatively highly ordered structures in a glow-discharge. Presuming that boundary geometry can affect dust distribution, we used cylindrical coolers held at 0 deg. C and placed against a striation containing a structure, to change the geometry of its outer boundary. By varying the number of coolers, their positions, and their separations from the tube wall, azimuthally asymmetric thermophoretic forces can be used to form polygonal boundaries and vary the angles between their segments (in a horizontal cross section). The corner in the structure's boundary of 60 deg. stimulates formation of hexagonal cells. The structure between the supported parallel boundaries is also characterized by stable hexagonal ordering. We found that a single linear boundary segment does not give rise to any sizable domain, but generates a lattice extending from the boundary (without edge defects). A square lattice can be formed by setting the angle equal to 90 deg. . However, angles of 45 deg. and 135 deg. turned out easier to form. Square lattice was created by forming a near-135 deg. corner with four coolers. It was noted that no grain ordering is observed in the region adjacent to corners of angles smaller than 30 deg. , which do not promote ordering into cells of any shape. Thus, manipulation of a structure boundary can be used to change dust distribution, create structures free of the ubiquitous edge defects that destroy orientation order, and probably change the crystal lattice type.

  19. The South Boundary of the Subducted Yakutat Terrane Seems to Affect the Distribution of Forearc Subsidence Since the 1964 Great Alaska Earthquake (Mw=9.2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, M. A.; Freymueller, J. T.; Ruppert, N. A.; Parsons, T.; Ebberhart-Phillips, D. M.; Sliter, R. W.; Wong, F. L.

    2006-12-01

    During the past 5-10 Ma, the Yakutat terrane has been colliding with and subducting beneath the Alaskan part of the North American Plate. Modeling of GPS data and analysis of deep-crustal structure bolster a hypothesized connection between the terrane collision and seismogenesis. GPS data collected near Prince William Sound indicate that forearc subsidence following the 1964 Great Alaska Earthquake (Mw=9.2) is concentrated in two areas. Crustal-structure data reveal that the subducted south boundary of the Yakutat terrane passes between these two areas, and subsidence is reduced directly above this boundary. Overall, the subsidence is consistent with elastic deformation from a locked subduction zone. However, the two separate regions of subsidence suggest that the Prince William Sound asperity, previously assumed to be a single large locked region on the plate interface, probably consists of two separate locked patches. Because the gap between the two corresponds in location with the edge of the subducted Yakutat terrane, this edge may control the seismogenic behavior of the subduction interface. We tentatively identify the two inferred asperities with the Yakutat-North America and Pacific-North America interfaces, respectively. GPS vertical velocities are based on data collected between 1993 and 2005, with all GPS solutions in the ITRF2000 reference frame and corrected for displacements due to the 2002 Denali Fault Earthquake. Vertical displacements from the 2002 earthquake in Prince William Sound were very small. The regional deep-crustal structure is interpreted from aeromagnetic and multichannel seismic-reflection (MCS) data. The shelf-edge magnetic anomaly (SEMA) closely follows the south side of the Yakutat terrane. North- trending magnetic anomalies of the Pacific Plate terminate along the south side of the SEMA, and to the north over the Yakutat terrane, the magnetic field is smooth. The SEMA indicates that the Transition fault zone (TFZ) forms the boundary

  20. Detecting Character Dependencies in Stochastic Models of Evolution.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, Deeparnab; Kannan, Sampath; Tian, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    Stochastic models of biological evolution generally assume that different characters (runs of the stochastic process) are independent and identically distributed. In this article we determine the asymptotic complexity of detecting dependence for some fairly general models of evolution, but simple models of dependence. A key difference from much of the previous work is that our algorithms work without knowledge of the tree topology. Specifically, we consider various stochastic models of evolution ranging from the common ones used by biologists (such as Cavender-Farris-Neyman and Jukes-Cantor models) to very general ones where evolution of different characters can be governed by different transition matrices on each edge of the evolutionary tree (phylogeny). We also consider several models of dependence between two characters. In the most specific model, on each edge of the phylogeny the joint distribution of the dependent characters undergoes a perturbation of a fixed magnitude, in a fixed direction from what it would be if the characters were evolving independently. More general dependence models don't require such a strong "signal." Instead they only require that on each edge, the perturbation of the joint distribution has a significant component in a specific direction. Our main results are nearly tight bounds on the induced or operator norm of the transition matrices that would allow us to detect dependence efficiently for most models of evolution and dependence that we consider. We make essential use of a new concentration result for multistate random variables of a Markov random field on arbitrary trivalent trees: We show that the random variable counting the number of leaves in any particular state has variance that is subquadratic in the number of leaves.

  1. 26 CFR 1.662(b)-2 - Character of amounts; when charitable contributions are made.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Income Or Which Distribute Corpus § 1.662(b)-2 Character of amounts; when charitable contributions are... instrument and local law capital gains are added to corpus. During the taxable year the trust...

  2. Importance of soil moisture and N availability to larch growth and distribution in the Arctic taiga-tundra boundary ecosystem, northeastern Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Maochang; Sugimoto, Atsuko; Tei, Shunsuke; Bragin, Ivan V.; Takano, Shinya; Morozumi, Tomoki; Shingubara, Ryo; Maximov, Trofim C.; Kiyashko, Serguei I.; Velivetskaya, Tatiana A.; Ignatiev, Alexander V.

    2014-12-01

    To better understand the factors controlling the growth of larch trees in Arctic taiga-tundra boundary ecosystem, we conducted field measurements of photosynthesis, tree size, nitrogen (N) content, and isotopic ratios in larch needles and soil. In addition, we observed various environmental parameters, including topography and soil moisture at four sites in the Indigirka River Basin, near Chokurdakh, northeastern Siberia. Most living larch trees grow on mounds with relatively high elevations and dry soils, indicating intolerance of high soil moisture. We found that needle δ13C was positively correlated with needle N content and needle mass, and these parameters showed spatial patterns similar to that of tree size. These results indicate that trees with high needle N content achieved higher rates of photosynthesis, which resulted in larger amounts of C assimilation and larger C allocation to needles and led to larger tree size than trees with lower needle N content. A positive correlation was also found between needle N content and soil NH 4 + pool. Thus, soil inorganic N pool may indicate N availability, which is reflected in the needle N content of the larch trees. Microtopography plays a principal role in N availability, through a change in soil moisture. Relatively dryer soil of mounds with higher elevation and larger extent causes higher rates of soil N production, leading to increased N availability for plants, in addition to larger rooting space for trees to uptake more N.

  3. Crossing boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Miedema, Baukje; Easley, Julie; Fortin, Pierrette; Hamilton, Ryan; Tatemichi, Sue

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To explore the tensions between professional and personal boundaries and how they affect the work and private lives of family physicians. DESIGN Qualitative case study using semistructured interviews. SETTING Province of New Brunswick. PARTICIPANTS Forty-eight family physicians from across the province. METHODS A collective case-study approach was developed, with 24 cases of 2 individuals per case. Cases were selected based on sex, location (urban or rural), language (French or English), and number of years since medical school graduation (< 10 years, 10 to 20 years, or > 20 years). Physicians were interviewed in either French or English. Participants were recruited using the College of Physicians and Surgeons of New Brunswick’s physician directory. Based on the rates of response and participation, some cases were overrepresented, while others were not completed. All interviews were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed thematically using a categorical aggregation approach. A coding scheme for the thematic analysis was developed by the research team before the interviews were transcribed. MAIN FINDINGS Almost all of the family physicians interviewed discussed how their profession negatively affected their personal lives. Many struggled with issues such as heavy workloads, the adverse effects of their profession on their family lives, and the trespassing of patients onto their personal lives in small towns and rural communities. Some physicians had developed strategies to balance their personal lives with their professional demands; however, this often meant reducing work hours or terminating certain shifts, such as those in the emergency department or after-hours clinics. CONCLUSION Family physicians struggle to keep their profession from intruding too much into their private lives. These struggles are important to acknowledge and address in order to avoid physician burnout and premature retirement from clinical practice. PMID:19282540

  4. Mediated Character of Economic Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanic, Josip; Bertovic, Igor; Kasac, Josip

    2003-06-01

    Economic interactions are conducted between economic agents - individuals and collectives, through exchange of natural or artificial entities - goods, services and money, in a myriad of combinations. In this article we adopt a microscopic point of view, concentrate on the exchanged entities, and extract their relevant attributes as seen from structurally simple economic processes. Following that, we approach the interpretation of the economic interactions with their mediated character emphasized. Mediators of the interaction are locally available environment units. They are locally recognized and appropriately interpreted in a given value set as goods and money. The overall intensity of economic interactions considered is related to mediators' spatial and temporal characteristics. Extracted characteristics of mediators and economic processes are compacted in the set of formal rules. The approach is connected with similar approaches in economy and physics.

  5. Across-shelf distribution of blue mussel larvae in the northern Gulf of Maine: consequences for population connectivity and a species range boundary.

    PubMed

    Yund, Philip O; Tilburg, Charles E; McCartney, Michael A

    2015-12-01

    Studies of population connectivity have largely focused on along-shelf, as opposed to across-shelf, processes. We hypothesized that a discontinuity in across-shelf mixing caused by the divergence of the Eastern Maine Coastal Current (EMCC) from shore acts as an ecological barrier to the supply of mussel larvae to the coast. Existing data on the relative abundance of two congeneric blue mussels, Mytilus edulis and M. trossulus, were analysed to quantify the association of M. trossulus with the colder temperature signal of the EMCC and generate larval distribution predictions. We then sampled the across-shelf distribution of larvae along two transects during 2011. Larvae were identified using restriction digests of PCR amplicons from the mitochondrial 16S rDNA. Mytilus edulis larvae were consistently abundant on either the inshore and offshore transect ends, but not homogeneously distributed across the shelf, while M. trossulus larvae were less common throughout the study area. The divergence of the EMCC from shore appears to create a break in the connectivity of M. edulis populations by isolating those inshore of the EMCC from upstream larval sources. Across-shelf transport processes can thus produce connectivity patterns that would not be predicted solely on the basis of along-shelf processes.

  6. Boundary layer aerosol size distribution, mass concentration and mineralogical composition in Morocco and at Cape Verde Islands during SAMUM I-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandler, K.; Lieke, K.

    2009-04-01

    The Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment (SAMUM) is dedicated to the understanding of the radiative effects of mineral dust. Two major field experiments were performed: A first joint field campaign took place at Ouarzazate and near Zagora, southern Morocco, from May 13 to June 7, 2006. Aircraft and ground based measurements of aerosol physical and chemical properties were carried out to collect a data set of surface and atmospheric columnar information within a major dust source. This data set combined with satellite data provides the base of the first thorough columnar radiative closure tests in Saharan dust. A second field experiment was conducted during January-February 2008, in the Cape Verde Islands region, where about 300 Tg of mineral dust are transported annually from Western Africa across the Atlantic towards the Caribbean Sea and the Amazon basin. Along its transport path, the mineral dust is expected to influence significantly the radiation budget - by direct and indirect effects - of the subtropical North Atlantic. We are lacking a radiative closure in the Saharan air plume. One focus of the investigation within the trade wind region is the spatial distribution of mixed dust/biomass/sea salt aerosol and their physical and chemical properties, especially with regard to radiative effects. We report on measurements of size distributions, mass concentrations and mineralogical composition conducted at the Zagora (Morocco) and Praia (Cape Verde islands) ground stations. The aerosol size distribution was measured from 20 nm to 500

  7. Across-shelf distribution of blue mussel larvae in the northern Gulf of Maine: consequences for population connectivity and a species range boundary

    PubMed Central

    Yund, Philip O.; Tilburg, Charles E.; McCartney, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of population connectivity have largely focused on along-shelf, as opposed to across-shelf, processes. We hypothesized that a discontinuity in across-shelf mixing caused by the divergence of the Eastern Maine Coastal Current (EMCC) from shore acts as an ecological barrier to the supply of mussel larvae to the coast. Existing data on the relative abundance of two congeneric blue mussels, Mytilus edulis and M. trossulus, were analysed to quantify the association of M. trossulus with the colder temperature signal of the EMCC and generate larval distribution predictions. We then sampled the across-shelf distribution of larvae along two transects during 2011. Larvae were identified using restriction digests of PCR amplicons from the mitochondrial 16S rDNA. Mytilus edulis larvae were consistently abundant on either the inshore and offshore transect ends, but not homogeneously distributed across the shelf, while M. trossulus larvae were less common throughout the study area. The divergence of the EMCC from shore appears to create a break in the connectivity of M. edulis populations by isolating those inshore of the EMCC from upstream larval sources. Across-shelf transport processes can thus produce connectivity patterns that would not be predicted solely on the basis of along-shelf processes. PMID:27018654

  8. Free-Stream Boundaries of Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrsin, Stanley; Kistler, Alan L

    1955-01-01

    Report presents the results of an experimental and theoretical study made of the instantaneously sharp and irregular front which is always found to separate turbulent fluid from contiguous "nonturbulent" fluid at a free-stream boundary. This distinct demarcation is known to give an intermittent character to hot-wire signals in the boundary zone. The overall behavior of the front is described statistically in terms of its wrinkle-amplitude growth and its lateral propagation relative to the fluid as functions of downstream coordinate.

  9. Grain boundary engineering of highly deformable ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Mecartney, M.L.

    2000-07-01

    Highly deformable ceramics can be created with the addition of intergranular silicate phases. These amorphous intergranular phases can assist in superplastic deformation by relieving stress concentrations and minimizing grain growth if the appropriate intergranular compositions are selected. Examples from 3Y-TZP and 8Y-CSZ ceramics are discussed. The grain boundary chemistry is analyzed by high resolution analytical TEM is found to have a strong influence on the cohesion of the grains both at high temperature and at room temperature. Intergranular phases with a high ionic character and containing large ions with a relatively weak bond strength appear to cause premature failure. In contrast, intergranular phases with a high degree of covalent character and similar or smaller ions than the ceramic and a high ionic bond strength are the best for grain boundary adhesion and prevention of both cavitation at high temperatures and intergranular fracture at room temperature.

  10. Airborne determination of the temporo-spatial distribution of benzene, toluene, nitrogen oxides and ozone in the boundary layer across Greater London, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, M. D.; Lee, J. D.; Davison, B.; Vaughan, A.; Purvis, R. M.; Harvey, A.; Lewis, A. C.; Hewitt, C. N.

    2015-05-01

    Highly spatially resolved mixing ratios of benzene and toluene, nitrogen oxides (NOx) and ozone (O3) were measured in the atmospheric boundary layer above Greater London during the period 24 June to 9 July 2013 using a Dornier 228 aircraft. Toluene and benzene were determined in situ using a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS), NOx by dual-channel NOx chemiluminescence and O3 mixing ratios by UV absorption. Average mixing ratios observed over inner London at 360 ± 10 m a.g.l. were 0.20 ± 0.05, 0.28 ± 0.07, 13.2 ± 8.6, 21.0 ± 7.3 and 34.3 ± 15.2 ppbv for benzene, toluene, NO, NO2 and NOx respectively. Linear regression analysis between NO2, benzene and toluene mixing ratios yields a strong covariance, indicating that these compounds predominantly share the same or co-located sources within the city. Average mixing ratios measured at 360 ± 10 m a.g.l. over outer London were always lower than over inner London. Where traffic densities were highest, the toluene / benzene (T / B) concentration ratios were highest (average of 1.8 ± 0.5 ppbv ppbv-1), indicative of strong local sources. Daytime maxima in NOx, benzene and toluene mixing ratios were observed in the morning (~ 40 ppbv NOx, ~ 350 pptv toluene and ~ 200 pptv benzene) and in the mid-afternoon for ozone (~ 40 ppbv O3), all at 360 ± 10 m a.g.l.

  11. Bait attending fishes of the abyssal zone and hadal boundary: Community structure, functional groups and species distribution in the Kermadec, New Hebrides and Mariana trenches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linley, T. D.; Stewart, A. L.; McMillan, P. J.; Clark, M. R.; Gerringer, M. E.; Drazen, J. C.; Fujii, T.; Jamieson, A. J.

    2017-03-01

    Baited landers were deployed at 83 stations at four locations in the west Pacific Ocean from bathyal to hadal depths: The Kermadec Trench, the New Hebrides Trench, the adjoining South Fiji Basin and the Mariana Trench. Forty-seven putative fish species were observed. Distinct fish faunal groups were identified based on maximum numbers and percentage of observations. Both analyses broadly agreed on the community structure: A bathyal group at <3000 m in the New Hebrides and Kermadec trenches, an abyssal group (3039 - 4692 m) in the Kermadec Trench, an abyssal-hadal transition zone (AHTZ) group (Kermadec: 4707-6068 m, Mariana: 4506-6198 m, New Hebrides: 2578-6898 m, South Fiji Basin: 4074-4101 m), and a hadal group of endemic snailfish in the Kermadec and Mariana trenches (6750-7669 m and 6831-8143 m respectively). The abyssal and hadal groups were absent from the New Hebrides Trench. Depth was the single factor that best explained the biological variation between samples (16%), the addition of temperature and average surface primary production for the previous year increased this to 36% of variation. The absence of the abyssal group from the New Hebrides Trench and South Fiji Basin was due to the absence of macrourids (Coryphaenoides spp.), which defined the group. The macrourids may be energetically limited in these areas. In their absence the species of the AHTZ group appear released of competition with the macrourids and are found far shallower at these sites. The fish groups had distinct feeding strategies while attending the bait: The bathyal and abyssal groups were almost exclusively necrophagous, the AHTZ group comprised predatory and generalist feeders, while the hadal snailfishes were exclusively predators. With increasing depth, predation was found to increase while scavenging decreased. The data suggest scavenging fish fauna do not extend deeper than the hadal boundary.

  12. 29 CFR 18.405 - Methods of proving character.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... proving character. (a) Reputation of opinion. In all cases in which evidence of character or a trait of... conduct. (b) Specific instances of conduct. In cases in which character or a trait of character of...

  13. 29 CFR 18.405 - Methods of proving character.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... proving character. (a) Reputation of opinion. In all cases in which evidence of character or a trait of... conduct. (b) Specific instances of conduct. In cases in which character or a trait of character of...

  14. 29 CFR 18.405 - Methods of proving character.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... proving character. (a) Reputation of opinion. In all cases in which evidence of character or a trait of... conduct. (b) Specific instances of conduct. In cases in which character or a trait of character of...

  15. 29 CFR 18.405 - Methods of proving character.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... proving character. (a) Reputation of opinion. In all cases in which evidence of character or a trait of... conduct. (b) Specific instances of conduct. In cases in which character or a trait of character of...

  16. 29 CFR 18.405 - Methods of proving character.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... proving character. (a) Reputation of opinion. In all cases in which evidence of character or a trait of... conduct. (b) Specific instances of conduct. In cases in which character or a trait of character of...

  17. Boundary streaming with Navier boundary condition.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jin-Han; Vanneste, Jacques

    2014-06-01

    In microfluidic applications involving high-frequency acoustic waves over a solid boundary, the Stokes boundary-layer thickness δ is so small that some non-negligible slip may occur at the fluid-solid interface. This paper assesses the impact of this slip by revisiting the classical problem of steady acoustic streaming over a flat boundary, replacing the no-slip boundary condition with the Navier condition u|_{y=0}=L_{s}∂_{y}u|_{y=0}, where u is the velocity tangent to the boundary y=0, and the parameter L_{s} is the slip length. A general expression is obtained for the streaming velocity across the boundary layer as a function of the dimensionless parameter L_{s}/δ. The limit outside the boundary layer provides an effective slip velocity satisfied by the interior mean flow. Particularizing to traveling and standing waves shows that the boundary slip respectively increases and decreases the streaming velocity.

  18. Structural Features and Gas Hydrate Distribution Across the Boundary of the Submarine Taiwan Accretionary Wedge and Passive China Continental Margin Offshore Southwestern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, W.; Liu, C.; Lin, C.; Hsu, H.; Ko, C.; Chen, S.; Chung, S.; Wang, Y.

    2012-12-01

    This study analyzes a 3D seismic data volume in the upper reach of the Penghu Submarine Canyon for gas hydrate investigation. This 3D seismic data set runs across the deformation front which separates the passive China continental slope from the Taiwan accretionary wedge. Bottom-simulating reflectors (BSRs) are widely distributed in the study area which suggests that gas hydrates are present in both the extensional and compressive structure domains. We use 3D seismic images to map the spatial distribution of BSRs, and to identify structural and sedimentary features across the deformation front. Seismic attribute analysis of the 3D seismic volume has been performed which helps to reveal structure details and physical properties of the substrata. Our study identifies detailed structural variations across the deformation front: In the passive continental slope domain, besides normal faults, buried submarine canyons and paleo-topography of the continental slope before the arc-continent collision are recognized, while in the accretionay wedge domain, the fold and thrust structures dominate. BSR distribution in the 3D box correlates well with the seafloor topography, buried channels and fluid migration paths, we suggest that there may be different gas hydrate systems for the passive continental slope and for the accretionary wedge domains. As the Penghu Submarine Canyon is an important conduit offshore southwestern Taiwan for transporting terrestrial and shallow marine sediments, we suggest that the buried channels that filled with coarse-grain sediments could be good reservoirs for gas hydrates and free gases. Accurate substrata velocity models derived from a large-offset 2D seismic profile data in the study area will help us to better estimate the gas hydrate concentration in those reservoirs.

  19. Boundary Layer Aerosol Composition over Sierra Nevada Mountains using 9.11- and 10.59-micron CW Lidars and Modeled Backscatter from Size Distribution Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutten, D. R.; Jarzembski, M. A.; Srivastava, V.; Pueschel, R. F.; Howard, S. D.; McCaul, E. W., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    An inversion technique has been developed to determine volume fractions of an atmospheric aerosol composed primarily of ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate and water combined with fixed concentration of elemental and organic carbon. It is based on measured aerosol backscatter obtained with 9.11 - and 10.59-micron wavelength continuous wave CO2 lidars and modeled backscatter from aerosol size distribution data. The technique is demonstrated during a flight of the NASA DC-8 aircraft over the Sierra Nevada Mountain Range, California on 19 September, 1995. Volume fraction of each component and effective complex refractive index of the composite particle were determined assuming an internally mixed composite aerosol model. The volume fractions were also used to re-compute aerosol backscatter, providing good agreement with the lidar-measured data. The robustness of the technique for determining volume fractions was extended with a comparison of calculated 2.1,-micron backscatter from size distribution data with the measured lidar data converted to 2.1,-micron backscatter using an earlier derived algorithm, verifying the algorithm as well as the backscatter calculations.

  20. Complex root networks of Chinese characters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Po-Han; Chen, Jia-Ling; Wang, Po-Cheng; Chi, Ting-Ting; Xiao, Zhi-Ren; Jhang, Zih-Jian; Yeh, Yeong-Nan; Chen, Yih-Yuh; Hu, Chin-Kun

    There are several sets of Chinese characters still available today, including Oracle Bone Inscriptions (OBI) in Shang Dynasty, Chu characters (CC) used in Chu of Warring State Period, Small Seal Script in dictionary Shuowen Jiezi (SJ) in Eastern Han Dynasty, and Kangxi Dictionary (KD) in Qing Dynasty. Such as Chinese characters were all constructed via combinations of meaningful patterns, called roots. Our studies for the complex networks of all roots indicate that the roots of the characters in OBI, CC, SJ and KD have characteristics of small world networks and scale-free networks.

  1. Probability of boundary conditions in quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suenobu, Hiroshi; Nambu, Yasusada

    2017-02-01

    One of the main interest in quantum cosmology is to determine boundary conditions for the wave function of the universe which can predict observational data of our universe. For this purpose, we solve the Wheeler-DeWitt equation for a closed universe with a scalar field numerically and evaluate probabilities for boundary conditions of the wave function of the universe. To impose boundary conditions of the wave function, we use exact solutions of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation with a constant scalar field potential. These exact solutions include wave functions with well known boundary condition proposals, the no-boundary proposal and the tunneling proposal. We specify the exact solutions by introducing two real parameters to discriminate boundary conditions, and obtain the probability for these parameters under the requirement of sufficient e-foldings of the inflation. The probability distribution of boundary conditions prefers the tunneling boundary condition to the no-boundary boundary condition. Furthermore, for large values of a model parameter related to the inflaton mass and the cosmological constant, the probability of boundary conditions selects an unique boundary condition different from the tunneling type.

  2. On the Character of Consciousness

    PubMed Central

    Annila, Arto

    2016-01-01

    The human brain is a particularly demanding system to infer its nature from observations. Thus, there is on one hand plenty of room for theorizing and on the other hand a pressing need for a rigorous theory. We apply statistical mechanics of open systems to describe the brain as a hierarchical system in consuming free energy in least time. This holistic tenet accounts for cellular metabolism, neuronal signaling, cognitive processes all together, or any other process by a formal equation of motion that extends down to the ultimate precision of one quantum of action. According to this general thermodynamic theory cognitive processes are no different by their operational and organizational principle from other natural processes. Cognition too will emerge and evolve along path-dependent and non-determinate trajectories by consuming free energy in least time to attain thermodynamic balance within the nervous system itself and with its surrounding systems. Specifically, consciousness can be ascribed to a natural process that integrates various neural networks for coherent consumption of free energy, i.e., for meaningful deeds. The whole hierarchy of integrated systems can be formally summed up to thermodynamic entropy. The holistic tenet provides insight to the character of consciousness also by acknowledging awareness in other systems at other levels of nature's hierarchy. PMID:27065819

  3. Developing Individual and Team Character in Sport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaines, Stacey A.

    2012-01-01

    The idea that participation in sport builds character is a long-standing one. Advocates of sport participation believe that sport provides an appropriate context for the learning of social skills such as cooperation and the development of prosocial behavior (Weiss, Smith, & Stuntz, 2008). Research in sport regarding character development has…

  4. First Course in Japanese: Character Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niwa, Tamako

    This character workbook is an introduction to Japanese writing designed to be used in conjunction with Parts One and Two of this introductory course in Japanese. All the "hiragana", several "katakana", and 88 Japanese characters are introduced in this text. The workbook, consisting of 30 lessons, is divided into three parts.…

  5. 7 CFR 52.781 - Character.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... United States Standards for Grades of Canned Red Tart Pitted Cherries 1 Factors of Quality § 52.781 Character. (a) General. The factor of character refers to the physical characteristics of the flesh of the... rule). Allowances for Quality Factors ...

  6. 7 CFR 52.781 - Character.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... United States Standards for Grades of Canned Red Tart Pitted Cherries 1 Factors of Quality § 52.781 Character. (a) General. The factor of character refers to the physical characteristics of the flesh of the... rule). Allowances for Quality Factors ...

  7. 7 CFR 52.781 - Character.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... United States Standards for Grades of Canned Red Tart Pitted Cherries 1 Factors of Quality § 52.781 Character. (a) General. The factor of character refers to the physical characteristics of the flesh of the... rule). Allowances for Quality Factors ...

  8. Character Development Practices in Higher Education Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wesley, Vernon L.

    2010-01-01

    Character Development continues to be the all too unintentional elephant in the room of Higher Education. This project looked at what character development practices are being accomplished and who in higher education is making it happen. No longer satisfied with leaving the task to elementary and secondary education, higher education has begun to…

  9. Purpose and Character Development in Early Adolescence.

    PubMed

    Malin, Heather; Liauw, Indrawati; Damon, William

    2017-02-08

    Character development in adolescence is of growing interest among psychology researchers and educators, yet there is little consensus about how character should be defined and studied among developmental scientists. In particular, there is no fully developed framework for investigating the developmental relationships among different character strengths. This study examines the developmental relations between purpose and three other key character strengths that emerge during early adolescence: gratitude, compassion, and grit. We analyzed survey (n = 1005, 50.1% female, 24.1% Caucasian, 43.6% African American, 18.9% Hispanic, 11.9% Asian American) and interview (n = 98) data from a longitudinal study of character development among middle school students from the United States. Data were collected over the course of 2 years, with surveys conducted four times at 6-month intervals and interviews conducted twice at 12-month intervals. Data analyses showed small but significant correlations between purpose and each of the other three character strengths under investigation. Interview data revealed patterns in ways that adolescents acted on their purposeful aspirations; and interview analyses identified qualitative differences in expressions of gratitude and compassion between adolescents who were fully purposeful and those who were not. The findings suggest that character development can be better understood by investigating the multidirectional developmental relationships among different character strengths.

  10. Characterizing behavioural 'characters': an evolutionary framework.

    PubMed

    Araya-Ajoy, Yimen G; Dingemanse, Niels J

    2014-02-07

    Biologists often study phenotypic evolution assuming that phenotypes consist of a set of quasi-independent units that have been shaped by selection to accomplish a particular function. In the evolutionary literature, such quasi-independent functional units are called 'evolutionary characters', and a framework based on evolutionary principles has been developed to characterize them. This framework mainly focuses on 'fixed' characters, i.e. those that vary exclusively between individuals. In this paper, we introduce multi-level variation and thereby expand the framework to labile characters, focusing on behaviour as a worked example. We first propose a concept of 'behavioural characters' based on the original evolutionary character concept. We then detail how integration of variation between individuals (cf. 'personality') and within individuals (cf. 'individual plasticity') into the framework gives rise to a whole suite of novel testable predictions about the evolutionary character concept. We further propose a corresponding statistical methodology to test whether observed behaviours should be considered expressions of a hypothesized evolutionary character. We illustrate the application of our framework by characterizing the behavioural character 'aggressiveness' in wild great tits, Parus major.

  11. A database application for wilderness character monitoring

    Treesearch

    Ashley Adams; Peter Landres; Simon Kingston

    2012-01-01

    The National Park Service (NPS) Wilderness Stewardship Division, in collaboration with the Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute and the NPS Inventory and Monitoring Program, developed a database application to facilitate tracking and trend reporting in wilderness character. The Wilderness Character Monitoring Database allows consistent, scientifically based...

  12. Character Education: A Sense of Urgency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ankeney, Kirk

    1997-01-01

    Provides a rationale for character education and emphasizes its need, based on the visions of America of Theodore Roosevelt, Alexis de Tocqueville, and others. Briefly lists some useful suggestions from the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development for adding character education to the curriculum. Includes a list of references. (MJP)

  13. Developing wilderness character monitoring: A personal reflection

    Treesearch

    Peter Landres

    2006-01-01

    The 1964 U.S. Wilderness Act has one, clear mandate to the agencies that manage wilderness: preserve the wilderness character of the area. But even though the Wilderness Act went into effect 42 years ago, and all four federal agencies that manage wilderness have policies that direct managers to preserve wilderness character, the agencies can't show whether they...

  14. 7 CFR 52.809 - Character.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... CERTAIN OTHER PROCESSED FOOD PRODUCTS 1 United States Standards for Grades of Frozen Red Tart Pitted Cherries Factors of Quality § 52.809 Character. (a) General. The factor of character refers to the physical characteristics of the flesh of the cherries. (b) (A) Classification. Frozen red tart pitted cherries that have...

  15. 7 CFR 52.809 - Character.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... CERTAIN OTHER PROCESSED FOOD PRODUCTS 1 United States Standards for Grades of Frozen Red Tart Pitted Cherries Factors of Quality § 52.809 Character. (a) General. The factor of character refers to the physical characteristics of the flesh of the cherries. (b) (A) Classification. Frozen red tart pitted cherries that have...

  16. Using wilderness character to improve wilderness stewardship

    Treesearch

    Peter Landres; Wade M. Vagias; Suzy Stutzman

    2012-01-01

    This article describes how understanding wilderness character leads to improved communication among staff and with the public, helping park staff make more informed decisions about park planning, management, and monitoring in wilderness. Wilderness character is defined in terms of five qualities: natural, solitude or primitive and unconfined recreation, undeveloped,...

  17. Readers and Book Characters: Does Race Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Kerry; Powell, Sarah; Holmes, Stacy; Witt, Emily

    2007-01-01

    The authors report the results of a study in which they sought to determine the effect of the race of a book's primary characters on the reading motivation of 3rd-grade students in Mississippi. Students (N = 35) from 2 3rd-grade classrooms chose books with covers that depicted main characters who were either Black or White. The authors sought to…

  18. Developing Individual and Team Character in Sport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaines, Stacey A.

    2012-01-01

    The idea that participation in sport builds character is a long-standing one. Advocates of sport participation believe that sport provides an appropriate context for the learning of social skills such as cooperation and the development of prosocial behavior (Weiss, Smith, & Stuntz, 2008). Research in sport regarding character development has…

  19. A Novel Solid State Character Generator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Paul Allen, Jr.

    This thesis describes a character generator which was built for a refreshed cathode-ray tube (CRT) display and demonstrates the feasibility of displaying high quality dot-matrix characters using the low-band width sinusoidal scan. The CRT used was a low-cost entertainment-quality television tube, and hence had a very poor deflection band width.…

  20. Primary School Teachers' Perceptions about Character Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demirel, Melek; Özmat, Demet; Elgün, Imgehan Özkan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the perceptions of primary school teachers about character education. In this descriptive study, data were collected by using a survey questionnaire which required descriptive analysis. Based on the findings, it was revealed that primary school teachers (n = 60) defined the character education as moral values…

  1. Character Development Practices in Higher Education Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wesley, Vernon L.

    2010-01-01

    Character Development continues to be the all too unintentional elephant in the room of Higher Education. This project looked at what character development practices are being accomplished and who in higher education is making it happen. No longer satisfied with leaving the task to elementary and secondary education, higher education has begun to…

  2. Don't "Dumb Down" Character Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starnes, Bobby Ann

    2006-01-01

    Most character education-advocate organizations list traits that they identify as the central principles or "pillars" in character development. They usually include words like responsibility, fairness, pride, and citizenship. As so often happens in education, these words are presented as though they represented straightforward, commonly understood…

  3. Improving Student Achievement through Character Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finck, Chip; Hansen, Cynthia; Jensen, Jane

    This report describes a program for improving moral character to increase academic achievement. Targeted population consisted of middle school students in a growing middle class community in a northern suburb of Chicago, Illinois. The problem, an absence of proper moral character, was documented through data collected from discipline referrals to…

  4. 47 CFR 10.430 - Character limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Character limit. 10.430 Section 10.430 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMERCIAL MOBILE ALERT SYSTEM Alert Message Requirements § 10.430 Character limit. A CMAS Alert Message processed by a Participating CMS Provider must not...

  5. 47 CFR 10.430 - Character limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Character limit. 10.430 Section 10.430 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMERCIAL MOBILE ALERT SYSTEM Alert Message Requirements § 10.430 Character limit. A CMAS Alert Message processed by a Participating CMS Provider must not...

  6. Facing the Challenge of Character Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Tony R.

    2005-01-01

    Following every unfortunate and tragic school shooting is an accompanying cry for moral/character/values education, in the belief that such teaching could have prevented the tragedy. Society decries the rising statistical evidence of the apparent lack of values and character demonstrated by youth as evidenced by soaring crime rates among very…

  7. Character order processing in Chinese reading.

    PubMed

    Gu, Junjuan; Li, Xingshan; Liversedge, Simon P

    2015-02-01

    We explored how character order information is encoded in isolated word processing or Chinese sentence reading in 2 experiments using a masked priming paradigm and a gaze-contingent display-change paradigm. The results showed that response latencies in the lexical decision task and reading times on the target word region were longer in the unrelated condition (the prime or the preview was unrelated with the target word) than the transposed-character condition (the prime or the preview was a transposition of the 2 characters of the target word), which were respectively longer than in the identity condition (the prime or preview was identical to the target word). These results show that character order is encoded at an early stage of processing in Chinese reading, but character position encoding was not strict. We also found that character order encoding was similar for single-morpheme and multiple-morpheme words, suggesting that morphemic status does not affect character order encoding. The current results represent an early contribution to our understanding of character order encoding during Chinese reading.

  8. Character Education, New Media, and Political Spectacle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winton, Sue

    2010-01-01

    Ontario's new Character Development Initiative is analyzed to determine whether it can be characterized as political spectacle. Examination of official policy texts, media reports, speeches, web pages, webcasts, and events at the Character Development Symposium suggests that the Initiative contains many elements of political spectacle; however,…

  9. Character Development in the Catholic School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cronin, Patricia H., Ed.

    This collection of essays addresses the particular qualities of character education in Catholic schools. The focus of the essays is on developing Christian character in students and the envisionment of the Catholic school graduate as a Christ-like person. Specific suggestions are made for early childhood, middle school, and secondary school…

  10. A Missing Piece of the Contemporary Character Education Puzzle: The Individualisation of Moral Character

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Yi-Lin

    2013-01-01

    The different sorts of virtuous people who display various virtues to a remarkable degree have brought the issue of individualisation of moral character to the forefront. It signals a more personal dimension of character development which is notoriously ignored in the current discourse on character education. The case is made that since in…

  11. A Missing Piece of the Contemporary Character Education Puzzle: The Individualisation of Moral Character

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Yi-Lin

    2013-01-01

    The different sorts of virtuous people who display various virtues to a remarkable degree have brought the issue of individualisation of moral character to the forefront. It signals a more personal dimension of character development which is notoriously ignored in the current discourse on character education. The case is made that since in…

  12. Usage of Statistical Cues for Word Boundary in Reading Chinese Sentences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yen, Miao-Hsuan; Radach, Ralph; Tzeng, Ovid J.-L.; Tsai, Jie-Li

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the use of statistical cues for word boundaries during Chinese reading. Participants were instructed to read sentences for comprehension with their eye movements being recorded. A two-character target word was embedded in each sentence. The contrast between the probabilities of the ending character (C2) of the target…

  13. The discipline of building character.

    PubMed

    Badaracco, J L

    1998-01-01

    What is the difference between an ethical decision and what the author calls a defining moment? An ethical decision typically involves choosing between two options: one we know to be right and another we know to be wrong. A defining moment challenges us in a deeper way by asking us to choose between two or more ideals in which we deeply believe. Such decisions rarely have one "correct" response. Taken cumulatively over many years, they form the basis of an individual's character. Defining moments ask executives to dig below the busy surface of their lives and refocus on their core values and principles. Once uncovered, those values and principles renew their sense of purpose at the workplace and act as a springboard for shrewd, pragmatic, politically astute action. Three types of defining moments are particularly common in today's workplace. The first type is largely an issue of personal identity. It raises the question, Who am I? The second type concerns groups as well as individuals. It raises the question, Who are we? The third kind involves defining a company's role within society. It raises the question, Who is the company? By learning to identify each of those three situations, managers can learn to navigate right-versus-right decisions successfully. The author asks a series of practical questions that will help managers take time out to examine their values and then transform their beliefs into action. By engaging in this process of self-inquiry, managers will be gaining the tools to tackle their most elusive, challenging, and essential business dilemmas.

  14. Postprocessing for character recognition using pattern features and linguistic information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Takatoshi; Okamoto, Masayosi; Horii, Hiroshi

    1993-04-01

    We propose a new method of post-processing for character recognition using pattern features and linguistic information. This method corrects errors in the recognition of handwritten Japanese sentences containing Kanji characters. This post-process method is characterized by having two types of character recognition. Improving the accuracy of the character recognition rate of Japanese characters is made difficult by the large number of characters, and the existence of characters with similar patterns. Therefore, it is not practical for a character recognition system to recognize all characters in detail. First, this post-processing method generates a candidate character table by recognizing the simplest features of characters. Then, it selects words corresponding to the character from the candidate character table by referring to a word and grammar dictionary before selecting suitable words. If the correct character is included in the candidate character table, this process can correct an error, however, if the character is not included, it cannot correct an error. Therefore, if this method can presume a character does not exist in a candidate character table by using linguistic information (word and grammar dictionary). It then can verify a presumed character by character recognition using complex features. When this method is applied to an online character recognition system, the accuracy of character recognition improves 93.5% to 94.7%. This proved to be the case when it was used for the editorials of a Japanese newspaper (Asahi Shinbun).

  15. Character Recognition Using Genetically Trained Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Diniz, C.; Stantz, K.M.; Trahan, M.W.; Wagner, J.S.

    1998-10-01

    Computationally intelligent recognition of characters and symbols addresses a wide range of applications including foreign language translation and chemical formula identification. The combination of intelligent learning and optimization algorithms with layered neural structures offers powerful techniques for character recognition. These techniques were originally developed by Sandia National Laboratories for pattern and spectral analysis; however, their ability to optimize vast amounts of data make them ideal for character recognition. An adaptation of the Neural Network Designer soflsvare allows the user to create a neural network (NN_) trained by a genetic algorithm (GA) that correctly identifies multiple distinct characters. The initial successfid recognition of standard capital letters can be expanded to include chemical and mathematical symbols and alphabets of foreign languages, especially Arabic and Chinese. The FIN model constructed for this project uses a three layer feed-forward architecture. To facilitate the input of characters and symbols, a graphic user interface (GUI) has been developed to convert the traditional representation of each character or symbol to a bitmap. The 8 x 8 bitmap representations used for these tests are mapped onto the input nodes of the feed-forward neural network (FFNN) in a one-to-one correspondence. The input nodes feed forward into a hidden layer, and the hidden layer feeds into five output nodes correlated to possible character outcomes. During the training period the GA optimizes the weights of the NN until it can successfully recognize distinct characters. Systematic deviations from the base design test the network's range of applicability. Increasing capacity, the number of letters to be recognized, requires a nonlinear increase in the number of hidden layer neurodes. Optimal character recognition performance necessitates a minimum threshold for the number of cases when genetically training the net. And, the amount of

  16. Anorectic family dynamics: temperament and character data.

    PubMed

    Fassino, Secondo; Svrakic, Dragan; Abbate-Daga, Giovanni; Leombruni, Paolo; Amianto, Federico; Stanic, Stana; Rovera, Giovanni Giacomo

    2002-01-01

    Modern psychobiologic research conceptualizes personality as a complex adaptive system involving a bidirectional interaction between heritable neurobiologic dispositions (temperament) and social learning (character). In this study, we evaluated temperament and character traits of patients with anorexia nervosa and their mothers and fathers, and we analyzed the correlation of temperament and character traits among family members in anorectic families. Finally, we tested the ability of the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) to discriminate between normal controls and anorectic subjects, their parents, and their families. Temperament and character features of 50 restricter anorectic patients and their parents (23 fathers and 25 mothers) were analyzed and then compared with a control group of 60 women and their 20 fathers and 20 mothers using the TCI. Data suggest that both temperament and character factors are involved in anorexia nervosa (AN). Anorectic individuals were high in harm avoidance (HA), low in novelty seeking (NS), and high in persistence (P) ("obsessive temperament type"). Their character was remarkable for low self-directedness (SD). Their mothers were distinguished by low SD. The fathers were high in HA, but also low in P, and high in reward dependence (RD). Again, they were low in SD. The anorectic family had low SD as a common denominator observed in all family members. This finding indicates that the psychopathology of AN extends beyond obsessiveness, but combines obsessiveness with low character development. None of the above temperament and character profiles is pathognomic of restricter anorectics. The observation that both temperament and character have an important role in the etiopathogenesis of AN has important treatment ramifications. The TCI was useful in discriminating between normal controls and anorectic subjects, their parents, and the whole anorectic family.

  17. Character Recognition Using Correlation Techniques.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    public release; distribution unlimited PREFACE The following thesis is a presentation of the results obtained during research on the use of correlation...47 6.3 ENERGY MODIFICATION PROCESS........................49 ViI. RESULTS ......................................................... 51 7.1 SAME...limited the study only to typed letters of the English alphabet.. This excluded stylized print (Script, Gothic, etc.), numerics (1, 23, 58, etc.), and

  18. The Crustal Dichotomy Boundary West of Tempe Terra: Speculation on Where it Lies Beneath Alba Patera Based on Mola Topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, H.; Roark, J.; Sakimoto, S.; McGovern, P.

    1999-01-01

    MOLA gridded data based on profiles collected during the Aerobraking Hiatus and Science Phasing Operations suggest the crustal dichotomy boundary west of Tempe continues beneath Alba volcanics, at least to 105 W at about 50 N. A broad shelf-like region in the Alba units is continuous with a similar region of Tempe in which Hesperian volcanics overlie Noachian cratered terrain. Perspective views show significant changes in the sloping character of the flanks of Alba east and west of 105W, with much more continuous steep topography to the west. We suggest that Alba sits astride the ancient crustal dichotomy boundary, not adjacent to it, and that its eastern half lies on old cratered terrain. If true, this would significantly affect the estimate of Alba volcanics volumes, and might also explain some of the observed asymmetries in the structure and the distribution of faults associated with this immense feature.

  19. Coal and coalbed-methane resources in the Appalachian and Black Warrior basins: maps showing the distribution of coal fields, coal beds, and coalbed-methane fields: Chapter D.1 in Coal and petroleum resources in the Appalachian basin: distribution, geologic framework, and geochemical character

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trippi, Michael H.; Ruppert, Leslie F.; Milici, Robert C.; Kinney, Scott A.; Ruppert, Leslie F.; Ryder, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    The study area for most reports in this volume is the Appalachian basin. The term “Appalachian basin study area” (shortened from “Appalachian basin geologic framework study area”) includes all of the Appalachian Basin Province (Province 67) and part of the neighboring Black Warrior Basin Province (Province 65) of Dolton and others (1995). The boundaries for these two provinces and the study area are shown on figure 1.

  20. Study of Boundary Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    THEORY OF ABC-CBA STACKING BOUNDARY IN fcc STRUCTURE .......... 11 - 4 TRANSITIONS AND PHASE EQUILIBRIA AMONG GRAIN BOUNDARY STRUCTURES...19 B THEORY OF ABC-CBA STACKING BOUNDARY IN fcc STRUCTURE .......... 37 C TRANSITIONS AND PHASE EQUILIBRIA AMONG GRAIN BOUNDARY...layer structure. 10 SECTION 3 THEORY OF ABC-CBA STACKING BOUNDARY IN fcc STRUCTURE The (111) planes of the fcc structure is stacked as ABCABC... as

  1. Development of perturbations in the boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dovgal, A. V.; Kachanov, Y. S.; Kozlov, V. V.; Levchenko, V. Y.; Maksimov, V. P.

    1986-01-01

    The transition of laminar flows into turbulent flows in a boundary layer is discussed. The individual aspects of the transition process, observed under controllable model conditions are examined. The aspect of this problem, namely the development or excitation of the natural oscillations in the boundary layer, the so-called Tollmin-Schlichting waves is covered. Three types of excitation of these waves are considered: (1) distributed generation throughout the boundary layer; (2) generation in the vicinity of the forward edge of a model, having either a sharp edge or an edge with a large radius or curvature, and (3) generation in a developed boundary layer by means of a focused effect.

  2. Diradical character dependences of the first and second hyperpolarizabilities of asymmetric open-shell singlet systems.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Masayoshi; Champagne, Benoît

    2013-06-28

    The static first and second hyperpolarizabilities (referred to as β and γ, respectively) of asymmetric open-shell singlet systems have been investigated using the asymmetric two-site diradical model within the valence configuration interaction level of theory in order to reveal the effect of the asymmetric electron distribution on the diradical character and subsequently on β and γ. It is found that the increase of the asymmetric electron distribution causes remarkable changes in the amplitude and the sign of β and γ, and that their variations are intensified with the increase of the diradical character. These results demonstrate that the asymmetric open-shell singlet systems with intermediate diradical characters can exhibit further enhancements of β and γ as compared to conventional asymmetric closed-shell systems and also to symmetric open-shell singlet systems with intermediate diradical characters.

  3. Character-based DNA barcoding allows discrimination of genera, species and populations in Odonata

    PubMed Central

    Rach, J; DeSalle, R; Sarkar, I.N; Schierwater, B; Hadrys, H

    2007-01-01

    DNA barcoding has become a promising means for identifying organisms of all life stages. Currently, phenetic approaches and tree-building methods have been used to define species boundaries and discover ‘cryptic species’. However, a universal threshold of genetic distance values to distinguish taxonomic groups cannot be determined. As an alternative, DNA barcoding approaches can be ‘character based’, whereby species are identified through the presence or absence of discrete nucleotide substitutions (character states) within a DNA sequence. We demonstrate the potential of character-based DNA barcodes by analysing 833 odonate specimens from 103 localities belonging to 64 species. A total of 54 species and 22 genera could be discriminated reliably through unique combinations of character states within only one mitochondrial gene region (NADH dehydrogenase 1). Character-based DNA barcodes were further successfully established at a population level discriminating seven population-specific entities out of a total of 19 populations belonging to three species. Thus, for the first time, DNA barcodes have been found to identify entities below the species level that may constitute separate conservation units or even species units. Our findings suggest that character-based DNA barcoding can be a rapid and reliable means for (i) the assignment of unknown specimens to a taxonomic group, (ii) the exploration of diagnosability of conservation units, and (iii) complementing taxonomic identification systems. PMID:17999953

  4. Character-based DNA barcoding allows discrimination of genera, species and populations in Odonata.

    PubMed

    Rach, J; Desalle, R; Sarkar, I N; Schierwater, B; Hadrys, H

    2008-02-07

    DNA barcoding has become a promising means for identifying organisms of all life stages. Currently, phenetic approaches and tree-building methods have been used to define species boundaries and discover 'cryptic species'. However, a universal threshold of genetic distance values to distinguish taxonomic groups cannot be determined. As an alternative, DNA barcoding approaches can be 'character based', whereby species are identified through the presence or absence of discrete nucleotide substitutions (character states) within a DNA sequence. We demonstrate the potential of character-based DNA barcodes by analysing 833 odonate specimens from 103 localities belonging to 64 species. A total of 54 species and 22 genera could be discriminated reliably through unique combinations of character states within only one mitochondrial gene region (NADH dehydrogenase 1). Character-based DNA barcodes were further successfully established at a population level discriminating seven population-specific entities out of a total of 19 populations belonging to three species. Thus, for the first time, DNA barcodes have been found to identify entities below the species level that may constitute separate conservation units or even species units. Our findings suggest that character-based DNA barcoding can be a rapid and reliable means for (i) the assignment of unknown specimens to a taxonomic group, (ii) the exploration of diagnosability of conservation units, and (iii) complementing taxonomic identification systems.

  5. Identification defect character of MMM signals based on wavelet singular entropy and RBFNN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lan; Zhao, Yongrui; Tian, Chong

    2010-08-01

    Metal magnetic memory is a novel NDT method that can be used to detect residual stress distribution of ferromagnetic components.Wavelet decomposition and entropy theory are used and wavelet singular entropy is introduced to extract characteristic from abnormal signals of defect. Furthermore, RBF neural network is utilized to identify defect character. Experimental results showed that, compared to the traditional gradient value, the proposed new method can be used to effectively reflect defect character and it is immune to the effect of noises.

  6. Antiferromagnetic character of workplace stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Jun-Ichiro; Akitomi, Tomoaki; Ara, Koji; Yano, Kazuo

    2011-07-01

    We study the nature of workplace stress from the aspect of human-human interactions. We investigated the distribution of Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale scores, a measure of the degree of stress, in workplaces. We found that the degree of stress people experience when around other highly stressed people tends to be low, and vice versa. A simulation based on a model describing microlevel human-human interaction reproduced this observed phenomena and revealed that the energy state of a face-to-face communication network correlates with workplace stress macroscopically.

  7. Antiferromagnetic character of workplace stress.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Jun-ichiro; Akitomi, Tomoaki; Ara, Koji; Yano, Kazuo

    2011-07-01

    We study the nature of workplace stress from the aspect of human-human interactions. We investigated the distribution of Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale scores, a measure of the degree of stress, in workplaces. We found that the degree of stress people experience when around other highly stressed people tends to be low, and vice versa. A simulation based on a model describing microlevel human-human interaction reproduced this observed phenomena and revealed that the energy state of a face-to-face communication network correlates with workplace stress macroscopically.

  8. Probability of boundary conditions in quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nambu, Yasusada; Suenobu, Hiroshi

    2017-08-01

    One of the main interest in quantum cosmology is to determine boundary conditions for the wave function of the universe which can predict observational data of our universe. For this purpose, we solve the Wheeler-DeWitt equation for a closed universe with a scalar field numerically and evaluate probabilities for boundary conditions of the wave function of the universe. To impose boundary conditions of the wave function, we use exact solutions of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation with a constant scalar field potential. We specify the exact solutions by introducing two real parameters to discriminate boundary conditions, and obtain the probability for these parameters under the requirement of sufficient e-foldings of the inflation. The probability distribution of boundary conditions prefers the tunneling boundary condition to the no-boundary boundary condition. Furthermore, for large values of a model parameter related to the inflaton mass and the cosmological constant, the probability of boundary conditions selects an unique boundary condition different from the tunneling type.

  9. How jurors use and misuse character evidence.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Jennifer S; Budesheim, Thomas Lee

    2004-04-01

    The Federal Rules of Evidence allow defendants to offer testimony about their good character, but that testimony can be impeached with cross-examination or a rebuttal witness. It is assumed that jurors use the defense's character evidence (CE) to form guilt and conviction judgments but use impeachment evidence only to assess the character witness's credibility. Two experiments tested these assumptions by presenting mock jurors with various forms of CE and impeachment. Participants made trait ratings for the character witness and defendant and guilt and conviction judgments. Positive CE did not affect guilt or conviction judgments, but cross-examination caused a backlash in which judgments were harsher than when no CE was given. Using path analysis, the authors tested a model of the process by which CE and impeachment affect defendant and witness impressions and guilt and conviction judgments. Implications for juror decision making are discussed.

  10. Building character: a model for reflective practice.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Charles S; Babelay, Allison M

    2009-09-01

    In 1950, Harrison and colleagues proposed that the physician's ultimate and sufficient destiny should be to "build an enduring edifice of character." Recent work in philosophy underscores the importance of character ethics (virtue ethics) as a complement to ethical systems based on duty (deontology) or results (consequentialism). Recent work in psychology suggests that virtues and character strengths can, to at least some extent, be analyzed and taught. Building character might be enhanced by promoting among students, residents, and faculty a four-step method of reflective practice that includes (1) the details of a situation, (2) the relevant virtues, (3) the relevant principles, values, and ethical frameworks, and (4) the range of acceptable courses of action. Exercises using such a model bring together the major goals of ethics education in U.S. medical schools--teaching the set of skills needed for resolving ethical dilemmas and promoting virtue and professionalism among physicians.

  11. Character Development: Renewing an Old Commitment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wynne, Edward

    1986-01-01

    Growing public concern with student discipline, increases in student suicide rates, homicides, and high pregnancy rates of teenage girls are causing educators to give renewed attention to the concept of "character development" in public education. (MD)

  12. Accretionary orogens: definition, character, significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cawood, P. A.; Kroener, A.; Windley, B. F.

    2003-04-01

    Classic models of orogens involve a Wilson cycle of ocean opening and closing with orogenesis related to continent-continent collision. Such models fail to explain the geological history of a significant number of orogenic belts throughout the world in which deformation, metamorphism and crustal growth took place in an environment of on-going plate convergence. These belts are termed accretionary orogens but have also been refereed to as non-collisional orogens, Pacific-type orogens, Turkic-type and exterior orogens. Accretionary orogens evolve in generally curvilinear belts comprising dominantly mafic to silicic igneous rocks and their sedimentary products and accumulated largely in marine settings. They are variably deformed and metamorphosed by tectono-thermal events aligned parallel to, and punctuating, facies trends. Accretionary orogens form at sites of subduction of oceanic lithosphere and consist of magmatic arcs systems along with material accreted from the downgoing plate and eroded from the upper plate. Deformational features include structures formed in extension and compressive environments during steady-state convergence (arc/backarc vs. accretionary prism) that are overprinted by short regional compressive orogenic events. Orogenesis takes place through coupling across the plate boundary with strain concentrated in zones of mechanical and thermal weakening such as the magmatic arc and back arc region. Potential driving mechanisms for coupling include accretion of buoyant lithosphere (terrane accretion), flat slab subduction, and rapid absolute upper plate motion over-riding the downgoing plate. The Circum-Pacific region provides outstanding examples of accretionary orogens. The Pacific formed during breakup of Rodinia in the Neoproterozoic and has never subsequently closed, resulting in a series of overall ocean-ward younging orogenic systems that have always faced an open ocean, yet have been the sites of repeated tectono-thermal events and

  13. 26 CFR 1.662(b)-1 - Character of amounts; when no charitable contributions are made.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... income as the total of each class bears to the total distributable net income of the estate or trust... THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Estates and Trusts Which May Accumulate Income Or Which Distribute Corpus § 1.662(b)-1 Character of amounts; when no charitable contributions are...

  14. 26 CFR 1.662(b)-1 - Character of amounts; when no charitable contributions are made.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... income as the total of each class bears to the total distributable net income of the estate or trust... THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Estates and Trusts Which May Accumulate Income Or Which Distribute Corpus § 1.662(b)-1 Character of amounts; when no charitable...

  15. Recognition of Telugu characters using neural networks.

    PubMed

    Sukhaswami, M B; Seetharamulu, P; Pujari, A K

    1995-09-01

    The aim of the present work is to recognize printed and handwritten Telugu characters using artificial neural networks (ANNs). Earlier work on recognition of Telugu characters has been done using conventional pattern recognition techniques. We make an initial attempt here of using neural networks for recognition with the aim of improving upon earlier methods which do not perform effectively in the presence of noise and distortion in the characters. The Hopfield model of neural network working as an associative memory is chosen for recognition purposes initially. Due to limitation in the capacity of the Hopfield neural network, we propose a new scheme named here as the Multiple Neural Network Associative Memory (MNNAM). The limitation in storage capacity has been overcome by combining multiple neural networks which work in parallel. It is also demonstrated that the Hopfield network is suitable for recognizing noisy printed characters as well as handwritten characters written by different "hands" in a variety of styles. Detailed experiments have been carried out using several learning strategies and results are reported. It is shown here that satisfactory recognition is possible using the proposed strategy. A detailed preprocessing scheme of the Telugu characters from digitized documents is also described.

  16. Development and evolution of character displacement.

    PubMed

    Pfennig, David W; Pfennig, Karin S

    2012-05-01

    Character displacement occurs when competition for either resources or successful reproduction imposes divergent selection on interacting species, causing divergence in traits associated with resource use or reproduction. Here, we describe how character displacement can be mediated either by genetically canalized changes (i.e., changes that reflect allelic or genotype frequency changes) or by phenotypic plasticity. We also discuss how these two mechanisms influence the tempo of character displacement. Specifically, we suggest that, under some conditions, character displacement mediated by phenotypic plasticity might occur more rapidly than that mediated by genetically canalized changes. Finally, we describe how these two mechanisms may act together and determine character displacement's mode, such that it proceeds through an initial phase in which trait divergence is environmentally induced to a later phase in which divergence becomes genetically canalized. This plasticity-first hypothesis predicts that character displacement should be generally mediated by ancestral plasticity and that it will arise similarly in multiple, independently evolving populations. We conclude by highlighting future directions for research that would test these predictions.

  17. Development and Evolution of Character Displacement

    PubMed Central

    Pfennig, David W.; Pfennig, Karin S.

    2012-01-01

    Character displacement occurs when competition for either resources or successful reproduction imposes divergent selection on interacting species, causing divergence in traits associated with resource use or reproduction. Here, we describe how character displacement can be mediated either by genetically canalized changes (i.e., changes that reflect allelic or genotype frequency changes) or by phenotypic plasticity. We also discuss how these two mechanisms influence the tempo of character displacement. Specifically, we suggest that, under some conditions, character displacement mediated by phenotypic plasticity might occur more rapidly than that mediated by genetically canalized changes. Finally, we describe how these two mechanisms may act together and determine character displacement’s mode, such that it proceeds through an initial phase in which trait divergence is environmentally induced to a later phase in which divergence becomes genetically canalized. This plasticity-first hypothesis predicts that character displacement should be generally mediated by ancestral plasticity and that it will arise similarly in multiple, independently evolving populations. We conclude by highlighting future directions for research that would test these predictions. PMID:22257002

  18. Effects of Interaction Between Normal Shock and Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donaldson, Coleman duP.

    1944-01-01

    A discussion of the interaction between normal shocks and boundary layers on the basis of experimental evidence obtained in studies of supersonic flows in passages is given. The investigation was made as a result of the inability of the existing normal-shock theory to explain phenomena involving normal shocks that occurred in the presence of boundary layers. Assumptions with regard to the character of the effects of interaction between boundary layer and normal shock are proposed; these assumptions seem to give good agreement with certain experimental results.

  19. Algorithms for Discovery of Multiple Markov Boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Statnikov, Alexander; Lytkin, Nikita I.; Lemeire, Jan; Aliferis, Constantin F.

    2013-01-01

    Algorithms for Markov boundary discovery from data constitute an important recent development in machine learning, primarily because they offer a principled solution to the variable/feature selection problem and give insight on local causal structure. Over the last decade many sound algorithms have been proposed to identify a single Markov boundary of the response variable. Even though faithful distributions and, more broadly, distributions that satisfy the intersection property always have a single Markov boundary, other distributions/data sets may have multiple Markov boundaries of the response variable. The latter distributions/data sets are common in practical data-analytic applications, and there are several reasons why it is important to induce multiple Markov boundaries from such data. However, there are currently no sound and efficient algorithms that can accomplish this task. This paper describes a family of algorithms TIE* that can discover all Markov boundaries in a distribution. The broad applicability as well as efficiency of the new algorithmic family is demonstrated in an extensive benchmarking study that involved comparison with 26 state-of-the-art algorithms/variants in 15 data sets from a diversity of application domains. PMID:25285052

  20. Distribution bias of the sequence matching between exons and introns in exon joint and EJC binding region in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Li, Hong; Zhao, Xiaoqing; Zheng, Yan; Zhou, Deliang

    2015-01-07

    We propose a mechanism that there are matching relations between mRNA sequences and corresponding post-spliced introns, and introns play a significant role in the process of gene expression. In order to reveal the sequence matching features, Smith-Waterman local alignment method is used on C. elegans mRNA sequences to obtain optimal matched segments between exon-exon sequences and their corresponding introns. Distribution characters of matching frequency on exon-exon sequences and sequence characters of optimal matched segments are studied. Results show that distributions of matching frequency on exon-exon junction region have obvious differences, and the exon boundary is revealed. Distributions of the length and matching rate of optimal matched segments are consistent with sequence features of siRNA and miRNA. The optimal matched segments have special sequence characters compared with their host sequences. As for the first introns and long introns, matching frequency values of optimal matched segments with high GC content, rich CG dinucleotides and high λCG values show the minimum distribution in exon junction complex (EJC) binding region. High λCG values in optimal matched segments are main characters in distinguishing EJC binding region. Results indicate that EJC and introns have competitive and cooperative relations in the process of combining on protein coding sequences. Also intron sequences and protein coding sequences do have concerted evolution relations.